Niles Township High School East - Reflections Yearbook (Skokie, IL)

 - Class of 1956

Page 1 of 184

 

Niles Township High School East - Reflections Yearbook (Skokie, IL) online yearbook collection, 1956 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 184 of the 1956 volume:

“REFLECTIONS NILES TOWNSHIP HIGH SCHOOL SKOKIE, ILLINOIS NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FIFTY-SIX VOLUME XX N I L E H I REFLECTIONS (?Ki nt tfileki J)a TABLE OF CONTENTS Learning Is Stimulating - - 15 Activities Are Creative - - 35 Special Events Are Thrilling 65 Competing Is Exciting-79 Teaching Is A Challenge - 105 Being Together Is Fun - - 123 Excitement runs high as Nilehi’s school spirit is sparked by cheerleader Alva Sholin. . Cheering the winning touchdown, Swaying to " No, Not Much " , Trying out for Reflections Revelries, Ironing our robes for graduation. Even day to day things like Rushing to Roundy ' s for lunch, Meeting that special someone in the hall, Cramming for a big exam, Receiving report cards with thumping hearts Give us that special feeling. Afeie We rfie . . . Even little things like being together can be exciting, discover Tony Vaos, Sarane Crowth- er, Dick Shea, Ann Splinter, Phil Quigley, Mary Ann Dell ' Aringa, Charles Mark, Barbara Larsen, Bob Schroeder, and Marion Carter. Anticipation mounts as sophomores, juniors, and seniors gather on the front steps, waiting for the first bell of the new school year. This exciting new life begins for freshmen Donna Norman and Gail Nelson as they receive their program cards. " I go to 219 next. What about you?” Senior Wally Novak, juniors Helene Neer, Hal Neimer, and Dick Nelson compare their schedules for first semester. Tjiteki, 9S6 SUMMER ENDS AND A NEW YEAR OF SCHOOL BEGINS That day looked forward to with mixed emotions is here at last—the first day of school. The buzz of 1850 stu¬ dents waiting before the main door reaches a high pitch as we question what the new school year will bring. The bell rings! Picking up program cards, getting new books, becoming acquainted with teachers, greeting old friends . . . we ' re swept up in the rush of school. Although feelings range from the frightened bewilderment of a fresh¬ man starting a new life to the carefree confidence of a senior ending a high school career, everyone agrees that the first day of school is exciting. Seniors Ken Walter and Bob Blowers, re¬ ceiving textbooks from Mr. Bruce Sorensen, dread the homework soon to begin. A new teacher and new students become acquainted with each other and with the school as Miss Mary DiTullio explains high school life to A1 Heppner, Vic Bernell, Sen- net Tzinberg, and Ronald Schultz, of her freshman homeroom. 7 . . . FILL HALLS AND CLASS ROOMS Crowds and confusion are a problem in a school with an ever-increasing population. We fill the halls, creating traffic jams outside the library and at the third floor entrance to the new wing. More students produce a need for more classrooms, a need which is met by having English classes in the art room, sociology in the Assembly Room, and classes all through the day in Rooms 322 and 222, which will be hallways when the new addition is completed in September of 1956. More students travel up and down the stairways than ever before as enrollment continues to increase. ) Sidewalk superintendents Joyce Olson, Ted Pristash, and Bruce Peterson look over the foundation of the new wing started in September. With only a twenty-six minute lunch period, students impatiently wait in the long lines in the cafeteria. X etfih Htj . . . IS EXCITING, TOO . . . STUDIES HELP US DISCOVER NEW WORLDS Chemistry, American lit, world his¬ tory, Spanish, Algebra — homework piles up as we pass from class to class. We delve into new fields of knowledge and become experts in specialized sub¬ jects by taking notes in class, conduct¬ ing experiments, doing daily assign¬ ments, and writing research papers, projects, and term papers. Because the work is never ending, week nights are packed with hours of study. Going over assignments on the telephone, using a dictionary to check the meaning of a word, and listening to Eddie Hubbard as we read about the Revolutionary War fill the hours from dinner to bed time. The unknown challenges Frank Saunders, Dave Karas, Bette Halvorsen, and Lois Adelman who experiment with hydrochloric acid in the chemistry lab. Bill DiGilio, Barb McKaig, Rosemary Nitsche, and Jack Hagman tell Adrienne Falcon " We ' re from Niles, couldn ' t be prouder ' as they explain student activities when Niheli was featured on the television show, " Hi Time For Coke " , on November 12. School isn ' t just studies—to most of us it is our world, a world created by using our talents and interests in working and playing together. Our combined efforts produce the Nile- hilite, Golden Galleon, and yearbook. The thrill of seeing our story in print is equaled only by our satisfaction as we cooper¬ ate in running the Student Supervised Study Halls, or the lift of heart we feel in singing with the choir in Christmas Vespers. Through the class cabinets, Student Council, and Student Court, we make rules, conduct contests, give dances, and enforce laws—increasing our leadership abilities while adding to the fun of school life. THOUGHTS STRAY FROM ASSIGNMENTS 11 Admiring the shagged crepe paper and glittering tinsel, juniors Judy Burt and Doug Wold listen to the sounds of rustling taffeta and the rhythmic brushes of a drum. Danc¬ ing to the strains of stardust melodies are Barbara Kitch and Dave Lindquist and Donna Vanderwall and Wally Borne- i Bette Kalvorsen, Anne Collins, Karen Holmberg, Eileen Corr, and Debbie Rothholtz transform the drab gym into a winter wonderland for the Belles and Beaux Cotillion. THE CLASS BELL IS SILENT; THE WEEKEND ARRIVES Jin It if . T. G. I. F. — thank goodness it ' s Friday! After yelling ourselves hoarse at the football game, we pile into the car, head for Cooley ' s for a bite to eat, and then home for a good night ' s sleep. Saturday comes, but not until ten or eleven o ' clock. At eight o ' clock looking our best, we set out for for the Teatro—or downtown if it ' s a special evening—and later join the crowd for pizza at Albertis. A kiss goodnight completes the evening, and we give a sigh of satisfaction as we dream about the wonderful time we have had. “Hold that line, hey; hold that line! " Varsity cheerleaders Beth Williamson, Lynne Izard, Alva Sholin, Cynthia Johnson, Linda Morse, and Jo Ann Lotz give moral support to the team with their spirited yelling. 13 teq’ihiwq . . . IS STIMULATING . . . WE HAVE FUN - - UNTIL GRADES COME OUT! Grades are all impor¬ tant! Because of the poor marks on Mike Shea- han ' s report card, he has been " put into the dog house. " Neither Mike nor the pooch look too hap¬ py about this new ar¬ rangement. No, it isn ' t a Mr. Magoo cartoon! As a matter of fact, who thought that psychology could be so amusing? Maybe Joyce Holtz, Dale Kaiser, and Myrna Zlatos should be psychoanalyzed. 15 ENGLISH, MATHEMATICS, SOCIAL STUDIES, AND 16 SCIENCE . . . To acquire mastery of the bas¬ ic mathematical skills and to develop perfection in analytic thinking, freshmen Penny Mair and Bill McGrath work togeth¬ er to solve an algebra prob¬ lem. General science students Nor¬ man Lavander, Fred Weil, and Duane Creviston explore the miracles oi modern science by experimenting with water pres¬ sure. U.S. history student Dick Ras¬ mussen briefs Carol Trobeuk, Greg Dolin, and Cynthia Cor- des on how to present a report to the class. In social studies students study about democ¬ racy using the democratic method of student-centered in¬ struction. 17 To graduate, every senior must pass a test on the Illinois State Constitution. Carol Schweger and Ken Lavnick use the bul¬ letin board to display pam¬ phlets and pictures explaining the Illinois Constitution. In freshman social studies stu¬ dents are trained to use the card file. Gerry Beckway, Carol Christianson, and Eddie Copp know that the ability to use the library properly is neces¬ sary for success in school work Arnold Feinberg and Diane Courtright show their sopho¬ more English class that a sen¬ tence is much easier to un¬ derstand if it has been dia¬ grammed. 19 " This is the view of Mexico we saw from the plane. " Debbie Rothholtz describes the Mexico trip to Eileen Corr, Dorothy Collin, Carole Goldstein, Jim Hodgkinson, Don Morton, and Don Michonski, members of her Spanish class. 20 WE PLAN FOR COLLEGE THROUGHOUT HIGH SCHOOL. In the early years of the twentieth century only a small percentage of the population at¬ tended high school; today, a college education is commonplace. Colleges, confronted with this problem of increasing enrollments, have raised and are continuing to raise their requirements for admission. To help the sixty-five per cent of students who will attend college meet the entrance re¬ quirements of the college of their choice, Niles Township High School offers seven college pre¬ paratory tracks or courses of study. In general, a college preparatory course includes three years of English (with four strongly recom¬ mended), one year of algebra, one year of plane geometry, two years of a foreign lan¬ guage, one year of a laboratory science, and two years of social studies. Six other college preparatory tracks in commerce, engineering, science, nursing, natural science, and home economics are designed to provide a student with the courses required for entrance into a specific school of a university. Since a knowledge of man ' s past experience is necessary for an understanding of the present, world histor y students Richard Young, Sharon Olnick, and Jay Doney find the history of past civilization a very per¬ tinent study. Angles, triangles, and circles are a puzzle to most of us, but geometry students Alan Berberick, Joyce Kor- tauck, and Gary Spain solve the mystery with the use of protractors and compasses while Nina Nipper and Linda Timmel work theorems. liv I o TAKING COURSES IN TRIGONOMETRY, PHYSICS AND ENGLISH ... Allen Lange motions Jerry Vick to the left, while Bob Kuchar assists, as they take the angular measurements between the tower and the front sidewalk. Examining the internal structure or a lima bean, biology students Sue Bell and A1 Cantor prepare a report on what they have seen. SPERMATOPHYTES SJEDS Aft) SEEDLUGS WHICH MEET THE “Rosemaries for remembrance and pansies for thoughts. " Sweet Ophelia scatters flowers in front of Lady- Hamlet as Marge Rask and Diane Peterson act out a portion of Hamlet for their senior English class. Micki Tatman and David Cleven ad¬ just th e weights on a pulley as Jules Traut takes notes on the experiment in physics. Composition, a new course at Niles this year, prepares students for col¬ lege rhetoric. Staring into space, Marilyn Dell tries to think of the right phrase to express her idea while Karen Frenzel and Mary Kohls check the meaning of a word in the Oxford Dictionary. " Dear Mr. Brown: ' ' —students in the beginning class practice typing a business letter before starting their ten minute timings. In clerical practice, a more advanced phase of business education, seniors Joyce Olson and Sandy Paul learn to cut a stencil. FOR MANY OF US SCHOOL WILL END WITH GRADUATION . . . Because graduation will be the end of formal schooling for thirty-five per cent of the students, Niles Township High School offers courses to pre¬ pare graduates for entrance into the business, in¬ dustrial, or homemaking world. Future secretaries, clerical workers, typists, and bookkeepers are trained in the twb business cur¬ ricula. Students in the stenographic and secretarial curriculum, in addition to two years of typing and shorthand, study General Business and Record Keeping 1, 2 and Business Practices and Business Law, 1, 2. Students in the clerical curriculum, in addition to typing and General Business and Record Keeping 1, 2, take Clerical Practices 1 and 2 in the fourth year. This course provides training in the use of office machines. To welcome their parents to short¬ hand class on Parent ' s Day, senior Janet Ryerson and junior Beverly Wauthier pin up greetings to the Moms and Dads and display work done by the class. WE TRAIN TO ENTER THE BUSINESS, INDUSTRIAL . .. Senior Darlene Thomas, a stu¬ dent in the diversified occupa¬ tions program, trains to be a dental assistant by working with Dr. Robert Donovan. The industrial arts curriculum is designed to " prevent excessive repetition and permit broadening a student ' s educational experience to more than one industrial area. Consequently, a freshman takes Industrial Arts Laboratory 1, which is a survey course, introducing the student to various shop courses. As a sophomore, a student chooses auto mechanics, electricity, industrial draw¬ ing, metals, printing, or woods for one semester of study. As a junior or senior, a student chooses one of the above areas for more specialized study. However, the industrial art department recommends that " students be limited during grades ten and twelve to fifty-four weeks in any one area of indus¬ trial arts " . For students who wish to work while attending school, Niles Township High School offers the diversified occupation curriculum. This program is organized so that all required subjects and technical related classes are offered in the morning; in the afternoon, students receive on-the-job training in a rotated laboratory experience in business or industry in the community for a minimum of three hours and a maximum of five hours per day. 28 Making steel punches on the engine lathe, seniors Wayne Johnson and Bruce Peterson work in the metals shop. Before adding a finish of shel¬ lac, juniors Dave Horseman and Bill Yant sand a table made in woodshop. 29 Cooking a good meal is only part of the job of a homemak¬ er. In advanced foods, juniors Barb Simonsen and Marion Belue set the table attractive¬ ly, knowing this adds to the enjoyment of a meal " Mmmmmmmm! Do they look good.” Good homemakers are good cooks, and junior Jerry Rudolph is learning as she takes her rolls from the oven. AND HOMEMAKING WORLD. Future homemakers, following the general home economics curriculum, are required to take Home Arts Labora¬ tory 1 and 2, a survey course, in either the freshman or sophomore year. A total of at least six credits must be earned in Clothing 1, 2, 3, 4 and Foods 1, 2, 3, and 4. Home Making 1 and 2, a course which emphasizes selecting the furnishings and equipment of the home together with providing for the care and health of its members, must be taken in either the junior or senior year. Dresses, suits, and jumpers are major projects of students in advanced sewing. Fashion¬ conscious senior Diane Payne models for Elaine Larson, Bar¬ bara Fronzak, and Mary Lou Daly. ELECTIVES DEVELOP VOCATIONAL SKILLS, AND PREPARE US FOR COLLEGE. Niles Township High School ' s answer to the criti¬ cism that modern education is like a cafeteria where students choose subjects without any plan other then that of individual whim is the thirteen courses of study or " tracks " . However, students in each curric¬ ulum are allowed freedom in choosing major-credit electives ranging from those developing a specific vocational skill to those providing a preparatory foundation for a special area of college study. This freedom is limited by requirement of sequence, apti¬ tude, and the individual ' s educational and voca¬ tional plans. Art, home design, journalism, photography, physi¬ ology, psychology are only a few of the fifty major credit electives which are available to students. Minor-credit electives in glee club, choir, band, and orchestra develop a student ' s talents and interests and provide a basis for extra-curricular activities. 32 Being able to speak before an audience is an asset. In a two minute speech, junior Eileen Scott tells her public speaking class about her most embar¬ rassing experience. A1 Capp and Norman Rock¬ well—watch out! Betty Porter, Mary Meehan, and Mike Ezsak learn to apply the basic prin¬ ciples of art to their drawings. 33 Clarinet players Allen Olson, Marcia Wesley, and Pat Ham¬ ilton get help on a score of music from the band director, Mr. Provost. flctiCitieA . . . ARE CREATIVE . . . WE WORK TOGETHER TO BUILD OUR WORLD Biil DiGilio (president) leads a discussion of the members of the general assembly whose job it is to represent their homerooms and vote on matters concerning the entire schdol. Back Row: J. Tansor, R. Liss, J. Allen, J. Rosenberg, J. Meneilley, L. Wotan, S. Backus. Sixth Row: J. Comiano, M. Kamin, Mr. Pritikin, R. Denley, B. Gigstad, A. Johnson, D. Eckel, R. Thomas, A. Canter. Fifth Row: S Hawk, J Habich, L. Schwartz, R. Johnson, D. Wright, H. Feuerzeig, D. Caird, L. Larsen, P. Grabow, R. Moore. Fourth Row: B Denker, A. Finzel, C. Cooperman, D. Stiska, A. Splin er, D. Roberts, J. Gopperton, J. Nelson, D. McDowell, B. Wau- thier, A. Atwood, A. Lange, B. Dilg, R. Morgan. Third Row: J. Bolin, J. Dahlman, V. Day, C. Janis, P. Hagen, A. Ditthardt, J. Erickson, C. Constantine. Second Row: P. Ream, C. Kadish, M. Tatman, J. O ' Malley, J. Pflaum, D. Jefferson. Front Row: J. Liss, J. Schultz, M. O ' Beirne, J. Scheuer. Standing: S. Wollack, G. Willard, M. Weingart. " I move that . " " I second the motion. ' ' “Is there any discussion? " " Point of order! " " I rise to a point of inquiry 1 " " I call for an immediate vote! " " I call for the question! " These remarks ring out in 16B during first period as the Council carries on its many activities. This year the Council was in charge of the Homecoming Parade, a St. Patrick ' s Day Dance, bus service for the students to " away games " , the Big Brother and Sister program, the new Student Lounge, the Citizenship and Code Assembly, and selling programs at various sports events. At the beginning of the year, each homeroom elects a Council represen¬ tative and alternate to represent them in the Council meetings and bring up any problems which need to be solved. Council provides the students with an opportunity to speak for themselves and have a voice in the governing of the school, thereby giving them experience in democracy at work. Officers of the Council, Bill DiGilio (president), David Cleven (vice-pres¬ ident), Mr. Lain (sponsor), and Pat Holm (secretary), discuss important items to be brought up in the Coun¬ cil and direct all formal business meetings. 36 STUDENT COUNCIL IS DEMOCRACY IN ACTION . . . Members of the executive board, who are also committee chairmen, work on the agenda for the coming business meeting. Bill DiGilio (president), David Cleven (vice-president), John Meneilley, Carol Constantine, Dennis Caird, Allan Lange, Marcia Pritikin, Mr. Lain (spon¬ sor), Micki Tatman, Jim Tansor, Jane Scheuer, Henry Feuerzeig, Joan Comi- ano, Betsy Denker, Ann Splinter, Doro¬ thy McDowell, and Pat Holm (secretary). Judges of the student court are S. Schmidt, J. Erny, J. Linn, B. Koif, D. Payne, R. Prebish, J. Baker, and B. Den¬ ker. Students are called before the court for such violations as misconduct in the halls and smoking on school grounds. The court hears the case and decides whether the defendant is guilty or not guilty. One of the new projects of the Council, the Student Lounge, is in operation dur¬ ing eighth period for all students on the first shift. Looking on while Elaine Pass and Allan Friedman dance ore S. Iver¬ son, M. Motis, K. Julian, A. Kaselow, L. Bodritzki, D. Hodgkinson, J. Pitt, B. Ro¬ wan.. A. Hervi, J. DeVries, and R. Rosen¬ berg. 37 Hl-Y AND TRI-HI-Y AIM FOR GROWTH The officers of Hi-Y discuss the Junior Citi¬ zenship Award to be offered to the out¬ standing boy and girl of the junior class. Back Row: L. Meyer, J. Berg, P. Bennett, R. Johnson. Middle Row: R. Rydin, Mr. Roth (sponsor), B. White, J. Meneilley, B. Eaman, B. Dews, D. Lindquist, S. Nelson. Front Row: J Hartmann, J. Traut, D. Wold, D. Fehns, P. Quigley, H. Feuerzeig, L. Wotan (second semester president), B. DiGilio (first semester president). Hi-Y, with a membership of one hundred boys, has been an outstanding organization at Niles for nine years. Hi-Y initiated such school activities as the Homecoming Parade; the Junior Citizenship Award, which is given to a distinguished junior boy and girl; the Hi-Y Scholarship, awarded to a deserving senior; and last year put out the first Student Directory, which listed the names and addresses of all students. The club had the honor of having a member, Phil Quigley, elected Youth Governor for the University of Good Government, which is held in Springfield every spring. The real worth of Hi-Y lies in its value to the indi¬ vidual. Honest scholarship, sportsmanship, clean living, and Christian character are the ideals that the Hi-Y hopes will stay with its members when they leave high school. Nominees for the Hi-Y Citizen¬ ship Award, Hal Neimer, Dave Cleven, Doug Wold, JoanCom- iano, Arlene Atwood, and Pat Baumann, were chosen from the junior class for their Chris¬ tian character, leadership, service, and citizenship. Hi-Y has many interesting meetings. Dr. Hartz of the Cook County Medical Board explains to the boys the diagnosis of disease. 38 ) F GOOD CHARACTER Tiie Tri-Hi-Y is affiliated with the Y.W.C.A. This organization has spon¬ sored hay rides, dances, and during the Christmas season held a party for the children in St. Henry ' s Or¬ phanage. Officers of the club are: Karen Breitzke (worship chairman), Margherita Rask (secretary), Harriet Boyd (president), Judy Lewis (vice- president), and Beverly Wauthier (treasurer). Singing, laughter, ice cream, candy, and a visit from Santa made the Christmas party complete for the children in Saint Henry ' s Orphan¬ age Tri-Hi-Y made this party pos¬ sible for these children and others like them during the past three years. Tri-Hi-Y, founded in 1950, is affil¬ iated with the Evanston " Y " , but most of its support this year has come from the Skokie Valley Busi¬ ness and Professional Women ' s Club. Juniors and seniors, who are eligible for membership, were initiated in January at a meeting attended by parents. Tri-Hi-Y, sponsored by Mrs. Rita Gauer, successfully combines activi¬ ty and Christian ideals. This year members of the club held a Christ¬ mas party for the children of St. Henry ' s Orphanage, went roller skat¬ ing at the Playdium in Glenview, and raised money for their organi¬ zation by making and selling octopii, an eight-legged creature made of yarn. During the year the program committee provided a model, a beautician, and a minister to speak to members. As proud parents witnessed the initiation, forty-one girls took the pledge to become members of Tri-Hi-Y. The girls listen atten¬ tively as President Harriet Boyd lists what is expected of them as members of Tri-Hi-Y. " FOOTLIGHTS UP! When the curtain goes up on another smash hit, all the excitement and color of a Broadway opening comes to Niles. In the last minutes before the curtain rises make-up is hurriedly applied, an actor grabs his play book for one last look, the sound effect that didn ' t work at dress rehearsal is checked and re¬ checked, and the missing property is thankfully found. In six weeks prior to the great night the assembly room is the scene of lively activity. Properties are gathered from all corners, publicity schemes are worked out, special light¬ ing effects are tried over and over, and 40 All Thespians are pledged to help extend all phases of dramatic arts, both on stage and behind the sets. Back Row: W. Bornemeier, B. Martin, R. Shabel, B. Godell, P. Quigley, D. Wold, R. Simpson, B. Schroeder. Third Row: J. Comiano, N. Cox, J. Godell, D. Payne, C. Stine, J. Stansfield, G. Hoppe. Second Row: S. Crowther, I. Portnoy, J. Eischen, D. Dziadula, J. Burt, M. Escher, S. Lavine. Front Row: D. Vanderwall, R. Nitsche, P. Holm, J. Willert, J. Reiter, L. Heim. Officers of the Thespians discuss plans for the initiation held after each play. Standing: W. Bornemeier (photographer) R. Shabel (vice-president), D. Wold (sergeant-at-arms). Seated: D. Dziadula (secretary), R. Nitsche (treasurer), Lela Heim (scrapbook chairman), B. Martin (president). HOUSELIGHTS DOWN! " make-up crews practice for perfection. Meanwhile, on stage, the cast rehearses each line under Miss Stemp ' s direction. This year " Cuckoos on the Hearth " and Timeout for Ginger " were presented. The two drama organizations are Thespians and Spotlighters. For many students, Spotlighters is the stepping- stone to the honorary Thespian Society. To become a Thespian a student must work at least one hundred hours on dramatic productions. Additional hon¬ ors can be earned by additional hours of work. Spotlighter president Donna Vander- wall demonstrates the application of theatrical make-up to Gayle Beck¬ way and Judy Burt. " Help! Someone, help! " screams Charlotte (Margo Calamaras) as she is threatened by the crazy Professor (Richard Deitsch). Doc Ferris (Barry Schutz) and the Reverend (Tom Con¬ ners) stand by showing little emo¬ tion over her plight. The scene is from the fall play " Cuckoos on the Hearth. " In the spring play " My Three An¬ gels " , a happy ending for. Marie (Lynn Watson) and Paul (Doug Wold) horrifies the father, Henry (Wally Bornemeier) but completely satisfies the three convicts (Ron Sha- bel, Fred Melberg, Bob Schroeder). 41 AS THE BAND PLAYS ON, OUR SCHOOL SPIRIT RISES Twirlers Barbara Hogan, Jacquie Worthley, Jan ey Freschke, and Mary Lou Gengler add color to the greyness of Homecoming day. Most of our hearts beat a little faster with excitement when the Nilehi band, brave in uniforms of gold and blue, struts onto the football field on a golden October afternoon. Our school spirit gets that extra little shove when the band plays " Nilehi! Nilehi! " at pep as¬ semblies and basketball games. For band members these colorful per¬ formances are preceded by hours and days and years of rehearsing. Students in the cadet band practice for one or two years before they are ready to join the varsity group which presents con¬ certs at the township grade schools every February and March. High point of the year ' s work is the band concert on May 11, when a repertoire of march¬ es, classics, and jazz is presented. This year the program included Finlandia, Cuban Fantasy, and Gypsy Love Song. Varsity band, directed by Mr. Leo Provost, re¬ hearses two periods a day, fifth and sixth, in preparation for their performances at sports events, grade school tours, and spring concert. Back Row: Mr. Provost, M. Tatman, S. Nelson, P. Kriz, B. Kitch, D. Aull, J. Gould, K. Schiff- man, R. Dietch. Third Row: I. Kaplan, L. Leith- erer, C. Breen, M. Levine, R. Franz, D. Turner, S. Miller, W. Howard, N. Martin. Second Row: F. Hodges, W. Hanson, J. Mendera, R. Kofoed, H. Sherman, T. Steinhort, D. Metzler. Front Row: B. Oosten, D. Enstrom, A. Raglan, D. Nied, P. Grabow. Standing: D. Wold, D. Caird, I. Rothchild. Back Row: T. Oiler, L. McColloch, B. Gain, B. Nor- gan, P. Hamilton, G. Humburg, J. Sodeman, R. Wanke, C. Bernat, C. Fox, D. Pankey, R. Kuchar, G. Fehring. Middle Row: A. Olson, M. Wesley, R. Shapiro, R. Friedman, R. Raben, J. Thorton, B. Reinger. Front Row: R. Keats, A. Larson, S. Smith, D. Gierahn, K. Larson. Each member of cadet band anxiously awaits the day when Mr. Leo Provost, band director, will say to him or her, " You are now ready for the varsity band. " Back Row: I. Tansor, K. Mason, I. Johns, M. Stone, J. Papandrea, G. Goldstein, D. Wicker, Mr. Provost, J. Pauzer, D. Nelson. Fourth Row: A. Canter, R. Dumay, G. Winberg, M. Kuchar, W. Eggert, R. Wanke, H. Lerman, F. Foss, J. Jones, L. Lindquist, F. Herzon, J. Babcock. Third Row: S. Kirschner, R. Genthner, R. Linick, J. Coursey, T. DeVries, J. Miguel, J. Demlow, R. Raben. Second Row: K. Evenson, G. Baverlein, R. Colano, K. Mag- ner, B. Ritter, J. McGinnis, H. Eklund. Front Row: J. Frandzel, R. Krone, W. Gutowsky, V. Burnell. Mr. Leo Provost, band di¬ rector, announces the opening selection at the band concert, May 11. 43 Fifth and sixth period every day, the orchestra, directed by Mr. Hugh McGee, rehearses for performances. Back Row: D. Stolls- dorf, S. Erdman, B. Maxson, D. Wold, B. Kitch, D. Aull, M. Tatman, S. Nelson, B. Reinger, C. Fox, G. Fehring, D. Metzler, Mr. McGee. Third Row: N. Cleary, R. Hartley, B. Swinyard, R. Denley, P. O ' Neal, B. Halvorson, S. Williamson, D. Mueller, S. Larson, J. Walski, D. Nied, P. Grabow, J. Mendera. Second Row: J. Mc¬ Ginnis, C. Cleary, L. Silverman, R. Caplan, L. Anderson, K. Grubb, I. Sonkin, P. Nelson, S. Schmickl, C. Maculuso. Front Row: R. Keats, A. Larson, B. Oosten, D. Enstrom, M. Wesley, R. Friedman, B. Stine. At the piano: Bruce Robins. ORCHESTRA AND VOCAL Eyes on Mr. McGee, the orchestra awaits the downbeat for the number, " Street Scene " , at the spring concert. Members of the orchestra and vocal groups had a busy year rehearsing for " Student Life " , the first musical comedy ever to be presented at Niles Township High School. Until opening night on April 27, Friday nights and weekends meant practice, practice, and more practice on selections like " Hernando ' s Hideaway, " " Heart, " " Two Lost Souls, " and " So In Love. " Christmas Vespers, the grade school tour, a PTA meeting, the May Festival, and gradu¬ ation were other special events at which the orchestra performed. The Dream of Olwen, " " El Relicario, " " Blue Moon, " and " Street Scene " are but a few of the many numbers the orches¬ tra rehearsed throughout the year. Julie McGinnis, Diane Haas, and Nelson Cleary of the string section play their part of " Blue Moon " at the spring concert. GROUPS REHEARSE FOR " STUDENT LIFE " Beautiful gowns and lyrical voices of members of Vivace delighted the audience at the May Festival. This group, directed by Mr. H. McGee, is noted for its lyrical perfection. Back Row: P. Busch, D. Peterson, D. Foley, P. Baumann, F. Budnick, S .Smith, J. Linn, D. Stiska, C. Nelson, C. Joslyn, M. Heppner, F. Marling, D. Donile. Third Row: S. Bell, J. Stockmar, C. Dolan, A. Newton, M. Johnson, M. Dell, J. Comiano, K. Hotchkiss, J Schultz, J. Gutowsky, J. Nelson, M. Sams. Second Row: B. Kamin, D. Bau¬ mann, S. Schuster, G. Mengarelli, C. Schweger, M. Escher, K. Nordlof, G. Bolin, J. Coleman. Front Row: N. Kep- peler, J. Burt, J. Piper, S. Crowther, A. Atwood, A. Otiepka, J. Erickson, J. Weissburg, D. Courtright. Old time barbershop harmony rings out every Tuesday night when this group of ten meets to sing such old favorites as " When You Wore a Tulip. " Back Row: B. Gigstad, C. Trendler, B. Robins, L. Wotan. Sec¬ ond Row: D. Guess, M. Malz, D. Peters. Front Row: B. Gutowsky, E. Kezios, B. Piper. 45 The choir, the most advanced music group, sings " Just Another Polka " under the direction of Mr. H. McGee as Karen Holmberg and Roger Jones dance an accompaniment. Back Row: J. Stockman, J. Schultz, K. Hotchkiss, L. Fogarty, B. Barker, P. Baumann, D. Foley, B. Kenny, P. Quigley, J. Beddia, R. Shabel, B. Gigstad, F. Brill, J. Lotz, R. Simmons. Third Row: J. Burt, B. Lantz, M. Dell, C. Conrad, C. Eicchorn, D. Morgan, R. Carlson, V. Donile, J. Smithim, J. Larsen, J. Hansen, M. Malz, B. Buckingham, J. Comiano. Second Row: A. Atwood, S. Crow- ther, C. Halama, D. Zeutschel, R Swanson, D. Eckel, L. Hiby, B. Martinez, J. Gutowsky, J. Nelson, M. Bjurman. Front Row: M. Escher, L. Berzon, B. Berzon, D. Peters, C. Trendler, E. Kezios, B. Piper, E. Bushey, L. Betts, J. Minors. MUSIC GROUPS CLIMAX THE YEAR Advanced girls ' glee is open to all sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Back Row: S. Bell, J. Pete rson, J. Gilbert, M. Calamaras, D. Collin, N. Phillips, J. Moore, J. Linn, F. Budnick, J. Borik, C. Hillam, C. Gallagher, J. Bolin, D. Horwitz, D. Krueger, B. Brodd, E. Wood. Third Row: D. Jefferson, P. Boyjian, G. Mengarelli, A. Blott, V. Fazio, S. Schuster, D. Courtright, R. Lonn, M. Johnson, P. Ponto, M. O ' Beirne, K. Crouchley, A. Matson, K. Nordlof, D. Hodge, R. Radke. Second Row: S. Richman, C. Simon, G. Lieberenz, L. Tiseth, M. Cavaretta, B. Norris, I. Scott, D. Swanson, J. Reynolds, K. Gillespie, J. Otiepka, R. White, J. Weissbufg, N. Knepper. Front Row: S. Weiss, J. Erickson, J. Swanson, M. Walker, L. Swital, B. Sielski, A. Weber, A. Meyer, A. Lee. With their sights set on becoming members of choir, the se freshmen girls are eager to learn everything they can about music Back Row: J. DuBonn, J. Matter, A. Demas, S. Debes, L. Hicks, J. Sonne, P. Boom, H. Paskind, B. Soltis, A. Pazen, L. Olson, A. Ward, B. Lowry, K. Walde, G. Siemund, P. Thiry, C. Olson, J. Nilson, G. Johnson, L. Isle, J. Link, J. Babcock. Fourth Row: A. Santis, H. Zimmerman, J. Laselow, L. Slade, M. DeMarco, E. Schwartz, K. Hehn, M. Barnet, P. Teichert, S. Goldstein, C. Michaels, R. Corr, A. Holstein, G. Buchanan, J. Santner, R. Young, G. Littrel, B. Martin. Third Row: A. Cusic, N. McAvoy, B. Savage, S. Hunt, N. May, G. Miller, E. Laiho, C. Povol, J. Kaiser, S. Stockmar, J. Norberg, F. Peterson. Second Row: S. Kagen, K. Rcsenquist, J. Comiano, K. Jackson, K. Naylor, H. Lucas, N. Ribken, M. Neuman, G. Golden, N. Johnson, L. Hubbard. Front Row: J. Landerholm, P. Didier, S. Schmidt, M. Kimberlin, M. Derman, T. Paris, P. Stann, R. Goldberg. WITH THE MAY FESTIVAL . Boys ' glee meets daily during fourth period to practice such numbers as Romberg ' s " Student Life " or Cole Porter’s " Summertime " . This group is open to all class levels. Back Row: L. Schwartz, F. Salomon, V. Bradley, J. Hager, R. Ricordati, W. Brumer, C. Ragland, T. Con¬ ners, D. Nelson, D. Hanson, D. Guess, B. Bell, J. Harms, J. Ostermeier, J. Stellas. Second Row: H. Motch, J. Rutherford, B. Lacher, J. Biancalana, K. Schultz, D. Ward, S. Pearson, M. Matten- son, D. Fox, L. Janson, G. Krauss, Mr. McGee. Front Row: B. Eckbald, D. Lreinck, M. Magit, M. Schellict, K. Crost, W. Fritz, J. Lambert, A. Sussman, O. Thorne. ' 56 STAFF Co-editors Linda Morse and Barbara Neuman discover that planning Reflections 1956 re¬ quires careful consideration ot pictures. " No, Mom, I can ' t help you clean the house. I have to lay out the yearbook dummy today! " " Is it all right if I ' m not in class next Friday? I have to go with the photographer to take pictures for the yearbook! " " Sorry, I can ' t go to the show tonight. I have to write copy! " These excuses are not unusual from a member of the yearbook staff. Under the direction of Mrs. Mary Ida McGuire, staff members, who are now juniors and seniors, started planning the 1956 edition of Reflections as soon as the 1955 book had been com¬ pleted. Homework assignments were laid aside as the co-editors chose the theme—excitement—and or¬ ganized the yearbook. Outside obligations were ignored as pictures were assigned and received, and copy, headlines, and cutlines were written. As the deadline date of March 23 drew near, Room 225, fifth period, bustled with last-minute prep¬ arations. During spring vacation the staff checked and rechecked the spelling of names, corrected er¬ rors in grammar, and inserted the final punctuation marks. Reflections 1956 was sent to the printer. The staff waited until the yearbook banquet and then breathed a sigh of relief: the completed yearbook in their hands was worth all the hard work of pro¬ ducing it. 48 Chairmen of yearbook sections, Jane Scheuer (activities), Daryl Foley (special events), Nancy Keppeler and Sandy Bruening (seniors, portraits, faculty, ad¬ ministration), Jerry Vick (pho¬ tography), Karen L. Holmberg (G. A. A.), and Robert White (sports), discuss ways to make 1956 Reflections more interest¬ ing to all students. WORKS ON A BIGGER AND BETTER REFLECTIONS Pictures to be used in the 1956 Re¬ flections are selected by first year staff members, Nancy Phillips, San¬ dra Dragisic, Alan Lange, Roberta Rice, Jay Wollin, Pat Leverenz, Frank Kiszely, Carol Stine, and Debbie Rothholtz. Students in charge of the senior sec¬ tion, directed by Mrs. Lucille Barnes, organize the taking of senior pictures and the signing of senior activity sheets: E. Cosely, M. Johnson, D. Peterson, C. Johnson, N. Scanlan, K. Breitzke, S. Hagen, E. Sahs, Mrs. Barnes, co-chairmen J. Warnecke and D. McDowell, S. Joyce, and A. Ditt- hardt. Mr. Ronald Van Arsdale outlines the magazine sales campaign to mem¬ bers of the yearbook finance staff This year ' s successful magazine drive helped solve the financial problems of producing the yearbook. Back Row: D. Krauss, T. Russell, M. Wein- gart. Sixth Row: D. Courtright, B. Kret- schmar, D. Platt, D. Stollsdorf, J. Wal- ski, M. Bjurman, M. Solomon, B. Oos- ten, G. Humburg, J. Cohan, C. Rick¬ etts, P. Maguire. Fifth Row: N. Knep- per, M. Kerr, K. Kent, J. Diebold, C. Stine, J. Comiano, K. Hine, D. Hal¬ stead, J. Masters, D. Nelson, P. Cirkle, G. Colussi. Fourth Row: G. Beckway, A. Finzel, S. Bischof, S. Backus, C Joslyn, J. McGinnis, M. Dell, S. Ha¬ gen, F. Budnik, P. Kalmes. Third Row: B. Deitch, M. Dell ' Aringa, J. Schultz, S. Elster, J. Munry, B. Bar¬ tholomew, N. Harris, D. Searing, P. Hoppe, C. Monson. Second Row: B. Fisher, D. Rothholtz, B. Stryker, E. Sahs, P. Holm, J. Gutowsky, J. Holtz, J. Hokanson, J. Dahm. First Row: M. Meehan, L. Rose, A. Czermonka, B. Berzon, D. Klinge, B. Porter, G. Hoppe, M. Kamin. 49 STAFF RECORDS EXCITING EVENTS IN NILEHILITE Barbara Neuman (editor-in-chief and sports editor), Barbara McKaig (news bureau chief, Barbara Kitch (feature editor), and Barbara Simon (news editor) look over Nilehilites of previous years, noticing the changes and improvements that have been made. Reading over and discussing the good and bad points of a Feb¬ ruary issue of the Nilehilite are Marilyn Escher (circulation man¬ ager), Larry Laske (exchange editor), Marcy Pritikin (chief typist), and Judy Burt. Mr. Paul Eberhardt explains one of the finer points of proof¬ reading to his eighth period journalism class. Back Row: Mari¬ lyn Escher, Sarane Crowther, Marion Carter, Richard Weiss. Second Row: Judy Stansfield, Roberta Rice, Janet Minors, Marcy Pritikin. Front Row: Larry Laske, Dennis Burke, Henry Feuer- zeig, Donna Vanderwall, Judy Burt. A bustling newspaper office filled with stu¬ dents busily reporting the happenings of their high school community—that ' s the home of the Nilehilite, Room 219, every day during eighth period. The process of getting out the Nilehi¬ lite begins on Tuesday when the staff members and Mr. Paul Eberhardt, sponsor, gather in a circle and report the scoops they have gath¬ ered from their faculty news sources and tips from friends. The editors assign the important news the following day, and the staff reporters go after the facts so that they can meet the Friday deadline. Letters to the Editor, briefs about alumni, humorous happenings, and stories are handed in to the news, feature, and sports editors, who check them for errors in fact, grammar, and spelling. The stories are typed and sent to the lino-typers, who set them up in type and send galleys back to the staff to be proofread. The editors make up the pages and write headlines, and give the dum¬ mied Nilehilite to Mr. Gale Wesley in print shop. The pages are then put to bed and the presses start rolling. The Nilehilite is given to its readers on Friday. Similar steps are followed by the news bu¬ reau chief, who assigns stories every Wednes¬ day. These are edited, typed, and sent to the community newspapers. Reporters see their stories, with bylines, in the papers the follow¬ ing Thursday. " Nilehilite is out! " Roberta Rice, Judy Burt, Dorothy Collin, and Sarane Crowther count Nilehilites while Barbara Simon reads off room numbers. Golden Galleon board members ap¬ praise work submitted for publica¬ tion. Back Row: Barbara Busch (pres¬ ident), Sarane Crowther, Marilyn Escher, Phil Quigley. Front Row: Cynthia Johnson, Jerry Vick. Students whose work is published in Golden Galleon are initiated into the Guild at a dinner held in the spring. Back Row: J. Rossman, C. Borchert, Miss J. Loranger, Mr. W. Bost, Mxs. P. Rice (sponsor), Kay Christiansen. Front Row: M. Walker, T. Glass, J. Brandon. Mrs. Rice enjoys the fantastic cos¬ tumes of guild members Frank Saun¬ ders, Phil Quigley, Bob Martin, and Barbara Busch at the club ' s “Travel " party. Under the direction of Mrs. L. Barnes, freshmen scribblers are encouraged to develop their writing talents and to submit material to the Golden Galleon. Back Row: W. Wise, G. Behr, L. Lindquist, A. Blocke, M. Banks, S. Tzinberg. Third Row: R. Raichle, S. Kirchner, G. LaBarbera, D. Dettloff. Second Row: D. Dibos, V. Vernell, J. Eggersted, K. Zuiker, N. Johnson, A. Lane. First Row: J. Wil¬ son, A. Goldsmith, K. Evenson, J. Kublin. Standing: P. Cohn. Every Golden Galleon member knows that not even a straight " A " report card, nor scoring the winning touchdown, nor being elected prom queen can surpass the thrill of seeing one ' s brain child in print. Golden Galleon, a slim literary magazine of some fifty pages, is published yearly by the Golden Galleon Guild. As¬ piring authors are asked to submit essays, short stories, poems, or one act plays, the best of which are selected by members of the Guild for publication. The chosen authors are invited to be¬ come members of the Guild and are inducted at a formal dinner in June. Besides encouraging creative writing, this group sponsors so¬ cial activities which this year included an initiation party on a " Travel " theme, a tea for mothers of members, and a theatre party to see " Tea House of the August Moon. " Each year the Guild to see " Tea House of the August Moon. " Each year the standing member; last year ' s winner was Tom Glass. GOLDEN GALLEON ENCOURAGES CREATIVE WRITING . 51 What a thrilling moment this is for the forty-nine juniors and seniors in¬ ducted into the National Honor So¬ ciety! Three of last year ' s inductees, Dave Chevrier, Barbara Neuman, and Marilyn Dell, present certifi¬ cates, roses, and pins to Frank Go- rom, Joan Comiano, Linda Morse, Cecilia Belgarbo, Barbara Oosten, Judy Warnecke, Dorothy McDowell, David Cleven, Kaari Kivimagi, Re¬ becca Barker, Sandra Howard, Karen A. Carlson, Ken Kay, Frank Kiszely, Jay Young, Doug Wold, and Jay Wollin. OUTSTANDING NILEHIERS MAKE NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY. Only five per cent of the junior and senior classes attain the goal of every student: induction into the National Honor Society. Students in the top twenty per cent of their classes are judged by the faculty on the basis of character, scholarship, leadership, and service. On March 16 the chosen juniors and seniors received the coveted invitations to become a member of the National Honor Society. Parents and friends glowed with pride at the March 22 induc¬ tion ceremony when new members, wearing shiny gold pins and holding certificates and roses in one hand, lifted their burning candles and recited: " I believe in Character as the foundation of life; in Scholarship as the means to achievement; in Leadership as a worthy aim; and in Service as the object and end of living. To the upholding of these ideals, I now pledge myself, mind and spirit. " The highest honor achieved in high school is to be in¬ ducted into the National Honor Society during junior or senior year Students are chosen on the basis of character, scholarship, leadership, and service. Seniors who were initiated last year are: B. Schroeder, J. Vick, B. White, M. Dell, B. Halvorsen, R. Nitsche, R. Shabel. Seated: N. Keppeler, B. DiGilio, P. Quigley, J. Lotz, K. Backstage after the induction ceremony, Mrs. Breitzke Holmberg, D. Chevrier, and B. Neuman. D. Shea is adjusts daughter Karen ' s rose while Mr. and Mrs. missing from the picture. Wold congratulate their son Doug. Hearing the ideas of others is an important aspect of building a winning debate case. Debate members listen as Phil Quigley discusses federal aid to education. Back Row: Dr. J. L. Betts (sponsor), J. Beddia, J. Wollin. Third Row: C. Stine, J. Vick, F. Wettering, R. Kofoed, J. Comiano. Second Row: J. Erny, R. Hartley, M. Levine, D. Turner, J. Bolin. First Row: G. Mengarelli, J. Weissberg, R. Young, J. Michael, E. Pollock. The Nilehi debaters left their mark this year as they met thirty-eight Illinois high schools in tournaments and finished their season with an all-time high record of eighty-two wins and fifty-eight losses. Niles was the host at a tournament in which Chicagoland area teams participated and traveled to Lyons Township, La Grange, Evanston, Blue Island, Mendota, DeKalb, and the University of Illinois at Navy Pier for competi¬ tion. On February 3 and 4 the varsity won seven out of twelve rounds in the annual tournament at Augustana College. The teams, coached by Dr. Betts and Mr. Mattka, are made up of sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Star debater Phil Quigley pre¬ sents his winning speech at the American Legion Oratori¬ cal Contest. Phil was also elected governor of Illinois for the Y. M. C. A. Youth and Gov¬ ernment Program held April 19 and 20 in Springfield. He won this honor in competition with students from Hi-Ys of the northern half of the state. 53 DEBATE TEAM SETS NEW RECORD _ MONITORS AND SEE CHICAGO CLUB ARE TRADITIONAL SENIOR ACTIVITIES See Chicago Club is the largest senior club in the school: membership is open to any senior interested in exciting trips to see Chicagoland ' s many wonders. The See Chicago Club also sponsors the spring trip to Washington, D. C., which be¬ comes one of high school ' s brightest memories for travel- minded juniors and seniors. Seniors are the backbone of the Student Union and the much-copied monitor system. At the Unions friends have a good time playing pingpong or card games, watching a movie, dancing, or just making the rounds to see who is there. Moni¬ tors, who check passes and regulate traffic in the halls, are a familiar sight. The monitor system is as much a part of Nilehi as is the big clock on the first floor. Washington, we are here! Posed in front of the nation ' s capitol, juniors and seniors on the spring trip of the See Chicago Club get set for a day of sightseeing. Third Row: P. Jensen, J. Burt, L. Fogarty, B. Kitch, K. Breitzke, J Mendera, D. Freres, F. McGinnis, Mr. E. Napier, Mr. O. Hend- rikson, Miss H. Heitmann, Mrs. J. Hallberg, Mr. J. Hallberg (sponsors), R. Bo dinus, R. Simmons, C. Asbiornsen, D. McDowell, S. Bruening. L. Morse, B. Peterson, D. Erickson, N. Keppeler. Second Row: G. Rediffer, D. Trendel, D. Cleven, H. Sherman, D. Urich, P. Joelson, D. Fehns, B. Enke J. Traut, D. Wold, B. Gigstad, B. Robins, B. Eamen, P. Mueller, R. Simp¬ son, W. Johnson, R. Perlick, J. Beddia, K. Swital, A. Manchester, D. Steven¬ son, D. Reichert. Front Row: J. Renberg, D. Searing, D. Platt, D. Collin, B. Barker, H. Boyd, E. Sahs, E. Cosley, J. Faber, M. Carroll, N. Scanlan, B. Halvorsen, C. Latham. J. Nelson, M. Kamin, P. Topolinshi, M. Tatman, R. Keats, D. Zeutschel, K. Horner, P. Czerwonka, B. Weiss, L. Palmer " Now, where shall we go?” The See Chicago Club board answered this question by planning trips to China¬ town and to see " Oklahoma.” Stand¬ ing: J. Beddia, B. Harris, M. Usow, P. Pierce, M. MacLean, Mr. Napier (sponsor). Second Row: B. Water¬ man, K. Frenzel, M. McMillen, J. Rei¬ ter. Front Row: J. Scheuer, D. Peter¬ son, D. Pionke (secretary), D. Payne (president), B. Busch (treasurer). Under the direction of Miss Lamberg, the monitor board works out the rules and policy for the monitor sys¬ tem. Monitors carry messages, pick up the attendance slips, and check student passes. Standing: B. Allen, T. Freeling, R. Perlick, M. McLean, C. Middaugh, B. DiGilio. Front Row: J. Febel, S. Joyce. L. Izard, B. Blow¬ ers, B. McKaig. The Union Board, sponsored by Miss Lamberg and Mr. Sheahan, plans the Student Unions and keeps the Unions running smoothly. Clockwise: J. Haq- Man, J. McGinnis, L.. Morse, E. Shuman, B. Neuman, B. DiGilio, G. Vick, L. Wotan, B. White, D. Cnevrier, G. Mills, F. Marling, B. Busch, J. Febel, M. Dean, J. Lotz. Center: D. McDowell (treasurer), C. Joslyn (president), B. McKaig (secretary). 55 France, Mexico, Rome, and Germany become familiar to stu¬ dents of foreign languages. This year, once again, members of the Spanish Club traveled to Mexico City where they conversed with natives, observed authentic customs, and toured public buildings. Although looking forward to the Mexico trip, the Span¬ ish Club took time out to sponsor a dance, show movies of Mexico, and have Miss Nora Kuehne, a former resident of Latin America, as a guest speaker. Pat Holm (president), Barbara Larsen (ser¬ geant-at-arms), Cecelia Belgarbo (secretary), Lee Brink (sergeant-at-arms), Mr. Donald Blair (sponsor), Skip Nelson (vice-president), and Lenora McColloch (treasurer) make plans for the sock hop to be given by the Spanish Club. On the annual trip to Mexico, the Spanish students visited the Floating Gardens at Xochimilco. Admiring a picture of a French cathedral are Marcia Pritikin (secretary), Tom Cooper (vice- president), Beth Hampel (treasurer), and Ron¬ ald Prebish (president). 56 Members of the Latin Club gave a fashion show displaying Roman costumes and jewelry. Under the supervision of Miss Lam- berg and Miss Hind the students made and modeled fashions. Highlighting the activities of the French Club was the trip taken by Mrs. Baker, sponsor, and members of the club to a French restaurant where they experienced French atmosphere and en¬ joyed the food peculiar to France. German Club members saw a film taken in Germany by a fellow student, Richard Aull. Playing games and singing folk songs typical of Germany also occupied the time at their meetings. On April 6 and 13 a group of students dined at Math Igler ' s restaurant—sauerbraten and all. BRINS US CLOSER TO FOREIGN LANDS 111 11 4 I V r I j| JH L%[ I mm - IBIIS MS f L ' II I ALVETE OMNIBUS 40 X l V Fashions modeled by Latin Club members Sue Broscoe, Maryanne Swartz, and Pat Cirkle would have won whistles of approval from the ancient Romans. Elaine Cosley, Judy Schultz, Barbara Oosten, Judy Lewis, and Phil Quigley listen attentive¬ ly as Jay Young, a member of the Latin Club, reads an ancient scroll. Miss Gustafson (sponsor), Jay Wollin (ser¬ geant-at-arms), Axel Denk (vice-president), Klaus Schneider (president), and Alice Mer- witz (treasurer) look at pictures to be dis¬ cussed at the next German Club Meeting. 57 Experiments and lectures build a solid in¬ terest in physics. Mike Leptich (vice- president), and Anthony Sloan (secretary) watch as Dave Cleven, president of the Physics Club, demonstrates how to light headlamps. Exploring the mysteries of life is the aim of the Biology Club. Sponsor Charles Hus¬ sey points out a rare butterfly to Sandra Howard (secretary), Larry Messe (vice- president), and Francine Budnik (presi¬ dent). STUDENTS LEARN BY WORKING WITH They ' re not really mad scientists—just very interested members of the Freshman Boy ' s Science Club. Surrounded by weather in¬ struments made by members of the club, Douglas Spengler conducts an experiment for Douglas Marshall, Lou Janson, and Aaron Bloch. The club is sponsored by Mr. Harvey. Girls of the freshman science classes have formed their own club to carry on experi¬ ments and learn more about science. Sec¬ retary Judy Kuhlan takes notes while Miss F. Harrison (sponsor), Betty Stine (presi¬ dent), and Judy Comiano (vice-president) conduct a business meeting. 1 Interest in a particular field of classroom study is further stimulated by membership in a related club. Science clubs provide a chance for students of all levels to develop scientific knowledge. Freshmen join either the girls ' or boys ' science clubs, where all fields of science are open to exploration. Sopho¬ mores, through membership in Biology Club, study living organisms. First hand information is gained on field trips and in actual dissection of plants and animals. Upperclassmen have experiments and demonstrations of the physical sciences in the Phys¬ ics Club. Members of the science clubs also work for future rewards such as the Science Fair and college scholarships. Students of other classes also find it fun to carry their interest beyond the classroom. The Pins and Pans Club gives girls of the home economics classes Officers of the Pins and Pans Club are Linda Wolfson (secretary), Lois Rose (vice- president), Alice Merwitz (president), and Nancy Lotz (treasurer). Pins and Pans, open to all girls in the home economics department, recently had Ruth of Lincoln- wood at a meeting to demonstrate hair styling. OWN AGE AND INTEREST GROUPS . Membership in the 100% Club requires typing 40 words per minute without error or passing a shorthand test. Sponsored by Miss Immel, the club has guest speakers which tell the girls of the business world. Recently they had a formal initiation din¬ ner for the installation of the following of¬ ficers: Dorothy Dziadula (vice-president), Dianne Brennan (secretary), Sandy Paul (treasurer), Sandy Dragisic (promotion manager), and Elaine Shuman (president). a chance to whip up their own concoctions and test their designing ability. Many of us wear the blue and gold school collars which they made. Proficien¬ cy in typing or shorthand is rewarded in the 100% Club, where members learn of the business world direct from the business man. Members contribute to the By Lines, a paper of the business education department. A common interest in preparing for a career while still in school brought together the members of the Diversified Occupations Club who spend half a day in school and half a day working. At their meetings they discuss their jobs and how to better relations with their employers. All these clubs are more than an outgrowth of the classroom: they are the means by which the student can observe and learn in the way he likes best—working with his own age and interest group. Training for their future careers now, the members of the D. O. Club attend school in the mornings and work during the after¬ noons. It isn ' t all work, for in the spring they entertain their employers at a dinner. Mr. David Murphy is the sponsor of both the club and the D. O. program at Niles. Standing: D. Reichert (president). Back Row: J. Goushy, B. Thurwell, D. Kohler, C. Maierhofer, J. Pescetto, M. Gross, J. Henrici, I. Crestman. Second Row: D. Blesser, D Barty, R. Eggert, L. McWherter, C. Slack. Front Row: W. Novak (vice-president), M. Riha (secretary), J. Belaian, and G. Henry. SERVICE CLUBS CONTRIBUTE TO SMOOTH RUNNING OF NILEHI " When do tickets go on sale? " " Have you sold out for Friday ' s per¬ formance? " Before any football game, play, swim meet or ba sketball game, the Ticket Sales Club is swamped by such ques¬ tions. Handling the tickets for Reflec¬ tions Revelry was a booming business: the seating capacity of the gym is fif¬ teen hundred; the last figures for Re¬ flections Revelry stood at fourteen hun¬ dred sold in advance and one hundred sold at the door. Membership in the newly formed club is open to the entire student body. Arriving at the spring musicale, " Stu¬ dent Life " , or " Time Out For Ginger " , the spring play, people were shown to their seats by members of the Ushers Club. Open only to junior and senior girls, the club is primarily student-run. However, Miss Dorothy Lungmus, spon¬ sor, does instruct the girls in the prop¬ er procedures for ushering and advises them what to wear for the various events. " Have you bought your ticket tor the game? ' ' If not, members of the Ticket Sales Club can help you. Mary Walker, Mr. John Hallberg (sponsor), Beverly Crist, and Wally Bornemeier direct the sales of tickets during lunch periods. Ushers Club provides girls to usher for school plays, Reflections Revelry, Christ¬ mas Vespers, and the spring musicale, Student Life ' ' . Dorothy Collin (junior chairman) and Gail .Dent (senior chair¬ man) assign the girls to their posts. 60 Members of the Visual Aids Operators Club are the only students in the school who are permitted to operate and service the audio¬ visual equipment. Back Row: P. Mueller, J. Traut, D. Stevens. Front Row: B. Norgan, W. Bornemeier. Under the direction of Mrs. Dorothy Hind, members of Visual Aids Opera¬ tors Club learn the techniques required for anything from setting up lights to running a projector. Operating the au¬ dio-visual equipment for PTA meet¬ ings, Booster ' s Club meetings, pep as¬ semblies, Hi-Y meetings, and niqht school keeps the boys busy. Eighty percent of the faculty are frequent users of the specialized equipment. The Welfare Committee, under the direction of Miss Elizabeth Lawson and Miss Doris Tillman, campaigns for two worthy causes, the March of Dimes and the Red Cross. The members of this committee are chosen from the group of representatives elected by each homeroom. By checking books, writing fine slips, and putting books back on the shelves the members of the Library Staff serve • their school. Taught by Miss Walker, they learn exactly how a library oper¬ ates. Membership on this staff is open to girls of all class levels. Members of the Welfare Committee discuss plans for the annual Red Cross Drive. Represented on this committee are two people from each class level. Back Row: G. Littrell, S. Weiss, N. Scanlan. Second Row: I. Wollin, J. Link, Miss Lawson (sponsor). Front Row: J. Otiepka, N. Harris, R. Shabel. Giving up their free periods to work in the library, girls on the library staff check books and collect fines. Back Row: E. Johnson, M. Solomon. I. Ringel. I. Gilbert, R. Leger, M. Usow, M. Pritikin, M. Kamin, C. Pike, D. Pomerich, A. Finzel, B. Denker. Third Row: P. Poppenhagen, P. Czerwonka, C. Colussi, M. Kerr, V. Day, D. Krueger, J. Godell, S. Hagen, B. Jeske, M. Singer. Second Row: E. Gannon, D. Harrigan, L. Warkenthien, E. Roberts, R. Rosenfeld, A. Wulf, S. Karpin, B. Levinson, P. Roubal, I. Swanson, D. Halstead .Front Row: H. Neer, S. Greene, B. Jacob, V. Beach, G. Dent, J. Schultz, P. Cirkle CLUBS DEVELOP WORTHWHILE HOBBIES FOR Since twentieth-century man now enjoys greater leisure than ever before because of the limiting of his work week to forty hours, and since this amount of leisure time will continue to increase, the individual needs to develop worthwhile hobbies for recreational hours. This year for the first time students, instructed by Mr. J. Michael, were given an opportuni ty to learn to play bridge. The Craftsmans Guild, sponsored by Mr. B. Sor¬ enson and Miss J. Oehler, was organized for artistic students interested in leather work and ceramics. An attempt was also made to organize a club for students interested in model railroading, but the group was dis¬ banded, at least temporarily, because of lack of interest. Dr. Mason, who is particu¬ larly interested in meeting the recreational needs of young people, has appointed Mr. J. Sheahan to make a study of additional clubs to meet special interests. Mr. Michael explains to Carol Constantine the technique of the finesse during a bridge game with K. Frenzel, C. Joslyn, and M. Dell. Kibitz¬ ing are B. Bartholomew, P. Pierce, Mr. J. Mi¬ chael (sponsor), E. Pollock, and J. Michael. Mr. Adams points out the possibility of " castling " to Laurence Ruttenberg during a meeting of the Chess Club. Each year the champion chess player is determined through round robin tournaments. Back Row: L. Rut¬ tenberg, Mr. G. Adams (sponsor), J. Stout, R. Rosenberg, R. Grandberg. Middle Row: A. Berberick, A. Bloch. Front Row: R. Kofoed, S Pearson. 62 LEISURE HOURS After a successful season, the mem¬ bers of the bowling teams held their annual spring banquet. Standing: Denny Williamson, Chuck Richards, Ron Furtak, Tony Slone, Mike Lep- tick, Dick Young, Harvey Sherman, Boll Bell (third high bowler), and Gene Brodsky. Seated: Howie Gor¬ don, Gary Friedman (first high bowl¬ er), A1 Martin (second high bowler), Not all teen-agers are interested in such modern hobbies as hot rods; members of the Astronomy Club are fascinated, as man has always been, by the mystery of the heavens. President Joe Stout explains the workings of a telescope to club members. Standing: D. Turner, M. Singer, R. Guess, T. DeVries, J. Gould, C. Cleary, G. LeBarbera, M. Matten- son, J. Piell, R. Zuber, J. Gear. Seated: M. Escher, J. Frandzel, R. Bourgerie, Mr. Botthof (sponsor), R. Kofoed (secretary), T. Stark (vice-president). Marconi had nothing on the members of the Radio Club! They learn transmitting and telegraphing as well as picking up stations all over the world. Listening to a foreign sta¬ tion are: M. Levine (vice-president), I. Schmid- ling, J. Kinsey. L. Weiss, D. Virnich, P. Jensen. Seated: W. Meneilley (secretary), T. Straley (president), S. Allen, G. Sorenson. Special Client4 ARE THRILLING . . . WE WILL HAVE THESE P r MOMENTS TO REMEMBER! The house is quiet—not a crea¬ ture is stirring, not even a mouse! Diane Peterson, starry- eyed from a breathless eve¬ ning at the Prom, regretfully places her corsage in the re¬ frigerator before tiptoeing up¬ stairs to change into Bermu¬ da shorts. She and her date rush to a party, have break¬ fast with their friends, and spend the day at Lake Geneva. " Though other nights and other days will find us on our sep¬ arate ways " — we will have the Prom to remember. Bob White helps Diane Peterson from the car to a magic night of dancing at the Palmer House. Prize-winning float was the “N " Club ' s green dragon. En¬ joying their victory are San¬ dy Bruening, Nancy Keppeler, and Nancy Harris. HOMECOMING PARADE AND THE KICKOFF ARE HIGH POINTS OF AUTUMN ... Gail Dent, Merle Hendrickson, Barbara Busch, Kathy Krause, Barbara McKaig, Mary Kohls, and Bette Vosnos, members of homeroom 208-5A, add color to the gloom of the day. " Come On! Keep Going!” Mr. T. Schubert keeps the traffic moving, as the parade gets under way. " OUR HEARTS WERE YOUNG AND GAY " ... BUT OUR FEET WERE WET! The misty, rain-soaked day of Homecoming is something our young hearts will never forget. At six in the morning we are up to put the final touches on our floats. Cries of " Watch out! It ' s falling! " drown out the wham of hammers. Finally, amid " ohs and ahs, " the float is set to go. The hurrying, scurrying to get started and the hustle, bustle of trying to find our driver fills us with anticipation. Now all we have to do is wait. The parade begins! A blur of brilliant colors whizzes past our eyes while the " rat, tat, tat, tat, tat " of the Woody Woodpecker float beats on our ears. After the parade has ended and the prizes are awarded to the " N " Club for first place, and to senior homeroom 208-5A for second, we rush to the football field to watch the struggle between Niles and Oak Park. Banners wave, yells of " Come on team—fight! fight! " rise from the crowd huddled under blankets for protection from the driving rain and wind. Warmed by steaming hot coffee, we cheer on the team until the final whistle. Score— 20 to 20! The game over, we dash home to pin up oui straggling curls for the glorious evening ahead. Nine o ' clock finds us drifting to the strains of " Ten¬ derly " in an autumn-decorated gym colorful with corn shocks and pumpkins. Then, twelve o ' clock strikes and Homecoming ' 55 is over. Cutting through the line in the game against Oak Park, full¬ back Lenny Miresse plows down the muddy field. During intermission at the Homecoming Dance, Bill Pe- gausch gives Sandy Paul, Frank Kiszely, Nancy Colletti, Terry Moore, and Barbara Thompson a first hand account of the afternoon ' s game. 67 " Silent Night, Holy Night " . . . Members of the music department presented the annual Christmas Vespers on December 18. This year, for the first time, a tableau interpreting a Christmas theme, composed by Mrs. Parepa Rice, was used with dramatic effect. 68 A present for everyone! Robert Lentzner, Roger Simp¬ son, Don Woldman, Pat Holm, Sandy Howard, John Gunnarson, Rosemary Nitsche, Dorothy Dziadula, and Robert Godell wonder what their packages hold at homeroom 219-5B ' s Christmas party. " WE ' RE DREAMING OF A WHITE CHRISTMAS " , PARTIES, AND HOURS OF SLEEP . . . The Christmas season is here again! Joyous strains of " Hark the Herald Angels Sing, " ring through the halls as the music department practices feverishly for the spectacular Christmas Vespers. Whether we are the audience or the performers, the splendor of this production on December 18 awakens our long-forgotten Christmas spirit. The audience is quiet, and the singing begins; never before has Christmas music sounded more beautiful then when Niheli voices blend in the beautiful melody of " Silent Night. " Filled with Christmas spirit, we celebrate the Yuletide sea¬ son with parties in our homerooms. Fudge and Christmas cookies are munched, while grab bag gifts are excitedly tom open between stanzas of " Joy to the World. " Those urgent book reports and tests forgotten, we concentrate completely on having a marvelous time. With school over at last, we look forward to two weeks of fun and festivity. Outstanding memory of the Christmas sea¬ son was the Belles and Beaux Cotillion. Here a winter wonder¬ land was made reality by the silhouette of the horse-drawn sleigh, and by the big evergreen-draped doorway on which we labored so long. Although " I ' ll See You in My Dreams " echoed through the partially emptied gym all too soon, we looked forward to hours and hours of sleep and a white Christmas! Nancy Keppfeler and Lenny Miresse catch the spirit of Christmas from the pine-scented air and the Win¬ ter Wonderland music of the Belles and Beaux Cotillion. Food and Christmas presents—what better way to celebrate the beginning of Christmas vacation? Frank Saunders, Malcolm MacLean, Bob Martin, Ron Shabel, and Tom Lowry enjoy a holiday luncheon in the cafeteria. 69 TROJAN TRUMPERIES PLAYS TO STANDING Helen of Troy (Margo Calamaras) rules over the 1956 Trojan Trumper¬ ies surrounded by her court of en¬ tertainers: Susy Schuster, Ann Ide, Jill Linn, Karen Holmberg, Arleen Atwood, Carol Schweger, Ronald Ra- ben, and Harvey Sarnat. Jerry Adams reads the 64,000 lira question to contestant George Grist under the watchful eye of announcer Dick Shutan in a take off on the $64,000 Question of TV fame. Lion hunting holds no terrors for Cecelia Belgarbo, Gayle Beckway, Carol Stine, and Joan Comiano—or so they say in their song and dance number. 70 1 ROOM ONLY Frank Milazzo, drummer in Twilighters band, gets the Max Factor treatment from Pat Holm. If the ancient Trojans were thrilled by the Greek production of the Wooden Horse, then Trojan Trumperies, the 1956 Nilehi talent show, would certainly have made Hector ' s Palace! With a program ranging from the satire of the 64,000 Lira Question, the mad music of the " Crazy Little Mama " quartet, to the piano solo of Douglas Wold, and the brilliantly costumed dance of Karen Homberg and Susie Schuster, students at Nilehi proved again that not all the talent is in New York and Hollywood. All the hours of rehearsing, all the anguish of knocking knees and shaking hands are forgotten as the house lights dim, the footlights go on, and the curtain rises on Reflections Revelries of 1956! " Take back your mink! Take back your pearls!” sing seniors Joan Gutowsky, Pat Pierce, Sandra Hagen, June Cohan, Nancy Cox, Pat Maguire, Claudia Joslyn, Carol Sue Ricketts, and Betty Bartholomew in their 1956 Reflections take off on " Guys and Dolls.” CURTAIN RISES ON FIRST MUSICALE, STUDENT LIFE With a blare of trumpets and a whirr of drums, the overture begins; the house lights dim. And so, on April 27 and 28, the school gymnasium became a lively college sorority house as the curtain rose on Student Life, the first musical ever to be produced at Niles and in the community. The show opened with the members of the choir marching through the audi¬ ence, singing the song " Student Life. " The audience held its breath while the villains, played by Ron Shabel and Marilyn Dell, tried to break up the ro¬ mance of Phil Quigley and Carol Schweger. Watchers sympathized with Arlene Atwood as she tried to stop her boy friend, Bob Martin, from flirting with all the pretty girls on campus. They laughed at Joan Gutowsky ' s ef¬ forts to keep Bob Piper from studying all the time even on dates. The Or¬ chestra and Girls ' Glee provided a mu¬ sical background for the production. Seniors Donna Vanderwall and Bob Martin were the co-directors; Karen Holmberg was the choreographer. Mr. Hugh McGee was the musical director and advisor. " It ' s Almost Like Meing in Love " sing leads, Carol Schweger and Phil Quigley. Members of the make-up crew, Mimi Stone, Judy Comiano, and Betty Stine, apply eye make-up to Liz Hiby, Warren Hanson, and Ernie Kezios. 72 " I ' m afraid of all dogs! " explains mailman Warren Hanson to Arlene Atwood. 73 Sorority girls at Northern, Becky Barker, Gloria Mengarelli, Liz Hiby, Pat Baumann, and Sarane Crowther, relax and listen while Diane Payne reads to them. Leads Bob Martin and Arlene At¬ wood dance a soft-shoe routine, singing " Thou Sweet, Thou Witty. " Elaine Shuman, JoAnn Lof3, Sandra Bruening, and Barbara Neumar. campaign for their candidate for prom leaders in the annual parade which precedes the voting. A MIDSUMMER NIGHT ' S DREAM " What color is your dress? " . . . " Who ' s your date? . . . " I hope he sends an orchid. " . . . " How much does it cost at the Chez Paree? " . . . Finally, after months of anticipation, June 1, the night of nights, arrives. After hours of combing our hair, polishing our shoes, hunting for a lost earring or cufflink, we ' re ready to slip into a fluff of tulle or the formal whiteness of our rented tuxes. And then the dream becomes a reality as we enter the grand ballroom of the Palmer House where a mist of pink, yellow, and powder blue formals makes a rainbow of colo r. We swing and sway to the music of Russ Carlisle . . . applaud the pres¬ entation of the prom leaders . . . enjoy the crush of the grand march. Then, on to the Chez Paree or the Boulevard Room! Before we know it, a glance at our watches reveals the time . . . three o ' clock in the morning! The night may be over, but we greet the dawn with a breakfast party with our friends. When the last strip of bacon is gone and we have completely hashed over the night spots we touched, we ' re ready to change to shorts and bathing suits for a lazy day relaxing in the sun and swimming at Lake Geneva or Crystal Lake. Then, " sunset and the evening star " and one more glorious memory . . . 74 Jack Hagman, president of the Junior Cab¬ inet, and JoAnn Lotz congratulate Kay Chris¬ tiansen and Jerry Best, leaders of the 1955 Prom. Such a wonderful time! The prom is over, but with the night till young, Harold Hite, Diane Nelson, Bill Dastic, and Julie McGinnis go on to late suppers in hotels and homes. . . . THE JUNIOR PROM! Caryl Bristol, Don Kneisel, Kay Christiansen, Jerry Best, Diane Donile, Dave Krause, Anna Otiepka, and Fred Melberg lead the Grand March at the 1955 Prom. The familiar walls, our f-iends and parents, and the choir singing at graduation brinq a lump to our throats as we wait to receive our diplomas. SENIORS LEARN THE MEANING OF " PARTING IS SUCH SWEET SORROW " Miss M. deBooy. assisted by Fred Melberg, presents schol¬ arship awards to Barbara Ka- min, Cindy Berquist, Dolores Renberg, and Janet Wahlen at the senior breakfast. This year, for the first time, because of the increased number of grad¬ uates, breakfast will be served in the gym. To the strains of " Pomp and Circumstance” we procede down the aisle, realizing at last the meaning of gradua¬ tion—the end and beginning. Four splendid years at Niles are over. Never again will we be the bewildered freshman, the sophisticated junior, the composed senior; never again will we race down the hall as the bell is ringing or wildly cheer our basketball team on to victory. The class of ' 56 realizes at last that four years has not been such a long time, after all. The last few months before commencement are a whirl of preparation. Some of us write a skit for the senior breakfast; others search our classmate ' s personalities to complete the class will; still others complete plans for the future. When the long awaited and dreaded day of graduation finally dawns, we flock excitedly to the breakfast, held in the gymnas¬ ium, for a last exchange of laughter and tears with classmates. Afterwards, beneath a hot June sun, we practice the processional for the thrilling moment ahead. Twilight ... a sliver of a moon . . . the scent of red roses . . . the swish of white robes . . . we begin the processional to the strains of " Pomp and Circumstance. " Under the flickering star., in our white or blue caps and gowns, we march down the aisle toward the platform. A lump swells in our throats. We are tom between two emotions: sadness at leaving our high school friends and Niles, our daytime home for the past four years, and excitement over the unforseen future. At last, we hear Mr. Ohlson call our name and step foreward to receive our diploma. The future—careers, college, and marriage—lies ahead! Patricia Bartholomew receives her diploma and congratula¬ tions from Mr. Harold Ohlson, Mr. Leo Bushey, president of the Board of Education, and Dr. Joseph Mason, superin¬ tendent. Classmates and friends con¬ gratulate one another after the ceremony. Charles Holler wishes Arlene Haubrich " good luck. " 77 Rog Peterson (46) hooks the ball over the out- stretched fingers of Evanston defender Dave Tremaine while John Pe¬ terson (50) of Evanston watches helplessly. All eyes on the game! Just as tense as the players, the varsity bench prays that the free throw will be good in order to tie the score. Competing U Cxciting . . . WE CHEER OUR TEAMS IN VICTORY AND DEFEAT! — The Trojans tense to " hold that line " against the High¬ land Park gridders. The ef¬ fective Trojan defense, which enabled Nilehi to defeat High¬ land Park 32 to 6, was the secret behind a winning rec¬ ord this year. OUR SPIRITS RISE WITH FIRST LEAGUE WIN . . . The Niles players pursue the Bremen Township full¬ back in the opening game of the season. The slow¬ ness of the Bremen attack is indicated by the final score, 31 to 13. Halfback Len Miresse (7) cuts around right end for yardage in the homecom¬ ing game against the Oak Park Huskies. The hard- fought game ended in a 20 to 20 tie. For the first time in many years, Nilehiers had good reason to cheer when their team trotted onto the football field No longer were they the underdogs, an easy victory for other Suburban League squads. This year ' s Trojans were not only a fighting team; they were a winning team. Under the watchful eyes of their coaches, Mr. Basrak, Mr. Odlivak, and Mr. Lain, the team gave a clue of better things to come in the first game of the year as they pounded Bremen Township, a team which did not lose another game all year, 31 to 13. Un¬ paralleled excitement raced through the com¬ munity when the Trojans rolled over Proviso, 13 to 0, for the first Suburban League win in four years. A 32 to 6 victory over the Highland Park Little Giants, another step toward the goal of a winning season, was led by the four touchdown total of high-scoring Trojan half¬ back Len Miresse. Together with the first Sub¬ urban League win came another first for Niles. Ron Hein, outstanding Trojan guard, was picked for the All-State team. Good coaching makes good football teams. Mr. Odlivak (line coach), Mr. Basrak (head coach), and Mr. Lain (end coach) brought the Niles Varsity Foot¬ ball Team a long way along the victory trail. The Varsity Football Team gave Niles its first Suburban League victory. Back Row: Mr. Basrak (head coach), F. Kiszely, R. Jones, J. Tomsik, C. Rey¬ nolds, S. Allen, B. Koif, D Kaiser, B. Enke, B. Nordlie, B. Hartig, D. Horseman, R. Holzl, G. Uhlir, T. Moore, Mr. Lain (end coach). Second Row: H. Feuer- zeig (mgr.), A. Wittkamp, B. Weldon, D. Dann, T. Swanson, V. Donile, R. Korsan, B. Pegausch, K. Walter, C. Vosnos, B. Allen, J. Rosenberg, B. Blowers, D. Wright (mgr.), Mr. Odlivak (line coach). Front Row: B. Peterson, B. Reinger, J. Rice, D. Proft, G. Mills, L. Miresse (co-captain), R. Hein (co-cap- tain), D. Chevrier, J. Hagman, L. Breden, R. Simpson, T. Pristash. Bruce Reinger ' s attempt to gain yardage against the New Trier squad was doomed to failure. Quar¬ terback Ken Walter (5) runs up to lead interference in the ill-fated ven¬ ture. The Trojans were defeated by a strong New Trier team, 20 to 6. Mud and Oak Park defenders failed to stop Bill Pegausch as he ground for a first-and-ten in the Oak Park game. Running interference are Gary Mills (75) and an unidentified Trojan. WE FINALLY LEAVE THE BASEMENT 82 VARSITY RECORD N.T.H.S. 31 Bremen 13 N.T.H.S. 13 Proviso 0 N.T.H.S. 6 Waukegan 7 N.T.H.S. 6 New Trier 27 N.T.H.S. 32 Highland Park 6 N.T.H.S. 12 Evanston 35 N.T.H.S. 20 Oak Park 20 N.T.H.S. 13 Morton 6 Ron Hein, guard and co-cap¬ tain, was the first Trojan ever to be selected for the first All- State team. What the Niles frosh-soph football team lacked in size, they made up for in spirit as they won three of eight contests. Back Row: J. Pitt, C. Larson, M. Sheahan, B. Connell, R. Marks, D. Brei, E. Jaster, C. Richard¬ son, D. Echel. Second Row: Mr. Rambis (coach), T. Paulus, R. Chez, D. Leban, D. Wille, B. Bell, J. Berg, Mr. Harmon (coach). Front Row: L Biedrzycki, T. Baumann, D. Samuel- son, R. Swanson, J. Quancy, G. Krauss, D. Hodgkinson, B. Feingold. This year ' s frosh-soph football team proved that quality, not quantity, is what counts The team shut out both Bremen Township and Waukegan 13 to 0 and whipped Highland Park 21 to 0. Hard playing, high spirit, and good coaching were the secrets that enabled the small squad to win three of their eight games. OF THE SUBURBAN LEAGUE Overshadowed by the varsity was a fine freshman football team which finished the year with a record of five wins, two losses, and one tie. Featured were wins over Proviso, Waukegan, and Evanston. The freshman football team finished their season with a record of five wins, two defeats, and one tie. Back Row: B. Herkert, J. Coursey, M. Le- Vi ne, J. Hager, T. Dobrowski, R. Bentley, J. Haper, G. Fogarty, C. Ragland, C. Shoemaker, H. Masek, F. Didier, D. Hanson, J. Carlson, S. Hawk, R. Lis, R. Morgan, G. Willard. Second Row: Mr. Hoosline (coach), J. Browder, D. Lewiston, W. Tomsik, K. Ransom, J. Papandrea, T. Bristol, A. Gold, I. Tadelman, K. Hopper, M. Johnson, K. Schultz, J. Weil, R. Kihl- strom, R. Harrison, L. Weinbrecht, Mr. Sheahan (head coach), and Mr. Hussey (coach). Front Row: J. Coop¬ er (mgr.), L. Lange, M. Magit, B. Mink, J. Allen, K. Hoppe, W. Brum- mer, D. Kutok, R. Heinz, W. Maryan- ski, C. Wheat, W. Johns, W. Mc¬ Grath, L. Weil (mgr.). FROSH-SOPH RECORD N.T.H.S. 13 Bremen 0 N.T.H.S. 6 Proviso 13 N.T.H.S. 13 Waukegan 0 N.T.H.S. 6 New Trier 27 N.T.H.S. 21 Highland Park 0 N.T.H.S. 0 Evanston 14 N.T.H.S. 6 Oak Park 13 N.T.H.S. 13 Morton 14 FRESHMAN RECORD N.T.H.S. 0 Arlington 6 N.T.H.S. 7 Proviso 6 N.T.H.S. 7 Waukegan 6 N.T.H.S. 0 New Trier 14 N.T.H.S. 13 Highland Park 6 N.T.H.S. 19 Evanston 13 N.T.H.S. 6 Oak Park 0 N.T.H.S. 0 Morton 0 Speedy Bruce Reinger charges past a Leyden guard in an at¬ tempt to pass the ball to a teammate in position to shoot. High into the air swarm Tro¬ jans Dale Kaiser (number not visible) and Roger Peterson (46) as they steal the rebound from the Evanston five. Every muscle taut, Roger Pet¬ erson soars high above two Leyden guards to sink a lay¬ up shot. 12 It ' s two more points for Niles as All-Suburban Dale Kaiser (44) uncoils his deadly jumpshot against the futile defense of his Leyden op¬ ponents during the Regionals. VARSITY SCORES N.T.H.S. 57 Leyden 71 N.T.H.S. 68 Maine 53 N.H.T.S. 51 Proviso 62 N.T.H.S. 47 Highland Park 49 N.T.H.S. 62 Oak Park 64 N.T.H.S. 61 Pekin 63 N.T.H.S. 60 LaSalle-Peru 62 N.T.H.S. 54 New Trier 63 N.T.H.S. 73 Morton 80 N.T.H.S. 48 Evanston 44 N.T.H.S. 51 Waukegan 49 N.T.H.S. 50 Proviso 56 N.T.H.S. 69 Highland Park 50 N.T.H.S. 75 Oak Park 71 N.T.H.S. 78 New Trier 85 N.T.H.S. 63 Morton 52 N.T.H.S. 61 Evanston 66 N.T.H.S. 54 Waukegan Regionals 45 N.T.H.S. 47 Leyden 53 TEAM SPIRIT MOUNTS AS EARLY SLUMP HALTS The final quarter of each game proved to be the downfall of the Trojans as they lost to eight of their first nine oppon¬ ents. The Trojans snapped out of their seven-game losing streak by defeating Evanston 48 to 44 and downing Wau¬ kegan 51 to 49. The first-place Proviso Pirates had to put up a battle the following weekend to keep the Trojans down, but the team bounced back to revenge a sudden death defeat earlier in the season at the hands of Highland Park by beating the Little Giants 69 to 50. The Trojans had finally become a team! With their new spirit they easily slashed Morton ' s seven-game winning streak. The season closed with a victory over Waukegan for the second time. The team finished in fifth place with a record of seven wins and eleven losses under the coaching of Mr. Sheahan. Leading the team in rebounding and scoring, Trojan center Dale Kaiser ranked as the second high scorer in Suburban League competition and was placed on the area ' s all star teams. Mr. Sheahan (coach) demonstrates the effectiveness oi a good passing attack to the varsity team. Back Row: D. Shea (mgr.), H. Neimer, L. Renis, T. Pristash, R. Peterson, L. VanMersbergen, D. Kaiser. Front Row: B. Pegausch, K. Walter, D. Chevrier, K. Kay, G. Neu¬ mann, J. Febel, B. Reinger. Ace dribbler Joel Febel (45) tries to streak past the close guarding of Evanston ' s Don Johnson. Going high into the air Ron Henrici (31) tips the rebound to teammate Mike Sheahan (18). Unstoppable! That ' s the only word for frosh- soph player Bill Ihne ' s (11) deadly shot. YOUNGER TEAMS HIT THEIR STRIDE The frosh-soph team had a successful sea¬ son under the coaching of Mr. Phipps. After losing their first three games, the Trojans bounced back to win the next nine out of thir¬ teen games with a five game winning streak in the midst of these wins. Of their seven losses during the season, five games were lost by only one point and the remaining two were lost by less than seven points. The team tied Evanston for second place in the League with their nine won and seven lost record. FROSH-SOPH RECORD N.T.H.S. 44 Leyden 51 N.T.H.S. 38 Maine 53 N.T.H.S. 44 Proviso 45 N.T.H.S. 38 Highland Park 30 N.T.H.S. 63 Oak Park 47 N.T.H.S. 39 New Trier 31 N.T.H.S. 54 Morton 55 N.T.H.S. 39 Evanston 40 N.T.H.S. 49 Waukegan 43 N.T.H.S. 46 Proviso 47 N.T.H.S. 42 Highland Park 36 N.T.H.S. 73 Oak Park 48 N.T.H.S. 55 New Trier 44 N.T.H.S. 42 Morton 36 N.T.H.S. 43 Evanston 40 N.T.H.S. 37 Waukegan 38 Fight, determination, and hustle made the frosh-soph team come out on the better half of the scores. Back Row: D. Wicker, R. Henrici. B Ebbert, M. Sheahan, J. Dragisic, B. !hne, C. Macaluso, and L. Larsen. Second Row: Mr. Phipps (coach), B. Johnson, G. Herriott, J. Hederick, H. Jung, J. Keidel, D. Mendelsohn, S. Ahrens (mgr.). Front Row: E. Arnold, K. Grubb, B. Ahlberg, T. Baumann, J. Schiff (mgr.). 86 The Junior Varsity team met rough competition this year as shown by their record of four wins and nine losses. Most thrilling part of the season was their overwhelming victory over Waukegan by a score of 70 to 48. All the boys played hard under Mr. Sheahan ' s coaching, but Bill Pegausch and Larry VanMersbergen, high scorers, did especially fine work. Although the Frosh squad ' s record of five wins and twelve losses was not a good one, they showed fight and good team work under the coaching of Mr. Hoosline and Mr. Basrak. After losing their first ten games, the frosh beat Highland Park to set off a four-game winning streak. The high spot of the season came when they swamped Glenbrook 68 to 13. JUNIOR VARSITY SCORES N.T.H.S. 37 Leyden 51 N.T.H.S. 34 Proviso 48 N.T.H.S. 55 North Chicago 64 N.T.H.S. 53 Oak Park 71 N.T.H.S. 57 New Trier 53 N.T.H.S. 57 Arlington 60 N.T.H.S. 43 Morton 51 N.T.H.S. 47 Evanston 62 N.T.H.S. 70 Waukegan 48 N.T.H.S. 52 New Trier 55 N.T.H.S. 83 Morton 79 N.T.H.S. 54 Glenbrook 31 N.T.H.S. 57 Waukegan 74 Free throws can be the difference between a win or a loss Bill Pe¬ gausch, ' coached by Mr. Sheahan, illustrates the correct form of shoot¬ ing free throws to the junior varsity team. Standing: F. Kiszely, D. Ro- senfield, W. Kerstetter, S. Bennett, L. VanMersbergen, D. Cleven (mgr.). Kneeling: K. Demano, B. Gigstad, and B. Hartig. Future varsity stars showed hustle and team work this frosh season. Back Row: J. Allen, R. Elkeg, W. Reading, J. Tansor, S. Tzinberg, R. Johnson, M. Sacks, J. Baker (mgr.). Second Row: R. Linnick (mgr.), J. Carlson, C. Schey, S. Hawk, C. Wheat, R. Lis, J. McGinnis, K. Krause (mgr.). Front Row: K. Krause, H. Eklund, B. Mink, W. Nack, D. Kloepfer. FROSH SCORES N.T.H.S. 40 Leyden 44 N.T.H.S. 17 Proviso 38 N.T.H.S. 34 North Chicago 46 N.T.H.S. 32 Oak Park 44 N.T.H.S. 37 Highland Park 40 N.T.H.S. 42 New Trier 46 N.T.H.S. 37 Arlington 45 N.T.H.S. 43 Morton 46 N.T.H.S. 38 Evanston 45 N.T.H.S. 26 Waukegan 44 N.T.H.S. 40 Highland Park 31 N.T.H.S. 45 Leyden 28 N.T.H.S. 42 New Trier 36 N.T.H.S. 67 Palatine 32 N.T.H.S. 42 Morton 65 N.T.H.S. 68 Glenbrook 13 N.T.H.S. 31 Waukegan 49 WRESTLING TEAM TAKES TEN OUT OF FIFTEEN MATCHES This year ' s Trojan wrestling squad finished with an outstanding record of ten wins, four losses, and one tie. Victories included a tough opening match win over Leyden, a shutout against North Chicago, the third shutout in the school ' s history; a close decision over a good Arlington team; and a tie with one of the strongest teams in the state, Waukegan. De¬ serving of special mention are Henry Feuer- zeig, who finished the season with a thirteen win, two loss total; Ed Jaster, who came from the ranks of the frosh-soph team and finished third in the sectional; and Jim Esbrook and Len Miresse, who won in the sectionals and went to the state finals, where Len won a fourth place, being the first wrestler from Niles to place in the state. The frosh-soph team defeated such rugged opponents as Maine, Palatine, and Glenbrook. Under Mr. Odlivak, the team also beat North Chicago and Highland Park. Glenn Kuehn was the outstanding member of the frosh-soph team. The varsity wrestling team presented Niles with the best Lcason ' s record in years. Back Row: B. Nordlie, B. Enke, J. Hagman, E. Jaster, B. Allen. Second Row: D. Horsman, R. Simp¬ son, R. Chez, L. Miresse (captain). Front Row: H. Feuerzeig, R. Johnson, D. Wright, Mr. By¬ ram (coach). Demonstrating: J. Esbrook, B. DiGilio. VARSITY RECORD N.T.H.S. 26 Leyden 22 N.T.H.S. 16 Maine 24 N.T.H.S. 24 Palatine 17 N.T.H.S. 46 Zion 5 N.T.H.S. 56 North Chicago 0 N.T.H.S. 14 New Trier 26 N.T.H.S. 35 Morton 8 N.T.H.S. 28 Riverside 12 N.T.H.S. 27 Arlington 14 N.T.H.S. 12 Evanston 30 N.T.H.S. 32 Glenbrook 11 N.T.H.S. 23 Waukegan 23 N.T.H.S. 47 Highland Park 5 N.T.H.S. 31 Oak Park 9 N.T.H.S. 13 Proviso 27 FROSH-SOPH RECORD N.T.H.S. 10 Leyden 48 N.T.H.S. 27 Maine 21 N.T.H.S. 39 Palatine 11 N.T.H.S. 51 North Chicago 5 N.T.H.S. 10 New Trier 35 N.T.H.S. 20 Morton 24 N.T.H.S. 32 Riverside 13 N.T.H.S. 8 Arlington 26 N.T.H.S. 8 Evanston 40 N.T.H.S. 27 Glenbrook 17 N.T.H.S. 16 Waukegan 29 N.T.H.S. 49 Highland Park 5 N.T.H.S. 21 Oak Park 29 N.T.H.S. 6 Proviso 40 The frosh-soph wrestling team won six of fourteen matches. Back Row: G. Kuehn, H. Masek, P. LeTourneau, R. Marks, W. Haerle. Second Row: D. Jarvis, F. Weil, R. Dilg, R. Pankey, B. Herkert. Front Row: T. Bristol, J. Cooper, L. Weil, S. Kirschner. Demonstrating: B. Franz, W. McGrath. This year ' s varsity swimming team leaves behind a new 200-yard medley relay mark of 1:59.2. Back Row: Mr. Schubert (coach), D. Stryker (captain), R. Larson, T. Oiler, B. Yant, J. Thornton, D. Holzl. Second Row: R. Larson, J. Harms, R. Recker, D. Wold. Front Row: J. Hartmann, K. Middleton, F. Hodges, W. Nelson. On diving board, D. Minkley. VARSITY RESULTS N.T.H.S. 33 Maine 44 N.T.H.S. 66 Leyden 9 N.T.H.S. 60 Riverside 17 N.T.H.S. 36 Waukegan 41 N.T.H.S. 47 Proviso 30 N.T.H.S. 32 Highland Park 45 N.T.H.S. 30 Oak Park 47 N.T.H.S. 14 Riverside 8th N.T.H.S. 25 New Trier 52 N.T.H.S. 38 Morton 39 N.T.H.S. 9 Evanston 68 N.T.H.S. 541 2 DeKalb 2214 FROSH-SOPH RESULTS N.T.H.S. 32 Maine 45 N.T.H.S. 57 Leyden 19 N.T.H.S. 55 Riverside 22 N.T.H.S. 35 Waukegan 42 N.T.H.S. 32 Proviso 45 N.T.H.S. 21 Highland Park 56 N.T.H.S. 35 Oak Park 42 N.T.H.S. 25 New Trier 52 N.T.H.S. 55 Morton 22 N.T.H.S. 16 Evanston 61 N.T.H.S. 57 DeKalb 20 The frosh-soph swim team sported a record of four wins and seven losses. Back Row: F. Herzon, B. Glassberg, , M. Malinas, F. Farring- ton, B. Feingold, N. Carberry, G. Fogarty. Second Row: A. Gold, R. Morgan, M. Banks, N. Petersen, P. Tworoger. Front Row: H. Sar- nat, D. Sullivan, D. Morgan, B. Norgan, J. Iverson, Mr. Harmon (coach) instructing D. Oakes in water. SWIM TEAM TIES FOR NINTH PLACE IN STATE MEET. This year ' s varsity swim team won crushing vic¬ tories against Leyden, Riverside-Brookfield, and De- Kalb. The team also supplied many thrills with a close, hardfought victory over the Proviso tanksters and looked good even in defeat against strong Maine, Waukegan, and Morton squads. The team also tied for ninth in the state meet at New Trier on the basis of the 200-yard medley relay team which set a new school record. Looking especially good this year were Doug Stryker and Bill Yant. Bill set a new school backstroke record of 1:10.6. The frosh-soph team, closing with a record of four wins and seven losses, swamped Leyden 57 to 19, and drowned both Riverside-Brookfield and Morton by identical scores, 55 to 22. Showing promise were Burton Feingold, who finished fourth in the Suburban League breaststroke, and Dave Oakes, a backstroker. The Varsity Baseball team set their sights on a winning season and the Suburban League crown. Back Rcw: Mr. Phipps (coach), D. Chevrier, T. Nelson, L. Breden, J. Rice, T. Pristash, H. Neimer, B. ihne, R. Whitsett, R. Machas. Second Row: V. Donile, B. Gigstad, J. Tomsik, R. Korsan, L. Miresse, H. Dilg, K. Walter, D. Shea, T. Moore, B. Marciante. Front Row: K. Sorensen, J. Meier, C. Gunsaullus, B. Reinger, B. Pegausch, F. Milazzo, H. Ahrendt. TROJAN TEAMS SET SIGHTS ON CHAMPIONSHIPS RECORD N.T.H.S. 6 Palatine 0 N.T.H.S. 2 Arlington 5 N.H.T.S. 6 Glenbrook 6 N.T.H.S. 8 Waukegan 4 N.T.H.S. 5 Waukegan 3 N.T.H.S. 3 Proviso 2 N.T.H.S. 12 Evanston 3 N.T.H.S. 2 Evanston 5 N.T.H.S. 2 Morton 3 Excellent pitching, fine fielding, and good hitting combined to bring Niles one of its best baseball teams in years. Goal of the team was the Suburban League championship, and the future looked bright as this book went to press, with a pair of victories over Waukegan (8 to 4 and 5 to 3), a slugging triumph over Evanston (12 to 3), a hard-fought win over Proviso, last year ' s champions (3 to 2), the team was well on its way. The highlight of the season, how¬ ever, was an opesing game win over Palatine, 6 to 0, in which Ken Walter and Hal Neimer combined to hurl a no-hitter. As well as these fine pitchers, Rog Whitsett, Bruce Reinger, Bill Pegausch, and Bill Ihne have been doing a commendable job under the coaching of Mr. Phipps. Responsible for many of Niles victories was the pitching of Ken Walter, Hal Neimer, and Rog Whitsett. Hits win baseball games. Bill Pegausch, Bruce Reinger, Ted Pristash, and Bill Ihne col¬ lected many of the hits needed. The frosh-soph squad started out the season right by winning two of their first three games They defeated Glenbrook, 11 to 8, and Arlington, 5 to 2. Their single loss came at the hands of Evanston, 6 to 0. Ron Chez, Jerry Keidel, and John Dragisic have been particularly outstanding. Coached by Mr. Hooseline, the team has rough encounters ahead against New Trier and Oak Park. The freshman baseball team, under the direction of Mr. Schubert, is looking forward to a successful season. A win over Evanston, 6 to 1, in the first league game of the year was the accomplishment of these underclassmen. A loss to Arlington, 4 to 1, has served notice that other rough games against foes like Morton and Proviso may be ahead. Ron Chez, who doubles as a pitcher, tenses to lay down a bunt during frosh-soph baseball practice. Success of the frosh-soph baseball team seemed assured as they won two of their first three games. Back Row: A. Maurizi, A. Johnson, D. Brie, J. Dragisic, B. Fyfe, J. Keidel, L. Hoos- line (coach). Second Row: D. Wille, J. Hederick, L. Biedrzychi, R. Johnson, J. Berg, B. Rakowski, R. Rudolph. Front Row: D. Mendelsohn, P. Le- Tourneau, W. Herriott, R. Chez, C. Koszuta, W. Ahlberg. The freshman baseball team won their first league game, beating Evanston, 6 to 0. Back Row: K. Hoppe, S. Tzinberg, D. Lasine, G. Roubinek, R. Lis, J. Gross, J. Baker (mgr.). Third Row: C. Schey, B. An¬ derson, L. Lange, J. Allen, M. Banks, K. Artwick, R. Elke. Second Row: B. Maryanski, H. Eklund, T. Dobrowol- ski, R. Pinkowski, B. Lund, B. Mink, M. Magit. Front Row: D. Sullivan, D. Lewiston, A. Hoffenberg, J. Copper, B. Gutowsky, D. Kloepfer. 91 The serve is good! The ball is smashed over the net by varsity ten¬ nis star, John Whitehead. EXPERIENCE BRINGS VICTORIES! With four returning lettermen, three juniors and a sophomore, the varsity tennis team started the season with a bang. In their first game they swamped Arlington Heights 5 to 0 and went on to beat Glenbrook 4 to 1. The following week Maine had a hard time holding the Trojans down by a score of 3 to 2. The Trojans then bounced back to defeat Waukegan and Proviso in their first two Suburban League encounters, which tied them for first place in the League. The Trojans also played a Suburban League meet at Oak Park and a district meet at Evanston. Coched by Mr. Sheahan, they had their sights set on that first place trophy in the Suburban League. Not to be overshadowed by the successful varsity, the frosh- soph team, also coached by Mr. Sheahan, was victorious in four of their first five matches. Arlington Heights, Glenbrook, and Maine were swamped by the Trojans. Waukegan defeated the Trojans, who came back to smash Proviso 4 to 1. The team, composed of three freshmen and six sophomores, is looking towards that frosh-soph Suburban League crown this year. Coach Sheahan demonstrates the forehand stroke to the frosh-soph team. Standing: D. Hodgkinson, F. Carlson, B. Glassberg, J. VanDer- Veldt, J. Bobera, R. Morgan. Kneel¬ ing: D. Block, R. Hagen, L. Janson. Ron Johnson is shown the correct way to grip a racket by Coach Shea¬ han as the varsity team looks on. Standing: L. Wotan, K. Adam, J. Whitehead, T. Cooper, R. Prebish Kneeling: B. Eggersted, E. Kezios, C Eichhorn. 92 Mr. Kivilouma shows the correct use of the different woods to K. De Mono, B. Nordlie, J. Febel, G. Dolan, L. Larson, and B. Peterson. The golf team practices and plays regularly at Arlington Country Club. Their schedule included meets with Palatine, Oak Park, Arlington, Leyden, Proviso, New Trier, Glenbrook, North Chicago, Wau¬ kegan, Maine, Evanston and Morton. To qualify for the golf team, prospects must participate in an elim¬ ination round in which the top seven scores deter¬ mine the regular members of the squad. Those who did not qualify in the elimination round can chal¬ lenge and defeat one of the seven selected members to win a place on the team. Ineligibilities have cost the squad several good golfers, but the excellent turnout of freshman and sophomore golfers im¬ proved the team ' s prospects. GOLFERS TEE OFF AT ARLINGTON . . . With a smile of satisfaction, Bruce Peterson smashes his drive down the middle of the fairway. Using his four wood for a rather difficult fairway shot, Joel Febel begins his back- swing. 93 UNHERALDED BUT SPIRITED N.T.H.S. 42 VARSITY Proviso 23 N.T.H.S. 47 Leyden 15 N.T.H.S. 46 Waukegan 19 N.T.H.S. New Trier—by default N.T.H.S. 30 Glenbrook 26 Suburban—Peters placed 12th N.T.H.S. 52 Evanston 20 N.T.H.S. 45 Oak Park 18 District— -Niles 12th in field of 14 N.T.H.S. 27 Morton 29 N.T.H.S. 76 FROSH-SOPH Proviso 15 N.T.H.S. 20 Leyden 44 N.T.H.S. 30 Waukegan 27 N.T.H.S. 37 New Trier 23 N.T.H.S. 40 Evanston 17 N.T.H.S. 39 Oak Park 18 N.T.H.S. 43 Morton 15 Unheralded because of the successful football sea¬ son were the efforts of the cross-country teams. Cross¬ country, an outgrowth of track, is a two mile race. The varsity team, like the football squad, won their first league meet this year, beating Morton. The frosh-soph, not to be outdone, took a meet from the Leyden track- sters. Consistent winners were Dave Wilson and Don Peters, who took twelfth place in the Suburban League meet. The spirit of the squads was high, but the num¬ ber of boys participating was low. The Niles speedsters like the foot¬ ball team won their first Suburban League cross-country meet this year. Back Row: Mr. Kiviluoma (coach), D. Cooper, R. Aull, R. Conrad, T. Coop¬ er, T. Freeling, D. Rosenfield, C. Gunsaullus. Front Row: J. Whitehead, D. Wilson, S. Bennett, D. Peters, L. Solomon. The frosh-soph cross-country team looked back with pleasure upon their victory over Leyden. Back Row: Mr. Kiviluoma (coach), A. Gutenrich, D. Morgan, E. Staplefeld, B. Fife, W. Ihne, D. Manaugh, R. Pankey, K. Grubb. Front Row: D. Anderson, F. Herzon, G. Kuehn, J. McGinnis, J. Goldstein, B. Stein, R. Thomas, W. McDowell. 94 Breaking both individual and team records, the track team made this the most successful season they have had in many years. Back Row: Mr. Harmon, K. Zahn, W. Zuber, W. Read¬ ing, R. Conrad, R. Rosenfield, J. Tansor, B. Stein, E. Paster, Mr. Byram, Mr. Hussey. Third Row: R. Thomas, S. Kirschner, B. Herkerty, R. Pankey, T. Baumann, R. Eckblad. Second Row: Mr. Marcus, H. Jung, K. Hertweck, C. Bonfiglio, L. Wolf, E. Arnold, R. Aull, J. Hager, A. Rugendorf, J. Hager. Front Row: W. Brummer, G. Kraus, D. Wilson, J. Himelfarb, N. Magit, J. Sefick. ' The track team started on the road to victory this season. Although the varsity have not had any team wins as yet, they have two strong prospects for downstate. One is senior Jack Hagman, who has broken the school record for the shot-put, setting a record of 47 ' 2 " . In addition, he is only four inches short of the school record for the discus throw. The other is senior Dave Wilson, a fast half-miler, who also ran a leg of the mile relay team with Dick Rosenfield, Ken Zahn, and Ron Conrad. The varsity is coached by Mr. Harmon, who was TRACK helped this year by Mr. Byram and Mr. Marcus, practice teachers. The frosh-soph have won two triangular meets already, beating Highland Park and Waukegan in one, and North Chicago and Morton in another. With 39V 2 points in the big Lake Shore meet, they placed third. Outstanding was Frank Fortuna, sophomore, who is already beating the varsity in the dashes and quarter mile. With a strong team and good coaching by Mr. Hussey, the frosh-soph piled up their best record in many years. Gary Krauss and Dick Pankey clear the low hurdles in a close heat. Soaring over the high jump bar in good form is Bill Zuber. Tom Baumann, Dave Wilson, Ken Zahn, and Dick Rosenfield compose the varsity mile relay team. It ' s up and over for pole vaulter Dick Aull. 95 The goal of " N " Club members is to develop good sportsmanship on the athletic field. Back Row: B. Eggersted, K. Kay, S. Bennett, D. Rosenfield, B. Reinger. Fourth Row: L. Renis, A. Wittkamp, D. Peters, B. Hartig, H. Neimer, B. Enke, L. Wotan, K. Adam, B. Pegausch. Third Row: J. Hart mann, T. Swanson, C. Reynolds, D. Wright, R. Holzl, J. Esbrook, Mr. Byram (sponsor). Second Row: L. Breden, C. Penrith, B. Allen, J. Whitehead, G. Mills, D. Chevrier, Mr. Odlivak (sponsor). Front Row: B. DiGilio, L. Mi- resse, J. Hagman, K. Walter, B. Blowers, Mr. Kiviluoma (sponsor). Hal Neimer, " N " Club initiate, shines the shoes of Ken Walter, “N " Club member, as Ken supervises. ' N M CLUB AIMS TO DEVELOP GOOD SPORTSMANSHIP. The " N " Club, which is open to all boys who have won a major letter in sports, is largely responsible for promoting better re¬ lations between the faculty and the athletes, and between the athletes and the students. The " N " Club sponsors many activities, among which are the " N " Club-Faculty bas¬ ketball game, which the teachers won this year; the selling of candy in the stands dur¬ ing the basketball games this winter; usher¬ ing at various athletic events; and the “N " Club initiation, which is the induction of the new members into the club. For the second time in as many years, the " N " Club ' s float won first prize in the Homecoming parade. The club meets two times each month under the sponsorship of Mr. Byram, Mr. Kiviluo¬ ma, and Mr. Odlivak. Mr. B. Welch, Mr. J. Palmer, Mr. W. Bost, Mr. J. Phipps, Mr. C. Markus, and Mr. D. Wright seem totally disinterested in the cheering of Mrs. L. Moran, Miss B. Ray, and Miss H. Her¬ mann during the annual ”N " Club-Faculty game. 96 pa • - tJF Tv " fi t r. £ i- s C CHEERLEADERS KEEP NILEHI’S SPIRIT " RED HOT " " Hey, hold that line! Hey, hold that line! " shout varsity cheerleaders Linda Morse, Alva Sholin, Jo Ann Lotz, Beth Williamson, Cynthia Johnson, and Lynne Izard at the game against Amundsen. At the special assembly held atter our first foot¬ ball win at Proviso, the varsity cheerleaders Jo Ann Lotz, Linda Morse, Beth Williamson, Alva Sholin, Cynthia Johnson, and Lynne Izard give out with a " Trojan Yell. " At the close of the winter sports season, players and cheerleaders were guests of honor at a banquet. In recognition of the cheerleaders ' success in keeping Nilehi ' s spirit " red hot " , the girls were presented with awards. The outstanding perform¬ ance of the cheerleaders which merited this recognition was the result of regular practice sessions held every Tuesday and Thursday afternoons at which time Mrs. Shirlee Changnon, sponsor, helped the girls polish new yells as well as re¬ view old ones. Using the rotating captain system again this year, each of the girls planned a pep assembly and organized the cheers at a game. Newly organized last year, the Pep Club continued to be a loyal cheering section for Nilehi teams. Dressed in iden¬ tifying white blouses and seated in a special cheering section, members of the Pep Club responded to the cheerleaders and sparked the enthusiasm of other spectators. The Frosh-Soph cheerleaders Susan Stockmar, Marilyn Barnett, Mimi Stone, Ginger Golden, Diane Jefferson, and Renee Baron work out a new cheer in a practice session before a big home game. Whether sparking the spirit in a football crowd or planning skits for the pep assemblies, the Pep Club members always show the same en¬ thusiasm. Standing: C. Czarnota, S. Kagen, M. Kohls. Seated: D. Rothholtz, B. Larsen, C. Joslyn. Taking time out from an executive board meeting, Barbara Duckers (vice-president), Eileen Corr (treasurer), Roberta Simmons (secretary), and Karen L. Holmberg (presi¬ dent) think ahead to the plans they have made for the G.A.A. membership drive. UNITY, TEAMWORK, AND SPORTSMANSHIP ARE TOPS IN G.A.A. G.A.A. members paid a special visit to the Norwood Old Folk ' s Home in Chicago. After the program Eileen Corr served refreshments to some of the old folks, At the G.A.A. formal initiation held in May, newly elected 01- ficers are installed, letter win¬ ners receive their awards, ana qualified G.A.A. girls are tak¬ en into the club as members. Mrs. Changnon presents Carol Constantine with her swim award as M. Hendrickson, F. Kadens, N. Keppeler, F. Mar¬ ling, D. Payne, D. Petersen, and M. Dell wait for their awards. Unity, teamwork, and sportsmanship are tops on the list of goals for the Girls ' Athletic Association. Last summer the four officers of the club, Karen L. Holmberg (president), Barbara Duckers (vice-president), Roberta Simmons (secretary), and Eileen Corr (treas¬ urer) met together to plan the year ' s events and the goals to be achieved. When school began, they introduced these plans to the board members, the planning group of the club. It was then the duty of the board members and officers, guided by the three sponsors, Miss Helen Heitmann, Miss Betty Schmidt, and Miss Barbara Ray, to make all necessary arrangements for each activity. Besides planning social events, each board member is a manager of a sport, assuming leadership in organizing that activity. Mass meetings, a new activity this year, are held monthly for all G.A.A. members to come and work together and to give their ideas for the success of their club. At this time, also, the executive board and board members discuss plans for the coming acti¬ vities and give reports on the new sports ' schedules. After the meeting the members can sign up on different committees for these activities. Playing on the field or work¬ ing together on a social acti¬ vity, board members need teamwork to accomplish the year ' s goals. Back Row: D. Platt (tennis), B. Halvorsen (points and awards), J. Sode- mann (basketball), N. Phillips (swim), M. Kamin (soccer), P. Roubal (tumbling). Middle Row: C. Latham (publicity), L. McCollach (basketball, acting secretary), I. Sonkin (softball). First Row: K. Kivimagi (volley¬ ball), B. Farwell (golf), S. Schuster (modern dance). C Xi, ■ Last spring Karen L. Holmberg and Barbara Duckers were chosen from the junior class to represent G.A.A. at Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, where they received training in leadership, sportsmanship, and organization. Having been trained in the rules and techniques of their particular sports, junior and senior gym and swim leaders assist the PE teachers during their classes. Back Row: S. Waterloo, E. Corr, M. Kamin, L. McCollach, S. Waddell, C. Belgarbo, D. Platt, S. Crowther. Second Row: K. Holmberg, P. Hamilton, R. Simmons, J. Sode- mann, M. Carroll, J. Erny, L. Berzon, S. Paul, R. Barker.First Row: P. Whitesell, B. Duckers, A. Atwood, B. Wau- thier, M. Larsen, J. Gutowsky, J. Renberg, C. Schweger, R. Nitsche, D. Petersen, M. Rask. The race is on! S. Schmidt and teammates, M. Tabel, Mr. Platt, Mrs. Platt, Mrs. Tabel, and M. Tabel, take the lead against P. Roubal and teammates, B. Wolff, Mrs. Schuster, D. Schuster, S. Schuster, and J. Linn during " follow the leader " relay at Parents ' Playnite held March 21. The responsibility of Barbara Krum- sieg, freshman representative, is to attend board meetings and to voice opinions and ideas of other fresh¬ man G.A.A. members. =7 C. McGrath (referee), M. Motis, K. Julan, L. Otti, and A. Czerwonka pose before playing a game of tennis doubles. D. Kariolick aims for an open space to score that winning point in the last seconds of the field hockey game. J. Babcock, teammate, prepares to assist her but S. Burger, P. Le¬ man, and K. Rosenquist have plans to stop the ball before the point is made. In the last seventeen years, G.A A. has raised its membership from a small handful to a large group of three hun¬ dred girls. The sports schedule has grown from one day a week to four. Activities, once very limited, have in¬ creased to include sports of all types. A G.A.A. member now can choose to par¬ ticipate in field hockey, soccer, tennis, swim club, bowling, basketball, mod¬ em dance, tumbling, volleyball, soft- ball, or golf, or all of them. Social activities have also increased. This year G.A.A. sponsored the two annual dances: the Christmas dance.. " Belles and Beaux Cotillion " , with dec¬ orations of blue, silver, and white; and the turnabout dance, " Seventh Heav¬ en " , with a leap year theme of cupids carried out in colors of lavender, pink, and white. The G.A.A. float brought teamwork to the club as many mem¬ bers gathered during evenings in a cold garage to put together Woody Woodpecker which won a place in the annual Homecoming Parade. Shirley Ahrens, senior, demonstrates her bowling form as she aims for another strike at the Glenview lanes. Shirley is high scorer and high series girl of the N.T.H.S. league. That ' s using her head! Jean Dunn leaps into the air to rebound the soccer ball to her teammates during a tournament game. Spikes and high set-ups are chal¬ lenging to the girls in volleyball. L. Eggers blocks the ball to her op¬ ponents D. Rothholtz, J. Cohen, P. Whitesell, and J. Dunn while J. Go- dell and G. Snyder, teammates, pre¬ pare for a sudden rebound. Kitty Mueller shows good form in her execution of her layup shot prior to the championship game. Steady! During G.A.A. tumbling S. Schmidt and K. Holmberg demon¬ strate good form and balance in the shoulder stand to M. Tabel, J. Sode- mann, Miss B. Ray (sponsor), B. Krumsieg, P. Roubal, and M. Larsen. M. Tabel, M. Kern, J. DuBonn, E. Shuman, S. Rushin, and M. Dell in¬ terpret " Fear " through modern dance movement. M. Stone places the golf ball on the tee for J. Frankfort who demonstrates the proper stroke to M. Johnson, J. Chester. Golf, an individual sport, was held at a stop and sock fairway during the spring season. Before going out on the field for a game of softball, D. Nied, J. Borick, and J. Otiepka dis¬ cuss their team ' s chances of winning the game. J. Nelson, J. Polly, L. Levitt, and B. Birmingham ride each week at the Haldorf stables in preparation for the horse show being held this spring. Esther Williams has nothing on members of Ripplettes Swim Club who practice kips, dolphins, and pin wheels in preparation for a water demonstration on May 2. Back Row: B. Sweet, J. Gutowsky, R. Nitsche, F. Marling, D. Foley, J. Renberg, D. Stiska. Third Row: D. Peterson, M. Larsen, B. Halvorsen, R. Bitter, M. Kohls, N. Harris, J. Lotz, L. Morse, M. Rask, C. Schweger, S. Schus¬ ter. Second Row: K. Kent, S. Paul, B. Stryker, M. Carroll, S. Wad¬ dell, C. Belgarbo. Front Row: J. O ' Malley, N. Phillips (manager), S. Olenick, L. Sweet, J. Petersen, B. Farwell. Teaching jfo Challenge FACULTY RELAX IN QUIET OF LOUNGES. r aculty members find sanc- uary from the ringing bells, :hattering students, and :rowded halls in the teach¬ es ' lounges. Miss Frances Williams, Miss Mary DiTul- io, Mrs. Parepa Rice, Miss Mice Line, and Mrs. Mary da McGuire forget about ;lassroom duties over a :up of coffee. Mr. and Mrs. Jack Lain and bord at the Kungsholm Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Kivi- louma find that smorgas- does not surpass the buffet dinner at which faculty members were guests of the P. T. A. HELPING YOUNG PEOPLE REALIZE THEIR POTENTIALITIES IS EXCITING Dr. Joseph A. Mason, superintendent of Nilehi, finds excitement in planning an edu¬ cational program for young people which will help them realize their potentialities. As future citizens, young people need knowl¬ edge to prepare them to assume responsi¬ bility in the community as well as to meet the requirement for college or a career. Part of the challenge of Dr. Mason ' s position is finding teachers with the ability to spur on their students. Furthermore, a setting must be provided which will inspire both students and teachers to search for knowledge. In addition to his functions at Niles, Dr. Mason has held offices in state and national educational organizations. During 1956, he acted as president of the Illinois Association of School Administrators. He was a member of the Governor ' s Commission on Education which planned the Pre-White House Confer- ence and attended the White House Confer¬ ence on Education as the delegate from Illinois. Dr. Mason, superintendent of Nilehi, finds excitement in seeing young people come alive through activities planned by his staff. Miss Helen Johanns, administrative assistant to Dr. Mason, has charge of public relations and acts as Dr. Mason ' s personal represen¬ tative. 107 Members of the Board of Education, Mr. W. Morris Wise, Dr. Walter Bornemeier, Mr. Clyde Anderson, Mr .Leo Bushey (president), Mr. Daniel Lang, Mr. Clarence Payne, Mr. Warren Meyer, and Dr. Joseph Mason gather around the long table to discuss the plans for the new building. Miss Johanns acts as secretary for the Board. A MODERN SCHOOL IS " BIG BUSINESS " . A modern school is big business and the responsibility for directing the two million dollar enterprise is in the hands of the seven man Board of Education which includes five business and two professional men. Matters of broad policy, teacher ' s salaries, approv¬ ing funds for purchasing and maintenance of equipment for the present school plant are problems of this group. Furthermore, in 1956, the Board of Education has had to su¬ pervise the planning of a new school for which contracts were let in May, 1956. Cost of this new building, which will be ready for occupancy in the fall of 1957, will be four million dollars; equipment and land devel¬ opment will bring the total cost to five mil¬ lion dollars. Members of the Skokie Valley Association were guests of Nilehi on Industrial Education Day, March 16. Dr. Mason explains a rough sketch of the new school to Mr. W. Meyer, board member, and Mr. P. Farley of industry. 108 This year ' s PTA officers are Mrs. Allan Weissburg (president), Mr. Ken¬ neth Stevens (vice-president), Mrs. Joseph Miresse (secretary), and Mrs. Herbert Walter (treasurer). Gertrude Knodler is served a hot dog by PTA members Mrs. Robert Seneco, Mrs. Earle Constantine, Mrs. Melvin Kawell, and Mrs. Charles Fisher who were on hand at the football game to keep Nilehi fans supplied with hot coffee or cocoa. The Parent-Teacher Association give Mom and Dad an opportunity to meet the faculty and learn more about Nilehi. Eacn year, at four meetings of PTA, a particu¬ lar class level is represented at which time the homeroom teachers of that level are present to become better acquainted with the parents of their students. At a dinner given this year on November 17, teachers were guests of the PTA. A second goal of the PTA is that of providing parents with an insight into our school life. Each year, during American Education Week, parents are invited to accompany us through our daily sched¬ ules, so that they may learn exactly how we spend our school hours. Furthermore, at the monthly meetings, school groups such as the choir, orchestra, or band per¬ form. This year, a panel composed of juniors and seniors discussed whether modern education teaches students to think. PTA members also lend their services in other ways. Homeroom mothers help to plan Christmas parties while others sell refreshments at athletic contests. A month¬ ly news bulletin informs parents of school events and provides interesting informa¬ tion about the faculty, administration, and school organizations. 109 Mr. Harold R. Ohlson, senior class adviser, helps Charlotte Conrad decide on a college best suited to her needs and abilities. ADVISORS ARE TEACHERS, 110 ' As advisers we receive our greatest rewards through helping a student realize that he can find a worthy place in life and make the most of himself if he learns self¬ guidance and applies himself to his studies. We prepare people for self-guid¬ ance and thinking for themselves. " Al¬ though this is the most exciting aspect of their work, the six advisers, who are class principals, guidance directors, and teach¬ ers, also check excuses for absence, talk to parents and visitors, and attend meet¬ ings as part of the daily routine. As class principals the advisers attend weekly meetings to develop the policies of the school and to decide on methods of putting them into action. Responsible for a certain class level, they guide the Sophomore advisers, Mr. Mar¬ vin Ihne and Mr. Keith Hert- weck, take time out to discuss a bulletin regarding the ath¬ letic award assembly. Miss Margaret deBooy assists girls who are interested in a career by planning panel discussions and var¬ ious trips. She also has charge of coordinating each week ' s schedule of activities, Miss Aune Toivola and Mr. Victor Wenzell make plans for testing the eighth graders who will become next year ' s freshman class. COUNSELORS, AND ADMINISTRATORS homeroom teachers and activities at each class level. They also assist the superin¬ tendent in evaluating the work of indi¬ vidual faculty members. As guidance directors advisers register transfer students, handle serious cases of discipline or truancy, and counsel stu¬ dents in making program changes and plans for a career or college. Teachers consult them when there are problems involving students. As a committee they work together to formulate guidance pol¬ icies for the entire school. As members of the teaching faculty the advisers instruct a class in one of the academic departments. Like any other teacher they attend regular staff meet¬ ings and spend evenings grading papers. Dr. Arthur Ryden and Mrs. Marjorie Schwab, junior advisers, consult the schedule as they discuss a student ' s program card. " AND GLADLY WOULD HE LEARN AND Priscilla Baker, Janet Loranger, Lois Lamberg, Lorraine Gus¬ tafson, and Donald Blair acquaint students with the customs and cultures of foreign countries through the study of French, Spanish, Latin, and German. Members of the Social Studies Department have reorganized the senior Social Studies Department with the result that economics, sociology, and Latin-American history were add¬ ed to the curriculum. Standing: Anthony Shubert, Vernon Haubrich, John Palmer, Howard Byram, Eugene Napier, Mike Basrak, James Michael, Leo Babcock, David Jackson, Thomas Harmon, Charles Mattka. Seated: John Betts (chairman), Dorothy Lungmus, John Hallberg, Aune Toivola, Don Wright, Marie Green, Keith Hertweck, Arthur Ryden. Like Chaucer ' s Oxford Scholar, the faculty of Niles Township High School continue their studies. Of the eighty-four faculty members who responded to a ques- tionaire, three hold the degree of Doctor of Philosophy and four are working on a Doctors degree; forty-eight hold the Master of Arts degree; of the twenty-four who hold the Bachelors degree, fourteen are working for their Master s degree in such diversified fields as guid¬ ance and personnel, speech correction, theatre, biol¬ ogy, health and physical education, mathematics, edu¬ cation and history, industrial education, school admin¬ istration, and business education at such schools as the University of Illinois, Northwestern, Columbia, Uni¬ versity of Chicago, University of Wisconsin, and Uni¬ versity of Colorado. The Board of Education not only encourages this professional growth but requires that faculty members receive five credits every five years. Teachers may earn these credits by attending school or working, either alone or in committees, on problems affecting the school. For the past two years, teachers in the Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, and English De¬ partments have been working with the Curriculum Committee of the University of Illinois on a study to de¬ termine whether students can learn to think critically through instruction in logic, semantics, and scientific method. Other professional growth committees work on the following problems: reorganizing the curricu¬ lum; developing a guidance program; surveying the freshman mathematics classes to find out how the scores on the Schorling-Clark One Hundred Problem Arithmetic Test correlate with success in algebra; cor¬ relating the Social Studies I and II classes; bridging the gap from elementary to secondary school in mathe¬ matics; surveying of students enrolled in industrial arts concerning accomplishments of students enrolled as compared to those of the student body as a whole. Furthermore, this summer, teachers with Master ' s de¬ grees, will continue to enrich their backgrounds by studies in the comparative arts, Latin, and Greek and Roman history. GLADLY TEACH " Mary Ida McGuire, Ronald Van Arsdale, Marjorie Schwab, Dorothy Elkins, Lorraine Hats- cher, Lucille Barnes, Janet Lo- ranger, and William Bost of the English Department dis¬ cuss the merits of a new text¬ book. Helen Smith, Priscilla Baker, Parepa Rice, Doris Tillmann, George Adams, Paul Eber- hardt, Claire Kleinschmit (chairman), and Leonard Setze work on the objectives of Eng¬ lish instruction. 113 MONDAY IS RESERVED FOR Mr. Leo Provost, bond director, Miss Virginia Stemp, dra¬ matics, Mr. Clifford Collins, music teacher, and Mr. Hugh McGee, music director, discuss plans for the Fine Arts De¬ partment in the new building. Murals in the halls during the Christmas season, posters for school events, and scenery for school productions are created by the students of John Wil¬ kins of the Art Department. Setting up objectives, curriculum planning, and designing room arrangements for the science section of the new high school occupied members of the Science Department: Charles Hussey, Homer Ellis, Bernard Welch, Myra Robinson, Ralph Harvey, Robert Botthof, Carl Burgener, George Roth, and Florence Harrison (chairman). FACULTY, HOMEROOM, AND DEPARTMENTAL MEETINGS Aims of General Math I and II, IA and IIA, integration of solid geometry and plane geometry, and incorporating meth¬ ods from the Principles of Critical Thinking Program, were problems studied by Mathematics Department members Margaret deBooy, Leo Hoosline, Earl Hoff, Albert Rambis, John Sheahan, Helen Hall, Frances Williams, Elizabeth Law- son, and Thomas Kiviluoma (chairman). Three forty-five each Monday finds the teachers of Nilehi gathered together, (often for¬ tified with cookies and coffee) to consider pro¬ fessional problems. The first Monday of each month Dr. Mason meets with the entire staff to discuss such topics as the building program, salaries, or administrative policies affecting the entire school. The second Monday of each month is reserved for homeroom teachers ' meetings at which time the advisers, who di¬ rect the work at each class level, brief the teachers on such points as registration proce¬ dure, guidance activities, and routine adminis¬ trative duties. Department meetings are held on the third Monday and more frequently, if necessary. These meetings, which bring together all the teachers in a particular subject under direc¬ tion of the department chairmen, are used to set up objectives of the teaching in that field, to plan curriculum offerings, and to select text books. New courses, like sociology, economics, Latin-American history, grammar and syntax, creative writing, home design, architectural drawing are an outgrowth of this study. Estab¬ lished courses also are evaluated and revised. This past year faculty members have had the additional responsibility of designing rooms and selecting equipment for both the new wing, which will be ready in the fall of 1956, and for the new building, which will be under construction next year. Mary DiTullio, Mary Nutt, Ada Immel, Marie Green, Helen Johanns (chairman), Nova Thompson, Eugene Napier, Joan Coon, and Onni Hendrickson have assisted in the planning and equipping of the modern Business Education Department in the new wing to be ready for occupancy in the fall of 1956. FACULTY KEEPS Janet Oehler, Florence Butler, and Alice Line (chair¬ man) examine the seam allowance on a pattern. Nilehi teachers, in addition to their intra-fac¬ ulty professional activities, participate in local, state, and national organizations. A majority of the teachers belong to the Illinois Educa¬ tion Association and the National Education Association. Forty-eight teachers, responding to a questionnaire on the subject of profession¬ al activities, belonged to ninety-six organiza¬ tions. National organizations such as the Na¬ tional Council of Teachers of English, National Science Teachers Association, National Speech and Hearing Association, American Associa¬ tion of Physics Teachers, American Personnel and Guidance Association, Women ' s National Aquatic Forum, and state organizations such as Illinois Council of Teachers of English, Illi¬ nois Association of Chemical Teachers, Illinois Council for Social Studies, Illinois State High School Coache ' s Association, and Illinois Guid¬ ance and Personnel Association keep the fac¬ ulty up-to-date, through journals and meetings, on latest research in both subject matter and techniques. Local associations such as the North Suburban Council for Social Studies, the Chicago Classical Association, and the Chi¬ cago Personnel and Guidance Association like¬ wise provide professional literature and work¬ shops. In a two month period, twenty-seven teachers attended fifteen meetings. Faculty members also attend meetings of local civic organizations such as the Skokie Valley Industrial Association, Skokie Valley Business and Professional Women ' s Club, and the American Jewish Congress, Skokie Chap¬ ter. During the past year, staff members have spoken at meetings of the Rotary Club, Kiwan- is, Lions, Chamber of Commerce, and the Re¬ tail Merchant ' s Association. 116 During a physical education departmental meeting, Shirlee Changnon, Helen Heitmann, Barbara Ray, and Betty Schmidt study the P. E. class schedule and the complications resulting from crowded conditions. Nelson Grote explains the operation of a new drill to mem¬ bers of the Industrial Arts Department: Gail Wesley, Jack Lain (chairman), Bruce Sorenson, George Fink, and Robert Mackey. This year the department added courses in home design and architectural drawing to their curriculum. UP-TO-DATE IN SUBJECT MATTER AND METHODS . . . Should the juniors have swim¬ ming the first six weeks or should they play touch foot¬ ball, letting the sophomores take swimming? Harold Isaac¬ son (athletic director), Mike Basrak, Howard Byram, Jim Phipps, Tom Harmon, and Tony Schubert wrestle with problems arising from lack of space. 117 At Nilehi, as in any modern school, the faculity includes members who are train¬ ed to provide us with many special serv¬ ices. If we feel ill or have a sudden acci¬ dent, Miss Weinsheim, the school nurse, is on hand. She also arranges for yearly chest X-rays, sight and hearing check¬ ups, and keeps our medical records up to date. To help us find the reference books or magazines which we need for many classes, Miss Walker keeps her vast supply of books catalogued and stacked in the right places. Each year she han¬ dles 8500 textbooks and 2000 new addi¬ tions to the supply. Mrs. Moran corrects, SPECIALISTS SOLVE THE Mary Walker, school librarian, handles ap¬ proximately 20,800 books and magazines each year. June Weinsheim, school nurse, checks the temperature of a complaining student. Lu Ann Moran demonstrates the formatio: of vowel sounds while attempting to correc a speech defect of one of her students. PROBLEMS OF A MODERN SCHOOL with the aid of tape recordings and exer¬ cises, speech deficiencies of students. Driver ' s Education is given at some time to every student at Nilehi. The course, which includes both lecture work and ac¬ tual driving practice in specially made cars, is under the direction of Mr. Bab¬ cock and Mr. Odlivak. Through the visual aid program, Mrs. Hind serves the town¬ ship by distributing films and film strips to the grade schools and various organi¬ zations. She also provides tape recorders, phonograph equipment, and opaque ma¬ chines for school activities. Nick Odlivak discusses a copy of " Rules of the Road " with Leo Babcock before taking out a group of students in the Driver ' s Educa¬ tion car. Caring for and keeping check on 250 films and 350 film strips in the job of Mrs. Dorothy Hind, head of Visual Aid Department. 119 Dorothy Herkert, secre¬ tary to Dr. Mason, looks up a phone number be¬ fore placing a call. Teresa Schweitzer, book¬ keeper, checks the cafe¬ teria receipts with Helen McGinnis. Joel Febel discusses with Florence Keppeler, the school registrar, a tran¬ script of his credits to be sent to the college of his choice. Mabel Morse assists Miss Walker in the tre¬ mendous task of keep¬ ing track of the many books in the school li¬ brary. THE MAIN OFFICE IS THE NERVE CENTER OF NILEHI The switchboard buzzes impatiently and type¬ writer keys clatter in that nerve center of Niheli— the main office. Behind the scenes, vast file cases contain histories of each student and records of meetings, activities, and schedules. Duplicating ma¬ chines continuously roll off copies of tests, bulletins, and announcements. In room 114, tardy students are constantly reporting to obtain passes, deten¬ tions, and admits to classes. The registrar ' s office is a familiar place to college bound seniors and all others who desire information concerning grades, honor points, or credits. The main clock ticks away the minutes until time for each bell, and then a flood of students and teachers pour into the office for information and help. As Betty Moe, receptionist, types, Helene Snyder, switchboard operator, and Monica Shabow, order clerk, discuss the announcements of the day. Irene Prang, the office manager, pauses for a moment at the desk of Ruth Ackerlund, typist, who prepares a test for a teacher. In Room 114 Helen Marks, the attendance clerk, and Lucille Murphy, the advisers ' secretary, read over the daily absentee list. 120 Upper left: Alice Seul, Dorothy Ahrens, Marie Hudson, and Frances Garner examine the menu for the day. Upper right: Irene Steek and Ebba McNeil put the finishing touches on a row of delicious-looking pies, as Harriet Feich watches. Lower left: Eleanor Scheebe and Jean Larson begin on the endless stacks of dirty dishes left by hungry students and teachers. Lower right: Lining up to pass the dishes are Emily MusslI, Esther Fountaine, Dor¬ othy Ahrens, Vi Coutre, and Carolyn Borchert. CAFETERIA STAFF AND CUSTODIANS Soup, sandwiches, salads, and desserts—these and many other pleasing dishes are prepared each day by a hard-working cafe¬ teria staff. In the morning a fragrant aroma of pies, cakes, and other delicacies issues from the kitchen. As the hungry students and teachers rush through the crowded lines, members of the staff stand ready behind each shiny counter to heap the plates with hot dogs, hamburgers, or roast beef. The custodial staff spends hours each day scrubbing, polishing, mending, and repairing to keep the building in good order. Shov¬ eling snow, cutting grass, painting walls, and refinishing desks are only a few of their many routine tasks. Setting up the gym bleachers for a basketball game or the folding chairs for an assembly takes a great deal of time each week. During the summer the whole building must be completely cleaned and decorated for the following school year. completely cleaned and decorated for the following school year. MAKE NILEHI PLEASANT The custodians take time out from their busy day for a short rest. Seated: Johanna Einar- sen, Margaret Henning, Russ Pirovano, Roy Stockbridge, Harry Boyd. Standing: Ray Pe¬ terson, Lloyd Midtelstadt, Ed Kurr, Cosmo Bova, Herman Ochs. 121 firing Togetkei 9 ' Jkh . . . During our four years at Nilehi we become good friends through hours spent in classrooms and at school sponsored acti¬ vities. More important in our close relationships are week-end activities. Jay Young, Bette Vosnos, Chuck Vosnos, Mary Meehan, and Bruce Pe¬ terson decide they would rather talk than dance at an “open house”. “I ' ll meet you in Roun- dy ' s after school” is a phrase familiar to all students. Chuck Wicker, Mary Mahoney, Karen Carlson, Charles Gunsal- lus, Jules Traut and Le¬ onora McColloch discuss weekend plans over a coke. WE SHARE GOOD TIMES DURING FOUR YEARS AT NILEHI. A HARD-WORKING CABINET . . . The pace quickened as our senior year began. From the Homecoming Dance in autumn to Graduation in June, our last year was filled with responsibilities, ex¬ citement, and preparation. Bigger duties were given to us: we reg¬ ulated the hall traffic as monitors; edited the school yearbook and the Nilehilite; planned activities as members of Union Board, See Chicago Club, and Senior Cabinet. We saw history made when our team won their first Suburban League football game by defeating Proviso. When we re¬ ceived senior pictures, ordered announce¬ ments, and were measured for our caps and gowns, we realized our high school life was drawing to a close. To prepare for the future we struggled through chemistry, composition, sociology and trigonometry. Our class standings became vitally important to us as we ap¬ plied and made plans for college and careers, studied catalogs, and took col¬ lege board examinations. We looked for¬ ward to graduation and our entrance into a challenging adult world. The Senior Class Cabinet, composed of elected representatives from each homeroom, works together to plan Graduation, Homecoming, and other senior activities. Standing: Merle Hendrickson, Nancy Harris, Myrna Zlatos, Joel Febel, Dave Chevrier, Ken Kay, Dave Lindquist, and Bob Blowers. Seated: Mary Kohls, Sandy Bruening, Barbara Larson, Paul Bennett, Barbara McKaig, Marilyn Horn, Felicia Kadens, Jack Hagman (President), Bob Schroeder (Vice-President), Rosemary Nitsche (Vice- Secretary and Treasurer), Bob Koif, Barbara Neuman, Ed Hensel, and Bette Vosnos. a . . . AIDS A GROWING SENIOR CLASS. Elaine Shuman and Bob Schroeder enjoy themselves as they work on the decorations for the Homecoming Dance. KENNETH ADAM HR. Vice-Pres. 2; Concert Band 3, Cadet Band 2,3; Tennis 1,2,3, Minor " N " 2, Major ' ' N ' ' 3; Hi-Y Club 2,3,4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Magazine High Sales Award 1,2,3, Certificate Award 1,2,3. LOIS SUZANNE ADELMAN Transferred from Sullivan H.S., Chicago, Illinois, 3; Bronze Pin 3; Spot¬ lights 3, Play Crews 3,4; Water Show 2; Spanish Club 1,2; General Science Club 2; Physics Club 3; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4 Homecoming Committees 4; Golden Galleon Guild 4; Symphonic Choir 2; Synchronized Swim Club 2. PHILLIP R. AHRENDT Freshman Chorus 1; Baseball 1, Shield 1; Monitors 4. SHIRLEY ANN L. AHRENS Freshman Chorus 1; Girls ' Glee Club 2,3; G.A.A 1,2,3,4, Minor Letter 2; Bowling 1,2,3,4; Tri-Hi-Y 4; Monitors 4; Style Show 4. WILLIAM ROBERT ALLEN Honor Certificate 2; Cabinet Alternate 2,3; Student Council 4; Football 1,4, Minor “N " 4; Swimming 1; Wrestling 2,3,4, Major “N " 3; " N " Club 3,4; Hi-Y Club 3,4; Spanish Club 2, Vice-Pres. 2; General Science Club 1; Physics Club 3; Monitors 4. DIANE V. AMES Honor Certificate 2; H.R. Sec. 2; Freshman Chorus 1; Play Crews 1; Spanish Club 3,4; Chemistry Club 4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Homecoming Committees 4. VIRGINIA GAYLE ANDERSON Concert Band 3, Cadet Band 1,2; Twirlers 3; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3,4; See Chicago Club 4; Ushers Club 3. CAROLE J. ASBIORNSEN G.A.A. 1,2,3,4, Minor Letter 2, Bowling 3, Water Show 3, P.E. Leaders 4; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3,4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Magazine Drive Captains 4. FRED C. BABENDERERDE See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4. LEROY BACCI H.R. Pres. 1; Debate Team 1; Freshman Chorus 1; Football 2,3, Shield 2; Latin Club 1,2. 125 WE BECOME LEADERS . . . WITH RESPONSIBILITIES. Nancy Cox, secretary of the sixth period Stu¬ dent Supervised Study Hall, checks roll as juniors and seniors study. IRENE BAILEY Freshman Chorus 1; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4. SANDRA BAIN Transferred from Evanston Twp. H.S., Evanston, Illinois, 2; Citizenship Committee 2; Girls Glee Club 2, Vivace 2; Playmakers 1,2, Sec. 1,2; Fall Play 2, Play Crews 2; G.A.A. 2; Frosh-Soph Girls ' Club 1,2; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Pins and Pans 2. TRUMAN BARON Transferred from Lane Technical H.S., Chicago, Illinois, 3. BETTY LOU BARTHOLOMEW Student Council Alternate 4; Spotlighters 1,2,3, Treas. 3; G.A.A. 1,2 Tri-Hi-Y Club 3,4, Spanish Club 3,4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4 Pep Club 3,4; Welfare Committee 2; Yearbook Financial Staff 2,3 Magazine Drive Captains 2,3,4. HERMAN K. BARTZ Freshman Chorus 1; Baseball Shield 1; Monitors 4; Diversified Occupa¬ tions Club 4. CURTIS BASLER Cadet Band 1; Football 1; Hi-Y Club 2,3. VALERIE M. BEACH Girls ' Glee Club 2,3, Vivace 2,3, Minor Choral Award 3; Spotlighters 1; Play Crews 1,2, One Acts 2; G.A.A. 1; Water Show 4; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3,4; Spanish Club 3; General Science Club 1; See Chicago Club 4; Moni¬ tors 4; Service Club 1,2; Ushers Club 3; Library Staff 2,4; Scribblers 1; Magazine Drive Captains 1; Reflections Revelry 4. SEYMOUR IRA BECKER Transferred from Roosevelt H.S., Chicago, Illinois, 3; Basketball 2; Nilehilite Staff 4. JAMES R. BEDDIA H. R. Vice-Pres. 2; American Legion Oratorical Contest 4; Debate Team I, 2,3,4, National Forensic League 2,3,4, Degree of Excellence 3; Boys ' Glee Club 2, Choir 3,4, Barbershoppers 2, Major Choral Award 4, Freshman Chorus 1; Chess Club 1,2,3,4; Hi-Y Club 2,4; Latin Club 3; Spanish Club 4; French Club 1; General Science Club 1; Astronomy Club 2,3,4, Sec. 3; See Chicago Club 4; Service Club 1,2. JUDITH A. BELOIAN Spotlighters 1, Play Crews 1, One Acts 2; G.A.A. 1; Tri-Hi-Y Club 4; French Club 1,2; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 3,4; Scribblers 1; Golden Galleon Guild 2. 126 PAUL G. BENNETT Cabinet 4; Student Council Alternate 2; Hi-Y Club 2,3,4; General Science Club 4; Monitors 4; Homecoming Committee 4; Magazine Drive Captains 4. 3EVERLY BIRMINGHAM Transferred from North Park Academy, Chicago, Illinois, 2; G.A.A. 2,3,4; Horseback Riding 4 Ripplettes Sv in Club 2,3, Water Show 2,3; P.E Leaders 3; Tri-Hi-Y Club 4; See Chicago Club 4; Style Show 4; Home¬ coming Committees 4; S.S.S.H. 4. ROSEMARY BITTER G.A.A. 1,2; Ripplettes Swin Club 4; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3,4; Spanish Club 2,3; General Science Club 1; See Chicago Club 4; Junior Prom Com¬ mittees 3; Homecoming Committees 4. MILDRED BJURMAN Freshman Chorus 1, Girls ' Glee Club 2,3, Vivace 3,4, Choir 4, Major Choral Award 4; G.A.A. 1 Tri-Hi Y Club 4; Latin Club 1,2; See Chi¬ cago Club 4, Monitors 4; Ushers Club 3; Pins and Pans 4; Yearbook Financial Staff 3,4. BENJAMIN BLAND Transferred from Senn H.S., Chicago, Illinois, 3; Monitors 3. RICHARD BLESER Monitors 4; Diversified Occupations Club 4. ROBERT BLOWERS Cabinet 3,4; Student Council 2; H.R. Vice-Pres. 1; Football 2,3.4, Minor " N " 2, Major " N " 3,4; Basketball 1,2, Minor “N " 1,2 ; " N " Club 3,4, Sgt. at Arms 4; Monitors 4; Senior Counselors 2; Service Club 1,2; Junior Prom Committees 3; Magazine Drive Captains 2. NANETTE BLUMENFELD Tri-Hi-Y Club 3; General Science Club 1; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4. NANCY HELEN BLUMFIELD Transferred from Roosevelt H.S., Chicago, Illinois, 3; Minor Art Award 1; G.A.A. 1,2,3,4; Bridge Club 4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 2,4. ROLAND W. BODINUS Orchestra 1; Concert Band 2; Cadet Band 1,2,3,4, Letter 2,3; General Science Club 1; Physics Club 3; Chemistry Club 4; See Chicago Club 4; Service Club 1; A.V.A. Operators Club 1,2,3.4. ROBERT J. BOETTCHER Freshman Chorus 1; Bowling 2,3; Spanish Club 3; See Chicago Club 4 Monitors 4; A.V.A. Operators Club 2,3,4; Homecoming Committees 4 ROBERT BOUDART Football 2, Minor “N " 2; Monitors 4. HARRIETT CHARLENE BOYD Twirlers 1,2,3,4, Letter 2; Vivace 3; G.A.A. 1,2,3,4; P.E. Leaders 4; Tri- Hi-Y Club 3,4, Pres. 4; 100% Club 3,4, Promotions Mgr. 3; See Chicago Club 4; Pep Club 3,4; Ushers Club 3,4; Library Staff 3. JOANNE MARIE BRADSHAW G.A.A. 1,2,3; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3,4, Biology Club 2; See Chicago Club 4 Monitors 4; Service Club 1; Pep Club 4; Ushers Club 3,4; Style Show d; Pins and Pans 3; Debate Team 1. 127 SHARLENE BRECHT 100% Club 2,3,4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Ushers Club 4. LEO R. BREDEN Freshman Chorus 1; Football 2,3,4, Minor " N " 2, Major " N " 3 4- Base¬ ball 1,2, Shield 1, Minor " N " 2,3; “N " Club 3,4; Monitors 4. ' ' KAREN BERNICE BREITZKE Bronze Pin 4; Student Council 3; H.R. Sec.-Treas. 4; Spotlighters 1,2, Play Crews 2; G.A.A. 1,2, Minor Letter 2; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3,4, Worship- Chairman 4; Spanish Club 2,3; Chemistry Club 4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4, Ushers Club 3; Style Show 3; Pins and Pans 3; Year¬ book Senior Staif 4; Magazine Drive Captains 4, Magazine Drive Certi¬ ficate Award 1; Bridge Club 4. DIANNE J. BRENNAN H.R. Sec. 4; Twirlers 2,3,4, Letter 2; G.A.A. 1,2,3; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3,4; 100% Club 3,4, Sec. 4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitor 4; Pep Club 3,4; Ushers Club 3,4. ROBERTA BRESLER Transferred from Senn H.S., Chicago, Illinois, 4; G.A.A. 1,2,3,4, See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Magazine Drive Captains 4. SANDRA LYNN BRUENING Cabinet 4; Girls ' Glee Club 2,3, Freshman Chorus 1, Minor Choral Award 3; G.A.A. 1,2,3; Cheer Leaders 2,3; General Science Club 1; Biology Club 3; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Service Club 1; Pep Club 4; Ushers Club 3,4; Junior Prom Committees 3; Homecoming Com¬ mittees 4; Golden Galleon Guild 4; Yearbook General Staff 3,4; Year¬ book Financial Staff 2; Magazine Drive Captains 2; Reflections Rev¬ elry 3. CONSTANCE L. BUCKMAN Transferred from Hillside Junior H.S. Salt Lake City, Utah, 1; H.R. Pres. 1; Monitors 4. MARGARET ELIZABETH CARTER Transferred from North Park Academy, Chicago, Illinois, 3; Bronze Pin 3; H.R. Sec.Treas. 4; Play Crews 3; G.A.A. 2; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3,4; Latin Club 1,2; Latin Honor Society, 1,2; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Pep Club 2; Homecoming Committees 4; Nilehilite Staff 3; Yearbook Financial Staff 4; Bridge Club 4; Palette and Brush Club 1. BARBARA ANN BUSCH Bronze Pin 3; Cabinet Alternate 1; Student Council 2; Debate Team 1; Vivace 3; Spotlighters 1,2, Treas. 2, Play Crews 1,2,3, One Acts l| G. A.A. 1,2,3, Minor Letter 2; Water Show 2,3; P.E. Leaders 3,4; Tri-Hi- Y Club 3; Spanish Club 3; General Science Club 1; Chemistry Club 4; See Chicago Club Board Treas. 4; Monitors 4; Student Union Board 3,4; Service Club 1,2; Pep Club 3,4; Ushers Club 3,4; Library Staff 3; Junior Prom Committees 3; Homecoming Committees 4; Scribblers 1; Golden Galleon Guild 3,4, Pres. 4; Yearbook Financial Staff 3; Maga¬ zine Drive Captains 3, Magazine Drive Certificate Award 3. JOHN F. BUTTERWORTH H. R. Pres. 1,2; Football 2, Minor " N " 2, Mgr. Shield 1; Basketball Mgr. Shield 1; Baseball Mgr. Shield 1; Hi-Y Club 2,3,4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4. DAVID C. CHEVRIER National Honor Society 3,4; Bronze Pin 3; Cabinet 1,3,4, Alternate 1; H.R. Pres. 2; Illini Boys ' State 3; Football 1,2,3,4, Shield 1, Minor " N " 2, Major " N " 3,4; Basketball 1,2,3,4, Shield 1, Minor " N " 2, Major " N " 3,4; Baseball 1,2,3,4, Shield 1, Minor " N " 2,3, Major " N " 4; " N " Club 3,4; Hi-Y Club 2,3, Vice Pres. 3; Latin Club 1,2,3; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4, Board 4; Student Union Board 3,4; Junior Prom Commit¬ tees 3; Homecoming Committees 4. HOWARD H. CHRISTENSEN H.R. Pres. 4; Monitors 4; Service Club 1. JUNE E. COHAN H.R. Sec. 3; Girls ' Glee Club 2, Choir 3,4, Vivace 2; G.A.A. Basketball Mgr. 2; Ripplettes Swim Club 3; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3,4; Spanish Club 3; See Chicago Club 4; Student Union Board Committees 3; Pep Club 3,4; Ushers Club 3,4; Library Staff 3; Junior Prom Committees 3. MICHAEL ROBERT COLEMAN MONITOR POSTS . . . SYMBOLS OF OUR NEWLY GAINED AUTHORITY. " May I check your pass? " Ted Pristash asks sophomore Raynette Brown, as he performs his duty as a senior monitor. GEORGIANN COLUSSI Honor Certificate 3; Freshman Chorus 1, Girls ' Glee Club 2; Bowling 4; Latin Club 3,4; 100% Club 4; General Science Club 1; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Ushers Club 3,4; Library Staff 4; Scribblers 1; Year¬ book Financial Staff 3,4. RUSSELL CONNELL Freshmen Chorus 1, Basketball Shield 1; Bowling 1; Hi-Y Club 4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4. CAROL LYNN CONRAD Transferred from York Twp. H.S., Elmhurst, Illinois, 1; Girls ' Glee Club 2, Choir 3,4, Minor Choral Award 3; 100% Club 4; See Chicago Club 4, Board 4; Service Club 1,2; Welfare Committee 2; Style Show 3,4; Pins and Pans 3; Magazine Drive Captains 4; Reflections Revelry 4. CHARLOTTE CONRAD Tri-Hi-Y Club 4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Ushers Club 3; Library Staff 4; Pins and Pans 3; Magazine Drive Captains 2. CAROLE CONSTANTINE Honor Certificate 2; Student Council 4; Girls ' Glee Club 1,2; G.A.A. 1,2,3, Golf Mgr. 3, Volleyball Mgr. 2; Ripplettes Swim Club 1,2,3; Water Show 1,3; P.E. Leaders 3; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3,4, Spanish Club 2; See Chicago Club 4; Pep Club 3; Ushers Club 3; Bridge Club 4; Maga¬ zine Drive Captains 3. NANCY RUTH COX Student Council 2; H.R. Vice-Pres. 1, Sec. 4; National Thespian So¬ ciety 2,3,4, Recorder 3, Spotlighters 2,3, Recorder 2, Major Dramatics Award 4, Play Crews 1,3, One Acts 2, Spring Play 2, Fall Play 4; G.A.A. 1,2,3, Minor Letter 2, Volleyball Mgr. 2; Bowling 1; Water Show 2; Spanish Club 1,2; General Science Club 1; See Chicago Club 4, Monitors 4; Reflections Revelry Award 2,3. CAROL CUMMINGS Withdrawn. DONNA CUTRO Freshman Chorus 1; G.A.A. 1,2,3,4, Minor Letter 3, Volleyball Mgr. 3; P.E. Leaders 3,4; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3,4; Latin Club 1,2; Spanish Club 3; Biology Club 2; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Service Club 1,2; Ushers Club 3; Library Staff 2,3; Homecoming Committees 4; Yearbook Financial Staff 3; Magazine Drive Captains 3,4. JOYCE LYNN DAHLMAN Transferred from Evanston Twp. H.S., Evanston, Illinois, 3; Honor Cer¬ tificate 3; Student Council 4, One Acts 1, Playmakers 1,2; Spanish Club 2,3; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Ushers Club 4. RUTH ANN DAIBERL Freshmen Chorus 1; Girls ' Glee Club 2; G.A.A. 1; Monitors 4; Diver¬ sified Occupations Club Treas. 4. 129 HOMEROOM FLOATS ARE HARD WORK BUT GREAT FUN! Busily working on the 208 homeroom float, Dick Reed, Diane Rit ' er, Barbara McKaig, Karen Breitzke, and Pat Hoppe are tangled up in needles, thread, and material. 130 DIANE DANIELS Transferred from Amundsen H.S., Chicago, Illinois, 3; H R. Sec. 4, Girls ' Glee Club 2; G.A.A. 1,2, Major Letter 2; P.E. Leaders 1,2; Tri- Hi-Y Club 2,3; Spanish Club 2,3; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 3; Pep Club 2. RONALD DAVIS Transferred from Sullivan H.S., Chicago, Illinois, 2; H.R. Pres. 1; Ameri¬ can Legion Contest 3,4, Deba e Team 2; Orchestra 1,2, Award 1; Cadet Band 1,2; Drum and Bugle Corps 1,2; Drill Team 1-2; Football 1,4; Swimming 1; Letterman ' s Club 1,2; Latin Club 1; See Chicago Club 4;’ Monitors 4; Homecoming Committees 4; School Newspaper 1,2. MICHAEL DEAN Bronze Pin 3; H.R. Vice-Pres. 4; Debate Team 1,2, National Forensic League 1,2, Degree of Honor 2; Spotlighters 1; Hi-Y Club 2,3,4, Promo¬ tions Chairman 4; Latin Club 1,2,3, Latin Contest 1,2; General Science Club 1; Physics Club 2; Chemistry Club 3; See Chicago Club 4 ; Moni¬ tors 4; Student Union Bocrd 3 ; Welfare Committee 2,3; Golden Galleon Guild 2; Yearbook General Staff 3; Magazine Drive Certificate Award 1. MARILYN DELL Transferred from University City H.S., St. Louis, Missouri, 2; National Honor Society 3; Bronze Pin 3; Student Council 3, Ass ' t Sec. 3; H R Sec. 4; Freshman Chorus 1, Girls ' Glee Club 2, Choir 3,4, Vivace 3,4; G.A.A. 1,2,3, Minor Letter 3; Ripplettes Swim Club 3,4; Water Show 3; P.E. Leaders 3; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Pep Club 3,4; Ushers Club 3; Homecoming Committees 4; Talent Show 1. GAIL DENT Bronze Pin 3; Debate Team 1; Girls ' Glee Club 4; Play Crews 2,3,4; G.A.A. 1,2,3; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3,4; French Club 1,2; Chemistry Club 4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Ushers Club 3,4 Library Staff 3,4; Golden Galleon Guild 3,4; Yearbook Financial Staff 3; Magazine Drive Cap¬ tains 3; Reflections Revelry 3,4. WILLIAM DEWS Concert Band 1,2, Cadet Band 3, Letter 3; Basketball 1,2; Swimming 3; Hi-Y Club 2,3,4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4. WILLIAM DIGILIO National Honor Society 3,4; Bronze Pin 3; Cabinet 3, Vice-Pres. 3, Al¬ ternate 2; Student Council 1,4, Pres. 4; Hi-Y Citizenship Award 3; Freshman Chorus 1; Football 1,2, Shield 1, " Minor ”N ' ' 2; Cross Coun¬ try 3, Major N 3; Baseball 1,2,3, Shield 1,2, Minor " N " 3; Wrestling 1,2,3,4, Minor ”N ' ' 1, Major " N " 2,3,4; ”N ' ' Club 2,3,4, Vice-Pres. 4; Water Show 1; P.E. Leaders 3,4; Hi-Y Club 2,3,4, Vice-Pres. 3, Pres. 4, Promotion Chairman 3; Latin Club 1,2,3,4, Latin Contest 3; General Science Club 1; Biology Club 2, See Chicago Club 4 Monitors 4, Board 4; Student Union Board 3,4; Service Club 1,2; Junior Prom Committees 3; Homecoming Committees 4. ARLENE DITTHARDT Honor Certificate 2; Cabinet Alternate 3; Student Council 4; H.R. Sec. 4; Freshmen Chorus 1; 100% Club 4; Biology Club 2; Monitor 3; Service Club 1; Library Staff 1; Yearbook Senior Staff 4. SHARRON DODDS Transferred from Cathedral H.S., Denver, Colorado, 2; Girls ' Glee Club 1,2, Choir 1; Tri-Hi-Y Club 4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4 Pep Club 1. JOHN R. DOLINA Honor Certificate 3; Track 1; Wrestling 1,2; Physics Club 3; Monitors 4. DONALD K. DRITLEIN Transferred from Lane Tech H.S., Chicago, Illinois, 3. BARBARA DUCKERS National Thespian Society 3,4, Major Dramatics Award 3, Play Crews 1,2,3, One Acts 2; G.A.A. 1,2,3,4, Vice-Pres. 4, First State Letter 3, G.A.A. Camp 3, Tennis Mgr. 2,3; Bowling 4, P.E. Leaders 3,4; Latin Club 1,2; General Science Club 1; Biology Club 2; Physics Club 3; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Pep Club 3; Yearbook Financial Staff 1,2,3; Maga¬ zine Drive Captains 1. DOROTHY D. DZIADULA Honor Certificate 2; National Thespian Society 2,3,4, Treas. 3, Sec. 4, Spotlighters 1,2,3,4, Minor Dramatics Award 3, Play Crews 2,4, One Acts 2, Fall Play 2,3,4, Spring Play 2,3; G.A.A. 1,2,3; 100% Club 3,4, Vice-Pres. 4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Pep Club 4; Welfare Committee 4; Style Show 2,3; Junior Prom Committees 3; Homecoming Committees 4; Reflections Revelry 3. WAYNE EHRET Transferred from Foreman H.S., Chicago, Illinois, 4; Checkers Club 1; Basketball Club 2; Travel Club 3. JAMES R. EISCHEN Transferred from Saint Gregory H.S., Chicago, Illinois, 3; Cadet Band 1,2, Letter 2; Play Crews 1,2; Basketball Mgr. 1,2; Track Major ' G” 1,2; Swimming Mgr. 1,2; Cross Country Major " G " 1,2; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Craft Club 4; School Photographer 1,2. THOMAS ELIA Diversified Occupations Club 4. HARRIETTE ELLMAN Transferred from Hirsch H.S., Chicago, Illinois, 4; Jr. Honor Society 1,2,3; Student Council 3, Alternate 2; H.R. Pres. 2; Choir 1,2,3; Play Crews 4; Spanish Club 1,2,3; See Chicago Club 4, Board 4; Pep Club 4; Library Staff 1; Hirsch Herald Staff 2; Homecoming Committees 4. JAMES ENDLER Transferred from Marshall H.S., Chicago, Illinois, 4; Freshman Chorus. DOUGLAS ERIKSON H.R. Vice-Pres. 4; Cadet Band Letter 2; Wrestling 2; Chess Club 3; Chemistry Club 4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4. JAMES A. ESBROOK Freshman Chorus 1; Wrestling Major " N " 2,3,4, Most Valuable 3; “N " Club 2,3,4; Hi-Y Club 2,3,4, Service Chairman 4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Welfare Committee 2,3; Junior Prom Committees 3. JOHN N. FAUST , , 0 Cabinet 2; Cadet Band 1; Basketball Shield 1; Cross Country Shield 3; Hi-Y Club 2,3,4; Chemistry Club 4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4. Bronze Pin 3; Cabinet 4, Alternate 3; Student Council Alternate 2; H.R. Vice-Pres. 2, Pres. 3; Freshman Chorus 1; Football 2,3,4, Minor " N " 2, Major “N " 4; Basketball 1,2,3,4, Shield 1, Minor " N” 2,3, Major " N " 4; Track 2, Minor " N " 2; Baseball 1, Shield 1; Golf 3, Minor " N " 3; P.E. Leaders 3; Hi-Y Club 2, Latin Club 1,2; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 3,4, Board 4; Student Union Board 4; Junior Prom Committees 3. RICHARD FEHNS Cabinet 4; Hi-Y Club 2,3,4, Membership Chairman 4; See Chicago Club 4, Monitors 4; Bowling 1,2,3, Sec. 1,2,3; Magazine Drive Captains 2,3, Magazine Drive Certificate Award 2. GENE FEHRING Transferred from Austin H.S., Chicago, Illinois, 2; H.R. Pres. 1; Orches¬ tra 3,4, Letter 4; Concert Band 1,2,3,4, Letter 1,2,3,4; Baseball 2,3,4, Shield 2, Minor “N " 3; Monitors 1; Yearbook Financial Staff 1. 131 132 STUART FISHER Transferred from Austin H.S., Chicago, Illinois, 2; H.R. Pres. 4; Student Council 1; Concert Band 2, Military Band 2; Track 1; Tennis 2, Major Letter 2. DARYL J. FOLEY Honor Certificate 3; H.R. Sec. 2; Orchestra Letter 1; Girls ' Glee Club 2,3, Choir 4, Vivace 3,4, Minor Choral Award 3; Spotlighters 2; G.A.A. 1; Latin Club 1,2,3,4; General Science Club 1; Biology Club 3; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4, Service Club 3; Ushers Club 3; Junior Prom Committees 3; Yearbook General Staff 3,4; Yearbook Financial Staff 3; Magazine Drive Certificate Award 3. MARYLYN LEE FORESTER Cabinet 2; H.R. Sec. 1; Twirlers 1, Letter 1; Spotlighters 1,2, Play Crews 2; G.A.A. 1,2; P.E. Leaders 4, Tri-Hi-Y Club 3,4; See Chicago Club 4, Monitors 4; Ushers Club 3; Library Staff 2,3; Welfare Committee 4; Yearbook Financial Staff 3,4. BARRY FREEDMAN Transferred from Senn H.S., Chicago, Illinois, 3; H.R. Vice-Pres. 4- Basketball 2; Track 2. THOMAS E. FREELING Transferred from Von Steuben H.S., Chicago, Illinois, 1; Student Coun¬ cil 1; Illini Boys ' State 3; Orchestra 1,2; Barbershoppers 2,3; Football 3; Cross Country 4, Major " N " 4; ”N " Club 4; Bowling 2; Chess Club 2,3,- See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Welfare Committee 3; Magazine Drive Captains 4. KAREN FRENZEL H.R. Sec.-Treas. 1; Spotlighters 1, Play Crews 4; G.A.A. 1,2; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3,4; Spanish Club 1; See Chicago Club 4; Monitor 4; Service Club 1; Pep Club 4; Junior Prom Committees 3; Yearbook Financial Staff 4, Magazine Drive Captains 3. DALE FRERES Football 2, Mgr. Shield 2; Latin Club 1; Spanish Club 2,3; General Science Club 1; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Service Club 1; Mag azine Drive Certificate Award 3,4, Bowling 2,3. SUE BETH FRIEDMAN Transferred from Austin H.S., Chicago, Illinois, 2; Bronze Pin 3; H.R. Sec. 1,2,4; Girls Glee Club 1,2; Choir 1,2; Spotlighters 4; Play Crews 3,4; G.A.A. 1,2; Horseback Riding 1,2; Bowling 1,2; Chess Club 4 Spanish Club 1-2; 100% Club 3,4; General Science Club 1; See Chi¬ cago Club 4; Monitors 1,2; Service Club 1-2; Library Staff 1,2; Home¬ coming Committees 4; Yearbook Financial Staff 4; Magazine Drive Captains 4; Magazine Drive Certificate Award 3. GERALD L. FRIEDNER Transferred from Senn H.S., Chicago, Illinois, 2. JUDITH L. FRISK Spotlighters 1,2; Play Crews 1,2; G.A.A. 1,2,4; P.E. Leaders 4; Tri-Hi-Y Club 4; Spanish Club 2; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Ushers Club 4; Magazine Drive Captains 4. RONALD FURTAK Transferred from Foreman H.S., Chicago, Illinois, 3; Choir 2; Track 3; Bowling 4; Hi-Y Club 4, Biology Club 2; See Chicago Club 4, Monitors 4; Magazine High Sales Award 3. EVELYN GEBBIA Student Council 2, Alternate 3; G.A.A. 1,2; Cheer Leaders 1; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Style Show 3; Pins and Pans 3; Homecoming Committees 4; Yearbook Financial Staff 2. JUDITH GELMAN Transferred from Austin H.S., Chicago, Illinois, 3; Honor Club 1 2 3 Student Council 1, Alternate 2; H.R. Sec. 2; Girls ' Glee Club ' Z Masque and Gavel 1,2, Minor Dramatics Award 3, Play Crews 2, One Acts 1; G.A.A. 1,2,3; Bowling 1; French Club 3; See Chicago Club 4, | 2-3; Library Staff 1,3; Welfare Committee 1,2,3; Monitor 1,2,3; Austin Times Staff 2,3; Homecoming Committees 4. RONALD GIERLACH Transferred from Lane Technical H.S., Chicago, Illinois, 4 Track 2 3 Crpss Country 2,3; Monitors 1,2,3; German Club 1. WE CLOSE THE DOOR ON OUR LAST HOMECOMING Elaine Shuman and Bob Martin, like many other seniors, say good night after an enjoy¬ able evening at their last high school Home¬ coming Dance. HELENE RIVIAN GLIKMAN Transferred from Von Steuben H.S., Chicago, Illinois, 2; H.R. Sec. 1; Girls ' Glee Club 1; Spotlighters 3,4, Play Crews 3,4; G.A.A. 1,2,3,4; Bowling 1; 100% Club 3,4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 2,4; Pep Club 3; Ushers Club 4; Library Staff 1; Homecoming Committees 4. ROBERT TERRY GODELL Cabinet 2, Alternate 3; Student Council 1; National Thespian Society 2,3,4, Spotlighters 1,2,3, Major Dramatics Award 4, Play Crews 1,2,3,4, One Acts 1,2,3, Fall Play 2,3,4, Spring Play 2,3; Bowling 2,3; Water Show Crews 2,3; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4, A.V.A. Operators Club 1,2,3,4; Homecoming Committees 3,4; Magazine Drive Certificate Award 2; Reflections Revelry Crews 2,3,4. RICHARD WILLIAM GOETZ Transferred from Lane Technical H.S., Chicago, Illinois, 4; National Honor Society 3; General Science Club 1; Biology Club 2; Physics Club 3; A.V.A. Operators Club 1,2,3; German Club 3; Slide Rule Club 1 , 2 . RHONNY GOLDMAN Transferred from Senn H.S., Chicago, Illinois, 3; Bowling 4; See Chi¬ cago Club 4; Monitors 4; Bridge Club 4; Library Staff 2; G.A.A. 1,2. CAROLE GOLDSTEIN Student Council 4; Orchestra 1, Letter 1; Ripplettes Swim Club 1; Water Show 1; Chess Club 4; Spanish Club 3,4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Yearbook Financial Staff 3. JILL ELAINE GOPPERTON Orchestra, 1,2, Letter 1,2; Concert Band 2,3, Letter 2,3; National Thespi¬ an Society 3,4, Spotlighters 2,3, Play Crews 1,2,3; G.A.A. 1,2; Tri-Hi-Y Club 4; Spanish Club 2,3; General Science Club 1; See Chicago Club 4; Pins and Pans 4; Homecoming Committees 1. JOYCE GORDON Transferred from Roosevelt H.S., Chicago, Illinois, 3; Girls ' Glee Club 2; G.A.A. 2; Monitors 4. FRANK GOROM Bronze Pin 3; Debate Team 1,2, National Forensic League 2,3,4; Track 2; Hi-Y Club 2,3,4; Latin Club 1,2; General Science Club Sec.-Treas. 1; Physics Club 3; Chemistry Club 4; See Chicago Club 4, Monitors 4; Welfare Committee 1,2,3,4. JOE GOSCHY Freshman Chorus 1; Spotlighters 1; Wrestling 1,2,3, Mgr. Shield 1,2; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Bowling 3; Diversified Occupations Club 3,4. FREDRICK GRAYLESS Transferred from Taft H.S., Chicago, Illinois, 3; Rifle Team 3. 133 WE PLAN FOR COLLEGE AS WE LOOK TO THE FUTURE Thoughtful students listen attentively to Mr Harold Ohlson, senior class advisor, who ex¬ plains entrance requirements to college bound seniors. SHEILA JANET GREENE Transferred from Von Steuben H.S., Chicago, Illinois, 3; Freshman Chorus 1; G.A.A. 1,2,3; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3; Monitors 4; Library Staff 4; Masque and Gavel Club 1,2. JOHN GUNNARSON Orchestra 1, Letter 1; Monitors 4. CHARLES GUNSAULLUS Transferred from Oak Park H.S., Oak Park, Illinois, 3; Track 1,2,3; Cross Country 2,3,4, Major ' N " 3; ”N " Club 3; Monitors 4. JOAN MARIE GUTOWSKY H. R. Sec. 2, Vice-Pres. 3; Choir 3,4, Vivace 2,3,4, Minor Choral Award 3; Spotlighters, 1,2, Play Crews 1,2,3, One Acts 3; G.A.A. 1,2,3,4, Minor Letter 2, Basketball Mgr. 2; Ripplettes Swim Club 3,4; Water Show I, 2,3; P.E. Leaders 3,4; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3,4; French Club 1,2; General Science Club 1, Vice-Pres. 1; Chemistry Club 4, Pep Club 3; Junior Prom Committees 3; Finance Staff 4; Reflections Revelry 1,2. SANDRA GAIL HAGEN Honor Certificate 4; H R. Sec.-Treas. 3; Freshman Chorus 1, Girls ' Glee Club 2,3, Minor Choral Award 3; Spotlighters 1,2,3, Play Crews 2,3; G.A.A. 1,2,3,4; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3,4; Spanish Club 1,2; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Pep Club 3,4; Ushers Club 3,4; Library Staff 3,4; Pins and Pans 4; Junior Prom Committees 3; Homecoming Committees 4; Scrib¬ blers 1; Golden Galleon Guild 4; Yearbook Senior Staff 4; Yearbook Financial Staff 3,4; Magazine Drive Captains 3,4; Bridge Club 4; Reflections Revelry 3. JOHN L. HAGMAN Honor Certificate 1; Cabinet 3,4, Pres. 3,4; H.R. Pres. 1,2; Illini Boys ' State 4; Freshman Chorus 1, Boys ' Glee Club 2; Football 1,2,3,4, Major ”N " 3,4; Basketball 1,2, Minor " N " 2; Track 1,2,3,4, Major ”N " 1,2,3,4, Wrestling 3,4; ' ' N " Club 1,2,3,4, Pres. 4; Hi-Y Club 2, Sophomore Co¬ ordinator 2; Latin Club 2; Monitors 4; Student Union Board 3,4; Service Club 1,2, Pres. 1; Junior Prom Commi.tees 3; Homecoming Committees 4; S.S.S.H. Chairman 4. BETTE HELENE HALVORSEN National Honor Society 3,4; Gold Pin 4; Orchestra 1,2,3,4, Letter 1,2,3,4; G.A.A. 1,2,3,4, Second State Letter 4, Points and Awards Mgr. 3,4, Publicity Mgr. 2; Ripplettes Swim Club 4; Water Show 3; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3; French Club 1,2; General Science Club 1; Biology Club 2; See Chicago Club 4; Scribblers 1; Golden Galleon Guild 2,3,4; Nilehilite Staff 3, Reflections Revelry 2. PETER HAMPTON Cadet Band 1; Hi-Y Club 3,4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4. WARREN J. HANSON Cabinet Alternate 3; H.R. Trcas. 1, Pres. 4, Concert Band 1,2,3,4, Assist¬ ant Director 4, Letter 1,2,3,4; Swimming 2; Wrestling 3; Golf 3; Water Show 3; General Science Club 1; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; A.V.A. Operators Club 1,2,3,4; Magazine Drive Captains 2; Reflections Revelry 3. BILLIE HARRIS Transferred from Austin H.S., Chicago, Illinois, 3; H.R. Sec. 1, Treas. 2; Girls ' Glee Club 1,2; G.A.A. 1,2,3, Volleyball Mgr. 2; Bowling 1,2; P.e! Leaders 4; Spanish Club 1,2; General Science Club 1; See Chicago Club 4, Board 4; Monitors 2; Service Club 1,2; Library Staff 1,2,3; Homecoming Committees 4. NANCY M. HARRIS Honor Certificate 3; Cabinet 2,4. H R. Vice-Pres. 1,3, Sec. 2; Girls ' Glee Club 2, Freshman Chorus 1; Spotlighters 1; G.A.A. 1,2; Bowling 1; Ripplettes Swim Club 3,4; Water Sh ow 3,4; P.E. Leaders 3,4; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3,4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4, Pep Club 3,4; Ushers Club 3; Welfare Committee 3,4; Junior Prom Committees 3; Homecoming Committees 4; Yearbook Financial Staff 3; Magazine Drive Captains 3. WAYNE A. HARRISON Football 1,2, Minor " N” 2; Track 1,2,3; Baseball 1,2; Wrestling 3. ELAINE MARIE HART Transferred from Maine Twp. H.S., DesPlaines, Illinois, 3; Girls Glee Club 1; G.A.A. 1,2,3,4; Horseback Riding 1,2; See Chicago Club Board 4; Monitors 4. JAMES HARTMANN Transferred from Schurz H.S., Chicago, ' llinois. 3; H R. Pres. 4; Football 1,4; Swimming 3,4, Major " N” 3; “N " Club 3,4; Water Show 3; P.E Leaders 3; Hi-Y Club 4; Monitors 4. HENRY A. HEDBERG H.R. Vice-Pres. 1; Bowling 2,3,4; Hi-Y Club 2,3,4; General Science Club 1; Physics Club 3; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4. GENE HEIDELBAUER Cadet Band 1,2, Letter 2; Play Crews 1; Hi-Y Club 3,4; Physics Club 4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; A.V.A. Operators Club 1,2,3,4. RONALD HEIN Football 1,2,3,4, Minor " N " 1,2, Major “N " 3,4, Most Valuable 4, Cap¬ tain 4; Basketball 1; Track 3; Baseball Shield 1; Wrestling Major ”N " 2,3,4; ”N ' ' Club 2,3,4; See Chicago Club 4. JAMES HELFERS Transferred from Amundsen H.S., Chicago, Illinois, 2; Football 1; Hi-Y Club 3-4; See Chicago Club 4, Monitors 4; Homecoming Committees 4. STEWART HELIGMAN Transferred from Senn H.S., Chicago, Illinois, 4; H.R. Treas. 2, Sgt. at Arms 2,3; Football 2. MARTIN F. HENBERGER Cadet Band 2; Bowling 1,2; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Welfare Commidee 2; Magazine Drive Captains 2. MERLE JEANNE HENDRICKSON Transferred from Schurz H.S., Chicago, Illinois, 2 Cabinet 3,4; Illini Girls ' State 3; G.A.A. 1,2,3, Dance Mgr. 3; Ripplettes Swim Club 1,3; Water Show 3; Swim Leaders 1,3,4; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3; Spanish Club 2; 100% Club 3,4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 1,4; Ushers Club 3; Junior Prom Committees 3; Homecoming Committees 4; Golden Galleon Guild 4. EDWARD HENSEL Cabinet 4 Student Council Alternate 3; H.R. Pres. 2; Football 1,2, Shield 1, Minor " N " 2; Swimming 1, Shield 1; Wrestling 3; Hi-Y Club 2,3,4, Sports Council 2, Member, hip Chairman 4; See Chicago Club 4; Moni.ors 3,4; Homecoming Committees 4; Reflections Revelry 2. JERROLD HIMELFARB Transferred from Senn II.S., Chicago, Illinois, 3; Sec Chicago Club 4, Monitors 4. DALE JEANNE HODGE Transferred from Evanston Twp. H.S., Evanston, Illinois. 3; Minor Art Award 2; Madrigal Singers, 2, Girls ' Glee Club 3; Tri-Hi-Y Club 2, Worship Chairman 2 135 136 JAMES F. HODGKINSON Transferred from Plant H.S., Tampa, Florida, 3; Basketball 1 2- P E Leaders 2; Spanish Club 3; Physics Club 4; See Chicago Club 4; Moni¬ tors 4; Bridge Club 4. CAROL HOFFMAN Withdrawn. MICHAEL HOGAN Concert Band 1,2,3, Letter 2,3; Magazine Drive Captains 2. JUDITH H. HOKANSON Debate Team 1; Orchestra 1,2, Letter 1; G.A.A. 1,2; Bowling 1; PE. Leaders 4; General Science Club 1; See Chicago Club 4 ; Monitors 4; Service Club 1; Welfare Committee 4; Yearbook Financial Staff 4- Magazine Drive Certificate Award 1. I ' AIiUUIA KAE HOLM Student Council 4, Sec. 4. H.R. Sec.-Treas. 2,3; Freshman Chorus 1; National Thespian Society 2,3,4, Spotlighters 1, Play Crews 1234 Spring Play 2,3; G.A.A. 1,2,3, Minor Letter 3; Bowling 3; Water Show 3- PE- Leaders 3,4; Tri-Hi-Y Club 4- Spanish Club 2,3,4, Pres. 4- See Chi¬ cago Club 4, Monitors 4; Pep Club 3; Ushers Club 3,4; Junior Prom Committees 3; Homecoming Committees 4; Golden Galleon Guild 4- Yearbook Financial Staff 4; Magazine Drive Captains 1,2,4, High Sales Award 1, Certificate Award 1,2; Reflections Revelry 3; Student Lounge Board 4. KAREN L. HOLMBERG National Honor Society 3; Honor Certificate 2; Student Council Alter- nate 1,2, Orchestra 1; Girls ' Glee Club 3, Choir 4, Vivace 1, Minor ™ n Awar , d 4 Freshmen Chorus 1; Spotlighters 1,2, Play Crews 1,2 ,4 One Acts 2; G.A.A. 1,2,3,4, Sec. 3, Pres. 4, Second State Letter t ' -Tr A J F amp 3 ' Da nce Mgr. 2; Water Show 2,3; P.E. Leaders 3 4- P ub 3; French Club 1-2; General Science Club 1; Chemistry Club 4, See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Pep Club 3; Ushers Club 3- Junior Prom Committees 3; Yearbook General Staff 3,4; Reflections Revelry 3. JOYCE HOLTZ H.R. Treas. 3, Vice-Pres. 4; Freshman Chorus 1, Girls ' Glee Club 2- S A u A , bowIi ng 2; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3; Spanish Club 1; See Chicago Club 4; Welfare Committee 3; Homecoming Committees 3; Yearbook rinancial Staff 4; Magazine Drive Captain 3. DICK HOLZL H.R. Pres 1,2,4; Football 2,4, Minor " N ' ' 2; Swimming 1,2,3,4, Shield 1 , Major ” N ” 3 ' 4; Base ball 1,2, Shield 1; " N " Club 3,4- Hi-Y Club 2,3,4. PATRICIA L. C. HOPPE Transferred from Visitation H.S., Chicago, Illinois, 2; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3 oo 2 ' ' C T h T emistr Y Club 4 ; Monitors 4; Pep Club 3,4 ; Librar btaif 2; Student Union Code Board 2. MARILYN HORN Cabinet 2,4; Orchestra 2, Letter 2, Cadet Band 1; Vivace 2 3 4- G A A 1- Water Show 3; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3; 100% Club 3,4; See Chicago Club 4- Homecoming Committees 4; Magazine Drive Captains 3. SANDRA JEAN HOWARD Bronze Pin 3; Cabinet Alternate 2; Freshman Chorus 1- GAA 123 Minor Letter 3 PE. Leaders 3,4; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3; Spanish Club ' H Vice-Pres 3; 100% Club 3,4; Biology Club 4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Pep Club 3; Ushers Club 3,4; Yearbook Financial Staff 3- Magazine Drive Captains 3. LYNNE IZARD G ? b, D net ,! ' 3; ■ [ , 1 Sec 4 - Girls ' Gle e Club 1; Spotlighters 1,2; G.A A L2; Bowling 1; Cheer Leaders 4; Latin Club 1; Spanish Club 3; See Chicago Club 4; Monitor Board 4; Pep Club 3,4; Welfare Committee 1,43; Junior Prom Committees 3; Yearbook Financial Staff 3- Maga¬ zine Drive Captains 3; Reflections Revelry 3. JANICE F. JACK National Honor Society 3,4; Silver Pin 4; H.R. Pres. 3 Vice-Pres 4- ? b ° Ir 4 ' vace 2,3 Freshman Chorus 1; National Thespian Society 2 ' 3 ' 4 ' , S P°i! 1 9 ht ®, rs JAM. Dramatics Gold Pin 3, Play Crews 3, One Acts 1,2, Fall Play 1.2,3, Spring Play 1,2,3; G.A.A. 1,2,3; Water Show p? ' , Fr 9 en 5 h GI “ b 1,2 ‘ r 1C u‘? re n ' 2; Gener °l Science Club 1; Biology Club 2; See Chicago Club 4; Pep Club 3; Ushers Club 3; Junior Prom Committees 3; Homecoming Committees 4; Scribblers 1; Golden Gal- leon Guild 3,4 Board 4; Nilehilite Staff 3, Editor-in-Chief 4, Yearbook Financial Staff 3; Reflections Revelry 1. SANDRA E. JACOBSSON ? P Snf.bon r u 2 ' 3 ' e P D a ? rew 5 A ° n f A J ts 2; G A A - ' 2 ' 3 ' Ma i° r Letter 3 T? H? vr 2 ' °r 1 nd r r, rdS o Mgr U P.E. Leaders n 3 G1 , ub 4; Fren = h C1 “ b 1; Se e Chicago Club 4, Monitors 4; Prom Commi ttees 3; Homecoming Committees 4; Nilehilite Staff 4, Girls ' Sport Editor 4; Magazine Drive Captains 1. WE WORK TO RAISE OUR CLASS STANDING. Diane Payne and Brenda Martinez improve their reading skills in a special class taught by Miss Helen Smith. PHILIP JOELSON Play Crews 4, See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4. CYNTHIA JOHNSON Honor Certificate 4; H.R. Sec. 4; Orchestra 1, Letter 1; Spotlighters 1; G.A.A. 1,2,3,4, Major Letter 3; Water Show 3; Cheer Leaders 1,4; Tri- Hi-Y Club 3,4; 100% Club 3,4; General Science Club 1; Biology Club 4; Monitors 4; Junior Prom Committees 3; Homecoming Committees 4; Golden Galleon Guild 4; Yearbook Senior Staff 4; Yearbook Financial Staff 3,4; Magazine Drive Captains 2, Magazine Drive Certificate Award 1. MARY J. JOHNSON Transferred from Roosevelt H.S., Chicago, Illinois, 2; G.A.A. 1,3,4; Spanish Club 3,4; 100% Club 4; Pep Club 4; Yearbook Senior Staff A; Magazine Drive Captains 3,4. SANDRA LEE JOHNSON Cadet Band 1; National Thespian Society 3,4, Spotlighters 1,2,3,4, Minor Dramatics Award 4, Play Crews 1,2,3,4; G.A.A. 1,2,3; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3,4; See Chicago Club 4, Board 4; Monitors 3,4; Homecoming Committees 4; Reflections Revelry 3,4. WAYNE JOHNSON See Chicago Club 4; Monitor 4. JOANNE JONES Cabinet Alternate 1; Freshman Chorus 1; G.A.A. 1,2; P.E. Leaders 4; Tri-Hi-Y Club 4; General Science Club 1; See Chicago Club 4; Moni¬ tors 4; Service Club 1,2; Ushers Club 3; Yearbook Financial Staff 4. CLAUDIA JOSLYN Honor Certificate 3; Cabinet Alternate 2; Freshman Chorus 1, Girls ' Glee Club 2, Vivace 2,3,4, Librarian 3,4, Major Choral Award 3; G.A.A. 1,2,3,4; Ripplettes Swim Club 3; Water Show 3; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3 4- Spanish Club 1,2; French Club Vice-Pres. 3; General Science 1; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Student Union Board 3,4, Pres. 4; Service Club 1; Pep Club Pres. 3,4; Ushers Club 3,4, Chairman 3; ’ Welfare Committee 4; Junior Prom Committees 3; Homecoming Committees 4; Golden Galleon Guild 4; Yearbook Financial Staff 2,3,4, Chairman 4; Magazine Drive Captains 1,4; Bridge Club 4. SHARON LYNN JOYCE Transferred from Amundsen H.S., Chicago, Illinois, 2; Honor Certificate 3; H.R. Sec. 4; G.A.A. 1,2,3; P.E. Leaders 1; Latin Club 3,4; See Chi¬ cago Club 4; Monitors 3,4; Pep Club 1; Ushers Club 3; Homecoming Committees 4; Golden Galleon Guild 4; Yearbook Senior Staff 4; Magazine Drive Certificate Award 3. FELICIA HELENE KADENS Honor Certificate 3; Cabinet 4; Student Council 2; H.R. Sec. 4; Fresh¬ man Chorus 1, Girls ' Glee Club 4; Spotlighters 1, Play Crews 1,2; Ripplettes Swin Club 3; Water Show 3; Swim Leader 3; Spanish Club 2,3; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Pep Club 3; Ushers Club 3,4; Magazine Drive Captains 1. DALE A. KAISER H. R. Pres. 3, Vice-Pres. 4; Orchestra Letter 1,2; Concert Band Letter I, 2; Football 2,4, Minor “N " 2, Major " N " 4; Basketball 2,3,4, Minor ”N " 2, Major “N " 3,4; Cross Country 1; Baseball Shield 1; P.E. Leaders 3; Hi-Y Club 4; Reflections Revelry Award 3. 137 A LASTING REMINDER OF FRIENDS . . . GRADUATION PICTURES Adding a personal touch, John Widerquist signs his graduation picture for Laura Thing- gaard. ALLAN J. KALUZNA Transferred from Austin H.S., Chicago, Illinois, 3; Student Council 2; H R- Sgt. at Arms 2; Debate Team 2; Concert Band 1; Choir 1,2,3; ' Football 1; Monitors 4. DAVID E. KARAS Cabinet 1; Debate Team 1; Football Shield 1,2; Wrestling Minor ”N " 1,2; Latin Club 1,2; Monitors 3,4. WILLIAM A. KAWELL Concert Band 1,2,3, Letter 1,2; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4. KATHLEEN M. KAY Honor Certificate 2; H.R. Vice-Pres. 3; 100% Club 3,4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Style Show 3. KENNETH L. KAY Bronze Pin 3; Cabinet 4, H.R. Vice-Pres. 4; Basketball 2,3,4, Major " N” 4; Cross Country 3,4, Major " N " 3; Baseball 2, Minor " N” 2 ; " N " Club 3,4; General Science Club 1; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4. ROBERT KENNEY Boys Glee Club 1,3, Choir 4; Football 1; See Chicago Club 4; Moni¬ tors 4. NANCY ANN KEPPELER National Honor Society 3,4; Bronze Pin 3; Cabinet 1, Alternate 2; Stu¬ dent Council 3, Alternate 4, Sec. 3; Illini Girls State 3; Freshman Chorus 1, Choir 3,4, Vivace 2,3,4, Madrigal Singers 3, Minor Choral Award 2; Ripplettes Swim Club 2; Water Show 2,3; P.E. Leaders 3- Latin Club 1,2,3,4, Latin Contest 1,2,3; 100% Club 2,3; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Service Club 1; Pep Club 4; Ushers Club 4; Library Staff 2; Junior Prom Committees 3; Golden Galleon Guild 4; Yearbook General Staff 3,4; Yearbook Financial Staff 2; Magazine Drive Cap¬ tains 4, Reflections Revelry 3. MARSHALL KESSLER Transferred from Senn H.S., Chicago, Illinois, 2; Orchestra 3,4; Concert Band 2,3,4; Letter 2,3,4; Choir 2; Biology Club 2. ERNEST KEZIOS Council Alternate 1; Boys’ Glee Club 1,2, Choir 3,4, Barbershoppers 4, Minor Choral Award 4; Tennis 1,2,3, Minor ”N " 1, Major " N " 2; " N " Club 2,3,4; Biology Club 2; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Home¬ coming Committees 4; Reflections Revelry 4. BARBARA CAROL KITCH Orchestra 4; Concert Band 2,3,4, Letter 2,3,4; Cadet Band 1; National Thespian Society 3,4; Play Crews 2,3,4; G.A.A. 1,2; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3,4; Latin Club 1,2; Chemistry Club 4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Ushers Club 3,4; Scribblers 1; Nilehilite Staff 3,4, Feature Editor 4; Yearbook Financial Staff 3; Magazine Drive Captains 3; Reflections Revelry 2,3. 138 KAARI KIVIMAGI Bronze Pin 3; G.A.A. 1,2,3,4, First State Letter 4, Golf Mgr. 3, Volley¬ ball Mgr. 4; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3,4, Biology Club 3; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Yearbook Financial Staff 3,4. BONITA RUTH ANN KLEIN Honor Certificate 2; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3; 100% Club 4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Yearbook Financial Staff 3,4; Magazine Drive Captains 4, High Sales Award 2, Certificate Award 2. JOYCE V. KLEMMER H. R. Sec. 4; Girls ' Glee Club 2; G.A.A. 1,2,3; P.E. Leaders 3,4; Tri-Hi-Y Club 4; 100% Club 3,4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Service Club I, 2; Homecoming Committees 4; Magazine Drive Captains 1,2. MARY E. KOHLS Cabinet 4, Alternate 2; H.R. Sec.-Treas. 1,2; Spotlighters 1,2, Recorder 2; Play Crews 1,2; G.A.A. 1,2,3,4, Minor Letter 2; Ripplettes Swin Club 3,4, Water Show 2,3; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3; Spanish Club Sec. 2; Biology Club 4, See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Service Club 1,2, Sec. 2; Pep Club Sec. 3,4; Ushers Club 3; Library Staff 2; Junior Prom Committees 3; Homecoming Committees 4; Scribblers 1; Golden Galleon Guild 4; Yearbook Financial Staff 2; Magazine Drive Certificate Award 1; Bridge Club 4. Cabinet 4; Student Court 4, Pres. 4; H.R. Pres. 3; Freshman Chorus 1, Boys ' Glee Club 2, Choir 3; Football 1,2,4, Shield 1, Minor " N " 2, Major " N ' ' 4; Basketball 3; General Science Club 1; Monitors 4; Homecoming Committees 4. KATHLEEN A. KRAUSE Silver Pin 4; Council 2,4; H.R. Pres. 3; Freshman Chorus 1; Spotlighters 1,2, Play Crews 2,3, One Acts 2; G.A.A. 1,2,3, Major Letter 2; Horse¬ back Riding 2; Ripplettes Swim Club 4; Water Show 1,2; Tri-Hi-Y Club 4; Spanish Club 1,2; General Science Club Sec.-Treas. 1; See Chicago Club 4, Monitors 4; Service Club 1; Homecoming Committees 4; Year¬ book Senior Staff 2,3,4; Magazine Drive Captains 1,2,4. SHIRLEY J. KRIESE Cabinet 4; Council 1; Freshman Chorus 1; Spotlighters 1,2; G.A.A. 1,2; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3,4; Spanish Club 2,3; 100% Club 2,3,4; Chemistry Club 4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Ushers Club 3; Library Staff 2,3; Magazine Drive Captains 2,4; Magazine Drive Certificate Award 1,3. JEROME E. KUCERA Major Art Award 2; National Thespian Society 3,4, Spotlighters 1,2, Minor Dramatics Award 3, Play Crews 1,2,3,4, One Acts 2, Fall Play 3; See Chicago Club 4; Nilehilite Staff 4; Magazine Drive Captains 1, Magazine Drive Certificate Award 1. ROBERT A. KUCHAR Honor Certificate 3; Concert Band 1,2,3,4, Letter 1,2,3; Hi-Y Club 2,3,4; General Science Club 1; Biology Club 2; Physics Club 3; Chemistry Club 4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; A.V.A. Operators Club 1,2,3; Golden Galleon Guild 4; S.S.S.H. Chairman 4. ARLENE L. LAHNA , 0 Transferred from Phelps Free Union H.S., Phelps, Wisconsin, 4; Stu¬ dent Council Sec.-Treas. 3; Concert Band 1,2,3,4; Girls ' Glee Club 1,3; Cheerleaders 1,2,3; Pep Club 4; Junior Prom Committees 3, Junior Prom Queen 2; Magazine Drive Certificate Award 2. ALLAN LINDSAY LANGE Traisferred from North Park Academy, Chicago, Illinois, 2; Bronze Pin 3- Student Council 4; Barbershoppers 2; Tennis 2; Latin Club 4; Gen¬ eral Science Club 1; Biology Club 2; Physics Club 3, Vice-Pres 3; Chemistry Club 4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Nilehilite Staff 4; Yearbook General Staff 4, Yearbook Photographer 4; School Photog¬ rapher 4. DORIS LANGE , , Honor Certificate 3; Freshman Chorus 1, Girls Glee Club Z; Play Crews 3,4; G.A.A. 2,3; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3,4; Spanish Club 2,3; Ushers Club 3; Magazine Drive Certificate Award 3. BARBARA H. LARSEN . Cabinet 4, Alternate 1; H.R. Vice-Pres. 2,4, Sec. 1, Welfare Chairman 1,2,3; Girls ' Glee Club 1,2, Vivace 2; Spotlighters 1,2, Play Crews 1,2; Water Show 3; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3,4; Spanish Club 3,4, Sgt. at Arms 4; General Science Club 1; Biology Club 4; See Chicago Club 4; Moni¬ tors 4; Pep Club 3,4, Vice-Pres. 3,4; Ushers Club 3,4; Junior Prom Com¬ mittees 3; Homecoming Committees 4; Yearbook Financial Staff 2,3,4; Magazine Drive Captains 2,3; Reflections 2. ELAINE MARALE LARSON Freshman Chorus 1, Girls ' Glee Club 2; 4; Monitors 4; Style Show 2,4. G.A.A. 1,2; See Chicago Club MARGARET LARSON Transferred from St. Charles Twp. H.S., St. Charles, Illinois, 4; Concert Band 1,2,3, Twirlers 1; Choir 3; G.A.A. 1,2,3,4, First State Letter 3, Tennis Mgr. 4; Rippleties Swim Club 1,4; Water Show 1; P.E. Leaders 4; Tri-Hi-Y Club 4; Spanish Club 4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Pep Club 2,3,4; Homecoming Committees 3 Play Crews 3; Operetta 3; Yearbook Financial Staff 4; Magazine Drive Captains 4. KENNETH A. LAVNICK Transferred from Austin H.S., Chicago, Illinois, 3; H.R. Pres. 1,2; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 2,4; Library Staff 3; Engineers Club 1,2,; Architectural Drawers Association 2; Athletic Sales Representative 1,2; Talent Show 2. ROBERT C. LENTZNER Transferred from Von Steuben H.S., Chicago, Illinois, 2; Choir 2; Golden Galleon Guild 4. MICHAEL LEPTICH Bowling 1,2,4; Hi-Y Club 3,4, Physics Club Vice-Pres. 4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4. DAVID LINDQUIST Bronze Pin 3; Cabinet 4; Concert Band 3, Cadet Band 1,2; Baseball 2, Hi-Y Club 2,3,4; General Science Club 1; Monitors 4, Homecoming Committees 4. JOANN S. LOTZ National Honor Society 3,4; Honor Certificate 3; Student Council Al¬ ternate 1; H.R. Sec. 1, Vice-Pres. 2, Pres. 3; Freshman Chorus 1, Girls ' Glee Club 2,3, Choir 4, Vivace 1, Minor Choral Award 3; Spotlighters 1; G.A.A. 1,2,3; Bowling 1; Ripplettes Swim Club 3,4; Water Show 2,3; Cheer Leaders 3,4; Latin Club 1,2,3,4, Latin Board 2; General Science Club 1; See Chicago Club 4; Biology Club 2; Monitors 4; Student Union Board 3,4; Ushers Club 3,4; Magazine Drive Captains 1; Reflections Revelry 3. THOMAS G. LOWRY General Science Club 1; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4. LINDA LUPORI Transferred from St. Scholastica H.S., Chicago, Illinois, 3; Style Show 3. PATRICIA R. MacDONALD H.R. Sec.-Treas. 2,4; Freshman Chorus 1, Girls ' Glee Club 2; Play Crews 3; G.A.A. 1,2,3,4; Bowling 4; P.E. Leaders 3; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3,4; Latin Club 1,2; Spanish Club 3; General Science Club 1; Biology Club 2; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Homecoming Committees 4. MALCOLM B. MacLEAN H.R. Treas. 4; Debate Team 1; Boys ' Glee Club 1,2; Swimming 1,2,3,4, Minor " N " 3; Water Show 2,3; Hi-Y Club 2,4; Latin Club 1,2; General Science Club 1; Biology Club 2; Physics Club 3; Chemistry Club 4; See Chicago Club 4, Board 4; Monitors 4, Board 4; Junior Prom Com¬ mittees 3. NATHAN MAGIT Transferred from Alexander Hamilton Sr. H.S., Los Angeles, California, 3; Track 2,3,4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4. PATRICIA GAIL MAGUIRE Transferred from Roycemore Girls School, Evanston, Illinois, 2; Girls ' Glee Club 1; Spotlighters 2,3, Play Crews 2,3, One Acts 2,3; Horseback Riding 1,2; Bowling 1,2; Swim Club 1; Water Show 1,3; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3,4; French Club 1; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Pep Club 3,4; Ushers Club 3,4; Welfare Committees 2,3; Pins and Pans 3; Junior Prom Committees 3; Homecoming Committees 4; Yearbook Finahcial Staff 3,4; Magazine Drive Captains 3. DENNIS MAHER H.R. Vice-Pres. 2, Pres. 4; Boys ' Glee Club 2, Freshmen Chorus 1; Football 2; Biology Club 2; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; A.V.A. Operators Club 1; Homecoming Committees 4. CHARLES R. MARK JR. Student Council Alternate 3; H.R. Pres. 4, Sec. 2; Major Oratorical Contests, Master of Ceremonies 3; Boys ' Glee Club 1,2, Choir 3, Madri¬ gal Singers 3, Minor Choral Award 3; Swimming 1,2,3,4, Major “N ' ' 2,3,4; " N " Club 2,3,4; Water Show 2; P.E. Leaders 2,3,4; Hi-Y Club 4; Spanish Club 3,4; Chemistry Club 4; See Chicago Club 4; A.V.A. Op¬ erators Club 1,2,3, Magazine Drive Captains 2, High Sales Award 1, Certificate Award 1,2,3. BELLES AND BEAUX COTILLION " MEMORIES ARE MADE OF THIS " . Before entering a gym transformed by the magic of tinsel and pine branches, Daryl Foley and Doug Stryker receive a bid from Miss Betty Schmidt and her escort. FRANCES ANNE MARLING Student Council 1; Debate Team 1; Orchestra 1,2, Letter 2; Concert Band 2, Letter 2; Vivace 3,4; Spotlighters 1; G.A.A. 1,2,3,4, Minor Letter 2, Swim Mgr. 3; Bowling 1; Ripplettes Swim Club 1,2,3; Water Show 1,2,3; Swim Leader 3; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3,4, Treas. 3; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Student Union Board 4; Service Club 1,2; Junior Prom Committees 3; Homecoming Committees 4; Magazine Drive Captains 1. ALVIN MARTIN Transferred from Sullivan H.S., Chicago, Illinois, 3; Bronze Pin 3; Orchestra 1. NEAL MARTIN H. R. Treas. 1; Orchestra 4; Conc ert Band 2,3,4, Letter 2,3; Cadet Band 1; Track 1,2,4, Minor " N " 1,2; Cross Country 1,2,3, Minor ”N " 1,2, Major " N” 3; " N " Club 3,4; Hi-Y Club 2; See Chicago Club 4; Junior Prom Committees 3; Reflections Revelry 2. ROBERT MARTIN Student Council Alternate 4; H.R. Vice-Pres. 2, Pres. 3,4; Choir 4; National Thespian Society 2,3,4, Vice-Pres. 3, Pres. 4, Spotlighters 1,2, Vice-Pres. 2, Minor Dramatics Award 2, Play Crews 1,2,3, One Acts I, 2, Fall Play 2,3, Spring Play 1,2,3; Bowling 1; Water Show 1,2,3; Latin Club 1; French Club 3, Pres. 3; General Science Club 1; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Junior Prom Committees 3; Homecoming Commit¬ tees 4; Golden Galleon, Guild 3,4; Reflections Revelry 1,2,3, Award 2,3. BRENDA MARILYN MARTINEZ Transferred from Soldan-Blewett H.S., St. Louis, Missouri, 4; Choir 1,2,3,4, Letter 3; Play Crews 4; G.A.A. 2,3,4, Minor Letter 3; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Service Club 1,2,3; Pep Club 1,2; Library Staff 2; Craftsman ' s Guild 4; Magazine Drive Certificate Award 4. Connie McCarthy Transferred trom St. Gregory H.S., Chicago, Illinois, 3; See Chicago Club 4; Pep Club 1. ROBERT CLAYTON McCOWN Monitors 4. dorothy McDowell Bronze Pin 3; Cabinet Alternate 1,3; Student Council 4, Alternate 3; H.R. Pres. 2; Girls ' Glee Club 2, Freshmen Chorus 1; G.A.A. 1,2; Tri- Hi-Y Club 3,4; Water Show 3; Latin Club 1,2,3,4, Board 3; General Science Club 1; Chemistry Club 4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Student Union Board 3,4, Treasurer 4; Pep Club 3; Ushers Club 3.4; Junior Prom Committees 3; Homecoming Committees 4; Yearbook Sen¬ ior Staff 3,4, Chairman 4; Yearbook Financial Staff 4; Reflections Revelry 3; Bridge Club 4. julie sue McGinnis Honor Certificate 3; H.R. Sec. 3; Orchestra Letter 1,2,3,4, Concert Mis¬ tress 4; G.A.A. 1,2,3; Bowling 3; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3,4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Student Union Board 3,4; Pep Club 3,4; Ushers Club 3,4; Yearbook Financial Staff 3,4; Magazine Drive Captains 3,4; Reflections Revelry 3, Bridge Club 4. BARBARA McKAIG Bronze Pin 3; Cabinet 4; H.R. Sec.-Treas. 3; Cadet Band 1; G.A.A. 1,2,3; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3,4; Latin Club 1,2,3,4; See Chicago Club 4; Moni¬ tors Board 4; Student Union Board 3,4, Sec. 4; Pep Club 4; Ushers Club 3; Homecoming Committees 4; Nilehilite Staff 3,4, News Bureau Chief 4; Magazine Drive Captains 2; Reflections Revelry 3; Bridge Club 4. HOLIDAY SPIRIT TAKES OVER WITH HOMEROOM CHRISTMAS PARTIES In homeroom 121-5A, Sandy Hagen, Joel Febel, Nancy Harris, Bill Dews, Marilyn Dell, and Betty Bartholomew prepare to enjoy their Christmas cake. MARLENE R. McMILLEN Transferred from North Division H.S., Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 2; Girls ' Glee Club 1; See Chicago Club Board 4; Monitors 4. RONALD McWHERTER JOHN F. MENEILLEY Cabinet 2, Alternate 3; Student Council 4; H.R. Vice-Pres. 3; Swim¬ ming Shield 1, Minor " N " 2; Hi-Y Club 2,3,4, Sgt. at Arms 4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; A.V.A. Operators Club 1,2,3,4; Homecom¬ ing Committees 4; Traffic Patrol 2. MARILYN MERSCH Freshman Chorus 1; G.A.A. 4; Tri-Hi-Y Club 4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4. CHESTER L. MIDDAUGH Cabinet 1; H.R. Pres. 3,4, Boys ' Glee Club 1; Track 1,2, Shield 1; Wrestling Minor “N " 3; Monitors 4; A.V.A. Operators Club 1,2,3,4. JAMES MILETTA Transferred from Steinmetz H.S., Chicago, Illinois, 2; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 3,4; Homecoming Committees 4. MARTIN MILLER Transferred from Austin H.S., Chicago, Illinois, 2; H.R. Vice-Pres. 4, Pres. 1; Golf 1,2; Tennis 2; Horseback Riding 1; General Science Club 1. GARY MILLS Cabinet Pres. 2; H.R. Pres. 4; Football 1,2,3,4, Shield 1, Minor " N " 2, Major “N " 3,4, Captain 2; Wrestling 2,3; " N " Club 3,4; Hi-Y Club 2; Monitors 3,4; Student Union Board 3,4; Junior Prom Committees 3. BARBARA MINDELL Transferred from Austin H.S., Chicago, Illinois, 3; G.A.A. 1,2,4; Bridge Club 4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 2,4; College Club 2; American Girls ' Club 2. LEONARD A. MIRESSE Cabinet 1, Sec. 1; Student Council 2,3, Vice-Pres. 3; H.R. Pres. 1,4; Football 1,2,3,4, Shield 1, Minor “N " 2, Major " N " 3,4, Capt. 2,4; Base¬ ball 1,2,3,4, Minor ”N " 2,3, Major " N " 4; Wrestling 1,2,3,4, Minor “N " 1, Major ”N ' ' 2,3,4, Capt. 4, " N ' ' Club 2,3,4, Sec. 4; Hi-Y Club 2; Junior Prom Committees 3; Homecoming Committees 4. CAROLE JEANNE MONSON Transferred from Schurz H.S., Chicago, Illinois, 3; Concert Band 1,2,3, Letter 2; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 2,4; Library Staff 3; Homecom¬ ing Committees 4; Yearbook Financial Staff 4; Library Club 3. LINDA MORSE Honor Certificate 3; Cabinet Sec. 3; Student Council Alternate 1; Cadet Band 1; Girls ' Glee Club 2,3, Choir 4, Minor Choral Award 3; G.A.A. 1,2,3,4; Ripplettes Swim Club 3,4; Water Show 1,3; Cheer Leaders 3,4; Latin Club 1,2,3,4, Board 2; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Student Union Board 3,4; Junior Prom Committees 3; Homecoming Committees 4; Nilehilite Staff 3; Yearbook General Staff 3,4, Co-Editor 4; Reflections Revelry 3. DONALD A. MORTON Honor Certificate 2, H R. Vice-Pres. 4; Baseball 1,2, Shield 1,2; Latin Club 1; 100% Club 2 ;See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 3,4; Boys ' Bowl¬ ing 1,2,3. PAUL E. MUELLER Freshman Chorus 1; Football Shield 1,2; Wrestling 3,4; Water Show 1,2, Crew Chairman 3; A.V.A. Operators Club 1,2,3,4, Pres. 4, A.V.A. Award 3,4; Welfare Committee 1; Reflections Revelry Crew 3,4. DIANE MARILYN NELSON Transferred from North Park Academy, Chicago, Illinois, 3; Honor Cer¬ tificate 3; Play Crews 3; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3,4; Spanish Club 3,4; See Chi¬ cago Club 4; Pep Club 2; Homecoming Committees 4; Bridge Club 4; Palette and Brush Club 2. JANET RUTH NELSON Honor Certificate 2; Orchestra 1, Letter 1; G.A.A. 1,2,3,4, Major Letter 2, Tumbling Mgr. 2; Horseback Riding 2,3,4; P.E. Leaders 3; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3; Spanish Club 4; 100% Club 4, General Science Club 1; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Pep Club 3. JEAN NELSON Transierred from Evanston Twp. H.S., Evanston, Illinois, 3; Student Council 4; G.A.A. 1,2, Archers Club 1; P.E. Leaders 4; 100% Club 4; See Chicago Club 4, Monitors 4; Homecoming Committees 4. ROBERT NELSON Transferred lrom Schurz H.S., Chicago, Illinois, 4. BARBARA ANN NEUMAN National Honor Society 3,4; Bronze Pin 3; Cabinet 4, Alternate 3; Stu¬ dent Council 1; Spotlighters 1; G.A.A. 1,2,3,4; Bowling 1,3; French Club 1,2; 100% Club 2,3,4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Student Union Board 3,4; Pep Club 3; Ushers Club 3,4; Junior Prom Committees 3; Homecoming Committees 4; Scribblers 1; Nilehilite Staff 3,4, Sports Editor 4, Editor-in-Chief 4; Yearbook General Staff 3,4, Co-Editor 4; Yearbook Financial Staff 2,3; Yearbook Senior Staff 2; Reflections Rev¬ elry 2,3. GEORGE NEUMANN Football 1; Basketball 3,4, Minor " N " 3; Wrestling 2; Hi-Y Club 2,3,4. DONALD E. NIED Bronze Pin 3; Orchestra 4; Concert Band 2,3,4, Letter 2,3, Cadet Band 1; Latin Club 1; Physics Club 3; Chemistry Club 4; See Chicago Club 4; Service Club 1,2. ROSEMARY CAROL NITSCHE National Honor Society 3,4; Honor Certificate 2; Cabinet 4, Sec.-Treas. 4; Student Council 3; H.R. Reporter 3; National Thespian Society 2,3,4, Treas. 4, Spotlighters 1,2, Minor Dramatics Award 3, Play Crews 1,2,3,4, One Acts 1,2,3, Spring Play 3, Fall Play 4; G.A.A. 2,3,4; Ripplettes Swim Club 4; Swim Leader 4, Tri-Hi-Y Club 3; Spanish Club 3,4; Biology Club 3; See Chicago Club 4; Senior Counselors 2; Service Club 1,2; Pep Club 3,4; Junior Prom Committees 3, Homecoming Committees 4; S.S.S.H. Chairman 4. ROBERT NORDLIE Freshman Chorus 1; Wrestling 3,4, Minor ”N " 3; Golf 3, Minor “N " 3; Monitors 4; Spanish Club 3. WALLACE A. NOVAK H.R. Pres. 1; Freshmen Chorus 1; A.V.A. Operators Club 1,2; Diversified Occupations Club Vice-Pres. 4. MELVIN NOVIT Transferred from Von Steuben H.S., Chicago, Illinois, 1; H.R. Sec. 2; 100% Club 3; Biology Club 2; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Spanish Club 3,4; Junior Prom Committees 3; Golden Galleon Guild 3. WAYNE OHLSON Baseball 1, Shield 1; General Science Club 1; Monitors 4; Bowling Club 2. MARTHA OLANDER Honor Certificate 3; Student Council Alternate 4; G.A.A. 1-2; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3,4; See Chicago Club 4, Service Club 1; Welfare Committee 2; Homecoming Committees 4; Yearbook Financial Staff 3; Magazine Drive Captains 4. JERRY OLIPHANT ALAN DOUGLAS OLSON Concert Band 1,2,3,4, Letter 3; General Science Club 1; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4. JOYCE OLSON Freshman Chorus 1; G.A.A. 1; Bowling 1; Tri-Hi-Y Club 4; See Chicago Club 4. CHET F. O ' MALLEY Cabinet Alternate 4; General Science Club 1; Monitors 4. RITA RAE PAINTER Transferred from Evanston H.S., Evanston, Illinois, 4; Choir 1,2,3, Madri¬ gal Singers 2; Tri-Hi-Y Club 4; Spanish Club 3; See Chicago Club 4, Style Show 1,2; Welfare Committee 2,3; F.H.A. Club 1,2. ROBERT PAOLELLA Freshman Chorus 1; Wrestling 2, Minor " N " 2; Monitors 4. FRANK PAPANDREA Transferred from Steinmetz H.S., Chicago, Illinois, 4. SANDRA PAUL H.R. Sec. 2,3; Spotlighters 1,2, Play Crew 1, One Acts 2; G.A.A. 1,2,4; Bowling 4; 100% Club 3,4, Treas. 4; See Chicago Club 4; Ushers Club 3. DIANE MARJORIE PAYNE Honor Certificate 3; Cabinet Alternate 2; Student Court 3,4, Sec. 4; H.R. Pres. 3, Vice-Pres. 1; Vivace 3,4; National Thespian Society 3,4, Spotlighters 1,2, Play Crews 1,2,3,4; G.A.A. 1,2,3,4; Ripplettes Swim Club 3,4; Water Show 3,4; P.E. Leaders 3,4; Hi-Y Club Honorary Mem¬ ber 3,4; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3,4; Latin Club 1,2; General Science Club 1, Pres. 1; Chemistry Club 4; See Chicago Club 4, Pres. 4; Monitors 4; Pep Club 3,4; Ushers Club 3; Pins and Pans 3,4, Pres. 3; Style Show 3,4; Magazine Drive Captains 1,2; Reflections Revelry 2,4; Bridge Club 4. CRAIG PENRITH H. R. Vice-Pres. 3,4; Football 2, Minor " N” 2; Swimming 2,3,4, Minor N 2, Major N 3,4; N " Club 3,4; Hi-Y Club 4; Latin Club 2; General Science Club 1; Biology Club 2; Monitors 4. RALPH McCORMICK PERLICK Transferred from Amundsen H.S., Chicago, Illinois, 2; Boys ' Chorus I, 2; Spanish Club 2; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 2,4; Pep Club 2; Bridge Club 4. THROUGH ACTIVITIES WE GAIN THE SATISFACTION OF A JOB WELL DONE " Lights, camera, action! " Roger Simpson op¬ erates the equipment behind the scenes for the fall play, " Cuckoos on the Hearth " . MARY LU PERRIN Council Alternate 4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Style Show 2,3. JAMES R. PESCETTO Diversified Occupations Club 4. BRUCE WALTER PETERSON Student Council Alternate 4; Cadet Band 1; Football 4, Major " N " 4; Basketball 1, Shield 1; Baseball 1,2, Shield 1, Minor " N " 2; Golf 3,4, Major " N " 3,4; " N " Club 3,4; Monitors 3,4; Nilehilite Staff 3. DARLENE PETERSON 100% Club 3,4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Ushers Club 3; Style Show 2. DIANE LUISE PETERSON H.R. Vice-Pres. 1, Sec. 2; Girls ' Glee Club 2, Vivace 3,4, Vice-Pres. 4, Freshman Chorus 1; Spotlighters 1,2, Play Crews 1,2; G.A.A. 1,2,3; Ripplettes Swim Club 3,4; Water Show 3,4; P.E. Leaders 3,4; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3,4; General Science Club 1; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 3,4; Pep Club 3; Ushers Club 3; Style Show 3,4; Pins and Pans 3; Home¬ coming Committees 3; Yearbook Senior Staff 4; Yearbook Financial Staff 3; Reflections Revelry 2; Bridge Club 4. ROGER PETERSON Student Council 2; Freshman Chorus 1; Basketball 1,2,3,4, Shield 1, Minor " N " 2, Major " N " 3,4, Most Valuable 1,2; " N " Club 3,4; Hi-Y Club 2; Monitors 4. JUDITH PFLAUM Transferred from J. Sterling Morten H.S., Cicero, Illinois, 3; Bronze Pin 3; Student Council 2,4; Drama Club 1; G.A.A. 2,3,4, Numerals 2; French Club 2; 100% Club 3,4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Pep Club 4; Yearbook Financial Staff 4. PATRICIA ANN PIERCE Girls ' Glee Club 2, Freshman Chorus 1; G.A.A. 1,2,3; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3,4; Spanish Club 1; 100% Club 2,3,4; General Science Club 1; Chemistry Club 4; See Chicago Club Board 4; Monitors 4; Service Club 1; Ushers Club 3; Junior Prom Committees 3; Yearbook Financial Staff 1,2; Bridge Club 4. DONNA MARIE PIONKE Bronze Pin 3; Debate Team 1; 100% Club 3,4; See Chicago Club 4, Board 4; Monitors 4; Service Club 1,2; Library Staff 2,3. THEODORE PRISTASH Bronze Pin 3; Student Council Alternate 2,3; H.R. Vice-Pres. 2,3, Pres. 4; Freshman Chorus 1; Football 2,3,4, Minor " N " 2, Major " N " 4; Basket¬ ball 1,2,3,4, Shield 1, Minor " N " 2,3; Baseball 1,2,3, Shield 1, Minor " N " 2, Major " N” 3; " N " Club 4; Monitors 4; Welfare Committee 1. 145 OUR DAYS AT NILEHI LIVE ON IN OUR LAST REFLECTIONS. JoAnn Lotz and Dorothy McDowell remember the good times of the year past as they auto¬ graph yearbooks. GLENN PROESEL H.R. Sgt. at Arms 4. RICHARD PROFT H.R. Pres. 1, Vice-Pres. 2,3; Boys ' Glee Club 1,2, Choir 2; Football 1,2,4, Minor " N " 2, Major " N ' ' 4; Track 1,2, Shield 1, Minor “N " 2; Wrestling 3, Major ,4 N " 3; Magazine High Sales Award 1, Certificate Award 1. PHILLIP QUIGLEY National Honor Society 3,4; Silver Pin 4; Cabinet 2,4; H.R. Pres. 1; Illini Boys ' State 3; American Legion Oratorical Contest 2,3,4; District, Re¬ gional, State Oratorical Contest 3,4; Debate Team 1,2,3,4, National Forensic League 1,2,3,4, Degree of Distinction 4; Choir 4; National Thespian Socitay 2,3,4, Minor Dramatics Award 3, One Acts 2, Spring Play 2,3, Fall Play 3; Golf 4; Hi-Y Club 2,4; Latin Club 3,4; General Science Club 1; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Golden Galleon Guild 3,4, Board 4; Reflections Revelry 2. MARGHERITA M. RASK Bronze Pin 3; Student Council Alternate 4; Freshman Chorus 1; G A A 1,2; Ripplettes Swim Club 4; P.E. Leaders 4; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3,4, ' Sec. 4; Spanish Club 3; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Pep Club 3; Style Show 2,3,4; Junior Prom Committees 3; Yearbook Financial Staff 3,4; Magazine Drive Captains 4. GEORGE REDIFER Cadet Band 2. RICHARD R. REED Boys ' Glee Club 1; Choir 2; Barbershoppers 2; Minor Choral Award 2; Basketball 2, Mgr. Shield 2; Swimming 4; Hi-Y Club 2; General Sci¬ ence Club 1; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4. RICHARD WAYNE REICHERT H.R. Vice-Pres. 1, Pres. 4; Monitors 4; Service Club 2,3; A.V.A. Opera¬ tors Club 1,2,3,4; Welfare Committee 1; Magazine Drive Capt. 3; Reflections Revelry 3; Diversified Occupations Club Pres. 4. BRUCE REINGER H.R. Sgt. at Arms 4, Treas. 3; Orchestra 1,2,3,4, Letter 2,3,4; Concert Band 2,3,4, Letter 2,3,4; Football 2,3,4, Minor 44 N " 2, Major " N " 3,4; Basketball 2,3,4, Minor ”N " 2,3; Baseball Shield 1, Minor " N " 2 Major " N " 3,4; " N " Club 3,4 ; Hi-Y Club 3. JUDITH REITER Honor Certificate 3; Concert Band 2,3, Letter 2,3, Cadet Band 1; Na¬ tional Thespian Society 4, Spotlighters 1,2,3, Play Crews 2,3,4; G.A.A. 1,2,3,4, Minor Letter 2; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3,4; Spanish Club 2,3; See Chi¬ cago Club 4, Monitors 4; Homecoming Committees 4. JANET RENBERG G.A.A. 1,2,3; Ripplettes Swim Club 1,2,3,4; Water Show 1,2,3; P.E. Lead¬ ers 4; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3; Spanish Club 2,3,4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Yearbook Financial Staff 3; Magazine Drive Captains 3 . LE ROY RENIS Football 1,2, Shield 1; Basketball 1,2,3,4, Shield 1, Minor “N ' ' 2,3; Cross Country Major " N " 3; Baseball 1,2, Shield 1, Minor " N” 2; ”N " Club 3,4, Monitors 4. JOHN S. RICE Honor Certificate 2; Freshman Chorus 1; Football 1,2,3,4, Shield 1, Minor " N " 2,3, Major " N " 4; Basketball Shield 2; Baseball 1,2,3,4, Shield 1, Minor " N " 2,3; " N " Club 4; Hi-Y Club 2,3; Spanish Club 2; General Science Club 1; Physics Club 3; Monitors 4. CAROL SUE RICKETTS H.R. Sec.-Treas. 1; Girls ' Glee Club 2; G.A.A. 1,2; P.E. Leaders 4; Tri- Hi-Y Club 3,4; General Science Club 1; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Student Union Board 3; Service Club 1; Pep Club 3; Ushers Club 3-4; Library Staff 3; Junior Prom Committees 3; Homecoming Commit¬ tees 3; Yearbook Financial Staff 3,4; Magazine Drive Captains 3. WILLIAM GEORGE RIHA Cadet Band 2; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4. DIANE RITTER Transferred from New Trier Twp. H.S., Winnetka, Illinois, 2; G.A.A. 1,2,3; P.E. Leaders 4; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3; Biology Club 2; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Ushers Club 3; Homecoming Committees 4; Year¬ book General Staff 3; Yearbook Financial Staff 3; Bridge Club 4. NORMAN ROBINS Cadet Band 1,2,3, Letter 2,3; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Boys ' Bowling Club 1,2. BARBARA ANN ROHNER Honor Certificate 2; H.R. Sec. 4; Freshman Chorus 1; G.A.A. 1,2,3; P.E. Leaders 3; 100% Club 4; Welfare Committee 1; Style Show 2; Golden Galleon Guild 4. LOIS KAY ROSE Transferred from Von Steuben H.S., Chicago, Illinois, 2; H.R. Treas. 1; Orchestra 1; Play Crews 4; G.A.A. 1,2, Representative 2, Volleyball Mgr. 2; P.E. Leaders 1,2,4; Swim Leader 2; See Chicago Club 4; Moni¬ tors 4; Ushers Club 3,4; Library Staff 2,3; Style Show 4, Pins and Pans Vice-Pres. 4; Yearbook Financial Staff 4. JERROLD A. ROSENBERG Honor Certificate 2; Student Council 1,4; H.R. Pres. 2; Freshman Chorus 1, Boys ' ' Glee Club 2; Football 1,2,3,4, Shield 1, Minor " N " 2, Major ”N " 4, Capt. 1; Basketball 1,2, Shield 1, Minor " N” 2; Track 3; Baseball 1,2, Shield 1, Minor “N " 2; " N " Club 4; Hi-Y Club 2,3,4; Monitors 4; Service Club 1,2; Junior Prom Committees 3. EDWARD ROSS H.R. Treas. 4; General Science Club 1; Physics Club 3; Chemistry Club 4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4. JERALD L. ROTHCHILD Transferred from Senn H.S., Chicago, Illinois, 3; Concert Band 4; Cadet Band 3; See Chicago Club 4; Nilehilite Staff Reporter 3. MARTIN RUBIN Transferred from Von Steuben H.S., Chicago, Illinois, 4; A.V.A. Opera¬ tors Club Co-Captain 1,2; Sound Crew Chairman 2. MARION O. RUESCH Girls ' Glee Club 2, Freshman Chorus 1; Bowling 4; Monitors 4; Pins and Pans 3. FRANK RUSKOWITZ THOMAS JOHN RUSSELL Student Council Alternate 1; HR. Vice Pres. 4, Sgt. at Arms 1,4; Con¬ cert Band 1,2, Loiter 2, Cadet Band 1, Letter 1; Barhershoppers 2,4; Football 3; Swimming 1; Baseball 1,4, Wrestling 1; Hi-Y Club 2,3,4; General Science Club 1; Biology Club 4; See Chicago Club 4, Board 4; Monitor 4; Nilehilite Staff 2,3; Yearbook Financial Staff 4. RUSSELL RYDIN Freshman Chorus 1; Hi Y Club 2,3,4; Physics Club 4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Magazine Drive Certificate Award 3,4. JANET RYERSON Transferred from Foreman H.S., Chicago, Illinois, 3; Honor Certificate 2; H R. Sec. 1,2; Girls Glee Club 2,3; All-State Music Activity 2; G.A.A 1,2,3, Volleyball Mgr. 2; Monitor 2,4, Library Staff 1; Major Service Letter 2; Social Committee 2,3; F.T.A. 2,3; Homecoming Committees 4. ELAINE LOIS SAHS Freshman Chorus 1, G.A.A. 1,2,3,4, Minor Letter 3, Soccer Mgr. 3; P.E. Leader 3; Tri-Hi-Y Club 4; Latin Club 1; Spanish Club 2,3,4; Gen¬ eral Science Club 1; Biology Club 4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 3,4, Ushers Club 3; Scribblers 1; Yearbook Senior Staff 4, Yearbook Financial Staff 3,4. KENNETH J. SARTINI Student Council 3; H.R. Vice-Pres. 2; Cadet Band 1,2, Letter 2; Baseball 1; Monitors 4, Magazine Drive Captains 1. FRANCIS J. SAUNDERS JR. Honor Certificate 2; Debate Team 2,3, National Forensic League 2,3, Degree of Honor 3; Latin Club 1,2; General Science Club 1; Biology Club 2; Physics Club 3; See Chicago Club 4; Scribblers 1; Golden Galleon Guild 4. LARRY W. SAVRE Transferred from Oak Park H.S., Oak Park, Illinois, 3; Swimming 1; Wrestling 4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4. GEORGINNE SCHEEL Honor Certificate 2; G.A.A. 1,2,3,4, Latin Club 1,2,3,4; Chemistry Club 4; Monitors 4. JANE ANN SCHEUER Honor Certificate 3; Student Council 4; Freshman Chorus 1, Girls ' Glee Club 2; Spotlighters 1,2; G.A.A. 1,2,3; Bowling 3 ; Tri-Hi-Y Club 4; Latin Club 1; 100% Club 3,4; See Chicago Club 4, Board 4; Monitors 4; Service Club 1,2; Ushers Club 3; Pins and Pans 3; Yearbook General Staff 3,4, Activities Editor 4. MARILYN SCHMIDT Spotlighters 1, Play Crews 1; G.A.A. 1,2,3; Tri-Hi-Y Club 4; Spanish Club 1,2; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4. CARL SCHOENE Play Crews 1,2,3; General Science Club 1; Physics Club 3; Chemistry Club 4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Radio Club 4. NANCY SCHROEDER Transferred from Steinmetz H.S., Chicago, Illinois, 1; Honor Certificate 3; G.A.A. 4; Tri-Hi-Y Club 4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4, Pep Club 4; Pins and Pans 3. ROBERT E. SCHROEDER National Honor Society 3,4; Honor Certificate 3; Cabinet Vice-Pres. 2,4; Student Council 1,3; Harvard Award 3; Debate Team 1,2,3, National Forensic League 3,4, Degree of Honor 3; National Thespian Society 3.4, Spotlighters 1,2,3,4, Pres. 3, Dramatics Gold Pin 3,4, Play Crews 1.2.3.4, One Acts 3, Fall Play 2,3, Spring Play 2,3; Tennis Shield 1; Latin Club 2,3,4: General Science Club 1; See Chicago Club 4; Moni¬ tors 4; Service Club 1,2, Pres. 2; Junior Prom Committees 3; Homecom¬ ing Committees 4; Reflections Revelry 2,3,4, Award 3. WILLIAM SCHULTE Transferred from St Mel H.S., Chicago, Illinois, 4; Homecoming Com¬ mittees 3. OUR LAST PROM . . . WILL WE EVER FORGET IT? John Meneilley, Claudia Joslyn, Karen Frenzel, and Gary Mills enjoy a coke during the inter¬ mission. BARRY M. SCHUTZ Transferred from Sullivan H.S., Chicago, Illinois, 3; Honor Certificate 3; Major Oratorical Contests 3; Play Crews 1,2, Fall Play 4, Football 2; Basketball Minor Mgr. “N " 3, Major Mgr. " N " 2,3; Swimming 1; Base¬ ball Minor " N " 3, Major ”N " 3. FRED SCHWARTZ Transferred from Crane Tech., Chicago, Illinois, 3; Concert Band 1,2; Yearbook General Staff 1. CAROL ANN SCHWEGER Orchestra 1; Choir 4, Vivace 2,3,4, Pres. 4, Student Director 3,4; Na¬ tional Thespian Society 2,3,4, Spotlighters 2,3,4, Major Dramatics Award 3, Play Crews 1,2,3, One Acts 1,2, Fall Play 2,3, Spring Play 3; G.A.A. 1,2,3,4, Vice-Pres. 3, Major Letter 2, Softball Mgr. 2; Ripplettes Swim Club 1,2,3,4; Water Show 1,2,3; P.E. Leaders 4; Tri-Hi-Y Club Vice-Pres. 3; See Chicago Club 4; Service Club 1,2. DONNA SEARING Girls ' Glee Club 2,4, Vivace 3,4, Minor Choral Award 3; Spotlighters 1,2,3,4; G.A.A. 1,2,3; Bowling 1; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3,4; Latin Club 1; Spanish Club 2,3,4; General Science Club 1; Biology Club 2; Chemistry Club 4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Pep Club 4; Ushers Club 3,4; Pins and Pans 4; Yearbook Financial Staff 4. CLIFFORD SEUL General Science Club 1; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4. RONALD SHABEL National Honor Society 3; Honor Certificate 2; Student Council 3, Alternate 2, S.S.S.H. Committee 3,4, Head Supervisor 4; Illini Boys ' State 3; Choir 4; National Thespian Society 3,4, Vice-Pres. 4, Spot¬ lighters 1, Major Dramatics Award 3, Play Crews 2, 3, One Acts 2, Fall Play 3,4, Spring Play 3,4; Spanish Club 3,4; General Science Club 1; Physics Club 3; Chemistry Club 4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Service Club 1,2; Reflections Revelry 3. RICHARD DAVID SHEA National Honor Society 3,4; Bronze Pin 3; Cabinet 3; Boys ' Glee Club 1; Football Shield 1; Basketball Minor Mgr. ”N " 3; Baseball 2,3, Major " N " 3, Mgr. Shield 2; Wrestling Shield 3; Junior Prom Committees 3, Magazine Drive Captains 2. GARY SHENFISH Hi-Y Club 2; General Science Club 1; Physics Club 2; Monitors 4. ELAINE ANN SHUMAN Bronze Pin 3; Cabinet 4, Alternate 3, Sec.-Treas. 4; Student Council 1,2; Hi-Y Citizenship Award 3; G.A.A. 1,2; P.E. Leaders 4; Cheer Lead¬ ers 2; French Club 1,2, Sec. 2; 100% Club 3,4, Pres. 4; General Sci¬ ence Club 1; See Chicago Club 4; Student Union Board 3,4; Pep Club 4; Ushers Club 3,4; Homecoming Committees 4; Scribblers 1; Golden Galleon Guild 3,4; Yearbook General Staff 3,4, Special Events Editor 4; Reflections Revelry 3. BARBARA SIMON Transferred from Central H.S., Detroit, Michigan, 4; H.R. Rep. 1; For¬ ensics 3; Unity Forum Club 1; G.A.A. 4; Swimming 1,2,3, Letter 3, Mgr. 3; Latin Club 3; See Chicago Club 4; Citizenship Award 2; Nilehilite Staff 4, Assistant Exchange Editor 4. 149 WE ACTED AS USHERS . . . JUNE 16, 1955. Barbara Neuman, Phil Quigley, Linda Morse, Joel Febel, Janice Jack, and Rosemary Nitsche were on hand to distribute programs and seat the guests at the ' 55 graduation. 150 ROGER A. SIMPSON H. R. Pres. 2, 3, 4; Concert Band 1, 2, Letter 2; Boys ' Glee Club 1; National Thespian Society 2, 3, 4, Spotlighters 1, Major Dramatics Award 3, Play Crews ], 2, 3, 4, One Acts 1, 2, 3, Spring Play 3, Fall Play 3, 4; Football I, 2, 3, 4, Shield 1, Minor " N " 2, Major " N” 3, 4; Wrestling 1, 2, 3, 4, Minor N ' 1, M ajor ”N " 2, 3; " N " Club 2, 3, 4; Water Show 1, 2, 3; P.E. Leaders 2, 3; Hi-Y Club 2, 3, 4; General Science Club 1; See Chicago Club 4; A.V.A. Operators Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Award 3, 4, Chief Operator 3, 4, Student Engineer 3, 4; Style Show Crews 2; Homecoming Committees 4; Magazine Drive Captains 3; Reflections Revelry Crews 1, 2, 3, 4. MELVIN SINGER Monitors 4. MARION SANDRA SOLOMON Transferred from Senn H. S. ( Chicago, Illinois, 1; Freshman Chorus 1; Tri- Hi-Y Club 3, 4; Spanish Club 3; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Library Staff 4; Pins and Pans 4; Yearbook Financial Staff 3, 4. RONALD SOLTIS Football 3; Baseball Minor " N " 3; Hi-Y Club 3; Monitor 4. WILLIAM SONNE Transferred from Crivitz H. S., Crivitz, Wisconsin, 2; Junior Prom Com¬ mittees 3. LOREN JOHN SPENCER Transferred from Roosevelt H. S., Chicago, Illinois, 2; Football 3; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4. CONSTANCE L. SQUARDO Freshman Chorus 1; 100% Club 3, 4; Monitor 4; Service Club 1, 2. FREDERICK A. STANSFIELD MARTHA STEEL Transferred from Senn H. S., Chicago, Illinois, 1; H. R. Sec. 4; Girls ' Glee Club 1; Tri-Hi-Y Club 4; Monitor 4; Pep Club 4; Library Staff 1; Magazine Drive Captains 4. NEIL E. STENHOLT Transferred from Amundsen H. S., Chicago, Illinois, 4; Boys ' Glee Club 1; Choir 1; Football 1, 3; Basketball 1, 2, 3; Track 2, 3; Swimming 1; Spanish Club 1, 2; Monitors 4; Bowling 1, 2, 3. BETTY JEAN STRACHAN Transferred from Austin H. S., Chicago, Illinois, 4; G.A.A. 2, 3; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Service Club 1, 2, 3; Ushers Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Pins and Pans 4; Homecoming Committees 4; College Club 1,2, 3. DOUGLAS STRYKER Concert Band 1, 2, 3, Letter 1, 2, 3; Football 1, 2, Shield 1; Track 1; Swim¬ ming 1, 2, 3, 4. Minor " N” 1, Major " N” 2, 3, Capt. 3; " N” Club 2, 3, 4; Water Show 1, 2, 3; Hi-Y Club 2, 3, 4, Sec. 4, Promotion Chairman 3; Chemistry Club 4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Reflections Revelry 2. BARRY SUGARMAN Transferred from Foreman H. S., Chicago, Illinois, 2; H. R. Pres. 3; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4. WILLIAM E. SWARTZ Radio Club 4. BARBARA LOUISE SWEET Transferred from North Park Academy, Chicago, Illinois, 4; Choir 2; Horse¬ back Riding 4; Ripplettes Swim Club 4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Pep Club 4. KENNETH SWITAL Concert Band 2, Cadet Band 1, 3, Letter 3; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; A.V.A. Operators Club 4. CLIFFORD E. SWITZER Boys ' Glee Club 3; Hi-Y Club 4; Monitors 4. JUDITH E. TADELMAN Transferred from Senn H. S., Chicago, Illinois, 1; H. R. Sec. 1; Orchestra 1; Spotlighters 4, Play Crews 2, 4; G.A.A. 1, 2, 3; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3; 100% Club 4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Pep Club 3; Ushers Club 3; Junior Prom Committees 3; Magazine Drive Captains 4. THOMAS G. TANSOR Transferred from Amundsen H. S., Chicago, Illinois, 1; H. R. Sgt. at Arms 4; Cadet Band 1, 2, Letter 2; Football 1; Track 3; Hi-Y Club 2, 3, 4; Biology Club 2; Physics Club 4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitor 4; Magazine Drive Captains 4. LAURA JUNE THINGGAARD Freshman Chorus 1; G.A.A. 1, 2, 3; P. E. Leaders 3, 4; Spanish Club 3; See Chicago Club 4; Ushers Club 3; Style Show 3; Homecoming Commit¬ tees 4; Yearbook Financial Staff 2, 3, 4; Magazine Drive Captains 2, 3. EVELYN H. THIRY Girls ' Glee Club 2, 3; G.A.A. 1, 2; 100% Club 3, 4; Monitors 4; Magazine Drive Captains 3. DARLENE THOMAS Freshman Chorus 1, Girls ' Glee Club 2, Choir 3, Vivace 3; G.A.A. 1; Monitors 4; Service Club 1; Library Staff 3; Diversified Occupations Club 4. LINDA TIMMEL Debate Team 1; Freshman Chorus 1; Spotlighters 1, 2, 3; G.A.A. 1, 2; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3, 4; Spanish Club 2; 100% Club 3, 4; See Chicago Club 4; Style Show 2. SAMUEL PHILLIP TOPEL Transferred from Austin H. S., Chicago, Illinois, 4; Play Crews 4; See Chicago Club 4; Homecoming Committees 4. 151 RICHARD TRENDEL Freshman Chorus 1; Track 1, 2, 3, Shield 1, Minor " N " 2, Major " N " 3; Bowling 1; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4. DONALD L. URICH Football 2; Wrestling 3, 4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4. MARJORIE FAY USOW Orchestra 2; Spotlighters 2, 3, 4, Play Crews 2, 3, 4, Fall Play 4; G.A.A. 1, 2, 3, 4; P.E. Leader 4; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3; Latin Club 2; General Science Club 1; Biology Club 2; Chemistry Club 4; See Chicago Club Board 4; Monitor 4; Pep Club 3, 4; Ushers Club 3; Library Staff 4; German Club 4; Homecoming Committees 4. DONNA KAY VANDERWALL Girls ' Glee Club 2, 3, 4, Vivace 2, Freshman Chorus 1, Minor Choral Award 3; National Thespian Society 2, 3, 4, Spotlighters 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice- Pres. 3, Pres. 4, Minor Dramatics Award 3, Play Crews 1, 2, 3, 4; One Acts 2, Spring Play 3, Fall Play 3, 4; Water Show 3; General Science Club 1; See Chicago Club 4; Pep Club 4; Ushers Club 4; Golden Galleon Guild 3; Nilehilite Staff 4; Reflections Revelry 1, 2, 3. GERALD ALLEN VICK National Honor Society 3, 4; Bronze Pin 3; Cabinet 3; Illini Boy ' s State 3; Debate Team 1, 2, 3, 4, National Forensic League 2, 3, 4, Degree of Ex¬ cellence 3; Chess Club 1, 2; Latin Club 1, 2, 3, Council 3; General Science Club 1; Chemistry Club 4; Student Union Board 3, 4; Service Club 1, 2; A.V.A. Operators Club 2; Junior Prom Committees 3; Golden Galleon Guild 4, Board 4; Yearbook General Staff 3, 4, Photograph Editor 3, 4; Magazine Drive Captains 1, 2. VERA VON RAUTENKRANZ Freshman Chorus 1, Girls ' Glee Club 2. Vivace 3; G.A.A. 1, 2; 100% Club 3, 4; General Science Club 1; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Service Club 1; Ushers Club 3, 4; Welfare Committee 4; Homecoming Committees 4; Nilehilite Staff 3. JOSEPH F. VOSMIK Freshman Chorus 1; Bowling 1, 2, 3; Monitors 4. BETTE E. VOSNOS Cabinet 4; H. R. Pres. 2; Spotlighters 1, 2, Sec. 2, Play Crews 1, 2; G.A.A. 1, 2, 3, 4, Minor Letter 2; Water Show 2, 3; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3; Spanish Club 1, 2; Biology Club 4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Service Club 1, 2, Treas. 2; Pep Club 3, 4, Treas. 4; Junior Prom Committees 3; Homecoming Committees 4; Scribblers 1; Bridge Club 4. JAMES WALL Freshman Chorus 1, Boys ' Glee Club 2; Biology Club 2; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4. JAMES WALLACE Transferred from St. George H. S., Evanston, Illinois, 1. KENNETH WALTER Cabinet 1, Pres. 1; Student Council 2; H. R. Vice-Pres. 4; Orchestra 1, Letter 1; Football 1, 2, 3, 4, Shield 1, Minor " N " 2, Major " N " 3, 4; Basket¬ ball 1, 2, 3, 4, Shield 1, Minor " N " 2, 3; Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4, Shield 1, Minor " N” 2, Major " N” 3, Most Valuable 2, 3; ' ' N ' ' Club 3, 4, Treas. 4; Hi-Y Club 2; Latin Club 1, 2; Monitors 4; Service Club 1, 2. LOIS M. WARKENTHIEN Orchestra 1; Concert Band 2; Cadet Band 1, 2; G.A.A. 1, 2; Bowling 2; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3, 4; 100% Club 3, 4 ; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Service Club 1; Pep Club 4; Library Staff 3, 4. JUDITH M. WARNECKE Bronze Pin 3; H.R. Vice-Pres. 4, Sec.-Treas. 4; Freshman Chorus 1; Spot¬ lighters 1, 2, Play Crews 1, 2, 4; G.A.A. 1, 2; Bowling 4; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3; Latin Club 1, 2, 3; General Science Club 1; Biology Club 2; Chemistry Club 4; Monitors 3, 4; Style Show 3; Pins and Pans 3; Homecoming Com¬ mittees 4; Yearbook Senior Staff 2, 3, 4, Chairman 4; Reflections Crews 4. JUDITH WASSON Transferred from South Shore H. S., Chicago, Illinois, 2; G.A.A. 2; Tri-Hi-Y Club 2; Chemistry Club 4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitor 3, JUNE 14, 1956 ... WE ARE ON STAGE FOR GRADUATION As the big moment approaches, Fran Marling, Pat Pierce, and Bob Kennedy don their grad¬ uation robes. BARBARA LOUISE WATERMAN Play Crews 2, 3; G.A.A. 1, 2, 3; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3; Spanish Club 1, 2; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 3, 4; Ushers Club 4; Pins and Pans 4; Scribblers 1; Magazine Drive Captains 1, Magazine High Sales Award 2, 3. ROBERT WHITE National Honor Society 3; Bronze Pin 4; Student Council Alternate 2, 3; H.R. Pres. 4; Debate Team 2; Hi-Y Club 2, 3, 4, Co-ordinator-Chaplain 3, 4; Latin Club 1, 2; General Science Club 1, Vice-Pres. 1; Biology Club 2, Vice-Pres. 2; Physics Club 3; Chemistry Club 4; Student Union Board 3, 4; Yearbook General Staff 3, 4, Sports Editor 4; S.S.S.H. Supervisor 4. JOHN WHITEHEAD H.R. Vice-Pres. 3; Basketball 3, 4, Minor " N " 3; Cross Country Major " N " 4; Tennis 1, 2, 3, 4, Minor " N " 1, Major " N " 2, 3, 4; " N " Club 2, 3, 4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4. PATRICIA WHITESELL Spotlighters 1; G.A.A. 1, 2, 3, 4, Major Letter 3, First State Letter 4, Soccer Mgr. 4; P.E. Leaders 3, 4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Pins and Pans 3. CHARLES ALBERT WICKER Football 1, 2, 3, Shield 1, Miner " N " 2; Swimming 2, Minor " N " 2; Hi-Y Club 2; See Chicago Club 4. JOHN WIDERQUIST H. R. Sgt. at Arms 4; Concert Band 1, 2. DAVID WALTER WILSON Transferred from Evanston Twp. H. S., Evanston, Illinois, 3; National Honor Society 4; Bronze Pin 4; H. R. Pres. 4; Track 3, 4, Major ”N " 3, 4, Captain 4, Most Valuable 4; Cross Country 4, Major " N " 4, Captain 4, Most Val¬ uable 4; Wrestling 3, 4, Major ”N ' ' 3, 4; " N " Club 3, 4; Latin Club 4; Physics Club 4; Monitor 4. TERRY RAY WILSON Transferred from Roosevelt H. S., Chicago, Illinois, 3; Play Crews 1; Monitors 4; A.V.A. Operators Club 2, 3. HENRIETTA WOJNAR Freshman Chorus 1; Girls ' Glee Club 2; G.A.A. 1; 100% Club 3, 4; See Chicago Club 4; Service Club 1, 2. DONALD NORMAN WOLDMAN Transferred from Senn H. S., Chicago, Illinois, 4; H. R. Sec. 2, Vice-Pres. 3; Choir 3; Football 2; Basketball 1, 2; Baseball 3; Spanish Club 1, 2, Treas. 2; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 1. 153 GRADUATION IS THE END AND ... THE BEGINNING. Heading towards the future, Jo Ann Lotz and lack Hagman leave the past behind. JACQUIE WORTHLEY Debate Team 1; Twirlers 2, 3, 4, Letter 2; Girls ' Glee Club 4; National Thespian Society 3, 4, Spotlighters 1, 2, 3, Play Crews 2, 3, 4; G.A.A. 1, 2, 3; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3, 4; French Club 3, 4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Ushers Club 3, 4; Library Staff 3; Nilehilite Staff 3; Magazine Drive Captains 3, 4, High Sales Award 3, Certificate Award 3. LEO WOTAN Bronze Pin 3; Student Council 4, Alternate 3; H. R. Vice-Pres. 3; Freshman Chorus 1, Barbershoppers 4; Wrestling 2, 3; Tennis 2, 3, 4, Minor " N " 2, Major " N " 3; ' ' N ' ' Club 4; Hi-Y Club 2, 3, 4, Sec. 3, Senior Coordinator 4; Latin Club 1, 2; Chemistry Club 4; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Magazine Drive Certificate Award 2; Student Union Board 4. SHIRLEY JEAN YERAMA Transferred from Amundsen H. S., Chicago, Illinois, 1; Bronze Pin 3; H.R. Sec. 2, 4; Freshman Chorus 1; National Thespian Society 3, 4, Spotlighters 2, 3, Play Crews 2, 3, 4; G.A.A. 1, 2, 3; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3, 4; 100% Club 3, 4, Treas. 4; General Science Club 1; See Chicago Club 4; Monitors 4; Pep Club 3; Welfare Committee 3; Style Show 3; Homecoming Commit¬ tees 4; Magazine Drive Captains 3. JAY MARSHALL YOUNG Transferred from Hyde Park H. S., Chicago, Illinois, 3; Bronze Pin 3; Student Council 2, Alternate 4; H. R. President 1, Vice-President 2; Football 1; Track 2, 3; Basketball 1, 2; Latin Club 3, 4; See Chicago Club 4; Mon¬ itors 4; Homecoming Committees 4; Biology Club 2. MYRNA ZLATOS Cabinet 4; Freshman Chorus 1; Spotlighters 1, 2, Play Crews 2, 3; G.A.A. 1, 2, 3; Tri-Hi-Y Club 3; French Club 1; Biology Club 2; See Chicago Club Board 4; Monitors 4; Ushers Club 3; Yearbook Financial Staff 3; Magazine Drive Certificate Award 1; Bridge Club 4. 154 JUNIORS UNDERSTUDY SENIORS . . . Planning for the Junior Prom is an exciting experience for the Junior Cabinet. Standing: Ron Korsan, Ted Swanson, Terry Moore, Den Michonski, Hal Neimer, and Bob Hartig. Seated: Lorelei Schiller, Barbara Thompson, Bob Peterson, Vince Donile, Norm Garland (president), Kaye Eberhardt, Dick Machas, Pat Baumann, Lela Heim, and Mary Meehan. As juniors we entered the upper strata of high school society. Teachers knew us by name. Many of us had the ring of that all im¬ portant boy on a chain around our neck. We were big " wheels. " We began to assume leadership in school affairs as officers of clubs, supervisors and chairmen of study halls, and as experienced members of Student Council. Under the leadership of the Junior Cabinet, the halls of Niles were " decked with holly " for Christmas. To earn money for the Prom, we held two dances, the Cashmere Casual and the Pencil Pushers ' Hoe-Down after basketball games. Recognition for our re¬ sponse to the demands of leadership came to all of us, and especially to that boy and girl " with outstanding character " who received the Hi-Y citizenship awards, won last year by Elaine Shuman and Bill DiGilio. Furthermore, five percent of the junior class was inducted into the National Honor Society. School became more difficult as we looked forward to college and careers. We began to realize that our class rank could make or break us. Our subjects were more specialized as we branched out into the various curricula like engineering, nursing, diversified occupations, or secretarial. Being juniors, we were more active in extra curricular activities. Spring brought Trojan Trumperies, the Washington trip, and the musicale, Student Life. The Junior Prom at the Palmer House climaxed our most exciting year. Sandy Paul and Mary Dell ' Aringa create a Christmas at¬ mosphere by decorating a window with a mural of Santa. 156 WE BEGIN TO ASSUME LEADERSHIP IN SCHOOL AFFAIRS. ROW 1: Harold Ahrendt, Spencer Allen, Loren Al¬ ter, Jerry Altshuler, Stuart Anderson, Arlene Atwood, Richard Aull. ROW 2: Annemarie Bachmann, Alice Baptist, Re¬ becca Barker, Freya Bass, Patricia Baumann, Jeff Beach, Gayle Beckway. ROW 3: Cecilia 6elgarbo. Marion Belue, Stanley Ben¬ nett, Geraldine Berens, Charles Berndt, Benita Berzon, Loretta Berzon. ROW 4: Linda Betts, Dick Beimolt, Marianne Birm¬ ingham, Norman Birndorf, Arlene Blott, Loretta Blue, Geraldine Blum. ROW 5: Alice Bobowski, Walter Bornemeier, Bon¬ nie Bowles, Theodore Brangan, Fred Brill, Wilbur Lee Brink, Jene Brodsky. ROW 6: Joanne Buchanan, Barbara Buckingham. Frank Burenr, Dennis Burke, Judith Burt, Ellyn Bushey, Gwen Campion. ROW 7: Karen Carlson, Karen Laurine Carlson Rita Carmignari, Marilyn Carroll, Marion Carter, George Chabot, Joan Chastain. ROW 8: Ronald Chedeck, James Chrestman, David Cleven, Joyce Cohen, Ronald Cohen, Dorothy Collin, Anne Collins. ROW 9: Joan Comiano, Peter Conrad, Ronald Con¬ rad, David Cooper, Jeanne Cooper, Tom Cooper, Kenneth Cooper. ROW 10: Cynthia Cordes, M. Eileen Corr, Elaine Cosley, Joan Courtney, Scott Crowe, Sarane Crow- ther, Sandra Cummings. ROW 11: Patricia Czerwonka, Joanne Dahm, Mary Lou Daley, Richard Dann, Jerry Davidson, Richard Deitch, Robert Dell. ROW 12: Mary Ann Dell ' Aringa, Kenneth De Mano Joan De Vries, Joyce De Vries, Joan Diebold, How¬ ard Dilg, Sandra Dohnke. 157 FUN PLUS LEARNING MAKE A TYPICAL SCHOOL DAY. ROW 1: Gregg Dolan, Vince Donile, Sandra Dragisic, Dale Dubman, Roger Wayne Eales, Robert Eaman, Kaye Eber- hardt, John Eckmann, Judy Edelstein, Irene Edwards. ROW 2: Bruce Eggersted, Ron Eggert, Larry Elowitz, Bill Enke, Diana Enstrom, Linda Erickson, Janet Erny, Marilyn Escker, Michael Ezsak, Jean Faber. ROW 3: Nancy Falknor, John Feichtner, Sue Feinzimer, Louis Henry Feuerzeig, Geraldine Ficks, Betty Fisher, Helene Fisher, Rosalind Fogarty, Robert Franz, Gary Friedman. t ROW 4: Richard Friedman, Barbara Fronczak, Bernadette Fronczak, Bernadine Fronczak, Joseph Furlong, Gerald Ga¬ bel, Elaine Gannon, Norm Garland, Saralee Garland, Sharon Gaynor, Judy Gelsheimer, John Genz, Barry Gigstad, Barry Goldberg, Walter Elliott Goldstein, Paul Grabow, Donna Kay Griener, Melvin Gross. ROW 5: Bob Grubb, Gayle Gunter, Patricia Hagen, Clarice Halama, Thomas Hallam, Tom Hallberg, Patricia Hamilton, Judith Hanelin, James Harms, Donna Harrigan, Mike Harris, Bob Hartig, Lela Heim, Robert Heinz, Judith Hennig, John Henrici, Georgann Henry, Penelope Hibbert. ROW 6: Liz Hiby, Fred Hooges, Gloryana Hoppe, Cardline Horle, Karen Faye Horner, David Horsman. Diane Horwitz, Kathy Hotchkiss, Virginia Humburg, G. Lawrence Jean, Paul Jensen, Carole Johnson, Glenn Johnson, Robert Johnson, Roger Jones, Marvin Kamensky, Marilyn Kamin, Sandra Karpin. ROW 7: Rosemary Keats, Karen Kent, Wayne Kerstetter, Frank Kiszely, Madeleine Kitchen, Diane Klinge, Carole Koch, Donald Kohler, Joy Kooperman, Ron Korsan, Tom Kostelnicek, Anita Koutny, Sharron Kramer, Dick Krauss, Lawrence Kriete, Paul Kriz, Rhea Kulczyk, Daniel Kussmann. ROW 8: Ellen Lannert, Barbara La Rocque, Allen Larson, George Larson, Roland Larson, Sharon Larson, Larry Laske, Carol Latham. Ken Lawton, Krista Leberl, Jacqueline Leist, Helen Lerman, Rcbert E. Lev, Patricia Leverenz, Michael Levin, Franklin Levinson, Judy Lewis, Pat Lichtenfels. ROW 9: Georganne Liodell, Gail Lieberenz, Lorna Lien, Loretta Lindberg, Judith Liss, Sheldon Litowsky, Doris Loed- ing, Arlene Loewen, Thomas Lucki, Richard Machas, John Mackintosh, Ora MacLeod. ROW 10: Mary Mahoney, Karl Maierhofer, Albert Manches¬ ter, Bob Marciante, Don Marshall, Robert Martin, Mario Mauro, Lenora McColloch, Robert E. McCoy, Michael McGee, Frank McGinnis, Larry McWherter. ROW 11: Mary Meehan, Jack Meier, Joseph Mendera, Davis Metzler, Lenny Meyer, Joel Michael, Don Michonski, Frank Milazzo, Carol Miller, Richard Miller, Sally Miller, Donald Minkley. ROW 12: Janet Minors, Dan Miroballi, Roger Moore, Terry Moore, Jim Morrison, David J. Moser, Dorothy Mueller, David Murie, John Murlas, Mont Nechtman, Helene Neer, Harold Neimer. Surprise! Kathy Waddell " huffs and puffs " to blow out the candles on her birthday cake while Iris Sonkin, Suzanne Waddell, Nancy Phillips, Cecilia Belgarbo, and Leanne See- kamp watch. 159 RAIN OR SHINE . . . THE PARADE GOES ON. Rain and cold didn ' t keep Elaine Cosley, JoAnn Dahm, Joan Chastain, and Lela Heim from representing their homeroom, 106-4B, in the home¬ coming parade. ROW 1: Janice Nelson June Nelson, Richard Nelson, Willard Nelson Jr., Thomas Oiler, Brian Olson, George Ottlinger, Richard Pain, Lynne Palmer, Gerald Pam, Linda Paul, Sandra Paul. ROW 2: Robert Pearson, William Pegausch, Donald Peters, Richard Peters, Betty Peterson, Robert Peterson, Nancy Phil¬ lips, Carol Pike, Janet Pitt, Dorothy Platt, Barry Pokorny, Edward Pollock. ROW 3: Janice Polly, Diane Pomerich, Elizabeth Porter, Iris Portnoy, Ronald Prebish, Jon Price, Marcia Pritikin, Robert Quid, Richard Rasmussen, Roland Recher, Marilyn Reiter, Clarence Reynolds. ROW 4: Roberta Rice, Jerry Richmond, Marie Riha, Philip Robbins, Dennis Roberts, Charlotte Robertson, Bruce Robins, Charles Rogers, Alan Rogin, Natalie Root, Richard Rosenfield, Deborah Rothholtz. ’ ROW 5: Ann Rothman, Phyllis Roubal, Richard Rudick. Geraldine Rudolph, Nancy Ruesch, Alan Rugendorf, Jo¬ sephine Ruh, Lois Runge, Deone Sadewasser, Mike Safranski, Laurie Salomon, Linda Saxon, Nancy Scanlan, Larry Schane, Kenneth Carl Schiffman, Lawrence Schildgen, Lorelei Schiller, Jack Schmidling. ROW 6: Dave Schnur, Mari Schuck, Geraldine Schuldiner, Judy Schultz, Pat Schwandt, Ilene Scott, Dick Scully, Donald Scully, Sonja Sebby, Leanne Seekamp, John Sefick, Ronald Selzer, Mike Shaeffer, Robert Shapiro, Myrna Shellist, Harvey Sherman, Alva Sholin, Richard Siemsen. ROW 7: Lorraine Silverman, Roberta Simmons, Barbara Simonsen, Charles Slack, Gary Slavo, Anthony Slone, Brian Slotky, Betty Smice, Judy Sodemann, Jacqueline Solan, Keith Sorensen, Ann Splinter, Patricia Stanbery. ROW 8: Judy Stansfield, Terry Stark, Ted Steinohrt, Donald Stewart Stevens, Robert Stevens, Carol Stine, Diane Stiska, Juliann Stockmar, Joyce Strauss, Barbara Stryker, Ted Swan¬ son, Mary Anne Swartz, Jayne Thomas. ROW 9: Barbara Thompson, Jack Thornton, Bill Thurwell, Jerome Tokarz, Jim Tomsik, Patricia Topolinski, Matthew Toth, Frank Trapper, Jules Traut, Sandra Treutelaar, Carol Ann Trobeck, Gary Uhlir, Larry Van Mersbegen. ROW 10: Tony Vaos, Charles Vosnos, Suzanne Waddell, Charles Wagner, Edward Walsh, Marie Warda, Harold War- mann, Shirlee Waterloo, Beverly Ann Wauthier, Nanci Weiner, Leonard Weiss, Lois Weiss, Robert Weldon. ROW 11: Frederick Wenthe, George Wenzel, Frederick Wet- tering, Robert Wiener, Betty Wies, Janice Willert, Beth Williamson, Larry Wilson, Maxine Winnick, John Winters, Katherine Wirtz, Arthur Wittkamp, Douglas Wold. ROW 12: Lawrence Wolf, Linda Wolfson, Jay Wollin, Jean¬ nette Woltersdorf, Dale Wright, Robert Wyatt, William Yant, La Verne Yeend, Ron Young, Kenneth Zahn, Adolph Zawis- towski, Dauneen Zeutschel, Larry Ziemba, Bill Zuber. 160 SOPHOMORES ARE NOW PART OF NILEHI Seated around the table making plans for their class Homecoming float are the members of the Sophomore Cabinet: Mary Ann Reese, Manfred Malz, Helen Sitler, Bonnie Clark, Roger Cope, Alex Spiegel, Joe Stout. Carol Czarnota, Ken Smith, Jerry Keidel, Don Samuelson, Phyllis Ponto, Suellen Mills, Jeff Shiff, Lillian Hoffman, and Sheri Olenick. The day finally arrived—we were sophomores. No longer were we looked down upon as " those lowly little freshies. " We found ourselves looking at the freshman class and thinking, " We could never have been that green! " As sophomores we were given more freedom in choosing our cur¬ riculum; we studied specialized courses such as world history, biology, typing, a foreign language, or shop courses. Walking through the halls was no longer an ordeal; we were familiar with the school, the faculty, and our classmates. What made us feel even older was being permitted to eat lunch at Roundy ' s with the juniors and seniors. We discovered that our social life had become " it. " Saturday evenings were no longer spent at home; we attended activities, parties, and dances with the upper classmen. More people than ever came to watch our class teams. Our frosh- soph basketball squad had a better record than the varsity and tied for second place in the Suburban League. When we beat the juniors in the annual J-V game, we were really proud. Our homeroom representatives to the Sophomore Cabinet, elected at the beginning of the year, were kept busy with the float for the Home¬ coming parade and the drive to collect canned goods for an orphanage. Dianne Jefferson, Phyllis Ponto, and Mary O ' Beirne weathered the cold and rain to ride with this huge par¬ rot on Homecoming Day. 162 10B-4A Mr. Phipps Back Row: Ed Jaster, Rodney Swanson, Chuck Macaluso, Carl Trendler, Bruce Fyfe, Bob Guskay, lim Pinkerman. Third Row: John Cummings, Norman Petersen, Gary Surenson, Peter Johnson, Jim Person, Bob Sayles, Brian Curtiss, Glenn Hansen. Second Row: Barbara Hojnacki, Judy Ream, Janet Freschke, Lois Sweet, Mary O ' Beirne, Karen Hine, Diane Halstead. Front Row: Phyllis Ponto, Jonna Kahn, Bar¬ bara Ladd, Jean Weissburg, Sue Raymond. 102G-5A Mrs. Gauer Back Row: Mrs. Gauer, Ruth Newmen, Bobbi Davison, Judy Frankfurt, Sue Elster, Vicki Day, Carole Hillann, Diane Kruger. Third Row: Janet Glienke, Carol Cornelius, Janet Petersoi}, Alice Merwitz, Renee Ba¬ ron, Barbara Kretschmar, Ellene Johnson. Second Row: Anne Marie Czerwonka. Mary Ann Reese, Rosalyn Mindell, Linda Levitt, Barbara Lawson, Linda Shubert, Roslyn Virgilio Front Row: Marge Colella, Penny Matzick, Leah Copp, Barbara Deitch, Twila Wells, Ruth Russel. 108-5A Miss Thompson Back Row: David Nelson, Kent Valand, Roger Stone, Manfred Malz, Donald Eckel. Roy Swanson, Dan Mendelsohn. Third Row: Miss Thompson, Allan Friedman, Robert Piper, Kenneth Haas, Ronald Klein, Gary Meyers, Andrew Peterson, Judy Rin- gel. Second Row: Cecile Bongiovanni, Kitty Mueller, Rosemary Krieman, Lois Ro- dish, Marilyn Kerr, Sharon Slovacek, Doro¬ thy Tellfors. Front Row: Rayna Garfield, Elizabeth Roberts, Judy Reynolds, Nancy Wiser, Donna Lee Swanson, Ann Weber A quiet hour in the sophomore study hall in Room 220 gives us time to relax a little as we think over the highlights of the day or begin to do tomorrow ' s assignments. 163 110-4B Miss Green Back Row: Don Strand, Martin Weisberg, Richard Vick, Don Saunders, Ernest Stapel- feld, Dick Benson, Mike North, Lee Roy Callisen Third Row: Sheron Olenick, Ro¬ berta Lange, Harvey Fink, Brian Gain, Bill Swinyard, Leslie Kittler, Janet Masters, Miss Green. Second Row: Irene Petrie, Phyllis Boyajian, Suzy Schuster, Sarah Smith. Betty Farwell, Lois Gerber. Front Row: Anne Meyer, Anne Glickman, Lois Gerber, Judy Erickson, Elsie Endicott. 212-4A Mrs. Barnes Back Row: Alan Johnson, Paul Kraatz, Hartley Begoun, Alex Maurizi, Robert Hart¬ ley, John Dragisic, Thomas Lowe, Richard Young. Third Row: Mrs. Barnes, James Koch, Dennis Trumble, Patricia Kalmes, Richard Pearson, John McKillop, Jerome Rajski, Leslie Novak. Second Row: Judith Borik, Rosalind Lonn, Mary Cameron, Hel- ga Engelmohr, Jo Ann Bell, Antoinette Panico, Dawn Melchior. Front Row: Jo Ann Haberman, Helen Sitler, Renald Hand, Beverly Shipka, Carolyn Schweig, Vinnie Fazio, Anita Kubowicz. 212-4B Mr. Byram Back Row: Mike Sheahan, Bob Ebbert, Ron Stone, A1 Little, Nelson Cleary, Ron Hall. Third Row: Mr. Byram, Ron Rudolph, Tom Jacobs, Tom Steffens, Joe Stout, Carl Cleary. Second Row: Barry Kalom, Jim Solan, Joyce Gross, Sue Iverson, Marvin Anderson. Front Row: Donna Roberts, Mar¬ cia Wesley, Lorraine Swital ,Carol Gal¬ lagher. 164 ACTIVE INTEREST AFFAIRS. 216-4B Mr. Sorensen Back Row: Mr. Sorensen, Stuart Ahrens, Melvyn Becker, Frank Farrigton, David Cohan, Don Samuelson, Jay Doney, Dan Lang. Third Row: Mike Levine, Arnold Feinberg, Jerry Troesch, Ronald Chez, Jim Gerarge, Charles Fox. Second Row: Ted Straley, Jackie Munry, Virginia Snyder, Jackie Moore, Arlene Tarnow, Janet O ' Mal¬ ley, Herbert Hagen. Front Row: Peggy O ' Neill, Carol Wenzel, Iris Sonkin, Judy Chiet, Sandra Anderson. 217-4A Mr. Hallberg Back Row: A1 Manzardo, John Bobera, Ed Green, Robert Schulte, Jack Berg, William Meneilley, Phil Letourneau. Third Row: Paul Trowbridge, Burton Feingold, Barbara Blackstone, Sandra Bischof, Charles Green, Denny Williamson Second Row: Patricia Tillery, Joanne Otiepka, Ed Anderson, Bar¬ bara Norris, Suellen Mills, Judith Bolin. Front Row: Jean Jacobsen, Sandra Schmi- ckl, Karen Nordlof, Marilyn Carlson. 219-5A Mr. Rambis Back Row: Frank Ness, Richard Freiden Scott Etter, John Ostermeier, Paul Carder, Melton Arbit, Charles Richards. Third Row: Mr. Rambis, Ralph Ahrens, Tom Rueckert, Alan Sussman, Herbert Wasserman, Frank Salomon, Bill Savas, Jim Eischen Second Row: Dick Jagieklo, Davida Frishman, Vir¬ ginia Van Beek, Judi Godell, Marilyn Car- arretta, Ann Finzel, Charlene Lascody. Front Row: Judy Swanson, Carole Elenew- ski, Barbara Wolff, Phyllis White, Renee Limbos. Homeroom Christmas parties mean grab-bags, ice cream, cookies and lots of fun. Helen Sitler, Dick Young, Bob Hartley, Allan Johnson, and Judy Borik trim their tree for the festivities. 165 222-5B Mr. Mackey Back Row: Louis Glenn, Howard Carna¬ han, Ernest Malone, Jerry Adams, James Kinsey, Robert Johnson, Dave Wicker. Third Row: Mr. Mackey, Bob Ketelsen, Irving Capitel, Dennis Willie, Charles Hansen, Kenneth White. Second Row: Gary Spain, Russell Reuter, Thomas Arney, Charles Kadish, Gerald Shulman, Dale Gullian. Front Row: George Grist, Robert Konowich, Richard Ablin, Robert Janis. 222-4A Miss Butler Back Row: Bob Glassberg, Lennie Larsen, Jim Vanderelde, Jim Jensen, Larry Messe. Third Row: Jessie Bridges, Carol Stier, Jill Linn, Susan Bell, Stan Banash, Miss Butler. Second Row: Ted Darch, Jean Miller, Ray- nette Brown, Jeff Schiff, Ken Grubb, Leon Biedrzycki. Front Row: Marlys Johnson, Nancy Farnham, Barbara Hogan, Adrienne Lee, Barbara Koppman. 309-5B Mr. Welch Back Row: Terry Tobin, Roy Swenson, Hans Jung, Alan Gertenrich, Owen Reebie, Glenn Herriott. Third Row: Bernie Can- nata, Ronnie Deahr, Jim Smitham, Dick. Pankey, David Turner, Jerry Symon, Mr. Welch. Second Row: Carol Czarnota, Vir¬ ginia Stegmeyer, Betsy Denker, Bill Con¬ nell, Kay Crouchley, Karma Gillespie. Front Row: Nola Knepper, Betty Matayka, Diane Courtright, Anita Aver. 166 314-5B Mr. Botthof Back Row: Peter Horsman, Jay Bulaw, Charles Richardson, Jerry Gaugham, Roger Cope, Bill Hillman, Victor Kastil, Claude Koszuta. Third Row: Mr. Botthof, Bonnie Smith, Joyce Kortanek, Wallace Maede, Alan Berberick, Bonnie Polen, Arlene Mat- son. Second Row: Barbara Gorden, Bever¬ ly Crist, Linda Freasier, Lucy Tiseth, Judy Shakman. Front Row: Leah Kaplan, Diana Cavallari, Dee Wulff, Tony Greene, Judith Gilbert. 316-5B Miss Harrison Back Row: Jim Iverson, Dennis Marines, Bob Barkin, Bob Marks, Peter Tworoger, Dennis Wegl, Bob Oliphant, Jerry Bushier. Third Row: Jim Pitt, Miss Harrison, Dick Marshall, Bob Calkins, Joe Forman, Keith Abell, Don Brei, Jerry Keidel. Second Row: Jim Chandler, Pat Koehler, Barbara Brodd. Roslyn Radke, Diane Fesselmeyer, Sherry Annex, Orlyn ' Thorn. Front Row: Linda Ward, Nancy Plotnick, Gloria Mengarelli, Mary Walker, Carolyn Janis, Carol Bonnie, Pat Moskal. 321-5B Miss Loranger Back Row: Bill Ihne, John Hederick, Gary Krauss, Allan Kessler, Richard Guess, Rog¬ er DuMay, Bill Ahlberg. Third Row: Miss Loranger, Bill Bell, Walter Leitherer, Edson Brock, Don Manaugh, Erling Fossum, Douglas Ward, Dennis Caird. Second Row: Jean Dunn, Rhona Grant, Rochelle Libert, Lillian Hoffman, Susan Painter, Susan Broscoe, Nina Nipper. Front Row: Carol Ahrens, Helen Ahrens, Ruth Rosenfeld, Ju¬ dith Henry, Dolores DiDomenico, Sally Gannon. Sophomores George Grist, Dick Shu- tan, and Jerry Adams prepare to go on stage during Reflections with their take-off on The $64,000 Ques¬ tion. 321-5A Mr. Bost Back Row: Mr. Bost, Roger Franz, Richard Shutan, Gene Tillery, Bob Hedberg, Dick Hodgkinson, Alex Spiegel, David Blatt. Third Row: Harold Ruttenberg, Tom Hunt, Ronnie Johnson, Bob Farnham, Joe Gabel, Bill Rakowski, Lawerence Ruttenberg. Sec¬ ond Row: Patricia Bacher, Rosemary Leo- zer, Ann Ida, Linda Cowan, Robert Gran- berg, Carol Anderson, Bonnie Sielski. Front Row: Beth Kurti, Georgeanne Rateike, Bar¬ bara Jeske, Susan Trendel, Mary Elliots, Margo Calamaras. 323-4A Mr. Hoff Back Row: Howard Gordon, David Mor¬ gan, Russell Kofoed, Allen Stiefel, Robert Zuber, William Ticha, Carl Larson, Mr. Hoff. Third Row: Thomas Baumann, Earl Arnold, Ronald Carlson, John Gear, Rich¬ ard Peterson. Second Row: Francine Bud¬ nik, Carole Selzer, Patsy Poppenhagen, Mary Lou Gengler, Elizabeth Wood, Arlene Bush, Diane Jefferson. Front Row: Patricia Cirkle, Carmella Panico, Dale Pickell, Paula Grant, Donna Bistolfo, Marjorie Gar¬ ner, Sharon Richman. 325-5B Miss Kleinschmidt Back Row: Ronald Oliver, Richard Leban, Tom Paulus, Carroll Eichhorn, Ralph Pop¬ penhagen, Steve Cowan, Fredric Nierinck, Daniel Rosen. Third Row: Alfred Canter, Dennis Blevit, John Beyer, Bruce Westgate, Arthur Kasch, Frank Fortuna. Second Row: Miss Kleinschmidt, Susan Weiss, Bonnie Levinson, Elizabeth Hampel, Lyla Kaplan, Judy Southern. Front Row: Joan Matheson, Bonnie Clark, Bonnie Peterson, Paula Gold¬ berg. 168 FRESHMEN . . . NEWCOMERS TO THE EXCITEMENT OF NILES. The Freshman class cabinet is composed of a representative from each homeroom. Organ¬ ized in the second semester due to the increased freshman enrollment, these students learn the duties of a cabinet and discuss student problems. Standing: Dick Iverson, Steve Fox, Judy Comiano, Gene Fogarty, Nancy Lotz, Douglas Spengler, Mimi Stone, Bill Anderson, Ronald Krone, Miss Toivola and Mr. Wenzell (freshman advisers). Seated: Linda Randel, David Kreinich, Penny Boom, Judy Sonne, Carole Silvermen, Keith Krause, Judy DuBonn, Harmon Motch. Who will ever forget the confusion of those first unforgettable weeks! It seemed as if we would never become accustomed to the bewildering schedules, large building, crowded halls, and new classes. My mid October, however, the strangeness began to wear off. The boy next to us in study hall was " Dick, " not just somebody in a blue shirt. The frosh-soph mixer helped to break down our feeling of in¬ feriority. Some of the school spirit rubbed off on us, too, when we saw how excited everyone was about our football win over Proviso. We were becoming a part of Nilehi. In our classrooms, too, we felt less strange. Our first talk in speech class had us shaking from head to toe, but after we knew our class¬ mates better it wasn ' t quite so bad. The Kuder Preference Tests given in our social studies class gave us a new look at ourselves. We were surprised to discover that some of the girls would make good mechan¬ ics, while some of the boys looked promising in home economics. As we look back on those first days we can laugh about the em¬ barrassing moments of walking into the wrong classroom or forgetting our locker combinations. Soon we ' ll be selling " elevator passes " to the new freshmen and sending them to the third floor via the base¬ ment, knowing that we could never have been so " green. " The first day of school was " D Day” for fresh¬ men, who received instructions from freshman advisers, Mr. Victor Wenzell and Miss Aune Toivola. 10B-4B Mr. Basrak Back Row: Robert Dziadula, Klaus Schnei¬ der, Jerome Gould, George Behr, Carl Shoemaker, Harry Masek, Gwen Johnson, Mr. Basrak. Third Row: Norman Levander, Ken Trobeck, Douglas Marshall, Peter Ellin, Terry Koenig. Second Row: Gail Sullivan, Paula Cohn, Bob Dilg, Charlotte Witt, Jean Kandl, Carol McGrath. Front Row: William Ruesch, Lenore Otte, Evonne Millet, Noel Ostrom, Mimi Stone, David Anderson. 21-4B Mr. Fink Back Row: Bill Anderson, John Felt, Roger Ketelson, James Flannigan, Robert Hauss- mann, Mr. Fink. Third Row: Ruth Capian, Judy Santner, Harriet Paskind, Beth Sav¬ age, Janet Nilson, Susan Stockmar, Dennis Dettloff. Second Row: Sheldon Kirschner, Pat Reem, Judy Wilson, Margaret Minx, John Nelson, David Kloepfer, Ralph Cola- no, Gerard Jorgensen. Front Row: Bruce Maxson, Eddie Frisk, Joel Frandzel, Rich¬ ard Hartzell, Marie Peterson, Kathy Smith- am, Cathy Waddell. 110-4A Miss DiTullio Back Row: Larry Milner, Bruce Herkert, Albert Ceh, James Coursey, Thomas Do- browolski, Terry DeVries, Sennett Tzinbert, Bruce Stein, Ronald Schultz. Third Row: Karen Council, Marla Tabel, Karen Bran¬ denburg, Carol Cominsky, Robert Foster, Alfred Heppner, Sheldon Harris, Arthur Lawrence, Lynne Anderson Second Row: Michael Weingart, Roberta Young, Patte Painter, Nancy Schramm, Mariana Marks, Gayle Siemund, Leslie Hutchings. Front Row: Bill Hankner, Tobey Archer, Nancy Campion, Judy Comiano, Anne Santis, Victor Bernell, Miss DiTullio. 210-4B Mr. Haubrich Back Row: Robert Levin, James Tansor, Gene Fogarty, Sherman Horan, Larry Weinbrelt, Aaron Bloch, Mike Sachs, Carl Loescher. Third Row: Ronald Wanke, Bur¬ ton Roseman, David Graham, Berry Duke, Jerry Enenstein, Carl Siegel, Gene Gold¬ stein, Mr. Haubrich. Second Row: Anne Cusic, Ronald Ruehrdanz, George Elliott, Eileen Wainberg, Carol Christensen, San¬ dra Goldstein. Front Row: Nancy Kutz, Marilee Motis, Joyce Burdsall, Judy Pouzar, Bonnie Mill, Bernice Murphy. 170 216-5B Miss Schmidt Back Row: Donald Kemnitz, Carole Silver- man, Donald Hansen, Lou Janson, Tom Conners. Third Row: Don Wagner, Joel Piell, Merry Jo Alfredo, Kate Barnhart, Bar¬ bara Soltis, Bob DeWitt, Penny Johnson. Second Row: Diane Davis, Carol Herdrich, Warren Fritz, Sue Herter, Jeffrey Habich, Mary Ann Jacobs, Donald Schultz, Van Bradley. Front Row: Judy Sonneborn, Ju¬ dith Evans, Jeanora Melzer, Harmon Motch, Bill Gutowsky, Marcia May, Miss Schmidt. 217-4B Miss Hatscher Back Row: Lewis Lichterman, William Nettleton, Arnold Goldstein, Jack Alesia James Alexander, Richard Thomas, Dennis Schultz. Third Row: Miss Hatscher, Leon¬ ard McGee, Stephen Hawk, Jay Doniger. Joe Edwards, t Gerald La Barbara, Dan Virnich, Fred Foss. Second Row: Carol Ol¬ son, Eugene Snyder, James Henderson, Sharon Hunt, Karin Walde, James Peder¬ sen, Jon Vraney. Front Row: Patricia Nel¬ son, Judith Sonne, Iris Johns, Abby Gold¬ smith. Pam Stann, Aoby Paris, Beverly Laing. 221-5A Mrs. Elkins Back Row: Mrs. Elkins, Leslie Lange, Ar¬ thur Ricordati, Kenneth Hoppe, Myron Mor¬ gan, James Stellas, Gerald Beckway, Don Dethlefson. Third Row: Diane Dinitz, Ju¬ dith Landerholm, Pricilla Carlson, Rhoda Goldberg, Ginger Golden, Rita Berens, Barbara Pam, Dixie Nelson, Karen Mag- ner. Second Row: Robert Eckblad, Charles Wheat, Richard Harrison, Leonard Rosen¬ berg, Warren Wise, Michael Skolnik, Bar¬ ry Mink Front Row: Lynne Hicks, Elea¬ nor Schramm, Judith Matter, Lynne Eggers, Susan Korshak, Annette Demas. 223G-5B Miss Oehler Back Row: Irmgard Clapperty, Betty Stine, Ellen Mae Waywot, Karen Hansen, Mary Jane Biesman, Jeannean Babcock. Third Row: Linda Slade, Louise Faber, Paula Harvis, Carol Schiller, Mary Ann DeMarco, Maureen Olney, Sandra Massel, Wyn Dor- rian. Second Row: Karen Hehn, Jaunita Miguel, Dorothy Lullo, Marilyn Kuchar, Karen Julian, Judy Kaselow, Kathlyn Lar¬ son. Front Row: Sharon Dean, Janice Cher- ner, Diana Shenfish, Lynn Breen, Gertrude Knoedler, Marilyn Barnett, Natalie Johnson 171 225-4A Miss Nutt Back Row: Neal Shapiro, Gary Roubinec. Kert Artwick, Sue Burger, Ronald Henrici, JoAnne Walski, Barbara Lowry, Bronna Medwed. Third Row: Barry Lund, Ron Den- lev, Bob Drella, Bill Tomsik, Melanie Lewis, Mel Shapiro, Carolyn Roltgen. Second Row: Earl Guenther, Kent Krause, Linda Weinberg, Carolyn Kuchar, Keith Krause, Henry Sienkiewkz. Front Row: Christine Michaels, Jim Streiff, Linda Hubbard, Mi¬ chael Fisher, Willa Bryen, Sherrill Wil¬ liamson, Miss Nutt. 301-5A Miss Ray Back Row: Diane Kussman, Roy Johnson, John McGinnis, Michael Magit, Mike Le- Vine, Riley Morgan, Charles Ragland. Third Row: Joan Eggersted, Merle Druck, Mary Mead, Joyce Milbrandt, Barbara Fisher, Marlene Derman, Ann Stern, Jo Ruschli, Miss Ray. Second Row: John Cooper, Ronald Linick, Alan Hoffenberg, John Rutherford, Steve Orton, Allan Bir- holtz, Ira Tadelman, John Nechistak, Jim Stanberry. Front Row: Jerri Hardt, Sylvia Rushin, Sandra Limbos, Gail Buchanan, Marcella Schmidt, Carrie Melone. 310-4A Miss Lawson Back Row: Ray Thinggaard, Greg Howe, Clifford Schey, Dave Kutok, Marvin No- reen, Don Cosley, Larry Ortt. Third Row: Miss Lawson, Darlene Stollstorff, Sandy Wexler, Barbara Krumsieg, Sandy Schmidt, Linda Camacho, Liz Ellis. Second Row: Donna Akerlund, Adell Troesch, Connie Slavo, Kathy Jackson, Mary Rae Kimberlin, Marilyn Kozak, Nancy Lotz. Front Row: Michael Winter, Fred Weil, Stuart Laff, Dennis Sullivan, Jack Maloney, Jim Allen. 312-4A Miss Gustafson Back Row: Richard Iverson, Kirk Hopper, Glenn Kuehn, Robert La Frentz, Axel Denk, Norman Carbery, William Johns, George Willard. Third Row: Robert Fields, William Nack, Robert Mann, Donald Lewiston, James Browder, Robert Kruger, Joel Baker, Miss Gustafson. Second Row: Georgie Webster, Jacqueline Faust, Patricia Thuy, Alice Pazen, Judy Link. Front Row: Dolores Ricci, Donna Norman, Ann Raglan, Shari Fishman, Sheila Erdmann, Louise Wright. Sandra Kagan. 172 314-4A Mrs. Robinson Back Row: Mylan Malina, William Haerle, Steve Garbo, Frank Didier, Ray Thomas, Joe Schiller, Stuart Jacobson, Donald La- sine. Third Row: Mrs. Robinson, Howard Alter, Stanton Frishman, Lewis Ezsak, Keith Ransom, Steve Foerster, Bill Cher- tack, Eugene Deters, Judy Dubonn Second Row: Marcia Hagman, Joseph Siciliani, Mary Lee Isel, Robin Dorr, Sandra Klehr, Barbara Rowan, Ann Ward, David Jarvis. Front Row: Paula Rudich, Susan Goldberg, Alice Holstein, Jayne Cieszykowski, Bar¬ bara Wessendorf, Kathleen Campbell, Su¬ zanne Hulse. 317-5B Mr. Harvey Back Row: Mr. Harvey, Jim Lewis, Myles Mattenson, Wayne Brummer, Paul Merz, Ron¬ nie Lis, Joel Carr, Jerry Gross. Third Row: Bruce No rgan, f Harvey Sarnat, Hirsch Levin, Bill Eggert, Sam Pearson, David Kreinick, Mat Ruxton. Second Row: Evelyn Zuiker, Jinx Mandel, Barbara Weichmann, Dennis Dibos, Nancy Conrad, Nancy Swanson, Harriet Lucas. Front Row: Barbara Gerich, Pat Kmety, Phyllis Groah, Barbara Konkey, Carol Dankowski. 312-4B Mr. Palmer Back Row: David Magnuson, Lance Lindquist, Duane Creviston, William Reading, Mitchell Portugal, Arthur Sigel, James Schwandt, Mr. Palmer. Third Row: Ronald Krone, Harvey Goldstein, Neal Siegel, Ted Bristol, Keith Lar¬ son, Steve Wollack, Steve Rioff, Sharon Wor- dell. Second Row: Sue Debes, Penny Maier, Anthony Riccardi, William McDowell, Karen Korol, Elizabeth Kriz. Front Row: Katherine Walter, Elaine Schwartz, Carol Bendoff, Ar¬ lene Ptaff, Diane Singer, Leila Rudolph. 319-5B Mr. Mattka Back Row: Jim Hager, John Griner, Don Nel¬ son, Ralph Madden, Dick Heinz, Fred Herzon, Howard Herber, Mr. Mattka. Third Row: Bill Maryanski, Nancy McAvoy, Richard Genth- ner, Jim Biancalana, Linda Randel, Delores Nied, Phyllis Lerman, Jan Chester. Second Row: Eddie Copp, Dick Diener, Denise Kario- lich, Kent Mason. Linda Olson, Shirley Harris, Patty Teichert. Front Row: Michael Singer, Herb Eklund, Judith Mesh, Nancy Mongardt, Terry Annex, Bill Manahan, Sue Sprigel, Cherie Habib. 322-4A Mrs. Moran Back Row: Allan Gold, Richard Jornd, Bob Nelson, Douglcs Spengler, Robert Fiacco, Michael Banks, Bill McGrath, Wayne Powers. Ihird Row: Mrs. Moran, Neil Ricci, Steven Rosen, Gregory Thomas, Allen Escher, Alan Lane, Gary Weiss, Kenneth York. Second Row: Lowell Weil, Robert Borchers, Gayle Littrell, Lori Norris, Barbara Jacob, Judy Hardowski, Phyllis Fenton, Margaret Kern. Front Row: Barbara Barabas, Susan Backus, Karin Even- son, Georgia Miller, Christine Banas, Patricia Dravus, Faith Peterson. 325-5A Miss Hall Back Row: Norman Messer, Mike O ' Donnell, Don Sporleder, Neil Paul, Carl Bonfiglio, Mark Johnson, David Block, Donald Douglas. Third Row: Miss Hall, LeRoy Schanz, Carol Seneco, Charlotte Cooperman, Barbara Wirtz, Arlene Hervi, Penny Boom, Tony Peitramale. Second Row: Donna Levinson, Lana Glikman, Linda Burkhart, Jocn Norberg, Judy Kaiser, Corrine Pritchard, Elizabeth Laiho, Nancy Ribken. Front Row: Jean Berg, Bonnie Schroeder, Judy Chavin, Barbara Kaste, Carole Povlo, Elaine Pass. 329-5B Miss Stemp Back Row: John Carlson, Steve Fox, Stanford Smevold, Richard Bourgerie, John Hager, Rich¬ ard Bentley, Richard Kihlstrom, Bob Hansen. Third Row: Miss Stemp, Judy Gruber, Kay Naylor, Virginia Mehring, Leandra Mattio, Bonnie Martin, Howard Anderson, Karen Rosenquist. Second Row: Lawrence Schwartz, Bruce Locher, Jim Papandrea, Ken Crost, How¬ ard Blackstone, David Honis, Richard Lam- mersfeld, Henry Novoselsky. Front Row: Susan Ohren, Gail Nelson, Susan Levin, Harlean Zimmerman, Judy Kuklin, Sharon Buckman, Marilyn Neuman. 174 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS A student yearbook is a record of the year: the 1956 Reflections portrays this year as an exciting one in all phases of school life. With forty additional pages and a full-page colored picture, we ' ve tried to make you feel the excitement of our world—Nilehi. Our thanks go to Mrs. Mary Ida McGuire, sponsor of the general staff, who helped in the planning and copy-writing; to Mr. Ronald Van Arsdale, sponsor of the finance staff; to Mrs. Lucille Barnes, sponsor of the Senior Section; to Mr. Koenig of the Norman King Publishing Company; and to the photographers of Root Studios. Our personal thanks, also, to the faculty for their patience and cooperation. Without these people and their aid, this book would never have been possible. Linda Morse, Editor-in-Chief Barbara Neuman, Editor-in-Chief NILES TWP. HIGH SCHOOL, SKOKIE, ILLINOIS


Suggestions in the Niles Township High School East - Reflections Yearbook (Skokie, IL) collection:

Niles Township High School East - Reflections Yearbook (Skokie, IL) online yearbook collection, 1953 Edition, Page 1

1953

Niles Township High School East - Reflections Yearbook (Skokie, IL) online yearbook collection, 1954 Edition, Page 1

1954

Niles Township High School East - Reflections Yearbook (Skokie, IL) online yearbook collection, 1955 Edition, Page 1

1955

Niles Township High School East - Reflections Yearbook (Skokie, IL) online yearbook collection, 1957 Edition, Page 1

1957

Niles Township High School East - Reflections Yearbook (Skokie, IL) online yearbook collection, 1958 Edition, Page 1

1958

Niles Township High School East - Reflections Yearbook (Skokie, IL) online yearbook collection, 1959 Edition, Page 1

1959

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FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
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