Niagara Falls High School - Niagarian Yearbook (Niagara Falls, NY)

 - Class of 1929

Page 1 of 84

 

Niagara Falls High School - Niagarian Yearbook (Niagara Falls, NY) online yearbook collection, 1929 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1929 Edition, Niagara Falls High School - Niagarian Yearbook (Niagara Falls, NY) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1929 Edition, Niagara Falls High School - Niagarian Yearbook (Niagara Falls, NY) online yearbook collection
Pages 6 - 7

Page 10, 1929 Edition, Niagara Falls High School - Niagarian Yearbook (Niagara Falls, NY) online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1929 Edition, Niagara Falls High School - Niagarian Yearbook (Niagara Falls, NY) online yearbook collection
Pages 10 - 11

Page 14, 1929 Edition, Niagara Falls High School - Niagarian Yearbook (Niagara Falls, NY) online yearbook collectionPage 15, 1929 Edition, Niagara Falls High School - Niagarian Yearbook (Niagara Falls, NY) online yearbook collection
Pages 14 - 15

Page 8, 1929 Edition, Niagara Falls High School - Niagarian Yearbook (Niagara Falls, NY) online yearbook collectionPage 9, 1929 Edition, Niagara Falls High School - Niagarian Yearbook (Niagara Falls, NY) online yearbook collection
Pages 8 - 9
Page 12, 1929 Edition, Niagara Falls High School - Niagarian Yearbook (Niagara Falls, NY) online yearbook collectionPage 13, 1929 Edition, Niagara Falls High School - Niagarian Yearbook (Niagara Falls, NY) online yearbook collection
Pages 12 - 13
Page 16, 1929 Edition, Niagara Falls High School - Niagarian Yearbook (Niagara Falls, NY) online yearbook collectionPage 17, 1929 Edition, Niagara Falls High School - Niagarian Yearbook (Niagara Falls, NY) online yearbook collection
Pages 16 - 17

Text from Pages 1 - 84 of the 1929 volume:

-7" ZW' '- , QV "W ' J' Lf" . 4. wi" bi? i?"?'f"f' ff" if55 ' 5" 1 ,"'55 5I?'i'4ifu,VVi3k"7f+,ETf?:.-.f"'725 Hg1'iJf5?i'ff1i'EgS ','E5.f1g '-+3-'iris',',"-'-,jf-:tf3f'.:' fzfnfi 1: . X , .V ,:,.f,,Q: -'2' -If-.141-5 .,d- " .. Nw .' 3 ,3-E' L 132 -79 K, , .., 'V kb-, ,. .n sv . fm. .. if .. 5 1. . -f-IU i ,-, ,.1.,, N ,, x. I , , G+. ' -. ' 0,7 , - .M .,'- 1 ' .. I - . . ' "-5,.,, ' -5- 1 ' '- j ' .s1 ,i-is, .'-mf.-11-.Lf fizf? Irgeeyt , --i .Z 5 1. 5, -' g 'ff-'Q " ,f.f1- 51 115-:gf A :g-V 21'-Q4 ,e nv?-Q-Qfqf-4 , f5?' .t,' 31 5 .1251-, ,A Lis4'3ff':f .11-w,f,,E. A Q ulmiyil- : air :A . ,R-Z. ,4w,,,,,q . ,Zi .iv 5 . ,,fIQ9:.E.,gxZ7 Q,g,,L5y,g ,517 Jw, VQQKOIIM gg ' . Lan" 1,5 :" ' Q23 i , .W - . fy, ,WH ' ,' 1 f L. , - -.,- -1 2: -D .- 1,1 w 'L ,ji ,,g,,.,v., -e5"?1"',' .-..'L- S'-F' j - 221'-fly -Q wp. "' 'wi .4x.f4'9Nf-W' f " - , M - 4 ah f:f:s+f1 f , fr' ' :-fw,' 4ifgQ-Tw? . TIL - -:i'x ff? .ff S " -faxing lp 1. "" lfrxgfgm, I, lv I T ,frwwhbm 44 .31 I dwg H.,.g,.,. ,.,,-qw QV. ,ku 5 Y., ,H we in VL! ' A-' W7 Q- -1 My I., ,Q Q' '- iiaiwff at-.z 7. f-ivugi fwfqms' 31 ,htm . 5-W . M., H Q yi was "' ' P Q '4w., ,,f'1 'gave " " 'MW' 1 ,, ft h-, , ' " J- XJ.. x L, ' ,, ,. ' f .. , ' - X: f.- 4: Qfwf- if If r. a,"'ff .5 T - 2 '- 5" ..y1. - vinwz, if Qgifmilrf.-'f ""3::? awe-QT:-J ., ,ga "g:25?g1:A'9'5""'Kf,'7 f - ' ,.f'f'i',, Q , 4 "f i L" QA"-is Lf' 1"'1!v- 'i-2331! 2 Z' Lfl'21--Fai ,.i ' M ' V 113'-W: 1 : ,. " 'F f"wf' - fa-fi !'i"'1"fJ . 1"f1r.1- . 7 31 T 'fag ' 1535723 '15 0: :, , fi- -,f??a?r'f -f'.?'6:9"5.'.'34:!1."'f5 " '-3 KX? 0 'J-lg 4 1 -vi' X ,npr AFM, ,JJ 1, , Q .fi S .w 'X' 155, wx E-rv. W, ws W. H J, A My PM ., K -'E ffm A 1 ,- J- f vw. ax ' .J rj .. .Q - . A VTR ,., hh A V x,-v E , .. -' ,, , - Y . ' . . 'M ' ' 'f ,. ,, 5' " J: ' I- - ' A 1- . ' . 3, L f' 'f Ly x, ,mf-"1,,-",,-A 3 L+, ' , ' '7 ' " ', - J ?" Ziff' L'f 'f!" i ' ':1"'i3" .. -'fi we 'Q Q 4" ,, " Q ., ' ,,i.,.a 'Zi I, , '-s ,'3 " 'H-Lu Ek. , My W QW. .7 ,,1 y , Y ri , K . ,, , l , 3, id. , .faq I i A h, .31 -, 4 , -1 . ..1',,Rl .. ,I-wigs U Y It ,Q . ,-. , H-L, 1 . ,iff ., 1 Y -,f ct- 2--f f' ',- 1" 1. ' Z-4 ' vt Wh 1 13 fi - f 1,91 n A' 4 . g--1' gg, figs. gg N, 5 3 V ":wj'z:i,4.,',. 4.5 Q sf 1 ig- ' 'I'-,25IT.'g?i ft 'ff -ffi' vga. 45? V ,, .Q-?ff:,:': ' F, rgilfq . Z M- Qi.: .1351 5: '74 1-, 1 fiP'r,,.5 ' f 1, V- 1, Q - ,. , A ,, 4 ,,,, . A, D , . , ., ., W, , . - - 1 t -vfifggfff-ig-,4.,f A i zw K,-4-H Mgveg- . , ,Wit 'gr- L 4 -.LL M if L 4. 1-,ff ."g"1Lf:,- 1.+fX..u1..m1'a5.!x'GW-Q Ni" -4 rf-.rf .Y 2 N Q ,gh ,N - -g.-lf 5 V ,--ff ff ,ff - ., ,Aviv .4 V ., .x , . if X A .ahxh -. V mqiy G.. .,,,,ug? 1 ,,, -4' L ,F gf 'AWQQ AQ, Taq ' .SQQQ 4 1 is I wmgt, 5 x 1 1 ,inn .L F1144 ,Eg 1 J f 'if' an 52? 51,1 '54,-x. 45, 5 figs'-u we 4 AQ: 1, Lg? :fffHF?,2?fgffig,f",f ' i:,2.f'!"-w'fQ.52gvi?':-1":Le"f. S ' 51,,gf gy . j ' . wi-f"A .. 5 "L j-'ifH'?fQ, f,gF 'ff " Zw ilffim 'fdgf rlg - a' f' 9- " f15iiJfswi,,.-"g.:t- -H--f -, - V '- ',-' .-L Y .C 'V 1, - ,. M, 'Y J R ' V - 3-, . '- ,V-Lf, ,--5.3 fffrlx l'-F ' , ,,fg4-ish . f 5, - .Q 4 1- '- -uffj 1-.T...., . A .-11... -Mm, 5, - k , p.,.m.1 ,.1 , I Milf: .V . 1 ' 1 ,915-a f A, -, 12,5 WMI..-ygg i :-MA., -,mv f k may x K- V V' " ht : .,va-'41-ww-ww' -'?:zm+,'.1-,--1' 1-1 , K1-. . ' w.,i.i1v bfi f .12-'ffeg-:4 af -3 7: fwf , rf- ' -fy f f M6 ,, ,,.. , .,I Hiya 'S A .r gif H df 4, ay! fx, N f fi' 4, 'A -. .F ,kg Q x 1.553 ,ff iv, avg? UWM QL A ew ,gl X223-gmegxu VV H 1' 1i.'99g'Ci 'W A las' rjfwg' ' -- YL." L13?""f3,i', ffhbfrff .izhii-c. 5 :gn ' "f"'Qv: 1.f51,5 Lt ins' t EMI: if ! .1 2 . ' 15 . , 1: 4, Q , Q, 1 Q v up ,J ,- ,A .1 .' -Q gf 1 ba, 'f 4 Lf 3 9 f ,,, f , 1. , 5 1 . V f , -1" fx 1 .114 1 ' ,gy-: lx- ., ,L . X 1:5 Ag, . ' V' ,,.f.- -f q , 3. .M --45' A -, .' ' 'f gi-1jj.,,t:gyQ1I up f -:gig if ggi? .yr '14 ,Q-r.. H " 45-..1, Q?-xii 1' -5'2" 5' '1 Eff' " 21"-, " i'i if ,U 555221,-11-,.g: QL '-.p-Q-415 my -':.k:, x -if arf '+G-1.qgxa-f1f'i,,,:.,? ,iw .. WW 'Y' H 1-,gf A Lad v- .fx-'ff' 'wif rw- "3'y"' ,131 3 ' 5' ,uillfw-214 aff N - 1- N '-u f : N .QAHKW SJ I -' , , r .. 25 . A ,Agg,Q,.fww - ,, . f A " xyxxfxglvf W wi?-awww 'ah 'Y R 5,1 X ' 15 Q ff'-T7 fi wk ,ff , nf: js' 1 ,, MEL, Q I I I 'AF 5 - V1.3 .- I ,M - Y ,,.,..-'-1- - .-- . -5 ' -, 1. - - v 5 w- - , .L A J f' vi- 4- , . ,V ,MA -....- . 1. -, N 'FP gf-:erik if , 9 ' , Q t-, in " : 2' - , 5 - -' ww1g'35a' if F" V552 "' C7-T - N 'F X57 ?ff?3fV,J3ff"'r',-"G" V-jg? ,, ,.r, ,J, . W 4, Gia.. ,, :B t r- , if K, Nu' 1, P. W Nga 2 fi 4 E 1 5:-. -2- 'fi'-"f'l 'ffl an Q -V 3, Q' M- QE? ' - .J x. - 29 5-if ff .IRL ts-,figs 1 5?-N:1f,uJ -2 Egfw ' e ', L QM if ..- 'V' NWN' 1' we i. ff" 1:21 fri- ,Q , if -J 1 ,s5,.gg'2i2'1Q'2ff' , 1 3- ,,s1+ 121' , 4f,g:.ff"--M - c ,. :" M- '11-"vfi,,J -Z 1. g g, V ir' ,I ffv- . im. 'Vw ' ' r p 2 H -- ' 11 '--1-f-21-'Hub 1".2' 1' ' ,F mfg. : - 5, L' , - Q ml. . ,5A V,i,3,,ig'5v 1 J , Q. an .gms Q Q A-. V 5, A- .'J.-- .. '- .ff an-1, FJ, ' .. ff ' - 1: -, V ' :Y-- : ' , .i Q '1 3: - V1 W. ' ff .. .:,.,' ' f.. , , 'i ,, Y -, -in .. , . A ,,.- Q. f V L. ..,... - 47 ,N A 1 ., , V, A-ui. ,.,,, . s L ng: Q E, 5. 5' - , v f.3uu,15j my 5 QW'-I L ,W X 4 54, I' y "x Dv adam. r I sh ,Q up Y 12 , is ,I .U . , ,dv fn., .QL ,' r:A,Yv.4aJd vi -.D fb if -' Af -f . fy -- - 1-,-' g- -P. V w1,'.,1 ' . " 1. - ,,-.. . lj fffv 2 4 1 ,A af' 5, 5 ' T' ' ' P- 'vatfif .aw ,A WS 1 gi f ' fer:-5 - 1 , .' g'..,Q,f :: V - ff' L- vqg 7 ,?,:,,I ,, A J x. V, v w rwkxv, , .3 ,. ,hp-,... , - ,.. -.X r .4 , M.- 5 . , ,-iffy, ,I--gk? 4--ff S . V v- mk-Sm! . 1' . fa, . .f, .5 ' , Y ,Pe-95. A, ,"':5'iLrl,f"'xi'F3'f-'?' 'f. -- -- ff'Tvf55Ev:W" 4 1-, Qi'-gy Q- -. 15' pf, "1.3",.. - :ru ,, Wir -:v55,r.-g43g1e5jgf:-- ,-,Q,,f 'f4-i.,,v,5g--'f-. --.ug 1 If - af 'fff 553- 5 .1 5 ig : -1 - "" Giza JJ' Q VVVV 1 " 1 ' .Y Laffy f -5 'f 4 1 ' -. ff' ' is f y- .5 '--i- ' '-"M v,iu5.- 2 x -A .f,..w,,E :Q 'A-,ggi-4 ,-L..-if ,J-rwu t: -.Y. ., ug,-fA - - - lg wg +f+f+.f in r-1 4A f R -af .4 uf V ga -1. 1 Jigs! -uf ' 'awr- . ., , . . ,,. V . 5 . 4 , .4 . . J, 54,5111 7.25 .--gL:L.T?r J. W A V 1 J., FR 'Mt' ' J ,?:5zf:,a ' - ' -. w ie '- "w-sffilsw 4 -wg-5 , - f lfibtvfh ..5,:, 21-. r . 'tv' A , . ijt -.5 A 41' W "Ef :'gg" ij 1255 ,H U., ,. A T . ,, - , wk a1E 21 w ' it - H21 Af af f ff an-. hir. se A.. . ,L ., ..,,, H., . eng. , . . 1' 1 - ew '- fs A If M- , 1 . f f P -,gn 1- fff ' 55135 by 4+ ,' "N " 322'-q -,: 1 5 ,.ff -,ygw 'P31.,. Zhu J ',.-f.A-rf.: : 3 'Q gf ,mgyfh , J.: f f xp, ,iff '- Q: 54,1-'592' . 1'-"t'E , -. ."frf.3gg5,?' ,I ' ' I A- 7 5 7 I 564m V 'efff J .1 4? ag .K ,S Q. 6 i 'lieu'-Q,.N - ,ii " " Y-f .- ,'5wj"'G.-Gs 1 '49--T5-'-135:34 f -4 --iv? .,j?ESa , + -51' '-d' 5 " -'fl F234 , -:JE ' 55, If lg-L 'i,gP+.",7,v- 1' .:,,f , -1 .sri A1 . ef. -, ,A . ,. ., 'f . lx -wir, :iw-v-A '- sf -ffm! - gf fl- af wfen Q Q .sae ,JM . WF, 5232 .w .-.gf1,,kg,,,,f..?gx A ,Q A.3.b ...I I4 1-- V F. 455 ru 'KW 93 'iw wifi .. gi Q' ,gg '1 EEK 2 ,Q-wif. J, R lm? 1 ldv ' 1- " - , V, ..f -X :my A ,- 535 ' 9 3 " -f 'fT"' f. '- , gif L5' A, 5,3 J 4.1,-,i -Vx' 5 ---. Y r-.. ii., A 4 , .- , , :V+ 3' -gs' ' F' QA: ,J . , , . 1iLRf'L 'ls'g A W ' ,Ek J, sf "f as ' W V 1 . f 'X ',,'l'--"f.,:,ffi' "1---,5"'15-5 f .'-'Mi ' TT , , Q 4' : ,' , 'T5"- 1227- "1 .f n if '-. gf iv. avi.: Fl. JZ-1 -, T 132 H .f. - ,Q . if-4-"ff-Fw 1 ge I. ' ' J - - .- Www ,L -ff-'f f '1 . 'ig f an-1 -M,...,,,.. , .. ., ,, ,, -2f:f'fi4 i1xff 4 .lfuf jeff ' S. QW wa w , kg. , A gi, SE 'fi -'5H'f- "-in w" ' , , ':i4,..f.'1- R 1' 3 f'iQf EH"-pf5?f 1 ' ifafgm 4 . vs A -1 -A '1 43555 f 5-L2 " - , -'V+ - -W iii ' H Wea, ff- 'L -1 ,511-H 1 1- 1 'V'-2 -V-f -Q fa-S .-5-g5i,4if:,5- -:.'f1y QL- .iw ini A .ff-5, 3? Kgvf 'A . .iA R.:gf g y 1, ., A 1 'E Q' -' : L 15. R .MLK 314 mi ,mv 'Vg lm wflxfit In ,vs -35, 9 V Nfl, ,-nr ,BME 'Z 1 -1 ,b if .-. ..,+, - mf - 5. . ..Q. , V ., . V K, qi- . V-., V . Y, A.. f ,U 1. 1 Y, QM, . 743, K 1, ,IK i sv "' , gf' f. 455.351 , at-Q . r' , . f' P , z ,.- ,. ' QF' f' fx-ff 6- vw.. ,t'21.w.5' 25fK:.x 'iE5QlJf,'i'??i. . 5,1.x"vf-,"F- V K ' " ., .-if fi.-3: 1 ,-1:-3 '-"-f'-x. -'-.Q 1 :vs wr , 5. .HW Q. . 1- -v I 1. ff Q21 "vw iif-W ff' . ' . fl Ziff. f. -fi , ,. ..,A.+,, - V L, 1 fm.-V. , K- ., ,, jp wwf. L 1 " 959' "-.1 M, su- " "ffi!S. 31 ,gif Tgfih g? -I "2 4 J A. ,4,. .,x ' Y l 1 5 Q - , . ,U ,, -. , .I ., F- . Q, flilnc5:".. 951.1115 , iv-dig , ' 2.35 . .. , ,J , n Vx' -I .. v.,.... ,. i .fa . ,. 5 wi ,., A ,145-' 4' 552' 4 ' , gg. 'B ,., 'QW QM-f ,mms - f , P: Q ,qu i i 1534 A X, 5. .fm Q V' Q' A' -A If , -11: , Q. Q I., , ,f,- -1,-N , -. 3352 i5iam2ff'.+?"5 . yay f,f.. v - ,mpg . mfm- figffi M42 -H x ' ig' .w,'Sf.: f ff? 23515 ff' U , ei- '. H' 333' - A L ib .1 7 - 'f f . . L fl? A4 -" 31.1-HJ !,Lpf.5?":3f'4""i f -EIS.-5.'!1!F'T'f::MTvF '-f .f .1 1j'?f'2QQ,'--ii'wAFE'+5f ' ,'f ff52'iE 1w4'i4'fPf' f'ggv2iJggse-sf -. ,.--K , - J -' '-rv.-'y . f .V , . .- '1-Q V . V' ., - ff ,'f .l ,f - b ' , 2.4, A-Iggffigg if gfgsfr wifi? -wa-wb W Emma W, Af-'fb?Lq',i'fy: 'Ur '-q1:--.- '1 5. ' -H 'M ' 'V "' V " ' 'J' ' ' 1 - -. V H., wwe Ag A ,A W , '4:ff,n,.g'- 4- ,Mmw .Q sag?-p Q A. 1' 5 ' " 3,1-1-f- g3f..Lgjf.f7vg'i' Q- xv-fi , V 4 A-. v .fm f,,fA,,q ,-- u, G1 ' - - 4. LAI-3'fx4sft23lEE-J-Q , -fdugfl V 1.,wA"' 1 :I-ru: ' ' .-1. "' .2145 ,yf ,.,.. 3 . , ' --A X . ,' ::- . ,'- - :slr ' 'z 12, x , A H ,, L ., .. A -, ., 'Q- 5 , 8547, 599' .K'1:y N1 4:...5". , ' .ag 7 ' ":,1. Q - Y" ".'- rl'-1 vffiff-.2-2 .- 9'-V , -. f " J 754, W- 'Y,j v,qJ5,.j",gLg .V , 'T j '-1' 7:31595 .ggi 1 ,Q 1"x:m:' Y, r' 'ff -Q Sig' at ,sf 1 Q 1. " J' 5? P Y .,. - 1, . - V. . , 1x3X , :iV1,. : if-fra fb f f - "M: " 2 '-'f +64 kiiffi. -H521 ?2f?2C5 'Q Agijkf .. 'I'I'1 - ff: H' W' -,., Q ,l'j:.f'-Qi jjt'., . fqigz "1 Q4 : 5 , - 51.1, H rf--.iffy 5 Lslggg -Af - kk , ,K -WJ ., I1 -I-if .xx lnzthabn--5 . - ,-,, 34, .- V . wg .ml , .f ' 5.1.9 ,A', f ,f ...yr ,s .ln N mg K k. .-?.,,.qu ,A,, ,. 1: , ,j:,,, v. .HW , wt, , pn- , I -F A, -.-.5 f' .F ' 11 2 5" ' "Af ff 'r iw J 'M ! "rg 'H Y P' ' f ' 1 i - ' ' " - ' ' ' -'J --. .f,'iw5l3.1 Y U Mix -Z'fQ"tz.f ' 'im-' zffi wp' QE-avg-5':fm vm-beg - -H , . f 'mae ,, - nfs ' '- f -Q ,aw 5' 1. .ax . . x ,V f. mf L- 11- VL 2, :me--2 fr- '+1fw'fff-.a.4Ag,'. fs,"-2, v Y 'L '-'. - -4'4" 2517'?:!"'- . ., ::'1S 2' . M V -la. ,z -' 1.1" - 'P'-, Ai ' 'K Mf r, ' ' , m"9-'f.-1- V . V -'x Y -.N ff. W, 1- - '--i 'Z af '4'LY-- '- "'iA2?:vz,f Jw 'J f- 53 s- 1 gi55,?T.,i-'fix .1-.125 'i-41jQ..,g 5 ' Ay r- -2-gg.. , j , - 93,--f3ntf1Esff,fw:fjf? sag! s Q3 , I' , U F 0 L 551i 2 A Q 11 M F ' V' 1 wwf: 'F A535354 ff- 'H .3 f?4"k r 1 av 'fgf A 4+ ff M . .. .' -H. ,. J' -'f,,.. ,. V E J' . a-..A., X. ,..5n.. ..,,. .. . ,, ' , ,, p h A ,- ' s-N f, p 1,.- ' I - r 'J' rf .- 1, 6.-"-'Sv 13' :E --ng' xg., V V 'fm-': .- ,. ..we?r"-w.'- -:QL ,ei -WH, - - 1 , - . 1.-f gui- gs N-' -:SY f Pffwfa -:j f 9?i1"?5,:::.z:3'r --T a-flafklfib I .5921 '- 'x'?l'?R-J'E'La2'7P1r 1'h'2A':knis" EQ' 1 4: 'V 'Z".- . f' ' -. 1 ' Z, """? M -4., I-v'5 ' - - .'. ' A 'X " '- , 5' '."'1' "' f JV' ' '.,'., 'f""' o,-::':- ffl- B, ' 5f,.,x,.' ' 'K'-'.2k'h.'1w4'f "" iff yn ' ' ..- Q' V , . e.- L' -1 A L" '12 . A aff'-E - .. f'T'ff"Yl 4 - if 'f"?7i5f?, 's?P ivJ' A f T- T "r ff? V ' Af ' 'fi' ,sy . , ,, Q ., .,?,.,, ,. , ,ff . ,, , .,5f., , , .. My K, ., ,, ,. , ,. ,i , ,. M , . ,afyvf , Marg. 4, -lg 563, :gfix1.f5lfn'f ,fi -fu Q If ., nf in .e " if 'i ifwffglf-W 'ff Q? '+':-:.si'7e: q '9 3 HL. ,fin -1'5" 39112 is'.':""- ':3 . . 1. -Wiii 1' 'M' ' P.J,w.:'iM - "-1-1a..'L' .Sf?.1.'f'f 'Qin' -If :V-.F"3.f'f"'.-,":5 ' ":.'. 9 'I' 1-17 iff. 1- C -1, .- 'f ' '1. ff ' "" . ,.l'r'if'1" N 'H fm?" 2 W'0'R'-', 'w'? 3 f H "' 4E'+ 'W 'Q J ,M 5' ,K ig A, yt, :A , Mgwig f - xiutik 5, , ,gg gg, , A 'sfwftfff 355' -1-f H, ffwmf ZW-Lf 'X 'Z Q- ' S" Q 2 i?'2'v4ff 4'?'f f P 35311. min H 1 - V- -' ' -.-if-Sig iq 'jj ftiiill-' ',j',F'l ".1.'f if f- gfggg' ''E-!'1i'QZ:'-gqgllgz'f".j":1',j65,. :WV Q, .r:,,'5"if"-2: .:.' , V '- ' ' J ' , J F1 ci . ., .agif 'Q-2 , ' -f-V? "Lf - -' 'f H . 7 -V . . .f-11, - 1 ,- --"ri w 4 ' 1 ' ". gr Ask 'W - +1184-+-' 1- .,,! -,.t- --f , . 'fn , .f 1- -, .. L 1 .- .1 1 .1-A , - . ' 1 ' ' 1 -P - ww, .. ' . J,, F' pf, Mgt 'ai '- A .2 f ' . I5-".,.?1 -- . r' :gg-pi ' Ia ' , -, A :-f 7 - "J , 1-2,1 Qwf , -fQwguET5g'gT x '1 'fc wtf 4- A 'Q S B M115 g J-" A igfi . .f 5 reg f Q' , cj, wi' .sy H mv 9 4, ' ' 3 'WP TTI, , T 9. ff:-'f 353' -Riga Ti, Mfqyv b M A an A .f ,, . 4 ,.. ,, - .,. A. , . ,A ,. , .4 , , . . 1 ' - fa,..1J,C'i:f 'Q J ,-?,g.pA+,, ,,.1,.. , .l -- r . ,fa.,: 7.1 351-L-5 ,,-:law . ,1 , , , W1-1, A ,., f 1-A .M 5-:.Q..m , ,gd -QA X rf- , gl, 5 , ' ., , '54 T I, :S--:A ZF, R: 5 J' V Fr-5' ir.-tm-t .5-5: I. . 2, I - 77 3 . Jw JK, -U , - ,gn ' I as E525 I 7- -, : i-21 2-17,1 is ' N . ,N f : " A -- L.: 4:-A.. XA M 1.1,-M. . ,G . Q, 4' , ,n ,. 1. ,-f., . A -. u Luv ' ".-, -JL-'v '45, - . ' 'fax f-:L-341' f 4 1 . 15 '- fa L'i."4-. .- -'91-AQ - - -5 .- 'f - -W -'E 213 f -1, .. 5 gg 9332: 'Liu' 142 7 - 1, " f "'fK1p!'j-I'c.w:'5"i'x'? +V 3f+f4:fif1"f," .1 "1 1"-L-"' -f?f??f'Z2.'5 ' -ig, :H- ..Zq4?Q257-F" ,, .vin-',.f?"3 Pg. 'f K , Y- w 5 , ' ' kin- f. ' f"w"Q" A . . f ,fi . .as 'TP' 2'5"ff ., .Li Qi? Mia: ., in .4511 V - Q- .- 1 'f., 1452.1 ug , '.', ' V -1..,s-. fvfagfexf f ' " :fl ,. f':-Y:-fy 5. 3, V" fQT"f' s,'-' 9" ' 'V ffifif' 'V 152' ,, .. n. is ,, .1 'Xa W g f 141 ,J if , J 'I - . 1: '5 4Y' ,sw 5 '4' --ar aff?-1: Q' f , If A , , Ai: W , H V ar A PF ' as s L. 1 nf A -'3 If f H3 1 'L d:v,..:,:1,. fd lg it di X 5 ,W . -.-.va :J ,.54Z,f,5f+ 4 , , ,L,N:,.:,f,gfi4:' Q., ,4 ,.1!f:3g-ffl , 34, .. - Q - -, ' 334,216 ,. fb 4391, 2514 - Hr-7 , . ' 'f 1 .ui 'J .,:1-' Ji' ,- . ' , " '1L.g!,f 1,41-i..,,. :Q ., I 2 as , ,-arp .5 .Q 5 4 xl . . , , , . i 2 f',5'w-'1'5- J-iw Q . W.-ti, Q .6L.Q5V:gh,:,,,,gg'5., an , K, .i M 'fi ,. ..x - '-"5-sn.. Yagi -we mg fs- '- 'li 4' 2533 ,, . . 15,53 fx' i i-51"fif'Q3-f3'1 -'5'?Ai1 fag?" if if w' 'rf' 'ff 1 '75, A 'F' 'v s "'Zf"f12. iff ,: 1- - .. -wif. 1. ., 2 g ,,-ggxw nE'xg. - , f' -. ,Q , 31- Md .r V w , - QA 16"5"1-0 'gv"'1, V' ' ,- I, K 5 - 5 ,ggig1L:L,f A E 7 , 7212 I j : j3g?q' , n A .521 LZ- ,Q-51 F uw.. f. . ,..x- A.. , ,- few M . , - .b .,..w-1 " ' Mg' " '- " V 'f fifif ,V .A A V, -,M-.1 -f,..:fn ',.i,,.fgr. rn -.3 I, uf u N ".'E'- -ff--N." its -A 1 13 . 4.5, -vw 'E jf-'2L":""iF2L' ii ,,, , , ..- . - A , - . - - f VAM' 4 2 11 ia v- E 1: ,C , E WF-it I, , .,, L v Ad, 8 . 1 In mg N 3 .ffk mi .. . ,L+ .x.,, , .. . N' , ., , . ,, .. , , -1. , SH? ., 9 ,N ' ,,, 1 , ' .. Q. ' ' mi . ' - If fl 1- ASQ' fair- ,fn'.2. H J -'Ag-X' . -511 :. . Q -' 'Ha 1: '- fy' ..- f1"":1' , 5-2 - -5 -Wg' ,",5t1pwAf,Vjf-ug! -3,39 I 'gl 1- , 1 rd 4. V' 3 W-L N as 5 Q . Q '55 R Q , Q F My 1 A 5.1 l v i., ,AQf1ff5.,.:i-.pg . .. .. , . K . A .. .v , 1 . . . . .. ,, .,. . 1 , A 'fn 4 , , QW? W 'M V ,M an 1 f A + xpiggfm jwff 1, W f 'M ffm J f Q t .+,..ff.Q , . .v ,454 A Q 49 4 ' , ' W"-:T 'l.ff1??- .dy 1 Y 1: ,. L .V p- -if ,.. ., Y- f .-.+:- - ,r A , .5 'LU' - WL Ms1"7eiSg4K'1. J ' ies. M' A . ' ' 'aff Q4 " U-ggizflgi ' Y ' 1 - 3 w , , ,W , . n fs- , . 'fa ,I ...w a M,.,, , ' f 4 - -f, -' Q'.1f, ' '+gsQ,.:- -- ' S 3 -1 ., ,Y .T"v" ':- ' H1 - - V-f. iw ,-'S Qi ffffx frs ' f f ff.ig?5EfE9f33g+1i'a-,f- L- E: - .N - . 1,--:f -- -. -V-' '- - H : --Ya ' -f..f-2.-W-,,, A' H ., Q., Y iw- .eff -fr. Q. K.. ,uv 'rf ,V ' 4- 5 , , ,wr frziw, . ,H , k,1,..,"' , ., M . .wwru .,..q.,,N4,., . .A - .ggi AV . .. 'Y Q. Jak-43, it ,E,Z ,x, ,., V. ,L 5 as J N . ,, A , .Ir 2 T:-'?j:Sp-5"'f'f'?-31" 'E , ,4 rarg qqw ,W . Mufwf ,I 1 Q. :,t k1, g, ,tm-, ,LEU 5,,aRg9g:.gi, Y M . , '9 .W I 7'. ,' 2mff'1L , , . . 'L-" 5345 H a R ' , 2 AW., . ,, "NYM QW -, 4,4 is- .av 1' '4f.x,- 45 yrs F , 2. -4. 2 b ff '21 :ff , ,,. W, M' I 1 .52 A: 5: ifF+ f" ' ' 15+ ni? -4: 1 -- ' . - . m a y. W-E,E..,f.,,w mga -M a , , gil.-fm . .. . 5,1 gl . .. Ava M. J,,! -1.-?f-99 i y 5 1 M 4 Shir' 1,1 .fu A .,,, max .-"pl, : Y Me' ,- , I W 1.4 f. , . - x:.fw .A- ,A , -,pg , . -.V :N H, qw, L- ' 43 -' - :ws 1 - vf-H349 ,, ,ffiggw 1 M, -:f i 1'e.'3, , 'A g gpg N - ' 1+ f f ' 1 'I" 2-E5 4 -fifiii, U 7,?'F1Jf 'El?2lv?L'.Ql'fil 'f5 g . 4?:ef' W L Si-gf ',, ' f-ii " 1'iQ 'V.'fI-'QQ '. t . ,. A, I t , . V , , ' ,'.,,-+- -12'.., .j. '1-:,1+vgfiiTr,,-:Zi , ,V ,Q-:, g'1xgws,.5fq . N-.,p":a,,,lfe- 1' ,Q 41: .W',',g -rv. '. : ., i'k,, 4,.. -w g' "wr i,gig,,,' 1" - 'f.5 .., , 335 axis? 3fzZw,,fLg-.f1Q4'N -537: "1"- -' i w 1 -,' ., gf '.,s . 1' -1: .1 " . P'-"f3. :7i"1' f 'ST4 -' W- "f ' if 1 -. 1 ,qQfQ.F. 1 . ' r-EJ 5 '.- 'f:-' 5 . ' tal., d'L'V - YL, M: 5 ,, -. A'-,Q Q44 'M i f-arg-JY: . .i higklqzfwji-g uv- ln? 24.5 fp. , E , Ep wi 4 In 4' 'Q - is J if 'm l' ji ..-, , ' jjf' vi: -JZ' H 'A g'KA:5,.' " -I: ' .bl-V, A - i f X ' .. " sig? '5g+gfv?ag,.'55fFY' 'f '3,,, -gi'?:1v1e'r3' 'f,3 'fM ?"f ?,..i.. ' 'Q :f '1 ' '1 ' H, 'sz' Alu il , V+? NF'4.iR?'-:S 1 vs .1 ff 1?' 1 3 .5, .TQ 5 Us il ,- -3. 1, ,- .i ,gb ,gi-ini A L,s,f :,g V1 -'gi 1 t 255335: Aix 'tkei-P M -1-,PE .i ,Eli- rival .K F 8 .,, +L . . . V. ,Y ,AL .. V, ,. -I V it b e. 7.1, ' V -N l : N .-ww H gf, ,vu h , gg-.-. s. v,.e FLW - jr, Q-131521: .,, . L x 2. ff"f :iff . 3 5 f i U T, . fi ' ,L , W2 fy -' --ff 'Rf 1: ii ff' 3 T2 I , 'ff' ,A A 2- 1-1-- K. If an ff wav'-'W Q W 1 Ky , 2 ""' -. pg 1, ug gli ,--V - .M My . -, My Jgafqfzfwv' ff' ' J-sw 3: his We 1 jiff K , 1 ig. ,H Mwml, . ff' L' ' .Qi 4 - li fl g w 55 ' if 4.. Q . ff X ii - I 1 LJ," ',,'kf" T ' aiu i Q. iyry- L .,f' Q. 9 L - 41.-Q 5, n.i53l'5 uf-3 'wkgw I 2 , 1-, - V, - gfw xrs 3-.3,4,fi"-ff 1 4- k Y f . 4 MJ- '. x-.11-A ' .y V mf 1., ' : , --'r - ,,-, , .. ' ,-. A . -7-, 134 ,,.' .- V waxy W 2'-"f " 'Q 1 GX. 1 -'Eiga -3511 3-HV, ,ka-,' 'qryi' 'Ty "-is '-ty " f -,,gff5+f'.f-,,j5 1,g eirw-.Vff I pq . 1-' f 4' ff' -: I 2. ' I . ' f 4-,. ,H Ml-. 1 Quay.-, 1 . r . QE : Pier' 2- 43 "ai" ' N . '-1' ,x1 ,?rIa,,:.ii'gj:g ' . f' mg. -Wx , wx H -F Y . , ,. A bfi. A, ,iff V Q.Q::.l-,A JV. J: , la, L I if 5, 1 .HQ .. ' 'i"' aah-giixff 'ifwf QYQLTA1 fkrgfu A " "Q" 'H A ,A Ap..u ' ,f ,, fs"-.Q'-',1,f? - ...M ., .,., , 1, ,. , . H .. , ., , 1 ff, ,ET : -ff' W' W' A yi -v' ' 'r 1- 'kt ' ' u i 1 in'-Pm' if ix "f A in f -' 1i'f1a??i.? Z- , ' A " 2' 'Q up A , S .Y .,-f. , ,M .p -ffhgmc. .hfwv lf may z . .,E,,a E-gvqp ,ip . 2 iq V. , 33:81. .ff-,ig 'E .Y Q: z3f,qA5Q,:-5l., A ,L5.gN -fgmi, V 5,5 V- -,fn , .'.w- , H .. f ,559 1. ag ,Q kim ww ,,":g,,g?.- .wx -- -"-ww 22" -A '15 " A-P vu f' :I-'12-'-5' ' :L 'i.i'2 'W A-' 1 Y vr- ,.fvf?f?+H , ,-z'11.1.fs s.:? . 'Arr i- ' ' -W' W5-"P - f 4- '1Pr:fnw"fEYu- EJ" gi?'N'm3b1'f - ' .hw if-'WY , , A ff: ff ff' .. qg,.ff, f,Qi,dx.QP: P -.H .f.N.u.n,,Q dna- W3 43,51 me -wk- if- 1 iff, Q U, 1' gf- fx -' 1 . a U' P A 1: ' ,, ,p 5 , ,3.f,":r:.f2 . I ' ' -' ,:.-.4rg.- :H 1--:-1 -' '1 ifln-,T q V. - '., S ,. x, " gqixi-2.1 1 j 1, "1 F Y-'9 1 A ., Ae Jw' yi, ,Y1'k5'j! " , ' X' -s F' N5 ' " ,, 6 , .l H . .3 4, ,Mk 5 i, ,,,,.,,.l ,F ,. .. , t A- . bf, ,M 5... X Hr? W-"f'x.,g fa ff ga rw 59" " QM? .f'f2Q-52 x. ,AEE 1. 4 9 4 Q G1 R at 2'9" ' rd g J :shi R 'rag in' 1 af -iffxalk jafhxm 'H Q' 5 Lg , ,1 -.1 1, r- ,, , 5. w-1 V L hr., V ,. , id., - , 1. , ' .' fr., - . - -- fl ' gg -.glfl ff. 2 1 ' .,., -y Qw A U Ms. -.1-S, .,. . , if-ff' ' '. - .I Liffl, 1 f"f :I ,, 1 Y: ,J f', ,-ia. U T. ' -' 4,fQ-"G1i 75 ??:2f."' 5-.uk r' FT" ', ff , -113-',.,g. -. . Q,-Al ,I '- 'n erd T .gh - '7 -f .gr lggfr . psJ"'7 U 1, ' ,z ' f 4 f LQWQ -- + 1 , we ,-1 gl -. -"H, :.. - L :' " 1'?1.+'-.'3 .E - ' 'ff ' ' 1 4-ff." . , F fy . . V- . .-?5,"5r-' .. ,, , I 13 '34 , .k,,f-',., ' 'S' .V , ' 5 , ' .'1g?,' ".-T, 4:51 -. --I 4' 5 .- ,K ,Q 5 Q.,-1: ,K .H Bi, gwg 'wr 5 :X -'W 13 , .?,,a,?gNff M. ,-. wx- 1 ,-A23 K: - ,f -P5 15 4341- kv, -. 14-..- iii Q -:J 1' f -wg, ., 11 gg -ggi .--f,fi,5 ',,f-',.',, -i g z. -ig.. 'in' Jia ,549 fx 14- ,Q 55-xjibrd 'iff " M x fqpgva EJQHSFH 'wkjffgin " X 44. 5 251 ,l ,fyfq 4, if QKJWE ' T '51-3 '-f W1 'Mist' 5 gf '12 Ji' fwwm ax.: E 1 'gin --6.1 , 'Q' ,, 3,7 F fa 'QE' ' . 5 . . " " 31- H51 '- f f f ','iTi'f1,f.,.:A-5 'ff ' ' L 4:7 " 4 , Si: "F . ik ' " ' ,. - , 1 f .- X .f , , , " , V -Jn W--,".-,. ' f-- 4 - -. - '. 'Q1f fe- ,v'2+1.v.-. ,VI V ,'.f.,.C ' Shi' ,-A-2: '1 r- V 2.31 1" 5: f" - '. .. X. -- ,' 1 .' H' -' ' ' 5, . me , g ff ng? t11f" -v.ii--'j:'A- A, b , ' v L. -74, f":i:.,'?S iff! x, .., Mzlfklv, . 15' X' , . ,. V , -. , x- .-.. -A .. rf, fr . f-N ,. .Q .2 V ., -, ., fi V ,ii -1 .cv YA vp I y L?l ,3,, qu, W .i r ,? n,., , , . qgg:'si5?Q111Lyg7,', .sf .rt.L,. :. F ., J .- ,, :L , ,.,. gg 1 :F- I 1, ,e-,IV If.: - A .-, .J ,, , 11 gf 1, J Y- .-f.Y, A - M-Q 5 . fa f-,.r . 5 , ' ., . . . M. '-if TI V ? '- 1 " V gaffi ' '2'f'f""'?. 9 'Q'f'g:i "ig-'-'an n ' .: 5?'Q - -T'- f-2-P5-QQYQ N"3?5'1Z1f'4??M5'-f4?1"' gfh' 8.22 Eff' W 2 'EE Wgngf 1:52, Nw ' 24- +V" , swarm M We 32,1 A :fn ,A 'z f , w ',a.g ,..e,35: .21-glifg E jug-5' '- , -1: .Q 35.451 435. ' .igzr V 'r , 3, iaggz, ,j-,,:,,,.- . 4. V N. ,, ,:'w. '- ., 2 - ,qf , ., 1, , W . V-.kr-fl - " -- ' ,f"!"" 24, .,f -4:q,f-- .bs - -:J , '. fry," ,- mfv- ff-x'b'v, ig- 'f'Z5J"Li'f4Hv-,rf-435 v. ,I 'I 5 Y AM! -. 'iv ,-' ' ,ao S Ek' AAS 'J 4 1 3 sf 'if ,aw ,, M, gi- ggiw' if 37' 'L 7' 5 . I va- "3"bP-- I '- WN' A f .5 diff' -If mafia, +'+"'2-4473? 4 ff?-if 'sg-, -'PHZQ 'A ?",4 nf.. v vF1,3iPa-ffgv., fzalf :fig Y 24 U f- W, . r 4 H ' ff " v f W K , f- ' 21.6 , sm " A Z . Ps' rg . 'ff ul 1 X' .1 H' 4 Jw ' if rig U? 4" S , . . if-Q guy . L ,f Y P' f ,,g, ,. , f f ' ,Qs gg . , A l Qwfp v . 1 A L je' 4'5f+w3'fl N 8 'fi g my 'QM Cg?"7 f9r41-viqg' wffd 'fwfmx 'P' X' f., ' xg L' F- wa wr.. ,Q an ' 'PE Hg . N ' ggi K ' 35.4 if-25: it sg ,R gi In ,A 4? 'ug' . .-,w4H LM' 1? X , "-bf T' Q, HW " 1' :gm 'Sr xg .s u kv Q'-'fiif ii J. fi' , . N 4 1: A 34 53? ' 0. in '11, 1 ' W vi ' .J , L :- g Hi" h m 4?x,,.-,fu gt 6 , , . ,. 4 ,. T:4Eff?4I?' Q fi 9 . .- H .'-w'f2i- ., .f-ff-U--Q. f g' -g3mfsf"-Siqgfr, .,'gY"'25 ef '-13Qg"' - M X mia F ,..:,:: . .,a: ' I-"s it f .1 ' .Q 'sat-1 011 92?-fi'-'ff-'?F'L5a1TPf:"'55f5-'3'af ., -, 3 -fi , ' , ., X rj ,Vg -An - . - .t m in '- f '. - 2" 4 l wiki?" ,ffsiff Qmif Fwy --- .H . .. . . . . V . ,. . , . . , , .. . . . . "'?Q- . ,. f .f,:,,f:-5sj- Qflf,-ig.-, .2 ,1u,x?.gJ!5,f A , - ' AL AW-f , y, , LA lx. if L. ,:' " . up-r. ' 1:5 ph - figs: ff -f -E'-2 ' , , ,.f-4 i,,:,i,w"5:v:'fi c Q -, -1--,Q-e+-sad N- --fr, 'sf -- " ' ' .- . -f r ' -2- ' ' - ' -v - - - ' - Vw 1 - H 'v ' - -M V - A ,, . ,, , ,,,,,.-,-4, r.,,,,,- ,, , ., . , .,,l,,,., W ., , Q, .. YZ, .MH .. W., , - ,-. 5 Kp . 1 'Im ,,, 4' K, if 12 ,H a 4186- T ,.,,, ,-, . ,. A .. Q, .. ...-V .. ., -fn .,, ,-.. .,.,-.r,AN . ,nf , L., ,. .. L . , , .V L ,S , P.. E. P-my-. - A+ fm- 58. ff wr r 'ff 1 "fa ' f , 4 . . A w -.f f"5'1'FJ-" ,Juv ww . a4'gf'.'f:53pz1-'W ff"'1if'.1 w 1 ---t'wi-?- ' gi ff ,fjjjij 'nga -1 - 352 -33153 -r 'fail' A . ,,,,,.Lb ,,.,,, -:L .. . ,, ,6,.1, . g r , - 65, ,. A 1, 6 ,,,i3,.HA,,r.4.1wE, AfgHC,4..,,.x,... ,fu 4 as 5? 4' + 4 'Q fvgfm 'QQ tg W1 N-"M 'Z 'M Y- V J' '1' H- 5 ,. - ,Lf-. n . . i . .,: - 1 1 ' f ' .4. I "' , A gg 1.1, .' Fr if "' s...,n,.-' A.: ., . . fr' "1 " -i ' ' . ' N -4 1, 3-'A A :Y -.-X-1,1 , y.,..'.- f,:.'t+f F 1 - 'PF 7: ' , - rr- f , . ,s-4',J' 'f' H' ' ' Q., . :- - - ,vpn few? ' .np -- f, , 3. . , I Sv' .-V ,gsm - .1 f gi.Q,w' . , 9. V, 4 va '-.1m.A,+,, V Q, :.f. -A,,..,,q ' wwqg' -35' 2' -, P' .4 '29, .. 1 w- , 1 af M' 4"nff k":ffFf1f ,, 2' -'peas'-:"'!'i'r sl.. ' ffv,.' 1- :A ,--, 1' 'M S- '41 -' . ', , J Y . ?f'2h"?" 155' i-9:11:51 ISR.-'g"1. P! .1 'f.3'N"3, 'Q-LAM , Sis' ii.. , 'ffff 'J-, f T H , ' A Ag' ff " :LZ ' SW '-, 'i,yf, 'f 565 'W' mf ww 'ved Q35 . 1 -1 'f5'?gi-e:,,R, ff Q 1 M A r W WE' WWMW G 31 'V oc v- 3' 'f e f 'P x 1' f 1 v J ' K 'f SG B Q? E? fa an E as 5 F 53 S 5 N5 K9 NIAGARA FALLS HIGH SCHOOL 'QZQ 9 SENIQRYEAK-B005 - '9z9 3 I'v' . '-.l::".x'.' V a,.:.,1,', " Q '- , 2' v I ffggff . Q Qfftylti gp , W. !':,,::o .:v.'v.'v?fs3J 5554 5 'Envy .5 'gig' 5 ' I .!og'?i'S' 1' .gf . " A. ' 1 Tiff 'Ny' -'ff ,ff s qc .-52:23-,t, .-191 nfs!! il 213 , .3Ll'lf.!', ,z f i'.'1'1." I . 1- . 'Z 'L-"' 'Q:3f':2'3"f-11:12-'rx n'?:3Y?.?!f:??. :s'1. 'A .' " .r': :.:' :l::,. EY: v Ez':?fE:.'f,',f Q 1. -'I aff L- :s.fi:','f: fa 20, gt' it 3 ' I D' "." ' aiu". ' . n ' ol 2, : ' . . Q' ',, st' H. . BCCK 929995 IUKY 'AKB00 '92 MISS RUTH JENNINGS In voicing our greatest appreciation for the wise counsel, the kind interest, and untiring attention of our adviser, we, the Class of 1929, dedicate this Senior Chronicle to Miss Ruth Jennings. 929 SENIGK- YEAKISUUK, NIR. WALTER S. FRASER 9wsSENI0K'YEAK-3005, MISS EMMA HULEN 97199 SENIUKYEAKBUUK MR. JAMES F. TAYLOR 8 19290 Slllllilll-YI? liwlll -'929 The Faculty PRINCIPAL-WALTER S. FRASER, STATE COLLEGE QB. AJ, COLUMBIA QM. AJ. VICE PRINCIPAL--EMMA HULEN, TUFTS COLLEGE QB. SJ, COLUMBIA QM. AJ. ENGLISH DEPARTMENT WINNIFRED A. NAYLOR-Head of Dept., Columbia, QM. AJ. ETHEL F. BRAY RUTH JENNINGS Syracuse University, QB. AJ University of Rochester, QM. AJ OLIVE CLINES G. BERENEICE MCCARTY Alfred University, QPh. BJ Seton Hill, QB. AJ MABEL ESHELMAN GEORGINIANA MONTGOMERY Columbia, QB. SJ North Western, QB. AJ RUTH A. HAUCK A. MARION PEPPER Ohio University QB. S. in Ed.J Albany State Normal, QB. AJ ELLEN G. HOLDEN CARRIE A. RICE Cornell University Fredonia, Columbia. CARRIE INRAHAM Wellesley College, QA. BJ RUTH A. YOUNG William Smith, QA. BJ HISTORY DEPARTMENT NINA G. HARWOOD-Head of Dept., Syracuse, QPh. BJ. DOROTHY ASHTON THYRA M. RASMUSSEN Buffalo State Normal. Buffalo University, QB. AJ - JESSIE C. ROBILLARD University Buffalo, QB. AJ ADA L. STEELE Syracuse, QB. SJ JOHN K. BORNEMAN Franklin Marshall, QA. BJ University of Pennsylvania, QM. AJ ESTHER M STURGE BARBARA, COLE I University of Rochester, QB. AJ William Smith, QB. AJ ROBERT C. SIMPSON FLORENCE M. HOWE St. Lawrence, QB. AJ Niagara University. QB. AJ, QM. AJ LATIN DEPARTMENT MARGARET J. HUTCHINSON-Head of Dept., Buffalo Normal. RUTH A. BARNES Buffalo University, QB. AJ CORA J. GRATWICK Cornell University ETHEL L. BLOOMINGDALE Rochester, QA. BJ GERTRUDE E. MONROE Allegany College, QB. AJ MODERN LANGUAGES ALICE M. FINN--Head of Dept., Albany State College. A. GOW BROWNELL MARY ALICE GOODING Syracuse, QB. AJ, North Western, QM. AJ Syracuse, QA. BJ RUTH A. COOK Syracuse University WELDON E. OLIVER QColgate, QA. BJ ELVERTA MILLER Pennsylvania University MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT CHARLES F. NEWTON-Head of Dept., Cornell, QA. BJ. OLIVE M. ALLERTON Syracuse, QB. AJ FLORENCE E. MILLER Syracuse, QB. SJ DOROTHY E. DICKINSON MARY A. WALSH Wells, QB. AJ, Columbia, QM. AJ Oswego Normal, Harvard University. CHRISTIANA S. HATHAWAY Elmira College, QB. SJ CLARE C. WANDOVER Bucknell, QB. S.l COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT ' ESTHER C. NEUBECKER-Head of Dept., Rochester Business Institute. MIRIAM L. ANDERSON Plattsburg Normal. ELIZABETH M. MALLAM Elmira College, QB. SJ M. ALICE INNES Rochester Business Institute. CAROLINE MENDENHALLUniversity of North Dakota EVELYN M. KEIM Syracuse, QPh. BJ MARY RYAN University of Buffalo, QB. SJ HELEN G. LAYDON New Rochelle, QB. AJ L. DALE SUCHER Buffalo State Normal. MARGUERITE TEN ECK Rochester Business Institute. ' SCIENCE DEPARTMENT HARLAN P. FREEMAN-Head of Dept., Amherst, QB. AJ, Columbia, QM. AJ. BENTON G. ABBEY Hobart College, QB. SJ ALFRED W. BENSON Syracuse, QA. BJ MARK R. BEDFORD MAY B. CRAMER Houghton, QB. AJ, Columbia, QM. AJ Syracuse, QA. BJ JOSEPH O. OTT, Canisius College, QB. AJ, QM. AJ MUSIC DEPARTMENT HAROLD A. SPENCER-Head of Dept., New York University. HAROLD N. FINCH WARREN A. SCOTCHMER NEWTON W. WARD Oberlin, QB. S. MJ Ithaca Conservatory of Music, QMus. BJ Rochester, QMus. BJ PHYSICAL EDUCATION CHARLES L. MCCABE-Cornell University. BRAINARD N. PARSONS Cornell University. THOMAS SYCZERBACKI Lacrosse University. AMELIA E. PHELPS Sargeant University. BEYRL TENNANT Cortland Normal. DRAWING DEPARTMENT FRANK J. BEDASKA Mech. Dr., Buffalo State Normal. ALICE M. COBBE Fredonia State Normal. DOMESTIC ART LIBRARIAN LOUISE B. MOSHER-Bryn Mawr. MAUD A. CATHCART-State Library School. I929 SIEIJIUKYIEAKBUUK -1929 9 gg 10125 rsity Ov the X xfz' X Q! Z? 0172 -X 929 S SENIUKYEAIKBUU 1929 WILLIAM G. MAYNE "Won't Get Married" President of Senior Class '29. Chronicle Business Mgr. '28. '29, Senior Play. May Day Festival '28, Student Council '26, '27, Inter Class Basketball '2'7. '28 Senior Hi-Y Club '29, Ring and Pin Comm. Gift Committee, FLORENCE B. MORICE "Fine Beautiful Maiden" Vice President Senior Class '29 aingand Pin Comm, Secretary Sophomore Class '27, A Student Council '27, '28, ARDEEN F. LAMBERT "Always Falthtully Labor- ing,- Secretary of Senior Class '29 Vice-President Choral Club '29, Orchestra '27, '29, Swimming Club '29, French Club '28, '29. Student Council '29, Girls' Swimming Team '29, Senior Play '29, Mixed Chorus '29, Senior Ring and Pin Comm. '29 C. CORNELL WETZEL "Cupid's Charming Warrior" Treasurer Senior Class '29, Treasurer Dramatic Club '28. '29, Senior Play '29, Business Manager Senior Play '29, Varsity Swimming Team '28, '29. Tennis Team '28, '29, Ring and Pin Committee '29, Chronicle Staff '29. Senior Hi-Y Club. Letterman Club '28, '29, ARTHUR E. SHRUBSALL Accomphshes Everything Successfully" Debating Team '27, Dramatic Society '27, '28, President Dramatic Society Stage Manager '28, Student Council President Senior Play '29, French Club '29, DOROTHY S. BALDWIN "Doesn't Squelch Boys" Class Poet '29 Secretary of School Council '29 Senior Play '29 Color and Flower Committee '29 Society Editor of French Journal '29 School Council '28, '29 Literary Society '28 French Club '28, '29 Swimming Team '28, '29 Swimming Club '29 Water Carnival '28 May Festival '28 GORDON LEWIS RICHARDSON "GUNS, Laughs and Runs" Class Statistician '29. Dramatic Club '27, '28, '29, President of Dramatic Club '29 Senior Play '29, Senior Play Committee '29, Social Committee '28, Social Committee Trea- surer '29, Chronicle Staff '29, Senior Chronicle Com- mittee '29. Vice-President Senior Hi-Y Club, FRANCES DYKSTRA "Fitted With Distinction" Class Historian '29 Senior Ring and Pin Com- mittee '29 FRANCIS L. TAYLOR "Figs, Pineapples, Tomatoes" Class Testator '29, Senior Play '29, Ring and Pin Comm, '29, Business Manager of Se- nio: Chronicle. Chronicle Staff '29, D,amatic Society '28, '29, Senior Hi-Y '28, '29, JAMES ANTHONY LI BRIZE "Jumping and Laughing" Swimming Team '27, '28, '29, Cheer Leader '28, '29, International Relations So ciety '28, '29, Debating '29, Dramatics '28, '29, Student Council '28, '29, Class Prophet. Senior Play. Ring and Pin Comm. "N" Club. We SENIGK-YEAKB00 -'92 GERALDINE E. ECKER "Gerry's Especially Energetic" Chronicle Staff '28. Senior Chronicle Comm. '29 Draniatlc Club '27, '28, '29. Senior Play '29. Library Staff '29. Svvggming Team '27, '28 Mgr. Swimming Team '27. Water Carnival '28. Swimming Club '29, Basket Ball '27, '28. May Festival '27, EDITH ISABEL LEWIS "Ever Is Laughing" WILLIS S. GREENFIELD "Wise Studious Gentleman" Debating Team '27. Dramatic Society '26, '27, '28, '29. Cross Country '27, '28, '29. Track 28. Student Council '27, '28, '29. Glee Club '27, '28. ROBERTA DAMON "Rarely Dumb" L SARAH S. RUBEN "She Smiles Rarely" 9. ll MARY ELIZABETH BAILEY "Mai-y's Ever Busy" Order Gregg Artists '29 7' OSCAR BELL "Oh Boy!" Debating Team '27, '28, '29 President Debating Society '28, '29 President of Junior Class '28 Student Council '28 DORIS SEYMOUR WALSH "Doris Seems Wise" JAMES ROBERT GARRITY "Jimmie Runs Great" Baseball '23, '24, '25, '26, '27 Basketball 28, '29. Football '26, 27, '28. Track '28, '29. Capt, Basketball '29. Capt. Baseball '26. Order Gregg Artists '28. kifmion vmomu 0'NEIL "Marion's Very Osten- tations" Choral Club '26, '27, Dramatic Society '27, '28, '29. Literary Society '27, '28. Girls' Swimming Team '26, '27, '28. Student Council 26. Water Carnival '28. '92QvSENI0li'Y 'AKI500 -'92 ' 1 Q 1 i i 1 CHARLES H. ARGY "Charles Hales Arithmetic" Swimming Team '29 MARY ELIZABETH BAKER. "Many Enthusiastic Beaux" O. G, A. '29 HYMEN WISBAUM "Hearty and Wholesome" Debating Society '28, '29. FLORENCE MARGARET BURNS 'Tasclnates Many Boys" Literary Society '29 JAMES ll. BOABDMAN "Jimmy He's Bright" E s i 9 IOLA BELLA FOOTE 'fldolized By Friends" Choral Club '25, '26, '2'7. Literary Society '28. Band '27. Dramatic Club '25, Chorus '25, '26, '29. WILLIAM L. KWAPISZ "We Like Kwaplsf' Varsity Football '25, '26, Varsity Track '25, '26, DELTA LANDIS WILLIAM J. BOYLE "Willing Boy" MABJORIE MoCBACKE.N "Modest and Coulderstf' May Day '27. Wei' ENIUK-Y 'All-B00 -492 EDNA J. McCLl'VE "Endlessly Joins More Clubs" DOROTHY MILDRED HODGE "Doesn't Mind History" Cap and Gown Committee. O. G, A. Certificate. HAROLD S. BANKS "I-le's Some Boy" Student Council '27 Tennis Team '27, '29 Indoor Baseball Champs. May Day '28 Chairman Senior Cap 85 Gown Committee MAE COLPOYS "Mocks Cupid" 9 Bmrmcis sums "Bright 'N Busy" French Club '27 '28 '29 La Chronique Francais Staff '28, '29 May Day Festival '27 Wing Collar Day '27, '28, '29 9 I3 MERVIN E. HESHER DOROTHY ISABELLE DONOVAN "Delays In Doing" CHARLES A. VAN KUREN "Charlie's a Vicious Kid" STELLA A. BIGOSINSKI "She's Always Busy" MERVYN TAYLOR "Marvelous Trackman" Stage '23, '24. Cross Country '24. Track '24, '25. Ass't. Mgr. Track '24, '25. 19299 SENIDIQYEAIXBUU -492 1 i 1 1 4 1 1 MARY B. TARCZYNSKA 1 "Many Beautiful Thoughts Social Committee '29 International Relations '29 May Day '27 Cho-'al Club '27 Chronicle Staff '29 u FLORENCE SCI-IULTZ "Famously Studiour' 1 v DERALD L. HILL "Doesn't Like Hiking" E ML ,J Y ANNA T. KEENAN "Attributes True Kindness" GERTRUDE ELAINE HART "Gets Every Honor" DOROTHY BERNICE SILVER VINCENT DE LORENZO "Very De-LlghtluI" Track '28, '29 MARJORIE RUTH NEYERLIN "Ma.rjorie's Real Nice" L. W. DAWLEY "Likes Making Designs" MILDRED A. WILLIAMS "Mildred's Always Win- some" May Day Festival '27, '28 Chronicle Typist '28, '29, I9299 I3 10K-YIZAINWUK "GZ EDWARD N. BARBARI "Eddie Never Bl.lks" FRANCES M. FEDERSPIEL "Finds Many Friendships" O. G. A. '29, L, C. Smith Typing Certi- ficate. Royal Silver Pin, HASKELL WALLENS "Humble Worker" A 'v' MARJORIE SOUTHWOOD "Much Smiling" WILLIAM R. ROSS "Won't Read Rubbish" Band '2'7. '28. '29. A Associated Music Club '27, , '28, '29. . Track '28. 9 I5 MARY VICTORIA LOW "Ma.ry's Very Lucky" EARL R. SINGLETON "Ever Radiates Sunshine Order of Gregg Artists. VERA ANN DOLTON "Very Abrupt Decisions" THEOD ORE JOHN PRADELSKI "Tells Jokes Perfbctlyn OLIVE DAHLSTROM "Oh Dear!" Student Council '27 IE IGKYEAKBUU -'02 BEATRICE WOBIG "Beatrice's Always Willing" French Club '28, '29. EUGENE J. McINTYRE "Every Joke Made Interesting" ELFRIEDA BRUSS "Earnestly Reads Books" May Day '28 Wing Collar Day '29 WALLACE F. NAWROCKI "Won't Fish Now" 4. JOSEPHINE PAONESSA "Joyful Person" , . 9 ANNE PATRICIA GALLAGHEB, "Always Pays Generouslyn Basketball '26. '2'7. '2B. '29 International Relations Club Vice-President International Relations Club '29 Wing Collar Day '29 J OHN FRANKLIN MADDEVER "Justly Famous Man" EVELYN KATHRINE FRANKE "Ever a Kind Friend" FRANK J. Gninnau "Frank's a. Joyful Gentle- man" MARY KATI-IRYN HOGAN "Men tel Know Her" 9299 IE IUKYEAKBUU -'92 HELEN G. BEST "Hates Going Broke" ROSE FRANCES CHIODO Rather Friendly Child 0. G. A. '29 WALTER SULLIVAN "Wonderful Shlek" WANDA MARTHA!! WISZ "Will Marry Wisely" DOROTHY OLGA EDDY "Dates on Excitement" 9 I7 W IIELEN CAROLINE OLSON "Has Considerable Originality" May Day '27. Choral Club '27. JOSEPH T. SCI-IIAVI "Joins the Scholars" SARAH LOUISE REED "Says Lovely Remarks" MERLE WRIGHT REESE "Merely Wants Rest" Band '28, '29. GLORIA VIRGINIA GARLOCK "Glorious, Very Genteel" Literary Society '29. Wwe I3 I0 'YEAKU00 '1Q29 HARRIET MAY DUNN "Hates Many Duties" French Club '27, '28, '29 Dramatic Club '28, '29 Water Pageant '28 Girls Swimming Team '27, '28, '29 DORIS C. KING "Darn,ed Clever Kid" French Club '29. Swimming '27, '28, '29. Basketball '27, '28, '29. Wing Collar Day '27, '28, '29 May'Day '21 Swimming Club '29. DAUNT STENZIL "Dalights Speeding" Varsity Baseball '26, '27, '28, '29. Varsity "N" Club. MARJORIE E. STURMER. "Marjorie's Ever Sweet" "Modest, Tactful, Discreet 1 MARGARET T. DICKINSON ll .dm MARGARET ELAINE GARDI-IOUSE "Merrily Ever Giggles" French Club '28, '29. ELIZABETH BABYAK "Efficiently Brusqud' Royal Proficiency Club '29 EDWARD ANDREWS "Enjoys Anything" LORENE W. WEAVER "Lorena Works Wisely" Order Gregg Artists '29. Chorus '26. Class Night Clothes Comm '29 RUTH SINCLAIR "Right Sweet" Literary Society '29. 19290 l5Nl0lWl5AYr300 -'Q29 I9 RUTH J. DALES "Really Jolly and Dear" Dramatic Club '26, '27, '28, '29 Senior Play '29 French Club '28, '29 Social Committee '28, '29 Literary Society '28 COOPER N. LANSING "Cute 'N Lovable" Swimming Team '27, '28, 29. Swimming Team Captain '29 Senior Play '29. Debating Society '27, '28, Cross Country '28. Student Council '27, '28. Vice President of Student Council 28. Studio Club '27, '2B. Vice-Pres. of Studio Club '28 MARJORIE LOUISE LEWIS "Much Lovely Laughter" Dramatic Society '26, '29. Literary Society '29. Fenicr Play 29. Associated Music Club '26. '27, '28, '29. French Club '27. 28. 29. May Festival 28. ROBERT MABON "Right Matb.ematically" Band '27. Assistant Manager Tennis Team '28. ELIZABETH K. MORGAN "Ever Kidding Many" Dramatic Club '27, '28 Secretary Dramatic Club '28, '29 French Club '27, '28 Vice President French Club '28, '29 Literary Society '28 French Play '28 Senior Play '29 Choral Club French Chronicle Staff '29 May Day Festival '28 Swimming '28 ALBERT IRA HAUSEB "Always ln Heaven" Dramatic Club '27, '28, '29. French Club '27, '28, 29. Varsity Tennis 28, '29. FRANCES MARION DIEBOLD "Frat Men's Darling" WALTER 0. GAGEB "Wins Over Giants" HELEN REGINA GRAY "Has Real Grace" EBON HAROLD MOXHAM "Easy, Hard, Medium" 'mv IENIGIK-YEAKB00 '929 DORIS ST. DENNY "Darling, So Different" French Club '27, '28, '29. Chronicle Staff '28, '29. MILDRED E. DART "Makes Education Desirable" Order of Gregg Artists '29 Choral Club '28 LYLE HENRY LAUBOCKER 'Lots of Hard Labor" THELMA PAULINE FREEMAN "True Pal and Friend" International Relations Club '27 '29, Dramatic Club '29. Literary Society '27, '28, f Chronicle Typist '29. V LOUISE BURNS NORRIS "Likes Big Noises" BETH MELNOTTE "Bautiful Musician" PAUL C. WUSTRACK "Pereola.tes Coffee Wonder fully" LENNA MOSCATI "Lovely Maiden" EDWARD T. READ "Ever Teasing Rutlxlessly' Stuzrigent Council '2'7. '28, Athletic Council '28. '29. CARMELA MARIE CATERINA "Calm, Marvelously Collected" 1929 9 I -1929 2I REED ALICE "Alice Dramatic '29 May 'Day Chronicle tee. ARLEEN WILSON "Always Willing" A. ROBINSON "Really All Right" AUDRY HARDY "Always Hopeful" FRANCIS CURRY "Faithful Companion" Basket Ball Team '26. '27. '28, '29 Student Council 25, '26 LEAH MINGOS Loathes Men" Club '26, '27, '28, '27, '28, Staff '29. StudentCouncil '26, '29. International Relations Club '29. Senior Play Committee. Senior Chronicle Commit- ADELINE L. STEELE "Adorable, Likable. Sincere" French Club '28, '29. Literary Society '29. May Festival '28, ELSIE E. THOMPSON "Elsie's Ever Trustt'ul" HAROLD D. MORT "Hates Deceitful Maidens" Football Team '27, '28 Student Council '29 Wing Collar Day Comm. '29 Varsity "N" Club '28, '29 Student Council Nominating Committee '29 President Vocational Activi- ties Club '25, '26 PAULINE SYLVIA LECKSELL "Pauline Smiles Lovely" MAMIE M. MALICORE "Mamie'll Make Money" 'Que ENIGIQYEAIXBUU -'92 MAE L. PIIELPS "Mighty Lovely Person" . , . CLARENCE A. TYRON JR. - A "Clever and Tough" Senior Play, French Club. Class Night Committee. MONICA TERESA PUTNAM "Mighty True Pal" HERBERT J. NELLES "He's Joyful News" DOROTHY VERA IIAGER. "Dolls Very Helpful" 9 WILLIAM J. SKIMIN. JR. "Watchl'ul and Shrewd" Student Council '2'7. '28, RUTH REED "Rough and Ready" Student Council '28, '29, CHARLES J. LAUR "Chuck's a. Jolly Lad" Associated Music Clubs '29, Band '29, Senior Dance Comm. '29, 0 CELESTINE I. DURNIN "Can illustrate Delightfullyn EDWIN LLOYD REEVES "EndlessIy Loves Reading" Www E 10K-YIEAKBUU -192 TELCA CALANDRILLI "Takes Chances" WILLIAM P. READ "Willie Pleases Red-Heads" t EDITH LOUISE PHILLIPS N "Ever Looks Pretty" L. C. Smith Certificate. GEORGE TOUCI-IETTE "Great Ta,nkman" Swimming '25, '26, '27, '28. BEATRICE MARY ROMMEL "Blond, Merry, Ravishingn O. G. A. Literary Society '29, 9 23 MAY T. SARKEES "May Truly Satisflesn JOSEPH L. LONGO "Joe Llkes Latin" Intgsnational Relations Club MARIE CATHERINE EWING "Makes Clever Editor" CHARLES TERWILLIGEB "Clear Thinkerf' ROSE MUSSARI "Refuses Many" '92Q0Sl3Nl0li'YI3AK'l500 -192 RETA MAE STEIGERWALT "Really Modest Student" Swimming Team '29. Water Pageant '28. O. G. A. '29. Ch'onic1e Typist '28, '29. HELEN DYER i ' llelen's Different KENNETH E. BURMASTER "Knowledge, Ellegance, Brilliance" EDITH GORNBEIN "Ever Gracious" Associated Music Clubs '26, '27, '28, '29 Literary Society '27, '28 FLORENCE NAPOLEONE "Faultlessly Neat" , Orchestra '26, '27, '28, '29 ' O. G. A. '29 Class Night Clothes Com- mittee Music Committee EDNA A. HEUEB. "Edna-'s Always Hun-ying Chronicle Typist. STEPHEN J. MATUSZEWSKI "Studious, Just, Manly" I-IAZEL VIOLET WISCH "I-las Various Wishes" MAURICE MICHAEL ABBOTT "Money Means All" ARLENE NINA MT. PLEASANT "Always Nice and Most Prim" 'QZQQSE IUIWIEAKBUU "gm 25 MARY ANTOINETTE LULICK "Ma.ry's Always Liked" French Club '29. Literary Society '29. May Festival '2'7. GENEVIEVE BOARDMAN "Guzzles Books" P. JAMES MASELLA 'Trefers Jolly Made- moiselles" rf EVELYN LANE "Endlessly Laughs" Chorus '27, '28, '29 Choral Club '27, '28, '29 Swimming Team '27 GENEVIEVE E. GREGEB. "Going Ever Gaily" ELIZABETH NORTON "Easily Noticed" L. C. Smith Certificate. DUANE PYKE "Daring Person" Student Council '26, '27, '28. Varsity Baseball '28. STEPHANIA 0. DUDZINSKA "Starts Out Determinedlyn NORMAN WILLIAM HUDSON "Norm Will Hustle" KATHERINE MARY 0'CONNOB "Keeps Men Outwlttedn 'QMS ll I0 'Y K-B00 492 IDA K. YARNELL "Is u Knowing Youngstern Student Council '2'7. Student Council Bookeeper '28. '29. Chairman Senior Color and Flower Comm. EDWIN ENOS "Ever Entertaining" MARJORIE LORETTA SHERRY "Merry Little Senior" International Relations Society. May Day '28, Wing Collar Day Com- mittee '28. Water Pageant '28. PHILIP SEMINAEA International Relations f Club '29. EDNA ANNA FESS "Edna.'s Always Fusslng" 9 FRANCIS B. THOMPSON "Fran Doesn't Flirt" JULIA M. SAVAGE "Just Made Stadiums" O. G. A. Certificate. SAMUEL A. SLAIMAN "Sam's Always Solemn" VIOLA R. WINTERS "Very Ready Winner" Tennis Championship Qdoublesl '27, '28, '29. Swirgiming Team '27, '28 '2 . L. C. Smith Certificate. Senior Motto Committee '29 May Festival '2'7. JOHN J. BODDECKEB. "John Just Balances" 1 I9299 ENIGK-YEAKB00 '1929 27 CARL BOHMHOLDT "Charming Boy" EDYTHE LILLIAN FLACK "Earnestly Likes Fun" WILLIAM J. H. FISCHER "Willie Just Hates Foolin' " DOROTHY BROOKS "Delightful Brilliance" Choral Club '26 Chronicle Typist '28, '29 Class Night Committee HENRY I. KWAPISZ "Henry is Kind" International Relations Club '29. Varsity Track '29. CARL RICHMOND "Charming Rogue" Senior Play Committee '29, Student Council '27, '29. Sogcber Divisional Champs International Relations Club '29. VIOLA MAE GOODWIN "Very Magnetic Girl" JAMES H. KIRK "Just Hates 'Klds"' SUE MORGAN "Sweet Mortal" French Club '29. Chairman Girls' Cap and Gown Comm. Dramatic Club '29. Choral Club. RAYMOND JOHN DANAHY "Ray Just Dives" IQZQPSE Illli-Y ' R500 -'92 BERTHA F. ROSINSKI "Become Friendly Readilyn RUSSEL CONGELOSI "Royal Comedian" Track '28, '29 Mgr. of Track '29 Cross Country '28 International Relations '28, '29 MARY L. KOBIERNY "Merry Loving Kid" International Relations So- ciety. Order Gregg Artists. ANTHONY L. MITBO "Always Looks Manly" Orchestra '26, '27, '28. ETHYL KATHALEEN HUGHES "Ethyl's Kind Hearted" 9 EDNA SMITH "Ever Serene" Choral Club '26 May Day '27, '28, ARTHUR J. KENNEDY "Another Jolly Kid" Baseball '29. EVELYN CORRINNE HARONEY "Enjoys Clear Harmony" May Day Festival '27 Orchestra '27, '28, '29 French Club '28 Literary Society '28, '29 Usher Committee '28 Swimming Team '29 Ass't. Librarian '27, '28, '29 Associated Music Clubs '27 JAMES L. SICILIANO "James Loves Studying" ALICE WOOD "Always Welcome" Order of Gregg Artists '29 'gms E I0 -YIEAKBUU -'Q29 29 HELEN DAY JOHNSON "Has Droll Judgement" French Club '27, '28- Stlldent Council '26. '2'7. TAYLOR WILSON "Thrills Women" RUTH McLEARN "Rather Meek Lady" WITANT JOHN BALTUTH "Witty .loklng Boy" Football '24, '25, '27. '23 Stage Mgr. '25, '26 Interclass Basket Ball '26 Varsity "N" Club Pres. '29 Dramatic Club '26 ALICE D. BANNISTER "Always Drinks Buttermilk" Basket Ball '27, '28, '29 May Day '28 Wing Collar Day '27, '28 CLARE E. PROZELLER. "Clever, Effective Personality" Dramatic Society '28, '29. French Club '28, '29. Literary Society '28. Senior Pin and Ring Com- mittee '29. Senior Dance Committee '29. Student Council '28. French Plays '28, '29. Senior Play '29, ROBERT McLENNAN WISHART "Reliable Men Win" Varsity Tennis '27, '28, '29. Treasurer of Student Coun- eil '29. Student Council '28. Varsity "N" Club '28, Stamp and Coin Club '26, '2 . ELIZABETH JEAN ROWE '1Everything's Just Right" Senior Play '29. Student Council '2'7. '28, May Day Festival '27, CHARLES A. EDWARDS "Charm Assures Enchant- ment" JOAN BARNETTE "Just Bewitchingn Wing Collar Day Committee '27, '28 French Club Senior Play '29 Tennis Singles '27, '28, '29 Tennis Doubles '27, '28, '29 Library Staff '28, 29 me lENI0lWl5AK'B00 -4929 JEROME PARKMAN BAKER "Just a Perfect Boy" Chronicle Staff '28 Editor of Chronicle '29 Dramatic Society '27, 28, '29 Ch. Senior Chronicle Comm. '29 May Day Festival '28 School Council '27 ANN BERNICE WEITZMAN "A Beautiful Woman" FREDERICK W. SCOTT, JR. "Full of Sense" Varsity Football '27. '28. Varsity Baseball '27, '28, '29. Captain Baseball '29. Varsity "N" Club. Secretary Varsity "N" Club '28. Swimming '27. Wing Collar Day Com- mittee '28, '29. KAROLYN F. BRACKETT "Kay Fools Boys" Vice President Dramatic Club '28 Social Committee '29 Chronicle Staff '28 Senior Chronicle Committee '29 HARRY LEONIDAS KEATING Hliuggable, Lovable, Kissable" Student Council '27, '28. Chronicle Staff Sport Edi- tor. Varsity Basketball '26, '27, '28. Varsity Tennis '26, '27, '28. Captain Tennis Team '27, '28 varsity "N" Club. BRUCE W. JAMIESON' "Busy, Wilful, Just" Tennis '27, '28. School Council '27. GERALDINE .IEMISON "Glorious Jerry" Senior Motto Committee '29. Literary Society '27, '28. Dramatic Club '27, '28. French Club '28, '29. Student Council 27. May Day Festival '28. EDWIN WOOLCOCK "Ever Winning" Debating '27, '28, '29. Student Council '28. MARGARET BIGELOW "Merry and Bright" Senior Chronicle Committee '29 Junior English Contest '28 Student Council '27, '28, '29 Choral Club '27 Orchestra '27 Studio Club '28 Mixed Chorus '26 Literary Society '28 CHARLES EDWARD MUNSON "Cheerfully Ever Masterfuln Chairman Usher Committee 28. Student Council '26, '27. Dramatics '26, '29. 9299513 IUK-YEAKB00 '1Q29 31 GARDMAN G. CHORMAN "Gallant Chap" Tennis Team '25, '26, '27, '28, '29 Ch. Class Night Dance Com- mittee 29 JOSEPH E. MORAN "Niagara.'s J. E. M." Football '26, '27, '28 Captain Football '28 Track '26, '27, '28, '29 Captain Track '29 MARGARET DOROTHY BLIGH "Margaret Desplses Books" JOHN WILLIAM FICK "Just Won't Fail" Debating Society. French Club. Class Night Dance Com- mittee. PAUL QUINN "Perfectly Quiet" Tennis '28, '29. Mggg Swimming Team '28- Varslty "N" Club. Class Nizht Programme Committee. JOSEPH C. ELIA "Joyous Entertainer" Glee Club '2'7. French Club '28. Class Night Committee '29 EDWARD BOND "Brilliant Business Man" Social Committee '27, '28 '29 French Club '28, '29 Dlggmatlc Society '27, '28 Senior Play '29 May Day '27, '28 LEONORE E. McCUSKER "Likes Every Man" Swimming Team '27, Orchestra '27, '28. Glee Club '27, '28. May Day Festival '27, '28 '29. Student Council 27, '28. MARVIN HOUSE "Ma.iden's House" HOMER J. TERREBERRY "He's Just Tired" 1 1 Wee EN GKYE R300 2-492 ANDREW SWIFT "Always Studious" AGNES M. SCI-IERBER "Alertness Means Success" PETER. A. SPINNUZI "Peter Always Studies", International Relations Society '29. FLORENCE CAROLINE UI-IRI "Flirts Coquettishly and Unscrupulouslyn ABRAHAM COHEN "Always Composed" Assistant Manager of Track '25 Track Manager '26 Cross Country Manager '26 A Student Council '26 Debating Society DAVID GAISE "Determined and Genlal" LAWREN A. WOOD "Loves All Women" HANNAH MAGDALEN DONOVAN "Hopeful, Modest Damsel" Orchestra '28 Girls' Basketball '27, '28, '29 Wing Collar Day 27, '28, '29 WILLIAM HARDY "Wonderful Helper" Joi: .vosnm "Juan Josher" 19293 SIENIGKY A121500 EARL STEVENS "Easily Smiles" CHARLES F. ACKERSON "Chuck Full of Ambition" CHARLES H. WEAVER "Chuck' Has Wisdom" RUTH ISABEL SINCLAIR "Really Is Sweet SAMUEL H. APPOLONEY "Sam Has Appeal" EDWARD JOSEPH BURKE "Ever-Jolly Boy" VERA ANN DOLTON "Vera's Always Determined" WILLIS FERRIS "Writer of Fiction" VERNA LILLIAN LANDIS "Very Lovely Lady ANDREW DiCAMELLI "Ambitious, Daring, Cheerful" ANNE K. FINDLAY "App. eciates Knowing Figures" EDITH LEWIS FRANK M. WILLIAMSON "Fra.nk's Mighty Wise" KENNETH WILLIAMS "Knows Women" WALTER TRYAN "Wilful Tempter" JOE AUGUSTINO "Joe's All Right" MARJORIE HELEN BURNS "Makes Honest Bargains" HERMAN L. GRAFF "Has Likable Gruflnessu DEREK CROSS "Doesn't Care" DOROTHY MARGARET CROWLY "Darned Clever" MARGARET VIOLA KIBBY "Mighty Victorious Kid" DELTA T. LANDIS "Darling, Timid, Lnvable" French Club '27, '28, '29 Orchestra '27, '28, '29 May DOROTHY E. ANDERS "Dot Eats Anything" Class Night Committee '29 Literary Society '29 Chronicle Typist '29 O. G. A. '29 Festival '27, '28 DORA QUIMBY "Doesn't Quibble" 0. G. A. '29. .4929 MARJORIE TRAVIS5 "Much Talking" WILLIAM J. BOYLE "Willing, Joyful Boy" ALBERT I. LEVY "Always in Luck" HENRY ANDERSON "Hank's Ambitious" ANNE BOWEN "Always Beautiful" WILLIAM CURTO "Wllly's Cute" ANNA PINKOWSKI "Always Patient" MERVIN E. HESSER "Many Exciting Happenings" EDWARD K. 0'NEIL "Ed Kids Others Nn.lvely" RUTH C. FINN "Rlghtfully Called Fortunate" CARROLL GEORGE GOSLIN "Can Grin Graclonslyn Underwood Typing Certifi- cate '29. Chronicle Typist '28-'29, 929 'SIINIGIK YIZAKWIQK, -1929 Im OLO 9 OE YOUK INITH ' Q of LEARNING QRAHD, KDSSSLYFRQQIK AEWAV-53 ALWAYS if QAAUNCH ANU TRUE LNNAY6 ALWAYS I F mf ,WEEE bww RO 0 T TIIIF HEJAQ9 WIP' IQQQE f C I xx ls r 1 f ' , E x T TT OF YOUIQ CLAS9 , 75 I f X E S I 'JNJ if In IIII7' MW .fx ,- f" Qfxff NT TTA 4vx4' f, nllawp '17 W I "ol ,I ' Xl I M I 9' 'VII Zi? 6 I ' , f, ' E IW W WE V I E ,. , I xx X X X ' I W A v .f gf! X 5 C, 25 f A4 I f .Q WHERE INILI. HE LAND? THERE WAS A CHICKEN IN THAT EGU AFTER AII. MEMORIES we move wee., SSGH YOUR c,oLoP-9 WELL HI How Axon ANU YO Il N355 ouo WEL SNG, E 0 Tl E o 19299 SENIGK-YEAKMUK ,929 Oil' f 'QZQRSENIUK-YEAR-1500 -'929 Class Poem Tonight, dear friends, we close a book On which in years to come, we'll look With pride. A book which tells of years well spent ln faithful work, and we're content To say it's been worth while. Our hearts are heavy, for here ends Our school life, spent with happy friends- Who've been with us from day to day, Who've worked with us and shared our playg We hate to part, but yet we must, Still in each other's fame we trust. "ln Knowledge there is Power," we cry: Our Alma lVlater's honor, high Above the other schools has grown, Through years of glory she has shown Her faithful love for us, to be The same in loss or victory. For Her we have but one wish now- That we, in turn, can show Her how We love Her, how we'll work and strive To keep Her teachings e'er alive, As on to fairer heights we pass- The members of this happy class! Tonight our warm hearts beat as one, As we've our Alma Mater sung ln praise of One who's helped us climb This rugged path of work sublime, Till now, successful, we must stand- Alone, at Life's mysterious land! DOROTHY BALDWIN, - B Mb- -um N Poet of the Class of 1929 19299 SIYWUKYEAIK-1500 -4929 37 History of the Class of l929 "Tempus fugit," so they say in Latin. "Time flies", so we say in English. When first we entered this spacious building in 1926, to look ahead to graduation seemed an eternity, but true to that little phrase, to look back it is but a moment. It seems only yesterday when for the first time, we were handed program cards and told to regis-ter in our classes. So many teachers, so many subjects, so much of everything, it was all so puzzling, but soon our cards were all filled out telling us just when and where to go. We spent a peaceful night only to arise early the next morning to assume our duties. School was really to begin that day. Our next ordeal was to find the number of the rooms we were assigned to. VVe would race speedily from one end of the hall to the other, up one stairway down the other, too proud or perhaps too wise, to ask the help of the seniors. It took about one week to find our class rooms readily, to be- come acquainted with ourselves, and to dis- tinguish the teachers from our classmates. Then came our first assembly, which was ,looked down upon by us all-but not in the way I know you all are thinking. The secret lies in the fact that we, as sophomores, were expected to sit in the balcony. Expected, I said. Our first activities as a class began when we elected our class officers. jasper Rowland was chosen Presidentg Viola Goodwin, Vice- President, Florence Morice, Secretary, and Harry Ingram, Treasurer. At this meeting we also selected Myra Baldwin and Margaret Bradley as our class representatives to the Social Committee. These members worked hard and proved what they could do when the 6'Gedunker's Gambol," and the "February Frolicu were held. Wing Collar Day was the next peculiarity we chanced upon. On April lst, we all came wearing bows and ribbons or wing collars, fmay I barely mention the fact that we wore greenj. As April showers bring May flowers, so did Wing Collar day bring May Day. We gazed with awe upon the stately Queen, her flowing robes, and her illustrious courtiers. Next we launched into the sea of examinations and sailed away to our summer vacations. In September 1927, we became Juniors and lost no time in electing our officers of that year. Oscar Bell became our President. Since we had not found any need for any other officers, we elected only a President that year. To represent us in the Social Committee, we chose Kaye Waite and Gordon Richardson. VVe hurried through this year enjoying the customary happenings until exams came along. lt is a physical and mental impossibility for any one to delight in them. September 1928 saw us Seniors.. After we all had become "big beans" Qfor Mr. Fraser had given us thorough instructions with il- lustrations on how this was accomplishedj and after we had successfully survived mid-year exams, our first Senior meeting was held. This year we chose: W'illiam Mayne .... ......... P resident Florence Morice .... Vice-President Ardeen Lambert ................ Secretary Cornell Wetzel ................ Treasurer Miss Jennings was chosen Faculty Adviser. VVith her willing and helpful assistance our officers have proved only too efficient. At still a later meeting we chose our class night officials. which were: Gordon Richardson .... .... S tatistician james Librize ...... ..... P rophet Dorothy Baldwin .... ....... P oet Francis Taylor .................. Testator Frances Dykstra ................ Historian XVith the approach of Wing Collar Day, colors had to be selected. After having duly chosen Gold and White, we changed our minds and gave Orchid and Yellow the favor. How proud we were to wear our Senior colors on that eventful day. And then came May. This year being Seniors we were to have the honor of choosing candidates for the Queen. After we had chosen Florence Morice, a Viola Goodwin and Sue Morgan to be voted upon by the entire stu- dent body, it was necessary that we have no May Day because sore arms and legs were anticipated as a result of vaccination. As Seniors we enjoyed many special privileges but from vaccination we were not to be ex- empt in spite of the fact that commencement was but a few weeks off. We are an marked class. And so we have been making history all these years for the class of '29 and now on our graduation day this history comes to a close. Old friends must part, old pals, must go their way. But as we go, a wish of good will for good old N. F. H. S. will remain al- ways deep in our hearts. VVe will always re- member the days spent with her as our hap- piest and will always hold a love for Niagara Falls High School, our Alma Mater. FRANCES DYKSTRA, Historian '29. 38 I9wvSl3Nl0ll'YEAll'B00 -1929 Class Will of the Class of '29 We, the graduating class of the Niagara Falls High School, which is known to be in the City of Niagara Falls, in the County of Niagara, in the State of New York, in the United States of America, being of unusual sound mind and body, and having fulfilled the requirements of the State Board of Regents, do hereby declare, publish and testify this to be our last will and testament. Through this epistle we bequeath our entire "educa- tional estate" to the persons or groups herein designated, subject to the conditions herein stated: First: To the juniors, our illustrious and well- meaning successors, we leave the sole right to attend detention study hall, whether re-- quested to go or not, where you might prepare your 1ess.ons as well as we have in the past. We hereby invest in you the right to sign your own report cards, providing you can get away with it. To the first ten juniors re- gistering next 'fall we leave the ten unattached desks in the Senior study hall, to be placed at any angle convenient to the owner. With you we leave the spirit and vigor with which we have always upheld our school during the past three, four, tive or six years, whatever it may be. Furthermore, and lastly, we bequeath our unqunchable thirst for book reports, our everfamished hunger for physics and chem- istry, and our undying love for study in gen- eral. Second: To the Sophomores, our unwilling victims of criticism, we give the right to hold their Annual Marble and Ping-Pong Tournament on the Haeberle Lot. Furthermore, we are having mirrors and soap dishes installed over the drinking fountains for your benefit, so that you might look neat and tidy in class. To you, we leave the sole right to construct a summer-house in Schoellkopf Park where you may play with your dolls and sew. We also leave you the privilege of attending the Afternoon Dances, provided you are escorted by a suitable chaperone. And finally, you are hereby permitted to occupy the front seats at any athletic game or contest under the condition that you yell as loud as. we have heretofore. Third: To the Teachers, our laboring and untiring mentors, we leave a record on your books that will probably never be equalled. ln just con- sideration for what you have meant to us, we leave each of you two unsoiled linen hand- kerchiefs to be used at our passing. We also leave you many happy thoughts of ourselves in your spare moments . .. . . if you have any. Fourth: To Mr. Fraser, our co-graduate, we be- queath an elevator with which you may attain greater heights. Fifth: To Mr. Strough, the incoming principal, we bequeath an accurate yard stick with which you may measure up to Mr. Fraser's standing. Sixth: To Miss Hulen, our devoted vice-principal, we leave all the patience and persistence that we possess, that you may bear the incoming Sophomore class. Seventh: To Miss Jennings, our beloved faculty ad- viser, we leave the thought that it was only with her cooperative aid and self-sacrifice that our class has been so successful. Eighth: To the various individuals about school, we bequeath the following: To Kenneth McDonald, Francis Curry's elongated stature. To Sherwood Jann, NValter Gager's brevity of body. To Kay Searles, Ruth Sinclair's rotundity. To Kenny Thayer, Taylor Wilson's lanki- ness. To the faculty, Fred Scott's smile. To the person who needs it most, Dorothy Baldwin's pleasing personality. To the President of the Class of '30, the executive ability of our president, NVilIiam Mayne. Ninth: To the fair maidens of the student body, we bequeath a sum of money to be used in creating the Conference Room into an up-to date beauty parlor, where five minutes can be spent between classes, thus relieving the bore on teachers of watching noses being powdered and lips being made more like Cupid's bow. Tenth: To the dashing youth of the student body, we bequeath an equal sum of money to be used in renovating the Teacher's Rest-room into a modern billiard room, where leisure moments and skipped periods may be spent, thus ceasing sleeping in classes. W'e do hereby appoint as an executor of this, our last will and testament, our respected and honored friend, John Gombert. IN VVITNESS WHEREOF, we have here- unto set our hand this twenty-fourth day of june, in the year of our Lord, nineteen hun- dred and twenty-nine. Senior Class of '29, Francis Taylor, Class Testator. 'Quit llllltlll-YIZAKISGIQI '1g29 39 We, whose names are hereunto subscribed, DO CERTIFY that the testators, above named, in our presence, set their hand to this document and in our hearing, declared this to be their last will and testament. IN WIT- NESS TI-IEREOF we hereunto subscribe our names. Guy VVattswize, Noetall, N. Y. Dinah Myte, Bignoyse, Mont. Kay Ellemenoe, Alfabet, Ohio. Class Statistics Our class Historian has just told you about our glorious past, our Prophet will tell you of our brilliant future, and it is, my solemn duty to call to your attention our inevitable present. One of the most beautiful, most magnificent and most soothing words in the English lan- guage today is that majestic word, "Senior." Even by its sound you would know at once that it was a most extraordinary word, but ah, its meaning-. For the past three months I have searched diligently for its true meaning and at last after reading through several dictionaries and delving in ancient manuscripts, I have found its exact significance. We will take each of its precious letters separately so that you may know better what a grand person a SENIOR 15. S-Successful E-Elegant N -Noble I-Ideal O-Optimistic R-Radiant There you have in a nutshell what we have struggled through three years of honorable endeavor and earnest study to obtain. So it is with pardonable pride that I am able to state that this class of 1929 is not only the largest class to be graduated from Niagara Falls High School, but it is also the best. Our noses numbered 260, of which 109 are attached to male faces and 151 are powdered regularly. Of the entire 260, 259 are talented and accomplishd in one thing or another- the other one is extremely studious and will probably turn out to be a high school teacher. 33 11312, of us will enter higher institutions of learning next year while the remainder are determined to show the busy business world how things should be done. Our ages range from 16 to 21 with a grand total of 4 milleniums, 6 centuries, 7 decades, 2 years, 5 months, 14 days, 45 minutes, 242 seconds, daylight saving time. We are sincerely thankful that our class has suffered no severe casualties this past year, with the exception of 25 cases of astigmatism caused by the glare of Whoopee hats, those pieces of brightly colored headwear that some of the boys like to flout before the eyes of unsuspecting and innocent bystanders. I have also estimated that of the 219 persons. vac- cinated, 157 took effect within a weekg the remainder were very fortunate. When the female portion of this renowned class entered these halls of learning in 1926, each girl required at least 72 yards of cloth for her dress, styles must have changed in the meantime, for today the 7 yards have disappeared and only the M yard is exposed. Sophomores and Juniors beware! Of the three girls who have not as yet been kissed, two have never had the chance, the boys, were so busy. One more interesting fact and I leave you with a deeper, and I hope, more appreciative knowledge of the class of '29, If we were all laid end to end, with our heads toward the rising sun and our feet toward the City I-Iall, not only would a great many people whom we have troubled and annoyed during the past years be made much happier, but it would also be a great relief to our beloved principal and teachers to know that we were safely tucked away. I do here solemnly swear that these sta- tistics are the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth. Attested this twenty-fourth day of June, 1929. GORDON RICHARDSON Class Night Address This program tonight will bring to a climax our high school career. We are leaving three memorable years of social, sport, and educa- tional life behind us. The three years which we have spent and thoroughly enjoyed within the walls of the Red and Gray have wrought wonderful changes in us. We entered high school as boys and girls and we leave as young men and women. The Class of '29 wishes to express its grati- tude in a three-fold way. First, we thank our parents for the wonderful love and coopera- tion they have given us in order that we might participate in this program tonight, second, we sincerely thank the Board of Education and the people of the city of Niagara Falls for the wonderful building which it has been our privilege to use, and last but not least, we pay our tribute to our principal, Mr. Walter S. Fraser, to Miss Emma I-Iulen, our vice- principal, and to our teachers for the wise counsel and aid they have given to us. 40 'QMS Elf UK-YEAKI500 -'929 In one sense, we might term this commence- ment as a double graduation. As we are going out for higher things in life, so is our esteemed principal entering a higher position in a new field. VVe heartily wish him much success as we know he wishes the same for us. At this time, fellow classmates, I wish to thank you for the honor you have bestowed upon me as President of the Class of '29, My duties have been many, but pleasant. Your cooperation has made the work much lighter. and also I wish to congratulate our treasurer, Cornell Wetzel, whose management of our finances has been superb. Some of us will enter higher institutions of learning while others will go right out into this wide world. Soon we separate, each to go his own way. May we enter into this new phase of life with loving devotion to our com- rades, and with new ideals in our spirits. WILLIAM G. MAYNE, President, Class of '29, Planting ofthe Ivy May 31, 1929. VVe, the Class of '29, do hereby plant this ivy as a remembrance of our growing life in N. F. H. S. May this plant flourish and cling to the walls of the Red and Gray as our loving memories will do in future years. To you, the Class of '30, we wish to present this time honored shovel. Now as the Class of '29 is in a way passing out of the school life, we leave with you this shovel, hoping that you will honor it, discharge your duty faithfully with its use, and pass it on to the next class.. WILLIAM G. MAYNE, President, Class of '29. Acceptance of Shovel "It is with the greatest of pleasure, Mr. President, that I, in behalf of the Junior Class, accept this shovel. Next year we will be Se- niors and will try to go on with the work that has been so successfully carried out this year. Thank you." RICHARD MCDONALD, Junior Class President. Presentation of the Gift to School As the President of the Class of '29, I take much pleasure in following the established custom of graduation classes, in presenting to the school through our principal a farewell gift. There is nothing that can express our deep gratitude for the spoils we have reaped in the past three years. Accordingly we feel that a gift which represents the highest ideals in art and in life would serve our purpose ade- quately. Therefore, in behalf of the class, it is my pleasure in presenting to you, Mr. Fraser, our gift to the Niagara Falls High School. VVILLIAM G. MAYNE, President, Class of '29. The Prophecy of the Class of l929 Scene: The cave of the class witches. Witches: Kay Brackett, Marjorie Lewis, Ida Yarnell are weaving a spell. james Librize class prophet enters. "Hail witches three- thou witch of know- ledge, witch o'f sports and witch of so- ciety. I have a boon to ask of thee." VVitches: "Hail! Hail! Hail!" james Librize: "I offer thee the most pre- cious gift in the world, the seat of my extra- ordinary knowledge, n1y wisdom tooth, if thou wilt disclose to me the future of my class." lst witch: "The spell is not yet woven: come, sisters." CThey chant.j "Day by day with greatest zeal Hidden knowledge we did steal Night by night by bright moonlight, Words and numbers we did write." lst witch: "The first that in the cauldron goes, Is that which caused the students' woes, Algebra, Geometry, solid and plane, English and Math., that fevered our brain: Then French and Latin and Spanish too, And lo! our cauldron begins to brew. Then, History-Physics Chemistry-Civics All into the cauldron go Making the contents grow and grow." VVitches: Chant. 2nd Witch: "The next to throw into the flame, Is what has brought Niagara fame- Swimming-football Tennis-baseball Track and basketball. Throw all into the enchanted pot, And our wondrous charm will 'fail us not." Witches: Chant. 3rd VVitch: "Next add the meeting of friends each day, The clubs and dances that were so gay. Assemblies and Chronicle every week, The "pep" meetings and games that gave us a treat. I9290 Sl3llIOK'YEAlI'B00 4929 41 Drop all into the cauldron one by one And behold our charmed brew is done. All Witches Three: "The spell is woven Come and see." james Librize: This is indeed strange, why I see a vision in the fumes of the pot. I see a long shiny ladder with a glittering star on top, shining brilliantly down the ladder upon a group of people below. There is something familiar about that group. They're standing upon the steps of a building that I know. Well, I'll be a monkey's aunt. Why, it's the dear old N. F. H. S. and the people are no one else but my beloved class.mates. I can't understand what I see now. Everybody is making a dash for that ladder. The track men are in the lead, but itis a rather close race. They try to climb the ladder, but they all canit do it. Some are doing nicely, they're climbnig steadily upward. I can't quite coni- prehend the situation. They all aren't painters because I can't see any brushes or paint. Well anyway, our class is striving hard to climb upward. That ladder is mighty slippery but I see some of them stooping over a box nearby on which is written Honesty' Courage and Sportsmanship. There is sand in the box and by the help of this, the students can easily altho, slowly climb the ladder. There is one ingenious youth who has thrown a rope at- tached to a pulley over the ladder and is quickly hauling himself upward. A mighty good scheme I'll say. He seems to be doing well, but no, about half way up the rope breaks and he falls. He tries again and again but with the same result. Sore and bruised he gets sand 'from the box and slowly starts. climbing up. About half way up he discovers that he didn't bring enough sand with him. A lot of others make similar discoveries, so down they go and this. time they bring up plenty of sand. The climb is hard and tedious for some but more than half achieve their goal. On top of the ladder is the group smiling and laughing. Above them waves a red and gray banner on which is written, Success. There, the vision is slowly dying away. It certainly was an auspicious vision, though. Ah, ha, another vision coming, but I can't make it out yet. It's rather blurred, but it is clearer now. I see a nice looking, neatly dressed woman beside a little white country school house. She is ringing a bell and all the children are running to school. This dear school marm accepts a red apple from a little urchin and she repays him with a kiss.. She's familiar to me. Where have I seen that boyish bob before? Oh yes! It's Anne Weitz- mann. You all remember Annie, don't you? Well the vision changes. Now it seems that I'm in a theater, enjoying a talking picture. There is. a stylishly plump man with vasolined hair making love to a pretty blond girl in an airplane roadster. Gosh, but they look familiar, too. For heaven's sake! It's Francis Taylor and Viola Goodwin. Well I'm sur- prised at "Buns". The vision again changes. I am now in the town of Punksitoney, at least so the sign says on the R. R. station. Sur-- rounded by a throng of interesting spectators are two players engaged in that strenuous and manly game of tiddle-dee-winks.. Sud- denly a cry of joy is heard from the people and they lift a big hulking fellow up on their shoulders and call him champion. The cham- pion is no less than Ken Williams. Now the scene turns to a banquet. Some- one is presenting a lady a prize of some s.ort. On the little box it says "Nobel Prize" for best selling novel for 1940, and the woman is Dorothy Baldwin. Ah ha! The next is a funny scene. I see an initiating meeting of the House of David. Everybody is centered around a young heavily bearded man with hair that hangs to his shoulders. He is writing the following, "I do hereby solemnly swear by my luxuriant crop of sable curls to denounce all women for- ever and a day and I'll always be a faithful House of Davider. Sincerely your, Cornell Wetzel. The scene now shifts to a Turkish harem. My, oh my, Oll my, such lovely maidens I have never seen and so alluringly attired. They are all trying to please a young, handsome looking man seated leisurely on a heap of silk cushions. Boy, how I do envy that fellow! Iill take a second look at him. VVell for pity sakes, it's Gordon Richardson. What is the world coming 'to anyway? The next scene is the same and yet so different. There are a horde of girls as in the previous scene trying patiently to draw the attention of a grumbling and disgusted youth who wears a badge say- ing "Night Watchman at Old Maids Home." And the unfortunate youth is "Jeff" Mayne. The vision changes to the lawn of the White House. President of the United States Walter S. Fraser is listening to a number of harmonica players. After each harmonica player has played his song, the president retires for a moment and comes back with a cup which he smilingly gives, to Ardeen Lambert for rendering that popular ditty, "I Wanna Be Loved By You," in the most alluring passion, I mean fashion. His attention is then drawn to the national marble contest. One curly headed boy with a pair of pink knickers and a red tie is taking all the honors. To this worthy, who is none other than Joe Moran, Pres. Fraser gives a loving cup. Pres. Fraser is then summoned to a special session of Con- 42 19299 SEllIOK'YliAli'l500 -'929 gress by the White Houe errand boy, Fred Scott, who is invaluable to Pres. Fraser. Look- ing over the faces in the Congressional Cham- bers I see one or two that I know. There is Florence Morice who is Senator from N. Y. State and Margaret Bigelow, Congresswoman also from New York State. Over at one of the desks pounding at a typewriter is Claire Prozeller chewing gum in time with the ma- chine, while dashing around handing out papers and bringing water and opening win- dows is that enterprising young man, Bob Wishart. The scene now changes to a little oasis in the Sahara desert. Under its only palm tree is a little shack with the sign that bears this legend: Touchette Corners, George Touchette Mayor, Manager, Proprietor and janitor. Coop Lansing, Commissioner of VVater Department and Life Saver. The next scene appeals to me. I see two red nosed young men happily and contentedly at work in a room almost full o'f bottles. These fellows are openin.g the bottles one by one and testing their contents althoi sometimes they linger too long at the bottle to consider it a taste. The bottles that they make a face at are signified by a large cross and the bottles, that bring a smile to their handsome faces are marked O. K. Oh yes, the boys are Frank Williamson and Harry Keating. Of course, this is the U. S., for the 18th Ammendment has been repealed. I now see a woman delivering a fiery speech to some two hundred women who are wielding umbrellas and waving their arms something terrible to see. The speaker, Elizabeth Bailey, has a band on her arm with the initials, W. C. T. U., which I take to stand for Women's Christian Temperance Union. I see now another theater, the audience ap- plauding wildly and enthusiastically for a prima donna. They continue and continue to applaud until the prima donna encores. She has come out three times already but the audience demands more. So she comes out again and sings. in a beautiful soprano voice. She is Ruth Dales. We are getting along in the world. The scene changes to the great White Way of Niagara Falls which was known years ago as Falls Street. In front o'f the Richmond Theatre of which Carl Richmond is proprietor, blazes an electric light, "Alice Mingos, pre- miere dancing star in person." Reed Robinson in a beautiful uniform is with difficulty re- straining the people from pouring into the already overcrowded theater. I go way up north to Greenland University now, where I see Harold Mort teaching the greasy co-eds how to play that fascinating game called golf. The scene now changes. from one of cold to one of warmth. It seems to be a scene in a jungle, and sights of sights! Who do I see but Edward Bond all garbed in white with a big cork hat making motions to a monkey. He is studying evolution and is, tryin.g to ask the monkey questions. The monk is baring his teeth. I guess he's laughing at Edward. I see now a lot of Chinamen. It must be a scene in China. I see a very kind looking woman going about from filthy Chinese hut to hut, alleviating pain and consoling the heathen as best she can. They cast them- selves at her feet but she bids them rise. It touches my heart strings. It is such a worth while course. The woman is joan Barnett of "I"omander W'alk" fame. The scene changes again to an English court. Something is going on. I see a preacher and a bride, so I guess that somebody is going to get married and sure enough there is. It is Marie Ewing and she's marrying the Prince of NVales' valet. W'ell, I heartily congratulate you, Marie. 4 This next scene is as pretty a scene as any. There is a huge ballroom with daintily attired girls. They are gazing fascinated at two lithe and graceful young men who are evidently showing them new steps in ballet dancing. The men are swaying and twisting in a most captivating manner. To be sure itis Derrick Cross and Francis Curry. Who do I see now but "Bud" Chormann on the N. U. campus. He's wearing a large N on a purple sweater. "Bud,' is smiling hap- pily for he has just been elected to the Kappa Beta Phi, Senior honorary society. The next is a confused scene. Thousands and thousands of people are walking through l3ergholtz's only street toward the VVorld's Fair. Entering the midway I see many stands upon which are varied world champions.. I see the people crowding near one stand upon which a sign says "Modern Hercules and there chewing pieces o'f steel, breaking chains and hammering nails with his bare fists is Witt Baltuth. On the next stand is that re- nowned beauty, Elizabeth Babyack, who is unanimously elected "Queen of the Fair" over such contestants as Ruth Sinclair, Geraldine Ecker and Lenna Moscati. My gaze rests next on a stand surrounded by gloomy looking individuals among whom I recognize several prominent undertakers. On the stand talking to Marve House is Oscar Bell. It seems that he has just invented a pill that will prolong life by at least 10 years. Marve after taking a pill, is leaping and pranc- ing down the midway. I don't know why Marve wants to live 10 years longer. CContinued on page 773 mastiff lwmtmo EDITORIAL F REWELL VVe sincerely regret the loss of our principal, VValter S. Fraser, who has been with us for the past four and one-half years. Mr. Fraser is leaving Niagara Falls to become Superin- tendent of the Tonawanda schools.. When Mr. Fraser first came to Niagara Falls, he became principal of the Fifth Street School. In September, 1925, he was trans- ferred to become principal of South junior High School. In March, 1926, Mr. Fraser be- came principal of the Niagara Falls Senior High School. Under Mr. Fraserls guiding hand many im- provements have been accomplished in our school. He was confronted with many prob- lems, all of which have been efficiently solved. We wish Mr. Fraser the best of success in his new work and we know that he will take the same interest, give the same wise counsel, make as many friends and accomplish the fine work that he has done in the Niagara Falls High School. 'QZQSSENIUK-YEAIKWU -'Q29 Jerome Baker . . . Allen Welch .... Harry Keating Gladys Rendall Doris St. Denny .. William Mayne .. Francis Curry .... Beatrice Andrews Kathleen, MacKay Clifford Masterman Cornell Wetzel Thomas Cagle Carolyn Wilson Thomas Shiya The Chronicle Staff . . . . .Editor-in-Chief . . . .Associate Editor .. . . . . ...Athletics . . . . . . . . Editorials ..... .Exchanges ..Business Manager . . . .Circulation Manager REPORTERS TYPISTS I 928-29 Alice Mingos Arlene Mt. Pleasant Francis Skimin Gordon Richardson Francis' Taylor Mary Tarczynska Regina Walsh Dorothy Anders '29 Edna Heuer '29 Dorothy Brooks '29 Dora Quinby '29 Thelma Freeman '29 Rita Steigerwalt '29 Mildred Williams '29 SENIOR CHRONICLE YEAR Francis Taylor, Business Mgr. Jerome Baker Oscar Bell Margaret Bigelow Karolyn Brackett Francis Curry ART DEPARTMENT jack Anthony Pete Scozzafava ADVISORS Miss Bereneice McCarty BOOK STAFF Geraldine Ecker Ruth Dales James Garrity Cooper 'Lansing Alice Mingos Gordon Richardson Cooper Lansing Mr. Alfred Benson .'- M G 1 IQZQSSENIGK-YEAKB00 'jQ29 45 3 1352 Q f ai -rf' Mm , . T . 31 f YQ' A nr ,LS i-,, ..' - , K, 5 f V H W I i ,K ' i A, S M W , ,V X 51 5 s A . t' v-v: : ' Eff - THE CHRONICLE STAFF 929 9 SENIUK' YEAKBUUK 'Que SEIIIUK-Yl5Ali'li00 'QQZQ 47 Dramatic Club The annual production of the Dramatic Club for this year was a comedy in two acts entitled "At the Sign of the Greedy Pig," written by Charles S. Brooks. The play, with the cooperation of the Student Council, was presented on December 6 and 7, 1928. The persons in the cast were Elmer Woolcutt, Wil- liam Rose, james Librize, Charles Munson. Cooper Lansing, jack Anthony, Marion O'Neill, George Candee, Anna May Baker, Elizabeth Morgan, Cornell Wetzel, Gordon Richardson, Edward Bond, joseph Murphy, Ernest Shustik, Arthur Shrubsall, Ruth Dales and Selma Bernstein. Many other members took part as villagers, peasants and servants. Several interesting plays were given before the members at club meetings. "Not Quite Such a Goose" with Barbara Baker, John Lewis, Ella Sbarbati, George Candee and Margaret Scheil in the cast was especially en- tertaining. Other plays. presented before the club were: "The Fatal Quest," "Ground Khans Diamond," and a "Game of Chess." In September the membership committee of Ruth Dales, Anna May Baker and Arthur Shrubsall was elected. Selma Bernstein, Anna May Baker and Charles Munson were in charge of the club committee. The Dramatic Club officers for 1928-1929 were: Gordon Richardson ............... President Selma Bernstein .... .... V ice President Betty Morgan ..... ........ S ecretary Cornell Wetzel .......... ........ T reasurer Social Committee The activities of the Social Committee this year were a success both socially and finan- cially. The season opened with two Friday afternoon dances which were well attended. Everyone seemed to enjoy them, consequently, more dances followed. The Hallowe'en Dance was the first even- ing dance of the year. Some of the costumes were very original for which prizes were awarded. Cider, doughnuts and ice cream were served. About this time a Bargain Dance was held one afternoon. Stags were charged ten cents. and couples one penny. After Regents' Week in February, a dance was held to cele- brate the fact that Regents were over. On May 17 the annual social committee party was held. Next year Anna May Baker will succeed Margaret Louise Bradley as president. George VVallace will succeed Edward Bond as vice- president. William Curry will succeed Rich- ard Denner as secretary. Mario Di Gregorio will succeed Gordon Richardson as treasurer. Miss Gooding, Miss Ashton, Miss Ingraham, Mr. Brownell, Mr. Newton, were the faculty advisors. Literary Society The Literary Society has become an estab- lished club in the high school. The constitu- tion has been revised and meetings are held on the second and fourth Thursdays of each month. The second Thursday is always a business meeting when many interesting dis- cussions were brought up. The fourth Thurs- day is devoted to jolly times, delightful talks and Heats." On one occasion Miss Naylor gave a splendid talk on her trip through the Yellowstone National Park and showed many picture slides to illustrate her speech. At this meeting the society had as guests the members of Miss Naylor's English and American Literature class. On another occasion Mr. Brownell told of his visit to the Alhambra in Spain and read a selection on the same sub- ject. Both talks were greatly enjoyed by the members and visitors. The officers for the past year were: Pres. ..................... Donald Kobler Vice Pres. .............. Caroline Wilson Secretary Treas. .......... Ruth Tschabold Librarian ................. joseph Murphy This year the society wish to contribute something to the school which would be en- joyed and of value to every one so a copy of "The Historical Notebookl' by Brewer was purchased and presented to the Library. We consider that this society is of great value to the students in developing an appre- ciation for the best in literature and in stimu- lating interest in social gatherings among the students. International Relations Club This year the International Relations Club passed its third year of existence. The honorary society is a comparitively new or- ganization, as it was organized by the Social Science department in 1926. The purpose of the club is: To promote a knowledge of world affairs on the part of the students of the Niagara Falls High School. The membership is open to anyone who has passed one year of a social science at an average of 8078, and who is keeping his work in the third year at that average. These qualifications tend to limit membership to juniors and Seniors. f The society meets every second Monday, alternating business meetings with social meetings. At the social meetings refreshments CContLnued on page 503 1929 Slillldlli-YIEAKBUUIS -1929 ss SOCIAL COMMITTEE 4 -HW nf www ENIGIKYIEAKBUG -'929 49 L Q Joy DEBATIING TEAM lit ROW-J. FICK, O. BELL, A. WELCH. 2nd ROW-F, RIPPLE, E. MANSFIELD, E. WOOLCUTT 3rd ROW--R. SILER, G. WALLACE, M. Di GREGARIO. 50 l9W5l5llI0K'YEAll'B00 -1929 CContinued from page 479 are served following the program. Outside speakers are obtained when possible. The social gatherings have been among the most enjoyable and profitable of the meetings of the past year, for instance: 1. Everyone enjoyed the topics and dis- cussions on China and Sweden, also the ex- bitions carried on in connection with them. 2. Mrs. King, a Chinese missionary gave a special talk on Chinese customs. 3. Mr. Olsen, the Swedish consul, en- tertained the club with an interesting talk. 4. Miss Rice, a faculty member, told us about her trip through Italy. 5. Miss Hickox, Principal of the North Junior High School, illustrated with slides, her talk on Italy. 6. Besides these many student talks were given on International questions. The 'following officers were elected for the first term: Joseph Murphy .... . ....... President Bessie Merrow ........... Vice-President Melvin Baumhofer ........ .. ........ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Secretary and Treasurer Officers for second term: Joseph Murphy .,........... .President Anne Gallagher ........... Vice-President Alice Mingos ..... Secretary and Treasurer Miss Cole and Miss Harwood were faculty advisors. Debating Society The 1928 debating season resulted in three victories for Niagara and one defeat. The first, with Erie Central High School, ended with a double win for Niagara. The question was: "Resolved, that the present system of install- ment buying and selling is opposed to the best interests of the American public." The members who represented Niagara at Erie were: Eddy Mansfield, Edwin VVoolcock and Allen lfVelch, captain. These debators who upheld the affirmative, won a 2-1 decision over Erie East. At home, captained by President Oscar Bell, the Erie team which upheld the affirmative, was likewise defeated by a vote of 3-0. The other two Red and Gray debators at home were Francis Ripple and John Fick. Mario di Gregorio and George NVallace were alternates. Later on in the season the Niagara teams met their greatest rivals. Kenmore. The teams managed to split one and one with Ken- more. For Kenmore the same question and the same debators were used as for Erie. At the opening of the 1929 season the society witnessed the departure of its advisor, G. E. Norton, who had accepted a position as principal at Soquoit, N. Y. Mr. M. Bedford was chosen to succeed him. Due to ineligibili- ties, vaccination, and lack of funds debating was suspended for the term. At a recent meeting of the society the fol- lowing officers were elected for the next sea- son: President ........ ....... A llen Welch Vice President .....Eddy Mansfield Secretary ...... ..... F rank Ripple Treasurer ................. Ralph Seiler Stamp and Coin Club The Stamp and Coin Club of this school withdrew their last exhibition of stamns from the show case in the main corridor, May six- teenth. The first display of stamps was placed in the case shortly before Thanksgiving, and has been changed about every two weeks since that time. The collection represented the stamps of the different members of the club and were the club's contribution to the school and the community. That is, the exhibitions were principally to interest collectors who were not members of the club, applying to the English language and history classes. The art department cooperated with the club by printing the cards on which the stamps were mounted. The first series of stamps displayed were issued during the time of the revival of the Olympic Games. Among these stamps were found stamps from Greece, dated 1896 and 1906, Belgium dated 1920, France dated 1924, and the Netherlands dated 1928. It is inter- esting to note that the U. S. will hold the Olympic Games in 1932, and no doubt at this time will issue a special stamp such as the other countries have done before. Lindbergh stamps featured in the exhibits. These included the issue of the U. S. stamps and also the stamps issued by the Central American countries during Lindberghls re- cent Central American flight. Covers Cenvelopes with stamps onj brought over on the Graf Zeppelin were shown. The stamps mentioned are but a few of the types of stamps that have been placed on ex- hibition by the Stamp and Coin Club. The last meeting of this year was held May 23 in the Model Apartment. Prizes of stamps were given to the winners. The following members received prizes: lst prize-Eugene McIntyre 2nd prize--Robert Smith 3rd prize---Victor Drinkwater 4th prize-Edward Bowers The club was organized in the spring of 1925 with Evelyn Hinds as the first president. The third year Franklin Maddever was presi- dent, and the fourth year Ralph Hessenger held this position. Miss Hulen has been the advisor for four years. CContinued on page 531 , 'QZQQSIEII' K'lUiAK'B00 '1g29 53 tContinued from page 505 The officers of the club for the past year were: Eugene McIntyre, President, and Robert Smith, Secretary and Treasurer. The purpose of the club is to give students who are actively interested in this work a chance to get together and exchange stamps and ideas, and to nou ish this interest that the student may carry it out in adult life. Le Cercle Francais The French Club or "Le Cercle Francais" as it is better known has made a year of suc- cess. The Club o ganized in 1925, has thrived and prospered under the guidance of the French teachers. Membership to the club is open to all French students who have had at least one year of French. Meetings were held twice a month. one being a social meeting, the other a literary or business. All meetings are conducted in French. The purpose being to produce a feeling that French may be spoken everywhere not onlv in the class room. In this way the French students become more fluent in their speech. The F1 ench Club presented a French play, "Jeanne d'Arc" for Parents' Night. November 7. 1928. The principal characters were: Jeanne d'Arc ............. Clare Prozeller Jean .................... Richard Conroy Une Voix .............. Elizabeth Morgan Charles V11 roi de France .... Bruce Dilby Le -Iuge ................ Perry Mansfield Duke of Strafford ............. john Dick This year for the first time in the history of the Niagara Falls High School, a foreign language newspaper was published. It was a French paper called "La Chronique Fran- caise." It attained a great success, which is due to the untiring efforts of Miss Gooding, one of the French teachers. The officers were: President ................... Bruce Filby Vice President .... Flizabeth Morgan Secretary ...... .. .... Donald Kohler Treasurer .... . . . .... .Ieraldine Jemison Lib arian .................. ,Ioan Barnette Program Com. ..Mary Lulick, fchairmanj The French Club is greatly indebted to the French teachers for their cooperation, Associated Music Clubs This has been a record breaking year for the Associated Music Clubs in many ways. Much of the success of the organization is due to the business-like administration headed by President Louis F. Mayle. The other of- ficers are: Bert Leuppie. Vice-President, C. Howard Channing, Secretaryg and Dorothy F. Dean, Treasurer. Last September, the Music Department moved into new quarters, a music room and four studios built especially to meet the needs of the department. Instruction and con- ferences may occur in the studios, while a rehearsal takes place in the main salon. The concentration of musical activities, with texts, supplies, and equipment all at hand, has pro- duced an efficiency never before possible. The Associated Music Clubs takes care of the social and business contacts of the various classes and clubs of the entire de- partment. Managing concerts, arranging pro- grams, and much detail of the individual or- ganizations have been cared for expeditiously. Several social events and departmental hikes have been arranged. Prominent among the organizations which make up the Associated Music Clubs is the Girls' Choral Club. Marjorie Abendschein is President, Rilda Courtright, Vice-Presidentg Gertrude McAnulty, Secretary-Treasurerg and Elsie Burgess, Librarian of this club. Its director is H. A. Spencer. Another group is the Boys' Glee Club. The following are officers of this Club: President, 'l. Frederic Taylor, Vice-President, Frederick MacDonald: Secreta"y-Treasurer, Melvin H. llaumhoferg and Librarian, Lawrence Butler. The Glee Club is also directed by Mr. Spencer. The High School Symphony Orchestra, led by XV. A. Scotchmer. and the High School Rand, conducted. by Newton W. W'ard and Harold N. Finch, did not reorganize this year. but retained their regular school status as classes, As such, they worked under auspices of the Associated Music Clubs. The Little Symphony, which plays for spe- cial occasions, has met, as heretofore, at the call of the director. Mr. Scotchmer. It has performed for the school plays, and has had several outside engagements. Several members of the Orchestra and Band have met to play chamber music. As yet, however- they have not organized, although a Chamber Music Society in the near future is a certainty. The String Trio is but one group from the potential Chamber Music Society. The 1928 Thanksgiving Concert was the first general activity of the Clubs this school year. Don Gallahue was concert chairman, and was assisted by Rilda Courtright, in charge of newspaper publicityg George Mitchell, ad- vertising anrl posters, Florence Napoleone. tickets, and Charles VanKuren, house. The concert celebiated the Schubert Centennial, and was made up entirely of works by the Master of Song. The fine performance of a tContinued on page 569 56 '92Qf'5l3lil0ll-YEAIX-1500 -1929 CContinued from page 531 movement from the Schubert C Major Sym- phony by the High' School Symphony Or- chestra merits particular mention. "Miriam's Song of Triumph," by the Glee and Choral Clubs, was another outstanding achievement. At the invitation of the Associated Music Clubs, choral units from the three junior high schools also contributed to the program, which closed with a thrilling performance of "Die Allmacht," one of the greatest songs. the world has ever known. The concert stepped up in- terest in vocal music in the junior schools very considerably. Over S225 was realized for the music fund. The Spring Concert of the High School Symphony Orchestra, which was also spon- sored by Associated Music Clubs, was in charge of Rilda Courtright, general chairman, and the following: Iola B. Foote, newspaper publicityg Dominick Iannuzzi, posters and ad- vertising, Florence D. Napoleone, tickets, and J. Bruce Filby, house. The assisting soloist at the concert was Newton W. Ward, baritone, a member of the faculty. Orchestra and soloist alike were heard to good advantage, and an audience of comfortable proportions was de- lighted. About S150 more was added to the fund for band uniforms. The next purchase will be gray trousers to go with the present caps, and capes. Thus equipped, the band will present a better appearance and be more com- fortable at football games. On Friday evening and Saturday morning, April 12th and 13th, the Associated Music Clubs entertained musical organizations from many schools on the Niagara frontier at a music "meet" or get-together. Students were present from Gasport, Middleport, Newfane and Tonawanda. After a New England supper served by the Girls' Choral Club, there was a concert in the auditorium of the new Trott Vocational School. At this time the Newfane High School Band, Carl j. Hulshoff, leader, and our own Glee Club and Symphony Or- chestra were heard. With the assistance of the Music League, about one hundred guests were entertained overnight. In the morning, the final session was held in our own audi- torium. ,The remaining organizations were heard at this time. Among other events, the All-junior High School Band made its debut, winning its spurs gracefully. The visitors left Saturday afternoon, expressing the wish that the Niagara Frontier Music Meet might become a yearly event. In addition to its yeoman service in as- semblies and the concerts already chronicled, the Symphony Orchestra- in collaboration with the Glee Club, gave a program before the convention of the New York State Mothers' Federation. It will be heard, as usual, at the various 'functions of commencement season. The High School Band has played for as- semblies, football games, basket ball games, and for the City-wide Athletic Meets held this spring. In addition, they furnished music for the International Pageant held at the Y. W. C. A., the Memorial to Heroes of Peace, and the water pageant, "Une Notte in Venezia." At the request of Chaplain Wilcox, at Fort Niagara, the Band made a trip to the post and played on Sunday evening, April 28. Elizabeth Morgan, soprano, sang a group of solo numbers. The Band also had the assist- ance of a mixed quartet made up of Rilda H. Courtright, soprano, Iola B. Foote, con- traltog George W. Candee, tenor, and Walter C. Dyczkowski, baritone. A program of colonial music was prepared by the Girls' Choral Club and rendered for the Lillian Rebekah Lodge on the evening of February 22 at their George Washington Birthday Party. Instrumental music by the String Trio, and a play, 4'Childe Handel", made a varied bill. By request, the club later went by auto to the Odd Fellows Home at Lockport, where the play was repeated for the old folk. Such success attended these two ventures that an assembly performance fol- lowed. The unusual number of immature voices in the Glee and Choral Clubs has made it un- desirable to present any extended work this year. However, the Glee Club has appeared with success at the Hotel Niagara and the Y. M. C. A., and in several assemblies, in addition to the events already mentioned. The fine new home of the department has inspired the desire to make it attractive. Com- panion portraits, in charcoal, of Schubert and Mozart have been executed by joseph De- Pietro and jean Bowerman. These were suit- ably framed, with Miss Blackmar's assist- ance, and hang in prominent places. A fine tapestry, the subject a musical one, has been procured and will brighten a large space on the east wall. Other improvements, in pros- pect, will make the Music Room still more attractive for work and recreation. It has been a pleasure to share quarters with Le Cercle Francaise and a number of other or- ganizations during the year just closing. The School Council Each year the School Council of N. F. H. S. has grown and accomplished so much that it is now the center A around which all other school activities are built. i Through the Council, the school is able to carry on its out- tContinued on page 771 19299 SIENIGK-YEAK'BO0K, -'92 Us N Oi v-1 ca. - NIAGARA FRONTIER DISTRICT - APRIL 12 AND 1 MUSIC MEET 929 9 SENIUKYEAKBUUK THE BAND THE ORCHESTRA 9wsSENI0li'YI5AK'B00K, 1929 SENIGK-YEAKBUUK -'92 as 2 LITTLE SYMPHONY CHORAL CLUB CLUB GLEE THE TRIO LQZQ9 E IGKYIE 12300 '1g29 1 I N X! Mgt! 'frying . ' 7" I-I5 N -- 'Zf"'f22a2 Yifi I 1 V f' + , Qf"'fs2f1S922Zv ,, f 6,1 gm, , ,N , 'E.-f:-H135 I '11 44363 : pf? A ,v if wily g.g4',gWW f X ,6.w2.W3-95 gp: ,,,, , 'MSM :W "sWW,'3'tXvK no sm f ww MWO's's if 'X QW, QMRQQIW, Q7 W" V HM , ff M00 WWGQMN' f f -X9 WM WM f, 4 MWWM ' M s MMM M OMHHWUN3 x.xn'.Mc.,xe.mm' X 5 V 'X Y X Q N Q SMG-M LAN 'za X + X ay gXX ,. l..- twgg 9290 SENIUKYEAKBUUK, -1929 Q.lC'J' 64 'Wav IENIGK-YEAR-B00 -1929 'tg 1 ' tigiff f' - ti, - The Sport section of this year's Year lhcl-1 is dedicated to Niagara's basketball team one of the best and scrappiest teams that ever represented our school. They played 17 games winning 15 and losing 2. Our team represented the R. P. 1. League in the sectional playoff in Buffalo and after defeating two League winners in llamburg and .lamestown they lost a close game to a better team, a team which consisted of older and more experienced players. Niagara is not disgraced but should be proud of her team who played and fought to win but their best was not quite enough. Wie wish to congratulate the members of Niagarais winning team: Captain james Gar- rity. joseph Maloney, Harry Keating, Francis Curry, Richard MacDonald. Kenneth Rowe. .loseph Nloran, Andrew Hastee and Melvin Martin. . Niagara 47-Technical 11 The Red and Gray basketball team opened their season, December 14, in the local gym by trimming Technical High School of Buf- falo. The local team far outclasscd their big town rivals and won an easy game. -17-ll. Niagara 29--Alumni 14 ln the second game of the year Niagara de- feated its Alumni 29-14. The game was fought during the first half, but the Alumni tired from the lack of condition in the last half and the Red and Gray walked away with the se-- cond victory of the season. Niagara 33-Bennett 9 Niagara took the scalp of another liuffalo team on january 4, when they took liClll1.'If High School to camp by a 33-9 score. Niagara 22-Tonawanda 14 The Red and Gray won its final league game on january ll, when they beat Tonawanda by a 22-14 score. The game was close through- out but was marred by many personal fon's caused by unnecessary roughness. Niagara 26-North Tonawanda 17 ln the closest game of the early season, Nia- gara defeated North Tonawanda by the score of 26-17. Niagara pulled the game out of the fire in the last two minutes of play when 13 points were scored, 11 for Niagara and 2 for North Tonawanda. Niagara 33-Batavia 19 The Red and Gray traveled to Batavia and beat the local high school 33-19. The game was well played but the Niagara team out- classed their rivals. Maloney, playing wonder- 'ful basketball, scored 13 points. Niagara 26-Kenmore 18 Niagara went to Kenmore Friday, February 1, and defeated Kenmore in the first big game of the year. The game was played in the new Kenmore Gym and over 3000 people witnessed the game. Both teams were about evenly matched and it was not until late in the game that control was decided. McDonald played a good game as he held the veteran. Stumpf. scoreless from the floor. The final score was 26-18. Niagara 35-Lockport 6 The Red and Gray closed the first round of the R. P. l. League race and remained in first place in the race when they defeated Lockport in the high school gym. Niagara was some time getting started but after the first quarter the game was won and put on ice. the 'final score being 35-6. Niagara 19-Tonawanda 15 Niagara started on the second round of the R. 1'. 1. row and won a very close game from Tonawanda by a 19-15 score. Captain Gar- Klaloney each played and out- riyals. Maloney still playing iity and .loe classed their true to form, scored 13 points. Niagara 27-North Tonawanda 20 The "lumber shovers' came here on Feb- ruary l5 and were defeated by the Red and Gray by a Z7-20 score. The veteran Matthus was best for the Twin cities while Red Ma- loney was the outstanding player for the Falls. Niagara 30-Batavia 13 liatayia was Niagara's next victim. They fell before the Red and Gray and were whip- ped by a 30-13 score. Niagara 20-Kenmore 22 Niagara received her first defeat of the sea- son on March 1 when Kenmore defeated the Red and Gray on the local court by a 20-22 score. This game was by far the best game CContinued on page 72.3 QQQSSIENIUK-YIZAKISUU M2 M , v. BASKETBALL TEAM 65 WELCH, J. MORAN, H. KEATING, F. M. MARTIN. Standing-M, PARSONS. Biz gif? M5 EE EQ: 55 was 'ies gi- Q 55 Q. 35 hid Ei Hz go mE .LH 422 ,iw av- in: D5 D O 66 '-QZQSSEIIIGIWIZAIX-B00 -'Q29 1 i is f-A A The football team of the Niagara Falls High School has had a successful season for 1928. Attica, Lackawana, North Tonawanda and Medina were the new teams that battled with the Red and Gray iron men. Out of the eleven Frames that were played, Niagara held four of her opponents scoreless. Captain Moran, lialtuth, Hunter, Scott, Wagner, Augustino, VVilliams, Danahy, Garrity and Mort played their last game on the Red and Gray gridiron. Coach Charles L. McCabe is going to leave Niagara Falls High School and accept a posi- tion as head coach of the physical education department. His friends, the students, faculty and his teams, all regret his departure. Ni- agara will never forget McCabe. His record while in capacity of football coach has been remarkable. In the period of five years, his squads have won or tied all but four games. Attica Niagara's football team won the first game of the season on September 29, when they de- feated Attica High School, a new school on their schedule by the score of 45-6. The great work of Captain Joe Moranwas the outstand- ing feature of the game. Depew The Red and Gray eleven won its second victory and the first home game by decisively whipping Depew to the score of 34-0. Moran and Cornell, the sensational backs, again featured, however, the whole team worked in unison and displayed a decided improvement. Lackawanna October 13 proved to be unlucky for the Steel City boys as they were Niagara's third victim of the gridiron. The score was 38-0. with Niagara on the heavy end. The game was very slow, with several substitutions for both sides. East Erie Erie East invaded Niagara on October 20. and held Niagara to a 6-6 tie. It was the best game of the early season. Although both teams fumbled many times, the game was very thrilling. In the final stage of the game Ni- agara made one last effort to break the score. With one minute to go. Captain Moran threw a 25-yard pass which cleared Cornell's fingers by inches. This same situation occurred in Erie the year before with Erie trying des- perately to score. However, Erie was more fortunat and scored, thereby winning that game. Tonawanda Our high school team received its first de- feat of the season, October 27 before a crowd of 5,00 people, when Tonawanda came here and defeated the locals 19-6. This was the first time Niagara Falls footballs team was de- feated at the new stadium. Captain Moran's work again was outstanding for the Red and Gray. North Tonawanda At North Tonawanda we were again forced to accept another defeat from the Twin Cities. The smooth running Lumber team trampled N. F. H. S.. to the tune of 27-6. Although the Falls boys were outclassed they were not out- fought. Dunkirk Niagara Falls broke her two-game losing streak by going to Dunkirk and defeating her on November 10, 1928. Cornell captained the team in Moran's absence. Chrysler's initial start proved to be the feature of the game. Hunter and Mort also played a sterling game. The final score was 28-14. Medina The Red and Gray easily defeated the Me- dina squad by the large one-sided score of 63-0. The Niagara Reserves played a good strong offensive and defensive game. The regulars played the final minutes of each half and piled up the score. The feature of the game was Jimmy Garrity's 85-yard run for a touchdown from kickoff with 20 seconds to go. Lockport The County Seat rivals of Niagara came here for the final game of the season. Niagara's regulars and reserves trounced Lockport by the score of 56-0. Although Lockport seemed to have the size and strength, they lacked the class. Captain Moran, Baltuth, Hunter, Garrity, Scott and Mort played their last high school game for the Red and Gray. 9wvSlENl0KYEAK'B00K 68 19299 Em KY AKB00 '1gZ9 ii ,pf I-1 bra ly Tl ,A ly .1 ' a tb The baseball team, under the leadership of Coach McCabe, won the P. A. Miller trophy for 1929. Kenmore, North Tonawanda, Tona- wanda and Lockport were the teams that com- peted against Niagara for this coveted cup. Their splendid record was only marred by two defeats out of eleven games. Tonawanda was the only team to defeat them in league competition. The team was captained by Fred Scott. He is to be succeeded by Harold Hopkins, captain-elect. The team will not be serionsly crippled next year by the regulars leaving, although Captain Scott, O'Keefe, Stenzel, Danahy and Kennedy have played their last game on the Red and Gray nine. Kenmore CHQ In the opening tilt of the season the Niagara Falls High School nine took a big start when they defeated Kenmore on April 27th by the one-sided score of 15-1. Our batters obtained fourteen hits from Ellithorn and Albright. Page, a new man for Niagara, got a perfect batting average, getting three hits in as many times to bat. Cornell and Stenzel handled the pitching for the local squad. North Tonawanda CT.j On May 6th, in a very close game, Niagara's sandlotters managed to squeeze a one-point margin over North Tonawanda and take a victory by the score of 5-4. Cornell and Kin- zley each allowed seven hits to their oppo- nents. Michael and Captain Scott each gathered two hits, the former getting a double. O'Keefe, Page and Hopkins starred in fielding. Fosdick-Masten CHQ The powerful Fosdick-Masten team which has long been Niagara's rival on the court, bowed to Niagara on the diamond when they accepted a 6-1 trimming at our stadium on May 11. Stenzel allowed but three hits dur- ing the seven-inning affray, while seven hits and three errors accounted for Niagara's runs. Appoloney starred for Niagara in the outfield. T ff Lafayette CHQ Lafayette, the second Buffalo aggregation to invade the Niagara dugout, took a severe trouncing when our batsmen gathered ten runs and they failed to score. Cornell fanned eight men and let out but two hits. Niagara got eleven hits, eight of which were two bag- gers. M A hi Tonawanda CHQ On May 18, Tonawanda came here and ac- cepted a 10-8 defeat from our local team. The fielding was very imperfect. Niagara was credited with eiglit misplays and Tonawanda with two. Curto broke the tie in the ninth. with a man on base, when he connected with the ball for the first home run of the season. Lockport CT.j Six straight wins came to Niagara when Lockport was beaten on May 26th, 10-6. The game was loosely played as each team had five errors, the total of ten bases were stolen by the teams. Cornell and Stenzel gave the l.ock City boys eleven hits, while the best Niagara could get was ten. Michael's work behind the bat and with the stick featured. Kenmore CTJ ln the return game with Kenmore on May 25th. Niagara again defeated her. 7-0, in a seven-inning match. Stenzel displayed won- derful form on the mound only allowing two hits to the twenty-two batters that faced him. Curto. Page and Stenzel hit doubles while Hopkins pounded out a triple. Our battsmen gleaned ten hits. Kenmore's fielding proved faulty with a total of five errors. North Tonawanda CH., The Red and Grav nine virtually won the P. A. Miller trophy for the 1929 season when they defeated North Tonawanda on May 29 in a two extra inning contest, by a 5-4 score. Roth games with the Lumber team had the same score. Cornell allowed seven scattered hits. The McCabe squad collected eleven, seven of which were two-baggers. N. U. Freshman CH.j The Niagara University freshman team in- vaded the Red and Gray camp and forced them to accept their first defeat of the season by the score of 6-1. Clancy, the Yearlin.g's pitcher, allowed but three scratch hits. while the Frosh gathered a total of ten hits off Stenzel and Cornell. Tonawanda CTJ The Red and Grav received their first defeat in league competition when we traveled to Tonawanda on ,Tune 3rd and were given a 2-1 setback. Cornell worked well and only let out five hits. Oswald, for Tonawanda, allowed seven scattered hits. The locals on their off CContinued on page 70.5 9299 SENIOKYEAK'BO0Kf 70 59293 ENIUK-YEAKB00 -1929 x --' -1 S., V. 2-.2-Lf ftff' The swimming team rounded out its most successful season since the start of swimming as an inter-school sport at Niagara. Cooper Lansing captained the team this year with Paul Quinn as manager. Coach Syczerbacki developed a squad that went through to win second place at the state meet, only being beaten by the strong Buffalo section. The team got off to a slow start, when on December 13 we lost to Bennett High, 35-34. Due to the absence of Selkirk, ex-Captain Car- rigan, and Major, three strong swimmers, we were crippled. On December 20 we also lost to Nichols, 27-23, when Captain Lansing got lost in the wilds of Black Rock while trying to follow Coach Syczerbackils directions to the school. Our meet with Bennett for january 10 was postponed. On january 15 we won our first home meet from Technical, score 43-26. We beat our old rivals, Hutchinson, here on February 1 by the score of 50-19. Tonawanda, in their new 75-foot pool, lost to us on February 5 by the score of 47-22. Returning to meet Hutchinson we again defeated them, 42-27. We lost our next meet here to Lafayette on February 13, before a fairly large crowd, by the score of 46-23. The next three meets were won in short order. Masten Park on February 19 fell to the score of 53-16. Tonawanda, a week later took the count of 52-17. On February 28, Nichols was defeated, 43-16, thus avenging our defeat of December 20 there. On March 7 we swam Bennett and after a close, exciting meet, nip and tuck all the way, Niagara found herself on the heavy margin of one point for a win. The score was 35-34, the same score when Bennett defeated us. Sectionals Coach Syczerbacki whipped the tean1 into shape for the sectionals, which were held in Niagara's natatorium. This year we were placed in a new section, number 5, with the Tonawandas, Lockport and Kenmore. On Saturday, March 2nd, we qualified twelve men for the State meet. State Meet The State meet was held at Colgate Uni- versity, Hamilton, N. Y., on March 15th and 16th. In the trial heats in the evening the following swimmers qualified for the finals: Carrigan, Librize, Major, Selkirk, Lansing, Grady, VVetzel, and the relay team, composed of VVetzel, Grady, VVilliamson and Lansing. The finals the next morning were the most exciting races of all. Our two foremost breast-stroke swimmers started off with a bang. Carrigan took first place in the 100- yard breast stroke with the time of 1:16, a new state record. After a quick sprint, com- ing from behind the entire field, Major, Cap- tain-elect, came up to within a few feet of Carrigan, Cwho lead all the wayj to take second place. Selkirk pushed the ex-state champ all the way to come in just behind Miller of Lafayette for a close second. Librize executed some wonderful dives to win over Barrett, the ex-state champ, also of Lafayette. Niagara now has two state swim- ming champs. VVetze1, Lansing and Grady each placed fifth in their respective events, namely 40- yard free, 120-yard medley, and 100-yard back- stroke. Niagara's fine showing this year has been greatly dye to the coaching of Mr. Syczer- backi, who surely developes winning teams in the sports he coaches. BASEBALL tContinued from page 68.5 day presented some miserable fielding. Page made a two-base hit. Lockport CHQ In the final game on June 8, after snapping its losing streak, the Niagara nine won the P. A. Miller trophy when they badly defeated Lockport High, 9-1. Page and Michels lead the Niagara batters, the former getting a home run. Pease of Lockport accounted for two of Lockpoi-t's three hits. Stenzel struck out eight men and Pease sent nine back to the bench. Doctor: 6'You are looking far better this morning than I expected." Patient: "I expect that's because I fol- lowed the directions on the medicine bottle." "Let me see-what were they ?" "Keep the bottle tightly corked." 9wsSENI0KYl?Ali'B00K 72 '929v5l3llI0li'YEAll'B00 U29 CROSS TRY In the fall of 1928 Coach Parsons started to get the cross-country harriers in shape to go after the cup at the State meet. Some good material showed up, among whom Captain Hewitt was the best runner. Brown, Hewitt, Hendricks, Moran, Conjeyoci and Greenfield were men who had had a previous season and of whom something was expected. Lockport The first meet was with Lockport which was won easily by Niagara when they placed four men in the first four positions. Captain Hewitt got a clean first place with no com- petition inside of seventy yards to the finish tape. East Aurora The second meet was held with East Aurora. This meet was also won by our har- riers. Hewitt took first place, Messler third, Greenfield fifth, Hendricks, Moran and Con- jeloci also landing up in the first ten, among a field of twenty-'five men. Alfred Doc Parsons finally decided to take the harriers to Alfred. W'ith eight men he had strong hopes of winning this meet although there was a field of close to one hundred men. High schools from all over the state were re- presented, among them East Aurora, East High of Buffalo, Lockport and many others. When theh gun went off the runners all had to crowd and race for an opening like that of a sheep pen. It was the survival of the fittest. The course was up a high mountain, over ditches, stones, fields and stubble. Many of the runners could not finish because of the hard grueling grind. Hewitt, our strongest hope was able to get second place, Messler twenty-fifth, Hendricks, fifteenth and Green- field thirtieth. The cup was awarded to an- other team, however Hewitt received a medal. Sectionals The sectionals came soon after this and were held at our stadium. Parson's team placed Hewitt, Messler and Hendricks to go to the State meet. These three won the coveted New York shields. State Meet ' The State meet at Cornell did not come up to our expectations. Hewitt won fifteenth place, Hendricks, thirtieth, and Messler failed to place. This was the time that Niagara missed the wonderful work of her ex-cross- country man who has always placed in front in this weet. The team this year was thankful that the cold weather held off for so long and that the grind of practicing was not like winter as it was in 1926. Hewitt, Hendricks, Messler, Brown and Greenfield received their major letters 'for cross-country. BASKETBALL fContinued from page 64.5 played this year by either team. A three- minute overtime period was necessary to de- cide the contest as at the end of the regular playing period the score stood 20 up. A crowd of two thousand people packed the gym and was by far the largest crowd that ever witnessed a basketball game in the local gym. Niagara 21-Lockport 14 Niagara got back to its winning ways on March 5, when they defeated Lockport at Lockport by a 21-14 score. Niagara 21-Kenmore 18 In the most exciting game of the year Nia- gara defeated Kenmore on March 7, by 21-18 score and thereby won the R. P. I. Cup. The game was the best game of the year and was a contest throughout. The game was not decided until the last gun when Niagara achieved a victory. Again a record crowd followed our team and three thousand spectators crowded the 174th Armory Building in Buffalo where the game was played. Niagara went to the sectionals in Buffalo and defeated Hamburg by a 32-11 score, Jamestown by a 17-9 score, and lost the sec- tional title to Masten Park of Buffalo by a 20-25 score. Mary: 'Tm not going to wear that red and white striped sweater any more." Alice: "VVhy not?" Mary: "Some guy mistook me for a stick of peppermint and gave me a good licking." 9wvSENI0li'YI5AK'B00K 74 '92-a9SliliI0li'YliAll-1500 ',9Z9 TRI? CK. The 1929 track team presented a credible showing this year considering that Coach Parsons only had 3 letter-men of 128, J. Moran, VValters and Hewitt, around which to build his team. However, he has stocked himself with some fine material and looks for a prom- ising season next year. Nichols XfVith several of last year's stars missing, the Red and Gray track team were forced to accept a loss in their initial start against Nichols, May llth. The final score, 57M- 46j6, found the Bison City boys running off with seven first places, while the most the Falls could get was four. Captain Joe Moran proved to be a real iron man when he copped fifteen points for Niagara. Spillane, a new man, showed good form both in the 440-yard dash which he won, and in the relay. Alfred At Alfred on May 17th, Niagara entered a five-man team and managed to score six and one-sixth points, to take ninth place among some forty interscholastic rivals. Schenectady ran away with first place with 35M points, with Lafayette of Buffalo, second with 27. joe Moran added a quarter of an inch to the pole vault record to break the record at 11 ft. 721 in. He also added one point by getting fifth place in the Javelin throw. George Moran added the fractional counter when tied for fifth place with five others for the pole vault. Lockport The local trackmen were overwhelmed by the Lockport boys at their home stadium on Saturday, May 18, by the score of 63-27. The County Seaters annexed all the first places except one. Coates, their champ Speedster, copped three first places, the 100 and 220- yard dash and the broad jump. The Moran boys tied for first place in the pole vault. Sectionals In the most closely contested meet on record, East Aurora High School squeezed out the championship in the sectional meet at the Kenmore stadium on june lst. Eleven different schools participated. Niagara managed to grab fifth place with 15 points, East Aurora 20, Batavia 191-3, Lock- port 18 5-6, preceding us. Moran as usual gained first place in the pole vault with G. Moran second. Walters placed third in the 220 dash and Hewitt was third in the mile event. TENNI Tennis is growing as a popular sport among high school students. This year our team was stronger and better supported than any year before. XVe won 28 points out of a possible 28, to easily win every match. Coach Syczer- backi was fortunate in having Captain Staf- ford and Kealing, two champions, on the squad, who took the state championship in the doubles. New material will be needed for next year as Keating, VVilliamson, Stafford, Banks, Wis- hart, Quinn, Houser and Mgr. Robinson are graduating. On May 14 we defeated Tonawanda, 7-0. On May 16 we set back Devaux, 7-0. Then on May 21, Nichols was blanked 7-0. The last match of the season was taken away from Kenmore, 7-0. At the sectional meet on May 25, William- son won the singles, 6-2, 6-1. Keating and Stafford won the doubles, 6-1, 6-1. State Meet The state meet was held at Syracuse Fri- day and Saturday, june 7 and 8. In the pre- liminaries, Frank Williamson, section 7, lost to Blour, section 1, of Woodmere, Long Island, 4-6, 2-6. In the doubles prelims, Keating and Stafford, section 7, defeated Carl- son and Ankelen of Newburg, 6-2, 9-7. In the semi-finals, Keating and Stafford defeated Cummings and Owen of Schenectady, 6-3, 6-2. In the finals the Keating and Stafford com- bination again came through to win the State title from Clock and Collett of Buffalo, 6-4, 9-7. 9wvSl3NI0K'Yl5Ali-B005 76 19290513111 II-YliAlI,'l500 -'929 JCKES - . bfi", KV ?,2f2.+4 flu: K'VVl1at is it, Maud?" boomed her father about midnight from the top of the stairs. "Fred's watch isn't going." "How about Fred P" "I'se for a five-day week. How 'bout you, Sam?" "Mani I'se for a five-day week-end." Prof: "NVhat is your excuse for being tardy?" Late: "Stop me if you'Ve heard this onef' My daddy is a traffic cop, And I must say I envy him: XYhen he says go or stop I note That folks obey with lots of vim. But I dont seem to have his knack, It niades me sad and full of woe: : I've no luck with the boys at all- XVhen I say stop they always go! Young Man: "Your daughter and I would like to get married." Father: "Married? On what?" "On XVednesday of next week, sir." "NVhen I kissed her last night she began to cry." "She didn't like it?,' "No, she was crying for more." Lorraine: "So you're engaged to an avi- ator! I should think you'd find the uncer- tainty terrible!" Laura: "Oh, it isn't so bad. They all fall sooner or laterf' "1 think a lot of you, jack. Why, I'd even give you a suit of woolen underwearf' "Gosh, Bill, that would tickle me to death." Visitor: "Tell me, is this village lighted by electricity ?" inhabitant: "Only when there's a thunder- storm." Teacher fgiving lessons on charityj: "Pike, if I saw a boy beating a donkey and stopped him from doing so, what virtue would I be showing?" Pike: "Brotherly love." Some men have friends and others buy their neckties. Old Man: "Aren,t you ashamed to be smok- ing a cigarette ?" Kid: "Sure, but whatsa guy ,gonna do when he ain't got the price of a ciggff 1' if Teacha: "VVho came after George the Third ?" - jonna: "July the Fourth l" Being Kissed: "I could have you put in jail for this." Who Kissed: "If you do, send me to At- lanta. I haven't seen my folks for 'five years." Grandma: "Young Lady, I'll have you un- derstana that at your age girls were very adept in the use of the needle." Granddaughter: "Really Grandma, and in which arm did you find the injection most ef- fective for vaccination ?" Two Scotchmen tossed to see which should pay for a drink. The winner called "Heads," The loser called "Firel" and escaped in the confusion. He: "May I have the first dance?" She: "Rather early to ask, isn't it?" "Oh, well, you know, the early bird catches the er--er-er-" "Wither away with them shears ?" "Cuttin' classes today, goof!" Dad: "Ruth, does your mother know you are wearing such a short dress?" Ruth: "She should, I borrowed it from her." Love is like your last cigarette. You begin it without stopping to think. You fondle it, you play with it-until at last it burns your fingers . . . Of course you can always get more cigarettes. "What were you doing in the garden with your hatchet?" asked old man Washington of his little son. "Oh, just cutting up a bit," quoted the future daddy of his country. 'QMS' lllll-YE llllllll '4g29 W LETTER AWARDS BASKETBALL MAJOR 1 M. VVelch, AI. Maloney, Garrity, H. Keat- ing, K. Rowe, F. Curry, A. Hastee, J. Moran, R. MacDonald. IYIINOR M. Martin, 'G. Moran, A. Stoneham, G. Vandervort, A. Murphy, M. Nichols, W. Curry, J. Cleary, S. Sobczyk, E. Kelly, B. Hardy. TRACK MAJOR R. Congelosi, R. Hewitt. il. Moran, G. Moran, A. Stoneham, W. Spillane, Walters. MINOR C. Carigan, Manea, Messler. Baseball MAJOR H Nichel F Cornell F Scott Ca t R .H ,'. ,. ,C pJ.,. Page, F. O'Keefe, H. Hopkins, fCapt.-electj, D. Cubello, A. Appoloney, M. Curto, D. Stenzel. N. Soluri, CMgr.j. MINOR E. Cunningham, R. Danahy, E. Quarantelo, S. Sobezyk, A: Kennedy. Cross-Country MAJOR R. Hewitt. M. Hendricks, Messler, Brown, VV. Greenfield. Swimming MAJOR C. Carrigan, O. Major, D. Grady, F. Sel- kirk, C. XVeaver, H. Gibson, C. Lansing, J. I.iBrize, F. lVilliamson, R. Fairburn, R. Dan- ahy, G. Rerick. MINOR P. Quinn, C. Argy, T. Schields, K. Mc- Dowell. Tennis MAJOR H. Keating, E. Stafford, F. VVilliamson, R. Vifishart, H. Banks, P. Quinn, A. Hauser, F. Taylor, H. Skarsky, F. Schreiber, R. Robin- THE PROPHECY l tContinued from page 425 The fair with its glamour fades into oblivion and its scene changes to a domestic one. Seated before a fireplace are the Siamese twins. jerry Baker, husband to Ida Yarnell is glowering at Al Hauser who is making pas- sionate love to Ida's bosom companion, Viola Winters. I see now the majestic battleships of two progressive nations saluting each other. Com- manding the salutes of the Yiddish vessel "R, P. I.", is Admiral Jas Robert Garrity and returning his salute is Arthur Shrubsall, com- mander ofthe Swiss ship, "Gobblessmysoul." Ah-the next scene is a sight for sore eyes. Sue Morgan is entertaining the royal patrons of Kay Brackett's cabaret with an educational SOI'l. talk on Football Men and their Mannerisms, and who should know better than Sweet Sue. Among the notables present is the Arch-Duke of Minni Hahaw and his beautiful wife. Marion O'Neil. Selling cigarettes is a truly marvelous girl whom I recognize as jerry jemisofn. The scene is now outside the cabaret. The most magnificent car I have ever seen draws up to the curb. I am very curious about the make of the car so I look at the radiator. It says there, "Fratso Lappi Special Twin S." It must be some new fangled French car. NVell, Charles Van Kuren steps from behind the wheel and opens the door of the car and a most dazzling woman arrayed in furs and jewels steps out followed by-Oh hang! The 'fire's gone out and the charm is done. Now we'll have to wait ll years to find out who the millionaire with the charming wife is. JAMES LIBRIZE, Class Prophet. School Council fContinued from page 565 side business and is able to regulate those things that are being carried on within the school. Perhaps the most outstanding achievement of the year was the successful management of a Parents' Night. lt has been a much desired hope 'for sometime that a night be set aside when parents might visit N. F. H. S. and be- come better acquainted with the teachers and our school life. This year, under the careful guidance of the School Council the dream of a Parents' Night has become a reality, to be made an annual event in future years. To encourage thrift among the students of N. F. H. S. has always been a very definite aim of the School Council and thus it is that the Council has charge of all the banking in the school. The cups which have been won by Niagara teams have been in serious need of a clean- ing. This year the Council investigated the matter thoroughly, and then appropriated the money to have them cleaned. This was a service to the school well worthy of mention. There are innumerable things which are Council does, such as taking charge of VVing Collar Day. the Book Store, and questions arising concerning school organizations, all of which have been successfully handled this year. The Council officers for the year 1928-29 were: President ........ . . . .Arthur Shrubsall Vice President ...... Richard Denner Secretary ....... .... D ororthy Baldwin Treasurer ..... .... R obert Wishart 929 0 SENIUK' YEAKBUUK Autographs K xr I2 33: '929f'5Wl0K'YEAK'l500K Autographs S S 5 ,1 55 1 IE? 51 1 , X K fi .,. . ,, .vm F .M .1111-.1 ,. Aw M Wa W-yn, , -. 1.7. f ---V , if . H -V .r ., , ,..,.- .M U .- -- , , : ,. .4 -ia M,--,1,w- , id. , .'-e,,5qL1,J3wQg,g .am is ,Q , M., sw.. -Ml ,fan-4.,f +V .wx ., 1 K 44.5, 3 S . x1 v,,!,55-1415 -mimi ,Q , n , fig ,,ygi.f, W Q-.J eg.L.l1'ix'?:,,w-M gf M Us--ga' ,. ,H N gf'-4 - W- .44 .1 . -,N 4-..A,,, -31,4 .,., ,pg an -A 4, .?Sf 1g:'Z . .' 'ff-' L"', - " ' J' b' f H- " Ni!" 'I' 'W' '- f , . ,. . . . . "p'4W,f'f-5 -an 35" -"-mr L'5'3T '5I aww 'LS' fiw um -- T fl' Ill. -f . - 1 H. "Tw ,R ,. ' - -, suv : Z... wh-' ,gf-ya Ll . ., ,.,, ,. , JP is .. ., . APN, . Q., , Qw- 5333352 f WQQEH GEF? wkQ.Mf X fQwiffgfwif22?wffvQwQvfefmfiQ wal? Wg? "5 . , . , . . . , . . . . , ,.,.-,- V- , . if 'H' f 8 ...mi .K , V , NW V ,ff T . X. , ngfwa-:'3'gQ.'ffw -ff ' 5 -if m e-.gf lark' an 2. q.? " yf 'B p?'2ffW2T, 0,5 V 'P ' ' - - Qlx25'5gQf5f?i4'59W'1 ' R 1 " " li i'w'h'h 'W ' 'W u 111. V ' ' nigfif 'ii ' L' ' Y ' ' ' Wi?" ' 'RJ' "Elk" ' ' A f1'm Eff ' y-'W +V , an Q NM 4? lx '31 " , fi, 351. uw. M, 445' :Lia , 31- , ' J-Af: i me - ' 1 V ,,, f1f'f-"gigi'Q3" -A Q W f z f '..- gg, f2"3,2..fqGTG "Q5L,'iwu.f. 33' ' J' 'I Q1 X ' qi. f 'ff' H -Xi Ql'EipA ' i ! R515 fy ' ff 1" ":u4i-inf :fi :WJ ,: . ' f':3+'m? 7"'f s B .3 I by Y f 44 ,. ,wig . K N., --f ,E 'L ,.1q.:,Q J-' . ' . .1 'nz 'pi'---Q L- . -4.4 1 .- M-. M -v ,- - ' Y 1: ., D 1.24-539' 51, . 3 Q, 'By I , ,- . . . . , , , , , . . . V , -1 4,4 -.,-g. ,J , f .1 2L2w'V 4.-' ' - n . eY'H.51 i' Tj" 'Q-7. N V' j k ' 'Z Q N J 'Jq' ,v:'3fJ'ih" ' - . , I M , f .911 A :fuk f 'S' 1 JL ard' f sw 5' A Y ,ji g, L 114. ,li 'T .R , ' " , 3, W '15 Af aim, av, gf " -M ' - w - mf'- ik I Y sf- vb! X 1, 4.- '-UY1 S , 1 iv I J , 'L Y +4 ' H '-':5',Qrx: 1x 1 - - -:-1- -J-' - f -'- r--. -G . 'T '1 V : .- Q' Fw .. ,,-, .. Q X' '- 2- .4 .yu .. ,JR rl ' ' 3 !X.- ' " v J' 1' -5 2' ,, a' ': 'i' 2 -L11 ,- 5ev..qg-gaigivz:g 1: - is 1' .Z-V A he , ,I 4.5. nnlfflxixifljfggv x :gi A . " Ljfkg- 4xi,K - ,J A X ., v . . A ' - If 1- L, W , .- SU! M E , ,Y , .ei , .hw . . . . . If xv w. .8 W at k it 'E " 4 . 9 as J.. 54 Y, wbqhvmf E '1 1: 'ig E J P if ki JJ I 23 2 3g,,..,,, "" ' 1 , ., .n w + -fir m. . ,f.wfciffg1:g A-if "' ff gi f- ' N- - Q " Q1 '- '- w,:N .?-' rf- if - 1 3 , A ,H nh 1, ,. M"v , , 3-1'e'3,' if A .5 4 4- '55,5'f?' 3' 95' 1"' '-15"Ws'rfwf:1' .' 7',5+j'5Q. ' '-521 ,M-ii '-:Q-" "4 " ' 1b.:Q ff',, " ff ' ,zz " ,lf f " f m 1 Y k- ff 1' , f' 1,11 V . :lf M P W Q -' 'fn 4.5-11 ,f ra-1-It X A , V- F ,f , H .. up J' J 1 . f' ' m g --' ,.-f' - 1 "' " .. A. ., .. 5 ALA. N -.Aw-11, -4 +G-: V ' ,, rg, -1' ,M V -N - V- uh .mn ..,'c-.yb - , 'Aw Y Q -, We - ' 445' -, - Q' :. . . 5.1.4 snug? v-.:. -- 1.. ,- Af ,. Y '- 1, 4-,,, 5.19391 :nf A135 if ...w v ri : fe-f u v' , ,fM?':'?4Ei-L:s,f-'xLg,,.:,h1g3r, ' N. fl ew M "-,g-iftg -3' ,,, 4 -' Hawks. . is " 4' . V. 'WWF :iifg - .X if jfffiv-F1 .--'wgssgq 41 1- . ' -,X -' " A f 'f-fl' ,fr xv., 39' 1, 'L 2 5 'X ,vt-f.. JA ,..,L-w',.'.f-! , - -.ss - ,q-,2e:g,.,,x, Q ., ft . f Ev -1- 1,,2.J,iu.f - . -gh' fy' , 'mg-ES--1 ,-f,,A.4m-.f.-,..1'T- : . ,ff f 1-+-fr , 1 -wr.-f ,. z. rdf- fw Q L 1 2.1!-1 ww, 11- -. A L --1'-1 f1fr"""f' :-1 V ff f" Jgffi ff f LQ 455399 , 3 4 1' ,LQ -1 ---3 if . VA :f 'ff fa gmrgkfgfgx r f, , V .A i fl W-:I fPQ, , 'g j qm 5 ig 14:55, -A mg. 95. 'qgg'.w. 4.g,,f1-,i f 5,2351 if 5, 'Wy' Q . N Q fbrffj , 32 1' g gi., wg.:'F?afff ,p g '1 ,Q . '-' fi " i n R 1't'Q"1-f " '3 Af'-P1 51,0 3' , 1 mf- -:5,f.. ' Eze- 'iff S' .- fl . '!'-H T' " 5' ' iff' 3 'wx A 'ff Z '-, I -- -'f' "' lf ff! ' 'if rf" f" ' "'-A 5: k',. ' :. 1' gfsfg Flu wi ' - ' 35,552+ ?'7 ' ?l"iE,i31,fQ ' ff5 "'EF?'2f?, f'F'-1" 1 A. 2 SYN , -u,," "'F'f'QE'3- ff?-'f "'1- --2 v.Sf?g'f,g fifi 2- - Q' V. . 1-.. f wa, , -fa N- -. 1 . . 9.14 - 2 , i Q-.az -4 - 4 2- .1 :. 1 'Y Ps' .? A . ww- -3,-111 x.,1 4- 'ge' 'lbw "f-WQHQ-f..,'. 1 .-mf 1 ---':,:-.. 'Q 45:5 A ,-:v+F""' P A5 4, ,W -,. f-N ,xp a . f -uf.-,w ,A - -v . ' ,M 1 F- .P -255- jfxg gwg. 4-ap: pe, . . ,,. . 5-K iwgik. ,fm ,,.-wr 5. fe-mp Q, .1 - A ,I I V ,f...,,- VA ,, 4,1-A uf., , QL, A - , ,, adj,-. V .,A A -R , .,.,,'- ' 1.11-12 ,U 1."f-.S'f,i X --271.0--'M 1 L' 71 1,-I' ,A , ap- vw- . AQ, - flgw - 4- 4-fr 7 -,ek j:'13f7iQ-41?"f'-' ,,.14'V,i"9,4:'i'w ' aff: -ff. H +'-1,1-QF, 4 VW? f'5'g:G9li5' ' f-f'a4a"f.1 ' 'r' in " ,W f Y . ,fwfr ga'-. . --.V G ' hi fi if 4 " 'ff fi Wg 4-12, QS!! ,wp 1., f'yEQ".'.1: af,-1 " fu? " E 1-5.-Hlfwki-1 5. s Y! s. 5, 1 5 ' .Twig 'F' 31 A 1-'3,.. - V ' " T evgffkf f,:g,F,3q,.Efif-jvlf' , - , 15. 'f y zgfiifig'-gij ji' 1- QB -44ii5fQQ,45f:g,5k-T553 W' Q QQZKQE- g,j2iL'1-Q,f'.1iF'Ki.?:z"n3i9" '64if1f?F'5 F'-3' ?'1Zf'i"1 -,fu .4 i g ' " ' 12,-fr .. F 'Ti'-925' ' 'lf 52 '-. 'Z 6' 4 -ff fa: af' " W .. :MA - K. --,rw ' ,ve raw- gf lid :,,gL1-- - A 1 ' 2- ' "4' U' 11. 1-N W' ' 2,kvs'qg3, ,! . '1 'ff f- 'v-:A L - E P- ' w h a, - 5 -3 , ' - f fi 1: .,Qq'+ gk'-5515-5 s f 1 . any .P,5.Q.b'Wq-fr-.V - . eww -' v i -,, gif apia' ,nge , ,, ,l, ,1.Q v3 ' :a:. f?s4 ,Q - f f l' - - 'fs .1-Q f- ' F513 Q -' A- W '1,gvg5-,g ' c v-vw ,Z 2' ,L,. g. :rm 2 Li,-.ig F - .rx P Q. wwe. . - I ,rg -,I -A ,3' -Kew . 1, 3 f - -f-4',w,f -Fl 1..wi'- ' Biff Q 1' " Q rff- g"F:2ff:f',T"'fI'7 if -' :'?f-- - ' V '--44 , ,. Q rj, J - Q ' g ' .' .,f-,iw ' ' f if , "" Q A --, 'T V, T ' s f W ' - ' , ,Q :,I-,i.- fx-, ',. ip- -- ,. - . 4.g,,:.e . .. r V1 :G ,, ,H--x , V V, V 4 Ng., . 5, V 3 . ,, .1 , -. S, Q-,gb J . -M ,V '-- ,,, gy.-gg, rv. A . 4 V . - SMT : f ' . - - f, ' g35i,E?f5i,53i:1:-Nb .gig ,ff afgxzi 42,21 - g C. zg g g,:2 I1 - 1?V,QW'f '- ' ' ,Elegy f , ,Q ,V we gi. -:git 4 6' nw ? nw T5 giyitg , -fi""'r',,4 4 ggi 2- ,fTQ?.3, ig-1 H I2 k.?g,11-it-q'f,3r5,.fj A51 I Im -- is fax ah- ,-fggqk 15 L. M-cr, 41, 4 4, M if ,Q 19511 1:51 2,5 -K gain New gf fu rw , ,: 7.5, .5 F' p rf .r :iv ,Q-Fiji! 1Ffsgm14,:,3l.,i,,5gm A, ' , H9553- hpf 1' I' 45-751555 , M, WH' """w- i. f1,,.:"!g' Q51 A 1 LA , ,- " :iw ,A V. -' P . , ,',4. 1 gpvx. " '4 Zffflpw' f. "7f2""",' "Y3l'ZJ'f2r1f '-i f I: "4-I' ' ' w ire- :+L fn S' -' -' -. I X V 1- , --YMAQ 1 , A , ---1-2 -N - .. F3-iv'-' , f '- :.-.4 , ff-14555 , Qi.: 1 , "" f Hg '1 qgf ,-gg .PQ mg., Y ,L -ji-J'-2? 1 ,. V MZQQ y:,5'y5zU".t:. -- 'gin 4 -5' 'Vi ,-,s,,v2l:Q,,qh,,J':N.ky , 53.71, 5-, L. ,QW Y V ,':' f , ' 1. N 1 : '- , i , ff. if-'f pei .. v -'?-w ':Q:, .wh M 553 -A -ff,-any-M - Nr. g fynff vw .sg ,fy-.,:,: 1- , Y df 1 L -,+L-, E vs , .--.L 4. ,,s- 'ff' -. 4 b1"Q""'. ., .. ---H,'+p,'- auf' 5.6-, 34 -, N,.'af-v..,9w 'Y' "M ' .fr af' -, -vs 4-1-uf-F K. -'41Qf'xg-:ggi 1 i f.fmP ,:,. Nasir- uw -'f-igkfga 5,42 :.1- Ci- 'i 7'T... ' -55351 nz-Pri?-1 ,mfr if '1 Jima-'..f:.A T 5 "r .vs-,aim V-f1Q275!V : QE' , " A ' if wsf --ff -' ,ef an - if mf wq fw - ' - 1 1' . - 1 'v gg-va ,-, , W ai, Hi, ,Afnf 11 1'i".'Qf'fl43!':fJkpff?'?Q,v7fsl mf:-"?f'?fi.b '--ww-..'s ' V 1. V - fmxgli H4195 , W Q4 :HPC 1 j9f.,f,Q!5'3g,g 43531 I , - T5f..,:--fiiff' fg,'gi,:' ,3K-jx: IQ gr? V 52 Y H 2"z+" .Qt ' 5 .. 1, ' Higgins p.5 -a-f 1g,,-fj, .- " A ' A " 'i1 rg3" g+ - - 223, 1 - q13"ff-m+xw. +- ' W 'sfG 113N fr ,J :f ' ' 2 , mm-a:2'ff if- v ., , Lliif,-N . rm,- ' 7 X' ,fwar k- 1 V 'In .A lf 'Y -1-Q-1-Q ' 5- . 51" if ':53"7"w". . f-'V ' 5+ f 'fha vs- .: 15 ,--' az?-fir-' ',,Af.. Pg5'-. . A A , A . P ., -W . 'Wx 711-,fl W :ef W' -we-2" - .- ' 1'-?11?i'5ff '- ' . zffw- f if ' , 1 a- 4 ' 'L f' +':' ,,':' f ff- K: f , ' .-wHwf5.i' " A -'f -sf. 1.52-" .L A: ., g f. I- Hz.. 4 ,ir-5. ,.- W- 4- gif . ni- , 1 -, Q- - V YE 3 f 34 -Q. . 19 ... w h 9 V iff i'. fi,w ", ' Q: , 'YQ . 1 f" 5 ' Q 1 . , U W -'-254,-:, . 9515 A pak - :Fl ,nf - ' ' "ny, - J. ,ig-gf, If . H " 5. 2' ' :.'2?2'E+,.,f,:?-PQ., , 9? F wi . "L - ,f-33 - '- gr -H ,ily , '- . 4 J" 1' , ,g 13, if E ff 33, gf 1 i, 7 1, 0, "' ' in Pl '4-fg V Q ff 3' :F :'Ai" " 411- 1 1 4' ' r J? ' M ui Q' 5 , , - - , ,- -,f -.-V- M " W . 'A ' , " H -,,' 'T' X QW' . , , . , , ' ,fr L ,4:?13f,wfv ,f .,,.4.ml gg ir.. we , , 9'-!'KVqvw,, 1. 1 P-,KY 1 HVQQ rip K - I, 4:-. V V,pg5,:vN. 'gfgfq . fr ' 'X , if C 4 r ,C A .,, . W A 5,5 am--A, 1 1,4 I -' V. 111' 3 Q ,C - .gg fl ', Lf -,,,' ,1f an-I 5 , ' j'f',gf?i-'.1fi I-if .. . ---,gm an M ,A -V 1 1 . .M W - -- wr 4.x -'ef A 1, . .-L -1' L f ,mg .uni-1 1 "' f .2 : gg,, I . ui .- , - ,.- - ,. vw .fltlw . :W JA- V - Egg K 'iii' X 3,-1 5 ,1LQf.,wQ, , 52' fi" 'M M' Q W'-, - 1-Q f?2i'1'A1??e4f -' ,-ga, .-4 .7 , , Y . ' .,,- ,. ,9 .1 -' -5-. 5 .M -f 1 ,, -I .M gg -, " ,. y.f, ,Y 'lcv' " ,- " ,,- -.,,Qq"' fwfr. -if v, ' 1' fm - g 'w?'mi. ' -' 'f 'ff-'V .f,,' -, " , '- f'5 ,J -- - XSL ' -'Zifwff ' J " ' '-'S V -- rfwik 41 wwf...-vsifff V ' .mv .mm-., , -ff. . -me A , if - P - . V .. iff ' - - f . V ' J1'f'4'1.u , 5 5-- f 4 ' ' 1 A g ':IfF+e'I52"- -3, , .Q " Tr. ' - , ,QZ QAS-' " ' ,isa gi.-siirifi b "IW" I "N 'N ' ' ' N53 5" ' " 'A' W'g.1vf' '- i ' ' ' ' 'Q ' If "2iilf,f1 4 V - 1'.t:,j' - -' V f .'ff4 2.j:JHiw. f- . ,v ljr 11 yum! 1 5 4 4 X 1 X, 51:-w-'.-f ':. Jug ff?f'f 'X' 5' 'ff + ME"?"' fi' " 'F W ' ' - if J. N 4' " fx 'E 24:-'-:.?l"3 X , 4 535.-l ' f'3."" -ff' ,. ga 'Q .+'- 4 :""Ai,5' - 'fkgui , ' . J-1' . igxj 132' if ' ' i fi. " ., f'- ll t, " gn , gg, Y -. fffi' ,,. ,gs 5-,gl ff' 5, , . f ,F A ai..-c. . , ef, .V 'ffl QR '97 "4 '35, f F AME- ,M r 1 F f J 1195? 7 " 'X' " 1' :E gg V V X . -4 ..- ,waw vf-- ...- , 1-.',, nqvfx 5:7181 V . V 1'f .. xp, , -'4- .. -.-fa. 4 , ., .Y V I - ,, , .tw ' . f - Q Kg- -7. v -.4 5.-,,,-1. . 'NV ' 75.12 ' -X - - 5- -V ' 1'- ' - - 'ff -- M " f ' ' 1, , -Z, , -, , ,....1m ,3---11, f W- '- K, sf, Ie -, - -,151Y,-7.1L-AMA. , Ag '- v--9. '-1-E, -V . j,:-i f-. -j ,-- i5'ik2qg-,f-1?-xap:'J3fi-gC,W5?"5-fgii glgqigxw - N1 313:-74 'f-"'-1p'w.y1, .'1XS?'.g , , J , . . W, . ew ., -' rf.. ' ,. ,br i idfv' Y, ,X W -- .. ' - rf ff- 1:1.f'-we 1 z ., -... - 1 - 1 . - ,',' mysf f -. P'-uj,7'.'fqy :k..,-,g,.-, gf-' 'ff ' .LTUJ3 -. ,Q A, '- - 4 51, ,J Pb-vb ",'.4,M' . V -1 fy -.. Aj- . , A Ng 1-R ' c '- ,c 3235, Sirwfvfjxyw-5 ,li 'ff L A , ,, 4 'fy M12 5 x - gvgtwg . fa Y A jr,-3 v.:,,.,f.I 5 3 Vi' -uw, .,,V,,,- .geqt 951, j2L:g2',- . I ' .Q , s- - H , f x- I 1 V' 'avg L ' .-. ,,4 " ,, f,g.3t-' V W: 3- -A k V QA, --Peg, - ., . I ,Q ,inf :Vg ' f' " a v '- ILE ., . .1 Kfmli. gm-h""'hf' Tiff " 'i 5:4 .np ' i wa, , ,, " , . . . , X, '- JJ, " , :RWM in I ' , A P-A .'- -. 2531- 7 1 ful 54 5 51 .,. im 'ieffh' '.,e M qi ' ,'4.":. g ' . 7W""w"5 , 4. 11 ' Q fr xv.-'59 'fy fi- fm ., -. 5' f- Q, F" fi . w ' . " R ug, , A- 1, 9 1- ' xr , up ' 1 Q .'xZQ,:-' - . A . -. fe ,Zr. ,?ikQwF-Ni: - m r 5 " ' . V--g.,51:.,,.f-if 1 - - , fl . .V s 1425 if w 1' A r. " 4 . ':' vs f E., if , F-' ig 1 . 45, - . .. A AH.. ., 14,3 m x, '!5Q'f,T, A 5, ,il .,,. fi, ' ,M ,Jag 'Y un .MQ vfgxgq P A Y A.. ff -L ' ,lim ,q w up 'S nh V -I 4 W. Kg. lh.. 11 91:4 25 "f'1:. lm SWF ,TIS it 2,432 9122. if? VJ.- ,Q-if ,W i,l..ii' :Q- , gg, fa ., 1 aff "E W , ii 5-445' 35' J' -H 14.1 My :aff ffj ff!! iff ' 4 ff? 'Ars' f. ff ff! 3 '- fi' 2:1 , sis". 4:24 ffl : 4: P15 + If .. Q , ga. 1: ' fa r W 4 5: y- N1 fr Ja X, , . M, mf, .53-fl? F " ' T 11 gfggqk j A i i, JL T- H ,y ' , 53, .pg ,A gi. ,L ,if ,,7Q--,,,A---, - - 9134 T1 ,f,w5?1u,e- ' Q fn as My f I "' M k Q 4' gk Ku M " v- F If ff ,H -. by me W J' A' I ' ' L' ,Y if lu is 3 Z h W -1v.- "f A .Z ' ,1 :. ' 'f v 41. :, 1' -'J-Ln'-.11-""' -'g . 7 4. -'71 '.'!141 f - ' , " ' H H 4 1116 13 s- -' 14, Q- ,'.,'-'K , . . ,g 'rf - x- "uv, .. , 'qw ,sa up 4QQ:,n efA1+- U 3:-if Wh' " -Q 21 I 4 2 ' ' ? ' " 4 ,r 1.1-f M: 35,536 f f " ' , .'-fy'-f'f f3':sal?i Y Q: ' ,azz 'w fb x-f "" 4: 'Af A. '-le' fiiifffl-5 1,117 f"'f:.W-fff f' . , - Q E i f , A, -Q ., ., -W Q M , ' if A x . .f ,.wf Q-mzfflg ,,., X -34-f - -f ' 4 IQJ? 4 , . 1 A ' . 4 A rc ' H PZ idwvgfz-i,w3vx-Q -' , 3.35 : .- f -W! sf ,wr '- ...fin-,re-'.'W-1 .pw . . ,ga-4 4- ' , 'W 2 I r '54 ' QQ W 'iw ,Y-,.x .9 1 v -- J'-U rv QW -. 'f-f. W 2-' , .'f"f1':..' i'41S-S" ' ' -Jie V f V P " N' 11'.ff '3"q ' 1 fm " ' J J.. ', .5 ' , ' -f'?ig'-,.a.,-eff.,-F "' f',g,igi:i??g" 9'3 L55 V , .7 - "1 "1 - ..f'+1,i:e'w -5'-39Z',i55"?' 4' 1 ,g,.3ggb- " 1 Q' -'-in sa- ' ff f "" W fifmggw'-.If .-".. ,MEL " 5 Lwlxlu 1'9" 5 'fr 'lwyy rl k 3 f L' ,. Q .f.,g.Q1-- .. QF- - X- ,f.- . . X. . .- ,f , W ,. ri. K tiki' Xar,v,Y .:. W., mug gr-. . . f, Q' J- kd -v ",,54,:iH:', n M 5 7" E""i.Q'i?'S:"' ffIP':1 ,-'EJ' " 5 , , HN '13 ' f., ' H V' ' ' 1 ', -fl ' " 'J-Sf Q51 "E 5 ' 'fa -71:5-"g'jf'h" 9" f"7' 17 - 'W-,F-T'P'. 7' V fr- -1 A - tw-, 1 id ,.- V 1 ' 53" f'ff,"3-9, , ,yfa ,f:Q3ri'jg'51i'59g- ' A T , "'L97?f""' 1 K . Qiggx M U f Q 0 'x f ff qv- 1 .lm ,, Wy 4 x 9- 1 ., , fn J. f A 'jf' Q, Y , Q rw 1- "V A fi ,va f-V-.T ,jg I T V. " 5 5 u it ' V ,:' 1 . 9' gy- ' v- I. ij IL' "W-.Avg ,. A -if fr . - ...Pty - H ,-F-W. V . , --W .., ... .. ,.- L t . .- -., .,,,, -, , ,, V. ?. -?..,.,. 'al . ,, .. V- J? -fd' , , f ,V V. .' . ""'QJf-ew Fl, . a l s A 1 4 .. . p aw.. if f mv -' " ,,,2w1 - Y ' 'g i' t-, A H a w.. -,-n w I IJ, :wg V . . may t . Q . ,I 'fe 1' j i g? 1 -5 -vr 'rw-his fixqikgv-,m,, Lvl Lv 1-:iw j .4'f2g1g,,4 ' . 'il - . ,- '-- f ' V-V 4 A 1 ' -'-- ' x ' --" - '- A , 4. A A ' x - Q 4 , V - l 7, . M' 5'A'Yi'," li 'I Lf f f v' "Hi 'T'-- P f' ff!-' wi V -' I .' - ' L 52 .fu "ir " ' , Q Q I 1 -fb ' L' 'V . 41" ' ,V FQ'ff1'w'ff'-iff ,rr-5 'fi '25 1' "ff ' li 'lf " ' f- !:: L kg! iff? li V 4' 45' 'mn -H V h V' WH SQ" ,iff N ' ' bi Q, ' -., V ' , 1, 1 47.1, . - -I 5: 'V 7 J- , f i 1 ' V' ' , MJ '4 1 , " "' " 4 , - ' ' RM A :JS NH 4 V' W " Nw """", wie 'GF 'gait' hm, c 5 I M .. V ,id 'Z' sf I 3 .045 ,ggi w X MN N F 1 i W 1 N .a V9 wh .af I fl 9 I, if fT?5 5 ', g J Y an 3 'ia wr hswabg 4 J K 4 r , 4, 1 ,E .r I A Mfg. 1' Y' 1 , . 1 f Q AF 1 ,,. 4' sf a 1 44, Q, f H ,v A H, 5 ' fum Q gi. X F his 4.-A sf :ik S ? gf, ,Y irfgk B , Q55 Wx F- ' A' V' N Af' I 1' " .. Q M .1 'U .X ' A " ,, r X wif , ,, ' ' vi y 31+ 1' S 332111 , , . 1+ '1' 4, 1 R M 4 1 a 1 'X K A-ivy ' f vm W: l Q5 'U-J' W 1 I Qt A xi gi we an Ri L gg' X :V 3 5 ms r , 1- W, 4 4- 'r gig ' 1 + 4- 1 2 wg ff H ' f we " w f 4 3, 1 ,Q lr' 1 if L 5 5, 1 1 .wi -- w QQ , , . . A ' ew ' a, QQQQ Ji PY qf . , A mn A , ,w.- f+' +gQ:,JQ,3. fi 5 .ii X .Q xf n f ' v. ' ' X 1 - i2, i1' fr .1 A if-Q f, rw 'Q - ,wr 'v' . . - iw M W' f. M www. ff-. . 1 . ff fav- 'fi orgy :sig U zipeggmgwql w Agp . ,.9Q4.?vs FLW 9,3 V4 I 4 . , 2?fC.,-wg 'IL .egg as 55' 43551, g'-'-":f'r5f?f- , 'sf ff wx-qu -ri,-q,,7 . 4 if - "' ,- 1 , g--4,,h'i-5-Q : J ,g2fP.fQ.v,. .. ,. ,-5.- 4.4-My W- ,FS ig3P'-., w'1- 6 '5-,1"3"i5v, f ' ,, .,'f,-4 "2 a ' 1 ...gf " .Eg '-'-Ci4"'9+ Qfnsfxvf 1 :Sa 'W' aqgyw . 4 . 'K' 1 'H-' J." ' 'N -.L ---1 -ai xrjff-,-'z ,. P " ' 'f 'Q ' ,- -nf '-nf . - , ' 'f:3fE?,' :" -1 'Y '. mp MJ " wif 1" ..w..., - -65451, A X ":..wv Vw-f V H,g,,n-1? 1 r 5'5" f ' gf? 4' 'JF'--J:f,L5f9' V-aww, ww 2 - . f. : ,-1 .. - Li' gsgggy 'H-fu z ,f 1221? 7 . 4- -H "-,ivy-?ii'..,j"2f, -H gf'-5 eff?-I, -1,52 hgf "fi , ""f' ,,.,:,3,iq5:,QQiiw2f:Ta,Agni., .Q "-7-fv ,".,g--'ga5.,,f ggfyiifv- -.ig-,R 'FL fgf ' A M . 9352-Egg. A wh, ,Q . viii 4 , K , Y , :N , 1 Tl: .xifabsl-34311 V Y? 4509, ww fx? Pd. pil- tub Q, ,, Meitj, X ,fig Bi Fifa J I 3. '44 J 1, fy R f- ff: Q ' " 'Q slat,-3' bk ' as . ' Q ' 3 " P 4 3 Tim Aw . ii 'Y " fp' .54 it :ms ' Q iv fs. + I l . J a v Q '- - 4' f 1 4, W f W vein A '23 22' .. "f H ME fwffiigv "?g4i:f4f9"' -W N A , if J I b.-N K- ..f 'jf C3 fwQjyL'.l. TN 1 ' ,' " ff"'yv13,,' ,,.,A,x: 'xi -- ,,.Q,-Emil: cm, 'f Q ' A V 5 235:-, ' f avi mfff' " -5 V' ' "4 "" '- 5 .p 7, "u f ?-" Wfrwgf 9- 72' iff-5" Hy, ff '--r .1 1 ,L . turf- . ! iam. I ' - 'Q L7i:'i21 fii'1"' 'H -T ' 1 4 xi -wav ,,..:,:, , I . ..,N.Lg.. ,


Suggestions in the Niagara Falls High School - Niagarian Yearbook (Niagara Falls, NY) collection:

Niagara Falls High School - Niagarian Yearbook (Niagara Falls, NY) online yearbook collection, 1925 Edition, Page 1

1925

Niagara Falls High School - Niagarian Yearbook (Niagara Falls, NY) online yearbook collection, 1926 Edition, Page 1

1926

Niagara Falls High School - Niagarian Yearbook (Niagara Falls, NY) online yearbook collection, 1931 Edition, Page 1

1931

Niagara Falls High School - Niagarian Yearbook (Niagara Falls, NY) online yearbook collection, 1932 Edition, Page 1

1932

Niagara Falls High School - Niagarian Yearbook (Niagara Falls, NY) online yearbook collection, 1933 Edition, Page 1

1933

Niagara Falls High School - Niagarian Yearbook (Niagara Falls, NY) online yearbook collection, 1934 Edition, Page 1

1934

1985 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1970 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1972 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1965 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals
FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
Are you trying to find old school friends, old classmates, fellow servicemen or shipmates? Do you want to see past girlfriends or boyfriends? Relive homecoming, prom, graduation, and other moments on campus captured in yearbook pictures. Revisit your fraternity or sorority and see familiar places. See members of old school clubs and relive old times. Start your search today! Looking for old family members and relatives? Do you want to find pictures of parents or grandparents when they were in school? Want to find out what hairstyle was popular in the 1920s? E-Yearbook.com has a wealth of genealogy information spanning over a century for many schools with full text search. Use our online Genealogy Resource to uncover history quickly! Are you planning a reunion and need assistance? E-Yearbook.com can help you with scanning and providing access to yearbook images for promotional materials and activities. We can provide you with an electronic version of your yearbook that can assist you with reunion planning. E-Yearbook.com will also publish the yearbook images online for people to share and enjoy.