Newark High School - Reveille Yearbook (Newark, OH)

 - Class of 1926

Page 1 of 202

 

Newark High School - Reveille Yearbook (Newark, OH) online yearbook collection, 1926 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1926 Edition, Newark High School - Reveille Yearbook (Newark, OH) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1926 Edition, Newark High School - Reveille Yearbook (Newark, OH) online yearbook collection
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Page 10, 1926 Edition, Newark High School - Reveille Yearbook (Newark, OH) online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1926 Edition, Newark High School - Reveille Yearbook (Newark, OH) online yearbook collection
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Page 14, 1926 Edition, Newark High School - Reveille Yearbook (Newark, OH) online yearbook collectionPage 15, 1926 Edition, Newark High School - Reveille Yearbook (Newark, OH) online yearbook collection
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Page 8, 1926 Edition, Newark High School - Reveille Yearbook (Newark, OH) online yearbook collectionPage 9, 1926 Edition, Newark High School - Reveille Yearbook (Newark, OH) online yearbook collection
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Text from Pages 1 - 202 of the 1926 volume:

X, ' ff? 1 1 1 u r I sb . 1 n X4 'AAA lx? W 4 HQ M223 N 152 -5 w 1 w 1-- 4. , , -Q 1 ns.u4.uuwma-n.vmf:..nuunirv-sw -.nam-.B . .su - 1-,w..,1-'-u u - 'sn -mm ., .1 . ,:- nv-fn.w1rrr: 1 -1: .vm-.anxr in nm,x,s'.n-on-1.an::r'.: mnmuznnxnvuumiavmm xvrvruvwxsf-uvu1 ,au ' uma Lunches Ice Creams Candies Quality for 22 years The Sparta Newark's Leading Confectionery 1 "Treasure Island" ROBERT LOUIS STEVEN, Q SON'S famous pirate ro- mance, "Treasure Islandf' has f Xssflxl charmed uncounted thousands of i it readers-particularly of the A 'mx W iv- 1 ' younger generation. f T N Everyone can have a treasure ' island of his own that needs no t ' - -if X ,- x N ,ll H g A ' B, 4 K 3 1 I3 n chart to find, where pirates cannot break in, and where his hidden hoard is constantly increasing. ' Build your treasure in an interest bearing account HERE Ebe Franklin National Bank 51 .Youth 5rd Jt., Newark, Ohio T A - 2 For The Miss .fmartest and 9? Latest Apparel r -1 Designed and Tailored to Correctly fx N Fit and Becoming to your Slender and 5 W Youthful Figure. W X J , +:1:M f ff? 1 There is no 0l1G'Wll0 follows style xi more closely than the up-to-the-mlnute ri American Miss. i n . She demands styles with originality. ' rl! She is quick to sense the difference he- u tween the smart origination and the commonplace, or ordinary. 'il n These are the kind of garments she J invariably selects here from the Wide , l range of styles that are moderately V priced in every instance. ll 5 li A f' 1 Apparel .Shop ,ngyqg its 4th Floor W fi 1 il JLYW111-v11L',',A ' Y' Y' Meyer-Lindorf Company NEWARK, OHIO 3 To Newark High Graduates: We extend heart Ll gyafoyfapa ANYWHERE ANY TIME Phone 244921 Res. 24625 y rlt dbt h ll drk if Wt x'K 1926 3Ket1eiIIe Vol. 16, ian. 6 mm 51.00 Guiteu for The Glass uf 1926 of Glbe jaetnark Gbin Zfaigb Sarbuol my The 3KeheilIe Svtaff Guitar-in-Ghief .....,,,.... Qssnciate Guitar .,....... Qssistant Guitar ..., ...G,UW..e..,,e.....,4,Gutuaru Sarhnute .....e...,,1fern Gstbet Gbannell Business Manager ..,eee..... iLitet'arp Guitar ......e,.ee,. jaehms Guitar eee.,e,... Qtbletir Guitar .e,..,.. jfun Guitar .,....... Qlrt Guitar ,......V.. Robert wnnlsun e..e,...eGuhJaru Brown 2e.WeGuna westin!! ikirk winule ,wllatnrenre ikhnues Virginia Bubrhuugb Rosalyn Byarmett 26 26 28 27 26 26 26 27 26 5 RUTLEDGE BROS The Home of Real Clothing and Furnishings Zl SOUTH PARK NEWARK OHIO As you go out from your school let your dress represent the man. lt is one of the assets of your future. Remembering "ln the Bright Lexi- con of Youth there is no such thing as Fail." With Best W ishes to the Class of 1926 l l l 6 49" " Glzthlv nf Glnntvnta FOREWORD DEDICATION Mr Frank A Woolson FACULTY CLASQES PFIZQS Class of 26 O e P1ophecy Insert IDS61 t Insert Off1C6lS Commencement Speakel s Membel s of Class Play Hlstory Class of 27 Class of 28 Class of 29 - - - - - - - - - - 11 . . - - - 13 ' ----- 21 ' ----- 23 d . ' ---- 69 ' ---- 75 ' ----- 79 EDITORIALS - - - - Insert Features of 1926 Annual - - - 83 ' ' ' - - - 84 ' . . . - 84 - - - - - 85 ' . . . s 86 ' ' - - - 87 . K I ' . ,. - 88 Hxstoly of the Gymnaslum The New Supe1v1s1on of the Reve1lle Staff Cum Laude Value of Extla Cuuxculum Act1v1t1es Fa1ewell of the Senlors What Constltutes Pl0p9l School Splut CR E'S City Dru g Store Drugs and Gifts Everything in Toilet Articles Specialists in Courfeous Treatment Good Service Cui Prices Prescriptions carefully compounded by Registered Pharmacists only. We appreci- ate your business. Wlllldlll B. UGIIQ Mdlltllt M. Udlll! Efahlr nf Gnntvntz Glnntmurh LITERARY Insel t The Mounds of Licking County Hel Own People The Sacied Arlow 89 90 91 ACTIVITIES - - - - Insert Reveille Staff Debate Thalian Literary Society Song and Cheer Leaders Minstrels Band Orchestra Athenian Literary Society ATHLETICS - Year's Captains Gymnasium - Football Team - Football Summary Letter Men - - Basketball Team - Basketball Summary Athletics Snapshots Interclass Baseball JoLLY .msrs - AUToGRAPHs 1-1 f' 'Z-O Civic Society Dramatic Club Girls' Reserves Hi-Y's 9 Insert 117 118 119 - 120 122 123 124 126 - 128 Insert Insert fn Zi in If! X ' K EMERSON FelloWs""""' Be First! Win Distinction as a5tudent, i"'Athlete You'll be sure to win distinction as a Clever Dresser lf you wear Emerson Clothes They have Spice and Sparkle, Fit and Finish, Class and Cleverness, ' Real High School Clothes. M h tt , X Trunks Newest Col- aranil an NDOHQ sc Hats Q Suit Cases V lars, Snappy Eagle Shirts X an ups X Bags Neckwear RCE EMERSON CORNER THIRD AND MAIN 10 , g fitness - - t o 1,-A ,g QQSQQQLQW''L!k5wlEJ.,!MJb"w Q98 5kY!'EiHbE? m ' ilfiff ilsgs flblflsii Nr '1 9 KV, S. ,1 S- , goal 'ffofz' dm? wwf U ,- s '4 11055 4 www if, . 5 I Mai-: wg: .331 nz- - 'z s"'1 ll I 'Ep -o i 1 ,u ug we I 1' FEw9 . 3.3- s"'4 s"'4 s I . lg! LAQINIJ8! .o I. I viz' 5 2 ff-21 1115-3 vgff 5 fi: fan: F 5557 : 0 : jforetnoro lit has been the custom of the liebeille Qtaff each year to make the Zlnnual a fitting climax to the actibities of the senior class. Sao toe, the ilkebeille Svtaff, take pleas: ure in presenting to our frienos anh to those interesteo in high school actibities the sixteenth annual of the jaetnark Zbigh Svchool as a tribute to the class of 1926. Qs an interesting ano fitting theme is necessary to gibe unity to a story so it is necessary for an annual, ano this year toe habe chosen as a theme the mounos about jaetpark. we habe carrieo out this ioea in ebery oepartment ano hope you tnill be pleaseo with the effect. ' Elf these pages bring to unfa: miliar frienos a glimpse of the life at gaetpark ilaigh school, if to the Qlumni they atnaken recollections of their otnn high school oays, ano if to the stuoent booy they probe a source of present interest ano per: haps amusement, then toe shall consioer our efforts tnell retparoeo 9637 C? E25 f RQEQY 551 : Link Q :gf ee? I -GM viii E 2 . ish Q Gi-A R- ' 0- Q26 505: Q , 1 fi!! Q G R :" 'I -22 . Q o .., . G' -I-' 'GW f . -uf!! 3 6619 wee. 2 ' W t ,, M M nu J' ?,,,S ?,,,4 20,4 yur' A ehicatiun "Your deeds are known In 'words that kindle glory from the stone s mga ZHrank A. Maulana L UUUAUURI!UAUUHUUAUUN!UMURUUAUUA!!UN!UN!UAUUIIUUAUUAUURUUNJURUURWA Zbeoiration t fllflr. Jfranb Q. Yllllioolson, for some pears the ritp eoitor of the jaemarlx Qobotate, ts tbellzknotpn as one interesteo m any plan for the betterment of j2BiUHl'li'S publir school spstem. jfnbe pears ago tphen he was elerteo a member of the Zboarb of Qkoueatton, lem real: tgeo the possibtluties that this man hah tmthln him. Soon he became one of the most tnfluenttal members ot the isoaro ano tt toas has an stght into the neebs of the schools ano hts energp tn presenting those neeos to hrs fellotn members that to a large extent mouteb the Eoaro of QEouratton to go fortnaro on the protest that resulteb tn our present gpmnastum we therefore tn rerognntton of the real tnterest that he has onsplapeo tn the tpelfare of our srhools oebtrate thus tssue to ilblr jfranb Q woolson WWHRURRV RURRUDRVRRURR FIRURR RVRRV URFRUFIRURRUDRUHRURRUIIRUIIRUII janultp He is wise who can instruct us and assist us in the business of daily virtuous living W u- -'..n 1-.- fum-..xcr4vwn,1u-.-f-1 w- W. - umnmawu -mr-, v- - .-nnnn-:mu-nu: ..a.m-, 1-1 :'-.- V 4. .1 ,zu-ern-'uxmmnv'-,..':':. 1.4-lnunuu -.avu:a.nr,x-: fnL':xf:.umus.:.::u x Oren J. Barnes ' B. S. Ohio Wesleyan H. F. Moningel' University, Post Grad- Ph. B. Muskingum. uate: Cornell, Colum- Principal- bia. Superintendent. John Alfred Tait A. B., Dickinson Clara L. MacDonald Post, Graduate' CO' A. B., Denison Uni- lumbla versity. 1 Vice-Principal. M. A., Co umbia H' t - l Dean of Girls is my Latin N. Bertha L. Crilly Paul B. Edwards B. A., Denison B. S., Ohio State Post Graduate: Co- University, lumbia, Ol1i0 Stiltff Post Graduate, Ohio University, and Mid- Statg University fllebury College Chemistry, Biology Critic Reveille English 15 J. W. Swank Ph. B., Mt. Union Mathematics Mary Larason Huffman Shorthand and Type- writing Hood S. Johnston B. S., Ohio Ui-iversity g Post Graduate, Man- , , 1 - - Eunice E. Thomas ual -Altb, 0l'll0 l.lIl1- B. AAL, Ohio Wfresloyau Wmlb' Linivel-my MlltllIll11l1llC'S, Modern Post Graduate, C0- History lumbia English Lloyd G. Millisor Dorothy Montgomery Athletic Coagh B. A-, Olli0 State Rochester Normal UIliVel'Sity University TYP0Wl'ltln2 ilflfl Head of Commercial Sl'lO1'tl121HCl Departlrflent 16 Rosa A. Pugh B. S., Muskingum Ancient History E. H. Heckleman B. A., Ohio Wesleyan University Florn W. Smith M. A., Ohio State University Mathematics Ma1'Y McClure Ph. B., Denison Uni- versity Post Graduate, Sor- bonne, Paris English, Algebra Amy E. Montgomery A. B., Denison Uni- versity Post Graduate, Ohio State University English A. B. Long Purdue, Bradley Poly- technic University of Wiscon.sin Physical Director iv Clinton P. Smith V A. B., Ohio Wesleyan University 1 H English, Latin, Al- Ldlth ,Myers gebra Mlchigan State Nor- mal Kent State Normal Domestic Science Mabel G. Pugh Jam? El0g?S.H1i1JPI2 .t - . ., no mversm y Ph' I?" Muskingum M. A., Columbia English Post Graduate, Ohio State University Sociology, Ohio His- History William FI. Painter Director of Manual Winn-1,edH00k Arts B. A., Ohio Wesleyan University Post Graduate, Chica- go University Spanish 18 I I e G, 5 . . l I Willis J. Handel B. S., Denison Uni- C. W. Klopp versity , Post Graduate, Ohio Music State University Commercial Law and Civics Laura E. Hosick Mildred Hawke B-I4-f Denison Uni' Ph. B., Denison Uni- Velslfy . Versitv Post Graduate, Chica- English, General go Umverslty I Al ebra General His- Science g ' tory Phil G Horton L' J' Tipton I , B.. S., Denison Uni Ohio State University vel-sity Manuel Training M. S., Ohio State Uni versity General Science 19 I Earl T. Osborn George W. Brown , B. Pd., Franklin Col lege Mathematics B. S., Ohio University Post Graduate, West La Fayette Economics, Commer- cial Geography - l Emerson Miller L. H Berger B. A., Ohio State B. A., oh' W .1 . University . Universitio eq eyaq . Post Graduate, Ohio Accounting and Eng- State Umverslty lish Florence Myers Michigan State Nor- Carrie B. Allen M. A., Denison Uni versity Latin Kate Foos Special Work, Colum bia University of Chi mal Girls' Physical Direc- C330 A tor French, Sociology 20 ' W4 , 7 E n 5 .Q A mlm, X ...Q .. 155525 A little learning is a dangerous thing, Drink deep, or taste not the Plerian spring -. FAM 5 "i" 's , at in .-i"",,.,,.5..' HJ 5?-1, T-' "iw, V: . '. 54,59 - 1,1 '. 3. 5 . ,. V1 . ..-f . 1 ff-u11'j---,. 1 , F"cJ1i95,S ' ,, . , K. 1. figs'-1'," -Lf ' :js "gc, ' TQ: 41' V1 :Q vw. 1, . 9 2 9? ,, Afxj, 1 ,A f 3+2L:?':x ,i X "2 -J A, 'Gyn .HY Harvard Cup The Harvard Cup is a trophy that is awarded each year to the boy in whom the following qualities are most pro- nounced: Supreme attainment in scholarship, excellence in athletics, participation in the various school activities, school spirit, marked leadership, patriotism, and those qualities which show a fine manly character. This cup is named from that famous institution which endeavors to bring out the best in one, Harvard University. The ob- ject of the donor is to encourage Newark High School students to attend Harvard University. Therefore, a scholarship of at least one hundred dollars is given to any recipient of the Harvard Cup after the completion of the first half of his Freshman year at Harvard successfully. The former recipients of the Harvard Cup are: 1923--Earl Richrick. 1924-James Settles. 1925--Geye Oxley. X ' 1926- w 710 Jfmnaey ,f " ff Ill PF lk lk Ik HF Hartzler Cup Similarly, the Hartzler Cup is given to the girl possess- ing the foregoing qualifications. The cup is given by Mrs. W. W. Davis in memory of her father, Mr. J. C. Hartzler, who was Superintendent of the Newark Schools from 1874 to 1898. The girls who have received this honor are: 1923-Bertha Clutter. 1924-Louise Ralston. 1926- Jffmw HF ik SF Sk wk HIS The Civic Cup The Civic society this year has stressed high scholar- ship, and with this object in view the members have se- lected a large silver loving cup on which the name of the boy or girl having the highest average each semester is to be engraved. For the first semester of the year 1926, this honor goes to Hulda Ashcraft, who attained an aver- age of 95. Hulda will have her name engraved not only on the la1'ge cup but also on a miniature one which she will receive as a permanent possession. The Civic so- ciety is to be congratulated on this great step forward in scholarship. 21 'E . f v 'ff 1925-H l W th. e en Ye ZZ!!! Denison Scholarship 5 A ENISON University has established the precedent of giving a scholarship to the boy and girl attaining the highest four-year average in Newark High School. The scholarship is in the form of a four-year tuition at Denison University. In the past four years the following students have been award- ed the scholarshi : P 1923-Paul Handel, Dorothy Hirshberg. 1924-James Settles, Elizabeth Scott. 1925-John Rector, Emily Spencer. 1926-Kirk Windle, Virginia Dayton. Ill lk Sk Ill IF ll' Roosevelt History Prize ,gf n. HEODORE Roosevelt was a typical American whose championship of every 3 cause of right has forever endeared him to the hearts of his people. Thus, the Roosevelt History prizes are given every year to the boy or girl attain- i ing the highest marks in this subject. The prizes consist of from three to six volumes of books selected by a committee, but always including "The Foes of Our Own Household" by Theodore Roosevelt, and "Hero Tales from American History" 'by Henry Cabot Lodge and Theodore Roosevelt, and "The Man Without a Country" by Edward Everett Hale. The donors of these prizes wish to keep their identity secret. Those receiving this honor for the past four years have been: 1923-Ruth McCally, James Lloyd. 1924-Inez Hooper, James Settles. 1925-Vir i 'a Wilson, How rd Danner. mfr 73252351 ll' Ik Uk lk Ill fl' French Prize A gg W IKEWISE to the girl or boy who makes the highest French grade goes also a in prize consisting of books. The donor of this prize like that of the Roose- velt Prize is kept secret. Those attaining the highest marks in French in ' the past three years have been: 1923-Dorothy Hirschberg. 1924-Elizabeth Scott. 1925-Ma e B nes. 1926- 41 Ik 41 if ill HF Mr. and Mrs. William Edwin Miller Fund English Prize ,gi i. HE family of the late William E. Miller has presented a prize of twenty-five dollars in gold to the person having the highest average in regular English requirements for the four years. This prize has been given as an incentive to further education and realization of broadening in the classics in inculcat- ing idealism and leadership which are indispensable to life's highest attainment. This fund, a commemoration of the altruism of William E. Miller and which is to be known as the Mr. and Mrs. William Edwin Miller Fund, will be awarded yearly to the student of sound moral character having the highest average in regul r English requirements for his high school years. iL,,..,1,f WILL, jf ' 22 l ,NH SME wi x.. Q5 s ' 72 5 H J Gig: 4 Q9oe to the Qllass of illitneutyziix Q fem more bays, hear seniors 'till you all must part Quo leane fore'er the srhool house euoeareh to ehery heart jan more will your gay laughter he erhoeh in the hall jan more your measures footsteps on tn nhlug siairease fall Jfono mem'ries mill reminh you of hours of pleasant strife whose bays are almost euoeh the happiest in your life you may forget the lessons you lauotn so tnell tooay you may forget the teaehers who helpeh you on your may Qs from those things you lobe, it nom comes time to seher we hope the menfries of school bays mill stay foreher. Fr, ,, I F l l l 1 i ORRIEN LYNN Cheerful at morn he wakes from short re- pose, Breathes the keen air, and carols as he goes." Athenian, '24, '25, '26, Dramatic Club, '26, Bas- ketball squad, '26, Re- veille, '25, '26, Ushur, '25, '26, Glee Club, '23, '24, '25, '26, Civic Society, '26, Football squad, '25, '26, Pres. of Senior Class, Pres. of Athenians, '25, Christmas Play, '25, Dra- matic Club Play, '26, Sen- ior Play, Minstrel, '26, Commencement speaker. EDNA MAE WESTFALL "She's going to be a suc- cess some day, Just because she looks that way." Thalian, '24, '25, '26, H CYRUS G. McKINNEY HCy7! I "Strong of body, sound of mind, a better man is hard to find." Athenian, '25, '26, Hi-Y, '23, '24, '25, '26, Dramatic Club, '24, '25, '26, Basket- ball, '25, '26, Captain, '26, Civic Society, '25, '26, Football, '24, '25, Track, '25, '26, Thanksgiving Play, '25, Senior Play, Minstrel, '25, '26, Inter- locutor, '26, Vice Pres. Senior Class, Pres. Hi-Y, '25, Pres. Dramatic Club, '25, Dramatic Club, '25, '26, Glee Club, '24, Civic So- ciety, '24, '25, '26, Tennis, '24, '25, '26, Track, '24, Debate, '25, '26, Reveille, '24, '25, '26, Usher, '24, '25, '26, Girl Reserves, '24, '25, 25 f KARL LEIDY 'I always get the better whne I argue alone." Athenian, '24, '25, '26, Dramatic Club, '26, Glee Club, '23, '24, '25, '26, Civic Society, '24, '25, '26, Debate, '26, Senior Play, Minstrel, '24, '25, '26, Treasurer of Senior Class, Pres. and Treas. of Athen- ians. Commencement speaker. '26, Secretary of Class, Secretary, Thalians, '25, Secretary, Dramatic Club, '25, '26, President, Girl Reserves, '26 Thanksgiv- ing Play, '25, Senior Play, Commencement speaker. 'l KENNETH ALSPACH FRANKLIN ANDERSON ISK-mirnyii "Though I am not spleni- tive and rash, Yet have I something in me dangerous." Athenian, '25, '26, Hi-Y, '23, '24, '25, '26, Dramatic Club, '25, '26, Basketball, '25, '26, Glee Club, '23, '24, '25, '26, Track, '25, '26, Thanksgiving Play, '26, Senior Play, Minstrel, '24, '25, '26. Unocil "Happy am I, from care I m free! Why aren't they all con- tented like me?" Football, '26. EMELENE ALBERRY llfrowv "Blue eyes of a child frankness, Is Emelene and yet so wild Over all dances and parties galore Lessons must wait, they have waited before." Dramatic Club, '25, 26, Tennis, '23, '24, '25, Sen- ior Play. ELSIE BAUMAN 6CBah!! "He is a fool who thinks by force or skill To turn the current of this woman's will." Basketball, '24, '26, '26, Girls' Reserves, '23, '24. These mounds of the Country Club are the chief group and the largest among many located in the Cherry Valley District. Formerly there were three distinct roadways with a long mound on each side that led from here in the general direction of Newark. However with the building up of our city, most of these excavations have been destroyed. WALTER BEADLE "Winnie" "And when you stick on conversation burs Don't strew your path with those dreadful urs." Dramatic Club, '26, Baseball, '23, '24, '25, '26, Tennis, '25, '26, Glee Club, '26, Senior Play. PAUL BARUXES "Brux" "Think not I am what I appear." Reveille, '26, Glee Club. '23, '24, '25, '26, Minstrel. '23, '24, '25, '26. RUTH BEBOUT "Jackie" "Many shall run to and fro, and knowledge shall be increased" . Dramatic Club, '26, '26, Girls' Glee Club, '25, '26, Usher, '25, '26, Thalian, '26, Civic Societly, '25, '26, Sec. of Civics, hanksgiv- ing Play, '26, Dramatic Club Play, '26. MARGARET BEAN . 6lMarz1! "If laddigsu be but young an air, Thlgy haze the gift to now 1 . ' Dramatic Club, '24, '25, '26, Glee Club, '23, '24, '25, '26, Basbetball, '26, Reveille, '25, '26, Usher, '24, '25, '26, Thalian, '24, '25, 26, Girls' Reserves, '28, '24, '25, Civic Society '25, '26, President of Dra- matic, '26, Thanksgiving Play, '26 , Senior Play. ml mmMwulllMll"" """"l' H' 'll'lll'll'l" ' Y """'w"'l 'l' ' l " hmmin-'il-iiaml Minilimliimlllllljwwllalwn,1llliillhwlLllllhtlllllIl 7 ,--4-rl, v v y ' 19' 'xv f 31 Q ' v ,Q D 5 5 V v ' 1 0 0 v v S 4 Q I Y V Y Q 1 1 9 .T gtg' Q 'tahhnfk beg' 11 fiigb' '355.??f:srgws,r.z+--- ""'1I!9Al5-7'4"-5-"L ' If .ff L .,.-.-., ,A ,MM A X ....J LOUISA E. WORLEY usqueezen "The first sign of -love is the last of wisdom." Glele Club, '23, '24, Tha- lian, 24, '25, '26, Girls Re- serves, '24, '25, '26, Civic Society, '24, '25, '26, Ten- nis, '25, '26, Treasurer, Civic Society, '25, '26' Re- veiue, '25, '26, Publicity ' Manager, Dramatic Clu Play, '26. LEAH WEAKLEY ll L wi! "Though I am young, I scorn to flit on the wings of borrowed wit." Girl Reserves, '23, '24, Glee Club, '23, Tennis, '23, '24, '25, '26. LOUISE WRIGHT "Shorty" 'A laugh is worth a thousand groans in any market." Girl Reserves, '24, '25, '26, ,Glee Club, '23, '24, 25, 26. JOSEPHINE WINTERMUTE MJD!! "For she's just the mod- est kind, Whose nature never wor- ries." Girl Reserves, '23, Bas- ketball, '26. This view shows the circle at the Country Club. This difcrs from the circle at the Fairground, inas- much that it is smaller, being 2880 feet in circumfer- ence. and more perfect. The wall, as shonm in the picture, is abou! six feet in height. and has two openings, one at the oclagon and the other Jireclly opposite which is closed by a small mound. EDWARD SCHNUTE llEd!l "Describe him who can, An abridgement of all that :vas pleasant in man. - Athenian, '24, '25, '26, Hi-Y, '25, '26, Dramatic S2"",2'f" di" 223' 'Si' S ee U 6 ' 6 'zsf '26, Civic society, '25, '26, Orchestra, '24, '25, ?6t2Ba5egballQg23, 34, De- a , , aptain, '26, Reveille, '25, '26, Edi- tor-in-chief, '26, Vice- rllfgesil Athenianial '24, '25, an sgivin ay, '25, Christmas Pgay, '25, Min- strel, '24, '25, '26, Senior WILLARD LEIST "What wondrous haunting melodies His fingers bring from the ivory keys.' I Band, '24, '25, '26, Glee Club, '23, '24, '25, '26, Football, '23, '24, '25, '26, Minstrel, '25, '26. Play. MARGARET DRUMM upegn "A merry, laughing, danc- ing girl Who with her eyes flirts with the world." Glee Club, '23, '24, ,w w 1, if , ,.ww! W ANNA LOUISE CRAIG "Craigie" "Mingle a little folly with your wisdom." Basketball, '24, Girls' Reserves, '24, '25, Track, '24. , 1 l ,K if u w ' i ' 2 ' l ' ' l w hi l ,, , ,, , um wx, un W ll I U 4 ' w ,, iiii ' ,,,, .s ,,., ' 6.. 6 ww ' l 'V ' li ww iiii 6'6N , M lm. - 1 iw W , w i ,X 66,6 ,. kd H "',1",:g1,1'N'."a 'ru ,u'1::1n,1 .. A - mlxwwilsallhimmwlnli C.. 25 .......Mf VV, Y ' l"Av hw' '17 Q, QIQAQIQLQIOF 6f's9OAO,v? QL.. ,vs'.' - - 1 I V i 'O 5 A Q . V F. A 4 .fgofq ,:Mq,v'f,4,v.5 0 A A i A ' 4 . A , 'S' 1 I' Q. , 'J QAM. V- 'il 'O 'Q ' 9'Q9rY4f3k:c4v.Qv--- Ii:r1'..'?.'.f1.ifQZl43!"" ' 1 LAWRENCE RHODES GLENWOOD PARR unustyva ucyn Home thing is forever "The greatest truths are good? . . the greatestg and so That ofle thmg ls Sue' are the greatest men." cess.' 1 1 Athenian, '25, '265 Dra- Glee Clubf 23' 24' matic Club, '24, '25, '26g - - 'Hi - 5, Glee Club, '24, '26g Civic szigcieggd '256h'2c-sg 1-Eagle, f.. 7, Q , g eer a er, '25, '26, Minstrel, '24, '25, '26g Pres. Dramatic Club. '26g Serg-at-arms, Athen- ian, '263 Christmas Play, '24, '25g Thanksgiving Play, '25g Senior Playg Dramatic Club Play, '26, -' ANNA LAURA McPEAK MARGARET F. "That load becomes light MONTGOMERY which is cheerfully "Monty" borne." Glee Club, ,23. H "Each day dawned for her a fresh adventure." Dramatic Club, '24, '25, '26, Glee Club '23, '24g Reveille, '24, '55, Umm '24, '25, '26g Girls' serves, '23, '24, '25, 326: Civic Societ , '24, '25, '26: Dramatic Club Play, '26g Senior Play. It is indeed fortunate that the Mound Builders' Country Club, under State Supervision. has secured the district containing the largest mounds in the Cherry Valley region, just as the Licking County Fair Asso- ' ciation has control of hfoumlbuilclcrs' Park. That the former group is also in excellent condition may be in evidence from this photograph. ELMER ACORD ' CONWELL MADDEN "Tuggles" "Con" "He that hath kl'l0Wl- "L0Qk ghggy-fully upgn me edge spareth ,h-is words." hgre, loyeg Glee Club' 26' Thou seest how diligent ALICE MARRIOT ALICE MILLER "Here's a sigh for those "Ally" who love me." i ' Gln Club, '24, '25, '26. 30 ,'!WHllmI.ml1ximlmimmluti lliw:7MIzruwvlHiu..,w.Hman "What a different place she can make the same p ace. Dramatic Club, '26g Glee Club, '235 Tennis, '28g Thalian, '24, '25, '26g Civic Society, '25, '26g Track, '23g Captain of '23 Track team, Sergeant-at-arms 'zsg vice Pres. '26 of Thaliang Senior Play. ii,11.iu,momit Gigi 'Sir .,n... Elf 25 ll fkfsfiffg ' ,.p Y V 'fy' L Q Qckvasi , . 4 lt 4. 'UWY7 M "N ff' VUE , V, ' 145123 Hn v L':f:f.:QZf' A" ' ''Z!W5'.'fZo1-:.:+:+z'4'4""' f if 1 I X wr ww w 'w T1-ack, '24, '25, '26g Presi: iw . wx ,, w w l w ,, l wwl " ww www we w w ww ww w w . 1, wrww w ww ww . w i l wlw 'www 'ww w w, ,,, J w u ww. www M ww ill, iw , Fw. lw will . Www? wl wwww ,N w -www X 'w ,W , lm Xu, ,W wh w J ' ww l ww' -ww w L' ' 'www w www ,ll w ' ,w w wi w ww wt l lwwwl"w 3"" , ww' www w W w, www w, M l tw , ww ww 'wwlxwr 'U 'iw N: w, :w hw wwww. w w ww . ww l' l w , w A ww , .ww , wwf , www it ' w ww , X l' N w lw ,w www www Wypwx, 7 'll' ill' wl 1 lwwwwf ,,w,, : w ww w wl w wlqww w . . xw ',,,www,.w.,r,,,,,. ..WfMwwJ,!w w GEORGE A. TRAICOFF "Wash Funk" "I'm sure care is an en- emy to life." ' GEORGANNA VAIL "G. V." "Always happy, always gay, always driving care away.' ,, Thalian, '25, '26, Treas- urer, Thalian, '25, '26. www ww-ww w w- ww ww-w-wwwwwww- w. . , xlqrxtmx, ww H W, ,W wwqw A ww ww , w -ww. w , w, ,pw Aww. .www .whww ww ww ww ROBERT E. WAGENHALS y limb!! "I hurry not-neither do I worry." ' .l ISABEL HATCH A ulbbyn "If you sighed your "Ci"- out once, it to t e' winds would glide." Dramatic,Club, '25, '265 1 Glee Club-" '23g Thalian, '24, '25, '25, Civic Society, '25, '26g Senior Play, President of Thalian, '26g Secretary of Dramatic Club, '25. The fact that the State has acquired the octagon and circle at the Country Club perhaps has been in- strumental for overdoing the matter of restoration. W However, with the considerable reduction iwwww these . built-up portions both from weathering and settling of the earth, the diference is less apparent at the present. RUSSELL TOWER lCRusl! WAYNE WIN GERT "Buzz" "Ml1SiC is the universal "He's considered a wit in language of mankind. Hi-Y, '23, '24, '25, '26, Orchestra ,'23, '24, '25 dent Hi-Y, '26, Minstrel, ,'23, '24, '25. GERALDINE WILCOX "Gerry" "Ha piness is no other than soundness and Tperfection of mind." hallan, '24, '25, Girl Reserves, '24, , Glee Club, '23, '24, '26, Civic Society, '24, '25, '26, Reveille, '26, Usher '24. i 1 Jww 25, 26, Chaplain, 'Phal- an, '25, Secretary, Thal- an, '26: Dramatic, '26. his own home town, but he's far, far fiom home." HASSELTINE JOHNSON "Teenie" " "'She is little, but oh-" . Qflee Club, '23, '24, '25g ' .' w. w wg. , ww ,, .-wwwwww. L' M 1 ,, . w. w . www will , ,w ,.w.w 'w ,www- www W , Md 1 ,,y,,,m, W ,A U, H ,Ww,,!w,,,,, wN w ,ww V , wf y wwh iw N ,Nwww wwww,gwww,.lwww.N wwww - w,,,ww,! .,g "ww llw ' ' w w 'www tw www . w ww ww n www twww wwll-wlwl ' ww ww " w wwwwwzwsw wwww ' w. 1.w,wwwwwww'w- ww ' wwww w w' w . w, . ww ' """N ' w x Him fi: 9 5 g:"f.f,Q,' H . Q I' 5.Wfo'l'P " V1 Q90 - N 4.l,l.-4' 4 9-9 0AO'sw..v4 wma- mm o4r,g,'i0fi3v . Q , '5 ,A ' , A ' ' , 'Q . mf' ' W vvffg? 1' I K v V ww vvw '- PAULINE BLISS MARJORIE BRICKLES upollyu r4Margies9 "She's: the jolliest' kind of "Pains Of love be sweeter a friend far When you're in for some- Than ,all other pleasures thing new. are- . She'Il tackle almost any- , Glee Club, '235 TGHHIS, thing 23, '24, '25, '26, Ushur, When others find noth- ?5, 1263 GIPIS' RGSSTVBS, ing to do." y 23, 24- Glee Club, '26, Reveille, '26, Ushur, '25, '26, Girls' Reserve, '26, Civic So- ciety, '25, '26, Sec. Civics, '26, Dramatic '26. ,. FREDERICK BONHAM JOHN BRICKLES ' ulpredv "Ping" - "Happy-go-luck, fain and C 'If he will, he will, and you may depend on 1t." Orchestra, '23, '24, '25, '26 free, Nothing there is that bothers me." Athenian, '24, '25, '26, Hi-Y, '24, '25, '26, Dra- matic Club, '23, '24, '25, '26, Basketball, '23, '25, Baseball, '22, '23, '24, '25, Glee Club, '22, '23, '24, '25, '26, Football, '23, '24, '25, Track, '23, '24, '25, Dra- matic Club Play, '24, Min- strel Play, '24, '25, Min- strel, '25, '26. This picture shows the ends of two sides of the large octagon at the Country Club. - The evenness of 'the mounds are portrayed here. These walls are about ive and a half feet high. However although the walls are uniform in height, nevertheless the fgurc ' is not that of a perfect octagon. CLARRIDGE CLEAVER "Cabbage" "He is well paid that is well satisfied." Glee Club, '22, '23, '24, Civic Society, '25, '26, Football, '25, Track, '26. MARTHA BURRELL "Well may your hearts believe the truths I tell: 'Tis virtue makes the blis, wher'er we dwell." ,26Glee Club, '23, '24, '25, ROY COCHRAN "Titles of honor add not to his worth who is himself an honor to his titles." Reveille, '26, Glee Club, '23, '24, '25, '26, Civic So- ciety, '26, Football, '25, Minstrel, '25, '26, Vice Pres., Athenian, '26. VIRGINIA DAYTON "Ginnie" "A friendly busy sort of lass, Standing high in every class, Friend of all who know her Well, A happy future, who can tell?" Glee Club, '23, Thalian, '24, '25, '26, Girls' Re- serves, '26, Civic Society, '25, '26. ...x N q , , ,., xl 'f'vf 95 , wvnvvw. 6 1 V 4 tH.QN I :AJ ,xl 4 ,s x ' - ' .."'Y, , ,A I Vt. U-,1'a374'4'.' 'Ii' A W . 4 f N '.ffifagaylomymfligt t ' YY' Q 4. 0 v rm 473 4 "mi", O O 4 Q.' Q I C H 1. AL 3? Y ,mm 4 4 'O LOIS HOLLER IIPUD7! "Never negligent in work or study." Glee Club, '23, '24, '25, '26, Thalian, '26, Civic Society, '25, '26, Prose- cuting attorney of Thal- ian, '26. LUCY HALE HOLLANDER HLu7! "Has she caught her heavenly jewels ?" Thalian, '24, '25, '263 Civic Society, '24, '25, '26g MALCOLM KOEHLER UDOCYI "Comb down his hairy look! look! it stands upright." Glee Club, '25, '26g Or- chestra, '25, '26g Track, '25, '26, Minstrel, '26. ARTHUR HARRIS CKRedl! "Nothing is more simple than greatness: indeed, to bensimple is to be great. Glee Club, '23g Orches- tra, '21, '22, '23. From this photo of the mounds at "Moundbuilders' Park" a fence may be seen. This constitutes the out- ward fence of one of the best horse racing tracks in this section of the state. Facing west on this track is a medium-sized amphilheater. JOHN WELLS BERNARD KELLEY lCJohnny!! 6IBuS9! "I build my soul a lordly "Is there no play, pleasure-house To ease anguish of a tor- Wherein at ease for aye turing hour?" to dwell." Basketball, '26, Stage Baseball, '24, '25g Foot- Mgr., '26. ball, '25. VERA HAWK FLORENCE ETHEL "What joy to feel that HOFFLR now it all is over!" "FlosSy" Civic Society, '25, '26. "Study is like the heav- en's glorious sun." Glee Club, '2-1. '25, '265 Thalian, '24, '25, '26g Girls' Reserves, '26, Civic Society, '25, '26g Chaplain of Thalian, '26. , , -,,., N-I"""'u 8 M ' ' .tofu VW W 25 f f 4'4" if za 9 ,- Y YO Q 0 1 'WMM' f.s..w:'T'f O 9 VO' , ' ' ' .tAy0Q,,, vi . Q45 ' A A 4'A.A'4 OAC. ,A ,A ,A fm .VQQAO Fig- A A E JOSEPH SLAVICK llJoeH "Come, give us a taste of your quality." PAUL SCHEFFLER "Nothing endures but per- sonal qualities." Glee Club, 26, Football '24, '25, Minstrel, '26. MARTHA LY ONS "Mart" "A winning way, a friend- ly smile, In all, Ia girl who's quite worth while." Glee Club, '23, '24, '25, '26, Thalian, '24, '25, '26, Girls' Reserves, '24, '25 '26, Civic Society, '26. HELEN PETTY llPet!! "For she was the quiet kind Whose natures never vary, Like streams that keep a summer mind Snowhid in January." This photograph shows one of the higher mounds at the entrance of the enclosure at Moundbuilders' Park. At these mounds several excavations have been made but none were of such nature as to yield much important knowledge to archaeologists beyond what the general outward aspects presented. WILFORD SKINNER "Forgive me if I blush." Orchestra, '23, '24, '25, '22, Minstrel, "23, '24, '25, 2 . HARRY SHANK "Shankie" "The manly part is to do with might and main what you can do." Hi-Y, '25, '26, Dramatic Club, '24, '25, '26, Basket- ball, '26, Baseball, '23, Glee Club, '25, '26, Foot- ball, '25, '26, Track, '24, '26, Reveille, '25, Senior Play: Minstrel, '25, '26. EULA 1-'ORRY omgn "nada" "Gentle of speech, Beneficient of mind." Dramatic Club, '24, '25. '26, Glee Club, '23, '24, Basketball, '26, Girl Re- serves, '23, '24, Christmas Play, '25, Dramatic Club Play, '26. LUCILLE MOXLEY llMox!! "Every soul is proudest of the good itself has fathered." i N i AJ WV 1'4" f'Q .H Qmlojwiv f iG.m'5gf,f" P ww . , Q" , , .' b A J !f.f:tfQ?t's 'F' Miiaaffl if 3 'xzggv-'lf' ' I ' A9 QWVOIQ 4 4 4 Ag'4ka'h'1K"f'-'fA""""""" --un1ga4f.LQf4fQY0.O.h'P ' P F ! I f E E f I i i l...L.g -M N..- ,- A CATHERINE GRAHAM "Kate" "She hath a quiet charm, A happy, friendly face A smile that one is glad To see in any place." Glee Club, '23, '24, '25, Girls' Reserves, '23, '24, '25, '26. WILMA DE LONG uLonge,yu "Begone, dull care, I'm busy." Dramatic Club, '26, Glee Club, '23, '24, Girls' Re- serves, '24. EDDA FOSTER "She that was ever fair and never proud Had tongue at will and yet was never loud." Dramatic Club, '24, '25, '26, Glee Club, '23, '24, Tennis, '23, '24, '25, '26, Reveille, '25, '26, Girls' Reserves, '24, '25, '26, Track, '23, '24, Sec. Girls' Reserves, Thanksgiving Play, '24, '25, Senior Play. ROSALYN DEYARMETT "Rosie" "A friendly young lady and accomplished art student. Who could want more?" Dramatic Club, '26, Glee. Club, '23, '24, '25, '26, Re- veille, '24, '25, '26, Ushur, '25, '26, Girls' Reserves, '23, '24, '25, '26, Civic So- ciety, '24, '25, '26, Sec. Civics, '25, Pres. Civics, '26, Publicity Art Mgr. for Dramatic Play, '26. This photograph also shows another view of the ditch and embankment at the Fairground circle. ll has been said that this ditch formerly was covered with a great many flat stones. However, whether or not this was an actual fact cannot he told from the present appearance of the moat which is devoid of stones. V Doulwtless these rocks were carried away for domestic USC. CLAYTON KLINE "Count" "I stand at the brink of a great career Will somebody please shove me off ?" Hi-Y, '24, '25, '26, Base- ball, '23, '24, '25, Glee Club, '25, '26, Football, '25, Track, '25, Minstrel, '25, '26, Vice Pres. Hi-Y. ,24. RALPH JACKSON KfJack!I "He danced without thea- trical pretense Not like a ballet-master in the van Of his drill'd nymphs, but like a gentleman." RUSSELL LOUGHMAN usandyu "I am Sir Oracle, And when I ope my lips let no dog bark!" Athenian, '24, '25, '26, Dramatic Club, '26, Band, '24, '25, '26, Band Direc- tor, Baseball, '23, '24, '25, Athenian, '24, '25, '26, Hi-Y, '23, '24, '25, '26, Dramatic Club, '25, '26, Asst. Stage Manager, '25, Orchestra, '23, '24, '25, '26, Track, '25, Senior Play, Minstrel, '23, '24, '25, '26, Secretary, Athen- ians, '26, Trws. Hi-Y, '26 40 '26, Reveille, '25, Glee Club, '23, '24, '25, '26, Or- chestra, '23, '24, '25, '26, Track, '24, Debate, '24, '25, '26, Captain of De- bate, '25, '26, Dramatic Club Play, '26, Senior Play, '26, Minstrel, '23, '24, '25, '26, Senior Play, Commencement speaker. RALPH HUGHES ilPeg.D "None knew what he could do until he tried." Glee Club, '22, '23 '24, 1 7 '25, '26, Football, '24, 25, Track, '24, '25, '26, Foot- ball coach, '26. 9 'I Y 1' s. 0 o 4 'V lqlyf flgzlkvfl--":,O: v f ' ,g j M v'f'g'5', ,Q .0 PV' 'Q x I GMU A41 W MIA 4 'k I . v V , .-unfit!-M ' ' ll, fgpfx. "z" 0' 5 sq , A A 4 k.f""5"ls. 4 y 4' A CARL FRYE JOHN GREEN Speech is great-silence "There is no knowledge 1? .81'93t?l'-" that is not power." Civic Society, '25, '26. Athenian, '25, '26. FERN ESTHER EVELYN HUNTER CHANNELL "Dimples" "Femie" "This is the smallest school I've ever run." Dramatic Club, '25, '26, Glee Club, '23, '24, '25, Reveille, '24, '25, '26, Ushur, '24, '25, '26, fHead Ushur, '26J, Girls' Re- serves, '23, '24, '25, '26, Civic Society, '24, '25, '26, Debate, '26, Christmas Play, '25, Dramatic Club Play, '26, Vice Pres. Civ- ics, '25, Vice Pres. Girls' Reserves, '24, '25, '26. "In each cheek appears a pretty dimple." Glee Club, '23, '24, This View does not conslilule one of the group mounds al the Country Club but ralher one of lhe in- dividual mounds. To the left of the rather irregular mound in the foreground is seen a low even mound which is one of the sides of the large oclagon. The olhcr figure at the Club is that of a circle. PAUL HACKNEY HARRY GARDNER "Chick" "When you can't change a "I stand for justice: an- swer, shall I have it?" Civic Society, '26. LUCILLE HAMMER Knowledge is more than equivalent to force." thing don't let it change you." CLARA FULGER uB0bbyn "A woman of polite learn ing and liberal educa tion." Girls' Reserves, '24, "ins- i of v 'VV Zvi db 4544- Q. ' . Y ' No' fff9'o'o""' ' xxx A O 7 9 , gf. 1-i..',,,y'g L, ,Q'0.f.Q,, Y 'YA' 6 'W A Hvv- "' . 'Qi QQ 90's 'V ' ",4'H, AAAA 1 4 A. p .... ...J ALICE LINTON MAI!! "I'll be merry and free, I'll be sad for nobody." Dramatic Club, '26, Glee Club, '23, '24, '25, '26, Re- veille, '25, '26, Ushur, '25, '26, Thalian, '24, '25, '26, Girls' Reserves, '23, '244 '25, '26, Civic Society, '25, '26, Track, '23. ANITA JEFFERS "Jeff" "And Mistress of herself though China fall." Glee Club, '25, '26, Civic Society, '26. ball, '25, '26, Minstrel, '24, LOIS HANES LAURA TYRRELL "Hanezie" "Boots" "Oh, keep me innocent, ' "A friend, modest and make others great." quiet too." Glee Club, '26, Girls' Girl Reserves, '26, Civic Reserves, '26, Society, '26. This view shows clearly the huge embankment at Newarlfs "Moundbuilders' Park". The average height of this mound throughout the entire circle ranges from twelve to sixteen feet, measuring fifty feet across the base. The circumference is approximately four thousand feet. The ditch pictured here averages about seven feet in depth and from twenty to thirty feet across. WALTER KENNETH SCOTT "Scotty" "Worth, courage, honor, these indeed Your sustenance and birthright are." Hi-Y, '25, '26, Band, '25, '26, Glee Club, '23, '24, '25, '26, Orchestra, '24, '25, '26, Class Basket-. EDITH WHITE HEd!l "Plain without pomp, and rich without show." Glee Club, '24, '25. '25, '26. MAE KREAGER "Mazie" "Serenity personified, calm, peace and quiet in the flesh." Glee Club, '24, '25, '26, Civic Society, '26. VIRGINIA LARASON uGinnyn "She is a form of life and light, Laughing eyes and man- ners bright!" Dramatic Club, '25, '26, Glee Club, '23, '24, '25, '26, Reveille, '26, Ushur, '25, '26, Civic Society, '25, '26, Dramatic Club Play, '26, Song leader, '26, Sec- retary of Dramatic, '26, YQWQ X "..f"Q FE- R . UVQQQQ A' i Wfbsftffix t V h lfflfqlfxl lik f . 40 ol' H "W 4 ,, V '. . 4, 1 qtaxwvx 'tx 71 n-4 . A Q f 'yfvgg . , A, , "Vw-'NN , 5 . . - 0 N ,, ,dr "', 0' 4,4 f f is . , 4 iff. PM y ' ' '- vvvt' ,f '94 v vvv ' 4 sax.,-.. . ' " AAAA '49 A' ' 'sn Q p Ill- ' H 'f .ofuo Jilin' I . , PAULINE BEEKS HPal!! "A fair and friendly lass is she Full of fun and jollity. Ever -ready to beguile Friend or foe with her dimpled smile." Glee Club, '22, '23, Girls' Reserves, '22. BERNICE BLIND "Bernie" "She is ever willing to help with her bright smile. We all know her as one who does her work and does it well." Thalian, '24, '25, '26, Civic Socic'y, '26. K I Tl-IELMA BEENEY llfrebi! 'Pleasant, quiet, friendly, slow to speak, but re- member when she does speak it's always the ' right thing at the right time." Glee Club, '23, '24, '25, 263 Girls' Reserves, '23 '24, '25, '26, Civic Society, H HELEN BEENEY To waste one's thoughts in idle words, It is ruthless. So, leave it to the com- mon herds." Glee Club, '23, '24, '25, '26, Girls' Reserves, '23 '24, '25, '26. '26, Formerly there was a rather large pond midway between this mound at the ffairground and the mounds at the Country Club. Since this mound was undoubt- Y . ,-,J ,edly used as a fortification it has been asserted by , E some writers that an "underground tunnel" connected the ditch with the pond, by means of which it could have been flooded at will. VIOLET CANNON ELIZABETHCHALMERS uvin "Libby" "By studious means she UAH honest mind and wins her Wray." Etlalfz-'-alien must speak Gl , l b, . e fu - es C U 26 Glee Club, '25, '26. KENNETH CROOKS CARL CONRAD "Kenny" "And his looks were sad." "There is nothing like 1 BQHCL , '24s 01'0h9StF2, work for a man to 23, 24, 25- grow fat on." 4-s, flaw' ,Tk YI e an n 4 Viva, 'vigil A K 9,0 'WH .,'4','.'Y6" IH, v lflagefoyv UQ, 1 13q5,4!A?!"Qi:E1,' N IL K . ' ,Q "N ' 'mf 5 f"'f ff. fn,-5 x 4."Qqv ,ll-4.vi'3, ag, ' r , N" I . V """' 'vvr 1 f -',vv ' ' 41 - ..4.44'AIf.9 V r ,,,Al K ' GLADYS ROWLAND PEARL MARIE PRIEST "Billy" 'Tony'- "The silence often of pure H31-,al-pfs the word with innocence her." Persuades, when speak- Glee Club '24 '25- Bas- ing fails." k tb 11, '26g,G' -1' R ' Glee Club, '23, '24, Girl '22, 24, '25, 22. eserves' Reserves, '24. GRACE STAUFFER "Her lot is made for her by tthe love she ac- cep s." Glee Club, '23, '24, Girl Reserves, '23, '26, Civic Society, '26. DOROTHY RAINEY SCD0t!3 'A lovely girl is above all rank." Girl Reserves, '23, '24, '25, '26. Within the park mounds is one of the best efigies in the slate called the "Eagle Mound". It is of sin- gular shape and supposedly made lo represent a bird with expanded wings. Yet il can hardly be called one mound but is rather a group of four mounds in lhe general outline of a bird. HELEN ROBB ALMIRA SIMPSON "Sunny" "Tootsie" "Eyes that were fountains "Not only goqd Qflt 2005 of thought and song." for sonlefihlng- Glee Club, '23, '24, '25 '26. FRANCES V. TAYLOR BEATRICE POWELL "Vickey" "Bee" 'Grace was in all her "Charms strike the sight steps, heaven in her But merit wins the eye, soul." In every gesture, dig- nity and love." 48 K ff! H 'Ip ',' W1 . ,diff 'va 1 Q . .A ' 15 ,Yup 0.'p avfff 0 'iq H4 AAN-O 'QQQ14 6 ?'Y'4.'4 tt' 4' .,.' . ffgvnl' A 5- ' A , Q kaq,:w4'a'd'i'0?I.'1f""""' . . EVELYN VIOLA SPITZER UB0bby!! She moves a goddess, and she looks a queen." A MILTON JOHNSON 'fchubbyr LILLIAN SCHAUWECKER CII-lil!! "Your gentleness shall force, More than your force move us to gentle- ness." JOHN PARKER "Johnny" "Unpractised he to fawn, or seek for power." Glee Club, '23, '24g Christmas Play, '24. no time to waste." "For men in earnest have Athenian, '25, '26g Glee Club, '23, '24, '25, '26g Civic Society, 25, '26g Minstrel, '24, '25, '26. This mound is another one of the various types scattered about those of the Country Club. All of these have been pretty thoroughly excavated, but the excavations seem to have disclosed nothing except an abundance of rough stones which must have been brought from the nearby creelf or some remote local- ity, as none are scattered over the remarkable plain on which these works are situated. ROY GREEN -' Ilbaneii "Fain could I climb but that I fear to fall.'l RUTH GREGORY "Ruthie" 'Speech is silver but sil- ence is golden." K CHESTER CLARE MEARS "Chet" Nothing is impossible to industry." MARY RUTH SMITH "Ruthie"' "Quiet, reserved and stud- ious is she." Glee Club, '24, '25, '26, Girl Reserves, '26. f QW s'u. eigix Mg Po S"NXfx ,:5... af JJQQAB5? , MWF!" Amf , Qs In ,hx S 948' link I I 0 4 A '-'.'.3'+'m Q co 'SF' Q I +aH' .4 1 . , - f i 'svvf K . ff'vv" Y xx ' ww "za f ' 1. Q A, ' s V , ,x Www. L' v"Ofl1' V0's's '- Q.-, ' V ' ' AA" L Am. 4.. A . I 1 3 if RUSSELL BURRELL uRustyn "If but amusement were the end of life." Glee Club, '26, Orches- tra, '23, '24, '25, '26, Foot- ball, 26, Minstrel, '26. Senior Play. PEARL BENNETT "Clever and quiet, with little to say, Works quite hard the live long day Always a smile in her own sweet way, This is the way she passes the day." RAYMOND BROWN "Brownie" "Slow and easy but he gets there same." Hi-Y, '26, Club, '26, Glee Orchestra, '23, '26, Track, '25, ' just the Dramatic Club, '26, '24, '25, 26, Senior Play, Minstrel, '26. MILDRED SWART ccMillyss "A maiden good without pretense Blest with reason and common sense." Glee Club, '23, '26, Tha- lian, '26, Girl Reserves, '26, Civic Society, '25, '26, Reveille, '25, '26, Usher, '25, '26. The class of these mounds at the Club is not the same as those of the "Temple Mound" groups and were made for a diferent purpose. apparently, al- though it is somewhat uncertain what may have been the intention of either. It is probable that most of them were in some manner connected with the defense of the enclosure to which they belong. ROBERT COLEMAN GlBob!? "There was never as merry or as good nat- ured a chap as he." HAROLD COOPER llcoopv "Knowledge is power, but It won't make an auto go. Hi-Y, '25, '26, Basket- ball lMgr.J '26, Glee Club, '24, '25, '26- Foot- ball, tMgr.J '26, Minstrel, '24, '25, '26, Senior Play. GERALDINE CRUM uJen,yn "Let's be gay while we may." MARGARET DANNER "Marjie" And her face so fair Stirred with her dream as rose leaves with the a1r." Dramatic Club, '24, '25, 263 Reveille, '25, '26, Civ- ic Society, '26, Dramatic Club Play, '26. U A ir, ax ,, , -1 'Uv A NvV,fm' A Alisa. nv .0 I-I ,f'f: .f' 25 gr , , . O 01 AQHA 9 'fffllh 1 nn 9 'JIAJ AQ, 'fa ,b '.I slug, f 545 . . 'Y' A v ' ' ' "life f 'cl 21" "We" - Q 'alf, V' 1',:' 5 ' iJA3..' ' mg.-'Q' ' 00" "' E'fQi5" JOHN HUNT "It matters not how long we live, but how." HELEN HUPP ucupieu "Bright as the sun her eyes the gazers strike, And, like the sun, they shine on all alike." tAlike on all but one.j JAMES HOTTLE "Shenandoah" "He bears him like a port- ly gentleman, And, to say truth, Ve- rona brags of him To be a virtuous and well-govern'd youth." Band, '23, '24, '25, '26: Glee Club, '23, '24, Or- chestra, '23, '24, '25, '26, Football, '25, '26 Min strel, '26. MARY DAVIS UJane79 "A winning way, a friend- ly smile, In all, a girl who's quite worth while." At the present time, Newark perhaps has one of the best and most unusual golf courses in the state. This golf course is that of the Moundlzuilders' Coun- try Club and is located on the west outskirts of Newark. The fact that it is unique is because it is formed by mounds, one of which is pictured in the above photo. DANIEL HUPP "Josh" "Quiet and reserved is he" Baseball, '26. HELEN MOORE "Freckles" "Her ambition knows no rest." Glee Club, '23g Civic So- ciety, '263 Basketball, '26. ROGER MOSSMAN l6R0g.el! "Heavy work in youth is great rest in old age." Tennis, '25, '26, Track, '24, '25, '26. LOUISE LARASON "My tongue within my lips I rein For he who talks much, talks in vain." Glee Club, '24, '25, Girls' Reserves, '24. un' is 6, 55.0.59 4 6 Q v 1 ,O 6 0,56 'S N . QW' t4sn":1 ' y V "',fi -f x 1 Y, Q lsr v Q ggga of 4 .gk 1 . 1 fy' 4 4 V , V vqygvwhln. u. x tlgtlkyifivn'-'f"""""1 A . ' ' RALPH DUSH "Nature can stand up and say to all the world, 'This is a man'." Civic Society, '25, '26g Football, '25. LYNNLY WILSON "Skindall" "Work with all ease and speed you can Without breaking your head." Civic Society, '25, '26, Reveille, '24, '25. MARGUERITE WALSH DOROTHY WILKIN Klmargi! Clnoti! 'Virtue ,alone is true no- "Quiet enough to be a bility." quaker " Glee Club, '24. This ditch at Moundbuilders' Park is considerably deeper at the entrance than anywhere else: in fact, the entire structure is the greatest at the entrance. An interesting fact to observe is that the amount of dirt taken from this ditch falls far short of equalting thai used in building the mound. CHARLES DALY "Monk" 'Other men have acquired fame by industry but Q this man by indolence." DOROTHY V. SWISHER ' lCDotH! "And when a lady's in the case, You know all other things give place." 56 v RALPH ADAMS TOMLINSON llRats7! "Come then, expressive 97 silence FLORENCE M. SW ANK "Swankie" "I probably never will grow up." Girl Reserves, '23, '24, Glee Club, '22, '23g Ten- nis, '23g Basketball, '25, '26 K f"'I:" Y .I . X . , . v V m1.f.:.f',3 Viv.. 'rrp' A Jv',",LQ Y,V.'Q Ff6YaOfO.Vlafa'i Q4f59,f4fQ,ta,,Q ' ' .v v 1 'N 'Q' VU" x ,gmmg.E:':Q:0YOf0f9 """l"'4101'-'f'f'?9-'-'Af' ,Y ', , -,J BERTHA HARRINGTON "Bert" "Capacity for joy BERTHA ISABELL HAYS' "Bert" Admits temptation." "The silence of the good Reveille, '26, Thalian, damns more than bad '24, '25, '26, Civic So- men's curses." ciety, '26. JOIE A. HARTMAN mltUSSELL,HOLCLOMB A "Pleasure" kg- 'A-- "Red" Y W' I i "Eenjoyment is the n1an's HI envy H0 man Wnf' most heartfelt praise knows more tnan I dv, To him that fl-am'd his But I Pity hlm who being." knows less." Athenian, '25, '26, Re- veille, '25, '26g Ushur, '25, '269 Glee Club, '23, '24, '25, '263 Civic S0- ciety, '25, '26, Minstrel, '24, '25, '26, The mounds pictured here are also located at the Country Club. This small mound is one within the large oclagon mound. This octagon mound is directly connected to the circle. At a point immediately op- posite its cntrance it would seem that its builders de- termined to carry out parallel lines but finished by throwing up large excavations at the uncompleted parts. JOHN HAMILTON GEORGE STEDEM , HENRY "Johnny ' "Jesters do often prove "StllbbY" prophets." "To most men no disgrace can loom like theirs Who dare do aught save by the grace of cus- tom." ' ELLA MAE HANON IONA GUTRIDGE "Snooks" "Red" "Wit is the flower of the "How her fingers went imagination." o'er the ivory keys." Basketball, '26. Glee Club, '23, '24, '25g Basketball, '26. Ll "Sf fatal' fx, ' 4-4 4' U Qv' fu ' x . v'f's'. v, bays r' v +' Q at . tts, 'Axv"9'Vv A, tsl fs'.'. in .ff xilfiu' Q' 0 Icthbl ,il I ALLEENE ELLIS J! M 3 "Of serious worth and in- ward flee." Glee Cub, '23 '24, '25 ROSANA FLENNER "Rosie" "The best way to be happy is to have a good time." Glee Club, 23, '24, '25 '26g Girls' Reserves, 23: '263 Girls' Reseifves, 'zaf Girls' Reserve, '23. '24, '25. 24. CARL FELUMLEE "A handful of common sense is worth a bushel of learning." Athenian, '25, '26g Band, '24, '25, '26g Glee Club. '23, '24, '25, '26g Orches- tra, '23, '24, '25, '263 Track, '26, Minstrel, '25, '26. Although the fact could hardly be recognized by observing this picture of the embankment, this mound at "Moundbuilders' Park" is not really a true circle being in the shape of an eclipse. By measurement, one of its diameters would be found to be approxi- mately one hundred feet shorter than the other. OWEN DIVAN JOHN SMITH "John" "Slim" "When youth and pleas- "All which he understood ure meet by rote, To chose the glowing And, as occasion seW'd hours with flying would quote." feet." Orchestra, '25, '26, Glee Club '26. Glee Club, '26. , HELEN HANNUM l6Pat9! "The glory of a firm ca- pacious mind." 'iff-' Ss 'W77 1 gi P351 99 ,-:wa Q?4?f5w a'mi'w44 'W'r9oA9 .avvvrrnq 4406:-1:-Q, ,gfidimfe Xeef3f53qv,9 lggv X4 A . ,," v jvff 'QQQMYXOIKOLOLOZQYQYUH if-'-'A'-.33z.',4.'.' I DOROTHY GRUBAUGH SARA GRANT "One could trust your "Peggy" kindness." "Rich in saving common Basketball, '25, '26. Sense," Glee Club, '24, '25 Girls' Reserves, '23. ANTHONY SABIAN 6STony H "Of manners gentle, of affections mild! In wit a man, simplicity a child." One may see from this picture that the "Fairground Circle" is in a perfect stale of preservation. This work has been accomplished by the fact that the county owns the park and thus prevenfs all destructive actions. Besides being the seat of llre Licking County Fair, the park has been a place for many open-air city and domestic festivities. RAYMOND MIRISE DWIGHT SAWYER "Raymi.e" "Tom" "The letter is too long by "lt matters not what men half a mile." assume to beg Or good, or bad, they are but what they are." KIRK WINDLE "Pinkie" "Honor lies at labors gate." Athenian, '25, '26, Hi- Y, '23, '24, '25, '25g Dra- matic Club, '26g Civic So- ciety, '25, '26, Debate, 526, Reveille, '26g President, Athenian, '253 Senior Playg Commencement speaker. 62 Q mx wa: '4':6ii,Ms f tk 'kv 4?nO8S, Q V' :X ,, 1 .X 5 1,9-Q, NS f3m'Y6'i4a 4. J,-Aii:Yb:I,' . SCN -i 25 f iivffm Q OW QV21l' 'lxllfv v V. , . x..'AYA,A. . ,gf 5 'li ' ' 'W Y f H w S , timggixgii ' ' in History of Class of 1926 X T the end of four years it is well to look back and think what our high school career has meant to us. Our first year spent, largely, in getting acquainted with the rules and regulations of the school and learning to bear with a smile the title of the year, "Freshie." A few of our boys entered into ath- letics, but on the whole the year 1923 was passed in silent preparation. In our Sophomore year we advanced in wisdom and strength. The Thalian and Athenian Literary Societies claimed many of the students. Likewise many Sophomores gained places in the Civic Society and on the Reveille Staff. The Sophomore Class did its share in Debate this year, too, by giving Russell Loughman to the team. This class also displayed much talent in dramatics as was shown by the number admitted to the Dramatic Club. When one is a Junior, he begins to feel a bit important. After he has undergone two years of "getting started" he has a right to feel the joys of an upper classman. Many of the Juniors became very prominent in athletics, and the league championship basketball cup came to Newark. Many of our Juniors received "N's" in football. De- bate was the main issue of this class, for it was represented by three able debaters. This year Newark won a unanimous decision from Zanesville while it lost by a 2 to 1 vote to Mt. Vernon. The Senior year is always the grand finale for "all's well that end's well." Our Senior year was filled with activities. The Class of '26 gave a captain and many play- ers to the football team, which was very successful this year. The basketball team was captained by a '26 man, and tied with Mt. Vernon for the league championship. This was a big year in our athletic history. We were the proud possessors of a new gymnasium, a fine "gym" where we were proud to meet our visitors. The Seniors also took part in the open meetings held in chapel by the Civic, Thalian and Athenian Societies. The publishing of the Reveille was largely in the hands of the Class of '26. The editor-in-chief, the associate editor, and the editors of most of the depart- ments were recruited from its ranks. The Senior Class again this year showed that it was rich in argumentative abil- ity, giving six debaters to the school. Debate this year was a great success. Newark won both banners by a unanimous vote at both Zanesville and Newark. This is the first time in seventeen years of debating that Newark High has received all six votes, and the Class of '26 is proud of the part she played in the victories. A party was held in the new gymnasium April 6. It was a great success, and it showed the real spirit and enthusiasm of the class. At the last meeting of the Senior Class before the Annual went to press, three commencement speakers were chosen. The class flower and colors have been chosen. The cast for the Senior play has been selected, and practices are being held in preparation for this play, which this year is in charge of the Dramatic Club. Thus ends the history of the Class of '26. "Oh, Newark High! Dear Newark High We all will ne'er forget That golden haze Of High School days Is round about us yet Those days of yore Will come no more But through our future years The thought of you, So good and true Will fill our eyes with tears. The thought of you So good and true, Will fill our eyes with tears." 64 Class Prophecy u-1-1 A 7f X S I sit here on this thirtieth day of June, 1936, reading my 1926 Annual it re- calls fond memories: the different societies, the good times, and old-time E friends. Little did we realize during the editing of our Annual the pleasure it would bring us in after years, especially in being able to bring before our eyes the picture of old friends and school-mates. Now, here is Elmer Acord. My, but he was droll in school, no wonder he is a comedian now. Emelene was surely the vamp of our class. Little did we think she would settle down and be such a wonderful wife. Kenneth Alspach has reached the pinnacle of success and is a great theatrical manager. Franklin Anderson has made his wealth by selling his prescription for keeping thin. The proud owner of the Sparta, now, is Paul Baruxes. I see by the "Cincinnati Enquirer" that Russell Loughman, now a prominent young lawyer, whose private secretary is Bernice Blind, is trying a breach of promise case for Margaret Drumm against Russell Burrell. The verdict is unset- tled. Elsie Bauman, Anna Louise Craig, and Eula Oder are the girls' athletic instruct- ors in Flea Town High School with John Brickels in charge of the boys. Walter Beadle is considered Hollywood's best-dressed man and Geraldine Crum is the most popular fashion model in the Lazarus Store. Margaret Bean is starring as one of Mack Sen- nett's Bathing Beauties. I have noticed that Ruth Bebout, Willard Leist, Russell Tow- er, and Wilfred Skinner compose one of the numbers of the Newark High School Lec- ture Course this year. Pauline Beeks is working as ticket girl at the Auditorium Theater, the manager of which is Raymond Brown. Helen and Thelma Beeney are teaching at Newark High School. A beauty parlor has just been opened in Chicago under the management of Pearl Bennett and Almira Simpson. Pauline Bliss and Rob- ert Coleman are featuring a specialty dance in Zieg'field's Follies. Marjorie Brickles was so successful in designing her own home that she has gone in the business of building love-nests for others. Martha Burrell, Violet Cannon and Elizabeth Chalmers are the three most prominent lady judges of the country. Edward Schnute is a suc- cessful surgeon. Fern Channell is the present speaker in the House of Representa- tives. Claridge Cleaver with Roy Cochran and Carl Conrad as his assistants, is Ldi- recting the congested traffic in Black Hand. Harold Cooper, President of the Interna- tional Baseball League, gave an interesting talk to the boys of the Y. M. C. A. last evening. Kenneth Crooks is succeeding his father as owner of the feed store in New- ark. Charles Dalyhas just edited a series of History Chronicles. Marjorie Danner is a movie star of growing fame in Hollywood. I see by this evening's "Advocate" that Mary Davis and Owen Divan are to broadcast several selections from station N. H. S. Virginia Dayton is at the present time in Czecho-Slovakia reviewing movies. Wilma De Long is leading an eleven-piece orchestra consisting of Ralph Dush, Carl Felumlee, Carl Frye, Helen Petty, Harry Gardner, Clara Fulger, Roy Greene, frederick Bonham, Aileene Ellis, and Lucille Moxley, engaged this summer at Buckeye Lake, which is now under the management of Edda Foster. None other than our Rosalyn De Yarmett is following in the footsteps of her uncle in designing money in the United States Mint, Rosanna Flenner has recently invented a facial lotion. Roger Mossman and John Par- ker are at present engaged in constructing a blacksmith shop at the corner of Fifth Avenue and Broadway. Catherine Graham is the wonder-trapeze performer of the world, in the Miller-Montgomery circus owned by our Alice and Margaret. Also in the same circus are James Hottle selling peanuts, Dorothy Rainey making hot dog sandwiches, and Harry Shank exercising his vocal chords by yelling, "Pink lemonade here!" Isabel Hatch and Cy McKinney are featuring as tight rope-walkers, while Con- well Madden is the head animal trainer, Margaret Besanceney is the snake charmer of this circus. It seems quite a coincidence that so many of the class of '26 should congregate into the Miller-Montgomery circus. John Green has just invented a new 65 rattle for the Ford Airplane. Sara Grant, Dorothy Grubaugh, Ruth Gregory, and Iona Gutridge are now featuring as chorus girls in "Freezone" with Paul Hackney, John Hamilton and James Harris as leading men in the same company. Lucille Hammer, Lois Hanes, Helen Hannum and Ella Mae Hannon are life savers at Summerland Beach, and the business is rushing they say. Bertha Harrington and Joie Hartman are spe- cializing in working cross-word puzzles. Vera Hawk, Bertha Hayes, George Henry, and Russell Holcomb are all entries in a beauty contest now being carried on by Ralph Jackson. Florence Hoffer, Lucy Hollander, and Ralph Hughes are the judges, and the prizes are to be presented by Lois Holler. In cooperation with this contest is the "Daily Times" edited by John Hunt and Daniel Hupp. Evelyn Hunter, Helen Hupp, Malcolm Koehler, and Bernard Kelly compose a quartette now touring Hanover. Anita Jeffers and Hasseltine Johnston are co-workers in settlement houses at Ellis Island. Milton Johnson has gained his prominence as a sculptor by his bust of Clayton Kline, Presi- dent of the United States. The Old Man's Home at Claylick is proud to have as nurses Mae Kreager and Louise Larason. Karl Leidy, Orrien Lynn, and Chester Mears are featuring as end-men in "Lasses White Minstr-els," now owned by Lawrence Rhodes, Broadway's leading comedian. Martha Lyons is now so renowned as a Scenario writer that she keeps two typists busy: Virginia Larason and Alice Linton. Anna Laura McPeak and Alice Marriot are manufacturing ''No-Holes-Ever-Running" silk hose. Helen Moore, Glenwood Parr, Beatrice Powell, and Pearl Priest help to compose the faculty of the University of Newark, Ohio. When I was at the Telephone office the other day, I noticed among the operators Helen Robb, Gladys Rowland and Ruth Smith. In the same office were Anthony Sabian and Dwight Sawyer as district traffic super- intendents, Lillian Schauwecker as chief operator and Paul Scheffler as trouble clerk. Walter Scott has just had patented his preventative for breaking arms. John Smith is in training as a prize fighter under Joseph Slavic. The manager of Kuster's, George Traicoff, has as his waitresses, Grace Stauffer, Florence Swank, Mildred Swart, and Dorothy Swisher. Evelyn Spitzer is now happily married and living at "Happyacre," a large estate on beautiful Racoon Creek. Frances Taylor, Laura Tyrrell, Georganna Vail and Margaret Walsh are the joint owners of the Goldbird Tea Room. Ralph Tom- linson and Robert Wagenhals are working in the Newark Post Office. Edna Mae West- fall is a real estate dealer, with "Lots and Lots." Leah Weakley is the only lady Auto racer. Edith White, Dorothy Wilkin, Lynnly Wilson are joint-owners of a vegetable farm. Kirk Windle is teaching swimming at Harvard. Geraldine Wilcox and Louisa Worley are doing research work for "King Tuts" in Egypt. The Missionaries to Moun- tain people in Ohio are Josephine Wintermute and Louise Wright. John Wells and Wayne Wingert are engaged in the manufacturing of bathing suits in Alaska. Ray- mond Mirise is succeeding Rudolph Valentino in the movies. Can it be that those were the last pictures! Old friends, old school-mates. How they bring back fond memories: "When at last our ways are parted By the mighty monarch time, Then our duty shall await us In perhaps some distant clime. Then shall others rise to praise thee, Who shall also know thy might, For we all shall be defenders Of the Crimson and the White." 66' COMMENCEMENT SPEAKERS FIRST ROW-fLeft to Rightl-Virginia Dayton, Edna Westfall, and Marxraret Montgomery: SEC OND ROW-Karl Leidy, Joie Hartman, Russell Loughman, Kirk Windle, and Orrien Lynn. 67 H SENIOR CLASS PLAY TOP ROW--fLcl't to Righty--Raymond Brown, Harry Shank, Edward Schnute, Lawrence Rhodes, Cyrus McKinney, Kirk Windle, Orrien Lynn: CENTER ROW'-Roy Cochran, Margaret Montgomery, Isa- bel Hatch, Edda Foster, Margaret Bean, Emelene Alberry, Edna Westfall, Alice Miller, BOTTOM ROW! Walter Beadle, Ralph Jackson, Karl Leidy, John Brickcls, Russel Burrell, Kenneth Alspach. HF Pk wk Senior Play "' 'W ACH year the Senior class presents a play during commencement week. This ' yeai the play IS undel the auspices of the Dramatic Club and under the di- rection of Mlss C1 lllv and Miss Dorothy Montomery. The play which has and been chosen this year is "Monsieur Beaucairef' a three-act play by Booth H32 -.wir '- lg . . A gg. - .. ' , ' Tarkington. The cast is as follows: Monsieur Beaucaire ---- Kenneth Alspach Duke of Winterset Mr. Molyneux - - Harry Rackell Captain Badger - Beau Nash - - Lord Townbrake Mr. Bantison - - Sir Hugh Guilford Henri de Beaujolais Marquis de Mirepoix Francois - - - Victor ---- Lawrence Rhodes - - Orrien Lynn - Harry Shank Cyrus McKinney - Ralph Jackson - - Karl Leidy - - Kirk Windle Edward Schnute Edward Schnute Russell Loughman - Walter Beadle Raymond Brown Servant to Beau Nash Russell Burrell Lady Mary Carlysle - Marga1'et Bean Lady Malbourne - - - Edda Foster Lady Clarise ---- Isabel Hatch Lady Rellerton - - Emelene Albery Lady Baring-Gould - - Alice Miller Estelle - - - Edna Mae Westfall Marie - - - Margaret Montgomery Winton - - - - Roy Cochran Louis - - - - Joie Hartman Jean - - Harold Cooper Berquin - - John Brickles Zuma? if 5 ff 9 fPx The Junior Class HE class of 1927 has so far made a mark for itself in high school life, for it has been well represented in all the act1v1t1es of the school as well as ln scholarship. To begin, let us take Debate. This year, we had two Juniors i on the teams. Freda Kupplnger and Oscar Eclebelry. Freda has held a place on one of the teams for two years and has done her part toward making them successful. We, of the Junior class, are surely proud of her. Although Oscar has only served for one year, has has done well, for he was alternate on the affirmative team this year, and we all believe that he will be a still greater aid in securing another ban- ner for us next year. Next, consider the societies. There are a great many Juniors in every organiza- tion and at some time during the year offices in all of the societies have been held by members of the class. In the Dramatic Club three Juniors have taken part in plays produced in Chapel: Oscar Ecleberry and Kenneth Shannon in the Thanksgiving play and Ethel McGlade in the Christmas play. There were also' a number of Juniors in the cast of "Daddy Long-Legs," which the club gave late in April. In every case they have proved very efficient. On the Reveille Staff, also, several of the departmental editors have been Juniors. The Fun Column especially has been very good this year under the leadership of Vir- ginia Rohrbaugh, for the material has been very well handled. The Exchange has also been under a Junior girl, Madia Baruxes, who has helped to build up the communica- tion with other schools by her faithful work. In addition to the ones on the writing staff of the paper, the business manager, Edward Brown,' was a Junior and surely helped hold up the reputation of his class by his splendid work this year. Nearly all of the Reveille Staff for next year is composed of the class of '27. We, of this class, are also very proud of our boys who have taken an active part in the athletics of our high school, for they have all played the game fairly and square- ly and have not neglected their scholastic work in the pursuit of these diversions. These boys have shone in all branches of athletics and there are several having more than one letter awarded for playing the game well, and for clean sportsmanship throughout the whole season. The list of those who have received letters are as fol- lows: Football, Robert English, Ralph Brown, who is captain of next year's football team, Bernard Youse, and Franklin Johnson. Basketball, Ralph Browng Bernard Youse, who was assistant manager this year, and Frank Tomlinson, the captain of N. H. S.'s basketball team for next year. Track, Ralph Brown. Last, but not least, comes the cheer-leader, John Lamphear, probably about the most well-known boy in the class. He is one of the peppiest boys in N. H. S. and ev- ery one likes him very much. ' In conclusion, let us take the class officers, who, although there has been nothing very important to do, have proved very efficient, especially in the matter of class pins. They are as follows: President - - - - - - - Paul Green Vice-President - - Wallace Donnelly Secretary - - - Esther Philips Treasurer - - Virginia Rohrbaugh 70 JUNIOR OFFICERS PAUL GREEN WALLACE DONNELLY President Vice-President ESTHER PHILLIPS VIRGINIA ROHRBAUGH Secretary Treasurer 71 JUNIOR CLASS-FIRST PICTURE Si gl H3 .3 :1 o .D as aa CQ nv Q? E arence Simpso 5 P: ua C: m B1 if 5 5 T A - .-I 2 m 8 : 3 3 o m H U2 M H B-4 O Em '-'Q Z 55 N EE ni E E'-6 hu N2 mid 25 5-0 LT-4 P- 5. E .-C 5 62 O O Q rn Q3 .Jn N212 34 UE E DG 25- :mari H- N2 env E w:m N42 ME QI 2 E S7- IU W f" W .Q O E z- 5:25 QE-4 CQ h.E Egoz cams A E N D5 N.: CE gm 35 N Q2 m E CQ Jw -1: QQ 3 ?- S: 0 Q23 dj!-4 552 Q E Sgeg msim ssc? 0:2513 B E miwo Twgl A, wuz? SEQO 'HQ D: JE Su D443 in EE EOF ii S535 Q: EE 5565 'J mn CD ..- -w ogg EE pq... is --'E 50' E m 5 .ti E U1 5 E Lvl 2 5 ev... td A.: Q 3 o n E c E fi 3 a 3 E S o U2 O EU: NE -II :s O aa I ua BL : L11 a 3 2 an CL 52 gm QE if NE Sb. .93 fc-e rv C C Q2 bd E o . 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N 'U 9' In 4- an E D-4 EV 5 U 5 .1 .:: O E :1 E mi E 3 o CD 53 N E OJ E 1.4 W -I 4-v N U 'E s: o Q .J 9' au Pf E .E .+I .ICD Q as T-L an 2 N ca ,C U P1 CQ .Q av .E E . 3 o on I HE EI 151 Su I 4: Q4 E ra u 2 ei E S El ua o 9' 3 O -E sw-- gs FE u v- N .C Q U1 4: eu 5 cu III LT av .C .E 3 rn su .:: 'F as E E od .:: 9' C5 I Q W 0 :J A s: as GJ Q 1-' 5 .ca o Cd sf o .5 ev 3 CZ W 1 1 5 av GJ P- ua M -C C.. Tu Q1 ai I5 E we C 1" ES .Q o an 2.4 GJ ? S m 'U Tv if fs -E E B N ..-1 QT: 2 :E nu E 0 3. 3 oe v-J W 1 GJ Q1 Qi of LJ s: 9' 5 5 ou n-I 'E Tv Di -E' .E .: U FD -' ...,g:u,1 - 4 , ,ff - k 1 x 'v Q ef . M N q ,I ' 9.5: n 7 A ' 1 c 5 . f fi R x XX 82 hiturials "And so I penned It down, until at last it came to be, For length and breadth, the bigness which you see fi A -in k , , 1. Q , :aff 1 x:1' 13, lf., u"1 :lun ,A+ N 1 ,. . uf. ru- -J 4 x -A uf I 4 I A E11 ..1 1 v , f Wy he v ' 'si ' rf. L , '. :be-' ' .VU 1' ,, ,,,, 1, 1 . -' ,ugh x,vl51"5 'igm f- ,'-1"e'- A 'exp . . s f. .- -- J xv .194 Z", 1 v ,. A -1 . 3 M1594 .lbw ", M r . 'A . 1. 1: ii if .' 1 P 4-ff: .3121--Vx.: M M wx, ,-gm-'. YW, 'C Aff: - -. U .,+'. ms I---.A-,.f . 'Nh f 'f.5' Interesting Features of the 1926 Annual .-..i... 3 gf , HE staff this year has exerted a great effort towards publishing a better QE' annual than any preceding year. Greater interest has been shown in the publishing of it than former years. Those who have .supervised the paper N ' tl this year deserve much credit for the work they have done. The Staff just- ly feels that it has made a decided advancement in the 1926 Annual in numerous ways. The central art scheme, new style of binding, and the new kind of inserts used are the most outstanding features and easily discernible. Both this art scheme and binding were the results of suggestions gained through the attendance of the Ohio State High School Journalism Convention held in Columbus last October. It was noticed that most of the competing Annuals in the state-wide contest were those which used an art scheme. It gave more unity to the book and greatly increas- ed a reader's interest. These art schemes were various, including those representing a prominent citizen's life, historical events and places of historic interest down to the fourteenth century life. Art schemes depicting a historic event were the most popu- lar it seemed. Since Newark and its vicinity have long been noted for their historic mound forma- tions, the mounds were chosen for the art scheme of the 1926 Reveille. Pictures of these mounds coupled with the skill of the art staff have furnished designs for the pages. The Ex Libris on the cover pages is a miniature diagram of all the circle and octagon mounds at the Mound Builder's Country Club. The photographs were taken at the Moundbuilders' Park and the Moundbuilders' Country Club. Then, explanation to the pictures caused a diligent search for suggestions and an examination of various sources of information in regard to the customs and implements used by the native moundbuilder. The ideas thus secured were then skillfully worked into a design for the pages containing the Senior photographs. Here, since the moundbuilders had very little knowledge of proportions and shaped, a very brief explanation may serve to aid the reader to understand more clearly this design. The drawings at the top of each page are those pipes used by the primitive man. In the center of the page the coiled snake represents another form of pipe they used and the lower border consists of draw- ings of the various shapes of arrow heads which were used in that age. The central photograph is made from a picture of part of the various mounds. These photographs were secured by the staff photographer, Robert Woolson. The second prominent feature, the style of binding, was adopted with a View of making the Annual correspond more closely to the average college annual, or year- book as some are called. The leather effect gives the book a richer and more impres- sive appearance to the eye. Now the diversion from the old order of inserts occupies our attention. This year it was decided the inserts should be of a photogravure type. In this way the art scheme could be easily carried out and it would afford diversion from the silhouette style of inserts. Of course this lengthy explanation of the outstanding features of this year's An- nual will seem superfluous to most of its readers, but the casual observer does not realize when looking through a volume of this sort just how great 3, task it is to pro- duce it. Therefore, the main purpose of this article is to place before the readers of the Reveille how many details must be considered and how much time must be devot- ed to it in order to publish such a book. EDWARD J. SCHNUTE. 83 The History of the Gymnasium HE idea of a gymnasium for Newark High School first began to germinate in I the plans for the proposed new High School building considered by the School Board the year following the war. The whole proposition was, how- ever, at the request of the Citizens's Committee temporarily abandoned be- cause of the unsettled post-war business conditions. ' Several years later with new plans and estimates, a bond issue was proposed which failed to meet the approval of the voting public at a special election in the spring of 1923, having previously been defeated at the regular fall election. Thus it seemed to the friends of the school that the students of the overcrowded High School must suffer a continuation of the unsatisfactory condition . However in February of 1924 new hopes were aroused because at a special meet- ing of the Board of Education, called at the request of a member, Frank A. Woolson, it was decided to erect a gymnasium and from that time on things began to move rapidly. Several plans were considered, the first idea being to construct a temporary building to take care of the congestion until a new High School could be built. This idea was abandoned in favor of a more complete project, the plans for which were submitted by Vernon Redding and associates of Mansfield, and in September, 1924, actual construction began. The building itself cost EB140,000, stands on a 320,000 site, and is thoroughly equip- ped with modern apparatus. It was originally intended to have the building ready for occupation in January, 1925, but a six week's delay in removing the dwelling from the lot brought the construction period into severe weather and prevented completion before the present school year. Its floor, larger than any other high school gym- nasium floor in Central Ohio, contains 8100 square feet and accommodates on the aver- age of twelve classes every day, thus relieving greatly the serious congestion in the High School. In addition to these features the administration offices are located in the front of the building, together with storage rooms and sewing and art classes. The permanent chairs in the balcony seat 300 and the removable bleachers take care of 1200 more, making the seating capacity about 1500. And now, we begin to realize, regretfully, that we are drawing to the close of an eventful school year and that we have experienced the unique sensation of being the very first to use our new and modern gymnasium, the largest of its kind in Central Ohio and one which will mean much for the health conditions of our city. ROBERT E. WOOLSON. The New Supervision? of is the Reveille Staff HE work put out by the "Reveille" Staff of nineteen-hundred twenty-five and - twenty-six was under an entirely new plan of supervision. Never before in .-c,,,, the history of the school magazine has it been edited in such 3, successful CIVQQD manner. A class of journalism was organized as soon as the fall term opened. This jour- nalistic work was responsible for the improvements in the "Reveille" The class in- cluded only the members of the writing staff and the members of the art department. Much of the work that necessitated the cooperation of department editors and the edi- tor-in-chief was accomplished during this period. As a reward for this work which took a study period of the staff's time, each member has received one-half credit. Due to the fact that the paper was written in a class, it has shown greater unity, and the make-up has been greatly improved. This year's issues have received favor- able comments from exchanges. These favorable criticisms have given more assur- ance and more confidence to the members of the staff in doing this work in addition to their regular studies. Besides having better unity and better make-up, the issues As the staff closes nineteen hundred and twenty-six with the Annual which is have been ready to go to press on the date set. The success of the Reveille has not been due entirely to the work of the staff, but the cooperation of other forces have proved to be an invaluable asset. Through the courtesy of the local "Advocate," the staff has secured all photo-engravings from the N. E. A. Service. This work has been excellent and has cut the expense of the en- gravings down to a reasonable price. Another expense was cut down also when the supervisors chose three senior girls from the commercial course to do the typing. h . . . . t e issue for the seniors, it feels it has completed a most successful year. However, it does not wish to take all the credit upon itself because without the backing of the school and without the help of the faculty, the paper would surely have been a com- plete failure. So, the whole staff wishes to thank the members of the faculty who assisted in editing the different columns, Miss Crilly whose untiring efforts played a large part in the success of the year, and Mr. Tait whose work as a financial adviser has made it possible to publish- the paper and leave not a deficit but a surplus in IA ROHRBOUGH. the treasury. VIRGIN 84 Cum Laude N colleges and universities, there is anational fraternity, the Phi Beta Kappa, gifs' which recognizes scholarship. For the same purpose, the Cum Laude So- Yifa ciety was organized for high schools. Since Newark High School has not a L-5" chartered chapter of this society, it seems only fitting that the Annual should give some recognition to those having high scholastic records. In 1922, such a plan was started and it has been followed each year since. In our first 'Cum Laude" edi- torial we published the names of Ruth Kinsey, Naomi Alspach, and Helen Jones, who had received no semester mark below ninety. Of these Helen Jones did not go to col- lege, Ruth Kinsey and Naomi Alspach have been elected members of the Phi Beta Kappa, the one in Goucher, the other in Denison. Marguerite Smith, who had twenty- five out of twenty-eight semester marks in ninety, is also wearing the Phi Beta Kappa key. If such a society as the Cum Laude were organized in our high school, the pupils from the Senior class whose names are listed below would probably be eligible because of the excellence of their scholastic work. At this time only averages for three and a half years' work are available. Bernice Blind 92.9qJ Virginia Dayton 94.2516 Joie Hartman 93.906 Alice Linton 90.1'Zz Margaret Montgomery 93.2'Zu Mildred Swart 90.17W Edna Mae Westfall 92.616 Geraldine Wilcox 92.693 Louisa Worley 90.25'Zn The names of Ruth Bebout and Violet Cannon would have been on this list had they attended Newark High four years. Ruth Bebouts' average for two years here is 91.2'Zw, while Violet Cannon's is 93.85'W for one year. Other pupils who might qualify for such a society are listed below. No Juniors are listed having less than seventeen marks in ninety, no Sophomores with less than nine, no Freshmen with less than four. Juniors Number of grades Number in ninety 20 20 Hilda Ashcraft Hulda Ashcraft Marie Beall Violet Hammer Esther Phillips Marjorie Rapp Sophomores Stella Binger Linda Davis Harvey Eagle Earl Green Elaine Grosenberg Elizabeth Hatch Frances Hutchinson Dorothy Johnson Mary Kolp Ardella Ponser Jane Solenbarger Lucy Snow Wyeth Freshmen Hester Landram Mildred Jones Robert Gamble Reeve Eckman Elizabeth Brashear 20 20 20 20 22 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 11 12 12 12 12 Carl Steel Nellie Scaffide Marjorie Moore Ruth Lichenstein Mary Louise Lee Wilma Lawrence Some one has said that to have high marks, one must be a grind. If one who is familiar with the activities of Newark High School for the last few years will examine carefully the list of senior names in this article, he will observe that all have been ac- tive in at least one outside activity and that some of them have been among the most active members of the various organizations of the school. They prove the fact that to be a good student does not necessarily mean that all of one's time must be spent in studying. 8 FERN ESTHER CHANNELL. 5 Value of Extra-Currlculam Activities ln High School ,, gg I. HERE is constant discussion as to whether or not extra-curriculum activities Eg of a high school are of any particular value to the students who participate ,,-4?J--Ds in them. Many persons say they are of greater value than the knowledge 1445" gained from the textbooks, and others argue that they are a hindrance to the class work and other regular curriculum. Both of these statements are somewhat ex- aggerated, as they represent the two extremes. However, public opinion as a whole seems more favorable than unfavorable to extra-curriculum work, and they are gener- ally regarded as being of intrinsic value to high school life. If for no other reason than that they afford diversion from the usual routine of school work, the various extra activities should occupy a high place in an institution. For, using our own high school as an example, life here would be largely a drudgery to the average student if there were nothing to look forward to, except a continuous round of study and recitations. But our athletic teams unite fthe players and the whole student body in 9, common interest, and furnish an opportunity for this develop- ment and enthusiasm. Following the athletic seasons of fall and winter, debate activ- ities bring the climax of enthusiasm and spirit. Then besides the contests, the various clubs and societies have at different times during the year their initiations, dinners, and parties, all of which make for greater social contact. So we see how valuable from a social standpoint extra-curriculum ac- tivities are in high school. For it is from these associations that life friendships are often formed, and the memories of these good times enjoyed while in high school are cherished treasures in the hearts of those who have had the pleasure of participating in them. Turning now from social benefit to the training th-at is gained from extra activi- ties, we find them just as valuable. In athletics the boys are so drilled that they are then trained to rely upon their own judgment and discretion in other walks of life. A football man, for instance, learns to think quickly and to act with equal celerityg but he must be able to think accurately and to do it in a fraction of a minute's time if he is to make any gain. Moreover participation in athletics carries with it a certain standard up to which the athlete must keep his marks. So the athletic boy is sure to have a good understanding of what is contained in his text books. Then above all, athletics develop a fellow physically to a degree of almost perfection. Therefore since sound health and a clear, alert mind are the fundamental requirements of a success- ful business or professional man, everv boy who has something to do in the way of athletics in his high school days has that added advantage and training over the boy who does not. Much benefit is derived from debating activities by those who take part in them. For what can be more desirable to a man or woman than the ability at almost a min- ute's notice to deliver a talk or address before a gathering of intelligent people and feel perfectly at ease? Such a person' is always welcome in society and has an ability often necessary for success. High school debating is one of the means for gaining a start in public speaking. One not only acquires ease of delivery, but also an ability to think quickly and decisively on the spur of the moment in an emergency. Probably the most severe criticism of debate work is that too few people are interested or par- ticipate in it and its influence reaches but few of the pupils who might profit by it. Journalistic work might well be included in the list of high school activities which prove of value in future years because ability to write well, that is clearly and con- cretely-is a quality to be wished by everyone. After a short time of working on the school paper, a student should be able to sit down and write an article with greater concentration and much more conciseness. As proof of the immense benefit derived from high school journalism, one needs but to notice those who are now in journalistic work. These people all give much credit to their school paper experience as being of much value in their present work. Besides the above named activities there are the literary societies and dramatic and civic clubs. The civic society should do a great work among the students by its training for better citizenship. So after considering the various activities in detail, we must accept extra-curriculum activities as an integral part of high school life because of their invaluable service to the students who take part in them. EDWARD J. SCHNUTE. 86 Farewell Of The Seniors , S our Senior year nears its close our thoughts naturally turn to the past and lgfix to the various events of the past four years. It seems but a short time EW since we entered Newark High School as Freshmen, each one feeling fright- "' ened and friendlessg the lessons seemed unbearable, the entire school life appeared gloomy. But, growing accustomed to the new surroundings, much learning and many pleasures were derived. The Seniors, perhaps, do not now realize all the benefits that they have received during these four years, but sometime in the future they will see how essential this study was in forming their careers. Obedience, self- reliance and friendship are among the greatest benefits obtained during the high school lifeg all aiding in the upbuilding of character. Meeting daily with hundreds of people gradually tends toward making friends. Thus, the contact with the many high school pupils develops true friendships and com- radeships, that they will never forget. Not alone among the students, but valuable friendships are formed between students and teachers. The teachers have worked with patience and care, instructing us in the various subjects and through this daily contact, a lasting friendship may be formed. There is not one Senior who will not look upon his graduation with some measure of regret because of separation from all these friends whom he has made during his high school life. ' Many of the Seniors have taken active parts in the various forms of extra-curricu- lum activities, athletics, debate and work of the societies. As one of the most essen- tial characteristics of a successful business person is cooperation, the team work ob- tained through participation in these activities is invaluable in 'later life. Now the time of parting has come. We must leave behind many friends, class- mates, and teachers, but above all dear old Newark High. We of the Senior class are graduating this June after four years of work in this school. The majority of us will return to visit the school from time to time and while we will be among, we will never again be of the student body. While we are happy in the thought of reaching the goal we have been striving for during the past four years, yet we are sorry that we will no more enter the school as students. Many will go to colleges and universities, but.we will never forget the school that gave us the foundation for our higher learning. Some will reach the height of fame and others will gain mediocre success but each one will still be loyal to Newark High and will truthfully say "None knew thee but to love thee, I None named thee but to praise." Next year it will be the work of the present Junior class to uphold the dignity of the Senior class and Newark High School and to strive to live for the same purpose as the Class of '26- "And departing leave behind us Footprints on the sands of time." FERN ESTHER CHANNELL. 87 What Constitutes Proper School Spirit F 3 UPILS are often heard to say that such a person has no .school spirit, using -Q gs the term gllbly, and yet we wonder how many of the pupils of Newark High 'f2.??,l' School could define school spirit and how closely their definition would agree with the best one that we can obtain. It might, therefore, be well for us to try to define school spirit. Some might say that school spirit is to our little world of school what patriotism is to the nationg but this would not help us, for few would de- fine patriotism alike. There is a noisy type of patriotism which cheers the loudest when the flag goes by and yet will use the protection of the nation to exploit their fellows. Such patriotism is spurious. Probably we can best reach our conclusion by the use of concrete illustrations. As there is a noisy type of patriotism, so there is a showy type of what is termed school spirit. A girl who accompanies her school debate team to a neighboring town and while there makes herself conspicuous, in an elaborate display of her school colors, by standing in thekhotel lobby, or by walking up and down the streets, does not under- stand what real school spirit is. When the star of the football team allows himself to become so negligent toward his scholastic work as to render himself ineligible, the teacher is often blamed for the losing of the game and criticized as lacking school spirit, but is it really the teacher who is to blame and who lacks school spirit? What of a boy who is th-e greatest foot- ball player that his high school has ever known but who neglects his scholastic work except in football season, who goes away to college, makes the team in his freshman year, has every chance for success, and then fails utterly in his studies? Has he the proper school spirit? A teacher who is fond of athletics and who gives a boy passing marks during foot- ball or basketball season and then fails him for the semester's course has no concep- tion of the true meaning of proper school spirit. The girl in the first illustration was advertising her school, but in such a way as to cause criticism and to lead people to believe that the school was teaching low ideals. The boy in the second case showed a reluctancy to sacrifice a little time and the teach- er in the third case was instructing false values by emphasizing temporary success but in reality was teaching deceit. In direct contrast with these is the example set by a senior girl who has been on the debate team for two years and who is graduating with an average of ninety-three. It is worth noting how especially is the last few years, the debaters have so success- fully carried on that work along with their regular studies. The fact that these pupils can be members of the debate team and yet maintain their high scholastic standing illustrates the genuine significance of real school spirit. Besides getting the main work of the school done satisfactorily there is another important factor of proper school spirit, and that is one's appreciation for one's respon- sibility. There are some pupils who like to have the honor of being assigned certain work but who do not like to assume the responsibility of getting that work done. This is not what one would consider a characteristic of school spirit. Therefore, proper school spirit might well be defined as that which tends to en- hance the respect of the members of the school and those interested in it. LOUISA E. WORLEY. 88 literary Write to the mind ami heart, and let the ear Glean after what it can." 15 L w Q V M ' x 1 ,xv Q -. :Q F' . 'fs r' . um as-mc-.mzrlnr 1.1: The Mounds of Licking County By Paul Green t f HIO is vastly rich in historical objects of surpassing interest. Foremost of li these treasures are the prehistoric remains or monuments of the Mound- builders-"the race that left no memory." These mounds have always been martini objects of great curiosity in the past and even at the present they are a growing source of wonder to inhabitants of their immediate vicinities, to tourists, and to archaeologists. Probably the most renowned and most diversified works in the state, if not in the nation, are located in our own Licking County. Historians have it that there are or rather were thirteen distinct groups of mounds in Licking County and probably about five hundred earthworks without including in this estimate the excavations at Flint Ridge. The best known of these groups are the "Alligator Mound" between Newark and Granvilleg the "Fortified Hill" also near Granvilleg the "Stone Mound" near Buckeye Lake, the "Taylor Mound" located south of Newark and on the former Taylor farm, "Tippets Mound"g and the antiquities at the junction of the South and Raccoon forks of the Licking River, which include all the mounds in and about New- ark. The other groups include less important mounds than these. However it is with the Newark mounds that we are concerned. The best known one of these is the circular embankment located in Moundbuild- ers' Park, and evidently used as a fortified enclosure. Its shape is not that of a true circle but rather of an ellipsis, one of its diameters being about one hundred feet great- er than the other. There are also two or three other slight irregularities in the gen- eral outline, too trifling, however, to be observed without a careful study. The im- mensity of this great structure can readily be seen by one's first glance and also by recording its measurements. Since elevation is from twelve to sixteen feet in height and its base is about fifty feet wide. Around it there are two moats, except at the entrance, one inside and one out, each averaging seven feet in depth and about thirty- five feet in breadth. Even today the undertaking of the completion of such an object would require great labor and time, so that one wonders how the constructors of these mounds really accomplished such a colossal task. Centrally located within this mound is found one of the few effigies in the state. It is in the shape of an eagle with wings out-spread, whence it derives its name. This "Eagle Mound" is a low spreading affair, its greatest length being one hundred and fifty-five feet. It is rather difficult on first glance to distinguish what its general shape really is. Today, after many years of weathering the elements, these mounds are still found in an excellent state of preservation. This is due to the fact that the Licking County Fair Association has purchased the land and prohibited any destruction. This fair- ground or park is a very beautiful spot with the inner side of a circle forming a nat- ural race course. The other principal set of these mounds is found in the Cherry Valley district, which is sprinkled thickly with small circles, parallels, lodge sites, and mounds. The most characteristic of these are located at Newark's Country Club. The mounds here consist of an octagon, covering approximately fifty square acres, and a perfect circle, covering twenty square acres. The sides of the octagon are not connected, but the gaps are overlooked by small pyramidal elevations thus proving this was also used as a means of protection. The circle is joined directly to this octagon, being 2880 feet in circumference and six feet in height. While the general height of the latter is five and one-half feet. These mounds have been pretty thoroughly excavated, but these excavations have disclosed little. However these mounds and their vicinities make up one of the most unusual golf courses in the State. The "Stone Mound" near J acksontown was once the scene of an important excava- tion. As its name implies, it formerly was a mound consisting of many loose stones eighty feet high by five hundred feet around. However, these stones have since been hauled away for commercial purposes. When excavated this mound contained several skeletons and a small box which was opened with difficulty. The contents of the box were one stone. The stone had four sides with inscriptions upon each. These inscrip- tions 'were translated and found to contain valuable information about the Moundbuild- ers possible origin. This stone has since been called the "Holy Stone of Newark." South of Newark are the works of Flint Ridge. These consist chiefly of a square fortification made up of flint blocks. This fort encloses about seven square acres. A small mound about fifteen feet high stands within the center of this excavation. Another interesting effigy is the "Alligator Mound" west of Newark. This Work 89 is placed on the summit of a hill which overlooks a valley that evidently was one of the centers of ancient population. The total length of the mound following the curve of its bod is 250 feet and its breadth is forty feet. It stands about four feet in height. Hsbwever the name "Alligator" does not seem well chosen because the gen- eral shape of the form portends to show that it was made to represent an "oppossum." This mound is quite visible and accessible to all travelers along the Granville-Newark thoroughfare.. Although only a few mounds have been briefly touched upon and doubtless an en- tire volume might be written about the points of interest concerning the Newark or Licking County mounds, the foregoing mounds are among the best known. That the Licking County excavations are the most complete and complicated works of the Moundbuilders is a recognized fact by many historians, especially by Howe who says: "The Newark earthworks are the most extensive, numerous, and diversified in style and character within the State. The purpose of their erection seems as difficult of explanation at the present day as when first discovered in 1800. Suffice it to say, that we must consider these works as one of the mysteries of the past, unless the science of archaeology, which has made such wonderful advances in the past few years, shall solve its mysteries for us." If ar is Her Own People By Violet A. Cannon W1 AR was brewing in the camp of Chief O-ge-ta, of the Wyandott tribe, and the S. 'S outcome was sure to be interesting. For, when Nahoma, the Chief's daugh- elvgr ter, and only child, asserted her rights, the result was a clash in which her 'i-iv:-I father was not always victorious. But the present cause of disorder was of an entirely different nature from those of previous occurrence, this was an affair of the heart. Nahoma, in her daily rides from camp, had met George Carndon, a soldier sent by St. Clair to keep down the redskins near what is now Columbus, Ohio. I'n the meet- ings which followed, they conceived a violent infatuation for each other. Their meet- ings were discovered, however, and so had ceased. Hence the storm. Nahoma, to the staid and submissive women of the tribe, was a source of wonder, to the men, she was a bad example to the others. Besides, the tribe had a distinct horror of inter-marriage, as well as very definite ideas about the behavior of a princess. Above all, she should be obedient, especially in the choice of a husband who should be their next chief. The choice of O-get-a was the young brave, Manuv, whom he had reared as his own child, after the death of his father, the last chief of the Manoes, a neigboring tribe of ancient lineage. The boy had grown up with Nahoma, and had always loved her. She gave him all the alffecfion she would have given a brother, but rebelled at the thou ht of him for a hus ana. She iaced the council defiantly. These wrinkled, painted, stern old warriors, what couldlthey know of the heart of a maid. She rose to plead her case. "You are old, you have lived your lives as you wished. Have not I, your Chief's daughter, as much right? Am I to be no more than the poorest squaw of the camp, who takes only what is given her, does only what she is forced to do? I demand the right to love, as you have done, to live, as you have lived. Surely you will grant this." She threw back her long braids of hair, steoped back and watched the council. Finall the medicine man rose. "lilly daughter," he said, "you have plead well, it was worthy of you. But you are mad to think of marrying a white man. It is against the traditions of your nation. Then, too, the white people would never accept you, princess though you are, as one of them. They would only scorn you. Here is Manuv. He loves you as you love the white man. He is of your lrfwn people.h Take him, and enjoy your happiness. The council has s oken. You wi see the w ite man no more." The girl Iturned to seek an ally. She met the stern decided look of the council, the loving, pleading look if Magux. She piltiedthiiin, but, she could not love him. But who was the white sage w o sai Pity is a in o ove.' She leaped to her feet, and faced the judges. "I will see him! He shall be mine in spite of you. I ---- " she broke off abrupt- ly, as the thought came to her that perhaps she could best carry out her plan by pre- tending submission. "It is spoken," she ended, "I will see him no more." An hour later she saw Manuv take his canoe and float down the moonlit Scioto. He was chanting a love song, but to her it contained the air of a death chant. Manuv, her lover-brother, was sad, he was lonely. She wished she might comfort him. Per- ha s if she had never seen Georgei. P She drew a deep breath, and turned to her wigwam. Once inside, she chose her best trinkets, and thus arrayed, she took her horse and set out in the direction of the soldier camp. The first streaks of dawn were showing in the east when she neared it. 90 She leaped from her horse and ran stealthily toward the camp. The first tent was the commander's. The Indian stopped as she heard voices, and listened. She could understand most of what they were saying, chiefly because one voice was George's. A moment later she heard the officer say the words which altered her whole life, and showed her her own mind,-and heart. "The hostiltiies are brewing, Carndon, and the settlers are not safe. I don't know who is responsible, but I strongly suspect that young Manuv of O-get-a's tribe is the ring-leader. Get him, and then if hostilities don't cease, get the rest." lCarndon's lips set in a thin line. "Count on me, Major. I will bring him dead or a ive." He wheeled and went out. The Indian girl had retreated to the woods, and there was having the battle of her life. To save Manuv was the thing. That meant the loss of her lover, and his ruin as a soldier. To her, his was a contemptible task. Never would she harm one of his people. In the moment which followed, Carndon was weighed in the balance and found wanting. Nahoma spoke to her horse and started her race to save a lover from a lover. Every hour she rode her anxiety for Manuv grew more intense. She sensed that Carn- don was close behind her. She halted once only, and then it was to water her foaming horse. About ten miles from the village she saw the smoke of a camp fire, and riding to it, she found Manuv sharpening his weapons. She leaped from her horse, and throwing herself upon him, cried, "Manuv, Manuv, you must fly. My white man comes to kill thee." Manuv drew himself away from the excited maiden. Proudly he replied, "If he is your lover, I care not to defend myself. If not, I will kill-him. I would not take him from you." But Manuv, you do not know him. He is not so kind. He means to kill you." "It shall be his pleasure. I could easily kill him, but I will not." The tortured princess could endure no more. She threw her arms about his neck. "Manuv, you are the blind one. Can you not see? I love you, Manuv, I love you. I did not know it until I heard of your danger. Your life was all, his duty I could not understand. Will you still meet him?" The warrior crushed her in his arms, almost in a dream. "Nahoma, I will meet him, but it shall be at home with a treaty. My heart was full of hatred, and I longed to lead my braves against the whites. This day was I made chief by thy father. It was nothing, now it is everything. I will save his life, for he was once dear to you. His Deople shall have our word of eternal peace between our tribe and his people. It shall celebrate our wedding feast. Come, my Nahoma, my beautiful. Let us go home to meet the lover who is no longer thine." As the evening stars were shining and the moon rose o'er the Scioto, Carndon rode from the village with the treaty, and Manuv and Nahoma watched him from their canoe on the golden river of their dreams, the moonlit Scioto. ' 4: fl as The Sacred Arrow By Edna Westfall HE dark mounds showed dim against a reddening sky, a few spirals of smoke - floated lazily up, in the distance, the faint call of a bird was heard-all was mm peace. Even tall straight Lampokso keeping watch on the highest mound was motionless, and looked like a tall tree stamped on a sheet of vivid red. In the valley the squaws were busy with the evening meal, silent and disinterest- ed. The men and the babies were about the slowly dying campfires-truly a picture of peace and contentment. Lampoksoo came down from his watch, and his stand was taken by another stal- wart warrior. "Our fears are groundless, Chief Tamplosoo. There isn't a sign of anything in any direction. I've watched faithfully all day" said Lampoksoo as he sat down by the side of the Chief of the tribe. "Ugh. Perhaps--perhaps," and the Chief scowled over his ground meal. "But it's been so long since we have heard a thing from them. Surely-". "Well, we can't be too sure. Time will tell. I'm old, and perhaps I'll never see Chief Wampag but he'll come-yes, he'll come-someday to find the royal arrow my father, Chief Iega, took from his tribe. He'll come! Perhaps I won't be here to pro- tect it" and the old man sighed softly and his eyes were troubled. "Chief, let me guard it for you. I'll guard it with my life. No man shall ever know its hiding place," eager, Lampoksoo, stood up, the bravest, strongest warrior of the tribe and the Chief saw that he meant it. "It's a great charge, Lampoksoo, the greatest I've ever given a warrior. The arrow must be protected. They must never find it. Lean closer and I will disclose its hiding place. A sudden blaze and the fire showed their faces. Lampoksoo, interested, eager, ' 91 impressed with the seriousness of his task, and Tamplosoo, a little sad to think that he must pass his sacred duty on to another. There with the still quiet mounds, silent guardians, in the background, in front of them, the slowly dying fires, they made a compact that was never to be broken. Two years passed. Another sun was setting, and Chief Tamplosoo went to join his father in the happy hunting ground, sure that his trust had not been misplaced and that the glory of his tribe would be carried out. The warriors sank exhausted. All day long they had danced the war dance. Their Chief was safe. He had been placed in a mound with his father. Suddenly with piercing shrieks, a low beat of the tom-tom and rough cries, the hated tribe of Chief Wampa bore down on the mourning Indians. Tomahawks flashed red with blood. Fresh scalps hung at the belts of young braves, and suddenly a red blaze mounted to the sky. The tribe of Chief Tamplosoo was gone. In its place a roaring, raging fire. Day dawned, cold and gray, the fire was still smoldering. It was gone-all gone. It was on this that Lampoksoo looked when he finally regained consciousness. A shud- der ran through his body, his shoulders twitched with a keen pain and his heart was sad and heavy. Why had he been saved? How he wished he might have died with the rest of his tribe, his secret buried in his heart? He tried to move but found that he was tied to a tree. He had been purposely saved. What could they want of him? He lay there half the day-waiting-praying to his gods. Late in the day a warrior came to drag him to the tent of Chief Wampa. He raised his eyes and met the black piercing ones of the hated Chief Wampa. Instead of frightening him they seemed to fill him with 9, strange confidence, a new strength. "Lampoksoo, we know Chief Tamplosoo told you the secret of the royal arrow. We know that you know where it is hidden. Your life has been spared that you might tell us. You will be free and will be made a royal warrior if you will but tell us," and Chief Wampa scowled at Lampkosoo. V "I'll tell nothing. Chief Tamplosoo's secret is locked in my heart." That is all he would say. Days passed. The Indian warrior from Tamplosoo's tribe was subjected to every possible torture. A year passed. Lamploksoo was a bent, broken many he could scarce- ly walik. He had never spoken one word. He had kept his faith. He would find his rewar . Hundreds of years passed. Things changed. There were no longer Indian tribes in the valleys protected by the mounds. One day during an excavation, a box crudely fashioned filled with corn and bright colored stones was found. On its lid roughly carved were Indian characters which translated read: "To Lampoksoo, the bravest warrior I ever knew." "Chief Wampa". 4 '.', , I 'f .'3,' Q . X X I 1 K 92 Qtfihititii The manly part is to do with might and main what you can do." rQE'?" ' -.Q ' '-A 'g-.- .,2 .fix fig-It 1.51501 ,LH . 'I -' ,,-'Pg ----'-1-'-if f-r' -s wf ' yi' '-'Uf'f?'r' 'K'-.75 - .' 'Lx,!53v. A. ' , . , 1 -W '- . - . is-V L ,--PM A ' -' .:l.' -- ".'- 'V'-"'T'Q.,"."10q.. If"-'Q .' i, " ' ' -fb - I :img an-1 -'.-.2 -, ,T :"Ti?-,ft-'yr ---.1 '4' - -' ' , 1-., ,Elf-w V .H ' 1 4 flcli' g, V' 'X :'l5a.4',n., -U L- ' H .Aai,i""T'k'f'L" 1 ' +9-ni-14. -- M' id' W.1F-,gg- fly, W I It 'tw-As, 'I 1 44?-V xv . 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Qlgg--1:3-"sa c 5 , ".,-5gQ.,'i,'3"Qk',-egg,-' -- H-g ,, M, -.-FQ' '-K -' V ' Q. -F5 -' " 'H ff.-RFQ :H '- '-' "' ' '25 y-: .. L' --2-?E:1:,'jl, 4-I 5.16 Q y- 'IF' "' k34,'f9Q35E35g"? ' .Wag I .ki 4- - '-.17 . -fb? 5 'L f' pf, ',i,:f'a4':.Y-,g-,Fii:- . i.fi"', ff a' . ff'-92' - -. -- - ,"f'.w' ,, , "Q .:- -1 ihad- :f. -Q.-.-,' HN-.CJ -- , A -..f. -1' - - -- --H he-. . '-'f'-.5 u Gif,--r ,B-.L'i1.Tf-f,-Q: ', " 1 'fig-Qi'---5 , 1"--'ig-es P Jjff 2 f1f,Q'.fX5 A if-gif? The End of the Year I. 3 S the end of our scholastic year draws near, we begin both to review the past history of our career and of our school activities and to see what the future holds 1n'store for us. Doubtle-ss there are many who are able to look back . . 'Mil over their records with a Justlfiable feeling of pride, and again there are also those to whom their own achievements are none too noteworthy. However on the whole Newark High consists of a majority of the former class, especially since there has been such a good showing on the honor rolls. Nineteen-twenty-six also marks the close of a very successful sport season for Newark High. Our football team, led by Captain Leedy, although it did not win the Central Ohio Championship, was indeed of championship caliber. Ralph Brown was elected asnext year's captain. Football was immediately succeeded by basketball in which we were even more successful. Captained by Cy McKinney, the "Wildcats" tied with our foremost adversary, Mt. Vernon, for championship honors, the cup being awarded to each school for a half vear. This makes the second consecutive year that Newark has retained the cup, and it is hoped that next year's team can also do as well under the leadership of the new captain, Frank Tomilson. As this issue goes to press, track practice has again been resumed and there are several letter-men who will lead the Red and White this year in that sport. With equal importance, debate for this year was eagerly received by the entire school body. Indeed the untiring work and vigilance of the debaters and Coach Johns- ton coupled with the enthusiasm of the rooters was responsible for unanimous decisions in both debates. This has also been a red-letter year in the development of the school organiza- tions. This is best shown by the spirit with which the various societies presented chapel programs-the Athenian Literary Society on Armistice Day, the Dramatic So- ciety on Thanksgiving and Christmas, the Civic Society on Lincoln's and Washingtonk: birthdays and Decoration Day, the Thalian Literary Society's presentation of art pieces to the school, the Hi-Y Club on Easter-all of which were conducted in an interesting manner. The Glee Clubs have also been active, one of the best programs of this year being the annual High School Minstrels, given by the Boys' Glee Club. The High School Orchestra has also been very prominent this year. Although not considered as one of these societies, nevertheless the Reveille Staff, headed by Edward Schnute, is one of the most important and beneficial branches of the school curriculum. Each year the Staff endeavorsto increase the value of the Re- veille to the best of its ability and this year has done so by the creating of a special class in journalism. Before closing this brief survey it would be fitting to say something concerning our new gymnasium. This was dedicated the latter part of 1925 to the memory of Lieutenant Ralph Laughlin. The dedicatory address was given by Prof. Williams of Denison University. This gym is perhaps one of the largest and best equipped in the state. It easily affords seating capacity for a crowd of 1500 to 2000 which statement was especially in evidence at the Newark-Mt. Vernon basketball game. Newark High School is at the present a large school, possessing some thousand- odd students. As usual, the first year class men make up the largest group, with the others following in order. The graduating Senior Class of this year leaves a difficult precedent for other succeeding classes to follow. Figuratively speaking, they have finished their educa- tiong whereas it has only begun. Their work in the High School will doubtless serve as an incentive to the next Senior Class and also as a stepping-stone for themselves to the greater things in life. 93 p Reveille Staff - - INCE the journalism work was carried on this year in the form of a regular class which met for one period each day, the task of editing the Reveille has iff? been easier and has taken less time than formerly. Each member of the had staff was interested in his work and was very prompt in complying with the press dates for each issue. Much- time was devoted to the discovery and development of some new feature which would make the paper still more interesting. The stories produced by the literary department were exceptionally good and add- ed much to the paper. This column and the Fun column received special commenda- tion from critics. The News Department, which is a hard column to edit in a school paper of magazine form, did commendable work in each issue. The News writers dis- played splendid ability in choosing only items of special interest to the students. The Alumni page and the Exchange page proved to be under capable and efficient direc- tion, while an interesting detailed account of each football and basketball game of the year together with many other fine articles appeared in the Sports column. This year-'s editorial staff has endeavored to produce articles which are more relevent to our own High School life and have attempted to eliminate the uninteresting, lecture type of editorial. Then, also, too much credit cannot be given Miss Crilly whose willing super- vision and helpful suggestions were largely responsible for the success of the paper. Besides the five regular issues, Freshman, Christmas, Basketball, Debate, and Track numbers, the staff published a full page of High School news! in each of the local papers during National Education Week. News was also furnished for a high school column at least once a week and most of the time each day. Through- this work of the staff all debate, minstrel, dramatic, and Senior Play publicity in the Newark daily papers was done. Thus the Reveille Staff of 1926 is completing a year of many accomplishments and leaves a high standard for future staffs to attain. As some of the members of the staff were not present at the time that the picture was taken, and in order to give due credit to the students who have served on the 1925- 1926 staff, we wish here to give the complete list: Edward Schnute, Fern Channell, Robert Woolson, Edna Westfall, Geraldine Wilcox, Snow Wyeth, Paul Green, Kirk Win- dle, Sue Montgomery, Marjorie Rapp, Wallace Donnelly, Virginia Rohrbaugh, Louisa Worley, Ethel McGlade, Kenneth Shannon, Edda Foster, Lawrence Rhodes, Florabelle Fundaberg, Oscar Eclebery, Madea Baruxes, Alice Belt, Rosalyn D'Yarmett, John Long, Joie Hartman, Margaret Danner, Pauline Bliss, Mildred Swart, Alice Linton, Virginia Larason, Bertha Harrington, Elizabeth Arthur. 94 THE REVEILLE STAFF Kenneth Shannon, Paul Baruxes, Woolson, ert oh R ps ther Philli S 1413 Right 41Left to ROW FOURTH itg Ta 1'. an. M artm n Lynn, Joie H ie nO chi-a Co L4 Swart Roy Foster, Flon-abelle Fundaberg, Mildred da Ed McKinney, Cyrus on-ley, W ouisa L D'Yzn'mett, Pauline Bliss, Rosalyn Wilcox, 4Ge1'aldine ROW RD I TH we aruxas: SECOND R0 aB Mcfllade. Madl Ethel mp, R31 ugh, Marjorie Vi 'ginia Rohrbo Lawrence Rhodes, Kirk Windle. Lon hn Eclebery, VVallac-e Donnelly, Jo W4Osca1' R0 FIRST Belt 5 Debate ,4 X LTHOUGH working under gieat difficulties this year, the debate teams of llc Newark High School finished the season in much glory. Again two banners t were added to the Grand Old School's superior collection of debate trophies. ' " Moreover the year of 1926 constitutes a year of history in the annals of the Triangular Debating League. For in the debates of this year Newark High School became the first school to be awarded the full number of votes cast. The Negative ' ' 'th th Mt. Vei non roup due to a wider team at home was successful in its contest wi e ' g knowledge of the question, which was, "Resolved: that the United States should estab- lish a separate department of aviation," and to a decided margin in speaking ability. Although the home team was awarded the decision by a vote of three to nothing the Mt. Vernon team deserves much credit for the opposition they furnished. They pro- duced splendid arguments but failed to meet the economical, commercial and military efficiency issues propounded by Newark. Newark's affirmative team which journey- d t Z. nesville and met the Crimson and White's ancient rival on her platform e o a emerged with a three to nothing victory also. This team was coached to such a de- gree of superiority that their cooperation was perfect. Each member handled his part ' ' '1 ' h' t. H w- of the question with a noticeably bettei understandn g of It than is opponen 0 ever, victory was not assured until the last speech had been given. Zanesville's team was composed of very capable speakers who in their constructive speeches presented a strong case against the establishment of a separate air department. But in their re- buttal speeches the opposition was unable to produce statements sufficient to block the arguments set forth by Newark in favor of the department. As was stated at the beginning of this article the debate teams were forced to cope with great difficulties this season, greater obstacles probably than former teams. For nearly IOU1' weeks they were without the aid and guidance of their coach, Reed S. Johnston, due to his serious illness. But with Mr. Johnston back on the job, work went more smoothly. A trip to the Ohio State Library proved profitable, for some valuable material was secured. Much additional material was secured through cor- dence with the United States officials who were exceedingly prompt in acknowl- respon . edging the various requests. However, the speakers encountered some difficulty in securing the auditorium at times in order to practice their speeches. The lunch room f h' and the hall on the third floor were used extensively or t IS purpose. The debaters as a whole manifested a deep interest in their work as was shown by thir diligent pursuit of new a1'guments. Many Saturdays and, in fact, every spare ent of each one was devoted to the work. The two captains, "Sandy" Loughman, mom . Affirmative, and Ed. Schnute, Negative, exerted every eftort to cover all phases of the question. Bernice Blind rendered a great service to the teams through her effi- - ' h d refutations. cient work in typing the many speec es an In view of their remarkable success the debaters and Mr. Johnston were enter- tained at luncheon by the Kiwanis Club, and were guests of Blackstone, The Magician, at one of his performances. The annual banquet was held in the Jo-Ann Tea Room on March 30. The names of the debaters in e or 1 th de' in which they spoke are as follows: AFFIRMATIVE NEGATIVE Edna Westfall Karl Leidy Kirk Windle Freda Kupninger Russell Loughman, Capt. Edward Schnute, Capt. Oscar Ecleberry, Alt. Fern Channell, Alt. This year, in place of the customary debate trophy, Mt. Vernon and Zanesville gave Newark a beautiful silver loving cup. On this cup, which Mr. Moninger pre- sented in chapel, Wednesday, April 14, will be engraved on the one side all the de- bate records previous to 1926. 'The 1926 victories will be the first to be engraved on the other side. The debate cup will be kept with Newark's other trophies until a trophy case is obtained, then it will occupy a place of honor in that case. 96 DEBAT E T EAM TOP ROW-1Left to Rifzhtj-Oscar Eclebery, Alternate, Russell Loughman, Captain, Mr. Johnston. Coach, Edward Schnute, Captain, Kirk Windle, Karl Leidy: FRONT ROW-lLeft to Rightj-Fern Esther Channell, Alternate. Edna Mae Westfall, Freda Kuppinger, Bernice Blind, Typist. 97 Song and Cheer Leaders When debate time comes around it is necessary to have someone to direct all the pep and vim of the school into the right channels and to arouse the pupils to the highest pinnacle of enthusiasm at the correct time. Therefore we have our song,-leaders and cheer-leaders. Last year Nellie McFarland was chosen as Mary Neighbor's assistant, and did her work well, for the school readily responded to her leading. She is very popular with all the pupils, al- though still an under-classman, and be- longs to the Civic Society and the Dra- matic Club in which organizations she takes an active part. Because Mary was graduated last year it was necessary to select another Q - . . s - song-leader. From about twenty-five girls who, "tried-out," Virginia Lara- son was selected to fill her place. Vir- ginia is a Senior and was chosen the G chief song-leader. She is an active member of the Dramatic.Club and took pa1't in a play "Nevertheless" which was pre- sented in chapel. V1l'glI113..1S an usher and also belongs to the Civic Society and Glee Club. Besides these activities her scholastic record is unusually high, her name al- ways being on the honor roll. Under her fine leadership and with Nellie's assistance, the Debate songs were unusually good this year. Just as the songs raise the enthusiasm of the students, so do the yells increase the "pep." But to get the greatest amount of noise we must have fine cheer-leaders. Thus we find Junior Lamphear as our cheer leader this year. Johnny certainly has lots of "pep" and makes lots of noise for a boy of his size. Johnny, a member of the Junior class, is very popular with all the stu- dents because he is so cheerful. He is also a member of the Athenians, and an active one, having assisted in several of their p1'ograms. This year Lawrence Rhodes resigned his office of cheer leader, but he has helped Junior at the games and was the cheer leader at Newark for the debate. Rhodes is very popular among the Sen- iors as Well as among the lower class- men. He is very cheerful, and everyone knows that grin of his. Larry belongs to several organizations at school, do- ing his share in each. He is an active member of the Athenians and belongs to the Civic Society. Furthermore he takes an active part in the Dramatic Club work and acted the part of a dejected lover in their Christmas play very well. Besides this, Lawrence is Sport Editor of the Reveille, doing much to enliven the accounts of the different games. We could not get along without cheer-leaders, so here's to Johnny and Larry, the Mutt and Jeff of Newark High School. 99 Minstrel FAQ Thursday and Friday, March 26 and 27, the Boys' Glee Club of Newark 1 High School presented the seventeenth annual minstrel under the supervision of Mr. Klopp. Each year since the first time it was produced the minstrel 'f--dh-3 has improved and each year it is looked forward to with much interest by the student body and all those who are interested in high school events. Besides the two evening performances, the minstrel was given for the benefit of the grade school pupils on both Thursday and Friday afternoons. The amount of work which is necessary to produce this event is not appreciated by the average person. However, those who take part in the minstrel must practice every afternoon and evening for weeks in advance. This means that they must have grades higher than the average in order to keep up with the regular class work. A half credit is given for this extra work in presenting the minstrel. The minstrel boys are chosen from the members of the Boys' Glee Club and any boy in high school is eligible to take part. The chorus and ends this year were exceptionally good and the work of the inter- locuter, Cy. McKinney, and the premier end men, Ralph Hughes and Ralph Dettre, was above the average. The chorus this year was very effectively dressed. The front row wore white sailor suits and caps, and the back row wore blue sailor suits and caps. The interlocuter wore an admiral's uniform and the end men were dressed in the reg- ular end men's suits. The olio this year was prepared by the Dramatic Club. The two plays, "Moon- shine," and "Gassed, were very successful. They were coached by Miss Crilly and Miss Montgomery. On the whole the minstrel was pronounced by everybody a huge success. if ll! 11 Band , A-1 HE band which was organized last year has continued to be one of the most Q. active organizations in school under the leadership of Russell Loughman. K4 It has been largely responsible for the pep at the football and basketball tif-'51 games. The day of debate the band led the parade which escorted the af- firmative team to the station. At nearly every football and basketball game the band was present in uniform and played between periods. Thus it is this organization to which much credit is due for the success of Newark High's athletic teams. Much of the school spirit hinges around the band and Newark High is certainly grateful for their fine work. . ' 1' 10 L PZ. ,ff I, 8 'lf X Orchestra .NE of the most active organizations in the high school is the high school or- chestra. It meets for practice twice a week in the gymnasium and, under .,,m,. the efficient leadership of Mr. Klopp, is able to furnish the music for chapel ltkiffftl and other occasions. This year it was the small orchestra which played in chapel. The entire orchestra furnished music on special occasions, and a small orches- tra was selected from this group to furnish the music for the minstrels. Therefore, it is to this organization that much credit is due for the success of the minstrels. The orchestra and Mr. Klopp are to be congratulated upon their fine work, and the school certainly appreciates what they have done. 100 101 BAND EE s, Ja Tho eb K iam Alfred r -Will E as : o Q Qz O U -E Ee: Cl ld rn :E E' U v 411.25 if T5 is cz cu r-4 Q3 Fl o Q7 U E' ml LT B a: Q2 A l 3 o an P V1 as .. L'-4 E BN da.- .c m D1 Ai 32 N :E E c s: 5. GJ as E 'EJ 5? 5 'S o 3 E .cz o Cd i Ei sf O a cr C SV O 'EQ I-TI J .. 9 .1 rn 3 2 5 23 4-v u P 5 E N E -C E5 5 .J E m af 5 EZ uf .E is o Cl U: .2 5 .:: U ai T5 +2 O I m QI E m va as U :v as .c rn .Z 9' ew .c EO ORCHESTRA QNQI 'SLZSN '13-5'5'g 'Swv 5 D-1 ,Jw .a mm .-c :: :1 E 'EFI-4 32 ,E "MD QE e212 .554 Fel' 6:5 EE -JET, 'QD-4 cz si S :-:N ,221 2511 Q3 '52 WP' .. 1:-:bd FQ:- ,gi S E N F11 m 0 ,si 1" 75 ra as 2263 225 az ,go EE od gi Ma si fs? +2 w GJ E-4 Z O D5 IL S in SDC mga 'AE-19 2,5545 GJ Wt'-.1 Mas E523 E53 fusing 5213 Emi -EEE :EE 48? -5 .M W: QS A h .E E M 'E 5 SSE .-c GJ as ev E :J 4: rn ?-E D12 O I-I :Q 2 S1 O-O :Q-1 Em ld,-an .nw EEL' --min W.: sag A an N ei: :WE 5,552 mas .ig Esh S! zur, .-.: L5 SVI za QQ w KD E nd Ev: E 0 4-1 :A C SV O E I S2 75 5 'E' as F14 L6 .Q 9' M 1 I E 42 U P4 L12- QC! ,iii ..-.GJ xi w. 'PE -1- Q..- EE 3 -5 Ez.. O 2 555 U 9-fm 55 E3 rn FZ VJ .2 E 'P 5 5 W5 3 o as E 5525 .C U A "U 0 -u N CD w 0 .ff QP -J c 'IVE ov : 6533 Wh 1:1 153m BO 9- .-I QM? E o E v-'Q C50 E 'vs an G 3? E ..:,. me Di 3 -3-JZ Ev. 1: s: o ui BJ E 2 ni' SE as O ED as E o .c H E S 5 .Q 'S n: .ac than 2 as Q 'E ev D4 si o W .x U nv Pu .: 'E as 9' :1 .v .2 sz. GJ 4: ... Ep H-1 as 5 o Y: cu -54 .Ei Cl ULUE 22 QE E . 3 1: Fil ui 22.5 ga: 23 EE 23 N is S DIE -E Sm E 3 E o Cl U2 2 E .: O sf 0 s: a as F' o L: U YL o .c P' li s: o Q If 5 5 M .nf .ff E rn : -C O va nf B E ca The Athenian Literary Society E il ANETEEN hundred and twenty-six marks the close of the seventeenth year in the development of the Athenian Literary Society as a successful school or- Efyglkq ganization. This year has been particularly successful both through the able gfffli direction of the critic, Mr. Hupp, and through the cooperation of the mem- bers. The society consists of boys of the second, third, and fourth year classes and the qualifications for membership in the organization have been so raised that only Students of the highest standards and best literary ability are permitted to become Athenians. In taking in new members the society also considers whether the members will help the club by living up to the motto, which is "To make the society the biggest and best organization in the school." The Athenians meet every Monday at noon for literary programs in which cur- rent events and topics of interest are discussed for the purpose of facilitating and de- veloping ability in public speaking. Thus, it has always been a purpose and a tradi- tion for the Athenians to manifest interest in Debateg and it is interesting to observe that all the boys on this year's debate team, numbering five, are Athenians. The election of officers is held once every two months in order that as many mem- bers as possible may receive the training these offices afford. At the latest election the following were successful: Ralph Jackson, presidentg Paul Green, vice-presidentg Roy Cochran, secretaryg Oscar Eclebery, treasurerg Delmar Lynn, chaplain, Lawrence Rhodes, Sergeant-at-arms. As the Annual goes to press the Athenians are considering possible applicants as new members and are formulating plans concerning their yearly party. The Athenians this year have kept up the high standards of the society, "trans- mitting it to those who follow better than it was transmitted to us," and it is hoped that the club will maintain these standards in future years. .,"cau.. . 9 '-1. . 104 ATH ENIAN LITERARY SOCIETY tw Cv ,E o F 5 gd if: O VS El-1 2 bi -sv.. .Mm ja: T1 ac : o D ua ll ee 5- N Te 3 E an 1 O E 23 3 o as SQ zz 48 ul-I-I .LLU1 2 U.. W3 'E S.: IU Om I E .94-c: nz!-rl 'F' E' 5 0 a-4,1 Q-li W.- 'Jan O 4-1 Q2 oi Di af F- g? fa? hx LE 5: GJ ELT Ea QQ 234 H O T33 , J 5.. 2:1 G: cu 91 me EE Pc? 5 E E cv SV UIC 5.1: ii N mf of E.- E2 C O v E mr: LW 'TC Q O rf O 4: e sv -C 8 E U2 Q... MO '5 ,546 U2 .Ev-a s: , Eugene I. l 9 3 g.: 5- U-4: CS fi Q75 D-42 : v. bl 5 2. ,J 5 9 E o .f: P' E E 'B' I3 5 ra E .:: 'CL : c n-1 E v: 1: D Cd f 2 . o .c D1 G? D L: 9' 5 as v-I 5. GJ :: .E Z U 2 Z F v. U 5 me E fd oz I .2 D '1- :E U N c. UQ 2 .E 4-f OJ C i 4 .:.' 'E : Q1 IE s: .c o va Thalian Literary Society HE Thalian Literary Society representing scholarship and high moral stand- - ards has been organized for sixteen years. It has just finished one of its !,7?mX most successful years. The aim of this society is to promote literary cul- iffli d ture, to etablish a spirit of enthusiasm for high scholarship, to give instruc- tion in the common rules of order adopted by all regularly organized bodies, and last, the one added this year, to create a keen interest in art. The name "Thalian" is derived from the Greek muse Thalia, the muse of litera- ture. Since the work of the society in other years has almost exclusively pertained to music and literature, it was decided to study this year great works of art and their artists. Each girl in the society has had a part in at least one program, at which time she discussed a subject concerning art given her by the program committee. Since the Thalian Literar Society had been studying art, it was decided that this organization should present the memorial of the class of 1925. This memorial con- sisted of three pictures and was presented in Chapel, February twenty-sixth, together with a picture given by the society itself. The pictures were: "The Constitution" by Tuckermann. "The Athenaeum Head of Washington" by Stuart. "King Lear" by Sir Edwin Abbey. "The Red Mill" by George Inness. At this program the girls told of each painting and the life and works of its painter. Miss Carrie Allen has been the critic for the society this year. It has been her first year in the work, but every girl will testify to her ability and interest in her place as critic of the society. It is the plan of the organization to study a different subject each year, for exam- ple, "The American Business Woman" or "English Literature." The plan is to have a group of three subjects each of which will be given every three years. The society hopes that each succeeding year will be as pleasant and prosperous as the year nine- teen twenty-six. 1 at Q The Civic Society HE Civic Society is one of the most flourishing societies of the school. It has I a membership of about one hundred and thirty. To become a member of this ,iwx society, one must have good gradesand a good standing in the school. The purpose of the society is to teach citizenship. Mr. Paul B. Edwards was the critic this year, and under his supervision the society is progressing very rapidly. One of the special features this year was the plan of having speakers in the meetings. They were either some teacher in the school or someone outside who gave very interesting talks. The Civic Society took charge of the sale of Christmas Seals this year in the high school. It also took charge of the chapel programs on holidaysg such as Lincoln's and Washington's birthdays, and Decoration Day. dThe society also gave a prize each semester to the member having the highest gra es. . The officers for the Iirst semester were: President, Rosalyn De Yarmettg Vice- President, Edward Brown, Secretary, Ruth Beboutg Treasurer, Louisa Worley. The officers for the second semester were President, Cyrus McKinneyg Vice-President, Ruth Beboutg Secretary, Pauline Bliss, Assistant-Secretary, Martha Lyonsg Treasurer, Louisa Worley. 106 T HALIANS :YI . Eiga 'Em-EEE: C' hfo ,nifi Qgdim .H in EEE!! gms,-End ::'-'.-4'Uv 49552 .N S Emiig ,sv-u Qzcmi -9.02 -g-I sz 3 Exim? :A-2?-' fifgi SVLENP M53 m -5.13535 415 gd wh' . Ergo: :finds pg CYJHDQ wima 531-H2 32552 So Q O' CN 5552 :agus 5 25532 IKSI5 2111.43 DEE:-.SV'5: 54550 E5 md U2 .wsg EWNEM ,QE-V WEEE 31, sim gimgc Lama E., E 01.421-2 . 55535 FH 2 E Siea 5552 . IEC E :I E 5. me Q -E -E E P CIVICS 'Cl 9' E 2 3 U U m Q E A m I H Q D N : : 55 W 5 5 GJ F 6 U E I 3 w c m E E w Q-1 I 3 n E D5 2 5 GJ s-I l 3 O D5 E-' Z O O3 Ll-4 3 O Di C Z O O I-Q U2 : o w u c 4 f CJ E 4 Q P 2 9-4 E o .E 5 2 3 9' Q : 'IC 3 u E 5 L4 x v 9' fl-4 E c : N r Q F 5 IJ-1 .D , N ge mm F :1 o .-I ?- UJ E o u H c c E H P m 3 x 2 r U - m I c U 0 S SV U Q 2 n 5 E E 5 s 'F ff r H GJ A a N E 6 E E c .J 3. zu C 3. .cz ... 9 E A .- 5 c H CL E E I x r v E1 2 5 o 1 SV av A QC E 5 P 4-T H 3 Q 9' C. C 5. E 1 c M U E 6 5 v 5 5 'U m E n Jiw s U- W: F .-O aj? GJ L: L: 42 i 3 m Q x v E nl 5 o .Ez 1 B : Q 71 N U : EV W P 3 o m Q E m E-4 : o 2 CU U N I-I - i 4-3 BJ L3 3 o c M 3 U : A J on me 5 E H 5 1 E D-4 E .C H L W E m n SV C GJ E 3 1 Q m U ai L -Q N O5 : 5 5 E 5 FV E : m -fa P' o n F 5 nl S : o 9 5 c E E E 5 -C J x B GJ 6 'T 3 o m m P' m D o Q 5 a ,Q C GJ ffl S A V Q1 E s QE 5 9 S E GJ 'U N C1 S. U -C +4 GJ E E 54 5 U E o I : Q3 S 5 H Ill I Q2 U E w D-1 f L E GJ E E va D-1 ?' 5 E o u M : Q . : 2 i ... o .Q W D3 .C H : D1 A 11 E m 1 H 0 A N .E E F Ga if nv D-4 gE ,215 o wi : S E L1- f-' 5 n o 'T 3 O M I H fl-4 H m 5 E 3 T m Pm 2 5 3 E 0 2 2 m H H I W 3 0 m 2 m : 1 lr! E N, iM?E2-53 org:Tw Q Ev o::, aa:- el33AmE3 5 cu 4-1 D2 an Cl 5 2 2 'U E ia I 4 E S GJ C E X . E I P S U c o L S 3 v 5 1 o G S 5 4 7' 5 o A 5 3 N 2 U 8 E E L E E Q S U -C 1" 5 5 7 E A 'U 6 A Q m 5 CG E 2 O E Q2 u o 2 6 Q : : L U M T 9 5 nv CIVICS SOCIETY-SECOND PICTURE LW Lilidgi moizw'-Lua A of Fl 2-52255 wimgwgm Zgilggtnra Emfwgilg ev ,.1-- . m?.v5c:'E5 H- N :eg IH 32x?.W ajigw 21.1122 EE ,-g,g9f,TjE'L':z "'.:LO" EMSSEQE 155.552 G14-1 ggirgii UH O fmgic "'afEi-mm. :1,,,,x bl MESEJSE 52234355 ::Qim?U kgs L. .2 Fm uw P59552 Ns: E3:C!3W 55a?4wi QEEg!Ej g2mL3L5 an FVOWO s:2,2.'5gqCQgg4 IDLIE :C ia.,-mE-1 Egozimx E84-Ewa swhrucc 54,2-E:2L.lVk' lziigsg Ewmagda ug! CPM! ul". N EQESUSQ -Sfwsvrm QLQJQQ H- .EL cv uixch 1 3525555 'ihifcgmi N :3,c 322540155 E43-322.2 aiFE25E mini- O EMQWQEJ fX4Qcd.E'5L. TEESHE QEECQCVJ N +4 E 5 E sz H z m L1 C EV I-Y-4 :f C o 5. .J cu ..c: .J Q E J an .2 S an 1 'a o J S u : E Vx .r: - 9 c Q E u .E n: i7 T: H VJ .5 11 'E :T E E 9: EU 2 Q GJ aa 'C V 6 m : c E 1 Te C 2 3 o m I ? A- V- rv .- L 3 EU 'sf L: 4 x: 5. 9' .f L11 5 me E 5 o CG T vs 'U .5 C 5 S E I 2 Q3 E i Q3 on A cu Ll at v 6 u- u- ua '1 E E Q m .2 C 'W .E If 1: s-1 'E :1 Di rf EV .E D o Q a. o Cd 5 5. n-1 C an 5 if O .Zz 2' c : z n-I Cf o : : w -C m 5 Ci : : Q2 LC 5 5 9 CQ TJ ee 3 The Dramatic Club , , , ,gf I, HE Dramatic Club of Newark High School has probably had a more progres- sive and a more profitable year than ever before. The members of the club 0394,-N, have presented at their regular meetings five one-act plays. On November Mmii 5 six girls presented "The Rehearsal." Two weeks later four members of the society gave "Two Slatterns and a King". At the regular initiation on Decemba' 17, eight boys were admitted into the society and they presented the clever one-act play "The Lost Silk Hat" as part of their initiation. On Thursday, February 25 "Nev- ertheless," a playlet, was given and was repeated later in chapel with great success. "Phoebe-Louise," and "The Impertinence of the Creature" were given before the so- ciety at later dates and were greatly enjoyed. Besides the regular meeting programs, the Dramatic Club has had charge of two chapel programs: one, the Thanksgiving and the other, the Christmas entertainment. On November 26, the following plays were presented in chapel by capable casts: "Two Slatterns and a King," and "The Sojourners." On December 23, 1926, "How the Noise Began," a curtain raiser, and the one-act play, "A Christmas Chime," were presented. In addition to these plays the following songs were sung to lend to the Christmas spirit: Mirza!! "Oh, Come All Ye Faithful" - - - - - School "The First Noel" ----- - Dramatic Club "Silent Night" ------ - - - School "Though Poor Be the Chamber" ---- Dramatic Club L All the plays given were very satisfactory and pleasing to the audience. Miss Montgomery and Miss Crilly are to be congratulated on their successful coaching. In addition to all these pleasures, the Dramatic Club this year has also b1'ought about two important changes. The Constitution has been revised and is being rigidly enforced. On November 5 the society voted to apply for Service Membership in the Drama League of America. The request was granted by the Drama League and the society has greatly benefited by its connection with this league. The Dramatic Club gave an evening performance on April 23, 'at which time they presented "Daddy Long Legs." This was a big undertaking, and was a decided suc- cess. The Senior Play this year was in charge of the Dramatic Club. They chose "Mon- sieur Beaucairef' It was 9, very beautiful play. The beautiful costumes and setting made it a play long to be remembered. The Dramatic Club's success has been due to the keen interest shown by the mem- bers and the two critics. They are looking forward to another successful year begin- ning soon-September, 1926. 110 CLUB DRAMATIC - . : O i O o 3 1' W .ca O: 05: E s: EIU .AE ,cu Q54 GJ 'EJ L3 on -oz ,cn U.: .c 25 U La . ':1 s: UE 1. Om E Lv. 'ru 52 5.2 w: .ECU WZ il Q3 Eo Eid M- LE ES --an Dim O., -H2 ur: pi 3 5. gs :' ze m iz EQ L- 3 N D- -D1 ca U3 EO .I Cu 2 Lf 4.5.22 QE: J: -ai' 2 A sf cv II as DE 3 .E .E pm ? .E U .. N 'JI .:: .. QI .o ne .5 5 .E Q .. N E 'E .Q N 1 ... 15 O 7 F IC -1 v-1 .E E CL 5 sf av as CQ 4-1 91 Gi E Q5 -:s N I V O .c M u L D1 2 z F 5 C.: .L Cu 'U as Q SI SU 5 :U A QS 4-2 5 L: -F ,. m if E 5 'U H sf O 1 6 4. 3 E fc -H 99 : .: o P1 Q1 nc 2 'za r: 41 Q1 s: : N Q K! F4 . ms E i TJ 4: .1 ri 31 Q- -1 z cu 5 L5 L' E 53 -U O .E : 'T' 1 3 O D5 U: F ca 'D 9 u-4 I ea 5 E CD me Cl -U 1: E 97 5 cu C- '5 aa .Q Lv .5 E 99 V The Girl Reserves TF 51 ROBABLY the organization in Newark High that reaches the most girls and F gg., tends most to establishing a spirit of friendship and love among all girls is the Girl Reserve Society. This society is the high school branch- of the 139319 N Y. W. C. A. This has been a very profitable year for the Girl Reserves. The meetings held every two weeks have been very interesting. There was a little friend- ly rivalry among the classes as to who could produce the best program. Special pro- grams were carried out on Lincoln's and Washington's birthdays. The Girl Reserves have many good social times. They had a picnic at the gym- nasium. This followed the initiation which admitted about sixty girls, of all classes, into the society. As the Annual goes to press they are planning hikes and picnics to take place in the early spring. To share with others is part of the Girl Reserve Code and at Christmas time sev- eral poor families were made happy by gifts from the girls. Much credit is due Miss Amy Montgomery, the Critic of this society. She is very much interested in her work and gives her time and personality to the work. This year the club has been very fo1'tunate in having Miss Brillhart, a former Y. W. C. A. worker, as an advisoaland helper. Mrs. Phil. Horton, too, is always ready to help the society in any possi e way. A Girl Reserve with her code G racious in Manner I mpartial in Judgment R eady for Service L oyal to Friends R eaching toward the Best E arnest in Purpose S eeing the Beautiful E ager for Knowledge R everent to God V ictorious over Self E ver Dependable S incere at all Times is an asset to any school and Newark is proud of her Society. Pk lk if J unlor H1-Y HIS year ends the third and most successful year of the Junior Hi-Y. The club - was organized for Freshmen and Sophomores in 1923 under the leadership ,ITZX of Mr. R. L. Mosshart and John Africa. Hamilton Fisher was elected presi- dent and Cyrus McKinney, vice president. At that time there were only five members, but the membership was soon in- creased. At the present time there are twenty-five members. The club is now under the leadership of Mr. Mosshart with Mr. Sam Treharne of Denison University as assist- ant leader and Raymond Devereaux as president. An advisory committee has also been formed which consists of Dr. P. H. Corner and Professor Earl T. Osbourn. The Junior Hi-Y was organized as the Senior Hi-Y, to create, maintain and ex- tend throughout the school and community a high standard of Christian character. Likewise the slogan of each club is "Clean living, Clean athletics, Clean speech and Clean scholarship." Although the Hi-Y clubs are under the supervision of the Y. M. C. A. it is a High School organization and any boy of high morals and a. good Christian character is The Hi-Y Club s ROBABLY one of the outstanding organizations in the school that all High .qv School boys are desirous of joining is the Hi-Y Club. This select group of bigfiq, boys was organized in 1921. Since then it has developed very successfully 138'-31 and has taken an active part in affairs of both the school and community un- der the capable supervision of Ray Mosshart of the Y. M. C. A. For the past year the Club has been under the leadership of Cyrus McKinney, as president, during the first semester, and Russel Tower during the second. At the open- ing of the school year the Club held a successful Freshman Rally at White Athletic Field for the purpose of getting the Freshmen acquainted. At the time the Annual goes to press, the Club is planning a campaign for the betterment of social conditions for high school fellows. The work of the Hi-Y is not entirely local, being a nationally-organized club. Furthermore, each summer Hi-Y camps are established at convenient spots centrally located in each state. There are also numerous conventions of the Hi-Y Clubs each year, those this year being held at Middletown and Zanesville. In the course of these meetings many vital points are touched that are necessary for true Christian develop- ment in character. 112 eligible to membership. GIRLS' RESERVE il 33 cv cu D2 I 2 cv Beeney, H SECO M ma Joh E .c E' Kennedy, de yM F' 9 63 ,.. S4 LC Q3 c O vw .u .: 1' E ? ,- Q.. -C E ca 5 O Od H rn Oi .-4 In O Di Q Z E ... uc 41 Q9 fi E5 :1 P4 A N C D z C .2 3 U ?. 5 P. 113 .:: .J 9 o Q 4-v 4.: cu LL ti E O amgett, Mary i: IL 'C : CD u S F1 if .: .J cv M -:I z: CJ vz f.-1 5 .c .J :1 Di sf 0 9' 51 V 1: 9' E 2 'Li I .2 1 :E GJ E GJ LQ 20 2' 326- SJ: 1 O 3 o GJ EL E 'z 5' M ae ws 9' L1-4 IE 5 'U 9' E E as .J ,,, o Ln i .ne ZH-1 ms eu CU .EPZ 2 at D-1 QI U SV U .ni D .J .E m gn-I H3 :fd E1 9- . 4-'x: O .J 5. .e CZ 72 S Q2 eu 5.2 C gg..-. C?-l "U.Z.' W? Ed :3 :..SI OE 'Q S 5 E G2 -aa VJ an E63 ,JB QE Elk 2 o 5. is .3 EE JE Es: 58 -C Of I EI wi. -:J YZ M3 klmxqm .-C 21:55 ua NIE o is 56 A u: +3 .: E Ki .if .I Su sv C on .2 3 f-12 an 5-E ?"'t!1 O E-'Eg .5 .SLE I as f gh.. o"'D U E :wi 'EN CU 52 s: 5 1' 'ima in ST. .Q an uu:E 2 B F4 5 .J a Ta' Sm S .ic .242 3. 1-' 0.1 4-U .Z isv E!"-5 M 52 15 E' : Lf E ev F4 E 2 .E .E K: nv Ez cd 2: c P2 vw w ei cd IE Oi xi nz P. M 3 S u .E CQ E CD r-ui 22 We 51 a sv o 'W .5 :Yi E Z b. mE -:P B E J +1 cu F'- G rv rd E ac. 2 :cz .-I 'H Ea 354 .14 U C52 N51 '15 :F ff ,ii sg :tm 'EE s: rn E IME EE Nm -Cl B E gc U rd 5 .E F1 5 Q 5. E -C .. 3 H GJ .Ei x: L: UQ! mi im cv. cw mv. IZ D. cu S :x 4 .5 ...- CE cn F115 :J mm Q2 N .E f' N 32 K1 ci ' :1 as .5 s. .:: H P o C- E W .1 1 s: G3 .: .2 J .: .. : D1 P: 2 P14 : ?' .c 1-V we bd Q CJ s: .E ii U E ra .c 1-' as 2 5. rf. :J E 2 3 53 .C +- si EV 5 E GJ E z cd 2 E nz E 2 .cf f' 5 5 o I v. .c 4. 2 o Q 5 F 2 Z GJ : u 4 .5 U c 94 FH JUNIOR HI-Y cAffee: Neal M DCE' P9 B as 'J .c sz. T15 DG S Q3 3 : :vs 7 E we E Q5 .E F-4 -:S Tv : o KT A +- -C .E x 2 2: 0 .J I 3 o as 5-1 V1 rr ,.. Fa .ge Geox nner, Da , Wil C 5' U E .E hm ae ss: O F 5 P cv 9' 9' f cu Q 1 5:57- 041 E., Q 'rx Mg iw QQ EL is 45 EO Q3 2: iff ia ,EO as 5 3: :E Qtr H J gl 'LE gen S1 55 'E 3U C . Di... cu QL' Z O U Q UI ,Z u II ZZ Q7 E ni 'F .. ed .c TID VJ o E E E .ai .2 QE D3 rn az S .C U Ill S 93. 3 S E c .: U: I2 o E EV? 55 Q- u-1 E5 LY H OR I SEN V Q: gm: 'ici-12 5940 :QEF E-Hi 5554 2:25 T-SO ii'-' Oi og . :II gi: 1552 3u:L,J. E'C""p'C :Elms W :Z QE -gsig 33555 TS . Egggg 55,235 QEJSE Oafw ZQESE mwgg guffv oixgf gimgi 5 ZEMEJ .53 EiE,d EZHE- MQ lo-35 E Lf cu f,'E"',:m Qiig QEEEE Oywx: fredii? P-o5O:. wif Ha-13 Lain E25 Pi C frO'1 .mg Q1 lr 'W 2 :G . A, :': my Ai I 4 5 '51 x Wk ,Q x. XS 5 I 1' ff 53' W 'H if L' 3 5? Qtbletirs X 1 am a great friend to public amusement for they keep people from vice." All ' ',s1 'Ht' "ff-TE'1': ', .' n 13" lAf.3Pw+.. 45,xm1 , A A 1. I ,, , , V 1 ,f Q53 Y. 22, 'fi AUQ f- . 1.1-.4 1, . -. .JJ 5,1 s ' ' '..,v .f .1 -Q sl' 1,4 U 'M V wr gy, .L,,'l 13?l1-,-'- H. eq., -' -. r . .ZU11-i13?9i JA. N. J. man.-.. . ef J. ,lim- nf. A, A M. fi-" 1. G- '-an 'gf . L, H 'm'.':5,0 .., -Q--P. ,F-ls, 4. ', 7x ,, . 1 H : -'Ina . 'AEC' rf- f . x2,ue'1:'-"ti A . J w ,. my 11 -' ' P' b H f, 1 - " b ..,. x c ani mms-umnn. nu.. rw .L un.: Na, This is the picture of one of the best all-round boys that has ever entered Newark High School. Be- sides his participation in three branches of sport, he is connected with many of the societies of the school -Athenians, Dramatic Club, Hi-Y, and Civics So- ciety-and active in all of them. He is vice-pres- ident of the Senior class and is a very good man for the position. It is in athletics, however, that Cy has been most successful. He was a member of the football team two years, playing end and play- ing his position with versatility. His two years of playing on the basketball team has seen two cham- pionships come to Newark and this year he piloted his charges to victory. He was twice chosen an "All Conference Man" and was this year a unanim- ous choice of the coaches. He is a very good track man specializing in the weight events. Truly Cy McKinney is a real representative of Newark High School. Stanley Leedy was captain of the Newark High School football team this year. Stan has played under the Red and White colors for three years. He played tackle and guard and was known as one of the best players in the conference. Leedy was pick- ed on several All-Conference teams, and is one of the best football players Newark High has ever put out. Stan is also active in school affairs being a member of the Athenian Literary Society. Ev- eryone knows Stan to be a real fellow and everyone knew him to be a real captain. 117 ' GN 2 5 'fi 1 D5 'E as n 2 5 2 -J 2 'E as Hugh Gymnaslum-Dedxc "If ei 3 u Z FOOTBALL Q5 QE NN u V1 ci .E Ji u N T 3 o as Q az 5,0 5 v. O LW U2 E 9-1 '4-1 D .: U rn 'E od D4 .E .E 'Fm :: Fd z-' .. Q .o O Di i GI 3 E -C O P1 I 'S -C .9 Di 3 3 0 A i 3 o H ef U2 as li rx. E as .:: .2 Q FD Pa :Q Q2 a F-1 as Q .E Z 4 S -1: 3 :: o Q 5. W -F .2 CQ f' . O .o o Q1 of an s: .2 6 I C N -C U1 P' .. S I 3 S Q E u: ua 5 D1 E E o VZ Lf Q! 1: c 4 LI U P as 2 O 82 5:11 z:-rf ... is as E' In .i 5-3 ea me cl: 0 5 5 r' .. aa I an E2 va .2 io G9 -X 5.2 'nn .4 E E GJ Q fs 2 S: .E O F5 I 3 o D5 EQ u U2 5" .- N as E he mE U: su..- ,,.. N... EE xi ::E N L4 W5 -s Sic. ,ww 'P N F as W D-4 E .2 O NS I Q Qu: E ,Q gl: mc 'Ewa wow. alma-1 F 5 2 Q J: E is C3 5. CI 1: .E N U E an F .4 5. U -Ea 58 8 QU 52 HP -E Em -0-7 U! - Ei IJ fin. 55 ggi A N2 rm- Football Summary b A , CROOKSVILLE Q The boys put another "crook" in Crooksville. Wells, Shank, Leedy, and Company tore things up to the tune of 32-0. ' LANCASTER Football a la track meet! We upset the Fairfield County boys 44-6! Everybody happv-except Lancaster! DOANE ACADEMY Newark won theifirst annual water carnival 7-0. We won when Brown carried the ball and two tons of water over the goal line. Ev- erybody wet but joyous. WESTERVILLE Too much Miller! Rival Red and White halfback tears things 'up right. Final score 14-0 in their favor of course. 120 QQ QQML CAMBRIDGE Mud, mud everywhere and not a drop for beauty clay. We bat- tled thru one hour of playing and fifty feet of mud to the final score of 0-0. MT. VERNON The upstaters came down to see us and we decided to show them how to play football-they decided the same thing at the same time. 14-14 and everybody happy. COSHOCTON Too much Mt. Vernon. We journeyed to the far off hills of Cos- hocton county and were beaten by the far eastern team 7-2. ZANESVILLE Up from the east at the break of day! They came, they saw, they were conquered. We closed our season in a blaze of glory by defeating our old rivals 19-6! ' fin A m Ll, WA xl ---V--.-QQ p ,f-"' " fl .,-----"""' 1 ug- -,iff-" I f . ,,,,............ ...--...,.. -- 121 1, ,, ' r V w W 'H ' 'H ww xx- , , ,, , ? N W' nv W. , 1 lm N4 W N 'W,WWMWN M wwwmw W , A , ' ' ' ' " "' 'M W w N M H 4 ' X ' M1 A 1 N N 1 'WW 4, N 4 I , W Lmfmnumu Name , Fwmlm gammu 1 x x Brown, Ralph McKinney, Cyrus Hottie, Jamal Sdmd0en RKM Holtaberry . 1 Qgarlos ' Watkins, wav, lima. Youae, Wellsf John Enzlishf Ima hymn., YI: Tomlinson . v Myers, Eugene Eagle, V C Haidlil logakazeni may Ralph 122 N H H, H, :AH K J! L W., ,, . W , 1 M N W 'N V- , 5, v, .1x1g',,,,,,, iw ,. ' 1111- 4 ' 1 M n , , g f 1 'fy 1 . Q ' H ,vwmi1w1' wfm mm, ' f ,MU ,lg 1 w, V JMMJNN91: S5w,',1m1,5'w,,'1 ' F M , V- nl. 'H r N '. , 1 ,wx 'f ' WI", :"."Nf"w 5+-'muw 'u4.N'l,1'2iHf1"" WM l ' LN M L ' M xv N, jw1""wRPlwbr-I-WZQM NN1Nnwijml Mk, 'QU Z?W"'p.fULuqJ': M V mwlG"?q,wUv! "'1'M ! y ,,:!V! j 3Q.wN 1"-jj W N A X fm E BASKETBALL Donald Eagle, ey ney, Harv G M O un Z2 .E EE 22 J ID sf F fm E.: 'E Em QM sie Mo :SE 'TE EQ 9,54 'J-E E71 EM eu.. Qs 'Q EO ...-C, me BE it 53 I2 go gz P8 35 F-4 PHE o aa F1-4 Basketball Summary WESTERVILLE They're off. The Newark Red and White defeated the Wester- ville Red and White 25-11. CAMBRIDGE Too much Westerville. The boys from the East upset us 18-11. ZANESVILLE The Blue Devils came and went-and in going took with them the long end of a 22-12 game. um COSHOCTON Way down in Coshocton county! The Indians were driven off the reservation and massacred by our team 16-10. Regular Demp- sey-Wills game. Stone hatchets were even allowed. LANCASTER Down in the Hocking Valley and back up again with another scalp. The Wildcats strutted to the tune of 19-11 four favorj. CAMBRIDGE Revenge is sweet! Our boys paid the Guernsey County crew back with compound interest, 28-23 and everybody happy. MT. VERNON Oh what a game! Just won by one point-that is Mt. Vernon did. If we always played like we did in that game-bring on Ohio State! The final score was 23-22 in favor of the upstaters. 124 COSHOCTON Basketball ala track! Good game for bookkeeping students- adding machines 'n everything. Coach Millisor's charges rambled through to the tune of a 34-8 victory. LANCASTER Lancaster again! And the Red and White continued their march of victory by downing the Fairfield County entry 19-13. WESTERVILLE Again 1'evenge is sweet! Millisor's men evened up the score fWesterville 14, Newark 0 in footballj by again defeating the rival Red and White 19-13. I x- , G -A f--2 1- ' rf 1 - W X f I OJ. ', 1 . "' xx 2 'N ' k A L A y -1:1-Q-.1 C-" ,I' - .xx I -Q R ..., U Tj- -,,,,,,,,.,-nik'-Q 1 Q' N "kv s..,.. Lp -"' Q'-.- ZANESVILLE Once again-same old story. Two real teams met up but Zanes- ville was the "realer." We took the short end of a 30-14 score. MT. VERNON Aha! Back again! Welcome! And we proceeded to beat 'em 23-15 in a most satisfactory fashion. Tied for the championship O1 Central Ohio! Hurrah! AQUINAS OF COLUMBUS Newark continued to show their prowess on the hardwoods by defeating Aquinas 26-10 in the f11'St round or the Central Ohio tour- nament at Delaware. Go west young man! We did and were defeated by the hard riding cowboys 23 to 12. Newaik played wonderiully but me "1'unch- e1's" played a bit better and-well you know the rest. 5. :X R fflflfixfil L7 K 'L 125 'ii My " VV, N - - . A Q 'W -:ij 14. A y ivx ,V , Q . Im, G-A N ,:,f , 'y -. aff i NY ' , p ,Ai if X 1 - L 1 ' f . 'wi 1 Q3 .MYW V I Q K . 1' fx 126 OVBY' 127 Interclass Baseball ..,1-I I. HE second annual Interclass Baseball League was played in the spring of gig 1925. This Interclass league took the place of the Interscholastic games ,Quai that had been played up to the time of this organization. The opening of limit this race saw four teams lined up: the Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors. At the start of the season the Seniors jumped in the lead and were never overtaken, and the close of the season saw the Seniors with six wins and no losses chalked up for them. The Juniors and the Sophomores were tied for second place with three wins and three losses. The Freshman were last, failing to win a contest. Box scores were kept for each game and all players taking part in three or more games were given a numerical rating in batting and fielding. These ratings were added and the first twelve players having the lowest numerical standing were award- ed letters provided they were maintaining school work that made them eligible to take part in interscholastic sports according to the rules of the Ohio State Athletic Asso- ciation. The players awarded letters last year were, Seniors: Clayton Kline, Richard Graes- er, Wilbur Lewis, John Brickles and Arthur Vogelmierg Juniors, John Wells and Wal- ter Siegelg Sophomores: Paul Campbell, John Geidenberger, Thurman Peck, Joe Boich- an, Bernard Youseg and Freshman: Frank Stare. Joe Boichan and Bernard Youse were tied for 12th place, and so letters were awarded each. The leading batters were Clayton Kline .625, Eugene Myers .538, Richard Graes- er .500, Ro Dehevoise .500, John Wells .500, and John Brickles .400. Tony Earas led in the base stealing department with eight stolen sacksg while Clayton Kline led the league in both batting and fielding. Altogether the league was a very great success and an even better season is look- ed for this year. 1.225 Emily Ezsts Wit, now and then, struck smartly, shows a spark -.n,a. wus.. U lf Hifi. Fw- V i, 'Ei '-5'-.'1.:- , T :iq .fa ,. . lzgiipi ' 'L f"":-'.- 1 j- '1'-fw wx" - A l':.,v:f'-- g-I 4 .- 4 iw'-15 .. ns' Eur-'g?:lZ 'Fi"F' ...r 1 EQ. . .Y7"1 -T,","',,'g 'V 5 'A I cl W. . A A ' ' ,-Viflgx .Y ,f 1, . yy, " ,..v, ,. H. -JAH, " ,gl-fig..-5 Q- A:--Jig. -1 J'-, .al TW. '- - . W 'F x Q 41'-. x 5:1 ' : ' U 51 Y . . '. J - .. .-' M- .w N ' - . 'P' :ing .GV ' ' .. .5 . A , , ' I' -,qw .iq ' - . jk... 1p":21Q.1g4ii'xf-9f' n 1 ' 7 Q. 5' 1f.R"".f.55.,1Q'f5- "lb-, 21- QF, 13 . , ,A NA , 31. , Y 3 . - I-. 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' .. -, Q' 2 -.-2? .:Qh2,:.Lf,!1.: .rw . 55 F 1 Flirting Flirting is a pastime fMy gosh, I hope it isl In which we all desire to delve While we humans still exist It's a game of broken hearts Gee, it makes you just in bliss Of broken vows and dreams Gee, it makes you just in bliss At least that's how it seems Just a little wink or two Then a little smile And a little note or two Forgotten after 3, while If everyone would give up flirting How funny it would be Let's try it for a week or two And see what we shall see. - If all the world were a stage some of us sure would consider ourselves excellent stage managers. And So Young Too One: "Poor Jim is so unfortunate." T'other: "How zat?" One: "During the track meet he broke one of the best records the high school had. Tall Timber Jac: "Track material seems to be terribly short this season." Mac: "Why I know three men who are onthe team, and all of them are over six feet." g One Stude: "Somethin's preying on my mind." Other Stude: "Dont' worry, it'll die of starvation." Miss Foos: "Why is that word plural?" Alice Miller: "Because there are more than one women." Mr. Tait: "What was the fifty-four forty?" Lucy H.: "A line!" Thomas Carlyle once suggested that the world is full of willing people-those will- ing to work and those willing to let them. Just read this definition of a pessimist and see if you don't think it's the best yet: A pessimist is a fellow that would rather read a funeral notice than the comic sec- tions. Basketball is down and out Debate is over too ' When the minstrel's done, there ain't no doubt, Dramatic play is due. -Harry Shank flookirg at a miniature stagejz "It's all right but where's the moonlight ? " 1 A g Q A f F x 1 , , f - fs- P A .. mall I' Kirk W. Qtranslating Frenchjz "Beside the ham was a cake that the Republicans had eaten." Miss Mac: "Who was his mother, Alice ?" Alice M.: "Juno?" Roy C.: "No, do you?" We hear Ramie M. has a real estate lov- er-she loves him lots, and lots, and lots, and lots. Do You Know the Type of Fellow Who- Knows so much but never shows it? Who invariably plays hooky every Fri- day afternoon and then boasts of having the gift of not being caught? Who borrows two or three dollars from a fellow, never expecting to pay it back. and then won't lend the same fellow a dime? Who always has his books crammed with love notes. Who is forever making grand stand plays in scholastic activities? Who only plays center or guard because he's giving the other less important guys a chance? Who wears his cap on his right cheek bones and some sweet young thing's scarf. Who's always saying "got any gum" or "have you your machine here?" - Who tells every girl he meets that they have beautiful eyes and that he loves them lots and lots. i Who always opens his conversation with "Hey, you with the red hat on 'Z,','. Who closes with such expressions as "Be Good" "Don't take any wooden money" and "Resevoir." The Real Reason Jack took Madelaine to the movies every night. He was real liberal but she could never marry him because he was too jeal- ous. Dick sent her candy and flowers but he didn't understand her so she couldn't marry him. Bill took her on long, moonlight walks and understood her perfectly. He was a real good friend but she couldnltxmarry him. He was too poor. Harry had a 1926 sport model roadster. He was very nice but it was plain to be seen that he loved her too much. Paul was good looking, like a young Greek God, but he was lazy. Walter loved her without a doubt. He had money,' position, looks, understanding and personality. He appealed to every de- licious sense she had, but he was already married and the others hadn't asked her to marry so consequently Madelaine is pad- dling her lonely canoe alone. 129 H' a To Be Found in the Office: 1. A silver compact containing one lock- er key, 2 pennies 11898 and 19145, a note containing some interesting information. 2. A blue leather pocketbook empty ex- cept for a card bearing the owner's name. 3. A pair of tan kid gloves with brown stitchfng. Owners may have Sam? by de' scribing the lost article to the office clerk. English Literature Quiz 1. Was the Lady of the Lake an Ol ' entry? Y gfnplgcoes the "Inside of the Cup' take place in a restaurant? Q , 3. Was Sir Philip Sidney any relation t S' "S'd"'? 04. wwasl "As You Lrike It" supposed to b .lang expression . . y , 85? ,lNas Spencer's "Faerie Queen' his . th -t? , qwdie ISS Shakespeare write "Much Ado About Nothing" after having quarreled with his better half? H 7. Was "The Way of the World a road 'd ? ,, . guse Is "She Ftogps tg? Conquer the 011' ' th d ' en. gig. ofDideJonadthan0Swift go out for track? 10. Was "The Tale of a Tub" In the Saturday Evening Postr? 7 11. Was "Vanity Fair" a compact- 9 12. What kind of a hoe did Ivan have. 13. Did the fuse burn out when KID' ' ', l' ht failed? , Ima? gas the old Curiosity shop anythlng like our new dollar store? ,-,li . g . ,K .- 'l . .AMW V' U ... .f l ,: '-" .vm 4 ......1...... Q U11 Lv -,im Love, like ice, is fearfully slippery and it soon thaws. Miss Foos: "Well, erase the vacant places then." Kirk W. fin Eng.J: "The introduction starts at the beginning of the play." Malcom K. freciting on "Wurzel-Flum- mery" in Eng. Classlz "Is that where they got "and he took the fifty thousand." Freshie: "I wonder why they don't have insane asylums in Arabia." Sophie: "Because they are Nomad peo- ple there." Mr. Tait: "In spite of the fact that he was a Senator, he was a learned man." Lim-er-icks There is a young fellow named Cy Who to athletics does ply He likes Ibby Hatch And that's quite a match So here's to Ibby and Cy. There is a young fellow named Ed His names linked with Fern's, 'tis said They're always together Like birds of a feather Best wishes to Fern Esther and Ed. Mr. Tait: "Where do you find a provision about the habeas corpus?" Lucy H.: In the constitution!" Mr. Heckleman: "Now tell me how you would ascertain the height of the Trust Building with a pocket barometer." Physics Pupil: "Lower it from the top with a string and measure the string." The news that a tuning fork can put out a flame may be true, but it is not especi- ally interesting. We have heard of ukuleles or saxophones putting out an entire neigh- borhood. If you must draw the color line draw it at feeling blue. Who takes a sheet of tinny tin Immerses it in paint, Then puts a little engine in And calls it what it ain't? Popular N. H. S. Songs "Pm in Loven .....................,.. Margie Brickles "Loving You, Thatls All" ........ Cy and Ibby "Charleston Mad" .......................... Most of Us "That Certain Party" ........................ Emelene "Oh, Boy, What a Girl" ................ Edna Mae "Lovable Ladies" ....,.,.........,...,. N. H. S. Girls "Brown Eyes" .......................................... Monty "You Forgot to Remember" At Exam Time "Farewell" , ,... .,............. . .......,......,....,, S 6T110l'S Bob Woolson: "Say, you haveva funny complexion." Edda Foster: "Well, don't rub it in." Bob: "No, just dab it on the outside." Mr. Tait: "What would were a policeman and saw a man steal an automobile ? " Charles Daly: "Call out the force!" you do if you 130 Newark Hi-awatha On the corner of North Third Street By the shining big ten cent store Stood the drug store of the Hall Bros. Makers of the "Coac," the Hall Bros. Dark behind it rose the bakery Rose the black and gloomy bakery Rose the bakery with a roof upon it Right before it stood the schoolboys Stood the "sheiks" and drug store cow-boys Too the vamps and great gold-diggers There the Hall Bros. sell their ices. Sell their "Coacs" and crooked pretzels, Keep them guarded from the onslaught By a lid of strongest glass. Yells are stilled by clerks saying "Hush! the officer will hear thee!" We hear the slopping of the dish water Sounds of drinking, words of slander, "SerVice! service!" cry the Shebas "So's your gran' paw" says the waiter. Saw the candy in the window Saw the flecks and spots upon it. Whispered, "What is that, waiter?" And the good waiter answered, "Once this candy was as good." BUT Without the permission of Mr. Longfellow I have ruined his goodbye poem And I hope I'll be excused For not knowing better. Don. "29" Ain't It the Truth The kind of mother who used to say her 12 year old daughter was six, so she could travel on half-fare, now trys to make her 16 so she can drive the car. English teacher: "Have you done any outside reading this six weeks?" Pupil: "No, it's been too cold to read outside." Eula O. fin Latin classjz "But I have seven feet." Paul H. fin Eng. classj: "They were in love, but somehow or other they fell out of it." The difference between ancient Greece and modern America is the difference be- tween "classic" and "classy," Romance It was a beautiful summer night. The porch swing moved softly as if gently push- ed by the July breeze. The moon was round and full looking down smiling at the pretty sight. The roses climbed over the porch and the honey-suckle covered the very entrance onto it-almost. All was romantic and quiet. Never a sound was heard from the porch, but people did not wonder because there was no one in the swing. 131 fy if Edna W.: "Say, the crowd goes wild in this'story .about every five lines." MISS Crillyz "Well, have them do some- thing else for a change then," We were told not to hurry Nor sit up late and cram, Nor to feel a sense of hurry In taking the exam. And so we didn't worry, 1 Nor sit up late and cram, Nor feel a sense of hurry And-we flunked in the exam. Shapespeare's Classification of Newark Hi Classes Freshies: "Comedy of Errors." Sophies: "AS You Like It." Junio: "Much Ado About Nothing." Senior: "All's Well That Ends Well." Edna W. tin Thalian meetingjz "Only the head of General Lee and two other horses are finished." Here lies the body of Thomas McCray He bought "Pop" Swankis old Chevolet. Now I lay me down to sleep In my little Bunk I hope I die before I wake And thus escape a flunk. When you go to a party And d0n't get home 'till late Remember that it's bedtime - And don't hang o'er the gate. Bob F. '27. Clas Peppiest Girl ....,........,.. S Standing "Monte" Montgomery Peppiest Boy ,.,....................... A....A H arry Shank Most Popular Girl ............ Edna Mae Westfall Most Popular Boy .........,............ John Brickles H Best Girl Athlete ................ Snooks" Hannon Best Boy Athlete .,.,...., McKinney Best Girl Student l.........l....... Virginia Dayton Best Boy Student ............................ Karl Leidy O 'K LT Sweet Dreams Down in a deep dark jungle A pole cat lay asleep The little birds moaned in the water The fishes growled cheep, cheep, The broom handle ran through the window Chasing the fork and the spoon A plate danced a waltz with a skillet And the sun make a face at the moon. 10 hundred and 56 bed bugs Had a war with 25 fleas While a woman in flowing hoopskirts Sat busily rouging her knees From out of the depths of a tree-top Came the hippo's well known scream And a peanut with eyes in the back of his head Dived down in a saucer of cream. The potatoes were growing on branches And the oranges were hugging the ground The flanpers were doing folk dances The sheiks weren't making a sound. As I took my lunch in the cellar I saw an old man blow a horn And I vowed by St. Patrick's own valor 'Twas my very last fglassfulj Nateful of corn. What Newark High Students Strike for 1. More drinking fountains. 2. Shorter periods. 3. Fewer subjects. 4. More vacations. 5. Longer chapels. 6. Shorter assignments. 7. Fewer teachers. 8. No school at all. Freshman Catechism Ques.-Why did we come to Hi School? Ans.-We came to Hi School to learn to loaf, to be laughed at, and to fear the Seniors. Ques.-Who runs the school? Ans.-The seniors run the school. Ques.-What is the purpose of chapel? Ans.-The purpose of chapel is to teach us to sing and yell. Ques.-What teachers can be bluffed easiest? Ans.--Mr. Heckleman and Miss McClure look easy to bluff, but we are afraid to take any chances. Looks are deceiving. Embarrasing Situation Dick's a boy that's plenty nice, He takes me to the ball. Yet Bob is nearly just as sweet. I guess I love 'em all. Ted's eyes are big and black For which we all do fallg And Jack's got brains-but I guess l love 'em all. Bill's shoulders are so big and broad, And he just loves to cally But B0b's the one who sends the flowers- But still I love 'em all. Now tell me just what shall I do? I'm 'fraid I'll lose 'em all. I'll tell each one-no, guess I won't, 'Cause I just love 'em all. King Arthur who was laid up with the gout and wanted some kind of amusement had bill posters printed and distributed throughout his kingdom. They read like this: WANTED: Anyone who can make King Arthur laugh or get his mind off his gout 55,000 offered. But anyone who fail- eth shall have his head severed from his body. These posters caused great concern in the land as he was such a good kind Knight, kind to everyone but now he was so indis- posed. Many tried but all failed and they met death by the headman's ax. When at last he was becoming so unbearable that one of his Knights proposed Buckeye Lake, "the pleasure center of Ohi0,' as it was a last resort he went there and saw some of the "beautiful" girls from Newark so that he was cured of his gout. MORAL: There is always a last resort. It has been said and the Bible so states that King Solomon was the wisest man that has ever lived or ever will live, yet he was fooilsh enough to get married 700 times. He may have been butt 132 .5,., '-fg fd M.. X U I Q x Q 13+ ' :'1 -2A' , if' Y Es -'N Wx ff' ,MGA Ja 'Rqiph Q . 1 if 0 34 5 we 2 E g., K .KE 3 F5 lj R3 W V' ef , if : fx Ir il 3" Q ' X V' x ffr ' Yx -'wffw """"" f? ' kffw i - ,. , :. ' f -": A X l ,,,.M: XJ- 9' if L. 4. ..., M, ., 1 - 133 Our Latest Murder Mysteries QBy I. Solvem Cases, the famous criminoligist.j Out in the kitchen walked Susie Slim. She was inspecting the new cook's speci- mens. The cook being a conversationalist naturally supposed others to be likewiseg hence she began relating her trials and tribulations. The sympathizing lady of the house remarking "Tough, terribly tough" as she picked up one of the new cooks bis- cuits. Suddenly a shot rang out thru the wide open spaces. "Holler," hollered the lady, "I'm hit!" True, she was hit. "Ugh," she grunted, as she saw the blood stream- ing from her caboodle, "I'm assassinated." Right again, so she was. Assassinated, but b whom? Ay, there's the rub, but I, I. Soiyem Cases, will soon discover. I straightway went to her coffin, having only one clue, that the shot had rung out in the kitchen, Who wrung it out. I examined her head and straight- way discovered that as she had been shot in the kitchen, the kitchen must be another word for cranium. Why had they shot her? Probably to kill her I soon conclud- ed. I scrutinized. her facial expression. Nothing there. I looked into the hole in her head, a bullet there. Then she had been hit. This was the first thing that had dented her brain since her last idea on "why girls should rouge" hit her. I tapped her skull lightly with a tapper but found to my dismay that it bent easily. This was a, clue. I quickly realized that the new cook was an inventress of bendable bullets. She was immediately convicted to the elec- tric chair, from whence she departed to in- vefit non-piercing horns and self-starting ta es. The Agitating Adjective An adjective is a masculine or feminine, singular or plural noun or pronoun which is used to modifyg cut down, lessen the value of another word which it envies. The tense of an adjective is usually dis- covered by its state of mind after having been modified by an adverb. 4 The comma is used to separate two ad- jectives which are following each other without a direct object in view. The conjunction is used in English to unite adjectives which have been separated from each other by a sentence fjailj. Two or more adjectives in a series are usually continued in the next issue. A limiting adjective is not an express agent for "the limited." Miss Foos: "My, but I think this room is hot." 'Carl L.: "Turn the lights out." Smiling, gliding, kicking, laughing, Blushing, falling, hopping, shouting, Wiggling, shaking, joyfully carefree Oh, Charleston, we are nuts about thee. I'll write you a song, It's not very long But funny as funny can be. Wait and see! I don't like to boast It's funny almost, Some dittee! just take it from me Wait and see! You'll laugh till you cry, And then by and by You'l1 probably laugh at me. Wait and see! It's original too And funny clear through. But, gosh, giminyt, gee. Wait and see! I'll write it I vow, Let me see now. I forgot What that song could be. Don. "29" That's All There Is There Ain't No Mo' A strip of chiffon A stragugr two A paipaof e Two slippers too A little bracelet And maybe a fan A pair of beads Or maybe a strand A little ring It may be a pearl And there, you have The modern girl. A flashy tie A 6 inch belt A pair of bags A shirt not silk A crushed down hat A pair of brogues Double-breasted coat Red-hot striped hose A cigaret, a pipe, a smile The beau of town for quite while. EE 134 w u min iM..11-l,.i"'l.st.. . :.w4:.Il-2:11. It seems strange. The darkest parts of theaters always fill up first. After examining all histories we are con- vinced the Venus of Milo was the first woman to attend a disarmament confer- ence. An apple may have caused the first down- fall of man but bananas have caused most of the rest. We're going to take leave of our Seniors We are sorry to see them go For a time, till things set settled The old "Hi" will sure seem slow. Can we have love affairs in the Junior class That can compare with Ibby and Cy Of course we will do our best To copy them or try. Now take Ed and Fern They get along grand Do you think our editors Can take up that stand. There's Orrien and Ruth He's the president you see Do we think, could we think That could happen to Green. Also we have Shank With Emeline goes That is unless With another he goes. Now Edda, she too Is a lady tied down But I fear she will lose him As he's about to leave town. While everybody is knocking G. W., I will say that he was like a piano-grand, up- right and square. Also I might add that Maryland QMerry- landj is the happiest state in the Union. Most people aim to tell the truth but some of them are bad shots. The best way to make hard cider is to freeze it. Here is our ideal stingy man: He married an armless woman so he wouldn't have to buy a ring. He stopped the clock at night so he wouldn't,,ggear out the works. He would look over his glasses so as not to wear them out. He would jump so he wouldn't take so many steps. He would keep his cherry pickers whist- ling so they couldn't eat. No Percy, when they sav a man made a cool million they do not mean he was in the ice business. The only difference between a tree and some sausage is that a tree has the bark on the outside while the sausage has the bark on the inside. It is said that rain makes everything beautiful. But as you look around you would think most of us folks came from a dry country. Ireland ought to be the richest country in the world as its capital is always doubling 1DublinJ. ' The way some of these girls expect you to spend money for them, you would think their mothers taught them to say-"Lets go buy, buy." Some people think there are too many people in the world so they are studying to be doctors. Why do they call medicine a practice? As I am a doctor I shall gladly answer any questions concerning health. Anyone wanting questions answered address letters to Doc. Cuttemup. Here are some of the questions already received: Dear Doc: What is a good skin food? Ida No Ans.: Sausage is the only skin food I know. Why is a young lady like a hinge? Because she is something to adore Ca doorj. Dear Doctor: What would you do for a face like mine? A. Venus. Anse: Chloroform is the best thing I know. Dear Doctor: Please tell me something to keep my hair in. Ima Loozinit. Ans. A little box is a very good thing. Dear Doctor: What is a good thing for scars and facial blemishes? Ans: Carbolic Acid will remove them all. Some Ideal Jobs Manicurist in bake-shop-looking after the lady fingers. Cashier at the police station-counting the coppers as they come in. B. V. D. salesman at the North Pole working on a regular salary. Ice man in the Sahara Desert working on a regular salary. When a barber tells you there is electric- ity in your hair, does he mean that it is connected to a dry cell? 135 Sept. Sept. 17 Sept. Sept. Sept. 25 Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Nov. Nov. Nov. Nov. Nov. Dec. Dec. Dec. .I an. J an. Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Feb. Feb. Feb. Feb. Feb. I 'i CALENDAR FOR 1925---1926 14-First day of school. First spasm! -First vacation. In cha el M1 P 1 Moninger told freshmen how to walk upstairs. 18-Big vacation. Everyone went to Fair and took his lunch. 23-Hilarious chapel! Mr. Barnes spoke. -Newark took the crook out of Crooksville. First football game. Our game 32-0. 10-Track meet. Newark beats Lan- caster 44-6 on the gridiron. 16-Pep meeting in chapel. Another spasm! 23-First defeat in football. Wester- ville beats Newark, 14-0. No bones broken. 30-General Johnny Clem visits chapel. He ran in the battle of Bull Run. Those who didn't run are still there. 31-Jazz-bow. Newark and Mt. Ver- non play a tie-14-14. 7-Mud slinging contest between New- 13 ark and Cambrid e 0 0 . g , . -Bone crushing. Coshocton 7, Newark 2. 21-Farewell to football. Newark 19, 25 Zanesville 6. Hurray! -Dramatic Club gives Thanksgiv- ing play. Cy-the perfect lover. But we're from Missouri. 26-"Time out" for Thanksgiving. 18-Football letters awarded in chapel held at the gym. When asked whether he returned in single blessedness, Mr. Tait replied, "Merry Christmas!" 21-Formal dedication of gym. Miss Myers anoears in latest fashion of gym clothes. 23-Christmas play - and vacation. Spasm! 1-New Year's... Resolutions made and broken. 4-School started again. Biggest spasm! 8-Basketball team won at Westerville. 9-Too much Westerville. Lost at 15- Cambridge. Dr. Smith, medical missionary told us about the cannibals of Africa. 19-Hi-Y initiation. Too many pad- dles. Boys all were cripples on the 20th. 28, 29-"Exams" More fun! 27, 5-Lost first league basketball game to Mt. Vernon, 23-22. Sweet re- venge is yet to come! I0-Beat Coshocton. 12-Lincoln's Birthday Program un- der auspices of Civic Society. 14-St. Valentine's Day. Cupid busy in halls of the school. 15-Mr. Swank appears with new hat. Feb. Feb. Feb. Feb. 16-Dramatic Club gave "Neverthe- less" in chapel. Quite clever to say the least! 18-Washington Birthday program in chapel. A nice one. 25-Mr. Edwards wears squeaky shoes. 28-Pay day. Teachers in good humor. March 5-Debate in morning. Short periods are here for dumbells. March 6-Debate! Two banners by un- animous votes. Hurrah for our side. March 11-No chapel. Everyone happy- nit! March 1.6-Blue Monday. "Pinkie" Windle stayed home. . March 18-Miss - fell down the steps. March 27, Sh-. Don't tell who. 28-Minstrels. They went over big. April 1-Everyone's birthday. Yes, and Annual goes to press. April 8-Party season opens with the Seniors. Ice cream stored in the girls' lockers. April 19-Vacation! Teachers give Colum- bus a thrill' at the Ohio State April 16-Athenian Party-Feather fans and Conference. hats and everything. April 23-Daddy Long-Legs given by Dra- matic Club. Sandy falls hard! April 30-Dramatic initiation-unlimited talent discovered. May 1-Hi-Y May Breakfast Hike. Grease- soaked pancakes and squirtless grape fruit. May 7-Junior Party. The youngsters en- joyed themselves immensely. May 8-Mt. Vernon Track Meet. Newark gallops off with Yellow-Jackets. May 15-Millisor's force invades Delaware camp. May 28-Civic Society Memorial Day Chapel. May 29-Conference Track Meet at Lan- caster. May 31-More vacation! June 1-4-Senior Exams! Lots of agony! June 6-Baccalaureate Sunday. More new clothes. June 7-8-Senior play-swords and every- thing. June 10-Commencement. Spirit of gloom pervades. June 11-No more pencils-no more books, No more teachers' sassy looks. Cheese it! Here comes the ice- man with his ice hooks. Caesar had nothing on new teachers or new students at N. H. S. "They came, they Saw, they were conquered." A bright one in Latin class: "What are the principal parts of "possum"? "Head legs, 136 and tail." Tough ! It's awful how the modern girl Is talked about these days. She can't do this, she can't do that, 'Cause they aren't the proper ways. Her skirts must never be too short, She must never roll her hose, Her cheeks must never be too red Nor her lips fixed like a rose. She must walk along demurely And not look to left or right And act like grandma years ago Or they say that she's a sight. So you see what an awful life The modern girls do leadg But they do not seem to care For they do just as they please. If s-i-o-u-x spells "su," And e-y-e spells "I," And s-i-g-h-e-d spells "cide," What in the world has a speller to do But go and commit siouxeyesighed. Bob F. '27. If we are good we go to a land of ever- lasting bliss. If we are bad we go to a land of ever- lasting blister. Here I sit Broken-hearted Trying to write But haven't started. I haven't yet an inspiration Only torn hair And perspiration. Here lies the body Of Georgie McParr He stepped in front Of a trolly car. Here lies the body Of Henry McCall He went to his death Drinking wood alcohol. Here rests in peace Old Adam Chair He went out hunting They said 'twas a bear. A retired old soak Lies in this grave He choked to death On a big salt wave. Here lies a Seaman named Augustus Tate He died, yes he died Under a heavy weight. A tombstone big Lies over his grave His life was wrecked On a permanent wave. Sillygisms All good talkers are good debaters Fern is a good talker Therefore Fern is a good debater. All good girls are beautiful We are all good girls Therefore We are all beautiful. All boys wearing balloon trousers are shieks Kirk Windle wears balloon trousers Therefore Kirk is a shiek. All persons wearing debate pins are de- baters Raymond Mirise wears a debate pin Therefo1'e Raymond is a debater. All good girls love their girl friend's brothers I am a good gi1'l Therefore I love my girl friend's brother. Recreation is essential to all pupils Chapel is a recreation Therefore the pupils should have chapel this afternoon. Pore Ole Shakespeer This Shakespeer was a writer Of verse and that there junk. If Shaky wuz alive today, I'd call his stuff the bunk. His Hamlet is a funny thing, An' folks all call it tragic The only things they read today ls Whiz Bangs an' some magic. Now Bill did rite some dern sad stuff, But peepul call 'em comics. Looks like ole Shake had loony spells- A sawbones calls 'em "chronics." I dunno how them dudes got by An' missed the booby-hatch They Wrote a lot o' dizzy pomes An' thought 'em hard to match. J. Caesar was a better man- The Garlic Wars he swung, But with all his eddication Knew not the English tongue. You have never heard of a Jewish base- ball team-they are afraid to step on a diamond. Why Is the Wind Blind? The wind is 3 breeze, A breeze is a zephyr, A zephyr is a yarn, A yarn is a tale, A tail is an attachment, Attachment is affection, Affection is love, And love is blind. B. F. '27, I gf' :J 25' ' 2 fm 5 X6 , 2 f 'O fvfg' N . 1 2 P Q x C in Q , J 46 5 W ' f ' ' 4- V. 5 QW-gi' , L '?'n:2',5 Q . . 1 A, ' Life Ain't life a funny thing? Don't have no fun at all. Have to go to school each day- Can't even loaf 'round the hall. Ain't life a funny thing? Ain't even got no beau. That's the sting down in my heart That's what's been a hurtin' so. Ain't life a funny thing? Gee, you know I'm blue. I wish that I were dead Then life 'd be all new. Ain't life a funny thing? Gee, gosh! I'll say so. I laughed and cried and acted nuts- And now I got a beau. The Annual By careful work, and honest toil, By friends too meek to name, By silent application, and By many seeking fame: By sacriligious jokesters who Their l'0t and puns put o'erg By foolish, raving editors- Yet deep from mystic loreg By lots of ink-fiend journalists Who can't recall their brand: And by patience's hand. The Village Sheik fWith apologies whe1'e they are duel Under a spreading chestnut tree A modern young sheik stands. The youth, a handsome thing is he, With small and dainty hands And the muscles of his long thin 2l.l'I'T1S Are strong as rubber bands. His hair is slick, and black, and long His face is as shiny as the sun, His No He To mouth is spread from ear to ear task he'S ever done. looks about to every face see the smiles he's won. Sighing, smiling, loafing, Onward thru life he goes. Each morning eats his meal in bed, 1 Sr lf. A Form of Study 7:30 Bob decides to stay at home and study for a History test. 7:35 Bob hunts for his History. 8:15 8:25 8:30 Finds a "College Humor". Laughed himself sick at the jokes. Decides he doesn't feel well enough to study. Retreats to kitchen and eats half a pie. Feels stronger. 8:35 Finds his History. Hunts as- signment. 9:05 Still hunting. 9:15 Starts to study Chapter IV. 9:45 Discovers test starts with 10:30 10:45 11:00 11:02 Chapter VI. Counts pages of mate1'ial in- cluded in the test. Still counting. Been counting too hard. Eyes hurt. Bob goes to bed. Flunks test. Each evening enjoys repose. Nothing attempted, nothing done So his life comes to a close. g:.. , -Y .T,e. .... 139 U in 'O ff, M ' "' 3 Late Discoveries 1. Oysters are most always cultivated in the water. 2. Gabriel mastered the fine art of sax- ophone playing. 3. The Battle of Bunker Hill was fought on a hill. 4. The King of Servia was massacred in a bloodless revolution. 5. If a man runs 2Vs miles from home he will reach a point exactly 215 miles from where he started. 6. To be a wealthy person it is neces- sary that one have money. 7. It has been estimated that over 100 straws are either lost, strayed or chewed up in Hall's Drug Store every week. 8. The most recent vogue of hair-cuts isn't. 9. To be a healthy person onelmust be physically fit. 10. Some people are so dumb they think there's a barber shop at the North Pole. Irish You may get a thrill and I know that you will When you find that youive broken my heart But don't be so sure for they say there's a cure For such diseases when doctored with art. If you think you're the first who has had the joy Of brealging my heart, over-confident Oy Guess again, little one, for I'm Irish you see And broken hearts are less than nothing to me. So, better be careful young men or there'll be A hearse and some horses your heart to receive. Irish sunny good humor and mirth you shall see y Will win loads of hearts that are opened with glee Stop softly and firmly but surely and true i If an Irishman's pointing cupid's bow at at you. Some people are opposed to marriage yet we have good proof that some of our great- est men were married. Patrick Henry: "Give me liberty or give me death." Daniel Webster: "I would rather be right than president." After Portia had accepted Caesar didn't he say, "The die is cast." And at another tiime he said, "I came, I saw, she conquer- e I! Even President Lincoln said, "I would rather stay at home."' We wonder if Mrs. Lincoln had anything to do with that. George Washington fought all his life for freedom and then got married. 'L Here lies the body of Ima Sap, Who lay on pins to take a nap. Here lies the body of Iva Head, -He used his name, and now he's dead. Here w've buried Betta Cent Who died because her "jack" was spent. Buz W.: "I thought this was a "yes" and "no" test. Mr. Heckleman: "This is a "know" or "don't know" test. Take That! He told me he liked me, And by my side he sat. He said again he liked me, but They all say that! He said that I was charming- That he loved my eyes of black. He said he thought me thrilling, but They all say that! He said he'd like to hold my hand As by my side he sat. My hand flew up and him it hit, cause He said that! Mr. Tait: "What type of cattle was rais- ed for beef in the cattle ranges at first?" Emaline A.: "Cows" Senior Weather Bureau Fair--"Margie" Danner. Cold-Roy Cochran. Windy-Fern Channell. Unsettled-Harold Cooper. My readers have noticed I write with a wooden arm and perhaps would like to know how I lost my real arm. One day I was swimming in the ocean when a steam- boat ran over it. Hair may be woman's crowning glory but a rolling pin is man's. Life and hash are what you make them. Q 6 r LT i S unu- ..., .. ' -lst 140 if . A IM. ft f "at ""V'- A , Qutngrapbs e Beneath the rule of men entirely great The pen is mightier than the sword." 'I-9 .sjlif "Nj-J '.Am'u1'--V- , L' ff' 1QV.'-if-..x,2?'fQiw QW' -5,--1?-Ji' - ' i f ? 'H .ei-!'I',Z,i'i+'?1?3f""' 'G--5171114 "1VfA1'2,,fgrLR'V:?',E af' -.g,.1...-QW, X 'wg , V. V-VVLQ.. 4.0. V' ' 72.27. . M P - V' V .'2?:1fs3' -V-'if V' ..,-.-. , g.- . ,A ,.... , V ,rg . .1v.. N, N439 - Q ', jg- .q:.,.Qj,F4Q5 V- . ,. 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I ,,3,., ,, 5. lf.: AurfM'.-fax. .'.g,-.5,,',iQ:: . . .4 . .1 V UA 7d'A..,, V . ll hh -,y 'JV-M. rfff.-V. .xv fr'-.V PQ , 'FQ .VZV,a.Q, V.V,.v.- :V. , +..-,QL ' F - 5....V,. "ma V. . ,Vp V A A -2. , . VV' 'V Q.. - 1 .. . .mv..VV.'x.... L... .,..'f , . .135 .VV.V.'L-rag .V . V. V.4., .. .-a. -. 5 -ian 4. ...ha V.r,. V Vx ii .-.gx JMFV- 4 , 4.1, VA3 ... ,. V- .. E. V. N--. .Q --' -.Q .- -AWVV -V. V V -PM efit'-1V,M1jfl'.VgQ "4.vff""fe..-.'Vi.1i.ff!,ViL:5 - ylV.ff.f.gVpV.,.. -Y:ffLf5s"?52. Q V ,-'VV--. .'..' if 'fi1V,,,??gVae" Q?Q1Ti,L3V.Q+1Vg'VVgV V -Qggiiiiif' 'R-3g1f2i'. V. V- ' 2:1 ,,w ZsV?Qg.,."g-sa :V Vf ga ? .63 V-F.. -' V2' r"w "--.Ll"?X" K ' 'Vw TTT' fu' S "i" " "'fN - JJ .-' -T331 .. V .Vw V. i N .-.:.v.LVk,j V-.V?L .7'.. -i.5,.li1i:AV-A . QM9':37:E.3?Ciq-1 ,.,vi.x- .-'VV F of :Vi ' lx ai. Vr: ' iff ' L' 7 'I-fi '1"9"f7'2iV.i.13?V ff?c4?' .5 ,V- L??"?lM. n-:H " 4" ."'."'f'f3i 1"V?-3' -V . 5' 5, - 9-.' 1 - '-Q51 K1 You Can Taste The QUALITY fllflIdS ICQ fftdlll The Diamond Store H. W. Mackenzie 51 Hudson Ave. Newark, O PERFECT DIAMONDS WATCHES PLATINUM JEWELRY Charge Accounts Permitted V .G ,N s The Prettiest and Latest in Lighting Fixtures at McKims 28 South Third lFor Your Healtl1's Sake, see David C. Swigart Chiropractor 60 East Main Street Phone 9446 141 9 v 2 'lu ,, ,XS il! W 97 EW 'In , ,' M W .W M wars ll? , ,'ym- 1'.-1,153.5 pf, xx ,uw.'u.1-'UW 'Y q,HM.., Q "wi" JM ,U-"'-.W I ln, " Q-. MXH A N,1,,,'ixWL A . 1- MU U X ,"':u,'gfw3ws ,U nw,4'9 'g 'N ,,,k,glLw WN, N' C21 '- 'QWHM W, ,Mm Yu , wwf 3 ,, ,JM M W !!ww'5w 'BEL W1 J' 'M M g: l 5111 11: wk X W Nw w M, Jr W 'K 9 5f f L, 17" .' Nw A N, ,, M Im vfF4'yIy', 'fQ1?'l' 'A :M we ,A .MVXEM , X4 yyw11w'1'1,fQ,uw'f'12w-W u 'u,1v"11- , H J. f N'1'::' WVQMWWEM L 4 .ww RH' wi: 2 f ww mM' f.u 7 .Wi M112 M , .'wx'L1Ii"" Q ' , 13' Ww1?1'5 N? Q ' ,,L,:,,,w W fx -' 1' .L W ' .. N., ,V W 1, FMNmflw IL ' Y W X' 'nf 312m 1 V271 .'5kaU '.,,,3"'5fJ!r. 1115: mf' Mm , Am, , ,1x'h",. 'HH , A, . , .V W ' ,.v 5.1 W 551703 0 WHAT'S BEHIND YOUR INVESTMENTS? If you own stocks, What's behind your investment? A factory build- ing probably, good only for the purpose for which it is being used. Your stocks perhaps are further protected by machinery-with lit- tle or no sale value. And then, too, a large part of the assets of many com- panies is listed as good-will. But in times of need "good-will" can't be readily sold. How different when you invest in "Old Home 5'k Certificates of De- posit." What's behind them? For every dollar you invest in "Old Home" 5? Certificates you get 150W real estate security-real estate that can quickly be converted into cash. The "Old Home" has plenty of good-will-but it doesn't carry it in its financial statement as a tangible asset. There is no inflation in "Old Home" security-it's the real, regular one-hundred-cents-on-the-dollar- kind. We Pay SUQ on Certificates of Deposit 57949 Home Building Association Co. North Third and west .Main Jtreets NELUHRK, OHIO 143 xl, 1 "W W 1 n,mf ' - -Q' f JM. Y"wEt!1"' ' WE 'lu' ',m"T"W w W www . , , ,M w 'WW In ' A W W M I4 r um 'FL H Vi au ,mm ,Hin N 'N ,N LN Wi ' ' .L M: ' lj,j Vw FF""i9 'W 3, ,N1r1'mj'!12'f51 ' W wp." ',' fWm wp r gm 11-h" '5N., 1' w 1 1 jf W' W ' ' MQW , Mm,k'4Wg5Q wa. '- EL! 1 .,.,,, ' 1' WW ',:" ' W !'rLMNE'w,iW.1 W' f' 1 MF ' M ..N.W VM E' !,if1'm, ,: w au, f , ' W: '-' 1 1, GN. H 13. pw m W + W f L NR" H" ,,,:,v' , F N 1y1W:wW WNW':+3,? ' -- xl MQ NH!-N , ' 'limilwmi M W :VH V13 H 75 W -E lQ W +f E"E s T .'Qf,,EffH, , a1ff?EF H! 'H ,'W"2 ""f3eW ' w, W"ww" ' J, 'Q 'W' JW 11: 'W 't','L11'- xi umxul ff .V 'UW ,r Y'i+fm' wo "u ,ww 4, ' v'L'l,, Yiwu 1 xvmv 3 www M w W T' 5195 1 1 .2 !:,,f:f'M1v' f x "M'l 'gm' v ,uv 'w "4-N -fr' W' '1 W , , X , 'lm W ' 5' ' M , .1 .5 I 60-62-64 Hudson Avenue lhe Vacation Special is Ileady to leave. :-. -f x x .. . IFE 0. .' ' "' - Where to spend your vacatlon I 1 3? 'Yi le-'5 .-7' ,-L1--. - - K- has already had your conslderatlon. ha.i"- sgf5"5:'5'2e'1L'.,"5'1QZ.a 4. - - :lv And now 1t's t1me to choose the x H- X, 7- ' -3,5:,.'u-ibm N. . proper clothes and accessorles to e ggpggygag. 1-gif' if--ggesem -. ' ".- . " 35, make that vacatlon perfect. ' "' fain . E..-lay-fa-giwffifi-- We're ready w1th colorful gar- f..,, v In V-,I -1'.'.a',- ,-f 3 lwf Y " A? ments for the shore, camp, moun- 41"' ,,,- tains Or boat trip. So no matter - 4561 .01-1-X571-E h - - f .- -e V--J-1 1 AQ, W at actlvlty you have a Oot, We ' 3? 'X . "an 0 - are equlpped to Serve you. 90611 Q:C?aw Candies -- Sodas E S Uh N In all ZZ 1--:if """""'-1 ..,.,, JT . In the Arcade e at 9 A a l Q- gl rasldllg 'ff ..s,.. M e aa a a wal .- -I 'fit 3 '- c M RA FILMS. 1 'l"' 5 K . 4.7,-6 ,LA ,EVM .ak,.,. ,f 4 -if. , - 7,171 2 ?4,,i'2a.,f O r P e eil. al. ls f 5 I I 0 I ,I 5 -2-h X 6 - fi r. i . - 5' f EVERYTHING? 'N DRUGS Our Motto ,ffefifif Q NRAD' 7 7 DCFEZG Srpi COMPLETE LINE OF . TOILET GOODS Be one Of our Satlshed Southeast Cor. Public Square Newark, Ohio Customers 145 111 1 11111 1 1 11'! X M' 5 .4 1 111. 1 1 11 11 1 A 1 1 1 1 gcntugazzxplys 1 I 1- ' cd. so 1- 1 11 , '1 !'1111111!" Yr A' 1' M111 V113 11111 111111111 if :AW ' 1111 1115335 1 1111111 1 111 11 -1 1 1 Q X 1 11 111 111' .HWY V '1 '11 1' 11121 11 1111111 rw '11 1 15, 11 M 11 11 1 1 '11 1111 1111 111 11111 11 ,411 1 - 1 IM M N11 11:15 1 N 111 114 1 '11, '1 ' T11-:'1 1111 11 11112 1, 11 1 1 1 1 I 1'l 1 4 1 ,. Y 11 1 1111.191 1 1 11 51 1 111? 111 1111 M1 L1 W 11- W 0115111 W. 1 1 1' 'W1'-1'i11fL11 1 1 M 11 M 'W111 "WW 1 11 111 1111111 1 11111 1 1 1 1 1 11 1 1 1 1 11111 11 1 1111 1 1 11111111111! 1 A 1 11 1F 1.1111 11 911111 1 'M11 I W W 111 111 VN 1 11 1111 11111 1 11 v 1 141 1111 1 H 'W 1 "4 'VW '1 'xx' "WN 11" 1 11 1111, M M' 11 11 1 111 1111. ' 1111141111 '1 111511412 ' 'Wllm 1 ,,,,,.. 11 " 1111 -1111 11 11111 11.11 1 F1 11,1111 . 11111 1' 11111 1 1. 1111 4 11 11 X T 111 11 1 111 11 "MF . .111 11 -111111 1' 111 1 1 1' 11111 11C'fI 1 1 1 11 11 1 1 '-111 1 11 1 1111 1111 ' 1 1 11 1 1 1 1" -.-31' 1 1 11 1111.111 111 11 1-W1 1 "' " ' 111-1111-1"' A211- 111111 1 111' 1 1 1 111 11111111 111111111115111111111111111111111 1.11111.1111,1111,111 1,111 1 We take this opportunity to thank each ancl every member of New- ary High School who has so gen- erously contributed to the success of our Athletic Department. 9 A n 9 QR.L.HULL. D.W.BEA TY C Bring your diplomas and class photos to us for framing, and receive special school discount. BOYS, fletiif If you want to make some easy money, buy a Boulevard, Princess or Big Four LAWN MOWER Contract with your neighbors for taking care of' their lawns. You will make good wages, work short hours and be your own boss. Sole Agents EI.I.IUIT HARDWARE UU. 16 W. Main St. THINK IT OVER The only typewriter that meets all your requirements-whoever you are, whatever you do and wherever you go. A practical necessity for college students. it ,.,t 1 Ag 4'-'Av. ' fa so "X, ev r CORGNA The Ideal Graduation Gift Leist 8: Kingery 34 West Main Street 147 utngxahh V1 W! w , ., W- , , ,, , , li w Y W ,. ,, ,, ,, nun , M M 'VNU X w m 1 X XX , C X X XXX X X XX XM , 'H y "" !1 XX,nX XX "Wm ' 'E J '- 1" N' 1 ' W W , 1 ' , y W ' ,Mn , HM " " N w XM, m W u WX W , XX XX X X XX X Xn ,AL N XX XXXX X wx XXXXX Xr N Xu ,, 1 XXXX M X P M FOR GRADUATION AND AFTER Blue Cheviot Suits X ,l ' if " 'th 2 ' Q 355, oh, Jfff ll. :Q We also feature all the important blue cloths tl L M wALEs, HERRINGBONE wEAvEs i My 7, X, UNHNISHED woRsTEos it lu 5 if U FLANNELS 1- ' ' 33? cruiviors if Single and double breasted models NEWARK, " NEWARK we CLOTHIER "For Good Clothes-Hats-Furnishingf' I a g Q Boost for If it s Tlres you Want Newark I-ligh School and SEE Buy your Painting Material at l-lorner's Newark Paint Co. Masonic Temple, Phone 2494 WGLFE The Tire lVlan 61-63 Hudson Ave. Phone 9740 149 11 111111 1111 mr -wqv q1 11-u11p111ug11111-J1131r111111v-11-111m1W11m1, . - 1F 11 111 -'11 1- 1' 1 f,.1!:1 1 W , 11111!111!,1:11,1,1 111 11511 -1 v 11 111-1 '11 111 111 111 111, 1 1 1 1 1 1 . 1 im 1 11111111114 11 11 1 M 1 131' 1111 .1 V11 U1 1 1' .111'111'111111' 1 - 1 11111 N11 .1 1 1 1'11111'1 11' 111111171 11111111 111 1111 1 11 1111 1 12111111 11 11 -1111'1"'1111 131 1 1 11111 11111 1 111 1 1 1W1111111,111111" 1 31 '11 1,1111 11 '1111'fI1 1111111111 11 1 11 1111111111 111, 111 1 1 111 1 1111 1 1 1"' 1 1 1 '1:!'1 11 1 1 1m 1 QH111 11' 1, .1 111, 1 1 1 1'1 1!' 1 1111111 11 1 1.111 1 111 1111 11 11 11 1 .11 1! 1 1 1 11 "111111'1'A '111 111111 11111 1111 11111111111 11 11'11'N ' 1111 11111111111 1 1 -1 1 1 ' . 1 1 1 11 11 1 111 1 1 ' 1 11 1 1'11 1 1 1 11 111 111 N' 1 11 1 1 1 '11 '1-1 11 1-1-111111111 1111 1.11 11111 1 1' 1 A 11 1111 A .11-111 QNP ammo on? Every day more Licking coun- ty people are using this bank to help themselves "CET ON" Our new "Getting On Plan" en- ables you to buy S1000 on Easy Payments. Our Investment Department helps you earn 636 safely on your accumulated savings. We Can Help You "Get Oni, lil? Pdfll Nfllllllllll Bllllll "Newark's Complete Bank" 151 'Qfg1L1Mf5jlL.w" Order Quality Flowers From THE Kent Flower Shop For Graduation 20 West Church Street Phone 24085 111 Youth, Charm, Beauty and Personality are combined in the gift that is always appre- ciatecl- Your Photograph ID ite's Studios Fl-lClCpl1Ol"lC OI' Call for an ap' pointment , 475 Hudson Ave. W W 1 ' X 1 W H , 1 1 11 111 11 ,. '11 ,,1111L.1 ' W 'N W V 'HW X W W L W '1111 H' 'MEM W -'M TM 55131 1 :LW '111 5T!11111'111,1 '- 1' gcuiiugraqxhs X "1 1 .15 ' 1 11,111 ,vguggk 1 11,11 M118 . ,M g 11,-11 . x"'1ljf'1'su1511 11 JP, W 1 ?1f1:x p1iW M311 M11 .am , WM! .A . Q - , ' 1 . T A1 'Q111 1 1 JW 11 . X - X . 1:1 1 11 ,Ml N 1 , 1, 'M '1 115 1 1 The Crane-Krieg-Flory Co. HARDWARE Corbin Builders' Hardware Lowe Bros. High Standard Paint No. 11 South Park, Newark, Ohio Cl anmg PTGSSI g Smith's U c BENZOL DRY CLEANING AND DYE WORKS Congratulates 111 West Main The Phone 9758 THE PLACE OF Class of GREATER CARE Dy g H tR at g 153 W1W1,w1111wr111l1y-M1111-1111xr11111-11 1 1 -111 gM1111r- 1 1 , 111!!!-.. ...V 11111-Af:-11311-1111111-111W11qmmWq,u 1 , "-1"-I '- dl Wu 1 1 A 1 11'111!1'1 M1113 ,4 1, 1'-1-'. -1 111, W1 AY 1"111' 1..1!111 Y 11- ' J 4. 5 utugraphs I 1 I w 1 1 ' W 1 4 1 . 1 ' Q 1 M111 I 1 1 N W ' "1 111 Y 'IN 11- 1111 , 11, UN 1. 1 N431 11 4 xhx t 1 1 111 L1 11 1 11 ' 1' vu 11 NH111, 11 '11 J! xww ,X11 11 .1,H1, 1 .- 11 "M 111111 f' JFME QM :HW ' JI 1' ,QT 41 .1111 , h X . J 1M . 'Wil -- ' 11 1 'WV ' 1 11 W ' L HQ' A ' 1 14.111 W' X W H W1 1 11 1 1 1 111 11 1 , 111, 1. . 1 1 1 1 . W 1 .1 1,1 1 , -11W,", " H M111 ' -A11 1 11111 M 11 1 W 1' 11" 1 11111 W ' M W W ' ' W" "1'1 "1 " 'V W 11" '," 1111, ' ' H' " 11' ,V , 11.1 1- 1111 , :- 1 1 1 11 M11 1 ' , ,, , ,N ' 1'11111Q1fW11 11.1,! 1 '111 111111111111 21 1111111111 111-1111315111 1111.51 11L:1'1111u11W ,, 1'11- 1 1 1 1 11 1 ' "H 1' 1111 ! 11. 11 N M 111 111111 ,M m 11 1111 1 ,N MVN! ""1" ' 1' 11 1111" 1' 1 111 1 1 11 1- ., 1 1111 1 11 1 1 1 11,11 1 , 1w111 ,N1 1,1 1. ,, 1. N ,1 1 , 11 1, W1 M 1 1111, Sergeant Cloak 8 Suit Co. NeWark's Largest Exclusive Shop E a Q A ' f . ' , ,A fy t 9 M ,. ' ' tail? WUWU 'Q 'M i Q 3 4 I' 1 ll 1' x ' 7 f A We are always prepared at Grad- uation Time with the type of gar- ments you will be interested in then. Anything that is new and smart in Women's Apparel can be found here I wish to take this means to ex press my personal congratulations to the Graduate of 1926. WM. M. SERGEANT. 155 SETI-I TOWER lality Coffee, Tea, Spices fllll lint! of Qlldlily Groceries Peanut Butter Made while you wait I8 West Main Street Phone 4267 EVERY NEED MET Business houses and individuals in this commun- ity find that the efficient service which the NEWARK TRUST COMPANY renders meets every banking need. Moreover, the courteous attention extended to them makes the transaction of their financial affairs pleas- ant. Distinetive Commencement CQRSAGES Resee Tied With Class Cellcoors at PQUNDQS FLQWER SHUI? Pham 9368 We 5121555 22123565 time we O RT H O P H O N IC New Records A f. f. WYQUI Every week 40 W. Mdlll SI l N ST R U Nl E N TS 157 11 1" 1111" 1 111 111 1 1111111111111 . W" '11Z1'11'1qw!l "1 '1111' '1"11'l1F111'M"1,1Qf"W1"11'1'1 1 " 11'f"111'1111111111111111Mf1H1'1'FFW11 1 11 1 111 11 1 11111111 1 WI! 111111111 " 1111111 1 11 1 1111' 111 '11111 1 111 W 1 N 11 1 1 1111 1M 1 1 1 wwgwzrh 158 1 . . 11 11 -1 1 1111 1111-1'-1 . - 1 1 1 11 1111 1 1111 1 1 I 1 1 1 1 111115 11111 1'1 .1111 ' 111 11 11 111: ' 111 '11"11" 11 111 1 ?111111111111+1111 111 1 -'11411111111111141 H- K-1:1 611 R: 1111111 1 1 1111 W 1 '1111111 1111111 ' 1111111 5 11,11:11111111211'1 .11 111 111 11 1 1 1 11111111 11111111111 11 3 1151111111111 ' Q11 11 Q11111 1 1111111 1111111 1 11.11 1' 1 11111 1 1 111110: 111 "1111 111 11 1 1 1 1 111511111 111 :W 11 1 1' 1111-1111 m1173511 11:1 111111 111 11 11 ,1111 1 ' 11111 1 11 11111 11111 '11 111 11 111: 151111 1 11. 1 121 11' 1 111111, 1 11111 11 1 1 1 11 1111 1 1 . 111 1 1 1 11 '1111 1 111 1111 11 1111 111 111 1 ' 111111 .'111f' 11 :11 W1 1111 1 1 1 11 11. 11 '111 1 1'1!'-111111111111 1!,,.. .11111 1 1x11 1 111111 11111111'MJ wA u 1 w 1 '11111111111 '11 11 1111111111111"111 11 111111 1 '1'1 1 11 W J11111111 1 11!1 1 '11"" 111111fi1111 1 111 '1' ' 11 ' 1 1' '1 111 1111 1 117 1 1 : 11"11"1 11 W W M xv xxx, 1 1, X 1 1V 1 1111 1,1 .1 1 11 1 11 1 1 , 1.11111111.111M COMPLETE BANKING SERVICE Commercial Banking Personal Checking Accounts, Trusts, Bonds Safe Deposit Boxes and Savings Accounts Plus 475 The Licking Bank C9 Trust Company The Bank of Service Special Attention Paid to High School Students, noon hours and after school. All young barbers. lg-.- GIVE US A CALL lg.. King's Barber Shop 14 The Arcade Superior Service Dry Cleaning .Qi PRESSING REPAIRING DYING Lg, CALLENDAR CLEANS CLOTHES CLEAN ig.. Callander Cleaning Co. North Fourth and Church Sts. Newark, Ohio 159 N 111 wc, 1 1 1' ' '-W W "'f " ' 'W "11111 1'--T - M ' ' " +1 113 1 111 1111i1 "E:"1" 5 w ' ! W"' !u '1' 1'a 'TN' 7 ' 'FR W "i"'!'hw 1 H ' ' N ' -1H1'111 1u1N11U1' "" 1 1 ENN' 1 1' . 111114 1 1 111- 1 W 1 1 . n u "'r h -.11 1 7 1 1.- - 1-. 1 1 s 1-, X Q1-11' in -A W if 1,1.1 1 11 v1-1111 ,111 W 1 11 1H1 1111 V111 1 11, X 1 Q ' - . . . 1 'F 1.1 '1,1,,,1 "V 1V1111+1 ' 1 " ' 1 '11J11111'11 M1119 M 1 iihgr A , , Q E 'if ,JEH1 KA :wh A gi W.: EA 'bg N ' - U if 1, 1 7 2'- 1 1 ,, 1 " 1 1 ' 1 1 111 ' 1 1' 111 1111111g11 1 1M1m111wW1Wh1wH115w111N'91 1'1 W 11 1111 vhm W 1 11, I in X111 1-11 R W 1 N1 N T1 'N 1' X1 w 11 111 " ix W fQ1W1 M!' 1W1'111! 111 W1K"111 'J 11N Www M X m1 11 1 When we clon't get fo Rebuild Your Shoes we Both Lose BECAUSE "We Double the Wear of Every Pair" A uwml A A real Factory Job of' Shoe Repairing Acme Shoe Shop 57 Hudson Avenue FRANK FISHBAUGH, Manager S by SSSSAASASS S earner A Always the Largest and ' ,Most Complete The Home of ' A . ' , . " A Mllllner DIS la , Newark Maid Bread - ' y, p 'yi - ' in Newark ' Q Huber S Bakery Reductions Now Phone 21927 6, South 2 d Street Church Sir:-:el Hai Shop ' INA G. BEARD I5 W. Church St., Rear Y. M- C- A. Lum, . -. 1 f 111111 ,L , ,, ,, ,1,, . X, - ,,, , 1 ,,,,,, ,, ,, W, 11, ,,,,,f 517' 1 ,WMU , 1, ,,,ff11"'1' h 1,,.1,, 5, 1 X . 1111 1 -11 11' M1 ,,, ,1,'11" ,'11.," 11 , ,, , , , , , 1,11 ,,,A1',! v,,,:,- HN 2,-,vi ,f, 1' , 'rw ,lag 'f,,1 L31 111- N 11 ,N N , 11, 11 L' 11 jmmv 1 'U 111g 111r" H W, ?,,N11?F fm' 1 W1 - 'win' :,, .W , ,11 Q ,EM 1 fi,i,,,,' + ff, ,, ,,,,',1, v U, 1 , -- 1 - UT 11-,1', ,,,,. 1' ' 1,' W1 W 111, wt W !11',! "1Y,1Y' lN'i, 11 N WM! Q111! 111 N W1 MEM ir! ' qv, 1., ,,-5 T.,!1K4' W ,,,,l 4, -T 2, "Hu, ?V1,,,11 W M F11 1 , M1 U f-,MY X H511 F11 ' P T ,J ' X 1 XF N, W1 '11 W1 '.,- ,1 . 1-'1,, , , , , , , , ,, ,1,,, ., ,NN .,,, 51111, , 1, 1, .' '1," 1T1111 , , .,1,'-, ,, W 1, ,,,, , 11,1, X, WE, W :,,,1,g,, ,N 1, ,,, 111 ,,1H' ., ,,, 1 ' . ,11,'4 .-11' ,'111,,1 3 f,,,1 1 v, , ' N 1 NM 1 , 1.111 s",1:g,4 - 514,11-1"11 'F1 !1l1WT,1M,3K U 'V My 112,121 , ' ,, 'E " W, ,,. ,Q 111 ' , 11. ',1uj-1-'.1,:,,:, , 1,1 ,,, ,I M ,,,,,,,, ,W W ,.. ,, ,h1 A,N'1Ni! 11,7 , 111: 11,1 - ,,,,g,i r 11 F or Thirteen Years We have been co-workers with nu- merous Reveille Staffs, giving our best service and assistance, originat- ing many new features which have been profitable to "Reveille" progress. "REVEILLE" is the first word in our plant during the school year. REMEMBER We also lmve Fine Engraved and Prinled Cards fm' 4S?fnifn's and olhers. If lltere is !1ll,ljUIi71g you wantprinled wc can prinf II. Postal Printing Company Masonic Temple North 4th St. Phone 9845 Sherman's Bakery The Home of Good Things to Eat Try and get in Sherman's Bakery Y. M. C. A. Building 163 -XXX XX L1 MMM X MWWW X!W'W' WWM1 X ,XXXXV XX XJ ' XXX XX X X XX' ,X, .X " " , X X X ,X . X,,, X X XXX, X,.,,,,, X,, X, ,,,, ,X,,X, X X X XX 'XXX,: ' XX" X W' X, X 2 ,- -,X 'X X"'fXXf X-- XXXXXXXAXXXXXXXXXX, XXXX X XX XXXX XXXXXXX X X X ,X X X XX X X X , .. X X, X,,X,,,X'I1:XXXXX,,MX X , .,X X XX .,X:XXXXXX X X. wy4yX TF' ,. XXXXX,X X ' X MXjM 1XX,f3' .X Xwfgx' XXX- X ,,,X ,XXXXX XX- ,,X X , XXX ,, .XX X ,X XXX XX,XXXX 'XIX ' H' ,, .XX X, X, J mXU X' X 'XXXXX X 1' J XXXXXHX' X I W X i XX, XX Xu !"'XXX -X" fXXXXXXX XXXXXXXXXX, 'X XXXXXX XXI' ' XXX 'W H' ' ' 'WX 'XXX' X , i- XXX XX 'X - XX, X ,X Q .XX X X , X X , X X . X ' .t X Q XX X 'XIX X XXXXXXXXUW X XXX! ' X X ,X,X."XXvXX ,XXX ,X X,,W X X, 1 r XXX' X X , X WX X X X u Y X X X X.X4X,X -X, 1. 1 X X X X, X X X X 'X X X .XV " ,X X5 H' XXX M':XXXXXX,X XXXW- L" X XX XX XXV X ,X XXX,,'XXX,'1 XX' X X, XMLJ-X XJ XM ,XXXX XX XX XXXXX X XXXXXXXX X X X X X W 9 . 4 KXX XX X4 "' XX X XX, XXX X'4A XX, X X X XXXXX XXXX. J' mxtugxsaqxflxs X , I 1 X A Xx 164 X4 XX -R"-wa? ,, ,"X X X UXXXQIX Y X X X. f"'X:XXXXX 7 X XXXX1,i,,"'fXX'5 :wi ' ,L-Xw X . X2"IflX3'i:' "' -X ',X-fx. ma .' ,' 'X XXX XX. ,XXX ff XXXXXXXXX, X"X 4X:'XXX'? ,WX XwXX ,X,,XXXXXXXfXXXXXm X XXX X, :XXX ' .X X XXX ,XXYVX MLW XX X XX X Xf W 'XM XXW Xvww XX X X' m XX X " XL X 'nf 'U U 'X X XX' W - , X, X' XXX! XX XXXU X X ,X XX X , X ,XX XXXXHX ,X, XX,,X X ,X,,X,X, XX, ,.X XXXXXXXXXXX,XXXXXX,,X X X X X X4 XXX XXXXXXUX X XX X X jfXX.WXX" X X-X XXXXX XX' X -XXX. XX j+1 XXX XX, XXXXXXWX ,XX.X,,,XXXX X IXXXXXXX XXX, XXX, XXXX XTX X,, W X XXXXXXX XXX. XXX, XXin,XfXXX4XXXX,,XXX,XXX ,XXXX X, X ,.,,X XXX,X XMLXXX ,,,,XXX , XX XXXXwmWwXywwWX'wXwwmwwXXwwXX XXXX XXXXX XX'X Everything F or the Home Rugs, Curtains, Stoves Furniture 44 f??7lfa ' af' afaigfff' ,f . vcff' 00,,.fo 2 1-23-25-26 w. CHURCH sr., 22-24 ARCADE FRAT BRAND CLOTHES Specializing in Young Men's Clothes Fashions Exclusively THE 4 , ' , , Mum. W-M' ' ENB ' YQ vm' 'MF- ' 1' 13 Y " ,M , ' W ' 3' w 'L1 ':q Z? , 7.1:-'Uf L-M W 4 v+1 h ,Q '-'ST W 'E U' ' . ""f'd ' : W 'L lx 1 'mxqwww , QM,-' Minxmzk, 1 W ' . i++'wWF',N 'Y Hman YL.YwLfJi.1n ' ' ' W M-L . M. J. 11 'f ' :HU E ' H ' wg:aw H , w-'mzwyd 'wwlfwm wx rw Vqgjkuu fm xv-V'fE'F N Awxma M A Saw-Test Furniture IDEAL GRADUATION GIFT Graduation Time! What a splendid opportunity presents it- self for the giving of tokens of friendship and good will. And the selecting of the perfect gift-a gift that combines beauty, utility and permanence-we can be of definite assistance to you. Saw Test Furniture is the perfect gift. In no other are the necessary factors of beauty, utility and permanence so admirably combined as in Saw Test Furniture. And we want to emphasize that gifts of Saw Test Furniture, in price, are available to the most limited purse. Cedar Chests Spinnet Desks Occasional Desks Framed Mirrors Dressing Tables and hundreds of other suggestions Carlile Furniture Company "NeWark's Dependable Home Furnishers" Phone 9098 76 W. Main St About June Ist we will The Maiestic move from our present Onfe Oner location, Z8-30 Arcade, to 28 No. Park Place where we invite you to come and see us THE BURCI1 Glfl SHOP 167 Furnas lee Cream . Socias, Cigars Candies, Tobaccos K oolest Place in Town GRGVES 84 NIES Proprietors if NA AUTHORIZED Qi mail l lr' Nl Battery and Ignition Q. . '1 f '1 fl Ill' . l We have a battery for any car. 4 butts., M Expert service on any make of bat- lll tery, generator, starting motor or l 511.75 Full Size lt will pay you to take your Electrical Troubles TO AI E RS lVl A N 56 W. Main St. Phone 9463 llllllli lllllllliirr- illilwll -,' l llfmlll. illll llwllll-IIA muh , -I I 'V i mA,,guuM?gj,"l Y Will riii llllllll ll MIM HU "' M4 ll lllllllll ' :vii L y 3 magneto. THE NEW ELECTRICAL THE ROSEBUD lfor, Powell Electric Co. SODA ICE CREAM WESTINGHOUSE FARM PLANTS and APPLIANCES CANDY ELECTRICAL REERIGERATCRS -0- and N8W31'k,S Most Popular ZENITH RADIO Confectionery Store PHEQIHSQ4 NORTH PARK PLACE l 169 15 W . ww-,,f .UWM-any , Hgwnl1 A V' W 'xi 170 wg w1u -,A r ,ww M, W do "Cover the Earth" El-a?H A complete line of Paints and Painters mate- Q5-4 rials. Each product for its purpose is best. Sherwin-Williams P ai n ts . Convince yourself by trying Sherwin-Williams Paints, Varnishes, Stains, Shellaces or Enamels Rogers' Brushing Lacquers in many Colors xx, QS? Q- -vi ..:...fR' C. S. OSBURN 8g CO. Phone 21885 Cor. 2nd and Church T1-113 oH1o PoWER co. Electric lighting for domestic pur- poses not only has hecomea special convenience which has enhanced real estate values many times, but the 20,000,000 electrical labor saving de- vices which are in daily use in the homes have forever banished the do- mestic drudgery of 25 years ago. Tl-IE OHIO POWER CO. 171 I u , , M g, ,J ,- '1 M , u: 1 - '1"' u':Cw'-W M M, g,w,.h.i!'.' M 'bwls' " W atm" 1'W ,w13N""'1' Eh' U MW ' ,,,, v,M H3W "" A 'uf 1 ,,,m"1g',,',vUN! w " U,, " N, m,,M M " M 1' ' ' " " -'?,11n,1', ww! U ' ,G .,"'wFWi'1" , '7f"'W"11"! 3" " ' N. ' ' X " ' WUL JWI. I "9 ' " ' w , 1 , ' , 'jf' 125'-m ' ,W M ' L., utngxaqzchs L LH W 'Lx W I X 4 W .1 u 4 , , ,,.,,,,, ...,-.....---- 172 w wx X ,I W M u. , W 1 " , , H. www W W u 'WI'1F: ' ' ' , , .w f s , , , , '11,. w1. W A N ,A MM fww "wW..N ', ww , m"'wwuu1..v: ,xx ,. W. ,,,x.N. W ' 1"N1 ' H M if, W , '3v'MwrJ 'vw H 1 H" ' ' A Tl H w Vw+MM!w 1w m 2 , ww1 , 5- W a wa 11 "!:vN "'Mw! V N v H 1 Y f, .X H , ,, , , 1,. ww my N, Graduation Day You have looked forward to this day with anticipation and expectancy. You have persevered in your studies for many years and fully merit the honors now being conferred upon you. Do Not Forget Life's pathway is strewn with Human Driftwood-Drift wood of lost opportunities-dissipation-indicision, inaction, etc. c levements A h' Come to those who have vision, initiative, character and ambition. Decide now on some definite achievement in life and work unceasingly for its accomplishment. Wadi! fnifzkzaliffe 06 Q6 "Trains You for Success" Carroll Bldg., 3rd Floor Phone 9092 173 gsutugraphs Vacation Pictures Get your KODAK out when going on your vacation. No vaca- tion is complete without a picture record of all the good times. Our developing and printing service helps you make better pictures. Craylon's Drug Store South Side Square GRAHER 81 BRASHEAR MEN'S WEAR 5 S. Park Place, Newark, Ohio GOLF KNICKERS New Diamond Weaves Plaids, Checks, and Lots of Color among - these new arrivals 35.00 to 310.00 New Gobf Hose 591.50 and up Where the Best is Sold 174 The Reveille Staff wishes to express their appreciation of the support of our advertisers who have, by their patronage, help to make this issue possible- cook aa I xclufive A ent for the QA"' 'I laflu -.nu lil '3 ' b I el 9 Battle Greek Sanltanum Health Funds These are the wonderful Battle Creek Sani- tarium Health Foods, which have become known throughout the world. These foods are unique. They possess quali- ties found in no other foods. They are not only delicious to the taste but build up the blood and the tissues as no other foods do. This is because they are scientifically made, each one the result of long years of painstak- A ing research and experiment. We cordially invite you to call at the store and let us tell you about these foods which lead the way to Perfect health. J Tig" ' Q'-90225:-reefefag Where a Hungry Man Eats To His Heart's Content At This Restaurant Everything you get here is well cooked and temptiugly served. You are in an atmos- phere ot quiet refinement which adds to your appetite. TRY A MEAL HERE The atoma Restaurant North Park Place ' N , f I Uv?-l , - 1 QL f' X ma ack 9 l 7 'Elm . , KL l Q58 Q s gg, EQ, 1 CHQ? 3 Cir? 351 'Fx . , mg? f A Zlttertnoro Qtbis enos the Qnnual for the pear nineteen ttnentp:six. we babe earnestlp trieo to make it a success, as gooo if not better than the Qnnuals of other pears. we bane rereiheo the trienolp rozoperz ation of the school ano so me he: liebe that me babe aeromplisbeo our purpose. we earnestly hope that this Qnnual mill probe of lasting halue to all four elasses. 9355? 5599 i n c 'QD XD mv l i s Y C3222 ffm wil- l , e was T? :lib- l , f W ' faapgn Wa? -:fy f x , l r 'L 4, lTv'r1g.?lys?t'r1ge':JawQ"fsf ,M mx- rv, . -Q gn, , -'ff ,. ,,w,w.,1g ps mp- - , ,,,': , X-2,2-:AVL pg, .-N. ,. 1 :E .- J - ' , Fr. 4 -ga Jgze- ,, - .,1:s5.ku 5 crew- -'.y,, - cr. 1. : "L,-J L...1 V, pr.: ,.lIl'I'J'lJf': -gy lu-1 ., 'Gngm vga 4. 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Newark High School - Reveille Yearbook (Newark, OH) online yearbook collection, 1922 Edition, Page 1

1922

Newark High School - Reveille Yearbook (Newark, OH) online yearbook collection, 1924 Edition, Page 1

1924

Newark High School - Reveille Yearbook (Newark, OH) online yearbook collection, 1925 Edition, Page 1

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Newark High School - Reveille Yearbook (Newark, OH) online yearbook collection, 1928 Edition, Page 1

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Newark High School - Reveille Yearbook (Newark, OH) online yearbook collection, 1929 Edition, Page 1

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1930

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