North Coventry High School - Torch Yearbook (Pottstown, PA)

 - Class of 1949

Page 1 of 60

 

North Coventry High School - Torch Yearbook (Pottstown, PA) online yearbook collection, 1949 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 60 of the 1949 volume:

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' 4 ' '4 ' .fair ff- 4. :si ' 4434: I 4 4 44 '41 '144'4:f 4- 4. -.ifliffl 4,'4 4 449- W' , . 44 4' . 7" -. '7'- ' 'X 1 "iii-.H 44 4'4?bf':5?41 N' ' " ' 124 -4 E 3 2' iv. .-- ,qu .- Q. 4 4 tf?'. ,.4. 4 , 'Si 52a..f,- .gAi... Q 5444- 4-F L.:4:'1:?QI:g .,. 9 1 - Q Qfquaff' ,- . , A .4 , A4.. Q. 3: -4 Y 4 44 - Q -4 . ' ' 4'-,A A'A -. - 4 4 . .'-..Q"'f"4i.' 4 '-4:44 41'5V'H4-'gwfZ. . 5' :ff...,.. v-,34m5,.: 'li"g"'r V M. " 4., - ',.Q.' , 11- - , b..- " ' ' 'K - . 'fherv 'TE 4.3 "' 'ni "" T9 Q 4 ff' ' Vol. 'W I The I Q49 TOVCZ1 JI tiff The IQLIQ Senior Glass of North Qozrentry High School ucliccitud lo , we r, cc, ..c,,,---.-c,vcc MR. ALVIN S. ALDERFER The Class of 1949 dedicates this issue of The Torch to our eflicient class adviser, Mr. Alvin S. Alderfer, whose encouraging leadership has been a great factor in aiding: us to lay firm foundations for our future lives. Mr. Alderfer is always ready to help and advise thosc who need his guidance. Through our years as un- derclassmen, here at Norco, we have not always heeded his admonitions and warnings, but now as we embark on this step, the greatest of all challenges - the step into life itself, we realize the true value of his counsel. Truly, he will linger in our memories long after we pass through these portals for the last time. In deepest appreciation we dedicate this yearbook to him. IA-ft lu l'iR'ill'fll. Ilillipl XY N11-l'1'11mlwl4-li IC I :mu .l. l'z11'v ll lfrivs, PRESIDENT VICE PRESIDENT SECRETARY TREASURICRS Class flrlriscrs Miss J. Delp Mrs. IC. C. Clark lVlr. A. S. Alclerfer Glass Cjfficc CLASS MOTTO Keep climbing, for we are no yet there." CLASS COLORS Blue and Gold CLASS FLOWER Yellow Rose . Ethel Bean . William McCrudden . . . Janice Care Hannah Dilliplane Robert Fries S4-:ntl-ll, lwfl In riulll li, II:-1:11. Il. Ifilliplzunf-. IZ, lic-ml. ll. .X. Mullin, .l. f':ll'm-, Y. lialglv. wlil--r: N, Alzunwilln-r, Ir, St:uxv1'wsIQy, KI, lh-rrilu-r, N. lmlnt, Sl:m1lil1g:, lm-i'l In l'i:l1l --,X. 'l'wr:lli. Al. 1':ls1n-r, NI. XX'ilsw11, A. .Xllf-11, 11. Slll'lIlII. Mrs. .l. V. Nnxiglnzuluf-, Mus. IG, Ulurk, Qulxismsp V. 1,1-xvllgmfcl. tl. lirvps, ll. lfrim-S, Al. Al4'l'lll'llX. Q. .., , The Torclz Staff l'IlPl'l'Uli-lN-Ifllllilf' Venice liugrls- lTl'SlNl'ISS MAN.-Xillill .lzmicc Caro XSSlS'l'AN'l' Nancy Mzmwillcr l,ITl'IliAliY IGIDITORS Mary Ann Mullin, Dorothy Stuvcrosky l'l'IllSON.'Xl.S l'llJl'l'0llS Beryl Read, lllzxrjorio licrrilivr XSSlS'l',rXN'l'S Gloria Shrum, Marg'arct lN'lL'l'Ilroy, Marlene xVllSl1ll. Curl l,0vL-uguml l"l'l.vX'l'l'lll'lS l'IlDl'l'0liS Nancy Lulu, llzumall Dilliplum- .Xll'I' l'IlJl'l'Uli Mary Caspvl' .".SSlS'l'.XN'l' Ann Allvn f3l'Ul1'l'S I-IIJITOILS Agnes TorulQ, llolwert Fries l'llU'l'0tll!Al'llY r:1ml'1'm:S Pltlwl Hcmw. fivfwv lirf-vs f'0l'Y l'II1l'l'OllS 'l'wclf'tl1 Grzulc f'ummcrciul Group lf,xf'lll,'l'Y ,XIWISICRS Mrs. listhcr Clurla, Mrs. Jennie C. Sz1x'ig'mxnu iil llClU1f' Glflpflllk .:UIlC9lE!l"S Class ol' '4EP: America. even in your day, is still the land ol' opportunity. The same land that saw a wood chopper become its President has in your time seen a haberdashery sales- lnan become President. I know, as you know, that we all cannot become President ol' the United Statesg but you know, as I la now, that there are countless opportunities for the one who has the qualifications when "Opportunity's door" opens. If it is your lot to be a ditch digger, be the best ditch digger in the group. If your work is that of a secretary, do an extra fine job for the boss. If your calling: is the ministry, be the best disciple of God in the community you serve. There is room at the top for those who are worthy of top honors. In past years the egraduates of North Coventry High School have set excellent records to which you can aspire. They have made it possible by their record for you to get a job more readily, or to be acceptable to institutions of higher learning. Your part is to perpetuate these high standards ol' work so that future graduates will have similar opportunities to live a happy normal life. May you all be good Torch bearers. Sincerely, Paul H. Grim PAUL H. GRIM Supervising' Principal SCIIOOI l,3Olll"ll lml' n 791 Vs i. ': 'wc-prcsimlvilli lil'Hl'LI't' XY, Popc- l I ll lil Iunnci NI XX nniplmi xi Innd, sz-1-iw-tally: IC. tlilln-It Slnn!'I'4-r, president' Nlxllcr 1' Ion"' ll'!"lYlll'4'l" .. . 1 ,,, .. . I-'dwniwl I-I. Wclmlm-r. l!lL'llllH'l'1 l'nnl ll. llrini. Sll1lt'l'YlSlll,Ll'1!l'llll'llHll. Smut--1I, I1-fl IH right Miss .lwyvw High. Miss llznril- Ilngizsliy, Miss .I4-ssiv In-lp, XII lisllif-1' l'I:ll'l4, Xlws Ye-Vhzl lrrrs, MV. I':nl1I Grim, sllln-rxisillg IUIIIIVIIIIIIQ Mis. I"Iv-ru Iiml ml Miss Ilwris l,ym-Ii, MVS. .Xlllm 'I'l'vg4w. MVS. ,lvimiv 1'. Szexiglnzliw, Mrs, I"1h1:n SI1im-Ih-11s.- htnmllllgg, I4-Il In I'Ig1'IlI Mr, .IUIIII IIl'XIll1'1'IllIS. XIV. .XIXIII .Xlch-VI:-l'. MV. l,.,n-is In I uxnluil, Miss Vlzuw- I.:nm-. Mr. Imh- Smith, M11 I':iul Ilzmlu-V. Mr. Milf-s SIJIIIIIIIIII. All: Willllm I'zwI:m1m1i1', Mr. Nm-:ll .illirtm-1'. IIICIIIIU XI VIN 51. .-XI,I?I'IIiIVICIQ--Ilivwlwgy, I'1'uIwlL-11114 wi' IDL-i1wci'zu'y, Ilrivf-1' 'lizxixiirig' I XIII, N. ILXIQICIL, -III.-fIiLlSIIIOSS IVI21II10I11ZlIIL'S. S. I'. A., VIij'DCXVI'ItIlI2, IillUIxIiCL'IlIll1,1' I I UILX S. IIIIIIILXNIQ-.-XII Silpvivism' XI XI. Il. IIIIRTNIGIQ-Aguim-LlIl111'Q, Shop I5I'III'IIl V. fII,,'XIlK--I'I11g'IisI1, I"i'L-Holi, I,ihi':u'y II S IUIIN II. IIQVINCICNTIS---INIQL-Imiiiczxl Iirawingg, I'lng:Iisl1,SImp SIIG NI. IJI'II,I' -Ilislory, Visuui ICrlL1cat,io1i 'CIC A. IIIGIIfVucz1tirmaI and General Home I'Ic'mmmics KI XIQIG Ii. II.-XNICv.ILmim' High Histnry, Gcogwzlpliy IJOIIIS IC. I,YNCII4I'hysica1I I':CILlt'2ll,i0ll, IlcuItI1,Sm'iul Ailjlnsllm-111, Girls' Fuzlcli XI RNA INI. OIIRS-Music SLIPCVVISUI' iNII,I.IAINI .I. I'AOLANTONI04Histol'y, Civics. IUIIUIIIIIII Cuzlcii, .Nssisiuiit Iizxslxclhull flill I1 NI XIIIIC N. IIUGUSKY-Scimol S9Cl'CI2ll'y II 'XINIIC V. SAVIGNANO-Sliorihzlnrl, Typcwritiligy Uilivu I'rz:cticc, Iiusim-ss liligglis I IIY.X H, SIIINICIIOIISI'I-Trigulimnctry, iiooniutry, AIg'cln'z1, TA .'Xl'IIIII1lL'IIl', Sovizll XKIIUNIIIHIII .Iuniur Ilusincss 'I'r'ai11i1ig' IIXIIIG III. SINII'I'II-5-Iunim' High Iingrlisil, JLIIIIUI' High IiIi1iI1L'l1I21iICS. ,Iuni fi' High I"outh1II Kuuh XIILICS INI. SIX-XNNII'I'IIf.Iui1im' High Iiialiliclimtivs, Sc-iclwo, Pliysics. Ulicliiistiy N.-X C. 'I'IlI'IIi0, Il. N.-Scimol Nurse, Iiomc Nursing' 21-J 1 . bU7' HO1f CJICISS V I VIRGINIA ANN ALLEN Ann COMMERCIAL Hockey Sl, 103 Camera Club, 10, 11, 12, "Norco News," 122 "Torch" Staff. "Neatness is a crowning grace to womanhoodf' Quiet . . . neat in everything she does . . . collects min- iature dogs and horses . . . boys are the least of her worries . . . gifted with artistic abilities . . . energetic . . . frank . . . hopes to attend art school. LAVERNE ANDERSON LaVerne .VOCATIONAL Glee Club, 93 Basketball,-93 Softball, 93 Arts and Craft Club, 9. "With eyes that lo0k'd into the very soul." Pretty, clear complexion . . . beautiful eyes . . . excellent saleslady , . . likes to ride in a green Ford . . . one of the home ec. girls . . . 226 York Street is her second home . . . will probably become a housewife. ETHEL BEAN ' "Beanie" COMMERCIAL Hockey, 9, 11, captain, 122 Softball, 93 Glee Club, 9, 10, ll, president, 123 Camera Club, 10, 11, 12: "Norco News," 9, 10, ll, 12: Class President, 9, 10, 11, 123 Class Play, ll: "Torch" Staff. - "Man is the maker of his own happiness." Prettv blonde hair and blue eyes . . . peaches 'n cream complexion . . . dreams of Bill . . . enjoys her work at Ramble Inn . . . reliable center half in hockey . . . capable leader . . . hopes to be a model. MARJORIE BERRIKER "Margie" VOCATIONAL Softball, 9, 10: Basketball, 9, 10, manager, 11, Class Play, ll, Class Vice-President, 103 Glee Club, 9, 10, 11, 123 Hockey, 9, 10, 11, 12, "Norco News," 11, 12, "Torch" Staff. "Gentle of speech, beneficent of mind." Naturally blonde curly hair . . . pleasant smile . . . good home ec. student . . . lovely hands . . . well liked . . . musically inclined . . . thinks women are better drivers than men . . . will make a good housewife for Roger. JANICE CARE "Peanut" COMMERCIAL Class Vice-President, 9g Class Secretary, 10, 11, 125 Cheer- lcadcr, 10, 11, 123 Glee Club, 9, 10, 11, 12, "Norco News," 10, 11, 12, "Torch" Staff. "A small body and a great mind are usually well combined." Tiny and dainty . . . neat dresscr . . . one of the shorties of the class . . . never idle . . . an A-1 jitterbug . . . peppy cheerleader . . worries constantly about Bill . . . will be a stcnographer. MARY CASPER "Casper" COMMERCIAL "Norco News," 9, 10, 11, 125 Class Treasurer, 10, 11, Class Play, 11, 125 Cheerleader, 11, 125 "Torch" Staff. " A good laugh is sunshine in a house." Blonde with flashing dark eyes . . . has an unmistakable laugh . . . pretty hands . . . interested in athletics . . . likes to polka . . . looking for that "model man" . . . hopes to become a secretary. CLARA CLEMENS Clara COMMERCIAL Glee Club, SJ, 10, 11, 123 Softball, 12. "Labor conquers all things." Sincere . . . good shorthand student . . . takes life calmly and philosophically . . . only senior to come from "Hope- well" . . . constant companion of Margaret . . . would like a stenographic position. HANNAH DILLIPLANE Hannah COMMERCIAL Softball, 9, Glee Club, 9, 10, 11, Secretary, 123 Class Treasurer, 12, Class Play, 11, 12, Cheerleader, 123 "Norco News," 11, 123 "Torch" Staff. "Elegant as simplicity and warm as ecstasy." Expressive blue eyes . . . speedy typist . . . gets along well with everyone . . . competent baby sitter . . . ardent War- wick fan . . . Elsie's is her second home . . . loathes Frank- enstein and snakes . . . plans to be a secretary. VENICE ELAINE EAGLE "Ersal" ACADEMIC Typing Club, 95 Speech Club, 9g Glee Club, 9, 10, 11, 12: Hockey Manager, 105 Softball Manager, 105 "Norco News," 11, 123 Band, 125 "Torch" editor. "The price of wisdom is above rubies." Tall and slim . . . dependable . . . good natured . . . capable leader . . . surprising sense of humor . . . amateur drum- mer . . . likes to travel to Warwick . . . known for her impersonations . . . basketball fan . . . hopes to go to college. ROBERT EVANS "Chickie" VOCATIONAL Rifle Club, 93 Basketball, 115 F. F. A., 9, 10, 11, 12, Patrol, 9, 10, 11, 125 Football, 10, 11, 12. "Nothing tried, nothing gained." Neat appearance . . . blushes furiously . . . never worries . . . thinks book reports are a necessary bore . . . girl shy? . . . pilots his dad's new Plymouth . . . dependable right- end on the football field . . . dusts off his books only when necessary . . . a future farmer. ROBERT FRIES "Lewt" COMMERCIAL Baseball, Sig Football Manager, 103 Patrol, 12, Class Play, 11, 123 Class Treasurer, 123 "Torch" Staff. "He that has patience can have what he will." Appears shy! . . . calm in the midst of chaos . . . never caught hurrying . . . the "Georgie Fonder" of the class . . . denies any interest in girls . . . neat . . . good worker . . . patient . . . plans to enter the Navy. SHIRLEY HALL "Skip" VOCATIONAL Typing Club, 93 Softball, 9, 10, 11, 125 Hockey, 9, 10, 11, 123 Basketball, 9, 10, 11, 125 Glee Club, 123 "Norco News," 11, 12. "A great sport wins the game of life." Tallest girl in the class . . . basketball "whiz" . . . fast, snappy talker . . . fond of all sports . . . moves slowly except when playing hockey and basketball . . . finds Les her one and only . . . Margie's pal . . . will probably put her home ec. training into use. GEORGE KREPS George VOCATION AL Rifle Club, 95 Baseball, 103 Basketball, 10, 113 Class Vice- President, 11g Class Play, 11, 12, Football, 10, 11, 123 Glee Club, 125 Varsity Club, 11g F. F. A., 9, 10, 11, Pres- ident 12g "Norco News," 11, 125 Band, 125 Camera Club, 11, 125 "Torch" Staff. "Honesty and ambition go hand in hand." Good friend to everyone . . . willing to help in any situ- ation . . . industrious . . . active in all school activities . . . class photographer . . . rugged football player . . . a con- firmed bachelor . . . doesn't mind being teased . . . will enter Penn State after graduation. JOHN LECK "Jack" ACADEMIC Football Manager, 115 Patrol, 11, 12, Class Play Prompter, 11, Boys' Glee Club, 12. "He who sings frightens away his ills." Hails from South Pottstown . . . thinks homework is a joke . . . likes to play the piano . . . really "hep" when it comes to "Boogie Woogie" . . . imagines he is Dracula's double . . . possesses a good singing voice . . . hopes to attend music school. CARL LEVENGOOD "Livie" GENERAL Baseball, 10, 11, 12, Boys' Glee Club, 12, Class Play, 123 "Torch" Staff. "Good humor is goodness and wisdom combined." Ladies' man . . . has a good time anywhere . . . known for his deep voice . . . knows a variety of jokes . . . likes to drive his brother's Ford . . . will do anything for anyone . . . has a liking for senior girls . . . expects to take up radio and television repair work. NANCY LOHT "Radar" ACADEMIC Glee Club, 10, 11, 125 "Norco News," 11, 12g Hockey, 115 Class Play, 11, 129 "Torch" Staff. "The tongue can no man tame." Redhead of the class . . . enthusiastic letter writer . . . solid geometry is her downfall . . . advocates the "New Look" . . . can talk her way out of any problem . . . gets around . . . leads a hectic life . . . likes opposite sex, but denies it . . . intends to go to nursing school. NANCY MANWILLER "Blackie" COMMERCIAL Glee Club, 9, 10, 11, 123 Cheerleader, 10, 11, 125 Class Play, 125 "Norco News," 125 "Torch" Staff. "Happiness is made to be shared." Brownette with large green eyes . . . comedian of the class . . . well liked . . . Jim occupies her thoughts . . . thinks life is a great experience . . . never seen without a smile . . . one of the Union Township gang . . . plans to go to hairdressing school. WILLIAM MCCRUDDEN "Bill" GENERAL Rifle Club, 95 Baseball, 9, 11, 12, Patrol, 9, 10, 11, 12: Varsity Club, 10, 115 Football, 9, 10, 11, 125 Basketball, 9, 10, 11, 125 Class Vice-President, 12, Class Play, 11. "Success is won by patient endeavor." Dark, wavy hair . . . neat dresser . . . Cassanova, although his heart belongs to one . . . dislikes studies . . . veteran on the gridiron . . . sports enthusiast . . . pals around with Evans . . . constantly losing his books . . wants to join the Navy. MARGARET MCELROY "Peggy" COMMERCIAL Glee Club, 9, 10, 11, Softball, 10, "Torch" Staff. "Softness of smile indicates softness of heart." Short blonde with blue eyes . . . good commercial student . . . wears a diamond on her left hand . . . always talking about Barney . . . inseparable from Clara . . looks forward to being a housewife. NANCY MOYER Nancy VOCATIONAL Glec Club, 9, 10, 11, 125 Typing Club, 10. "Lost time is never found again." Carefree . . . full of fun . . . knows a variety of cowboy songs . . . usually seen at Free-se's Heights . . . great apple polisher . . . works only when it is necessary . . . always eating . . . expects to be a housewife. MARY ANN MULLIN "Moon" COMMERCIAL Hockey, 9, Basketball, 9, 10, Camera Club, 10, 11, 12, Class Play, 11, 125 "Norco News," 9, 10, 11, Editor, 12, "Torch" Staff. "Laugh and the world laughs with you." Pretty brunette . . . beautiful smile . . . Hirtatious eyes . . has an opinion on every subject . . . sophisticated air . . . well-rounded vocabulary . . . enjoyslbeing with George . . . personality plus . . . will make an attractive secretary for some businessman. SARA MURRAY Sara 1 VOCATIONAL Arts and Craft Club, 9. "Ornament of a meek and quiet spirit." Quiet . . . shy . . . capable home ec. student . . . basket- ball . . . week-end worker . . . friendly . . . has a secret crush on a senior boy . . . will probably continue working at Woolworth's. FLORENCE PENNYPACKER Florence VOCATIONAL "The cautious seldom err." Always smiling . . . willing worker . . . a devoted friend . . . comes from Shenkel . . . gazes . . . friendly to every- one . . . blushes at the mention of boys . . . wants to go to hairdressing school. ANNA POSTER Anna VOCATIONAL "Speech is great, but. silence is greater." Medium brown hair . . . cute smile . . . moody at times . . . no time for boys . . . finds Florence a good friend . . . an excellent cook . . . likes an interesting movie . . . finds eating spare ribs a difficulty. ,Qi BENJAMIN POWELL "Benny" GENERAL Typing Club, 95 Patrol, 9, Glee Club, 12, Band, 12. "As for me, all I know is, that I know nothin-r." Black hair, brown eyes . . . shrugs cfl' worries . . . dare- dcvil on his motor bike . . . lniscticvous . . . shortest boy in the class . . . doesn't appear interested in girls? . . . member of the stage crew . . . is interested in continuing: music. BERYL READ "Mousic" COMMERCIAL Hockey, 9, 103 Arts and Craft Club, 93 Basketball, 103 Softball, 123 "Norco News," 11, 123 Class Play, 11, 123 Cheerleader, 11, 12, "Torch" Staff. "A light heart lives long." Dark hair and eyes . . . attractive . . . good dancer . . . wolfish . . . willing to do anything . . . example of per- petual motion . . . a "Ronnie Douvaulle" fan . . . South Pottstown is her second home . . . would like to go to an airline school. GLORIA SHRUM "Shrummie" VOCATIONAL Class Treasurer, 93 Class Play, 12, "Torch" Staff. "Popularity is like the brightness of a falling star." Pretty country lass . . . full of fun . . . neat dresser . . . excitable . . . easy to get along with , . . dreamer . . . would be lost without her gum . . . looks forward to marry- ing Pat. DOROTHY STAVEROSKY "Dot" ACADEMIC Speech Club, 95 Typing Club, 9, 109 Glee Club, 9, 10, 11, 123 "Norco News," 9, 10, 11, 129 Class Play, 119 Cheer- leader 9, 10, 11, Captain, 125 "Torch" Staff. "Politeness goes far, yet costs nothing." The answer to a teacher's prayer . . . one of the few academic students . . . interested in cheerleading . . . ex- ccllent math. student . . . ablc to do many things well . . . has a smile for everyone . . . never misses choir practice . . . future undecided. NANCY SWAVELY Nancy COMMERCIAL Arts and Craft Club 9' Glee Club 9 10 11' Class Pla Y Y ! l Y 7 by Prompter, 11. "He who is good is happy." Quiet . . . reserved . . . always neat . . . easy-going manner . . . willing to help . . . loses no sleep over boys . . . an A-1 commercial student . . . studious . . . will be an efficient secretary. JANET THOMPSON Janet COMMERCIAL Arts and Craft Club, 9, Glee Club, 9, 10, 11. "I agree with no man's opinion, I have a few of my own." Quick tempered . . . enjoys reading . . . can be found at Red Corner any time . . . one of Woolworth's salesgirls . . . scrappy guard in basketball . . . always ready for an argument . . . is interested in accounting work. AGNES TORAK "Aggie" VOCATIONAL Hockey 9 Mana e1 ll' Softball 10, 125 Basketball, 10, ' .y -, g 'Q v w 123 Class Play, 123 "Torch" Staff. "Anger is momentary madness." Tall, attractive blonde . . . one of the younger members of the class . . . all around athlete . . . possesses a wicked temper . . . always out for a good time . . . likes to polka . . . girl of many moods . . . uses her blue eyes for many things . . . will probably continue working at Woolworth's. MARLENE WILSON Marlene COMMERCIAL Glee Club, 9, 10g Camera Club, 10, 11, 123 "Norco News," 123 "Torch" Staff. "A friend is a second self." Calm . . . happy . . . neat . . . tells you what she thinks . . . treasures her diamond . . . dreamer . . . temperamental . . . always with Ann . . . finds driving a problem . . . will either be a housewife or a secretary. sw I ' I WILSON YERGER "Wilsi" GENERAL "One cannot know everything." Class jcster . . . possesses a vivid imagination . . . defin- itely a womanhatei . . . has an answer for everything . . . enjoys a good "Western" . . . gets his exercise bicycle riding . . . plans to become a diesel engineer. VVILLIAM L. ZERR "Bill" GENERAL Rifle Club, 9. "God bless the man who first invented sleep." Black, wavy hair . . . handsome . . . heart breaker . . . collects absentee cards . . . drives a distinctive '37 Pontiac . . . card shark . . . thinks of school only as a pastime . . . excellent in mechanical drawing . . . plans to join the Navy. ---1-1-i-1-W.---. lvlmt illldll Wliss 'lllost Mr. Alderfer's warnings about life . . . Hearing the band practicing . . . Noon basketball games starring LeRoy Wilson . . . Singing our Alma Materg there is no other like it anywhere . . . Those "rare" assembly programs . . . Cramming for exams . . . Hectic arguments in class meetings . . . The everchanging couples . . . Mrs. Clark reading Shake- speare . . . The Girls' Glee Club searching for those high notes . . . The dances - pretty decorations and a great man shortage . . . "The gang" . . . Mr. Grim's hearty laugh . . . Jack Leck's noontime piano selections . . . The library, a second Grand Central Station . . . Football games and our hoarse voices afterwards . . . The pre-bell chatter . . . Livy's jokes C?J . . . Marie and her helpfulness . . . "Ointz" sitting at Miss Delp's desk every day . . . Nancy Moyer warbling cowboy songs . . . Room 9 with the straw paper decorations on the ceiling . . . Tales of past week-ends . . . Reading "Norco News" . . . Mrs. Trego's aspirin . . . The Underclassmen who helped us financially . . . Dodging flying paper bags in Room 9 . . . Mrs. Savignano's thorough t:aching . . . Being crowded into the bus . . . The chats during lab . . . And most of all - We'll miss Norco! , Glass Sovfzg ii 4134. if M9331 Grad-u - u-bon clay IS fze--re Forfffg cfass of for- T9 nine Ag we leave, fear Af' ma. aj fin' Garb clrefwealwggz feavs! W .ll i ii 1 Q i i9 5 ' :xo A .Z-72 Zlwefve Sborfyears wiv 'reacl7eJl'f1e4goa.l,l4nJ now we face l' e orlf.-I And Imem'-ries of Urese .flap-py ea s, Will long wfflw us r - va 5 208,31 .jjjgji 3 fh J W l ii 3 4 5 ii ff Your feqchviys and dee? Qaid ' ance, Wi!! aid us on our wa? Be '- fore we efass' mqfes 0. - rf , 75 face asfrnn en nf J W i 3 11 1 1 3 ig Elaine We'H fbl'low ev-ery YUIQWEQEICQYHCJI alloux fu-lure years Engle Wg gqilrer f1e're fo IQIVE fo Uwe Our fdSf'f6hJfaT WE' f L ri L Ycsy if i ig ii ii i 31 211ii1y"f' ML! il U O.. 'T " , Dorofhg Y - - - H 3 vevosky Glass ilgoem Twelve years ago in thirty-seven We came to thee with childhood fears. Fearing, expectant, never surmising the joys Awaiting us in all our school years. Through the grades we went until We found ourselves in the fall of '45. Faced with choosing our high school course, We chose the goal for which to strive. With anticipation we entered this new life Seeking friends, education, and fun, too. VVe found all we sought in dear N. C. As we braved the winds which blew. We tried our courage in sports and Learned much more than how to play. You taught us good sportsmanship - the golden rule That solves life's problems and eases our way. Our class dances, parties and plays Have all come and gone too fast. Our dreams for these four years Once in the future, now lie in the past. We pause now with due gratitude To thank and praise our teachers dear. More than anything or anyone, they have been Our greatest assct with advice sincere. We have dreamed our dreams, voiced our hopes Now we must harken to the graduation bell For all too soon in forty-nine. The time has come for our farewell. We leave thy cherished classrooms and halls, But in heart and mind we shall ever be aware Of thy constant inspiring presence as we "Keep Climbing, For We Are Not Yet There." Dorothy Staverosky Qlass Will SENIOR Ann Allen LaVerne Anderson Ethel Bean Marjorie Berriker Janice Care Mary Casper Clara Clemens Hannah Dilliplane Venice Eagle Robert Evans Robert Fries Shirley Hall George Kreps John Leck Carl Levengood Nancy Loht Nancy Manwiller William McCrudden Margaret McElroy Nancy Moyer Mary Ann Mullin Sara Murray Florence Pennypacker Anna Poster Benjamin Powell Beryl Read Gloria Shrum Dorothy Staverosky Nancy Swavely Janet Thompson Agnes Torak Marlene Wilson Wilson Yerger William Zerr WILLS her giggle her long eyelashes the presidency devotion to one boy nickname "Peanut" cousins Ed and Ollie shorthand ability dreamy stare aloof manner his phone number unhurrying gait tall stature excellent marks singing ability HJ seat on bus red hair smiling face wavy hair bookkeeping knowledge deep voice absence excuses quiet manner cooperative spirit Home Ec. ability flashy sweaters dancing feet long, shining hair math. knowledge good report cards quick temper big blue eyes diamond happy-go-lucky air hot-rod Pontiac TO "Screendoor" Brockway Miss Delp "Jiggs" Bodolus Shirley Dilks "Horsey" Jones Virginia Haile and Joa Chester Laverty Sheila Collins Mary Bates Phyllis Fulmer Victo1'ia George Janet Nimmerichter Lee Batdorf Gloria Yusko Joe Smith Elma Stoudt Sarah Straw Joe McMullen Ruth Gerhart Frances Righter Joyce Giles Clyde Rupert Annie Thompson Mildred Luft "Pud" Pellicotti Gary Buckwalter Dolores Bates "Washer" Beidler George Shrum Ellen Frain Rena Tiernan Cleo Brown George Roadcap Bob Cressman n Torak Qlass prophecy T'was the year of 1969 As a newspaper columnist, my job was fine. From New York to Chicago it was my luck to go, And I traveled by train because of the snow. I boarded the train and reclined in a seat. Equipped with paper, my trip was complete. Within a few minutes I was on my way, The trip was long, the day was gray. Reading my paper I was soon attracted by This startling headline as it caught my eye: "Mr, Wilson Yerger, chemist, winner of Nobel Prize." Among other things, he has invented artificial eyes. Interrupted in my reading by a short screech, I glanced outside, to see within reach - An advertising car driven by Robert Fries. It seems all Bob has to do is ride in ease. Now back to my paper I went once again To learn of the loss of the industry of airplane. Both Beryl Read and Mary Casper profess They've tired of the job of airline hostess. "Dean of a Woman's College to Marry" Nancy Swavely's past and future surely will vary. From a woman suffragette she will become The blushing bride of some handsome one. I see that Mr. William Zerr is using his A's He got in mechanical drawing for displays. He is now printing titles on bedtime books About talking animals and running brooks. Well, of all the businesses, here I see One that holds, for me, no mystery. Gloria Shrum and Marlene Wilson, this spring Are turning to the manufacturing of a diamond ring. I see in this ad that a concert is to be Held by a master pianist of the key. Mr. John Leck is performing tonight After winning fame, much to our delight. "Mlle. J. LaRue Care, importer and designer of frocks To Janice, for gowns the wealthy society flocks. After being a secretary in the industry of 'phone- She now dictates to one of her own. Venice Eagle in Japan is teaching school Showing the "wee Japs" the golden rule. She has taken Mr. George Kreps' place Who now is working on a "soil" case. Benny Powell, our hero, wrestles tonight In the greatest of all twentieth century fights. He is under the training of Janet Thompson Who gets his opponents at the point of a gun. Although she has children of her own - two - LaVerne Anderson is governess to - guess who? Yes, she's teaching the President's little girl, The art of living in a social whirl. Miss Florence Pennypacker now owns a meat truck Delivering the best in all kinds of duck. It seems she learned the trade while in school, Delivering meat drawn by a mule. Robert Evans, who was a student in F.F.A., Now struts around in fine array. After graduating from school, he bought a patch For which, today, there is no match. c W , glass prophecy Both Marjorie Berriker and Margaret McElroy reside In the country, since their marriage, side by side Marjorie, for Margaret, plays the piano When there's nothing to do - nowhere to go. Clara Clemens, after school, got a job. Which makes her heart throb and throb. She's secretary to Cary Grant, the movie star Whom she always worshipped from afar. The girl in this picture I surely have seen Yes, here is her name - Miss Ethel K. Bean. Ethel is now a regular model, it seems, Modeling those clothes of "the girl of your dreams." A peep into Hollywood now I must take "Another Valentino" it reads without mistake. For there William McCrudden - in glory is he, After adventurously roaming over the sea. And now on the society page I see a belle. Nancy Loht is engaged to - must I tell? She started out to become a nurse But changed her plans for him, of course. "Nancy's Beauty Shoppe" - this ad reads In all she does she really exceeds. You'll never be bored in Miss Manwiller's shop She knows the latest in both beauty and gossip. Here on the sports page is good news, 1'm wondering who is going to lose. Tonight in two exhibition basketball games Agnes Torak's "Aims" play Shirley Hall's "Flames." ln the center of the sports page now I can see That "Home-Run King" certainly suits "Livy," For, as a first-baseman in the popular game, Our own Carl Levengood has won much fame. Mary Ann Mullin still likes to write As seen by this article in black and white. By the title on the top, the text is evident. "The Art of Learning How to Win an Argument." Miss Allen - Virginia Ann, I mean Is the Rosa Bonheur of the twentieth scene. With her pictures of horses, fame came fast, And now by other artists, she can't be surpassed. Next week there's a show coming to town, With horses, elephants, tricks and a clown. Nancy Moyer, in school, loved to sing, Now she serenades the cowboy king. "Get your tickets, only a few remaining," Reads this next ad under "Entertaining" Miss Hannah Dilliplane's act regularly appears, As Frankenstein she keeps you in tears and fears. Well, well I see that a county fair was held. Sara Murray's prize winning cakes excelledg While Anna Poster's sewing won first prize. Their Home Ec. training really satisfies. As I folded my paper, my heart was glad To think of the success that my classmates had. Since graduation it's been many a long day But thoughts of Norco still help us on our way. Dorothy Staverosky MCDI1, .lJ1fCJ1lll..E' ililfilefi On April El, 15948, the Junior, under the capable dire delighted audience with the farce, "Oh, l'romise Me!" by P Judging by the frequent bursts ol' laughter, the play to the final curtain. Barry Hollis fltobert Friesb, a young a note to l'atsie Linden flieryl Ready, a dancer, telling her to a dream girl, Gladys Vance fEthe1 Beanj, whom he met Trouble starts when Barry gets the notes mixed! l'atsie Linden arrives with her mother, lVlrs. Linden them, tells them that his sister June tHannah Dilliplanej i ctorship of Mr. Dale Smith, entertained a ete Williams. was thoroughly enjoyed from the lirst line millionaire just home from college, writes everything is over between them. and one on the train, asking her to come visit him. tlVIary Casperlg and liarry, to get rid ol' s his wife. June, not suspecting his plans, ruins everything, so Ann Furber tMary Ann Mullinl is Uarry's next victim to play the part of his wife. Ann is the daughter of the butler QGeorge Krepsj whom she has come to visit. To make the marriage more convincing Barry has 'borrowed' a strange baby. But, alas, Gladys arrives and Barry has to convince her he isn't married! At this point his Aux it Sue fDorothy Staveroskyj walks in and asks for an explanation! Harry is really in trouble when lVIrs. Jones flVIarjorie llerrikerl comes storm- ing in, promising him she will have him put into jail for kidnapping her baby. Ralph Saunders fllaniel Weidnerl, Ann's boyfriend, to get married but she is saved from this fate when the H nizes Saunders as the husband who had deserted her after a chance to repay him for it. All ends well when Barry's lawyer fHill McCruddenJ They all desert him except Ann, Whom he asks to marry hi explains that the hankrupe story was just a scheme of hi appears to take her with him to New York ollis' maid Kathleen fNaney Iiohtl recog- their marriage years ago, and now she has tells the guests that Barry is bankrupt. m. The play ends on a happy note as Barry s to discover who were his true friends. Q ' W ,iflozfotlier goose The complications which set in when four orphaned children struggle to maintain the ownership oi' their home, provided the theme for our hilarious senior play, "Brother Goose" by William Davidson, presented on December 9 and 10. Jeffrey Adams fRobert Friesj, the oldest of the four Adams children, attempts to serve as both father and mother to his brother, Wesley fGeorge Krepsj and two sisters, Carole fGloria Shrumj and Hyacinth fNancy Lohtj. Helen, the cook fAgnes Torakj resigns as the play opens. She declares she cannot cope with the tomboy antics of Hyacinth. Jeff's dire need for a cook and housekeeper is relieved by the a1'rival of a hosiery saleslady, Peggy Winkle fHannah Dilliplaneb, who, because of fondness for Hy and a deeper affection for Jeff, undertakes to hold the family together. As the mortgage fall due on the house, Jeff lands a contract to design the Wee Blue Inn for Lulu Trimmer fMary Casperj. JefF's progress is slowed down because of the plans he is drawing for Lenore Hudson fMary Ann Mullinj, bubble gum heiress who has a few plans of her own, namely, to marry Jeff. Through all this, the normal life in the household attempts to go on. Hy, a stellar halfback for the "Palace of Sweets" football team, practices every night on the lot on which Lenore plans to build her house. For this reason, and others, she makes no effort to hide her dislike for Lenore. Wesley, who is in Carole's estimation "girl crazy," finds his latest dream-girl in the form of the new Southern bclle in the neighborhood, Eve Mason QBeryl Ready. His main problem is keeping his arch rival, Muggs, away from Eve. Hilarity is provided by the impromptu football scene, in which Sarah, the lVlason's colored cook, fNancy Manwillerj confuses "faint" with "feint." Hy plans to thwart Lenore's intention of starting excavation on her lot before the crucial game between the "Palace of Sweets" and the "Dawn Mortuaries," and accomplishes this by almost causing the truck driver fCarl Levengoodj to have heart failure. The complications do, however, get ironed out. The ending is surprising and life once again settles down to normalcy. 77 qdimfy FRESHMAN FOLLIES . September 7-Today we started our freshman year - that time long awaited by all. Our orig- mal number has been increased by pupils from South Coventry, East Coventry, and Union Townships. Part of us are in Room 4 with Miss Beers, the rest, in Room 2 with Mrs. Burbank. September 17-Now we're an organized group, ready for business. Today's elections brought the following results: president, Ethel Bean, vice president, Janice Care, secretary, Fayctta Miller, treasurer, Gloria Shrum. October 31-Tonight we sponsored our first class dance. Decorations were in accord with Hallowe'en traditions. We can pronounce the affair a success. A swaying, rhythmic conga line high- lighted the merriment of the evening. November 22-The annual Turkey Day Classic found most of us freshmen yelling our hardest. It helped, for the Wildcats came through with a 25-13 victory. Bill McCrudden and Bob Evans were right in the fight. December 21-Safety Patrol Dance. The freshmen were there in full force. We definitely en- joyed stepping out in a social way. March 10-Round and round we go. Yes, it was a roller skating party. Most of us are amateurs on skates, but professional floor cleaners. April 20-A spring concert - on a big scale this year. We were very much excited over our first experience in singing in formal attire. Compliments are being handed out on the fine selections, especially on our rendition of the "Italian Street Song." April 26-Junior-Senior Prom. The theme was "A Night in April." The members of our class who attended related their experiences to the other freshmen, who enjoyed their "second-hand" thrills. April 30-Athletic Banquet. Our Norco mothers certainly are good cooks. Members of sports squads, including some proud freshmen, received their letters. May 9-The Glee Club participated in the Chester County Choral Festival at West Chester. The girls were nervous, but soon realized that their fears were needless. They enjoyed this unusual experience and the trip to and from our county seat. .lune 4-We surely whizzed through this freshman year. Some of our group couldn't stand the pace, but most of us survived the trials of six weeks' tests, mid-years and finals. American Legion awards went to Mary Ann Mullin and George Kreps. Congratulations to these deserving pupils! SOPHOMORE SCENES September 6-Greetings to those who came back for more knowledge. There was much hilarity as we exchanged tales of vacation days. Some are in Room 2 with Mrs. Burbank, others, in Room 5 with Mr. Alderfer. September 10-Election of officers: president, Ethel Beang vice president, Marjorie Berrikerg secretary, Janice Care, treasurer, Mary Casper. October 5-Football season is off to a good start. McCrudden, Evans, Kreps, and McElroy are on the squad. The sophs are all back of you, fellows! October 17-We chose class colors - blue and gold, and the class flower - yellow rose. October 31-A class motto was adopted: "Keep climbing, for we are not yet there." We are all hoping to climb high on the ladder of success. November 25-This Turkey Day Tussle with West Pottsgrove was a big victory for Norco, 40-0. The soph players were right in the game. December 20-Our Sophomore Hop! The big event of the year ffor us, anywayj. Wouldn't you know the weatherman was against us! First snow - then a downpour of rain. In spite of that, there was plenty of fun for everyone. Ken Nichols' Orchestra supplied us with the downbeat. The colorful decorations reminded us that Santa Claus is coming to town. February 19-A day of great excitement - we selected ou1' class rings! An oblong ring, made by Loren Murchison, finally won the approval of all the class. to Kea, Diary April 26-Another Junior-Senior Prom, with the sophs well represented. This was "A Tropical Night" and there was plenty of jungle atmosphere - huge green leaves, parrots, glittering stars, and a yellow tropical moon. May 8-Our annual skating party was held at the Rocks. Some improvement over last year's attcmpts, but the best description is a "floor-wiping" good time. May 31-Commencement Dance. Sophs were represented by Beryl and Janice, who are faithful attendants at every dance. June 1-Now begin three months of fun, frolic, and, alas, work for some of us. We're looking forward to a big junior year. J UNIOR JOTTINGS September 5-First day of school. This year we are keeping Mr. Paolantonio and Mr. Fellman busy in Rooms 1 and 10. September 7-Class election of officers. Results were president, Ethel Bean, vice president, George Krepsg secretary, Janice Carey treasurer, Mary Casper. September 10-Football season with five Juniors out for positions on squad. Unique pep rally featured a funeral. Best of luck, fellows! November 25-Big football day again. Norco trounces West Pottsgrove, 24-0. December I5-Boosters Club Banquet for football fellows, hockey girls, cheerleaders, and parents. Plenty of food and a good time for all. January 14-Farm Show at Harrisburg. Agricultural boys and home ec. girls took the day off to see the biggest exhibit of its kind in the United States. January 22-Mr. Baker replaces Mr. Fellman as our home room teacher and instructor of com- mercial subjects. February l2-Juniors held skating party. What goes up must come down, and practically every- one went down fon the floorl before the evening was over, but everyone enjoyed himself. April 9-Junior Class Play, "Oh, Promise Me!" Overwhelming success. Bob Fries amazed every- one by his dramatic ability. April 20-Spring Concert - Big production with novelty numbers. Props, colored lights and costumes were used for the first time. Beryl Read and Mary Casper showed talent as dancers for "Siboney." April 21-Prom decorating started. There will be no rest for two busy days and nights. Every- one is working hard to make this prom a great success. April 22-We're all ready to drop, but it's fun, too. April 23-Our Prom. At last, and a beautiful one it was. Rainbow colors, with the theme, "Mex- ican Fiestaf' Steve Baer's orchestra provided the musical background. Ruth Kirkner was crowned queen of the "Fiesta." April 27-Athletic Banquet. Awards were presented to football fellows, hockey girls, basketball "guys" and girls, and the cheerleaders. May 31-The Glee Club sang over KYW, an event we'll long remember. May 9-KYW Forum League Meeting at Norco. Several juniors attended. Venice Eagle spoke for Norco. June 3-Good luck, Seniors of "48"! May you have success in everything you undertake. As wc listened to honor speeches and presentation of awards, we wondered what next June would hold for us. June 5-End of school - We felt our throats tighten as Seniors wept upon leaving their last assembly. Vacation is before us, and then - we'll be the seniors! SENIOR SKETCHES September 7-At last, Room 9. Thirty-four students have weathered the storm. Miss Delp's ma1'tyrdom begins. Qzaifyg c September 14-Election of officers - Ethel Buan, president, Bill McCrudden, vice president, Janice Care, secretary, Robert Fries and Hannah Dilliplane, treasurers. September 15-Seniors follow tradition, selling vanilla and emulsions. September 20-22-Class trip. Three wonderful days! Never-to-be-forgotten incidents. Every- one was disappointed because "Uncle Harry" wasn't home. October 8-First night football game at Franklin Field - Norco versus Marple-Newtown. We won a thrilling 7-0 game. November 25--Annual Turkey Day game. Three seniors played their last game for Norco: Bill McCrudden, Bob Evans, and George Kreps. Victory for Wildcats, 18-0. First appearance of new school band. Everyone was pleased and surprised at the spirited performance. December 9-10-Senior Class Play, "Brother Goose". This farce comedy was a decided hit. Nancy Loht as the "tomboy" was a sensation. December 14-Today we began work on our yearbook. We all hope it will be a great success. December 23-Our assembly program featured an impressive candlelight procession by Girls' Glee Clubs. The new Boys' Glee Club made its debut. Later a hilarious Christmas Party was held in Room 9. Many startling and mysterious gifts were exchanged. All sorts of toys amused us. Mary Ann's gift from Janice and Nancy seemed to cause her embarrassment. January 15-Boosters Club Banquet. Second year for this annual affair. LeRoy Miller of WFIL was toastmaster. February 24-Annual trip to Civic Forum Lzague Meeting at Temple University. Seniors took part in a model day in Congress. Wilson almost got lost. March 4-Senior Dance. St. Patrick's Day d:corations helped to give final touch. This was a last contribution to the treasury. April 8-Junior class presented "The Arrival of Kitty," with Mr. Smith as coach. Chester Laverty, impersonating the real Kitty, added to the confusion, hilarity, and general madness of the plot. April 12-F. F. A. boys sponsored a Parent and Son Banquet. Miss High and the home economic girls prepared and served a delicious meal for the ninety guests. Seven fathers were received as honorary F. F. A. members. April 21-The Spring Concert was presented by members of the Junior and Senior Girls' Glee Clubs and the Boys' Glee Club. Miss Orrs did an excellent job of directing these groups. Novelty numbers included "The Kerry Dance," "By the Waters of Minnetonka," and "A Little Dutch Garden." Appropriate dances accompanied these songs. The program ended with a beautiful rendition of "Battle Hymn of the Republic." April 29-Junior-Senior Prom. The theme of the decorations was "The Blue Room," and the auditorium was transformed by crepe paper walls and ceiling of shades of blue. Particularly attrac- tive was the stage, set up as a terraced garden. Don Garrell's orchestra furnished all the soft, dreamy music that any romantic couple could want. May 3-Athletic Banquet. Plenty of delicious food for everyone. Basketball, football, and hockey letters were presented. Bill McCrudden received the Boosters Club Award for the most val- uable football player. May 13-Farmer-Farmerette Dance. Couples danced confortably in dungarees and plaid shirts. May 25-That group of enthusiastic musicians that sometimes filled the air with discords this evening burst forth in harmony. Venice Eagle, George Kreps, and Benny Powell participated. June 3-Class Night. We resumed the tradition, broken during the war, of an entertaining program given at night for friends and relatives of the graduates. .lune 5-Baccalaureate service was held in Shenkel Church. This impressive and inspiring service was equalled in beauty and solemnity only by the service we attended in Washington Cathedral. .lune 6-Again breaking from tradition, we held commencement exercises outdoors. We were proud of the fine speeches by our honor students, Dorothy Staverosky, Janice Care, and George Kreps, and the mantle oration by our class president. We were happy to receive that coveted diploma, but our hearts were heavy as we thought of leaving our alma mater. .lune 7-Truly the last day of school for us - and for many, one of the saddest. Good-bye, com- rades and classmates. Best of luck to everyone! 6130 I Q Z 'RFU' 'Thi I f. uhm Ig, xxx 1 '- er 'iso'-Af, 'T Q 1' s Q' E S .. 'WET' ,P xx 'im f iff 155 :qi-he-"' - :,,x , .4 44 W'.F' -1 r 4 7 J!!! Y gran JT 'ff of-A WOW ! . ,Q H, Q- 'o lou L10 f 01 I , ., 1f'!ff'ffff7A V I 0 4 5 Gs '- Q 11153 'NERC , 2, 0 gyWQ', ffl: 09 Senior HIUU IIHIJ I I'iVsl Vww, I1'I't lu right .I. lslxvrly. AI. SXYLIXI-IX. .l. H11-xxx, IC, Sl:-11111. 'I'. Smith, .I. I nI1fI11IsI:nL::-1' I.. XX'iIS1Il1, I'. I.llI'1, .X. BI. F4-mm-1. II. 'Iiw-lluslll. .I. II1l'isIIl':ll1. .I. 4':u1n:1Iw, .I. X1 1 rv NI.Il1vI1I. Iv. Kllnlzlm-lnxull, NI. Ilzlllslf-y. Ii. 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Iiznumzm. IL Lluyul. li, I'Ix:1n:4, ll. lin-ps, W. Ilnwvxw-1'. .l. SillIllll'l'k. 'I.lliI'4l rww- -XY, 'I'ysm1. XY. Mc-tll:11'gl1li11, li. Gauss. K, llrzul, 12. Sllllllll. li. lllllll'l'IlllII I"ulll'lll l'UXY+xY, Aluliw, IL lmy, U. 121-2111, M11 N. Uu1'tm-1', aulxismz 57111110111 011111 S4-:ull-ll, la-ft 11- rig'l1l-- Y. th-mg:-. A. Allvn, M. XYils,x1n. M, A. Mullin. IC. lim-am. .l. ffillllil ln . X. lung.: '. Slum ding- li. lmvm-ll, tl. lin-ps, I.. Sumls, M11 A. Almlu1't'v1', zulxisurp 1'. Ii1'UWll, lllllllllklllll if pO1ftS N 'av First row. left torip:l1tflt. llailu-l, XY, Ma-1'runl1l1-ii, I.. llntiloi-t', I-'. xY2tlllIll1'1'. .l. fll'lllHlHSll. 1-:iptnini 414 Krw-ps. lt, lla-ish, II. livnns. ll, lloznlm-zip. S1-4--iiicl row U. l'rilv:inic-k, II, llvllllllll. XY. V1-nwny, 4', XllIl'l'1lj'. li. Il:-idli-r, XY. llhynn-r. ll. Ile-idle-i'. l'. llrown, XY. .loin-s. 'Vhird row- Mr, lv. Fllllll. Mr. NY. l'zu-Iannltnio, iw-:uclnsi 'l'. Manger, L. Ih-t-klt-y. S. lioilolns, ti, Fhrnni, tl, Wninplcr, .I. Krm-ps. Ii, Keen. n nlingvis, lioollinll lflvcry Scptenihcr hrinigs at recurrence ol' foothzill fever, and this ye-ur was no exception. lfoollrilll txcitement was in the air as early as August and hy the time school opened in Septeniher. fitliltd l'z1olz1ntonio had twenty-four hoys going: tliroug'h u tough daily drill. Out of the twenty-four, the sturt ing: line-up forthe tirst tzzune was as l'ollows: Reish, lett endg Kreps, left tackle: Rhymcr, lct't gruzlrll llodolus. centerg C. Rupert, right gruzwclg l,. Hatdort, right taclcleg Iivznis, right end: Wumplcr, quztrtcr- hack: Oruntlosh, right l1ull'hziclcg D. Ilatdorf, left hulthuclcg lN'lcCruddcn, tullliucli. With liiggh hopes, the lnoys drilled through strenuous hours of practice under the skilled truininie ot' head couch, Nlr. l'z1olz1ntonio, and his cupahle assistants, Nlr. Dale Smith and Mr. Louis liucliwulter The sczison opened in fine style. with an decisive victory over Collegeville. The next, contest was ai liard-fougfht game with Murple-Newtown, in which Norco's lone touch- down was scored hy Orandosh. This was a night Qjklllle played at Franklin Field and drew zu hig: crowd hoth from Norco and Pottstown. The next, two gzanies with lioyertown and East Greenville liroug'ht in scores with our opponents on the winning side. llowever. our hoys played hard and the record does not do justice to the figlitiiig spirit ot' the Wildcats. lietter luclx cznne with the Wyomissing' game, which ended in at 1-1-I4 tie. 'l'hen t'ortunc cliuntred treatin when Spring' City hrougrht at larger, strong,flv-t'a:vored eleven to the Alumni Homecoming: trznne Norco held the Pirates scoreless during the first, half, and only in the second halt' did Spring' t'ity scorc on an couple of lucky hreztks. The Wildcats started the West Reading game in fine form and the first half ended with seven points in our favor. But we could not stand the pace in the second half and West Reading rolled up eighteen points against us. In this game, thc spectators were privileged to see "Horsey" Jones make some of his spectacular tackles. Norco's trouble was the same factor that he'ped to defeat us in the Boyertown and Spring City games. The weather was unusually warm, and the boys were exhausted by the last quarter, but we did not have adequate reserves to replace many of the regular players. The season ended with two smashing victories. The Upper Chichester game opened with a thriller. Orandosh ran eighty-five yards on the opening kick-off. Then, Evans, on an end-around play, ran sixty yards for a touchdown. This good beginning inspired our team to a 20-6 victory. The Annual Thanksgiving Day game was plzyed on Thanksgiving afternoon on Pottstown's field. With ideal weather conditions and a big crowd of enthusiastic rooters backing them, the Norco boys played their best and ended the season with an 18-0 victory. Three seniors played their last game for No WILLIAM McCRUDDEN Bill, our sturdy fullback, was a powerful lin Bill received the Boosters Club award for the most ROBERT EVANS Bob, our plucky right-end, was always in th defcnsc, and made an unusual showing in the Upp GEORGE KREPS George, left tackle, was the scrappiest boy on the squad. fifteen minutes. George called plays, and, in add tion was the of the team. 2 fight with a xr Chichester rco on Thanksgiving Day: 2-plunger, the hardest-working man in the backfield. valuable player on the team. never-give-up spirit. He was best on game. He played the full season except for 0118 who kept up the pep and morale SUMMARY OF THE SEASON Visitors Norco Collegeville 0 32 Marple-Newtown 0 7 Boyertown 10 0 East Greenville 30 6 Wyomissing 14 14 Visitors Norco Spring City 14 0 West Reading 18 7 Upper Chichester 6 20 West Pottsgrove 0 18 92 104 The junior varsity squad was made up of faurteen hard-fighting boys, coached by Mr. Buck- walter. The six-game schedule resulted in one victory, two ties and three losses. These youngsters, of various sizes, but all filled with enthusiasm for that go with hard training. Norco will be able to the game, learned to take the bumps and spills find some of her future stars in this group. SUMMARY OF TIIE SEASON Visitors Norco Visitors Norco Pottstown 14 0 Boyertown 7 0 Phoenixville 8 6 Second-String Squad 0 0 Boyertown 6 13 -1 - Hill School 0 0 35 19 4 I-'irsl row. lm-tl to riglil-ll. llezld, N, lXlnnwiller. Miss .l. IM-lp, znlrisor. Si-4-mi-I row .l. 1':uln:ilni, Ib, Sturm-rnsky, 1-auptziing V. th-orgq-. 'l'hii-il iw-wwell. Ivilliplnne. J. l'ara-, S.1'olIins. Fourth row-M. Casper, J. Christman, C. Brown. Ciwerleciciez's The fall of '48 brought with it many things. Among these were the cheerleaders, their new coach, and new cheers. The squad started its year with Dorothy Staverosky as captain. It consisted oi' eight girls: Janice Care, Nancy Manwiller, Beryl Read, Mary Casper, Dorothy Staverosky, seniorsg Sheila Collins, Janet Christman, juniorsg and Jane Camaho, a sophomore. These eight girls worked with apprentice cheerleaders through the fallg and, after eight weeks of practice the following three girls were chosen to join the squad: Hannah Dilliplane, seniorg Victoria George, sophomore: and Cleo Brown, freshman. One of their many problems was the lack ofa coach. When, in the middle of the football season Miss Jessie Delp undertook the task of advisor, the squad's morale was greatly boosted. 7 The annual Cheerleaders' Dance held in December was a great success and secured the badly- needed funds for new uniforms. As a means oi' raising additional funds, the girls made and sold red and white pom-poms to the student body. The cheerleaders worked long and hard to train not only themselves but the student body as well. They were on hand at every game to support our teams. Pep rallies were held before every football game in order to bring about enthusiasm and pep. Contests, novelties, and skits gave the students the "school spirit" needed. All this resulted in a crowd of students willing to support their team and eager to inspi1'e it "on to victory." I-'irsl row. IcI'l to rielit--Rl, I1-riiker. l'. l"ulnn-r. .l. lfxrns, IZ, l'i'rs"l. I-T. lil-zin, captzii 1 Xl, lltwiiliu-i, S. Il:ill. Il. Ni-sley. S. 11151.41- Fvviillll rin If lllllil, l.. XX'ilson. Y. Ilziile. S, liilks. IC. Iixans. .l. Visririk. .l. Sw--iiilnirl. Xl l.:inusti-li. Xl, llilres. 'fliiitl row Miss Ir. Lynch, --oat-li: .I. Gill-s, l'. Swaxwly, S. I.i:litcnp. .l. Flizinei. I' .XI.-wi-inlilt-11. ll, tit-iliart, IC. lil'1!IllI2lll. n'an:,gt-rs, I focleeif 'llie hockey season of the fall of '48 was one of the most successful in the past few years, in spite of what seemed like an unfavorahle lmeg.rinninL!'. The opening' ganie had to he postponed twice. so it wasn't until Uctoher ti that we traveled to Spring' City. Our girls dropped this frame to the liluc and White, -1-l. Our hopes of a hetter score were alnicst realized in the next game, Pottstown at North Voventry. The girls showed improvement, hut Pottstown managed to get one more goal heforc the whistle hlcw, and we were on the short end ofa -1-53 total. That was our last defeat. Affairs took a turn for the hetter, and in the game with Downing'- town on tlctoher 21. Shirley Hall scored four goals in the second half, hringing' us a 4-2 victory on the hoine field. Hur trip into Ilerks County resulted in a victory of Z-1 over Hoyertown. When Spring' City came to Norco on Novemher 8, we were all set for revenge: hut somehow Spring: Vity seems to "hex" us, and we had to he satisfied with a tie score. The rest of the season was a series of victories - three in a row - over Pottstown, Downing:- town. and XVest Reading: VVe can look hack over our l'ecord with pride, Miss l.ynch's good coaching' and lone' hours ol' training hrought results. The frames were marked hy good sportsmanship and a friendly feeling' hetween rivals. The girls who played will take with them happy memories of coni- radeship and good times on the hockey field. NVith regret we say farewell to three senior girls, who have heen on the hockey field during: the past I'our years. l'I'I'III'II, IIICXN l'lthel was the varsity captain, a steady, courageous leader of the g'roup. She was our hard- liiltiney reliahle center halfhack, dashing' all over the field and filling' her position more than adequa- lcly. SIIIIILICY lI.tI.I, Shirley. the center, had many good qualities as a player. She was our high scorer, with nine goals to her credit. In addition to speed and ahility to drihhle well, Shirley was a deceptive passer and kept the enemy guessing' as to where the hall would he in the next second. NI.tR.l0IilIC IWIICRIKER "3larg'ie" was a 1 iarentlv a shy, Quiet ierson, hut, turned into a dangerous ommonent when she . - .- I l I 1 I - . went into action on the tield. As left halthaek, she was sure to he on the Joh and she fed the line continually. laying the f,:roundwork for many of our goals. line:-liliu. left to iight- M. Sc-heiilt. li. lit-ish, XY. Mi-I'i'lltl1lvii. Si-ate I. li-It to right U. Iarlinatou, IP, Tyson, V. illll'1'l'l. 12. Iluekwallt-r, 'l'. I-Illis. Ii. lim-ii, l". XY:iinplt-r. Stauiling, li-ft In right Mr. I.. Iliiekwzilli-i'. i-oat-lil ll. t':tni:ilio, K. Iii-en. l', lIl'uu'u. XY. .loin-s, l,. limklvy, I,. Ili-itllvr, lt'. Krrliu. XY. Nvliee, Mr. I'. Suiitlt, -'vi.u'Ii. Sci-oinl row. sliiiuliiia. It-ft to right-XY. I"u1nicr, lt. llupcit, li. 1'l't'5SlllElIl. li, i'lt'Illt'IlS, 1 i l ' ' ll l I I ll vous bciseet in The first game of the 15718-42? season was with West I'ottsg.frove, our traditional foothall rival Seeking' revenge for their loss on Turkey Dav, the Falcons played solely for a victory. The NVihlcat were unahle to keep up with the constant scoring' ofthe Falcons and were defeated -131-22. Ilene tlleinen was high scorer with nine points. Un lleccniher 22 the XVildcats went to Collmgeville, hopefully looking' forward to their firft victory. llut Lady Luck had turned her hack on the Wileats, and they lost 49-18. the Lats played hard hut found themselves surrounded hy a tough Conshy Five. The final score w: ti-1-221. Rupert was higrh scorer with nine points. On llceeniher 22? Norco was swamped hy a strong' llahy Trojan team 55?-143. Uur hoys were un accustomed to the large court and found themselves lest, when trying' to make field goals. For our next game, on January 7, the Wildcats traveled to Bridgeport, where they suffered another defeat at the hands of the Dragons, 58-26. The NVildcats' next gfaine, January 21, was with Spring City. Our hoys tried constantly to keep pace with the Pirates' scoring, hut. were unsuccessful, as shown hy the score, tit?-18. Norco's next encounter was on January 25 with Warwick, our arch rival. liehind her st: forward, liill llaver, Warwick was alrle to keep the score out of reach of the Vilildcats duriuir the eutiit game. lteish led the Wildcat scoring' column with 12 points, hut the total 134-238. In our game on January 28 with Upper Merion, Norco was unahle to alter the attack. With tht experience of their previous grames the Wildcats played to win, hut found their hopes for a vietolx were useless. Clyde Rupert led the Wildcats with SJ points. The final score read 78-28. Norco took its second loss from Bridgeport on lfehruary 4. Norco drifted alone' casually until the final quarter when they came through with 15 points, These, however. were not enough to comhz lZrid3:eport.'s previous high scoring. Gary Huckwaltcr led the Wildcats with lil points. Collegzgeville invaded Norco on l"clwruary 8 and found something: they hadn't liargained for in tht On January ll the Wildcats met Conshohocken on our home court. Still looking: for a victory is form of guarding. Gary Buckwalter skillfully held Clayconib, Collegeville's sure-shot center, to only 13 points. Despite a hard battle by the Wildcats, Collegeville won 46-21. ' Norco showed its best spirit and teamwork in their game with Conshohocken on February 11. Despite the disadvantage of playing on an unfamiliar court our boys played one of the best games of the season. Leading in the first quarter the Wildcats were unable to hold the lead and bowed to a final score of 43-29. Ace scorer for the game was Bill McCrudden, our only senior player, who hit the double scoring column with 10 points. On February 14 the Wildcats played a return game with West Pottsgrove. The Falcons held a great advantage of height over the Wildcats causing them a great deal of trouble. Becouse of this disadvantage the Wildcats were mostly unable to get the ball past their guards. The final score was 56-26. Our return game with Spring City was on February 18. The Wildcats kept pace in the first quarter and when it ended we were trailing only one point. In the second quarter the Pirates out- scored us and kept the score out of our reach for the remainder of the game, 67-28 was the final score. On February 22 the Wildcats journeyed to Warwick. Again the Wildcats were unable to check Warwick's sure-shot center, Bill Baver, who personally kept the score out of the hands of the Wildcats. The final score was 61-20. Our final game of the 1948-49 season was at Upper Merion. Again the Wildcats were at a disadvantage, playing on an unfamiliar court. Rupert and Wampler each had nine points, but the Wildcats were unable to battle the onslaught of shooting by Upper Merion, 101-28 was the final score. Under Dale Smith as the new coach the varsity found plenty of action in the 1948-49 season. After several practices a probable starting line-up was announced. It included: Gary Buck- walter, center. This is "Bucko's" first season at Norco and he was our biggest threat, hitting the double scoring column many times. This was Oscar Darlington's first season on the varsity, and his alertness and agility were a great asset to the team. Thorpe Ellis played either guard or forward. This is also Thorp's first season on the varsity, although he had previous ex- perience playing junior varsity. He is a "south-paw." Thorpe shows promise as an ace shot next season. With one season of varsity experience to his credit, Ralph Reish, our tall guard, is a depend- able player. Although he, too, is left-handed, Ralph is one of our most valuable players. Substitutes were Clyde Rupert, Francis Wampler, Donald Tyson, Ralph Keen and Melvin Scheidt. These boys saw action in almost every game and because of their versatility were often in the starting line-up. Bill McCrudden was our only senior player this season. With three years previous experience, this was Bill's first year playing varsity. Bill played either forward or guard and kept the team alive with his spirit and vitality. At the end of the season he was elected captain. We are sure he will be greatly missed next season. VARSITY SUMMARY West Pottsgrove Bridgeport ...... Collegeville ,.,......., Norco Opponents 29 77 . 21 46 Collegeville ,..,...... ..... . ,,.... . Pottstown Junior Varsity f3,j'QsihQ,2ffjg1P09g """' Bridgeport ,..,.,,.......,..... Spring City .ll.'.4l'vl 28 67 Conshohocken .. .... Warwick I 20 61 Sprmg City 4--'- Upper Merion ,,.... ,. 28 101 Warwick .. ,...... 38 64 T - Upper Merion .,... .,.. 2 8 78 376 932 Under the leadership of Louis Buckwalter, the Junior Varsity won three games and lost eleven. Gene Clemens led the junior varsity scoring columns in every game. He shows great promise as our chief threat for varsity next season. The junior varsity team consisted of Gene Clemens, Plato Brown, Bob Cressman, Leland Beekley, and Lorrin Beidler. This group exhibited some clever and consistent playing during the entire season. Junior Varsity substitutes were K. Keen, W. Fulmer, F. Brockway, and G. Wampler. These boys also saw a great deal of action during the season. JUNIOR VARSITY SUMMARY West Pottsgrove Collegeville . ....... . Bridgeport .......,.... Conshohocken ..,. Spring City ,..,.,. Warwick ...,.,. Upper Merion ....,. Bridgeport . ..,,. . Collegeville .,,....... Conshohocken .......... West Pottsgrove Spring City ........ Warwick .,.......... Upper Merion ,..,.. . Norco Opponents 28 32 22 36 32 26 21 38 42 33 27 37 354 485 Kin-Q-ling, la-ft lu right---Il. Spolin. F. Stznultcr, .I. Fliam-r. S. Ligblf-:xp. Shalt-ml. It-It In ii,L:l.l- IC. lrxans, IZ. Nt-slcy, F. llall, .l. lixans, .X. 'I'or:zk, l'. l-'lnlnn-r, .l,llil1-s, V I A Ntamlllig. lelt to right Miss IV. liynch, 1-oavlii X. Mu-oin, Bl. ltotlu-nbr-rgcr, .l, llllvli- walter, J. linker. tl. Gloss, l". lfrain, A. 'l'llUlHIlSUll, M. Iicrrilu-r, S. Ulscn, lllHll2lHl'l'S, Cifirfs' llifasleetlmll The 1948-49 basketball season opened January 7 with Amity. The entire game was fast and thc team showed great rpfiit, but the game ended in a loss for Norco. The girls successfully held Amity until late in the game, when the opponents broke through with a few long shots. The final score read 32-223. The following game on January 11 was with our neighbor and arch rival, Pottstown. Our girls were unable to show their skill during this game because their playing was overshadowed by that of l'ottstown's star forward. She easily broke through our defense, which was unusually weak during this game. The result was another loss for Norco, 32-SP. The third, and most exciting game of the season, was with West Pottsgrove. Previous to this game, a change had been made in positions. The two senior players, Agnes Torak and Shirley Hall, who represented the height on the team, were Changed from forwards to guards: and Joyce Giles, who had previously played guard, was moved to a forward position. During this game the new guards were a tremendous improvement in defense, and with their help the game was won by a last-minute basket by lflsther Evans. The girls played a hard-fought game and both teams kept the score at an even pace, never giving the opposite side a commanding lead. The final score was 15-14. February 4 found us facing a formidable foe - Warwick. During this game the new guards were unable to prevent kVill'VVlCli,S forwards from shooting. Their crack forwards would receive thc ball and with a few passes, score a basket. It was an overwhelming victory for Warwick, 18-11. On l"ebruary 15 one of the hardest fought games of the season was held at Royersford. Our girls tried constantly to break their defense but were largely unsuccessful. Hoycrsford won, 231-12. The second victory of the season was won over Downingtown on February 18. Both teams were evenly matched throughout the game, which ended in a close score - Norco, 14g Downingtown, 11. The last contest of the season was a return game with Pottstown. lt was a heartbreaking defeat, as Norco lost by one point. We had a chance to tie the score, but the deciding foul shot was missed. Even though Norco lost, our girls showed good sportsmanship and clean playing. VARSITY SUMMARY Norco Opponents Norco Opponents Amity ....,,.......,..,,.. 23 32 Royersford ...,. ,..... 1 2 23 Pottstown ,.,...,.... .... 9 32 Downingtown .... .. 14 11 Wcst Pottsgrove ....... 15 14 Pottstown ..,.... ...... 2 7 28 Warwick ......,.,4,.,..,,.,...,........,.. ...., 4 18 T -- Amity ...,.....,,..........,.....,...,............., 21 36 125 194 The varsity played two extra non-schedule games during the season, both with the faculty. The first was a victory for the varsity, 17-12. Jessie Delp and Agnes Torak were high scorers for their respective teams. The second game was won by the faculty with a close score of 24-23. AGNES TORAK With two years of junior varsity experience to her credit, Agnes Torak, fleet-footed forward, was changed to guard after the second game of the '48-'49 season. Here Agnes displayed her ver- satility by mastering quickly the duties of this position. With her fighting spirit and desire to win, "Aggie" was an incentive to the other girls and will be missed next year. SHIRLEY HALL Shirley was also a victim of the transfer of positions. A mainstay at forward in three previous years of basketball experience, she was transfered to guard position along with Agnes. Here she de- veloped dormant ability to guard closely and accurately. Speed was her greatest ally. Shirley seemed to guard two girls at one time and usually prevented excess scoring on the part of the opponents. QJQ ljlaying 67,19 game Remember when you play the game To always do your best, No matter what the game may be It should be played with zest. And think of the other players When you play the game. Strive for good sportsmanship and teamwork And in the end - fame. You are but one player working for the team, But each one has his role to fill. Stick to your job through trouble and strife, And do your part with a will. If you play this way in the game of life All through the coming years, There will be no fouls against your namc As the end of the game nears. Niemories of Qiir lvashingtfizi Trip .lilways to ii3E1llf3Hli7Ul' Getting up so early . . . Fries's huge suitcase . . . Leck's impersonation of Dracula . . . Anna and her memorable spare-ribs . . . Nancy Manwiller in her towel . . . Beryl's remarks to the man across the street . . . Loht's fatal forgetfulness in 214 . . . Janice, locked out of her room . . . Mary Ann and Nancy in the shower . . . Casper's friend with his stick . . . What the girls in 214 saw from the bay window . . . Janice, Mary Ann, and Nancy in the park . . . Nancy Swavely, caught in her safety belt on the plane . . . Aggie and Janice and the "give-away" telephone call . . . The way Dot and Casper commun- icated with the street below . . . Evans, who thought it was raining . . . Nancy Moyer and her cowboy songs . . . McCrudden, Evans, and Zerr, who were followed by three girls . . . Livy and his jokes . . . Shirley's friendship with the elevator boy . . . The foreign embassies in the rain . . . Venice's pink raincoat . . . Our first glimpse of the White House . . .The people Who wouldn't eat breakfast . . . Those sleepless nights . . . Our aching feet . . . Wilson's complaint about restrictions in the Bureau of Printing and Engraving, "All that money and look at those bars." . . . Dot's package with its deceptive shape . . . How the boys looked in the girls' hats . . . Shrummie losing her wallet . . . The exchange of food during the candle-light dinner . . . The party in room 203 . . . Those elevator trips to the rocf . . . The poker game in room 214 . . . Walking down from the Washington Monument . . . Hannah's breathlessness as the plane left the ground . . . The quiet, impressive service at the Washington Cathedral . . . Getting lost on the free nights . . . Florence and the broken light switch . . . The fateful and unexpected visit from the dectective . . . Mr. Alderfer and Miss Delp at the breakfast table . . . George and his camera troubles . . . The football line-up along Pennsylvania Avenue . . . Clara's remarks in the Smithsonian Institute . . . Margaret's dislike for the Medical Arts Build- ing . . . The scribbled post cards . . . Margie's call to Roger . . . Ethel, talking in her sleep . . . The telltale smoke rings . . . Jack, the singing bus-driver . . . Smiling for the class picture . . . Looking across the Potomac from Mount Vernon . . . Checking out of the hotel . . . The beautiful sunset at Oxford . . . Singing our Alma Mater on the way home. Yes, we'll always remember! W...-X+--xx ...ww-f""" X i ...i........-,. n .. 1 Seniors Hs lwe See Them Ann Allen ,4,., ,. . ...,,, . LaVerne Anderson .,.. Ethel Bean .,...... 4, Marjorie Berriker ,... Janice Care .,,.l..,.. Mary Casper ,.,, .. Clara Clemens .,.l... . Hannah Dilliplane ,... Venice Eagle .,4,... Robert Evans ...,... Robert Fries ll..... Shirley Hall ..... George Kreps ,F , John Leck . .. Nancy Loht .. . . . Carl Levengood .. . Nancy Manwiller , . William McCrudden M Margaret McElroy Nancy Moyer .,.. F, .. Mary Ann Mullin , .o , Sarah Murray . ., Florence Pennypacker Anna Poster .e,. ,...,.. . Benjamin Powell ,o,., .. Beryl Read ..i.,....., Gloria Shrum .,oy4,o....,o. Dorothy Staverosky Nancy Swavely ...,...,.. Janet Thompson .,o..,.o Agnes Torak Wilson Yerger ....4 Marlene Wilson 4,e... William Zerr ..4, .,., "Queen For A Day "Young Widder Brown ,. ,, ..,.. "Kate Smith ., "Our Gal Sunday' "Portia Faces Life "Dinah "Blondie "The Lone Ranger "My Friend Irma "Ersal Twing "Dick Tracy "Flash Gordon "The Thin Man "Casper Milquetoast "Stop the Music "Little Iodine "Can You Top This? ..h. "Sparkle Plenty ,. "Ozark Ike "Barney fGooglel Maggie Cand Jiggsl . "Moon Mullins "Little Orphan Annie , "The Shadow "Betty Crocker "Eega Beeva "Minnie Mouse "Bride Cand Grooml "Mrs. Bufforpington 'Information, Please "Life Can Be Beautiful "Sage Brush Sal , .. "Little Abner "Buck Rogers 7 7 9 7 9 Y l 7 1 Y l 1 Y 9 1 H32 Sad gag: awgigg P3050 3524 ,835 25555 ,-Bei 3:2 Tagmweam .4 no um lm UEWEMEL ummbiigmwm 3003 253 MO -H823 -HOWTGN EEOETSSS COWHEOH' CNP 3 E-Quran aa: Ewmgp Eegbm gzazmm E M26 'SMCNFSQQL UEOMN -H Dm im .ASW 2902 :gm NSAC EWEOQOSUS ,Saga FSSQEMSOSQ aim Pamagbgm 'Sagem 'dgmgmaam .SCE OEWE EOEWPS .5553 UQOFTEMSL ,agsrgg N ,522 BEADED ,ESWEEU ,assi 325 heme? 3:5 0,593 rigm 2:-OPQ in adm ' 'Siam Bapsisrm 'swag Sam ENESVWBNW :mam mzpm he-QOH. 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CDBG ann: mggw Q23-Algwmm Wang wiv-OED NNE' RWEEOUFH: 225: 205305 MCEWBE amass? mega MO :sh :NASWOW :mn-2 ,sm 3505 wiv-Nm mg-Ew5OQ 5:032- MEHMMG mwwzldda 'H-SN E253 Sway E555 E555 052,52 4205 M254 COWQEOFF GBE:- rmgdam M282 kgmemggm NAEPSQ EBEW gg-U MESH Tram :QSOAH have IHBWORH N32 WEE. .HESHEEOAH 82985 55:52 gsm 5:52 Eg' has ,SMOE NS-:WZ NAOISQUE Pyswssz 5035.692 EE-E5 as-:aewz M252 EDA KSC-WZ UOOMSPQH TSO iq! -Eg asm Wwgmww :Mm NS-Him mga tggw msgm :BOM gwnwm SES, 25-AE:Q ENE-Mm 25505 ESD :ago has 950 0322 ,axirgm lugs F-gm Gem COMFSHEQ 05815 50:4 E24 H242 . w . IIIIIOI'-SUHIUI' IIVUHI lleralded as one of the nu-st lmeautilul and suecesslul pronis in the history ot the school, the annual Junior-Senior Prom was held April Zflrd in the school auditorium. l"ollowin1,5 the theme, "lVlexiean Fiesta," the auditorium was gaily deeorated. Dancing: under a gala ceiling' oi' multi-colored crepe paper and liallovns, the dancers were enchanted hy the surround- ingrs. The lwaleony was changed into an artificial lawn with rustic turniture inviting' the dancers to rest and enjoy the ret'reshments served to them. ln the center ofthe lawn was a throne. l'aper chains Nlexiean hats, colored lights, and ia mer lanterns com mleted the decorations. Pedro a hu "e failv minted i is ls . l Mexican, was an appropriate staple setting: for Steve Baer and his orchestra, whose soft music pro- vided the proper ll2lt'liLfI'Ulll1tl for the dancing: couples. popul This was the first prom to t'eature a queen and her court. Chosen from the Senior t'lass hy ar vote in the .lunior Class, their identity was kept a secret until the day of the prom. The results revealed liuth Kirkner as queen, with Shirley llean. Nadine Ilavidheiser. Phyllis llersh and Joanne lier lin in the court. During' intermission Ruth was led to the tlirrne and crowned with a garland of roses "Queen of the Mexiean Fiesta" lry Ethel Dean, president of the Junior Class. Each memher of the court re- eeived a liouquet and the Queen was presented with a small grift. llus prom will long' remain in our memories as one of the outstanding.: events in our seliool career, Mary Ann Mullin Most likely to succeed Most industrious Most original Most amusing Best naturcd Best student Best all-around student Hardest worker Most generous Most agreeable Most optimistic Quietest Noisiest Most flirtatious First to marry Most athletic Best dancer Best mannered Most graceful Prettiest Best dresser Greatest apple polisher Most sophisticated Did most for school Did the school for the most Best musician Best artist Most mode1'n Best personality Cleverest Meekest Most Most Most Most bashful modest often tardy popular Sleepiest Most talkative Most serious-minded Flightiest Most dignified Least studious Laziest Fairest Biggest bluffer Wittiest Best looking Prettiest blonde Dreamer Most school spirit Most argumentative Most reserved Youngest Smallest Most willing Dorothy Staverosky Ann Allen Mary Casper Nancy Manwiller Nancy Manwiller Dorothy Staverosky Dorothy Staverosky Venice Eagle Ethel Bean Florence Pennypacker Nancy Swavely Nancy Moyer Beryl Read Gloria Shrum Shirley Hall Janice Care Marjorie Berriker Janice Care Hannah Dilliplane Janice Care Nancy Moyer Mary Ann Mullin Ethel Bean Nancy Moyer Marjorie Berriker Ann Allen Beryl Read Janice Care Venice Eagle Sara Murray Nancy Swavely Anna Poster Hannah Dilliplane Mary Ann Mullin Nancy Moyer Nancy Loht Dorothy Staverosky Nancy Loht Mary Ann Mullin LaVerne Anderson Nancy Moyer Clara Clemens Nancy Moyer Nancy Manwiller Agnes Torak Marlene Wilson Janice Care Janet Thompson Clara Clemens Janice Care Margaret McElroy Ethel Bean lbliosyncmcies George Kreps George Kreps Carl Levengood Wilson Yerger Carl Levengood George Kreps George Kreps George Kreps Carl Levengood Carl Levengood Robert Fries Robert Fries Jack Leck William McCrudden William Zerr William McCrudden William McC1'udden Carl Levengood Robert Fries Carl Levengood Benny Powell William McCrudden George Kreps William Zerr Jack Leek Carl Levengood William Zerr Carl Levengood Carl Levengood Robert Evans Robert Fries Robert Evans William Zerr William McCrudden William Zerr Wilson Yerger George Kreps Wilson Yerger Robert Fries William Zerr William Zerr George Kreps Jack Leck Wilson Yerger William McCrudden William Zerr William McCrudden William McCrudden Robert Fries Jack Leck Benny Powell George Kreps Mr. and Mrs. High I. Q. Mr. :xml Mrs. lVlusclc Hound llvssio llashful :mel l olnlny liznckwztril Mr. aml Mrs. Joker Polly Pretty and lloruco Hzmclsomc Mr. and Mrs. Modest Mr. anfl Mrs. Wcclcling liouml Molly Manners and Percy Ilolitc flzfiogznpfzs fllurzo imater ee E+ 'The Norco lllilclcut Every high school has a legend Passed on from year to year, To which they pledge allegiance And always cherish dearg But of all the honored idols, There's but one which stands the test- It's the stately Norco Wildcat, The symbol of our best. Chorus : Hail to the Wildcat, loyally bred! Hail, Alma Mater, with your White and Red! Norco forever, moulder of men! Fight for her honor And victory again. is Alllln ' gnll llii' Q I RTM CQVENTZ I !IIClUl' - CIUSSIIIUII l-'irst row, It-tt to right--li. Ili-ish. I.. IlatvlorI', li. l'1-llic'olli,.l, Smith. Ii. Ile-irlh-r. If. lint tort. l'. lliipi-rt, .I. fll'illlllKlSl1, XY. llrowt-r. .l. liillllllilll, T. Seidel, I' l.:1x:-rly. S. IS.-dollis. .I. Salsuinivk, Ir, l,loy:I, Ii, Faiids, XV. Alvliauzhlin, XY. Tyson. S1-coin! row -IC. lil'iIllll?lll. Ii. flerharl. l'. lfnliner, IS. N1-sl:-y. .l, Ilol-vrls, .l, Siu-inlnvrl. S. lils--ii. .I. Inu-kowilz, M. lim-Ii, S. Uxerliollzefr, S. Vollins. S. Straw, Y. Ilzlilv, .l. Yu-:spin-r, 42. Ifivv I' I'ors1I 'I' 1're-'isy I-.. Milt-iizlv. Third row .I. Ka-ipi-r, l', Ilrown, ll. Ilina-s. .l. Vhiislnian, S. llilks. I-'. lfrain. 'l', Iillis. l"'Vl'l'llI row .l. HXIIIIH, H. Gloss. ll, liven, 'I', Fish:-r, .l. lh-lnniil. .l. All-llivllt-n. 1+'iI'1h rouvl lass adxisors. Miss LP. Lyncli, Mr. 1'. llakm-r, Mrs. I-'. llui-bank. Glass oc 756 J Tinie marches on, and we, who but a short time ago we1'e inexperienced frcshinen. then more sophisticated sophomores, now stand ready to cross the threshold into the senior year. This is a fittingr time to review the achievements of our junior year. We are indebted to our four classmates - Stephen Bodolus, president: Phyllis Fuhner. vice- prcsidentg lillcn Frain, treasurerg and Joyce Sweinhart, secretary - who have broug,1'ht us stlccessfully through the mast year. Mrs. Burbank, Miss Lynch. and Mr. llaker, class advisers, have given ns able l . . guidance. VVe are proud oi' the large representation ol' juniors in sports, patrol, band, grlee clubs, on thc cheerleading squad, and on the "Norco News" staff. The two outstanding! events which we sponsored were the Junior Prom and the junior play. The l'ron1 was a gala aifair, with striking' decorations centered around the theine, "The lllue Ronin." "The Arrival of Kitty" gave some ofthe dramatic inenibers oi' our class an opportunity lo appear on the stage. The play was a cleverly-constructed plot, based on the idea of mistaken identity, with a young inan posing: as Kitty. The delijihtful laugh-lines ,rave our audience their inoney's worth ol' entertainment, and we were pleased with the substantial gain for our treasury. For this first time at Norco, the junior class has been permitted to start several IIIKIIILXX-llllllillltl' projects before the senior year, so that the burden will not be so great, next fall. Now we are looking forward to a happy senior year. Hut there is sadness in the thougrht, for we inust say farewell to our senior friends. To the class of 12349, we extend our sincere best wishes. We hope they may ever be a credit to their Alma Mater. I .3 First ruw. Is-It in 1'i,L:'I11-I". Iiimrlv. G. Rw:uI1':l11, .I. If'I.l1Z4-11. I.. Yusi, K. Ibvml, 'II M1'1Iuwal1l,l'. AIm'1':1y. Ii. 'I'rytI1:1II. IL 1 I-up.-xg 11, Irm-lillglmly I-1, sl.,u.11. M, g.-l,,.i,l1, ly' 'pys II. IIIIIN'l'I. I". NV:un1pI4-V. I.. III-idlm-1', 'l'. AIIllIL1'l'I', I-'. IIuI1I. ' S4-I-MINI I'llXY'.I. Films, .I. Ulvxzl, H. FIZIIII-I'l'I', Y. 41:-mg:-. .I. I.:Iu-Vty. NI, I"r:1in, I AIVAIIIIIPII, M. Mvlirvwzun, IC. Ili:-I1:u'1Is, .I. NIH lm-Via-lull-1', .I. 4':1m:lIuw, M. Iizuuslc-y, AI. IluI1I, 'XI O 1:1-um.. n. Im-.-. 1-'. ni..-1.1.-I-, N. ni.-1.1.-I-, xv. '1'.,1.i.1S. 'I'I1i1'1l nm'--Yl', I,:m1lmu1'. Ii. Ivkus, Il. 1'1'.ssnmn. I.. III-I-Iilm-y, A. 'I'lmmpsu11, M. Ilzllm-N l l'. IA'yI'l'I', 11, IIlI4'IiXYIlIII'I'. FI I"lPlll'III run' II. Smith, II, YI-Vgq-y. W. .lr-m-s. .I. .Inm-H. I'. IIUIIIIIIIS, Mr. I.. IIlll'IiXY1lIIIl J Miss J. Iligll, All: M. Spuullutll, andxisws. Ifivst 1-mv. lvI'I I1vl'Ip:IllfII.4':1l11:lI1u, l'. I-If-In-l', .I. Fry, NV. I-'ulnm-V. II,l1uss,II. IIHIAIIIIIZIII. I I ulwp, Il. Ituln-I. I'. XIvl'1'114IxI1-lx, XY. Iilmymm-1'. V. lllwwwlm, U, I'riIv:1ni4'k, XY. IIUIIXVEIX, Ii. llauy, I ' I Im-Iwwilz, Il. Swuu-ly, XY. MI-lim-. K. K.-vu, .I. Kr:-ps, Iv. SIlt'IlSIl'j'. QIUSS Svwlllll nw-xv .I. Iillvlcwznllm-I'. Il. Ilzltm-S, M, II1'Il'IIi1'l'. IXI, Swan-Iy. I.. XVI-lllm-I, J. IIIIIit'I', I. Inrnzm, II. Iimntzln-mann. .X. XI. S1-rm-t. IZ. lihly. Il. Ilillm-V, I.. Wilswn. l'. l.11l'l. AI, Ilinu-s, I Nlnnuvr, l'. Swuvn-Iy. li. .I. IAIIU-ZIIIII, S. I.igI1l1':1p, AI. Ilrvlllvlxln-l'p:'4-1'. AI. 'I'm':uIi, II. Iiulvym-Iii, X Xmmnl. O 'l'I1i1'1l www- .I. ilu-rlu-Itzn-l', 'I'. Fmith, .I. Ifux, Il. IM-ml, ll. liulwrts, Il. Slmlm, J. IlNlIIIi. I.. Il. SI-urs. .I. .loI1ns1vl1. A, I.:lll-Il. ., I4'w1l1'lI1 1-mv-V HMV, Il. Smith. aulxismt IG. lfixams, N. Cul:-, I.. Ilallc-In-V, Ii. lIIl'IllL'lIS. M. lun,., 42. SIIVIIIII, I.. Km-Im-1'. h I4'iI'lI1 rmv- XY. Salaam-1-li, Il. Ym-um. ti III-am. 4'. Nvlku. lf. Ilrm-Icwaly, ll. IIllIIL'l'lll2lIl, Sixth row-Mr. J. .I.3L'yIIlL'K'1III5, Mrs. J, LT. SilYIgllIllIU, aulvisurs. 4 . QQ Q . : -LQ 1 11:"f,.fi'Q 'LQ 5 A .. fgjrw- V 'QC . "i w W--:jg '5 4, Ji- '.-jj-' Q33 AQ1.. nip, 13, 4 4 4 : 4 g ,M 4 Q Q .Q H QQ., .. Q ,K,v .Q .QQAQQAQE QA. .MA ,m 1A,A,.,,A QiA,,?,,,.J,4,Q4 Q Q Q Q QQ . 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Suggestions in the North Coventry High School - Torch Yearbook (Pottstown, PA) collection:

North Coventry High School - Torch Yearbook (Pottstown, PA) online yearbook collection, 1944 Edition, Page 1

1944

North Coventry High School - Torch Yearbook (Pottstown, PA) online yearbook collection, 1950 Edition, Page 1

1950

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1951

North Coventry High School - Torch Yearbook (Pottstown, PA) online yearbook collection, 1952 Edition, Page 1

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1954

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