University of Wisconsin River Falls - Meletean Yearbook (River Falls, WI)

 - Class of 1934

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University of Wisconsin River Falls - Meletean Yearbook (River Falls, WI) online yearbook collection, 1934 Edition, Cover
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Text from Pages 1 - 210 of the 1934 volume:

E X I B R I STHE 1934 MELETEAN THE LH'KAiMf WISCONSIN JisAiS i-ULLEGE. RIVER FALLS, WISCONSINCOPYRIGHT CAROL ISAACSON EDITOR THORVALD THORESON BUSINESS MANAGERTHE 1934 MELETEAN Published by the STUDENTS of the STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE RIVER FALLS, WISCONSIN Volume Twenty-ThrePRESIDENT J. H. AMES 1909-1913 Head of History Department 1914-1917 Director of Training School 1917-1934 PresidentTo President Ames in grateful recognition and appreciation of his twenty-five years of service to the River Falls State Teachers College ... a quarter century of significant and vital growth in the history of our Alma Mater ... we dedicate this Meletean of nineteen hundred thirty-fourFOREWORD While the primary object of this volume is to record the events and portray the life of the campus during the past year, since nineteen hundred and thirty-four is the sixtieth year since the founding of the college and the twenty-fifth since the coming of President Ames to the school, an attempt has been made through the art theme and through occasional reference to recall those periods during which there developed the institution that is today.NORTH HALLTHE TRAINING SCHOOLWINTER SCENE ON SOUTH CAMPUSINDUSTRIAL ARTSAdministrationThe Faculty William Segerstrom B.S.M. Stout Institute Manual Training Roy e. Spriggs B.S. Ktnut State Agricultural College Agricultural Engineering and Manual 7 raining Clyde B. Campbell B.S. Iowa State Agricultural College Trader Training in Agriculture Woodwork Architectural and Mechanical DrawingThe Faculty Rudolph a. Karges Ph.B.. Ph.M. University of Wisconsin Ph.D. University of Iowa Chtmittry James P. Jacobson B.S. Beloit College M.S. University of Wisconsin Phutics ALFRED C. VOGELE M.S. University of Illinois Biology Physics Laboratory Twenty-two Chemistry LaboratoryThe Faculty Charles G. Stratton A.B. Michigan Noraul College Groaiaphu. Geo ofV Draft of Mm Joseph Robertson a.b. M.S. Suie Tfjchm Collrgr. P «. Nebraska University of Nebraska Ilialofu Theodore Setterquist A.B. Carleton College M A Unis-ersity of Wisconsin Chtmittry Biology Laboratory Geology Laboratory T we my-threeThe Faculty M E L E T E A N Walker D. Wyman B.Ed. Illinois Si.no Normal University M.A. University of Iowa Sotial Sciences and Public Speaking The Office MAUD A, LATTA A. B. University of Wisconsin A.M. University of Chicago History European History Justin Williams A.B. Arkansas State Teachers College M.A.. Ph.D. University of Iowa History 1 9 3 4 Twenty-fourNelle L. Schlosser B.S. Botton Univenity English. Expression Grammar The Office 1 Twcmv-fivc 9 3 4The Faculty Glen P. Junkman Ph.B. University of Wisconsin Mathematics Margaret Chapman Eide A.B.. A.M. University of Wisconsin Mathematics Erasmus A. whitenack A.B. Rutgers College languagesThe Faculty Cara Amelia Wharton B.Music. Gunn School of Music and Dramatic Arts, Chicago Hittoty of Miuie, Theory, Piano B. J. ROZHNAL B.Music. Northwestern University Music MARVIN D. GEERE Pennsylvania Conservatory of Music Warren Conservatory of Musie Music Twenty-sevenB. Louise Hilder B.S. University of Minnesota Art in the Training School The Faculty Edith E. weberg State Teachers College. Stevens Point. Wisconsin Home Economies Linoleum Blockprints Twenty-eight Advanced Design Class Abstract Decorative Panels raBMaBBBHThe Faculty Theodore Setterquist A.B. Cartoon College M.A. University of Wisconsin Physical Education Mary Louise Branstad A.B. University of Nebraska Physical Education Osborne B. Cowles A.B. Carleton College Athletic Director Gymnasium Class Hockey 1 1The Faculty Irma Hathorn A.B. Univtrtiir of Minnttou M.A. TikIhii Coll |f. Columbia U rrmiiT Dm 0 Woo1 0 Administration and Supervision Philosophy of Education James I. malott B.S.. A.M. Univmiiy of Mittoori Pufchotog 11. Director. Rural Education WALTER H. HUNT Ph.M. Valparaito Univmily Director. Principal• DepartmentThe Faculty Mabel L. Bridges A.B. University of Nebraska M.A. Teachers College. Columbia University Supervisor. Elementary Grades Nathalie Delander B.S. University of Minnesota Training • Tfather, Geography and History. Junior High School Russell Johnston A.B. Washington and Jefferson College M.A. University of Minnesota Director of Training Deportment Junior High SchoolPb.B. University of Wisconsin Rural Education VERA M. MOSS A.B. State Teachers College. Kalamazoo. Michigan M.A. University of Michigan Training Teacher. English. Junior High School The Faculty Augusta M. Thomas B.S. University of Minnesota Training Teacher. Fifth Grade Training SchoolThe Faculty Lucile M. Fobes B.S. Teacher College. Colombia University Training Tearlier. Firti Grade M E L E T E A N Irma B. Armstrong B.S.. M.A. Teacher College. Colombia University Training Traihtr. Firti Grade Training School 1 9 3 4 Thirty-threeThe Faculty Library Rhea Gibson A B. University of Wisconsin Librarian Mary Bradley Library School. University of Wisconsin Attiuani Librarian Amy Fuller B.E. River Falls State Teachers College Attiuani Librarian Office Thirty-fourEsther Murphy Cierk FAYE WATTONVILLE Manager, Cafeteria Ethel West Secretary Marjorie Nelson Clerk OFFICES E. J. PRUCHA Registrar Valera Devereux Clerk 1 9 3 4 TbinyfixcClasses BOOKSENIORSM E L E T E A N Sylvester Nolde Edward Monette The Senior Class OFFICERS First Semester Sylvester Nolde . Laurin McChesney Donald Parish President Vice-President Treusurer Elaine Peroutky...........................................Secretary VERY senior class gropes around for some distinction to set it apart from all others. The class of '34 has one real distinction: that is. we are the largest degree graduating class in the history of the school. In June, ninety-one young hopefuls will receive the degree of Bachelor of Education for having successfully performed the work required. This seems like a heavy death in numbers from the original two hundred and forty green, energetic freshmen who entered these sacred portals for the first time in the fall of 1930. but graduations from the one-, two-, and three-year courses made heavy inroads into our ranks. As freshmen, under the able guidance of our president. “Punk'' White, and the skillful council of Professor Vogele. we immediately jumped into the limelight by taking first place on our float in the Home-coming parade and by setting the precedent of the big limestone "R” on Bliss Mound, which tradition has been faithfully followed. As we look back, the high light of the first three years was the Sophomore Prom. Under the leadership of our president, Laurin McChesney. we decorated the gym in novel style. The effect was to produce an "Inferno." It was a huge success. Under our various presidents, Ralph White and Joe Braun as freshmen, Laurin McChesney and Alice Bartosh as sophomores, and Claude Tait and Vernon Peroutky as juniors, we steered safely through the first three years of college and gathered to us many honors. In our fourth year we started out under the leadership of Sylvester Nolde and continued to uphold the traditions we had established. Under the leadership of Edward Monette we have established a precedent we hope will come to be an annual function. We have the honor of giving the first senior formal ever held in the college. 1 9 3 4M E L E T E A N Alfred C. Vogele The Senior Class OFFICERS Second Semester Edward Moncttc.....................................President Edson Stiles..................................Vice-President Donald Parish......................................Treasurer Mary Quinlan.......................................Secretary IN athletics, debate, membership in organizations, and in scholastic achievements, we have made a high record throughout our college life. Our ban ner was carried high by such stellar athletes as Glen Morrow. Carl Kuss, Norman Panzenhagen. Emil Schiesser, Joe Braun, Vernon Woodward, Laurin McChesney. Wallace Voskuil, and Sylvester Nolde. In dramatics we were represented by such well-known characters as William Lover, Allen Hocking, Claude Tait. Marjorie Gallup. Dorothy Swenson, Joyce Heidbrink, Vernon Peroutky, and Helen Knutson. In journalism. Vern Woodward, Donald Parish. Edward Monette, John Sebeson wrote for, and Ella Polgar and Bill Lover edited the college paper during a part of their career. In debate, we bowed to no class. Our two star debaters, Leslie Libakken and Morris Buske. carried the class honors as well as the school honors to a new high peak during their four years sojourn in this institution. Thus it has been in every phase of life in or about college: in scholastics, in athletics, in leadership, our class has supplied a good share of the push. Leonard Dorman and Bernice Smith were prominent as presidents of the Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. respectively. Other members have brought us glory in still another field—Leslie Libakken and Carol Isaacson as editors of the Meletean. Carol has the distinction of being the only woman editor of this publication in recent years. The annals of another class are concluded. Perhaps we are not the most illustrious class in the history of our school, but our loyalty and good will cannot be questioned. Perhaps the greatest factor in the success of our class has been the able and efficient advice of our most excellent advisor. Professor Vogele. Always he has been willing to cooperate with our every enterprise. We wish to extend to him a sincere expression of our gratitude for his skillful and willing service throughout our college career. —EDWARD MONETTE.Amery ERNEST ANDERSON......................... Science and Mathematics Y. M. C. A. 3. 4. Secretary 4: Honor Society 3, 4; Class Vice-President 3. ROYAL ANDERSON................................Baldwin Agriculture and Science Y. M. C. A. 1. 2. 3. 4: Agrifallian 1. 2. 3. 4; Student Voice 1. 2: Football 2: Intramural Basketball 3. 4. CURTISS H. AUSTIN..............................Basco Science and Mathematics Y. M. C. A. ), 2: Homecoming Committee 3. ALICE BARTOSH............................River Falls Mathematics and Science Y. W. C. A. 1. 2. 3, 4. Cabinet 2: G. O. P. 2: Honor Society I. 2, 3. 4: W. A. A. I. 2: 1931 Meletean: Homecoming Committee 1. JEANNETTE E. BENEDICT .... River Falls Elementary Education Palette Club 3. 4: Girls’ Glee Club 3. 4: Chorus 2; Homecoming Committee 4. Foci;NORMA BERG Drummond English and History Y. W. C. A. 1, 2. 3, 4: W. A. A. 1. 2. 3. 4: Swimming 4: Tennis 3, 4: Homecoming Committee 4: Prom Committee 2. ERLIN BERGEMANN............................Cranton Agriculture, Science, and Music Newman Club 1. 2: Agrifallian I. 2. 3, 4: Band 1. 2. 3. 4: Orchestra 1. 2: Chorus 1. 2: Football 2. 3, 4. JOSEPH BRAUN , . • A gonw Mathematics and History "R” Club 1. 2. 3. 4. President 4: Baseball 1. 2. 3. 4; Basketball 1. 2; Football 1, 2. 3, Freshman Coach 4. MORRIS R. BUSKE . . . ... . Cadott History and English Y. M. C. A. 1. 2, 3. Cabinet 2. 3; Honor Society 1. 2. 3. 4: Masquers 1. 2. 3. 4: Debate 1. 2. 3. 4: The Forensic Forum 1. 2. Secretary 2: Orchestra 1.2: Student Voice 1. 4: 1934 Meletean; Football 3; Homecoming Committee 1. 2: Prom Committee 2: Ring Committee 4; "Finger of God” 1: "The Goose Hangs High" 4: "Rondo" 3. JOHN CAMPBELL......................St. Croix Falls History and Social Science Honor Society 4. Pony-oneROY C. CARAWAY...........................................Ellsworth Moody Bible Institute. Chicago: Macalestcr College. St. Paul JOHN CASEY...................................New Richmond History and Social Science University of Illinois I: Debate 1. 3: Football 2. 3. GERHARD J. CHRISTENSON Prairie Farm Agriculture and Science Y. M. C. A. I. 2. 3; Agrifallian I. 2. 3. 4. Vice-President 3: Chorus 2: Student Voice 2: Prom Committee 2. 3. WALLACE CLAPP...................................Roberts Agriculture. Mathematics, and Science Y. M. C. A. 1. 2. 3. 4. Cabinet 3. 4; Agrifallian 1. 2. 3: Lincolnian I: Forensic Forum 2:.Debate 2: Student Voice 3: Football 1. 2. 3; Homecoming Committee I. 3: Prom Committee 2. LEONARD P. DORMAN...............................Brantwood Science and Mathematics Y. M. C. A. 1. 2. 3. 4. President 4: Band 2. 3. 4: Orchestra 2. 3. 4. VortV'iwo Beldenville GORDON FOSS............................ Education. Science, and History Band 1. 2. 3. 4: Baseball 3. 4: Basketball 1. 2. 3. 4. AMY FULLER................................ River Falls Education. English, and Foreign Languages Wheaton College 3. MARJORIE GALLUP...........................River Falls English and History Y. M. C. A. I. 2. 3. 4: G. O. P. 2. 3. 4: Honor Society 1. 2. 3. 4: Masquers I. 2. 3. 4: W. A. A. 1: Chorus 1. 2. 3. 4: Woman's Double Trio 4: Orchestra 1,2: String Quartette 3, 4; Student Voice 4: Homecoming Committee I, 2. 3. 4: Prom Committee 2: Social Committee 3: "The Goose Hangs High." "Wedding Presents," "Mix Well and Stir." "Kelly Kid." "Back to Your Knitting." HARRIET GILBERT.........................River Falls English and History Y. W. C. A. 4: Masquers 4: Chorus 4: “The Goose Hangs High” 4. HAROLD A. GROSSKREUTZ .... Centuria Agriculture and Science Agrifallian I. 2. 3. 4: Band 1: Student Voice 2: Football 3. Forty-threeKENNETH R. HANNA.......................River Falls Science and Mathematics Y. M. C. A. 3: Debate 4: Homecoming Committee 3. 4: Prom Committee 3. OTTO HANSON ...... Spring Valley Mathematics and Science Y. M. C. A. 1. 2. 3: Intramural Basketball 1. 2. 3, 4: Homecoming Committee 2. IRVING O. HAUG Amery Agriculture and Science Y. M. C. A. 1. 2. 3. 4. Cabinet 1. 2. 3: Agrifallian 1. 2. 3. 4: Honor Society 2. 3. 4: Chorus 1. 2. 3; Student Voice 1. JOYCE I. HEIDBRINK..........................River Falls English and History Y. W. C. A. 1. 2. 3. 4: G. O. P. 2. 3. 4. Treasurer 3. Secretary 4; Masquers 2. 3, 4. Secretary 3; Class Vice-President 2: Chorus 1. 2; A Capella Chorus 3. 4: Girls' Sextette 4: Prom Committee 2; Ring Committee 4: "The Romantic Age" 2: “Back to Your Knitting” 3: “The Successful Calamity" 3: "Rondo" 3: "Accidents Will Happen" 4. DONALD HEMBRE..............................Greenwood Science and Mathematics Y. M. C. A. 4; Agrifallian 1. 2: Honor Society 1. 2. 3. 4: Intramural Basketball 1. Forty-fourALLAN R. HOCKING.......................River Falls Science and Social Science Y. M. C. A. 1. 2: Masquers I. 2. 3. 4: 1934 Mexican: Homecoming Committee 4; Prom Committee 2: Social Committee 3: Golf 1. 2. 3, 4: "The Elopement of Ellen" 2: "The Successful Calamity" 3: "The Goose Hangs High” 4: One Act Plays I. 2. 3. 4: "The Big Idea" 4. HARRY HUGHES...............................Hudson History and Social Science MILTON S. HUNNICUTT .... Cumberland History and Science Y. M. C. A. 2. 3. 4; Masquers 3. 4: 1933 Mele-tean: "The Clod” 3: Vaudeville 4. HELEN HUNTER.........................................Roberts Mathematics and Foreign Languages Y. W. C. A. 1. 2. 3. 4: Honor Society 4: W. A. A. 1. 2: Soccer 1. 2: Volleyball 1. 2; Chorus 1. CAROL ISAACSON.............................Spring Valley English, History, and Foreign Languages Y. W. C. A. 1. 2. 3. 4. Cabinet 3. 4. Vice-President 4: G. O. P. 2, 3. 4. Treasurer 4: Honor Society 3. 4: Masquers 1. 2. 3. 4; Class Secretary 1. 3: 1934 Melctean, Editor: Homecoming Committee 2. 3. 4: Prom Committee 2: Ring Committee 4: Girls’ Glee Club 4: "The Pipe of Peace” 4: "Back to Your Knitting” 3: "Mix Well and Stir" 2: "The Robbery' 3: "The Big Idea" 4. Forty-fiveESTHER JENSEN..............................River Fall$ Education and Science W. A. A. 4: Rural Life Club 1. 2: Basketball 4: Hockey 4; Soccer 4: Volleyball 4. ALVIN L. JEPSEN.........................................Luck Agriculture Y. M. C. A. 2. 3. 4: Agrifallian 1. 2. 3. 4. FORD V. JOHNSON........................River Falls Science and Mathematics Basketball 1. 2: Football 1, 2. 3: Swimming 1. 2. WILLIAM E. JUEDS Marion Agriculture and Science Y. M. C. A. I. 2. 3. 4, Cabinet 2. 3. 4: Agrifallian 1. 2. 3. 4: Student Voice 4. LAWRENCE JUNCHEN...........................................Neillsville Science and German Y. M. C. A. 3. 4: "R Club I. 2. 3. 4. Treasurer 4; Baseball 1, 2: Basketball I. 2. 3, 4; Homecoming Committee 2. 3. 4. Foxiy-tixJAMES KELLY River Falls Science and Mathematics LEE KLEIN........................................Amecy Agriculture and Science Y. M. C. A. 1. 2. 3. 4: Agrifallian I. 2. 3. 4. Treasurer 4: Student Voice 1. 2: Football 4. HELEN C. KNUTSON....................Diamond Bluff Elementary Education Y. W. C. A. 1. 2. 3. 4: G. O. P. 3. 4; Masquers 3. 4: Homecoming Committee 1. 2, 3; Prom Com mittee 2. CARL KUSS............................................River Falls Science and Mathematics Y. M. C. A. I. 2: Honor Society 4: "R” Club 1. 2, 3. 4. Vice-President 4; Baseball 1. 2. 3. 4: Basketball I, 2. 3: Football 2. 3. 4; Homecoming Committee I. 2; Prom Committee 2. NAIDA KYLE............................... History and English Y. W. C. A. I. 2. 3. 4: W. A. A. I. 2. 3. tary 2. Cameron Sccrc- Fony-KtcnCARL LAWRENZ.................................Algoma Agriculture and Science Y. M. C. A. 2. 3; Agrifallian 1. 2. 3. 4: Baseball 2. 3: Homecoming Committee 3. LESLIE LIBAKKEN .............................Holmen History and Social Science Y. M. C. A. 1. 3: Masquers 1. 2. 3. 4. Vice-President 2, 3; Forensic Forum 1.2: Debate 1. 2. 3. 4. Assistant Debate Coach 3, 4: Extempore 4; Student Voice 1. 2: 1933 Meletean. Editor: Homecoming Committee 1. 2. 3: Prom Committee 2 : Social Committee 2: "Her Step Husband" 1: "The Romantic Age” 2: "Dwellers in the Dark” 2: "The Kelly Kid” 1: "The Way Out” 4: "Divorce for Four” 4. WILLIAM C. LOVER Barron Science and Mathematics Y. M. C. A. 2. 3. 4: Masquers 1. 2. 3. 4. President 3: Student Voice 3. 4. Editor 4: Homecoming Committee 2, 3. 4: Prom Committee 2: "Elopement of Ellen” 1: "The Romantic Age” 2: "Mix Well and Stir” 2: "Successful Calamity" 3: "The Clod” 3: "A Girl Made to Order” 4. ALICE E. LUND...............................River Falls Elementary Education Y. W. C. A. 1. 2. 3. 4: G. O. P. 2. 3. 4: W. A. A. 1. 2: Chorus 1. 2. 3: Girls’ Sextette 4: Girls’ Glee Club 3. 4: Homecoming Committee 2: Prom Committee 2. LAURIN K. McCHESNEY......................Turtle Lake History and Social Science Y. M. C. A. 2. 3. 4: "R" Club 2. 3. 4. Treasurer 4: Class President 2, Vice-President 4: Student Voice 2. 3: Baseball 2. 3: Basketball 2. 3, 4: Football 1. 2. 3. 4: Swimming 2. 3; Homecoming Committee 1: Prom Committee 2. Pony-eightJOHN MCDERMOTT...................Netv Richmond History and Social Science Newman Club 2: Football 2. RUTH MCINTYRE.............................River Falls English and History Y. W. C.A. 1. 2. 3. 4: G. O. P. 2. 3, 4: Masquers 2. 3. 4: Class Secretary 1; "On the Rocks" 4. ERNEST MACK River Falls Science and Mathematics "R" Club I, 2. 3: Basketball I. 2. 3: Football 1. 2. EDWARD O. MONETTE.........................Wabeno Science and Mathematics Y. M. C. A. 1. 2. 3, 4. Cabinet 2. 3: Honor Society 1. 2, 3, 4; Class President 4: Basketball 1. 2. 3: Chorus 2: Student Voice 3. 4. GLEN MORROW.......................................Mazomanie Science and History "R” Club 1, 2, 3. 4: Basketball 1. 2. 3: Football I. 2. 3. Foriy-nincChetek PHILLIP NEWMAN .... Agriculture and Science Eau Claire State Teachers College 1: Y. M. C. A. 2. 3: Agrifallian I, 2. 3. 4: Honor Society 1: Student Voice 1: Baseball I. 2. 3. 4: Intramural Basketball. Science and Mathematics Y. M. C. A. 1. 2: "RM Club 3, 4: Basketball 1.2: Football 1. 2. 3. 4: Class President 4: Prom Committee 2. Y. W. C. A. 1. 2. 3: Honor Society 4: Basketball 2. 3: Volleyball 2. 3. JAMES K. OSTBY.....................................Baldwin Mathematics and Science Y. M. C. A. 1. 2. 3: Debate 4: Chorus 4: Football 1, 2. 3. Manager 4: Swimming I: Homecoming Committee 2. 3: Prom Committee 2. Mathematics and Science Y. M. C. A. 4: "R” Club 3, 4: Football J. 2. 3, 4: Prom Committee 2. SYLVESTER NOLDE Algoma PEARL OLSON Amery NORMAN PANZENHAGEN Turtle LakeMondovi DONALD A. PARISH .... Agriculture and Science Y. M. C. A. I. 2. 3. 4: Agrifallian I. 2. 3. 4: Honor Society 3. 4: Class Treasurer 4: Student Voice 1. 2. 3. 4. Business Manager 3. 4; Debate 3: Homecoming Committee 3. EDITH PEABODY............................. Star Prairie Elementary Education Y. W. C. A. 4: Woman’s Chorus 3. 4: W. A. A. 3: Soccer 3: Hockey 3: Volleyball 3. 4. MERCEDES PEABODY.......................Star Prairi Elementary Education Y. W. C. A. 4: Palette Club 3: W. A. A. 2. 3. 4; Baseball 2. 3. 4: Basketball 2. 3. 4: Hockey 2. 3. 4: Soccer 2. 3. 4: Volleyball 2. 3. 4. MINNIE PEDERSEN.........................River Falls Elementary Education Y. W. C. A. 1. 2. 3. 4: W. A. A. 1. 2. 3. Vice-President 2. OLAF C. PEDERSON..............................Cumberland Agriculture and Science Y. M. C. A. 1. 2. 3. 4: Agrifallian 1. 2. 3. 4. President 4; "R" Club 3. 4: Baseball 2. 4: Football 1. 2. 3. 4: Intramural Basketball: Student Voice 3. 4: Vaudeville 4: Homecoming Committee 2. Fifty-oneMerrill ELAINE PEROUTKY .... Elementary Education University of Wisconsin 1. 2: Stevens Point State Teachers College 2: Y. W. C. A. 3, 4: Palette Club 4: G. O. P. 3. 4: Honor Society 3: Class Secretary 4. VERNON W. PEROUTKY .... Maiden Rock Agriculture and Science Newman Club 1. 2. 3: Agrifallian 1. 2. 3. 4: The Forensic Forum 1: Masquers 2. 3. 4: Class President 3. Vice-President 3: Oratory 1. 2: Golf 3. 4: Tennis 3. 4: Homecoming Committee 3. 4: Prom Committee 2: Ring Committee 4: "Successful Calamity" 3: "The Robbery" 2: "Wedding Presents" 3; "So This Is London” 3: "A Lady to Order" 4. STEVE PRUSAK.......................................Clayton Mathematics and Science Y. M. C. A. 1. 2. 3, 4: Rural Life Club 1: Baseball 2. 3. MARY QUINLAN New Richmond Elementary Education College of St. Teresa if Superior State Teachers College 2: G. O. P. 3. 4: Class Secretary 4. ESTHER C. REINKE..........................Elmwood History and English Newman Club 1. 2. 3. 4: G. O. P. 3. 4: W. A. A. 1; Baseball I: Hockey 1: Swimming 1, 2. 3: 1934 Mcletean: Homecoming Committee 1, 2. 3: Prom Committee 2: Social Committee 3. 4. Fifty-twoELMER RIECK Mondavi- Science and History Y. M. C. A. 1. 2. 3: Chorus 1. 2. 3, 4: A Capella Chorus 3. 4: 1934 Melctcan: Student Voice 1, 2. 3; Homecoming Committee 1. 2, 3, 4; Prom Committee 2. CARL RYDBERG............................Shetl Lake Agriculture and Science Y. M. C. A. 2. 3. 4: Agrifallian 1, 2. 3, 4. HENRY A. SATHER.............................Deer Park Agriculture and Science Y. M. C. A. 1. 2: Agrifallian 1. 2. 3, 4: Debate 1. 2. EMIL J. SCHIESSER . . . . . Forestoille Agriculture and Science Agrifallian 1. 2. 3. 4: "R" Club 3, 4: Basketball 2. 3, 4: Football 2 3, 4; Swimming 3. JOHN SEBESON................................Catawba Science and Mathematics Y. M. C. A. 3. 4: Honor Society 2. 3. 4: Debate 2. 4: Student Voice 3, 4. Fifty-three BERNICE SMITH.......................... . River Falls Elementary Education Y. W. C. A. 1, 2. 3. 4. Cabinet 2, 3, President 4: Palette Club 3. 4; G. O. P. 2. 3. 4. Vice-President 3: Honor Society 4: Class Secretary 2; Chorus 1: Golf 3. 4: Swimming 1, 2. 3, 4: Tennis 1. 2. 3. 4: Prom Committee 2: Social Committee 2. 4: Treasurer 2. MERLE SMITH . . . . River Falls Elementary Education Y. W. C. A. I. 2. 3. 4: W. A. A. I. 2. 3. W. SMITH.......................River Falls Education and History Y. W. C. A. 1.2: Honor Society 4. CLARICE O. SOLUM ....... Chetek History and English Stevens Point State Teachers College 1. Eau Claire State Teachers College 2: Y. W. C. A. 3. 4; Honor Society 3. 4; Girls' Glee Club 3. EDSON G, STILES.........................Wells. Minnesota Science and Music Y. M. C. A. 2. 3, 4: Honor Society 4: Football 1. 2. 3: Swimming 2: Homecoming Committee 4. Fifty-fourPHILLIP SVEC Ellsworth Science and Mathematics Y. M. C. A. 2. 3. 4; Honor Society 4; Football I. 2. 3: Swimming 2: Homecoming Committee 4. THOMAS CLAUDE TAIT .... New Richmond Agriculture, Science, and Education Newman Club 1. 2. 3. 4: Class President 3; Masquers 1. 2. 3. 4. Vice-President 4: Agrifallian 1. 2. 3. 4; Golf 3. 4: Swimming 3. 4: Tennis 3. 4: Debate 1. 2: Homecoming Committee I. 2, 3. 4: Social Committee 4. President 4: "Her Step Husband" I: "Rondo” 3: "Dwellers in the Dark" 2: “A Girl Made to Order” 4: "Successful Calamity" 3. FRIEND TERPSTRA ...............Onalaska Agriculture and Science Y. M. C. A. 1. 2. 3. 4; Agrifallian 1. 2, 3. 4. . President 4: Baseball I. 3; Basketball 2. 3. JOHN W. THOMPSON........................Cameron Agriculture and Science Y. M.C. A. 1. 2. 3. 4. Cabinet 2. 3. 4. President 3: Agrifallian I. 2. 3. 4: Honor Society 4; Band 2: Chorus I. 2. 3. 4: Orchestra 2: Y. M. C. A. Quartette 2. 3: Student Voice 2. 3: Homecoming Committee 3. LOIS I. THORSON...........................Hammond Elementary Education Palette Club 4. Fifty-fiveHOWARD TURNER.......................................Roberts Science and Mathematics Y. M. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Agrifallian 1, 2; Honor Society 3. 4; Basketball 1: Football 1. WALLACE VOSKUIL..........................Baldwin Agriculture and Science Agrifallian 1. 2. 3. 4: "R” Club 3, 4; Baseball 1.2: Football 1. 2. 3. 4: Intramural Basketball 3. 4: Debate 1. 2. 3: Homecoming Committee 3. LEWIS WALTERS...................................Holcombe Science and Mathematics Baseball 2. VERNON WOODWARD........................River Falls Science and Mechanics "R" Club 1, 2. 3. 4: Baseball 1, 2. 3: Basketball 1, 2, 3: Football 1. 2. 3: Swimming 1, 2. 3: Student Voice 1. 2: Homecoming Committee 3; Prom Committee 2: Ring Committee 4. HAROLD J. ZORN............................River Falls Science and Mathematics Newman Club 1. 2, 3: Honor Society 4: Intramural Basketball 1, 2: Homecoming Committee 1, 2. 3. 4; Prom Committee 2. Fifty-iixJUNIORSHarold Isaacson William Dougherty The Junior Class OFFICERS First Semester Harold Isaacson ...................................President Willard Swanson...............................Vice-President Fac Hanson...............................Secretary-Treasurer DUE mainly to graduation from the rural and two-year courses, there remain only eighty-seven of the original two hundred thirty-two students who entered the college as freshmen in 1931. With Professor Russell Johnston as advisor and with August Spiss, Walter Brooks. Ernest Brickner. and Preston Lampson serving consecutively as president, the Junior Class, headed this year by Harold Isaacson and Helen Jenson, has attained a prominent position in college activities. As freshmen, our football and basketball teams had very successful seasons, losing only two games apiece. Lineus Maack and Omer Simpson succeeded in making the varsity squad. Our swimming team tied with the seniors for first honors in the inter-class tournament. The class was also represented by eight members in the Masquers, five on the Press Club, one in inter-collegiate debate, seven in band, six in orchestra, vforty-four in Y. M. C. A., twenty-six in Y. W. C. A., and twenty-six in Agrifallian. In its sophomore year our class was reduced to one hundred fifty-eight members. Four of these were "Y” cabinet members, two were first-squad debaters, fifteen were Student Voice reporters, three were members of the Meletean staff, and eight were active in Masquers, while Maack. Simpson, and Brickner earned letters in football and Isaacson. Morrow, and Lampson in basketball. Omer Simpson acted as basketball manager. Phyllis Glass served for the second consecutive year as drum major of the band. Winifred Kahut won first place in the women’s tennis tournament. Elaine Brunner. Doris Shelia, and Omer Simpson were members of the Student Social Committee. Elaine Brunner was placed in charge of arrangements for the Prom, with Leona Weber heading the committee which decorated the North Hall gymnasium in modernistic black and silver to represent a Century of Progress.Russell Johnston The Junior Class OFFICERS Second Semester Helen Jenson William Dougherty Fae Hanson . President Vice-President Secretary-Treasurer THE Junior Class claims six lettcrmsn on this year's varsity squads. These include Captain Simpson. Captain-elect Brickner. Lineus Maack, Preston Lampson. and Berger Kolberg in football and Harold Isaacson in basketball. In forensics James Mason and Philip Chase were chosen members of the first team and Alfred Mathieson and Alfred Nelson of the second. Walter Brooks served his third year as cheer leader. Grace Schwalen was admitted to the Aquatic Lague. Phyllis Glass, Romell Wallin. Dorothy Swenson. Charles Stapleton, and Marguerite O’Berding have appeared as soloists in musical events. Paul Davee. president of the Masquers, was in charge of the annual spring vaudeville. Other juniors managing student organizations are Marie Klugow, president of W. A. A. and president-elect of Y. W.C. A.. Catherine Phillips, president of the G. O. P.. and Helen Jenson, chairman of the Honor Society. Harley Borgen has been elected president of the Y. M. C. A. for next year, with Harold Rasmussen, Vernon Hanson, Willard Swanson members of the cabinet. Doris Shelia. William Kulstad, and Romell Wallin are members of the Social Committee. On student publications are Thorvald Thoreson. Arnold Lewiston, Harley Borgen. Charles Carpenter, and Edith Olson for the Meletean and, on the Student Voice. Editor David Teske, Associate Editor Alfred Nelson, Marie Klugow, Alfred Mathieson, Hermina Schmutz, Helen Jenson. Phyllis Glass, Edward Lyons. Harold Rasmussen, Willard Swanson. William Jueds, Robert Rathmann. Merle Hanson, and Vern Woodward. Thus, in spite of the marked diminution in membership since its freshman year, the Junior Class is still well represented in all college activities. 1 —Helen Jenson.FLOYD W. BAKER.......................................Hudson Agriculture Agrifallian 3. AUDREY L. BATTY.............................Hammond English and History Newman Club 1. 2. 3. ALBERT BERG.........................................Mondovi Agriculture and Science Y. M. C. A. 1. 2, 3; Agrifallian 1, 2, 3; Student Voice 2. ELIZABETH BONNEY..........................Ellsworth Mathematics and English W. A. A. 1. 2. 3; Girls' Band 1. 2, 3; Homecoming 3; Baseball 1. 2; Basketball 1. 2. 3; Hockey 2, 3: Soccer 1. 2. 3; Volleyball 1. 2. 3. HARLEY BORGEN.............................Dallas History and Social Science Y. M. C. A. 1, 2. 3. Treasurer 3: Honor Society 3; Debate 2: Student Voice 1: 1934 Meletean; Cheer Leader 2. SixtyCottage Grove LLOYD BREKKE History and Social Science "R” Club 3; Basketball 2. 3: Football 2. 3; Swimming 2, 3. ERNEST W. BRICKNER.....................................Ellsworth Science Newman Club 1. 2: "R” Club 2, 3; Class President 2: Football 1. 2, 3. WALTER L. BROOKS.................................Colfax Science Class President 1; Cheer Leader 1, 2, 3. EVERETT CAMPBELL.......................River Falls Science and Mathematics Y. M. C. A. 2. 3: Honor Society 2. 3. CHARLES C. CARPENTER .... Maiden Rock Science Y. M. C. A. 1. 2. 3: 1934 Meletean Sixty-oneTHOMAS CASEY New Richmond History Newman Club 1, 2: Debate 2: Basketball 2: Football 2. 3. PHILIP CHASE.................................Knapp History and Science Y. M. C. A. 2: Newman Club I. 2. 3: Spring Football 2; Debate 3; Homecoming Committee 3. PAUL DAVEE..................................River Falls English and History Masquers 1. 2. 3: "Successful Calamity" 2: "Mix Well and Stir” 1: "Back to Your Knitting" 2: "The Goose Hangs High" 3. WILLIAM DOUGHERTY..................................Downing Agriculture University of Wisconsin 1: Agrifallian 1. 2. 3: Class Vice-President 3: Baseball 1. 2, 3: Basketball 1. 2. 3: Football 1. 2. 3. ROY EIDE . . .. . . . .v Lodi Agriculture Y. M. C. A. 1. 2. 3: Agrifallian 1. 2. 3: Football 1. 2. 3: Baseball 2. Sixty-twc1MELDA FARRELL...............................River Falls Elementary Education Newman Club 1. 2: G. O. P. 2. 3: Masquers 1. 2. 3: "So This Is London" 2: "Mix Well and Stir” 2: "The Clod” 2: "The Travelers" I: "The Pipe of Peace" 3. THELMA FINN River Falls Elementary Education MARGARET FORD . • • • Roberts History and English Y. W. C. A. 1. 2. 3: G. O. P. 2. 3: Band 2. 3: Chorus 2: Girls’ Band 2. 3. PHYLLIS FUNK...................................Maiden Rock English and History Newman Club 1: W. A. A. 1, 2: Baseball 1: Hockey 1: Volleyball 1. 2. VERNON GEIGER Tony Agriculture and Science Y. M. C. A. 3: Agrifallian 1, 2. 3: Orchestra 2. 3: Student Voice 2. Sixl)-thrccGUNNER GUNNERSON . Washington Island Agriculture and Science Y. M. C. A. 1. 2, 3: Agrifallian 1. 2, 3; Honor Society 3: Baseball 3: Basketball 1: Swimming 1: Tennis 1. HELEN HANSEN..........................Turtle Lake History and Art LOUISE HANSEN................................Turtle Lake English and History Newman Club 1: Soccer 1. 2: Volleyball I. 2. VERNON N. HANSEN . . . . • • NV Agriculture and Science Y. M. C. A. 1: Agrifallian 1. 2. 3: Baseball 1: Football 3. MERLE HANSON..................................Mondovi History and Science Y. M. C. A. 1, 2, 3; Chorus 3: Student Voice 3: Intramural Basketball 1. 2, 3: Swimming 1. 2; Tennis 1, 2. 3. Sixtv-fcurVERNON F. HANSON.........................................Osceola Agriculture and Science Y. M. C. A. 1. 2. 3: Agrifallian 1. 2. 3; Football 1, 3. ALFRED HERSTRUM.........................River Falls Agriculture and Science Agrifallian 1. 2, 3: Honor Society 2, 3. RICHARD HYLKEMA.........................Turtle Lake Science and Mathematics Baseball 2. 3: Basketball 1, 2; Homecoming Committee 3. HAROLD ISAACSON...........................Spring Valley Mathematics and Science Y. M. C. A. 1. 2; "R” Club 2. 3: Class President 3: Vice-President 2; Baseball 1. 2, 3: Basketball 1, 2. 3. JOSEPH H. JACKELEN .... Glenwood City Agriculture Newman Club I, 2. 3: Agrifallian 1, 2. 3; Football 1. 2. 3. Sixiy-fivcRiver Falls WILBUR JOHNSON......................... Science and Mathematics Y. M. C. A. 1. 2. 3: "R" Club 3: Football 3. FAITH JOYCE ,......................River Falls Elementary Education Newman Club 1. 2. HOPE JOYCE.................................River Falls Elementary Education Newman Club 1. 2: Honor Society 3: Chorus 2. WINIFRED M. KAHUT.........................River Falls Mathematics and Science Y. W. C. A. 3: W. A. A. 1. 2. 3: Band 1. 2. 3: Orchestra I. 2. 3: Baseball 1. 2. 3: Hockey I. 2; Soccer 1. 2. 3: Tennis 1. 2: Volleyball 1. 2: Basketball 1. 2. 3. MARIE KLUGOW.............................. Turtle Lake Mathematics and History Y. W. C. A. 1. 2. 3. Treasurer 3: Honor Society 1. 2. 3. Treasurer 2; W. A. A. 1.2. 3. President 3: Chorus I. 2; Student Voice 3; Baseball 1. 2. 3: Basketball 1. 2. 3: Soccer 1, 2. 3; Swimming 1. 2. 3: Tennis I. 2. 3: Volleyball 1. 2. 3: Homecoming Committee 2. 3: Prom Committee 2. Sixir-tixBay City BERGER KOLBERG ...... Science and Mathematics Y. M .C. A. 2: R” Club 3: Football I. 2. 3. CLARENCE KUBE.............................Arcadiat Science and Mathematics Y. M. C. A. 1. 2. 3. I WILLIAM M. KULSTAD . . . River Falls Mathematics and Science Y. M. C. A. 2: Chorus I: Student Voice 2: Homecoming Committee 3: Prom Committee 2: Social Committee 3: "Le Voyage de Monsieur Perichon" 2. DONALD LARSEN . .... Clear Lake Agriculture Agrifallian 1. 2. 3. 4. MARGARET LAURENT.................................Thorp History and English Y. W. C. A. I. 2: Honor Society I. 2. 3: Student Voice 1. Si iy K rnARNOLD F. LEWISTON .... Spring Valley Education and History Honor Society 3: 1934 Meletean; Homecoming Committee 3: Baseball 1. 2. GRACE LINDERSON..............................Clear Lake Junior High School Stout Institute: Y. W. C. A. 1. IRVIN LOFF . . ... . . ... • . . Lodi History and Social Science Y. M. C. A. 1. 2. 3: Swimming 1.2: Basketball 1. GLENN V. LUND..............................River Falls Science and Mathematics University of Wisconsin 2. 3. 4: Y. M. C. A. 1. 2. Cabinet 2: Honor Society 1.2: Class President 2: Football. Assistant Manager 1: Men’s Chorus 1. 2: Mixed Chorus 1. 2: Homecoming Committee 2: Prom Committee 2. HAROLD C. LUNDE................................... Ellsivorth Education and Mathematics Y. M. C. A. 2: Band 1. 2: Chorus 1. 2. Sixty-eightEDWARD J. LYONS...............................Glenwood City Agriculture and Science Newman Club 1. 2. 3; Agrifallian 1, 2. 3: Football 1, 2: Debate 1: Band 3; Student Voice 3; Homecoming Committee 2. 3. PAUL MeCULLY . . . . - . ■ Lodi History and Social Science Y. M. C. A. 1: Baseball 1; Basketball 1: Football 2; Chorus 2. TIM MAIN.............................................Hortonville Agriculture Agrifallian 1, 2. 3; Baseball 1, 2; Basketball 3. JAMES E. MASON............................River Falls History and Social Science Masquers 2. 3: Debate 2, 3; Band 1. ALFRED F. MATHIESON.................................Edgar Agriculture Agrifallian 1. 2. 3; Tennis 2. 3; Debate 2. 3; Student Voice 3. Sixty-nineEILEEN MAU ........ Elk Mound Elementary Education Y. W. C. A. i, 2. 3: W. A. A. I. 2: Swimming 1: Volleyball I: Band 1. 2. 3: Orchestra 1. 2. 3. HARRY K. MOE ....... River Falls History and Social Science Masquers 3. ELDON S. MOEN.................................East Ellsworth Science and Mechanics Y. M. C. A. 1. 2: Student Voice 1. 2. 3. ALFRED NELSON..............................Elk Mound Agriculture Y. M. C. A. 1. 2: Agrifallian 1. 2. 3: Honor Society 2: Baseball I: Debate 2. 3: Chorus I: Student Voice 3. MARGUERITE O’BERDING .... Elmwood Primary Y. W. C. A. 1. 2. 3: G. O. P. 3: Band I. 2: Chorus I. 2. 3: Girls' Sextette 3. SeventyEDITH L. OLSON Glenwood City Elementary Education Y. W. C. A. 1. 2. 3: Palette Club 3: Chorus 1: Girls’ Glee Club 2. 3: 1934 Meletean: Homecoming Committee 3. GRACE K. OLSON...................................Grantsburg Elementary Education Y. W. C. A. 2. 3: G. O. P. 3. Z. JOHN ORDAL................................Rioee Falls Mathematics Luther College. Decorah. Iowa 1. 2: Y. M. C. A. 3: Honor Society: Band 3. JOHN PADDEN.....................................New Richmond Agriculture and Science Newman Club 1. 2: Agrifallian 1, 2. 3. HARRY W. PALM....................................Ogema Science and History Y. M. C. A. I: Agrifallian 1. 2, 3: Honor Society 2. 3. Seventy-oneGERALD B. PETERSON.................................Ellsworth Science and Mathematics Y. M. G. A. 2: Basketball 1: Band 1, 3: Orchestra 1. 3. GLADYS PETERSON.............................River Falls Primary Y. W. C. A. I. 2. 3: W. A. A. 2. 3: Basketball 2. 3; Hockey 3: Soccer 3: Volleyball 2. 3. LOIS M. PETERSON.........................River Falls Elementary Education University of Minnesota I. 2: Y. W. C. A. 1. 2: G. O. P. 3: Chorus 1. 2. CATHERINE PHILLIPS .... New Richmond Junior High School Y. W. C. A. 1. 2. 3. Cabinet 3: Palette Club 2. 3; G. O. P. 2. 3. President 3: 1933 Meletean: Homecoming Committee 1. 2. 3: Prom Committee 2. DORIS PITZER..................... English and History Honor Society 2. 3. Barron SCVCMJMWOHAZEL PROBST River Falls History and Social Science Y. W. G. A. 1. 2. 3: W. A. A. 1. 2. 3, HAROLD RASMUSSEN.......................Danbury Science and Mathematics Y. M. C. A. 1, 2. 3. Cabinet 3: Masquers 1, 2, 3; Swimming 1, 2. 3: Chorus 1, 2, 3: Homecoming Committee 3: Student Voice 3: "A Successful Calam-ity” 1; "The Clod” 2: "The Robbery” 2: “The Goose Hangs High” 3. LUCILLE ROTTIER.............................River Falls History and English Y. V. C. A. 1. 2. 3: Chorus 1, 2. 3: Girls’ Glee Club 3. HERMINA SCHMUTZ....................................Menomonie History and English Stout Institute I; Y. W. C. A. 1, 2. 3, Cabinet 3: Girls’ Glee Club 2: Student Voice 3: W. A. A. 2. VERONA SCHRUTH.............................Pepin Elementary Education Y. W. C. A. 1. 2 .3: Rural Life Club 3: Palette Club 2, 3: Chorus 1. 2, 3. Scvcmy-ihrccRiver Falls GRACE SCHWALEN Mathematics and Science Newman Club I. 2: W, A. A. 1. 2. 3: Orchestra I. 2. 3: Homecoming Committee 3. CECIL W. SCRIBNER Wyoming. Minnesota Agriculture and Science Y. M. C. A. I. 2, 3: Agrifallian 1. 2. 3: Swimming 1. 2: Homecoming Committee 1. 2. DORIS SHELLA..........................River Falls English and History Y. W. C. A. I. 2. 3: G. O. P. 2. 3: Class Treasurer I: Homecoming Committee I. 2. 3: Prom Committee 2: Social Committee 2. 3. OMER SIMPSON . ... . . . Phelps History and Geography Y. M. C. A. 2: "R” Club 1. 2. 3: Basketball Manager 2: Football I. 2. 3. Captain 3; Chorus 1, 2. 3: Social Committee 2. AUGUST SPISS..................................Ellsworth Science and Mathematics Class President I: Homecoming Committee I, 3. Sevrntv fourMILDRED STEVENSON......................River Falls Elementary Education G. O. P. 3. WILLARD L. SWANSON...........................Shell Lake Science and Mathematics Y. M. C. A. 1. 2. 3: Honor Society 2. 3: Class Vice-President 3: Swimming 2: Band 1. 2. 3: Orchestra 3: Student Voice 3. DOROTHY H. SWENSON.....................River Falls Elementary Education Y. W. C. A. I. 2. 3: G. O. P. 2. 3. Secretary 2: Masquers 1. 2. 3: Girls' Sextette 3: Girls’ Quartette 1: Chorus I. 2. 3: "Elopement of Ellen” 1: "Back to Your Knitting" 2: Prom Committee 2. DAVID E. TESKE.........................Neu Richmond English and Foreign Languages Y. M. C. A. I. 2. 3: Student Voice 1. 2. 3. Associate Editor 3: Homecoming Committee 1. 3: Prom Committee 2. THORVALD THORESON...................................Woodville Agriculture Y. M. C. A. 1. 2. 3. Cabinet 2. 3: Agrifallian 1. 2. 3; Honor Society 1. 2. 3: Debate 2: 1934 Meletean; Student Voice I. 2: Homecoming Committee 2. Scveniy-fiveHAROLD E. TOLL............................Shell Lake Grammar Superior State Teachers College 1: Orchestra 3; Band 3; Chorus 3. GERHARD TOSTRUD..........................River Falls History and Music Y. M. C. A. 3; Swimming 3; Band 3: Chorus 3; Orchestra 1, 2, 3. ROBERT VIETHS.............................Hager City History and Social Science Red Wing Junior College 1: Band 2, 3; Orchestra 2. ROMELL WALLIN................................Luck Elementary Education Y. W. C. A. 1. 2. 3; Chorus I. 2. 3; Girls’ Glee Club 2. 3: Social Committee 3. LLOYD WILSON ....... Clayton Agriculture Scvcntj-jixSOPHOMORESCarl Pflanz Mike White The Sophomore Class OFFICERS First Semester Carl Pflanz .........................................President Marlowe Michaelson..............................Vice-President Floyd Krause.........................................Secretary Mike White......................................Treasurer THE Sophomore Class began its career as one hundred and ninety-one bewildered freshmen in 1932. The air of bewilderment was. however, soon abandoned and replaced by an air of achievement. Under the leadership of Mike White and Alice Smead. and the guidance of Dr. Justin Williams, the class soon made a place for itself in the extra-curricular as well as the scholastic life of the school. The members of this class were very active musicians, one-half of the membership of the band, orchestra, and glee clubs being made up of these freshmen. The class was also well represented in dramatics, eleven members being active workers in the Masquers. Seven budding journalists distinguished themselves as workers on the Student Voice, and Carl Pflanz represented his class on the Meletean Staff. The class ship has been ably piloted through the past year by Carl Pflanz. The class was represented on the Student Social Committee by Maxine Olson. Helen Kotts. and Mike White. Although our class decreased from one hundred and ninety-one to one hundred and thirty-one members, its enthusiasm suffered no loss. Dr. Williams again helped guide our ship to a happy landing. Several members of the class responded to the first call of the athletic season, the call for football players. However, no sophomore succeeded in winning his football "R". The class was best represented in the field of athletics on the basketball floor. The participation of Louis Kulas, Donald Anderson, and Mahlon Hanson played more than a minor part in the success of the college basketball team. This class also contributed a cheer leader, Perry Luchsinger. The girls were no less active in their fields of athletics than were the football and basketball stars. 1 MKItlffllbl 9 3 4Justin Williams The Sophomore Class OFFICERS Second Semestet Carl Pflanz .....................................President Mike White..................................Vice-President Floyd Krause.....................................Secretary Margaret McCabe..................................Treasurer THE three arts, music, dramatics, and art. were not neglected. The names of two outstanding pianists. Ardelle Hamlett and Mary Jane Larson, are to be found on the class roll. Helen Kotts. Virginia Anderson. Leone Capper distinguished themselves as accompanists. The band, orchestra, and glee clubs drew many of their members from our class. Maxine Olson. Jane Boyle. Eleanor Ohman. Ophelia White. Mariann Wakefield. Helen Kotts. Mary Jane Larson. Ardelle Hamlett. Mildred Chelgren. Gerhardt Thompson, and Carl Pflanz appeared in dramatic performances throughout the year. Mariann Wakefield. the only sophomore member of the Palette Club, has served as president of that club throughout the year. Thirty members of the class belong to the Y. W. C. A.: Gertrude Kirch-meier. Zona Gale Martin. Jane Boyle, and Helen Kotts were members of the cabinet. Mary Jane Larson. Leone Capper, and Joan Smith have been chosen to serve on the cabinet next year. Donald May was the only sophomore serving on the Y. M. C. A. cabinet this year. However. Marlowe Michaelson. LeRoy Brown, and Harold Compton have been selected for next year’s cabinet. Mariann Wakefield is the only member of the class on the Student Voice staff. Scholastically, the class has contributed its part to uphold the honor of the school. Twenty out of the eighty members of the Honor Society are sophomores. which exactly fills our quota. This spring all roads of sophomore endeavor lead toward the prom. General arrangements are in the hands of Helen Kotts. She has chosen Jane Boyle. Maxine Olson. Mariann Wakefield. Virginia Anderson, and Mike White as committee chairmen. —Joan Smith. i Scvcniy-ninoGUDRUN ANDERSON............................Hudson Advanced Rural Rural Life Club 1. Treasurer 1. EVELYN L. ARNESON...............................Luck Intermediate Y. W. C. A. 1. 2; Newman Club 1: Chorus 2; Orchestra 2; Homecoming Committee 2. MARIE M.BLATT.....................Clear Lake Grammar Y. W. C. A. 1. 2. MARGARET J. BRACKEY . Burkhardt Intermediate Rural Life Club 1. MARY C. CHASE..................... Knapp Intermediate Y. W. C. A. 2: Newman Club 2: W. A. A. 2. EightyMILDRED D. CHELGREN .... River Falls Grammar Y. W. C. A. 1. 2; G. O. P. 2: Honor Society 1. 2; Masquers 1, 2; Mixed Chorus 1. 2: A Capella Chorus 1. 2; Vaudeville 2: Ring Committee 2: "Grandma Pulls the Strings” 1. EMILY COLLINS.................................Hawkins Primary Y. W. C. A. 2: Student Voice I. MARION COMPTON......................... Intermediate Y. V. C. A. 1.2: Tennis 2: Hockey 1. Bruce IRENE DICKEY . . . . Primary Glenwood City DOLORES B. DUNBAR............................River Falls Intermediate Y. V. C. A. 2. Eighty-oneLOIS J. HSPESETH Dallas Intermediate Y. W. C. A. 1. 2: W. A. A. 1. 2. Vice-President 2. Secretary 1: Baseball 1. 2: Hockey 1. 2: Soccer 1; Volleyball 1. 2: Student Voice 1. 2. VIOLET FIEDLER............................................Prescott Intermediate Y. W. C. A. I. 2. MARY FINNEGAN...........................New Richmond Primary Y. W. C. A. 2: Orchestra 2. PHYLLIS W. GLASS................................River Falls Primary Y. W. C. A. I. 2. 3: W. A. A. 1: Band I. 2. 3: Chorus 1, 2, 3: Orchestra 1, 2. 3; String Quartette I, 2. 3: Drum Major 1, 2, 3: Student Voice 3; Basketball 1: Soccer 1. NORMA HAGEMANN...................................Ellsworth Intermediate Y. W. C. A. 1: Newman Club 2: Band 2: Orchestra 1. Eighty-twoAGNES HANSEN Menomonie Primary Dunn County Normal 1: Y. V. C. A. 2 W. A. A. 2: Chorus 2. FERNE HANSEN ...... Glenwood City Primary FAE HANSON Primary Y. W. C. A. 1. 2: G. O. P. 3: Honor Society 2: Class Secretary-Treasurer 3: Homecoming Committee 3: Soccer 1: W. A. A. 1. Secretary 1. VIOLET HENNINGS River Falls. Grammar Y. W. C. A. 1. 2: Band 1. 2: Orchestra 1, 2. MARTHA 1NGLIS................................Hallock, Minnesota Intermediate G. O. P. 2: W. A. A. 1: Baseball 2: Basketball 2: Hockey 1: Tennis 2: Volleyball 1. Eighiy-ihrccHELEN KIRCHER....................................Pepin Primary Y. W. C. A. 2: Rural Life Club 1: Chorus 1. 2: W. A. A. 2: Basketball 2: Soccer 2: Hockey 2: Volleyball 2. GERTRUDE KIRCHMEIER . Prentice Grammar Y. W. C. A. 1. 2. Cabinet 2: W. A. A. 1.2. Secretary 2: Basketball I: Hockey 1: Soccer 1: Swimming 1. 2: Tennis 1, 2: Volleyball 1: Band 1. 2; Girls' Glee Club 1. 2. MAXINE LARSON......................... Grammar Y. W. C. A. 1. 2: G. O. P. 2: Chorus 1. Mondovi MILDRED LARSON East Ellsworth Primary Y. W. C. A. 1. 2; Girls' Sextette 2. MARGARET E. LORENTZEN . New Richmond Primary Teachers’ Training Department. New Richmond. Wisconsin 1: Y. W. C. A. 2: W. A. A. 2: Basketball 2: Soccer 2: Chorus 2: Homecoming Committee 2. Eighty-fouiCATHERINE McANDREW .... River Falls Primary Y. W. C. A. 2: W. A. A. 2. MARGARET McCABE..............................Hammond Grammar Newman Club 1. 2.: G. O. P. 2: Honor Society 2: Class Secretary 2: Debate 1. 2: Chorus 2. DORIS G. NELSON........................................Star Prairie Intermediate Y. W. C. A. 1. 2; W. A. A. 1. 2, Recording Secretary 2; Baseball 1,2: Basketball 1, 2: Hockey 1.2: Soccer 1. 2; Swimming 1, 2: Tennis 1. 2: Volleyball 1,2: Homecoming Committee 2. EVELYN V. NELSON.......................Nye Grammar Y. W. C. A. 2. MARCELLA NELSON........................River Falls Primary Y. W. C. A. 1.2. Eighlj-livcROSELLA PAULSON Hammond Grammar Y. W. C. A. 1. 2; Debate 1, 2. HARRIET RASMUSSEN............................ Cylon Intermediate Y. W. C. A. 2. ♦ GENEVIEVE RICHARDSON .... Maiden Rock Grammar Y. W. C. A. 1. 2: Rural Life Club 1. JOSEPHINE E. ROACH.............................Hammond Intermediate Newman Club I. 2. ODILE ST. PETER . New Richmond Primary Newman Club 1. 2: G. O. P. 2: W. A. A. 1: Base-ball 1: Basketball 1: Swimming 1: Volleyball 1. Eighty-sixEVA ROSE SCALZO Spooner Intermediate Washburn County Normal 1: Y. W. C. A. 2: W. A. A. 2: Hockey 2: Soccer 2: Tennis 2: Volleyball 2: Basketball 2. VIOLET SCHILLINGSTAD.........................Wilson Grammar Stout Institute I: Y. W. C. A. 2. BERNICE A. SCHRAM.................................Baldwin Intermediate Teachers' Training Department. New Richmond. Wisconsin 1. BERNIECE E. SCHULTZ .... Gtenwood City Primary Rural Life Club I: Honor Society 2: Palette Club 2: W. A. A. I. 2. ZENA C. SNOW.....................................Betdenoille Grammar Eight jMctcnDORIS SPREEMAN .... Alton, Minnesota Primary Rural Life Club 1. Treasurer I, Vice-President 1. MARY CURRAN STEVENS..............................Cylon Intermediate GLADYS TMMERMAN........................River Falls Intermediate Y. V. C. A. 2; Rural Life Club 1. FRIEDA H. VRUWINK . . . . Hammond Primary Y. W. C. A. I, 2. ESTHER WALSTEN..............................Cushing Intermediate Superior State Teachers College 1: Y. W. C. A. 2. Eighty-eightSOPHOMORES FOUR-YEAR GROUPIN MEMORIAM FRED RIETZ '36Margaret Allen Science River Falls JAMES A. ANDERSON . River Falls Science Virginia Anderson . Hammond History and Foreign Languages Howard Askov .... Hudson Agriculture GORDON H. BABCOCK Frederic Mathematics and Science Omar Bacon Ellsworth English and History WOODROW BERGNER . . Marathon History and Science Jane Boyle .... Ashland Junior High School LEROY Brown Cumberland Science and Mathematics LEONE CAPPER . . • _ West Salem History and Social Science Ninciv oneKenneth K. Chinnock . River Falls Science and Mathematics Vernice E. Clapp . . Roberts English Leroy Collins . . River Falls History and Social Science HERALD R. COMPTON . Mason Science CORINNE CROGEN . Baldwin Junior High School JOHN R. Crow . . Maiden Rock History and Music Jane T. Curtis . St. Paul Special Ida Jane Dawson . River Falls Science FREDERICK DOSCH . Richland Center Agriculture DEANENLOE .... River Falls Science and MechanicsHarry Enloe Science River Falls Allen Erickson History and Geography Melrose MELVIN ERICKSON . . . Melrose History and Geography HENRY FORSYTH . . . River Falls Science Donald Foss . . River Falls Mathematics and Science LOWELL FRYE . . River Falls Science and Mathematics Thomas Gillingham . Richland Center Agriculture Wayne Gustafson Maiden Rock Junior High School ARDELLE HAMLETT . . River Falls English and Music MAHLON W. HANSON . . Rice Lake History Ninel ) '«hiceWoodrow Haugen . . Prairie Farm Agriculture ETHEL M. HELLER Arkansaw Science and Mathematics DEWlLTON HlLYAR . . Deer Park Science JAY HOLMAN...................Barron Science DALE JOHNSON Maiden Rock Science and Mathematics GALEN KlNTNER . . Garland. Ark. Agriculture HELEN KOTTS . - Baldwin English and Foreign Languages Floyd Krause . . Bay City Science and Mathematics LOUIS A. KULAS . . Athens History and Science PRESTON LAMPSON . . Cumberland History Ninccy-ZourMARY JANE LARSON . . River Falls English and Music Floyd Lind . . . . . Mason History and Social Science PERRY LUCHSINGER . - Belleville Science ZONA GALE MARTIN . . Bloomer Mathematics and History DONALD MAY .... River Falls Science and Mathematics Marlowe Mickelson . . Webster Mathematics and Science Harley e. Nelson . Beidenviiie History and Social Science ELEANOR OHMAN Glenwood City English and History MAXINE OLSON . . . Hudson English and History MADGE O. PECK . . Elmwood English and History Ninciy-iiieIrvin Peterson .... Hudson Science and Mathematics CARL H. Pflanz . Black River Falls Science and Mathematics EDWARD PLATT . . River Falls Mechanics VIGGO RASMUSEN ... Withee Science Clifford Rogers . Ellsworth History and English LEONARD SEIDEL . . . Rib Lake History and Social Science Joan Smith .... River Falls Junior High School VAUGHN SMITH . . . Glen Flora History and Social Science Gerhard w. Thompson . Poskin History and Mathematics MARSHALL THOMSON . River Falls Science and Mathematics Nine«y-HxMARKUS THORSON . . Hammond Science and Mathematics LESTER UREN . . - River Falls History and Music Arthur Van Duser . . . Elcho Science Benjamin Vezina . St. Croix Falls Science and Mathematics MERLIN VOUGHT .... Bruce Agriculture Joseph Vozabel . . . Tony Science and Mathematics MARIANN WAKEFIELD River Falls Special Kenneth Wallen . . Grantsburg Agriculture GRETNA WALLER Ellsworth English and Music Sherman Weiss . . . River Falls Agriculture Kineiy-scrcn CHARLES WEYDT . . River Falls Science « HAROLD WHITE . . . Roberts Agriculture MIKE WHITE . . . . Minong Junior High School Ophelia White . . . River Falls Junior High School Wayne Wilcox . . . River Falls Mathematics ELEANORE ZIMPELMANN . Eagle River Primary Niiiciy-ci«hi FRESHMENMelvin Swanson Newell Younggren The Freshman Class OFFICERS First Semester Palmer Aasterud....................................President Melvin Swanson Vice-President Frederic Patchin...................................Treasurer Minnie Embretson...................................Secretary HTWO hundred and seven freshmen enrolled in school last fall, and with the J- aid of their advisor, Professor Glen Junkman, faced banter and discouragement bravely. The label "green” may now be taken off the class of '37 for these freshmen have won the fight and have come out on top. Besides their general good attitude and fine school spirit a great many of them have taken active part in college activities. On Homecoming, the traditional freshmen initiation day, the boys of the class, led by Newell Younggren, worked with fervor to decorate the main street and put the lime "R” on Bliss Mound to welcome the "Old Grads.” The girls did their share in constructing a float for the parade. Properly initiated they then went forth in their individual ways to win honors for themselves. Twenty-six first year boys went out for football. Two, Palmer Aasterud and Dean Zaner, became regulars of the team and earned "R”s. A squad of thirty boys opened the freshman basketball season, of which sixteen were chosen for the "Frosh" team. Two of them, Walter Herkal, and Merton Wulf, were placed on the varsity team and were awarded the "R". The Women's Athletic Association claims sixteen freshmen members who have taken active part in girls' athletics. Last fall the following freshmen were selected as members of the Masquers. William Amery, Fern Steig, Newell Younggren. Frederick Bremer. Haide Larson. Gerhard Thompson, Emma Lou Tubbs, and Louis Zahradka. Roman Zorn was placed on the first debate squad this year: Rolf Ordal and Louis Zahradka on the second team. 1 One hundred 3 4M E L E T E A N Glen P. Junkman The Freshman Class OFFICERS Second Semester Newell Younggren................... Nolan Isaacson......................... John O’Brien................... Frederick Patchin...................... President Vice-President Treasurer Secretary npHE Student Voice has three freshmen on its force, namely. Fern Steig. Emma Lou Tubbs, and Maurice Shepard. One freshman. Edna Wahl, is on the Meletean staff. The freshmen have a good representation in the Honor Society, too. Edrys Ruethin. William Mayer. Nancy Njos. Velma Segerstrom. Edna Wahl. Betty Cutsforth. Ariel LePage. Ruth Lovett, and Dorothea Panzenhagen all received their silver "R”s. The Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. added many freshmen to their numbers. In the Y. W. C. A. two freshmen have been elected for the next year’s cabinet. They are Gwendolyn Fox and Helen Spalding. Louis Zahradka is the only freshman to be elected on next year’s Y. M. C. A. cabinet. In the musical organizations the freshmen have scored. Twenty of the sixty-two band members are freshmen. Iris Mills and Maurice Shepard represent them in the orchestra. A large part of the vocal groups is made up of first year students. Edrys Ruethin and Nancy Njos have taken part in one of Miss Wharton’s recitals and played for various activities. There are six freshmen members in the Palette club to an average of three in each of the other classes. There are thirty-six "Frosh" in the Rural Life Club. Frederick Bremer. Kenneth Hove, and La Verle De Marce were freshman members of the Social Committee. Under their supervision two freshman parties were given during the year. Having so well fitted themselves to enter into "bigger and better” things next year, the freshmen leave, holding their standard high. —Emma Lou Tubbs. i One hundred one 9 3 4MARJORY AFDAHL Hammond Intermediate VIVIAN AFDAHL . . . Hammond Intermediate HARRY ANDERSEN . . River Falls Science LeRoy w. Anderson . Woodvilie Science William Amery . . St. Croix Falls Mathematics and Science Virginia Avery . . St. Croix Falls Social Sciences Julia Bergstrahl ■Primary Robert o. Bergstrom Agriculture River Falls Glen Flora Ina Bergstrom . . . Glen Flora Intermediate GERTRUDE BLATT Clear Lake Primary One hundred twoFrederick Bremer . . River Fails Science and Mathematics Lily Cass ..... Owen Grammar Charles D. Christiansen . Rice Lake Mathematics and Science Dena Christenson . . Ellsworth Rural Everett L. Compton . . Mason History Vivian Cox .... Spooner History and English Betty m. Cutsforth . . Chetek Science MARVIN DAHLQUIST . River Falls History and Social Science Lorin Davidson . . . Ellsworth Agriculture . HELEN DEGOLIER River Falls Primary One hundred threeLA VERLE DE Marge, Lake City, Minn. Primary Wilma De Master . Baldwin Primary ALICE P. DlNEEN . Glenwood City Rural ALICE EIDE..................Mondovi Primary MINNIE EMBRETSON . . - Stanley Primary ROBERT ENGDAHL . . River Falls Science and Mathematics FERNENLOE . . . . River Falls English ARDUS ERLANDSON . . River Falls English and Languages GERTRUDE FELLENZ . Ellsworth Rural Clarence filkins . . . Prescott Science Oik hundred fourFlorence M. Filkins . River Falls Rural Genevieve Finn . . . Ellsworth Rural F. FRED FISCHER . . Durand Rural Gwendolyn Fox . . River Falls English and History NELLE. FRELS .... Cable Rural KATHLEEN FULLER . . Shell Lake Science and Mathematics Eugene J. Gossen . . . Eicho History'and Social Science EDNA GREEN .... Baldwin Special HARRY GUINN . . Hannibal History and Social Science WALTER GUINN Hannibal English and History One bundled fiveAmery MARIAN HOUGER Primary Kenneth Hove .... Barron Science and Mathematics Ruth Hughes Hudson English Nolan Isaacson . . Spring Valley Mathematics and Science Woodrow m. Iverson River Falls Rural Bernice Jacobson New Richmond History and Mathematics HOWARD JENSON . River Falls Science ARTHUR JOHNSON River Falls Agriculture Margaret Johnson Deer Park Rural Mary Junkman . . River Falls History and English One hundred ixColfax Ruth Gullick .... History and Languages Gwendolen Hageseth Rural Woodville STANLEY HALLS . . Ellsworth Science Donald Hart .... Bloomer Agriculture FRANCIS J. HAUGH . River Falls Agriculture WALTER HERKAL South St. Paul History and Science MARGARET HJELSTUEN . . Amery Primary Dora Mae Hocking . . River Falls English Inez Hocking River Falls English VERNA MAE HOLMES River Falls Primary One hundred sevenHarriet Linehan River Falls Primary Ruth Lovett . . Hudson English and Music Robert McCabe Hammond Mathematics and History William Mayer . . , , Nelson Science and Mathematics WAYNE MEEHAN . Ellsworth Science ROSE MIELKE .... Emerald Rural IRIS L. MILLS . . . . Baldwin History and English Edwin Morgan .... Baldwin Mathematics and Science ALICE M. NELSON . Ellsworth Rural Bernard Nelson . Baldwin History and Social Science One hundred eightPAUL V. KEYES .... Dallas Agriculture Arthur D. Knuth . . . Elcho History and Science VINCENT KONIG . . . Milwaukee Science and Mathematics GEORGE KRENTZ . . Cumberland Mathematics and History HELEN B. KUMHERA . . Almcna Intermediate Robert Lacey . . . Ellsworth Science HAIDE LARSON . River Falls Primary Margaret Larson . . Turtie Lake Intermediate RUBY LAUSTAD .... Colfax Primary ARIEL LEPAGE . St. Croix Falls History One hundred nineJohn Nelson ... Downing Science and Mathematics NANCY NJOS .... Baldwin English Evelyn m. Nordstrom Ellsworth Rural BERNARD NORWICH . Rick Lake History DORIS NYEGGEN . Spring Valley Rural JOHN O'Brien ... . River Falls Mathematics and Science Nathilla O’Hearn . . Melrose Intermediate MONICA OPPRE1CHT . Lynxville Rural ROLF ORDAL .... River Falls Science and Mathematics WARREN OSKEY . . Bay City Science One hundred tenDorothea Panzenhagen . Turtle Lake Science Frederick Patchin . Chetek Science and Mathematics Madonna Peterson . . Woodvilic Rural Olive Pofahl . . . Hager City Rural BERTHA POLGAR . . . Hawkins Intermediate MARVIN RAY . . River Falls Rural Adolph D. Reidt . . . Nelson Science and Mathematics VIRGINIA REIERSON . . . Frederic Primary JOIE REINKE .... Elmwood Science Robert Rhodes .... Barron Pre-Law One hundred elevenRobert Riter River Falls Science EDRYS RUETHIN . . Science . . Barron Anna Sabby . . . Rural Spring Valley Thelma Sanden . Intermediate . Baldwin EVELYN SCHLOSSER . Grammar . Arkansaw Edna d. Schulte Rural River Falls VELMA SEGERSTROM . River Falls English and History Paul Shaw . . . Science River Falls Maurice Shepard . Science River Falls Mary Alice Sheran . History . River Falls One hundred twelveDONALD SIMMELINK Baldwin History and Social Science ANNA SMITH .... Clear Lake . Primary HELEN E. SPAULDING . . Ingram Primary FERN STEIG . . Willett. S. Dak. English LEO STENBACH .... Phelps Science LAWRENCE STENE - Baldwin History Gertrude Stephenson . . Blair Rural Larayne Stewart . . Wanderoos Rural BERNIECE STRAUB . Ellsworth Rural LUCILLE STRIEBEL . River Falls Intermediate One hundred thirteenLouise Swanson . . Glen wood City English Melvin Swanson Ellsworth Science and Mechanics DOROTHY SYMES . River Falls English and Foreign Language Hugh Thompson . . St. Croix Falls Science KENNETH THORESON . . Woodville Science ALICE THORSON . Menomonie Intermediate EMMA Lou Tubbs River Falls English and Foreign Languages OTIS VAGSTAD . Chippewa Falls Mathematics and Science Helen Vaughan Alma Center English Gertrude Vietor . Clear Lake English One hundred fourteenEdna Wahl . . Neillsvilie History and Foreign Language EDNA WAUGHTAL ... Roberts Primary NEWELL WEISER . . . Elmwood History DWIGHT Wiedeman Spring Valley Rural FRED WlGAND . Clear Lake Science Marion Williamson . . Cornell History and Social Science Lloyd Wood . ... Clear Lake Science and Music CHARLOTTE WOODS . Webster Rurat Loren a Woods . . Webster Rural Merton Wulf .... Aigoma Science and MathematicsNewell Younggren . . River Falls Science WlLMER YOUNGGREN . . River Falls Science and Mathematics LOUIS Zahradka . . . Osceola Agriculture Roman Zorn . . . River Falls History Oik hundred MMcenActivities BOOK illMUSIC DRAMAMissing Page"Bui the fates have spoke the word." Romany Rede THE setting is a gipsy camp near Seville, and the time is the evening before the opening of the great Seville Fair. One of the girls announces that her lover is to ride in the principal race, and the stars indicate that if he does not win. his love will be lost to her. A fortune teller, who doubtless has learned through prying gipsy inquisitiveness that a neighboring peasant intends to ride a swift Arabian horse in the race, tells the girl's fortune and predicts disaster and doom If "the milk-white horse of Araby" is entered. At this point the wife of the peasant appears at the camp, professing disbelief in gipsy arts but nevertheless asking for a charm to assure her husband of winning the race. The gipsies so work upon her fears and jealousies that she hurries away to give “the milk-white horse of Araby" a sickening brew that will keep him in the stall until the race is over. PERSONNEL Helen Kircher Margaret Lortntzen Alice Land Mary Jane Larson Nancy Njos Jayne O'Regan Edith Olson Lois Peterson Orelle Peterson Edith Peabody Genevieve Richardson Yerda Robertson Lucille Rottier Evelyn Scblosser Ann Smith Helen Spalding Thelma Sanden Louise Swanson Lucille Striebel Alice Tborson Romell Wallin Edna Waughtal WILMA DEMASTER Alice Lund 1 9 3 4The College Orchestra '"PHE aims of the college symphony orchestra, under the able guidance of A Professor B. J. Rozehnal. are to develop a cultural taste for musical programs, to offer entertainment, and to provide musical instruction for students. This year of 1933-34 has spelled success for the orchestra in every way. Besides furnishing music for Commencement, the organization provided music for college dramatics and various other entertainments. A pop concert was presented on Sunday afternoon. March 25. and an excellent program was given. The orchestra not only possesses quality, but it also has complete instrumentation, which is very unusual for a school of this size. Besides rare instruments such as the oboe and bassoon, the bass clarinet, which has recently been added, plays an important part. With Professor B. J. Rozehnal as director the orchestra expects to aspire to still greater heights next year. Professor Rozehnal. besides being an outstanding instrumental soloist, is also an excellent director. Due to his efficiency and the cooperation on the part of-the students, the organization has won remarkable recognition the past year. PERSONNEL Violins Gerhard Tostrud Phyllis Glass Leone Capper Dale Johnson Mary Finnegan Grace Schwalen Charles Weydt Viola Elmer Waikins Helen Glass Cello Maurice Shepard Margaret Johnson Double Bau Wayne Wilcox Howard Askov Oboe Neal Jacobson Clarinet Willard Swanson James Anderson Iris Mills Bass Clarinet Eileen Mau French Horn Dj Wilton Hilyar Nevin White Trumpets Frederick Bremer Gerald Peterson Trombone Harold Toll Fred Wigand Percussion Donald Foss Drums Robert Lacey Piano Virginia Anderson Wynyard Swain son Flute Winnie Kahut Violet Hennings Alice Thorson John Milbrath •Training School students. 1 9 3 4 One hundred twenty-twoThe College Bands BUILT up for the first time to an organization with complete instrumentation. the College Band had an excellent season under the capable direction of Professor B. J. Rozehnal. Work began in the fall with the organization of a marching band of forty-five men. This group played for pep meetings and games. It also made formations on the football field between halves. As an auxiliary unit, a Co-ed Band of twenty-five pieces was organized under the direction of Phyllis Glass. They made an appearance at Homecoming. During the basketball season a pep band, chosen from the concert band and averaging about twenty-five members at each game, supplied peppy music at pep meetings and the games. After the completion of the football season, the Concert Band began its work. An outstanding feature was the presentation of several Sunday afternoon “pop” concerts. On May 10 the band took a short trip, playing at several high schools, Stout Institute, and over station WTAQ at Eau Claire. The climax of the season was the second annual band concert. CONCERT BAND Piccolo John Milbrath Violet Hennings Flute John Milbrath Violet Hennings Phyllis Glass Oboe Neil Jacobson Bassoon Marshall Johnston Clarinets John Ordal Ruth Lovett Virginia Anderson James Anderson Willard Swanson Vernice Clapp Helen Glass Iris Mills Mary Junkman Wayne Wilcox Bass Clarinet Eileen Mau Saxophone Velma Segcrstrom Winifred Kahut Trumpets Charles Stapleton Curtis Burkholder Frederick Bremer Charles King Newell Younggren Gerald Peterson Norma Hagcman Frederick Patchin Horns De Wilton Hilyar Edna Waughtal Nevin White Howard Askov Baritones Robert Engdahl Margaret Ford Trombones Edson Stiles Erlin Bcrgemann •Training School students. 1 9 3 4 Harold Toll Frederick Wigand Arthur Johnson Basses Leonard Dorman Hugh Thompson John Crow Percussion. Tympani. Belts Donald Foss Drums Robert Lacey Robert Vieths Edward Lyons One hundred twenty-threeTraining School Music A yTUSIG organizations in the Training School arc divided into two groups, ■ vocal and instrumental. This year there are four vocal groups: General Chorus. Special Chorus, Girls’ Chorus, and Boys’ Chorus. All students are required to take the work in the General. Girls’, and Boys' Chorus. The special Chorus is a group of thirty students picked from the Junior High School, whose voices are better than the average, and this group practices on more difficult music than can be performed in the General Chorus. The music is almost entirely four-part, and the Special Chorus serves as a model for practice teachers going into music teaching. Under the direction of Miss Vera Moss the Special Chorus has done excellent work this past year. On December 8. 1933 the Junior High School presented an operetta “Paints and Patches” by Clark-Penn to an appreciative audience who pronounced it one of the finest performances given in the college auditorium. With a cast of sixteen and three choruses totalling about thirty more the entire Junior High took part in this presentation. All the work, including stage setting, advertising, lighting and other duties, was done by students. The instrumental organizations under the direction of Prof. B. J. Rozehnal have made excellent progress this year. The orchestra has been augmented to thirty-seven pieces with complete instrumentation: the band in its second year of existence has increased to thirty-six players. Both organizations are playing material of high school level. In addition to teaching music to the students in the training school, the orchestra and band give college students who plan to teach instrumental work an opportunity to observe and practice conducting model organizations. Although the Junior High School is only in the Class C in the local contest, the orchestra and band competed against high schools in the Class B division. The band also entered the marching contest. i 9 3 4 One humlrcal iwcniy'lourTo prove additional training for the more advanced students in the Training School, ensemble organizations are formed. Three of these competed in the contest. They were: STRING QUARTET Marjorie Thomson . . . First Violin Joyce Chapman Viola Shirley Mueller Second Violin Margaret Johnson.. Cello BRASS QUARTET Harry Miracle . .First Trumpet Ncvin White French Horn Leslie Paulson. . ... Second T rum pet Paul Prucha . Baritone WOODWIND QUINTET John Milbrath... Flute Maynard Hoffman Clarinet Neil Jacobson. Oboe Marshall Johnston ... Bassoon Ncvin White French Horn The Junior High Department also entered the following soloists: Marshall Johnston..............Clarinet Harry Miracle................. Trumpet John Milbratb.....................Flute Leslie Paulson..............Sousaphone Neil Jacobson......................Oboe Margaret Johnson.................Piano The Training School also offers an opportunity for students to have class lessons on all band and orchestra instruments. Large classes have been enrolled in each section the last two years. Children from the fourth grade through the ninth are eligible for these lessons. The Training School presented a program for the College Assembly on March 15. The following program was given: 1 Oik hundred uveiuydlvc“Dinner is served." So This Is London By Arthur Goodrich Presented by the Senior Class, June 7. 1933. under the direction of Miss Nelle Schlosser. CAST Hiram Draper, Junior (Called "Junior") . Elinor Beauchamp...................... Lady Amy Duckswortb................... Hiram Draper. Sr...................... Mrs. Hiram Draper. Sr................. A flunky at the Ritz ................. Sir Percy Beauchamp................... Alfred Honeycutt...................... Lady Beauchamp........................ Thomas, a butler........ Jennings. Lady Duckswortb’s butler.... La Verne Campbell . . . . Elaine Brunner .....Imelda Farrell ......Glen Gallup ■ ■ Adele Williamson ......Earl Sumner . .Vernon Peroutky . . .James Deringer . . . Helen Stewart . . .Leslie Libakken ......Earl Sumner “HPHE son of a rich and characteristically American show manufacturer. A Hiram Draper. Jr., becomes acquainted with Eleanor Beauchamp, daughter of Sir Percy Beauchamp, an English manufacturer of shoes. The meeting has taken place on shipboard prior to the opening of the play. Before the boat arrives in England the young people are engaged to the consternation of both families. Old man Draper imagines (and his notion is dramatically shown in a very funny scene) that all English people are affected fools, while Sir Percy (in a similar scene) is convinced that all Americans chew gum and tobacco. At last the two families meet and become acquainted with each other, finding to their great surprise that there is not so very much difference between England and America at all. and the young people are allowed to marry.” 1 9 3 4 One hundied iw«uy-»ix"Granny! What is it? What's happtntdf" The Goose Hangs High By Lewis Beach Presented by the Masquers under the direction of Miss Nelle Schlosscr CAST Bernard Ingals............... ........................Morris Buskc Eunice ................................................Harriet Gilbert Noel Derby................................................Paul Davcc Leo Day.........................................................Leslie Libakken Rhoda ............................................Dora May Hocking Julia Mardock.........................................Marjorie Gallup Mrs. Bradley..........................................Ardclle Hamlett Hugh Ingals......................................................Allen Hocking Lois Ingals.............................................. Pern Stcig Bradley Ingals..................... ..............Gerhard Thompson Dagmar Carroll...........................................Helen Kotts Elliott Kimberly..................................Harold Rasmussen “HPHE Goose Hangs High” was one of the best plays ever staged in North A Hall Auditorium. The play dealt with a group or family of thoughtless selfish people who, when the time came, proved to be not so selfish. Mr. Ingals resigned his position as city assessor and caused much comment because he wouldn’t be bull-dogged by petty politicians. His sons, Hugh and Bradley, and his daughter Lois all plan to go to work and prove their wholesome unselfishness. Hugh even changes his plans for marriage. It does, however, come out that Noel Derby and Mr. Ingals go into the nursery business. Hugh and Dagmar are married and Lois and Bradley go back to school. 1 p Oac hundred twcnty rc«cn 3 4"I see you've found my P P - A Pipe of Peace Coached by Imtlda Farrell CAST .............Allen Hocking ...............Carol Isaacson .................Imelda Farrell THE plot of this play is woven around the marital problems of a pipe-loving husband and an antique-collecting wife, who sells the husband’s favorite meerschaum for an old piece of imitation furniture. It so happens that the husband buys the pipe the wife has sold to an antique dealer and proceeds to cause the wife no end of worry. When she finds her husband has the pipe, she reverses the situation, and the troubles arc not ironed out until a note is received from another pipe lover, who explains the situation. The play was very well done, difficult as it was with only two characters to be portrayed. Joe Terrell. . . Gladys (His Wife)______ Mary (The Maid)_________ Accidents Will Happen Coached by Leslie Libakken CAST Grandma ...........................................Joyce Heidbrink Grandpa ...............................................Carl Pllanz Dick ..................................................Paul Davee Gladys ..............................................Maxine Olsen This play was presented as an assembly program and was well received by the students. One huiulr l tweniy-dglt! 1M E L E T E A N On The Rocks Coached by Harriet Gilbert CAST May........................................................Haidic Larson Roy......................................................Louis Zahradka Daisy Anderson.............................................Ruth Mcntyre Alex—the gas man....................................... Newell Younggren Willie—grocery boy.................. ....................William''Amery Mrs. Carstairs...................................................Mariann Wakefield The Rocks” was appropriately presented as a depression play. The two young ladies involved were attempting to run a tea shop without money and several times without tea. Roy, the hero of the play, and supposedly May’s boy friend, saved the day by taking charge the last minute ad preventing disaster which was inevitably coming. The gas man and the grocer's boy added sparkling bits of humor here and there. Miss McIntyre showed unusually fine talent as as the depression sick co-hostess. A Girl To Order Coached by Vernon Peroutky CAST Dudley (Dud) Elliott, a senior.................................Gerhard Thompson Howard (Lady) Clayton, a junior.......................................William Lover Fred (Puck) Evans, a junior. .A.......................................William Amery Earl (Biscuits) Nelson, a sophomore............................Newell Younggren Mr. Elliott. Dud’s father..............................................Claude Tait Elsie Jordan...................................................Dorothy Swenson This play was of a typical college nature and was much enjoyed by those who saw it. 1 p One hundred ureMf-nine 3 4"Well, excuse me. I just wanted to get a cigarette.' 'Alice. I think he had better have a mustard footbath. One hundred thirtyFORENSICSM E L E T E A N Pre-Conference Debate Schedule January 20. Eau Clair Tournament........ January 25. 26. and 27 Normal University February 10. Macalester College...... February 17. St. Cloud Tournament February 20. Hamline University..... February 24. Hibbing Junior College.. March 3. River Falls Tournament... March 22. Macalester College........ Tournament ... . January 31, St. Thomas February 6. St. Thomas ■ There There . Here . There There .There Here . . Here . . Here There Coach Wyman THE school year witnessed one of the most notable debate seasons in the history of the college —in the size and variety of the debate schedule, in the experience given to the debate teams, and in the relative number of victories. Mr. Wyman, in his second year as debate coach, continued the policy begun last year, in which contacts were made with teams from all sections of the country. During the season, we debated schools from California. Texas. Louisiana. Oklahoma. Kansas. Nebraska, Minnesota. Iowa. Illinois, South Dakota, and Wisconsin. At the beginning of the season, about thirty candidates reported for debate. They were divided into teams for the purpose of practice work upon the question "Resolved: That the United States should adopt the British system of radio control." After a series of five rounds of skirmishes, the first squad was picked for work upon the college question. "Resolved: That the powers of the President of the United States should be substantially increased as a settled policy”—from December to the first week of April, this statement haunted the footsteps of Philip Chase. Kenneth Hanna. Louis Zahradka. Rolf Ordabl. Roman Zorn. Leslie Libakken. Morris Buske. and James Mason—not to mention Coach Wyman, who was heard to express interest in the matter from time to time. Of these. Mason. Buske. and Libakken were the only ones to return from last year’s first team. Zorn. Ordahl. and Zahradka performed the rather unusual feat of making the first squad in their freshman year. Philip Chase, a junior, also made the team on his first trial. This squad had its first chance to meet other teams when, on January 20. a preliminary tournament was held in Eau Claire with four teams from River Falls, five from Eau Claire, and three from La Crosse participating. It proved valuable in acquainting the teams with other viewpoints, and giving good practice at the same time. A practice debate was held the same week-end before the Kinnikinnic Country Club: Buske and Libakken. on the negative, were given a unanimous audience decision over Hanna and Mason. Some surprise was expressed by the latter two at finding so whole-hearted a group of Republicans still in existence. One week later Mr. Wyman. Zorn. Hanna. Buske. Libakken. and Mason left for Normal. Illinois, to take part in the first of the three most important events of the season. The tournament at Normal University was notable for two things: Mr. Wyman’s familiarity with his Alma Mater, and the fact that the school placed second. Mason, alternating with Zorn and Hanna, won four debates and lost three: Buske and Libakken won seven and lost one. The trip was a pleasant one until, on the return trip, several feet of the gas line on the car froze and Buske and Hanna each froze a foot in a vain attempt to fix it. 1 9 3 4 One hundred ihirry twoDebate M E L E T E A N Hastings. Nebraska........ St. Olaf.................. St. Thomas................ Concordia ................ Gusiavus Adolphus......... South Dakota State........ Sioux Falk................ University of South Dakota Western Union............. Nebraska Wesleyan......... Mayville Teachers......... Northern State Teachers... Won one. lost one ........Won two .............Won .............Won .............Won ...........Lost .............Won .............Won .............Won ............Lost ............Lost .......Lost ON January 31 Buske. Libakken. Hanna, and Mason debated St. Thomas College at St. Thomas in a practice debate that continued what has become a traditional rivalry between the two schools. St. Thomas returned the visit on February 6. when they were entertained by Chase. Ordahl. Buske. and Zorn. Two practice debates were held the following week at Macalester College, in which the lineup was shifted so as to pair Zorn with Libakken. and Buske with Mason. This arrangement was kept during the remainder of the season. The next two weeks saw the squad settle down to preparation for the St. Thomas tournament. On February 17 Ordahl. Hanna. Chase, and Zahradka left for the tournament held at St. Cloud. By virtue of three straight wins earned by Chase and Zahradka. and two losses and one win netted by Ordahl and Hanna, the River Falls squad placed second in the tournament. The following Monday. Zorn. Libakken. Buske. and Mason met Hamline University at St. Paul: Zahradka and Zorn entertained a Hibbing Junior College team here on the following Saturday. On February 27 Coach Wyman shifted Zorn. Libakken. Buske and Mason to the week’s military headquarters at the St. Francis hotel for the St. Thomas tournament, for the busiest campaign of the season. Zorn and Libakken were eliminated in the preliminaries on Tuesday: Buske and Mason, with three wins and one loss, were entitled to go on. On Wednesday they bowled over two St. Olaf teams. Gustavus Adolphus, and Concordia. In the semi-finals Thursday morning St. Thomas, last year’s champions, and Sioux Falls were overcome, which enabled River Falls to enter the finals against Hastings. Nebraska, that evening. Hastings, who won second last year, presented a strong attack that earned them a four to one decision over River Falls. On the following noon the debate was broadcast over station KSTP. It is interesting to note that Robert Smith and Lucille Garley. representing River Falls two years ago. also placed second in the tournament by virtue of a defeat at the hands of St. Thomas in the finals. An informal tournament was arranged at River Falls on the Saturday following the return of the squad from St. Paul. Eau Claire. St. Cloud, and St. Johnis University were represented: Zorn. Hanna. Zahradka. Libakken. and Chase debated for River Falls. Eau Claire, with five wins and one loss took first place over the four won and two lost record of River Falls. Hanna, debating twice with Zorn and once with Libakken. won three straight debates, as Chase and Zahradka dropped two and won one. 1 One hundred ihiny-lhreeMorris Buske James Mason Leslie Libakken Roman Zorn Debate “ N Thursday. March 22. Macalester College was debated before the assembly by Buske md Mason. The debate proved to be a decidedly close one. and gave the school one of the few chances of the year to see the squad in action. It is recognized as a just criticism of the present style of tournament debating that the debates are almost invariably held out of town. Although the forensic sea was quiet for the next four weeks, unusual activity became apparent near the end of March. On Thursday. March 29. after a practice debate before the local high school the preceding afternoon. Coach Wyman. Libakken. Buske. and Mason left in the general direction of Lexington. Kentucky for the national Pi Kappa Delta forensic tournament. After a trip marked by passage from the "land of ice and snow" to the "sunny south." the squad was submerged in the flood of 700 other delegates from 42 state —it was an experience from which, especially in the case of Libakken. complete recovery is doubtful. It has been estimated that he sent longing hearts back to 31 states and one insular possession. The debate team of Buske and Mason won two and lost three debates, losing to Emporia Teachers of Kansas. Louisiana South West Institute, and Stephen Austin of Texas, and winning from Kirksville, Indiana, and Redlands. California, national champions in 1932. Although Buske and Libakken will not be back next year, the outlook for the coming season is decidedly bright, and will be more so if Mason should elect to return. His work was probably the best of any on the squad. Zorn. Ordahl. and Zahradka. with three years ahead of them, are certain to go a long way. Chase, who will be eligible one more year, may be expected to use his oratorical attack on discomfited opponents. Under the direction of Coach Wyman, whose work is recognized throughout the northwest, the school is certain to be formidable in debate for some time to come. One hundred ihirty-fourRoy Caraway James Ostby Joan Smith Alfred Mathifson The Second Team Hudson High School ............There New Richmond High School There Hammond High School............There Hudson High School..............Here Hammond High School.............Here River Falls High School.........Here River Falls High School............ There Baldwin High School.................There River Falls High School ............There Stillwater High School............. There New Richmond High School............ Here Chippewa Falls High School...........Here THE practice of dividing the year's debating experience among as many students as wish to participate by organizing a second team was continued this year. Under the guidance of Leslie Libakken the team developed into one of the strongest second teams the school .has ever had. In debating the high school question. "Resolved: That the United States should adopt the British system of radio broadcasting control, the teams grew into a group that made every debate an interesting one. James Ostby. Joan Smith, and Everett Gilette. as one team, made particular progress. ORATORY AND EXTEMPORANEOUS SPEAKING The school was ably represented in two solo speaking events this year. Leslie Libakken. entered in the extemporaneous speaking contest at the Lexington Pi Kappa Delta meet, earned the right to enter the semi-finals round after he came successfully through three elimination rounds. Only the fact that the school was not a member of the organization prevented him from going on. Rev. Roy Caraway, speaking on Peace for Notions and Men. represented River Falls at the State Oratorical Contest on March 18. where he won fourth place. He earned the right to enter by winning the school contest here the week before. Carl pflanz Rgsella Paulson Alfred Nelson Ruth Hughes i 9 3 4 Winners of The Forensic “R” FORENSIC “R” (Plain key awarded for five points) Laura Keller. 21 John Williams. 21 Leo Shannon. '21 Winfred Bird. ’23 Allan Me Andrew. '23 Phillip Mitchell. '23 Margaret McDermott. '25 KENNETH PRESTON. '25 Carl Amundson. 29 Helen Hawkins. ’29 Elmer Beran. 31 Leonard Madison. '31 La Verne Campbell. '33 James Deringer. ’33 Elaine Forsyth. "33 DAGMAR PEDERSON. ’33 Joan Smith. ’33 Kenneth R. Hanna. ’34 Philip Chase. '34 Louis Zahradka. 34 ROLF ORDAHL. '34 Roman Zorn. 34 HONOR FORENSIC "R” (Key with one star awarded for ten points) Frank Albee. '22 Langdon Chapman. ’22 Everett Smith. ’25 Ronald Baker. '25 Chester Crowell. ’30 Lyle Lamphere. ’30 LeRoy Luberg. '30 James Henry. '32 Carleton Ames. '25 MARGARET BAILEY. '25 James Mason. ’34 DISTINCTIVE FORENSIC "R” (Key with two stars for fifteen points) Alvin Howalt. 22 Donald Olson. '28 Reynold Jenson. '25 Martin Abrahamsen. ’30 Thomas Barry. '28 Horace Merrill. '32 Raymond Penn. ’32 DOUBLE HONOR "R” (Key with three stars for twenty points) Edward Casey. '23 Rex Liebenberg. '23 Catherine Chapman. '25 DOUBLE DISTINCTIVE FORENSIC “R” Melvin Thompson. '22 Marshall Norseng. 28 John Davidson. ’28 Bernard Morton, 28 John Burke. ’28 Fred Wandrey. ’28 Lucille Garley. '32 Robert Smith. ’32 Morris Buske. ’34 Leslie Libakken. '34 One hundred ihiriy-uxPUBLICATIONSM E L E T E A N Carol Isaacson The 1934 Meletean Editor Carol Isaacson Business Manager Thorvald Thoreson Athletics Photography Arnold Lewiston Charles Carpenter Edna Wahl Harley Borgen Faculty Advisor Maud A. Latta One hundred thirty-eightThorvald Thoreson M E L E T E A N The 1934 Meletean Act Jane Curtis Music Mary Jane Larson Forensics Drama Morris Buske Allen Hocking Organi zations Esther Reinke Elmer Rieck T ypist Edith Olson Esther Reinke i 9 3 4 One hundred thirty-nineEdith Olson Allen Hocking Edna Wahl The 1934 Meletean THE first volume of the MELETEAN was published in 1912 by the senior class, with Jennie Wiesenthal as editor-in-chief and Robert Moser as business manager. Homer Elertson, one of the art editors, is now one of the most distinguished artists in the United States, whose work is seen at all important art exhibits in the East. Harvey Fletcher, who later gave his life in the service as a reconnaissance officer in France, was one of the athletic editors. It was Mr. Fletcher who gave the annual its name. Each year since 1912 the MELETEAN has appeared and increased in size and scope as the school has grown. In 1919 a small student directory was issued as a private business enterprise by a student of the school. The MELETEAN. recognizing the desirability of continuing this publication, took over the work the next year and transferred the advertising material from the annual to the directory. Since then no advertising has appeared in the annual. This is a most desirable feature and one sought by all annual builders, but one rarely attained because of the financial necessity of making the advertising pay in part for the book. Jane Curtis Arnold Lewiston i One hundred forty « 3 4Charles Carpenter Mary jane Larson Harley Borgen The 1934 Meletean HTHE Student Directory has also grown until it is a complete handbook of J- school information, the compiling and publishing of which is no small task. Until 1930 the MELETEAN was always issued by the graduating class. Since that year it has been an all school book with the majority of the staff, however, coming from the junior and senior classes. It has been a true school product in plan and execution. All designs and all art work have been done by students. The MELETEAN has won high standing in national competition with publications of other colleges, receiving All-American rating for several years from the National Scholastic Press Association. More and more it has become the aim of the various staffs to produce a book as accurate and as pictorially complete as possible. This then is the object in presenting the 1934 MELETEAN. the twenty-third volume of the college annual. Oac hucdre.1 totty oneWILLIAM LOVER DAVID TESKE The Student Voice STAFF Managing Editor David Teske Editorial Writers Edward Monette Phyllis Glass William Lover Sports Writers Vernon Woodward Olaf Pederson Feature Writers Helen Jenson Fern Steig Faculty Advisor W. D. Wyman Oi e hundred fony-iwoSchB-l . Elda Nelson Marie Klugow Edward Platt Bertha Polgar Morris Buske Eldon Moen Willard Swanson Bathe. Gillsp. Glin. Iltaton. Klagow MmHII. NthM. I'lill. Rmmi Swjntoa. Tbofctoa. Tabbt. ViMtW. Wi News Writers Emma Lou Tubbs John Sebeson William Jueds Maurice Shepard Columnists Mariann Wakefield Business Manager Donald Parish Advertising Harold Rasmussen Distributing Merle Hanson Marie Klugow Donald Parish Edrys Ruethin Betty Cutsforth Edna Wahl Hermina Schmutz Marjorie Gallup Emma Lou Tubbs Kenneth Thorbson i Ok bandied foetyihteeM E L E T E A N 'T'HE STUDENT VOICE is the only publication that brings to the eyes of the reading world the every day happenings on the campus of the River Falls State Teachers College. Locally the publication aims to promote school spirit, to further professional interests, and to maintain River Falls Teachers College traditions. Ten issues of The Studem Voice are published each term. Wednesday is the established date for the distribution of each issue; however, exceptions are made in regard to distribution, so that other campus organizations may make use of The Student Voice for advertising special activities. The Student Voice staff meets every Wednesday at 3:10. At these meetings the organization advisor and the editor comment on the type of work each reporter has done in the issue that has last been published. Assignments and plans are made for the succeeding issue. The organization as a social institution promotes all-school events, not only through the publicity it affords, but also through the participation of the staff members. At the middle of the second term an annual banquet is held at which the editor for the remaining half year is announced. Toward the close of the school year the staff enjoys a picnic at which is announced the editor for the beginning half of the coming school year. The reporting staff members who have fifty column inches of written material for three successive terms receive as an award the Matrix Key. After the Marix Key is once earned, a star is added for each extra year of Student Voice staff membership. Members of advertising and distributing staff receive the Matrix Key after three successive terms of effective service. Stars are likewise added to these keys in recognition of continued service. In addition to the Matrix Key and the stars for each staff member one extra-curricular credit in journalism is recorded at the registrar's office for each year of active membership on The Student Voice staff. 1 One hundred forty-four . 3 4STUDENT LIFEHighlights of Homecoming—our most thrilling festivity of the year.Organizations rally in colorful attire for the benefit of the "old grads."“Y. W. and Y. M. revelries out-of-doors."I "At Lake Independence and the retreat.""We have our actors and howl"Campus freaks and others during their leisure. "Here and there in country and in town."Athletics BOOK I IVCoach Cowles M E L E T E A N Assistant Coach Setterquist The Athletic Department THE ATHLETIC COUNCIL R. A. Kargcs...................................President E. J. Prucha Vice-President Osborne Cowles....................................'Coach E. A. Whitcnack.....................Secretary-Treasurer W. H. Hunt . . . . . . . Director A. N. Johnson...................................Director THE COACHING STAFF Osborne Cowles Theodore Setterquist Glen Morrow Joe Braun Laurin McChesney Norman Panzenhagen . . . _ . Coach Assistant Coach Student Assistant Coach Student Assistant Coach Student Assistant Coach Student Assistant Coach MANAGERS Ernest Brickner ..................................Basketball Steve Prusak........................................Football James Ostby.........................................Football 1 One hundred fifty-five 3 4Rl«z. IIcikII. Norwick. Sveinson. Parnell. brckke .... ..Jr. £ow '. Hare. Johmon, May. Clapp. Vezina, Kraute, Prdenos Van Winkle, Srhio.er. Maack. Aaitcrud. Daw.on. Mark. Ku... Kolberg. At.iua.. Coach Smcrqui.t Jackelen, Lampoon, Aaner, Vo. k nil, Captain Slmpion. Panzenhagen. McGbeiacy, Noldr. Diicknrr Mtnaor Jamn Oil by THE 1933 FOOTBALL TEAM Palmer Aasterud Erlin Bergeman Lloyd Brekke Ernest Brickner Wallace Clapp Charles Dawson Donald Hart Harlan Herrell Joseph Jackelen Wilbur Johnson OMER SIMPSON. CAPTAIN Berger Kolberg Floyd Krause Carl Kuss Preston Lampson Lineus Maack Ernest Mack Donald May Laurin McChesney Sylvester Nolde Bernard Norwick Norman Panzenhagen Steve Parnell Olaf Pederson Fred Reitz Emil Schiesser Valdo Svcinson Charles Van Winkle Benjamin Vezina Wallace Voskuil Dean Zaner MEN NAMED ON ALL-NORTHERN STATE TEAMS First Team McChesney Panzenhagen Maack . Dawson Brickner Left End Right Tackle Left Guard Quarterback Fullback Second Team Mack Aasterud One hundred Halfback Center i 9 3 4Captain Simpson Managers Ostby and Prusak Results of the Season River Falls 20 Macalester 0 River Falls 13 Stout 6 River Falls 7 Eau Claire 0 River Falls 0 La Crosse 0 River Falls 0 Superior 6 River Falls 7 Moorehead 6 CONFERENCE STANDING Won Lost Tied Pet. Stevens Point 3 0 1 1000 Milwaukee 3 1 0 .750 La Crosse 2 1 1 .667 Oshkosh 2 1 1 .667 River Falls 2 1 1 .667 Superior 2 1 0 .667 Stout . 2 2 0 .500 Whitewater 1 3 0 .250 Eau Claire 0 3 0 .000 Platteville 0 4 0 .000 1 9 3 4 One hundred (ifiy-tcvcnNOLDE LAMPSON, Kuss Pederson River Falls 13, Stout 6 [ ED by the hard driving Brickner, who scored both Falcon touchdowns. River Falls scored late in the second quarter and again in the third to defeat Stout for the first conference win by a 13-6 score. Hard line plunging by Zaner. Brickner. and Mack with Mack also running excellent interference, brought the Falls down the field to the five-yard line where Brickner again took the ball and smashed through center for the first touchdown. Both sides were offside on the try for point, but Simpson's second try missed its mark. The second touchdown came by the same route of line plays. The ball was carried to the six-yard line where Stout was penalized for offsides, placing the ball on the one-yard line. Brickner plunged over for the touchdown. Voskuil kicked the extra point with a spectacular place kick. Stout scored its touchdown a few minutes before the first half ended by a long pass, Beckman to Stori. who was finally run out of bounds on the four-yard line. Another pass, a short one, scored. An attempted pass for the extra point was incomplete. One hundred fifty-dull! 1Krause Maack. Brickner ASTERUD River Falls 7, Eau Claire 0 BEFORE an Eau Claire homecoming crowd of about two thousand people, River Falls defeated an inspired and determined Eau Claire team. 7-0. Eau Claire had one of the strongest teams on the field that she has ever had. and the Falcon’s win was a well deserved one. It took River Falls four quarters to shove the ball over the goal. Four minutes were left to play when a long pass. Dawson to Lampson, Falcon end. put the ball on the twelve-yard line where a triple pass play, with Zaner carrying the ball, scored for River Falls. Voskuil kicked the extra point from placement directly between the uprights. River Falls had much the better team on the field, but failed to advance to a scoring position except for one time when they had the ball on the seven-yard line. Fumbles seemed to.be on the card for the day. with the Falls carrying the honors. Dawson at quarter was easily the best man on the field. His running, generalship, and punting were the highlights of the game. Zaner was the best ground gainer of either team. One hundred fifty-nineJOHNSON MACK PANZENHAGEN River Falls 0, La Crosse 0 A homecoming crowd of from one thousand five hundred to two thousand people witnessed the Falcons and Maroons play a 0-0 tie. River Falls completely and distinctly outplayed the La Crosse team, but failed to win despite many chances to score. Outplayed in every department of the game, the visitors failed to get inside the Falcons’ forty-three-yard line, and gained but thirty-four yards from scrimmage all afternoon. When the third quarter opened, the Falcons pushed to the Maroons' ten-yard line. Punts were exchanged and McChesney knocked a River Falls' punt out of bounds on the one-yard line. La Crosse punted. River Falls gained possession on the two-yard line and Voskuil tried for a place kick on the fourth down but failed. La Crosse punted to end the game. The Maroons' longest gain was five yards; River Falls made fourteen first downs to La Crosse none and gained 182 yards from scrimmage.Zaner VOSKUIL KOLBERG River Falls 0, Superior 6 RIVER FALLS took their only defeat of the season when they played Superior on the Superior field in a night game. This was Superior's homecoming game, and what a game it must have been from the Superior rooters’ view. Neither team showed signs of scoring during the first three quarters. There were three minutes left to play, when Superior, with a determination to win, made a drive down the field followed by a pass and touchdown by Captain Wright. Captain Wright was the outstanding player for Superior. On defense he threw River Falls back for losses time after time. If first downs indicate anything. Superior deserved to win. The Yellowjackets made fourteen first downs to the Falcons' three. Kuss played a strong defensive game, breaking through to get his man and throw him for a loss. In the third quarter he broke through to block a Superior punt. Zaner. Brickner. and Mack played a good game in the backfield. Lampson. substitute end. and Schiesser. substitute half, played good ball while they were in the game. One humlrol uny-oecDawson SCHIESSER McChesney Non-Conference Games THE Falcons, after two weeks of heavy training which included a scrimmage with St. Olaf. played their first game on show field against Macalester, trouncing the Mac eleven to the tune of 20-0. Led by a hard driving backfield, the Falcons did not waste any time getting a touchdown the first quarter. Zaner, former Northfield high star, dashed around right end from the fifteen-yard strip for the score. In the second quarter the Mac center threw the ball back over the goal line giving the Falcons a safety when a Macalester back fell on it. The second touchdown came as a result of an intercepted pass by Mack. The final touchdown came in the last period as a result of a pass from Dawson to Kuss for a gain of about forty yards. The Moorhead Dragons furnished the opposition for the final game of the season and went down to defeat by 7 to 6. River Falls scored their touchdown in the first quarter. The Falcons marched from mid-field and Zaner went over on a triple pass. Voskuil kicked goal to give the Falls their margin.Fryc. Dowli. Erickson. Stenbaek. Crow. Vagstad. Bergstrom. Braun Erickson, Younggren. Lintban. Lein. Zahradka. Christensen, O'Brien Freshman and Spring Football THE freshman football team is composed of players from the various schools entering for their first year of college football. Their playing is the result of various methods of coaching and different styles of play, which must be altered to coincide with the system used by the college coach in his attempt to develop them for a position on the varsity team. The team played two games against the Macalester freshman squad, losing both games: the first 6-0 and the second 7-0. The second defeat resulted from a blocked punt back of the goal line that was recovered by Macalester. Norwick was the outstanding player of the team. He is a great player, both defensively and offensively. Spring football is spent in drilling on the fundamentals of the game, and gives the freshman his chance to break into the lines of the varsity team. iisCIwsder. Htika!. Brickr.fr. Brrkkc. Norwick. Lampion. Jaekelen. Blank. Kolbcsg. Weber. Krause. Coach Panzenhagen Ouiccli. Isaacson. Hansen. While. Simmelink. Vagsiad. Wulf, Leise. Anderson O'Brien. Doscb. Frye. Harr. Haugb. Christiansen. Selvig. Zahradka. Anderson 1 One hundred sixty-threeCoach Cowl . Schictwr. Kola . Brrkkr. McChrtnry. Morrow. Wolf. Andrrtrn. Hinton. Hrrkal. Ituctoa The 1934 Basketball Squad Glen Morrow. Captain Emil Schiesser Merton Wulf Louis Kulas Donald Andersen Lloyd Brekke Mahlon Hanson Laurin McChesney Walter Herkal Harold Isaacson CONFERENCE STANDING Won Lost Pet. Superior..................... 7 1 .875 La Crosse ................... 6 2 .750 River Falls ................. 5 3 .625 Stout................. . . 2 6 .250 Eau Claire................... 0 8 .000 MEN NAMED ON ALL-NORTHERN STATE TEAMS First Team Herkal .......................................Forward Second Team Morrow........................................Forward Andersen .......................................Guard 1 9 3 4 One hundred sixty-fourCaptain Morrow Manager brickner Results of the Season NON-CONFERENCE River Falls 21 Hamline River Falls 30 Macalester River Falls 13 St. Olaf . . . River Falls . 40 St. Olaf River Falls 30 South Dakota State . River Falls . 37 Hamline . River Falls . 35 Macalester . . CONFERENCE River Falls . 39 •Stout . River Falls . H 37 Eau Claire . . River Falls 33 Stout River Falls . 35 Milwaukee 20 Superior River Falls . 25 La Crosse River Falls 31 La Crosse River Falls 38 Superior ........ River Falls . 44 Eau Claire CONFERENCE STANDING Won Lost EH Superior .. . 7 HI 1 .875 La Crosse 6 • PI . .750 River Falls 5 3 .625 Stout . 2 6 .250 Eau Claire . 0 8 .000 1 9 3 4 27 41 25 33 25 31 39 35 33 22 40 39 30 30 36 30 One hundred sixty-fiveKULAS SCHIESSER McChesney Basketball ■HE Falcons began their basketball season by playing six non-conference games before facing their first conference opponent. This was the strongest pre-conference schedule River Falls has played, and was an excellent help to Coach Cowles in developing a strong team from new material. Hamline University, the first opponent, was met on the Hamline floor. River Falls surprised the "U” men by taking the first half 12-9. but this lead was reversed during the second period to give Hamline the game 27-21. Kulas, a new addition, took the honors for the Falls by ringing up eleven of the twenty-one points. The team turned its next attack upon Macalester. finding defeat from the beginning. The score ended 41-30. A second half rally by Kulas. Isaacson, and Morrow failed to account for enough points. Morrow led the Falcons with thirteen points. Cohm of Macalester. getting twenty-one points, was the winning factor for the opponents. St. Olaf was the third opponent. The game was played at Northfield. The score, St. Olaf 25. River Falls 13, indicates the defensive game that it was. The tables were turned, however, when St. Olaf met the Falcons on their own floor. The score. 40-33. Morrow won honors as high point man by accounting for 17. while Wulf, a recruit, came through for 10. Making an eastern tour and coming well recognized as a strong team. South Dakota State invaded River Falls, only to lose by a 30-25 score. The game was ragged and hard fought. At no time was the Falls threatened, although the game was no runaway. Brekke and Herkal held scoring honors even. Hamline, champions of Minnesota colleges for 1934, played a return game at the Falls January sixth. They were defeated, 37-31. Hamline, confident of winning, held.the Falls to a 16-16 tie at the half. All the Falcons contributed well to the score in the second half. Herkal taking the lead. The Hamline game completed the non-conference games for the time. Coach Cowles had developed a real fighting machine that was clicking nicely when the conference season began. i 9 3 4 One hundred tuty-tiiIsaacson Herkal Wulf At Stout the Falcons took the long end of a 39-35 score. The game was hard fought throughout. River Falls found strong opposition in Chourberlain and Hylland, Stout forwards, who accounted for 27 of their team's 35 points. Morrow and Herkal held high score for the Falls: Morrow 15. Herkal 11. The following night the Falcons took their second conference game from Eau Claire, 37-33. The Falcons had little trouble in downing Eau Claire, although Eau Claire managed to draw close in the closing minutes of play. Again the scoring was led by Herkal and Morrow, Herkal collecting 12 points, and Morrow 9. The next encounter was a non-conference game in which Macalester. after trailing behind all through the contest, came to the front to nose out the Falcons by a score of 39-35. With five minutes to play, and the score tied at 24. Smith of Macalester made a field goal to put the Macs ahead for the first time during the game. This was the last non-conference game of the season. Stout was the first conference opponent for the Falcons after the Macalester defeat. River Falls won. 33-32. The game was marred by many fouls on each side. Stout committing 21 and River Falls 14. The first half was ragged and uninteresting, but River Falls displayed a much better showing in the second half to cop the honors which were even. 10-10. as the first half ended. Morrow and Isaacson found the basket for high honors, with Herkal playing one of his best games, althought not accounting for more than four points. Milwaukee came to River Falls as one of the three teams that had not been defeated to that date. River Falls and Superior being the other two teams. The outcome of the battle was in doubt to the finish. The half ended 17-10 in favor of the Falcons, and when the second period began the score soon leaped to a 26-12 mark. With the score 31-24 and five minutes to go. the Beer City five became desperate. Finding the loop, they sank one basket after the other so fast that before River Falls could realize what had happened they were on the short end of a 40-35 score and the game was over. River Falls met with a crushing defeat at the hands of Superior on the 1 9 3 4 One humlscd tiurmnANDERSEN BREKKE HANSON Falls' floor that put them out of first place in the northern division conference. The score, 39-20. Although he did not make many points. Herkal was the flash of the evening for River Falls. The Maroons of La Crosse, having a brilliant piece of luck, forced the Falcons to be satisfied with the short end of a 30-25 score. River Falls found it difficult to find the loop, while the Maroons collected with freak shots. The first half found the Falls trailing 17-12. but the second half was held to a 13-13 tie. Results might have been different, if Morrow bad not lost his position on fouls. The return game with La Crosse was one of the hardest fought battles of the season. River Falls came from behind in the second half, after trailing by a 17-9 score, to sweep La Crosse off their feet and take the lead, only to be outdone in the final thirty seconds of play by a chance shot by Butter wick. The game ended with La Crosse winning by one point, 31-30. Much credit is given to Andersen in this game for playing the defensive game so well, while at the same time scoring 8 points. Herkal was high point man with 14 points. The Falcons, playing at Superior, routed the ''Yellow-Jackets" by a 38-36 score. Captain Morrow found the basket for 16 points before he was sent to the showers via the foul route. Isaacson, Herkal. and McChesney also were dismissed, on fouls. The first period ended with River Falls ahead 24-20, but with the point-makers going out on fouls, Superior tied the game near the finish. Hanson, in the game for McChesney. came through fighting to score the final basket and win the game. The final game was played at the Falls against Eau Claire. After winning from Eau Claire earlier, the Falcons were confident that )ey would win again. Eau Claire surprised everyone by holding the team to the close score of 16-13 at the half. River Falls came back strong to win easily by a 44-30 score. Coach Cowles' team rang up a record that was far from expectations when the season began. By hard work they developed into a team that was a threat to all comers. Their defeat of Hamline and Superior, both state champions, gives the Falcons a high position among the teams of the two states.Viguid. Nclsoa. Stcsbick. Simmrlink. Ea|4ihl B«e»t ona. O'Brifn. M CiW. Nflton Mium Piubii. Imctoa. YoongRrto. RMn, CoMh Stturqiui Freshman Basketball TED SETTERQUIST, the Falcons' new assistant coach, took over the training of the freshman basketball team. His call for players met with strong response. All of the players were given a try-out before the squad was cut to one team and intensive drill began. Practice was held every night, so that the team might learn to work together smoothly. This was the hardest task in developing the team, as each man was accustomed to the method of play taught him in high school. These various methods had to be disregarded, and a complete new style adopted. After several weeks of practice, the team was scrimmaged against many of the surrounding high school teams, such as River Falls, Roberts. Prescott. Hudson, Baldwin, and Hammond. Regular games were not played with these teams, although the score was tallied and the time was approximately equivalent to a game. In each of these scrimmages the freshmen came out above their opponents. Two regular games were played. Osceola, one of the strong teams in the neighboring high school conference, was defeated 45-17. Younggren started the scoring by making a couple of field goals. The rest of the team followed and when the whistle blew for the first quarter the score was River Falls 16. Osceola 2. Osceola retaliated in the second quarter when the Falcon regulars were taken out and substitutes put in. Both teams garnered eight points to end the half 24-10. A third set of players were used in the third quarter by the Falls. The score advanced to 34-13 at the end of the period and leaped to 45-17 in the last quarter when Osceola became too weary to give opposition. The team was defeated in the other game by a narrow margin of 26-13. at Durand. Difficulty seemed to be in finding the loop for the pointers. Simmelink. Younggren. Erickson. O'Brien, and Engdahl stood out among the yearling performers in competitive plays.Lind. Krause. Captain Vosknil. Great on. Wick Intramural Basketball Results of the Season Won Lost Pet. Kuss’s Badgers 8 2 .800 V ©skull's Eagles 8 2 .800 Nolde's Tigers mmmmmb 3 .700 Seidel's Wolves ' 7 3 .700 McCully’s Panthers 5 5 .500 Holman's Gophers 5 5 .500 June hen’s Elephants 4 6 .400 Baker’s Swans 4 6 .400 Gustafson’s Giraffes 4 6 .400 May's Dinosaurs 8 .200 Michelson’s Parrots 0 10 .000 Captain Baker. Rasmussen. Ostby. Newman. Cox 1 9 3 4 One hundred seventyDoKh. Van Dascr. Captain Holman. D. Compton. H. Compton INTRAMURAL BASKETBALL provides an opportunity for those students to play basketball who cannot play on the varsity squad. When the call is made for teams to form a league, the chosen captains hurry about in the search of the best material. When the teams are completed, each captain selects a name to designate his team. Competition runs wild at times and interest develops among the non-players as well as members of the teams. The season began immediately following the closing varsity season. Kuss’ Badgers began the race with great odds and were picked from the beginning to take the honors. They were soon caught by Voskuil and his Eagles. The Eagles could not hold the pace and dropped back until the final part of the season, when they came back strong to defeat Kuss by a point and tie for the honor of first place. Nolde's Tigers and Seidel’s Wolves finished tied for third and fourth, after the Tigers had made a gallant march from the bottom to within a game of the top. Brickntr. Vczina. Brown, Thorion. Land 1 9 3 4 One hundred jcvcniy-oiicM E L E T E A N W»bbcr. Erickton. Braun. Waif. Kati. Kiln. Coach Cowit Newman. Iiaacion. Seidel. Baker. Erick too. Coo peon Baseball BASEBALL is fast becoming one of the major sports of the college. Until recent years little attention has been given to the game. This year about thirty men reported for practice and to try out for the team. Each year a large group of veterans return, around which the coach must build his team. Mattson, Leseman. Kulas, Isaacson. Braun. Kuss. Woodward. Baker, and Luchsinger were back this year to help constitute a strong team. The pitching staff this year was composed of Braun. Leseman. and Erickson. Leseman. who was a regular at short stop last year, was called on for more hurling this year. Braun played regular behind the plate, but gave up his position to Luchsinger or Baker when he took the mound. Erickson was a “rooky” with the team. Kuss. one of the hardest hitters, and Mattson, one of the surest hitters, played the left and center fields respectively. The fast corner of third base was played by Kulas. and Isaacson covered second like a veteran. On batting the Falcons could be counted for the trick. Mattson was a sure hitter, usually sending the ball on a line over short. When a long, hard drive was needed, the call was given to Braun or Kuss. Isaacson. Kulas. and Leseman could be counted on for safeties, with Isaacson taking the honors as bunt man. River Falls is so situated that it is convenient for the Falcons to make arrangements for many games. Games have been played with such school teams as Concordia. St. Olaf. St. Cloud, and Eau Claire, with additional outside games with city teams near River Falls.The Pool. Minor Sports THE athletic program at River Falls is arranged so that it will meet the demands of the greatest number of students. Nearly every student is interested in some form of sport and with such a wide program is given the opportunity to take part some time during his college life. The program is planned so that games of some sort are going on all the time. Tennis seems to be played by more students than any other game. The school maintains six fine courts, two of which are concrete and equipped with flood lights to permit night use. A college tournament and intercollege contests are held every year. Swimming is a popular sport the year round. One afternoon a week is set aside for recreational swimming for men and one for women in the pool in North Hall. A class swimming meet is held every year, with each class represented by all of the best swimmers who wish to take part. In the spring a kittenball league is organized for those who enjoy a soft-ball game. The games are played immediately after supper on the South Hall campus. Golf is popular among many of the students and they are fortunate in having a chance to play on the excellent community course on the mounds east of the city. Students are given reduced rates during the academic year. Later in the spring intercollegiate and local competition is set up to increase interest in the game. Boxing never has taken much of a stand in sports at River Falls until the last few years. Interest in this sport throughout the school can be attributed to Vern Woodward’s skill in the sport. Woodward’s success has drawn others into training, although it is merely a personal procedure and not an activity of the school.Bricknrr. Voskuil. Panwnbagch'i Kolbcrg. Kmum Sthicmr. Brtkke. Kuss. Morrow. Hcrkal. Hanson. Noldc Braun. Iuacson. Woodward. Wolf. Lampton The “R” Club Organized in 1925 THE "R” CLUB is an organization composed of members who have won their "R” by representing the college in the major sports. The organization's purpose is to sponsor intramural sports and aid in promoting all athletic contests conducted at River Falls. WINNERS OF THE ATHLETIC "R Joseph Braun Ernest Brickner Charles Dawson Ray Helixon Wilbur Johnson Lawrence Junchen Carl Kuss Lineus Maack Donald Andersen Lloyd Brekke Ray Helixon Louis Kulas Laurin McChesney Joseph Braun Ray Helixon Carl Kuss Football Laurin McChesney Ernest Mack Glen Morrow Dean Zaner Sylvester Nolde Norman Panzenhagen Olaf Pederson Basketball Ernest Mack Vernon Woodward Carl Kuss Fred Mattson Glen Morrow Baseball Fred Mattson Vernon Woodward Louis Kulas Omer Simpson Wallace Voskuil Vernon Woodward Palmer Aasterud Berger Kolberg Floyd Krause Preston Lampson Emil Schiesser Merton Wulf Mahlon Hanson Walter Herkal Harold Isaacson Emil Schiesser Clarence Leseman Perry Luchsinger Harold Isaacson 1 One hundred KiMpfow 9 3 4WOMEN’S ATHLETICSKirelinieicr. Peabody, Sehwalen. Gr«n, Scatzo. Bonney, Cr07.cn, Peterson Kahuc. Smith. Hspescth, Klugow, Melton, Br.1ntt.1d, (Advisor) Women's Athletic Association Organized in 1921 as the Girls' Athletic Association when it conducted sports in which over one hundred girls participated HPHE aim of the Women’s Athletic Association is to get many girls interested in sports. It has a diversified sport program, so that it may satisfy as many as possible. It sponsors both organized and unorganized or individual sports. Its organized sports include hockey, soccer, basketball, volleyball, baseball, and tennis. Its unorganized sports are ping-pong, skating, hiking, and swimming. Those who wish to maintain their membership in the W. A. A. must get one hundred points each year. These points are gained by taking part in the activities. Those who attend at least one half of the practices for any one sport receive twenty-five squad points. Those reporting for all practices get fifty points for perfect attendance. The girls who succeed in getting on the honor teams in hockey and basketball are awarded one hundred honor points. Points are given for taking part in unorganized sports. Anyone who gets five hundred points wins a letter. One hundred seventy-six 1 9Sdnlli. Cox. Lociiun. Wabl. McAb4k . Kirdxr. Mills O'Horn. Smith. Srhlotscr. Cast. Hanson. Schnniz Women's Athletic Association A BUSINESS meeting is held once each month. The head of the organization • is the executive council which is composed of the officers, the sport heads, and the advisor. The officers are Marie Klugow, president; Gertrude Kirchmeier, secretary: Bernice Smith, treasurer. The sport heads are Elizabeth Bonney, hockey; Grace Schwallen, soccer; Eva Rose Scalzo, basketball; Gladys Peterson, volleyball: Mercedes Peabody, baseball; Winifred Kahut, tennis. Miss Branstad is the advisor. Meetings twice a week are devoted to sports. Under the efficient management of Miss Branstad the girls learn the fundamentals and technique of the games. The first few practices of each game are given to learning the principles and developing the technique of the sport. Then teams are chosen which practice together. Each season is ended with a tournament. The two important events of each year are Playday and the spring camping trip. Playday is given for the girls of the surrounding high schools. The motto of Playday is "Play for play’s sake.” The camping trip is always anticipated with keen pleasure. It was held at the Y. M. C. A. camp for the week-end of May 18. 19, and 20. The girls spent the days in rowing, walking, swimming, and playing baseball and other games. 1 One hundred seventy-sevenlogin. Ncltoa. Peabody. Lomim. Wahl. Scbwallr . Eipwlb. Kirebrr. Smith. Schultz Sandra. O'Hrara. Sebmutz. G. Prtmoe. Scalzo. Crogca. Mill . Jemen Paszmhaara. Bobmt Hockey HOCKEY was the first sport of the season. Elizabeth Bonney acted as sport head. Twenty-seven people appeared the first day eager to learn how to play the game. They spent the first few practices in learning the technique and fundamentals—how to bully-off, to use only the flat side of the stick in hitting, and similar things. After the girls learned how to play the game, four teams were selected which practiced together in preparation for the tournament. At first they practiced outside on the campus behind South Hall. However, because of cold weather later, the practices had to be finished in the gymnasium. The hockey season was finished by a tournament played inside by the four selected teams. Competition was very keen. The tournament games showed the result of the practice. The ten best players were selected as the honor team. They were Mercedes Peabody, Bernice Schultz, Corinne Crogen. Eva Rose Scalzo, Gladys Peterson, Martha Inglis. Lois Espeseth. Margaret Lorentzen, Edna Wahl, and Dorthea Panzenhagen. One hundred tcvcniy-cight 1M E L E T E A N Srhuliz. PfjboUy, Klr h«r. I.oifnizen. Stricbrl, Kabul. Wahl. NeUon. Cox. Kirchraeirr. I’an cnhaRcn. Scilzo Jrnirn. IVicrwn, Caw. ScbwalUn. O'lltarn. Grogcn, Bonnfy Soccer HPHE season for soccer opened on November 7. Thirty people turned out for it, showing that it is increasing in popularity. Grace Schwallen acted as sport head. One of the rules of soccer is that no one except the goal keeper may touch the ball with her hands; accordingly, the first part of the season was spent in learning to hit the ball with the shoulders, the chest, and even the head, as well as kicking the ball. However, even after this training, the players sometimes forgot themselves and tried to stop the ball with their hands. The next part of the season was devoted to practice games, after which teams were chosen and the tournament was played. The tournament ended the season on December 12. Those who received points for perfect attendance in soccer were Eva Rose Scalzo, Evelyn Schlosser, Gladys Peterson. Nathilla O'Hearn. Doris Nelson, Corinne Crogen, Lily Cass, Mercedes Peabody, and Grace Schwallen. 1 Q One hundred icveniy-nlne 3 4Scalzo. Schw.ilkn, Schrulh. Kir li«r. WaW. Suitfel. N Imm. Kirebaeifr. Ricfcsrdwn. Espocth. Braauad (Coicfc) Pfibodf. Kumhifj. CrofM. Bonney. Peabody. Smith. O'Heara Jfown. Co . Pflinoo. Cut. Mil! Volleyball THE last indoor sport of the season was volleyball. The season began on March 13 and lasted for six weeks. Gladys Peterson was chosen sport head. Twenty-nine people participated. The girls practiced serving, returning balls, and getting the ball off the net. Corinne Crogen and Hermina Schmutz chose teams for the tournament. The tournament games were played during the last three practices. Since the teams were quite evenly matched the games were exciting. However, the team chosen by Hermina Schmutz finally won the tournament. The girls who received fifty points for perfect attendance are Lily Cass, Corinne Crogen, Helen Kircher. Doris Nelson, Nathilla O’Hearn, Hermina Schmutz, and Edna Wahl. One hun.lic.1 eighty 1 9Crogrn. RicbardSon. I.orrnizcn, Solzo. Cos Bnaiiad (Coach). Bonncy. I'anzcnhagcn. Sandrn Basketball SINCE basketball is a very popular game, more people came out for it than for any other activity. The basketball season is the favorite season of the year. Forty girls took part. Eva Rose Scalzo was sport head. The first part of the season was spent in developing the technique of passing, pivoting, shooting, and other plays. New rules were played according to which the new center passing was used instead of jumping center. Three teams, having as their captains Helen Kircher, Dorothea Panzcn-hagen. and Doris Nelson were chosen. Later class teams were organized. Each of these groups played a tournament. The juniors won the interclass tournament. Doris Nelson’s team won the other. A tournament was played also with the River Falls and Ellsworth high schools. The honor team chosen for basketball was comprised of Dorothea Panzen-hagen, Helen Kircher, Doris Nelson, Gladys Peterson. Corinne Crogen. Evelyn Schlosser. Mercedes Peabody. Eva Rose Scalzo. and Alice Bartosh. 1 9 3 4 One hundred eighty© 1 9 3 4Organizations BOOK IVM E L E T E A N The Alumni Association Founded in 1887 Mary Carroll Standish........................... President Della Berg Benson............................Vice-President Gladys Mason Symes . . Secretary-Treasurer AS the graduate is the product of the college, it is he x who represents the institution in the field, carries out its projects, and forms a most valuable link between college and state. There are now River Falls alumni, not only throughout Wisconsin, but in almost every state of the union. They are engaged in many types of work, but no matter what their occupation or location they form a loyal body of supporters of their Alma Mater. 1 9 3 4The Honor Society Organized 1930 OFFICERS Helen Jenson Alice Bartosh Ardelle Hamlett . President V ice-President . Treasurer THE Honor Society is an organization of those students who have achieved a place on the honor roll for scholastic ability. At commencement a gold “R” is awarded to those who have maintained a high scholastic standard throughout their course. Alice Bartosh.. . Dolores Dunbar. Marjorie Gallup. GOLD “R" ......... Mathematics Donald Hembre......................Science ......Intermediate John Sebeson.......................Science ...........English Mildred Smith (Mrs.). . Secondary Education Clarice Solum......................History Ernest Anderson Howard Askov Omar Bacon Ida Bartholomew Alice Bartosh Harley Borgen LeRoy Brown Curtis Burkholder Morris Buske Everett Campbell John Campbell Leone Capper Roy Caraway Mildred Chelgren Vernice Clapp Betty Cuttsforth Dorothy Dcmulling Delores Dunbar Marjorie Gallup Harriet Gilbert Helen Glass Gunner Gunnerson Ardelle Hamlett Fae Hanson Alfred Herstrum Irving Haug SILVER "R” Helen Hunter Carol Isaacson Helen Jenson Dale Johnson Hope Joyce Herman Klevgard Marie Klugow Helen Kotts Floyd Krause Carl Kuss Margaret Laurent Ariel LePage ' Arnold Lewiston Ruth Lovett Jean McIntyre Margaret McCabe James Mason Alfred Mathieson Donald May Edward Mayer Edward Monettc Alfred Nelson Marcella Nelson Phillip Newman Nancy Njos Maynard Olson Pearl Olson John Ordal Dorothea Panzenhagen Harry Palm Donald Parish Gerald Peterson Doris Pitzer Yerda Robertson Edna Rocknem Edrys Ruethin John Sebeson Bernice Schultz Bernice Smith Mildred Smith Clarice Solum Velma Segerstrom Earl Sumner Phillip Svec Willard Swanson Thorvald Thorson Howard Turner Arthur Van Duser Harry Vruwink Edna Wahl Mariann Wakefield Melvin Wall Harold Zorn One hundred eighty-fourWallin. Hove. LePag . Reinke While. Smith. Tail (President). Shelia. Bremmer The Student Social Committee Seniors—Claude Tait, Bernice Smith. Esther Reinke Juniors—William Kulstad, Doris Sheila, Romelle Wallin Sophomores—Maxine Olson. Donald May. Mike White Freshmen—Kenneth Hove. Ariel LePage. Frederick Bremmer Advisor—Miss Hathorn THE Student Social Committee is a representative organization. Three members from each class are chosen by the president of the class. These students, under the direction of Miss Hathorn as faculty advisor, sponsor the all-school social activities of the student body. The biggest function of the fall term, which the Social Committee labored to make a success, was the Homecoming ball. The efforts were not in vain, for a record breaking crowd of old grads and students filled North Hall gym to capacity. Throughout the year, it has been the desire of the committee to have something doing each week in the line of social activities. Week-ends, when organizations or classes were not having a special program, the Social Committee had a dance or card party. A matinee dance was held on registration day of each term. The spring term was climaxed by the Masquerade, which has become an annual event. A large crowd attended, and many prizes were given to students and faculty members. Card tables were purchased for the social room, and ping-pong tables for the men’s recreation room. It is the hope of the present committee that future members will be able to help finance and in this way increase the number of social activities of the students. The Student Social Committee has endeavored to carry out to satisfaction the social functions of the group which it represents—the student body.THE CABINET 1933-1934 Clapp. May. Riumimi. Jacobtoa. Tbocaptoa. Hanton. Swantoa Prauk. Boigrn, Dormin. Tboccsoa. Aodmoa. Juedt The Young Men's Christian Association Organized 1915 LIFE in an ever-changing world demands rhe development of liberal, understanding, appreciative attitudes toward the beliefs and practices of our own and our world neighbors. It is toward the bringing of these fundamental principles of Christianity into practical operation in our lives that the Y. M. C. A. is working. The organization, in which membership is available to every man in school, is governed by a cabinet of twelve members who choose their own officers. Each man is the chairman of a committee representing a certain phase in social or religious service. It is highly desirable to have every member of the organization active in some phase of the work. Several of the cabinet members attended a spring cabinet training conference at Lake Independence, Minnesota. Leonard Dorman was chosen chairman of the Wisconsin division of the student council which has as its purpose the planning of the Lake Independence Conference program for the coming year. Several committee meetings were attended at St. Paul during the school year. The weekly Y. M. C. A. programs were held every Monday night, and they were devoted to topics concerning world affairs as well as questions concerning personal life. Several of the meetings were devoted to strictly religious topics. An especially interesting and worth while project was the report on the war question by the committee on Christian World Education headed by Wm. Jueds. One hundred cighiy-six 1THE CABINET 1934-35 Hinton. Crow. Tot I rod. Micharlton. Ritmutirn. Swjnton Zihridki. Brown. Borgcn. Gninn. May. Compton The Young Men's Christian Association MANY other varied programs of the year act as drawing cards for the association, such as. student and faculty discussions and leadership, outside speakers and entertainers, special music, and many other specialties of interest. During the year the Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. plan meetings in which both men and women are vitally interested. A series of joint discussion meetings was conducted during the winter term which was of great interest to the students. Several topics were discussed under the guidance of capable leaders. The topics selected were: Personal religion, understanding our neighbors, how to spend our leisure time, and problems of etiquette. The growing attendance at these group discussions seemed to show that these subjects were of importance and interest to the students. The all-school mixer, the homecoming banquet, the boys’ Christmas party, the stag party, and the installation banquet—activities which the Y. M. C. A. sponsors alone or jointly with the Y. W. C. A. are becoming traditional. With five old cabinet members still holding office and a very capable group of new men elected, the Y. M. C. A. looks forward to another year of worth while service under the devoted guidance of Professor Jacobson. 1 Oac hundred cighty-tctcnKir hmri«r. Hoyle. Rons, Phillip . Schmurz Klugow. Smith. HMhorn (Adritor). Iuacson. Martin The Young Women’s Christian Association THE Young Women's Christian Association is the oldest organization on the campus. In the first complete record of school affairs—the 1912 Melc-tean—it is mentioned as already active and flourishing. This association is open to every girl in school, and it attempts to enrich and make her school life easier. The purpose of the Y. W. C. A. is "to unite in a desire to realize a full and creative life through a growing knowledge of God and the participation in making this life possible for everyone.” The work of the Y. W. C. A. during the past year has been aimed toward active participation of every girl. Each cabinet member was the chairman of a committee which had some particular project to fulfill. The result was a larger number than usual benefiting by the stimulative thought and activity of the organization. The programs for the year have been of a social, cultural, and devotional nature. Some of the outstanding devotional services of the year were the Candle Light service, the Easter service, and the Installation service. The Big Sister Movement opened the year’s activities. Before school opened last fall all the older girls who desired to become big sisters were reminded of their duties as such. They started their guardian duties on the first day of college. Along with this movement, the Y. W. C. A. sponsored a faculty, big and little sister tea. and with the help of the Y. M.. an all-school mixer. The Candle Light service took place during the early fall for the purpose of receiving new members into the organization. As a Christmas project, doll beds, dolls, and clothing were made for several poor children in this vicinity. These gifts were displayed at a Christmas tea given by Miss Hathorn. and later presented to the small children at a party in the social room. 1 9 3 4 One bundled cishJy-eixMThe Cabinet at Lake Independence The Young Women’s Christian Association THE Y. W. C. A. at River Falls keeps in contact with the national organization at all times. We were unable to secure the visit of a national secretary or representative this year, but have maintained a lively correspondence with the larger movement. Early this spring our Y. W. and Y. M. entertained students from Stout at a Sunday evening dinner and meeting. They planned an economic conference which was held later in the spring at Menomonie. The annual Wisconsin-Minnesota Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. Conference was held at Camp Iduhapi, Minnesota, in April. Several of our students attended and returned with many interesting reports. Last year the Y. W. C. A. sent two delegates to the Geneva Summer Conference at Lake Geneva, Wisconsin. Colleges of nine states are represented at this conference at which speakers of national fame lead the discussions. Such contacts as these are made possible by the diligent work and co-operation of our members, and the generosity of the women of the faculty. One of the goals toward which every “Y” member looks is this summer’s conference. This year's program will culminate in the annual old and new cabinet retreat which will take place in May. This year's success has been manifested in the way in which the large percentage of the girls participated in the Y. W. activities, and is largely the result of Miss Hathorn’s faithful leadership. With an enthusiastic new cabinet and association members, prospects are promising for a very successful coming year. 1 p One hum!rtd eighty nine 3 4Andfi on, A«kov. BAtr. Ber . Bergemann. Btrgmom. hmun-on. Clapp. Davidwm Do cb. Dougherty, Eide. Gfiger. Gillingham. Grostkrcuiz. Gunncrion. H n cn. Hjiuo Hjii. Ibug. Haugen, Hough. Ilrritrum. Jackclcn. Jcpscn. John-on. Jued The Agrifallian Society 'T'HE Agrifallian Society was organized in the fall of 1912, soon after the opening of the new department of agriculture in the Normal School. It was composed of the faculty and students of the department, other members of the faculty who were interested, farmers of the community, and business men interested in agriculture. It proved a valuable adjunct to the school of agriculture and grew steadily in numbers and favor. Today it is made up of all men of the agriculture department and is an organization for the purpose of giving its members training in parliamentary practice and public speaking. It also gives one training in organizing programs. 4-H clubs. Future Farmers of America, and various other farm clubs. The agriculture department now has an enrollment of sixty-seven and is especially for the purpose of training Smith-Hughes teachers, but it has a twofold purpose, as. on completion of the course, its members are granted a general teacher’s license. All the members passed on by the State Board of Vocational Education are granted a B.E. degree. Arthur N. Johnson One hundred ninety 1 9Kero. Kiaia . Klein. Liim. Uvioz. Lroot. Miin. Kbtbinoa. Njitho N«!wa. N'naii. Piddie. Parish. Pcraaiky. RydWn. Sjiber. Sdiinut. Soibnei Tail. Thompson. Tboretoa. Voskuil. Wallen. Wiiu. While. Wilson. Zabradka The Agrifallian Society OFFICERS of the organization are elected twice yearly. During the first half of the year, Olaf Pederson was elected president: Alvin Jepsen, vice-president: Edward Lyons, secretary, and Lee Klein, treasurer. The last half Friend Terpstra was elected president: Emil Schiesser, vice-presidnt: Edward Lyons, secretary, and Lee Klein, treasurer. Regular meetings are held every other Thursday night. Programs, arranged by students of the agriculture department, include outside speakers and programs furnished by the students. Outside speakers this year were Mr. R ham low. secretary of the Department of Horticulture at Madison, and Mr. Chapman, agriculture instructor at Baldwin. The programs are very educational, entertaining and interesting. This year the society is sponsoring "Field Day." This is a day made up of demonstrations, exhibits, etc., for the benefit of the students in surrounding high schools. Members of the senior class are working in pairs coaching boys of the under classes in putting on demonstrations for this event. OLAF PEDERSON FRIEND TERPSTRA 1 One hundred ninety-© 9 3 4Cbmtrnioo. Dincrn. Ffllfaz. Filkiat. Finn. Fitter Frrf . Ivmon. Johoion. Mirlkr. N«Ikm The Rural Life Club Organized 1916 WHEN a student enrolls in the Rural Department of the River Falls Teachers College, he automatically becomes a member of the Rural Life Club. This club holds its regular meetings twice each month. Its aims are to equip the student with training in preparing programs for rural schools and with the ability to conduct a business meeting successfully. The first Rural Life Club meeting was held September 22. 1933. Any shyness on the part of the girls or backwardness of the boys was dispelled after playing the "get acquainted" games and learning to pronounce each others names. Dwight Wicdeman served as the first president and did his part toward making the Rural Life Club meetings both interesting and profitable. During the second semester the club members elected Herman Klevgard. whose able leadership brought the year’s work to a very successful close. Fred Fisher served as chairman of the program committee the first half, and Berniece Straub carried that responsibility the second half. The programs were varied. There were talks by different members of the faculty, music by many of the rural students, and one-act plays. "Mrs. Perkins' Hat Shop.” directed by Miss Lucile Malott. was especially well given. Mr. Malott gave an illustrated lecture about our native birds. Those present on that evening have a better background for teaching the life and characteristics of bird life in the community in which they teach. One of the first school activities performed by the Rural Life Club as an organization was preparation for Homecoming. Determined not to be outdone by former Rural Life Clubs they began their plans early. i 9 3 4 MABLE JORSTAD Om hundred ninety-twoNordttroa. Xy«tK«a. Oppcridx. Pflmoi, R«y Sabby. Scbntb. Stepbeasoo. Siraab. C. Wood . L. Wood The Rural Life Club BEFORE the Christmas vacation the customary Christmas party was held in the rural rooms on third floor. A Christmas tree was decorated and gifts were exchanged. The toys were first "fished for.” There was a good deal of hilarity in exchanging names, so that each member would receive an appropriate gift. The practice teachers were in for this event. When practice teaching begins, at the beginning of the second term, our club loses the attendance of about one-third of its members, because during practice the student lives in the school district which is between ten and fifteen miles from River Falls. However, the advantages of six weeks in a rural community are greater than the advantages which must be sacrificed for one who expects to spend his entire time next year in a rural district. There is a great deal of difference between observing a class being taught and teaching a class of eager, spirited children. In the mind of every practice teacher in the rural school there dwells a memory of varied experiences during practice teaching. Some remember the first wieldly lecture they gave to the first and second grade children, others the witty remarks their pupils made. The January thaw which made it necessary to wade the Rush River or the April flood which destroyed bridges will be long remembered. 1 9 3 4 Dwight Wiedeman Herman Klevgard One hundred ninety-threeAmeiy. Boyle. BmaM. Batkf. Chrlgrfn. Fulfil Gallop. Gilbert. Haalftt. Heidbriak. A. Hocking. D. Hocking Haaaicatt. laicw. Katltoa. Koitt. H. I.mcn. M. I.inon The College Masquers Organized 1929 THE College Masquers have thirty-eight members. Fourteen of this number were elected and initiated into the society at the beginning of the year. The number who are admitted each year corresponds to the number who graduate the previous year. At the annual election held last spring Paul Davee was elected president; Claude Tait, vice-president; Carl Pflanz, treasurer, and Helen Kotts, secretary. The organization has seen a very successful year under these officers and Miss Schlosser. The outstanding performance of the year was the presentation of the Christmas play. "The Goose Hangs High.” The play was appropriately presented just before the holiday season with great success. This was the annual benefit performance for the organization and was well attended. The one-act plays coached by the students under the supervision of Miss Schlosser have proved so beneficial, that they were continued this year. This type of work enables students to come in contact with practical play work as well as giving a better knowledge of the technical principles involved. This year four plays were presented: "The Pipe of Peace.” coached by Imelda Farrell: "On the Rocks.” coached by Harriet Gilbert: and “A Girl to Order.” coached by Vernon Peroutky. These three plays were presented to the public March 21. 1934, and were well received. “Accidents Will Happen.” coached by Leslie Libakken. was presented at assembly April 18, 1934. 1 Ok hotwired ninety-four 3 4 Nelle L. SchlosserI.ilukkrn. Lover, Mclniyic, Mot, Ohmu. Oboa Ptiouiky. Plim, Ratmaitm. Stcig. Swenson, Tail Thompson. Tubbs. Wakefield. While, Wilcox. Younggren The College Masquers ■AUL DAVEE this year introduced into The College Masquers a point system which requires each member of the organization to earn a certain number of points or relinquish his membership. The plan has proved very successful and has made the organization a much more active one. The person earning the largest number of points and contributing the most to the furthering of the club’s ideals is to receive an award annually. Programs this year have been unusually entertaining; several plays, discussions, skits, readings, and musical entertainments have been presented and have proved not only educational along dramatic lines, but have also afforded much enjoyment. Although the club is of a dramatic nature at heart, it does invade the social realm; as is the custom, the old members entertained their new fellow members at a dancing and card party held this year in the Woodland Lodge. The third annual formal held in the North Hall presented something new in formats, the theme for decorations being "The Last Round-Up." Arnie Kuss and his Royal Badgers furnished the music for the dance, which was one of the best attended dances of the year. The activities of the Masquers officially ceased for the year with the party and election of officers held May 3. 1934. Paul DaveeAndmoa. Chrlgrcn. Farrell. Ford Gallop. Hamid. Ilanton. Hndbriak. Inglii. Itunos Knaltoa. Koic . M. J. l.irion. M La non. Load. McCabe G. O. P. Organized 1912 THE G. O. P., which originated about twenty-one years ago as an organization for "pep” alone, has gradually developed into a group which fosters loyalty to our school, its standards, and its traditions. During these years, the standards of the club have gradually been raised, so that pledges are now chosen from the three upper classes only. The scholastic average as a basis of eligibility is being stressed. The trend is now toward the idea of having only those girls who are definitely enrolled in degree courses eligible as pledges. Since one avenue of expression of loyalty to the school is through the attitude of the alumnae, it has been gratifying to notice the unusually large number of G. O. P. "grads" who have returned to attend the annual G. O. P. social functions. Alberta Greene One hundred ninrty-M McIntyre. Marlin. O'Berding. G. Olson M. Olson. Peroutky. Quinlan. Rcinkc. Si. Peter. Sheila Smith. Stephenson. Swenson. Vak:Seld. Waller. While G. O. P. DUE to the capable leadership of Catherine Phillips, the timely suggestions of our advisor, Miss Greene, and the efforts of the G. O. P. members, this has been a year of great social activity. The spring luncheon and Homecoming banquet were real events. A fall dancing party was well attended. The big social event came in February—the G. O. P. formal. The South Hall gymnasium was effectively decorated to represent the deck of a yacht. Members of the organization and many alumnae spent a most enjoyable evening. Each year the G. O. P. presents a gift to the school. Last year leather magazine covers were given for the girls’ social room. Catherine Phillips i One hundred ninety-sevenM. Afdibl. V. Afdihl. Benedict. Cart it. Fox. Olton PeroutVy. PhUlipt. Sindcn. Smith. Tboetoo. Uica The Palette Club Organized 1932 ORGANIZED through the efforts of Miss Greene and Marvin Pratt, in September. 1932. the Palette Club had as its charter members Bernice Smith, Mariann Wakefield. Jean McIntyre, and Ruth Robinson. A constitution was drawn up and Marvin Pratt elected as first president. A club of this sort, organized by people who feel a need for creative expression which cannot be satisfied in the class room, is the dream of every art instructor. The Palette Club is definite evidence of such a need on this campus. The interest aroused in the art classes had grown to the extent that it could no longer be confined to the limits of class work—liberal as they arc—and needed this greater opportunity for individual expression. The officers of the club this year were: Mariann Wakefield, president: Marjory Afdahl. vice-president: Gwen Fox. secretary-treasurer. Miss Greene has continued to give her time to the club as advisor. This year the schedule of meetings was changed from bi-monthly meetings of the fall and winter terms, to weekly meetings in the spring. ALBERTA GREENE 9 3 4 Oac hundred nincty-eishtM E L E T E A N Work of the Club The Palette Club COMPOSED of people who are actively interested in art, the Palette Club has as its ideal the purpose of fostering and inspiring creative artistic ability in its members and of making them better appreciate the artistic side of life. The requirement for entrance is to create an original piece of work, which is submitted to a judging committee. Several of the meetings last year were devoted to the study of present-day trends in art. Before Christmas the work done was for the most part concerned with Christmas gifts, wrapping paper, and cards. Some pen-and-ink work, sculpturing, and book plates were made. This year, although the work has continued along the same lines, it has also included various other types initiated for the first time. A loom; furnished a means for making rugs. Several bracelets, plates, and buttons of pewter have been cut, etched, and polished. A project in the binding of a family history into one volume was completed by one of the girls. ■ Mariann WakefieldPRINTED BY AU6SBURG PUBLISHING HOUSE 425 SOUTH FOURTH STREET MINNEAPOLIS ■NORAVIO OY BUREAU OF ENGRAVING, INC. 500 SOUTH FOURTH STREET MINNEAPOLIS


Suggestions in the University of Wisconsin River Falls - Meletean Yearbook (River Falls, WI) collection:

University of Wisconsin River Falls - Meletean Yearbook (River Falls, WI) online yearbook collection, 1931 Edition, Page 1

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University of Wisconsin River Falls - Meletean Yearbook (River Falls, WI) online yearbook collection, 1932 Edition, Page 1

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University of Wisconsin River Falls - Meletean Yearbook (River Falls, WI) online yearbook collection, 1933 Edition, Page 1

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University of Wisconsin River Falls - Meletean Yearbook (River Falls, WI) online yearbook collection, 1935 Edition, Page 1

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University of Wisconsin River Falls - Meletean Yearbook (River Falls, WI) online yearbook collection, 1936 Edition, Page 1

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University of Wisconsin River Falls - Meletean Yearbook (River Falls, WI) online yearbook collection, 1937 Edition, Page 1

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