North Dakota State College of Science - Agawasie Yearbook (Wahpeton, ND)

 - Class of 1951

Page 1 of 192

 

North Dakota State College of Science - Agawasie Yearbook (Wahpeton, ND) online yearbook collection, 1951 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 192 of the 1951 volume:

rasie 1951 m. THURS. FRI. SAT. i 4 5 6 0 . 11 12 13 7 18 19 20 4 25 26 CM 11 z 1 MILDRED N. D. ST A' WAIiPE’ JOHNSON LIBRAS E SCHOOL OF SCIENCE ON, N. DAK. 58075 GORDON PLUM, Editor CLAYTON KULSETH. Business Manager Published by the students at the State School of Science, VVahpeton. North DakotaEdward IYrrre Basketball Cordon Patterson Assistant Football George Hrackin Boxing Pride of the campus—our new athletic building—dreamed of, planned for, and now a reality. Its modernistic design, strong, smooth, earth-hugging, the spirit of progress caught in brick and steel. A place for people to work, to fight, to cheer,—and, through it all, to learn. To the men on these pages, it is the symbol of accomplishment, a tangible pat on the back for the many small triumphs that don’t show on the score sheet. To Skip, who himself has become a symbol of something good in athletics, to our three capable coaches, to the live material from which they mold their squads, we dedicate this annual, with a rousing fifteen rahs for the entire gang!Monday 4'folewo’ib . . . “Time and Hands"—limitless theme for a yearbook, or so it would seem. Yet,—strange—how dynamic these short words can be. They condense into twelve letters our entire purpose here at the State School of Science. With the time allotted us, and with our own hands we create the things that will determine the course of our future. That is why the theme was chosen as a basis for this particular book. Appropriately the hands chosen are industrial hands, square, strong, and dependable looking. The 1951 Afjawasic has been divided into eight sections to give you a cross-section of your life here. In line with our theme we have labeled each section as a day of the week. Large pictures of hands in action introduce each section. To guide you through the book, and to point out the various divisions we have imported a little character whom we call Sammy Science. Carry on, Sammy! aDon Fauss, the big little man of the Drafting Department, is typical of Science instructors. Don’s day is much like that of many Science family men. After breakfast with the family, it's off to school for Don where he has classes in drawing and math. From the wide windows of the drawing room, he can look out on the new Athletic Building next door. Perhaps, at the close of the day, he’ll stop over to chat with the workmen and check on building progress. Don is one of the fifty instructors whose job it is to inspire their students to try for that something better, and to teach them how to achieve it. His story introduces the section in which we have grouped the men and women whose lives run on a Monday through Friday cycle, whose days are punctured every forty-five minutes by the dismissal bell, and who daily guide the hands and minds of 600 young Americans.Gclm'mshatioe Section Section One . .. brings you highlights from the administrative section of the Science school.... In his vivid modernistic office President E. F. Riley, known to intimates as “Joe,” handles the more basic problems of administration, hires and fires, and keeps his trade courses, junior college, and business school functioning with down-to-earth efficiency. Bill H verty, director of the trade department, makes a business of knowing the names and abilities of six hundred young men while Registrar Wally Nordgaard serves as a one-man employment agency Tor a hundred business careerists. Professor F. H. McMahon, authority on many subjects, is a guiding light to a hundred college freshies and sophs. 8 Venerable Old Maina message jjlom the CjoCelnCi . .. lloh.man filunsdale, CjoceUioi, £tate o| Tloltii Dakota “Hands and Time” as a theme suggests many thoughts as it is applied to a preparation for life. Perhaps this theme reminds us of a clock, but after all a clock is only an instrument denoting time of day with its hands, whereas, if we apply it to vocational education where generally one associates the hands with the learning of skilled professions or occupations, it takes on new meaning. America today is living in a time of crisis. Emergency demands, because of all-out preparation for defense or possibly even war, requires that its industrial facilities be geared to all-out production. Time may be an element. Nobody knows how soon the enemy may strike somewhere else than in Korea. Once again the skilled hands of industry will be utilized to the fullest extent. We realize these are serious times for the future of our country. We hope that the efforts of our statesmen and the United Nations may prevent the outbreak of another World War, and, thus, spare the sacrifice that must be made by the youth of our land who always pay the most. If they must be called back to defend our country it is of utmost importance that they be adequately supplied with the necessities of life and the weapons of war. Yes, we are training the skilled hands necessary for industrial production, but they will be needed in greater and greater numbers. Time is short, perhaps, but America has the “know how” if only given the time. NORMAN RRUNSDALE Governor of North Dakota o£tate Scale) ofj Hicjlt el Education ■'rank '. Whitney Left to right. front rote: A. S. Mar shell. Forties: Merle Kidder. Toienrr: Wwvst Hoard Mrnibcr Fred J. Tray nor. Devils Lake: {. A. Trnhey of Fargo teho recently resigned. Hack rote: Dr. .1. I). McCannel, Minot: A. F. Arnason. Commissioner: L. ). Frederickson. ‘chili: Hoy Johnson. Cassellon. “Give them your best,” motto of the man who originated the administrative plan for Science sets a high goal for faculty and students alike. Operating since 1922 under the system set up by Dean Earl J. Cab-cock. the school is under the supervision of the State Board of Higher Education, which holds the top rung in the administrative ladder. Seven business and professional men from across the state have the final word on campus improvements, projects, and matters of equal importance. Mr. A. E. Arnason holds the position of Commissioner of Higher Education for the state. 10The President 9 It is impossible to review the school year without mention of the effect of war mobilization on the student body and the school. Each week during the school year, several students have dropped out of school to enter the armed services. All this has made a general atmosphere quite serious throughout the school year. We can only hope that next year will bring a more helpful condition. The outstanding change in the physical appearance of the campus has been the completion of the new Physical Education Building. This will be ready for use in March. After this new building is completed, the present gymnasium will be remodeled as an auditorium; the remainder of the building for other school activities. These improvements will make a decided change of school life on the campus. I wish you all the best of luck, E. F. RILEY PresidentG.dminist'iatiOe Hzabs II. C. ft Hub ami Boarding' Department Manager (I. F. Patterson Secretary-Treasurer Nancy M. Lauder Director of Public Relations James A. Horton Assistant Director of Trade School 12 Muriel Connolly School Nurse jf i p eisonne Elizabeth Swingen Administrative Secretary Alein Eckre Trade School Secretary Heverly Funtar President’s Secretary frrnr Cameron Registrars Secretary Dorothy Filer Public Relations Secretary Sylvia H asilalil Assistant Manager «,f Bookstore ir. ('orol Anderson Librarian Pi L ntincj ete ese cience kaward Adams Linotype Operation anil Mechanism II eslcy Alien Radio Shop and I'elated Theorv Hen II. Ilarnard Kloctrical Shop. Matlu matics and Theorv Charles II. Hrockmeyer Electrical Mathematics. Radio and Theorv Michael Hizal Music and Dramatics Earl II'. Ilale Mathematics. Director of Athletics and Physical Educationme nun that . • • Half Cherniak Band Xornutn Ckhlatl A.C. Lab aiul Shop Work. Motor Tost in” Donald ('. Fa ass Surveying and Mathc-inatics Donna Fork tier Homo Economics lone Hannon Secretarial Training. Bookkeeping II. I,. Hahcrman Accounting: Vernon Ileklner Social ScienceCjuide the plocjless xjcu anc) me Bernard Hilgers General Mechanics Clarence It. Ilorfs Klectric Motor Repair Mrs. It nth Hodgson Practical Nursing Merton It. Jacobson Klectrical-Inside Wiring: Spencer (). Hokenson Shop Sketching and Sheet Metal Howard 0. Kindc Printing, Hand Composition and Press Work Henry .-I. Knight Mathematics, Science, Drawing 'Toivalc) access in Caleels . • • Mrs. Mildred Larsson I Van of Women Frank II. Mr Million English lid win Li I Ike Aviation Engines IIjam Melsled Radio Theory and Shop Hubert McMillan Chemistry. Geography Mercedes Morris 0 m C. Neperud Typing and Business Auto Electrical English 17Gnc) set tlx e exam • • J. Maurice .Xi f aartt Refrigeration (Hen II. Peterson Auto Mechanics. Oarage Shop ('. Merle Ralston Machine Shop Merle I). Robertson Draft ins: and Estimating: Arthur M. Sampson Aviation. Aircraft Repair R si her Schulz Language. English Warren R. Schuett Auto Mechanics ISH Sven town An In Body Repair Alice IVolton Shorthand. Typing Itoyd Will Electrical Julian ■'. Szczitr Earl Smith Auto Mechanics. enrage Shop Welding Waller II. Wellan Business Fundamentals. Record Keeping for a Small Business 0T PICTURED: Harvey L. Itisek Welding and Electrical Appliance Repair Herbert Diet: Plumbing Trade Hilding Johnson Auto Body Repair Land on Petersen Related Trade Subjects Edward 1 Terre English. Biology, Athletics Thomas . Tisdel Refrigeration 10(ytudent Cabinet 1 l.el I to rifjht. Seated: Jim Flaa. Joan J acobc tick, 'resident Clayton K til set h. Harold llolm: Standing: Eduard Solee. dene Jacobson. Shades of Democracy! Here lies the Student Cabinet, student governing body of SSS! Elected in the spring, the cabinet includes members from the trades, junior college, business school, engineering, and long winter term departments. Once each week this weighty group gets together to form regulations for the student body. Party committees are appointed, delegates dispatched to conferences, students are encouraged to take an active part in campus affairs—all these are works of the Student Cabinet. Clayton Kulseth Cabinet President James Flaa Student Financier Joan Jaeobchick Takes the NotesOver in "reference corner." several SSS students persue the lines, ichilr others concentrate on a little biology. Magazines, hooks, newspapers, and even the "hinnies" are available for the student in the reading room of the library. Library . . . scene of j eace. quiet, and imaginative study is the library of SSS. For research and entertainment it has over 10,000 books on its shelves, plus 110 technical and general magazines and 50 newspapers. These books are available to all students and faculty members, and are often used by citizens of the state for reference works. Keeping tab on all these books, magazines, and newspapers is Librarian Carol Anderson, with her assistant Ted Erickson, who files his cards and counts his Dewey decimals to keep everything in order. It is one of the libraries in the Northwest to receive a Carnegie grant and has added many of the latest volumes on the theatre, history, and English literature in the last few months. It also has the most complete collection of trade literature in the area. Carol Anderson Librarian 21Long, lean, jean-clad Bill Weinberger is one of the 500 young men whose daily classes in the completely equipped Trades Building teach keen minds and strong hands to understand and operate the complicated machines which are the basis of our modern world. Bill, a second-year electrician, is an active member of his department and last fall stepped into the spotlight as Electrician club president. The twenty-three year-old Parshall, North Dakota boy shares a Burch Hall room with two trades buddies and heads for the campus cafeteria at meal time. After school Bill saunters over to the Campus Hub for a few hours work and in the evening he plays intra-mural basketball or pays a call on his best girl over at Cottage Court. After graduation Bill plans to get a job where he can put to practice the trade he has learned at Science.7iade (ycb col Section .. . 'Tuesday Presenting the Trade school . . . the largest and probably the best known of the three departments of the upper midwest’s most unusual school. Trade students, like Bill Weinberger, spend eighteen months in specialized training. They arc in demand by employers all over this area, who know that a Science-trained man is skilled in the actual operation of his job as well as with the book-lamin’ that goes with it. Spacious and well-equipped shops, enthusiastic and talented men, and qualified instructors arc the ingredients which are used so successfully by Bill Haverty and the Trade school staff in turning out tirades graduates that Science is proud of! Progressive Trade School'’flow 'Jlte tteab 0| 'l ahe School G. W. Havcrly Director of Trade School TO TRADES AND ENGINEERING STUDENTS: Rather than supply a conventional paragraph for your Arjuivasie, I decided to include here high points of a few of today’s "happenings” in the trade school office. In this morning’s mail was a letter from a former student who is employed in the Safety Division of a Bismarck power company. In his letter he tells of his complete satisfaction with his present position and relates interesting details. He then speaks of four former students of the school who arc employed by the same company and he outlines what they are doing. Then there is a telephone call from Grand Forks relative to organization of a special course for employed metermen; also a long distance call from a Moorhead. Minnesota employer who has three former students in his employ and who has need for another. Three men who are officers in a State Trade Association were here today and requested that the school organize a new course which would prepare young men for work in the welding and blacksmithing trade. These few illustrations show the tie-up that exists between management, workers, and the school; between employers, employees, former students, and the trade division of the State School of Science. It is this kind of “working together" that brings results. Our trade school is efficient in proportion as it gains and holds the good will of employers. If students from the school are in demand, then the courses arc “on the right track." This means that they must be practical and up-to-date; and must be taught by men who are masters of the trade. None of us know what the future has in store for us, but one thing is certain: all young l eoplc must realize that each must prepare for a career; and. at some time, must exercise the functions of that career. It is my sincere wish that what you gain here will be a prime factor in bringing you happiness. contentment, and security in the years that lie ahead. Good wishes and good luck. G. W. HAVERTY 2T-J 7( ist'tj ea Cute 7fl eclt antes Some of the first year students in the auto mechanics course are shown working on engine blocks and rear end assemblies. In the foreground are seen Herbert Welle. Russell Rroadland. and Verne Westerwall. Looking over the engine blocks in the back of the shop are mechanics Clinton Fettig. Wilbert Vossler. Donald Haumann, Robert (Iowan, Marlin Miller, and Richard Merrick. Very much in evidence are the “greasemonkey” hats tv h i c h these auto mechanics proudly wear while at work on the Olds with the hydrarnatic drive down in "auto mech corner” of the trade school base m e n t. Researching on the Olds are Russell llelgerson. (Hen Thompson, Wesley Kaider, Allred Cooper. (Hen Krueger. K lion G I a d, Wayne Loft, and Joseph Rata. Another auto mechanic chore is learning the use of the testing generator. Watching the machine are i ewell Stiles. Jack S t a n t o n, Kenneth Vangness, Carl Wannemacher, and Glen lieu tow. 28'fi’iit-tjea’i Ctutc Tftecltanics Displaying no interest in the photographer, hut completely engrossed in checking n SS ampere current and voltage regulator are auto mechanics Key-mond Honaime. Martin Robeson. William Stewart. Clifford Sears, and Lyle Emory. Seated on either side of demons!rotor Harold Hurley are Dennis Prat-schner and Hark fllickcnsdcrfcr. Auto mechanic Clyde Ngreen demonstrates the use of the magnetor while his classmates watch. Observers are Jack Mac-ftae. Theophil Fisher. Darell Ellingson. Ralph Finstuen, Keith Houldcn. Russell Ault, and John Schaffer. George Miller is in charge as first-year auto mechanics students arc testing a Ford V-8 distributor. If (itching the operation are_ Ronnie Kechter. Luther Dougherty. Rudolph Eh-reus and Ralph Magnusson. 20Guto lllecltanics aux) Guto l oc) j 'freshmen The largest group of freshmen nt Science this gear are concentrated in the auto mechanics department of the school. Here future mechanics Richard Cochran, Harry filer, Robert Hrown, Alfred Cooper. John Norton, (leorge Thompson and A'orbert Schlenker look over some of the equipment they use in the auto mechanics shop. Close kin to the auto mechanics are the hoys in the auto body department. Shown here work-ing on and in a car of the 'IS variety, are Nicholas Krug, Donald Albertson. Theodore Dachl, ffehnell Hanson, (in car). Donald Sayer, Carl Vollerand. Jerome Hovdenes. and Duane Rail-weber. Several fender benders are taking a visual lesson here as Oswald Juarez, Carl Harrison, and Ceorge Werre demonstrate the proper way to repair a door panel. Observers are James ffeise, William Frederick, Deter Ifosch. Donald Heise. Robert O'Rrien. and Richard Smith.r?led(jlin j Ooiatcis anb Dlafjtels and Zstimatels Freshmen aviation repairmen learn the fundamentals of aviation mechanics in a concentrated course at Science. Working on the plane are (loner) Raymond Rergloff, James Donnelly, and Arliss Fedje. Inside observers are Leltoy Felher and Robert Long. Checking the motor Charles Gierke and Simon liieze. Every drafting and estimating student gets very well acquainted with his drawing board. Watching Elizabeth Gilles sketching are R. E. Hart ness, L. Gauge. It. Gudmestad. George Mess. E. MY ir. Cecil Corbet, and Harry Decker. Flans are the ground work for these drafting students. Left to right they are (front row) Jack Sinioniteli. Hill A 'old. E. It. Anderson. H Peterson. Leon Wandlcr. and E. J. Anderson. Watching from the background arc David Tupa and Hugo Miller.'faesl imen Slectticians Among the most popular courses at Science is the IS months schedule in electricity. First-year students learn the principles oi wiring in the inside wiring shop. Studying the fundamentals of wiring are Joseph Johnson, flag Manley. Joseph Hit:. Hubert Stuessy and John Hohlig. Harold Foss, electrician, demonstrates testing armature on a Growler tester while Sylvester Harthel. Glenn Gumeringer, Thomas Flkins. Edmund Green and lloland Anderson watch. Everybody helps as these first-year electrical students test a motor using a lamp hand as a resistance. Left to right are Gilbert Smestad. John Seelham-mer, James Schneider, Sevir Samualson. Oscar Heine and Wayne Lovcgren. 32One of the courses token by electrical students is welding. Exhibiting the proper stance for welding ore George Norton and Word Kennedy. Watching the exhibition are electricians Donald Engebretson. Robert Roller. John Reff, Donald lloscoe. and Emmanuel Fran:. Of course, if the tuo demonstrators were actually welding, the observers would hare their goggles on. but since the photographer was catching the welder’s position and not actual performance, the electricians obliged by letting him see their faces. Science is known as the school where students learn by doing. This is positively demonstrated in this picture of electrical students wiring in the model house in the inside wiring department. Installing wiring in this picture are electricians Donald Kessel. George Riggs, Phillip Djornseth. Patrick Cummings and Donald Rebliahn.Students On TI te Plumbincj Goulse .■I long winter term course, plumbing attracts many students to the Science school. As part of their course, the plumbing classes this year helped to install the plumbing and heating fixtures in the new gymnasium, folding the pipe wrench is Peter Myhra. Helping tighten the fixture are Alphonse Houdek. Holiert Hussey. iXorman Sundahl. Mart-in Johnson and Hen (ieiger ' L •j Putting into practice what they learned in class, these plumbers inspect the shower fixtures that they helped to install in the recently opened field house. Ptitling the final touches on the installation are Hernard Strand. Alvin Hasch, Hubert Haritcs and Marvin Johnson, supervised by instructor Herbert Dietz. 31'filst'Xjeal Putitel's Deoils .t group of first-near printers natch as (!ary Falstad demon• strates his ability on the linotype machine. Watching (fury set type for the SCIENTIST are printers Alton Ifurke. Hoy Collar. Henry Fortin. Joe Del!osier. Wallace Foster and Kenneth Hold. One of the biggest jobs in printing is learning to operate the "big press." Frank Hauser is feeding the paper here as harry Mellon. Richard Kuschel. Roger Monson. Irvin Kleingartner and Kenneth Mokler watch. Arthur Jacobson and Herman Du fieri are also engrossed by the operation of the machine. 35 Plintels and Radio 'f’leslunen Fascinating to printers and non-printers alike is the nctc automatic press, which "docs it lor you."—if you do it right. Trying to get the knack arc first-year printers Herb Seahold. Itiiehen {rile. Dennis Wright, Charles Swanson and Aldon Thcil. ftadio students consult the books while working on their testing equipment. Seated are radiomen Myron ffodapp. Richard Johnson. James Pithey. Lowell Gaul-rapp and Ernest Michel son. Watching from behind are Charles McConnell. Charles Wendelbo and James Oseold.7W t On Radio and Refacje'iation Jiadio units are under discussion in this picture as a group of freshmen in the radio department check on some important details. On the left arc Walter Snyder, Vernon Weber. Howard If eland and ftusscl Person. On the right side of the table Duane Aldrich. Donald Wasness, Hilly Schaubert, Hubert Ficek and Lloyd Kutter make adjustments. One of the most unusual courses offered by Science, refrigeration holds the interest of these nine first-year students. These reefers are dewing the operation of a commercial condensing unit. Standing are Harold Dirksen. Duane Tou gas. Henry Sybo. Paul Hutchinson. Edwin Uhlich, and Carlyle Hummel. Seated are Jimmy Sjothun. Edward Johnson and Jerry Erdahl. l Vr. 3 7 Gate fiody duly . . . Goiaticn Gluly Front rote, left to right: ‘ .entraf. U'rrrc. O'Hricn I’achl. Lottery, {add. Halverson. Daugherty. fittest ad. Second rtttr: Albertson. YoUevnnd. Hanson, J. Hrise, lijork, Monger. Haiberg. Harrison. I), fleise. Third rote: Mathiason. Krug. Hovdenes. Sager. Aniassen. Juarez. Ilosclt. Dahl. Smith. Hack rote: Halt Weber. Frederick. Hanson, t'eterson. M. Johnson. (). Johnson. Maynard Itjork Hoads the Automen Arliss Fcdjc Prime Aviator Front row. left to right: Holcomb. Clap. Long. Steidt.Dick. Felber. Kiezr. Donnelly. Fedjr. Hack row: Ann strong. Haider. Xelson. Wick. Gierke. Weber. Itrrgloff. Xrss.Quto Tlleclianics Front row. left to right: Eonuime. Eahcson. Ault. Sepcrnd. litter. Ixrucger. l.oue.n. . row: Schelcnker. Thompson. Mitchell. Mctiar. Cockrnn. Itaumnnn. Peterson. tzler. Wolf. had: row: Mnresli. Ellington. Thor sen. Smedherg. Sorton. Etcher. (Hod. Thompson. Ixolilrr. Lunins. X or man Anderson Auto Mechanics Club President Front row.__ wood. Thompson Hack row left to right: Mont hid. Sears. Yrskc. Yossler. Olafsotl. Xcpcrud. Erickson. Knoepfh ompson. Second row: Stiles. Iljdseth, Hutchinson. Sienna, Yttmmen. Kochel. Andcr "n ",J' : Fisher. Magnutson, Slewart, Wunnemacher, Yang ness, Stanton. Schaffer, t 'green ''nr • ,f,fekenac aldi . «onhart rkensderhHill Weinberger Head Electrician Front row. left to right: Koistinen. Henchert. Schntl.Hohn. Martin. Steelier. It. It. Itarnard. Ilanson. Scharf. Inf eld. Hal ear son. Learn. Mattson. Second row: Hauer, Seitz. Lamprecht. Hint. Lei k ness. Third row: H. Johnson Veitenheimer. Johnson. Schmidt. Sperry. Feser. Olson.Stredwick. I.indberk. Wright. Sotby. Frickson. Jail. Hude, Welstead. Hold, Krogh. Hack row: Luken. (loetzfridt. Weinberger. Olson. Sletten. (Ireb. (Her. •10 Front rote, left to right: Johnson. Hess el. Manley. Hoscoe. Hit z. Schneider. Seelhanuncr. Ilartliel. Second row: Kampsclimr. Frierson. Steussy. Holitig. Franz. Hjornseth. Holler. Morton. Heine. Hack row: Loeegren. Foss, Flkins. (lumeringer. Kennedy. (Ireen. Anderson. Miller. Heft. Slechlcai (3lubDla tincj anc) Sstimatincj Qluh . . Front roir. left to rif lil: Knapp. i ess. LaPointe. Hcttig, (ingot, Aalganrd. Anderson. Cudmestad. Second row: Sold. Hurnham. Hunter. McClure. Pelentan. Corbel. Tupa. Itnck row: Conge. Anderson. Miller. Witt. Keeker. Wandler, Hartnrss. Jim Witt Drafters Proxidi-nl Francis Knrrtts Printers' Proxy Front rote, leh to right: DcRosier, Kurke. Strait. Melton. Dueffert, Monson. Foist ad, Swanson. Wright. Hauser, Seabold. Kuschel. Wanner. Second row: Hanson, Hegle. Foster, Hold. Sundguist. Karrus. Cottar. Heile. Sanders. Fortin. Klstad. Kleingartner, Jacobson. Mokler. Hack row: t.okken. Williams. Miller, Harlow, Adams, Kindc, Lombncss, Gragc, Diemert, Hiscock, Hrilz. •11 Radio Club .... Re iicje iation Club Front row. left to right: Aldrich. Ilauge. (initlrapp. Ficek. Kidcn. Kelt gen. Stem. Hclland. {rinsing. Schult;. Second row: Urn. Kultrr, llodapp. Fithey. Schauhcrt. Wrhrr. Johnson, ( scold. Wmdrlbo. Kulscth. Mel son. Ilr own. Hack row: Morin. Frrson. Snyder. lliUesta:l. Michel son. Mark. McConnell, Wasnexs. Harder. Hill Kelt gen Rules the Radiomen James While Reefer President Front row. left to right: Cliapiil. Agho. (). Johnson. II hite. Hummel. K. Johnson. L'hlicli. Tongas. Hack row: .arson. Edwards, Michel. )irksen, Hutchinson. Sjothun. 12t heet ?Tletal Club.... Cjenelal lUeckanics Students I'ronl rote, left to right: HW i nah. Grucnich. .arson. Foltz. H eifle. Wallers. Trigs. Fliassen. Van Onim. ('.oh!, Rindy. Ilach row: Gourneau. Hr a an. lag. Werner. Jenson. Carlson. Rocdigheimor, Clemen. Grucnich. Hermit Fliassen Directs Sheet Metal Activities Front row. left to right: Hilgers. Melville. Wenstad. Hjornstad. Larsen. I.uduig. Solee. Herg. A 'el son. Atioood. Zola. Ridgeway. Langsetli. My lire. Second row: Schreiner. C. Johnson, Mont ad, Haas. Morstad, Danielson, Wade son, Miltilstadt. Ilarnthsen. Heine, Fngel Millar. Haaland. Hack row: Langendorfer. Woods. Unite. Howe. (!. Johnson, Loc, Roscncrans, Kosojed, Rasmusson. Simmons. Murphy. Huehler, Mueller. M. Lee. R. Lee. Foster, Robey. N.D.S.S.S. Wednesday8. usmess School •ir»Efficient, demon-typist Gert Krause is typical of the many girls who come from a distance to take stenographic courses in the busines college. Gert stays at Center Cottage with a bunch of fun-loving friends, a good record collection and a closetful of smart clothes. Her alarm clock rings an hour early to allow time for a jaunt to the Cafeteria where she and several other students slice the oranges and cut the rolls for breakfast. After that it’s off to Old Main for classes in shorthand and secretarial training and even a bit of junior college psychology. When Friday afternoon ends classes Gert is ready for a gay weekend with the Cottage kiddies or perhaps she’ll catch the bus for New Effington and a weekend at home. 46Business School Section .... Wednesday Glamour girl of the cottages is Cottage Court. One of the newer features of the campus, the pint-sized girls' dorm was designed especially to keep sixteen girls comfortable and happy. The “L-shapcd" building contains four small apartments, each with a living room and two bedrooms furnished with colorful, modernistic twin beds, dressers and desks. The scene of loafing, laughter, hair-cutting and pin-up boards. Cottage Court is a pleasant setting for happy-go-lucky dorm life. Sugar 'n Spice: Cottage Court JSCi Wad T 5 The business Students... IK. M. tXordf aard Head of Business School Registrar TO STUDENTS IN THE BUSINESS SCHOOL: Last evening a local attorney called me aside to inform me that lie was looking for a girl for his office. During the course of our conversation a number of things were mentioned, but he made it a point to impress me with one thing in particular, which I wish to pass on to you. 1 cannot quote his words exactly, but I can give you the jist of what he had in mind. He said that his problem was not necessarily one of skill in shorthand, typing, bookkeeping, or filing: but rather was one of finding a girl who was willing to assume responsibility and anxious to learn that which might be new to her. He said, ‘‘I do not expect to find a girl who will have all the answers and all the training necessary to my job, but I do think that I can expect to find a bright girl who is willing and ready to tackle any job that I might give to her. Sure, mistakes will be made while learning, but those can be corrected.” I believe that all of us can learn a very important lesson from his remarks—one which, I hope, you will take with you when you leave school. “Be ready and willing to accept new responsibilities when they are thrust upon you." Best wishes, W. M.NORDGAARDBusiness Bchoc I flesh men Fascinated by Iheir shorthtnnl notebooks are these first-year students in the business school. Rapidly taking shorthand notes are. front to back, I onora (loel-ten. Mary Dell, Rath Heeler. Second row. Kilert Ifinrichs, Mary Jane Seelhaminer. Rath Saewert. Third row. Albert Rnresh. and Virion Knoll. Hilling oat registration forms for entry into the business school at Science are six of this year's commerce students. They are. left to right. J or gen Fog. Ronald Noel, Irvin Pfeifer, Donald Knie. Jim I.under, and Rob Campbell. jieslt usinees oo men Demonstrating the line art of mimeographing is business (rash Doris Doll man. Watching the operation of the machine are l.eona Snndho. Theresa Cote. Joann Leshoeskg. amt Anna Mae Zaeatneg. With this happg smile of concentration it's certain that these bogs are not calculating their income taxes! Working, from left to right, on the adding machines are Dan Thcle. Hirdeen XeIson. llgron Ixrantz. and llob SchiFcuen. R usiness School 'flesh men Another of the important phases of a well-rounded business education is a thorough knowledge of filing methods. Working on a filing system in the department are these freshmen: Don Woodall. Kaymond Funfar, Miles Miller. Esther Ifjelseth. Uosemond fturaus. liobert Ityrnes. and Claire Can-ham. One id the basic courses in any commercial schedule is typing. Here is a portion of one of the first-year classes at Science. Shown in the row nearest the camera are Dorothy Splichal. tteverly Jacob chick, and Freda Schuering. Second row. Joan Anderson. Delores Spellerherg. and Eunice llohn. and the third row. 1‘atricia Theede and Laura Fackineau. 51 $Business cltoo I "flesh men f.ois Davis, commercial stadenl. points nil some of the important (cord forms to other members of her shorthand class. Then ore Dernier It lease. Judith Kvranvn. Itcverly Anderson. I’hyliss Murphy, and H’iona Clark. One of the coarses in Hint offered at Science features these small individual file boxes where students practice arranging cards from “A" to Left to right in this group are Virgil Schlueter. Mary Lou ftasmus-sen. Irvin Pfeifer. Elaine Luehr, Virgil Syrerson. Stephen l ok-sina. and Arthur Divert. 53 School clays for likeable 11a Langseth arc typical of the six-hour-plus clays of a hundred students enrolled in junior college. A wide range of extra-curric ular activities. favorites with collegians, arc packed into Ila's spare time. In between trips to the cheery home cc room and the chemistry building, biology and chcm labs I la can be found at a typewriter batting out a story for the Scientist which she assistant edits or at a piano beating out a rhythm in Mixed Chorus practice sessions. Presiding at Sacajawea meetings, playing “Toasty” in the Drama Club production. or packing a tasty box for the LSA basket social all have a place in the schedule of this versatile gal. Her busy day done. Ila jumps into her trusty Ford and heads for a quiet evening with Mom and Pop and perhaps a bout with a Spanish translation.College Section ... 7Luis a j Its cornerstone proclaiming it a part of the original old Red River Valley University, the chemistry building has sheltered struggling students and stifling smells for nearly fifty years. The smallest building on the campus, the little brick box houses a first floor physics lab whose intricate instruments are known only to engineers, a lecture room and an instructor’s office while one flight up arc the chemistry and biology labs, one with its unbelievably accurate scale and the other boasting a new high-powered electro-microscope. Pint-sized and unromantic, old Chem has often witnessed the gleam that sparkles in the eye of a usually ordinary joe when he glances up from his latest experiment and shouts, “Hey! Look! I found the answer!” 58 Eternal Chemistry HuildingEspecially jjOl the jj-uniol College F. H. McMahon Head of Junior College TO STUDENTS IN THE JUNIOR COLLEGE: While this message is written primarily for students in our Junior College, the events and principles mentioned are of equal interest to those in trades and business. On account of our interactive process we are able to perceive—better than we could in a strictly academic school —that vocational and cultural education have the same underlying principles. I wrote in last year's Agaicasic that students, instead of being disturbed by thoughts of war, should keep on planning toward peacetime careers. Though serious danger cf a new war came sooner than we expected, the principle still remains the same. In 1942-43, shortly after Pearl Harbor, we had many men who let their school work slide, because they thought of war as the end of everything. When they got into the war, their attitude changed and they realized that, under any circumstances, one must plan ahead. Some of the same men who worked, in 1942-43, far below capacity, came back here after the war and worked at their best. Here and elsewhere, the school work done by veterans raised the standard for all. Speaking frankly I say that students here are doing better work than did their predecessors of eight years ago. Some of that better work, they owe to the experience of veterans of the last war. Speaking frankly, we know that these are troubled times; and we cannot know what lies ahead. We do know that, whatever happens, courage and faith must remain. In 1787, when our Constitution was being made, there were many who wanted to yield to the expediencies of the moment. The grave problem was solved by a few words from George Washington: “Let us raise a standard to which the wise and honest may repair. The event is in the hands of God.” Sincerely yours, F. H. McMAHON 59'•unio’i men The tope recorder always holds fascination for the College "froth'' and here Marlys liar• tholoinay is demonstrating to Sheila Currie. Carol Edenborg. and Richard llermes the technique of proper diction. Many of the junior college courses hare added such devices to improve the students' practical training. 7 Coll 1 es ea The library, with its unfathomable quantity of literature, is also the most quiet place on campus to stitdy. or so seem to be the thoughts of Mrs. tinsel Wefel. Jim lilair, Charles I’opp. Ogden Lovedokken. Mina Ram-slad. and Stanley Nichols. Everyone is wondering the same thing! What has Richard Novotny got in focus under the microscope . . . a paramecium. perhaps? The curious inquirers are Alvina Stone. Marilyn Meyer. Rodney Tflugrath. and Janet l.oberg. Of course the scene is the Itiology lab. where the first - year "bugologists" even resort to slicing up frogs, just to see what makes them lick!unic'i College rffiesltmen Here Virginia Kaatz. Dougins Find. Ktigcne Holliman, [telly I It land, and Marion Moiandcr are caught unatcare. deep in that engrossing shill called "sludging." Can't you jusI literally feel the atmosphere of concentrated thought ? These happy bachelors are taking a breathing spell between classes in Old Main, and seem to be pil ing both feet and brain a rest. IVay up on the top step are Allen I’ope with (lerald IVold. next is Keith Common, and then vale in Kellogg. 61The engineers because of the variety of types and the versa-talily of their courses, are classed with junior college for the sake of convenience. Here playing "peek-a-boo" with the help of a surveying instrument are Odell liraun. Cyril Stadsvold. Cecil f.erew, and Willis (Heller. Equipment related to the drafting department becomes mighty familiar to the engineers. Here ire a group watching Henry steidl plotting some big project on the drawing board. Standing left to right are Hob-ert Nelson. Theodore Holler, and Donald Skadeland. Physics is a “required” for engineers. Here William Danish. John If ays from. Charles l)oh-man. and Dean Knmpschror watch while Merlyn Dick sets up the equipment for a physics experiment.Practical TiuUes "Do you know how tv fix square corners on a bed?" M’ell. here Mrs. Ruth Hodgson, practical nursing instructor, is demonstrating the proper tucks and turns to Marilyn Krump and Clarice Mills. .Is the girls uill be working primarily with "bed-cases." tittle tricks like this must receive "prima" attention. "Now, don't cringe, this won't hurt a bit." says practical nursing student Margaret Rrackhaus to Marlys Kchternach. I.earning to slide the needle in carefully, rather than "jabbing" it in is just another phase of practical nursing study. Want to be next, just for practice? For the first time in a non-hospital school in the state of North Dakota, practical nursing was offered as a college course. Under the direction of Mrs. Ruth Hodgson, the four months course was inserted into the Science schedule during the winter term. After the sixteen weeks of training here at the school, the girls go to St. Andrews Hospital in Bottineau where they complete eight more months of specialized training under the supervision of registered nurses before becoming eligible for tests which qualify them as licensed practical nurses. Mrs. Ruth Hodgson Practical Nursing Instructor 6.1Home Economics Students .1 common scene up in the home ec room is depicted in this picture ns selling machines keep lip n steady hum all day long. Threading her machine in the lower right corner of the picture is Itosie Huraas while peeking aver Norma Toppe's shoulder to inspect her fine seams are Arlene Johnson and llerllia Itos-sert. Cheery yellow walls, green plants, sewing machines, kitchen appliances, plus a continual whirl of activity transform the third floor corner of Old Main into one of the busiest departments in the school, home economics. Donna Forkner instructs the girls in needlework, foods, textiles, sewing, and art work besides supervising myriads of extra projects carried on by her students. Home ec girls occasionally take time out for fun as they gather at someone’s house for an informal evening of entertainment. Such an instance was the Halloween party held at Miss Forkner’s home when scavanger hunts, black cats, owls, and mixer games were the order of the evening. Special projects in class may range from a lunch to the more formal teas staged in the Hub. Athletic letters were stitched on sweaters, major reupholstery jobs undertaken, wedding dresses were completed, all as a part of a year’s work. For the spice of all spices in departmental goings-on, no doubt the home ec department rates tops around the campus! Art classes lake lime out lo do a special furor for the Com puny I men prior to the activation of the local national guard unit in February. Around the table, left to right. Sarah Sundahl. Adeline Kupser, Etta Stiles. Katherine Kupser. Donna Fast, and Marine llelgerson finish up the guard contribution boxes which were placed in the downtown stores.Club 1 Celt unioi ece Front roiv, lett to right: Phillips. Xicliols, I). Finn. Lovdokken. Pope. Hermes. Kellogg. Plum. Second roir: McCarty, Loberg. Meyer. Seclhammer. Scheming. Cilles. Spellerherg. Theedr. Keranen. lungers, Pettier. Knoll. Hleese. Casey. Oakland. Third row: Packineau. Dohman. Phillips. Fisher. Vik, Krause. Edenborg, Har-tholomay. Uamstad. Plunkett. J. Jacobchick. It. Jacobchick. XVe el. Ewald. Kube. Hoe 1. Currie. Sandbo. Molan-der, Clarke. Hack row: Dell, ' aralney. Anderson. Cote. Paris. H. Anderson. Kantz. !And holm, l.angsrth. Johnson. Stone. Mollherg. Leshorsky. Coellcn. Saewert. Hjclscth, Hingdahl. Students in the Junior College at SSS got together this year for the first time in several years in organizational form. At the initial meeting Doug Flaa was chosen president, Stanley Nichols was elected to the vice-presidential position, and Frances Casey was appointed to handle both the secretarial and treasury records. Flaa, a first year student in pre-commerce, is from Wahpeton; Nichols, also in pre-commerce, is from Lari-more; and Frances, also from Wahpeton, is a second-year student in Liberal Arts. Doug Haa Hoads Reorganized J.C.'s jinee'is Howie £ conowncs cu ■'rout rote, left to right: McClure, .am bourn. Holcomb. Sieitll. Jacobson, Mitchell, Dohman. Leri aid. Hack rote: Set son. Holler, hilts. Skadeland. Stelter, Erickson. Dick. Danish, Stadseold. Avis Hocft Chief Cook Don Mitchell E-Qtuul S Leader Front rote, le t to right: Johnson. Ituraas. Scheuring. Kixima. Bartholomag. Spellerbcrg. l oc t. Dost, Hingdahl, Stiles. Hack rote: Lnngseth, Ficald. K. Kttpser. Hosscrt. Sltndahl. .1. Kttpser, Hoppe. M ellon, Hohn, Ihland, IIjelscth. CGunioi 'Toastmaster s Glub § Front row. left to right: Steidl. Novotny. Dolt man. Danish. Dope. Wold. Commons. Hack How: llagstrom. Culp. Dick. Ftlugrath. Nelson. La Hue. Skadeland. Mr. McMahon. Drown. Holler. Stelter. Stadsvold. Kampschror. Organized this year under the direction of Mr. F. H. McMahon, the Junior Toastmasters elected John Hagstrom of Lowry, Minnesota as president. The club’s twenty-odd members cooperated in presenting some programs of interest to all students at the State School of Science. In cooperation with the Junior College club, the Toastmasters sponsored an assembly at which Victor Johnson, whose interest in historic material has brought him to prominence, showed some of his artifacts and geological specimens. At a later program, George Fischer, president of the National Bank, and Gordon Patterson, treasurer of the Science school were guest speakers at a panel discussion as to problems of youth in wartime. John Hagstrom Presiding Toastmaster acajaivea Club Front mu-, left to rif ht: Johnson. Knoll, ll'cfel. Lind holm, lljelsrth, Kinydaht. Stiles, f’ackineau. Oakland, and liillcs. Second rote: Itossert, Anderson. Krunip, Mills, Murphy. hanyseth. Clark, thland. f oeft, Kobe, hander. and McCarty. Front rote, left to right: Saeteerl. ‘hillips. Sandbo. Jlingers. Dohtnan, Mrs. Larsson, Keranen, Seclhatnrner. Kdenbery. Hartholinnij. Jacobchick. Itack row: Coellen. Meyer. Splichal, Rleese, Molunder, Scheming, Lcs-hofsky, Anderson. Casey, Cote, f.obery. Johnson. Mollberg. Stone. 1‘oppe, Currie, Davis, Eicald, Kanistad, Theede, Kaatz, Krause. 68 fucWf ItWs 3luly Sealed tell to right: dene Wick. Agnes Hauer. Jackie Frederick. Lorraine llilleslad. Irene Fliassen. Amy llailberg. Millie lionising. Second rote, standing: list her lljclselh. Evelyn toil. Del.oris Krug. Hetty Hold. Florence llurke. Hetty Jean Hanson. Genevieve audios. Until O’Urien. Grace Morin. Grace Holm. Lauretta Mon son. Esther Snyder. I’hyllis Olson. Marion Syreen. Gladys Geiger and Monica Goetzfridt. Meeting every two or three weeks throughout the year, the Student Wives club elected Mrs. George Olson president. Though not directly connected with the school as a student organization, the club composed of wives of students attending Science, proved to be very active on campus. When Mrs. Olson left Science, her presidential duties were passed to Mrs. Steven Reinsing who held the position for the remainder of the year. Gene Wick took notes for the club, while Ann Tiegs handled the finances in the capacity of treasurer. 69.Hub Ciciioities 71} High on the list of important people and their busy days is the belle of the campus, the Hub. Probably the best known spot on the campus, the Hub doorway leads to the long counters at which tradesmen enjoy break-period coffee and doughnuts or to the bookstore where Benny daily offers bargains on everything from Webster’s Collegiate to wrenches and hand lotion. Over in one corner trim tan and green-clad waitresses dispense malteds and hamburgers, and in the booth beyond text books take a back seat to a deck of cards. In the middle room the scene is set for one of those hard-fought skirmishes in the annual whist tournament and way back in the Hcpcat room. Mike Bizal conducts rehearsals in all his music groups. While manager Ratzlaff smiles that secret smile of his and the hands of the clock approach ten, someone stacks up some records and spreads a little dance wax, and a party's well started. 72Gctioities Long, low and white, the Campus Hub stretches out neatly between the dusty bricks of old trades building and the even older gym. Its clean lines show it to be a relic of the period in the early forties when the Science trade school was incorporated into the naval training program, and the new building was added as a sick bay. Since that time, the interior of the Hub has changed to keep pace with the growth of the school. In 1949 a large back room was built to provide extra space for the music deparment, and this year some radio equipment was installed to facilitate Science broadcasts. From an early seven to a late eleven, on special nights, the Hub is the center of student activities across the campus, serving as an informal coffee shop as well as a meeting place for clubs, and the scene of the popular coke parties. For this reason pictures of a typical day at the Hub have introduced the section concerning clubs and extra-curricular activities at Science.195 Homecoming Royalty October 21, 950 Kino Don Mitchell Quern Heeerly Etc aid 75 Attendant Lou Ann Kuhe Attendant Doris HerrickIHEOUS i r, life the avengers COW. NO OUST l£; fx AVENGE! THE AVENGtKS x« 0T-DUTTHE-0U5T IHomecoming Hujlilicjlib. Choosen as 1950 Homecoming chairman was second-year printer Bill Barlow, who, with the assistance of his committeemen and faculty advisors, succeeded in making this the big event of the fall term. Bill, who hails from Devils Lake, became well known around Science as a trades representative on the Student Cabinet in the spring of ’50. With his competence and the cooperation of the students. Homecoming was rightly acclaimed a highly successful occasion. Sharing in the glory are the committee heads: Avis Hocft, decorating; John Phillips and Gordon Plum, parade; Clayton Kulseth, pep rally; Gcrt Krause and Lois Freese, alumni luncheon; Dean Knapp, coronation: Joanna Lauder and Jay Spoonhcim. entertainment; and Durwood Ohm. in charge of football game activities. Chairman of the float committee for the radio department teas Hill Kelt gen. of Cargo. The II' ah pet on Chamber of Commerce presented to the first place limit winners a trophy inscribed "First Fitter Float. 1950 Homecoming ’tirade Iladio Department Winning Float Hill llarlow Han ll«' l Homecoming Arrange-mcnU Copping lop honors in the parade dieision of Homecoming lias the radio department Hoot, which depicted the "One Hang Laundry” cleaning the Ellen-dale Dnsties at half price. Second place winner teas the sheet metal department with a similar theme, and third honors went to the auto mechanics, to complete the trades monopoly on float prises. 78 Chamber of Commerce ’resents Hadio Trophyinnin Science Winter Scene By Donald Wasness Literary SSS’er By Robert Rottijr Trades Snap By Roy Cot tor 707 te the E litor-in-chicf...... Business Manager .... Associate Editor...... Administrative Sec. .. Trades Section........ Business Section...... Junior College Section ---Cordon A. Plum .. Clayton J. Kulscth ... Patricia McCarty Marlys Bartholomay .......Cert Krause ....Beverly Ewald ....Joanna I auder “Time and hands control and shape the future for you and me.” With this thought uppermost in the minds of the editor and his staff, the Agawasie has developed into the publication you’re paging through now. It was a long hard process, and was accomplished only through the combined efforts of the editorial leadership, faculty counsel, and student writers. Pictured below are a few of the shots taken in the Public Relations Office where the staff members headquartered their work on the annual. In the first picture on the far left, annual editor Plum and Bev Ewald, Scientist editor, post notices for a combined Agaivasie-Scientist coke party, to prove that it’s not all work and no play being a member of the publca-tions staffs. In the second picture on the left page, associate editor Pat 80I%l Clcjawasie Hub Activities Section................Ila Langseth Athletic Section.....Darrel Kampschror Mitch DcRosier Religious Section...........Sheila Currie Graduation Section......Carole Kdenborg Advisors ...........................Nancy Lauder I-andon Petersen McCarty types up a final page of copy in the introductory section as staff writers Marlys Bartholomay and Sheila Currie look on. A typical scene is the picture on the left below in which Gert Krause and Bev Ewald glance through one of the annuals from the school file for ideas for their sections. In the meantime Mitch DeRosier, sports-minded staffer, patiently bides his time waiting for the sports section to come up. "Women ! !” sneers sports writer Darrel Kampschror as Carole Eden-berg gleefully laughs at his attempts to trim pictures for the dummy pages of the yearbook in the cut below. Standing at the left is Jo Lauder, another copywriter, who is identifying a picture for her junior college division of the annual. 81Social activities at Science School were enough to keep one in a steady whirl in 1950-51; and most of these events are planned and carried on in the two busiest buildings for cxtra-curriculars on campus, the Campus Hub and the Gymnasium. Starting off the year’s schedule of parties was the annual get-acquainted dance which was held Monday evening before classes officially began. Providing music was the Jimmy Thomas Orchestra, while the faculty sponsored the party. Something new in entertainment was inaugurated by Mike Bizal and his radio club as Patricia McCarty was chosen Broadcast Queen for her lively reading, "Time Out.” All Science was invited to the contest and party, both of which were broadcast over KBMW, with Ken Stuart as disc jockey, and Clayt Kulscth as emcee. Jeans 'n Calico were the order of the evening at the Hallowe’en hard times dance held October 31. Clever costuming by Bertha Bossert and John Phillips won awards for masquerading as a clown and a character, respectively. Under the direction of Verona Vik, the party was entertained by an outstanding group of Indian children who gave out with Dixieland jive, and by a reading of Hallowe’en’s effect on campus by John Phillips. 82 JOrchestrations by the Tempo Kings starred at the Thanksgiving dance held November 20. A dance by Bev Cruse, and vocal solos by Bill Merrymon and Sandra Swenson furnished the entertainment for the event, which had as its chairmen Lou Ann Kube and Ila Langseth. Sacajaweans were honored guests at an Electrical Club party held December 6 in the Hub. With Darrell Kampschror in charge of the party, two movies were shown, a bounteous lunch was served, and the evening was completed by dancing to the nickelodeon in the Hcpcat room. Indian School “Al Jot son” John I’ltHlips reads the l allotce'en predictions. The Breckenridgc Lutheran Church was the scene of the Christmas banquet and inspirational candlelight ceremony of the campus Lutheran Students Association on December 13. Red-haired Corky Lcikness was the man who capably handled another “first” this year . . . the Christmas formal which took place on December 21 in the gymnasium. decorated in a novel manner with Christmas trees and an original lighting effect. Jimmy Thomas and his modern music makers supplied the metrical melodics for this all-school affair. 83 I’hillips and ll'erre had the lack of girls at Science too much lor them.___________— W ' 1)1 Vi I Engineer mid their guests ei,. jog a hmit uet. Chosen by contributions to the March of Dimes drive, printer Mitch De Rosier was elected King Joker, or Campus Card, to reign over all campus cards of the year. At this dance, held January 19, Sig Bjornstad was in charge, with the Chuck Arnold Orchestra playing. February 5 was an important date for the Sacajaweans as over 60 couples danced to the so-smooth Carl Colby rhythms in the gymnasium at the girls’ club winter formal. Under the direction of Gert Krause, plans were completed for an evening with a Rose Rendezvous theme. Science Engineers and their guests enjoyed a banquet and party at Hotel Wahpeton on February 6. Main speaker was F. H. McMahon and Gordon Lerfald presented some E-Quad-S magic as entertainment.I‘ing I’ong is highlight of skating party. A novel twist (figure eight) was initiated into the social swing with an ice skating party for all students at the Chahinkapa Park Rink. "Love is Too Much Trouble,” a three-act comedy of college life, opened a new aspect of entertainment for Science ... dramatics. Directed by Mike Bizal, a cast of fourteen guys and gals frolicked through this successful first endeavor. Rounding out the activities for the year was the annual Senior Reception ball, a formal to which Wahpeton and Breckenridge high school seniors are invited as well as guests of Science students. Dancers enjoyed the evening in the new gym with the added atmosphere of Lee Williams and his orchestra. Some of them actually got on the ice.Conversation, rather than dancing. takes the spotlight at this scene from the Sacajaieea formal. Science girls had plenty of social activity this year through the Sacajawea Club. President of the club, I la Langseth, used her talents as an accompanist to good advantage during the meetings throughout the year. Cabinet members were Gert Krause, vice-president; Donna Mollberg, secretary; Avis Hoeft, treasurer; and representatives Norma Poppe, Joanna Lauder, Dorothy Splichal, and Marion Molander. The annual fun-fest, “Big-Sister Little-Sister Tea” was staged in the Campus Hub on Tuesday. October 3. Senior Lois Freese gave the welcoming address, and Carole Edcnborg answered with a response for the first-year girls. "Rose Rendezvous" provided a dreamy background for the annual Sacajawea winter formal which was held on February 5. Gert Krause, general chairman, and her escort led the grand march which took each couple through a rose covered archway. On March 29. Sacajaweans staged an all-school square dance in the gym. with Mrs. Earl Bute calling the dances. The annual Mother’s Tea was held in the Hub May 19. Joanna Lauder headed the committee for this last social event in the Sacajawea year. Sacajatvcans and their dates dance in the lose Hendezvous. I I The entire cast of “hove Is Too Much Trouble" gels into the net here in a scene from the ping. Cast of ('liaructers Pinky.........Clayton Kulscth Joe........... Milch DcRosicr Toasty.............1 In Lnngxcth President Pilsey . George Werre Ebb ............Joanna Lauder Flo ........................ Pat McCarty Shirley .... Delores Spollerbcrg Sugar Lou ____ Uni Ann Kobe Miss Ross ................. Avis Hoeft Mrs. Bates.......Alvina Stone Connie........Beverly Kwald Oogy ............ Keith Anderson Monica........Carole Eden bo rg Clift Hayward .. John Phillips Clnyt (Tinky) Kulseth and Joe (Mitch) DeHosier talk their problems over icith Keith (Oogy) Anderson as they droun their sorrows in a soda at the “Poison Tot." Cast and coached by Michael Bizal, head of the dramatics and music department of Science, the performance of the comedy, “Love Is Too Much Trouble” was presented Monday-evening, February 26 in the SSS gym. This successful production was the first presented by Science students for several years. Michael Hi:at Music and Dramatics Director ■ ........................................... .ft ioac)cast dub Grouped around the microphones li'hitc a broadcast is actually in progress are radio broadcast actors Plum. Stone. Xicliots and Lovcdokken. l.angseth and Deli, osier. Engineer Harold linage These readers prodded the basis lor the radio broadcast activities this gear at Science. Tlieg are Mitch DeUosier. Jo Lauder. Ogden Lovedokken. Darrell Kampsehror. Clayton Kulseth. John Phillips, Diehard Hermes. Stanley S'icliols and Alvina Stone. Each Thursday evening at 7:30, the members of the Radio Broadcast Club went “on the air” at KBMW to present their weekly show, titled “Wahpcton Science Presents.” The show orginated from the Campus Hub at the school, and dealt each week with some new phase of student activity, or with the inside dope on a specific department. Before each holiday, the cast prepared and presented a special show with a seasonal theme. The nucleus of the broadcast club arc shown here. The shows were directed by Mike Bizal and student assistant Clayton Kulseth. while Nancy Lauder wrote the scripts for the performances. The music for the broadcasts was presented by the mixed chorus and small music groups from the school, and the band under the direction of Ray Chermak.7he Dakota dentist Here riff Kwatd Editor-in-chief IIackboiie of the paper are the reporters. In the top picture are shoten Ha Langseth. Lou Ann Kuhe. Alma Oakland. Marion Molandcr. and Marlgs Har-tludomay. In the second picture associate editors Kenneth His-cock and Hurt Ktstad are shown (corking on the make-up of the paper, while headline writers Frances Casey and Aeis limit are checking for errors. Down at the bottom of the heap are the editorial writers: those who con t ri hit t ed part ol their thought and energy toward making paper policy. Left to right on the counter are Fat McCarty, John Fhillips, Alvina Slone, and William Sanders. Kampschror and De tosier Sports Writersfiappij llotes jjlom the Tftusic Front row. left to right: Mills. Oakland. Casry. Vik. lAtuder. Director Itizal. Ewald. Edenborg. Itartholomay. Spellerberg. Iloeft. Second row: DeRosier. Dohnian. Anderson. Dell. Plankett, Pncktneau. Dans. Stone. Lang-seih. Currie. Zaialney. Post. Schucring. Third row: Plum. Phillips. Larson. Derg. Raiseth. Drown. Raider, Larson. Weber, llelland. Cottar. Olafson. Rack row: Johnson. Steen. Weinmann. Anderson. Loe. Spoon helm. Flan. Anderson. Schultz. Rjornstad. Ptlugrath. Nichols. Front row. left to right: Plum. Larson. Derg, hulseth. C. Flan. Raeder. Larson. Drown. Cottar. Olafson. Second row: DeRosier. Johnson. Phillips. Steen. Accompanist Stone. Weber. Rjornstad. Schultz. Nichols. Rack-row: Weinmann. Anderson. Loe. Kampschror, Spoonheim, Anderson. fleUand. Pflugrath. 90Debaltment o| tlte Science School Many small music groups were formed on campus this year in addition to the full sized groups such as mixed and male chorus. Among these was the mixed quartette, shown in the top left picture on this page. The four voices which blended to form this group were Delores Spellcrberg, Carole Edcnborg, Clayton Kulseth and Jay Spoonheim. Accompanied by Ila Langscth, their favorite numbers included “The House I Live In” and “You’ll Never Walk Alone.” The six girls in top right here made up the girls’ sextette. Carole Edcnborg, Marlys Bartholomay, Joanna Lauder. Sheila Currie. Beverly Ewald and Delores Spellcrberg had as their specialties. “White Christmas” and “Winter Wonderland.” The two capable accompanists for the various music groups were Ila Langscth and Alvina Stone. In addition to playing for the small music groups Ila accompanied the mixed chorus, while Alvina gave the pitch for the male chorus. Chuck Flaa, bass soloist, favored many audiences with the gay song. “The Sleigh.” Other soloists under director Mike Bizal’s guidance were Joanna Lauder, alto, and Carole Edenborg, soprano.The f t onegtones I an;;sclh. Rdcnlwrg, I uulcr The Honey tones, harmonious trio, made up of I la Langseth, Carole Edenborg, and Joanna Lauder, added their voices to the many talented ensembles of the State School of Science. Among the best known of their repertoire was "Aba Daba Honeymoon.” which they sang at the Sacajawea formal. They also took part in many outside activities as well as the Science broadcasts. Through the untiring efforts of its capable director. Ray Chermak. the SSS band took part in many school functions. It was always present at home football and basketball games, and did a commendable job of supporting the team. The band made a striking performance over each weekly broadcast and gave much pleasure to its audiences. Left to right, front rote: Xichols. Common. Peterson. Spoonheim, Hamstad. Second row: Lamprecht. Davis, Steuart. If abler. Dohman. Wold. C. Flaa. Hack row: Huresh. .Xeinas. Lund. Langseth. Harlholomay. D. Flaa. Lander, Director Chermak, Campbell. 02fiehind-tlie-sceHes "Wheels" ‘reparation of the chotv over in the Harch Hall dining room is the task handled by this cretv of seven which is also supplemented with student help. Left to right the employees pictured include Lois Theil. Martha Grab, Astrid Johnson. Mabel Johnson. Xina Lien. John Idea, and Ira Keeney. Genial Hub waitresses in the back row include Evelyn Thomas. Dorothy Olson, and Verona I 1st ad. while the fourth helper. Hetty lliland. isn't pictured. Mrs. Wallace Foster and Mrs. Steve lionising, seated in the front row. are employed in the kitchen section of the Hub. Maintenance crewman smilingly face the camera in their shop headquarters on campus. Front row. left to right, are Oscar Dahlgren. superintendent of Huildings and Grounds, Shorty Deter ka. Ted Kressin. and Charles Smith, while the back row includes Hill Lundgren. Hank Lehman. Hill Sturma. and Ed Marquet. Familiar to Science sports fans are jerry Daugherty's shy. Irish gun. ant one-hand push shots. Jerry s duces the section m which gi idders. cagers. and golden glovers pass in review. Jerry is a Fordvilie, North Dakota lad who spends his day healing auto bumps and bruises in the fender-bender shop. He sneaks a few extra seconds of dreamt.me in his Burch Hall bunk before cutting across campus to his morning classes. Break-period finds him sipping a cup of coffee at the Hub. In the afternoon it’s back to the auto body repair shop for shop and shop knowledge. After school there’s time for a whist game with his roommates or a trip to the (f)utility room to lux some undies. Jerry is happy as he tries on the new shorts and warm-up tec shirts worn by the SSS cagers, before heading for the hardwood and a thrilling game. Finally there's the satisfaction of a song in the shower. 96Gthletic Section . . . yatu’ic)a j This year was full of changes for the old gym, a red brick structure at the entrance of the campus. The scene of phy ed and practice sessions as well as basketball games and golden gloves bouts, the large hardwood Moor put on a crepe paper party dress for all-school dances and also served as an assembly room and stage for the drama club play. Last spring the old gym fell into misfit catagory as all eyes turned to the contruction of its glamorous cousin, the new athletic building going up a block away. This spring another change converted the three-story building into a dormitory for 350 clerk-typist trainees as the Air Force came to Science. The Now-Dated GymnasiumScience, 13; South Dakota Wesleyan, 0 The fii-st game of the season, September 15, saw the Science Wildcats take the Tigers from South Dakota 13 to 0. Both teams, this being their first game of the season, were a bit excited and keyed up causing fumbles, bad timing and offsides. The Wildcats played good defensively but they couldn’t get their offensive working until the end of the first half, when, on a series of runs by Daugherty and end runs by Kothe, they moved the ball to the five. Balcer passed to Lauder who skirted right end for the T. D., and Becker kicked the extra point making it 7-0 to end the first half. Brilliant runs by Balcer and Kampschror and a pass from Baker to Gaulrapp, for five successive first downs, moved the ball to the Tiger’s 10-yard marker. Becker, from fullback position, plunged over for the second tally. The extra point was blocked leaving the score 13-0 for the Wahpcton Science Wildcats. Ted Carr, Bill Gaulrapp, John Weaver and Captain Dean Knapp looked good in the forward wall with lots of good ball carrying by Jerry Daugherty, Herb Kothe and Jim Lauder. First downs: Wildcats-14; Dakota Weslcyan-7. Baker averaged 13 yards per punt with Kampschror and Becker averaging over four yards per try on the ground. Baker completed five out seven passes for a total of 75 yards. i 99Everybody leave the field a Daugherty and some Dakota Wesleyan friends argue over "Who has the hall." Science. S; Hottineau, 0 The second game of the season, also on the home field, ended in another victory for the Butemen 8-0 over the Bottineau Foresters. Both teams played good defensive ball with the only score of the first half coming when a Forester fumbled a punt from Kothe of Science and it rolled into the end zone where Knapp and Kelly fell on it to give Science a 2-0 lead at half time. The last half star ted in a nip and tuck battle with neither team making much headway. The Science club ate up the yardage in mid-field but failed to get any closer than the 15-yard line. The punting by Herb Kothe and Leo Balcer kept the Wildcats out of ser ious trouble while a good defence of the line held the Foresters to a single first down. The brilliant running of Becker-. Balcer. and Kothe of the Science club picked up 15. Late in the last quarter, Balcer ran a punt back to the Bottineau 15-yard line and then passed to Kampschror to place the ball on the seven yard line. Quarterback Lauder handed the ball off to Balcer who skirted left end to paydirt. The kick for extra point failed, leaving the score 8-0 and little time for the Foresters to stage a scoring threat. The whole line deserves credit for the fine defensive play with Kelly, Knapp and Carr as the standouts. 100 . Daugherty HB (i. Falsi ad RflJ. Flan I,. liuulrupp .. K amp sc hr nr I). Kampschrur If. Kelly HB LE HB RE RT Science, li; Itrainerd, 21} Playing the Brainerd Junior College Red Raiders at Brainerd, in the first game away from home, Science failed to get the right combination to trip the Minnesota outfit. The local lads went down for their first defeat 26-6. Although the clubs played even ball the difference lay in the passing attacks and the consistent drizzling weather making the field soft and slippery. In the late minutes of the first quarter, the Raiders pushed the ball over to give them a 6-0 lead at the end of the initial period of play. The Wildcats took over in the second quarter and marched down the field to the three-yard line and from there Jim Lauder smashed across for the Cats only touchdown to tie it at 6-6. A 30-yard pass by Klein of the J. C. was good for a T. D. The Science club took to the air but a pass from Kothe to Gaulrapp backfired when Wayne Little intercepted and ran it back for another touchdown. The kick was good and Wahpeton trailed 19-6 at the half. In the last half the Wildcats outplayed the boys from Brainerd but could not score. In the final quarter. Kampschror attempted another pass which was intercepted for an “all the way" touchdown for Brainerd. Brainerd made ten first downs while the Wildcats picked up six, all of them in the last half. 101I). Knapp LG . Kothc III? . Lauder QB V. Mitchell LE I). NeUcrmoc HB 102 Famous for his shy grin and all-around good looks, Science looks to Dean for leadership in many fields. Ilis capability in everything he attempts earns him the respect of the entire student body. Dean likes Science, but even more important, Science likes Dean! Dean Knapp Captain Science, IS; Mayvillc STC, 6 Receiving the 26-6 gridiron blow in the non-conference game against Brainerd, the Wahpeton Science Wildcats put themselves back in the winning column by drubbing Mayville State Teacher’s College 13-6. The game had several highlights, one of them being the 54-yard run by Herb Kothc in the second quarter. Also on the important list was an injury to the quarterback Jim Lauder, putting him out of commission for the rest of the season play. Much honor and credit should be given to Jim. He was a good player as well as a fine field general. No scores were made in the first quarter, but later the tide changed with Kothe’s run from the 36-yard line to pay dirt. Kampschror ran off-tackle for the extra point and the Cats led at the half 7-0. The third quarter was like the first one, with small yardage gains for both teams. In the fourth quarter Balcer threw a touchdown pass to Daugherty making it 13-0. The kick for the extra point was outside the goal | osts. The Comets started to click with a few "down field’ passes, and finally made a touchdown ending the game at 13-6. Wahpeton had 15 first downs to Mayvillc’s nine. Rushing yardage for the Cats was 194, and SSS gained 117 through the air, while Balcer completed eight out of nine to ends Gaul-rapp and Kampschror. Kothe was the leading ground gainer with 82 yards. The average of the back field was better than four yards per try. Captain Dean Knapp, a product of Glendive, Montana, led the Science gridders through a creditable season. Dean, two-time winner of the honor of being Lettermen president, is a consistently good athlete. In addition to starring on the gridiron, Dean has made a formidable name for himself in boxing circles, winning the local Golden Gloves award as well as the amateur title for his home state.The Jamestown Jimmies played host to the Wildcats in their Home-coming game and were trampled 27-6 by a greatly inspired Jamestown team. The first quarter started with Jamestown taking over in the offensive department, but they met stubborn Wildcat resistance whenever within scoring range. The second quarter was a different story when the Cat defense against the Jimmies aerial attack fell apart and they were plagued with passes that accounted for three touchdowns, Jamestown leading the Wildcats 20-0 at halftime. In the second half the Wahpcton team came to life and played good ball but could not get closer than the 20-yard line. Jamestown picked up their final touchdown on an end-around play and an extra point to lead 27-0. The fourth quarter was all Science with Balcer throwing passes to Becker and alternating ground plays to march down the field 75 yards. A final pass to Gaulrapp in the end zone netted Science’s only T. D. and left only five seconds of play, ending the ball game 27-6 in favor of Jamestown. . Sold FB T. I cur sun C. T ». Stuessy LG II. Ptlugrath LE J. Simonson FB mam Front rote, le t to right: Kothe, Finn, Carr. Lauder, Wearer, Knapp, Hnlccr, (iaiilrapp. Williams. Johnson. Second row: Pearson, Daugherty. Heine. Armstrong. Pflugrath, t'hlich. Thordarson, 117 , iXcllennoe. Stuart Weinberger. Third row: Stevens, Henderson. Cottar, Falstad. Simonson. A'old. Kelly. Corbett, Strussy. assistant coach Patterson. Fourth How: Coach Karl Hute, Kozojed, L. Kampschror, Michel, Decker, Kampschror, DcKosier, Cat ken, student managers Christenson and Dick Dietz, assistant coach Ed ll'erre. 103Science, 0; EH end ale, Ilf In their last home game of the season, the annual homecoming tussle, the Cats went down in defeat before a hard-driving Ellendale Normal team 19-0. Ground gains, fine passing and a pass interception gave the Dusties a touchdown in each of the first three quarters. Pass defense was again the headache of the Wildcats with Ellendale taking all the breaks that came their way. Cat guard Ted Carr, tackle Dick Kelly and end Bill Gaulrapp starred for the Science team with help from the rest of the team. Statistics were: first downs, Ellendale 10 and Wahpcton 10; passes: Cats completed four out of 14 attempts and picked up 87 yards in 34 tries; Star punter Leo Balccr booted the sphere 234 yards in six tries, averaging 39 yards per try. Daugherty. Becker, Kampschror and Kothe together with Balcer displayed some nice running. Science, 13; Minot STC, 33 The Wildcats suffered the worst defeat of the season in their final game at the hands of the Minot Teachers Bcavei-s, 33-13. It was all Wes Luther of the Beavers leading the free scoring attack. Although the Cats played one of their best games of the year, they could not overcome the power of the Beavers. Balcer passed for the first SSS T. D. to end Vince Michel. In the final period Harry Becker, fleetfooted Montana boy, intercepted a Beaver pass and outran all opposition for 60 yards and then kicked the extra point to end the game 33-13. Ted Carr played his usual good game on defense and good running was seen on the part of Dean Kampschror and "Crazy Legs" Kothe. All boys making the trip saw action in the last game of the season with the exception of regular end Darrell Kampschror who was out due to injuries received in the homecoming game. {. Thordarson RC J. Weaver C. T L. Williams LT J. Wilt RE C. Christensen Mgr.iq$6-SI Reason fin (Zeoieu) Front rote, left to right: Itnchicr. Captain Kcth . Stadxvald, Daugherty. Flan. Hack rote: Syrerson. Itcckrr. Simonitch, Witt, Teh Ic. and Coach Fd ll'crrc. Reporting for a heavy 21-game schedule were three returning letter-men together with about 75 boys for tryouts. The last year’s team members who reported back were Gerald Daugherty, Jim Witt and Dick Kelly, who was elected captain for the season. The Wildcats did not do too well, getting only five wins from the 21 games. They ended the season in eighth place in NDIC standings. This was the second year that Coach Ed Wcrre, Science basketball mentor, guided the Wildcats through a cage season. Captain of this year’s Wildcat cage squad is 19-year-old Dick Kelly of Wahpeton. Dick, a graduate of Wahpeton high school, and a two year letterman at the State School of Science is married and is a new. but proud papa. Dick is a second-year student in Pre-Commerce, and has starred for Science in football as well as basketball. Dick Kelly 1951 Wildcat Captain 105Jerry Daugherty Daniel Tehle Itasca Junior College Traveling to Coleraine, Minnesota, to play the Itasca Junior College, the Science five grabbed one of their wins by defeating them 63-48. Big Jack Simonitch, a first-year man, hit 23 counters from the pivot. Simonitch is a former St. John’s University ball player, taking a drafting and estimating course. Concordia College Their first let-down was to the fast-breaking Concordia squad. The Cobbers handed the Wildcats a 81-5-1 loss. The early stages of the game looked as though it would be an interesting game, but the Cats lacked strength as five players were lost via the foul route. Wally LaRose, who left us mid-season for the Air Force, was high pointer with 12. Moorhead State Teachers College The following week the Wahpeton Science Wildcats bowed to MSTC 63-48. At the half they were ahead by ten points. However the Dragons got hot in the second half and came from behind to clip the visitors by 15 points. Again LaRose and Simonitch were high with 18 and 13 respectively. Harry Keeker Jack Simonitch I aptain Dick Kelly 106i j Cyril St ads rold Jim ill University of North Dakota Keeping on the road, the team went north to Grand Forks to play the University. The “U” men were too much for them and they fell, 72-64. Scoring strong for Science was Simonitch. again hitting 21 points. Iiemidji State Teachers College At the first home game in the Science gym. Bcmidji State Teacher's came from Minnesota to whip the Cats 71-50 and during Christmas vacation the Cats met the all-star “Newburg Flashers.” This outfit, which put on a good show, beat us to the tune of 88-60 at an exhibition game. Dickinson Stale Teachers College At the beginning of the new year a fine Dickinson five out-classed the Wildcats 66-54. This was the first loss in conference play for the Cats. Kreig, who ended the season second in conference scoring, got 26 points that night. Simonitch collected 25 for the Science team and Witt and La-Rose hit 12 and eight respectively. Doug Ftaa Arlen Syterson hems Buchlor 10Adding to the pep of the basketball conflicts on the local court were Mitch DeRosier of Brainerd, Minnesota and Clayton Kulseth, the red-head from Grand Forks, who led cheers and urged the team on through their physical and vocal efforts. Although these boys spend most of their normal lives on the ground, while working for Science Spirit they always seemed to end "up in the air.” Milch Dcliosicr High Flying ChcerloaUcr tWorth Dakota Agricultural College As for the AC game at Fargo, the team could not overpower the Bison for another win, and were again shown the road to defeat by a 62-27 scalping. . amestown College At the Jimmy game at Jamestown, a second conference loss was taken by Science as the Jimmies tripped them 56-49. Except for the early part of the tilt, the Jimmies led all the way. Jack Simonitch of Science was on top with 20 points. Ford and Ken Becker hit 16 each for the opponents. Mayville State Teachers College Next the Mayville State Teachers College Comets were pressed during the first half before beating the Wildcats in a 75-61 NDIC tilt. May-villc had first and second stop leads at both halfs. Leading the winning attack were opponents Duane Pratt and Harlan Larson, with 19 and 18 points respectively. Wahpeton’s scoring was rather balanced: Simonitch, 17; Syverson, 15; and Tehle, 14. Valley City State Teachers College Heading for a three-day trip in the northern section of the state, the Cats were thrown a hoop-happy defeat by Valley City when they slammed us 66-44. Marlowe Gundmundson ran wild with 27 points. Science’s Simonitch. Witt and Daugherty all hit for a count seven. Bismarck and Minot The next game on the trip was Bismarck. The Mystics clipped us 65-57. Simonitch was high with 24 points. Heading for Minot, a tired quintet fell to the Minot Beavers 53-48. Daugherty played a good game, being high with 15 points. Jack Simonitch hit 14 counters. Bismarck Junior College After getting home and resting up, the SSS squad surprised the Mystics from Bismarck JC, who came over to get a jolt from the “get-even” Wildcats. Sparked by forward Jerry Daugherty, the Cats downed the JC outfit 66-63 in an overtime. The beginning of the game looked like the usual, but they outfought the Mystics and spurted on to victory. Daugherty made it possible for the overtime by sinking a free shot in the last three seconds. He hit for 12 points. Sitch hit 19 and Syverson hit 10 for the victors. Valley City Stale Teachers College Science showed that the win against Bismarck wasn’t only a lucky punch as they came back to score a 50-42 victory over the Vikings from Valley City. The Cats showed some fine ball handling and sharp shooting for a 36.4 percentage from the floor. Big Jack Simonitch tallied 16 from the pivot and Tehle hit nine at forward. Price of the Vikings hit 18 points.Bottineau Series Keeping in stride the team journeyed north where they successfully accounted for two victories in two nights against cellar-dwellers Bottineau. The first game ended 45-37 and the following night it was a 74-56 defeat for the Wildcat foes. For Science. Jack Simonitch hit 36 points in two nights with Daugherty grabbing 12 points. Jamestown College The last game of the season saw the Jamestown Jimmies come over to rap the season record book with a loss score of 75-67. Simonitch tallied 15 points that night to end the season with 214 points. Arlen Syverson had a hot night counting up 24 of the joints. Tehle hit 14 |K ints. also playing a good game. High for the Jimmies was Ford with 21 points. So ended the season in a last game on the home court. This finished the Cat conference schedule with four wins and ten losses for the year’s total. Jerry Daugherty was second in Science scoring with 88 points in 11 games. Hig Jack Simonitch. number 25 on the Cat squad, is shown tipping in two points for the SSS team. The fine basketball skill that "Sitch" demostrates here is typical of that ichich garnered him a total of 211 points for the season.Going up for Science at the tip off against Valley City is center Simon-itch. Science and Valley City each took one of the games played this season. The Vikings took the Cats 66-44, while the Cats retaliated with a 50-42 win Wildcat flasket ball Season Record Opponent Itasca J. C........ Concordia.......... Moorhead S. T. C. . North Dakota U . . N. D. A. C......... Bemidji S. T. C. Newburg Flashers Dickinson S. T. C. . Ellendale Normal . Jamestown College Mayville S. T. C. Valley City S. T. C. Bismarck J. C...... Minot S. T. C...... Bismarck J. C. ... Mayville S. T. C. Valley City S. T. C. Ellendale Normal . Bottineau Forestry Bottineau Forestry Jamestown College dame Science Score Opponent Score . . . Away 63 48 Awav 54 SI .. . Away 48 63 Away 64 73 ... Away 27 62 Home 50 71 Home 60 88 54 66 Away 50 74 .. . Away 49 56 61 62 44 66 Away 57 65 48 53 66 63 . .. Away 61 75 50 12 Home 47 63 45 37 Away 74 56 Home 67 75 noPieoieu) ojj Pla eis Known primarily as a hard-working team, the ten men who comprised the ‘51 squad were actually extremely individual players, each with his own outstanding characteristics. To individualize each player the sportswriters give you their version of cage sketches: Harry Meeker Harry played guard and made a fine impression for a first-year man. He stands six feet one and weighs 190 pounds. The 19-year-old Glendive. Montana player is a fine defensive man. Lou Muehler Lou, also a reserve, is 18 years old, and comes from Obcron, North Dakota. He is a first-year man playing guard. While in high school Lott earned a letter in basketball. Jerry Daugherty This was Jerry's last year of basketball at Science. Last year he was a regular on the B squad. He is a very accurate shot from his forward position. He is 19 yea re old, stands five feet, ten inches and weighs 150 pounds. Jerry is a product of Fordville. Doug Ft tut Doug Flaa, an 18 year-old Wahpeton lad. was the mid-season select player. He received a letter in football in high school and played intramurals. On the Cat team he was a reserve guard. Dick Kelly Dick captained this year's squad and is a returning letterman. The 19 year-old Wahpeton eager stands five feet 11 inches. He played guard, and although he is smaller than most of his teammates, he was a great boardman and a good shot. Dick attended high school at Wahpeton where he was an all-around athlete. Jack Simonitch “Sitch” is 19 years old. stands six feet three, weighs 183 pounds, and plays center. Jack was a two-year letterman at St. John's College of Minnesota. He was a very fine hook shot and was the mainstay in the team's scoring punch. Cyril Stadsvold The Fergus Falls guard was a stable reserve on this year's Cat squad. Cy is a first-year man. having attended the Fergus Falls high school. Arielt Syverson Arlie comes from Wahpeton where he played high school basketball. He is a fine shot and has good playing form. He stands six feet two, and weighs 172 pounds. At 19. experiencing his second year of ball, he can play both center and forward. Later on in the season he earned a starting position. Dan Teltlc Dan hails from Breckenridge, Minnesota. His age is 18. and he stands six feet one. and tips the scale at 179 pounds. "Honker”, as friends call him, played regular about midseason for the Wildcats. He played high school basketball at Breck. Jim Will Jim, who left Science late in the season, was a regular on the Cat squad. At present the fast guard eager is serving Uncle Sam in the Marines. Jim is 18 yea re old and tops the scale at 187 pounds. Being six feet three inches, he also proved to be a good rebound-cr for the team. mhllnc {yjxrtts Outl ooh: Baseball b-'l’iach Baseball Prospects At this writing, baseball is still in the planning stage. Training started for the two last sports in the school year, and the organizational meetings found the response quite satisfactory. Forty-four candidates signed up for the coming baseball season at a special meeting called by head coach Earl Bute on Thursday, March 29. Practice will start indoors in the new gym as soon as the moving problem is completed, and will be continued on this plane until the weather permits a move to the open field. Nine games have been scheduled, with the first game to be played on May first. Among those signing up and the positions that they will try for are: Pitchers: Flaa, J., Wahpeton; Juarez, Drayton; Kampschror, D., Glendive; Anderson, B., Lari more; Steurst, Gilby; Ness, Erskine; Beinc, Reynolds; Kellogg, Fair-mount; Novotny, Breckcnridge. Catchers: Werre, Dawson; Kuschcl, Hebron; Flaa, D., Wahpeton; Ellingson, Rosholt; Knoepfle, Bottineau; Armstrong, Fargo; McCormick, Barney. First base: Syverson, Wahpeton; Tehlc, Breckcnridge; Frederick. Belcourt; Kampschror, Dean, Glendive; Reile, McClusky. Second base: Zentgraf, Wahpeton: Anderson, Lake City; Falstad, Garrison. Third base: Johnson, Grand Forks; Lindberg, Kenmare; Nienas, Thompson; Cottor, Sidney. Short stop: Kutter, Hankinson; Lcik- ness, Foston; Daugherty, Fordville. Outfield: Stadsvold, Fergus Falls; Williams, Heaton; Alsop, Fergus Falls; Kohlmen, Anamoose; Buehler, Oberon; Wold, Wahpeton; Pflugrath, Wahpeton; Pithey, Lamoure; Keck ter, Midwest; Becker, Glendive; Kothe, Fairhaven; Hay, Par-shall; and Michelson, Regan. April 27 MSTC at NDAC May 1 Mayville TC at NDAC: MSTC at Wahpeton Science May 2 MSTC at Concordia May 4 Concordia at Jamestown College; Wahpeton Science at Nl)AC May 7 NDAC at MSTC May 8 Jamestown at MSTC; Jamestown at Concordia.Mayville TC at Wahpeton Science May 9 NDAC at Concordia May 11 NDAC at Mayville TC; MSTC at Jamestown; Wahpeton Science at Concordia Mayville at MSTC; Mayville at Concordia; NDAC at Wahpeton Science May 18 Wahpeton Science at Jamestown (two games) ; Concordia at NDAC May 21 Concordia at Wahpeton Science May 22 Jamestown at Mayville (two games) May 23 Concordia at MSTC May 24 MSTC at Mayville; Jamestown at NDAC (two games) May 29 Concordia at Mayville Baseball Schedule of Carnes For the Conference May 15 Track Flans Ten candidates turned out for the belated track season. Coach Ed Werre laid out a tentative training schedule and issued track equipment at a meeting held April 9. Among those who signed up are: Jack Seel-hammer, mile, half-mile, and pole vault; Glen Carlson, half-mile; Joseph Deane, shot-put, disc, and javelin; Clifford Sears, 220, mile relay, and 100-yard dash; Harold In-112 fold, mile: Roland Jenson, 440, relay team, 220, and 100-yard dash; Richard Kuschel, weights, and pole vault: Mitch DeRosier, high jump; Reuben Reile, pole vault and broad jump; and Darrell Kampschror, 440, 880, and mile run, and discus. Plans were laid to attend any track meets that may be held in the conference as soon as track men were ready.Science iTlittmen la ze The Front row. left to right: Cay din. II roc kin. Knapp. Kassa. Miller, flock row: Coocli (Ivor ye Hoy. Hr own, Kelly. (Iowan. Koch. Hall webber. Hrackin. The SSS boxing team, under the coaching of George Brackin. wearing the favorite colors, red and black, again had a successful season, winning 58 bouts and losing only 21 of the 82 total for an impressive 70 per cent average for the year. In totaling up the team matches of the season the Wahpeton Mittmen won 41 bouts, losing but 19 to win six matches with but one tic which was later revenged when they met Fort Yates in a return match In the Golden Gloves at the Science school. January 26-27, in a total of eighteen bouts for SSS boxers they won 13 and lost only five, three of these the first night. Nine men comprise the Wah| cton team that Dean Knapp Assistant Boxing Conch placed five out of the eight championships. Rolla Brown. Lee Hay. and Joe Kassa were eliminated the first night with Gagelin, Brackin, Kelly, Gowan, and Knapp all winning by way of TKO’s and Marlyn Miller getting a decision. In the semifinals three of four SSS bo :crs came through as Knapp, Brackin, and Kelly all won by KO’s. Bob Gowan lost by a close decision to Francis Borshcim, who was later dccisioncd by Knapp for the M ddlcwcight crown. Six Wahpeton boxers were left for the final round when Lady Luck frowned on Terry Kelly, which resulted in the only loss by way of a TKO to Adolph Hcpper. The most impressive victory for the SSS men was Johnny Brackin’s KO in the second round over Hollis Dryer of Morris. Dean Knapp got revenge for the year before when he lost to Francis Borshcim, but this year it was a different story with Knapper taking an easy decision. Danny Gagelin, Marvin Bach and Glen Miller also won to total five Champs for the State School of Science. 113Soxels at Science Jl ook Sack Stale School of Science, 5; trainer(I, 2 Danny Gagelin, 120. dccisioncd Daryll Adair, 117 Jack Brooks. 134. decisioned Richard Dean. 127 John Brackin, 122, decisioned Jim Bednar, 123 Harold Hermes. 155, KO'cd Bob Marti 11a, 158 Tim Kochcl. 176. lost to Neil Holm. 177 Dean Knapp. 167. decisioned Don Morrill, 168 Terry Kelly. 154, lost to Tom Herron, 149 State School of Science, I; Fort Yales, i Harold Hermes won by a decision, Danny Gagelin won by a TKO in the first round, Johnny Brackin won also by a TKO in the first round, and Bob Gowan won by a decision. Jack Brooks lost by a decision as did Rolla Brown, George Ness was KO’d in the third round and Terry Kelly lost a close decision to Adolph Hepper whom he met again in the Golden Gloves. ui Kolia lira ten Joe Kassa Lee 11 an SI ale School of Science, il; Hettinger, I Dean Knapp. 164. TKO'd Charles Clark, 169 Harold Hermes, 155. decisioned Adolph Hepper, 152 Jack Brooks. 133. was decisioned by Russell Clark. 135 Tim Kochel. 176. decisioned LeRoy Lowenstein, 182 Terry Kelly. 152, decisioned Tony Miller, 147 Robert Gowan, 154. TKO'd Elmer Hagen, 151 Marvin Bach. 167, decisioned by Henbold Schaible, 168 Danny Gagelin. 115. decisioned by Dale Wallentine. 101 .Joe Kassa, 158. decisioned Jack Katherin, 160 James Kozojed. 161. decisioned Harvey Hewson, 158 George Ness. 147. decisioned Marvin Wilson, 151 Duane Ballweber, 152, lost to Donald Wanner, 148 Johnny Brackin. 125, decisioned Leland Jacobson, 126On Gin Outstanding Reason Terry Kelli Marlyii Miller Robert (intofin Stale School of Science, 7; Wilmar, I Dean Knapp decisioned Dean Dirks Jack Brooks decisioned Roy Emberland Harold Hermes lost to Melvin Brecht Danny Gagelin decisioned Omar Nagaard Johnny Brackin, no decision over Terry McNellis Rolla Brown lost to John Shanahan George Ness decisioned Gerald Roske Joe Kassa decisioned Jim Zeman Jim Kozojed lost to Earl Witthus Bob Gowan lost to Wayne Schladeroff Terry Kelly decisioned John Zeman Tim Kochel decisioned Arlan Tangevell Slale School of Science, 5; I'orl Yates, 2 Danny Gagelin, 114, decisioned Sammy Walker. 113 Johnny Brackin, 122, TKO’d Warner Loon, 123 Joe Kassa, 157, decisioned Red Tomahawk, 154 Tim Kochel, 178, was TKO’d by Smoky Cloud, 176 Rolla Brown, 140, was decisioned by Iron Eyes, 134 Terry Kelly, 147, decisioned Art Walker, 140 Dean Knapp, 165, KO’d George Tiokasin, 157 Sidle School of Science, 6; Detroit Lakes, 0 Rolla Brown TKO’d Darrell Crane Johnny Brackin decisioned Dick Wyland Lee Hay decisioned Norbert Sloan Bob Gowan decisioned Howard Folden Marvin Bach decisioned Ivan Crandall Terry Kelly decisioned Curtis Backanaga State School of Science, 5; I Ad ( er wood, 2 Marlin Miller, 114, lost to Irvin Bertram, 119 Jerry Simdorn, 138, KO’d David Bartel, 137 Rolla Brown, 136, KO’d Don Utzon, 140 Bob Stuessy, 146, lost to Calvin Bertram, 149 Lee Hay, 157, decisioned Ervin Schutlz, 161 Danny Gagelin, 120, KO’d Shun Sahum. 119 Joe Kassa, 161, KO’d Donald Shcrie, 163 Marvin Bach. 169, lost to Francis Borsheim, 167 9PHHHICjolc) en Cjlooes, 'T'toplties, Tflinnea clis . Results of First Round Marlyn Miller, 112, decisioned Jack Borowski, 101, of Fergus Falls; Danny Gagelin, 117, TKO’d Jerry Enderson, 119, of Fergus Falls in 1:10 of the third round. Johnny Brackin. 123, TKO’d David Bartell. 120, of Wheaton in 16 seconds of the second round. Itolla Brown, 135, lost by a KO in 1:13 of the third round to Kenneth Long, 130, of Bismarck; Lee Hay, 145, was decisioned by Adolph Hopper, 147, of Hettinger; Terry Kelly. 154, TKO’d C. Borshcim. 151, of Wheaton in 1:43 of the second round. Joe Kassa, 151, was TKO’d by Francis Borshcim, 161, of Wheaton in 27 seconds of the first round. Bob Gowan. 152, TKO’d Donald Sheirc. 153, of Morris in the third round. Dean Knapp. 159, TKO’d Harold Carrison, 159. of Fergus Falls in 44 seconds of the first round. Results of Semifinals Johnny Brackin, 123, KO’d Warner Loon, 121, of Fort Yates 1:29 of the second round; Terry Kelly, 145, KO’d Byron Dryer. 114, of Morris in 59 seconds of the first round: Bob Gowan, 152, was decisioned by Francis Borshcim, 161, of Wheaton; Dean Knapp, 159, KO’d Bernie Red Tomahawk of Fort Yates. 152, in 24 seconds of the first round. Golden Gloves Finals Flyweight: Dale Wallentine of Hettinger decisioned Samuel Walker of Fort Yates. Bantamweight: Danny Gagelin, of the Wahpeton team, decisioned Edwin Belzer of Bismarck. Featherweight: Johnny Brackin, of the Wahpeton team, KO’d Hollis Dryer, of Morris, in the second round. Lightweight: Arthur Walker, Fort Yates, decisioned Calvin Bertram of Wheaton. Welterweight: Adolph Hepjxir, Hettinger, won by a TKO over Terry Kelly, Wah-l eton. Middleweight: Dean Knapp, Wahpeton. decisioned Francis Borshcim, Wheaton. Lightweight: Marvin Bach, Wahpeton team, decisioned Reinhold Sellable, Hettinger. Heavyweight: Glen Miller, Wahpeton, won by a TKO over Frederick Hobbs, of Fergus Falls, in the third round. At the Golden Gloves the four entries lost their tournament at M inneapolis, Wahpeton lighters found it rougher going as three of initial fights. Danny Gagelin lost a split decision to Nat Gingcrilli of the Hibb-ing team. Johnny Brackin was decisioned by Vclcssi Solon of the McGregor team on Monday night. Marvin Bach decisioned Dick Kalh of the Owaton-na team but Dean Knapp was KO’d by Bill Plnkus of the St. Paul team in the third round of the second night. Wednesday night all Science hopes were lost when Marvin Bach was TKO’d by Danny Stcvcr-mer in the third round. Left to right: Glenn Miller, heavyweight; Martin Bach. light heavyweight; Dean Knapp, middleweight; Adolph Jlepper. welterweight; Arthur Walker, lightweight; Johnny Brackin. featherweight; Danny Gagelin. bantamweight; Dale Wallentine. flyweight. Conch George Brackin. 116Qtbletic Commission These three students represent the entire student body in handling financial problems tor the athletic fund. I.cft to right they tire: Don Ungge. Alice Abrahamson and Durwood Ohm. Created by Article V in the constitution of the Student Cabinet, the Athletic Commission is required to have among its members, the president of the school, the athletic coach, the faculty representative of the North Dakota Intercollegiate Conference, and three members of the student body. Elected in the spring, the three students on this page have as their duties, the control of the athletic fund, the awarding of all athletic 101101 8, and the supervision of all athletic activities. In addition to this they arc expected to nominate the business manager of the various athletic teams. Don Hagge, Alice Abrahamson and Durwood Ohm are shown here counting the money taken in at one of the Golden Gloves events of the season. They also sell tickets and programs for affairs of this type. Front row. Irft to rif ht: 117 . Gaulrapp. Williams. Knapp, Kochel, Phillips, Lykken. Lauder, Kelly. Hack row: Palstad. Steussy. .Wild. Dauf herty. Kampschror. liecker, Kothe. Plan and Corbett. Proud indeed arc these winners of the coveted S.” In addition to this honor, they arc automatically members of the Lettermens’ Club, an organization composed of lettermcn in major sports on campus. The main interests of the club center around fellowship and athletic betterment at Science. This year, under President Dean Knapp, the boys initiated twenty-two men in football alone, several more were taken in at the close of the basketball and boxing season. After all the initiations were completed, the boys in the “S” club celebrated by traveling to Minneapolis where they saw the final game in the NCAA collegiate tournament. Not pictured arc several of the lettermcn who were absent when the picture was taken or were initiated later on in the sports season. Among those are Ron Thordarson, Rodney Pflugrath. Dean Kampschror, Don Ncllermoe, I eo Balcer, John Weaver, Doug Flaa. Dan Tehle, Lou Beuhler, Al ien Syverson, Rolla Brown, Lee Hay, Robert Cowan. Glen M llcr, and Joe Kassa. ns President Knapp Heads Lettermcn@nfaamu ial Basketball 'Teams in eel the (3hamf s: Glide lllechamcs The eight men who took the championship for the second straight year were the teamsters from Auto Mechanics. The spark plug of the team was Bud Lykken, who comes from Kindred, north Dakota. He rolled in 127 points for the team in ten games, enough to hand himself a berth on the first five all-star team. Better known as “Trigger,” Bud played guard. Next on the tall side was Ken Vangness of Marshall, North Dakota. Ken hit 85 points and made second all-star five. Ken was starting center for the team. Other players were Jack McCrea of Midwest, Wyoming, who garnered an honorable mention, Warren Nienas of Thompson, who played froward, William Stewart of Gilby, forward, and subs Eugene Olafson and Darrell El ling-son from Gardar and Rosholt respectively. Coaching the winning auto mechs was DeWaine Knoepfle of Bottineau. Front, left to right: Seinas. (Hofson. Ellingson. McCrea. Hack: Stewart. Lykken, I angsness. Knoepfle. Guto @oc) V Goiation Front row. left to right: IInobler. Mess. Fether. Hack row: Culp. Fedje, Gierke, Armstrong. 110 Left to right: Axelson. Hallweber. Albertson. Johnson, Dahl.Slectiical I fluniol College 2 Front row, left to right: sutler, Wendelho. Kulseth. Hack row: Schultz, Johnson, Michelson, It idea. Caulrapp. Front row. left to right: Erickson, Kothe. J. Flan. Hack row: McCormack, Williams, I.indsay, Nolle. Honorable Mention Foster of General Mechanics, Weinberger of Electrical II, Michelson of Radio. Erickson and Lauder of Junior College II, Reile of Printers, Kampschror of Electrical I, Novotny of Junior College I, McCrae of Auto Mechanics and Seelhammer of Electrical I. Arliss Fedje of Aviation was awarded the outstanding player award; he was also the high point man for the intramural season. Front row. left to right: Steussy. Cummins. Seel-hammer. Hack rote: Hohlig, Heine, Kampschror. First Five Bud Lykken........ LuVerne Williams Arliss Fedje...... Allen Pope........ Gordon Sathcr... ... Auto Mechanics .Junior College II ..........Aviation .. .Junior College I General Mechanics Second Team Vernon Olson.................Electrical II Herb Kothe...............Junior College II Paul Ness.........................Aviation Ken Vangness..........................Auto Mechanics Charles Poppe...............Junior College Slechical 2 Front row. left to right: Learn, J. Learn. Infcld. Hack row: Olson. Weinberger.Ill P'lintels Q enela eckanics Front rou left to right: Sandeold. Kelson. Foster, Sot her. Danielson. Hack rote: lluehlcr. Atwood. Halt. Mur phi , l.ec. Law. Pritchard. Front row. left to right: Lokkrn. Cottar. Dettosicr. Heilc. Hack row: Falstad. Sanders. Scnhotd, Hold. Sundt uist. Kuschel. fluniol College I Final Standings II ins Losses Junior College II......... 9 1 Junior College I ......... 8 2 Electrical II ............ 8 2 Auto Mechanics............ 7 3 Aviation ................. 5 5 Radio .................... 5 4 Electrical I ............. 4 3 Printers.................. 4 5 Engineers ................ 3 6 Drafters ................. 2 5 General Mechanics......... 1 7 Commercial ............... 0 3 Refrigeration ............ 0 3 Front row. left to right: l higrnlh. II 'old. Poppc Lovdokkcn. Novotny. Hack row: Nichols. Hermes, Pope, Holliman. Commons.N.D.S.S.S Sundaybrown-eyed Steve Rcmsing, who lives with his charming wife and two cute kids in one of the compact trailer homes grouped on the east side of the campus. The story of Steve’s Sunday introduces the section containing the names and faces important in SSS religious organizations. Early morning sends the family off to church as it does most Science students and their families. Afterwards the young ’uns romp in the snow with a friendly dog while Mom fixes dinner. Of course Steve, a second-year Science man, finds time to relax with the Sunday paper from which little Karen and Daic have already removed the bright-colored funnies. At the end of their holiday the Radio-2 man and his grade-school age daughter turn again to the serious business of school as Steve reads up on frequency modulation while Karen wrestles with the multiplication table. 121 Three dozen windows set in Burch Hall’s square, battered face stare across the campus from their vantage point west of the oval. Behind these windows HO men relax in varying degrees of comfort in the traditional dorm atmosphere compounded of Esquire calendars, twisted tubes of shaving cream, card-playing buddies, and an occasional text book used to prop up one of those windows. Named for Science’s first president, Burch hall was built in 1010 and at one time served as a girl’s dorm. In recent years the lower floor was modernized by the addition of the college cafeteria. 120cl Oman Front row. left to right: Jungerx. Schucring. Cities. Meyer. Lauder. Casey. McCarty. Spellerberg. Thvede. Jaeobchick. Kupser. Coetlen. Second row: Holler. Schneider. Dick. Danish. Schall. Doit. Atwood. Hit:. Seel-hammer. I’achl. Sayer. Zola. Duck row: Steidl. Drilz. Cuetzfridt. Lexer. Cummins. Ilohlig, Tupa. Kesscl. Morin. Wcinmann. Danielson. Robert Ficck Newman Club President Front row, left to right: IF right. Cot tor, Phillips. Stiles. Ficek. Seelhammer. Cote. Kelt gen. Lei k ness. Foltz. Second row: Diden. DeRosier. Martin. Ilaas. Harrison. Johnson. Tongas. Manley. Weber. Iluresh. Roller. Dock row: Cautrapp. Wolf, I.amprecht. Decker. Kozojed. Murphy. Dnumann. Oseold. Data. ....................•• ........................................................................................................................................................................................................»,,. ■■■■-.-=4.—ft------------------------------------------- — -------------------------------c—:------------------------------------------------------------------------ ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- — iZuibeian tuclents (Jssociaticn ■'runI rou. left to right: I’ost. Hingdahl. f.eshovsky. Mullberg. Lind holm. Dads, Anderson. Oakland. Biiruus. Hleese. Keranen. Saeicart. Krause. Mnlander. Kobe, lloeft. Langseth. Kicald. Second rote: Kd-enborg, llarlholrnnay. Unas. Kniseih. tlarenlhesen, J. Finn. Falstad. Larson, Berg. Albertson. Hanson. Sletlen. Slelter, HJornslad. Steen. Heuchert. Schaubert, Itack rote: Blunt. Ilalcorson. I 'angsness. Fedje, Locedok-ken. Spoonheim. C. Flaa. IVitt. Heine, Braun. Schultz. Helland. I Fatness. Wonstad. Under the direction of President Beverly Ewald and faculty advisor Esther Schulz, the Lutheran Students Association had a very active year. One of the highlights of the season’s programs was a candlelighting Christmas service and banquet which was held at the Lutheran church in Brcckcnridge under the student leadership of Jay Spoonheim. Later on in the winter, LSA’ers gathered at the Campus Hub for a basket social. The second largest religious group on campus, the Lutheran Students Association met regularly every two weeks at the Hub. lislher Schulz LSA Faculty Advisor Ut t erly Kicald Hoads the LSACtlumni Qssociation Holding its annual meeting of officers and alumni luncheon at Homecoming time, the alumni association began it’s forty-second year of existence this year. Mrs. Gordon Patterson took the presiding position as president while past-president Mrs. Deota RatzlafT wound up a year as head of the group. At the annual meeting Mrs. M. O. Peterson was elected vice-president, Nancy Lauder, secretary-treasurer. Many of the founders of the alumni association were present at the 1950 meeting. Several of the original group, including George Reeder, first president of the State School of Science alumni association, gathered in front of the gymnasium for an informal picture. Mrs. Hen Hatzlaff rind Mrs. (iordon Hatter son I'ast President and New President of Alumni Association Alumni (fillher in front of the gymnasium at the alumni luncheon. I.eft to right: Mrs. John A'ess. Ann Hess, Mrs. 0. M. Olson, Mr. George Herder, Mrs. John Lingo and Ruth II'hipps. 120Sck col Physician anc) School liaise Or. .4. M. Thompson Official School Physician Often unrecognized is l lie work of these two members of the administration. Always available, and fully appreciated only when needed, the school physician and the school nurse play a vital role in the lives of students. Quartered as always in the old gymnasium, the infirmary was increased in size with the arrival of the air force. Nurses arc now on duty twenty-four hours a day. Financed partly by the student fund, the services of Dr. Thompson and Nurse Connelly as they comprise the Student Health Service arc a guardian against illness or injury at Science. v Muriel Connelly. R.N. School Nurse 130faculty-Student Committees Plan Real's Social Scents Quite often working without recognition are the faculty committees which work along with the student chairman in planning social events for the students of the Science school. Here is a list of faculty committees for the year together with the name of the student chairman who headed each. Faculty rally: Miss Morris, Chairman; Mr. Adams, Mr. Barnard. Mr. Hektner, Mrs. Larsson, Miss Lauder, Mr. McMahon. Mr. Schuett. Mr. Tisdcl. Mr. Will. l omccnminy: Bill Barlow, Student Chairman, Nancy Lauder, Faculty Chairman; Mr. McMillan, Mr. Allen, Mr. Bute, Mi’s. Cameron, Mrs. Swingen, Mr. Eckre, Mr. Hokenson. Mr. Kindc, Mr. Littke, Mr. Nordgaard, Mr. Patterson, Mr. Ratzlaflf, Mr. Schuctt. HatUnce'en Hurd Times Party: Verona Vik, Student Chairman; Miss Schulz, Faculty Chairman; Mr. Allen, Mr. Eckre, Miss Hanson, Mr. Hil-gers, Mr. Hokenson, Mrs. Larsson, Mr. Mclstad, Mr. Nygaard, Mr. Ratzlaff, Mr. Sampson. Thanksyieiny Parly: I la Langseth and Lou Ann Kubc, Student Chairmen; Mr. Ekblad, Faculty Chairman; Mr. Brockmeycr, Mr. Fauss, Miss Forkner, Mr. Hoefs, Mr. Jacobson, Mr. Johnson, Mrs. Larsson. Mr. Smith, Mr. Svenkcson, Miss Walton. Christmas Formal: Leigh Leikness. Student Chairman; Mr. Ilaber-man. Faculty Chairman; Mr. Barnard, Mr. Bizal, Mr. Jacobson, Mr. Kindc, Mr. Knight, Mrs. Larsson, Mr. Nordgaard, Mr. Glenn Peterson, Mr. Ralston, Mr. Szczur. March of Dimes Parly: Sigurd Bjornstad, Student Chairman; Miss Lauder, Faculty Chairman; Mr. Allen, Miss Anderson, Mr. Barnard, Mr. Brockmeycr, Mr. Ecki-c, Mr. Fauss, Mrs. Larsson, Mr. Littke. Mr. Robertson, Mr. Wcllan. Apache Parly: Charles Flaa, Student Chairman; Mr. Hektner, Faculty Chairman; Mr. Barnard, Mr. Bute, Mr. Hokenson, Mr. Johnson. Mrs. Larsson, Mr. McMillan, Mr. Landon Peterson, Mr. Wcrrc. Senior Reception: Spriny Formal: Mr. Horton, Faculty Chairman; Mr. Barnard, Mr. Bute, Mr. Havcrty, Mr. Kindc, Mr. McMahon, Miss Morris, Mr. Ratzlaff. Miss Schulz, Mr. Szczur, Mr. Wcllan. % VGraduation day is marked with a big red circle on the mental calendar of more than 250 Science seniors whose diplomas will symbolize a credit card for work completed as well as a draft on the Bank of the Future. Blond, curly-haired Ted Erickson, who will complete his junior college work toward a degree in Arts and Sciences, is typical of the grads who smile smugly from the following pages. Ted’s name is familiar to most Science students. It tops the straight “A” honor roll posted at the end of each term. The Lowry, Minnesota boy lives in Burch hall and spends his spare time as an assistant librarian lending a friendly hand to struggling students who haven't yet solved the mysteries of the Dewey decimal system and the card catalog. J31---1------------------------------------.-------------------------;---i-i. duation £ectioh Truly a product of Science ingenuity, the new athletic building stretches its 110 by 100 feet along the cast edge of the campus. Thoughtfully planned by President E. F. Riley, Athletic Director E. YV. Bute and Science staff members who consulted with engineers and architects, the .$210,000 structure is a dream of utility and sound construction. As work progressed faculty members designed lighting, heating and plumbing features which trade students installed gaining practical experience in their fields. The neat, earth-hugging lines molded of tan brick and shiny steel arc a tangible product of dreams, hopes and a big dose of cooperation. And best of all ... it’s OURS! Athletic Ihiildinf : Dream Come True 136A 'dents emoi esi Standing: Joan J ac oh chick. Jar gen Fog. and Ted Erickson. Sealed: all-senior president Willis f.ukkcn. Taking honors this year as all-senior president is second-year printer Willis Lokkcn from Wildrose, North Dakota. Lokkcn was elected by the entire graduating class at a meeting in February. Willis automatically represents the trade school as division president also. The business school section of the State School of Science elected Joan Jacobchick of Wahpeton to represent them in the council of presidents, while Junior college students voted for blond Ted Erickson from Lowry. Minnesota. First-year certificate president is Jorgcn Fog. Secretarial training student from Lisbon, who represents the nine months business graduates. Duties of this weighty group include student planning of such affairs as Baccalaureate and Graduation. In addition they handle the arrangements for sale of graduation announcements to the class of ’51. '' The Students cl the Anderson. Keith G. Wahpeton. N. D. Pre-Commerce Baeder. Dale D. Now Rockford. NT. D. Radio Barlow. William F. Devils Lake, N. D. Printing: Barrus, Francis D. Wahpeton. N. D. Printing Bcngtson. Karl W. Fargo. N. D. Electrical Blcesc, A. Bernice Endcrlin. N. D. Commercial Bohn. Eunice Hankinson. N. D. Commercial Bold. Forrest D. McClusky. N. D. Electrical Bosscrt. Bertha Oakes. N. D. Home Ec Trade tate (yclt oci Science Buns. Marlin H. VVahpoton. N. D. Elec. Engineering Caldcrwood. Willis L Crary. N. D. Auto Mechanics Casey. Francis M. Wahpeton. N. D. Liberal Arts Christenson, Charles R Lowry. Minn. Liberal Arts Cimburck. Henry Vcblcn, S. D. Auto Mechanics Dell. Mary Ann Breckenridgc. Minn. Commercial Dohman, Doris B. Wahpeton. X. D. Commercial Elstad. Burt B. Bowbells, N. D. Printing Erickson. Dale M. New England. N. D. Electrical Trade Braun. Hardwig W. Minot. N. D. Sheet Metal Brilz. Arnold J. Richardton, X. D. Printing Brown. Holla W. Devils Lake, X. D. Radio fti 139Erickson. Theodore D. Ix vry. Minn. Liberal Arts Presents "The Ksterby. Kerniil o. Appam. N. D. Commercial Ewald. Beverly .1. Walcott, N. i). Home Economics Flu a, Charles M. Wahpeton. N. D. Liberal Arts Flaa, James Wahpeton. N. D. Pre-Commerce Frank. William H. Linton. X. D. Electrical Trade Freese. Lois M. Wyndmere. N. D. Secretarial Arts Gocllcn. Honors A. Cogswell, N. D. Commercial Guyot, Frederick H. Britton. S. D. Drafting Estimating Halverson. Jackie Tagus. N. D. Auto Body Halvorson, Morris Battle Lake. Minn. Electrical Trade Haugc, Harold O. Mayville, N. D. P.adio Trade 110I%l Cj iac)uatin(j Cl ass Heuchert, Lawrence L. Cavalier, N. D. Electrical Hi lies tad. Luverne A. Alamo, N. D. Radio Hiscock. Kenneth A. St. Cloud. Minn. Printing Hjelscth, Elmer Carrington. N. D. Auto Mech. Hoeft, Avis E. Hankinson, N. D. Home Economics Hubler, Gerald E. Ryder. N. D. Aviation Trade Hunter, Arthur W. Wahpeton. N. D. Drafting and Estimating Hutchinson, Ernest P. Ayr. N. D. Auto Mechanics Jacobchick. Joan L. Wahpeton. X. I). Commercial MlJolmsgnrd, Paul A Wahpeton. N. D. Liberal Arts Johnson. Allen D. Leonard, N. D. Electrical £eoelal Lundied ambitious Jacobson. Gene E Epping. N. D. Pre-Engineering dJtL. Johnson. Burton L. Steele, N. D. Electrical Johnson, Loran L. Fergus Falls. Minn Electrical Jungcrs. Jacqueline It Itichardton. N. D. Commercial Kcifcr, Douglas C. Warwick. N. D. Machine Shop Welding Kcranen, Judith M. Rock Lake, N. D. Commercial Kizima. Gladys J. Kief. N. D. Business Special Knapp. M. Doan Glendive. Mont. Drafting and Estimating Knoll. Vivian It. Cogswell. N. D. Commercial Kotlic. Herbert H. Fairhaven. Minn. Liberal ArtsKrause, Gertrude 13. New Effington. S. I). Secretarial Arts Kubc, Lou Ann Wahoeton. N. D. Liberal Arts Kulseth, Clayton J. Grand Forks. N. D. Radio Langscth, Ila M. Wahpeton, N. D. Home Economics LaPointe, Richard D. Pine Ridge. S. D. Drafting and Estimating Lauder. Joanna F. Wahpeton. N. D. Liberal Arts Lee. Clifford G. Lily. S. D. Printing Lconhardt, John D. Glyndon, Minn. Auto Mechanics Lindbcrg, Larry D. Lost wood. N. D. Electrical TradeIll eace nele to McClure. Arthur T. Wahpeton, X. D. Architectural Engineering McCormack. Keith Wahpeton. X. D. Commercial Miller. E. Leo Golden Valley. X. D. Printing Mitchell. Gile H. Lima. Mont. Refrigeration Moore. John M. Lari more, X. D. Printing Morin. Roman C. Dimseith. X. D. Radio Mork. Odean A. Petersburg, X. D. Radio Xelson. Argalus C. Eckman, X. D. Auto Body Ness, Paid R. Er.skine, Minn. AviationCjo On On Oile Nicnas. Warren c;. Thompson. N. I . Auto Body Oaklaml. Alina M. Cartwright. N. D. Commorcial Olson, Duane C. Devils Lake. N. D Electrical Phillips, John VV. Fargo, N. D. Liberal Arts Plum. Gordon A. Napoleon. N. D. Liberal Arts Plunkett. Donna M Bowdon. N. D. Commercial Rcttig, Robert P. Wahpeton. N. D. Drafting and Estimating Riden. James E. Pingree, N. D. Radio Rindy. Duane V. Alexander. N. D. Sheet Metal Ringdahl. Delores M. Milnor. N. D. Commercial Saewert, Ruth E. Cogswell. N. D. Commercial Scharf. Dennis M. Devils Lake. N. D. Electrical j 1-15Puttina Schultz. Charles E. Stiruni, X. D. Radio Seclhammer. Mary Jane Cogswell, N. D. Commercial Sletten, LeRoy M. Larimorc, N. D. Electrical Sorenson. James W. Carrington. X. D. Printing Spoonheim, Jay W. Brocken ridge. Minn. Pre-Commerce Stack. Jack E. Minot. X. D. Auto Body practice Scheurlng. Freda M. Barney. X. D. Commercial into Schlcnker. Myron C. Jud. N. D. Electrical Schmidt. Francis H. Fergus Falls. Minn. Electrical Steen. Norman U. Eckman. X. D. Radio Steffens. Lois Wahpeton, X. D. Commercial Stevens. James E. Sanish. X. D. Aviation 116What they lealnec) h V Sundquist, Gordon T. Forman. N. D. Printing Syvorson, Arlen Wahpcton, N. D. Commercial Thcedc. Patricia M. Fairmount, N. D. Commercial Thompson. Robert D. Cotcau, N. D. Auto Mechanics Vammen. Paul I. Luvernc, N. D. Auto Mechanics Vik, Verona E. Wahpcton, N. D. Liberal Arts Wanner. Sebastian J. Dickinson. N. D. Printing Weaver, John R. Lowry, Minn. Refrigeration Williams, LaVern E. Heaton. N. D. CommercialTIte (ytate School o| Science Burnham. Clarke H. Aberdeen, S. D. Drafting and Estimating Goet fridl. Puis A. New Salem. N. I'. Electrical Gourncau. Charles .1. Belcourt. N. D. Sheet Metal Hansen. Gordon Baudctte. Minn. Electrical Jensen. Donald H Fergus Falls. Minn. Auto Body Jensen. Fred E. Fergus Falls. Minn. Auto Body Jensen. Roland W. Wyndmcre, N. D. Sheet Metal Lennick. Albert R. Hebron. N. D. Auto Body Pfeifle. Leonard Ashley. N. D. Sheet Metal Schall. Peter Harvey. N. D. Electrical Tiegs, Arthur H. Lidgerwood. N. D. Sheet Metal White, James A. Minot. N. D. Refrigeration MSCjoldon Ci. PI urn £ditol, l%l Ccawasie A 1310 GOODBYE ... . . . with this page we end another edition of the Aguicusic, and we hope that you have enjoyed it. Accept my apologies if your name is misspelled or misplaced. Some days everything went wrong, but with the support of two wonderful advisors. Nancy Lauder and Landon Peterson, the yearbook appeared, and here it is! Next big thanks to my congenial and unbeatable staff . .. first to Clayton Kulseth, chief ad-getter and business manager. You did a swell job, Clayt. To Pat McCarty, scintillating red-head: Without your imagination and sparkling prose in the introductory sections, this Agatcasie might have remained just another book. To the whole printing department, and in particular to instructors Howard Kindc and Edward Adams: many thanks for your cooperation on every detail, for your master job of setting and printing this book, and most of all for your PATIENCE. To my fellow photographer, and chief of the sports section, Darrell Kampschror: I think your work in photography is among the finest I have seen in a yearbook. Thanks to you for sharing your ability and geniality with all of us. My special praises to all the writers on the staff. Always busy hunting up someone to help indentify a picture, or check a fact, these staff members were the people who actually put the type on the pages of the 1951 Aga-tvosic. They included Beverly Ewald, I la. Langseth, Mitch DcRosicr, Carole Edenborg, Sheila Currie, and Joanna Lauder. I tip my hat to Mr. Carrol Brown of the Greene Engraving Company, to Mr. Leo Miller of Dakota Photo Engraving, to the Globe Gazette for binding the books, and, of course, to the art department of the S. K. Smith Company for designing and executing these unique covers. For you, students, here is the 7.95 Ago wash! Read it. enjoy it. and, we hope, treasure and remember it myself ... goodbye and good luck, for this is .. the staff The £nc). . . . . . fjOl theil in valuable help in ptoducinj the Gcjawasie, the editor and stajjjj extend thanks to. . . . . . Out pafaons You will find in the following scetion. messages of interest from the grandest people in the world . . . our advertisers! R.eab ’em! Pahomze em!rr flte M it 9nteAeAti+t(f Stogie 9n Walufieto-n" THE GLOBE-GAZETTE Printing Co. Wahpeton, North Dakota A trip through the gift department at the Globe-Gazette is always a fascinating experience. It's the gift headquarters for exclusive gifts in Wahpeton and Brecken-ridge. You'll find a complete line of greeting cards and party goods. Art Hnsch, Sylvia Wanda hi, Hob Lovell and Joan Jacobchick watch the Globe-Gazette's Hay IV. John-son demonstrate an A. H. Dick mimeograph. • A. B. DICK MIMEOGRAPHS • GENERAL FIREPROOFING ALL-STEEL EQUIPMENT AND BERGER STEEL OFFICE FURNITURE • PRINTING • GENERAL OFFICE SUPPLIESAuthorized Buick Service Station MONARCH MAYTAG Home Appliances | Washing Machines RCA ! Stoves Radios ; I.H C. Refrigerators GOODYEAR McCORMICK-DEERING Tires Tractors Accessories and Oils J Implements and Repairs I. E. LILLEGARD, INC. 70S DAKOTA A VIC. PHONIC 3621 For Style Without Extravagence It's LIEBER'S IN WAHPETON STORE OF THE WELL - DRESSED lire Kir aid. Pat McCarty and Jo I.under admire S S S COED the tine selection of ladies' fashions at lAeher’s in II 'alipeton.Looking your best means service from BON-E-MAE We specialize in speed and offer four-hour service if desired. A W Mercury Cleaning Vnit Hal {locking S lea in Finishing {nurds BON-E-MAE Cleaners Phone 573 WAHPETON, N. D. W Student Hist Courses arc listed according In the following key: AH—Aula Hody lie pair Acclg—Accounting Adv Stcno—Advanced Stenography AM—Auto Mechanics Arts—Liberal Arts Aria—Aviation H 1‘rac—Husiness Practice DE—Drafting and Estimating Elec—Electrical Eng—Engineering CM—Ceneral Mechanics Home Ec—Home Economics Jr Col—Junior College MS—Machine Shop P Com—Pre-Commerce Plum—Plumbing Print—Printing Uadio—Radio Trades lief rig—Ref rigeration Sec —Secretarial II Sec Trng—Secretarial Training SM—Sheet Metal Steno—Stenography W—Welding PN—Pradical IS'ursin g ic ☆ ☆ Aalgaard, Leonard Hannaford ......................... DE Abrahamson, Alice—Akra .................. See Trng Albertson. Donald—Cando . ...AB Aldrich. Duane—Perham. Minn. ...................... Radio Ailsop. Joe -Fergus. Minn. ... AB Amussen, Donald- -Lead. S. Dak. ......................... AB Anderson. Beverly—Endcrlin ............... Acctg. OP Anderson. Eugene R.- Endcrlin ......................... DE Anderson. Eugene J.—Larimorc ......................... DE Anderson. Joan—Wahpeton ................Acctg. A- OP Anderson. Keith—Wahpeton .................... P Com Anderson, Ix ran—Lisbon ...Acctg Anderson. Norman—Kenneth. Minn ......................... AM Anderson. Roland—Lake City. S. D ....................... Elec Anderson. Sally—Brec'nridge.Minn. ...................Sec Trng Armstrong. Lloyd—Fargo---Avia Atwood, William—Tuttle...CM Ault. Russel—HenaeJ .......am Axclson. Allen—Fordville.AB Bacdcr, Dale—New Rockford ...................... Radio Baish. Rueben—Hazcn .....Eloc Balccr. Leo—Glondivc, Mont...AM Bailer. Robert—Fergus Falls. Minn ........................ Elec Ballwcbcr. Duane—Reeder .... AB Banish. William—Midwest. Wyo. ....................Arch Engr Thanks... For the very fine patronage we have enjoyed during the past year from the students and faculty of the STATE SCHOOL OF SCIENCE VALLEY THEATER Wahpeton RIDGE THEATER Breckenridgc | m E TWe Thank You For Your Paironage During the Past Year SUPPLIES TOOLS • BOOKS We Are Always Ready to Serve You • FOUNTAIN SERVICE • LUNCHES Campus Hub 151TEMPCON INC. Northwests Most Complete Stock of REFRIGERATION and HEATING Supplies Wholesale Only 336 E. Lake Street Minneapolis, Minn. ☆ ☆ ☆ Congratulations To The Class Of '51 PENNEYS Corky Lei kite.sx Winter Formal Chairman ☆ ☆ 1951 STUDENT LIST Barenthsen. Alvin Powers Ijike ......................... CM Barlow, William—Devils I akc ...................... Print Barrus, Francis—Wahpeton ...................... Print Barthcl. Sylvester Colva ...Klee Bartholomay. Marlys -Wahpeton .....................Home Ec Bart ness. Roger Dilworth, Minn. ......................... DE Bata. Joseph Dresden.......AM Baur, Carl—Pembina........Elec Baumann. Donald Fessenden .AM Becker, Harry Glendive. Mont. ........................ DE Becker. Marcus Anamoose .. .AM Bcine. Keith Reynolds......CM Bell. Arthur Rugby........ Flee Bengtson. Karl—Fargo..... Elec Berg. Ix roy C. Campbell. Minn. ........................Acctg Berg. Richard A. Hillsboro ..CM Berg. Vernon J. Wahpeton . .SM Bcrgloff. Raymond Center ..Avia Berndt. Eugene—Hankinson ..................... Refrig Beutow, Glenn— Codington. S. Dak.................... AM Bey, Henry Brcckenridge. Minn. ....................... Radio Biggs. George Hankinson ... Elec Bitz. Joseph —Braddock.....Elec Bjork. Maynard Montpelier . .AB Bjornscth, Philip -Fargo ....Elec Bjornstad, Sigurd Cando----GM Blair. Jim -Williston...P Com Blair, William—Maida.........AM Blccsc. Bernice—Endcrlin ..Acctg Blessum. Gordon—Edmore------SM Blickcnsderfcr, Kurt—Mott ..AM Boedtghcimcr. Anthony—Petersburg ....................... SM Bohlig, John—Minncwauken . .Elec Bohn. Eunice—Hankinson ..................Acctg OP Men's Clothing and Shoes See Us for Styling and Value RUBERTUS Clothing Co. Wahpeton, N. I). FLOWERS For All Occasions Anniversaries Weddings Baskets Sprays Funerals Birthdays Pottery WAHPETON FLORAL COMPANY A. W. EDENBORG 802 Dak. Ave. Dial 3171 155 and to ask you to come in S get acquainted and use the service that our bank offers this community. to remind you that you will very probably have need for banking service after you graduate THE CITIZENS NATIONAL BANK Wahpeton Established 1S91 North Dakota Member FDIC LILLEGARD CHEVROLET, INC, Telephone 561 Wahpeton, North Dakota Chevrolet Cars and Trucks Midwest Bodies St. Paul Hoists Anthony Dumps Hi Way Trailers ) J. I. Case Farm Machinery Craham-Holmc Plows Dual Loader-Stacker Goodyear Tires Martin Motors 156GLEASON'S Your Friendly Variety 5c to $1.00 Store 517 Dakota Ave. OLSON'S Slyle Center THOMPSON FARLOW SMART STYLES AT LOWEST PRICES lleverly Eiutld Journalist and Homecoming Queen 1951 STUDENT LIST Bohn. Gray don—Great Bend ...................... Kef rig Bold. Forrest -McClusky---Klee Bold. Kenneth—McClusky .. .Print Bonaime, Raymond—Neche .. .AM Bosch. Peter—Knox.............AB Bossert. Bertha- Oakes .Home Ec Bouldcn, Keith—Larimorc ....AM Braaten. Newman Wyndmere ........................... AM Brackhaus. Margaret—White Rock. S. Dak.............Prac Nurse Bradford. Emil Belcourt...AB Braun. Hardwig—Minot .....SM Braun. Odell —Breckenridgc. Minn...............Elec Engr Brenk, Dennis- -Wohpeton--DE Brilz. Arnold -Richardton ...Print Briskc, Bernard—Fosston, Minn. ........................ Radio Broadland. Russell—Breckenridgc. Minn....................... AM Brooks. Jack—Detroit Lakes. Minn. ............Acctg Bus Prac Brown, Robert—Wllliston .... AM Brown. Rolla—Devils Lake .Radio Brummond. Mavis—Hankinson ................... Bus Spec Bruncau. Arlene—Breckenridgc. Minn................ Home Ec Buehlcr. Lewis Oberon.........GM Bunnis. Bennie—Detroit I.Akos. Minn....................... AM Buraas. Roseamond Kempton .................... Home Ec Buresh, Albert—Manning ............. St Acctg Si OP Burke. Alton—Wahpeton ...Print Burnham. Clarke—Aberdeen. S. Dak......................DE Buus. Martin—Wahpeton ...................Elec Engr Byrnes. Robert—Williston ............Acctg Bus Prac Calderwood. Willis—Crary ... .AM Campbell. Robert—Casselton Acctg Bus Prac Harry Olson Arnold Olson Wahpeton N. Dak. Phone 3771 SirhlauJi (County jFarmrr-(gliilu Published by E. DONALD LUM 1). ELDON LUM NORTH DAKOTA'S GREATEST COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER Wahpeton, N. 1). m I £ i IMany Science students became acquainted with the facilities of Radio Station K ft MU' throuyh their participation in Student Broadcast Club activities. Here several of the club members rehearse their parts in one week’s show. Left to right are: Cordon I’lum. Alvina Stone. Stanley .Xicliols, Ogden Rovdokken. Ha l.angseth. and Mitch DeRosier. Ii's . . . M W BRECKENRIDGE WAHPETON ON 1450 FOR Onihe Scene —SPORTS Y our F avorile — MUSIC Local, Regional and National — NEWS 138Willis Lokken All-Senior President ☆ ☆ 1951 STUDENT LIST Canham, Claire -Wahpeton ..........Acctg Bus Prac Carlson. Glenn—Condo, S. Dak. .......................... SM Carr. Ted—Wahpeton .............Acctg Bus Prac Casey. Francis—Wahpeton .. .Arts Chaput. Denis—Langdon ..Refrig Christensen, Arnct—Wahpeton ........................ Elec Christenson. Charles—Lowry. Minn.................... Arts Clmburek. Henry—Veblcn, S. Dak. ......................... AM Clark. Wiona—Fairview, Mont. .......... Steno—Aectg OP Clemen. Louis—Bristol. S. Dak. .......................... SM Cochran. Richard—Midwest. Wyoming .................. AM Common. Keith—Wahpeton ..Arts Corbett. Cecil- Cannon Ball .. .DE Cote. Theresa—Thorne .............Steno Acctg OP Cottor. Roy—Sidney. Mont. . .Print Craft, Clifford—Detroit Lakes. Minn...................... DE Culp. Murl—New Rockford ..Avia Cummins, Patrick--Portal ...Elec Currie. Sheila—New Westminster. BC ....................... Arts Dahl. John—Williston.........AB Danielson. Arden—Fosston. Minn. ....................... Print Danielson. Clarence—Watford City .......................... CM Daugherty. Gerald—Fordvillc .AB Daugherty. Luther—Fergus Falls. Minn...................... AB Davis. Lois—Forman Minn............Steno. Acctg. OP DcKrcy, Phillip—Pcttlbonc--AM Dell. Mary Anne—Breckenridge, Minn..............Steno. Acctg. OP Dell. Terence—Breckenridge. Minn. ....................Elec Engr 1.10 One sure way to keep contact with "your school i through the State School of Science Alumni Association. With membership in the association, which is open to every student that has attended SSS one |u:u-tcr or longer, you will receive the I) a to hi Seim list regularly along with publications of the association Dues of $1.00 per year are due each September first. Join now! North Dakota State School of Science ALUMNI ASSOCIATION You'll Want to Remember Your College Days . . .Attention! BEFORE YOU BUY — INVESTIGATE — GET THE FACTS We Sell and Install Everything Needed for Power or Heating Plants Bros Boilers For Any Pressure For Any Service Wntertufoc— Return Tubular— Firebox Bros Slokers J£ We Manufacture and Install Larsen's Plunger Slokers for Homes - Churches - Schools - Greenhouses - Laundries - Holds - Stores Office Puddings - Etc. Rum Dakota Lignite Efficiently and Economically by Use of Proper Lignite Equipment FOLLOWING ARE SOME OF OUR LIGNITE BURNING INSTALLATIONS: State Capital—Bismarck State Hospital—Jamestown State Mill Klevalor—Grand Forks State Penitentiary—Bismarck State College—Fargo Soldiers Home—Lisbon Mercy Hospital—Valley City Trinity Hospital—Minot Trinity Hospital—Jamestown Cass County Home—Fargo High School—Minot Horace Mann School Fargo Clara Barton School Fargo Jefferson School—Fargo Shotwell Floral Co.—Fargo Veterans Hospital—Fargo Veterans Hospital—Minot Armour Co.—West Fargo Richholt School—Bismarck St. Lukes Hospital—Fargo Universal Building—Fargo Ottcrtail Power Co.—Harvey Jamestown Steam Laundry— Jamestown Municipal Power Plant—Valley City Cass County Courthouse—Fargo Northern States Power Co.—Grand Forks Northern States Power Co.—Minot Northern States Power Co.—Fargo City of Fargo Water Plant Fargo Sewage Disposal Plant—Fargo Jamestown Water Works—Jamestown Ward County Courthouse—Minot Cass-Clay Creamery—Moorhead Central High School—Watertown Woodrow Wilson School—Fargo Ottcrtail Power Co.—Devils Lake State Teachers College -Mayville State School of Science Wahpeton State School for Deaf Devils Lake Normal Sc Ind. College—Ellendatc University of N. D.—Grand Forks Municipal Power Plant—Moorhead State School of Forestry—Bottineau State Teachers College—Valley City State Training School—Mandan State Teachers College—Minot State Sanitorium—San Haven Bridgeman Creameries—Grand Forks Mandan Creamery and Produce Co. Minot True Food Dehydrators--E. Grand Forks American Crystal Sugar—E. Grand Forks American Crystal Sugar Co.— Moorhead North American Creamery Co.— Oakes Russcll-Millcr Milling Co.—Minot Russcll-Miller Milling Co.- Valley City Northern Normal In. School— Aberdeen Siebrecht Floral Co.—Aberdeen Muncipal Power Plant—Water-town. S. D. Dakota Public Service Co.—Ellen-dale N. D. Concrete Products—Bismark Bismarck Hospital—Bismarck North American Creamery Co.— Carrington State Teachers College—Dickinson WRITE or THOSE — Further Information and Quotations Gladly Furnished Without Obligation Lignite Combustion Engineering Corporation BISMARCK Established 19 IS Phone 107 NORTH DAKOTA 160GILLES THEATER SHOWING THE LATEST AND BEST IN MOTION PICTURES Wahpeton BROWN'S RELIABLE CLEANERS Phone 3681 LAUNDROMAT Half-hour Laundry Phone 610 Across from Post Office Wahpeton Your Patronage is Appreciated Eddie Solve General Mechanics Cabinet Representative ☆ ☆ ☆ 1951 STUDENT LIST DcRosicr, Joe Braincrd, Minn. ........................Print Dcttler, Joan Langdon, ...........Stcno, Si Sec Trng Dick, Meryln—Nckoma,. Avia Kngr Diemert. Leonard—Sanborn. .Print Dietz, Richard—Wahpeton ...........Acctg Bus Prac Dirkscn, Harold Condc. S.Dak. ...................... Refrig Dohman. Charles Wahpeton ................... Klee Engr Dohman. Doris Wahpeton .............Stcno, Acctg. OP Dolan, Jim Williston.....P Com Donnan. Jane Campbell ............ Stcno. Acctg. OP Donnelly, James F.—Miles City, Mont.................... Avia Donnelly. Jerome—Ray.......Elec Dow. Charles—Glyndon. Minn. ........................ Elec Dueffert. Herman—Wahpeton ....................... Print DuMont. Pete Williston......SM Echternach. Marlys—Wheaton, Minn.........................PN Echternach, Marlys—Wheaton, Minn............ Prac. Nurse Edcnborg, Carole—Wahpeton .Arts Edcnborg, Joanne—Wahpeton ...............Jr. College Spec Edwards. Edward—’Wolverton. Minn................ Rcfrig. Ehrens, Rudolph—Dwight ....AM Eirikson. Howard—Edinburg ..AM Eliassen. Kcrmit—Grenora ... SM Elkins. Thomas—Regan .....Elec Ellingson, Darell—Rosholt, S. D. ......................... AM Elstad, Burt—Bowbells ... Print Emery, Lyle—Bottineau.....AM Engebrctson. Donald—Frazec, Minn....................Elec Engel, Loren—Vclva..........GM Hollhusen Bros. GRASS FIELD GARDEN SEEDS “Our Deliveries Make Friends” Phone 31 11 Wahpeton, North Dakota Sturdevant's Auto Electric Wholesale Automotive Parts Wheel Aligning and Frame Straightening Service Magneto Parts Service Carburetion and Motor Tune-up Phone 53 1 Wahpeton X. Dak. 161A Complete Photographic Service . . . PORTRAITS PHOTO FINISHING COMMERCIAL THE JOHNSON STUDIO Carlyle M. Johnson, Photographer Wahpclon, North Dakota Try the Rexall Store First For Your Drug Store Needs WAHPETON DRUG COMPANY B. C. Thompson, Prop. • Ford • Mercury • Lincoln • Massey-Harris Farm Machinery The Ford for ‘if is l ic object of the admiration of Herb Kothe, Hill Itanish, and Jack Mcftar. STOUT MOTOR COMPANY Dial 546 — Wahpeton Sales Service Auto Body Dept. Radiator Dept. 162THE NATIONAL BANK Wahpcton, N. 1). Home Owned and Operated Capital .........$75,000 Surplus_________$150,000 Member of the K.D.I.C. HYDE'S School Supplies - Ice Cream Pop - Candy - Tobacco Groceries - Lunches BRONSON CLOTHING COMPANY The men’s store of Breck-enridge would like to meet you personally; drop in at your first opportunity and acquaint yourself with this fine store. Breckenridge, Minn. KELLY'S DINER 50.000 Capacity 26 at a time Located at 707 Dakota Avc. New Part of Town A. C. KELLY. Prop. Dean Knapp Synonymous with Sports ☆ ☆ ☆ 1951 STUDENT LIST Erdahl, Jerry Ypsilnnti ...Kefrig Erickson. Dale—New England ....................... Elec Erickson. Theodore—Lowry. Minn. ....................... Arts Estcrby, Kcrmit—Appam ............Acctg Bus Prac Ewald, Beverly Walcott Home Ec Ewcrt. Arthur—Nashua. Minn. ........... Acctg Bus Prac Falstad. Gary—Garrison ... Print Fcdjc, Arliss—Milnor.....Avia Felber, Donald—Rothsay. Minn. ....................... Avia Foser. Richard—Glen Ullin...Elec Fettig. Clinton Killdccr__ AM Ficck, Robert—Dickinson.. .Radio Finstuen. Ralph—Bin ford--AM Fisher. Thcophil—Lehr.....AM Flaa. Charles—Wahpcton ... Arts Flaa. James C.—Wahpcton P Com Flaa. Douglas—Wahpcton . .P Com Flohr. Bob Dickinson.....Print Fog. Jorgcn—Lisbon .............Acctg Bus Prac Foltz. Pius—Grand Forks .... SM Forness. Lloyd—Trail. Minn. . AB Fortin. Henry—Devils Lake .Print Foss. Harold—Devils Lake .. .Elec Foster. Blake Amenta ......AM Foster. Robert—Grnndin ....CM Foster. Wallace—Pingree .. Print Frank. William—Linton ....Elec Franz, Emmanual—Hankinson ....................... Elec Frederick. William—Belcourt . AB Freeze. Lois—Wyndmcrc----Arts Frcitag, Donald—Breckenridge, Minn .................... AB Friton, Hjalmer—Sleepy Eye. Minn ...................... Print Fun far, Raymond—Wahpcton ...............Acctg £ Bus Prac Gafkjen. Arvid—Alamo ..... DE Cange. I awronce—Berwick ... DE PHILLIPS "66" (bis—Oil—Greasing Flushing and Washing can altcai s do heller at Hraun's" Phone 1151 Wahpcton Braun's Super Service Congratulations ... 1951 Seniors Farmers S Merchants State Bank Phone 226 Breckenridge Minn. Shoes Get Sick. Too— But there's a sure cure AT WAHPETON SHOE HOSPITAL Repairing—Shine WESTROM'S MARKET QUALITY MEATS AT FAIR PRICES Cleanliness - Quality Service 320 Dakota Avenue 16.1Charles Miniteman, Joan Hahennan. Ilarliara Hale-man anil Orville Fenske natch the sanitary bottling ei uipinent in operation at the H II' plant in Hreckcnridyc. B W DAIRY LAWRENCE KROHN, Prop. Pasteurized Milk and Cream BRECKENRIDGE. MINN. 164The Motor Oil Company Your Friendh Neighbor Stop at our complete Immper-to-bumper service station for lubrication needs. We are equipped to handle all makes of cars and trucks, able and ready to render complete and satisfactory service. Fill your car with Pure Pep Solvenized gasoline and Pure Lube motor oil. Enjoy the peak performance of quality products. Our complete line of accessories will take care of all your motoring needs. Remember— You Cun A lieu 1 8 “HE SURE W ITH CURE" Yale Tires and Tubes Batteries Tire Repair Service Phone 3121 Doris Herrick A Queen’s Attendant A ☆ A 1951 STUDENT LIST Gartner. Gerald Brocken ridge Minn....................Print Caulrapp, towel 1 — Breckenridgc Minn................... Radio Geir. Clarence—Edinburg ... Elec. Gierke. Larry—Moorhead. Minn. ........................ Avia Gilles. Elizabeth Battle Lake, Minn...................... DE Gilles. Robert—Wahpeton ..PCom Gillig. Solomon—Harvey-----AM Glad. Elton Lancaster, Minn AM Glum. Joseph Bismarck......AM Gocllcn. Honors Cogswell ............ Steno, Aectg. OP Goetzfridt. Pius New Salem .................... Elec Trade Gobi, Wilhelm—Aberdeen. S. Dak. ......................... SM Courneati. Charles Belcourt . SM Gowen. Robert—Oslo. Minn. .. AM Grage, Donald—Fergus Falls. Minn...................Print Grcb. Sidney—Dazey ......Elec- Green. Edmund—Hankinson ..Elec Grueneieh. Alvin Ashley .... SM Gruenich. Leo Ashley ....... SM Cudrncstad. Robert Glcnwood Minn......................DE Gumeringer. Glen Esmond .. Elec Guvot. Frederick- Britton. S. Dak. ........................... DE Haaland. Stanfield -Cooperstown .......................... GM Haas. Frank Lofor .......... GM Hagge. Donald- Alamo .... Radio Hagstrom, John- Lowry. Minn ...................Elec Engr. Haiberg. Oris- Crosby ...... AB Halverson. Jackie—Tagus----AB Halvorson, Morris—Battle toko, Minn.....................Elec Handlos, Grant—Sherwood .. .AM Hansen. Basil—Mott .............Acctg Bus Prac Hansen. Gordon—Baudette, Minn. ..........................Elec. Wedding Announcements • Reception Cards A At Home Cards A Printed Napkins A Fancy Deluxe Plain A All Types .Ay X Fast Delivery VALLEY Printing Co. It reckon ridge PuhUthert of the GAZETTE-TELEGRAM 165MEET YOUR FRIENDS ---AT -- Hotel Wahpeton THEO. F. STELTEN, Mgr- Cocktail Lounge Coffee Shop SCENE—The Campus Hub ....... CAST OF CHARACTERS____Boxers hochel, Brooks, Knapp ana eitenheimer ALL TOGETHER—Say. that's real refreshment—Mission Beverages MISSION BEVERAGES—Distributed by Hausauer Bottling Co., Wahpeton 166167Wahpeton's Finest ■ . . Good Food Better Service MAKERS OF HOME-MADE CANDIES AND ICE CREAM After the Theater or Party Visit the Del Rio Miller Pharmacy Corner Drug Store Compliments of "Two Friendly Stores" WAHPETON, N. DAK. C. V. RAMSTAD, Prop. • COMPLETE SODA FOUNTAIN • LUNCHEON SERVICE • AIR CONDITIONING • CLEAN • COOL • COMFORTABLE Jlin+t l.inn’s is a popular spot icilli Science students in tlieir free hours. Enjoying 11 treat at f.inn's are Howard Uctland, Sheila Currie. .1 farlys llartholoinay. and llerh hot he. cAaSlSlU, 168"Largest Greenhouse in the Two Cities" MEHL'S Flower Shop and Greenhouse Deliveries twice daily to Wahpelon and Breckenridge Phone 118 BRECKENRIDGE HOPPERT'S Wahpeton Plumbing £ Heating Co. HARDWARE PLUMBING HEATING TIMKEN Oil Burners and Stokers Waterman Waterbury Furnaces DUOTHERM Oil Heaters Furnaces WAHPETON, N. D. Phone 4241 BRECKENRIDGE, MINN. Phone 70 Don Mitchell Homecoming: King V 1951 STUDENT LIST Hanson. Arthur—Hankinson ,.AB Hanson, Gerald—Fargo .... Print Hanson. Homell—Hamar-----AB Hanson, John—Beach .......DE Harrison. Carl Butler. Minn. .AB Hass. Edward- -Valley City ..................Eicc Engr Hauge. Harold—Mayvllle ...Radio Haugo, Evan—Aneta.......Elec Hauser. Frank—Bismarck ...Print Hawley. Donald—Underwood .AM Hay. Wesley—Raub..........SM Hcglc, Manley—Gwlnncr .... Print Heine, Oscar—Hazcn......Elec Hclsc, Donald—Ryder ......AB Helsc. James—Ryder........AB Hclgcrson. Mrs. Marine—McIntosh. S. Dak..............Home Ec Hclgcrson. Russell—McIntosh. S. Dak...................AM Hclland, Howard—Hannaford ..................... Radio Henderson. Dale—Lowry. Minn. ...................... Ref rig Henjum. Bonnie—Breckenridge. Minn..........Steno—Acctg—OP Hermes. Richard—Moorcton .Arts Herrick. Doris—Breckenridge. Minn............Steno—Acctg—OP Hestdalcn. Dcolyn—Abercrombie ...................Pre Nurse Heuchert. Lawrence—Cavalier ........................ Elec Hillcstad, Luvernc—Alamo .Radio Hillcstad. Orlic—Alamo ....AB Hinrichs. Eilert—Tower City .............Acctg Bus Prac Hiscock. Kenneth—St. Cloud. Minn. ...................... Print Hjalmcr, Glenn—Rosholt, S. Dak. ......................Pre-Ed Hjelscth.Elmer—Carrington . .AM Hjclseth, Mrs. Esther—Carrington ........... Acctg Bus Prac Hodapp. Myron—Glasgow, Montana..................Radio Dr. George Murray Dr. Walter Helland DENTISTS Citizens’ National Bank Bldg. Office Phone 553 JACK H. PFISTER H. H. PFISTER DENTISTS Pfister Bldg. Phones 631 — 581 GRINDY'S Richland Wilkin Creamery Co. CREAM EGGS POULTRY GRINDY'S Quality Pasteurized Butter Milk Cream 169DAKOTA MOTORS DODGE DESOTO PLYMOUTH New and Used Cars Repairs and Accessories, Dodge Job Rated Trucks Alemite Oils and Greases, Body and Engine Repairs Phone till Wahpeton, N. Dak. SCHMITT and OLSON Armstrong Linoleums — Venetian Blinds Window Shades FUNERAL CHAPEL AMBULANCE SERVICE Vic Peterson, Mortician Lady Assistant VA 11 PKTON, NORTII DA KOTA Day Dial 3577 Night Dial 3578, 3341 MORTH americak IN CREAMERIES, INC. CAMPUS HUB fountain specialties are always a favorite with SSS students such as Virginia Kaatz. Donald Wasness. Dick Johnson and Carole Edenborg because they're made with ARVILLA BRAND quality ice cream—the best money can buy. Rich, creamy and delicious. Arvilla Brand Quality Foods are produced by NORTH AMERICAN Creameries. Inc. North American is the leading creamery organization in the Upper Midwest and serves the State School of Science through its offices in WAHPETON, N. D. 170Where You Are Entertained Twice a Week Dancing to The Top Bands of the Midwest AMERICAN LEGION PAVILLION rSreckenridge, Minnesota Lou Ann Kubr Attendant. Party Chairman ☆ • 1951 STUDENT LIST Hocft. Avis Han Kin son ................... Home Ec Hod. Donald Christine .............Acctg Bus Prac Hoff. Lorainc Willow City ........... Stcno—Acctg—OP Hofticzcr. Robert—Castlewood, S. Dak................... AB Hoksina, Stephen Fort Totten .............Acctg Bus Prac Holcomb. Stanley- -Luverne ...................Avia Engr Holm. Harold —Mayvillo....Elec Holte. Carl—Whitman.........CM Horst. Raymond—Elgin .....EIcc Hovdenes. Jerome—Hamar-----AB Howe, Warren—Vclva..........CM Hubler. Gerald—Ryder......Avia Hummel. Carlyle—Coleharbor ..................... Rcfrig Hunter. Arthur—Wahpeton ... DE Hurley. Harold—Walhalla----AM Hutchinson, Ernest—Ayr ____AM Hutchinson. Paul—Kempton ..................... Rcfrig Ihland. Betty—Abercrombie .................... Home Ec Ihland. Sally—Abercrombie .................... Home Ec Indcrgaard. LcRoy New Rockford ........................ Elec Infold. Harold—Fordville---EIcc Iszler, Harry—Streeter ....AM Jacobchick. Beverly—Wahpeton ........... Stcno— Acctg OP Jacobchick. Joan Wahpeton ........... Stcno Sec Trng Jacobson. Arthur —Valley City ....................... Print Jacobson. Gene- Epping . Pre-Eng Jaff, Robert—Cleveland.....EIcc Jensen. Donald—Fergus Falls. Minn...................... AB Jensen. Fred—Fergus Falls. Minn. ............................ AB GAFFANEY'S G17 1st A vc. No. FARGO, NO. DAK. • Royal Typewriters •' Office Supplies Dictaphones • Acme Visible Systems Rebuilt Typewriters ’ Steel Desks • Office Desks, Chairs Stationery Office Safes • ALSO SHAW-WALKER FILING EQUIPMENT 171Northland Electric Supply Company WHOLESALE ELECTRICAL DISTRIBUTORS OF QUALITY ELECTRIC MERCHANDISE 307-311 South Fifth Street Minneapolis 15, Minn. SHIRLEY-ONSTAD, INC. Wholesale Distributors or KOHLER of KOHLER-BRIGGS BEAUTYWARE WAYNE HOME APPLIANCE PLUMBING and HEATING WHOLESALERS FARGO MINOT LEACH and GAMBLE COMPANY Wholesale Distributors of LA FENDRICH CIGARS CIGARETTES CANDY LIBBY'S AND PLEE-ZING FOOD PRODUCTS FRESH VEGETABLES AND FRUIT Leach and Gamble Company Established 1806 WAHPETON NORTH DAKOTA 172Now is the Time to start thinking about your ad in THE 1952 AGAWASIE Don't overlook this opportunity. Have your advertising plans ready when the advertising representative of the 1952 Agawasie calls upon you. The 1952 Agawasie is the only means of reaching the entire campus community with a single ad. -No other campus publication accepts advertising. Clayton Kulseth Student Cabinet Proxy ☆ ☆ ☆ 1951 STUDENT LIST THE 1952 AGAWASIE “Something New And Different." Chuck Coughlan's Coast to Coast Store • Auto Accessories • Sporting Goods • Paint • Appliances • Furniture • Supplies • Housewares • Tools • Hardware In Wahpeton's New Loop District Jensen, Poland—Wyndmcrc ...SM Johnsgard, Paul -Wahpeton .Arts Johnson, Alice Jane -Grafton .................. See Arts Johnson. Allen—Leonard ....Elec Johnson, Arlene—Wahpeton ..................Home Ec Johnson. Burton—Steele ....Elec Johnson, Clyde—Bowdon ....CM Johnson, Curtis—Felton, Minn. .......................... CM Johnson, Edward—Colcharbor ...................... Refrig Johnson, Ellwood—Lowry, Minn. ........................ Arts Johnson, Gerald—Lankin ___GM Johnson, Joseph--Dunscith ..Elec Johnson, Loran—Fergus Falls. Minn.................... Elec Johnson, Lyle—Annandalc, Minn. .......................... AB Johnson, Morris—Fessenden ..AB Johnson, Odell—Wahpeton ...AM Johnson, Ole—Larson ..Refrig Johnson, Omar—Fairdale...AB Johnson. Richard—Grand Forks ....................... Radio Johnson, Vcrtis—Lowry. Minn. .......................... AM Juarez, Oswald Drayton....AB Jungcrs, Jacqueline—Richardton ...........Adv Steno See Trng Kaatz. Virginia- Wahpeton ................... Sec Trng Kahler. Wesley—Goodrich ....AM Kampschror, Darrell- Glcndivc, Mont.....................Elec Kampschror, Leslie- Glendive. Mont...............Arch Engr Kassa, Joseph—Hankinson ... .AM Kavanaugh. Thomas—Crary .Avia Kechtcr, Ronnie Midwest. Wyo. .......................... AM Kecch, Delos Wahpeton ................... Elec Engr Keeler. Ruth—Driscoll ...............Steno O. P. “Everything for the Car’ 0. H. MARTINSON Owner Brecken ridge, Minn. SEIFERT'S JEWELRY ☆ SILVERWARE A- DIAMONDS ☆ WATCHES Wahpeton, N. D. 178VERTIN FURNITURE COMPANY WAHPETON, N. D. Fat Theede. John Phillips. Virginia Kant: and Beverly Jaeobchick relax in the comfortable surroundings of the Vertin Furniture show floor. For your own home furnishing needs you will find this area's outstanding selection at the VERTIN Furniture Company 174FARM and HOME STORE • HARDWARE and HOUSEWARES • GUNS and AMMUNITION • FISHING TACKLE AGENCY FOR JOHNSON SEAHORSE MOTORS 320 Dakota Ave. Wahpeton. No. Dak. WAHPETON PAINT and GLASS CO. Phone 4108 Wahpeton, N. D. NOVETZKE MATERIAL CO. PHONE 3378 All Materials for Your Building Needs GLASS PAINTS WALLPAPER 1951 STUDENT LIST Kelley. James—Milaca, Minn. . .AB Kellogg:. Calvin—Fairmount .Arts Kelly. Richard—Wahpeton .P-Com Kelly. Terrance—Fort Yates ................Acctg Bus Prac Kcltgcn, C. William—Fargo .Radio Kennedy. Ward—Berlin .....Elec Kerancn, Judith—Rock Lake .........Steno. Acctg O. .P Kessel. Donald—Dickinson ... Elec Kelfcr. Douglas Warwick .........................MS W Kiesz. Rueben—Brcckcnridge. Minn ............................ Avia Kizinm. Gladys—Kief ... Bus-Specl Klein. Kenneth—Center ...P-Com Klicn, Ronald—Breckenrldge Minn. ..........Acctg Bus Pract Klclngartncr, Ervin—McClusky ............................Print Knapp. Dean—Glendive Mont. .............................. DE Knie. Donald —Breckenrldge. Minn. ..........Acctg Bus Prac Knocpfle. Dewain--Bottineau .AM Knoll. Vivian—Cogswell .........Steno. Acctg O. P. Kochel. Timothy—Bentley---AM Kohlman. Eugene—Anamoose ........................... P-Com Koistincn. Wilbert—Devils Lake ............................ Elec Koppelman. Gladys—Breckcnridgc. Minn....Adv Steno Sec Trng Korll. Geralyn—Flensburg, Minn. ......................... Arts Dick Kelly 1051 Cage Captain £ $ Kothe. Herbert—Fairhavcn. Minn. ....................... Arts Kosojed, Harold- Grafton . . Radio Kozojed, James -Cummings ..GM Krantz. Byron—Kenmarc ............Acctg Bus Prac Krause. Gertrude—New EfTington. S. Dak................Sec Arts Kristjanson. Sigurbjorn Crystal .............................Refrig Krogh. Nels—Williston ....Elec Krueger. Glen -Breckcnridgc. Minn......................AM Krug, Nicholas—Regent .....AB Krump, Marilyn—Wahpeton .................Prac Nurse Kube, Lou Ann—Wahpeton ..Arts Kuehn. Kenneth—Breckcnridgc Minn...................Arts Kulseth, Clayton—Grand Forks ..................... Radio Kunz, Dallas—Bowdon .......AM Kusper. Adeline- Karlsruhe ................... Home Be Kupser, Katrcna Bergen ................... Home Ec Kurtz. Norma—Fairmont ................... Home Ec Kuschel, Richard—Hebron ..Print Kutter. Lloyd—Hankinson ..Radio Lambourn. Lawrence Reeder ................... Elec Engr Lamprccht. John—New England ......................... Elec Langen. Percy—Kennedy. Minn. ........................... AM Langcndorfcr. Wendell- Wahpeton ........................... GM Igmgseth. Ila—Wahpeton ....................Home Ec I ingseth. Verle—Breckcnridgc, Minn....................... GM LaPlante. Lois—Binford .......... Steno Acctg O. P. LaPointe, Richard—Pine Ridge. S. Dak......................DE 175176 POSSESSING AN EARNEST BESIRE TO COOPERATE Bristol DISTRIBUTING COMPANY 119 N. 1 . Avenue Phone 5851 FARGO. NORTH DAKOTA 20 North Dakotas Largest Distributors Of Radio Darts £■ Supplies OF CUSTOMER SATISFACTION •6 ☆ ☆ 1951 STUDENT LIST LaRose. Wally Williston ...........Acctg Bus Prac Larsen. Merwyn—Flaxton --GM Larson. Eldon—Wahpeton ....AM Larson. James—Dickey---Refrig Larson. Leslie—Hanks......SM Larsson. Mildred—Wahpeton .................. Bus Spec Lauder. James—Wahpeton ............Acctg it Bus Prac Lauder. Joanna—Wahpeton ..Arts Learn. Delbert—Fordville ...Elec Learn, James—Fordville......Elec Lee. Clifford—S. Dak.......Print Lee. Milton—Ashby, Minn.......GM Lee, Robert—Larlmorc..........GM Lehman. Rudolph—Great Falls. Mont.......................AM Lcikncss. Leigh—Fosston, Minn. ........................ Elec Lennick. Albert—Hebron .....AB Leonhardt. John—Glyndon. Minn. ............................ AM Lorew, Cecil—Jamestown .......................Pre-Engr Lcrfald. Gordon—Erskine. Minn. .......................Prc-Engr Leshovsky. Joann—Milnor ......... Steno Acctg O. P. Levorscn. Carlton—Elgin ..P-Com Lindberg. Larry—Lostwood ..Elec Lindholm, Marilynn—Lisbon ........Adv Steno See Trng Lindsay. Robert—Wahpeton .Arts Loberg, Janet—Wahpeton ...Arts Lobcrg, Roy—Velva...........AB Loo. Emil—Warwick ..........GM Loff. Wayne Colfax .........AM Lokkcn, Willis—Wildrose ... Print Lombnoss, Joseph- Grand Forks ...................... Print Long. Robert—Sharon ......Avia Lovdokken. Ogden—Wyndmere ................... P-Com Lovegren. Wayne—Grand Forks ........................ Elec Ludwig. Merlin—Hillsboro.....GM Luken. Roy—Ellendale ......Elec Lykken. Eugene- Kindred ....AM MacRae, Jack Midwest. Wyo. ......................... AM Magnusson, Ralph—Edinburg .AM Mahler. Lavonne—Fairmount ...........Steno Acctg O. P. Phillips and M’erre Girls Are Scarce Here ☆ ☆ ☆ Mair. Chris Jr.—Linton....Elec Manley, Ray—Minncwaukan .Elec Maresh. John Grandin ......AM Martin. Eugene Lefor......Elec Mathlason, Harvey Fairdale . .AB Mattson. Bernard Bottineau .Elec McCarty. Patricia Wahpeton ...................... Arts McClure. Arthur—Wahpeton ................ Arch Engr McConnell. Charles--Dunn Center ..................... Radio McCormack. Keith—Wahpeton ............Acctg Bus Prac McCulley. Alex—Linton .....AB McKenzie, John—Grandin ....AM McMillan. Leonard Wimbledon ........................ AM Melville, Ronald Valley City .CM Melton. Larry—Thermopolis. Wyo. ......................Print Merrick. Richard—Kent. Minn. .........................AM Merrymon. William Williston ...................... Elec Meyer. Marilyn Wahpeton ..Arts Michel. Vince Hope .....Refrig ☆ ☆ ☆ Michel sen. Ernest- Regan ..Radio Mielke, Roger--Brockenridge. Minn..................P-Forestry Millar. William—Webster...GM Miller. E. Hugo—Golden Valley ............................. DE Miller. E. Leo—Golden Valley .......................... Print Miller. George—Bismarck...AM Miller. Glenn— Napoleon...Elec. Miller. Marlyn Buffalo ...AM Miller. Miles- -Lisbon . .Acctg. .....................Bus. Prac. Mills. Cla rice— Brocken ridge. Minn...............Prac. Nurse Mische. Bernard—Hebron ............Acctg. Bus. Prac. Mishak, Mildred—Kent. Minn. ...................Bus. Special Mitchell. Donald—Elbowoods ........................ P-Engr. Mitchell. Douglas—Courtenay... W Mitchell. Glle—Lima. Mont. ........................ Refrig. Mittelstadt. Raymond—Killdeer .......................... Elec. Moklcr. Kenneth—Fargo ....Print Molander. Marion—Ponsford, Minn. .....................Sec. Arts Mollbcrg, Donna—Breckenridge Minn........................See. Arts Monger. John—Alamo........AB Monger, Vernon—Alamo......Elcc Monson, Roger—Grand Forks .........................Print Montricl, Raymond Belcourt ........................... AM Moore, John—Larimorc......Print Morin. Roman—Dunseith ...Radio Mork, Odcan Petersburg ... Radio Morstad. Kent—Fordville...GM Mostad. Merwyn—Langdon .. .GM Mueller. Herbert—Wahpeton . .GM Muggli. Thomas Beach ...P Com Murphy. Phyllis—Fort Yates ....................Sec Trng Murphy. William—McCanna ..GM Namcniuk. Matt--Belfield ... .Elec Nellcrmoc. Donald -Hickson ..DE Nelson. Argalus—Eckman ---AB Nelson, Birdecn—Rothsay. Minn ..................Acctg B Prac Nelson. Clarence—Felton. Minn. ........................... GM Nelson. Emmit—Fort Ransom ....................... Refrig 177MANV visitors come to the campus of the North Dakota State School of Science in Wahpeton every year and when they leave they are hound to have been impressed with something about the school. You would normally think that the individual visitors would be most impressed by a multitude of different things. Hut strangely enough, most of them arc impressed by just one thing—the student body. It’s not because they look any different from the students at any other college. It's something more intangible. Technical Kducatinn News, a national education magazine, perhaps best explained it: “. . . something about the mood at this school is different. Something makes the students seem to appear happier, healthier and friendlier. It is probably because here, at a nominal fee, they can learn by doing that which will be their life’s work—and they are glad of the opportunity.” I‘he State School of Science is proud of its student body for it is because of it that the school has become known throughout the nation as a great school." NORTH DAKOTA STATE SCHOOL OF SCIENCE What Makes A School GreatThe Head Office Homocoming Bosses Operated Here 1951 STUDENT LIST V V Nelson. Robert E. Devils I-ake ...................... Avia Nelson. Robert G.—Henry. S. Dak. ....................... Elec Nelson. Robert L.- Madison. Minn. ...................Elec Engr Ness. George -Fordvillc.....DE Ness. Raul—Erskine. Minn. ..Avia Newell. Eugene—Breckenridge. Minn......................DE Nichols. Stanley—Larimore ......................R Com Nielson. Kenneth Hope ....Radio Nlenas. Warren Thompson ...AB Nold. William- Wahpeton ....DE Nolte. Lincoln Breckenridge. Minn....................Arts Norton. George Man dan ...Elec Norton. John Mnndan..........AM Novotny. Richard Breckenridge. Minn...........Pro-Education Nybo. Henry -Hoople .....Refrig Nyreen. Clyde—Portal.........AM Oakland. Alma- Cartwright ......................Adv Steno O'Brien. Robert Fargo .......AB Ohm. Durwood Scranton ... .Arts Olnfson. Walter Gaidar.......AM Olson. Duane Devils Lake . . Elec. Olson. George Bismarck ... Print Olson. LaMar Cambridge ...Arts Olson. Vernon Minot..........Elec. Onchuck. Gerald Wahpeton ..AM Oscarson. Donald Fergus Falls. Minn.........................CM Oscarson. Raymond Wahpeton ......................... Elec. Osvold. James— Crosby......Radio Rachl, Theodore South Heart ............................ AB Packincau. Laura- Elbowoods ..................St Actg O P Parrow. Dean— Havana .............Acctg Bus Prac. Pearson. Thomas Madison. Minn. ......................... Elec. Person, Russel Lltchvillc ..Radio Peters. Richard Grand Forks .AM Peterson. Arvil—Edinburg ..Elec. Peterson. Virgil—Langdon ....AB Peterson. Wayne—Fordville ... DE Peterson. Willis—Fordville ...AM Pfeifer. Irvin—Frazee. Minn. .............Acctg Bus Prac. Pfeifle, Leonard—Ashley.....SM Pfistcr. Jack Wahpeton .............. College Special Pfliger. Bernard—Stanton ..Elec. Pflugraph. Rodney Wahpeton ...................... Pre-Dent Phillipp, Florabel—Kimball. Minn. ....................St Acctg O P Phillips. John—Fargo.....Arts Pithey, James -LaMourc, ..Radio Plettl. Anton- Wahpeton ....Elec. Plum. Gordon. Napoleon ..Arts Plunkett. Donna Bowdon ............Steno Sec Trng Pope. Allen- Wahpeton ...Arts Popp. Charles- Wahpeton ... .Arts Post. Donna—Columbus . Home Ec. Praska. Donald Oakes.......AM Pritchard. Willis Verona ....CM Pratschner. Dennis Jud.........AM Rand. Arthur Ray ..............AB Raguse, Richard Beardsley. Minn. ........................... AB Ramxtad. Mina Wahpeton .................... Sec Trng. Rnndganrd, Robert Montevideo. Minn......................AM Rasmussen. Mary- -Lisbon ...........Acctg Bus Prac. Rasmusson. Arnold -Warwick .CM Rebhahn. Alfred—Leal .....GM Rcbhahn, Donald—Leal .....Elec. Reff. John—Bemidji. Minn. ..Elec. Reile. Reuben—McClusky ...Print Reimcr. Donald Hampden . . Elec. Reinke. Arlene Mantador ............Steno Acctg O P Remsing. Stephen Dunn Center ......................... Radio Renschler. Harry Linton ...Elec. Rettig. Robert Wahpeton .... DE Riden, James- -Pingree.....Radio Ridgway, Dean—Fordville ....CM Rindy. Duane—Alexander.....SM Ringdahl. Delores —Milnor ..........Adv Steno. Sec Trng Robeson. Martin Cando .....AM Robey. George Mohall...........GM Roit. Joseph—Dodge ..........Elec Roller. Robert -Clifford ..Elec Roller. Theodore- Clifford ...Elec Roscoe. Donald—Sanger......Elec Rose. Ronald—Wimbledon ... Elec Rosencrans. Leo Fordville . . .GM Ross. William— Garskc .....AM Rude. Earl- Grand Forks . .. .Elec Rusch. Dennis—Judson ....Refrig Russell. Nelson—Grand Forks ....................... Elec ☆ ☆ Saewert. Ruth Cogswell ...........Steno. Acctg OP Sahli. James Perham. Minn. .AM Samuelson, Selvin— Erhard. Minn. .......................... Elec Sandbo. Ix ona Jamestown ............Steno Acctg O. P. Sanders. William New Rockford ......................... Print Snyer. Donald Detroit Lakes. Minn......................AB Scarr. Laverdc—Alamo ......DE Schafer. Delbert—Mott __Refrig Schaffer, Ralph—Cando.......AB Schaffer. John—Cando........AM Scholl. Peter—Harvey......Elec Scharf. Dennis Devils Lake .Elcc Schatz. John Jr. Temvik....AM Schaubert. Billy Bowdon ..Radio Schaubert. Marlyn Bowdon ..GM Schctcrlein. Catherine Wahpeton ........... Steno Sec Trng Scheuring. Freda Barney ............Steno Acctg O. P. Schlenker. Myron Jud........Elec Schlenker. Norbert -Jamestown ........................... AM Schuelter. Virgil—Frazee. Minn. ...............Acctg Bus Prac Schmidt. Francis Fergus Falls. Minn......................Elcc Schneider. James Glen Ullin . Elec Schreiner. Gerald Felton. Minn. ........................... GM Schultz. Charles Stirum ...Radio Sehweycn. Robert- Kcnmare ........... Acctg Bus Prac Seabold. Herbert Fargo------Print Sears, Clifford Elbowoods ...AM Seelhammer. John—Cogswell .Elcc Seelhammer. Mary Jane—Cogswell ............Steno Acctg O. P. Seitz. Edgar—Hazcn ..........Elec Severson. Garfield—Enderlin .Elec 17ft ☆ ☆ Formal Fun Time Out From Dancing At the Formal •V- -V- V- 1951 STUDENT LIST Severson. James Overly ....Arts Sim. Hess St. Vital. Canada ........................ Refrig Simons. Ben—Cavalier .....CM Simonson. John Grand Forks ......................... AM Simonitch. Jack Wahpeton ..DE Sjothun. Jim—Rutland....Refrig Skadoland. Donald—Lauda ...................Arch Engr Skaro. John- -Hoople......Elec Skorheim. Janet Wahpeton.. Arts Sletten. LeRoy Larlmore---Elec Smerberg. Robert—Wahpeton ..........................AM Smedshammer, Curtis—Litchvillc ..............Acctg Bus Prac Smestad. Gilbert Souris-----Elec Smith, Lcland Castlcwood ...DE Smith. Richard—Berthold ...,AB Snyder. Walter Van Hook .Radio Soeby. Donald Walhalla .... Elec Solee. Eddie—Hillsboro .......CM Solhjem. John Leonard.........AB Sorenson. James Carrington .......................... Print Spellerborg. Delores Fairmount ..............Steno Acctg O. P. Sperling. Walter Lehr ....Radio Sperry, Wade Minot..............Elcc Spitzer. Marvin -Wahpeton .................... Arch Engr Splichal. Dorothy Dickinson ...........Steno Actg O. P. Spoonhein. Jay Brcckenridge, Minn...................P-Com Stack. Jack—Minot ..........AB Stadsvold. Cyril—Fergus Falls Minn...............Arch Engr Stanton. Jack—Bisbee .....AM Steelier. Joe Mandan......Elec Steen. Norman—-Eckman ...Radio Steffens. Ix is Wahpeton .....................Adv Steno Steidl. Henry Fingal ..Avia Engr Steiner, Arnold—Mott..........AM Stelter. Willis—Doran. Minn. ....................Arch Engr Stenberg, Victor Sheycnne ..SM Steussy. Robert— Fergus Falls. Minn......................Elcc Stevens. James--Sanish ... .Avia Stewart. William—Gilby.....AM Stiles. Everctta Fort Yates .....................Home Ec Stiles. Newell Washington. D. C. ........................... AM Stock. Virgil- Appleton. Minn. .........................Radio Stone, Alvina—Mooreton ....Arts Storbeck. Leonard—Minot ...Elec Strait. William Fort Totten ........................ Print St red wick, Norris—Minot ... .Elec Stuart. Kenneth—Compton. California.............. P-Com Sullivan. Larry—Mandan.....AM Sundquist. Gordon Forman .Print Swanson. Charles Mandan .Print Syverson. Arlen— Wahpeton ........................ P-Com Syverson, Virgil Brcckenridge. Minn.........Acctg Bus Prac Tehlc, Daniel Brcckenridge. Minn.........Acctg Bus Prac Tiegs. Arthur—Lidgerwood ...SM Theede, Patricia—Fairmount ............Steno. Acctg OP Thiel. Alden—Wahpeton ....Print Thompson. George—Fergus Falls. Minn........................AM Thompson. Glen—Clifford....AM Thompson. Jerry—Pembina ...AM Thompson. Robert—Coteau ...AM Thordarson, I-arus Akra ....AM Thoreson. Harold Sanborn ..AM Thuleen. Roseoe Annandalc. Minn....................Refrig Tongas. Duane—Pelican Rapids. Minn....................Refrig Tupa. David Grafton .........DE Uhlich, Edwin Garrison ...Refrig Urseth. Arthur Grand Forks ..........................Print Vammcn. Paul Luverne .....AM Vangsness. Kenneth—Marshall ......................... AM Van. Ornum- Wahpeton .....SM Veitcnhcimcr. Lawrence Glen Ullln...................Elec Vik. Verona Wahpeton......Arts Vollevand. Carl—Forman......AM Volimas. George—Parshall--SM Vossler. Wilbert—Lehr.......GM Wadeson. Gerald—Fingal.....GM Wagar. Jacob Gilby .. .Avia Engr Waite. Shirlee Brcckenridge. Minn..........Acctg Bus Prac Walters. Wayne Valley City .SM Wanner. Allen Medina.......Arts Wandlcr. Leon New England.DE Wannemacher. Carl Manning. AM Wanner. Sebastian Dickinson ......................... Print Wasness. Donald Northwood .. ......................... Radio Weaver. John Lowry, Minn. ........................ Refrig Weber. Eld ward Hillsboro ...Avia Weber. Vernon -Cnsselton... Radio Wefel. Hazel Wahpeton ....................Sec Trng Wegerle. Oscar—Hazen .....Print Weinberger. Ralph—Parshall ........................ Elec Wcinmann. Alvin—Harvey . ...SM Weiss. Yvonne—Great Bend ....................Pro Nurse Wei Ian, Marilyn—Wahpeton ....................Bus Spec Welstad. Roy- Upham.......Elec Welle. Herbert Larimore ....AM Wendelbo. Charles—Pembina ....................... Radio Wenstad, Ordis—Crosby ....GM Wenz. Eugene New Rockford .......................... DE Werner. John— Kintyre.....SM Werre. George—Dawson......AB Westcrvall. Verne—Steele -AM Whaley, Ronald—Fordville ...AM White. James—Minot......Refrig Wick. Robert -Larimore....Avia Wick. Roy Grenora .........Elec Williams. Earl Sisseton. S. Dak. ....................... Print Williams. I aVern Heaton ............Acctg Bus Prac Wingerter. Joe Selfridge ............Acctg Bus Prac Witt. James—Wahpeton .....DE Wittenberg. Esther—Valley City ........................ Arts Wohlwend. Barbara—Wahpeton .....................Prac Nurse 180☆ ☆ ☆ 1951 STUDENT LIST Wold. Gerald—Wahpeton ................. Pre Dental Wolf. Daniel—Dickinson.......AM Woodal. Donovan- Grand Rapids. Minn................ Bus Spec Woods, William—Forest River .......................... GM Wright, Dennis—Fargo......Print Ycskc. Lester—Columbia. S. Dak. .......................... AM Zentgraf. Delmar Wahpeton..AB Zavalney. Anne Mac Wiiiiston .....................Sec Trng Zola. Harold Oslo. Minn......GM January 8, Enrollment Andrews. Charles Petersburg .......................... GM Barnes. Robert—Minot ....Plumb Berg. Iw'iuritz Bisbee ......GM Cooper. Alford- -Fordville .... AM Geir. Clarence Edinburg ....Elec Foss. Roy—-Hanks.............GM ☆ ☆ Geiger. Ben—Dickinson ... .Plumb Halvorson. Boyd—-Brockenridge, Minn........................GM Hammes, Ray—Sykcston ... Plumb Haugen. Harold—Grenora------GM Heller. Llovd Leonard ......GM Hill. Alvin—Ray ..............GM Hoffman. I.awrcnce- I-arimore ........................... GM Houdek. Alphonse- Grafton ........................ Plumb Huessy. Robert Breckenridge. Minn......................Plumb Johnson, Marvin Galchutt ....................... Plumb Kubela, Norman Wahpeton . .GM Kvale. Clifford-Crosby .......GM Law, Robert—Wimbledon.......GM Lindsay, Robert Wahpeton .......................Jr Col Luehr. Mrs. Elaine- -Breckenridge. Minn..................Bus Spec Lundc. Ingval Crosby..........CM Myhra. Peter Wahpeton ..Plumb Nelson. Dunne Sheyenne ....GM V V Pazdernik, George Breckenridge. Minn..................... GM Peterson. Clarence—Devils Lake ......................... GM Pikarski. Lawrence Wahpeton ......................... GM Peterson. Glenn Tappen.....GM Rasch. Alvin Hazen .....Plumb Richter. Norbort Sykeston ...................... Plumb Sandvold. Reider- Hnnks....GM Sathor, Arthur Starkweather ......................... GM Sears. Lawrence—Elbowoods. .GM Shervan. Vern—Charlson.....GM Strand. Barney—Regan .... Plumb Sundahl. Norman—Sherwood ...................... Plumb Sundahl. Mrs. Sarah Sherwood ........................Home Ec Thompson. Roland—Leonard ..GM Tolbert. Francis Breckenridge. Minn..................... GM Wise. Russel Regan ........GM Wright. Marion Driscoll ....ElecIntroductory Section . . Administration Section Trades School Section Itlisiness School Section Junior College Section Huh Actin'ties Section Athletics Section ....... Iteligious Life Section . ('.rail not ion Section . . . ................ ................ 22 ............... ................. it ................. 70 ................. 9J ................122 .................132 Alumni Association ...........................139 Administration .............................12-19 Advertising ..............................151-183 Agawasie Staff .............................SO-81 Athletic Commission ..........................117 Auto Body .....................................30 Auto Body Club ................................38 Auto Mechanics ................................39 Aviation ......................................31 Aviation Club .................................38 Band ..........................................02 Baseball .....................................112 Basketball ...............................105-111 Boxing ...................................113-115 Broadcast Club.................................88 Business School Students ...................50-53 Cafeteria Staff ...............................93 Campus Hub Employees ..........................03 Class of 1951 ...........................138-1-18 Dakota Scientist Staff ........................80 Dedication ...................................2-3 Drafting and Estimating........................31 Drafting and Estimating Club .................-II Editor's Message ..............................HO Electrical Club ...............................10 Electrical Trades ..........................32-33 Engineers .....................................62 Engineers Club ................................66 Football ..................................99-101 General Mechanics.............................-13 Golden Gloves Tourney.........................116 Governor's Message .............................0 Haverty's Message..............................27 Homecoming Highlights .......................78 Homecoming Preview .......................76-77 Homecoming Royalty ..........................75 Home Economics ..............................61 Home Economics Club .........................66 Honeytones ..................................92 Intramural Basketball ..................119-121 Junior College Club .........................65 Junior College Students...................60-61 Junior Toastmasters Club.....................57 Lcttermcn's Club ...........................118 Library .....................................21 Lutheran Students Association...............128 Maintenance Crew ............................93 Male Chorus .................................90 McMahon's Message ...........................59 Mixed Chorus ................................90 Newman Club ................................127 Nordgaard's Message ..........................W Plumbing ....................................31 Practical Nurses ............................63 President Riley's Message ....................H Printers .................................35-36 Printing Club ..............................-11 Radio ....................................36-37 Radio Club .................................‘12 Refrigeration ...............................37 Refrigeration Club ..........................12 Sacajawea Club ..............................68 Sacajawea Events ............................86 School Play .................................87 Senior Presidents ..........................13" Sheet Metal Club ............................43 Snapshot Contest ............................"9 Small Music Groups ..........................91 Social Events.............................82-85 Student Cabinet .............................20 Student Health .............................130 Student List ...............................153 Student Wives ...............................69 Track ......................................112 Printed in Printinu Tradii Department State School or Science Waiipi-ton, N. I). 1811951 agai SUN. MON. TUES. 1 1 2 7 8 9 1 14 15 16 1 21 22 23 e 28 29 30 t K if 'Mia s i e 19 5! W D. THURS. FRI. SAT. 3 4 5 6 lb it 12 13 [| 18 19 20 H 25 26 27 ■j A ttUJDBED £l 1 N. D. ST;' "1 WAHPI J0RH39H LIBRARY TE SCHOOL OF SCIENCE TBS.S. DAK. 58075 ;


Suggestions in the North Dakota State College of Science - Agawasie Yearbook (Wahpeton, ND) collection:

North Dakota State College of Science - Agawasie Yearbook (Wahpeton, ND) online yearbook collection, 1948 Edition, Page 1

1948

North Dakota State College of Science - Agawasie Yearbook (Wahpeton, ND) online yearbook collection, 1949 Edition, Page 1

1949

North Dakota State College of Science - Agawasie Yearbook (Wahpeton, ND) online yearbook collection, 1950 Edition, Page 1

1950

North Dakota State College of Science - Agawasie Yearbook (Wahpeton, ND) online yearbook collection, 1952 Edition, Page 1

1952

North Dakota State College of Science - Agawasie Yearbook (Wahpeton, ND) online yearbook collection, 1953 Edition, Page 1

1953

North Dakota State College of Science - Agawasie Yearbook (Wahpeton, ND) online yearbook collection, 1954 Edition, Page 1

1954

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