Niles High School - Tattler Yearbook (Niles, MI)

 - Class of 1922

Page 1 of 160

 

Niles High School - Tattler Yearbook (Niles, MI) online yearbook collection, 1922 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1922 Edition, Niles High School - Tattler Yearbook (Niles, MI) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1922 Edition, Niles High School - Tattler Yearbook (Niles, MI) online yearbook collection
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Page 10, 1922 Edition, Niles High School - Tattler Yearbook (Niles, MI) online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1922 Edition, Niles High School - Tattler Yearbook (Niles, MI) online yearbook collection
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Page 8, 1922 Edition, Niles High School - Tattler Yearbook (Niles, MI) online yearbook collectionPage 9, 1922 Edition, Niles High School - Tattler Yearbook (Niles, MI) online yearbook collection
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Text from Pages 1 - 160 of the 1922 volume:

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K. .El ,' '1 1. 1 1 1 , 1 if 1 :V ,I QQ 2-. lpn A -4 'L V., ,ie . iff? Q' if sf' I', -:M 'L 1,,,- ,A V, , -i, 'U If 14 rr ,, w. f 'f 'A f 4 ri iL.', .yn 11, 4 5. . 9 Q .X-, , Y. X,- V J . -Q1 . ,ag ,, 75. 1, N, ,. N si .,,, . THE TATTLER YEAR BOOK THE SENIOR CLASS OF NILES HIGH SCHOOL s X ,If NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-TWO 'C' FOREWORD WE, the Tattler Staff, in publishing this annual hope to live up to all ideals for which Niles High School stands. In the following pages we have tried to include those things which will be of interest to everyone and which in the years to come will bring back memories of 1922. ,fa i , .H fl wx!! - -Fry ,. fl! ! DEDICATION WE, the class of nineteen hundred twenty-two, respectfully dedicate this issue of the Tattler to Hilah L. Allen, Margaret M. Durham, and Walter J. Zabel, our Senior Advisers, and to Adah E. Milligan, our Tattler Editorial Adviser, in appreciation of their help during the past year. E51 Board of Education A. W. HUDSON ---- J. W. WOOD - W. I. TYLER - - MRS. F. W. RICHTER W. N. BURNS - l61 President Secretary Treasurer Trustee Trustee I c SUPERIN Tnlumhia Univ O. W. HAISLEY, A. M. '17 c-rsity, TENDENT OF s I T I CHOOLS The Tattler Staff Editor-ill-C11 fqf Ca lcfndar Ed itofr Calefndnfr Ed itor Atlzletif' ECIljftIT Snupslzot Eclitor Poem Edihw' Joke Editor Art EfZIjtf?T - Business Mctnugcv' - Associate Business .7WfINl'l,Clgf'?" Associate I-!usz'1'1vss Md,7Lfl,gC'T Associrltf' Business Manager Qfficiul Typist - Qfficial Typist - - Faculty Edzforiul Adrriscr Faculty Hz1s1fm'ss Ad visor S Maurice L. Brenner - Adelia Bird Helen Moore - Gilbert Otto Gertrude Otto Mae Marr Verna Luth David Bennett - Wilbur Sargent Daniel van Noppen - Jennie Howe Bernice Brown - Josephine Skalla Kathryn Shouder Adah E. Milligan Walter J. Zabel lfll C. R. MACDONNELL, A. PRINCIPAL Hanover College, '13 SCIENCE HILAH L. ALLEN, A. University of Michigan HISTORY WILDARENE ANDRUS, Michigan State Normal, '21 HOME ECONOMICS ELLA CHAMPION Western State Normal School, ART I10l B B. B. 'o MARGARET M. DURHAM, B. S Northwestern Univ.-rsity, '16 ENGLISH MARGARET G. HAMILTON Michigan State Ncrmal, '16 COMMERCIAL M. VERNE HARRIS, A. B. Kalamazoo College, '20 ENGLISH ADELIA HOBBS, A. B. University of Michigan, '20 MATHEMATICS T111 HOWARD H. JACKSON Western State Normal, '12 MANUAL TRAINING MARY JANE KNEESHAW, B. S. University of Illinois, '18 HOME ECONOMICS MIRIAM KOBLER Columbia Normal School of Physical Education PHYSICAL EDUCATION LENA LARDNER MUSIC l12l FLORELLA L. MACKAY, A. University of Michigan, '18 LATIN AND FRENCH HORACE B. MERRELL Bradley Polytechnic Institute, '17 MANUAL TRAINING MILDRED LIND MERRELL Bradley Polytechhic Institute, '17 HOME ECONOMICS ADAH E. MILLIGAN, A. M. University of Illinois, '21 Monmouth College, A. B. ENGLISH E131 HELEN M. PLATT Western State Normal, '17 PUBLIC SPEAKING AND DRAMATICS LOIS RYNO, B. A. Lake Forrest College, '21 SCIENCE MARGUERITE SCHNEIDER, B. A University of Michigan, '18 COMMERCIAL HAZEL SNUFF, M. A. University uf Illinois, '18 Noithwestern College, A. B. HISTOILY l14l FLORENCE TALBURT, A. B. DePauw University, '11 LATIN AND ENGLISH DOROTHY TICHENOR, A. B. University of Michigan, '20 MATHEMATICS L. S. WALKER, B. A. Kalamazoo College, '16 DIRECTOR OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION WALTER J. ZABEL, A. B. Universify of Michigan, '19 ECONOMICS AND MATHEMATICS L 13 I Class of '22 CLASS MOTTOf Possumus quia posse videmur. We can because we think we can COLORS- Blue and White. ADVISERS- W. J. Zabel, Hilah L. Allen, Margaret M. Durham. OFFICERS- President-John Burkeg Vice-President-Harry Leeg SecretaryMMarie Frizzog TreasurerYWilbur Sargent. llfil ill L E JOHN G. BURKE ".1oHNN1E" "I have loved three whole days together, and am like to love three more, ilflt prove fair weather. " President Class '20 '22 Vice-mfsiilent '10 '21 Lambda Si,Q,'ina Lit. '10 '21 Orchestra '20 '21 Junior Play '21 Senior Play '22 Glev Club '20 HARRY D. LEE "WORM" "I wish when I"m at table My feet would touch the floor. " Vice-presidt-nt c-lass '22 Basketball '20 '21 '22. All Stale Center '22 Football '21 Baseball '10 '20 '21 Captain '22 Junior Play '21 MARIE LOUISE FRIZZO "JACK" "Where surrlmer's song rings hollow, and flowers are put to scorn." President Glee Club '22 Vice-pre-siclent Advisory '22 Treasurer Class '20 Secretary Class '21 '22 Secri-tary Advisory '20 '21 Glas Club '10 '20 '21 '22 "Feast of Little Lanterns" '20 uIill'!,'2' lione's llau,e:htor" '10 "Windmills of Holland" '22 May Festival '10 '20 '21 Gym Show '20 '21 Lambda Sigrrna Lit. '10 '20 Basketball '10 '20 '21 '22 F. WILBUR SARGENT "WILL" "We loved with a love that was more than love, lurid my Annabelle Lee. " Board of Control '10 '21 President Advisory '21 '22 Business Manager Junior Play '21 Business Manager Senior Play '22 Business Managqer Tattler '22 Trwasurt-1' Class '21 '22 Lambda Sigma '10 1181 4 4 DONALD ALLERTON "DON" 'I lzave a reasonably good earjbr 'lll'IlS'l-C. H JOHN R. BARRETT "JACK" Some Scholar 1vho's hofzzrly expecting his lecwmng. " Bu se Ball '20 ALDEN L. BAYLES Sigh no more, laclzfes, sigh no more, Men were deceivers ever. " .luniur Play '21 Smaiur' Play Gym Shun' '20 '21 Glfw Ulub '20 '21 '22 Surge-nt at Axnxs. Iizmlula Sigma l.i1. '20 EDGAR BICHRENS "EGGS" This new life is likely to be Hard on rl gayjifllow like me. " ll91 DAVID S. BENNETT "DAVE" On the stage he was natural, simple, afecting, Twas only that when he was ojhe was acting. " Junior Play '21 Senior Play '22 Board of Control '21 Tuttler Staff '22 Glee Club '21 '22 Gym Show '20 Lambda Sigma Play '19 ADELIA ELIZABETH BIRD "DEDE" Full ofjancy, fun, feeling, or spiced with satryic. " Treasurer Le Cert-le Francaise, lleortleld Shields H. S. '19 French Play IT. S. H. S. '19 President Lambda Sigma '20 Samurdi Society 1.1. S. H. S. '1!J Junior Play '20 Secretary Board of Control '22 Tattler Staff '22 MAURICE L. BRENNER USKINNYU H 7 Nower so busy a man as he there n as And yet he seemed busier than he was. " Lambda Sigma Lit. '19 '20 President Class '21 Gym Show '20 '21 Board of Control '21 Chairman Board of Control '22 Editor-in-chief of Tattler '22 Track '20 ARNEAL BROWN HBROWNIEY' Softly speak and gently smile. " Glee Club '21 '22 i201 I 1 BERNICE BROVVN HBERNIEH "Pretty to walk with, witty to talk with, And nice to think about." Secretary 62 Txwzisuiu-i' Class '10 Xl L' H it Svi'r:etzii'y 'M 'Treasurer XV. S. X ' 1-1 G -l. L. . .. lrgince Festival '20 Rl. ll. S. Girls A. A. 159, 20 M. U. H. Latin Play Ill. C. H. S. .lunior Play '20 '21 Basket Ball '21 '22 Glee Club '21 I'i'eSi1,lent Ailvisury '22 xvlCt'-lll'E'Slflk'llt Amlv Tattlm-r Staff '22 Senior Play '22 isory '21 CERETO COCHRAN 'ASWEETIEU "But down in her heart I know She's not so slow." S. b. 19 Basket Ball Granville ll. S. '20 . Literary Sooic-ty '21 Pri-Simle-nt Advisory '22 Gym Show '20 WALLACE COLES "wALL1E'l "Putting all jokes aside, Fm cz se guy." .luniur Play '21 ETHEL L. COOPER HTOOKH "It's gutd to be merry and wise, "It's guifd to be honest and true. " Glee Club '20 "Kim: Ilene-'s llailzxliteru '20 "Feast of Little Lanterns" '20 Kill riou s MILFORD CREVISTON HSFUD" 'KThou sajzfst an undisputed thing In such a solemn way. " Junior' Play '21 Tlwusurm' Class '21 '22 Rozxrd of Fontrol LEVVIS E. DARLING HRELV' "Here's hfurfrah for the football player and the honor and fame he bears." Baseball '19 '20 '21 IC. H. S. XviCE-I1l'GSlllL'l'lf Class '21 IC. H. S. Vice-ywesimll-nt Advisory '22 Flmtball '22 Track 'E 2 CECELIA DUDLEY 'lDUD" Hlfinol earth not gray but rosy, Heaven not grim butjair of hae. Basket Bull '20 Glee Club '21 THOMAS A. DURM "TOM" "I holol he loves me best who calls me Tom " fll'f'll9Sll'il. '22 Glee Ulub '22 1221 ,, 1 CARRIE MAUDE FORREST "And can I ever bid these-joysfrzre 'well ?' ' 'Z'1wasi1i'er Class '20 Junior Play '21 S:-niui' Play '22 Bziskilt Ball '20 '21 Tre-zisilre-1' .-Xflvisury Birzlrfl of Control '22 Gym Show '21 MARGARET L. GARRETT "A primrose by a ri'Uer's brim " l mee Cum '20 "Fvast uf the Little Lanterns" "King Ilenafs lHl.ll!.1'llI4-'IJ' '21 MARY HELEN GARDNER " What a thing isj'i'1'er1dship, World without end. " Lainlulzt Sigma Lit. 'lil '20 Glee Club EILEEN GRAHA M "Ji-:RRY" Here's to the lass of the classy And! the class ofthe lass." Glev Club 'lit '20 Iiilnlula Sigina Lit. 'l5l '20 Gym Show '20 "Fi-ast uf tht- Little Lanterns" '20 .r l23j BEATRICE GORTON "BEE" "There was a lady lived in a hall, Large 'ln eyes, and slim, and tall. " Lambda. Sigma. Lit. '19 '20 G-lee Club '20 Basket Ball '20 '21 Gym Show '20 '21 IONE E. GUYBERSON "RED" President Ulass '21 B. H. S. Treasurer Class '19 B. H. S. BERNICE GUYOTT "PIG" " When joy and duty clash Let duty go to smash." Secretary Class '19 F. P. H. S. Freshman Play '19 F. P. H. S. Basket Ball '19 '20 F. P. H. S. "Feast of Red Corn" '20 F. I". H. S. Senior Play '22 ZORAH C. HAHN "Shy as the squirrel that leaps among the pine-tops." Glve Club '22 I 24 1 l- ln1 ISABELLE J. HAIN UIZZIEH "Why should I study and make myseU' crazy?" Lambda Sigma Lit. '19 Basket Ball '20 '21 '22 Love Pirates of Hawaii" '20 King' Rene's Daughter" '19 Feast of Little Lanterns" '21 "XVinclmi11s of Holland" '22 Gym Show '20 '21 Glee Club Treasurer of Advisory '21 4. u HYLA HEALEA "BILLY, "The good are always the merry Save by an evil chance, And the merry love the fiddle And the merry love the dance. " JOHN O. HOFFERTH 'AI am, not always a man Qfwoe. " Senior Play '22 .luniur l'la.y '21 Lambda Sigma Lit. '19 JENNIE HOVVE "Let man say what e'er they will, Woman, woman rules them still. " Vice-president Class 'l!I B. H. S. Gym Show '21 Junior Play '21 Sl'l'1lUI' Play '22 Vice-president Aflvisrwy '21 l'l'QSlfl6'Ilf .lrlvisory '22 Board of Control '22 Tattler Staff '22 E251 KATHLEEN KANE HKANE" "I could be better, iflwould, But it's awjid lonesome being good. Baskot Ball '20 '21 '22 Glae Club '10 '20 "Feast of Little Lanterns" '20 Lambda Sigma Lit. '10 '20 Gym Show '20 '21 RALPH L, KIZER "It's wiser being good than bad, It's sotfe-r being nieeker than jierce, It's fitter being sane than mad." VEHNA M. LUTH USHORTYH 'tSoniebody's been up to something." Basket Ball '19 '20 '21 '22 "Feast uf Littlu Lanterns" '20 "Lovi- Pirates of Hawaii" '20 Uhziinpionsliip Tennis '21 Gym Show '21 Tatllei' Staff '22 C-lee Club LEVI S. MANGES "Concei11e what I must have been at fowrteen. ,, 4 Glue Club '22 I 26 1 MAE H. MARR "I know a maiden fair to see Tuke care. " "King liene's l7aug'lit91"' '20 Feast of Little Lanterns" '20 Lovt- Pirzitf-s of Hawaii" '21 "Vx'lHtl1Tll1lS uf I'l0ll21l1fl" '22 Gler- Club '19, '20 '21 '22 Lambda Sigma Lit. '19 Tattlel' Staff '22 5. 4. MARJORIE MASON UMARGEH "lf she will, she will, you may depend 0n7t. !! Ushe won't, she won't, and that's an end on't. " Basket Ball '20 '21 '22 Glee Club '20 Gym Show '21 Lambda Sigma Lit. '10 '20 "Feast of Little I.antli'ns" '20 HELEN MOORE " With tears and laughterjor all time. " Lambda Sigma Lit. '20 ' Junior Play '21 Gym Show '21 Basket Ball '21 '22 Tattler Staff '22 MARY NEVVBERG "MuRRY" "IL's the songs ye sing, and the smiles ye wear That's a-makin' the sun shine every- where." I're:-:irlent Advisory Junior Play '21 Board of Control '21 '22 Gym Show '21 G1.e Club '21 E271 GERTRUDE N. OTTO HGERTH 'AI am now past the craggy paths of study and come to the flowery plains of honor and reputation. " Treasurer Latin Club '19 Gym Show '20 Basket Ball '21 '22 Oratory '21 Secretary KL 'Treasurer Advisory '22 Glee Club '22 "XVir1dmills of Holland" '22 Tattler Staff '22 GILBERT F. OTTO '1AGmco1,A" 'A noisy man is always in the right." Lambda Sigma Lit. '19 Oratorical Contest '21 Board of Control '21 '22 President Chess Club '21 Gym Show '20 '21 Football '22 Track '20 Captain '21 '22 Senior Play '22 Tattler Staff '22 HARVF1 PENWELL "HARv" "Hail foo' a gay fellow like me." Male Sextet '21 H. H. S. Football '20 '21 Track '20 KATHRYN A. SHOUDER "KATE" "Happy afre thou, as if every day thou hadst picked up a horseshoe. " First Honor Student Lambda Sigma '19 Tattler Staff '22 i231 nz JOSEPHINE A. SKALLA "Jo" An ounce of -mirth is worth a pound of sorrow. " Iillllhllil Si,a:'ma 'IU Tattler Stuff '22 Gym Show '21 PERRY C. SPENCER tHe hardly drank tea without a strat- agem. ' ' Gym Show '21 Frmthull '22 'l'1'2iL'k '22 EBON E. ULLREY 'An honest man's the noblest work of God. " GEORGIA UMHOLTZ My book and heart Shall 7'L6L'6l'1?l1'I't.H Lambda Sigma Lit. '110 '20 I 29 I DANIEL VAN NOPPEN "DANNY" "And even the wise are merry of tongue." .lunior Play '21 Seniur Play '22 Lamluln Sigma Lit. Play '19 Treasurer Class '21 Glee Cluh '21 Board- of 1'unt1'rl '22 Track '21 'ZZ Football '22 RUTH E. VISEL "RUFUs" "I am cz part of all that I hmfe met Second Honor Student .luniur l'1ay '21 ftrchestrzl '21 '22 Lambda. Sigma Lit. 'lf' LYNNE VVEAVER 'tLet h,1"m not cease an instant to be htn1seUl " Urcllestra '21 Junior l'l.1y '21 MALCOLM B. VVEAVER "We do not what we ought. What we ought not we do, Anal lean upon the thot, That chance will bring us thvuf' Truck '21 '22 I 30 1 MARY LUCILLE VVILLIAMS "And her dark eyes,-how eloquent. " Lambda Sigma Lit. '10 SELBY A. WILLS "A1'n't he cute? " Treasurer of .Xxlvisury '22 FRANCES LUCILE VVINN ' Iakilllbflli Signm Lit. 'lib "T1LLi1s" 'I love herjor her smile, her look, her way." Sl-4-rotary Ak TI'l'2iSLll'l-31' of ,Xflvisrwy '21 lflev Club 19 '20 '21 '22 Bwmiwl nt' Coutxul '22 l'1'e-siulent of Aflvisury '22 ZELDA E. ZIMMERMAN "SKlNNY" as 1 Oh, may Ijoin the 'choir invisible? ' llhmles Scholar '10 Glue Club '1!I Vice-president Lztmhmlzt Sigma Lit. '19 Kirg' lienefs lPaupL:'l1tQl"' '20 Love Pirates nf Hawaii" '21 Fuast of Little Lanterns" '21 XVimlmillS of Holland" '22 XYlP6-Dl'6SlllPI1t Glue Club '20 '21 '22 H .. .- l31l Voyage of '22 In the year of 1919, in the month of September and on the 7th of the said month, after voyaging on the sea of "Grammar Grades" we landed on the coast of "The Niles High School." It was a wonderful land full of opportunities and we were well pleased with the sight. Our crew was a goodly one with John Burke at the wheel and Miss Allen as captain, with first and second mates, Durham and Zabel, as the latter's able bodied assistants. We also had a very experienced chaplain and advising pilot, Brother Brenner. Our crew altogether consisted of fifty-nine able bodied people. We were all over-joyed at the sight of land, for we had been sailing on a troubled sea for days and days. Some had been in far distant parts and others in our own ship, but finally through numerous circumstances we were thrown together, and all reached our destination in the stated year above. We then started our little colony on the "Niles High School Is- land" and called it the Class of '22, a very fitting name indeed. We were unaccustorned to this life, so it took us our first year to become settled and acquainted. The other inhabitants of the is- land paid little attention to us except to reprimand us for misunder- standings and things that were not our fault. They were an over- whelming people and we green ones could not do much against them in a form of self protection. Well one year passed and we were getting-used to our island life. We became more contented with it, and our heads began to swell a little from praises. We gave a few entertaining dances and parties in o-ur colony, and were pleased with the success and ap- pearance of them. These little things caused the inhabitants in the other colonies to take more notice of us. Some of them even said CI mean the wiser onesj that We would be the leading colony on the is- land some day. We did not think much of it at the time, but it was brought back to us in later years. The second year passed and we were now the second leading colony on the island. The leading colony then was the "Colony of '21" and the one after was the "Colony of '23." The "Colony of '20" had mc-ved from the island and had separated into distant "College Mainlandsn where they said were oHered greater 'opportunities We did not believe them very much at the time because we were busy with a great reception for the leading colony. Very elaborate prep- arations were being made for the great occasion. On the evening of the festivity the palace ball room was decorated in very dazzling colors and festoc-ns. Palms were grown in the ballroom court, and sweet smelling flowers were strewn among the palms and festoons emitting sweet c-dors and making a general air of coolness in every nook of the grand ball room. A foreign orchestra was hired from l32l 1 the mainland to play for us. It could not be surpassed. Before the ball the "Colony of 21" was entertained at a great and elaborate ban- quet, managed by our ladies and chefs. The guests seemed to relish everything offered them. After they were through eating, our lead- ing citizens from our colony and the leading ones from theirs gave very amusing and charming speeches. Then we all repaired to the ball room. The people stood agast at the sight of its magnificence. When they all marched into the hall to the sweet strains of the or- chestra, the swing of the dance was on. At the mystic hour of twelve the clock in the palace tower tolled its warning to the people to go to their abodes for it was not safe to be out after the witching hour. After the people were all out, the lights were switched off and the great ball room lay in a still semi-darkness with only the moon peeping through the window to witness the lonely decorations. The "Colony of '21" became dissatisfied with the island life and so they, too, moved to the college mainlands, leaving us the leading citizens of the island. This is now the year of 1922, our fourth year on the island. We are now the most respected colony here. We publish the only mag- azine on the island and call it the "Tattler." It is such an elaborate book that it takes us one year to publish it. We all contribute to it. We moreover have gone in for dramatics and have produced an excellent play, that has made us famous throughout the island. Yet we are getting more restless on our island home and want to see the mainland and its treasure. The "Colony of '23" hears of our intentions of leaving and gives us an elaborate reception similar to ours of '21. We are so enticed that we want to stay on our island home, but we have made our decision and cannot go back on it. A week after the reception we are called by the mayor of the island and given our passports to our "College Mainlands" across the water. He gives us an inspiring speech. Tears well in our eyes and we wish not to leave our home and its old companions. Never- theless at the close of the year we embark on our boat again on the "Sea of Life" into the "Land of Colleges" and greater opportunities. -David S. Bennett. I 33 l Class Will '22 We, the Class of '22, of the Niles High School,- County of Ber- rien, and State of Michigan, being of sound mind and disposing memory, do hereby make, publish, and declare this our last will and testament, hereby revoking all former wills, bequests and devises of whatsoever nature by us made. 1. To Mr. Haisley we leave a loving memory of the largest class which has ever left Niles High. 2. To Mr. Macdc-nnell we will a "BIG RED BOOK" which tells about holidays, parties, freak days, etc., to be read in assembly When he has finished his "LITTLE BLUE BOOK." 3. To the rest of the faculty we leave old note books, and the sincere hope that the joy of teaching in the wonderful new build-- ing will comfort them to some extent after losing us. 4. To the student body we leave quiet halls between periods in accordance with one of the psalms in the "BLUE BOOK." 5. To Junior High we leave the old desks in the school build- ing providing they treat our initials with all due respect and rev- erence. 6. To the Juniors, as a class, we leave our shining example of an ideal Senior class. 7. To the Sophomores we bequeath the right to have five parties a week, providing they study one hour one other night and don't stay out later than ten the last night. 8. To the Freshmen, who must remain in Junior High, we will the right to lord it over the lower grades of said organization. 9. Unto Dora Peters, Maurice Brenner wills his copy of "How to Live on 24 Hours a Day." 10. Unto Ruth Condon, Zorah Hahn bestc-ws her modesty and quiet demeanor, hoping that it will be used conscientiously. 11. Unto Olive Kay, Zelda bequeaths all her giggles and Kathleen Kane bequeaths the aforesaid, Olive Kay, all of her hilarious conduct. 12. Unto Wilma Asmus and Lydia Belknap, we bequeath con- dolences and the heart felt sympathy of the entire class in the loss of their dear friends, Gilbert, Cereto, and Alden. 13. Unto Donald Allerton, Lucille Winn wills all her books on etiquette that he may perfect his already blameless courtesy and politeness. 14. Ruth Visel, one of the violinists, in the Senior class, be- queaths her chin rest to Ella Ream and her bow to Beatrice Curtis. 15. Carrie Maude Forrest bequeaths her pep and enthusiasm to Bessie'Hendershot. 16. We bequeath the assembly waste basket to Mary Trask in order that she may keep her desk cleared of papers and in a con- dition which will conform with that of an ideal Senior desk. l34l 17. Unto- Bernice Mutz, Josephine Skalla wills her sweet dis- position. 18. Unto Marshal Brenner, who is called Mush, we will a sack of corn meal. 19. Unto George Contois, Malcolm Weaver bequeaths his athletic ability, knowing that George was very dissatisfied with the mark he received last semester. 20. Unto Alex Hunziker, Marie Frizzo wills her electric curl- ers with instructions on how to use them. 21. Unto Clete, Hank, Faj, Eddie, Tommy, Foxy, and Jiggs, we will our Honor students' big A's so they will not have to worry about eligibility next year. 22. Unto Robert Calvin, Helen Moo-re wills her position as assistant French teacher, on condition that he make Esther Rough refrain from giggling, while he is in power. 23. Unto Zorah Eisele, Lena and Ferne Houseworth, we will first choice of all the new Freshies in order that they may find some one who can take Ralph's place. 24. Unto Arlene Stout, Mae Marr bequeaths her baby talk, on the condition that the afore mentioned Arlene Stout use it on all occasions. 25. Unto Dorothy Huntley and Wilma Otteson we bequeath an undying friendship like unto that of Jennie Howe and Bernice Brown. 26. Unto Loleta Ruckman, Helen Babcock, and Isabelle Fisk we bequeath permanent seats at Richters' in place of seats in the assembly. . 27. Unto Helene Skalla we bequeath a portable dance hall which may be set up or taken dc-wn at a minute's notice. 28. Unto Arlie Hatfield we bequeath a place all her own in Ward's truck. 29. Unto Gertrude Powell we bequeath Mary William's posi- tion as Miss Schneider's assistant. 30. Unto Casper Grothwohl We will a pair of rubber heels, and a bottle of brilliantine, and a box of po-wder, in order that he may becc-me even more popular and beloved in Dowagiac. 31. Unto Ruth Hood, Verna Luth bequeaths her athletic ability. 32. Unto Pauline Moorhouse, lone Guyberson wills her nickn name "Red" and her right to be bright at all times. 33. Unto Josephine Wilkinson and Catherine Jefferson we will a second "Brook Farm" where they may write sto-ries to their heart's content. 34. Unto Martha Roberts, Marjorie Mason bequeaths the right to defend and protect, at all times, all members of Mr. Zabel's advisory. 35. Unto Esther Rough we will all rouge and pc-wder left over from the Senior Play. 36. Unto Howard Cook, we will the right to continue to as- sist Miss Durham in keeping class room order by taking charge of any particularly noisy group of girls which he wishes. 37. Unto Leslie Boulton we will the continuous position of janitor at the Christian Science Church. l35l C 38. Unto Gordon Clark we will an undying love for Kathleen ox. 39. Unto George Crumb we bequeath the right to fall in love with underclass women. 40. Unto Demott Fisk, Red Darling bequeaths his ability to play football. 41. Unto Russel Finley we bequeath the right to make the re- maining students yell their loudest to try to make up for losing us, the lusty Class of '22. 42. Unto Mark Ullery we will all the gum left sticking on the seats in hopes that it will cheer him up a little. 43. Unto Genevieve Gerald and, Janice Barron we will the right to sit together every assembly period and during all classes. 44. Unto Glynn Skally we bequeath the red tie worn by Gil- bert in the Senior Play in order that he may be more noticeable. 45, Unto Dayle Clevering we bequeath a copy of "Stolen Kisses." 46. Unto Harold Asmus we will a baseball bat on condition that he use it to help win all the games that Niles High plays next year. 47. Unto Harriet Bullard we will a shorthand pony to take Marjorie's place. 48. Unto Florence Cook we will a pad of signed excuses so she can skip whenever she pleases. 49. The blond Senior girls will Leslie Shoemaker their hair nets which aren't torn too badly to be used again. 50. To Ben Brown we will the right to be a sub-Latin pro- fessor and hope that his instruction will nc-t be fatal to any of his victims. 51. To Margaret Kane we will all our books with stretched bindings so she can carry cookies, suckers, etc., about without at- tracting the teacher's attention. 52. Selby Wills bequeaths to Chester Erickson his place be- fore the looking glass. 53. To Frederick Richter we bequeath a fan to keep himself cool while arguing on disarmament, taxation, bobbed hair, etc. 54. To Frederick Fisher, Wilbur wills a brake, which Anna- belle doesn't want any more, to keep back any rising ambitions which may come to him. 55. To Lucille Beebe, Bernice Guyott wills her giggles. 56. To Erna Garlenger we will all the explosives we have left lying around in the laboratory to try to disturb her usual calm- ness. In Witness whereof, we have hereunto set our hand and seal this eighth day of June, A. D., nineteen hundred and twenty-two. CLASS OF '22. Signed, sealed, published and declared by the said Class of '22, as and for their last will and testament, in the presence of us, who, at their request, in their presence, and in the presence of each other, have hereunto subscribed our names as attesting witnesses to said instrument. -Walter J. Zabel. Margaret Durham. Hilah Allen. l36l Heaven A Senior is a Senior for all time. So when we see Maurice Brenner seated at a table industriously working, we at once rec- ognized him as a Senior. Everything is peaceful. Which is as it should be. As Senior? Maurice: Danny: Maurice: So enter Gilbert, very oratorically: Jennie, rushing in and pointing to Maurice, then Wilbur and Selby: John and David: M aurflce: Mr. Shakespeare says .... what is hc-me without a ACT 1-1928 Things have gone finely, all heaven is well Since I've done the work of St. Gabriel. All heaven is happy, there's scarce a dissenter. Is that someone knocking? I say comrade enter. I say old thing there's some men at the gate. They loc-k rather hardened..shall I tell them to wait? Hard looks matter little, 'tis human to sin. Don't stand there so stupid, I say let them in. Gilbert, David, John Burke, Wilbur, and Selby. I have spoken to princes, consorted with kings, Assisted at making most wonderful things, Played dunce to the ladies, played sage to the learned, And now wish the rest I most surely have earned. To help rule in heaven may sound very quaint But it's really quite tiresome to marry a saint. The world calls us crazy and doubtless we are. We tried hitching our cars to the dim eastern star, And had almost succeeded when dawn brought the day And our work became hampered. There were clouds in the way. We were booksellers brave and bold Routed from houses manifold. We hounded the tenant, his purse to attack When John left the front door. .I entered the back. There is rest for the married man, rest for the crooks, But where is there rest for the man who sells books? Thy sojourn in heaven will cleanse thee from taint, And instead of plain Mister, you'll all be called Saint. E371 A call from withoutg Wally Coles comes in: Ho! St. Maurice why cc-mmeth thou not? As Herald of heaven, most hard is thy lot. I sadly remember the days that have passed When I was the deacon. .the pride of my class. But hasten! now in yonder nook, Awaits fair Carrie Maude the cook. Her cake tastes like bullets, her coffee like glue, You'll starve if yc-u don't eat and die if you do. Exit all. ACT 2-SAME SCENE Everything is silent. Softly, softly comes Ralph Kizer follow- ed by his group of chorus girls. .They are all familiar. .Bernice Brown, Eileen Graham, Beatrice Gc-rtcn, Helen Moore, Marjorie Mason and Marie Frizzo. Ralph: The world is coming to an end, or so the news has ,E t spread. n er I heard it in my earthly home and here my chorus Zelda, led Tommy D5 You told us that as chorus girls we'd have to change our guise. If we can't be chorus girls on earth. .we can in paradise. Eileen: Stay yet a moment. As you happened to pass, ' Did you see any members of our old Senior Class? Bernice B5 Oh girls, I'd forgotten, I saw Kathleen Kane. And she's running a tea room with Isabel Hain. They serve lobster salad and mince pie with pop. And are really quite good for a celestial tea shop. Mg,y'ie.- I too, can tell what has happened to some. Ruth Visel is trying to- abolish fruit gum. Ethel and Margaret are learning to fly, And Zorah is cleaning the stars in the sky. For a light in the heavens they are using Ione And Ebon is running an old lady's home. Lucile, poor child, is tuning her harp, And striving to tell a fiat from a sharp. The news of the reunion has spread so gradually that more and more people assemble. Bernice G: Why when I saw Steiner and he cried, "Don't for- sake me," I said, come above, St. Peter will take thee. But he held out his youngest and said with some vim, He'd been married six years, there was no rest for him. I saw Katheryn go walking abroad with a Spitz And staying at rooms in the heavenly Ritz. E381 Edgar B: Adelia B: Alden B: Adelia: Alden: Bernice G: Enter M. B: I can't find Red Darling, where did that boy go? Why Red is a preacher..Didn't you know? He's teaching the heathen that if they will but try, They too can be Seniors in the sweet by and by. If it isn't Adelia! why 'tis long since we met. And the next time you see me will be much longer yet. I heard yc-u had proven the earth really round And were given an A. B. for your learning pro- found, And Edgar is doing his own little bit By being a clown in a vaudeville hit. I'm running a paper called the Heavenly Truth, My reporters are Hyla and her friend Verna Luth. But we've lost our subscribers who tell us forsooth That nothing is heavenly that's as bad as the truth. Attention! we've just received news from below That the rest of our friends would be rather slow. The Bachelor Maids' Club meets c-nce again And a pie eating contest is holding the men. So each of you go to the work assigned you, And leave me in peace. .I'm busy too. But Maurice at his work of keeping the celestial books is soon disturbed. Once again Danny comes. Danny: M. Beg pardon sir, for breaking your rule. There's a man who would enter. .the man teaches scho-ol. A teacher. Ye Gods. .He shan't enter heaven Though his pull should be that of seventy times seven. They burdened our lives when we tried our best, So now take him away. .far from the rest. Bc-th M. and D. are wrathful. They make a very determined exit. Suddenly frc-m the background comes a sound. Some one is calling not loudly but determinedly. Voice: Harry! where are you, I say Harry Lee. And wonders of all wonders! the huge Morris chair which has all this time been turned to the wall is wheeled around and HARRY LEE untangles his legs. Harry I hear my wife calling. .can it be she wants me? I wandered in heaven. .How pleasant it seemed At my own class reunion. .alas I but dreamed. I won't tell my wife. .she would only condemn For the source of one's trouble. .Cherchez la femme l Curtain. E391 Class Song Hail to our colors so steadfast and trueg How proudly they wave in the air. The bonny white stars on a background of blue Give courage to do and to dare. In sports and in scholarship we are the bestg The hills will re-echo our name. 1 The banner of victory fling wide with zest To tell the whole world of our fame. CHORUS: So a cheer for the lads who have conquered, And a cheer for the lassies so true. As comrades we've weathered together- Hurrah for the class of twenty-two. Here's to the classmate whose friendship we m The years have been proof of your might. Here's to your spirit so nobly displayed In championing always the right. And thee Alma Mater will be but more dear, When memories only will reigng Knowing we'll owe to thee year after year The goals that your pupils obtain. -Mae Marr. l 40 1 ade W JU .M , I N f i! . , ' :Zff f' "if . f f I . . ' 'W ff 1 ' X . f 4, N lj F5 ,w Y X f 1, f 'f ff, 4, 7 Af ,lf VE' A x ' I ,X X , Wx li ' Jf xg 5 ,. ' ' 7 WM f' ff ' mi 'L I., , 1 ' E35 we vi, 1" V u 1 T :nw pw ,ff X N, ,. M in SEQ' 4 22 ' a,i ':2 ' ' N-Q1-YH ' .f 1 1 , 423. ffm Af '.'1:Zw'.r'f,,: ' . Hit' u 7""ir " 'HQIEJ QW? ' ,phd mi p , ivy1,,,46f gff',1 4 ,15 F - - . :wig P, ' , Q f 5' 1 L X F 'f' " ,,,-,J 'fwiff jf' 9332197 , " " 'Milf' F' ," 'F"f'i'S4'1 il. ' X 'f I ' ff - + ll lIrWf + 1, If , XX 'ln' 'A My ,501 5 QQY I! 3J'?:7'2'5Qzvq,sJ,-ll 119 A ' S l , f 21 x" 35 4.5 Z' 'fn Yi, W L .fflfi m nl MW, s ..,,,- W. .,,-. LN, ! W .mlfw WW 4: lt. , fa ., , 'A v, g- '- f n 'WN W if ff la Y f -L f' 4. ,,,E7N da ,H ' I' P f Q -I wi ig Iv gfwf, . iq' J ,f " "ff-J gl ! , A, X ' f fl, ,v. ,,,Z,?," 1 f 2- fx cg,NTf-oc -!,s-iJ ., 4 X iff S- W5 '-Thai" X 7 "if Mfff ,,-tai? I , 1 11411 JUNIOR CLASS Class Roll CLASS OFFICERS Junior Class Alexander Hunziker . . . President Casper Grathwohl .... Vice President Genevieve Gerold .... Secretary Dora Peters ....... Treasurer CLASS COLORS Violet and Gold CLASS ADVISERS Mary J. Kneeshaw, Mildred Lind Merrell H B Merrell Donald Allerton Harold Asmus Wilma Asmus Helen Babcock Janice Barron Lucille Beebe Lydia Belknap Leslie Boulton Marshall Brenner Ben Brown Harriet Bullard Robert Calvin Edward Chambers Gordon Clark John Clevenger Dayle Clevering Florence Cook Ruth Condon George Contois George Crumb Beatrice Curtis Harland Curtis Chester Erickson Zora Eisele Thomas Farrell Russel Finley Demott Fisk Isabelle Fisk Frederick Fisher Frank Forrest Mildred Franz Erna Garlanger Genevieve Gerold Mar Casper Grathwohl Arlie Hatfield Bessie Hendershott Ruth Hood Lena Houseworth Fern Houseworth Dorothy Huntley Alexander Hunziker Catherine Jefferson Margaret Kane Lloyd Krueger Gladys McCo-y Mildred Miars Pauline Moorhouse Bernice Mutz Wilma Otteson Dora Peters Gertrude Powell Ella Reum Frederick Richter Martha Roberts Esther Rough Lolita Ruckman Henry Schrumpf Leslie Shoemaker Helene Skalla Helen Shetterly Glyn Skelley Arlene Stout Mary Trask Mark Ullrey Gerald Wedel Jc-sephine Wilkinson guerite Zimmerer I 43 1 Class of '23 lWith Apologies to Poe. J It was many and many a year ago, In our high school you see, That a class came in whom you may know As the class of '23g And this class came in with no other thought Than to get out as soon as could be. First they were Freshmen, green as grass, In our high school you see, But they were as happy as they were green, This class of '23g And they played and said that they'd get through As soon as could be. And this was the reason long ago, In our high school you see, That a hand reached out of the office, grabbing Some of the class of '23 And sending them far away from school Sooner than we'd be. And then they cruelly shut the door, on The too playful of '23, Those that remained, were wise and stuck, To the class of '23, And grew to be Sophs, then Juniors, Just like you and me, And worked and prayed to get out of school By nineteen twenty-three. And our class was better by far than the class Of those far older than we, Of those far wiser than weg And neither the Board of Control, Nor the weighty faculty, Will ever again expel any of us From the class of '23. The year will never arrive, while I'm alive without Memories of '23. The time I spent and the things I lent, To those in it with meg But when we've learned the rule and departed from school Bound for life, as genius or fool, We'll continue to praise to the end of our days- The CLASS OF '23! -Catherine Jefferson, '23, I44l SOPH .1 l 1 SOPHOMORE CLASS Class Roll CLASS OFFICERS Sophomore Class Clayton McCoy . . . ............. President Henry Mason . .. .......... Vice President Alene Whisman Secretary and Treasurer CLASS COLORS Black and Orange CLASS ADVISERS Marguerite Schneider, Forella Mackay, L. S. Walker Maxine Allerton Dorothy Bachman Russel Berg Charles Benjamin Clayton Boht Neva Boller Dorothy Brown Gertrude Burns George Camp Dwayne Clevering Kathleen Cox Loretta Corey Stella Emberger Harold Eycleshymer Ethel Fedore Gladys Franz Donald Gardner Muriel Geltz Mildred Glossenger llah Hart Martha Hall Evan Haslan Donald Hoisington Virginia Jarm Glen Jones Alan Johnson Olive Kay Wesley King Ruth Kinney Beatrice Lahey Ruth Long Carl Marston Thora Martinson Everett Madison E471 Henry Mason Clayton McCoy Arthur Morley Hester Moore Margaret Moon Ethel Montgomery Lester Neib ' Dominic Nemeth Martin Otto Richard Otstot David Pammel Inez Pankow Margaret Parent Lawrence Plym Pearl Richardson Emory Rose Edward Reum Carson Schumaker Mildred Schlundt Esther Scheibach Jack Secor Max Siegel Mildred Sparks Mary Smith Eleanor Teller Edward Troost Marion Ullrey Thelma Vose Marjorie Vose George Weaver Alene Whisman Thelma Wolfe Lloyd Young Theron Young We of '24 We're the mighty Sophomores, Ready to show our zest To help the dear old hi school Of c-ur "Alma Mater," N. H. S. We came into junior hi school Full of hope and pepg We've done nothing of any importance But there's lots of time left, yet. Then we joined the Freshman class, Where everyone thought us slowg But they soon found we were bound to pass In spite of the hardest foe. We accustomed ourselves to senior hi And began to enjoy it toog The praise of the upper classmen won't die Since we've showed them what we can do When our Freshman year was finished, We were waiting, we thought, in vain, 'Cause our vacation would not diminish, So that school could start again. Finally thc-se long mc-nths passed, And we came back to our lesson, Then others looked up to us, at last, For we kept the Freshies guessin'. And now we are true "Sophies," Only two short years are left, To let all the others see That we can do c-ur best. And though we have been rather slow, We'll make a strong home score, Improving each day as we go, For we are the class of '24. -Allene Whisman, 'QL I 43 l PRES!-IIVIAN 'XO r N FRESHMEN CLASS I 50 1 CLASS OFFICERS Freshmen Class Edward Zwergel .... ....... P resident Robert Burns .... Vice President Mary Burns .... ....... S ecretary Erma Loveland . . . ..... Treasurer CLASS COLORS Royal Blue and Silver. CLASS ADVISERS Helen Platt, Adah Milligan, Howard Jackson. Alexander Abraham Lucile Allerton Vernon Armstrong Leon Asmus Lorraine Asmus Raymond Asmus Robert Astley Ila Augustine Fred Austin Lucile Bachman Nettie Bachman Blanche Ballard Peter Baran John Barman Frank Barron Eileen Behrens Simeon Belknap Stanley Bigelow Annetta Brockhaus Arden Brenner Beatrice Brunk John Bruycher Donald Brown Beatrice Bucher Lauris Burge Mary Burns Robert Burns Camilla Butler Blanche Cameron Earl Clark Charles Crabill Class Roll Jean Crabill Harold Crain Joseph Coffman Slater Coleman Edith Coons Thelma Cook Verlin Davis Loren Dittmar Beatrice Dudley Helen Dunning Margaret Dunning Doris Eager Rexford Earl Marguerite Ehlenfeldt Lewis Ehninger Ruth Everman Charles Fandre Marion Fisher Esther Forler Kingston Fox Kathryn Franz Peter Frizzo Annamarie Garlanger Dorothy Geideman Lyle Giddings Robert Groat Anna Fay Gilson Margaret Griffith Malbourne Hall Raymond Hanson John Hargraves E511 Richard Hain Marvin Harger Robert Harger Alva Hart Irene Hartman Mildred Harvey Fern Hood Elaine Huntley Muriel Huntley Leah Henderson Vera Hoffman Pearl Hunt Betty Jauch Evelyn Jenkins Josephine Jenner Alden Jones Albert Kale Irene Kelley Julius Johnson Helen Kehoe Lura Kepler Lawrence Kendrick Velma Kiblinger Frederick Kiger Georgianna Kingston Ida May King Charles Kirk Raymond Knauf Joseph Krajci Rachael Krinowitz John Lagoni Benjamin Larsen Lois Lamberton Mae Lewis Rosalie Lauder Dorothy Linsenmier Josephine Leggett Harold Logan Marion Luth Luella Mandeville Frederick Marshall Mildred Mapes Kenneth McConnell Roger Mattix Winifred Merritt Eva Messinger Gladys Meyers Daisy Mitchell Mary Eleanor Moon Raymond Morris Harriet Moore Thelma Moorehouse Louise Morgridge Milliard Murphy Evelyn Murphy Aleta Ostrander Arthur Pfeil Florence Pfister Lillian Pfister Alice Platt George Platt Earl Pierce Frederick Powell Mary Sophia Powers Margaret Prenkert Thelma Pressnall John Raymond Russell Renbarger Ernest Repine Edna Reum Wavle Reum Fredonna Roberts Dorothy Rose Roland Saffran Eloise Saum Harriet Skalla Elizabeth Sewell Elmer Schrumpf Lawrence Schrump Carl Schwartz ' Margaret Schmidt Anne Siegel Russell Shoemaker Evertt Sharp Hilles Smith Helen Smith Alton Snui Irene Solf Raymond Spansail Marion Starke Vernon Stowe Donald Stowell E521 'K Opal Strahle Thero-n Tade Mildred Teske Junior Thompson Kenneth Thornton Henry Towar Lyle Ullrey Catherine Ullrey Milton Updike Frederick Vandenburg Harold Van Tassel Genevieve Van Tuyl Anita Visel Bessie Voglesang Helen Ward Marguerite Weaver John Weaver Mabel Webber Cleo Wideman George Wideman Elna Wilcox Burdette Wilson Flossie Williams Roscoe Windbigler Hartsell Withers Jerome Wood Lucian Wood Robert Womer Edward Yoss Edward Zwergel Our First Steps We, the people of the Freshman Class, Are of one big jolly mass. The history we're about to tell We're sure will explain us very well. We agree it was quite a treat In the Niles High to obtain a seat, For Miss Platt met us with that smile Which goes with her kind of style Our seven B days came and went Until to Island Park we were sent. We didn't bother about a hat On the picnic for Miss Platt. Details of our eight B picnic which took place We're afraid, would take up too much spaceg But if it wasn't for this, maybe, Arthur wouldn't have been called baby. Next our Literary Society we organized, Which we take pride to emphasizeg Into this the eight B-3 became one of us, Which made us nineteen plus. We now leave Junior High With one long deep sigh. The past we will now let rest For the High School requires our zest. -Velma Kiblinger, '25. I 53 l Feathertop Old Mother Rigby, wishing to play A joke on the wc-rld, made a figure of hay, And breathing upon it enchanted it so That the world neverknew it was just a scarecrow. Her arts had transfigured his heart made of straw And his voice which regechoed the raven's shrill caw. Her pipe had endowedihim with power and pelf. Old Mother Rigby, she' laughed to herself. So sweet Feathertop, for such was his name, Went to the village, searching for fame. The maidens who saw him first simpered, then sighed, Then gave him the hearts they their lovers denied. Old Mother Rigby, sat longing to know The fate of poor Feathertop, the bonny scarecrow. Amidst her reflections came a knock at the door And poor Feathertop fell dead on the iioor. The old Mother gazed at her scarecrow forlorn, "Some maiden," she said, "held his true love to scorn His manners were perfect, his actions most kind, Still love was nc-t satisfied, it could not be blind. He wished to go from this world full of strifeg It would be most unkind to renew his life. The stain from his soul I never could wipe. Ho Dickon!" she shouted, "A coal for my pipe!" -Mae Mawr, '22 I 54 l ORGANIZATIO ' . .V iq sf W, L Y 5, " 5' h lQT 1 ma 65" if ' vi ll . ' L Board of Con fro! E551 Board of Control C. R. Maedonnell .... ..................,.... Walter J. Zabel ..... ............ Maurice L. Brenner . . .... Student Gilbert Otto ...... .... S tudent Adelia Bird .......... .................... Ollie Steiner Mary Newburg Jennie Howe Milford Creviston Lloyd Krueger 6 Daniel van Noppen Lucile Winn Lydia Belknap Carrie Maude Forrest Alene Whisman l President Treasurer Chairman Treasurer Secretary Orville W. Coolidge Scholarship The Orville W. Coolidge Scholarship was established last year by Mrs. Charles A. Chapin in memory of her brother, Orville W. Coolidge. It is a trust fund of 512,500 from which the interest of S750 is given to some boy out of each graduating class. This sum is di- vided equally over a period of two years. The contestants are judged by three things: scholarship, lead- ership, and service. Scholarship needs no definition. The only re- quirement is that the student be above the average to such an ex- tent that he will be able to carry college work successfully. The candidate must possess a good character and moral worth rather than personal popularity. He must possess qualities that go to make a good, clean, well rounded boy. The candidate must have worked for the welfare of the school in the absence of all selfish motives, and desired to see things accomplished for the general welfare. It is also stated that color, race, or creed shall make no dif- ference in the award of the scholarship. Donald Brooks who won the scholarship last year has made a strong record at Purdue realizing 4 A's and 2 B's in an Engineer- ing course. The College Club Scholarship A loan fund for girls has been established by the College Club of Niles. The loan is a sum of not over two hundred dollars to be loan- ed yearly to some girl from the graduating class. This sum may al- so be awarded to the same girl for each of her four years at col- lege. The award is based on scholarship and sense of responsibility of the applicant. - The last year's award was given to Amanda Reum who is at present at Western State Normal. l57l The Orchestra FIRST VIOLINS-Malburne Hall, Mae L6W1S Ruth Vlsel Hestel Moore. SECOND VIOLINS-Deane Eager, Josephlne lenne1 Dlck T0b1l1 FLUTES-Frederick Richter, Russell Fmley CLARINET-Harry Gross. CELLO-William Kay. DRUMS-Donald Allerton. PIANO-Erna Garlanger. SAXOPHONE-Margaret Moon. l5Sl The Boys' Glee Club Arthur Morley Roland Saffran Theron Young David Bennett Levi Mangus Richard Otstot Thomas Durm Donald Gardner Chester Erickson Lloyd Young Murrel Griffth Laurence Abbott Lyle Giddings Peter Frizzo Edward Zwergel Leslie Shoemaker Frederick Richter Ollie Steiner Emery Rose Malcolm Weaver Gilbert Otto Malburne Hall Leslie Boulton 5 Margaret Moon Esther Rough Mildred Miars Bernice Mutz Lillian Pfister Louise Morgridge Aleta Ostrander Geneveive Gerold Janice Barron Marjorie Vose Gertrude Otto Marguerite Weaver Margaret Dunning Mae Lewis Thelma Vose Mary Trask Isabel Hain Zelda Zimmerman Marie Frizzo The Girls' Glee Club Thelma Morehouse Beatrice Dudley Stella Emberger Lucile Allerton Lucile Winn Gladys McCoy Irene Hartman Ethel Fedore Elizabeth Sewell Mary Newburg Dorothy Brown Erna Garlanger Mildred Schleindt Ruth Everman Zorah Hahn Helen Gardner Ruth Hood Mary Smith Alva Hart Martha Roberts I 60 l Helene Skalla Mae Marr Vera Hoffman Mildred Mapes Helen Smith Isabel Keene lone Guyberson Ruth Long Esther Shiebach Mary E. Moon Ila Augustine Camilla Butler Annamarie Garlanger Helen Kehoe Betty Jauck Fern Hood Velma Kiblinger Dorothy Rose Muriel Huntly The Glee Clubs Music is the language of the soul. It is a language which every- one understands and it touches the hearts of all. We hear lovely soft sad music and immediately we are sad. If there be a smile on our face, it is a sad one. Then we hear the happy kind of music us only a picture of also leaves a smile and immediately we are happy and see before sunshine and happiness. This kind of music but this smile is much brighter and may have hind it. Again we hear some dance music and not be controlled, we feel the rhythm through a careless laugh be- our feet simp can- our whole b y and We forget everything else. Music is so powerful and so beautiful that it is a necessity to our life. The Girls' Glee Club is prc-bably the largest branch in the music department. On September 14, 1921, the club organized and elected officers with nearly sixty girls as members. Although we have no Galli-Curci among us, all the members appreciate a high standard of music, and moreover there are some promising vocal- ists. At our first meeting a picnic supper was planned for the com- ing week at River Bluff for the members of the club and their guests. Everyone had a lo-vely time. Christmas eve about six girls and Miss Lardner went around town "Christmas Caro-ling." This was something which had not been done for a number of years. Next the club set to work on a delightful and pretty operetta "Windmills of Holland" which was given at the Niles Opera House, February 28th, in the-afternoon and evening. The stc-ry of the operetta is of a young American who is in Holland trying to install American inventions there in place of the windmill. He meets with very little success as the people of Holland will not part with their old things which are so dear to their hearts. Miss Coolidge coach- ed the dramatic work and it is partly due to her that the operetta was such a success. The cast was as follows: Mynheer Hertogenbosch ............... Fredrick Richter Vrc-uw Hertogenbosch .... .... Z elda Zimmerman Whilhelmina ......... .... M ildred Miars Hilda ....... . . . . . . Marie Frizzo Bob Yankee . .. ..... Lloyd Young Hans ........ .... D onald Allerton Franz ................... ,...... ........ A r thur Morley Katrina .................................... Mae Marr Probably our last public appearance for the year will be at the "May Festival." This year the Girls' Glee Club has worked hard to make the music department grow and we feel that We have done quite a bit towards this end. -Marie Frizzo, '22 T611 Cast of Characters George B. Nettleton ........ . . . . . . . T. Boggs Jc-hns .................... Krome, their bookkeeper .............. Miss Sally Parker, their stenographer Thomas J. Vanderholt, their lawyer . .. Tony Toler, their salesman ....... Mr. Applegate ............. .... Office Boy .............. Shipping Clerk .......... Mrs. George B. Nettleton ...... Miss Florence Cole .................... .... Daniel van Noppen Business Partners . . .. David Bennett ...John Burke . . . Bernice Guyott .. Maurice Brenner . . . . Gilbert Otto .. John HoiTerth .. Hilles Smith ....Alden Bayles Jennie Howe . . . . Bernice Brown Coddles, an English maid of all work .. . Carrie Maud Forrest l62l A Pair of Sixes The Senior play was heralded with a great deal of anticipa- tion and no one was disappointed, fc-r under the excellent coach- ing of Miss Platt it was a great success. In fact it was considered one of the best amateur theatricals that has been given in a num-- ber of years. The play, "A Pair of Sixes," had a very clever plot, it being the story of two partners, George B. Nettleton and T. Boggs Johns of the Eureka Digestive Pill Company, who find it very diflicult to agree on anything. If they aren't quarreling over the color of their pills, then they quarrel over who should have the services of Sally Parker, the stenographer. Poor Krome, the bookkeeper, tries to bring peace but in vain. Finally the partners call in a law- yer, Thomas J. Vanderholt, hoping to settle their disputes. Howe ever, they aren't able to arrive at a satisfactory decision, so Van- derhc-lt proposes that they play a game of poker wherein the loser shall become the butler of the winner. This is to be kept a secret between the parties involved and anyone breaking his agreement shall pay the other five .thousand dollars. T. Boggs loses and, ac- cording to the agreement, becomes Nettleton's butler. This makes things very complicated because Florence Coles, T. Boggs' fiancee, breaks her engagement. T. Boggs, however, finds a way to revenge by pretending he is in love with Mrs. Nettleton. Florence helps make Mrs. Nettleton jealous of her husband. At length, after Mrs. Nettleton has very effective hysterics and her husband is in a rage, T. Boggs and he come to a mutual agreement and everything ends very happily. David Bennett as T. Boggs Johns completely won his audience. As either a business man or a butler he was perfectly at ease. Dan- iel van Noppen as Nettleton was constantly alert to outwit his rival. Jennie Howe as Mrs. Nettleton brought down the house with her hysterics. Throughout the play her natural grace and dignity lent charm to her Winning personality. Florence Cole, T. Boggs' sweet- heart, was coyly assumed by Bernice Brown. Maurice Brenner, who took the role of Thomas J. Vanderholt, the dashing young law- yer, had a wonderful faculty of getting things tangled up. Sally Parker, Bernice Guyott with her gum-chewing and laughter, Krome, John Burke, and Tony Toller, Gilbert Otto with his timidity with- stood the storm of the partners' wrath admirably. Coddles, Carrie Maude Forrest, dropped her h's as a typical English maid. Every member of the cast was wisely chosen and moreover, deserved the favorable comment from the two large audiences. -Adelia Bird, '22, I 63 l Honor Students Of all high school activities, the winning of honors in scholar- ship is the accomplishment which aiords both to school and in- dividual the most distinction, and mutual satisfaction and service. Therefore, above all others, are honored the students of Niles High who forge ahead on the educational road to mental efficiency and success. Once upon a time our schools were all private institutions, supported by fees. Education was then thought to be a matter of private advantage only. It enabled the fortunate possessor to win out over his fellows. Now we have broader ideals. We still believe that the educated man or woman has a personal advantage for himself. But we further believe that that advantage is not only for himself alone. It helps him to help others. It has been said, and we all know it to be a true saying, that democracy can only fail through the ignorance of its rulers. We are the rulers-our own rulers-and students in school are the rulers-to-be. The good citizen, the ruler of democracy-of our town-must be able to contribute by brain or brawn to the needs of his fel- lows. He must be a producer of something that others need, phy- sical, mental or spiritual. He must have a mind stored with useful knowledge, or know how to obtain and assimilate information when he needs it. He must have the ability to observe rightly, and to think straight. He must have right attitudes which come from hon- est thinking. He must know the dangers and mistakes of the past and be prepared to avoid them. He should know how to behave in polite society. He should have a respect for the laws of public and private health. He should know how to use his leisure time. Such a citizen is not a dream. There are many of him in Niles. He is a product of education-of our schools. The aims of Niles High are typified in him. Because we have faith that through the study of books, the questioning trials of the laboratory, and the helpful guidance and instruction of teachers, these aims can be attained, we support by public funds, and ever more generously, the schools. We are invest- ing in future good citizenship. We are insuring for homes, and health, and happiness. Our honor students, and they are many, are helping greatly to justify the wisdom of our investment, and increase the prestige of our school. We admire them for their native ability. We honor them for their ideals, their industry and their loyalty. Miss Hila Allen has compiled a record of students now in school who have a distinguished scholarship record during the past four years. In this record are three students who have been on the honor list with grades averaging 90 per cent., or higher, every l64l ' semester they have been in school. First comes Kathryn Shouder, an honor student for eight semesters, with an average of 92.391, Ruth Visel is second, for six semesters an honor student, with an average of 92.1'Z:. Gilbert Otto, distinguished athlete and orator, as well as student, is third, with seven semesters, and a 91.370 average. Gertrude Otto averages 91.298, but in seven semesters failed once of making the honor list. It is interesting to note in the records of these four students that whereas the median grade of the student body is taken to be 859: and advisory groups frequently fail to make more than 60'Z: to 701: as good a record as they should, Kathryn Shouder's grades are 148921 of the normal advisory ranking and the others are all sc-mewhat above 140'Zf. The next group is of students who have been on the honor list during every semester that they have been in high school. The figure following the name indicates the number of semesters they have been in high school: Kathryn Shouder C833 Gilbert Otto C733 Ruth Visel C633 DeMott Fiske C533 Dora Peters C433 Hester Moore C333 Allene Whisman C333 John Barman C233 Esther Forler C233 Margaret Griiiith C233 Russell Hart C233 Winifred Merritt C233 Alice Platt C233 Jerome Wood C233 Frank Barron C133 Mary Burns C133 Beatrice Brunk C133 Muriel Huntley C133 Inez Pankow C133 Lillian Pfister C133 Kenneth Thornton C133 Lucian Wood C13. This group is of students who have been on the honor list every semester except one: Gertrude Otto C733 Helen Moore C533 Dorc-thy Huntley C533 Lolita Ruckman C433 Gladys Franz C333 Martha Hall C333 Ethel Montgomery C333 Leslie Shoemaker C333 Ethel Fedore C233 Rachael Krinowitz C23. Those who have been honor students every semester but two are: Maurice Brenner C633 Adelia Bird C533 Beatrice Curtis C433 Isabell Fiske C333 Alva Hart C333 Margaret Moon C333 Richard Otstot C333 Mildred Sparks C333 Eleanor Teller C33. These have been on the honor list every semester except three: Marshall Brenner C433 Robert Calvin C433 Cereta Cocoran C533 Verna Luth C63. --C. R. Macdonnell. I 65 l Eudoxia ........... Rev. Pontifex Deetle Jane Deetle ....... Mrs. Rossmore . . . Miss Nesbitt ..... Judge Rossmore Ex. Judge Stott .... Expressman . . . Shirley ...,.... Jefferson Ryder .... Hon. Fitzroy Bagley Jorkins ..... ...... Sen. Roberts . . . Kate Roberts .... Mrs. Ryder ......... John Burkett Ryder Maid ............. Cast of Characters L66 Margarite Zimmerer ...... DeMott Fiske Lydia Belknap Ruth Kinney Catherine .Jefferson Ben Brown . . . . Marshall Brenner .. . Leslie Boulton .. Virginia Jarrn .. . Robert Calvin . . . . George Contois Alexander Hunziker . . . . Leslie Shoemaker .... . Isabel Fiske Beatrice Curtis . . . Frederic Richter . Genevieve Gerold The Junior Play Just as the Tattler goes to press, the Juniors begin work on their play. This year they are going to give "The Lion and the Mouse," by Charles Klein. They expect to have the performance the two nights of May twelfth and thirteenth. The story of "The Lion and the Mouse" is built around John Burkett Ryder, the "Lion," and Shirley Rossmore, the "Mouse," When the curtain goes up, the scene is laid in the home of Judge Rossmore in a little Long Island village. Judge Rossmore has just been impeached. The shock, and unfairness of it has completely broken his spirit. The man responsible for his impeachment is John Burkett Ryder, one of the most wealthy men in the country. Judge Rossmore, in his position as Judge of the Supreme Court, has rendered decisio-ns contrary to Ryder's wishes, so Ryder with- out bringing any suspicion on himself makes it appear, by a clever treachery, that Judge Rossmore has accepted bribes. Judge Ross- more has a daughter, Shirley, who has just returned from Europe and so knows nothing of her father's disgrace. In Europe she has met Jefferson Ryder, the son of John Burkett Ryder. At the time she comes home she is more than interested in him. Judge Ross- mc-re breaks the news to her and she determines to go to Ryder in order to help her father, of course she will not believe him guilty. Shirley has written a book about Jc-hn Burkett Ryder. She does not call the character that, but she calls him the "Oct'a pas." Ryder reads the book and recognizing himself sends for Miss Green, for that is the name under which Shirley writes. This, she decides, is her great opportunity. She goes. John Burkett Ryder is a man of sudden likes and dislikes and he takes a great fancy to Shirley on sight. After a little talk, he engages her as his secre- tary. She takes up her duties, and continues tc- study Ryder and wait for an opportunity. Ryder owns certain letters which would completely clear Rossmore. With the help of Jefferson, Shirley steals the letters and sends them to her father. Ryder at first is wild. Shirley tells him her real name and why she came and then prepares to leave for home. At the last minute Ryder goes to her and begs her to stay as he is entirely refc-rmed. She finally con- sents, and Ryder gives Jefferson his long delayed permission to marry Shirley Rossmore. Miss Platt, who has so successfully coached c-ther plays, is coaching the Junior play. We predict that under her direction "The Lion and the Mouse" will be a great success. l67l Oratorical Contest The local oratorical contest took place on March the ninth in the high school auditorium. All friends and patrons of the school were cordially invited to be present. Any junior or senior by com- plying to certain regulations were eligible to this contest. After many weeks of hard work and drilling the contestants accomplished something for which a great deal of credit is due them. The fact that eleven reported for the contest shows that the interest is not lagging but on the contrary gaining. Maurice Brenner received second place, his topic being "The Boss In Politics." This being a very modern subject, appealed to all. Maurice's delivery was natural and he seemed to live in his oration from the beginning to the very end. The first place was awarded to Gilbert Otto, his selection be- ing "The Modern Farmer." He delivered his oration exceptionally well, so that he held the attention of the audience without diliiculty. This is Gilbert's second year in oratorical work. Having carried away last year's honors he has determined to do likewise this year. Miss Platt's skill in oratoricals has brought the work to a high- er standard than that of last year. Declamatory Contest The senior high school students assembled on March the six- teenth in the main room of the high school building for the pur- pose of hearing the selections of the four declaimers chosen from the freshman and sophomore classes. These four worked very hard during the limited time and showed their good work by their ap- pearance in this contest. Declamatory work has improved rapidly under the splendid supervision of Miss Platt, and during the pres- ent year has done some very efficient work along this line. John Raymond received second place, his declamation was a cutting from "The Man Without a Country." He stirred in every heart the spirit of patriotism by the enthusiasm and the forceful manner in which he delivered it, Robert Burns selected the modern inaugural address of Presi- dent Harding. His vigor and passionate zeal won for him the first place in the local contest. l68l 1 H 77 l 0n Your Toes On your toes, boys and girls, on your toes. What's the use of gloomy looks Now you're thru with High School books? .Meet life's problems firm and stout-your natural foes. On your guard, boys and girls, while on the toes, Twist these problems into shape, Bring them right up to the tape. Hit the ball! Hit the ball! Hit it, I say, high or low. When you start out for first base, on your toe, Don't be rattled by the crowd, let it howl. Keep on going, do your best, even tho' they call out foul 'Cause you know your very best is what players owe. Watch first sharply, on your toes, If he muff, go down! go down! Don't be standing looking roun' When you might get home-who knows? But in this struggle, boys and girls, on the toes, Don't forget the other fellow's right, To expect fair play in this fight. Give and take on the square, not for show. When the umpire calls the game, on your toe. If you're beaten fair and square, don't be sore. Buck up again, be a sport, not a bore. Boys and girls, this to you from me, 1et's go. -A. W. Hudson. L 70 l ATHLETIC S any cg "' f I .f ! Wh D t K -K :I jxw ' 1, 4 Cxix-.fi A- Xl N. X .. S an 11, - r e, ,' 11: C ' " f i "Hu I ' f ' I, . x y ,, 9 2 ' M wx K V , I V I: ! in 7 X, X f X f ' xx, 2 ' f ' W WJ N BNN W r VICTORY ' ee H X ,e ,a' rr ff r r f 1' X ly 'Mx , 7 E YV' I UP - 7, ,r'Wgf,2 gglz,f e 1 f Foofoall Basketball Coach-L 3 Walker Mgr W.bd. Zabel N.H. . T,-agfx Ter-mfs Baseball Lee Forresf Forrest Schrumpf Forresf' Forresf Schrumpf Hnlem, Chambers Wedel Lo e Offo Cur1I5 Krueger Chambers Wea ver Schrumpf Harper Clevenger I Van Noppen Lge fdfrell HCCOQ1 1 6fl2lr'lef" Krueger Berg Wedel Darling Clever-.gor Spencer 1 l-15m L45 Orfo , Graihwoh! Darling ' Darlmg Sch:-Umpf N Vog-els ang X I i711 bn!!! -J '5- 41 CQ 'E N -5 3 A --4 41 L, NTOIS HELL FAR C u 2 5' ED Z ... - ..- A G-4 LC 42 A .- E P- E QU IZ LII CO VZ I C11 EE ,nm mi UQ: I2 A :rn 0 3 m E-1 41 ni F-YJ Ei: A Z EJ QU I-rl D If tri cc rn E H? GHG mm I C in ill .J mil G E R C'l.l'1VEN bl 3 M EFOR R S ENCE 2 SP SANC VOGEL APT. SCHRUMPF C NOPPEN AN V TEINER 0 S OTT The 1921 Football Season In 1911 football as a major sport in Niles High was on the decline and in 1912 there was no schedule. From that time c-n no effort was put forth to resume the sport until the school was given an athletic field. Then plans were laid to re-establish football in 1922 when the new gridiron at Plym Park would be in readiness. But the demand last fall for a 1921 team became so urgent that the athletic department consented to organize a team in spite of handicaps in order to develop material for the season of 1922 when the sport will be formally introduced into Niles High athletics. Upon Coach Walker's first call for candidates he was sur- rounded by a throng of eager though "green" aspirants for grid honors. With his efficient effort he soon whipped into shape an eleventh hour football team that surpassed all expectations and took county honors. The boys were taught the fundamental prin- ciples of the game, falling on the ball, tackling, how to spill the interference, how to give interference, and catching the ball. All these had to be mastered before the work of real organization could be started. The three weeks practice before the first game were weeks of steady relentless grind, but at all times the results were most encouraging. Much. of the success of the season may be accredited to the spirit of the team. Their morale was of the highest. Training rules were followed, individual ambitic-ns were freely sacrificed for team work, nor was there a display of egotism on the part of any of the players at any time. The team played hard and earnestly in each of its three games and though it suffered one defeat it was accepted with true Niles spirit. OCT. 21-NILES 23, WATERVLIET 7 The initial clash was with Watervliet which was reputed to have one of the best grid teams in this section. The outstanding feature was the line smashing of Berg and Forrest. The halves were able to make-consistent gains on off-tackle plays. Schrumpf's toe proved to have more power behind it than that of the Water- vliet punter and he easily had the edge on his opponent. On de- fence Forrest was the star while H. Lee followed close. Water- vliet was repeatedly stopped and forced to punt, her only touch- down being by the old "shoe string" pass while Niles scored three touchdowns and a drop kick, Vogelsang kicking two of the three goals. OCT. 26-NILES 6, DOWAGIAC 13 The following week Niles gave way to the more experienced Dowagiac eleven, scoring but 6 points to the opponent's 13. Their experienced line resisted all attempts to plunge or circle it while their shifty backfield completely baffled the Niles defence. To- l73l wards the close of the last quarter Darling intercepted a pass and raced fifty yards for a touchdown scoring Niles' only points. NOV. 5-NILES 39, ST. JOSEPH 14 After the defeat at the hands of Dowagiac the locals settled down to ten days of hard drill and mastered the science of forward passing. When our old and dangerous rival from St. Joseph arrived the locals were ready and confident. St. Joseph received the kick- off but Niles soon had pc-ssessio-n of the ball. On the second of- fensive play Darling ran 35 yards on an off-tackle play and scored the first touchdown within seven minutes of the beginning. Then followed an exchange of punts, Schrumpf easily keeping the pig skin from the local goal. In the second quarter Niles uncorked the aerial attack, the long high pass from Schrumpf to Lee making repeated and consistent gains and twice scoring. The short snappy pass from Schrumpf to Vogelsang and vice versa proving very dis- concerting to St. Joseph. On defence Farrell and Lee were the out- standing features while Forrest though working hard was han- dicapped by a heavier opponent. St. Joe scored but twice, once on an intercepted pass and once by working the ball down on line plays. Three Rivers was to have been the next opponent but can- celled on account of weather conditions and futile efforts were made to get a return game with Dowagiac. Benton Harbor being out of the county athletic association, Niles can rightfully claim the county championship, having beat- en St. Joe and Watervliet, the only other teams in the county. With such a showing from an inexperienced team Niles has reason to look forward to a good season next year. The line from tackle to tackle remains unbroken, Spencer right end and Lee the lengthy left end who starred in the St. Joseph game will be lost by graduation. Darling the speedy half and Otto heady quarter will also be graduated. But Captain Schrumpf the fullback remains to pilot the next season's crew. Name Nickname Position Year Age Ht. Wt. Harry Lee "Worm" L. E. Sr. 17 73 158 Gilbert Otto "Agricola" Q. B. Sr. 19 65 133 Perry Spencer "Nick" R. E. Sr. 16 66 133 Louis Darling "Red" H. B. Sr. 17 71 144 Henry Schrumpf "Hank" F. B. Jr. 19 72 158 Frank Forrest "Clete" R. T. Jr. 18 68 165 Gerald Wedel "Foxy" L. G. Jr. 18 64 150 Lloyd Krueger "Faja" C. Jr. 17 71 154 Thomas Farrel "Tom" L. T. Jr. 17 68 147 Russel Berg "Brute" R. G. Soph. 18 68 151 Richard Harper "Dick" C. Soph. 19 66 156 John Vogelsang "Johnny" H. B. Soph. 18 67 135 Daniel Van Noppen "Danny" H. B. Sr. 16 68 147 Clayton McCoy "Muldoon" H. B. Soph. 18 69 163 Jack Secor "Jack" E. Soph. 15 68 132 John Lagoni "Fat" G. Fresh. 15 70 178 Touchdcwns: Lee 2, Otto 1, Darling 2, Schrumpf 1, Vogelsang 2, Berg 2. Field goal: Vogelsang 1. Goal kicks: Vogelsang 3, Schrumpf 2. E741 THE FOOTBALL "N" MEN I 75 1 S. WALKER, Foach XVI-Illl-IL lVlcCOY CHAMBERS FARRELL W. J. ZABFI Mg Namc- Schrumpf, Captain Clevenger Lee ....... Forrest . .. .. Krueger . . . . . . Chambers . . . . . McCoy .. ... Wedel ..... .... P c'1.r1vr:NGr:n FORREST SCHRUMPF LE1-1 KRU1-:ann State Champions Position Baskets Free Throws Total Forward . .107 ........ .... . .. . Forward 86 2 out of 4 .... .. . Center 99 5 out of 12 .... .. . .Guard . 99 94 out of 169 .. ... Guard . O ............... Forward 23 2 out of 4 .... Center 20 ............ Guard . 2 ............. . . . Guard . 0 ....................... Farrell .... . . . Niles Totals ....... Opponents Totals .. ....107 435' 92 out of 217 . ioefollt bf Tssff Average points per game: Niles-39, Opponents- 761 12 Ig. The Basketball Season Undefeated, the Niles High School basketball quintet closed the season of 1921-22. This season has been a success in every sense of the word. The members of the team stood not only for physical prowess but for mental or moral development. They have succeeded not only on the basketball floor but they have achieved success in the class room. Coach Walker's quintet was essentially a team and not five individual players. They played the ball rather than the man. It was due to the wonderful coaching and splendid spirit of the players combined with their athletic ability that en- abled them to win the county, district, and state championships without losing a single game the entire season. These factors en- abled the team to be developed to such a high degree that three of the players were picked as all-state material. During the entire season the team played 970 minutes and scored 975 points, averag- ing more than a point a minute. The initial appearance of the team was on December third against Elkhart. Schrumpf, Lee and Forrest divided thirty-five points among themselves while the guards allowed Elkhart one field goal. This game showed the possibilities of the season in that eight men were used, four c-f them new to first team atmosphere. The team next journeyed to Warsaw, Indiana, for the second game of the season and cramped from their long ride allowed the Hoosiers to snatch a two point lead in the first half. They warmed up the second half, however, and in a hard fought battle gained a three point advantage on their opponents. Cassopolis next fell, followed by the Kalamazoo College re- serves who had in their lineup three men from last year's Kala- mazoo Central's championship team. In this game Lee starred with fourteeen points to his credit while the defense allowed the total Kazoo score to but equal his. Christmas vacation gave the alumni, home from college, an opportunity to see the machine work-For- rest alone chalking up twenty-two points against them. The first week in January the team went on a two days' trip and defeated Three Rivers and Sturgis by large scores. Warsaw then came up from Hoosierdom and went back with eight points. Schrumpf and Clevenger each garnered sixteen while Lee and For- rest signed up a few. The next week the team was lost on the large Normal Hoor at Kazoo, and the first half ended four to two with Niles holding the twins. By the second half they found themselves and reversed the order, doubling on the Celery City men twenty-two to eleven. Benton Harbor was scheduled to halt the undefeated five but failed miserably. Forrest here added more to his fame by caging nine free throws without a miss and totaling eleven out of fifteen attempts. St. Joe next came to Niles and though they fought hard E771 were unable to stand the onslaught while Krueger and Forrest as usual held firm on the defense and Clevenger scoring almost at will accounted for twenty out of Niles' forty-six points. Mishawaka and South Haven fell hard on two succeeding days and the following week Coach Walker's squad raised the gym rec- ord When they connected with eighty-five points in the game with Three Rivers. After again trouncing Mishawaka, Walker sent his men once more against Benton Harbor. The Northenders counted four via the free throw route before Niles got warmed up. Lee and Schrumpf then started registering and the half ended fourteen to four with Benton Harbor trailing. The second half started with a rush, Benton Harbor trying desperately to overcome the ten point lead. The locals were able to score only one more point than the Northenders this half. The following week Lee starred in the contest with St. Joe at the county seat. Niles finished its regular schedule by defeating South Haven on the latter's court. According to the rules of the county athletic association it was necessary for Niles, the best team in the county, to play the winner of Class B for the county honors. Baroda was met and defeated, incidentally a new gym record was placed at 93 points. DISTRICT TOURNAMENT This year the state was divided into three classes-A, B, and C. Niles having less than five hundred enrc-llment was placed in Class B and entered the District Tournament at Kalamazoo, March 24th and 25th. In the first game Niles met Ionia which team was entirely unknown to us. Fearing that Ionia might be a dark horse the Niles offense started with a rush and ran up a 24-4 score the first half. With three substitutes playing the last half the final score was 41-14. Marshall having beaten, Hastings was our rival in the semi-finals and fell hard before the Niles onslaught. Grand Haven, who had beaten St. Joseph by a clo-se score was our opponent in the finals. Before the tournament, Grand Haven had been considered by some as the favorite and interest was keen when they were matched with Niles. Suffice it to say that though they fought hard, they were allowed but 19 points while Forrest alone garnered 16. STATE TOURNAMENT On March 31 and April 1 the Niles outfit entered the State Tournament at East Lansing. Mt. Pleasant was the first team that met the undefeated five at East Lansing and fell 25-15. In the semi-finals Niles met the fast and clever Cadillac team, which had been heralded as the most probable to win state honors. This was probably the hardest game that Niles played this seaso-n. The speed and caliber of both teams may be seen by the fact that the score was 7-6 in favor of Niles at the end of the first quarter. Five min- E781 utes before the half ended the score was 14-12 in favor of Cadil- lac. At this point the Niles men spurted and in five minutes scored 20 points to Cadillac's 8. In the final game of the tourna- ment and the game which closed Niles' 1921-22 basketball season, Niles met Howell and defeated them 22-14. In the first minute of play, Schrumpf received a severe injury to his arm which nearly incapacitated him. Nevertheless he played the entire game, being entirely without the use of his left arm. The basket shooting of Lee was the outstanding feature of the state tournament. He is credited with more field goals than any other single player at the tournament. Twenty-Five Victories Without a Defeat Date Place Score Score Dec. 3 .. . .... Niles .... . . .Niles Elkhart . . . . . Dec. 9 . .. .... Warsaw . .. . . .Niles Warsaw . .. . Dec. 16 ....... Cassopolis .... . .Niles Cassopolis .... . Dec. 21 ..... Niles ........ ..Niles College Reserves Dec. 30 ....... Niles ........ . .Niles Alumni ....... . Jan. 6 . .. .... Three Rivers . ..Niles 'Three Rivers .. Jan. 7 . .. .... Sturgis ...... . .Niles Sturgis ... . . . .. Jan. 13 .....,. Niles ......,. . . Niles-49 Warsaw ...... . Jan. 20 ....... Kalamazoo . . . . .Niles Normal High . .. Jan. 25 ....... Bentcn Harbor ..Niles Benton Harbor . Feb. 3 ........ Niles ........ . .Niles St. Joseph .... . Feb. 10 ....... Mishawaka . . . . .Niles Mishawaka . . . . Feb. 11 ....... Niles ..... . . .Niles-61 South Haven . . Feb. 17 ....... Niles . . . . .Niles- Three Rivers . . Feb. 21 ....... Niles .... . . .Niles Mishawaka . . . . Feb. 24 ....... Niles ........ ..Niles- Benton Harbor . Mar. 3 .. ...St. Joseph ... ,.Niles- St. Joseph ... .. Mar. 10 ...... South Haven . ,.Niles- South Haven Mar. 15 ...... Niles ........ . .Niles- Baroda ....... . DISTRICT TOURNAMENT AT WESTERN STATE NORMAL Mar. 24 ...... Mar. 25 ...... Kalamazoo ...... Niles-41 Ionia ........., Kalamazoo ...... Niles-21 Marshall ...... Mar. 25 ...... Kalamazoo ...... Niles-32 Grand Haven . . . STATE TOURNAMENT AT MICH. AGRICULTURAL COLLEGF Mar. 31 ...... East Lansing . . .Niles-25 Mt. Pleasant . . . Mar. 31 ...... East Lansing . . .Niles-43 Cadillac .... . . . Apr. 1 . .. .. .East Lansing . . .Niles--22 Howell .. . . .. . E791 80 HENRY SCHRUMPF, Captain Captain Schrumpf was unan- imously chosen all state for- ward. He was a whirlwind on the Hoor, an expert passer, and probably the best dribbler on the team. He scored more field goals during the season than any other player. The fact that he remains for next year is sufficient cause for rejoicing. HARRY LEE Harry was unanimously chosen all state center at the state tournament because of his consistent jumping, almost faultless floor work, and his ability to score, having more field goals to his credit at the tournament than any other player there. He is the only man graduating, but his loss is heavy. FRANK FORREST, Captain-elect Forrest was picked as the best floor guard in the state be- cause of his wonderful floor work, his stc-ne-wall defense, and his ability to score. Be- cause of his ability as a free thrower he led the team in number of points scored. He always exerted a good iniiuence on the team and the fact that he will pilot next season's crew speaks vc-lumes. JOHN A. CLEVENGER Johnny was one of the flash- iest forwards ever seen on the Niles court. He could always be counted on to score and holds the record for high score in a single game. LLOYD KRUEGER Krueger played a hard posi- tion and gave his best at all times. His ability to control the gc-al is attested by the fact that the opponents rarely edged a shc-rt shot. Because of their cc-nfidence in him the other four men played an offensive game with confidence. He also re- mains in school for another year. L. S. WALKER, Coach ' This was Mr. Walker's sec- ond year in charge of the bas- ketball team. He was able to develc-p a championship team this season because of his abil- ity to instill in the players the fine pc-ints of the game. The passing of the team which was the marvel of the tournament was due to his untiring efforts and work with the team. S1 82 EDWARD CHAMBERS Eddy had an eagle eye for the basket and cc-uld toss the ball in the basket from almost any angle. CLAYTON MCCOY Muldoon w o r k e d hard throughout the season. He was always ready to give his best either at center or forward. THOMAS FARRELL Tom was steady and put up a stc-ne-wall defense, making Krueger work at all times for his position as backguard. F I' n Date Dec. Dec. Dec. Dec. Dec. Jan. Jan. Feb. Feb. Feb. Feb. Mar. L. S. WALKER, Coach HUNZIKER WOOD COOK W. J. ZABEL, Mgr. STEINER OTSTOT ZWERGEL DARLING BRENNER Reserves The following schedule Piave . . . Niles .... . . . Bristol ..... . . Galien . . Niles ...... . . . Niles ...... . . . Eau Claire B. Harbor .. . . . Niles .... . . . . . Niles ...... . Niles ....... . . Niles ..,... . St. Joseph . . Niles ..... Bristol . . . Galien . . . Niles .... Niles ........ Eau Claire .. B. Harbor Res. Niles ........ Niles .... Niles .... Niles .... Niles . . . l54 l lfliv was played: Srore ...17 Elkhart Reserves ...19 Niles ........ ....28 Niles........... ...31 Eau Claire .. . ....33 Galien...... ....15 Ni1es........... ...17 Niles ........ 19 St. Joseph Res. . ....34 Brist0l......... 52 Cassopolis ..... 22 B. Harbor Res. . . St. Joseph Res. . Reserves It is hard to say what men this year co-mprised the second team. At least fourteen different men played on the second team. It was because of the wealth of material in the reserves that Niles first was able to finish so successful a season. Their real duty was to furnish as much opposition in practice for the first team as possible. Out of their ranks must come the men for substitution in first team games and from them must be developed material for future seasons. They certainly were not lacking in spirit and as most of them are underclassmen there is gc-od prospects for the future. This year because of the development of the second team, Niles was able, several times this season, to send teams to two different towns on one evening. All the games which the reserves lost were games played in this manner and may be accounted for by the fact that the real strength of the reserves was with -the first squad on these occasions. Benton Harbor Reserves was the only team to take a victory from the pride of the local reserves. St. Joseph Reserves was the only other team to meet the best Niles reserves away from home and were scalped. Tennis Tennis last year did not prc-ve quite as triumphant for Niles as it had the two previous seasons. With the erection of the first unit of the new central building the historic tennis court was de- stroyed and lovers of the net game were deprived of the only place to play that the city afforded. Nevertheless Schrumpf and Armstrong, the two veterans of the 1920 season, played true to form and defeated Benton Harbor in the doubles while Armstrong retained the county tiile in the singles at the county meet early in June. The following week, Schrumpf and Armstrong again defeated their opponenfts in the doubles and retained the tri-cou11ty championship against St. Joe's opposition. Armstrong, thc-ugh he fought a hard and drawn-out game, was unable to stave off defeat in the singles and surrender- ed the tri-county championship to St. Joe. Schrumpf still remains in school and should easily handle any challengers in the singles and re-take the tri-county championship. Armstrong's graduation is indeed a loss but the new courts at Plym park should prove an opportunity to develop several good net art- ists to take his place. E851 i W. J. ZABEL, Mgr. FORREST CHAMBERS CURTIS FORBES L. S. WALKER loach VOGELSANG LEE, Capt. SCHRUMPF KRUEGER CAMP CLEVEGER ASMUS GRATHWOHL Baseball Team Pitchers-Forrest, Schrumpf Catcher-Lee First Base-Krueger Second Base-Grathwohl Shortstop-Vogelsang Third Base-Curtis Fielders-Chambers, Asmus, Clevenger, ISGI Camp, Forbes Baseball The baseball team in 1921 was not as successful as was hoped fo-r. Shortly before the first game Forbes who showed prospects behind the bat was injured in a track meet and remained on crutches nearly the rest of the season. This necessitated moving Captain O. Lee from his regular position at third to the receiving end. Nevertheless Niles too-k five of the eight games played. St. Joseph gave the locals the most trouble. In the initial game of the season they early picked up a lead but Schrumpf arose to the occasion and held them scoreless the last three innings while Niles picked the necessary nine points to win the game. In the second game we met Edwardsburg and defeated them on their home diamond, Forrest pitching a gc-od game. Next we met Mishawaka at home and the local team here displayed an ex- cellent brand of baseball functioning without a single errorl With three victories to its credit the team met Dowagiac, the near champs of the state in 1920. Niles scored four runs the first 'in- ning but was allowed only one more hit which failed to score. Though Dowagiac was held scoreless the first three innings, they were able to pick up six runs the last six innings and handed Niles its first defeat of the season. Edwardsburg was the next opponent. Smarting under the defeat at the hands of Dowagiac, the locals crushed them seven to cne. The following week the team went to Mishawaka. As the game was after schc-el, it was scheduled for seven innings, but at the end of the seventh inning the score was tied. The eighth added one run to each team's credit but the ninth, Mishawaka failed and Niles added another, winning the game. Niles next met St. Joe, who handed us our second defeat of the season and subsequently tied for cc-unty honors. In the final clash of theseason after a hard and vigorous battle we surrendered the county cup to St. Joe, who in turn relinquished it to Watervliet. Date S0076 Score Place April 30 ...... Niles ... 9 St. Joe ....... Niles May 3 Niles . . . 6 Edwardsburg Edwardsburg May 10 Niles . . . 4 Mishawaka Niles May 14 Dowagiac 6 Niles ........ Niles May 17 Niles . . . 7 Edwardsburg Niles May 24 Niles . . . 5 Mishawaka . . . Mishawaka June 1 St. Joe .. 6 Niles ........ St, Joe June 8 St. Joe ....... 8 Niles ... . . .5 Benton Harbor l37l L S WALKER, Coach MCCOY CALVIN BOHLEBER KRUEGER FORREST W. J. ZABEL Mgr FINLEY OTTO WEAVER FORBES VOGELSANG VAN NOPPEN The 1921 Track Season Track took a rapid stride in the spring of 1921, and establish- ed itself firmly in the high school. The runners had trained the major portion of the Winter and were in the best of condition when the spring opened. In a dual meet with Elkhart the locals were defeated though Weaver, Forrest, and Otto showed their caliber by winning three iirsts. A Week later Niles met four Indiana schools in a quintangular meet at Elkhart and placed third with the same men showing up to advantage. Weaver and Otto were entered in the meet at Western State Normal and though neither won points, they made a sho-wing and profited by the experience. ISSJ - COUNTY MEET, MAY 28 May 28th the locals went to Benton Harbor and after a plucky fight accepted second place in the county meet with St. Joe lead- ing by a few points. The locals proved weak in the field events. This was doubly felt when Forrest for the first and only time last season failed to toss the shot c-ut to first place but just to third place. Weaver was handicapped by a sprained ankle and so failed to break the tape in his respective events. However, he fought hard and running almost on nerve placed second in both the 220 and 440. Otto won the 440 and 880. The proper combination was found in a relay team composed of Weaver, Finley, Vogelsang, and Otto, who won by an easy margin from St. Joe's best. TRI-COUNTY MEET, JUNE 4 With the experience of the county meet behind them the lo- cals the following week invaded St. Joe determined to win the Tri-County meet. Weaver was in perfect condition, his ankle hav- ing strengthened, and Forbes, who had pulled a ligament in the Elkhart meet, was back on the job with vengeance. The meet started very favc-rably for Niles with Forbes winning the 50 yard dash and Weaver tying for second. With this encouragement Weaver rushed things in the next two events, running the 100 and 220. In the 440 Otto was off form and Weaver's ankle began to trouble him and he followed Krueger of St. Joe, placing second. Otto finished the runs with a first in the 880. Niles having taken all the tirsts in the runs save the 440 found herself with a comfortable lead but was again weak in the field events. In spite of the fact that Forrest pushed the shot out 37 feet, 11 inches and took first and Forbes a third, St. Joe crept up on us in the jumps and pc-le vault where Van Noppen tied for third in the pole vault and Calvin repeated in the high jump. Bohleber finished the field events by tossing the discus to second and St. Joe was leading 35 to 34 5-6 with the relay to decide the meet. Weaver though run- ning for the eighth time that day started and no-sed out his op- ponents giving Finley a small lead. At the start of the third man a slight confusion arose and Fc-rbes burst forth. With the flying feet of Mercury he picked up a good thirty foot lead which en- abled Otto to cross the line for Niles in advance of St. Joseph's runner. The locals won by the close score of 39 5-6 to 38 and brought the beautiful silver cup and relay banner to the south end while Weaver alone was credited with 1614 points and awarded the individual point winner's award, a handsome silver cup. lS9l 4 4, ,, Plym Park Plym Park is one of the finest things that has been given to Niles and to Niles High School this year. Mr. Plym donated the ground which lies directly back of his factory, the Kawneer. Plans for a club house and athletic field have been made which will bene- fit not only the high school but all of Niles. The School Board hired Mr. Walker to superintend the work. Mr. Walker's experience in athletic work distinctly qualified him for such an undertaking. The work has progressed quickly and the land has been drained now and a permanent system of drain- age installed. The low places have been filled in and roads have been made. Plym Park contains an up-to-date club hc-use in which there is a large assembly ro-om with an open fireplace. Locker rooms for both men and women, apartments for a caretaker, and a grill room have been provided. From the wide porch there is a fine view of the athletic field which cc-ntains a quarter mile track, within this circular track is a baseball diamond and football field, and a sum- mer wading pool or winter skating pond lies beyond this. Farther over to the right are four tennis courts which the school has al- ready enjoyed, and behind the club hc-use is a beautiful nine hole golf link. Both Niles and the Niles High School owe a great debt of gratitude to Mr. Plym for making possible such a Wonderful park. -Adelfia Bird, '22, l 90 l l r b Y I "N" Club With the re-addition of football to the high school curriculum there arose in the minds of the athletes the question of how to handle sweater awards. According to the rules of the state athletic association the high school cannot award any athlete a sweater or anything that exceeds one dollar in value. Money for any sweaters purchased for the athletes must nec- essarily be raised independent of the school. Heretofore basket- ball as the major spc-rt has received recognition from the manage- ment of the Strand Theater, who magnanimously aided the bas- ket ball players in earning sweaters. It was seen that if this plan was followed with football the sports which come later in the sea- son, namely basket ball and the two spring sports, baseball and track, which have stepped into the high school curriculum, would be in no position to be treated the same way. At the suggestion of Mr. Haisley the diiliculty was brought to the attention of local fans and business men. As a result high school athletes united with alumni wearers of the "N," business men, and fans to form the "N" Club, the membership dues to be one dollar per year. Dr. George I. Vetter was unanimously chosen as president and Reginald Smith was elected treasurer. W. J. Zabel was requested to fill the office of secretary, because the books would then be at the high school convenient for any mem- ber. The "N" Club decided that any student winning an "N" in any of the four major sports should be awarded a sweater, but that no youth should receive more than one sweater per season regard- less of the number of sports in which he participated. The following committees were appointed: The "N" Club committee consisting of Dr. Platt, chairman, J. Walter Wood, C. E. White, Reginald Smith, and Claude Huffg the entertainment committee composed of Fred Kc-mpass, chairman, Frank French, Dr. Bonine, Henry Towar, and Fred Cookg and the sweater com- mittee composed of Dr. Henderson, chairman, F. J. Plym, Walter Parkin, Tom Hance, and Carmi Smith. The Club early sponsored a dance at the Moose Hall. Later Mr. Codd very gracic-usly consented to the "N" Club giving a bene- fit at the Riveria. Over 1,000 people purchased tickets from the "N" men for the show Tom Moore, in "Made In Heaven." The net re- turns from these events together with the membership fees CSL00 per yearj made up the fund which was used to purchase the sweaters for the athletes. The high school athletes wish to thank all members of the "N" Club for their assistance and consideration. We wish especial- ly to thank Mr. Codd for so graciously and Willing giving us the use of the Riveria on the evening of February 9, 1922. E921 4 ix Y T lil.,,- , i ,- -' if-i f-' 3' fi: I - ' 5 I 2 3 .1-J ':.' , 1 5 1-, -g H S ' 33 3- - S-15 EE E E5 T Fil : 5 : E -1 E2 .1 1' Eg ,g E 15' .--1 -,-K , ,-ff' .. -Q3 rf f Y' ii- Y J V ' ,, -E' 4917. QL-ab lk jf: --1--iff -P fx' f 1-l - " HQ . . Y-- ,,, ' -l" -if - - M + . "' E-:' - 'iff ' +f1- 4 1 ,VV ' V :fir at K. ' 9 , g GN I xxx QT X 'Vg 1gIL, 4 !.' f g' 4' , ...., ,L f1 '..-L... 747' 'NH XX? jffvlllflgglf CW f A, 5 ny' ffl ,,. mt!! X Q-.ff Wi X N A X ' Xi Fl' r larsl .M,, -e if lkv al l 1 4 . V .X I 1 22 28 ,1 TWV, n 'f " 2 Alf-' QD if J lvl 4-,fl fi .l5lfIlIll'lul mm.. at E 'I'l.'.II'l II Q, my ra. M 1 i I I , .4 A . 4 . . ..u.z..:I l"lf'?' Htl S X GQ lt , f i M lllzl l 5 r f ' an 1 l 9 l 9 l ' "ll l E S - W' fs I ll 'JU' l'1mfl,lu ,i .1.1'1.'i 1 l . 2 I wjl fifll' P ' T ' ' ' . f 1 l M1721 fi .te ' I fmfu gdf full" ,H 2311 T EL ' 1 1 , 1 1. V. J, .,,,!f.- V 1 'V .X Q' -, -L f ,,, ' M Zmf . wif -School opens. At eight o'clock the new teachers are introduced to the student body. -Miss Allen's history class starts out brilliantly with Wally Coles affording entertainment. Miss A: Wallace, who is the King of England?" Wallace: "George." Miss A: "George who?" Wallace: "King George." -We all went down to Jackson's To beat on our tin pan, He sent us down to Richter's- We'll say we like that man. -The students had a special assembly with Mr. Haisley. We bet the teachers listened through the keyholes and sky-lights. -The first installment of the Junior rings arrived last night. We are glad they were not ordered by head size or they never could have worn them to school. -The Seniors went to Wilbur's And played Winkem half the night. David rose when Zelda winked at him But bumped his head on an 'lectric light. -Berrien teachers meet at Niles to see model classes of model students. Needless to say Niles makes a hit. -Is 13 an unlucky number? N. H. S. ties the Carrol Hall boys 13-13 in the first football game that our school has played for ten years. -Gilbert Otto: "As far back as I can remember, three or four years, Niles has had a Tattler." A new theory has been evo-lved in Niles Public Schools. Miss Crowley asked one of her pupils what caused earthquakes. She received this answer, "When the earth revolves it bumps into a rc-ck or something which is jutting out and causes an earth- quake." E941 V. 21 - f .If ,nj ' -'9 3 G N .., -The members of the Board of Control are elected. We wish them a successful year. -We find c-ut something today. Miss Talburt said, "You know the crazy house is in Austin where Mr. Macdonnell and I came from." The Tattler Stai is elected today. "Nuff said!" -The Junior Mask Ball is being given early this year because of Teachers' Institute. All come in gay costumes and enjoy a round of amusement. -Well children, Dowagiac sure took the conceit out of us. We did feel jubilant going over even if not coming back. -Jennie invited us, the Seniors, to her woods at Buchanan. After the marshmallows were roasted we made up new yells. The boys won with, "Let's give 'em the tree 1augh-Bark- Bark!" -The first matinee dance of the year is given. We are hoping to have lots more of them. Mr. Haisley wins honor for Niles by his talk at the State Teachers' Convention. We are proud of our superintendent. and 28-To Junior High who are having vacation. We used to have the bestest alibi We said, "All noises are made by Junior High" But now it is no use We have lost a good excuse, And the teachers all declare, "It's a lie!" -I had a shiv'ry feeling He whispered, "I won't hurt you, Today in assembly Don't you know, you little fool, And when I turned to look That this is the day when ghosts A ghost was sitting there All come back to visit school?" with me. ,, -,415 fgm, 5 v wjr ap 9 ' "JT ' '45 "" i',lllh5S3- -281 votes for Russ Finley, yell leader. Rah! At staff meeting little Dave says, "Let's have a different kind c-fla co-ver. They always have brown or White or some other co or." -New yell leader demonstrates his vocal qualities in assembly. -Miss Durham in Eng. VII: "I wonder what the men fixing ther- mometers think about." She also wonders if they think that We always talk about love in English classes. -We inflicted on the St. Joe football team a grand defeat. We ended the day with a real old-fashione-d snake dance on Main Street. St. Jo-e was burned in effigy and the remains were toss- ed into the St. Joe river. -Better English week! We are going to cut out slang and stop using prepc-sitions to end sentences with. I 96 l Much talk of skipping on Armistice Day. Looks as if school will have to be discontinued. All the skippers are disappointed. We have a holiday. Every- one's grief is noticeable. -The Senior girls and their mothers enjoy a delightful tea at Mrs. Parkin's. The speaker did no-t arrive but we enjoyed very much the talks given by the diEerent members. -Cc-lds are now in vogue. This was heard in assembly, Dave, blowing his nose, one terrible inexpressible racket. Pete, "Close your cut-out. Y0u're in the business district." The Boys' Glee Club entertains us during Advisory Period. We discover that N. H. S. has some pretty fine tenors. -Seniors have intelligence exams with sixth graders. We al- ways wondered where we belonged. -Another exam. What are theosophy and therapeutics? We also ask do stones float in the air? -You know that line of Shakespeare's, "Take, oh, take those lips awayg" Dayle Clevering was reading it In English class c-ne day. When asked if he understood, He said, "No, mam, not me, Why he should say, 'Take them away,' Is more than I can see." In general assembly Rusty leads in a few yells. Mr. Macdon- nell compliments the yell leader on his efiicient service during the football season. Mr. Zabel announces the football games scheduled for 1922 and 1923, and the basketball games for this season. We are all saving our pennies 'cause Mr. Zabel says that seaso-n tickets will be on sale one week from Monday. Miss Durham in Eng. VII: "Dale, what is hell, do you remem- ber?" Bids for the new school building are started. In first period assembly we saw Miss Hobbs pick something long and yellow and curly off John C1evenger's coat. But what we want to know is why she Went down by Dorothy's seat and stoodlthere glancing from John to Dorothy and laughing to herse f. -Definition of a lyric as given by an English pupil of Niles High: "A lyric is always accompanied by a liar." , The Juniors prove themselves champion inter-class basketball. Good for you, '23! Thanksgiving vacation is a delightful one for all. -At Senior class meeting Mr. Zabel preaches a sermon. Text, "Ye the class of '22 of N. H. S. are not dignified enough for Seniors but are like unto Freshmen." Then he closes by saying that he doesn't mean it as a Hbawling out." Horrors! Let us hope, my brethren and sisters, that he never bawls us out. Seniors have a freak day and no one has to be told what it is. Miss Durham seeing Red Darling's colo-r scheme of pink, red, and blue, asked him if he looked that way when he was little. Iit is very refreshing, we say, to come off our 'er dignity for a ay. E971 2 3 4 5 7 10 13 30-Report cards! My papa said If I was brite That I might have The car tonite. But when he sees These four red D's The garage will be Locked up for me. V12 ts 3 13 . - no 20 if .. S 'X up if' flfllliwizf Q" x kj QP' ulllili A ur :tl vc- ul' JA A -zqjfizgi ings, :V ' I ' I X 2 'i f iii J MWA -!' 3:,4'f- - ,M 1-Much talk about Miss Hobbs' advisory's party. We hear that Dayle enjoyed it very much indeed. How about it, Dayle? -The old building is being wrecked. We have a good excuse now for not having our lessons. The wreckers make so much noise! They have put up a beautiful board fence to keep the workmen out of the school yard. -We win our first basketball game of the season. Elkhart loses by the decisive score of 35 to 4. Poor boys! -Miss Durham: "What kind of a house did the leading charac- ter of 'The Silent Woman' live in?" Howard Cook: "In the last house on the last street." Miss Durham: "You're thinking of something else." -Bishop Moulton of Salt Lake City tells us all about Utah and Salt Lake City. He says we could take our books, lie down on the lake and study. We think ilooding the assembly with salt water would be an ideal plan. An exciting Tattler Staff meeting. When Maurice hollered, we all ran to the windows and leaned far over the sills to watch some horses pull bricks off the top of the old building. Then the working men disappointed us by untying the rope. -In English VII: Helen: "An illusion is a wrong idea." Miss Durham: "Well, there certainly are a lot of illusions in this class." -Gilbert Otto causes great excitement when he is completely vamped by a young lady of indefinite age. And girls! he even escorted her to the new building. Gilbert isn't the only attraction, however, for We have a peppery pep meeting to give the bc-ys a send-off for Warsaw. -Harold Van Aiken, a South Bend violinist, plays three charm- ing selections and an encore in assembly. Miss Swartz, a Sal- vation Army worker, who has been all over the world, tells us about South America. The falling bricks make it almost im- possible for us to hear but we do learn quite a bit. E981 15 16 19 20 -After a lot of preparation the "N" Club which iirst was organ- ized this year gave a very successful dance at the Moose Hall. We hope they will have one every year now. -The girls have the gym for basketball practice tonightg all the girls wear a smile. Today the boys go to Cassopolis. The game is a Walk-away. Cassopolis certainly opens its eyes when Frank makes a basket from way out in the middle of the floor. -Jennie translating in French class: "The man came to his ear. No, he bent over to his ear." -Miss Platt talks to us in general assembly. She tells us how much work the losers as well as the winners did in last year's oratorical contest. Her easy conversational tone and her di- rect way of presenting her subject are inspiring to everyone. Mr. Haisley emphasizes the benefits of such training and in- troduces Mr. Hudson. Mr. Hudson presents Gilbert Otto and Frederick Richter with the medals which the school board promised to any o-ne from our school who wo-n honors enough to go to the state contest. We are all proud of our boys. We wish to thank the schoc-l board for their hearty support and encouragement in our oratorical efforts. Don't we all wish we were the little boy who was bad in as- sembly and had to stand up on the platform with Mr. Zabel? 21-Big pep meeting in assembly. All the team sit upon the plat- form and look so scared. Captain Schrumpf proves to us that he really can talk. Mr. Walker gives letters to the Junior boys who won the interscholastic basketball championship. 22-Christmas vacation begins. The only thing that dampens the Christmas cheer is the doleful lc-ok on the Freshies' faces. There is a general celebration thruout the school. The High School Orchestra plays for us in assembly at 2:45, Malburne Hall plays "Souvenir" and Mr. Macdonnell wishes us all a Merry Christmas. Off for home! 30-Nearly everyone is so homesick after our long vacation that he uses the game tonight as an excuse to come back to the school house. X ff f f ' 5 ff f f '-"' . 4 R- X .E : - ip, HL' -11-K.-A 4,,.-... ""Z"'-5 79-29 H Quang 3 -Back again! Many girls added to the bobbed hair society over Christmas. The walks do not furnish enough sliding so the iioors have been oiled. All our toys are broken, All our new bo-oks are read, All of our candy is eaten, We are tired of lying abed. We gather up gum, books, and pencils And come back to the school hc-use, dearg After our long vacation It seems rather goc-d to be here. l99l -The Junior boys appear with cute little blue stocking caps with nice yellow '23's sewed on the front. -Miss Platt introduces her play cast with three short sketches to make us want to come to the play. We all had our tickets, so we were assured it would be worth while. Oh, what a butler "Dave" makes. We wish we needed one. But whew! We're glad we're nc-t Sally Parker. The first picture show this year is given this evening. -Another pep meeting to send our boys off right to Three Riv- ers and to Sturgis. -We win at Sturgis and, by the way, we wonder how Mr. Zabel feels? -Hurrah! We have some new songs for Tuesday, with very touching titles such as "Roll Them Down" and "There's a Tavern in the Town." -Mr. Bailey of Kalamazoo speaks the third period on "Small American Colleges." Mr. Walker introduces the speaker. Mr. Bailey suggests that we write to him any time that we wish to get something back on Mr. Walker and he will give us the in- formation that we want. After explaining the term "Small American Colleges" the speaker points out the advantages such colleges have over large universities. The advantages he emphasizes are the personal contact of student and teacher, the development of leadership, democracy, comparative ex- penses, and the bringing out of personality. We certainly agree withkMr. Walker when he says, "Mr. Bailey is a rattling good spea er." The Senior play, "A Pair of Sixes," is presented. Everyone says that it is the best home talent play ever given in Niles. -The play is presented a second time. Critics do not change their opinions. ' -Today is Friday, the thirteenth, And tonight we play a game. Of course Warsaw will be unlucky For luck is Niles High's middle name. Another game. We win! -The boys go to South Bend to practice on a large floor. -Much snow and ice. Skating parties are popular. General assembly for singing. The Seniors admit there is nothing quite like their singing in the whole high school. Their talents certainly are appreciated. -Cake and sandwiches left from the advanced shorthand class party last night are enjoyed in school today. Dark Clouds! Everyone goes into classes with pale faces and fast beating hearts and everywhere we hear, "Did yc-u get out of history?" "No, I didn't want to anyway." -Exams finished. Mary Newburg leaves us to take up a business course. The boys go up to Kalamazoo and win their ninth victory. -List c-f Hunks are out. Due to the 6-3-3 plan which will be car- ried out when the new building is finished Junior High grad- uates do not become members of Senic-r High today. New semester begins. The assemblies are so crowded that no one can study. l1001 1 if .J Lf 24-No general assembly, but one of our numerous canine pupils expresses his feelings 6th period. Miss Mackay giving dictation and looking through the door at the same time gets mixed up. "Oh, excuse me! I am looking at a man!" 25-A new dog visits us. We play Benton Harbor at Benton Harbor and such a game! Some of N. H. S. looked rather dilapidated after the game, especially Gilbert. When he tried to rescue Mrs. Walker from the howling mc-b, he received a severe blow on his chin. How- ever we got a few of the much coveted signs and we're all set for Benton Harbor. 27-The Senior class entertain the play cast, Miss Platt, and Miss Mackay at a banquet. The tables are decorated with the class colors, blue and white, and ferns. "A Pair of Sixes" is drawn on each place card and other pairs are scattered about on the tables. Adelia is toast-mistress. Other toasts are given by Miss Platt, Mae Marr, Selby Wills, and David Bennett. The evening is declared by all to be a huge success. We discussed a sleigh ride out to Barron Lake but some said is was too public. Mr. Zabel saved the day by saying he never heard of a summer re- sort that was very public in winter. After a benediction by brother Coles we adjourned. 30-Verna has her hair bobbed! Who next? Miss Platt tells Ruth Kinney that she could get thru any English class on her gift of gab. Sixth hour assembly goes on probation for a few weeks until they learn how to behave themselves. They need a nurse in- stead of a teacher. 31-The Misses Schneider, Milligan and Hobbs decide to see what the ice feels like, slide and take a fall. .ww W W! llll Jill! '::. . ,,g, c QQ mm? 0 1' f W sf , H' is My -lrf ff ' J .wil . U 'v ' 1 '1 ' N 15 ' I ltinilml lm gl . i e Z see ....,. M " m N- -i -iw MM.. " ::55w2!'vm1!.1l2 L 1-The Misses Durham and Snuff follow the example set by their co-workers. No serious results. 2-The employees of the Michigan State Telephone Company 3 give us a very interesting demonstration on "How to Use Our Phones." We can appreciate the trials of Central now. Freshmen hold a meeting for the election of officers. Mob rule, election postponed till Monday. The ground-hog doesn't see his shadow. -Pep meeting. Mr. Zabel speaks twice, Mr. Otto once, and Mr. Haisley gives us a very interesting talk. St. Joe really expects to win tc-night but Mr. Haisley says we are going to educate them. l101j P. S. St. Joe came, saw and was conquered much to our ever- lasting joy. The championship moves nearer. Mr. Macdonnell has on his new overcoat. -Miss Platt calls for recruits in the oratorical and declamatory contests and we hope everyone gives her his support. Miss Schneider tells us about the Colonial Fair. We unanimously decide to go. -The "Tempest in the Tea Pot" is over. The Freshmen with their advisors, Miss Milligan and Mr. Jackson, hold another class meeting. The nine B's very unselfishly gave in. This ac- counts for the virtuous expressions they are wearing now. Ralph Kizer gives sage advice to Gilbert Otto: "Don't have two girls at one time. They may both get mad at you." From now on this column will edit any future remarks to the lovelorn by this experienced young man. Mr. Zabel starts a rigid campaign on mice and rats. Beware ye mice! Lest ye be caught! Prices c-f cheese and traps go up. -We have a pep meeting to send the boys off to Mishawaka. They win their twelfth victory with a score of 27 to 10. -South Haven and Bristol are completely swamped by our team. -A new bell is rung now and henceforth. We aren't sure that we know what it means but Mr. Zabel says when it rings, we should be headed for where we're going. -St. Valentine's day forecast: Terrible massacre of hearts. Post- man overburdened with epistles for N. H. S. Marie receives a valentine with "I love you" on it. This certainly is getting serious. A number of people are surprised by Valentine's re- memberances in the shape of bent pins. Needless to say they were not delighted to receive them. We have a moving picture on the "Evils of Smoking," Sth per- iod. Most of it was upside down, however the last part came out all right. -The Caesar Class has a party. The losing side in a recent con- test treat the winners to crackers and water. A go-od time was enjoyed by all. But after the crackers and water they adjourn- ed to the domestic science rc-om and had something to eat. First grc-up of declamatory contestants try out after school behind locked doors. -The second group try cut. -The five survivors of Wednesday's contest and the five of Thursday's, battle in the assembly. The judges select the fol- lowing as the five best ones: Donald Brown, John Raymond, Robert Burns, Aleta Ostrander, and George Platt. There's not a new way left to say it, But we'll tell you just the same, Tho it isn't one bit original, We have a pep meet to help win the game. Still it's the same old story In the same way we told it before, Our bc-ys beat Cass and Three Rivers By a wonderful, whoppin' big score. -After a great deal of work on the part of everyone, the Colonial Fair is a great success. The booths are prettily dec- orated and lovely things are on display. One interesting booth is the Rememberance Table with Miss Allen presiding. Here are shown gifts that former students of Niles Schools have I1021 sent. In the assembly a vaudeville and passing show are eag- erly patronized. Madame Gonzalez, the fortune teller, is very popular. Dancing, cards, and tea are enjoyed by everyone. Mrs. Merrell: "Here is a little dress made entirely by hand with the tucks put in by machine." The music period is enlivened by a few yel1s.- This evening the boys play Mishawaka. Neither team shows much real playing, but then, of course, we win 25 to 10. The Freshmen play Junior High in a side-splitting two-act comedy. Junior High wins altho their players are much small- er than those of the opposing team. Washington's Birthday doesn't do us any good. They tell us we got this half holiday the Friday after Thanksgiving Day. We guess it's all right. The day is observed thruout the school by various programs. Donald Hoisington rushes in and asks to borrow Mr. Zabel's text book. Mr. Zabel is very willing but says that he will need it before the end of that period. At the end of the following period, Donald strolls in with the book and says, "Well, Mr. Zabel, I thot you were coming into the assembly after this book between periods." -Mr. Walker gives a long talk in pep meeting on gambling. All the public speaking students can surely take lessons from Mr. Walker. All those who have bet bittersweets on the game feel properly ashamed. But, seric-usly, we all agree With him. Last home game! The preliminary between our reserves and Benton Harbor's is exceedingly exciting but almost too close to be comfortable, nevertheless, our boys win over them 22 to 20. The first team game is not so thrilling but the score is just as satisfactc-ry to us. Too-ts and Muldoon entertain the team, Mr. Walker, Mr. Zabel, and lady friends at a banquet after the game. The rest of us understand that everyone had a gloric-us time. -Miss Durham in Eng. VIII: "Will you read, Lloyd?" Lloyd Krueger: "I've got a cold." Miss Durham: "How long have you had that cold?" Lloyd: "I get one in the fall and keep it till spring." Miss Durham: "What are you do-ing for it?" Lloyd: "Catching mc-re every day." Mr. Keats talks to us on salesmanship the eighth period. The Tattler staff feel that his points may be very useful to us in selling Tattlers. Miss Lardner gives us a little sketch from "The Windmills of Holland" which is to be given at the Opera House tonight. We are sure it will be a great success. We think Donald Allerton shc-uld lead the singing from now c-n as he demonstrated his ability in that line in the c-peretta. Betty Jauch at a committee meeting: "I don't believe we'll need a whole gallon of ice cream! Surely three quarts and a couple of pints will be plenty." l103j 13- 14- -l , W' l W Z ' H: M : MA 4 ,lgkx IIIZ4 f v " 9345 N e 1 W 1 f 5 1 1 I 1 .W W av J 2 , is Z9 run , WT 2-Thrift! Miss Wolfe explains the banking system which is to be used in Niles schools. She shows us the cup which will be given to the class having the largest percentage of deposits and the smallest percentage of withdrawals. The Board of Control at last have something to do. 3-Bank Day! Everyone brings his dime and lays the foundation for his future fortune. Some advisories go over the top! with 100'Z1. The Board of Control is as busy as the old woman in the shoe. A big crowd goes to the St. Joe game. The same old but happy story again. The county championship is surely ours HOW. 8-Report cards! Marks are very low this six weeks. It must be that everyone has spring fever. Wilbur, very excited after taking Bernice home, reports the loss of his "Collar and Dan iels." 9-Casper Grathwohl in Eng. VIII: "I am going to write about the Pebeco Indians." After much questioning Miss Durham dis covers that he means the Pueblo Indians. The oratorical contest is given, all the orations show excellent preparation and training and certainly reflect Miss Platt's fine help. Gilbert Otto, o-ur winner last year, again takes the hon ors with his oration, "The American Farmer." Maurice Bren ner Wins second place with his oration, "A Boss In Politics The next local event will be the declamatory contest. 10-Pep meeting! Russ is not present. We miss him but little Laurence makes a splendid sub. The boys go to South Haven and by winning this game make a record of all victories and no defeats for this year. dear." Adelia, shocked: "Old dear!" Maurice, scandalized: "What!" The Juniors got all ready to have their pictures taken. M Zabel told them to look at the birdie. When crash! the bleach ers slipped out from under them and the class took a down ward trip. Everyone felt sorry that we couldn't have a picture of them like that and call it "The Fall of the Junior Class The Juniors very maliciously accused the Seniors, imagine it the Seniors! of having something to do with it. We felt very hurt and abused. Mr. Kavanaugh tells us about the essay contest which the Knights of Pythias are going to hold. All the school is eligible The winner of the contest will have a vacation at Charlevoix and also win a medal. This contest ought to be well supported by the literary talent of N. H. S. The H. H. Chemistry class make peanut brittle. It isn't so bad even if they do use a putty knife to pry it off the plates. I 104 :I Maurice, reading a foreword in an annual: "Those who hold -Mr. Zabel, describing the method of artificially lighting chicken houses: "You know it isn't really day but it's easy to fool chickens." Toots: "I know c-ne chickeniyou can't fool." The highest score ever made on the gym floor is made when Niles conquers Baroda 93 to 10. -Declamatory contest takes place in assembly eighth hour. Rob- ert Burns takes first placeg John Raymond, secondg Aleta Ostrander and Kathleen Cox tie for third place. -Junior class has a tryout for the play cast. All the Juniors are running arc-und with books reciting parts that they are go- ing to read in the tryout. Most of them sound like this: "I love you," "I heard you the first time," "Oh Oswald," Cgreat pathosl. After the wonderful spring weather the snow storm is-well to say the least-quite a change. Everyone arrives looking like an iced cake. The absence slips are three pages long. The Juniors crowd the bulletin board to see who are the chos- en ones. The old saying applies, "Many are called but few are chosen." -Miss Durham in English VIII: "Selby!" Selby, coming out of trance and starting to read: "Let us pray-." Mr. Haisley gives us a talk in assembly on the mock election which is to be held Thursday under the direction of Miss Al- 1en's American History classes. This is to prepare the students so they will know how to vote wihen they take up their duties as citizens. Miss Allen's room is crowded with those who are registering to vote tomorrow. Big plans for the coming election. Election Day and everyone is boosting his candidates. Short speeches in advisory period boost the candidates. The Demo- crats win in the election. -We have a big pep meeting to send the boys off for the basket- ball tournament, also three others, who go to the track meet at Evanston. Excitement runs high and we're all backing our men. Spring vacation begins. The Boys' and Girls' Glee Clubs have a banquet and party. Miss Coolidge is guest of honor. -"The Tattler goes to press." APRIL -The boys having won at the district tournament go to Lans- ing to contend for the state championship of Class B. They win and we have three men on the all state team, Hank, Frank and Harry. We certainly are proud. Vacation is over and the front of the assembly room has dis- appeared. It is no longer the place We used to know. Bang- ing, hammering, and buzzing fill the air. But joy! We can whisper all we want to 'cause nobody knows whether it is the students or the new building. Some of the windows have been washed during our absence. f1051 Baseball practice starts and Mr. Merrell reports a large num- ber of applicants. We were to play Edwardsburg but the weath- er postponed in indefinitely. Big snake dance for the boys. Russ surely knows how to make them snappy. 4-Three-twenty p. m. The High School Moon comes out for the first publication. We are all glad to have a school paper and we are sure it will be a big success. 5-Sewing III, Wilma Otteson: "What kind of sewing machine have you home?" Helen Moore, dreaming: "It's an Ingersoll." 6-We have general assembly and Mr. Zabel tells us all about the tournament and that the results were due to Mr. Walker's ex- cellent coaching. Then Mr. Walker gets up and tells what a good manager Mr. Zabel is, after that he "takes great pleasure" in awarding the medals and sweaters. 7-First' night of gym show. Everyone says it is better than ever before. All the work shows the excellent coaching of Miss Kohler and Mr. Walker. 8-Gym show is presented again with equal success. 10-Mr. Zabel enters the office and starts dictating a letter: "Have you received the letter which I wrote you ?" Josephine: "No, I haven't received any letter." Mr. Zabel: "Oh, I'm giving you dictation." ' The Rotary Club entertains the basketball teams, both iirst and second. Dinner is served and followed by a speech. 11-The Oratorical Contest comes off at Dowagiac. Gilbert wins in the oratorical. Although Bob Burns does remarkably well, Dowagiac takes first in declamatory. Bob gave them close com- petition and carried off second honors. We hope for big things from him next year. Credit certainly is due Miss Platt for her splendid coaching and the interest she took in the work. 12-The Seniors are threatened with a lecture but it doesn't get any further than a threat. John Clevenger entertains the basketball boys, the coach, manager, "trainer," and lady friends at a dinner party. 13-Mr. William Heyliger, a prominent writer of boys' books and a member of the editorial staH of the American Boy, gives a very instructive and interesting lecture on "Reading" q 14-Miss Durham: "Didn't you ever see 'ribbed sea sand?' I am afraid some of you boys sit around with your eyes shut when you go to the beach." IQ1061 Echoes from Alumni The razing of the Old Central School Building brings favor- ably to c-ur minds the object of school and its success. Many class- es and many students have graduated from the Old Building and many have been very successful in their business life. Those who stand high in the ranks of graduated students are as follows: Royal R. Ingersoll, '60, Rear Admiral U. S. N. Cretiredj La- porte, Indiana. Thomas M. Swobe, '60, Lieutenant Colonel U. S. A. Cretiredj, Omaha, Nebraska. Stephen Babcock, '60, Traffic Manager Rio Grande 8m Western Railroad, Niles, Michigan. Charles A. Chapin, '65 Cdeceasedj, Indiana Sz Michigan Elec- tric Company. Frererick H. Brown, '66, Lawyer, St. Louis, Missouri. Mortimer M. Gregg, '73, Vice President Pacific Milling Com- pany of California, Monterey, California. Susie A. Searl, '75, Missionary in Japan. E. H. Hamilton, '76, Representative 4th District, Michigan, Cretiredb, Niles, Michigan. Dennis Alward, '76, Secretary Michigan State Senate, Lans- ing, Michigan. George Gillette, '76, Gillette, Hertzog Steel Company, Minne- apolis, Minnesota. Singer Gillette, '76, Gillette, Hertzog Steel Company, Minne- apolis, Minnesota. U Robert H. McMurdey, '76, Lawyer and Author, Chicago, Illi- nois. Lynda E. Voght, '74, Librarian, M. A. C., Lansing, Michigan. Fred G. Coan, '78, Missionary in Persia. Dr. Fred N. Bonine, '82, Eye Specialist, Niles, Michigan. Charles N. Dickson, '82, Government Civil Engineer, Washing- ton, D. C. ' John F. Dodge, '87, Cdeceasedj, Dodge Brothers, Detroit, Mich- igan. Ruth D. Tuttle, '91, Interior Decorator, Chicago, Illinois. Floyd E. Westfall, '94, Doctor in Ann Arbor, Michigan. Charles E. White, '94, County Judge, Niles, Michigan. I Thomas C. Hance, '94, Cashier Niles City Bank, Niles, Mich- igan. Horace B. Correll, '95, State Rater, Insurance Department, Lansing, Michigan. J. Walter Wood, '96, Secretary and Treasurer Niles Steel Tank Company, Niles, Michigan. George T. Hoppin, Jr., '97, Comptroller First National Bank, Detroit, Michigan. John Dickey, '98, Governor Engineering Contract, New Or- leans, Louisiana. Ring Lardner, 1900. Ivo G. Faurote, '02, Assistant Vice President, First National Bank, Detroit, Michigan. K1081 JO, lf ?g?T , ,, , 'gl -ig, f N x X , 3, -f Yff'C',':?'3.XxY N ' ' , ,,. :' fx IX ia X I-.QQ-73' i5.qiiN-iii Y X YE? EE? Twjme' ' N X X X X 222-fgiia X X X XXEQEHE lrffgi-12NNXXAk5VYf? 2 . 5 'X N, . N',lK fg5Vi!??3g X wmwigg l109j It Used to Be but It Ain't No More 1. We used to dance but now we wrestle. 2. Formerly at parties we were full of spirits but now we're full of tea. 3. Do yc-u recollect when "Ma" washed our ears, but since we've got to be Senic-rs we can do that ourselves. 4. Girls, when you were little you used to wear long dresses. But that ain't no more either. 5. Do you remember that day we got caught smoking behind the barn and father introduced us to his favorite razor stropg but now he doesn't use force any more, he just says, "Theodore, I won't give you any money to take Hannah to the show," and that is all right, isn't it? 6. When we used to lose a game in basketball, how we used to be disappointed, but we are never disappointed any more, are We folks? 7. Girls, you used to have those golden and raven locks hanging down your back, but that ain't no more. 8. You used to lock out of the east windows of the assembly room and see the old building loc-ming up outsideg but now you see the future home of all your descendents. 9. That day you were sure you had her in your clutches, and you said yc-u were going to try to keep her, and then the next day you saw her with about sixteen Notre Dame guys ahangin' on her arm and she just about fell over you and said "Pardon me." "Ohl death, where is thy sting!" 10. That day you fell in lc-ve with the good looking teacher, and then you were put in one of her classes, "Oh, gee, isn't she a mean old thing." 11. That day you first took typewriting, punch here for B, punch here for C, and here for X. But now Da, da, de, da, here we go all over the key board. 12. That first day you made doughnuts in domestic cooking class and gave one to a dog that was hanging around the hall. Next day the dog was dead. 13. That first night of the play, with your heart in your pant's pc-cket, your hands shaking so that you could easily mix a malted milk with them, your knees keeping time with the orches- tra, you step out cn the stage, trip on the rug, and finally get your bearings. The play goes through successfully, congratulations everybody in the play, the play ain't no more. 14. When you had that first class picture taken in the first grade there you were, cutest little things, hair all a shinin', shoes all brushed up, that little buster brown suit you wore on Sundays, a big bow tie, and a great big grin, and then the taker said, "Now children look at the little birdie" and yc-u all gawk up to see it and he takes your picture. But now the photographers say look at the i'Chickens and we fall all over ourselves to see them, and our picture is taken with us lookin' cross-eyed. l1101 Best Looking Girl Best Looking Boy .... Most Popular Girl . .. Most Popular Boy .. Biggest Bluffer Cgirlsj Biggest Bluffer Cboysl Best Girl Student Best Boy Student . . . School Baby ...... Laziest Boy . . . Laziest Girl ....... Most Ladylike ...... Most Gentlemanly . . . Teachers' Beloved .. Worst Knocker Cboysj Thinks Only of Clothe Mo-st Musical Girl .. Most Musical Boy .... Giggliest Giggler . . . Best Girl Athlete .... . .... . Best Boy Athlete ............. Most Persistent Fusser Cgirlsj Most Persistent Fu Most Original Girl SS Most Original Boy ............ Most Conceited .... School Clown ...... Biggest Flirt Cgirlsb Biggest Flirt Cboysl Most Easily Smitte I1 er Cboysl Girl ..... S ....... Most Easily Smitten Boy ...... Worst Knocker Cgirlsj ........ Best Looking Lady Best Looking Man Hardest to Bluff . First to be Married Most Easily Fussed Who's Who Second Bernice Brown . .....Harry Lee .....Jennie Howe Maurice Brenner Ruth Kinney .. Laurence Abbot Gertrude Otto . Maurice Brenner Zelda Zimmerman George Contois Ruth Condon .. Jennie Howe .. Jc-hn Burke .... Jerome Wood . Lloyd Krueger . Hyla Healea . . . Zelda Zimmerman Russel Finley . Zelda Zimmerman .Verna Luth . .. Frank Forrest . Ruth Kinney .. Laurence Abbot Bernice Brown Russel Finley . . David Bennett . Russel Finley . Mary Smith Alden Bayles .. Bernice Guyott Wallace Co-les . Mae Marr ..... Faculty Most Dignified ..... Most Enjoyable Cla SS .Miss Kneeshaw Mr. Walker .... .Mr. Zabel ... .. Miss Kneeshaw Miss Milligan . Miss Allen .... Miss Allen .... flllj First . .Jennie Howe . .John Burke . .Gladys McCoy Henry Schrump ..Carrie Maud Forrest . .Maurice Brenner Dora Peters Gilbert Otto Gladys McCoy Slater Coleman Ruth Kinney Adelia Bird Maurice Brenner Maurice Brenner Wallace Coles I :Mae Marr Gladys McCoy Claytc-n McCoy Ruth Kinney Marie Frizzo Henry Schrump Mae Marr .Wallace Coles Mae Marr David Bennett Maurice Brenner Wallace Stick Bernice Guyott Dayle Clevering Carrie M. Forrest Ralph Kizer Carrie M. Forrest . .Miss Mackay Mr. Merrell Miss Allen Miss Kobler Miss Hobbs Miss Hobbs Miss Durham Tragedy of the Browns There cnce was a person B. Brown, Who always was held in great renoung Although, I confess, you'll have to guess If 'tis Ben or Bernice I expound. If either is late or tardy to school, The other must suffer from that blamed rule. "Get an Admit" the teachers all do cry. "Why I haven't been absent" is Bernice's reply. "Your name's on the absence list, my little lass, Now don't deny it or you go c-ut from class." "Yes, but Mr. Zabel, it's really trueg I'll go get Ben and prove it to you." And probably in the next door room Ben is suffering his terrible doom. "What, you are not tardy, sir? I guess you are, I've seen your name down here before." "Oh, no Mr. Macdonnell it's not quite right, I've never been tardy in all my life." And to this list of Browns we add A D. Brown as complicating as we previously had. For Donald and Dorothy are in this same fix And have their troubles over the absence list. But these four Brownies one day met together, And simply decided to their names add a letter. They all agreed that Ben and Don This extra "E" to their name tack on. And now you see these distinguished young four Never mixed up again, no never more. -B. Brown. The Bells fApologies to Poej Hear the teachers ring the bells- Warning bells! What a world of scurrying their tingling fc-retells! How they tingle, tingle, tingle, Always jingling in my ear! Oh! it almost breaks my heart That I can't tell the bells apart, But one long ring's all I hear. As they ring, ring, ring, The confusion that they bring Tries in vain to rise above them, tries to drown the clamor out Of the bells, bells, bells, bells, bells, Bells, bells, bells, Of the jangling and the clamoring of the bells. L1121 J. A. Kerr Hardware Co. Builders' Hardware, Sloves, Fence, Glass, Paints, Oil and Varnishes. . Baseball-7'ennj.siGoU Sporling Goods. Niles, Michigan HEAR 0 205 Mum S" uv Ph""e3041 NO W That You Have Worked Hard to Get Your Education Do not lose the force of it by neglecting your personal appearance. We have what we think is the finest line of Ready Made Clothing in the United States today with no exception. in Tailoring Best in Woolens in Style Tailored at Fashion Park ready to wear. Ralph D. King Clothien Tailor and Haberdasher l113j NILES. MICHIGAN MISHAWAKA, IND. 109 NO. ZND ST. 607 NO. MAIN R. L. RENWICK 8: CO. MILLINERY 114 E. WAYNE STREET SOUTH BEND. INDIANA BERNARDIS NILES' LEADING DRUG STORE S SODAS IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC DRUG . CANDY, CIGAR5 TOILET ARTICLES I. Hains Cgiving talk on "Disarmament"J-They don't mean to give up their arms, but just reduce them, because you know it ' at all. would not be practical not to have any arms B. Guyott CEng. VIIIJ-I don't think there is such a thing as a true friend. Miss Durham-None? B. Guyott-No! He always fails when tested. Class-He! JAWBONE WISHBONE BACKBONE Some people talk about the value of saving-That's Jawbone. Some people wish they had saved, or were saving- That's Wishbone. Some people resolve to begin saving now, and do it-That's Backbone. Which class are you in? RELIABLE-HOME BUILDING Xu LUAII ASSOCIATION 102 N. SECOND W. R. VVILLS, SEC. l114j Safe Deposit Boxes for Rent NEWMAN Sz SNELL'S STATE BA K 473 Interest Paid on Savings Deposits Second and Main Streets Niles, higan C Bad Investment He sent his son to high school But now he cries alack. I spent a thousand dollars And got a quarter-back. A pessimist-One who says, "I can't." An optimist-One who begins with "I think I can." A peptimist-One who rips right in. If Ford and Lincoln Cars o Fordson Tractors Tun UNIVERSAL, CAR, Implements P. B. FRIDAY TQ, Authorized Sales and Service Phone 192 Niles, Michigan l115J Style in Clothes is an ear mark of breeding and intelligent taste. Extravagance is an indication of weakness in a man's mental makeup. The well balanced individual will choose Landsman's Clothes and get style Without extravagance Landsmanis the home of Hart, Schaifner and Marx clothes and good shoes Niles, Michigan If you are loyal to your school And want to have Tattlers alway, Patronize those who have ads here And let them see these ads pay. 'Tis the fifth hour in the morning, And with my hungry soul I am yearning and longing For some coffee and a roll. "Sag it with mowers" of Superior Quality The Red Line Company Niles' Leading Florists Dbonf 75 1HiI66, michigan l1161 "Quick, Quiet, Conscientious Servicen Troost Brothers Company Funeral Directors Ambulance Service E. V. Augustine, Licensed Embalmer Telephone No. 10 202 S. Second Street Philosophy of a Freshman I admit some teachers are cranky, There are lots of good ones too. But most of the time if you treat them right, They are bound to do right by you. Now I have found this out, And truly it is so, The better you are to the teachers The better for you it will go. -Raymond Knauf, '25. The Hunter Compan Artificial Ice Pure Pasteurized Milk and Cream H unter's Ice Cream 'Every Bite a Delight" Telephone No. 36 Niles, Michigan I117j cd' XXSXX ' J . K9Ln.Pf'Sii5r2F,2f..'bmPan9 .iey vnu, For Your Kitchen Nothing so happily makes for that pride and rontent- ment whic-li a housewife iinds in a well-regulated kitvhen as vleanliness and beauty. "Silo-White" kitchen tables have lent beauty and lightened the tasks of housewives in thousands of Amer- ican homes. Their beauty is expressed by graceful design, convenient arrangeinents and immaculately white porce- lain metal tops and enamel finish. A "Sno-VVhite" table in your kitchen will provide a Iixture whivh will be a sourc-e of long satisfaction to you. Dealers Everywhere "Sno-White" tables are on sale with the better class of dealers everywhere. It' you cannot buy a "Sno-VVhite" at your dealer's, we will arrange to supply you. Write for Descriptive Folder Kompass 8: Stoll Company l'11S1 A SHOE STORE Where the Fitting of lhe Fool is Always Considered. CALVIN BROS NILES. MICHIGAN Fads and Fancies I thought bobbed hair was awful I knew sport shirts were worse, I didn't like rimmed goggles, But goloshes win the purse. Rolled socks with purple garters I sure thought took the payg But bells on sloppy footwear Sure took my breath away. I d0n't so much like low cut waists, Or funny colored spatsg But if they're to wear hip boots, Just feed me to the rats. Oh some day I might leave this world. Yes, maybe I will die, And go to live there near the stars Away up in the sky. Then I'll look down and if I find One sign of a golosh, I'll drop my harp and go some other Place to stay by gosh. -Donald Brown, f1191 '25 - K jrk ii. 1 National-Standard Company Automobile jacks, Railroad Track Tools, Air Compressors and Wire Braids Es? r W. G. Shinn Manufacturing Gumnany MAKERS OF Shinn-Flat Pure Copper Cable Lightning Rods and Fixtures MEYER'S 5-CENT AND 10-CENT STORE 211 MAIN STREET CLAUDE J. HUFF TIRES AND ACCESSORIE S The Good Student on Test Day QApologies to Whittierb The richest now is not my peer The proudest not more proud Today of all the weary year I'm envied by the crowd. Today they slave while I am free. I th' k of them ith contem t. in W p They have to take all their exams. But I! I am exempt! H. Illoofre, '22 H. B. LABERTE "The Grocer" AUX Just a Little Bii Belief' Phone 200 1893-1922 Main Street l1211 Building Material and Real Estate R. C. Atkinson , , fem' up Awp c?e'r aus? ElEGlI'lU SETVIGB lilllllllillly T5 ASHDAY I A 97 . Q4,.q1sQ?f Wlgml 1 'AMX-5, - e -I IF HUBBY HAD T0 D0 THE VIASHING' A Flapper's Heaven A place where lass and buddy Never have a chance to study And any sort c-f working is rare. Where you'l1 never find restriction For the teacher's in perdition And the people Wear goloshes and bobbed hair. -M. M. '22 Paris Made Candy The Home of Good Candy f122J 1Ftiles waste llbaper Go. lpaper mill Supplies anb Goal 701 799 N S STREET TELEPHONE N 381 Rejected Contributions 'Tis an ill wind that blows from the chemistry lab. sBad Air-Ed. There's a hole in the assembly And altho it's Very small It has caused more talk among us, Than all the rest of the great wall. -A Vacuum-Ed. TuttIe's Grocery- In the heart of the city Where all the kids trade. No. 902 Main Street Tuttle Sz Zwergel Staple and Fancy Groceries TWO Sm 3 3335 E12'2l2.Ef?5iei Niles, Michigan l1231 I. C. Penney Co. A Nation-Wide Institution-312 Busy Stores Our Permanent Policy We operate all our stores on a well defined plan that as- sures the people of every community where we locate-Bet- ter Service and Lower Prices. To accomplish our aim we have eliminated many of the expenses that the average one-store merchant encounters. In Buying- We Buy for Cash. We Buy principally from Manufacturers. We Eliminate Middlemen's profits almost entirely. We Buy only Dependable Merchandise. We Buy in Vast Quantities. We Buy at Lowest Prices. In Selling- We Sell at a Small Profit. We Sell for Cash Only. We sell at One Price to Everybody. F urthermore- We Eliminate Delivery Expenses. We Eliminate Credit Losses. We Eliminate Collection Expenses. We Eliminate "Premiums," Remember - The saving we effect in buying merchandise and in op- erating our business is the saving you participate in every time you purchase at our store. I. C. Penney Co. Where you can outfit the ENTIRE family under one roof for less money. Newman Sz Snell Bank Building, 2nd Street, Niles, Mich. l1241 The Niles Lumber Co. M. S. Rudisill, Sec'y and Treas. Lumber and Building Material Phone 6 Found in Test Papers "America was discovered in 1492 by the Spinach." "The king was not allowed to order taxis without the consent of Parliament." "Lord Raleigh was the first man to see the invisible Armada." "The line opposite the right angle in a right-angled triangle is called the hippopotamusf' "Parallel lines are the same distance all the way, and cannot meet unless you bend them." "Andrew Jackson was called 'Old Hickory' because when he was a boy he was a little tough." "Benjamin Franklin is the founder of electricity." "Franklyn produced electricity by rubbing cats backwards." "I dc-n't know anything abc-ut the constitution as I was born in Kansas." "The minority is composed of minors." Mahoney Coal Company All Grades of Coal and Wood Telephone 202 Cor. Front and High Streets 11251 We aim to please Once you patronize us you'll come again. Moyer 62 Stanner Electrical Contractors Phone 910 120 S. Front Street Alex H. CTime 1:05 P. MJ-Mr. Zabel, may I go down to Miss Hobbs' room, I have to catch a girl before the classes pass? R. Kizer tDiscussing Hoor space in Geom. III problemb- That cc-uldn't be right, that would give only sixty feet for forty- iive cows to stand cn. Mr. Jackson Ctalking about gear teethb-When ga man cuts his gear teeth he needs more material. J. D. SCI-INOOR FLORIST Greenhouses North Fifth Street Phone 221 Niles, Michigan JAMES BASSO Fruits, Confections, Ice Cream 203 Main Street l126J For Graduation ' 5:3 9 ' Glfts ' 5 u S N' of the latest de- i fri ., r-1-if! signs, the best quality and for right prices, call and let us show you our complete line. WILL A. THAYER, jeweler Inspector M. C. ll. ll. Watches Edison, Columbia Phonugranhs and Records The Censured Alphabet A is for our Alma Mater so bright. B is for Books, that we take home each nite. C is for our Cards, which we know very well. D is for "Dandy" of that we never tell. E is for Earnest in all kinds of Work. F is for Fun, which never we shirk. G is for Grave, of which we have fear. H is for Harmony, that comes to our ear. I is for Idleness, of which Freshies don't tell. J is for Juniors, with boneheads that swell. K is for King, which the Seniors lay claim. L is for Latin, that makes one insane. M is for Marks, which we all make our aim. N is for Noise, which we never hear. 0 is for Order, that is found right here. P is for Pep, to sho-w that we live. is for Questions the teachers sure give. is for Reports, that soon away fade. Q R S is for Seniors, the class that's self-made. T is for Teachers of which we have enough. U is for Us, who write such stuif. When you are downtown STOP AND SHOP AT THE Albers Baking Company 108 Main Street Niles, Michigan f1271 An Electrical Home Means Happiness ole Easy Vacuum Washer Hamilton-Beach Cleaner Lighting Fixtures Electrical Appliances Wiring Blue Bird Shop Phone 65 fMishawaka Coach at basket ball gamej-Shoot for the love of Mike. M. Mason-No, shoot for a basket. Miss Milligan-What did you choose in today's lesson? L. Plym-The Quaker Widow. Miss Snuff Cln Assem.J-Now people stop stamping your feet before you get started. The Home of Good Eats Tynan Sz Walsh 208 Main Street Phone 103 f128l Good Eats at All Hours Interurban Cafe John Pethick "Peanuts" Abbott really Wears a number seven hat, but since he told Mr. Haisley about the bond issue in the assembly, he had to buy a number eight. One day over in the old building, when We had art class in Miss Champion's office, Abbott brought in a picture of a tiger. Af- ter locking at it a While Miss Champion said, "Some lion." Of course it was merely a little slip of the tongue. Harry T. Richter Drugs Stationery Kodaks Toilet Articles Wall Paper Niles, Michigan ll29j wmgx UGO E:-.S DE B 'E 'anim -Co 930 0-585 UO 5.-Cla-4 305 :UWC MSS.-C1 f-1.20.5 :mmm Umqg EMU nugg- C5 gd OP w Z D. Z O O 'E .Q E :J Z view of our Air-Plane U .53 23 in Q0 is 53.5 Ea: S-4 33 Q40 v-4 -v-4 DD GRE gon O"U ,CG WG! 4-Jill CIT! ET: emu: tow. AN MICHIG ES NIL ground. l1'301 Western State Normal Sehoel KALAMAZOO, MICH. The Progressive Teacher Training School Democratic Faculty Modern Equipment Live Students COME 'ro WESTERN TELL YOUR FRIENDS What's in a name? Out from the CAMP the MESSENGER rushed KNOTT to de- lay no MOORE. Over the LEE through the DAYLE and FORREST to the LOVELAND he went, where the ABBOTT and WEAVER lived. CThe MIARS prevented MOORHOUSESD. He summoned the MARSHALL, the MASON, the GARDNER, the SHOEMAKER, the COOPER, and the FISHER, and HUNT-ed the HALL and CHAM- BERS through but at last in the GARRET near the SILL the SAR- GENT saw thru the KEHOE plenty of BAYLES of KALE. Just HOWE he'd WINN the good WILL of these FOXY BIRDS WOOD be hard to TELLER. Deep in his YOUNG HART he knew the MERRITT of this HOUSEWORTH so much to an EARL. Determined to do what was WRIGHT, he ROSE early with the COX and CRAINS, donned his HOOD, grasped in his ARM- STRONG a STOUT SHARP BROWN STICK for a KANE with which to PIERCE the last CRUMB of GRAHAM bread from the BURNCsJing COLES, and with one LONG last glance at his PARENT, he set out to see the KING in the NEWBURG. When he reached the TOWAR in order to WARD off the COONS with HENDERSHOTT, he yelled LAUDER to the KIZER, HDARLING! KINNEY be admitted?" -B. B. t131J Compliments of The Forler Cash and Carry Market Phone 38-W Niles, Michigan - New Zliurler 1511121 We make a specialty of Sunday Chicken Dinner. Telephone No. 36 412 High Street Miss Durham CEng. VIIIJ-What is a lute? R. Kizer-I'm not sure whether it is a bird or an animal. Miss Hobbs Calgebraj-Are there any more peanuts in the room besides George Contois? J. Howe-What are you loc-king at? G. McCoy Cstaring at Jennieb-Oh! nothing. Forler Grocery Company 410 High Street Staple and Fancy GROCERIES f1321 JOHN BAUMANN HAY, STRAW, GRAIN AND FLOUR Poultry Foods and Garden Seeds 120 Main Street of all kinds. Phone 201 For a Standardized Business Education attend the i. , 6, South Bend Business College Thu BECAUSE:- Gnggmblem It is fully Accredited by the National Association of . , ,fm Accredited Commercial Schools. igmclenlschool It is so located as to place you in the best positon as soon as graduated. The reputation and standing of this school among business institutions will give you a prestige of great advantage. TERM OPENINGS-June 5, July 3, September 4. Catalog FREE on request. Miss Allen CAm. Hist.J-What is the Divorce Bill? R. Kinney--It was a bill that separated the Gc-v. from the banks, you know divorce means to separate two things. Miss Durham iEng. VIIIJ-How do you account for the pres- ent jazzy age? B. Guyott-I dc-n't know unless it is the advancement of civil- ization. Miss Durham tEng. Lit.J-What dces the character Caliban stand for? D. van Noppen-I guess there weren't any chairs in sight. Henkel Brothers Dry Goods and Carpets l133J Flmerican Ieaners 204 N. Second St. Telephone No. 129W Prompt Service "We dye for others, We'll dye for yo Congratulations and Best Wishes io the Class of 1.922 Ratliff 62: Kasler Chiropractors Niles City Bank Building Palmer Graduate Phone 1036 St. Jc-e Principal CAt St. Joe.J-Making an announcement in the balcony-There is a baby down in my office crying, is the owner here? Wally Stick Knot hearing himb-Here I am. Mr. Zabel tEconcmicsD-Are shoes ever over head? Cmeaning over head expensej. Miss Durham CEng.D-Daniel, do you intend to do nothing every Monday? D. van Noppen-Yes'm Mondays and Fridays. New Center Market Miller 81, Unruh, Proprietors We handle the BEST MEATS in the city at all times. Opposite Riviera Theatre Phone 504 I I 1 S. Second Street f1341 ul! M DR. GEO. I. VETTER DENTIST WSAITON nr norm Umm- 441 NILES, DTICHIGAN NELSUN RGDGERS PRINTER NILES, MICHIGAN L. Krueger-Say Mr. Walker We sure could have a good swim ming team if we had a swimming pool. Mr. Walker-Yes, I believe so because there are a lot of poor fish in this school. Miss Schneider-What is the word sign Ctprij? R. Kinney-I dcn't know. Teacher as a suggestion-You can hear them now in the next rcc-m. Hear them now? tmeaning typewritersj. R. Kinney-Triplets. COMPLIMENTS OF THE TWIN CITY GROCER CO. NILES, MICHIGAN l1351 Why Men Like to Buy Clothing Here They can come in and be taken care of in a business-like Way "quickly Without fuss" at the lowest price possible-quality considered. Chas. julius Company CHAS. McBAIN, Manager. Miss Lardner, after Zelda had sung a solo-I don't hear some of yc-u listening very hard. Miss Durham-Harry have you any apples at home? H. Lee-No,. but we have a tree. Z. Zimmerman Cto a J. H. Studentb-Can I get through here? J. H.-I don't know, you can try. HATCH GARAGE GARAGE AND GENERAL REPAIRS 199 South Second Street Niles, Michigan Stock of Tires and Tubes Stock of Ford Repair Parts Y l1361 Chas. Geideman Sz, Son Best Meats and Groceries Telephone No. 684 815 North Fifth Street Mr. Zabel CIn Economics a discussion over the best location of stores on the N. c-r S. sideb. Student-S. side because of Dr. Bonnine's office. Mr. Zabel-Oh, that wouldn't make so much difference his patients couldn't see anyway. Miss Durham CEng.J-Why was the Trojan War considered so great? L. Krueger-Because there was a lot of fighting in it. The Niles Sweet Shun-Ice Cream Parlor It's the Biggest Open Day and Night It's the Grandest Before c-r after the thea- It's the Cleanest tre is a grand time to It's the Original make a visit to this noted It's the Only Real place. Yes! We Serve Luncheon Phone 1135 T00 Michigan Wire Goods Co. NILES. RIICHIGAN XNIAIKERS OF Wire and Steel Hardware Specialties and a Complete Line of Folding Toy Beds f1371 TOWAR COTTON MILLS, Inc Manufacturers of Tire Fabric and Heavy Cotton Duck NILES, MICH. Acme Belting Co. Manufacturers of STITCHED CANVAS BELTING Niles, Mich. For Men Only 'peaq 1911 uo pue1s O1 peq aqs JI moqaulos ll QB 193 pg-Jus mouq 9M peel Apeaaye siaqs QU ulaod Sgq1 11aqLL S1I'lLIq3l10p O1 smauop 19q 01 Bugmm GJCBAA 'Afxoqs B 10 1S0qB 'e u9ArB JI AAoq9u1os 1no 11 pug 11,9qs 19q am puv Mouxi 01 1ou 1q3no BHS qogqm 1eq1 ueq1 191193 1no pug O1 saxm umuom 'e Burq1ou s,9.19q,L WALTON BROTHERS News Dealers 308 Main Street ' ' NILES, MICH. l13S1 OSTRA DER, GROCER casa Fruits, Groceries, Vegetables and Meats Qi Oak and Reddick Streets V Phone 699 My Idea It isn't the man with the fight idea, Nc-r the chap who possesses the night ideag But the fellow who's filled with the right idea That usually wins the prize.-"A" He and She arrived in the second half. He-Score is still nothing to nothing. She-Goody! We haven't missed a thing. Gafill Gil Company CORNER SYCAMORE AND SECOND High Tesl and Regular Gasoline Free Crank Case Servire Keesione and Mobile Oils I. 1391 Clduer 62 Company Jewelers Silversmiths Diamond Merchants High Grade Watch and Jewelry Repairing We carry a complete line of Watches, Jewelry, Diamonds, Clocks and Silverware Phone 918 220 Main St. NILES, MICH. Miss Durham-I wish you would stop annoying the people arc-und you. D. van Noppen-Fm not bothering anybody. Miss Durham-You are disturbing me. Miss Milligan CAm. Lit.l-Fitfully, that is a pretty well chosen wc-rd for Whitman. Miss Milligan CEng. VJ-Class! You people must pay atten- tion, I realize what you are facing but nevertheless you can find things worse. A. VAN DYKE FRESH, SALT AND SMOKED MEATS TELEPHONE 23 113 N. SECOND STREET L1-101 DR. J. G. BRODIE Dentist Over the J. C. Penny Store NORTH SECOND STREET COMPLIMENTS OF Ube 1Riviera Ebeater is Niles, Mich. Miss Hamilton LCom. Geo.J Where in N. Y. are the iron mines located? E. Repine Cblanklyl-Pennsylvania. Miss Snuff CCcm. Arith.J-Explain how you worked that prob- lem, what did you do? Student-I left my paper at home. W. Sargent-When an imaginary child grows up he can't get over the habit of imagining things. Marshall Grathwohl PLUMBING and HEATING Phones-Residence 481-I 112 South Third St., Shop 814 NILES, MICH. 11411 1 585 ' ' Sf s T ,.. -if Lg 5-2 ,,,. Q 5-as C 2 T '1E2f vii' HEX' , """-" Q 'j"'::j'''jjj'gjgjjjggg:::1:"'t'jfi1"':'g":.i "" """ A ' i 5 , .. A..... .4 ., ,,., ., ..,... ...A, r sl 'T is W f y , , Y ' I , 0. ' 55555 :I 157. 4-'- .. ' , A 'V 3 "f T f Q - , L. Q ir + 1-2 El 'N is K X-N 'Kg f rlwm 'NW 1 ' ' if Q lffw' ni' 41 Iunzffg F" 'NIE I F5 'f Wim s Q! X365 i .::1:m,. :I 'E X ::1u,. I 'Yu l .: l. mm i -LEM Wmghm Q3'j'u'M'i35fE-35i53R51IiE3agm N il E r 4 , a -ii .V11g!J'1 1 fi 3 Lg 3 H gf-1 tau. W n g'EmLm , My 4 W i"fi7x Q' A NV 1 TW ! 4QSFSSf WL 1 gil? qymifkxff, PVC 1 f WN' KN? 9 iw 3ZL4 X nf xwgg I ' 'kr if Wk 4 kwsffmxf A K' Gil-ALITY JENGRAVIN G S and prompt dehvegfhave buult for us one of the largest en ravm and art estabhshments xn the co nt Court s co operatxon and personal mterest m our customers are addxtxonal mducements we offer m return for your busuness JAHN Sz, OJLLIJER JENGRAVING ICO 554 WEST ADAMS STREET CHICAGO ILLINOIS -f 1 X P P l 'M Wie ,WIN ! 2 r -1 ..,, , is ...,..,..... ,f .F A My. M X X A ,A ,N , , ,WJ '52 'E 355523. "" 1:12211-fa 1, X ,fd X 4 M Xxx xx 55:11 ik!! I f ' f "" 1 5' 2 f' f. Q' 1 - X Y-:iss-. Qt-J-'31 Q eszig? 5'2- f TTT sw? ' Q i'1fNl?LgL7' iffias Giiaffakil '- ., 'f iiiiii ' f fit ' ff s lI:.'l1M"' " ami! ' f. 1: 'fl' 1 ' ' 1 f -Q" -HL ' ' 'I . 233 is . - N ,IA g I ..:,.,:. ' . F 1' ' X-1 -5 Q ',!-I Gum. r , R H :mu-:: : 4:.,,. 11 ill! T ss-w::a:. M Q l . ' " Egg I 1 NIH 'i f :JI : '5!- ,-N - ' Ls- ff? ssl'--.--.WS XX ,, , 9- " -- rsmiffx u 71':Ee7!,s-N 'll-1-X5-v-wrS,air'!,EE35J gif! 2 X V, -H WA Wm, W H 1 - Bs :jeg FEE P is Lf ,rg mf Q . 5.135 -2 : , KX' Ki J ,,,, EEN eil' 'ZA' .. s-X '- ,, sf W, we 5:-I 5-2 'W X13?iE,?!EE:3 fa!':"Y"':f5i "': . A ":"'i2!55f!P''SHEEP f"5W2 F25 "" :az vi- E' 4 u: 'ase2:f12azzszn1:s.i we feii. ii . " "Pi .M .:- 5'3" 'tial f'1iEE5f!"' f "" iii y :N . gqgg r r :Hg ::::::'Q-:ez 'H-T:---+-f--ff, w-'- rf, ,. ,.,f: .------T---Q -1...:m-ff- v-1:-w::w-fr: -T-1,--1--f...v-7 n-Y,-3-9---4 ,wmrs--Q .--- -M-.ff szefffsra si:-r-1 :1-4 ' iIE:vE' Ei?!5JL ' ig 21 11521 . g 3 . :EEE 4 or office: in. man rinci a. cultic.: 125225 ' f. ,:g1..:, 3: . i . ... 51555 253 .... 3331 iii" f1421 Niles Gas Light CO. OFFICE AND SALESROOM 302 MAIN STREET T. M. SWAIN MANAGER I Miss Mackay fLatinD-F. Richter Will you please take your arm off from Bob's shoulder, I am sure I Wouldn't enjoy such af- fection and I don't think he likes it. Miss Hamilton fCom. Geo.J-From what does aluminum come? M. Weaver-It comes from a growing plant. E. Graham fChem.D holding a deflagrading spoon. Does any- one want a spoon? That's all except Clete Forrest was badly in- jured in the rush. O. D. EWELL FUNERAL DIRECTOR AND LICENSED EMBALMER Motor Equipment Including Molor Ambulance Prompt and Efficient Phones-Office 1025 Service Residence 932 f143j he iles Glitg Zgamlz Member Federal Reserve System If you do not save your own money, somebody else will, and if you don'l get the SAVING HABIT in your youth, you never will. UN. H. S. Flower Garden" Weeded and cared for by B. Brown Shooting Star ..... Johnnie Jump Up . Primrose .......... Morning Glory . .. Golden Glow ....... Brown-eyed Susan .. Dutchman's Breeches Cupid's Dart ...... Bleeding Heart .... Bouncing Bets ..... Jack-in-the-Pulpit .. Poppy ........... Sweet Peas .. SunHower .... Sweet Briar .... Forget-me-not . . . l144j Harry Lee Johnnie Clevenger ....... Adelia Bird . . . . Maurice Brenner . . . lone Guyberson . . . . . . Arneal Brown . . . Dwayne Clevering Fc-xy Wedel Carrie Maude Forrest Verna Luth . . . . Laurence Abbott . . . . Marie Frizzo ....... Alice Platt Beatrice Gorton ... . .. Russell Berg The Senior Class The "Dry-Kold" Refrigerator Co. NILES, MICHIGAN Refrigerators for A II Purposes I H. L. SPENCER Tailoring, Dry Cleaning and Repairing 105 NQRTH FOURTH STREET NILES, MICH. Miss Schneider fgiving word, hoarse, in spellingj Ex.-To day I am a little ihorseb. Miss Milligan fEng. V.J-Thoreau used to take a bath and then go out on the porch wrapped in his reveries. V. Luth-John have vou any apples that you could bring to us for the Senior banquet? J. Burke-All I have is my Adam's apple. lliemech Stuoio llbhotograpbers Walton Building f145J JAMES M. 1oHNsoN DEALER IN Leather Goods, Shoes, Traveling Bags and Trunks F. A. REYNOLDS Hardware Phone 460 NILES, MICH. 209 Main St. Miss Allen fAm. Hist.7-Who can tell me anything more about Benedict Arnold? A. Bayles-When Benedict Arnold died they buried him in his union suit. Miss Durham irecommending books for reportsl--I like "The Eldest Son," better than "The Squire's Daughter." L. Krueger KPhysicsD-A Whipple tree is a tree that you make whips out of. ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS BY USING Lithographs, Show Cards and Posters MADE BY The National Printing Sz Engraving Co. Offices: CHICAGO NEW YORK ST. LOUIS Home Plant: NILES, MICH. L1461 McOmber 84 Company Real Estate, Insurance Opposite lnterurban Station Telephone No. 1 133 Sunday Chicken Dinner our Specialty All Meals Prepared by Mrs. Chas. B. Gibbs GIBBS RESTAURANT Open Day and Night Phone 51 113 MAIN STREET NILES, MICHIGAN Miss Durham fling. Lit.j'-The laurel is usually given to the winning victor. Miss Andrus fCo0kD-Girls, put the boiling Water on to heat. Miss Milligan-Why was Thoreau considered a man of com- mon sense? R. Finley-Because he lived alone. I. Hains iEng.J-He didn't have to buy any tools, he had only an axe and he borrowed that. Dean's Drug Store The Rexall Store f1471 A. R. HENDERSGN Billiard Hall Fishing Tackle Barber Shop in Connection 134 MAIN STREET NILES, MICH. COMPLIMENTS Michigan Mushroom Co. B. F. BIRD, Mgr. D. Pennington CHygieneJ-Miss Kohler, what makes me feel so hot all the time? Miss Kohler-Maybe it is due to some disturbance of your heart. Miss Allen KAm. Hist.J-Will you name all the great men in our lesson today? F. Powell--Caesar, Pompey, Octavius, and Cleopatria. Glenn Jones fAncient Hist.j-Caesar invaded Egypt and found Cleopatria, who had been ruling for over three hundred years. GEO. E. CORELL INSURANCE AND REAL ESTATE NII.Es CITY BANK BUILDING NILES, MICHIGAN PHONE 213 l1481 G. B. WINTER GROCER The Club Cigar Store ciao. BUTLER, Prop. Cigars, Billiards and Lunch Phone 329 117 North Second St. NILES, MICH. E. Rough fEng.J-He sent for his wife and other five chil- dren to be sent across. Miss Milligan lEng. V.J-David will you please scan the first stanza of "To Helen"? D. Pammel--Shall I start in high or low? Mr. Macdonnell QChem.J-Please bring up your tardy admit, Beatrice. B. Gorton-Why Mr. Macdonnell, you are all I've got. Niles Fuel and Supply Co. CGA Office Main Street and Big Four R. R. Phone 160 l1491 Complete Home Furnishers Just oodles came in tardy Teacher said, "We'll keep them in," Now the laggard stays to ninth hour To ponder o'er his sin. When you're reading c-ver the poems, And looking the snap shots thru, While you're laughing over the jokes, Be sure to read all the ads too. Wlliiil Prompt and Efficient Service Price Building Cedar and Second Streets l150fl "Thank You" Miss Milligan and Mr. Zabel, The critics of our book, Accept c-ur heartfelt praise For the careful pains you tookg For countless hours and labor, For patience without endg For helpful Words and sympathy, For the counsel of a friend. Our work is now completed, And rest is soon in store, We pause once more to thank you And shall forever more. - The Stajl Thanks for reading this book clear through We've endeavored to make it the best 'tis true. See only the good and leave out the chaff, And here's to the success of next year's staff. Here's to our critics and artists we've daily sought, And our photographers and engravers who so delicately wrought. +Thc Staf. up ,A p f f X! at I F F ara. fi f fr as r Q i t h' 'E' l ' J , 0 i Vi I A ,4f?f7'f"j'O W , ' Q , 5 4 - N' ""l J4,",..,y7, l , gg, f 1 I c ,ff y 1 , XX - K .? K-,M . '-ff, 'hgh ' ' ' '--e ' f f 5 ' 'e ffw xx V ' "'U-nfdgffp ff 12'-ffi:,fQ4..fxs4x1 ,eff ,lx l151l .9 , .w.. V, ,. ' . , - .V , ,.,. ,-.,-. ,V.:--V-g.gs:s.'1 -f Vf:'.4'-5?ffTui:rffi-,j. 11,-V.a,i,b'V542?1VS:'?g:,agg'f-'L--V.'f-.V 'Q ' . . ' 2 - .IV . V?-'ff:"i'-:PY-ii , wiv? .5 '9i'l"234 5fi?3ff:252,-ffl!!-3-aLbS??Q1:Pf?VFfVia 15- f-' ,Q ,.,.Vq,QV.QQQ. .. Q.Q5Vl:.-Ji? vim-53255-5-4 -wiki QQLVEE Q. 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Suggestions in the Niles High School - Tattler Yearbook (Niles, MI) collection:

Niles High School - Tattler Yearbook (Niles, MI) online yearbook collection, 1920 Edition, Page 1

1920

Niles High School - Tattler Yearbook (Niles, MI) online yearbook collection, 1921 Edition, Page 1

1921

Niles High School - Tattler Yearbook (Niles, MI) online yearbook collection, 1923 Edition, Page 1

1923

Niles High School - Tattler Yearbook (Niles, MI) online yearbook collection, 1924 Edition, Page 1

1924

Niles High School - Tattler Yearbook (Niles, MI) online yearbook collection, 1925 Edition, Page 1

1925

Niles High School - Tattler Yearbook (Niles, MI) online yearbook collection, 1926 Edition, Page 1

1926

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