North Shore Country Day School - Mirror Yearbook (Winnetka, IL)

 - Class of 1966

Page 1 of 158

 

North Shore Country Day School - Mirror Yearbook (Winnetka, IL) online yearbook collection, 1966 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1966 Edition, North Shore Country Day School - Mirror Yearbook (Winnetka, IL) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1966 Edition, North Shore Country Day School - Mirror Yearbook (Winnetka, IL) online yearbook collection
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Text from Pages 1 - 158 of the 1966 volume:

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" ■ . n _; y " ■ ■ ■ .- • » ; ; " ■ iU ' ■ ' ' : ' : ' :: : : : • • ' ' 5 ?5i ; y -■ ' ' ' ' : - ' ■ ' ' ■ ' : : ; : : : :: ' ■ : - ' • . i i : ■ : :: - : - ' • i : i : f : : : : : • - ' • ' i i : : ; ; ' : : : TiH ? r • iiil • ' • ' ' ■ ' •- " ;;;; " •-• ' " ;;;;• ' , - • ■ : •■• " - ' . . " ; " - ' • " ■ ' - ■ ' . Wy : ' " : ; " " -i " : : : " • ; ; ; ' • ; ; ; ■ ' « • : • :; : -::::: , :•;: :: v :::;:;• :: -•:::::: :: ■ : :.;:::; ; - •-:::: ::;::i " ' :•:: , ::; :- : -: 1 XDJ OFrfc . ;!r - The North Shore Country Day School Winnetka, Illinois " Idjacation is something that a man has to fight f r an ' pull out iv its hole be th ' hair iv its head. That ' s th ' reason it ' s so precious. F. P. Dunne Mr. Carnegie ' s Gift DEDICATED TO L E P E T I T B I J O u " Round about And round about And round about I go; I think I am a Doctor who is visiting a Sneeze " A. A. Milne " Round about And round about And round about I go; I think I am a Traveller escaping from a Bear " A. A. Milne Junior Kindergarten FRONT ROW: Patty Strauss, Rowan O ' Riley, Bill Gallagher, Steve Zaharik, Nancy Sotern, Lisa Gordon, Annabet Berline, SECOND ROW: Lynne Lauke, Mark Fitzgerald, Elizabeth Weinstein, in background — Linda Gawthrop THIRD ROW: Anne Maddin, Julia Springer, Michele Harland, David Kepuis, John Pellechoud, Carl Rothe, Pam Friend, Andrew Macheod, Java Selvia, John Harza, Mrs. Damaske ABSENT: Teddy Jackson, Kenny Osberg Senior Kindergarten TOP ROW: Peter Wirtz, Todd McConnell, Peter Sturgis, Jay Sudak, Fax O ' Riley, SECOND ROW: Bobby Rivkin, Alice Joseph, Jason Thodos, Greg Olsen, Sheila Fitzgerald, Lynn Getz, Kari Lunding, Cheryl Angelos, Martha Haks THIRD ROW: Patty Gallagher, Lissa Weinstein, Jamey Isaacs, Gregory Gale, Tracy Louis, FOURTH ROW: Wendy Jensen, Marnie Lucas, Gordon Mark, Eleanor Smith, Carolyn Schnarz, Risa Silvia, . . . deep inside, in that silent place where a child ' s fears crouch Lillian Smith First Grade FIRST STEP: Jennifer Lau, Jeanne Heald, Laurie Gordon, Kenny Funk SECOND STEP: Anne Hines, Caroline Schnering, Wendy Restin THIRD STEP: Sarah Hoffman, Susan Bransfield, FOURTH STEP: Mrs. Parsons FIFTH STEP: Mark Rosenfeld, Danny Deuble, STAIR RAILING: lying down, Michael Lipman, sitting Charli Colbert, STANDING: John Strauss, Tommy Wilson, Mark Fisher, Darrell Stern ABSENT: Clinton Mullins 12 [} bEZEsianti m en BiJQCT±qdfflES miLS£ISSSD SoraW n fm n Second Grade FIRST ROW: Julie Sudak, Clinton O ' Connor, Michael Russell, Gweneth Jessen, Julie Cohen, Jim Deuble, Nina Beisel, SECOND ROW: Laura Harza, John Edwards, Susan Perkins, Karen Wirtz, Raymond Durham, Anthony Granatelli, Gilbert Fitzegerald, Eric Kindt, Karen Spencer, Teacher: Miss Renoe ABSENT: Richard Waite, Michael Weinstein, Julie Beth Gordon 14 Third Grade FIRST ROW: Miss Dalton, Tracy Maynard, Jodi Roberts, Michael Searle Philip Boal, SECOND ROW: Katherine Zeitlin, Elizabeth Springer, Donna Budding- ton, Vickie Joyce, Anne Ross, Lauren Leavitt THIRD ROW: Kim Louis, Tim Ober, John Kowalik, Jonothan Isaacs, Tom Abelmann FOURTH ROW: Mrs. Frisch, Elizabeth Breuer, Mark Berlin, William Corrington, Ted Lauke, Clark Elliot, Jim Damaske 15 ELMER THE DRAGON Elmer wasn ' t an ordinary dragon. Elmer breathed bullets instead of fire. Elmer never liked to hurt anybody. When Elmer saw a bur gler he never tried to kill him. Elmer always shot at legs and arms so he wouldn ' t kill them. Once Elmer killed a burgler and he felt very sad. He did not shoot anybody be- cause he feld so bad. In World War IX Elmer was asked to fight in the war because he would never run out of bullets. America was against Russia in the war. After Elmer got rid of the front lines he needed something to eat. Elmer ate so much that the men had hardly anything to eat, so they couldn ' t fight. Elmer went back and bombed the second line. When Elmer got to the third line he started wrecking it. The Russian men got smart and shot all their am- munition at the dragon and killed it. The men got food and beat the Russians. All the men were sad that Elmer died. They made a monument for him and had a day called Elmer Day. Ned Jessen THE MONSTER OF WHAUKEY-EEKA The monster of Whaukey-Eeka was a very nice monster, and his name was Herman Berban. He was a big but lonely monster, because when he went around trying to make friends with people, they ran away. So all day he sat on the shores of Whaukey- Eeka moaning, " Oh why don ' t people like me? " One day Herman smelled smoke. (He had a very good sense of smell.) He got up and ran to where the smoke was coming from, and when he got there he saw a big fire. The fire was heading for a town, and Herman knew at once that if the fire reached it, the town would burn down. So he took a big breath and blew out the fire with a mighty blow. Then all the people came to Herman cheering. And from then on Herman was a happy monster. Harold Joseph 16 3a r ah THE CATS HAT I once saw a cat Who played with a hat The hat tumbled over And covered the cat. He scratched a hole And tried to get out. But he was too stout And couldn ' t get out. Along came the wind. As strong as could be, It blew the hat off him So he could be free. Oh! that little cat Was as scared as could be. So he ran in the yard And climbed up a tree. The Second Grade .- • ft 1 17 THE BIRD THAT COULD READ One nice day we opened a window at school. A bird flew into our room. He sat and look- ed at us as if to say " Will some one share a book with me? " Then he flew over to my book. He just sat there as though he was reading. After we came back to our seats, he flew a- round the room stopping at every desk to look at that per- son ' s work. He stayed with us the whole day. Then when we left he flew right out the win- dow again. Linda Salisbury TYRANNOSAURUS REX The Tyrannosaurus Rex was the greatest of all flesh-eating dinosaurs. The Tyrannosaurus Rex was about twenty feet high and fifty feet long. It had small arms with very sharp claws. When a Tyrannosaurus Rex killed another dino- saur, he would stand still for about five minutes. Then it ate the other dinosaur. Then it went to sleep for about a week to let the food digest. When it woke up, it went out to kill again. The Tyrannosaurus ' head was about four feet long. His teeth were six inches long. The Tyrannosaurus Rex died out because mountains started forming which dried up the swamps where the plant eating dinosaurs ate. The plants died and new ones grew. So all the plant eaters which the Tyrannosaurus Rex de- pended on for food died out, so the Tyranno- saurus Rex all died out. The Tyrannosaurus Rex lived 98,000,000 vears ago. Bill Corrington 18 Fourth Grade FIRST ROW: Tanya Mc Knight, Peter Geraghty, Linda Salisbury, Parti Stern, Ray Gardner SECOND ROW: Denis Bohannan, William Leavitt, Joan Golden, Kathy Eldridge, Kim Whiteman, Alida Milliken THIRD ROW: Howie Sinker, Chip Frank, Mrs. Conner, Eliza Winston, Bill Crowle, Larry Lyons FOURTH ROW: Ann Morse, Mason Taylor, Nancy Stibolt, Ricky Mac- Arthur 19 r i ■ r y • - . ' IK £. , -.: ' " ' 77 " ' • j, ' " ■ ! $ « . L-J T - ' , V " n .V , if ' (• ' , V ■ ,Ji • %• •■ . Ml Fifth Grade FRONT ROW: Susan Roberts, Judy Berry, Thayer Preece, Bonnie Katz, Laura McCormick, Jim Pugh SECOND ROW: Patti Salisbury, Kathy Flynn, Lucy Morse, Ben Wat- kins, Jerry Perkins, Sam Howe, Flint Dille, Richard Ober, Harold Joseph, Bill Hines, Clothield Spencer, Nina Babson, Susan Mullins THIRD ROW: Michael Wollaeger, Kevin Cassidy, Brandon Lipman, Jim Montague, Ned Jessen, Miss Collingbourne 20 22 23 Sixth Grade FRONT ROW: Kathy Borowitz, Gail Wirtz, Joan Carroll, Hattie Blair, Jean Vance, Susan Colbert, Audrey Weaver, Barbara Delaney, Ginnie Boone, Mitchell Paul, Dick Hoyt SECOND ROW: Jim Carton, Chris Breuer, Charles Herndon, Barbara Flint, Caroline Maynard, Mary Dern, Ginger Hobart, Bobbe Ann Greenspon, Stephanie Schmitt, Jenni Leimert, Bob Leavitt THIRD ROW: Jeffrey Eldredge, Andrew Da Miano, Bob Stibolt, Richard Corrington, Steve Katz, Herny Babson, Steve Grag, Scott Williken, FOURTH ROW: Nick Johnson 24 Seventh Grade FIRST ROW (from front to back): David Dobkin, Rill Wilson, Rocky Wirtz, Frank Wollaeger, Spencer Punnett, John Massey, Jamie Flynn, Peter Eiseman SECOND ROW: Genni Cremin, Mark Preece, Rill Stern THIRD ROW: Allison Hurd, Mark Parisi, Eric Alsberg FOURTH ROW: Kathy Dole, David Severson, David Rragman FIFTH ROW: Ann Howard, Cathy Welch, Marianne Ware, Nancy Green, Ann Jacbson, Liza Millard SIXTH ROW: Stuart Kopple, Susan Severson, Ann Leimert SEVENTH ROW: Tom Roal, Lindsay Harper, Meredith Herndon EIGHTH ROW: Peter Jefferson, Ellen Benson NINTH ROW: John Ayer, George Hollerith, Gideon Searle, Mark Milliken, Jim Restin, Charles Lyon, Philip Fortune V ,- • ' . " ' ' . ■ ' i 27 Eighth Grade FRONT ROW: Ruth Mayer, Diane Flint, Sue Wells, Laurie Litten, Polly Ross, Gwen Miller, Helen Brown, Art Jessen, Betsy Perkins, Phyllis Becker, Choumy Mac-Arthur, Suki Lipman, Lisa Young SECOND ROW: Ruth Burnell, Steve Geering, Craig Johnson, Jenny Donahue, Michelle Kovvalik, Mila Watkins, George Booz, Jeff Hoffman, Pegge Carton, David Schweppe, Bob Cody, Martin Springer, Don Whiteman, BALCONY: Mary Garvin, Chris Reinhold, Laurie Schmitt, Dean Turner, T. Q. White, Joe Wilkinson, Geff Kenly, Chas Durham, Jim Leslie, Ed Gordon, Fred Alsberg, Huntley Gill, Ken Paul ABSENT: Clancy Philipsborn 28 Through the trees outside the window the setting sun disappeared over the shabby grass hill. Inside the house the fireplace soothed the quiet room. The gay pictures stood out from the dull blue gray wall. The quilted rug messed with magazines covered the bare brown floor. The little table with the clean ashtray stood by the big dulled orange colored chair. In the bare corner the wood- en varnished chair stood with the gay flowers on the mantle overhead. The shiny bronze and irons in the black fireplace had no more wood to burn. The white plaster designed the fireplace. Nick Johnson The trees on the lawn are as black as soot. Some have leaves as yellow as gold fluttering in the fierce driv- ing wind. Leaves are tumbling to the ground every second. Squirrels scam- per excitedly across the lawn look- ing desperately for food. A dog as white as cotton romps contently into a clump of bushes. Horrified chip- monks scatter from their hide-away in disorder as the huge dog lumbers in and invades their privacy. A snazzy red corvette speeds by furiously and the leaves scatter pell- mell over the lawn. Above a jet plane whizzes through the grey clouds. The cold breeze hints the arrival of winter. Squirrels construct their nest in un- occuppied trees and ignore the occup- pied trees. Birds soar through the ocean of air. The barren trees display that summer is rapidly fading away. Bob Stibolt 29 All is calm; a serenity cold and chilling. Yesterday ' s leaves have long flamed colors Of scarlet and yellow and wandered Slowly to the ground leaving the trees They once clothed so beautifully bare And naked with stark, gaunt limbs or arms Reaching mournfully for the bluish-black Harvast sky. Life is a thing of the past; the Whole world seems cold and forbidding. The scene is a scene of eternity; the glowering Sky has cupped the Earth since the morn of Time And the trees; knarled and mishapen, seem to have Lined forever. A chill, icy wind breezes through The woods, a silent reminder of the frosty winter ahead. Every bush and tree casts a ghostly shadow through The forest, and one ' s thoyghts turn to the eerie tales Of horrible creatures who wander and roam the wilds At night and have done so since the world began. No living being can long endure being alone on a Night such as this; even the smallest animal of the Woodland seeks others of his own kind. I in turn feel a long for fire and floor, so now I Forsake the cheerless depths of the forest for the Warmth and cheerfulness of men. Spencer Punnett A crisp Monday morning was the best day to have the wash brought in. This was the day three hundred pound Jim wobbled down the street along side a crickety old wagon filled with the Sunder- land ' s laundry and Rascal ' s long awaited piece of peppermint candy. Rascal, by some such sense, was able to sense Fatso ' s arrival to the split second. I personally don ' t think it was because he smelled the candy or Jim from five blocks down the street, but I think by some extra sense he instinctly knew it. Probably Rascal has an acute sense of hearing. When Jim arrived, he carefully watched Ras- cal devour the dainty piece of red and white strip- ed candy as though never knowing how to eat peppermint candy, he was learning for the first time. Jim ' s mother, the North ' s washerwoman, had taught Jim how to make candy when he was small, causing both of them to be extremely fat. Every week Jim would up a batch of peppermint candy, just for Rascal, bring over the choicest piece for Rascal, and then finish up the remaining canes and drops of candy afterwards. Kathie Rorowitz 30 The house over that one, surrounded by acres of farm land, has blue rooms and a big fire place on the left wall with a big old horse hair chair on the right. The pic- ture next to the fireplace has been there since the house was built. The house looks so old, as if it had been left behind from another age with its old golden rug and picture, plus the big window and shades. Jim Carter The sunset lay helpless in the back of our old house with the old dead, rotten tree of ours blocking the bright dying sun. Flowers always covered my house. There were big red and yellow flowers. In our long white fireplace there was al- ways the same glittering fire. As I think back I can remember many more things — the old beaten up couch with four long cushions, and the way that stinky chair smelled. Gail Wirtz 31 The sunset was shining through the stiff bar- tree. The walls look like they were made of carpet- ing. The room itself looks very homey and snug. There is a picture on the wall that looks like the view from the window. To me it looks like a sick old man would live there because I saw a snug chair and some kleenex in a dull container. But this man might have a wife because there are many flower arrangements. Stephie Schmitt Omaha Beach, Normandy — December, 1965: Jutting forever against a foreboding gray-blue sky, the bone white crosses rise from the grass- covered graves. Alone — a moist and hungery wind roams the brooding, Sullen earth. Alone — except for me. The lonely wind calls its partners-in-woe: rain, ice, sleet; and the four of them jealously dump their misery upon me, penetrating not only my clothing and my skin, but my heart and my soul. I flee to the beach. Here the wind bows to the lashing commands of the angry, crashing thunder- ing surf. Here the sea h olds sway, flooding the land which painfully dares to push itself upward and rise above the level of the water — the land which seems to mark the boundaries of land and sea. The ocean is as gray as the sky and the two join in a far-off foggy mystery. Slowly, sorrowfully, I tear myself from this God-painted picture with- out canvas and hike up the barren cliff to civiliza- tion. Spencer Punnett i JMM fe i. - r m 8 i — »»4A T y F I I. M ,.-r .15A. -»J.»... F " " " " !«? 1 KODAh.TRI. X PAN FILM -= 27A - 28 -3»-28A -»29L KODAK S ' AFETY FILM 1 ¥ A m M Freshmen FRONT ROW: Cory Weary, David Lyon, Linda Breuer, Cathy Askow, Paul Delaney, Jackie Miller, Jat Hobart, Wylly Morse, Miriam Geraghty, Bruce Blair, Susan Folds, Anita Locke, Andrew Struthers, Bill Batson, Nancy Colbert, Peter Kuh, Marty Kaufman, Jill Witte, Bill Berry, Jim Wilson, John Loomis, Debbie dePeyeter SECOND ROW: Mary Millard, Josie Strong, David Stark, Karen Wollaeger, Buffy Lynde, Sarah Pugh, Doug Severson, Amy Kopple, Carolyn Jarchow, Fred Fortune, Holly Foote, Lucy Bartholomay, Lawrence, Miller, John Leimert, Muffy Wilkinson, James Getz, Richard LeBolt, Jeff Kentor, Kathy Gardner, Donald Misch, John Victor, Winnie Boal, William Comstock, Mary Ann Sewell, Ben Earle ABSENT: Anne Searle, Charles Barman, James Colman, Edward Kneip, Andy Phillipsborn, John Stibolt 36 RAISON d ' ETRE Alone in a path in the wilderness, Alone in the world — reign With a pencil for my sceptre And some paper for my train. My crown is but an inkwell And my subjects are unreal, My court is just a new idea That lacks in taste or zeal; But it is my sole job to build, With this unwieldy hand, A worthy bit of literature By which the world must stand. A world that must soon recognize That with her wars, transversal. Only a chosen few may find A language — universal Now my path is cut and found, My mark will soon be tried: But, until I try my skill at that T need a worthy guide. For now I ' ll leave my altar And live the every day, So loving ones may reach me And teach the proper way; But some day I ' ll return again. My burden none the lighter, And resume my given job As a teacher and a writer. J. Witte " DESCRIPTION OF A MAN The fat mounds of pink flesh heaved and heavy red eyelids came down over bloodshot eyes and rose again in a slow, international blink. The effect was so much of a large pink toad that you would expect this beast to emit a croak any moment. All around, folds rested upon folds of fat, and one large mound stood out as a nose. Below it, a round opening in the flesh opened and closed, sucking in air and releasing it in a slow hiss. The eyes slid closed and the man slept. Corky Millard 37 Y . « •Mm » - 40 r FS iibw • ) 41 v ; mX ns ' -- " •■ j£ US THEM Morgan Park 20 6 North Park 35 13 Waltner Luther 6 8 Elgin 3.3 Lake Forest 8 Glenwood 39 Parker 36 13 Latin 40 6 Break-Training Work Day 48 51 « -C .qj Ode to the Teach-Urns " I think Mr. Wallace should be made president because he is a good guy. He is nice and funny and everybody likes him because he is an ex- ceptional G. G. (good guy). The fact that he is a socialist can be over- looked because he is a G. G. and because the president doesn ' t get a vote. " I don ' t think Mr. French should be president because . . . well . . . uh he has been dictator for so long and we want to give all the insignifi- cants a chance to experience a high office although we all will acknow- ledge (big word) that Mr. French is a pretty G. G. (great guy). " " Mr. Lacy should be a (I think) delegate-at-large because he has so many neat ideas and opinions. " Point of Order! Isn ' t a delegate-at-large supposed to represent the opinion of the body politic? " " Oh, Mclvin is always making those creepy P. of O. ' s. " " Yea, down with Mclvin! " " Down, down. " " I want Mr. Almquist as sec . . . . " " I deel . . . " " ... cretary because he always says that handwriting is an art and should flow . . . " " Please, I want . . . " " . . . from you and if you can get rhythm . . . . " " I want to . . . " " ... in your writing it is so beautiful and his writing is so neat (I mean cool neat, not exactly neat, neat.) " " ... decline! " " Mr. Almquist declines. Other nominations for secretary? " " Well, I ' m captain of the football team and I want to re-nominate Miss Deane for secretary because she is organized and a G. G. (great gal) and has done a good job for the past three years and so I want to re-nominate Miss Deane (for secretary). " " Well, I ' m captain of the Quoits Team and . . . " " I think we should abolish student council and worship Tadziu-u-u-u-u. " Ding-dong! " G. G. (Good God!) The bell has rung and the period is adjourned so the meeting is over and the discussion tabled. " " P. of O! P. of O.! " An anonymous contributor. " Stamp out Mclvin! " (f or political reasons) s ' My initials are BARRY GOLDWATER 53 ■w- The Expense. Of Excellence: 340 Dollars In The Red. urp Survey. The Artist ' s Vision WORK DAY IS NEXT WEEK! 966 Mirror — A Paradise Lost anted: Dr. Watson, for Murder EVERYBODY COME TO THE BASKETBALL GAMES. STUDENT COUNCIL Jasketball ' 66,-MISCH-MASH Editorial Staff Susan Eastman, Barb Kaufman, Co- Editors Marty Baach, Feature Jerry Gordon, Photography Diana Harper, Literature Chris Johnson, Sports Tyson Keel, Humur Bob Wilcox, Student Activities . . . The 1965-66 Purp Stuff is proud to announce that its first issue will be given out in the lunch room today . . . Due to print- ing complications, we regret to inform you that the Purp will not come out this week . . . . Well, Susie, are you writing an article this week, or am I? . Now, the questions is, kids, should the Purp have a slant, and, if so, what should it be? Should we use any article handed in? Should we include faculty articles? Should we . . . . Agatha is lonely, and she wants letters! The Purp mail-box is next to . . . . Would the real " BARRY GOLDWATER " please stand up? . You ' re running out of sports articles, Chris? Well, how about one on chess? . . .Fearless Frank was shafted, but now we have the Moose- ballies anyway-you know, Spruce N ' erdowrong, Precious Pote, and Beezy Badnews? . . . Well, we did have twice as much picture space, and less ads, and twice as many pages, but, I mean, 340 dollars in the red! How did we do it? . . . Hey, Jerry, can you paste up a back page of pictures tonight? Yeah, I know it ' s sorta late, but we changed the deadline . . . . . . Our humor is " sophomoric? " Well, of all the . . . . . . But we can ' t print Part II of our article, David . . . because it got taken to New York, heh heh . . . The Homo-Boobiens Confused and hysterical, the 1966 Mirror began the year with psychological overtones. With the invaluable assistance of their sponsor, the staff was rescued from the depths of utter despair. Re-established by advertising head, Teddy Fitzmorris; Beth Nichols, literature; Scott Preece, triangle and scissors; Chris Johnson, philosophy consultant; and Mitchell Dalton, gossip ( " Oh, how said! " ), the Mirror soared to new heights. Liddy Marcus and Bruce Jarchow, supplying spiritual encouragement, existentialistically blob- bered the Shakesperian Balzac. " The most creative work of the century, which will probably go down in the annals of civilized man ' s greatest treasures. " Clark Kent, star re- porter for The Daily Plan- et, a great metropolitan newspaper, fighting for truth, justice, and the " American Way " . haltcspcAre V iT Prologue Peter Wilson Falstaff Bruce Jarchow Doll Tearsheet Lee Taylor Mistress Quickly Betsy Waldman Prince Hal David Ingersoll Catherine Beth Nichols King Henry IV John Flanzer Chief Justice Chris Johnson King Henry V Fred Croft Stage Manager Carol Howard iVir JB ;: i wi The Situation Comedy Winter, my favorite old woman has whispered, Scattering bits of grain from the Midwest Across the garden of prickly-pear and dust, is Is, well, let me avoid what I should say. ' Wasn ' t it you, ' she said, loading her gun ( 357 Magnum ) To shoot the Arizona elephants or small winter boys At one hundred yards and watch their smiles fall Deathless in the spines and stickers, ' Who told me about the situation comedy. ' Inundated by blue and nascent spring With the horny stallion typecast, His colt nipping at my suit and Sheila laughing, The eggnog turning in the glare so good for photographs, I failed to see the situation. An astute self-commentary that I was dull And I went home . . . home to bathe in shadows of gin Rock on my horse of black windows and smile Evilly of fingers and the silence of impotent Christmas. The clock struck Hallelujaia and the . . . the what, The weeping and the fog returned. 1 ! W? " m i " ' Wm " " WW ' Up r " ■■■ m r-. J %%$?- Last spring, which wasn ' t, because it was grey Central Park and Third Avenue were about to take off The recession had made last years narrow clothes too small And I would turn back to the Times Idly flipping while Nero barfed on the floor. This was my spring, only balloons from a back window Budweiser, WQXR, and stewed beef from cans The phone rang only for the others And even past lovers inquired only for my health I read four bad novels And for once I starved. I saved for the one afternoon I knew would happen The afternoon of bitching, of insults, of no love The balloons, yellow, blue and green, withered like old breasts When Nero whined, I did too. But the afternoon came, We went and had Scotch in a small bar Eighteen, and ninety-four, looking both fourteen A museum, a walk in the sun and the fumes The box office of " A Man for All Seasons. " When we parted, I could not grasp hands But we talked of a situation comedy we could write Since we both knew well what was trite and banal Along the forty-second street sidewalk of bawdy movies And the man who gave us tickets for a show Good by, says the dowdy mother to the ineffectual father Where am I To walk back in the dusk and the dark To another dead quart of beer As the dog bites the broken balloon that has come in the window. —J. P. Pray January 8, 1963 The Night Life There ' s an atmosphere at night time, that is somehow more exciting, more keenly alive than the opaque dullness of mornings. It was raining outside, dripping, clammy rain. Peering through the long, dark, silent mist, I drove on, climbing at last to the parking lot, where a few saturated Volkswagens huddled in the drizzle. Through the art room windows, I saw three levi-clad, intensely re- laxed figures clustered about a plaster mold, their dark forms engraved upon the glaring white light. As I entered the building, new, chaotic signs of life appeared. A damp raincoat was flung over a banister. The clear tone of an English horn rang out. A broken flat, half-painted a dull bluish-gray, balanced precariously against a practice room door. Scatter- ed voices shouted, bold with unaccustomed freedom. John ' s make-up was ■ ::: ' M. ■ terrible, it needed re -doing. Where was Falstaff? He should be on stage, and Jane could not find her crown. As I moved towards the auditorium, activity became more hushed, more fremzied, until all movement all emotion, crystallized upon the centripetal stage. I sat down in the darkness. The actors, absorbed in concentrated, calculated emotion, had forgotten that they were the center, the focus, even the purpose of all other movement behind stage; but the watchful perimeter knew it, and they responded to the dramatic magnetism with eagerness. I, too, entered the fringe. A figure, listing intently, lounged over two chairs in the blackness. There were cigarette butts on the floor. The cellist waited, reading Life. 65 Barb Kaufman ' 4 4 VAUDEVILLE November 18, 1965 ON A WONDERFUL DAY Pam Anderson, Susan Cranage THE HOOSIER HOTSHOTS .... Ceci Ewen, Jessica Harrer, Steve Bab- son, Paul Fairbank, Bill Harper, Art Hynes, Bruce Jar- ehovv, Tison Keel, John Menk, Tad Meyer. A FANTASY Kathv Borowitz SWEET ZOO ..... Sophomore Girls WIR SINGEN UBER BIER A Cappella DEEP PHILOSOPHY Mary Garvin, Laura Sue Lipman MY WAY Randy Miller, Kathy Severson THE TRAIN _ Ellen Benson, Genevieve Cremin, Nancy Green, Lindsay Harper, Mere- dith Herndon, Ann How- ard, Alison Hurd, Anne Leimert, Marianne Ware, Catherine Welch FOLK SONGS Junior Boys SPIRITUALS Ensemble EXODUS ..._ . Barb Kaufman, Jim Marcus THE RELUCTANT CANNIBAL Paul Fairbank, Tison Keel THINGS GO BETTER WITH COKE Helen Brown, Jane Donohue TODAY Susan Restin, James Restin SWAN LAKE Sophomore Bovs ELVES ' DANCE Jane Coulter, Barb Kaufman FEATURING: THE SUN SPOTS Pussy Harper, Bruce Jarchow ;$m 3WE Josephine Hoyt Atkinson On Monday where the sun is not, I wonder to myself a lot: now is it true, or is it not, that what is which, which is what? A. A. Milne want to live in clear air and say Yes, or No, mean what say, and have it understood and no nonsense Katherine Anne Porter Martin Richard Baach " Two roads diverged in a wood, and I — I took the one less travelled by, And that has made all the difference. " Robert Frost " The Road Not Taken " Stephen Holmes Babson Gail Hathaway Barber I love to walk through the park or walk along the sea I love to look at pretty girls who smile and wink at me I love to make things with my hands for all the world to see But most of all, in all this world, I think I love most ME Love Kisses, Beez " The belief that youth is the happiest time of life is founded on a fallacy. The happiest person is the person who thinks the most interesting thoughts, and we grow happier as we grow older. " William Lyon Phelps Sometimes you may recall a girl with a " HOT " yellow V.W., a super skier who bumped her head, a horse, a pool in a fifty foot yard, and a love of freedom. Barbara Reed Bradford This is a hard paragraph to write. My view on any idea I now believe in and try to express here, will most probably be changed by the time this is printed. The important thing is though, that I do have some ideas — no matter how expedient — and I ' m glad the busy work stage is behind Charles Benjamin Ban The world is filled with enough triviality with- out having me add to it. Charles Adams Bartholomay Should it seem odd that he steps to a different beat; perhaps he hears a different drummer. Henry David Thoreau " Sing hey diddle diddle, the cat and the fiddle, The cow jumped over the moon; the little dog laughed to see such craft, And the desk ran away with the spoon. " Barbara Jean Bulge] Do you think if more peo- ple spent more time wonder- ing about the " cow that jump- ed over the moon " that there might be less pain and suffer- ing in the world? I do, be- cause I think too many people worry too much about noth- ing. 81 Jane Allen Coulter " only a few people could save themselves in the whole world; those were the pure and chosen ones, destined to start a new race of men and a new life . . . " Dostoyevsky Michael Paul Brickman The two most significant events in a life are birth and death. What man does in between is completely arbitrary. Man determines his own fate and therefore is his own Ond. ivobert Bruce Butler I was born early one November morning, I ' ve lived only a portion of my life, and someday I ' ll finally die. But you know, merrily, merrily, merrily, merrily, life is but a dream. " So big deal . . . " Butts " Mary Mitchell Dalton If she ' s not asking Mr. Talley a physic ' s problem or bewail- ing an English assignment, Mitchell is most likely found in her room with a diet-rite, 12 packs of Doublemint gum, and islands of rough drafts. Known most notably for her caustic humor and weight-losing regimes, Mitchell sometimes re- sembles the Mannian character Aschenbach in her intent ef- forts " to get into college " . Analysing someone ' s behaviour pattern over a triple order of beans during lunch, Mitchell ' s last words will probably be: " OH, HOW SAD " . L John Phillip Manzci : ABCDEFG HIJKLMNOP QRSTUV W XYZ Now I know my ABCs But where is that going to get me? Under the map, the world ' s the key, And since I ' m growing into maturity Where Ares needs the sea of humanity More than any university. And once you ' re there with him you ' re going to fare with a care Because ABCs ain ' t gonna get you Nowhere, Mr. Alabaster, wherever you are. Jane Warren Drake These are a few of my favorite things: 5th grade follies lunch time activities dull sessions with the girls Quaker Oats T-Lazy 7 braces and rubber bands Amy Vanderbilt ' s Etiquette Book Calculus on Fridays 8th period Station partys football field the green door Impala car door beach house on the Bluff The Saturday before school THE SPIDER 84 Eleanor Elizabeth Durham Have I ever given thanks? I don ' t think I did; Because as a freshman I was only a kid. The school had habits That used to upset, But kindness and sincerity are with us yet. There were seven and a half years I have given to you; The environments and improvements have Helped me too. Mr. French, Miss Deane, and all of you, Wallace, Valvo, what can I do? So many teachers and all of them grand. With the only Miss Spence I ' ll do a handstand. A gentle whisper came to me: Now what, now what did I ever see? It was giving, getting, and all there was there, From a faculty that I have always known Would care! William Cowper Fowle II When I first came to North Shore I had few friends, but as the years passed this changed. I don ' t think there is one boy in my class that I couldn ' t call my friend. North Shore has not only helped me socially but academically as well. Be- fore I came to North Shore studying was a burden, but once at North Shore studying became more than a chore. It was a challenge. Susan Cheney Eastman p D To live, to err, to fall, to triumph, to recreate life out of life! " A Portrait of the Artist As A Young Man " James Joyce Peter Buckley Garrison If one is silent; then his contemporaries must evaluate the merits of his achievements. Pelican 86 Suzette Buckingham Elliott . . . The wise men looks into, and does not regard the small as too little, nor the great as too big; For he knows that there is no limit to dimensions. Lao-Tse Shaping — re-shaping — The eternal spirit ' s eternal pastime. Carl Jung Jerome J. Gordon Mr. Aggens telling you to tuck your shirt in Wondering how Mr. Allison can bang the podium so hard Getting kicked out of class the day be- fore a grading period Being sick the day after Boyne Having the bus either 10 minutes early or 20 minutes late Papers that come back without grades Having N. S. stay open when every other school in the world has been snowed in. Getting checked by Ben Earle 87 Bruce Alan Jarchow " Pull Ten Busses — Strong Like 30 Horses — Drew 3V2 millions peoples one night in Tokyo — Incredible but true I ' m going to sign contract for 10 millions dollars to make movies " . . . The Great Antonio (world super star, prehistoric man) . . . my idol Putting aside my vocational desires in the field of Pro-Wrestling or playing the xylophone in the Community Discount Department Store commercials, all I want to be is a swell fellah Theodosia Stark Fitzmorris Smoker ' s smoker; logic; one wild week in Aspen; cheerleading; down at the beach " watching the sun come up " ; Plato, Brahms Cezanne; Sunday morning " drive-in " service; attached to Mr. Allison, Madame and Mr. French; off campus expert; junior year English; pneumonia queen; coffee; intense dislike for pseudos; ridiculous red Tempest; beef stroganoff at I.H.; fine arts, but not artsy-craftsy; could sleep forever; seer; " The List " ; belief that discretion really is the better part of valor. Joanne Mary Fueshmann Let ' s do the Hora in the middle of the floor, Let ' s call me Toad instead of Joanne once more. I may not seem sane or might act funny, But in my life away from school, I ' m a playboy bunny. I ' m somewhat unfriendly like the typical senior girl, And I don ' t come to school with my hair all in curls. So goodbye to good old North Shore, I know it won ' t be upset, It ' s possible that you ' ll get some more girls that can give the school some pep! Christopher Wolcott Johnson I don ' t have much to say about myself, so I ' ll take the standard escape for a writer with nothing to say: " borrow " something someone else said. " Men can only be happy when thy do not assume that the object of life is happiness. " George Orwell Robert Stephen Kentor Sara Sewall Greeley I look upon this as my first opportunity to pub- lish something. Yet, I am at a loss for words. Words that is, that would make sense to someone else. So, I shall just give you some of my favorite words and forget about making sense. A Scribbitch of Papers Garbage Cans . . . Ugwob . . . . Squinny . . . . Duffle . Mugwump . . . . . Plurabelle . . . Frog . . A Snigglement of Siring A Gumdulum of . Drumjargon . . . Smithereens . . . Spinnaker . . . Thrumbled Flurr . . . Scrump. . . Lissadel . . . Bogybug . . . Squeegee . Trombone . . . Oaf . . . Hobnob . . . Fluctuate . . . Twirl Blunderbuss . . . Galoshes . . . Bowl . . . Befuddled . . . Pumpkin . . . Crum . . . Blob . . . Ariel . . . Willow . . . Whirr . . . Lissom . . . Sibilant . . . Petticoat . . . Nimble . . . Ogled Fizzle . . . Guzzle . . . Buzzard . . . Bamboozle . . . Og . . . Oblong . . . Squirt . . . Every Jackass Going The Roads Thinks He Has Ideas . . . Squidge . . . Owl-cry . . . Squcemous . . . Squelch . . . Squash . . . Squab ... All Exaltation of Larks . . , A Booing of Buffaloes ... A Smother of Spiders . . . Ploo . . . Tris-Tras . . . Kinclunk . . . Shem . . . Croomb . . ' . Phloop . . . Ram Tarn Gee Pickagee . . . Blodge . . . Limet . . . Twilliter . . . Barnacle . . . Flurr . . . Tristam . . . Okum . . . Tombigbee . . . Parsnip . . . Sycamore . . . Sentiment . . . Shoshone . . . Chindwin . . . Cam . . . Aar . . . Okefinokee. Diana Phillips Harper Never accused of defalcation, positive nutation, or of being a quadroon, I have never been seriously held in the grasp of gen- eral opinion. Its ' twines love to hold everyone who is salacious; a lecherous old man I am not. I like lecherous old men but nilch. The new profile of the negro — a bunch of lines lolling on a graph. Out of sight, man. My Profile — Rudy, you just don ' t know how it feels to grind a coffee grinder and bite your toe- nails when you are in love. One deferent when playing in THE GREAT SYMPHONY— the fear of the abolition of ' color. Control over my cane helps me to walk with my had up. I love and I hate, no more and no less. Extremity equals control over the cane as long as extremity never becomes dogmatism. Coffee and sex — lunchtime and the trough is surrounded. On and on and on to the end. " Hoc est quod unum est pro laboribus tantis 1 . " 1 " This is in itself return for such hardship. " John Anton Kollar III Most everything man comes in contact with he destroys, And he rarely creates something which is lasting, truly lasting. A Carol Lynn Howard Live, baby live! Fly every day without going up. Crazy! Life ' s no hang-up — Live and thumb your nose at the insurance man. Swing through free and easy. Feel it. Don ' t ask if it grabs you or not: that only kills it. ' Don ' t laugh Don ' t sing Don ' t dance ' Don ' t live you might well say. Submerge your you in existence. Life throbs, but none of that drag stuff. No. " But it ' s wrong. " What ' s wrong? What. What, tell me. I ' d like to know, What. Groovy. No Whats. Get into life — a swingin ' bag. Fly. Feel. Be. Live, baby, live! Tappan Gregory Merrick Look into the sky. Where does the universe end? Is there a brick wall? It ' s a bird that flies by itself. Why can ' t man? It ' s a plane that man needs to propel himself into the vast unknown called space. No need to wonder now over these things. Our duty is to create a better world for children, and our children ' s children, so that they might find these answers. It ' s SUPERMAN, and only he, that can do this. So let us live our lives to the fullest, let us have a lifetime of fun and knowledge, but let us also allow our children to have more of this fun and knowledge than we could ever have imagined possible. 92 Theodore Constantine Mouzakeotis Life is a . other bite. . sandwich, and every day is an- Courtney Ann Hurd " A picture is worth a thousand words. " Anonymous Barbara Sue Kaufman ... I drink tea, thanks, no coffee . . . . . .Well, Susie, are you writing an article or am I? . . . We ' re what? Three hundred and forty dollars in the red! . . . Nothing beats sitting around a candle-lit table singing madri- gals. But today I ' ve got a voice lesson, heh heh. . . . Hubby, I ' ve got a little scheme . . . abolish Council? Are you serious? . . . My loves? Sangerbund trips, jelly beans, trumpets, silent thoughts translated by electric eyes, Vaudeville clowns, and Christmas caroling (with accompaniment on the euphonium). . . . Yea, it ' s operatime! Remember the jestor, remember Basing- stoke, remember when . . . . . . Sure, I ' d love to . . . and some day I ' ll find the time, I promise. Scott Everett Preece Necopinatius, etiam necopinatius " Here, you see, it takes all the running you can do, to keep in the same place. If you want to get somewhere else, you must run at least twice as fast as that! " The Red Queen Stephen Edward Reinhold " The mass of men lead lives in quiet desperation " — Henry David Thoreau My greatest hopes for the future is that I will enter a career which I will be happy in. One which I would work hard at, not because of the financial gains I would receive, but because I truly want to succeed at it. Work should not be a way of survival, but a fulfillment of a dream. Experience is not what happens to a man; It is what a man does with what happens to him. Aldous Huxley Elizabeth Cele Marcus Perhaps a discussion: instincts and emo- tions, a depressing day in October, Ives St. Laurent, Chicklets, Arthur ' s in New York, the Morality of the Artist, my cello, Ardrey on anthropology, Proust on love. Campbell Edgar Stanton " Dost thou love life? Then do not squan- der time, for that is the stuff life is made of. " Ben Franklin Elizabeth Owen Nichols What do they mean — put your essence in a para- graph? Thank God it ' s Friday, I think I ' ll go read a book. Or go to a hockey game. Or play Monopoly. Oh, they tell you life is frittered away playing games but I know a secret: they are the fritterers. What use is a pot of strong coffee, three o ' clock in the morning, pink cigarettes, and a grinding essay, when all you want to do is lie in a black inner-tube and play Socra- tes? Thomas Arnet Sinding See Spot run . . . Bozo eats peanuts — Jolly Jane? Pushshovestomphill Fightrepelonwardguts! At last. A weed in the soil of man ' s future? Kendra Jane Pfisterer Nonsense " Few people know how to be old. ' La Rouchefoucauld " All Great Men are in some degree Inspired " . Cicero " None but a Fool is always right. " Hare Good wine is a good familiar Creature if it be well used. Shakespeare " When Flatterers meet, the Devil goes to Dinner. " Anon. This morning I told the senior girls that I had a date, and they all jumped out the window. Herbert Lyman Stern III " He is calm, cool, collected Understands life thanks to an excellent set of values Life is a jest and all things show it I thought so once but now I know it. " Theophile Gautier My own Epitaph ggp , fl j 98 Anne Crocker Pugh She will hopefully have everything she needs paraphanalia-wise, and exist as an artist (not looking backwards, that is) painting in the day- time with dirty brushes — cleaning them at night to achieve the ideal greatness. The apartment will be roofless so as not to stifle inspiration and success, and which will of course allow for maximum sunlight. Besides, I can always go out- side if it should rain unexpectedly. Rollin Delos Weary III I CAN ' T BELIEVE IT! I JUST CANT BELIEVE IT! After ten years they ' re going to let me out. ■- Robert Byers Wilcox One of my favorite occupations, which helps me enjoy life is thinking, often about slightly stupid things, such as whether pigs have wings. For instance, has it ever occurred to any- one that every year history is a tough- er course to take, because there is more of it? " The time has come " , the Walrus said, " To talk of many thing, Of shoes and ships and sealing wax, Of cabbages and kings. And why the sea is boiling hot, And whether pigs have wings. " Leigh Elliott Schweppe I am going where life is more like life that it is here. Sean O ' Casey Maryanne Beaumont Sutherland My Neck shall not be broken Without a little battle . . . I shall always sing a little In tough weather. —Carl Sandburg For there is no shadow Where there is no Sun, —Anne Sutherland Peter Grimm Wilson To every thing, turn, turn, turn, There is a season turn, turn, turn, turn, And a time to every purpose . . . The question is when to turn, turn, turn, When is the time to laugh, When is the time to weep. Is there time for war? Is there a time for hate? I swear it ' s not too late . . . Turn, Turn, Turn . . . Every man must decide for himself When to turn, turn, turn, He cannot reap when it is time to sow, He cannot tear down what he has not built. But when to laugh, When to weep, These are questions Far more deep . . . No one else can tell you these things, Nor should they For it is up to you to decide When to turn, turn, turn, I hope my decisions will all be right, So I may laugh while other laugh, And weep, while others weep . . . To every thing, turn, turn, turn . . . 101 Cynthia Wilkinson I have a house where I go When there ' s too many people, I have a house where I go Where no one else can be; I have a house where I go, Where nobody ever says " NO " ; Where no one says anything — so There is no one but me. Milne Barbara Schumann Wells " The observance of rhythms, rhymes, and verbal melody hampers the direct movement of my thought, and in fact keeps me from saying what I wish . . . But WHAT DO I WISH TO SAY? That is the question. " Paul Valerv Prospective Students Bulletin of 1966-67 . . . 14% with 450-525. 45% with 570-620, 5% with 650-725 . . . small, liberal arts . . . large, coed . . . 319,000 volumes, 2500 periodicals . . . extra curricular; clubs, dramatics, music, publications, fraternities, sororities . . . ratio 1:10 . . . expenses: tuition, room and board, books and supplies . . . financial aid . . . ROTC . . . new dorms . . . Departments of Instruction: Biology, Chemistry, Classics, Economics, Education, History, Philosophy . . . The tension, the agony, the research, at last you siphon out Your Ten. You ' ve read every bulletin there is. You ' re sick of percentages and courses of instruction. You write friendly, business-type letters ( with no mistakes ) . Finally you think you can lean back and take a deep breath; all bulletins read, all letters sent. But no! This is not all. The letters you sent out must all be answered . . . and they are! Every day a new stack of forms. Medical forms, transcripts, confidential reports, personal questionaires, and autobiographies. All must be filled out completely. All are the same: name, last, middle, first. . . . address . . . father ' s name, last, middle, first . . . address if not the same as above . . . mother ' s name, last, middle, first . . . schools attended . . . extra-curricular activities . . . honors and distinctions . . . health record . . . scors . . . why here? future plans. At last you reach the back page! It looks blank . . . how easy you think. Then your eyes catch the small print at the top: " Please write a brief essay recalling your childhood, your family life, your problems, failures, strengths and weaknesses, your school life, and an experience which has greatly influenced your life. Why your feel we would benefit by having you here with us. Limit your essay to 1,000 words! " You fall back in a faint. No . . . no! It can ' t be worth it. All this can ' t be worth four years of toil, boys, sweat, girls, 3.2, curfews, and comprehensives . . . Six weeks pass and you ' re on your last " life. " Your mind is in a daze, you have nightmares at night, you develop an inferiority complex; for alas, your weaknesses are in the open! Your last one is stamped, addressed, and mailed. All you have to do now, is ... . WAIT .... Anne Sutherland CD THE SENIOR CLA55 of %b -orWree 103 THE PIRATES OF PENZANCE or A SLAVE OF DUTY by Gilbert and Sullivan LEADS Peter Wilson, Paul Fairbank, Chip Moses, Barb Kaufman, Susan Restin, Susan Cranage, Kathy Severson, Steve Cook, Macgill Lynde, Pam Anderson, Debby Dunn, Howie Strong, Liddy Marcus, Beth Nichols, Anne Suther- land, Molly Brown. ... and a CAST of THOUSANDS Some day I shall become wise. And when I do: Everyone will realize how dumb I am now. And then the rain, In the city streets will cease to depress me. I will analyze my pipe dreams, And discover that they were not pipe dreams at all. But merely masochistic fantasie. (For the possibilities of their occurences were nil) And then the rain, In the city streets will cease to depress me But first I must come out of the rain and hang up my coat to dry. For I am all wet. Robin Geist Reverie I walked home alone. In the dreary dampness there was no sound. The air smelled heavy; of raindrops and leaves. The house s were withdrawn, in meditation and brood- ing. The sky hung low and white. The trees were limp with stillness. Only the church was not quiet. The sound of bells settled like the rain. Neither loud nor soft. Neither close nor distant. Not foreign to the mood. No one. Solitude. Lonliness? Harle Damman 106 6 J WeTall together into the obviousjyangry stre ; and alajmy body floats itowmitr and, yours unnaturally floats upstream »T or vice versa . 9 - of that I ' m not quite. Surer Then over the cra y white waterfalL we crawl, z? excruciatingly -» trying desperately io reach safety s % the mother fafner love earth? , But .alas again ' " ' 0 J the cliff is an overhang f and we4)oth crash back into the river floating again in opposite directions. !• •» And, Ba bie, tr!|fl aple€r efttut; not so younf ♦ butetoo young to die « 1 and still cut m m You don ' t carf andl aWthat- Butit you don tgyou djf j , andsHove you J Jt VjfflhateyqjAl anff I ' m tired and rre wihd through aspen b l and the doorway is te$$£|l$ andgthe sjpjfcaie uncli aritl tner is nothing wf Jcto f ekcept h% f J and since we cannot b " We (us) c|8mot be and yellow-red pleases our eyes together — above the bastard bridjffe j (f rt yw hang (fMinggo; . I We £aB past tbat4vhich we we ; -Ifatoway .% «: •1 •WRfthe godd f.Ut| J»4turn, -§ " 4 9 aximumispeed neS he ©f»is l ievitab ls, a mirj) .anywj P$ slower» |ianusum , %mJM Then the f orris wheefwhich is never sMffif sf p turning _ , " : - JVmZ The Blue OnaJ|e a d yfellow artd continue tejwi»g« i nervoysl ; r ... 2 Wflile we get out o£ our cage— and with no one " eke but oWsfll ' gs we flout through the mist of Irnival rrf ft and laughter crying, away om our love and our dreams ami our love driams ,We spent all night together " once and my flowery scarf « arid your love soft breasts ajcM my love and your love . fund our love. But screw all that Babie, Please, for love Don ' t forget me or yourself ' or us .» 108 109 Wi ■ szia3 w Ya JOB • i y£ 1 " February 4, 1966 Cast Garcin Frank Wallace Valet Tom Keener Inez Charlotte Waisman Estelle Jane Almquist m i ■KM M aMMMw I 9 S S i ISswfe Of Ages Past The wind blew the dust of ages past in great clouds down the desolate sheet, covering the charred rubble of stone, steel, and brick. Grass and moss crept up through the cracks in fallen buildings, and green vines were scaling the heaps of stone. A sudden gust of wind set the tiny leaves to shuddering, like a scared child waking up in the middle of the night from a nightmare. The cooling rain pelted the lonely ruins which once loomed high in the sky, like the giant redwood trees of the historic west, reaching up to grasp the sun, or to snatch a falling star out of the darkness of never-ending space. The dust of history has settled, and the streams of time run down to the end of the wet street in a senseless hurry, where it trickles into a mammoth crater, once black and lifeless, now teeming with green grass and wild flow- ers swaying in the now gentle spring shower. The rain dripping form the vines hums endlessly on the tarnished tin of a once great civilization that protrudes from the exploding rubble. Ben Earle • I wjgnt 119 n n AiA A ; . It , ° mtM a 1966 MIRROR PATRONS Mr. and Mrs. Wallace G. Atkinson Mr. and Mrs. A. Harris Barber Mr. and Mrs. Henry Bartholomay Mr. and Mrs. John G. Bulger Mr. and Mrs. John C. Butler Dr. and Mrs. Harry A. Bliss Mr. and Mrs. Albert C. Cook Mrs. Thomas Cranage Mr. and Mrs. James J. Croft Mrs. John Creigh Mr. and Mrs. Macon M. Dalton Mr. and Mrs. Thomas L. Dammann Mr. and Mrs. J. Sanford Doughty Mr. and Mrs. Dimmick D. Drake Mr. and Mrs. Antony D. Eastman Mr. and Mrs. James Fitzmorris Mr. and Mrs. Paul H. Fox Mr. James R. Getz Mr. and Mrs. John D. Gray Mr. and Mrs. Samuel S. Greeley Mr. and Mrs. Paul C. Harper, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Royce A. Hoyle, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Roger S. Hurd Mr. and Mrs. Robert B. Jarchow Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. Johnson Mr. and Mrs. Jack B. Kaufman Mr. and Mrs. Fred Kent Mr. and Mrs. William E. Kentor Mr. and Mrs. Leonard H. Lavin Mrs. Jack MacDonald Dr. and Mrs. Richard E. Marcus Mr. and Mrs. Robert B. Mayer Mr. and Mrs. J. Worth McAlister Mr. and Mrs. Glenn R. Miller Mr. and Mrs. Robert D. Misch Mr. and Mrs. Phil D. Missner Mr. and Mrs. Hamilton Moses, Jr. Dr. and Mrs. Herbert F. Philipsborn, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Warren E. Preece Mr. and Mrs. Ezra Pugh Dr. and Mrs. John S. Schweppe Mr. and Mrs. Russell T. Stern, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Richard H. Samuels Mr. and Mrs. George E. Victor Mr. and Mrs. Seymour Waldman Mr. and Mrs. James R. Wilson Mr. and Mrs. Charles S. Winston, Jr Mr. and Mrs. Henry C. Wood Mr. and Mrs. Dwight E. Zeller " Let Us Cross Your Wires For You " Two Switchboard Mothers Class of 1966 CONGRATULATIONS and GOD BLESS YOU ALL ALL GOOD WISHES (fpiIRtl TO m The Graduating Class QUINTO BRUNO ' S PURE OIL SERVICE A FATHER Phones 635 Vernon Avenue VErnon 5-1766, 0247 Glencoe, Illinois NORTHFIELD FOODS, INC. Compliments of Complete Line of Groceries Produce Prime Custom Cut Meats Free Delivery LEED ' S JEWELERS L. Weskamp 1652 Willow Road W Meier Northfield, Illinois Hi 6-2270 HEARTH FARE RESTAURANT Featuring OPEN HEARTH CHARCOAL BROILING - AGED STEAKS -PRIME RIBS -DOVER SOLE AND SPECIALTIES EXPERTLY PREPARED OPEN FOR DINNER FROM 5 P.M. - SUNDAY 3 P.M. 1918 Waukegan Road, Glenview PA. 4-3830 CLOSED TUESDAYS y jruner (jewetru Co. 612 Church Street Evanston, III. GR-5-7775 HAND MADE JEWELRY WATCH and JEWELRY REPAIRING 574 Lincoln Ave. Hi 6-1177 Telephone HI 6-1462 INCORPORATED 1913 BUILDING CONSTRUCTION 545 LINCOLN AVENUE WINNETKA, ILLINOIS BAUMANN-COOK 551 Lincoln Ave. Winnetka, III. HI 6-5000 North Shore Real Estate For 36 Years Christine Baumann Collins, Florence S. Cook Wilma Ferguson Edythe Layden Mabel Coulter Lucille Octigan Ruth Mills Elwood Frances Olmstead Lucy Jone Hedberg Claire Sherwood Winnetka trust and Savings Mank Winnetka, Illinois Northwest corner Elm Green Bay Road Telephone Hi 6-0097 [HE R N D It REAL ESTATE MORTGAGES INSURANCE ■■ »-jK r 7 14 ELM STREET WINNETKA, ILLINOIS HILLCREST 6-5544 125 Best of Luck To The CLASS OF 1966 John Welter, Florist Phone: AL 6-0891 615 Ridge Road Wilmette, Illinois for: convenience Phone ALpine 1-2775 profit Glenview and Evanston — Enterprise 1 238 safety and SCHULTZ DRY CLEANERS, service INC. save in person or by mail at FIRST Shirt Laundering • Tailoring FEDERAL SAVINGS OF Quality Dry Cleaning Same Day Service including Saturdays WILMETTE 1152 Central Avenue Wilmette, Illinois FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF WILMETTE Green Bay Road and Central Avenue, Wilmette, Illinois Telephone: ALpine 1-7200 The North Shore ' s Largest Savings Institution EAT POPPYCOCK GOOD LUCK BABY SISTER 127 Congratulations Class of 1966 the BANKING HOURS (including walk-up and drive-in windows) Tuesday through Friday 8 «.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday 8 a.m. to noon in addition WALK-UP AND DRIVE-IN WINDOWS Monday 8 a.m. to noon FIRST NATIONAL BANK of WINNETKA the southwest corner of Elm Street and Green Bay Road Phone: Hlllcrrst 6-0010 A. W. Zengeler Co. Dry Cleaners- Since 1857 In Winnetka — North Western Railroad Station In Hubbard Woods — " Our Drive-In " 1010 Tower or call HI 6-0898 For Shoes That FIT As Well As They LOOK LOOK TO Children ' s Shoes From Tots To Teens, Adult Casuals Barnes §f Bootery IN NORTHFIELD JESSE BARNES ECKART HARDWARE CO 735 Elm St. Winnetka illinois CURT ' S RESTAURANT PORTER ' S Congratulations to the Class of ' 66 601 Green Bay Rd. Wilmette ALT -9679 A Casual Atmosphere Fish Fry Friday Evenings All You Can Eat Open 7 days a week 6 A.M. - 8 P.M. Winnetka Clinical Laboratory 25 Elm St., Winnetka, 111. HI 6-4588 All kinds of laboratory tests for your doctor A Complete Drug Store REHN ' S HILLMAN PHARMACY C. Ellsworth Edton, R. Ph. 353 Park Avenue, Glencoe, Illinois VE5-0387 130 , ' We won the game! " 131 Frances Hoffman ' s Pastry Snop H E JF F E R N A N M 928 Linden Avenue Hubbard Woods, Illinois 572 Lincoln Winnetka DECORATED CAKES and Phone HI llcrcst 6-0367 INDIVIDUAL PASTRIES WALLY KING ' S MUSIC CENTER Hair Shaping and Cutting At Its Best For The Casual Set 669 Vernon Ave. Glencoe, III. JACQUES Phone: 835-3433 Instruments Sheet Music BEAUTY SALON Records 640 Green Bay Rd. Kenilworth, III. Guitar Lessons AL 1-3532 AL 1-9697 HARK! LET THE TRUMPETS BLOW FOR THE WHITE TORONADO 133 Go n To College n Time BULdVA HAMILTON LONGINES WITTNAUER GIRARD PERREGAUX COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE. GAS - OIL - CREASING • WASHING TIRES AND BATTERIES MOTOR REBUILDING — BRAKE RELINTNG IGNITION SERVICE BODY AND FENDER WORK — PAINTING Runnfeldt Belmont Service Station 475 Chestnut Street, Winnetka, 111. Phones Hi 6-0009 Hi 6-0334 and of course our dependable low-cost WINNETKA WATCH WOZNICKI JEWELERS 819 Oak Street Winnetta, Illinois - 446-0685 134 Courtesy of Mr. Walsh WINNETKA DRIVING SCHOOL 609 Ridge Road Wilmette AL 1-6403 146 Greenbay Rd. 235 Ridge Rd. Winnetta Wilmette Hi 6-4492 AL1-4400 GR 5-4400 PHELANS DRUGS Congratulations to the Class of ' 66 PH0T0TR0NICS, INC. 740 Elm St. Winnetka, III. 135 Compliments of °3i azel Baxter 567-A LINCOLN AVENUE WINNETKA, ILLINOIS Compliments of BERT J. DREW Groceries PAUL ' S RECORDED MUSIC Phonograph Records Art Supplies 944 Spanish Ct. AL1-8281 FOR: LONGHAIRS JAZZ COLLECTORS HIT HUNTERS JUST BROWSERS For The Finest In Real Estate RERLTV ring Rinqpr for res ults _ Winnetka 999 Linden Avenue Hi 6-7274 Highland Park 482 Central Avenue ID 2-6600 VE 5-4600 Winnetka Travel CATHERINE J 5. ROWLEY, OWNER H 16-081 4 561 LINCOLN AVE., WINNETKA ILL. (Winnetkc I ' sQWJi Travel Agency) Comp ete Travel Arranaements La Casa de Alfonso 687 Vernon Avenue Glencoe, Illinois 835-0062 wwjnim- ' HMD i linn mmmtm0 " irt - if AA Compliments of Wil-Shore Motors 138 Em% ifi. JaJ INTIMATE APPAREL 578 Lincoln avenue Winnetka, Illinois HIllcrest 6-4750 HlLLCREST 6-9860 PAUL ' S PURE OIL SERVICE WILLOW AND EDENS NORTHFIELD, ILLINOIS Paul Greening Telephone HI6-0145 72nd year in Winnetka Lindwall ' s Upholstering Traditional Fabrics Furniture Repairs Antiques 808 Oak Street Winnetka, Illinois HALLOCK MUSIC HOUSE 301 Happ Rd. Northfield, III. Willow-Hill Shopping Center Phone: 446-2813 Instruments, Accessories, Strings and Sheet Music Lessons In All Instruments ALLEN ' S Stationers Shop WILMETTE, ILLINOIS 1 129 Central Avenue Eden ' s Plaza AL 1-7940 AL 1-7353 Greeting Cards for Every Occasion Party Goods Favors — Home Office Supplies Albums, Scropbooks 4 Diaries School Supplies — Art Supplies Two friendly stores dedicated to quality merchandise and quality service for quality customers. North Shore Cleaners of Glencoe, Inc. 5 Hour Cleaning Service 336 Park Ave. Glencoe VE 5-0038 Congratulations, ' 66 Graduates! E. B. Taylor Hardware 560 Chestnut Winnetka VERNON 9-0035 JEWELRY - GIFTS JEWELRY ft WATCH REPAIRING 348 PARK AVENUE GLENCOE. ILLINOIS 140 mee WINNETKA • LAKE FOREST T For The New and Unusual in Clothes 729 Elm St. 29 E. Illinois Rd. Winnetka Lake Forest in Li m m m rin 1 635 GREENBAY ROAD WILMETTE. ILLINOIS ALpine1-0878 - FELL SHOES - A Name You Know With Shoes You Love 44 Years on the North Shore 932 Linden, Hubbard Woods 635 Central, Highland Park Chieftain Pontiac Inc. Hubbard Woods Since 1886 Where Savings Really Pay WINNETKA SAVINGS and LOAN ASSOCIATION 814 Elm Street Winnetka, Illinois World Champion 1964 - 1965 Motor Bikes by IMPERIAL YAMAHA B. S. A. Imperial Motors, Inc. 725 Green Bay Rd. Wilmette, Illinois Beulah ' s 946 Linden Avenue Hubbard Woods Hi Merest 6-0593 HENRY C. WIENECKE, INC. HOUSEWARES - HARDWARE - THE TOY SHOP 680-82 Vernon Ave. Glencoe, III. - VErnon 5-3060 - TAKE TIMEOUT. TO SHOP AT BETTY ' S OF WINNETKA 818 Elm Street When You Look In Your MIRROR Be FELL Dressed The Fell Company 520 Green Bay Rd. Winnetka, III. TROOPING THE COLOUR Congratulates The Graduating Class 896 Linden Ave. Hubbard Woods HI6-6360 WILMETTE eW Spm S W Eilabl ih.d 1932 VERSINO BROTHERS, Prop. 605 Green Bay Rd. WE SERVICE WHAT WE SELL ADIDAS RIDDELL SHOES WILSON and RAWLINGS SPORTING GOODS DISTRIBUTOR pil cafjcss;- jtfORTINGlQUIP Why Look Further? Baseball Basketball Football Tennis Trophies Golf Roller Skc Hunting Boxing Bowling tes Table Tennis Softball Badminton Skates Sharpened Fishing Archery Guns Ammunition Tennis Restringing Congratulations to the Graduates of the Class of 1966 Vose Bootery of Winnetka 837 Elm Street Winnetka, Illinois JON ' S PARK DRIVE BEAUTY SALON 513 Park Drive, Kenilworth AL 1-6788 Closed Mon. Delicatesse Hou 9 - 6 Mon. - Sat. 9:30 - 3 Sunday Phone 446-0326 389 Central Northfleld, III. Aged Beef, Fresh Poultry Sea Food Home Made Sausage - Freezer Orders JOszii c rardcvatz and ho%t± 1923 Willow Road Northfield, Illinois Specialists in: Baseball, Football, and Basketball Equipment Full Line of: Fishing, Hunting, Hockey and Skating Equipment f , vnrr LITTLE TOUCH fejitOF HOLLAND The Bakery with the European Touch 343 Park Avenue Glencoe VE 5-3527 N.A. HANNA, INC. 952 Spanish Court Wilmette, Illinois AL 1-0467 AL 1-0468 INDIVIDUAL HAIR STYLING EXPERT HAIR TINTING euw t J SALON DE A 554 Green Bay Road Winnetka, Illinois Phone Hlllcrest 6-0762 GOING SOMEWHERE? Stop At WALLY ' S First 574 Green Bay Rd. Winnetka, III. HI6-3025 TEEN-AGE TEN COMMANDMENTS 1. Stop and think before you drink. 2. Don ' t let your parents down, they brought you up. 3. Be humble enough to obey. You will be giving orders yourself some day. 4. At the first moment turn away from un- clean thinking. 5. Don ' t show off when driving. If you want to race, go to Indianapolis. 6. Choose a date who would make a good mate. 7. Go to church faithfully. The Creator gives us a week. Give Him back at least an hour. 8. Choose your companions carefully. You are what they are. 9. Avoid following the crowd. Be an engine, not a caboose. 10. Keep the original Ten Commandments. JOE JACOBS CHEVROLET 435 Green Bay Road Wilmette, Illinois FOCUS IN ON POWELL ' S CAMERA MART 847 Elm St. Winnetka, III. HI6-5141 589 Central Ave. Highland Park, III ID2-8550 146 WHITE ' S DRUG STORE Complete Drug Cosmetic Departments 454 Winnetka Ave. Winnetka, III. Hi 6-2625 810 ELM ST. WINNETKA THE HOME OF BASSWEEJUNS JOYCE OLD MAINE TROTTERS EDITH HENRY SANDLER OF BOSTON MISS AMERICA Ray ' s Sport Shop v r Tor tportu of the day tee equipment at Ray ' $ " 659 Vernon Ave. VE 5-2366 oti i eo L Young Juniors 6 to 14 Juniors N ' Jr. Petites 3 to 15 Hubbard Woods 990 Linden Avenue Winnetka 148 Zh rough the Passing years It is with pride that once again through the medium of photography we have been able to fashion a graphic record of your school year - a pride stemming doubly from the knowledge that herein not only have we helped to create a record of so much meaning to each of you, but in so doing we have had the opportunity to share warm pleasant asso- ciations with so many. Always, as years pass, this record will have a special place in your heart for it will be the visible token of the wonderful experience of your growing years, rich in the foundation of true and lasting friend- ship. Our heartiest congratulations to all! Cordially, John Howell and Craftsmen 149 - :::.:: ; — ::::::: ?-:■: h »- : -: ; : :-: : ' : :.;:: : :.i ?- - ;: : : :■: :■ : : : ; f ::.: ;:;::•; ' -::::::: ' : — ■ ' . .:. • ■- : : ;: — ' - ..:.; " • " • «• " .. . , :.; ' • -■ — .. •..,. - .. •■■■... " - • ■ .;::•;; " -• ■k,.;.:: :;;.;;■ - --. .,:::::;• ' • :„ ■ — ■ :;:; ■• ' •• .; • ' :: :: - • • : ; • :: " :::;■«• ' ■--::.;;;:;:; " •-..•.,:::::; ' :;;;■■ •::::;: v: ; U. - M ; : ; ; : ; .♦ I : ; ; : i ; : : ; : :t ;.?; " •■-::::::: !-:::::ii!!i : " ' -::: •;:;; : y---i:: : ' . - : - ' - ' ::: u- ■--:::. ::y :: --- ■-::■■- ' ' - ' - 1. ., r . j, „.••••--■. t ,,,, • ' ' ■ ' •,..„ ' ' ' ■■■ -■«»,,.,. ' • •■•■.«,.. • ■ • • ■ • ■ -•■•..,,. " • ' . .i . , „ ,. 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Suggestions in the North Shore Country Day School - Mirror Yearbook (Winnetka, IL) collection:

North Shore Country Day School - Mirror Yearbook (Winnetka, IL) online yearbook collection, 1963 Edition, Page 1

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North Shore Country Day School - Mirror Yearbook (Winnetka, IL) online yearbook collection, 1964 Edition, Page 1

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North Shore Country Day School - Mirror Yearbook (Winnetka, IL) online yearbook collection, 1965 Edition, Page 1

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North Shore Country Day School - Mirror Yearbook (Winnetka, IL) online yearbook collection, 1967 Edition, Page 1

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North Shore Country Day School - Mirror Yearbook (Winnetka, IL) online yearbook collection, 1968 Edition, Page 1

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