University of Wisconsin River Falls - Meletean Yearbook (River Falls, WI)

 - Class of 1937

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University of Wisconsin River Falls - Meletean Yearbook (River Falls, WI) online yearbook collection, 1937 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 202 of the 1937 volume:

THE MELETEAN 1937COPYRIGHT ROLF ORDAL EDITOR FRANK SIRIANNI BUSINESS MANAGERTHE MELETEAN 1937 The annual publication of the students of the State Teachers College River Falls, Wisconsin Volume twenty-sixCONTENTS ADMINISTRATION CLASSES ACTIVITIES ATHLETICS ORGANIZATIONS■(ndmLn.Li.tta.tion I 1 NORTH HALLBOARD OF REGENTS OFFICERS Edward J. Dempsey.......................................President Edgar G. Doudna.........................................Secretary Robert K. Henry.........................................Treasurer PERSONNEL William L. Seymour........................................Elkhorn John Callahan.............................................Madison Edward J. Dempsey.........................................Oshkosh Robert Curran............................................Superior George B. Martens.................................. Stevens Point J. H. GRIMM...........................................River Falls Mrs. Charles Crownhart....................................Madison Joseph A. Padway........................................Milwaukee Archie V. Hurst........................................Eau Claire A. W. ZERATSKY.........................................La Crosse Mrs. Anna Dilungs Cunningham..........................Platteville 19)REGENT J. H. GRIMM £ 10 JPRESIDENT J. H. AMES tHlFACULTY JOHN M. MAY B.S. Kansas Slate Agricultural College M.S. Cornell University Agricult ucal Educat ion E. J. PRUCHA B.S.. M.S. University of Wisconsin Agronomy, Registrar ARTHUR N. JOHNSON B.S. University of Wisconsin M.S. Iowa State Agricultural College Animal Husbandry CLYDE B. CAMPBELL B. S. Iowa State Agricultural College Teacher Training in Agriculture ROY E. SPRIGGS B.S. Kansas State Agricultural . College M.S. Iowa State Agricultural College Agricultural Engineering WILLIAM SEGERSTROM B.S.M. Stout Institute Manual Arts I 12 1FACULTY RUDOLPH A. KARGES Ph.B.. Ph.M. University of Wisconsin Ph.D. University of Iowa Chemistry CHARLES G. STRATTON A.B. Michigan Normal College Geography, Geology Dean of Men JAMES P. JACOBSON B.S. Beloit College M.S. University of Wisconsin Physics THEODORE SETTERQUIST A.B. Carleton College A.M. University of Wisconsin Chemistry Assistant Coach BENJAMIN H. KETTLEKAMP A.B., A.M. University of Kansas Ph.D. University of Pittsburgh Zoology CATHARINE LIENEMAN A.B. University of Nebraska A.M. Washington University Ph.D. University of Nebraska Botany [13]FACULTY JUSTIN WILLIAMS A.B. Arkansas State Teachers College A.M., Ph.D. University of Iowa History ORVILLE M. HANNA A.B. Franklin College A.M. University of Chicago English MAUD A. LATTA A.B. University of Wisconsin A.M. University of Chicago History L. LUCILE HADDOW A.B.. A.M. University of Wisconsin English WALKER D. WYMAN B.Ed. Illinois State Normal University A.M., Ph.D. University of Iowa Social Sciences, Public Speaking NELLE L. SCHLOSSER B.S. Boston University A.M. University of Iowa English, DramaticsFACULTY GLEN P. JUNKMAN Ph.B. University of Wisconsin M.S. University of Iowa Mathematics ERASMUS A. WHITENACK A.B. Rutgers College German MARGARET CHAPMAN HIDE A.B.. A.M. University of Wisconsin Mathematics J. HENRY OWENS A.B. Franklin College A.M.. Ph.D. University of Minnesota French EMMETT P. LOWERY B.S. Purdue University Athletic Director MARY LOUISE BRANSTAD A.B. University of Nebraska A.M. Teachers College, Columbia University Physical and Health Education [15]FACULTY MARVIN D. GEERE Pennsylvania Conservatory of Music Warren Conservatory of Music Music ALBERTA M. GREENE B.S. Teachers College. Columbia University Act B. J. ROZEHNAL M.M. Northwestern University Music B. LOUISE HILDER B.S. University of Minnesota A.M. Teachers College. Columbia University Act in the Training School CARA AMELIA WHARTON B.Mus. Gunn School of Music and Dramatic Arts. Chicago History of Music, Theory, Piano FAYE WATTONVILLE B.S. University of Minnesota Home Economics, Cafeteria [16]FACULTY JAMES I. MALOTT A.B.. A.M. University of Missouri Psychology, Education RUSSELL JOHNSTON A.B. Washington and Jefferson College A.M. University of Minnesota Education, Director Teacher Training WALTER H. HUNT Ph.M. Valparaiso University Education MABEL L. BRIDGES A.B. University of Nebraska A.M. Teachers College. Columbia University Elementary Education IRMA HATHORN A.B. University of Minnesota A.M. Teachers College. Columbia University Education, Dean of Women MABEL JORSTAD Ph.B. University of Wisconsin A.M. University of Minnesota Rural Education [17JFACULTY NATHALIE DELANDER B.S., A.M. University of Minnesota Secondary Education, Social Science ADELINE C. PATTON Ph.B. University of Wisconsin Elementary Education VERA M. MOSS A.B. Kalamazoo State Teachers College A.M. University of Michigan Secondary Education, English IRMA B. ARMSTRONG B.S.. A.M. Teachcss College, Columbia University Elementary Education AUGUSTA M. THOMAS B.S. University of Minnesota Elementary Education LUCILE M. FOBES B.S.. A.M. Teaahers College, Columbia University Elementary Education t.18;].FACULTY RHEA GIBSON A.B. University of Wisconsin Librarian MARY BRADLEY Library School. University of Wisconsin Assistant Librarian AMY FULLER B.E. River Falls State Teachers College Assistant Librarian L. IRENE McCOURT. R.N. A.B. Lawrence College School of Nnrsing. University of Minnesota College Nurse [19] ETHEL WEST SecretaryVALERA DEVEREUX Clerk ROSAI.EE HRDLICHKA Clerk ESTHER MURPHY Clerk [20]THE SUMMER SESSION RUSSELL JOHNSTON Director ' I 'HE summer session was established at River Falls A twenty-five years ago. It is now conducted for six weeks each summer and has become a regular part of the program of the college year. It offers opportunities to teachers in service to improve their educational background and to college students to continue their regular college work during a part of the summer. A wide variety of courses is offered by the members of the college faculty as well as instructors and lecturers brought to the institution especially for this session. 121]SOUTH HALLSLETTELAND JACOBSEN HAUGH MORGAN FOX OFFICERS First Semester Arthur Sletteland..................... Bernice Jacobsen...................... Nancy Njos............................ Theofil Cuhel......................... NJOS CUHEL' ..... President .Vice President ......Secretary .... Treasurer Second Semester FRANCIS Haugh.............................................. President Stanley Morgan....................................................Vice President Gwendolyn Fox............................................... Secretary Theofil Cuhel Treasurer Glen P. Junkman .................................Adviser GLEN P. JUNKMANDONALD ADERHOLD................................Athens Agriculture and Science Mission House College I: Agrifallian 2, 3: F. F. A. 4; Honor Society 3, 4. LEROY E. ALEXANDER.......................Ladysmith Science and Mathematics Die Deutsche Gesellschaft 4. President 4: Honor Society 1, 2. 3. 4: Mathematics Club 2. 3: Science Club 3; Y. M. C. A. 1. 2. 3. 4. Cabinet 4: Band 1. 2. 3: Chorus 1. 2. 3, 4: Orchestra 1, 2. RUSSELL BARTLETT............................Augusta Agriculture and Science Agrifallian 1. 2, 3: F. F. A. 4: Homecoming Committee 3, 4; Ring Committee 4. GERTRUD BLATT..........................Clear Lake Elementary Honor Society 2. 3. 4; Y. W. C. A. 1. 2. 3. 4; 1937 Meletean: Student Voice 3. 4; Homecoming Committee 3, 4. EVERETT L. COMPTON...............................Bayfield Mathematics and Science Mathematics Club 1. 2, 3. 4. Chairman 4; Y.M.C.A.. 1, 2, 3, 4; Homecoming Committee 2. 4. [25]THEOFIL J. CUHEL..................................Ladysmith Science and Mathematics Die Deutsche Gesellschaft 4. Secretary and Treasurer 4; Honor Society 2, 3: Mathematics Club 3; Science Club 3, 4: Y. M. C. A. 4: Band 1: Chorus 1: Orchestra 1: Student Voice 1. HAROLD DORGAN...........................River Falls Science and Mathematics Science Club 3. 4: Intramural Basketball 1. 2, 3, 4; Homecoming Committee 1. ALLEN ERICKSON..................................Melrose History and Geography Baseball 1, 2. 3: Volleyball 1. 2. 3: Intramural Basketball 1. 2. 3. 4: Die Deutsche Gesellschaft 4. ARDUS ERLANDSON.....................River Falls English and History G. O. P. 3, 4: Y. W. C. A. 1. 2, 3, 4: Class Secretary 3: Homecoming Committee I, 2. 3; Prom Committee 2, 3; Ring Committee 4; Social Committee 3; Student Voice 2. 3. 4. OLIVE C. FLATHE....................................Stockholm French and English University of Minnesota: State Teachers College. St. Cloud: French Club 4: Honor Society 4; Masquers 4: W. A. A. 4: Y. W. C. A. 4: Social Committee 3; "Double Door” 4: Senior Class Play 4. C 26]GWENDOLYN FOX..........................River Falls Elementary Education G. O. P. 2. 3, 4: Masquers 2. 3. 4: Palette Club 1: Y. W. C. A. 1. 2. 3. 4: Class Secretary 4: Chorus 1. 2; Quartet 1. 3: Girls’ Sextet 4; Homecoming Committee 1. 2, 3. 4: Prom Committee 2. 3; Social Committee 3. KATHLEEN FULLER............................Barron Mathematics and Science Die Deutsche Gesellschaft 4: Honor Society 3, 4; Mathematics Club 3, 4. CLAIRE FYKSEN.................................Hudson Elementary Education Honor Society 3. 4: Palette Club 3. 4. EUGENE GOSSEN - . Bessemer. Michigan History. Science, and Social Studies c 4; Science 3. 4; Intramural Basketball 1. 2, 3. 4; Volleyball 4; Homecoming Committee 2. 3. 4: Social Committee 4. President 4: "Caleb Stone's Death Watch" 3: "Heels” 4; Senior Class Play 4. ELIZABETH GRIFFITH........................River Falls English and History Macalester College 1. 2: Y. W. C. A. 1. 2. 3. 4. Cabinet 3. 4, President 4; Archery 3. 4: Women’s Chorus 3. 4; Homecoming Committee 3. [27]HARRY J. GUINN.................................Hannibal History and Social Science Die Deutsche Gesellschaft 4: Y. M. C. A. 1. 2. 3. 4. Secretary 2: Class President 3: Golf 3. 4: Volleyball 3. 4: 1935. 1936. 1937 Meletean. Assistant Editor 1935. Editor 1936: Homecoming Committee 1. 2. 3, 4: Prom Committee 2: Ring Committee 4. RUTH GULLICK..................................Colfax History, English, and Latin Masquers 3. 4: Y. V. C. A. 1, 2. 4: Homecoming Committee 4; Ring Committee 4; "The Late Christopher Bean” 3. DONALD HART.......................................Bloomer Agriculture and Science Agrifallian 1. 2, 3. Treasurer 3: F. F. A. 4; "R” Club 2. 3, 4; Science Club 3. 4, Vice President 4: Football 1. 2. 3. 4. FRANCIS J. HAUGH - - - - - - River Falls Agriculture and Science Agrifallian 1. 2. 3: F. F. A. 4: Honor Society 4: Masquers 2, 3. 4. Treasurer 4: Class President 4: Intramural Basketball 1. 2, 3. 4; Football 1. 2; Homecoming Committee 1. 3. 4: Prom Committee 2; Social Committee 4: "Poor Old Jim” 3: "Double Door” 4; “Heels” 4: "Moonshine” 2: “The Emperor’s New Clothes” 2: “The Rising of the Moon” 2: "Do Your Worst” 3: Student Voice 3. 4: Senior Class Play 4. MAE HECKEL.....................................- - Prescott Elementary Education Clef Club 2. 3. 4: Masquers 3. 4: W. A. A. 3: Y. W. C. A. 1. 2. 3. 4: Basketball 3: Hockey I; Swimming 1, 3; Tennis 2, 3: Volleyball 3: Band 2, 3: Chorus 1. 2. 3, 4: Orchestra 2. 3. 4: Girls’ Quartet 3: A Cappella Chorus 3. [28]WALTER HERKAL - Minneapolis. Minnesota History and Social Science "R" Club 1. 2. 3. 4: Baseball 1. 2. 3, 4: Basketball 1. 2. 3. 4: Football 2. 3. 4. DORA MAE HOCKING............................River Falls Elementary Education G. O. P. 2. 3. 4; Masquers 1, 2. 3, 4. Secretary 4: Y. W. C. A. I. 2. 3. 4; Coed Band 1: Chorus 1, 2. 3: "The Goose Hangs High" 2: "The March Heirs” 2: "The Youngest” 3: "What They Think" 3: "Double Door" 4; Prom Committee 2; Social Committee 4. ROLAND HUNSADER..........................Algoma Science and Mathematics Clef Club 2. 3: Honor Society 4: Mathematics Club 3; Science Club 2. 3; Y. M. C. A. 2: Class President 3: Chorus 2. 3, 4: Homecoming Committee 2, 3. 4; Swimming 1. JOHN HURON................................................Phillips Agriculture and Science Agrifallian 1. 2. 3: F. F. A. 4. Treasurer 4: Science Club 4; Y. M. C. A. 1.2.4: Homecoming Committee 4. WAYNE INGLI......................................Ellsworth Agriculture and Science University of Minnesota: University of Wisconsin: Agrifallian 1, 2. Secretary 2: F. F. A. 4: Y. M. C. A. 1. 2. Vice President 2: Lincolnian 1.2: Debate 1,2: Orchestra 1. 2. [29]GERTRUDE VIETOR ISAACSON - - River Fall English and History Y. W. C. A. I. 2. 3. 4. Secretary 3. NOLAN ISAACSON..........................Spring Valley Mathematics and Science Mathematics Club 2. 3. 4: "R” Club 4: Class Vice President 2. 3: Basketball 1; Football 1. 2. 3, 4. JOSEPH JACKELEN......................Glen wood City Agriculture and Science Agrifallian I. 2. 3; F. F. A. 4: "R” Club 4: Football 1. 2. 3. 4. BERNICE JACOBSEN .... New Richmond History and English Honor Society 2. 3. 4: Y. W. C. A. 1. 2. 3. 4: Class Vice President 4: Student Voice 2. 3. 4. Editor 3; Homecoming Committee 1. 3: Prom Committee 2: Social Committee 4. Secretary-Treasurer 4. BERTHA JENSEN...............................Hudson Elementary Education Y. W. C. A. 1. 2. 3, 4; Chorus 3, 4. [30]MARY JUNKMAN...........................River Falls History and Mathematics Honor Society 2, 3. 4: Mathematics Club 3, 4: History Club 3, 4: Band 1. 2. 3, 4: Coed Band 1. 2. 3. 4; Orchestra 2. 3, 4; Women's Chorus 1, 2. 3: Homecoming Committee 1, 3, 4; Prom Committee 2. ARTHUR KNUTH................................Elcho History and Social Science History Club 4: Y. M. C. A. 1. 2. 3, 4: Intramural Basketball 1, 2. 3, 4; Volleyball 3. 4; Homecoming Committee 3. IRVIN LOFF History and Social Science Y. M. C. A. 2. 3. 4: Baseball 1: Basketball 1, 2: Football 1: Swimming 1; "William Tell” 2: "Adolf Hitler” 3. Lodi ROBERT McCABE ------ Hammond Science and Mathematics Mathematics Club 1. 2, 3: Science Club 3, 4: Basketball 1; Intramural Basketball 2, 3, 4: Debate 1. 2; Homecoming Committee 2. 3, 4; Prom Committee 2, 3; Social Committee 3. IRIS MILLS - -- -- -- - Baldwin History and Music W. A. A. 1. 2. 3. 4; Y. W. C. A. 1. 2. 3. 4; Basketball 1, 2. 3, 4: Soccer 1,3: Volleyball 1. 2. 3: Band 1. 2. 3. 4; Chorus 1, 2. 3. 4; Orchestra 1, 2. 3. 4, I 31 JBaldwin STANLEY MORGAN - - - Science and Mathematics Clef Club 3: Mathematics Club 2. 4: Y. M. C. A. 2, 3, 4, Cabinet 3. 4. Treasurer 4; Class Vice President 4; Chorus 3: Football 1. JOHN W. NELSON..................................Downing History and English History Club 3. 4: Y. M. C. A. 3: Basketball 1, 2, 3. 4; Student Voice 2. 3; Homecoming Committee 1. 2. 3. 4: Swimming 1: Prom Committee 2; Senior Class Play 4. NANCY NJOS...........................................Baldwin English and History Le Cerclc Francais 4: G. O. P. 2. 3. 4: Honor Society 1. 2. 3. 4. Vice President 2: Y. W. C. A. 1. 2. 3. 4; Class Secretary 4: Orchestra 4; Women's Chorus 1. 2. 3. 4. CLIFFORD NOREEN............................Hudson Agriculture and Science Agrifallian 1. 2. 3: F. F. A. 4: Y. M. C. A. 2. 3: Football 2: Homecoming Committee 2: Senior Class Play 4. ROLF ORDAL...............................River Falls History and Social Science Clef Club 3. 4: Honor Society 2. 3. 4: Masquers 3, 4: Y. M. C. A. 2. 3. 4. Cabinet 4: Debate I. 2, 3. 4: Extempore 4: Prom Committee 2; Ring Committee 4: Student Voice 2. 3. 4: 1934-1937 Meletean, Editor 1937: Senior Class Play 4. [32]DOROTHEA PANZENHAGEN - - - Turtle Lake Science and Social Studies Die Deutsche Gesellschaft 4: Honor Society 1. 2. 3. 4; W. A. A. 1: Y. W. C. A. 1. 2. 3: Student Voice 2. 3. 4. Editor 4: Prom Committee 2: Social Committee 4. ARCHIE K. PAULSON..........................Mt. Horeb "R" Club 2. 3: Y. M. C. A. 1. 2. 3; Class Vice President 3; Baseball 2. 3; Football 2. 3. ARNOLD RHIEL.................................Plum City English and History Modesto College. California. 1. 2; Die Deutsche Gesellschaft 4: Masquers 4; Basketball 1.2: Swimming 1, 2; Volleyball 1.2: Extempore 1. 2: Homecoming Committee 2: "The Youngest” 3: "Death Takes a Holiday.” "Hotel Dilemma" 4: Senior Class Play. VELMA SEGERSTROM.........................River Falls English and History Honor Society 1. 2, 3. 4; Y. W. C. A. 1. 2. 3. 4; Class Treasurer 1; Band 1, 2, 3. 4: Student Voice 3, 4; Homecoming Committee 1. 2. 3; “The Followers” 4. ELSIE SCHORTA........................ River Falls Elementary Education History Club 3. 4: Honor Society 3. 4: Palette Club 3: W. A. A. 1. 2. 3. 4; Y. W. C. A. 2, 3. 4; Baseball 1. 2: Basketball I. 2: Hockey 1. 2: Soccer 1. 2. 3; Swimming 1. 2. 3: Volleyball 1. 2. 3 4; Chorus 3. [33] MAURICE C. SHEPARD River Falls Science Clef Club 2, 4: Masquers 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3: Science Club 4: Y. M. C. A. 1. 2. 4: Class Treasurer 3: Tennis 1, 2. 3, 4; Chorus 3. 4; A Cappella Chorus 4; Orchestra 1. 2, 3; String Ensemble 2, 3; Mixed Quartet 4: Student Voice 1. 2; Homecoming Committee 1. 2, 3. 4: Prom Committee 2: "The Tabloid" 2: "The Late Christopher Bean" 3: “Dr. JekyH's Full Statement of the Case” 3: '"The Goal” 4; "The Double Door" 4. DONALD SIMMELINK..............................Baldwin History and Science Y. M. C. A. 3: Class Secretary 2: Basketball 1: Football 4: Tennis 2, 3. 4: Volleyball 4: Student Voice 3. ARTHUR SLETTELAND.........................Holmen History and Mathematics Luther College I: History Club 4: Y. M. C. A. 4; Class President 4: Intramural Basketball 2, 3, 4; Tennis 2, 3, 4; Student Voice 3. 4: Homecoming Committee 3. LEO A. STENBACK Phelps Science and History University of Wisconsin 1; Honor Society 4; "R" Club 1. 2. 3. 4; Y. M. C. A. 3: Baseball 1, 2. 3. 4: Basketball 1. 2; Football 1. 2. 3. 4. GERTRUDE L, STEPHENSON - - - Taylor Elementary Education Palette Club 3. 4: Rural Life Club 1. 2: Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3; Women's Chorus 2, 3. 4. [34]River Falls LUCILLE E. STRIEBEL......................... Mathematics and Science Clef Club 2. 3, 4; Honor Society 4: Mathematics Club 3. 4: Science Club 4: W. A. A. 3. 4. Vice President 4: Y. W. C. A. I. 2. 3. 4; Die Deutsche Gesellschaft 4: Badminton 3. 4: Baseball 1. 3. 4; Basketball 3. 4: Pinball 3, 4: Soccer 1. 2. 3: Coed Band 4; General Chorus 1, 2. 3. 4; Glee Club 1. 2, 3, 4; Student Voice 1. 2. LOUISE SWANSON...................................Glenwood City English and History Le Cercle Francais 4; G. O. P. 2. 3. 4. Secretary 4; Honor Society 1. 2. 3. 4: Y. W. C. A. 1. 2. 3. 4: Class Vice President 2: Band 2. 3. 4: Coed Band 1. 2. 3. 4: Orchestra 4: Women’s Chorus 1, 2. 3, 4. GEORGE TRACY.......................................Ellsworth History and Social Science Die Deutsche Gesellschaft 4: Baseball 1, 2. 4: Swimming 1; Tennis 1, 2; Volleyball I: Intramural Basketball 1. 2. 3, 4: Homecoming Committee 2, 3, 4. EMMA LOU TUBBS.............................River Falls English and History G. O. P. 3. 4; Masquers 1. 2. 3. 4. Vice President 4; Y. W. C. A. 1, 2. 3. 4. Cabinet 3. 4: Student Voice 1. 2, 3, 4; Homecoming Committee 3: Social Committee 3: "The Emperor’s New Clothes” 2; "The Double Door” 4. MARY VANDENBERGE.........................River Falls Elementary Education Die Deutsche Gesellschaft 4: Honor Society 4: Rural Life Club 1; W. A. A. 4: Y. W. C. A. 1. 2. 3. 4; Badminton 4: Pinball 4; Swimming 1: Tennis 2; Chorus 4. 135]ANNA MAY VOLD Balsam Lake History and English Milwaukee State Teachers College 1: Honor Society 4; Masquers 3: Y. W. C. A. 2. 3. President 3. EDNA WAHL.............................................Neillsville History and English History Club 2, 3. 4: Honor Society 1. 2. 3. 4: W. A. A. 1. 2: Class Secretary 2: Assembly Program Committee 2: 1934. 1935. 1936 Meletean: Student Voice 1. NEWELL YOUNGGREN .... River Falls Science and Social Studies Masquers 1. 2. 3. 4; Science Club 4; Y. M. C. A. 2: Class President 1: Basketball 1: Intramural Basketball 2. 3. 4; Band 1. 2. 3, 4: Homecoming Committee 1. 2. 3: Prom Committee 2; Social Committee 2. 3: "The Swan” 2: "The Youngest" 2: "Dr. Jekyll’s Full Statement of the Case” 3: "Caleb Stone’s Death Watch" 3: "The Emperor’s New Clothes” 3: Senior Class Play. LOUIS A. ZAHRADKA.........................Osceola Agriculture and Science Agrifallian 1. 2. 3: F. F. A. 4. President 4: Masquers I. 2. 3. 4: Y. M. C. A. 1. 2. 3. Cabinet 2. 3: Class Treasurer 2: Football 1: Debate 1.2: Oratory 1.2: Homecoming Committee 1.2: Prom Committee 2r Social Committee 2. 3: 1936 Meletean; Student Voice 1: "Tea Kettle on the Rocks” 1: "Dr. Jekyll’s Full Statement of the Case” 2: "The Emperor’s New Clothes” 3. ROMAN J. ZORN................................River Falls History and English History Club 2. 3. 4: Honor Society 2. 3. 4: Pi Kappa Delta 3. 4. President 3. 4: Class President 2: Debate 1. 2. 3, 4; International Debate 2. 3. 4: Extempore 2: Homecoming Committee 2, 3. 4. Homecoming Chairman 4; Prom Committee 2: Social Committee 2. 3. 4: Student Voice 2. 3. 4. Editor 4. I 36 JunLoti.DYKSTRA LARSON PEABODY MAY RENDLER SODERSTROM PEDERSEN OFFICERS First Semester Daniel DykStra.....................................................President Adeline Larson..........................................................Vice President Maxine Peabody.....................................................Secretary Mildred Pedersen...................................................Treasurer Second Semester JAMES MAY..........................................................President THOMAS Rendler..........................................................Vice President PHYLLIS SODERSTROM.................................................Secretary Mildred Pedersen...................................................Treasurer L. LUCILE HADDOW......................................Adviser L. LUCILE HADDOW [38]LILLIE AHLGREN Frederic English and History W. A. A. 2, 3; Y. W. C. A. 1. 2. 3; Basketball 2, 3; Volleyball 2, 3: Debate 1; Homecoming Committee 2, 3. JOYCE ALTON...........................River Falls English and History G. O. P. 2. 3; Y. W. C. A. 1. 2. 3; Sextet 3; Homecoming Committee 3. RUTH AMES............................................River Falls English and History Clef Club 2. 3; G. O. P. 2. 3: Y. W. C. A. 1, 2. 3: Chorus 1, 2, 3: Orchestra 1, 2: Sextet 3. ANDREW ANDERSON......................Spring Valley Science and Mathematics LE ROY ANDERSON...............................Woodville Physics and Mathematics Science Club 1. 2. 3; Y. M. C. A. 1, 2. 3. [39]ORLIN ANDERSON................................Rib Lake Science and English Honor Society 2. 3: Science Club 2. 3; Y. M. C. A. 2, 3: 1937 Meletean. HELEN MARIE ARNQUIST.......................Hudson Elementary Education Clef Club 1: G. O. P. 2. 3: Palette Club 3: Y. W. C. A. 1. 2: Band 2. 3: Chorus 2. 3: A Cappella Chorus 1. 2. 3. GLENN BENSON...................................Luck Science and Mathematics Honor Society 1; Y. M. C. A. 2, 3: Volleyball 1: Debate 2. 3. LUCILLE BIERBAUM........................Wabeno Elementary Education Clef Club 1, 2. 3: G. O. P. 3; Honor Society 3: Orchestra 1, 2, 3: String Ensemble 1. 2. 3. ELINOR BOARDMAN .... GlenwoodCity English and History Y. W. C. A. I, 2; Chorus I. 2. [40]Elmwood WARREN BREDAHL - - - - History and Social Science Y. M. C. A. 2. 3: Basketball 1: Soccer 1: Volleyball 2. 3. FREDERICK BREMER.........................River Falls Science and Mathematics Masquers 1. 2. 3: Y. M. C. A. 1. 3; Band 1. 2. 3. 4: Orchestra 1, 2. JOHN CANNON.........................................Ellsworth History Y. M. C. A. 3. EDDIE CASS Owen History and Social Science “R" Club 3, Secretary 3: Science Club 2, 3; Y. M. C. A. 1, 2. 3. Cabinet 3; Football 1. 2. 3; Social Committee 3. NORMAN CHRISTIANSON .... Bay City Agriculture and Science St. Olaf College 1: F. F. A. 3; Honor Society 2, 3: Rural Life Club 2: Science Club 3; Y. M. C. A. 2. 3: Student Voice 3. Ml]CHARLES CUDNEY.............................Bloomer Science and Mathematics "R" Club 1. 2. 3; Science Club 2. 3: Basketball 1. 2. 3; Football 1. 2. 3. ROBERT DEVEREAUX.........................Reedsbutg Science and Mathematics Science Club 2: Y. M. C. A. 1: Class Treasurer 1; Basketball 3; Golf 3; Tennis 3: Volleyball 1; Band 3: Orchestra 3. STANLEY DOOLITTLE.........................Ellsworth French and English Le Cercle Francais 3: Bands 1. 2, 3; Orchestra 1, 2. DANIEL DYKSTRA.............................Baldwin History and Social Science Pi Kappa Delta: Honor Society 1. 2. 3: Y. M. C. A. 1. 2, 3: Class Vice President 1. President 3: Intramural Basketball 1, 2, 3: Debate 1. 2, 3: Student Voice 2. 3: Homecoming Committee 1. 2, 3: History Club Committee 3. ALICE EIDE......................................Mondovi Elementary Education Palette Club 4: Y. W. C. A. 1. 2. 3, 4. f 42JRiver Falls HOWARD ELLIOTT .... English and Music Y.M.CA. 1. 2. 3. Cabinet 2. 3. Vice President 3: Class President 2: Bands I. 2. 3. Student Manager 2. 3: Orchestra 1, 2. 3: String Ensemble 1, 2. 3. LEOTA ELLIOTT............................River Falls Elementary Education Rural Life Club 2. 3: W. A. A. 1: Basketball 1: Hockey I: Volleyball 1. LUCILLE EVANS................................Mondovt Elementary Education G. O. P. 3: Masquers 3: Y. W. C. A. 1. 2. 3: Homecoming Committee 1: "Hotel Dilemma” 3; Senior Class Play 3. MARY FINNEGAN.........................New Richmond Elementary Education Clef Club 3: Chorus 3; Orchestra 2, 3. GEORGE FREIER ------ Ellsworth Science and Mathematics Honor Society 1, 2. 3: Mathematics Club 1. 2, 3. [43]RUSSELL GETTINGER .... New Auburn Mathematics and Science Honor Society 1, 2. 3: Mathematics Club 2. 3; Y. M. C. A. 1. 2. 3. Cabinet 3: Baseball 1. 2. 3; Basketball 1: Intramural Basketball 2, 3; Orchestra 1; Student Voice 2, 3; Social Committee 3. DOROTHY HALL............................Chetek Elementary Education Y. W. C. A. 1. 2. 3; Chorus 1. 2. ELZA LOU HANNA................................Rim Falls English G. O. P. 2, 3; Honor Society 3: Y. W. C. A. 1. 2. 3; Orchestra 1, 2, 3. WALTER HANSEN..........................‘ Glen Flora Agriculture and Science Agrifallian 1, 2; F. F. A. 3: Y. M. C. A. 2: Homecoming Committee 2. MARION HAWKINS..................................Hudson English and History Pi Kappa Delta 2, 3. Secretary and Treasurer 3; G. O. P. 2, 3, Vice President 3: Honor Society 2. 3; Masquers 2. 3. President 3; W. A. A. I, 2. Treasurer 2: Die Deutsche Gesellschaft 3: Hockey 1. 2: Volleyball 1.2: Debate 1. 2. 3: Glee Club 2; 1935 Meletean: Student Voice 2, 3: Homecoming Committee 1, 2. 3. 1441LEONARD HERMANSON .... Woodville Science and Mai hematics Honor Society 1. 2, 3: Mathematics Club 2, 3; Rural Life Club 1; Science Club 2. 3: Y. M. C. A. 2, 3, President 3; Chorus 2: Student Voice 3. ALLAN HILLIARD...............................Mondovi Science and Social Science Y. M. C. A. 2. 3. ELIZABETH HILYAR..........................Deer Park Elementary Education W. A. A. I. 2. 3: Y. W. C. A. I. 2. 3: Basketball 1: Volleyball 1. 2: Chorus 1. 2. 3: Orchestra 2. 3: Homecoming Committee 3. CLARENCE HOYT...........................Brooklyn Elementary Education Y. M. C. A. 1: Band 1: Orchestra 1. 2. 3. JOSEPH HYDE..................................Hammond English and History University of Minnesota 2; Honor Society 1. 2, 3: Palette Club 3: Golf 2. 3: Swimming 2: Tennis 3: Band 3: Student Voice 1. 2. 3: Homecoming Com mittee 1, 3. H5]LAURAINE ISAACSON .... Spring Valley English and History G. O. P. 2. 3. Treasurer 3: Y. W. C. A. I. 2: Chorus 1.2: Student Voice 2. 3. Editor 3: Homecoming Committee I. HOWARD JENSON............................River Falls Agriculture and Science Agrifallian 2: F. F. A. 3: Rural Life Club 2: Y. M. C. A. 2. 3. MYRON JOHANSEN............................Frederic Agriculture and Science Agrifallian 2: F. F. A. 3: Science Club 2: Y. M. C. A. 3. DALE JOHNSON.............................River Falls History and Social Science Intramural Basketball 1. 2. 3. DEAN JOHNSON ------ River Falls Science and Social Science Honor Society 2, 3: Intramural Basketball 1. 2, 3: Homecoming Committee 2. 3. M6]Woodvillc FREDERIC JOHNSON Science and History Palette Club 3: Science Club 2. 3: Y. M. C. A. 1. 2. 3: Student Voice 3: Homecoming Committee 3. ROBERT JOHNSON...............................Almena Science and Mathematics Eau Claire State Teachers College 1: Masquers 2, 3: Mathematics Club 3: Die Deutsche Gesellschaft 3: Science Club 2. 3. President 3: Y. M. C. A. 2. 3. Cabinet 3: 1937 Mcletean; "What They Think” 3: "Double Door” 3: "The Unknown Soldier" 2; "Peace I Give Unto You" 3. OLIVE JOOS...........................................Alma Center English and History Die Deutsche Gesellschaft 3; History Club Committee 3: Honor Society 1. 2, 3 : Masquers 3: Y. W. C. A. 1. 2. 3. Cabinet 3: Badminton 3: Chorus 2: Student Voice 2, 3; "Land’s End" 3: "The Thirty Three" 3. MARY HELEN KAY...........................River Falls Elementary Education G. O. P. 2. 3: Palette Club 3: Chorus 3; Orchestra 1, 2. ROBERT KNOWLES........................River Falls History and Social Science Masquers 1. 2. 3: Band 1; Chorus 1, 2. 3; A Cap-pella Chorus 1, 2. 3: Social Committee 1: "Rising of the Moon" 1: "Emperor’s New Clothes” 2; "Caleb Stone's Death Watch” 2; "Double Door" 3. [47]LAWRENCE KNUTSON - Cumberland Science and Mathematics Eau Claire State Teachers College 1.2: Science Club 3: Y. M. C. A. 3. RUSSELL KURTZ.................................River Falls Agriculture and Science Agrifallian 1. 2: F. F. A. 3; Science Club 2. ADELINE LARSON...............................Grantsburg Elementary Education Clef Club 2: G. O. P. 3: Honor Society 2. 3. Secretary-Treasurer 3; Masquers 3: W. A. A. 2. 3: Y. W. C. A. 2. 3. Vice President 3: Class Vice President 3: Hockey 2: Chorus 2: Homecoming Committee 2. 3: Social Committee 3. LE ROY LEADHOLM.............................Amery Science and Social Science “R•' Club 3; Basketball 1. 2. 3: Football 1. 3. JOYCE LEONARD.....................................Ellsworth English and History Pi Kappa Delta 3: Honor Society 1. 2. 3: Masquers 1. 2, 3, Secretary 2: Y. W. C. A. 1. 2. 3, Cabinet 2. 3; Debate 3: Chorus 2. 3: “Emperor’s New Clothes” I: "Caleb Stone’s Death Watch” 2: "The Teeth of the Gift Horse” 1: Social Committee 3. [48]Maiden Rock HOWARD McCLEARY Science Club 3: Y. M. C. A. 1, 2: Swimming 1, 2; Tennis 3: Volleyball 3; Bands 1. 2, 3. ELIZABETH MASON......................River Falls English and French Le Ccrcle Francais 3: G. O. P. 2. President 3: Masquers 1, 2. 3; Y. W. C. A. 1. 2. 3; Tennis 1. 2. 3: Homecoming Committee 2. 3: "The Emperor’s New Clothes” 1: "Poor Old Jim” 2. Pre-Medical Honor Society 1. 2. 3; "R” Club 2. 3: Y. M. C. A. 1. 2; Basketball 1. 2. 3: Class President 3; Class Vice President 1. History and English Clef Club 1; Honor Society 3: Palette Club 3; Y. W. C. A. 1. 2. 3: Chorus 1.3: Student Voice 3: Homecoming Committee 3. English and History Honor Society 1. 2. 3. President 3: Y. W. C. A. 1. 2, 3. Cabinet 3: Die Deutsche Gesellschaft 3: Chorus 2. 3: Debate 3; 1937 Meletcan: Student Directory 2. 3; Social Committee 2. 3; Homecoming Committee 2: Prom Committee 2. 3. JAMES MAY River Falls EDNA MOLINE Pepin MAE NELSON Prentice [49]RUTH NELSON Elmwood Mathematics and History Clef Club 1. 2: Masquers 2. 3: Mathematics Club 1, 2. 3. Secretary-Treasurer 3:_ Y. W. C._A. 1. 2. 3; Chorus 1. 2: Homecoming Committee 1: "The Followers" 3. DAN O’BRIEN...................................River Falls Pre-Law Basketball 1. 2. 3; Tennis 1, 2: Chorus I. 2, 3. JOHN O'BRIEN..............................River Falls Science and Mathematics ’R" Club 3: Baseball 2. 3. 4: Basketball 1. 2. 3. 4: Football 1. 2. 3. 4: Tennis 3: Volleyball 4. CHARLES OSBORN......................................Prescott Pre-Medical Baseball 1. 2. 3; Basketball 1. 2. 3; Football 1. MAXINE PEABODY.......................................Milltown English and History G. O. P. 2. 3: Honor Society 2. 3: Y. W. C. A. 2. 3; Class Secretary 3. [50]MILDRED PEDERSEN................................River Falls English G. O. P. 3: W. A. A. I. 2. 3, President 3: Y. V. C. A. 1, 2. 3. Cabinet 2, 3. Treasurer 2; Class Treasurer 3. GERTRUDE PETERSON...........................Prescott Junior High School Stevens Point State Teachers College 1: Clef Club 2: Palette Club 2. 3: W. A. A. 1. 2. 3: Y. W. C. A. 1, 2. 3; Basketball 2: Swimming 3: Tennis 2. 3; Badminton 2. 3: Chorus 2. 3: A Cappella 2, 3; Homecoming Committee 3. ROY PETERSON.................................River Falls History and Social Science Die Deutsche Gesellschaft 3: Honor Society 3. WARD RANDLES..............................Alma Center Mathematics and Science Football Manager 2, 3; Basketball Manager 3. MICHAEL REAGAN - River Falls Agriculture and Science Agrifallian 1. 2, 3: F. F. A. 3. [51 JTOM RENDLER La Crosse History and Social Science Die Deutsche Gesellschaft 3: "R” Club 1. 2. 3, President 3: Baseball 1, 2. 3: Football 1, 2. 3: Intramural Volleyball 1. 2, 3; Student Voice 3. LORETTA RYAN...........................River Falls Elementary Education Soccer 1: Tennis 2: Volleyball 2. CATHERINE SALMON.........................Cylon Elementary Education Palette Club 1. 2. 3: Y. W. C. A. 1: Soccer 1; Tennis I. HOPE SANDOW..........................Spring Valley English and Music G. O. P. 3: Y. W. C. A. 2, 3: A Cappella Chorus 3: Quartet 3; Women's Chorus 2, 3. GLADYS SCHULZE............................Clear Lake Elementary Education Clef Club 1, 2. 3: Honor Society 2. 3; Y. W. C. A. 1. 2. 3; Chorus 1. 2. 3. [52]LAWRENCE SELVIG............................Amcry Science and Mathematics “R" Club 2; Football 2. 3. GERALDINE SIMPSON.......................River Falls Elementary Education W. A. A. 1. 2. 3: Basketball 1. 2. 3; Soccer 2; Swimming 2, 3; Chorus 1. 2. 3. FRANK SIRIANNI...................................Cumberland History and English Pi Kappa Delta; Baseball 1: Volleyball 3: Debate 2, 3; 1937 Meletean; Student Directory 3. PHYLLIS SODERSTROM........................Ogema English and History Die Deutsche Gesellschaft 3: Honor Society 1, 2. 3: Y. W. C. A. 1. 2. 3. Cabinet 3: Class Secretary 3: Chorus 2. 3; Homecoming Committee 2. 3: Social Committee 3. PAUL SOMSEN - ..............................Baldwin History and Social Science Clef Club 2. 3: Y. M. C. A. 1. 2. 3: Chorus 1. 2. 3; Quartet 1, 2, 3: Men’s Octet 1. 2, 3; Homecoming Committee 3.LUCILE SPRIGGS................................River Falls English and History G. O. P. 3: Honor Society 1, 2. 3: Y. W. C. A. 1. 2. 3, Treasurer 3: Tennis 1. 2, 3: Orchestra 1. 2. 3: Student Voice 2. 3: "The Will o the Wisp” 3; Homecoming Committee 3. DOROTHY SWANSON..................................Ellsworth English and History Y. W. C. A. 1, 2. 3: Women’s Chorus 1; 1936 Meletean. STANLEY TORGERSON.........................Amery Science and Mathematics Basketball 1. 2. 3; Football 1; "R" Club 3. LESTER UREN.................................River Falls History and Art Palette Club 1. 2; Bands 1. 2; Orchestra 1, 2. KENNETH WALL.................................... Hawkins Agriculture and Science Agrifallian 1, 2; F. F. A. 3: Honor Society 1, 2, 3, Vice President 3; Y. M. C. A. 1. 2. 3: Basketball 1. [54]ELMER WATKINS...........................Hudson Science and Mathematics Y. M. C. A. 4: Bands 2. 3. 4: Orchestra 1. 2. 3. 4: String Ensemble 2. 3. 4; Homecoming Committee 1. LEONA WEYH.........................................Prescott Elementary Education Clef Club 1: Y. W. C. A. 1, 2. 3: W. A. A. 1: Bands 1. 2. 3; Chorus 1.2; Girls' Glee Club 1, 2; Orchestra 2. 3. MAYNARD N. WIKHOLM .... Stockholm Elementary Education Morton Junior College. Cicero. Illinois. 1. 2; Y. M. C. A. 3. 4; Baseball 1. 2: Swimming 1. 2; Volleyball 4. MERTON WULF.................................Algoma History and Social Science "R” Club 1. 2. 3. 4: Baseball 1, 2, 3. 4; Basketball 1, 2. 3. 4; Football 1, 2. 3. LUCILLE ZAHRADKA........................Osceola Elementary Education G. O. P. 3: W. A. A. 1: Y. W. C. A. I: Basketball 1; Hockey 1: Bands 1. 2, 3: Glee Club 1; Homecoming Committee 1. 3. [55]U.nde.'nctcLteme.n3n ifflemortam iJIerlitt J. JHtliecLARSON WHITEMARSH GRUNKE LYONS ARNQUIST SOPHOMORE CLASS OFFICERS First Semester Lowell Larson......................................■ - - ce denl Niles Grunke............................................to ™ Frederick Whitemarsh.................................Secretary Dorothy Arnquist.....................................Treasurer Second Semester Frederick Whitemarsh.................................President Thomas Ronnigen...........................................Vice President Cyril Lyons..........................................Secretary Dorothy Arnquist.....................................Treasurer Theodore Setterquist.......................Adviser THEODORE SETTERQUISTLENORE ANDERSON - - Hudson English and Foreign Language DORIS ANDREA - - River Falls Elementary Education DOROTHY ARNQUIST - New Richmond English and Foreign Language EDWIN BAKER - - - Durand Agriculture RALPH BAKER - - - Hudson Science and Mathematics WILLIAM BARTZ - - Mountain Science EDITH BAUER - - - Elcho English and History STANLEY BEDNARCZYK - Withee Agriculture and Science ELIZABETH BELITZ - - Cochrane History MARTIN BENTS - - Comstock Rural [60]ANDREW BERNOSKI - Park Falls Elementary Education RANDALL BIRKEL - - Ellsworth Rural CHESTER BIRKMOSE - - Hudson Pre-Medical BETTY BOARDMAN - Glenwood City English and History MARGARET BOLES - River Falls Elementary Education MARION BOLES - - River Falls Rural JOHN BRADLEY - - River Falls History JEANNE BRAKKEN - - Cable Elementary Education ROMAIN BRANDT - - River Falls Mathematics and Science FRED BRECHLIN - - River Falls Agriculture [61]HELEN BRUNNER English and History Elmwood WALTER BUSCH Pre-Industrial Arts River Falls HARRIET CAMPBELL English and Music River Falls JUNE CAMPBELL Elementary Education River Falls MARGARET CARLSON -Rural - Amcry MAURITZ CARLSON - - Frederic Agriculture and Science ALFRED CHELGREN - River Falls Science and Mathematics JOHN CHRISTIANSON Agriculture Bay City JOHN CLAIR .... Hudson English and Foreign Language ELAINE CLAUSEN - - River Falls Rural [62]LUCILE CRESWELL Elementary Education River Falls GLEN CROWLEY History River Falls HOWARD DEETZ -. -Agriculture Mondovi CLARENCE DRETZKE -• History Barron FRANKLIN ELLIOTT History River Falls DONALD EMRICH - Battle Ground. Ind. Elementary Education BRUCE ERICKSON - -History Glen Flora IMBERT ESLINGER Science and Music Stanley CHARLES FAHLAND -Pre-Commercial Clam Falls CATHERINE FARRELL - River Falls English and Social Science [63]Elmwood EVELYN FEDDERLY - - Elementary Education LLOYD FRANK - - - Stratford History MAE FURBUR - - New Richmond Rural RAYMOND GILLES - - Plum City Agriculture WERNER GLEITER - - Hammond Science and Mathematics PHYLLIS GOLDEN - - Elmwood Rural VIOLA GRANICIA - - Ojibwa Elementary Education FLORENCE GREELEY - Ellsworth Rural JEANNETTE GRIFFITH - River Falls English and Mathematics WALTER GRONNING - - Dallas Agriculture 164]NILES GRUNKE - - Clear Lake Science DANIEL HALL - - - River Falls Science ' JULIETTE HARDING - - Bay City Elementary Education BETTY JEAN HAUER - - Portage Elementary Education RHODA HAWN - - - Bcldenville Rural ELMER HEHNKE - - Janesville History ESTHER HENNINGS - - River Falls Elementary Education HENRY HERMANSEN - - Curtiss Agriculture CLIFFORD HERMANSON - Woodville Agriculture GLADYS HERSTROM - River Falls Elementary Education [65]Hudson HELEN HICKOX - - History and English ROBERT HOEY - - Balsam Lake English and History BETTY JANE HOGUE - River Falls English and History BERNARD HYLKEMA - Turtle Lake Agriculture ORVAL IVERSON - - Roberts History JOSEPH JACKOBS - - Shell Lake Agriculture FRED JACOBSON - - Cumberland Pre-Forestry DONALD JENSEN - - - Amery Agriculture KATHRYNE JENSEN - - Baldwin Elementary Education BERNADINE JOHNSON - River Falls Elementary Education 166]HILBERT G. JONES - Summit Lake Science and History LUCILE JONES - - Bcldcnvillc Rural LA VERNIA JORGENSEN - Frederic English and Social Science LUCILLE KAY - - - River Falls Pre-Physical Education JOYCE KING - - - Arkansaw Elementary Education GEORGE KINNEY - - - Amcry Agriculture LEO KLECKER - - - Ellsworth Science and Mathematics KATHRYN KREBSBACH - Maiden Rock Elementary Education ARTHUR LAMON - - Elmwood Agriculture BETTY LARSON - - River Falls English and History [67]EARL LARSON - Starbuck. Minnesota Mathematics and Science LOELL LARSON - - Hammond History JOHN LAWSON - - - Frederic Pre-Engineering EDNA LEGLER - - - Roberts Elementary Education MILDRED LE PAGE - Sr. Croix Falls Science and Mathematics JENNY LINDH - - Merrill Elementary Education ALLEGRA LUNDE - Minneapolis. Minn. Elementary Education CYRIL LYONS - - Glen wood City Agriculture LESLIE MADDEN - - - Osceola Agriculture [68] NORMA MAREK - River FalU Elementary EducationNelson LESTER MARQUARDT -Pre-Engineering DOROTHY MAXWELL - Arkansaw Elementary Education GALEN MEIER - - - Elmwood Science RUTH MILBRATH - - River Falls Elementary Education •MERLIN MILLER - - - Dodge Agriculture RAYMOND MOEN - East Ellsworth Science RUTH MOEN - - East Ellsworth Elementary Education ROGER MONTGOMERY - Baraboo Agriculture DOROTHY NELSON - River Falls History and French JOHN NELSON - Red Wing. Minn. History • Deceased [69]NOLAN NICCUM - - - Hawkins Agriculture RUSSELL NYSTROM - - Superior History MYRTLE OLSON - - Star Prairie English and History ROBERT OST - - - Reedsburg Science and Music EDGAR PALM - Ogema Science and Mathematics BEULAH PAULSON - - Star Prairie Elementary Education HELEN PEDERSEN - - River Falls Elementary Education REYNOLD PEDERSEN - - Frederic Mathematics MANGHILD PETERSON - - Amery Rural RUTH PHILLIPS - - River Falls English and Social Science [70]CHARLES PL0ET2 - - - Lodi Pre-Law MARY KATHERINE PRUCHA Science River Falls ARTHUR PYNNONEN - - Sheldon Elementary Education LOLA QUANDT - - River Falls English and Foreign Language HELEN RIEN - - - Plum City Rural BENJAMIN RIVARD - Stillwater. Minn. Rural ROSE ROGERS .... Cable History FLORENCE SAGSTETTER - Plum City Rural ROBERT SCHLOMANN - - Tony Agriculture DOROTHY SEVERSON - Cumberland Elementary Education 171]EDWARD SIREK - - - Rice Lake Agriculture ELIZABETH R. SMITH - - Loretta Elementary Education MURIEL SOMSEN - - Baldwin Elementary Education NILS SONDERGAARD - - Frederic Pre-Medical CHARLES STRATTON - River Falls Science and Mathematics JOHN SWARTZ - - - River Falls Science ELIZABETH THOME - - Rice Lake Elementary Education ROBERT TORGERSON - Deer Park Pre-Forestry THENARD TORGERSON Houston, Minnesota Agriculture ROSALIE TRAYNOR - Spring Valley Elementary Education [72]WILLARD TRAYNOR - Spring Valley Rural KATHERINE TYLER - - River Falls Elementary Education ELVA VRUWINK - - Hammond Elementary Education GERALD WALLACE - - Hudson Science CARL WALLIN - - - Grantsburg Pre-Forestry HOWARD WERT - - Hudson Science FRED WHITEMARSH - - Omro Agriculture FLORENCE WIBERG - - Hager!City Elementary Education LE ROY WINTERFELDT -Agriculture Shiocton WALTER WOOD - - -Rural Bay City I 73 1CONDIT CARLSON GRIFFITH FRESHMAN CLASS OFFICERS Gordon Condit........................................President William Carlson...........................................Vice President Donald Staley........................................Secretary Mary Griffith........................................Treasurer Mary Louise Branstad......................Adviser MARY LOUISE BRANSTAD I 7-MMILDRED ABBOTT - - Chetek Pre-Pharmacy LOUISE ADAMS - - - Chetek Pre-Nursing ELDRIDGE AFDAHL - - Hammond Agriculture MARALEE AHLGREN - - Prescott English and History RACHEL ALDRICH - New Richmond English and History FRED ALFONSE - - Cumberland Science and Art MARY ANDERSEN - - River Falls English and Social Science MARION ANDERSON - Woodville Rural NORRIS ASHLESON - - Downing Agriculture VERNON AUSEN - - - Amery History [75]VIVIAN BACH .... Luck English and Social Science KEITH BARRY - - - River Falls Science BEATRICE BATTEN - - Burkhardt Elementary Education FLOYD BECK - - Wells. Minnesota History LOWELL BENGSTROM - Maiden Rock Pre- E ngi neeri ng MARVIN FOX - - - Elmwood Agriculture ELMER BLAISDELL - New Auburn Mathematics and Science MILDRED BOLES - - River Falls Elementary Education FERN M. BRACE - - - Osceola Elementary Education KATHLEEN BREDAHL - Elmwood Elementary Education (761JOSEPH BURGER - - - Edgar Agriculture BETTE CAMPBELL - - River Falls Elementary Education CLARA CAMPBELL - - River Falls Elementary Education WILLIAM CARLSON - - Plum City English HERBERT CAROW - - Deer Park Pre-Forestry EVERETT CHAPMAN - River Falls Science and Mathematics ADELAIDE CHRISTENSON - Frederic English and Social Science GORDON CONDIT - - River Falls Pre-Forestry VERDELL COOKE - - Ellsworth English and Art VERA CRERAR - - - Centuria History [77]ROBERT CROMMETT - - Amery Pre-Medical VERN DAHL - Hudson Elementary Education HII.TON DANIELSON - - Clayton Agriculture MARJORIE DAY - - - Hudson History MYRTLE DEETZ - - Mondovi Elementary Education BERNICE DEISS - - River Falls Pre-Physical Training JOHN DIESING - - Maiden Rock Agriculture NORMAN DILLEY - - Lakewood Agriculture DONALD DITTLOFF - Plum City Rural AUDREY DOOLITTLE - Ellsworth English and Music 178] LOIS ECKLUND - - River Falls Pre-Pharmacy GENE EGAN - - New Richmond History BURTON ELLIG - Wells. Minnesota Mathematics and Science MARGARET ERICKSON - Cumberland Rural ESTHER FALTEISEK - River Falls Elementary Education EDMUND FISHER - - - Durand Mathematics and Science HAROLD FJESETH - Prairie Farm Science ERVIN FLETCHER - St. Paul. Minn. Pre-Engineering ULRICH BENTS - - - Comstock Pre-Engineering GEORGE FRANK - - - Pepin Pre-Engineering [79]HILDING GADDA - - - Ashland Agriculture GLENN GERHARDT - - Agriculture Neillsville LAURENCE GHERTY Pre-Law River Falls MARY GRIFFITH Science River Falls MILDRED GROSSKREUTZ - Centuria Elementary Education ARDYTH GRUPE - - - Roberts Rural MARY KATHRYN GUTZLER - - ... - River Falls Elementary Education PHYLLIS GUTZLER Pre-Nursing River Falls BURTON HANSON - -Agriculture River Falls HELENE HARTWIG - - Elementary Education Hammond [80] ELEANOR HATCH - - Boardinan English JAMES HEALY - - - River Falls Pee-Forestry MARCIA HEALY - - River Falls English and Foreign Language KENNETH HEIDEMAN - Clinionville Agriculture DOROTHY HELLER - - Arkansaw English and History FLOYD HENDRICKSON - - - - St. Cloud. Minnesota Pre-Forestry MILDRED HENNINGS - River Falls Elementary Education • ADELAIDE HILL - - Woodville History ROBERT HOAGENSON - Black River Falls History DONOVAN HOHMAN - - Arcadia Agriculture [81 1Cumberland GEORGE HOPKINS Pre-Engineering DOROTHY HOUSE English and History DUANE JACKMAN - - Agriculture LYNN JACKMAN Agriculture RUTH JACKMAN Elementary Education ESTER JENSEN - English LA VERNE JENSEN - - Elementary Education ALLIS JERNEY History ROSS L. JESSE - - - Mathematics and Science ELVA JOHNSON - - - Elementary Education Prescott River Falls River Falls River Falls Frederic - Luck River Falls Shell Lake Deer Park [82]LA VERNE JOHNSON - River Falls Rural CLAUDE JONES - - - Amery Pre-Engineering GRANT JONES - - - River Falls Pre-Engineering KERMIT JONES - - River Falls Pre- Engineer i ng HERMAN KAISER - - - Cadott Agriculture ALLEN KINNEY - - - Amery History VERA KLIMPER - - - Ccnturia English and Social Science EVELYN KLUGOW - Turtle Lake Elementary Education WILLARD KLUGOW - Turtle Lake Pre-Engineering ANDREW KUBA - - - Bloomer Agriculture [83]River Fills ROSE JEAN LANG - - Elementary Education HAROLD LANSING • Spring Valley Agriculture RUSSELL LARSON - - Stockholm Rural MARGUERITE LEWIS - Glenwood City English and Music ALICE LIEN .... Hawkins Science ELLWOOD LINDER - - Ellsworth Rural DORIS LINDH - - - Frederic Elementary Education VIVIAN LINDUS - - Hammond Rural VELMA LIVINGSTON Rural Arkansaw [84] JOHN LOWE History River FallsVIOLET LUBNOW - - Ellsworth Rural JOE LUCENTE - - Cumberland Agriculture LOREN LUND - - - River Falls Pre-Engineering EDMUND LYGA - - Independence Agriculture WALLACE LYSTAD - - Hudson Pre-Commercial MARY MCCARDLE - Spring Valley Rural LYLE MACKIE - Lewis History LOUIS MALOTKY - - Clintonville Agriculture EUNICE MANSKE - - - Wabeno English and Foreign Language . KENNETH MARR - - - Algoma History I 85 JComstock GORDON MARTIN History GILBERT MATTSON Pre-Engineering BERNARD MERRIMAN History GORDON MICHAELSON Pre-Law CARL MILLER Science NINA MILLER History WILLIAM MILLS - - Agriculture DONALD MONSON Pre -Engineeri n g LYMAN MORROW - - Agriculture 186] Ogema - Owen Hudson Osceola Paris. Illinois - Baldwin Cable River Falls FLORINE MUEHLHAUSER Pre - Professional Luck ISABELLE MURPHY - Spring Valley English and History MARY MURPHY - - River Falls Elementary Education HAROLD NELSON - Black River Falls Pre-Forestry EARLE NELSON - - Star Prairie Agriculture FERN NELSON - - - Star Prairie English and Music FRONA NELSON - New Richmond Elementary Education GRACE NELSON - - Maiden Rock History MARCEL NELSON - - Cumberland Mathematics and Science MARCIA NELSON -Rural River Falls MARGARET NELSON - New Auburn Rural [ 87]CARL NICKERSON - Indianapolis. Ind. History DORIS NYSTROM - - Cumberland Rural NORMAN OLSEN - - - Hudson History ADELE OLSON - - - Milltown Elementary Education ARTHUR OLSON - - Woodvillc Science and Mathematics NORMAN OLSON - - Baldwin Pre-Lau) ANDREW OSBORNE - - Barron History ARLENE PALMSTEEN - - Osceola Science HAROLD PATTON - - - Dane Agriculture ALLAN PETERSON - - Barksdale Agriculture DONALD PETERSON Agriculture Milltown ORVILLE PETERSON Ellsworth Science and Mathematics RUTH PETERSON - - Prescott Rural ROBERT PLATTE - - River Falls Elementary Education ROBERT RASMUSSEN - Chippewa Falls Pre-Forestry ELLEN REAGEN - - River Falls Elementary Education GEORGE REICHARDT - - Osceola Mathematics and Science MERLIN REYNOLDS - - Osceola Mathematics and Science GEORGE ROBERTS - - Roberts Agriculture MYRON ROBINSON - - Stanley Agriculture [89]River Falls GLADYS RODDE - - English and History JOSEPHINE RYAN - River Palls Elementary Education MELVIN RYDBERG - - Shell Lake Agriculture RUTH SAMPSON - River Falls Elementary Education FLORENCE SCHMIDT Ellsworth English and Foreign Language OREN SCHNEIDERWENT Tony Science JOHN SCHORTA - River Falls Agriculture NORMA SCHWALEN River Falls Pre-Nursing ELLEN SELVIG - - - Amery Rural CLARICE SEVERSON - Cumberland Elementary Education I90JMondovi VALE SEVERSON Elementary Education LAWRENCE SHEDD - - Arkansaw Agriculture LYLE SHEDD - - - Arkansaw Agriculture GEORGEANN SHERMAN - River Falls Elementary Education VIRGINIA SMITH - - - Durand Elementary Education JOYCE SNOW - - - Ellsworth Rural BERTRAND SNYDER - - Barron History JEROME SOBOTA - Independence Pre-Engineering NORMAN SODERSTROM - Ogema English and History ORLAN SOLI - - - River Falls Pre-Engineering 191]ARNOLD SOLSTAD - Lashburn. Saskatchewan. Canada Science and Mathematics LUCILLE SOMMERS - - Arkansas Elementary Education FREDERICK STECKELBERG - Lodi Science PETER STENE - - - Baldwin Mathematics and Science WALTER STENEMAN - - Roberts Agriculture EDITH STEWART - Ellsworth Rural WILLIAM STILES - Wells. Minnesota Science DONNA STRUCK - - - Frederic Pre- Nursing ALBERT STUNER - Jump River Agriculture EMMA SVOBODA - - - Frederic English and History I 92 JCornell AVIS SWANSON English and History JEANNE SWANSON - - Shell Lake Elementary Education GLENN THOENY - - Mondovi Agriculture EARL THOMPSON - Cumberland Mathematics and Science GEORGE THOMPSON - - Hudson Science MERTON TIMMERMAN - River Falls Agriculture EFFIE TOBIASSEN - - River Falls Rural STELLA TOBIASSEN - River Falls Rural MARION TURNER - - Montfort History NINA TURNER - - - Hawkins Elementary Education [93]VICTOR ULVESTAD - - Dane Agriculture ARLENE WALSTEIN - - Cashing Elementary Education MARSHALL WARD - - Mondovi Pre-Engineering JAMES WEBERT - - - Stanley Pre-Dentistry ROBERT WELLS - New Richmond History MARY WERTS - - - Canton Pre-Home Economics and Music WINSTON WHEELER - Arkansaw Agriculture VIRGINIA WHITE - - Minong Pre-Nursing BURR WIGER - - River Falls History and Social Science MARSHALL WILCOX - River Falls Science [94JRiver Falls RUTH WILHELM Elementary Education LEONARD WILSON - - Clayton Agriculture and Science FRANK WINTERLING Downing Mathematics and Science LLOYD YANISCH Ellsworth Science RICHARD YANISCH - - Ellsworth Science FLORENCE YOUNGBERG - Elmhurst. III. English and History 195bbeBU WINTERPLATE 1 Don't fall, window washer. . . . Dorothea corrects 'em in Dr. Wyman's absence. . . . Ah-MenI . . wheel." . . . Conversationalists. . . . Future Piccards. . . . Y-e-s S-i-r! . . . On our scratch pad. banquet at R. F. . . . Gee. Katy. it must be cold. . . . Look at us! . . . Having a doggy time? . . . . Nice " watch . . . Debaters—PLATE 2 Pinochle tournament. . . . Preparatory to “Gas Engines.” . . . Before algebra. . . . Look me over! . . . Heavy thinkers. . . . Sody. . . . Smilin’ Bill. . . . Discussion on the railing. . . . Look closely. . . . Dale explains. . . . Pretty young maid. . . . Posing again. . . . Stan is a draftsman. ... Why wasn’t I born a football player? . . .---PLATE 3 Behold, ye Faculty dances foe the merriment of ye students. . . . The “R” turns Romantic. . . . "Firey" Opera. . . . The Plumbers’ Union presents. . . . Girls and fictitious beaus. . . . W. A. A, portrays the classrooms. . . . Junior class dines. . . . Prof. Jake’s bean soup party. . . .-----PLATE 4 Harmony. . . . Strong-arm Fred. . . . Look at me! . . . After the game. . . . Upsy-daisy. . . . Here comes the queen. . . . Formation. . . . The bonfire. . . . Just as good as the Gophers? . . . Battle-scarred Alcazarite. . . . House winner. . . . The "R.”. . . . The parade starts. . . . When Hcosier meets Badger. . . .---PLATE 5 The "Y” Float. . . . Here comes the parade. . . . Herr Chairman consults. . . . The Masquers’ Castle. . . . Her Royal Highness. ... As befits the frosh. . . . Warming up. . . . Are we confident I . . . What did the doodle-bug say? ... A queen in state. . . . Mert gets one off. ... Why so worried. Ted? . . . Streamlined. . . . The fairer band. . . .-----PLATE 6 Winter on the campus. . . . Atta Boy, "Red.” . . . Happy kids. . . Cascade Ave. . . . Glory of winter. . . . The Honor Society skates. . . . Frank and Hans. . . . The road wasn’t plowed. . . . Oh, oh, Iris. . . . Snowbound? . . . Velma on a footbridge. ... To and from the "club.” . . . After physics class. . . .PLATE 7 “B." . . . Football injury. . . . Serious discussion. . . . Girls take shop work, too. . . . When the river cath. . Marr reads the funnies. . . . Watts and amperes. . . . Before the trip. . . . Proud papa and climbing son. . Looking down upon us. .. . Between halves. . . . Faces and expressions. . . . The beautiful green campus. . Roman passes the olives. . . .-PLATE 8 The college farm becomes motorized. . . . Our reporter. . . . Faces. . . . Deutsch war sehr interessant. . . . Must have been hard to pronounce. . . . Bill takes a lesson from Der Lehrer. . . . Mr. Stiles. . . . Really working. . . . Registration week. . . . Sweethearts. . . . Interesting shop work. . . . Three gentlemen. . . . Who snapped this one? . . . After four o’clock. . . . Sign lettering. . . . Joseph smiles and . . . Joseph ducks. . . .AluiicLow . Jontt, Shepard, lerin.uiton. Almndw, Cbrlgren J. NeWon, Somtrn, Pmrton, Mo««, Lnndr. Ivtrion. H. Nrlion Swjinon, Fiona Nelion, S.uidow, Campbell. Hamleti, Pern NeWon. Hill, Ames A Marvin D. Geere Allegra Lunde Sopranos Helen Marie Arnquist Harriet Campbell Frona Nelson Gertrude Peterson Ruth Phillips Hope Sandow Avis Swanson Alios Ruth Ames Ardelle Hamlett Adelaide Hill Ruth Moen Fern Nelson CAPPELLA CHORUS PERSONNEL MARVIN D. GEERE . . . .Director . Accompanist Terrors Hilbert Jones Robert Knowles John Lowe John Nelson Maurice Shepard Paul Somsen Basses Le Roy Alexander Alfred Chelgren Gene Egan Bruce Erickson Clifford Hermanson Orval Iverson Earl Nelson Rolf OrdalOltoa. Cldil. Gimilntll. Hiicia NVItoa. Prdmn. I.inJh Grinin . Kin . Hil»l'. Mol inf. Siaptoa. Fienrcia. Mx Ndue. SodmltM Loglcr. Hum. Hincr. F. Nfl»M. Mitt Whinoa. Sirifbd. Vjo4 rbrrgf. T lf» WOMEN'S CHORUS PERSONNEL Cara Wharton.................... Jenny Lindh............ Phyllis Soderstrom, Viola Granicia Helen Pedersen................. Edna Legler, Kathryn Krebsbach.. Harriet Angell Helen Marie Arnquist Edith Bauer Margaret Boles Jeanne Brakken Vera Crerar Vern Dahl Esther Falteisek Mary Finnegan Mae Furber Viola Granicia Elizabeth Griffith Mildred Grosskreutz Betty Hauer Adelaide Hill Elizabeth Hilyar Bertha Jensen Lucille Jones Mary Helen Kay Joyce King Evelyn Klugow Kathryn Krebsbach Edna Legler Joyce Leonard Mildred Le Page Jenny Lindh Gunvor Moe Edna Moline Frona Nelson ■■ CARA WHARTON . Director . President Secretaries Treasurer Librarians Mae Nelson Marcia Nelson Margaret Nelson Nancy Njos Adele Olson Helen Pedersen Gertrude Peterson Ruth Sampson Hope Sandow Gladys Schulze Geraldine Simpson Phyllis Soderstrom Muriel Somsen Lucille Spriggs Gertrude Stephenson Lucille Striebcl Avis Swanson Louise Swanson Elizabeth Thome Nina Turner Katherine Tyler Mary Vanderberge Leona WeyhHuu. Elliot I. Fjlmwk. Wilcox. Brace. Miller. Derereaix. Weyb. Chelsitn. Njo . N«l oa D. Nelsoa. B. Campbell. Clair. Stile . Egan. Esliogee. S«U M. Barry. Heller. Fiaaeiu Hoyl. J. Campbell. Lewi . Junkman. Adam . Waikia . Henning . Hilyar Merriman. H. Campbell. Aidricb. Liadfc. Bierbaom THE COLLEGE ORCHESTRA PERSONNEL Violins Lucille Bierbaum Bette Campbell Harriet Campbell Mary Finnegan Dorothy Heller Mildred Hennings Elizabeth Hilyar Clarence Hoyt Jenny Lindh Bernard Merriman Dorothy Nelson Marcia Nelson Nancy Njos Lucille Spriggs Violas Louis Adams Mary Junkman Elmer Watkins Cello Rachel Aldrich String Bass Howard Elliott Flute June Campbell Oboe Marguerite Lewis Bassoon Gene Egan B. J. ROZEHNAL Clarinets John Clair William Stiles Alto Clarinet Imbert Eslinger Horns Keith Barry Louise Swanson Fred Whitemarsh Cornets Alfred Chelgren Robert Devereaux Carl Miller Leona Weyh T romborte Fern Brace Drums Marshall Wilcox Harp Elza Lou Hanna Piano Esther Falteisek 11081Dooliuic. Lubnow, Heller. Wilcox. Aldrich. Rydberg, Mill . Mrcriman, Kumlrll. Pit ton. N'flton, Elliocc. Sicncman. Dcitt. Brace. Reynold . Fjeceih. Ward, l.amon Adam . Kay, Zahradka. Weyh, 0«. Devweaui. Millet. Turner. Falteisrk. Ilanna, Bradley. Doolittle. Lowe. Crommetr. Wiger. Etlinger Robert , Junkman, Sirek, Bremer. Chelgren. Younggrcn. Hendri k»on. Swanton, Barry. Watkini, Egan. Lewi . Clair. Stile . Wert . Edkin . Arnquist. Campbell THE CONCERT BAND PERSONNEL Flutes Helen Marie Arnquist June Campbell Dorothy Edkins Mary Werts Oboe Marguerite Lewis Bassoon Gene Egan Clarinets Louise Adams John Clair Stanley Doolittle Dorothy Heller Mary Junkman Lucille Kay Violet Lubnow George Roberts Edward Sirek William Stiles Lucille Zahradka Alto Clarinet Imbert Eslinger Bass Clarinet Arthur Lamon Alto Saxophone Burr Wiger Tenor Saxophone Marshall Ward Cornets Frederick Bremer Alfred Chelgren Robert Devereaux Esther Falteisek Carl Miller Robert Ost Marion Turner Leona Weyh Newell Younggren French Horns Keith Barry Floyd Hendrickson Louise Swanson Elmer Walk ins Baritones John Bradley Robert Crommett Audrey Doolittle John Lowe Ruth Milbrath Trombones Fern Brace Bernice Deiss Harold Fjeseth Merlin Reynolds Walter Steneman Basses John Nelson Harold Patton Robert Rundell String Bass Howard Elliott T ympani Marshall Wilcox Percussion Bernard Merriman William Mills Melvin Rydberg Harp Elza Lou Hanna I 109 JTHE MARCHING BAND PERSONNEL Drum Major .Field Officer Burr Wiger Howard Elliott Herald Trumpets Alfred Chelgrcn Leslie Paulson Cornets Mauritz Carlson Robert Devereaux Bruce Erickson Marvin Fox Wallace Lystad Carl Miller William Mills Robert Ost Melvin Rydberg Jerome Sabota George Thompson Clarinets John Clair Lyman Morrow George Roberts Edward Sirek William Stiles Alto Clarinet Imbert Eslinger Saxophones Gordon Condit Gene Egan Howard McCleary Marshall Ward Horns Keith Barry Floyd Hendrickson Robert Platte Elmer Watkins Baritones John Bradley Robert Crommett John Lowe Trom bones Norris Ashleson Stanley Doolittle Harold Fjeseth Merlin Reynolds Walter Steneman Basses John Nelson Harold Patton Robert Rundell Drums Roy Chelgrcn Chauncey Mcacham Bernard Merriman Ted Olson Marshall WilcoxTHE CO-ED BAND T rombones Fern Brace Bernice Deiss Muriel Griffith Ruth Peterson Bass Dorothy House Baritone Audrey Doolittle Ruth Milbrath Horns Mildred Abbott Louise Swanson PERSONNEL Cornets Doris Andrea Esther Falteisek Ida Frank May Heckel Ruth Jackman Marion Turner Leona Weyh Drums Rachel Aldrich Frona Nelson Marguerite Lewis Lucille Streibel Clarinets Louise Adams Carolyn Goble Dorothy Heller Mary Junkman Lucille Kay Violet Lubnow Iris Mills Lucille Zahradka Saxophones Mildred Peterson Effie Tobiassen Flute Dorothy Edkins VOCAL ENSEMBLE Fox. Shepard. Swiuoa. Alto . Epa. Ncbca. Amu. FaluiarkTRAINING SCHOOL OPERETTA AMONG the outstanding entertainments produced during the college year was an operetta, "It Happened in Holland." presented by the junior high school students under the direction of Miss Vera Moss, junior high school critic, and Professor B. J. Rozehnal, director of instrumental music. The woodwind and string sections of the college orchestra provided instrumental accompaniment. Tabea Foss, a pupil in the seventh grade, sang the leading role. She took the part of Julianna, the Burgomaster’s daughter, called by her subjects "the Dutch Doll." Lloyd Sherman sang the part of the rich, old. gout-tormented Burgomaster, who has a great attachment for Gertrude the Cat. Irene Larkins. Although Julianna is envied by the Dutch girls for her station and riches, she is envious of their freedom. This longing for release and the skillful persuasion of Arlene, a gypsy girl, played by Betty Dodge, led her to change clothes and homes with Arlene "just for a day” on the evening before the festival. Thus disguised as a gypsy. Julianna discovers a plot to destroy her father. Overcoming a series of difficulties, she saves her father from the gypsies and the town from a leak in the dyke. Among the other children who had singing parts were Evelyn Smith and Dorothy Edkins as Hulda and Katrina, young Dutch girls, and Marshall Olson and Harold Edkins as Peter and Jan, Dutch boys. Mijnheer Katz, an eccentric old Dutchman, was impersonated by Gailen Christensen. Other characters were Gypsy Josh. Glen Anderson, Gypsy Jane. Muriel Griffith, and Hans, who saves the Burgomaster with his snuff, William Richardson. Still others as gypsies and guards were Robert Dopkins. Robert Knapp. Lowell Wilcox, Carl Carlson. Howard Chinnock. and Richard Peterson. The remaining junior high school pupils were used in specialty numbers and in choruses of gypsies and Dutch villagers. Quaint Dutch costumes and the gypsies’ colorful ones against a background of Dutch windmills furnished a picturesque setting.THE COLLEGE MASQUERS OFFICERS Marion Hawkins.............. Emma Lou Tubbs.............. Gwendolyn Fox......... Francis Haugh............... Miss Schlosser.............. President Vice President . . . Secretary ... Treasurer .....Adviser Lcnore Anderson Edwin Baker John Bradley Harriet Campbell William Carlson Alfred Chelgren Vern Dahl Lucille Evans Olive Flathe Gwendolyn Fox Eugene Gossen Niles Grunke Ruth Gullick Ardelle Hamlett MEMBERS Francis Haugh Marion Hawkins Rhoda Hawn May Heckcl Clifford Hermanson Dora Mac Hocking Betty Jane Hogue Robert Johnson Olive Joos Robert Knowles Adeline Larson Betty Larson Joyce Leonard John Lowe Cyril Lyons Elizabeth Mason Ruth Nelson Rolf Ordal Andrew Osborne Ruth Phillips Arnold Rhiel Maurice Shepard Lucille Spriggs Avis Swanson Emma Lou Tubbs Fred Whitemarsh Newell Younggren Louis Zahradka f 114]THE COLLEGE MASQUERS THE College Masquers have as their aim the object of furthering interest in dramatics. This is done by selecting the personnel of the organization through a competitive process, by making studies of present day activity in drama, and producing a number of plays during the year to give the members opportunity to act in them. This year a new system of adding new members was inaugurated. Preliminary tryouts were held early in the fall, through which a group of twenty-six "apprentices” was selected. These individuals served an apprenticeship lasting two terms. During this time they acted in or assisted in some other manner the plays coached by regular Masquers. This apprentice system is based on a scientific tabulation of activity in numerical values. Together with this the dramatic ability shown is given due consideration. At the end of the apprenticeship period the fourteen apprentices adjudged to have been most active in dramatic work, and to have shown most promise in dramatics were formally initiated into the Masquers organization. These new members raised the personnel to its constitutional limit of forty. Although this apprentice system is relied upon for providing most of the new members, any person may try out for a part in a play. and. if successful, he automatically becomes a Masauer. The Masquers meet every second Thursday at 7:00 P. M. At these meetings various programs, usually featuring some aspect of dramatics, are given. Some take the form of reports on the presentation of plays in New York, or in the Twin Cities. Others include the reading of plays, musical numbers, and sundry feature events. At least once a term these meetings take the form of parties with dancing and refreshments. In the fall of the year Miss Schlosser chose, the three-act play "Double Door" by Elizabeth McFadden. It was cast and produced under her direction. It featured Olive Flathe in the leading role as Victoria Van Bret, an outstanding character presentation. As the production of a play of this nature is quite a complex affair, many of the Masquers not in the cast assisted by serving on the committees in charge of lighting, properties, staging, tickets, and advertising. Twice during the year the Masquers presented one-act plays to the student body as assembly programs. The first of these was the play "The Goal,” produced under the direction of Ruth Phillips: the second was "The Sacrifice.” a play by Lewis Stone, coached by John Bradley. The Masquers also presented a program of four one-act plays to the public on the evening of March 17. All these plays were coached by Masquers as part of their activity in the organization. These plays were "Heels” by Joyce Caraway, coached by Francis Haugh: "Land's End" by Dorothy Hughes, produced under the direction of Marion Hawkins; "Hotel Dilemma" by James K. Donovan. supervised by Niles Grunke: and ''Thirty-three” by Hiram Gordon, directed by Joyce Leonard. The Masquer .are also active in other ways. At Homecoming time the Masquer float is always interesting and usually good. The Masquer stunt in the vaudeville secured first prize. The outstanding social event of the year is the Masquer formal. This year the decorative design carried out a vineyard motif. The general effect created was that of a grape arbor. The concluding event is a formal banquet. At this time the officers for the next year are chosen. [115]'“The pearls! My pearls! Mine!” DOUBLE DOOR By Elizabeth McFadden Cast Avery................................. T elson............................... Louise................................ William .............................. Anne Darrow............ Caroline Van Bret..................... Victoria Van Bret................ Mr. Chase. . Mortimer Neff.................... Rip Van Bret..................... Dr. John Sully................... Lambert.....................8fi Dora Mae Hocking .......A1 Chelgren .........Mae Heckel . . Robert Johnson . Emma Lou Tubbs .....Ruth Peterson .......Olive Flathe . . . Maurice Shepard . .William Carlson . . .Robert Knowles ......Niles Grunke . . . .Francis Haugh Production Staff Director.....................................................Miss Schlosser Assistant Director..............................................Ruth Nelson Properties—Edwin Baker. Fred Whitemarsh. Cecil Lyons. Jim Webert. Ruth Gullick. Gwen Fox. Georgeann Sherman. Betty Jane. Jane Hogue Lighting...................................Maurice Shepard. Lyman Morrow Make-up.........................................Ruth Phillips. Betty Larson Advertising—Newell Younggren. Rolf Ordal. Jack Osborne. Laurence Gherty r H61“I'm going to get out of this dump.” THE GOAL Staged by Ruth Phillips Sir Stephen Famariss. the engineer......................John Bradley Daniel, bis son.........................................John Lowe Sir Lydden Crane. M.D................................Maurice Shepard Adams, the butler....................................Burton Hanson Peggy Lovel.............................................Avis Swanson Nurse Clandon.............................. ............Betty Larson THE SACRIFICE By Lewis Stone Staged by John Bradley Colonel Sutherland......................................John Lowe A Doctor. ..............................................Fred Hanson Suna, a maid.........................................Stella Tobiassen Hugh Sutherland......................................Lyman Morrow"You may take them to prison, officer THE THIRTY-THREE Miller, the crook. Lucille, the maid. Mrs. Simms-Vane Miss Jones...... Police........... By Hiram Gordon Staged by Joyce Leonard ........William Carlson ..............Olive Joos ...........Avis Swanson ..............Ruth Moen .Jack Osborne, Jim Webert HEELS By Joyce Caraway Staged by Francis Haugh Peter........... . . %................. Magda...............‘................... Mr. Blankensop.......................... Maria................................... . . Eugene Gossen Betty Jane Hogue .Romain Brandt . . . Rhoda Hawn'7 have seven bathrooms in my house.” The Young Man. . Prima Donna The Old Gentleman The Young Girl. . . The Old Lady.... HOTEL DILEMMA By James K. Donovan Staged by Niles Grnnke ..............................Laurence Ghcrty ............................Harriet Camobell ................................Arnold Rhiel ................................Lucille Evans ................................Doris Nystrom The Countrywoman The Wisp The English Lady. . The Maid....... LAND'S END By Dorothy Hughes Staged by Marion Hawkins ...........................Lucile Spriggs ..........Vern Dahl ...........................Lenore Anderson ...............................Olive Joos I H9J"Bigger and Better Wars,” a peace play, given at the Monday night meetings, had the following cast of characters: Bill......................Norman Soderstrom Clyde.........................Warren Gates George ................................Walter Busch Henry...........................Norman Dilley Jack.......................Oren Schneiderwent Upton ........................John Brackey "Peace I Give Unto Thee,” the Christmas peace play, was given at the joint Christmas Vesper Service of the organizations held in the Auditorium on the afternoon of the Sunday preceding the winter vacation. Its cast included: Marta.........................Ardelle Hamlett Joseph........................Robert Johnson Peter............................Edwin Baker Alec . ........................Arthur Lamon A Soldier...................Fred Whitemarsh “The Things That Are Caesar’s,” the third play of the year, one remembered for its peace message and its lighting effects, was given at the joint Easter Vesper Service with the following cast: Junius........................William Carlson Justus...................................Robert Schlomann A woman.........................Mildred LePage A girl..........................Bette Campbell Lucius..............................Edward Cass Gaius........................Lawrence Knutson An officer................................Loren Lund THE Young Women’s and Young Men’s Christian Associations this year followed their tradition of presenting several plays of different character from those presented by the dramatic organizations on the campus. Three plays were given this season, two before large public audiences in the auditorium, and one presented to the groups at their regular Monday night meetings in the Men's Union. [120] T 'cen LciDEBATE 1936-1937 SCHEDULE November 11—Oxford University.............. January 13—St. Olaf ....................... January 21—Hamline ........................ January 22—Augsburg ....................... January 23—St. Thomas.................... January 26—St. Thomas...................... January 30—Eau Claire Tournament February 2—Macalester ..................... February 5-6—Red River Valley Tournament February 9-—St. Olaf....................... February 11—Macalester .................... February 13—Eau Claire..................... February 16—St. Catherine's College........ February 19—Augsburg ...................... February 20—Eau Claire..................... February 23—Macalester .................... February 25—St. Thomas..................... February 25—Hamline ....................... March 1, 2, 3-—Northwest Tournament March 13—River Falls Tournament . . . .Here . . .There . . .There . . . .Here . . .There . . . .Here . . .There . . . .Here . . . .Here . . . Here . . .There . . .There . . . .Here . . .There ____Here . . . .Here NORTHWEST TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE Augustana......................Won North Dakota Wesleyan..........Won St. Olaf.......................Won Concordia................Won Three St. Catherine’s................Won Oshkosh Teachers...............Won Hastings................Lost Two Augustana ....................Lost Luther College................Lost Nebraska Wesleyan ................Won one: lost one Midland University.............Won Morningside ...................Won St. Mary's....................Lost Macalester...............Lost Two St. John’s.....................Won Aberdeen Teachers..............Won Chadron .......................Won Mankato Teachers...............Won tf ip gp« A COACH WYMAN r 1221DEBATE N Armistice Day the River Falls State Teachers College opened its debate season with an international debate. Roman Zorn and Rolf Ordal debated Mr. Kay-Shuttleworth and Mr. Greenwood from Oxford University. The question under discussion was—Resolved: That this house prefers peaceful militarism to militant pacificism. After this debate the regular Pi Kappa Delta question—Resolved: That Congress should be empowered to establish minimum wages and maximum hours for industry—was the topic of discussion throughout the debate season. Twenty-one speakers represented River Falls in intercollegiate debates this year, which is a procedure in keeping with the democratic policy made possible by the expanded debating program. On January 13, two debate teams went to St. Olaf College at Northfield. The members of the teams were: Frank Sirianni and Loell Larson, and Mae Nelson and Joyce Leonard. On January 21, Zorn, Dykstra, Christianson, and Thompson traveled to St. Paul where two debates were held with Hamline. When Augsburg visited River Falls on January 22, Greene. Osborne, Benson, and Ordal entertained them. The following day Zorn, Dykstra. Ordal. and Benson debated two nondecision debates with St. Thomas at Sr. Paul. A return engagement with St. Thomas (here) was held on January 26. Four teams went to the Eau Claire Tourney on January 30. The teams were: Leonard and Nelson, Sirianni and Larson. Dykstra and Zorn, and Osborne and Gherty. Debates were held with Eau Claire. Stevens Point. Platteville, and La Crosse. Here River Falls won second as a school. Zorn and Dykstra won all of their debates, tying for first place as a team. On February 2, Hawkins, Hickox. Webert, and Greene traveled to Macalester for another series of two non-decision debates. During the latter part of the week Zorn, Dykstra, Sirianni. and Larson participated in the fourth annual Red River Valley Tournament at Concordia College. Moorhead, Minnesota. Over thirty colleges of the northwest and about one hundred seventy debaters were represented at the tournament. Zorn and Dykstra won four out of six debates, defeating Augustana. Concordia. Chadron. and Valley City. Sirianni and Larson received one decision. The Dykstra-Zorn team was honored by being chosen to participate in the special demonstration debate held at Moorhead College. Their opposition was St. John’s University. River Falls received the decision. [123JDual non-decision debates were held with St. Olaf at River Falls on February 9. Macalester teams were guests of Nelson, Leonard, Benson, and Iverson on February 11. On February 13, Eau Claire brought four teams to River Falls. The two women’s teams motored to St. Catherine’s College for the first intercollegiate non-decision debate with that college on February 16. During the next week debates were held with Augsburg, Eau Claire, Macal-estcr, and Hamline in preparation for the major engagement of the year, the Northwest Tournament. On February 25, Zorn and Dykstra debated with St. Thomas College in an assembly debate in the River Falls auditorium. One member of the St. Thomas team was on the team which won the National Pi Kappa Delta Championship last year. Then on March 1, 2, and 3, the Northwest Tournament was held in St. Paul. Zorn, Dykstra, Sirianni, and Larson entered the men’s division at St. Thomas College and Leonard and Hawkins entered the women’s division which was held at St. Catherine’s College. In the tourney the Leonard-Hawkins team defeated Augustana, North Dakota Wesleyan, St. Olaf, Eastern Teachers, Concordia, St. Catherine’s, and Oshkosh. At the end of the seventh round the River Falls team was the only undefeated team in the women's division- Leonard and Hawkins lost in the semi-finals to Augustana, South Dakota, thus placing third. Mankato Teachers and Morningside met defeat at the hands of Larson and Sirianni. Zorn and Dykstra defeated Concordia. Nebraska Wesleyan. Midland. St. John’s, Chadron. and Northern Teachers. Zorn and Dykstra reached the semi-finals in each division. Both River Falls teams were defeated by the winners of the Northwest Tournament. On March 13. 1937, the debate season closed with the River Falls Tournament. Eight colleges participated in this unique tournament, which was open only to the less experienced debaters who had not debated in the Northwest Tournament. Veteran debaters acted as judges. Webert and Nelson, and Gherty and Osborne won three out of four debates respectively. River Falls ranked third as a school in the River Falls Tourney. This season was the most active debate season in the history of the college. The schedule indicates that one hundred fifteen debates were held. Of these debates sixty-seven were non-decision. The season's average for all teams was sixty-two per cent. A total of thirty-four colleges and universities were debated, and four tournaments were participated in. 1124]ZORN DYKSTRA LEONARD HAWKINS ORDAL LARSON SIRIANNI NELSON OSBORNE GHERTY WEBERT Roman Zorn and Rolf Ordal, seniors, will be lost to the debate squad through graduation. Although these two fine debaters are a loss to the team, the remaining members of the squad are looking forward to an active, successful season next year. PROVINCIAL SPEECH CONTEST FOR the first time River Falls delegates attended the Upper Mississippi Provincial Speech Contest which was held at Luther College, Decorah, Iowa, on April 9 and 10, 1937. Rolf Ordal represented Wisconsin Delta, the local chapter of Pi Kappa Delta, in the men’s extempore speaking division. Joyce Leonard entered the play-reading division of the convention. Joyce Leonard won second place in competition with entries from seven colleges from three states. [125]PI KAPPA DELTA THE Wisconsin Della Chapter of the Pi Kappa Delta national forensic fraternity has successfully completed its first year of organization. Besides supporting the most active debate season in the history of the college, the chapter sponsored the league high school speech contest which was held on April 24, 1937. Dr. Justin Williams and President Jesse H. Ames are honorary members of Wisconsin Delta. Membership in Pi Kappa Delta is granted in four different degrees according to the extent of the intercollegiate debating done by the applicant. These are the degree of Fraternity, degree of Proficiency, degree of Honor, and degree of Special Distinction. Degree of Fraternity Jeanne Myron Joyce Leonard Degree of Proficiency Werner Gleiter Helen Hickox Frank Sirianni Degree of Honor Loell Larson Degree of Special Distinction Daniel Dykstra Roman Zorn Marion Hawkins Rolf Ordal Walker D. Wyman (coach) 11261ORDAL NELSON SIRIANNI THE 1937 MELETEAN Editor ROLF ORDAL Associate Editor MAE NELSON Business Manager FRANK SIRIANNI Adviser MAUD A. LATTA MAUD A. LATTA [128]THE 1937 MELETEAN STAFF Werner Gleiter Kathleen Fuller Gertrud Blatt Robert Johnson Orlin Anderson Eunice Manske Glen Crowley Elaine .Clausen Margaret Erickson Harry Guinn GLEITER BLATT ANDERSON CROWLEY ERICKSON 1129] FULLER JOHNSON MANSKE CLAUSEN GUINNTHE STUDENT VOICE Lauraine Isaacson STAFF Editor-in-Chief Dorothea Panzenhagen Executive Editors Joseph Hyde Rolf Ordal Desk Editor Velma Segerstrom Editorial Writers Joseph Hyde Velma Segerstrom Feature Writers Rachel Aldrich Faculty Adviser Walker D. WymanNews Writers Franklin Elliott Marion Hawkins Lucille Spriggs Olive Joos Leonard Hermanson Roman Zorn Hilbert Jones Romain Brandt Franklin Elliott Russell Gettinger Hilbert Jones Frederick Johnson Edna Moline Sports Editor Glen Crowley Sports Writers Marion Hawkins Columnists Daniel Dykstra Copy Readers Business Manager Frederick Johnson Business Staff Photographer Werner Gleiter Florence Schmidt Bernice Jacobsen Francis Haugh Norman Christianson Velma Segerstrom Florence Sagstctter Daniel Dykstra Tom Rendler Frederick Johnson Lucille Spriggs Florence Sagstetter Velma Segerstrom (1311 SOUTH CAMPUSTHE ATHLETIC COUNCIL R. A. Karges....... E. A. Whitenack.... Emmett Lowery...... W. H. Hunt......... A. N. Johnson...... J. H. Owens........ Theodore Setterquist ..........President Secretary-Treasurer .............Coach ...........Director ...........Director ...........Director ...........Director THE COACHING STAFF Emmett Lowery..........................................Coach Theodore Setterquist........................ Assistant Coach Harold Segerstrom...................................Freshman Coach MANAGERS Ward Randles Donald Staley Ervin Fletcher William Stiles .Football Basketball . .Baseball .Football . [133]Cudney. Frank. Wolf. Suky. Cnow. Sdvig. Skyfcrr Lowrry (Coach). O Biwa. Lcadholm. S «k«1bcrg. Miff. Erkksoa. Nywraa. Johaws. Scu.qui.t Readier. May. Ifrrkal. Cass. Nrlton. Tocfcno . Alfome NkknKt. Itaacion. Bart . Geiturdi. Stcaback THE "R” CLUB THE "R" Club is an organization composed of members who have won their “R” by representing the college in the major sports. The organization's purpose is to sponsor intramural sports and aid in promoting all athletic contests conducted at River Falls. WINNERS OF THE ATHLETIC "R" Fred Alfonse Football Donald Hart John O’Brien William Bartz Walter Herkal Tom Rendler Herbert Carow Nolan Isaacson Lawrence Selvig Eddie Cass Le Roy Leadholm Donald Staley Charles Cudney Kenneth Marr Frederick Steckelberg Lloyd Frank Carl Nickerson Leo Stenback Richard Gelo Russell Nystrom Lyle Wheeler Glenn Gerhardt Merton Wulf Charles Cudney Basketball Marcel Nelson Kennard Skyberg Walter Hcrkal Russell Nystrom Stanley Torgerson James May Ward Randles Merton Wulf Melvin Erickson Baseball Donald Johnson Leo Stenback Walter Herkal Russell Nystrom Merton Wulf Tom Rendler I 34 JCOACH LOWERY COMING to River Falls after having had only two years' experience in the coaching field. Emmett P. Lowery has firmly established himself in the hearts of the Falcon fans. Upon graduating from Purdue University in 1934, where he was a star athlete in three different sports, football, tennis, and basketball. winning all-conference recognition in the latter, he received the position of head coach at Rochelle. Illinois. High School. After coaching one year there he became head coach at Mankato Teachers College. Mankato. Minnesota. He served there one year, and his football team won the Minnesota Teachers College Championship. He was appointed in the summer of 1935 to succeed Osborne Cowles, and in his first year here has proved an admirable and capable coach. Besides doing a fine bit of work in intercollegiate athletics. Coach Lowery sponsored one of the best intramural programs ever carried on at the local college. Largely through his efforts a wide variety of sports was added to the program with medals awarded to the winners. 1135]Siik« (Mjajger). Sunbick. LnAola. Sinklbnt R. Tw«t« . J- O'Briin. Schlominn. Silky. Rinflo (Uiuftr) CbroiiiuM. Hjii. Sflvig. Sintrailink. Wbwkr. Wolf (Cipma). Cirow. Bull. Nynioss. Aifor.w Fr »k. Cm. kndki. CWihirdt. Gclo. luKm. Cudncy. HcrkiL Min Nkkmoa THE 1936 FOOTBALL TEAM Merton Wulf..................................Captain Ward Randles.................................Manager Fred Alfonse Donald Hart Lawrence Selvig William Bartz Walter Herkal Donald Simmelink Hubert Carow Nolan Isaacson Donald Staley Edward Cass Kenneth Marr Fred Steckelberg John Christianson Carl Nickerson Leo Stenback Charles Cudney Russell Nystrom Stanley Torgerson Lloyd Frank John O'Brien Lyle Wheeler Richard Gelo Thomas Rendler Merton Wulf Glenn Gerbardt Robert Schlomann LeRoy Leadholm MEN NAMED ON THE ALL-CONFERENCE TEAM Wulf ............................................End Rendler.....................................Fullback C1361RESULTS OF THE SEASON CONFERENCE River Falls 0 La Crosse 6 River Falls 0 Superior 13 River Falls 26 Stout 6 River Falls 0 Eau Claire 27 River Falls. River Falls. 4 River Falls. NON-CONFERENCE .... 6 Macalester. . . . . 26 St. Thomas . . . . 6 Milwaukee. 0 6 0 CONFERENCE STANDING Won Lost Tied Pet. Superior........................................... 4 0 0 1.000 Eau Claire.......................................... 2 1 1 .667 La Crosse.......................................... 1 1 2 .500 River Falls........................................ 1 3 0 .250 Stout.............................................. 0 3 1 .000 [137]HERKAL ISAACSON CUDNEY NYSTROM O'BRIEN FOOTBALL 1936 SEVEN lettermen reported to Coach Lowery in his first call for football practice. They were Captain Merton Wulf, Walter Herkal. Leo Stenback. Donald Hart, Charles Cudney, Thomas Rendler. and Lawrence Selvig. The Falcon prospects were hit hard at the start of the season when eight lettermen who were counted on heavily failed to return to school. After two weeks of intensive practice the locals opened the season in a game with Macalester winning by a 6 to 0 score. This game was played on a rain soaked field and the score was no indication of the Falcons’ superior strength. For River Falls Rendler, Wulf, and Marr, a freshman, played good ball. Displaying a brilliant aerial attack the La Crosse Maroons handed the Falcons their first defeat of the season by a 6 to 0 score. The Maroons scored early in the second period on the execution of three pass plays which brought the ball to the Falcon sixteen-yard line. Here Binter, a' Maroon halfback, scored on an off tackle run. The try for point was blocked by Carow, River Falls left guard. In the third quarter the Falcons made their only serious scoring threat, marching from midfield to the eleven-yard line, where the Maroon line held. Late in the fourth quarter the Maroons began a march on the Falcon goal which carried them to the locals' nineteen-yard stripe. At this juncture, however, the game ended, preventing all further scoring. HART [138]STECKELBERG RENDLER SELVIG ALFONSE CASS GERHARDT FOOTBALL 1936 LA CROSSE made eleven first downs to six for River Falls. Each team was penalized fifty yards. For River Falls, the play of Rendler. Wulf. Staley. Carow, and O'Brien was outstanding. The second non-conference game was a night affair with St. Thomas. Again the Falcons showed superior football technique and came away with a 26 to 6 victory. A brilliant aerial attack and two long runs by Herkal were essential in the Falcon scoring. Coach Lowery, taking advantage of the large score, used every man on the Falcon squad. For the locals Herkal, Wulf, Frank, and Alfonse played fine ball. In the Homecoming contest, a great Superior team made use of the breaks to defeat a fighting Falcon eleven 13 to 0. Superior presented a team with an exceptionally large line and a fast, tricky backfield. The first break came early in the game when Rich of Superior intercepted a Falcon pass, running it to the forty-nine-yard line where he was stopped. Here the Falcons held momentarily until third down when Gentile broke loose on a thirty-four-yard run to the fifteen-yard line. Two plays later he scored on a lateral pass from Rich. The try for point was missed. During the remainder of the half, the two teams battled on even terms with no further scoring. The Falcons made a strong bid for a score in the third quarter advancing to the Superior twenty-nine-yard line, where Superior took the ball on incomplete passes. [139]STENBACK BARTZ NICKERSON CAROW FRANK FOOTBALL 1936 SUPERIOR then began an uninterrupted drive of seventy-one yards to a score. The kick was barely good, making the score 13 to 0. On the following kickoff, the Falcons attempted a difficult lateral pass which was recovered by Superior on the River Falls’ twenty-five-yard line. In the closing minutes, the Falcons fought desperately, but not in vain, to keep Superior from scoring. The play of the whole Falcon team was commendable, considering that they were playing the conference champions who had played together for three seasons. Coach Lowery’s Falcons came back in a big way after the defeat at the hands of Superior to spoil the Stout Homecoming by beating the Blue Devils 26 to 6. Rendler. Falcon fullback, led the onslaught on the Blue Devils by scoring three times. Captain Wulf scored once, and Cudney kicked two points after touchdown. Stout got her only score in the closing minutes on a pass. Nystrom made the longest run of the day to set the Falcons in position for their fourth and final touchdown. Wulf played fine ball: his punting was especially good, having an average of thirty-eight yards per kick. Coach Lowery used a total of twenty-five men. all of them showing up well. The Falcons made eleven first downs to eight for Stout. The play of O’Brien. Staley. Frank, and Wulf was outstanding for the Falcons in the line, with that of Nystrom and Rendler outstanding in the backfield. I HOJSTALEY GELO LEADHOLM MARR WHEELER FOOTBALL 1936 AFTER battling on even terms for the first half, which ended nothing to nothing. Eau Claire’s powerful football machine got rolling to run up twenty-seven points and handed the Falcons their third defeat of the season. The first half appeared to be slightly in favor of the locals even though they made only two first downs to Eau Claire’s three. Long runs by Cudney and Rendler were the feature of this half. The Falcons lost their best opportunity to score in the second quarter when Wulf attempted to lateral after he had caught a pass thrown by Herkal. Eau Claire recovered on her own sixteen-yard line and the Falcons never threatened again until the closing minutes. In the second half a pass by Eau Claire, and interception of three River Falls’ passes led to four touchdowns and a final score of 27 for the Zornadoes. River Falls outfought Eau Claire in the first half, but the failure of her passing attack in the last half led to the defeat. Outstanding for the Falcons were Wulf. Staley, Frank, and O’Brien in the line, and Cudney and Rendler in the backfield. In the final game of the season, the Falcons played the Milwaukee Green Gulls, one of the strongest teams in the Southern Conference. The Falcons showed their superiority in every department of the game except passing, but were able to score only once. Rendler scored in the third quarter on a fifteen-yard plunge behind excellent interference. Again Rendler and Captain Wulf were the outstanding men on the field. mmLowery (Coach), Alfonse, Wulf. S. Torgerson. Skyberg. M. Nelson J. O'Brien. Cudney. Herkal (Captain). Nystrom. May THE 1936-1937 BASKETBALL TEAM Walter Herkal...................................Captain Donald Staley...................................Manager Fred Alfonse Charles Cudney James May Marcel Nelson Russell Nystrom John O'Brien Ward Randles Kennard Skyberg Stanley Torgerson Merton Wulf MEN NAMED ON THE ALL-CONFERENCE TEAMS First Team Walter Herkal. . . ........................... Russell Nystrom.............................. Forward . .Guard Second Team [142J James May GuardRESULTS OF THE SEASON CONFERENCE Superior 38 River Falls 40 Stout 17 River Falls 26 La Crosse . . . 35 River Falls 34 Stout 28 River Falls 37 Eau Claire. . . 45 River Falls 43 Superior .... 40 River Falls 34 La Crosse.... 28 River Falls 34 Eau Claire. . . 53 River Falls 41 NON-CONFERENCE Augsburg . . . 28 River Falls 42 Macalester. . . 25 River Falls 31 Oshkosh .... 39 River Falls 55 St. Olaf 40 River Falls 54 St. Olaf 32 River Falls 33 Oshkosh .... 33 River Falls 27 Milwaukee. . . 39 River Falls 22 CONFERENCE STANDING Won Lost Pet. La Crosse . .. ... 7 1 .875 Superior . . ... 5 3 .625 River Falls 4 4 .500 Eau Claire 4 4 .500 Stout 0 8 .000 CAPTAIN HERKAL [H3]CUDNEY. MAY. WULF. NELSON BASKETBALL 1937 COACH LOWERY'S call for basketball candidates was answered by a large turnout, including live lettermen from last year's championship five. These men were Captain Walter Herkal, an all-state forward for three seasons, Russell Nystrom. last year’s all-state guard, James May. Stanley Torgerson. and Merton Wulf. After two weeks of intensive practice. Coach Lowery sent his boys into action against Augsburg in a non-conference game. The Falcons got off to a fine start, defeating the Auggies by a 42 to 28 score. Herkal paced both teams in scoring with thirteen points. The Augsburg victory was followed with a win over Macalester, Minnesota State College Champions, by a 31 to 25 count. Herkal, again, led the scoring with eleven points, but was closely followed by Nystrom. May. and Wulf. The Falcons continued their winning ways by beating Oshkosh 55 to 39, and St. Olaf 54 to 30. In these two games, the play of Nystrom and Herkal was outstanding. In a return game with St. Olaf, the Falcons again won by the score of 33 to 32. To close the non-conference season Coach Lowery took his squad on a three-day tour of the southern part of the state, meeting Milwaukee and Oshkosh. The trip proved to be disastrous for the locals, as they were beaten in both games. 39 to 32 by Milwaukee and 33 to 27 by Oshkosh. In the opening game of the conference schedule the Falcons were pitted against one of the strongest teams in the conference, the Superior Yellow jackets. In a sensational battle, the Falcons came out on the long end of a 40 to 38 score. 1144]S. TORGERSON. SKYBERG. NYSTROM BASKETBALL 1937 NYSTROM and Herkal scored fourteen points each in turning back the highly touted Northerners. The defensive work of May was outstanding in that he stopped many Yellowjacket drives for the basket. Following the Superior game the Red and White Cagers journeyed to Menomonie to play Stout. This was a slow, uninteresting game, which the Falcons won by a 26 to 17 score. The Blue Devils presented a fair defense, but not much offense. The defense did, however, succeed in holding the high scoring Falcons way below their average number of points. After the victory over Stout, the locals met the strong La Crosse squad on the Falcon court, coming out this time on the short end of a 35 to 34 count. This game was featured by one of the most unusual freak shots ever seen on a local basketball court which proved to be the deciding factor in the game. Herkal and Nystrom again paced the Falcons in scoring, getting twelve and nine points respectively. In the return game with Stout, the Falcons chalked up their third conference victory, turning in a 37 to 28 win. Coach Lowery used the whole squad in this game and each one played good ball. Individual scoring honors were taken by Nystrom, who scored fourteen points. The Falcons suffered their second conference setback at the hands of the Eau Claire Zornadoes in a tight game by a 45 to 43 score. Mert Wulf paced the Falcon attack, garnering sixteen points. However, his loss on fouls with four minutes remaining, was probably the main reason for the Falcon defeat. U45]BASKETBALL 1937 JOURNEYING to Superior for a return game with the Yellow jackets, the Falcons again got the short end of the deal, taking a 40 to 34 defeat. The Superior lads, scenting a tie for the championship, were not to be denied. Herkal and Nystrom. the Falcon all-state stars, again played brilliant ball, getting fifteen and ten points respectively. Playing one of the best ball games of the season, the Falcons handed the La Crosse Maroons their only conference defeat by a 34 to 28 score. The feat was the more remarkable in that the game was played at La Crosse. The offensive play of Herkal, Nystrom, and Cudney was outstanding: however. May and Wulf shared honors with them by turning in fine defensive performances. A second half rally which scored thirty-eight points, paved the way for a 53 to 41 victory over the Falcons by Eau Claire. This game closed the career of Captain Walter Herkal. one of the finest players to ever represent the Falcons on the hardcourt. He led a courageous fighting Falcon team in a brilliant battle, but Eau Claire was not to be daunted. Nystrom turned in a marvelous game, scoring seventeen points which gave him conference scoring honors for the season. Cudney played the best game he had played all season, contributing eleven points to a lost cause. Mert Wulf also turned in a fine performance in the last game of his career. The whole team showed up well, but Eau Claire was hot and was not to be defeated. ASSISTANT COACH SETTERQUIST [H6]Stittrquist (Coach). Lyga. Blaisdell. Fisher Reichardi. Lansing. Thoeny. Nickerson. Thompson FRESHMAN ATHLETICS THE freshman football team was under the direction of Harold Segerstrom. former Falcon star: As usual the squad was a product of many different types of coaching, but under his able direction it was molded into a compact unit which provided excellent opposition to all opponents. Although there were no individual stars, many men gave promise of filling in the holes in next year's varsity left by those graduating this season. The frosh played two games with Red wing Training School, defeating them both times by the score of 18 to 6 and 6 to 0. Outside of these two regular games a number of informal scrimmages were held with the local high school. The freshman basketball team was one of the best in recent years. It played a schedule of seven games, winning six and being defeated only by Elmwood Class "C” Championship team from this district. The "Greenies" opened their season with a 30 to 22 win over Independence High School. They followed this by handing the Intramural All-Stars a 24 to 9 defeat. The third game was a 29 to 22 defeat at the hands of Elmwood. The local National Guard provided the opposition in the fourth game, being turned back 72 to 40 by the frosh. In a return game with the All-Stars the freshmen were again victorious by a 48 to 36 count. The sixth game was with the Hammond High School, and that team was given a 46 to 26 defeat. The final game of the season was played at Ellsworth against the high school of that city. This resulted in a 29 to 23 victory for the frosh. Besides these regular scheduled games the frosh scrimmaged the local high school and Elmwood to give these teams practice against outside opposition. The men who showed promise and should be of valuable help to next year’s varsity are Lansing and Reichardt, centers. Fisher. Nickerson, and Thompson, forwards, and Lystad, Lyga, and Blaisdell, guards.Sieckelberg. Jess . Martin Roberts. Jones. Bartz (Captain) Stoner. Hebnke. Wilson. Simmelink Peterson. Jacobson (Captain). Nic-com Beck. Staley. Gronning Lyons. Hoey (Captain). Sonder-gaard Gerbardt. Schlomann. Healy. Kleck-cr. Koba, Johnson. Younggren (Captain). Gosscn INTRAMURAL SPORTS UNDER the leadership of Coaches Lowery and Setterquist and with able assistance from Tom Rendler. the college had one of the best intramural programs ever held in the history of the school. Basketball was the first sport on the intramural program. Over one hundred and twenty-five men signed up for participation in this sport: they were divided into twelve teams under student captains. The captains of the teams were: Younggrcn. Nelson. Gettinger. Cass. Sletteland. Rendler. Isaacson, Hoey. Bartz, Jacobson. Knuth, and Crowley. A schedule was provided whereby each team played every other team once. At the conclusion of this it was decided to hold a tournament, the league winner and tournament winner playing for the championship. The Bartz and Jacobson teams ended the league season in a tie for first place, with Bartz winning the playoff. The tournament was won by Isaacson’s team, a team which had finished the league schedule in the second division, but played fine ball to win the tournament. In the final game between Bartz and Isaacson, Bartz’s team won by a 26 to 19 score. The athletic department presented medals to the members of the winning team. Torgerson. Gettinger (Captain), Erickson Green. Hermanson. Stiles Bredahl. Hylkema, Platte. Wallin, Lund Cass (Captain). Wheeler, Marr Reicbardt. Nelson, Marquard, Gos-sen (Captain) MANAGER RENDLERINTRAMURAL SPORTS Mackie, Slettcland (Captain), So-derstrom, Gclo Rundell. Jensen. Wells A N interesting feature of the sea-lx son’s play was the publication in the Student Voice each week of the ten scoring leaders. The leading point-getters for the season were A1 Erickson of Knuth's team and Mel Erickson of Nelson’s team, who scored 143 and 123 points respectively. At the close of the basketball sea- Patton, Cannon. Kinney Knuth (Captain), Pedersen son ping pong, volleyball, and badminton were started. The ping pong championship was won by Russell Kurtz, who defeated Tom Ronnigen in the finals. Dr. Owens won the badminton championship, defeating Robert Platte. The volleyball championship was won by Gossen’s team, which defeated Hehnke’s team in the finals. As a fitting closing for the winter intramurals, the athletic de- Devereaux, Wintcrling. Klugow. Hansen Nelson. Rendler (Captain), Hoag-enson partment sponsored a sports show where the finals were played. Kittenball was the closing event in the intramural season. Two leagues were formed, one made up of campus house teams, and the other of student teams, captained by students. Regular scheduled games were played in the evening on the south campus. Mills, Lansing. Malotky, Jones, Si-rianni. Stratton Torgerson. Selvig. Isaacson (Captain), Bremer Deitz. Carlson. Scene Uren. Crowley (Captain). Johnson Merchant. Haugh. Steneman. Hun-sader. Ashleson Erickson. Nelson (Captain), Frank Owens. Branstad. Mason. MayFletcher, Stoner, BUiidcll, Sirnbick. M. Ethkioit, Christianson. T. Torgrrson, Lowery (Coach) lloagrnson. Teeplei. lirrkal, Johnson, Hansen. Nysirom. Readier, Osborne Hoey, Moore, Nickereon BASEBALL BASEBALL prospects at the local school received a severe jolt with the announcement that A1 Erickson, star catcher for the past two seasons, had signed a contract with the Columbus team of the American Association. Even on top of this came the news that Mert Wulf. star first baseman, would be unable to play because of illness. However, six lettermen, Herkal. Erickson. Nystrom. Johnson, Rendler. and Stenback, provided the nucleus for a fairly strong club. The showing of three new men, Moore. Marr. and Teeples. gave the Falcons a representative club. Regular scheduled games were played with Minnesota, Gustavus Adolphus. St. Cloud, and Mankato. [150 JJosm. Mill . Alfoatr, SliWy. Kinney. Gbcrty Nickerson. May. D. O'Bmn. S!«ulind. J. O'Brien MINOR SPORTS MINOR sports, which have been on a decline in state colleges the past few seasons, were given a big boost this season. Superior sponsored an intercollegiate boxing tournament for Wisconsin colleges. The Falcons were represented by a team composed of Mills. Kinney, Alfonse. Staley and Gherty. The Falcons made a creditable showing, considering the amount of boxing experience team members had had. Plans were being made to send a track team to Eau Claire to take part in the state meet there. Track has been badly neglected on the campus here, and an attempt will be made to arouse interest in it. Prospects are good for a tennis team with Jim May, last year’s school champion, returning. A tournament was to be conducted, and, if the material warranted it, regular scheduled matches were to be played with other schools. 1151JWOMEN'S ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION OFFICERS Mildred Pedersen...... Lucille Striebel...... Iris Mills, Edith Bauer. Helen Pedersen........ Lucille Creswell....... Lillie Ahlgren......... May Heckel............. La Vernia Jorgenson Stella Tobiassen...... Elizabeth Hilyar...... Mary Katherine Prucha . Miss Branstad......... ............................ President ........................Vice President ......................... .Secretaries ........................Point Secretary ............................Treasurer ...................Hockey Sport Head ..................Pinball Sport Head ...............Basketball Sport Head ...............Volleyball Sport Head .................Baseball Sport Head . . .Badminton and Tennis Sport Head ................................Adviser Lillie Ahlgren Marion Boles Edith Bauer Betty Belitz Lucille Creswell Bernice Deiss Audrey Doolittle Mae Furbur Olive Flathe Florence Greeley Mary Griffith Jeanette Griffith Ardyth Grupe Viola Granicia MEMBERS Rhoda Hawn Mae Heckel Betty Hilyar Betty Jane Hogue La Vernia Jorgenson La Verne Jensen Lucille Jones Lucille Kay Joyce King Edna Leglcr Eunice Manskc Dorothy Maxwell Iris Mills Mildred Pedersen Helen Pedersen Gertrude Peterson Mary Katherine Prucha Florence Schmidt Elsie Schorta Joyce Snow Lucille Striebel Edith Stewart Emma Svoboda Stella Tobiassen Effie Tobiassen Mary Vandeberge Mary Werts I 152]WOMENS ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION PERHAPS the most active women's organization in school is the W. A. A.. one without whose existence school would be a dull affair. Here it is that the vigorous spirit of the women students manifests itself. This organization need put forth no effort to secure new members—all good athletes seek it out. and they need not fear being refused admission. The W. A. A. welcomes all women who are interested in and who are willing to put forth a little effort to further women's athletics. To be sure, once having joined the group one must live up to its standards, but they are not too high---fifty points a year being sufficient to retain one’s standing as an active member. Points are awarded on the basis of attendance and ability. The sports program is varied to suit individual tastes. Among the organized sports are basketball, hockey, baseball, volleyball, and hit pin ball. Of the individual sports, badminton, tennis, archery, and swimming have a considerable following. Several tournaments are run off in both tennis and badminton. In addition to this, the W. A. A. sponsors a spring camping trip. With such a program to choose from, a girl has every opportunity to participate in the activity that suits her best. These sports are supervised by Miss Branstad and the student sports heads. Activity meetings are held on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 4:00 P. M. The first activity meetings in each sport are devoted to an attempt to master skills and techniques. After a few practice sessions tournaments are run off in each sport—tournaments that are colorful and exciting. At the end of each tournament an honor team is selected from the best players in the group. Business meetings are held on the third Wednesday of each month. The executive council, composed of the adviser, the officers and the sport heads, manages the affairs of the group. Awards consist of a W. A. A. membership pin, attainable only when a member has accumulated 250 points, an "R." received upon the amassing of 500 points, and a Red Cross Life Saving Emblem, secured upon passing the official Red Cross Life Saving Test. Endeavoring to have a sports program that will suit the taste of every member, the organization sponsors a spring camping trip at the Y. M. C. A. camp at Lake St. Croix for those who feel the urge to live close to nature. The camping trip is scheduled for a week-end in May. Swimming, boating, hiking, baseball, archery, and treasure hunts are all part of the recreation while in camp. For those who like their recreation mild, there is always an opportunity to sleep or read! At any rate, camp is a wonderful place to be in the spring, for it gives one a chance to relax after a long winter. It is one of the highlights of the spring program, and it is much anticipated by the W. A. A. members. 1153 ]Grope. Deiss. S. Tobiassen. Svoboda. Stewart Creswell. E. Tobiassen. Manske. J. Griffith. Jorgenson S. Tobiassen. Boles. E. Tobiassen Stewart. Snow. Grupe (Captain). Granicia. Hawn Bauer. Prucha. M. Pedersen. Kay Creswell. Striebel. Manske (Captain). J. Griffith. Jorgenson M. Griffith. Jensen. Ahlgren Schmidt. Wens. Driss (Captain). H. Pedersen. Svoboda BASKETBALL AN eternal gift of gratitude will be Dr. Nai-smith’s for his invention of this popular game. During the winter months basketball is king. Thirty-five girls reported for the first practice of the year. The first few practices were given over to developing fundamentals and to short periods of practice play. After a few meetings three teams were selected, captained by Bernice Deiss. Ardyth Grupe, and Eunice Manske. A round robin tournament of eighteen games was arranged. The sharp-shooting Grupe team got off to an early lead in the tournament, which they held until the finish. Man-ske's team, which was slow in reaching its top form, placed second, while the jinxed Deiss team placed third. The games were colorful and exciting, played with a zip and dash that aroused interest. In addition to the regular tournament games several games were played with the River Falls high school teams. Early in February the college women were hosts to the high school teams in the college gym. Three games were played, all three being won by the college teams. In March the high school girls returned the invitation. Again three games were played, and again the college women won. The officiating for the games was handled by Miss Branstad and several of the girls. La Vernia Jorgenson was sport head for the season. The captains and sport head selected an honor team as follows: guards—Effie Tobiassen, Jeanette Griffith. Emma Svoboda. Edith Stewart, and Lucile Creswell: forwards—Stella Tobiassen, Ardyth Grupe, Bernice Deiss. La Vernia Jorgenson, and Eunice Manske. [154 JWorn. Dritt. Crciwcll. Grupt. Brantud (Coiih). Snow. Schorl j J. Griffith. M; Pedersen. Jorgrnion, H. Pederson. E. Tobiaiitit, Jensen. Ahlgren, M. Griffith Srew.irc. I.onl.-r. Bauer. Cuiicu. S. TobiasMn. Boles. Hawn. Sirifbel. Svoboda VOLLEYBALL ABOUT thirty girls reported for the first volleyball practice of the year. The volleyball season was rather short this year as it was cut into by both baseball and basketball. Viola Granicia, Joyce Snow, and Edith Bauer were selected to captain the teams. A round robin tournament of nine games was arranged. Viola Granicia's team won the tournament, winning five out of six games. The sport head. Stella Tobiassen. and the captains selected an honor team as follows: LaVernia Jorgenson. Effie Tobiassen. LaVerne Jensen. Emma Svoboda. Marion Boles. Bernice Deiss. Lillie Ahlgren and Lucile Creswell. HOCKEY 1 IN SPRING a young man's fancy turns to thoughts of—well, you guess; but in autumn a young woman's thoughts turn toward hockey. Synony-mous with the opening of school is the opening of the hockey season. From then until Jack Frost comes the shrill cry of the referee’s whistle can be heard coming from the hockey field on south campus. Because hockey is a strenuous activity, calling for genuine interest and physical endurance from the participants, not many reported for this sport. But for those who like it hockey is tops! Two teams captained by Marion Boles and Mae Furbur engaged in a seesaw battle for hockey supremacy. Marion Boles’ team won the first two games of the tournament. Not wanting to go down without a fight, Mae Furbur's team took the next two games, thus tying the percentage standings. The fifth game was a tic. neither side being able to score to take the lead in the tournament. The last game was a game! Amidst a mad, scrambled thrash of hockey clubs and players’ legs, Marion’s team succeeded in winning the tournament 2-1! It was with great reluctance that the teams put away their clubs, balls, and shin guards until the next hockey season rolls around. [155] SWIMMING SWIMMING is rapidly establishing itself as a major sport in women’s athletics in this institution. We have a fine pool, well-kept, which should receive a good deal of attention from the students. Swimming is an activity which can be engaged in long after one leaves school. It is a sport that can be enjoyed singly or in company. For these reasons more people than do should come out for swimming on Wednesdays. Our school is not without good swimmers. Under the instruction of Miss Branstad several of these swimmers have worked until they have become eligible for the Red Cross Life Saving Award. To receive this award, a girl must be proficient enough in swimming to pass a rigid test of skill as outlined by the Red Cross organization. The following compose the Life Saving Corps: Betty Smith. Gertrude Peterson, Vivian Bach. Marguerite Lewis, Eunice Manske, La Verne Jensen, and Lucille Kay. BADMINTON Could you name three persons who have not heard of the new craze that has swept this school? It is badminton, of course. The game is a veritable whirlwind that has picked up players of all kinds and set them down on the badminton court in South Hall. Everybody's playing it! It is a fascinating English game introduced into this country from Canada. No less than six tournaments were held this year, four of them sponsored by the W. A. A. In the women’s singles elimination tournament, consisting of twenty-four entries. La Vernia Jorgenson defeated Miss Branstad for the title, three games to two. In the women’s doubles ladder tournament, made up of twelve teams, that ran for a period of eight weeks. Elizabeth Mason and Eunice Manske were the winners. The Joos-Branstad and Peterson-Jorgenson teams were runners-up. The mixed doubles ladder tournament that lasted for seven weeks was won by Miss Branstad and Doctor Owens. The Williams-Manske and Setterquist-Mrs. Owens teams were runners-up. This was the largest tournament of all, twenty-four teams having entered. Based on their final positions in the ladder tournament, mixed doubles teams were seeded for an elimination tournament. In the finals played on All Sport Night. Dr. Owens and Miss Branstad won over Elizabeth Mason and James May. This was the sport sponsored by the W. A. A. that had the greatest number and widest variety of participants. Badminton has gained a prominent position in the intramural games. It was one of the features of All Sport Night, held this year for the first time, on April 19 in the North Hall gym. This night was devoted to the playing-off of title matches in the intramural sports that have gained the widest following.BASEBALL TO the baseball player, spring is the most welcome time of year. It means a rousing good time spent out of doors whacking the old limbs into shape for another baseball season. Chasing balls, catching balls, batting balls—doing anything with balls—bring delight to the baseball player. The spring baseball season found two teams brushing up on their baseball form in anticipation of what they would do to their rivals. A schedule of five games was arranged between the E. Tobiassen and L. Jorgenson teams. As a result of heavy slugging and fine team work, Effie Tobiassen’s team subdued Jorgenson’s team to win the tournament. Elizabeth Hilyar was sport head. ARCHERY This time-honored sport was introduced in this institution this year. It promises to become very popular, as about thirty girls gave evidence of their interest in it. Miss Branstad is instructing the girls to shoot according to the Rounse-velle method. The good feature of this method is that one is taught six fundamental principles that enable one to correct his own faults and errors. After the period of instruction, a Columbia Round was shot. HIT-PIN BALL The W. A. A. introduced a new sport into its program this year—hit-pin ball. The game is developed on the combined principles of baseball and soccer. Played indoors, it is a fast, exciting game. Three teams of twelve players each were selected to play in a tournament consisting of fourteen games. Edith Stewart. Catherine Hogan. and Joyce Snow were team captains; May Heckel was sport bead. The tournament lasted for a period of seven weeks. The excellent team work and alertness displayed by Edith Stewart's team were sufficient reasons for it to win the tournament. The honor team, selected by the captains and sport head, was made up of the following players: Lillie Ahlgren. Marion Anderson. Lucile Creswell, La Vernia Jorgenson. Emma Svoboda. Effie Tobiassen. Stella Tobiassen. La Verne Jensen, and Eunice Manske. Because of the interest displayed in the sport this year, it will be added to the W. A. A. sport program. TENNIS Each spring and fall the W. A. A. conducts a tennis tournament. Because of the uncertainty of the weather, these tournaments are often much delayed. The finals of the fall tournament were played on a cold, windy day in October. La Vernia Jorgenson defeated Eunice Manske for the title 6-2. 8-6. Her superior drives and placements were responsible for her winning. Singles and doubles tournaments were held late in the spring.(ytijcLnijatLonl. THE TRAINING SCHOOLHtmum. Sooua. Joan. Altxindn. Low . Cb«l$r a J. Nelson. Fiu |ia. Bicbiom. Wens. Simtol. LegUr. Bwn. H. N l oa Shepard. Hill. Mon. Peterson. Hialett. Fein Nelson. I.or.de. Iverson M. Nelson. D. Nelson. B. Campbell. Swmsoo. Frooa Nelson. Sandow. H. Campbell. Sebnlz . Arne THE CLEF CLUB OFFICERS ARDELLE Hamlett....................................President Paul Somsen...................................Vice-President HILBERT Jones.............................Secretary- Treasurer Mr. Geere............................................Adviser THE primary aims of the Clef Club, whose meetings are open to anyone interested in the programs presented, are to foster a greater understanding, appreciation, and enjoyment of music. This year the club programs have included reviews of current affairs in the music world and special topics of general interest. The first program of the year, which was conducted by Miss Cara Wharton, consisted of a general historic review of the progress of vocal music from the early part of the Christian era down to the beginnings of opera in France and Italy in the sixteenth century. Illustrations of the fundamental types through the various stages of development were given by various members of the club— representative folk-songs, some hymns of Palestrina, and some of the early secular songs. Subsequent programs have been devoted to later phases of music, taken up in chronological order. Studies of French and Italian opera were conducted by Bette Campbell and Harriet Campbell respectively. Selections requested by guests of the club were given by members and from records. Mr. M. D. Geere. adviser to the Clef Club, presented a program of the choral music of Johann Sebastian Bach. For this program the A Cappella Chorus sang two of Bach’s choral works. The German opera, as characterized by Richard Wagner, was the subject of the joint meeting of the German Club and the Clef Club in April. Wagner’s "Tristan and Isolde" was reviewed in detail by Ardelle Hamlett. the approach being made from the combined dramatic and musical standpoint. The final meeting of the year, conducted by John Nelson, was given over to the vocal works of the Romantic composers. Schumann. Schubert, and Brahms. f 159 1Bernice Jacobsen THE HISTORY CLUB EXECUTIVE COUNCIL Olive Joos Daniel Dykstra Joseph Hyde Mr. Williams FACULTY ADVISERS Mr. Owens Mr. Wyman ONE of the most unusual societies of the college is the History Club. Its singularity lies in the fact that it has no definite organization, roll of members, or dues. It is open to all college students whose interest in affairs of the world prompts them to attend. The purpose of the History Club is to furnish a forum for the discussion and interpretation of current issues of state, national, or international scope. Topics of immediate and vital interest are presented by qualified speakers. Following the address, the students have an opportunity to discuss the topic or elaborate more fully upon it. The activities of the club for the past year are as follows: November 3: Election Party November 17: Address. "My Analysis of the Presidential Election"—Dr. Justin Williams December 8: Address. "The Spanish Situation"—Dr. Walker D. Wyman January 19: Address. "Repercussions Arising from Spanish Conflict”—Dr. J. Henry Owens February 2: Address. "Prospective Legislation in 1937 Legislature"—Senator Walter Hunt February 16: Discussion, "Judiciary Reform Proposal”—Roman Zorn and Daniel Dykstra March 2: Address. "The Russian Constitution”—-Mrs. Elsie Stanton March 17: Address. "Arctic Adventures"—Captain Albert Hasselt I 160 1LE CERCLE FRANCAIS OFFICERS Dorothy Arnquist........... Elizabeth Mason........... Stanley Doolittle........... Mr. Owens.................. ..........President ..........Secretary . Program Chairman ............Adviser MEMBERS Rachel Aldrich Lenore Anderson Dorothy Arnquist Betty Boardman Stanley Doolittle Olive Flathe Betty Larson Elizabeth Mason Nina Jean Miller Nancy Njos Ruth Phillips Louise Swanson ONE of the new organizations on the campus this year is Le Cercle Francais. The membership is restricted to third and fourth year French students who have been invited to join the club. Meetings consist of informal discussions and games the purpose of which is to develop conversational French. Several French books and plays were reviewed; one of the French plays was put on by the students. 11611THE STUDENT SOCIAL COMMITTEE OFFICERS EUGENE GOSSEN........................Chairman BERNICE Jacobsen..........Secretary-Treasurer MEMBERS Rachel Aldrich........ Edwin Baker............ Fred Brechlin.......... Walter Busch.......... John Christianson...... Franklin Elliott...... Eugene Gossen.......... Russell Gettinger...... Francis Haugh.......... Dora Mae Hocking.... Bernice Jacobsen...... Adeline Larson......... Mae Nelson............. Dorothea Panzenhagen. Robert Platte.......... Mary Katherine Prucha. Florence Sagstetter.... Phyllis Soderstrom.... Roman Zorn............. Organization Represented .........French Club .......Y. M. C. A. . . . .Sophomore Class ........Science Club ......Honor Society ........Palette Club ........Senior Class . .Mathematics Club ............F. F. A. .............G. O. P. .......Student Voice ............W. A. A. .......Y. W. C. A. ........Senior Class . . . . .Freshman Class . . .Sophomore Class . . . .Rural Life Club .........Junior Class . . .Pi Kappa Delta [162]THE STUDENT SOCIAL COMMITTEE THE Student Social Committee is unique among organizations on this campus in that its membership is composed of representatives of each class and organization in the college. The class presidents each appoint two representatives. while each organization is entitled to select one member for the committee. Working in conjunction with the student group is a faculty social committee of which Miss Hathorn is the chairman. The purpose of the Student Social Committee is to plan the all-school social program for the year. Under the leadership of Eugene Gossen, a senior who was elected chairman of the group, the committee has planned and carried out an excellent calendar of social activities. Bernice Jacobsen, also a senior, was chosen secretary and treasurer for the year. In order to divide the responsibility for arranging for social affairs, each member of the organization was appointed chairman of a committee composed of several other members of the group to have charge of at least one event. Mr. Gossen, as general chairman, assisted each of the individual committees. Social life at the college under the direction of the committee opened with a dance which was held Friday, October 2. Arnie Kuss and his orchestra furnished the music for this well-attended party. The committee voted that a uniform admission of ten cents per person be charged for this and succeeding school dances. The social committee initiated what will probably become an annual custom in the college by nominating six representative senior girls for Homecoming queen. Nominations from other members of the student body were acceptable until the Thursday before Homecoming when the committee conducted the election in the college assembly. Adeline Larson was elected queen with Ardus Erlandson and Bernice Jacobsen elected to be her attendants. The Homecoming dance, which was held October 22. was the first major event for which the Student Social Committee assumed responsibility. An unusually large crowd of old grads and students danced to the music of the Minnesota Collegians in the North Hall gymnasium, which was decorated with red. white, and blue crepe paper and balloons. The Christmas party sponsored by the Student Social Committee was given after the musical organizations’ Christmas program. The Yuletide spirit was carried out by a Christmas tree, the distribution of candy and apples, and group singing of Christmas songs. As has become traditional, the committee sponsored matinee dances for the afternoon of registration day for the second and third terms. Throughout the year free dances and dime dances were held after basketball games and on other convenient occasions. Several parties at which cards and other games were played were very popular with the students. Besides planning social affairs for the college, the group decided that some of its funds should be used for subscriptions to magazines not taken in the library, since this would benefit a large number of the students. Magazines were ordered for the Social Room, the Men’s Union, and the College Infirmary. A ping-pong table for the South Hall gym and a new punch bowl were also purchased with student social activity funds. The Student Social Committee has been successful in giving the student body one of the most varied social programs it has ever had. We hope the new committee which was selected this spring will plan a still more efficient and successful program for the coming year. 1163]THE YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION CABINET Leonard Hermanson............................President Howard Elliott..........................Vice-President RUSSELL Gettinger............................Secretary Stanley Morgan...............................Treasurer Lc Roy Alexander Edwin Baker Eddie Cass John Christianson Everett Compton Franklin Elliott Robert Johnson Rolf Ordal Mr. Jacobson............................ Adviser 1 164 lTHE YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION THE purpose of the student Y. M. C. A. at River Falls is to foster active Christian interest among the men students of the college. During the past year the organization has had an unusually large membership, and it has carried on a varied program throughout the year. Regular meetings of the Y. M. C. A. are held each Monday evening in the Men’s Union. These meetings usually consist of musical numbers and talks on some subject of interest. Among the out-of-town speakers who addressed meetings this year were: Dr. O.T. Walter of Macalester, Dean Price of Stout Institute, C. Stanley Lamb of the St. Paul Y. M. C. A., and Ben Schmoker, executive secretary of the Christian Association at the University of Minnesota. Several faculty members also addressed some of the meetings. Among them were Dr. Wyman. President J. H. Ames, Dr. Karges, and Prof. W. H. Hunt. Cabinet business sessions are held once a week, usually following the regular Monday evening meeting. The cabinet also meets twice a month for Sunday morning breakfast. At these meetings the time is spent in the discussion of some problem. As usual, several projects were sponsored jointly by the Y. M. C. A. and the Y. W. C. A. during the year. Among them were the freshman mixer, the Thanksgiving program, the Christmas program, and the Easter service. These programs were held on Sunday afternoons in the auditorium. The play given at the Christmas program. "Peace I Give Unto You," was repeated several times on later occasions. A group of discussions was also sponsored jointly. These meetings were held during the first three weeks of February. During these discussions the organizations were divided into smaller groups so that each group could choose its topic. This series of meetings was closed by an address by Ben Schmoker of Minneapolis. The freshman mixer held this year was a new activity. It was held in the evening of the opening day of school, giving opportunity for the freshmen and the faculty to become acquainted. The mixer was well attended, and it is probable that similar mixers will be held in future years. The annual spring retreat was held at Big Lake in the latter part of May. Most of the cabinet members attended this retreat, and plans were made for the activities for the year. The fall retreat, held at the same place, was held during the first week in September. At that time, final plans were made for most of the year’s work. The student conference held at Lake Independence on May 16 and 17 is one event which is always well attended by River Falls students. At this conference the students have an opportunity to meet and exchange ideas with others from colleges in northwestern Wisconsin and in Minnesota. Each year some of the members of the Y. M. C. A. attend the student conference at Lake Geneva. This year Professor Jacobson. Le Roy Alexander, and Leonard Hermanson attended that conference. The Y. M. C. A. also took an active part in the Homecoming activities. Instead of entering a float in the competition for prizes, the "Y" built the float on which the Homecoming queen rode in the parade. A Homecoming banquet was also held, and many former cabinet members attended. The final meeting of the year was the installation banquet which was held at the Congregational Church. Rev. Gordon Amphlett was the speaker. Six new cabinet members were installed on this occasion. f 165 |THE YOUNG WOMEN’S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION CABINET Elizabeth Griffith..............................President ADELINE LARSON.............................Vice-President Phyllis Soderstrom.......................... . .Secretary Lucille Spriggs.................................Treasurer Elza Lou Hanna Olive Joos Joyce Leonard Iris Mills Mae Nelson Mildred Pedersen Louise Swanson Emma Lou Tubbs Miss Hathorn Adviser 11661THE YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION THE Y. W. C. A. on the campus is a branch of the national Y. W. C. A. The aim of this organization is very well expressed in the purpose which is as follows: We, the members of the Young Women's Christian Association, unite in the desire to realize a full and creative life through a growing knowledge of God. We determine to have a part in making this life possible for all people. In this task we seek to understand Jesus and to follow Him. The governing body of the Y. W. C. A. is the cabinet with Miss Irma Hathorn as its adviser. The cabinet is organized in committee groups, the purpose of the committees as a whole being to fulfill the needs of every girl on the campus, in other words, striving for individual participation. The Y. W. C. A. works continuously throughout the entire year. Each Monday night is set aside as "Y” night. On these evenings varied programs are presented. Some of the most outstanding programs of the past year were the Candlelight Service, Amateur Night, and various musical and discussion hours. A few meetings were given over to outside speakers. On special occasions, Thanksgiving. Christmas, and Easter, joint worship services with the Y. M. C. A. were held in the auditorium. These programs were especially outstanding. At the Christmas program the play. “Peace. I Give Unto You,” was presented, and at Easter the play. “The Things That Are Caesar's,” was given. During the month of February we held four meetings with the Y. M. C. A. These discussions were on the subjects. "What are we in college for?’’. “Is Campus popularity worth seeking?”, and “Social relations between men and women.” The fourth meeting was a large group meeting at which Ben Schmoker. Secretary of the Y. M. C. A. at the University of Minnesota, was the guest speaker. In the fall the Y. W. C. A. jointly with the Y. M. C. A. put on a freshman mixer which was held during the first week of school. The Y. W. C. A. also promotes the Campus Sister Movement, which is an upper classman adopting a freshman girl and assisting her in the difficult process of becoming acquainted with the school and college life in general. Sometime during the first week the “Y” girls have a tea at which time the older girls bring their little sisters. Homecoming, one of the biggest times of the entire year, found the Y. W. C. A. with a float in the parade and a luncheon for present and past members. The luncheon is outstanding in that it gives girls a chance to really see old friends and feel that they are still a part of the organization of the "Y.” Early in the spring is the annual Puff-Pant Prom which is the biggest social event of the “Y” year. It is a prom, yes! but only girls may participate. Men are strictly excluded. During the year are two conferences of great interest to the “Y.” One is at Lake Independence, Minnesota, in the spring. At this conference schools in the Minnesota-Northern Wisconsin area are represented. The other is our summer conference at Lake Geneva in the southern part of Wisconsin. This is a longer, more important conference at which Y. W. C. A. members from nine states are represented. This is the outstanding conference for this region. Here are speakers of interest: here plans are gathered and formulated for another year's work; here we may participate in recreational as well as mental and spiritual activities. Through this conference we may hope to bring back to our campus some of the fire and enthusiasm of what we call the "Geneva Spirit.” I 167|THE HONOR SOCIETY OFFICERS Mae Nelson......................................... President KENNETH Wall....................................Viet-President ADELINE L ARSON...............................Secretary-Treasurer MRS. EIDE............................................ Adviser GOLD "R" Le Roy Alexander.... Science. Mathematics Rolf Ordal......... Gertrude Blatt........ .Elementary Education Dorothea Panzenhagen Theofil Cuhel......... Science. Mathematics Velma Segerstrom. . . Claire Fyksen........Elementary Education Anna May Void...... Mary Junkman..........History. Mathematics Roman Zorn......... Nancy Njos............English. Social Science History. Social Science .Science. Social Science . . . . .English. History ......History. English ......History. English SILVER •R” Louise Adams Donald Adcrhold Le Roy Alexander Lenore Anderson Orlin Anderson Dorothy Arnquist Ralph Baker Lucille Bierbaum Gertrude Blatt Betty Boardman Mildred Boles John Christianson Norman Christianson Elaine Clausen Gordon Condit Glen Crowley Theofil Cuhel Daniel Dykstra Franklin Elliott Olive Flathc George Freier Kathleen Fuller Claire Fyksen Warren Gates Russell Gcttinger Florence Greeley Jeannette Griffith Mary Griffith Niles Grunkc Ardelle Hamlett Elza Lou Hanna Francis Haugh Marion Hawkins Leonard Hcrmanson Helen Hickox Roland Hunsader Joseph Hyde Bernice Jacobsen Dean Johnson Olive Joos Mary Junkman Adeline Larson John Lawson Joyce Leonard Mildred Le Page Alice Lien Jenny Lindh Velma Livingston James May Carl Miller Edna Moline Dorothy Nelson Mae Nelson Nancy Njos Doris Nystrom Rolf Ordal Dorothea Panzenhagen Maxine Peabody Manghild Peterson Roy Peterson Ruth Phillips Mary Katherine Prucha Florence Sagstetter Florence Schmidt Gladys Schulze Velma Segerstrom Phyllis Soderstrom Lucille Spriggs Leo Stenback Lucille Striebcl Charles Stratton Louise Swanson Merton Timmerman Mary Vandenberge Anna May Void Edna Wahl Kenneth Wall James Webert Fred Whitemarsh Richard Yanisch Roman ZornTHE HONOR SOCIETY AT the end of every term a list of the people who have made at least two and one-half honor points for each credit hour is published in the Student Voice. These people were honored, in the early days of the school, at a tea given them by the faculty. Later they entertained the faculty at a few teas, thus becoming a loosely organized group for the purpose of entertainment. The next step was in the direction of meetings two or three times a year. At these meetings they listened to some outside speaker. Today the Honor Society is purely a social organization, endeavoring to give its members a few hours of recreation. It is now a regular organization with officers, faculty adviser, and regular scheduled monthly meetings. This year the Honor Society presented a stunt at the annual Homecoming. It was a dramatization of the Martins and the Coys changed to the Falcons and the Hornets. This season has been especially noteworthy for its excellent entertainment. Chairmen from among the members have been chosen by the president. These chairmen took charge of the various meetings by planning the entertainment for the evenings. Among the chairmen were Mary Junkman, Dorothy Arnquist, Phyllis Sodcrstrom, Russell Gcttinger, Kenneth Wall, and Mary Katherine Prucha. The first party of the year was a Bunco party held in the social room. It proved to be a successful way of starting a season of fun. It was followed the next month by a card party, also in the social room. Another meeting took the form of a sleigh-ride, after which refreshments were served. Later another party was held at which the members had a choice of skating on the college rink or playing cards in the social room. In the spring a progressive game party was held in the Men’s Union. The games consisted of indoor croquet, indoor horseshoe, ping pong, and other indoor games. Another meeting was a scavenger hunt after which members met to elect officers for the next year. The last meeting of the year was a picnic. A large number attended, thus ending a year of excellent entertainment. The Honor Society has as an emblem a small silver R pin. which each member is entitled to wear after having had his name on the Honor Roll for one term. If. at the completion of a course, he has earned two and one-fourth honor points for each credit hour and has no grade less than C. he is entitled to a gold R. Honorable mention may be acquired by having had no grade less than C and having earned at least two honor points per credit hour during attendance at school. Faculty adviser for the group is Mrs. Eide who has made all feel welcome at the parties and who has assisted in making plans for the many enjoyable evenings. f 169]THE RURAL LIFE CLUB OFFICERS First Semester Florence Greeley . . Willard Traynor . . Manghild Peterson Walter Wood....... Elaine Clausen Miss Jorstad .........President.... ......Vice-President. . .........Secretary.... .......T reasurer.... .. . . Program Chairman Second Semester Willard Traynor . Ruth Peterson ... Edith Stewart .... Martin Bents Velma Livingston .....Adviser Marion Anderson Martin Bents Randall Birkel Marion Boles Margaret Carlson Elaine Clausen Lcota Elliot Margaret Erickson Mae Furbur Phyllis Golden Florence Greeley Ardyth Grupe MEMBERS Rhoda Hawn La Verne Johnson Lucille Jones Russell Larson Ell wood Linder Vivian Lindus Velma Livingston Violet Lubnow Mary McCardle Marcia Nelson Margaret Nelson Doris Nystrom Manghild Peterson Ruth Peterson Helen Rein Benjamin Rivard Florence Sagstetter Ellen Selvig Joyce Snow Edith Stewart Effie Tobiassen Stella Tobiassen Willard Traynor Walter Wood I I70|THE RURAL LIFE CLUB THE Rural Life Club is an organization which has been influential in the rural department for nearly twenty-five years. All students enrolled in the rural courses are members of the organization and are given an opportunity to develop the qualities of leadership desirable for teachers in rural schools. For the past two years its enrollment has been increased due to the adoption of a two-year rural course for all rural teachers. This gives the club the advantage of experienced members and an organization that is continuous from year to year. Miss Jorstad acts as faculty adviser of the group. Regular meetings of the Rural Life Club are held the first and third Thursday evenings of each month. The early part of the evening consists of a business meeting, the primary purpose of which is to give practice in parliamentary procedure essential for conducting school societies and community meetings. The remainder of the evening is devoted to programs of education and entertainment. The interesting educational programs which have been given are the results of the efforts of the chairman of the program committee and the cooperation of the members. Some of the students who have given talks on particular problems are: Velma Livingston. Joyce Snow. Edith Stewart. Mary McCardle. and Doris Nystrom. Such problems as rural community organizations, rural school programs, choral speech, and music in rural schools were discussed. Others who have helped with the programs this year are: Miss Louise Hilder. Miss Stella Hendrickson and Professor Malott. Attendance at out of town rural meetings has been featured. Most of the sophomore members of the club went to the Pierce County school board convention at Ellsworth in October. Several students accompanied Miss Jorstad and Mr. Malott to Eau Claire on May fifteenth and reported a very worth while rural convention. Programs of entertainment other than informational activities were also included in the year’s meetings. Early in the year a picnic to welcome freshman members was held in Glen Park. The first indoor meeting was also devoted to playing "get-acquainted" games: and. as in previous years, a feeling of interest and cooperation among the members of the department was established. The last meeting before Christmas was given over to the playing of games and drawing of names for the exchange of Christmas cards. In January the social entertainment consisted of a sleigh-ride party at which most of the participants were unceremoniously dumped into snowbanks. After the ride refreshments were served and the new officers were elected. These officers have very ably led the club during the last half of the year. During the last half of the winter and the first half of the spring terms, the sophomore students spent six weeks in rural school districts which are located from five to eighteen miles from the campus. The last Rural Life Club meeting before leaving for practice was extended so that farewells could be made. However, after six weeks of practice experience in a rural school the students usually regretted leaving their younger friends and the rural critic who had indeed been a friend to each of the inexperienced "student teachers." The rural critics are: Miss Bernice Hawkins at the Hammond Central School. Miss Florence Jenson at the Herum School, and Miss Ruth Nelson at the Angel Hill School. On April twenty-ninth the sophomore members were entertained at the home of Professor and Mrs. Malott. After dinner a very enjoyable evening was spent around the fireplace. f 1711THE PALETTE CLUB THE EXECUTIVE COUNCIL Franklin Elliott.....................Chairman Gertrude Stephenson.......Secretary-Treasurer Joseph Hyde Gertrude Peterson Edna Moline Miss Greene......................... Adviser MEMBERS Doris Andrea Helen Marie Arnquist Mary Louise Branstad Lucille Creswell Franklin Elliott Claire Fyksen Werner Gleiter May Heckcl Gladys Herstrum Elizabeth Hilyar Joseph Hyde Frederick Johnson Adeline Larson Norma Marek Galen Meier Ruth Moen Edna Moline Gertrude Peterson Catherine Salmon Dorothy Severson Georgeann Sherman Gertrude Stephenson Jeanne Swanson Elva Vruwink Mary Werts r 1721THE PALETTE CLUB npHE most evident activity of the Palette Club this year has been the sponsor-jL ing of a series of exhibits of contemporary American paintings. The exhibits have been open to the public and have furnished an opportunity for everyone to see examples of notable modern art. The four exhibits have provided a means for the school and public to become acquainted with the work being done by artists living today. Included in the series were works by such outstanding artists as John Martin, Georgia O'Keeffe, Peggy Bacon, and Marsden Hartley. A small jury of distinguished artists and art critics selected the pictures for the exhibits from hundreds submitted to them during the past year by foremost American artists. Using the paintings in the fourth group as examples, Miss Alberta Greene, head of the art department, talked before a meeting of the Palette Club on April 28, on "How to Look at Modern Pictures." The meeting was open to the student body and to the public. A number of people from the local community attended this program. The student body was invited to another program at which a discussion of surrealism was conducted by members of the executive committee. Joseph Hyde reported the history of the movement, and Gertrude Peterson spoke on the emotional quality of surrealist productions. Using an exhibit of surrealist pictures gathered by Gertrude Stephenson, the group discussed their reactions to individual compositions. In accordance with a basic purpose of the Palette Club, many of the meetings have been planned to furnish the members with an opportunity for the recreation derived from creative expression. During the fall term members, choosing individual projects, made Christmas cards and handicraft articles for Christmas presents. Through the remainder of the year projects were outlined by the officers for the group to do together. This year projects have been chosen which would acquaint the members with the fundamental principles of various artistic and handicraft processes. Clay modeling, leather tooling, and wood carving, and portrait sketching were among them. A friendly, unified spirit was fostered in the society early in the year when the club's adviser. Miss Greene, entertained the group at her apartment. On the first evening after Easter vacation the organization held another party, this time in the social room. This friendly spirit developed further during the month of May when the club went on a series of sketching tours. With the aid of Miss Greene's rich sketching experience, the group found real enjoyment in recording their impressions of scenes in and near River Falls. 11731THE MATHEMATICS CLUB OFFICERS Everett Compton...................................Chairman RUTH NELSON......................................Secretary MRS. ElDE..........................................Adviser Le Roy Anderson Ralph Baker Ulrich Bents Elmer Blaisdell Everett Compton Burton Ellig George Freier Kathleen Fuller Warren Gates Russell Gettinger Leonard Hermanson Nolan Isaacson Duane Jackman Robert Johnson Kermit Jones Mary Junkman Willard Klugow Stanley Morgan John Lawson Mildred Le Page Loren Lund Gilbert Mattson Galen Meier Carl Miller Ruth Nelson Reynold Pedersen Lucille Striebel Leonard Wilson Frank WinterlingTHE MATHEMATICS CLUB THE Mathematics Club is a comparatively recent organization. It was organized three years ago for the purpose of studying those topics of mathematics which do not fit into any course offered, or which time does not allow the members to study in class. All people who take mathematics courses and have a C average in these are allowed to become members. The organization meets every second Wednesday of the month when a few of the members talk on mathematics topics. Several programs of interest have been presented this year. The first program of the year was held October 14. 1936. The topic of discussion by George Freier was “The Beauty of Mathematics”: “Magic Circles” was discussed by Ruth Nelson. On December 9. 1936. the Mathematics Club had a party in the social room. Games, puzzles, and a play, “The Eternal Triangle.” provided the entertainment of the evening. On January 13. 1937. Nolan Isaacson demonstrated the use of the Trigono-graph with which one may multiply, divide, and find functions of angles much more easily than by ordinary methods. The New Number System based on the number twelve was presented by Ralph Baker. At another meeting complex numbers were discussed by Nolan Isaacson and non-Euclidean geometry by Russell Gettinger. Mrs. Eide gave at this meeting an interesting talk on her trip to the Council of Teachers of Mathematics at Chicago. At one of the meetings Galen Meier discussed the history of x. Kathleen Fuller told about Descartes and his work on analytical geometry, which was published in 1637, thus making this year the three hundredth anniversary. One of the best programs of the year was a symposium on numerology presented by the following freshman students: Loren Lund. Willard Klugow, Carl Miller, Ulrich Bents, and Donald Monson. The last meeting of the year was in the social room. Reynold Pedersen and Everett Compton reviewed two recent books on mathematics, “Mathematics for the Million” and “Men of Mathematics.” After this games of mathematics were played and refreshments served. 1175]THE SCIENCE CLUB OFFICERS Robert Johnson............................. President DONALD HART.............................Vice-President WERNER GLEITER.....................Secretary-Treasurer Mr. Spriggs....................................Adviser Lc Roy Anderson Orlin Anderson Norris Ashleson Ralph Baker Glenn Benson Walter Busch Fred Brechlin Eddie Cass John Christianson Norman Christianson Gordon Condit Theofil Cuhel Russell Gettinger Raymond Gilles MEMBERS Werner Gleiter Walter Gronning Donald Hart Kenneth Heideman Henry Hermansen Leonard Hermanson John Huron Bernard Hylkema Donald Jensen Howard Jensen Myron Johanson Frederick Johnson Robert Johnson Claude Jones Willard Klugow FACULTY MEMBERS Lawrence Knutson Mildred Le Page Loren Lund Gilbert Mattson Galen Meier Roger Montgomery Mary Katherine Prucha Thomas Ronnigen Robert Rundell Lucille Striebel Robert Torgerson Frank Winterling Lloyd Yanisch Richard Yanisch J. P. Jacobson R. A. Karges B. H. Kettlecamp 1 1761 Catharine Lieneman R. E. Spriggs C. G. StrattenTHE SCIENCE CLUB 1HE Science Club was organized in the spring of 1935 by a group of students desirous of creating an interest in current affairs in science. Meetings are held twice a month in the chemistry lecture room at which time programs are given which should appeal to all students interested in science. Membership in the club is open to all students who are either majoring or minoring in science and to all students who have had ten credit hours of science. The student body is, however, invited to attend the meetings. The college science teachers are honorary members of the organization. Mr. R. E. Spriggs is the club’s adviser. The programs are made up of talks and demonstrations by faculty members, students, and outside speakers and of instructive motion pictures. During the past year the programs named below have been given. On October fifteenth Lawrence Hope, the district conservation warden, gave a talk on the conservation movement in Wisconsin and showed two very interesting Conservation Department films entitled "Propagating Northern Pike,” and "The White-tailed Deer.” On October twenty-ninth an inspection tour of River Falls’ new sewage disposal plant was made. This plant is new and unique and was explained by William Hagestad, consulting engineer. On January twelfth Mr. C. G. Stratton, head of the geography department, spoke on the subject of the calendar. He gave the history and evolution of the calendar and discussed the various proposed calendar changes. On the twenty-sixth of January A. W. Plahn, the district oil inspector, demonstrated and explained the inspection of oils and fuels. In demonstrating, he performed the inspection of gasoline, kerosene, and motor oil. On February ninth Lawrence Peterson of the River Falls Motor Company showed an instructive group of films on the motor industry. These films showed the entire process in the manufacture of an automobile from the raw to the finished product. On February twenty-third R. E. Spriggs of the college faculty, discussed the subject, "What Is New in Auto-Power Design.” Among the new trends discussed was the interesting subject of Diesel engines. Perhaps the most interesting program of all was that of April sixth. The five reel film, "Jewels of Industry.” was shown. This film gave the complete story of carborundum and its use in modern industry. The film was preceded by a short talk by Dr. R. E. Karges. who described his visit to the carborundum plant at Niagara Falls. At the business meeting which followed the last meeting officers for the coming year were elected. The following were elected: Leonard Hermanson. president: Ralph Baker, vice-president: Frederick Johnson, secretary: and Russell Gettinger. treasurer. 1177]DIE DEUTSCHE GESELLSCHAFT OFFICERS Le Roy Alexander...... Alfred Chelgren......... Theofil Cuhel............. Mr. Whitenack............. ..........President .....Vice-President . Secret ary-Treasurer .............Adviser MEMBERS Mildred Abbott Maralee Ahlgren Le Roy Alexander Fred Alfonse Edith Bauer William Bartz Elizabeth Belitz Martin Bents Ulrich Bents Alfred Chelgren John Clai re Tbeofil Cuhel Robert Devereaux Lois Ecklund Allen Erickson Bruce Erickson Melvin Erickson Imbert Eslinger Harold Fjeseth Ida Frank Lloyd Frank Kathleen Fuller Werner Gleiter Jeanette Griffith Mary Griffith Eleanor Hatch Marion Hawkins Marcia Healy Helen Hickox Adelaide Hill Betty Jane Hogue Dorothy House Frederick Johnson Robert Johnson Hilbert Jones Olive Joos Leo Klecker Vera Klimpcr Rose Jean Lang Loell Larson Marguerite Lewis Alice Lien Carl Miller Raymond Moen Florine Muehlbauser John Nelson Mae Nelson Andrew Osborn Robert Ost Edgar Palm Dorothea Panzenhagcn Mildred Pedersen Reynold Pedersen Roy Peterson Lola Quandt Tom Rendler Arnold Rhiel Rose Rogers Robert Schlomann Oren Scbneiderwent Norman Soderstrom Phyllis Soderstrom Frederick Steckelberg Peter Stene Charles Stratton Lucille Striebcl George Thompson Mary Vandenberge . Mary Werts Marshall Wilcox Frank Wintering Lloyd Yanisch Richard Yanisch I 178JDIE DEUTSCHE GESELLSCHAFT DIE DEUTSCHE GESELLSCHAFT is a club open to all students interested in the German language or in German customs, arts, and personalities. As such it is in no sense an exclusive organization, but is designed to render its services to a large group. Only a reasonable degree of familiarity with the German language is expected of its members. A German club had not existed on the campus for many years, but this year so great a demand was evidenced for such an organization that Die Deutsche Gesellschaft was organized last fall. The primary aims of the society as stated in its constitution are: 1. To afford those interested in German an opportunity for social contact. 2. To develop skill in using and understanding spoken German. 3. To'gain a knowledge of German life and customs. 4. To learn to appreciate German arts. 5. To promote an understanding of contemporary German history and an acquaintance with great German personalities. Meetings are held in the social room of South Hall on the first and third Thursdays of each month at 7:30 p. m. The new organization has had a very successful initial season. Group singing of German songs during a part of each meeting has been one of the most popular activities of the society. In this way the entire membership participates in realizing several of the aims of the club and at the same time enjoys a novel form of recreation. Whenever possible it has been customary to play various German games to enliven the social period following each program. This feature has been much enjoyed and has brought about a spirit of good fellowship coincident with practice in the use of the language. In order to encourage a wide membership the club has not assessed regular dues but has simply made small charges for refreshments and other incidentals as the need arose. On February 18 the club presented for the public a colorful program of German music that was especially enjoyed. Every type of German music was represented from the compositions of the great masters to the rollicking airs associated with German student life and the "Bier Garten." Groups participating included Mr. Rozehnal. Rozehnal's string ensemble. Herr Fritz and his German Band from the River Falls high school. Miss Ardelle Hamlett at the piano, and a group of vocal soloists and ensembles. Two other meetings of special note were held in the spring. At the first meeting Dr. Karges gave a very lucid account of the scientific achievements of Goethe, that giant of versatility. The other meeting was a joint session with the Clef Club. Miss Hamlett gave an inclusive review of the Wagnerian opera. "Tristan." following which both groups participated in a dancing party in North Hall gymnasium. Much credit for the success of the club must go to Mr. Whitenack. whose versatile knowledge, ready wit, and linguistic fluency made him a favorite speaker as well as adviser for the organization. [1791FUTURE FARMERS OF AMERICA OFFICERS Louis Zahradka .... Michael Reagan John Christianson .. John Huron....... Mr. May........... Donald Aderhold Eldridge Afdahl Norris Ashleson Edwin Baker Russell Bartlett Stanley Bednarczyk Fred Brecblin Joseph Burger John Christianson Norman Christianson John Diesing Norman Dilly Glenn Gerhardt Raymond Gilles Walter Gronning Francis Haugh Walter Hansen Donald Hart Kenneth Heideman Henry Hermansen MEMBERS Clifford Hermanson Donovan Hohman John Huron Bernard Hylkema Wayne Ingli Donald Jensen Howard Jensen Myron Johanson Herman Kaiser George Kinney Andrew Kuba Joe Lucente Cyril Lyons John Madden Louis Malotky Merlin Miller William Mills Roger Montgomery Clifford Noreen ......President Vice-President Secretary Treasurer Adviser Theodore Olsen Norman Olson Harold Patton Allan Peterson Donald Peterson Michael Reagan George Roberts Thomas Ronnigen Melvin Rydberg Robert Schlomann Lawrence Shedd Lyle Shedd Walter Steneman Glenn Thoeny Merton Timmerman Thenard Torgerson Victory Ulvestad Kenneth Wall Fred Whitemarsh Louis Zahradka C 180 JFUTURE FARMERS OF AMERICA PROFESSOR JOHN M. MAY, head of the agriculture department, was largely responsible for promoting the collegiate chapter of the Future Farmers of America which was organized at the beginning of the year. Mr. L. M. Sasman, state supervisor of vocational agriculture, spoke to the men of the agriculture department on the value of a collegiate chapter during the organization period. The agricultural students believed that an organization of this kind would serve the needs of prospective Smith-Hughes agriculture teachers better than the Agrifallian society which for many years had filled the needs of the agriculture students. Because every Smith-Hughes high school agriculture department sponsors a Future Farmers chapter, the men of this department wanted experience and information concerning this line of their work. Collegiate Future Farmer chapters are chartered by and are under the authority of the state associations of Future Farmers of America. The sole purpose of such chapters is the training of prospective teachers of vocational agriculture in their duties as local advisers of high school chapters. The activities of the local chapter must be in harmony with the purposes, principles, and ideals of the National Future Farmers organization; the meetings are conducted according to the national ritual. A constitution was drawn up by Donald Aderhold, Francis Haugh, Michael Reagan and Louis Zahradka. This constitution states the rights and privileges of the organization, which also includes a system of degrees designed to stimulate advancement by the members. An organization of degree teams to confer higher degrees on eligible members of neighboring high school chapters, the conducting of a rural school day to provide educational demonstrations and entertainment for rural school children, and the conducting of an educational meeting on Future Farmer activities for officers of high school Future Farmer chapters are the main activities of the River Falls Collegiate Chapter of Future Farmers of America. These are the activities with which agriculture teachers in the field will come in contact. They give prospective teachers experience and at the same time give them a chance to come in contact with the types of boys and girls with whom they will be working. [181]THE G. O. P. OFFICERS Elizabeth Mason.............. Marion Hawkins............... Louise Swanson............... Lauraine Isaacson............ Miss Greene.................... ......President . Vice-President ......Secretary . . . .Treasurer .......Adviser MEMBERS Joyce Alton Ruth Ames Lenore Anderson Dorothy Arnquist Helen Marie Arnquist Lucille Bierbaum Harriet Campbell Ardus Erlandson Lucille Evans Gwendolyn Fox Ardelle Hamlett Elza Lou Hanna Marion Hawkins Dora Mae Hocking Lauraine Isaacson Lucille Kay Mary Helen Kay Adeline Larson Betty Larson Elizabeth Mason Ruth Milbrath Nancy Njos Maxine Peabody Mildred Pedersen Ruth Phillips Hope Sandow Lucile Spriggs Louise Swanson Emma Lou Tubbs Lucille Zahradka 1182THE G. O. P. DURING the past year the G. O. P. has met bi-monthly, one meeting a month for business and the other for cultural programs. The cultural meetings consisted of talks by various people on the campus and in the organization itself. The subjects for the meetings were topics of interest to everyone, such as new books, music, drama, and art. Besides the meetings, numerous social functions were planned during the year. A dinner at Miss Greene’s apartment, for which she is justly famous, started the year. Soon afterward the organization started plans for homecoming. There was a stunt for the big mass meeting and the annual homecoming G. O. P. dinner at Mrs. Brundage's home. Just after Christmas fourteen new members were taken into the organization with all the fun (for the old members) of initiation week. Immediately afterward plans for the winter formal were formulated. The dance took place in the North Hall gym which was decorated on the winter theme. It turned out to be one of the best formats of the year and the G. O. P. girls rightly were proud of the financial success. The biggest event of the year was the celebration of the twenty-fifth anniversary of the foundation of the G. O. P. Its history from the time when it was an active pep organization on the State Normal School campus to the social group which functions on this campus is very interesting. Former G. O. P. members are scattered all over this section of the country, many of them even in more distant places. Every effort was made to reach these members and invite them to the reunion luncheon which took place on Saturday of commencement week. It was inspirational to have these women come back to their school, laugh, and talk over the organization which they knew when they were here. Their enthusiasm for the present organization was most heartening and enabled everyone to get a new enthusiastic interest in the work. fun. and future of the G. O. P. I 183 IPrinted by AUGSBURG PUBLISHING HOUSE 425 South 4th Street. Minneapolis, Minnesota Engraved by BUREAU OF ENGRAVING. INC. 500 South 4th Street. Minneapolis. Minnesota 


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University of Wisconsin River Falls - Meletean Yearbook (River Falls, WI) online yearbook collection, 1934 Edition, Page 1

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University of Wisconsin River Falls - Meletean Yearbook (River Falls, WI) online yearbook collection, 1935 Edition, Page 1

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University of Wisconsin River Falls - Meletean Yearbook (River Falls, WI) online yearbook collection, 1939 Edition, Page 1

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