New York University - Violet Yearbook (New York, NY)

 - Class of 1938

Page 1 of 280

 

New York University - Violet Yearbook (New York, NY) online yearbook collection, 1938 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 280 of the 1938 volume:

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B-157'-J D ' 4- 'Qi J - N X '1 'q"'5-5 ' -- 5 Kx . X - " N. w .I-5 " J B Q-bs " ' N , x r .gh -Q is as 111 N X 5 L32-1 ' x' .12 xg -Nxk 1 QX q Q i Q N 1. -X X S X5 X Qs' . -xx . f ': Q as .ix MEMS "Let us strive to . . . do all which may achieve and cherish a just and lasting peace among our- selves and with all nationsf, ABRAHAM LINCOLN. Copyright 1958 H. BUNGARD R. S. RATNER SHP IIQILEII 1938 NEW YORK UNIVERSITY University CoIIege I CoIIege of Engineering UNIVERSITY HEIGHTS . . . NEW YORK CITY T is now three quarters of a century since Lincolrfs Emancipation Proclama- tion was supposed to have marked the end of siavery in the United States. Yet today we are chained to the contra- dictions of a life which produce war, and enslaved to time conflicts past, present, and future which feed upon our strength and our learning. About to leave an institution de- voted to knowledge and life, we dedi- cate those qualities to an intransigent struggle for a new Emancipation Proc- lamation, which will deciare our free- dom from madness, and destruction, and death f- our unwillingness that our bodies be the ttiin smoke upon the aitars of war. 1 'Q FED IU Lyilfktfli Book 1 . Book 11 . Book ill . Book BV Book V . N FE' N T . Faculty . Classes . . Sports . . Qrganizations . . Advertising -..,,,,-Q-3-5qi,:rn-Tfvf.-g 5 --ffvjfz-f:1f::ff -L-f+:'?.:' ff -, ' PAQUILTW UNIVERSITY COUNCIL FRED I. KENT President ALLAN IVIELVILL POPE Vice-President WILLIAM IVI. KINGSLEY BENJAMIN T. IEAIRGHILD FINLEY J. SHEPARD PERCY SELDEN STRAUS ARTHUR SMITH TUTTLE EDVVIN LOUIS GARVIN PERCY S. YOUNG ALBERT E. GALLATIN WILLIAM W. BRUSH FRED I. KENT WILLIAM I'I. I'IAM1LTON ARTHUR B. GRAHAM DAVID SARNOFF ORRIN R. JUDD PRED I. KENT MEMBERS BENJAMIN STRONG .Secretary XfVILLIrXM IVI. KINGSLEY TFGUSLIVGF ALLAN IVIELVILL POPE GEORGE E. ROOSEVELT BENJAMIN STRONG SAMUEL A. BROWN BARKLIE I-IENRY CASS CANFIELD HARRY W. CHASE LAURENCE O. IDAYSON IVIALCOLM D. SIMPSON R. KEITH KANE JAMES D. IVIOONEY RALPH W. SOCKMAN PHILIP A. BENSON JOHN IVI. SCHIPP ASSOCIATES OF THE COUNCIL JOSEPH S. AUERBACH NATHAN L. IVIILLER WALTER EDWIN FRENV JOHN BOND TREVOR 9 ' S , ,.. if, 1 1 I . 1 , 1 is 5163 17 HARRY VVOODBURN CHASE, PHD., L.H.D., LLD. Ctiancettor ot New York University Phi Beta Kappa: Sigma Xi: Sigma Nug Kappa Detta Pig Psi Ctiig Pcrstare et Praestare. Born at Grove- tanci, Massactuusetts, April 11, 18833 graduated from Dartmouth, 1904. BA.: 1908. 1N1.A.: Ctartc, 1910, Pt1.D,g Lenoir, 1920, L1-,D.g VX'a1:e Forest, 1920, LLD.: Georgia, 1923, LL.D.g Dartmouth, 1926, LLD.: Nortti Carolina, 1930, 1,t-.D,g Rottins, 1931, Dr. ot Humanities: Mictiigan, 1952, LLB.: Director for Clinic for Sutnnormat Ctiitciren, Ctartf University, 1909-10, Professor of Ptiitosoptiy of Education, 1910-14, Professor of Psyctwotogy, 19141-19. Acting-Dean, Cottage of Litaerat Arts, 1918, Chairman of the Faculty, President of ttie University of Nortti Carolina, 1919-1930: Presictent of ttie University of tttinois, 1950-19335 Ctiancettor of New York University since .tuty 1, 1935. Fettow ot ttie American Association for ttie Advancement of Science: Trustee of ttie Ptuetps-Stotces Foundation: Director of the New Yortc Actutt Eriucation Councitg Member of ttle Generat Education Board, ttie Nationat Recovery Committee ot Education, and the Nationat Advisory Councit on Radio in Education: Member of the Ctiamtzer of Commerce of the State of New Yortc, the Bronx Board of Tracie, University Ctutns of New Yortc and Ctiicago, Century Association, Town Halt Ctuto. 10 ' LQ 4 7 .2,.. K, 1 i' A f--'fe V4 V 'iii -f ' - if , ,V ,. ' 1 'A 4, V' iff, , 1 9- c 1 ly, -. i "-2 4.21 , ' if ,,- id. 1 , wt-SL,-: ef3t '1, , , . 1 9' Q51 f R ",,1,1,!Qf1, lfrf I ,gm il ,, WT. V Z SWW5, rms' , wg A tyy, : x g vig , A 1 ,V 13: in V145 V -' " .1 . .Q-' W yy ,, . , . ' e 1 M ff ,L I It 4' , X "":i . w.-Y gn.: -13-mga--,, -.i v 4:3-:,, ,- .K jg- L- -, 11- ' ' 4 I W, " f 9 we -e-' MARSHALL STEVVART BROVVN, MA, Dean of ttie Facutties, Professor of History and Potiticat Science Zeta Psig Phi Beta Kappa. Born Keene, N. H., gractuatect from Brown University, 1892: 1V1.A.. 1893: tnstructor in History, University of 1V1ietiigan, 1893-94: studied at Heiriettaerg, 189596: Professor ot' History and Potiticat Science, New York University, 18943 1V1emtxer American Historicat Association: President History Teachers Association Middle States and 1V1ary1anc1, 1917f18z President History Teachers Association of New York, 1906-O71 Member of American Potiticat Science Association: Registrar of Facutty 01: New York University, 1895-1902: Acting Dean of Cottcge of Arts and Pure Sciences, 1916-19171 Dean of the Facutties, 1918: War Emergency Committee, New York University, 1917-18: Chairman of New York University Committee on Students Army Training Corps, 1918-19, Director of War tssues Course, S.A,T.C., 1918: Acting Dean of Sc1'1oo1 ot Pedagogy, New York University, 1920-1921: Acting Dean of Cottege of Dentistry, New York University, 1927: Mayorys Committee on Pubtication 01: Minutes of Common Councit, CitQ of New York: President Beta Chapter ot New Yort. 01 Ptii Beta Kappa, 1922-19293 Committee on Actministration of New York University, 1929. ' K . ' , A Y A -""- Y S sig. , f N r ' ' -, n rt Wy ,Q wa: ' . . r,,,Jf.-.awf,z.'Z -- 1- . 2'eFgQ'?2Z'Z'4ffqEf1-,r,-,gf iff: 1, ,,k'f.fji.RVaf 'Yi' , - I 1 ',' 1 1 , 1 " pg, J: ,fi by M Q ig, uk ,Z 7 N rv-1 W I, Q , V I . if 95.4, ,gg gi,.5,3Si3Lt.-5-p.f,, 5 '..,f,.-.,.15.:,.3,-Mkfylpgk , f fi, a f f. VE. ky ,4 V1 U. ,L . - A Q L 7 , , :, .. - "Z" 7 Liiigi..s7Jgf:,iez:.,4+:f:tsw-af .,.,i.A M Q W f 1+ - , '-- . -' -' : l 2 A 1 ,- I ig 1 nn H ' Y A L :. Q 'FX vxxw - -1 1 , . sg, Yi 'r 'I v L., ,i i, A 11, '1 I M. that 1 N mm-xfz',,,1, 2,3 -fm P X W g-:fy:'f,,,g3, .1 , - -' A .. .4552 A ' f ff R K 5 592 we QA , , r 53 it 4 " X x 5, ,N vfx lfqz -' 1 ,,.- :.. ff- - i ggegfzgthsav. A 1-:ily ,I IRVING HUSTED BERG, AB., BD., DD. Dean of Ltie University College of Arts and Pure Science, and University Ctiaptain Ctii Phi: Honorary Ptii Beta Kappa. Born Rocky 1'1i11, N. J., 18785 graduated Lafayette Cottege AB., 1901: honorary D.D., 1916: post-graduate 1'1arL1:orc1 Seminary, BDU 1904. Pastor. Nortti Reformed Church, Vxfatervhet, N. Y., 1904-O63 First Refonnect. Catstcitt, N. Y., 1906-12: South Congregational. Hartford, Conn., 1912-17: Fort Washington Coitegiaic, New York City, 1917-56. University Ctiaptain since 1919, Member, University Council, 1931-36. Trustee, 1'1aritorc1 Seminary Foundation, Lafayette Couege. 12 1 'ff 1 1 , 3y,f'. - f I ' - I A! ..::,,..'f... N W 5 f"'5' N f , .. , 'f"-.5 - fi 'IL :Y x r Q Q . "" ' 1 ,zu ---Y '-.4:,,, 3,1 , . A I... f - I , f -1' ,- A f 5 .9 - -1 . . 1, . . It 1 1: "ff CM' - g.11i1 ' iE9ff-3 V -V WW." 1' 'af-1... aw L1f.aLf1.i,gQi . 1224 . . .we itg iii? iiiiti wi'-.1 . ' 1 V . ,J ' .. . . " ' ' , ,ff Pbf25.wf?'f'., - ,,,. .v,.. mf., . .." J -21 " H121 't' . S "Vi "":" ' -. , -. 51155 - " 4" 4 . .-... ..--. -1- . w e .- .f . 2' .if".:2,.2'1:' we fs-'1'4w' ff-fm 1- f - nf f wr """"" ' ' 'W t w+ X ,amz MMA, 1494: mfs-'aw Af DEAN THORNDIKE SAVILLE, AB., BS., NS., CE. Dean of Cottege of Engineering, Professor of 1'1yr1rau1ic and Sanitary Engineering Iota A1p11ag Ptri Beta Kappag Tau Beta Pip Sigma Xi. AB., 1"1arvarc1 19111: BS., Dartmouth 11V1agna Cum Laudel 1914: CE. 1915: IVIS. Ntassactrusetts tnstitute of Tcc11no1ogy 19111 Assistant in Sanitary Engineering and Assistant in Geo1ogy, Harvard University: First Lieutenant, U. S. Arrnyg S11e1r1on Travelling Fe11ows1'iip from Harvard. 1919g Associate Professor and Professor of 1"1yr1rau1ic anr1 Sanitary Engineering at University of Norttr Caro1ina, 1919-1932: Ctmief Engineer. Nort11 Caro1ina Geo1ogica1 Survey and its successor. North Caro1ina Department of Conservation anr1 Deve1opmc-nl, in charge of Xvater Resources and Engineering Division. 1920-1932: Professor of Hyriraulic anrt Sanitary Engineering, New York University since 19321 Associate Dean and Dean, Couege of Engineering New York University. 1955: Member, Nationa1 Xfvater Resources Committee, 1935-1 Consu1ting Engineer for Rocttefetter Foundation to Government ot Venezue1a. 1926-1927: Meminer American Nationa1 Committee, Xwortrt Power Conference: 1N1em1aer ot' A,S.C.E.p Member of American Vxfater Works Association: Ntember, Boston Society ot Civii Engineers: ixftemtzer. American Pu1J1ir 1'1ea1t11 Association: Member, Engineers C1u1i of New Yortcz Author of articles and papers in various scientinc journa1s and magazines, Engineering News-Record. Canactian Engineer, ,1ourna1 of American Xfvater XVor14s Association acl ottrers. 15 ARCHIBALD LEXVIS BCDUTON Dean Emeritus of the University CoIIege COLLINS PECHIN BLISS Dean Emeritus of IIN: CoIIege OI: Engineering 14 wr 'ff 1" 41 , - fiiqg' A,,fa1Qf:f,tL . -f".:Y,.,n'-.fn . 1' I1 I i I 1 ,,. 4, . 5. V E' I 1-, FF ' f -' ev. ,f A f V- ., -2 xy J ' Y' ' " 'T' 75, W. 2. ' : ' ,, , f, fn , ""gfi.? la , , ,N , 'r Q Q " l f' g-'-y, I I ' 5 1 , :H2'.',i5 76-I I f IQILZE ffl' If ' fl B Z 'I' , Q-1,155 I , In '.f'Q'-YW I I .E'z,,V2f' P1"" v ,Q I L . . - WA-.Jgp f. -ff S w- we-f"I1,.,-,f-f' .uI,a+,. ' ' .I w ,,:,,pf,.,1-If-'44 ..,.'aw:,f.fJ1:-ww.JNw'fvf'..fPf-:M 'I' -V w " . -1, ., . f ' . - v- - I -. A' I '- P- ' . ' .---,,,, Q.,,.d. asf .flwffffW"ffffm'1ffsf" if f' I2.54':'AAi'5i"'1f-'!'f""7"" 14' ' 0' X' A drawn ww I t-My I V4 vm! I mm,HAd,mvlW oy.-'Gigi MJ ,mlm A, A .. M.-.,.x.J.,M,,.,.,, XNILLIAM REIVHNGTON BRYANS Assislant Dean of the College of Engineering and Secretary of Lime Faculty XVILLIAM BUSH BAER Assistant Dean of the Univc-rsily College of Arls and Pure Science 'fu F .114 ,VY rdf, f Af --9 ,A-,,, A , I, . 4 ' ,, , -A J-'ffyf I! V' - ' 71:1 4' 5' A' '4 'V- K-' EDXVAR D C,-XSPfXRITSClA I AXXILIFIUTLIS ,lql'CClSLll'L'l' XVINTHRCP ROGERS Rl-XNNEY Secretary, University College 16 f QL , 3 'Y X , Q A V I f,,.gg,,. A 1' 2 13 " '5Wf??, R' ' -V . mv. aw 'ff J mm ag ,I ' --ff -- .:, 1 Q 1 ' 4 au- 5- .V ' qw - L 4 5+-LM, 1, Wh: if . ,- , -,K f ,,m.A, J- , -' ,'-L4 . Y - x , .52-I ' l g 7 5 .- ff,,,1fv Q ggi'-qfg, "1f'5,'-N:Z.3 ts 1 A 1fl1,,i.J - W ,, 1 ,, ' ffg-JeQ.,.f5 r , 1-. M 1 - ' ' , 1 ., - f::" Q.L"5'- " :.::.: . ",:. 'ziidf-,-.:, f 1. 1g.,.v2a. f' f, Q'--fw-2yg,.,f,f-.21fe1ysff'4MfG' ' .,: . f 7' ,. iw , f'fA'1,. . "M "' ---W 'f,S.Q,.iY-u5,L.,14jj,,, f -vl- , . - ' " ' ' ' ,:.1,- , .5 'ww' 'ww-A.-,Wx -' - -, - -1, f ' - IRVING H. BERG Chaplain LAURENCE LANGE Director of Admissions and Student Personnel , J 11' THE UNIVERSITY SENATE OFFICERS President - HARRY XVOODBURN CHASE, PIYD., L.H.D., LItt.D., LL.D. Vice President P- FRANK I-I. SOM MER, ID., LL.M., LL.D,, D.C.L. Secretory - PAUL NORTH RICE, AE., A.M. IHor1.j MEMBERS ADMINISTRATION I'IARRY XVOODBURN CHASE, CI1anceIIor MARSI-IALI, S. BROXVN, Deon of Faculties RUFUS D. SMITH, Provost PAUL N. RICE, Direclor of Ifle Libraries UNIVERSITY COLLEGE Dean IRVING H. DERG Professor JOSEPH H. PARK COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING DEAN TI-IORNDIKE SAVILLE Professor ITIENRY II. MASSON GRADUATE SCHOOL Dean JOHN MUSSER A Professor RICI-IARD COURANT SCHOOL OE EDUCATION Dean IIO1-IN W. WITHERS Professor IQALPH E. PICKETT SCHOOL OF LAW Dean FRANK H. SOMMER Professor FREDERICK II. DE SLOOVERS COLLEGE OE MEDICINE Dean CURIiIER MCEWEN Professor ROBERT K. CANNAN SCHOOL OF COMMERCE Dean JOHN T. IXTADDEN Professor CLEVELAND E. DACON XVASHINGTON SQ. COLLEGE Professor IAXRLEIGI-I E. WILLIAMS GRADUATE, SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Dean A. WELLINGTON TAYLOR Professor IVIAJOR B. FOSTER SCHOOL OE RETAILING Dean IVIORRIS A. BRISCO COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY Deon ALLEN T. IXIENVMAN Professor CLAUS E. HINCK SCHOOL OE ARCHITECTURE Dean E. RAYMOND DOSSANGE Professor DEWITT C. POND DIVISION OE GENERAL EDUCATION Deon NED H. DEARBORN HOESTRA COLLEGE Dean. PXRTI-IUR D. WHITMAN -4 ff- V I .Af Tx ' .MZ - ML 5979, ' . yfemaiif Wai' 3-jg, - In , ,,Li:.I'.s,2-jg iw .'. fl Y -,,1 i 'H 4 V? I 355'-JE? 1, ' I I 5 3: L- I , ' I h . .,.. ,gm-'-1 I , .1 'fr ' ' '11 I TIP' Ent If I ,-6 C gf gg I. 'I' ' I F I wa ' I V ..-49 I, . , A ' I V I . H W, - -.W V I . -I Ax 322 A WP.. . I I9 , Efi1.f" If? ' --f. WTP. A L , , .3.... vw. ig.-, -r -- kj. - I ,V f' .. - .. 'T Us 3 3 'I' Q r fr - .U-A. . . ' I ' " ' , ' 2 L "L, wif., 'v':.:.II ' ARTS AND SQIIENQES RICHARD PINKHAM 1'1ALL FA, EE, BAE. QE Associate Professor Hencterson-Brown. AB. 1919 AJV1. 1922, Ca1ifornia. PHD 1924 DANIEL LUDNVIG EE. BAE Associate Professor Ursinus. AB. 1925: Pcnnsyl Vanin, PHD. 1928 CPIARLES 1'1.WIl.LEX' EE, BAE Assistant Professor New York, AB. 1922, SUN 19211, PHD. 1929 C. M. 1'1ARROLD, JR. BAE Graduate Assistant XXIEIBEISJ1, AB. 1957 TI-IERON Q. ODLAUG BAE Graduate Assistant Luther Co11ege, AB, 1933 New York, MS. 1955 GEORGE OSTERMAN BAE Graduate Assistant' Vvashington and Jeffxerson AB. 1955,1V1.b. 1955 I'1ENRY W. SCI-IOENBORN BAE Grarfuute Assistant De Pauw, AB. 1935 JOHN LECOQ WILLIAMS BAE Graduate Assistant Berea, AB. 1957 BIOLQGY IJORACE W, STUNKARD CIJKCIF, QBK, EE, BAE IJIAOIUSSCI' Coe. SCB. 1912: 111inois. AAI. 1914.P11.D. 1916 QTTO M. HELFF TA, HF. EE, BAE Associate Professor New Hampstrire, Sc.B. 1921 Chicago, SCJVJ. 19223 Yi-11e 1925 CARL J. SANDSTROM KA, KIJBK. EE, BAE .-1ssistant Profssor Chicago, SEB. 1925: PhD 1929 C. C. GOODCHILD BAE Grmluate Assistant Xvcstminster, B51 1955 JOHN J. MILFORD, JR. BAE Gl'UCIllU19 Assistant Howard Couege, BS. 1955 LOUIS OLIVIER BAE, QIJBK Michigan, BS, 1956 KENNETH L. OSTERUD BAE, fIJBK Graduate Assistant Ranclotph-1V1acon Couege, AB. 1955 R. W. WILHELMI BAE Graduate Assistant Nebraska VVSSISYBH University. AB. 1955 JAMES 1-1. WILMOTH BAE Grartuate Assistant Ntonnwouth, BS. 1952 ,f rx 1 'Q Q If , ' - f "ff ,f 1 XL' 1. .5 , 35571, gg . , , Q A ,,,L ,tr ,' I """ ' 1 I '11 1 gn .w I f X 'S' fs 'V "T,1'i- 'fax xf V ' - I-F: -'lb 5' ' - Vt?" 7' '-Tijr "T w - ',J1,i 9- 511 f A CTU' - - -Jig... -Jiigff' 1 ' ' 1 ' K J ' Pj-YJHI' - - P - . 7 i i- gf-,,, ' ,, -, .1 M. -1742, ' If' . J' 1- H 1- F' ff' J3"1'J'J -f?'Cis - 7-1 - .E"ime62f'G-BN , 'z'.,Lw:2vs1,,Lfa -:-,M.L- -1114-f fm- 1.1-1.41121-V. Q. . . . -I-.-.-- V- sw H 4. ..,... 1 . ima' . 1 ARTHUR EDXVARD 1'1ILL ACID, EE, IA, CIJBK, QAT Professor New Yor14, SOB. 1901, SCN 1903: 1:rei1Jurg, 131'I,D. 190-1 .1OI-IN PAUL SIM MONS AKD, fI1AT Professor: Director 01 Nic11o1s 1.a1JOra1ory New Yor1:, SOB. 190-1, SCD 1910 JOHN ETTORE Ricci BAE, EE, QDBK, QDAT Assistant Professor New Yor1:, 13.5. 1926, A15 1923, P11.D. 1951 THOMAS W11.1DERS DYXYIS EE, CIDBK, 1IJAT Instructor New Yar1c, 13.5. 1925. 91.5 1926,P11.D. 1928 ROE ERT DAVIS BARROXVS SIJAT Graduate Assistant Trimiy, BS. 1957 GEORGE STONE DUR1-1iXBI QAT Graduate Assistant Recd Co11ege, AB. 1955 HARRIS 1... FRIEDMAN YIPAT Graduate Assistant New Yor1c, BS. in Chemistry 1934 171ENRY PRIMAKOFF CDBK Graduate Assistant Co1um1Jia, AB. 1935: A.1V1. 1936 'PBT FRANCIS PHILIP JAHN TAT, TBI-I Graduate Assistant B.S. in Ch. E. 1935 SIDNEY MAGRAM CIJAT Graduate Assistant Pittsburgh, BS. in Chemistry 1937 RICHARD F. REEVES Graduate Assistant Syracuse, AB. 1933 GLENN C. SOTH Graduate Assistant Reed. BA. 1937 KENNETH W. SAUNDERS Graduate Assistant Queens. BSC. 1936, MSC. 1937 CHEMISTRY ff 1 - .-.-, ,,, . HARRY G. 1.ilNDNVALL AXE,EE,1IDBK,fIJAT. TBII Associate Professor Yale, BS. 1925, PHD. 1926 1'1YMAN HENKIN KIJBK, TAT Graduate Assistant City CO11ege O1 New York. BS. in Chemistry 1936 GEORGE N. FERGUSON KIJAT Graduate Assistant 111inois, BS. 19311 LEONARD 1V1AY KDAT, TBII Graduate Assistant New Yor1c, BS. in C1115.. 1936 1V1.S. 1937 WI1.LIAM 1V1. WIDENOR TBQ Graduate Assistant Lafayette 15.5. in C12em. Engi- neering 1935g 1V1ic1c11e1Jury,1V1.S. 1937 ROBERT WINTERBOTTOM KIJAT, BAE Graduate Assistant New Yortc, BS. in Ctmemislry 1937 21 , "F-' RAEMER REX RENSHAW YDAF, EE, IA, KDBK. CDAT Professor Oregon, SOB. 1902. Sc.1V1 1905, Columbia, PhD. 1907 1'1ENRY AUSTIN TAYLOR EE, KIDAT Pl'0!CSSOt' 1.ivcrpoo1, SOB. 1920, P1'I.D 1922 T1-IOMAS 1V1. SMITH TAT .Assistant Professor KG1'11llC1Q', SOB. 1907: Chicago SQN1. 19151 New Yor1c, P11.D 1921 EDXVARD 11. DURI-IAM TAT tnstructor Rc-ec1, AB. 1924: Rire 1nsti- lule, 1N'1.A. 1928: 131113. 1930 RAYMOND B. CRANVFORD Graduate Assistant Xworcester 13O1yteC1IniC 1rIstif wie, BS. 1955, MS. 1955 CLARENCE 1. JOHNSON Graduate Assistant 1oWa, BA. 1937 ALVIN GORDON KIJAT Graduate Assistant Broo141yn Po1ytec11nic Sc11oo1 BS. 1rI Chemistry, 1957 KARL AC-UST HOLST Graduate Assistant Trir1ityg13.S. 19511, MS. 1957 HARRY KAPLAN KIJBK, TKA, KIJAT Graduate Assistant New York, BS. in Chemistry 1937 NORMAN QBED SMITH 'DAT Graduate Assistant 1V1arIito1Da. 15.5. 1935, MS 1936 A. R. SUSSERMAN CDAT Graduate Assistant City Co11ege of New York 13.5. 1934 MORRIS ZIFF EE, CIJBK Graduate Assistant New Yor1c, BS. 1934, P1113 1937 RICHARD B. 1V1ICLOT A Graduate Assistant St. Amtarose, AB. 1937 1 ai' 'Su ,L 1: if ,X-..,..... W if - h , . . W . I Fila I 4 1. Hg, . , , ' QNQ 1 Y ,1,i - , Q lip- : fi 1? .- f i.: - - 1 . ' ' 9 F! A - I , , I .f i urlli 'L -2 fi 4 ' I. H ' I up A - 3 r 2 I 5 it ' . f, 5-2 - V "" 1"-fs " ,.I ' 2'1" V' 'T if, 1 .,f ' . ' '. , 1, . 1' ' ' 5 r' - I " ' V 2' ,Z-'gr .III 4' " - fifff2-A ' . 11 'a?:-f-wwf --H2- 25 ' U' .. ' 'k ' " ' ' 1 R1 A - .-q 5 ...... -A ' ' -' "rf " 1" " "" " 'S - ' 2 .. . . 2 . . -5, 3 -Q 111-gems .k A X 'v 'PV . ,117 f' f -2 ARCH1BALD L. BOUTON AKEAIJBK Professor 1Direc1or of E1mer E11swort11 Brown House for Eng1is1i Stuc1iesJ Amherst. AB. 1896: Co1um- bra, MA. 1900: A11Jion, L1r1.D. 1922. ARTHUR 1-1. NASON AKE, QIJBK PVOIGSSOI' Bowdoin, A.B. 1899. BIA, 1903: Columbia, PhD. 1915. ATWOOD H. TOXVNSEND WT Assistant Professor New Yorti. AB. 1920, A.1X'1. 1925,P11.D. 1950 Q MA STAN LEY KIHBK Assistant Professor Texas, A.B. 1926: Harvard 1V1.A. 1928: Co1um11ia, PHD. 1956 MERLE M. BEVINGTON Instructor 1V1us1cingum, AB. 1922: C0- Iumhra, MA. 1927 R101-1ARD D. MALLERY WT, 1IJBK Instructor New York, A.B. 1928: Oxford BA. 1931,1V1.A. 1956 MORTIMER B. HOWELL ZW Instructor New Yortc, BS. 19275 Harvard AM. 1952 HARWAY KNOX WILSON Instructor New York, A.B. 1922: North- western, 1V1.A. 1928 ENGLISH WINTIYIROP R. RANNEY KKK, QBK Assistant Professor Dartmouth, A.B. 19223 Har- vard, 1923 Pr11L1P B. MCDONALD Associate Professor 1V1ic1'1igan Co11ege of Mines, E.1V1., 1910 22 Q 4 ALBERT S. BORGMAN CIJBK Professor 1V1ic11igan, A.B. 1911: Harvard, NIJA. 1912, 1919 CHARLES B. 1V11LL1CAN ACID, QDBK Associate Professor Emory. A.B. 19221 North Caro- 1inr1. 1V1.A. 1925: Harvard, A,1N'I. 1927, PhD. 1950 EDNVARD L. MCADAM, JR. KIDBK Assistant Professor Car1eton, B.A. 1927: Minneso- ta. MA. 1929: Yak, P11.D. 1956 NVILLIAM BUSH BAER AAKD, QBK Instructor Hami11on, A.B. 1924: Harvard, NIA. 1926 EDXVIN B. KNOXVLES, JR. WT. CIJBK Instructor VX-Ies1eyan, AB. 1924: New York, 1V1.A. 1928 PHILIP BABCOCK GOVE IIDFA Instructor Dar1moL1t:1'1, AB. 1922: Har- vard, 1V1.A. 1924 MILTON S. 1V1uLLOY Instructor Amherst. A.B. 1926: Harvard, A.1V1. 1929 J. WARREN KNEDLER, JR. Instructor Harvarct, AB. 1924, A.1V1. 1927, PILD. 1957 "' is-i"75""'fI1. . - ' K ., ' - .f' , f . 1 - 9 '. .V 1 ..,..,.. . 1 1:9 1? 15531 4' 1.5,x 1 5 'Y F' .- ' J,,,, M f -- , H Q 1- ,, v :T p r 7 , .9 1 '-Q-"""'-v 1 fr-W-Q. MPL' ,A , 15 1 11 "-fs 4 H ' ,, - 11 1211 . Jr .. - . 'f "-"'r'1 -111' '-M fr E47 i f-41115 'X-rv .- , .- Q 7' tl., '1'1'5 F is itwttfi- im ' ' . 1. 1 if 115'2." ' H T L- s w .. 1 Jr' 6 5-L2 h EiY43"'r::-.int-M5913 .214 XI' 3 ,X "R, mf 1 ffi ' ? 1 1 'fl 11 I 'i ' - " . ' f- '- 1""f H ' f- if-wf'f1':'f' fs-r- -:-':wf 1-'1f11:1f,.sR, . , -- - . .-,ff,.....5,.-itt":.,.':, .... 11' -"1 1 ' .- . ' v A " U , . " WW rf 'r THOMAS W. EDMONDSON IA. 'SIJBK Professor Emeritus London, AB. 1888: Cambridge, A.B. 1891. Clark.. PhD. 1896 DONALD A. FLANDERS Associate Professor Haverford, AB. 1922: Penn- sylvania. PILD. 1927 HERBERT H. PRIDE ZA. QBK Associate Professor Amherst, AB. 1915: New York. SCM. 1922, Ph.D. 1926 MATHEMATICS ' H. J. ECKWEILER, JR. Instructor New York, BS. 1928 FRANCIS C. HALL Instructor Co1umInia, BS. 1916, NIA. 1918 ARTHUR S. PETERS IA, TBH Instructor New York University. SOB. in E.E. 1929, MS. 1959. GEORGE M. ROBISON EE GEORGE A. YANOSIK I nstructor IA, -IJBK PERLEY L' THORNE Corne11,A.B. 1916. MA. 1917. Assistant Professor QAG, IA, QBK PILD- 1919 New York, SOB. 1918, CE. Professor 1919 COII3y, AB. 1907: New York. 1909 LEON GROPPER Instructor LOUIS DE RONDE Massachusetts Institute Tech- EE nology, SB. in Math, 1929. Assistant Professor PHD, Rensse1aer, CE. 1910: Har- vard. AM. 1926 JAMES J. STOKER, JR. EN, TBI-I FRED ASSADOURIAN Assistant Professor QBK Camegie Institute of Technol- 1 , , ogy, B.S. 1927, MS. 1951- gZ,i,uC?Z,r1c, BIS- 1955, MIS. TecI'1niscI'1eI'1ocI1scI1uIe, Zi1ricI'1. 1956 MatI1.D. 1956 25 X nge- in Q . -359 ff 7.7 . .X 'I' if -g,: I vQ "VK-My , ,X Y , 7 Y V !-rqg , . l iii-i 1 I ' . ' +- i f f" l ' vi Y , . ii . 'sf ' ' ' . ,,.,.. U, I 1 I A W' -JL S I.: 1 ALM, -xi-aww, 4-er A1 :I I I I , ...,.,, . . 'li' ALLAN C. G. MITCFIELL TBK. EE Associate Professor Virginia, BS. 1925, SCN 1924 Catitornia tnslitute ot Tecti no1ogy,P1'1.D. 1927 W11.1.IA1v1 PTENRY CTQEXNV FA, EE Associate Professor U. S. Navat Academy, 1922 Itotins Hoptcins, PHD. 1926 CARL TRUEBLOOD CHASE EZ Assistant Professor Princeton, BS. 19243 Catifor nia tnstitute O17 Technology MS. 1926: New York, P1I.D 1950 PTORACE V. N. 1T11LEERRY TA, EE Assistant Professor Q1Jer1in.A.B. 1921 JOHN LAWYER ROSE B91-I, EE Instructor Denison. BS. 1921: Ohio State, 1V1.A. 1925: New Yortc PHD. 1952 ROBERT N. VARNEY tnstrucior Catitornia, AB. 1951, A.M 1952. PHD. 1955 CHARLES A. BARTON Graduate Assistant Sottlwestem, BS. 1957 BOWEN C. DEES Graduate Assistant Mississippi, BA. 1957 CLIFFORD Cv. SHULL Graduate Assistant Camegie tnstitute of Tectmot- ogy, BS. 1957 L. M. LANGER Graduate Assistant New Yortc, BS. 1954 v PHYSICS ALLAN C. G. MITCI-IELL . DANIEL W.1'1ERING TA, EE. . Professor Emeritus, Curator ot . the James Arttiur Cottection of Time Pieces Yale. PHB. 18725 CE. 1578: Vvestern tvtarytanrt Cottage. . P1'I.D. 1895: Pittstuurgtl, 1.,.L.D. 1907: New York, L.1...D. 1916 - RICHARD T. COX QAK, QKT, EE, QBK Professor Jotms Hopkins, AB. 1920, PHD. 1924 OTTO HALPERN E2 Associate Professor Vienna, P1T.D. 1922 P. W. DOERMANN CIVBK Assistant Professor .1o11nS Hootcins, AB. 1925: Vienna, PHD. 1925 FRANK EVANS TVTYERS Assistant Professor Rc-oct Cottage, AB. 1927: New YorL,1N"1.Sc. 195O,P1I.D., 1954 M. 1-1. .TO1-INSONNTR. instructor Harvard AB. 1929, A.1X1. 1951. PHD. 1952 LOUIS PETER GIQANATH Instructor NfVastIington State Cottege. BS. 19252 New York, P11.D. 1951 MARTIN D. WHITAKER Instructor XVa1ce Forest, AB. 1926: Nortti Carotina, M.A. 1950. PHD. 1955 WILLIAM C. BRIGHT Graduate Assistant Frantctin and. Marstiatt, BS. 1957 CRAIG M. CRENSHAW Graduate Assistant Southwestern, BS. 1957 ARTHUR CHARLES WEID Graduate Assistant BS. Atatnama Polytechnic 1n- stitute, 1955 DAVID T. WILLIAMS Graduate Assistant Columbia, AB. 1950, A.M. 1955 ml? Q 1 ,... aw-1 115' 'V T Y f' A fi I1 I' 'P ' -N 1 . . ' A .4-",?.z. M, 9. 1 - f- A M. Z . , .15-4-f-rf-f---.eEE. . 4 .1 1 P? it 1. .af 1 15 -gf. . -129 1 2:- A-M 1513-. I 1 r 1' 1 1' ' ' . ' f " 'www .f . .V D 1 '1-fff ' 1 -f' '31 W- f U .Zi I If-151 'I ff i ow. f-1 P ' '- E ,t 11 1, 1 ' -- 514-4-1" 7 ' 31 ' i f i1"f: w1f -. 3411 ' lm' A ' 1' uw- .wwir 1 HUGH ELMER AGNENV BTE Professor of Marketing 1X'1ic11igan. AB. 1902: Hunl- ingron, L1rt.D. 1935 HERBERT M. SC1-HEFER BFE, AKW, AAE Professor of Finance New York, BCS. 1916, MBA. 1932 RAYMOND RODGERS Professor of Finance Kentucky, BA. in Eco. 1921: New York, M.B.A, 1925 JOHN 1'1ENRY PRIME Associate Professor of Market- ing PHD. DALE HOUGHTON Assistant Professor of Market ing New York, BCS. 1923, 1950: Co1um1Jia, A.M. 1933 MYRON W. WAT KINS TBK, A1-IZ, AACD Professor Michigan, AB. 19145 Corne11, PLD. 1917 FRED JAMES ELLERMAN AI-IZ Instructor Sout11Wes'l: Missouri State Teac11er's Co11ege AB. 1925, 1'1arvarc1, 1V1.A. 1957 1957 COMMERCE GEORGE R. COLLINS BFE, HKA, KIJBK Professor of fwarlzeiingg Direc- tor of College-Commerce Course 1V1aca1ester, AB. 1916, LED. 1954: Harvard, 1V1.A. 1920: New York, 1V1.B.A. 1922 GUSTAVUS TUCKERMAN ECONOMICS A. 1-1. ROSENKAMPFF BFE, AKW Professor of Accounting New York, BCS. 19103 State of New York, C.P.A. CLEVELAND E. BACON Senior Professor in cnurge of Instruction in the Law of Corn- mcrce and Finance VV'111iams, AB. 1898: New York, UB. 1900 EDXVARD GASPARITSCH KE, GJBK Associate Professor of Accounting New York, AB. 1915. 1V1.A. 1916. PhD. 191S,1V1.B.A. 1925 RUDOLPH F. BROSIUS Associate Professor of Business English Minnesota, AB. 19155 Wis- consin, A.M. 1921 GUSTAVUS TUCKERMAN Acting Cftczirrnan Assistant Professor Southwest 1V1issOuri. AB. 1925. 1V1.A. 1927 JOHN P. TROXELL KIJDT Instructor Washbum AB. 1920, Wis- consin, PHD. 1951 51-Q -were-. -- . ,. ' ' Cb?-I N- . ar. '- TN 2 'YE ' ft -' '-' ' .F ,43 .1 , .- , E153 -. 'll 1 'ig f .ax 'R ' , ,Iv 'kt 2 9 I k ,.i?r5'- M- 2 . ' -5 ',e7"'ff ig "' --Q 1. .L if ' L- A i,-'F 1' ...tm 1.-fel, If ,., J, - L- ,t .-,. - H 1 Q, 'J N , ,,. L. ,. ,Y 1. .1 , 15 . 1 . , . ,-, Q.. ,. 'ff - S ::- .- , ,zfjv 1 3 ff""r'. -,al-. '. if . - . , I A Y Y , -q-A va. -gw-v11-g- A -' I 1 ..... . 1:7 :v ,.1k...'..43f-7 :,.s:E W . - L. --it t :T L J Y gA 1 'I 7 ' 1" Y MURAT H.ROBERTS Assistant Professor Tennessee, AB. 19155 Prince ton, A.1V1. 1921: Ya1e, PHD. 1932 ERNST KOCH Insiruclor Penn State, AB. 1928. A.1x'1 1951. PhD. 1954 ROBERT ALLEN FIOYVKES Gracluale Assislant IIJBK New York. B.A. 195-41, 1X'1,A. 1955 HENRI C. OLINGER ATQ. KAII, QIJBK Associoie Professor Co1unI1Jia, BS. 1908, 1V1.A. 1915 FREDERICK F. FALES CIJBK Assisianf Professor New York, AB. 1925, 1V1.A. 1927 ROBERT E. QUINBY Insiruclor Harvard, AB. 19203 Perugia, DIp1omag New York, A.1V1. 1930 GERMAN l'1ENRY BRENNECKE EN, IIJBK Cfmirnmng Associule Professor CO1LlUl1J1H, AB. 1914, 1X'1.A. 1915: N1-W York. PIID. 1926 HARRY Cl .IFTON HEATON HAROLD F. H. LENZ Instructor New York. SOB. 1928. 1V1.A. 1930. Ph.D. 1954 FRANCIS JAY NOCK 'IJBK Insfrucior Haverforcl, AB. 1926: New York. MA. 1928, PHD. 1954 HARRY CLIFTON HEATON KIJBK Pl'Uf9SSOr Ya1e, AB, 19071 Co1um1Jia. Ph.D. 1916 JGSEP1-I A. VAETH Associale Professor Missouri, AB. 1905: Colum- bm, NA. 1912, PIID. 1917 RICI-IARD A. PARKER Assislcznl Professor Johns Hop1cir1s, AB. 19212 PHD. 1929 RQMANCELANGUAGES , J! qi j.'.,'Vb-' I MYVL, fr Q6 M ff' 1 , 111 5 11" M , lk .YAV U I., Hy. I I . f I . s., 11, --fv . ...K ,.. ,--.. H v x 1 1 ' 1 ! 11- ' ,L ' 4 - . .O I I Ji, . A U L1 ' 1' V.-V77 V' 1' 7' , if 7 'I Y . ""'TJ, I n A rx.. 1- Iflgflf .-flff z r nf 1 WM 5117: 1 I 11 1:1 111 .. 1' F I ,H . if .1 . . -, 1:91. 1 " '-'f'y'i',l1Z,g,'1:2!"f?2f2f' '-ff -'Iv -"' F 4:w:44-- - - E + - 11:4 THEODORE F. JONES AT, CDBK Professor, Dirvtior of 1l'L8 Gen oral Library 1'1z1rvarr.1, AB, 1906. PHD 1910 WESLEX' FRANK CRAvEN Associalo Professor Duke. AB. 1926: A.1X'1. 1927 COrne11, PHD. 1928 JAMES W. SNYDER, JR. TKE Irzsirucior PennSy1vania, AB. 1924: Now York, MA. 1929 EDWARD CONRAD SMITH B91-I. 'ZIPBK Professor VN7estV1rginia,A.B. 19155 Har varf.1, PHD, 1922 JESSE T. CARPENTER TKA, QIJBK Assistant Professor Duke, AB. 19205 1owa Slate. 1V1.A. 1926: 1'1arvarc1, P1'1.D. 1930 HISTCRY 21:41 ' 4:1 :.A:.1 im:-,V-. my-.v . MARS1-IAL1. S. BROWN ZW. CIDBK Professor Brown, 1311.111 1892. 1X'1.A. 1895: New York, 1...1'1.D. 1932 EDVVARD CONRAD SMITH PQLITICAL SCIENCE 27 JOSEPH H. PARK CIIBK Professor Co1um1Jia, AB. 1912, 1V1.A 1913, PHD. 1920 JVIARSHALL W. BALDWIN AAT, YIFBK fhsisfant Professor CO1urn1Jia, AB. 1924: Prince- Lon, 1V1.A. 1926, PHD. 1934 FRANKLIN LEV. BAUMER lnslrucior YALE, BA. 1954: PHD, 1938 ARNOLD JOHN ZURCHER QBIK Associole Professor O19er11n, AB. 1924: Corne11 1V1.A. 1926: Princeton. PHD 1928 CLARENCE H. YARROW lnslructor Corne11, BA. 1931 .rim-115-A A I V ,L - . .114 mm ...L 1 1? 'M ., ...V -N-.. f I' '11 'T 1' ' 1: -' ff. I Rm", . .1 1 .1 1 1 - 'f .sl I-Y. 'I' 1- f A 3 ...V ' 1 , 1-' 'V f' A '1' 31 53-,4A.2.u. ,. fi 1-27 ' 'J J-I 13,51 . JL - 1 'UIQ - - 1 J' ..." ' .... ' 1 ' ' ' 1' ' I-5' C H "C V 'Y " band... 1,-1-5,5.,.,':2gigfra-mn,-W --9:-,,:1.,,:q..,.-,.,,,,.:,.... ., sz 1-S--,fr-, -.1..,:::-:Ea'.-R-'-51",f . - - --ff ff -' f '- ir . 1, J ,jg h fl , ,. ' ""-th f Ni! :Aa ,y .,..,..,1- Q LOUIS WILIDIAB1 MAX EE. IIDBK. YPA Associale Professor Johns 1'1op14ins, AB. 1923. P11.D. 1927, Na1iona1 Resear1'1x 1:e11Ow. 192T-Q9 1V1ALCOLM fx. CAN1PB ELL 1-PX Inslruclor Recd CO110ge. AB. 1928: Oro- gon, A.1V1. 1950: Slan1orc1 PHD. 1955 B. R. SAPPENFIELD IPX Grmifualo Assislanf De Pnuw, AB. 1955 ALFRED M. GREENFIELD Associate Professor 1ns1i1u1e O13 1V1usica1 Art, 1925 WIL1.ARD XZAN WOERT Instruclor New York, AB. 1928: Union TneO1ogica1 Seminary, 1V1.S.1V1. 1931 if yi 12.9.1 '1' 1- W1 1.'TE'.'- .1 . . 1 1 1 " Q I mas-M541-, 1' Q1 1-wp-1 .1 1 - 1... A 1 1 JL 11 1 H 1-:1,w1!w17f'rP""'f.f11 . 2 - 1 PSYCHOLCDGY DOUGI.1XS 1'1ENRY FRYER AII Z. WX Associalv Professor Spring11v1c1, 1311. 1914: C1ar1a. MA. 1917. PHD. 1925 ALFRED GREENFIELD MUSIC "f""'-4 ., fffffgvxm.. M 111141. "ii 1 1 EDXVIN RUTHVAN HENRY KAH, HKA, KIJAK. WX .-1551510111 Professor Kansas Stale Teac11er's Co11ege. BS. in Ed. 1928: Ohio Stare MA. 1929, P11.D. 1951 RAYMOND P. ABBATE WX Grad 1111 l12.41ssis1unl N. Y. U., BS. 1936 M. Y. 1X'1CCOI1'I1C'Ii WX Glnclunle Assislant Maine, AB. 1955: A.1X'1. 1936 1'1AROLD HEERE MANS Inslrucior MAUREI. I'1UNKINS lnslructor Cahfornia, A.1V1. 1927 5 , aim., . ,L E 124- w lw r .. 1 .21-.1 f -. j 1" ,,,11:,v1- . Sg"g3fy-""f-'-ff ' 5 1 . 1 ,yggr ' .19 4 -' '. , gf ' la l ' ,1iS2,4j- fz n gl' - A 1'.-1211" 1'?1'J""7 ' , -951 "'-if-'W71 wi'Ii'?'S 'A- C. VAN DE VVALL lnstructor New York Univcrsily, IKM. 1930 ELMER E. NYBERG Assistant Professor Nlacalesker, AB. 1922: consin, VLA. 1926 RALPH MAX Z1NK 11936-371 Instructor N. Y. U.. BS. 1955 1. 'ig - ', ,.- -X'-1' 3 " -- , , 4,...-i Dm ITRIS T. TSE LOS Instructor Chicago, PHB. 1926. A.1V1 1928: Princeton, ABI. 1929 MFA. 1931, Ph.D. 1933 E. MOTTERSHEAD, 111 H KA. KIJBK Instructor Macalester AB. 1937. DEAN FARNSNVORTH Instructor Southwestern. AB. 1924 Northwestern, M.A. 1929 ., .- 5 .4QL..,ak - 'I ' 7 7 ! edztr IVIILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS IVIARLIN CLACIQ IVIARTIN Assistant Professor IVIajor Infantry, US. Army C31-IARLES F. F. COOPER Assislcmi Professor IVIaiOr, Infantry, U. S. Army WALTER C. RATHBONE LLB. Assislant Professor Major, Infantry, U. S. Army HOWARD G. CANN CDFA Assisiant Professor and Direc- tor of Physical Training University I'IeigI1ts, New York, BS. 1920 F. V. S. CI-'IAMBERLAIN Professor COIODIII, InIanIry, US. Army IIOXNARD G. CANN A. DONALD CAMERON Assistant Professor Major, Infantry, U. S. Army DrXVID A. NEWCOMER Assistant Professor Captain, Engineers, U. S. Army NV. F. M. LONGWELL I-Issislcmt Professor Captain, Engineers, U. S. Army WILLIAM E. RACIICOT Irisirucfor PHYSICAL TRAINING 30 aflbk I4 """ ' tl. If " ' " I IA ' : :'?'1H'f ' , -i, . I ,I W , if --I gQ.,:". . , I 1- f A F . .. , 'f-A In 1, A . ' E YY ' I. 5 I 4- , I V A F If I ' I - 1-' I 'I "1'AI "f n'3'5cl'z: EI ' " is I I- L S '5'55'Z""'ir ' ' 'UF I HENRY PRATT FAIRCHILD 'IPBK Professor Doane, AB. 1900: Ya1e. PHD. 1909: Doane, LLD. 1950 WILLIAM C. SWABEY Associate Professor Stanford, AB. 19155 Come11, PhD. 1919 SOCIOLQGY HENRY PRNIVI' FAIRCHILD VVILLIAM C. SVVABEY PHILOSCDPHY RAY ERXVIN BABER Professor Campheu, AB. 1915. A.M. 19205 NVisconsin, 1311.131 1923 HARMON 1V1. CHAPMAN Assistant Professor Ohio State, AB. 1922: Uni- versity of Cregon A.1V1. 1923: 1'1arvarC1, PHD. 1935 if . T R X. N , s , ' .yww 1, - 1 x s I ' Q K , 1. 1-W., ,V -V Y "X- J , A if 1. 1 ,. 4 r 1 -1 'H ' . . ,Az . A .CW -' BS - " 'U . ar- A . A V , ,, - - V, i., if -nf '1 . r , 1 ,. 7 -A . Ts 1 , .L '.-- . M- W! if .5.-.V - 1 f ' " 0- fi-'5 91. -W ' V "1 - . F "WI ' ' 1 I " ' ' 4: " N' ' V -' ' . A 'M ' " ' if ' !"' " ' 5 V 1 .,,...,.,.., ,4,. . . ..,.,.,.,,.V.,...,.., ..., , ., . , , , , 2, X f . JOSEPH E. WOODb1zXN CDBK, IA, I-IKA. TBH Professor: Direrlor Of 1110 Gvo- Iogicul 1X1uscurn HarvarQ, SOB. 1896, ,XM 1900, BOD. 190.2 CLAUDE M. ROBERTS ITlS1l'UC107' Hiram, AB, 191293 New York SC.M. 1950 ALBERT BILLI-IEIM ER QBK Associaie Professor GCUyS1Jllrg. AB. 1906g Prince- 1on,P1T.D. 1917 WILLIAM ISIARRIS STAHI- HKA lnsirucior New York, 1929, 1930, PHD. 19541 6: 1, .qv .l .1 - f,,.1,... . I - V,-5.-. 1.11 H I .a.- , ,,. GEQLOGY JOSEPH E. XVOODMAN R. VAN D. MAGOFFIN CLASSICS ,.-I, wiv M ff--QA Swzmm, I!! ERNEST R. LILLEY IA Professor New York, 1917, 1918, SCD. 1921 LOUIS C.15I.-XRLENE Gruzfunle Assisiont New York. SOB. 1955 R. VAN D. NIAGOFFIN QAK, TAI-I, QBK Professor Michigan, AB. 1902: Johns Hopkins. PHD. 1908: Wash- ington, ULD. 1922 ERNEST G. SIHLER P1'OfCSSOI'E17'LQ1'ffUS .1o1mS 1'1op1cins, PhD, 1878: Lafayette, 1.ilt.D. 1915 .. 1 . . ,'1, . ,rr 'f' --1 ,f -,1,y.,fg,, -,mf .- .fz Vw " H 1. .4 me-' V , , ,, A , ' M!- 1 .H ip 5, 4, 'fin i X' , 1 . 2. I -,. ., .M Y I. , V , . ., ,,,jw:,.?,mW-,xn Zu 5. 2 'Lf ry - H 1 ,gg-,1 51' 7' 11 11, 'f""', in I . aw, .... ' V K Mar Wy. . H 15 I A ww lil. 6.35 1, M. , 1 . . , fp V' ' fl 'H ' """' 1 25 7, , ' 5 T WSW., ,,2a.i1.f...3".' -V ""'-'0""frW ': K E. .. . 'F "W ' "ff, n BKl 1 4'f.,.... ,, Q . M-. 1.1115 .Ja-I -. - ' V - -A . -.-61S.1.,35,.. n,m.3.,,,,,g,S . ,Q QQLLMBE QF ENQHNEENNQ3 ALEXANDER KLEIVIIN IA. 211' Professor in Charge of the Aeronautical Research Laboratories London, SCB. 1908: IVIIT. Sc.M. 19143 Kenyon CoIIege LED. 19311 JAMES M. COBURN Assistant Professor of Air Transport Yale, PILB. 1914 ALEXANDER TROSI-IKIN Instructor BS. in ME. 1951 SIDNEY M. SEREBRENY Instructor in Aeronautical Mvateorology New York, BS.: BS. in Edu- cation I-IENRY JAMES MASSON KIJEK. EE, CDAT, IA, TBH Professor CoIumIJia, CEE. 1914, A.M, 1916, New York, SEM. 1915, PIID. 1918 ROBERT TREYBAL TBH. IA, CIJAT Instructor BS. in CILE. 1955, MS. 1956 AERGNAUTCIAL ENGINEERING ALEXANDER KLEMIN HENRY J. MASSON CHEMICAL ENGINEERING FRED,K K. TEICHMANN IA. TBH Assistant Professor New York, Aero. E. 1928 BrooIcIyn PoIytec1Inic, M.M.E. 1935 ATHELSTAN E. SPILHAUS 1-Issisiant Professor of Ateterology IN'I.I.T.. MS. EVERETT E. SCHAEEFER Instructor New York, BS. in IVIE. 1950 Aero E. 1951 PHILIP L. MICHEL Grartualc Assistant ES. in AeronauticaI Engineer mg 1957 JO1-IN R. I'IUFFIvIAN AXE, EE, FA Sigma Nu, Assistant Professor Yale, BS. 1926, PHD. 1930 FRED C. FAIR QAT Instructor Carnegie Institute of TecI1noI- ogy, ES. 19191 Columbia, X-XM. 19235 New York, PILD. 1954 9 94 gig, A,- -- 'Lf' ' .2 Y 'N - 4 ,JJ ' , 'f ' N 4, Q ' ' ,fi , " HV? ,,ffg:i'E. X' f . ,M - -.f ' ' .7 ftfflfffi 'lie' E 1 -- ,- -. - -A 'N "' ' V' ,, ...-9f.....,. - I -E -I- -'frffd' W ff." I. 1 'H-ff: -,Q 4' - EM' ' .-IM 'Ny 1 1-1-'?I'f:. , 1 -- 'I . 1 M. vw, vw 'ai' t, H rg 5 - ,, 6:3 I . , I g, I. .U up 19, 1, - I K -. 3 - . g,,:g5,f1,-, f ., "" ----- ...,- .,...1., f - '- " 1' f' - A 1 - - 1 1 rw , ' , wuz fr- ..,, , ,- ,. - 1.--if -A 1' F IT ' .4 H 1:1 1 ' -'-' ff"r1 ,s' y A - 'iff 1 21'-CM ' H 1 ' ' 5nI,.,.,fai-A I2 ',-,wa 1- ' HL -,.. ,... A , CHARLES HENRY SNOW ACD. CIJBK, IA Professor Emeritus New York, CE. 1886: Pitts- burgh. SED. 1895 DOUGLAS S. TRONVBRIDGE IA, TBI-I Professor of Surveying: As- sistant to Director of Evening Division, College of Engineer- ing New Yor1c 1910, Sc.1V1. 1914 LEWIS V. CARPENTER Professor of Sanitary Engineering West Virginia, BS. 1918, 1V1.S. 1925 MS in Sanitar En in- , . . y g eering 1926 FERDINAND L. SINGER Instructor IA, TBH N. Y. U., BS. in ME. 1925. M.S. 1954 STAN FRANZ YASINES Instructor Syracuse, CE. 1928: N. Y. U., CE. 1931, U. of 1V1ic11igan. 1957 THEODORE A. BRIGANTI Graftuate Assistant New York. BS. in CE.. 1956 CIVIL ENGINEERING THORNDYKE SAVILLE KIJBK, EE, IA, TBH Dean of Cottage of Engineer- ing: Professor of Hyotruutic and Sanitary Engineering 1'1arvarc1. AB. 1914. NIS. 19173 Dartmouth, CE. 1915. MI.T.. MS., 1917 55 CARL T. SCI-IWARZE ECIJE. IA, TBH Professor I.cI11gh. SEB. 1905, C.E. 1905 1'1AROLD E. XVESSMAN Professor of Structural Engineering University of 111inois. BS. 192-1. MS. 1925. C.E. 1929, 1956 1'1ENRY ELTINGE BREED IA, TBH Assistant professor of Highway Engineering Co1gake, BS. 1900, SOD. 1925 LLOYD RICHARD SETTER Instructor in Sanitary Engineering Vvisconsin, BA., 1928: Rut- gers, 1V1.S. 1929: PhD. 1932 JOHN K. VENNARD EE. ARH, XE Instructor M. 1. T., SB. 193O,S.1V1. 1932 ARCI-IIE M. ER1C1csON Lecturer, Structural Engineering BS. in CE. FRED KUNITZKY Graduate Assistant New York, BS. in CE. 1937 4121- ff .FW ' af,-w -'W '- -1 ,. . -' ' ' '. 1 1 '1 AG ' A 1 1 if f f .fi .lf f . ' 1 ., . -. . ff' . " A ' 'qn ' '- . ' " ' ,Y ' , --,,. 5 31 . .1 'ff V A Z .,-5,-5. . .. Ai . . V , X ' - 1 ' v j - F r P 0 - A -' har-If me 1 f A A M1 A ' 9. ' YE- J 1 A F1 1 A : A fi iw. -:mi . A ,,.,,,VM M., .,.. . .. ...f.,.:f.,. . ,. .v., ., .E -. , 7, . ,. , . , . 1. . ,.. . . f. arf' ' '- 1 . . . . "' -' .'ftf-- -' ' v-- . . 2. . .... N A ' ' 1 L'."'f" " 7 ' ' ' ' A ' ' ' RICHARD E. BROWN EKN. TBH, IA Associate Professor I.eI'IigII, EE. 1910: CorneII. IVI.IVI.E. 1916 HARR3' NELSON WALKER QIH, IA, TBH Asssitant Professor, Supervisor of EIeciricaI I.aEoralories BrooIcIyn PoIy1ecIInic, EE. 1926. MS. 1937 ALEXANDER SENAUKE IA, TBI-I Assistant Professor, Lecturer on Aircraft Radio New York, IXIE. 1922, EE. 1926 PHILIP GREENSTEIN Instructor New YorIc, BS. in EE. 1927 HEBER DUNHAM Professor Purdue, BS. in IVIE. 1909 EDWARD C. LA VALLEY Instructor New York, BS. in C. E. 1929. 1931 ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING RICHARD E. BROXVN HEBER DUN I-IAM ENGINEERING DRAWIN G SAMPSON KIRBY BARRET ZIP, IA. TBH Assistant Dean, in charge of Evening Division: Professor BrooIcIyn PoIytecI'1nic, EE.. 1910 PAUL C. CIROMNVELL Assistant Professor Camegie Tech., BS. in EE. 19241 New York, IVIS. 1955 HAROLD TORGERSEN IA, TBH Instructor New York, in 1929 XVILLIAM A. PETRASEK TBI-I, IA Assistant New York, BS. in 1955 LAWTON IVI. PATTEN Instructor University of Washington, B.F.A. 19528: CoIumIJia. B.- ArcII. 1955 JAMES R. REYNOLDS Gmciuate Assistant New York, BS. in ME. 1956 36 f "D '3 4' JJ" It I ' - H ,... ,I Mme, ,. -, if' ' - .-.17 P . . - WW . . 1 I ' - - A f . I f- "ff L '- . I ' I I 1 L- . If -I ,. ,. MI. . . , QM I Q I. f-, .If www yi, ,. ' I I. 1 I A 'f 'ff H . fi' , - I . -f .I Q' p ., f,, A A Q - R , I V - bhI3s.f..EiQ , 'fll' . ffr 'F' I. ff 3 Y F 1, .csc -fit 1 I.-5-A Is It 9 , I . , I ff ,, HA, .r V- -Im r f iw' W, f' A R- gf ,Kg F F ' H 'I ,E 4, M . , 1- I H:- 1, "2 ' 3- 'I 'dflfl' " . ,, ,. :...:.::-wg,..C- ,f I LEON PRATT ALFORD EE Professor of Administrative En- gineering Xvorceslcr PoIyIec1Inic, BS. in EE. 1896, BS. in ME. 1905 CIIARLES W. IDYTLE .-. Z.: Associate Professor: Director of Inztustriat Cooperation Cincinnati, IVIE. 1913 ANDREW I. PETERSON Assistant Professor New York, BS. 1922, IVIE. 1925 ROBERT HENRIWEILLS Lecturer in Inzfuslriat Analysis anrt Accounting Problems N. Y. U., BS. in IE. 1924 WILLIAM R. DRYANS IA, TBII Professor of Engineering NIG- ctianicsg Assistant Dean, Sec- retary of the Faculty New York, PLS. 1906, IVLE. 1908 COLLINS PECHIN BLISS IA, TBII Dean Emeritus Princeton, IDILB. 18911 CoIum- bm, AB. 1838. AM. 1891 JAXRTI-IUR C. COONRADT IA. TBH Associate Professor: Chairman, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering Stanford, BA. in IVLE. 1909: New York, Aero. E. 1928 IVIARIO CARL GIANNINI Assistant Professor N. Y., BS. 1925 L. IVIOROAN PORTER EE, TBII Assistant Professor YaIe, BS. 1924, 1925. IVIE. 1926 JOHN GREGG BARRIE IA Instructor New York, BS. in IVIE. 1930 INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING LEON P. ALFORD XVILLIAIVI R. BRYANS MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 57 , l ,,L..i:1Q. .swf ..,---5, H JOSEPH WICKHAM ROE EE, IA, TBII Prof asso It Emeritus Yale, PIIB. 1895, ME. 1907 DAVID BURR PORTER EE, IA, TBI-I Associate Professor Yale, PIIB. 19111 CARLOS DE ZAFRA Assistant Professor: Assistant Curator of the farnes Arthur collection of Cloclzs and IVatctIes New Yorti, BS. 1904, IVIE. 19083 Director of the Gage Laboratory' .IO1-IN IVI. LABBERTON IDBK Professor, University of North Carotina BS. in E.E. 1915 C1'IAR1.ES EDWARD GUS IA, TBII Associate Professor at Engineer- ing twectianics: Assistant Di- rector of Evening Division: Executive Secretary, College of Engineering New York, BS., 1925. IVIE. 1924 ERWIN I'IUG1-I HAMILTON IA. TBII Associate Professor: Supervisor ot Alccnanicat Laboratory New Yortc, BS., 1918, IVI.E. 1919 FERDINAND L. SINGER IA, TBI-I Instructor New YOIIQ, BS. in IVIE.. 1927. MS. 1935 DONATO L. RUSSELL Instructor COII.ImIJia, BS. 1923: CoIum- Inia SCIOIOOI of IVIines, ELIVI. 1925: New York. CE. 1953. .. ,,.I. r . fx , ., Ig' 'I ". ,."--232 A '15, .QI mi M.. , - -I H I I I A A , y 1 . I r f xx f fl iigi , V , - I i. 7- A z .. fl! . ..J " "' ' If . . fr-It i . V - It "I gk H ' "It ' ' " 1- .. , I- . -w: s, , , ,., , '71, -If - :,. . A v -. -, V II., ,V . , A ' '- .- ,, , . .., I ifaw-2529 ,D ,s .. 'mwah-iw A' JI.. "- .- --1 ' " r 1- -- -rr -4 3 1 'I I' AM . . Z. . .A - if-fn ' , . ..,.-. .. ...Q .V , 4 , , Y hh L-Q' . f- W. .. - w'a9? f. - if--. " It 1 A - 1 'I . 1 4.'-alzifzia-1 ffv.yI1 . 31- as-1-if-1 QLASSES President Vice-President Secretary Historian ,aa . LAURENCE LUSTIG CLASS QF 1958 41 QN. ., oxrgs- :V . , M,4nln.,,, .143 Laurenceloushg Monroe Aboloff XfRiorfXhcheck Milton J uoov y '3?1f'!!" 't - in LANVRENCE LUSTIG MONROE ABELOFF SENIQR CLASS T is a dithcutt feat of imagination indeed to see in the mature and dignified Seniors ot today the eager, ehutiient madcap spirits that descended on the Heights Campus in Septemher of 1954. The men who were then rather uninformed novitiates have been during their upperciass years potent and moving forces in student activities. The Class of 1958 went through its First year in an eager hut seemingly uninspired manner. Led in its First year hy Bots Wiener, in its second hy Bitt Chayefsiqy and in its third hy Arty Miller, the Class approached the Final lap with a tre- mendous amount ot potential energy and a record of good hut average achievements. The Class of 1938 approached its Senior Year with the siogan of its Ctass President, Larry Lustig -4 One Good Year - Fixed tirmty in mind. And one good year it was indeed. The scholastic Senior Year started ott in fine way with a Weit- organized Bloody Thursday under the chairman- ship ot' Joe Sonnenreich and was continued in the same vein hy Herh Bungard with an equaity Weit- run Dueling. The Seniors seemed welt on their Way to that Hone good year.H The social season was given a hne send-oft with a new Campus in- novation that seems destined to hecome a tradition - The Senior Party. Chairman Norton Zavon and his committee which inciuded Ralph Weii, Bob Ratner and Stan Gladstone received Welt merited praise and credit for the tremendous ici- nanciat as wett as social success of the First Senior Party. Ptans were immediately gotten under Way for a Second Senior Party during the Spring Semester. In the Lihrary Check-room ,37 left a permanent record of its stay on the campus hy presenting the University with hrass tags carrying the unani- mous Campusxs sentiment -1 Hats oict to the Class of 758. Howard Kaptan headed the Gift Committee. The Second Senior Party dupiicated the Icirst in every Way. Due to the Fine Work of Chairman Nat Fishman and a committee, the affair was a grand social and financial success. ' f 4: ,.,:2fff Ja. gygi.,.s? -,W 4 . J ff ' . -fe , 7 'g f 15 ,. "f . , mv-if "F m eg rpg, 1-. iv' -'fe' 1 "T3'.Z. g . Z9 If" '41,-.,.'U'.I'q V254 m.-4,1 re V -5 fiaig ' t "' tii 1 4 , ,,, it! i . V i ii -. tl ii f' f ffi VI ' ' ' ' . ' AW Ili' iran .--.'?'I',fl5E" ' ' -,ii -Mg.i7 2LfIff1i'3 . . 4 Y- ..,.. --is .,.f..:1f. E' 'f"',1L,.:2. M235 'ffiafrfw-2234i77:E15zt?mW' MRM- :I ' " " tn athtetics, ,38 contrihuted a good deal to University Sportsdom. On the Gridiron -H Mitt Miller and Bernie Bloom. Cn the Court - Irv Xfvitty. Cn the Fencing Strips - Joe Sonnenreich and Dick Nusshaum. In a class reptete with leadership, there were several standout men on the Heights. Among them were President Larry Lustig, Captain Paul H. Kahan of the Debating Team, Editor Bch Ratner of the Violet, Vice-President Herh Brown ot the Student Council, Editor Joe Sonnenreich of the Medley, Chairman Dave Gotdtcnopf of the A.S.U., Chairman Stan Gladstone of Lawrence House, President Howard Kaplan of Adam Society, and President Les Fiedter of Perstare and Praestare. Working together for new and tiherat reforms in student government, these hecame jotqingty known as 'fthe interlocking directoraten and won the respect and admiration of the entire student hody. Four years had passed since the hatcyon days of Septemher, 1954, four years marked with new de- velopments in a fermenting world. To the Ctass of 1938, those four years had heen years that meant the gaining of a mental and spiritual stature and maturity. It was a successful Class, one with a record of past undergraduate achievement and highest hopes for the future, that came to Senior Week. The Seniors danced at the Senior Batt at the Essex House under Chairmen Ahraham Tan- nenhaum and Stanley Levien and again on the SS. Peter Stuyvesant as it sailed up the Hudson with UStcipperH Githert Goodgion. The Senior Stag Dinner with Irv tsraet as chairman completed an evening which had started with Jerry Zunacht as chairman of the new Senior Theatre Party. The Uto-he-graduatesn recatted four years of friendship and hard Wortc and comaraderie and vowed to keep alive the ctass spirit which flamed so high in that Hone good yearn, Class Day, with Paul Kahan as chairman, ended the stay of the class at the Heights. The exercises were marked hy the presen- tation of awards to Mrs. Frantdin D. Roosevelt and Rohert Moses. 45 VICTOR ALTCHEK MILTGN JUCOVY T X X Z -V ' "ib""'3e-- fa ' ' K k U 'fre X give 5 ,, .Y H ,s - I ' 1 . -M' or . -sa' ' N7 " if ,. f mtv. V ' - if A- .- . A - , 'L My i T 5: I- 1. ,- - . - . 'F ' - Q , .... v ' H WW -'." L, 'e "F?'i'f,'E:2"' " .. kr' Y4:,,.'s.- 12 "si '. ' fir 1 . . .:..i. ' ' ., " -f . ' 4 ' lVlONROE JAY ABELOFF Arts New Yorlc, N. Y. Zeta Beta Tau: Vice Presiclent ot' Senior Class: Historian, Sophomore Class, Junior Class: Fraternity Editor, Violelg Chairman, Ring Committee: Pulisanles Honcltzoole, HERBERT ABRAMS Aris - Commerce New York, N. Y. Captain, Tennis: Freshman Baslcet Ball: University College Basketball: Presiclent, Hamilton Commerce Society. ELIAS ADLER Arls New Yorlc, N. Y. Ptii Sigma Delta: Freslwman Footlwallz Frestimaii Baseball: .lunior Prom Committee: lvlall Committee: Lawrence House Committee: Sturlent Faculty Relations Committee: Senior Duclcing Committee: lntramurals. PAUL AGNANO Engineering Arclsley, N. Y. President, A. S. C. E.: Undergraduate Engineering Council: Society ot Testing Materials: Newman Clutn, Engineering Demonstration Day Committee: Junior Prom Committee. Vicroiz S. ALTC1-IEK Arts New Yorlc, N. Y. Secretary, Senior Class: Duclcing Committee: Heiglits Literary Union: Ptlilosopliy Clulo: Sociology Clutz. MILTON AMSEL Arts New Yorlc, N. Y. University Bancl: Franlcwood Vvyilliams Society: University Cvlee Clulo: Cliapel Clioir: Lawrence House Forums Committee: Chapel Program Committee: Sociology Club: Heights News: Mall and Duclcing Committees. 441 1 .fx ,- . - ., ,I ,W-A I. ,Z A 0,1 'K any 2+- . f, f Jar' ,il g 1 , 'I 1. Y- ' ""4 H I . MN,,.ff7h':3z-,rebar rf'-f 'gf e 1 ' f. i' '-'-' 1 . ,,, :.Mf..s,. ' get l Wulf. 1 ' 59572 lil: : . 4 2941 2 l V L ? I fl Q ffl- 31- NN" ... W - : M .J ',' ' W?3,3h,,?:- EJ Wea- ,W 5 3 .5 5 ISI. X ? I Q It I' It 1 V X .. V , . 4 My :L zf.-:NJ .QI It g , A' WQQZ4' A r. . ' .1 . -- -r ' .- . ' f ,- - 7 .5 y sf is V ' V Y, 2 sw.-' "'-I - ir ' ,sf .' Q- 7--.5 YW LK ttf: r- 1155512 -we-': uri, .5 ,wail 51 V ., , ' , . ' ,4 ' -5 1752 ,'f ' I H, 1:41 V , 1 : V CT -Lf . - - rg, - . . q. rw ,qi -1 , e :.".g.. . . r:.,....,. : .ff 4-1 . f- f'iA r: , i ffs ' IJ' it s Hu' W ' f-'f HU ' fm, ff! JZ, f f 15 7 K all fin p it f K V ' 'f 3 5 F gl 3 ""' ' '- SAMUEL ANFANG Arts New York, N. Y. Sociology Society: Ducking Committee. BERNARD APFELBAUM Arts Vxfeelmawken, N. J. Heigtits News: Frankwoocl Vxfilliams Society: Cliess ancl Cliecker Clulwg ltleclley: Senior Ball Committee. HOWARD l'l. ASH Engineering New York, N. Y. Perstare Et Praestare: Eclitor. Quadrangle: Clwairman, Sophomore Prom Committee: .lunior Prom. Committee: l. Ae. S.: A. S. M. E. fAerol: Heights News. JULIUS BADER Engineering Brooklyn, N. Y. BERNARD G. BALLER Arts New York, N. Y. Tau Epsilon Phi: l-leigloits lntramural Boarcl: Skull and Bones: lxflall Committee: .lunior Prom Committee. STANLEY BARASH Aris New York, N. Y. Olkice Manager, Medley: Lawrence House Forums Committee: Hall ol Fame Players: .lunior Prom Committee: Frosli Prom Committee: Sociology Clula. 415 .152 -1-S X - 'N fr I I Q 'A .7 -. ' I V , V ' S- QA? t , . f' Xiwifia . - " , f' - ' ' ' l .I ' " ' , ', , if JP I tj , , 'I ,- fx. I ,Qu , 1 . L I-it f -gf n Q In r ,Y . E I I I I Af. , - i A 4 I- . I , , , 5 . . - I 1 , I nl X gf Q : .?l.'.: , K- "' ' 4 '37 I 'A ' ' 7 ' . ' " gf: -1 ' Q ., l . 'f Ls Y bv ' l Y ll . " Y V' . ' A r . r -. If . ' .1 r "- . ' 1 1. "Ji ' -- -1 -'ill ' Ili 'h,. -: ' .Im-A' .A If.-i-I--v :,'II I 1 . I -J ' rr . - - ' 'I - I , . 1 E 1 C' I H I pf .- A -, .V - - n . fvzigig, U -.,I , II I . in UI I4 XIX -III ,?IIv'Y,?.I, . ACI-IILLE BARBERO Engineering MITCHEL BARNETT Arls Junior Prom Committee: Senior Ball Committee: Cleo Club: Sociology Club: DAVID BEL1- Aris New York, Y. New York, N. Y. Intramural Handball. Brooklyn, N. Y. SIDNEY BENDET Arts New York, N. Y. Vice President, Adam Smith Societyg Alpha Pip Mau Committee. MORRIS BERG Arts New York, N. Y. Bristol Premectical Society: Ducking Committeeg Intramural Sports. JOSEPH BERGER Arts Brooklyn, N- Y- Ducking Committee: Philosophy Ckukm. 46 , ,urb I ' A JK,,-,ex.y,.-Q ,ti ' - I Q' ' , U,--1 ' .r Q H fo : 'Xt' , ', 1 - '. x' r .:+- -.-.F QW. ,K rg !v?...,,,V? L - H, V V 7 I ' ' erin Y A , ,I 'f ! . , -P4 4, in , 1 f QM? ,i g , ,M , kk fif,2"'finf 4.6 -.j'f",, 'I-M., tx ' . "? V. . . W' L . ., 4 11' f 7.Q..::g . "il '-wi - fu , 'L ' r lv? if -aff - W , , i. A'-git, , 1, Q ran, ,. iffy gf - f-j. - -QM: .4 f.-A -:gg E, X , KJ I ' Iii' ' .. '..,ff.1fT'a.-- ' ' pn T' I' Z' ' ' ug, il'v ' 'i'-3515193-itil-1'rQ5awm-'Q553- -iffy ' -f - io, 9 ff - f rf-T1 ' 4. 'ha' '-',,1- ' f r i ' Zf?5QL25Z37?Zf'.wm""'2Qi'mi':f.71.255113411.3-.Efnmas:aMf4f4m1 'fl-: . 1' '- A '-h " ' 5 . 'J W1LL1Arr BERGER Arts New York, N. Y, Phi Lamlncla Upsilon: Bristol Premeclical Society: Photographic Society: German Society: Plii Beta Kappa. MARK L. BERGM.-xx Engineering Hollis, N. Y. A. S. C. E. CYRUS HENRY BiscARDi Arts Brooklyn, N. Y. President, ltalica Society: Associate Art Editor, Medley: Hall of Fame Players: Heights News: Swimming Team: Fencing Team: Traclc. 54 tziwe ,, , Awaits? S 4, A4- ,ws Minis? Wye X557 N it fiz vi- V' . A :R - 5.4-ei 5 "0 Ifi 1?t3 .t- .53 Eiggzgg-j.' .- Qjfr g, 5 rg ' . j. W:-:g,c"'QI9:. .1115 -,Q-:,:,f, t,- rr-iff... -.,'v,.g1-A, -, : RQ' ff: '-'Qs AW.: ,-:rfvh Q .Q A E CLAYTON L. BLICK Arts Waterbury, Conn. Pi Lambda Plii: Duclcing Committee: Mall Committee: Freslaman Glee Club: .lolin Marslmall Law Society: Hall of Fame Players: lntrafraternity Council. BERNARD BLOOM Arts Broolqlyn, N. Y. Fresliman Football: Varsity Football. BELA J. BODNAR Engineering New Yorlq, N. Y. A. S. C. E.: A. S. T. M.: Newman Clulu: Little Symphony. ' 47 2 -,gnafw-E-ba.. . J---'ff-W 1 A nn '1 'YQ MICHAEL BORSELLA Engineering New Yorlc, N. Y. l. A. A. S. M. E.: Duclcing Committee: Mall Committee. JOHAN l'lOEG1-I BOUMAN Engineering Great Neclc, N. Y. Zeta Psi: Vice Chairman, S. A. E.: Chairman, Teclmifrolic Committee: Undergraduate Engineering Council: Glee Clulo: Chapel Choir: lleigtits Little Symphony: R. O. T. C. Rifle ancl Pistol Club. SIDNEY BRAVERMAN Engineering Yorrlcers, N. Y. A. l. Ctr. E.. MILTON BRENNER Arts New Yorlc, N. Y. John Marshall Law Society: Stevenson Geological Society: Sociology Clulaz Mall Committee. RICHARD E. BRODIE Arts New Yorlc, N. Y. Associate Board. Violet: Treasurer, R. O. T. C. Rifle and Pistol Club: Rille Team. HERBERT J. BROWN Arts New Yorlc, N. Y. Editor-invcliief, Critical Review: Vice President, Stuclent Council: Perstare Ei Praestare: Vice Chairman. Undergraduate Sclwolarslwip Committee: Faculty Committee on Discipline: Green Room: Hall of Fame Players Debating Team Associate Editor Violet American Stuclent Union Alptma Pi Phi Beta Kappa 4, 2'-"Q-Q ,,,,4BWshu,,w 'gr vi M " " ' ' A fr ' ' 1' ' -1 5 ' L' -- I :1" A, ' " ,A I Z A . : : 2 A 1 KV" .Q . ,. , . W ,Ly 11+ ' - 1 , . -- mn.-.,,, ' :P -sf-s,.f' ' . , V . .. v . .V , N V Q . ,VVV ,,,,,,-F 1, Q V J2,,,,,.Vlk . 5 in . A ll ,, . , N . , , ,, N l V, V 'iff -,li l L ii-ii" A- ' E ' sy T 4 "N ' M , . - 1-ewj"":- V. 1' . 5 - S' ,-Q '.,' , E' ' - ' , f f ,- .. ' A "4-. - --S" '. V if 4 'r "' ii. 4 've' ' ' fi alas- + 4- g 1 ' - ' . r .:. ' ' . 'ff '1' 1. ' ' 2 1 , . 4 " -,grief I .-.-....,,H, -As H v 'ff' iff' - if 1 - WJ- gr I VT' lg 4 r "i ' "sr, 'i r- -- -b 3 vw t' Kr hr' Q, ' f if It gi f .- -'lf In ..... -.mp ' ' U, ' ' "eH.eQ?.,, '25, 4 - ...li ft 1-piff-:H-:awww ' rv- 1 m,,,,,J,,.l.,,- ': 1- Q are f R, Rh'-Praia., .5 r -we-3 -.4ra::':r?' er-':+:::F'-f-1-''2--'I-2were-2'-'if'-f-4-ff' -"ri " ' " " HERBERT l-l. BUNGARD Arts New Yorlc, N. Y. Perstare et Praestare: Eclitor-inechiel-, Violet: Psi Chi: Business lxlanager, Crilicnl Review: Presiclent, Menorah Society: American Student Union: Peace Council: Slcull ancl Bones: Franliwoofl XiX',illi6ll'T'lS Society: Freshman Camp, Athletic Director: Freshman Tracli and Cross-Country: Varsity Traclc and Cross Country: Chairman. Duclcing Committee: Chaimian, Sophomore lnlormal. , , ABRAHAM J. BYE Engineering Westmount, Que., Canacla Phi Sigma Delta: Perstare et Praestare: President, Hall of Fame Players: Presiclent, Green Room: A. S. lVl. E.: l. Ae, S.: Lacrosse. HILLIARD WARREN CAMING Arts New Yorlc, N. Y. Alpha Pi: lvlanager, Delnating Team: Vice Presiclent, .lohn Nlarshall Law Society: Faculty Eclitor, Violet: Associate Eclitor, Critical Review: Hill Historical Society: Mall Committee: Bristol Pre-Medical Society: Heights News: Photography Club, Phi Beta Kappa. ALBERT CORT CAMPBELI. Engineering White Plains, N. Y. Psi Upsilon: Scalolnarcl anal Blafle: Undergraduate Engineering Council: A. l. E.: Demonstration Day: Slcull and Bones. FRANcis R. CANDIO Arts Lyndhurst, N. J. Vice Presiclent. ltalian Cultural Society: Duclcing Committee: lxflall Committee. MICHAEL CANEI.IS Arts New Yorlc, N. Y. 49 raft . 'TKT-:sf , Q- -- . V - HOWARD J. CARLOCK Engineering New Yorlc, N. Y. A. S. C. E.: President, A. S. T. N.: Intramurals: Engineering Demonstration Day Committee: Ducicing Committee: Undergraduate Engineering Council. FRANCIS B. CARLSON Engineering Qssining, N. Y. Delta Phi: Srabbarcl ami Blarie: Business Manager, Heights News: Eucieian Society: A. S. M. E.: Newman Club: Skull and Bones: RiHe and Pistol Club. DANIEL DOLPI-I CHrXMPl.fXlN Engineering New York, N. Y. Scabivarci and Blnric: A. S. N. E. fAeroi: I. A. S.: Rifle and Pistol Club. i JAMES R. CHAPMAN Engineering Kansas City, Mo. Zeta Psi: A. S. M. E.: S. I. E.: Secretary Treasurer, S. A. E.: Engineering Demonstration Day. FELIX CHARDON Engineering Glen Rock, N. J. I. A. S. WILLIAM CHAYE1fsKY Arts New York, N. Y. President, Sophomore Class: Student Council: Skull and Bones: Track. 50 L ff' A' F Y: . f.,Q,fT"M"34f 5.-Q. .. , V . . . , -, ,, , ff"". ,. - N ty in r . -gfwi . ew- gpm E gijvwe Y g r , ,. . 5 ,Al lg : , ,I 1 Q , : , . 1 ALBERT I. COHEN Arts New York, N, Y, Sociology Club: Ductring Committee: Mail Committee: Menorah Society. . BERNARD COHEN Aris I Yonkers, N. Y. Morse Mathematics and Physics Society: Intramurals: Mail Committee: Ducicing Committee. Ducking Committee. HENRY S. COHEN Arts New York, N. Y. Sociology Club: Hamilton Commerce Society: Fencing: Ptiiiosoptiy Club: Mau Committee: Ducking Corn- mittee: German Club. IRVING COHEN Arts West New York, N, J. Morse Mathematics and Physics Society: Intramurals: Mail Committee: Ducicing Committee: Phi Lambda Upsilon. BERTRAM L. COLEMAN Arts New York. N. Y. Lawrence House Orchestra Leader: Lawrence House Committee. QLIVER H. COTE, JR. Engineering New York, N. Y. Phi Sigma Omega: I. A. A. S. M. E.: S. A, E.: Rifle Squad. 51 . -...inw VA rj .C . XJXN' i si. r . C., avril: g. , 4 .- xr? L' "-3: , ' - F - i 4 -' - I i X r ': AQ. 1 i W. In A g f -. Q' 5 , , 3 X og , , 19 f . , I gg' W Ly Wm . -.3,..4.l..3 1. X '- V. , ,, ,. rv , , 1- H., h A I N lug.: .. ' .S X-' sal? 132 , XL' .' "Il" L Q E I .f 1 - 1 ' - - 4 , f - A ' -e Nl. .. : . - ' g ...ra f i , A, ff. f. , N - 5 Iv .1 :Q N4 - i , . 2 U . .4 3,4 LMI .L t I, . in-15 H312 - . , ,.,. R . , , R T' ' ., 4793 Y . . -. ' - ..- - - -sas. "- 1, I 1 1 ,cC4,.s,,i,..5L15:.r,"1.'.1'.2'.A?g4-14.Y ,. .. H-, .. - '.--- fa NICHOLAS E. D'APUzzO Engineering Broolrlyn, N. Y Alplwa Plwi Delta: l. Ae. S.: Slcull and Bones. ROBERT DECKER Engineering New Yorlc, N. Y I. A. S. PAUL E. DEUTSCHMAN Aris Bronx, N. Y EDNVARD J. IDENVENDER Arts New Yorlc, N. Y. Psi Clin Perstare et Praestareg President, Green Room: President, Hall of Fame Players: Managing Editor Crilical Review: Vice-Cllancellor, Literary Union. Louis Pl-IILLIP DIAMOND Engineering New Yorlc, N. Y. Secretary, A. l. Ch. E.: Engineering Demonstration Day: Senior Duclcing Committee. lVliCHAEL JOSEPH D,l'llPPOLlTO Engineering New Yorlc, N. Y. Eta Kappa Nu: Scalnluarcl and Blarle: A. l. E. E. 52 ' P ,-. PM . , A 4 endif if arf.. 'fi' ,www 'X - ,K .1 . .. - fr? 4 L ,jg Q -4 G, 5 ' A V1 . 'ef . A - I l lr ll f-5',.1'eal. . -f 1 L 'gvffl 'A 1 ' 2' H mf , 'V .' ' 4 " f 'ff r. ' r"" in f Zi Ike" VT 1 JJ, X 3' ff 14. ' ' i - " ,- r g ...9 A any .A . . W . -rr - ' sf ff ' A .' -'1 7 ' fr J ,G ' ' ' -3 rf - -L . 1 1- if - . -. A". 1:-'i' r- 'f rr E, " ll . -fig A w I gi li ' I. f. ,. K i - V A , - fl A . ' - "-me- 'r fs 1 11 .1 15' i f P if E -., , . ,ep gl. 6 , r ,. ., . , ,. , . . r . ,,. F F -' M, 'A ..., Wg' , 'H 1 1 ' ir," ff fri' ru r 'My . ' 1 we ff' 'W' 'Q . ' 1 ' ' W' f f' fi , 4 "" M-A fefrffffyr'-' 1 'f 0 ff l' " ' " F ....l 'E ....,. . .,..., " A ' CHESTER DIC!-ITER Aris New York, N, Y, American Student Union. STANLEY DICKES Arts Brooklyn, N. Y. Alpha Pi: Presiclcnt, R. O. lll. C. Rifle ancl Pistol Clulo: Bristol Pre-lVleclical Society. JAMES DUBIN Arls Brooklyn, N. Y. ,lolm lxflarsliall Law Society: Senior Ball Committee. CHARLES D. DURFEE, JP.. Engineering Yonlqers, N. Y. Tau Beta Pi: Treasurer, Undergraduate Engineering Council: A. S. C. E.: A. S. T. lvl. FRED ROBERT DIQOSTE Engineering Queens Village, N. Y. Plii Kappa Tau: Business lvlanager, Quadrangle: Business Manager, lrresliman Camp: S. l. E.: S. A. E.: Glee Club: Senior Party Committee: Mall Committee: Slcull and Bones: Swimming Team. RAYMOND EISENBERG Arts New Yorlq, N. Y. German Clulmg Bristol Pre-lVledical Society: Sociology Cluln: lX'lall Committee. 55 - .. 1,- i r R. . 4' X . 'N , .gg i 11 viii .. , 1 . , , l . I ,Z , , I: . . 4 1 .. , " "X . A it, - -, . Qi -' 4 - 'I f , 1 Q , 4 f: N. , 'f, ' 2,51 3 , 5 3 ,Q ' , . Q 1 ,E il ,L 1 iv r- ' - T' . f rf' My '-gi,ZL v.,,f, - ,jr ww" A '- 'Zi'-'-r e ' " , -,-T , 1 ' ,L I A .-.. 1 : " 5: l y "-' I ' K-.Zi 5.5 if lg rf'fE,,m.,r,, A- ' , u, J' 3 "flq .I . H-U, ., .Y 'Ain N. 4.1-M 31-74: vi-Aj. r ,,V,, ,Er ,, 3.1, - .,, L., . if fy. .. , , 1. .,-,-V-ups. ., , . , . . , , - - I E i s . I 3 .... K .. I 321 Hey 41, 411 . . . Here 40, -10, here . . . Noses bleeding, tomatoes flying, eggs cracking, cameras clicking . . . The sophomores and the freshmen are brawiing again . . . Shoeless feet, and feetiess stioesg iimtniess trousers, on ieaftess iimtvs . . . stripping. ttie order of the clay Throw the soptws on the malt . . . Duck! tiere comes a tomato . . . XVatCh outt here come the crazy frosiw in a snake dance . . . Duck fast . . . GH my eye, right in my eye . . . Boy! what a iight . . . Am I tired . . . Oh for a shower, and a clean white taect . . . 54 n I,-- ,. , .fi r., 1, - I . . , if, 4.---1. J Water, water everywhere but not a cirop to . . . Pajamas, green pajamas with red stripes, loiici pajamas, mild pajamas, not so mild pajamas, siogging through the night . . . Laughter in the night, songs in the night, splashes and gurgles disrupting the night . . . iym ali wet . . Dry paddles on wet inaciasicies hot coffee in coici insides . . . Dry clothes . . . and then the dance . . . What an evening . . . Gee, Herb, that hurts . . . Today I am a Mani 55 DAVID EISENSTEIN Arts Broolclyn, N. Y. Psi Clii: Bristol Pre-Meclical Society: Vice President, Sociology Clulv: Slcull ancl Bones: Violet: Mall Com- mittee: Franlcwoocl Williams Society: German Society. . GEORGE YALE ELSON A Arts Brooklyn, N. Y. Plii Sigma Delta: Heigliis News: Medley: Bristol Pre-Meclical Society: Junior Prom Committee: Mall Com- mittee: Fresluman Prom Committee: Co-Chairman, Senior Party. lVlART1N EVANS Arls New Yorlt, N. Y. Zeta Beta Tau: Bristol Pre-lxleclical Society: Swimming: Radio Club: Literary Union: Teclinical Stall' of Little Tlieatre: Nall Committee. MYROSI.AV FEDYK Engineering New Yorlc, N. Y. A. l. Cla. E.: U. E. C.: lntramurals. LESLIE FIEDLER Arts Newarlc, N. J. Presiclent, Perstare et Praestare: Cllairman, Undergraduate Scliolarsllip Committee: Undergraduate Library Committee: Hall of Fame Players: Secretary, Frencli Society: Alplia Pi: Debating Team: Vv'inner, Eucleian Pulnlic Spealcing Contest: Eclitor-in-Gliief, Critical Review: Managing Eclitor, Violet: Gavel Glulo: Literary Union: Student Council: Liberal Club: Peace Council: Phi Beta Kappa. LESLIE HAROLD FINK Arts Bronx, N, Y, Beta Lamlocla Sigma: German Clula: 'Bristol Pre-lVleclical Society: Plrilosopliy Clula. 56 '-1' 'x . li 1 E- ffggr W ,, ., : i Ii L41-:IT 2 5 Q, T E-QM L f if , ggi r . ., . YV' , X Eg g X t -gl : Q A . , , i : J gj i m x . it D AQ: -,. , l if ll 3 V f E A 4 . - f - ,-.. ,im-.1 , . 'l M ' ,. .. as ', wZ-N- m.,: W . J W2.,,v-'V-1:1-:sbt .,,i:.,.i.::i.A.:i,,5g53,.,,3,HMV.,1.-,I ,...s ..,f.?.,..5.,., ., ..:.::lV.:h1 -lgzilhiljdrgi NATHAN FISHMAN Arts Union City, N. J. Secretary, Atptia Pi: Vice President, Hitt Historical: Adam Smittl: Morse Ntattiematics Society: Jotin tvtarstiatt Law Society: Hamitton Commerce Society: Heigtits Bastcettuatt Team: tntramurats: tvtatt Committee: Chairman, Senior Party Committee: Ptii Beta Kappa. SEYMOUR L. FLAXMAN Arfs New York, N. Y. Bristot Pre-medicat Society: Vice President, Deutscher Verein: Halt ot Fame Players. MURRAY ELIAS FLENDER Arts New York, N. Y. Adam Smitti Society: Bristol Pre-mecticat Society: German Ctutn: Sociotogy Ctutu: Junior Prom Committee: Ductcing Committee: Matt Committee. -1 N: JOSEPHAFONTANETTA Arts Queens, N- Y- Atptia Ptii Detta: Cverman Ctutm: txtorse Mathematics anrt Ptiysics Ctuti: ttatian Ctutn. STANLEY PRAM Arts Br00t4ty1'1, N- Y- Pi Lamtncta Ptiip Hott of Fame Players: Junior Prom Committee: Matt Committee. ROBERT WILLIAM FRANK Engineering Jamaica, L. t., N. Y. Scabbafd and Btadec AA, S. M. E. fibxerolz I. A. S. 57 Qgw- 1 i"7ifif, A T ' Egg 'Thi ' V- - .- - A' +R fm' A . 4 ' 5 t. i V l ' A 4 ff ' ifw 3 1 W "' 3- T 1. -' ' ' It -.-........ 5371 MICPIAEL S. FRANKEL Engineering l. A. S. JACK E. FRICIQ Engineering I, A. SQ Cross Country: Traclc. GEORGE FRIEDMAN Arts Plmtograplwy Society: Chess ancl Clweclier Clulu: Mall Committee: Lite Franlcwoocl XVilliams Society. X v x Y' iw ie I S X , 35F'271'4iIf:5 -EifE1II.2I2'fL:",-'Z 1 5 .'.' f X 'v. ' . ,. -:-:::-'E-::-1-'-. '-Q1-I: 'N'-. N. 2-. '-:-P:-S15-Zet:' iviivi .4 . ' ,, -I-fb-ff - r: f .Q .. -23 -:Irie if ,-fm'fQ1sLx' rary Union: Bronx, N. Y Bogota, N. rl Brooklyn, N. Y Bristol Pre-Medical Society lvAN B. FRIEDMAN Engineering A. S. M. E.: A. S. E. E.: Duclcing Committee. WILLIAM FRIEDMAN Arts Far Rockaway, L. l. New Yorlc, N. Y. Phi Sigma Delta: Chairman, lnterlfraternity Council: Vice President, Junior Class: Chairman, Prep Scliool Week: Clmairman. Junior Prom Committee: Senior Duclcing Commitlee: Bristol Prefwleclical Society. Pre-Medical Society. JOHN F. FRITON Engineering New Yorlc, N. Y. Chairman, Freshman Prom Committee: Vice President, S. l. E.: A. S. M. E.: Scalolaarcl ancl Blade: S. l. Rifle ancl Pistol Clulaz Duclcing Committee: A. S. M. E. N .iff Sir - ,.,.L " J- ,345 ' - 1,-.....: 1 A 1 Y 5 . . . x . I ' "-7 -V .41-1343, 1, I V. 'iinh 4 Mir: rl ' ' 5' 1 I - I 5 .: , . f ". . 'fy' I ygiefy ., , ' fi , V he Y-,ir ww I I ' s i, 1 A Sb, X, , . , , ' gf- I 'lf .1-,- gf, . . ,, h' r-eggemxfn. . t- - . t f iwhfsr ' . I f .f iff. . ... - M ' - 'Q W i - - .f , .- -- 4, ..,1. -- - - I e .- . ' I I -' -. f .rf ,,' -. rr. f I .211 ' F" l .F T I i I+. ..r"'-V" A ny?-uf ' -rxfrff w'-' 1f".'f"f?m4fffw4-sm -i-i nf A. : ' V .. ,. . . -ftvpuib :eww-irsrfl-. -. '.r...N- -'ffiij-' L " -u v:-- 'Q ' I " -f4' MAX FUNK Engineering Easton, Pa. Kappa Sigma. ROBERT GABRIELSON Arls Broolclyn, N. Y. Bancl: Psi Chi: Bristol Pre-Medical Society: Pliotograpliic Clulnz Franlcwoocl Williams Society. GORDON LLOYD GETLINE Engineering Haverhill, Mass. A. S. M. E. fAeroJg l. Ae. S.: l.ittle Tliealre: lntramural Baslcetloall: Fresliman Rifle Squad. STANLEY N. GLADSTONE iAris New Yorlc, N. Y. Student Director, Lawrence l'lous.eg Managing Editor, Heights Daily News: Secretary, Undergraduate Athletic Boardg Director, Tliircl Annual Press Conference: Freshman Camp: Palisades Handbook: Medley: Perstare et Praestare. DANIEL GLASS Arts New Yorla, N. Y. Alplia Pig Cliairman, 'Mall Committee: XfVinner, Corwin Prizeg Delegate, Moclel Assemluly League of Nations: Delegate, lnternational Relations Clulas Conferenceg Assistant Manager, Tracl: Team: Hall of Fame Players: Plii Beta Kappa. FREDERICK lVl. GLOECKLER Engineering Teaneclq, N. J. Fresliman Traclcg Varsity Traclc. 59 . , ,N QT -K V- Q A I 4 , '4j?v?"f': if .. 5'-"LR "N, I i' V n ' ' 7 - 9 ' F" ' 1 .it e . Ni -fe apr'-r ff r' 'l ' 'E A? ' -fffi A - ' in W' H ' 'I 11. 'N ll ' I ' - - '- V 1 H li ' li ii Z' "" A " . -2. . ' ' :"'T" . - - 11 - V . .3 . . 'V -1, - E .,,-fr, i,...f-, . .. 1 . 1 ., , ,,, -.?,.,-Zi. .,,,. I. , 5 ' igf' 1 . sl -.Q-M . ROBERT GOLDBURG Arfs Yonkers, N. Y. ARTHUR GOLDFARB Arts New York, N. Y. Bela Lamlxla Sigma: Vice Prcsiclenl. Psi Clwig Vice Presiclent, Bristol Pre-lxleclical Society: Track: German Clulo: Franliwoocl Xvilliams Society: Mall Committee: Plii Beta Kappa. DAX'1D GOLDRNOPF A Arts Versailles, Conn. Psi Chi: Cllairman. American Sturlent Union: U. S. C.: literary Associate. Violet: Associate Eclitor, Criiicnl Review: Peace Council: Franlcwoocl Xfvilliam Society: Perstare et Praestare. IRVING ROBERT GOLDSMITH Arts - Commerce Arverne. L. I. Hamilton Commerce Society: Sociology Clula: Tennis Squarl. BENJAMIN GOLUB Arts Brooklyn, N. Y. Duclqing Committee: Mall Committee. GILBERT F. GOODGION Arts Elmhurst, L. l. Plii Kappa Tau: Secretary Treasurer, lnterfraternily Council: Red Dragon: American Stuclent Union: Slcull anrl Bones: Cluairman, Boat Ricle Committee. 60 ,.f"" .QM V. : ,I Z wgv 'if-it R f ,.,,,,, . .1,.. ..-i,.,, . ..,,.,. ,,,, .,.,-., , .i ...,.. , ,., ..,.,.,..... .,,,.. . ...,.., .,.. .......,. fiv. -,i.. , ..,,.,,. , ,... ., , 7 2,1 Lf f A ' V?" f .1425-. f . if ., ' - , ,,,f,f'1:,' V B l Q", IC ' "L , li' T7 , ri . , .L+ Qi' -jen " N H t 1 "rf: L L , - .Q l. 9 ' g , M . A . V ,. . " 'HQ I ,. ,. - Jn. .925 V . P 1 ,' e -.1 ' E" , , ., B, ' F f 'Mg ff' f, , g E, w, 3 3, is " I - f A ' ' ft: - - Q Xi . ' ' ----H:-'- V -r 1 -f i: " , I 'W' - . , , E L- . .. '- ' "-f ' " Nl:-.o:.. - 1 . 'fi Y 4: .a .. ' V' A: 4-4: 5'7"Z,f7'f."f1 ' " -5:57 r 'Y'-- ' lf - - ,V Q J ' ' VK' ' 1111215--:-.,,i'f:B...,.,..,.:if. . , , 1,,, , M 4....f.m. .,r .,, s...B. , f-- ,M-1-pf ?:- if -"'.' '- lVlARVlN JEROME GORDON Engineering Oklahoma City, Qlcla. I. Ae. S.: Band. HERMAN A. GOULD Engineering Roselle, N. J. A. l. Cli. E.: lntramurals. ROBERT WILLIAM GRAHAM Engineering Brooklyn, N. Y. Glee Clulsg S. A. lvl.: lntramurals. ALBERTO D. GRANA Engineering Forest Hills, L. l. Unelergracluate Engineering Councilg Xvrestlingp S. A. E. RUDOLF GRAUPE Engineering Maspetlu, L. l. Scalalnarcl and Blade: A. S. N. E. fAeroJg l. Ae. S.: Newman Clulng Plrotograplric Society: S. A. M. E., KARL GUTTMANN Engineering New Yorlc, N. Y. Scalalaarcl anal Blade: A. S. M. E.HAero3 l. Ae. S.: Scalzmluarcl ancl Blacleg Rifle ancl Pistol Squad. 61 . .523 Y' w ' A r ,X, .1 A 9' Q 'Q"'i-NRM .IV f-A er el - - . m f . ,-!:'r V ---Y ',' . ni- . B 1 , 1 'v .. 1. y 1 Q..- 4511216 '?'i'22h . ' . "'Dl"" 's:.' A A 1 , - - - 1 - - - 12' , .5 ' I-if ' . , e ff- f . 'Q f I . '- . 1 in ' I pu ' Us ff: -ml i ' J VV W I 'sf - diff -- . , . .fm-,-A rlffnefw A . , A -J, r., - - Q-, -M V ,F A-, 5 3 'A -. ..,, ' i i A Yrrr ii YYVV YY SW 'x 3 ' I 'f' f . M -K 4, -'...,,,.., . . 1 r,5:6itt'1'T":':'T'r'i'?'L"f t , V . " 1 - .,. iff! I V. .. 'Jem'-' r- 1 - ff Q - ' f 9 ' fle. '. "il 'tr - I . . g F T " ' I ' .fy . s f' , .. 1 w 1' ' ,, 4 fj'f'f::'7'+5: :Mi u l., . -- fi. 1 gr ' 'vyl ,,1 1, 1. ti :' I! V-' ' ' ,.' .,. 'si' 1 f.,u' ., , Ju ' A.. " 1" f 1 ' ne-V.-A A of. 1 '- ' :fri . AV- 1 f - 1 2 5. -. f. 4. 1 ' " " f , 2' o r Vg, il X ,N . V L ,I rags' P U V - I M m i S WF, . 65 .. - 3 far- 5 .1. QE - - f -iii: 1- - '10-'i 1 ' .1 1 l U ly I , 1' -, , . -' , .glfl ty - ..Q' 7 4Qi".'-,f.:I'i ,f ' K' .' ' ,' rfg, ' . T .r "' ' if'-"'i"f"Ef is.+"" 'L ti.. ff' f " M J" . ' "Wt" 'i r rf ' ' ' ST 21? EMANUEL HABER Arts New York, N.. Y. Assistant Manager, Varsity Football: Manager, Frestiman Football: Hall of Fame Players: John Marshall Law Society: Stevenson Geological Society. HENRY M. HAFER Arts New York, N. Y. Pi Lambda Phi: Hall of Fame Players: Green Room: Chairman, Litzrary Committee: Matt Committee. IOHN KERR HAMMOND A Arts Scarsdate, N. Y. Zeta Psi: Manager, Varsity Football: Duclcing Committee: Intramurals. F FRANCIS J. HANMER Arts Mt. Vernon, N. Y. Newman Club: Literary Union: Halt of Fame Players: Fencing. THOMAS HARDGROVE 'Engineering Rictgeicietct Park, N. J. Delta Chi: A. I. E. E.: A. S. M. E.: S. A. E.: Duclcing Committee. DAVID HERMAN Engineering East Grange, N. .JJ Intramurals: I. Ae. S. 62 www 6 - --Q --r---1 f ':.:r2r -t 'uf ."-. ...,. ..,: .,. .....,. ..,,-, ..,. , A STEPHEN HERMAYER Arts New York, N. Y. Phi Lambda Upsitong Bristol Pre-Medical Society: Ducking Committee. CHARLES A. HERRMANN Arts Merrick, L. I. Zeta Psi. LOUIS A. HICKS Arts Valley Stream, L. I. Zeta Psi: Secretary. Freshman Class: Student Council: President, Eucteian Society: President, Christian Science Organization: Vice President, tnterfratemity Council. JAMES F. HIGBEE, JR. Engineering Yonkers, N. Y. FRED Huzscu Arts New York, N. Y. Morse Mathematics Society: Literary Union: Quaigkig Sociology Club: Swimming Squad. GEORGE E. HOLBACK Engineering Yonkers, N. Y. 65 ' -E .ri - ---..f ' - ,-.-.. - - E.-no BERNARD HOLLANDER Aris New York, N. Y Bristol Pre-lVleclical Society: Pliilosoplwy Clulaz Sociology Club: Duclcing Committee. HENRY L. HULST Engineering Greenwicla, N. Y Pl'1i Gamma Della: lnterlraternity Council: l. A. S.: A. S. M. E.: A. S. M. E. fAerol. SAMUEL Huruiwirz . Engineering New York, N. Y A. l. Cli. E.: Engineering Demonstration Day. lRv1NG lSRAEL Arts New Yorlc, N. Y Plii Sigma Delta: Prcsiclent, Hall of Fame Players: President, Green Room: Chairman, Senior Dinner. SAMUEL A. JACOBS Arts New Yorlc, N. Y DONALD P. JENKS Engineering Baldwin. L- l Plmi Gamma Delta: A. l. Clr. EJ Scalatnard and Blacle: Skull and Bones. 64 JOHN STEWART JENSEN Arts Yonkers, N. Y. Zeta Psi. BEN B. JORDAN Engineering New Rochelle, N. Y. Vice President, Tau Beta Pi: Secretary. Undergraduate Engineering Council: Vice Chairman, A. I. E. E. Eta Kappa Nu: Radio Club. MILTON E. JUCOVY Arts New York, N. Y Historian, Senior Class: President, Psi Chi: President, Franicwooci YViHiams Society: Undergraduate Scholar- ship Committee: Bristol Pre-Medical Society: Beta Lamtacla Sigma: A. S. U.: Ptii Beta Kappa. PAUL H. KAI-IAN Arts Brooklyn, N. Y. Perstare et Praestare: Secretary. Tau Kappa Alpha: Captain Debating Team: Student Council: Vvyinner, Sancuaam Extempore Speaking Contest: President. Atptia Pi: President, Model League of Nations: Hitt Historical Society: American Student Union: Associate Editor, Violei: Halt of Fame Players: Crilicol Review: Heigtzis Daily News: Secretary, Gavel Club: Delegate to international Relations Club Conference Chairman. Class Day. HOWARD KAPLAN Arts New York, N. Y. Perstare et Praestare: Undergraduate Sctiotarstiip Committee: President, Adam Smith Society: Alpha Pi: Vice President, Ptiotograptiic Society: Chairman, Senior Gift Committee: Phi Beta Kappa. JACOB KAPLAN Arts Bronx, N. Y. 65 Vtrmuxxa A V ,V S,-fr., g , -Y -- Y I, 1 ' ik? 1-.54 Q W H U , SMG. , I sq: . . 1- FWF I Y- r r 'R " 'ff ' A' l REU L15- ' A 'Q f 0 I ' Q, af -Tin... x f '- ' ' Wi! .' 5014 ' I Y- ' T ' V 'M' ' 3 VY A w.,.:.zz :.,':--:-., - ' f'ff"- J 4 -4 - 'A-1 , --- Qh, its grind, grind, grind ...... grind by day and grind by night and no relief in sight .... Assignments, papers, quizzes .... God! keep me from going mad . . A quiz today and three tomorrow . . . No rest for the Weary . . Looks like another weekend spent at home . . What will Ethel say? . . Gee Spike, I only asked him a question . , . I Wonyt speak anymore . . honest, I wonit . . . Tm becoming an inteiiectuatfwl 66 ff ' 1 f I A ,,uf4--.--5. Epitaph: To my memory which deposited from me this twenty-second clay ot June in the . . . My God, when will they hand out the exam papers . , . Nine o,clocIc, and I Can,t rememher a thing . . . Ah, here they come . . . What a tough quiz. VH never finish this . . . Eleven-thirty and tm not halt through . . . Gosh, ran out of ink . . . My hactfs hitting me . . . Oh my neck! . . . Gotta hurry, gotta hurry . . . There goes the hell . . . What a relief . . . Qnly four more exams to go. 67 ,N 1 N J HERBERT KARTLU KE Arts White Plains, N. Y. FRANK KATZENBERG Arts New Rochelle, N. Y. Manager, Orchestra: Vice President, Norse Mathematics and Physics: Giee Club: Cross Country: Camera Club: Heights News: String Quartet. GERARD KAUFMAN Engineering White Plains, N. Y. 9 ROLAND KINSLEY Arts Bronx, N. Y. French Society: Mail Committee: Ducicing Committee: Intramurals. JOSEPH B. KLEBANOFFVYV Arts New York, N. Y. American Student Union: Adam Smith Society: Ducking Committee. HARVEY KLEIN Arts New York, N. Y. Philosophy Club: Duclcing Committee. 68 .r is ?, I. jus . . 7 Q ? - U A A If t if QQ I V -9:-M5 ff' ,, l A-" ""-fit: 4 , fin H Q ., N I 4' V ft? 3:1 1 . I " ,' 7 V, ' T- ' A " ,J - ' -. QI ' R 1' f :.'5',a,g 2 3 fm-.,ft , A is , an ',t5,., ,,,,.,,,,g r n -'R X 4 3' ' V . . Mfnb. -'M --:f"' wr rf- -W 1-,wh fwfr ' Am-,fn V- . - .' - 5' S - .r'.g ., y " " '-Lf' 'fafuwff' 1' ' '31, ' v ' v W we - ..,., .. .-.Uk '-if' 1 L. ,F 2- 4 4: ' - F Qi ' :rm H A .gnfm-iE5r31,r'.f5gf -W3 I3..,T..,..5-..T:..,,,.,..fZ,fT.Q f - ' ' ' :fm - LLAWYYQVM V V 4Q4V1:,, A H- -A-A--we - MARTIN KLIGER Aris Bronx, N. Y. DAVID KLINE Arls Kingston. N. Y. .SAUL KOPALD D Arts New York. N. Y. Varsity Debating Team: Joiin ixiarsidatt Law Society: Niall Committee: Senior Ducifing Committee: Cuiturai Ciuin. I i i SEYMOUR KOPPELMAN Arts New Yoric, N. Y. Bristoi Preeivieciicai Society: German Ciuia: Literary Union: Ptiiiosoptmicai Society: Sociology Society: Menorah: Ciassicat Society. JACK KOSSIN Arts New Yoric, N. Y. Beta Kappa Nu: Nienorati Society: Niall Committee: Ducicing Committee. ISADORE M. KOZAK Engineering East Grange, N. J. Manager, Baseball: A. S. C. E.: Vice President, A. S. T. Ni.: Psi Chi: German Society: Frankwooci Xviiiiams Society: Morse Mattiematics and Ptiysics Society. .69 .A- 'A --. X fx . """5" ff-"" REQ .... sf -"Yi A, , H- E I w.-g . .Aw 'x Q. ., it H -X W-- H s - M , 5, . 1 ' .15 A--if'-sr. H ' . t . 'Y Q : ... 5 . Ai ree Y i 4 , L A . H A . I' - 51 -jg. .. 3 -nl" 11' 1: '.1 .W , I . - - - 4 , E55 A 7' 34- . - A2 .Ev2 :I.,w,.. xy? F Q .. 7. 4:17, V V Us . i b V, V , , . W4 .. L., f k 1.1: PM . - W-ir .. -'-" .. . . - '. 'ff' -"f.f'."""v .W - " ' ' ' A' ' ' ' ' "' . -2-'fn ' .fl .4 I ' ' 1 STANLEY KRAMER Arts New York, N. Y. Photography Ciuh: Radio Club: Heights News: Senior Duclcing Committee. EMANUEI.. KRANTZ Arts New York, N. Y. Psi Chi: Bristol Pre-Medical Society: German Ctuh: Frankwooct Williams Society: Philosophy Club: Morse Mathematics and Physics Society. HAROLD HART KROLL Engineering New York, N. Y. Vice President, Quaigh: Chairmanjtiohhy Show Committee: Engineering Demonstration Day: Glee Club: Fierlleyp Malt Committee. NORMAN Kizucieixow Engineering Stamford, Conn. A. S. C. E.: A. S. T. M.: Quadrangle. MARIO R. LABARBERA Arts New Milford, N. J. Alpha Phi Delta: Chairman of Sophomore Prom: Eucleian Literary Society: Student Council. MALCOLM LAND Engineering Brooklyn, N. Y. Tau Beta Pi: Photographic Society: Undergraduate Engineering Council: Heights News. 70 - RALPH LANGER Arts New York, N. Y Track: Heights News: Sophomore Prom Committee: Intramurals. FREDERICK LATHER, JR. Engineering Bronx, N. Y Rifle and Pistol Club: Rifle Team: Slcutt and Bones: Co-Chairman, Malt Committee: Junior Prom Committee Duclcing Committee: Meteorological Observer: Chairman. Air Transport Safety Committee. LEONARD LAUE Arts Bronx, N. Y Beta Lambda Sigma: Bristol Pre-Medical Society: Adam Smittr Society: Sociology Club: Matt Committee Phi Beta Kappa. 1 5 JOHN LAUTZ Engineering SCGFSCIGIG, N- Y- MELVIN E. LEA Arts Lancaster, Pa. Bristol Prexmedicat Society. HOWARD LEDERBERG AHS Jamaica, L- I- Secretary, Student Coun-"it: Director, Halt of Fame Players: Secretary, John Ntarstmatt Society: Freshman Debating Team: Dramatics Editor, Violel: Perstare et Praestare. 71 S Y A ' .f X ny ' ' if R. A.. :Q ,Q :"- 15.4.5 I EDNVARD LESSINGER Arts New Yorlc, N. Y. rxlerfleyr Violet: Philosophy Club: Sociology Cluln: lntramurals: Ducliing Committee. ANTHONY RICHARD LETO Arls New Yorlc, N. Y. Violelg ScciHmrcl rinfl Blllfllfj Photography Clulag Newman Clulaz Philosophy Society. lVlAURICE B. l.rEX"lEN Engineering New Yorlc, N. Y. Track: A. S. C. E.: A. S. T. M.: Psi Chi: Co-Chairman, Senior Ball Committee: Junior Prom Committee: Duclcing Committee. t DAVID J. LEviNE Arts Jackson l-leigluts, L. l. Cross Country: Traclc: Sncrclary, lxlenorah Society: Mall Committee: Hall ol Fame Players: lntramurals. JOSHUA M. LJEVINE Arts Somerville, N. J. Hall ol Fame Players: Ecliior, Sfurlcnl Direclory: Residence Bureau: Secretary, Fein.-Sept. Class: Sociology Club: Franlcxvoocl Williams Society. BERNARD LIEBSCHUTZ Arts Bronx, N. Y. Beta Lamlacla Sigma Bristol Pre Rleolrcal bocretg l iterarw Lnron Vice Presxclent French Society Philosophy qocrety Unclergracluale Scholarship Committee Amrncan Stuclent Union Phi Beta Kappa 1 mwgadnm- ef ff gr W 1 i ff! Q " .. ' : 1 ' C ' " , 1: ' ' ' : ' . L fe-""kj,v . . lf' ,Lf ' -" -. -- - r ' Q - f 'rg 1: if' N. , . .- . ,Zh 21' C H 11 L . ij.: s.,,,,,. y rw, 1. F , I if , l , Lf.- v X W, .,,, . , , 4,9 , , . M- 3 zu-H -1 i- ' , ,.s-,, , r , if ' -- sf ,' -1 ., ,f ' .,,, . znjm. in ff .tif A 3. gt, 'n I YA 2,1 , 1 'Y : 2 ,V H ....ja",.J jlr. A, -13 2,1 H l N-"Yip V2 'ilw il if L la ti? E ' I ' ' if 1 1 el Sf?" 43f" 5wP -. W . l-IW" V 5 L, , , ff Y- rm. -4 .. gush Z ,1 . , , ,. ,N -I ,I H .fl I- , ,fl , if -f -. W. My , .ge ,Vai . . Fin. ., -I f r a Q.. Wm- w- ' - ,---,- 1 - I, 'r iv-. . V ."'?'7'-Q. ,, Y , ,, . . ,. U I -,M 4 j f f f s,..zu...4 ..,. i BERNARD LINDENBAUM MASON LINDSEY Tau Bela Pi: Phi Lambda Upsilon: Cliairman of U. E. C.: President. A. I. CIW. E.: GEORGE K. LIPPENCOTT New York, N. Y. Wood-Ridge, N. J. University Band: Cvlee New XIOFIQ, LAWRENCE H. LIPSEY Engineering HAROLD LIPSTEIN Arts Track SCIUEICIQ Freshman Baseball: and Bones. MILTON LOWENTHAL Arts New York, N. Y. New York, N. Y. New York, President, Bristol Pre-Medical Society: Heights Little Symphony Orchestra: Rifle and Pistol Club: Morse Mathematics and Physics Society: Mall Committee. 3352: Y Y+Y i ALFRED LAWRENCE LUNDIN Engineering New Yorlc, N. Y. Zeta Beta Tau: A. S. C. E.: A. S. T. M.: Quadrangle: Sopliomore Prom Committee. BERNARD LUSKIN Arts Bronx, N. Y. Traclq Team: Franltwoocl Williams Society: Mall Committee: Sociology Clutn. LAURENCE Lusric Arts Brooklyn, N. Y. Presiclent, Senior Class: Perstare et Praestare: Vice President, Tau Kappa Alpha: Varsity Delnating: Art Eclitor, Violet: Medley: Vice President, Gavel Club: Community Lecture Service: Freshman Camp Committee. DOUGLAS D. MACDONALD Arts Jamaica, N. Y: Alpha Pi: Lilaeral Clulm: Duclcing Committee: Medley. CI-IARLES A. MANGANARO Engineering New Yorlc, N. Y. A. S. C. E.: A. S. T. M.: Engineering Demonstration Day: Mall Committee. EDMUND lVlANSUETO Engineering Bronx, N. Y. Meteorological Observer: l. Ae. S.: Air Transport Society Committee. 74 ff' il... . - w A - ,ff , , i Ei: YVII Q , . I L , , i , ,,,. - .... --Ag-'Z .K K l 1 f 5 l5'5'7:Efi?l "f' l'.-'ifi i " ' I K . 'I' itQ'f'fT'if'??,, :5a" '5' , Ag . HAY? .. SE Kg ,T ii , 41 I :Q 2,! 'v 'llf' f3,: .Q,', , pcm 3 , Q IIA ,Q 4 1 ' .. N .Q ' -211 . i ---" P1 ,r M : - - nt- f Q, 3 , - H ," +," . -',, If-'Al -'- '1r"i:5i21 .- A .'?i .i' """ A "5 ' 'f ALEXANDER N. MANUCK Arts 1VIaspett'1,L. I. Psi Chi. AUGUSTUS MARCHETTI Arts Corona, L. I. Rifle and Pistol Club: Scabbarci and Blade: Mau Committee. IRA M. MARKWOOD Engineering Yonkers, N. Y. A. I. Ctr. E.: Band: Scouting Society: Quadrangle. ARTHUR P. MARSHALL Engineering New York, N. Y. Phi Kappa Tau: A. S. C. E.: A. S. T. M. MARIO MARZITELLI Engineering Bronx, N. Y. I. Ae. S.: Mau Committee: Meteorological Observer: Air Transport Safety Committee. JOHN ANDREW MAYREIS Engineering Forest Hills, L. I. Phi Gamma Delta: A. 1. Ch. E.: Track: Intramurals. 75 I , 4, ,r .. Q if' I A . "WP:-Lil'-X, THOMAS MCHUGH Engineering Bronx, N. Y. A. S. M. E. AMBROSE NIEADE, JR. Engineering Pittsburgh, Penna. Tau Beta Pi: Cross Country: Traclc: A. l. E. E.: Pldotograplric Society: A. S, M. E.: Unclergracluate Engineer- ing Council: Co-Chairman, Demonstration Day: lntramurals. ROBERT MEAGHER . Engineering New Yorlc, N. Y. Traclc: Captain, Cross-Country. R-new - X- Y- -- - GEORGE MELOY Engineering Teaneclc, N. .l. President, Tau Beta Pi: Unclergracluate Engineering Council: l. Ae. S.: Co-Chairman, Engineering Demons- tration Day: Rifle Club: Class Day Committee: Perstare et Praestare. LEONARD F. MENCZER Arts New Yorlc, N. Y. Phi Sigma Delta: Scalaluarcl and Blacle: Heights News: Pistol ancl Rifle Cluln: Duclcing Committee. NOEL C. MENZL, JR. Engineering Crestwoocl, N. Y. Zeta Psi: Undergraduate Engineering Council: Manager, Basketball: President, S. A. E.: S. A. M.: Techni- frolic Committee: Duclcing Committee: R. O. T. C. Rifle and Pistol Clulo. 76 K- tx ,Z iq, . N ..... jr., W i- X- l l' r . ..f4"'i77?"TfSW"f'l - , ' -H.: YNY 53 1.11. I t-?'f'2"1"- . - , ft. I -i A jf' -:fl A 'gin' Q V 0 I' " ' L H 1 'L V4 M lg 1.1 . . I be ' gr-. 1 1 ' W . , . . .. img: . - - if M f - -- - . A ' - r - 'H' - ' ul- -' lik' ' ij L-3""EWJ:ittf"iI1m'1T 1 'f if ' f 'N 'GW ' E ' ,. F W .,.-.,.', E. 'f"'-j f jj t JOSEPH MIHINA Arts New Yorlc, N. Y. Vice President, Plai Lamlocla Upsilon: Stevenson Geological Society: A. l. M. E. ARTHUR MILLER Arts Broolclyn, N. Y. Presiclent, Stuclent Council: Perstare ct Praestare: Presiclcnt, Junior Class: Vice President, Sophomore Class: Director, Freshman Camp: Business Manager, Palisades Handbook: Editor. Palisades Handbook: Sports Editor, Violet: Varsity Swimming Team: Frestiman Swimming Team: Winner, Eucleian Pulalic Speaking Prize: Bristol Pre-Meclical Society: Slaull anal Bones: Duclcing Committee: .lotin Marsliall Law Society: Heiglits Pulalications Boarcl ot Control: Hall of Fame Players. MILTON MILLER Arts Brooklyn, N. Y. Varsity Football: Varsity Traclc: Skull and Bones: Prcsiclent, Stevenson Geological Society: Heights News: Presiclunt, A. l. M. E. ' SAMUEL MILLER Arts Weeliawken, N. J. tvlorse Mattieniatics ancl Pliysics Society: Traclt Team. EUGENE MILNER Arts New Yorlc, N. Y. Hall of Fame Players: Menorah Society: Bristol Pre-Medical Society: Deutsclaer Verein: Pliilosopliy Clula: Sociology Club: Mall Committee. ABE MINDES Engineering New Yorlc, N. Y. Radio Clulu: Pliotograpliy Society: A. l. E. E.: Engineering Demonstration Day Committee. 77 .-w '--. A ' -4'l'...!'-.5-.. -""NX A .Vx-'-Xfea . 'L 'L . r ' ka .A I If xg, . N 1 . -V V h , ' , i -" X KV , .--N xg :ff , . I. VI' L ! - -lx. X, , ' , -vp? .Zi 1 "U . f . , iif qgfe-i Qt- w r - -l' ' ' It ' I 3 - " 5,25 " 1 I-if ,Lg :iv - .. .. ,l. rj: ' ' A - 'I 1 2 l ' .im : N I ul- . . 'ef VY ' 'W L : A' 4 ,521 :fE.,.f.a.:.-...4:1qa132' ,, , , , , 55190 -of .-at -f ,WK -4 -'-A A li! Ctiess and checkers . . . speakers good and speakers bad . . . from bonnie Scotland . . . the student tnody gathers round to discuss vital problems . . . football, basketball . . . iaoolss, Mr. Force, more books, books yr 1 1 . ju. ..: , LQ. L .1 X indulge in a bit of mental. speculation . my friends, I have COIHS to tell you . . . what a bore . . . time marches on and with it the grand old man of the campus . . but the memory of him and his work remains. 'Qu , k T' ,X ,..wf'-f:f.g:W" ., is, .' gfl t ' 5 i A .183 ' 5 ' QC ,V 55353215 ,N ' T .: 33, i,., X Y X1 F 11 A f ,M V In l A. JL? Ze .4 ,K ---, . ,- ,.,, X A: , yew. - , Wk A13 VW, f V , Nl m KX .fx - Jr, "L ,-'f'g1-sam , ,W 4 5 ...Gift f mf I T- xynfi' ff a - 5 w .. 1 - 9 , Zum. Q2 -,E Rfk , :: 5 5? jf K Ye. 5 'S-vs ay V+.. me . get xL get fe "L si- r A Xxx., A , . '59-if if is 1 7 There is romance at the Heights . . . wolf, wolf . . may 1 cut in . the pied piper of the campus . . . what a game . . come on Witty . . the prospects for the coming year are very heartening . . . some kid, Ht say Male and female try to figure it out . . . stop shoving . . . is he smooth . . . the hoys enjoy good music . . . the crowds enjoy the play . . . and a good time was had hy an . . . its the same old story day in and clay out as we go on. 79 i.frJ',gw51,g,gfliigiwpir,.a3:,i..:JM rf.-1 Lf. ., . -, . , 4 .t HAROLD MITHERZ Arts New York, N. Y. Captain. Debating Team: President, Tau Kappa Aipimag President. Gavel Club. ANTI-IONY P. MONACO Engineering Jackson Heights, L. I. A. S. M. E. fAeroJ: I. Ae. S.: Photography Club: Newman Club. JULIUS MON EAGLE Arls Madison, N. J. STEPHEN MONTANARO Engineering Corona, L. I. A. I. Ch. E.: Freshman Cleo Ciutng Intramurals: Mail Committee: Ducking Committee. STUART DORSETT MORETON Engineering New York, N. Y. Radio Club: Photography Club. ISADORE A. MOSKOWITZ Engineering Bronx, N. Y. I. Ae. S4 Meteorology Oioserverg Air Transport Society Committee. 80 r I+" H' i Ax V ' W- '55,- ' P A wffffvf f-vw-'fi Y' ' .Y i 'ffwfl , .-.if ' . . ,.ri.g?"'i" iv . f,,V ,1Jf,- ,? f .. Q ' ' f LQYV . ' 'T it gg f A at A 55 ""1 f .i '4'. .1 .... .., . Sr i' ,..,, f'9 T... ' ...- RALPH MUELLER Engineering Mt. Vernon, N. Y. Associate Editor, Qucrcfrringleg Undergraduate Engineering Council: A. S. M. ABRAHAM MUFSON Arts Bronx, N. Y. Franicwoozi VX!iHiams Society: Mail Committee: Duciting Committee: Tennis RICHARD H. MY ERS Engineering Upper Darby, Pa. F JACOB NAIMAN Engineering BFOHXI N- Y- Eu S. NEWBERGER Engineering New York, N. Y- Quadrangle: Secretary Treasurer, A. S. M. E. ffxerol: i. Ae. S.: Ducicing Committee. SAMUEL NOOGER Engineering New XIOIIC, 81 is . X.. . . - 1, " X it misxwki' H. , .t ilk. .nnlli ' -If 11 RICHARD NUSSBAUM Arts New Yorlc, N. Y. Varsity Fencing. GUSTAVE GRE M LAND Arts New Yorlc, N. Y. Phi Sigma Delta: Tennis Squacl: Arts Baslqetloall Team: Junior Prom Committee: Heights News: Bristol Pre-Meclical Society: lntramurals. LEONARD PARIS Arts Brooklyn, N. Y. Beta Lamlzzcla Sigma: Managing Board, Violet: Undergraduate Scliolarsliip Committee: Slcull and Bones: Hill Historical Society: Jolwn Marsliall Law Society: Morse Matliematical and Physics Club: Vice Cliairman. Stuclent-Faculty Relations Committee: Plli Beta Kappa. -. . 1 .wxXW,... , . . Q HERBERT PASS Engineering Broolclyn, N. Y. l. Ae. S.: S. A. E.: A. S. M. E. fAerol. CHARLES W. PENRY Engineering Dallas, Texas Zeta Psi: Perstare et Praestare: Glee Club Manager: Scalnlnarcl and Blade: l. Ae. S.: S. A. E.: Freshman Camp - Committee: lntramurals. MARTIN PEPPER Engineering New Yorlc, N. Y. A. l. Cla. E.: Mall Committee: Duclaing Committee: R. O. T. C. Rifle Team. , 82 .- W if ,f'--+- Y ya 414 ff wr if 4 . fins 1 A . . ff . : .. . A. - - 'L ily g A , r , . gg Q 'gil L .EEF gi: I A 'V V M ig I ,U KQV ' 7 ' A ali! V I 5,193 5 ...gi .. ,. ia 1, 2 Q f frm. . , ' ' 'Eff I ,Q 'V .isp-Y 5 f .t - 2 f"'r - '4-1 - - M if 1,-3-Bl'J ii im A ft. .:iv.1fn2i:w-11 , 2 ' - L g 1 . 1.91.4 ,, , 79. . ,. .Jr .Ht .. Mm, 4 3 IRVING PERLSTEIN Arts New Rochelle, N. Y. Beta Kappa Nu: lnterfraternity Council: Psi Chi: Duclting Committee. 'ALFRED JOEL PEZENIK Arts Bronx, N. Y. Fencing Squad: R. O. T. C. Rifle ancl Pistol Cluh: John Marshall Law Society: Menorah Society: Treasurer. ltalica Cultura Society: Duclting Committee. CHARLES Pouvu' Arts New Yorlc, N. Y Beta Kappa Nu: Beta Lamhrla Sigma: Bristol Pre-Meclical Society: Mall Committee: Phi Beta Kappa. fm l l MURRAY A. POPPLE Arts New Yorlc, N. Y. Fencing Mall Committee: Ducliing Committee. LEON PORDY Arts New Yorlc, N. Y. Beta Lambda Sigma: Bristol Pre-Medical Society: President, Philosophical Society: German Lyric Society: Duclcing Committee: Phi Beta Kappa. ALPHONSO G. POSTIGLIONE Arts New YOIIC. N- Y- Alpha Phi Delta: lnterfraternity Council: Secretary, Junior Class: Stuclent Council: Lawrence House Com- mittee: Duclcing Committee. 83 ' K ,'J 1 4+ 11-4. " - 'ii - - SAMUEL PRESSER Arts Bronx, N. Y. EARLE PETER PURPURA Engineering New Yorlc, N. Y. A. l. E. E. YALE RABINOWITZ Aris Broolqlyn, N. Y. Vice-Cliancellor, Beta Lamlxla Sigma: Treasurer, Plfiilosopluical Society: Fresliman Fencing: Heights News, Blooclless Tlaursclay Committee: Plii Beta Kappa. l Q I WILLIAM M. RAND Engineering New York, N. Y. Slcull anal Bones: lVlall Committee: Senior Ball Committee: A. l. E. E.: A. S. M. E.: S. l. E.. ROBERT S. RATNER Arts Brooklyn, N. Y. Perstare et Praestare: Eclitor-in-cliielj, Violet: Tau Kappa Alplia: Secretary, Undergraduate Sclriolarslxip Com- mittee: Cliaimman, Student-Faculty Relations Committee: President, Hill Historical Society: President, .lolm Marshall Law Society: Varsity Detzating: Associate Eclitor. Critical Review: Alplia Pi Society: Adam Smitll Society: Gavel Clula: lst Prize, Lane lsecture Contest: Lawrence House Executive Committee: Heights Peace Council. HENRY REINGOLD Engineering New Yorlt, N. Y. Chairman, A. l. E. E.: Vice Presiclent, Eta Kappa Nu: Tau Beta Pi: Unclergracluate Engineering Council: Engineering Demonstration Day Committee: A. l. E. E.: Student Convention Day Committee: Delta Pl1iAlpl1a. 84 r' 'E G. lx , ,' ,ff sw , L - V . , . :ef I v ' """Y' "'--5-5.1 ' 'IL . , ff . I . if, , , , I .. i , . r.,,. , ftrv .rr g, I 1 if : 3 M --N A I - 1 5 'y W I 431,51 , -" , if ,Z 4 .rw M, sink, f - Q 43, - - . -- ' : 1 - H ' A - r .. :- :Q -- H - - ff- 1 . 5 ' ,: 1 A ir Wifvrgi f ,ggi Q l ffqff- ' -. ', .. ' .... , is ., ,. ':L:,1 ra'w.ff ff -- 'K' " :""-L GEORGE M. REISNER Arts New Yorlc, N. Y. Zeta Beta Tau: Varsity Manager. Baslcetlaallg Vice Presiclent, Freslimari Class: Palisades Handbook: Junior Prom Committee. JAMES S. REITMAN Aris Woodclilff Lake, N. J. Sociology Cluloz Pldilosopliy Clulaz German Club: lvlall Committee: French Club. GUSTAVE RICHTER Arls Tarrytown, N. Y. Delta Cliig Real Dragong Clxairman, Unclergrarluatc Library Committee: Glee Clulag Cliapel Clloirg Heights Newsg Eucleiari Literary Socielyg Duclcing Committee: Classical Society: lnterfraternily Council. DANIEL E, RILE Arts Hastings-on-Hudson, N. Y. Treasurer, Alpha Pi: Classical Society: U. S. C.: Psi Clli. BERNARD ROBINSON AVIS New York- N- Y- WILLIAB1 ROBINSON Engineering HO50LC11N- l 85 .xy - Y , 'dl-I-. J 'N "1Q,,f 'J ,E-:url gr -2 R ...-""" " "'F - IRVING RODNER Arts Yonkers, N. Y. French Society: Adam Smith Society: Ducking Committee. IVIILTON RONES Arts Bronx, N. Y. Intramurals: Matt Committee. SEYMOUR D. ROSEN ' Arls New York, N. Y. Franlzwood Wfittiams Society: Matt Committee: Freshman Prom Committee. i BERNARD ROSENBERG Aris New York, N. Y. University Literary Union: Matt Committee. DAVID A. ROSENBERG Arts Bronx, N. Y. Undergraduate Scholarship Committee: Beta Lambda Sigma: President, German Society: Adam Smith Society: Secretary, Philosophy Society: Assiciate Editor, Critical Review: Bristol Pre-Medical Society, Phi Beta Kappa. HARRY JACK ROSENBERC Arls Jersey City, N. J. Bristol Pre-Medicat Society: Intramurals: Sociology Clutn: Philosophical Society: Freshman Fencing: Matt Committee. 86 f""LQ .. 1 M " , as em is jg, ttsr A . .. . , ,. . . . tr N -7,45 A' 2. rv I tr.. V. nut- . - dl V799 I Q if ' ' . 1 - . ig.. fr-i,,s-53. r .. .r ' " iw-.ff A I " I VY Q ' f 21:4 1. fr its 5 "Elin: ' X ' ' f ' 542. -gif -U V ' 4 ,, , f Q V' r te' .v " H 1' Mg- .-. if . f , . A , .A wt!-A , - in , nf- . A - V4 ,.i.Q,+ fr ' iff . ' iff diffr e - 4,,zf-:uw 4. ..--1 :.....4,.', A 1 MONROE ROSENBLUM Duclcing C JAMES ROSEMAN EUGENE ROTH WILLIAM RUBIO Arts Bronx N Y U. S. C4 French Society Pre ldenl Classxcal Soclety P111 Beta Ixwppa ALVIN M. SACKLER rts Broollyn Beta Lambda PSI FYHHLYVOCA XAXIHIGITIQ Society Polzsadcs Iiflnflboob RAYMOND SACKLER Arts Brooklyn Psi Chip Adam Smith Vxce Presxdent Franlwood Vxfnllrams Soclety Palzsuflc Handbook -P ,-rf PAUL SADLON Engineering New York, N. Y. A. I. Ctr. E.: Freshman Giee Club: Intramurals: Matt Committee: Ducking Committee. WILLIAM SALKALN Engineering Brooklyn, N. Y. STANLEY Sfxiviowirz ' Arts XXAOOCHHHVSH, L. I. Psi Chi: Franlcwoori Vfiuiams Society. STANLEY SAVIET Arts Teanecli. N. J- Stuctent Council: President, Sociology Ctutxg Heigllis News: Bristol Pre-ixfieciicat Society: Franlcwood Williams Society: Literary Union: Ptiitosoptiy Club: Little Symphony Orchestra. CLARENCE J. SCHEIN Arts New York, N. Y- Vice Chancellor, University Literary Union: Secretary, German Ctuin: Menorah Society: Ptiiiosoptmy Club: Bristol Pre-Medical Society: Matt Committee: Phi Beta Kappa. LERCY SCHELLER Aris New York, N- Y- 88 s dl' A ,-A f . HJ, 1 I 'I Wngff 1.-.W-,E-.7, - ., . ', i tv' ' -,. ',- '-. ' , "". . f ' I. ., ' Z Y,--+L, v nw '1 2 W ,Q My-A 1 nw 44 bv r if JA Y JJ, wi 1 f- 1 :Lis 'fy ' - ,. . .. r , 'fl if , - ..,, u it-rg ff ,M r rr , Q55 Z! CL.: ,i - ' - 1- 0 Y Mig! - ky: - ,Qv.s ,j:f, W V 51 .5, , Y -, Fei L7 5 p- A , " 1+ 1 - 4 .- -- -, - 2 -E ' V- "1 -41' 1, '-, 'A +-. .. A 1 wr.. " .--wwf W ff- C 1 YV'ji'L'f'Q, . f . A A i ia ig 2 fi 4. 'f - fra 9332 g . . , . ..... .. ....-..-.,..- ,,.., . E, GERHARD Sci-1L1sss1NcER Arts New York, N. Y. ARNOLD M. SCHOENFELD Arts New York, N. Y. Pi Lambda Phi: Manager, Varsity Tennis: Hall of Fame Players: American Student Union: Heights Little Symphony Orchestra: Mau Commitlec: R. O. T. C. Rifle and Pistol Club: French Society. SAUL SCHOTTER Arts New York, N. Y. Secretary, Literary Union: French Society. MARVIN SCI-IULDENFREI Engineering Bronx, N. Y. I. Ae. S.: A. S. NI. E. fAero,: Piioiograpllic Society: Radio Club. SHERWOOD C. SCI-IWARTZ Arts Bronx, N. Y. Beta Lambda Sigma: Psi Chi: Bristol Pre-Medical Society: Frankwooci VViHiams Society. WILLIAM SCHWARTZ Engineering Brooklyn, N. Y. A. S. M. E. 89 -L ml :L,,. V ji ' -" 'lx "' x' .. s... ' ,--, -',QQ!. So oft to wort: we go - Lamb at his lessons .... Little Hiloen - that was no scarlet Iacly, that was a rect . . . Lustig in a representative pose - one Way to become popular . . Kaplan considers - two A,s or not s....,,., Two A,s that is the question . the 'Stark factsn ..... Making the grade . lt,s nice Work - and Glaclestone gets it . . Bei mir bist du SCITOCD. 1 f, f 4 ' 1' ,i fl " .Y ! .1 ., 'ei ' 'L-H "fra .--W . j ff r ,2' " ' W1 f . A . f Q' ,J LL, -- f , W . P ,f ' ,ww y - ' '- 5 l , . XS-N H if 4 .f .., mmf "fm---Q--, 1, . ,Qi - i mp-4f"'ff, V,-.. . L .I2f,,if' , " i"?'l9', ' ' 1' nf v . Ligv , f-Q V M I VT ,if ' ' ,,r, 1: V3 5 1. iftnrn W-: . ., 1- ttt?f'f4"T?Z.if-f-fxi1.i?1'Tff?ii'5? M ,J , 1 -5- . i ' ' '-if 1 ' ' , A f ,,,i.2,,..,,,,ygggi--.,,if.' . "" T' 0 cr- M'-aw' 16?---wwf744vxaig:f1Q2.Lb,.a mimi-rifrgmxmw f,.,L.,.,,.59M:afvi.Qs4,. - if 5- Steep my littte one steep my pretty one . u ' They Shan not pass - - - . . Sticking up for the class To-night my love H Kanan talks fast . , , , . . The military Inawt ..... Dress rehearsal for men only ..... six pillars of wisclom and nine steps to success , ,.,a.t,,,-35,1 V-2 Ratner foncues the family fortune ..... Smile damn you ..... 91 -,.,---,- - V - qv it. K Y , 2 , ,,,. ' ,.,i X M , f -51555 X Y I , X. 4 L 2' -: -f,. Q.: , f'Qfqe.:1?'-1 f' 4 Q473fQ"fi-1' 35 5 61'L.f2,.'5,,,1fQit21-:A , -gfawgr' Lid., . ,, , A , , w he 14 123 T12 .. K ' ' M' .sf ns.-N. ,V Q ,M ., 3. V14-fssniai-L-,,,A!it. , :Ji..,K., , "lv ',", ' xi' fx - 1- ' ' , , .,,- M ,-,xg V, If V V Gravis V. SCUDDER Engineering Pelham, N. Y. S. A. M. LEONARD SEGLIN Engineering New Roctuette, N. Y. A. I, Ch. E.: Unctergractuate Engineering Council: Ducking Committee: Ntorse Mathematics and Physics Society: Swimming, JACK SHAPIRO Arts Vxfest New York, N. J. Business Ntanager, ixfiecueyg French Society: Secretary, Franicwoocl Xvittiams Society, Undergraduate Library Committee: Adam Smith Society: Gtee Club: Hott of Fame Players: Heigtits Peace Council: Quadrangle. IRVING SH E1NHARTz Engineering Bronx, N. Y. A. t. Cn. E4 Ducicing Committee. HAROLD MURRAX' SHUSTER Arts New York, N. Y. Ducking Committee. IRVING Jusrin Smear. Arts New York, N. Y- Philosophy Club: Sociology Club: Ducking Committeeg Camera Ciuiw. 92 'ir 'I 511.341 .. E - ' 1 ' ' H 'iii' N ,. 4 f .f-I -- -ffifmi' V v Z, r ALVIN JAY SIEGLER Engineering New Yorlc, N. Y. Eta Kappa Nu: Unclergracluale Engineering Council: A. l. E. E.: lnstitulc ol Radio Engineers: Raclio Clula: Pliolograpliic Society: Quadrangle. JOHN CARL SILTANEN Engineering Brooklyn, N, Y, Psi Upsiloni Tau Beta Pi: S. A. E.: A. S. lxl. E.: Glicler Cluloz Scalalvarcl anrl Blade. JOHN SKOP Engineering New Yorlc, N. Y. l 1 i LAWRENCE B. SLOTNIK Arts Vxfliite Plains, N. Y. MARCUS JOEL Sivuru Arts New Yorlc, N. Y. Psi Chi: Presiclent, Franlcwoocl Williams Society: Chairman, Forums Committee: Glee Clulo: Heights News: Nlecllcy: Ancliron Club: Claess Cluln. ROY SMITH Engineering Broolclyn, N. Y. Tau Beta Pi: l. Ae. S.: S. A. E.: A. S. lvl. E. fAerol: Hall of Fame Players. 93 Vx . , TJ -S .. lx LL., A , ...ff ,,, ,B-antigf .1,-,AN Q , -,,,,.,z..,, .,---- , E , . 41.1 I, l 1' 1 .I Q K , .. . i . A f-55 .. fi. ' for A """"" l-gas" .511 he " "1 'F ' ' - 91 - 5' , T . . uf .' in 'll' -' 'T Q 4. ' .. . ' 111 J - ,.-ii' 4 ' f f' 1 -5. , I " ' if -iv L als ,J 'fig 1 ,. 'LQ A 13, 115 H .4 ' - ' - If 9 1 ' ' WZ. .-.1'Yii"'!',"'.,"' ' ., Q ' Pl?-'.. ' - . E. , - ' f ' . , l lv ' -..-If! 5,1 A --1' , LTAY l I 2 1 mel"v2'.j.EZ'Z'...,'."fQ'.'fffflfff ....., l?'f"'.' ' ..f..i ,, '31 "1.1Li?1'a' "'f?'1'1:?'t'f' '- -'YF ""'?"!'17"' 79" Z "7 :K ' Y 7 'Y ' " ' ' ' l v ' ' A ' -l-- r' ,f x x ff '.: TH, in ARTHUR SMITHLINE Arts New York, N. Y. Managing Board, Violet: Stevenson Geological Society: Photography Society. JOSEPH I. SCNNENREICH Arts New York, N. Y. Editor-in-Chief, Medley: Perstare et Praestare: Heights News: Adam Smith Society: Violet: Green Room' . Halt of Fame Players: Critical Review: Dehating Team: Gavel Club: T. K. A.: Varsity Fencing Team: John Marshall Society: Deutsche Verein: University Literary Union: Slcuu and Bones: Menorah Society: A. S. U.: Chairman, Btootltess Thursday: Delegate, League of Nations Conference: Chairman, Fordham Rally. BERNARD SPANO Engineering Bronx, N. Y. EUGENE SPH-Z , Arts Forest Hills, N. Y. Undergraduate, Scholarship Committee: Phi Beta Kappa. ROBERT CARLTON STACK Engineering Ossining, N. Y. Zeta Psi: President, Newman Club: Secretary, S, A. IW.: Swimming Team: Duclcing Committee. BERNARD SABIAN STARR Arts Brooklyn, N. Y. Junior Prom Committee: Ducliing Committee. 94 . rg -,P ,A . M, ' ' 7' - - , "WZ"-ff X . 7 ' ,Ls ff-+4 nr ' "TR :aw I '22sf't:af 'fi' 1.:- " I ' i ' ',.2 3 f',1'fw57 , N , . - .1 M , . -f-- -1M'j1,f:i""- 1 V. 5 2 t ' . . 1 4' it , M , s . 7, , , 'yi' .NTL . . , fd . E , H, ,, J.,-21, -, ..- 2 .- ff.. . .. .-f , --F , 2 ' .ug , 1 5: - : : - . ' r '11 1' . ir: - .' rf .-V, A -T .ze ' 'A H ...sf . , .- .. U 1.95 3 , Y T V- KV, .5 .. t fred- , . v A . - 14 at Y f s . .- at- f.: iw-'V- ,-eymgg ,- -:tv f r gg 'MIL AIJ - V Vero 2 . ..nteu,a N., tw - ti 4 ' lisa,-fi-,.:4:aaa la-4.-. -w:1"i'1f1-1 V 'o:z.Z2,4Qiaxxs:arv.a1,i:M:a6aiutzfu?M'Q? frm.-:'.zfii 4 ..rrmemte.eo21f711'f1,v -L ef- Men ff -' -: ' A - ' ' A W A -L'-'mfr 4' 1 . HERBERT J. STEIN Arts New York, N. Y. Zeta Beta Tau: Violet: Heights News: Chaimian, Junior Prom: Heigtmts Chairman, Att University Frotics: FRANZ RUSSELL STEINBACHER BERNARD STEINBERG Ntanager, Basketball. Engineering Baltimore, Maryland Tau Beta Pi. Arls Jackson Heights, L. I. Secretary, Stevenson Geological Society: ttalica Cultural Society: txftenorati Society: Duclcing Committee. HOWARD STOCKER Arfs New Rochelle, JY. Track: Ptxi Lambda Upsiton: French Society: Photography Club. IRVING RONALD STORCH ANS New York- N- Y- ' Pi Lamtzcla Phi: Varsity Tennis Team. Dfxvm F. SUN1uN Sancltiam Medical Preparatory Fettowstiipz Arts New Yorlc, N. Y. Beta Lamtacla Sigma: Bristol Pre-Medical Society: Ptxi Beta Kappa. 95 5 fB,,5,,- ' V LF.: ' as LEONARD KENNETH SXVENSON Engineering New Yorlc, N. Y. Gmega Delta Phi. Tau Beta Pig Presiclent, A. S. lVl. E.: Scalulnarcl anal Blacleg Undergraduate Engineering Councilg Demonstration Day. FRANK TAFFEL Engineering New Yorlc, N. Y. A. S. C. EHA. S. T. M. ' JOHN A. TANCEL A Engineering Broolclyn, N. Y. Clueer l.eacler: A. l. lf.. E.: Duclqing Committee. ABRAHAM TANNENBAUM Arts Broolclyn, N. Y. Delneating Teamg Clriairman, Senior Ball: lxfloclel Senate: Adam Smith Society: l'lill Historical Society: Gavel Club. RALPH ALLAN TEITELBAUM Arts New Yorlc, N. Y. Hamilton Commerce Society: Arts Baslcctluall Teamg Sociology Clulz. DANIEL TERZANO Aris Broolclyn, N. Y. Secretary, ltalica Cultural Sooietyg Slcull ancl Bones: lVlall Committee: Sociology Club: Senior Ball Com- mittee: Newman Clulzg Pllilosopliy Clula. if I ' f ,V ,..Ngwiw,W ...- . . - . 1 'L ' ' f ,. Af' . 3 I I I. r r r ': '1' Y 3 11' , Aw' tf:i'ri?'2xxN .. . I . ,L M V.: 553 2, W A E 7 A . ' J .-.. 5, J , gf fm? i. 4 1 i . . f . , . -,gl .. X' .-a t Q 1 ' ll. fi' lt 3 fig. Z 5 . . - .Y W .V .553-ii ag? in if r ' 1' -'-" var.. ' L'-W . ' ' ' ' ' rffw-i - '15-1 'sf " 13 'T5?"T I E E ' 4-'- , . ,..,., , H .,,,, ,,,. ,..,,, ,,, , . ,,,, , ,.,.,. , . . l JOSEPH BURR TIFFANY Arts Manhasset N. Y. Zeta Psi: Art Eclilor, Afeilleyp Vinlcl: Traclqp Duclcing Committee, JOHN T. TORIAN Engineering New York, N, Y Treasurer, Eta Kappa Nu: A. l. E. E.: l. R. E.: Glec Clulo: Choir: Clrristian Science Organization Rarlio Clula JEROME TREIHAFT Ang New York, N' Y Freslwman Baslretlvall: Fra-slwman Baseball: Junior Prom Committee: Duclaing Committee. JACK TROY Aris New Yorlc, N. Y. Bristol Pre-Medical Society: Pllotograplwy Club: Mall Committee: R. O. T. C. Rifle and Pistol Club. FRANCIS A. VITOLO N Engineering New Yorlc, N. Y. Phi Gamma Delta: A. S. C. E.: A. S. T. M.: lnterfratemity Council: Newman Club: Senior Ball Committee. ALFRED WALD Arts Bronx, N. Y. Franlcwoocl Williams Society: Treasurer, Menoralr Society: Sociology Clulaz Mall Committee: Freshman Fencing: Freshman Traclc. 97 44.57-.O Y . - rr - ----4 ' "S+-Y , J---. . - x-'- M . M V , HOWARD WILLIAM WANDER Aris New Yorlc, N, Y. Freshman Track. SAMUEL FREDERICK WASSERMAN Arts Boston, Mass. Hall of Fame Players: Junior Prom Committee: Nlau Committee. IVIYRON A. WASYLKIXV Engineering Hudson, N. Y. A. S. C. E.: A. S. T. M. HOWARD WATSKY Arts Mt. Vernon, N. Y. MILTON WAXENFELD Arts New York, N- Y- JQSEPH WEGBREIT Engineering New York, N. Y. A. S. M. E.: Photographic Society: R. O. T. C. Rifle and Pistol Club: Mau Committee: Intramural Track. 98 "A , -frfimfr-sw.'E:f'3' f 1. -' if .i"' f Q" ff . ,... ...A f . 1 . ' 1 CY I 'ge ,L I MAL . .-.,,. . . . . ...1,-,. " ii" ' :rf . ' if ,, A. 1 1 A 5 J " .1 L A . -' A ,.. . A- Y A". -Hs: vA.f.'5'3:4-ill. ,Wi c ', I :A I ' Kita ' j:!..,A, '.f"vW' ",'. if 1- 'fl' fg ffj 1 I .s-' --... rl- M... f HOWARD R. WEIL Arts Brooklyn, N. Y. Treasurer, John Marshall Law Society: Junior Prom Committee. RALPH B. WEIL Arts Brooklyn, N. Y. Alpha Pi: Secretary, Psi Chi: Bristol Pre-Medical Society: Philosophy Club: Mali Committee. LEONARD NVEINBERG Arts New York, N. Y, HARVEY WELLMAN Arts New York, N. Y. Chancellor, Literary Union: Sociology Club. GILBERT WEISS Engineering Bronx, N. Y. A. S. M. E.: 1. Ae. S.: Undergraduate Engineering Counciig Tecimifrolic. HAROLD JAMES WEISS Engineering Brooklyn, N. Y. President, S. I. E.: A. S. M. E.: Undergraduate Engineering Council. 99 . "K V Y 's 1 . X , --N, ' ' . .. " "v. J'- ,,1ln.,l""S A. 1. 1 , -xc. . . . . R - . 1 - 4, V-v N. 4 Z, . ?j . .,ll . A R ll 1 ""- . V .',.-.,- f. I .X 'I-'iz l - 'f P .I 'f ,ff Eff Y " ni" K7 ,. T I .X ' ': . , ' fi ' jim.-' 1 Q gi .iq " 1 " 1 fi 1 '51 J' W 'ft' ww . 'hw 2 . 1 -: ,A lm: -v1v5f.h.,t,v,. ,,. L, 3 ' , J' , - . - 1 ,IL - - Q n V f -. - 1- V- 1- ' N v -- ..1,' " I" ' ' i ' ' ' ' ""' "' 'V r' ' ' 'i "' ' . 1... -!....d!:..: i MAXNVELL WPIITE Engineering New Yorlc, N. Y. Traclc: Cross Country: Plwotograpliic Society: Skull and Bones: A. S. lvl. E.: A. l. E. E.: Engineering Demons- tration Day Committee: lntramurals: Chairman, Fresliman Cap and Tie Committee. ROBERT A.Vv'1ENER Aris New Yorlq, N. Y. Pi Lamlscia Phi: President, Frcsliman Class: Stuilent Council: Vice President, Hamilton Commerce Society. lnterlraternily Council: Violet: Perstare et Praestare. KEITH S. WILSON Engineering Bolivar, N. Y. Psi Upsilon: Glee Clulaz Band: Orcliestra: Flying Club: Unrlergraciuate Athletic Board: S. Ae. S. F ABRAHAM l. WINOGRAD Arts New York, N. Y- Rifle ancl Pistoi Clulu: Vice Presirlent, Stevenson Geologic Society: Hall of Fame Players. SIDNEY WISHNITZ Engineering Bronx. N. Y- Vice Presiclent, A. S. Nl. E. fAeroJ: Quadrangle: l. A. S.: S. A. E.: Co-Chairman, Sophomore Sweater Committee: Traci: Team. LAWRENCE H. WISHNOFF Arts New Yoric, N. Y. Baslretlvall' Baseball: Mall Committee: Duclcing Committee. 1'-'A' f" Z W, fi .. as W re f :riz ... Zfi r-.. .' lj, -- gd' f X I 'yW,.iWr , ' I 3. V H W: J X 1. .- X n V- , :I ,- . MY: .. x Y , 4, g 4 'fl' L L ' " 'Q:r,. ' ,' . X ,, . xl, ,. - :fir + , . : 6. T 5 1' i " f "ffff""f?. 'r w at . R 4 ,WMI 'A' iii! r if .- Ii kg i- I V I ' , "- 1 . 4 .-1 P R : . Amy- ' ':':,." - 355, 5 F gy . - . 'zz' M .. -ii, . r. 4 i , .J K , V3 ...Ev .,,,.., .- .1 -.A - H, rn' A f ' "'4,fl ff , ,4 f f ,cv f a- 1 fm,-Wg, frf 'MY . .. ........ IRNVIN WITTY Arts Brooklyn, N. Y. Freshman Baslcetloall: Varsity Baslietluallg Freshman Baselyall: Frcsliman Camp: Duclcing Committee, NATHANIEL CONNER Vv'oL1.1N Arls Bronx, N, Y, Bristol Pre-lvleclical Society: Psi Clii: Literary Union: Clmcelqer and Clqggg Club, HAROLD E. YOUNG Args Yonkers, N- Y- Duclcing Committee. JOHN J. YOUNG Engineering Kingston, N. Y. Delta Clii: Glee Clula: Cliapel Clloir: Scalxlmarcl ancl Blacle: A. l. Cli. E.: Rifle ancl Pistol Clula. JOHN YOUNG Engineering New Yorlc, N. Y. Tau Beta Pi: A. S. Nl. E. fAeroJ: l. Ae. S.: Engineering Demonstration Day Committee. RICHARD H. ZACHARIASON Arls Port Chester, N. Y. Morse lxflatllematical ancl Physics Sociely: Duclcing Committee. 101 , ex' ' - - i-:xx V Y "gn ,. Parte expouncts a tittte about Vxfitty IV. . Fryer could use a tittte extra-sensory perception . tt'16 Ctiancettor Hnatty gets a cap and gown Lilley is tootcing for a new strata . . anct Prof. Nason ttings American tit to the tour Winds . Vwltiatt PFOIC. JOHGS without a tnootc I t . anct Baer without a Bible. 102 v,,,,,-.L....-,,- 1 Time, inexorable . . . sectate tick of a master ctoctc . . . . . steps, deliberate and slow .... quick, nervous tick of a pocket watch . . steps eager. restless, atert .... . f - i ' 1312 . restrained impatient quivering in the stancts as the sunlight pours clown, tint, mellow . . . . . soporotic . . . . . marctiing torwarct sturctity, gropingty, courageously, toward a new world, another world ..... 105 ,,- .--xx B 4 .f,. f QQ, , , wt. as . ,I-,wifi l 5 -iaeazm. a . sf' 1' -1 V IRVINC ZALEXVITZ Arts New York, N. Y. Basketball: Heigrllls News. NORTON ZAVON Arls New York, N. Y. Pi Lambda Phi: Secretary, Alpha Pi: Chairman, Senior Party Committee: Heights News Staff: Delegate to Nortel Senate: Phi Bela Kappa. ARTHUR ZEICER Arls Bronx, N. Y. Associate Editor, Criliral Rravicw: A. S. U.: Psi Chi: Frankwood Xyiiliams Society: Literary Union, HERBERT ZINBERG Engineering New York, N. Y. Undergraduate Engineering Council: President, A. S. M. E. ffxeroyz Varsity Band: Quadrangle: I. Ae. S.: Engineering Demonstration Day: Mall Committee: Technifrotic Committee: Concert Band. IRVING LAWRENCE ZIRNSKY Arts Brooklyn, N. Y. Secretary, John Niarshail Society: Stevenson Geological Society: Violelg Student-Faculty Committee. BERTHOLD ZOFFER Arts New York, N. Y. Freshman Fencing Team: German Club: Bristol Pre-Wledicat Society: Vice President, Quaigh: Literary Union: 1VIedIey:Violel. IO4 ,f fi fr ,f' 5. ' AVVY :H Q Y . .av gm: FZ MQ, W , L Z' 4 f Iwi., 2' .,,. , . if ,ffl gl k J A , W i In' . Jgfr' , X , , : ii.. f J 1 . i A f' ' 21 ' . it F' is . wma. A Q.. . U . F- ., M 4. f f -in . '35 'Q W2 , J - ' . " .2 .- -Ei ... k. . T .- ' H . ff 1.f,,,,f.f gr , .TW -,fM,..?.- :'w.,:-me-.A . . . .. . "' "" ".. .'::,' :.. ' .- +1 -Mem-5-fe-.' - f .i...4.mz.af4Ea,.J.h,.. ,4:mA5M5+J2so:wh.a:nwZrvfw:Q1.7S1154ximfmiihmm-4624v::e.:f5.awr,-im-ff 11142161--4 -rf -0-'r"W-+f- X " - ' - -- r F 9' -'V' " 'U HAROLD ZOLAN Arts New York, N. Y. Bristol Pre-Medical Sociciyg Univvrsity Literary Union, Gorman Society: Philosophical Society: Niall Commillee. JEROME J. ZUFLACHT Aris Bronx, N. Y. Manager, Theatre Ticket Qfiiceg French Ciuiog Bristol Pre-ivieciicai Societyg ixfiorse Matiwematicai and Physics Society: Phi Beta Kappa. JOSEPH NACHAY Engineering Bronx, N. Y. Tau Beta Pi. 105 X.. i L..--'SR ix ' ' Y to ""'-"'ao- nuns ' 1 HAS Out In Life VX712 Xvencl Our Xvayn X 1 :fr f H gf ' 2, If ,W . f . I . mf - 4 . ' 146 2 "5 ' ' .- 1.Zif,,, ,,, J I ? 'EK' 2 N J sawwgg, -il, . f f Q 4- f"'1'1 '-19 5351 3 : ' v , Af? nf ,: bf . .4fYf'i' 4fv'ELW 'i, , ,, ,.! ji 31 5 ,, H W Wifi' iw J-04, , f ' ' ry. . , Y ,L A l:'+-fs. Q- f - "AM ., n Q. ' hfigsz w Y ,-,,., fs ,,,,,:1 2 r an -IJ - Q. , " . . V va 1 f Y .,g',:-,cl 45, I, Ml.fAg5..fjy1E3 'Ar , '-'igjf 527-.5 M.-2:5- W pf: -5 A, xggw: - L J" gif. Q x ' 2 , - ' -J' A eifi , H 5 2 ,141 , .. .: fi-e '- wb,-Q ,-1 VL . . M,-14 IL. .... m"?,: 'me waz-'.f-z,w-:fc-vm 'z'f',f."gr.1v1wwnwav 'fif-,mn ff ,W-vi' m4..,.,1-2. ff mia: ..,3,s:vz fffLiff'i4Yf'f'z:xef'G'v3 wi.,Vswimxzs4.ev::,..3.Z::?4A'c-mmf1b.w:f.-z'1':N-un,..1-pay. an ,X M . Nmlagwfgiazgfiimf . --.f"T"'1-'-f""' JOSEPH UADDARIO N Septemher 1955 the present Junior class hecame memhers of the class of ,59. Qrienta- tion had hegun in Freshman camp and was continued during the first Weeks of school. The vigor and vitaiity of the ctass Was shovvn in the First hig inter-ciass hattie of the year, the Chapel Door fight when the class of ,59 actministerect a crushing defeat to the Sophomores, and in the annual song-fest, the freshmen carried oft au the honors. Shortly thereafter class elections Were heict and Jess Luhitz was eiectect President, Thomas Breit, Vice-President, and Stephen De Simone, Secretary. April of the next year saw a success- ful promenacte at the Hotei Taft uncier the chairmanship of iViurray Karron. The success of the class in its many activities was crowned When it receivect the class hun from the seniors. The heginning of the second year saw the eiection of Morton Xvahi as Ciass President. Ai Grimm as Vice-President and Martin Martin as Secretary. Under the leadership of Joe Steneic, Stcuii and Bones did an excellent joh in ectucating the freshmen, who were forced to toe the mark or face the possihiiity of dire consequences. For the second successive year the ciass of ,39 Won the interciass sing and hy virtue of this and their class-spirit proveci their right to the class hun. The sociai caienciar of the class was extensive and varieci in content. important class functions inciucteci a successful Christmas ctance hetci in the gym under the chairman- 107 . , ,,., - or Y V- . ,V--X51-" ,. 1 .-.y ref- Mir- ia- . -i--W. f 1, ,anim A ' 1115 r .. ,' .ff ,, X .lim 1 JOSEPH DADDARIO ROBERT SCHLESINGER f , , . .. i-v-f--- -L ship of Rohert Ka11er, and a stag run at the Peter Stuyvesant Hotet the next semester. The month of March was ushered in hy the crown- ing sociat a1tair of the Sophomore year. The Soph Saunfcr hetd on the Astor Roohto the music ot Vincent Lopez and his orchestra. With Bruce Hectcer and Gordon Rowe as Chairmen the attair was a great success. Because ot a tacutty decision, the offices of presi- dent, vice-president and secretary were vacated and new elections were hetd. Murray Davidoff was etected president, John Petach vice-president and Herhert Friedman secretary. The tottowing autumn saw the c1ass away to a fast start. Ar the etections hetd in May ot' the preceding year, Joe D,Addario was etected president. Bot: Schtes- singer vice-president and Herhert Friedman reetected secretary. A Under the ahte teadership ofA1 Kaptan and Harotd Kort appointed co-chairmen of the Matt Commit- tee the matt was caretutly guarded from the un- sanctified tread of freshmen and sophomore feet. On March 25th the ctass of ,39 reached its socia1 apex in the Junior Promenade. The 1'1ote1 St. Moritz, over- looking Centrat Part: was the stage for this high spot of co11ege hte. 1n a11 fjietds ot' cottegiate endeavor the ctass of ,59 has distinguished itsett. James Moody was etected Editor-in-Chief of the Heights News in his Junior year and Bernard Freedman, a junior, was appointed Sports Editor. When the ctass of 1956 graduated it conferred a signat honor on the c1ass of 1959 as the one emhodying in highest degree the quatities of enthusiasm and ethi- ciency. This trophy is awarded hy the ctass that has won it Iast, to the ctass which it feets most capahte of representing the ideats of the cottege and is the highest award that any c1ass can win as a unit. At the hegin- ning of its second year, the c1ass, under the teadership ot the president of Stcutt and Bones, and his organiza- tion hattted a tar 1arger Freshman Ctass to a standstitt and managed to enforce the freshman regutations. A record was atso set for the numher of freshman shang- 108 .Y I 1 I 'K A 1, I 'll H '---v, 9,1 6 A r 9" A f gl R ' 54" f ,,, av 4 17,-, a "Z'v 5:,,,1sf,-Q Q 'VY -A 'A 5 . 1' fir Q., ' Mp n g " L pf- ' -' u - . 1, "iw-.f 'X I ' 9'32" ,..f - '- wifi ' 1 f --SLA-3, 'Q 'W ffcf. '--f Q .- ' f' ' ' ' '- 'W' haied to Hunter to he depantsed. The interctass sing trophy was atso retained hy the victorious Ctass ot 1939. The Junior Prom as usual was the hest attair ot the entire year. Amid the heautitut surroundings of the Hotet Saint Moritz hattroom, the Juniors and their guests dined and danced. The guests of honor tor this affair were Gtenda Farrett and Donatd Cook, screen stars of great retcnown. They were introduced hy Harotd Wax, since he hrought them down. Bitt David- son presented each ot them with a crown and they hoth delivered speeches expressing their appreciation of this signat honor. The Junior Ctass otlicers proved themselves out- standing teaders on the campus. Joseph D,Addario was the outstanding potiticat figure of the year. Norman Cherner, who won his ottice unanimousty, had a tot of history to record and the secretary, Herhert Fried- man, had a great many notes to tatce. The othcers tried their hardest to matce their ctass a good one and from the wort: they did the ctass succeeded. Many memhers of the Junior Class distinguished themsetves during this year. On the Violet. Atfred Lowy, Herman Eisen, Herman Sussman, and Harotd Engel stood out. On the Heights News James Moody was editor-in-chief, aided hy such worthy puhticists as Stephen Fischer, Jerome Yestco, Rohert Katter, and Abraham Ahrams. The Critical Review employed the tatents of Rohert Katter and the Medley used Harotd Nemseids services, and Arnotd Deutschmans tn sports, Bitt Davidson and Herman. Sussman were outstanding. However they were only two ot many who participated in athletic activities. The Junior Ctass memhers wilt he ahte to Pitt the empty rantcs tett hy this yearys Senior Class and they wilt he ahte to make a good joh of it. The Junior Class has spent three Years OH the Heights Campus. They have added richty to att divi- sions ot student activity. in schotarship, in extra- curri- cular activities, in athletics, they teave a martc that cannot he easity wiped out. They march on to even greater ptaces during their fourth year. 109 HERBERT FRIEDMAN NORMAN CHERNER mei! :Y HV' w .N J -. ---43 1,4 , ,, V .K X ik 1940 MfXR"l'IN XVITTE ROM the annuai Fresh-Soph Chapel Battle to Bioociiess Thursday the Class of '40 Freshman showed the way and defeated the Class of '59 decisively. The highlight of the annual Btoocitess Thursday Battle in 1956 was the kictnapping of the ,59 president, Morton Wahl, to Vxfashington Square where he was left with only underctothes and four cents. Following the two months of hazing, the fresh were fuuy inctuctect as true sons of New York University when they were immersed in the Fountain ot Knowledge. in the class elections which were held shortly after the ducking, Martin Vxfitte was etecteci president. Marshall Whittach, vice-presidentg Lawrence Hart, secretary, and Rohert Davis, historian, were elected for the other positions. The sociai activities of the class were started with a stag smoker held on Decemher 5 in the Rainhow Restaurant. Following a 'Fresh Hopn in the Gymnasium on January 8, the class eagerly supported its format on March 29 at the Tower Room of the Park Central with Jerry Blaine and his orchestra furnishing the music. Arriving at the campus for its seconct year in the University, the newly-advanced sophomores went to work hazing the incoming freshmen. Twenty-six memhers of Sicuti and Bones were elected at the encl of the previous year, hut twenty-two more were chosen hy the society at the heginning of the schoot year 1957-58. John, the Cop, ruined all plans for an amhush prepared for the freshmen, when he unlocked one ot' the doors and with treachery the fresh surpriseci the 140 men. Again the class of 1940 ushered in their social season with a stag this time at the Gold Room of the Manhattan Qpera House. Marvin Christenfetd was chairman of the 2 I g W lwif m V' f , ., If ,Q 'E r- '- , .L 1 flag. if-far-,WX ,U A I . P 1 .A ,Q 9- ---- 1,1--a z Q , ,A I- A f , , f. ,. f - ,.l"""' f, . v... . 4:9 , , ' ft' ..f of- ?z 'f 1 . T ,, . an ' -.. l ,W " 9' -r""N 5 .iv - ' V 1 , - ' A.-r-fu.'ff,v.':, wa.-1 , - .. fi. 1' - ' .-'H 1. 2:2 ' f' 1. r' -,Q f' ' f Q V, f Z ' . in 1 , A V- fhaiff' ,i f ' ' ff? r V -if '4"Ef-: ' - 51 ?' 3 YY it ff- 4441-' ,1 saga: 2' 1 38519 2 , r ggem' A. 4 Z A V Z',uf,!lM?--" y ' A lf 4 ' Lv- ' 4-I ' - z, c- . ' 1 1. .SEP '-' 'V ii' 'lf'g'.. .cf ' -' ' - ' - .E FF '. " " "" x"'71.---f.:M...,, ' - .tv-s H M-1. smolaer committee ancl proclucecl a noteworthy success. The Heights formal season was inauguratecl hy the Sophomore Saunter, which introclucecl a prom novel io the campus. The affair was helcl at the lxfleaclowhroolq Country Cluh at Ceclar Grove, N. il., with Franlt Dailey ancl his lxleacloxvlaroolt orchestra furnishing the music. liesicles heing the First affair in the history ol' the campus to he helcl out of the city limits, il: was also the First atltair to he hroaclcastecl over the raclio, heing airecl from micliiight to 12:50 A.lVl. over station XVABC ancl the Columhia Broadcasting System. .lustin lvl. Golenhoclc of the Arts College anal .lemme lVl. Govern ot the engineering College were co-chairmen of the attair. They clicl an excellent joh for the atlfair was a Financial success as well as a social success. The sweater committee, heaclecl hy Henry Nlasarslcy, hnancial committee heaclecl hy Daniel Caicitz, ancl other committees worlqecl very ellniciently. The Executive Council, originatecl this year, acloptecl a constitution ancl became a legal operating laocly, offering aclvice ancl having a hancl in leacling the class. The group introclucecl hy Witte, the presiclent, is the lirst step towarcl a more clemocratic system of class aclministration. The extra-curricular activities of the memlaers of the class continuecl to malce acl- vancements with sophomores ohtaining the Assignment eclitorship of the Heights Daily News, Business Manager of the Palisacles Hancllooolt, two placements on the 1Vleclley hoarcl, staff position of the Violet. clulo presiclencies, eclitor of the Stuclent Directory, parts in Hall of Fame procluctions, ancl many other valuecl positions. I i 5 1 I MARTIN wrrris SETH UPSKY 111 , 1 A , M-.2 -,-,-f-L I , . ll y - x i i 1-gi . X v V AFLTLVIT :V eitixy v. ,-,afa f ,M ' f he-'fMb'J52' .ia-.'gFi X 'f 1? 'f .-l -- 5 J if ' 1 - w ,. ' w, ' , 'ity ' 4 V - , ,- 1 '53 - . 1 . . " ..wr:1.: iii iii f1",'Ai7 . . . fit -.g -' i ,L yi fair J- J Y if A ' ,iffrifrfifi-tf???'fff . ,fm . , v,f3'Y9' ,nal STANLEY KANES FRESHMAN CLASS HE time of the entrance ot '41 into the Heights is near enough, so that those first turhutent electric days are sti11 vivid in retrospect. Freshman camp at Port Jervis seemed, to those Frosh who attended, the tutt hetore the storm. There they were introduced to the Mayor ot' Port Jervis, to Atumni, Facutty members and prominent undergraduate campus teaders. Frosh camp and the guidance ot Lawrence Lange, director ot Personnel, moored the incoming class to the toedroctc ot Viotet tradition, hut it was the ctass spirit of '41 which hetped to overcome so quictcty the hectic confusion produced hy the rush ot' ctasses and hy Soph harassing. This class spirit has carried ,411 through two great victories and one morat victory. Although the Frosh etticientty and emphaticatty suhdued their traditionat enemies, the Soph, in the equatty traditionat Chapet Rush, and atthough their spirited, it somewhat unmetodic voices, secured them victory in the songttest, their star was dimmed on Btood- tess Thursday. With victory in their grasp, the hidden Viotet Hag fone ot the features ot Btoodtess Thursdayj was discovered hy a tceen-eyed Soph. Defeat, however, found the Frosh undaunted. Even the cotd water ot the UFountain of Knowtedgefa and the chitty night air of Octoher 15, coutd not quench their spirit. On that evening the pajama-clad Fresh march- ed Nthe tast miten in a weirdty ittuminated torchtight procession, down Fordham Road, west to Sedgwick Avenue and south again to the rear of the tihrary where immersion in the murtcy waters of the converted horse-trough, and etticientty wietded paddtes awaited them. Doughnuts and hot cottee served at Lawrence House, and a dance in the gym concluded the ducking ceremony which marked the tinat induction ot ,41 into the rantcs of 1oya1 sons of N. Y. U. Ctass setections tottowed shortty atter and a heated campaign terminated in the etection ot Richard Goutd as ctass President, Stantey Kanes as Vice-President: Douglas Sherwood as Secretary, and Kenneth tV1cNutt as Historian. tn February, Richard Goutd was succeeded hy Stantey Kanes as President of the Ctass. 112 divx. . . E- . , " . ff-ifamwwu., fi 1 fe . ii' , . Mm' ,,... . N' , L ,e , - 4, 1 . xv-.-'J ' , pi 5 ,L , " j , K --P ,Z 3 "--H'-1, H w.,, f 'fp -"4-M., .5 'Ka if?-, 'li 2- .iff ., fs , ' is 1, 4, 5 'ful'-af" , 1 '- , -I - EL ' ,,,. ,, grit , 1 1p.ff1gp 1 , x, i,,i,m. ' A- - FEBRUARY-SEPTEMBER CLASS EBRUARY saw a new army of violet caps and orange ties invade our campus as a hewiidered, hut determined group of Fehruary-Septemher freshmen entered the 1ists to swe11 the ranks of the Class of 1941. They were faced with the awesome prospect of hreaking into the current ot campus activity in the middte ot the year and ot Finding ptaces for themselves in the whirl of extra-curricuiar activity, when most of their class had aiready adjusted themseives to their new surroundings. While they missed the thri11s and excitement of the Freshmen-Sophomore hatties that are so numerous during the first few weeks ot Qctoher, Skull and Bones, the otliciat sophomore hazing society, made their hte hazardous enough to moid the group into a solid unit and give them a stight taste ot reat college hte. Aiding Shun and Bones in its attempt to initiate the new memhers ot the campus into the cottege atmosphere, the Student-Faculty Re1ations Committee heid a Iuncheon tor them at Lawrence House. An exceptionatiy large turnout made the hinch period a pleasant one, enahiing the new students to meet and hecome acquainted with many mernhers of our tacuity. Oriented soon after their entrance, the neophytes sett1ed down to taclde the many prohtems a coitege course presents. After the regular cotiege year c1oses at Commence- ment, these men wiit continue their courses throughout the summer, having the heautitui campus and ati of its athietic facilities to themseives. Conctuding a fun summer of study amidst such pteasant surroundings, the Fehruary-Septemher students will enter their sophomore year as tutt-tiedged memhers ot the Class ot 1941. 4 1 115 KH' .1-4:-' ""f X' .illlll1 "H rfrf. . SIPQIRTS FCDQTBALL MARVIN A. STEVENS HQGCZ COGCFI STAFF ARCPIIE ROBERTS HERSTER BARRIES FRED LINEIIAN CHARLES COMERFORD UBUFFERH COLLINS I l7 ,ip ' , Ag, ---X A , l s K X X V 1 V I H F - -ff -f 'F A nr 'F' ' for + . JF A Y ' A i f -"'? "f L .. . w " 41? "" 2 ' IJ V ' . ' . 4 . 4 '- 5-Ti A ' ' . 1 s - I ' 1. .. . :1"' 'Y " f 5 ' V X 7- ' V """n ' if --Q E ' " f " E97 fmt 2' 1 YY W rw'-si ,.-1 ., ', .12 -1, '. . ' - .- 1 ,w ,, , ,, ,, ,,,!,f ' 1 Q- . BM- . . . 5 5 . , , 1 , .-M - , 2 ui' 1 -v-'. . ."W,.,J. ":.W. -fL:'i1f'1.:i'.- .L. .ff . 2, L 5 ' 4: 4 - ,gf ,m :A 4 ' , .,. , f. ., . ' - i-2 - M , - Q 'I W I 'A' ""'1:12'.w:'zHf21-f,fa-:vvif-1 .,.' . -,-, , -. Y -. ., I. W1-,. .M W-V " ' T"-A '- T ' " ' " ' ' ' ' "' ' ' ' . ' - V M 1 gvf my -2 a..l '-'+'M4'Mvv"-xc -Y 1, K. . A11 WTX 9-:X gg X' -'VK TL? 1 . X 5' V -L ye+gg.x1 x X rr' .. ffm' 3 :. - -. m is I Xl if 411 v 3 "fe1'E':f 31 , '-:X :fn fill-A 'El .Q iv ,Q rgz X xx X 3 Sussex 1, E.-"""ZI-i kms-5, fgga WE.: In ' j X 'W Q 2 .- fn! 5? Er 5 . Q g Y XR, dz. WI ' up N . gl., --ey X v x A 1 X 1 Q. l i .l 14 r fp .z r..-gg 'li -' 314 :Q S 4 I y.- '65 ., 1- , 3. ,bi wif i 55 r, ' fe. l fl ' L D Wx PMC. LAYING its initiat game against a weatq Pennsylvania Military Cottege team, the Viotet started Ott on the right foot hy over- whelming its cadet opponent, 56-7. Twelve thousand saw Mitt Mitter, strategist of the successful 1956 Fordham tray, catting the ptays from the center position Less than a minute after the opening tcictc-Ott, Howie Dunney htoctted a cadet punt and on the First Viotet ptay, George Savarese swung around tett end hehind good interference for ten yards and a touch- down. tn the second period Bernie Bloom hurled a tong pass to tactcte George Btom- quist who was stopped on the three yard martcer. Here Ed Boett, sophomore sensation, went over on the hrst try. The second hatt saw tour more scores were made with ease. CARNEGIE TECH EHIND 14 to 12 with the ctoctc show- ing tess than two minutes to ptay, the Viotet titeratty plucked victory out of thin air to gain their first major victory of the season against Carnegie Tech. Bernie Bloom stunned ab partisan crowd of 15,000 at Pitts- hurgh hy hurting a 52 yard pass to tittte Joe Sivatc on the Ptaidis 1.2 yard stripe. Savarese, Boett, Mitter and Shorten proved a Fine comhination for the Violet. Savarese started the scoring hy dashing from the Tech 45 to their 15, Boett passed eight yards to Shorten. Savarese made a First down and in three huctcs at the tine went over. Starting from their own 11-yard mark, the Violets passed their way to the second score. Boett gained 57 yards on passes to Pauline, Cetta, and the center, Mitter, who caught a touchdown pass from the end position. 119 E X ' 1 1. K x ,Aff . , ,R . Q . sa V X -f , t. . .,xV . .- X.,A... . , . . "tt 1 fats: I' , :sm +- '- f f 'Aw ' f ,f- f in ,WE 5, ,.., , NQRTH CAROLINA The opening whistle found Bloom, N. Y. U. receiving the Lick-oft. Bernie tuctcecl the halt in his arms and set out for the enemy goat-line, hut was trappect hy a whote horde of Carotinians. Vxfhen the ptay was over it was ctiscoverect that the teams injury plague was stitt rampant - Bernie had Ctis- located his shoutcter. He was withctrawn from the game anct Sophomore Est Boett reptacect him. Having outptayect the visitors cturing the hrst halt, the team ran out on the field for the seconct hatt cteterminect to hrealc the tie. However, a series of unfortunate Uhreatcsn turnecl the ticte in favor of the atert oppor- tunists from the South, and prolciting from every one of their seven interceptions of Boettts passes, two heautitut quiet:-Licks hy Little, and an N. Y. U. fumhte, the Tar Heel tacts scorect another touchdown in the thirct perioct, and a third in the last quarter ot the game. ST. JQHNS with New York University on the tong end of score was the Hnat resutt of the game with St. Johns of Annapotis. The contest was ptayect hetore a smatt crowct of 5,000 spectators on Qhio Fietct. The Halt of Famers hegan their touch- ctown paracte on the second ptay of the game. After St. Johns hact Icictcect oft and the han placed on the Violet 57 yarct line, hig ECI Vxfittiams ran sixty-three yarcts for the first touchctown on a wide enct sweep. Wit- tiams ctict not stop there, however, as he crossect the hnat white line twice more he- fore the termination ot the First period. His seconct score was the result of a forty yarct run through the micldte of the opponents tine and his thirst touchdown came after an oft-tactcte smash from the ten yarct stripe. 120 ,f"'+-dmswnmskm ll!! K ' 'Q' ' 'f 'Z 2. , Q., , L 4 . r acre..- ., J r . ,- " Lf-fiq.f- 21 i of -v. i . N 2 "' 1 5 'xirfev rigs, .. 1' , J.: L, 21. ,.' 5 , rv ,, V "A p - -y ' .f1'gf,,p, H y. , .1 . I Yun W 51 5 .V f wt: wr fri" -'K ' m "Zf f? - v- of -.Ar Mt I 3 E7-"M: 1'7" ? -.f ,. . ,. .f fn.L,,r, ,,... t'.',, 1 . , 555' ir.-Wi:-fave i t ,egg-" ' - ' -f"i--.' COLGATE N a contest that delfinitety marked Mitt Miller as one of the hest defensive hack- iietd players in the iast decade of New York University foothatt, the Violet team defeated the Red Raiders from Colgate. The hnai score, 14-7, was the result of the hne dc- fensive and ohfensive ptay hy the entire Hail of Fame team. The First Halt of Fame tatty came as ai resutt of a thirty yard forward pass hy Bernie Bloom to Howard Dunney in the end zone. The New York team held the Red Raiders scoreless for the remainder of the First halt. and held their lead untit midway in the third quarter. Then the Colgate team dispiayed a heau- tifui offensive drive and marched for their only touchdown of the game. LEHIGH N a duii, sixth game of a swiftly ciosing season, the New York University foothaii team defeated the surprising Lehigh squad, 15-O. The Han of Famers had entered the contest overwhelming favorites not only to defeat the Engineers hut to trounce them. They failed in the latter ohjective, however, since the Lehigh team was too aggressive for the talented Violet passing and running at- tack to make any headway. The New York University scoring came in two sudden outbursts. Taking the halt for the first time in the game two minutes after the starting whistle had hiown, the Halt of Fame team marched to its First touchdown in four successive piays. The last play of the touchdown march was the feature of the game '- a sixty yard pass from Bernie Bloom to Harry Shorten. The second touchdown came midway in the third quarter as a resuit of a sustained drive which was ctimaxed hy a twenty-six yard run hy Ed Williams around left end on a reverse play. 19 "1 ' ,lf in . 1 V2 WT? . sa.. re. 12 ,4,-Www Q , V , , , 2 , r L, ., mar!!-, VL-,-,,,,, - .. . fn ,Y V. W 1- .LW . 1 -" ' , . .. '. ,f Mx' -41 ' '-"f":'2 7- W r - "L""""j'.. i., . 1 'ri f. ' +4 5 'L L L . .ifif 1 if -' , 1-rf-., ' V I Y2fZg'f,,.F Kbliwr 1, f S3 v , 4 B -.,--, ' 4 I., 'Z 1 i .3421 ku a 11 ' 5 1-any "max ' 7 Af- ' "' ' 1 6 kg , LAFAYETTE N the next game, a surprising hand of gridders representing Lafayette College harged into the Yankee Stadium and admin- istered an unexpected 18 to O defeat on a hewitdered, outspartied New York University aggregation hefore 7,500 spectators. The Violets threatened to mar the un- heaten, untied, and unscored upon record ot Lafayette only once during the afternoon. That happened when George Renzi raced twenty-six yards on an end-around maneuvre, placing the hall on the Leopard eighteen. The New York U. threat came to naught, however, when Harry Shorten fumhted on the Fifteen-yard marker. Taking advantage ot frequent lapses in the home teams pass defense, the Maroon struck sharply and advantageously through the air on two occasions to record the only scores of the contest. GEORGETOWN. LAYING on a rain drenched Held, a fast charging and alert Georgetown foothatl team completely outptayed an erratic Violet eleven at the Polo Grounds to win hy a score of 6-O. The Violet was not very impres- sive and showed it hy its loose hau-handling and continual fumbles. In the Final quarter Tom Keating, the Hoyas, triple-threat star kicked the halt tow toward Mikrrtka, the Violets, safety man, and the halt went through his legs. Snyder, the Georgetown end, recovered the halt on the N. Y. U. three-yard line. Keating, on the very next play, fumhted the hall when he was hit hy two N. Y. U. Iinemen. Bernie Bloom recovered the hall in his end zone and white attempting to run the halt out he was taclded, and furnhted. John Frantz, the Hoya right guard, recovered for a touchdown. 2 " ' ' M ' - J M .-.yin -,gg w -, 42 -wwf, , Z , , . ' ar I .J , ..,.w.. . 3, .-.- ' H - me.. ., . , ,.L Y,' THWLV 'a f 1 M . lim , , -'411',,..i,', 3, . , H2123 ii. ' '14, ., ,, . . ,, - ,r ,V , V . .- ., 4,-. f 4-f ff ' ., ,-'fr:,f:g,,v1:-.'. .. ::jff.r,-:f'f,- fmzi4w"ff 3' zaaarwm'-"'tNf1Wawmz7 i ' H 51,2 5.!f.?mf, . V- 1 . -. ' ' 4+-'ffm l- -- if FORDHAM T last came the game with Fordham. And as the 65,000 spectators crowded into the Yankee Stadium there was only one thought dominant in their minds: could the Violet repeat its startting upset of the prev- ious year. The answer, however, was not long with- held. Employing its superior strength and experience to hrittiant advantage, the Ford- ham tine throttted the running attack of its traditional rival with decisive finality, hold- ing the Violet for insignificant gains on the defensive, and opening gaping holes for its own hacks on the ohrense. Principe, Granstci, and Woitkoski scored for the Rams, with Dunney, one of the greatest punters in the East, crossing the goat-line for the Violet on a pass from Boett. Voget converted for the Violet, making the Final score 20-7 in favor of Fordham. The Madow Trophy, which the previous year had heen awarded to Howard Dunney, was given this time to At Wojciechowvicz, Fordham center. Outstanding tor the Violet were Ed Boett, who passed with consistent accuracy despite the heavy rain and poor ptaying conditions, Mitt Miller, Bernie Bloom, and Ed Wittiains, hacks, and Cap- tain Andy Barheri, Dunney, and Contin in the tine. George Savarese, who saw action tor the First time since the Carnegie Tech encounter, was again hurt after a few ptays and had to be removed from the lineup. Although it was hetd to seven points, the Violets achievement was hy no means a small one. Qnty nine points had been scored against Fordham previous to its game with the Violets, and up to the very tast minute of the Rose Bowl selection it had heen con- sidered one ot three outstanding candidates for an invitation to play in the Rose Bowl. 125 H V "- ' it A A BA KETBALL HOWARD G. CANN HQUJ Coach 124 gf f , ,, 1 4- 51' Q - ' 'N ' - ,1 , ,lf-' 1 , I W if Ay A A , . 0 ,,-1" Z ,,,..,,, 3.6, vw A 4 f xl -, y ., f -A f -fy . .J 1 A ' ,Nw 'f va' ' '73 Ns E , " 1 ' 'g'17gfff"f' , :gif-mg ,Zz -- . , . f ' ws: 5 -L- - - ' wa ? .ff f f 1 .filly W 5 fx, - , 4 A , 1 ,V ff, , f ,'.-' ' U5-1 'Lf ,, 2 r- ,T 1-b - 1 v r--r"'f' :'- , '- f , , ., ,--. ' 1' ,,A,1 g ,. ,, 'f 3 f H" ' f. 'Z J i ! aw ' 3 M29 ag: 1, . v - 1 5, " W , r fi 2+ aff , . -f-M ' --If ., ,--1 -rr H 5 - - I, - v. - fp . 2 22:52 , , " V 1 ' 3,7 , -a,, wg ' ,. . gf W. -1,4 -:+,:.,. , . N- -- . L '- Sixth JM my Q vw ' 411 ' L L ' 9 hm fl ff ,.-' 1- 52 1' Aw . f w- 4. W. N 9 s z , ' .5-fff f. 2 M, ' ' . 7 . ' "7 ' -, Y' ' ' 1 I ' fihwmnlfr 4 Whips .ww 419.4 -x - sg ,H 'mx .QV . Wir QE? i1Sg'59"'E 1 7.2:?-.WS E' FQ W IF.. gf. iiff? fgfif, , ,2 W' f 'La' Lf' 'J-11 lvl. an-QEQIWX Ia. ,, '- 5 ,.:EJ"7Q gn 5. 43 fi . 1 1 F Ex i' 1' E ln H , 1 . Q, r if 1 :lp w P T i 3 1 , , v Q I v , W L W , , : rf, IWW KNO ifvw PJHY. .7 1 , 1 - f I p-1 I0 U1 VARSITY BASKETBALL TOT untit the tinat game had heen ptay- ect coutct one decide whether the 1937- 58 haslxethatt season might he caTTecT mediocre or successtut. Xvhenever the Violet ptayect one of their city opponents they never faitect their supporters and they tootc each one of the games in their stride to win the city championship. The winning of the city crown gainect for the Violets an invitation to the National Baskethatt Tournament heTcT at Madison Square Garcten as one of the Repre- sentatives ot New York City. This year Coach Howarct G. Cann was fortunate to have four veterans who formed the nucleus of his team. Two sophomores who matte good this season were Bohhy Lewis anct Arthur Schttig. Danny Dowd, one of the most improved hasTqethaTT pTayers on the entire team and a junior with one year's experience on the varsity earned the starting role on the team. The Viotet was fortunate in reversing some ot the defeats of the prececting quintet, anct it heat such outstanclirig rivats as George- town, Fordham, anct C. C. N. Y. Notre Dame, TempTe anct Vittanova were victorious over the VioTets. The Viotets openect the season with the University ot Newark, anct they toppect them hy the score of 47-50. A scrappy Seton Han Team forced the VioTets to extenot them- setves to heat them in an overtime period hy a 31-Q7 score. Upsata anct Brootctyn Cottege were the next visitors to the Heights gym anct the HaTT of Famers turned in two lcine performances. winning hy the respective scores of 60-54 and 55-57. Wagner and St. Francis were atso met at the Heights gym and were conquereot hy the VioTets. fy ,f I .... N.. fi . iagi, - 1 .4 T ' ' 4: , " , ' We I r. L g. 1-Mgr, , .5 if.-f . . . . V , ,WJ-V . A ,.....,,,W - ., ' : jig, , 41 , .. , H w i' , 1 1 .Q ' AEM ' ....., me A .. - sf. M af - .M..9C ,7, f 41 ,51 A - im. ,- . . 2 ir' 1: 11-' H FFT'-3 7 ' -' "1 . i '.4"5Q V .7 ' 4-" .' is L9 ilu ' 25 5 i f" '-F 'viii-we . 5" ' 23 it " yt' 1 . -- .- 1n its tirst encounter at the Garden ttie New York team met ttie poxvertut Goptiers of 1V1innesota and went down in defeat 36- 31. 1n the next encounter ttie Viotets met an outstanding Georgetown team and won by t1'ie score of 49-41. This victory revived the hopes of a very successfut season. Cn a Northern trip to upstate New York, the Viotets defeated Union and Cotgate on successive nights 13y the scores of -17-33 respectivety. Directty after exams the Viotets travetted to the Soutti, Where it was iaadty upset. The Marytand Five was defeated to ttie tune of 42-27, but ttie scrappy tives of Richmond and North Carotina tootc the measure of the team by the respective scores of 34-25 and 57-39. After the disastrous Southern resutts the N.Y.U. quintet returned to ttie Garden Wtiere it defeated a tiigtity favored St. Jotanas team, 40-33. Journeying to New Brunswick the Viotets defeated the hitherto unbeaten Scartet of Rutgers, 49-20 with Vxfitty and Tartow showing the way for ttie Viotets. Tempte, the next opponent of the Viotets, defeated the team by the score of 42-34. Again ttie team returned to tide Garden to face another Metropotitan opponent. tn this game the Viotets avenged ttie defeat of their footioait team by defeating the Fordtaamites, O-23. Ttiefinat game of the regutar season, the traditionat ctassic against City Cottage, proved to tie the contest Wtiicti prevented New York U. from spoiting its record against Metropotitan opponents. After the regutar season had been com- pteted the New York University team was tendered an invitation to the Nationat Basket- 19a11 Tournament 11e1d at Madison Square Garden. The first opponent of the Viotets was L.1.U., the Viotets snowed their catitaer by waging an up11i11 toattie to defeat the Btactdoirds, 39-37. 127 ' x I X- xi - - f""t""'f---A ,,.'mhBsm. 4-"' Y . Awww! 1 f lg' if gg I I, 3 fl I - , 1- 2 ,'L'f"1?"7'7' A " UT 7' we fit uf t X f aftfff in - -- -N 5 7 'I' A 'V A A Q ' V it 'H 1 'Q V' A -. .H .Q -14ei, 't " j" .', J is ,, . A-2 - ' 1 ' - - .. -- ,, . T7 a,.,,.,? ,...,...,,.., M ,,,,.,,,.,....,,,.,.,,, , . i..,..,.. .. . -. -- ,.., .. , ,. 1. A , .- - . . 1 N A gg un-zz I BASEBALL s i i W i , XNILLIAM MCCARTHY PIGCLCI COOCFL f ,fbwwwdh W - '- ,..iji -fi. .,,, ,Y,,w K , . - F' , Q 1 - v , ,f V . rf? J ' A ' ., ' -2:.xc , 'X -L f'cL,,,,.A.4..+,.fJ--1- -1 ,, , Ht Q.-...e,. fx' 24 f f X E.W'Y L" ' E: Wise 5' - ,TW Af fi ' W f V M45 f .2 2' 1 ', -. 1 1 v li' K, it , 5' qv' 'gs ' L. if 4.1 1 ',, .4571 , ' , ,',..f..,Lf -A-:mu ' ' ' - U: 5131" , r v-V asm-Y . - ,gs 5 . ,Q T I n - Q WS! 3 xg I. 5 ggfl iii ua 15: 1 -r -,fy mi Q lv 'g V ?q 1 U I' 1 , I 1 JI,-, , NX '-Vv ,, -41-A I il. , 1 sr' 1 s Zi. : 3 , gi: 1 Ae' 5 4 1' A LMA . ,-,-..-4 ,.74'.,-L3 1 -4..If LE.,-3, , :A 31 f f, G I i ki 1 5 A Tr J in :Qi 453'- , -. 45' in X A NlT1fht."' J F 41. 5-- . 'I , if 1 wr . Q, W IL b F U , ey' Q. -:Y .WX 'Az iff!!! Q , J7 . , 'JU ,..f.. aw .ivi -,M ,L BASEBALL HE Hail of Famers launched their 1957 diamond campaign in grand styte en- countering and routing a rniscettaneous alumni team, the Hnai count heing 14 to 1. Atkinson started this game, displayed promis- ing form, and was removed when the Violets accumulated a comfortahte lead. He was suc- ceeded on the mound hy two hurters who did exceptional work in holding the alumni in check - Lefty Griehet and Bud Menzin. The Violets' intercollegiate season got under way with Cotumhia providing the op- position and hehind outstanding pitching of Atkinson and the powerful hitting of Schoen, the visitors overcame the Lions hy the count ot 5 to Q. Schoen contrihuted to the Violet attach with a mighty 560-foot home run over the left Held watt. Following the Cotumhia contest, a supposedly impotent City College nine visited Qhio Field and immediately proceeded to down the Viotets hy tattying two runs in the Final inning to nose out the home team, 6 to 5. Manhattan and Brook- tyn next howed to an effective Halt of Fame offense, the Jaspers losing hy a 5-4 count, and the Kingmen heing overwhelmed hy a deluge of Violet tatties, 15 to Q. The Jasper contest was the thriller of the cam- paign. Vxfith two out in the ninth inning, men on First and second and Campione pinch- hitting for Sistcind, the sophomore utility outfielder drove a douhle to center Fietd to send in two runs and tie the score. Then in the next stanza Ed Ntorschauser singled to send in the winning run. Philadelphia was the site of the Violets, next hasehatt outing, with Temple providing the opposition, which, unfortunately, proved too much for the New Yorkers, who went down to defeat hy the score of 11 to 7. Erratic playing marked the game of hoth 150 77" ,ff- , Bd, , W 5 'Vik . " ,.1..f.,.,.g. V- '-1' I ,.ffffZ'f'f-?fQHf J, Q' ' 125, Qt. 1 Y f ' , ' , , 'fi " wx' .- . r , t I ' L' ' ,T ' nL'I1j:"f!" E'f"' ' J' -' Y Q- - , " "' ., --1- -' 1 fit: .. u ,, i + -r . , . .V-is . . f W A- ..,, -si, , f " vii- f, V-lf, fu , -V f f it ,A ,I . I. I , ': Q .N . :v:,:. ll' 'A ' '4- 5. 1. 13-,- r M VV-'!"5-4 P' Leila' tg "ig -f' Qitrizftt 'l Z ' if ' W4 fini ' L' W" teams. But, once more in the friendly sur- roundings of the Bronx the Hatt of Famers hit the victory trait, at the expense of Rutgers. In this, the forty-eighth meeting between nines representing the Scarlet and the Viotet, the tatter emerged the victor, 5 to 5. The traditionat ctiamonct encounter with Ford- ham followed a cancettation of the scheciutecl meeting with Lafayette on account of rain, anct once more scoring an upset victory over a favored Ram athletic team. the visiting Violets putiecl the surprise of the campaign hy downing the favorect Ntaroon. 5 to 1. At- kinson once again turned in a supertative pitching performance to teact his team-mates to victory. in the Ram victory the Halt ot Famers ptayect their Vhest game of a fair season. Onty one error was committect hy the Violets anct that came in the ninth inning when Sisicinct pulled Terjesen oft seconct hase with a wide throw. After Lefty Griehet hurteci the nine to a timety triumph over St. Johnfs, the Viotei nine met diamond disaster once again, this time running up a losing streak of Five con- secutive games. City College, Princeton, Georgetown, Maiihattan, and Army ati scorect successive victories over the haptess Hail of Famers. The tosing ways of the Viotet came to an ahrupt end at the ex- pense of Long Island University, however, when Atkinson again provect Mccarthyys ace in turning hack the powerful Btactchirds, 5 to 4. The Ntccarthymen tapsect into another losing streak for their Final two appearances of the campaign, chopping games to hoth the New York Athtetic Ctuh anct Fordham. By virtue of the tast two tosses the New York University hasehatt team concluded its schect- ute with a mediocre recorct of eight triumphs and nine defeats. 151 3 - ' .' ' rr Y x . 'J. vi - I A ' . fiili, T. M '45 ' ' 'E rf - ' - ' ' ,Q 3 ' - i f' Nr 1 . If ' Q ' ri 'g, ,, , 1 -712 ' x .-N3 ' V - f, -, W: H ' 'lj WY Q ' ' . 2 ,?t,'51T!9,i'J.ff,f'Q'5"f ' '-' .nf -..- ..., . .. J' - ' 1-.. ' vf - . ' WM' -gut ' I .,,. ,,.. , ,.,. . . r . .W r , . , v.-as-an -.a, . ,,,y ' - S I J'--4 2? , Q - , ' ' P' V ' 'qi-:fi-2 ' 1' iw 4 ? 1 I wg .53 r' k :A ' A 'gf IQ ,Q 14' ,f I '23, 5 4 J, . 12 --Q I A 7 ln.. - TRACK EIVHL VON ELLING Head COGCIZI. 152 .4 . 354.1 , ' 1 pg , I ,,., K , a L f V ,.,- .,.,. 7- Ny.. W .,, . ., ', ,f--, 1 a ff-1-r7y-H ,, , vg, 1 'g , J ,, , ,,, 4 A. , 1 K. - UM-, X-1,45 , g',,,f33.g, 1, f, ,-,f-J ,.... Y . . vu, f. 5, fn-N4 Q 'C 5 f ,, f W i X. J , 22' V l 2 Y v- A n W Q' . , -- 'H' ,,,5'f 'if -- -nz . ., -www 5. Z !?9?'3 :, 1 H 51-V V f.. ,gr 1,1 -- Q 49. W Z. ,- .- M151 ., .y , an . . ,- AMN J , LS f 4 1 .H ,f , Q nv 1 y 5,5 I . :4 1 Q. 5' r , ag ,nh l H f gf f , H,,,wL ,f , i Q, C+, n.Bz,hmfMwQ , ff . . 1 , . . A . ,, , L 1 , . .. , Q , , ,, . ,-. V. - X f , . v.ys,i.,4 :f ' ' ,z , V gg: Lak - , N . f ., Q I, :LV w:.i-'smf.q,-:1-.- 4 mum , , , X A . .,,. . , ., ,.,. , . , . ,,, . - V. .fl H ,A I F 5, 1 ,v :,., . . V K. .JV ,-,M-,Z-A ..,... . -. ,.-,:,, , 5-K, I . .,..:,,f 5 ET .hs H 'vff-V fitffafa- : Ui g i g. 251. C3 1 43? 23 iii' in HQ, Ez H il U1 ff ' I U' - -IZ! '-xv' 'J' , . 1' V? , 1: I I I , iv, 1 Q f' 1- .2 4.1 JS -, f wa1.,, , " F L-gf? i vw -- ':f- 'ffilifi 'LYS fr, A Try, h V., :.' U. ,fl .. my Q Lx .' ' ,u . .l 5- 5' J . f:'Q, ,lfx If ff! I ' f '11 4,55 ,iff-V Lg.--J., .-5 quam INDQOR TRACK OACH Emit Von Ettings tractc team turnect in a gooct strowing during ttme past indoor season. This year martcect ttre etigitpitity ot James Hertuert. This year tie not only won twetve out ot ttie thirteen ot ttiese mictctte ctistance events, taut set two wortcts recorcts, one tor the 600-meter event in the National A.A.U. Ctwampionstiips, and anottier for the 600- yarct event in the Knigtits ot Columbus meet. Ectgar Stripting proved his wortti by ptac- ing tnetiind Hertmert in ttie t.C.A.A.A.A. anct ptacing in the National A.A.U. enam- pionstiips anct ttie K. ot C. meet. , The mite retay team proved to tue excep- tionatty strong, and gainect ttie rating ot being the greatest team ever to run at the Garden. The team, consisting of Witte, Hertnert, Strip- ting, anct Gidctings, ctimaxed its icine showing by winning this event in ttie National Cham- pionstuips. They tnrotqe two recorcts at the Garden during the season, estatztistiing a time ot 5: 19.8, ttie fastest time in 51 years. The ttwousanct meter mecttey retay team, with Bustastein running the tiunctrect yarct tap, and Witte, Stripting and Gictctings compteting the team, also won in its event at ttre Na- tionats. Winiiing the team troptuy in stuctl meets as ttie Brootctyn K. ot C. games, the Seventh Regiment meet, and ttue Grover Ctevetanct games, ttie team was fairty strong in ttie sprint events, with suctw men as Hagans, Fangtnoner, Bustistein, and Jacobs winning consistently. tn the N.Y.A.C. meet, the Mittrose games, the Nationats, and ttie K. of C. meet, ttme Viotet came ttirougti Witti Hying cotors. The t.C.A.A.A.A. meet provect to be a disappointment to ttie New York fottowers however, since the Violet was unatmte to place better than in the team scorings. ff' 'W ,vu ,, ' 1 'af' J' '- A- f' ff s 3' P V- . . H Z 1 'F""'?'iJl ' "N w ' T ' ' ' --- 'fam wb A fi,g.,w4f.i, , 3' ,. ' ' gffixif ' fr il A 4 Q Yiii,----7Tf,' ,- .-,gi- --N av,-. mf"YV .i . 2 S' 2: 2 x - i. . 5, 1- - I r Lv L "" - f ,.,',1I.. '1' , . i f. .'iiTHfAff -5 -----. , TL 4 .Ai "' -f' hw-rh,'1 ' ' - tm' ' . f 2 ' - f 5' - :Y fi ' " "' wtf L' gg' -. 1' .., U4"'lff ' vi - - 16 4 " i, --WA' . '4 . ' 'Win-4-1 'Qifafw-x 'iran 2 H ' 'if . , L 'hang ig ,gQ, ,p.,f I-emmmm' .f Is- .. .. ' Me' ' - QUTDQCDR TRACK ITH not a too well hatanced squad. Coach Emil Von Ettings 1937 out- door track and held forces achieved their fame through individual efforts rather than through team strength. The seasons opener. the Penn Relay Carnival, was provided with one of its early surprises when Howard Britt, giant N.Y.U. sophomore shot-putter. tallied a second place with a toss of 48 feet 1078 inches. Edgar Stripting anchored a two mite relay home second hehind Manhattan College in the championship event at that distance. One week later, at Randattys island Sta- dium, the team captured third ptace in the Metropolitan Intercollegiate championships. Cart Blanlce was N.Y.U.,s tone individual Winner of the day, though Viotet representa- tives taHied points in fourteen of the Fifteen events on the program. hftanny Krosney was the teamys high scorer with seven markers, scored in the sprints and the hroad jump. The tack of Welt rounded team strength Was evident in duat meets on successive Saturdays which were lost to Army, 81-45, and Temple, 70-65. Stripting, in the quarter- mite, and Britt, in the shot put, were Winners against hoth schools, Britt helping himself to a Temple Stadium and meet record against the Qwts with a 49 feet 255 inch heave. Severat of Von EHing's charges ac- quitted themselves Welt in an A.A.U. meet. Howard Stocker, Alex Botash and a varsity mite relay were victors, White Maiirice Levien gained second honors hehind alumnus Harold Hliumpyn Lamh in the 440. Stripting was runner-up hy inches in the 600-yard run for the Father Duffy Memorial Trophy. Britt and Soi Cohen, a pole vaulter, like Stripting, won sitver medals in their events. In the Final Striphng registered a Fifth place. hecoming the First Violet tracisster to score in the intercollegiate 440 in many years. 15 . 'fx ., X X -W -. ---"'s ,gist ,H B an 41 E .K S' - - I -X . V A V, - A . - - . ,i I ve-, l -I . -X. N . - -2 ' 1 V - - ' I' 1: A ' ' '. -:,'- ' " ,, t ' . 3 'A - '-j . Q ,s 56 ,, H g U r I ' f , , I ' 535 - Q 1 N . "' 1 ,W . ,. , ,L , . ii --- Y , .- f 5 ' . as -, " 1" if T5-if Q. - -fi' - 5- ' - We - 'f ' ' V . 3 A 4- ' " ' '71 'UI ' ' if Ag. ,v ,,V3..- , M. . . - . ,L . L -,,,. jg. .l ii. , .2 . , ,I M ' , L - h I . ,. - iff. --H A '- - 'ss - ' . " -."N- fl "1 'f r Jn . I ,. - " . ' . "' ' -- 1 . - ' -V-Q' 'md f r - ,QA Q if 3 , . I,, 3 , , , i FENCING COACH ....,......,. JULIO M, CASTELLO CAPT.-XIN ..,... ,.,....,. J ACK GORLIN MANAGER ..,......,,... FELIX FELDMAN XVON 7 - TIED 1 Q fencing mentor .initio Ni. Castello goes the honor of turning in the greatest coaching feat of the year. Faced with the task of taking two Veterans from his championship team of the previous year and inuilcting it up to its former strength, he combined inex- perienced sophomores and former jayvee men to go through his second successive un- beaten year and capture for the fourth consecutive time the intercouegiate title. 156 ,Af Z zwuo fMmm""'j ,, . ,9?iNA?, ,LV . . U X VN,f.',,2 V V li E f N f . i f P r f . r' -,nm i 1 C. " Mlm ' 1 "' --' 4. 12 '1!,,....e 4 , ,, 1 1 1 f H , is 1 3 VY' . f:vg5f5?ifv,, 5 ,v""i A I Q! 5 A , N 6 A I ft 2 L, 'swf ' E' 'Q B 5 his' 1.1 ' .. if adm. - wfffw v f if With ttie entire toit anct epee teams wipect out tny graduation and with onty tiis son, James Castetto anct Captain Jack Gortin re- maining, Castetto tormect a toit team com- posed ot txftitt Sorotca, Sitvio Ciotito, anct Archie tgnatowg an epee squad ot Paut Moss. Saul Reiss, anct Joe Sonnenreictag and actctecl Dick Nussbaum to ttie saber team to matqe it the most powertut weapon ot' ttie ttiree. The Viotets inauguratect ttie season by Qte- teating a visiting Purctue team witti ease, 15 to 4. tn the matcti against Yate the Hatt ot Famers taact to fence their toest to e14e out a 14 to 15 triumpti. Cornett was an easy victim, 16V2 to 1OV2 anct Army, atways a strong toe, was atso tianctity tneaten, 15 to 12, ctespite some rattaer poor otticiating. St. Jotmis was ttwen stoppect tay a 16 to 11 score after ttae satner team torotce a cteadtoctc. City Cottege was ttie next oppo- nent to tatt toetore ttie Viotet Btactes 16 to 11 score atter the satwer team tarotre a cteacte toctc. Cotumtnia ttien tvrotee ttae tong string ot wins tny tieing ttie Viotets, 15V2 to 13V2 tae- cause ot a poor stiowing toy the epee team. 111 ttae tinat duat meet ot the season Sattus Fenc- ing Ctutb was tiattect 18 to 9 to give ttie Cas- tetto men a recorct ot being untneaten in twenty ctuat matctaes Covering ttiree years. Going to ttie tntereottegiates at ttae Hotet Astor, ttie New Yorkers were a ttiirct etioice with Yate, Navy and even Cotumtaia given a better ctaance to win ttie ttiree-weapon titte. But'team taatance proved decisive anct atttiougta the Viotets won tew inctividuat anct team crowns, ttae Hatt ot Famers emergent witti ttie ctiampionstaip. Joe Sonnenreicti anct Dietz Nussbaum, taotti Heigtitsmen, won ttae Class C epee anet satner tittes respectivety anct ttie sataer team toot: ttie ctiampionstaip. The epee squact, consieterect the weats- sister on ttae team, misseet tirst ptace toy two points. Ttie ottier outstancting competitors tor the Viotet were Sorotra, Moss, anct Gortin. 15 e mwah- -"fi f- . .::1 INN 1 . "L-"'25'f'E'-f a 1' N 'L 'ef 'H an , ' ET 'f gf ' 1 t ,f'i' Qf1 .ff' L ' 1. 'A 41: 1' ' 4 Q .. gi QW mi n g , M. , il... I ,lf . . Tak-, R N 'AQ W H , , 1 5,111 -f, l 1 W W W k 1 - 't V. ,V 1. A 4 3"-'isa 4' .f-dl ' Q ' -, .:- -r,Qa.g,,, .. ' . 2' 3 -wma-fy ,ag-.-.-.W P ,K 1 , f Y TENNIS COACH ........... ,....... J ERRY EIVIERSON CAPTAIN .,...... ...,..... I- IERB ABRAIVIS MANAGER ................ A. SCHOENFELD ARD hit hy the graduation of Captain IVIichaeIs, I.ioI3eI, and IfosIan the VioIet courtmen, Ied hy Captain I'IerIo Ahrams and IVIush Rosch, went through a cIiFticuIt scI'1eduIe which incIuded such teams as IVIiami University, with Gardner IVIuIIoy in the Iineup, and North CaroIina, in additon to the stronger IVIetropoIitan aggregations. From the numerous candidates for the team, Coach Jerry Emerson chose GeraIcI EI'1rIich, Irving Kram, Ben Theemna, and Egan as those he thought WouId he hest aI3Ie to carry the VioIet coIors on the courts. In the Hrst match of the season the VioIet engaged Miami U. and Iost hy the score of 9-O. Mush Rosch, carrying a eIeven victory sIcein, extending over two seasons met .IacI: Behr in a marathon match with Jack Behr Winning out 6-4, 9-7. The VioIet racI:et-wieIcIers came I:JacIc to defeat Amherst 6-3 and I3rooIcIyn CoIIege hy the score of 9-O. 158 4 ,, Zn, --Z 1- av 'rz fm- 1- A ' rv , A 1 , . ,,.L . , . U ' -' :wg 1 ,- fi - ,-, phi ,. .A . , ,, ,Lg My 'Yu W I ,, . N A - ,, it ,-,Z . H fi I -1- I-ft I ,. . M, .M , W M, ,, ,, 'V' it 1"'f MVC I I A 5- - t ' - V g "If-',"'H :fy I . X42 . ' ,fgv , 3 . 7, 1. 1.5, ,3, L V , Waltrip I, , fmt , , A .M Q' .. , Q, 52 Q3 I - V 1- - 114 H "'.-"I,,,,- :Q , - 0,4 1 4, . it gt UN , -.-t, , ..1-.L,.,. ,,gJ... " " " I vera, 'g ,i . ha s HU U--.-,,,- 7, ,- .fm 'M:sa-awww"Jffw-1-:M-, Y, ,,,,,, Am... ,a..g...4i. GOLF CAPTAIN ,.....,.,,...,.... VARDON DIEXEL MANAGER .,..,,.......... LOXV ELL ABELES HE New York University Nibiicic Vxfieiciers were ted by Captain Varcton Diexei and Lowell Atueies, who were tooth Heigiitsmen. Matches were played at time Eimsforci Country Club in Long isiancl, with most of the Metropoiitan Coiiegiate teams furnishing the opposition. The graduation of Captain Abner Koiioerg, George Rudy, Philip Arnow, anci the departure of Herb Rotfer, left the golfers practically stranded at the beginning of ttie season, taut actciitionai recruits Fiiiect the gaps and consequently the Violets enjoyect a fairiy successful season. New recruits who Fitted time piaces of time graduating members of time team were Jack Zarnes, Irving Richland. Paul Bouns. and Robert Snyder, anci Lowell Atneies, who was the one-time Winner of time World-Telegram hole-in-one contest. 159 w 4 . f ll, -'-"i -.-, .9 ,EL in :Lyn ,,,....--r-wvx. ...nur . .- -- , - V .1 i X Qerxdtfftft t SWIMMING ' COACH ...,.... .4...... F RANCIS P. NVALL C.'XPT.'NlN ...4,.....,......... LEE RGSENFELD MANAGER .. EDXVARD XV. INGRAIVI HE Violet swimming team conctuctect its season in a htaze ot gtory ctespite its early sethactas. After tosing the hrst tour meets to Rutgers, St, Francis, Fordham and City College, the team gathered its forces to futt strength anct handity triumphed over Brooklyn College, Manhattan and tastty, Fordham in a return engagement in which the Violets captured six First places. The outstanding event of the season was when Junius Catitri, a consistent point scorer ot the Viotets, heat Bitt Schirner of Forctham to establish a new university recorct. Captain Lee Rosenfeld anct Ectwarct Kramer, a newcomer. contrihutect their share of points throughout the season. The only Heightsman to he tost hy graduation for whom a replacement must he founct in the distance events is Arthur tvtitter. 140 Z-ik ,Jing z! .- f' N --eg-iff . - - , f ,, . . ,.,, . 4 ,ag It I H- 1 A 4 - Egg!! 1 ..,f:4,,f--,.ff:i1?1r'f:za,I tl? Q X tum' -f E X V f . . SVA , 5 W EZIV.-4...-1 as ,Q -we-. '-'iL.,,w-iL,r",.'3' - f 4 -BTW' 'V 1 " .. ' .- P 'Z .-V73-f '55 7 V1.2 " . ' "1 . . C ,. HW, ,,,, ,in ,,,,.,, Wm.,-Fm H , Wm, My RIFLE TEAIVI COACH ...,..,.........,...,. FRED XVALLACE CAPTAIN .,.,.,,... ALBERT I'IORXVATI'I MANAGER .....,,........... H. GREENBERG HIS year,s Varsity RiIIe Team Iias Ineen quite successtuI in competition. CaptainecI by AII9ert S. I'IorwatI1, one of the few veterans remaining from Iast yearys squad, the nimrocIs, cIespite tI1eir inexperience, estaI3IisI1ecI quite a notewortI1y recorcI. Veterans of tI1e team are E. .Ianis ancI H. Greenberg, tI1e Iatter Ioeing tI1e manager of tI1e team. The rnarI4srnen were victorious in nine cIuaI matcI1es, ancI Iost Eve. victories over YaIe, CoIurnI:nia, Lafayette, IVIicI1igan State, Rutgers, BrooIcIyn CoIIege, Carnegie Tech. St. tIoI1n,s, and Penn State, were gained and Iosses to BrooI4Iyn PoIy, Pittsburg, Iowa, ancI Mass. Institute of TecI1noIogy were registered. Competing against ten of the IJest IVIetropoIitan teams, tI1e I'IaII ot' Fame riIIemen were victorious in the annuaI St. rIoI1n,s Invitation IVIatcI1. Winning Iirst pIace. I 141 CROSS-COUNTRY COACH ......,.,,.,...,..., EMIL VON ELLING CAPTAIN .,,,..,,...,.... EDGAR STRIPLING MANAGER.. ...BERNARD ROBINSON FTER taking a severe beating from an exceptionatty strong Princeton squact, the New York University cross-country team went on to defeat Lafayette, Rutgers, and City College for a successful year of ctuat competition. tn the Metropolitan championships, the Violet rcinistuect seconct behind a Weu-balanced Manhattan aggregation which ptacect seven, men in a tie for first. A week after the Metro- politan championships, ttie Violets paced Hfteenttq in the i.C.A.A.A.A. ctiampionstiips, and tnen Finistlect behind Army anct Navy anct atieact of Columbia in a quactrangutar meet at Van Corttanct Park. Captain Ed Stripiing, Curt Gictctings, Ed Vxfeioln, Niartin Witte, and Stan Meares were the mainstays of the team. 'I -12 1. , . . ,. ,f U' X -x V .. -4. ww X'-EQ -'Emu ff 7 , ii. J rr. . 5 i ' f f 'f - 441- Q. rs. , .i 1 V A V- H - 4' 3 V . A - -- y 2f.:z,zf "'."1f' ' 51 'K 'ii ld"' 117"3 4 if - A45 Y 3 f7"'9' ' f- ' f '35 fi ' f' if """ :' 'K 5" "'V"' 'iw Q r :- if - P ' "" .::if't.f . -2 - - 3.-1, ' 1 'MUS' ' A Va 1 -ww-f ia ---- . x tt "V 1- -V . ' xii 1 . , Ll KCI if .fs . P - 'Q 4 5' 'Heli 'T i f X 'Z " '. .'1-.P--if . -V-' f . ' ' . -' COACH. ..,... , ...... AL BRISONI TI 2 fzfzi- ' "" - - ..,... . .,.., "4 i ' s . M ., LTHOUGH handicapped hy its unothciai status anct tack of a practise field, the Palisades Lacrosse Ctuh hnisheci the season with a .500 average. The sport of tacrosse was othcial at New York University until a few years ago, when it was chopped OHT the list. Coach Brisotti, mentor white the team was recognized as a memher of the university sports tarnity, has kept the group together, and each spring the team plays a compiete schectute. A F631 spirit of amateurism prevails among the ptayers. They huy their own equip- ment, share expenses on road trips, anct practise ciaiiy, playing for the sheer joy of playing. Last year, the unofliciai Violets met St. Francis Cottege, City College, Stevens Tech, Lafayette, Lehigh, and the Bear Mountain Lacrosse Ctuh twice. Against this formictahte opposition the Halt of Fame Ptayers managect to hreaiq even. 145 w . ss" 4 1 X X . 5 , V, '-X'-1' " . X . . , - 'r Q Q -az.. -11 - Qi. . -.L- . .. ' ...nm -'Y . 1-.- - .. ilk - ' V y y .y. FRESHMAN FGQTBALL COACH . .... .,.. . .JOI IN NVEINHEIMER MANAGER ,....,..,... EMANUEL HABER LAYING four games against some of the outstanding freshmen teams of the East, the New York University freshman football team compietect its brief schedule Witti a recorcl of one triumph and tiiree losses. Under the tutelage of Head Freshman Coach John Vxfeintieimer, the Violet yeariings launched their campaign at Easton, where the Lafayette frosiu defeated the Han of Famers by the score of 6 to 0. The foiiowing week the Violets travelled to West Point and once again the yeariings were iaianiceci, 7 to O. Cn the traditional Election Day game, the New York U. gridders made their lone appearance of the year before a home crowd, playing host to the Fordham Fresh on Ohio Fieici. The home forces bowed 19 to 6. The Rutgers cubs were defeated in the Final game at New Brunswick, 15 to O. 1 44 af' 'KJ .1 '- , 1 f' . 'A "v 71 V' . ' ' inrfiffi-'Z' . ,W -f -N. . . .zu 'A Vi., 'mi L 'gf -X192 . 2 .. 1. 7 ' ' ,, ',-r4v'gg,5Ugs., 5. 5. 4,-1 .:-.p 'I 'Qi , ' 2 f 1 if ' j ' 't G ',g 1 V H N 1 11:-i:.'::fflq4 I1 . I T, -V Q aim - 4- " 21 5 : .1312 K ' pi gm 1 W if , 1 S " "" 1x -if . -ffmf f ?"'5 'hiiifsra f f .f , :"':r'-'--A . p-Q. V . .fl-g, 1 1 ' 122 2 2' P , '. f H ' 'f . "ff: - 'rw -V FRESHIVIAN FENCING COACH ..,... ........, S TANLEY SIEJA HXIDERED lay a iacic of experienced sworcismen coacii Stanley Sieja commencecl what proved to tae one of the poorest seasons a freshman fencing team has ever had under his tutelage. The First match tooic piace eariy in February against a strong Yale freshman aggrega- tion. The score was 1472 to iQV2 in favor of time Halt of Famers. However, this First victory couicl not ine used as a criterion to judge to future success of ttie yeariing tencers, since in the next two encounters time Hail of Famers Finished on the snort enci of the score. The Neoptiytes iost to a strong Nassau-Hofstra team, anct a cieterminect Saitus Club B team by the same score, i4V2 to IQVZ. 145 e I V X Y., - . 4. . buff"-3,r...,.,,,,, -,M . gm, ug., of-'Lg ,I 1, .LF " . ir' :mf t 'P X ' , 'ith ,y Y 4 W H 'V' f ,,,:f.i I-xiii! Y i 5 . ,A 1 ' f ' i SX 'M J :ll sn ,, A 3' ig E -i V Q M V. M - :X , Y A Qggwfgl-i ,., fa . I 1, V, V fi 'lg i ., 5 i .1 -- '. " 5 ' ' J -. 1' T X -f i . " - - - r - f W fi-W ,, , -gi af " 5 ' t ,. i'ff:""" 'A ' si. ,, . 3 Q' FRESHMAN BASKETBALL COACH ....... ...,............ A L MAIER N.-XN.-XGER ......... LKXURENCE LIPPS Xvim-ll l.osL-5 HE Hall of Fame cuhs started the 1937-38 court campaign sporting a weighty twenty- game winning strealt as a result of the unsulliecl record of the previous freshman team, and they shortly added to the string with a smashing 59 to 241 conquest ol out- classecl School of Commerce quintet. victories over the Seton Hall frosh and the Broolalyn College jayvees extended the unlaeaten streal: to twenty-threeg however, the Violet yearlings went down to defeat to Evander Childs High School. The Violets triumphed over St. Francis and Washiidgton Square College. Early in January, the Hall of Famers registered tive victories in succession limeljore howing to the Scarborough School. The Violet frosh lnrought its season to a successful conclusion lay routing the City College jayvees, 60 to 58. M , , , , , , 146 I 1 ,i f - c , i ,,r"fff', J jwcjl . 4 ,Z-L+ 4,,,n-r,24.f,e,A.,4m fa 'fi 'ii f , - ,il I 7 'gg gg 1 3' li .-Llp' if A My el ll 2 Q. :IJ iiiiliiiiz, ,i .. 2' 1.2'.,g?fAgii t"' QW: ' nttfgqfsyfwf-..N1Q,.e :aah , YJ ' ' -cf? H 4- ' ' FRESHMAN , . .. BASEBALL COACH ....,... ARCHIE ROBERTS HE Freshman Baseball Team, under the expert tutelage of Coach Archie Roberts, went through a season Qf seven scheduled games in which it won three, lost two, and tied two. The team openect its season in earty Aprit against the St. Johns freshmen and tost a Aharol fought contest, 11 to 5. Both teams were handicapped hy a driving wind, anct they hact to go into extra innings to clecicte the game. The next two games against George Washington and James Monroe High Schools resulted in 1-1 ties. ln its next encounter the team was shut out hy a strong Fordham aggregation, 2 to O. However, it came hack in a htaze of glory to triumph in its three icinat games. Several days later it traveled to West Point, heating the Army Ptehes, 8 to 2. tt followed up this victory with a scoring spree against the N. Y. U. Physicat Education team which resulted in a 15 to O shutout. The yeartings ctimaxed their season with a win over a high1y touted hfianhattan trosh outicit 5 to Q. 147 , x M iq' 1-,, if n .QQ 4 H f XX TT' fl nfs 'V i .1 1' - S . F 'E . ' 1-" ' ' 5, if WEaw1:.f2.vf gg' 'exif ', ,..-- g .1-ti if ' ' , - ' ' '. ' 14' i y r f . ' ' - . - I , 1 "1 wr. :' as H '37 A ,,g'QT7f'y1f,,-:q2!1T'Q-1l,,1,,L. . ' ' ' "' 1 H f" " fe 1 . ... 5 T'-,!X! ff", ,. ,- ,mix Pj 1' ff-- ERESHMAN TRACK TEAM R COACH ,.........,,.... EMIL VON ELLING MANAGER ...,.. HERBERT FRIEDMAN HE freshman track team of 1957-58 proved itself one of the most promising aggrega- tions of yearlings ever to attend New York University. In the very First indoor track meet of the season, the mile relay, composed of Ligget, Carney, Hagans and Bogrow, captured the much coveted First place, while Jared Fangboner won a gold medal in the 100-yard Handicap. These ten points helped the team capture the Meet Trophy. In subsequent meets, Harrison Marshau and.Ervan Levine, two upstate boys, also proved to be valuable prospects. The most thrilling race staged by the Freshmen occurred in the National A. A. U. Championships, when the IOOO-meter medley relay team composed of Bogrow, Marshall, Jacobs, and Fanglaoner pTaced fourtti ahead of some ot the leading varsity teams in the country. - 3. N? 5 'Q , . i 1 148 .+I 4.4. 1 . 1 . 7x 5 -,nM . ' . lf. H1 fm . F!!Mfia+ MT - it W. E . H V. W2 7253" V "' If A ' " .- e - T new . tiny N 11 DE, 9,-15: F -ww 'T . Yi ' if. ' ' ..., 4 -1 1 'rx S ,v,, """' 5 " ' ff- 1 " P- . ' ,i ' ,, , ' S",-212' if'-sig-Q5 " 'f , 1. .- . -f i L . 1 R" 'Q L' .M Q " " "' ' ' T. ' - -,,::' wrir q h 1. ,5 ,V - in 14. , -I ', ,, , ,' ,, ,' 'L Q Y. 1' '-. ' u I H " 'Z . j vu, . --v- ... , , . .i.s.fz.i:,.-..gf ..' , . - . -- i - . y di 1 EROSH CROSS-COUNTRY COACH ...,......,....,.... ENIL VON ELLING MANAGER ...,,..,,. I, HAROLD KELLER NVON 1 H LOST 6 HE Violet Yearlings macte a poor snowing in the 1957 season. The team was successful against Columbia but lost to Princeton, Manhattan, Rutgers, and New Roc11eHe High School. Princeton, in the opening dual meet, defeated the Hall of Famers in a fairly close contest, 24 to 51, and a weelc Iater Manhattan repeated with an 86 to 124 victory. A week later the New York cubs were Beaten by Rutgers, Q0 to 55. On Election day, the Violets faced New Roc11e11e and the City College frosh in a triangular meet. The high school team was First with 19 points, the Violets placed second with 56, and City College was Iast with 65. In the Final dual contest, Columbia was an easy victim for the Halt of Famers, 16 to 59. The team Enislaed tenth in the interco11egiates. 149 , "1 '- 7. H- N l 4 Jufvig -.,l ' ll, I ..., INTRAMURALS N a city as large as ours, wtiere space is so valualsle, a lnoy in luis late ,teens laas little cliance to participate in any athletic activity. Vxfliatever cliversion ot tluis type tie receives is touncl mostly in inctoor recreation centers ancl gymnasiums. Ttieretore, wlaen lie goes to a metropolitan college lie aslcs tor something more ttian just a place to clevelop luis mincl. He aslts tor a place to ctevelop tiis lnocly as well. lr is tor tlais reason that intramural activities at tlue Heigluts lwave receivecl suclw excellent response on tlle part ot all stuclents. William E. Racicot ancl Howarct G. Cann are in claarge of intramurals, and togetlaer wittr tlne aicl ot an intramural laoarcl composecl ot' ltour stuctents, tlaey malqe all sclneclules for tournaments, act as juctges, ancl in otlier ways clirect tlwe clepartment along its course. During tlais past year, tlwc sixteentla in wliicla lVlr. Racicot luas actecl as lieact ot intramurals, more tournaments were startecl ancl completecl than in any otlaer year in tlrre past. Baslaettvall, ping-pong, lsaseloall, liancllaall, tennis, tiorsestioe, foul strooting. swimming, ancl volley laall tournaments were all Hnisldect lay tlte competing stuclents. These various sports gave tliose stuclents wluo were incapalnle ot competing in varsity sports a cliance to talce part in tlae sport tlwey lilcecl loest ancl to compete against fellows ot ttieir own alnility. Alnove all, liowever, ttiese sports gave tlue stuclent tlae relaxation tie neeclecl from tmis studies. Following ttie example set in past years, the fraternities provecl to lne tlae axis arouncl wlaicla tlue wlaeel revolvecl. The rivalry laetween tl'1e clilterent houses macle almost every traternity tournament ttre loest in tlwe sport. Large turnouts of players ancl tans macle eacl'1 game exciting ancl Well playecl, ancl tlae aclclition of anotlaer golcl cup tor tlae runner-up in tlie lntertraternity competition macle eacti tournament lvetter tlian tlie preceding one. 150 ,ff i 1 I 2.7 .. , X fe- .I V Z . , v A, Each of the hrst tive Greelq-letter organizations in each fraternity tournament was given a number of points towvarcls the hnal calculation for the trophies. When all the tournaments were terminatecl the house having the most number of points receivecl the large golcl lnter-Fraternity cup and the runner up receivecl the smaller golcl trophy. Last year Pi Lambcla Phi won the cup, while Phi Sigma Delta linishecl in seconcl place. The lirst event ol: the intramural year toolt place on Qctober 18. lt was the annual Campus Run open to every stuclent with the exception ot members of varsity squacls. For the seconcl consecutive year the one ancl one-halt mile grincl around the entire campus was won by a member of Zeta Psi fraternity. Bruce MacDonald won the event by a goocl margin, beating out Richter A,-10. Faurot A3420 hnishecl in third place. This annual event was the hrst running competition of the year, since the all-University Relay Carnival was helcl in April at Qhio Fielcl. Two other tournaments were completed by the termination of the tall semester. The football passing and punting for clistance contests showecl that there were still stuclents left who coulcl throw ancl liiclt a pigslqin. Richter Won the passing test with a heave ot Fifty yards, while Baller A,58 tinishecl lirst in the punting contest, lsiclcing the ball 60 yarcls. Besicles the popular fraternity tournaments there were interclass, club, ancl school contests, ancl also chances tor inclivictual ability in ping-pong, foul-shooting, ancl hanclball tournaments. ln the interclass baslcetball tournament the senior Arts team showecl the way to the rest of the competing teams. lnter-clormitory games are also another feature of the far-reaching intramural program. As a result, stuclents at the Heights are given a chance to participate in activities that they woulcl otherwise have to clo without, ancl the city boy is given a chance to realize his dreams of clean. healthful sport. 15 l , -- '1 -f-' , .1 r Y . M""' M' 'F 'E . A ,, , H .. i ffvt itjfiqil ., My Q .-"' 1 -, ' V I ye ?,?fJA,frvL,i.f ' A. rf-in ,I M - Mg iw L- tl' L: A 3 ...ag V Y L4 ' ,l .I Y-Lit' t I ., , ?:'t" , zi11.g4"'A -nga., .--gi f """'!'l v h X rr I Q "ilt5'.J5 -r fi QE' 1 'xx tx mf 1 if L .LJ ... ,fu E Lfspf fkpj i Approximately 8055 ol the Heightsmen participatetl in intramural activities cluring the past school year. Briefly statecl, the results ot the intramurals are: The campus run was won hy B. lVlacDonalcl, AYLH, while Zeta Psi lecl the tra- ternities with the low score ol' 5-I points. lvl. Richtarili passed 50 yarcls to talce ltrst place in the tootlaall passing contest, ancl Barney Baller capturecl the toothall printing event with a 60-yarcl laiclc. The Arts 338 haslxethall team outclassecl eight competing classes to win lirst place in the class haslqethall competition. The intercollegiate laaslcetlaall title was talaen lay the Dental Collegeg ancl Phi Sigma Delta lecl the other fraternities in the fraternity tournament. P. lxlessenlxer EYLIO lecl a held ot 40 men to triumph in the ping-pong tournament. The fraternity volley Ball title was won lay Phi Sigma Delta, which lecl the 10 other fraternities in the event. Two l-leightsmen emergecl victorious in the All- University Wrestling Contest, hcl. Catlferelli won the 165-pouncl title ancl A. Cvrana won the 'I45-pound event. Representing the Heights in the All-University Swimming lVleet, the Arts ,SS clulo toolq hrst place in the 160-yarcl relay. The Baselaall clulo tournament was won lay the Upperclassmen team, ancl the fraternity hasetnall event was talqen lay Pi l.amlJcla Phi. The clormitories as well engaged in intramural competition: South Hall emergecl victorious in the lnaseloall tournament ancl the same Hclormu toolc the loaslqetlnall contest. ln the All-University interclass Baslqetluall Championships, the Heights class cham- pions, the Arts ,58 team, lost to the Nvashington Square College class of '40, Seven fraternities competecl in the Boarol Traclq Relay contest ancl the Phi Sigma Delta's team of 10 men tool: hrst place. 152 ff' Afllivfsa emi: 'N f ,-- .. -, -Miz , . - "'7 'wa' -wvisfisiy-,L:.'iZ I V ' ' " If I, gLfVA4fM tn . ' f" if l A H K If .isslsszaa-N. 2, l 4 . , -' 'y . : I fi: wr' I gin F t -lv 93142 1. ,:TwTM?.. X242 ":UT,f3 ,, il .-gufil. 1 Jge. . ' fe s 'kill-at . , " lt e1.f'x2: .T t i UNDERGRADUATE A.A. BQARD HE Undergraduate A. A. Board acts primarily as ttme intermectiary between the stuctent body and time University athletic actministration. It is composed of members of time Cottege of Engineering, Vxfastmington Square College, ttme Sctmoot of Commerce, and time University Cottege of Arts anct Pure Science. Ttme function ot the iaocty is time consideration of problems arising out of time attmtetic activity ttme results of Wtmictm are submitted to time attmtetic administration. tts rote is an important one in awarding major and minor attmtetic insignia, i.e., ctetermining requirements for time awards and passing on ttme inctivictuats suggested by ttme coactm of time particular sport for tetters or numerals. This year time Unctergraciuate A. A. Boarct has set a maximum of ten tictqets to time ForcHmaimm't'ootl3aH game as the quota for eacin student in orcter to prevent speculation and to insure a fair ctistriiaution of tickets. Etimination of keys and violet sweaters on time campus imas been planned. Time tmoarct has encteayorect to obtain better seals for students at inaslcettnatt games tmetct in Mactison Square Garden. Several open meetings were imetd. An innovation. tmas been introctucect this year in naming ctifterent omcers for eactm semester instead of tmaving time same group of omcers functioning for time entire year. Bernard Carnevate. Vxfastmington Square College, was etectect president and Stanley Gladstone, Arts College, secretary for time fall semester. From February to June ltme officers were: Harry Swirslcy, Washington Square College. president, and Keith Vxfitson, Engineering Sctmoot, secretary. 155 .-:-::n-1::.':-..:.-Lr:.2:.-:g4-,171::1.L1gg.f:,Q:1,1.',1:LL.,-L..1:-iff.-fvf,--, r, 1- -,- ,- . 1 1, - -if 11, fp.-:Y -.uf ,-Q, 1 - - . . f , 1 QIRQANIIZATVHQNS HQNQRAIRKIES PERSTARE ET PRAESTARE Howard Ash l-lerlaert Brown Herbert Bnngard Abraham Bye Edward Dewencler Leslie Fiedler Stanley Gladatone David Goldlrnopf Paul Kahan Howard Kaplan Howard Leclerluerg Mason Lindsay Laurence Lustig George lVleloy Arthur lxfliller l'larolcl Mitherz Jarnea Moody Charles Penry Freolerielr Phillips Robert Ratner Joseph Sonnenreieh Robert Nviener 'Qi 22 r 2 ,ttiwiisf nil! L L ln 1235 , .r gr My :3:..,,. 5, ga , 4 F kr If L ,a.. za , ,.,. - 'fl-Tl""f'i'i27 - Pl-ll BETA KAPPA William Berger Her-laert Brown Hilliard Caming Leslie Fiedler Nathan Fielirnan Daniel Glass Artlniur Goldfarb Milton Juoovy Howard Kaplan Leonard laaula Bernard Lielnsclautz Leonard Paris Cllarles Polivy Leon Pordy Yale Raluinowitz David Rosenberg l'loWarcl Rosonoff William Ruliio Clarence Seliein Eugene Spitz David Sunltin Norton Zavon Jerome Zullaclxt 159 SX X X' ,,,,f---...- George lVleloy Ben Jerelan J. B. R eese F. C. Phillips TAU BETA Pl Charles Durfee Jr. lvl. Lindsay A. J. Meade. ilr. L. K. Sivenson F. R. Sieinhaeher H. R. Pass J. Naehay H. Rheingeld W 5 160 R. Smith M. L. Land J. C. Silt anen W. N. Siena A. N. Clark J. A. Raven G. G. Kayien A. S. l'lorwatl'i K. G. Barnhill C. H. Christensen J. H. Soenniclusen F. C. Krason Q 9 f f j, ig g"':,": , "" 7:3-yum.. e 1 .....,, , , ' " J 5.,fQ- 'rf ' . ' , --W . . .:-, .. ' i . ': ' r Hp ll ,,, ,, 5: . .1 - -r. ...mg- -.. 1 in . -- -rr f.- -' X f 3 gm, . , . na. .q . fv- 93521 ' Kwai A 'Q 2 ...,... rrlu A ICDTA ALPHA Donald T. Jordan Joseph Win. Rozelra Attilio Baltera Hector J. Seniioley Joseph A. Cravero Siolney Metzger Sarnuel D. Fein E. Leernan Gostin Charles Egaatan Vxfallace A. l-lelrnnth Marcus C. Benerliet Edward J. Longhi " .tar Daniel J. Foley Salvatore A. Faiia Samuel M. Jaeohs Boris Feinnaan Lawrence lVleCreaoly John Garielr Seton Grim Christian Holstein Colhy Baker Walter J. Cake Earl G. Lundstrom E. William West r 41, LT , I v 1 mann W. .Ml ,, 1: lv Qf v: TAU KAPPA ALPHA Paul H. Kalman Laurence Lustig Harold Mith erz Murray Neitlich Robert S. Ratner Murray 'Segal Joseph Sonnenreiclu 1:62 c:":w VW 125: V 55 1- 'Q W ",-Ji m fs.. ' , ' .Y A V in Y I f Sr-'v : ,z FTW' x -'fi ...w"'-W'gTfiu,. ., . ' , , L-W I -'F f .. . . N ,141 .42-ilfwm U - , ,,,......, '- -Haig, N :V ry- , ,iz cu ,O N gre' . .-:T iyq 4 5 E . pay wr 8,1 ,a.fg136g,',-mpg : V ju!- :., , I -'I I 4--,, 'jg H 'ifwag' -. 254,-. J ' we J'---H.- fy- I' W ly, WI Us-,lazy 'Q 21-F?" , - '-:.wfff.ef1:-rw v-'ffz' ' H " , STUDENT QQVIEIRNMENTF ARTHUR MILLER STUDENT CGUNCIL Presicleni' .....,. ..... X- XRTI-IUR IVIILLER Vice-Presiclen! . . .....,... HERBERT BROXVN Secretary ...,....,, ...... I 'IOXVARD LEDERBERG Laurence Lustigg Stanley Saviet Joseph Dhfxcldario Alphonse Posfiglione Nlarkin VXf'il'fe Ixflario La Barbara Stanley Kane ' Bruce Hecker Paul Kanan James Moody Leslie Fiedler John Pekacn Seymour Hersnkowitz 164 A if ,fp , E f f 5 ' L L 1 L no L R L STUDENT CQUNCIL ERHAPS tlae organization xvitlw tlie most responsibility on its slioulclers is tlwe Stuclent Council. To tlciis group, electecl lay tlae memloers ot tlcie several classes, talls ttie tasl: of aclministering tlue policies ancl lfinances ot stuclent extra-curricular activities, about St5,000, as well as enacting legislation permittecl luy a moclel constitution wtiiclw tlwe Council cleems necessary to stuclent welfare. The Stuclent pulalications. sucli as tlie VlOLET. tlie l'lElC1HTS DAll.,Y NEXIVS, the MEDLEY, and QUADRANGLE, and the CRITICAL. REVIENV, are att supported lay appropriations from ttie Council. This year, laowever, it was found necessary to recluce tlae allottment to certain ol tlaese publications as an economy measure. ln aclclition, tlae Stuclent Council sulasiclizes sucln popular activities as tlie Debating Team, Hall of Fame Players, The Glee Cluln, Little Sympliony Orctiestra, ancl a myriacl of clulas ancl special groups. A great torwarcl step in aclcling to tlae comforts of tlie stuclents was ettectecl lay tlciis governing laocly wlaen it appropriatecl tlwe sum of 81500. for tlwe improvement of Lawrence House, tlae stuclent activities center. ln order to ascertain wtiicli facilities ttie stuclents most clesirecl, a poll was concluctecl in cluapel. Tlie sum ot 3500. was tentatively allottecl tor ttie furnishing ot a lounge in Goulet Hall Witli ttie provision ttiat ttie university omcials appropriate a lilce sum. A continuing source of prirle was the series of Stuclent Council clances Wlaicla liave laeen notalaly successful for several years. It is to tlie Councilys creolit tlaat tlie clances lwave tween Hnancially successful. When tlie climcult taslcs ancl lcnotty problems Wtiicla confrontecl tlais year's Council are talcen into consicleration, ttie Stuclent Council is Wortliy of lnigla praise for tlie aclinir- alnle manner in wliicli it carriecl on its Worlc. 103 X Y xg - I ' 4qP'-'P-- l . ' ,sf i- .4 ' Nisfl' t I :U K: ,,,,anlha.,. 9 'W B 1 UNDERGRADUATE SCHOLARSHIP COMMITTEE HE Undergraduate Scholarship committee is the stuctent actvisory hoarct for curriculum . improvement. The committee is self-perpetuating with appointments subject to the judgment of the clean. Etigihte for membership are juniors anct seniors who have ctistinguishect themselves hoth in scholastic and extra-curricular activities. Formerty composed only of stuctents in the Arts cottege, this year the committee has chosen a memher of the College Com- merce Course in order to inspire this newty organizect hranch of the cottege hy representa- tion on the committee. The formation of the Unctergractuate Scholarship Com- mittee was a recognition of the need for student advice in curricular affairs. Interviews with students and faculty memhers, as welt as the judgments of the committee memhers themselves, are supplemented hy the resutts of a general reterenctum. The suggestions of the Committee are then emhodied in a report which is suhmittect to the Dean and to the faculty curricutum hoard for considera- tion. Many of the recommendations, such as that of a two-day stucty-perioct to precede the June examinations, have met with approvat. The officers of the Undergraduate Scholarship Com- mittee for this year were: Lestie Fiectter, chairmang Herhert LESIJE FIEDLER J. Brown, vice-chairmang and Rohert S. Ratner, secretary. 166 ff" fly ag Y: f., f T V-gi' f - .- , 'iff 1 ii A ' : y, f T ' "T" 2:29 1, ' , y ' Tala. f 'Wi 1.5.-.,-lisa T 1 fa .L UNDERGRADUATE ENGINEERING CGUNCIL HE Undergraduate Engineering Council was formed in 1951 to a-ct as a student advisory board on curriculum claanges and to inaugurate measures loeneicicial to tlie students of tlae Engineering Scliool. ln tlie past, tlae council has initiated suclu improve- ments as: faculty-student lunclueons and clnapels for tlae promotion of a loetter understand- ing between tlue students and tlae tacultyg tlsie placing of laulletin laoards in convenient, conspicuous locationsg a survey of tlie curriculumg and tlae formation of tl'16 University clearing lrouse, vvlsiicla consists ot a laulletin of all events on the campus. The council is composed of tlae following memlnersx two seniors ancl one junior lrom eacli lorancli of tlie Engineering College, wlsro are elected lay tlae students of tlae respective scluools. ln addition, two soptiomores are appointed solely on tlsie lnasis of scliolarstiip. Heads of professional societies are automatic memlaers. lncluded in tlais yearls program were tlae very successful Tectinifrolic, informal dance for Engineers, vvlsiicla was laelcl in tlie Crystal Room of tlae Hotel Great Nortlaern on Decemloer 18, 1957, and tlie Engineering Demonstration Day, on wlaicla students from other colleges visited tlae Engineering School, inspected tlae laboratories and attend- ed lectures given lay various memlaers ot tlae Engineering faculty. This yearys omcers Were: lxlason Lindsay, claairman, Ben B. Jordan, secretaryg and Fred Durtee, treasurer. MASON IVAINDSALXY 167 s, - . fr A 1 5-tl . r c f' ft 53 wja l ,f A K ,, ' ' -V - F , ' Q ,V ,H V V ,,,,...,R, , , . by , ff gx ' ' -nm , -4 9 at 'q 3 I H, . ' Q t r! '42 5- ' . . ' g,1q,,,V Ti my .q' Ns "- J 'fi -5'-X' , 5 ... 1 f2a+'4-f r -'fa f 1 ' , ' ' f ec-. ' A - :Lg 'J f .S vis 5, Ev . . . ,- -- ff , A . I. V MW 14 A ,'-', ,LN me - A- , it Q ' -, STANLEY GLADSTONE GEORGE RUDY LAWRENCE HOUSE COMMITTEE RGAIXHZED in 1956 to matte ttie facitities of Lawrence House avaitatate to the entire student body, ttie Lawrence House Committee tias carriect out its original aims. "The Housen has become the scene of the meetings of many ctutus, att Heights affairs, and a targe numtaer of extra-curricular activities. 168 - 2- fam.-, 5 V, , , F 51 .h it , H ,r-in l fc! ., kg N Q -:X 1 -' P V' I ,, ' ' --- I. i I , .f,M,f., T . T .,ff+ff-Q--'qczrf fr., f , fl , T O wfiicy, f -sn' . tif:-.1 -- . - ' ' ' - - ' - , f' f -, - . X , ,, . L , ,MU-,', . 4, -. . . . 4 -' C ' ' e'1.2A:'.'11-S-1 uf , M ' .M W" v 1 4 , H A A Q P1 if . if ,I-, H , vt, A J ' iz J , , t 1 1 Q lb ,' .. . , fm z..,1...Z.,,,.,Zf,.',l, ,..,. ,,,cJT,Lm,,.f,3x,,,,,,,., .... vm.. .,,.. fLr5L.-,ffLf"i1f ,-.1,f ., gLL.-.fi'L.,,'1,:',,Lf', 4 1 ye Among the many new features introctucect this year for the henehl' ot the sluclents were meetings and afternoon teas for the Fehruary- Septemher stuctents and memhers of the faculty. These gatherings hetpect to promote social contacts among the new sluctents, and also to acquaint them with the sociat anct scholastic tractitions of the University. ln- vitations were eytenttect lo att Engineering Schoot societies to holct meetings at Lawrence House in orcter to help matte it a center for the extra-curricular activities of the Heights stuctents. Atumni organizations were also attowecl the use of the House. The committee en- gagect speakers on various topics for ctuhs that were unahte to ohtain them. The various suh-committees of the Law- rence House worlcect hanct-in-hand to mate the Lawrence House a center tor stuctent activity. To these committees can he at- trihutect the feeling prevalent among the stuctents that it is always open house at Lawrence House. Recognizing the vatue of Lawrence House as a stuctent activities center. the Stuctent Council appropriatect 591.500 to he usecl in making actclitions anrt repairs to the UHouse.H The ctirectors hegan immectiatety to renew the Lawrence House. Painters anct ctecorators were hirect, anct actctitions hegan to appear in the many rooms to provide a more homey atmosphere to the Lawrence House. '- This year. atso. att the piihtications which were tocatect at Lawrence House reatizect its worth. anct Lawrence House hecame the ctistrihution center for the puhtications. The puhtication omcers tounct that Lawrence House provictect the correct atmosphere for their work. Among the many other attairs hetct at the HHouseH were the following: Christmas Day Party, Friday Afternoon Teas, Student Faculty ctinners. and intormat class ctances. 169 ui 1,21 4 ...Q i tl X4 J x s . ' sy, , , fu. .E,f-xxx 4 f X ' ' I 1 - ..... - iz - , Y " c ' ' --,' i Y V . Q i qw 51 , I . Ti ' 1 v 'Zi' , , Qtix xf, ,ffflfi 1. V W ll I A 1'1 ' I ' . 545 - Pl . .M ' 'Qing' . . ,ri . ' A "'V 'L ' . , . ' V Qi . 1, Tj fev i ' WY Q' ff - fi--f ' ' . ' -f f 5 3 .. 5 --A" Y, tl... . - ' " .110 HNQE-4 iQ in -we .. as twat nf A . so ff ' p 1 2 ' , , . ,,-,KN av 2 ,MLA-M,-J STUDENT-FACULTY RELATIONS CQMMITTEE HE Stuctent-Facutty Retations Committee continuect its Pine work of hringing the memhers ot the stuctent hocty in ctoser Contact with the memhers ot the tacutty. The Committee triect to create a Hrmer honcl hetween these two groups on the campus. Thanks to the sptenctict cooperation of the actministration and of the men on the campus the Committee hact an excettent record. Ar the Lawrence House, the Committee hetct tuncheons at teast once a month. Different groups of stuctents were invited, such as Sophomores, Freshmen, Biology majors, anct the memhers of the faculty most ctosety related to these groups in their work attenctect. tn this manner, the young men were ahte to meet their Uprotsn on an , equat tevet anct get away from the formality anct stihfness of the classroom. tn this way the students also tearnect that their teachers were ahte to ctiscuss hasehatt and toot- hatt with as much gusto as physics or mathematics. Besides the tuncheons, the Committee sponsorect numerous afternoon teas at the Lawrence House. After ctasses were over students gathered around the samovar anct ctrantc tea with the members of the tacutty. Free from the cares of wortc anct extra-curricutar activities, stuctents anct faculty spun yarns, totct jotces, anct in general had a gooct time. in this manner, the Committee createct a feeling ot tettowship hetween the two groups that matte up the ROBERT s. RATNER College- 170 ,,.. t aa-ee ff i , i 'QW R. EIL ', V v A 5 s 3 v A 7 ' sf A 1 if . i2A',e5g 1:' H' . ,- -cw 5 - - " ' ' Mi- E5 -vii . . we ., , Z. ' Q' I' ' - L 'J ."ZJ fm' " " -., Q , .4 , . f'fWfi1'f+i ,,,,,,,,5,,,,!.,,,3,,g ,, ' u'i!"4' 'rw Mi" 1-4 .ffLig153,3E,,,,. -' Z 39 at eg f , ir 1, 'I' PF, -1 u us r t" f-12 21. 1 of X f f fee' " . X 1 fg"t'?'z,, ,gs ,, lg ,, J, ,J ,,g,,,,J ,, . , ..., V QW, ,Ky I :Lia IPUBLMIATMDNS RGBERT S. RATNER HERBERT BUNGARD Editors-in-Chief THE 1938 VIQLET I 72 san, -- , .1f'.. , , , M, . . ,.,..s .. .,, .4 I A 2 'f , 4., ,g .,4?1....:g g ' 1 1-M ' ' Xl' 1, .f - ,gn Ji, ,V lx, ,, --51-11..1Q-.wwf-.4 ,,i:.M, I , " A S ,V , f 1 i,,.l'5fd4.L'S.f-JN -u:1'....,Jf., 5 fry 11 Nu -J 2' k f 'M' . :- f VIOLET STAFF Ectiiors-in-Ctiief HERBERT H. BUNGARD ROBERT S. RATNER MANAGING BOARD LESLIE FIEDLER LAURENCE LUSTIG twanaging Ectitor Art Editor HERMAN EISEN ARTHUR SMITHLINE Associate Atanaging Ectitor Ptiotograptzy Ectitor IIERMAN SUSSMAN ARTHUR IVIILLER Business Manager Sports Editor LEONARD PARIS DAVID GOLDIQNOPF Literary Editor Literary Ectitor HAROLD ENGEL Senior Ectitor ASSOCIATE BOARD NORMAN I. GINSBERG Assistant Ctutzs Editor DAXYID GOI.D Features Editor IVIONROE ABEl-OFF Fraternity Ectitor HERBERT BROWN Associate Ectitor ALFRED LOWY Assistant Ptioto Editor HILLIARD GAMING Faculty Editor ANTHONY LETO Ctutns Ecliior LITERARY ASSOCIATES JUSTIN GOLENBOCK PAUL KAI-IAN GERALD DAVIS MARVIN CRISTENFELD BERTRAM XJOGEL RAY HAVRILA IEEE SMALL NATBIANIEI, EISENBERG GERALD G. KAYTEN LEONARD GREEN BERNARD FREEDMAN BUSINESS STAFF HOWARD ASH ALFRED LEBERFELD STANLEY SMITH ARTHUR LEVY ABRAHAM LEVINE LEO SILVERSTEIN IRWIN LOWENFELD JOSEPH IVIORRIS IRVING JACKSON ROBERT KALLER IVIARTIN GROSS IRVINC .IACKSON IVIARTIN GIIOSSMAN PHOTOGRAPHY STAFF ARTHUR DRELICH ABRAHAM ABRAMS GEORGE BREITBART 175 "' Iv.-In . C1 , . .J S, x . ' A5'AT""3",... V,--s'Qx5 Y A '-4. . I ix FIEDLER LUSTIG EISEN SMITHLINE ENGEL SUSSMAN LOXN' Y MILLER PARIS LETO 1958 VKDLET HE 1938 VICDLET is an ac1c1ition to American year1Joo1: history, for here are recreated for the reader, vivid and actua1, the scenes of the past year. The editors have tried to comhine in this votume the hest of the past, the moving swittness of the present, and the imagination of the future. It is more than words on paper, it has the tang anc1 suhstantia1 virtue of something grown out of the campus it c1escrihes. During the summer of 1957, Messrs, Ratner and Lustig p1annec1 the hook. They wanted it to he digerent, different in the truest sense of the word. They had new ideas and new patterns to weave. And as they hegan to c1eve1op them, the p1anners of the 1958 V101..ET rea1izec1 that this hook wou1c1 have an origina1ity anct hri11iancy hoth inthought and expression, that wou1c1 he unequa1ec1.f The First thing c1ecic1ec1 on was to dedicate the hook to Upeacen. 1n view of the conc1i- tions existing throughout the wor1c1 today - a wor1d in which hate and destruction have rep1aced hrother1y 1ove and gooct feuowship, a wor1c1 in which knights of the air rain homhs on innocent chi1c1ren H "Peace: is the greatest desire of a11 inte11igent men. At no time did the Co-Editor arrangement that existed hetween Robert S. Ratner and Herbert H. Bungard prove unwie1oty. Both cooperated sp1enc1ic11y in putting out the VIOLET. 174 ff' -1 L' , :V 1' :A .H . ' V ' ' iff! 1411356120 ' M I if l- i i 'W' u 1 ' 1' me 3 V50 .31 pl.. U A V Q f -7. '15 3,4 'I ftp! .,fi gr., . jd., -. Q if i-4, . 5: 1' " gilt 41, f - :'1". :' v1- ' W 1' E 5 E. Q3 ..-.- 4 To Arthur Smithtine - praise and more praise. Arthur handled the photography work with the finesse of a genius. He tool: most of the candid camera shots which HH the pages of this volume and enlarged all the pictures to their proper sizes. The dedication picture is only a small sample of his remartcahte ahitity as a camera-man. The memher of the staff who did most for the votume was Ahcred C. Lowy. It can truly he said that minutes do not exist for At, he ftgures time only in terms of hours and days. The horder which runs throughout the entire hook is one of Ats original creations and most of the montages were made hy him. It was also a common sight to see AI, steaves rotted up and sweat on his hrow, developing and enlarging pictures, for he is a photographer of note. He took an the pictures in the haslcethau section, as weu as numerous candid camera shots. ' When praise is in order we cannot forget Herman Eisen, the associate managing editor, who did att his Work with very great etliciencyg Herman Sussman, the husiness manager, who made money for the editors to spend and who helped in the preparation of the hoolcg Harold Engel, Senior Editor, who compiled the senior section almost single- handedty and who acted as stag secretary, Ray Havritta and AI Lehertetd, typists extraordinary, who wrote copy and read proof, Arthur Miller, the sports editor, who com- piled the sports sectiong and Ahe Levine, sports writer, who covered the different events for the Violet. But one cannot forget the freshman who did a senior,s joh and did it Weil, Norman Ginsburg. Vwlithout UGinsyH the group pictures could never have heen handled as Welt as they were. The respect and admiration which the VIQLET editors and the staff held for the faculty adviser, Mr. Richard D. Mattery, can hardly he expressed in words. We ati owe him a deht of gratitude and appreciation for his excettent advice and unequaited coopera- tion. He gave freely of his time and vast store of knowledge in order to make this a good hook, a true record. 175 is serif.: --f"Lif -. .' , ' , ,, ... W , ,. . , - if NP . . ' . X ' . X .H . . ... If ,K ?" I ' 1 My 5: -ge ,ff gg U ,. H-. A- . f-- , I ' 1. . I4 ' sei x ,Z 'inf -a:. '- ' V tx .-A91 ' i N' - L -V 'ga :.- " fs ,,.-wa---' " ...'fr:Hi' , V - - ': t UNIV E ' - .Y . ., . . , . ., g, , , 1 , - :. - if at A 2f.ipQfs.4::':ff.:aL:fa Q. - ... 'mv-E JAMES R. MOGDY Editor-in-Chief Heights Daily News 176 ' nf ' wh .g. I' 2, -..,,,J'k YQ. f , , , ,A .-., f " X ' f 2 .- "'3" 'A " ' ,mM"' ,, ,gf ,.,,. ! ,, 1, Iwvvw , M- , " ,, HN, 1 ' My lv 1.4.31 1- 'X ff , ' 5 4. VT "fi f 'Q' rf 1- Q ' mx 4 . .5 F A 1 2. WL' 4 P2 '9"" ' -H I T - .- f ' 'J' ' X ' : 'W f , , vin, A .-'. 11 H 1, . Q . H H j ,, V-1 IU , A-4,41 ew ,gi . -F Q, :f - 517' ' --- , ,.,, Q, H 3 ,4 -H -. r:1: 7 4 Q .V ,-, y - 1- , , , , -, - i e'L'2f: 1 , I G ! , . ,f , ig, -"' ws- , - 1fgL ','f in Q . - h ' ui? 3 me 5ibfE,i f ,, fu-N V A , A ' , 2-15 , Lfww 'H z, up-A 1' W ,. , 5 W 'f , . - . ' - 1-'15, 5 If Q1 iff ' , 1 WWI' - A f ggizqg-f,,,..,. .,g1. J' - ' ' .2 a .V-"wi: f 1 in? , .. 5 I IW'-:TF ww , ,- ' . . ,,.,,ur,- . 1, "" V ,-5,...-,.,M, ,. . ff , .7 55: 1- -ff ? '- Q :xl ' 1 t - -- A I u l H, V E ,,, M ,, ,, ,,.,.,, JL. ,... . WM, ,. .. . V ., V L, ,, HEIGHTS DAILY NEWS o Efliiof-in-Chief JAMES R. MOODY Managing Editor Sports Editor STANLEY N. GLADSTONE BERNARD J.. FREEDMAN Business Manager Faculty Adviser FRANCIS B. CARIESON PROF. ATWOOD H. TOWNSEND IAIUTTIUUS TFGGSLITLF PROP. EDNVARD GASPAR1TSCH NEWS BOARD: City Editor, Stepben M. Eiscberg Copy Editor, Robert Katterg Assign- ment Editor, Justin Gotenbockg Perry Steigtitz, David Einkeistein, Victor Lazzaro, Ricbarcl Ereunci, Pbit Lewis, Niarvin Friedman, Joseph Vxfittko, Wittiani Kapian, Saut Goldstein, Abrabam Abrams. FEATURE BOARD: Pbitip Eriecitanct, Feature Editor: Marcus Smitb, Josepb Sonnen- reicb, Norman Lurcb, Max Kampetrnacber, Bernard Appetbaum, George Etson, Milton Amsel, Seymour Bancier. SPORTS BOARD: Copy Desk, Bertram Vogel, Jerome L. Yeslcog Assistants, Seymour Greenberg, Leo Silverstein: Alfred Wacbsman, Allen Brooks, Herbert Goldstone, Leonard Pullman, David Liss, Artbur Klein. BUSINESS BOARD: Josepb Kramp, Lawrence Hart, Herbert Weisenberg, Howard Hagenbusb, Albert Wray, Vx7infieJcJ Ructer, Jobn Winkler. 177 . 1 .,f---'Y , v -- ...Q GLADSTONE CARLSON FREEDMAN FISCHER KALLER GOLENBACK FREIDLAND HART VOGEL YESKO HEIGHTS DAILY NEWS EPTEMBER, 1957 marked anotiaer forward step for New York University news- papers wiien the News became a four-page daily. A iittie over tive years has passed since the inirtii of a separate journai for the two Heights coiieges, and time papers now compare weii with the other ieading national papers. Under the ieaderstiip of James R. Moociy, editor-in-chief, and Staniey N. Glad- stone, managing editor, the editorial poiicy expressed many views completely opposed to ttiose of tiie managing board of the year before. As in time past, however, the News, poiicy continued to be one caretuiiy weighing iaotti sides of all controversies before taic- ing a stand. Qniy a few misunderstandings occurred, and the instances of Utiottiead- ednessu were few. Of ali the criticisms which the paper received, very few came from ttie active memtuers of ttie student body. That the two men in ctiarge of poiicy seldom agreed on any matter at First seemed at the start to be a great obstacle for managerial etiiciency. But the prognosticated handicap became a blessing, for the resuit of time clash of opinions were editorials that retiected considerable thought, and the advice of out- siders was often sought in order to settie arguments. The oniy notaiaie addition to ttie news pages was tire column, News in Brief, sum- marizing tiae events of the day. But the news staff worked harder than any others with the paper coming out more frequently. Stephen Fischer, city editor, and Robert Kaiier, copy editor, were iargeiy responsible for time more complete and more accurate coverage. The outstanding men of the board were Justin Goientaocic, Perry Stiegiiliz, and Manfin Friedman. For the First time in many years tide sports page emerged with a deiinite editorial policy. During ttie past year, sports editor Freedman campaigned for a pro-union atiaietic J. 1' M5 , ' I, ' W:-r.- I , -A - .-J, I M' sr ,E W , "7' 5 q'7 iF - . - 'H WH policy, a more equitahte distribution of scholarships, recognition of the lacrosse team, and hetter management of athletics in general. Perhaps the higgest story of the year was the revelation that an othciat of the athletic hoard had hired stritce-breakers tor the N. Y. U.-Long tstand University game at Madison Square Garden. Mr. Heiherg, target of the accusations, later denied that he had hired scahs. Relations between the sports editor and faculty athletic hoard were unfriendty att year. Most active among the sports writers were Jerry Yestio, Bert Vogel, Seymour Green- herg, and Herh Goldstone. Goldstone was the most promising of the newcomers on the staff. ,Round Ghio Field, reduced to a one column format, continued to he written hy the sports editor and remained the oldest feature in the paper, having run for thirteen consecutive years. Although the feature page has far to go hefore it can meet with the complete approval of the students, Phil Friedtand and his assistant, Wtax Kampetmacher, worked hard to tceep this section of the paper hright and interesting. The standard format and the regu- larity of the columns was a decided change for the hetter. The page further served as a place where att students could air their views in letters to the editor. If the success of a newspapefs editorials he judged hy the quantity of discussion it elicits then this yearys editorials were truty outstanding. The paperis attitude toward the Spanish Civil War, in which it sympathized with the Loyatist Government and its daring stand on the question of puhticizing the anti-Syphilis campaign were two issues that were responsihte for many heated discussions in its columns and on the campus at large. From the point of view of time, effort, importance, and opportunity the Height Daily News is unquestionably one of the leading activities on the campus. 179 'J' 1 -n F , y K, ff ., -5 -f. ' 26' is , . 'gift ., , 'll . ,. ' , -Q X, E: , S f xl, X' gif :f: "f'. 'S -.,., . .. ,..."' A f- 'A - A H: jf, I 5 . 'W ', - fi' L Q I t 1 ' .. Til. .'i':'!' 2' " " if--1 41 -' ?""if" ,lin g:.n,,,,.f,BA-gEA'A'L', ' Aki- -Qgggf' ,, .V ' .k In f 5 1 JACK sHAP1Ro JOSEPH TIFFANY iosern soNNENREiCH MEDLEY HE Medley this year was again received with enthusiasm by the entire student hody. The College Comic Association considers the Medley' among one of the foremost magazines in the East. Vxforicing under the handicap of a Kcut' in the appropriation hy the Student Council, Joe Sonnenreich went to wort: to uphold the former standards of the magazine. - The First issue which appeared in the tatter part of Gctoher more than justified the expectations of the school. This year, hir. Sonnenreich was ohiiged to foiiow a policy to Uiceep it cieanu. He showed, hy having a 99 -MXIOOW pure humor magazine, that humor couid he funny Without being lfitthy. With the advantage of a iarge staff, the Niediey whipped together funny and interest- ing issues. Continuing the poiicy set last year, there were 8 issues, one a month. These were given out in an orderty fashion at the 'Lawrence House. The Qctoher Medley employed a maize-up stightty different from that ot last year,s issues and the contents seemed to he ot a higher and more dignified quatity. HSeen, Heard, and Suspectedf, and UFrom the Heightsu were articles that were continued. 180 ,"?-- wlwamm, 551 f i . ,. ' - '--f' . - , 5 If 1 4 'il' 'if " -" -1 A ., 112' A . ii - KH- i-4, 1 -.fS.' ii " -V 552' V771 ' . .. fu' ' LEE: Fiit i, . . i A fr'-.Ii ,if f' 2 Q ' , ,. ,,, 'ml 1-:I 'I , , fm , ,'Lg,-,ff-gig-c - 2-'lk-3.5 A , W" ' ' V 51 il . .Ts iieiig 2 ' .f-gf, A-r . .11-if M- After the first issue, the Editor changed the next issue to one a little more risque. in the later issues the, the former popular Utvleddiingsn were continued. This is similar to HTaH: of the Townn in the New Yorker. Umeddiingsyy and HTypographyH were new tea- tures consisting of newspaper headlines or columns with comments hy Medley. HUncte Bunny!! again became a popular feature. Joseph Tiffany, the Art Editor, did a good jot: and had his staff iitustrate some ot the jokes. They served their purpose and the Mediey retained its prestige. 'The American Drama Seriesu by Philip Friedtand proved to he an interesting series of features. Hcoiiich Coursesn also proved its worth. Part of the success of this year,s tviedtey was due to the conscientious efforts and cooperation that the Editor received from Jack Shapiro, whose diiigent work made the eight issues possihie. The Meddiers were made up of about ten memhers, att ot whom did their hit of work efficiently. Harold Nemser, Nathaniet Eisenberg, Philip Friedtand, and Vxfatter Rosenberg, Jerome Zvrin and Norman Menlcen contributed to HUncie Bunnyu, HDramaH, "Typog- raphyn, and HtVIuddiing7' features. Shep Boneparth and Arnold Deutschman did a good ioh in getting advertisements for the hooks. Bert Zotter and Stanley Barash handled the circulation and office management exceptionally welt. Considering the fact that the Medley was run under strict censorship ati year long, and that the money handicap was atways present, Wtedtey proved itself to he an integral part of Campus Life. ISI ...Q ,ffm -""X - . +1 l, ZA.,. ,,Y1,fi ,H Min- N --- -1 ip .P ffsl 1 oi i.fLi. night V? jg I ,..--I x-Q 1-., - 1 - 1 4 - Ma. ' . . , --" N..-A...-..., . . .,...... Jig- -' ' "'9 ,,-- -- ,e'5g' , . ,., , ,:,M,1.,,-, ,,. U 1' Z as . MEDLEY STAFF M E D L E Y M E N JOSEPH I. SONNENREICH Editor-in-Chief JACK SHAPIRO Business Pfanager M E D D L E R S NATI-IANIEL EISENBERG HAROLD NEMSER ARNOLD DEUTSCHIIAN PHILIP FRIEDLAND NORMAN IVIENKEN WALTER ROSENBERG JOSEPH TIFFANY Aff Editor- LARRY LIUSTIG JEROME ZVIRIN DOUGLAS IVIACDONALD SHEPARD BONEPARTHE EUGENE ZAI-IN M E D L I N G S Bernard Sciueur Lawrence Weber Leonard Rosenfeld Kenneth Weiiner Joseph Zeinigiier Paul Kalman Edwin Sciiottuman Stanley Schwartz Cyrus Biscardi CONTRIBUTORS Perry Stiegiitz John Reese Paul Deutsciuman Leroy Schiller-Safian Leo Silverstein Jerome Greenberg George Eison James R. Moody Bernie Friedman Justin Goienioocic Bois Hertzitowitz George Breitioart Murray Apfiebaum ixiaurice israel Les Feurstien Mark Smith T. Bawer Million Amsei Alfred Vxfeiss Danny Greenwald David XfVGiSS Staniey Barasia, Office lwormger Berttiold Zotfer, Circulation Manager Faculty Advisor, Prof. C. Bowie Miiiicang Business Advisor, Dr. E. Gasparitchg Art Advisor, Mr. D. Farnsworth. 182 ' , ,f , ,, I 5- Y , I r V. 14 . 4 ' ' P ' .du Mgt 'if fllfiei f 'T f ' ?7't"' ' I . H Mi V. 'MI .. P' - . .M-if -. rf I fi' .- - 1 - : , -P I- - :fl - m . .- - Jr..- Ari , L. lv , :V ,If , Q, -rgifi"l,-tiger., V, I 4, 'P-:ir " ..if52flm- If 'i3'3"f'3 .QI Lf , . . 5 .-Zim EDWARD DENVENDER HERBERT J. BROWN HERBERT I-I. BUNGARD CRITICAL REVIEW HE history of the Critical Review for the past few years has Ineen somewhat devious. As the students, medium for Iiterary expression, the magazine has sought to Igind those channeIs in which campus creative interests How most ahundantIy and to the greatest effect. At one time it Iirnited itseI1C to the reviewing of newIy puI3Iished hooks . . . hence its name. Soon it enIarged its scope Iay incIuding more truIy creative worIc such as poems, short stories and essays. This year, continuing its experimentaI search for the most proIjitaI:JIe veins of undergraduate Iiterary taIent, and toIIowing, therefore, the trends which seemed to prevaiI in the materiaI submitted for editoriaI consideration, the Critical Review made some new aIterations in its poIicies. The hook reviews which had originaIIy inspired not mereIy the titIe hut the very estaIoIishment of the magazine, were compIeteIy aI3ancIonecI. Un the other hand, the usuaI content of poems and stories was incIudecI as Iaefore. But in addition there were two newffeatures which, whiIe not outright innovations, were given an emphasis they had never had in previous years. For one thing, the Critical Review adopted a detinite editoriaI poIicy. The First was an appeaI for the estaI3Iishrnent of the R.O.T.C. on an optionaI Inasis with a view for its uItiinate aIJoIition. This was accompanied hy a striking picture drawn Ioy Laurence Iiustig, A '58 The second was a caII for participation in the annuaI nationwide Student Peace Demonstration. The other new aspect ot the CrilicaI Review was its greater stress on articIes, some of them controversiaI, deaIing with topics of current importance to students and to society in generaI. They touched on such suhjects as student organization, methods of preserving peace, the conservative versus the IiheraI point of view, etc. The intention of the editor in printing materiaI of this nature was to make the Crilicat Review an avenue for ex- pression in a greater variety of Iiterary media. in the poIiticaI essay as weII as the short story, therehy broadening Iooth the magazines appeaI and its usetuIness on the campus. 185 B r t .1 + .'z',f . fix., ' "" "IA -M TE" In 5 ? 'I' 5,f"' ,t X V.4' Vvyf. .,.i , - nfl. Wa , ,. H- ,V up I, ,r , U, f .-,-. 75,7 -.,.-,f . A V- - Aff' J if 14" ,iifw i " ' " ' A But it must not be ttrougtit that purely artistic ettorts were etbowed into a secondary position in ttie Criiicaf Review. In all of its issues, there was a decidedly larger amount of space devoted to poetry and Hction than to any other form of writing. Particutarty noteworthy were the stories of David Gotdknopf, Edward Dewender, and William Davidson, and ttie poems of David A. Rosenberg. Leslie Fiedler and Arthur Zeiger con- tributed to an amusing series of feature articles entitled 'Ttie Lunatic Fringef, describing some of ttie strange people to toe found on the outer edges of ttie American radical movements. Other interesting Writers in the Critical Review were Robert Katter, Jerome Helter, Abraham Frank and Robert Herstcovits. R STAFF Editor-in-Chief Afonaging Ediior HERBERT J. BROWN EDWARD DEWENDER Business Pfanagers PIERBERT H. BUNGARD HERMAN SUSSMAN EDITORIAL BOARD PAUL H. KAHAN ROBER'F S. RATNER ALFRED KOSBERG I-IILLIARD CAMINO JOSEPH SONNENREICH ASSOCIATE BOARD DAVID GOLDKNOPF ROBERT KALLER LESLIE FIEDLER JEROME I'IEL.LER ART1-IUR ZEIGER Davin ROSENBERG 184 -ffkg ,z2Jr:ff?2?f4 1-1113. .. " 2' , E. . ' T r , , ' . , swf 4 t L .. T, F, fx, 32.1 1 ' f Qf., :3'?', 'i-f v'-Joie 4 A Y , . , M ,' - :Et H' L 5fw4i'f,2 .wfqifm 'zz wi Hi, 3 1 ti -'V' .f i me 1 GERALD G. KAYTEN I--IOWARD H. ASH ELI NEVVBERGER THE QUADRANGLE INCE the Quadrangte was first issued in 1950, its editors have endeavored to exercise a policy ot continuous expansion and improvement. This year,s Managing hoard proved to he no exception. The staid cover which had adorned the magazine tor severat years was discarded, and a new, more modern design was substituted. The cover, though gaining much in attractiveness, tost none ot its dignity in the transition. Editor Howard H. Ash was responsihte tor this progressive innovation. This innovation, however, was not the onty noteworthy accomplishment. Though stitt tcept primarity a puhtication ot, and for the engineering students, the Quadrangte was attered stightty to inctude artictes hy memhers ot the tacutty and prominent men in the engineering profession, The first issue containing artictes hy txftajor Alexander P. de Severstcy, Dr. Alexander Ktemin and Dr. Fred C. Fair. The high quatity of the Quadrangte materiat was ittustrated hy the setection ot Major Severstqfs article, "Evuitding the Wortdgs Fastest Aircraftf, for reprinting in one of the nations foremost technicat magazines. The January issue contained artictes hy four seniors: Qtiver H. Cote, tvtason Lindsey, tsadore M. Kozac, and Maiirice B. Levien. Coteys paper was a treatise on 'Smatt Bore Rittes and Arnmunitiongn Lindseyys was a survey ot 'Finishes ot Non-Ferrous Die Castingsgu and Kozac and Levien cottahorated on the third, a description of the new Sanitary Engineering Research Euitding and its equipment. 183 V , ..--is E 1 .1 .W x 'X x 'X -f -iE...,L,1-,,,... Mu V! ,i ', , ' A M .,,, Q ff i. -417' ""f't"'- D. l W1 -' 11' - ' 'a"' 5 1 Y K Adi .V 'Y ffl! ' y-ig ijt' " hip. U: r -q- ' 1 X I r- - . " ., 14 ' i" i ' M . M f 1 I Q -1 ' " Y . Q 1 1 A A s mdaswii it 1 sf is- fa. ww' - , Y, .1 59541 ':' ' 'W LAT , " ,Ma a in 4- -'rm-uwf nw v , I 9' t' -' , , . I , g 7. ,5-1 .. .. .is ' - i .-,,,..,,,r.,..-. ..- ... ... i.i.....1...em,..i.:....44mur . V Y 1 his A .M f i The most outstanding feature of the year was the inctusion in the March issue of an eight page photographic story on the manufacture of Stainless Steel. Along with this was an excellent article on 'Stainless Steel anct Shot-wetctingf, hy Herhert R. Pass, a senior aeronautical engineer. Besides these, there were several other outstanding papers ptus the regutar features. The magazine was ctouhtect in size. Of unusual interest are the stancting feature columns. These serve as the vihranci tintcs among the many engineers. Withoiit these the Quaflrangle would he little more than a ciistinguishect compilation of technical Iqnowtectge, in short, tittie more than a student written hook. With them it hecomes a warm suhjective ctocument. Primary among these several columns is Hcampusn which represents an opportunity for every ctuh anct society of a technical nature to hnct out what is going on within the chamhers of its neighhor. Qne function ot great importance, that of maintaining contact with men who have passed heyond the academic portals, is performed hy the hfxlumniu cotumn. HEngineering Ad- vancen has progressect untit it now occupies a position ot outstancting importance in the periodical. its function is to gather and conclense important achievements in the engineer- ing World, into short artictes of extreme interest. Eli S. Newherger, has handled this department with unusuat success. Putt opportunity is given Editor Ash to tampoon anct Hatter outstanding men and Professors in the column naivety tittect "Laugh Engineer, Laughf' 186 .. - 'rf 1 j,,:f T A.. 3: ,, ,,, I, , q 7 " ,r ,-f"t"' - . .V if - 211 A ,,-.1st,1..i.,., , q ,ggi pa: -A 5 xr I'--, 3 frail: in - l , 49 " 'VEi ?n5ia,5"g2r3':.4m !i5L-i?fbi?EQ5i51x. W ,. T"f' f eww QUADRANGLE STAFF HowARD H. ASH Ecliior-in-Chief GERALD G. KAYTEN DUIS W. IVIEADOR Business Iwanager Aiumni Eciiior BERNARD LINDENBAUIVI RALPH .MUFLLER ELI S. NEWBERGER Associaie Editor , Departmental Editors SIDNEY NVISHNITZ PAUL C. PAFAGEORGE Circulation. Manager Advertising Manager EDITORIAL STAFF R. I. Byrne W. II. Martino C. Eisengrein .I. R. Moody J. Hopkins IVI. Pitkin V. Lazzaro W. IVI. Robinson D. Maiman I'I. ZinI3erg BUSINESS STAFF S. Boneparihe E. I'IaIIe E. II. Byrne I. Shapiro EVENING BOARD EDWIN A. HILBERT HENRY NV. SCORALIC K Editor-in-Chief Associate Editor EDITORIAL STAFF LI. P. AncIrasIco D. L. Sherwood J. Benedetti G. Thompson D. B. FoIey J. R. Vxferger FACULTY ADVISERS Dean TI1orncIiIce SaviIIe Assistant Dean XfViIIiam R. Bryans Professor P. B. IVIcDonaIcI 187 5-Q . . X.,---ff' -- . k . . . - I 'I ev -.-4,! -:L WFU' 1" g - 2. A!-mf , ,- ,, ,.,,. M,...,i,.W-, . 4.7. ,i..-s. if - r ARTHUR MILLER PALISADES HANDBQOK N an ettort to impart the intorrnation so vitat in guiding the trestiman toward a suc- cessful cottege career in a more pleasant and inviting manner, the current PALISADES HANDBOOK not only came tortti with an entarged format, but with an increased amount of materiat as welt. tt was the policy of this year,s managing hoard, to include not onty the standardized materiat which becomes more accurate and otliciat each year, taut atso a more readatnte sportys section and severat ottier features designed to give the neoptiyte a ctearer view of undergraduate tife. With a view towards etiminating the sometimes bewildered and vague ideas of the trestamans First few weeks at the university, the HANDBOGK was sent to eacti freshman severat weeks before the cottege year tnegan. A striking white Hexitnte faturitioid cover upon which was superimposed in violet the university seat and the words PALTSADES HANDBOOK, aided in retaining ttie tuootfs traditional reputation for artistic excettence. tn order to make the ittustrations more clear and concise, a specialty coated grade of paper was used. Distributed ttirougtiout the boot: were many familiar campus scenes which tietped in snowing its Beauties to the newcomer. AH important administrative officers of the university were included to show the great progressive strides wtiicti ttie University tias made during its existence. Going a tnit astray from traditional times, this year's HANDBOOK was dedicated, not to any individual in particular, taut to the freshman ctass as a whole. The chief administrative o'rHcers wrote, instead of the usual letter, an essay on various phases of cottege lite which migtit tue of aid to the ueoptiytes. Starting this year the Handbook was made up before ttie end of ttie second semester, so as to enable the entrance committee to send out the pututication to eacti man who tiad ttie honor of Being admitted to the Heights. 188 a ,f-' - ,.fP---i mammm, EMU K ' 442 1 5 V it 'Vi . r .. ' X' , , - - ' ,- V 11-1-i it of M . - F mv "M A , - ..-z-w5,...-m,, . ' 4 "hm" V' 3: , 3 W i 1 .1 "iffy, 'A -, 1. .:,?'3,i9 . -- V .Mi , n vt-U -V Cysi.. -fig, : ' , :Vt , :A , . ,V HY- '-'J ' iff, I, .-uf 'sm' .ZXQX I 5 Lift-if, ffY5Z, i'.1,, . V. ,. V .,. -X , ,Wh o ,i , ,, I ,HM , ,, r If . - ,. if-7 1 , Q., L. U - ,I .1 :,,.,,. ia V , 5 W YE' I W K 1 . V ggiwr 'i ,, Q 1 lv C U. ,T ,ZA My ,H V -hiv : I 9 ' L" "' ' ' E ' i fl 4 W N' .::'i"'3 wi-rn.,-'Hi '.f,4 , i , ffl-'J if 41' ' if A' 5' .5 ' t' " -' if 'V 'E ' 5 .MM dw. " "" M224-fa, 2 - - ' eygizw -'f:.e:M5f.-ways1mWQef3'w4wwa-.4s:-mn 1 ,Aw f 1 PM-1 'I' W' """t' 'N 5' ' 1 -,T v ,,.. ,. 1 . y '1 f-,i'.1-,Hai f b damning foam ,..,z :sift-'-:,::a,v,im-.ztei-. . . ..-Q-f f s .,.. ff . -- . - tvtucta credit must tue given to the men on the statt who gave up a great cteat of their time in orcter to insure the putting out ot a gooct tnootc. To Jerome Greenberg, wtio saw to it that everyttiing was property taken care ot, anct to Marty Btitzer, Met Wahrhaftig, Harotct Z. Engel, Ataratiam Levine, anct many others, crectit must toe given for their whotetueartect cooperation in the writing up of the book .... The statt of the Hancttnoota tiope that their task was ctone successfutty, for it may wett be saint that ttieir proctuct is an important factor in ttwe orientation ot the incoming freshman to the campus, ttie attitetics, anct to att ttie ottier important factors which are of vitat importance to tiim. PALISADES HANDBQOK STAFF Ectitor-in-Ctiiej ,...4........... . .........,,.... ARTHUR MILLER Managing Erlilor ...,., ,,,... J EROME G. GREENBERG Business Ittarmgcr .,... ........,4......,......4...,.,.....,,..........,......., R OBERT DAXVIS EDITORIAL BOARD MARTIN BLITZER BRUCE HECKER NATPIANIEL EISENBERG ROBERT KALLER HAIQOLD ENGEL JOSEPH KESSLER A MAIZX'lN FRIEDMAN fxBRAHAM LEVINE RICHARD FREUND LAWRENCE SCHRAGER CI'lARLES FUCHS JOHN WAPIIJQUIST Cyl-IARLES HEC1-IT MELVIN XXIARHAFTIG PIERMAN SUSSMAN L, ccccc , cccrccc L ' 189 X 'f I 'il-an... ,L AZ al, -eS"'3...-'Rex 4"" We ' 'K News, Hot off Hue Wires I I A 2,-55:1-f , , ' ff? '+I .. X l 5 ,gg ,f , - - A 'fx qu' M F P' m X .y ,,.. jgfqgw' 3 'f,'-G: Q 9 f 'l7:'-- f35 ,j'! l2,,VfSA15Q X '4 . W - EM f '7 'Q M 'ei'T ':ls: 5 N , A '911'f' ,.Li'Q:.- CS if-, 5 , p. ,- - -- - , , , px 4 f , .f ,, -L f 1' 190 2:1 al dw, ,. ,, A5 .4 'ff f " f M " ,EM L, 4 , I Q -V if . V .x 1, ,952 ,yi ',' ,W ' 1 ,. --', fn' -1: V-' sq, 'ig . U. I . V ,v.w-n- 1 , " 1 . ,,.z.. 'A -vm H W .-V -6- , Hg z. , - Y f-,., .fm .13 . - i, H .,,v,,-. .f ., ...,. . .. ,....,-,....,,.4.x- ...ay NNE ARTS .HV ig : I 1 . V V .fl - " ' ' tw, HAROLD MITHERZ PAUL H. KAHAN DEBATING EW activities at the Heights offer as much in the Way of after college training as debating. Qur debating team, hesictes heing super-salesman for the University, otters its memhers the training that may later prove essential F the atnitity to speak Welt in puhtic. The ahitity to inttuence peopte has atways heen a resutt of Fine puhtic speaking training. tts success at the Heights is attestect to hy the fact that this years debating team inctuotect the presictent of the Senior Class, the Editor of the Violet, the presictent of Alpha Pi, Hill Historical Society, John Marshall Law Society, the Ectitors of the Criiical Review and fweclley, the President ot the Model League of Nations, the Vice- Presictent of the Student Councit and icive Student Council memhers. Dehating hrect teactership, thought, and ahitity. Led this year hy Co-Captains Paul H. Kahan and Harold Wtitherz, the team estah- lished for itsehc an enviahte record. Among the Seniors on the team were Lawrence Lustig, Joseph Sonnenreich, Leslie Fiectter, Robert Ratner, Ahe Tannenhaum, and Manager Hittiarct Caming. The Junior contingent included Murray Neittich, Nturray Segal, Robert Katter, and Bruce Hectcer. The Sophomore Ciass was represented hy Chartes Hecht and Irving Jackson. The team met some 150 teams during the season before Welt-sized auctiences in churches, synagogues, toctges, and community centers. The chief suhject ctiscussect re- volved arounct the extension of the powers of Lahor Relations Board to include that of compulsory arhitration. Qther topics ctiscussed range from international affairs to purely tocat topics. Dehates were hetct at the Heights campus and were Wett-attenotect. Three Heightsmen H Paul H. Kahan, Lawrence Lustig, and Joseph I. Sonnenreich 192 5 f 'f' 5? L " , , - L , X f.4.t-., wifi A f, 'si 2 . aw - ,Q 1. --gl 2 . w K 7 , ' 1 -nf 1"-w i,-ff ' , g 'z .1-- Q li' , .. .. - yi- .,, - re' , , , . I , , - . , -' ., ,- , tag ' ,,"- ts-V-1-f' 'cu " -, ' K Ji? 5 if .4 2" iywt,-1 5 ' ' :EQ L3 'I ge n, 'Lg T m e I 6- 'f ,fri ,. ., .' - "H ' 1""'f ' ' ' Q .. ' '. , . . ,. . .-W1 1 'V' -" ' ,LL '1"'7"i"?'9?.'Z'1 : . 'I r"31- i ' "'i'537'i"'f'v traveted as tar west as Minneapotis representing the University. The team participated in the Northwest tournament in St. Paut, creating a very tavorahte impression anct, though sutnsequentty etiminatect, heat hoth hnatists in the tournament. The trip, a highty suc- cesstut one, inctuctect stops in Chicago, Eau Claire, Madison, Xfvinona, St. Paut, Min- neapotis, Ctevetanct, anct Washington, D. C. Among the teams met were the University of twtinnesota, Wisconsin State Teachers Cottege, Vwtestern Reserve, Loyota, St. Maryts Cottege, etc. tn att some 50 ctehates were schoctutect anct hetct. tn generat, the 1937-58 Dehate Season was a highty successtut one. tt was martcect hy the arrivat ot a new coach, Ectmunct Mottorsheact who was himsett a prominent ctehater in his unctergractuate ctays in the Northwest. The team atso hact a weetxty ractio program over one of the targer New Yortc Stations anct schectutect ctehate contests every Sunctay. The innovation was tremenctousty successtut anct ctouhttess Witt he continuect. An unusuatty heavy Freshman Dehate Program was schectutect this year. Coachect hy Pant Kahan anct Murray Neittich anct managect toy John H. Batt, the 1941 team engaged in a numher of ractio ctehates as wett as a great many inter-cottegiate contests. Among the teams met were Princeton, Army, Rutgers, Fordham, Manhattan, City Cottege, Brootctyn Cottege, Hunter, Cotumhia, etc. The Freshman Dehate team inctucted Martin Richman, Presictent of the newty formect Freshman Dehate Forum, Perry Steigtitz, Secretary ot the Forum, Seymour Mit- stein, Phitip Lewis, Harotct Rahinowitz, Eugene Bergman, Edgar Barnett, Jay Teitethaum, Leonard Reiss, Arthur Kavater, John Batt. 103 l.:i"'F- Lu.. K -- x Q H ,,ffive:PPf1. . 7 tx . .. , 4-1 . ' 5- Sa..?,,--5 - -Tk ,1 . ' J X VX: .I X :", ' X 221 , f W' ! . pea FH ' ,fa f--:-5,544 71 .,- -f. . 'f ' M 1, V , ik '14 N. '- V "M-,..r'-'rf l. ' :Q r f ' Q X. ' vm sw 11-4 4 413' "M" ge ffm "Q Q fa 4 3 3, ' 1 X . as faassxi X, ,-'-"wa '-Ar'-"-1-sn Jr ,I . ' L JE , ,ji-, 'Z Vg ff' 1 i n Q fgd, 51,5 f 72 1 , wr , . ,,, GLEE CLUB HE New York University Glee Club is one ot lltie otctest organizations on the campus, dating back to 1885. The group opened this past year with a concert at Carmet High School, Carmel, N. Y., Where it performed for an alumni scholarship funct benefit. This recital saw the debut of Keith Witson, E '58 and Arthur Bernstein, A '40 as xytophone and piano soloists. The 59 undergraduates combined with the faculty and alumni gtee clubs for the eleventh annual Town Han concert on December 11 at which Dr. Joseph H. Bryan '86, the founder of the c1u13 in 1885, was given a gotct Gtee Club key. The presentation was made by Ctiancettor Chase immectiatety after intermission. The Town Hall program included David fuzz, a modern composition by Joseph Wagner, Canto de Auginalcto, an Anctatusian F0114 tune, Echo Song by Orlando di Lasso and an arrangement of an 1nc1ian tune by Pietro Yon, noted organist who was a guest of the ctutn. Sotoists with the ctutv inctudedz Willard Peck, A. Seymour Weeks, E 159, Gustave Richter, A ,58, Wittiam J. Wotfe, E ,41 and John Torian, E '58 December 17 saw the first Brooklyn performance of the Gtee Ctuta at Memorial Presbyterian Church and on January 7 the club travetiect to Kindertioolc, N. Y., to enter- tain the community at a recital arrangect by an alumnus. The club officers for the year were Charles Penry E '58, managerg Vincent W. M. Freimarclc A ,59, tibrarian, aancl Eugene Bania E ,4O, assistant librarian. Professor Alfred M. Greentielct, is ctirector of the c1u19 and Harold Heermans, accom- panist. . The Glee Ctub has assisted in numerous affairs and has given several free concerts at the Heights. 195 Y '1 , , , f""i""'-1 ' , if ni '13 ffg 5? f- 4. f ' I ' .-i.. 1- 4. ,. w e K 1 'K I. " ' f . 1. 7' . -L 'H git jtizfffsjf i f.: J .Ei i. . 1 11 U , i Q M, ,q . 1- ,I -15. gg X n 44 'cY ,,,,,,, f i A ' ' , 3-Him ,X 'X x HALL OF FAME PLAYERS GAIN in 1958, the l'lall of Fame Play- ers, the Heights dramatic society, came through with flying colors, hringing the stanclarcl of amateur clramatics higher than in any previous year. With lvlr. Henry l'lowarc,l, as aclvisor, and Mr. Dean Farns- worth as technical clirector, the Players and Technical statt surpassecl all previous at- tempts. Both major procluctions of the year playecl to paclqecl houses with numerous re- quests tor repeat performances. The current season for the Players opened on Decemher 17th ancl 18th with the well known ancl recently cinematizecl clramatic coinetly, The Front Page hy Ben Hecht ancl Charles MacArthur. The opening provecl to he an auspicious one for, following this suc- cess. the procluction staff selectecl for the second procluction on April 7th, Sth ancl 9th, Criminal al Large, hy Eclgar Vyfallace. Following an innovation introclucecl last year, hoth procluctions were entirely the result of stuclent effort. The procluction staff, chosen lay Green Room, Heights honorary clramatic society, in turn selectecl the clirector, Howarcl Leclerherg, for the procluctions plan- necl. After much selecting the linal casts were cleliinitely clecidecl upon ancl the gruel- ling grincl of rehearsals hegan, while the technical stall lalnorecl over setting ancl special raclio etfects requirecl for the procluction. Co- operation ancl keen interest, so necessary for a stuclent venture ancl especially so in the theatre, was everywhere to he found. ,ff af. , i t..i A . """"""" , -511 57 ' t i f: f i f 1 ff' . sp L. ff g., V - 1,1-iw, 1, :Ep Vi. o n , 7, Q -' Q ' 1 A 'Q 'V 'jy ' 1' 4, .. gl.. A -. , , -5' +,.. , '- , , Ig- M ,L.,- ,f , f . , My W ffft ifiit wit it if I 1' 2 rm. mn, .. A 'Y -r ,-i - .M riff --...Q ' " f .". si . " 9 v. " ri .f " The technicat stattx, under the teactership of Mr. Dean Farnsworth, receivect nothing hut praise from att quarters. tn actotition to the excettent sets ctesignect, the technical statt' ctisptayect much ingenuity in lighting and speciat ractio ettects. Noteworthy in this respect was the scene in The Front Page where Eart Wittiams, the murderer, escapect in the midst ot shouting, ringing atarms, shat- tering gtass anct machine gun chatter. Aside from its purety ctramatic activities, the Halt ot Fame Ptayers foster stuctent ptay writing and matte-up. The Players atso oper- ate a cut-rate ticket othce which otters the stuctent ctesirahte ptays at ctrasticatty rectucect pricesg Metropolitan opera tictsets at cut-rates are also on sate at the ottice. The seconct ptay ot the year was the great criminat anct mystery ctrama, Hcriminat at Largef, The ctirector ot this proctuction was Howarct Lecterherg and the star was trving tsraet. tsraets performance was excettent. His realistic portrayat ot' the insane man sent shuctcters clown the hacks of the auctience. The scenic designs were excettent. The tight- ing set the atmosphere heautitutty. The Hatt ot Fame Ptayers have macte a distinct contrihution to the cutturat tite ot the cottege. The society has given the men with ctramatic ahitity a chance to show their Worth. tt has given the scenic ctesigners their opportunity anct the directors experience anct devetopment. The Put-gtic Speaking Department aicts the work ot the rtramatics groups hy ottering a numher ot speciat courses on various aspects ot the theatre. Prof. Nyherg, Messrs. Zintc anct Farnsworth are the instructors. The otticers ot' the Hatt ot Fame Players Were. President ...... , ,..., Aaizaifimi BYE tizviuo ISRAEL Secretary ..... ..... J osrrfri SONNENREICI-I 197 . Y v V N V fha... U -X. , . ,tam 4 'A , gl! - 7 Y , 5 ' -I xi., M1 6 T133 Jr, .Q , I , '-- X ' i V, i L ri 4 'U - I., cp . '- v A A 1212 ,-1 1 :53 rt A F., it . r 5- Q . , 1 W I A Mihai 1 A -. i -217: , H If' i 2 1 rv ,, . if Aw -,Q my H . ,V . 1. 'V H - ' V I 5 l 1 I .V Y' 1 I Auf. Q! I pri, ky 3. ,f i gt W . ' "" V Z GREEN RCDOM HE Green Room is an honorary society that was founded in 1952. its purpose is to further student activity in dramatics on the N.Y.U. Heights Campus. The memher- ship is composed of those who have completed two years of meritorious service in the Halt of Fame Players and have then heen elected hy the mernhers of the society. Although most of its rnemhers are the leaders of the Halt of Fame Players they have no executive power over the other group. However, following an innovation introduced last year. Green Room selects the production staff, which chooses the major plays to he produced during the year. The staff chooses the directors for these plays, Who, with the advice of the staff, is in sole charge of casting. Every year towards the end of May, a Green Room day is held when students present their own plays for approval hy the student hody. Also in line with its purpose is the vigorous campaign for a larger theater and more campus funds with which the students can carry out their wortc. This year one step was taken in which the student council appropriation was increased. The oHicers are: Presidents, Ahe Bye and Irving tsraetg Secretaries, Joseph Sonnen- reich and Henry Hater. eil., 198 ,ff-iwmwmm v! ' . . 2 - - , . , -- 1' , ,, 7 . -M.. ., . l , AM ,, F W , V T. w . 1- ,R 't ,B . F J gy. 'ff 4f'1i'g1'ft2: . at f "Tr .,,-- ,,' 41 ' . 1 3. rrfy iv ' , 2, U, ,- 'mal - f- - - w ' , '... 1- .--. ' '. '- u I . eww X L 5 ' L' . .L-ed' f. . ,,:?Zff,Lj ' 5 ,lf 'Fritz . t+,4.'.g,,",a.f47T!fggf ,- -..,.'rHzMY , f. -,gg,:f. -, l 1... , 03.2 V 'J n 'I 0 f J ' HEIGHTS LITTLE SYMPHQNY ITH the passing of this academic year, the Heigtuis Littte' Symphony compteted its hintta year of existence. Formed in 1929, by a group ot'15 students who were zeatous to team and play symphonic music, the group has now expanded to 35 members who are acquainted with Lotta wind and string instrumentsg among which are Hrst and second violins, Yiolas, celtos, basses, ttutes. ctarinets. trumpets, trombone, and Lasso. ln accordance wittr a policy initiated tast year, the group, together with the tVTan- hattan Qrcnestra, gave two concerts H one during ttme regtdar claapet period, and ttae other at Manhattan Coltege. Mrs. Hunlcins, the wife ot the conductor, Mr. Maurel Huntcins, ptayed "The Grieg Piano Concertof' Tn addition, the orchestra ptayed ttre 'Spanish Dancen lay Sarasate and 'Rosemunden tny Schubert. Credit for the splendid Wortc the Little Symphony did goes to the conductor, the manager, Frantz Katzentzvurg, ttxc assistant manager, Leslie Peck, and ttme Concert Master, James Woot. t 199 4-djylfi. s ,, - ' J f.: Y .,.,,s - 1 V it I i 41254 ,- I I I f.a.a NEW YORK UNIVERSITY BAND EW YORK UNIVERSITY cIistinguisI1es itseIt on tI1e gridiron, Inetween tI1e I1aIves as WeII as cIuring tI1em. preeminent in nerve and spirit as weII as precision, tI1e eigI1ty-piece aII-University I3ancI Iias Ient' coIIegiate coIor to tI1e VioIet contests and given inspiration to our footIuaII forces, not onIy at Iaome Ivut in enemy territory as weII, for, instituting a new poIicy, tI1e IoancI accompaniecI tI1e team to tI1e game with Carnegie TecI1 at PittsIvurgI1 WIiicI1 saw tI1e VioIets triumph over its favoreCI opponents. The Band, cIespite tI1e Iaandicap of a tI1I'GG'I"1OtIl' practice session once a weeIq, Ilas assumecI an outstanding part in tI1e extra-curricuIar IiI7e of tI1e University. As in tI1e past, it was aIJIy cIirectecI Iay Mr. IVIaureI I-IunI:ins, former cIrum major ancI IJancI director of tI1e University of CaIiIornia. Assisting Mr. Hunkins were WiIIiam ZaIcIe, gracIuate manager and composer of all I:JancI formations ancI maneuvers, ArviIIe Gray, stucIent director, Frank Kehoe ancI Robert Kamm, assistant managers. WaIIace uVx7aIIyH Newman IivecI up to tI1e tradition estaIJIisI1ecI Ioy tI1e Iong Iine of IariIIiant cIrum majors. Few who were present at tI1is years I'ootIvaII games WiII forget tI1e spectacIe of WaIIy tossing Iais Inatons to astonishing I'1eigI1ts ancI I'1is stiII more astonl isI1ingIy inIaIIiI3Ie retrieves. The Band, foIIowing tI1e custom estaIJIisI1ecI Iast year, continuecI to function tI1rougI1- out tI1e year as a concert unit. 200 ,A .wb .J ,L af"1I', i 3 W, ,,. ,, . 1, . . . ,. ,. , .1 - W , Jfsfs... Zhi Q , W 5 fig. 7 IIA' ' 3 if- .L f 'Wu f I .. ,. ' f , I ,ffl J' 'A X' . -- ' I' I ,r . f-. W, dm -:ff ' v 4-I-r a 1:2 S' ' 5 rr: 'z ' :' .. 1- 2 I W-24:'.f1' 'I' A" 'J 1 Ut d? 5 " -I " I 5 'f" '?' ow-K 1: V: 3-,455 an -579441 if K, ,I 3 I , . . :ym.,', f,,+ -V 93:13 ,Z ' .QW H A: I, 35, Q i.a.,,...',ifa5 - J F :la mem., .. -71 ' ., ' 2.'5"'f--' A 'M ... -, -1.I: z'i.f- SQQHETHES ALPHA PI INETEEN-THIRTY-EIGHT marlqect the tenth anniversary of the existence of Alpha Pi, honorary potiticat science society, at University Heights. Though re- strictect to stuctents with exceptional ahitity in Potiticat Science, the society has assumed a numher of extra-curricular activities. Through its athtiations with the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, Atpha Pi sencts delegates to the tnternationat Relations Ctuh Conference and the Model League of Nations. At the former, hetct at St. Lawrence University in Canton, N. Y.. the society was representect hy its President, Pant H. Kahan and Daniel L Glass. The Model League of Nations Detegation consisted of hh. Glass, Chairman, Joseph L Sonnenreich, Mtirray W. Neittich, Murray Siegel, Ahfrect Kosherg and Rohert Kalter. Pant Kahan, as , , 1 President of the Model League, headed the cietegation. The Heights delegation, representing France, attended the sessions at Rutgers University on Aprit 7-8-9. The otlicers of the Society Were: Paul H. Kahan, Presidentg Nathan Fishman, Secretaryg Norton Zavon, Corresponding Secretary, and Daniel Rite, Treasurer. The society met once each month to heact actctresses hy its memhers. Among the many interesting speeches was the one hy Rohert Ratner on ltwhy Centratization of Governmentf, Qther speakers were Leslie Feictter and Rohert Katter. PAUL H. KAI-IAN Q02 ,. .A 5 V L . T j l - 2 ' . . .,.,,, t V- 'MVA ,Vg V 1 A Y Y J i ,J ., .fa sy 3? Q 5, W. W I -MT? ,... ...,.-,...,4,: Midi' 3,3 I W if ,4 1 K ,QW 17 F , J. ,H .i gg. , ,.,., .,,, V M 'f ' 4 vi at -4 'ff ' ' - . . if F... . M . "" ' "ir-' 1.n'zg-. ,:..3 ' 3 ' " : A t, wr" -A if .1 V ,, YL' ' " ..Sf'i.x-si, 1 2 1, ' ,Lam Q3 55 , ., ' ' mi, .f 1' 5 ,l31!"'f'iLg M ' tt ti '? f M .2 . ' A .1 1 ,, '.. - - -- -:ff-wi , , 'L '2':Sii:.'F, mt? 1' 7 ' f I 2 fm i 5 ,...f+N.. aawmmm h 4! f ,ff if- f,, .. , ,3- 1 1 , A17 L4 It F i sf V 3 L ADAM SMITH SQCIETY HE Adam Smitb Society was formed on tbis campus eigbt years ago as an bonorary group in Economics. tts mernbersbip consists of tbose students wbo bave sbown prof ticiency in tbe subject, as indicated by bigb scbotarsbip, and wbo merit tbe recommendation of tbe faculty. The cbiet purposes of tbe Society are to provide an opportunity for intelligent dis- cussion of current economic problems and economic tbeory in general, and to furtber cordial relations with tbe members of tbe Economics department. tt is witb tbese ends in view tbat tbe Society botds regular montbty round table discussions in tbe Lawrence House. preceding eacb discussion a member is designated to prepare and read a paper on the selected topic. Among tbe topics discussed tbis year were tbe federal debt, tbe economic effects of war, tbe undivided protits tax, institutional tag in tbe economic system, industrial unionism, and federal regulation of . 4 securities and speculation. In tceeping with its tradition, tbe Society conctudes its activities for tbe year by botding its annual dinner in Ntay. wben a prominent economist is invited to address tbe group as its guest. Past members of tbe organization wbo are present in tbe city at tbe time are also invited. At tbis attair tbe Society,s sitver cup is presented to tbe student wbo bas done most towards accomptisbing tbe aims of tbe group. Tbe officers are: Howard Kaplan, presidentg Sidney Bendet, vice-presidentg and losepb Reicb, secretary' treasurer. HGXV.-XRD KAPLAN 205 N .K ' -'A . ' ws.-.-1-'Q . ---is W, ' f ' V .fs .s.. .. -I-W "4-M nnlihl- -if -- .. ... I L ' ' BETA LAMBDA SIGMA ETA LAlVlBDA SIGMA, tlae lwonorary society in laiology, was founclecl on the University Heiglnls campus eiglwteen years ago. The Society was createcl for tlae purpose of promoting unclergracluate interest in luiological researcla ancl stuclies, ancl estalnlislaing a common grouncl on wlaicli stuclent members, alumni, gracluates, and tlsie faculty coulcl meet for tlae cliscussion of biological prolalems of general interest. lvlemtner- slmip in Beta Lambda Sigma is cleterminecl on tlue lyasis of sclaolastic excellence in biology. Featurecl at tlue montlily meetings of tlwe Society were a numlaer of reports by prom- inent biologists on tlae nature olj tlneir investigations. Tliese tallss attorclecl the uncler- gracluate memlaers a Hrst lciancl opportunity to appreciate tlae importance of tlae experimental attitucle in tlae solutions of biological problems. Professor Horace Nvesley Stunlcarcl, aclministrative cliairman of tlue Department of Biology, in a particular intriguing report on HAnoploce- plwaline Cestoclen tolcl tlaie Society of tiis recently completecl solution of a prololem in parisitology tlciat laas loattlecl in- vestigators lor tlwe past two generations. Qtlaer interesting spealcers were Dr. Nlorris Harnly of New Yorlc Universitys Xvaslaington Square College. wlao CllSCt1SSSCl luis investiga- tions on tlwe nature of tlwe 'Bocly Fluicls of Drosoplailafy ancl Dr. Ross W. Nigrelli, parisitologist at tlie New Yorlc City Aquarium, wlsio reportecl on some "Diseases of Fislmn The activities for the year were concluclecl with the annual clinner ancl reunion, at wluicla time newly electecl memlners were incluctecl into tlcie society. YALE RABINOXVITZ Q04 win- "lp g V. V, ...,- A. . sf-vw V' X I7 W' . tl E". -' ' X , 'siiqaxaa c 1 - in in : A ff' t as 1-fin-ai .1 . THE HILL HISTORICAL SQCIETY HE HiII I'IistoricaI Society this year changed its poIicy of Iceeping the organization very smaII an-:I opened its ranks to a greater numher of the oiitstanchng history students. The Societys program consisted of three cIistinct parts. In the First pIace, memhers of the FacuIty acIcIressecI the group. Prof. Craven spoke on the suhject "History BooIcs.H I-Ie pointed out the hardships invoIvecI in such work ancI how the student shouId interpret history IoooIcs. Among other speakers was Dr. Joseph H. Park. The seconcI part of the program consistect of research papers hy the memhers. At the Ioeginning of the year the presicIent, Rohert S. Ratner, cIetiverecI an acIcIress on ltwhat Is I'Iistory?n During the seconcI semester papers were reafI hy AIfrecI Ifosherg, PauI I'I. Kahan, ancI Iaeonarct Paris. Liuncheons ConstitutecI the thircI part of the program. A numher of these were given during the year. A tea for the Deans and memhers of the History Department con- cIucIecI the year,s program. The concIucIing Iuncheon ot the year was wicIeIy at- tencIecI Ioy the History honors men ancI the facuIty. The officers of the Society were: Rohert Ratner, presicIentg Nathan Fishman, vice-presicIentg ancI Bruce I'IecI:er, sec- retary. ROBERT S, RATNER ' - x , .'iT""ii'I'5-fjf-.' 2 fjxx Y -"Li - -' , -fi! T I gi A. W, "'f"' "MN" pun! - '-I -I 2.7 f- hu" t X .,-,ff f ali , 'fifi ,gi Q- "' -- A ., If ,. ' , J-fi ' E H .b F I , " K I .- im.. W v, ,fi -rv . iq :Ji I 1 -He -- ..t. ' -.- r- - N ..,ffr't PHI LAMBDA UPSILQN INCE 1955, when it succeected the Draper Chemical Society, Phi Lamhcta Upsiton has heen the honorary organization of stuctents who have done outstanding Wortc in chemistry. High scholastic recorcts anct speciat ahitity in chemistry are prerequisites for memhership. The strict entrance requirements of this society have kept it in the top rantc of Heights organizations. This years activities startect with a meeting actctressect hy Professor Shecttovstcy and Mr. Otto Hopf, hoth ot the Roctcefetter tnstitute for Medical Research. The tatter gave a demonstration ot glass htowing. At the initiation meeting hetci in November a physicat chemist from the tw. XV. Kettogg Company spoke on the applications of his hranch of chemistry in the oit refining industry. Other speakers were Prof. Fink, of Cotumhia University, Dr. Per K. Frotich, Director of the Stanctarct Oil Development Company fNeW Jerseyb, anct Dr. Harry Sohottqa, ot Mt. Sinai Hos- pitat. At the Final ctinner of the year Dr. Alexander Gettter, chief toxicotogist tor the city ot New York, act- ctressect the society on the nature of chemical work in crime-ctetection. Qtticers for the year were: Mr. F. P. Jahn, presictentg Joseph Mihina, vice-presictentg Leonarct May, secretaryg fftr. Harry Kaptan, treasurer. FRANCIS P. .IAHN 206 A M., . - Z,- PSI CHI SI Cl'll, the Heights chapter of the national honorary society in psychology was founclecl in 1951 as an informal cliscussion group, known on the campus as the Psychology Society, Reorganizecl in 1932, the society hecame a permanent organization lcnown as Phi Lamhcla Mu, the local honor society in psychology. Since April 20, 1954, when a Psi Chi charter was grantecl, Phi Lamhcla Mu has hecome the New Yorlq University Heights Chapter of the National Fraternity. The society aims to encourage all stuclents interestecl in psychology hy securing spealcers representative of the most authoritative views held in the ljielcl. Meetings, helcl hi-monthly, are generally open to all stuclents interesteol in psychology. The program of these meetings consists of papers delivered hy memhers, presentation of researches macle hy stuclents ancl faculty. anrl tallqs hy guest spealcers followed hy cliscussion. ln the early part of Qctoher, Mr. lsrael Saltzman, a major in psychology at the Heights last year, cleliverecl an interesting tallc on hypnotism, exposing many of the artilices of the Yogi. During the seconcl semester, Dr. Alhert Frei- herg, of the Psychology Corporation, spolce on mljhe Psychological Background of Aclvertisingf, The otlicers of the society were: Miltoii Jucovy. presi- Clentg Arthur Golclfarh, vice-presiclentg Alvin Saclcler, secretary-treasurerg Ralph Weil, corresponcling secretary. MILTON JUCOVY Q07 H. ,wif 3 l fi fl - ,,1if""7R'7f'l'?:a u ,fs ' ' 1 n 1 .1 Q , ' 4 if x X N 1 ,, 9 1,9 .-if , , .U 1 ', 'Y .1 11,1 51 'PA . ,I .f:f,,,,: ' , if .' sp 1. 1 .1 1 A , , . ' . 1:1 --, 1 as Q, ,xi . L I M D Q, V lz, 2: 4 ., 1, I, I, 5 VY SQ If . 5 iq -Q .I F., iq 1 .A V 5. ii f , -J ri if 1- '12- 1 '- ,,-4 f-L, ag'-iv' " 1, ' ..:1.-.,, 5 v ,. -, .4 , ' s -Y 1 1 , . . I . 3 -- if 1' s ,, ' 5 1 1.-11 . 1 -1 1 - 1 1 1 1 we-W 2- -wa.fr'2':'2"f:wf-f'a,ff1fJ'1 :.::z.vm-.1 51:-1-,f A 2 -fr " 1 ' -f f- ' ' 1 f Y - -' .r - ' ' - 1 , , g g ww-h4ww,.svw VV' g . 'sN'Nw-1.-was ...N nm.. A.I.CH.E: ITH an active membership of 97, the student chapter of the American tnstitute of Chemical Engineers reached its highest enrollment this past year. Under the leadership of President Mason Lindsey, assisted by Vice-President David Kohn, and treasurer John Mayreis, the organization has been active both academically and socially. For the weetdy meetings, lectures by such leading faculty members are Dr. F. C. Fair, Professor H. J. Masson, Professor A. E. Hitt, and Professor H. G. Lindwatt were arranged. In addition, interest in several technical exhibits, supported as much by the tower classes as by the juniors and seniors, was so great that it was found necessary to use the large halt in Nichols Building. Evening smokers were held frequently enabling the evening division members of the chapter to become acquainted with the students. Day-time sessions featured welt-known guest speakers, such as Wir. Asher Blum, an outstanding patent attorney. One of the most important of this yearys accomplishments was the successful handling of a project never before attempted. A moving picture, concerning the life of a Chemical Engineering student at New York U. was completed under the direction of Mr. Ira M. Markwood. 208 ji 9 ' QM 4 .' 1 . ,fu XJ. V . . rw- ,ff 3 ' ,,,.f,,,,W. I " , y . .-ff' N,-,V ' " ax., K i - - - . " '. . , "' " '-5-1' ,I I I ' 5' ' 252 :fx ' ' . A F ,.r.. .liie ' AJ, -' . .. if . ,,, !,, Y i 17 . , z, A, 5, 5 .. I V' .,,ff'r'q-1---.wal if U -N .., 1 1-s . .. . . V . - W .- '- --I - WU .w 'H '. ff. e W ' f ti " r A i f fm- , RF-- .f.",'Q 1 2 l 'twflf' if ', .JMJ1 Us gi 'J s.,,.,bi-5,.5if .4- ,E Q: -Ji A 9 '75 v : ' A E. F ' . ' " -.f 'K L, r . . 1i9kw-4:-J f'-' nf::z..fv.3f3m'ie2tfii?f-' - 5 A" 'R W ':l"""""i' - V' --11'55"flT"u3'f!'l5'---fY6f+2f"W'1f3'V' f- AMERICAN SOCIETY QE CIVIL ENGINEERS HE New York University Ctiapter of tI1e American Society ot CiviI Engineers was estatJIisI1ecI primariIy to give tI1e stucIents of ttie profession a cIearer concept of their Iife,s worIc and to instiII in ttiem an appreciation of the I1igI1 standards and ethics of the engineering profession. The Society aIso encteavors to Iceep its members intormect of modern engineering cIeve-Iopments tI1rougI1 Contact witti active senior members. The Parent Society affords many priviIeges to its junior members incIucIing recIucecI sutnscription rates to its puIJIications. IVIemIJersI1ip and participation in tI1e society is a materiaI aicI to those students wI1o expect to Inecome members of the senior organization. The activities of the Society consist of meetings, smokers, and inspection tours ot' the senior organization. Interest in stucties and sociaI activities is stimuIatecI Iay joint smokers witI1 tI1e otI1er IVIetropoIitan engineering coIIeges. Among tI1e guest speakers this year were Professor LI. S. DocIcIs of Iowa State CoIIege, IVIr. I-I. A. BartteII of New York City, ancI Mr. RaIpI1 EIJerIin, aIso of New York City. The annuaI meeting of tI1e junior ancI senior ctiapters was I1eICI in New York in January and gave the members an oppor- tunity to meet their senior Iarottiers. Entering upon its nineteentti year at the I'IeigI1ts. tI'1e Society enjoyed its Iargest and most active memIJersI1ip. The otticers of the Society were: PauI Agnano, Presidentg Kenneth BarnI1iII, Treasurerg Peter S. D. DraIcos, Secretaryg Professor DougIas S. Trowbridge, Facutty Advisor. Q09 :i w . V K J X A urls! ,--GV . I I , , . ..- , .r Ui. X . f - 323 F Y i,LYii- "sy Y : I" AAL ni ' I4 -Q Q F. G Q .-A - Y I LL, Q A' I ' ,'- . . ' Tqt F F' , 4 , ' , ' ,. 'j ' ' , -3334 H iq' , V . I-1 . Q 1 -, , . ' " 7 ', '1' " " ' ' ' .-,ll A EFL :il-in . H 5 .. 25, gW,,,,,,:ig,. ,..,3..Q, al' Y I U do ,Jilin I 3 4 'eq 4 4 , A F-I ,A V- , , ,.- . 'V-'m.-lttsa-.f.vff-,,'-w ' - -- - -1 -- .. - W ., . -- -'I , - ' I ' 1 -1-571 -- Egg, - In ' V 'gr A V - . . - A- -' 1. v-ag x X' J A. S. M. fAero Division HE Aeronauticat Division of ttie American Society of Mecnanicat Engineers is an organization which encieavors to combine the practical anct ttieoreticat sides of aeronautics. This year, as in time past, it has been successful in bringing to its members a complete picture of the trade conditions now existing ttirougti the mectium of prom- inent speaicers representing every branch ot this wictety ciiversitiecl icietri. As in ttie preceding year, evening smokers were tietct at Lawrence House where stuctents and faculty met to tiear papers by one of their number or to tistetn to an outside speaker. Luncheon meetings were also heist at frequent intervats, at which time the faculty attemptect to present aspects of Aeronautical engineering which they Wouict ordinarily not have an opportunity to cto in ctass. The Society came into existence in 1933 as the result of a separation from ttie A. S. M. E. Membership in the Society is open to att aeronautical stuctents. The purposes of the organization are two-fold: it aims to provide members with information concerning moctern engineering ctevetopmentsg and it strives to combine theoretical principles with recent practices. Thus, the Society encteavors to tultitt iaeneficiat functions by making available to student mucti desiralzte materiat. Q10 f . Xi. , 3 4-4-im: ri. , ' '- mn f ' il , 3 .. sr I ' fi .. -ev . J ,.,fy.e .. - w'-I ff' r I .fig-9, . - H V- - ' ', vi' 5"-nf -'eww ,,,. wi, ,- Y 42 2 :1 L? ,- i, P' fi: ' ,i 1 .. "' " , -. if -5 H , 'ft j ff M ini, .I 37 - nm 5, . , Y 5 ,A-pref-T-. .ML A 1: -f i .if is 3 ' s l at-.1 .... 1 " 5L'M2i5'Wf . ,. . it 2 BRISTOL PRE-MEDICAL SOCIETY HE Bristol Pre-wtedicat Society exists for the purpose of providing a common social and semi-professional meeting ground for all students who expect to enter the Field of medicine. A high scholastic average as welt as superior personal qualities are pre- requisites for admission, hut the society is not essentially an honorary one. The society is a very active one at the Heights. Day and evening meetings are held at regutar intervals. At the latter, lectures are given hy welt known authorities in the various medical Fields and the talk is followed hy motion pictures and demonstrations on the material presented. At the day meetings prohtems relative to entrance into medical school, requirements, qualifications, etc., are discussed and faculty and student speakers present the various phases of medicine which interest and henefit the group as a whole. The society encourages its memhers to increase their interests and their knowledge of hiotogy, chemistry, physics, and psychology since they are essential qualifications for admittance into medical schools. Under a new system of admissions inaugurated hy the Bristol this year, att newcomers to the society are considered as pledges until January, when they enter the society formally, provided their qualifications for memhership have heen found satisfactory. 211 g - -ka. ---'LS R H v .xxx awza,..i A Y. ---1'::':'5-,- N I . - I' .- .3 5 E xx ,, 'W' ' . . " -' " A ' H' ,E m p 17 ,5 7, . .ber I .U I I, gr j 1 . fag I- "J jf' ' N Y 1- N . X , fl 5 ' V., gig, f ,. .Q L K g ,, T - -i - . ,J V 'fm .sf -'4'aG4Z-'Alana V' FRENCH SOCIETY A SOCIETE FRANCAISE, the honorary French society of the Heights, this year increased the scope of its activities many foict. The principal function of this society is to further and stimulate on this campus a cteep interest in French civilization anct culture. In addition to the usual list of speakers which included members of this and the Washington Square Faculty, as Welt as the memhers and ofhcers of the society, the society presented HRuy Btasn over the puhiic actctress system of the Lawrence House, and ULa Cigate chez ies fourmisf, a one act comedy, at the Little Theatre. These presenta- tions Were the first of their kind in the history of the Society. The society also puhtisherl a journal and distrihuted it on the campus. This puhli- cation containect articles on various aspects of French life, Written exclusively hy the memhers. To give the memhers of the Society an opportunity to speak French, forums anct discussions on current topics were heict. The result was an improvement in the speaking French of the memhers. The officers of the ctuh Were: Alfred Berger, presiclentg Bernard Liehschutz, vice- presictentg Alfred Kosherg, treasurer, Alien Kopiin, secretary. 212 f -, -V , t Q 1 i ,f f fzffi-3' S ' ' I vi M., V YY , - - ' :HQZ 1 'ry .. ' . Q. , f , . , V Q f"51, '--Hi' 1 rf' 'ff' 2' ' Y' "" 115--f., fe- -rri,'i- , I . e -if "Um V 'Qi'Pff. 'a v -s 4 -J' T1 4. 4 Y 7 l ' ., .1:Q'E3t 4 2 4 it 1 54 wi ,LM :- J pa X' V . ii- 4' '1'1.'. 54 GERMAN CLUB GUNDED to promote the study and appreciation of German cutture the German Ctutm has consistentty presented each year a program that contained a series ot tattcs, lectures, and forums in tine with its original aims. Five tacutty symposiums on ditterent phases ot German titerature, an annuat heer-test, two dances, the presentation of a ptay, two radio programs, and the puhtication of the group's magazine, Dos Scherflein, were the chief items on the program during the past year. A special tecture-recitat hy Dr. Felix Guenther, music critic, and Mrs. M. Betctrer- Reinhard, soprano, on Heinrich Heine and his wortcs was atso hetd. tn addition Professor Henry Brennectce spoke ahout his trip to Germany. Because ot the active support ot atumni, who were memhers at one time, and of the faculty, the German Ctuh was enahted to tormutate a futt schedute of activities and then adhere to it. This term the ctuh presented two ptays, hoth of which met with great success. As has been the custom in the past few years, the sociat year was culminated with the heer-fest. Many of the German professors attended, as did many of the memhers and their friends. As an added attraction the ctuh was honored with the presence of Bch Fawkes, a former student at the Heights and at present a graduate instructor, who spoke on the conditions of the cottege student in Germany. 213 .-,5 ,mg ...f-Pg i ' ' ' 1 "1 --A, ....,- ,hz as . E . ,am ,,, f X r . 1 ' ' at . Wm " fs . 5 nz H1 - ' J 1" t M fffgf ,A , ., ,Q-f J ,, -ni f p . ,J jfs . V? .f , XX 7..:w:EA,-' .5-41, . ,' , V X , . I I K -' .51 :. A - V ,- . K I Q- I V I 1 4 ,rl - --. , , I U 5 Q 1? VI 1 ' as 59 1 2. i he , sz.. ,. ,, . '.w.-.,-- ' '4,A:.- ff f-1 f ...A H .V . . t.- , A -' f -t :fb H-L-xwvfwf 131942:-qv:'!se0'l,'1 f'N,.,,,,n: ,, , ,.., - A - - , . ev ' L ' 1 ' 1 - p . t T. gg, 1- n- . I , . ., , 7 ' .,,-. -I ..-5 Q .X --fp-Q " 7:2 .. 7 H., gf -1" 'si ' 1. ' -r " - Y J s Y . V., , . :'. - -V v ' -- , ,Y -- . , , , 3 ,H ir , - - 1 .L , ,-51-. ,, 4.3.5. -.1,,,:.1.. -- vt QW' Www-' 'WW' -5' We r-- Q-i......ar.g,- 1 fi I 5 HAIVHLTQN CCDMMERCE SOCIETY HE Hamilton Commerce Society was organized in the tau ot 1956 by a group of College-Commerce students who tett the need for suctw an organization. The ctutn' entered its second year as one of the major organizations on the campus. A large part of the success of this ctutn can tue credited to the interest and cooperation displayed toy its faculty advisor and Honorary President, Professor Edward Cvasparitscti, and its Honorary Vice-President, Wir. Frederick J. Etterman. The Hamilton Commerce Society was originally organized to turing together students enrotted in the Cottege-Commerce course. Since its inception, however, ttie ctut: has accepted as memtners many students who were enrotted in other courses in the University College, but who were interested in ttie Business world. During the year the club tietd many social meetings and tunctdeons, at which the members heard timely and prominent speakers. In addition to their instructive value, ttiese meetings served to bring faculty and students ctoser together. 2 I 4 '7--fu-Vt. E' i ' - - i Q if ..,,, -Q, . . V' 1' ' '4 U,' - ez- .. E hr' X '-f. t' 1, ' ' 'VIII' '29, ' S432 VQtSQ 'fi?J tf: + c .f,3.'af:?.- J Q' W ' ' - ct ' r f fi 2. , ggi . H .i t . ' ' 4 f 4' - , W ig 'Z ,':?iaig3jf:'5ff1't t an ttf? ' " i i : i f A INSTITUTE GE TI-IE AERONAUTICAL SCIENCES HE New YorIc University chapter of the Institute of AeronauticaI Sciences was formed in the spring of 1936. It was organized to promote the appIication of science in the deveIopment of aircraft by farniharizing the students with the important aircraft companies. During the year severaI interesting meetings and smokers were heId. Mr. George F. GetIine and Franz Steinbacker handIed the publicity and programs respectiveIy, whiIe Herbert Pass was assigned to membership. Mr. George F. Titterton of Grumman Aircraft spoIce on "Aircraft IVIateriaIs and Processesf, Mr. AIbert BaumIer, who Hew in Spain, spoIce on the types and eftectiveness of the miIitary aircraft being used there. Prof. SpoIhaLis spoke on the UIVIeteoroIogicaI EIt'ects ot' I-Iigh AItitude FIying.H There were aIso severaI other taIIcs by students on various subjects reIatecI to the aeronauticaI history. A trip through the Bermuda CIipper of Pan-American Airways at Port Washington was madeg and severaI aircraft pIants were visited. The headquarters of the Institute are at the SIcyport in RocIceteIIer Center, New York. Here is maintained a compIete aeronauticaI Iibrary, which incIudes every worthwhiIe pubIication issued in the worIcI. This Iibrary is for the convenience of members of the Institute. The Institute has its own monthIy pubIication 'The .IournaI ot the AeronauticaI Sciencesf' Every member receives a copy of this magazine which is unique in its cIass. The otticers eIected for the year were as foIIows: President, Frederick PhiIIipsg Vice- President, Richard Berneg Secretary, .Iohn Reese. 215 15' I' v. . . I , ,f-4 -'-"'? , 5 ' 1 u i ,, -- n, 1 me 1 . t it, ., ' iznftii v . - . Sfff 5: 'II ,L V ' ' I -' .Ji . 5 f --ft 6 X ff . - ' if , ',"1I'-I 3 - ' 2 .1 " - ' .- 'I 4 LMI'-'IE 1-14 ' :ff-xv Tiff ?-""' -' -' ' ,. 1- - qi' - 'Uyf' I tl -II' Q-lu " i' f 1 L- ' f" :J - ' I 14 wr 'K."'v"J"m" "ig eerie-- THE JCDHN MARSHALL LAW SCDCIETY HE John Marshall Law Society fouowed through an enlarged program of activities with remartrahie ahitity. The guest speakers this year inctuded many of the most dis- tinguished judges and tawers in the country. Amoong them were Justice Aaron Steuer, Justice John Ciaric Knox, Justice Ferdinand Pecora, and Grin Judd. Qne of the most interesting events of the year was the ceiehration of Constitution Day sponsored hy the Society. The guest speaker of the evening was Judge Knox, who discussed the Hconstitution and Ntodern Trendsf, The Society presented to the iihrary a copy of Burton J. Hendricifs BULWARK OF THE REPUBLIC. The organization also held numerous tuncheons. A new policy, hy which regular discussions were held during the meat was innovated. At one of these discussions the question of Americas foreign policy was dehated. Prof. Jesse Carpenter presented a history of the topic and then Paul Kahan and Hiuiard Camoong dehated on the various issues involved. The Societyys success this year was the direct result of the excellent Woric of the president, Rohert S. Ratner, and the invatuahte aid ot' the organizations sponsor, Arthur Butter Graham. 216 .L 1 I . . r F, .fd K i iw? ,,'f ., JL, ?w My '- .f f :Q 25525 M f "M", , . ,. ,. U 7 f' if f"' .f f' ,fl . K- -' , ""'7!jffAfv24!?:,j'n'f'7fqLgXQf?1, . - I. f-v Y' ,lf , ' .S . i F 5' I ' 'tim ' " i. . ' " J 4 i A is W T? i "" " v f ff , , , vi I I ' 1 ' 3 Y i t i .s . . .wtf . ...ws 4, 1 1 an i. ,. ,y . 1 V i, r aft" . ,L . - ' -'-- '- ' - H ,, :ff,1wff--, 5 i in E 'mit . ' ' V" ' ' mfrffw i f ' ki Ev 'Y ff SCABBARD AND BLADE HE National Society of Scabiaard and Blade was originally organized by the University of Wisconsin in 1905 for the primary purpose of developing the qualities of courage, leadership, and initiative in the Cadet Officers of the Regiment of the Reserve Qfticers Training Corps, and to promote the cause of preparedness for our national defense. From this isolated origin the group has grown into an honorary military society spreading over forty-live states and having over, twenty thousand members. In 1926 a petition from Diamond and Circle enabled a chapter to tae organized at New York University, Icnown as E Company, Sixth Regiment. Membership is open to an commissioned officers at University Heights who are interested in Military Science, who stiow an ability for ieaderstiip and have a sutticientty nigh scholastic average. During the year Scatatrard and Blade ran several dances and smokers, the profits of when were put to awards for students of Military Science for proticency in ri'He and pistol martcsmansnip, class standing, and platoon and squad competition, as Weil as to the cadet oflicers who successfully complete R.0.T.C. camp at the end of their junior year. Sabres are awarded to the highest ranking junior and senior cadet officers for outstanding wortc. Q17 1-"S fl x 'xx -f:9lh.,,i,-Q-X :+V Q- ' , ' G 4' "' ' 1 '. . f fe, ' , g ' - ' ' ,. L ls. V' . . "NX 45, s. . , My ':Hi"'fis7f" P' u- -3' ff If A :cy At X1 ggi ' L . H -I A - N I J' 5, 'nl , . V ' M1 . " .. y - 1 i, V -1. ., . V fzflf- . - af ' f i ' - wie. 'Jw-A H. i' .. 'ii 7 ' Wi' ' ' t 'ef-1 ' "' I u "' pf" 1. ' .A ..'f- -- 1' ' . , fi.. .fa ' , 2 ' ' ..:.-. -f- - r J NWM fkkmeffy-1:-emits: "' V ' ' '- -- - P "il" ' - " 1 " 'L' 'S' f I Y e I - Y SGCIETY OE INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERS I-IE Society of IncIustriaI Engineers is the New York University IJrancI1 of the Society for the Advancement of Management. The Iatter conducts an annuaI conference, maintains an engineering IiI9rary, and its faciIities are avaiIaI3Ie for information and em- pIoyment services to tI1e student members. The I'IeigI1ts ctiapter enCIeavorecI tI1rougI1 ctiapter ancI joint meetings witIi otI'1er student I3rancI1es in tI'ie metropoIitan area, to aquaint its members with new cIeVeIopments ancI current proI9Iems in incIustriaI engineering. AISO incIurIecI in the societies program were pIant inspection trips ancI varied misceIIaneous activities. 218 1. - J' JJ . ' 'Q I 'I 'Ik-. ' ,,, 1 W.-.arf i ,zrfggffiidiqw 1 .4 ' ,I . . , . ,f.. - , s ,.,. .....,., . 1 Lt?""" L' 1. . r ap- 7 , A, " I if f f ,Lg-f. .. 'Q' ' dv4'r'fQ'e, R A .J QL ""' fi? 't ill ' . I 'Q ' . ' Ig - Q5Q'f11ifi: - , J ,tv ,YV .'Eg'g.fgg ,, .Sify ,, I.. 5 .19 ' - I I ,,' 3,.' .,. .- .. 7 . f , I 5 I + f"'I1 '-'f ' f' W M W ' 'M tg, XML, ,,, 14 in . I., n s. 5,5 I - f -f-"""i v 67 1 5, gg K ,M 3,1 .,. , 5,2 ,,4 ,, ,4,.,.,, ,,Qf, , -V ' AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS HE New York University Branch of tI'1e American Institute of EIectricaI Engineers Iias compIetecI its fourteenth year on tIae Heights. The Iarancti sponsorect numerous Lawrence House smokers tI1rougI1out tI1e year, and encouraged its members to taIce act- vantage ot tI'ie eXceIIent Iui-montI1Iy tecI1nicaI meetings and inspection trips provicIecI Ivy the parent society. In tI1e spring tI1is IJrancI1 cooperated witti ttie other IVIetropoIitan Branches to I1oIcI the ann.uaI New York City District stuctent convention: stuctent papers were presented at ttie afternoon session, 1CoIIowecI Iny a joint meeting with tI1e parent society in ItI1e evening, aII arrangecI Ioy tI1e stucIent Inrancties. AMERICAN SCDCIETY OE MECHANICAL ENGINEERS HE New York University stuctent ctiapter ot the American Society ot Mechanical Engineers was founcIecI 28 years ago to bring stuctents ot IVIecI1anicaI Engineering into cIose contact with engineers in tI1e active FieIcI of tI1e profession. This year the chapter Iias Iaeen very active and I'1as IiacI many weII Icnown men in ttie I3ieIcI of IVIecIianicaI Engineering to acIcIress its memI3ers. ReguIar meetings witI1 tacutty members were I1eIcI at ttie Lawrence House. The purpose ot tI1e meetings was to cuItivate a cIoser reIationsIiip Iaetween stucIents anct facuIty men, in order tI'1at the potentiaI engineers sI1ouIcI have a IcnowIecIge ot tIie protntems tI1ey wouIcI Iaave to face when tI'iey are gracIuatecI. 219 , A-.g -4-,..:.S ' ' ' - I H if "5X'QI5wf X, X -is I i -4..,,,,, -, . . . .s.n,1.. Y L , . . V , 5 A Wadi" 'S ' I ll" Us + ' ' ff ' I ,' 'i ,,,Qw 'T ' i-: W ,, -sg. 'H - ' . ' 'f ' 1 al" ' -LQ g , . " 7 L l 5 ing . " .. - 'Lf F. f fi iff it 11 sf ...q 1 , :N 'ff ' .1 'HW' 12" . We 'LW.,,..4ii.r3"J 2i'5Z'wi21aZfIF', 'ii--I -' -- ' -i"""'Pf9' " .. 5-il" .f!. eh .J " ' ' I ' ' 'I .. 'td w . 5' .i 1 2 ' My A ' ' - 'Y t ' ' ' . ' . , -. "'--lT""fi U ' A 3 , ..,. . ,,., ,. , . ,,,, , ,. L , . W I . , I V 1, H A W SQCIETY FOR TESTING MATERIALS HE Society for Testing IVIateriaIs enterecI its second year with an ambitious program in view. Organized in tIie taII of 1956 Iay Professor ScI1warze, tI1is society in tI1e SI'1OI'Il space of one year, Iay virtue of its activities was soon recognizecI as a top-ranking engineer- ing society. Its originaI purpose of investigating materiaIs of constructionaI of engineering purpose I'1as Ioeen wicIenecI to incIutIe tI1e promotion of researcti activities in tI1e 1CieIcIs of engineer- ing tI'iat have been onIy partiaIIy investigated. This year four groups were organized to carry on experiments WitI1 tI1e UI'IuggensIJerger Extensionieterf' tI1e UBegg's Deformeterf' HPI1oto-EIasticity,H ancI tI1e testing of cIocI4 springs Ioy the Strain-Energy metI1ocI. S.A.E. HE New York University Student Branch of tI1e Society of Automotive Engineers, wI1icI'1 was founcIecI in December, 1932, Iias attemptecI to Ioring to the attention of tI1e stucIents new cIeveIopments in the automotive industry. In another sense a record function of S. A. E. is tI1e promotion of friendships among students and facuIty. TI'1e StucIent Branch of tI1e Society at the I'IeigI1ts is capaIJIy advised by Professor Erwin I'I. I-IamiIton who is I1imseIf a member of I'1igI1 standing in the parent organization. Last November tI'ie members of tI1e student Branch turned out in fuII force for the NationaI Convention of tI1e Society. 220 Tm'!?IQL!r1 if 1. . . , f ,,.,,. ,--gow... iw, N' fm, , 5 i, . T" 'i' 1' iv, If I 2 , ' Q. , AM-vt M i , .. , 4 , , ' F I Y ' VI T A ' '-L,f TIT" "tr Af .V ,' 11 ' ' -' A -- V- ' , . J -.-Aff N- ', 1 1 v lt' 14 I if 'vt ' - - ' " A , s-'ef . f., E v, . .,- -1 i' - ' .1 . - ., YF I, .. K . .. ., H . , 4,g,, 3. 2: YV in if, -f fm ? .-ati 'A " pikiiifvif I' bitt I' it - rf . '- . . I .. af 3 - V. --.. "1-1 . I J f " J, f. 4 M ff 'fi Z0 r gg at . 1 , , . ggi A 1 1 E. -'iia ig ., ,,g.g,,,,., .ymf Q "3 E, .5 'gtg ff f as :Ti-...i..'...a.. 2-'ff-1 'yw1'w1z'sbf ,.,.f ' 9 'f ti " 4' ' I 'f- fr H N GAVEL CLUB HE purposes of the Gavel Ctuh, in the words of its own constitution, are Hto foster and create interest in forensic activity among the student hocty at the University Heights, to reorganize merit and service in speech activity and to serve as a pre-requisite to memhership in Tau Kappa Atphaf, Among the events sponsored hy the Gavel Ctuh asicie from its regutar meetings were iuncheons, dinners and a Freshman-Sophomore Dehate hetct in the Freshman Chapel. The debate, judged hy the memhers of the ctuh, was won hy the Ctass of '41. The otlicers of Tau Kappa Alpha were: Harold Mitherz, Lawrence Lustig and ETA KAPPA NU HE Beta Zeta Chapter of Eta Kappa Nu, national honorary society for electrical engineering students was founded on the University Heights campuses this year. Paul K8.l'1ElI'1. A memorahie ceremony and dinner oiiiciatty estahtishecl the Chapter at the University on January 27. Present at this impressive meeting were Dean Saville and Prof. Brown of the Engineering College. Memhership in the Society is open to hoth day and evening engineer- ing students. The Society owes its estahtishment mainly to the efforts of Prof. H. N. Walker. The oiticers of this chapter were: Everett Thieten, presiclentg Henry Reingotd, vice- president. 221 V A Y 'L xx: 4315... 'I is H, I 351 V. iv Rt? ,, ,A Y V A Q , f . ' !+:.,.., ffxkl ' " 1 , ,.., ,A -' fi g, V -fi-fv+ f "rf Q.,,mf ,A eg 1- . . i V , X 4 - ff'-fC"f" l2.i1I1g1m . 2-.. , ' A ,Sw ' T ',o 'fn ' 1' I ' I- f ' Y ' 1 . ', 'K - i ' f 1 -"" ' , fl 5- 1. .,,.,, i A , ,Q I , iv .. Y . ' .. ,, N - ' g . A N , ,H . g ,. ,... ,. . , U .I 'ff QE 3 C' ' A G .... g Lys? - M-f-1" -' h"' 1 ' 1 - A bm - 5 rffq A - l .3-. f' 'I --'J 'Y gf.. ""f.,,f'.,,1...,f.,,j, .... Y .- sg- V' A-+5-L '-wp --V 1,-N . N 1- 4 .. . X, -. ,. , 4 4 - , ' ' V ' , . A -3... ..-gn Y . . --- 1 X f UNDERGRADUATE LIBRARY CQMMITTEE HE Undergraduate Lihrary Committee enjoyed its third successtut year since it Was ' forganized in 1956. Under the ahte guidance ot Dr. Jones the committee rendered an invatuahte service in enahting the acquisitions of the library to he supptemented hy many vvorthwhite hooks which could otherwise not have heen ohtained. tt also hetped to estahiish a hrovvsing room in Brown House which proved invatuahte to many students who had tree time and nothing to do. The room was a great success in that a great majority of the student hody on the Heights managed to visit it at teast once during the schotastic year of 1937-58. V PHILOSOPHY SQCIETY HE Philosophy Society was formed in 1937 mainty through the initiative of Professor Swahey and a few students who fett the need for extra-curricutar study and discussion in phitosophy. Membership in the society is open to att students interested in the suhject and its primary aim is to introduce undergraduates ,into the vast reatms of philosophy. Under the direction of Leon Pordy, and David Gottfried, the ctuh hetd day meetings which featured addresses hy students fotlowed hy general discussion. The purpose of the society Witt he accomplished itnit can encourage its memhers to tay aside the insignificant cares of every day tife and delve into ultimate phitosophicat prohtems. 222 '5..s,'41g,-- 'X 2 ' ' if 1 - ,, 4 4 ff M" M ' .f Ja .. L ' gf' , I' -. ,,,- ., ,, . ., NJ, " , 2Qf"" 1 Q ' ' f ' .- , ffg-+44 , . J " . ., -' gr 'egg-i'? L"a,-af f new V 'R' my 5, View-ife---f1ff"i. . L.. --i f . D . fy . '- ,X T ' N 4 yu' , , , -' ,-, . s py 1 W, vi- , f ni,-fir , W U- ii .Ulf-...Q , , 1 24, pw My .i M 5, if .,. .-,. - -Q 5 ,V I y , . , ,nw i 5, , I, In ,.., .1 ,N .A l ,I H M ,i-4, .3 rv ig,..gg..m. 5 V- fm N- . - ' BBL . fi:-3:1 A 1-L ,iv Q-' 'fa,..,u ,- vi-, ,a .. ,,u,c,,- i, V ,. 5,.,.. mf , , 1, can-.y .LMI ,J A . ,gig f E2 F. Econ: . 4 5 f i A 'A f','ZTf4gL"' its - i V f . . i fi 'C-1:4131 wi: .,-,i".LIfi 'Y' ngf'iQi5j2Q,,f Villi ,7y2.' .:'S'-,ff ,.1 - iw 4' -f .L, V 2-fi: 'i i .... fi ' . fm fff- ww f -M-1 ww I FRANKWQOD XNILLIAIVIS SOCIETY HE Frankwood WiIIiains Society, tI1e First coIIege mentaI Iaygiene society in the country, Iias undertaken to provide guidance in soIving prot:Iems tI1at may arise for coIIege students. Numerous autI'1orities in tI1e I:ieIds of psycIioIogy, psychiatry, education, and socioIogy Iuave addressed the society. TI1rougI1 a series of round taI9Ie discussions various cIifI'icuIties tI1at might confront a student on tI1e coIIege campus were anaIyzed, and tI1e desiraI3Ie soIutions indicated. The ofIicers of the Society were: IYIarcus Smith, president, Raymond SacIcIer, vice- president, and .IacI: Shapiro, secretary. THE UNIVERSITY LITERARY UNICN N tI1e autumn of 1933 a smaII group of students proceeded to reorganize tI1e stagnating University CoIIege Union. Acting on tI1e assumption that the Iove of good Iiterature was Iatent in aII coIIege men, tI1e product of tI1e metamorpI1osis, the University Literary Union undertook tI1e task of utiIizing tI1at feeIing. Members of tI1e facuIty cooperated Iny presenting severaI Iectures. Nor was the Union content with that move. During tI1e next few years it brought Ioefore tI1e students sucI1 men as T. S. StriI9Iing, PuIitzer Prize Winner, Kenton KiImer, son of Joyce KiImer, Countee CuIIen, negro poet and New York U. aIumnus, IVIicI1aeI GOICI, and tI1e editor of the "New Masses." 225 , sff?i?"::+P-4'fA- , ,im - ' .1 ' 'K l ,GY . --g t .N ' -2 1, .-11' 'f-'-r"""Q- , L I ' T - an ' 2 gr ' 65' hy' gg- in cb.. 1 X, tfflktjxj t 1 -H -sl!!! ' ' : 1 Vx H IN! W V, .m i , , 1 ' all . , 1- f . v--II: ' -: .. T ' ' 5' .. ff 'I 1 ' W ipfgi . ' '.: ' " . , if , , . , ' ' - H . 1- En , . f' -iq . ' -gi' ..,-,. . :E -1-J ' -ffl", 2' -- , . I:s.i.:...r..- Nfwv- 1-' 'I ' I. J ,, ., 9'M'I 1 ' ' - - -- J, , --Y - A, ' H'-"n' 1 '1" " ""' Q. ,,.4.4.-.s4,4,,-:Ms fvswrww- . R ' - A -A g L H I 'W' i-"2 "QQ I I l E THE AMERICAN STUDENT UNION Crt-'TON anct ectucation were comhinect in the program of the American Stuctent Union this year. The Union at the Heights presentect Dr. H. T. Lin in con- nection with the Japanese hoycott, raisect money for mecticat suppties for the Spanish government and gave its energetic anct tutt-heartect support ot the Washington Pitgrim- mage tor the passage ot the American Youth Act. A joint tuncheon with the Menorah Society at which Mr. Littander of the American Jewish Congress spotce on the suhject ot anti-semitism attracted consicterahte attention as ctict another tuncheon with the German ctuh which was actctressect hy Dr. Fowtces who tattcect on "The Student Under the Swastitcan anct presented its imptications tor America. ' THE SOCIOLQGY CLUB HE Sociotogy Ctutn is a new organization at the Heights having tneen organized in Septemher 1957. tts ohject is to stucty sociotogicat phenomena as expressed in New Yortc City tite and institutions. Membership in the ctuh is open to att those interestect in sociotogy. During the past year the organization macte Fietct trips to Father DiVine's HHeaven,H Chinatown, Wettare tstanci in New Yortc City anct to Sing Sing. Severat of these trips were conctuctect in conjunction with the Sociotogy Ctutn of Washington Square Cottege. 224 fwfr-f,:fg cv . I f g x f ' r . 2 rx J, f Mr Xa, , 4 M Q 2+-+ mwah, M '1 wg 5 1 'S 4' , f .4 ,, I-"sg . fl' """' 'YA' V- L . f T ,- .Jirgj ' I Lg,-W" , ,I . 53257.45 ix ' f '-.. M -- . N Q'iIff2'E,.' --, M r - 1 I 1 f 1 ' 5' Tn' 1 A ' ' 1- '- -.LL F3 L 5 ,Q Y A , ,153 , .. '. ,.L. -pg 31-.. I ,: T v' 1- , , ' v' I, '16 'X 1 f -qw", ' 5' ,A .15 .g, .,.,- :Q .55 3, ,, " V --'mf-g TW xml-4 l ' f t 2' Tft ltt 't I :J 'Pr--' --1 P ' TH", 4' R E - t',tlL.'T'Li H ,I I' ,, " t-1-- M 'ti T. ..aff" "- ': ,.', 7 't a' ' r1..?t-f'f-f'fwif?fJ' T ' f 4' f ew g,,.ifQ?+'f'.. -bm ' . A - ' ' T .-.Q 4 .,., rw . .x. - '1: 1,- Fh' " ' - 5 - 1 . H , ,,-qv,-441 '74, I ,'..,t M an ,yi up ft '-4? -,s4fa--v'f'tu,,N.f..Q45v is ,M gwtn'.-Q-mu-ff'-V:-Zzmgff V ' ' ..."' -- f1f'.:'T" . QM, .eq ruff? 5:5 'affair-1'-'.Wv,f"'22V' ' . -1' -' fr- 'Q fm, - .. .'2:I1,,'4 . . 111: .h:'ffs.' ' uae'-sswwsaw can A-,M nsflfmr, aisffirsrf-34 L ft? i ' Km 1315, QV' ' Q ' Y ' A J f 'M ' 'Aw' " W' " 'M ' f '-' W4 5www-1 ' 'M' T "--' 1 -'.'. r - " ' IVIENORAH SOCIETY HE New York University Christian Association is cIevotecI to the reIigious and sociaI Iife, tI'1OL1QT1t and cuIture. It discusses ,Iewisti proIJIems and seeIcs to awaken within its members a Finer reaIization of what Jewisti civiIization Iias contritnutecI to manIcincI. The IVIenoraI1 Society Iias acIoptecI no arbitrary principIes or viewpoints, Iyut weIcomes free discussion of different opinions on aII subjects. The group is non-sectarian, and aII students on tI1e campus are invitecI to Ivecome m,emIoers. HEIGHTS STUDENT CHRISTIAN ASSGCIATION HE New York University Ctiristian Association, is cIevotecI to tI'1e reIigious and sociaI interests of the Heights student. As a part of its 1957-58 program, the Christian Association initiated, IJesicIes its weeI4Iy noon meetings Iast semester, a series of evening forum programs wI1icI1 consisted of discussions on the subject of HIVIarriage ancI The I:amiIyH Iny such members of tI1e facuIty as Dr. H. Lenz of ttie German Department, Professor Babel' of the SocioIogy Department, Professor I:aIes of the Frencti Department, ancI otI'1ers. This semesteifs pro- gram was devoted to taII4s given Ioy Dean Berg, Professor Gus of tI1e Engineering CoIIege, and Professor PauI TiIIicI'1, exiIecI German Professor of PI1iIosopI1y reIative to tI1e subject of lKTI'l6 Christian ancI the Modern VNforIcI.n 225 ' I , uf! - ' ' r- X 5, fa ' -N 'x ' 1 . xr 4 369 , ., -I - , , 1, j I' , M, 9,7 ' ,'. p Q13 V 'K '11 YT I" rvff,. .ut ' ...41 i-ftliii .L IM.-:Q ,. L - V s as -14- ..,. - . 2 j CLASSICAL SOCIETY EADED by Wittiam Rutnio, president, and Bertram VogeI, secretary, tI'1e CIassicaI Society went through a year of particuIarIy successtut endeavor. Its memiaerstiip, wI1icI'1 was tI1e Iargest in a great many years, was Iaased entireIy upon the interest of ttie student rather than on sI'1eer sctiotastic actiievement, SeveraI innovations were effected wtiicti were pIeasing to the student Iuody and to the society as a group. EarIy in ApriI a dance was I1eId at Lawrence House, to WI1icI'1 ttie Washington Square CIassicaI Society members were invited. Various professors aIso attended the attair. EUCLEIAN LITERARY SOCIETY HE EucIeian Literary Society, founded in 1852, is tI'ie oIcIest organization at New York University. It pIayecI an important roIe in ttie extra-curricuIar Iite of tI'1e University, at one time occupying a speciaI I1aII. The records of the society are preserved in tI'1e GouId IVIemoriaI Library, tnecause of their importance in recording the Iiistory of tI'1e scI1ooI. Abram Cgden Butter, ot the cIass ot 1855. Ieft a fund in trust tor tI'ie society from the proceeds ot which eacI1 year a prize for a worttay Iiterary creation is presented, and with wI1icI'1 the EucIeian coIIection ot tIie Iiivrary is enIarged. The EucIeian Literary Society founded the Itfedley, as WeII as ttie Geyser, a Iiterary puI3Iication vvI1icI1 is no Ionger in existence. 226 ?Jf f.. I ' i 'L yi-x IH' . 7 his lrk. Cm. X 4 Jw. ' 5 - 1 a 7 1 2.51, .- , iaifatfihwua, 4 . LM I 2. ar e r r Ttigitifxf fg'g'i:, Lg L 53,2 fm ig 1 LQ , A V' W Q4 .,.,, ' 'f ,V ff H 5 '- ,Qq,.f7.u , iiI"t.i1 .f'I?ir' -5 V - Tuff ' ' 4 V "3.'l1-Elgin ' ' Q 4 .Tfif -n 3 V . I ,Q J- -- 'I . . , -V . ' f...r . . 4 f , .,w f-'-- ' ' -vn u - - ',, '- 11 ' f - -as P's+tvHW'9?""'- . fare. 1- .wmv Q . .,-' ,, ', I . 'X . 4 , -, +A.. , . 1 f -x.',,v-- M., M: V ,ai V' 4 41:-:ft-jr tw. ' gifgtiii YP- ,Ai-1 vim - - 1- ' .,.v , ' 3- , -1. " . - " .-2-2 -cy,-A . , i' 4: 4 ,' : .ff.,. ,V 1, f- V - -'--pf was pm. , -,-:rag ' ' . , . JM- 5 4......LI--V ' "r " " iaguzvslk. .EIQVA -. - ' - - ' ' - , an PHOTOGRAPHIC SOCIETY INCE its inception during the fait semester of 1935, this society has heen one of the ' leading organizations on the campus. This year it expenctect a great cleat of time anct money in equipping its ctariiroom, where tive partitions have heen erectect to enahte several stuctents to use the ciuhls tacitities at the same time. Ntoreover, a miniature enlarg- ing machine anct a printing hox have heen added to the group,s resources. During the perioct hetween Thanksgiving and Christmas the ctuh held an exhihition of outstanding pictures talcen hy the sixty-eight memhers of the organization. RADIO CLUB HE Radio Ciuh, an organization of Fifteen men interestect in the perfection of the uses of ractio, Worked closely with the Department of Meteorology' and Climatology cturing the past year for the purpose of keeping it in communication with the weather ohservatory on Whiteface Moiintain just heiow the Canadian horcter which New York University! is sponsoring. Reports are transmitted to the Heights regularly hy the two men snowed-in on the top of the peak, and instructions are retayect hack. A 500 crystal control transmitter is tcept on the top Hoor of Bliss Building as is also a General Electric receiver ot 14 tubes. '227 1, v . -X X V x X- --Jffgg-:ffl-.Q A '-QA 3 fl '- or -3 R gi ' , . D, A . 1 f Q f " .. -.. . . r '- "rf 1' ""' H-JL A-ina . f - .,...wr...ag2:.::gi,...,.g4.a..L,.,,,,g.f,:g3ga....,...., , - +f.+-2f'1- M- 4 . ' I ni ITALICA CULTURAL SQCIETY HE ttatian Association ot America founded ttie ttatica Cutturat Society at the Heigtxts to promote ttre interest ot Heigtitsmen in ttatian cutture. Ttie Society atso aims at furthering triendstiip among ttie ttatian-American men on the campus. The Society, which met weetity, tietd ttiree format dances eacti semester at Lawrence House. Ttaese dances were succsstut in tmringing together the students of severat metro- potitan cotteges. Prominent memtners ot ttie tacutty atso addressed ttie society at regutar intervals. NEWIVIAN CLUB HE New Yortc University Heights Chapter of ttie Newman Ctutm is comprised ot about '55 students. Ttie purpose of ttie Newman Ctut: is to foster Cattiotic teaching and principtes in non-sectarian institutions. The Heights tacutty was extremely active ttiis year. Captain Wittiam F. M. Longwett of ttie Military Science Department, and Dr. Austin Taytor of ttie Ptxysicat Chemistry Department contributed mucti of ttreir ettort to tt1e furtherance ot the ctutfs program. Father Keogtr, of ttie Holy Spirit Paristi, acted as ctraptain to ttie group and was instru- mentat in stimulating spirituat discussions within the group. 228 'fn-- t Af "" "2 s 1 ...V .G V, . if- ' 'A r ia' 7, , V .f-' Z M, fs- ,. r , , . .g.,,.,. . . Fifi? f ' ' x 1 -Lv-'V ' ' ' V - v i . K ' 3547 N. 3 , Y f'- - .- 1- , 5 r 'f "L 'f"'1'f'3 "-. -- . , . fzifz 4, 1. if 1."xL"z 2- ,. '11, P Y 2 A , ' " f .121 ' X- . - f, vi-7 3 r at iw - .. ,J .1 "aa z I f Q F ' f 2 - . . . ,wp -gm. . 1 1 ' A - "3 - fi a-'f,--- .Y f ' - +' ,. , .. sa W1 72 "s H: 1 X , c ' ,. ggi. - -MW YY gf, -Q .525- M345 5 in 5 ,. gg H 5 in 5 ,V . I S . . ,I ,Hr wg .14 hi s, Q 6 Aihsi nj 3 5 FT? V , F-7: Zi. ',,.i..4h ,-'rg f ,--qi ,, K gi. In X , ' ' Q I f. - ig fgth, , ,Q .ff f . -114' "rv: ' ff' , ga sf' :wi ' 31. ' . " "m' "f3i"'f'?fi' - """'!' .,1fLZ"" I P bmw- ' STEVENSON GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY RCM Dr. Stevenson Wtio founded and tieaded ttie first geotogicat department in New York University the Stevenson Geological Society derived its name. First under the leadership of Dr. Woodman, and now under ttxe teaderstiip ot Dr. Littey, the society tias dedicated itself to a study of the ettect ot geological conditions and the economic effects of such conditions. The Society at its many meetings discussed the problems facing the geologists of today. Among these topics were the mining of coal and its future, the various types of rock formations, and fossit preservation. The officers Were: Mitton Miller, presidentg Abraham Vx7inograd, vice-president, Milton Brenner, secretary-treasurer. MORSE MATHEMATICAL AND PHYSICS SOCIETY oRsE MATHEMATICAL AND PHYs1cs socirfnf was established in 1951 by a number of students desiring a ctoser Contact with those phases of mathematics and physics not generauy treated in ctass. Originally designed to serve as a discussion group, the society expanded and in a snort time presented Iectures and taucs by members of the faculty and student members on particular subjects in their field of common interest. In addition, the club estatotistied a tutoring committee for students who were having diHicuIty with etementary mathematics and physics. 229 I I, 1' I 1 I .Tgfgjla I i QI SII- Lf , I, X X ,, 1 . lu !. .- If I- 'gl' ,I 'fbias , - fa Q-at", ta: I5 M A .' -1 ,T I ll -71' IH . . . ai r Y x X 1 xg r . , ed ---.. - 4,555-f, , xnxx' 2 WY? ......f if I 1 ...' ,fm-ff A, 1, ,-7. N ,. fs,,, .1 . X, !,ff'4Qit?ai I. 4.91 it 2-.1 QUAIGH UAKSH began the year in a better Hnanciai condition ttaan any other ctutn on the campus, even ttmougti the student council refused to pass its budget demands of seven cents, because of the benevolent benefactor, Dr. Gasparitscti, who endowed it with one dollar in an irrevocable trust fund. Going from had to worse, Quaigtm attempted to turn the Senior party inside out, picket the Commons, and start a movement to colonize Brooklyn fa suiaurio of Manhattanl. April First, having been oicliciany recognized as Quaigtfs day, brought the Whole Campus to its feet in great expectation of one of Quaigns colossal events, but Quaigti was too busy ptanning its Coup d,Etat of the student council, to show up. THE CHESS AND CHECKER CLUB HE Heigtits Chess and Checker Club exists for ttie purpose of providing for the stu- dents an excellent opportunity for diversion from the routine of academic Work. it functions also as a social group, bringing ttiose students who play chess or checkers into a Closer friendship. This year the activities included instructions in ctiess for beginners by members of the Heights Team, a tournament sponsored by the club in which over ttiirty players participated, and a match Witti ttie ctiess-playing members of the faculty. 250 if t . V-A tw.. F' Bi ei. H N5 .i W9 nn 3iPR a , fy V f. . . . M. , ,. ,. - ,W sm... . , . 3-5, 1- ff 'vi .3 , , -4--M'-' 'il-ffl'-, 3 L., , ,Q v f 1 7' . " - ,,, .- ,' 4. ., - " - J' W, , ' . ' ' 'J . .,x,":'- " , l-Fla' ff ! fa . f Y' . vq-. -ff -.1 .gm-5. 5 f' , Q F L if ,ay H, il' 5 -gifs' .,, 4. -TvZ1.QL, . qv 5 N' I W 'T "5 ' Q' QW- 'VP ., , "link L34 - - v'y,,4", i' , - lu 5. ' - ' .. , if X-.ww W 9 4' ' , 3 ssc.:-'-,f. 1 .xg-,.u.f,.,. .,. . . 1 '- A H, , , ' .g c ., 5-i,.e,,g A if ..., . L . rs. mf ' . -fvitza. - "'L -if-A'sv-P-1,...,.y1'6iffwat ,f,Mf'.swaa::.bsa'i22 iirwfii emum?.saL'6Lf-zmrwriisQ-.vm2a2:a.wxd:an42:sz.s4'A1sJo4xv4xa,fJ:e34'?-w - .M,wwz'1'zmfmuaem ff vw..-V .fs JM .f-'A-1 . -.w ea , Jr ., -V if f I 35 ,,.,3FW. ,. SURVEY CLUB HE surveying camp is tocatect at Camp Greentcitt, in Grange County and ctasses are hetct there each year tor the first three weeks in June. tt is attencted hy the civit engi- neering sttidents from the day anct evening ctivisions of the Cottege ot Engineering. The camp is situated at Lake Marting anct is surrounded hy heavity wooctect hitts. The site is wett suitect to topographic, hyctrographic, anct highway surveying anct, through the courtesy of the ctistrict engineer, the stuctents are permittect to use the U. S. Geotogicat Survey gauging station on the Detaware River tor stream How measurements. in actctition to the hours spent in the ttetct or ottice, time is attowect tor swimming, hasetnatt, tennis, and other sports, ptus an occasionat trip to Port Jervis. R.0.T.C. RIFLE AND PISTOL CLUB EMBERSHIP in the Ritte and Pistol Ctuh of New York University, is open to anyone enrottect in mititary science. For a nominat tee its memhers are permittect use ot the ritte range, where they are coachect hy Sergeant Fred Wattace. The ctutn was tormect ahout six years ago in order to further the interest in ritte and pistot shooting. tt atso serves as a suhsiciiary to the New York University Ritte Team which has won many trophies in the past few years. The otticers ot the ctuh are Stanley Dickes, president, Wittiam P. Kraus, vice-presictentg Kart Posch, secretary: and treasurer is Richard Brodie. 231 . i N1 ' 1 , , gp x is - I ' . XXI' -1 S ' ' . ' ' -' ' w ' , 1 ,,ag:i.ms,.., e ' ,.v lift ' "L , A . Q H-""' "f"' ,, pg! ' 'Q -f - ' ,,1" N ' 5 g', ., ,f:Lj4.g,,5,,f,a ' f i' , fi 'N 1 ' ' ' 1 A v ' . ' ' F wg- V - if 1 -'I' i " -1 L 'F IME" t""'q it L ti 1: A t R L ' 3" me Y J ,-gif' -j'. jzkl' -W"i '1"Lf-" ry-1hg.' nv: . J .' 1 .1 -,J 1 " J .195 ' Q ' - A A- L4 ' 4- -YT Y. - L 1 Z W8 ' - J 1,,ar.-- 4.:ieg,mu.' ...--..,. ,.'i1.:'..nxf-:a.r1i:san.1.mSi..1.k -3' ' - V W' .' A - 3 L 1 T A , , , L-mi, , ,,,. '?i' ,4 ff "xnxx rv 1 affwvf-Gafxl-A f It , F M' ,,,,.,,..m.. A x f in W R' ' 1 J. V f 'L ' nil ,, - 1 f , , T51 -, 3 5- 'L Zi i Af ' ' ' rar. X" , " " ' - , N S . 1? ,. - H-W Q -sa 2 ' 1 .- gem , A i. -YV 62375 5 ' jx gv vf 1, f' fn 1 A ,, , , ' i ' ' i' Ax "" -v 1, ' ,, J Q2--ff' ' :W T .21 , . ' ,.'.gg5,g.f.-M . a'4"fbj4 ' f ":"'-K--- -. f M... - '-ffff , we f' gwzwf 1 ' Q, , Em wg' ' , ,r ' " L ' 15.1 2-v A If S -- Ff,,- - ,, -1 ' - ,. 'PH 1 v-,ALJ N , V .-I -, ., . 4' 1:...f1 .. J' 2. 1 f Nw ff' ff, 7' 1 55 rl up.. 4 ' 1 +1 ,IG .4 ea 0 'P' 1 ,, 4.4 ,ef - ,. , , , ff r ff 1, w f w M.. I K VV fx' N Mg wkfwg, fm " ---'- . V- ,. ,. . .. ., . FIRATERNHTIIES X r 9.5 iv . rg Us ,,, i- ff . MWQFZE ZQOKPQXA PSI UPSILON DELTA CHAPTER EstaI9IisI1ecI 1837 FRATRES IN CONCILIO ArtI1ur S. Draper EcIwin I.. Garvin WiIIiam IVI. KingsIey FRATRES IN FACULTATE EcIwin B. KnowIes, Jr. Andrew I. Peterson Richard D. IVIaIIery AtwoocI I-I. Townsend FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE Robert L. ScI1weI3eI FRATRES IN PRAESENTI CLASS or 1958 r RicI1arcI ID. Berne AII9ert C. CarnpIJeII Frank Cv. I'IuI9tJarcI Edward W. Ingram VvIiIIiam T. Davis J. RowIancI Ericson Robert R. Grantham HeigI'iton D. James Robert Faurot Robert W. Good Benedict C. I'IauscIorf StanIey G. Kroto TI1eocIore .IacIcens CLASS OF 1959 A. Seymour Weeks CLAss OF 1940 CLASS or 1941 Robert N. .IacIcson Frederick PI1iIIips iIoI1n SiItanen Keith S. WiIson Robert W. Kamm .IoI1n E. I3etacI1 .IoI1n E. UIIman Courtney T. VV'aIceI:ieIcI WiIIiam W. IVIapes PI1iIip IVI. RotIuweII ,IoI1n C. ScI1roecIer CarI B. Tracy Frederick Waftenschmidt 254 .' W ,L+ , ' , AL. 'F'51',w.' . 1 ,531 A - V N " I P I- 11 . :f "ll','?f ' ' A-'..ff,'5 f. 1. " J 7? ..,,. ' I I, I"f ,A, + I " i5'Im,51i'-1 ft ' ' I H Ijylz? Aff. " ' z M ' "l ag, -p-1I'I"' .. 1 733, It F T F ' I ' .1 "-- It . -. 'f-.ffg,-ftiiake -5 '2" 'tt'.'f 'i" Ii- . KEITH VUILSON HE Detta chapter of the Psi Upsiton Fraternity was founded hy Jeremiah Skidmore Lord. In 1857, this was the First Fraternity at New York University. This house re- cently cetehratect the 100th anniversary as a chapter. Vxfhen one tootqs hack through the century one is glad to see that Psi Upsiton men, past and present brothers in the Council and of the Faculty, have ptayect their part in the growth and progress of the University. in the words of one of the songs, Hpresent hrothers can only try to hear the honors of the past along the hurrying yearsf' tt Witt he interesting incteect to peruse the recorcts when the Delta chapter of Psi Upsiton has reavhed the second century mark. 235 r ' . Aff'-MS.- ,Q K -V fi fi' xx - rv .I. , , ' Y y ,, , 5 15'-e' v'f5 , . ff, , yn' 1 ' i- 1' Y " Q " if Ai ,.L,T .V X i " J "-pg .f,:- .tm 'I71Q"f-W ,Qi "vit 1 1 --'52 f J-1 -4' 'Q 1-fi-A4-ga' "f Jwi, W - ., .I a ,f ., , ' - at PN .1,, LH - VV I - -- I ' A - - A- - f V . .-,J , , X , ...,..x-.K-Ingram ' - ' N- .M .s.f ... if-LL 4-'77 PV ,P 'i 'mia 2521. 4-1' 55-if-H-.SQB DELTA PHI GAMMA CI-IAPTER EstaI:IisI1ecI 1841 FRATRES IN CGNCILIO Jerome S. AuerI3acI1 ArtI1ur B. Graham WiIIiam B. Brush Arthur S. TuttIe FR!-XTRES IN FACULTATE WiIIiam T. DaiIy JOIIH P. Simmons Arthur Edward I'IiII Edgar S. TiIton CHFIOS DCZHIQFH FRATRES IN PRAESENTI Francis B. CarIson WiIIiam T. Dyckrnan WiIIiam Masters, Jr. Newe-II Davis Fredrick GriswoIcI Lucien McComb CLASS or 1958 CLASS or 1939 CLASS OF 1940 CLASS OF 1941 236 I-IaIsey CranoIeII Barnard S. Adams Raymond King W. DucIIey I'IiII Robert Raben Rudyard CoIter S S at Haifa f--14-9-Gia-me I sf 1 X'-V Y -. 1, 'f-' I . if ,F I , 1 Q V , V 4- -6.1. A f r, Q f 1, . cf, .., r - Q. .U , 3 , 1- . i , - - wa' . , , -- ,, .,.:f.,g i V. - -, . , , 1, , ' ,, 0 1 alia- W--2 " 1 e ' WM - 5" r 1 ' it? " "1 tr P 'W ' Q Lf ' - 1 . . ..,., ,,.-,I -I A4 W - : Jw W H -H 1 1 FRANCIS B. CARLSON AMMA chapter of Delta Phi was established at New York University in 1841. Delta Phi throughout the years has contributecl its stiare of prominent men to the services of its Country both in War and peace and in arts and science. Charles Henry Snow for many years Dean of the Engineering College, was a brother, and so were Vxfiiiiam Henry Nichols who gave the Heights its Chemistry building, and Arthur Butler Graham who was president of University Alumni association for a number of years. The history of the Gamma chapter now in its 96th year has been closely interwoven with that of the University, as it has climbed into prominence in the academic and collegiate world. 257 . 'AN T, H x ,- . J. -4 :-. Y S , 3 j1,,' Y ' ,,, eg 3 'P H 3 g f XX' ,Y , 'Q , .. . 'J ,Sq """"6' ' . . V' 'E '. -4- f " .2 . - X I 5 ng 1 7' - : ' ' ' J - ,. . Mg - . If -- '- , . 11:-' .F "" U . - 1 -I all X 25? fx xxx If "-GIFFIIY '. 1' Wszufwhiu 26 me ami TN f' Lim 219 5 'Ll Q SH Qgux Qxvsgiffgg H ZETA PSI PI-II CHAPTER I:ouncIecI 1847 FRATER IN SENATU IVIElI'SJ'1E1II BFOXVH FRATRES IN FACULTATE IVIarSI1aII S. Brown A IVIorhimer B. I'IoweII Lawrence XV. Lange FRATRES IN PRAESENTI JoI1n I'I. Bouman JoI1n P. I'IammoncI Louis A. I'IicIcS NoeI C. IVIenzI James R. Chapman A. Thomas Breit XIVIISOH Van AISI, Jr. Gene Bania Burfiet Brown John Berg-Johnsen, WiIIiam IVI. Bidder James A. BoIton Bruce D. IVIaccIonaIcJ Henry F. IVIcInerney Jr. CLASS or 1938 CI1arIeS W. Penry JoI1n B. Reese Robert C. Stack Joseph B. TiII:any CI1arIes Herrmann CLASS or 1939 CoIton I'IaIsteacI WiIIiam White CLASS or 1940 Thomas Carey FrecIericIc I.1encJI1oIt Thomas K. PicIcI1arcIt Robert Vxfhite CLASS OF 1941 Jay B. IVIiIIer WiIIiam J. Murray Bruce NicI1oIS Frank R. Pike IVIiraI3eau C. Towns, J Roger WiIson 258 f. ..w1VlWMfAb4a...1,.,jf., ' f gamer- 17 A 1 f . V i 3 JOSEPH TIFFANY JOHN IWIAF-f11N'1OND N 1847, when the Greek 1etter fraternities were but twenty years o1d anc1 New York University but sixteen, the Phi Chapter of Zeta Psi was founded on ttie Washington Square campus. Zeta Psi was the first fraternity to esta131ist1 a chapter on the Pacinc coast and ttie Hrst to tounct a chapter in Canada. 1n 1910, 1nternationa1 Heaetqiiarters were esta1o1is11ee1 at 51 East 59t11 Street, New York City. An executive secretary uncter the direction of a centra1izer1 board ot trustees, was emp1oyec1 to carry on the wort: of the tnternationat Qrganization. At ttle present time, Zeta Psi is represented in 29 co11eges and universities t11roug11out this country and Canacta. Q59 X, . Mdgnib., .-f'Sx uma XF 1 'L , V 4 A .. - -1 , - ,, 5. ' f' xv' A 7 fi er N - ' , ' ' ' ' 1 e ' ' uflix 1. if Mk-- ,QV -A , i li , 1 axe' H " - - , '12 1 - it 'i f f . . 1- w 'fi" 1 if 1' 1 ' ' - 1? F Q, 1 , l i ' Q i .Li 'i ' " - 1 wiliwfr i. 12 eil ' 'J YY., ' 1 V ' ' ' ""'5NFf1 "' Y -if 4. Ll-,, A - 7, ' 4 ' ' ,, ,4 ""' V A -.. 1 , - ., I ' ""'l1g1.k - "J Hn: if Y 'Y ,I E vm , Vwurw - Ld. ...Stix t if tt if A R 0 . . f, Legs fi-L: qv b 1 1 wil , , IM- ,'r 2 .. . M- 'asv Nr .L 'Ht 'I 'Ii I o , dw , tp .."'.' ' vida, 'J E .W wrmoenm I. 41521. .Jam DELTA UPSILGN NEW Yom CHAPTER Estahtishect 1865 FRATER IN SENATU Ezra S. Tippte FRATRES IN FACULTATE .Iohn IVI. Clapp John CoIIins Howard S. ConIcIin Arren Du Bois Ernest Fischer Chartes R, I'IuIsart Jeremiah W. .IenIcs Theodore F. Jones Fiske KimIJaII E. Ctovis La VaIIey John F. IVIacCracIcen Cectric A. IVIatos .Iames P. Muhh Nartnury C. Murray Athert B. Nixon Arthur C. Perry John T. QuingIey Warren E. Schmitt FRATRES IN PRAESENTI J. StanIey Meares Homer E. Barnes CharIes J. IVIasur Francis Beatty Conrad Hoover Genarct J. Ctohessy I-Iarry W. .Iohes Alden K. SmaII CLASS or 1959 CLASS OF 1940 CLASS OF 1941 James J. IVIoran Robert E. Regetmann .Ioseph Ia. Stenetc RaIph IVI. Pugh David T. Thurston Stuart S. Smith John A. WahIquist John B. White WiIIiam W. White 240 ,f 'i ,,N1V Lt: V 441-3if2'?-'is' WV? N91 jg 1 , ' -.-ff . 1- "gv5""" ef- I A ' 4 ' ' . 1 " "YN ' ' ti ' " ' !if"',y i .- A- - -" ' ""s,q . . - .3 at V025 ,var iw bi I, V . . 5 M . A ',i V' S . - i".,LL ly 6 I Q 1 7 2" -H . "" I 'j dv- I' I V1 H . f , ,. If 'E ,I mf. ' ' ,, . i- ' - , Mp.. 4 AU ' . -,Sf ., Uk., -: I" J--' mf:-Idsf?-. . L 'iivivfi I Nay., at ii"i"f4i5 u4 1'-., it i- ai . 5 " " A ., Ft' If if , 5 i, .- A L.. uw .'.-v- ' I- i,. .. . ., . .. - x: -. i. . - f f. 'ff-'lflivviln ' . 1v""?"w. J L 1. .V-.iz-at--. fi ,A -.-,li . I . ' - .- . .. 4 I 1 5?-WM55'-f":f- ' 7. 5511 5 Q.-'n'.wE'1-'-:me--I..,4q5Wi".2' .-:refs in ze5'sv'1qv'ff1 2 f ' . - . 5 :-MMUA1 " -V' ' - A ' 5 Ng, p .--, vi- A -.M " -' " ' --11-:wr-rilidzfffk.i.t:f5if?!fQi'JA!+ f x' , LMA! WW? S' 6 ff' I 4 " WGN I " -we J. STANLEY MEARES ECAUSE of tlie wiclespreacl opposition to ttme exclusive secret societies ot tlie time, Delta Upsilon, one of the olclest of tlue Heights fraternities, was founclecl in 1834. lt celeloratecl its- Centenary in 1954. From tlwe stuclents in tlae many Universities Wlio felt tn bl 54 t' e Delta U silon claapters luave cle- tlmat tlaese secret groups were o jectiona e, ac iv - p velopecl in tlne colleges tlirougtiout tlme country. lt is outstanding in tlae clegree of success it has lmacl in attaining relations laetween its claapters. Among tlue more famous Delta Upsilon Alumni are incluclecl Claarles Evans l'luglr1es, Cluarles ancl Rufus Dawes, Major- General Jolun L. 0,Ry'an, James J. Barton, Altrecl P. Sloan, Jr., Heywoocl Broun. Joyce Kilmer, and Jolmn Erslcine. Q41 Tl xx- A NX jj- Q r . -'N ' M "li .111 X X W I K ,I - v 'xx 1 4 A ' W J M l, ' -'wi -4.--'-rP+'. J f ' x . P, . -5 2 .. ,Y f f. 1 W I - " 'f' " " ' I- z' f ' fl ' ' - ' ' i . , . '73 ., ' i - . ' ' -' 7 ' ' ' V 325 Q .EM71,Lg,i3 5,7M:Hr'M4,1 b i, K ,il ' WLT I jr., iq - . Hr V vt Q- ' :nn ,. F Q i -- --A -Aw A . .... v -1-'rf -1-mr-uf--, -f-.fm-. '--.F -L -Vg . - bf f 5 .,.. - 'f-,pa r . 1 I if! 1 , X - u ,V-VN W .L "vw- fd: SOI 1 f af? up"'1i.-.-"-T" 5 J'irr4'K-r -'fis'xh Ee? DELTA CHI NEVV Yom CHAPTER Esrablishecl 1891. FRATRES IN CONCILIO Arthur BuIIer Graham Grrin R. LILICIQI FRATER IN SENATU Ffiiflli SOIHIUGF FRATRES IN FACULTATE John Lyon Lawrence SIfl'1pSOI'l JOIID V. Scudi Frank I-I. Sommer WiIIia1n F. VxfaISI1 FRATRES IN PRAESENTI Thomas I'IarcIgrove I3auI IVIocI:ricIge W. Carey BuI1Ier Robert B. .Iames John CafareIIi Laurence C. BIenI1eim W. Murray Gall .IoI1n Roger Beck LIoI'1n IVI. Coe f"""' 5 CLASS OF I958 .IoI1nLI. Young CLASS or 1939 CLASS OF 1940 CLASS OF 1941 CI1arIeS IVIoeIIer 242 RaIpI1 IX"'IueIIer Gustave Richter Joseph Kramp I3auI LYHHIIHH Duis W. IVIeacIor JOIIH B. RoI3erLs Robert D. Vasa James Doody Richard I-Ioffrnan I "'1 "' 'I' J flier. ? 7 f fi, VF"F"? If we ,. 1.12-1 . ,,. wg.-I. 5 , - ' 1 ",.'--- If " I :rw-e r r .fr WW' irrl ffl: I .ff M , ff, 2 , . ff---, 'ga' eg, '- kg - 3 ..: ,, W-yy , .. ,QV-E. . Q, fi ...Q M . I 5 Tn? . f' 'II '5',?sN ?. fi" IW I 'f I f'-avg 5 R , V I H n s,-J L . ..ff J, 4 ,.- fp ' fm f' ..f.'.f,,lfli.. ..,' I I 'V his 'I DUIS MEADOR HEN Delta Chi fraternity was touncteci at Cornell University in 1890, it was the purpose of the founders to matte the tegai profession the basis for memtyerstiip. The New York University chapter was organized one year later at Washington Square and in 1922, when it moved to the University Heights campus, it opened its doors to stuctents from ati branches of ttie University. White many Delta Cinis, like Samuel Seatoury, have attained prominence in their chosen field. the list of noteworthy atumni is not conlinect to the profession of law, but contains sucti outstanding names as Dr. Charles W. Gerstenlnerg, who was president of the National tntertraternity Conference, and the nationally known band leader, Peter Van Steeden. Q43 Q v X .NN-Ak. fear.. ,R A . , . li , ' K ' x L U :.,Y.5i:?,:.. rx , i , 71 ,r fr y ui xxiziixk ff'15 " ' 4 4 ff . 52 il' . ' - ' W' - 9 ,,.f" ' t . , ' .i 2 ' V " '1- hi aaa ..., zffumum. 1, its or , . ' 1 i. ...i .. . mt, fd A"L"... I .,f' 3 ...... ,af . f-Jlfjifqiiria 7' M W"4??" -11174 4.1 ,,..4..y.f-Q.. 1 . qw' A , . W . . .. -f' ' - wgm. - rs' -. . ., , .Lg i, 3, -if r 551 ' v, ' -N ,, my 'I vii L 4 " ., Q P A ' I Y X . yr 1111 II - 1 , 111 1 I W . QI mf PHI GAMMA DELTA NU EPsrLoN CHAPTER EsEaIJIisI1ecI 1892 FRATRES IN CONCILIO SamueI A. Brown MaIcoIm D. Simpson FRATRES IN FACULTAE I-I. Eltinge Breed Samuel A. Brown Howard G. Cann Victor M. Genez John Gercles Philip B. Gove Hayward J. HOIIJSII Frederick C. I'IoIden HaroIcI C. Knapp YViIIiam P. Sears, Jr. Cherries G. Shaw Cnaries NV. Vv'aIIier FRATRES IN PRAESENTI Henry HUISI Donald P. Jenks Renato E. BuggeIIi Arthur W. Courtney James R. Moody .IOI'11'1 Cykldfe Robert T. CIapp IVIicI'1aeI M. Davis Frank LaSaIIa CLASS OF I938 C1.Ass or 1,939 Peter Viscarcli CLASS or I9f1O CLASS OF 1941 Q44 . . . ,,,-.-. ,Z . Lf'--.4 f ::.:--:N-!Z53..L.L,,, if.. .Qian I . fvffflkif ziaimsz?-im.i:i M:1.:Lma L!! A ML if V I 5 fp iw " ,-V35 . 1 ,Nt . ' - V. John A. IVIayre'is Francis A. ViIoIo Thomas F. Moran AcIoIpI1 Parra, lr. John A. Rane DougIas A, Parker StanIey A. Lescarboura James N. Lewis ' Edmund B. Stueben 49 Q- V' ., .. ,,.,E,.,.,. wanna- 'Q' a ' f:- 3 , , . :Q ' .. ' W: f 1, ,-.isiliififlft 1 5 , a---a...,- . ' . .-1vG.:f:'z:5-1 giq- no -A 3-13,.M.s-.L .1 5.-,v.w54 -4.- '- L far aff- 2-1' '.-. .s?'.:w::.: . . ,-7.50 ,W , . if " .- HENRY L. HULST HI GANHVIA DELTA was founctect in 1848 at Washington and Jefferson College. Since its inception, it has expanciect to its present total of 73 chapters, having at least one in every state of the union, and in ttie Dominion of Canada. Nu Epsilon chapter was established in 1892. It has played an important rote in the life of New York U. Some of its alumni are Howard G. Cann, Director of Athletics at the Heights, John Nveintieimer, Freshman Football Coach, Harold C. Knapp, Malcolm D. Simpson, William Patterson, ati former Presidents of the New York University Alumni Federation. Dr. Samuel A. Brown, former Dean of the Medical College was also a brother. y Q45 ., -,Mum-aka.. --'LS ' ,- - '21 ., ,fp -'f""' "fn li "' " ft " ' ' V-.,1-fa Q- , -t" V' 'A ...U ' . .. 522 .- 1- ' . ' Q.,-,gif .. if -iq it . '1 fl ' me Qf" r P31 . A iw Ava. xvetqa-' "L, i.4.. ..-Y .., ,R fx 2 5. , , "Ae,-' 'GV I -QI fI:,,,-QE! wx... 'A I .V vile- 0 gag -- , , 'T S S Wx ,few M, xsf Q gi' II' I S I No.1-rgos ,venus PI LAMBDA PHI GAIVIIVIA CHAPTER EsIaIwIiSI1ecI 1898 FRATER IN FACULTATE I-IGHTY I'IowarcI FRATRES IN PRAESENTI CLASS OF 1958 CIayton BIicI: A StanIey Fram Henry I-Iafer RoIoert Wiener CLASS OF 1959 Arthur AIpert WiIIiam DavicIs0r1 SIanIey GoIcIman I'IaroIcI Vxfax CLASS OF 1940 Marvin Behr SI1epI1arcI Boneparth .IacIc GoIcIInerg Edward GoIcIman Seymour Greenberg 246 , Norton Zavon fXrnoIcI ScI'1oenfeIcI Irving SIorcI1 .IosepI1 Krakauer Irving Rutenberg Herman Sussman Roy KugeI AIvin Lesser Norman SiIver ,Iay SrnoIin Irving ZarcI1in . , 'x ,. udxfv ns' 1. ' , V, I-f - -, f u Y Q A i vp TIT! 'M , If! liao 22:54 W , U .. 95,12 1 ,,.,- v'?':.:y4AYWW-'14, A3,.,P.agM 'gy A . 1 ,I I 9 fi if I I I -I I I I w e I , If 1 I"" ' r"- ---f- 5-f--I -.-A ' I ,. ' QI "I 'N ' 5' I 41 .- "'-' , r 'Y "' " A I I so I BI A IWII 'Im fe--2 -um I. 1 wr-9 I , I ri wh. .4,.sI ' ' S -VII 'W - fe " f eff 'M " "swf" WI V'W"'W '- 'mf "' CLAYTON BUCK I LAMBDA PHI Fraternity was founded at Yale University in 1895. Since that time it has grown rapicuy until, today, it has twenty-two chapters in the United States and Canada. Gamma, the chapter at New York University, was founded in 1895 and has been active on tne campus for the past four decades. tts chapter house is Iocatect at 2195 Andrews Avenue. Gammays alumni association numbers over three hundred members, among whom are: Albert Ottinger, Arthur Garfield Hays, the Loew Brothers, Oscar Hammerstein, and Arthur Schwartz. -f'X- f , Ji: .- r lf- " ' QL i JW' N' " if . i fur . if .' . , f4JL , ' , M y I I ,s 1 5 ' ,JA 1 I' ,, 4 N I. X H 'W ' .3-A -, gf . q-.Ef" 5-, cu-Jzq? -' ESQ, xl A' il ,.3..1 ' -'. 'V . , 5- I ,' -1' ' ' ., Q. . -i 4. H Y N W, y a. y V A NWN 'VA VM Ag ,Il rg,-.3-Q, 1 s mia-N ' iv 'ir Vind 1 . M gk-aww 1 ,. .4 ref: - :W f f .13 S . - V Y 4-:..,f W:- 5 . X? X f U EKD I E515 N I ii 4' N Z KAPPA SIGMA GAMIVIA ZETA CHAPTER EstaIJIiSIiecI 1905 FRATRES IN FACULTATE WiIIiam Brown EcIwarcI Hand Preston EcIsaI Caspar Kraem er Edward Gasparitch EIIOI Smith IsIoycI Dewey Frank XVaII FRATRES IN PRAESENT1 WiIIiam R. Creamer .Iarnes IVI. Brown David L. BumeII Stephen De Simone AIfrecI E. Grimm WaIter H. DetIe1cS CLASS OF 1958 CLASS or 1939 CLASS OF 1940 JOSSDII IVIaSSimiIIiano CLASS OF 1941 FrecIericIc H. Rubin 248 -- eff' N. 4 . .,f""+-L I 1,1 I-. lv 5 pawns Y - ' A. Q -, .A 5. :. 1, ,V ' 1 - .. . ,- . A-. ,r .V .--W--.45 -Q I' , --1.9 H1 Max O. Funk John I-IIII Robert E. Katzrn HD Peter VX7. Koenig Joseph Vxfittko I"Iarry Price ., A-N Y J .fl 1 I 5 -f 911,242 1 I QTL, V .1- ,M 21.2 1, 5 A , i E K 1 ' : f, . 7 ' if ' ,.f .. I-'::ffff.fIE:i1, 1 u4 ' ' Jil!-. -AQ fx,-T K . L, . I Si," hl i- 'lv-1 3: 3 'Adm' VI VV 151' J I. Q L "'- ei . , . " tif . P- H ' " fi - i i 1 MAX O. FUNK APPA SIGMA fraternity, the otctest fraternal orcter in the world, was founctect at New York University in 1905, when Gamma-Zeta chapter was organized. The fraternity is the largest national group on this campus with 107 active chapters. The chapter has heen the recipient of the Von Etting Intramural tract: trophy, the Howard G. Cann award. and the Francis P. Watt trophy. The chapter is one of the hrst Heights fraternities to Win the tntramurat Bastcethatt Championship. The Gtee Ctuh has always had memhers of Kappa Sigma on its active list and two previous presidents ot' Tau Beta Pi were hoth memhers ot this chapter. The only honorary memher of this fraternity is the otctest son ot Jefferson Davis the Confederate president of Civil War period. Q49 . Q . ,He-.21-2, - Q ,B ,. If 1.59: . -isxgu -I t 4 T .M YM'-TM, .1 .wr lf 1 .. . yi , Em. .av ,S 'AMA---1 ' F' 'E ' align' '-."'.ifLa.,..--,,.1..1Tq2'.lnia. . 114, ,Tai-.ff'.1'11'1L-iium- ' , i H " 3 ' , gtt v U, 153' 713. . '8"'fg' L L N.. T za'r ll -. H I mi.. W, 4, e ,L L ig, I ina- if ' fllllniununw A? A "'lummml"L 0 0 I , '.n ,I 'oh 0 In -.2 Og 1"l , 1 v- 1 , QL 52 S 14 : i 1 I ' in 4 , - I 1 , 4 C S X ' 1 W 5 X I f u ' 4, JSA' Q. X ' , A g hqq 0, I , I - - . 4 , Q - f"w1u,Q' W,-F' i n Q il v I .llllh 'fm' . I I : nmmi 'mf .. lxsx ZETA BETA TAU GAMMA CHAPTER EsIaIJIiSIiecI 1006 FRATER IN ITACUILTATE Victor Vxforonov FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE Edgar ISI. BacI1racI1 SicIney Cowen FRI Monroe AINIOII IVIartin Evans Eugene GoILISIein Louis Gordon Bernard Hath StanIey Baker Ierorn e Kaufm an Martin Caine DanieI Greenberg Newton Cvresser I,awrence Hart ArtI1ur Karp Herbert Baum Harry Berman Morton IJuIJow Lewis StacIQeII Peter Dorsey VNfaIter SCI1acIaat RTRES IN PRAESENTI CIJXSS OF 1958 CLASS OF 1959 RaIpI1 TucI1rnan CLASS OF 1940 CLASS OF 1941 Q50 Lfsfffifiaramge, I I - yu' L4 -I ' 1 , ff vftlfizl , ' ,' ' a n IDI1iIip Jonas AItrerI I.uncIin George Reisner I'IerIJert Stein IVIiItOn SterngoICI Kenneth Stiaftan Rene SiIx'er IuIian Kre-rnsCIorf Harris Mayer IVIartin Shapiro WaIter SImIman IVI. I'IerI3ert Weisenberg DOnaIcI RosaIsI4y David Stein RicI1arcI Tumpowsky xifjygs A 1. Hx, ' H ? I' lx' ' -fi 4 I I is I rf, ,gf . f ,I f- I - --fi - 1 , I-1 - - -1 I 1 -, AL. ww L- I .. -. y. 1 '- fm , 1 r Y - A ' Q .. L ve - .,-Lf, W, ,A ,L S, M., '3-wp-..2, ,S . 'F V' --W wp--iv, .-f-ac! . , ir 2. , , - ' ,5- GEORGE REISNER ETA 'BETA TAU, the first Jewish fraternity estatatistiect in America was founclecl at the Coitege of the City of New York 41 years ago. Since its incorporation. Zeta Beta Tau nas primarily stood for high sctiotarstuip and the development of stuctents who Witt be assets to their community, race, and nation. With these objects foremost, Zeta Beta Tau has 56 active ctiapters and 40 atumni clubs in the United States and Canada. Gamma ctiapter of Zeta Beta Tau was estaivtistieci at New York University in 1906. Since that time, it has been one of the most active fraternities on ttie campus in tbotti extra-curricular activities anct attitetics. Among some of the more prominent alumni are Justice Benjamin Carclozo, Governor Henry Horner ot Htinois, Justice Irving Lehman of the New York State Court ot Appeals. Federal Court Justice Grover tVIosLowitz was one of the four students who founded the New York University chapter. 251 A 'TJ N., V 5 .::'A ar , Nic. ,,4nnn,,, .4 -. 1 . V -, ,U-55, -P , ,a - , as M H - - -qi-5 - . , 1 51 - - - 1 - A ,, - A " iv '-" 2 ' ' "- -" A 1. sea - v . .iv fa -wig'--Wil f - .. A a s . ' I - 1- V 1 .. . 4 . . 4 . 1 -- - a A J 13 P -'7 1 . ,.- 1 . 1 . V 1 . .. L., fa- ' . V - 11' W 0.9.4. .fgff-.-gg. , M '3 '11?'ffr'ie" A A ' . ' 9'Jvfi'7 4' Q A V-" " ai ,, A I, -2, 1,11 "3 r .Q v, Sf., .. , B' A! glial I 3 PI-II SIGMA DELTA DELTA CHAPTER Estabiisbeci 1915 FRATRES IN FACULTATE I'IaroIcI BrancIaIeone Robert Gessner FRATRES IN UNIX-'ERSITATE George A. Bernsiein Loo Vfooi IVIaurice I'IaIIe IsacIore A. Simon Josepb IVIarcus Norion Sbainess Myron Sachs FRATRES IN PRAESENT I Elias I'I. AcIIer George Y. EISon Abrabam Bye Irving Berwiiz Aifred GoIcIWaier Vxfaiker Saks IVIarsI1aII Sabir Bruce A. Hecker Seymour Treib IVIiIton Eisenberg James VVOII Seymour -Baum Howarci Rosensiei Theodore Geffner StanIey Kane Howard Horn I1 CLASS OF 1938 Irving IsraeI CI,ASS OF 1939 Herbert Breger CLASS OF 1940 CLASS OF 1941 Irwin Coben 252 L Leonard IX'Ienczer NViIIiam Frieciman Gusiave OremIancI I3I1iIip B. Devries Irwin Meyer Xwiibur Kaufman Irioward Wolf Cbaries Pacbner .Iustin IVIiIIer Gene Springer Richard Harris Robert Franken Bernard Unger Frank Fredericks IVIaurice VoIin SicIney SiIver 'A Wf"L' 'yi 'TW :aw , . , ..,fff'l1- ,fn '--"3 A 1- V ' .- ,A Y,-:...,3l ,N - , T., I , I , ,LL 32531 , ' I5-'fi . ' A 'ffgfTf'i:fff,i . 1 ' T WDW I'2lr'.Q'f -. lS . I ' L 'K ' ' 1 Q" .' A" .' 'I ,,1..f ,, I is V Isl: Z' ff-i3f'14'w 4!g- -.2 3 ' 9'1?'w" 2-53313, I ' 5' Eff'-31 V A ' , . 'Z ' im c- . . Z. : f fff A f 2' f '-1-que. K - iv., A14- Lana- i- sg 3 " ,Q 9 V- ., 45,-:far-fiEg??::'sEQ: - v 35 " if 5' Y f".'?52f':.?L'1"f"i1 gm' , J ' .gg-3 .-Q. . , ., 15 .11 '-flivihzi-Ziarift'-fy 'V 1 1 s S 5 , fy Q f fix 1 ' 9 L fc g 4 Z 43" ' 5 f 1 Q 1 f Q f iii?-.wrvafi-af.t fr 1 yr , 1 , Lf al. -I 5 A .. -pf 4.35-4' Ni ' 'gg' -'Vw :,s.3r , FX t , , V -se-31 ':k1ggi,5535-, fy 7711 Q. Z ' . if XNILLIAM FRIEDMAN 1 1 Ht SIGMA DELTA fraternity came into existence on Novemher 10, 1909, at Co1um1oia University, where its Atpha Chapter was organized hy a group of eight undergraduates who had found in no existing group on that campus the particutar inctuce- ments which their ic1ea1s demanctect of a fraternity. Un February 9th, 1915, Detta Chapter at New York University came into existence. Within a few years, the fraternity had passed out of its ear1y stages and spread rapictty until now the twenty growing chapters of the fraternity form an unhrotcen chain of traternatism covering most of the ectucationat centers in the country. 253 Y -A 't ,, -dffiiujbl-X - . . -5 . ---4. ,z. 1'-.,A ,,,afg-,-QA., ,, ' ' .215 i , rf 7 2 iff? 1 " - fr U y fine ,ir at M" Ly N 1 V- -f iv- xr ef: . .,,-'- fe- ..t. ' ,.. .-V ., ' ' , .,. . I' - , , -:f V ' V f , " - ,i m we .Ut in-A-4' 1 ' - " ' 'I 'H AM dna. . V . . , lg ,J M Y W . I 4 r, x , U , V W- X ' 'J ' " f- F'-45u',IQ Q, ' ' ...L .- v.. N, ,. , - 3 -1 I tl Z, 3 Q ' 1 U 41 I VHS fi t gi if z. I A U HA PHI DY ALPHA PHI DELTA 'VHETA CHAPTER Estatntistwect 1921 FRATRES IN PRAESENTI CLASS OF I938 Nictwotas D'Apmzzo txftario R. La Bartocra Atptionso G. Postigtione C. Joseptr Fontanetta CLASS or 1959 Satvatore Guarnera Vxfittiam J. Ntartino Frecterictc tVtarzutto CLASS OF 1940 Ctiartes C. Coscia Carto De Gennaro Vvlatter tvtanzi CLASS OF T941 G. Vincent Amico Anthony J. Cravero 254 ff-L., ' , 1-, If ffl -i ff F fvv- A if H-WXM 1 " f' vw ' t". . " ,M .ZW V. s.: V- - fr Af.: :. ,p!L, W Ar. mg ml- vp, , in ,HF IU ' v ,S , . V 5 . ,bw-if' ' " LQ --N-LCHZL ' w , ,E.'i.9 . - - A U,4J I ,Ui-..A'Q..V..,.,, ,. ,V :.2,. L.,.. . Q, .f .1 4. Ei-ip i I ti Q ' ' -7- W . ' ttf " F' ' A - Z , f.,, .5, - ,, , V . - fwm:w.,., '. N ,,,.,..,,.,-- .,,g:'f" ' ' , .. .L k- r i 1 7 ' ' . iff . .2 . llffs ' , , . f'Q?1'rmi"1'?fa-Lf'i:. 255 ' . 1 -swf ' M" 4 i vm, ,. .,. D IARIO LABARBERA HETA' chapter was organized in 1921 and immeotiatety made itsett known at the Heights hy assisting the Itatian Club to raise funds for the ctonation to the University of the hust of Dante Ahgheri which now rests in a niche ahove the entrance to Language Han. 111 1928 the fraternity 1Ce1t the need ot a separate chapter house to accommodate a targe numher of members attending the downtown schoots. Therefore, the Nationat Organization granted the downtown group recognition as a separate chapter with the name Theta Beta. The activities of the chapters are supervised, controttect, and coordinated hy a Centrat othce tocatecl in New York City. From these headquarters are issued the KLEQS, the fraternat quarterly, the Dokirno, a ptectgee hanc11Joo1c, the directory and the songs of Atpha Phi Detta. 255 N. , -, , N x ,pam ---S A' ,J if U A V VA ,X - ' - I A - ,, : , ,V -'V xx 4. -, H ,VM . 4.:g,.iVl-J--.. , : - , I . lx 4-- ' 'I Q1 ! f xg, 2 . X 3 f gmt? . 1 ,yd i f l 3. I. an -n 'Q -. - R I , . V ' .L " - ,Q , i jf' 1 My in J' " T'-g?. ,: -f 2':: 5 ,-.. - ' J, P . " . 4. "3 W' 4 ,Q 'F' 1. f ...Q 1 . 1. 5. - f -'k1.f::ai-1, ,.,..,..,. f 'Lf A , "W ' , 1:,,L,,..sf1 '1?.'4iPfbl'a+2a- -.-QW f ' I-, 1 " J Pl' ' ' ' ' ' ' - ., 'H ' Y ' --- ' ' 1 1 'i1v':fxm:.z.,ff-W,.2 L'II1,,,:j,.,.j1,','?r,.,22,53A.,f.,,,,,r.,T,s,-,:--, 35:-giragy-ampwrz.-z-1"vw:fa.r-fzgagam-V A ' ' : " f -' , ' -i- - I . . fr- '-' -f a- ' . L Q -fe .-gi:-u Q I - - 1 1 I 1 ,r" .xxwxrk I i. 1. .X Ham' Aga iinwmiyllllf'-W W J X 'WHIP Q S- - WW nI'1l Am 1luI:mI ' Q I :FM PHI KAPPA TAU ALPHA BETA CHAPTER Esiabiished 19211 FRATRES IN FACULTATE Robert Carianci Conn .loinn H. Prime Alfred M. Greenfield Charles Skinner Haroioi F. Lenz Howard Waliiert John Arthur Zangier FRATRES IN PRAESENTI A CLASS or 1.938 Fred F. Droste Arthur P. Marshall George Sciuram IT1 Carmine Ixqaiciari Dominick Di Giacomo Paul Erickson Peter Bagan 'x -N U - ' , - ' ff H , ,, K 1 , ,.fff+:.:s?.W Gilbert Goocigion CLASS or 1959 Paul Papageorge CLASS OF 1940 Peter Dralcos George Koutsoniiqols CLASS or 1941 Robert Mills John Steinback 256 off' . . ,-f'ff39ie',E, ri "gf, .31 :ff A ' 1 fr i 1' 1 ,' -. .Y I, "fn In " 1 .3 5 KE" ' ' :Half H H ' " L1 " 'h fm ' I S A Vi fzsff v- fm an 4' View--:.,:f,:'L,,-' ' ff -. ' Tw---fl .i--f'31f":"93-."-,W ' . 'V .' ' 71' A 'F Win 'Rf'-if V- '? Eu r " "' .n ie W -5 ' if 1-wi? .. Q ef' .,, Ik, 5ffj'x2" ': -26, 'Q' .ft ' '1 4 .. v , 1 1 ' ' dig. is- N .- . Vs.: -' .1 'ze i '3'f'1.A"W9:E'1io'f ' ff'-' f-5" QQH v, t:"'A."f - . 'A ,' ' FRED R. DROSTE N 1906, Phi Kappa Tau was founded at Miami University, Qxforct, Qnio. Qriginaity it was a non-fraternity group which was createct in an attempt to break up ttie control of student offices by a clique of ottier fraternities. This society was soon aiimiatecl with the Qtuio University Union, a similar organization, and spreact to other colleges, Finally, in 1916, the Various chapters unitect into one Greek letter fraternity. The national office at Oxford puiotisties a quarterly magazine, ttie Laurel, devoted to the activity of the chapter houses and to tne maintenance of fraternity icteats. The Alpina Beta chapter was formed from a pre-existing local fraternity, Ptii Lambda Beta, in 1924. its main purpose is to provide ttie student with an intimate group with xvnom tie may have much in Common. Q57 -Q.:',QTf!-4. -2-is A 1 - 'W !HP' 'F -' ff' H i ' 1. , i , - f . 1, 4 I .LL ..a.....uz,. aw! WM' "fl 4F':'li V 1 'ZA 1 L.. ...C 1' N V i.. ., emma-ik .-., ,.-. ..... - .- 2-iq ' -1 s A - -Y 5143- '-"xx 'I .A 1 1 , 'Y' if 1 L1 If QMA is .9 M . S Eianm KAPPA NU BETA CHAPTER EsIaI3IisI1ecI 1916 FRATRES IN FACULTATE Robert PoIIacIc Louis GottIieI9 I"IowarcI IVI. 'XN'iiIner FRATRES IN UN IV ERSITATE Louis I:eIcIman CIIHIICS Vxfise Conrad Rosenberg StanIey Xvittenberg ,IoeI Watsky Irving WOII FR!-XTRES IN PRAESENTI Jack Kossin Irving I3erIsIein Irving B. Bernaisky Herman I.iicI1siein Bernard NeIson Arthur DreIicI1 CLrXSS or 1938 I'IowarcI Vvfatsky CLASS or 1959 CLASS OF 1940 Leo SiIverstein 258 CITEHAIGS I3oIivy C'erI1arcI ScI1Iesinger Alan RosenInIum S. Robert Watsky Jerome L. Yesko I-I. Bernard LICIIISIISICIH J . A A JFS I. J ,.v r -A of ,. r. : I 5 ., 3 f . I I, -. Qin- 1 1 1 V 12. f r I ,:.. A - ",,:,, ,ff----.. V A ,V 1- J- , , A- V.. - H Y I , A5 L '-A., ,,, , .4 . -fa- .: , A A .Y A . . 1- I U- f-' ' - A tr . Q-, I A fl .I f 1 1 Q, I pf A- A " ry-,Her I I f I in, A 1 A I if i 1 .- fy' I 4 2 W? 1 1 I :Ms 1 pi-aww UAL- Y W -F """ , W ff MZ? I W' 4,, I , vw: 1 A f- H Y vffpwgvf fr A rw 1 r,.. VAV- 1.f .,.:,. - ' IRYINCT PERISTEIN APPA NU fraternity was founctect at the University of Rochester in 1911. Since tnen. a11 the chapters of the fraternity have consistent1y maintained a nigh standard of memtzerstiip, and have earned for the fraternity a p1ace of recognition and distinction ttirougtiout the country. 1n nationa1 scnotastic rating, Kappa Nu stancts fourth, and is a Senior member of the National 1nterfraternity conference. tts graduates are prominent in professionat Fields, anct as educators and pu131ic servants. Beta Chapter of Kappa Nu was founded at New York University in 1916, and for e1even years thereafter 11e1ct the sct1o1astic 1eac1ers11ip on the campus. For the past t1'1ree years, it once more assumed sctaotastic honors. tn 1935, to facititate reorganization and deve1opment, Beta Chapter was duty constituted and recognized as Beta Kappa Nu fraternity, a ptectgee ctiapter of Kappa Nu fraternity, at New Yort: University. Q59 'J X. . if , 1,51 , i ' rw . 1 1111 1 , 1 rr 'ag 1 . N- V 'fm-, 'i 14 ' W 5 ' Q In U , ' -5? - J ' 'J' ' ' , it fret, , , . ' x -n- 3: :Q at - ff' ' Cf 1 -' - A ' .,1-'5" "t," 'N 'Ml5.Ef ,, .x2: 1Y- ' ,5" 'f . t ' ' , - " . 1 ' " , 5 I 'HJ Lf M- -- -i A-1 A-.LM-11 .Y . 'Lt-. m..s..A ' . md 11.-...mi-'. ' 1. ' , if .f" .nu-'id 5'-llxq ri! ' AL I 1-1' ' '4, 1 -jviylqg v -K X lx --N ,.""' ,,- 'S ' --.. ' fi ' A A. V4 1. M E' A- 'iq H ,: 517 ?i 1 'fl . f .1 ' . f . A A --.,4 1 H29 Af , Ju gay 1 -4 1 1 111' I 1-1 '...am.m-.21 J'-'M 1 1 145746-is 7 W x I X I f I N I Q 1 ' 1 1 2 N I 4 r w, A N K I ' igQ'.vb"4' TAU EPSHSQN PHI FRATRES IN PRAESENTI CLASS OF 1938 Bernard Bauef Cl.ASS or 1939 Robert Barteistone Bernard Lyons Irving Kramer David Swiger Daniel Weiss CLASS OF 1941 David Abel Lawrence Weber Q60 -,f .I - ' 'M f ' " ' "" f ' " -17.51 .. ' Q yy 1? " S ,glA m x -14?lM"- -A lv-1---1 fe. ., ,:..f, 1 If V, F' fr , - 1, '14 A pr: --- I E K hx f-1 -. ' K.1a4masLms:Af'1'ee1:axmmf . , -. , .,. .. ,?5y1f:.. X . ?:.,"ic2' BERNARD Pw,'NI.1.FR AU EPS11..ON 131-11 was founc1ec1 at Co1um13ia University on Qctober 19, 1910. The Gamma Chapter was FOUHCIGC1 at N. Y. U. in 1912. There are twenty-eight ctuapters that are active t1'1I'OUg11OLl1 the United States and Canada. Some of the permanent members are: Judge Abraham Pinanski of Bostong ttme 1ate Nathan Strauss, p1'1i1ant11ropistg Sri Barnett Sure, co-discoverer of vitamin Eg Dean XIXZOFIUSCF, c1ean of Fordham Law c 001. 261 ' '1 '. , .X .aiv-army s., .s . , 1---'fs 1- .i 1 ..1 , . f-T. ww 2 1 Y 1 -"f.- . -fi'5"'fm--- . L ' 'T' -1 . -1 . 1-,. 1 ,. - ri i. 1 I 11. -tt -- Qi 1 1 W 3 1 "..- .J 'Ali WY E -Q., GILBERT GOODGION LOLHS HICKS , 1 XVILLIAM FRIEDMAN INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL HE tnterfraternity Council was organized on the Heights Campus in 1929 anct is now composed of fourteen memher fraternities - Atpha Phi Delta, Beta Kappa Nu, Delta Phi, Delta Chi, Pi Lamhcta Phi, Tau Epsilon Phi, Psi Upsiton, Zeta Beta Tau, Phi Gamma Delta, Kappa Sigma, Phi Kappa Tau, Phi Sigma Delta, Zeta Psi and Delta Upsiton. The Council was header! hy Vxfiitiarn Friedman, Phi Sigma Delta. The Vice- Presictent was Louis A. Hicks, Zeta Psi and Secretary-Treasurer, Githert F. Gooctgion, Phi Kappa Tau. The main event of the year was the annual tntertraliernity Council Ptectge Dinner, which this year was hetct, for the lCiI'S't time, on the campus, at the Lawrence House. The assemhtect ptectgees and hrothers were treated to an entertaining program which featurect speeches hy Dean Berg, Dr. Gasparitch, Professor Pride, Wtr. Lange anct hir. Howell. The Co-Chairmen were Paul C. Papageorge, Phi Kappa Tau, and M. Herhert Wiesenherg, Zeta Beta Tau. ' Among the activities of the Council were the promotion of a scholarship ptan tor fraternity men, the ctonation of a cup for the house with the greatest rise in scholarship during the preceding year, an active effort to present the fraternities to the student hody. anct representation at the annual Intertraternity Conference at hotel Commodore over Thanksgiving vacation. 262 I ,Q,,,,s I., T! V X Irggyggfi gg , 1 , U gi, 1, fg -' 5 f A ,. - H X +P .ft ,553 i ,Jw ' 1 : 1 1 L 'Y' W 5 E . ',, , X. M. ., , I , . .. . Q F W X 'W - ' ? 5 ' " i A fi 'I 4'E?Zff,l.f J-.rM'g'iiw .2 .QW L' ' f f 5 V: . 4 1' - ' I ft. ' - -QQ: MF H' ' -fries -. .'1. -. x :-L"--11 Liza- F YV 5 I 1131? aw ,a fQ..3:2...? "LEE 1, J i f gf -11 ig' I 1i . J 'f't'Y .. jz 'M4?fW".s, f 'W' "QA H nk if 1, 3,-.,,,,,,.,.2."fj33?ff-a5. , , 1 -N f ' ' ' -:i V " FEATURES SENIOR BALL HE Senior Batt turned out to he a Fitting climax to the sociat activities of the ctass ot 1938. Vvfiih the cotonnactes of the Essex House as a hactqgrounct and George Halt and his orchestra supptying the music the mem- hers of the class and their guests ctancect far into the night. However there was a certain sadness ahout the whote attair tor the three hunftrect seniors who were there. For them it meant the enct ot their tour years at the university. tt meant that this woutct he the fast time att the men xvoutct he together as memhers ot the stuctent hocty. The faculty anct administration turned out en masse. Dean and Mrs. Berg, Dean and ixirs. Savitte, were the guests of honor. The co-chairmen ot the attair were Ahra- ham Tannenhaum ASS, anct htaurice Levien ESS. THE JUNIQR PRQMENADE HE Hotet St. hioritz-on-the-Partc was the scene of this year's Junior Prom. txtany couptes ctancect to the music of Enoch Lights orchestra, which is very poputar with smart cottegians. The Junior Prom is consicterect to he the main sociat event ot the tour years ot oness unctergraduate lite, anct it therefore over- shaclows att other events on the campus. As is the custom at every Junior Prom, some souvenir is given to the girls who at- tenct the attair. This year the Prom Commit- tee chose as a gift a heautitut locket and chain, to he kept as a remincter of the prom. The Guest ot Honor was Donatct Cook, the Broactway star, who appearect this season in Hvxfine of Choicef, He accompanied Glenda Farrett, the movie star. The co-chair- men ot the affair were Vxfm. Davictson and Kenneth Barnhitt. Stephen Fischer was in charge ot' puhticity. SQPHOMORE SAUNTER OR the ltrst time in the history of thc Heights, a sophomore class went outsitlc the city limits to holcl their annual formal when the class of l-10 helcl their Sophomore Saunter at the Meaclowhrocilq, on the Pomp- ton Turnpilce, in New Jersey, Friclay evening, March nth. Over one hunclretl couples tlancecl to the tunes of Franlc Dailey ancl his "Stop aml Gow orchestra, and the Columlyia Broadcast- ing System transmittecl the program over the air. The Sophomores ancl their guests enjoyecl an atmosphere clitlferent from the orclinary night clula lay atlencling an alfair helcl at a country clula. A spirit, which might easily he laclting at a formal helcl in a city hotel, was noticealale, with a frienclly atmosphere exist- ing throughout the evening. The chairmen for the Sophomore Saunter were: .Tustin Golenhoclc ancl Jerome Govern. They accompaniefl the prom girls who were Misses Sonya .lusltowitz ancl Tvlargarite Wein- herg. MILITARY BALL HE annual Military Ball, which tools place this year in the Grand Ballroom of the Hotel Commodore, on April 22, proved to he one of the most hrilliant social affairs of the season. The affair was helcl uncler the auspices ol: the Heights Chapter of the Scahlaarcl and Blade, the national honorary Military Science Grganization. The aprlair was ahly supportecl hy many stuclents talaing the elementary and aclvancect courses in Military Sciences, ancl also lay numerous students not enrollect in the courses. The celehrants clancecl to the music of George Hall ancl his orchestra, whose ex- cellent arrangements of latest songs were a great source of entertainment. The hallroom was clecoratecl for the ahfair with many banners representing both the University ancl Scahharcl and Blacle. The extraorclinary success of the Ball can he atlirilautecl to the worlc of the chairmen, .laclq Friton ancl Gus Nlarchetti. SENIQR PARTIES HE two most successful informal social functions of the year were unclouhteclly the two Senior Parties which were sponsorecl luv the class ot ,58. Eclclie Henlqler and his ten-piece orchestra, a favorite at collegiate clances, furnishecl the music in the gym at lioth Parties. The first attair. which was helcl on Novem- lner 1. election eve. featured olrl tashionecl movies ancl a community sing in the chapel. ln the gym, the varsity fencing squacl, holclers ot the National lntercollegiate Champion- ship. gave a sterling exhihition ol: the feather anal balloon fencing. The seconcl senior party tool: place on Felnruary QI, the eve of Vxfashingtonls hirth- clay. "Little Vxfillien Lieherson, funny-man of the class of ,57, as master of ceremonies, heaclecl a Fine Amateur Show in which sev- eral Heights sturlents clisplayect their talents actmirahly. TECHNIFROLIC NAUGURATING a new policy, the Tech- nifrolic, the outstancting social function for engineers, enlisted the support of artsmen to concluct a formal of outstancling success Sat- urclay evening, Decemher 18 in the Crystal Ballroom of the Hotel Great Northern. The clance is the only all-engineering tor- mal of the year, ancl is sponsorecl hy the Unclergracluate Engineering Council, with the cooperation of the engineering societies of laoth clay ancl evening schools. It is out- stancling to note that many artsmen, who have not in the past three years given much support to the Technitrolic, were present. This yearys Technifrolic, the ninth annual in the history of the school, honorecl Miss ,lanet lXlacNair. Dean Bryansy secretary by awarcling her the title of Hthe engineers mothern in recognition of her years of service in the engineering college. Among the guGStS ot honor were Deans Berg ancl Saville, and many memliers of the faculty. THE FRESHMAN HOP N htarch 18, the ctass ot 19-11 hetd its annuat Freshman Hop. Departing from tradition, this year's Freshman ctass hetd an in1orma1 dance. tn an oh:icia1 vote of the whote c1ass, it was decided to forego the usuat format Freshman Hop in favor of this new type of attair. The site of this year,s attair was the cottege room of the Hotet Edison, in the heart of Times Square. ALL-UNIVERSITY FROLIC HE A11-University Frotic tru1y tived up to its name this year. Students from att divi- sions of New vi or14 University attended what proved to he a great success. 1t was hetd in New Yortfs most glamorous hotet, the Watdort-Astoria, and in the most famous room, the Grand Ba11room. The 11oor was targe and the accomodations exce11ent. To the strains of Jimmy Dorsey,s music, the couptes danced tar into the night. One of the features of the affair was the crowning of the queen, Francis Langford. The famous singer entertained the guests with a few ot her heautitut numhers and received a gift from the committee. SOCIAL AFFAIRS HE year 1957-1958 proved to he one of the most successtut in the history ot the schoot, for socia1 activities on the Heights. Beside the regutar format affairs which were hetd hy the various ctasses, the sociat catendar inctuded many intormat dances. These intormats which were hetd at the Gymnasium and at the Lawrence House turned out to he hoth enjoyahte and successfut. The hightight ot the year, as usuat, was the Junior Promenade. which was he1d at the Hotet St. Moritz. Many of the c1ass of '59 attended as did other memhers ot the school. Miss Gtenda Farrett, the we11-Icnown Hottywood comediene, and Donatd Cootc, the Broadway star, were the guests of honor. Not to he forgotten were the successfut ahfairs run hy the c1ass of ,110 and the ctass of Y41. The Soph Saunter, tor the First time in the history of the school was hetd outside of New York. Topping the format year was the Senior Batt hetd at the Essex House. An inauguration which proved poputar was the starting of hi-monthty c1ass dances hetd at Lawrence House. For these dances, the young men had the privitege of enjoying the company of the co-eds of the various schoots. As usua1 the year a1so inctuded the various informat dances which were hetd at the Gym. With the music supptied hy welt-known hands, and entertainment given hy top- notch performers, enjoyahte evenings were had hy att those who attended. The ctasses on the campus were not the on1y organizations to run dances, for a1so tisted on the catender were ctuh dances. Such dances hetd hy Bristot Pre-Med, Society, the ttatica Ctuh, the Sociotogy Ctuh and most a11 the other ctuhs on the campus, were 2-111 inctuded as part ot the schoot sociat activities. With the strains of the music of the dances sti11 in our ears, we may truty say that this year has heen the 1'oremost year for social functions on the Heights Campus. Q67 THE SENICDR DUCKING CQMMITTEE HE annuat pitgrimage to the fountain ot tqnowtectge toot: ptace this year as 500 Fresh- men, attirect in pajamas, wendect their way from the tihrary steps, across the campus. down University Avenue to Forctharn Roact, anct ctown Sectgxvictq Avenue to the fountain. The cotortut ceremony was ptannect anct executed hy the Senior Ductqing Committee. Uncter the teactership ot Herbert Bungarct, the upperctassmen, armect with pactcttes and carrying torches guictect the Freshmen on their tretc, anct tootc charge of things at the fountain. A targe crowd, attractect hy the noise anct the Weird tights. witnessed the events at the fountain. There the Freshmen were imrnersect in the fountain hy the att too witting seniors. The Freshmen then hecame true sons ot New York University. Many ot the Freshmen hrought atong their girt friends to witness the ceremony, anct after the ctuctcing the couptes Went to the Lawrence House Where the Doughnut and Cottee Committee ptayecl host to the shivering Frosh. A ctance sponsored hy the Stuctent Council rouncted out a pleasant evening. f P ,I ,ff 3- 9 Mr Hg, , I , ,icfiffiff -fm f , , .A--A -,-..,.r Xi f, 1 f 4 v - ' W' ff" - ET f f Q, , 'M ' ' ff A -' ,H -- v . .jf Q i , H .W Mei. M ' , 4, W ,, . . . 39,5 i .1...g-r-eff, Emi, ,VI A " 5 p YL . Hi 5 V 6,53 5 2, ' ' ' f , . , . , J , .gn - Z , , ' zgfvqg nf 4 :-YY., ,L 4, -1 in 7' -. V -3 H Q , , gf, e :H ,, ' - , '-K, -Q, V. - L 44 gg J H ?9"' .V - if ., Q l kg F . V., , ,-W.. A iff'-.V nY., .f,. ,, al. fl fx U A A, ' y.,.:,.3,w., eng-,Z 4 -.g . M .- v,... ' rv M- - f, 'GY ' Y 2- - it - -2 ,m r My ..f-,' .P , - I .V - H. : . ,e.f:1. V -. . - Z Q. T . Q --J u, ' '-12554 " ' ffl ' N V-f-:2.:,w,. 'X if' W' ff .,' if 1-fufpireww '-- " f'gi sHf.'-'Bw ' L ' -1- . ff swat. iwfgeggsz . .:a,,,q.,pwg.:v.f, .fi .fvaw f,,v,.,aage,- , , , . V rw . jr 11 " . .J -' :..f...W -maa- - ' ' " ur s , H1151 ?',5,, f ,W -.,g- ,M w w 217- "-'v' . '1"sy3e.U1pz .f 4. :':,, 2 M . -' ' MALL COMMITTEE ORMED to enforce tlxe tradition that only upper classrnen may cross the Mall, the .lunior Mall Committee has become tleie impartial guarclian ot tlwe interests of tlre ttiirrl year class against luotlw lrcslrimen ancl soplwomores. The real worlr ot tlwe group is mainly eoneentratecl cluring tlie period of froslu-sopli Hgluts wtren it functions as a continuous guarcl to lceep memlvers ot luottr lower classes from crossing tlwe Mall. Under tlue elwairmansluip ol' Allen lioplin tlnis yearys group attempteel ttie formulation of a cocle of conduct lor the lower classes. Discussion among several memluers of tlne class of '41 as to tlue aclvisalnility ol rushing llwe Mall. lecl to tlwe tlnreat tluat tlwe committee would alnanflon its traclitional attiturle ot impartiality. No sucti attempt was macle in the encl. The class of 340 was not as lortunate since they macle several attempts to ruslu tlwe Mall, taut tlwey were cleteatecl witlu clisasterous results. Truly this year ttie Wlall was reservecl only for upper classmen clue to tlwe etlieiency ot tlwis committee. ln many instances, to attaclr tlwe Mall meant a clousing in a pool ot water, usecl for suclm purposes, or a paclelling tliat was not easily forgotten. ...urff + . MQWKQ' ' is f X-wsqtf-'ief'tfP?f,,..1 42- A -V ' ..-es 269 'x 324110 ...B- - T il SKULL AND BQNES HE Sophomore hazing society has as its purpose the uphotcting ot Sophomore superior- ity over the Freshmen. The society was tounctect a few years ago, and in a short space of time has joinect the rantcs ot the other tractitionatty famous societies on the campus. The stanctarct of Stxutt anct Bones is gractuatty heing raisect hy raising the entrance re- quirements, anct matting the initiation ceremony more ctithcutt. Stqutt and Bones arranges the Sophomore part in the annuat chapel rush, anct the organization is the mainstay of the Sophomore class on Hmoonttess Thursctayf, But there is another sicte to Stqutt anct Pnones. Untitqe the Matt anct Dueling Committees, Stcutt anct Bones ptans to function att year rounct. A series of ctances and other sociat functions were planned for this year hy John Roherts, presiotent of the society, and the organization co- operatect with other societies for the wettare ot the entire stuctent hocty. Stcutt anct Bones is a ctirect outgrowth ot the society of the same name at Yate. A movement has heen macte towarcts the estahtishment of the society on a national hasis. This would serve to increase the importance anct prestige of the society. Q70 'ff,f.,. -- x-'S--,,4uiMmg.,,A 'K N" P i. fl' -s .i,gf? gy ' . . -V zdffkgl,-Haas X LV , . -' V I 41573.-vfvf, , ...,s. T12 Y b H 7 4 Y' ' '4 L L ' i 4. , ' ' - ffl, , X ,Y , 4 V -,qv x 4 I ., J 'TNQ V F-v 4 , Vg ls., way ,yu . 3 . L!! L. 1 ,A ' .AQ 4-ff-3-fer-1-w..1.,,g?,L Kyiv? S q v W A , 1 ' 7452- ' " '-' ' :yt 1. 'fi 4 pi -4 'ij , gf. k A . 14 V4 .V :..,u, pn . mn V- ' ' 6 'A -S - f , in iw, 91" ,R . .. ff . 1 -L9 f " sf . ' t W 1 , 'f X ,i M .:. ,, , " ff f 1 .f at f as f 1 y 4 Pe W" t me" 1-' 'ku .mf f.. M' "mf 'M W J' fa 32422, by if f 7 .sux W22' H K " L ' vm YV, gg j is f 5 5 1 .V ' A, , if i '- " 5 ,,., ,.,.- V . 5 . ,,,, f,,pgZ, '- "i ' . . QQ " f- - 'W . I f H E 3 E .r f ff ' f - ' W - - " +A" "" - ' -L ff --'ri' " A HISTORY OF THE HEIGHTS EXV YORK UNlX'lfRSl'l4Y l'lElCl'lTg, Heiglwts Division of N. Y. U., owes iis founding, namely to Dr. Henry Nitcliell txlaccraclqen, wlwo as Vice-Chancellor and later sixtli Clwancellor ol New Yorlc University, advised and aided in tlae estalnlisla- ment of a University College huptownf' Mlilne University College!! said Dr. lVlacCracl4en, 'planted in some easily accessilnle neiglalaorlwood, would in a slsrort time fullill more nearly tlae American idea ol a college tlwan one in a lpusiness locality ever canf' When Dr. .lX'l3CCf8FLCI'l spolqe ol Uuptownfy lie liad in mind tlie district around Forty-second Street. wlwicli was in tlae late nineties on tlwe outsliirts of time city. But a luetter site was found on Fordlaam Heiglwts. On August tt, i89'!, tlae Council of New Yorlc University laouglat a tract of land ol' I8 acres, at tlne price ot 3508000 from tlae Mali estate on tlue Heiglnts. ln succeeding years tlae University purclrased otlrer parcels of land as they came upon tlie marlcet, until tlae present campus was completed. ln return for assistance in purclwasing tlne land ot Loring Andrews, and in gratitude for otlier sulnscriptions from tlae Olaio Society, a group that wanted in some way to repay New Yorlq City for erecting a tomln tor President Grant, a native Olaioan, tlae University Council, in February, 1804, ordered tlsrat tlne atlaletic Held on tlae new campus sliould lye ltnown as Qluio ljielcl. Next came tlae prolilem of erecting tlae lnuilclings on tlie campus. The lilnrary, tlae Hall of Fame, and Gould Hall were all erected tlarouglr tlae generous donations ot Helen Gould, now Mrs. Finley Sllepard. in memory of lwer tatlaer, .lay Gould. Pliilosoplay Hall is tlne gift of Mrs. Jolan. Stewart Kennedy in memory of laer tatlaer, Cornelius Batter, wluo served as a memlner of tlae Council in tlae early days of tlie University. Language Hall. tlue Hrst lecture laall to lne lnuilt to replace some wooden lvuildings wlwicla were used temporarily, was lauilt tlwrougli tlie etliorts of memlaers ot tlue faculty. lflavemeyer Hall 271 , fsiif'--5 -:SV .affeef-4---. xl! MTX ,,.! .Q if I .Mi-r . .l. XX 3 .- lp-V-in. . ,V Q , ,gu y 2,3 4, 1 ff.. . 'billamtihaaribs V .L , . " ..... ' . ' .I Y' 1' i..f , I 'if , , . -'-- -- if 1 bf, - -., ,A 1, r- fd' .l',-, is namecl in honor ot Dr. Vxfilliam Havemeyer ot the Chemistry Department, who Worl4ecl zealously to gather tuncls lor the huilcling ancl afterwarcls paicl olt all the clehts incurred with his own money. The Nichols Chemistry huilcling. completecl in 1927, is the gift of Dr. William I-I. Nichols of the class of ,7O. The huilcling contains complete lecture ancl laboratory equipment. A moclern gymnasium was huilt in 195l, with plans made for future extensions, anrl the huilcling of a swimming pool. Other lauilclings such as South Hall, Brown House. lVlacCraclQen Hall, anal Lawrence House, are former private homes acquirecl hy the University through purchase or clonation. ln 1894, Dr. lxlaccraclxen aclvisecl that the Engineering School he moved to the Heights. Helen Goulet again came to the rescue, ancl with a gift of SQOODOO aiclecl in the estalnlishment of the new school. . Green Laboratory, Sage Builcling, Guggenheim School of Aeronautics, ancl Bliss Builcling were all constructecl from tuncls ol generous clonors who realizeol the importance of this College ancl the necessity for its growth. The Engineering College owes much to Professor Bliss who, from the time he joinecl the faculty in 1896, clevelopecl new lnranches of engineering on the campus. After the famous Linclhergh flight in 1027, aeronautics hecame the most popular ot the engineer- ing courses given at the Heights. The latest accomplishment in the Fielcl of engineering on the campus has heen the erection of a sanitation huilcling. which is laeing operatecl jointly hy New Yorlc University and the City of New Yorlq. Perhaps the most famous part of the Heights campus is the Hall of Fame. This nationally famous colonnacle was erectecl to commemorate the names of great American men anal women. Elections to the Hall ot' Fame are helcl every Five years, ancl those Americans chosen are honorecl posthumously hy having their laust placecl in the Hall ot Fame. 272 ..., 4 is'.i' ' . - , A vf"'- owmmramm nw rf i f .. . iff t - i ii zfgtiiffi Q 'frat - A. , t ' . I ANAV. V, ,. vi V ff' 1.151521 , in . . .i N . .yy if ,,- A t. Q, .af- fuaiwams 5,5-5-:QW ,Wk . ,.,f.m,. f,., ie. ,JM ., ..-. . '- , ' A- -A - ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Though the VIOLET is targety the proctuct of the efforts of the statt, it coutct harctty have maturect without the sptenctift coo aeration JF t 1 4 cer ain men and women not ctirectty connected with it. tt is to these peopte that the ectitors wish to pay tribute before ctosing. To Mr. Richard Matlery, for his sound actvice at att times. To Prof. Ectwarct Gasparilich, for heing a reat uctoct, whenever we hact finan- cial rits. To Prof. Jesse Carpenter, tor his excettent pictures. To Prof. T. F. stones, tor his information on the history ot the Heights. To Arthur Smithtine, for taking rnost of the pictures in the hook. To Bolo Kelty, for heing a great printer anct a great armani, to cleat With. To Frect Fuchs, for heing a toterant sout anct a suffering man. To Robert txitunttett and Mr. Hitt For handling our engravings so wett. To Jess Gotctsmith, tor heing an otct ectitor with new icteas. To Ntiss Beatrice Turtc, for her cooperation as heact of the college ctivision of Arthur Studios. To P. A. Porteous, tor feeding the hungry stomachs of the statt. To tvtrs. Porteous, for her motherty care ot the editors. To HGusH, tor heing a reat pat to the hoys. To the General Photographic Service, for the picture on the cover. To these, We the editors give our heartfelt thanks anct sincere appreciation. MR, MALLERY "DOC" GifXSPARtTSCt't ROBT. KELLY ., mfs- L- . 4 f 1 ,T , ,f gf? L ,Q , Q75 .14-1-"X -'K - '- 'A MQW'-V-f--fr--..-arm-.g .iw Q.:--:A F f-,,L,4.f.zr.v:L.2Qz:L:f.-asf.,-ml.-, ,. , V, , IDVERTVHSIINQ -f ' --Q fy.f,,.- ,- - --54.-L-.-'.u:z.:z-.:,1-.Hv.f:.ff IjI1one ITOrctI1am 4-T59-I SCI-I'ILLINGINfIANN,S CONFECTIONERY AND IJUNCI-IEONETTE SpeciaI Attention Given to Orders From FRATERNITY IEIOUSES and N. Y. U. STUDENTS 36 XIVIEST BURNSIDE AX'ENI,IE BYOUX, VIAIHC Une IIavors. smootI1 texture ancI pure ingrefIienIs in I IORTONS ICE CREAM have macIe it Americas favorite since 1851. GEORGE SCHAEFER 8 SONS, Inc. 'HUDSON VALLEY FARM PRODUCTS" Ixfeufs - Poultry - Butler - Eggs SERVICING SCHOOLS, CAMPS and INSTITUTIONS OUR SPECIALTY 2291 IQTH AVENUE NEW YORK CITY Quer Fifty-tfzree Years of Successful Service NIINNER 5 BARNETT, Inc. 80 .IOHN STREET NEVV YORK cirY Manager IVIetropoIitan Department Zurich GeneraI Accidents ancI IsiaIaiIity Insurance Company of Zurich, SWitzerIancI fIII forms of casriufily insurance 77 ARTHUR STUDICDS, INC. OFFICIAL PHGTOGRAPHER for the IQBS HEIGHTS VIQLET Exclusively equipped to do Year Book photography 151 WEST 42nd STREET NEW YORK C 278 Th C NEXV YORK UNIVERSITY PRESS BOOK STORES UNIVERSITY HEIGHTS, N. Y. Sl XVASHINCTON PLACE. N. Y. 90 TRINITY PLACE, N. Y. Operated by the University for your convenience Restaurant de Ia Paix WitIi its CeIeInratecI Orchestras and Entertainment For Dinner and Supper Dancing Encfianiing Music. . . Delicious Food . . . Exciling Almospfierc Always AT The ST. IVIORITZ On-The-Park 50 CENTRAL PARK SOUTH PersonaI Direction: S. Gregory TayIor Hpopu Wiener Vvislies you ifie best of luck AIways remember Iiim for Iiis good food University Sanitary I'IanCI Laundry Near University Avo., cor. Nvest l8lst Street TeIepI1onc RAymoncI 9-0265 TeIcpI1one TRemont 2-8765 JEROME PALACE American and Cfiincsc Rcsiauranl 2001 JEROIVIE AVENUE Near Burnside Avenue Subway 27 9 TIIG NEXV YQRK UNIVERSITY COMIYIGNS Cczfeiericz Service - UNIVERSITY I-IEIGHTS and XVASI-IINGTON SQUARE NEW YORK OIJCIOLCII Inv LIIC LIINVOY ' IiOI' VOUI' AIXIQTI-TER BUCK by Kelly Qur organizarion . . . publishing 62 yearbooks This Season ...are specialisrs, a+ your service from biolcling Io c:omIoIeJrion, helping you selecjr malrerials, suggesring ROBERT W. KELLY plans Io III your specificarions and definijrely making your parJr easier in The buiIding of your monumenf Io memory. PUBLISHING CORPORATION, 309 LAFAYETTE STREET. N. Y. 280 CoTTege and scT1ooT annuaTs bear added distinction when printed with STERLING photo-engravings. - The plales in lTiis book are STERLING engravi 1 S - STERLING ENGRAVING CGMPANY 304 EAST FQRTY-FIFTH STREET, NEXN YORK, N. Y. MUrray T'TiTT 4,0715 to 0726 281 Acilqnfmxvlcclgmcnls ..... Aclam Smitlu Society ....,,... Aclvertisements ....,.........,....,.,.., Aeronautics, Department ot ........ Alplia l3l'1i Delta .4,.....,.,,.........,.. Alpha Pi .A.i..,..4....,..,,,i..,..,......,...,..,,,. American lnstitute of Clwemical Engineers ...4.........,...............,....,... American lnstitute of Electrical Engineers ,.....,..... ...,......... ,......,.... . American Society of Civil Engineers American Society of lVleclianical Engineers .......... ,............. ..,..., ,,.... . American Society of lxfleclianical Engineers fAerol ..,.,,.................... American Society Testing Materials.. American Stuclent Union.. Atliletics .........................,.. Band ri,..,............ Baseloall Team ..... Baslcettaall Team ...... Beta Kappa Nu ,,..,...... Beta laamlacla Sigma ,...,,,.... Biology, Department of ....., Bristol Pre-lvleclical Society .,.............. Cliemical Engineering, Division o Cliemistry, Department of., Clwess ancl Clieclrer Club .,.. Civil Engineering ....,..,..,.. Classical Society ..........,..... Classics, Department of .... F .... College Commerce, Department of ,... Council of New Yorlc University. ..... . Critical Review .......,...............,....... Cross-Country Team .....4. ..... Deloating Team ........,... ..... Delta Clui .......,,, ,,,,, Delta Plli .,.....,. ..... Delta Upsilon .....,................ ..... Duclcing Committee ........., Economics, Departm ent of ...,,... ..... lN 273 203 275 34 25-1 202 208 21 9 209 219 210 220 224 1 15 200 128 124 258 204 20 21 1 34 21 230 35 226 32 25 9 1.83 142 192 242 236 240 268 25 'I 7 DEX Electrical Engineering, Division ol? .... Engineering Aeronautical, Department of .....,,....................... Engineering Drawing, Division of ..,... Englisli, Department ot ..,... Eta Kappa Nu .................... Eucleian Literary Society.. Faculty .............................. lielgruary-Septemlaer Class Fencing Team .................... Fine Arts, Department ot., Footlaall Team .................. l7ranl4woocl Vx-'lilliams Cluln Fraternities ........................ ljrenclu, Department of ...... Frencln Society ........,.....,.. Fresliman Pvaselnall Team . ljresluman Baslretloall Team Frestiman Class ...........,.... Fresliman Fencing Team ljreslaman Footlaall Team .... Fresliman Promenacle ..,...,. ljreslwman Tracl: .,........,.... ljreslaman Cross-Country .. Gavel Club ..................... General Societies ..,.........,. Geology, Department ol' .... German, Department of .... German Society ................ Glee Club .......... Golf Team .... ............ Green Room ............,..... l'lall of Fame Players ........ Hamilton Commerce Society ........,.. l'leigl1ts, History of ........... ......... ..... l'leigl1ts News ................ l-till Historical Society ....... l-listory, Department of ........, ..... Honor Societies ................ ............... lnclustrial Engineering, Department of .....,...,,..,,................................... 36 3-1 37 22 221 226 7 113 136 29 117 223 233 26 212 147 146 112 148 144 267 148 149 221 191 32 26 213 194 139 198 196 214 271 176 205 27 157 37 Institute of Aeronauticat Science ,,,.,. tntertratemity Council ..................,,.. Intramurals .........,,,,...,, ...... Iota A1p11a .....,... ...... ttaliea Society .,..........,,.......... ...... John Ntarstiatt Law Society ....... ..,... Junigr C1355 ,.,.........,........,.., ...... Junior Promenade ..,,,. ...... Kappa Sigma ....,,,.... ...... Lacrosse Team ..,... ...... Lawrence House ..... ,..... La Societe Francais .... ...,.. Literary Union ..i.,.... ,,.. . Little Symphony ..,,.....,.,.,,...., ,..... Matt Committee .,.....,..,.4..,,...... ...... txdattiematics, Department of .,..,.....,. 1V1ec11anica1 Engineering, Department of ........ii........,.,i......i..,...,.,..,...,.i.,,,. txftedtey ...,.,,.....,... ...... . .. Menorah Society .,.,. ...,,,.. . Mititary Ba11 .......,............,...,,.......... 215 262 150 161 228 216 107 264 248 145 168 212 225 199 269 25 57 180 225 265 1V1i1itary Science, Department of ........ 50 Morse Mat11ematica1 and Physics Society ..........,.,,.....,.......,....,....... Music, Department of ..,.., ...... Newman Club . ,,.,...,.... .. .,.. .. Patisades Handbook ..... ,..... Perstare et Praestare ....... --,-.- Phi Beta Kappa ........,. ...,.. Phi Gamma Delta ...... .....- P111 Kappa Tau .,...,,.,..,........ ,,.,.. Phi Lambda Upsi1on ,........,.,.,. ...... Ptiitosoptiy, Department of ..,,,..4 Pnitosoptay C1u19 .,.,.,,.,............ ,..... Phi Sigma Delta ........,,...,..,..,....,..,,... Photography Club ....,.....,..,..,.......,.., Ptiysicad Training, Department of .,,. Physics, Department of ,.........,......... Pi Lambda Ptii ..,..,.,..,,.,..,.........,,,... Potitical Science, Department of .,.... Psi Chi .,,.......,,........,.......,.........i..,.. Psi Upsi1on ............,...,.......,,.,..,.,,.... Psyc1'io1ogy, Department of ,.4..... ,.. Putalications .....,. ,....,,.,....... ..,.., 229 28 228 188 158 159 244 256 206 51 222 252 227 50 24 246 27 207 254 28 171 285 Public Speaking, Department of ........ QL1E1d1'al'1gIG ........,,.,..........,,.............. Quaigti .,..,..,....,.,........ .,..... Radio Club .,,..........ii....... ..,.... Ritte and Pistot Club ......,. ,.,.... Ritte Team .................. ....... SCEIBIDHFCI Bfld Btade ....,, .4..... Senior B311 .....,,....... ....... Senior Ctass ...... Senior Party ......,... ,...... Stcult and Bones .,.....,,,.... .,..... Socia1 Affairs .......................,.......,,. Society of Automotive Engineers ...... Society of 1ndustria1 Engineers ...,.... Society for Testing Materia1s .,,...,..... Sociotogy, Department of .....,.,. Socio1ogy Ctub ............,...... ..,.,.. Sophomore Ctass ..... -.-,-,, Sophomore Saunter ..............,. ..4,... Stevens Geo1ogica1 Society .....,4......... Student-Facutty Retations Committee .....,.............. ....,,. Student Counci1 .......... ....... Student Government ....,.,,..........,..... Student Christian Association ........ Survey C1u1a ..,..... ,... 4 , ...,..,,.,..,.....,,. , Swimming Team Tau Beta Pi .....,..,,.. --,---- Tau Epsi1on Phi ,...,. ...-.-- Tau Kappa Alpha ,..., .--, Tect1nifro1ic ,.........,, ....,., Tennis Team ....... ....... ,..,.., Track Team ........,....,,...,......,,,,,........ Undergraduate Engineering Council.. Undergraduate Library Committee ,.,. Undergraduate Sctwotarstiip Committee .......,......,..,...,...,.,...,.... University Board of Athletic Contro1 ....i...,,....,....,.....,..,,.......... Vio1et ...,.i,..., ------ Zeta Beta Tau ,.., --"--- Zeta Psi .....,,. -r----r 29 184 250 227 251 141 217 264 41 266 270 265 220 218 252 51 224 1 10 265 229 170 165 165 225 251 140 160 260 162 266 158 152 167 222 166 155 172 250 258 ,409-K A VNUQ, f-'XS' DEIZSTAIIE ET PIIIESTAR M DCCC X XXI 52525. Q Q' MT 1' r ' - . ff 'cw' 1 3' N Q :I in -SL? F.. L-1: n 5 1 ' ' ' , 'I P ' nu: - XLfT1T g- X . -Y T Y . mf . ll ,, . . ,4 dui- gn:-nu 7 ., 'C I Ivy- -N , Q JA? .gm -2: '41 M ...LL . 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New York University - Violet Yearbook (New York, NY) online yearbook collection, 1933 Edition, Page 1

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