Newport High School - Newportian Yearbook (Newport, KY)

 - Class of 1933

Page 1 of 170

 

Newport High School - Newportian Yearbook (Newport, KY) online yearbook collection, 1933 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 170 of the 1933 volume:

' .4 Q ' m . , a 141$, WAX LFQ W ht K mm: Q EX LIBRIS ALBERT E. HOWE REPUBLICAN CANDIDATE -. FOR - - SHERIFF rimary: Saturday. August 5, 1933 ?ction: Tuesday, November 7, 1933 Compliments of NEWPORT DAIRY CET YOUR FRIENDS AT - - THE IDLE HOUR The Home of Good Caddies Monmouth Street Newport, Ky. DE JACO BROS. CO. Incorporated PAINTS and HARDWARE HOUSE PAINTING - Prices Very Reasonable - Cet Estimate Now SOuth 6708 908 Monmouth Street Compliments of - 3T AUTO SERVICE Sixth and Overton JOHN E. SMITH -:- INSURANCE -:- Central Savings Bank 82 Trust Co. Bldg. Eighth and Monmouth Streets Phone SOuth 4737 Newport, Ky. Compliments of the Central Savings Bank and Trust CO. J. RUST CAFE 1004 Monmouth St., Newport, Ky. Phone SOuth 3207 A Good Place To Eat and Drink Mobleyas Barber Shop 603 Monmouth Street It Pays to Look Well See Us! ALL ITEMS 25c ZIEGLER9S Food Store FAMOUS FOR TUB BUTTER 837-839 Monmouth St. 'Newport, Ky. Compliments of CHARLES E. HICKS SANITARY BARBER SHOP 843 Monmouth EMPRESS BILLIARDS l007 MON MOUTH -. - FINIS 3hr Enmpr like the turret of a castle Zita spire pimeg upmarh, Marking where the mannering knights way finh emouragempnt anti shelter. a ,, Wmhwm WV . 132--. ..0tIIlII.Il " .-.u.'-.-sw w..-- - 32i-33 Published by the Senior Classes of Newport High School EDWARD PUFF. . . . . . Editors . . . HENRIETTA WILLIAMS PAUL WENDT . . . . Business Managers . . .CHARLES GILLETT AVIS M. LAMB MAUD HAMILTON Class Adviser Class Adviser VI 932 V: I 933 DEDICATION DO? TO OUR ADVISERS, Miss Avis M. Lamb and Miss Maud Hamilton, whose sincere 63.0115, patience, and un- derstanding have guided us discreetly in all class activities, we dedicate this the eleventh volume of the H1 V H,L,'lJ0l IZ.!1II.M , , 1h adC2X1-r:;t:ir:--; lei??? +1;;;sz1' ,7 .Iy FOREWORD IN FUTURE YEARS, there will be a time when the members of the grad- uating class will thirst for remembranees 0f the long ago happy days in high school. They will appreciate and treas- ure 3 medium that will unite them with the past. The purpose, then, of the chewportiana, is to bring to the members of our class fond memories of the days that once have been. May they ever hold dear 0111' hook of memories. -le Slay. Annual Staff of 19321; . 77'7 7w lidiInr-inJIllit-f ................................ Emulm A. Pl H Assistant EMUtr....................., .......5'1 EPHEN Cl'T'HZR Literary Editur ........................................ HI'TII Hmu: Vu-ial Editor ................................ Es'HLHJ-L Eumsnx Atlllvtic Editor ................................ Amuw McA'IH-L Athlvtiv Editor .................................. CLAI m: WILsnx Huturv Editur ............................. MAME Mmmmn Wit lidilnr ........................................ Jmumnwz S'mx Wit Editor .................................... HUBERT HEmmAxx letu Editor .................................. Ulilmu m; me5 Alumni Editur ................................. 'XDELAIDE DH'TH; Stuff Artist .............................................. JACK MAMA Husim'ss Hunagvr ............................. PM I, S. W'ENHT Assistant Businms Nlunugvr ......... A hymn; XIMBUH lertising Xlunugrr ........................ Climax; CAva Chivf Ft'pttrlvr.... ..........................MARTHA Comm Twigs Umm KIM; S'HMIJV, lhxzn. Dmm'lm quan. KHHEIHNE Strmx. ELIZABETH SvmmnE. Annual Staff of 1933 0 Editnr-in-Chief ........................ HENRIETTA WILLIAMS Assistant Editor ................................ CAROLYN ESTES Literary Editor ...................................... OPAL YOUNG Social Editor .............................. DOROTHY WORMALD Athletic Editor ............................... ...CLAYTON LEPPER Athletic Editor .............................. MARGARET WHITE Athletic Editor ...................... LAWRENCE CREEVHOLZ Feature Editor ...................................... MARTHA REED Wit Editor .......................................... MARIAN SAUER Photo Editor .................................. VIRGINIA PURCELL Alumni Editor ...................................... THOMAS REIS StafT Artist ................................ FRANCIS STAMBAUGH Business Manager ........................ CHARLES GILLETT Assistant Business Manager ........ DOUGLAS BROWN Reporter .................................................. JOE SOMMERS TypistSA-VIRGINIA LEE BROERING, ADELE FIEGER, FREDA E5510, LILY MAE WILLIAMS. THEME We have chosen the life of the early American Indian as the theme of this issue of the Newportian. The now-vanished American Indian, or Redskin, as he is more commonly called by all nations, presents a fascinating study to everyone, and is of particular interest to those interested in primitive institutions and religions. Ever since his early separation from the Mongolian people the Redskin has fashioned a life which finds itself living in the great out-Of-doors and worshipping the c:Creat Spiritf9 To this he has added his remarkable fortitude, his skill in woodcraft, his legends and skillful hunting methods. What life of man was more picturesque, more exciting and more colorful than that Of the Indian? But now, since the coming of the paleface from Western Europe, all these customs and modes of living, which have endeared themselves to every boy and girl, have slowly disappeared. The Indian has become a part Of our great civiliza- tion. No longer does the call for the Fall Buffalo Hunt go forth among the tribes, and the wierd war chant is stilled forever. As our beloved Longfellow has said, the real Indian has gonee In the glory of the sunset, In the purple mists of evening, To the regions of the hmne-wind 0f the Northwest-Wind, Keewaydin, T0 the Islands of the Blessed, To the Kingdom of Ponemah, To the Land of the Hereafter! In choosing this theme the artists have set down a portion of the colorful career of the Redskin in the following inserts and pages. F-Elaine Morrison. Table Of Contents ADMINISTRATION CLASSES ORGANIZATIONS ATHLETICS H UMOR ADVERTISEMENTS Farewell, 0 My Laughing Water All my heart is buried with you, All my thoughts go onward with you! $t$$t T0 the Islands of the Blessed, T0 the Kingdom of Ponemah, T0 the land of the Hereafter! Listen to their words of wisdom, Listen to the truth they tell you, For the Master of Life has sent them From the Land of light and morning! $$$$$ Thus departed Hiawatha, Hiawatha, the beloved, In the glory of the sunset, In the purple mists of evening T0 the regions of the home-wind, Of the northwest-wind, Keewaydin, T0 the Islands of the Blessed, T0 the Kingdom of Ponemah, T0 the land of the Hereafter! eLongfellow. BOARD 0f EDUCATION MR. HARRY ALLINGTKON. . . . . . . . . President MR. EMIL GERHARDT . . . . . . . . . . Secretary MR. A. D. OWENS . . . . . . . . . Superintendent MR. GEORGE EICHER DR. PAUL REIKOW DR. R. W. SCHEER MR. GEORGE F . SCHNEIDER A.D.OWENS Superhnendent A.E.ARNOLD INinzipal IN M EMORIAM In Loving Memory of Our Friend and Teacher MISS HETTIE ERMERT Who passed away February 23, 1933 I KNOW NOT WHY I know not why God let her die. Perhaps He needed her 011 high Bul this I knmvw- 'leil she has Iivml and loved and taught. In mum lhings has Imnw :1 purl: And hm' Iilkx. wilhin nu lwarl. A lming nwmnm has nruughl. ENGLISH Charles Eckerle, A. B. Catherine Fitzsimmona 8.9. Grace Harper, AB. Alma Lamb, B. A. Celeste Loving, A. B. Marion Parsons. NR. SCIENCE J. L. Cobb, 8.5. Jeannette Owens, A. B. Katherine lsuhlhush. RS. MATHEMATICS Maud Hamilton. BS. Alive Harrison. B. 5. Beryl Svhwarlwrg. 13.5. SOCIAL SCIFACIC-- Avis M. Lamb. B. A.. Kl. A. Mattie Phillips. 8.5. F ACULTY LANGUAGE Della Holliday, B.A. Theo. Fred Hotz, A.B., M.A. Gladys May, A. B. Hazel Ryan. A. B. COMM ERCIALu Bernice Culbertson, B. S. Mary Tanner, 8.5. Katherine Warren. RS. PHYSICAL EDUCATION Virginia Ebert. B. S. in Phys. Ed William .I. Foster. AR. MANUAL TRAININGi 1 Edward Bodenstein DOMESTIC SCIENCEa Katherine 7X1. Werner. BS. MIVSICi- Albert Scholl LIBRARIANea Mary Elizabeth Morris. A. B. CLASS POEM When about to leave behind us That which we hold dear: Our usual thoughts are sad, We hide away a tear. Not so with us for we,ve been taught To linger not on sorrow; F rets of today are worthless-aught, The future lies in tomorrow. We cross the threshold without fear, Ours is happy expectation; A joyous event without a peer, We call success our coronation. With this in mind we are graduated, May our ideals never wan, The future to us is radiated It7s not twilight, but dawn. 356nm . . guy; ;: , m CLASS 0f 1932V. CLASS MOTTO: 4CAltiora Peuf, CLASS COLORS: Blue and Silver CLASS FLOWER: Pink Rose OFFICERS PAUL WENDT . . . . . . . . President GLADYS KING . . . . . . Vice-President MARTHA COLKER . . . . . . . Secretary STEPHEN CUTTER . . . . . . Treasurer MISS AVIS M. LAMB . Class Adviser 'I U I JULIUS BORCHERS 'Tlxigzh "Plain nilhoul pomp and In afgjwithout shun L I Staff. Orvhestra Eek; I51 1' 1" n C r .I .' - - '. 'V I ' I loutbdll 1 2 5 4, p r, Fexxpm er ms 655 h; "'1355 '"L ' II M . I 2,; II xxx WW " I h w M II ,. I , a w ,y W N MK Mg: I I I Ly 9013i :3 l XI- -- -' ' 2IBa12B New ' MiqRWIXR NII I . , A I nual I ' I. an. g'r 4A. 1 . kW, xMngManUI4 WYIWVU WIIW I II I I v -' I IARFHA COLKER "Malt f, "41111 all her looks a walm disclose x, 0f innorenw and lruth." IImnmerciaI Club 4: Class Secretary 4A; Annual StaH'. Repurter-in-Chief 4A; Class Will. .I MIK COLLI VS ' Ke1f "TIN! rloluls mm' drop ern IUZCS anti mtulex Wmlfh may WM us. but H'I'Mlnm mus! 1m lMlltghff lulirl Club 2: Biology Club .53. STE PHEN CUTTER 'Steve" ' 1'$16551'ng5 0n thee little man" Cor uur money if you can. Hi-Y 1-2; Student Council 38; Athlvtic Association 1-2-34; Class Treasurer 3-4; vapnrtcr Staff 4, Sr. B. and Sr. A. He- purter: xXnnual Staif, Assnciate Editor 4A. PAUL DAY cTali, "For It'lmt I will, I will and thereis an end? aw r'i:1;:tszx ,y 2 IV Hi-Y 1-2-3: President 4A: Football 3-4; Athletic Association 1-2-34. GLADYS KING "Clad" "Cram 13' 11,71 llc'r step. hmz'cn in her rws In Wl't'lT guslurc. dignity and low." Cirl Hrwhm 1-2: Glee Club I-ZA: Cum- nrt-miul HUI. 4: melmrlvr Stuff 4A. Vir- l !lILiIilH1 Manager. Typht: Annual Stuff. Txpixl rlxX: Vth: ViCe-Prtltidvm 4A. , 1! Jig, GERTRUDE KRAN 13$ 2 Geit MEIUIUICUICL foresight slreligt ,und 5111! A perfeLt woman nobly .1111 11811 Somnwlcial Club EQ; Amm;i15aff, Photo 11wa RN ix AW .11 1K X6 AC AWAXSON Jacka yw , 7W W Iom 7,7,6 64717101. his hem 10 the sale I of fin fog? WM- He Is" all IIII'ItlI" Athiem Asmuiation 1-2-2-4: Football 4: Baseball 23; Intramural Basketball 4: Class Vice-Presidem 4B: Hi-Y 1-2: An- nual Staff. Artist 4A. ALFRED MAYBLYRY "AI" "In company a very pleasant ,iellawf' Latin Club 2: prurter Staff 4A; Annual Staff. Advertising Manager 4A: Hi-Y 1-2: lemlwr nf N. S. P. A. 4A: V:lass Basket- ball 3: Football 1; Greater Cincinnati 5. P. A. 4A: Class Historian. ADELAIDE DUTTLE "Dud" 'Her very frowns are fairer far Than smiles 0f olhw maidens are? Girl Reserves 1-2; Girl Reserve Lke Club 2; Commercial Club 3-4; Newporter Staff. Typist 3: Annual Staff. Alumni Editor 4A. ESTELLE EMERSON "Stell" "4 pure. transparent. pale. and radian! face, Like to a lighted alabaster vase. Cmnmvrcial Club 4: Glee Club 4A; Latin Club 2; Orchestra 2A3; Band 2A3; va- pnrtvr Staff 2-33. Exchange Editor 2-33: Annual Stafi Social Editnr 4A. DOROTHY GAINER 'Dot" 511'udesty is to merit. u'lmr shade is m figures in a picture. I! giz'es it strength and makes it smnd nut... Unnmercial Club 4: Cirl Rmerx'ws 1-2-3: Annual Staff. TVpist 4A. MA ICRA CLICK wClhrkie" "Vfurw r'mnlmuml of oddity. mer, uml fun. Who relishes a join: and rejoices in a pun." Cnmnwrit'al Clulp 4: Girl lriwervcs Jr13; qumrh'r Stuff 4. CHARLES CUBSER Cup" "Full well they laughed with multior- fwitwl glee. ,4! all his jokes for many a joke 11ml INHH Immaculutu High 12. ROBERT HERRMANN mow 14711711'41g by sfluly must be ICON, 11 1mm ncacr entailed from sire to 3071:, Latin Club 2. President 2A; Newpurtor 5mm Feature Editor 3A: Annual Staff. VWt Editor 4A; Student Council 2; Biol- ugy Club 38; Vulmlicturian. RUTH HOWE "Rudy" nHull? much to be priid mul esteemed is a fritml. 0n whom 1w can always Irillz .x'uj'e'ty depend." Latin Club 2. Vice-President 2: mepurIc-r Stuff. Feature Etlilnr 4A: Annual Stuff. Iitvran Editm' 4A: Studvnt Cmm-il 2A- SB: Class lesidvm 3B: Sulululnriun. X I ' NORNA MILLER Imam? uJim! st' the charm Girl I . , ' cm Reserves IIke Club ;G. A. Newlp ma r StaHY 4 Exchange, Ellimr; ' ' , wVBau" IV X I 17M ' divine I Q I . Ie INIIUIS , , h IWmm" r hIAMWWI WIWp ' ' dII l x ., A II; II M ,, Wm :MXE itor 4A9u I- am M Imam; ' . x 3A- Dral arid mu ugNng 1:!!! II 'WXXXXx .X$$ NNW KIwkvaQI X0 RN CARL NELSON "Nels" WI finishll genflemun from top to 106." Latin Club 2: Cumnwn-iul Club 4: Hi-Y 1-2. EDWARD PUFF "Editor" "True ease in 1vrit1'ng rm e's from m'! not r'lmm't'." K. 1 H1; Hi-Y 1-2; Athlvtic .XSNFOELIHUH 1-2-34; Latin Club 2, Trtlasurer ZB; Stutlvnt Cuun- til 33; Dvhating Team 3: f '1lwr N. S. P. A. 4A; Ureatm " ' . ' S. P. C. Annual 5'th Fditqr- 1119;? 11 Y pnr It r StaH Fea gm- J Lditur 43 Min 49111111 121.; 1 Yiuyx aMznrf W 1; L12 A1 H iSCrHRngm if k 1 ; 14': 4X" IEEII 2! xi 1 A 1 ! 11111 2x21" gracequ ,1 Imllowh , 1141,, W 111$0r4tmnessn anongy? Ann :11 81 H Wwist .LD N1 r E'V ERETT SMITH "Smitty" "He is the mildes! mannered man." Athletic Association 1-2-34; Biulngy Club 3: Latin 1111111 3X38. JOSEPHINE STEIN HJoe" ttEarl'y, bright. transient, chaste as mum- Ing tlclt she sparkled." Cirl Reservvs 1-2-34; Glee Club 1-2-3-4: Commercial Club 4; Athletic Assucialinn 1-2-3-4; Annual Staff. Wit Editor 4A; New- porter Staff, Typist 4A; Basketball Team 2A. KATHERINE SUTTON ttKittyat "She attracts me daily with her gentle virtues, So soft and beautiful, and heavenly." Girl Reserves 1-2-3; Glee Club 1-2-3-4; Latin Club 2; Band 1A; Commercial Club 4; Athletic Association 1-2-3-4; Newporter Staff, Typist 4B; Annual Staff, Typist 4A. DOROTHY WEBER ttDot't, 34nd as the bright sun glorifies the Skies So is her fare I'HuminW by her eyes.w Commercial Club 4. PAUL WEVDT ttPaul" hUn the txtage he 10:15 natural. simple, rtmcting." Athletic Association 1-2-34: Latin Club 3. Seaman 3A: Dramatic Club 3A4: Class PwsidenHA: Class Secretary 43: New- purter Stag. Dramativ Editor 48; Asswiate Editor 4A: Member N. 5. P. A. 4A: Mwn- , her Greater Cincinnati 5. P. C. 4A: Ky. ; H. S. P. A. 3A: Annual Staff. Businvss Manager 4A. I CLAIIDE WIILSOLV "BQQIIIQVZ' "trim an my zeal Ix VJ TIMI! young am! ficry arhlefeI feel." Athletic Association 1-2,:3-4M'Fuwthu1l 2- 3 4. Cn-Captain 4i$WBIiOVItgy Cl h, Prvsi- dmt 3; Class Sui: II I, Clws Ruust H' ff'x I .IIfI X 9: I I5, II ,, , Ir X Comm lrIeiul C 4 , V1 I pr I I m Ume I" IIII' HIAI . , q yIlI lI I I VI , MNxW , j, . . . I V, WWW, MW W ' 9 PW ,uxm M Iv u ,1 y ,- ,,. ,I M , ,IWIIIH HM III I WII I , A 5.1;; a 14 ' Hx, x. x x , x ax x x x,,;r-xi;;;:X-r-L33: 1.?ng CLASS HISTORY On February 10, of the year 1929, there assembled on the path that leads to a higher education a class of young people, who for the next four years were to experience both the pleasures and the burdens of self improvement. Our class entered the Newport High School with the expectation of accomplishing great things and of upholding the high standards. morals, and class traditions that had been left by our predecessors in this institution of learning. The first year we, as Freshmen, were promptly assigned to our various studies and classes. This year it was not long before we became acquainted with our school duties and began to progress in our pursuit of learning. As our Class was not organized we had no Class activties of our own, but we entered into all per- mitted scholastic and social events with whole-hearted enthusiasm. Thus the year ended with the final examinations and we were given the coveted title of Sophomores. As Sophomores we quickly settled down to more serious study, realizing the necessity of a higher education. This year, as we were still unorganized, we again could not engage in any class activities; however, we were now recognized by the upper-classmen as loyal supporters of their class activities and social events. Some of our class members now aspired to become athletes and showed great promise of upholding the standards of our school in this field of endeavor. We now heartily applied ourselves to the final examination and so passed into our Junior year. Upon entering our third year we organized as Junior Bls under the leadership of Miss Mary Tanner and the following class oHicers were elected: President, Ruth Howe; Vice-President, Frank Buddell; Secretary and Treasurer, Stephen Cutter. The outstanding event of this semester, which was the Juniors, annual send-oH to the Seniors, was known as the Ju-Se Prom. The marvelous success of this affair will long be remembered and Cherished in the minds of the students. The final event of this semester was the class hike which was enioyed by all who attended. In the second half of the year We again elected class officers, who were: President, Frank Buddell; Vice-President, Virginia Barrett; Secretary and Treasurer, Stephen Cutter. We closed the year with a number of social events and activities and in January, nineteen hundred and thirty-two we passed into our fourth and final year. The first business of our Senior-B semester was the election of officers under the advisership of Miss Avis Lamb. The officers then elected were: President, Frank Buddell; Vice-President, Jack Mason; Secretary, Paul Wendt; and Treasurer, Stephen Cutter. The most outstanding social function of this semester was the annual Junior send-ofT, the Ju-Se Prom, to the Seniors. The event was under the able supervision of Miss Maud Hamilton and Miss Della Holliday. Another social event of the semester was a hike. The selection of class pins was the most important business matter of our Senior-B year. Again we faced the final examinations and this semester was brought to a happy end. The Senior-A semester found us immediately organized and we elected the following ofhcers: President, Paul Wendt; Vice-President, Gladys King; Secretary, Martha Colker; and Treasurer, Stephen Cutter. Our treasury showed the effect of old man depression, so we busied ourselves with formulating a program for raising money. We sponsored a picture show, a Hallowe7en party, a skating party, two candy sales, and a pop corn sale. The must successful of these activities was the Halloween party. This year, through the untiring efforts of our classmates, the School Board consented to a change in the school ring. This change in the ring was the first since 1910. We assure you we were proud of our new rings. We broke camp on January twenty-iifth, nineteen hundred and thirty-three and rode out on the plains of higher education and business careers, never to forget the instructions and joyous moments spent in our Alma Mater. r-Alfred G. Maybury, Jr. n?! a , ,- 1 Qt ,t' 1:: gmmkh-mlgm.--3$ms-s KW .. r V x PROPHECY The golden sun had disappeared in the West, and the stars were appearing in the darkened sky. The cool, sweet air of a clear April night came to my nostrils. I turned my head on my pillow and saw the moon, gorgeous to behold in all her radiant, silver glory. The night was beautiful, mystic, and inspiringe-a night for dreams! I became restless and the blood quivered in my veins, for who could sleep with such a night of mystery. The sensation brought back the memories of another beautiful night not long ago; and Visions of my graduationamy classmates, became real again. Why, where were my companions? What were they doing? 'What was their future? I could not rest because of my thoughts. I dressed and went downstairs to set out alone on foot across the silver-splashed streets. lVly destination was a small hut in the farther edge of the town wherein dwelt the astrologer, Mekkan Rorab, well known for his prophetic insight. In a short space of time, I was knocking on a door. It opened to reveal a little long bearded man, Who bade me enter and tell my mission. When I had told him, I was escorted into a low room with a ceiling of stars. He searched the heavens with a telescope and finally spoke: tHI see a bright light. Why, there are many bright lights surrounding a young woman, a scenario writer. Yes, it is Ruth Howe, who is being congratulated by her many friends on her great literary ability. Ruth is looking extremely self- conscious because of all the attention she is receiving. tiThe light dims and there comes into View a spacious building, the Herrmann 8i Collins Department Store. Bob and Jack are certainly critical, for out of one hundred applicants, they choose only Gladys King and Carl Nelson for models in their clothing department. Wyith their combination of ilta and becoming clothes they are making business boom. Their latest customer is Alliene Moore Maybury, lovely wife of the Newport police judge. Alfred is extremely jealous because Jack Mason, employed as artist and designer, frequently draws Alliene,s picture. But who could help it, by the heavenly stars, she is lovely; even lovelier than as you knew her. Her countenance speaks of beauty from within. She is - - 3, VtPlease go on, Mr. Astrologer:7 I interrupted. 66Oh yes, your classmate, Claude Wilson, demonstrates kiddy-cars in the toy department. It seems that he tried coaching, marrying, and instructing others how to play bridge, but couldn,t succeed in any work,9 As though he read my thoughts, he added: iiYes, Claude is still the old teasing, capricious, captivating nuisance? Wllhe scene changes. Everything is stillequiet. It is a hospital. An attrac- tive nurse in crisp white approaches. She is Gertrude Kranes who by the contented, happy look on her face, is evidently fulfilling her lifeis ambition. 64Ah! more bright lightslvg suddenly critd Mekkan. 66It is a hotel. No, a theatre. Sterling Rech and his fourteen iKentuckians7 are in the orchestra pit play- ing that old favorite, 4St. Louis Blues,. Whytwhat is stimulating his laughter. It is those popular dancing partners, Alvera Click and Charles Gubser. Charles is now doing his unique sleeping act, in which he doesn,t move a muscle for forty- five minutes. The audience looks bored and a few get up to leave, but Alvera starts giggling and soon has all, including the orchestra, roaring. TiAs these names fade away I see the name of Paul Wendt, renowntd because of his excellent interpretation of Shakespearian roles. His realistic portrayal of Shy- lock in 4The Merchant of Venice, has put him on the acme of success. thIay he never totterfl His trusted and dependable valet is Everett Smith, who says he will never marry because of his inferiority complex. Everett gets frightfully embar- rassed if Paul,s handsome leading ladies look at him. His reserve is a quality found in few young men. N i s 3b 19 llHere is Martha Colker who is walking across a brilliantly lighted hall. It is a lovely, modern dining salon. Martha is the hostess. She is taller and walks with a graceful air, which is very becoming. iiAh, the planet Saturn is in the sign of Scorpioethis intensifies the creative faculties along religious lines. Norma Miller and Elizabeth Schrode are doing a great work? said the astrologer in awe. iLTheirs will be the reward from the heavens upon which I gaze. Norma is in Sunday School work where she is happy teaching others to be happy, and Elizabeth is a missionary to foreign lands. She has converted many to her own doctrine of flawless morals. iiYour engineer friend, Julius Borchers, who had dreams of building a bridge . across the Pacific, and of laying plans for a system of irrigating the Sahara Desert, is now contented with blowing a whistle on a railroad train? The astrologer shifted his telescope and exclaimed, 2The atmosphere is now businesslike. I see a newspaper office. Frank lcollar-adl Buddell, editor of the iNewport Herald: is telling the business manager, George Camins, Something. Alas, Day,s Grocery, formerly Rummel7s, has ceased to advertise in their paper. It seems that Paul wants his full page ad on the front page and George and he can,t come to any agreement. Frank is so peeved that he pounoes on his sweet forgiving little secretary, Dorothy Gainer, because she misspelled a word. Dorothy gets out McAteejs abridged and discovers she has spelt it correctly after all. Arnold McAtee., by the way, is a radio broadcaster of children,s bedtime stories. The only trouble Arnold has is in using words that children can7t understand. iiHere are those inseparable pals, Josephine Stein and Katherine Sutton. They have a school for Screeching Sopranos and Bellowing Basses, in the sunny south. They attribute all their success to the firm foundation received at N. H. S. Glee Club. 44Just across the street from the Sutton-Stein School is a darling little hair- dressing establishment. Dorothy Weber is employed as an operator. Dorothy tries to make the hair of others look like her own golden crown. Of course, none could look exactly like hers, but she herself is so sweet and gentle that the patrons always come back. TA crowd of people come into view? said Mekkan. iclt is a party. The society belle is charming Estelle Emerson. She is dancing. As always, happye idealisticeromanticl ccHere is another OHICC, more modern than the other one. Adelaide Duttle is leaning back in a chair with her feet elevated to the radiator. She is reading Professor E. A. Puffis latest book, 4Success.9 Across from her sits Esther Zwerin, who is typing away as only a brilliant, industrious stenographer can type. The door opens and in walks Stephen A. Cutter, president of the concern. Stephen has grown stouter and wears sideburns. He glares at Adelaide with a look that Was meant to quail, but doesn7t. The young lady merely shifts her position. The door opens again. A young woman enters with a nonohalant swagger. She is none other than Norma Kranes, who stays with one firm-at a time. She gets one job after another, because, as Norma says, 4The office boys donat appeal to her in any case? If Virgo doesnat shift her position by tomorrow night, Stephen will be unable to hold his toupee in place. Cruel will be the mortification. iiMy starslw suddenly cried Mekkan. 46The moon is passing through the sign of Capricorn. It indicates a gatheringHa reunion! Yes, a reunion of all your classmates in future years. Happy are their facesebright! Ah, the Vision is gone. That is all, my friend. I can tell no moreeno more, no more, my friend, 'no more can I tell you?9 I paid him his fee and felt the exchange was exceedingly onesided for I had learned so much. On my way home, Visions of the future and of our reunion lay un- veiled before my eyes. The mystic, star-bedecked night surrounded me. I was happy. weElaine Morrison. CLASS WILL After exploring the lesser trails of knowledge, we the Class of Nineteen Hun- dred Thirty-two and One-Half, find that new fields are awaiting the imprint of our footsteps. Spurred by curiosity of the unknown, we leave this plane with mingled feelings of joy and sorrow for broader fields of experience, but before going, We make this, our Last Will and Testement, to be carried out in the following manner: Item I. To the Senior-B,S, success in all future activities and the advice to re- frain from undertaking any Pop Corn Ball Sales. Item II. To the Juniors, our poise and dignity if it isnat too much for them to tackle. Item 111. To the Sophomores, the privilege of makings things miserable for Freshmen. Item IV. To the Freshmen, freedom to roam halls and to use the olhee telephone. Item V. T0 the Newporter, another etlieient editor to take the place of Edward Puff, and a business manager who will prove as capable as Frank. Item VI. To our new Jazz Orchestra, the accomplishment of playing the iiSt. Louis Blues?7 Item VII. T0 students with a sensitive sense of smell, the delightful odor of sauer-kraut to warn them of the days menu. Item VIII. T0 the typing classes, new records for the Victrola that will put some snap into their rhythm. Item IX. To all tardy students7 good bluffs and excusesesee Howe, Gubser, etc. Item X. To students who find it difficult to sleep during classes, more considera- tion and better facilities for their comfort. . Item XI. To Virginia Lee Broering, Estelle Emersonis ability to read short- hand notes. Item XII. T0 Curtis Lusby, a giggly Freshman who would like to take the place of our Alvera. Item XIII. To Edith Allington. the slimness 0f Norma Miller. Item XIV. T0 Jeanne Joerg, the dignity of Esther Zwerin. Item XV. To Al Gaskins, the place that Claude holds as giggolo. Item XVI. T0 Harry Mumma, we grant his request to be willed Paul,s with women. Item XVII. T0 Erma Click, a memory book in which to keep her notes from Jack Collins. Item XVIII. T0 Ann Peck, Ruth Howeis ability of getting high grades. Item XIX. T0 Dorothy Amos, Gertrudeis technique of showing off. Item XX. T0 Charles Gillett, the collegiate air of Carl Nelson. Item XXI. To Virginia Purcell, Norma,s line of g4Buy a ticket, won,t you, pleaseiw Item XXII. To Vera Mae Gieble, Gladys, place as the ilIt7, attraction. Item XXIII. To Elizabeth Knapp, Elaine M0rrison7s love of books. Item XXIV. To Dot Wormald, the brilliant blush of Katherine Sutton. Item XXV. T0 Mary McLane, the wit and originality of Elizabeth Schrode. Item XXVI. To Adele Fieger, the expressive eyes of Dorothy Weber. 66 79 way To the aforementioned, we, the Class of Nineteen Hundred and Thirty-two and One-Half, do set our hand and seal in this twenty-fifth day of January, Nineteen Hundred and Thirty-three. Witnesses: The Penpusher. X. Y. Z. The Office Mouse. ' . K . -.... ...- .. .,47, J Popularity Contest of 1932V2 GIRL BOY Elaine Morrison ........................... Most Popular ....... . ............................ Paul Wendi: Aliene Moren .................................... Best Looking .................................. Frank Buddell Ruth Howe ...................................... Most Brilliant .......................... Robert Herrmann Katherine Sutton .................................. Cutest ........................................ Stephen Cutter Gertrude Kranes .............................. Best Dancer .................................... Sterling Rech Elizabeth Schrode .......................... Most Original .................................. Edward Puff Esther Zwerin ................................ Most Dignijged .................................. Edward Puff Elizabeth Schrode ................................ Noisiest .7 ..................................... Claude Wilson Gertrude Kranes .............................. M ost Stylish .................................... Sterling Rech Elizabeth Schrode ................................ Wittiest ...................................... Claude Wilson Dorothy Weber .................................... Quietest ................................. Robert Herrmann Elaine Morrison ...................... Most W illing Worker .............................. Paul Wendt Norma Kranes .................................... F riendliest .................................... George Camins Alvera Glick ...................................... Giggliest ...................... ; ............ Claude Wilson Aliene Moren ................................ Best Disposition .......................... Alfred Maybury Josephine Stein ................................ Best Athlete ................................. Claude Wilson Adelaide Duttle .................................. Optimist .................................. Arnold McAtee Esther Zwerin .................................... Pessimist ...................................... Everett Smith Elaine Morrison ............................ Most Collegiate ................................... Carl Nelson Gladys King .............................. Best I llustration of WW .............................. Carl Nelson Esther Zwerin ...................... Man Hater - Woman Hater ........................ Everett Smith Margaret White .............. . ..... M ost Popular U ndergraduate ....................... Thomas Reis OPTIMIST LOSEJ A BALL CLAUDIUS WILSON ow? STAR ATHLETE 0W1 N?GH SanooL. onus Dou'r :ruoy ,- THE: MUSIC MAsSAcREM MASTER .. A TIE .. Tut uAss cvrne p NATURAL vlaw HAYBVRY RUTH HOWE evil ervkt v Nosr BRILLIANT 0" FRANK BUDDELL JvDGb STEVIE Wm. Mnf- Dab 0F 77!: TREASURY" Ebola PUFF ' Luzina SleTJe oun gmrair OUR ANIMATED ' nonm- N013: BOX 7 I w u-o-J-...-.;-- E 5 I 1 l2:- : :13: K m? D x. AW PAuL DAY .0 H l: WAY T. U. ..,: r-, ;:1:. . MW OPTIMISTIC Abeuuot 0am; n0H welt! '7 CAN'T RAIN FM: th DoncTny we ask a we res r P RVUS 97 WE $ M; a n4 Gecko; cAM'ws SuCLEIKFVL Dusuvess pm" PAyL WEyDT nasr wiLLmd woRKu? -1- .. ,7 w 70;. EM'NE Ma.gfunlv M"? PaPuLAR l4 Z l IENE Manny BEST DISPOSIron 6'ulo IT' ez- Loan 1mm in $9ny cmst L: 5 V07 Iii 1 l l t at "9V VIZ 1w . Then the little Hiawatha Learned of every bird its language, Learned their inames and all their secrets, How they build their nests in Summer, Where they hid themselves in Winter, Talked with them whene,er he met them, Called them 6gHiawathafs Chickens? Of all the beasts he learned the language, Learned their names and all their secrets, How the beavers built their lodges, Where the squirrels hid their acorns, How the reindeer ran so swiftly, Why the rabbit was so timid; Talked with them Whene,er he met them, Called them 46Hiawathefs brothers? -Longfellow. The Legend of the Humming Bird There was once a wise Indian chief who had a brave little son. The boy was loved by all the people of the tribe. The little brothers of the wood stopped often to play with him, and the birds sang their best songs to him. He had a kind heart, and he loved to make everything happy. Best of all he loved a certain little brown bird that had a tiny nest built high up in a tree and lined with the softest down from fuzzy cat-tails. The bird was smaller than other birds, and it could not sing; but all day long it stayed near the little son of the chief. The Indian boy had an idea that its wings made music, and so he call-d it, llThe bird with the - 77 sweet wmg-song. One day the wise chief had to send a message to a far-away chief. The mes- sage was that the Green Corn Moon was now in the sky, and so it was time to give a feast and thank the Great Spirit for all the fruit and grain that the harvest- had brought. Would his friend come to the feast? the wise chief Wondered. The wise chief called the little chief to him and said, 4lYou must take a message to my friend who is far away. Twice the sun will set and twice it will rise before you reach him. But the trail is plain; the little brothers of the wood will play with you; and all night long the little Stars with Wings will give you light. Go, my son, and prove that you are the brave son of a brave chief? So the little chief started. Over hishead the bird with the sweet wing-song went gayly Hying. All through the day the boy journeyed. Whenever he stopped to rest and to eat berries, the little brothers of the wood came stealing out to play with him. That night he slept safe and sound in the friendly wood. The West Wind sang him to sleep, and the Stars-with-Wings stayed near to give him light. When he came to the edge of the wood he found two trails. One led to the chief who was the friend of his father; the other led far away to a chief who never took the trouble to thank the Great Spirit for the harvest. The little Indian boy could not tell which way to go. He stood still for a while thinking. Presently he said, 4:Go, my bird with the sweet wing-song, and find the trail to the friendly chief? The bird flew off; in a moment of two he was out of sight. All through the day the little chief waited, and all through the night. At last, just as the Moon Mother was putting the stars to sleep under the white cloud blankets, the tiny bird came back. For a long time the boy and bird talked together; then they took the trail to the far-away chief. It was a long way to travel, but the boy did not mind, because he knew he was on the right trail." The chief was glad to see the little son of his friend, and he promised to come to the feast. Afterward the two companions set out for their own lodge hrea-the little bird leading the way. When they reached the end of the home trail, all the braves came out to meet them. As they led the boy hack to the camp, the little bird, swift on his little brown wings, flew along above them. The wise chief was proud of his is t t-li 1. i I: W '. i am. g ix ,J t ix as ax; Qt" t :1th sh! X i K t xtt 'w. brave little son; for the boy had shown that some da; he, too, would be a wise chief, able to lead his people. The boy told his father that the bird helped him find the way. i40 Wise chief, my father? he said, Lithe little bird is very plain as you see. Let me show my love for him by giving him a wonderful suit of feathers?, The chief was glad to reward his son, and the boy set to work at once. He gathered some Howers and grasses that were growing near at hand, and pressed the color from them. Then with the yellow and orange and red that came front the Howers and the green that came from the grasses he painted the sober coat of the little brown bird. tHow beautiful the new suit was! All the other birds were envious. As for the bird with the sweet wing-song, he was so proud that he flew happily round the little son of the chief, and louder and Clearer than ever he made a humming sound with his little wings. From that time on he hummed constantly. Because of the masic that he made with his wings he came in time to be called the hum- ming bird. eEllen Miller Donaldson. Courtesy of aThe Youthgs Companion? UNCAGED Love placed us here, Oh, long ago, To give our wings a chance to grow. Within this golden cage: Protected thus we were content. In joy our childhood days were spen, Learning to fly. Too soon we longed for bigger things, And then be beat our tender wings Against the golden bars. How 0ft, in foolish, youthful pride, Impatient for release, we cried, ttOh, let us fly? But 10! the cage swings wide its door, Our penions grown, we now must soar, And leave our golden home. We turn our faces toward the light, As timidly we poise for Hight, thCome, let us Hy? e-Carolyn E stes. CLASS of 1933 CLASS MOTTO: Not Evening But Dawn CLASS COLORS: Orange and Silver OFFICERS LAWRENCE GREENHOLZ . . . . President GORDON WALZ . . . . . a Vice-Presidem: ADELE FIEGER . . . . . . Secretary VIRGINIA LEE BROERING . . . T reasurer MISS MAUD HAMILTON . Adviser HERBERT ADDLEMAN, gAn affable and walleye? qentemang, -x 6' ' Football 1.2.3; Tram. 122a KGVxA 23; Dramatic Llufiwzfp 1 ' V; x X'f ' N EDITHfAIJJNQN; She; brings 101121 Ill; Ollityf, 91,1 Athletic YAsm$igtii0n 1-2 3-4; EatiinubZ Eng w i 3 M1,; 4 I g ,, r. l, WILLIAMBARDd, c .f'The "11:1th ilhat? 61135563 W I 'bI u,ti?.9".$-, l. . , . Athletic AsEchillatiogz: 17i2:3 $34 . W x rljiy-Y; Latin Cgub f2; fB'lldl6gz L ' pdrter Businbsglls'faffi' Class Smilentrfln'uihcil. ; st 9? v a 3 f f! f X f 2 . v x' v ", " 17; y" ', 17 x . z 1 VIRGINIA LEE BROERINE;4L9614 ' LShe is most often, joyous? Elass Treasurer 3-4; Athletic Association '1-23-4; G. A. A. 1-2-3-4, Corresponding Secretary 2; Basketball Manager 3; Re- mrding Secretary 4; Girls Basketball Team 2-3-4; "NH Club 3-4; Student Coun- vil 3; Commercial Club; Latin Club 2, Treasurer; Newporter Staff Typist 4; An- nual Staff Typist; Hockey Honor Team 4. DOUGLAS BROWN, QCDoug" 'Wlmrever he did, was done with so much ease. In him alone arims na'ural to please? Athletic Association 1-2-3-4'; Biology Club; Hi-Y 1-2; Latin Club 2; Annual Staff, As- sistant Business Manager; Rtmlers Club. ROBERT CAUDILL, BOIW "His llmugh! is oflt'n original? Commercial Club, Vichucsidvm; lli-Y 2 JANET CLOSTERMAN, 4cC103yp Blushing is the colour of virtue? English Club 1; Varsity Basketball 3: Latin Club 2, Vice-Presidcnt 2X; Girl He- serves 1; G. A. A. 1-2-3-4, Treasurer 4; Assistant Business Manager of Neanrter 3A, Business Manager 4A; Hockey Honor Team 4; Class Treasurer 3; Routers Club 1-2 34. CHARLES CLAYBON "711's Imys arr full of mafia"; yea, 0an full of pleasure, 1,007, Svivnce C'ub 1; Binlngy Club 2; Latin Club 2; Hi Y 3-4. ROBERT DEMLER, 2Bob2 2He who obeys with modesty appears worthy of being some day a com- manderf Science Club 1; Athletic Association 1-2- 3-4; Varsity Basketball 4; H'i-Y 1-2-3-4. DOROTHY EBERT, c4D0t94 "A girl of such delicate grace, all laughter and love? Eatin Club 2; Athletic Association 1-2-3-4; Inglish Club 2, Secretary. FREDA ESSIG, 2Fritz2 266M163 of speech, benejicient of mind? Annual Staff; Newporter Staff 4; English CEub 2; Commercial Club 4, President 4A; C. A. A. 234; Shorthand Scholarship Representative. CAROLYN ESTES, 2Carol9$ 250 sunny and honest and pure and kind A fully developed and inyiinte mind? :irl Reserves 1-2 3-4, Secretary 4; G. A. X. 1-2-3-4; Latin Club 23-4, Vice-Presi- 'ent 3A, President 43, Secretary 4A; 'English Club 2, President; Student Council 3; Newporter Staff 3A-4; Creative Writers Club 4A; English Scholarship Representa- Iive 2-4, Latin Representative 1-2-3; An- tual Staff, Assistant Editor; Class Poet. RALPH EVANS uKnight without fear and without re- proachf, Athletic Association 1-2-34; Biology Club; Rooters Club. KENNETH FALK, KaW the elements So mixed in him that nature might sfand up And say to all the worltL this is a man? Latin Club 2; Biology Club; English Club 2: Athletic Associatiml 1-2 3-4 LUCHJJIFENBERS, CdF, LHer disposition is devout, Her coutnvtenan ce angrlicalf, G. A. A. 2-3-4; G. A. A. Home Room Rep- resentative; Girlqs Basketball Team 3-4; Latin Club 2; Commercial Club; English Club 2. Secretary. EDWUUU PTSSLER, EW7 WVu talent, yet 11 rhamrterf, Commercial Club; Latin Club 2. ADELE FIEGER, c De1,, USound mind in a sound bod V197 Cirlis' Basketball Team 1-2-3-x4g KY Club 2 3-4; G. A. A. 1-2-34, Vice-Pkesidfent 2-4, Qin'reslmnding Secretary 3; Chg Secre- tary 3A4; Commercial ClubiSCretary; Student Council 2-4; Ncwp Btu. Annual Typist; Boglzkfiem g. Representative. a lull Li .Qyiwilighzjj, G. A M12, 4, . 7 0X F4 2, '. , ' 7 1g?! 3113,13 ' Hwy WEaSHvX- .x, . rhh. iXx ? S I Nix, ' I R tx Th Shhybt x 0 -' :1 g RD N MWCIGO Club 2? - , , , g X0 xv hwk H g7; L; . H 3 . f L ,, h, , Kw; x M, , muja 4', f m . . A. - 324; ;, 11 "Webs , in' 3w, u , 't lrfil: g: i I Eu w ,7: ' W2 " ' r"; , - : , MN l: ' "W I I AW .W , ' M WARLESQLLLTI, 4-Ch5721w M 1 ,' 1'; ,,,,, , Gilli? Evm rhbugl; Janquished, helmn argue , , f Mill? WW I ;B'usiness Manager nf Annual; Debating Fcam 3-4, Captain 4; I'W'nlljall 23-4.; va- prmcr Staff 3-4:; Luiin Clul; 2; Band I; HLY 1; Athletic Aamiruliun 1-23 4; Tvn- nix Club 2-3-4; Humaxlir Club 34; Claw Presidvnl 48; Class Pmphw-y; N" Huh 4; Hislrirl Urumrit'al Clmmpiml 3. H'- : '. l ' '1 x I l? 'X . ,z ; M H21; 1T ' :gthy Club; English A ,5, , .1 p r .j , xv. . ' NA i-j'Ck : WM E443 N , WREg-gna 2;: N , m xx II AA . X! M; ,7 , 14th r rgg 114150;, theisl'g! ,Ll l x Utem ' El and biftsbrighi are." Wigalxl ub 2 ii: sident; u A; , h ':1 Lust 1H zyEp , vu 2.3- u w Ax . A 1 ' A . 4, g , ,5 . CIRQV?-?c 'l-Ys x lass Prxsulem . 1911ch ; Clathn - A . A x m w A w A , x3 , lr': Amy, :1 WWW 5 'a Akin 69 A V x CS:Smf hall ya x; .AnnuAlszSH , Cllixh A1 2; . ters Clul 1 2- A'Vx SciencekCl 11,3; 'xlzyoostelr Gil, h, ' INN .5 AAXXZ v V x Ax AA SANA h A . AXAXA A XKKVAM XAAAAAWCV; Ax! A X .AA BEATRICE HERROLD, AABea97 A5116 doetlz little kindnesses, Which most leave undoneg 0r despiw?7 Commercial Club. UAyAAAyA, . , AV 4775,27 WW WQWQQ , , x ?Myxx Xx THOMAS HESSELBROCK, 44T0m47 "0n wilh the dance! Let joy be uncon- fined." Hi-Y 2; Latin Club 2, Vice-Presidcnt: Athletic Association 2-3-4: Rooters Club 2-3.4. LAWRENCE HOSIER 44How dimple and how circumspect? Latin Club 2: Commercial Club. THEODORE HOVEL, 46Teddyw 44Patience is a necessary ingredience 0f 0' ' 97 bemus. Latin Club 2. President; Boys4 Athletic Club 1-2; Dramatic Club 1-2; Creative Writers Club 4; Highlands High 1-2. GILBERT HOWE, chOSBw "So exceedings tall and strong? Football 1-2-4, CoCaptain 4A; Glee Club 1; Debating Team 1; Band 2; 44N" Club 1-2-3-4; Scotch Club 234; Athletic Assm-iu- lion 1-2 3-4; HiiY 2. DONALD HUNGLER, $0113 2The mildest manners and the gentlest heartf'1 Junior Red Cross Secretary 2; German Club 2; Hi-Y 2; Commercial Club; Base- ball 2; Athletic Association 2-3-4; Rooters Club 1-2-3-4; 3N" Club. JEANNE JOERG, 2Cookie3 gWilh her eyes in, flood with laughter? Studem Council 1; Honor Baseball Team 2-3-4; Honor Hockey Team; Basketball Team 2-3-4; Aerial Dart Champ 3-4; Cheerleader 4; Annual Business Staff; Biology Club; Newporter Staff 3-4; G. A. A. 1-2-3-4; Hockey Manager; Latin Club 2; Dramatic Club 2-3-4; 3N", Club 2-3-4; Honor Kickball Team 1-2-3; Tennis Club 34 HAROLD KLING, 3Hotzg, 1'And he will discourse most eloquent music? Orchestra 1-2-3; Band 1-2-3; Athletic As- sociation 1-4; Football Manager 4; Debat- ing Club 2-3-4; Newporter Staff, Wit Ed- itor, Advertising Manager 4; Latin Club 2; Hi-Y 1-4; Tennis Club 2-3-4; Dramatic Club 3; 3N3 Club 4; Fourth Place State Violin Contest. JUNE KRIEGER, 64Junie3 3Grace was in her ste heaven, in her 6 e 9 In, every gesture dignity and love? English Club 1; Latin Club 2, President; Student Council 1; Dramatic Club 3-4; Newporter Staff 3-4; G. A. A. 2-3-4; 3N3 Club 3-4; Varsity Basketball Team 2-3-4; Honor Huckey Team. SYLVESTER LAFATA, wronf9 WVone but himself could be his parallel? Biology Club: Latin Club 2; Hi-Y: Ath- letic Association 1-2-34: Ruoters Club. GERALDINE LEMOS, Gerry, dOffl'cious, innocent, sincere, 0f every friendless name Ihv frivnrl." English Club 2: Latin Club 2. CLAYTON LEPPER, WJCW "One who never turnwl his back bu! marched breast forward?" Football 2-3-4; NH Club 3-44; Athlvtir Association 1-2-3-4; IIi-Y 1-2-3; Latin Club 2; Annual Stuff; Biology Club. JOHN LITTLE Sure he is goodness, wisdom, glory, livht? General Science Interscholastic Contest 1; Biology Intersclmlastic Cuntest 23; Latin Club 23, Vice-Prcsidmlt 3A; Football 2-3- 4; NM Club 4. NNQQ ORIQVI ILIC IVIcATEE, 64Herk93 11011? and then, sIrm-A' smartly, 1m a spark? Latin ;InIramuraI BaskelIJaII Cham- pitms "Basketball Manager 3- 4; Cull 'I bunk; 4 Captazm 3-;4 3N3 C41ul; 4; ,, 4 W3 32 3 4- Class Rum ,,r U! I Iloil; 33IIen I . ; JIFoolhaI h; BgQIcthaIII a uh k3; Lagtin IggCIuI; 331.2. fZSt alafmJ 3 M qu343 I ' Iy- 3M H ,I , . v', ' NxQ $51331 I 3 1:1 Xxx , 0r. 4 , 4 3, ' . . r x x44 I .4 , - , ANN I II x 3x VIRGINIA MARTIN 3 Minnie Wife silent and safe-Silem'e never Nays you." Ilmnmential Club; English Club 2; C. A. A. 1-2-3-4. LEONARD MILLER W4 fair exterior is a silent recommenda- n'onf' Athletic Asswciation 1-2-34; Biology Club; German Club 2-3-41. Vice-President; Hi-Y 4. NINONA MILLER $91171 the wonder grew 12070 0710 small head would carry all she Imam, Wyrhville, Virginia 1-2B; Music Club 1-23; Girls Hi-Y 28; Girl Reserves 2A-3-4-; Creative VVriItn's Club 4; Library Assistant. HARRY MUMMA 75w manners are not idle, but the fuzz" 0f loyal nalure and of noble mind? Phillipsburq High School 1-2; Orchestra 12; Glee Club 1-273-4; Dramatics 1-2-3-4; BasehaH 12; Winner-County Algebra and Dist'ussion Contest 1; Band 3; Newporter Stiff 4; Winner-District Contest-Genmetry and General Scholarship 3; Second Place V' cal Contest 3; Third Place State Dram- ativ Cuntest 3. EDNA NEAL LcMac" 74'120 truly. aml My life shall be A gram and nobl" crcwlf MaysviIYe High School 1; Girl Reserves 234-; C. A. A. 273 4; CirK Buslwiiull Team 2; Cumnwrrizll Club. A N N PECK 211179 hath no dim and lowly spot Thar doth no! in her sunshine share." Latin Club 2; English Club 2, Vice-Presi- dent; G. A. A. 1-2-3-4, Board Member. Aerial Dart Manager; Biology Club; Ten- ns Club; Dramativ Club 3-4. EDWARD POPOVITZ 2Speech is great; but silence is greater? Athletic Association 1-2-3-4; Biology Club; Football 3; Hi-Y 4. VIRGINIA PURCELL, 2Babe39 "A perfect woman, nony planned, To warn, to comfort and command? Athletic Association 1-2-3-4; Latin Club 2; Uke Club 2; Dramatic Club 3-4; Glee Club 3-4, Secretary 4; Newporter Staff 4; Annual Staff. Photo Editor; Class Vice- President 33, Class President 3A; Student Council 3; Commercial Club; English Clull 2, Presidem; Class Song. JAMES O'BRIEN, 2Jimmy79 Write mun that loves uml laughs mus! sure do wer lmmavulala High 1-2-3; Clw- Clul: 1-2-3; Baseball Team 1; Latin Club 1-2-3; De- bating Team 1; Literary Club .. f1" MARTHA REED, 11MEr1113 . , . l , 11171116118 duly calls she IS 0114: ys found? x u' . , C. A.A.1-23-4; Latin Club 1 2; Newpmler 81.511111 Peatuw Editor 1 "WJACK .3111LSE1NBE 1 1He does weglifqW 1y11nmacula a H1 1h 1115, Baaeballv e V 1111!111 1,. .1. 111,, HMARIAN SApER 1,4111Pure digni1y. composure, ease? 9' A. A. 1-2-3, Treasurer 2, Class Repre- sentative 5; Dramatic Club; Newporter Staff, Feature Writer, Office Reporter 4; Latin Club 2, President 2A; English Club, President 23; Annual Staff, Wit Editor. 2A 1 'name is rather to be chosen ,areat riches.n Hi-Y, ' .. M11 Delauting Team; 1111111 1. M19111 11.111-110 A3531: 1 1115' in 19111111171111'1111 Ia 'gxlh , 11' A5501: 13', 014K 1111;1111 KYDW tion 4; G ee 56 1a1 1; 111111111 Mn 7 C1uh 1 2, hatm T 5111 11' 1f 111111171 Cm '3. 1. N11 1 x .111- 111 WTxDMxN TVRDVT XTTWxXXDXg 1- $111 I 1 11 1 11 , N1,- 1M NORBERT SCHNELL?3 1,1, A you ll of 511111 a gen 11! 771001. 9 "1W 1mmacu1ata High 1-2-3; Glee C1u11 1-2351, 131139111111 Team 1; Latin C1u11 1-2 3: De- bating Team 1; 1.11111'ary Club 3; AH: z'tic Assuciutiun 4-. EARL SCHWARTZ 1'74 gentleman makes no noise? lmmaculata High 1-2-3; Tennis Team 1; Glee Club 1-2-3; Baseball Team 1; Liter- ary Club 3; Athletic Association 4. AUDREY SHANNON, 11Audie'M "Her quiet nature seems to be Turned to each seasonk harmony? G. A. A. 1-2-3-4; English Club 2; Latin Club 2: Commercial Club; Girl Reserves 1-2. CHARLES SHUMSKY 280nm 1blu1951 are mighty steep? Biology Club; German Club 1-2, Secretary and Treasurer; Debating Team 2-3-4; Hi-Y 4: Newporter Staff 3-4; Tennis Club 2-3. JOSEPH SOMERS, 11097" Wl'lze reason firm, the temperate will, Enduram'e, foresight, strength and skill." Athletic. Association 1-2-3-4; Biology Club; Latin Club 2; Annual Staff, Reporter. FRANCIS STAMBAUGH, ChFranny" Francis Lis our fullest throat of song? Latin Club 2; English Club 2; Hi-Y 2-4:; Glee Club 3-4; Athletic Association 1-2-3; Newporter Staff. Club Reporter 4A; An- nual 5133' Artist; Symphonic Jazz Orches- tra, Vocalist. JEROME STAUBACH, 44Jerri9 2Self-reverence, self-kn owledge, self- control? Xavier High 1-2-3; Acholytical Society 1-2; Swimming Team 2; Track Team 2; Smlal- ily Junior 1-2; Smlality Senior 3. CARL STOPPER "Formed 0n the good old plan, A true and brave and downright honest man", Band 3-44; Orchestra 34-; Biolngy Club. WILMA STRUB, 6cBilliev, dHou; sweet and fair she seems to be." Commercial Club; English Club 2; Ath- letic Assnicaliun 12-3-4; Tennis Club. ' uh; FRANCES TRAME, 1AFSanlfjiea, 2Ever in, motion, Blithsome and cheery? Eninsh Club 2; Lamn C21" C1ub. iM 1511112 N 91211 1 .V'XawIw; 1,11,; ,, .222" 2 , f1 Wu KIWI I W RUTHw WARWOOD Rugs 222 2222' 2222 417,41 htXr mffstwansuel and graceful air, 2 Show her wise and good as she is fair? Ludlow High 1-2; Cirl 1eserves 1-2 3-4; Iatin Club 1-2-3-4; C169 Club 1-2; Hume Economics Club 2; Creative WIiTtJTS Club 4', Treasurer. N Highl - 2-3; Glee Club 1-2-3; Baseball ,,imy1319Ldtin Club 1-2-;3 De- LVVLIIH' ry Ciuh3 hating 1 63 V fljiup for alazrrchzVx her 59V q? V a listen. V V lxleeva Peadeerw xi, - W , 4; 2N3I1uii 23-4 kVaguxent C uicil 3 . '13: SpoftE' Newport r St 1-2- -4 V Annualw t .,ff C rls Spo i th mtf CluliZ 2, iCc- res lent; 2 x x VVVVXVV V 3 X XV i XXXXN V NXNKX Vm iVi i V ,VVV LEONARD XWIGGINSN VVVjcv 31! is better 1:0 be small and shine, Than to be large and cast a shadow? Latin Club 2; Biology Club; Athletic As- smflatiun 1-2-3-4. LILY MAE WILLIAMS, cWlilliea' 44Wirh rosy cheeks and auburn curls, And sparkling eyes and teeth lila- pearls? English Club 2; Latin Club Z; Coxmnercizll Club: G. A. A. 1-2-3-4; Annual StanC Typist. HENRIETTA WILLIAMS, 44Henry74 43Her airs, her manners, all who saw ad- mired; Courteous though coy, and gentle, though retired? Girl Reserves 1-2-3-4; Latin Club 2, Treas- urer ZB; Newport Staff, Feature Editor 4; Biology Club; Glee Club 1-3-4, Vice-Presi- dent 4; Annual Staff, Editor-in-Chief. DOROTHY WORMALD, 44Dot4, 44With merry-makin, geves and focund smiles? C. A. A. 1-2-3-4; Latin Club 2; Biology Club; Glee Club 3-4; Annual Staff, Social Editor. OPAL YOUNG, 44Pa1,7 4450 bonny and Winsome, so fully com- plete, She steals your affection away? Girl Reserves 1-2-3-4, Hing Girl 4, Chap- lain 3, President 4; G. A. A. 1-2-3-4; Latin Club 2-3-4, Secretary 3A-4B; Glee Club 3-4, 'IVI'easurer 4; English Club 2; Red Cross Representative 2; Newporter Staff, Club Editor 48; Annual Staff, Literary Editor. . I , - . cup D ZIMMERMAN, sBemw , g 7 x; l Th, tarteaus, fair, and strong? I Immac latv High 1-2-3; Tennis Team 1; Glee C u "1-2-3pABaseball Team 1; Latin Club 1 v 1 Wm?! Team 1; Literary Club. 3; Aiiigiivx beg: ,iation 4L ' VP 1 $ ; . xxx QWN X WK x W x X L k W CLASS HISTORY In September, 1929, our class of one hundred and fourteen students from the eighth grades of various schools enrolled in Newport High School. Like all other Freshmen we thought it would profit us to assume a more sedate manner for our places by imitating the stately attitude of the upperclassmen. We were constantly greeted by scorning remarks such as, tlHey, Freshiesf, or iiUp the wrong stepsf, Truly we could not make a false move without some watchful eX-Freshman hover- ing over us. However, after we became accustomed to these hard knocks and the ridicule which came our way, each settled down to the course which he had in- dividually selected. We did not have much time for outside activities as our studies demanded nearly all of our attention. After the first examiyggtion, a little comedy relief was injected into the drama which we felt we were ac iri'g, when a new group of Freshmen was introduced into our midst. Our class was now known as Freshman A. In unison we all heaved a sigh of relief and started off with clean slates and a less bewildered idea of what it was all about. With the usual amount of study- ing and a great deal of examining, we prepared for the final examination which would end our Freshman year. Upon our return to school in the following September, we missed a great many faces from our classes, but we also greeted a few new ones. Sixty-three of us answered present to the roll call. By this time each knew what was expected of him and was quite capable of carrying out his own assignments. We now felt as though we had time for outside activities; some of the students went out for the squad, while others became interested in the Glee Club, Orchestra, Band, Girl Reserves, the High-Y and other organizations. As the season passd others partici- pated in basketball and baseball. As a whole our Sophomore year was quite suc- cessful, both scholastically and socially, but we were all looking forward to the time when we would be considered upperclassmen. The beginning of our Junior year held a lot of interest and excitement for all of us, as we were at last permitted to organize. William Bardo was elected to be our first president; Virginia Purcell, our vice-president; Adele Fieger, the bearer of th Quill and Scroll; while Virginia Lee Broering was chosen collector and cus- todian of external as well as internal revenue. We were all pleased to learn that Miss Maud Hamilton was appointed to act as our advis:r for the next two years. In the second semester of our Junior year, Virginia Purjell presided over our meetings as president, and Ernest Troendel became Vicepresident. The oilicss of Secretary and Treasurer were retained by Adele Fieger and Virginia Lee Broering respectively. Th most important social event of the year was the Junior-Senior Prom given May 6, in the gymnasium, by the Juniors in compliment to the outgoing Seniors. Everyone enjoyed this affair and the highlight of the evening was the fioorshow. We shall never forget Betty Marx and her escort, Ernest Troendel, as they led the grand march. The beginning of our Senior year found us all on our toes, eager to accom- plish as much as possible in our one remaining year. ln the first semester Charles Gillett and Thomas Reis were elected to occupy the president9s and the 'Vice-presi- dentas chair, to be succeeded at the beginning of the second semester by Lawrence Greenholz and Gordon Wall. Adele Fieger continued as secretary, while Virginia Lee Broering continued to waylay everyone in the halls and elsewhere for class dues. Time passed rapidly in this, our last year. Selecting our class pin and ring aroused much discussion, but a pretty design was finally agreed upon for each of them. Another interesting occasion was the selection of our class colors. After a great show of forensic effort on the part of a few, some favoringr one combination of colors, others wanting another, we finally agreed upon orange and silver. Perhaps the most important decision made by the Senior A Class was the selection of caps and gowns for the graduation exercises, instead of following the usual fashion set by the former classes of Newport High School. It was necessary to hold several meetings and take a re-vote before the matter was definitely settled. We held many candy sales, sponsored two picture shows, and presented a class play to augment our treasury which was to go toward printing our Annual. The Juniors may certainly be congratulated for the way they arranged and gave the Ju-Se Prom. Everyone enjoyed it and appreciated the eHorts that were ' put forth to make it a success. The last few weeks of our Senior year passed entirely too rapidly for all of us. There wasn,t nearly enough time to do all we wanted to do. Some were finishing experiments and cramming for flnals besides attending dances and parties. At last the time for the class play arrived, followed quickly by the Baccalaureate Service, Class Night, and finally by the evening of our Commenment. Of course, the most impressive event was Commencement, when seventy-seven boys and girls received the reward for which they had worked for four years. Thus ended the united efforts of the class of 1933. eleanne Wheeler. CLASS PROPHECY TIME: 1950. PLACE: Othce of Dr. Gillett. After all my good plans and thoughtful deliberation to be President of the United States had gone astray, I became a doctor. Listen to me giving orders to my efficient secretaries, Adele Fieger and Virginia Lee Broering. 4gMiss Fieger, order another crate 0f Greenie soap from Procter 81 Greenholz, and also send a letter to Brown 81 Bardo, Inc., and tell them that just because they have the largest pharmacy in the South is no reason for their delay in filling prescriptions. t4Make the consultation with that famous trio of surgeons, Schiff, Claybon, and LaFata for seven olclock tomorrow morning, as we will have to work all day on the cases of those Palmolive Soap models, Ann Peckrand Nell Fleming? cLMiss Broering, I want you to go down town and get me some show tickets, books, and other things that will enable me to occupy my leisure time for the ycoming month. First of all, stop and get me a ticket for the Newport Rsvue, starring H. Kling and his Klangers, with Mrs. K. Frank Paderewski at the piano and Mr. C. Stop Stopper trumpeting the trumpet, Johnson and Purcell tVallee and Boswell of the theatrel and H. Mumma and Miss M. Sauer, deans of the American stage. Get me a ticket to see Mose Howe, heavyweight champion of the world, fight. See Don Hungler, his manager, and you will probably get better seats. Also stop in Martha Reedas bookstore and get me the book, IiHow to Get Your Name in the Newspaper Without Half Trying:9 by the three J98, Halenkamp, Closterman and Krieger. The book is published by Somers 81 Fald Publishing Co. And on your way down town take my seven kids to the Staubach 81 Hesselbrock School of Dancing? Having finished giving directions to my secretaries, and business being rather dull teveryone was curing his sickness by taking the Cure-all pills discovered by Fessler and Demler and manufactured by Trame, Zimmerman, and Schleyer, Incl, I decided to take a stroll down the most beautiful street of the most beautiful City of the greatest stateeMonmouh street. And whom should I meet but Jeanne Joerg, former N. H. S. cheerleader and now NewporUs official sports announcer. As we went down the street she gave a running account of the wonderful views, mingled with a few giggles lthat habit never having left herl. Jeanne stated, 4There at the left is Prof. J. Little,s School of Latin for big children. Its professors are the Misses Young, Estes, Warwood, and Miller. Look whois attending this schoole-M. McMath, R. Evans, and C. Lepper, Newporfs three biggest business men, all desiring to further their education in the study of Latin, a subject which they have always loved. clDo you remember Audrey Shannon, who used to be a clerk in Woolworthis when we were in N. H. 5.? SheIs now owner of the store. And look who,s hunt- ing for bargains in there, those world-famed stenographers, Wilma Strub, Jeanne Wheeler, and Beatrice Herroldf, We then stopped in the Wiggins 8; Troendel News Shoppe and bought the Newportian News, edited by H. Williams. There was nothing very important except that Mayor Mary McLane sent a petition to Congress, through her secretary, ' Lily May Williams, telling them to hurry up and repeal prohibition. Just as I was becoming interested in Edna Nealls column, llAdVice to the Lovelornf7 Jean started again, llWell, so long, Charley. Ilm going into Ed Popovitz, to get a hair cutesay, look whojs in there. Dorothy Ebert, the finest permanent waver this side of Chicago. Shels working on Edith Allington, president of N. H. S. School Board, and look Edith started giggling and got her hair burnt. Well, so longf, Giggle, Giggle, Gig. After leaving Jeanne I went down to Andrews7 Ball Park to see Marg White, Gordy W312, and Tom Reis coach their Newport High Wildcats and try to make them play like the Wildcats of White, Walz and Reis fame. And who should I see on the sidelines but Schnelle and Schwartz, now cops, just helping the team out by their presence. Their official duties were not great. Geraldine Lemos and Dorothy Wormald, famous journalists on the Newportian News were Viewing the playing of the teams preparatory to giving them a great write-up in their paper. Also among the spectators were Addleman, Fee, Caudill, Reisenbeck, Hovel and Hosier, all Ph. D. men and now professors at N. H. 8., enjoying the antics of Herk McAtee who is still manager and trainer of the team. On my way home I stopped in Essigls Essalube Eat Eatorium and enjoyed a delightful soda served to me by Lucille Fenbers, still Freda,s best pal. After coming out of the Eatorium, whom should I meet but Minister Stam- baugh who talked to me without a halt, all the way to my home, where we met Leonard Miller and Charles Shumsky, famous attorneys, who joined in the con- versation and incidentally, kept on talking until I had to invite them all in to dinner. -Charles Cillett. 3C f-V-fT-ir'11$.:Tzfr-Jff-ggggc-;:g ; :11"? t" '3 'x T , 5??? CLASS WILL We, the class of Ninetenn Hundred and Thirtythree, realizing that we are about to pass frcm the domains of Newport High School forever, being in pos- session of a sound mind and a more thorough knowledge of life, hereby make this our Last Will and Testament as followsi 1. T0 Evelyn Seifried, someone to conhde in now that Clayton Lepper has gone. 2. T0 Earl Maloney, the hatred of horses that Ernest Troendel has since the affections of Martha have been Captured. 3. T0 Charles Riedinger, the place in the hearts of the fair 1c1asses,7 that Tom Reis has previously held. 4. T0 Bob Little, the ability that brother John had in pleasing Miss Lamb. 5. T0 Norbert Purcell, the honor of now being Newporfs igfastest human? since the departure of Clayton Lepper. 6. T0 Jeanne Youtsey, Ann Peck,s ability to ask silly questions. . 7. To John Thomer, Mose H0we1s ability to put on weight. 8. T0 Don Parker and Curtis Lusby, at last a date with Dorothy Lawson. 9. To Jacob Miller and Albert Howe. instruetions from Douglas Brown and Sylvester LaFata in how to get excused from school. 10. T0 Donald Schneider. success in his chosen position of 0f1icial errand boy since the retirement of Orville McAtee. 11. T0 Peggv Von Blon and Virginia Jahrries, the giggling championship once held by Edith Allington and Dorothy Ebert. 12. T0 Vera Mae Giebel, the popularity and cheerfulness 0f Marian Sauer. 12. T0 Rachel Clifton, the success of Virginia Lee Broering as a commercial student. 14. T0 Stan Arnzen and Harold Gaskins, the pick of the Freshman girls, now that Bob Demler and Ralph Evans are gone. 15. T0 Fred Kuhnheim, the succes of Richard Weick in his role of school sheik. 16. T0 Donald Fagaley and Lucille Fox, an everlasting friendship. 17. T0 George Gibson, 3 chance to graduate with brother Red. 18. T0 Will Schoepf and Billy Grau many more happy years at Newport High. 19. To any musically inclined student, Katherine Fronk,s ability. 20. T0 Ernest Meyers and Harold Hiteman, more girls for them to thrill with their gruesome tales. 21. To any two grids of high standard, the ability of Henrietta Williams and Dorothy Wormald in the keeping of their continued friendship. 22. T0 Dick Hewling, the popularity of Tom Reis. 23. To Martha Hamilton, someone to take the place of Adele Fieger. 24'. T0 anv enterprising student, the right to make the excellent grades of Harry Mumma and Carolyn Estes. 25. T0 Billy Brinkman, the careful guidance of Marietta Hardman forever. 26. T0 Kenneth Hay, someone to take the place of Jeanne Joerg. 27. T0 the remainder of the student body not mentioned we wish success. In Witness Whereof: We, the Class of Nineteen Hundred and Thirty-three hereby set our hand and seal, this fourteenth day of June, Nineteen Hundred and Thirty-three. v-William Bardo. Popularity Contest BOY ' GIRL Thomas Reis .................................. Most Popular ............................. Margaret White Thomas Reis .................................... Best Looking ................................... Nell Fleming Harry Mumma ................................ Most Brilliant ................................ Carolyn Estes Lawrence Greenholz ..................... Most Attractive ............................... Marian Sauel Clayton Lepper .................... . ............... Cutest ...................................... Frances Tram:- Oreville McAtee ................................. Wittiest ................................. Jane Halenkamp Harold Kling ....................................... Happiest ............................. Dorothy Wormald William Bardo .................................... Giggliest .................................. Edith Allington Clifford Zimmerman .......... . .......... Best Disposition ...................... Henrietta Williams Harry Mumma ................................ Most Versatile ................................. Adele Fieger Harry Mumma ................................ M ost Dignified ................................. Wilma Strub Lawrence Hosier .................................. Quietest ...................................... Ninona Miller William Bardo ...................................... N oisiest ................................ Virginia Broering Charles Gillett ................................ M ost Talkative ........................................ Ann Peck Charles Gillett - Robert Caudill ...... M ost Original .................................. Martha Reed Francis Stambaugh ........................ Biggest Blujfer ........................................ Ann Peck Thomas Reis .................................... Best Athlete ................................ Margaret White Kenneth Falk : ................................. F ashion Plate .................................. Marian Sauer Richard Weick .............................. Sheik and Vamp ...................................... Ann Peck Thomas Hesselbrock ........................ Best Dancer .............................. Virginia Purcell Thomas Reis ............................ Best Illustration of WWW, ........................ Jeanne Joerg Carl Stopper .................................. Best Musician ............................ Katherine Fronk ' Joe Somers .......................................... Optimist. .............................. Dorothy Wormald Charles Schumsky ............................. Pessimist ................................ Geraldine Lemos J ohn Little .................................. Man Shy - Girl Shy ............................ Ninona Miller Stanley Arnzen Most Popular Undergraduate .................. Vera Mae Giebel W at: W. 1 SCHUHSKY'S NEW JOE SOMERS 750 PAGE BOOK TALKING TOANNE CLOSE-UP or REis GILLETT-ow mm .' Reszclenr GREENHOLZ Tarrma For Ordev ucgvv weicur 33400" Hows . m m Ac'rfoN 16P'EI Rh TRO EN Dl-E . xx 2' mm xxmm, in! W, M ., ' '. LLLePPER ; $ PREbCRIPHONS T0 BRowN C311 9 1:9 GET SICK FOR BARDo 4E ADD E D ATTRACTION SHUMSKY HASN'T 51V BODY GoT ANY NEWER Noun? tEP DlE FoR EVANS P mp RES. GREG N HOLZ J38 E5; DiNG 1000 $66k HANG V $9 $$Q'z '2 YE SCHOOL COURT JUDGE--Justin Faire. JURY4Kitty Speakes, foreman;'1ma Convict, Ura Crum, Doolittle 'Fusse, U. R. Kussin, Wava Finger, Ketchum Hawk, Ida Claire, Ivan Itche, Egypt Spinks, I. Slay, and U. Robb. NAME . Mary McLane Doug Brown Ann Peck Francis Stamhaugh Edith Allington Jane Halenkamp Dick Wieck Bill Bardo V Charles Gillette Bob Demler Jeanne J oerg Martha Reed J ack Riesenbeck Joe Somers Henrietta Williams Gordon Walz Larry Greenholz COURT RECORD CHARGE Falling down thesteps Sleeping in school Chasing boys Telling jokes Giggling Staring into space Breaking hearts Tripping down the hall Passing for President of U. S. A. Hanging out at Phistergs V amping Being original Being quiet Having a way with women. E diting the Annual Being a football star for four years Being the most attractive boy in the class PENALTY Case dismissed, for the law of gravity will take its course No dates for one month Future chasing must cease until she obtains a hunting license Francis, shall be tapped 0n the :wrist ,till it festers Edith must appear in courte the 2nd Tuesday of every week Wear Smoked glasses Life sentence at Lovers7 Lane Stay away- from 3.2 Shall be hanged by the neck until dead from the scalp up Stop drinking coca-colas Case dismissed for Jeanne Since Martha is so original she can devise her own penalty He must be vaccinated With a phonograph needle Give him the right of way, boys! Acquitted and awarded a lace- tailed Kitten Hereafter he shall be a linesman Pose for an advertisement of Ar- row collars ccBM Class Senior We, the class of 1933V2, entered Newport High School in 1930. For twohyears we suffered the trials and tribulations of underclassmen. In our Junior year, under the guiding hand of Miss Della Holliday, we aided in makingr the Ju-Se From a big success. Our class also had a treasure hunt. V: 47.73,; . 4 We have now attained the desired title of Senior, and with Miss Kathryn Fahl- bush as our adviser, we are looking forward to new activities. CLASS OFFICERS 3 President ...................................................... EARL SMITH if Vice-President ...................................... JOHN SCHWEIKERT a Secretary ....................................................... ELSIE DEWALD Treasurer ........................................ CHARLES SCHORMANN : 4; Class Adviser - MISS KATHRYN FAHLBUSH Harold Schlake Charles Schorman Floyd Castor Madeline Lowe .4 ...a-.V .2. 1-. 9, ! i 6 C Elsie Dewald Thelma DunaWay Stanley Grau Marietta Hardman Bernard Heidelberg Robert Little Dorothy Maxwell Ralph Merkowitz Evelyn Newell Harold Puff Stella Pursche Phillip Schiff Norma Schraer John Schweikert Earl Smith Raymond Thoney Mary Louise Todd Junior 66A79 In the Autumn of 1930, we, the Junior A Class, entered the portals of Newport High as 6gFreshiesf, True to tradition, we were treated as such, experiencing all the embarrassment, chagrin, and hard luck that has for ages been counted just punishment for the terrible crime of being a gTreshief, Our Freshman year safely behind us, we became Sophomores and looked for- ward to the time when we would be upper-classmen. At last the looked for year arrived and our class organized, under the leadership of Miss Alma Lamb, as the Junior B Class. During this year we became very important-ein our own estimation. Now, we are Junior As and are justly proud of our class. Our prospects are bright for a successful fmish Of our high school course. Boyd Allen Roy Blaut Wesley Bodkin Billie Brinkman Joseph Burkart Carl Chappie Leo Charkins Keith Clue Howard Cutter James Dolan Harold Gaskins Oswald Headley BOYS Albert Hengelbrok Rex Hill Wilbur Hindmarch Iver Hodesh Ben Jurin Vernon Kessel Albert Knox Nicholas Krebs Fred Kuhnheim Elwood Lottes Matt Maschinot Carl Messmer Donald Parker Joseph Pelgen Leroy Poinsett Charles Riedinger Edward Rohrer Elmer Schwertman Albert Thoney Charles Weber Jack Weber Earl Weisenbeck Allen Ziegler Junior 62497 OFFICERS President .............................................. CHARLES RIEDINGER V ice-President ...................................... BETTY J ANE OTTING Secretary ............................................ VIRGINIA ANNE BOHN Treasurer .................................. . ................ BENJAMIN JURIN Class Adviser - MISS ALMA LAMB Virginia Bauer Dorothy Boesiger Genevieve Bohlinger Virginia Bohn Frieda Brown Anna Mae Brun Helen Clause Helen Cramer Joie Davenport Estelle Deschler Jessie Dwyer Georgia Evans Ruth Evans Lillian Flummer GIRLS Vera Gaskins Alice Geiger Bertha Fuhrman Myrtle Hansjergen Lucille Harris Thelma Hilge Gladys Kaffenberger Ruth King Elizabeth Knapp Margaret Kopp Kathryn Lanham Mary Virginia Maier Marian Martin Alice Minsterman Janis Mitchell Thelma NeCamp Betty Otting Althea Roettger Virginia Rosteck Dorothy Schoultheis Marcella Smith Norma Steinbeck Bettie Thompson Vivian Valentine Elda Whiteside Dorothy Wiefering Jean Youtsey Junior 691399 Class We started up the trail of higher learning in February, 193 we were bewildered and the way was steep and rough. As Freshmen, When we became Sophomores, the way was more clearly defined. Now, as Juniors? having traveled over half the distance to our goal, we have become organized under the advisership of Miss Marion Parsons. Our chief activity this year was the Junior-Senitn Prom, but we hope to have, in the future, many more successful activities. Jack Bantu Wayne Blatt George Bogner Billy Brauntz Merlin Chaille I Robert Chapman Jack Clark James Dwver Byron Fehler Howard Gaskins Joseph Gassman Richard Graf Edward Greifenkamp Howard Guhser BOYS Louis Hagemeycr Walter Hamer Kenneth Hay Dick Hewling Lester Hodge William Hoffman Arthur Jacquillard Harold Klausing Ralph Loeekle Edward Loehner Curtis Lushy Jack Martin William Meiers Robert Nugent Edwin Poate Thomas Poe Robert PJHHHI Norbert Purcell Albert Sandf'oss Donald Schneider Louis Schrader Joseph Schwerman William Slater Robert Snyder Charles Stenken Louis Zakem Junior 66B99 CLASS OFFICERS President ........................................................ KENNETH HAY Vice-President ............................................ MERLIN CHAILLE Secretary ................................................... MILDRED MEYERS Treasurer .................................................. HAROLD KLAUSING Class Adviser - MISS MARION PARSONS GIRLS Regina Andrea Agnes Hearn Betty Pressler Carolyn Braden Jeannette Hermann Lenora Pryor Marian Butler Joyce Hermann Mary Robinson May Caldwell Alma Hickey Lucille Schafstall Henrietta Campbell Hazel Hieber Bessie Schindler Rachael Clifton Eleanor Hill Evelyn Seifried Ruth Demler Pauline Hopkins Ruth Simon Elizabeth DeMoss Pauline Hultquist Lucy Stanfill Marie Finley Aliene Losey Margaret Steinman Vera Giebel Gertrude Lusby Mary Welsh Martha Hamilton Mildred Meyers Betty Haskin Rosemary Pirman Sophomore chw Class Wflmn we entered high school we were as inexperienced as the usual Freshmen. After a few weeks, we took up our work in the customary manner. Now, after two years of student life, we have reached the Sophomore year, but like most unorganized bodies, we have done little to attract the attention' of the upper-classmen. Thus far, we have tried to live up to the standards of the school and to support the various organizations. Mater will be proud. Stanley Arnzen Robert Austin King Beebe Clyde Benke Albert Bonnick Charles Braun Louis Bm-hh'tit Cordon Collins Arthur Crosby Billy Davis Frazier Deatherage Edward Siedenhnfwr Wilbert Suckworth Louis Evans August Faeth Donald Fagaley Edward Fitzer Carl Filler William Caugh BOYS Edward Coetz Frank Goodfriend Richard Henson Stanley Hodesh James Hoop John Hummll Richard Kendrick Wrilliam Knahle Louis Knopf Max Lessure Ernest Mauer Charles Maver Raymond Neufmlh James Penrod VXiHiam Platke Edward Quinn Albert Rawe Jack Rice Joe Robinson We are striving to become a class of which our Alma Victor Rusenhagen William Rnthe William Ruff Rudolph Schmidt Vernon Schneider Paul Schmnaker Victor Schoultheis Richard Senior Orville Sowers Howard Sullivan Harry Swope John Thomer Frank Viel Harold VVessling Edward Wientjes Walter WoodruH' Kenneth Wright Sophomore 66A99 Class Marian Beckman Anna Botts Melva Brown Grace Brun Florence Camins Betty Crawford Catherine Gammon Edith Gilb Rosalind Gillett Lillian Houser Alma Huff Jessie Jones GIRLS Dorothy Kaufman Marguerite Klaserner Vera Kreutzer Ruth Ling Doris Martin Rosella McIntosh Florence MCKibben Virginia McLane Jeannette Miller Muriel NeCamp Martha Nepper Audrey Niehaum Helen Niehaus Lauretta Poate Gertrude Robinson Vivian Schneider Evelyn Schwartz Thelma Stanfield Elfia Stoehr Martha Swope Hazel Thain Mary Ina Wessling Virginia Yeager Elizabeth Young Sophomore 661399 Class We, the Class of 1935V2, entered Newport High School, February 1932. Al- though we have not been organized, we have done our best to uphold the standards of the school and have wholeheartedly participated in various activities, so that when we become upper-elassmen we shall be ready to assume our responsibilities. James Ardit Howard Beck Arthur Benke Albert Biery Julius Biltz William Block Orin Britt Bernard Buechter Howard Burkart Woodrow Campbell Edward Connor Roy Daines Harold Day Wilbur Dehner Ralph Dewald James Dolan Edward Duddey Edward Duve Joel Essig Fred Fettig,r James Flaig James Ford Ernest Gesenhues B O Y S Kenneth Gibson Wilson Gosney Jack Gutfreund Jack Hansjergen Russell Harris William Heekman Albert Howe Robert Huddle Richard Hughes Calvin Huss Norman Kaffenherger Clinton Kilmer Lewis Lanier Charles Levine Clyde Lewis Thomas Lincoln Victor McAtee Dale Morgan Kenneth Pauly Robert Pelgen Jack Piekelman William Poate John Popp Everett Ruisor John Kidder Charles Rieehers Jack Root Frank Svharherer Jack Sohmitz Robert Schneider William Schoepf Harold Smith Howard Smith Lawrence Smith Joseph Stodghill Howard Storn David Strasinger Lealand Timme William Tuttle Joseph Viel Edward Walerius Robert Wells Thurman Wells Lawrence Wientjes Carl Yeager Richard Zakem Sophomore 6??? Class Geraldine Andrews Emily Ackley Grace Bengel Mary Brennan Zella Brinkman Ruth Citron Garnet Clifford Dorothy Darbro Florence DeVoss Nathalie Dye Mildred F ahlbush Gertrude Fisher Jeanne Fisher Victoria Freund Pearl Gayhart GIRLS Ruth Geis Erma Click Doris Grau Lucille Hodesh Ruth Horn Garnet Howe Grace Kaeff Louise Kaltenbach Martha Kaufman Viola Keller Alma Melching Ruth Meyer Ann Mile Dorothy Miller Margaret Patterson Jeannette Pepper Dorothy Pressler Eugenia Richardson Helen Schmidt Victoria Schneider Evelyn Schwartz Helen Shearer Virginia Shirley Mary Styles Marian Swope V irginia Theetge Adelaide Weier LaVerne Welte Freshman CGAw Class We Freshmen felt proud as we were directed to various rooms upon entering N. H. 5. As soon as the strangeness had worn off, we proceeded to make friends with fellow students and teachers. We found that the upper-classmen were not as dangerous as they would have us believe. Our first year holds memories not only of work but also of the many pleasures the school has given us. During the year our teachers were very kind and sympathetic, listening to our tales of woe and giv- ing us a helping hand whenever possible. Now that the year has ended we are eagerly anticipating our Sophomore year when we shall again greet 01d fl'iendst classmatea and teachers. BOYS James Allen Robert Anderson David Anrtrews William Backinger Edward Bailey Arthur Barth Royce Beard Roy Bogen William Booker John Brodwolf Gilbert Carr John Casson William Champ Curtis Cook Louis Crawford Edward Daniel Leroy Daniel Glenn Enslen Harold Fuhrman Carol Cumpfer Joseph Gampfer Edwin Gaskins Ravmond Coekler William Crau Arthur Guy Vincent Hztmbrick Leroy Hardin Frank Heidebrink Gail Johnson Mark Kettenacker Charles Kline George Knarr James Knippling Jack Krebs Earl Langr Charles Leftin William Matz Nelson Millar J acob M i l lvr Julius Miller Hansel Moore Ellsworth Nelson George Morris Robert Potrie Robert Poinsett George Raehford Clem Reker Albert Reisenbeck Robert Ritter Robert Ruff William Schloss Richard Schoepf Donald Schupp Joe Sehwalhach John Schwartz Joe Schweitzer Walter Schwer Eugene Sp -nu-r John Stauhach Scott Stierer George Stoneking Edward Sturm Jack Sword John Taylor tV'aurice Vandt Erwin leker George WYagner Walter Wagner Norman Wiggin Frank Wilcox William Williams Wilbur Winters Edward Woods Earl Wothe Walter Ziegler Elsie Baugh Viola Bley Wilma Boesinger Elverta Bohne Rose Bramel Evelyn Broadwater June Bruns Ruth Bubenhofer Bernice Clause Katharine Clifton Martha Cook Shirley Crites Clara May Dance Lucille Daniel Elizabeth Daniels Marie Dauzenberg Margaret Dreyer Estella Dumhoff Olive F ee Rose Finley Blanche Flynn Catherine FOX Hester Hendrick Willa May Henzie F reshman 66A99 Class GIRLS Irene Heyl Florence Hill Caroline Hofacker Ruth Holderback Gertrude Horn Virginia Jaeger Virginia Jahrries Nellie Jones Lillian Knapp Elizabeth Kraft Faye Lile Helen Madden Fay Mader Irma McGivern Emily Meinze Jean Meyers Helen Miller Vera Moore Elaine Morehouse Dorothy Murray Betty O9Brien Jane Patterson Florence Pryor Evelyn Rankin Dorothy Riley Dorothy Rogg Dorothy Rummel Ruth Rust Grace Schmidt Esther Schnake Virginia Seither Nancy Seminara Barbara Smith Lucille Smith Mary E. Stegar Emma Strasinger Lillian Vander Helen Velkley Violet Wachsman Norma Walgroski Anna Welch Mary Weller Helen Wood Kathleen Wood Elsie Young Mary Zechella Freshman WV Class In January, 1933, we began our High School career with pleasant anticipations of the future. support all school functions. Being an unorganized body, we have had no class activities, but we are striving to overcome our gcgreenness, and are anxiously awaiting the time when we shall become dignifled upper-classmen. Cyde Ahlbrand Erwin Anderson Lloyd Andrews Harry Arnzen William Ashby Stanley Atwood Marvin Ballard William Bane Leonard Bauer Quentin Benedict John Benton Fred Borchers David Boyar Richard Buerger Elmer Burgin Elmer Byrd Edwin Crealh Ben Cummins Howard Dameron John Dance Carman Darnell Arias Davenport BOYS Charles Davis Roy Dewald Junior Diesel Freddie EEiltus Malloy Dixon Donald Eckstein Albert Fausz Charles Foss Ralph Fowee Jack FOX Richard Gaan Sheldon Gehring Jack Craf Clifford Graves Ray Cuemher Willard Guy Charles Harcourt Charles Hardman Durward Headley Henry Hosen Warren Hoskins Elmer Kuhnhvim Edward Kurst John Lang John Langheim Louis Larvo Bruce Lovins Donald Luehr Nelvyn Lyle Earl Maloney Aubrey McCracken Russel McKibben Elmer Minning Ralph Mussman Charles Myers William Neiser Rav NPls'm Jack Neuforth Dan Points Harold Price Louis Raniero Bernard anerty Alvin Risvh Franklin 'iush We have joined varigus organizations and have done our best to Javk Schahor Robert Scheer Paul Schrader Jimmy Schufflebarger Woodrow S'ihultz Fred Schupp Joseph Sirnecz Jimmie Sheridan Robert Shirle Jamvs Smith George Simlwl Edwin Sutton Stanley Swope Glenn Thorn Edward Tillinghast Roy Weber Richard W70iner Ralph Wmslinfz Robert Wcssling Marjorie Allen Ann Anderson Jean Arnold Margaret Bantu Aileen Benjey Ruth BPHSI'IIC Vera Bihl Anna Bryant Mary Buchert May Cassidy Jeanne ChalifT Alberta Champlain June Claylmn Betty Coy Vivian Darnell Mary Lou Druffel Jane Egan Margaret Fleitz Helen Frederick Hilda Caskins Henrietta Cubser Lillian Hall Martha Hartman Grace Haven Freshman 66B99 G I R L S Elaine Herrold Virginia Hindmarch Margaret Hoffman Mary Lou Hllck Marian Hunnicult Wilma Jones Helen Kelly Margaret Kenney Alberta Krechting Rnsemarian Krieger Ruth Kurzynski Dorothy Lawson Martha Llewelyn Lorna Lunsfunl Angela Marino Vera Marz Almeda McCormick Mildred McKee Violet NTSSINCI' Mary Murphy Roberta Noble Kora Ormes Jean Petracco Kathryn Prindlc Class Virginia Reuscher Jeannette Risch Thelma Risrh Jean Rodner Edna Rounion Martha Schaefer Betty Scheihley Alice Slater ' Mathilda Smmtag Anna Sparks Mary Staab Evelyn Swainson Dorothy Tibbalts Jessie Tattershall Vera Mae Utendorfer Peggy Von Blon Margaret Walters Yvonne Weber Betty Wenderoth Dorothy Wittenberg Geraldine Yeager x . L Club Creative Writersa 1he C1eative Writers Club was organized this ye ar under the excellent adviserr ship of Miss Grace Harper. The membership includes sixteen students all Of whom are interested in learning to write some form of poe trV or prose. At the Club meetings which are held onee each week types of liteIature are studi1d. Original writings are submitted to the Club and Miss Grace Ha1pe1 and the members offer 111nstru1'tive criticism to the writers. Although the Club is now in its infancy, its members appreciate the svmpatheti1 undeistanding and helpful 1'1iti1'iem which have been Given their efforts towatd literally production and they believe that the Club will grow to be a most worth- while enterprise. OFFICERS President ................................................ BILLIE BRINKMAN Seeretary ........................................... MARIETTA HARDMAN Treasurer .............................................. RUTH WARWOOD Librarian 14 . ...................... KATHRYN AULICK Adviser - Miss GRACE HARPER MEMBERS Herbert Addleman Marietta Hardman Charles Schorman KathrVn Auiick Theodore Havel Iohn Schweikert Billie Brinkman Thelma Hilge BettV Jane Thompson Keith Cloe Albert Knox Ruth Warwood Elsie Dewald Kathrvn Lanham Carolyn Estes Niiione Miller The Tawasi Literary Club was organized in 1932. meaning 64Friend and Helper, Tawasi Literary Club 97 Tawasi is an Indian name and Shuta, their motto, means g4Achieve by working? The purpose of the organization is to increase the appreciation of literature. Several social affairs, including an interesting Visit to the Taft Museum and a pleasant supper hike, were enjoyed. OFFICERS President ................... JOHN M. POPP Vice-President ........... MARIAN SWOPE Secretary ............ MILDRED FAHLBUSH Erwin Anderson Arthur Barth Royce Beard Marian Beckman King Beebe Aileen Benjey Clyde Benke Elverta Bohne June Bruns Jeanne Chaliff Ruth Citron Lucille Daniel Florence DeVoss Nathalie Dye Joel Essig Don Fagaley Mildred Fahlbush Jeanne Fisher Catherine Fox Treasurer ............... Club Reporter ....... Club Adviser ........ MEMBERS Rosalind Gillett Edwin Goetz Henrietta Cubser Lillian Hall Elaine Herrold Lillian Houser Lucille Hodesh Ruth Holderback Virginia Jahrries Nellie Jones Martha Kaufmann Louis Knopf Ruth King Clyde Lewis Victor McAtee Irma McGivem Mildred McKee Ruth Meyer Dorothy Miller Jeannette Miller Vera Moore Dorothy Murray Kora Ormes Margaret Patterson Jeanne Petracco Jack Pickelman John Popp Kathryn Prindle Virginia Reuscher Jeannette Risch Robert Bitter Gertrude Robinson Jack Schaber Ester Schnake Vivian Schneider Fred Schupp Mathilda Sonntag Elfia Stoehr ............. JOEL ESSIG ...LUC1LLE HODESH ..MISS ALMA LAMB Marian Swope Hazel Thain Walter Wagner Edward Walerius Margaret Walters Adelaide Weier Lawrence Wientjes Kathleen Wood Earl Wothe Elizabeth Young Jeanne Rodner Martha Schaefer Victoria Schneider Donald Schupp Joseph Sernecz John Staubach Evelyn Swainson John Taylor Latin Clubs The Latin CluLs are organized in the second, third, and fourth year Latin classes. Their purpose is to present to the students a picture of Roman life. This is done through special reports, games, and dramatizations. Latin Club meetings, which consist of a short business session and a program pre- pared by a special committee: are held once each month, during the Latin recitation period. As a joint project this year, the members of the Latin Clubs attended a picnic at which the 01d Roman outdoor games were revived. Chariot races, foot races, and gladiatorial combats were held. In accordance with the Roman custom, the winner of each event was crowned with a wreath of green leaves. MEMBERS Geraldine Andrews Carolyn Ardit Jack Bardo Marian Beckman George Bogner Albert Bonnick William Braumz Mary Brennan Grace Brun Robert Burkett Florence Camins Woodrow Campbell Floyd Castor Robert Chapman Edward Diedenhofer Wilbert Dllnkworth Edwin Duddey James Dwver Carolyn Estes Louis Evans August Faeth Blanche Flynn James Ford Catherine Gammon Vera Mae Giebel Rosalind Gillett Edward Greifenkamp Jack Gutfreund Louis Hagemeyer Betty Jean Haskin Oswald Headley Joyce Herman Richard Hewling Alma Hickey Hazel Hieber Harold Hiteman Lillian Houser Raymond Huber Alma Huff Pauline Hultquist Jessie Jones Richard Kendrick Louis Knopf Nicholas Krebs Anthony Lestingi Charles Levine Ruth Ling Robert Little Florence McKibben Virginia McLane Dorothy Miller Mary Miller Ninona Miller Audrey Niebram Margaret Patterson Joseph Pelgen Jack Pickelman Edwin Poate Lauretta Poate William Poate Thomas Poe Dorothy Pressler Norbert Purcell Stella Pursche Edward Quinn Albert Rawe Jack Rice Victor Rosenhagen William Ruff Rudolph Schmidt Vernon Schneider Vivian Schneider Evelyn Schwartz Earl Smith Lucille Stanfill John Staubach Charles Stenken Howard Sullivan Ruth Thoroughman Edward Walerius Ruth Warwood Edward Wientjes Lawrence Wienties Mary Ona Wessling Elizabeth Young Opal Young Louis Zakem Biology The purpose of the Biology Club is to bring to the attention of the class inter-4 esting and useful information that is not included in the regular Biology course. Many worth-while programs have been given by the students and several trips of interest have been taken. OFFICERS President ....................................................... GORDON WALZ Vice-Presidenl ........................................... STANLEY ARNZEN Secretary .................. ......................... KENNETH GIBSON Stanley Arnzen William Bardo Ralph Dewald Victoria Freund Kenneth Gibson Jack Hansjergen Kenneth Hay Joyce Hermann James Hoop Albert Howe Pauline Hultquist MISS ALICE HARRISON MEMBERS Jeanne Joerg Richard Kendricks Sylvester LaFata Clayton Lepper Thomas Lincoln Charles Mayer Mary MeLane Mildred Meyers Ann Peck Edward Quinn Charles Rieehers John Ritter Harold Schlake Victor Schoultheis Carl Stopper Harry Swope Gordon Walz Leonard Wiggins Henrietta Williams $0r0thy Wormald Commercial Club The Commercial Club was organized in September, 1932, under the supervision of Miss Warren and Miss Culbertson. The meetings were held every other Friday, and interesting business topics were discussed. During the year the club enjoyed a Moonlight Hike and two parties given as a farewell to the Senior A Classes and a welcome to the Junior A Classes. The ochers 0f the club were: President ..................................................... FRANK BUDDELL Vice-President .......................................... ROBERT CAUDILL Secretary ..................................................... ADELE FIEGER Advisers - MISS KATHERINE WARREN and Mrss BERNICE CULBERTSON Virginia Lee Broering Frank Buddell Robert Caudill Martha Colker Adelaide Duttle Estelle Emerson Freda Essig Lucille Fenbers Edward Fessler Adele Fieger Nell Fleming Katherine Fronk MEMBERS Dorothy Gainer Alvera Click Beatrice Herrold Lawrence Hosier Donald Hungler Gladys King Gertrude Kranes Norma Kranes Virginia Martin Alliene Moren Edna Neal Curl Nelson Sterling Rech Thomas Rels Elizabeth Schrode Audrey Shannon Josephine Stein Wilma Strub Katherine Sutton Frances Trame Dorothy Weber Jeanne Wheeler Lily May Williams Esther Zwerin Debating Club This year Newport Highis Debating Team enjoyed a very successful season, having had debates with Bellevue, Dayton, Erlanger, and Highlands. In the Dis- trict Tournament we lost by a close decision to Covington, 1932 State Champions. Our subject this year was Resolved: 4i'That at least one-half of all state and local revenues should be derived from sources other than tangible property? Our adviser is Miss Alice Harrison. The members of the team follow: Keith Cloe Phillip Schiff Charles Gilletl John Schweikert Harold Kling Charles Shumsky Contestants Phillip SchiH ............ Chemistry-Biology Royce Beard ...General Science Lawrence Creenholz ................. Physics John Little .............................. History Robert Little ......................... Geometry Waller Ziegler ....................... Algebra Ninona Miller ......................... Literature Carolyn Estes English Mechanics 11 Kenneth Wright .. English Mechanics I Adele Fieger ......................... Accounting Freda Essig ......................... Stenography Marry Mumma ...... General Scholarship Virginia Lee Broering ............... Typing Barbara Smith ........... Home Economics Virginia Purcell ...................... Speaking Charles Gillett ......................... Speaking John Schweikert ....................... Speaking Harry Mumma ............................... Music Betty Jean Haskin .......................... Music Harold Kling .................................. Music Katherine Fronk ............................ Music RESULTS IN STATE Harry Mumma, first place in Music and General Scholarship. Adele Fieger, first place in Accounting. Royce Beard, third place in General Suience. $gnuleoN SET: FOR JANUARY 25h? Volume 15 54km End for Ldimr H .. M4 . m! u ram PLnXB: KS mm MM Nb NEWPOhTER STAFF 0f 1932K, Editors ............ Edward A. Puff, Paul S. Wendi Featuresinlaine Morrisom Jeanne Joerg, Ruth Howe, Charles Gillett, Henrietta Williams SportsgLemy Jnlmshm, E. Srhferlman, Mal garet White- Drumativ ........................................ Harry Mummu Wit June Krieger Jane Halenkamp, Harold Kling Exchange ........ Norma Miller, Charles Shumsky Alumni .............................................. Carolyn Estes Club ........................ Opal Young! Mary McLane Junior Hi ...... Virginia Purcell, Virginia Bauer REPORTERS Office News ................ . ............... . ...... Marian Sauer Senior A ........................................ Stephen Cutter Senior 8 ............................................. Martha Reed Junior A .............................................. Harold Puff Junior B ................ ................................ Keith C106 Band ......................... .. ................ George Camins Orchestra ..................... 4 ................ Julius Borchers Mothersa Club ................................ Rachel Clifton Staff Adviser .................. Catherine Fitzsimmons BUSINESS STAFF Business Manager ............ , ............ Frank Buddell Assistant Business Mgr ........... Janet Closterman Subscription Mgrs. Alliene Moren, Alvera Click. Keith Cloe Advertising Managers Alfred Maybury, William Bardo Circulafn Mgrs. N0rma Kranes, Gladys King TypislsaCladys King, Adele Fieger, Virginia Lee Bruering VDAEDY" WiLBCATS imguhmlav gSPEAKmE AND MUSIC DOWN HIGHLANDS CONTESTS TO BE HELD 'MVWHf 5,... m WW L Auodmn: Wm. Www.dzm 'mKA ' K-pv snl uuvm . him a. Md ham 5'. YJw-u M m W Cawmm am. now Wm NEWPUHTEH STAFF of 1933 Editors................Philip Schiff, Wesley Bodkin Typists Virginia Broering, Freda Essig, Elsie Features h'1arion Bauer, Ben Jurin, Henrietta Dewald, Adele Fieger Williams, Charles Gillett, Henrietta Adviser..............................Catherine Fitzsimmons Campbell, Virginia Bauer Dramatic and Music....................Harry Mumma BUSINESS STAFF Poetry....................J0e Robinson. Carolyn Estes SportsaElmer Schwertman, Wesley Bndkin, Margaret White News Virginia Purcell, Martha Reed, Francis - Stambaugh, Jeanne Joerg Harold Kllng Business Manager.....................Janet Closterman Assistant Business Manager............Har01d Puff Advertising Managers..............Charles Shumsky Gossip Jane Halenkamp, June Krieger, Mary Circulation, Mgrs.......G0rd0n Walz, Keith Cloe McLane Subscription Manager................Kathryn Aulick MISS DELLA HOLLIDAY Adviser OFFICERS President ................................. OPAL YOUNG Vice-Presidenz ................ NORMA STEINBECK Secretary ............................. CAROLYN ESTES Treasurer ........................... MARGARET KOPP Chaplain .............................. NINONA MILLER SQUAD LEADERS BETTY JEAN HASKIN ALMA HICKEY MARTHA KAUFMAN RUTH WARWOOD HENRIETTA WILLIAMS MEMBERS Mary Brennan Genevieve Bohlinger Rose Brammel .Anna Bryant Ruth Bubenhofer Florence Camins Jeanne Chaliff Ruth Citron Shirley Crites Clara Mae Dance Estelle Deschler Vivian Darnell Elsie Dewald Blanche Flynn Victoria Freund Alice Geiger Edythe GiIb Rosalind Gillett Doris Grau Joyce Hermann Lucille Hodesh Gertrude Horn Mary Lou Huck Virginia Jaeger Irma McGivern Dorothy Miller Jeanette Miller Vera Moore Edna Neal Jeanne Petracco Jean Rodner Ruth Rust Gertrude Robinson Vivian Schnider Alice Lee Slater Marian Swope Virginia Shirley Esther Schnake Elfla Rose Stoehr Bessie Schindler Dorothy Schoultheis Vera Mae Utendorfer Lillian Vander The HiiY is the High School branch of the Y. M. C. A. The purpose of this organization is to improve its members both physically and morally. In the last year the Club has conducted Bible Study Classes under the direction of the Reverend A. J. Hotz of St. Pau17s Evangelical Church. We have also organ- ized a basket ball team and have gone on hikes. Herbert Addleman James Allen Harry Arnzen William Backinger Edward Baily Marvin Ballard George Bogner Julius Borchers Elmer Byrd George Camins Keith Cloe Robert Demler Raymond Fee Stanley Grau MEMBERS Lawrence Greenholz Frank Heidelbrink Richard Henson Edmond Hesser Iver Hodesh John Hummel Arthur Jacquillard Ben Jurin Mark Kettenacker Nicholas Krebs Jack Mason Ralph Merkowitz Leonard Miller Elmer Minning Edward Puff Harold Puff Robert Rodgers Phillip Schiff Bill Schloss Charles Shumsky Earl Smith Everett Smith Harry Swope Robert Wells Edward Woods Walter Ziegler P resident ................................................. HARRY MUMMA Vice-President ................................... HENRIETTA WILLIAMS Secretary .................................................. VIRGINIA PURCELL Treasurer .......................................................... OPAL YOUNG Virginia Bauer Aileen Benjey Evelyn Broadwater Robert Burkett Jeanne ChaliFf Rachel Clifton Kieth Cloe Vivian Darnell Estelle Deschler Florence DeVoss Estelle Domhoff Jayne Egan Estelle Emerson Louis Evans Jeanne Fisher Katherine Fronk Victoria Freund Alice Geiger Wilson Gosney Director - ALBERT SCHOLL Henrietta Gubscr Betty Jean Haskin Joyce Hermann Edmond Hesser Alma Hickey Thelma Hilge Gertrude Horn Lillian Hauser Gladys King Lillian Knapp Margaret Kopp Gertrude Kranes Norma Kranes Ruth Ling Mildred Mevers Elaine Morrison Harry Mumma Jeanne Patracco Harold Puff Katherine Prindlc- Virginia Purcell Victoria Schneidm Vivian Schneider Dorothy Schoultheis Helen Shearer Francis Stambaugh Mary E. Stegar Josephine Stein Margaret Steinman Katherine Sutton Vera Utendm'fer Lillian Vander Henrietta Williams Dorothy Wormald Opal Young Mary Zechella Walter Ziegler Orchestra WW wwwxmmhM The Newport High School Orchestra, under the direction of Mr. Albert Scholl, was organized in 1930. Since that time Newport High has always had a splendid orchestra. During the past year the orchestra has played for assemblies and for many other school functions, including the Anniversary of the P. T. A. Later in the year a jazz unit was organized and bi-monthly dances were given. FHRST VHOIJN: Ben Jurin Carl Messmer Harold Puff Barbara Smith SECOND VHHJN: Albert Bonniek Tom Lincoln Ruth Meyer Victor Schoultheis MEMBERS TRUMPET: Richard Buerger William ' Knable Raymond Neuforth Edward Quinn Carl Stopper TROMBONE: Walter Ziegler SAXOPHONE: William Heckman DRUM: Billy Brauntz Dudley Tuttle PHANO: Ruth Bubenhofer Katherine Fronk Margaret Kopp Band The N. H. S. Band was organized in 1930, under the capable leadership of Mr. Albert Scholl. Their first appearance was at the Newporl-Covinglon football game. The Band has played at several assemblies, at school dances, and at most of the football and basketball games. MEMBERS TRUMPET: TROMBONE: SAXOPHONE: Richard Buerger Walter Ziegler Walter Deal Raymond Neuforth Victor Schoultheis Louis Evans Edward Quinn DRUM' Wilson Gosney Carl Stopper . William Heckman Bllly Brauntz Ralph Dewald Dudley Tuttle WILLIAM J. FOSTER Coach VIRGINIA EBERT Girls, Coach Cheer Leader Rahff Rahlf Rah! Rah Rah a:ahll RahII Rah! Rah 'ialx Rubi! RuhH Rah! Rah Rah Team! Team! Team' tWhoD Team! :Whm Team! 1WWH Team! Team! Team! With flashy red and white uniforms, and plenty of spirit and pepq our 1933 cheerleaders led the rooters section throughout the football and basketball seasons. and cheered the teams on to Victory. Jeanne Joerg and Margaret White will he graduated this year but the remaining three will be veterans to lead the yelling: in 1934. Football Squad Review of the Football Season Fostermen completed one of the Newport Hi7s most successful gridiron seasons with only three lettermen from the squad of the preceding year. The team finished a schedule of nine games with eight Victories and one defeat. This defeat came at the hands of the Toledo-Waite High School team who later claimed the National High School Championship. Newport totalled locally 267 points to their credit as compared with 6 points of their opponents. Newport claimed the Northern Kentucky Championship by Virtue of their splendid record. NEWPORT 3 - DAYTON 0 Newport opened the season with the Dayton Greendevils. The Newport Wild- cats started slowly and were held to eight points in the first half, but they came back in the second half and scored 22 points. Bob Davis, the star of the Dayton team, although unable to penetrate the Wildcats defense, played a great defensive game. NEWPORT 33 - CATLETTSBURG 0 The highly ittoutedi, Catlettsburg eleven tasted defeat at the hands of the Wildcats. The game was played before a large crowd at Andrewsa field. The Newport line made holes and the backs scampered through for hve touchdowns and three extra points. The Wildcats were the underdogs in the game, but superior teamwork enabled them to win. The Visitors featured an End who was six feet, five inches, and who was a great pass receiver. NEWPORT 21 - BELLEVUE 0 Bellevue, third Victims of the Wildcats, came to Newport confident of victory. Coach Foster substituted freely throughout the game, and Newport scored only 21 points. Wuest, an outstanding man for the opponents, scored on both defense and offense. Sandfoss and Lepper were outstanding for Newport. NEWPORT 0 - WAITE 55 Newport journeyed to Toledo, Ohio, October 7, to play the strong Waite Indians. Although outweighed several pounds to the man, Newport went into the game to fight to a finish. The Wildcats held up well in the first quarter but Were weakened under the vicious thrust of the Waite eleven. Their defeat is by no means a disgrace, as the Waite team is in a class by itself. NEWPORT 75 - FALMOUTH 0 Wow! What a track meet. The inexperienced and light Falmouth team was no match for the heavier and more experienced Newport eleven. The Falmouth team never put the ball in play by scrimmage more than five times in the whole game. Falmouth upon receiving the ball immediately punted. Many of these kicks were returned for touchdowns. The features of the game were touchdowns by Lepper, Purcell, and Sandfoss, while Reidinger and Howe played best on line. NEWPORT 34 - HIGHLANDS 0 Newport playing Highlands, for the first time in ten years, had an easy victory. The Wildcats started fast, scoring a touchdown on the first play of the game, but the backfield was in motion and the play was called back. Newport scored only two touchdowns and one extra point during the first half. They threatened many times during the first half, but ea'rh time Highlands braced and Newport was unable to score. In the second half the Wildcats came back with a rush and scored 21 points. ffMoon" Maureris kicking and Gubseras passing were the features of the game. NEWPORT 32 - ERLANGER 0 Newport defeated the Lloyd Juggernauts in a one-sided contest. Newport took the ball 'on the opening kick-off and marched down the field for a touchdown. Newport used a variety of many new plays which completely bewildered the op- ponents. Kuhnheim and Gubser starred for Newport, while Day and McGill looked best for Erlanger. NEWPORT 13 - LUDLOW 0 t In one of the hardest fought battles of the year the Wildcats subdued the Panthers. Ludlow was primed for this Game and almost upset the Wildcats. New- port scored the first touchdown by a 40-yard run by Gubser followed by a 20-yard run and touchdown by Purceell. An extra point was made by Sandfoss. The feature of the game was the plunging of Sandfoss, Newport,s fullback. In the fourth quarter he carried the ball from midfield, on a series of plunges, for a touchdown. ffMose,9 Howe played best on the line. Big Tom Stewart, the Ludlow fullback, was the outstanding player for the Panthers. NEWPORTJ I- NORWOOD 6 Newport travelled to Cincinnati to play the Norwood High Indians. The Nor- wood High School team has taken the place formerly held by Covington as the annual homecoming game. ' The CameeNewport, with three men ineligible, outplayed the heavier Nor- wood team from start to finish. Newport scored all of its points in the first half. All three of Newportis touchdowns resulted from passes from Gubser t0 Blaut. Norwoodas lone marker came in the third quarter. It was scored from a forward and lateral pass. Blaut played a great game for Newport. Schurman looked best for Norwood. GILBERT HOWE 6iMosel, - Tackle llMosei the Co-Captain, completed his third and last year as a regular tackle of the Wildcat squad. Howe weighed 240 pounds. Because of the good work at his position he was selected for honorable mention on the All-State Team. CLAUDE WILSON l'Boonei, - Guard Here we have the only player in Northern Kentucky to make the All-State-Team. 6iBoone,9 was Co-Captain and played guard. He was not only the out-standing linesman but also a man who did much punting and passino. This is Wilsonas last year and in losing him we lose one of the best players. ARNOLD McATEE ctMad, - End Here,s to QiMacf, our smallest and lightest man on the squad. iiMacg9 weighed only 118 pounds. iiMac,9 is a good tackler and blocker but catching passes is his chief ability. We regret to say that this is iiMacs last year. His leaving will make on the forward wall a big hole which will be hard to fill. CHARLES RIEDINGER ttSamig - Tackle Here we have the well known i6Sam,9 who played tackle and called signals. tiReidief who was exceptionally fast. pulled out in inter- ference and was a good blocker and taekler. Sam will be back next year and will be an ex- ceedingly valuable man to the team. GEORGE GIBSON ttHootii itHootia was an exceptional player. Although only in Junior High School he made regular center and lettered the precedingr year. Much of our success was due to Gibsonas accurate passes and great defensive game. We are glad to say that Gibson has four more years to wear the red and black. K, ROBERT LITTLE l4Dub,9 - Guard Here is one of the members of the team who represents Southgate. Little, although not eX- Ceptionally large, could hold his own with the best of them. lgBob,7 could always be depended on in a pinch to open holes in the line and 'to throw opposing backs for losses. We expect great things for Bob next year. KENNETH WRIGHT ttKenl, - End llKenl, is one of the pair of star Wingmen, playing right end. Kenis specialty was piling the interference and exposing the ball carrier to the defensive backs. We are glad to say that W7right has two more Years at Newport Hi and will be a valuable man. ALBERT SANDFOSS ttSandW - Fullback llSandy,7 was a new addition to the squad and because of his unusual ability he made himself a regular. From the first, llSandy,9 showed that he had the making of a good player. 4lSandya, is heavy, fast, and an exceptionally hard plunger. He backed up the line like a champion and it took a good man to get by him. 4:Sandy,, has one more year to play for dear old N. H. S. CLAYTON LEPPER 46Lap,, - Quarterback 64Hats 0H7, Ladies and Gentlemen, to our diminutive but fast quarterback. :14an, though weighing less than 135 pounds, was chosen on the second All-State-Team. 4lLap,7 starred in every game by his long and spectacular runs. thlayaa played safety man on defense and re- turned several punts for touchdowns. We are sorry to say that clLapi7 graduates this year and his shoes will be hard to fill. He was one of the outstanding backs in Northern Kentucky. NORBERT PURCELL ClShortyll - Quarterback 26Shortya,7 another little plucky back, alter- nated With Lepper. llShortfs,9 longest suit was his running ability. He made many long and spectacular runs in every game that he played. As he is still only a Sophomore, great things are expected of clShortyw during the next two years. V l W: eAl x IQ; ROY BLAUT iiRoyh - End Roy is another of our regulars. This is his second year as a letterman and his fourth year on the squad. Roy was a good defensive full- back, but played his best as an end in the Nor- wood game. We regret to say this is Roy7s last year. FRED KUHNHEIM icCheese,7 - Fullback iiCheesei, is a veteran of many battles, was one of the smallest but toughest men on the squad. He delighted in making hard and driv- ing tackles and blocks that jarred our oppon- ent7s whole frame. lcCheese7, has one more year to wear the colors. ERNEST MAUER iiMoonieii - Halfback czErnie,,, starting slow but gaining momen- tum as the season progressed, developed into one of the best punters in Northern Kentucky. iiMoonie7i was a good passer and the best block- ing back on the squad. Mauer has two more seasons to play for his 66Alma Mater? HOWARD GUBSER iiGooberii - Halfback 6iGoober,9 was also a new addition to the squad. Because of his passing and blocking ability Howard was able to hold his regular position. He could pass far and accurately, and many of his passes resulted in touCh-downs. He7s another of our regulars who Will be back next year. JOHN LITTLE itProF, - Tackle Here is the other half of the Little brothers. John was a versatile man. He played every position from tackle to tackle. John is a very valuable man, and his leaving will be a loss to the squad. r I", i n An: Wit .1 il'. iiilll . .. div Ill il-qul" 4 ,m". ., 1' .. $1 5w W W x X L- 7 t . JULIUS BORCHERS ttTarzani9 - Tackle Here we have another of our hard-working boys Who was out for the squad for four years. Borchers is another man who plays any position on the line. We lose tharzanai this year, as he is a Senior. LAWRENCE GREENHOLZ ttLarrW - Halfback 4tLarryw is another boy who was always giv- ing the best that he had. What threenie7, lacked in weight and speed he made up in nerve. itGreenie,7 was another one of these boys with an education, too. As tiLarryia graduates he will not be with us next year. JAMES ALLAN 4cHoggie" - Guard Allan was one of the best prospects from last year7s team. An ankle injury received in an auto accident during vacation, greatly han- dicapped him. Allan has three more years 'to play, and we expect great things from him. DICK HEWLING ttDicky77 - Halfback Dick is another substitute back who broke into the lime light this year. Dick is a good runner, but his best asset is his ability to break up passes. He will be with us two more years. ALBERT HOWE itBeans7i - Center cheans9, is the boy who made good in his first year out for the team. He relieved Gibson as Center. With a years experience 'to his credit, Al should next season he a great asset to N. H. S. CHARLES GILLETT ttRazori9 - F ullback Here is a boy whose perseverance was an inspiration to the other boys. ccRazor77 was out for the team for three years. With his courage and determination, he should go far in life. HAROLD KLING itPots,9 - Manager Hereis to our student manager, iiPotsf, Kling t6toted,, the water bucket and other things for the boys on the squad. Through his work, he helped the team to victory. KENNETH GIBSON ttRed,, - Trainer. Here is another one of our loyal and faith- ful assistants. iiRed,7 was the chief iiCharley- horse-beatelm and did all odd jobs that he was told to do. ccRed,, has many, many more years with us. TO THE REST OF THE BOYS ON THE SQUAD: We Seniors know that you will uphold the name of N. H. S. Although you may never make the first team, the training and hard knocks that you receive will be of great value to you in your battle of life. Boys9 Basket I NTH 0H1 ltij'liltitN The Wildcats deserve much credit for their splendid record. No other school can boast of such teams as those represented by Newport Hi. Although these teams have made this record, not all credit is deserving of them, for Coach c131utj,7 Foster through his excellent ability as u lleder and mentor of sports, has made it possible for the Wiidt-ast to play the class; of hahkethail they have been playing. We all sincerely hope that Cuavh will he with us indefinitely and make as good 01' even better retards in 1119 iittlul'ti Summary Of Boys9 Basket Ball Games December 9, 1932 NEWPORT vs. CORINTH The Wildcats opened the season with a 31 to 20 'victory over the 1930 State Champs. The game was close up to the end of the hrst half, then Reis and Ried- inger broke the strong Corinth teamis morale by dropping them in from all parts of the floor, and the team won easily. December 16, 1932. NEWPORT vs. BELLEVUE Newport took Bellevue by a 30 to 20 Victory in one of the roughest games of the season. Played before a thousand anxious spectators, both teams were in a high pitch of excitement. Newport beat the toughest team on their schedule, as shown later in the season. Reis scored the majority of the points while Hewling held Bellevue,s scoring threat to two long shots. December 20, 1932. ' NEWPORT vs. WALTON Our boys beat the Regional Champs of 1933 by a margin of 8 points. The strong Walton team held Newport to almost a tie at the first half, then Newport shot both barrels at the Walton team and finished with a score of 34 to 26. Reis was again high point man, with 16 points 'to his credit. December 29, 1932. NEWPORT vs. RUSSELL Newport traveled to Russell, Ky. ,to give the home team a 41 to 12 walloping. The game was never close because the Wildcats far out-classed the Russell 8five,w despite the fact that Newport was minus a regular guard, Gibson. Reis was high scorer with more than 14 points. December 30, 1932. NEWPORT vs. ASHLAND From RusSell, the Wildcats traveled to Ashland, Ky., to be beaten by. the strong Ashland team, by two points. The game was Close throughout. Newport probably would have come out on the long end had they not been handicapped. Reis was high point man with 6 field goals. The final score was 28 to 26. January 6, 1933. NEWPORT vs. NORWOOD The much favored Norwood team was embarrassed by the unexpected defeat given them by Newport. Every division of 0111' team worked unusually smooth. Tommy was high point man with 24 points. Hewling followed with 12 points. Riedinger, Gibson, and Rohrer scored 4 each, making a total of 48 points to Norwoodas 28. January 13, 1933. NEWPORT vs. DAYTON The cfats,7 beat the strong Dayton team by a score of 37 to 23. Although the 14 points difference seems like a one-sided story, the game was a most exciting one, as demonstrated by the 800 witnesses. Reis was high point man again, while Riedinger scored the next most points. January 20, 1933. NEWPORT vs. HIGHLANDS The 3Cats7, trimmed the Bluebirds by a margin of 14 points. Our traditional rivals were ahead the first quarter, but after that it was all Newp irt and the game ended 35 to 21. Hewling was high scorer. with Reis and Riedinger tie for second high. January 24, 1933. NEWPORT vs. LLOYD By a score of 49 to 29 the Wildcats rang up another victory over the fighting;r Juggernauts. Newport scored most of their points the hrst half and many subs were given a chance to play. Arnzen and Hewling were the offensive stars, with 15 and 12 points respectively. thq January 28, 1903. NEWPORT vs. HAZARD The State Champs were completely bewildered by the fast m Ni 1': Wildcats who scored 29 points to their 15. Gibson, Riedinszer and Reis made NewporUs defense solid, holding Hazard t0 6 field goals. Arnzm and Hewling accounted for the offensive honors with 11 and 8 points respectively. 7 January 31, 1933. NEWPORT vs. WALTON Newport traveled to Walton, Ky., to return the game played at Newport. The game was the most exciting of the season, never being more than five points dif- ference in the running score. The Walton team being: exceedingly fast, especially on their own small floor, made it tough for the w'Cats,,, but the team held their own and came out on the long end of the 31 to 26 score. The whole team worked perfectly while Arnzen did his specialty in making the most points. February 3, 1933. NEWPORT vs. LUDLOW Newport went to Ludlow to win the roughest game of the season. Manv fouls were called while as many fouls were exmmitted that were not called. Twh boys were thrown out of the game for fighting; the fight being caused by the opponent. Despite all the raggedness, the team managed to score 41 points to Ludlow,s 24. February 7, 1933. NEWPORT vs. BELLEVUE Newport lost a hard game to the Bellevue Tirrers in thiir second game with them. The Wildcats fought valiantly but were playing; one Of their toughest games on an off night. The score was a tie at the end Hf th: first half, then the Tigers took the lead and kept it. The game ended with the score 34 to 26. Arnzen was high scorer with 15 points. February 10, 1933. NEWPORT vs. DAYTON Newport repeated their Victory over Dayton in their return game with them. The game was a rough and tumble affairlatid fouls on both sides were numerous. Arnzen and Reis were high point men, staring 10 and 8 points respectively. The score was close up to the fourth quarter then Newport spurted and the game ended 32 to 22. February 144, 1933. NEWPORT vs. RUSSELL Russell came to Newport to return the game played at Russell. The result was practically the same; 40 to 13. The domineering Wildcats completely be- wildered the Russell team on our large Hoor. Coach gave Tommy a much needed rest by not playing him at all. Riedinger scored the greatest number of points. February 17, 1933. NEWPORT vs. HIGHLANDS The Wildcats traveled to Highlands on one of their ion,9 nights to shut out the Bluebirds by a score of 50 to 14. The whole game was a show of Arnzen, Reis and Riedinger making field goals. Riedinger scored the greatest number of points, which was 22. February 21, 1933. NEWPORT vs. LUDLOW The Ludlow Panthers returned Newportis visit with an unexpected defeat. Saving his team for a much harder game with Stivers, Coach Foster used the l'e- serves most of the game. Although playingr against a reserve team most of the game, Ludlow coudnit beat the fighting Wildcats by more than one point. The hnal score was 23 to 22. February 28, 1933. NEWPORT vs. STIVERS The strong Dayton tOhiol Stivers team traveled to Newport to give the Wild- cats a second straight defeat. Although crippled, the 6I'Cats,9 fought hard but Were unable to hold the lead gained in the first half. The high-rated Stivers quintet gave all they had and Newport went down under a 32 to 29 score. March 3, 1933. NEWPORT vs. BELLEVUE Newport lost a heart-breaker in the 39th district tournament7 t0 Bellevue, in an overtime period, by a score of 30 to 28. The game was the closest and fastest of all games, besides being rough. Many fouls were committed by both sides. Riedinger being ejected 0n fouls handicapped the Wildcats. Reis was Newport,s high point man, scoring 11 0f the 28 points. This being the second victory for Bellevue, 0f the three games played with Newport, gives Bellevue a slight edge over Newport, but many still say Newport had the better team. THOMAS REIS - Captain Tommy came out for basketball the first season Mr. Foster coached for Newport. He was a first-class player from the start. He made a letter the first year and was chosen on the All-State Team the following year. Without Tom the team could never have made such an excellent record. He scored the greatest num- ber of points this season, and acting as captain, he showed great strategy in leading his team to many Victories. Tom is liked by everyone, and we all regret to see him leave us as there is going to be a vacancy hard to fill. DICK HEWLING - Guard Dick is small in stature but is nothing short of dynamite t0 Newportis opponents, and his fancy hall handling completely bewilders them. Dick is a modest chap and he is liked hyeveryhody. Very luckily Dick has two more years with us. CHARLES RIEDINGER - Forward When iiSama, first appeared with the squad not much was expected of him, but he completely surprised the masses and proved his importance. Sam has pulled the team out of many tight places with his uncanny shots and his ability to get the hall on the rebound. STANLEY ARNZEN - Forward Stan is the fastest 0n the team and a main cog in Newport7s scoring machine; his importance was well emphasized in the beginning of the season when he was out due to ineligibility. Stan is the fire of the team, he is always fighting, win or lose. He has two more years with Newport and much is expected of him. GEORGE GIBSON - Guard iiHootai completes the first five. He is an excellent guard and from that position he has made many long shots to pull Newport out of some tight places. Much is expected of ccHootv, in the future hecause this was his First year and he is only in Junior Hi. BILL ROTHE - Guard Bill is a valuable man because he can always come through in a pinch. He is another fancy ball handler. Bill has two more years and will probably be playing regularly before long. VERNON KESSEL - Forward Vernon is a natural basketball player; he dinvt play regularly due to inex- perience, although he is good for a basket every time he replaces a man. Vernon still has plenty of time to play regularly on the team. ED. ROHRER - Center Ed is the tallest 0n the squad. He proved very valuable to the team in the be- ginning 0f the season when Arnzen was out. Much is expected of Ed next season. NORBERT PURCELL - Forward Norh is Newportjs long shooter; he is sent in to make baskets because he is fast and has many chances to shoot. He usually makes the basket. JOSEPH BUHKART - Guard Joe is a new iihndji this year, and when we say Wind,7 we mean he is a player with future possibilities. Joe is a good guard and he has a fair Chance to be 21 regular player next. year. 7 7' 7,175 WV , 313,15, ,5, e , F?'v . ' ' 6cKittensw During the 1932-33 basketball season the Kittens were more successful than they had been in former years. They started off with a bang but let down toward the end. by losing the last three games. They won seven and lost Flve. Following is a summary of the games: NEWPORT 29 - UNIVERSITY SCHOOL 20 The Kittens Opened their 1933 season successfully by defeating University School 29-20. The game was close, although the red and black held a slight edge throughout. This was the first game in which the girls used the center throw, a new rule this year. NEWPORT 16 - S. O. B. C. 19 In the second game the girls dropped a heart-breaker to S. O. B. C., coming out on the short end of a 19-16 score. The teams seemed evenly matched, but the Kittens couldn,t get the breaks. In the second half the ball kissed the rim and bounced out time after time. NEWPORT 22 - BELLEVUE 20 The Newport Kittens chalked up another victory on the right side by de- feating the Bellevue Kittens at Bellevue, in the first game away. The orange and black rallied in the last half but were not able to overcome the lead against them. The final score stood 22-20. NEWPORT 31 - OAKWOOD 141 Here the Kittens looked good. They swamped the Oakwood team, the 1932 Champs of Ohio, to the tune of 31-14. This game seemed to be a good shooting contest between Joerg, McLane and White, and Oakwood could not break through the zone defense of Knapp, Krieger, and Fieger. NEWPORT 26 - HARTVVELL 15 Another Victory for the N. H. S. The girls turned back Hartwell 26-15. They set the pace for the game, and led all the way. This was an extremely rough and tumble affair, many fouls being called on both teams. NEWPORT 21 - HIGHLANDS 19 For the first time in three years the Kittens defeated their strong rivals, the Highlands, Bluebirds, with a score of 21-19. Highlands were leading at the half but Newport came back in the third quarter. The blue and white was weakened when two of their forwards were taken from the game because of personal fouls. NEWPORT 19 - S. O. B. C. 33 This was the second of the teams defeats. They lost to S. O. B. C. 33-19 in a very rough game. Newport was leading in the Iirst half but the game was all business college in the second. NEWPORT 30 - UNIVERSITY SCHOOL 21 The Kittens came back again on the Winning side and trimmed University School 30 21, in a last game on Universityis floor. In this game the teams offense and defense both clicked well. NEWPORT 18 - BELLEVUE 16 In a very exciting game, ending 18-16 in favor of Newport, the red and black defeated the Bellevue Kittens for the second time this season. The game was nip and tuck throughout, with both sides taking the lead many times before the final whistle blew. NEWPORT 11 - HIGHLANDS 25 The Kittens suffered their third defeat of the season from Highlands there, on their floor, ending up on the low side of a 25-11 score. Highlands held the ad- vantage and led all the way during the game. Their shots hit the basket from all angles. NEWPORT 19 - HARTWELL 20 In this game the Kittens took it on the chin, when they were defeated 19-20 by Hartwell whom they had beaten by a big score earlier in the season. Newport looked the best in the second half but could not quite overcome an earlier lead. NEWPORT 13 - LOCKLAND 16 Newport took their third straight defeat, and the fifth of the season, when they were beaten by Lockland 16-13. Lockland held a very slight lead during the en- tire game which was very rough. Many fouls were committed by both teams. I y Amt . y t 1 , MUN , lllljlhkxtn' 1 ' l 'l y llll I'll, Jl' .. 1x lilml 1: v31, 10 : u ' w ' x . k- r 4,1 . . cl ' s , .1 5' . iv 3'. 3": -".'.-..- .. 1 ., - N L r , ,1 t .- . '; .5 :y . -I 7t W7 V ' 2 y x'l, . . MARGARET WHITE - Forward To Margaret goes the distinction of being: an all around player and indeed, we may say an icaH around77 girl. She has played three years on the squad, two as guard, at which she was a fine player, and this past year as forward. She was Captain of this years team. She is the type of girl who inspires team work and good sportsmanship in her team by her own good spirit and cooperation. iiMawg,7 is the ideal of many an underciass girl, and her excellent qualities of character are sure to give her the place in life which she justly deserves. VIRGINIA McCLANE - Forward Virginia is our tall, lanky center who has shown some real basketball ability. This is her first year on the squad but she has played in almost every game. Virginia moves quickly, has very nice foot work, knows how to make the ichimniesf, and is fine on rebound plays. She was high point scorer this last SFQSQH. ELIZABETH KNAPP - Guard iiSisi7 is one of our three-year players who has played in almost every minute of each game, which proves that she is an excellent player. She is small in stature, but the last word in speed and endurance. She has excellent control of her body, handles the ball well, and is good on both defense and offense. Besides her fine ability in all departments of the game, iiSis,9 displays an un- selhshness which is admirable. She always congratulates her opponents and teammates and has spent much of her spare time in the gym helping other girls who aspire to he better basketball players. JUNE KRIEGER - Guard June is another three- -year player who has played in every contest this past season. She has certainly qualifled as one of our best players this year in our new system of zone guarding. June is not very speedy but she plays a very intelligent game of basketball. She has the unique ability of diagnosing her opponents offense, and this coupled with a sincerity of purpose makes her one of our outstanding players. JEANNE JOERG - Forward Jeanne ,the girl with the twinkling eyes, is one of our Seniors Whom we are certainly sorry to lose. She has played a fine brand of basketball this year, particularly on working her way right under that basket and shooting in any loose balls that may happen to miss the first time. Jeanne has much endurance and one can always depend on her to play a good, clean game. Her fine spirit in all affairs, her geniality, and her sparkling personality will be missed next year. ADELE FIEGER - Guard Adele is one of our very best players. She has kept many a player from mak- ing points by her excellent guarding. Adele never allows herself to become icrattled,7 or afraid of losing. She always plays the same good, consistent game. She wins with enthusiasm and loses graciously. The girls on the squad admire her for her fine spirit, her wholesomeness and the fine quality of self-control which she possesses. LUCILLE FENBERS - Forward Another Senior of whom we are very proud is Lucille, who although she had no athletic training before coming out for the team, has, through her persistency and effort turned out to be a good basketball player. She is a fine student, a faithful and hard worker and a girl on whom you can always. depend. VIRGINIA LEE BROERING - Forward We might call Virginia the inpepi, of the team. She is the type that adds zest and enthusiasm to the players in a game, and the contest is. never lost to her until the time is up. Virginia has a buoyant disposition, and shes always ready to give you that smile for which she is. well known. VERA MAE GIEBEL - Forward Vera is one of our most Winsome lassies. She is a rare type of girl, combining brains, beauty, and athletic ability This is the first year in which she par- ticipated in most of the games, and in each game she turned in a fine perform- ance, accounting for several baskets and showing an unusual ability for passing. Vera Mae has a determination about her that is undaunted and her perseverance and will to do are to be greatly admired PAULINE HULTQUIST - F orward This is iiPollys, first year on the squad and from the beginning to the end of the season she has consistently improved. She has a good eye for the basket, and with her height and more development in speed, she should by next year be one of our most formidable players. Pauline is one of our honor students of which we are very proud. She has shown her ability in leadership by coach- ing the Caw team which won the intramural championship of our school. VIRGINIA ANN BOHCJXT - Guard Virginia is our modest little girI-emodest in her talking but not in her per-' formance. One can always depend on Virginia to give her best, not for her own glory, but for the honor of the team. She has a fine spirit of cooperation, displays hne sportsmanship, and is an honor student. This combination of good qualities makes a splendid person. VERA GASKINS - Guard Vera is our scrappy little guard who has improved steadily in each game in which she has played. Her main idea is to get possession of the ball, and when she does, she breaks fast and passes well. With Vera,s natural adaption for the game, she promises to be excellent material for next year. 6W? Club Active boys, and girls, '1N,, Clubs were formed this year for the following pur- poses: to bring the members of the different teams closer together, to create a sense of responsibility, and to have respect for each member wearing the tcN9, and to forward athletics in this school. 7 The club plans to raise funds and to be active socially. To be eligible for membership, :1 student attending this school must have officially earned his letter by playing on or by managing an interseholastic team of Newport High School. OFFICERS ROBERT IJTTLE ..................................................... Prendent .ALFRED SANFoss ............................................ VEaePrendent KENNETH VVRHHiT .................................................. Secnnany JOHN BRODWOLF .................................................... Trauunn MEMBERS James Allen Howard Gubser Clayton Lepper Stanley Arnzen Lawrence Greenholz John Little Julius Borchers Jane Halenkamp Robert Little Virginia Lee Broering Richard Henson Arnold MCAtee Joe Burkart Richard Hewling Virginia McLane Janet Closterman Albert Howe Thomas Reis Lucille Fenbers Gilbert Howe Charles Riedinger Adele Fieger Jeanne Joerg W7illiam Rothe Harold Gaskins Vernon Kessel Edward Rohrer Vera Gaskins Harold Kling Gordon Walz Vera Giebel Elizabeth Knapp Margaret White George Gibson June Krieger Claude Wilson Charles Gillett Fred Kuhnheim Kenneth Wright Let us follow the members of the Girls Athletic Association through a season of their activities, fun, and sports. The G. A. A. of Newport Hi has now been in existence for four years. In this organization there is a sport for every girl and a girl for every sport, and the motto is, 64Athletics for 311.79 Hockey, basketball, baseball, and aerial dart are the major sports, although it also promotes tennis, swimming, hiking and roller-skating. The aim is not only to teach girls to play games but also to promote good sports- manship, and fair play, and the ability to win graciously and lose smilingly. This organiaztion follows a system of merit awards called the 66Point System? In this system points are given for the Various activities and are kept on file from year to year, a complete record for each member. Awards are given for a certain number of points. Girls Athletic Association HIKING - SWIMMING - SKATING These sports are all seasonal. Hiking is very popular and many hikes are held all the year round. Fifty points are given for ten hikes of five miles each. Swimming parties are enjoyed by many and are also very popular. Exciting events and races are held at these parties. Fifty points are given for six swims. Roller skating is done mostly in the spring and autumn. Eight skates of two hours each are required for fifty points. Many girls receive their points each year for these sports. AWARDS The awards for points are made each year on Class Night of June graduation. The first award for three hundred points is a pin; the second for six hundred points is red felt Class numerals; and the third for a thousand points is a heavy black sweater with a black chenille an set on red felt with the red letters G. A. A. woven into the letter. Also each year a sportsmanship award is given. This award is a black onvx ring with a red raised WNW set on it. This honor is based upon athletic ability, scholarship, leadershipa personality, and sportsmanship. To be eligible a girl must be an upperclassman, preferably a Senior. Hockey The first sport on the list is field hockey. This is only the second year for this, game, but it is enjoyed and liked by all and Will continue. This year an intra- mural tournament was held consisting of two leagues, the advancediand the begin- ners. The Yellowjackets and Hockeyettes composed the advanced league, while the beginners was made up of the Hockateers, the Jay Hawks, and the Goalseekers. The Yellowjackets won the championship by winning two straight games. Fol- lowing are the results of the beginners, from which the Jay Hawks emerged victors: Jay HawkseWOn 2, Lost 0; HockateerseWOn 1, Lost 1; and GoalseekerseWOn 0, Lost 2. Seventy-five points are given for Hockey, with twenty-live extra for making the Honor team. The following were picked on the Honor team: Virginia McLane, June Krieger, Jeanne Joerg, Virginia Maier, Virginia Lee Broering, Rachel Clifton, Mary Styles, Janet Closterman, Vera Gaskins, Roslyn Gillett, and Margaret White. r ' . f AeALs,ZFX: Ti-Ttt'fxw .513. .x-g;31;:11C3i121:g- :33: '35"? 53:53.? riff: . 37111": . "I " -:- JOKES -:- AN INTERNATIONAL AFFAIR hMy dear? said Mr. Nubbs to Mrs. Nuhbs, Itwhat name did I hear you call the new hired girl:w lilapanf, replied Mrs. Nubbs sweetly. hAnd why such an odd nameiw IIBecause sheis so hard on china? 5: $ :1: :14 Too MANY HORSES In horse-andrbuggy times a preacher driving two horses stopped to spend the night with a friend. At the supper table the little boy of IJC home started to ask the preacher a ques- tion, but his father said, 6tB equietlii Graci- oust turningr to the child, the minister smiled and said, iiLet the boy talk? 6tAre both of those horses in the stable yoursiw "Yes," was the reply. iLWhyiw 6WIVeII, my father said your were a one- horse, preacher? SIMPLE ENOUGH Little Mae: thother, I know why people laugh up their sleeves? Mother: ttWhy, dear ? " Little Mae: ttBecause thats where their funny bone is? :k :3: Hi: KNEW BUGS AND BOYS Two boys decided to play a trick on a noted entomologist. They caught a butterfly, a beetle; a centipede, and a grasshopper and glued parts of the four insects together ti form a iqueer-looking bug. Presenting it to the scientist, they asked him to identify it. He inspected it, looked at the anxious boys and inquired, 6Did this bug hum when you caught it?i, IiYes ,it didf, said' the ho s tr incJr to kee . . y, y b p their faces stralght. III thought so? said the scientist with a smile, IIand it looks like a humhug to me? x :z: :2: J: W'HAT,S WHAT glMiss Green, do let me help you to some more pudding? IIWeIl, I will take some more, but only a mouthful? iiBellaf said the hostess to the maid, Iifill Miss Green's plate? LIVING PROOF C. Gubser: HHow long can a man live without brains?" Friend: I6Well, youill soon be 19?. 2: ti: 5.: $1 REASONABLE Inehriated Motorist: itOfIicer, Iim looking for a parking place? Policeman: ;But you have no car? Motorist: iiOh, yes I have. Its in the parking place lam looking for? :5: i: 32: :S' TRUE LOVE Wife: mYou donit love me. The doctor says I must have a reducing course, and you wunit let me. Unsympathetic brute? Hubby: iiOf course I love you, darling. I love you so much I canit stand to lose an ounce of you? :k$2::k Too WILLING A. McAtee: III have lost a $10 bill. Has it been brought herefw Clerk: tINo, only a $65 bill? A. McAtee: AThen Iill take that on account? $$2::1: LUCKY FOR BOTH Father: IMoney, money! Itis never any- thing else from you. Iiin thankful live only one daughter? C. King Idaughter who was graduatingl: hSo am I, Dad? WH AT,S THE DIFFERENCE Whats the difference between a cat and a comma? Well, a cat has claws at the end of its paws. and a comma has its pause at the end of its clause. Miss Phillip, who was discussing the many millions of people in China and was giving as an example the fact that every time you breathe a Chinaman dies, suddenly heard some very hard putts. Turning about she asked, tiClaude Wilson, what are you doingiw C. Wilson: ITm killing Chinamenfi -:- JOKES -:- A. Maybury tto weeping girl in the moviel : , , . 9a ttlt you cant stand 1t, dear, we can get out. A. Moren: 6iSilly, Ilm enjoying the picture too much? r$.:::: Miss Harper calling out the numbers of the books returned by the English VIII class. -27, 30, 15, 5, 7, 18- E. Zwerin tin back of rooml: tKeeno? The teacher lecturing on physiology asked: tWVhat is dandruff?ll ltChips off the old hlockj" replied a student. :i: :1: :l: HAnd that on the right? said the guide, itis a skyscraper? llMy, Ild love to see it wogk," said the old lady from the country. :I: :t: . . MAKES A DIFFERENCE Ofiice Boy: HYour wife is on the telephonea sir, to say that she wunts to see you about"? Boss tirritablyl: ttAbout whatiw Office Boy: itAbout five, sir? Boss: tle ...... olclock or dollarsTt S: S: THE SOLE TROUBLE III dongt like these shoes? said the cus- tomer. iiThe soles are too thick? ttIs that the only objection, madamT, the clerk asked. "Then ,madam, if you take the shoes I can assure you that the ohjeetion will g;adually wear away? a; .,. WORK FOR BOTH J. Borchers thome for a vacationl: "Well, Dad, Ilve brought some books on farming for you to dig into? Dad: uYes, and Ilve bought another eighty acres for you to dig into? SEE To IT- 'iI see your husband never gets out at night." liSo do 1V HIGH SCHOOL PRAYER Now I lay me down to rest, Before I take tomorrowls test, If I should die before I wake, Thank God 111 have no test to take. MATTER OF TASTE tlI dreamed last night that I had invented a new type of breakfast food and that I was sampling it when ............ " ttYes, yes, go on? ttl awoke and found a comer of the mat- tress gone? A. Moren: ttOh, there is still some dew on these wonderful floweis you brought me? A. Mayhury: iTll settle up for them on payday? 2!: $ it! $ IN THESE DAYS llSay, Jack, if you had five bucks in your pocket, what would you thinkiw "Ild think I had somebody elsels pants on? .5 g. :5. TIME TO REFORM He: tlDarling, Iam so happy I could kiss the whole world? ' She: llNow that welre engaged, you must give up those bachelor habits? i . .-. 4. + DUMB Examiner tto applicant for job as telephone operatorl: tiHave you had any operating ex- perience?" N. Kranes: iiOh, yes. Ilve had my tonsils removed? . A negro went over to the hospital and asked how his friend was getting along. ttHels get- ting along fine? said the nuise. iiHEs con- valescing now? scYassum, Iill wait til he gets throughf ? :t: 2': :': Officer: liSir, you must accompany me?, Drunken Banjoist: ilAllri, what are you gonna shingiw Tennis OFFICERS MARGARET WHITE ............................................. President ADELE FIEGER ............................................... Vice-Prcsident VIRGINIA L. BROERING .............................. Secretary JANET CLOSTERMAN .. .. .. .4 ....... Treasure: Home Tsaas N nRocxmarr 35" 92K i NGr omoRTvM m. A n'mwifwm ' ' 3:3 A RT m "Fry; '5; t we WY ' Baaiw h; t: Ramm m 3 C M ., M, A m Nimm. mgamgm ' , ,Mfmm ,ngxm Yasuowawzxtrs Camps - I f55frrtf'T1y-i :f-ZHT: xfr': :2: 7X 1f?7.x:fi"i r"::X-:r477fry:-:VTX"1Tif-Xi:ZY - A iQiikf: 1.x , f C L" fr '7' ' V 7'77 -:- JOKES -:- I'Raatus, Ah hear yoi got a bear what's cross-eyed. What yoi call him? I'Well, Ah call him IGladlyI after that bear in the hymn? "What hymn is thatiw HYou know, IGladly my cross-eyed bean." :14 :k 3.4 $5 Baer Rabbit: IiWhatis Willie Skunk so downhearted aboutiw Uncle Wigley: iiHis father cut him off with a scent? Graduate engineer applying for a job: IiAnd how much do yOu payiw Boss: 2IOh, whatever you are worth? Engineer: iISorry, brother, I donlt work that cheap? Unemployed: lLady, can I cut your grass for my dinneeriw Kind Old Lady: siMy good man, you neednit cut it. You can eat it just as it is? i: 9k i1 3'5 Burn tasking for something to eatl: 6IBe- Iieve it or not, Lady, I ain't seen a piece of meat for three weeks? Kind Lady: IlBudget, show this gentleman a pork chop? Freshman: IIYOU know last year the doctor told me that if I diant stop studying I would he feebleminded? , Sophomore: "Why didnit you stopiw 5?. 5i: 3': $ RIGHT AT HOME HDo your neighbors borrow much from you?I ilBorrow? Why, I feel more at home in their houses than I do in my own? it ,3 $ at WHATIS THE U513 Diner twith very undone steakl: nI said well-done, waiter. Well-done? Waiter: HOh, thank you, sir, thank you very much. Itis seldom we get a word of praise in this place? OVER THEM ALL "How are you getting on with your job, Bill? nFine, Iive got five men workingr under me now? "Reallyiw llYes, I work upstairs." A GREAT HELP IILet me tell you, young man, Ilve forgotten more than youill ever know." IIDid you ever try tying a knot in your handkerchief? Many a girl will knot her brow who wouldnlt darn a stocking. 3!: :5: :4: $1 WANTEDaGirls to sew buttons on the fourth floor. Mr. Cobb: IIWhat is lightningTI P. Day: IlFoul air being burned up? :l: 3k :I: :2: uNot a bad looking car you have there, Mason. WhatsI the most you ever got out of itiw sISix times in one mile? Teacher: III will have to give you zero this semester? C. Gubser: IlWell, that means nothing in my young life?, . uIs this dance formal or can I wear my own clotheslw uHelp your wifeji says a domestic expert. HWhen she sweeps the pavement sweep up the pavement with her? I $ $ $ $ llink: llDid you know there was a baby born next door to us half human and half animaliw Dink: "Well, for goodness sake? Hink: "Yes, it had a dear head and feet? -:- JOKES Johnny: iiLaugh and the class laughs with you. Teacher: ttBut you stay after school alone? An agricultural expert says that potatoes are better when they havenit too many eyes. Teachers might add that pupils are better when they havenit too much tongue. $ :1 :t: :5 Opal: HW'hat can you do for insomniaTi Ann: itGet a lot of sleep? Senior: HThis horse was scratched in the last race? Freshie: iiWas he hurt very bad? Sitting on a tack is the sign of an early spring. Miss Harrison: tilt took seven sittings? Pupil: tiYou mean youive been having your portrait paintediw Miss Harrison: tiNo; Iive been learning to skate? Opal: iiDid you get a check from that pub- lisher youive been sending your poems to?,, Caroline: ttYes, a check in the shape of ,7, a card saying, iGive us a rest. English Teacher: ttWhat occasions Hamlets uncle, the King, to drink a rouseiw Bright Pupil: itMaybe he was thirsty? 2! :3 i?- :5: Psychology Teacher: tgAccording to the IQ how bright are youiw Gordy: ttSixty watts? Teacher: HWhat lesson do we learn from the busy beeiw 9, Pupil: gNot to get stung. i'Lifeis just a bowl of green persimmons," groaned the discouraged sister. itWhath the matter. de.:rie?" asked her chum. She said, tiOh, Iive used Ipana toothpaste, Listerine gargles, and Lifebuoy soap, and still Iim not popular." Tm: UNDERTAKEWS ASSISTANTS The man who lit a match to see if the gas tank was empty. The littie girl who would play with matches. The lady that just had to go to the bargain sale. The man who didnit believe in signs ttraHie signst. The boy who didnit know it was Toaded. The man who used wood-alcohol for his cock- A tail. Teacher: itBob, who was the first man?" Bob: tiGeorae Washinatonf D D Teacher: SWWhy, Bob, you should know bet- ter than that. It was Adam? Bob: siAw, I wasnit counting foreigners." June: ttI donit know whafis the matter with me lately, 17m always thinking of myseiffi Sis: iiOh, you should stop worrying over trifiesfi Mother: itStop using such terrible language, Ruth? Ruth: HShakespeare uses it? Mother: iiThen donit play with him. Heis no fit companion for you? CAN YOU IMAGINE? Tom Reis being a c13ench warmer? Harry Mumma singing jazz. Ninona Miller being a vamp. Virginia Purcell not being Whrilledf, Carolyn Estes reading Ballyh00f, Charles Shumsky eating ham. Tony La Fata speaking German. Clifford Zimmerman not going over big with the girls Marg White being a wall-Hower. Doug Brown having a Peps0dent GriN, instead of his Wpana Smile." Ann Peck being a small measure. Nell Fleming using anything but Palmolive soap. Gordon Walz 6 striking out? Mose Howe being a light-weight. Clayton Lepper losing a race. Class Calendar 193215 Sptember GeSchool begins. Boy, are we glad! Students resolve to study hard. September 9h-First week of school over. September 13$Seni0r B Class organized and elected Charles Gillett president. September 14--Meeting 0f the Newporter Staff. tSeV- era! Seniors were given positions on the staffgb September 15 Football passes on sale. September 16-Fist Senior A meeting. First night football game. Our boys defeated Davton 30 t0 0. Nice work, boys. September 17eFiredrill with the usual noise and confusion. Boy, if it were a real flre. September ZOeInitiation 0f Freshmen Girls into the C. A. A. Oh, those alarm clocks. September 21eCheer leaders selected. g4Letvs give a big locomotive, everybody? Glee Club enrollment. I Senior A election of ofhcers. September 22eG. R. Party. First orchestra practice. Boys, Gym registration. September 23eR00ters Club organizes. Rah! Rah! The Wildcats defeated Catlettsburg in the second game of the season. Score 34-0. Keep up the good work, boys. September 26-First meeting of the Glee Club held. Oh, the yodeling! F irst issue of the Newporter came out. September 27sSeni0r B meeting. September 28eSenior A meeting, but nothing unusual. September BOaSenior A picture show at the Hipp. It was a huge success. Thanks to all the students of this school and the grade schools. The Annual Staff was selected today accord- ing to their capability to do the work assigned them. Night football game with Bellevue. October 4-G. A. A. supper hike. Oh, well, things like this do happen. Senior B meeting. The class pins were selected. October 5-Fire Prevention week. t'Let,s hope that everyone Observes this week in the proper mannerJ G. A. A. Skating Party. Plenty of humps. October PJunior B meeting. October 7eFirst Assembly of the year. Football boys journeyed to Toledo. We were defeated by the Toledo-Waite by score of 55-0. Better luck next time. X w! . ' 4 WK? 7 , x .2 S x, 5 -. October lOeSenior A and B Annual Staff meeting to select the photographer for Annual pictures. Senior A Candy Sale. tDoctor wasn,t neededJ October IZwAh, report cards. Some students carried home the national colors. tWhite card and red and blue inkJ October 13-Band practice. October 14r-Senior A meeting to discuss plans for the Skating Party. Also Senior B meeting to select pins. Falmouth defeated by Wildcats by 75 t0 0. October 15-Gt R. breakfast hike, and what a day in their young lives. October l7eG. R. Ring Tea. Very impressive. October 19-eSenior A Skating Party. More faces! More fun. October 21-Senior Bis hiked to Lover,s Leap. tMore heels lostJ October 22-F00tball game with Highlands and as usual, we defeated them with a score of 34-0. October 24?Senior A Hallowe,en Party. What a success! tBest the gym has ever seenJ And the crowd and decorations! Thanks! October ZFGlee Club practice. October 27elntra-Mural :hockey teams chosen in the G. A. A. What will these girls do next? October 28eHere,s another holiday for us, for the teachers, convention. Oh, well, we don,t mind staying out of school for a day or so. Again our team marches home triumphantly, for they downed Erlanger 32-0. October 3JeHallowelen. OH! OH! OH! OH! tThe Goblins will get you if you donit watch outJ Newporter came out. November IeSenior B meeting. Girl Reserves meeting. November 2-The Orchestra and Glee Club gave a performance at the High- lands High School in return for a program given at one of our assemblies. Re- member the bus ride? November 3eThe G. A. A. began hockey games at the East End Field. So far they have made a good showing. November 4?Today we played Ludlow and sent them home defeated by 13-0. Not as large a score as usual, but it was a defeat anyway. November 8--Election Day. Half-holiday. November 9eJunior A Treasure Hunt. What fun. Group pictures were made for the Latin Clubs, G. R., Commercial Club, Band, Orchestra and Football Teams. November lOeGirl Reserve Service Day. Our hard working gals. G. A. A. Treasure Hunt and such fun and treaSUre. Commercial Club hike and it would be raining. . November lleArmistice Day. A holiday and peace - Rah! Rah! November IFWell, instead of iiBlue Mondayl, it is iiBlue Wednesday, Report Card day at N. H. S. November 17-Glee Club Concert given in the auditorium. ;B A' , ,oiw ' z . A , , AN .3 y t 47 A- 'l X 3 'if V! O I w t Vt v, 1,: E 1., A1 f'i I'l'u'l - t y, u: 1.. ' .t, 2' I ;,' 1, l 9 I l; v: 'I l v A 7" 4, .r v 0 I .1, t . 00- w- .twtil I November l9eThe Wildcats met lhe llorwinod 1in s in a game of football. November 21-Seni0r A pivtures for the Annual taken this week. November 22 Football banquet. and how those boys can eat. Aheml Combined Senior A and B meeting. Chose a different ring. November 24e'1hanksgiving Day. Anothcr holiday and were there tears Shed? Hill say notU November 30e-eSeni0r A pop com ball sale in the lunch room. More fun to see the girls, wallowing through that nice sticky molasses and a lot of student sup- port. And howl. December 1-Juni0r B hike. Oodles 0f weeners and burnt fingers. - December 2-Seni0r 13 picture show. Kittens de- f feated UniVersity bchool there, by a score of 29-20. December YeBasketball passes on sale and are they WA going like hot cakes. December 9eMr. Guest, a magician, put on the magic at assembly today, and we defeated Corinth t0- ni'ght with the good 'news, 81-19. December 15 h Wow! Newport Faculty played Highlands, Faculty tonight. What a game. But our boys are no snails, and so beat them 22-18. Also, Jr. B75 had a sledding party but, fer some reason, the sleds wouldn,t stay under them. December 16 - Defeated Bellevue in basketball. Score, 30-20. We have some team this year. December 20e5anta brought lolly pops t0 the G. R. Xmas, Party today. We defeated anltmfs team here to the words 0f 34 26. December 21hGee, the G. A. A. gave a dance in the gym and did we have the fun, though? You said it. And those Seniors, or0t sweet again, and had a candy sale. Oh, well, girls will be girls. Ah, the sad part of today- -rep0rts. December 22eLast Senior A mseting in 1932. iO-ur President encouraged the writers of the class will, song, prophecy, roast, etc., to try to have their work finished after the Xmas holidays. December 23-Oh, boy! Last day Of school 7til January 3, 1933. Are we. sorry? UM Hu Hu? Had a big assembly, and our new dance orchestra made its initial appearance. January 6eKittens defeated Oakaod 31-144, and Wildcats defeated Norwood 4-8-28. January 9hSenior A girls selected flowers for graduationeand of all the dis- cussion previous to this! January lleToday tells the tale of exemptions for Senior A13. Most of us get out of the exams-I hope. January l2eSenior A Exams start today and end tomorrow. Herets hopini we get through. January 2? -- Baccalaureate Service of Graduating Class of 1932;3 at Newport High School. January ZBaClass Night exercises for the Class of "3234 and wars it clever. Three cheers for the Class of ,32V3. January 25 Graduation a day when the graduates bid farewell to the dear old Newport Hi. January 27-liegistration for students at Newport Hi. January 28eBasketball game with Hazard tState Champsl. We bet the State Champs felt blue When Newport finished. January 30 e Students put their shoulders to the whsel and start studying. Welcome, Mr. Eckerle, to the far-tulty of Newport High. Hope you like your work wilh us, January BleBasketball game with Walton. What February BeeBasketball game with Ludlow. February 7vBasketball game with Bellevue. February lOe-Basketball game with Dayton. February l4eValentine,s Day. From the actions of some of our students, Cupid made good use of his arrowe-Or maybe it is spring? February 20:Girl Reserve iiPot Lturk Supper? tMostly luck-if there was anything to eatl Senior A Hop, with the Newport High Jazz Orchestra making their first appearance. February Zl-Basketball game with Ludlow. February 22-Holiday. tEveryone CllfpS down a cherry tree in memory of George Washington! February ZSeNeWport High School lt st one of their best and dearest teachers through the death of Miss Hettie Ermert. l'ler cheerful nature and witty remarks will he missed by all the students. February 24yBasketball game with Stivers. Oh; that German center! tMartha, don,t you wish Ernie could play basketlialliN March QwDistrict basketball tournament at Bellevue. March 3 District basketball tournament with Newport vs. Bellevue. March 6-Welcome, Mr. Hotz. We are glad to have you as one of the faculty of Newport High. Hope you will like your work with us. March Mlust another red letter day. A regular five weeks occurrence. Re- port day and ..... well! Newport-Erlanger debate. March 9-Regional tournament begins - - - Newport. March 13-G. A. A. Hike. Wonder if it really was? March l4-eGirl Reserve bake sale. Coed? Bakers. March 20wDebate with Highlands. March 21,-No - -we don,t get a holidrv. liut it is the hrst day of spring. So watch out. hovs. iiln the spring a young manis fancy lightly turns to thoughts of love ,i Girl Reserve Hike. I ,t ' 1' U? , w Hfjhmtiy ' in at '1; ll p ' Ill Wilt tI " V ,, 1 March 2274K basketball circus which was a game between Newport and High- lands faculty. They sure taught the boys a few tricks. March BlWDebate, Music, and Oratory contests at Highlands ended. April 1-April Fools Day. Sure, itas a holiday. Saturday. April SWCreative Writers Club. Wonder what they will write tFairy Tales, maybel. April 7-Seni0r A picture show. It was one of those dog pictures--a howling success. April 12-Report cards. Many hearts are fluttering and we are feeling sorry for ourselves because-Nuf Said. Aprilt 14WGood Friday. tStrange as it seems, we get a holidayJ April 17e-H0me Coming Dance given by P. T. A. in our gym for the present students and alumni of N. H. S. tStrange faces were seen theregi tOh, maybe we didn,t know our former graduatesJ Well, anyway, it was a real success. Here,s hoping they give one every year. April 21-23-One of those rare occasions. Two days off because of the K. E. A. Convention at Louisville. April 27$tWhat are you doing, Henrietta-Trying to absorb knowledge? Well, we thought so when we saw your Problem of Democracy book on your head dur- ing lunch todayJ May 1:Why are all the Seniors grinning? Sh! Sh! don,t tell anyone. The proofs of their pictures are here and well-you know the rest. May IZWJu-Se Prmo. Three cheers for the Junior classes and their advisers, for it was sure clever and a real success. May 17WReport cards out again. AndWOh, well, we,re used to that by now. May ISWNeWport High Moonlight-And Oh, What a Night! May 26WMusicaI Comedy, htSonia:7 given by the Newport High School Glee Club. tIt was a real successJ June 9--Exams. N0 dates now, kids. We gotta study. Senior Class Play entitled ttThe Charm School? under the direction of Miss Parsons. It sure was a success. , of 1933. June IZ-e-Class Night Exercises. tCIever, these Seniors! June 14WGraduation. And the high school days of the Class of 133 are over. ?ZW XW June IIWBaccaIaureate Services for graduating class E W -1- 3.; ALUMNI NEWS CLASS of 1932 Howard Enslen .............................................. Enslen,s Meat Market, Newport Adelaide Gray ................................................ Eastern Kentucky State Teachers College Edward Gutfruend ........................................ Xavier University Elizabeth Marz .............................................. Eastern Kentucky State Teachers College William Huck ................................................ Xavier University Helen Nuckols ................................................ Sullen College, West Virginia Marguerite Bohn ............................................ Western 81 Southern Life Insurance Co. Fred Knapp .................................................... University of Cincinnati James Myers .................................................. University of Kentucky Marguerite Goodfriend ................................ University of Kentucky Charlotte Wickliffe ........................................ University of Kentucky John Schwertman .......................................... University of Cincinnati Alfred Dorenbush ......... . ................................ University of Cincinnati Anthony Zechella ......................................... University of Cincinnati Dorothy Poate ................................................ National Underwriters Lottie Settler .................................................. Jobbers, Outlet Louise Daniels ................. . ............................ Newbury,s Store Charles Heckel .............................................. University of Cincinnati Richard Krauss .............................................. University of Cincinnati Edmond Hesser .............................................. Post Graduate Course, Newport, Clinton Weber ................................................ University of Cincinnati Helen Wilson ................................................ Woolworthk Five and Ten Virginia Spraul ....................................... ' ..... M arried Juanita Jarvis ................................................ Union College, Barberville Christian Seifried .......................................... Newport Printing Office CLASS of 1931 yz Helen Gross ................................................... Wittenbury College Eileen Walker ................................................ Krogefs Comptometer Jane Keslar .................................................... Dollar Store, Newport George Osler .................................................. University of Cincinnati CLASS of 1931 Robert Glier .................................................. Yung7s Meat Shop William Messmer .......................................... Otterbein College Virginia Quinby ............................................ Married Grace Rothe ............ . ....................................... Nurse at Bethesda Hospital Helen Otting .................................................. University of Cincinnati Anne Grigg .................................................... University of Cincinnati CLASS of 193m Robert Arnzen ............................................... Enquirer Offlce, Newport, Ky. Bertha Kuschill ............................................. Teacher - Newport CLASS of 193 Grace Hoffman ............................................. Procter 8; Gamble Co. Jeannette Humphrey ...................................... Married Joseph Bohlinger .......................................... Transylvania University Ruth Mae Braun ........................................... University of Cincinnati Anna Capek ................................................... Married Ruth Davies .................................................. University of Cincinnati Fred Dye. ..................................................... University of Kentucky Charlotte Weber ........................................... Teacher - Newport William Gainer .............................................. Klein 81 Kramer, Battery Distributors Anna Fay Lorenzen ..................................... Married Elizabeth McLane ......................................... Married Mac Hoffman ............................................... University of Cincinnati Stuart Cohen ................................................. Graduate Student, University of Cincinnati CLASS 0f 1929y2 Sara Craig ..................................................... Central Savings Bank, Newport Ada Mae Beard .............................................. Married Virginia Butram ........................................... Married Alma Berninger ............................................ Nurse at Bethesda Hospital Valla Young .................................................. Western Kentucky State Teachers, College Richard Greenholz ........................................ Procter 81 Gamble Co. Ervin Fieger .................................................. Wilmington College CLASS of 1929 Elsie Mae Bathiany ...................................... University of Cincinnati Mary Jane Braxton ........................................ Teacher - Newport Mary Lee Jones ............................................. Married Mildred Kruse .................... . ........................... Married Richard Nciser .............................................. University of Kentucky Roy Marz ....................................................... University of Cincinnati Martin Wagner .......................... 1; ................. University of Michigan Pauline Hewling ............................................ Married Ella Mae Schrode ......................................... Nurse at St. Joseph Infirmary, Louisville Howard Thompson ........................................ Coca-Cola C0., Cincinnati CLASS of 192m Howard Kreuter ............................................ University of Kentucky Jessie Stemler ................................................ Married William Peck ................................................ Procter 8; Gamble C0., California Carl Hoffman ................................................ University of Cincinnati William Ware ................................................ Netherland Plaza Hotel CLASS of 1927 Rudolph Enslen ......................................... Enslefs Meat Market Oscar Rummell . .................................... Rummellos Grocery Store Virginia Martin .......................................... Public School Music Supervisor, Newport Martha Davies .......................................... Teacher - Newport Vera Mae Kettenacker ................................. Married Marian Heckel.... ....................................... Teacher - Newport Emma Ruth Day. ...................................... Teacher - Newport CLASS of 192m Loretta Evans .............................................. Western 81 Southern Life Insurance Co. Mentor Graves .............................................. American National Bank, Newport Naomi Reed .................................................... Teacher - Newport Howard Gosney ..................... . ................... VVest-Side Savings Bank Thelma Shannon .......................................... Western 84 Southern Life Insurance Co. CLASS of. 1926 Louis Arnzen ................................................. Manager of Enquirer OHice, Newport Virginia Ebert ................................................ Physical Education Teacher - Girls Coach, Newport Mary C. Broering ......................................... J. B. Ford Sales Co. CLASS of 1925 V? William Glier ............................................... Yung7s Meat Markel Alma Lepper .................................................. Married CLASS of 1925 Elizabeth Williams ........................................ Married Lewis Williams .......:...ASS,t Cashier American Nat. Bank, Newp,t V M HJ M. . . 4 JX J , ' N1 fylv5 xlilll 1 . T ,x .35 7 2:;3342 ;:,f1ii::1"::ugi: AI-.,;,EL;::T;Xf:::f;:X 1' WT-ATYT 174T T1;?K$: F J5 y; T f .9?- i . at ca T .dj 3i: J; W I T -x .u A 1 . W H ' $523. $19 3 ' Xv?! S a. 4 .N. . f . 1, . Is . .. 4 rxvy? .. 7D K w . 5r khmhr ME R ?ggwREmi TIFFANYTONE PORTRAIT S are memories made permanent 12' 1 fl w': Pfxfuillwk' , 73,11 '1? Your Photographer YOUN G 81 CARL 75AM G RAFTS ENGRAVI NG GD. f Superior Printing, Plates- Pepfeotion ofDep th and Cblor PArkway 0268- -9 705- ll Sycamore St. lrI-In-I-I-n-uu- . Since 1891 producers 01' HIGH GRADE IRON and STEEL SHEETS The Newport Rolling, Mill Company NEWPORT, KENTUCKY Congratulations and Good Luck ,to the Classes of 193215 and 1933 11. EILERMAN 8: SONS CO; 818 - 820 Monmouth Street Newport, Ky. MEN9S WEAR. . . Everything from hats and collars to socks and garters . . with all that goes be- tween and underneath. FENBERS 8: ROSING 826 Monmouth Street Newport, Ky. 405 St. Paul Building THE LEHIGH CONSTRUCTION CO. Incorporated GENERAL CONTRACTORS Phone SOuth 4198 Newport National Bank Building NEWPORT, KY. - Cincinnati, 0. NEWPORTS FAVORITE THEATRE Its THRIFTY Today To B uy -QUALITY- Louis MARX 81 Bros. 840 Monmouth Street LEE B. KESLAR tMember Class of 19140 For County Tax Commissioner LOWE 8K CAMPBELL C0mpliments 0f ATHLETIC GOODS COMPANY N ewport Junior and Senior High School 705 Main St, Cincinnati, 0. Parent-Teachers, lee House That Service Builw Association FRED W. LAMPE President ............................... Mrs. Peper Kentucky Representative iVice-President ....................... Mrs. Glier Second Vice-President ... Mrs. Maybury 9'.- K- 96 '1" Secretary .......................... Mrs. Domhoff Phones: PArkway 5957 - 5958 Treasurer ........................ Mrs. Williams U. S. Government Inspected Est. N0. 165 The AMERICAN BECKER BROS. NATIONAL BANK COMPANY MEMBER FEDERAL A RESERVE SYSTEM Incorporated '2': Choice Meats : , ,; .$;'. m. Interest Paid 0n Savings Accounts ,w"19453:1f1m:iuf : 1'7 141M? SAUSAGE MANUFACTURERS , W; 1 OPEN SATURDAY NIGHT H otels and Restaurants Supplied Fourth and York Streets Newport, Ky. NEWPORT CINCINNATI OLDEST BANK IN CAMPBELL COUNTY ECONOMY MEAT MARKET FRANK TRIK, Prop. 637 Monmouth Street, NEWPORT Corner Ward and Center BELLEVUE Courteous Meat Cutters at Your Service S H O E REBUILDING TRY T OM75 SHOE SHOP Work That Satisfies 714 MONMOUTH STREET SOuth 3950 We Call and Deliver Free of Charge. We Also Use Outsanding Quality of Materials on All Work. Absolutely Guaranteed. First-Class Workmanship. Service While You Wait. SHINE PARLOR for Ladies and Gents. First-Class Waiting Room. YOU NO TOM FLOWERS . . .. FOR EVERY UCCASION Your Florist VICTOR H. BROWN -X- -X' ?f 9'.- We Deliver Anywhere . . We Telegraph Anywhere J- 9f- 99 i6 SOuth 4255 803 Monmouth St. N ewport Compliments of DIXIE CLOTHIERS '7: 'X- 96 9t- Outiitters t0 Men and Boys 809 Monmouth Street NEWPORT 538 Madison Avenue COVINGTON, KY. Compliments of Richard W. Phillips Candidate for CIRCUIT COURT CLERK HARRY F. SCHAEPER SUSANNE GRILLE PLATE LUNCHES Compliments of SANDWICHES SHORT ORDERS A FRIEND 624 Monmouth Street Newport PHONE S. 3611 '1 511-513 YORK 51'. N EWPORT, KY w 32 '4. .wa 5541:1111 .. FRED SANFTLEBEN Compliments of gark-A-TV a Barber Sho The Girls Athletic P Association 35 E. Eighth Street Newport NEWPORT HIGH SCHOOL 3 v u u .1 , r . A 6 . z A g. BWmHy -. Compliments of JOHN GREENBLATT Clyde E. Wallingford 646 Monmouth Street Compliments of FRED A. ERSCHELL and SON Funeral Directors Greetings . . . . T0 the Classes of 1932V2 and 1933 You are entering the world of business at a time of great opportunity. Good luck to you. The W. J. BAKER CO. Newport, Kentucky Manufacturers of FLY SCREENS WEATHERSTRIPS - TOYS Lee Hallerman Ethan Allen Clarence L. Lavery Boyd B. Chambers The CINCINNATI ATHLETIC GOODS COMPANY ii- i? 91- a1: 66Everything for the Athlete79 -X- 9!- -X- 9? 641 MAIN STREET CINCINNATI, OHIO PHONES CHERRY 46768 - 4769 ACME SCHOOL SUPPLY CO. 102 WEST SECOND STREET CINCINNATI, OHIO Specialize in SUPPLIES and EQUIPMENT ..f0r... CHURCHES, KINDERGARTENS, and SCHOOLS Compliments of GREULES Prescription Pharmzwy Cor. Fourth and Overton SOuth 0360 Newport, Ky. Compliments of Arthur Depenbrock THE W. H. JONES PAINT CO. 622 Monmouth Street' Newport, Ky. For QUALITY LAUNDRY SERVICE Phone THE ATLAS LAUNDRY COMPANY SOuth 1747 508 Monmouth Street GEO. B. MOOCK. MGR. Perfectly Pasteurized Dairy Products 324 E. Fqurth Street Newport IT PAYS TO INSURE Established 1884' , INSURANCE IHARTON' :CO. 35 E. Fourth Street Phone SOuth 0456 Newport Compliments of GRAU FRUIT CO. P. BARDO, Mgr. 639 Monmouth Street Phone SOuth 3691 Newport BUY A LOT and build your own home in Beautiful Blue Grass Subdivision, Southgate, Ky. Ten Minutes to Dixie Terminal Come out and see a Subdivision where Lots are being Sold and Houses Bullt. EWTHING IN P. E. Buchert, Agent 724 Monmouth Street Newport, Ky. 7 l W . f g xixegxwig DR. H. B. ITKOFF OPTOMETRIST Eyes Examined - Glassed Fitted Phone SOuth 5329 With MONMOUTH JEWELRY C0. 719 Monmouth St, Newport I THANK YOU For Your Patronage In the Past and WISH YOU SUCCESS In the Future PHISTER9S 708 Monmouth 'Street Newport BRANDTaS Newportys Place To Shop 85 Years Of Service NINTH and MONMOUTH . The NEWPORT NATIONAL BANK 810 Monmouth Street Newport, Ky. Member of Federal Reserve Banking S ystem egasm , 3,, em, 11" :4, H I'- :1 ' I WV WHEN YOU THINK WALL PAPER THINK STEITZ Seventh and Monmouth Streets Newport, Ky. Compliments Of x . The DeHAVEN ICE CREAM CO. Compliments of T he Commercial 2 Club Newport High School The JOHN J. RADEL CO. Funeral Homes 2+ 2+ 2+ Newport, Ky. Cincinnati, 0. .-'d-'.-v . - "yawn. "Prim JC. 4 l AWu I 4 OT ., V :Mtflff'g I.'u,u ! v ' I 51 ' 1! 4, ,5: I ' ' . , I , ,, '- nl 1. . u , H ' w t I 1f , r , I75, rt'l , , ll." , ,wq, . . 1,90 :nuhm Loki 1- .. ' ' I ; .,121" I, ml, u , ., "5 .',",:"' ., a :,;r , I I f V, Lulpmwf , 7,5: '1' LI' ""WIffdh'u' 4,1 ' 3411:5412: J .r,,; iv 4 " ll . r "M "Hmm i Il' II yIr5' h. ' I '5 :115. Mn, T". .,., , 5. . Fir," RSRNV . i :3le- NH? Wfa'nf $4. n, w ' t? '31. ff! mgla i .- . 7W 1: ,w Milk? xiw


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Newport High School - Newportian Yearbook (Newport, KY) online yearbook collection, 1925 Edition, Page 1

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Newport High School - Newportian Yearbook (Newport, KY) online yearbook collection, 1931 Edition, Page 1

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Newport High School - Newportian Yearbook (Newport, KY) online yearbook collection, 1936 Edition, Page 1

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Newport High School - Newportian Yearbook (Newport, KY) online yearbook collection, 1937 Edition, Page 1

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Newport High School - Newportian Yearbook (Newport, KY) online yearbook collection, 1940 Edition, Page 1

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