Newburgh Free Academy - Graduate Yearbook (Newburgh, NY)

 - Class of 1890

Page 1 of 106

 

Newburgh Free Academy - Graduate Yearbook (Newburgh, NY) online yearbook collection, 1890 Edition, Cover
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Text from Pages 1 - 106 of the 1890 volume:

v r x 1. NEWBURGI-I FREE ACADEMY ' NEWBURGH, N Y 56 2 3? SENICJR CLASS. 1890. 'FFF ' " 1 .J J . To Our' faitl2ful Principal, who by his lfind- ness and good-will lias endeared lzimself to all the Academy pupils, tlzis booli is respectfully dedicated by ' . THE' EDlTORS. ,fi Q- if .-2? A2 IX LENMQAL R E J. H. DIMMICK, Editor FRED NOE, JOHN J. DALY, A. W. SENIOR, V --i-45?e- U G Q? ,Dari Of? iisxvsa -inAChief IENNIE GRAHAM ALICE HAHN, MAY Y. CLARK. aw-- r Defiising Qsmmiiigea FRED NOE, HUGH HAGAN, .YQQLMS Q,- JOHN RECK f? TS? 1 1:1 J H fflwb N N ' , W In every work reqarcl tne u1riter'5 end, Since none ean qompass more than tney intend Rnd if the mean3 -be just, the eoncluot true, Applause, in 5pite of trivial faults, is due." Hmmm .- ,, Fri' - W 11 -X - 0aan. y-5:23 , gpowfiisizzlbeglfz ' 5 F1 "Rf sz? 1 A. S ' Eg 3511, 'V ?enmMfig??f50o'75?2: - QQ," ,,e6nlfL U' Q A ...L .gf -4- Q eng. f-.-,,x,A Y Y - Y A ,.,,,X,,-X.,-,,K:,N:f-X, -f-X., f-,,-.., -,-x..-v-,- Y- 1igQ : O us the year 1890 is memorable, not only as the time of our graduation, but also for the accomplishment of our first literary attempt. The present volume is the first that has been published by a class at the Academy. Our efforts might have been presented in better form had we possessed the requisite time and material. As it is we present our little book, hoping your criticism will not be severe, knowing, as you do, we are as yet but novices in the literary line. Our book is not by any means perfect. We have only started the literary movement. Our aim is to lay the foundation for future Academy publications that will be a credit to the school, and at the same time in- crease the loyalty of the students for their Alma Mater. we present to you a record of the alumni, hoping it may be of inter- est to some of the graduates. By its perusal one can see that the Acad- emy has turned out ,not the worst of men. Many of the graduates have won fame and position in both the professional and mercantile worlds, many have but just commenced the struggle for existence, while a few have gone to join the great majority. Our publication does not contain a record of splendid athletic achieve- ments. True, for their class, we have many excellent athletes, but 1n contests with adjacent wllegey they have to contend against the immense handicap of age and lack of experience. During the last few years there has been a decided improvement in the school. We have a number of regularly organized societies, athletic, social and musical, which have done much to improve their members and increase. the feeling of good fellowship. is Est quodam prodire tenus si non datur ultra." EDITORS. 75.-. .0 E ,dp 96.2281 Qjf diZGQl5iQZZa Q9f??,9?Ek8f?S'i?4f ' Ezefzefi. Term Exjz DAVID A. SCOTT .... 1887 1891 JAMES HASTINGS .... ....1887 1891 M. C. BELKNAP ...... .... 1 888 1892 WILLIAM S. WANDS ,............... 1888 1892 CHARLES N. WOOLLEY, M. D. .... . . 1889 WILLIAM HARRISON .......... .... J. L. WESTERVELT ..... .... I S90 JOHN H. VALENTINE .... . . ..189o Q Q..L.. 5 . 9 QM, , ffieefse 1889 ........ 1393 1895 1894 1894 PRESIDENT ...... .... M . C. BELKNAP. VICE-PRESIDENT ............... WILLIAM HARRISON. CLERK AND SUPERINTENDENT .. .R. V. K. MONTFCRT. LIBRARIAN ............ ........ C HARLES ESTABROGK. ASSISTANT LIBRARIAN ..... .. .LILLIE O. ESTABROOK. 4' " . . . .THOMAS HAWTHORN. ...5.. ef leg.. LQQQ53..-. JAMES M. CRANE, VPRINCIPAL, Instructor in Higher Mathematics. EUGENE W. HARTER, A. B., Instructor in Latin, Greek and French. HENRY N. PEARCE, A. B.j'f Instructor in Chemistry, Philosophy and Mathematics . MISSDORA M. TOWNSEND, Instructor in Higher English, History, Botany and Civil Government MISS AGNES MCFADDEN, Instructor in Algebra, Physiology and History. MISS IDA C. LEROY, Instructor in Industrial Drawing and Arithmetic. X, WILLIAM I. WOODS, B. S., Instructor in Manual Training. SYLVESTER W. HOLDREDGE, Instructor in Music. Resigned. . , -.-. 4 4 kiwi' ' Y X. , ,, . H 'lg ,nl , nv.. -1 -Q? Maya. 1 X -H W- 4 4- 'A Ay, ,ff -vi! . ,, .Mm 4 1' ff -4 .W ' i ' Z' 46. .5 .1 . , ! . . . -4-x f L51 ff. - gytqwgf 4- ,. . 4 - 1 4 ,5- 4 '4 ,:f:. V 'Q U . 'I S ' " Y 4Q5?4i-iffy, WA, 44' - W 4 -, -. ---- Se' 'fd .-" ,J',if.,11-' ,?S?'b"T'Jf?gj"g5' ' . - 4 fl f f 4- 5 .26 -'WP "EH Q. -ft' " " fx, , 'f " W 4. 4' s T if '2L"4k'z,'4',2-fi' '2S"Y:aK4 . - A ff'?'a ,x,., AxA,,14.4...x,., 17 f- . 2 , .. .Y-X H 4- . afivmyifdafh I-,4 ' as:-N i:f2'Z4?fff 4:1,,- -Y fmisif. ,jg - x f ,:-4W"Sw .-- sf aw . 152641 A ni, 35.2 R- 4 W' :eg ,- 2 'Q 'S'-if -4 , We ,T-.. Q, NSFWX ni uf , 2 b4 3'g Q 4' 'shag-XQ1 X f if if 'n A 4? -:fa ,Vf 4. f' - N35-9 NH' , , f.-,V . , 4 .n..-'ww -1121-fb: fnwrf.-r, 4. W. ,r 1- 4-Frm - ,--.wid ,iff P . 9 f . - ', 4' A . fa ? f-V! 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'12, 1- ',V,.,Y ,'fb'v' -2-W., rQs:x2?Euizffus'-m:y5u'Ri :LL llgi .--f M' 44. ..- ,Q 'S --- 1 ' - hx, 1 - '14 4 fd, 2221 4 -9 - :1 fflfzr - l.J-F-1 .-eg, L , ?f3J - - 4 . 242. 4 ' 'Y H 21--f,-f, 2 V i ' 4 ,L 4 f in '--wh ESF? ' "W ' gf 1 4 '-M2142-4 -wk! 'Tl,l'i"f 24 ' 2 ' A 77" :E ET.-1 Q.--12,0 .f'f- Lg, I ' 75-:P"' f , .7--f Y: - 4 ,. W. ' - .- ' A - 41- 'f 4 X' -4, ,,'.f1, " , uf .nn 'fx S . . - 'Qld 421 .,,,,, 4 , AM ,-. 4 - .4 ,. -- -- ' fl A- Q gwkf- . mt., ,,,4 1: ,, 4- p l, -fy ,fx J . -f ,- ,ffff , .nm - '1,-5. ' ,'- , mv' 7 -- A 4' 'T fKiQ,eMP"' 4u4W?'b- V 222 .Ht '73, 4 4 -f f4 4 - 1. K , : vw h ' A I J, - K A. , ' I f ' 'K 'Q 'N ..fisL'lTQ,:. ."'-i??i-- ' f 'I ' THE NEW ACADEMY. ie ezry----was A hung ele - nee e e ., - This institution may be said to have been founded by the Rev. George H. Spierin and the trustees of the Glebe, jointly, in the year 1790-just a century ago I In an advertisement published by the trustees on the 13th of july, 1790, they state that Mr. Spierin, who had lately settled in Newburgh, " pro- posed opening an Academy for the instruction of youth in the Greek and Latin languages and other branches of literature. A subscription will be started for the building of a convenient house for a Seminary, and in the meantime rooms for the purpose will be provided." ' In 1791 the inhabitants of the town of Newburgh and adjacent par-ts petitioned the Legislature for authority to raise by lottery a sum of money to be expended in erecting a suitable building for an Academy. In this petition they refer to the grant in 1751 of the Glebe tract offive hundred acres for the support of a minister and schoolmaster, and add, that the healthy location of Newburgh and other Well-known natural advantages make it a very eligible spot for a public school. For some reason not known this effort was not successful. In 1795 the trustees again took in hand the matter of erecting a build- ing, and by means of private subscriptions the edifice known as the f'Old Academy," was raised. It was not completed, however, until some years later. This building was sixty feet front by forty feet in depth, two stories high, and built of wood. Its exact cost is not known, but is estimated at Sz,5oo. The carpenter and builder was Aaron Lyons. The people of Newburgh, in their anxiety to secure the then new County of Orange, promised court-room accommodations in the Academy. Besides furnishing accommodations for the courts of the county without 1.9- pay, the room was used by almost every one who wanted it. The Meth- odist Church had a long lease on it, other religious societies used it, and Town meetings and political discussions were held in it. There is only one instance in its history in which any revenue came from these resources. That is in 1802, when Levi Dodge is made debtor t' To rent of ye court- room when let to ye waxwork people A1 4s.'l The Academy remained under the care of the Glebe trustees until 1804, when the inhabitants of the Patent elected nine trustees to take charge of the school. It is not known what caused the change, but it is thought that the General Act of I804 had something to do with the matter. This Act provided for the payment of i200 annually to the Academy. In I806 it was incorporated with the following trustees: Rev. james Scrirngeour, Rev. john Johnston, Daniel Niven, Jonas Story, Daniel Birdsall, Abram Schultz, David Fowler, john McAuley, John Brown, Hugh Spier, Derrick Aminerinan, William Ross and Daniel C. Verplanck. It remained under the care of Trustees till 185 2, when it passed into the hands ofthe Board of Education. The Academy under its old 'management was not, as a whole, a finan- cial success. The High School and Glebe School gave to the people the necessary instruction which their children required in the life they must follow, and the higher branches of the Academy dragged along slowly. N or did its principals or teachers from their salaries acquire real estate or speculate in stocks. Among the most popular teachers until the year I852 were the Halseys, Luther and john T., 1816-243 the Rev. N. S. Prime and his son, Samuel I., the noted theologian, Edgar Perkins, Iohn L. Lyon and the Rev. B. R. Hall. The latter leased the property for ten years and was principal until it came under the management of the Board of Education. The history of the Academy since it came under the control of the lat- ter organization is familiar to many of our town's people. Organized as a senior department it assumed the Academic character it bears to-day. This is mainly due to the fortunate selection of teachers by the'Board, the most prominent of whom are Prof J. W. Doughty and james M. Crane, the present principal. The conviction that a new building must be erected to take the place of the 'C Old Academy " seems to have first assumed form and character in the minds of the Board of Educationiin the year 1880, but it was not HIQ... till 1883 that the Committee on Buildings were instructed to procure pre- liminary plans and estimates for a new building that would provide ac- commodations for both grammar and academic classes. On the 1 ith of August, 1884, Mr. F. A. Wright, of Rossiter 8a Wright, architects, of New York City, was employed to prepare plans and specifications for the present Academy. It is a matter of satisfaction to know that the archi- tect of the N New Academyll was a graduate of the f'Old." The plans were submitted to the Board and adopted july rst, 1885. The contract was awarded to Mr. Thomas Dobbin, a prominent builder of this city, and he agreed to complete the building according to the plans for the sum of 353,933 The total cost of the "New Academy," including all expenses, was over ?p7o,ooo. The question whether this was a wise expenditure can be answered by any one viewing. the present building, but an especially favorable answer is given by us who have ,enjoyed its advantages for the last four years. And, later, when we have grown to manhood and woman- hood, and looking back on the building in which we received our early training for our sphere in life, will we never deny that '4 Our Academy 7' has been a success? 4... Q ,gg 'Q -L, ' ' , 4 I The aiemg QZZ. I Occasionally is heard this question, 4' What has become of the old Academy Bell P" I always endeavor, by a stroke or two, to inform the in- terrogator of the lziglz position that I occupy in the New Academy. I remember when I was exchanged for an old Queen Anne Bell of the Palatines, which had done service for nearly one-hundred years. I have served fifty-seven years already, and the outlook indicates that I will still serve a little while longer. ' I often return in my thoughts to the Old Academy. That building was not one that you would call beautiful, but it was simple and plain. But that quaint old edifice, so dear to the hearts of many, is no more. On its foundation a new Academy has been erected, which, I have heard peo- ple say, is a memorial of the intelligent generosity of the city of Newburgh. I am sure that I was very thankful to be placed at the top of this fine building, for I had some misgivings as to my future when the old build- ing was torn down. I have witnessed many things in my day, some of which have never been and will never be recorded. I watched the scholars of earlier years come and go until Icould almost call them by name. They have all departed to their various occupations, and are 'distinguished by more or less active careers. Many returned from the late war, having achieved honor and glory. But some who enlisted on the side ofthe old flag never returned, and the garlands of victory adorn only their silent rest- ing places. ' .' Proud am I to-day to think that once in obedience to my call came boys and girls who are now men and women nobly filling stations in all ranks of life. Did I not instruct, too? Did I not teach obedience and punctuality P - Through the long Summer vacations' I review the past again and again, and if I muse on the probabilities of the future, it is to wonder what will 1.121 be the destinies of those who have just passed for the last time, as pupils, under the portals of our Alma Mater. I speculate as to the probable number of lawyers, physicians, authors, etc., that will come forth from their ranks and carve for themselves names that shall be synonyms of fame and honor, and as I call to each class for the last time, I always try to say, "' Redeem the time, redeem the timell' QM QW are 713.-. rrlirlurr lrl ill lfhlilltl., The Trustees of the old Newburgh Academy are entitled to the credit of inaugurating the first public library in Newburgh by the purchase of 77 volumes for that purpose, 75 years ago. At a meeting of the Board, held March 3d, 1815, the teacher, Luther Halsey, proposedthe propriety of granting premiums to the scholars and the necessity of procuring a library of useful books for the Academy. Four dollars and fifty cents was appropriated for premiums, and Sroo for books, and Rev. John Johnston, Jonas Storey and Solomon Sleight were appointed a committee to prucure the books. At the next meeting the Rev. john Johnston reported the purchase of 77 volumes. In 1816 335 volumes were purchased, and during the next 35 years 135 more were added, making a total of 547. In 1852 but 418 of these remained, and they were transferred to the Board of Education and formed the foundation of the Newburgh Free Library. fTwo hundred and fifty- one of the books purchased for the Academy in 1815-16 are now in the Newburgh Free Library, and still in good cond.ition.j In 1816 the Newburgh Library Society was incorporated and continued in existence until 1821. There are no records to show what disposition was made of its books. In April, 183 5, the Newburgh Library Associa- tion was organized, and in September, 1847, united with the Mechanics' Library Association, which had been organized in 1838, andin 'I842 had purchased the books belonging to the Young Men's Mutual Improvement Society. N In 1839 tlie first books were purchased for the High School Library and in 1843 the Glebe school Library was commenced. During the thirty years between 1814 and 1844 seven public libraries were instituted in Newburgh, and, after fulfilling their mission, passed away, and the books of six of them ultimately became the property of the Board of Education, and aided in the establishment and growth of the Newburgh Free Li- brary. At a meeting of the Board of Education held Sept. 7th, 1852, on T14-i motion of George W. Kerr, it was resolved that all- the school libraries be consolidated and placed together in the Academy room now in readiness. Nine hundred and twenty-four volumes from the High School, and 737 from the Glebe, were removed to the Academy, and added to the 418 al- ready there. The duplicates were thrown out, a few volumes added by purchase, and the library, with 2,001 volumes, opened to the public, Sat- urday, Nov. 6th, 1852, from 2 to 3 P. M., and at the same hour each suc- ceeding Saturday until Ianuary, 1861. In I86O the number of volumes had increased to nearly 4,o00. More room and better accommodations being needed, a neat library building was erected on the corner of Grand and Campbell Streets, adjoining the High School, and the books were moved from the Academy to this new building. From 1861 to 1865 the library was open on Tuesdays from 7 to 9 P. M. for adult males and young men not connected with the schools, on Thursdays from 1 to 5 P. M. exclusively for ladies, and on Saturdays, from 8 A. M. to I2 M. for the school children. In 1862 the Mechanics' Library Association decided to disband, and by an. arrangement with the Board of Education their books, numbering 2,801 volumes, were added to this library. An amendment to the free school law, passed March 7th, 1865, empowered the Board of Education to appropriate, for the purchase of books for the Newburgh Free Library, all moneys received for the tuition of non-resident pupils, the fines col- lected for over-detention or injury to books, or any other money that may lawfully come into their hands applicable to such purpose, and the clerk of the Board was constituted the general librarian. This act was further amended in March, 1877, the office of librarian created, and the present incumbent appointed. - The fine and com1nodious edifice, now known as the Library Building, was completed in june, 1877, at a cost of S28,276.99, including lot and furniture. The books were removed to their new quarters, arranged and catalogued, and the library opened for visitors February 6th, and for the delivery of books February 13th, 1878, with IO,42I volumes. Some valuable donations have been made to the library since its organ- ization, but the space allotted to this article will not admit an extended notice. Mr. E. M. Ruttenber has depositedin the library bound files of the the P0lz'z'z'raZ Dzzifx from 1806 to 1827, with complete files of other New- burgh papers up to 1866, making a collection of local papers of inestim- . -Isn- able value. Nearly r,ooo volumes have been received from Rev. John Forsyth, D. D., and his family. The minute book and original records of the Newburgh Academy, from 1807 to 1856, have been placed in the li- brary by the executors of Rev. John Brown, D. D., who was for z 5 years one of the Trustees of the Academy, and nearly zo years President of the Board. His family also donated zo large volumes of old and rare books, some being fine specimens of block printing and hand illuminations pub- iished in 1468. - ' The present Librarian has chosen his assistants, with one exception, from the graduates of the Academy, as follows : Charles A. Peck, who served from June, 1877, to Oct., I88O. Frank E. Estabrook, N H June, 1877, to April, 1881. John A. Burnett, " " June, 1877, to Oct., 1880. Lillie O. Estabrook tto fill vacancyj, from April, 1884, to Sept., 1884. William Leech, who served from Sept., 1884, to July, 1887. Nellie M. Leonard," " Oct., 1880, to Oct., 1888. Alzamora Woolsey, Jr., who served from Aug., 1887, to July, 1888. The present Librarian and assistants are as follows: Charles Estabrook, Librarian, appointed April, 1877. Lillie O. Estabrook, Assistant, " 1, July, 1888. Thomas M. Hawthorn " ' Oct., 1888. In 1832 the library contained 2,001 volumes, and was open one hour each week. It now contains over 17,000 volumes, and is open daily from 9 A. M. to 9 P. M., except on Sundays and legal holidays. The current number of about thirty leading magazines and reviews, a number of scientific and illustrated papers, with the current issues of the four local dailies Qdonated by the publishersj are regularly received and placed on the reading-room tables. During the past year the circulation of books for home reading has been 65,144 volumes, and books of reference that are not allowed to go out are in almost constant use. The library is a favorite resort for many of the teachers and pupils of our schools seeking information to assist them in their school work and studies, as well as by very many others who recognize it as a valuable auxiliary in the acquirement of useful knowledge or securing the means for healthful mental recreation. ..I5- iiiri l Qlrraiiiiimg At the time of the opening of our Academy, in the Fall of 1886, the system of Manual Training was adopted as an adjunct to our system of public schools. The matter was discussed by the Board of Education for some length of time, and after a thorough investigation of its merits, it was decided to adopt the system and give it a trial. It has proved a remarkable success, and is now one of the finest elements of the education of our boys. p 1 When the system was adopted the shop Qwhich is located in the Glebe school-house on Clinton Streetj contained twelve benches and sets of car- penter's tools. A lively interest was at once manifested among the boys, and the teacher soon found his hands and time fully occupied. Since that time the interest has increased among the older boys, for they appre- ciate the advantage and usefulness of such a branch of education. The facilities have been increased from time to time, until to-day We have sixteen benches, twelve lathes, and two scroll-saws, besides new drawing materials. The work done consists of cabinet-making and mechanical drawing. For the latter, the Board of- Education has provided a room in the Lib- rary building and fitted it up with drawing tables and tools. In the former, the work is a series of exercises. The pupil is first taught the use and care of the different tools. He is then instructed in the different branches of the work-from planing a rough board, on through turning, scroll-sawing, drawing, and carving. Each pupil is given a certain piece of work to do. He first makes a drawing of his work, which he then completes according to his drawing. In this way the two kinds of work are blended together. At the end of the year specimens of the work are placed on exhibition, in order that the public may see the progress of the classes, and, also, as .-17, an incentive to the boys to do better work. T hissystem presents to the tired minds of the boys an agreeable change, besides giving them an insight into this useful trade. We desire to thank the Board and the public for this, as well as all the othei advantages, which they have given us. i fmmw T.. -Ex 129 -13- A It was night. Dark and ominous clouds, which had all day hung like a pall over land and water, were scurrying before the wind with an ever- increasing velocity, lightning Hashed wildly at intervals, and ever and anon was heard the clap of a thunderbolt, seeming to rend asunder the inner- most parts of the heavens. The glare of lightning lighted up the surrounding landscape with aghast- ly hue, and out upon the sea could be seen the mad billows as they surged and seethed, and seethed and surged, as if in defiance to the powers that had disturbed their calm repose. A flash, more brilliant than the rest, revealed in silhouette against the tumultuous heavens the form of a woman, with hair dishevelled and hands clasped as if in supplication. A low moan issues from her pallid lips, and 3, look of unutterable despair is stamped upon her features. 'C Is there no one near to save him? Must he perish thus, and I stand helpless and witness his doom? Ah I It's too cruel I" But, hold! Far up the gravelly beach can beseen the form of a young man, walking rapidly with athletic strides in the direction from whence come the cries of distress. He scrambles hastily up the slippery rocks, and is soon at the side of the lone female. '4 Oh! sir !'l she cries, ff save him, and all I possess is yours! Only save him Il' E " Say no moref! he says, and with a quick move divests himself of his eye-glass and shoes 5 another moment and the brave young man is bat- tling manfully with the fiends of the deep, and slowly making his way to- wards a small bark, tossing wildly on the angry bosom of the sea. But see ! He is gone! He has disappeared beneath the waves. Oh l can it be That one so young Must die like he? ..21-. Hold! He rises again, and, grasping the gunwale of the boat, draws himself over. As he lies panting at the bottom of the skiff, a small form rises from the stern, and makes its way to where the young man lies. He starts. A wild light comes into his ' eyes, and he gazes shoreward in the direction of the young woman in distress. But what a change! Tears of joy leave long streaks upon her beauti- ful face, and she beckons the young man to come ashore. The roar of the storm drowns his voice as he attempts to reply, but, raising the sail, he absently makes his way towards shore, and places in the lap of the now joyful woman a small terrier. She turns to thank the brave deliverer, but he has fied. On, on he goes, crossing field and meadow and brook, until he finds himself near Middletown. There he remains to this day, living-at the expense of the county. And the billows still roar and the waves stillwtoss, but he hears them not. He is a raving maniac! F Ju .....22.. Q Qeaeleneieal Zagmee A is for our Academy, a structure so fine, Where we've liad enjoyment, and have cultured our mind B is for Bell, a relic so old, Whose adventures for years have never been told. C is for Crane, our Principal kind, Who never will scold if we do not quite mind. D is for Desks, of which we've a store, But yet We need a great many more. E is for Electricity, whose power We love . When it rings our dismissal on the bells above. F is for Flag, our symbol so true, We are bound to adore the red, white and blue. G is for Glass, of which we own not a little, And we've kept it well, but it is so brittle. H is for History, on which we clote, -And would not miss it for a fivedollar note. I is for Ignorance, which we try to avoid, And should it o'ertake us, we'd be much annoyed. I J is for the Juniors, who belong to our tribe, They are not less quiet then bees in their hive. K is for Knowledge, of which we're in search, But when play is proposed, it is left in the lurch. L, is for LeRoy, our teacher of art, And as such we acknowledge she is very smart. Nl stands for McFadden, who teaches mathematics. And among all her books you find nothing but, cl assics - - . . 1 N is for Noise, in which we excel, I But a lull generally follows the sound of the bell. O is for Obedient, which we all try to be, Though we miss perhaps once out of every three. P is for Physics, a study most useful, But hard to commit unless we are dutiful. Q is for Questions, of which we'Ve a store, Andialwaysgcan find a few dozen more. R is for Rules, of which we've only a few, But we don't like them at all as long as they're new. S is for Singing, our first exercise, And probably the one we most highly prize. T is for Townsend, our teacher so.kind, Who tries to inspire us to culture the mind. U is, for Unable, but we'll not acknowledge, That we are unable to enter a college. V is for Vacation, which we hope to enjoy, But cannot, of course, if low standings annoy. W is for Wisdom, which Solomon sought, And we'll try to find it, as it cannot be bought. X is for Exult, which we surely will do When our examinations have been safely passed through Y is for Year, which is near at an end Then we must part from our dear school friends. 7 Z is for Zeal, for which we're not noted, But welll try to be zealous, and thus get promoted. f .. . vi., . ..... 2 4 -. Zan in. Q. gavage On the Thursday night preceding Arbor Day six members of Class 'go tooka stroll to the suburbs of the city. They went with a well-defined object in view. Perhaps it was to View the aspect of the country during a rainfall, again, it may have been to see how the grass grows at night 5 but I think the youths journeyed with the sole intention of procuring a tree. It was a warlike band. One of the members carried an axe, to chop the tree, or mayhaps to prevent molestation. Another carried a revolver, but for what purpose I am unable to find out. The most logical conclu- sion is that he knew of an adjacent hen-house, and intended camping by the wayside. In this case one must admit the usefulness of a firearm. About 8.30 they commenced their nefarious work, the desecration of one of the most ornamental of Nature's productions. The first sound of the axe seemed to awaken all the denizens of the region. The frogs be- gan to croak, the song of the katydid was invested with new life, the cows commenced to moo, while all the dogs within a radius of six square miles took up the chorus in such a long-drawn melancholy howl that the boys were frightened into silence, while the man in the moon became so sad and tearful as to cause a perfect deluge of rain. Simultaneously with the howling of the dogs the courage of some of the members began to ooze. They were too humane to belong to this earth. One didnlt wish to arouse the farmer, for fear he would come out in the wet to investigate, and mayhap catch cold and die. Another didn't wish the farmer to put a load of buckshot into him, for fear in after life it might lieiheavy on his 6072562-57265. Their consideration for mankind was angelic. So these humanitarians posted themselves about a block away from the scene of industry with the avowed intention of cautioning the agricultur- ist against undue exposure. They must have performed their task wellg anyway, they weren't seen again until the rest were on their homeward way. But to return to their colleagues. They are busy at their tree. It is a beautiful, wild cherry, just beginning to sprout, and exhaling a delicious .1251 perfume. They take turns chopping, and after a due expenditure of " el- bow grease" and mild criticisms on dull axes, they compel the tree to "give up the ghost." After hailing the scouts, they shoulder their prize and march with ,triumphant step toward the school. They pass through the principal streets. Pedestrians stop and view the procession, and then almost invariably exclaim, "Ohl 'tis the Acad- emy tree they plant on Arbor Day.'7 Poor, deluded mortals I Can't they see it hasn't any roots? There is soon another case of repentance. As we near Chambers Street and Gidney Avenue one of the above mentioned humantarians is seized with a severe attack of "conscientious scruplesf' He leaves the party for good, although next day he informs the scholars he sat on the fence for over an hour waiting for the rest. He was probably sorry for his misdeeds and sat in the rain to have his sins washed away. The schoolyard is at last reached. The tree is placed beside the lawn where the Board of Education, with wonderful forethought, had caused a hole to be dug. But it is not deep enough and they commence to en- large it with the axe. Axes were never made to dig with, and this one was no exception to the rule. About this time the neighborhood became inquisitive. Night-capped heads protruded out of windows, while one old gentleman came to the door carrying a bootjack, with the fond exa pectation of 4' getting square l' with the feline tribe. Evidently the cats had been troubling him. i A I They now came to the conclusion they needed a spade. If they con- tinued to dig with the axe they might expect a visit from a citizens' com- mittee. One of the members was now sent for the spade, after being duly cautioned against disturbing the slumbers of the owner. Possessed of this implement they made better progress. As they turned up the rich, black earth more than one remarked what a fine onion patch it would have made. The digging is now completed. All the while the rain had not ceased to fall, but, with the exception of a few remarks about the water being Wet, it was not noticed, the youths going about their task with that spirit of energy and perseverance that everywhere characterizes the American race. They place the tree in position, and then push it deep down in the yielding earth. As they view the results of their labor many must wish for the genius of a Burns or a Milton. As I think of their achievement -261 Tlong to- put it to verse, in fact it is the only time I ever feel real poetical. The diggers now liold a war dance around the tree. As they become warmed to their work they become more and more hilarious, until with one last, combined cry they scamper from the grounds. About 9.30 they bid each other good night. Their work is done and well done, and, conscious of their achievement, they depart, knowing they have given to the school an example of true American go-aheadness. About 5.30 the next morning the tree is discovered. The janitor first views it. Happy mortal, he doesn't appreciate how the fates have favored him. He doesnlt look at it in a true, poetical spirit. He comes down to everyday life, and estimates the time it will take him to pull it up. The problem is a hard one, and he seeks the advice of pafer frznzilzkzs. Pam' familiar is prejudiced, he has been pulled out of bed too early to appre- ciate beauty. He advises notification to the Board. So they journey to the house of the nearest member and request his assistance. He ac- companies them to the scene, views the tree and looks wise. He takes a good view of the matter, considers ita joke. He grasps the tree and com- mences to pull. The joke deepens. The tree is planted about four feet deep, and in five minutes, by good work, he can pull out a half an inch of it. After pulling about ten minutes he- gets enthusiastic and offers twenty-five dollars for information. as to who planted it there. He evi- dently knows a good job when he sees one. By the time he got the tree up he was very enthusiastic on the subject of tree-planting, and could discourse quite eloquently about this particuler case. The next day, with due ceremony, the Board planted their tree. It was of a different variety than the first one and not nearly as large. Their tree still Hourishes, that of the scholars met an ignominious death, but to a few loyal members of Class 'go remains the honor of planting the first tree in the New Academy yard. 1 rfgx er5ksN1Q't 127- Poor unfortunatesl how can you drag out another year of such an ex- istence, and finish your course? You need our sympathy, and we give it freely in some things. Coming here, as you did, with the intention of out- doing the class ahead of you, that class welcomed you with outstretched arms, and in your first attempt at baseball, out-doing you, you retired from the held to the tune of zo to 7. We hoped that this would lessen your de- sire for fame, but how could such an illustrious class retire anywhere sad- der and wiser. It only inspired you to greater deeds. Next you organ- ized your literary anddebating society. What excellent subjects you took for debate and extemporaneous speaking. , Let us look for a moment at one of them, given to the speaker by one of his brother members : ff Re- solved, that the girls of the A Class are homlier than the girls of the B Class." So you admit that your girls are homely, and are trying to console yourselves with the thought that you are not as homely as we are. Well, you know yourselves, and you may comfort yourselves as best you can. Perhaps we might sympathize with you if we are homely. Be modest and keep modest. Spend a little of your superfluous literary energy on 4' The Academy" next year. Make a better book of it than the Class of 1890 made. Keep up the good reputation of the Academy, and graduate with honor to yourselves and your " Alma Mater. " ...28... At a table in a small room sat an editor of 4' The Academyf' vainly striv- ing to form some opinion of the class of r892. Before him lay a few sheets of paper, some of which were scribbled with his efforts to solve the problem then occupying his mind. But all his labors were fruitless. Some one knocked. The editor rose, unlocked the door, and opened it. It was another editor, who came in, leading a diminutive youngster by the hand, at the same time gazing down at him with a peculiar look- Looking up he said : n " Mr. D---, here is a member of the Class of '9z. He is a represent. ative member of his class, and-I think can give you all the information you needf' Turning the youngster over to his brother' editor, he left the room. The editor, taking the youngster upon his knee, began looking him over, more puzzled than ever. Suddenly he felt distinct draughts of air, which seemed to center in that part of the room, and looking at the youth found that he was absorbing much, if not all, of it. All becoming calm again, this promising member of the Class of 792 lifted up his voice, and in a melancholy tone sang the following dirge: " We are here, we are here, And we cannot tell when we shall get out of here." The editor smiled and said, " What is your name, my boy ? " " Bobby Inclover, sir." tt Well, Mr. Inclover, is all your class of the same opinion that you seem to be of in regard to your length of stay here P 7' "I guess they are, sir," replied the little man, 4' anyhow they said I 1 29 .... was to stay here till I graduated, but I donlt know when that,.yvill be. What is your name, sir P-'l i ff That is not for you to know yet,'i said the editor. " Have you met any of the students yet ? " "Yes, sir, I met three of them out by the side of the Academy this morningf' replied the little fellow, Hand they asked me if I left all the little dears at home well. I said, yes, and they told me that was nice. Then one of them said, 'Bunk himf It didn't feel very nice, but they said it was necessary to keep the Walls of the building up, and I told them it was -all right. May I go now ? 3' - H Yes, little rnanf' said the editor, " and may your class go on in the same way in which you have begun. Probably you are not very bad as a class, and the three years before you may develope wonders among your num- ber? - - ' The youngster slid off the editor's knee, and left the room. The edi- tor gave aisigh of relief, and his problem concerning the Class of I892 was solved. . fi A Q H .J . 1.30.-. raise s. Ch-t-f-l-d-UN o sweeter soul eler trod earthls Ways." F-W-l-r-4' Once more speak clearly, if you speak at allfl Br-W-n-'L Can the world buy such a jewel? " N-u-t4t'Bait the hook well, this fish will bitef' M-r-r-t-" Indeed he hath an excellent good name." C-r-W-n-"I-Iow dangerous it is that this man goes loose. Class 1891-ft We leave you now in better company." W-l-s-n, '93-C' In lazy Walk or slouching trotf' Disturbed Debate-'f When some one-batters at the dove H-I'-m-n-4' Are these things spokenQ or do I but dream?" MCD-g-l-"We have lost himg he is gone." T-r-rly-" Yet I am stuft with nioisturef, Spider-4' I was not dead nor living." 77 B Class-" Here, O ye hallowed Nine! N-ble-4' In troubled mood broke off his speech." - v. 4' - B511 73 Cote doors v s Qieeen ire g Tale ef ee I. Have you ever heard of our Class "BHP Listen to my tale of Woe! ' Who tried to plant a cherry tree, E But on the size they couldnlt agree. Boohool Boohool Listen to my tale of woe. And so they all did then decree, Listen to my tale of woe! That from the campus they Woiild flee, And never again to plant a tree. Boohool Boohoo! Listen to my tale of woe. II. This class our actions do imitate, Listen to my tale of woe! They formed a society for debate, And officers did nominate, Boohool Boohoo! Listen to my tale of woe. But we will not procrastinate, Listen to my tale of woe! We bunkecl their officers 'gainst the gate, And in a style elaborate, Boohoo! Boohoo! Listen to my tale of woe. . -33- III. To publish a paper they did essay, Listen to my tale of woe. But the cost they couldn't defray, And viewed their efforts ivith dismay, Boohool Boohoo! Listen to my tale of woe Now we are sorry they've gone astray, Listen to my tale of Woe. For they've but a year to stay, And from pool should keep away, Boohoo! Boohoo! Listen to- my tale of woe. IV. No more of Ninety-one We'll speak, Listen to my tale of woe. We hope they will remain quite meek, On Ninety-two their vengeance reek, Boohool Boohool Listen to my tale of woe. They never again revenge should seek, Listen to my tale of Woe. F or we'l1 dump them in the creek, And leave them there about a week. Boohool ' Boohoo I Listen to my tale of woe. , 3: WQQH 555334-YQWQ KWQ -35- X e n senaaeron-Hate , 4 i f,3fgiQ -X K ' 6 ,, f Q i E A- B GFA cs QA' Us t. Q On the afternoon of Memorial Day, 1889, the scholars of the Academy were assembled at Washingtonls Headquarters for the purpose of receiving a silk Hag from Ellis Post, No. 52, G. A. R. A delegate had previously been elected from each of the respective classes to serve on the receiving committee, and from this committee james H. Dimmick was chosen as speaker. l Upon our assembly at the Headquarters,off1cers of the Ellis Post and the Academy Committee were seated on the platform. After prayer, ad- dresses by members of Ellis Post, and a few songs by the pupils, a presen- tation speech was made by Commander R. V. K. Montfort, as follows: " To ng: Young Frz'mzz's.' The members of the G. A. R. in this city, acting in unison with four hundred thousand veterans scattered through the cities, villages and hamlets of this broad land, have to-day as- sembledto scatter Howers upon the graves of their departed comrades, symbols of love and tender affection. To the old soldier these cere- monies are full of the deepest meaning. While they are not designed to stir up anew the bitter animosities of sectional strife, they are intended to renew the memories of the warg to strengthen the fraternal tie that binds together so strongly those who shared the hardships and privations, the sleepless nights and weary marches and the terrific battles of the civil war 5 to remind the survivors as they bend over the lowly graves of their departed comrades ofthe sacred duty of charity towards the destitute and the widows and orphans ofthe deceased. Cf the three ties that bind to- gether the veterans of the war for the Union, the strongest of all is loyalty -loyalty to the Hag and the Union. Believing that love for country, for flag, is a mighty influence in developing noble citizens, and realizing the fact that the work of the active participants in the great crisis of the nationls life will soon be finished, it has seemed fitting to the Grand Army here assembled that the closing cere- monies of this Memorial Day, occurring in the centennial year ...37.... of our Nationls birth, on this historic spot, made sacred by the presence of Washington at the close of seven years' heroic struggles of our fathers, through which we became a Nation and achieved the right to bear a Hag, should be devoted to an effort to inspire you with something of the same feeling of veneration and love for the Hag-the symbol of liberty and equal rights to all, without regard to color, condition or possessions-that warmed the hearts of men who bore that standard aloft on the two thou- sand battle-helds of the late war. In order that our country might live, that its flag might remain the emblem of a preserved Union, and that the doctrine that the national, government is and must be forever established, four hundred thousand men laid down their lives, and a million widows and orphans have mourned in loneliness. The men who fought at Don- aldson, at Vicksburg, at Gettysburgh, and marched with Sherman to the sea, transmit this flag, without a blot or stain, without one star effaced, to the boys and girls Qfor the safety of our country depends not less upon its women than its menj, to those who are moving forward to fill their places. They seek to impress upon the minds of the young the value of -our institutions, and the sacrifice that saved them, that they may be cher- ished and honored, as they should be by every American citizen. Mr. President and gentlemen of the Board of Education, we ask permission that this Hag may be placed in a conspicuous position in the assembly room of the Academy-that it may be borne by the pupils on all public occasionf' School Trustee David A. Scott responded briefly in behalf of the Board of Education,,and Commander Montfort, advancing to the committee of eleven boys, entrusted the Hag to their care, saying : 4' In behalf of Ellis Post, No. 52, Department of New York, G. A. R., I commit this Hag to your care, urging you always to remember that next to the duty you owe your Creator, is duty to your country." james I-I.fDimmick responded for the Academy pupils. He said 5 'f Commafzfler :md ,flfwzzbeffs of Elks Post, Nb. 52 .- On behalf of the pupils of the Newburgh Academy, I most heartily thank you for this beautiful gift. It is a gift not only beautiful and valuable in itself, but especially valuable as being emblematic of those principles of freedom dear to the heart of every patriot, and for the defence of which many a veteran has risked his life. The glorious principles of freedom are the hope and inspiration of every liberty-loving people, and it is only by plant- ing them in the hearts of the youth, in the spring-time of their life, that they retain their sweetness and beauty throughout the trials and vicissi- tudes of a nation's existence. Presented by you, the representatives of that grand army, who when these principles were assailed, forsaking home, friends, aye, even risking life itself, carried out at Antietam, Chancellorsville and at Richmond, that glorious work, the foundation of which was laid by our forefathers at Bunker Hill, Saratoga and at Yorktown, it has a special honor. They secured for us a government that is the wonder and aston- ishment ofthe whole world. You protected and defended the legacy they bequeathed us. The desire of the Grand Army that the flag of our coun- try shall Hoat over every. school-house in the land, is a noble one. It is from theseschools that the defenders and supporters of our xnation must come, and what is more fitting than while we are receiving that training that shall fit us for the stern battles of life, we should cherish those finer feelings of patriotism and love of country which are ours by right ofbirth. May the presence of this silken banner ever remind us that " ' Wherever the sun of America blazes, Wherever the stars of our bright banner shine, Millions of voices are chanting its praises, Millions of worshippers bend at its shrinef " Yonder Academic Hall will soon cease to ring with our merry voices, but our Hag with our school twill be remembered long after our student days are oier. Again, gentleman, in behalf of my schoolmates, I thank you." The scholars, with the Hag before them, marched to the Academy where a few short speeches were made by members of the Board of Edu- cation. The pupils were then dismissed and the members of the Board chose a suitable location for the flag. It hangs in the Assembly room over the platform, in full View of all the pupils, honored and loved by every scholar of the Newburgh Free Academy. ' es ssttlrll l-5'-1 r WW a f A dj ' 47 W "Lu x t--l 'T " mhz 0 ll, " r etisimg elite eeezsel Qktga At a meeting of the Board of Education, held September 27, 1889, the following resolutions, offered by Mr. joseph A. Sneed, were unanimously adopted: i Whereas, The instruction and impressions of early youth are the most lasting, and patriotism, love of Hag and country are among the most com- mendable virtues of our citizens, and the inculcation of those virtues is properly within the province of our public school system, therefore, F Resolved, That a suitable committee of this Board be instructed to pur- chase forthwith for each school building in this city a regulation Hag, with a suitable staff, fastenings and halliards, and that such flags be displayed from the opening to the closing of school every school-day in the year. Resolved That the principal of each school from among the scholars shall collect a color guard, consisting of not less than -boys and- girls, who shall be color guard for one month at a time, and whose duty it shall be to raise the flag at the opening of school in the morning, and lower the same at the close in the afternoon 5 the color guard to be chosen from among those who, during the preceding month, have shown the greatest proficiency in their studies and the best deportment. And that the several names of the colo guard of each school be entered as such on the roster. V The national colors were first displayed at the Newburgh Free Acad- emy, Wednesday morning, October 16, 1889. Patriotic songs by the pupils and appropriate addresses by Mr. David A. Scott and Mr. Wm. Harrison of the Board of Education, and Dr. W. Hasbrouck and Superintendent Montfort, added to the interest of the occasion. The color guard se- lected from the honor list of the school was composed of the following pupils: Academy Department-Fred. Noe, Jennie Graham, Luella Galatian, Ulysses Alsdorf, Lizzie Courtney, Frank Dickey, Ada Whitehill Walter van. ' Grammar Department-Georgie Howland, Anna Ostrander, Victoria Harrison, Hattie Lawson, Bessie Fark, Margaret Gibb, Nettie Mould, Robert McVey, Leo Mapes, Albert Ross, Rubie Hilton, Homer Herman, Wm. Standring, Frank Campbell. .-.40-. Qrhfarijgegi ire g rogramme. Reception by the Pupils of the Newburgh fleademy, UJQd17Qsday, Novqmbqr 27, 1889. March-Vignette-U. I. Alsdorf .................. .... O rchestra Singing-ft Thanksgiving Hymn " .... ...... S chool Selections from Class Journal of '90 ..... ..... I ohn Daly Declamation-ff The Spirit of Inquiry 7' .... ..... I ohn C. Peck Recitation-H Entertaining the Missionary U. . . .... Blanche Felter Nocturne I.-F. Pehr ........ ................ . ........ O rchestra Composition--'S The World Forgetting, by the World Forgotfl Ella Eckerle Reading-U The Bad Girl's Diary ll . . .... Lizzie Courtney Recitatiori-J' Guilty or Not Guilty ". . . .... Florence McCord Solo--" Marguerite " ,............. . . .Florence Taylor Declamation-'1 Patriotism ". . . ..... john Wilson Reading-J' How Girls Study ". . ..... Katie Davis Singing-" Dream On " ............. ......... School Recitation-"Nigl1 Unto Thanksgiving ". . .... Alex. Armstrong Composition-U Life l' .................. .. . ........ . Ella Krona Declamation-ff Spartacus to the Gladiator " .... .james H. Dimmick Clarinet Solo-Etude de ConcertQMeyer .... . ........ S. P. Alsdorf Recitation-" The Removal " ............... . . . Robert Gardner Reading-'f Nobodyls Child " ................. .... G race Smiley Piano Duet-" Clayton's Grand March "-Blake, Mabel Latta, Sherburne Latta Recitation-" Thanksgiving Pumpkin Pies " .......... Harriet Watts Declamation-" Damon and Pythias ". .... .... H arold Wilson Singing-" The 'Water Mill' ....... ......., S ChOOl ,45- 24 Composition-'fThe Diary of a Puritan Maiden" 2 5 Recitation-4' The First Thanksgiving l'. . . 26 Les Roses Valses Metra .............. 27 Recitation-" The Lovely Young Man ". . 28 Reading-'f The Gambler's Wife H. . . . 29 Recitation-J' The Schoolmaster ". . . 30 Mazourka Caprice Eilenberg ........ 31 Declamation-4' The American Flag " . . . . . 32 Reading-H Farmer Stebbins on Rollers ". . . 33 Singing-'f Far, Far Upon the Sea 7' ,,,, , , 34 Selections from Class journal of '90, , , ORCHESTRA: VIOLIN. -1620-1622, Jennie E. Graham . . .May Y. Clarke . . . . . . .Orchestra . . .Jennie Belcher . .Willetta Knapp .john R. Caldwell . ........ Orchestra . . . . LeRoy Dickerson ..Christina Oakley ..........School . . . .Wm. H. Jefferson Frank P. Noble. - Thomas'Marvel. William H. Mabie. Reuben Hilton Galloway. FLUTE-P. B. Taylor. CLARINET-Simon P. Alsdorf. V CORNET-Ulysses S. Alsdorf PIANO-May McCullough. UsHERs.' Theodore Merritt. Cornelius Terwilliger. Frank Snyder. Eugene Noe. William Wygant. X Andrew Leicht. Theodore Anthony. Edmund Lang. 'QYFM11' ll Yfxf' 'Q .-42, Deyo Belknap. Harry Coldwell. William B. Kelly. William Mosher. i pfly g ebretarffg eeebeioieg the Pupilg of the Neuiburqstp Academy, Friday, February 28, 1890, at one o'eloek P. fn. PROGRAMME. March-"Marines Joyeux? A. Mazza .... .... O rchestra. Singing-4' Red, White and Bluefl. .......,. ...... S chool. Declamation-" The Character of Napoleonf' . . . .... Fred. Noe. Reading-" Burdockls'Music Box." .............. . . . Satie Clark. Selection-From the opera " Puritanls Daughterfi. .V ...... Orchestra. Essay-L' The Dispute of the School Booksfl. .. .... Hattie Courant.. Declamation-C' Ciceronis in Catilinani Oratio prima.".Frank Noble. Declaniation-ff Oration Against Cataline l'.. .' .... Theodore Merritt. Singing-ff Only a Gentle Word." ........ L. .......... School. Reading-" Catching the Morning Trainfl. . . . . .Reuben Hilton. Recitation-'C Patchwork." ............. .... A nnie Ostrander. Reading-'4 The Heart of the War.l'. . .... Helen Montfort. Singing-if Flow Gently, Sweet Afton". .. ..... ........... S chool. Essay-J' Heroes and Heroismfi ............... Bessie Dougherty. Declamation-" Regulus to the Carthaginian Senate? . Frank Corwin. a-ci Lilngemle Gavotteyi . . ........ Orchestra 6-J' Pet ROD111 Mazourkaf' """' ' ' ' ' Recitation-" Troubles of a Wife? ....... .... L uella Galatian. Declamation-"Mr Butherwick's Horsefl... .... Fred. Sneed. Declamation-4" A Tin Henf' ............ ....... H enry Clark. Male Chorus- Ifgi21?3uYaE2g?',ady'i7 . .Academy Glee Club. Recitation-"Artie's Amen.l', .......... ...... P oebe Wilkins. Declamation-" Washingtonfl. . . .... john Rose. "Daybreak" f C. D. Parker' .... ........ O rchestra. Reading-4' Young America." ....... ..... IV Iaggie A. Day. i.43..... 25. Singing-" Sleep, Gentle Motlierffrom Ylvvafore ......... School. 26. Recitation-" The King's Bellf' ................. Herbert Dickey. 27. Nadjy Waltz .................... . ........... Orchestra. 28. Declamation-'C General Grant". ....... ...... W illiam YVygant. 29. Quartette--4' Sweet and Low." Bamby ...... Florence Taylor, Ella Krona, Charles Toleman, Bentley Taylor go. Recitation-" The Philosopherls Scales". . .Mary Emma Donoghue 31. Singing-" Traneadillofl. ............................... School. jleadqmy Orebqstra. VIOLINS--Clarence V. Fowler, Frank P. Noble, Thomas S. Marvel. FLrITE-P. B. Taylor- CLARINET-S. P. Alsdorf. CORNET-U. I. Alsdorxi PIANO-May McCullough. fAQadQmy QIQQ Qlub. FIRST TENOR-Chas. Toleman, Frank Corwin, Simon Alsdorf, Ulysses Alsclorf. SECOND TENOR-Frank Snyder, William jefferson, Chas. Hannan, Hugh Hagan. FIRST BASS-Louis Hoffman, Augustus Senior, john Daly, john Peck. SECOND BASS-Wm. Wenzel, Clarence Fowler, Bentley Taylor, Frank Noble. . USHERS-HUgh Hagan, Frank R. Dickey, joseph Harrison, A. W. Senior, Clinton Dimmick, Wm. Quaid, Everet Wilson, James Mat- thews, VVm. Galloway, Walter Vail, Albert Van Wagner, Wm. Standring. 654' Q Z U e p. In accordance with the act passed by the Legislature, the Academy observed a day on which the exercises were of a nature that would pro- mote the culture and preservation of trees. The exercises were held on Friday, April 25th, and began at 1 P. M. The programme rendered was as follows : I 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ro IT I2 13 14 I5 T6 I7 18 I9 . March-'f St. Elmo ". . . ...................... Orchestra . Devotional exercises ..... ' ....... Conducted by Rev. Rufus Emery . Singing-"My Country, 'Tis of Thee 7, .................... School . Reading of the law .......... H ...... . Composition-" Trees 'K . . . . 4' Encouragement Overture 'l . . . . . . . . Reading-'f The Voice of the Grass l' . Composition-'f The Spruce Tree ". . Singing-H Mother Goose " . Composition-ff Preservation of Fore fa. Kerry Dance . 4 6. Wo Danacht Lf. Volkslied . Composition-" Trees" ......... . , . Reading-" Making Maple Sugar ll. . 4' There is Beauty in the Forest " .... . Composition-ft Trees 7' ........ H . Quartette-'C Farewell to the Forest 'l .......... Florence Taylor, Ella Krom, Charles Toleman, P. st Trees H. . . Pine versus Oak " ................ . . . . . . . . .Louis Hoiifman . . .Harold Wilson . . . . . .Orchestra Nora Seymour .Helen Ruttenber . . . Cecilian Club .Christina Oakley . . . . . . . .Orchestra Lizzie McCullough ... . . .Pedro Leon School Margaret Lenahan Maggie Vlfallace . . . . . .Meldelssohn Bentley Taylor. . Class Composition-t'Whisperings of Flowers" . Read by Grace Smiley . Singing-" Woodman, Spare That Tree". . . ............ School 2o. Reading-"The Blue Bell 7' ................. Q ...' . . . May Burnett 21. Composition-" What Shall We Plant on Arbor Day?" Anna Hasbrouck 22. Singing-" Plant in the Springtime the Beautiful Trees H By Nine Boys At this point it was announced that 'the school would adjourn to the yard and there plant a tree. K , VVhen both scholars and visitors were assembled in the yard the "A Class 'I marched out and took its place near thetree. This tree, which is a maple, was decorated with " orange and blue " ribbons, and was named after the 4' Class of loo," by whose officers it was planted. When the tree was in position the school listened to the following ad- dress by Dr. Montfort: "From its earliest settlement Newburgh has been fully awake to the importance of popular education. The Charter of the Glebe, granted in 1752, set apart certain portions ofland for the support of a minister and school master. In a certain sense, this is the Centennial year of the New- burgh Academy, for the proposition to open an Academic institution on the Glebe is believed to have originated in 1790. The old Newburgh Academy was so far completed as to be in part ready for occupancy early in 1797. The funds used for the purpose were derived from the sale and rent ofthe lands set apart as above stated. The school remained under the control of the Trustees ofthe Glebe until 18o7, when it was regularly incorporated under charge of a Board of Trustees, and so remained until transferred to the Board of Education in 18 52. Financially, it was not asuc- cess. Its principals remained but a short time. Success, however, is not to be computed only in dollars and cents. That it exerted a very great influence upon the welfare of the town, is attested by its long list of grad- uates' who have proven themselves to be men of intelligence, integrity and worth. Itwould be exceedingly interesting if we could call the roll ofstu- dents who entered its portals 'during this long period of time, and trace their career, but that is impossible. It is a very commendable work that the present Class of 1890 has undertaken in making up aroll of the recent graduates since 187 r, with their present occupation. It will go far to show that the confidence so long placed in the institution by our citizens has not been misplaced. Organized as the Senior Department of the Public Schools, it soon assumed the Academic character. The School Act, passed in 1852 and amendedin 1865, reads as follows: 'The Board of Education shall have power, and it shall be its duty: I. To estab- lish and organize in said village such and so many Public Schools and departments of N45- higher grades Cincluding an academical departmentj and schools for colored children, as said Board 'shall deem requisite and expedient, and to alter and discontinue the same at its discrc-:tion.' H The popular sentiment in favor of the Academic Department had grown so strong that no Board of Education was found willing to discon- tinue the same. As one of the conditions by which the Board of Educa- tioifwas permitted to appropriate for school purposes the funds realized from Commutations of Glebe rents, there was incorporated in an Act passed May 13, 1884, a provision that the funds should be used in and towards the payment of the expense of erecting anew school building upon the lot of land on the Glebe in the City of Newburgh, known as the ' Academy Lot,' in which building shall be maintained and continued the Academic Department of the schools under the charge of the Board of Education. In this manner the permanence of the institution has been secured. Many of its recent graduates occupy positions of honor and trust, and as the years roll on the value of the work of this class in initiat- ing the keeping of a permanent roster of graduates will be more and more appreciated." p A song, "Planting the Treef' was then sung by the Cecilian Club and the male chorus united. The words of the song are : The tree we are planting this May day, Is chosen with tenderest rcare May beauty adorn it hereafter And clothe it with usefulness rare. May green leaves appearing each spring time, Be leaves ofa fair book of fame, And spread to the breezes the story Extolling the new given name. The tree is an emblem ofgreatness, As springing from one tiny seed, It mounts ever upward, and onward, An emblem of greatness indeed. The birds sing its praises to others, The winds carry swiftly the tale, The tree is the monarch of forest, Of hill, valley, greenwood and dale. After the singing of this song the school was dismissed for the May vacation. Zass ister , Colors- Orange and Blue. YELL: Yi! Yi! Yi!-Yi! Yi! Yi! A-C-A-D-E-M-Y I oFFicERs, CLASS '9o. . President ......... ............... . J. H. Dimmick. Vice--President .... .... I ennie Graham. Secretary ...... .... F . W. Wenzel. Treasurer ........... .... G race Minty. Assistant Treasurer .................. P. B. Taylor, jr. In writing our history the difhculty which presents itself is how to make a suitable beginning. Since most of us have been associated with each other in the various lower grades, it is hard to determine just where our existence asia class first began. A record of the experiences which have befallen us all in our school course, since its earliest day, when we were scattered among the different schools and classes, would undoubtedly be a chronicle worth writing, if such a task were possible, but the events particularly distingushing our career as a class would seem to be those which have occurred within the year just past, whose end marks the close of our school life. On the morning of Sept. 3d, 1889, we assembled in the A Class room ofthe Academy. A number of the former teachers having resigned, their places were filled by new ones, most of whom were strange to us, 'With the term was to begin the working of an entirely new system of in- struction, which, being undoubtedly superior to the old, was one of many auspicious circumstances which seemed to warrant us in considering our prospects for the year unusually bright. On the whole these prospects have been fuliilled. Of course, as the year has passed, we have met with some discouragements. We were not specially distinguished by our fondness for chemistry, or, in consequence, by our proficiency therein. Experiments were somewhat of a consola- tion, although to an on-looker our absorbing interest in them might not have been always clearly apparent. This, however, was, of course only the deception of appearances. Such slight drawbacks have been more than overbalanced by the pleasant features of our last year. When the press of business would permit, we published a periodical under the name of 44 Class. -j0ZL7'7Zflf W ,9O,,7 which became the receptacle of all the scintillating fragments thrown off from the pens of our humorous and poetic specialists, and was strik- ingly illustrated by our corps of artists. This publication was, unfortu- nately, discontinued two or three months ago. A noticeable feature of the term has been the HG. S. C. of '9o,l' with its attendant festivities. The circulation ofa Wild theory that the girls had organized a 'f cooking club " resulted in a number of visits from an uncanny set of half-starved beings, who signified their importunate desire for some of the good things by standing outside upon the sidewalk, and bringing forth a series of very frightful sounds from instruments of some mysterious and unknown construction. ' The formal organization of the " Class A of '9o" was an occurrence worthy of notice. It took place February zo, 1890, since which time oc- casional class-meetings have been held, and all business transacted in a very orderly manner. The girls have never quite grasped the great scheme of parliamentary law, but, notwithstanding, have usually found a way to make their sentiments understood when desirable. , After the organization, the choosing of class-colors took place, a custom which we have been the first Academy class to adopt. Various other incidents deserve mention, such as the Arbor Day tree- planting, in two acts, or the recent disastrous display of something which might almost be mistaken for a little of the old crusading spirit popularly supposed to have drawn its last gasp at the end of the chivalric age-but space forbids. In conclusion, it remains only to say that our last year has been a most pleasant termination of our school experience, and one upon which we shall all look back with happy recollections long after it has become only a memory of the past. i 1 SO... has orege. " Dear Friends," welre now beginning A life both strange and new, And while we do God's bidding Our hopes will not be few 5 For though We meet reverses Which seem too great to bear, With firm and dauntless courage We'll banish evlry care. While busy years are fleeting And trials ever come, Our thoughts will still turn backward To days when we were young. May all bright spots of school days Illume our future life, And e'er the hand of wisdom Be with us in this strife. When lifefis nearly over And cares about to cease, When sorrows have departed To be replaced by peacef Then happy days will ever Come like a pleasant dream To shed oler fading hours A bright and cheering beam. .-51... 4 N sie f J L .-. 5 ..- 0 51529522 00. 02.22 znd violins. . Qfe e iiea. C. V. Fowler, '91, Ist violin. F. P. Noble, '90, and T. S. Marvel, '93, S. P. Alsdorf, '93, Clarinet. U. J. P. B. Alsclorf, '91, Cornet. Taylor, '90, Flute. Marion McCullough, '90, Piano. Jgwhwxv 0125123522 C 00 Z 1Z7Z'7'J'f Tefwrs. C. B. Toleman, '90. F. R. Corwin, '91. U. I. Alsclorg '9I. S. P. Alsdorf, 193. First Banos. I. Daly, '90, I. C. Peck, '9o. A. W. Senior, 790. L. G. Hoffman, '90. u 00. 032 f . Safran!! T67Z07'I. F. S. Synder, '90. H. I. Hagan, '90. Chas. Hannan, '90, WV. H. jefferson, '90 Sammi Bassas. P. B. Taylor, YQO. Noble, '90. C. V. Fowler, '91. F. XV. Wenzel, 790. - geeiiiara Zar a .Firsf Sopnzfzos. Minnie Walshe, Maggie Dunlap, Maria Fawcett, Libbie lfValsh, Maggie Day, Alice Hahn, Hattie Gordon, Ella Krom, Pauline Brown, Gertrude Wise. Serwm' Sajbranox. Anna Hasbrouck, May McCullough Daisy Fowler, Lilian Swain, May E. Clark, Minnie Moore, Phoebe Doughty, Allie Van Cleft, Bessie Gordon, Grace Minty, Blanche. Felter. Libbie Walsh, Lucia Twiname, May Y. Clarke, Minnie Moore. Alias. May Y, Clarke, Iennie Graham, Q e ew ' e ef? OFFICERS. President ...... . ....... . . . . Vice-President. . . . .. Secretary ,,,,,, Treasurer, ., . . ........ . . , .. MEMBERS. May E. Clark, May Y. Clarke, Hattie Coutant, Kate Davis, Maggie Day, Maggie Dunlap, Annie Foster, Alice Hahn, Minnie Walshe. -56... Anna Hasbrouck Millie Hunter, jean McGregor, Grace Minty, Minnie Moore, Grace Shaw, Lucia Twiname, Libbie Walsh, 7 7 T. A. Merritt ......,, eefieag of 9 . Nelson Woodruff ............ ..... Q 9 ............Pre5ident Sergeant-at-arms. I. H. Dimrnick, Fred. Noe, Frank Poyer, James Carson, Hugh Hagan, P. BI Taylor, Ir. F. Sheed, B C. B. Tolenaan, Samuel Perry, Wm. jefferson, John J. Daly, Daniel Kelly, Louis Hoffman, F. W. Wenzel. james Carson. . . . . . T. A. Merritt, F. Noe, L. G. J. 1. Daly, F. W. Wenzel, F. I. H. Dimmick, S. B. Perry, ff Fi . 1 . 521226 ...Director Hoffman . . . 1 ...... Boxophone. Poyer ........ .... C antette. H. I. Hagan .... .... S tringzette. -..- T.. 1 jlgesibwfgk Q595ZQiiii,-f?l 355 dee QZZ 5959 92599 J. H. Dirnrnick, C. f. and p., Capt. F. P. Noble, cfand r. f. F. Donaldson, Ist b. and c. A J. YVilson, 2d b. F. Snyder, 3d b. H. Hewlett s. s. W.4Hill, 1. f. W. Cochran, p. and c. f. N. Snnth, r. f. SUBSTITUTES : C. Whitehill, F. Nutt, F. Hastings, D. Bell. MASCOT: L. G. Hoffman. --messe- Cgfd D ' i eeozfli of amos. 21 5 . ACADEMVVS. PLAYED AT Whitehill and Cleveland ........ Newburgh .,... N. Y. Military Academy ........ .Newburgh N. Y. Military Acadelny ........ Cornwall. . . Eastrnanls Business College. . . . . . Pdkeepsie Eastmanfs Business College ...... Newburgh .... ,9OVS.lQI.....-- ........... ...SSL Newburgh .... . . . SCORE 24- 28--29 51. 7-13 5-I2 zo- 005 Q22 ZQEQQZZQ A. J. McDougall, 90.. . . C. Warford, ,9I... . C. M. Diinmick, 793... . E. Horton, ,QI .... T. Merritt, '90... . WV111. Wenzel, ,9O. . Albert Van Wagner, J. Daly, lgo.. . . .. J. Peck, 790 ....... I. H. Diinmick, 790 Qcaptainj .... . . . F. S. Snyder, ,QC ......... ...... . . . . .centre rush . . .right guard . . . .left guard . . . .right tackle . left tackle ...might end ......left end ,quarter back ,right half back ,left half back . . . .full back Everet Wilson, ,QI 5 Frank Poyer, 790. liaiaisfise 6.5 sagem? Er' 15 1879. I88O 1881.- 1882. 1883.- 1884 1885 1886. 1887. 1888 1889 1878.-Estelle Millspaugh. Della C. Peck QMrs. F. W. Millerj. Amelia Samuels. Emma S. Halstead. -Jennie B. Brownlee. Lillie O. Estabrook. Clara B. Lamb. Iessie D. Shay. Fannie M. Spencer. AT NEW BUILDING. Sancha Stern. -Clara L. Shaffer. May Yale Clark Qclass of 18905. 1890.-Grace Minty. .aw IW vw NV . U 'Cf' Nfl 0 "CT 5 . WO my 4 I 00 MQ SEEN' mf ff , vt- ' WD :rqf ' , .0 IW " W W 1' f ' 7,. O mfg W Z f W 5' 4 Q f' T5 A- W . -61- cc . , Name. Anderson, Ella .... Ayer, M. Ella ..... Bennett, Mary A.. Baker, M. Gennette. . . Bingham, Elizabeth A. Colden, Anna ........ Connelly, Clara VV .... DuBois, Mary E ...... Doughty, Sarah C ..... LeRoy, Ida Clifton . . . Parmenter, Gertrude Ross, Mary C ........ Scott, Elsie B ........ Wait, Eva M ..... Wilson, Sarah ....... Wylie, Martha ....... Brown, john I ....... Clark, Robert S ...... Doyle, William E ..... Gibson, Jonathan W. . Hanmore, Fred W .... Mcliissock, Cornel's S. Osborne, Frank ...... Pollock, james M ..... Van Nort, I. Fred, jr. Williams, G. Mott .... 1871. Es! g1zafz'amj5r0dz'7'e iefzus, sz' 12011 zizztznf zzlfnzf' Present Name or Occupa Mrs. S. B. Davidge .... .. Mrs. john Coldwell Mrs. George W. Crandell. Mrs. Albert Hornbeck . . . Teacher ....... : ....... Mrs. George Cox ....... Mrs. A. Senior .... .... Teacher . .... , . . Mrs. White ........... Mrs. Rev. Geo..H. Hume. Teacher ............. . . . .Mrs. Samuel J. Hilton. . . Mrs. Hiram Lozier ...... Commercial Traveler .... Book-keeper . . Carpenter ..... Clerk .......... Custom House .... . . . . Teacher ...... Policeman . . . . .Druggist ..... Clergyman ........ .... Residence. Deceased. Newark Valley, N. Eau Claire, Wis. Newburgh. Newburgh. Newburgh. Corinth, Miss. Newburgh Newburgh. Newburgh. . Binghamton. Morning Sun, Ohio N ewburgh. Newburgh. H Newburgh. Newburgh. Chicago. Deceased. Newburgh. Newburgh. Newburgh. New York City. Cornell University. Goshen. Elmira, N. Y. Detroit, Mich. Name. Brown, Georgia. .... . . Crist, Estelle ......... Carter, Sarah F. ..... . Dickey, Sarah M.. . . . . Goldsmith, Emma A.. Goodrich, Katie L .... Halsey, Sarah E ...... Hanmore, Lizzie DeC. McCord, Anna ....... Miller, Mary A ....... Miller, Katie I ...... . . Murray, Lizzie ........ McCutcheon, Katie E. . Pollock, Mary E ...... Stitt, Mary. ........ . . Stocker, Lizzie ....... Tompkins, Nettie ..... Young, Lizzie. . . . Corwin, David I ...... Doyle, James C ...... .. 1872. N Vifzriz' Qzzz' Paiifzzrf' Present Name or Occupation. Reeidenee. Mrs. Stephen Bond .... ...Denver, Col. Mrs. Benj. B. Odell, jr .... Deceased. Teacher ........ .. ...... jersey City. Teacher .... .. ......... ..Newburgh. Mrs Lucius D. Harris.. .Grand Rapids. Mrs. Robert Reed. ...... Boston. Mrs. Daniel Alsdort... .... Newburgh. ................Santa Cruz, Cal. Mrs. Ed. M. Murtfeldt .... Newburgh. Mrs A. Norton ......... West Winsted, Conn . . . ................ ...Deceased. Mrs. james M. Crane .... Newburgh. Mrs. Charles H. Buxton...Newburgh. Mrs. Jonas Fletcher.. .... Newburgh. Mrs. W. G. Kimball.. .... Newburgh. Teacher .... .. .......... Newburgh. Mrs. A. R. T. Little. ..... New York City. ................'........Deceased. Railroad Agent .... . . . Farmer................ Matteawan. Larrimore, N. D. Kingston, David ..... ..Druggisf ............... Newburgh. Kerr, Charles L. C .... Cash'r First N at'l Bank. . .Newburgh Lockwood, Robt. M.,Jr ....,................ ..Newburgh. Odell, Benj. B., jr ..... Pres. Newbih A. E. L. Co. Newburgh. Parmenter, Samuel j...Lawyer ................ Brooklyn. Sloat, William A. A. . ...Pharmacist... . . . . . .Newburgh. Taylor, G. Bradley .... Lawyer ...... ..... N ewburgh. Weed, Charles G ..... Accountant. .... ..... N ewburgh. 9-64- Name. Armour, Ellen H ........ Boyd, Isabella M .... .... Boyd, M. Katie. ........ . Brown, Sarah L ........ Carmichael, Janie A... Decker, Margaret I ..... De Forest, Laura .... Kerr, Hattie A... ..... Lloyd, Catharine E.. McAlles, Lizzie .......... McCann, Anna M ...... Robertson, Ada M ...... Van Dyck, Kittie E ..... Wiley, Anna B .... ....... Willson, Emma. ....,... . H 1873. Surgere Semper C071zznz'es." Present Name or Occupation. Mrs. J. Wilde .............. Mrs. Robert Lepper .... .... Mrs. David I. Hyndman Teacher. ..... .... Mrs. I. A. Hovey ...... Seamstress ...... .. ...... Mrs Mrs Mrs Mrs. Martin A. Luther ..... M. H. Hirschberg .... W. I. Martin ......... G. W. Husted ......, Teacher ................... Mrs. Wm. E. Doyle ..... Mrs. M. I. Brooks ...... Bancroft, john H ........ Book-keeper ....... Deyo, john ...... ......... P hysician ....... Good, Thomas .......... Harlow, Archie L. .... . Moore, Wm. F ........... Lawrence, Wm. A ...... Clerk ....... Lawyer ....... Cutter ........ Taggart, Wm. George. .Clerk ......... ........ ........ . Tole, james F ..... ....... Van Gaasbeck, H. D... Van Dyck, E. D. .... .... . Foreman, Rfgzlvfer Oflice.. Physician ...... Clergyman. Residence. Newburgh. Malden, Mass. New York City. Newburgh. Newburgh. Town of Newburgh New York City. Newburgh. Clinton. Newburgh. Fall River, Mass. Newburgh. Brooklyn. .NeWburgh. Sloatsburgh. Newburgh. Newburgh. Newburgh. Deceased. New York City. Poughkeepsie. Newburgh. Newburgh. Deckertown, N. J. Carlisle, N. Y. Name. Brown, Jennie E. . . Crist, Linda... . . . . Edmonston, Lizzie. Farrington, Rachael W. Flemming, Maggie l... Greaves, Nancy.. . . Hilton, Mary R. ..,. . . Hoag, Rachael ....... june, Jennie ...... . Kidd, Nellie . . King, Emma Louise. . . Leslie, Libbie ..... Lester, Nealie ..... Miller, F. Lizzie ...... Roberson, Katie A, Peck, Lillie .......... Stitt, Flora ...... Shay, Alpha G... . . Taggart, Libbie.. . . Wood, Sadie C .... Adams, johniB .... Dobbin, Robert I ..... Flemming, James . . Gearn, Walter A.. . Hayt, Wlfalter V .... Marshall, Albert.. . . McKissock, Wm. Seaman, Wm. K ...... Taylor, Alex. R .... Terwilliger, Theron C. . 1624. , U Labor w'7z:z'!.' Present Name orOccup:1t1ou. Mrs. john Dubois ....... Mrs. R. D. Traphagen. .. Organist ...... ......... Teacher. ............. . Mrs. C. D. Macornlie . . Teacher ...... .... . . . ivrig. 'cf ii. ia,-roi .....,. Mrs. N. S. Taylor ....... . Mrs. D. H. Ward. ...... . Mrs. Rev. D. G. McKay. Teacher ...... ....... . . . Mrs. C. Reynolds. ...... . Mrs. john H. Bancroft. . . Mrs. C. Embler ......... Mrs. L. P. Sfanbrough. Mrs. J. Williamson ...... Mrs. isooklkeeper. .... . . . . Civil Engineer .... .... Civil Engineer .... .... Clerk . . . Civil Engineer .... .... Williamson, l.Hamilton ...... ...... Wilson, Albert D ..... Civil Engineer Wisner, Victor S. ..... Farm er ..... . .-65.. A, Milligan ........ llesiclcnce. Newburgh. Newburgh. Newburgh. Lakewood, N. jf Aflamsville, R. I. Newburgh. Newburgh. Deceased. Newburgh. Newburgh. Newburgh. Shushan, N. Y. Fishkill-on-Hudson Newburgh. Newburgh. Newburgh. N ewburgh. Cold Spring. Newburgh. New York City. Deceased. Brooklyn. Deceased. St. Louis. Chicago. London, Eng. Newburgh. Deceased. Yonkers, N. Y. Deceased. Deceased. Dakota. cmd Forks, N. D Name. Abbott, Minnie. .... Barnes, Emma C... . Corwin, M. Fannie .... Gowcley, Mary j.... . . . Harper, Amanda K .... Jansen, Ella.. ..... . . . . Maclcinson, Carrie .... Milliken, Anna . . . McConnell, Alice H .... Pollock, Mary G.... . . . Ramsay, Anna M ..... Scott, Anna B. ...... .. Toohey, Mary A.... . . . Wright, Mary B .... .... Wilson, Libbie.. . . Wisner, Addle . . . Vigdor, Dora G ..... .. Abbott, Henry... . . . . . Barnes, Wm.. ..... . . . . Carlisle, john W. . Collins, Wfni. VV. .... . . Iohnes, Henry P.... . . . Smith, Albert C- ..... . Seeger, Albert H. . Wright, Ezra J. ...... . Wisner, Chas. F ...... 1875. "Swfgfz77mr." Present Name or Occupation. Teacher ..,. ............ Typewriter and Copyist. . Mrs. M. I. Lewis ........ .Mrs. Robt. Kidd ....... Mrs. C. Cranz .... ..... Millmer... ........ . . . . Mrs. Vancleroef. ,... .... . Teacher.. .... ........ . . Mrs. W. T. McCullough. Teacher. ..... ........ . . Mrs. Jas. Forestal. ...... . Governess... ...... . . . . . Mrs. Perry Weeks. ...... . Mrs. F. Rosenbaum... . . . Merchant... ,,,, ,,,,, , , , Manufacturer .... . . . .. Clergynran. .... . Farmer... . Lawyer. . . Plumber.. . . Lawyer. . . Clerk. ..... . Merchant... . . . Residence. Brooklyn. Newburgh. New York City. Middletown. .New York City. East Saginaw. Newburgh. Montgomery. Newburgh. . Newburgh. Newburgh. Newburgh. Matteawan, N. Y. Newburgh. Deceased. VVest Coldenham. Chicago. Brooklyn. .Allegan, Mich. Newburgh. Newburgh. New York City. Newburgh. Newburgh. New York City. Grand Forks, Dak Name. Atwood, Mary W ....... Brown, Libbie M ......... Cochrane, Lizzie M ..... Colville, Maggie ......... Decker, A.. Estelle .... . Edwards, Emily S ....... Fielding, Anna M ...... Fowler, Anna ............. Farrington, Mary F ..... Gaul, Lizzie M ....... .... Hilton, Satie F .,......... Hunter, Emma L ....... Jones, Ella ...........,... Low, Nettie B ........., .. Lendrum, julia. ......... . McCollum, Maggie .... .. Odell, Clara ........,...... Randolph, Clara ......... Sarvis, Ella M ........,... Scott, I. Ella... Stratton, Aggie B ...... .. 1876. " Sine !czb0rep1'aemz'a nzzllaf' Present Name or Occupat Mrs Mrs. Decker, Linda K ....... .Mrs. . A. C. Weaver ........ - Residence. .N ewburgh. .Deceased. .............................Newburgh. Dr. M. C. Stone ...... Newburgh.. S. Rumsey ........ .Teacher .............. . Mrs. R. Mellany ............ Teacher ............. . ...... . Mrs. L. M. Allen ............ Mrs. Rev. S. G. Shaw ..... Teacher ........ - ............... ......Central Valley. Newburgh. ......Newburgh. .East Norwalk, Ct .Lakewood, N. J. New York City. .Walton, N. Y. .Middletown Clerk ......... . . ...... ...... N ew York City. Mrs. W. L. Smith ........ ...Paterson, Nrj. " C. L. Chatterton ...... Newburgh. ff I. W. Moar ........ ...Colorado ......Newburgl1. Mrs W. Irvin ....... . Brooklyn. Mrs. A. Cursol ..... ...... J ersey City. . . ...Mrs Mrs. Thompson, Annie L .......... Van Hagen, Libbie. .... Mrs Vernol, Emma ............ Van VVyck, Jessie A .... Van Keuren, Nettie .... Abrahams, Barney D . . Donoghue, Charles H. Hanmore, Louis E .... Lewis, john N., jr.. . . . Leslie, S. john ........... McCormick, Peter ...... McCroskery, L. W. Y.. Mapes, Eugene E ....... Millspaugh, Martin B.. O'Neill, john F .......... H CC Mrs. J. E. Smith ............ New York City. P. Decker ........ R. J. Dobbin .... W. E. Squier Victor H. Middleton M. Millspaugh ....... . . .New York City. .N ewburgh. .New York City. .N ewburgh. Grand Rapids, Mich .Montgomery. Chicago. Commercial Traveler. .... . Saloon-keeper .............. .Newburgh Physician ......... ............ N ewburgh. Lawyer ....... ...... D enver. Shoedealer ...... ...... N ewburgh. Grocer ...... ...... N ewburgh. Lawyer... .................... Newburgh. Clerk ......................... .New York City. Commercial Traveler ...... Montgomery. Letter Carrier. .............. Newburgh. -53 ... Name. Albertson, Alice ......... Baldwin, Eliza M ........ . Bowman, Ella I .......... Carpenter, Henrietta.. Cochran, Eleanor A ..... Dietze, Elizabeth M ..... Ferguson, Minnie ........ Greaves, Elizabeth ...... Goldsmith, Ada F ....... Howell, Martha B ....... Leech, Margaret J ....... Lindsay, Martha A ..... McCann, Sarah C.. 1877. 'tl-7'i1zi.v Corona! Opus." Present Name or Occupation. Mrs Mrs Mrs Mrs Mrs Mrs. Frank G. Peck ........ Tibballs ..... ........... George D. Barns .... W. Charles Johnston. A. Roth ................. I. Vernol ..... ....... Mrs. Worthey Conner. Teacher ........................ Mrs. Palmer ........ ....... Moncar, Ida. May ....... Owen, Sarah F .......... O'Reilly, Rose A ....... Sagar, Sarah A ......... .. Scofield, A. Carrie ....... smith, Ellaj .......,...... Stratton, Margaret Thorp, Mary S ............ Thorp, Fannie I ......... Waring, Josie ............. Weed, Emma R .......... Wells, Emma E .......... Wilson, Martha A ....... Wood, Kate A ............ Clarkson, David M. Mrs. james W. Barnes .... .--,................ Residence. New Haven, Conn New York. Sedalia, Mo. Newburgh. Newburgh. New York. Newburgh. Newburgh. New York. Newburgh. Matteawan, N. Y. Newburgh. Haverstraw. Newburgh. New Windsor. Compositor QHarper'sj ..... Brooklyn. Mrs. S. Marsden ............ Mrs. A. N. Chambers, Teacher ....... ....... ....... Dressmaker ....... Mrs. O. I. Covert ...... Teacher .......... Teacher ........ . . .Dressmaker . ............... .. Mrs. Thomas Moore, Ir... Manufacturer.. ....... . ...... Newburgh. Newburgh. Deceased. Newburgh. Newburgh. N ewburgh. Newburgh. Newburgh. Newburgh. Newburgh. .Portland, Or. Name. - Present Name or Occupat Chapman, John H ....... Estahrook, Frank E .... Gearn, George F ........, I-Iorobin, George I .. Druggist. ...... .Architect ....... Clerk .......... . Book-keeper .... HRTIISOH Matthew D ..................................... Macdonald, Benj. I ...... Nutt, John I .... .... ...... Peck, Charles Supt. Gas Works ............ journalist ............. Book-keeper ..,.. Peirce, Dexter .... .....Ranchn1an ....... Residence. Newburgh. New York City. ........Newburgh. . . . . .Cornwall-on-Hu Deceased. Newburgh. Newburgh. New York City. Dakota, Shelton William F .........................., . .... ........ . Stewart, Samuel L ...... Wood, A. Stanley ........ Wood, james T. L ...... Lumber Merchant.. Merchant ............ ...... . . Lawyer ..., . . . 9 WF this Newburgh. Newb urgh. 8 A 5 l dilgna vera, X-Y F gg N Y ! xi Name. Brown, Millie ............. Bell, Nettie A .......... Brundage, Ada E ......... Bennett, Lena E ........ Chatterton, Sarah A .... Champion, Minnie G... Champion, Carrie Crowell, Kittie ............ Donaldson, Alice ....... Dobbin, Minnie A. I... 1878. " Excellere Seffgber C07Zd7E.l1 Present Name or Occupation. Residence. Teacher ..... ... ... ..... Newburgh. Deceased. Newburgh. Teacher ....... ..... .Dressmaker..., ..... . ...... Newburgh. .M1ll1ner ........................ Newburgh. Mrs. Alexander G. Hall... .Mrs. Mrs. jesse Booth ........ New Brighton, S. I Peter I. Turck ........ Malden, N. Y. .. . .Campbell Hall, N. ...............,..................Deceased. Hulse, Irene F. ........... Mrs. F. S. McLaughlin .... Newburgh. Haigh, Sarah A .......... .Mrs. Hilton, Minnie T ........ Mrs Martin, May .............. Millspaugh, Carrie ....... Millspaugh, Estelle ...... Odell, Katie B ............ Pryor, Lizzie ....... Roe, Ella O ...... Stern, Lena ...... Scott, Anna I ............. Scott, Emma E ........... Schoonmaker, Mary .... Smedes, Fanny B ........ Templeton, Aggie ........ Taggart, Susie I ......... Waite, Emma B ...... Wells, Anna ........ Mrs. Albert Hepworth ..... Wethun, Belgium. . J. J. Nutt ....... ........ N ewburgh. Wm. M. Petingale. .. Teacher ........ ........... M1's. Frank VVashburn . Mrs. Mrs. Mrs. Mrs. Mrs. x Geo. I. Horobin .... .. Newburgh. ...Newburgh ....Piedmont, Ala. Newburgh. Cornwall. Martin .................. Paterson, N. L. Stern ................ Houston ................ Middletown. Aurora, Ill. George Goldsmith...Matteawan, N. Y. .Teacher. ................. ..... N ewburgh. Long Island. Teacher ...... . .. Dressmaker. ............... . Newburgh. Newburgh. Mrs. Iames T. Boothroyd.. Town of Newburgl ..71- Newburgh. 1 Name. Present Name or Occupation, Residence. White, Ada .......... Mapes, Win. H ........... McCray, james W ....... Pryor, Hugh MCC ...... . Quackenbush, F. T ...... Photographer ......... ...... Hotel Proprietor .......... L. Expressrnan ....... ...... Speir, james ............... Clerk: ............ Tarnkin, Chas. E ......... Terwilliger, Geo. VV .... Wilkes, Wm. I ......,..... Druggist ...... .Conductor ...... ..... ...... Asst. Postmaster ............ Bradley, C. Cole ......... Physician .......... . .. Chamberlain, ,T.Chester. Chamberlain, Wm. I .... Fleming, Henry A ....... Hyndman, Robert, Ir... Hyndnian, Wm. H ...... Johnston, Arthur M .... Electrician. . . . .. Missionary .... .. Book-keeper ....... ..... Contractor ...... Lawyer ..... .Lawyer ..... .AN 7 fqm liz D .-72-. Newburgh. Newburgh. ' Asbury Park. Deceased. New York. Newburgh. Brooklyn. New York. Cheyenne, Wy New York India. .Newburgh. Newburgh. N ewburgh. Newburgh. City 1879. 'ifllkffez' gui Lrzb0nzz'." Name. Present Name or Occupat Residence. Barnes, Anna M ......... Teacher ....................... Newburgh. Barnes, Anna ..... . Newburgh. Barnes, Minnie .......... Mrs. Rev. W. E. Webster..Whitesboro, N. Y. Bennett, Lena E ......... ................................. N ewburgh. Boynton, Florence C ................ ....... N ewburgh. Brown, Millie ............ Teacher ....... ....... N ewburgh. Colden, Mary. ....,...... Dressmaker ..... . Cochran, Caroline M ............................ ...... Chapman, Louise ........ Chadborn, Ella A ........ DuBois, Mary T.. Mrs. Dinsmore. ..... ........ Teacher ....................... Mrs. VV. H. Doughty .... 1. Dougherty, Isabella H. .Teacher ...................... . Goodale, Katie A ........ June, Aggie ....... Teacher ...... Leroy, Anna C .... f ........,...................... ...... Leghorn, Sarah E. McConnell, Maggie Mrs. Colmery ............... 1.0. Mrs. Elmer E. Roosa ...... O'Reilly, Mary E .......................................... Purdue, Jessie Peck, Della C ...... Roche, Rhoda M ....... Smith, Irene F. Van Wagner, Myra ...... Barnes, 'Edwin VV ...... . Stenographer 81 T'writer.. Mrs. F. VV. Miller ..... .... .Accountant ...... ........,.. Mrs. Wm. I. Brinckerhoff.. Newburgh. Newburgh. Waterbury, Conn. Newburgh. Nebraska City. Newburgh. Newburgh. New York City. New York City. Illinois. Newburgh. Newburgh. .N ew York City. Newburgh. Fishkill-on-Hudson Mrs. A. S. lVood ............ Newburgh. .Merch ant .................... .Marlborough Brown, Edward ............................. Beveridge, john F .... Belknap, Edwin S ....... .Gentleman . .... . .Merchant ....... .... ....... ..... . . Deceased. Newburgh. ....Bridgeport, Ct. Van Wagner Sta'n, N Y Name, P t N O p t Residence, XESCTA 211116 Ol' CCU 3. IOD- Getty, james K ......... ..National Ex. Ollice Galt, Clarence H ...... . Kerr, George W., jr.. Melick, Edward P ....... Peck, George W ......... Prentice, Vincent R ..... Roosa, Elmer E ......,... Scharps, Benjamin ...... Staples, john A... .... Weed, Frank.. .... Wiggins, Levi O .......... Wright, Arthur H ........ Physician ....... jeweler ................ Supt. Telephone Co ' Seattle, Wash. Merchant ......... ............ New York City New York City. Newburgh. Book-keeper ....... . ......... New York. Lawyer .......... Lawyer ............ Manufacturer ....... . Physician ....... Book-keeper ..... McCutcheon, Wm. E..,.Book-keeper..... ,ejffalegu N ewhurgh. New York City Newburgh. New York City New York City Newburgh. Name.. Barnes, Minnie ........... Baldwin, Clara V ........ Brockaway, Etta ........ Churchill, Alice. D ...... Crilly, Emma I ........... Crowther, Ada ........... Farrington, Emma Gerow, Josephine ....... Marshall, Mary C ........ Mulholland, Sarah A .... Moore, Ellen L ........... Morris, Luella E .......... McMeekin, Rachel .... .. Ostrander, Hattie. ..... . Samuels, Amelia ......... Tice, Lottie A ........... .. Taylor, Margaret .... ..... Wilson, Mary E .......... Williamson,Hannah M. Wilkes, Jessie R ........ Alsdorf, Charles T ....... Bower, D. Herbert ...... Brown, William R ....... Cassedy, Wm. F ......... Cathcart, Wm. In .... ..... Chapman, Fred. C ...... Doyle, Fred ........,...... Doyle, Frank ....... 1 88 0. '4 Excelsior." Present Name or Occupation. Mrs. J. H. Valentine ....... Mrs. Durgen ...... ....... Clerk ........ .... ....... Trimmer ........ ....... Saleswoman .... .. ..... .. Saleswoman ...... . .... .. Dressmaker ...... ....... Mrs, Sargent ...... ....... Mrs. Peter Millspaugh ..... Mrs. james Chalmers ...... Teacher ....... ...... Clerk ..... .. ..... .. Musician .........,.. . .... . Merchant Tailor ............ Statin Agt.Cornwall-on-H. Lawyer ........................ Salesman ..... ...... Salesman ..... ...... Farmer .... Residence. Middlehope. Newburgh. Paterson, N. J. Quincy, Mass. Newburgh. Newburgh. Newburgh, Newburgh. ' Newburgh. N ewburgh. N ewburgh. Goshen. Newburgh. Newburgh. Newburgh. Philadelphia. Newburgh. ,Newburgh Newburgh. Chateaugay, Can Newburgh. Newburgh. Newburgh. Newburgh. Chicago. .New York. North Dakota. Deceased. Name. Present Name or Occupation. Haring, George Hamill, Edward D ,..... Jansen, john R.... .. Merritt, George H ...... Pollock, David R ........ Peirce, Albert S ........ Ross, Edward C ....,... Scofield, Frank ........... Smith, A. Lincoln ...... Shay, J. Milton .......... Wylie, James A ......... VViggins, Charles L ..,... Shipping Clerk ..... Reporter ....... Machinist ...... Druggist ...... Salesman ....... .Book-keeper ..... .Miller ......... .. Civil Engineer ..... Barber .......... .Salesman ....... .Architect ...... Druggist . .. w ill '3-4+-H ill' B I 1 -75- Residence. Newburgh. St. Paul, Minn. Newburgh. Newburgh. New Haven. Newburgh. Newburgh. Brooklyn. New York. New York City Newburgh. Name. Bartels, Sophia .......,... Barnhart, Alfaetta ....... Boyd, Sarah ...,. .... Chapman, R. Bell. Gerecke, Lulu.. ........ . . Haigh, H. Maria .....,.... Hawes, Eliza .............. Halstead, Emma S Hilton, Ida L ...... Marvel, Jennie ,..... . . . .. Miller, Clara. .... Stewart, Mary A .... Tole, Anna M ..... VanlfVyck, Mary F ...... Weed, Grace ...... .. Burnett, john A... Belknap, Wm. C ........ Bartlett, Harry A ...... .. Barnes, George D. Coldwell, Wm. H ......., Dubois, Ira L ............ Marvel, Harry A ........ Merritt, Hiram .......... Phillips, Fred. L ......... Smith, Stephen I ........ Smith, George C... Terpenning, W. M ...... 1881. " Sawyer Disrefzfes. 'l Present Name or Occupation. Dressmaker .... Mrs. Wilson ..... Teacher ................ Mrs. Henry, Teacher ..... Mrs. - .................... Music Teacher ........ .. . Mrs. A. Weed ...... Teacher ......... Mrs. Wm. Gatter ,.....,..... Teacher .......... ...... .... Teacher .... .......... Mrs. H. Rogers ...... Clergyman .......... Manufacturer ..... . . Bank Clerk .,......... ....... Coal and Grain Dealer .... Salesman ...................... Book-keeper ..... ..... . Book-keeper ....... ..... . Coin. Traveler .............. . Lawyer ........................ Cashier Montezuma Bank, Bank Clerk ................... Lawyer .............. ..... Reside Newburgh. Brooklyn. Newburgh. Newburgh. Newburgh. Newburgh. .Topeka, Ka Newburgh. Newburgh. Newburgh. Newburgh. Newburgh. Newburgh. Newburgh. Sing Sing. Newburgh. N ewburgh. Newburgh. .Sedalia, Mo. London. Newburgh. Newburgh. Newburgh. Syracuse. Cortez, Col. Cortez, Col. Newburgh. x 1882. '4 Hz: rnefzzinzlme jzwabiff' Name. Albertson, Mary A .... Brownlee, Jennie B ..... Clark, Annie. .......' .,... Fowler, Ella .............., Present Name or Occupation. Mrs. Fred G. Wells... Teacher ..... .... . ...... . Teacher ................,...... Johnston, Maude L.....Mrs. Frank VVard ..... Kelly, Mottie F ......... Kennie, Nettie,.' ...... .. McConnell, Eflie L ..... McCutcheon, Mary.... Oakley, Mary F ......... Mrs. Wm. R. Harrison..- r .Mrs. C. H. Galt ............ Wenzel, Eliza A.. ....... Mrs. T. S- Schuyler .... Boynton, Edward C.,jr. Chambers, james L ..... Forsyth, Frank E ........ Graham, james G., jr... Miller, A. Lincoln I ..... M. Sz E. Engineer ......... Book-keeper. ..... ...- . Clerk ......................... . Lawyer ........................ Teacher.. ............. ..... . . Residence . I Marcellus, N. Y. Newburgh. Newburgh. Marlborough. Brooklyn. .N ewburgh. Deceased. Newburgh. .Seattle, Wash. Newburgh. Brooklyn. Brooklyn. Newburgh. Newburgh. Newburgh. Ins. and Real Estate Agt..Newburgh. Millspaugh, Thomas H.Stenographer ...... ....... Odell, George C. D ..... Samuels, Sigisniund ...... Smith, George K ....... Waring, Harry M ....... ....Newburgh. .Student ..... '....... ....... C o lumbia College Custom House ..... ....... N ew York. .Medical Student ............ Newburgh. .Manufacturer ........ ....... N ewburgh. .. . . Newburgh. Wood, john A., Ir ....... Book-keeper ...... 5:------X3 gi-Hx: Woo 050 .L 1883. 4' G1'fm'czZ'z'0fze 'wrzrimurf' Name. Present Name or Occupation. Residence. Boynton, Helen T ........,,...................... ...... N ewburgh. Brundage, Lillie A ...... .Teacher ........................ Newburgh. Estabrook, Lillie O ..... .Assistant Librarian ......... Newburgh. Flanagan, Kate A ....... Teacher ............... ...... Gerecke, Pauline ........ Mrs. E. T. Smith ..... ...,. . Newburgh. N ewburgh. Johnston, Maude L ...... ...................... . ...... . See 1882. Laib, Fannie R. A ...... Teacher ...... McConnell, Effie L ...... Teacher .... .... Newburgh. Newburgh. New Windsor. O7Re1lly, Kate A .................,............... ...... . Post, Ida E ............... Quick, Jennie S .......... Roosa, Nettie G ........ Schofield, Maggie R .... Mrs. D. W. B. Thompson Stern, Theresa ..... ...... . Taylor, Emma V. Thorpe, Lena R. ...... . Totten, Lizzie ............ Mrs. Wm. Rouse. .......... Troy, N.fY. Teacher.. . .... .......... . . .Newburgh. .Mrs. David R. Thompson Boston, Mass. Garrisons. Mrs. M. Fox ,.... .... ........ H a rtford, Ct. Mrs. S. Nichols .............. Newburgh. .Mrs. C. H. Pierson .....,... New Windsor. Teacher ........... ........... Woodin, Jennie B ....... Mrs. George Dart ........... Brown, Harry ........... .Clerk ................... ..... Delancey, Charles H. . .Student . . ... DuBois, Biewster G...Farmer .... Hilton, William T ....... Real Estate ..... Hoffman, William A ..... Clerk ........... Hyer, Walter E ........... Electrician ...... Olmstead, Clarence E...Machinist .... . Schoonmaker, Samll V.Merchant .... Schofield, William R. . .Surveyor . Townsend, J. Aug ustus.Salesman ........... Van Hagen, Charles H. Hardware Newburgh. Tuxedo. .Middletown New York Med. Col Marlborough. Newburgh. .......Goshen. Newburgh. Newburgh. N ewb urgh. Fishkill. Newburgh. Merchant ........ Brooklyn. Name, Bancroft, Alida G ..... Carter, Mary E. . . Clark, Florence B. Conway, Nellie M .... . Everett, Emma. . . Farrington, Kittie I 884. 4' Dzzrafef' esi ence Present Name or Occuoatio R Cl Mrs. Fred. V. Carpenter.Newburgh. Teacher ........... . . . Mrs. C. R. Stevenson .... . Mrs. 1- -l Teacher . . . Newburgh. Newburgh. . . , ...Highland Falls Newburgh. .......................Newburgh. Fowler, Lillie H. . Teacher ............. .. .Newburgh. X Fullagar, Anna. .. Mrs. C. C. Bourne. ...... N ewburgh. Hilton, Clara ........ Clerk, P. O. ....... . . ,Newburgh Howell, Nettie C ...... .....,....... .... N e wburgh. Lamb, Clara B ....... Organist ..... ...... N ewburgh. ' Lydecker, Clara B .... Mrs. Hugh Gibson New York. Nichols, Maggie C ............ .............. N ewburgh. Post, Ada A ................. ............ . ..Newburgh. Schouten, Ella F. Mrs. Wrn. E. W. Knight. .Newburgh Schoiield, Kittie M.. .......... .............. F ishkill. Stern, Satie .......... Mrs. Oscar Michel. ..... ..Newark, N. J. Taggart, Rebecca.. .... Teacher ......... Newburgh. Totten, Lizzie ....... Teacher . . . Newburgh. Van Duzer, Anna ..... Teacher . . . .Newburgh Van Wyck, Anna B. ...Teacher . . . .... ..Newburgh. Walsh, Alice F ..... ................. ..... D e ceased. Halstead, Chas. H ...... Leech, William ........ .. Merritt, Daniel ........... Book-keeper ..... Druggist ............. Moore, Henry ........... Railroad Clerk ..... Sagar, Daniel W ......... Teacher. ......... .. - 30 - ..Mt. Kisco. Newburgh. Newburgh. Newburgh. New Windsor. Name . Bayles, Anna E .... ,...... Campbell, Jennie M .... Corquodale, Jessie C... Crilly, Lizzie ..,............ Delaney, May E .... Delany, Katie ..... Dickey, Edith S .....,.... Fowler, Hattie J ......... Fowler, Ida ...... .. Himes, Ina VV ............ Himes,.Florence B ..... . Kelly, Emma K .... Taylor, M. Hattie.. Kimball, Mary A... 1885. "Fas Far." Present Name or Occupat .Teacher ...,............. .Student ..,...... . Book-keeper ..... . Teacher . .... . Teacher ...... . Teacher ...... . Teacher ........ . Book-keeper ..... ...... Teacher ,...,.. ........ Mrs. W. H. Callahan ..... Teacher ........ .. ........ .. Mrs. Geo. H. Merritt McCabe, Anna F ....... ..Mrs. J. J. Dougherty. Miller, Anna L ........... Miller, Marion S .... .... Moore, Mary E ..... Moshier, Anna ......... . . . Mowbray, Tillie .... Rogers, Agnes E... Sagar, Charlotte .......... Shay, Ella E ....... Shay, Jessie D ...... Simson, Laura ....., Daniels, Charles. C Book-keeper ..... .. Teacher ...... .......... Mrs. William Jones . Teacher....,. ..... ......Milliner. .. Teacher...... . Musician ................ Mrs. Hiram Meritt... Commercial Traveler Gardner, W. Frank ............................ .... .-81.1 io Residence. ......Newburgh .N ewburgh. ..Albany Normal Newburgh. ......Newburgh . ..... Newburgh. ......Newburgh Newburgh. Newburgh. Albany. Albany. .Newburgh ' .N ewburgh. Newburgh. Newburgh. Deceased. Little Britain. Newburgh. ... . .. .Boston. Newburgh. Newburgh. New Windsor. New York. New York. ......Newburgh New York. Deceased. Name. Gerecke, Frank W ..,... King, Robert ............. Mandeville, Williani F ....... ............... McDonnell, Ralph A... Monell, joseph W ....... Mould, Martin G .... ..... O'Grady, John I ......... Reilly, Thomas ........... Ryan, William A ......... Scharps, D. David ,.,..... Smith, Fred B ............ Snyder, Raymond I ...... Tompkins, Frank W ..... Toohey, Edward I ...... Present Name or Occupation Student ........................ Book-keeper ..... ....... Student ...... Book-keeper ........ . ...,. Quassaick Bank ......... .. Lawyer ............ ....... Iburnalist ........... ...... Clerk ............ . Student Yale College ..... Quassaick Bank ............. Clerk ...........,..... ...., Residence. N ewburgh. ., . . . . .Deceased N ewburgh. Yale College. Newburgh. Newburgh. Newburgh. N ewburgh. Newburgh N ewburgh. New York Law Clerk ...... ....... N ewburgh .Undertaker .... .,..... N ewburgh ...4s. .gQ..- ,821 New York. City ' Name. Barnes, Mary 1886. 4' V67'Z'l'Cl.S' Wfzrzlf' Present Name or Occupation. Residence. Bennett, Ada M ......... Stenogra Brown, Ratie ..... Burnett, Lizzie ....... Cleary, Mamie G ........ ph'r 81 Typewritlr Clerk ...,...................... Newburgh. N ew York City. .Newburgh Deceased. . ..Newburgh. Cochrane,Gussie ......... Teacher .... ,,,,,, C Oldenhgm, Donoghue, Anna F ...... Teacher .............. ......... N ewburgh. Estabrook, Hattie C .... Stenograph'r 8: Typewrit'r Newburgh. Gibb, Lizzie ..... '. ........ Mrs. Robert Herman ...... Newburgh. Hill, Mabel L ............ Mrs. Leslie P. DeGroot...Knoxville, Tenn. Murtfeldt, Bertha ........... .............................. N orth Newburgh. McGregor, Katie M ..... Teacher ...... . ...... Hillburn, N. Y. I Peck, Hattie M ........... Teacher ...... ....... N ewburgh. Post, Fannie ...... ,.................. ....... N e wburgh. Scharps, Ruth ............ Book-keeper ...... ..... N ewburgh. Spencer, Fannie M ..... .Organist ........ . ..New York City. Tweed, Sadie ............. ............. . ....... N ewburgh. Vincent, Jessie G ........ Teacher ...... .... N ewburgh. Bell, David C ...,. ...... C lerk. .............. ....... N ewburgh. Brown, Samuel F ...... .Stenographer ....... ....... N ewburgh. Calyer, Frederick F ..... .Stenographer ..... ....... N ew York City. Coutant, Wm. A ......... Clerk. ........... ........ ...... N e wburgh. Hawthorne, Thos. M...Assistant Librarian ......... Newburgh. Hilton, Robert G ........ Hoey, Edward P .... Hoyt, Osman P ......... . Jansen, Edgar W ........ Kimball, Harry H ...... Mould, Stephen H ...... Wilkin, Crosby I ........ Stuart, Charles ....... Student ........ ............... Book-keeper ...... .Student ...... .. Book-keeper ...... Hatter ......... Student ....... Druggist ,..... -g3.. .Yale Col., New Haven .......New York City. ... ....Syracuse University .......Newburgh. .......Newburgh. .. ...Cornell University, .......Kansas City. Deceased I887. 'ffiifzis Coffzmczz' O-ibm." Name. Present Name or Occupatio Residence. Colden, Abbie L ........ .Teacher ............... ..... . Newburgh. Coutant, L. May. ...Teacher ......... z.. ....... Newburgh. Coxson, Belle H ........................ Newburgh. Cronin, Olive R .......... Teacher ....... .Newburgh. Harrison, Mary E ....... Typewriterui... ...... Newburgh. Henderson, -Jennie ...... Box-maker ...... . . .N ewburgh. Kidd, Eliza W ........... Teacher ,........ ............. N ewburgh. Kidd, Gertrude ,......... Mrs. Fred Boger ............ Brooklyn. May, Mary A ...... ....... T eacher .............. .... . .N ewburgh. McCloy, Jennie A ...... Book-keeper ....... Newburgh. Potosky, Fannie ..................,........... ...... N ew York City. Quillan, Katie A ............................. Newburgh. Roome, Mary E ......... Dressmaker ....... ...... N ewburgh. Shafer, Susie C.. .. .................. ...... N ewburgh. Simpson, Mary C .................. . ..... Newburgh. Stern, Sancha ........... ..Clerk ..... ...... .N ewburgh. Terwilliger, Anna A ..... Clerk ..... ...... ...... N e wburgh. Thompson, Annie E ..... Dressmaker ....... ...... N ewburgh. Todd, Ella E. ............. Teacher ....... ...... N ewburgh. Tutliill, Addie ,..... ....,.......... ...... N e whurgh. Walshe, Nellie F ....... Milliner ...... .. ...Newburgh. Alsdorf, Edward P ....... Caterer ........... ...... N ewburgh. Drew, john E .......... ...Book-keeper ....... . .... .Newburgh Fowler, Albert M ....... .Studentf .... .... .... . C ornell University Hannan, john ........... .Compositor ..... ..... . Newburgh. Howell, Fred B ......,... Book-keeper ...... .Newhurgh. Kesseler, Anthony ....... Pharmacist ...... .New York City. McErlean, Hugh A ...... Hatter ..... ...... N ewburgh. Murray, john G. ...... Mason .. .. ...... Newburgh. Presler, Eugene R... ..Clerk...- .... Newburgh. Repp, Wm. H. G ......., Musician ...... West Point. Russell, Eli R ............ Clerk ........ ..... . Newburgh. Scott, W. Clement. Student .......... .Yale College. Smith, Wm. Lawson. .Patternmaker ..... Newburgh. Townsend, Edwin M...Clerk ........... Newburgh. Woolsey, Alzamora, jrujournalist ...... . Newburgh. -34- Name. Buckmaster, Emma Culbert, Emma L ........ Dugan, Mary L . ...... . Delancy, ClaraE ......... Dickey, Laura S ......... 1838. "Ammo ez' .Fzriefl Present Name or Occupatio Mllliner .........,........... Mrs. Wm. H. Culbert ..... . Residence. Newburgh. .Schenectady Teacher ............ ........... N ewburgh. Student ..... Student ..... Fuller, Lottie G .......................... Gerecke, Amy ........... Hannan, Eliza ......... .. Hill, Genevieve ......... .Student ....... Teacher ....... Student ..... Lenahan, Mary F ........ Operator ..... McCullough, Agnes .... Moore, Hattie ......... O'Brien, Kate E ...... Pope, Mamie I ....... Scharps, Lillie ........... .Operator ....... .Book-keeper ....... Scofield, Helen C ,....... Student .... Shaffer, Clara L .......... Snowden, Sadie W ...... Teacher ...... Student ..... Van Cleft, Josephine S ....... ...... Van Wyck, Lillie I ...... White, Carrie ......... Bartlett, George C.. Buss, Fred G ............ Hoyt, Gordon W... jones, Percy ....... Kesseler, joseph ......... Kimball, Frank G ...... Scarlett, George Smith, jesse W ...... Templeton, George .... Weller, Geo. S ...... Student ..... ....Brick Manufacturer.......... Printer ........................ .....Student........ Clerk ..... ... Law student ....... . .... Student..... .Carpenter ......... . . ...Coal Merchant. . .. .. . .-.85... Albany. ......Cornell University. .. ....Newburgh Cornell University. Newburgh. .Albany Newburgh. Newburgh. Newburgh. Newburgh. ... ..Cornwall-on-Hudson Newburgh. Albany. . ......Newburgh ... . . ..Albany. Newburgh. .Albany N ewburgh. Newburgh. Newburgh. Syracuse University. ......Deceased ......New York City. .. ....Newburgh Newburgh. ......Cornell University. N ewburgh. Newburgh. 1889. "1Ve,Cczz'e Mzzfz'r." Name. Present Name or Occupation. Bell, Anna. ............. . Brown, Carrie F.. ...... Barrett, Maud E ....... Brown, Clara B ......... Cook, Margaret M ....... Crane, Edith E .......,................ Crilly, Ida ................. Felter, Carrie G ..... Johnston, Ida A ..... Kidd, Frances B ........ McDowell, Anna B ...... May, Mary V ............. Millspaugh, Carrie ....... OlBrien, Theresa M ..... .Clerk ....... Dressmaker ..... Teacher ....... Student... .. .. Student ..... Rea, Lisetta ............... ,....... . . Schnitger, Clara L.. B... Smith, Josephine ......... Smith, Nellie M .......... Tice, Ida R ........ Wait, Lena C ......... Wiltsie, Anna M ........ Brundage, Howard .... Burke, Frank P ...... ,.... Beckman, Horatio B. jr. Teacher ..... Teacher ...... Clerk ........ .Carpenter ...... Student ...... Student ...... Carlisle, Theodore M ..,. Student .... .... Diinmick, Guy ..... 1 ...., Fleming, Harvey B ..... Fraser, George D ...,... Howard, George E. .... . Mapes, Frank W ......... Moss, Clarence B. ..... . Oakley, Isaac K ......... Sneed, joseph B ......... Whitehill, Charles H .... .Book-keeper ... Joiner. ...... . .Clerk ............ Book-keeper ..... Bank Clerk ...... Clerki ..........,. Clerk .............. Arc Light Co ...... ..... Manufacturer ...... ..... Residence. Newburgh. Newburgh. Newburgh. West Newburgh. Newburgh. Newburgh. Newburgh. Newburgh. Newburgh. N ewburgh. N ewburgh. Oxford Depot. Albany. Albany. Newburgh. Newburgh. Pawling, N. Y. Pawling, N. Y. Newburgh. C Newburgh. Newburgh. Newburgh. Niagara University Eastman College Newburgh. Newburgh. Newburgh. Newburgh. Newburgh. Newburgh. ' Newburgh. Newburgh. A Newburgh. Newburgh. Name. Beede, Lizzie. .... .. Clark, May E ....... Clarke, May Y ........ Coutant, Hattie F .... Davis, Kate ........... Day, Maggie A. ..... . " Esre Qzmm Vizierzfl Dunlap, Maggie R ..,... Dougherty, Bessie .....,.... Doughty, Phoebe V. V. .... . Foster, Annie E ......... Farrar, Mary F ........ Fowler, Margaret J.. Graham, Jennie Hahn, Alice L ......., Hasbrouck, Anna P. Hunter, Milly ......... Minty, Grace A .........,. McCullough, Dora E ...... McCullough, May .... McGregor, jean S ...... Moore, Minnie .... .... Shaw, Grace L ..... Swain, F. Lillian ..... Twiname. Lucia C.. Walsh, Libbie S ..... n. Walshe, Minnie E ........ Carson, james ........ Chatlield, George H erbert ....... ..... .... Q Residence. ......Newburgh. .Newburgh. .Newburgh. .....Newburgh. .....Newburgh. .......Newburgh. .......Newburgh. Newburgh. Matteawan. Newburgh. Newburgh. .......Newburgh. .....Newburgh. Cornwall-on-Hudson Balmville. .......Newburgh. .....Newburgh. . ..... Newburgh. ..... ...Newburgh .......Hillburn, N. Y. . .Newburgh. ......Newburgh. .....Newburgh. .. .....Newburgh. ... ..Newburgh. . .Newburgh .N ewburgh. .Cornwall. Name. Daly, John I ............. Dimmick, james H ...... Harman, Charles ....... Hoffman, Louis G... Hagan, Hugh I ...... jefferson, William Kelly, Daniel W7 ..... Merritt, Theodore A Noble, Frank P ...... Noe, Fred ........ Peck, john C...... Perry, Samuel B ..... Poyer, Frank ......... Senior, Augustus Sneed, Fred M ...,.,. Snyder, Frank S ...... Taylor, P. B., jr. ....... . Toleman, Charles B. Wenzel, F. William. Woodruff, Nelson ....... -:nf by .Xl , -im .fA w as - as 88 - -...., R' esidence. Newburgh. Newburgh. Newburgh. Newburgh. Newburgh. Newburgh. Town of Newburgh Newburgh. Mendham, N. Newburgh. Newburgh. Bethel. ,... ... .Newburgh Newb urgh. Newburgh. ....Newburgh Newburgh. Little Britain, N ewbui gh. Newburgh. elgnewZecZg enteQ ln Writing our hoolf We recei'ved much material aid from parties not connected with the school. The record of graduates would have heen an impossibility vvithoutthe generous assistance of outside friends. To the Academy faculty, to the City Lih- rarian, and to all Who tendered their help, We are sincerely grateful. To the merchants vvho so liberally adver- tised and thus helped us financially, We tender our thanlfs, and hope the students and friends of the school Will 'return the patronage. . g , - - Mi nfl .J-Pi fx-mP,'-9 JI, f . ZA-97 -- ,. if sg his Q .1 Q ,VN u-4 ,S -39- NEWBURGH Daily and Se1'ni:VVeek1y JQURN .. . . .45..j5f,,...5g.,.5gg--.5gA4.q,sgx..5+. . . a- Daily Issued at 4.30 P. M. Semi-Weekly issued Tuesdays and Fridays at 12 noon. . V f' 'N , Hi+l' ' TAEEZEQAZ he LA I ES F N E VV b. o 1 P' ' - - - , n y aper ln Orange County having a membership in lg xa g l lgig-Q3 Ei 14 HGH m i the Associated Press. Telegraph wire running direct To Editorial Rooms. B 1C,iN1Jia6H13ni 5iw 5gj? i A a 42. 42.- - - - Dillly, Del' Year. Sellll-WCBKIH, PGI' Yliilf. Tjf'?1 : i,, .-115. BQOK 2 Binding. Job Printing of All Forms. RITCHIE 64. HULL, Proprietors. 44 mee! 46 Seemed Sweet, JVew.6mQg'h, XV. Y 'i THE ACADISMYN was printed and bound at the journal Office. Outing Shirts will be largely worn, and right here we undertake to say that the largest line ever shown in Newburgh is on our counters, comprising the celebrated HBINGHAMTON SHRUNKEN l7LANNEL," OXFORD' CHEVIOT, and a great variety of Staples and Fancies. THE MUN+l?tPtEH SHIRT Is also a feature of our Furnishing Goods Business, made of the best materials and of fmest workmanship, in all sizes and different sleeve lengths. QNECK W Eifllliwe Is one of our leaders, and welhandle only the makes of the best known and thoroughly reliable manufacturers, and mostly eonlined styles, not obtainable elsewhere in Newburgh. COMPLETE ASSORTMENT OF DRESS Goons, Hosirer, Groves, RIBBONS, UNDERWEAR, UMBRELLAS, COHSETS, Notions AND WASH Goons. o V ACADEMY Biiigliil Schunnmukar l llalleb OF l BUILDING. CBRANCH STOREU GO TO JGNEST PHARMACY ---- A A Broadway, cor. Chambers Street, for BEST SODA WATER AND CIGARS IN THE CITY. T'y"SWOODLAND BELLSQ' the most delicate and lasting perfume in the mark Eiameqels, Wauahes aH5Cl jevfelmj. COMPLICATED WATCH AND FRENCH CLOCK REPAIRING A SPECIALTY. 27 Cofafen Sfffeei, - NE WB URGH, N. YT CHURCH H. MITCHELL, T HW' HIRE EURNHUES HND RHNGES. PORTABLE AND BRICK SET EIRE-PLACE HEATERS. - Sioves, Tinwmfe, 67. P!ZL77Z6f7ZgV in all Us Bmwzches. Nos. 62 and 64 SECOND STREET. SEAMAN, MANUFACTURING HATTER, 49 COLDEN STREET. L 5 L' Szjfles at Lowes! Prices. Repaz'1'z'1zg' in ll P f v .4 lx 4 X9 P- JOHN L. WILSTERVILLT, GUU1 ANU SIWEHSMHH, 142 Water Street, Newburgh, N. -44444--P--4-eJbb- l liave on liand at all times a large assortment of Sterling Silver Spoons, l7'orlf:s, Knives, lladles, dc. Bridal Rresen ts in cases in great variety. Plated Ware of tlze best Quality. School Medals, Glass Rings and Pins in Silver and Gold. ' Armlets and Bangles of every description made to order. T Fine Gold Vffedding Rings in stoclf and made to order at slzort notice. Fine Diamonds and Diamond Setting a Specialty. Repairing and Replating promptly attended. to. Gaslz paid for Old Gold and Silver. All Goods Warraizted the best of their lcind, and sold at lowest prices for good articles. - 4 .. W F. STERN, -- 1 DEALERS IN 1- Afi9...EifP'ZfFi,Q'lQ FUK5, FKENCH IVIILLINEKY A WEWEQESE' LADIES' and CH1LDREN'S CLOAKS, 6546. .. . ..+p:?9..-..39,.. Highest P P 'Cl f R W Furs. 125 WATER STREET, - - - NEWBURGH, N 7-N PM TUHNITUHE, UMTPTTS ! OIL-GLOTHS, MATS, MDTTTINC1. Wz'7zd0zU Shades, CTM7fZL6ZZ.7Z Pofes, T7fz'm7m'7eg5, C53 Ufholsfeffmg in cz!! 225 Bffmzckes. II4 WATER STREET - NEWBURGI-I, N Y OK. MILLERS NEEEEEEE NNE IIEII ESI!-IIE N AGENCY, 258 Broadway, - - H Newburgh, NV. Y. -lt?-L, Business pertaining to the purchase or sale of Real Estate promptly and carefully looked after. EXCELLENT FACILITIES EEN PIJIUING IENEE EENEE UF INSURANCE. A. LINCOLN J. MILLER. ' KIEIFER ESI SAXTON, IIHHI, IEEI, PEI, IEEE, NIEEEE, EE. SAUSAGE A SPECIALTY K 1 R cjlerecl Lard by Po cl T b Poultry 'in Season, ""-Afgs fx ,-..,N.,--Sf-X - No. 14 Colden Street BASE BRLL1N BHTS LA TENTVIS RACKETS. BALLS, 651. Eg' ASK FOR CATALOGUE. INDIAN CLUBS AND DUMB BELTS. BOOKS ON GAMES AND SPORTS AT N. S. SMTTHS, 3'Q'-5f.'iE.?:.T.?l2f..'Q.W MILLER, " THE J' H 'HER und EUHNISHIEH, QQEEQQAE ,A ,,,4O 37 WATER STREET, ' '1AfS 5EI?lilflIHil gii?ff::QAAaf.AQi1.f ' WBURGI-l,,N. Y. fs-vzsnnl-sg-Q, 'f :Q -.'Fa3'fA'b"':'. W- 4 " ..v"-gxp - 'E'-. . .w- -,-S-,M-. 21-f:.F:1.,, .. .Av iffy 3g5.?g ? "NA'?1iiY'13?' ' A-.":1 ' N 9, 5 'J -5-'V VS.-1 -hemagg- , Q , A wifi I hx:-:yi 5 +4 5.1:-Qhlyg Lf, 'Z H fs -as,-.U ff H1 i rux..45,1?m... ig '- r 'ua - 'fgngi Awxqgnu'-g yvf' lnq2,'7,m ,w f 1 N E LAWSOLN gl EMBLERA Have the Neatest Little Cigar Store ln the 1 y, where the RS AND TOBACCO B . Are found at the LOVVEST PRICES. Elyey make a Speqialty of Qiqarg by tlyq Box. S COLDEN 57112551 NEWBURGH N Y. J 0 N R. P US I , 2 AEWADQNAA N iwffx ?WNN,??Y5A?E 5 31 Eiil if F4 A1 I pw 'ik A.A,A f','A1AX' .AAAAA WAA.'NX ,A. A .A. A..A.nA 'A,f N 126 DVA TER STREEf NEWBURGH, N. Y. FURNITURE. Lawgesf Asswfmefef, Lczfesf Sfyles, ' Lowesi P72665 ' ESTABLISHED 1842 A EDGAHS FUHMTUHE WAREBUUMS 21 QWZQ3 WATER STREET HAMS BRANDED HE. gl M. NEWBURGH, ARE ALL GUARANTEED. - Gel' Mem hmm your Gmceff off Eizicheff. BARNES XL MHPES. 300145, STATIQNERY, FANCY GOODS ai GAMES, CARD Ermvms AND PRINTING I AT 55 cmd 67 Kqaieff Sfffeei, Newbufgk, N. Y JOHN M. UNDERHILL, Hm m m Mmm TEAS, COFFEES AND SPICES. .263 Soufh Waieff Sfffeef, Newbzaffgh, N. Yi RQ?Siiflg and G1'i1Q1di1'1g for the tfad . I-l'. C. DU NCAIXVS BAKERY, 525 5 Q Q21 QQ Cor. Water and Firsf Sts., NEWBURGH, N. Y. Weddz'ng5 amd P6l7fZLZ'6.S' Szypfzed. EISTABLISI-IEDD 1850. ' L. J. BAZZQNI, INIAKER OF q'R9-fvN- 6.,A.x,,.,a Clerrrieges arg Ieighs 6S'N-X.,-fa CORNER. BROADWAY AND GRAND STREET. NEWBURGH, N. Y. USE JUDGMENT IN BUYING FURNITURE, UIIPLPIIIS, UPLIIUIIERI, PII-IIEII IIIJIIIII, Or in short any article to furnish a house. Ask yourself the question, Where can I do the best? Hear our answer: RT TI-IE N. Y. FURNITURE UUJS, Because in running several of the largest stores in the country, we handle goods in carload lots. We manufacture all of our own Parlor Suits, Lounges and Mattresses. We import our own Crockery, We carry the largest Carpet Stock in this part of the State. We can afford to sell better goods at lower prices than any other house for the above reasons. Ask to see our 32.75 Tea Set, also our 314.50 Antique Bed-room Suit. also our Plush Trimmed Parlor Suit. at THE N. Y. FURNITURE U U ., 102 Water Street, ' - - Newburgh, N. Y. Factory-I IO and lI2 Front Street. W 1 ...Q WWQHWZQW WQWHX M W Z 'lip , X' ',.,::f" ! 'Y "1 1' VHMWW L, 4 ' .MW wmiyjf ,.., 1 4 Q AAG, Z' 'T f SVN f Y Q X K ' fx? Q? f f 45? Q ! I I 1 f .E W0 fx j f f Q Z ,y y, if X X ll A I lifff' 7 Z I "W M 52 J f . Waggf. X ' 'f Q I of A, X 3, If if K 0 4 I X E fl lf, ff ff cgi, M 1 , X ff A ,, ',W'W'4.,1W 1 'W Qf ff222f ff 'U A 5 sf? 1 0 W Q .Ax K Cl Hn if Q ii fc pl 1 """ u ! 'S' rl X , " ,rg f fl, MIIVWI 'gg X 'WI I S ' M' -px XL If flu 6 W f . NA Q W BKT! , X? Wwwqf ,J Q X 's ...,. .--, k A0 X, Q ' f QR W g f as , SWWWWA, . -f- Q Wy: , sQf5iX!ff mmhj kiktxi Neeohoeoh Pooee Bee foeeoeo GEORGEAC. WENZEL, - MANUFACTURER OF Plain and Fancy PAPE R BGX ES SPECIALTIES: , Wedding Coke, Gooeeetieoeee, lee Greene one Sundoo Sehool Boxes. 87 WATERVST, NEWBURGH, N Yf Rear Entrance from Third Street. X GRAN D CENTRAL CLOTHING HOUSE 83 and 85 VVater Street, Is the Largest in the City, and carries the greatest and best assort f Ready:NIede CLQTHING I h County, and Prices are Lower than the Lowest. -l4-4v9orb--- In omf Ha! cmd Gents' Depmfimemt we always V have cz fu!! line. In Neckwear the grandest display. 5O and 75 cent SOARFS for 25 cents. -l-44-ow-v-l NX. 81 V. SCHARPS, 83 AND S5 WATER STREET, NEWBURGH N Y , THE A WHITEHILL CGRLISS HNGQNH, CPATENTED APRIL 10, 1888,D BUILT BY THE NQEWBUPLGH STHM ENGINE WUHS, ROBERT WHITEHILL. Wofkss Newiufgh, N. Yi U' S. EW YORK OFFIC No 6 COAL AAD IRON EXCHANGE COR CORTLANDT AND CHURCH STS Carriages at All Hours VV. D. Traphagen. S. J, Leslle TRAPHAGEN 81 LESLTE, PINE SI-ICDES, 25 cmfb Q7 Qiicwcw St. NEWBURGH, N. Y. ORANGE HDTEL STIEXBLES, Livery, Sale, Boarding Exchange Stables. THIRD ST. OPP. POST OFFICE, IYEWBURGH, N. Y. Telephone Connectio Maven. G- MEYE WASHHNGTUN EA HNG ?0WMER M. Manufacturers of the Celebrated Wnshinnnnn Bnkinn Pnnninn. 80, 82 and 84 From' Si., Newburgh, N. Y EVERYONE Who Considers their Health, uses Washington Baking Powder, for it is the best. . Ask your Grocer for it. - Wnsnnnnnnn Bnnnnn Pnnnnnn Cn. 80 'ro 84 FRONT STREET, - - NEWBURGH, N. Y, THEODQ1: ERHITT, 40 Water Street, S E Newburgh, N. Y. ? DEALER IN i DRUGS PURE MEDlClNES AT LOVVEST PRICES. 'PROPFHETOR OF lVlel'ljl11tfS Tal' Cough Syrup, a sure cure for Coughs, Colds, and all dis- eases ofithe Throat and Lungs. 25 and 50 cents per bottle. l'Vler'r'i'U3'S Worm Syrup, acts promptly, and pleases the ,mothers of the suifering little ones. 25 cents per bottle. ' lVlerrit'h'S Laxative Compound, is the best known remedy for Consti- pation and DisorderedfLiver. 331.00 per bottle. ' lVl9rr'itt'3 Mlalaria Cure, will cure Malaria, Fever and Ague, and prevent chills 5 it never fails. 75 cents per bottle. lVlerrit1g'3 Pile Cure, was never known to fail in a permanent cure. 32 cents per box. M lVlerritt's Liver Pills, I5 Cents per box. A IVlerritt'5 Magig Liniment, is a remedy that no family should be with- out, as it is a general remedy for Cuts, Sprains, Lame Back, Frost Bites and Burns. 25 cents per bottle. If your Horse is out of condition with noiappetite, use fyney-ri'L'lg'5 H0rSB and Cattle Powders. F1111 PO11Hd PaCkf1seS 35 Cents- Merritt's Horse Liniment, is Without Sl Peer in the me of Spfmf Strains, Collar Boils, Cuts, also a sure relief for Colic. Full directions with eaCh bottle. 75 cents. J. D. MARIE, Steves, Heeeees, Heeees, Xe. Ne. 46 WAVTER STREET I ' NEWBURGH, N. Y. ESTABLISH ED 1857. WILLIAM G. JOHNSTUN, ff A ef ,If N ,flee ie ,ff A e X I 9 - TRUNKS, SA TCHELS, 61. 107 Water Street, ,- Newburgh, N. Y. L NEXT T0 NEWBURGH NATIONAL BANK. w. H. CORNISH af, OO., FIJQRISTS 68 gl 70 BROADWAY NEWBURGH N. Y. Baskezis Cu! Fhweffs Bougezefs CET. 1 I I ' East of Grand Street. tj ,Q ' 3 . 7 D FOR PARTIES, WEDDINGS OR OTHER USE. Noveltles IH WIre DesIgns, all of the Latest Patterns. JAMES HASTINGS, ,.---.-L:-Qilbi-.'H-fs?-16421.21eil-fgfrr' y' 5 -1 , HW 4 Q 0 25 I1. 1q1 ' --21,21 X I wi 'mga In-.17 W ff Q xii - 1 1 . wz 1 1: l 'X alkaSD1ii1:aiML2hi 4M5nE 'HQ U pa' ::1 I1 M iw 7 3' , , , -2413: if ' 1 F, X 5 13, PE1?4.'35,'-nlmg-,ggm1rp11lg1bu1 , 1 , X W f :mir 5, lx , , . , - fully? v M aj' ' LULL l '11 'xi :H V-H, 1 Uk, xy, 3, l ,QQ If :L 541.1 'funn 515 9f'Si g gwr2'3yk gr-x g-J N, - . 1 1. 1 ' VN 1 I wg: Fu X nl I f E W F 1 mm .. V.. Q M - - -E I ll -1,1 W ,X 'M ,v -'- 4, - u ,, 1 gr : Qgwmf an A - 'iw JW . WYOW?-A f'3 l4 WM ,mf fr' ' ' H 5 !4,.1k!,?Sfwfsvlgmfulm-,ig ig ...w-fEff'i-:1E5E??1i- aim KN' WMM I .1-53535355533my..wm-1:1-znnagik, M .... ml ,mir r- 1 PLUMBI G AND ROOFI G ' A SPECIALTY. ' A FULL LINE OF W IVE H i a ' I I House HIIHISHIHQ Goods, REFRUJERATORS P1 Y ' Y mam M QL I W M -'F' uun nn mmunn ilrm m mjimmmlrllmlzlaxm u munnmm l f, 1' ' y ,,- 2, , Q, -'gf' 1. -74' , 'nfi'uu 'Wm H0313 as -i-incl -o- -1 1 V 'Sk ,' 'j ,..,"' V312 .4 , , gun . L 1 I1 W ALSO TH E FAM O U S A 1 - Liam 1.13 .-4 -- :. f "iZ'?'n'5!1'.1, ' .: - 5 .Hmmm -,...,,gf1,:j,- ,zfq,g" 1 A, 5 1 s fi wf -. f' lifil 4. I 3: TA gm 9 Pyrri !uL MANHATTAN VAPUR SIUYE e I62 Broadway, NE WBURGH, IV. Yi q i ,ie ,- SHANNON Neo., 3 ' ate Fi wie PS X B. sf'-2' U , if , f- .2 T ffsl :. , -1. .sf 6 N, E' Ht. is ,Q-.5-tl' Q- K i H f -Y-inf A-if ut. xi. Jw - 13- 3 1 Q 5 If ,- N. ht 'v ' ' A -,grief " ,mr i V J.: in 1 5' -r- JI: 'il . .,-,,g..?g Emil, ' 'L i .N - I 1. .:,.,. 217-.nn:f:,fn qi 1. - , , ,gaGEN...-135357-15,12--g-,:,.-in-gr "' 'fum-11'-.ifgs-fe"-. EZ"-'1 V . if-f-f , ' ' PEL: .eg ugawrgge at 5. I . ,. . 5 X I Ax 0 x Q 1, fr- ee A i , ' I .ai a" "" ,K ' . v 'vi ' es-M . I , ' .v ,r f ,ass 3, 47 i , tg .sp:,1','. 4, if ' vnli,ii"1-1 I- " V ' " '1 ,Mil ' is, g 5 ,-5 , 'J ni un' WHOLESALE SLATE DEALERS, i n E owen ma wnmzoous, 107 LIBERTY sfrxzm, F - QFour doors North of Washingtonls Heaclquarters.j NEWB'-'RG-H, N-Y- . ' Manufacturers of if -.'lNf - A 9 . SLIXTE if WOOD MANTELS. WASHlNGTON'S H EADQUARTERS. Fancy Tile Hearths, Floor Tiles and Mantel Facings, Grates, Frames and Summer Pieces, Omamental Plaster Center Pieces and Brackets, Lawn and Garden Vases, Roof Cresting and Finials, also, all kinds of Building I Papers. We invite inspection of our Goods. I-ICDICE IVIEAT of all kinds. FIRST-CLASS GOODS AT Lowssfr PRICES. fPTNJIfF IQYHHDCUHEXB4 SNEED ck MATHEMEi InS SSSOI1. NEWBUFIGH, N. Y. AND GE TLENNENE DO YOU Like a Delicious DRINK? Z N315 QNLQLNWL som of?-1'm?f ':f' A iifgep' .si E Milk Shake or Egg Phosphate. Choice Fruit Syrups, Tamarind, Red Current, Blood Orange. Jon H. CHAPMAINVS N ew Drug Store, Liber Sts, Em Prescriptions a Specialty. ty and South EGTAEUGHED 1790. X QIESEEZ W. IXleCHelHlKE5JZelGil?2'S TOBACCO AND GIGAE FACTORY, No. 68 Watqr Street, - Q Nqwburqly, N. Y. ' -l4-4-ow-v---W Imported, Uemeetie end Keg West Gigure ' PIPES, FANCY GCUODS, CIGARETTES, SLC., SLC. AT GQ EH3lE.IjEl ON 325.511 Will buy a Gent's Heavy S l id Silver aech fine Will buy same as above i double case, wa. EE 5 5 . U U Will buy the Zsame in Solid 14k Gold Case. Other goods in the jewelry line equally cheap. WEDDING AND ENGAGEMENT RINGS, ETC ' i EEREIE, E E EEAEEH EEEEA. 7 Gold Filled Case warm t d BROADWAY SHOE STORE. A FULL LINE OF FIRST-CLASS BOOTS AND SHOES ALWAYS ON HAND. Terini Shoes OUTING FOOTWEAR JAMES COURTNEY, 177 Broadway, Newburgh, N. Y. REPAIRING NEATLY DONE. s. WHITAKER at co. arpet Cleaning VV Qrks, WEST NEWBUROH, N. Y. To our old patrons it is unnecessary to say anything in regard to the quality of our work, but to others we would state : We guarantee to clean Carpets of every description, thor- oughly removing all dust, vermin and moths without stretching or tearing. No ropes, whips or sticks are used to beat or club the carpet, andthere are no pegs or sharp .angles for the carpet to strike or fall on, as in other machines: but all dust and dirt is thoroughly removed from the body of the carpet. The nap is raised and the appearance of a new - carpet given it by this process. Carpets are not wet in any way with this machine. Only wet by our Renevo Process, which will remove grease of all kinds. We can take out stains in carpets without remov- ing them from the floor in the roorri 3 also have them thoroughly cleaned Without taking them from the floor. We can give the best of references for work done by these two processes. All work attended to personally. Second-hand Carpets bought and sold. Carpets called for and delivered free of charge. Orders received at Whitakerls Kindling Wood Wagons, by mail or by slates at C. I. Lawson's stores, 69 Water St. and 87 Broadway, will receive prompt attention. SAMUEL WHITAKER, Manager-


Suggestions in the Newburgh Free Academy - Graduate Yearbook (Newburgh, NY) collection:

Newburgh Free Academy - Graduate Yearbook (Newburgh, NY) online yearbook collection, 1921 Edition, Page 1

1921

Newburgh Free Academy - Graduate Yearbook (Newburgh, NY) online yearbook collection, 1922 Edition, Page 1

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Newburgh Free Academy - Graduate Yearbook (Newburgh, NY) online yearbook collection, 1923 Edition, Page 1

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Newburgh Free Academy - Graduate Yearbook (Newburgh, NY) online yearbook collection, 1939 Edition, Page 1

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Newburgh Free Academy - Graduate Yearbook (Newburgh, NY) online yearbook collection, 1955 Edition, Page 1

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Newburgh Free Academy - Graduate Yearbook (Newburgh, NY) online yearbook collection, 1956 Edition, Page 1

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FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
Are you trying to find old school friends, old classmates, fellow servicemen or shipmates? Do you want to see past girlfriends or boyfriends? Relive homecoming, prom, graduation, and other moments on campus captured in yearbook pictures. Revisit your fraternity or sorority and see familiar places. See members of old school clubs and relive old times. Start your search today! Looking for old family members and relatives? Do you want to find pictures of parents or grandparents when they were in school? Want to find out what hairstyle was popular in the 1920s? E-Yearbook.com has a wealth of genealogy information spanning over a century for many schools with full text search. Use our online Genealogy Resource to uncover history quickly! Are you planning a reunion and need assistance? E-Yearbook.com can help you with scanning and providing access to yearbook images for promotional materials and activities. We can provide you with an electronic version of your yearbook that can assist you with reunion planning. E-Yearbook.com will also publish the yearbook images online for people to share and enjoy.