Peru State College - Peruvian Yearbook (Peru, NE)

 - Class of 1912

Page 154 of 234

 

Peru State College - Peruvian Yearbook (Peru, NE) online yearbook collection, 1912 Edition, Page 154 of 234
Page 154 of 234



Peru State College - Peruvian Yearbook (Peru, NE) online yearbook collection, 1912 Edition, Page 153
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Peru State College - Peruvian Yearbook (Peru, NE) online yearbook collection, 1912 Edition, Page 155
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Page 154 text:

(TIip Athh'tir Carnival Since the Athletic Association found itself financially embarassed; since the masculine originator of the above named plan did not believe in letting the women do the work, he promulgated the idea of carnival. In this way, he hoped to provide social enjoyment for the people and funds for the Athletic Association. Since the Juniors, judging by‘.their own appetites, thought everyone famishing for an ice-cream-cone, a .booth at which to sell these much desired cones, had been built and a great demand for them ensued. Later, confetti was substituted and the managers did a rushing business the rest of the evening. The stentorian tones of the huskiest of the Juniors, magnified by the use of a megaphone, next made known to the public the virtuous and refined nature of a moving picture show, which would be well worth five cents. The pictures depicted the lives of the faculty members, past and present, and in some eases seemed to reveal glimpses of the future. A sanitarily inclined member next proceeded to demonstrate how easy it is to secure and retain a state of absolute cleanliness by taking a plunge every time an onlooker was accurate enough to throw a ball against the bar which supported him. This wonderful feat was called “The African Dip.” Knowing that "an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure,” provision was made for the settlement of all quarrels. This proved to be a wise idea, for the attorneys were exceedingly busy and so rushed were they that it became necessary, in order to sustain life within them, to make frequent trips to the "Dutch lunch counter.” The Orpheum and Gayety provided amusement for the frivolously inclined; next to them was the lunch counter, which provided the wherewithal to sustain the inner man. The High School pupils, being unable to tear themselves away from their books, tried to do educative work by exhibiting to others the ten wonders of the world. The Freshmen, in their play, furnished food for the imagination; while the candy, which had been prepared by the Seniors and sold from a beautiful purple and white booth, served to sweeten life at that time and the next day proved to have been food for reflection. The Sophomores, in the minstrel show, strove to depict the lives of our dusky brethren. Between acts they mingled with the crowd, where their elegant costumes, ebony countenances and distinguished appearances, made them conspicuous. What could have satisfied the desire of a student for a truly social affair more than to have entered the Gym on the afternoon or evening of March the second and heard the cry of “lee Cream Cones, five cents,” “Right This Way to the Gayety,” “You-alls Ought to Visit Coon-Town” and similar ones? The report of the students testified to its social success, while the $100 which was added to the funds of the Athletic Association leaves no doubt as to its financial success. Owe hundred forty-tlx

Page 153 text:

Hmjitum in ataunt Imum ©all The annual Washington Reception, held in Mount Vernon Hall in the evening of February 22. proved a pleasant occasion in which the young ladies of the Hall enjoyed their school friends and other friends in the town of Peru, with whom they have become acquainted. Mount Vernon Hall was opened so that the guests might know the real home life, as well as help celebrate Mount Vernon day in keeping with the time, hoping to give pleasure to friends in the patriotic sentiment which prevailed. The comradeship and closer friendships which result from meeting in one’s home life cannot be supplanted by any other social function. There is a common bond existing between hostess and guest when each realizes there is a genuine gratification of the heart’s desire to invite and to receive a relation not easily forgotten. Everywhere present were the national colors, decorations and flags, suggestions of modern home life, and the third floor hall represented a moonlight scene of a snowy path through the woods leading to places dear to the early patriots—the Independence Hall, Old State House, the Wayside Inn and the Postoflicc. In the dining room a short program was presented. The scene was in an open woods; the central figure, an Indian tepee. The suggestive thought pervading the program was the social factors in the territory known as the United States, as they have become a part of the present nation. The attitude of these same factors in the process of transformation. FIRST PART: Scenes from Longfellow’s Hiawatha, beginning with the tribal strifes, the coming of the missionaries and white man and" westward movement of the Indian. SECOND PART: Consisted of the states represented by the state’s flower. In the popular songs of their period was sung the history of our nation's life. MT. VKItXON IIAM,



Page 155 text:

(Uu' JFmithall itejrtUin The annual football reception of this year far surpassed anything that has ever been given in the way of paying tribute to the boys who win fame for us on the gridiron. The entertainment the earlier part of the evening consisted of mimic athletic stunts, boxing and prize fighting, and was given on the first floor of the Library. At promptly 8:30, all the guests, headed by President and Mrs. Hayes, Dr. and Mrs. Shcllhorn, marched to the gymnasium, where twelve young ladies ushered them to their places. During their entrance and the entire evening, the Normal Orchestra rendered some beautiful selections. The gymnasium had so been transformed that it no longer seemed the same place. Over the entrance, as well as all around the gymnasium, was a wonderful array of pennants. The rugs on the floor, beautiful potted plants, and convenient arrangement of chairs, gave it cpiite a home-like appearance. The honored guests were seated at the cast end of the hall during the rest of the evening. The following three-course menu was served: Salad a la Peru Salted Wafers Olives Brick lee Cream Cake Salted Nuts Coffee Dr. B. L. Shcllhorn, "The Kick Off"—Into the vale of years. Harley Shaver, "Touch Back"—He served with glory and admired success. Daisy D. Ncttlcton, "Our Boys"—Brave conquerors—for so you arc. Basil Sims, "Forward Pass”—Best of all amongst the rarest of good ones. D. W. Hayes, “The Final Score’’—A clean fire, a clean hearth and the rigor of the game. R. W. Thacker, "The Parade"—"Let the trumpets blow, that this great soldier may his welcome know." altp Junior (Class -party Juniors begin their year’s work with one disadvantage:—they are strangers. Yet the class of ’13 will certainly part at the close of these two semesters as true and lasting friends, having been united into one strong and loyal union by various intrigues and rivalries. None of us can forget the feeling of pride with which we entered the Library basement on the memorable November evening when we first became acquainted with our co-workers. How vivid is the memory of those apartments, transformed from staid and sober class rooms into one huge, attractive entertainment hall, resplendent in the glow of golden, brownish light and in perfect harmony with the gold and brown decorations. Longings for home were soon forgotten amid jovial laughter and friendly games that made everyone feel that his classmates were well worth knowing. The kidnapping of a young Junior threatened to break up the party, but his timely rescue by brave classmen only served to make the remainder of the evening less formal and more enjoyable. Refreshments, dainty and delicious, of cake and ice cream in the charming class colors, were served. The students reluctantly parted, not strangers as they had come, but as true Juniors knowing that they have a noble class and willing to put forth every effort to win and make school worth while. One hundred forly-tcven

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