Northwest Missouri State University - Tower Yearbook (Maryville, MO)

 - Class of 2000

Page 161 of 360

 

Northwest Missouri State University - Tower Yearbook (Maryville, MO) online yearbook collection, 2000 Edition, Page 161 of 360
Page 161 of 360



Northwest Missouri State University - Tower Yearbook (Maryville, MO) online yearbook collection, 2000 Edition, Page 160
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Northwest Missouri State University - Tower Yearbook (Maryville, MO) online yearbook collection, 2000 Edition, Page 162
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Page 161 text:

GREEKS rhic by Janelle McMullen The Grerk system had heen a major part of the University since the early lyOOs. Although they weren ' t always a welcomed on t ampus, (irccks represented a large portion of the student body, creating diversity. In 1907, the Sigma Delta Chi sorority was implemented and met until March 18, 1914, when the Board of Regents ruled that it was a secret organization and could no longer exist on campus. The ruling also stated sororities and fraternities were detrimental to the best interest of the school and the members of those organizations. It was concluded if these organizations existed, they were to dissolve. It was not until Oa. 25, 1920, that the Board of Regents ' statement was revised to state that only secret organizations were not welcomed. In March 1 927, Sigma Sigma Sigma was the first sorority to be founded after the ban. In April 1927, Sigma Tau Gamma staned as the first national fi ternity at Northwest. By the end of the decade, the influence of Greeks on campus was altered. " I have seen dramatic changes in Greek life recently, " Kent Porterfield, vice president of student affairs and former Greek adviser, said. " They used to have kegs at all the social funaions. Now they have striaer standards. Now the chapters have alternative drinks and they plan the funaions in advance. " The 1999 Greek adviser, Bryan Vanosdale, also saw significant changes. He watched the fraternities and sororities move toward unity. " It has turned into a community instead of a system, " Vanosdale said. " They ' re not 19 separate organizarions, they ' re a community. " Stereotypes of Greeks also changed. Fraternities and sororities were no longer viewed as negative organizations. " There is a more posirive attitude and environment for Greeks, " Porterfield said. " I think they add value to the campus, but I ' m not saying there aren ' t problems within some of the organizarions. " History had always played a role on how Greeks were viewed, but without their own histories they would not be what they are today. iThecampuswide reO ' ding program started. Recycling bins and boxes were added to every building of the University, reminding students of the imponance of reducing waste. Frattkcn Hall housed only upperclassmen and offered 24-hour visitation seven days a week. Phillips Hall was turned into a coed hall, and made tobacco-free. South Complex, which housed mostly upperclassmen, gained a 24-hour visitation policy. The Maryville Aquatic Center opened. Lamkin Gymnasium underwent major renovations. Phase one rhe old pool conditions did not meet health and safety standards, so a new facility seemed to be the only logical solution. The Aquatic Center brought 32 new jobs to Maryville; 20 life guards, 1 1 swimming instructors and one manager were among those who found employment. The Si. 6 million complex provided two lai e slides and several potential places for students to relax in the sun. of the project included a $2 million Student Recreation Center. Phase two of the project covered the remodeling of Lamkin. In addition to a new entrance and circle drive, the gym was resurfaced, and new lights, bleachers and a new exercise facility were added. Phase three included the new multipurpose first floor that contained a fitness center, batting cages, locker rooms, a large weight room and a state-of-the-art athletic training room. The renovations totaled $6 million, and the facility was dedicated to Ryland Milner, former University athletic director and coach. Ts m G reeK9

Page 160 text:

Members of the Sigma Sigma Sigma sorority gather for a group picture in 1938. It 1911, the female students were required to buy and wear peachbasket hats with willow plumes. The hats cost between $18.50 and $25. Tuition at the time was $6 ; term. Photo courtesy of Sigma Sigma Sigma sorority The fine amount for parking tickets raised ft-om $5 to $20 dollars. The World Famous Outback opened. It was a dream of four Northwest students to open a bar in Maryville that would truly depict college night life. Althoug h KDLX was named the best campus radio station in the nation. i B.D. Owens Library celebrated its 11 th anniversary. There were notable changes within the facility, including the use of the debit card. The card could be , there were several taverns in town, there were not any good " college " bars. The building was purchased from the defunct Power Station and has since proved to be a major social factor for many students. After a year of harsh weather, Jason McGee gives the sign to The World Famous Outback a fresh coat of paint in 1 99 1 .Also added to the bar that year was a beer garden. Photo by Allison Edwards ( 1 99 1 Tower) purchased for $ 1 and came with 50 cents already on the account. Students added money as they saw fit. The card was used to make discount copies from the copy machine and microfiche. hl(} ry



Page 162 text:

A student tears up Tower yearbooks and tosses them in the fountain outside of the Olive Deluce FineArts building to protest the lack of organization coverage in the book. Photo courtesy of 1 977 Tower. There was a string of fires in Maryville, totaling $1 .7 million in damages. It started March 15, when an electrical box caught fire at the Garrett-Strong Science Building. The hall was left without power for 24 hours while the box was restored. June 26, a grill at A G Pizza caught fire. Because of the extent of the damages, there were no plans to rebuild. Aug. 2, a radio at Rex and Ralph ' s Tire Shop shorted out. The building suffered $50,000 worth of damages, but the owners began work to rebuild their business. Aug. 10, China Garden was a victim of arson. An arrest was made. The Tau Kappa Epsilon house burned to ' the ground, leaving 14 fraternity ' members homeless. The fire was started because of faulty wiring. TKEs gathered on the empty lot at 222 W. Cooper St. where their house stood before burning ' down. To stay active on the social scene. but there were no plans to rebuild. Aug. 22, a fire started in a Dumpster at Woodruff Arnold. The construction company did not suffer extensive damages and began to rebuild almost immediately after the fire. Sept. 23, an electrical fire was reported at 116 N. Buchanan St. apartment complex. The fire was accidental and the complex was rebuilt. Sept. 28, an electrical fire started in an upstairs apartment of Accent Printing at 1 14 E. Third St. A law was passed by Maryville City Council that stated that no one under the age of 1 9 could enter a bar. the TKEs rented a large loft one block east of The World Famous Outback for meetings and parties. Their new house took six months to build. Ws ry

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