University of Wisconsin River Falls - Meletean Yearbook (River Falls, WI)

 - Class of 1957

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University of Wisconsin River Falls - Meletean Yearbook (River Falls, WI) online yearbook collection, 1957 Edition, Cover
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Text from Pages 1 - 168 of the 1957 volume:

1957 Meletean Published by Wisconsin State College at River FallsWhat seest thou else In the dark backward and abysm of time? The Tempest. Act I, Sc. i 1957 Mcletean Staff Editor..................Richard Doetkott Assistant Editor....Barbara Jean Brickner v»{5 Editorial Secretary .... Fronfc Holub 'i- Photograpers .......... Arlm Albrecht Richard Doetkott Editorial Assistants .... Mary NeU Relender Jane Aide Advisors ................ Wayne Wolfe James Crane mm v'Ai SL. I COLLEGE LIFE .... ADMINISTRATION ACTIVITIES .... ATHLETICS ..... ORGANIZATIONS . CLASSES ......THIS FOREWORD IS ADDRESSED TO T"E GRADUATING SENIORS OF 19 7. WHO. Jug KinTT A HALF CENTURY FROM NOW. MAY iE, t GSTALGIC enough to look at the YEARBOOK PUBLISHED THE YEAR THET • L.AlNDVA l' ' C T A F III Dl.iJI 2 XVI ' mam-. —i --------- WERE GRADUATED FROM WISCONSIN ST ATE COLLEGE AT RIVER FALLS. RICHARD DOETKOTT Mblitian Editor, 57Feb. 3. 957 his is the year 1957. To us it is one month old; to you. a half century. The purpose of a yearbook is to try to close this gap and with pictures and and words portray the past for the scrutiny (and perhaps sympathy) of the future. To give a complete picture of the school year ’56-’57 we must do more than record the scores of football games. What sort of pressures, political, educational, and otherwise did you meet when you graduated? What kind of world did we live in? Often one forgets. Perhaps this foreword will bring the year you left River Falls into sharp focus once more. You were graduated into a world of troubled complacency in 1957 and, as you might recall, this didn't seem to be a contradiction at the time. The gentle an of optimum might have imagined itself in the Dark Ages for all the support it received in ’s6-’57. Yet there wasn't so much pessimism either as complacency, a rather strange sort of "giving up” or resignation. This "I don’t care” attitude seemed to be an avoidance reaction to ten years of "The Cold War,” the term uniaue to this period of history. People today are tired. They are tired of a constant threat of tear with Russia, they are tired of paving three fourths of their taxes for the purpose of avoiding such a tragedy, and they are tired of worrying about both. This has resulted in a philosophy of “enjoy it while you can," a philosophy that ice have grown so used to that ice have almost forgotten our worries. In fact, a third world war would surprise and shock us today, even though the situ-ation is twice as perilous at before Pearl Harbor. To you in the year 2,000 we might seem quite like the ostrich, refusing to face the facts but still plenty vulnerable to attack, instead of sand, we hide today in our foam rubber cushions behind the chrome exterior of the latest model automobile. Automobiles today are getting larger, but people arc getting smaller. Because we are hiding in our materialism, we have adopted a smaller view of things. Today we are suspicious and resentful of criticism and because of this attitude we have been receiving more criticism than ever before — even from our friends. Relations with our traditional allies, France and England, have grown a bit cooler in 1957. Under the pressure of the times, our allies are desperately trying to survive without the advantages of the prosperity and wealth we enjoy. On top of everything else 1956 was an election year. We elected Dwight David Eisenhower for his second term. Formerly a general, there was no doubt that he would be elected in this era of uncertainty. When war is threatening we like to have someone around who has been in one — just in case. When President Eisenhower was elected to his first term many people expected some sort of miracle to happen to take care of the world’s troubles. Now at the beginning of his second term, we start to realize that one good man is not enough. But we are painting a pretty dismal view of your graduation year — at least of the political and world situation. It is encouraging to note that we moved ahead in 56-'S7 in science and education. This year was designated the National Qeophysical pear, dedicated to finding out more about the world we live in. In connection with this the planet Mars was observed more closely than ever before, new expeditions explored the Antarctic, and the first “space satellite” is due to be launched soon. In the field of medicine, science triumphed in ’56 57 with the conquering of poliomyelitis, the great crippler. Education moved ahead too, with integrated schools finally approaching a reality after much strife. Soon, all Americans will have the same opportunity to receive the best education we can provide. Schools are more crowded than ever before, but with help such as the Ford Foundation grants given this year and the proposed federal aid to education, this problem no longer looks insurmountable. Inventions were many in ’56 57 — the solar battery and atomic powered ships come to mind as two examples of important ones. Science, fortunately, moves ahead independently of world affairs, although not so independently that it is unaffected. Science today must make toys for the war-minded before humanity can benefit. Scientific progress can build a better tomorrow—if given a tomorrow. And what of the future? What lies ahead for us? You in the year 2,000 are in the enviable position of knowing our future. Perhaps at this trme it might be interesting to compare notes as to what the future may hold. To this editor there seem to be two roads into the future. They are, classically, the road to peace and the road to tear. It seems unlikely that the present potentially explosive situation of the "Cold War” can last fifty years and survive intact. It would seem that the touchy foreign situation is bound to erupt into a major war, with all the horror and devastation that atomic energy can produce. It would mean a severe setback to the human race, a setback that might take hundreds of years to regain what once was. We see little today to avert such a catastrophe. One hope and one hope only do we have. This hope is the United Nations; more specifically. United Nations disarmament. Disarmament would not solve all the problems of the world, but it would prevent war. We could then turn our attention to relieving suffering and hunger in the world. We could explore the universe. Science would create untold miracles. We would live longer and like it. We could dream again. In short, we could pull our heads out of the sand and live again. Whether nations will set aside their differences in the future, and disarm, only you can know and unfortunately you can’t tell us. Incklently, if you haven’t looked at the Siduation pictures in this yearbook, do so now. No ubt you will laugh heartily at the funny antique costumes and hairdos. We hope you will also laugh as heartily and as long at the worries and fears we had in 1956-57. We pray your children haven’t inherited them.mem since 1913. Professor May’s 44 years of service to his students, tne college and the state is the type of accomplishment that will ‘continue to make itself felt in die future. Praise of this contribution was aptly voiced by President E. H. Klempell when he said, "Nothing satisfies an administrator like knowing he has on his staff a man who has done an outstanding job for his kids and his community.” We are proud to dedicate die 957 Meletean to this type of man.The '57 Meletean Staff Presents A pictorial summary of college•Attfit primus. Scana Prima. hied Enter Or jnlmA Aim. OHmM. ■I I remember Aim, it li rpca life fafluon l rqiitiikdinrl «ill, bn: potfi a iboabnd Ciowi ci,» .l»iI o«Jnrt. Kai(;«d my brother on hit bUffing 10 breed nice well; and tbrte begirvt my fadocflc : My brother «{ be Ie:pel fcboole, aitdtcpott (jtilfi goldenly ot h i yevhl i i nvf pMi.br keeper me raAmllt at home , k(io Ipeak mote pioperty) ilaiet me heete at bom vakrpt: for tall j ou that Siteping for ■ gentleman oVmy birth, thatdif-fatnot from the lulling of an 0«e ? ha boef« !fb!fd bnm ocbdkUiihiiibey nt f in« liAof(M i|, they are laaght theit mintage, and to ihtt cod Rldm detirly hir'd : bail (hab»o«h«»)|»iiK»o»litoj voder htm bat growth. forthc bU A«l«ah •« hi. dsnelilli «tf i much bound to Una at I: befidmha no thing that he fo plentifully giuet me.tbe fomtthtngthii nature giuc nice. rat: htc kti rate feede with hit Hmdf..b»ntto«lb« pint of a brothel, i::d it mu«h n m lumliei. »i»i ray grot iluy with my cnu( :«o». ThU ii « tAlm that gtieuti me, and tbr Spirit of my F.nher, whie’i I ihinkc avmhmnat. b tmi«om imK g«i"flihi« frimtude. IwiUMilMgefcmfatcit. though yet I know no wife ■rowdy bow tv ww! it. Inter Q!r r. Aim. Yonikt comet my Mafltf.yoor br«nbtt. OHm. Goe a.part Aim, tod thou flaUbwiobow UaiHftiUiMip. OU. Now S't, what m»Vc you hmc' OH. Nothing :1am not taught to make ray thing. Oh. YVhit raar vau then fit ? OH. Matty fit ,'l mhe?ping you to war that which God made, ■ pootc mwofihy brother of yotaiaw Uh idUneOe. Ohm. Many fit be b«tcf employed.and be tuvaght • while. OHm. Shill I keepe your ho t, »ndtJ«ho k«"rt'' them? nhit piodigali portion hauc I fpentjtliat 1 fttou.d eoxe io fiish ptnu:y ? Oh. Know you wh«(f you t(f fir f OH. Oh.rajwdUlmttkt'fmiOtihul. on. Know yon before whom fir ? OH. 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OrL 1 wtil iwtiM I pUife i yoo flail hewe race tiny father ehaig'd you m hit will to glue me good cducati. on i yon nine min'drarlikeipoint, obfewinp rad hiding from me ill gcmleaiin.like qmbtiM i the lpl.it •fmy ftthergiowofliMig inmrr.and I wiUnoUnrer endure Ii: therefore iBow nehthntxtfei n may be-earaeagemtcmra.MgiM rare thepooreallottety my father left rat by tefluneM, with that I will got bay ray fort sen. Oh. And what wilt thon do beg when that Ufpent Well fir, net you in. 1 wdi not Uog be uoobled with yoo ; yooftall hanc ferae pan ofyoor will, Ifnjjm OH. Iwillnnflitthwfltndyn.tlKnbeeBntet race htarfgooi. Oh. Ceynn with Mm,yo aide dowe. Aim. It old does e ray reward i mofl t me, Ihanc loll ray teeth M yooi leraice i God be with ray aide me-flet e would om haoe oke fiaeh a word. tr.ttf.Xd. Oh. It it earn fo, begin yoo to grow vpon ms? I will yvM tmAtmt t, rad yet gtuenothoufaitd ctownci ncyther i botta 2 m . l—trDtmii. •Dr . CtOtyommtlhmt OU. Wit not CMtt the DuVet WiaAlef heetc to fpeakewithraek •Dm. So pleafeyoo ie it heetc at the dootr.and Ira. portuoet aeceffe to you. Oh. Call birain it ® be a good way: and ic rara-rowibewtaftUogb, tmr Chmia. €hd. Coedraenowtoioewwfldra OU. Gn MeanfletCbaefaiwhat'lihaMwntwa at the new Conn? CMu. There" no cewci at the Conn Sir, bo: the ptbmbt d« nm O c. ul itatoffctttUrt;,Wisconsin State College at Kiver Jails Wisconsin State College at River Falls has many facets. Many of these, strangely enough, seem to have been described by William Shakespeare. Although it’s true that the college is the oldest in Western Wisconsin, it can't claim to antedate Shakespeare. Yet, sometimes it seems the famous bard MUST have been writing about our college. A few examples follow. i “Mere is everything advantageous to life” The natural beauty of the campus invariably is the subject of comment by visitors. A green carpet covers the grounds during the summer months. In the winter, snow covering the trees and shrubs of all varieties converts the landscape into a wonderland. But it’s not only nature that provides “everything advantageous to life.” The college offers a wide variety of programs and course offerings in liberal arts, pre-professional work and teacher education.Of ZfolH0S Past” Staunch, weatherbeaten South Mall with its inscription "1874 - Stare Normal School - x 898” is a reminder of things past. Founded in 1874, the college operated for a half century as a Normal School. It became a State Teachers College in 1925 with a four-year degree. In 195 r the name was changed to Wisconsin State College at River Falls and the liberal arts program began. More than r 8,000 students have attended the college.My library teat dukedom large enough “A Spirit of youth in Everything” Symbol of the spirit of youth is the newest building on campus, the Chalmer Davee Library. With characteristic youth, the college continues to grow. In a short time the campus will be graced by a new Student Union Building and a Men's Dormitory. At the bottom is an artist’s sketch of the men’s residence hall, now under construction, and scheduled for occupancy by the fall of 1958. Future plans also include a Health and Physical Education Building, a new campus school building, a new farm she and additions to the residence halls.“Still Constant Jn a Wondrous excellence” The “wondrous excellence” of River Falls is generally acknowledged. Graduates of the college are serving in every state in the nation and in foreign countries. Accredit' ing agencies and the Wisconsin State Department of Education have praised River Falls for its forward-look' ing program. Part of the reputation of the school, at least, rests on the fact that the institution is student'centered. The student at River Falls always is an individual. He studies in small classes and comes to know many of the members of the faculty personally. He is assisted in his academic planning and in the choice of a vocation. The college measures its success by the success of each student.Faculty members at River Falls are distinguished by their enthusiasm, their scholarship and their interest in student welfare. They are well-qualified in their chosen fields and are sincerely interested in teaching. Their aim is to produce persons who know how to think and who are prepared to take places of leadership and to participate intelligently in today’s complex world.The iron tongue of midnight hath tolled twelveAnd yet J Would flat Sleep” Hachom Hall, women’s dormitory at River Falls, has been expanded with a new third floor. Rooms are large and airy, well heated and lighted. Men students, too, enjoy the TV set in die basement, die date rooms, com' fortablc lounge furniture and the eye-catching color schemes. Of course, only the girls who live there can appreciate the convenience of die laundry with automatic washers and driers and die pressing rooms. Soon, men students at River Falk will have these same advantages with construction of a new dormitory on the west side of the campus.“Md One Mm Jn Mis Zime Plays Many Parts ” A diversity of extra-curricular activities is offered at the college. Students interested in drama, music, sports, debate, publications, dance, art, and related fields find organizations and projects in which they may work with others of like interests. Many clubs and organizations are set up to foster interest in academic subjects — organizations such as the math club, chemistry club, French club, German club. Association for Child hood Education International, Music Educators National Conference, and the American Council for Teachers of English. Because the college is small, students are permitted to participate in a number of organizations and activities to broaden their interests and leam to do many things.The better foot before Students are also trained for democratic living. Government is conducted by a Student Senate, elected by the students themselves. Each class has its own officers so that students have a voice in conducting the affairs of the college. In addition to extra-curricular activities, clubs and organizations, and experience in self-government, students have the advantage of hearing outstanding speakers and artists who are brought to the campus for concerts and lectures. Light seeking light 1 would applaud theeThe books, the arts the acadames That show, confirm, and nourish all the world Students at Wisconsin State College at River Falls are preparing for many fields of service—for teaching and the other professions, for positions in business and industry, for jobs in government. The college offers both the bachelor of science and the bachelor of arts degrees. The first two years of each student’s education at the college level is devoted to broad study—to a knowledge of the sciences such as physics, chemistry, mathematics and geology, to a background in history, economics, government, psychology and sociology, to an appreciation of the values in literature, lan' guage, art, music and philosophy. This gives the student an opportunity to discover his interests and to see what area particularly challenges him.you Most Affect” The latter two years are then devoted to concentration in the field of the student’s greatest interest. The student may choose to major in any one of 14 subjects and has an equal number of minors from which he may select. •a °3 d? Gb c 5 a -OUJI Ed a E=J a i Bj EF c ®tP-□ g PRESENT »v FARM BUILOINGS TO BE ABANOONEO AS SOON AS A NEW c SET OF FARM BUILOINGS IS BUILT SOUTH OF CREEK — BU i ■(•(•it »■•••• ■ HEALTH ft PHY. EO-LABORATORY SCHOO) MEN'S OORMITORY COLLEGE UNION © © In “ZrueJ Zalk of Dreams” 0 0 a 0 (0 LEGEND j «•«•« untcHcouLio ® A00. TO WOMEN'S OORM. (D FARM BUILDINGS Enrollment at the college in 1957 passed the 1000 mark for the first time. Because of planning in the past, the college was able to accommodate this larger number of students. However, the student population at the college will continue to increase. By 1975, it is predicted that enrollment will have doubled. The needs of Wisconsin’s young people who choose to come to River Falls must be met. Two of the buildings in the plans for the future will have become a reality before many of our present students have graduated. The student union and the men’s dormitory will be functioning by the fall of 1958. But more facilities are needed. These include the Health and Physical Education building, a new Laboratory School, and additions to the residence halls. Plans are being made also for academic growth and for additional services the college may offer. The ability of the college to serve an increasing enrollment and meet its responsibilities to the state will depend upon the support it receives. Its alumni, students, faculty, and admini' stration must continue to back programs to “make a good college better.”“Such stuff as dreams are made on”Jm Memoriam Two OF THE college’s MOST FAITHFUL SUPPORTERS AND WORKERS DIED WITHIN HOURS OF EACH OTHER THIS YEAR AND BROUGHT SADNESS TO THE SPRING. J. H. Ames, college president here from 1917 1946, died April 12 of this year after an illness of several months. During Mr. Ames’ administration, the college II EC AM E A FULLY-ACCREDITED FOUR-YEAR INSTITUTION AND THE PHYSICAL PLANT WAS EXPANDED WITH A NEW WING on North Hall, the construction of the Industrial Arts Building and the addition of Ramkr Field. Mr. Ames was greatly loved by the students when he was HERE AND THEY NEVER FORGOT HIM. Joseph Kahut, maintenance employee of the college FOR MORE THAN 24 YEARS, DIED SUDDENLY THE NIGHT OF April i i of a heart attack. Mr. Kahut served one YEAR AS FIREMAN AND 23 AS CHIEF ENGINEER AT THE college. The last photograph of Mr. Kahut, taken ONLY WEEKS BEFORE HE DIED, APPEARS IN THIS YEAR’S MELETEAN AS A TRIBUTE TO HIM. When sorrows come, they come not single spies, But in battalions. Hamlet. Act IV. Sc. 5President Faculty Office Staff Maintenance A LLYOUR STRENCTH IS'INyOUR UNIONALL VOUMANCEE THEREFORE BEAT-PEACE HENCEi the Sonf o AAnwfte•| OvgAr.Our doubts are traitors And make us lose the good toe oft might win By fearing to attempt Measure For Measure, Act i. Scene 2 Only a brief time remains for those of us who support the cause of higher education to cast aside doubt and make bolder demands for those things in which we believe. At a point in history when true education supplies the only solution to grave problems — answers to the questions raised by the technical advances in atomic science, automation, and the manipulation of public opinion — many are fearful of asserting themselves to attain the quality of education which our children deserve. The future of education, and consequently the future of the nation, in a large measure lies in the hands of those who will be graduated from this and similar institutions in the next few years. If those in a position to realize the advantages offered by education fail to demand the same or greater opportunities for those who follow, we will have suffered a disastrous setback. The whole concept of equal educational opportunity is being challenged in the name of economy when, in fact, the percentage of the tax dollar spent for higher education has been shrinking steadily since the first World War. The “good we might win is too important to lose. But it will require a vigorous effort by all the friends of education. PRESIDENT E. H. KLEINPELLE. J. PRUCHA Registrar — 30 — JOHN M. MAY Director Division of Agriculturedr. james j. McLaughlin Director Division of Arts and Science Administrative Officers B. J. ROZEHNAL Dean of Studentsulleoe professors are a strange group — they come in all sires and styles with various beliefs and ideas. They are in f the unique position of enlightening mankind with words of wisdom and teaching great truths that mankind must have in order to grow physically and mentally. But the college professor is a paradox — even with the world’s wisdom at his fingertips to communicate he feels helpless without an object to communicate to. It is this desire to communicate, rather than the mere acquiring of knowledge, that marks the college professor. Today let’s take a look at Browning’s influence on modern poetry. People just don’t read poetry anymore. Browning was not appreciated in his time. I tconder if they care? A college professor’s greatest sin is to stagnate. He must be forever searching out new information, sifting it carefully, cutting it, adding to it, then communicating it to others. He must be aware of new ways of communication and how they may apply to his field. He must try these new methods, evaluate them and incorporate the ones he can use. Fads mean nothing to him. He warns to see. to try, to do his own evaluating. A college professor lacking this initiative is a sheep in academic clothing. We must look at this as a small facet of the whole. They’re not getting this. The college professor likes people. He likes young people and their vivacious energy, their love of life and their robust idealism. He acts as their reservoir — they draw out and take as much as they need. Sometimes he feels unwanted, winced ed. Is there a human who doesn’t? Now ARE YOU SURE THERE ARE NO QUESTIONS? We are the hollow men . . . Perhaps the greatest pleasure is the realization that one is important and that one is needed. It is these moments that the college professor treasures—the question that shows true interest, the earnest inquiry for advice and the good natured "hi” in the halls. Later it is success — not personal successes, but the success of others that one has helped. — 32 — An educator’s work is felt through the ages—witness Aiistotle. There may not be many Aristotles to coin the words, but there always must be those who carry the word to those who desire to listen. And when people listen and use what they have heard to better themselves — then these words cannot die. How many people would fear death if they knew that the message they gave the world through their work and life could achieve this immortality? The college professor belongs to this small group whose influence is felt long after they themselves are gone. Well, that question can’t be answered quickly I I haven’t had a question like that since grad school.YOU CAUGHT ME WITH MY BROWNING DOWN. And 1 couldn't be happier . . . The college professor knows he teaches attitudes — attitudes that will make a better world. Not everyone will listen to him but some will — he is content with so much.Blake Anderson English Earl Albert Physics Virginia Akins Biology Philip S. Anderson Education Audrey Adams Librarian Philip Belfiori Physical Education Tames Crane Art Fortin Raymond L. Garnett Education Amy Fuller — 35 — Librarian Richard DeLorit Agriculture Ann Dubbe Education Walter Engler English Richard Darr Economics Blanche Davis Speech •vtnLfitP!Wilfred C. Harris Education Russell Gerber Agricultural Engineering Rudy Hard Education Huco Hartic English Lillian Gough Mathematics Charles Graham Political Science Marion E. Hawkins English — 36 — Nicholas J. Jadinak Music Harold Hodoes SociologyOml A. Knox Education Nancy Johansen Education Ernst F. Urceks German, Philosophy Chauncey B. Kino Music B. H. Kettelkamp Biology Robert B. Krueger Education Laura Johnson Music Arthur N. Johnson Agriculture — 37 —James P. Murphy Education Vera M. Moss English Catharine Lieneman Biology Jean Lyle Education Leslie C. McKeen French Alfred E. Kuenzli Psychology Adeline L. Levin Physical Education Martin Laakso BiologyFrancis Pols foot Physical Education Richard Swenson Physics, Chemistry Gilbert Smith Economics Edward N. Peterson History 39 — Amy Nelson Nurse Mart Jo Roberts Education Theodore Sbtterquist ChemistryOffice Staff Marvin Thompson Agricultural Engineering Thorvald E. Thomson Agricultural Engineering Wayne Wolpk Journalism Melvin Wall Agronomy Ardyce Symes Library Office Staff Walker D. Wyman History REGISTRAR S OFFICE — Janette Cobian, Donna Fatm, Sylvia Olund. OFFICE O’Conner . 'Cc Davison. Sfani t'n?: Leona Gerry SoSin nnkS°n‘ bm",CM Ethel Wcsf. auditor; — 40 —MAINTENANCE EMPLOYES Barron, Neil ...................................... Fireman Busby, Mae......................Building Maintenance Helper Ellis, Henry .................. Building Maintenance Helper Foley, Ray ..................... Building Maintenance Helper Fritsch, Herman ................ Building Maintenance Helper Green, Esther ............................. Laundry Worker Hanvelt, Gordon ....................... Fireman (part time) Kahut, Joe .............. Supervisor of Building Maintenance Knapp, Harry ...................................... Watchman Fischer, Leo ....................... Watchman (temporary) McKahan, Henry ................. Building Mantenance Helper Meyer, Raymond ..................................... Fireman Pechacek, Bernard...............Building Maintenance Helper Peterson, Knute .................................... Fireman Schmitt, Willis ......................... Maintenance Man Smith, Henry ................... Building Maintenance Helper FARM EMPLOYES Herring, Clinton ...................................... Farm Laborer Koch, Byron ........................................... Farm Manager Joe Kahut Supervisor of Building Maintenance Maintenance — 41 —•Homecoming • Winter Carnival • Drama • ForensicsHomecoming rHE YEAR’S biggest social event got even bigger this year as more windows, houses and floats than ever before were decorated for Homecoming. Highlights this year included a talk by Elmer T. Benson, first homecoming chairman at RF, and the introduction to the student body of the members of the 1909'iO'H RF football teams who were present for the Homecoming game. The game itself was a good one, from the 200 balloons released at the kickoff to the final last second touchdown scored by River Falls to cinch the contest. The victory was celebrated at the dance that night in North Hall gym. Beautifully dec-orated on the theme of "Autumn Leaves” and reverberating to the Joe Braibec seven piece orchestra, the gym became the perfect ending to a perfect dav. Queen’s Helen Pechacek La Vonne Safe Lorraine Brynildson Attendants Sandy SkoglundThe cry it still, ‘they come : Macbeth. Act. v. Sc. 5. W55SP1 [lets 1 ■■ fe- ! Zhe Parade ' ■■■■■i f Was Worth Waiting Jor... tins year's sloganMcKeen gives his faculty team the word Zhe Skits Were Sunnier winning Vet’s Club float Ztie floats Were jCarger must be Young Dems — 46 — there was no stopping the snake danceZke Queen Was Pretty (so were her attendants) Lorraine BrynildsonXhe Homecoming Committee John Randall, chairman Carl Sharp Richard Doetkott Jemey Atelier Club window Zhe Dance Was Dreamyand the band played on .. . Krafty Naturally We Won! the Point teas pinned Zhe Activities Were Many Everyone Participated the opening kickoffZhe Winter Carnival Committee Winter Carnival rHIS YEAR’S Winter Carnival had tough sledding — no snow. After the initial surprise, the student body tore wholeheartedly into the activities that Chairwoman Sally Hallenberger outlined for the four-day activity schedule. Snow had to be “imported” from nearby hills for the snow sculpture activity, but the quality of the frosty works of art remained unimpaired. Anthony “Bucky” DiSalvo was crowned King of the “Snowless” Carnival at the FFA Talent Show and then proceeded to reign over the biggest Carnival yet. Would-be skiiers turned swimmers, and would-be tobogganers turned midway barkers as the carnival got underway. There was skating, though, and a hockey game for the more vigorous. A card tournament, bowling, beard judging, chess, basketball, and a candlelight pancake supper rounded out the schedule. The Winter Carnival Committee had proven that a successful Winter Carnival doesn’t need snow — but it woulda been kinda nice anyway. . . Chairwoman The Question Everyone Was Asking What Happened ?g$M A mockery king of snow. King Richard II. Act IV. Sc. i. •ihiSy ; vv »bucky got a new helmet Something for Everyone even Elvis camepool Some Went Swimming... Some Went Out... Some Staged Jn... Others Zook Zheir Water the Hard Way — 53 — All Had a Good Time candlelight pancake supperrHE AUDIENCES LAUGHED. For, it was a season of comedies in the Little Theatre. (The only exception being a student production.) Yes, the audiences laughed and enjoyed the plays. But soon, as is the way of audiences, they forgot the well-put line that made them laugh and the slight feeling of astonishment experienced as they heard a familiar voice saying unfamiliar things. And, in turn, they forgot the realization that came to them as they watched — the realization that it must take a bit of work, possibly also a certain amount of talent, to act like someone you aren’t. Yet, there were some who did not forget. They remembered because at one time, or many times, they too had been on the other side of the curtain. As the season got underway with "The Male Animal,” an Alpha Psi Omega production, (the first in the chapter’s history) the “old hands” chuckled at the stage-struck freshmen in the cast and said, “They’ll learn.” And they did. They learned, just as the upperclassmen did, with Director Blanche Davis out front saying, “Take it over.” “The Lady’s Not for Burning,” the year’s second play, was also a comedy. A record crowd filled the Little Theatre for the all-student presentation directed by Noel Falkofske. With the coming of the winter term the year’s newcomers to RFSC drama began to learn "stage right” from "stage left,” but the lights were as hot as ever and the rehearsals no shorter as Masquers made ready to present “The Devil’s Disciple.” The drama year ended with two student-directed plays. Laura Gardner directed “The Little Foxes” and Duanne Johnson directed the first “arena” play to be presented in Hathom Hall — “Blithe Spirit.” The curtains in the Little Theatre are tied now, and the handles on the switchboard are all up, on the “off” position. But there are many who haven’t forgotten the little stage. Still with them is the vivid recollection of the loud burst of applause for a production that they were a part of — for something well done. Suit the action to the word, the word to the action; with this special observance, that you o’erstep not the modesty of nature. Hamlet. Act III. Sc. 2 waiting for the cue Zhe fetors Worked Hard... Henri Elzinoa in “The Male Animal” what have you been shooting, mud balls? Jerry Johnson and Mike Flemino IN "The Devil's Disciple” 'hose drunk ? Zhe Plays Were Qood... Sara Garnett IN "The Lady’s Not for Burning” Julia Kaminski and Doug Krug in "The Devil’s Disciple” And Zhe Audience Coved Zhem!rHE DIRECTOR said we should consider tonight just another dress rehearsal. I almost wish it were, even if it does seem like we’ve been practicing for months. Hmm, 1 wonder how I’ll ever get that term paper finished. But it’s been worth it, I think — even though I’ll probably never get that flat paint out of my black slacks. What? Oh, time to make up and get dressed. I'll be right in as soon as we get this fireplace into position. Now, let's see, what number makeup did Dr. Davis tell me to use? There, I hope those lines under my eyes aren't too heavy. I wonder if the house is filling up? Oh well, I should worry. With my small part, they probably won't even know I'm on stage unless I make some terrible blunder. Til be all right if only I can remember all the things that the “Qood Doctor" told me. Boy, she sure has shaped me into character. It was hard for me to see at first, but when she pointed out ind demonstrated what she wanted, it began to come through. The curtain is going up. Let me see, it should be about 10 minutes until my cue comes to go on. On second thought, maybe I shouldn't have eaten supper. For some reason my stomach feels a little odd. Dr. Davis......................NDER THE DRIECTION of a new coach, Mr. Walter E. Simonson, River Falls debaters entered more debates and traveled more miles than ever before. More debaters took part in the program this year and more of the beginners saw tournament experience. Thirteen tournaments kept the debators hopping from East to South to West. Even with the hectic pace that they set, RF debaters won more than seventy percent of their debates and placed first in several tournaments. The biennial tournament sponsored by Pi-Kappa Delta honorary fraternity, of which River Falls is a member, was well attended this year with five contestants sent to Brookings, South Dakota. They brought back an “Excellent” in the Men’s Sweepstakes. The highlight of the year, which combined pleasure with business, was the 3,000 mile round trip to New York City. Stopping for debates along the way, debaters Arlin Albrecht, Bill Hagestad, and Richard Doetkott, along with Mr. and Mrs. Simonson, met New York State at Oswego and Le Moyne College at Syracuse and brought home a “five out of six” record. There’s a skirmish of toil between them. Much Ado About Nothing. Act I. Sc. 1. And therefore, 1 feel that you must concur with me that we should discontinue direct economic aid to foreign countries.Jt Was Jt Meadline year in ’56- ’57 US the judge's decision is final suspense Now, are you sure toe are giving the trophy to the right team? ■no ot mmm ’top aoY Judith Simonson Walter E. Simonson Dick HR A ' O t ssssss- Arlen Christenson r° re °D, Jfe r 6 ° e Arlen Christenson and Ron Losness I itiue here a piece of crushing evidence — somewhere e "° J v« r » « ' m IIP M after dinner speaking Deb ®»er ff e f°r Ti °P Richard DoetkottMart Dougherty Charlene WestlundBase Ball Track and Field Inter-murals They Laugh that Win Othello. Act TVi $c. i 0 our first college football game. The bright ■ m lights, glaring down from their nests, make m a the grass too green, the uniforms too vivid. You go through the warming up ritual auto matically, not feeling, not thinking. The head and brain in your helmet do not seem your own but rather unfamilar borrowed instruments. Your own brain was never so troubled with doubts and fears as the brain you are using tonight. One thing seems natural—the tight ness in your stomach. I wish Dad weren't here. What toilI he think if 1 don’t even play? I remember when I wot fust a kid, throwing the ball around bragging to Dad how good I would be, just like him. I can t let him down now. You watch the coach with your whole body, hoping to be given the sign to warm up, — half'fcaring you will. You know you can do better than those guys in there. Can’t the coach see they are goofing off ? Just one chance . . . then it happens. A man's hurt . . . Its your position . . . warm up! Qot to make good . . . Just let me carry the ball . . . Qot to show them. Qtve me the ball just once . . . At last! Now block him! Block him! Daylight! Qot to run faster . . faster . . run . . he mustn’t catch me! I can’t breathe . . . I made it! Dad, 1 made it! And the world is a score board with bright lights. — 62 — Then the game is over, but the lights do not go out. The lights of this game will always shine brightly for two people — a father and his son.'56 Schedule River Falls Opponents 14...Augsburg ..... 6 . 39..La Crosse .... 7 42...Stout ........12 42...Superior .....13 21...Eau Claire .. 35 35...Stevens Point 20 26...Winona ...... 12 14...Mankato ......19rHE 1956 FALCON GRIDDERS missed lying last year's record by just six points when they received their second loss of the season at the hands of the rampaging Mankato Indians in the final game of the season. After winning six of their first seven contests, they were defeated by a score of 19-14. Just one more touchdown would have given this year's team the victory, and a record of seven wins and one loss, to equal last year’s mark, the best since 1951. This years squad increased total yardage for the season from 2,311 in 1955 to 2,570 this year, according to unofficial statistics. The average yards gained per game figure' was also raised from last year’s mark of 288.9 yards to 321.4. A comparison of the total first down compiled over the two years reads 101 for 1955 and 113 for 1956. In the total points department, RF outscored its opponents this year by a total of 232 points to 124 points. These totals average out 29 points per game (eight games) for the Falcons, to 15.5 for opponents. Ron Wunrow, center, and John Steffen, left halfback, were elected honorary co captains of this year's footballers. Steffen was also selected as the Most Valuable Player of 1956. Wunrow received the "Academy Award — an award given to the player who has had the greatest number of cuts, bruises, aches, pains and other injuries. FOOTBALL — From Row:Bob Koplin,, Merlin Slcttca, Bucky DiSalvo, Jim Rutter, John Steffen, Ron Wunrow, Darreld Johnson, Bill Kraft, Roger Hanson. Second Rot: Jim Finstad, Lynn Lawrens, Amie Harrison, Gordon Hofi, The 1957 Football Team All Conference Ron Bob John Bill Wunrow Koplin Steffen KraftVerne Gilbertson, Al Wienkc, Jim Hallcn, Dick Shimel, Jim Carcw, Tom Shield, Ron Zastrow. Third Row: Jim Mast, Tod Gubcrman, Vcm Ellcfson, Dick Wilhelm, Jack Neurcr, Frank Sprengcr, Jim Simon, Pete Hubin, Ken Ellingson, Ed Olund. Jack Omcr. Fourth Row: Roger Piehl, Harvey Berg; Howard Madsen, Phil Lindcman, Marv Dusck, John Hillstead, Ray Meyer, Phillip Bclfiori, Francis Polsfoot, William Solley. Coaches Bill Solley and Fran Polsfoot — 65 — they can't do that to uswatch out for the bogey man Got Jt! got to turn that comer . . .Ron makes a beautiful block and Johnson is away. Johnson outruns his pur-suer and the crowd is on its feet . . . He goes over standing up seventyfive yards later for the longest run of the season. nice follow throughZwist mg Kims Kg Steffen... two with mustard teamwork And Zeamwork By the ZeamZhat Kept the Crowd on Jts fret from beginning to End.'56- 57 Schedule I IVER Falls Opponents River Falls Opponents 3© .. .. Augsburg .... 75 70 .. St. Cloud 77 36 .. Bethel 62 94 .. .. La Crosse . 86 $2 .. St. Cloud .. 86 84 •• Bethel 69 77 •• Mankato .... 84 82 .. Stout 61 90 .. Stout 78 100 .. Oshkosh .. 88 60 .. .. Carleton .... 58 105 Milwaukee 89 89 .. .. Gau Claire s § 73 • Eau Claire 89 60 .. .. Stevens Point 70 94 • Mankato ... 80 68 .. Platteville 85 82 .. Superior 86 66 .. Superior .... 75 85 •• La Crosse 9i "OUR FALCON CAGERS shot 40 Lj percent or better during the 20 game span this year to lead River Falls State to a io-io season’s record and a 5-7 mark in conference play. The team closed the season in a four-way tie for sixth place. In their first year under Coach Fran Polsfoot, the Falcon cagers bettered last seasons 7-13 record. Leading the top shooters was senior forward John Steffen, who connected on 115 of 254 shots for a 45 percent shooting average. Center Dave Herum hit 43 percent on 151 of 352 shots, Mick Lauber had 42 percent of 123 baskets in 290 shots and Griff Howell connected on 34 of 84 shots for 40 percent. From the free throw line Herum, the conferences top scorer, averaged 71.01 percent on 196 of 276 shots. Team-wise, the Falcons poured in 1,627 points for an average of 81.4, while opponents scored 1,583 for a 79.2 mark. [J1 better pressureHerum Repeats as Zap Conference Scorer Herum fakes one man . . . drives, jumps . . . another goalBaseballJt HUSTLING River Falk State Baseball club put together an 8-3 record t this spring in the best season under Coach Bill Solley since he took over the yt baseball coaching duties five years ago. His best previous year was in 1954 W when his squad had a 7-4 record. This springs Falcons posted a 3-3 conference record and won five consecutive non-conference victories. These included a 14-4 win over Carleton College, the eventual Midwest conference baseball champ. Leading the RF regulars in hitting was shortstop Joe Burgoyne, who collected eight hits in 17 times at bat for a .471 average. Rounding out a list of five regulars who hit .300 or better were second baseman George Holland (.368), centerfielder Roger Roffler (.314), pitcher and outfielder Dick Fischer (.304) and infielder A1 Suezaki (.300). Leading in extra-base hits was Holland with five, including four doubles and a triple. The extra-base hit totak: Doubles: Holland — 4, Steffen and Hoffman — 3, Roffler and Madsen — 2, Swanson, Fischer, and Larson—1. Triples: Burgoyne — 2, Holland and Fischer— 1. Homeruns: Swanson — 2, Anderson — 1. Holland was also the runs-batted-in leader with eight. RBI's: Holland — 8, Swanson and Fischer — 6, Roffler — 4, Hoffman and Anderson — 3, Stoflet and Burgoyne — 2, Wolfe, Simon, Steffen, Johnson and Madsen — 1. Dick Fischer led the Falcon mound corps with a 4'1 record and a 1.4 earned-run average. Louie Johnson had a 3 1 record, Jim Turnquist 1 1 and John Steffen 0-0. Johnson led in strikeouts with 30 in 33 innings. Fischer had 25 in 31 and two-thirds innings, Turnquist had 17 in 23 and one-third frames and Steffen had two in three innings. '57 Schedule River Falls Opponents 9................Bethel ...........,. x..;..... 4 14................Carleton ..................... 4 5................Stout .................... 1 3 .............Stout ...................... o 7 .............Eau Claire .................. 10 2................Eau Claire ...................10 5................Macalester ................... o 4 .............Macalester ................... 3 5 .............La Crosse .................... 2 6 .............La Crosse .................... 7 8 .............Bethel ...................... 2 River Fall’s runs — 68; ave. per game — 6.2. Opponent’s runs — 43; ave. per game — 3.9. Pase Hit — 75 — Louie Johnson rHE CROSS COUNTRY team wound up fall track and field events at River Falls with a perfect record — three wins and no losses. On the squad coached by Fran Polsfoot were Neil Sutherland, Bill Shimel, Phil Kuss, Joel Dahlby, Vern Parker, and Dan Teetzan. After placing third in their first meet this spring at La Crosse, the River Falls track squad went on to take nine of a possible 15 firsts to win their next meet at Ramcr Field. Among the nine first places was a record-breaking run by Kuss. He broke his own previous mark of 52.7 in the 440, running the distance in a hustling 52.3. Rounding out the afternoon nicely, he also won the 880. Teetzan came through with a first for RFSC in both the mile and two-mile. Other Falcons winning firsts were Roy Sprcnger in the 220, Parker (tied with Teetzan in the mile), Mick Lauber in the high jump, Delano Motaz in the pole vault and Bob Koplin in the javelin throw. Ray Meyer, Dick Coen, Phil Kuss, and Roy Sprengcr combined for a River Falls first in the 880 relay. RF State made it two in a row with their next meet at St. Thomas. Kuss and Sprcnger each came through with a pair of wins — Kuss in the 440 and 880 and Sprenger in the 100 and 220. Besides winning the mile, Parker was one of three Falcons who took the mile relay. His teammates were Kuss and Sprenger. Dropping the next meet to Mankato, RFSC won only three of a possible 14 firsts. Taking River Falls’ three wins were Parker in the mile, Teetzan in the two-mile, and Aaron Bluebell in the discus throw. In the last meet of the season at Rainer Field, Coach Polsfoot’s squad wound up third in a field of four, winning five firsts. Sprengcr was the only double winner for River Falk. He was first through the tape in both the 100 and 220. In other RF wins, Kuss took the 440, Parker won the mile, and Teetzan breezed to a new school record in the two mile. He topped the old mark of 10:29.3 with 10:23.2. The Meletean went to press before the final meet of the year, at Madison, was held. Relay breasting the tape NTRAMURAL SPORTS on campus are for the benefit and enjoyment of all interested in non-varsity sports. They develop sportsmanship and team work and those who participate realize satisfaction from the experience. The intramural football season was kicked off in somewhat uncertain weather, but was to become one of the most exciting in years. Tough competition was offered by the ten teams who participated. The intramural season came to an end with team A-i defeating team B-io by the score of io-6 in the championship game. This gave team A'i their fourth consecutive touch football championship. The basketball program was also one of the biggest and best in the history of the activity. Team A'4 won the championship by a score of S3'42 High scorer in the tournament playoff was Manley Olson with 38 points. form . . . he's going to have to eat it Fill all thy bones with aches. The Tempest, Act I, Sc. 2INTRAMURAL BASKETBALL CHAMPIONS: Tom Marshall, Tom Wiseman, Dean Kassera, Manley Olson, Jerry Olson, Mike Rice, Pete Hubin This is the short and the long of it. The Merry Wives of Windsor. Act II. Sc. — 80 —rHE INTRAMURAL PROGRAM includes not only football and basketball, but bowling, badminton, volleyball, ping pong, softball and golf. Interest runs according to the season of the year, but all are greatly patronized. Enjoyment and relaxation are the aims of the program which is open to all students. getting the bird no sweat Books are set aside and wait their turn, while the users are taxing their energies in a friendly, enjoyable, perhaps even a bit strenuous, game of the intramural program.f Student Senate I and Committees f Religious Groups • Inusic Groups ________ •Special Interest Grouperthe presidential smile by Dick Schultz serious ousmess for Rog Hanson and Dick Kinney Dick Kinney end Louie Johnson, the attentive senators rHE STUDENT SENATE meets regularly every Monday night at 6:30 P. M. to discuss campus (unctions and any problems which may have arisen during the week. The Student Senare regulates all campus (unctions o( major importance such as Homecoming and Winter Carnival for which it selects a number of candidates to run for chairman of activities. This year saw the rescheduling of all campus organization meeting times and places. The senate also picked the committees which scheduled the social and fund-raising programs such as Foundation Week, March of Dimes, Concert and Lecture, and Recreation Day. Calvin Martell Arlen Christiansen Mary Lou Jensen, secretary Duanne Johnson Checks foundation reportsConcert and Cecture Committee CONCERT AND LECTURE COMMITTEE — Harry Ekinga, Dixie Princ. Jerry Be«. 'jr y RINGING a balanced program to campus that appeals to students is the task of die Concert and Lecture Committee. The programs this year varied from ML y folksingers to noted speakers. This year also saw a very successful lecture given by one of the students on campus, Mr. Gail Roub, who had traveled throughout southern Europe and the Near East. The programs presented this year, although financed by a limited budget, were excellent. HATHORN HALL COUNCIL — Vcrlys Hicok, vice president; Sandra Kins, corresponding secretary; Theresa Bier, treasurer; Phyllis Benjamin, president; Laura Johnson, residont counselor; Marilyn A. Andersen, recording secretary. rHE HATHORN HALL Council is a group of girls elected by the residents of Hathorn Hall to govern the activities which concern the “dorm girls.” The purposes of this organization include the preserving of the organization's prestige and the maintaining of social contact with the student body. They plan activities such as after game get-togethers, square dances, jazz sessions, weekly dance lessons and the annual Halloween Party. The biggest event of the year is the Valentine Formal, when the girls ask the fellows and "pay all expenses.” 85 —FOUNDATION COMMITTEE — Richard Waak, Dean Lorce, Jamc Spark . Duannc Johnson, Lorraine Brynildson, Ardis Shannon. Rae Buchhol:. rHE FOUNDATION COMMITTEE is organized for the purpose of raising money for campus improvement. In this venture the committee was helped by faculty members Marion Hawkins, Richard Delorit and James Murphy. This year the committee proposed to raise money for the construction of a campus directory which would be prominently placed on Cascade Avenue to direct visitors to the campus. Among the events planned for Foundation Week were an "Old Time, Hard Time” dance, a smorgasbord dinner, a concert by the Men’s Glee Club and a semidormal dance. Of all the activities planned, the "Auction Bam.” where various goods and "services” were sold to the public, was truly different. Social Committee SOCIAL COMMITTEE — Carl Duch. Virginia Novak, Elvcra Pctcrccn, Glenn Sandvc, Marge Obon, Bernhard Feld, Dianne Shay, John Randall. rHE SOCIAL COMMITTEE is composed of students appointed by the Student Senate. Its functions are to regulate the social life of the campus and to assist organizations that are sponsoring all school events. The Committee selects the orchestras that play at all school dances and arranges record dances that are sponsored by organizations. In addition to the above mentioned duties the Social Committee has power of approval over all social activities. — 86 —AMMA DELTA b the organization composed of the Missouri Synod Lutheran students on campus. The organization supplies Lutheran fellowship and Christian leadership lor all students of the Lutheran Synodical Conference. This year Gamma Delta handled arrangements of an All-Lutheran Student Directory _ and conducted initiation of new members and various social activities. Gamma Delta was also host to the Regional President’s Conference and attended the regional convention. rHE PURPOSE OF THE LUTHERAN STUDENTS ASSOCIATION shall be to confront its members with Jesus Christ as Lord and Savior, with His Church, and with His call to disciplcship: to bear witness in the academic community to the Gospel of Jesus Christ as confessed by the Lutheran Church; to afford a means whereby its members may deepen and express their Christian faith; and to cany the witness of our faith into the ecumenical ventures of the student world, within the one holy, catholic and apostolic chords. (LSA Constitution). The LS.A. also provides Sunday evening nippers and fellowship. Christian social ventures on this campus and special programs and events sn keeping with the Church year. Several joint meetings with local and out of town church groups were held throughout the year. The _ Spring Banquet was held to initiate new officers and end die year’s activities. Z HE NEWMAN CLUB is a spiritual, intellectual and social organization which serves all campus Catholic students. The first event of major importance which truly exhibited Ncwmantsm in action this year was the welcoming of new students into the dub by dub veterans.” who had already experienced a year or two of Newman ism. Several special events throughout the school year formulated the biggest and best Newman year at River Falls. A greatly increased enrollment over previous _ years, the organization of the club newspaper, the "Loquitur,” the forming of a Newman choir which performed, among other things, a Christmas Concert, a carolling trip around town for the sick and aged, daily performance at church throughout Lent, a special trip to the North Central Province Convention in Mankato as a visiting choir, and trips to adjacent parishes on Sunday mornings. The highlight of the year was the Annual Cardinal Newman Day, February t, which included an entire day of festivities climaxed by a Banquet and Ball. HE UNITED STUDENT FELLOWSHIP unites all college and university students, especially those of the iconstituent denominations, into effective fellowship. They try to confront the campus community in its total life with the Z 1 Christian faith and with the necessity Gospel of Christ, and to inspire students to witness Christian faith and devolop active and responsible church members. USF furthers effective participation in the United States Christian Council and in the World Student Christian Federation. It fosters the sharing of worthwhile ideas, methods and programs with interested individuals and groups. Social events of the year included the “Upper Room Meal” with the Wesley Foundation, joint meetings with other college USF groups, a State Conference and the Spring Retreat. 4 OUNG MEN'S AND YOUNG WOMEN’S CHRISTIAN p m ASSOCIATION is an interdenominational group. M m The Association offers an opportunity to every student in ■ m college to unite in a program aiming at the well-rounded development of Christian personalty through the participation VI in wholesome social and rakious programs. 1 The Y’s cooperate with other colleges in a world-wide r Christian Fellowship for better understanding of the life and teachings of Jews. The YMCA and the YWCA make an organised attempt to influence the thinking of college students toward a Christian solution of campus, community and world problems. This year activities included noted speakers at regular meetings and Mr. Paul Bromicker as speaker at an all school convocation commemorating Brothorhood Week. Keligious groups house of Qod w ESLEY FOUNDATION ministers intellectual, social and religious need' students of the River Falls campus adherents of the Methodist church. The big brother-sister banquet, slcighrides, and Lenten breakfasts filled with fun and fellowship. The "Mea Upper Room” was held with the I herald the coming of Eastor. srrThe Churches We Go To First Congregational Church Lutheran House of Worship And I have not forgotten what the inside of a church is made of. King Henry IV, Part I. Act III. Sc. i. Trinity Episcopal Church IS OU GOD(Jama Delta President ...... Robert Quast Vice President . Robert Miller Secretary ...... Daniel Cjaeu Treasurer ..... Richard Bader Publicity . Paul Czamiecki M S. a President ...... Vice President .. Secretary ... Treasurer ... Executive Council Advisors Dennis Ruhnke Dick Danke Jumell Timm Qordon Hoff John Clemons Duane Johnson Colleen Rasmussen Rev. Arthur Johnson Phil Anderson Mary Uliman Walter Larson Newman Club President ....... Calvin Martell Vice President .. Jerry Qotz Secretary ................ Janet Wihela Treasurer ........ Ar s Shannon Corresponding Secretary Pat A. Phillips Chaplain . Father J. Kleinheinz Advisor ......... James Murphy GAMMA DELTA — Front Roto: Rev. Mueller, Mrs. Gary Bohn. Mrs. Leonard Becker, LaVonna Hannaman. BUI Shaw, Paul Czamiecki. Marrianne Stanck. Robert Miller, Robert Quast, Richard Bader, Dan Gaeu, Bonnie Hannaman, George Germann, lames Johnson, William Zuellrdorf, Louie Barber, Don Ncvala. Bock Row: William Zemke, Martin Augustine. Kenneth Kickbush, Leonard Becker, Gerald Miclke. Roger Raguse, Roger Poo. Gary Kamph, Ranee Giesiker. Sam Perry, Kenneth Hagen, William Goetch, Wally Wonzong, Norman D«Hirer. L.S.A. — Front Roto: Jerry Best, Doris Chcll, Ivan Gruetzmachcr, Don Klemmo, Alcda Ann Peth, Betty Lou Korb, Gordon Waller. Second Roto: LaVern Sexe, Larry Peterson, Dennis Ruhnke, Carolyn Brown, Lorraine Brynildson, Gwen Schlough, Charlene Wcdlund. Third Roto: Lorraine Potcrson, Betty Matousek, Patty Ross, Gerald Marlcttc, Jumell Timm, Ilcnc Larson, Joanne Pick, Kathryn Jacobson. Marilyn Y. Andersen. Fourth Roto: Leo Prill, John Clemons, Robert Butterfield, Charles Wallen, Marilyn Carlson, Mary Jean Plahn, Lynn Radkcy, Phyllis Benjamin, Collcn Rasmussen. Bach Row: Carol Beer, Duanne Johnson, Doris Mathison, Margaret Helgeson, Jay Bcrgstrand, Susy Sorenson, Patsy O’Flanagan, Dick Danko, Shelby Ludwig, Dale Wyss. NEWMAN CLUB — Front Row: Pat Phillips, Helen Glcsncs, Janet Wihela, Barbara Brie laser. Barbara Paquin, Sally Mayer, Mary Mahoney, Ethel Ryan, Ardis Shannon. Second Row: Beatrice DcGidio, Judy Whistler, Donna Timm, Ellen Foster, Alice Gardner, Jane Aide, Barbara Ron), Virginia Novak, Verna Newmann. Third Roto: Jim Michio, Norbert Kramor, Francis Pcichcl, Roger Genits, Richard Palin, Edward Pronschinskc, lames Murphy, Calvin Martell, Francis Gilson, Walter Skroch, Edward Drier. Michael Stengel, Melvin Luthor, ehn Stcber. Fourth Roto: Ed Schlumpf, Ted VerHaagh, Enoch Cordcs, Tony oss, Paul Gundermann, George Cipov. Lyle Ho acker, Lawrence Gansluckner. Mathias Felber, Donald Kuechlcr. Back Row: Robert Murphy, Alex Romanowski, Bob Acbly, Roy Englcbcrt, Charles Redmond, Glenn Shakacl, Edward Michalcwicz, Larry Sirinek, George Marx, George Kerckhove.U.S.F. — Front Row: Lucille Dahm, Marlys Meenis Laue, Mary Jensen, Donna Williams, Mary Pane. Back Row: Frank Holub, David Moore, Mark Wyman, Harry Elzinga, Rev. John Memer, advisor, Jim Laue, Don Laue, Gary Jensen. WESLEY — Front Row: Joan Gladwell, Georgia Thompson, Elizabeth Wintcrmeyer, Dorothy Walters, Roberta Schlough, Patricia West, Heather Borggren. Second Row: Ernost Johnson, Dick Krugor, Bob Uhrig, Betty Webort, Jeannine Slater Uhrig, Louise Berkseth, Jane McKinley, Carole Lagcrstroni, Richard Schwenk, Paul Streif, Richard Pederson. Back Row: Griff Howell, David Julian. YM-YWCA — Front Row: Heather Bcrggrcn, Shirley Christenson, Georgia Thompson, Gwen Schlough. Back Row: Hilbert Kaste, Paul Streif, Ed Thompson. U. S. J. President .......... Harry Elzinga Secretary ........... Sara Qamctt Treasurer ........... Jim Qardner Program Chairwoman Donna Williams Host ............... Frank Holub Publicity ............ Jim Laue Advisors ...... Rev. John Memer Raymond Qamett Wesley President ..... Richard Schicenk Vice President .... Ruth Hajek Secretary ....... Betty Wabort Treasurer ......... Dick Kruger World Christian Community Jeannine Slater Publicity ....... Joan QladweU Historian ........ Qriff Howell Fellowship ..... Sharon Ritchey Prooram ......... Wayne Peterson Advisors .. Jim Crane, Charles Qraham Director ..... Rev. Ralph Kofoed VM- yweA President Vice President Secretary .... Treasurer .... Advisor ...... Richard Pederson Daniel Michaelson Heather Berggren ... Hilbert Kaste .. Virginia Akins —r 90 —I had rather than forty shillings, I had my Book of Songs and Sonnets here. The Merry Wives of Windsor. Act I. Sc. i. Director B. ). Rozehnal Music groups Harry Elzinga Director Nicholas J. JadinakCollege Choir President Secretary Business Manager Librarian ...... Advisor ........ ... Robert Uhrig Mary Louise Olson James Johnson Carol Naiberg . C. B. King HE COLLEGE CHOIR consists of a select group of singers interested in The choir partakes in various activities on campus and several concerts throughout the year. The highlight in this year’s activities was the combined tour with the band. IE COLLEGE BAND, under the direction of B. J. Rozehnal, ddition to presenting concerts throughout the year, the band plays at many school functions including football games and assemblies. This year the band Kay foyal. Clarinets:Laura Qardner, Carla Nordeen, Marlys Olson, Ellen Foster, Joan Camp, Sharron Ritchey, Ranee Qieseker, Margaret Helgeson, Betty Murphy, Frank Qranger, Karen Peterson. Alto Clarinet: Jeannme Uhrig. Bass Clarinet: Marlys Laue. Oboes: Charlene Wcdlund, Curt Larson. Bassoon: Harry Ehinga. Saxophones: Doris Olson, Lorraine Jacobson, Bob Mountford, Walter Skroch, Jeanne Brown. French Horns: Janeth Johnson, Judith Johnson, Patty Ross, William Qoetsch. Cornets and Trumpets: Qlenn Sandve, John Kirk, Jerry Best, Judy Larrieu, Joe Pietrek, Bob Johnson, Jerrald Com, Jon Kilmer. Baritones: Lloyd Jennings, Verna Neumann, Melvin Luther. Trombones: Cathy Hooley, Tom Forthun, Lucille Dahm, Qary Dado, Phyllis Beniamin, Dick Pedersen, Jerry Smith, Neil Nordqmst. Basses: Jerry Olson, Oscar Lundbeck, Dick Meulemaru, Ed Thompson, Jim Johnson, Charles Zellmer. Percussion: Jim Laue, Dixie Prine, Mary Pautz, Sally Hallenberger. the enjoyment and study of choral literature from the various periods. President ........ Business Manager Librarian ....... B. . Rozehnal Ernie Johnson Jerry Olson Jim Laue composed of students who are interested in playing instrumental music. In combined with the choir for a Spring Conceit and a three-day tour of Northwestern Wisconsin. College Band Personnel Flutes: Ernest Johnson, Colleen Rasmussen, Mary Ellen Carew, Sonia Rasmussen, — 92 —CHOIR — Front Row: Mr. King, Kay Barlow, Dorsay Stcichen, Jeannine Uhrig, Shelby King, Beatrice DcGidio, Alma Bents, Phyllis Anderson. Second Row: Dixie Prine, Judy Whistler, Rita Murphy, Sandy Kins, Audrey Kane, Maty Jensen, Elaine Solum, Margie Olson, Shirley Christenson, Carol Naibcrg. Third Row: Charles Norclius, Charles Zellmer, James Tostrud, Dick Mculemans, Marlin Feld, Bcmhard Feld, Jim Johnson, Robert Uhrig. Back Row: Jerry Olson, Greg Griffin, Ed Thompson, Jerry Louis Smith, Roy Englchart, Dale Pearson, Norbert Tec! aw, Harry Elzinga, Ranee Gicsckcr. — 93 —FALCONAIRES — Front Roto: Judy Lurieu, Tom Forthun, Lorraine Jacobson. Back Row: Bud Berquist, John Kirk, Glenn Sandve, Jerry Olson, Harry Elzinga. M.E.N.C.— Front Rote: Harry Elzinga, Elaine Solum. Gerald Olson. Second Row: John Kirk, Dixie Prine, Lucille Dahm, Ed Thompson, Marge Olson, Mary Louise Olson. Bock Row: Tom Forthun. Shelby King. Audrey Kane, Ranee Gietckcr, Jerry Best. MEN’S CHOIR — Front Row: Bernhard Feld, Marlin Fold, Clifford Danielson, Charles Hicok, Jim Lauc, Dick Mculomans, Oscar Lundbeck, Richard Pedorson, Daniel Michaelson. Second Row: Robert Anderson, Don Laue, Ed Thompson, Charles Zellmcr, Earl Adams, Duane Johnson, Philip Knuf, John Kirk, Glenn Sandve, Joe Faulkner, Rolfc Rodlyn. Back Row: Waller Wanzong, Jerry Ccrnohous. Bill Taubman, Dale Swenson, Marvin Isum, Francis Granger, Jcrrald Com, Louis Barber, Leroy Knauf, Tom Forthun, Jerry Best. rHE FALCONAIRES is a dance band composed of students interested in playing modern ballroom music. The group plays for college dances and is in constant demand to play at high school proms and other engagements in the area. The Falconaires were under the direction of Tom Forthun this year. M s. m e. rHE MUSIC EDUCATORS National Conference was formed on the River Falls campus in 1950. Its aims are to provide students with an opportunity for professional cooperative development while they are in college. Membership is made up of undergraduate music students and other students who arc interested in music. M.E.N.C. offers a scholarship to an incoming freshman music student each year. The group also attends various outstanding music programs in the area. This year a new “History of Music" program representing the five periods in the history of music was presented in the Little Theatre. Mm’s Choir IRECTED by Nicholas Jadinak, 1 the 30'voice male glee club added many an enjoyable moment to musical concerts this year by presenting a variety of numbers ranging from Negro spirituals to light novelty selections. The College Glee Club was newly organized this fall by Mr. Jadinak. — 94 —Barbara Jean Brickner Assistant Editor Arlin Albrecht Photographer, Copy-writer Frank Holub Editorial Secretary rHIS YEAR’S MELETEAN, with seventeen more pages and a larger page size than last year, presented quite a task for a small staff. The ’57 Meletcan contains almost ten thousand words and two hundred and fifty photographs — excluding one thousand identification pictures. Even with this quantity, the Meletean staff feels it has captured only gross features of the year. This yearbook, then, is intended to stir and refresh in part the memories of those who experienced 1957 at River Falls, and is not intended to be a complete record in itself of the year. The staff is indebted to the faculty for their complete cooperation in letting Meletean cameramen come into their classrooms to photograph them unposed during actual class sessions. The faculty section is testimony of that cooperation. Our gratitude is also in order to the persons who have helped the photographers in their duties by holding lights, etc. These included Henri Elzinga who helped with football shots, Jim Laue, and Wayne Wolfe, who contributed pictures. Lit ttn nights avake, carving the fashion of a new quarto. Much Ado About Nothing. Act II. Sc. 3. Meletean ’5 Richard Doetkott Editor, PhotoorapiierJane Aide Mary Nell Relander Editorial Assistants The Advisors will someone please tell me how to work this thing? Wayne Wolfe Advisor Jim Crane Advisor The advisors of Meleteans in past years have been largely lost in the shuffle and haste of making deadlines and have missed their just tribute. This is unfortunate, as no publication of this size and importance could be printed without competent advisors. Mr. Crane and Mr. Wolfe have performed their duties as advisors well, tempering wild ideas, encouraging sound ones, and in general, making the book what it is and should be. Credit for the ’57 Meletean belongs to them. The 57 Meletean Staff —97-Zke Student Voice m HE STUDENT VOICE is the newspaper on campus printed by the students for the students. The "Voice,” as it is known, is distributed to a)) students every Monday afternoon in the cafeteria. Much of the work on the paper is done by individuals enrolled in journalism, but all contributors are welcome. It is this willingness to make the paper truly the voice of students that has made it the popular publication that it is on campus. The popularity of The Student Voice this year can be largely attributed to its editor — Arlin Albrecht. Using the Voice’s editorial page as a sounding board for student comment, Mr. Albrecht and his staff kept interest high in school elections, functions, and policy. This year, as in the past, students could "gripe” or praise what they thought fit and have the chance to be heard. Freedom of the press has meaning at River Falls. — It will always remain, so long as the students wish for a voice in their own newspaper. Arlin Albrecht Student Voice Editor rHIS YEAR saw the introduction of a new publication on campus — The Prologue. Edited by Wm. Hagestad, The Prologue is dedicated, in the editors words, "to give a voice to what has frequently been called 'the silent generation’ and to furnish an outlet for creative talent in the graphic arts. This is a magazine printed solely to give a voice to people who have something to say.” The Prologue is published every term and is financed from Student Voice funds. — 98 — William Hagestad Prologue Editor Wayne Wolfe, Advisor Mark Wyman and Carolyn Brown Reporters Rolland Grothe Circulation Manager Ed Schlumpf, Griff Howell, Jim Laue Sportswriters — 99 — ■ Stadtat I'.v I J|| Stadeat Vcitt Roo Gundlacii Sports Editor Barbara Brickner Editor, sprino term I hum | Sladeit Vcicc : XS-, $ Slajnt I’fiee 11A. C. S. I President ........ Betty DeQidio Vice President .. Helen Badzinski Secretary........ Qloria Swanson Treasurer ...... Aleda Ann Peth Publicity ......... Theresa Bier Advisor ............ Ann Dubbe ACEI — Front Rote: Betty Schmidt, Yvonne Olson, Sally Mayer, Susy Sorenson, Anita Gotder, Ruth Joles, Marilyn Carlson. Second Row: Colleen Rasmussen, Jane Aide. Elizabeth Webert, Gloria Swanson, Aidis Shannon. Joanne Fick, Betty DeGidio, Doris Chell, Marilyn Elliott. Third Row: Elizabeth Wintenncyer, Lorraine Peterson, Linnea Hoover, Joan Drier, Helen Badzinski, Sandy Kins, Phyllis Anderson, Agnes Sachscnmaicr. Fourth Row: Jane McKinley, LaVeraa Brown, Doris Olson, Louise Berkseth, Ruth Haiek, Headier Berggrcn, Georgia Thompson. Back Row: Aleda Peth, Betty Korb, Joanne Crownhart. rHE A.C.E.I. works for the education and well-being of children and to promote desirable conditions, programs and practices in the schools — nursery through the elementary. The organization tries to raise the standard of preparation and to encourage continued professional growth of teachers and leaders in this field and to bring into active cooperation all groups concerned with children in the school, the home and die community. The members try to inform the public of the needs of children and how the school program must be adj'usted to fit these needs. The A.C.E.I. sponsored activities for National Book Week this year. Social activities included a get acquainted supper, a workshop on elementary dance and a traditional breakfast for graduating seniors. The organizarion also sold buttons for Foundation Week and A.C.E.I. publications throughout the year. This year Joan Drier attended die national convention in Los Angeles. Atelier Marvin hum Verlys Hicok Carole Kelly . Lois Eaton David Julian .. Jim Crane President ..... Vice President Secretary .. Treasurer .. Publicity ... Advisor .. ATELIER — Silting: Jim Crane, Jim Armbruster, Jerry Moore, Marvin I»um. Standing: Carol Rasmussen, Louise Berkseth, Ruth Hajek, David Julian, Carol Kelly. rHE PURPOSES and aims of Atelier is to foster and promote a better understanding and appreciation of fine arts. The members attempt to familiarize themselves with all phases of fine art. The group conducted field trips to Minneapolis and St. Paul art exhibits and museums, and also presented a student art show on campus. Throughout the year discussion sessions of jazz, sculpture, water color and jewelry were held. —100—Phyllis Andcnon. Secretary; Georgia Thomptoa, IAWS Coordinator: Joanne Crownhan. Elvera Petenon, President; Julia Kaminski, Vice President; Virginia Novak, Marie Foreman, Treasurer. rHE PURPOSE of the A.W.S. is to promote the best interests of all women of the college by affording opportunities for leadership and participation in affairs of the college, by encouraging a high standard of social conduct and by emphasizing the responsibilities inherent in a democratic society. To acquaint the freshmen with the upper classmen, a Big and Little Sister Reception was held in Hathom Hall. This led off a series of Big and Little Sister events spaced throughout the year. An event honoring Faculty women and faculty wives was also given during the year. The culmination of the years activities was the Mother’s Day Banquet and the Senior Women’s Luncheon. President ............. Ehera Petersen Vice President ................. Julia Kaminski Secretary............. PhylUs Anderson Treasurer ................ Marie Forman Publicity Chairwoman ..... Dianne Shay Coordinator ......... Qeorgia Thompson Advisor .................. Nancy Knaak Valentine Formal —101 —rHE CHESS CLUB meets to bring together people who are interested in the intricacies of the game of chess. The group conducts a local tournament during the course of the year and also attends a tournament in Minneapolis. Chemistry Club President ...... Frederic W. Beedc Vice President Jerry Wendt Secretary-Treasurer . Clem Zidick Advisor ........... O’Neal Mason CHEMISTRY CLUB — Front Row: Kenneth Olson, Robert Hawley, O'Neal Mason. Second Row: John Helming, Carol Kosmo, Jean Biedcnnan. Clem Zidick. Back Row: Gerald Marlette, Neil Nordquist, Daniel Michaelson, Carl Duch, Floyd Hauth, David Johnson, Jim Burton. rHIS ORGANIZATION, being a student affiliate chapter of the American Chemical Society, places great importance in developing leadership and outstanding professional interest in future chemists. The club visited General Mills, Inc. and Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Research Division this year and was influential in the success of the science fair. The Christmas Banquet was held jointly with the Math Club. —102 —Wmm Psi Omega President . Vice President Secretary-Treasurer ... Advisor ... . Laura Qardner Patricia Williams Yvonne Olson .. Blanche Davis ALPHA PSI OMEGA — Front Row: Frank Holub, Henri Elzinga, Julio Kaminski, Pat Williams, Laura Gardner, Duanno Johnson. Back Row: Noel Falkofskc, Richard Doctkoit, Arlin Albrecht. OTA BETA is the River Falls Chap.er of the national dramatics fraternity Alpha Psi Omega. The group recognizes outstanding students of drama, who 7 „ , if are made eligible by working on a point basis in This year Alpha Psi Omega sponsored the Animal” during the fall quarter. Throughout the year the group went on various trips to productions in the area. Masquers . production “The Male outstanding dramatic Bob Hatcley polishes the kisser of Doug Krug cith his fist in “The Mcle Animal.” —103 —Big Brother Children’s Day 104 — the ladies helped toorHE PURPOSE AND AIM of the Veterans organiiation is to initiate a feeling of unity and to create fellowship among the veterans on campus. During the course of the year the Vets Club discusses and takes action in current veterans’ problems both on and off campus and initiates and participates in various activities and school functions for the betterment of the school. The highlight of the club’s social activities during the school year was the annual Christmas Party at the Terrace Supper Club. A variety show was put on to raise funds for Children's Day, which was held in May. The Vets Club also conducted the all-school Intramural bowling program, held a pancake supper and took an influential pan in Homecoming activities. FALL WINTER SPRING President Art Moe Art Mot Qene Counard Vice President Bob Dykstra Bob Dykstra Bob Seltrecht Secretary Eari Adams Earl Adams Bob Miller Treasurer Roger Knutson Roger Knutson Neil McClellan VETS CLUB — Front Rene: Bob Miller. Neil McClellan. Gene Counard. Bob Seltrechr. Second Row: Jerry Anderson. Douglas Kelly, Otto Becker. Tom Kinney. Third Row: Roger Germs. Ed Promchimkc. Don Eipcnback, Ted VerHaagh. Fourth Row: Leonard Olund. A! Becker. Fifth Row: Herb Scidmorc. Bob Nelson. Erik Pedersen, Ed Wamong. Sixth Row: Dick Kinney, Don Klcmmc. La Vera Somalia, Dick Patin.ANCE THEATRE is the group on campus I dedicated to interpretative dancing in all the various forms ranging from modem jazz to selections from classical ballet and interpretation of dramatic readings. The group meets for the purpose of individual creative enjoyment and individual and group expressions. Each year Dance Theatre performs selections for various school functions such as talent shows, campus school programs and the senior day program. Dance Zkeatre President .......... Hemi Elzinga Vice President .... Noel Falhofskc Secretary ................... Ruth Hajek Treasurer .......... Frank Holub Advisor ....... Adeline L. Levine the sacrifice is of purest form there proceeded a great and ensuing battle lasting many hours and many were slam. Alas! villain, thou must die for the many infamous crimes which were committed by thy seif. —106 —F.F.A. — From Row: Howard Nelson, Louie Barber, Donald Mocdc, Wilbert Herrmann. Gary Solum, Don Klcmmc, Nonral Pittman. Second Row: Earl P. Adam , Merlin Slcttcn, Enoch Cordcs. _ Roger Hanson, LcRoy Scgcrstrom, Lyman Franzun, Harold Riuc. Third Row: Steve Curtis, Ray Smith, John Clemons, George Pederson, Bill Taubman, Dick Shimel, Dan Tcetzcn. Rod Schubert. Fourth Row: Olin Fimreitc, Walter Skroch, Kenneth Becker, Hatty Beggs. Francis Gilson. Robert Butterfield, LaVem Korb, Tom Calvert. Fifth Rote: Bill Shimel. Ron Zuelsdorff, Dan Gacu, George Cipov, Fran Cobian, Harold G. Brown. Deraid Severson, Herbert Scidmorc- Bock Row: Roger Gonits, Bob Scltricht, John Helming, Stanley Bergum, Alan Krause, Wayne Peterson, James Sparks, Forrest J. Erickson. rHE FUTURE FARMERS Of America is the campus organization for all men enrolled in agriculture. The F.F.A.s primary aim is the development of agriculture, leadership, cooperation, and citizenship. The main purpose of this chapter is to train leaden for high school F.F.A. chapten. The F.F.A. sponsors various activities for Homecoming, Winter Carnival and Foundation Week. The annual banquet culminates the year’s activities. F.F.A. — Front Row: Everett Glaser, Charles Wallen, Rogor Raguse, James Johnson, Edward Knipp, Charles Christenson, LaVem Somalia, Larry Bates. Second Row: Michael Stengel, Tony Koss, Paul Gunderman, Otto Bcckor, Don Kueckler, George Marx, Norman Definer, Leo Prill. Third Row: Larry Peterson, James Karau. Albert Becker. Robert Accola, Richard Schwenk, Allen Wicnkc, Donald P. Hendrickson, Thomas P aff. Bock Row: David Pederson, Edward Michalcwicz, Roy Englebert. President Vice President Secretary Treasurer Advisor Reporter Sentinel Parliamentarian Faculty Advisor FALL Qordon Smith John Foss Earl Adams Bob Mountford Merlin Sletten Bob Butterfield LaVem Somalia John Clemons John M. May WINTER Forrest Erickson Joe LaVoie Francis Qilson Nick Rosandick LaVem Korb Tom Qeimer Bob Accola John Clemons SPRING Ray Smith Rodney Schubert Lyman Franzwa Tom Calvert Larry Bates Steve Curtis Enoch Cordes Chuck Wallen F. F, A. Banquet — 107 —FRENCH CLUB — Standing: Henri Elzinga, David Julian, Tom Fonhum, Jcny Johnson. Sitting: Patty Ross, Jim Laue, Jerry Best, Saundra Finn, Gwen Schlough. Helen Qlesnes Marlene Skagen Janeth Johnson Rolland Baker Leslie McKeen rHE FRENCH CLUB meets to make learning a language more enjoyable and to give students taking French an opportunity to use the language in an informal atmosphere. The high-light of the years activities was the Christmas party at the McKeen’s new home where the club enjoyed a program of French music and slides of France which were taken by one of the members. — 108 —F.T.A. — Front Rote: Susy Sorenson, Marilyn Y. Andersen, Doris Olson, Ardis Shannon. Second Row: Sally Mayer, Par Phillips, Linnea Hoover, Doris Chcll, Hazel Michaclson. Third Row: Ellen Foster, Louise Berkseth, Colleen Rasmussen. Phyllis Benjamin, Heather Bergeron. Fourth Row: Ruth Hajek, Aleda Ann Peth, Marlys Meents Laue, Dick Hoffman, Donna Williams. Back Row: James Karau, Wayne Stoflet, Miles Johnson, Richard Bennett. rHE RIVER FALLS chapter of the Future Teachers of America was organized in 1952. The organization welcomes members enrolled in elementary and secondary education. The aim of the organization is to provide experiences for its members that will qualify them to teach. The River Falk chapter is one of the largest in the state of Wisconsin. N.E.A. films, a Christmas party, a talk by President Kleinpell on public school support. president and Phyllis Benj'amin, state treasurer. Last November twelve of the members attended the annual W.E.A. convention in Milwaukee. President Ardis Shannon Secretary Treasurer Librarian Advisors ... .. Betty Wabort . Wilfred Harris, Ray L. Qamett Douglas NoreUus Ruth Hajek Sara Qamett During the current year the Future Teachers of America have sponsored these programs: a welcoming picnic, a talk by an educational sociologist, a showing of two and a discussion on mental hygiene, led by a psychiatrist of the Minnesota State Hospital at Hastings. Among the members of the F.T.A. are two state officers: Ruth Haj'ek, state vice-GERMAN CLUB — Front Row: Patty O’Flanagan. Ethel Ann Meyer. Carol Krantz, Barbara Brickner. Back Row: Norman Matzck, Dale Melttrom. William Clark, Frank Holub. Qeman Club President ......... Vice President ... Secretary-Treasurer Advisor ........ Frank Holub ... Carol Kranlz Patsy O'Flanagan Ernest Jcrgcns rHESE STUDENTS meet in order to increase their knowledge of Germany and its colorful background. This is accomplished by programs of slides and speakers. A traditional picnic is held in the fall for new members An atmosphere for conversation in German and learning about Germany is what makes the German Club enjoyed by its members. — no —Vie Qroup FALL WINTER SPRING President William Hagestad William Hagestad Keith Thompson Advisors ........ James Crane, Hugo Hartig, Wayne Wolfe rHE GROUP ATTEMPTS to give a voice to those students who are interested in discussing ideas of all kinds and types. The organization hopes to stimulate thought and arrive at a better understanding of matters in which the members are interested. The Group meets informally every Thursday night to discuss a topic of general interest. The members of The Group also write for PROLOGUE. Kappa Delta Pi President Vice President Secretary Treasurer ... Advisor ... Robert Dykstra ... Noel Falkofske ... Marilyn Carlson ....Jim Sparks Walker D. Wyman 4 y APPA DELTA PI is an organization on campus which encourages scholar-MS ship. They reward and recognize outstanding scholarship and leadership in education, and foster professional spirit among prospective teachers. The Spring Banquet and Initiation of new members this year was held at Glen Park Lodge. Miss Marion Hawkins was elected an honorary member and also served as guest speaker. Officers for the coming year were elected from the incoming members. The annual project this year was the sale of Wisconsin Historical Society Calendars. — Ill —MATH CLUB — Front Row: Lillian Gough, loin McDiarmid, Janice Smith, Dora Holst. Second Row: Gary Holt, Neil Nordquist, Paul Larson, Kenneth Olson, Richard Bennett, George Kerckhove. Bach Row: Donald Johnson, Donald Martell, James Burton, David Johnson, Oscar Lundbeck, Robert Wolfe. President ............... Donald Johnson Vice President .......... Oscar Lundbeck Secretary-Treasurer ........ Dora Holst Advisor ................. Lillian Qough rHE PURPOSE of the Mathematics Club is to promote a broader understanding of mathematics and to stimulate interest in it. The club also provides a social setting where those interested in mathematics can associate with each other. The annual Christmas party held jointly with the Chemistry Club was at Glen Park Lodge. The guest speakers were Glenn Junkman and Ted Setterquist. One of the most interesting speakers of the year was Norman Albrecht from Remington Rand Uni vac who spoke on the need for mathematicians and applications of high speed computors. — 112 —MASQUERS — Front Row: Barbara Bricknor. Sue Chrijliamon. Sara Garnett. Blic Kaminski. Pat Williams, Taloa Surr. Beatrice DcGidio. Back Row: Gerald iclkc. Jerry Best, Henri Elzinga, Frank Holub, Miles Johnson, Ora Fasf. Duanne Johnson. Romona Robelia. Noel Falkofske, Carol Naiberg. Paul Strcif, Alex Romanowski, Michael Cotter. Masquers President Vice President Secretary Treasurer .... Advisor ...... Noel Falkofske Pat Williams Pat Williams Sara Qamett Blanche Davis 'll m ASQUERS is the organization on campus for all students interested in various ! I ph 5 5 °f dramatics. Experience in the theatre is gained by working in actual ✓ J W L productions throughout the year. Masquers brings together people interested in W the theatre to plan, work on, and produce most of the plays. This year Masquers sponsored the production of George Bernard Shaw’s The Devil's Disciple. This production featured the facile use of limited space for five entirely different scenes and authentic soldier and townspeople costumes for one of the largest casts in recent yean at River Falk. — M3 —M p'PJ.A DELTA — From R nc: lube Kaminski, Mary Lou Jensen. Laura Gardner. Walter Simonson, Judy Simonson. Honey Berg, Sonia Rasmussen. Back Row: Earl Adams, Carl Sharp, Roger Hanson, Jerry Anderson, Dick Walk, Aden Christenson. Vi Kappa T)elta President ... Vice President .. Secretary-Treasurer Reporter .......... Advisor............ Arlen C- Christenson .. Richard Weak ...... Roger Hanson .... Jerry Anderson ... Walter Simonson 'mg I KAPPA DELTA is the honorary national fraternity on campus which stimulates progress in MF intercollegiate speech activities and interest in communication as an effort to provide F functional leadership training for life, and at the same time to encourage a spirit of fellow ship, brotherly cooperation, and incentive for achievement. Pi Kappa Delta sponsored the annual “B” Debate Tournament on the campus this year and attended the national convention on the campus of South Dakota State College at Brookings, South Dakota. — 114 —"R” CLUB — Merlin Sletten, Dale Cruler, Dick Fischer, Louie Johnson, Howard Madsen, Dick Shimel, Eim Mast, Dick Hoffman, Jim Karau, Bill Wcrbcckcs, an Corcoran, Bill Kraft, Tom Shield, Sam Erickson, Dick Wood, Everett Glaser, John Rutter, Robert Wolfe, Vera Gilbertson. Roger Hanson, Jim Hallen, Al Wienke, Rusty Titcl, Ron Wunrow, Ken Ellington. President ... Vice President Secretary'T reasurer Advisor ........... Ron Wunrow Merlin Sletten Dick Hoffman Phil Belfiori rHE PURPOSE of this organization is to promote a clear and cooperative relationship and spirit of good will with the faculty, student body, “R” Club members and other campus organizations. This year saw the final payment and completion of a $500 foundation fund pledge which began five years ago. The purchase of "R” jackets and "R” blankets for seniors was another concern of the club. The “R” club ends its year with the traditional banquet for all members.RURAL LIFE CLUB — Front Row: Virginia Novak, Patricia West, Marilyn Y. Andcncn, Agnes Marek, Mary Mahoney, Roberta Schlough. Second Row: Edith Johnston, Mary Lcschisin, Helen Fall, Dorothy Walters, Romelle Miller, Mary Krueger. Bock Row: Kathryn Jacobson, Nancy Rundhammcr, Doric Stcichen, Jumcll Timm, Sandra Skoglund, Shirley Christenson, Theresa Bier, Ilcnc Larson, DeLoris Behrens. Kuml Cife Club President .... Vice President Secretary .... Treasurer .... Advisor ...... ... Sandra Skogltmd .... Kathryn Jacobson ...... Theresa Bier .... Virginia Novak Raymond L. Qamett rHE MEMBERS of the Rural Life Club are those students taking the two-year course in teaching. Membership is entirely voluntary. The aim of the organization is to develop in the teacher a keen appreciation and understanding of rural problems. At many of the meetings former members, who are now teaching, come back and speak to the group on the experiences they have had. — 116 —SIGMA CHI SIGMA — Front Rote: Ardis Shannon, Pa William , Marilyn Carlson. Second Row: Mary Louise Olson, Elvcra Pdcrtcn, Elaine Solum, Julie Kaminski, Joanne Crownhar , Marly Mcents Lauo, Mary Jensen. Third Row: Ruth Hajek. Joan Drier, Lynn Radkoy, Marie Forman, Phyllis. Anderson Carol Naiberf. Sara Garnett, Joanne Fick. Bock Row: Carla Nordeen, Janet Wihela, Shtrley Luobker, Donna Williams, Laura Gardner, Colleen Rasmussen, Georgia Thompson. Sigma Oil Sigma President . Vice President Secretary . Treasurer Advisors ...... ...... Carla Nordeen ..... Ehera Peterson ...... Ardis Shannon ....... Lynn Radkey .......... Vera Moss Mrs. E. H. Kleinpell IGMA CHI SIGMA, an honorary sorority, has the threefold purpose of service, culture and sociability. A girl must maintain a high grade average and possess desirable personality and character traits to be considered for member ship. Membership is by invitation only. Sigma sponsors a scholarship for a worthy freshman girl and contributes generously to all local drives. Social activities also include attending a stage play in the Twin Cities and an out-of-town dinner meeting.SITZMARKERS SKI CLUB — Doug Kelly, Rae Buchholz, Sharon Todd, Carol Korsmo, Jay Bergstrand, Marlene Skagen. President ..... Vice President Treasurer .... Douglas Kelly ... Ed Miller .... Ed Miller rHE SITZMARKERS provided facilities and took an active part in making the Winter Carnival a success. During the winter months the members take weekend trips to surrounding ski areas. The club also operates its own ski-tow on Swenson Hill. — 118 —N.C.T.E. — Front Row: Elver Petersen, Donna Williams, Elaine Solum, Lynn Radkcy, Sue Christenson. Bock Row: Carla Nordecn, Mary Louise Olson, Shirley Luebker, Laura Gardner, Noel Falkofske, Don Laue, Carroll Cloutier, LaVonnc Safe, Pat Lind, Barbara Brickner. MM Hi President .................. Al Forsythe Vice President ............. Lynn Radkey Secretary-Treasurer ........ Elaine Solum Advisor ............ Francis P. Chisholm rHE RIVER FALLS Junior Affiliate of National Council of Teachers of English, is an organization which meets to consider and act upon matters of concern to teachers of language arts and to familiarize prospective English teachers with the conditions of their profession. The NCTE also encourages reading of professional materials. Projects were conducted to raise money to send a delegate, Al Forsythe, to the national convention at St. Louis. Next year the group is host to the undergraduates attending the national convention at Minneapolis. — 119 —TOASTMASTERS — Front Row: Dick Danke, Edward Pronschinske, Gary Jensen, Douglas Norclius, Bill LaRuc, Charles Wallen, Roger Gundlach, Dale Wyss. Second Row: Bill Shimcl, Dan Gacu, LaVcm Somalia. DcWaync Mork, Gene Counard, Bob Butterfield, Herb Scidmore, Francis Gilson, Harold Risse. Third Row: LaVem Sexe, LcRoy Segerstrom, George Gipov, John Clemons, Ray Smith, Charles Redmond, Louie Barber, Tony Koss, Paul Gunderman. Bock Row: Steve Curtis. Kenneth Lundcen, Robert Miller. President Vice President Secretary Treasurer SaRGEANT'AT'ARMS Parliamentarian Faculty Advisor FALL John Clemons Herb Scidmore Bob Montford Doug Norelius Jerry Wendt LaVem Korb B. H. Kettelkamp WINTER LaVem Somalia Herb Scidmore LaVem Korb Qene Counard Bob Butterfield Robert Miller SPRING Robert Miller Ray Smith Ray Franda Rod Schubert Joe Pietrek LaVem Korb M N ORGANIZATION of male students interested in self-improvement in I speaking and development and improvement in parliamentary procedure, the L group meets weekly, during the course of the year to attain these ends. The W chapter is a branch of the Eau Claire Toastmasters Club of Toastmasters International. The Club conducts a speaking contest for its members to name the outstanding toastmaster of the year. During the month of May, at the annual banquet, the finalists of the speaking contests deliver their speeches and a winner is selected. The ultimate aim of this organization is to increase die poise of the members in their business, social, and civic relationships. — 120—W.R.A. — Sharon Todd, Pat Phillips, Marilyn Hedlund, Romelle Miller, Elizabeth Schrocdcr, Card Krantz, Mary Plahn, Phyllis Long, Marie Forman, Gwen Sdriough. Co-Presidents .........................Sally Hallenberger and Barbara Rohl Vice President ..........................Pal Phillips Secretary .................... Sharon Todd Treasurer ...... Natalie Vanderhoof KusUtk Point Secretary ........... Sylvia Barsohine Advisor .................. Adeline L. Levine rHE PURPOSE of the Women’s Recreational Association is to promote permanent interest among women in recreational activities and to organize and sponsor extra-curricular activities. The group sponsored various sales of articles in connection with school activities. During the Winter Carnival the W.R.A. scheduled a basketball game as a major attraction. In the spring an annual play day for the girls from surrounding high schools is held on campus which is organized and supervised by the W.R.A. ■ H MYOUNG DEMOCRATS — Standing: Dick Kinney. Front Row: Jay Bergitrand, Mark Wyman, Gordon H. Lee, Howard Webb. Second Row: Mike O’Connell, Leo Prill, H. Gaylon Grccnhill. Back Row: Arlin Albrecht, Henri Elzinga, Tom Wiseman, Bob Ames. President ........ Vice President ... Secretary ........ Treasurer ........ Publicity Director Advisor .......... Richard Kinney .. Q or don Lee Richard Doetkott Jay .. Bergstrand .. Arlin Albrecht Walker Wyman rHE PURPOSE of the Young Democrats is to better acquaint the students of River Falls with the men and issues of our contemporary political world. Their aim, constantly in mind, is to become better citizens through know' ledge of the who’s, what’s and wherefore’s of politics. Members of the organiza' tion attended the State Convention and canvassed the River Falls community for candidates last fall. — 122YOUNG REPUBLICANS — From Row: Robert Wolfo, Albert Becker, Carl Sharp, Honey Berg, Mary Lou Jensen, Richard Waak. Jack Woodbury, Bill Dobson. Back Row: Don Patin, Alan Krauie, Gary Madson, Griff Howell, Stanley Bcrgum, Jim Sorenson, DeWayne Mork, Robert Accola, Tom Calvert, James Johnson, Larry Peterson, Fred Gilbortson, Michael Stengel. President ................. Richard Waak Vice President .............. Tom Calvert Secretary .................. Betty Schmidt Treasurer .................. Donald Patin Advisors ................... QQbert Snath James . McLaughlin rHE YOUNG REPUBLICANS foster an active interest in politics and gain an understanding of the Republican philosophy. The members gain an insight into campaign techniques and publicize and take sides on political issues — both national and local. The Young Republicans try to gain an understanding of these issues; national, international, state, and local. This year saw the Y.R. s taking an active part in the campaigns of various candidates. They also conducted a canvass of Pierce County for the candidates. — 123 —XV HAT do they think as they come down the walk from old South, trying to keep their cap on straight and the tassle out of their eyes? As they come across Cascade and up toward North Hall, what are they thinking? Is it about the practice teaching in the campus school, the basketball games and proms in the gym, or the first time they walked this way as a slightly confused freshman? No doubt it doesn’t seem like four years ago. Will they think, at least once, as they walk, “I wish I weren’t leaving?” Is it possible they might be thinking about the changes that River Falls has brought about in the way they think, yes, and in the way they talk and act too? Probably not — that will come later. As they walk across the platform, get their small roll and walk down while Mom, Dad and a few friends applaud, what do they think? Educators would hope they are thinking of how much they have yet to learn. mm COMMENCEMENT DAT Senior Class Officers SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS — John Clemons, treasurer; Carla Nordeen, secretary; Roger Hanson, president; Robert Dykstra, vice president. Why, then the world's my oyster, Which I with sword will open. The Merry Wives of Windsor. Act I. Sc. 2. — 128 —ROBERT ACCOLA MONDOVI Agriculture FFA 1234 Sen 4 Intra 1234 Y Rep 4 DONALD BARNES New Auburn Social Science Intra 1 FT A 4 RICHARD BENNETT Ellsworth Biology FT A 234 Math Cl 34 Rural Life Cl Treas 1 Masquers 3 SUSAN CHINNOCK BOWERS River Falls Biology FT A 234 Student Voice 12 Ed 2 WRA 12 Basketball Capt 2 Stage Crew 1 USF 12 RICHARD BUBOLZ SuRINC Agriculture FFA1234 LSA 123 EARL P. ADAMS River Falls Agriculture Pi Kappa Delta 34 FFA 234 Sec 4 Debate 34 Intra 1234 Hsr- USF12 Men's Glee 1234 BARBARA BEEBE River Falls Elementary ACEI 4 Y Rep 4 THOMAS A. BENSON River Falls Social Science TM 134 Sec 3 Y Rep 1 Math Cl 1 Chess Cl 4 USF 12 Student Voice 134 Sports Ed 3 BARBARA BRYNILDSON Osceola Elementary LSA 1234 ACEI 1 SCS 234 KDP 4 Cl Sec 2 ROBERT BUTTERFIELD New Auburn Agriculture FFA 1234 Reporter 4 TM 4 Sgt at Arms 4 LSA 1234 Intra 1234 HELEN PECHACEK BADZINSKI Hastings, Minn. Elementary Newman 1234 Treas 2 Dance Th 1 FTA 1234 ACEI 1234 V Pres 4 FREDERIC W. BEEDE Eau Claire Chemistry FFA 12 Chcm Cl 34 Pres 4 LSA 12 Intra 123 HEATHER BERGGREN Roberts Elementary WRA 1 FTA 1234 ACEI 234 YWCA 34 Sec 4 Wesley 234 AWS 1234 Kappa Delta Pi 4 GERALD BRYNILDSON Black River Falls Biology Vets 1234 Treas 3 Chcm Cl 1 LSA1234 Intra 1 THOMAS A. CALVERT Benton Agriculture FFA 1234 Treas 4 FFA Quartet 12 TM 3 V Pres 3 Wesley 1234 See 1 Pres 2 YMCA 12 Y Rep 34 V Pres 4 — 129 —JOANN E. CAMP MARILYN DORIS CHELL River Falls CARLSON Grantsburo Biology Amery Elementary Band 34 Elementary FTA 4 Falconcttcs 34 ACEI 1234 FTA 12 Sec 2 ACEI 4 FTA 4 LSA 4 Wesley 14 Stout Transfer Home Ec Cl 12 Dietetics Cl 2 Sigma Sigma Sigma 2 YWCA 12 LSA 1234 Reg Sec 4 SCS 234 Choir 2 Student Senate 3 Corr Sec 3 KDP 34 Sec 4 Personal Comm 4 AWS Board 2 Winter Car Ch Cand 4 Dorm Pres 2 AWS 4 CHARLES CHRISTENSON Baldwin Agriculture FFA .234 Bowling Team 34 JOHN E. CLEMONS Chippewa Falls Agriculture FFA 1234 LSA 1234 Treas 3 Executive Council 4 TM 34 V Pres 3 Pres 4 Intra 3 Cl Treat 4 ROGER M. COLOMBO Hastinos, Minn. History ENOCH C. CORDES Turtle Lake Agriculture FFA 1234 Sen 4 Newman Cl 1234 Intra 1234 TM3 STEVE C. CURTIS LUCILLE DAHM Clayton Agriculture FFA 1234 Rep 4 Newman Cl 12 TM 4 River Falls Music USF 1234 Treas 3 Fellowship Chr 2 MENC 1234 Choir 1234 Pres 3 Orch 14 AWS 1234 Falcone ties 34 Co-Director 4 BETTY DEGIDIO Cumberland Elementary AWS 1234 Newman Cl 1234 Choir 1234 ACEI 1234 Pres 4 Masquers 123 Hathorn Cl 123 Treat 3 SAC 4 BURT DEVINE WlTHEE Agriculture FFA 1234 Newman Cl 12 Intra 1234 BEVERLY DOMIKA Rhinelander English-Social Science Newman Cl 1234 Sec a Executive Comm 123 Debate 123 Oratory 2 NCTE 3 SCS 4 KDP 34 AWS 1234 Masquers 123 French Cl 1 YDem 1 ROBERT DYKSTRA Waldo Elementary-Guidance Choir 3 Vets 34 Pres 4 ACEI 34 KDP 4 Pres 4 Who’s Who 4 a VPres4 ROGER EKSTRAND Osceola Biology FFA 1 Student Voice 2 MARY ANN ENGEL River Falls Elementary ACEI 14 Newman Cl 24 FTA 24 — 130 —FORREST J. ERICKSON Appleton Agriculture FFA 1234 Pres 4 Math Cl 4 LSA ia34 JOANNE M. FICK Wilton Elmcntary FT A 1 ACEI 1 34 Treas SCS 234 Sec 3 LSA 1 34 Choir 12 AWS 1 34 Board 3 YM-YW 1234 Orch 12 Winter Car Comm 3 Hathom Hall Pres 3 AL FORSYTHE River Falls English NCTE 234 Pres 4 Basketball 123 Band 1 LYMAN W. FRANZWA Mondovx Agriculture FFA 34 Sec 4 Vets 34 TM 4 Intra 34 ROBERT GERLOCK Hastings, Minn. Social Science RONALD EVERTS Elmwood Elementary Intra 123 ACEI 4 FT A 4 Vets 123 RICHARD FISHER Stetsonville Biology R Cl 1234 Newman Cl 1234 Basketball 1234 Baseball 1234 JOHN FOSS Minneapolis, Minn. Agriculture FFA 1234 V Pres 4 Band 2 LSA 1 Intra 1234 TM 4 Student Senate 1 Cl Pres 1 ALLEN FRITZ Owen Math FRANCIS GILSON Casco Agriculture FFA 1234 Sec 4 TM 34 Sec 3 Intra 34 Newman Cl 1234 Band 2 NOEL J. FALKOFSKE Ellsworth Speech'English Masquers 1234 Pres 4 APO 234 V Pres 3 German Cl 1234 V Pres 2 KDP 34 V Pres 4 PKD 4 Dance Th 1234 Co-Chairman 23 NCTE 34 JUNE FLEISCHAUER River Falls English AWS 1234 NCTE 4 French Cl 1 Off Campus Women 2 Pres 2 RAY FRANDA Brussel Agriculture FFA 1 3 TM 4 See 4 Intra 1234 Band 2 Newman Cl 1234 Vets 4 RUDOLPH T. GEIMER Denmark Agriculture Vets 24 FFA 4 Rep 4 Intra 4 EVERETT GRILLEY Rice Lake Chemistry Football 12 Track 12 Vets 34 R Cl 1234 Intra — 131ROLLAND L. GROTHE Chippewa Falls Elementary ACEI i134 NCTEa Masquers 1234 APO 234 Student Voice 4 Vets 1234 Intra 34 LSA 1234 HERBERT R. HAHN HuMBIRD History Vets 234 USF 123 Treas 2 TM23 Intra 1234 IDA L. HAHN River Falls Elementary Rural Life a 12 LSA 1234 V Pres 1 ACE! 34 FT A 34 CWA 1234 SALLY HALLENBERGER Hudson Biology Band 1234 Falconeftes 34 WRA 1234 Co-Pres 4 Treat 3 Gamma Delta 1234 AWS 1234 Winter Cam Chr 4 ROGER HANSON New Richmond Agriculture Football 1234 Debate 123 FFA 1234 TM 1 PKD 234 Sec-Treas 4 LSA 123 Gamma Delta 12 V Pres 1 R Club 234 Student Senate 4 Who’s Who 4 Cl Treat 3 Cl Pres 4 BRUCE R. HARRISON Wilton Agriculture Intra 1234 Vets 34 MARK F. HAUGSBY Hawkins Social Science YMCA 23 V Pres 3 Intra 3 German Cl 34 FT A 4 JOHN P. HERPST Elmwood Chemistry Chem Cl 34 Math Cl 4 Vets 34 Intra 4 DAVID C. HERUM River Falls Math R Cl 1234 Basketball 1234 Capt 4 All Conf Center 34 Intra 1234 RICHARD W. HOFFMAN Arpin Social Science Baseball 1234 KDP34 FT A 4 R Cl 1234 ScC'Treas 4 Intra 1234 CATHERINE HOOLEY Hudson Elementary Band 1234 Treas 4 Falcone ttes 34 Go-Director 4 Choir 3 MENC 12 Newman Cl 1234 Board 123 ACEI 234 Pres 3 FT A 4 AWS 1234 SAC 3 Social Comm 1 Student Foundation Comm 2 Winter Cam Comm 3 WRA 12 LINNEA N. HOOVER River Falls Elementary FT A 34 ACEI 34 KDP 4 NCTE 34 JAMES C. HUBER Ellsworth History-English Vets 12 German Cl 34 Intra 234 Melctcan Staff 3 Foundation Comm 3 DOUGLAS JENKINS River Falls History EconomicS'Bnglish LSA 14 Ski Cl 3 TM 13 LLOYD E. JENNINGS Frederic Math German Cl 34 Math Cl 123 Band 1234 Choir 1 — 132MART E. JENSEN New Richmond Elementary Choir 234 USF 234 SCS 4 ACE 4 ERNEST JOHNSON BOYCEVILLE Chemistry-Math Band 1234 Pres 4 Math Cl 23 Orch 34 Intra 1234 FRANKLYN F. KELLEY Red Wind, Minn. Physics-Chemistry TM 12 Math Cl 23 V Pres 2 Pres 3 Band 12 German 34 BETTY LOU KORB Alma Elementary ACEI 34 FT A 3 Falconcttcs 4 LSA 34 WILBUR C. LaRUE St. Croix Falls Social Science Vets 123 Childrens Day 23 USF 12 Student Senate Soc. Comm 3 FT A 4 TM Pres 3 DONALD JOHNSON Milwaukee Math-Physics Math Cl 34 Pres 4 RUTH JOLES BOYCEVILLE Elementary Band 2 Dance Th 1 Masquers 12 Choir 12 ACEI 34 Hathom Cl 1234 AWS 1234 LSA 1234 WRA 14 GEORGE KLEIN Ellsworth Chemistry Chem Cl 4 LaVERN KORB Alma Agriculture TM 1234 Pres 3 V Pres 3 Sec 4 FFA 1234 Advisor 4 DONALD R. LAUE River Falls History Choir 1 Men’s Glee Cl 4 Intra 1234 Rec Day Chr 3 YDcm 3 Student Senate 34 Student Voice 1234 Mclctcan 23 USF 1234Pres 3 Personnel Comm 4 Public Relations Comm 4 Student Union Comm 4 Student Ins Rep 4 Cl V Pres 2 DUANNE JOHNSON River Falls Speech-Social Science Masquers 234 APO 34 Choir 3 Men’s Glee Cl 4 LSA 234 Council 34 Debate 3 SAC 4 Student Senate 4 Student Foundation Comm 4 Chairman 4 Homecoming Comm 3 Co-Chairman JULIA KAMINSKI Thorp Speech-English Masquers 1234 Sec 3 APO 234 Scc-Treas 3 PKD34 Newman Cl 1234 NCTE34 AWS V Pres 4 Cl Sec 2 Who’s Who 4 ROMONA H. KOCHENDORFER Spring Valley English AWS 1234 Board 1 Newman Cl 1 Choir 1 Folk Singers 1 NCTE 24 KDP 34 Historian 4 Atalier 34 Pres 4 Cl Sec 1 PHILLIP A. KUSS River Falls Social Science Basketball 1234 Track 1234 Cross Country Capt 3 R Cl 1234 Newman Cl 12 Intra 1234 FTA 4 MARLYS MEENTS LAUE River Falls Biology Band 123 Orch 123 Choir 12 Folk Singers 1 MENC 12 FTA 4 SCS 234 KDP 4 Wesley 123 USF 4 — 133 —JOSEPH C. LaVOIE Knapp Agriculture FFA 234 V Pres 4 Vets 34 Intra 234 SHIRLEY ENGLEMAN LUDBKER WoODVILLE Speech-English Student Senate 3 See 3 Student Foundation Comm 23 Sec 2 FT A 1 NOTE 234 PKD 1234 Debate 123 Band 1 KDP 34 SCS 234 LSA 1234 Dramatics 3 Student Union Comm 3 Cl Treas 2 Hathom Hall Sec 2 Homecoming Queen Cand 3 HAZEL MICHAELSON Balsam Lake Elementary FT A 4 ACEI4 LSA 4 AWS 4 JAMES R. MURPHY River Falls Elementary DOUGLAS NORELIUS Barron Elementary Vets 1234 FT A 34 Treas 4 TM 34 Treas 4 Intra 34 LEROY LEE RlOCELAND Biology Choir 2 LSA 2 Chess Cl 4 German Cl 3 KENNETH LUNDEEN Frederic Math-Physics Student Voice 23 TM34 Intra 1234 The Group 4 EDWARD MILLER River Falls Math Football 1 Baseball 123 Ski Cl 234 Treas 4 DONALD L. NEVALA Thorp Biology German Cl 12 Math Cl 4 Gamma Delta 4 EDET A. U. NSIKAK Adadia, Nigeria Economics-History Wesley 234 Dev Chr YM-YW 234 Dev Chr LLOYD LINDQUIST High Bridoe Biology Intra 34 DALE C. MELSTROM Ellsworth Social Science Masouers 12 Rural Life 1 German Cl 34 Intra 34 ROBERT MOUNTFORD Patmette Agriculture Band 1234 FFA 1234 Treas 4 TM 34 Sec 4 Orch 4 Intra 1234 CARLA NORDEEN Centuria English SCS 34 Pres 4 KDP 34 French Cl 1 Falcon cites 34 Band 1234 NCTE 234 FT A 13 AWS 1234 Who’s Who 4 Library Comm 3 Cl Sec 4 FRANCIS S. OAS River Falls Social Science Choir 12 Men’s Glee Cl 2 YMCA 1 Golf Team 234 Intra 1234 — 134 —GARY N. OLSEN St. Paul, Minn. Geography Minn Cl i Car YVONNE OLSEN New Richmond Elementary Masquers 234 Treat 2 APO 34 V Pres 4 ACEI 134 AWS 1224 Hathom Hall Soc Chr 3 MARY LOUISE OLSON Spring Valley English German Cl 1 Choir 1234 See 4 Sexene 2 Trio 3 SCS 234 Treat 3 LSA 1234 MENC 34 AWS 1234 Campus "Cover Girl” ELLA osrrs River Falls Elementary ACEI 34 FTA 4 German Cl 4 DONALD PEDERSON Ambry Social Science RICHARD A. PEDERSON Cumberland Science YM'YW 1234 Treat 3 Pret 4 Wesley 1234 Band 1234 Men’s Glee Cl 4 Math a 1 Intra 1234 Who’s Who 4 AGNES PETERSON ELVERA GERALD Luck PETERSEN PETERSON Elementary Ambry Centuria Art a 1 History Elementary ACEI 1 AWS 1234 Pres 4 Intra 1234 FTA 1 LSA 1234 NCTE 34 SCS 34 Pret 4 Band 3 FTA 13 German Cl 1 Who’s Who 4 LSA 1 WAYNE PETERSON Glenwood City Agriculture FFA 1234 Wesley 1234 Y Dem 123 YMCA 1 ALEDA ANN PETH ToMAII Elementary LSA 1234 Publicity 2 FTA 134 AWS 1234 ACEI i34Treas 4 WRA 1 Hathom Cl 1234 Ass’n Dorm Counselor 34 JOSEPH PE1TREK Arcadia Agriculture FFA 1234 Band 1234 Newman Cl 1234 Board 23 TM 34 Sgt. at Arms 4 Orch 4 NORVAL PITTMAN Clear Lake Agriculture FFA 1234 TM 3 Intra 1234 ANN RICHARDSON River Falls Elementary ACEI 4 FTA 4 ROGER ROFFLER Alma Elementary Baseball 4 Vets 34 ACEI 34 Intra 4 — 135 —BARBARA C. ROHL Roberts Elementary AWS 1234 FTA 1234 Newman Cl 1234 Ticas 3 SAC 4 WRA 1234 V Pres 2 Co Pres 4 ACEI 1234 Student Voice 4 JOHN RUTTER Kinney, Minn. Biology R Cl 34 LSA 34 RODNEY SCHUBERT Brandon Agriculture FFA 1234 V Pres 4 TM 34 Trcas 4 Intra 1234 RICHARD L. SCHWENK Hudson Agriculture Football 123 Choir 1 TM 123 Sgt. At Arms 1 Pari 2 FFA 1234 Wesley 234 Treas 3 Pres 4 SAC 4 Intra 123 WILLIAM SHAY Somerset Social Science Vets 1234 Pres 2 Social Comm 2 Newman Cl 1 NICK ROSANDICK Granton Agriculture Football 12 Newman Cl 1234 Vets 4 FFA 1234 V Pres 3 Treas 4 TM 4 Intra 1234 GLENN A. SANDVE Cumberland Music Band 1234 Pres 3 Orch 1234 Choir 2 FTA 1 MENC 1234 Student Voice 4 WILLIAM F. SCHULTZ Ellsworth Elementary FTA 4 ACEI 34 Newman Cl 3 Vets 1 Intra 3 HERBERT SCIDMORE Colby Agriculture FFA 1234 Rep 3 TM 34 V Pres 3 KDP 4 Vets 234 Intra 1234 Who’s Who 4 DONALD SIEBOLD River Falls Biology Math Cl 1 Vets 2 Golf Team 34 Student Voice 2 DENNIS RUHNKE Hastings, Minn. English LSA 1234 Treas 2 Pres 4 Reg Stud Sec 3 YM-YM 34 FFA 12 Y Dcm 12 Theology Cl 1 German Cl 34 Pres 3 The Group 4 BETTY J. SCHMIDT Hudson Elementary AWS 1234 Masquers 2 WRA 1 Newman Cl 124 Board 4 ACEI 34 Rep Off Campus Women LESTER SCHWARZ- TRAUBER Ellsworth Math M. ARDIS SHANNON Ellsworth Elementary AWS 1234 WRA 12 ACEI 1234 FTA 1234 Pres 4 Newman Cl 1234 Treas 4 , Student Voice 1234 Business Manager 3 SCS 34 Sec 4 Falconettes 34 Student Foundation Comm 4 Who’s Who 4 Cl Sec 3 ALBERT A. SIREK Rice Lake Agriculture Newman Cl 123 FFA 1234MERLIN SLETTEN Chetek Agriculture R Cl 234 V Pres FFA 234 Advisor Football 1234 LSA 23 ELAINE SOLUM WoODVILLE English LSA 1234 Choir 1234 Folk Singers 1 Sexette 2 Trio 3 Octete 4 FT A 13 NCTE 234 See-Treas 234 MENC 234 See-Treas 4 SCS 4 AWS 1234 VERNON STONE Ameby Agriculture FFA 1234 GEORGE THEIS New Richmond Football 12 Infra 12 Student Voice 12 Meletean 12 Vets 3 GEORGIA THOMPSON St. Croix Falls Elementary FT A 1234 ACEI 234 Wesley 34 Worship Ch 4 YM-YW 34 Publicity Ch 4 District Rep 3 SCS 34 AWS V Pres 3 Coordinator 4 GORDON W. SMITH Arcadia Agriculture FFA 1234 Pres 4 Newman Cl 123 Intra 12 JAMES SPARKS Merrill Agriculture FFA 1234 Sec 3 Vets 1 KDP 34 Treas 4 Math Cl 4 Foundation Comm 4 Intra 34 Who’s Who 4 Cl V Pres 3 DON SWANSON Ellsworth Chemistry Chem Cl 1234 Football 123 Track 1234 Foundation Comm 2 Vets 1234 KAYE-DON TIBBETTS Frederic Social Science Intra 1234. Student Voice 234 APO 234 Debate 3 Masquers 1234 LSA 1234 FTA 1 Personnel Comm 3 RUSSEL O. UTGARD Star Prairie Geography FFA 1 Intra 23 Vets 234 RAY H. SMITH New Auburn Agriculture FFA 1234 Pres 4 TM 34 Intra 1234 JOHN STEFFENS Turtle Lake Social Science Football 1234 Basketball 1234 Baseball 1234 RC1 1234 GLORIA SWANSON BOYCEVILLE Elementary LSA1234 FTA 14 ACEI 134 Sec 4 KENNETH J. THOMAS Osceola Social Science Basketball 1234 Football 1 Intra 1234 Wesley 1 Y Rep 34 NATALIE A. VANDERHOOF KUSILEK Clear Lake English Dance Th 1 Newman 1234 Board 4 Choir 1 Cheerleader 123 WRA 234 Social Comm 3 Sec 3 Homecoming Queen 3 — 137 —ARLAN VANDE WATER Holm bn Agriculture FFA 1234 TMCA 12 PAUL A. VAN SOMEREN Baldwin Social Science Basketball 12 Intra 1234 Choir 1 DONALD J. WEISS Roberts Social Science Kappa Delta Pi 34 Student Senate 3 Basketball 1 R Club 4 Intra 234 Class Pres 3 JEROME WENDT Schofield Chemistry-Biology Chemistry Club 234 Toastmasters Club 34 Sgt. of Arms 3 Vets Club 1234 PATRICIA WILLIAMS River Falls English AWS 1234 Sigma Chi Sigma 234 Student Voice 12 Business Manager 2 Choir 1 Masquers 1234 Treas 2 Sec 4 Alpha Psi Omega 234 Sec-Treat 4 French Club 34 Mclctean 2 Beaver Dam Agriculture Football 1234 Intra 1234 R Club 1234 Pres 4 Pi Kappa Delta 34 Foundation Comm 2 DARRELL YOUNGBERG Cumberland Social Science Basketball 123 R Club 234 RONALD ZASTROW Hastings, Minn. Social Studies Not Pictured LAURA A. GARDNER Fall River Speech-English Band 1234 Wesley Foundation 1234 Masquers 1234 Pies 3 Alpha Psi Omega 234 Pres 4 Pi Kappa Delu 234 NCTE 234. Sigma Chi Sigma 34 Kappa Delu Pi 234 State Treas of Methodist Student Movement 3 CARL SHARP Rice Lake Social Science Pi Kappa Delta 34 Vets Club 34 Y Rep 1234 Pres 4 Assist Homecoming Chairman 4 Debate 34 Intra 1234 YMCA 12 LSA 4 Two-Year Rural THERESA BIER Rush City Rural SANDRA LEE SKOGLUND Pepin RuralrHE JUNIOR CLASS made two major contributions to the Homecoming festivities, with the Queen and Chair' man both being representatives from the Junior class. The juniors were also in charge of the Campus decoration. As the year wore on the juniors sponsored their annual class movie and took part in the Winter Carnival. The spring was occupied with the Prom, held May 18. The theme was “Moonglow.” good morningJunior Class Officers JUNIOR CLASS OFFICERS — Charles Wallen, treasurer; Ruth Haiek, secretary; Calvin Martcll, president; Roger Genit, vice president. Deeper than did ever plummet sound. Fit drown my book. The Tempest. Act I. Sc. 2. — 140 —Albrecht, Arlin Ames, Richard ... Anderson, Jerry Bacon, Margie .. Barker, Orbn .... Becker, Otto .. .... Chippaca Falls .... St. Paul, Minn. ............ Deronda ........ River Falls ........ River Falls ........Turtle Lake Beebe, Jewels ........... River Falls Benjamin, Phyllis ... Hastings, Minn. Bercum, Stanley...............Wheeler Berkseth, Louise ............ Baldwin Boos, Gerald ................. Cadott Brue, Donald ................ Spencer Brunhorst, Edward .... Red Wing, Minn. Carbw, Mary Ellen ............ Elcho Christenson, Arlen ............Ameiy Christenson, Charles ....... Baldwin Claude, Jim ............... Centuria Cotter, Terrence .......... Prescott Crisler, Dale .............. Hillsdale Crownhart, Joanne .......... Ellsworth Czarniecki, Paul ............ Plymouth Dahlberc, Grace ............. Frederic Dahlby, Joel ............... Ellsworth Depfner, Norman ............... Wausau Dickey, David ........ Black River Falls Doetkott, Richard .......... River Falls Dusek, Harvey .............. River Falls Eaton, Lois .................. Ellsworth Ellincson, Ken ................. Clayton Elzinca, Harry ................. Sheldon Elzinga, Henri .................. Sheldon Erpenbach, Donald ........... Neillsville Finstad, James ...............River Falls Foster, Ellen ................... Hammond Galvin, James ..................Menomonie Garlid, Bernard ................. Baldwin Gehn, Dale .................Spring Valley Germann, George .............. Cumberland Gerrits, Roger ....................... De Pere Gilbertson, Lavbrne ........ Clear Lake Ginther, Lawrence ............... Augusta Glaser, Everett ............... Ridgeland Goodrich, Richard ............ Hudson Gorder, Anita ............. La Crosse Gotz, Jerome ............ River Falls Graham, Audrey...............Necedah Greene, Earl ............ River Falls Greenhill, Harold.......New Auburn Greil, Ken ................ Tomahawk Hagen, Kenneth .......... Cumberland Hajek, Ruth ................ Humbird Hansen, Merton ........... Deer Park Hanson, Harvey ............... Osseo Haushalter, Wayne ........... Hudson — 141 —Hawksford, Francis ........ Deer Park Helming, John ............... Tomah Holland, George ........ Spring Valley Huser, Roger ................... New Richmond Jacobson, David .............. Eland Jarciiow, Merle ....... New Richmond Jelen, Donald ..............Independence Jensen, Gary ..................... Amery Jensen, Mary Lou ............... Hudson Johnson, Darreld .... Red Wing, Minn. Johnson, Dean ...............River Falls Johnson, Gerald H. .............. Barron (ohnson, James A. ohnson, Lloyd .... Johnson, Miles ... Karau, James ... Kellerman, James Kelly, Douglas ... . Ellsworth River Falls ... Frederic Marshfield Cumberland River Falls Kharrazi, Hamid ........ Tehran, Iran Kinney, Richard .............. Hudson Koca, Edward ................. Hudson Kruger, Richard ............... Loyal Kubchlbr, Donald ........... Herbster Lancer, Malcom ............ Ellsworth Larsen, Richard .............. Hudson Laue, Jane .............. River Falls Leach, Richard .......... River Falls Lee, Gordon ................... Elroy Lindquist, Lloyd..............Baldwin Losness, O. Ronald ............ Amery Lundbeck, Oscar .............. Amery McClellan, Neil .......... Menomonte McDiarmid, F. Iola .......... Hudson Malinovsky, James ............. Clam Falls Marsh, James ........... Marshfield Marsolek, Morris ..... Fountain City Martbll, Calvin ..... New Richmond Marx, George ................ Amigo Matzek, Norman .........River Falls Meybr, Ethel Ann ...... River Falls Michaelson, Daniel....Balsam Lake Michalewicz, Edward ........ Edgar Moe, Arthur .............. Chetek Moen, Merwin ......... Cumberland Mork, Dewayne ........... Cameron Mountain, J. Douglas .... Ellsworth Mulhollam, William ...... Bay City Nelson, Elizabeth........River Falls Nelson, John ................... Star Prairie Nelson, Robert .......... Balsam Lake Nordeen, William ........... Centuria Olson, Betty ................... Nye Olson, David ............... Baldwin Olson, Doris ............... Baldwin — 142 —Olson, Gerald ............. Maiden Rock Olson, Kenneth ............. Qrantsburp Olson, Marlys ................. Baldwin Olund, Leonard .............. Rice Lake Otterson, John ............. Cumberland Pas sow, Joel ................. Arcadia Patin, Don ...................... Fond du Lac Prill, Leo .......................... Bloomer Quast, Robert ................... Ncillsville Radkey, Lynn .................... Beldenmlle Randall, John ............ Stillwater, Minn. Rasmussen, Colleen ............. River Falls Reardon, James .......... River Falls Risse, Harold ..............._ Bayfield Ronningen, Keith ........ River Falls Rutherford, Robert ............. Durand Safe, LaVonne .......... Spring Valley Schrader, Marvin ........... Dorchester SchraMski, Gerald ....... Balsam Lake Schultz, Richard E. ........... River Falls Seltrecht, Robert ............. Loyal Sexe, LaVbrn ................. Ettnck Shay, Dianne ............... Somerest Slater, Jeannine ............. Hudson I Smith, Janice ...... Sobottka, Emery . Sonsalla, LaVbrn Stengel, Michael Sundt, Donald .... Teclaw, Richard ......... Ellsworth .....Maiden Rock ........... Arcadia ............ Suring Minneapolis, Minn. ............ Thorp Thompson, Keith ...... Welch, Minn. Timm, Donna ................... Alma Uhrig, Robert ................ Loyal Urban, William ...............Thorp Veith, Donald .......... River Falls Waak, Richard ........... Eau Claire Wacner, Nettie .......River Falls Wallen, Charles ...... Prairie Farm Wanzonc, Edward.........Turtle Lake Webert, Elizabeth ..........._ Roberts Weis, Gavin......................River Falls West, Walter ..... Black River Falls Williams, Donna ............. Hayward Wood, Richard ......... Spring Valley Yousten, Alice ............... Almenc — 143 —SOPHOMORES began the year by enforcing freshman initiation and taking an active part in the Homecoming activities. The Homecoming Dance, very elaborately decorated, was the largest project. The sophomores also decorated a window and received second prize on their float. In the Spring the sophomores held the Annual Traditions Day. painting by the sophs' president in Atelier exhibitSophomore Class Officers SOPHOMORE _ CLASS OFFICERS — George Kerckhove, vice Eresident; E. Michael Fleming, president; Carol Naibcrg, secretary; riffith Howell, treasurer. In my school days, when I had lost one shaft, I shot his fellow of the selfsame flight The selfsame way, with more achised watch, To find the other forth; and by adventuring both, I oft found both. The Merchant of Venice. Act I, Sc. i. — 145 —Aebly, Robert ............. Downing Aide, Jake ....................River Falls Ames, Robert ........... River Falls Anderson, David ........... Clayton Anderson, Earl .......... Stockholm Anderson, LeRoy .......... Centuria Anderson, Marilyn Y........ Milltown Anderson, Phyllis ......... Centuria Anderson, Stephen ........... Amery Armbruster, Mabel ....... Rhw Falls Arnquist, John ............. Baldwin Bader, Richard ........ New Richmond Baker, Roland .................... Centuria Barber, Louis .............;.... Ladysmith Barnholdt, Harry ........ Stillwater, Minn. Barsokine, Sylvia ......... St. Paul, Minn. Becker, Albert ...................... Eleva Beers, Thomas ...................... Hudson Benson, James .. Benson, Jerome .. Bero, Honey .... Bbrcstrand, Jay . Bergstrom, David Berube, Wallace ..... Bruce . Spring Valley .... Elmwood ....... Amery ... Plum City ..... Somerset Bbskar, John .. Bier, Theresa ... Bladl, Paul ... Bohn, Gary ..... Botts, Byron .... Brooke, Richard ........ Prescott Rush City, Minn. ........ Owen ........ Frederic ......._ Elmwood ... Spring Valley Brown, Harold ................ Somerset Brynildson, Lorraine Black River Falls Burton, James .................. Hudson Carlson, Arnold ............... Dresser Casperson, Marvin ..... St. Croix Falls Cernohous, Gerald ......... River Falls Cipov, George ..................... Chelek Cloutier, Carroll ........ New Richmond Cobian, Francis .............. River Falls Coen, Richard ....................... Luck Corcoran, Daniel ....... Stillwater, Minn. Cotter, Michael ................. Prescott Czech, Ted .................. Hannibal Dacub, Patricia ........... Cumberland Danielson, Clifford ..... Spring Valley Danke, Richard .......... New London Dark, Lucy ............... River Falls DeMars, Arlen ................ Cornell Dietrich, Sharon ............. Clayton Dobson, William .... Black River Falls Dodge, Michael ................ Hudson Dougherty, Mary .............. Spooner Downey, June ........ Red Wing, Minn. Downing, Joann ........... Rrver Falls — 146 —Dulek, Clarence Dusso, Kenneth . Eaton, Clair .... Elliott, Marilyn Enstad, Richard Erickson, Charles ................ Thorp ........... Fox Lake ............. Prescott ......... River Falls .......... River Falls .. Center City, Minn. Everson, Truman Facerland, John Feld, Bernhard . Feld, Marlin ... Fennie, Ernest .. Fielder, Phyllis .............. Blair ............. Durand ..... Sturgeon Bay ..... Sturgeon Bay ......... Boycevillc ........... Prescott Flaherty, Ann ...... he Center, Minn. Fleming, E. Michael ......... Frederic Fleming, Elvin ......... Spring Valley Fleming, Thomas ... Red Wing, Minn. Forman, Marie ................. Cadott Forthum, Tom ........... Spring Valley Foss, Edward .. Franz, Kirjah . Fuller, Mary . Gaeu, Daniel .. Gardner, Alice Gardner, James Biddeford, Maine ........ Prescott .... River Falls ......... Merrill ...... Hammond ........ Pittsville Garnett, Sara .... Gipford, Robert Gilbertson, Fred Gleason, Donald Glesnes, Helen Goerks, Donald . ..... River Falls ......... Hudson Black River Falls ..... River Falls ..... Rrucr Falls ........ Baraboo Goetsch, William ....... New Richmond Graham, Robert ............... Necedah Gross, Merlin .............. Ellsworth Grubbs, William ............. Centuria Gruetzmacher, Ivan ........ New Lomfon Gunderman, Paul ............. Bloomer Gundlach, Roger ............ Frederic Hagbstad, William ....... River Falls Haclund, LaVonne ....... Maiden Rock Hallino, Vaughn ........... Stockholm Harrison, Arnold ........ River Falls Harrison, Richard ............ Wilton Hase, Carvel .......... Maiden Rock Haugen, Marian .............. Hudson Haugen, Norman ...............Barron Hawkinson, Leighton .... River Falls Hawley, Robert .............. Neenah Healy, Richard ......... River Falls Hedlund, Marilyn .......... Qrantsburg Helmeuller, Jerome ....... Plum City Hemm, Josephine ............._ Conratn Hendrickson, Donald ...... River Falls Henning, Lyle ............. Fall Creek Hicok, Verlys .......... New RichmondMarvin ... is, Tim .. «, Harlan , William n, David .. n, George Johnson, Gerald G............River Falls Johnson, James R.....Red Wing, Minn. Johnson, James S...................Blair Johnson, Roger Dean ............... Rice Lake (ostad, Morgan .................. Holemn OYAL, Kay ......... No. Si. Paul, Minn. E.ian, David .. habka, W. Kalantari, Kaste, Hilbert ... Kelly, Carole Kempp, Eugene........Red Kerckhove, George ...... King, Warren ........... Kins, Sandra .. Kirk, John ............. Klemme, Donald ......... Knipp, Edward .......... Knutson, Roger Koehler, Hugh Koss, Anthony . Krantz, Carol . Krause, Alan .. Kroeze, Alice . ...... Amety .... Milwaukee ......... Anligo ....... Barronett ... Maiden Rock ..... Beldenville ......... River Falls .............. Hudson .............. Cadott ......... River Falls .............. Barron ...............Hudson Lehman, Alfred Lein, Ronald Lent, Mary ........ LlNDABAUER, GERALD . Lindeman, Philip ... Ludwig, Shelby ... — 148 —Luther, Melvin .............. Elcho McGlyxn, John................ Bruce Madson, Gary............... Mondovi Marsh, Robert............Marshfield Martbll, Donald .......... Somerset Martin, Vauohn .......... Plum City Mayer, Sally .......... Cumberland Mbulemans, Richard.........Downing Miller, Roger ............. Hudson Miller, William .............Tomah Moline, Waldemar ........ Frederic Monchilovich, Helen ... Cumberland Mottaz, Delano ..... St. Paul, Minn. Murphy, Rita ................. Ellsxcorth Naiberc, Carol ................... Cadott Neises, Paul ..................... Hudson Nelson, Charles ...................Hudson Nelson, Howard ................ Barronelt Neumann, Verna ............ Somerset Norton, Verland .......... Menomonie O’Connell, Michael ......... Hammond O’Flanagan, Patsy .....Prairie Farm Olson, Lavernb ........ Taylor Falls Olson, Manley ......... Maiden Rock Olson, Marcie .... Olson, Severt... O era, Mary .... Ottem, Fred..... Parnell, Wilford Pearson, Dale . .......... Amery ......Shell Lake .......... Knapp Red Wing, Minn. ....... Somerset .... Cumberland Pederson, Erik ... Pederson, David .. Pederson, George Peichel, Francis . Perry, Sam ...... Peterson, Larry ... ......... Luck .... New Auburn ...Cumberland ....... Almcna ........ Aniwa Black River Falls Peterson, Rodney ............... Nye Pfaff, Thomas ................... Mindoro Phelan, James...................Menomonie Phillips, Patricia A...New Richmond Phillips, Patricia J....... Weyerhauser Pickericn, William ........... Eau Claire Plahn, Mary Jean ............... Hudson Prine, Danny .................Ellsworth Racuse, Roger ................. Shawano Rasmussen, Carol ...............Hammond Raycor, Beatrice .......... River Falls Redmond, Charles .............PUtsville Reinert, Vernon ................ Gresham Reynolds, William ........... Pittsville Ricci, Thomas.................Cumberland Riedel, Francis ................ Mosince Ritchey, Sharon .............River Falls Rosenberc, Joe ................ Milltown — 149 —Rundhammer, Nancy ............... Star Prairie Rutherford, James ..............Durand Samuelson, Glenn ............. Merrill Sather, Richard ......... Ellsicorlh Schaller, Robin .......Stillwater, Minn. Schlampp, Robert .............. Baldwin Schuler, William ............ Hudson Schultz, Richard H....... River Falls Sexe, Maynard ................ Enrich Shield, Thomas .......... River Falls Shimel, William ............. Merrill Shong, Kenneth .............. Augusta Simonson, Judith .... Sirinek, Lawrence . Skogland, Sandra ... Skroch, Walter ... Snuggerud, Russell Solum, Gary ....... River Falls ... Chetek .... Pepi n .... Arcadia ... Holmen Deer Park Sorenson, Susy ............. Ridgeland Starkey, DeWayne ........... Rice Lake Steichen, Dorsay ........... Deer Park Streif, Paul................Clear Lake Suezaki, Alvin .... Kealakekua, Hawaii Sutherland, Neil ............... Pepin Swanson, Donald L... Swoboda, Gary ...... Teclaw, Norbert .... TbHennepe, Roger ... Tetzloff, Marlys ... Thompson, Wayne .... Oconomowoc .... Algoma ......... Thorp .... Baldwin . Menomonie ...... Elroy Timm, Jurnell ...........Spring Valley Tobias, Richard .............. Hawkins Todd, Sharon ............ Shell Lake Tomfohrde, Wayne .............. Ar yin VanHaaoh, Ted .................. Amigo Voelkbr, Alan .............. Ellsworth Waalen, Donald ............. Amery Waller, Gordon ........... Ettrick Wallesverd, Donald ....... Baldwin Wallesverd, Walter ....... Baldwin Weeks, Bruce .............. Barron Wells, Fred .......... River Falls Westlund, Joanne .... Watertown, Minn. Wienke, Allen ................ Emerald Wihela, Janet ............. Iron River Wiseman, Thomas ..........;.... Wilton Wolfe, Robert ........ Chippcxva Falls Wolfert, Francis ..... Sheboygan Falls Wood, Patricia .............Spring Valley Wyss, Dale ................... Boycevilte Young, Robert .................. Frederic Zellmer, Charles ................. Wilton Zidick, Clement.............Land O'Lakes — 150 —rHE FRESHMAN CLASS, the largest in the history of the college, struggled through the first confusing week of registration and orientation to be met with six weeks of initiation. This ended with Homecoming, which the freshmen took a large part in by decorating Ramer Field and building the bonfire. They also decorated a window, won third prize on their float, and succeeded in pulling the sophomores through the creek in the annual sophomore-freshmen tug-of-war. The class’ only money-making project, a “sock-hop,” was held during the winter term. As the school year draws to a close, the freshmen look with anticipation toward the coming year when they will no longer be underclassmen, which will give them the opportunity to haze the coming freshman class. the kangaroo is guilty as charged Freshmen Class Officers FRESHMEN CLASS OFFICERS — Richard Shimel, vice president; Darlene Gay, treasurer; Betty Murphy, secretary; Curtiss Larson, president.Accola, David ................. Mondavi Ames, Monie ............ East Ellsworth Anderson, Delores ........ River Falls Anderson, Marilyn A............ Wheeler Anderson, Raymond ....... Little Falls Anderson, Robert ............. Centuria Anderson, Wayne .............. Centuria Ankley, David .................. Sarona Artz, Gerald ....................Antigo Augustin, Martin ..... Red Wing, Minn. Barjestem, Hamid ........ Teheran, Iran Barlow, M. Kay ............ Rhinelander Barron, Daniel .......... River Falls Becker, David ................. Eleva Becker, Kenneth ............... Eleva Becker, Leonard .............. Almena Bbckmark, Arthur .............. Siren Beckon, Weir ................ Deronda Beers, Carol ... Bbgcs, Barbara .. Beccs, Harry ... Behrens, Deloris Benoy, Thomas Benoy, Wayne .......... Hudson Minneapolis, Minn. ....... PeuMukee ......... Augusta .......... Hudson .......... Hudson Bentley, Myrna ......... New Richmond Bents, Alma ................ Comstock Berg, Harvey ............... Mtlltown Bergen, Kenneth ................ Iola Bercquist, Kenneth ............. Amen Bergseng, Dean .......... River Falls Bergstrom, June ....... Prairie Farm Best, Jerry ................ Woodville Bibeau, David ......... New Richmond Biederman, Jean ....... New Richmond Blank, David .................. Colfax Bleoen, Barbara .........Spring Valley Bohn, Alan ................. Frederic Bosman, Georgia ............. Baldwin Bottolfson, Sandra ......... Prescott Brackee, Wallace ............ Clayton Brackett, James ...........Elk Mound Brecka, Milan ............ Cumberland Brickner, Barbara Jean .... Riuer Falls Briggs, Dennis ................. Bruce Brighton, Cecil ..........New Richmond Brincman, Charlie .......... Barronett Brown, Carolyn .............. Somerset Brown, Jeanne ................ Roberts Brown, LaVerna .... Lake Elmo, Minn. Buchholz, Rae ............ Ladvsmilh Burchell, Aaron .......... Hillsboro Butler, John ............ Rice Lake Butler, Maurine ............. Winter Caflisch, Thomas .......... Baraboo — 152 — Carew, James .................. Elcho Carlson, Dale ............... Curtiss Casper, Richard ............ Waukesha Cernohous, Kenneth ............ River Falls Chesky, Marley .......... Qrand'Marsh Christenson, Shirley..........Cushing I Christenson, Suzanne Minneapolis, Minn. Clark, William Boyceville Corm, Jerrald ................Mosinee Crane, Charlene ................Tomah Crank, Duane .............. Holcombe Crowley, Emery ....... Chippewa Falls Dado, Gary ................. Clayton Dacue, Barbara ...........Cumberland Dahler, John .............. Menomonh Dam lin, William ............ Hudson DeGidio, Beatrice.........Cumberland Dietsche, Robert ........... Spencer § Dodge, Jack ................ Elmwood Drier, Edward ................. Plum City Duch, Carl .................. Sarona Duncan, Glen ............... Roberts Durand, Mary Jean .... Lake Elmo, Minn. Dusek, Donald ........... River Falls Dusek, Marvin ............... River Falls Eaton, Sherwood .................Ellsworth Eisbnhutii, James .................... Ejk Mound Ellefson, Vernon ........... Spring Valley Enoelhart, Robert ................ Fredenc Engle Bert, Roy .............. Forestville Enloe, Ruby ................ River Falls Erb, Harry ...................... Hudson Esswein, William ............ Boyceville Fast, Ora ....................... Wilson Felber, Mathias .......... Camp Douglas Felland, Robert ................ Roberts Fetzer, Joan ...............Plum City Fimreite, Olin ................. Eleva Finlan, William............River Falls Finley, Mary ........ Savage, Minn. Finn, Saundra ............ River Falls Foss, David ................... Hudson Fossing, Richard ..... Minneapolis, Minn. Frandsen, Paul ..................... Luck Frank, Wayne .................... Pepin Freier, Donald ....... Red Wing, Minn. Funk, Wayne ......................... Bay City Gall, John ..................Turtle Lake Gansluckner, Lawrence .... Maiden Rock Garlie, Thomas ........ Northfield, Minn. Gay, Darlene ....................... Owen Gease, Dennis ................. Stratford Gbister, Charles ............ Beldenville Gieseker, Rance ............... Plum City — 153 —G la dwell, Joan... Glover, Jim ....... Gobiirinc, Sally .. Granger, Francis .... Greoorich. John ... Griffin, Gregory .... ....Chippewa Falls ......... Webster .......... Prescott .... Stillwater, Minn. ......... Greenwood ........... Warrens Grimm, Garnette ... Guest, Steve ..... Gullickson, Eugene Guttino, James ... Haarstad, Dorothy Halada, Mary Ann ...River Falls ..... Ellsworth St. Paul, Minn. .... Ellsworth .... Ellsworth ...... Algoma Halles, Iambs .................Clear Lake Halls, Halsey ............ Ellsworth Hammer, Robert................. Green Bay Handeyside, Colin ............ Elcho Hancartner. Allen ............ Osseo Hanke, Ronald ............. Marathon Hansen, Charles ........... Deer Park Hanson, Nancy...........Spring Valley Hanson, Stephen................Spring Valley Hardy, Robert ............. Brookfield Hart, Darrell ................ Mondavi Hauth, Floyd ............. River Falls Hawkins, Lory........... Hammond Hayden, Ronald .... St. Croix Beach, Minn. Helander. John ........... Branlwood Heldbro, Robert..............Spencer Hkloeson, Margaret ....... Woodville Helmer, Jack ........... River Falls Hennino, Dale..............Fall Creek Herrmann, Wilbert ........ Shfluwio Hillstead, Jon ............. Wilson Hjelsand, Allan .............. Blair Hoe ps, Harvey ........... Milltown Hopacker, Lyle................Elmwood Holle, Frederick ... Holtz, Fred ........ Hubin, Peter ....... Hughes, Terrance ... Huibreotse, David .... Huppert, John ..... ...... Baldwin Chippewa Falls ... Shell Lake .... Hastings, Minn. lenbeulah 'dcnvillc Hyde, William... Iman, Hooshanc .... Inowell, Nancy .... acodson, James .... acobson, Kathryn acobson, Lorraine ..... Hammond ... Ahtcaz, Iran .....Rice Lake ........ Hixton Black River Falls ..Spring Valley AEOBR, Mary Lou ansen, Steve.... ensen, Thomas ... enson, Michael oiinson. Dale .. ohnson. Elroy ... ....... Hayward .... Cumberland ........ Hudson ....... Spooner .... St. Croix Falls ..... Brentwood I Johnson, Eugene ............. Frederic Johnson, Iola ........ Stillwater, Minn. Johnson, Janeth ................. Hudson Johnson, Judith ................. Hudson Johnson, Karen................Rice Lake ohnson, Melvin ................... Pepin ohnson, Robert ........ Qlenwood City ohnson, Roger David .......... Wilson ohnson, Sidney .................. Bay City ohnson, Thomas .......... Turtle Lake ohnston, Edith ........ New Richmond Caczmarzyk, Leonard ......... Mosinee Kahl, James ..... Kaluzny, Arnold . Kampp, Gary ..... Kane, Audrey .... Kane, Jerome .. Katka, Wayne .... ........... Barron ....... Milwaukee Red Wing, Minn. ....... Ellsworth ... St. Paul, Minn. ...... Highbridgc Kauphusman, Janet ........ River Falls Kennedy, Carol .... No. St. Paul, Minn. Kestell, John .................. Waldo Kettelkamp, Harriet ...... River Falls Kickbusch, Kenneth ............... Boyd Kilmer, Jon ................. Hillsdale King, Shelby ..................... Rice Lake Kinney, Thomas ............ River Falls Kleinschmidt, Edwin ............ Almena Kludy, Norma ................ Stratford Knauf, LeRoy ................. Marathon Knopps, Judy ................ Menomonie Knott, David ............. River Falls Knudsen, Joanne .......... Hager City Knuf, Philip .................. Unity Kofobd, Jeanne ............ River Falls Kolasinski, Warren ....... River Falls Kramer, Norbert ......... Rhinelander Kruecer, Mary ............ Star Prairie Krug, Douglas ........... Cumberland Kuczmarski, John ....... Rhinelander Kurschner, Larry ............ Barron Lagerstrom, Carole ... Qlenwood City Lamphier, James ............. Hudson Lane, Robert ............ Chippewa Falls Lang, Norman ..................... Colby Lancer, Robert .................. Spring Valley Larrieu, Judith ................ Elmwood Larson, Curtiss .............. Hillsdale Lau, Thomas ................. Cumberland Lauber, Michael .......... Qlenwood City Lee, Nels ........................ Hudson Lbibblt, Don ................. Marshfield Lewis, Jambs ...................... Qrand Marsh Lind, Patricia ....... Minneapolis, Minn. Long, Phyllis ................ Qlen Flora — 155 —Loree, Dean ............... Ettrick Luehmann, James ...... New Richmond Lurndal, Art ............... Nelson McDiarmid, Rachel .......... Hudson McGarvey, Robert ........... Wilton McKinley, Leona Jane ........ Siren McMullen, Jean Mabry, Patricia Madsen, Howard Maiilum, Dale .. Mahoney, Mary . Maney, Charles Sheboygan Falls ......... Luck ....... Amery ..... Mondovi .... Woodville ........ Elcho Marlette, Gerald ...... St. Croix Falls Marquardt, Donald ............. Bloomer Mast, James ................. Qreenwood Mathison, Doris ............... Roberts Matousek, Betty ........... Neillsville Matzat, Robert .................. Tomah Matzek, Marlys .......... River Falls Meents, Bbnuardt ........ Rice Lake Meyer, Charles .......... River Falls Meyer, Raymond .......... River Falls Michie, James ............... Harshaw Mielke, Gerald .............. Merrill Mikla, John ........... Qlenwood City Miller, Clinton .............. Dallas Miller, Leon .................. Mason Miller, Romelle ....... Lakeland, Minn. Milleren, Caryll .......... Menomonie Moe, David ............ New Richmond Moede, Donald ............... Shawano Monette, Edward ...... New Richmond Moore, David ......... Lake Nebagamon Moore, Jerome ....... St. Paul, Minn. Mullen, Roger ........ New Richmond Murphy, Elizabeth ...... River Falls Murphy, Robert .......... Spring Valiev Nelson, Beverly ............. Ellsworth Neubarth, Marlene .............. Hudson Neurer, Jack ............... Cumberland Novak, Virginia ........... Weyerhauser Nordquist, Neil .............. Centuria Norelius, Charles Nybo, Charles .... Oeffler, James .... Olson, Barbara ... Olson, William ... Olund, Edward .... ... Barron Stockholm . Frederic Deer Park .. Baldwin .... Sarona O’Malley, James ......... River Falls Omer, John ..................... Amen Osits, John ............. River Falls Paquin, Barbara .......... Cumberland Parker, Shirley ............. Hayward Parker, Vernon ............... Antigo — 156 — Patin, Richard ............ Fond du Lac Pautz, Mary ................ Rhinelander Petersen, David ................. Hudson Peterson, Ann Lorraine ........... Siren Peterson, David ................. Hudson Peterson, Gene ................. Webster Peterson, Karen .......... Spring Valley Pi eh l, Roger ................. Shawano Pofp, Roger ................... Waukesha Post, Marlys ...... Red Wing, Minn. Potton, James ................... Hudson Prodoehl, Dan ................... Antigo Pronschinske, Edward ........... Mondavi Ramberg, Paul ................. Baldwin Rasmussen, Sonja ........ Chippewa Falls Rassbach, John .......... Chippewa Falls Rautmann, Orval .............. Sheboygan Relander, Mary Nell ...... River Falls Ricci, Don ...................... Hudson Richardson, Harold ........... Barron Richardson, Richard ...... River Falls Robbins, Annie ........... River Falls Robelia, Ramona ................ Elmwood Rodlyn, Rolfe ................ Menomonie Rohde, Gary .................. Qreenwood Romanowski, Alex ................ Chetek Roskos, Charles ........... Independence Ross, Patty ..................... Hudson Rovney, Donald ................ Centuria Rubin, Fred ............... Rice Lake Ruemmele, David ................. Hudson Ruppert, Rodney ......... Chippewa Falls Ruano, Isidro ..... Cuernavaca, Mexico Ryan, Ethel ................. Qranlsburg Sachsenmaier, Agnes ............. Hersey Sahba, Mahmoud .......... Tehran, Iran Saucestad, James ............. Woodville Schiferl, James ............. Dorchester Schlouch, Gwendolyn ..... Prairie Farm Schlouch, Roberta ........... Boyceville Schlumpf, Edward ................ Durand Schoenwetter, Lewis ............ Emerald SCHROEDBR, ELIZABETH ........; PreSCOtt Seekamp, Helen ........... River Falls Secerstrom, Jon .......... River Falls Seibel, Harold ............ Fond du Lac Severson, Derald ................ Taylor Shakal, Glenn ..................... Boyd Sharp, Roger ............ Chippewa Falls Shaw, William ............. New London Shimel, Richard ................ Merrill Simon, James ............ Buhl, Minn. Skacen, Marlene ................ Emerald Skoug, Darrell .................. Chetek — 157 — m at v H © 11 y vs . Vi in V 1 ‘ i m, •v • £ A K § ii | y  Skoug, David .................. Chetek Skroch, Allen .............. Independence Smiley, Richard .............. Smith, Gerald Lee ........... Rtver balls Smith, Gerald Louis .............. Dallas Sons, John ...................... Auguita Soulati, Firooz ... Spencer, Frank .. Staioer, John .... Stanek, Marianne Starr, Taloa ..... Steber, John ..... Rezaeieh, Iran .. Springbrook .. Hager City ...... Cadott ........ Sir en ...... Amigo Steinhaus, Jon Steinmetz, Gbrhardt Strobush, Robert Susedik, Anthony .... Swanson, Barbara .... Swanson, Duane ...... ........ Montello ... New Auburn ...... Woodville ....... Ladysmith .......... Hudson Red Wing, Minn. Swenson, Dale .................Amcijj Szedlak, Anna ........... Rrver Falls Taubman, William ........ Shell Lake Taylor, Ella Mae ........ River Falls Teetzen, Daniel ............. Shawano Thompson, Donald ............ Hudson Thompson, Edward ........ Cumberland Thompson, Roland ........ Deer Park Thoreson, Wilma ......... Rrwr Falls Tostrud, James ......... River Falls Trapp, Gene ................ Hammond Tuloren, Donald ............. Hudson Turnquist, James ......... Qreenxcood Ukkola, Erland ................ MapU Urness, Duane ............... Mondovi Vahlsinc, Don ....... Wellsburg, Iowa Veenendall, Mildred ......... Baldwin Vollbndorf, Paul .......... Eau Claire Vorwald, Louise .......... Roberts Vosseteig, David ....... Galesville Walters, Dorothy ......... Holcombe Wanzono, Walter ....... Turtle Lake Warhol, Kent .................Amety Webb, Howard .............. Elmwood Webster, Charles ............. Gilman Wedland, Charlene ............ Balsam Weiss, Gene .................... Alma Wendt, Charles ............... Amery West, Patricia .... Black River Falls Westpfahl, Bernice ............ Tomah Whistler, Judith ..... Qlenwood City Wilhelm, Richard ............. Spring Valley WlNTERMEYER, ELIZABETH ....... Hudson Wiseman, Robert ............ Frederic Wittsock, Jerome ....... Star Prairie Wright, Paul ................. Hudson — 158 —Wyman, Mark River Falls IT3, if C. Yakkmi. Richard Young, Robert Zemke, William Zoller. David Woodvillt Frederic Sunn Stillwater, Minn. Vi 5 Zoller, John ZUELSDORFF, RONALD .. Stillwater, Minn. Merrill n JR[ V boil and bubble toil and trouble We have some salt of our youth in us. The Merry Wives of Windsor. Act II. Sc. 3. —159 — 


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