Newark High School - Reveille Yearbook (Newark, OH)

 - Class of 1937

Page 1 of 188

 

Newark High School - Reveille Yearbook (Newark, OH) online yearbook collection, 1937 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1937 Edition, Newark High School - Reveille Yearbook (Newark, OH) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1937 Edition, Newark High School - Reveille Yearbook (Newark, OH) online yearbook collection
Pages 6 - 7

Page 10, 1937 Edition, Newark High School - Reveille Yearbook (Newark, OH) online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1937 Edition, Newark High School - Reveille Yearbook (Newark, OH) online yearbook collection
Pages 10 - 11

Page 14, 1937 Edition, Newark High School - Reveille Yearbook (Newark, OH) online yearbook collectionPage 15, 1937 Edition, Newark High School - Reveille Yearbook (Newark, OH) online yearbook collection
Pages 14 - 15

Page 8, 1937 Edition, Newark High School - Reveille Yearbook (Newark, OH) online yearbook collectionPage 9, 1937 Edition, Newark High School - Reveille Yearbook (Newark, OH) online yearbook collection
Pages 8 - 9
Page 12, 1937 Edition, Newark High School - Reveille Yearbook (Newark, OH) online yearbook collectionPage 13, 1937 Edition, Newark High School - Reveille Yearbook (Newark, OH) online yearbook collection
Pages 12 - 13
Page 16, 1937 Edition, Newark High School - Reveille Yearbook (Newark, OH) online yearbook collectionPage 17, 1937 Edition, Newark High School - Reveille Yearbook (Newark, OH) online yearbook collection
Pages 16 - 17

Text from Pages 1 - 188 of the 1937 volume:

ff IIYIDIJSIIQY llIll?f-KIIJRIE I' Z mu- V--tr'-W' Y - EX .LLBRIS vsugza-Eg i i i i i Jcncncmcncn Ill llllllls :mama u Lx- irv- lv" .qw 311.2 ,N sz. ' J af- HL V --. - ffsyf, -4fEiij:3Hf:es f D g lll l lii '5 r ' A ? r . ,A -1 - 'M' -fa Messina ' ,..,..L.L.,L QI A H 83222: .- ,Jil qu-nf --I-T , EMERSON -11- Quality and Value Reign Some Styles Appearltor a Day Tlwen Pass lnto Utter Darkness I' llllllll, lrxl lllllllll lrltllllll lr lrllrlltll r.'ll llrllr Ir I I f llllllllllllllllllTllVIHllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllll GTA CLOTHES are made expressly For young men who stick to the game . . . Always in L tlwe leacl . . .Wear tlmem in any city in tlwe lancl and tlwey will be lfouncl up- e-m i n in lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllilllllllllTl!iH!!Illllllll'lilllll ii-'llllllrl lllilllllllllll lllllllllllIlillllllllIllflllllllllllllllllllllllll . . . Quality and Style LATEST STYLE HATS FURNISHINGS - SHOES IllllJ.llllll'lllhllllll1TTAll'llllllIllillllllllllllllllllllllllll-I R O E E M E R S O N ll s. west side square .P .s NEWARK TWO X ra? 1 Newark Senior.Higli School Editor-in-Chief Business Manager Diana Shuebruk Lucille Hall I937 Volume 27 Price S I .00 i A hearty congratulation to the Seniors with much success and happiness in their futurew THE H. w' asf-wwf L W photographs Anywhere Anytime Phone 2291 Res. 2594 Reveille Staff of Newark Senior High School Newark, Ohio Associate Editor Sports Editor Robert Rice Joseph Weakley Photographer Girls' Sports Earl Haynes Helen Glass Art Editors Typist Rena Ogle Jane Penn Clarence Shields Assistants Mavis Bachelor William Fisk Mildred Creighton Phyllis Hutchison Margaret Smith Jean VV all The Business Staff. Assistant Business Manager Subscription Manager Beulah Binger Janet Ruffner Assistant Subscription Manager Alice Berson Beulah Binger Mary Eleanor Chilcote John Cicur Paul Clary Sara Cochlan Allan Cook Evelyn Cummins Kathleen Davidson Robert Dustheimer Eleanor Sperry Mary M. Evans William Fisk Jean Fleming Lucille Hall Mary Hammond Lucille Hartshorn Dolores Heeter Helen Hightshoe Frances Kennedy Jean Lichtenstein Virginia Logan Virginia Milbaugh Kathleen Norris Dorothy Patchen Joy Patton Hazel Penick Rosalie Richards Mary Jane Russel Louise Synder Helena Stotler Richard Taafel Vivian Wills FIVE WE take this opportunity to thank each and every member of Newark High School who has so generously contrib- uted to the success of our Athletic De- partment . . . CSU 9 MRK I-PIPER SWR Bring your Diplomas and Class Photos to Us for Framing and Receive Special School Discount Proper Light for Home Study! Do You Have It? ,ei ml! fig ir ggi' V 2? A If Not . . . Local dealers have the New Study Lamp . . . to ease your eyes one OHIO PowER Ca NN! Mable Arnold Joseph Baggs Beulah Binger Charlotte Bushfield Mary Eleanor Chilcote Paul Clary Alice Conn Jean Lichtenstein Russell Lovell Ruth Maharg Robert Marshall Jean Midkiff Carl Nourse William Pletcher Helen Pound Reveille Staff lconclucledl Joseph Hirschberg Dorothy Hodge Sergie Jackson Sheldon Keinath Joseph Kvintus Allen Cook George C1-isweli Marian Davis Robert Dustheimer Robert Forgraves Elizabeth Heid Ruth Hershberger Janet Ruffner Mary Jane Russell Ernest Settles Elizabeth Smith Eleanor Sperry William Stevens Richard Taafel Robert Westbrook Style SEsseas,1'S We feel that fifteen years of Fashion Leaderrhip in Newark and our twenty years experience in the ready-to-wear business qualifies us to write and publish this ad. EXPERIENCE has taught us that there are no miracles-you simply can't get something for noth- ing, and you get just about what you pay for. EXPERIENCE will teach you that the test of a bargain is not the price. EXPERIENCE has taught us that it is smart to deal with reliable manufacturers whose product is generally nationally advertised and prices standard. Who have stood the test of time and customer acceptance. EXPERIENCE will teach you that it is smart to trade at a reliable well established store that handles nationally known and advertised merchandise. EXPERIENCE has taught us that it is not bow much you have in stock, it is what you have. Our customers like our policy of small selective stocks new fashions arriving daily as fast as they develop, and always something NEW. EXPERIENCE will teach you that you are far more likely to find what you want and much less likely to make a mistake in a store that merchandises in this manner. EXPERIENCE has taught us that it is profitable to giveiour customers a complete store service, charge accounts, layaways, approvals, alterations, deliveries. EXPERIENCE will give you an appreciation of this complete service. EXPERIENCE has taught us that it is smart to employ well informed style conscious, courteous, and willing sales people. EXPERIENCE will teach you that fit is smart to accept the suggestions and advice of our sales girls. They will take a personal intelligent interest in your wardrobe needs. At SERGEANTKS' exrlurively in Newark you will find-WOOLART coats and suits, AVENUE coats and suits, SHIRLEY LEA dresses, WONDER FROCKS, MODE OF THE MOMENT dresses, GOTHAM GOLD STRIPE hose, BARBIZON SLIPS AND LINGERIE, STETSON HATS, CART- WRIGHT junior dresses, SHAGMOOR coats, LEIGHTON hats, LUSTERTONE coats and suits, LAMPL 8: SNYDER sportswear. SEVEN ! 60-62-64 Hudson Avenue l 4' X For Your Graduation Graduating has its little thrill for everyone including the graduate, her parents, and her friends . . . The best thrill of all, is the gift giv- ing, and We're prepared to supply every sweet girl graduate With as marvelous an assortment of gifts as can be found the World over! The JCI-IN J. CARROLL Store A 75 ff?" RUTLEDGE BROS. The Store of Quality. .. Satisfaction Guaranteed ''''IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIllIIlllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIlIIlIIIlIlIIIIIl"' Your School Life is like Clothes, it is what you put into it. They re- quire quality, fit and long wear . .. Guarantee quality in your Life as we do Clothes. W"lllllIIIllllIIllllllllllllIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllw' Phone 3755 2I South Park FIGHT Patronize Our Advertisers Many Newark merchants have devoted many pages of this Annual to advertising. By their co-operation, they have made the publication of the Annual possible. We extend our thanks to these local business men for their help and encouragement, and we wish to offer our appreciation further by patronizing these establishments at every opportunity. IIIIIII I lllllllll IIIIIIIIIIII I ll IIIIII IIII Index To Advertisers Abbott Shoe Co .....A.............,,.....,......,.........A.. -------A 1 77 The Advocate Printing Co ......,. ...A.... 1 74 Airesman Electric Co .............. ---AA.,- 1 73 Allen, Brashear and Haslop ....,,. .-...-.. 1 81 Sam Alban Co .......................,,... ..-..... 1 30 Arcade Theater ....,,....,, ..Y.... .179 Art's Beauty Shop .....,... ........ 1 32 Burke Golf Co .............,.....,,..... ..V.V... 1 74 Callander Cleaning Co .........,,..... ......,. 1 71 Carlile's Furniture Sz Rug C0 .,..... ,....... 1 71 The John J. Carroll Store ...,..,..v,..... ........ 8 Chatterbox Restaurant ..................,...,,. ..,,.... 1 73 The City Rapid Transit Lines, Inc ........ l........ 1 4 Clunis and Householder ..............,......l. ..YY.... 1 72 Coca Cola Bottling Works ,......,,...,,. ,.....i. 1 76 College of Commerce ..........,,... VV...... 1 75 Crane, Krieg Kr Flory Co ........ ..,V,.V. 1 79 Criss Bros .......................,,..,.,,... ......,. 1 78 Doneff Home Baking ................,,.,.e ,,.... 1 82 The Edmiston's Book Store Co ......... ....s.11 1 78 Elliott Hardware Co .....,.,,.,,,.......... ,,.,..,, 1 67 Roe Emerson Clothing Store .....,.. .,....,, 2 A Friend ..,,,.,,....,,,,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,..,,,,,. ,..,,.., 1 64 The Furnas Ice Cream Co ....... ,.,..,.. 1 72 NINE Newark Automobile Dealers Association TEN Index To Advertisers I llllllll ll Hilllllllllllllllllllllll lllllllll The Gaytime Frocks, Inc .....,,... W. T. Grant Co ..,.............44...... Gutliph XL Henderson ....,,,...... Haynes Brothers, Jewelers .....,,.... The Hermann Co., Clothiers ....... . A. P. Hess ........................................ O. D. Hollar gl Son .................,......,... Horner's Newark Paint Co., Inc ....,... The Hub Clothing Store ........,......... G. B. Hunter, Typewriters .......... King s .....,....,.................,....... S. S. Kresge Co ................. Kroger .......,......................,... Lichtenstein Fruit Store .............. Licking Laundry Co ..........,....,,.......... E. V. McCament Funeral Home ......... McKim Supply Co .................,,...... MacKenzie Diamond Store ....... Maybold Shoe Store ...................... The May-Fiebeger Co .......................... Merrill Montgomery fLumberJ ....,,... Moore's Drug Store ................,,....,,.. J. M. Mitchell ...........,................. The M. H. Mueller Studio .....,.............................. ......... Murphy's ...........,..........,............................................. ........ The Newark Automobile Dealers Association ......... ..... F. M. Rugg Motor Sales ..........,. ................... ..... A. P. Hess Company ....,....,.,...,.... , Phalen and Cunningham Co ...,..... Edwards-Merchant Inc ........,. Coyle Motor Company ......... Spohn-Morin Motor Co ........ Curran Motor Co ........... Licking Auto Sales .......,. E. A. Bryan Motor Co ......, ELEVEN ' lpn-nomo 0 0 0 IENQBIRAXWIINBS The Greatest Factor in Advertising 0 In advertising of today attention devices are often paramount, for in getting a product before the public, above all things it must be displayed so that it will be instantly recognized. The ad- vances in the process of reproduction over the old wood cut days have been so great that many have failed to take advantage of them, both as an advertising medium and news value. We handle commercial, school and newspaper en- gravings. TWELVE Index To Advertisers The Newark Engraving Co ...,,... The Newark Fashion ........7..... The Newark Telephone Co .....,,. The Newark Wall Paper Co .......w Nobi1's Shoe Store ............Y....,.. The Ohio Power Co ......,.l. Ohio Shoe Repair ......,,,,. J. C. Penney Co ..........., Pounds Flower Shop .,..,,. Powell Electric Co ........ Mrs. C. P. Reynolds ...,,,,.. Rutledge Bros ..,,,....,,.. Schonberg Kr Sons ........, Sears, Roebuck Co .................,,,.. The Sergeant Cloak-Suit Co ...,....,, Sinclair Gasoline ..,.,,........,.,,.... P. Smith Sons Lumber Co ..,..,.. The Smith Cleaning Co .....,.....,........ The Stewart Bros. Kr Alward Co ....,.. . George T. Stream ..........,,.,..............,,....,.. Superior Welding and Machine Co .....,,.. Swmgle Music Store ...........,.,........,,......... E. L. Tate ....,.....,,.........,, W. D. Tracey ..,.,,..,. White's Studios .........,.,..,,. S. M. Wolfe Tire Shop ....,,,. Mrs. Mabell R. Younce ............ Webb .Sz Webb fLumberJ ....,,... THIRTEEN I 906 I 937 F OR MORE TI-IAN TI-IIRTY YEARS Newark's Dependable Headquarters for Furniture -- Rugs -- Stoves -- Draperies Curtains -- Radios! TTHD-M BROs.C Srnwbfnnnt 0 See the New I937 Stewart -Warner ELECTRIC REFRIGERATORS! LET US SOLVE YOUR PARKING PROBLEMS BY RIDING TI-IE BUS! ll "Your Local Bus Company" CITY RAPID TRANSIT LINES, Inc YRTEEN CONTENTS Adminisirafion Classes Activities Sports Features FIFTEEN Life Moves On . . . But Portraits Remain Forefver! IWWHHIIIHWWWWHWWHWWWWHWWW43NNNNNRHuHINHHHWWIIWWEHN IfWWNWW1WWNT151W1WWYH1IU?JWWW1WWWLH'WYWWWW:HIMWWWWWWHSI'1HWWWWWWWHwilWWHWWWWWIFINNNNNHHHNNNNNNHNl!!H!NNNNNNHHIIUNiNNNHillWNNNNNWllllNIWHIYIYIIIWI " Sweet Sixteen" you will be proud of yours at sixty If you make sure it's a Portrait of Charm and Personality KE WHITE'S STUDIOS The Gymnasium SEVENTEEN EIGHTEEN FOREWGRD The seal of Newark High School is used in the I937 Reveille as the theme from which the bool: is developed. The motto of the seal is "As you sow, so you reap." The fields of worlc specified are science, industry, commerce, and literature. Each section of the annual illustrates one of these fields in connection with the subject of the sec- tion. In this way the seal of our school has been brought out and has been a means of unifying the book. Coq? 'L Jgfidgi mm 1 ,53 .... A TZ i s! . In Memoriam "To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die." Leland T. Baxter, Jr. Franklin Booth February 29, 1920, March 13, 1918, April 30, 1936. June 26, 1936. Junior. Senior. Joyce Heeter May 28, 1923, April 4, 1937. Ninth Grade NINETEEN To the man who has worked untiringly in behall: ot our school, who is deeply inter- ested in the cause ot educa- tion everywhere, who is a constant inspiration to stu- dent and teacher alike, Mr. P. B. Edwards, we dedicate the 1937 issue of the l2eveille Annual. QLD EC il DCC "Finally, education alone can conduct us to that enjoyment which is ei once best in quality and infinite in quantlty Horace Mann TWENTY W K Our Student Council F. C. BOYD. At the present time I think all who read will concede that tremendous changes are taking place in secondary education. Probably the one most needed and the one destined to fix the value of all others is the Spirit in which this education is administered and received. In Newark High School the door through which this all-important change is invited to enter is the Student Council, A constitution establishing the Council was drawn up and ratified by the student body last September. As stated in this con- stitution the principal purposes of this organization are: 1. To unify all student organizations under one general control. 2. To encourage and promote all worthy school activities. , 3. To give the students greater opportunity for self direction. 4. Tfo develop in the student a growing appreciation of membership in a democracy by providing the educative responsibilities of, and privileges of partici- pating in, such a democracy in the school. The membership of the association includes the city superintendent, principal, teachers, and all registered students in Newark High School. The Council itself is composed of the eighteen Home Room presidents and two faculty members, ap- pointed by the principal. The officers are elected by the school at large, having been nominated by a committee composed of the faculty and senior members of the Council. The president automatically becomes president of the student body. Several standing committees are named by the constitution whose chairmen are to be appointed by the president in consultation with the faculty members of the Council. Some of the committees are: Organization Committee, Elections Com- mittee, Scholarship Committee, Attendance Committee, Assembly Committee, Social Committee, Welfare Committee, Vocations Committee, Ticket Committee, Athletic Committee, and Citizenship Committee. Additional committees may be added as the need arises. To get a true picture of our organization one must remember that each of the 1153 students enrolled in Newark High School is first assigned to one of the eighteen home rooms. Each home room is organized and its president is a member of the Student Council. Each home room will have many of the same committees as named in the Council. Thus it can be seen that the, say, Scholarship Committee of the Stu- dent Council, will be leading, planning with, and supervising eighteen committees. In this way its program can be uniform and can quickly reach every individual in the school. What has been said of the Scholarship Committee is equally true of other committees. This makes the Student Council the hub of the school with spokes running out to every school activity, influencing the life of every student. With this short description of its organization, purpose and jurisdiction what if any, have been its accomplishments this year? This question I think is best arf- swered by a review of the activities of the Council. Space will not permit more than a rough outline of the accomplishments of a few committees and it must be borne in mind that many of the programs are only in the formative stage. There is no intention of allowing a mushroom growth and a quick demise. Instead, the pro- gram is psychologically sound based upon careful study and must go forward with an ever-increasing amount of pupil responsibility as student leadership rises and develops to meet its challenge. Naturally one of the first committees to function was the elections committee. This committee busied itself with securing and disseminating information of demo- cratic voting procedure. It prepared and issued all ballots, supervised the election, counted the votes, and declared the results. In each home room a similar committee performed the same duties. This committee is deeply indebted to the Mimeograph department for the printing of the ballots. Right here let it be said that that is one of the fine things that every one has learned-the dependency upon others and the necessity of cooperating with them. Scholarship must ever be in the list of first essentials of any school striving for high attainment. The Scholarship Committee is constantly striving for new ways to encourage the individual to higher levels of achievement. Through the Reveille the names of the students attaining an A in three or more subjects each six weeks are published. This year this committee, under the leadership of Miss Laura Hosick, has established a chapter of the National Honor Society in Newark High School. The membership includes the highest l5'Z7 of the senior class. A recognition chapel marked the installation of this new society in our midst with Dr. J. L. King of Denison University as guest speaker. Much work remains to be done before the full significance of this move toward a higher and broader scholarship level can be realized, but the committee feels that it has taken a stride in the right direction. CContinued on Page Thirty-twoj TWENTY-TWO I c P d tfB dfEdt Jmmhu P I Sp tdt PBEdd FC TWENTY-FOUR Board of Education Q5 .Q F .-,.. .....l1. Shop. Dr. D. C. Swigart Clerk-Treasurer Chiropractor. Store. J. M. Mitchell President Proprietor-Mitchell Clothing Store. S. M. Wolfe Vice-President Proprietor-Wolfe Tire Stacy C. Conrad Proprietor-Conrad Drug NVa1ter Keller Employee, Holophane Glass Company. Superintendent P. B. Edwards B. S., Ohio State University. M. A., Ohio State University. TWENTY-FIVE TWENTY-SIX Principal Frew C. Boyd B. A., Ohio Wesleyan University. M. A., Ohio State University. Graduate Work at Ohio State University and Columbia University. Vice-Principal George Stoeckrnann B. A., Denison University. Th. B., Northern Baptist Theological Seminary, University of Illinois. Graduate Work at Ohio State University and Uni- versity of Wisconsin, English and Biology. TWENTYYSEVEN Loyd G. Millisor Commercial Mary L. Huffman Rochester Normal University Bliss Business College Head of Commercial Department Columbia University Director of Athletics Stenography Typewriting Dorothy Ro b lo A. B., Ohio State University Stenography Typewriting Dean of Girls f 1 , L i P. H. Sager A. B., Liberal Arts Ohio Northern University B. S. Commerce, Ohio Northern University Bookkeeping Science F. W. Smith E. H. Heckelman M. A., Ohio State University A. B. Ohio Wesleyan University Chemistry Post Graduate Work at Ohio State Physics 1 V l Oren J. Barnes X H A Mathematlcs B. S., Ohio Wesleyan University '?2f. ' l J W Swank Graduate Work at Cornell and ' " ' ' , Columbia Eh-da-.tM'wf'fkUw" t B' I ra ua e or , oos er Io ogy A Mathematics , , G. W. Brown B. Pd., Franklin College Mathematics Salesmanship TWENTY-EIGHT W Social Sciences Rosa A. Pugh B. S., Muskingum College Graduate Work at Ohio State Universit and Denison University American History and Civics Laura E. Hosick A. B., Denison University A. M., University of Chicago General History D I American History and Civics Lester B. Cox A. B., Otterbein Graduate Work at Ohio State University Economics Economic Geography Edith Myer B. S., Michigan State Normal M. A., Columbia University Sociology Economic Geography Foreign Languages C. P. Smith A. B., Ohio Wesleyan University Graduate Work at Ohio State University Latin Debate Ruth Lichtenstein B. Sc. in Ed., Ohio State University B. A., Ohio State University English Economics Commercial Law Mary M. Haymond A, B., Denison University Ohio University French Latin Social Sciences Nelle Smith B. S., Ohio University Commercial Law General History Florence Boyd B. S., Ohio University Graduate Work at University ol Wisconsin and Ohio State University , Modern and General History Sarah S. Schiffeler Wells College B. A., Denison University B. Mus,, Denison University Graduate Work at Ohio State University French German Library Mary A. Botten B. A., Concordia College, Michigan Library Training, University of Wisconsin Librarian TWENTYVNINE English Helen Lavin Eunice E. Thomas Ph. B., University of Chicago English .r A. B., Ohio Wesleyan A. M., Columbia University Ohio State University English Mildred Hawke Ph. B., Denison University Graduate Work at Denison University English Dorothy Bline A. B., Ohio Wesleyan M, A., Ohio State Graduate Work at University of Cincinnati English History l Physical Education A. B. Long Florence Myer Purdue University Bradley Polytechnic University of Wisconsin Director of Physical Education THIRTY Geraldine Evans B. A., Ohio Wesleyan University M, A., Ohio Wesleyan University English r B. S., Michigan State Normal Denison University UniversitE of California Physical ducation N Bertha L. Crilly A. B., Denison University M. A., Ohio State Univer sity Graduate Work at Columbia University and Middlebury College English Journalism Esther Larr A. B., College of Wooster English Public Speaking Dramatics Home Economics Elizabeth Owen Ph. B., Denison University Graduate Work at Universit Chicago Ohio State University Iowa State College Home Economics Y Music C. W. Klopp Supervisor af Music J. W. Dirlrson Fenn College, Cleveland Met. Eng. Kent State University B. S. in Education Director of Manual Arts Robert M. Reese B. S. in Ed., Ohio Sta University General Metal Shop Physical Education C. E. Orr Luther Hanshue , ' C ll B. S, in Ed., Wittenberg College Qgcgologyuslllngum o eg: Graduate Work at Wittenberg Economics F0llC82 Athletic Coach Hl5lf0'Y Economic Geography Assistant Coach i i Manual Arts Sam S. Gelfer Institute of Applied Music, New York Head of Violin Department, Denison University Instrumental Music L. J. Tipton Ohio State University Woodwork Printing . . 5, , Office of Superintendent 'WI iiif ,..,i, ' ,fl K" lc ' llr my Frank G. Handel , , 2 ' ,'V," Superintendent of Buildings .. ' 2- ,Q Attendance Officer U sis, I ' . Office of Principal Mary E. Barnes Secretary to Principal THIRTY-ONE Our Student Council fConcluded7 The organization committee undertook the task of furnishing an application blank to any group desiring to organize a club in Newark High School. After the application blank was properly filled out and returned to them, this committee care- fully investigated the club as to purpose, need, objectives, program and sponsor. If found satisfactory, they recommended the club to the Student Council and upon receiving the approval of that body a Charter was issued to the group. Twenty clubs have been granted charters this year. The committee is working on a ques- tionnaire to be given each club member in an endeavor to evaluate the club pro- gram this year and will use the information gained as a basis for re-chartering any club for another year. Much of the credit for our many interesting and worth while clubs must go to this committee for the careful way they went about deter- mining just What clubs should be chartered. As a result we have no club except where there was a strong desire for it within the student body. One of the busiest committees this year has been the Assembly Committee. Its task has been to build from the talent within the school, and select from talent outside, programs that will hold the interest of so heterogeneous a group as our student body. They have ever held in mind the ideal of a program, which, when the year is ended, will be well balanced. They have kept in mind the interests of various groups within the school such as the college, commercial and industrial. They have attempted to have programs that cultivated school spirit, provided entertainment, gave moral training, developed appreciation, motivated extracurricular activities, and made possible the development of poise and self-control before an audience to a small number, at least, of the student body, They are now working on an assem- bly program rating scale by means of which they hope to have the students give their opinions as to how successful they have been this year. With this informa- tion it is hoped to build an even more interesting and worth while program next year. Realizing that "all work and no play makes Jack a dull boy" the Social Com- mittee has stepped forward with a program designed to make high school more interesting, more pleasant, and in doing so, develop the pupil socially. Because of lack of experience in this field the committee has had to rely almost entirely upon other groups to initiate and execute the program. Under the very capable leader- ship of the Hi-Y Club two all-school dances were held: One in the fall and another in the spring. In addition to these two, the Sophomore class held a dance for its members and later the Juniors and Seniors will hold one. One must add to these the many parties and dances given by the various clubs and home rooms for their respective members. Realizing that social dancing, properly supervised, has become an accepted part of our present day recreation, and realizing that a large number of students are embarrassed at a dance because they never have had an opportunity to learn how to dance, the Student Council asked members of the High School P. T. A. if they would not provide for this very real need. The challenge was immediately ac- cepted by the P, T. A. and through the generosity of the Y. M. C. A. a room where lessons might be given was secured. The W. P. A. graciously provided teachers and within the short space of two weeks after the suggestion was made, the an- nouncement was made that all students who secured the consent of their parents might enroll for the classes. The response was immediate-over one hundred stu- dents asked for the privilege of being assigned to classes. As a result of this de- mand classes have been meeting at the Y each Monday, Wednesday and Thursday at 4:15 p. m. for one hour throughout the year. Over one hundred students have been made feel that they no longer need stand on the outside and look on. I know that these students are grateful to all who helped make the opportunity available to them. It was one of the finest projects that I have ever seen, and I say that only after observing many times the eagerness and the intense seriousness with which those in the classes showed their desire to become socially acceptable. If space permitted I should like to continue in this manner to relate some of the experiences being gained by many other committees of our Council. Since it does not, I wish to express my gratitude to Mr. C. P. Smith and Miss Rosa Pugh, faculty advisers to the Councilg to all other members of the faculty who, in one way or another, have given so unstintingly of their timeg to the very capable officers and members of the Council who have taken tasks and suggestions so cheerfully: and finally, to a most loyal student body without whose cooperation everything would fail. I feel that the philosophy and psychology upon which our Council is based are sound. I also am convinced that if democracy is to be preserved our youth must not only read of it-they must live it. THIRTY-TWO '7"" I x . 5-1OIl1'!ll , 1 lNDuS.T P-Y I 1 commsnci I LWERATUREQ 1 2 CH' X 4 an Z A , ' fwff, We . 0 O it--54 7 Z 5 1 Z 1 4 4 l sf xi" ,Q ,Q f Q rails. X ' Z"-w 7. 'l .M ,. QQ -mg- mf XXX ll xaa Science President ol Senior Class Anna Baker President of Junior Class Presidenl: of Sophomore Class Albert Mariano Paul Adams I936 PRIZE AWARDS The Harvard Cup, which is presented to the best all-around boy, is to encourage, the attendance of Harvard University. Don- ald Stage was the 1936 winner. The boy and girl having the highest av- erage for the four years in the College Preparatory Course receive a scholarship to Denison University. George Davis and Virginia Jones were last year's winners. Every year the Civic Society gives a cup, which has engraved on it the names of the students having the highest average for each semester. Dorothy Bline and Betty McArtor received the award last year. Wil- liam Fisk won the award for the first se- mester this school year. The Eta Sigma Phi fraternity of Deni- son University awards a medal to the stu- dent having the highest average for four years in Latin. Macille Mowery won the award last year. Robert Johnson won the French prize for the highest average in advanced French, The German Maennerchor pre- sents to the student having the highest av- erage in German a prize of five dollars. Ruth Spitzer received the award last year. George Davis and Virginia Jones won the Roosevelt history prize last year, which is given to the boy and girl having the highest grade in American History, Annually an award of twenty-five dol- lars is presented to the student having the highest average in four years of English. This award, which is the Mr, and Mrs. William E. Miller Memorial Prize, was giv- en to Virginia Jones. Each year a memorial award in journal- isrn is given to the senior boy who, in the estimation of the Committee, under cer- tain rules, is considered the rightful re- cipient. The prize shall be a cash award of S25.00. The boy must be enrolled in Jour- nalism in his junior and senior years, must have an average rating in other sub- jects and must complete the College Pre- paratory course. In 'event that the most outstanding work is done by a girl, an ex- ception may be made in her favor. Latin Medal Athletic Award l I THIRTY-FOUR Harvard Cup Civic Cup l Anna Baker Harrizs Morgan Diana Sliuebrulr Don Schofield Senior Class Officers President Anna Baker Vice-President Secretary Harries Morgan Diana Shuebrul: Treasurer Don Schofield THIRTY-FIVE Robert Adams "sob" l dare do all that may be- COITIE 6 mall: Who dares do more is none. Big Bother-Latin Chorus, Class Basketball Mary Jane Albyn "Janie" Sweets to the sweet. Big Bother-Homework Dramatic, Girl Reserves, Civics Operetta, Chorus, Basketball, Senior Play Robert Alban uhh.. The world is as you take it. Big Bother-Suspender pullers Martha Ann Allen ..Mady.. An all-around Friend and athlete. ki K k! Big Bother-Knoc . noe Who's there? Girl Reserves, Social Chairman, "The Empty Room," Mimeo- grarh, Chorus, G. Y., Basket- bal, Captain Hockey, Base- ball, Tennis, National Honor Society. Mary Anderegg "Blondie" And her sunny locks Hang on her temples like a golden fleece. Big Bother-My twin Girl Reserves, Science, French, Chorus, Flushing High School, Mt. Union High School Wayne Andrews Charles Armstrong .rspmtn Always willing. Big Bother-Homework THIRTY-SIX ..A'mY.. Lite is short but sweet. Big Bother-Sophomore: Travel, German Stella Anast "sm" She travels with a smile and so brightens the lile of others. Big Bother-Cracking Gum Travel, Chorus Donald Anderson "Andy" Edith Anderegg "Edie" A girl of true sincerity, Big Bother-My twin Science, Memorial Day Program, Basketball, Hockey, Flushing High School, Mt. Union High School He is willing to be convinced, But find the one who can convince him. Big Bother-"Worry Wert" Fisk Dramatic, Athenian, Rifle, Oper- etta, Lincoln Day Program, Debate, Chorus, Sophomore Delsate Class, National Honor Society, Minstrel Ross Airline MDM.. And entertains a cheerful disposition. Big Bother-Trying to g homework over the week end Chorus, Cheerleader, Class Bas- lretball i X Anna Baker M X ..Ann.. i An honor to her high posi- tion, upright and energetic. Big Bother-People who sing "Annie Doesn't Live Here Anymore" Dramatic, Thalian, Usher, Mime- ograph, Chorus, Class Presi- dent, Arbor Da Program, Na- tional Honor gociety, Senior Play Vlilliam Barcus et my ary Alice Balrer "Baker" The more like her the merrier, Big Bother-Trying to think of something to think about. Girl Reserves, "The Empty Room," Mimeograph, Chorus, Basketball, Hockey-Captain, Baseball-Captain Mable Arnold ..Lce.. l-lere's a girl you just stop. Big Bother-Budgets Travel, Civic, Room Chorus, Knitting Edmund Ashcraft ..Bud.. can't Could l find my proper groove, what a deep marlr I would make. Aient- Big Bother-Waiting on the field before game time Hi-Y Sophomore, Football-Leb terman, Captain Alberta Bailey "Bertie" A pleasing nature and a triend to all. Big Bother-Kate Brown Girl Reserves, Mimeograph Helen Barringer "Bill" "Fuzzie" A lWaPPY mleflr 5 Cliefffful Rain or shine. she's always Smile the same. A ls what announces Billy. Big. Bother-Staying home at Big Bother-Deutsch J--shi Chorus, Cross-Country, Track Glfl RCSCVVCF. Cll0'U5 Robert Beach Alice Bevwn ,,wimpy,. HM.. l'l5PPY'90'lUClfY Diligence is the mother oi Fair and tree Nothing there is that bothers me. Big Bother-Running out in the countr of gas Orchestra, Band: Chorus, Stage manager good fortune. Big Bother-Myself mostly Dramatic, Thalian Scribblers, Operetta, Reveiile Staff - Business, Debate, Chorus, Na- gpnal Honor Society, Senior BV THIRTY-SEVEN Shirley Bishop "assi-" A smile is worth a dozen groans in any market. Big Bother-S. O. K. Girl Reserve, Chorus, Student Council Frank A. Bolton. Jr. "Jack" My Ford is my chariot, l shall not walk. Big Bother-Having TOO much asoline. Gloiwe Trotters-President, Senior Hi-Y, Sophomore Hi-Y, Civic- President, German, Automo- bile, Chorus, Spring Football, Basketball-Manager, N Club David Braden "Dave" He whiles away the hours with music. Big Bother-Morning Classes Orchestra, Ba nd Anita Bline "Duet" Wisdom comes to no one by chance. Big Bother-People who call me, "Can't see girl" Dramatic, Thalian, Usher, Reve- ille, Mimeogra h Staff, Na- tional Honor gociety, Arbor Day Program, Senior Play Kenneth Brooks Kathryn Brown "Kenney" "Brownie" By the work we know the Eyes are a chief asset to workman. beauty. Big Bother-Getting up in the Big Bother-Not being able to morning chew um in school. Automobile' ' :l'tiiRTY'EIGHT Ba slretba I? "Jack" Phyllis soya "Phil" The science of nursing will be her work. Big Bother-Oral Themes Dramatic, Girl Reserves-View President, G, Y., Reveille Staff, Girls Sports Editor, Chorus, Baseball-Manager, Basketball Manager, "Turkey Red," "Why the Chimes Rang," National Honor Society, Senior Play Clyde Bowman Self trust is the essence of heroism. Big Bother-The Dramatics class play producers Chorus, Football, Class Basket- ball, Class Baseball, Operetta, Dratting, "Spooks" Chester Boyling "Chet" He is light-hearted and gay. Big Bother'-Trying to make an BV! shoe act graceful on a dance iloor. Room Agent, Reveille, Chorus, Class Basketball Oscar Brooks "Squire" This lad is earnest and sincere. Big Bother-"Deacon" Catt Printing, Orchestra, Minstrel Deborah Carlisle She attends strictly own business. Big Bother-Myself Alma Beatrice Calland "Betty" A good sincere and friendly girl who is ever kind. Big Bother-Fox and Geinger Mimreograph, Chorus, Zanesville Hrgh School Lucille Carpenter 'tarp'- Ivan Carter "Ivan" Oh. why should life all labor be? Big Bother-John Cicur. Helen Buckingham A good disposition is more to be desired than gold. Big Bother-My liar Uyrel Girl Reserve, Band, Huntington High School Neil Caldwell "Nid" Bashfulness is an ornament oi youth. Big Bother-Flies in my soup. Dramatic, Class Basketball, Sen- to her A fair exterior is a silent recommendation, Big Bother-Curly red hair. Girl Reserve, Chorus ior Play Robert Campbell "Hump" !t's his smile that turns the trielc. Big Bother-"BulIneck" Schaller Senior Hi-Y, Sophomore Hi-Y- Treasurer, Football, Minstrel Homer Cashdollar "CaShie" Why aren't they all con- tented lilre me? Big Bother-Teachers giving as signments. Basketball Clyde Catt Lester Catt "Fuss" "Deacon" l-le is a worthy man withal, A "Catt" my lo.olcnat a icing Big Bother-Pencil sharpener in Big Bother-"Squire Brooks. Room ls, Printing, Chorus Chorus THIRTY-NINE Margaret Chilcoat John Cicur "Ml"GY" "Circus" Elie suites hir owncmgid. Every man is a volume if '.5 ,O "" 'Pon 5' 5- you know how to read him, Girl Reserve, G. Y., Chorus Big Baths,-5-minus ben. Reveille Staff, Room Agent, Re- veille, Business Staff, Bird Club, Camera Club, Minstrel Emma Elizabeth Clark "sein" , Here is a true, industrious friend. Big Bother-Bell. German, Drafting Sara Cochlan "Sally" Nothing endures but per- sonal qualities. Big Bother-Waiting on trains and such!?! Dramatic, Girl Reserve, G. Y., Reveille Staff-Business Chor- us, "Speaks," Basketball, Hockey, Senior Play Alice Conn Hazel Crablain "NHC" "Mickey" A miss so.peppy With charm and grace That wins her friendships may. As fine as old lace, Big Bother-Blondes. Travel-Vice-President, Girl Re- serve, German, G. Y., Chorus, Room Agent Ready to work, ready to play, Ready to help wherever she Big Bother-English Xll. Knitting, Girl Reserve 'GFORTY lr ,lack Clary "Jack" Nothing great was ever achieved without enthusi- asm. Big Bother-Watching ,the Fords go by. Dorothy Clay Paul Clary ..Fee,.. ..Dot.. T's a bright and happy lass Big Bother-Frozen Fords. An honest manls word is as good as his bond. Big Bother-Getting the Ford to hold enough kids. Rifle, Hobby, Room Agent, Re- veille Business Staff, Class Basketball, Class Baseball, Minstrel Chorus, Hockey John Conlon "The Great" l-le never dares to be as funny as he can. Big Bother-Junior Reed's re- quests for "Funny stuff." A Science, Hobby, German, Air- plane Dramatic, Girl Reserve, G. Y. Phyllis Crane "Bobbie" Silence gives consent. Big Bother-Studying too hard. Girl Reserve, Reveille Statl- Business, Assistant Manager Mildred Creighton "Midge" That smile would let her through St. Pefer's gate. Big Bother-"Bow-ties" on "Guys." Dramatic, Thalian, Girl Reserve, French-Sgt.-at-arms, Reveille Annual, Room Agent, "Why the Chimes Rang," Basketball, Latin Play, National Honor Society, Senior Play George Criswell ncmy.. The world may go on without me, but l doubt it, Big Bother-Jack Coffman always blowing off. Travel, Dramatic-Vice-President, Senior Hi-Y, So homore Hi-Y, German Reveille Staff, Room Agent Gperetta, "The Tinker," Cheerleader, Chorus, Class Basretball, Senior Play, Min- sire Jean Cullison EV2lY" Cummins George Daniels "cally She hath a serious look. but when she starts to 'speak you'd be surprised. Big Batheri-Big Ben at seven A. . Dramatic, Girl Reserve, Chorus, Operetta Two rougish eyes Two lips that smile Two dancing feet These you beguile. Big Bother-Readin', Ritin', and 'Riehmeiia , Girl Reserve, Civic Society, Y., Reveille News Sheet, Busi- ness Staff, Knitting Madgzl Crosby "sang" l-ler ways are ways ol pleas antness And all her days are peace Big Bother-Wonderful Hero. Girl Reserve, Chorus Floyd Danley l probably never will grow u Big lBother-Chairs in Room 6. Class Baseball, Chorus Camera Club, Automobile Club Gr Kathleen Davidson iisnuffy-. eat in all things but stature. Big Bother-Harry Rifle. Hobby, Band, Cass Basketball Murle Davis "Sister" "Slim" A winning way, a friendly Not a word he spolie more smile than there was need, In all, a girl who's quite 559 30fl'Gf-l'llif0l'Y- worthwhile. Big Bother-Knock, Knocli. Travel, Girl Reserve, G. Y., Chorus, Reveille Business Staff, Knitting ronrvouis Owen Davis Kenneth Deal "Flash" "Kenny" lt amusement were but the end of life. Big Bother-Shorthand Home- Life is serious business and girls aren't in it. Big Bother-The Duchess. work. Travel, Athenian, French, Ger- 50Phomore Hi-Y man, National Honor Society Ca mera G lobekrokters-Tre I 5' urer, Vice-President, Secretaiy ' Hobby-Vice-President Audrey Denney "Denney" Pleasing countenance Serene and fair A musical voice And blonde hair, Big Bother-Brunettes. Girl Reserve, Reveille Staff - Business, Operetta, Chorus, "Turkey Red" George is Blessings on thee, little man Big Bother-Geidenberger Hobby Lucille Emch Quentin English "LUCY" "English" The rnildest manners and A good old scout in every gentlest heart. way. Big lolher-B. E. W. Big Bother-John Paul Conlon. Girl Reserve German, Football, "N" Club, Senior Hi-Y, Baskeiball-Re- serves .FORTY-TWO Carl De Witt "Bud" My tongue within my lips l rcrn For he who tallrs much iallcs in vain. a' a in -why naihqz. Si:gi'ibl.:le:s:-Treasurer, Civic, Ger- man, Room Agent, Chorus Hazel Diller Robert Ecleberry ..Hazy.. '-got," U Always busy, never weary. l never trouble until trouble AI h , I h . troubles nie, Bigrlayljothiijiifhya Wgylriic Iiiirier Sophomore Hi-Y, Chorus, Auto- combinakion. mobile Club Globetrokkers, Thalian, Usher, National Honor Track- 5a5k4tl'all"'Cla55 Society James Ellis "BIoat" As proper a man as one shall see on a summer's day. Big Bother-George. Hobby Gleneva Evans "Glen" A charming girl whos liness is radiant. Big Bokher--E. K. Girl Reserve, Chorus Lorraine Fedje l "Fedgy" Pleasant, quiet, helpful Slow to speak, but remember e.When she does speak lf will be the righf thing al fhe right time. Big Bokher-Waiching the Fords .go by. A Girl Reserves, Dramatic, Chorus -Croolrston High School William H. Fields "w, c." l-le lives to build, not boast. Big Bother--Homework. Chorus, Cross-Country 6 friend- Gertrude Felumlee "Genie" A pleasure lo the eye, a joy to the heart: sl-ie's merry always. Big Bother--Waiting for a model T on certain Saiurday nights. Girl Reserve, Chorus, Knitting Freda Evans "Fritz" She is full of fun and in- dustrious too. Big Boiher-No bother at all. Thalian Sergeant-ak-arms, Mime- ograph, Room Agenk, Chorus, Studenk Council Vrce-Presi- dent, National l'lonor Society Hi-Y Pauline Fink "Pinky" Mary Margaret Evans "M, M. E." Beware 'che red-heads. Big Bolher-Knighis Inn Girl Reserve, Camera, Reveille Staff - Business, Operelta, Chorus, Hockey, National Honor Society Phillip Evans Never worry today if you can put it off till tomorrow. Big Bother-Just Deaf. Travel, Senior Hi-Y, Sophomore Small in height, but great in might. A Big Bother-Norma Bur! waking me on Salurday mornings. Chorus, Baseball Don Fisher l-DH Fisllff nspeed.. Let the world slide. Let the world go. A fig for care and A fig for woe. Big Bolher-A few of my friends. Sophomore Hi-Y "SIRI Grottly Kid" Founded on a good old plan, a true and downright hon- est man. Big Bother-Roberf Rissler. Sophomore Hi-Y FORTY-THREE William Fisk Jean Fleming "Bill" Thoughtful independence irom the opinions of others with a sensitive regard for their feelings. Big Bother-Negative Debate eams. Travel - President, Athenian, Civic Society'-Vice-President, Reveille Sta Annual, Dra- matic Club, Lincoln Day Pro- gram, Debate, Sophomore De- ate Class, Chorus, Reveille Business Staff, Camera Club, Latin Flay, National Honor Society, Senior Play The fore of her own mind is evid ent. Big Bother-Isotopes. Dramatic, Girl Reserve, G. Y.- Secretary, Chorus, Reveille Business Staff, Basketball, Senior Play Virginia Fox lIFoXl2'. She seems to brighten all our day. Big Bother - "Gienger" and "Calland." Girl Reserve, Chit-Chat, Chorus, Basketball, Knitting, Baseball Richard Geidenberger "s Msn" Vainly look we for another ln your piace to stand, Big Bother-The Ellis twins. Dortha Fraizer "Doi" And she greeted the world with a smile and a laugh. Big Bother-Fudge Sundaesj ?l Mimeograoh, Chorus, National Honor Society Lois Gienger "Lois" A handful of humor is worth a bushel of learning. Big Bother-"Fox" and "Cal' Spring Football, Class Baskets land." ball Girl Reserve, Chit-Chat, Chorus, Knitting Frances Gilcrest FW'-ia Gill "Peaches" H ommln Nothing is impossible to Fwda is demme and slw' gndushy. l-ler friends are more than Big Bother-Dates lin historyl. i6W, Gif' RCWYVI. Cl'0'U5. National She speaks but iittle, but this Honor Society dass Knows she is "true-blue." Big Bother - Homework over week-end. Girl Reserve, Chit-Chat, Chorus, Knitting Richard Gillespie Leo Glover "Fly Wheel" Be silent and saie-silence Wit is the flower of the imagination. Big Bother-English. Football, Chorus, Reveille, Oper- etta, Minstrel FORTY-FOUR never betrays you, Big Bother-Cashdollar. Printing William Goodwin "Bill" And when a lady's in the case, you know all other things give place. Big Bother-Fisk's Ties. Globetrotters - President and Sgt.-at-arms, Athenian, Senior Hi-Y, Rifle, Lincoln Day Pro- gram, Chorus, Class Basket- ball, Automobile - Treasurer, National Honor Society. Ralph Grove Marjory Guy "MiclrGYl' "Marge" ln the best of sports this l-ler friends they are many. man is found. Her foes are there any? Bi? Bother-Getting Homework, Big Bother - Talkative people Ri le, Printing, Track lLadetl. Chorus Lucille Hall ..Yiny.. Not that I like study less But that l like fun more. Big Bother-Red Traffic Lights. Chorus Willard Goldberg Paul Goodin "Moe Ginsberg" "5lim" A dandxf fellow' 5 futum An aftable and courteous M- D- + Il Quiet? His friends say not. e ow' A determined look, a pleas- anl: smile. We like Willard a lot. Big Bother-Big brother. I Travel Dramatic, Athenian, Scribblers - Vice-President, German, Latin Play, Debate. Sophomore Debate Class, Basketball, National Honor Society, Senior Play, Minstrel Big Bother-Bookkeeping. Printing, Minstrel Martha Graft ..Many.. There's music in the air. Big Bother-Conceited Tenors. Girl Reserve, German, Operetta, Chorus, National Honor So- ciety. Richard Hall "Dick" The only shots that count are those that hit. Big Bother-Going to stud! halls. Travel - Vice-President, opho- more Hi-Y, Athenian-Fresh dent, Senior Hi-Y-Treasurer Rifle-President, Automobile- Secretary, Reveille Staff, Stu- dent Council, Class Basketball, Marie Hammond Muddy.. l-ler disposltron is sunny as her hair. Big Bother-Last period of the day. Girl Reserve, G. Y. National Honor Society Mary Hammond "Mickey" , We all know her by her pleasant demeanor. Big Bother-"Those twins." Girl Reserve, G. Y., Operetta, Business Staff, Basketball, Hockey, Baseball FORTY-FIVE Richard Handel Lucille Hartshorn "High Pockets" An -earnest straight-forward man. Big Bother-English Xl. Model Airplane Club, Class Basketball Harold Hayden "Pinlrie" A shy retiring spirit, yet holding his own. Big Bother - Antidisestablish- mentarianism. ..Lucy.i Golden is her hair, golden is her heart. As a true worker, always does her part. Big Bother-Night Shift. Business Staff, Girl Reserve, G. Y., Chorus, Basketball, Base- ball. Hockey Dolores Heeter "Delicious" She looks a goddess and she walks a queen. Big Bother- Everyone knowing your business. Chicago Polytechnic High School Arabelle Hett Joseph Heft A "Hen" "Joe" A maiden good without pre- A true fellow and a great lense, friend to all. Blessed with reason and some mon sense, Big Bother-Relatives. Dramatic, Girl Reserve, Scrib- blers, Room Agent, Chorus, "The Tinker," National Honor Big Bother-Standing in Chapel. Sophomore Hi-Y, Rifle, German, Camera, Chorus, Class Basket- ball. Thomas Hessin ii-I-om.. l'm little but l guess l know Big Bother-Mr. wank's jokes. Travel-Treasurer, Senior Hi-Y, Sophomore Hi-Y, Hobby, Globetrotters, Automobile Chorus, Class Basketball Helen Hrghtshoe Paul Hilgg "Hilsey" Who mixed pleasure with l-le has a genial nature. wisdom and wisdom with Bis Bother-Too much home- mirthh work. Big Bother-Watching the Fords go by. Travel Girl Reserve, Reveille Stafl-Business Manager, Bas- ketball, Hockey, Baseball FORTY-SIX Football, Class Basketball, Base- ball, Automobile Society, G-Y., Senior Play Daniel Hickman i.Dan.. True blue. dependable is he. The kind we all would like to be, Big Bother-Reciting in English Class. A Dramatic, Athenian-Treasurer, Debate, Sophomore Debate Class, Football, Track, Class Basketball, National Honor Society, Senior Play Margaret Hoffman "!0ssv" She serves to brighten all our days. Big Bother-To be on time. Girl Reserve, Baskctball, Base- ball, Chorus Faye Houdeshell Eunice Howard "Howdy" "Eunie" She was just the quiet kind The wisdom oi her life is kindness. Big Bother-Knock-Knocks. Girl Reserve, Science, Chorus whose nature never varies. Big Bother-l wouldn't know. Class Baseball Bette Jane Huffman "Hume" Her ways are quiet but quiet is eloquence. Big Bother-Sh! Lei's keep it a secret. Richard Hirst Dorothy Hodge "Hiriiy" "Dottie" This learning-how it bores Self-trust is the secret oi me! success. Big Bother-English. Class Basketball, Automobile, Printing, Rifle Neal lnscho "Shorty" While we live. iet us live. Big Bother-Gas for the Ford. Senior Hi-Y, Printing, Class Bas- ketball, Baseball Big Bother-Peanuls. Girl Reserve, Science-President, G. Y., Memorial Day Pro- gram, Chorus, Room Agent Lester Holcombe "Kitty" An earnest straightforward man. Big Bother-Listening to Don Keck talk. Printing, Chorus, Class Basketball Donard Iclen "Don" Moclesty is a Cardinal virtue. Big Bother--Mexican Senorilas. Hobby, Band Virginia Jackson "Ginney" Where the river runs deepest. it runs quieteslz. Big Bolher-Chemistry problems. Girl Reserve, G. V., Civic So- eiely, Chorus FORTY-SEVEN Frederick John Eleanor Johnson .. . ..E,.r Frosty ' You have a merry heart. Big Bother-8:30 A. M. Strong reasons make strong actions. Big Bother-Bookkeeping Class, Chow! Class Basketball, Football Marjorie Ann Jones UMMSH She thinks the world was U made for fun. ll! A Bother-Movie Actors with wigs. Dramatic - Treasurer Girl Re- serve, Scribblers French - Secretary, Reveille Stafi - News Sheet, "Why the Chimes Rang," Basketball, Senior Play Sheldon Keinath ncurly.. A sturdy, trusty fellow You can depend upon 'Twill not be many years Before success is won. Big Bother-Getting to school on Monday morning. Reveille-Business Staff, Student Council, National Honor So' ciety-President William Kennon Elizabeth Kent "Bill" "Becky" Strong ot body, sound in May a smilc on the face be mind. A better man rs hard to find. Big Bother-Making oral themes. FORTY-EIGHT but a reflection ot the feeling of a heart. Big Bother-Magazine Stand- Wooster, Ohio. Girl Reserve, Civic Society, Chorus, Mimeograph Virginia Jones Orville Jones r nwimpy.. But what sweet delight a quiet life affords. Big Bother-Short noon hours d I ' d . v.5'lr, 232..Z"" ' Donald Keck --nnny-- "BulI's Eye" She always does her share Who tczlcl'-lar? me Shall llnd Wh thtft 'llt 55" 0"'0e', e ip? a B 6 WI Um Bi? Bother-Women drivers.. On, E , A Ri le - Secretary, Hobby, Ger- A smile surpassing fair. man, Automobile, Football Bii Bother-A mistake in book- cr..5Ei""5' Frances Kennedy - ..Fan.. She hath so kind, so tree, so blessed a disposition. Bi Bother -- 'Most everyone knows. ' A Girl Reserve, G. Y., Crvrc So- ciety, Reveille Editorial Staff -Associate Editor, Chorus, Basketball, Hockey William Killworth "Bill" Tomorrow comes and where are we? So let us live today. Big Bother- Matching pennies with Hank. German, Cross-Country, Football, Track James Lemert Erik Kessmeier William Kidwell UKQSSY.. There is 'about some boys That precious gift of poise Manliness, tact, and grace With humor beaming from the face. Big Bother-General atmosphere. Dramatic, Arbor Day Program, Student Council, Basketball, Senior Play, Minstrel John Lake "Lakie" -.Hankn The deed l intend is great But as yet l know not what. Big Bother-Crawling through the ropes. So homore Hi-Y, Class Basket- ball, Golf, Track Worry, l have never met. Big Bother-Being kept awake in class! Lammle Ornament of a quiet spirit. Big Bother-Trying to think up a big bother. Travel, Girl Reserve, Civic So- ciety, Basketball, Baseball, Chorus uhm.. Virtuous youth rnalces flourish- ing manhood. Big Bother--Trying to get a trial balance. Printing, Chorus Frederick Lentz uhh l have a heart with room for every joy. Big Bother -- imitating Fred Astaire. Class Basketball, Golf Shirley Lewis Full of fun and frolic. Bi Bother - The sophomore Treart throb, Robert iTaylorl King. Girl Reserve, Class Basketball, Latin Play, Knitting Virginia Logan Albert Loughman "Ginny" "Loufie" An earnest girl with a cheery smile and a good heart. Big Bother-Making breaks. G. Y., Girl Reserve, Chorus, Seveille Business Staff, Knit- mg I would be friends with you. Big Bother-Getting up in the mornings. FORTYNINE Raymond Lukasko ..Ray.. :Speech is mightier than ' strength. 'Big Bother-Studying for exams. Cross-Country Betty McArtor rrsetsyir Jack Lytle "Casanova" Hold everything- l'm coming. Big Bother-Being a senior with- out a locker. Dramatic, Athenian - Secretary, Vice-President: Senior Hi-Y- Secretary, Sophomore H i-Y- President, Scribblers, French, Reveille Staff, Lincoln Day Program, Room Agent, Class Baseball, Class Basketball, National Honor Society, N Club-Secretary, Senior Play Quiet, reserved and studious is she. X Big Bother-Lots of things ipar- ticularly M. PJ. Thalian, Girl Reserve, Civic So- ciety-Treasurer, G. Y., Usher Chorus, National Honor So- ciety, Knitting John Maharg "Johnnie" l'm not so bashtul as l look. Big Bother-Income tax. I Dramatic-President, Senior Hi-Y - Vice-President, Sophomore Hi-Y-Vice-President, French, Operetta, Chorus, Student Council, Class Baseball, Class Basketball, Senior Play, Min- Glenn McDonald H Mac" Give every man thine ear, but few thy voice. Big Bother-History. Harold McDonald Mifilll MCElW6lN --Mach A quiet unassuming man of sterling worth. Big Bother-A. M. to I2 and P, M. to 4:00. Globetrotters ..Madn When the mind's tree. the heart is happy. Big Bother--Finding J. R. W. G. Y., Girl Reserve, Travel Camera, Chorus, Baseball strel Robert Markle nach.. We'll all agree he is a goocl fellow. Big Bother-Women. Printing FIFTY Robert Marshal nach.. Wise to resolve and patient to perform. Big Bother-Having seats in a study hall. Room Agent, Debate, Chorus, Operetta, Minstrel John Maier "Johann" A good scout and a good fellow. Big Bother-To get three A's all at one time. German, Class Basketball William Mercer "Bill" The class laughs with, but never at him. Big Bother-Trying to find a seat to put my gum under. Senior Hi-Y, Operetta, Debate, Grove City and Newcastle High Schools, Senior Play Alice Miller Am, Mille, NAV' "i'm Ike" A Charming and delightful Where Janet leaves off Anne companion. begins Bi Bother-Falling for the foot- B' B th. - " ian playin. lipeaiingrn Now. FranklY Girl Reserve, Basketball, Hockey, Elwood City school Girl Reserve-Treasurer, Travel, Civic Society, Chorus Frances Roberta Miller "Bobbie" Not only good but good for something. Big Bother-A certain handsome Charles Martin Woodrow Martin He is ambitious thereiore Big Bother- Bookkeeping home "Chuck" "Woody" ln quietness and confidence shall be your strength. worthy. Big Bother-Home Room Pro- grams. work. Rifle Printing Mary Evelyn Midkiff "Maddy" llle. Harry Miller She'll dance her way through Big Bother-Tick Tack! Tick Tock' Girl Reserve, G. Y., Chorus Mimeograph, Basketball, Hockey, Baseball "Fuzzy Moth" Oh, why should life all labor be. Big Bother-Flies in Study Hall brunette. Girl Reserve, German, Operetta, Guman Chorus, Mt. Vernon High School Janet Miller Louis Mink "l'm Mike" The hand that follows intel A cheerful look makes a dish lect can achieve 6 feast- gig Bfthezsmbryo Tid I-gaalys ' - a e, enran cr: ers Big Bower-Fan Mail' rgvic, German, Debate Varsity Travel-Secretary, Girl Reserve, G. Y., Civic Society, Chorus Sophomore Debate Natrona Honor Society FIFTY-ONE Anne Montgomery npcs.. A brown-eyed lass who ranks irrst rn her class. Big Bother-Cocoanut Cake. Thalian, Girl Reserve, Scribblers, French, Usher, Annual Reveille Staff, "Why the Chimes Rang," Latin Play, National Honor Society Claude Moore A "DOC" Good nature makes him a pleasant companion. Big Bother-Tomatoes and Cops. Senior Hi-Y, Football-Letterman, N Club Harold Montgomery ..Ham.. That young man believes what he says. He will go tar. Big Bother-Football practice on Monday. Rifle, Track, Class Basketball, Football Margaret Morehouse "Sue" A light heart lives long. I Big Bother-Remembering time of appointments. ' Girl Reserve Dramatic, Photog- raphy, Chorus, Girls Glce ciub, University Demonstra- tion High School Theodore Munch "Ted" Always good natured. Big Bother - Climbing flights to chemistry class. Dramatic. Hi-Y Senior, German, three Operetta, Orchestra, Band, Minstrel, Senior Play Marjorie Myer Harry Myers "l'm Mike" "Ike" She makes sunshine in shady places. Big Bother-Pinlrie Powder Puff. Operetta, Chorus FIFTYTWO Some think the world is made tor tun and lrolic and so do l. Big Bother-Dry Chapel programs Room Agent, Chorus, Baseball, Class Basketball Harries Morgan .lcanne Mulqulf' nsagn This tall lad is not very loud When he is in a class? We know he's not so quiet tho' When he is with a lass. Big Bother-My beard, Q Senior Hi-Y, Automobrle-Vice- President, Vice-President Sen- ior Class, Football-Letterman, Basketball,-Letterman, N Club Not much talk-a long sweet silence. Dramatic, Girl Reserves, Vit! President Scribblers, Reveille Staff, Orchestra, Band, Soph- omore Class Debate, Senior Play, Room Agent, Chorus, Hockey Margaret Myer "vm Ike" A cheerful, merry spirit has she. Big Bother-Utica, Ye Olde Mill, Dramatic, Operetta, Chorus, Mimeograph Frank Noblick A jolly good fellow wherever he oes Q . Big Bother-information blanks. Kathleen Norris "Kate" The world will ever wonder what she will do next. lig Bother-My Mother's usual "Be rn early." Dramatic, Girl Reserve, Scrib- blers, French, Science, Busi- ness Staff Reveille, Operetta, Debate, Chorus, Hockey, Sen- ior Play Rena Ogle "Rene" She is sophisticated and original, Big Bother-"Hi," National Honor Society, Girl Reserve, Chorus Richard Oder nmck.. I speak not often but my thoughts are deep. Orchestra, Band, Class Basket- ball, Baseball Maxine Nethers Alfred Nicodcmus ..Max.. Not for honor, not for glory ls it good to be sincere But to make liie's story sweeter Nobler to appear. Big Bother-My brother, humili- ating. Girl Reserve V, Thomas Norpell "Tim" 'Nick" That young man believes what he says. Big Bother-Oral Talks. A brilliant student, clever and ambitious. Big Bother-People calling me ' Timothy." Travel-Secretary, Athenian Presi- dent, Rifle-Range officer and Secretary, Frenc , Automobile, Lincoln Day Program, Camera, National Honor Society-Treas- urer Charles H. Parker "Bill" Tomorrow? That never comes, Why worry then l say? Big Bother-Red Hair. Printing, Hobby X Charles E. Parker "Doc" The measure of life is not length, but honesty. Big Bother-Trying to keep lrom chewing gum in typing. Printing Beatrice Parr .-Bea.. A capable girl and one to be relied on, no matter what her mission. Big Bother-Broken-hearted girls. Chorus, Mimeograph, National Honor Society FIFTY-THREE Marjorie Parsons ..Mars.. S A friendly busy sort of lass. Big Bother-A certain "Counter" at Ohio State. Girl Reserve, Chorus Dorothy Patchen "Patch" lt is tranquil peop cominlish much. Big Bot er-P. K. le wh arah Passman "Sally" She would talk! She would talk! Big Bother-Trying to keep in -tune on popular songs. Girl Reserve, G. Y., Chorus, Hockey, Knitting O ac- Trayel, Girl Reserve, Civic So ciety, Camera, Operetta, Chor- us, G. Y., Hockey Leslie Patten "Patten" Honor lies in honest toil. Big Bother-Having to use my brain because of a lack cf education. Dramatic, Athenian Vice Presi- dent, Sophomore Hi-Y, Sen- ior Hi-Y, Orchestra, Basket- ball-Reserve, Class Basketball, National Honor Society, Sen- Robert Peel nach.. There is nothing more useful than silence. Big Bother-Mr. Smith's test tubes. "N," Drafting, Letterman, Class Basketball Kenneth Pettit Lois Philips "Flip" "shrimp" The only way to have a friend is to be one. BigIBother-Anything in gener- B . The word "impossible" is not in my dictionary. Big Bother-Chasing flies in Mrs. Schiffeler's room. Girl Reserve, G. Y., Operetta "Why the Chimes Rang," Lhorus, Hockey, Knitting FIFTYrFOUR ior Play, Minstrel Joseph Patterson Joy Patton NJN.. npat.. A fine fellow and a great Friend to all who know her friend to all, bwell. I Orchestra, Band, Camera, Sci- Big Bother-Conceited Deople. ence Travel, Girl Reserve, German Robert Penn "Penn" Camera, Chorus G. Y., Busl ness Staff Reveille He is wise who listens much and talks little. . Big Bother-Getting lessons at home that cannot be pre- pared in study hall. Travel-President, Senior Hi-Y, Sophomore Hi-Y, Scribblers, Science, Civic Society, Auto- mobile Club, Chorus, Nation- al Honor Society "Mary Lou" Jackson Pierce Mary Louise Plymale "Jack" A stimulant to the hearts of the fairer sex. Big Bother-Home Work. Dramatic Class, Printing, Oper- etta, Chorus She has a smile that fits her face and she wears it every clay. Big Bother-Changing schools. Girl Reserve, National Honor Society, Buffalo High School, Juanita Powell Donald Pound "Don" People who make puns are like wanton boys who place pennies on the rail- road tracks. Big Bother-Miss Pugh's dates. Travel - Sergeant-at-arms, Soph- omore Hi-Y, Hobby, Drafting- Vice-President Camera-Secre- tary, Reveille Staff - Room Agent .lean Price Ke nova, W, Va. Eileen Powell MPM.. Not widely known, but well appreciated. Big other-Kid sister always tagging along. Girl Reserve, G, Y., Chorus - Sude As merry as the day is long. Big Bother-Only two know. Girl Reserve, Chorus, G. Y., Hockey, Class Baseball lrene Price "Pricy" A light heart lives long. Big Bother-Bicycles. "Jeanie" She has a heart that is gay. Big Bother-Laughing people. Girl eserve Chorus G Y R . . - '- Hockey, Operetta, Knitting- President Russell Priest "Rusty" l do not let any studies inter- iere with my education. Big Bother-Locust Street. Operetta, Class Basketball, Base- ball Ann Rank Evelyn Rawlings "Annie" "Eva" I Silence is more eloquent than The unspoken word never words. does harm. Big Bother-Slippery stairsteps. Big Bother-Going to bed. Girl Reserve, G. Y., Chorus, Chorus Knitting FIFTY-FIVE Virginia Rector ..Ginny.. She's a quiet girl-at times Big Bother-Fords at Kroger'si Thalian, Vice-President - Science, German Camera - Vi - , ce-Presi dent, Memorial Day Program Sophomore Debate, Chorus .lunior Reed "Reedy" As merry as the day is long. Big Bother-Women in general. Travel, Dramatic, Athenian, Sen- ior Hi-Y, Reveille Staff, Or- chestra, Band, Basketball Class, Senior Pay Virginia Reese "Ginny" The happier the time, the quicker it passes. Big Bother-Being little. Girl Reserve, G. Y., Operetta, Chorus, Knitting Florence Rinehart 'iFlo" To her a history class seems very sappy. She would rather do a dance or something snappy, I Big Bother-Letting studies in- terfere with my education. Dramatic, Girl Reserve, G. Y., Operetta, Chorus, Hockey. Senior Play Victor Ritter BNC' Roach "sucr- A pleasant triencl, a good companion. Big Bother-"Wild Mustangs." Senior Hi-Y Sophomore Hi-Y, Hobby, Globetrotters, Automo- bile Club-President, Football, Track, Minstrel FIFTY-SIX . If he will, he will and you may depend. Big Bother-The week before "exams." Robert Ricket Robert Rice "Bob" An equal mixture of good humor, and good sense. Big Bother-The evils of our social system. Dramatic, Athenian, Senior Hi- Y, Sophomore Hi-Y, Civic So- ciety. French - Vice-President, Annual-Associate Editor, "The Tinker," Chorus, Class Bas- ketball, National Honor So- ciety, Senior Play, Minstrel Harry M. Rifle "Bob" "Toad" l am sure care's an enemy If I don't know, I as to life' Big Bother-Locker Room Bio Bother-Dis!! English get me ,'o?'- down. Printing Rifle, Football, Track Robert Rissler "Bunny" You can't keep a good man down. Biq Bother-Keeping Schofield out of trouble. Class Basketball Betty Roberts Maxine Roberts "Betts" Quietness is best. Big Bother-Homework. Girl Reserve, Chorus, National Honor Society Lena Roilre And the sighing solos ot a violin awakened responsive cords. Big Bother-W. L. Travel-President, Scribblers Sci- ence, Orchestra, Minstrel Dorothea Rogers MDM.. Calm and unruflled as sum- mer seas. Big Bother-Standing in Class. Girl Reserve, Civic Society, Chorus Wanda Rowe Thomas Rugg ..Nib.. All the best of dark and light. meet in her aspect and in her eyes. Big Bother--Phi Sigs. Girl Reserve Civic Society, Travel, G. Y., Chorus Edwin E. Ryan "Popeye" Thou are a fellow ot good respect. Big Bother-Flat tires and other ukuggy.. l-le maintains that argument is the spice ot life. Big Bother-Reconciling broken hearts. Senior Hi-Y, Sophomore Hi-Y, Science, French, Rifle-Treasur- er. Reveille Editorial Staff "Wene" Many a triclc has she done But nevertheless 'twas always in tun. Big Bother-Charlie. Girl Reserve, Civic Society, Mim- eograph, Chorus, Baseball, Basketball Julius Sabo "Julie" Men of few words are best. Big Bother-Ed Boyling. Football troubles on date nights. Sophomore Hi-Y, Operetta Or- chestra, Band, Minstrel, Stage Manager, Minstrel, Chorus, Track, Cross-Country. Good boys love their sisters Enag Sgmpaul lohn Schaller 'Sample" "JohnnY" She's nicest as her own sweet self. Big Bother-Waking up on Mon- day morning. Chorus, Girl Reserve but so good have l grown l love other boys' sisters as well as my own. Big hBother-Red Fingernail Pol- is Travel-Vice-President, Senior Hi- Y, Sophomore Hi-Y, Civic So- ciety, Room Agent, Football, Spring Footba l, Letterman, N, Club FIFTY-SEVEN Howard Siegel Don Schofield "Cotton" Every sophomores ideal. Big Bother-She's mad, Baseball, Class BasketbalI,Treas- urer of Senior Class, Senior Hi-Y Ernest Settles "Ernie" Another unassuming lad Who has few words to say. Though he may not climb to the top. l-le'll rise high on the way. Big Bother-Ed. Ryan. Model Airplane - Vice-President, German, Reveille Staff Room Agent, Operetta, Chorus, Foot- ball, Band, Stage Manager, Minstrel Richard Scott "DiCk" A goocl fellow has come among us. Big Bother-Senior Bookkeeping. Hobby, Football, Track Dale Shaw ..Nobby.. A gentleman makes no noise. Big Bother-Squeaky shoes at midnight. Paul Shoppell Di '-wink" A likeable, trustworthy chap. Big Bother-Alarm clocks at 8:00 A. M. ana Shuebruk noi.. Laughing eyes. clever ways. and lots of charm. Big Bother-"ls the 'hoss' in the 'bahn?" Dramatic-Secretary, Thalian, Girl R e s e r v e, G. Y. -. President, Scribblers - President, French, Reveille Staff-Annual Editor -in-Chief, News Sheet, "When the Chimes Rang," "Turkey Red," Chorus, Basketball, National Honor Society, Sen- ior Play Ellen Jean Simpson "Siegel" Being president is getting to be a habit with him. Big Bother-To be here, there, and everywhere. Dramatic, Senior Hi-Y, President, "N" Club," Orchestra, Band, "Ghost Train," Student Coun- cil - President, Varsity Basket- ketball, Letterman, Senior Play Her nature is reflected in her smile. Big Bother-To find someone who can beat me drinking cokes. Girl Reserve, Civic Society, Travel, Hall Monitor Vivian Simpson "Shrimp" Measured by inches she's not very tall, But in good fellowship, she comes up to them all. Big Bother-Being tiny. Girl Reserve, Chorus FIFTY-EIGHT Margaret Anita Smith Huggy.. Happily smiling, sparkling. SaYf A charming companion in ever wa. Big Bother-grchestras which do not plaTy "Stardust" Dramatic- reasurer, Girl Reserve, French, Science, Reveille News Staff, Reveille Annual, Oper- etta, "Turkey Red," Chorus, G. Y., Senior Play Ruth Snelling "Ruth" When joy and duty clash, let duty go to smash. Big Bother-Shoe strings that won't be tied. Girl Reserve, Civic Society, Baseball, Chorus Louise Snyder "Weller" Nice things always come in small packages. Big Bother-Rehearsals!!! Thalian-Secretary, G. Y. Girl Reserves, Civic Society, Branch, Business Staff, Chorus, Basket- ball, Hockey, National Honor Society Robert Spangler nsob.. Oh, that the world were a playground and nothing to clo but la grams. Orchestra Eleanor Sperry "Skipper" She's small but-Oh, My! Big Bother-When l grow u . Dramatic, Girl Reserves, crib- blers, French, Chorus, Room Agent, National Honor So- ciety - Vice-President, Senior Play P Y- Big Bother-Home Room pro- Neva Smith William E. Smith "Shorty" There's everything nice about her. Big Bother-Monday morning. ' Snyder" "swim" Dependable and everyones friend. Big Bother-Getting seated in alphabetical order. Hobby Edith Marie Snyder She holds silence as a pre- cious jewel. Big Bother-Thinking of some- thing to say. Girl Reserve, Civic Society, Chor- us, Basketball Donna Springer Her mind is bright: her heart is right. Big Bother-Dodging traffic.. Girl Reserve, G. Y., Reverlle Staff Mildred Stough Rena Steele "Milly" "Reno" A heart ot gold beneath her A pleasing voice, a delight- quick ways. tul girl. Big Bother-Oral reports. Big Bother-Shoe Leather Ex press. Travel, Girl Reserves, Science Chorus, Room Agent, Hockey FIFTY-NIN E Bernice Stickle "Bernie" A maiden who has winscme ways. Big Bother-Having to keep still when I want to talk. Helena Statler "Leni2" She has the ability to mix work and play. Big Bother-Losing things such as-7? Travel-Secretary, Thalian, Girl Reserves, G. Y., Reveille Staff Mimeograph Staff, Chorus, National Honor Society Robert Swisher "sob" lnquisitive about what makes -the wheels go 'round. Brill Bother-Burning midnight I . German Hall Mon era, brafting Charles Edward Thompson Maud.. I make it a point never to complain. Big Bother-Used car lots-any- thing under Sl0.00. Printing, Chorus, Spring Football SIXTY itor, Cam- Edward Stone "Eddie" lntensely humorous and cheerful. Big Bother--Knock Knock's, or jokes I've heard before. Reveille Room Agent, Lnorus, Baseball Charles Robert Thompson "Bob" One who loves to keep his ambition a secret. Big Bother-Getting up every morning to come to school. Evelyn Swain A mild manner and a true heart. Big Bother-Kid Sister. Girl Reserves, Operetta, Memo- rial Day, Knitting, Chorus, Hockey Betty Jane Strosnider naeuy.. She is independent and indi- vidual. Big Bother-Monda mornings. Thalian - Vice-Presidyent, Mimeo- graph, Chorus, National Hon- or Society-Secretary Frances Swartz "Hank" l-ler sweet disposition makes many friends. Big Bother-l2:00 P. M. Girl Reserves, Operetta Room Agent, Chorus, G. Y., l'lockey, Knitting Wayne Terrell "Lefty" They stumble who run fast: A steady pace is best. Big Bother-Fourth seat, sixth TOW- Hobby, German, Automobile, N Club, Cross-country Lola Toothman ..Lo.. Cares may bc many, but none have l. Big Bother-Traffic lights. Girl Reserve, G. Y., Chorus William Uffner Juliet Upson nam.. Hay.. The deed is everything but An individual with individu- glory naught. ality. Big Bother-Teachers that talk a lot in class. Printing Marianne Upson Big Bother-Certain Blondes. Dramatic, Thalian, Girl Reserve, German, Latin play, Ushers, News sheet Editor Reveille staff, Chorus, Room Agent, nasketball, "Wh the Chimes Rang," National' Honor So- ciety, Senior Play Harry Thornton .lean Thornton "Sleepy" "Runt" You can't corner a square Always a smile to greet you man. Big Bother-The Twin. Big Bother-Noisy study halls. Betty Turner "Whirripy" Her numerous friends appre- ciate her worth. Big Bother-Sleepy mornings af- ter the night before. Travel, Girl Reserve-Sergeant-ab Arms, Chorus, Operetta, Bas- ketball, Thurston High School Elsie Van Fossen "UPPi2" Wan.. The klzd of Blll you lllle lc, Her good nature is measured mee ' by the yard. Bi- Bother-Exams and floods at the same ti me. Thalian, Girl Reserve, German, "Why the Chimes Rang," Chorus Charles Vinning "Chinlr" To take things as they come is the best way. Big Bother-Going through halls without stepping on sopho- mores. Hobby, German Big Bother-Ray. Travel, Girl Reserve, German, Chorus, New Philadelphia High School John Vogelmeier lljackll The social, friendly honest man 'Tis he who fits great nature's plans. Big Bother-Monday morning. Reveille Room Agent SIXTY-ONE Richard Wagenheim Jean Wall "Dick" Men of few words are best. Big bother-Pulling your loot out of water after breaking through the ice at 50 below. Baseball Robert Warman "Bob" A playful boy was he. Big Bother-Brunettes. Automobile, Football, man, Minstrel Joseph Weerkley HJUCH A jack ot hearts and a queen will take him. Bi r Editor-Annual, News Football, umm Basketball: Baseball, Varsity Basketball, Letterman, N Club g Bother-Counting Characters. D amatrc, Senior Hi-Y, Sopho- more Hi-Y, French, Sports "Ginger" She has a sweet disposition and a sunny smile. Big Bother-Other people's big brot hers. Girl Reserve-Treasurer and Pres- ident, French, Reveille Annual Staff, Operetta, Chorus, "Why the Chimes Rang," "The Emp- ty Room," Latin Pla , Nation- al Honor Society, Ushers Letter- Sheet Evelyn Wells John Wells "Skeeter" "Jack" Goodness centers in the Moclesty seldom tails to win heart. good will, Big Bother-The Hoosier State? Girl Reserve, 6. Y., Hockey SIXTY-TWO Big Bother-Moral victories. Senior Hi-Y, Globe-Trotter, Soph- omore Hi-Y, Automobile Let- Eirrgan, Football, Golt, N U Catherine Warnoch "Katie" Wherever she finds herself in life, she'll make a good addition. hi Bother-Mother's usual "Be- ilrave yourself." Thalian, Mimeograph, Hall Mon- itor, Room Agent, Chorus, National Honor Society Julia Warthen "Judy" Jesse Warthen "Pick" Fortune befriends the bold. Bic Bother-School in general. Baseball, Class Basketball Good nature is of daily use. Big Bother-Trying to get in my ocker. Girl Reserve, G . Y., Music, Hockey, Knitting, Baseball Gladys Weaver "Ladd" Plenty of humor to keep the story from being dull. Big Bother-Trying to keep quiet. Chorus Twila Wolfe "lwilight" l-ler ways are quiet, but si- lence is eloquent. Big Bother-Beaux. Chorus Phyllis Wortman Margaret Ann Wright Phil" HMBVSCH Good nature is of daily use. She is always pleasant and Bigb Bother-Thinking up a big Willing, , Ofhef- , , , Big Bother-Another "right," Gill RCSCWC. CIVIC 50C'2fY- Travel, Girl Reserve, G. Y., C"'0'U5 bChfrus, Knitting, Hockey, Base- a Francis Young "Fritz" Quiet, but a genuine pal. Big Bother-Ringing the curfew at Summit Station. Joseph Whyde "Butch" If you think size counts, look at Joe and change your Vivian Wills "Vidie" Her air, her manners, all who saw admired. mind Big Bother-To argue with a - ' - - certain junior. Hgcggfllefn gohgfg out of Huh Girl Reserve, G. Y.-Vice-Presi- P,intin3.P,e5ident ' dent, Room Agent, Business Staff Basketball, Hockey, Baselsa ll, "Spooks," Chorus John Wolff "Jack" Always Jolly. always kind. l-le's the boy we like to find. Big Bother-Lighting the lamps in Granville. Travel, Civic Society . Reba Young HRM.. A maiden good without pretense. Blest with reason and corn- mon sense. Big Bother-Sister's giggled Girl Reserve, Chorus, Mrmeo- graplr, National Honor Society SIXTY-THREE Row 1wMiss Laura Hosick, Arabelle Heft Eleanor Sperry, Louise Sny- der, Alice Berson, Mary Margaret Evans, Mary Lou Plymale. Row 2-Juliet Upson, Mildred Creigton, Betty Roberts, Martha Graff, Betty McArtor, Phyllis Boyd, Jean VVall. Row 3-Diana Shuebruk, Anne Montgomery, Freda Evans, Anita Blinc, Helen Stotler, Hazel Diller, Frances Gilcrest. Row 4-Robert Rice, Anna Baker, Betty Strosnider, Martha Ann Allen. Catherine Warnock, Dorotha Fraizer. Row 5-Louis Mink, Jr., Daniel Hickman, Beatrice Parr, Rena Ogle, Reba Young, Row 6-Jack Lytle, Sheldon Keinath, Kenneth Deal, Robert Penn. Thomas Norpell, William Fisk. Row 7-Richard Hall, Donald Anderson, Willard Goldberg, Leslie Pat- ten, William Goodwin. National Honor Society This year a new society has been formed. Its main objective is to give recognition to those people in the senior class who have high scholastic records. The society was presented with a charter which contains the rules to be followed by Honor So- cieties in all schools. There are 2,056 Chapters in the United States. A- school must be recognized by the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools before a charter will be granted. Each member receives a card entitling him to belong. On April twenty-first, a chapel program was given honoring this society. The mem- bers sat on the platform and their names were read. Dr. J. L. King, the head of the English Department at Denison University, delivered the speech. Officers President ............. Vice-President ..... Secretary .......... Treasurer ..........,. Faculty Adviser ..... . SIXTY-FOUR ......Sheldon Keinath ......Eleanor Sperry ......Betty Strosnider .......Thomas Norpell .....Miss Laura Hosick First Row-Miss Esther Larr, Jean Fleming, Diana Sliuebruk, Sara Cochlan, Juliet Upson, Phyllis Boyd, Jeanne Mulquin, Arabelle Heft, Eleanor Sperry. Second Row-Anna Baker, Mary Jane Albyn, Marjorie Jones, Kathleen Norris, Peggy Smith, Anita Bline, Alice Berson, Florence Rinehart, Third Row-Howard Siegel, John Maharg, George Criswell, William Fiske, Willard Goldberg, Junior Reed. Fourth Row-Theodore Munch, Leslie Patten, Robert Rice, Erik Kess- meier, William Mercer, Daniel Hickman, Jack Lytle, The Senior Class Presents "PRIDE AND PREJUDICEH ACTS 1, 11, III - THE BENNET HOME. cAsT or CHARACTERS Mr, Bennet ,,,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,...,,.....l ,.........,.. R O bert Rice Hill ,,,,,.,,.,,,,,,,..,.,,,,,, ....... D aniel Hickman Mrs, Bennet ,,,,.,,,,, ,,...,..,.... A nna Baker Lady Lucas ,.........,,., .,..... M arjorie Jones Charlotte Lucas ........, ,,,,,.,...... A rabelle Heft Jane Bennet .,.....,..... Elizabeth Bennet ........ Lydia Bennet ....,,. Mr. Darcy .......... Mr. Bingley .....,. Mr. Collins ........ ........,.Mary Jane Albyn ,.,......Diana Shuebruk ,,,......Kathleen Norris .,,............Jack Lytle ..,.,,.....Howard Siegel ..,,.,,.George Criswell Amelia ,,,,,.,,,,,,,,,, ,,,,, ,,..,.,. A n ita Bline Mr. Wickham ....... .,,.... E rik Kessmeier Belinda .............,. ....,.......... P eggy Smith Amanda .................. A Young Man .......... Captain Denney ........,. Miss Bingley ............,,..... Agatha ................,.............,.. A Second Young Man ,...,,,, ..........Eleanor Sperry ,....,.....John Maharg .,......Leslie Patten ........Juliet Upson .......Jean Fleming ..........Junior Reed A Maid ,.,,......,,..,,,,..,,,...,,,.,.,,,,,,, .,,,,.....,.... A lice Berson Maggie .,,.....,.,,,..,,,.,.,...,,,,,....ll,r,,,rl ,..,.... J eanne Mulquin Mrs. Gardiner .,..........................,..., .....,........... S ara COCh1aI1 Lady Catherine de Bourgh ..,,,,,,, Mildred Creighton Colonel Fitzwilliam .................... .....,,....,,,,,,,... .......... W i lliam MGFCQI' Mrs. Lake ................,,.....,.......,.. ...r,.r.,.....l....,.,..,... ....,...... P h yllis Boyd Director of Dialogue ....... Director of Orchestra ......... Directors Esther Larr Sam Gelfer SIXTY-FIVE Chairman ......,........,..x......................,,..,............. Class Song .......................................................,.....,....................,....,...,............... Class Day Class of 1937 Class Colors Blue and Silver Class Flower Iris Class Motto Out of School's Life Into Life's School. Class Song Tune, "When You Come to the End of a Perfect Day." When we come to the end of twelve long years, And all our school days are o'er. As we think of this, there drops a tear For the joys that will be no more. VVhen we think of the friends that we soon will leave, And the teachers so kind and true, That is the time that we start to grieve For the school days that we knew. For memory retains all the trials and cares That all our school days present. But in summing them up they appear so rare That our school days we can't resent. In years to come we will dream of the days That we spent with you, Newark High. These dreams we are sure will all be so gay That we'll cherish them till we die. -Kathleen Norris Senior Day Assembly Program May 24, 1937 Baker .Double Quartette Martha Graff, Jean Price, Jeanne Cullison, Helena Stotler, John Maharg, -George Criswell, Leslie Patten, Erik Kessmeier. Two-Piano Selection ........,....................,...........................,........ Beth Clark, Theodore Munch Solo ..............................................................................................,......,.....,.................... John Maharg Accompaniment .......... ....... M axine Roberts, Junior Reed, Marianne Upson Play ..,...,............................. .......... ....,.,..' ..............................,............,.., Th e L ost Silk Hat By Lord Dunsany Cast The Caller ....,,. The Laborer .... The Clerk ............... ,,.,..,,,,.. ..,, The Poet .......... The Policeman .......... ...................,,....,. ,.,.,.,.... .... Solo ...........,.,...... Thomas Rugg Chester Boyling .John Cicur .......Thomas Norpell Jack Bolton .......George Criswell Song ...................... ................... A Ima Mater .............,... ...................... S chool Senior Day Committees School Decoration ..,......Y.........Y...,......................................,............................... Freda Evans, Chairmang Betty Stro Entertainment. snider, Robert Warman, Jesse Warthen, Helena Stotler, Julius Sabo. Party Shuebruk, Chairmang Mildred Creighton, Woodrow Martin, Richard Gillespie, Marjorie Jones, Victor Ritter, Edwin Ryan. h Decoration ............,..,........,,......,., . ............,... , ,,,,,,....,.........,,,,......,,,,. . .Shirley Bishop, Chairmang Edith Anderegg, Juliet Upson, Howard Siegel, Paul Goodin, Leslie Patten, John Shaller. Refreshment .............................................,............,....,............,...,... Thomas Hessm, Chairmang Hosts and Hostesses .......................... Martha Ann Allen and Joseph Weakley, Chairmen: Don Schofield, Harries Morgan, Peggy Smith, Virginia Reese, Betty Calland. SIXTYFSIX Albert Marzano Robert Mercer Robert Evans Molly Lewis Junior Class Otificers President Albert Marzano Vice-President Secretary Robert Mercer Robert Evans Treasurer Molly Lewis SIXTY-SEVEN ROW 1 Mr. Geo. Stoeckmann Mary Beaumont Betty Bostwick Ruth Ashcraft Chariot Bell Charlotte Bushfiold Emajean Baughman Dorthea Beatty June Campbell Clarellen Burton ROWV 2 Ruth Barclay Mavis Bachelor Katherine Carnlin 'Hazel Arnold Margaret Brandt Martha Cagney .Tane Beall Marjorie Botts ROW 3 Margaret Adzic Ruth Andrews Martha Cass Charlotte Bigony Wilma Bermerman Freda Brucker Betty Jane Briggs Marian Beaumont Wilbur Armstrong Robert Bachman Margaret Booth John Conant Dorothy Davidson Howard Drew Robert Drumm SIXTY-EIGHT Junior Class Alice Buckingham Eileen Bruney ROXV 4 Earl Haynes Calvin Friend Virginia Benner Edith Boyer Virginia Anderson Betty Anderson Walter Colville .lack Cummons Robert 'Davis ROW 5 Wynn Jones Eugene Crouch Russell Cates Gilbert Curry Edgar Jones Delbert Holtz William Coelho Rex Forbes Lawrence Callander Robert Ellis ROW 6 Vernon Davidson Robert Dusthimer Randell Couden Wilbur Coen Wayne Dowie Xvilliam 'Farrow JUNIORS NOT IN PICTURES. Charles Feldner Virginia Jeffers Ellsworth Jones Ruth Mickly Ireka Roike Charles Sanders Mary Evelyn Schenk Tilton Bebout Edward Babbitt Ralph Cook Robert Boyd IIUW 7 Louis Brooks NVillis Berger Jerome Christman Joseph Baggs John Danford Joseph Dankmer Lynn Campbell Martin Bixler Bruce Bazlr-r ROW 8 Lowell Baughman Bernard Bickle Nicholas Evans .Tames Beeny Edward Boyling Chester Barrett Llovd Campbell Arthur Fisher ROW 0 Paul Cady Neal Carpenter Thomas Anderson Robert Benjamin Philip Booth Margaret V. Smith Betty Snelling Wanda Spearman Raymond Walters William Wharton Robert Worth ROSV 1 Gladys Grigsby Marguerite Johnson Myrtle Jaynes Dorothy Hall Irene Hopkins Phyllis Kelley Clanabelle Kemp Mary Hull ROW 2 Betty Haudenshield Betty Hill Phyllis Hutchison Eleanor Jeffers Bernice Holton Marjorie QH-ughes Shirley Keim .lean Kanuckle Eleanor Jeffers ROW 3 Audrey Hickman Marjorie Harter Jasmine Garapedian Jeanne Fundaberg Suemarie Johnson Helen Glass Barbara Helm Janet -Horwitz Mary Hogue Doris English Junior Class ROXV 4 Grace Ghiloni Alice Frost Dorothy Cavendish Jean Etnier Margaret Catt Jean Chrisman Mary Eleanor Chilcote Anabel Cochran Hazel Farquhar Vivian Cline ROW 5 Ruth Criss Eileen Curts Dorothy Flenner Charlene Edmunds Anna Marie Fisher Mary Cunningham Ruth Damuth Cora Alice Edwards Geraldine Deboard Jean Crane ROW 6 Helen Crawford Bonita Chaney Lorraine Bailey Dorothy Davis Bonnie Carey Dorothy Flack Frances Fisher Margaret :Ford Valeria Ford Magel Davidson ROW 7 James Grigsby Richard Huffman John Greider Thomas Goodwin John Ghiloni Nvilliam lH1orner Lewis Gray James Cope Gerald Haycook Richard Graham ROVY S Russell Inlow Eugene Hardway Walter Handel llichard Imhoff Marian Geiger Cheney Humphreys David Hardman Edward Flarmer Robert Copeland ROW 9 William Kale Royal Keyes Robert Evans Howard Decker Chester Emch VVil1iam Erskin SIXTY-NINE ROW 1 Frances Martin Betty Lanning Juanita Mason Dorothy Lewis Molly Lewis Jean Lichtenstein Marion McCullough Joan Kidd ROW 2 Dorothy Loar Marie Loy Margaret McCann Lorraine Lydie Mary MacDonald Helen Lucas Jean Little Marian McDowell ROW 3 Leo Rey Norman Ruff Andrew Turner Lillilan Lake Mary Lou Mitchell June Lehr Anne McKim Evelyn Lawson SEVENTY Junior Class ROW 4 Eldon Shauck Justin Reickert Ernest Rnmine Robert Roe Paul Wells Earl Stevens Neil Trimble Walter Tracy Vvilliam Trowbridge ROWRS John Shinn Robert Simpson Martin Wilson George Wolfe Ernest Smith Charles Ross Robert Welsh Robert Sanders Donald Smith ROW 6 Paul Layton Marvin Vlance Robert Wells Francis Trager Ernest Wintermute Russell Younce Robert Wortman John Quick Frederick Ricketts ROXV 7 Ralph Mason Robert Kincaid George Larason Robert McDanlels Robert Lauver Arthur Wright Ralph Russell Ralph Schwartz Roy Rowland ROW 8 Robert Lambert Roy Layman Albert Marzano James Lane Russell Lovell Robert Linton John Mercer Darrell Steele RUWV 0 John Lentz Junior Mclnturf VValker Maddox Robert Kunninger Clarence Mercer HOW 1 Roberta Painter Virginia Milbaugh Mildred Owen Mary Myer Be-tty Mitchell Marcella Morgan Marian Miller Bonnilee Priest Marjorie Owen ROW 2 Betty Norris Vivian Muhieman Hazel Peniok Irma Porter Frances Phillips Valeria Miller Christine Meriwether Ella Miller ROW 3 Robert Mercer Albert Schramm Dean Priest Harold Messick Wfarren Orr Frances Phillips Junior Class Helen Pound Gleneva Pritchett ROW 4 Frederick Martindale Alton Love Paige Nelson 'Harold O'Dell Robert Needham Joseph Painter Robert Pratt Gerald Miller ROW 5 Ralph Kirt Maramon McFarland llorin Kincade Neil Litten Frank Kover Ralph McArtor Elmer Prior Raymond Paulson VVarrer1 Montgomery ROW 6 Paul Maidel llalph Melick George McA1pine Vllilliam Passman James Orr Stanley Mueller Robert Morgan Robert Norman Clifford Miller ROW 7 Donald Powell James Ghiloni Robert Potter Clarence Hoffman William Pletcher Frederick Myers Charles Osborn Frank Price BOYV S Harvey Lowe Ralph Kelly Robert Green Harry Hinton Warren Holcombe Joseph Hirschberg Robert Parker ROW 9 Walter Hammack Henry Giles John Ingmire Elsworth Kelley Carter Harrison SEVENTY-ONE ROW 1 Jeanne Welch Eileen Warthen Kathryn Wilson Dorothy Walters Maxine Shaw Marcia Shields Josephine XValz Mabel Walters Frances Williams Mary Wolfe ROWV 2 Mildred Van Fossen Elizabeth Vogel Mary Margaret Sheboy Jeanette Shernmn Leona Prysi Luster Washington Mildred Worley Jean Toney ROW 3 Gladys Steele Ann Varner Bertha Walker Opal Smith Maxine Sparks Hazel Reid Phyllis Schenk Alice Puffer Ruth Sherard SEVENTY-TWO Junior Class ROVV 4 Lorene Stevens Helen Sayotovich Betty Stockdale Jean Wintermute Ellen Roshon Nellie VVillison Mildred 'Steele Susanne Titus Bernadine YVood ROW 5 Helen Unterhaher Margaret Tipton Helen Spellman Diana Seufert Mabel Thompson Neva. Smith Margaret Ann VVright ' Marjorie Young Jeanette Wright ROW 6 Carolyn Trefzer Mildred Souslin Rosalie Richards Beulah Taylor Betty Rechel Maxine Reel Janet Ruffner Madeleine Schlieffer Helen Van Fossen Harriet Somers ROW 7 Charles White Betty Shields Marjorie Shannon Martha Rose Sanders Edna Smith Esther Rine Marcella Spangler Evelyn Siegle Velma Shepherd John VVieber ROW 8 Morris YVolfe William Warthen Paul Thompson Floyd Smoke David Williams Charles Wright Ralph Ryan ROW 9 Raymond Walters Robert Worth Kenneth Wobbecke Warner VVolverton XVilliam Stevens. James Tiemann Paul Adams Howard Upson Lois Frye Robert Westbrook Sophomore Class Officers President Paul Adams Vice-President Secretary Howard Upson Lois Frye Treasurer Robert Wesfbrook SEVENTY-THREE ROW 1 Ollie Connor Ruth Craig Helen Boyd Margaret Bonham Geraldine Bonham Lillian Bailey Mary Chaftterton Marie Bosold ROW 2 Faith Barlow Vada Bell Helen Bell Hazel Bebout Mary Angeletti Christine Crabbin Betty Burt May Carpenter Beulah Binger Charlotte Branscombe R-0W 3 Bessie Billman Helen Brown Mildred Braddock Ozie Atwell June Barrick Rebecca Bebout Sophomore Class Jean Bachelor Mary Baughman Jeanette Carson Leah Baughman ROXV 4 Bet-ty Ball Evelyn Buchanan Mary Anderson Margaret Coyle Fran-ces Brown Harriet Bryan John Chism Clifford Clark Albert Berson Richard Benner IIOW 5 Robert Boyd John Bibart Oscar Cook Ch-aries Atherton Allen Cook Robert 'Ht Brown Robert Cartnal Robert Cramer Stanley Brehm John Chester. ROW 6 Richard Baker Leland Ball William Ayers James Cocanour Robert Coffman Harry Baker Robert W. Brown Charles Bibart Robert Black Harold Lehman ROXV 7 Russell Conley Paul Adams Wilbur Andrews William Cramer Robert Finney Hermann Boyd Rollin Bishop Norman Duvall ROW S Ernest Curry John Gutridge Robert Bolen Wayne Esworthy Eugene Griffith SOPHOMORES NOT IN PICTURES. Harold Azbell Ruth Baumgartner Margaret Burden Martha Chester Dale Cotterman Robert Cunningham Dorothy Davidson Sophie Eppic Cleophus Fears George Fulk Howard Goode SEVENTY-FOUR Maxine Gray Catherine Green Lawrence Giusinger Virginia Harris Della Kidner William McArtor Carl Maddux William Miller Olive Morrison Nancy Henzy Dolores Peart Lucille Price Howard Robinson Elmer Shaw Warren Shaw Robert Thompson Robert Trost Charles Wade Alice Westenbarger Kathryn Willy Robert Wince Magdaline Yannelli ROW 1 Evelyn Gray Julia Garapedian Maxine Hall Virginia Dudgeon Grace Dunn Marie 'Greider Christine Glover Ruth Graham ROVV 2 Bonnie Dustheimer Betty Davis Mary Martha Hackney Jeanne Dorn Helen Hall Grace Gentile Luanna Devall Margaret Crawford ROW 3 Jane Grigsby Gladys Davis Virginia Frey Virginia Edwards Dorothy Crothers Sophomore Class Ruth Graham Frances Cummins 'Hazel Frazier Ruth Davidson Florence Fuller. ROW 4 Hazel Faller Betty Fulton Shirley Grigsby Marian Davis Sarah lFrost Jlanet Franz Dorothy Fuller Orvalene Fowler Shirley Folger ROW 5 .lane Ferguson Lois Frye Marian Finney Dorothy Davis Jean 'Gamerdinger Georgiana Gerloch Robert Crouch Robert Gray Robert Forgraves ROW 6 Rowland Gano Blakely Diller Wlayne Davisson John Denton James Goodwin Marshall Freeman Elder Duvall Clyde Goff William Groves ROW 7 James 1Fernow Dale Guthridge John Crawford Robert Glover Herbert Dickerson Carl Deck Paul Gould Errol Gutliph Fred Hageman ROW 8 Lawrence Gentile Harry Dorsey Robert Good Clarence Fry George Griffith Charles Derringer SEV ENTY FIVE l I i ROW 1 Marie Keller Jean Kelley Helen Hanby Carolene Hammond Betty Hanes Freida Hartman Laura Harris Indus Hartman ROW 2 Olive Holman Dorothy Jeanne lHlomer Eileen Hollar Evelyn Hickman Ruth Hershberger Catherine Henry Marian Hartshorn Mary Heil Thelma Hawkins ROW 3 Anita Hollister Eleanora Humphrey Sylvia Hurst Eleanor Iden MarY Humble SEVENTY-SIX Sophomore Class Gwynfa Jones Betty Jones Ethel Johns Dorothy Jaynes Jeanne Kemp ROW 4 Geraldine Kegg Carolyn Keck Wilma Jones Laurene Jones Mlary Virginia Jones Katherine Jones Helen Jones Linnea Kessmeier Betty Kephart Dorothy Kemnitzer ROW 5 Forrest Holcombe Clair Hollis William Holland William Hill Robert Hickman William fH1ess John Hart Dana Hammond Everett Keller VVayne Hammfaick ROW 6 Carl Hurlburt Rollin Jauohius Herbert Howarth Carl Hollar Raymond Hoover Herbert lHlorton Robert Iden Roderick Huff Richard Idleman ROW 7 Joseph Luzio Robert King Richard McCoy Kenneth Kennon Bernard Inscho Russell Hupp Serge Jackson Sylvester Ingmlre ROWV S Joseph Kvintus John H. Loughridge Mary Layman Lawrence Lint Frederick Morin. ROW 1 Grace Milner Ruth Miller Dorothy Meaeham Marjorie Norman Ellan Jean 'Mason Frances Minor Dorothy McDaniel Jane Messick R0 NV 2 Betty Long Annya Koman Irene Lingafelter Darline Lybarger Dorothy Moore Carrie Linton Eleanor Mills Martha McKnight Row 3 Mary Lightle Marvene Lynch Ruth Maharg Helen McDowell Marguerite Lynn Sophomore Class Josephine Kirkpatrick Betty June Meacham Gladys Kinser .lune Kocher Evelyn Kreager ROVY 4 Geneva McCutcheon Juanita McFarland Pauline Lane Eleanor Lamp Betty Lightner Veldui Lawyer Jane Lees Ruth Lescalleet Catherine Lydia ROW 5 George Logan Kenneth Moore Forrest McDonald Edwin Moran Richard Le Blanc Donald McFarland Eileen Le Hew Elizabeth Larason Dorothy List ROW 0 Doniald Layman Paul Matthews Richard Mitchell James Montanaro Ralph Lane Forrest King Harold Lashley Russell McCullough ROW 7 Donald Myers Richard Oberfield Vernon Paulson Floyd Orr Paul Ricket Thomas Powell Robert Raymond Carl Nourse Floyd Rusk ROWV S. Louis Rico Alfred Prince Paul Redman Fred Offenbaker Richard O'Conner Jack Nelson SEVENTY SEVEN ROW 1 Alice Roberts Betty Richus Janice Pierson Helen Roberts Margaret Orr Gladys Roley Pauline Pritchard Janet Roof Mary Jane Russell Kathleen Phillips ROWV 2 Mary Roach Eileen Neighbor Rosa Rowe Geneva Murphy Janice Mulquin Margaret Myers Ellen Owen Dorothy Rose ROW 3 Dorothy Pethtel Estella, Orr Betty Parker .lean Myers Virginia Roberts Juanita Rogers Ruth Pierce Mary Restorick Margaret Ryan SEVENTY-EIGHT Sophomore Class IKUWY 4 Jean Young Annabel Peck Je-an Radcliff Irene Rupright Virginia Priest Betty Rector Iiena Orr Betty Mummey Goldie White Marjorie Winn ROW' 5 Ilelc-n Yearian Clara Mae Wilkin Catherine Wright Frances Yannelli Betty Welsh Marjory Welsh Helen VVeiant Margaret Ann Wfarner Betty Wilson Mildred Wolvrurton ROW 6 Edwin Pratt Ralph Woltjen Esther Yost Betty Warthen Joan VVorkman Barbara Zipoerer Katherine Westbrooke Rachel XVilley Lillian VVilliamS IUHV 7 George Wilson Joseph West Donald VVarmz-in Emmett Parson Josenh Neale VValter Nethers Vernon Penick Donald Morrow ROW S Harold Welsh Paul Whiteford XVayne Rogers Howard Neibarge James Rutledge Russell O'Neal Owen Pease ROW 9 Robert Wise I' Robert Westbrook William Murray Jack Warrington Eugene Nohls. Y v ROW 1 Ardyth Uffner Olga Veia Charlotte Swain Virginia Tharp June Stewart Ruth Ellen Stevens Shirlene ,Stanley Dorothy ,Shubirg ROXV 2 June Shearer Lucille Smith Betty Tucher Margaret Sepas Wilma Steele Wvilma, Smith Mildred Stiff Aimee Stuart Sylvia Sutton Dorothy Stough Evelyn Wallace ROVV 3 Betty Scales Margaret Shoemaker Berline Sanders Betty Shrigley Anna Stricklin Sophomore Class Elizabeth Smith Ruth Slater Phyllis ,Swigart Helen Stasel Dorothy Vermillion VVilbur Toothman ROW 4 Mary Skinner Virginia Vogel Ruth Schinske Nev-a Scott Richard Taafel Robert Varner Orville Varasso Kenneth Van Winkle Joseph Stevens Raymond Van Atta ROW 5 John Walker Estle Sanders Diana Savage Howard Upson David Simpson Clarence ,Shields Kenneth Seaman VValter Scott Harold Tate Elwin Toothman ROW 6 Richard Steen Joseph ,Schilling Eugene Shaw Theodore Schonberg Earl Settles Charles Smith John Telvin Donald Tumblin Robert Thompson ROW 7 Stewart Sedgewick John Sellars Laurence Wagner George Smothers Hubert Thompson Samuel -Sachs William Speaks John Mercer ROW S Edward Smith William Ryan Russell Simpson Kenneth Smith SEVENTYANINE EIGHTY Woodrow Wilson School Woodrow Wilson Junior High School Louise W. Eichhorn B. A., Denison University M. A., University of Michigan Principal I EIGI-lTYlONE Woodrow Wilson Ninth Grade Marjorie Abbott Faustina Allen Frank Ball Dorothy Beabout Virginia Belt William Berson Macille Betz Walter Bickle Charles Booher Virginia Bowers Betty Bozman June Brown Jean Brush Maynard Butt Warren Butte Elaine Campbell Janice Clay David Copeland Gladys Cummings Keith Cummins Marion Curp Dorothy Davis Ruth Dumm Mary Elizabeth Eddy Byron Elder Gene Fields June Florian Evelyn Frankenbery Woodrow Frizzell Carl Gano Earl Graham Eugene Green Grace Grigsby Lester Hallisy Ralph Harris Ann Hawkins Maudie Haynes EIGHTY TWO Richard Helphrey Joyce Heeter Betty Hickman Helen Hoffer Richard Hull Robert Hull Malcomb Idleman Eva John Gerald Juniper Leahmae Kemp Imogene Kilbury William Kincaid Don Kisamore Eileen Lallathin Carl Lambert Hugh Lauver Betty Lawrence Charles Lawrence Virgil Lehman Elma Lint Robert Mathews Joy Mitchell Charles Moore James Moore Margaret Moore Gerald Mossman Charlotte Myer Sue McFadden Barbara McKinnon Wayne McWilliams Roby Nelson Frances O'Banion Thomas Orr Gerald Peffers Charles Pope Frank Popham Keith Priest Paul Queen Mary Reid George Ridenbaugh William Schenk Irvin Scott Mildred Scruggs Betty Sellars Marcella Shaw Esther Sherman Gladys Skinner - Charles Slotterbeck Betty Smith Enola Smith Robert Smith Sylvia Smith William Spangler Kenneth Stage Bessie Stamas Eugene Steinman Charles Stevens Catherine Stiff Shirley Swigart Carl Tate Lucille Thompson James Touvell Robert Van Winkle Carson Varner Marjorie Wagner William Weakley Mary VVhite George Wiemer Dorothy Williams Donald Wilkins Sadie Wilson William Wilson Harold Windle Gene Woodyard Walter Worden Phoebe Wyant Jean Yarger Seated in front of the table-from left to right-Enola Smith, Phoebe Wyant, Elma Lint, Virginia Bowers, Miss Louise Eichhorn, Esther Sher- man, Maudie Haynes, Betty Bozman, Junc Brown, June Florian, and Jean Brush. Seated back of the table-Evelyn Frankenbery, Marcella Shaw, Betty Lawrence, Mildred Scruggs, Sadie Wilson, Mrs. Sara Ernst, Anna Hawk- ins, Virginia Belt, Janice Clay, Mary Reid, Lucille Thompson, Faustina Allen, and Miss Anita Mcllandlish. Standing--Leahmac Kemp, Dorothy Beabout, Margaret Moore and Jane Grigsby. Not in the picture-Mary Elizabeth Eddy, Be-tty Smith, and Dorothy Williams. Luncheon ls Served. The ninth grade home economics class of Woodrow Wilson Junior High School has enjoyed a varied course of study this year under the supervision of Mrs. Sara Ernst. The three main projects have cen- tered around the study of foods, shelter and clothing. The work with food problems consisted of planning, purchasing, preparing and lastly, serving the completed meal. Hostess training and etiquette augmented this project. For broadening experience a num- ber of field trips were enjoyed. These in- cluded trips through a local dairy, bakery, and furniture store. Of especial interest to the class was a visit to the model kitchen of the Ohio Power Company, culminating in a luncheon prepared by the students. A series of lectures was sponsored by the class, including talks by a contractor on home building, a banker on household fi- nance, and a social worker on family re- lationship. For inspiration in house planning, new homes have been inspected and discussed. At the conclusion of the clothing project a style show was presented and a tea given for mothers of the members of the group. The aim of the class has been better training for successful home making. EIGHTY-THREE EIGHTY-FOUR Roosevelt School Roosevelt junior High School Department H. W. Carr B. A., Ohio Wesleyan University M. A., Ohio State University Principal Jeanne Allen Xenia Athan Russell Baker Ralph Brooke Dorothy Brown George Budd Patricia Burkam Evelyn Burrier Philip Butler Jane Camlin Robert Carlisle Dorothy Carpenter Marjorie Carpenter Frances Carver Philip Christman Ellen Clark Eugene Cooperrider Donald Coss Eugene Courson Anne Davis Irona Davis Virginia Deck Arthur Dodson Betty Drake Betty Duncan Connie Dustheimer Edward Eikleberry Thelma Esworthy Martha Field Herman Fischer Thomas Flannigan Juanita Fogle Jean Fulton Virginia Gantt Patrick Giblin Gertrude Glass Charles Gleckler Roosevelt Ninth Grade. Eva Gleckler Clifford Gray George Greer J aunita Hardeman Richard Harris Betty Haycook Jean Hazlett Jerry Hess Mary Holmes William Horton Doris Inlow Herbert Jackson Darwin Johnson Ruth Kelley Mildred Kirby Mary Kuhn Bernard Lee Ruth Le Hew Ellen Levin Paul Linton Betty Logan David Long William Lothes Joseph McLean Ruth Marriott Wayne Martin George Massalas Thomas Massalas Julius Meriwether Robert Mickley Jean Miller William Miller Clara Moran Adrian Murphy Joan Myer Maxine Norpell Janet Nye Virginia Pierce Bernice Popham Thomas Radu John Raymond Richard Raymond George Reese George Rhodeback Joseph Richard Jack Ridenour Thomas Rogers James Sachs Virginia Scarbrough Minnie Schmoll Edna Shaw Donald Shrock Eugene Snelling Betty Spiker Robert Street Delbert Stroud Betty Sullivan Leonard Tipton Frederick Truex Robert Weaver Kathleen Weekley Marjorie Weston Doris Williams Jean Williams Earl Wilson Virginia Wonders Beth Ann Woolard Martha Worley John Wright Marjorie Wymer Mary Young Mary Zipperer EIGHTY FIVE Industrial Arts Shop Program. ROLAND ESPER. It is the wish of this department that the old term 'tManual Training" be abolished from any conversation relative to the shop. The term has been dead and buried for a number of years in every progressive in- dustrial arts shop. A person might ask why the change of terms? It is simply this, we wish to convey more than mere manual work, we would like to have the public realize that it is more than this we teach, rather a course in which three things stand out prominently in our objectives, these being the education of C11 the head, C25 the heart, Q39 the hand. With these in mind we are attempting to set up our new pro- gram, a progressive step in a modern In- dustrial Arts program. It was originally the intention that every boy be given a course in woodwork and sometimes woodwork and mechanical drawing. After a number of years' study on a program for the schools by prominent men in the field, among them being Dr. William E. Warner of Ohio State Univer- sity and Dr. Selvidge of Missouri Univer- EIGHTY-SIX sity, a new set-up has been brought about in which different materials are brought into play. In expanding our program, which we will attempt to do, we will in- clude in our curriculum the following types of work: C15 a foundry unit, C23 a sheet metal unit, Q33 an electrical unit, C49 a wrought iron unit as a start, and add more units in the future. Our program will call for a rotation of groups of students through these various areas, each one re- ceiving definite knowledge, on an elemen- tary basis, of each unit. After these varied experiences, if an individual feels he would like to concentrate on one unit and learn more about it, we permit him to do so. Then, there may be some who, after hav- ing had experience in each unit, wish to make a project perhaps involving several departments. They will be encouraged to take up the problem, only after careful planning. Through this set-up, the student is given experiences in various fields, thus broadening his viewpoint and adding im- measureably to the interest. Lincoln School Lincoln Junior High School Department. Thora Mac Donagh A. B., Denison University Principal EIGHTY-SEVEN John Adams Marian Andrews Edward Anton Floyd Armentrout Eston Armstrong Leland Barclay Marjorie Barrett Donna Baughman Charles Bell June Bentley Gisela Bero Mary Brownfield Marian Buckingham Eva Buell Ernest Busby Gene Cassell Margaret Cherry Robert Cherry Eloise Cooper John Cornell Pearl Cost Norma Cougill Helen Criss Raphael Davino Betty Davis William Davis Kermit Dilts Henrietta Drumm Russell Drumm Leonard Emerson Albert Francis Maxine Francis Gerald Freeman Robert Fulke Eva Glaunsinger James Glover EIGHTY-EIGHT' Lincoln Ninth Grade. James G-ood Delmar Handley Edward Hanes Mae Hankey Dortha Hartman Raymond Heck Marie Hinger Cecelia Hoffer Phyllis Holland Alice Holman Margaret Hornyak Mary Horton Robert Hoyt Esther Huff Charles Huggins Arthur Hughes Juanita Hull Goldie Hurst Claudette Hyatt Louise Matilda Jacobs Jean Jeffers Homer Jones Jack Jones Maxine Kanuckle Ralph Kastla Jean Kirk Charles Kline Charlotte Lamb Edna La Rue George Lascu Lee Layton Margaret Layton Arthur Lewis Dick Loughman Ruth Ludholtz Elizabeth McElwain Robert Mclnturf Vlarybelle McKnight Wayne Martin Cecil Meharry Henrietta Mencer James Miller Harold Milligan Naomi Mitchell Henry Moore Ann Morgan Richard Muhleman Marian Myers Susan Nethers James Norris Betty Nutter Fred O'Dell Paul O'Neal Austin Peel Roy Plymale Gloria Price Kathryn Price Luther Priest Louis Rector Virginia Richards Helen Louise Rickrich Betty Rubel Charles Ruton Walter Ryan Russell Sampoul Joann Schofield Leah Scott Joseph Sensabaugh Robert Sensabaugh Carl Shannon Clyde Shipp Rhea Siegle Elma Smith Elsworth Smith Jean Smith Laverne Smith Evadean Snelling Norris Snelling Donald Speaks Harold Steele Rose Mary Stewart William Stockdale James Sullivan Lewis Swanbeck Robert Swern Marie Thompson Elsie Ulrich Dorothy Vance Carl Van Curen Leland Varner Earl Walker Helen Walker Harry Wallace William Warthen Harry Welsh Frank Wessinger Katherine Whyde Robert Willard Anna William Fred Wise Tommy Wolcutt Betty Wood Hilda Worstell Phyllis Young The Sphinx Club. The Sphinx Club is the boys' honor group at Lincoln. Its membership consists of those students who maintain a high level of efficiency in their scholastic at- tainments. With the wide and varied pro- gram of the modern junior high school, we are in danger of allowing activities, both curricular and extra-curricular, to crowd in upon the class room. Sphinx Club is the incentive to good class room work in the boyis first year in junior high school, since a B average must be maintained throughout the seventh year in order to be eligible to admission. Suspension is the penalty paid for a lapse of class-work re- sponsibility. However, their interests are far reaching. The club purchased the new suits for the basket ball team this year. They also presented a delightful comedy, "Dinner Is Served" for assembly. Mr. Edgar Sherman acts as adviser to the group. The boys included in Sphinx are: Delmar Handley, George Lascu, Ells- worth Smith, Clyde Shipp, Leland Barclay, Lawrence Hunter, Robert Mclnturf, Fred Cochran, Robert Meachem, Richard Lecky, Leonard Emerson, Robert Fulke, Thomas Walcutt, Junior Bebout, Kenneth Wright, Duane Myers, Calvin Buchanan. EIGHTY-NINE First row-from left to right-Fred O'dell, Austin Peel, Frank Wessinger, Richard Loughman, Ray Davino. Second row-Coach Edgar Sherman, Thomas Wolcutt, Manager, James Smith, Harry Wallace, Clyde Shipp, Fred Wise, Earl Walker, Ellsworth Smith, Manager. Junior High School Championship Team. Play is a part of man's original nature and organized games should aim to secure a maximum of enjoyment as well as a defi- nite skill in participation. Under the direc- tion of Mr. Edgar Sherman, physical edu- cation teacher and coach at Lincoln Junior High School, a high standard of sportsman- ship is being developed. The welfare of the individual is kept definitely as a goal. This welfare includes not only his physical well-being, but his relation to the activi- ties of the school at large. He must prac- NINETY tice the qualities of the good citizen. There is no other phase of the school situation which provides the opportunity to prac- tice so many of these qualities of the good citizen as athletics. The athletic program should be such that the results should show in an enrichment of curricular activities. The members of this winning team rep- resent junior high school basketball as it should be, a fine and exciting, but thor- oughly sane activity. Central School Central junior High School Department. i. Dora Brennstuhl Miami University Columbia University Michigan State Normal Principal NINETY-ONE Beatrice Amos Helen Anast Arthur Armstrong Cleo Baker Virginia Blosser Marjorie Boring Charles Cline Ruby Conner Ralph Corbett Roberta Couden Jack Davis ' Frieda Dean Eugene Debevoise Billy Diehl Edna Diehl La Verda Disbennett Henry Drumm Robert Dudgeon Katherine Feldner Betty Ford Hilda Fouman Virginia Froelick Charles Garrison Alice Geidenberger Ben Goldberg Suzanne Goodwin Martha Gutridge Elizabeth Hankinson Edith Hare NINETY TWO Central Ninth Grade. Beulah Harris June Hartman Helen Hay Bessie Hightshoe Jim Hightshoe Phyllis Holland Billy Ingmire Katherine Kelley Martha Lahley Mary Lentz Olivia Loper Ida MacDonald Robert MacNealy Jack McClain Jack Maginness Anton Mantz Robert Marriott Paul Martindale Howard Meacham Garnett Miller J une Monroe Ralph Montonaro Francis Munkachy Mary Lou Naylor Marjorie Norman Margaret O'Conner Luther Painter Edward Paul Clyde Priest Frances Radcliff Cloise Radwell Eileen Reid Billy Richards Dorothy Riggleman Elsie Rine Edgar Ritchie Frank Rizzo Betty Roderick Arland Rogers Pearl Roley Mildred Ruffner John Savage Susanna Shackle- ford Gerald Shubirg Donald Smith Wilbur Smith Dorothy Spitzer Joseph Swick Fred Tiemann Jack Utrevis Robert Wagers Roy Walters Owen Weaver Jack Welsh Elmer Wilkin Virginia Wilson Dorothy Winter- mute Esther Wolverton Front Row, Left to Right-Mildred Ruffner, Ethel Wilkin, Virginia Haro, Kathryn Kemnitzer, Dorothy Goodin, Betty Lescody, Elizabeth Shannon. Second Row-Carolyn Kuppinger, Ruth Fields, Marjorie Courson, Lois Brandt, Rosanna Bieberbach, Juanita Jones, June Christofferson, Don- ald Shields. Third Row-Virginia Maier, Jennie Harris, Joan Frey, Suzanne Good- win, Dorothy Spitzer, Richard Meacham, Franklin Keyes, Elmer Munkachy. Fourth Row - Virginia Logan, Edith Hare, Evenes Stanley, Garnett Miller, Fred Mossman, Billy lngmire, Centrars Honor Roll. It seems quite fitting to honor in some way those who have been an asset to the school in scholarship and extra-curricular activities. Central is justly proud of the students pictured above, for not only have they made an enviable record scholas- tically, but they are pupils who have con- tributed much to the constructive program of the school. Their scholarship, their steady, reliable conduct, and their activity in school projects make them typical of that which is to be desired of pupils in the present day school system. Requirements for the honor roll are four grades of A, or three grades of A and a B. Too much praise cannot be given these students for their efforts and perseverance in attaining a place on Central's honor roll. NINETY-THREE have NINETY-FOUR x,, l :Sf-ff?" It rullure whzch fha!! make him to enjoy the world At the Table-Howard Siegel, Richard Tavafel, Sylvester Ingmire. Row 1-Earl Haynes, John Maharg, Robert Forgraves, Robert Mc- Daniels, VValter Tracey, Robert Boyd, Row 2-Mr. C. P. Smith, Janet Hoof, Betty Strosnider, Freda Evans, 'Helen McDowell, Margaret Brandt. Row 3-Ralph Cook, Miss Rosa Pugh, Shirley Bishop, Helen Pound, David VVi1liams, Erik Kessmeier. Student Council Though the Student Council was just introduced into the curriculum of Newark High School this year, it has been very active within the brief time it has been organized. This organization was intro- duced to create a democratic policy rather than an autocratic discipline in the school. Among the many things the Student Council has accomplished is the granting of charters to the various organizations of the school. Also a greater part of the responsibility of arranging chapel pro- grams has been assumed by this organ- ization. One of its most important functions is the chartering of buses to take students to and from games which are out of town. Often, without this convenience, many pupils would not be able to attend games. The Student Council has offered many benefits to the school this year but hopes to offer even more as it develops in future years. OFFICERS President ..,.,...,.....,,,, ,,.,,,,,,,..,.,.,,,.... ......,.. H o ward Siegel Vice-President .,,..... .......... F reda Evans Secretary ,,,.,..,.,.,.., ........,.,.....,.............,...... R ichard Taafel Treasurer .................. Faculty Advisers ...... lv INETY-SIX Strosnider .,..,,..Miss Rosa Pugh, Mr. C. P. Smith Row 1-Claude Moore, Robert Warman, Jack Lytle, Robert Mercer, Albert Marzano, Joseph Weakley, John Schialler. Row 2-Samuel Sachs, Quenten English, Hoy Lehman, Paul Adams, John WVells, Wayne Terrell, .J ohn Mercer. Row 3-Clifford Miller, Henry Giles, Elder Duval, 'Hiarries Morgan, Paul Hiles, William Trowbridge. Row 4-Robert King, Russel Hupp, Robert Speaks, Vernon Paula sen, Howard Upson, Charles Ross. Row 5-Sergei Jackson. Gerald Miller, Norman Duvall, Harry Dor- sav Vvilliam Fields, Kenneth Vvobbecke, Robert Raymond, Richard lm- hohf Row 64Ralph Cook, XVilli-am Kilworth, Howard Siegel, Robert Cope- land, Mr. C. E. Orr, Row 7-Robert Green, Edward Farmer, Dean Priest, James Cope, Robert Evans. Members Not in Picture-Bud Ashcratt, Fred Myers, Royal Keyes. Bob Hammock, Bob Peel, Clarence Mercer, Bob simpson, Bob Boyd. James Fernow. "N" Club The Newark High School "N" Club is an association that was organized under the direction of Coach Clifford E. Orr in the present school year. Its main objective is to encourage, aid, and maintain good, clean, and sportsmanlike athletics and athletic programs throughout the school and vicinityg in fact, anything at all that might be done in athletics is supervised by the "N" Club. The club has been instrumental in ob- taining many improvements about the building and in enforcing regulations to improve the conduct of spectators at bas- ketball and football games. Membership to this club is obtained by winning an athletic award. Any boy earn- ing a letter in varsity football, reserve football, varsity basketball, reserve bas- ketball, track, baseball, cross-country, or golf may become a member of the club. OFFICERS President .,...,,...,.. ...,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, ....... A 1 bert Marzano Vice-President ...... ,,..r.. J oseph Weakley Secretary .,.,....,. ,,,,,,..,..,..,, J ack Lytle Treasurer ............... ............... R obert Mercer Faculty Adviser ..,,.. Clifford E. Orr NINETY-SEVEN Row 1-Mr, F, W. Smith, Janice Mulquin, Virginia Hector, Kenneth Deal, Donald Pound, Kathleen Phillips, Lois Phillips, Junior Haycook. Row 2-Ellen Jean Simpson, Virginia Roberts, Ruth Pierce, Jean Price, Marian Beaumont, Betty Bostwick, Ruth Ashcraft. Row 3-William Fisk, James Beeney, Mary M. Evans, Betty Light- ner, Charlotte Branscombe, Robert Crouch, Richard Graham Row 4-George Daniels, Robert Swisher, Willi-am Murray, Joseph Patterson, Owen Davis, John Cicur. Row 5-Albert Berson, Joseph Hiott, Philip Evans, Thomas Norpell, Earl Haynes. Members Not in Picture-Carl Noursf-, ldlwyn Tootliiuzul, ldrrol Gutliph. Camera Club The Camera Club was among the new organizations of the school this year. The club is sponsored by Mr. F. W. Smith. The c1ub's programs are conducted by Earl Haynes, who explains the principles of photography to the members. They thus have an opportunity to improve their snapshots and to become more proficient in photography. Some elementary work in picture de- veloping is also given. This fascinating part of the c1ub's study has proved to be extremely valuable as well as entertain- ing. Through this system of study and appli- cation, the club has accomplished its two main purposes: First, to make the club interesting and enjoyable for the mem- bers, second, to provide a fund of infor- mation for future individual use in photography. OFFICERS President, ....,,,.,... ,,........,......,,, ...... K e nneth Deal Vice President, ..........., Secretary-Treasurer, ,,,,, Faculty Adviser, ....,.. NINETY-EIGHT Virginia Rector Donald Pound Mr. F. W. Smith Row 1-Mr. R. M. Reese, Adviserg Thomas Hessin, ltobert Wort- man, Robert YVarman, Thomas Norpell, Victor llitter, Jack Bolton, Rich-ard Hall. Row 2-Kenneth Brooks, Joseph Baggs, John Wells, Robert Penn, Justin Reichert, William Goodwin. Row 3-Eugene Crouch, Kenneth Wohbecke, Wayne Terrell, Carter Harrison, Harries Morgan, Stanley Mueller, George Daniels. Row 4fPaul Hiles, Forrest King, Donald Keck, Earl Haynes, Hob- ert Evans. Not in Picture-William Smith. Automobile Club Safety! That one word would form the constitution of the Newark High Auto- mobile Club. To prepare the youth of this school to assume the responsibilities in- volved in the operation of motor vehicles with a greater degree of safety is the pur- pose of this newly-formed club, The or- ganization desires not only to teach safe driving, but also to impress upon the pe- destrian the important part he can play in reducing the number of accidents. Post- ers, pamphlets, and other material will be distributed throughout the school in or- der that everyone may derive some bene- fit from the club. Within the organization itself, the members will study the func- tion, maintenance, and operation of motor vehicles. By an extensive campaign the club hopes to make students safety-con- scious and to enable them to cope more in- telligently with present-day traffic haz- ards. OFFICERS President .......,,....,., Vice-President ...... Secretary ......,....,, Treasurer .............., Faculty Adviser ....,.. ,,..........Victor Ritter .,.....Harries Morgan ...,,.............Richard Hall ,.......William Goodwin Robert Reese NINETY-NINE Row 1-Ruth Barclay, Diana Seufert, Kathryn Wilson, June Lehr, Helen Spellman, Mildred Owen, Juliet UDSon, Martha Graff. Row 2-Mary Myer. Eunice Howard, Hazel Reid, Elizabeth Vogel, Elizabeth Clark, Alice Conn, Frances Miller, Marianne Upson, Elsie Van Fossen, Virginia Rector, ' Row 3-George Criswell, Charles Vinning, Quenten ldnglish, Louis Mink, Carl Swern, .lohn Maier, VVillard Goldberg, Kenneth Heal, Harry Miller, Charles Armstrong, Philip Booth. Row 4-Ralph Mason. Joseph Heft, Robert. Lauver, Eldon Shauck. Donald Keck, Paul Thompson, Carl lie Mitt, Chaney Humphreys, Theo- dore Munch, John Conlon. Those Not in Picture-Clarellen Burton, Helen Crawford. .Toy Patton, Ernest Settles, Betty Stockdale. Der Deutsche Verein One of the main attractions of the Ger- man Club is its programs. At one meet- ing Reverend W. M. Brandt discussed, in German which could be easily understood by his listeners, the value of studying for- eign languages. At another meeting Mari- anne Upson told of her trip to Europe and gave many interesting points about her experiences. Also, various songs have been learned by the club members. The study of German music and Ger- man musicians formed an interesting part of the year's program. A trip abroad was planned and all the necessary procedures followed in taking such a trip were worked out. This yearis club has thirty-eight mem- bers. It was organized for a broader and more extensive interpretation of the cus- toms, language, and people of Germany. The club has successfully completed its third year as an extra-curricular organi- zation of Newark High School. OFFICERS President ........,..... Vice-President ...... Secretary ..,,....,,.... Treasurer ............,... Faculty Adviser ..,,.. ONE HUNDRED ....,..,.......Ju1iet Upson Charles Anderson Marianne Upson .....,..,.....,..F'rances Miller Sarah Schiffeler llow 1-Louise Snyder, Jean Wall, Kathleen Norris, Janet Horwitz, Dorothy Walters, Marian Beaumont. How 2-Miss Mary Hammond. Marjorie Shannon Janet tiuffner, Mar- cia Ryan, Mildred Creighton, Anne Montgomery, Miss Geraldine Evans. Row 3-Joesph Hirschberg, Marjorie Jones, Katherine Camlin, Diana Shuebruk, George Larason. Row 4-Thomas Norpell, Nickolas ldvans, Jack Llytle, Robert Mt:- Daniels. Not in Picture-Barbara Helm, Robert Evans, Bruce Bazler, David Hardman, Kenneth Deal, Kenneth Wobbecke, Mary Andregg. Warren Orr, Mary Lou Plymale, Thomas Rugg, Robert Rice, Margaret Smith, Marianne Upson. French Club The purpose of the French Club is to create a keen interest in the French lan- guage itself and in the customs of the country of France. This year several talks have been given by various members of the club. February 15, Thomas Norpell gave a very interest- ing talk concerning the French theater. He compared the present day status to that of 1600 under the reign of Louis XIV. The most important and the largest theater is the Grand Opera House, cover- ing three acres. In Paris, the twentieth century spirit of the theater is invading the theaters, and the Parisians now resent it. The feeling is bitter against the modern trend which is rapidly coming into the theaters. The French people would rather keep the traditions which have been handed down since the reign of Louis XIV. OFFICERS President .....,,.,,... Vice President ....... Secretary .,.,...... Treasurer ....,,.,,,,,,,,,, Sergeant-at-Arms ...... Faculty Adviser .,..... ........Jack Lytle .,......Robert Rice .........Marjorie Jones ,,...........,...,..Jean Wall ....,,....Mildred Creighton .......Miss Mary Haymond ONE HUNDRED ONE Row 1-Miss Esther Larr, Mary Wolfe, Diana Shuebruk, Mary Myer, Suemarie Johnson, Phyllis Schenk, Ellen ltoshon, Joan Worman, Mar- ian Beaumont. Row 2-Juliet ljpson, Mary Margaret Sh:-boy, Mildred Owen, Marian Davis, Margaret Ann Warner, Margaret Wintermute, Goldie White, Row 3-Irene Rupright, liorotliy Homer, Dorothy Jaynes, Janet lluffner, Anita Hollister, Ethel Johns, Mary llogue, Marjorie Botts, June Campbell. Row 4-Mildred Creighton, Marjorie Jones, Sara Couhlan, Kathleen Norris, Janet Horwitz, Dorothy Walters, Jean Lichtenstein, Barbara llelm, Hazel Arnold, Mary .lane Albyn, Row 5-Anita Bline, Jeanne Mulquin, Eleanor Sperry, Anna Baker, Phyllis Boyd, Alice Berson, Anna Konian, ltuth Hershberger, Janice Mulquin, Janet Roof. How 6-Ellen Owen, Virginia ldclwards, llfrances Cummins, Thedo- dore Munch, Harold Messick, lfloytl ltusk, Floyd Orr, Joseph Hirsch- berg, Eric Kessmier. Row 7-llollin Jauchius, Hoxvard Siegel, William Trowbridge, mls- worth Kelley, Robert Mc-Daniels, Ted Schonberg, Dana Hammond, Dan- iel Hickman. Row 8-Jack Lytle, Neil Caldwell, YVllI-Jrd Goldberg, liobert Boyd. Leslie Patten, William Mercer, Carl Hollar, Row 9-Junior Reed, George Criswell, ltussell Younce, ltobert Klee, Stanley Mueller. Not in Picture-Jean Fleming, Arabelle 1-left, John Maharg, Flor- ence Rinehart, Margaret Anita Smith, William Stevens, Joseph Weakley, Warner Wolverton, Jean Cullison, William Fisk, Marian Davis, Mar- garet Wintermute. Dramatic Club Several one-act plays were presented at Dramatic Club meetings this year. Each member has an opportunity to demon- strate his dramatic ability during his membership in the club. The plays are directed by students of the dramatics class and enacted by members of the club. This year a new constitution was adopt- ed which made many changes in the club policy. Two sergeants-at-arms were elect- ed instead of one as previously. Many different types of plays were presented, among which were comedies, tragedies and meloslramas. The persons who participated in the plays were in- structed about acting and speaking and in that way derived much benefit from their work. After the plays were given the members held a business meeting in which were discussed the good and bad points of the play. OFFICERS President, ............., . ,,....,................ ........... J ohn Maharg Vice President, Secretary, .,.............. Treasurer, ................. Sergeant-at-Arms, ...,, Sergeant-at-Arms, ...... Faculty Adviser, ONE 'HUNDRED TWO e George Criswell Diana Shuebruk Margaret Smith Stanley Mueller Eleanor Sperry Miss Esther Lan' Row 14Ilobert Lambert, Justin Heickert, Joseph Baggs, James Cope, NVil1iam Mercer, Richard lmhoff, Robert Evans, John Shinn, Theodore Munch, Leslie Patten, Robert Penn. Row 2-Stanley Mueller, Thom-as 1-lessin, Thomas Hugg, Robert Campbell, John Maharg, Howard Siegel, Richard Hall, Carl Swern, George Criswel l, Don Schofield. How 3-Quentin English, Claude Moore, Albert Marzano, lddward Babbitt, Harvey Lowe, Harries Morgan, Liynn Campbell, llobert l-tice. Eugene Crouch, Victor Ritter, William Trowbridge, Calvin Friend, ltob- ert Mercer, Mr. R. G. Smith, Mr. E. Hi, Heckelman. How 4-Thomas Goodwin, NVil1iam Goodwin, John Schaller, Ralph Cook, Junior Reed, Cheney Humphreys, Kenneth Wobbecke, Earl Haynes. Jack Bolton, Bruce Bazler, Joseph Weakley, Carter Harrison, Not in Picture-Philip Evans, Jack liytle, Robert Morrison, Neil Inscho, Jack XYells, Laurence Callancler, lloyal Keyes, Paul Cady, Wynn Jones, Robert XVo1'man, Russell Younce. Senior Hi-Y The outstanding work of the Senior Hi-Y Club this year was its sponsorship of "Friendship Week," an event which is to be an annual school function. The Hi-Y's pur- pose in making an annual affair is to ac- quaint the incoming students with the rest of the student body. The climax of this program was a school dance, featuring the Earl Wyeth orchestra. The Senior Hi-Y meets every Wednes- day night at 7:30. Its meetings usually consist of guest speakers, ordinary club business, and gymnasium activities. Some- times the business meeting is followed by refreshments which are enjoyed by all. The main plank on which the clubis platform is built is from the Hi-Y's pur- pose: "To create, maintain, and extend throughout the school and community a high standard of Christian character." OFFICERS President .............,,, Vice-President ......, Secretary .......... Treasurer ..........,..... Faculty Adviser ......., Y. M. C. A. Adviser ...... Howard Siegel ....,..John Maharg Jack Lytle ,,,,,,,,...,,........Richard Hall E. H. Heckelman Ralph G. Smith ONE .HUNDRED THREE Row 1-Miss Mildred Hawke, Louise Phillips, Ann Miller, Jean Wall, Martha Ann Allen, Marjorie Hughes, Phyllis Boyd, Charlotte Bushfield. Eleanor Sperry, Miss Nelle Smith, llow 2-Mary Jane Albyn, Evelyn Cummins, Betty Turner, Frances Gilcrest, Mary Baker, Betty Mc.-Xrtor, Ann Hank, Sarah Passman, Rena Ogle. Huw 3-Madgel Crosby, Virginia Jackson, Margaret Ann Nvright, Frances Swartz, Evelyn Swain, Virginia Logan, .lean Price, Virginia Reese, Delores Heeter. Row Aifhena Roike, Marie Synder, Ruth Snelling, lzlnas Sampoul. liavina Wilkin, Mary Evelyn Midkiff, Dorothy Clay, Margaret Chilcote. Row 5-Janet Miller, Marjorie Parsons. Lucille Hartshorn, Vivian Wills, Frances Kennedy, l-lelen Hightshoe, Ellen Lamb. Row 6-Phyllis Crane, Lucille hlmch, Mary M. Evans, Helena Stot- ler, Mary Lou Plymale, Lucille Carpenter, Jean Fleming, Sara Coch- lan, Louise Snyder. How T-Albert A, Bailey, Kathleen Davidson, Maxine Sparks, Mildred Souslin, Leona Prysi, Martha Mclzllwain, Betty Kent, Arabelle Heft. Girl Reserves OFFICERS President ...,....,... ....,...,....,......,,, ..,.,., J e an Wall Vice-President ..... ........ P hyllis Boyd Secretary .......... .....,. E leanor Sperry Ann Miller Chief Adviser ......,.,,. ........,,.......,.,,,.,............ M iss Mildred Hawke Program Advisers ,... ., ...,,. Miss Nelle Smith, Miss Dorothy Bline Treasurer ..........,. Velma Lattlmer l Social Advisers-Mrs. A. S. Wall, Mrs. J. L. Boyd, Mrs. Earl Allen Other Advisers-Mrs. S. S. Schiffeler, Miss Florence Myer, Miss Esther Larr, Miss Mary Hammond Service Adviser ............... ONE ,HUNDRED FOUR Row 1-Marian Harftshorn, Jeane Kemp, Betty Kephart, Betty Hanes, Dorothy Kemnitzer, Mary Virginia Jones, lzlleanora Humphrey, Dorothy Je-anne Homer, Dorothy Jaynes, How 2-Evelyn Kreager, Velda Lawyer, lndus Hartman, Evelyn Hickman, Laura Mae Harris, Mary Heil, Thelma Hawkins, Katherine Jones, Betty Jones, Eleanor lden. Row 3.-Frances Minor, Dorothy McDaniels, Janice Pierson, liutli Miller, Dorothy Moore, Eleanor Mills, Wilma Moorman, Helen Joni-S, Linnea Kessmeier, Marie Keller. Row 4-Janet Roof, Betty Lightner, Mary Roach, Carrie Linton, Marian Finney, Anne Mitchell, June Kocher, Geneva Mctiutcheon, Jane Messick, Pauline Lane. Row 5-Virgini-a Pierce, Dorothy List, Helen McDowell, Janice Mul- quin, Catherine Lydic, Ruth Maharg, Mary Lightle, Kathleen Phillips, Mary Jane Russell, Elizabeth Larason. Row 6--Marjorie VVinn, Irene Hupright, Eileen Neighbor, Margaret Ryan, Ruth Pierce, Dolores Pert, Helen Roberts, Margaret Orr, Mar- garet Myers. Row 7-Ellen Owen, Phyllis Swigart, Sarah Warthen, Marcella Jones, Jane Ferguson, Jeanne Radcliff, Anabel Peck, Geneva Murphy. Row 8-Catherine Vvright, M-argaret Shoemaker, Clara Mae VVil- kins, Ruth Slater, Helen Weiant, Aimee Stuart, Margaret Wintermute, Margaret Teuscher, Joan Workman, Virginia Tharp, Dorothy Vermil- lion, Mary Restorick, Betty Parker. , Row 9-Esther Yost, Betty Tucker, Lucille Smith, Olga Vlaeia, Dor- tha Stough. Row 10-June Shearer, Anna Stricklin, Betty Davis, Dorothy Meach- am, Jean Smiley, Bertaline Sanders, Betty Scales, Charlotte Swain, Girl Reserves The Girl Reserve ring service is one of the most important ceremonies in the life of a Girl Reserve. The girls who receive rings must be approved by the society ad- viser and the ring committee. The purpose of this ring is to make the wearers better Girl Reserves. A girl seeking this award must have the following qualifications: Be a senior class memberg have the code, purpose, official benediction and some songs of the Girl Reserves memorizedg possess a perfect body and spiritg develop a keen mind and characterg attain a spirit of cooperation and leadershipg and com- pose three themes, one oral and two writ- ten. There were twenty-seven girls award- ed rings this year. The ring service was March 12. ONE HUNDRED FIVE Row 1-Shirley Lewis, Dorthea liogers, l'hyllis Wortman, Beatrice Parr, Hazel Arnold, Lola Toothman, Evelyn Wells, Donna Springer, Freda Gill, Gertrude Felumlee. Row 2-Mary Hammond, Betty Roberts, Mary Macdonald, Helen Lu- cas, Betty Haudenschield, Clarabelle Kemp, Juanita Mason, Lois Gien- ger, Virginia Fox, Dorothy Hodge, Row 3-Juanita Powell, Audrey I-lickman, Jeanne Fundaberg, ltilelen Spellman, Kathryn YVilson, Mary Hogue, Elizabeth Heid, Marian Mc- Cullough, Jeanne Mulquin, Mildred Owens, Shirley Keim. Row 4-M-arie Hammond, Jean Lichtenstein, Dorothy Walters, Mar- garet McCann, June Lehr, Mary Myer, Betty Mitchell, Ella Miller, Jean Kannuckle, Phyllis Kelley. Row 5fChristine Meriwether, Phylis Hutchison, Virginia Milbaugh, Marjorie Owen, Bonnilee Priest, Lorraine Lydic, Suemarie Johnson, Phyl- lis Schenk, Diana. Seufert, Bernice l-lolton. Row 6iLouene Stevens, Margaret Tipton, Janet Ruftner, Bertha Yvalker, Bernadine Wood, Jean Toney, Maxine Heel, Maclelaine SChle1ffel'. Row 7-Marjory Young, Margaret Ann Wright, Marcia Ryan, Leona Prysi, Mildred Souslin, Rosalie Richards, Velma Shepherd, Frances Wil- liams. Row 8-Hazel Reid, Maxine Sparks, Betty Jane Shields, Alberta Bailey. Girl Reserves The club was organized in November, 1921, as a part of the Y. W. C. A. There were 85 members under the direction of Amy Montgomery, now Mrs. P. B. Ed- wards. In December, 1922, the name was changed from Y. W. C. A. to Girl Reserves. The first Girl Reserve conference attended by Newark girls was held in 1923 at Wi- nona Lake, Indiana, and the first Mother- Daughter Banquet was held that spring. Miss Mildred Hawke, the present ad- viser, became program adviser in 1927. The same year the Girl Reserve club ful- filled all requirements as a member of the ONE HUNDRED SIX Young Women's Christian Association with headquarters in New York. The Granville girls gave an International Festival, to which eighty-five girls went from New- ark. In 1930 the Mid-Winter conference was held at Columbus. The Newark club was on the decoration committee. At the Mother-Daughter Banquet in 1932 the club began giving rings to senior members who fulfilled requirements en- titling them to rings. In April, 1934, the Wittenberg Orchestra Concert was spon- sored by the Club to care for distressed families, and this work has been Very successful. How 1-Jean Etnier, Martha Cass, Eileen Baker, Ruth Ashcraft, Kath- erine Camlin, Margaret Brandt, Ellen Roshon, Alice Puffer, Marjorie Shannon, Marian Beaumont. Row 2fJane Beall, lluth Barclay, Mary Cunningham, Charlene Ed- munds, Wilma Bermermann, 'Freda Brucker, Betty Anderson, Mavis Bachelor. Row. 3-Betty llechel, Anna Marie Fisher, Mabel Davis, Hazel Du- vis, Hazel Farquhar, Margaret Catt, Marjorie Botts, June Campbell. Clarellen Burton. Row 4-Vivian Cline, Evelyn Baker, Leah Baughman, Ozie Atwell. Ollie Conner, .lean Bachelor, Rebecca Bebout, Frances Fisher, Mar- garet Ford, Row 5-Harriet Bryan, Helen Brown, Margaret Bonham, lluth Craig. May Carpenter, Jeannette Carson, June Barrick, Evelyn Buchanan, Betty Ball. Row 6-Marian Davis, Evelyn Gray, Mary Anderson, Charlotte Branscome, Beulah Ringer, Crabbin. Row 'I-Shirley Grigsby, Grigsby, Virginia Edwards, Grimm. Row 8-Helen Handby, Margaret Coyle, Betty Fulton, Christine Margaret Crawford, Marie Greider, Jane Frances Cummins, liuth Davidson, Emma Caroline Hammond, Anita Hollister, Uaro- lyn Keck, Dorothy Fuller, Florence Fuller. Not in Picture-Hazel Behout, Mildred Braddock, Ethel Johns, Betty Rector, Ellen Roschon, Mary M. Sheboy, Helen Pound, Emojean Baughman. Girl Reserves The Girl Reserve Club is the high school branch of the Y. W. C. A. The members of this organization aim to develop them- selves physically, mentally and spiritually. The program planned for the year 1936-37 consisted of the study of world peace and the history of foreign nations. The serv- ice committee aided six families of this city during the year. This year this organization has a mem- bership of three hundred and eleven girls. Among its social activities are: The initi- ation service and party held December 43 a party at which the Girl Reserve rings were presented with an appropriate cere- mony, March 129 the Mother-Daughter banquet, May 10, and a tea, May 23. ONE HUNDRED 'SEVEN How l-John Schaller, Ann Miller, Evelyn Cummins, .Jack Bolton, Betty Mc.-krtor, VVilliam Fisk, Miss Laura Hosick. Row 2-Ellen Jean Simpson, Marie Snyder, liuth Snelling, Betty Kent. Mable Arnold, Janet Miller, Phyllis Wortman, Dorthea Rogers, How 3eLena Roike, Dolores Heeter, Catherine Warnock, Virginia Jackson, Mary Jane Albyn, Robert Penn, Ted Schonberg, Joseph Hirsch- berg. Row 4-Marjorie E. Young, Marcia Ryan, Ann Varner, Frances Ken- nedy, Jean Lichtenstein, Janet Horwitz, Barbara Helm, Cheney Humph- ries, Carl De Witt. Not in Picture-Dorothy Pau-hen, Jack Wolff, Hazel Pennick, Civic Society This year the Civic Society, which has been one of the school's most active or- ganizations for eighteen years, became an honorary organization requiring a B aver- age for admission of members. In connec- tion with this honor requirement, the so- ciety presents twice each year a scholar- ship cup to the member of the club hav- ing thevhighest average for each semes- ter. The club's programs are arranged upon the same system as last year. People who are prominent in the civic life of the com- munity tell the club of their work. An interesting study of crime and society was made this year. Addresses by speakers were supplemented by preparatory talks by the members. The Civic Society is a club which has acquired many traditions during its eigh- teen years, Pleasant informality is com- bined with dignity to achieve an unusual- ly successful plan of conducting the meet- ings. The Civic Society has always stood high among the organizations of the school and has continually worked for the civic improvement of the school and community. OFFICERS President ........,,,.. ,, r4,,, ,,,,.,,,,,,,, , , Vice-President ...... Secretary ............. Treasurer. ..,...,,,..,,, Faculty Adviser ...... ONE HUNDRED EIGHT .......,Jack Bolton ...........William Fisk ..,,,,Evelyn Cummins ..,........Betty McArtor .,..,..Miss Laura Hosick Sitting-Jean Mulquin, Charlotte Bushfield, Carl De Witt, Molly Lewis, Diana Shuebruk, Kathleen Norris. Standingf.lean Lictenstein, Miss Helen Lavin, Olga Vaiea, Mary Macdonald, Marian binney, Charlotte Swain, Phyllis Swigart, Alice Ber- son, Neil Trimble, Phyllis Kelley. Wilma Steel, Eileen Bruney. Not in Picture-Elizabeth Smith, Ann Warner, Robert Boyd. Scribblers Club Members of the Scribblers Club par- ticipated in the contest, "The Constitution and What It Means to Mef' sponsored by the American Legion. The district award in this contest was presented to Jean Lich- tenstein. The members bring their rna- terial and ideas to the meetings and con- struct their themes together. Many other assignments are completed by the mem- bers, such as writing poems, short stories, and essays. A note book is kept by Miss Helen Lavin, adviser of the club, which contains the ex- ceptionally good work of the members and a paper is compiled the last semester for subscribers to the Reveille News Sheet. The purpose of the club is to promote creative ability and to encourage begin- ners in writing compositions. Often the members are given a subject upon which they must write something with no previ- ous thought. Miss Lavin often assists the members, but for the most part they are allowed to write as they please. The works of modern writers are also studied from the several magazines to which the club subscribes. OFFICERS President ............. ,....,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, Vice-President ......... Secretary ................,.. Faculty Adviser ...,..... ,.,Diana Shuebruk .......,..Mollie Lewis ..,,..........Car1 De Witt ........Miss Helen Lavin ONE HUNDRED NINE Row 1-Kenneth Deal, John Wells, Thomas Norpell, Robert Penn. Donald Pound, Jack Bolton, John Schaller, Robert Westbrook, Row 2-Philip Evans, WVayno Davison, Victor llltter, Floyd Rusk, Joseph Hirschbex-g,' Robert Eckleberry, Forrest King, Mr. Lester Cox,l Row 3-Andrew Turner, XVilliam Goodwin, Thomas Hvessin, Howard Upson, Stanley Mueller, Ralph YYoltjen, Harold McDonald, Paul Cady, James Goodwin, A Not in Picture-Louis Mink, Richard Hall, Jack Wolff, 'Harold Mes- sick, John Lake, Robert Martin, Ralph Woltjen, Robert Brown, Globetrotters Club The Globetrotters is a boys' organization which has for its purpose the study of travel and foreign nations. The club was organized by members of the sophomore class in 1935 as the Boys' Travel Club, under the direction of Miss Rosa Pugh. This year the club has enjoyed unusual success. It has become one of the school's most popular societies and has a greatly increased membership. In connection with the programs, which deal with the study of conditions and customs in strange lands, there is a feature of this club's work which deserves special note. Meetings are conducted in strict accordance with par- liamentary law, and the members receive an extensive training in this Work. Every member has the opportunity of becoming capable in the conducting of formal meet- ings. By this means the club is rendering a very definite service to the school, as well as to its members. OFFICERS President .............. Vice-President ....... Secretary ...........,.. Treasurer .....,,,........,.. Sergeant-at-Arms ....... Faculty Adviser ...,... UNE HUNDRED TEN Robert Penn ..........Richard Hall ...,...Thomas Norpell John Wells ...,...,Dona1d Pound. Lester Cox Row lfliuth Criss, Alice Frost, Maxine Roberts, Bonita Chaney, Virginia Hector, Charlot Bell. Ilovv 2-Ellen Jean Simpson, Eileen Curts, Islleanor Jeffers, Jasmine Garapedian, Dorothy Lewis, Betty Hill, Joy Patten. Row 3-Virginia Anderson. Elizabeth Vogel, Miss Rosa Pugh, Eileen Bruney, Joan Kidd, Hazel Arnold, Girls' Travel Club The aim of the Travel Club is to achieve a greater and more specific knowledge of the world and the various places interest- ing to visit. The Travel Club also furthers the knowledge of present day life and civ- ilization all over the world. The Girls' Travel Club was organized three years ago especially for those stu- dents interested in travel. Much credit for the success of this group should be given to Miss Rosa Pugh for her fine supervi- sion and cooperation. Miss Pugh's exten- sive travels, experience, and contacts with other countries proves exceedingly inter- esting to her travel students. Her reports give to these girls a more correct and de- tailed idea of the life and civilization of other people. At alternate meetings, local travel is discussed. On the other days, the time is spent in talking of foreign affairs. With the subject changing thus at every meet- ing, the program is made interesting. This organization, which assembles every other Friday, is composed of twenty-one girls. OFFICERS President .....,.,.......... ,,....,...,...,.,,,, .,...., ,....... Vice-President, ,, Secretary ............. Treasurer .............,,,, Faculty Adviser ........ .Maxine Roberts ,,..,.....Bonita Chaney Alice Frost ,,,,.,..Dorothy Patchen ,,,....Miss Rosa Pugh ONE HUNDRED ELEVEN Row 1- Anthony Luzio, Stanley Mueller, Paul Gould, Ellsworth Kel- ley, Sheldon Keinath, Clyde Catt, Derrell Myers, Mr. J. W. Dirksen. Row 2-Donald Pound, Elizabeth Clark, Betty Jones, Robert Mor- rison, Clarence Shields, Charles White, Chester Emch, Lynn Campbell, . Roy Rowland, Clyde Bowman. A Row 3-Robert Peel, Wayne Andrews, Robert Swisher, John lng- mire, Marvin Vance, Donald Iden. Marian Geiger, Robert Wells. Drafting Club Feeling the need for a form of art club, advanced mechanical drawing students or- ganized this year the Drafting Club. The club is limited to twenty-four members. The objectives of the club are to in- crease the members' knowledge of tech- nique of graphic arts, and of various other phases of that type of work. The club meets every Monday in the Drafting room of the Industrial Arts Build- ing. Each member has an easel, drawing board, and other necessary art equipment, The club members have been aided greatly by Miss Katherine Horton, super- visor of art in the county schools, who has given lectures at several of their meet- ings. Although this is the first year of the Drafting Club, it has been very successful. OFFICERS President ...................... ......................... .........,. R o y Rowland Vice-President ...........,.... Secretary-Treasurer, ..... ., Faculty Adviser ............. ONE HUNDRED TWELVE ,,.,..,..Dona1d Pound ...............John Ingmire J. W. Dirkson Row 1-Floyd Danley, Andrew Turner, Lester Holcombe, Neal lnscho, James Lemert. Row 2-Joseph VVhyde, John Wolff, Oscar Brooks, Paul Layton, Wll- liam Stevens, Paul l-liles, Harold l-layden. Row 3-Harry Riffle, Neil Trimble. Charles Parker, l':xu1 Goodwin, llalph Grove, VVoodrow Martin. Not in Picture-Jackson Pierce-, Leo Glover, Lester Catt, Robert Markle. Printing Club The Printers Club is composed of mem- bers of the various printing classes. The club has a membership of twenty-two stu- dents. Meetings are held twice a month. The objective of the club is to increase the knowledge of the printing trade be- yond the experience and the teaching that the pupils receive in their regular classes. This is done by discussions, written themes, and visits to the various printing concerns in the city. The Printers Club is one of the few clubs in which the members are given actual experience. They do the school a great service by printing almost all of the pro- grams, tickets, re-entry slips, special per- mits, and other miscellaneous materials that are needed. OFFICERS President .,........... ............,. Vice-President ...... Secretary ................ Faculty Adviser ....,, .......Oscar Brooks ........Lester Catt Jack Wolfe L. J. Tipton ONE HUNDRED THIRTEEN Row 1-Phyllis Hutchison, Freda Bruuker, Jean Lichtenstein, Rosalie Richards, Dorothy Lewis, Rena Steele, Dorothy l-lodge, Mary ld. Chil- cote, Jean Chrisman. Row 2-Mavis Bachelor, Betty Anderson, Marjorie Young, Eleanor Jeffers, Mary Macdonald, Maxine Roberts, Phyllis Kelley, Bernice Hiolton. Row 3gVirginia Rector, Eileen Curts, Clarellen Burton, Molly Lewis, Elizabeth Vogel, Jasmine Garapedian, Virginia lloberts, Margaret Shoc- maker. Row 4-William Fisk, Nicholas Evans, James Tiemann, llussell Lov- ell, David Hardman. Not in Picture-Mary Andereirgy Eunice Howard, Mary Lou Ply- male, Thomas Rugg, Harvey Lowe, Katherine Camlin. Philip Booth. Science Club. The Science Club is limited to thirty- five junior- and senior-class members. At the beginning of the second semester soph- omores are allowed to join, filling the va- cancies of the graduating seniors. Super- intendent P. B. Edwards, the first sponsor of the club, was made an honorary mem- ber this year. The club joined the National Federa- tion of Science clubs and has chosen as the pin a mortar and pestle, engraved with SC. The club has visited many factories and plantsg such as, The Newark Advocate, Water Works, Felber Biscuit Co., Ohio State Archaeological and Historical Mu- seum, Heisey Glass Co., and the Newark Engraving Co. OFFICERS President .,,.......... Vice-President ..,,,, Secretary. ......,. . Treasurer ............ Faculty Adviser ,,,,, ONE HUNDRED FOLTRTEEN ....,..Dorothy Hodge .......Virginia Rector Maxine Roberts ............Russell Lovell O. J. Barnes Row 1-Elwyn Toothman. Donald Tumblin, Russell l-lupp, Paul Adams, Theodore Schonberg, James Goodwin, Robert Black. Row 2-Robert Brown, John Telvin, Ralph Woltjen, Dana Savage, Forrest King, Robert Gray, Robert Westbrook, Richard Benner. Row 3-Mr. Lester Cox, Robert Forgraves, Stewart Sedgwick, Howard Upson, Samuel Sachs, Robert Boyd, Robert King, Robert liiayinond. Row 4-Carl Nourse, Floyd Iiusk. Not in Picture-Charles Atherton, John Denton, Serge Jackson. Joseph Luzio, llobert Thompson, Richard Taafel, Sophomore Hi-Y The Sophomore Hi-Y club this year, formed on the same basis as the former clubs of this type consists of thirty boys who are interested in furthering such ideals as clean speech and clean sports- manship. Since so many of sophomore boys sought a membership in this club, a type of self-elimination was introduced by which the boys themselves elected the members. The club is limited to thirty boys, including the officers. Meeting every Tuesday in the Newark Y. M. C. A., the club enacts its regular program and also a special program twice monthly, which the program committee puts forth. Every third Wednesday of the month is set aside for gym activities 'for the members in the Y. M. C. A. gyml nasium. OFFICERS President ............... .,,.,.....,....,,..... Vice President ...,,,, Secretary ........,... Treasurer ........... Faculty Adviser ...,, ......F'aul Adams ,................Russel1 Hupp ......Theodore Schonberg Lester Cox .,.....Donald Tumblin ONE HUNDRED FIFTEEN Row 1-Miss Lichtenstein, Vivian VVills, Mary Myers, Kathryn Wil- son, Ruth Maharg, Wanda Rowe. Row 2-Eleanor Sperry, Jeanne Mulquin, Sara Cochlan, Marie Sny- der, Suemarie Johnson, Phyllis Schenck, Helen Spellman, Marian Beau- mont. Row 3-Virginia Logan, Ann Hank, Martha Mclfjlwain, Evelyn Swain. Shirley Lewis, Margaret Ann Wright, June Lehr, llorraine l,ydic, Betty Hill. Row 4-Maxine Reel, Madgel Crosby, Maxine Sparks, Martha Cass, Ruth Barclay, Lois Gienger, Mable Arnold, Marjorie Botts. Row 5-Margaret Chilcoatt, Dorothy Clay, Audrey Denney, Ella Mil- ler, Virginia Milbaugh, Mary Hammond, Virginia 4Fox, Dorothy Hodge. Marie Hammond. Row 6-Margaret McCann, Betty Rechel, Margaret Bonham, Ruth Miller, Lois Phillips, Frances Swartz, Alice Conn, Janet Root, Janice Mul- quin. Row 7-Margaret Wright, Marcia Ryan, Jean Price, Julia Warthen, Jeanne Fundaberg, Madeline Schleiffer, Dorothy Jaynes, Anita Hollister, Marian Davis. Row 8-Charlene Edmunds, Frances Miller, Mabel Davis, Audrey Hickman, Elizabeth Held, Margaret Catt, Charlotte Branscome, Margaret Coyle, Mary Lou Plymale, Carolyn Keck. Row 9-Martha Ann Allen, Betty McArtor, Shirley Grigsby, Bertha Wialker, Jane Beall, Rosalie Richards, Goldie White, Margaret Crawford, Catheryn Lydic, Mary Evelyn Midkiff, Row 10-Virginia Reese, Delores Heeter, Betty 1-lanes, Wilma Ber- merman, Jean Bachelor, Mildred Souslin, June Kocher, Velma Shephard, Clariabelle Kemp, Shirley Keim. Row ll-Phyllis Hutchison, Velda Lawyer, Marjorie Winn, Frances Gilcrest, Helen McDowell, Evelyn Kreager, Rebecca Beabout, Eleanor lden. Nellie Willison, Ruth Sherrard, Margaret Ford, Evelyn Gray. Row 12-Olive Connor, Jane Ferguson, Mary Jane Russell, Ann Mil- ler, Marjorie Parsons, Janet Miller, Marian Finney, Marie Kellar, Dorothy List, Kathleen Phillips. G. The G-Y girls meet every two weeks on Thursday in the Y. M. C. A. Every two weeks on Tuesday night the girls use the Y. M, C. A. gymnasium to promote clean sportsmanship. The purpose of the club is to lead bet- ter Christian lives, to extend the feeling Y. of friendship and fellowship among the associates, to be good citizens, to serve the school community and nation in every pos- sible way, to attain the highest standards of scholarship, and to follow the laws of health. The programs consist of speakers who aim to develop the girls into better citizens. OFFICERS PPeSid9Ht ---.--.--4--- ........................ ........ R 0 berta Painter Vice-President ..,,, ,,-,,,,---- V it,-ian Wills SeCI'etHI'Y .....-....... .............,.. K athryn Wilson TI'e3.SllI'e1' ............,..,.... ,,,,,,,,-,,,,,,-,.-,,,,.,.- M ary Myer Faculty Adviser .......... Y. M. C. A. Adviser ...,., ONE HUNDRED SIXTEEN .......Miss Ruth Lichtenstein ........Miss Velma Lattemer Row l-Shirlene Stanley, Shirley Grigsby, Margaret Coyle, Mar- garet Shoemaker, Francis Young, Theodore Munch, Janet Franz. Miss Dorothy Bline. Row 2-Marie Cvreider, Margaret Tipton, Audrey Hickman, Pauline Lane, Eleanor Lamp, Gladys lloley, Clara Mae Wilkin, .Ioan Kidd. Row 3-Clyde Goff, Richard Oder, James Urr, 'Harold Messick, John Cicur, Ivan Carter, XVilliam Fields. Bird Club The Bird Club, organized in March, 1937, with twenty-four members, plans a hiking program for the spring months and a plan of bird study for the fall and win- ter months. Emphasis will be placed on conservation and the relationship of bird life with nature and the out-of-doors gen- erally. Members of the club are urged to keep individual records throughout the year. It is hoped the club can take part in the national census taken twice each year for the National Association of Au- dubon Societies. OFFICERS President ................ ..,..,.,...,.............. Vice-President ......... Secretary ...........,,,,... Faculty Adviser ........ ......Theodore Munch .........Francis Young ,.............,...Janet Franz ......Miss Dorothy Bline ONE HUNDRED SEVENTEEN Row l7Miss Dorothy Bline, Julia Warthen, Frances Swartz, Jean Price, Virginia Reese, Lois Phillips, Kathleen Phillips, Dorothy Davis, Freda Gill. Row 2-Mabel Arnold, Kathleen Davidson, Evelyn Cummins, Marjory Young, Katherine Camlin, Mary Macdonald, Maxine Sparks, Gertrude Felumlee. Row 3-Virginia Logan, Evelyn Swain, Sarah Passman, Ann Rank, Dorothy Lewis, Hazel Penick, Virginia Fox, Lois Gienger. Row 4-Shirley Lewis, Eileen Baker, Martha Cass, Betty McArtor. Knitting Club. The Girls Knitting Club was organized to teach girls the art of knitting and to create a desire in the members for do- mestic recreation. The club was organized this year under the direction of Miss Dorothy Bline, and thirty-five members have been accepted as members. These girls recently visited "The Cabin" and spent an enjoyable time learning how to make hooked rugs. They were very much interested in various phases of do- mestic activity and expressed a desire to accomplish many things made in that manner. The Knitting Club has a very interest- ing program, and there is created among the girls an enthusiastic feeling toward their work. OFFICERS President ....,...,,,.,,..,,.i, , Vice-President .,..,...,,. ,,,, Secretary-Treasurer ,..,.., Adviser .............,...........,. ONE HUNDRED EIGHTEIIN ...,,......Jean Price , .,.................. Ann Rank ..,.........Frances Swartz ,,,.,...Miss Dorothy Bline Row 1-Thomas Norpell, lbaymonrl Paulsen, Joseph Baggs, llicliarfl Hall, For-rest King. Row 2-Paul Clary, Donald Anderson, Donald Keck. Harvey Lowe, James Tiemann, Mr. ll. M, Reese. Rifle Club The Newark High Rifle Club, now com- pleting its second year of successful exist- ence, has followed the original program. The shooting range belonging to the Y. M. C. A. has been utilized instead of the Moundbuilders range which was used last year. Five new members were voted in to replace those who left Newark High. Recognizing rifle shooting as a popular man's sport, Mr. R. M. Reese, the instruc- tor, has endeavored to give the boys in- struction. which will make the handling of firearms a safe sport. This hobby, while it furnishes excellent training for the coordination of the faculties, can also be one of the most hazardous. With this in mind, Mr. Reese has emphasized safety as the major factor of the year's activities. The club has entered several contests with other similar organizations in the city. The members have attained high scores in these events. OFFICERS President .... .,............,........ ................,.. .....,...........,........ ,..,,,,, ' I' h 0 mas Norpell Vice President-Range Officer ,.....,.. ......... J oseph Baggs Secretary ............................................ ............ Donald Keck Treasurer ..... .,,................,........,........ Faculty Adviser .....,,, .......,Dona1d Anderson Mr. R. M. Reese ONE HUNDRED NINETEEN How lwilharlotte Swain, Willard Goldberg, Donald Anderson, llouis Mink, Marian Finney, Row 2-Robert Brown, William Mercer, Eugene Shaw, Mr, C. ll. Smith, Robert Marshall, William Fisk, Row 3-Theodore Schonberg, Sylvester lngmire, Joseph Hirsch- herg, Daniel Hickman. Debate The Newark High School team opened this year's work with the audition of the National Broadcasting Company's radio debate on the question: "Resolved that all electric utilities should be governmentally owned and operated? Soon after this the team journeyed to Wooster to participate in the debate clinic sponsored by Wooster College. After Christmas vacation the teams debated Massillon and Denison University in preparation for the regular season. Newark, this year, went through the third district undefeated, thus making a most unusual record. The team was finally defeated in the first round of the state eliminations. Among the schools met in Newark's practice debates were, at the Wooster clinic: Wooster, Canton McKinley, Cleve- land Shaw, Fremont, Niles, Massillon and Doylestown. Other non-decision debates were held with Marietta, Massillon, Ash- ley, Danville and Denison Freshmen. Decision Debate Schedule School Met Circleville Washington Court House Columbus North Columbus West Winner Newark Newark Newark Newark State Eliminations Fredericksburg Fredericksburg Faculty Adviser, Mr. C. P. Smith ONE HUNDRED TWENTY Row 1-Diana Shuebruk, Juliet Upson, Thomas liugg, Jack L.ytle. Richard Hall, Evelyn Cummings, Frances Kennedy, Junior Reed. A Row 2-Jean Lichtenstein, Charlotte Hushfield, Barbara 'H'eim, .VA-ary Macdonald, Marianne Upson, Jean Mulquin, Bonita Chaney. Row 3-Wynn Jones, Cheney Humphries, Eldon Shauck, Robert Lau- ver, Paul Cady. Reveille News Staff The editorial class performs the edi- torial work on the weekly Reveille News Sheet and it also makes a weekly contri- bution to The Advocate and writes a page each week for the Newark Leader. During the first semester a textbook of High School Journalism is studied, and all during the year the class is required to read the New York Times as a model paper. The Reveille has held membership for the past ten years in the National Scholas- tic Press Association, sponsored by the University of Minnesota. It is also a member of the Journalism Association of Ohio. Editor-in-Chief, Juliet Upson Associate Editor, Frances Kennedy ONE HUNDRED ' TWENTYIINE llow 1-Clarence Shields, Robert llice, Helen Glass, Diana Shue- bruk, Joseph Weakley, Earl Haynes, Row 2-Phyllis Hutchison, Margaret Smith, William Fisk, Mavis Bachelor, Rena Ogle, Jean XVall, Mildred Creighton, Jane Penn. Annual Staff With the first week of school the mem- bers of the Annual staff begin to plan the year book. The theme, the cover and the paper to be used in printing-all require careful consideration. Different members of the class are assigned various duties. The Editor and Associate Editor supervise. The sports editors arrange the sports events and the other members are divided into groups, some identifying pictures, some checking statistics and others writ- ing the history of the clubs and other activities. Finally the material is assem- bled and sent to the printer. When the material is first printed it is made up into galleys which are returned to the school to be proofread. The whole Annual is rechecked in this manner. Pic- tures are sent to the engravers, returned and checked again. After weeks of assem- bling, checking and rechecking, the Annual is sent for the final time to the printers. Editor-in-Chief, Diana Shuebruk Associate Editor, Robert Rice ONE -HUNDRED. TWENTY-TWO - I Row l-+MT. George Stoeckmann, Mary Eleanor Chilcoat, Louise Snyder, Jean Fleming, Lucille Hartshorn, Vivian Wills, Sarah Cochlan Jean Lichtenstein. Row 2-Kathleen Davidson, Beulah Binger, Alice Berson, Helena Stotler, Mary Margaret Evans, Kathleen Norris, Mary Jane Russell. Row 3-Hazel Penick, Rosalie Richards, Helen rl-Lightshoe, Mary Ham- mond, Lucille l-lall, Frances Kennedy, Evelyn Cummins. Row 4-William Fisk, Paul Clary, Allen Cook, Richard Taafel, John Cicur. Business Staff Another of the Reveille organizations is the Business staff. This group has for its specific duty the soliciting of advertise- ments for the Reveille Annual. The Busi- ness Staff organizes early in December and begins its Work. Certain advertisers are chosen by each member and are accord-- ingly interviewed. It is this Work of the staff which has proved to be of lasting benefit to the mem- bers. In this contact with the business men of the city, the members of the busi- Business Manager .,,.,,, Assistant Manager ....i. ness staff gain invaluable experience and business training. One phase of this train- ing which might be mentioned as one of the most important is the development of poise and ease in making contacts, This poise will be of increasing value as the student enters the business world. And finally it must be remembered that it is upon the success of the business staff that the success of the Annual depends. Not only do the advertisers receive valu- able publicity, but also aid in making our Annual possible. ..,......Lucille Hall ,,.,...Beulah Binger ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-THREE Row 1-Ardyth Uffner, Marian Davis, Mary Eleanor Uhilcote, liuth Maharg, Eleanor Sperry, Mary Jane liussell. Row 2--Beulah Binger, Elizabeth Smith, Alice Conn, Jeanne Mulquin, Ruth Herschberger, Elizabeth Heid, Mildred Wolverton, Mable Arnold. Row 3-Jean Lichtenstein, Janet Ruffner, Helen Pound, George Llriswell, Sheldon Keinath, Joseph l-lirschberg, Robert Marshall. How 4-Russell Lovell, Richard Taafel, Robert Westbrook, Paul Clary, Joseph Baggs, William Trowbridge, Ernest Settles. Row 5-Roderick Huff. Charlotte Bushfield, Samuel Sachs, Allan Cook, Dale Guthridge, Robert Dustheimer, Forrest King. Members Not in Picture-YRobert Forgraves Sergie Jackson, Joseph Kvintus, Carl Nourse, William Stevans, Dorothy Hodge, Room Agents A great deal of responsibility is placed on the shoulders of our Room Agents, so much that they must be ready to work at all times. The tickets for various enter- tainments in the school are given over to them for selling. All tickets for school en- tertainments are sold by this group. The main work of the Room Agents, however, is the same as in other years. Soon after school opens, the room agents interview each person in the school and solicit his or her subscription to the Reveille News. The room agents thus play a minor part in keeping the student body informed on the activities of school. The part that this has in creating school spirit is hard to estimate. When the first semester is drawing to a close, the room agents again solicit the students for subscriptions to the annual. This part of their work is of great im- portance in promoting the success of the book. In summing up the Work of the Room Agents one might say that it is they who make the whole program of the other Reveille staffs possible yearly. OFFICERS Subscription Manager ...,., Assistant Manager ......,.. Faculty Adviser ........ UNE HUNDRED TWENTY-FOUR ,,..,..Eleanor Sperry .....,.,.,Janet Ruffner Stoeckmann Row lfllatherine WVarnnck, Helena Stotler, Betty Callend, Mary Alice Baker, Anna Baker, Dortha Frazier. llow 2-'Anita Bline, Lena Hoike, Freda Evans, Martha Ann Allen, Mary Evelyn Midkiff, Albert Bailey, Hemi Young, Beatrice Parr. Mimeograph Staff. High scholastic ability and excellent typing are points considered in every senior girl chosen to participate in the work of the Mimeograph department. This year the sixteen girls selected by Mrs. Dorothy Robb, faculty adviser, completed the eleventh year of the Reveille News Sheet. Much work is needed to publish this sheet every week, and so the Mimeo- graph Department and Journalism Class work together. The news is gathered, written and typed by the Journalism Class and sent on to the Mimeograph Depart- ment where the stencils and illustrations are cut. While some girls do this, others cut the paper. At last the paper is run through the mimeograph and thus our paper is printed. Among other material which this group has printed are: Achievement tests, super- intendent's reports, ballots for election of officers and P.-T. A. letters. Faculty Adviser, Mrs. Dorothy Robb ONEHUNDRED TWENTYFIVE Row 1-Joan Kidd, Dortha Fraizer, Elizabeth Vogel, Betty Nici-X1-ter, Anita Bline, Martha Graff, Frances Gilcrest. Row 2-Jean Lichtenstein, Charlotte Bushfielcl, Barbara ihllelm, Beatrice Parr, Mavis Bachelor, Betty Strosnider, Phyllis Hutchison, Anna Baker, Row 3-Jean VVall, Alice Berson, Anne Montgomery, Diana Shuebruk, Marjorie Shannon, Frances Fisher, Not in Picture-Juliet Upsnn, Ushers Each year a group of girls is chosen by Mr. Boyd from the sophomore class to fill the vacancies that will be left by the seniors. The ushers must be of high scho- lastic standing and must show courtesy and efficiency in handling large crowds. They must possess initiative in order to cope with any arising emergency, and they must have the ability to manage large ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-SIX crawds with facility. They must be on hand to usher at all high school functions and, last of all, commencement. The ushers are divided into two divi- sionsg one division is stationed on the first floor, and one is on duty in the balcony. Each division is under the supervision of a head usher. The head usher takes the tickets and superintends the seating of the audience. Sara Cocklan, William Mercer, StandingfJohn Schaller, Clyde Bowman, Martha McElwain. Sitting-Vivian Wills. Standing!-Russel Younce, Sara Cochlan. Kneeling-.Lick Pierce. Warner Wolverton, Lucille Hartshorn. The Dramatic Class Presents uspooksn By Roger 1. Sherman Special Permission of Samuel French December 15, 1936. Act I-In the Old Mansion of Simon Rockwell. Act II-The Same. Act III-The Same. Elliott T. Buterfield ...,... Judy .,,,....,...,,,,,,,,,.,,,,...... Sam ....,,,,....,.......,,,,,,,, MHFIOH .,,,,,,. Laurette ....,,,.,,,,, Mrs. Brown ........,,,,,.,. Messenger Boy ,.,,.,,.,, Officer .....,............,,, Silas Willoby .4....,,..,. Detective .........,,........... Douglas Blackwell ...,,,,,. Director ..,. ,.... ...,.,.,,,.,,,. Time-The Present. Cast of Characters. .......Jack Pierce ...,,.,...Vivian Wills ......Clyde Bowman ,..,.....Lucille Hartshorn ..........Sara Cochlan .........Martha McElwain .,.....,.,.......Jack Bolton .............John Schaller ....,,.Warner Wolverton .........William Mercer ........Russell Younce ..,......,Miss Esther Larr ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-SEVEN Row 1-Mary Myer, Alice Berson, Evelyn Swain, Mary Margaret Evans, Frances Swartz, Phyllis Hutchison, Robert Marshall, Russell Younce, Mary Hogue, John Maharg, Florence Rinehart, George Criswell, Ardyeth Uffner, Martha Graff, Theodore Munch, Mavis Bachelor, Jeanette Sherman, Marcia Shield, Jean Wintermute, Helen Spellman. Row 2-Margaret Wintermute, Dorothy Vvalters, Mary Jane Albyn. Marian lFinney, Twila Wolfe, Reba Young, Beatrice Parr, Phyllis Swigart, Jeanne Cullison, Dorothy P-atchen, Ruth Maharg, Marjorie Botts, Carolyn Keck, Marjorie Myer, Dorothy Homer, Lois Phillips, Peggy Smith, Marian Beaumont, Marie Keller, Julia Garapedian, Mildred Owen, Mary Ham- mond. Kathryn Wilson. Row 3-Edwin Ryan, Ernest Settles, l-lric Kessmier, Willis Berger. Robert Sanders, Junior Mclnturf, Kathleen Norris, Janet l-lorwitz, Opal Smith, Betty Turner. Jean Price, Clyde Bowman, William Mercer, Harold Messick, Donald Anderson, Stanley Mueller, John Mercer. Newark High School Presents the Operetta "And It Rained" By Estelle Clark and Adele Ler- February 24 and 25 Act I-Garden and Entrance to Wise Hotel. Act II-Same as Act I. Cast of Characters. Mr. Wise, Proprietor of the Wise Hotel ,,..........,,.,,,,,,. ...... T heodore Munch M'lle Marie Carey, Manager of French Dancers .,..... . Dennis Black, Returning from College ..................., Mazie Black, Sister of Dennis ...........,......, Mrs. Wise .......,.............................,. Maibelle Rich .......... ........ ........... John Rich .........,...................................,........ Curly Rich, Member of Glee Club ................. Steele Black, Father of Dennis and Mazie .....,. Jack ..,....,..............................,,,...,.,....................,.. Fred ..................,....... Director of Music ......... Director of Action ......,. Director of Dancing ...... Director of Orchestra ...... Pianist .......,................,,. Assistant Pianist .,.... ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-EIGHT ...........Mary Hogue ..,....George Criswell Florence Rinehart .........Martha Graff ...Ardythe Uffner .....Russell Younce ,.........John Maharg Robert Marshall ........Don Messick .,....Eric Kessmeier W. Klopp ............Esther Larr ,.....Florence Myer Sam Gelfer ...,..Dorothy Bline ,.....Janet Horwitz Theodore Munch, M-artha Graff, Russel Younce, Mary 1-Logue, llob- art Marshal, John Maharg, Florence Rinehart, George Criswell, Ardyth lfffner. OPERETTA LEADS Edwin llyan, Ernest Svttlvs, Stage Managers ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-NINE Row 1-Joseph Painter fdrum-niajorj, James Smith, Warren Orr, Alan Burton, Junior Reed, Mr. Sam Gelfer fuirectorp. Row 2-Edward Kelley, David Braden, Floyd Rusk, George Hol- combe, Betty Hill, Ruth Criss. Row 3fGilbert Curry, 'Howard Siegel, Robert Boyd, Joseph Patter- son, Helen Buckingham. Row 4-Richard Oder, Janice Mulquln, Errol Liutliph, llobcrt West- brook. Row 5--Betty Lanning, Jean Holcomb, 'l'hom'as Wolcott,1'aul liickell, Betty Bostwick, Row 6-'James Curry, Frank :Feketc-, Marshall Freeman, Carl Kute. Jean Mulquin, Doris English. Row 7fVVilliam Passman, Roderick Huff, Bert Xvisc, llichartl Vvalton. Row 8-Oscar Cook, VV-arne Holcomb, William Tate, Robert lden, Albert Schramm. Row 9-Richard Steen, 'l'he-odoru lV1l1IlCh, l'aul Ze-hier, Gvorge Cum- mings, David Williams. Row 10-Ernvsl Settles, Edwin Ryan, llonarcl lclen, Robert Beach, David Braden. The Band The Newark High School band has proved very popular to the students of this school and has added much to the spirit of school loyalty at all home basket- ball and football games. At both the Zanesville and Coshocton games, the band was present. This year's band has sixty enrolled members who meet on Thursdays and Fridays. The band of 1937 holds the record of having the largest number of members since it was first organized. ONE HUNDRED THIRTY They wear uniforms consisting of a hat, coat and trousers, which were purchased from funds received from the senior play of 1935. Russell Loughrnan was the leader of the band of twenty-one members when it was first organized in 1925. Various business concerns of this city raised money in order to purchase caps and hats. In 1928 Mr. Sam Gelfer was appointed director of the band and has faithfully and capably con- ducted it ever since. Standing-Mr, Sam Gelfer, Betty Hill, Ruth Criss, Richard Steen, Roderick Huff, David Williams, Robert lden, William Passman, Jeanne Mulquin, Oscar Cook, Doris English, Marshall Freeman, Theodore Munch, Neil Shadoin, 'Helen Buckingham. Sitting iRow 12-Robert Bolen, ldrrol Gutliph, Oscar Brooks, Janet Horwitz, Paul Ricket, Betty Bostwick, Bonita Chaney, Howard Siegel, Gilbert Curry, Robert Boyd, Joseph Patterson, Leslie Patten, Robert Westbrook, Richard Oder, Janice Mulquin, Virginia Anderson, Mary Y. Jones, William Hess. Sitting LRow 25-Maxine Roberts. Jasmine Gzlrapedian. Floyd Musk, YVarren Orr, Junior llc-ed, The Orchestra The Newark High School orchestra pre- sented a program of descriptive music under the leadership of Mr. Sam Gelfer during Thanksgiving week. One of their selections was "The Feast of the Lanterns" by the French composer, Benet, illustrat- ing the full skill of the orchestra. The orchestra was begun in 1910 by Mr. T. R. Neilson. Mr. C. W. Klopp then was appointed director of the twelve members of the organization. He re- mained in charge until 1928 when Mr. Gelfer assumed that responsibility. The present orchestra of Newark High School is made up of approximately forty- five members who meet regularly on Monday and Wednesday. They have played at most of the year's chapel pro- grams, for the operetta, and for the senior play. The following numbers have been played this year by the orchestra. Surprise Symphony-Joseph Haydn L'Arlesienne-Georges Bizet Rondino--Fritz Kreisler-COn a theme by Beethoven? Three Morris Dances-Old English Beethoven Suite ONE-HUNDRED Tl-lIR'l'Y'0Nl:. Row 1-Paul Clary, Victor Ritter, Richard Gillespie, John Cicur, George Criswell, Willard Goldberg, Robert Campbell, Robert Rice. Row 2-Clyde Bowman, Leslie Patten, Jr., Robert Marshall, John Mercer, Russell Younce, Ernest Settles, Edwin Ryan. Robert Warman, Willis Berger, Donald Anderson, Paul Goodin, Eric Kessmeier, Harold Messick. John Maharg, Robert Sanders, Junior Mclnturf, Theodore Munch, James Beeney, Stanley Mueller. Row 3-William Ayers, Justin Reichert, Kenneth Smith, Jamfs Orr, Rob- ert Coffman, Philip Booth, William Smith, Vernon Penich, William Hol- lander, William Groves, Russell Conley, Eugene Crouch, Rollin Jauchius, Andrew Turner, Richard Graham. Row 4-Oscar Cook, Erroll Gutliph, Warren Orr, Robert Smith, Maxine Roberts, Dorothy Bline, Jasmine Garapedian, Sam Gelfer, Robert Boyd. Br-tty Bostwick, Gilbert Curry, David Williams, Richard Steen, Roderick Huff, Ruth Criss, Betty Hill, Wayne Martin. Newark High School Presents Twenty-Fifth Annual Minstrel. Songs by Chorus Wake Up and Sing We Joined the Navy Organ Grinder's Swing Blue Heaven Lights Out Alabama Barbecue The Old Pine Tree Great Day Solos Little Old Lady .......................... ,.................. ,..,,, R o bert Marshall Where the Lazy River Goes ..,.... Trust in Me ....................,....,......... Will You Remember ..................... The Love Bug Will Bite You ...... The Trio September in the Rain Down By the Sea ............. ..............,....... Big Boy Blue The Olio Dancing ......... Play ...................................................................,.............. Management ......A,..............,,.......,...,.................................. Roy Rowland, Edwin Ryan, Ernest Settles. Direction Mr. C. W. Klopp UNE HUNDRED THIRTY-TWO Miss Esther Larr .....Russell Younce ...Eric Kessmeier , ...,, John Maharg .George Criswell John Maharg .Russell Younce George Criswell ......John Denton ...Dramatic Club .......Don Schofield, Mr. Sam Gelfer Robert Rice, Robert Campbell, Willard Goldberg, John Cicur, George Crisswell, Paul Clary, Victor Ritter, Richard Gillespie, Endmen. Robert Boyd, Theodore Schonberg, Floyd Rusk, Dana Hammond. "Frenzied F inance." ONE HUNDRED THIRTYYTHREE Mary Hogue Frances Gilcrest Jean Wall Niary Alice Baker Mary Lou Plyniale Eleanor Sperry Arabelle Heft Janet Ruffner Phyllis Boyd Martha Ann Allen The Girl Reserves Present "The Empty Room" A Drama of the First Christmas. Friday, December 18, 1936 Scene - A Room in an Old inn of Bethlehem Time - Evening of the First Christmas. The Characters. Hornar, a Young Bethlehemite ........,,,,....,..,,,,,,,,,,...i.i,... i.,...... F rances Gilcrest Joanna, His Cousin ........,.....,.......,..., ........ E leanor Sperry Rebecca, Mother of Homar ....,,, ..,..,.,,.,......,. P hyllis Boyd Th.,e Prophet .............................. .....,. M ary Lou Plymale Mary of Nazareth ....,....,.,..,....,....,, ......,,,......,..,..,,, J ean Wall A Nobleman of Capernaum .......,,, . ,.... ,.Martha Ann Allen A Servant ..,,..,,,,...,..,,....,.............. ....,.......,,,.............. J anet Directors ....,.., .,........ M iss Mildred Hawke and Miss Mary Hammond ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-FOUR Seated-Dolores Hceter, Jean Lichtenstein, Janet Horwitz, Theodore Schonberg. Standing-Robert Penn, XVilliam Fisk, Joseph Hirschberg, Betty Kent, Jack Bolton. Memorial Day Program. This year's Memorial Day program was conducted by the Civic Society, under the direction of Miss Hosick. The program was built around the two central ideas of a memorial to the soldiers of former wars and then a peace discussion in relation to the present time. The program was opened with appropri- ate patriotic piano solos by Janet Horwitz, who had charge of the whole of the musi- cal program. Jean Lichtenstein and Wil- liam Fisk then presented the tribute to those who fought in past Wars with a talk and readings, respectively. The uselessness of war and the effect of propaganda in opposition to peace were de- veloped in tw-o talks by Joseph Hirsch- berg and Theodore Schonberg. The pro- gram was concluded by a series of readings showing the beauties of peace, given by Dolores Heeter. Decorations were in charge of Robert Penn, Evelyn Cummins and Betty Kent. Buglers were Roderick Huff and Richard Steen. ONE HUNDRED THIRTYFIXE Reminiscing On the Wings of Poesy September 8-The sun rises cheerily then hides its head in shame. The opening day of school's to blame. 16-Mr. Boyd welcomes the students here In the first school chapel of the year. 17-School is organized and Student Council elected. 19-6-0 West, but our spirits are unaffected. 26-Mt. Vernon defeats us 21-6. 30-Chevrolet pictures "The Perfect Six." October 2-Our luck at present has turned, at least, With a score of 13-6, we take East, 6-Although we might, I d0n't think we willg But in case of a fire, we practice fire drill. 9-Our good luck still exists. We beat Lancaster, 25-6. 13-E. J. Unruh speaks on World peace, An earnest plea that wars might cease. 14-George Elias says being a man with- out a country is little fun. 16--We get beat by Ironton, 6 to 21. 24-Beat Coshocton 29-7 in a game of football. 31-Tied with Zanesvile 6-6, a thrill for all. November 5-A talk on "Classifying Personalities" by Roy Burkhart. 9-Defeat Cambridge 48-13, and the rooters do their part. 11--Colonel Dockery speaks on War and needless death. 13-Culture visits the school in Hamlet and Macbeth. lnspector Drane Lester Dec. 4 ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-SIX Mr. George Elias Oct. 14 14-Gloomily, cheerlessly the sun setsg ,twas a horrible day. Marietta beat us 8-6, in the last moment of play. December 4--Ace "G" Man Inspector Drane Lester gives a talk. About how criminals are apprehended and caught. 9-Boys' chapel program, local talent on display. 11-Defeated East 27-4-How our team can play! 15-The thrills in "Spooks', nearly send us to our doom. 18-For a Christmas play, the Girl Reserves, present the "Empty Room. 19-Our school for a litle while is definitely over. Our boys are taken 28-26, by the team at Dover. 26-The Hi-Y gives their Christmas dance. 30-Newark defeats Jackson 54-195 and the fame of our team is enhanced. January 2-We take Akron Garfield 20-19, 'twas no test. 3-Mr. Moninger speaks on his trip through the west. 4-Back to school, to toil and care. 8-We 'beat Cambridge 26-18, there. 15-We defeat Coshocton 25-30 with greatest of ease. 16-We sail through Lancaster 32-17, just a breeze. 13-Elliott James presents a liquid air demonstration. 29-We beat Zanesville, what a celebration! This day also marks the end of examinations. February 5--The game with Cambridge ends in our favor 31-10. 10-Mr. Woolson talks of the Mound- builder who resembled cave men. 12-We beat Coshocton 31-35, an exciting game. 13-Take Lancaster 35-l2Q we're on oui way to fame. 16-After so many victories, we were bound for a fall. We get it when Marietta beats us 31 28 Their bo s are too tall - . y . 17-An interesting movie on the life of a Termite. 19-Marietta beats us again 21-23, but we put up a fight. 20-Pomeroy is defeated 28-26, good compensation. 22-George Washington's birthday and a welcome vacation. 24-The singing members of our school Derform. 25-The operetta is 'AAnd It Rained" but there is no storm. 26-This day is remembered with pleasure that's keen. Our team beats Zanesville 27 to 19. March 4-We thrill to the movie, "Hoosier Schoolmasterf' 5--Beat Columbus North 43-20 with a team that is faster. 6-Go to the district and eliminate Mt. Vernon. 7-We hear all about Wesleyan, a school for "learnin." 12-Newark rolls up another victory against Marion Harding. With a 46-19 score, we hope our good luck is just starting. 13-We win the district title 34-26 from West. Now the state championship is our quest. Dr. A. A. Shaw June 10 Mr. F. W. Woolson Feb. 10 17-Alas and Alack! Our hopes are for naught, Newark defeated 22-42 by Massillon in a game hard fought. 23-National Honor Society is formed for those first in the class. It's an honor desired by most every lad and lass. 25-Howard White gives a meat demonstration. -Today we get out for Easter Vacation. -Carl Sturdy says cans preserve vegetables fine. April 21-A chapel program in honor of the Honor Society. Dr. King gives the address, a speech of great variety. 29-The 25th annual minstrel was given today. 30-It was accompanied by Frenzied Financeg the minstrel play. 26 29 May 12-We see that renowned character, the man with a good and bad side. William Bale as Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. 28-Memorial day honoring our soldiers dead. The Civic Society in paying tribute led. June 6-Reverend L. O. Mink delivers the baccalaureate address. A plea that education might progress. 8-Drama and merriment now hold sway. "Pride and Prejudice" is given as the class play. 10-Dr. Shaw is speaker for commence- ment exercises. The diplomas are given out together with scholarships and prizes. 11-Our cares are over, Hurrah and Hooray! School is out for summer today! ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-SEVEN ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-EIGHT 'Y 4 5 'iv xx N , Qllllln -,,,,, 11 ' ff' so H E' 'F L T ATU E- ami? H my X Qi! H 9 - X 'Q , 4 .. 'lf!:w:.W:iief5sm.- f ,..l - X W M--.vw .... 2 X nxiffqf' S: PM 4 .X H "'--.mf-'Q' 1211: i 1 'mln .14 ' U .,,, 1 7 ' i :'f4j'ff. V' X. " 1.n.j,f.:.,.:vi: .f.u' x ' H ' 89, l rfl -If .Nb 4 52,0 f lnclusiry HONORARY CAPTAINS Bakeiball '37 Howard Siegel Football '36 Albert Mariano Track '36 Robzri Anderson Left to Right-Mr. Long, Mr. Boyd, M'r. Millisor, Mr. Orr, Mr. Swank, Mr, Hanshue, Mr. Cox. Athletic Board The Athletic Board of the Newark Senior High School consists of seven faculty mem- bers, president of student body and two members ex officio, who are the superin- tendent of schools, and the clerk of the Board of Education. This board governs all functions pertaining to athletics in the school, and its main purpose is to promote a better athletic program. This group decides on all matters per- taining to the conduct of athletic affairs. New athletic programs must have the board's approval, and all novel ideas in athletics, such as a stadium and resurfac- ing of track, are considered by the group. If outside organizations suggest any im- provements that could be made in athletics, the board must approve of it. Indeed, any- ONE HUNDRED FORTY thing at all pertaining to athletics in the school is governed by this board. The officers of the group include a presi- dent, a secretary and treasurer, and a fac- ulty manager, all of whom are elected each school year. The faculty manager takes care of all routine rnattersg such as, the securing of games and the hiring of offi- cials. An executive committee is appointed each year. This committee consists of three of the organizationls members, one of whom must be the president, and it may act in all emergency matters. The present officers are: President - - - Frew C. Boyd Secretary-Treasurer - - Lester B. Cox Faculty Manager - - John W. Swank Row 1, Left to Right-Stevens, Giles, English, Wortman, Moore, Schala ler, Farmer, Weakley, Marzano, Hupp, and Cook. Row 2, Left to Right-'Manager Coffman, Montgomery, Adams, Hick- man, Wobbecke, Trowbridge, Warman, Coach C. E. Orr, Jackson, Keyes, Imhoff, Cope, Wells, Assistant Coach Hanshue. I 936 Varsity Football All predictions of Newark High's foot-- ball team for 1936 were that it would be the worst season that any Newark High team had witnessed, but the fighting spirit of the boys disproved all such predictions by winning four games, losing four, and tying one, which might be called an aver- age season. In batting the .500 mark, the Wildcat gridders deserve plenty of praise because of the fact that when so little was expected of them at the opening of the schedule, they fought not only against odds but also against teams which were a great deal heavier than the Newark squad and ended up playing for the Central Ohio League championship with Marietta at the COACH ORR, SCORES Newark ..... ,,.... 0 Columbus West ,... 6 Newark ,,.,. .......,,, 6 Mt. Vernon ...,,..,,... 21 Newark .,,,. ,,.....,,, 1 3 Columbus East .... 7 Newark ..... .......,.. 2 5 Lancaster ,..,,,,.,,,,.. 6 Newark ..... ,.,,..... 6 Ironton .,,... ....,,.. 2 1 Newark .,.,, .,......, 2 7 Coshocton ...... ..... 7 Newark .,... ..,...... 6 Zanesville ,......,,,.,.. 6 Newark ,.,,, ......... 4 8 Cambridge .,.,........ 7 Newark ,.... ...,.. 6 Marietta ,,,.,..,,,...... 8 local field. The Wildcats were edged out of the title by a last minute pass which was good fora touchdown, defeating New- ark 8-6. When Newark High hopefuls reported for practice last fall, only two veterans were available for the Newark mentors, Orr and Hanshue. They were "Jabb0', Giles, fullback, and A1 Marzano, quarter- back, both of whom were members of the C. O. L, mythical team. As the season progressed, the Wildcats were fast improv- ing. Each game was marked by the run- ning and plunging of Giles and quick- witted Marzano, who called the right plays at the right time. ASSISTANT COACH HANSHUE ONE HUNDRED FORTY-ONE' First Down! Newark 25 In opening the Central Ohio League, the Newark Wildcats romped over a heavy Lancaster eleven under the lights in a light drizzle at the Golden Gales' field to the tune of 25-6. The Gales threw a scare into the local boys in the first quarter when Farmer fumbled a Lancaster punt on the 20-yard line, where Lancaster recovered and in three plays J. Bradford plunged over for a touchdown. In the third canto, Imhoff, Newark tackle, received a pass which was batted into his arms by a Lancaster back on the Wildcats' five yard stripe, from where he went over unmolested. The point after was no good. In the same period, Newark romped from their 40 to the opponents, 5, from where Moore marked up another SCHALLER Senior ONE HUNDRED FORTY-TWO Guard - All C. 0. L. First Team Lancaster 6 touchdown by virtue of a pass from Mar- zano. The last period found the Newarkites still going strong. With 40 seconds left to play, Marzano lateraled to Wobbecke on Lancaster's 30, from which point Newark's center was able to cross the Lancaster goal line unobstructed. The try for point was blocked. Statistics: Newark Lancaster 10 First Downs 4 211 Yards gained from scrimmage 87 14 Yards lost from scrimmage 24 14 Passes attempted 9 6 Passes completed 3 62 Yards gained from Dasses 35 3 Passes intercepted 1 3 Fumbles 3 2 Own fumbles recovered 3 0 Opponents fumbles recovered 1 15 Penalties 15 42 Avcrages of punts 35 WOBBECKE Junior Center - All C. 0. L. First Team Touchdown bound! Newark 27 Newark Wildcats turned in a remarkable victory by crushing a surprised Coshocton eleven 27-7. By virtue of this win, the Newark gridders remained in the thick of the fight for the league title. The local gridiron warriors showed superior play- ing in every feature of the game. In the opening canto, the Wildcats scored twice within five minutes. Capitalizing on costly fumbles of the Redskins, the New- ark eleven was able to rush the ball over with Wells scoring on a pass and Giles go- ing over on a line plunge. The Indians, recuperating from the onslaught, fought back gamely and was able to score in the second period by way of the air when Malone took an aerial from Tompkins, Opening the third quarter, Newark re- turned strong and battered their way to Co- GILES Junior C. 0. L. First Team Fullback - All Coshocton 7 shocton's five, from where a pass from Marzano to Moore converted the rush into a touchdown. Coshocton never threatened in the last canto, while the Wildcats were able to score once more, with Marzano carrying the ball on an off-tackle play. The local gridders, as a whole, played out- standing ball. Statistics: Newark Coshocton 4 First Downs 5 ll8 Yards gained from scrimmage 58 9 Yards lost from scrimmage 15 G Passes attempted 15 3 Passes completed 7 44 Yards gained from passes 97 1 Passes intercepted 0 1 Fumbles 3 0 Own Fumbles recovered 1 2 Opponents Fumbles recovered 1 65 Penalties 15 38 Averages of punts 30 MARZANO Junior Quarterback- All C. 0. L. First Team ONE HUNDRED FORTYATHREE It's a pass! Newark 6 The Newark High Wildcats still re- mained in the fight for the league toga by virtue of its impressive showing against the Lash High gridmen in tying them 6-6. The Newark warriors battled an uphill fight from the opening kickoff. The Zanes- ville warriors had the better team the first half of the contest, but the Wildcats came back strong in the latter half to fight a much larger team off of its feet, The Blue Spartans' score came late in the second period when they took the ball on their own twenty and launched a passing at- tack which netted them six points after connecting with five consecutive aerials. From the beginning of the third canto, the Wildcats never weakened and played in their opponents' territory the entire sec- ond half. The Newark warriors pushed Zanesville 6 over their score at the opening of the fourth quarter with English taking a shovel pass from Marzano. Late in the game, with only a few minutes remaining, the Newark Warriors advanced the ball to Zanesville's four-yard stripe, but their touchdown was denied when a pass was in- tercepted by the Lash high safety man. Statistics: Newark Zanesville 15 First Downs 6 238 Yards Gained from Scrimmage 45 15 Yards Lost from Scrimmage 25 18 Passes Attempted 20 G Passes Completed 10 64 Yards Gained from Passes 112 2 Fumbles 2 1 Own Fumbles Recovered 0 2 Opponents Fumbles Recovered 1 15 Yards Lost on Penalties 25 245 Distance of Punts 240 ENGLISH WEAKLEY Senior Second Team ONE HUNDRED FORTYFFOUR End-All C. 0. L. Senior Halfback Open up that hole! Newark 48 The Wildcat gridders continued their de- termined march for the C. O. L. title by crushing a favored Cambridge eleven, 48-13. Cambridge opened the fireworks when Henderson scored' from Newark's five after the Brownies marched from their own forty. The Wildcats, recovering from this Cambridge I 3 Moore, while Wells was snatching passes for long gains. Weakley, Warman and Wobbecke were continually breaking up the Brownies' much-feared offense. Cambridge's other score came from Weak1ey's punt being blocked and recov- ered by the Brownies. Henderson again scored, slicing off tackle on a reverse play. onslaught, opened fire and scored in four Siatlstlcsz C, mhridgg plays with Marzano finally going over for N'i3W"rk First Downs 'l 1- the score. Newark's next touchdown came 269 Yards Gained from Scrimmage 185 when Imhoff broke through the Brownies' 0 Yards L0St from Scrimmage TU forward wall and snatched the pigskin f :fuses ffttenqpfg S from a bewildered Cambridge back and H' -. . . asses 'omp e tp Q A 40 hs Maids Gained from asses galloped for a touchdown. From then on 0 Fumbles Q it was all Newark. Giles, Marzano and 140 . Penalties English doing the scoring, while aided by Q7 the beautiful blocking of Schaller and 21 Yards Punts Returned 12 WARMAN MOORE WELLS Senior Senior Senior Tackle I-Ialfback End ONE HUNDRED FORTYFFIVE Around the end! Newark 6 A fighting band of Newark High grid- ders dropped an 8-6 decision to the Mari- etta Tigers in a championship struggle for the C. O. L. crown before one of the largest crowds which has attended a high school contest for many years. Going into the last quarter, the Wild- cats were leading 6-2 when in the last min- ute of play, Marietta, trying desperately to score, connected with one of the many long passes which they tossed and Brady Hill was on the receiving end to score for the Tigers. Newarkls score came in the opening canto when Giles galloped thirty yards to score standing up after good blocking paved the way for his scoring dash. The Tigers' other two points came in the fourth canto when English's punt was Marietta 8 blocked. He recovered on the Wildcats, one-yard stripe, where the referee declared a safety because of the fact that English's foot was over the goal line. It was proved later that the decision was a mistake. Six seniors ended their scholastic foot- ball career. They are Weakley and Wells, endsg Schaller and Warman, linemeng Moore and English, backs. , Statistics: Newark Marietta 8 First Downs 7 158 Yards Gained from Scrimmage 107 15 Yards Lost from Scrimmage 25 3 Passes Attempted 8 1 Passes Completed 3 30 Yards Gained from Passes 54 3 Fumbles 2 15 Penalties 40 125 Distance of Punts 110 32 Average of Punts 24 40 Yards Punts Returned 0 Senior Manager, JACK COFFMAN WORTMAN IMI-1oFF . . Jlmim' Junior Guard Tackle UNE HUNDRED FORTY-SIX Row 1, Left to Right--Copeland N. Duval, Speaks, King, C, Miller, E. Duval, Savage, Cady, Upson, G. Miller, and Inlow. Row 2, Left to Right--Managers Morrow and Harrison, Sachs, Hollar, Paulson, Erskine, Fernow, Warrington, Sedgwick, and Jones. I 936 Reserve Football For the first time in the history of the school a reserve football team has been organized with a regular schedule which it follows throughout the autumn season. The purpose of the squad is to permit the boys, who do not have sufficient ability and experience to play on the varsity, to learn more about football in the way of putting their fundamentals into practice and securing more experience under game conditions. The reserve team which represented the school this season turned in some excel- lent performances in going through their schedule undefeated and being tied only once. 'I'his team, composed mostly of soph- omore boys, played varsity teams of class B schools with very credible athletic rec- ords. Many of the boys have proved themselves to be of great benefit to the varsity with the coming season through their individual performances under fire of a heated contest. Such is the object of organizing such a team. In this way, Coaches Orr and Hanshue hope to uncover some hidden material which will be very beneficial to the future varsity teams. Although the boys may be green and in- experienced when they enter Newark High as sophomores, they will be well taught and will develop a great deal faster under the program which is under the di- rection of Assistant Coach Luther Han- shue. With such a program, the Wildcat coaches hope to secure more material for the varsity squad and to create more in- terest in the boys for the desire of learn- ing and playing the game better. SCORES Newark Reserves.. 7 Newark Reserves.. '7 Newark Reserves..14 Newark Reserves.. 7 Newark Reserves..12 Mt. Vernon Res ..... 0 Lancaster Res ....... 7 Mt. Vernon Res. .,., 13 Pataskala .....,........ 6 Lancaster Res ....... 6 ONE HUNDRED FORTY-SEVFN V . A R S I T Y is A s K E T B A L L Row 1, Left to Right-Paul Adams, Albert Marzano, Fred Myers, Rich- ard Imhoff, Robert Mercer, Howard Siegel, and Coach Orr. Row 2, Left to Right - Jack Bolton, Manager: Royal Keyes, Joseph Nvcfikley, Robert Hammock, James Tiemann, Henry Giles, Robert Evans. l936 The Wildcat cagers, although not win- ning the state basketball crown, turned in the ,best record of any team in the history of the school. From the start, the Newark cagers were marked as the team to beat and were constantly on the spot wherever or whenever they engaged in a contest. In playing against such odds as revenge and beating a champion, the Wildcat bas- keteers turned in a splendid and outstand- ing record of 19 wins with 4 reverses. A forward, a guard and a center were needed to carry on the good name made by the state champs, since Marzano and Siegel were the only holdovers. In "Jabbo" Giles, Coach Orr found a gold mine for a center. Mercer, who was Siegel's running mate at guard, fulfilled his job in great shape. Although small, he was fast and an accurate shot. Evans proved himself of great value to the team in cool and steady playing. Adams, the only sophomore on the squad, crashed through in a roaring success in his first year at high-class com- petition. Weakley, who alternated at the forward post with Adams, played consis- tent and steady ball throughout the sea- son. Siegel and Marzano, from one game to the next, were marked performers. But, despite the handicap, they were largely responsible for the success the team re- corded. Siege1's uncanny speed and defen- sive work, and Marzands elusiveness and accurate shooting were what made them so outstanding throughout the schedule. SCORES. 4 Newark .,................ 29 Columbus East Newark .................. 64 Canton Lehman Newark .................. 26 Columbus North ,... Newark ...............,.. 26 Dover ,...,,... ....... ,,,,,, Newark ....,............. 54 Jackson ................., Newark ........,......... 50 Akron Garfield .... Newark .................. 26 Cambridge ........,,.. Newark . ................, 22 Mt. Vernon ......,,... . Newark ................., 30 Coshocton ......,.,,.... Newark ............,..... 32 Lancaster ,............, Newark .................. 28 Marietta ................ Newark .................. 22 Zanesville ........,,.... Newark .,,.............., 31 Cambridge ............ ONE HUNDRED FORTY-EIGHT Newark ........ ....... C oshocton .....,..,..... Newark ,,,,,.,. ,.,.,,. L ancaster .............. 35 31 35 12 Newark ........ .....,. 2 3 Marietta ................ 31 28 Pomeroy ..............,. 26 26 ' 18 Newark .................. Zanesville .... .,....... . CENTRAL DISTRICT TOURNAMENT. Newark .................. 43 ,Columbus North..20 19 18 28 Newark .................. 17 I9 18 Newark .....,,........... 46 Mt. 'Vernon .. ......... 15 Newark ..,.............., 45 Marion Harding ..19 STATE TOURNAMENT. 17 25 ig Newark ................,. 34 Columbus West .,.. 26 21 10 Newark .......,...,.... U22 Masslllon ....,........, 42 : -, H122 1,w1f.::mgg:y-ga .mf ,ww-,Qwf2:2?s" -fx" Sggwfzl -W1-fir' 1 : 1,5 , HAM PS ' ' m iC:nTe.r 1 ' Juniorlfy ONE HUNDRED FORTY-NINE Warming up. NEWARK 26 CAMBRIDGE 18 In opening the C. O. L. basketball sea- son for 1936-37, the local Wildcats copped their first league affray by defeating a stubborn Cambridge five, 26-18. The Newark Cagers, trailing 14-17 at half time, came back strong in the second half to hold the Brownies to one point, while garnering twelve points. The game, as a whole, was ragged and rough and it was typical of all Cambridge-Newark af- frays. NEWARK 30 COSHOCTON 25 The Newark High basketballers tallied their second league victory in as many starts by defeating the defending champs, Coshocton, 30-25, in the hardest fought con- test for the local cagers this season. The Wildcats held the lead throughout the game, but the Redskins threatened many times. With the score 19-18, at the end of the third canto, the Newark cagers a decisive pulled away rapidly to take verdict from the champs. The team, as a whole, played good defensive and offen- sive ball throughout the game. NEWARK 32 LANCASTER 17 The local cagers continued their league winning ways by grabbing their third con- secutive league contest from the Golden gales to the tune of 32-17 on the opponents' oor. ONE HUNDRED FIFTY ' NEWARK 28 MARIETTA 31 After winning seven consecutive league victories, the fast stepping Newark Wild- cats ran into a retarder at the hands of the river city Tigers, Marietta, to the tune of 28-31. After a listless first half the Marietta boys began to pull away, led by the im- mortal Brady Hill, who accounted for 16 of the opponents' points. It was evident that the local cagers were entirely off form and likewise the visitors played superior ball throughout the contest. NEWARK 22 ZANESVILLE 21 In copping their fourth consecutive league victory, the fighting Wildcats de- feated the Zanesville Spartans, 22-21, in one of the most hectic battles in which the local cagers have engaged so far this sea- SOIL Trailing, 11-12, at the intermission, the Newark cagers rang up three markers at the opening of the second half and con- tinued to lead the rest of the game, al- though the outcome was uncertain until the final whistle. The state champs played hard ball throughout the contest, while Harrison of the Spartans, a former, mem- ber of the Wildcats' state championship team, turned in the best performance for Zanesville. - Last minute orders. NEWARK 26 ZANESVILLE 18 Playing before the largest crowd that has ever witnessed a high school contest, the Wildcats secured a co-championship of the Central Ohio League by defeating the Blue Spartans in a fast and well-played game. Throughout the affray, neither team held much of an advantage until the last few minutes when the Newarkites cinched the game by dropping in three buckets. The first quarter ended in a tie, 5 upg the second quarter found Siegel and Mar- zano dropping in one fielder apiece to send the Wildcats in the lead, 9-5. Buckets by Weidleman and Harrison and fouls by Hos- ler and Harrison put the Spartans ahead, 12 to 11, at half time. The second half found everyone play- ing superb ball. The Spartans could not keep up with the pace set for them and the champs went through the visitors' zone defense at will. Giles held Harrison to nine points while collecting four, which might be termed a good job well done. Metcalf and Weidle- man loked best for Zanesville, while Mar- zano and Siegel were outstanding for New- ark. NEWARK 46 MT. VERNON 15 The Newark high basketball team con- tinued their drive for their second con- secutive district championship by soundly trouncing the Mt. Vernon cage squad. The Cats rolled up a 46-15 verdict over their former Central Ohio League rivals. The Yellow Jackets lost all their sting in their contest with Columbus Central the previous night and proved to be easy prey for the whetted claws of the Wildcats. By the end of the first half the Red and White total on the scorer's sheet was 22 points to Mt. Vernon's 3 markers. The sec- ond half saw Newark score twice Mt. Ver- non's 12 points to bring both totals to 46-15 in favor of the Newarkites. No one player of the starting quintet of the Newark basketeers scored less than six points. Marzano was first with 12, Siegel second with 8, Weakley third with 7, Giles and Mercer next with 6 points apiece. The outstanding feature of the affray was the fact that the highly-touted Yel- low Jacket forward, Lore, who scored 21 points the night before, was held to one lone field goal, while Lawrence and Payne played the most outstanding ball for the losers. ONE HUNDRED FIFTY-ONE Jump ball! NEWARK 43 NORTH 20 The Newark High Wildcats again proved that they could deliver the goods by de- feating Columbus North in the opening contest of the Central District Tourna- ment. This victory put Newark into the sec ond round of the tourney at Delaware, where they will meet Mt. Vernon. The champs completely bewildered North with a dazzling barrage of short passes and hooking fielders. Marzano again led the scoring with 14 points. Siegel and Mercer were next with 11 and 9 points, respectively. The Cats' starting combina- tion rolled up a score during the first half of 30-9. During the second half Coach Orr substituted frequently, enabling the whole squad to see action in the game. By virtue of this victory, the Wildcats established themselves as the team to beat in the tournament. Their sharp shooting, fast breaking, clever ball handling and general all-around good play were the out- standing characteristics of champs throughout the game. Sullinger, North's highly rated all-City guard, was held to one field goal, while Rosemergy and Weaver were easily the outstanding performers for the Columbus team. ONE' HUNDRED FIFTY-TWO NEWARK 45 MARION 19 By virtue of their 45-19 victory over Marion Harding in the semi-final game of the Central District Tournament, the New- ark High basketeers advanced to the finals to defend their title rights. The Newark team started rather poorly and failed to connect from the field. Mar- zano kept the state champs in the game the first half by making 10 out of 17 points scored by Newark. Newark led, 10 to 4, at the quarter. In the second canto, Newark began to play good ball and ran the score up to 17 to 9 before the first half ended. Newark started scoring in the third canto and they looked like the team that beat North and Mt. Vernon. With side and un- der-basket shots connecting, Newark ran the score up to 30 points. Wintermute was the only member of the Harding team to score in the third quarter, making one goal, With this big lead, the reserves were put in for five minutes of the last quar- ter. They continued to score at the expense of the Presidents. The game ended 45 to 19. The height of Marion meant little to the Newarkites, who displayed too much speed for their taller opponents. Marzano led the scoring for Newark with 14 points, while Giles' and Siegel's defensive work was out- standing. Decker and Wilkins played best for Marion. Dribbling champs. NEWARK 34 COLUMBUS WEST 26 The State champs of Newark High School successfully ended the defense of their title by downing the Columbus West, 34-26. By taking this final game of their Central District Tournament, the Wildcats retained their district championship for the second successive year. Newark started out with a rush that nearly swept West off their feet. At the end of the first quarter Newark had chalked up 13 markers while holding the city champs of Columbus to six points. With five minutes left in the second canto, Giles was removed via the personal foul route. The Cowboys then controlled the tip for the rest of the game. Evans, who replaced Giles, held Weigand, the tour- ney's leading scorer, to one field goal and three fouls. At half time Newark led, 24-11. After the Cats had added four quick points in the third period, West applied the pressure and brought its total to 20 points. In the closing minutes of the final quar- ter, Newark staged a stall that brought everyone to their feet. The stall drew open West's defense and Siegel charged in for two consecutive buckets, cinching the game. Out of the tournament play, Newark placed three members on the All-Tourna- ment first teamg Marzano at forward, Giles at center and Siegel at guard. Mercer, at guard, represented Newark on the second team. BASEBALL CAPTAIN S. The baseball captains appointed this year for the inter-class baseball league by A. B. Long are as follows: Sophomores: Robert Westbrook, Donald Tumblin. Juniors: Robert Mercer, Richard Im- hoff. Seniors: Jack Lytle, Richard Oder. CI-IEER LEADERS The cheer leaders who directed the stu- dent body in supporting athletic teams this year were probably the best that have represented the school for four or five years. George Criswell, a senior, and Robert Black, a sophomore, were the "step and strut" boys who spurred the crowds at the contests to louder voices and more support. ' Criswell, with his smoothness of motion and leading ability, and Black, exceeding- ly small and full of fire and vigor, made a colorful combination to watch. Their cheer leading merits great credit because it was through them that the crowds supported our teams so well. ONE HUNDRED FIFTY-THRFF R l E S E R V E B A S K E T B A L L Row 1. Left to Right-Ralph Woltjen, Robert Forgraves, Samuel Sachs. Robert Wvestbrook, Robert Grey, and Coach Luther Hanshue. Row 2, Left to Right-Stewart Sedgwick, Harry Dorsey, Vernon Penick, Edward Ryan, Mark Layman, Donald Tumblin, and Robert Murray 1937 In opening the 1936-37 campaign, Coach Luther Hanshue had to pick a winning combination from one of the smallestre- serve squads that have ever reportecf for a basketball cage team in the history of the school. Composed of Sophomores who might have been rightly called the Newark High Midgets, the reserve cage squad turned in a very commendable record in winning 13 and losing 4 games. Because practically every team that the little band of Newark reserves met had an overwhelming height advantage. Due to the teams small stature, Coach Hanshue depended wholly on speed and more speed and accurate shooting. If nothing else can be said of these little stal- warts, they certainly furnished plenty of opposition in speed and accurate shooting in making up for the opponents height ad- vantage. Gray and Westbrook, guards, were probably the smallest of the entire squadg but in spite of this fact, they were the mainstays of the combination because of their speed and clever ball handling. Ryan, Jackson, and Rauch were the taller of the group and it was up to them to get rebounds and tips which was seldom be- cause the opposition offered taller men. Forgraves and Woltjen, forwards, com- pleted the Wildcat reserves' fighting band of midgets. They turned in excellent per- formances and were a very important cog in the combination. SCORES Newark Res .,...,..... 34 Union Station ....,,.. 10 Newark Res ........... Pataskala ..,. Newark Res ........,.. 19 Coshocton ..........,. 24 Newark Res ........... 22 Lancaster ........,,.... 20 gewari E25 """""' fecflnd Tres' Newark Res ........... 23 First M. E. ..,.....,.,, 22 ewaf S '4"--"4-- ac Son Own Newark Res ........... 26 First Presby. , ....... 24 Newark Res ----------- Glenford ---- -- Newark Res ........... 22 Zanesville .............. 17 Newark Res ........... Mt. Vernon .. Newark Res .,...,..... 36 Lincoln Jr. H ......... 22 Newark Res .........., Coshocton .... Newark Res ........... 45 Roosevelt Jr. H ..... ll Newark Res ........... Lancaster .... Newark Res ........... 30 Wilson Jr. H ........... 22 Newark Res ........... Zanesville .... ONE HUNDRED FIFTYYFOUR Seated-Robert Mercer, Richard Imhoff, Howard Siegel, Albert Marzano- Paul Adams. Standing-Mr. C, E. Orr fcoachb, Frederick Myers, Henry Giles, Rober: Evans, Royal Keyes, Joseph Weakley, Jack Bolton fmanagerj. l937 Above is seen the group of Newark High cagers whoirepresented the local school in the annual Central District Tournament at Delaware, Ohio in the Wesleyan Univer- sity Gymnasium. After traveling to the tournament for four consecutive games and defeating Columbus North, Mt. Vernon, Marion Harding, and Columbus West respectively, the boys were awarded gold-plated belt buckles for individual honorsg and a large trophy, which may be seen at the right center of the picture, was presented to the school. These awards were furnished by the State Athletic Board. This is the second year in succession that a Newark High basketball team has won the Central District tournament, an achievement which is considered a very great honor for any team to be able to do. ROBERT BLACK AND GEORGE CRISWELL ONE HUNDRED FIFTY-FIVE Row 1, Left to Right-Jones, McCullough, Montgomery, Bostwiek, Peel, Myers, A. Marzano, Killworth, Crouch, Groves, Dewault. Row Z, Left to Right-Orr, Coach C, E. Orr, Nelson, Andregg, Wright, V. Mariano, Scott, Harrison, Anderson, Johnson, Whetstone, Giles, Farmer, Grahm. I 936 Track Squad For the season of 1936, the Newark High thin clads turned in one of the most suc- cessful records that could be expected from a green and inexperienced squad. The squad consisted mostly of sophomores and juniors who had never participated' in interscholastic meets. The Wildcats were able to develop into first-class rating tracksters through the closely knitted co- operation between the boys and Coach "Red" Orr. Strange as it may seem, the sophomores contributed mostly to the squad's success. They were able to do this through the efforts of "Jabba" Giles, dash and weight star, A. Marzano, ace javelin hurler, and Freddie Myers, dis- stance runner and anchor man on the mile relay. Out of six meets, the Wildcats won three, lost two, and tied one. Consider- ing the fact that they lost to such strong opponents as Mansfield and Columbus Central, and that they then came back strong to win from Westerville and Chil- licothe, to take the Central Ohio League meet, and to tie Columbus Central for dis- trict honors, the Newark High tracksters and their very able coach, C. E. Orr, de- serve all of the credit that can be cast upon them. SCORES Newark ....... ......,. 2 9 61 Mansfield ..........,. 103 Newark .... ,. ........ Col. Central ......., 71 Newark ...... ........ 8 2 Chillicothe .......,.. 49 70 62 Newark ...... ........ W esterville ....i..... ONE HUNDRED FIFTY-SIX C. 0. L. MEET. Newark .............. 67112 Opponents ........., 6015 DISTRICT. Newark .............. 51 V2 Col. Central ...... 51119 The home stretch! Mansfield The Newark High thin clads lost their opening meet to the veteran trackmen of Mansfield who presented a fast and well balanced team which proved to be too powerful for the inexperienced Wildcats. "Jabbo" Giles, sophomore weight star, secured the only first places for the local lads in the discus and shot put. Rod Har- rison copped both seconds in pushing Giles for first place. Distl and Hansen were the speed demons of the opposition, Distl captured the 120- yard high hurdles and the broad jump while Hansen ran wild in breaking the tape first in the 100 and 220-yard dashes. C. O. L. For the third time in the past four years, Newark High School played an important roll in the Central District, Class A, track meet by sharing first place honors with Central High School of Columbus with a score of 51112 points each. Newark captured five first places and a second with lesser places in other events to battle the Bucks on even terms. Giles, taking first in the shot, set the only new record of the meet by bettering Vinning's mark of 46 feet 7Vz inches set in 1934. Other Newark firsts were in the javelin with Al Marzano pacing the field and Montgomery of Newark second, the discus throw with Rod Harrison out in front, the mile run paced by Anderson, and the medley relay. Get set, Go! ! ONE, HUNDRED FIFT-Y-SEVEN Giles wins! . . ! Westerville In opening the home sprint season, the Newark High track team copped a very closely contested meet from Westerville. Though completely outclassed on the cinder straightaway, the Wildcats re- deemed themselves in the field events. Both teams took eight first places. Freddie Myers copped Newark's only individual running victory in the half mile run in the fair time of 2:15.3. The locals won two of the three relays, the mile and the medley, losing the 880 by only a few feet. Harrison and Giles were the outstand- ing performers for the Wildcats in the field, Giles winning the shot put with Har- rison second. Harrison also contributed a first in the discus throw. A. Marzano proved himself to be an up and coming field star by heaving the javelin 152 feet. ONE HUNDRED FIFTY-EIGHT District The Newark High tracksters copped their fourth consecutive Central Ohio League track meet in defeating Zanesville and Marietta. Out of the seven new records estab- lished, Newark marked up five. Giles' toss of 50 feet 916 inches bettered the former record of 46 feet 21!2 inches set by Morris of Lancaster in 1934. A. Mar- zano bettered the old record of 154 feet 4 inches with his throw of 161 feet 5 inches. Whetstone of Newark and Leo- pold of Zanesville tied for a new broad jump record by bettering the former record of 20 feet 83A inches set by Danner of Newark in 1928 with their jumps of 21 feet 31!2 inches. Anderson of Newark lowered Paul Benner's mark of 4:49.7 in 1934 by virtue of his good time of 4:49.5, Newark's medley relay team established the first record for this event in the good time of 3:49.3. 1 it l Row 1, Left to Right-Mercer, Fields, Lint, Larason, and Love. Row 2, Left to Right-Roberts, Dorsey, Myers, Raymond, Simpson and Boyd. Cross Country Squad With but three veterans in a squad of twenty-five boys answering the call for cross country material, the prospects looked none too bright for the 1936 sea- son. However, under the able direction of Coach A. B. Long the team rounded out the season in fine style, breaking even in the two dual meets and placing fourth in the district meet. Freddie Myers and John Mercer, both winners of letters the season before, and Alton Love were the only runners who had any previous experience. In time trials and practice meets the newcomers to the sport became better versed in the fundamentals and soon showed signs of developing into a well balanced team. The first meet of the season was with Dresden on the Moundbuilders course. Dresden did not have a full team, so only four men were entered on each team. Myers of Newark paced the field to finish first in 11:06. The other Newark harriers to finish were Mercer, Boyd, and Simpson. On Saturday, October 24, at Springfield the Newark thin clads placed fourth in the district meet with a total of 90 points. William Fields, who placed fourth, was the first Newark runner to finish. The other Newark harriers finished in the following order: Myers, Boyd, Raymond and Dorsey. On Tuesday November 3, the Newark thin clads lost a dual meet to Mansfield 35 to 20. Myers, Fields, Mercer and Dorsey placed for Newark. Myers, Fields, Boyd, Raymond, Mercer, and Dorsey received letters at the end of the season. ONE HUNDREDYFIFTY-NINE H O C K E Y Row 1--Barbara Helm, Rena Steele, Evelyn Cummins, Evelyn Wells, Eve- lyn Swain, Sarah Passman, Juanita Powell, Martha Allen, Mary Baker, Lu- cille Hartshorn, Vivian Wills,-Sara Cochlan, Louise Snyder, Alice Puffer, Mary Evelyn Midkiff, Row 2-Eleanor Mills, Catherine Wright, Maxine Shaw, Frances Kennedy, Florence Rinehart, Lois Phillips, Kathleen Phillips, Frances Yannelli, Phyl- lis Hutchison, Clarellen Burton, Betty Shields, Mary Myers, Helen Spellman. Row 3-Miss Myer, Marie Greider, Charlotte Swain, Marjorie Ellen Young, Marian Finney, Evelyn Kreager, Phyllis Swigart, Frances Minor, Mavis Bachelor, Jane Grigsby, Magdeline Yannelli, Freda Brucker. Seniors Win Hockey Title. Although the sophomores and juniors showed a favorable spirit of good sports- manship and strong opposition, the seniors excelled in every game, thereby winning the championship. The captain of the senior team, Mary Baker, showed her ability in evading her opponents, Lucille Hartshorn, the honorary captain, and Martha Ann Allen turned in good performances in the back field and center. Alice Puffer, the resourceful center half for the juniors, was ready in any emer- gency, With quick stick work and speedy action, s h e W a s 5, Q i I quick to recover her ' A ' S' ball and send it to f S her forward line. ' ' 7 I ii.i i Martha Ann Allen EQ '1r, and Mary Baker ,T came from Roose- A 'Vi. Io- " "' velt Junior High ',f,1, , 5? ' and Lucille Harts- E horn and Alice Puf- 3, 'ff r 332 -2"f :iw fer came from Wil- A K. son. H o c k e y is Q, 1 Q r played at Everetfs J lrrlr ifi "o21 field during the f, 1 2 Q ' fan' f . ' xlkp l.,r V . ., L. HARTSHORN ONE HUNDRED SIXTY M. BAKER B I A I I' S .. 9.- E A - fT. A B 3 A L L g I 7 Row 1-Mary Jane Albyn, Helen Glass, Uianlq Shuebruk, Martha Ann AI- " lan, Mary Evelyn Midkiff, Ellen Lamb, Mary Baker, Edith Anderegg. Row 2-Betty Bostwick, Shirley Lewis, Mildred Creighton, Virginia FOX, Lois Geinger, Alice Puffer, Doris English. Girls' Basketball. This year a change was made in the inter-class basket ball teams. Because of the large number of girls eligible for the sport, two leagues were organized, com-- posed of three teams each. Eleven girls re- ceived letters in the first league, while only four received letters in the second was very league. In the first league, the seniors won the championship by a slight margin. The ri- valry between the juniors and seniors was very keen because both teams were evenly matched. Martha Ann Allen showed her proficiency as forwardg Diana Shuebruk D. SHUEBRUK and fast in her suck- er shots. For the de- fensive side, Alice Puffer, a junior, exe celled over all other players. In the s e c o n d league the season ended with a tie be- tween the juniors and seniors. Among t h e outstanding players on the senior team were Shirley Lewis and Mary Evelyn Midkiff, at the forward posts, while Edith And- regg a n d Lois Geinger were out- standing as guards. accurate ,, M. A. ALLEN ONE HUNDRED SIXTY-ONE MISS MYER. Miss Florence Myer, girls' physical education instructor, has been very efficient in her supervi- sion in gymnastics over the girls in the Senior and Central Junior High Schools. About 500 girls in the Senior High School take physical training. Each girl has one and one-half hours of gymnasium work weekly. The time is beneficially spent in basketball, baseball, marching and calis- thenics. An intramural program was featured in both the Junior and Senior High schools. There were no interscholastic basketball games this year. A basketball play day was tried out. On this day the junior high schools assembled and played basketball. The girls who are unable to take gym are instructed in a health class. Miss Myer has instructed the dancing in the operetta, and a Latin play. She in- structed an adult dancing class, in which noted business women participated. MISS MYER BASEBALL. One of t h e favorite spring sports in the girls' activities is baseball. Each year an average of thirty- five girls are chosen to make up three teams, and from this group are chosen captains for each team. The first game of the season was played between the juniors and seniors, the seniors being the victors by a score of 18 to 4. Faye Houdeshell was the outstanding pitcher for the seniors. Her fast balls and her clever manner of controlling the ball made it almost impossible for the juniors to get a hit. The individual ability and the cooperation of the members of the senior team proved very effective in winning the game. There are two rounds of baseball played each season and all games are played at Everett's field. Miss Myer makes arrange- ments for all games played and also acts as referee. J U N I O R Uxlli HUNDRED SIXTY-TWO V I C T O R Y A Abbott, Marjorie .,.. .............. 8 2 Adams, John ................... 88 Adams, Paul .. ...74, 73, 141, 148, 149, 155, 115, 153 Adams, Robert ............... 36, 97 Adzic, Margaret .. ............. 68 Alban, Robert ............ ..36 Albyn, Mary Jane ...... 161, 128, 104. 108, 102, 65, 36 Allen, Faustina ......,......... 82, 83 Allen, Jeanne ............. .85 Allen, Martha Ann.161, 160, 104 125. 36, 64, 116, 134 Anast, Helen . . , ............. . .92 Anast, Stella .. . ...... .. . . .36 Amos, Beatrice . . . ,,,, , .92 Anderegg, David .... ..... . 156 Anderegg, Edith . .. ....... 161, 36 Anderegg, Mary .. ............. 36 Anderson, Donald. ,.... 128, 119, 120, 36, 64, 132 Anderson Betty Jean ..... 68, 114, 107 Anderson Mary Elizabeth ...... 74, 107 Anderson, Robert .... ...... ..... 1 5 6 Anderson Thomas A. ............. 68 Anderson Virginia ....... 68, 131, 111 Andrews, Marian ................ .88 Andrews, Ruth Beatrice ........... 68 Andrews. Wayne ............. 36, 112 Andrews, Wilbur ...... .... . ..74 Angeletti, Mary ...... ..... 7 4 Amspaugh, Dorothy. . . . Anton, Edward ...... ,.., Armentrout, Floyd Armstrong, Arthur Armstrong, Eston . .. ......., . . . . Armstrong, Charles .......... 100, Armstrong, Wilbur ..... Arnold, Hazel ......... 68, 111, 108, S8 88 .......9Z 88 36 102, 106 Arnold, Mabel. ..... 37, 116, 124, 118 Ashcraft, Edmund C. .,........... 37 Ashcraft, Ruth .......,, . 68, 107, 98 Athan, Xenia .......,. .......... 8 5 ........74 ----74. 107 Atherton, Charles. . . . Atwell, Ozie ........ Axline, Ross. . .... ,.,,,,, 3 1 '39 Ayers, William. . .. . . . .74, 132 Azbell, Harold ..... ......, 7 4 B Babbitt, Edward ............ .68, 103 Bachelor, Jean .......... 74, 107, 116 Bachelor, Mavis .... 160, 68, 128, 114. 107, 122, 126 Bachman, Robert ..... ,,... ....... 6 8 Baggs, Joseph .... 68, 103, 99, 119, 124 Bailey, Bailey, Alberta .... ,.104, 125, 37, Lillian ......... ,... ....... 106 74 Bailey, Lorraine .................. 69 Baker, Ann Evelyn ........... 107, 37 Baker, Anna Harriet ..... 35, 125, 102, 65, 64, 126 Baker, Cleo ........ ......,..... 9 2 Baker, Eileen .... .,,,. 1 07, 113 Baker, Harry . .................. 7.1 Baker, Mary Alicc ..... 161, 160, 104. 125, 37, 134 Baker, Richard. .. .......,. ..74 Baker, Russell .... .......... 8 5 Ball, Betty Lee... ,,,, 74, 107 Ball, Frank ..,.... ....,........ 8 2 Ball, Leland ..................... 74 Barclay, Anna Ruth. .68, 100, 107, 116 Barclay, Leland. . . ........... . . 88 Barcus, William. . . , , , . 37 Barlow, Faith ....... .,,, 7 4 Barnes, Mrs. M. E.. . . ., , .31 Barnes, Mr. O. J.... ....28 PORTRAIT INDEX Barrett. Chester ..... Barrett, Marjorie .... Barrick, June ...... Ba rringe r, Helen .... ......68 ........ss ...74,1o7 ......37 88 Baughman, Donna ..... ... . . Baughman, Emojean ..... ...... 6 8 Baughman, Leah. . ..... . . .74, 107 Baughman, Lowell. .. . . . . . 68 Baughman, Mary ...... ..... 7 4 Baumgartner, Ruth .... ...... 7 4 Baxter, Leland ....... ...... . .19 Bazler, Bruce ...... ., .68. 103 Beabout, Dorothy. .. ....,. 82, 83 Beach, Robert ....... ...... I 37, 130 Beall, .lane ............. 68, 107, 116 Beatty, Agnes Dorthea ............ 68 Beaumont, Marian ...... 68, 128, 102, 107 101 116 97 Beaumont, Mary. .... 'iss Bebout, Hazel .... .............. 7 4 Bebout, Rebecca .... .... 7 4, 107, 116 Bebout, Tilton. .. ....,.... ..68 Beeney, James .... .,.. 6 8, 08, 132 Bell, Charles .... ........ . . .88 Bell, Charlot .... ..... 6 8, 111 Bell, Helen... ......74 Bell, Vada ....... . ..,,,., 74 Belt, Virginia ,.... . .,., 82, 83 Benjamin, Robert .... ,,,,,, 6 8 Benner, Richard .... ..... 7 4, 115 Benner, Virginia. . . Bentley, June. , .. Berger, Willis ...... ...68, 128, 132 Bermerman, Wilma ...... .68, 107, 116 Bero, Gisela ..................... 88 Berson, Albert .......,......., 74, 98 Berson, Alice ...... 128, 102, 65, 109, 37, 64, 126, 123 Berson, William ......,,.....,.... 82 Betz, Marille .... . ......... 82 Bibart, Charles... .,,74 Bibart, John ..... , . , , .74 Bickle, Bernard .... . . .68 Bickle, VValter ...... . , . 82 Bieberbach, Rosanna. .. ...93 Bignnv Charlo te ................. 68 , v 1 t Billman, Bessie .... , . .. 74 Binger, Beulah. ..7-l, 107, 98, 124, 123 74 Boyd, Robert Leland. .74, 115, 96, 133 Boyer, Edith .,.......,.......... 68 Boyling, Chester .... ..... 3 8 Boyling, Bozman, Betty ...., Edward. . . . B raddock, Mildred ....... 82,83 38,130,131 Braden, David ..... .... Brandt, Lois ..................... 93 Brandt, Margaret ......... 68, 107, 96 Branscome, Charlotte. .74 107, 116, 98 Brehm, Stanley.. ...... ......... 7 4 Brennstuhl, Miss Dora, . ...... . . .91 Briggs, Betty Jane ...... .... ...... 6 8 Brooke, Ralph .............,.... .85 Brooks, Oscar ....... 131 38, 113, 132 Brooks, Louis .....,... . . ........ 68 Brooks, Kenneth, .... ....... . .99, 38 Brown, Dorothy ..... ..... 8 5 Brown, Frances ....... ....... 7 4 Brown, Mr. G. W. ,... .... . ...28 Brown, Helen ........ .... 7 4, 107 Brown, June ....... .... 8 2, 83 Brown, Kathryn ....... ....... 3 8 Brown, Robert Hollie. . . .... .74 Brown, Robert William ........,... 74 Brownfield. Mary ................. 88 Brucker, Freda ..... 160, 68, 114, 107 Bruney, Eileen .......... 68, 111, 109 Brush, Jean ..... ........... 8 2, S3 Bryan, Harriet ...,. ...., 7 4, 107 Buchanan, Evelyn .... . .... 74, 107 Buckingham, Alice. . . . , Buckingham, Helen .... Buckingham. Marian ..... 131,311,130 Budd, George ....... . . . . . . . .85 Buell, Eva. , ....... .... 8 8 Burden, Margaret. . . . . .74 Burkam, Patricia .... .... S 5 Burrier, Evelyn .... .... 8 3 Burt, Betty ..... .... .......... 7 4 Burton, Alan .,................. 103 Burton, Clarellen. . . 160, 68, 114, 107 Bushfield. Charlotte ...... 68, 104. 121, 109, 126, 124 Butler, Philip ..,... . ........ .... 8 5 Butt, Maynard, .... .......,... 8 2 Butte, Warren. . . .. . .82 Busby, Ernest. . . . . .88 C Carly. Paul. , ....... tiff, 110, 147, 121 Cavncy, Jane .................... 68 Caldwell, Neil ........... 65. 102. 39 Calland, Alma Beatrice tBetty1 125, 39 Callander, Lawrence, .....,........ 68 Camlin. Jane .................... 85 Camlin, Katherine .... 68, 107, 101, 118 Camebell, Elaine. . . .......... . . .82 Campbell, June .... . . .68, 102, 107 Campbell, Lloyd ....... , .......... G8 Campbell, Lynn ......... 68, 103, 112 133 Campbell, Robert .... 103. 39, 132, Carey, Bonnie. . . .. . ...... 69 Carlisle, Deborah ..,. .... 3 9 Carlisle, Robert ..... --..- 8 5 Carpenter, Dorothy .... ....... 8 5 Carpenter, Lucille .... . . .10-4, 39 Carpenter, Marjorie ..,. ...--.. 3 5 Carpenter, May ...... .... 7 4, 107 Carpenter, Neal ..., -...- 6 3 Carr, Mr. H. W.. . . .... . - -S4 Carson, Jeannette .... .... 7 4, 107 ....11l, Bishop, Rollin ................... Bishop, Shirley ............... 38, 96 Bixler, Martin ................... 68 Black, Robert ............... 74, 115 Blinc, Anita. .125. 102, os, 38, 04, 126 Bline, Miss Dorothy ...... 117 118, 30 Blosser, Virginia ................. 92 Boggs, Martha Jane ............... Bolen, Robert ............... 74, 131 Bolten, Frank A. ...... 103, 148, 149, 155,110, 15 5, 108. 99, xx, 135 Bonham, Geraldine ............... 74 Bonham, ivlargaret ....... 74, 107, 116 Booher, Charles ,... ......... 8 2 Booth, Margaret .... .......,. Boothe, Franklin ................. 19 Boothe, Philip ...... .... 6 8, 100, 132 Boring, Marjorie ...... ......,.... 9 2 Bosold, Marie Elma... ... .. . . .74 Bostwick, Herbert. . . ...,..... .156 Bostwich, Betty Zane .... 161, 68, 131. 1:40, 98, 132 Bottcn, Miss Mary .............,. 29 Botts, Marjorie. .68, 128, 102, 107, 116 Bowers, Virginia .............. 82, 83 Bowman, Clyde. .128, 38, 112, 124, 132, Boyd Miss Florence ............... 29, Boyd Mr. F. C ..... ...140, 26 Boyd, Helen ..................... 74 Boyd, Herman .........,.,... 74, 159 Boyd, Phylis. .104, 102, 65, 38, 64, 134 Boyd, Robert Milton ..... 68, 131, 102, 130, 132 Ca rter, Ivan ...... Cartnal, Robert ,... ,.... Carver, Frances ................. Cashdollar, Homer . .74 .85 case, Martha ..,.... ss, 107, 116, 118 Cassell, Gene ........,........... 83 Cates, Russell . . . ..... . .63 112 Catt, Clyde ................. 39, UNE llUNlJREl1 SlXTY'Tl'lltEE Compliments of A FRIEND TI-IE NEWARK TELEPI-IONE COMPANY A HOME INSTITUTION Telephone Service a great convenience, the best approach to employment . . . Indispensable to success in business CALL STATION 2011 When AppIying for Service OUR Catt, Lester ...... ............ 3 9 Catt, Margaret, .......,. 69, 107, 116 Cavendish, Dorothy ............... 69 Chaney, Bonita ..... 69, 131, 121, 111 Chatterton, Mary ................. 74 Cherry, Margaret ..,.............. 88 Cherry, Robert ..., 1 . . .88 Chester, John ..... .......... 7 4 Chester, Martha ..............,... 74 Chilcote, Margaret ....... 104, 40, 116 Chilcote, Mary Eleanor1 ...... 69, 114, 124, 123 Chism, John .,..... ....... 7 4 Chrisman, Jean ..... .... 6 9, 114 Christman, Jerome .... ........ 6 8 Christman, Philip ............ 1 .... 85 Christofferson, June .............. 93 cicnr, John 40, 98, 132, 133, 117, 123 Clark, Elizabeth1 ........ 100, 40, 112 Clark, Clifford. .................. 74 Clark, Ellen .... ......... 1 . . .85 Clary, Jack .... ............... 4 0 Clary, Paul .... ..,. 1 19, 40, 98, 132, 133, 124, 123 Clay, Dorothy. .. . . 1104, 40, 116 Clay, Janice ..... ...,... 8 2, 83 Cline, Charles. . . ..... 1 . . .92 Cline, Vivian .........,...... 69, 107 Cocanour, James. . . Cochlan, Sara. . .160, Cochran, Anabel. . 1 1 Coehlo, William .... 104, 102, 65, 40. 126, 123 ........69 . .... 11.68 Crouch, Robert .... Cullison, Jeanne. . Cummings, George. . Cummings, Gladys ...... Cummins, Evelyn. 1 . 160, Cummins, Frances. . . . . 1 1 Cummins, Keith .... Cummons, Jack 1 ...... Cunningham, Mary ..... 1 Cunningham, Curry, Ernest. Curry, James. Curry, Gilbert. Curp, Marion.. Curts, Eileen. .. Robert .... .63, D Damuth, Ruth .... Danford, John. 1 1 . Daniels, George. . 1 Dankmer, Joseph. Danley, Floyd ......,... Kathleen 1 Davidson, Davidson, Magel.. Davidson, Ruth Davidson, Davidson, Davidson, Dorothy Vernon .....1 Dorothy 1101, Helen Marie ....75, 98 ....1123, 41 .,.1.....130 104,121,106 41,118, 123 175,102,107 107 ....69, .......74 131,130,132 ...1......s2 111 169, 114, 69 .IIIIII69 ...99,-11,924 .....1....63 .41,130, 113 41,118,123 .........,69 107 .. ....... 68 ...1.6s .1........74 Coen, Wilbur. .,.. ...... 1 . .68 Coffman, Jack ...... .... 1 41, 146 Coffman, Robert .... 1... 7 4, 132 Colville, Walter .... ..... 1 . 1 68 Conant, John ..... ...... W1l11am1 ......1....1..,... 88 FHUU1 Conley, Russell1.. .....1... 74, 132 Conlon, John ..1,............ 100, 40 Conn, Alice.. 1,.. . . .100, 40, 116, 124 Conrad, Mr. Stacy ................ 24 Conner, Olive ...... ..,. 7 4, 107, 116 Conner, Ruby ..... ....1...... 9 2 Cook, Allan ..... .... 7 4, 124, 123 Cook, 0scar1 . .1 . .... 74, 131, 130 Cook, Ralph ........ 68, 103, 141, 156 96, 97 Cooper, Eloise ........ 1.,, ....... 8 8 Cooperrider, Eugene ......... 1 . . . .85 Cope, James ........ 69 Copeland, David ....... Copeland, Robert ...... Corbett, Ra1ph1 Cornell, John .... Coss, Donald .... Cost, Pearl ...,.... , 103, 141, .69, 147, 97 ss 97 82 ...88 Cotterman, Dale .... . . .74 Cnuden, Randall .... . . .68 Couden, Roberta . 1 . . . .92 Cougill, Norma ..... . . .88 Courson, Marjorie ..........,..... 93 Courson, Eugene ...,..,.... 1.., . .85 Cox, Mr. Lester B.. 1140, 110, 115, 29 Coyle, Margaret. 74, 107, 116, 117 Crabbin, Christine .......1.... 74, 107 Crabbin, Hazel . Craig, Ruth ...... . 1 174, 107 Cramer, Robert .... ...... 7 4 Cramer, William .... 1.,. . 74 Crane, Jeanne 111..11169 Crane, Phyllis ..11.. 1, . . .104, 41 Crawford, Helen ...,........,..... 69 Crawford, John ....... 1..... ..... 7 5 Crawford, Margaret1 ..... 75, 107, 116 Creighton, Mildred1.161, 102, 65, 122. 101, 41, 64 Crilly, Miss Bertha ....,........,. 30 Criss, Helen1 .......,.......1.... S8 Criss, Ruth ......... 69, 131, 121, 130 Criswell, George ...... 103, 100, 128, 65,102, 41, 98, 124, 132, 133, 129 Crosby, Madgel .......... 104, 41, 116 Crothers, Dorothy ................ 75 Crouch, Eugene..68, 103, 156, 99, 132 Duncan, Betty ...... Dunn, Grace ........ Dustheimer, Connie.. Dusthimer, Bonny . . . Dusthimer, Robert. 1 . Duvall, Elder ...... Duvall, Norman. . . E Ecleberry, Robert .... 75 1 1.... .175 ,...6S, 124 147, 97 ....74, 147, 97 .....1..110,4: Eddy, Mary Elizabeth.. ...... 1 .... S2 Edmunds, Charlene. . 1 Edwards, Cora Alice. . 1. .69, 107, 116 1 ............ 69 Edwards, Mr. P. B. ..1......... 25, 21 Edwards, Virginia .....11. 75, 102, 107 Eichhorn, Miss Louise W. ....... 83, 81 Eikleberry, Edward ..,.1... 1 .... 8.5 Elder, Byron ....... .... 8 Z Elias, George , .... Ellis, George. . . Ellis, James ...1. Ellis, Robert ..... Emeh, Chester ..... Emch, Lucille .1..... Emerson, Leonard. . . .1.13li ....42 ......-12 .1 ..... 68 .1..69, 112 .......1.104,4z English, Doris ...,.1 161, 69, 131, 130 English, Quentin., .l03, 100, 141, 144, 42, 97 Eppic, Sophie .....1.. ...,...... 7 4 Ernst, Mrs, Sara .... .,...1. S Q1 Erskine, William .... .... 6 9, 141 Esworthy, Thelma .... .....1. 8 5 Esworthy, Wayne1 ...1..1......... 74 Etnier, Jean ................. 69, 107 Evans, Freda ..1...,.. 1243, 43, 64, 96 Evans, Miss Geraldine ..1.. . . .101, 30 Davino, Raphael ......... .. .88, 90 Davis, Anne .1......... ..... 8 5 Davis, Betty ..... .... 7 5 Davis, Betty ...... ..... 8 X Davis, Dorothy H.. 1 . ..... . . 69 Davis, Dorothy M.. 1. .... 75, 118 Davis, Dorothy ...... .....1. 8 2 Davis, Gladys Mae.. ....... 75 Davis, Irona .1.... ........ 8 5 Davis, Jack ..... 1 ........... 92 Davis, Mabel ..... ....... 1 07, 116 Davis, Manan-. .75, 102, 107, 116, 98, 124 Davis Murle.. ..1. ....... 4 1 Davis, Owen .... . . 142, 98 Davis, Robert ........,1.......,.. 68 Davis, Mary Margaret .1..1. 128, 104, 8 1 S 43, 64, 9 , Evans, Evans, Glenea . Evans, Nicholas. . . Evans, Philip N. 1... .... 1 . Evans, Robert. . Hazel. 1 1 69, 67, 103, F Davison, Wayne ......1. Deal, Kenneth ..1. 100, 1 Dean, Frieda ...... 11.. DeBoard, Geraldine ..1.. Deck, Karl .,..... Derk, Virginia1 . . . . 1 Decker, Howard ...... Debevoise, Eugene ..1, Denton, John ...1.,. Denney, Audrey ..... Derringer, Charles .... i0Q '42, 75, 110 64, 98 92 69 .1..75 S5 6'l 92 75 42, 116 Farmer, Edward ..... Devoll, Luanna ...... Dewalt, Robert ......... Deweese, Russell .,..11. De Witt, Carl ...1... 100 Dickerson, Herbert ...1. Diehl, Billy. 1 ......,.. 1 Diehl, End .,..... Diller, Blakely 1 .. Diller, Hazel. ..1, . . Dilts, Kermit ..111..1.. Dirkson, Mr, J. W. .... . Disbennett, La Verda11. Dodson, Arthur . . Dorn, Dorsey, Harry. . . Jeanne.......... Duwie, Wayne. 1 1 Drake, Betty ..... ..11n4, 1n9, 71 1 ..... 75 .........156 ,108, 109, 42 75 92 i-10.111192 ....42, 75 64 ......112, 31 75 1.11 .... ,...97 149, 153, 00, 0. 2. .43 1...63, 114,101 110, 43, 98 148, . A0 69, 141, 156, 91 Farquhar, Hazel ....., 1 ..1.... 69, 107 Farrow, William . 1 ............ 68 Fears, Cleophus, . .. .. . .74 Fedje, Lorraine .... .1.. 4 3 Fekete, Frank ..... .- .130 Felrlner, Charles 1...11 .,1....1... 6 8 Feldner, Katherine1 .....1.1....... 92 Felumlee, Gertrude. . , . .43, 106, 118 Ferguson, Jane .... ...75, 105, 116 Fernow, James. 1. ...1.. 75, 147 Fields, Gene... ...... 821 97 Field, Martha. 1 . 1 .1....... .85 Fields, Ruth1 ....,.......1....,.. 93 Fields, William. 1 .1.1... 117, 159 43 Fink, Pauline ........ . . . .43 Finney, Marian 6. 1 .1.. 16 , 75, , 120 Drew, Howard . . . Henrietta .... Henry. . . Drumm, Drumm, Drumm, Robert . . . Drumm, Russell. 1 . Dudgeon, Virginia Durleenn, Robert . Dumm, Ruth ..1.. .... 85 68 .1..88 ....92 ....68 ....R8 ....73 ..1.82 123' 109. , 100, 116 Finney, Robert .............1..... 74 Fischer, Herman . . . 1 ......... .83 Fisher, Anna Marie. . . 1 159, 107 Fisher, Arthur ...1. . .1........ 68 Fisher, Don ................1.... 43 Fisher, Frances 1.1....... 69, 107, 1211 Fisher, Lon ............11....... 43 Fisk, William ..,... 114, 108, 65, 120, 122, 44, 64, 98, 135, 123 Flack, Dorothy ..1..1....1.....1.. 69 Flannigan, Thomas ...1.........1.. 85 Fleming, Jean ........ 104, 65, 44, 123 Flenner, Dorothy .....1 1 ....,..... 69 Florian, June ..... Fogle, Jannita 1 . . . Folger, Shirley 11.1 Forbes, Rex .... Ford, Betty 1 . . ONE HUNDRED .........82, 83 ..1..18'i SIXTY-FIVE 75 .68 .92 SERVICE WITI-I A SMILE . . . is the Watchworci of this store. Every co-Worker is ready, willing and able to serve you faithfully and well. ' 9 Kin s "A Home Owned Store" CONGRATULATIONS TO THE CLASS OF 1937 We I-Iope You All Continue on to Greater Things! ATI-I-A-NOR TI-IE IVIAY-FIEBEGER COMPANY South 21st Street Phone 6069 Everything Pertaining to Warm Air Heating Air Conditioning Stokers Insulation RED SIXTYSIX Ford, Margaret .... Ford, Valeria .,..... ..75, 115, 154, Foster, Kenneth ..... Fouman, Hilda ...... Fowler, Orvalene .... Fox, Virginia. . . 161, Francis, Albert ...... Francis, Maxine ..... Frankenbery, Evelyn .......... Forgrave, Robert. . . Franz, Janet ........ Fraizer, Dortha ...... Fraizer, Hazel ....... Freeman, Gerald . . . . Freeman, Marshall. . Friend, Calvin .... . Frizzell, Woodrow .... Frey, Jean ....... Frey, Virginia .... .. Froelich, Virginia .... Frost, Alice ....... Frost, Sara ...... Frye, Lois ..... Fry, Clarence .... Fulk, George .... Fulke, Robert ..... Fuller, Dorothy .... Fuller, Florence .... Fulton, Betty ...... Futon, Jean ........ Fundaberg, Jeanne. . . G Gamerdinger, Dorothy Gano, Carl ......... Gano, Rowland ...... Gantt, Virginia .,.... Garapedian, Jasmine. . Garapedian, Julia .... Garrison, Charles .... Geidenberger, Alice.. ....60, 107, 116 69 96 Geiger, Maria n .... .. ......... 69, lrz 44, 106, 116, 118 .s2,s3 ........117, 75 125, 44, 64, 126 ....75,131,130 .......68,103 .......75 .........92 ....69,11l .......75 ...75, 73 ......75 ......74 ........3s ....75,1o7 ......75,1o7 .......75,107 ....69,106, 116 ....75 ....s2 .75 69, 131, 114, 111 ....75,128,132 ......92 .44 Geidenberger, Richard .... . . . Gelfer, Mr. Sam ..... 131, 130, 132, 31 Gentile, Grace ................... 75 Gentile, Lawrence ................ 75 Gerloch, Georgiana .... . . .75 Ghiloni, Grace ...,........... . . . . 69 Ghiloni, James ................... 71 Ghiloni, John .................... 69 Giellger, Lois...161, 44, 106, 116, 118 Giblin, Patrick ................... 85 Gilcrest, Frances ..... 104, 44, 64, 126, 116, 134 Giles, Henry ....... 71, 141, 143, 15 5, 156, 151, 152, 157, 97 Gill, Freda ............ 44, 106, 118 Gillespie, Richard ........ 44, 132, 133 .........,.s5 ...161, 69, Glass, Gertrude . Glass, Helen ..... Glaunsinger, Eva. . . Gleckler, Charles. . . 122 . ...85 Gleckler, Eva ...... . . .85 Glover, Christine. . . . . .75 Glover, James . .. . . .88 Glover, Leo ...... ..... 4 4 Glover, Robert. . . ..... .75 Goff, Clyde ...... ...... 7 5, 117 Goldberg, Ben ..... ............. 9 2 Goldberg, Willard.. ..,. 100, 65, 120, 102, 45, 64, 132, 133 Good, James ......... . ........ . . .88 Good, Robert ...... ............. 7 5 Goode, Howard ..... ..... . ..... 7 4 Goodin, Dorothy. . . ........... .93 056616, Paul ..... ..... 4 5, 113, 132 Goodwin, James .......... 75, 110, 115 Goodwin, Suzanne ............. 92, 93 Goodwin, Thomas ........... 69, 103 Goodwin, William. .103, 110, 99, 45, 64 Gould, Paul ................. 75, 112 Graff, Martha ...,.. 100, 128, 45, 64, 126, 124, 129 Graham, Earl .... ....,......... 8 2 Graham, Richard. ..,.... 69, 156, 98 Graham, Ruth .... ........... 7 5 Gray, Clifford .... ........... 8 5 Gray, Evelyn. . . ...1 75, 107, 116 Gray, Louis. . . .......... . 69 Gray, Maxine ..... ............. 7 4 Gray, Robert ....,.. .. . .75, 115, 154 Green, Catherine .... . .......... 74 Green, Eugene .... .......... 8 2 Green, Robert .... . . .71, 97 Greer, George .... . .............. 85 Greider, John .................... 69 Greider, Marie ...... 160, 117, 75, 107 Griffith, Eugene. .,.,............. 74 Griffith, George. ............. 7.5 Grigsby, Gladys. ..... 69 Grigsby, Grace. . ............. 82 Grigsby, James ................... 69 Grigsby, Jane... .160, 75, 83, 107 Grigsby, Shirley. 75, 117, 107, 116 Grimm, Emma.. .. ............ 107 Groves, William .............. 75, 132 Grove, Ralph ............ 156, 45, 113 Guisinger, Lawrence ............... 74 Guthridge, Dale ........... 75, 98, 124 Gutliph, Errol ..... 75, 131, 130, 132 Gutridge, John. ..,............... 74 Gutridge, Martha .... ........... 9 2 Guy, Marjory ......... .... 4 IJ H Hackney, Mary Martha. . .... 75 Hageman, Fred ....... Hall, Dorothy .... .. Hall, Helen .... Hall, Lucille .......... Hall, Maxine ..... .... Hall, Richard 103, 121, Hallisy, Lester ....... Hammack, Robert. . . Hammack, Walter .... Hammack, Wayne .... Hammond, Caroline .... . ..... 75 69 ........75 .......-45, '06, 119, ....76, 123 75 64 .32 148 .71 .76 107 Sole Agents for I f If: Tirer You Want See . WOLFE I-IANNA'S GREE. SEAL FAI T The Tire Man ROAD SERVICE Elliott Hardware Co. 16 West Main Street bl-63 N. Third Street Phone 2740 Newark, Ohio ONE HUNDRED SIXTY-SEVEN UNE. HUNDRED SIXTY-EIGHT 55555,55,55fFQF5E55:F:FII1FEF31:FEF5 FFFFISZIIIT- III 22221211322122322222222222 22222222222 552 Piga-'Q-v-?:::5'f'5W F-E..:-:.P.,'E.:.E.f2.EPP 2-E-1 ggvrx-mmQ.n.g,n.:zr '- I-,'vQ'g:'5g555,-1 2gff!!i"i'.'4 5:5 -:g5'f"H5'Q,-ag'2 335 if 'I--13J::1: QE: ' P7255 Eff T"-' ' CCS :g,1gv1w:-HM-we -- rf 55-:P"'-SE?"2w55:g15g55:'-'5 ' 55153 S 355 55.2 '-11 rn ..."'J's.w '1 H' :Wasp 5:75 :,F':eQHi5:::2f2-Frm: 23 22wa5f25 . ND" CDO 055' -E n.gZ':a.c'11C.Q-NE.-:.w:g::,: FN? Tfgmwlfw.-,L 7: E55 mo4Q'D 43500 IU 1.f:,wa11:.' m2.2.2S':wS'22:.m -A152252 M2 5. mf-+4GcD -'1 2,:,,:g.r'gp-ww--+-wg.-,:L:.5-5.24-'-3 2:12 - +-:Q-D'-' CQ-D n-I m.aw:5.-?w::r'.13:Z:'.--'P-5:-Fw!-Fw-.'P' -' -'- O ,Q-gm H' 3-12:3--.,.....,'.:--'g.grf:m:A::.::--1 E' OD"-5.-U3-D agp UD ,.g.5.j-' ..... ...2.Q.-,,,r,- -- w 5926 '-,QI ,. -1--'--:Ag-.333 2- --V---:rpm-2 K I4 '1.,,m,,.,5' C5 :gpg-3. ,..1.: 1:12-11,151-1 R m 35555.93 :RCD .,j-.. V -2 :wt-f-'-1 O '.--,:- 3, -1-Eg g,,,,t5O5- S3 .:5,::'. .,.z,::S-f:::'.3-333 mam gg C-,.g-D Q 99 ,-.jj.f.-g. j......f...,.,-.- 3: m rc-s.,... ,.. k,:,',M:.........:., M NE5 m.gcQfOQ,5 2 m.,,.g,NA'A, .... .H...q....,.m.H,,A...g....,q:,,.5E Q63 IXJY Eh gg-H24 Z '-i',mp.p::::::3:::p::: -:g:P:gf:::s'::1::mmP'.em 5 so C1-P IF- v-Q HIM-Hiiziz'-:::::3-:':1-r-4:::::.:: '- K r- 3 - .5 'S 5 Q in fb 1 1+ n U, ggggqgwsmwzwwzw Q,.m:WgWm:mW2,zzQ:a rn 1 C: U2 :5-4 , -. -w..:N1ou:o:v:::a:eeowxu1meuc.:N mwcsa-G-on-. ooNoe:noceoQ--an-1:f:P:c':c.: 39.2 Kfldgm 9.0-QE-, I-11 '1 v- Z' I C K-D 5 CI 45.95 S, an v-4 F- ggqggg-zggggqgggqgqgg 5g5q::r:::::l::u::1:: :nm :z::n::::l::z::::u::::::::r::::::r::::n: 4 'Z O so - :::::,7vQn1qfm Q.,.33g:g:z ag :1,2.2,gggmwwwvwr-www -- - W5 -mrs 'Haw aw- - wwf: fffwwwqu 2? f-an-22122252222 2'-rl myq gp' 5- II :EEZ m'5.'5'5'5E Sis? fgfgflf- ,":g:3-aflmmmamso rf Q C+ 1- - Em -U:-:-:gm mms- :dwg Ig an ygm. . 5:-'gym-ng-:com z .-.b-b-- - ' CD 5' ,Q gEZ"233ff: -553'-102'-5,2203 wg gif: UWA: af F-ri . Ot-DQ0, QQ: !Q,.:F,,.'wE"' :-2-fmwm 'I' U--4N'5'o.:::..Zg1f'7':z: rv ' 5:1-+2 - Goff 2:2.-2125255 Egp22vf52w 5: .1:,2jf:52g:2.s2.z:S'z'F' - .V-., rn.. -1- .-' -"Q, 4.-. . QE-1 -cs"',f:L 22:2-amz: 525:-xx-2.2 P- Y'-JSSFFEH:-2553, Ossmggmgh.. Hg...3-aw.:-,:fFLi-:-5.155A:'-'-:Pl,:--3-2-N Q ... yi N:----.Q-.'v.j..-3.-:-..n,'.2ggI,.-..f.-'-E121 f-um7Q.-f-rorbmml Q ---- H. . I ..,.-u.3:."+--1-- -Q--vu ,-,,.'-cw- o-.....,..'. - -- - --Nw-:. 2.-Q.-2329:3--30:-1--:QM 'I"','j5c'---.-V+-1"-I-... ..IS-90-'g'epjj ,D-... .,-,.. .k,:,.-1...::.,.. '- . wi----rf--Q--:-WH-QP--fm-HwHo:5'H'2-'.'-,.". 'H'--Pi--s---,3--ff--.'-M'o.p..P.'.gj,,jj.. -,:::H :':2-f,'-AP'-2-"'Hw9 '-f-'.-'iv-N---' w,0...W'-na:-,,N1 ,VH 'N1o"':,"'oa,,-nv--H' ,..'..' v-av" vu . . . 9'-'. cs, . eva- I mae' mw' ' ' N."',s..h:,,a:m+-',,' O' QQ- wearer- ' ' W.'..'05 'fD"""- oa'f"'e-'w'N-ca""'D" -Jw .H...2.'..."-:fi ':' H' A X NS-was-zcqweogcc-aSo:goo:.:-was -loozicoagggoomo-nwoeoo :ow::olxnlo 4 ? J , ,:'w!W,.,4f -5-.. r-oocum-1ro.A:Na:v1u1. N-:caan--L mmm. oo-4-- mvhmsxmxuvw meow-lcvw . ii: - I ,. 'Q -"' . if' ' M 1-3 .':,5i .. fe. l iw ,,,4 .ill AIE, ,., V .41-4, II: ,, 2: wg Q Q Q 555555555 555555555555555555 5555555 . 195'-'z Q ep 5: I lf. " 1 1 Z1 2 " 2 'U 0 5 3:55-:::::::gg'ggg N -'H'-'-"v"-Qi 4 ,- w C-ff 5. c o c ' 5 'ff mNc--55'G'WW'-'NW - C"""'76'F6'fm-- ,V . .M ,, .I ,mr .- -fm:-...W . www ',,1:::aoo-o Q35 Q, j M ., . , , 'Q",' xiiif'-5:--' mg- SF F F w :1 5-21-1 J' Pm:-:Q ' - Q.g,Q,5EE3E - ww-"l"- ,, ' 5 , ' , F :- fm' Dum' ' ' :f mmm- N - ggggy ?FP U: f -'2' E1-if 5255 E -.PU Qamzotzxsrfds-v-U' ' ' ' F 596: - 5 m : :N -1 15' 'W -'U'-I --' -"'1-- r '- '50-0'2- .FQ E 1-V--4Mg2,,,:.fiv.. ff 0 5,1 Q :J U-5:12 gf vw:2g-gE."g- :E-42-ffghg 'fr-35,-gfoiiw 4 , .... .... -. ,..,..11V.4.. .. . .. -. . .-.QM . 5 'A :11 -rw Fai E? T 2 I 5 as E F PQ 5432 sv 1 3 5 3,5 F z 5 2: P55 Fi : PE g I I 2 5: : :Q H: - 1: : 1 ' I - 1 : 1 fir? 155:51 , I , . 3 - I 7: : : I 2: I ' - I - . - ' , ' : . . . Z , . , . . . A. :HLVATTT-21,-wi'-1-'11'511.1 :Lx : 22- ' - 1 ' - 2: : 5 - - Ll- - . 1 I I S - I 5? 3 3 HQ ' wg-:4,'-2-1-2242 g,g.AQm'- '..2,v-Rf--5 - :Di 2 ' .1 ' Q.'.::P::-', ' , , .,4,.g-fr'-1, ,.I-. , 1 I. . .... -z. . ...., A ,... www. ,,,M., , .. -. .. ,, ., 3 ak.-.M-A,,,L.---, r-.. . H+- -fw --.. - '-'-' W'f"'5' . :f3522:::g: 315.-5:: . :HL.:-:zz-L:-.H5::':g2::Hg:::fpf 5: Qirz : . I : . .1,3-52:31::3:':?3:4:F':r1::f31"::::?:: ' 1' -gt1:21:::..p2...Z:Z,..::,.,..::,..:,..g.gg,,,.-'-'-',,,- A-sms.: an oo 5' on . .---. .-o'L" ' NunnU-:NSD-,Sim33'Sslgwiim3235333332322-55't5f,aSJS5'SES Howarth, Herbert . . . .. . .76 J Keck, Carolyn. . . . . .76, 128, 107, 116 Hoyt, Robert ..., . ,..... ., , .... 88 Keck, Donald ........ 100, 99, 119, 48 Huff, Esther .,.... ............... 8 8 JHCKSUH, Herbert .... ---4-...---- 3 5 Kegg, Geraldine .................. 76 Huff, Roderick ...... 76, 131, 130, 98, Jackson, Sergei .... ,.... 7 6, 141, 97 Keim, ShirIey.... ..... , .69, 106, 116 132, 124 Jackson, Virginia --4--- 104. 103, 47 Keinath, Sheldon ..,., 48, 112, 64, 124 Huffman, Bette .................. 47 Jacobs, Louise ...... .........,.. 8 8 Keller, Everett ..,.. .............. 7 6 Huffman, Mrs. Mary L... .. ..,.. 28 JHYHQS, Dorothy ----. 76, 102. 105, 116 Keller, Marie ...... 76, 128, 105, 116 lluffinan, Ri:-hard ...... . . .69 Jaynes, Myrtle ................... 69 Kelley, Ruth . . , .........,....... 85 Huggins, Charles. ..... ...,. 8 8 Jaurhius, Rollin. , . .... 76, 102, 132 Keller, Mr. Walter .,.... . ..... ,. .24 Hughes, Arthur .... . ...... 88 Jeffers, Eleanor .... . . .69, 114, 111 Kelley, Elsworth .... . . .71, 102, 112 Hughes, Marjorie .... . . .69, 104, Jeffers, Jean ....... . ...... . . .88 Kelley, Edward .... ..... . . . .130 Hull, Juanita ...... ....... 8 8 Jeffreys, Virginia .... ....... K elley, Jean.. ...,............... 76 Hull, Mary. ..... . . . ..,,. 69 John, Eva. , ...... ....... 8 2 Kelley, Katherine .... .......... . .92 Hull, Richard.. ....... ., ...82 John, Frederick... ......... 48 Kelley, Phyllis ...... 69, 114, 109, 106 Hull, Robert .......... .......... 8 2 Johns, Ethel .... .... 7 6, 102 Kelley, Ralph ......... . ......,... 71 Humble, Mary Elizabeth. . ......... 76 Johnson, Alonzo. . . ...... 156 Kemnitzer, Dorothy ....... , . . .76, 105 Humphreys, Cheney ..... 69, 103, 100, -l0l'lHS0Il, Darwin .... ..... 8 5 Kemnitzer, Kathryn .... , ......... 93 121, 108 Jllhmon, Eleanor .......,......... 48 Kemp, Clara Belle ....... 69, 106, 116 Humphrey, Elggmm-3 ,,,,,,,,,, 76, 105 Johnson, Marguerite .............. 69 Kemp, .leane .... ....... 76, 105 Hupp, Russell ..... .76 141, 115, 97 Johnson, Suemarie...69 102, 106, 116 Kemp, Leahinae .............. 82, 83 Hurlbutt. Carl .... .......... , ...76 Jones, Betty ....... , ,.., 76, 112, 105 Kennedy, Frances ...... 160, 104, 121, Hurst, Goldie.. . . .......... ... .88 Jones, Ellsworth. .. . ....... . .... 68 108, 48, 123 Hurst, Sylvia ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 76 Jones, Gwynfu .... . . . .. . . .76 Kennon, Kenneth .............. . . .76 Hutchison, Phyllis ....... Y60, 69, 128, Jones, Helen, .... ...105 Kennon, William ................ .48 114, 122, 106, 126, 116 Jones, Homer ..,, .... 8 8 Kent, Betty ....... 104, 108, 48, 135 Hyatt, Claudette ,,,,,, , ,,,,,,,,,, 88 Jones, Jack ...., ..... 8 8 Kephart, Betty ..........., ,.76, 105 V JUIIPS, -111811113 --.A-- .-..4---- 9 3 Kessmeier, Erik ...... 128, 65, 102, 49, I ones, Katherine.. ........... 76, 10.5 96, 132 Iden, Donard ....... .... 4 7, 112, 130 Jones, Laurence ......,. . ......... 76 Kessmeier, Linne:i,. ...... ,. . .76, 105 Iclen, Eleanor ...... ., . .76, 105, 116 Jones, Marcella ................. 105 Keyes, Franklin ................. .93 Iden, Robert .......... .76, 131, 130 Jones, Marjorie ...... 102, 65, 101, 48 Keyes, Royal. . .69, 141, 148, 155, 153 Idleman, Malcomb ...,...... S2 Jones, Mary Virginia ..... 76, 131, 105 Kidd, .Ioan ........ 117, 70, 111, 126 ldleman, Richard ....,............ 96 Jones, Orville. .... ............... 4 8 Kidner, Della .................... Imhoff, Richard ...,..... 69, 103, 141, Jones, Virginia ....... .. ,... ..48 Kidwell, William ,,,,,,,,,,,....., 49 146, 148, 1545, 97 Jones, Wilma .................... 76 Killbury, Imogene, ............... S2 Ingmire, John ............... 71, 112 Jones, Wynn ....... 68, 156, 1-17, 121 Killwgrth, William ,,,,,,,, 156, 49, 97 Ingmire, Sylvester ..,..,.. 76, 120, 96 Juniper, Gerald .................. 82 Kincaid, Robert .... .. ........... 70 1YlglTlll'K', Wllliamu --'-4- 92, 93 K Kincaid, William ................ .82 lnlow, Doris. .,.. ........ 8 5 Kale, William ........ ..... 6 9 King, Forrest ...... 77, 110, 115, 99, Inlow, Russell ...... ...69, 147 Kanuekle, Jean ..... .... 1 06 119, 124 Inschn, Bernarrl .... ........ 7 6 Kanurkle, Maxine... ...69, S8 King, Robert ........ 76, 147, 115, 97 Insrho, Neal ..... . . .47, 113 Kastla, Ralph ..... .. . . .88 Kinkarlv, Lnrin ............ , . . . . . .71 SINCLAIR H. C. Gasoline I 'co 3 more miles per gallon M R P H Y ' S Fooo MARKET Established 1886 0009001 "Get It From Murphy's-It Pays" 48-50 West Main Street AMERICA'S FINEST BICYCLES And SPORTING GOODS Priced To Please We Service All Makes of Bicycles TRACEYS Opposite Postoffice Ol-llO SHOE REPAIR 32 NORTH FOURTH STREET I. H. BRUSH, Prop. Nailless, Stitchless Soles for Misses and Ladies Shoes Evening Slippers Tinted ,, . . ' Heel Plates of All Kinds We Specialize on Repairing Athletic Footwear. ONE HUNDRED 'SIXTYNINE Kinser, Gladys .... Kirby, Mildred .... Kirk, Jean ....... Kirk, Ralph ...... ....77 ....88 ....7l 77 Kirkpatrick, Josephine . . . . . . . Kisamure, Don .... Kline, Charles .... Klopp, Mr. C. W.. Kocher, June.. . . .. . . Koman, Anna. . . Kover, Frank. . . . . . .... ....82 .91 77, 10,5, 116 . ....... 77, 102 Kreager, Evelyn ..... 160, 77, 105, 116 S5 Kuhn, Mary. . .... Kuninger, Robert. . Kuppinger, Carolyn .... . Kvintus, Joseph... . .. L Lake, John ....... Lake, Lillian. . . . . . Lallathin, Eileen. . . Lamb, Charlotte. . . Lamb, Ellen ...... Lambert, Carl .... Lambert, Robert. . . Lamp, Eleanor .... Lane, James .... Lane, Pauline ..... Lane, Ralph ..,... Lanning, Betty .... Larason, Elizabeth. i. Larason, George. . . Larr, Miss Esther ....... La Rue, Edna ..... Lascu, George .... Lashley, Harold. . . Lauver, Hugh ..... Lauver, Robert .... Lavin, Miss Helen. Lawson, Evelyn. . . Lawrence, Betty. . . Lawrence, Charles. Lawyer, Velda ..... ..........109, ....93 ....76 ....49 161,104,419 70, 10:1 .....117, 77 '10 117, 77, 105 ....70, 130 .....77,105 70, 159,101 .102, 65, 30 .........ss 70,100,121 30 .....s2, ss .........s2 77, 105, 116 Layman, Donald .... ...... 7 7 Layman, Mark .... . . .76, 154 Layton, Lee ....... ...... 8 8 Layton, Margaret. . . ...... . .88 Layton, Paul. . ..,... . . .70, 113 Le Blanc, Richard .... ...... 7 7 Lee, Bernard ...... ..... 8 5 Lees, Jane ...... . . .77 Le Hew, Eileen .... . . .77 Le Hew, Ruth. . . .... .85 Lehman, Roy .... ........... 7 0 Lehman, Virgil. . . ......... 82, 97 Lehr, June ....... . . . 70, 100, 106 Lemert, James ..... . ..... 49, 113 Lentz, Frederick. Lentz, John ..... Lentz, Mary ..... Lescalleet, Ruth. . Lescody, Betty. . . Lester, Drane .... Levin, Ellen. . .. Lewis, Arthur .... Lewis, Dorothy. . . Lewis, Molly .... . Lewis, Shirley. . 16 Lichtenstein, Jean ..... . .70, 108, 102, Lichtenstein, Miss Lightle, Mary ............. Lightner, Betty. , . Lind, Marguerite. Lingafelter, Irene. Lint, Elma ......... Lint, Laurence. . . Linton, Carrie .... Linton, Paul ..... Linton, Robert. . . List, Dorthy .... Litten, Neil .... Little, Jean... , . Loar, Dorothy . . . ......49 ......70 . ...92 .. ...77 . ...9s ...70, 114 111, 118 ...70, 67, 114, 109 1, 49, 106, 116, 118 114,121, 109, 106, 126, 116, 135,124,123 Ruth .... ...... 2 9 ...77, 105 105, 98 .. .. ..... .77 .......71 ....s2, sa . .... 76, 159 .....77,105 . .,.. ...... 8 5 ......70 ,105, 116 ......71 ......70 ...70 Betty .... . . . Logan, Logan, George ........ Logan, Virginia ..... 104, Long, Mr. A. B. ....... . Long, Betty ..... . . . . Long, David. . . Loper, Oliver. . . . Lothes, William .... Loughman, Albert . . . Loughman, Richard .... Loughridge, John. . . . Love, Alton ...... , . . Lovell, Russell. . . . . Lowe, Harvey. . . . .. Loy, Marie .... Lucas, Helen ...... Ludholtz, Ruth ..... Lukasko, Raymond .... Luzio, Anthony . . . Luzio, Joe ...,.... Lute, Carl......... Lybarger, Darline, . .... . Lydic, Catherine .... . . Lydic, Lorraine. . . Lynch, Marvene ........ Lytle, Jack ........ 121 49,116,118 .....140, 30 77 85 ....92 ....s5 .....49 ...ss,90 .....71,159 ..70,114,124 .71,103,119 ..........70 .....70, 106 .......ss .....50 ....112 .. ......,. 76 .....,...130 17,105,110 .....70, 106 65,102,101, 50, 64, 97 Mc McAlpine, George ................. 71 McArtor, Betty ....... . .104, 108, 50, 64, 126, 116, 118 McArtor, Ralph .................. 71 McCandlish, Miss Anita ............ 83 McCann, Margaret ....... 70, 106, 116 McClain, Jack. ..... .......... 9 2 McCoy, Richard ....... .......... 7 6 McCullough, Marion.. . ..... 69, 106 McCullough, Maurice. .. . . . . 156, 157 McCullough, Russell .... ........ 7 7 McCutcheon, Geneva ......... 77, 105 McDaniels, Dorothy .... ..... 7 7, 105 McDaniels, Robert. . .70 102, 101, 96 Compliments of J. C. PENNEY COMPANY, INC. DEPARTIVIENT STORES A Natiion-Wide Institution 6-8-10 East Park Place, Newark, Ohio ONE HUNDRED SEVENTY Martin, Frances. . . . . . .70 Martin, Wayne ....... ...... 8 5 Martin, Wayne ......... ....... 8 8 Martin, Woodrow ............ 51, 113 Martindale, Frederick. ........,... 71 Martindale, Paul ................. 92 Marzano, Albert. . .70, 67, 103, 97, 141, 143, 148, 149, 155, 156, 151, 152 Mariano, Victor ...,......... 156, 157 Mason, Ella Jean ..... ........,. 7 7 Mason, Juanita... . .... 69, 106 Mason, Ralph ...... .... 7 0, 100 Massalas, George. ....... 85 Massalas, Thomas ...... 85 Mathews, Paul. . . ,... . .77 Matthews, Robert ....... 82 Meacham, Betty.. ......... 77 Meacham, Dorothy .... .... 7 7, 105 Meacham, Howard .... ....... 9 2 Meacham, Richard .... ...... 9 3 Meharry, Cecil. . . . . . .88 Melick, Ralph ...... .... 7 1 Mencer, Henrietta ............ . . . .SS Mercer, Clarence ................. 70 Mercer, John. . .79, 128, 159, 97, 132 Mercer, Robert. ..... 70, 71, 67, 103, 148, 149, 150, 151, 152, 97 Mercer, William ..,...... 103, 128, 65, 120, 102, 51, 124 Meriwether, Christine .....,... 71, 100 Meriwether, Julius ................ 85 Messick, Jane ..... ....... 7 7, 105 Messick, Harold ........ 117, 71, 128, 102, 132 Messick, Harold ..... 71, 128, 102, 132 Mickley, Robert ........ , ......... 85 Mickley, Ruth ................... 68 Mi-lkiff, Mary Evelyn ....... 161, 160, 125, 51, 116 Milbaugh, Virginia ....... 71, 106, 116 Miller, Alice ........ . . . . 108 Miller, Ann ......... 104 Miller, Clifford .......,. ' 162' -5.1. . , .115 ..71, 147, 97 Miller, Ella ....... Miller, Frances. . . . Miller, Garnett .... Miller, Gerald .... Miller, Harry .... Miller, Miller, Miller, Miller, Jean .... James . . . Jgiet .... Marian . Miller, Ruth ..... Miller, Valeria ..... Miller, Miller, William .... William ...... Milligan, Harold ..... Millisor, Mr. L. G.. .. Mills, Eleanor ..... Mills, Forest ..... Milner, Grace. . . ....71,106,116 ....100, 51,116 93 ...71, 147, 97 .....100, 51 ..........s5 ...104, 51,116 ....77,105,11ii .........140,28 ....160,77, 105 .I'.11'.1f1111.7'1 150 77 105 Minor, Frances Mink, Louis... . ... . Mitchell Mitchell Mitchell Mitchell , Anne ..... , Betty ..... , Mr. J. M.. , Mary ..... Mitchell, Richard. . . Mitchell, Joy ...... Mitchell Monroe, , Naomi.... June...... Montgomery, Anne. . , Montgomery, Harold ..... 141, 156, 52 Montgomery, Warren. Montanaro, James. . Montanaro, Ralph . . Moore, Moore, Moore, Moore, Moore, Moore, Moore, Moorma Moran, Charles ..... Claude. .103, '1'0'0., 120, 51, 64 ............105 .. .... 71, 106 24 . .... 70 ....77 .....52 64,126 ....... .71 . .......... 77 ...... ..92 go 'iiif 145 ' 521 'si Dummy. .,..... ,....f77, 105 Henry ...... James ...... Kenneth. . . . Margaret .... n, Wilma. . . Clara ..... ...... ..88 .......82 ........77 .....82, 83 . ..... 105 Our personal concern is in Congratulations seeing that each service represents a real heartfelt tribute. High School Graduater to all Ctutliph gl l-lenclerson cor. Church and Fifth sts. Qu Phone 2082 Furniture F or I-Iigh Grade Dry Cleaning and Pressing Service Call Furniture 8: Rug Co . HN if D 4 bl Callandor Cleaning Co. 13135, 8 Fourth and Church Phone 2710 West Main at Arcade Newark, Ohio ONE HUNDRED SEVENTY ONE McDonald, Forrest. . .. ... . . .77 McDonald, Glenn ..... ........,.. 5 0 McDonald, Harold ......,,,.. 110, 50 McDowell, Helen .......... 77, 96, 116 McDowell, Marian ................ 70 Mclilwain, Elizabeth .......,....... 88 McElwain, Martha. . .10-1, 50, 116, 124 M1'Fadden, Sue ............,,,.... 82 McFarland, Donald ..... ......... 7 7 McFarland, Juanita ..,,........... 77 McFarland, Maramon. .,...,....... 71 Mclnturf, Junior ..,.... ..70, 128, 132 Mclnturf, Robert. . . ........... 88 McKim, Ann ....... ......... 7 0 McKinnon, Barbara. .. .. . .82 McKnight, Martha ..... .... 7 7 McKnight, Marybelle. . . . . . .XR McLean, Joseph ........, .....,,.. 8 5 McWilliams, Wayne ............... 82 MarDonagh, Miss Thora ........... X7 Macclonalrl, Mary. . . 70, 114, 121, 109, 106, 118 Mac Donald, Ida ..... .. ......... 92 Mac Nealy, Robert .... .... 9 2 M Maddox, Walker .... . . .70 Maddux, Carl ...............,,... 7-t Maginness, Jack .....,....,.,..... 92 Maharg, John ....... 103, 128, 645, 50, 96, 98, 124, 132, 129 Maharg, Ruzh..77, 128, 105, 116, 124 Maidel, Paul ..................... 71 Maier, John ..........,...... 100, 50 Maier, Virginia .... ...... 9 3 Mantz, Anton. .. . . . .92 Markle, Robert .... .... 5 0 Marriott, Robert. . . ..... . . .. .92 Marriott, Ruth .............,..... 85 Marshall, Robert. ,.... 128, 120, 50, ox, 124, 132, 1211 Martin, Moran, Edwin ....... . . . . . . Morehouse, Margaret .... .... Morgan, Morgan, Morgan, Morgan, Ann ......... .... Marcella ,... ............. Robert ...........,...... Harries .... 35, 103, 99, 52, Charlcs ....... .... 5 1 ' 71 52 S8 71 71 97 76 Morin, Frederick ................. Morrison, Olive.. . ....... .74 Morrow, Donald ...... ....... 7 8, 147 Mossman, Fred .....,,,........... 93 Mossman, Gerald ...,......., ..... S 2 Mueller, Stanley. . .71, 103, 128, 110, Muhleman, Richard ..... Muhleman, Vivian ...... Mulquin, Janiee ......... 130, Mulquin, Jeanne ..., 131, 99, 102, 112, 132 . ......... ss rs, 131 102 A 105, 116, 912 121, 102, 65, 109, 52, 1:10, 106, 116, 124 Mummey, Betty ................ 78 Munch, Theodore. . .103, 100, 128, 131, 102, 65, 52, 129, 119, 132, 117 Munkachy, Elmer ................. 93 Munkachy, Francis ..... . ........ . Murphy, Adrian ..... .......... 8 5 Murphy, Geneva. . . ...... .78 105 Murray, William .... ...78, 1511, 98 Myer, Charlotte .,... .......... S 2 Myer, Miss Edith ................. 29 Myer, Miss Florenre ...,. 160, 30, 112 Myer, Joan ...................... 85 Myer, Margaret ......,........... 52 Myer, Marjorie .............. 128, 52 iviyar, Mary .,....,. 160, 71, 100, 128, 102, 106, 116 Myers, Derrel ..., ....,......... 1 12 Myers, Donald ...,............... 77 Myers, Frederick ........ 71, 148, 156, 159, 151, 153, 157 Myers, Harry ....,............... 52 Myers, Lnis Jean .,., ...,..,.. 7 8 Myers, Margaret. . . . .... 78, 105 Myers, Marian ....... ....... 8 8 N Naylor, Mary Lou .... .,.. 9 2 Needham, Robert .... .... 7 1 Negele, Joseph ....,. ,... 7 8 Nehls, Eugene ......... ...... 7 8 Neighbarger, Howard .... ...... 7 S Neighbor, Eileen ..,... .. 78, 105 Nelson, Jark . ...... ..... 7 T Nelson, Paige .... ..., 7 1 Nelson, Roby ..... .... 8 2 Nethers, Maxine . . .. . . 53 Netliers, Susan .... .. . .XR Nethers, Walter .... . . .... 78 Nicodemus, Alfred .... .... 5 3 Nohlick, Frank ,,.,.. . . . .53 Norman, Robert. . . . . . .71 Norman, Marjorie .... .... 7 7 Norman, Marjorie .... .......... 9 2 Norpell, Maxine .......,.......... 85 Norpell, Thomas. . .110, 99, 119, 101, 53, 64, 98 Norris, Betty .... ............... 7 1 Norris, James. . . . ............ . .88 Norris, Kathleen .....,.. 128, 102, 65, 109, 101, 53, 123 Nourse, Carl .... .......... 7 7, 115 Nutter, Betty .... . ............ 88 Nye, Janet. ......... .... 8 o 0 0'Banion, Frances .... .... 8 2 Oberfield, Richard ...... .... 7 7 O'Conner, Margaret. .... ...... 9 2 O'C0nner, Richard ...... ......... 7 7 O'De11, Fred ......,,.......... 88 90 O'Dell, Harold .......... . .... . . . .71 Oder, Richard ...... 131, 53, 130, 117 Congratulations To The CLASS or 193717 Clunis 8: Householder 1111lllll111111111ll111llllllll111111llllllllllllllllllllllltl W. T. GRANT CO. I7 South Third St. I1111111111111111111lilll1111111111111ll1llll11lllll11I1llllli ONE HUNDRED SEVENTYTWO l"lere's Health . . . Perfectly Pasteurizecl Milk :: Cream Cottage Cheese Buttermilk :: Butter Furnas Quality Ice Cream Q The Furnas ICC Cream COITIPGITY 4054lPhone--4054 Offenbaker, Frederick , .,.,...,.... 77 Ogle, Rena .......... 104, 122, 54, 64 ' 88 78 U'1NeaI, Paul .....,............... U'Neal, Russell ,..... ............. Orr, Mr. Clifford E. ...... 31, 141, 140, 1414, 156, 31, 1.51. 97 Orr, Estella .............,,...... 78 Orr, Floyd .......,.......... 77, 102 Urr, James. .. . .71, 156, 117 132 Orr, Lena ...,. ......,........ 7 8 Orr, Blarearet... ,......,. 78, 105 Orr, Tlmnias .,... . . .82 Orr, Warren .,... . .,........ 1.3.0 71 1:71, Ushorn, Charles ...... , . 102,10 132 Owen, Ellen ............ 78, 5 Owen, Miss Elilzibetli ....... ,..... I 10 Owen, Marjorie .........,.... 71, 100 Ona-il, 3IiI'IrerI. ,7l, 100 128, 102 100 Painter, Jirsvpll ..... ,... 7 1, 130 Painter, Rolxerta ..,. ....... 7 1 Painter, Luther ..... ......... 9 2 Parker, Bc-tty ....... .... 7 8, 105 Parker, Charles E. ,... .... 5 3, 113 Parker, Charles H., .. ........, .53 Parker, Robert ,... ..,......... 7 1 Parr, Beatrice ..... ...128, 125 53, 64, 106, 126 Parson, Emmett ..,,.............. 78 Parsons, Marjorie ....,,. 104, 54, 116 Passman, Sarah .... 160, 104, 54, 118 Passman, William ............ 71, 131 Patrlwn, Dorothy. .........,. 128, 54 Patten, lmslic ...... 103, 131, 645, 102, 54, 64, 132 Patterson, Joseph .... 131, 5-1, 130 98 Potter, Robert ..,........ . ...... . 71 Patton, Joy.. ......,,...... 111, 54 Pound, Donald .... 110, 55, 312,132 Paul, Edward .... ............. 9 2 Pound Helen ..... ..... 7 1, 6, Paulsen, Raymond .... ....... 7 1, 119 Powell: Dun ..... . ......... Paulsen, Vernon. . . . .77, 147, 97 Ponell, Eileen .... . .......... . .ea Pease, Owen ..... . ......... 78 Powell, Juanita .... .. .150, 55, 106 Peart, Dolores. .. ........ 74 Powell Thomas .... ....... 7 7, Peck, Anabel. . . .78, 105 Pratt, Edwin .... ..,,. . . , . . Peel, Austin. . .... 88, 90 Pratt, Robert .... ..... 7 1 Peel, Robert .... ..... 5 4, 112 Price, Franklin .... -.-. 1 Peffers, Gerald. . . ........... 82 Price, Gloria ...... . ,... . .,..... . .88 Pcnick, Hazel .... . . .71, 118, 123 Price, Irene. ..... ...,...,,.... 5 p Penirk, Vernon. . . . . .78, 154, 132 Price, Jeali. .128, 1 , 55, 116, 98, 15: Penn, Jam' ....., ............ 1 22 Prim-e, Kathryn .... ........... . .- Penn, Robert. .... . . .103, 110, 108, Price, Lucille ..,.. ,... ..... 7 . 1, , 99, 54, 54, 135 Priest, Bunnilee, . . .... , Prrlririr, lilrir-rilirllr .... .,. ...,... Prkst. Clyde ---' - 4 -1- - -92 Pr-trim, Drirrtlliy, , .... .. .78 fwfr l?f'i1'l- ' A '- - '11 gg Pettit, Kenneth. . .... .. .... ,54 Ijrgvsi, 1101111 -44- ""' X Q Phillips, Louise Frances ..,....,.,. 71 100511 I-UIIIPPV -' "' ' Phillips, Fraiirrq lr-iiisc ............ 71 Prgfsl. Rywsdl- - r - - ,X Phillips, Kathleen ...... 160, 78, 105, lI3l'195Yr AYHKISIZI - A ' ' '97 116, 98 118 TIME, FC ---- "" ,. Pliillipr, Lois virilrr. .160, 128, 104, 54, I'rg0r. Elmer--4, -- '---fl 116, 98, 118 Pritchard, Pauline. ......- 4759 Sieree, rkvklion. . . ...... 135 Pritchett, Gleneva . .......... . . .71 ierce, in .... . .... 7 , ., .- , .,,,,, ,,,, ' gy 1414, 101' Pierce, Virginia. .. . ..... 85, 105 PPS" Lift' 16, fm, ,Z ,UQ Pierson, Janice. ,. ...... 78, 105 Puffcrl 'LC' ' ""' ' ' ' I Plymale, Mary Lon ,,.... . ..., 104, 55. Pugh, Miss Rosa A. .... . . .111, 28, f-lb 64, 116, 134 Plyrnale, Roy ....... .........,. 8 8 Pletrher, 1rViIlialn , ..., . . . 71 Pope, Charles ...... . . .82 , G . ,.'A. I H ,, Pnphanl, Bernice. . . . . .85 Quujnl pid? 82 Popham, Frank ..., . . .82 Qnf' 'I' fm I "" ' ' ',, lm.-if-r, lrmr. ..... . . .71 Qiiirlr, Jiilrri. . .- .10 Sport Style Suits TO MAKE YOURSELF DRESSY AND ATTRA CTIVE 71131111113 IIrIIIIIriIIII'llIlllIlI'I:'I'll Complimentr of S. S. Kresge Co. 25c to 31.00 Store I I North Third Street Newark, Ohio Compliments of the HANG - OUT Chatterbox Grill C0l7lll7li7ll6IZf.I' of AIRESMAN ELECTRIC CO. 56 W. Main St. om: HUNDRED SEVENTYVTHREE, Congratulations Class of 1937 The Advocate Printing Co. 'ZTZCTZZTZZZ RR H M. MITCHELL Mabell Riggs Younce CLHEEIIER Teaflaer of Singing Studio Pb 125 E. Park Pl. N. 4 GEO. T. STREAM Plumbing and Heating LI!F Bicycles and Repairs Phone 3379 78 W. Main St. Y-FOUR EAST SIDE SQUARE NEWARK, OHIO Compliments Of The BURKE GOLF COMPANY Radcliff, Frances . .......92 Radcliff, Jeanne ..... . . .7S, 105 Radu, Thomas ................... 85 Radwell, Cloise ................... 92 Rank, Ann ........, 104, 55, 116, 113 Rauck, Rayrnond. Rawlings, Evelyn. Raymond, John . . .. ,...... .55 85 Raymond, Richard ...... Raymond, Robert ..... 77, 115, 159, 97 Rc-rhel, Betty. .......... 72, 107, 116 Rector, Betty .......... Rcclor, Louis. . , . , ..... ....78 Rector, Virginia.100, 11-l, 111, 56, Redman, Paul . . ...... . ........ . Reed, Junior ....... 103, 131, 121, 645, 109 56, 9 10 Reel, Max1ne........... Reese, George. . . 98 77 ..,' 130 .4.., 6,116 119 31 Reese, Mr. Robert M ,... .99, , mm, Virginia... 4, 56, 116, 118 Reichert, Justine ..... 70, 103, 99, 132 Reid, Hazel .... ...72, 100, 106 Reid, Eileen. . . Reid, Mary .,... Restorick, Mary.. ....,,....92 . ..... 82, 83 ....1a, 105 Rey, Loo ........... .. ....... 70 Rhodeback, George ........... .... 8 5 naw, Robert ...... 103, 65, 122, 102, ss, 64, 132, iss Richard, Joseph. ..... . . Richards, Billy. ........... . ...... 92 Richards, Rosalie ....... 72, 114, 106, 116, 123 Richards, Virginia ............ .... S 8 Ricket, Paul .........,. 77, 131, 130 Ricket, Robert ...... ........... 5 6 Ricketts, Frederick .... .......... 7 0 Rickrich, Helen. . . . . . . .83 Rickus, Betty ....... . . .78 Rico, Louis ........... . . . . .77 Ridenbaugh, George .... ....... 8 2 Ridenour, Jack ..... . ....... X5 mme, Harry ......... .. .5s, 113 Riggleman, Dorothy .... ....... 9 2 Rine, Esther ........ ....... 7 2 Rine, Elsie ....... . ....... 92 Rinehart, Florence. .. .... 160, 128, 65, 56, 129 Risslcr, Robert .... ............. 5 6 Ritchie, Edgar ................... 92 Ritter, Victor.. .. .103, 110, 99 56, 132, 133 Rizzo, Frank . .... . ............ 92 Roach, Bruce ....... ........ 5 6 Roach, Mary ......... . . .78, 105 Robb, Mrs. Dorothy .... ........ 2 8 Roberts, Alice ....... .......... 7 8 Roberts, Betty ...... . . .57, 64, 106 Roberts, George. . . .......... 159 Roberts, Helen. . . . . ..... .... 7 8, 105 Roberts, Maxine. . . . .131, 114, 111, 57 132 Ambulance Service J E V. lVlcCAlVlE. T Licking Laundry Co 000000 M ' S 'r Cleiiiiec? andlihissed 440000 Funeral Home, 117 W. Church St. Phone 2081 Merrill R. Montgomery Lumber and Builders' Supplies 130-138 North Cedar Street Phone 4046 COLLEGE OF COMMERCE 1 Sponsored by Businessmen Summer Term: June I4-Aug. 20 Fall Term Starts Sept. Phone 2092 7 ONE HUNDRED SEVENTY-FIVE ,Roberts, Virginia ......... 78, 114, 98 Robinson, Howard .... ..... 1 1 .... 74 .Roderiek, Betty. . ...,...,. 92 Roe, Rolwrt ..... ........... 7 0 Rogers, Arland, , . ............ 92 Rogers, Dorothea. . . .108, 57, MLB Rogers, Juanita, . ........... 78 Rogers, Thomas. . ..,...... S5 Rogers, Wayne, . . . . . . . . . . 78 Roike, Ireka .... .......,..... 6 8 Roike, Lena. .. .... 104 125, 108, 57 Roley, Gladys ............... TS, 117 Roley, Pearl ..................,.. 92 Romine, Ernest ..... Roof, Janet ..... 78, Rose, Dorothy ...... Iloshon, Ellen ,...... Ross, Charles.. Rowe, Rosa .... 1.621 . 105 72. ...,..'10 ,96,116 ...,..7s 102,107 ....70, 97 lloue, Wanda. .. .... 57, 115 Rowland, Roy. . . .... 70, 112 Ruhel, Betty . .. ....... , . . . .88 Ruff, Norman .. ............. 70 Ruffner, Janet. . . .72, 102, 101, 106, 124, 134 Ruflner, Mildred .............. 92, 93 Ruzl, Thomas ......... 103, 121, 57 Rupright, Irene .......... 78, 102, 10,3 Rusk, Floyd ....... 7, 110, 115, 131, 102, 130, 138 Russell, Mary, .. .78, 105, 116, 124, 123 Russell, Ralph. . . Rutledge, James .,.. Rutun, Charles ...... Ryan, Edwin. . ,128 Ryan, Marvin ....,. 57, 1:10, 108, 101, ......70 ......78 ......8x 129,132 106, 116 Ryan, Margaret ..... . . ,78, 105 Ryan, Ralph, ,.,., . ., . . . . . 72 Ryan, Walter ...... ........ 8 8 Ryan, ...79, 154 Sabo, Sarhs, William. . . .... . . S Julius ....... James ..... . . ........... 57 85 Sachs, Samuel .... .79, 115, 147, 154, 97, 121 Sager, Mr. P. H., . . .,...... . . .28 Sampoul, Enas ..... ..... 1 04, 57 Sampoul, Russell. .. .... , .SX Sanders, Bertaliene. . .. .79, 105 Sanders, Charles. .. . ..... . . .68 Sanders, Estlc , . . . .......... 79 Sanders, Martha , . . . ........... 72 Sanders, Robert .... .. .70, 128, 132 Savage, Dana, .... . . .79, 115, 147 Savage, Jol1n,. . . ...,...... .92 Sayatovieli, Helen . . . ....... .711 Sfales, BCN3 ....... . . . . . .70 10.5 Scarbrmigli, Virginia .............. 85 Sehaller, John ......... 103, 141, 142, 110, 108, 157, 97, 127 Sche11k, Mary Evelyn ............. 68 Schenk, Phyllis ..... 72, 102, 106 11'i Selwnk, William. ..,.............. 82 Sclriffelvr, Mrs, Sarah S. .......... 29 Schilling, Joseph ....,............ 79 Schinske, Ruth ........,......... 79 Schlciffer, Madeleine 72, 106, 116 Schmoll, Minnie. . ., ......... 85 Schofield, Dnn .... Schofield, Joann .... Srhonberz, Tllrodore .... 1.0, 10., 12.1, 13.1 ..103, 35, 58 ss WI10, 115, '1'0s, 0 r - lVloore's Drug' Store A. P. HESS CO EAST NEWARKHS. OWN The Best in . . . DRUG STORE GOODS The Best in . . . ' DRUG STORE SERVICE VVe Carry School Supplies C. O. MOORE, Ph. G. Phone 51562 361 E. Main St. DRINK. . ' ' ' 'iN BOTTLES NEWARK, OHIO Flowers for every occasion Coos-Cola Boflzlingi 'Works" Phone 5049 'Newarlo Ohio ONE HUNDRED SEVENTY-SIX Pounds Flower Shop Hudson ot Church Phone 3368 Scott, Irvin .... .... 8 2 Scott, Leah .... ...... 8 8 Scott, Neva .... ...,... 7 9 Scott, Richard .... .... 1 56, 57 Scott, Walter ...., ....... 7 9 Schramm, Albert .... .... 7 1, 130 Schwartz, Ralph .... . . .......... 70 Scruggs, Mildred ...... . . . . .82, 83 Seaman, Kenneth .... ......r.. , 79 Sedgwick, Stewart. ..79, 115, 147, 154 Sellars, Betty ........ .......... S 2 Scllars, John .......,..... ..... 7 9 Sensabaugh, Joseph. . . . . . .88 Sensabaugh, Robert. . . . . . .88 Sepos, Margaret, ..... .......... 7 9 Settles, Earl ....,.. .......... 7 9 Settles, Ernest. . . . .. . .128 58, 130, 124, 129, 132 Seufert, Diana. . . . .... 72, 100, 106 Shacloin, Neil. . . , ........... 131, 132 Shannon, Carl ................... 88 Shannon, Elizabeth ............... 93 Shannon, Marjorie...72, 107, 101, 126 Shackleford, Susanna.. .......... 92 Shauck, Eldon. , . . . .. .70, 100, 121 Shaw, Dr. Avery .... .......r. 1 37 Shaw, Dale ......, ......... 5 8 Shaw, Edna . . ,.,,. 85 Shaw, Elmer . . ....... 74 Shaw, Eugene ..,.. .. .79, 120 Shaw, Marcella .... ..... 8 2, 83 Shaw, Maxine. , . . . .... 160, 72 Shaw, Warren ................... 74 Shearer, June ........ ...., 7 9, 105 Sheboy, Mary Margaret ........ 72, 102 Shepherd, Velma ......... 72, 106, 116 Sherman, Mr. Edgar.. ....... 90 Sherman, Esther .... Sherrard, Ruth ..... ...s2, 83 Sherman, Jeannette .... ...... 7 2, 128 116 106 Shields, Betty Jane. Shields, Clarence. . . . Shields, Donald . . . Shields, Marcia. . . .......72, 160, 72, 122, 112 .....72,128 Shinn, John ................. 70, 103 90 ShiFP1 Clyde ....,.. ..........88, Shoemaker, Margaret ..... 79, 114, 105, 117 Shoppell, Paul ..... Shrigley, Betty .... Shrnck, Donald . . . Shubirg, Dorothy. . . Shubire, Gerald .... . .......... 58 ....79 ....85 Shuebruk. Diana .... 161, 35, 121, 102, 65, 109, 122, 101. 58, 64, 126 Siegel, Howard...103. 148. 149. 155, 131, 55, 102, 58, 130, 96 150, 151, 152, 97 Sis-vel, Rhea .............,....... 83 Sis-ele, Evelyn. . ................. 72 Simnson. Simrlson, Ellen Jean. .. David .............. .... 7 9 111, 108. 53, 98 Simpson, Robert ............ 70, 159 747 Simnson, Russell ............ Simpson, Vivian. . . . . . . .58 Skinner, Gladys. . . . . . . . 82 Skinner, Mary .... ....... 7 9 Slater, Ruth ..,,..... .... 7 9, 105 Slotterbeck, Charles. . . ...... .82 Smiley, Jean ....... .... 1 05 Smith, Betty ..... . . .82 SEE Powell Electric Company Compliments Of for Electrical Work and Lichtenstein Fruit Co Merchandlse Dealers for Copeland Electric 34 W. Church St. Phone 4480 Refrigerators. 18 East Church Street Ph. 3994 WHEN IN NEED OF PAINT SEE Horner's Newark Paint Co. Phone 3524 38 W. Church St. ABBOTT'S SHGES FOR ALL THE FAMILY 3 SOUTH PARK ONE HUNDRED SEVENTY-SEVEN Smith, Charles E.. .. ....... . . . 79 Smith, Charles W.. . . ...... . . . . . Smith, Mr. C. P.. . .. . . .120, 29, 96 Smith, Donald L. .... ....,..... 7 0 Smith, Donald .... ..... 9 2 Smith, Edward ,.., ..... 7 9 Smith, Edna ....... . . .... 72 Smith, Elizabeth .... . 79, 124 Smith, Elma. ..... ..... X 8 Smith, Elsworth .... . . .88, 90 Smith, Enola . .. ..... 82 Smith, Ernest . . . . . . . . .70 Smith, Mr. F. W.. .. .28, 98 Smith, James ...... 90, 130 Smith, Jean. ..... ..... 8 8 Smith, Kenneth .... .... 7 9, 132 Smith, Laverne . .,............,.. 88 Smith, Lucille .......... 79, 105 Smith, Margaret A.. . .128 122, 58 Smith, Margaret V. ............... 68 Smith, Miss Nclle ....... 104, 29 Smith, Neva ...... ..... 5 9 Smith, Opal .,.. .... 7 2, 128 Smith, Reva. . . ..... . .72 Smith, R. G. .... ...... 1 03 Smith, Rhnla . . . ....... .82 Smith, Robert. . . . . .. Smith, Sylvia .... . . Smith, Wilbur . .. . .. smith, William .... ..,. Smith, VVilma. .. .. Smoke, Flovd ..... Smothers, George .... Snelling, Bettv .... Snelling, Eugene Snelling, Evadean . 22,132 .....s2 59,132 .....79 .....72 ....79 .mea ....x5 ..,.ss Snelling, Norris . . Snyder, Marie. . . . Snyder, Louise .... Somers, Harriet . . 104 108 59 Snelling, Ruth. ......... , , ..104, 108, 59, 116 ..160, 104, 101, 59 64,123 Souslin, Mildred ..... 72, 104, 106, 116 Spangler, Marcella ................ 72 Spangler, Robert . Spangler, William Sparks, Maxine .... .. ............,. 59 ........... .82 .. . .72, 104, 106, 116, 118 Speaks, Donald ..... . ............ 88 Speaks, William .......... 79, 147, 97 Spearman, Wanda ..,............. Spellman, Helen.. 160, 72, 100, 128, Sperry, Eleanor .. 64, 116, 124, Spiker, Betty ...... Spitzer, Dorothy .... Springer, Donna. . . 106,116 1.14 102 65 59, 134 .. ............ 85 93 .-...59, 106 Stage, Kenneth . . . ...... .82 Stamas, Bessie. . ..... S2 Stanley, Evenes. . . ....... .93 Stanley, Shirlene. .. . . . .79, 117 Stasel, Helen ....... ....... 7 0 Staugh, Mildred ..... ..... 5 9 Steele, Darrell .... . . . .70 Steele, Gladys .... .... 7 2 Steele, Harold .... ......... . 88 Steele, Mildred .... ............ ' 72 Steele, Rena ..... ...... 1 60, 114, 59 Steele, Wilma. ............. . 79, 109 Steen, Richard ..... 79, 131, 130, 132 Steinman, Eugene ................ 82 Diamonds Watches ....IeweIry... HAYNES BROS. Established I 894 I2 EAST PARK PLACE NORTH C OMPLIMEN TS OF CRISSE BROS. P. SMITH SONS Wesuggm Established I865 Fountain Pen-Y Serving Licking County over 72 BUILDING MATERIAL Yemfr Calling Canals and Stationery AND DEVQE PAINTS for Gnzdmzion Gifrf Phone 3736 L. O. L. P. The Edmisl:on's Book Store Co. ONE HUNDRED SEVENTY-EIGHT Swingle Music Store Stephens, Joseph ..... . . . 79 Stewart, June, ..,.... . . . 79 Stewart, Rose Mary ..... ..,. . 88 Stevans, Charles . .... ........ 8 2 Stevens, Earl ...... . , ........ 70 Stevens, Louene ..... . . . . . .72, 106 Stevens, Richard ..,.. ....... 1 41 Stevens, Ruthellan ..,. ..,... 7 9 Stevens, William ,,... . . . . . 113 Stickle, Bernice .,.... ...,.. 6 0 Stiff, Catherine. . . . -. .82 Stiff, Mildred ..... . .... ........ 7 9 Stockdale, Betty .................. 72 Stockdale, William ....... . . . . . . . Stoeckmann, Mr. George. . .68, 27, .88 123 Stone, Edward ................... 60 Stotler, Helena ,..... .,.. 1 04, 125 60, 64, 123 Stough, Dorotha .... ...,.,. 7 9, 105 Street, Robert ..,.........,...... 85 Stricklin, Anna .........,..,. 79, 105 Strosnider, Betty ..... 60, 64, 96, 126 Stroud, Delbert ..,............... S5 Stuart, Aimee ...... .. . . . .79, 105 Sullivan, Betty ................... S5 Sullivan, James .................. 83 Sutton, Sylvia ................... 79 Swain, Charlotte .... 160, 109, 120, 105 Swain, Evelyn ..... . . .128, 160, 104, 60, 116, 118 Swanbeck, Lewis ......... . ....... 88 Swank, Mr. J. W. ............ 140, 28 Swartz, Frances. . .128, 104, 60, 116 118 Congratulations to the Class 1937 NEW ARCADE THEATRE STARTING SAT. 11 P. M. SUN., MON., TUES. CLARK MARION CABLE and DAVIES "CAIN anti lVlABEL" EXTRA FEATURE! Adventure, HKILLERS OF THE SEA," Action! . STUDENTS 15c ANYTIME! Crane-Krieg- Flory Ha fdwafe PAINTS GLASS 0. D. EIOLLAR at SON Plumbing and Heating , Norge Refrigerators ,a,n,d,, Combustioneer Stokers '62 West Church St. Phone 2584 ' ' ' ' Newark, Ohio IF YOU NEED i GLASSES SEE MRS. C. P. REYNOLDS The Square Deal Optometrist Twenty-six years' experience in the examina' tion of eyes makes her especially capable of fitting you Phone 26111 Best Frames, and Lenses Used Prices to Suit Each and Every One 71 East Main Street Newark, Ohio EWARK ONE HUNDRED SEVENTY-NINE Swern, Carl ........ . . . 103, 100 Swern, Robert ................... 88 Swick, Joseph ...........,....... 92 Swigart Dr. D. C .24 swigani Phyllis. . .'.'16d,' 7112 ' 1252, .105 Swigart, Shirley ...... . ....... 82, 109 Swisher, Robert .......... 60, 112, 98 T Taafel, Richard .,.... .79, 96, 124, 123 Tate, Carl. .... . Tate, Harold .,.. Tate, William .... Taylor, Beulah ...... Telvin, John ...... .. Teuscher, Margaret. . Terrell, Wayne ...... Tharp, Virginia ...... Thomas, Miss Eunice .... ........ . ............ 82 .79 .....130 ....79, 115 ............105 . .... 99, 60, 97 . . . .79, 105 30 Thompson, Robert .... ...... 7 4 Thompson, Charles . . .... 60 Thompson, Hubert . .... . 79 Thompson, Lucille. . . . .82, 83 Thompson, Mabel. ...... 72 Thompson, Marie. ...... 88 Tliompson, Paul ...... . . .72, 100 Thom son, Robert .... . ...... 79, 60 Thornton, Harry. ....,..... 61 Thornton, Jean . . "rmz1nn, James.. Trcmann, Frcd. . . Tipton, Leonard ..... Tipton, Mr. L. J.. . . Tipton, Margaret .... Titus, Suzanne. . . Toney, Jean ...... Toothman, Elwyn . . Toothman, Lola .... Toothman, Wilbur., Touvell, James. . . ..........61 148,114,119 ..........s5 . ......... 31 12,106,117 .....7z, 106 .....79,115 ...61,106 ......79 .....a2 Tracey, Walter .... Trager, Francis . . . Tretzer, Carolyn .... ....70,96 '7 Trimble, Neil ........... , Trost, Robert ...... . . .... 74 Trowbridge, William ...... 70, 103, 141, 97, 124 Truex, Frederick. . . Tucker, Betty ...... Tumblin, Donald .... 102, , ........ 79,105 .....79, 115, 154 Turner, Andrew ..... 70, 110, 113, 132 Turner, Betty ........... 128, 104, 61 U Uflner, Ardyth ..... 79, 128, 124, 129 Uffner, William .... Ulrich, Elsie ....... Unternaher, Helen. . Upson, Howard ..... 79, 73, 110, 115, 147, 97 Upson, Juliet ......... 100, 121, 102, Upson, Marianne .... Utrevis, Jack .... . . V Vaiea, Olga ............. 79, 109, 105 Vanatta, Raymond. . . Van Vance, Dorothy. . . . c ...... e, Marvin . 65, 61, 64 .100, 121, 101, 61 .........ss ...70, 112 Van Curren, Carl .... ........ 8 8 Van Fussen, Elsie ..... . ...100, 61 Van Fussen, Helen ....... ...... 7 2 Van Fossen, Mildred ..... ..... ' I2 Van Voorhis, Charles. . . . . . . Van Winkle, Kenneth .... ..... 7 9 Van Winkle, Robert .... . . 1 . 82 Varasso, Orville ..... ...... 7 9 Varner, Ann ...... . . .72, 108 Varner, Carson . . 2 ......8.. F U R N I T U R E Complimentx of R U G S McKim Supply Co. S T O V E S THOR WASHERS IRONERS LEONARD REFRIGERATORS TESAM ALBAN FIXTURES ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES 57-59 West Main Street P50122 3326 Suve Your Eyey The iamond tore Ellsworth l.. Tate 5, I-Iudj-0nA1,enue Optometrist Take: thi: opportunity to congratulate Phone 4362 the Gruduutef und unure you of our uppreriution of 27 N. Fourth St. Newark, Ohio your patronage ONE HUNDRED EIGHTY Walters, Varner, Leland. . . .... .XS Varner, Robert. . . .... . .79 Vermilion, Dorothy .... .... 7 9, 105 Vinning, Charles ..... ....... 1 00, 61 Vogan, Virginia .... ............. 9 3 Vogel, Elizabeth .... . . . 72 100 114 Vogel, Virginia. . . Vogelmeier, John ,111i126 ......si Wade, Charles. . . . . .74 Wagenheim, Richard. . . . .62 Wagers, Robert . , .... ..... 9 2 Wagner, Marjorie. ....,....... 82 Wagner, Lawrence .... ....,.... , . 79 Wall, Jean, ....... 104 122, 101, 62, 64, 126, 134 Walker, Bertha.. 72, 106, 116 Walker, Earl ...,. ....., 8 8, 90 Walker, Helen. . . ... . . . . . .88 Walker, Isabelle .... ..... Walker, John .... .......... 7 9 Wallace, Evelyn .... ........... 7 9 Wallace, Harry. . . ...... 88, 90 Walters, Dorothy ........ 72, 128, 102, 101, 106 Mabel ....... 72 Walters, Raymond ..... ...... 5 8 Walters, Roy ....... . . . 92 Walton, Richard .... .... 1 30 Walz, Josephine. . . , . .......... . .72 Washington, Luster. .............. 72 Warman, Donald .............. 78, 62 Warman, Robert. .14l, 145, 99, 97, 132 Warner, Ann ...........-.-- 78, 102 Warnock, Catherine. ..125, 108, 62, 64 Warrington, Jack ............ 78, 147 Warthen, Eileen. . . . . , ......... . .72 Warthen, Jesse . . Warthen, Julia ..... .... 6 2, 116, 118 Warthen, Sarah. .....,...... 78, 105 Warthen, William ................ 88 Warthen, William ......,......... 72 Wenkley, Joseph. . .l03, 141, 144, 148, 149, 155, 122, 52, 152, 97 S2 Weakley, William .....,........... Weaver, Gladys .... . . . 62 Weaver, Owen ..... . . .92 Weaver, Robert .... ..... 8 5 Weekley, Kathleen , . ...... 85 Weiant, Helen .... ..... 7 8, 105 Welch, Jeanne. . ............ .72 Wells, Evelyn .......... 160, 62, 106 wang, J5hn.,. .... 141, 145, 110, 99, 62, 97 Wells, Paul. . . . ............ . .70 Wells, Robert .... . . .70, 112 C OMPLI MEN TS OF YOUR LOCAL KROGER SHOP SEARS and SAVE Accept Our Congratulations 1937 Clow Allen, Brashear 81 Haslop 9 West Parlc Place Nobil's Shoe Store SHOES of style and quality for the family ai Reasonable Prices I4-I6 North Park ONE HUNDRED EIGHTY-ONE Welsh, Betty .... Welsh, Jack ....... Welsch, Harold .... Welsh, Harry .... Welsh, Marjorie. Welsh, Robert. . . Wessinger, Frank .... West, Joseph ........,........... Westbrook, Kathryn .... . . . Westbrook Robert. . , ..... 48 115, 154, 131 Westenbarger, Alice ..... Weston, Marjorie ........ Wharton, William .. Whetstone, Eugene. . White, Charles .... White, Goldie.. . White, Mary ...... Whiteford, Paul, . . . Whyde, Katherine. Whyde, Joseph. . . Wieber, John.. . .156 Ts, 102, .......82 .......7s ..,....ss 63 .......72 , 73. , 130, 1 1 78 88 131, 130, 96 82 Willey, Rachel .... ...... . . . Williams, Anna .............. Williams, David ...., 72 Williams, Dorothy ........... Williams, Frances ............ 72, 106 Williams, Lillian .... ......... 7 8 Williams, Doris ...... .......... 8 5 Williams, Jean. . ................. 85 Willison, Nellie ....,... ...... 7 2, 116 Wills, Vivian ..... 160, 104, 63, 116, 127, 123 Wilson, Betty ........ ........... 7 8 Wiemer, G:-orge. . . . .......... 82 Wilkin, Clara Mae... . . .78, 105, 117 Wilkin, Ethel ..... ....,...... 9 3 Wilkin, Elmer .... .... 9 2 WVilkin, Lavina ..... . , . 104 Wilkins, Donald .... .... 8 2 Willard, Robert .... .... 8 8 Willey, Kathryn. .. .. . .74 Wilson, Earl .... ........... 8 5 Wilson, George .... ..... ...... 7 8 Wilson, Katheryn ....... 72, 100, 128, 106, 116 Wilson, Martin .... ........... 7 0 Wilson, Sadie .... .... 8 2, 83 Wilson, Virginia .... ...... 9 2 Wilson, William ..,, .... ,... . 8 2 Wince, Robert ..... ........... 7 4 Windle, Harold ................... 82 Winn, Marjorie .......... 78, 105, 116 Wintermute, Dorothy. .. ........ . .92 Wintermute, Ernest .... . .......... 70 Wintermute, Jean ............ 72, 128 Wintermute, Margaret.. 128, 102, 105 Wise, Fred. . , .....,......... 88 90 Wise, Robert ........ .. ...... 78, 130 Wobbecke, Kenneth ..... 103, 141, 142 99, 97 DONEFFS HOME BAKERY Complimenlx of BUTTER TWIST GAYTIME FROCKS BREAD AND CAKES COATS-SUITS-DRESSES 45 S. Second Street MILLINERY-SPORT WEAR Phone 2927 I9 S. Park Place G B There's a Reason Why Everyone . . C Typewriters lglgn?-Ising UHllllllllilllllllllllllllllll Royal Typewriters Beauty Shoppe ALL KINDS OF PERMANENT WAVES Rentals Service 31,50 to 310.00 Phone 3338 29 W. Main Opposite Postoiiice Phone 2060 ONE HUNDRED EIGHTY-TWO Wolcutt, Thomas... .... 88, 90, 130 Wolfe, Wolfe, Wolfe, Wolfe, Wolfe, Wolff Woltjen, Ralph ..... rs Wolverton, Esther ..., George. . . ........ . .70 Mary. . . .... 72, 102 Morris. . . Twila ..... .... 1 28, .......72 63 Mr. S. M. ................. 24 John ................. 63, 113 , 110, 115, 154 Y Yannelli, Frances ..... . . . 160, 78 Yannelli, Magdeline. . . . . 160, '74 Yarger, Jean .... . ....... 82 Yerian, Helen .... . .... 78 Yingling, Louise. .. . . . . . . . . . 92 Wolverton, Mildred .,......... 78, 124 Wolverton, Warner. . . ...... 127 Wonders, Virginia.. ....... 85 Wood, Bernadine. . . .... 72, 106 Wood, Betty. ,....... ....... 8 8 Woodyard, Gene ....... ...... 8 Z Woolard, Beth Ann... ..... ...... 8 5 Woolson, Mr. Frank ..... . ....... 137 Yost, Esther ...... ....... 7 8, 105 Younce, Russell ........ 70, 102, 129, 127, 132 Young, Francis.. . ..,...... 63, 117 Young, Jean ..................... 73 Young, Marjorie .... 160, 72, 114, 108, 106, 118 Young, Mary .................... 85 Young, Phyllis ..... ............. . 88 Young, Reba ........ 128, 125, 63, 64 Z Zehier, Paul ..... . . . . . .......... 130 Zipperer, Barbara. . . . . .78 Zipperer, Mary .... . . .85 Worden, Walter ..... ............. 8 2 Workman, Joan ........, 78, 102, 105 Worley, Martha .... ............ 8 5 Worley, Mildred .... .,.... ..... 7 2 Worstell, Hilda. . . ............ . .88 Worth, Robert ................... 68 Wortman, Phyllis. ....... 108, 63, 106 Wortman, Robert .... 70, 141, 146, 99 Wright, Arthur .............. 70, 156 Wright, Catherine. .... 160, 78, 105 Wright, Charles .... ......... . . .72 Wright, Jeannette. . .............. 72 Wright, John .................... 85 Wright, Margaret Ann CJr.J. . .72, 106 116 Wright, Margaret Ann KSLJ. ..... 104, 116, 63 Wyant, Phoebe ............... 82, 83 Wymer. Marjorie. . . .. .. . . .85 WEBB 81 WEBB Lumber and Builders' Supplies 6th and Wilson Phone 2926 Compliment: of MAYBOLD SHOE STORE SMITI-I'S DRY CLEANING "The Place of Greater Care" 'i.!F Phone 9758 111 W. Main St. Newark, Ohio SEE US FOR Welding and Machine Work COMPLETE STOCK OF Standard Auto Parts SUPERIOR WELDING AND MACHINE CO. Rear 58 W. Main St. Phone 2269 M. Schonherg 8s Sons Fred Schonberg, Sole Owner Dealers in Rags, Metals. Magazines, Newspapers. lron, Batteries, Radiators, Tires, Etc. We Buy and Sell Used and Junlr Cars and Trucks. We Sell Used and New Auto Parts and Install Glass. I I3-I43 W. Railroad Street Phone 3348 ONE HUNDRED EIGHTY-THREE Qutogmphs IUNIWIIQII sawn


Suggestions in the Newark High School - Reveille Yearbook (Newark, OH) collection:

Newark High School - Reveille Yearbook (Newark, OH) online yearbook collection, 1932 Edition, Page 1

1932

Newark High School - Reveille Yearbook (Newark, OH) online yearbook collection, 1935 Edition, Page 1

1935

Newark High School - Reveille Yearbook (Newark, OH) online yearbook collection, 1936 Edition, Page 1

1936

Newark High School - Reveille Yearbook (Newark, OH) online yearbook collection, 1938 Edition, Page 1

1938

Newark High School - Reveille Yearbook (Newark, OH) online yearbook collection, 1939 Edition, Page 1

1939

Newark High School - Reveille Yearbook (Newark, OH) online yearbook collection, 1940 Edition, Page 1

1940

1985 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1970 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1972 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1965 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals
FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
Are you trying to find old school friends, old classmates, fellow servicemen or shipmates? Do you want to see past girlfriends or boyfriends? Relive homecoming, prom, graduation, and other moments on campus captured in yearbook pictures. Revisit your fraternity or sorority and see familiar places. See members of old school clubs and relive old times. Start your search today! Looking for old family members and relatives? Do you want to find pictures of parents or grandparents when they were in school? Want to find out what hairstyle was popular in the 1920s? E-Yearbook.com has a wealth of genealogy information spanning over a century for many schools with full text search. Use our online Genealogy Resource to uncover history quickly! Are you planning a reunion and need assistance? E-Yearbook.com can help you with scanning and providing access to yearbook images for promotional materials and activities. We can provide you with an electronic version of your yearbook that can assist you with reunion planning. E-Yearbook.com will also publish the yearbook images online for people to share and enjoy.