New York University - Violet Yearbook (New York, NY)

 - Class of 1895

Page 1 of 258

 

New York University - Violet Yearbook (New York, NY) online yearbook collection, 1895 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1895 Edition, New York University - Violet Yearbook (New York, NY) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1895 Edition, New York University - Violet Yearbook (New York, NY) online yearbook collection
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Text from Pages 1 - 258 of the 1895 volume:

Hurrah for the Gloinimetery Achieved by the Peeplel CLEVELAN Ginnie I-IILLQ HURRAH FOR THE GRANDEST SUCCESS EVER ATTAINED , BY ANY LAND COMPANY! And these things have been accomplished during the past six months, notwithstanding the Hnancial depression ofthe country. This success has been accomplished only by the most liberal dealings ever known in the development of suburban ' NOTE TI-IIS. A Three new sections, aggregating 4,000 lots now to be thrown open, and at such prices and on such terms that even the Government in its great generosity to help the homeless people and gladden the hearts of the multitude by throwing open the Cheiokee lands, will he outstripped in all its endeavors, for here is this property which we offer, right at your door, ac- cessible to your business, and the most beautiful the sun has ever shone upon. HERE ARE QUR OFFERS. Nearly 3roo,ooo new capital toibe loaned to people wishing to build. Make your application now and choose your lots. WE WILL GIVE LUTS ABSIILUTELY FR E E TU ALL WHO WISH T0 BUILII, A year's pass over the railroad free, and advance you two-thirds to three-fourths the money necessary to build. 385 LOTS, ONLY S40 ALOT. The highest price only 365, with 325 extra for corners, 9,10 cash on each lot, and 555 a month, with IO per cent discount on all sumsiof S25 and upward. Streets and sidewalks are being macadamized. Be sure and tuck a SLO bill in your pocket for deposit in case you are pleased. Train Erie Station, 1:20 p. m. SUNDRY TRHIN, 1:30 P.Y3lY. ' N0 NORTGAGE, NO NOTES, NO INTEREST OR TAXES, Except E51 street assessment and 22 cents real estate assessment until the city is incorporated. But the same liberal terms and thersaine liberal methods will be pursued as in the past. No man ever pushed for his payments in time of sickness or need. lliis is the golden opportunity if you wish to get a home or an investment. . Send for full particulars. Plans ready. Also full information of sale. Send us your name and we will send you tick- ets to view the property. property. .I.MeGlNNlS, E.s'rnRN, luunagers. Broadway. I I I I A 1. P I I I ESTABLISHED 1818. -'BROOKS BROTHERS '- , fggff ggfggggygg up C 1 ,U Broadway, cor. 22d St., New York City. I I . I CLOTHING AND FURNISHINO GOODS, I FOR MEN AND BOYS, p READ V MADE and MADE TO MEASURE I I , I In the Department for Clothing to Order will be found, in addition to a full line of seasonable goods, all the year round weights in all qualities, with a wide range of price, thereby giving the fullest opportunity for selection. I I The particular care exercised by us in the cut, manufacture and novelty of pattern in our 1VIen'S Ready Made Stock is also extended to our Clothing for Boys and Children, and guaran- ! tees exclusive style and the best of value at no higher prices than are frequently asked for garments I, made in large wholesale lots and of inferior workmanship. ,I Our Furnishing Goods embrace a most complete assortment of articles for boys as well as men. ji Underwear, Hosiery, Gloves and Neckwear in original shapes and coloring, imported by us from A leading London manufacturers, also Lounging jackets, Wate1'p1'oof Coats, etc. II In this Department we have added a new line of Leather and Wicker Goods, including I Luncheon Baskets, Holster Cases, Sheffield Plate Flasks, Riding Wliips, Crops, Dog Canes and Golf I I Sticks. I Catalogue, Samples and Rules for Self-Measurement sent on application. I I iii I? Ill I D D4,2'ti2'1Hml'n D IMPROVED ' 1 . 1 N PIPINGS Ma nn gc 1.1 Hmlm 1 fi x !CEPJCES,E.YY' THA T Sflgllb' HIGH .STJIDNIJARD OF EXCELLENCE IfIfHfC'H IIAS A Cflllf VED A lU!:PUT.f1lf'!ON FOR 71115170 W5 Q THE 4 .STANDARD 4 Of: 4 THE. 4 WORLD. . i 1-L u.a. 1iF-'W-'H'f' 771555 1.v57mf,wA1x'7'5 HA V13 nfflflxf .S'UPPLl!:'1'J fn c'HU1cC1f155, CON. 'D gl' W " ' zf1f.v Ts, SISYEXCS OF CHAJQJTV, Jff5sfmw1MES, AND ' ' .SCIXOOIQS nm' W0 M19 0 1f 'zf1v. ii' " ' H ,D ' 3: :3i7::::::fI'if. 5? WAREROOMS: 1 Jl fl i 46' I Q , ' VY l'V ww !'N' MT rf - W flbason :mb 1bamIm wmgan anb Duane Glo. , Q 158 Fifth Ave., New York, near 20th sr. ' , if fy91 - I iv . -1 " HE xx riting is in sight of the oper- atoi and dictator, and no time is used in spacing on XJ The rooks Typewriter. The line spacing is automaticg rd spacing requires no time. Ribbon is instantly in- terchangeable. Type is readily cleaned. Weight I7 pounds. No one who has dic- tated to an operator on the " Brooks " will ever dictate to any other machine or to a stenogra- pher. Full Description on Next Page. C C. W. PECK, 'f,QZ.I?f 1 f S 3 .. THE Bkooks TYPE RITLL , ,J 1 . 1. ' ,, ,all 'ii i :s5i11 g' g 1 . f ' , 1 ' IVHJ, P,-'I l' NPA' !7.S'!:'!.!" LY ,fl V!:'!1'l' .S'll0!1'7' Tlrlfli 4 gisllllf fn ' :I 5-"I Y , , . . . I , ,- .V . . . v. . . 1. . 1.1 11s 1.,11,o1. .S,1I frltz 111.1 1t1,s. 1 V fi .ss1:5-'gr-if-1':7'f9f"' I V? wld 'Q This scientihc machine, after two years' practical test, is now ready for the . finu . 1 market and snbstantiates the claim or rossessmts A1.1, 'l'IlE n11cR1'1's or Ati, 'l'lll2 ' ?:. F' 154519 tb'l'lllCR Mixciilxics, has none of their evident defects and adds a large number 1 ' '. ' 3.1, 1rf7?"' ' , Wljjitfll ' 1 of new features of real merit. I " . A glance at the illustration will show how clearly visible is the writing while Q in process on the Brooks, without having to rise from the chair to make it ' Q .A T. 7' L' visible," as in other so-called l'visible" machines. As each line is finished if n,WlllyliH1,,11111 Tir- .I .4 H 1 . 1 . 1 . V 1 Y 1 - , - 1 . 1 ,W - it tlisappeais fl om the view of the 1nt1 udmg obseixei. The writing being visible to the one dictating, he can always supply the next sentence at the right moment thus enabling the op- erator to accomplish a greater amount of work. The word-spacing is accomplished when the final letter of each word is printed, effecting a saving of twenty per cent. of time. The line spacing is automatic. An automatic line lock prevents the accumulation of characters at the end of a lineg a release key, however, allows the printing of four additionalcharacters when desired. Only one size of machineis required as along carriage can be in- serted for special work. The type is always in view, accesible for cleaning, and waste Gber caused by eraser does not clog the type or fall on the ribbon. A pointer indicates the exact location of the character to be printed and the writing may be removed temporarily, without disturbing the page for doing other work. lt will write paper an inch wide and do perfect writing at the very bottom ofthe sheet, but the approach- ing end of the page is always visible, preventing the liability of writing too low. A touch of the finger instantly adjusts the length ofthe line for tab- ular work. lt is a pleasure to address postals and envelopes on this machine, and speed heretofore unattained is easily possible. The ribbon is on removable spools and colors may be changed quickly without soiling the fingers. lt is not necessary when writing with the shift key depressed, to release it to get the period, comma, etc., while they can also be used without depressing the shift key. The entire connection from the key to the type is metal and the blow is struck on a platen, whose foundation is the earth, thus mak- ing the machine the best manifolder ever invented. The tendency of other platen machines being to lift the platen under a heavy blow. lt is the most nearly noiseless, the most durable, the simplest, does the best work, and is the best machine made. The black and white Celluloid keys are the least tiring to the eyes of any made and the size and shape of the keys are the most conven- ient for the operator, while the keyboard being 'tuniversalf' operat- ors on theleading keyed machines have no ditliculty in operating it. Remington operators, especially, find themselves at home on this machine. The Brooks weighs only I7 pounds, instead of 30 or 55 pounds and has only 6oo parts instead of 3,ooo. Seven Operators on the Brooks will do the work of It-n Operators on any ofthe other machines. The time saved will pay you to exchange your machines now in use for the Brooks. C. C. W. PECK, General A gent, NESS' YORK. UNION SQUAII E 'l'Yl'ElVl!l'l'EIl EXUIIA NGE, io E. .rgth St., N. Y., Uptown Agents, THE PHOEN X. To enjoy bicycling you must ride not ALONE an ELE19AN'l', but also a sAF1c wheel A broken frame is unknown to P11'1aN1x riders. Not the least of the pleasures of cycling lies in having a wheel that is recognized by every onlooker as being " 12111211 CLASS. " P11ucN1x riders have the assurance that their mount is beyond criticism,-the easy, graceful lines of the frame, the ele- gant finish, that "thoroughbred air" that speaks of money, time and care used in designing and building-in facta wheel built without regard to expense and having in view only the absolute determination to please the rider. SOME THINGS YOU CAN DO ON A PHOENIX. Fasten one end of its crank in a vice, put a giant crank-bender on the other end and the weight of a man of 175 pounds on the end of the crank-bender and you CANNOT draw the crank out of line nor break it, though untempered and soft to the nie. Again, lay on the floor the front wheel of our racer fweighing 2 pounds complete with tirej and let three men, aggregate weight of ooo to 7oo pounds, stand directly on the spokes and you cannot find a bent or distorted spoke when the wheel 1S released from the weight. Again, tap the bar of the frame with a pencil, it will give a clear, bell-like note, showing that by our method of re-en- forcement the vibrations travel all through the frame and do not stop at the head and crank hanger, thereby causing crystal- lization and in time, destruction of the frame. Our weights are from 20 to 22 pounds for Racers, 26 to ZQ pounds for Road VVheels, and our prices range from 3125.00 to S1 50.00. A postal card will bring you catalogue and any information wanted, but we would like to have you call when we will take pleasure in showing the details of construction, convincing you of the great economy in buying the P11f12N1x as the BEST Eastern Branch of the STGVER BICYCLE MFG. C0. 575-577 MADISON AVENUE, NEW YORK CITY. , viii wheel made. F THE MERIDEN GRAVURE CO, W NLLUSTRATORS Arm PRWTERS MERIDEN, CONN. 10 FAST 14r+1ST,NEW YORK, FOR 'IXXIEIAC OF CON'I'EN'I'S SICIC PAGE i 'ff , qi . 1 45' 1 al - ' -',v"'- 'lf , TQ! 1f ' f"f-QF. ' ' 'V-3 ' Lf-'A Q ,g'5fV:A'T'T'T7"f" Y A" """7'FT'?W77'f""'W' ' v if '- '-' ' -Kg - 1 -' .A A- ' 4 A A Q - 1,5 , A- - ' 1 j , .A 5, 3 ,' M QA wiv-grxifnfii L 4' A- I - A Ax uiv?-avg-ze 4' 1' gi- .up nil A. AX - Y ' A 'XA-LH-: A 'veg' if Q Azffwzefr- 'A ' -P .Fr A X A--yy? 'in fi-gi A an 41253-eff? .- .A f , Af . ,A A A -Q x' 1 X ts .2 9' , :Qian 133 ,A .YL Kgfbfafg. N Qld Y: A -XI, FQ -935.3 Q ? -J' A - A ' fl ' A' .. A. 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DARLJNG X X ,' J L I ' HENRY SINGER Jlxcog L . Nfwmw f ' 'P I.. N 9 Q X , X . ' . -X ., gvfx , Q f S! P g 7 1 w!k ck! X A X ' ' 1 7 Cl 45 4 Q E I 1 ,As 'v- ,. 1 fi Ii 5 I x , . I L 4 if I i a I i 5 . 1 x 1 I . a 'Q 1, l. W Q' 1 ii E5 F 3 TO AUSTIN ABBOTT, LL. D., DEAN OF THE UNIVERSITY LAW' SCHOOL AND HONORED ALUMNUS OF THIS UNIVERSITY, T1-113 FIFTH ANNUAL VIOLET IS RESPECTFULLY DEDICATED BY THE EDITORS, AS A PLEDGE OF THEIR RESPECTFUL ESTEEAI. 1 Ausrnv BBOTT, LL. D. HE name Abbott during the largest part of this century has been a household word. jacob Abbott, the distinguished author and clergyman, was known the world over as the author of popular biographies, histories, and juvenile books. His sons are equally famous. Austin Abbott was born in Boston, December 18th, 1831. After spending his boyhood in New England, he came with his father to New York in 1843. Here he completed his preparation for college and entered our University. From it he was graduated in the year 1851, taking an English oration at the commencement. He then devoted himself to the study of law, and in ISSZ was admitted to the bar before he was of age, on condition that he should not take the oath or enroll until he attained his majority. He entered into partnership with his oldest brother, Benjamin Vaughan, and soon after, Lyman, a third brother, since so well known as Beecher's successor, joined the firm. Austin Abbott prepared the greater part of 'K Abbott's New York Digest " and "Abbott's Formsf' After the dissolution of this firm by the withdrawal of his brothers, Mr. Abbott continued practice alone, being principally engaged as counsel in important cases, and consulting counsel in many in which he never appeared in court. He gained a national reputation in the defense of the suit of Tilton against Beecher, and his opinion was sought on important questions in the Guiteau case. ' But the work which makes Dr, Abbott best known is the series of law publications, begun in 1880 and completed in 1891. For these he had been preparing ever since the beginning of his legal career, and the fact that they are now text-books, and desk-books for the bench in all parts of the country, is G due to the years of thought and experience which his master mind had given to the subjects on which he was to write. Speaking of these works, the Albany " Law journal" says: "The treatment is in every way admirable. The series of four is indispensable to the safe conduct of causes, civil and criminal. There is no other living lawyer who devotes such shining powers to the benefit of his profession in such unambitious and practical waysf' In 1887, the University conferred upon Mr. Abbott the degree of Doctor of Laws, and in 1891 he was appointed dean of the Law School of the University. Since that time, the many changes in its curricu- lum and a constantly increasing attendance upon its classes have attested the wise and popular adminis- tration of Dr. Abbott. On August 3oth, 1893, at the Hrst session of the Section of Legal Education of the American Bar Association, Dr. Abbott delivered the opening address. 'What he said at that time has created a great sensation in legal circles. The thought he presented was, briefly, that legal education should be made more modern and practical 5 that procedure should be taught, as the basis as necessary to the Hnished lawyer as the study of tactics is to the generalg and that concrete examples should precede the study of abstract terms and principles. It would be impossible to do justice to so able a speech in such brief space, enough that the Doctor illustrated some of his statements by reference to work in our ownibLaw School. In the "University Law Review," the new monthly exponent of his views, Dr. Abbott advo- cates the necessity of an increasingly liberal interpretation of common law, and the importance of study- ing recent decisions as over against the blind adherence to traditional opinions. In conclusion we may say that in Dr. Abbott this country has one of its ablest lawyers 5 this com- munity a Christian citizen and gentleman always on the side of thoughtful progress, the bar a most useful friend through the practical and useful books which he has written, the great body of law students of this country a friend to help them to a better and fuller appreciation of the grand subject which they are trying to master 5 our own University a professor who teaches for the permanent good he may do to those who come under his instruction : so that we all are included among those who owe respect and gratitude to Dr. Austin Abbott. 7 ' 'te A v . ' aria, V W' '- 1- fx asf it 'Z' .mf ' N 1 . i fr f ' f V i :Y-fx' V 'JN' yi s ., 1 ::- ' ,ig ,'l' ,V:lZ7f: lg f f Nlyfk - ff- .15 H. W A A , .fn , A7 x yi LN dia- 2 .,-' "' . to - 0 Cf li" 'YW ' ' K' ' 4 ' l 'Wi' Elzflf X ij 4 L! 1: 1. . l Mu, f ' UN VV Q If .vip I I . H rl 3, M sy, ' i S f : ' X N1 iff , . X ,nf ati lc? MQ lg' ill -l , I J, :Zi- t .x , . 1 7 ,tj 1 - ' 5 H' " Lg ' , i a.qf5,g- f ' f Q. 5,1 " I 7. I I 5 1 5? fy, f 0 f f . sv "H f i N if i. s s .NELAL4 I., 77 X, I- -, x N J dug il ' X , 4, mv 1 ' " N ,'r- ' , 2 K.-, ' l '. ' , F J M 5, ' glad ia, E , gt H 2- ,,,1 q-ff f ,ef J H 3 13,672 I ' ,A fp ,Q .1 .jf '. , 2 gi . .I I I . W ix' 5 'jig' 0 VI- ,. I--lgggyg -I U VZ V J I f 4-44 11: -:Q , if K -,.?:.MtI -f m ? 17 . ii f"'7 2" 5111.35 ' -g f K 7152 aria...--r"'c .- if ma ii. s r- gf we-j g: f ca., 1: el aaa J. if f'f 'Cff CG 1' 'f ' 1 -J' 'Y ' 'X I' ' t 'ee Q f r 0 -X -e e i ' Q ' tl 3 W l fiftl ' 1 if ar the t'Violet" ffreets its readers - V ,-g-gr f 1 . V C'W"C lx tie 1 successix eiye , b , "i -". l W. 'I 1' ag: . . , V im It - -f-BS. 5 the students, alumni and friends of our alma wafer. , JEL HM iD W7 Again the external appearance of the book has been alteredg :M ' M "l f Q3 but we sincerely hope that this volume may reflect with as compre- ' ' :l ,, ' y . . . . . 1 Q jim if' Qji hensive and flawless an image the University life and enterprise, as 7 2!.:L 1- r i . R51 i ' ' J f have its predecessors. l J As the editors of a college annual change with each issue, that uniformity which is looked for in publications of more frequent edition can hardly be expected. However, we of ,QS have endeavored to maintain the spirit of the former numbers of the " Violetf and at the same time to continue the effort of our immediate predecessors, of introducing more and more of a literary tone as far as is possible in a book avowedly intended as a volume for reference. Hut the distinctive feature which it is hoped will give this book a more than ephemeral existence, is S the memorials that it contains, in the shape of sun and pen pictures, of the old University building, so soon to be torn down. A structure like this, associated most intimately with men and events of whom our country, nay, the world, is proud, should be held dearest and cherished longest in the hearts of those who are the last to receive their character-training in its halls, and hence inherit the longest line of tradition of the successes which those have achieved who have gone before. In later pages of this volume, reference will be made to some of the men who are most to be remembered by us for their lives and deeds in and for this University in the past. Let it now be our pleasant task to thank the men of the present, who each day have been unselfishly helping in the work of publishing this annual, by which we are to be known and judged by outsiders. First of all let us mention Dr. Austin Abbott, the dean of our Law School. The dedication of this book to him is but a hint of the honor and esteem which is his due, and which it is our pleasure to acknowledge. To the principal professors of the undergraduate College we are indebted for their willingness in allowing the insertion of their portraits. lVe believe that all, with one exception, have furnished us with photographs which are here reproduced, save the emeritus and assistant professors. The faces of many of those about whom the friends of the University hear frequently, now appear in a University publication for the Hrst time. VVe are especially glad to welcome from Lafayette College, Dr. Addison Ballard, who comes to us as professor of ethics and logic. May his stay with us be as long and pleasant as his stay at Easton. 'We cannot close this department of the "Violet" for another year, without thanking those our fellow- students who have materially assisted in the multitude of details incident to the publication of such a book as this. Especially do the artists deserve our remembrance for their share in that important feature of college annuals, the illustrations. Mr. Wightman, '95, has freely given of his time and his experience with the camera, in taking the originals of the Hartotypes " of the University building, inserted in these pages. Messrs. Irwin, Pentz, Munson, Graecen and others have used their pencils with 9 good effect and to them all we are most grateful. To Messrs. Chase, Moorhead, Barringer and others who are veterans in "Violet" publication, and to the Meriden Gravure Company for suggestions and assistance We owe thanks also. Finally, We are sincerely grateful to the alumni of the University, who have so kindly ordered in advance many copies of this book. VVhen the covers of the next "Violet" shall be opened, it Will, We trust, be upon the scene of our new and more suitable quarters in upper New York, until which time We bid our readers adieu. ff, like gi f? - ,.,, 3, ps A Qwgi llwi , LO DATE OF ELECTION. 1836. 1862 1865 1869 1871 1875 1881 1882 1882 1883 1883 1883 1884 1884 1884 1887 Glue Qbfficers anb Glouncil of the University of the CEitx3 of Tlflew 1IQork. PRESIDENT, VICE-PRESIDENT, SECRETARY, TREASURER, CHANCELLOR, CHARLES BUTLER, LL.D. IVILLIAM ALLEN BUTLER JOHN E. PARSONS. J. W. C. LEVERIDGE. VVILLIAIYI A. XVI-IEELOCK. , LL.D. JOHN HALL, D.D., LL.D. VVILLIAM LORING ANDRE VVS. WILLIAM M. TAYLOR, D.D., LL.D. LEMUEL SKIDMORE. RODERICK TERRY, D.D. IVILLIAM S. OPDYKE. ELBIERT B. IXIONROE. SAMUEL SLOAN. DAVID BANKS. ROBERT SEHELI.. GEORGE ALEXAN DER, D.D. WIIICCICS. - CHARLES BUTLER, LL.D. VVILLIAM ALLEN BUTLER, LL.D. JOHN REID, DD - WILLIAM F. HAVEMEYER. HENRY M. MACCRACKEN, DD, LL.D. GOUIICII. DATEOP ELECTION. 1887. 1887. 1889. 1890, 1890. 189Q 189L 1891. 1891. 1892. 1892. I89L 1892. 1893. 1893. 1393-A II GEORGE MUNRO. VVILLIAM L. SKIDIIORE. JOHN IQEID, D.D. FREDERIC BAKER, ISRAEL C. PIERSON, PH. D. W'ILL1AIx1 F. I-IAVEMEYER. HENRY M. MACCRACREN, EDXVARD I-I. LITCHEIELD. JOSEPH S. AUERBACII. ALFREID L, LOOIIIIS, M.D CHARLES T. BARNEY. CHARLES R. FLINT. JOHN P. BIUNN, M.D. A. D. JIULLIARD. JOHN CLAFLIN. C. R. O'I'IS. 'r D.D., LL D LL. D ' jlfounbers of the iflniversity. HON. MORGAN LEWIS. HON. SAMUEL R. BETTS. HON. JAMES IFALLMAIJGIL. JAMES M. M A1"l'HEXVS,'YD.D. GEORGE GRISWOLD, SR. LTYNDERT VAN SCHAICK. STEPHEN VVHITNEY. MARTIN E. THOMPSON. JOHN DELAFIELD. JAMES LENOX. SAMUEL JVARD. LION. ALBERT G'ALLATlN. HON. TJLIORGAN LEWIS. HON. JAMES TALLMADGE. JAMES NIAT'I'l'1EWS, D.D. X7ALENTINE MOTT, M.D. EDWARD DELAPIELD, M.D. SAMUEL HANSON COX, D.D JAMES TVIILNOR, D.D. ARCHIBALD TWACLAY, D.D. SPENCER H. CONE, D.D, CYRUS BTASON, D.D. WILIAIABI W. VVOOLSEY. CHARLES STARR. JOHN S. CRAIG. GABRIEL P. IDISOSXVAY. lDU65iD6llf5 of U36 GOIIIICU. GARDINER SPRING, D.D. CHARLES BUTLER, LL.D. JOHN C. GREEN, LL,D. JOHN TAYLOR JOHNSTON. Gbancellors of the Zllniversitp. ISAAC FERRIS, D.D., LLD HON. THEODORE FRELINGHUYSEN, LL.D. HOWARD CROSBY, DD., LL T3 GARDINER SPRING, D.D. fzza'z'1zz'e7'z'11zJ. JOHN HALL, D.D., LL.D HENRY TXTITCHICLL MACCRACKEN, DD., LL,D. 12 Eliumrui Elssociation of the University, Officers. PRESIDENT, - FREDERIC BAKER, '52, VICE-PRESIDENT, - JAMES STGKES, '63, SECRETARY, - ALBERT W. FERRIS, '78, TREASURER, - A. B. DEFRECE, '67. REGISTRAR, HENRY M. BAIRD, '5o. Executive Committee. Besides the abov armed officers,- BfYER S. ISAACS, ,5Q, JOHN I. STEVENSON, '63. ISRAEL C. PIERSON, '65, CHAS. S. BENEDICT, '8o. JAMES BQYD, '82, ALEXANDER LVMAN, '84 13 THE OLD BUILDING PEAKS. QSM F1'0m'1'5jJz't're.j " Marvellous indeed are the changes which I have viewed in my surroundings in If the six decades of my life," said the old gray structure of the University in confidence to the editor one day, "as I have stood here on my vantage-ground overlooking the Ffgr i busy square, and the street which bears myname. In my youth, the farmer ploughed and the xvildebirds sang directly in front of me, where now lies the neatly-kept square, and Where now rises the arch of our Constitutions centennial, to guard the street of the world's greatest Wealth. I ' ij , fi ff l "You ask what I have seen in these years? Indeed, one sees the most who only l I "'i stands and Waits. Past me have surged the tides of the city's progress. Suburban quiet has given place to the bustle of the fashionable residence quarter. This in turn has yielded to the throngs of the heart of a metropolis. And now at last I am left to the grim company of many-storied Warehouses, Whose height and stability declare that they will remain the permanent occupants of this part of Manhattan Island. "lVhen I was but newly erected, many a tongue pronounced me the iinest and most imposing structure in the city. But that day has past, for now my Gothic arches and grotesque carvings yield only a sense of impropriety in the midst of the din of the tradesmen's quarter. I" But at last I hear of green fields and a fair outlook that await my coming in that part of the great city which is now what VVashington Square was in my earliest years. Only now, I am told, no building can ever shut from my view the beauties of the sunset, and the heights of the famed Palisades of the Hudson, and the bright waters of the Western Rhine. i1Sincc the above went to press the Council of the University has decided that it would be impracticable to transfer the old building to University Heightsg so that this is "positively the last interview." I4 U No sight, howevcr, that will meet my vision there, can ever be dearer to me than the memory of the years during which I have watched my children,-the ones who call me alma zfzafer, and who make my old Walls echo daily with the shouts of my praises,-as they have crossed the Square each morning, coming singly from their homes, or in jolly groups from their fraternity houses, to add another day's interest to the principal of their character. How can I be aught but proud of those men who have gone forth from my halls to make me famed to the world, and, far more than that, to teach the growing country the lessons of freedom of conscience, and of broad moral and intellectual growth, which they have learned to champion from their schooling within my walls? " Not serious wholly, but mirthful also, are many of my recollections about these old days. The thought of the men who annually leave me, suggests also the little army that with each returning autumn enters my doors for the irst time. For the first time then I see the men who compose it, my second view is of a compact little group in the Square in front, huddled close about,-a stick of wood! Alittle distance from them, I recognize their next older brothersg then with a ringing whoop, the two masses become one. There is a surging sway of mingled humanity, an indiscriminate conglomeration ofthe various parts that go to make up an individual, a sudden resistless throe of energy, a feebly-resisted sloughing off of the outer and upper layers of the pile, a piercing yell of victory, an answering cheer from hundreds of spectators, and all is over. No, not all, for the procession of the conquering host through my old halls and the cries that start the echoes from every arch and nook and crevice complete the yearly performance that is called a ' cane-rushf "I might tell you, indeed, of many another scene of excitement, of which I have been a silent witness. I might tell of the brave band that left the quiet pursuit of classical study, to stake their lives for the maintenance of a threatened country. I might speak of the proud return of survivors of that great conflict, who were granted the knowledge of the fruits of their victories, and were spared the doom of the battle-field, and the living death of a southern prison. But enough for the present! Rarely do I con fide any of my secrets to my children, they are almost all too busy or too unconcerned to care about what I can reveal of the past. But to those who are able to hear my words, I am ever ready to speak." So spoke the old gray building. Its words of history are true, the same may its Words of prophecy prove! I5 f""ibX?, ' " ' n V f- Y eYOvr-Day C 'J fiwsb-2 ' , 97-xhe 1 i Mam'i.S X OC TOVCY1 bf Uma ll - Q e , X rr"ve.ibv ' djligwl 'Q 6 Wg' ,X fs J T--,X g A How, ff Sepl. Sejzf. Sejzf. Snff. LINIVEIREITY El-ILEINEIHR FDR THE! EURREZNT YEII-KR. 1 8 9 3 . 20, lfVvL'Il'7lc'.S'H7lljf, Department of Medicine opens. 25-28, .llofzffay fo yylll7'5IfIZ-jf, Fall Entrance Examina- tions, University College. 27, PIf'ud:zc.m'1g1, University College opens. 27, Ififefffzesffzzy, Schools of Engineering and Chemis- try open. Ori. 2, illolzffay, Graduate Seminary Enrolment begins. Off. 2, ilfzzizdfgf, School of Pedagogy opens. 1V0U. 30, Def. I, 7'bI!i'.YlIIfljf, R'Z.dllJf, Thanksgiving Recess. Dae. 15, Fr1?z'ny, First Term ends, University College. Dec. 22, 1G'zh'ay, fojmz. 2, Tzfcsziay, Holiday Recess. I 8 9 1-1-. fan. 24, Iflfcdvzeszfzgf, Day cf Prayer for Colleges. 106. 22, Yhzzzzway, Vxlashingtoifs Birthday Recess. flfllf. 16, Frz'1z'fUf, Second Term ends, University College. ffljni! 2-6, illomfay fo Frzrfcgf, Spring Recess. Ajfril 18, Vlfednesday, Founders' Day. IWIU -, Thzfrsziigf, Commencement, Department of Med- icme. zllny 24, Y-lkl!7'J'1?7I7j', Commencement, Department of Law. .fl1'aJ'31, fZ'Azzrrfz'ay, Commencement, University College. ..- 41...,,,i 331- THE COLLEGE CHAPEL. In the mind of the college man, more pleasant associations and more vivid recollec- tions center about the college chapel than about any other of the rooms in which he has " lf learned and forgotten and dozed and tlunked and laughed and shouted and performed . -' i 'Q i E 'xiii . . . Q Iij- Qi 2 . the other functions essential to college hfc. And why should it not be so? Did he i lf, 3 . .E ' not enter this room every day of his course from Freshman year to Senior vear, fexcept Q ' is ' 1: ' i P 1:i:.- ,, . . ' .ga 2 it , Ee: when he "cut 5? W'ere not the first audiences that ever listened to, and hooted at 3-ii-15' Z 4' ,eww i Q D' the Hower of his oratory seated upon the time-worn fand knife-wornj benches of this 5 3 1, same room? Did not his soul for the first time truly appreciate the subtleties of har- ' L mony and the divine gifts of St. Cecilia when the tones of that chapel organ first broke in waves of sonorous grandeur upon his offended ear-drums? Yes, brothers of the University, seriously speaking, we have good reason to remember , the old chapel. Vtflien we have read the inscription upon the marble shield that hangs on the ' chapel wall, and then have looked at our Chancellor and our Dean and our instructors, we -1.- Y have felt truly that they are the living inscriptions, " known and read of all men," who could i show us better than marble tablets how to attain U the noblest ends." f There are traditions,-alas! little more,-of the splendor of a great chapel which once occupied the central portion of the upper stories of the old University building. The colle' gian of these days knows nothing of its existence, unless by some chance, Qliucleian initia- tion or otherwisey, he mounts to the top of the building and sees the last remnant of the - line ceiling of this old chapel, he is fairly startled by its revelation of what the place of honor used to be in his fathers or grandfathefs day. lt could not have been from a feeling of imprfmpriety,imore probably it was from a laudable desire to economize space,-that the room was subdividedg and the only chapel which the recent student at the University knows aught about is the room represented on the opposite page. lt needs no introduction to most of us, and our last prayer to the council is, that our new chapel may not have benches of the same pattern. 17 HX XXX , J 1 W7 X X572 Wi , 'wT',Li17'g:x ,JIQQMI 4. h M M, lf: api-ski .S ,W ,ZX W' gi FACULTIES OF THE UNIVERSITY 19 CFI-IIE F.ACULTY Undergraduate Qollege, the Qradnate Seminary, and the Schools oi Engineering and Pedagogy. HENRY MITCHELL MACCRACKEN, D. D, LL, D., Cbfzfzfellor, S4 Irving Place, New York City. Professor ol' Intellectual and Moral Pliiloscphyg QP. B. K., A. B., Miami University, 1Ss7, D. D., Wittenberg College, 1878, LL. D., Miami University, 1886, Author of I' Lives Vis ,wo , ol' Religious Leaders," ooo pp., 1879, and several smaller treatises on subjects of Philoso- pliy, Sociology, History and Education. Onticer of American Church History Societyg , Society for Prevention of Criincg American Tract Societyg 1 ' American Institute of Civics. ---lil'-1 I-IIDNRY MARTYN BAIRD, D. D., LL. D., ' "'i Yonkers, N. Y. 1 Dean oii the Faculty ol' Arts and Scienceg Professor ' ol' the Greek Lziiiguzige and Literature, fP. 13. K., A. B., -----'-+1-' N. Y. U., 18501 A. M., N. Y. II., 1854, Pli. D., Princeton, CHIWCMLUR MMJCRACKHN. 1tF57g D. D., Rutgers, 18773 Ll.. D., Princeton, ISSZQ Tutor College of New jersey tljrincetonj, 1855-595 Professor of Greek in N. Y. U. since. Author of "Modern Greece, a Nztrraltiye of at Residence and Travels in That Country," 121110, 3So pp., New York. 1S56g "Lilo of the Rev. Robert Baird, D. ll," crown, Svo, 347 pp., New York, 1366, "History of the Rise of the Huguenots of Francef 2 vols., Svo, ppp. 571, GSID, New York, 1S7o, London, ISSOQ "The Huguenots and Henry of Navarre," 2 vols., Svo Cpp. 458, 5251, New York and London, 1886. J T. ADDISON RICHARDS, N. A., Emeritus Professor of Art. Prior. BMRD. 20 4' M Wg, f ,grew X H X ff' Cs Vgifgy ' ' .2 ft V 1, e L' f. ,,,, , VINCENZO BOTTA, Ph. D., Emeritus Professor of the Italian Language and Literature. JOHN JAMES sTEyENsoN, Pii.D., 3o8 lVest 45th St., New York. Professor of Geology and Biology, A. E254 13. K., A. B., N. Y. U., 1863, A. M., 18663 Ph. D., 1867. Professor of Chemistry and Natural History in XVest Virginia University, 1869-71, Professor of Geology in N. Y. U., 1871-82, of Chemistry, Geology and Physiology, 1832-913 ot Geology and Biology, from 1891. United States Geologist, 1873-743 1878-Soy Geologist on Pennsylvania Survey, 1875-75, 1881-82. Author of Geology of a portion of Colorado, ito, zoo pp., 1876, Geology of Greene and 'Washington Counties, Penn., Svo, .119 pp. and maps, 18763 Geology of Fayette and XVestmoreland Counties, Penn., Part I, Svo, .137 pp., maps, 1877, Part U, Svo, 339 pp,, maps, 18781 Geology of portions of Colorado and New Mexico, 4to. 426 pp , maps, 1881, Geology of Bedford and Fulton Counties, Penn., 8vo, 380 pp., maps, 18825 and many memoirs. Vice-President of the American Association for PRo1v. S'rEvENso N. Advancement of Science, 1391-QZQ Secretary of Geological Society of America, ISSS-QU, Yicc- President of same, 1893. Member of American Philosophical Society, Foreign, Honorary or Corresponding Member of many societies, among them the Geological Societies of Edin- ' bufgli, Liverpool, Nord, Austria, Hungary, Russia, Belgium, Australasia, Sweden, etc. ,l if e CHARLES is. BRUSH, M. s., c. E., 3 Vy.. . y Sf gf ' .1 5: if University Building, New York City. 1867, B. S. and C. E., University City of New Yorltp 1867-69, Engineers' Corps Croton Aqueduct, New York Cityg 1869 to date, independent practice, 1874, Adjunct Professor of ef 1' Civil Engineering, University City of New Yorlcg 1878, M. S., same: 1888, full Professor Civil Engineering, same, 1892, Vice-President American Society Civil Engineersg has had con- nections as folloxvs: Expert on water works at Cincinnati, Chicago, Memphis, Jamestown, """"'?" East New York, Passaic, Easton, etc., made the Examinations for foundations for Second Avenue Bridge, Neiv York, Thames River Bridge, New London, Conn., Poughkeepsie Bridge, Picor, Bisusli. Ql Hudson River Tunnel, New York and New jersey Bridge Company, The Tully Pipe Line ' f t ctor Woi'ks at S fracuse, N. Y., were built under his direction, he was engineer :or con ra 3 during construction of XVashington Bridge, New York City, at present he is engineer of ' - I 7 - P th th fllowin water companiesz Hackensack, N. J., New Rochelle, IN. X., ortsmou pw? e O g and Suffolk, Va., Far Rockaway, N. Y., also of the North Hudson County Railway, ' ' . 7 k I N .' Hoboken Land and Improvement Company, N. J., Associate Engineer New Xor . I , and New jersey Bridge Co., Consulting Engineer water companies at Kansas City, Mo., N, and Kansas, Plainfield, N. J., etc. ISAAC FRANKLIN RUSSELL, D. C. L., LL.D., 59 Van Buren St., Brooklyn. Professor of Political Science, W. T., dh B. K., flf. 41. QP., A. B., N. Y. U., 1375, LL.B., N. Y. U., 18771 Pkoif. Russian.. v , A. M., N. Y. U., IS731LL.L'I..V0.l6, 1579, D. C. L, Yale, ISSOQ LL.D., Dickinson, 1893: Professor of Political Science, ISSIQ Assistant Professor of Municipal Law, 1881, Professor of Contracts and ol' Elementary Law, 1888, Secretary of the Law Faculty, Author of " Lectures on Law for XYOmen," ISQ2. Q, , 1 DANIEL VVEISSTER HERING, C. li., .ljlyi First Street, Brooklyn. Professor of Physics, QP. B. If.: Berzclius, Ph. B., Yale, IS72Q C. E., Yale, 1878, Division l Engineer, Reading and Lehigh Railroad, 1873-7.1, Fellow in johns Hopkins University, A IS76-78: Assistant Engineer Baltimore and Cumberland Valley Railroad, 1373-303 professor l..... of Mathematics, VVestern Maryland College, 1880+843 Professor of Physics, Vlfestern University of Pennsylvania, 1884-S53 at N. Y. U., since 1385. I PRUF- HERING' 22 Pntolf. IsA.xcs. JEROME ALLEN, Ph. D., ABRAM s. ISAACS, Ph. D., 68 XV. 88th St., New York City. Professor of the German Language and Literature, 11. T., QP. B. K., A. B., N. Y. U., 1871, A. M., N. Y. U., 1874, Ph. D., N. Y. U., 1878, Author of H A Modern Hebrew Poet," 1878, "Stories from tl1e Rabbis," 1893, Appointed Professor of Hebrew, 1887, Professor of German, 1889. FRANK F. ELLINVVOOD, D. D., 53-5th Ave., New York City. Professor of Comparative Religion,A. B., Hamilton, 1849, D. D., N. Y. U., 1865, Secre- tary Board of Foreign Missions of the Presbyterian Church, Professor at N. Y. U., in grad- uate seminary, since 1886, Author of the A' Great Conquest," and numerous monographs in missionary and other magazines,Papers before the Pan- Presbyterian Councils at London 1888 and Toronto 1892, and Addresses at the XVorld's Missionary Conference, il""" London, 1888. 398 McDonough St., Brooklyn. Professor of Pedagogy, Ll. T., A. B., Amherst, 1851, Professor in Alexander Col- lege, Dubuque, Iowa, 1855, First President of Lenox College, Iowa, the oldest synodical tPresbyterianj college in Iowa, 1859'-67, State Institute Conductor, N. Y., three years, Vice Principal and Professor in State Normal School, Geneseo, N. Y., ten years, Principal State Normal School, St. Cloud, Minn., four years, Editor " Barnes' Educational Monthly," four years, Editor "School journal," and 'L Teachers' Institute," New York City, eight years, Professor Pedagogy, N. Y. U., 1887, President New York State Teachers' Association, Ph. D., Lenox College. Author of, in 1867, "An Elementary Grammar," 8vo, I32 pp., Monticello, Iowa, 1870, " Methods for Teachers," part I, Svo, Q5 pp. , New York, 1876, " Handbook of Experimental 23 -l-.-1-. Puor. ALLEN Chemistry for 'l'eacl1ers," ioo pp., large Svo, Gencseo, N. Y., 1876, 'tMap Drawingl' in ' 1' Y in Teachers," ni Monteitlrs Geographies, Quarto, 25 pp., N. Y., 1884, "Mind Studies or for g 1 small 8vo, 98 pp., New York, " 'l'empe1'ament in Education," small 8vo, Q2 pp., N. Y., 1886, HSllOI'll Studies in English," Svo, 229 pp., N. Y., 1889, "The Relation of Pedagogy to , ' Christian Philosophy," large Svo, 16 pp., N. Y., ISSQ, "The -Relation of Pedagogy to the 9 W , University," large 8vo, 9 pp., Philadelphia ,College Association of the Middle Statesj, 1890, -". " Education of Tcacliers i11 the State of New York," large Svo, I3 pp., N. Y., 1892, " Outlines iiii A of Educational History," small Svo, 42 pp., 1889, 'R Manual Training i11 Ungraded Schools," l Bureau of Education, large Svo, 201911, XVashington, D. C., " Education," Article in lnter- N -if! J natio11al Cyclopzedia, 4 pp., N. Y., 1891, " Lectures 011 the History of Education," large Svo, 270 pp., N. Y., 1892, "Motive in '.l.'e-aching," large 8vo, 8pp., N. Y., 1893, K' The Train- ing of Teachers in Scotland," small Svo, I4 pp., N. Y. FRANCIS HOYEY STODDARD, A. M., 27 NVest iitli St. Pico:-1 S'1'oDn,xiu1. Professor of English Language and Literature, W. T., 11213. lf., A. li., Amherst, 1809, A. M., Amherst, 1885. Assistant Professor of English literature, University of California, 1885-88: N. Y. UU sincc 1888, Author of numerous monographs, especially on the Early English Drama. ROBERT XV. HALL, A. M.. E. M., University Building, N. Y. City. Professor of Analytical Chemistry, Member l'Clio," Princeton, A, B., Princeton, 1873, A. M., Princeton, 1870, E. M., School ol' Mines, Member Angeric-an Chemical Society, and New York Academy of Science. P H Rolf. A Ari.. 24 VVILLIAM KENDALL GILLETT, A. M., Larchniont, New York. X K ,ff .SJW f' X Professor of French and Spanish, 11. Qi., QD. 13. Ii., A. B., N. Y. U., ISSOQ A. M., N Y. U., 18332 Columbia Law School, ISSO-SI, Abroad, 1881-S53 Instructor Mcderu Lan n A guages, Lehigh University, 1385-SS, Abroad, ISSS-oo, Professor at N. Y. U., since ISQO. J' ','- , . Qs! WN ""i . DANIEL ALEXANDER MURRAY, P11.D., i. 5 Lmivefsity isuaidmg, N. Y. city. ----- i Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy, A. B., Dalhousie, 1884, Tutor in Mgthe pR0,,' G,,,,Vm.,I. matics, Dalhousie, 1885-S75 University Scholar in Mathe- .l matics, johns Hopkins, 1388, Fellow in Mathematics, Johns Hopkins, 18893 Associate Professor at N. Y. U., since 18902 Ph- D-1 1011113 H01Jki11S. ISQ3- EDGAR DUBS SHlMER,P11. D. in Professor of Educational Psychology, Qi. ll. 11.3 A. D., Muhlenberg, 1874, M. A., h h Muhlenberg, 1877, Ph. D., Muhlenberg, 18873 Teacher in New York Schools, 18753 Lecturer on Psychology at N. Y, U., 1886, Adjunct Professor of Pedagogy, 135535 Professor of Psy- ii fi , .fTQ?fM7 1 if chology in School of Pedagogy, 18913 Translation of Hannak's 'L Training of Teachers in Austria," numerous educational monographs and addresses. 25 PRo1f. NIURRAY. F l 1 I l i, ---rf'--' EDWVARD RICHARD SHAW, PH. D., f Yonkers, New York. 7 L ' ,,kA , Professor of the Art andScience of Education and of Rhetoricg A. B., Lafayette 1881 Ph. D., N. Y. U., 13905 Author of "School Devices," 'tSelections for Writteii Repro , , duction," U The Pot of Gold-A Story of Fire Island Beach," A' Physics by Experiment ii L'Enghsh Composition by Practiceg until recently, Principal of Yonkeis High School 4' ,, -1, ii Professor of Rhetoric in the Undergraduate College, since 1392. i .r.. ' C A-PQ 1.f ' e-rr MORRIS LOEB, PH. D. l Q University Building, N. Y. city. PROF- Slmllik- Professor of General Chemistry: A. B., Harvard, 18333 " Ph. D,, Berlin, 18871 studied later at Heidelberg and Leipsicg Assistant of Dr. 'Wolcott Gibbs, Newport, R. I.g Clark University, ISSQAQIQ Professor at N. Y. U., since November, i 1891. 1 l ,, N ERNEST G. SIHLER, Pi1.D. 1 l Professor of the Latin Language and Literature, Concordia College, Ft. XVayne, 1869, ix! Concordia Theological Seminary, St. Louis, IS72Q Student of Classical Philology at Berlin ii flllfl Leipsic U11iV6fSiti6S. 1372-753 Fellow in johns Hopkins University, 1876-79, Ph. D., i johns Hopkins, '78 , Author of 'L Plato's Protagoras with Critical and Explanatory Notes," 2nd edition, Harpers, ISQIZQ "Complete Lexicon of the Latinity of C2esar's Gallic War," Ginn 8: Co., Boston, ISQI1 "Character and Career of Tiberius," " Xlischylus and I-Ierodotus Ml and their Account of Salamisf' 4'Virgil and Plato," L'HO1l16I'?tDd Strabof' "The Verbal 26 ll Ili ll it il it . ll l i - 1 Pizoif. Lori , Nouns in Thucydidesgn "The Traditions of Caesar's Gallic Wars from Cicero to Orosius 3" 'L The Roman Census in Livy 5" and other papersg also reviews and reports in The American f' , w g ings, and in the Classical Review. ' f if ., V JOHN DYNELEY PRINCE, PH. D., 9 East Ioth St., New York. iqii 1' WM! sy ' Professor of Semitic Languages and General Philologyg LI. 525.5 Columbia, 18883 johns Hopkins, 18923 Author of "Mene, Tekel, Upharsin, an Historical Study of Daniel V,', ...W journal of Philology, The American Philological Associatioirs Transactions and Proceed- Baltimore, 18931 " Notes on the Language of the Eastern Algonkin Tribes g" " The Linguistic Position of Turkish," Pkoif. S1H1.121:. etc, CHARLES HENRY SNOVV, C. E., University Building. N. Y. City. Associate Professor Civil Engineeringg Al. 111.3 C. E., N. Y. U., 1886, Member Engineer Corps Prof. Charles B. Brush, Construction Dept. Minneapolis, Sault Ste. Marie 8Atlantic Railroad, Engineer Ludington Iron Mines, Lake Superiorg later Ass't Sup't sarneg Engi- neer in charge organization at mines of Mineral Point Zinc Co. of Wisconsin, in Northern Mississippi Valley, and in New Mexico, ISQIQ Civil Engineer, New York City. 27' , Qfzigw fgr 'QQ f J if 'X xl 4 V g b 'f wi ,Q-v rn X . yn. .34 1 S we mf ik 'K new g f' tr--Pjafk-Qi -af-'-' s SQA hwy? A-.iw is 4 Vu-Z, Prior. PRlNCE lililllf. l'i.Xl.I.XlIl'. XDDHQON ll.'Xl.l...X.RD, ll. D. GEORGE COTNER MASON, C. E., lfuiversity Building, N. Y. City. Assistant l'i'ofceQr+i'i11 Civil Engineering, W. T., Q5. li. K., B. S., N. Y. U., ISQZQ C. E., N. Y. lf, XSO31 lustructox' at N. Y. U. since 1392: nd private practice in laufl surveying itlll-l Sub-clivisirm. LESLIE TOMPKINS, B. S., LLB.. University Building, N. Y. City. 2 W -- ' Lilmiriau uf Llic lfuiversityg W, 211, 41.13. K., 41.11. dh, X ll, N. Y. l'..1Siy0g LLB., NY. l'.,1Sq,, l'i'ot'cQsfir iii' lfpgicg W. T. g A. ll.. NYilli:miS: l'iwii'Qes4irz1tUliio University for 8 j'C3."SQ lst l"1'of0ssor' ol' lilu.-tm'iC at ll'illizims: ut. Alftflllilll, Cfilltfjgcs fm' u low years, College Pastor l at lvlllllllllbl uutil 13743 l'i'ofussrii' ol' lmgit- :mul litliics alt lgtlltycttc, 1874-1893, at N. Y. U. Qiucc QlIll'l.l1Zli'3', iSfi.i. as l'iifii'c+.sfii'f-1' lmgi--, zilwigiviuq iziiatixictioii iu Ethics and the Evi- k clcnccs 0l'Cl1i'iSIi:l11iLi'. L PROP. SNOXV 7 5 '38 FACULTY or THE LAW SCHOOL. CHANCELLOR.-HENRY M, NIACCRACKEN, D. D., LL.D. PROFESSORS.- AUSTIN AI3l5O'I'1', LL.D., Dean of the Faculty, Professor of Equity, Inrispruclen ce, Pleading and Evidence ISAAC F. RUSSELL, LL.D., Secretary of the Faculty, Professor of Law of Contracts and of Elementary Law CHRiS'roPi-IER G. TIEDEMAN, A. M., LL.B.g Professor of Law of Real Property and of Sales and Negoti able Paper. FRANK A. ERXVIN, A. B., LL.B,, Professor of Law of Contracts and Torts. LECTURERS- VVM. ALLEN BU'rL1zR, LL.D., Maritime Law and Admiralty, jurisdiction and Practice. CEPHAS BRAINERD, ESQ. , International Law. CHARLES F. MAQLEAN, U. D. 3 The Principles of Criminal Law. ABIASA A. REDIVIELD, ESQ., Descent, Distribution, Restraints on Alienation by Will. HON. NIYER S. ISAACSQ Examination of Titles to Real Estate. WILLIAL1 G. Dixvnzs, ESQ. g Law of Life Insurance. LIBRARIAN- IAQSLIE J. 'IxOMI'KINS, LL B. 29 FACULTY DF THE SCHGOL GF MEDICINE lD1.OfCv5Ol.1 H M M1xcCRAe1 LN D D LL D S.1.II'V1I'1g Place Chancellor of the Umversrtj CHARLLS INsLL1 PA QDI E M D 34 West 38th Sueet Deem of the F teultj Professor of Otology AL1 RED I Looms NI D LL D IQ 'West 3.1th Street P1ofessor of P"tfhO1Og3 'mud Pr'1ct1ce of Med1c111e VV111 1 111 H luousox M D I L D , NX est both Sueet Professor of Materm Med1c'1 and Thc1'1peut1cs XX M MLc 1 IENRURC P011 M D I I D 7 I ast ,6t11 St1eet Professor of Obstetues 'md Gjneecology Lexus A Srmsox M D ,4 East 1,dStreet Professor of SUIWGYS XV G11 NI xx Iuovrsox M D 49 Dtst 3otl1 Street P1ofessor of Phjs1o1ogX GEO WOOISFX M D 4Q Last 3ot11 Street Protessor of Anatoruy "LHdC11111C'11SU1gC13 HENRY P Looms M D 58 P ast 34th St1eet P1OfGSSO1 of Pfttl1olog1ca1 Anatomy L1111ox LDC xR M D 113, E'1st 35th Street ASs0C1 rte Proff SSO1 ofObstet11es CH XRLI s E Oerwusx M D 44 VVest 36th Street Adjunct Professor ol P1act1ce of Medlcme PR1-11 XV Gxxxnrz M D O7 E'1st 14th Street Adjunct Professor of Operatwe 'md Cl1Il1C'll SLIIDGIE No B In XII M D 6 West 31st Street Adjunct Professor ofMate11a lVICdlC21 F D FISHLR M D 6 VV'est 39th Street, Adjunct Professo1 of Nervous and Mental D1seases C11 XRLES S BULL M D 4, VK est 36th Street Professor of Ophth'11mologv HLNRY G P111 ARD M D ro XVest 35th Stxeet P1Of6SSO1 of Dermdtologj J 5 9 Ce 0 . . 5 'ea , . ., . ., 1 ' f, S ' . ' ' 1. P Us 1' Q , '. ,c ' '1 , 7 ' z ' rg ' ' '. 7 1. 1 , 1' . ., . ., I ' , ' 1. V Q L l ' U . H11 .IX 1.' U, '. ., 4 . ., " Vi' ' Rx '3 ', ' I -'- I l C 'hc . '- V. wtf 1 ,q, 11. ., 3 A ' ' ' 1 ' ' '- ' . 1 1 U, . ., " 4 f -" 1. A , 1 .' 1 'D -7- RUDOLPH A. W1'1"1'11,11,1s, M, D., I4 NVest 23d Street, Professor of Chemistry, Physics, and Hygiene. . .1 :DVS 1 "1', . ., f 'c R J, ' ',' ' . -'. . rw, . .. 7 Q '. ' - ,C "1 ' ". J. '.f'1'? .1 , . ., ' E , C 'I' 2' ' ':.'. "R, . .,2 , ' -As' ' . J' . . Hu H, . ., 2 .' ' , ' 1, ' ' " ' . 1. . S . '. ., ' 1 ' A I c '.' '. ' x . . , . ., " Y , c , . . 5" .,.. , A , ' . A ' '. 30 1 1 I 1 josErII E. IVINTERS, M. D., 36 NVest 32d Strcet, Professor of Diseases of Children. PRINCE A. MiJRROXX', M. D., 66 XVGSt4OtI1 Street, Clinical Professor of Gcnito-Urinary Disease AIIEL M. PIRIELPS, M. D., 40 XVest 34th Street, Clinical Professor of Ortliopocdic Surgery. EGI:ER'r LEFEVRE, M. D.. IOI VVest 23d Street, Clinical Professor off Medicine. IVIN SICKELS, M. D., I7 Lexington Avenue, Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Physics. JUSTIN L. BARNES, M. D., Adjunct Professor of Otology. C. G. COAKLEY, M. D., Clinical Professor of Laryngology. NVILLIS E. FORD, M. D., Lecturer on Electro-therapeutics, IRVING S. HAX'NES, M. D., Demonstrator of Anatomy. UNYGFS. GEO. D. I-IAMLIN, M. D., Obstetrics and Gynzecology. HENRY S. STIQARNS, M. D., Surgery. 1- Rnsos, M. D., Chemistry, Physics, and Hygiene. XVILLIAM F. S'I'oNE, M. D. , Anatomy. Hilstrllctors ano Glinical Zlssistfmts. VVARREN CoI.EmAN, M. D., Instructor in Pathological Laboratory.. j. S. FERt:USoN, M. D., Instructor in Histology and Laryngology. JOHN M. BYRON, M. D., Director in Dep't of Bacteriology. FRANK AI3llO'l"l', jr., M. D., Instructor in Bacteriology. CI-IARLES H. XAIALKICR, Ph. B., Assistant in Physiological Laboratory. CHARLES M. FORD, M. D., First Assistant Demonstrator of Anatomy. G. XV. Boo.xR'r, M. D., Second Assistant Demonstrator of Anatomy. TRLIRllli'LI, NV. CI,Ex'EI.ANIm, M. D., Gynwcology. WILLIAM T. Guns, M. D., Gynzecology. FRED. WIII'I'1No, M. D., Ophthalmology. J. B. GII:soN, M. D., Ophthalmology. ALEXANDER M. JEFFREY, M. D., Practice of Medicine. 31 P. G. BECKER, M. D., Practice of Medicine. D.xvm D. JENNINGS, M. D. , Surgery. ARCHIBALD E. ISAACS, M. D., Surgery. XVOR'l'l'IlNG'l'ON S. RUSSlEI,L, M. D., Materia Medica. XVILLIAM L. S'rowE1,L, M. D., Diseases of Children. MARCUS K. Go1.DsMi'1'H, M. D., Diseases of Children. W. L. CARR. M. D., Diseases of Children. FRANCIS A. ScuA'i'c11LEY, M. D., Nervous Diseases. VVARREN O. PLIMPTON, M. D., Orthopcedic Surgery. Clerk. HENRY C. Coomzii, M. D. 'M xxsx. I , I 4 W ssl 'web F -1' nw, ' X. X 5 .xl is X- V -I LIZ.. , I, N . .i .. -1,,,.,,-Wig ' ir , x- 1 x .- is 1 fi A H +14 . iimq ,, . MEN ,, . FN D -.g, v ,r' . X XX 59 1233 N lil Q X iv 32 I r I I , I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 0 I I I I II I I, I I I I I 1 " w , 4-5 .. Ef'?E1i55'g'f H2 ,iff 'lil "V: ,mill Us I f::x:1Q.f VW! rj: jrijrtiggfnaf 2,111 ' Wifi? ' remiss? Ulu-.. WEE H! H no as QL rl: 75 flillillillii ?L3EHHlilg Hif??f5'w'z I I Q . , .gh f 1.'f1g.f ' M ' nv ' '1'Jfi'4'J1" '-v'1' .' ' V ,. I ' rvv. , ..11,,.3.f f-nwg.ffs,4,- . yi V, '1 - ,V fy -l,jf,"KiLw'Wf?2:,4g-'t1E?Q1Qf1i'41A-fffsifj-I V, ' A 5, -:"F i - w'-H-,1,5'333? . 1, 1, 1 f Q 'ji 3. -',, Qin, 'f xKi:51J5'Ejc'F:.i. fqgkfgr f T, 313-,rg fg:f.gfQ'3?' f ' ,gjfijih,,gSff53'if.n':,f4-6,, 'Q ' .- 'A .-ff u.Q...,f 4-if-rw '11-fa miif f..1::'3'fv if i I A I 1 I i . .L n the library. A Qilliff 710012 A bzlg f117i,1-00015, liehffzzz' 1'1',--who 11111 I1'!!, 110.2 7011! rj'01lfdfllf Nfl' Lartf-11'f111151'l5 wear. fl'111.f'-11111 if be fl MN, ah? Almost every 511111111111 has its xlzflffffffl .v1z111'1'01'11111. So has our library. The room is JIS? sacred enough in itself, one would think, but there behind that green wire fcuce is located W., :Fa-' enough sanctity to put any ordinary cathedral to shame. No unhallowed foot ever presses the light-brown immaculateness of that enclosure. It is dedicated to jupiter Leslie and to his earthly representative, Thursty. Its votaries must approach hrmhly, take care not to 'ga M1 lean on the railing, wait zqyg minutes, and receive the oracle suhmissively. 554 .5 ?.EYy6 .is , ji, 375'-:'. 'ref .5-26521 .---f .gg H e 5 13 1, l ' M- "" - 4771 l -:'.,v f 'dy fi el d , 1 ri -' .' 'Gy' "" -'--, fr ' r f-I ' fesiiii H' 2 A ' ,g f FTZTTTQ Indeed, the quieting influence of this hallowed spot is felt all over the room, and the only 1 X 'sf' V method left to the student to actually conform to all the rules is to eat his hat, and then, arranging himself in a graceful group, to go to sleep, taking due precaution not to snore. Two hopes we students cherish, as regards our uptown library,-only two, may they not be granted bythe faculty, council or other body having jurisdiction? First, we should like to have the books intended for reading purposes, in a room that is not locked all the time, and second, we should likc to have the excellent likeness ofthe "Vice-Chan.," which now adorns the front of his safe, removed permanently from that conspicuous position. i 1 13 U11 I i H' ---. FRATERNITIES LIfJKi' HE 0RDER OF THEIR ESTABLISHMENT AT THE UNIVERSITY. .3 -Q 1 iw 1833 1337 1S39 1340 1341 1842 -THETA, -DELTA, -1zn'rA, SIGMA, GAMMA, -ZETA, 1842-LAMBDA, 1843-KAPPA, 1843-PSI - IS43-XI, - 1358-UPSILON, 1360-1o'rA, 1865-PHI, - IS75-Pl, 1376-CHI, - 1880-BETA-BETA, 1834-ETA, ISQI-'IxIxU, Isfjl-IXIU, - si Upsilon FOUNDED IN 1333. ROLL OF CHAPTERS. 36 University - Union University of the City of New York - Yale University Brown University Amherst College - Dartmouth College Columbia College Bowdoin College - Hamilton College - Vilesleyan University University of Rochester - Kenyon College University of Michigan University of Syracuse - Cornell University Trinity College - Lehigh University - University of Pennsylvania University of Minnesota 4 l 4 . 1 'lx -Y V--------- -...virrw f V AV-.- Y . ll ry YL H r N YL ll U 1: W J 'x , 9 wk 1 in E H 2 I A I I, u x 4 1. . 5 1 I i I r ? I lv, A A I 4 1 fi ? I W kms 1 N' Ns lj if xxx f iapfff XJR I X gr :wifi , ' , ' Q , N ,T ' 'M ' 1' ' V A ' Q. ' A W ff Q C-ffgvf N ' 2 X f, ,,g,' Q--,'Tx" PN ' , ' gf' t,f' --j.33, I, . f, . - , .f 1 - X V i , . ' W if Ri g? ix Q .N .4 ...ff-,.,... . ,Q Q Y, -T-, 0? ns. ' EW I - Ag? , -W W ' I ' 4 S .vm-.. x l7L ' ::::-AL ' 5-'W h? '4i55 , ' AIZETQXT , ' I r 1 f - -, 5 '-fx, 9' 1 - -V - ,hww , :..V1-f . A , l 1 , W , Yywix 5 , . , N A , f w Q W Q . i 1: Sf : ff' 'Eff' ,:"1k"i x HE , I 8 , -' ', Lf . . -g f - : . " 1'1" ' ,I I, 7' is :L . V - ug, . -5, .g K: jf' 31 V, K - hh,--gp, 3" ja , JI lim' ff -n ax nf " ' f 'lg fy , Y . ' ' Ag 1 W ' , V fl' ' , ff, f ,vf 'mm P 1 1 ' I 1 ' ' M-rm 1' IJELT. Tmzor JOHN W HENRY XV.-XLI., BRUCE Rlixwl Psi psilon. DELTA CHAPTER. FRHTRES IN FHCULTHTE. ESTABLISHED my LEWIS A. STIIIISON, M. D. IXUSTIN AIQIIOTT, LL.D. ISAAC F. RUSSELL, LLD. GEO!lGE C. JVIASON, C. E. FRANCIS H. STODDARD, A. M. CHARLES H. JVALKER, PII. B. LESLIE J. TOIIII-KINS, LL.B. FRHTRES IN PRPXESENTI. 1894. THEODORE ARTHUR GESSI,ER. JOSEIAI-I BARIJWELL LYIIIAN. JOHN JOSEPH BIUORHICAD JOHN XFOSUURGH IRWIN. JOHN HENRY 1wACCRACKEN. PERRY CARTER PIZNTZ. GOIIEREY ROGER PISEK. JOIIN ISDWARIJ RUSTON. 1895. HENRY HASXVEI,L BANIQS, JAMES OSCAR BOYU. JOHN JUNIOR CERAHAM. ARTHUR HOAC. HOWLAND. OIQRIN SACE WIr:II'mIAN. 1896. VVALLACE LEONARD DURANT. FREDERICK CIIINION SICCKIERSON. CIfIES'I'ER FIELII SIIIITII VVIIITNEY. BRUCE G1lA'.l"1'fXN PHILLIPS. GEORGE FRANCIS SWAN. LAWRENCE JVOOIIWARD VVHITNEY 1897. RENXVICK WYI.IE AI:IaO'1"I'. RALPH OI- DAXfID ORR, LOUIS IRYING SNYIIER JVILLARIJ JAY TOAIRKINS. SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. IJYKE. CHARLES HENIQX' WALRI-LR. SCHOOL OF LAW. HARRX' IiEDGES IESSICK. qw 'Ji Delta Phu JNDLD IN1 ROLL OF CHFXPTERS X Ummm Lolh, e 1 um 11 Umx elixtx C ANIXIA LTIHVBISILY of New X 011 D I X Lolumbm Col e YG EI S11 ON Rutgus Colleoe L X L mx 2.13113 ot Punnsylx 11111 I ANIBDA keussgl 1e1 Polx techmc Insutute W I Lhlsh U111XGI'S1t3 johm Hopl ms L I11X61S1tN OUICIXUX X llp Umx emlty Loxudl UHIVLISILD I C IFULH' F, 1' 527. Almllf , .--f ------ I ' 1a12'1'A, - A - ----- SQ ' 1 3 211 L , - - """ ' '4.' 7 qi ' 15 ,Ti , -f---- ---- - ' 1 1 5 4 J ' -,--'----,- 3- - ., , , D ZETA, ---ff--- Y - Harvard Umiversity TT: , ---------- f ' H 1 ', 1 5 fc 'C 1 A K , "A--- A - - w 331: ' ' ' ' ' 1 U, - ' - Y , - --Y, JA 'rr ' 7 ' 1 XI, - - V ---, . . . .W . Y x xv, - - - - - - -fA- fri K ' r - -' PI, - - - - , ..., . - 1 - , ' - , 38 N 5 I I Q 1 1 BL bu IS 1 V 'W v HB 6 6. i ' l XB NI' 'I' ,A -. , 1 X Deita P111 11111111 11111121111 FPA-IR S IN FAQUI-TAI 1 1111x11Q XI D L 1x1 1 P XVII 1 1 111 Ix1.N11A1 11 GILI1 11 A M C1 FRATRES IIXI IDPAESEN H894 -I I HONI xs FLON LXURIANLF HIX C 101 QI X 1 R1x111x I MEI som Q 1111 0111 GLO1 1 LX 121111211 SANII FI Bill TURN11 F11111Ps11uN1 DBI1i1P 1895 frLOl1 r GOUHZRA1 1 P X Cf II 18196 6130121 r T1 1 1111111 I1 111111 Q 1 1 1897 O11 I1o1 SQHOOT OI MT DILINI' Lows L11111 SLHOOI OI' I UV C D P01111 NS SCHOOL OF THVOI OC X 111 'NTI v MA 1 T111 X9 B111x1x E LSLA1 1 15111113 11111 I X XINSOIN H-KI 1 11111111115 mx 111 111 1 XI 11H x CMAQ A MLC XII C1A11NL1 SNIOLI I V n U 9 "1 I mix. 1 E . F I PQH 11 ' D .f I XXLVRIEIJ T1. I1 1 ,.1 . 1. I LD. , D '1' Q1115v PRIN '12 I-I. D1 111.1 .S'1'13'5,'., ', P11. D I 1 1 , 7 . , 1 1 I 1 1 1 'f 1 I 12"", ', '. I 1 :mis SNOW, C, E, I .. 1 . I. I n 'I 1 1: ' 1 1 '1, .Io 1 ic Q3 11 LY11131i141111Q. F21 "3 7 1 1 5 S11 11:11 I I ft " 1 E1 QQ 1 1 . Q I 1 1 f V JX1U1f1fR1xN1,111,11. I C 5 I. EDNVAIQD S1x11'1'H, O1z111N VV111111111 SN11111:1:,1ss, W1x11'1'1311 'I'A1f11111-:S1--11111111113 I ' Y Q ff 1:1 '1 'SIX 1.31. 1111 1 1 11, I 1115. KI 11 121 1 231 11z'1'1x11-111. XV1.'f12R 1. Po1:1211'1's 1 C111 1 I11:1:1 1 Sx11'111. I I I 1' T'-+1x,"' 3. G15 11111, 1' W. I . I'I1,11 1 'X 1 1 f ? I 5 N L. i 3: 1. I f' QM1 1 '11 . I . .'1Q."E1. D. .' '41 . I1 11:'21'1 'Q Q'D 1 'L11D91'. -511 1 '11, I :so 1 I I I 11 QI I: I I I I 1 ' I , PHI, ZETA, DELTA, SIGMA, CI-II, - EPSI LON, - RHO. KAPPA, TAU, UPSILON, XI, - PI. - LAMBDA, - PSI, IOTA, THETA Xl, ALPHA, ALPHA PSI, NU, - . ETA, MU, - BETA, Zeta Psi. FOUNDED IN 1546. ROLL OF CHAPTERS. 40 University of the City of New York - - - Willianis College - - Rutgers College University of Pennsylvania - - Colby University - Brown University - Harvard University Tufts College - - Lafayette College University of North Carolina - - University of Michigan - Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute - - Bowdoin Coilege - Cornell University - University of California University of Toronto - Columbia College - - McGill University - Case School of Applied Sciences - - Yale University Leland Stanford, jr., University - University of Virginia I I I I I I I I 'I' I I I 'I I I I .v ' I -. I 5 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I' I LI I I I nk I I I u I I . I I i I I I I l ii '-x x i. . .f'5ffi 6 ww Hr' as ,: .,a..Ai'?. if' ,f'Wi'? Z1f.'.gAF' X Wk ff P, MW' 'I 'Panamamumnnnvwunmvnu-vlan wvmlnvxwm mimmn' 0 Q xhum. . ..,...,. . ,.,. ...., . ., ,.,,,,,,, V-1 .. , 1- l-' "WW ,, 1,4-gf , ,- L1um1L:w1u:.wJ .y,.,,3. XL . 1' ry W- , 134.15 . .T , -I QQ, Q .5 iliffl if V F 7,5 .,,, , K 42, ,H QM. ff" ff? f A rf , W.. 14.51179-1: ,. , Y Vi ,i rv., 5" :if I 5 g Q-if , may -fm f - . LW- - -we- 4J A- +- V '- '2 i W 1 N N V, -'I if? " 'Q 5 - a D ,, as 5 . 3 y 3 ",fHi4-,,' ist 1 ' e' ' .. 1 'gggff 4 4 C ' 'p...""'u 1 U- -Q I 1' f ' if XL hw , Q + I' '1 uw , ...,,., 1,,,.,..,, ., ,, . . , . 1 , K' , W Mllliilllllgn' A ' 1 ' ,, W: .zw-H' ' i , WZWPMNIQTJ g25i,,rlJffI9,HI,: . as 11,2 A 'ez - 1 If M L 1 fixtwbw A YK N :Hifi ,W .. ,Q fl ya 1 4 :wwf , ' 8, f f vi U pl f In 'Q , Y 1 A ' on J 14 X L , , J 1 Q -gr' 5 ,-3 l,f U, if X X M W' Hy: 4 k 1 . Ls' LL V9 5 .A A W' J f-x ' ' 0 0 0 r ' A E Q fl H Ju 3' X 3 if :erm ,vw f' f QV e-, Wx V' d ' 1,3572 z 1 mfg X' I N Y ., 9 gh 'X hy . 1 A 1 7,3 w of f 37 5 4 , 1 ' K 1 Y V A ,A . N if N ,L ' W K 2 N N, I I i , Ng. ' Y Y Phi Chapter Of Zeta si. '94. CARLOS MORALES y CALYO. IOI-IN TERHIINE VAN RIEER. '95. JULIUS, ALEXANDER BECKER. I. HENRY RIRRY. WALTER DENTON LUDLUM. EENIAIIIN IIORACE STERN. '96, FRANCIS TREADXVAY CLAYTON. VVALTER ,IAIIIES GREACIEN. GEORGE IIENRV MATTHEWS CHARLES LARUE MEAD. XVIIQLARD FRANCIS OTTARGON, IOIIN IJRENTICE TAYLOR. 7 97, GEORGE VVASHINGTON DOXVNES. IIIOODV BLISS GATES. EIJMVND WILLIAM GREACEN.. GEORGE EDWARD MAYER. W. SEXYARD GIAIANAEAN. SCI-IQOL OF LA.W'. 3 94- JOHN VAN DEWATER CORNELL. I-IOWARD CROSEI' GRIEEITIAIS. PAUL GRAUT. 'WILLIAM 1. BARR. , '95. PETER J, EVERETT. CLARENCE MCRENZIE. SPECIAL. JUAN FRANCISCO MORALEG y CALVO. GEORGE SCHERIIIERHORN SEXVARD. 41 1 I XVILLIAMS UNION HAMIl,'l'ON A NIIIICRST AI DELI-BIERT Ci DLI! V R4 lCI'IICS'I'I-IR MII3l'Jl,lClZL'RX RPT! D ERS Chapters of Delta Upsilon. ISIU MVN COLGATIC N ICW YORK CIJRNELT, M A R1 IETTA SYRACUSE NlICfIlGAN NCJR'l'IINYICS'Fli RN XVISCONSIN LAlFAYI5'l"Fl92 LTOI,L'MI3IA LEIIIGII T L' FTS f' - IJ11:PA U NV 'PEN NSYLVAN MINNIESOTA IEC PXVDUIN '1'liCHNOLOGY NN ASSQCVXTIQNS. Yfzlslxixlgt-1:11. IJ. C. Boston, Mass. Now Yfvrl: City, N. Y. H111-f-1110, N. Y. HID I-lllgfiblll, Mass. 4-2 C11iL'11g'Ib, IH. -1 if K r i I P I , 4 I, r gl K N 5 i ' N W 1 .,, g , 1.X i I 'u 1 3 v u ,ff T3256f'if ,,fw,71f4?5' l airy , w iv 'nib' . J gf' sw 1 2344 JWYK dh-55 :M-427 906 ,V M 23 QQ I gk axx g f l KG' Lk Q fa, QXAIHI V Y A55 Zwx 1 ,Hi owaxrw! 4 -Uf k cn ,Jfl,j'8x,f W 'EQ Qu ir- V1I F m 'x if -. W S -i te' ' 2 wfrf-f w fw i I H 4,'w'21w 'Q' ' 1 gg ncmcfnw. , ' MS RACUS ,Q gzgsgag W Q, agfgagzgg ' AW ' ' viii? H ' . wa-1. ' .. :annum N, -: mls ff l ff-, J ' kwg f X 41' QE: ,f 'ff f ,A f 51-6 1' -s -' -- '1 1 , ' , f r ' M H .il w ai gf cf' :Y , X ff a lfa fwfr N 0 V W ' - 5 - ive , Q- ifgrff Q E . u ? 1f a f f? ' 2 Acfvua 4 -,,gjz1, ,f ,f 5 . X fi T emvil F iii ,. T- ,Ito ff. wwf? 'G ""0wGY' -- SMA .1-1 , ' , x V Q- Hin 1 fvpyrfynmm Delta psilon. NEW YORK CHAPTER. FRATRES IN FAQUL-TATE ES'rABL1SHEO 1365 HENRY MARTYN BA1RD, D. E., LL.D, JEROME ALLEN, P1-1. D. ABRAM S. ISAACS, Pu. B. ADDISON BALLARD, 13.13, FHATRES IN PRAESENII. 1894. 'PHEOOORE BAME BARRINGER, JR. JAMES EDDY BLAKE. SAMUEL J. S'111EBEL I JAMES FRANCIS TUCKER. 1896. HOWARD CROSBY L1'1J11GOW. NVILLIAM SEGGIE, JR. 1897. ALBER1' A. ANDERSEN. XVILLIAM AUCUSTUS HUDSON. CHARLES FREDERIC NAPIIER, JK. HARRY PRIME B1SSELL. ERAN141 JOSEPH MLCOUR'1x JOHN w'A'1"rS NVARRIN, JR, POST GRADUATE. JULIEN MYER 1SAACS. ARTHUR CECIL PERRY. ROBERT LIVINGSTON RUDOLRH. JAMES ERNEST GRANT YALBEN. ' SCHOOL OI? LAXV. THEODORE COX. FREDERICK MELv1N. ELMER JAMES XVALSH SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. T. BELLOWS B11E1+'UM, LANDER R EERNANDEZ. HARRY FULLER VVAITE. ' SCHOOL OF 'l'IIEOLfJiiY. EDWARD JOHNSON AI-SBOTT. 'IOHN LEXVIS CLARK. LOUIS OSCAR ROTENBACH. l'3 .PPT-L ' "" liil ALPIIIX . . ALPHA DEU'FlENON AI,I'IlA PIII . ALPHA CIII . BI2'I'A . . BETA lDEU'l'ERON BIQTA CHI . BETA MU . GAMMA DIcU'1'IcI1oN GAMMA PIII . lQEl.'l'.'X . . lJEl,'l'A lJIQU'I'IaIwN lJliL'l'A X1 . lEPsII.oN . . EPsILoN l.JIiU'lilCRON f ALI A . . ZIc'I'A lQliU'l'liROlN ZIc'I'A PIII . ETA . . 'PIII-I'l'A lJIzU'I'I-:IaoN 'llllIi'liA Psi . Io'rA MU . lN1APl'A NU . li.fXl'l'A 'FAU . l I I i i I I I hi Gamma Delta. FOUNDIQD 1348. ROLL Qi: CHAPTERS. XVashington and jefferson. Illinois VVesleyan University. University of Michigan. Amherst College. University of Pennsylvania. Roanoke College. Lehigh University. johns Hopkins University. Knox College. Pennsylvania State College. Bucknell University. Hampden-Sidney College. University of California. University of North Carolina. Muhlenberg College. Indiana State University. Washiiigtoii and Lee University, 'William Jewell College, Marietta College. Ohio XVesleyan University. Colgate University. Massachusetts Institute of Tech- nology. Cornell University. University of Tennessee. LAMBDA . . . LAIIIIIA DEU'l'lERON . LAMBDA SIGMA MU . . . MU SIGMA . Nu . . . NU DEUTERON NU EPSILON . XI . . OMICRON . . . OMICRON DIcU'1'I3ImN PI .... PI DEUTERON . PIIo'rA . . RI-Io DIEU'1'lEliON . Rno CI-II . . SIGMA . . SIGMA DEUTERON . TAU . . . TAU ALPHA UPsILoN . Psi . CHI . OMEGA . DePauw University. Denison University. Leland Stanford University. University of Wisconsin. University of Minnesota. Bethel College. Yale University. University of the City of New York. Pennsylvania College. University of Virginia. Ohio State University. Allegheny College. University of Kansas. Worcestei' Polytechnic Institute. Wooster University. Richmond College, NVittenberg College. Lafayette College. Hanover College. Trinity College. College of the City of New York. VVabash College. U11ion College. Columbia College. 1 1, 1 1 1 ' 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 I 1 1 15, 1 1 3 1 1 ' I 1 3 3 I I 1 1 1 1 ' ' 1 A 1 1 1 1 1 4' ' ! 1 1 11 I 4 1 I Zi f Q W11 lic. , Al fgigliffx.-.Q M, NUE E EKG LOL' ALFQ HAR S 'I E ANS SAM 1051 h amma Delta NU EPSILON CHAPIBR I SIIABLISHLD FEBRUARX IQ IDQ2 FRAIPLSIN FACUIIAIE EDGAR DUIDS SIIIMI R P11 D T' A CORNI I IUS GOIJI RI Y COARI I Y M D A INI 2 CHARI I S PROSPLR IAGNANI A I5 B S II FPAIPESIN PPAPSENI I OSI' LJRADUATI NORMAN XVII SON CROSBY BS WI' LIAINI .IANII S CIREANI I II B S M D EUGENL I AINSINC BI AUVEI I IIRAINLIS LEARY INIANNINL ANIOINIIL PIIIINIIAS X OISI AXYSKI FRANK VVASHINGTON IJLXRLINC LOUIS I IICKER PIIII IP ELSIWORIII XRIHUI IOHN IVALSLHEID JULIUS I MIL XYALSLI-IIIID CHARLES I IRARIJ XX IIEEI ER 9 IXVILI IAM PERRX IIADYVIIN DAIXII I DOXNNINL1 IOMPRINS SPFCI XI WILLIAM CLAY I ON HALRE'II'I I AYV SEYNIOUR NAIIHAN HAVVLI Y I ALI AND NVII I I XXI IIRIIDI RIC QUIGI LX THEODORE MONIIC OMERY IIII I I DVVARD SIDNI Y RANVSON EDWARD LAI AYI I II INIAVILRN CIIARI ES CL NRENCE VVOODRUFF MEDICAI ANSON IIORACE BIRGL KENNIIIII KLITH III NALPINI ROBIIRII SLI WART SAMUI I ALBERIUS BROVI IN MURPY XVISNER SI ACIEARS I OPFRI Md I AN GOI DON TAP II ,IOSEPII BLIXJAMIN ROI I C ECRLI I SLAWSON L EORGE IIIIX IS VVICKLS o l . HD. z'. C v - 1' ,f. I.. I 1 J I.. . 1 I I I ' 3, .I.,L.. I EJ ,I ,1I Q IIE, . .,. ,,A. ,M P11 , ., Aq,IH,f I' I I X I.. ' II' I - C. ' ' ,I I , .. IIII I yffr 1 211, .I., 7 94- 1, 1 2 , ffi I 11: 1 f 11 L 1M II -1, "p L 7 95 1 ' I. -I. o 796 51 . JR, f VH. ffw 1 1 I II 1 CEI' ' pI L . I,' 1.,I,-I 'I', 7'I 1, . 7 97- ALFRED CHAPMAN I,:ENEDIC'II. ' I f f ,1 I ' I L . I 5, I 'II 'I 'I 'II HARRY VVINFIELD ISROWN. FRANK LAVVS HU'II'IION. THOMAS IIICRBERT YVHIFFEN I , I 1. , I I rw 1 r 1 A . 1 I ' 5 I J A. ,,:I'1IL EI JVI. 1 ' I ' 1 ' 1,-. E II, . Q I . Q Ervxs f rxxvh Q Y Ji 1 I14 A A3 . ' IA. ' 1 1I. 1 11'I ' 1I I1 l I E. I L ' II'I D . I E, 1 'If x .I IE 11 I. Q 1 'I ",E Q I' IA P1 f ' H. 2+ :5YI , . :Q 1 Af I 11. I l A L P H A, BETA, GAM MA, DELTA, IEPSILON, Zl2'l'A, ETA, - T H ETA, heta u EpSil0l1 FOUNDED 'IN 1870s RCU. CF CHAPTERS. 'Wesleyan University Syracuse University Union Univei sity Cornell University - University of Rochester - University of California - Colgate College - Kenyon College - Adelbert College - Hamilton College - - Wlilliains College Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute - - Stevens lnstitute - Lafayette College - Amherst College - Alleghany College - - Rutgers College Pennsylvzmia State Colleve o UN iofrfx, - KAPPA, . - IQAPPA IJIEUTERUN, 1,Ai11anA, - - MU, - NU, xi, - cm1c1:oN, - - mncnox lJlCl"l'liRClN iii, - . . l'llJlCL"llI2lQ ', mio, . . SIGMA, 46 - Lehigh University University of Pennsylvania - New York University l" ' l fi 9 1 , W X . ii 3 b . 3 , 9 ? I . i I 1 , N , 4 , I ' I A , , ,H , . ...IA A, , V IIA I V l I J , 5 . 'J T-L. , i:,vC...L-, 11 1 I "Y ' ' 1 ,Y 11 fx H i 1 4 I I 1 1 J 4 1 1 J E I l. SINIXLIIXIIIR IIIIIODOPI ARIHUIX C1 SSL IRANQ15 I LAIXX MANNINC JOHN JObI PH MOOIXIILAD JOHN X OQBUIXG HXII IV DUDLLY IJAI AND C 1.851 I R Theta Epsllon Sophomore Soclety FIAIRESIN PRAESENI 1894 I LXIxIOSMUIxAII1Sx 1 XINO I1 IXIXX LAI ILR PI A I X GODI PLX IXOGPIX PISI Ix CJLORGI II OOIJRIIAI I XXIJXII 1895 II AL'II'I IAXI OR 8111 I XIXIJ PTRLY AI IIIUP X XI IDI N 1896 f J IIT I b .M 4PIx D If v 9 a M H' n 3 'L IJ xx xx U I O S XL ll Aj uk V N1 D if IS IJ IN IOIINI IOIDII AIXID IXLBION JOHN ILRHI XI IAN IXIPI I NNIOBIL IIIIBVAS XOISI XIXbIx.X I MANL XL FIXANIQ 'VI O Q XI. L I ORL I I I M IS IVILIxI.,S Ll 0 0 I -'I 'WE . IiS'IX-XI-BI, QHIC .590 1'-2 1 1 1. 4 wif " ' 235 ER, Ijgf 'I ,LQ J' C. ,'. J 11 L X' ' , ff ,ff T. DEH' I vf 1 '12 Us ' f fl. 'E' I "-P '. fx?" 2' SET 'TIJTL U, 7 .f,1-"ff 'O ' J'L, 'F E I JV? L-:'s.,,.E JK- fJ1' 'VA-f, HENRY I-IEDGES ESSICK. JOHN JUNIOR. GRAHAM. BENJAMIN HURATIIJS STERN T 'J A . f7 ILQH 'J XYQI, In IE IE ,'C"Q ' OWFQ, L ' VI' X 'L , Q . WJ5 f1 ,vw CMJ 1:43 Ze? M 33 Il V ?::1f I QE?" j D I 1 G Iffc-NN fivuky 1, 5 EE 11 If V Q S D Z1 0 I w I? : : I . ' .lj 5 y C t 2 S I 'Q G : 3 1 ? c'zo5HQ1':C:: 47 I C D Beta Delta Beta. ESTABLISHED ISQI. Freshman Class Society. ROLL OF CHAP TER5. ALPHA, - ' ' ' BETA, GAM MA, - DELTA, - - ' ' ' FRA TRES IN FACULTA TE. Syracuse University - Colgate University New York University Troy Institute of Technology 3gQ3.?Q-My -I--I-O?!""::? JqfJ?cQS'k.f- 973900-?5Q3 FKA TRES IN PRAESENTI. 1894. THOMAS ELOY ADR1ANc:E. PERRY CARTER PENTZ. GEORGE VVOODRUFF RANDALL. 'RHEODORE ARTHUR GESSLER. GODEREY ROGER 111SER. SAMUEL J. S'1'1E1aEL, 1fRANc1S LEARY MANNLNG. JOHN EDWARD RUSTON. ANTONIE PI-IINEAS VOISLAWSKY 1895. HENRY HEDGES ESS1eR. JOHN EIUNIOR GRAHAM. HENRY BERGMANN SINGER BENJAMIN HORA'r1US STERN. GEORGE LEXVIS WIGRES. 1896. GEORGE NAT1-1AN l-BOEHM. FRANK HEATH, JR. JULIUS EMIL XVALSCHEID. HARRY XVINFIELD BROWN. FRED CORNELL ROHEINS. ARTHUR JAMES XVALSCHEID. 1897. VENUS. RLOOM1N1JU'1'. DR. PARRHURST. SHEENGUAZE. COMMANDER SALLY HOOT11. ENG1NEER MOODY. CIRCE. COMMODORE GERRY. 1f1REMAN BILLY EDXVARDS. 48 at E R VAWWV W Vw F lx hi Delta Phi. Legal Fraternity. FOUNDED 1869. FIELD CHAPTER FOUNDED ISSS , FRRTRES IN FRCULTRTE. AUSTIN ABBOTT, LL. D., Dann. ISAAC F. RUSSELL, D. C. L., LL. D. CHRISTOPHER G. TIEDEMAN, A. M., LL. B. FRRTRES IINI PRRESENTI. HENRY MARTYN BAIRD, -IR. DAVID RAYMOND DALY, GEORGE WILLETS DAVISON. TH EO DORE MOMTGOM ERY HILL. VVILLIAM HOSMER IVES. GEORGE IVILLIAM ALGER. CHARLES BUNKER CRANE. RALPH ALDOM FROST. STEPHEN HENRY KEATING. GEORGE VINCENT MULLAN. 1894. HAROLD EDWARD LIPPINCOTT. BURTON CHARLES MEIGHAN. ALFRED CHARLES POST CPDYKE. BAYARD LIVINGSTON PECK. EDWARD RDCHEMDUNT SANDFORD. CHARLES SEYMOUR WHITMAN. . 1895. JOHN EDWARD RUSTON. 49 RICHARD HENRY CLARK, JR. HENRY HEDGES ESSICK. THEODORE ARTHUR GESSLER. HOWARD SIDNEY MEIGHAN. ROBERT RUSSELL REQUA. Illn .1 Delta Chi. Q 1 FOUNDED AT CORNELL IN 1889. ROLL OF CI-IPIPTERS. LAIV DEPAR'I'MEN'1', CORNELL UNIVERSITY. LAXV DEPARTMENT, UNIVERSITY CITY OF NEXV YORK. ALBANY LAXV SCHOOL OF UNION UNIVERSITY. LAW DEPARTMENT, UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA. LAVV SCHOOL, DE PAUNV UNIVERSITY. LAXV DEPARTMENT, UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN. LAIV DEPARTMENT, DICKINSON COLLEGE. LAXV SCHOOL, NORTHVVESTERN UNIVERSITY. IH- 50 l k--ri I :nf ' I elta Chi. Legal Fraternity. JUSTINIHN CHFIPTER. l894. ' JAMES AIKEN. CHARLES HENDRE KELBY. XVILLIAM JOHN BARR. CHARLES A, KENMORE. HENRY STORRS GOSLEE. NVARREN LESLIE. VVILLIAM STEELE GREY. EDXVIN L. MATTERN. HOXVARD CROSBY GRIEIIITHS. WILLIAM FREDERIC QUIGLEY. PAUL GROUT. EDWARD SIDNEY RANVSON. FRANK MAURICE HOLAHAN. EREDERIC JOHN STUHR. GEORGE JACOB IAEGER. FREDERICK EUGENE NVEEKS l895. THEODORE COX. LUIS NVALTON MOONEY. WILLIAM HENRY HEATON. MAURICE MULCAHY, JOHN K. MCDONALD. EDXVIN HOLLAND NICI-IOL. ROBERT STEXVART SCOTT. 51 Phi Beta Kappa. FOUBIDED 1776. QETA QHAPTER, ESTABLISHED AT N. Y. U. 1333. R095 OF THE UNFTED QHPPTERS IN THE S5955 OF NEW YORK- lsiy-ALPHA, - - - Union College 1338-BETA, University of the City of New York 1367-GAMMA, College of the City of New York 1369 DELTA, - - Columbia College 1870-EPSILON, - - - Hamilton College 1371-ZETA, - Hobart College 1375-ETA, - Colgate University 1833-'l.'HE'I'A, - - Cornell University 1887-IOTA, - - - - University of Rochester OFFICERS. HENRY M. BAIRIB, D.D., LL.D., - - P1'e5z'1fw1f. JOHN J. S'r1svENsoN, Pn.D., - - - Vifv-Pruszaefzf. HENIQX' M. lNIAcC1mc:1clQN, D.D., LL.D., C'0l'l'5.ff0lIIII17Zg' Secrelznjf. Islmc F. RllSSEI.I,, lJ.C.L., LL.lJ., - R54-0:'1f1'1zg Sefrefmjf. IJANIEI, XY. l'lERlNl2, C.E., ------- 7'rcfz.v11f'w'. MEMBERS. CLASS OF 1894. '1'Iamo1moR1c ls. BARRINGER, JR. JOHN V. IRXVIN. JOSEPH B, LYMAN. JOSEPH M BRom'. RALPH KIRBV. JOHN If MACCRACKEN, 52 r 1 bl' 4 i 4, A ,HW A 4- W J , I IW! -Q54 I 1 2 N 1: N Q K 1 1 Y I i E 3 . f Y I i E r T l f I f 5 W Y N 1 e J I i . 4 ' X r V 2 ratermty Summary. MEMBERSHIP IN THE LOCHL CHAPTERS. COLLEGIA TIL' FRA TENNITIES. PSI UPSILON, - - - - - 26 DELTA PHI, ' 2 1 ZETA PSI, - 25 DELTA UPSILON, - 25 PHI GAMMA DELTA, ---- 33 CLA 55 FIFA T E ICN! 7 7 15.51 THETA NU UPSILON, ----- - I9 BETA DELTA BETA, ---- 29 LEGAL ,lf7C.,.' TERNI I 7135. PHI DELTA PHI, ---- - 22 DELTA CHI, ---- 23 IIOJVORARY IRA Tl1'lC.VlTV. PHI BETA KAPPA, Q!fllll'67'lg'7'!IfZI1llZfb'5J, - - - - 6 TOTAL, - - - I CONVENTION S. PSI UPSILON, - VVith the Kappa Chapter at Bowdoin College, I-Bruiiswick, Manic, M115 DELTA PHI, VVitI1 the New York Club at New York City, November. ZETA PSI, - - VVith the Theta Xi Chapter at Toronto, Canada, blzmuary. DELTA UPSILON, NVith the Union Chapter atScI1e11ectady, New York, October. PHI GAMMA DELTA, - 'With the Omicron Deuteron Chapter at Columbus, Ohio, October. I 5:3 Undergraduate members of Fraternities not Represented at the University. EDWLN L ARENCE ECKEL '95 Alpha Delta Phi. GEORGE XVASI-IINGTON OSBORN, '95 Beta Theta Pi. JOHN ARTHUR FUN1c,'95. Delta Kappa Epsilon. FRANK HEATH, '96, Sigma Nu. NVILLIAM JONES MARSHALL, '95, Theta Delta Chi. c. WALTER 1aoG1zR'r,w,5. Theta Xi. MELVILLE D. CHAPMAN, '95, 54 FRED. P. KAFKA, '96 f 5 MISCELLANEOUS ORGANIZATIONS ii A4 :-1 X' .1 K ff-f " wffimfli ,j.,,4,QL ff iff- A' lfA "L ,'-' - Qf"2T.f 1 fa ' 1 wkiiii ,T K f 5' '44 -1, 'J - if X G ,. ,, Ju 1 .10 k-Q-L if 'N 1 , I E59 n ii 1 7 'S' x I :V v ,PfLf Z Ni f ai J-, 'Y Y 'S fN fi .,. . f ,fjfg -W ,,,, ,Y-4 '44,-ff-" . ,,-Y 4'-""' ,. ' :FEP-Q15 df' 51i?1'5 .. -1 ,f ,ff - . f' , -,pk--ff ,air-5-9 - -- , ...f ' , -' ! f,,,g7f,-- if-fd -f..,- 2--J'-L 'A ' ' ' P 74 i"1rnj' "iff, Y .,j,,. ,, .f ,,, :Y V,,-, . ,K-F J... i262 f '5y""T:-21:f"JQg:.':' -W A A 'ji-ff' W x, O OFFICERS. YVYEYVYBERS. Jfmfffmf-o1zR1N s, VVIGHTMAN, '95, A'rWA'r12R, YQS. GRUENENTHAL, '96 ffm,-V1m-,mfwff-EDWARD fr, MCKENZIE, '99, LEVY, 'Q7. MYERS, '96, .sm-I-my-xw'ALTER J, GREACEN, '96, SNYDER, ,Q7. VAN R1PER, '94, 7a-.WW-,9--JQIJN V, IRXVIN, 94. L, XVHITNEV, '99, 50 L .fl ,.-17 - ,ar -.-,Fh- K :'f?'vfgf' ,au-4a lm 4" f 2 f fi: 1. .v -- - ,LH 11.4 f 54. ., , 1- "I'1f.3"' L,-L:.L,,- V31 1 ,f-'gif-f': 4 ' ,LQ 1 Q 5 Q' -,'-4iQ?':,1- ' ' L f ' , -M 2' 1 ' , ' -f . - 1, '.,..fi"f?."3'--15" 1 ' X , ,,: Y. 1 1-df . iq: 1 .f - ' f . '- u N'ff,-'-1, - 1 , 1 v":'. 3- 4 . , . Y ,1 A ,-,M-,. , .5 4 ,..4. A, ' . N 1 v-I .,. if '3., ,g.' 7.4 :N 1 -:,7f,' ., . , G Y. .. , f j' L w fl E i s Q iff.. ,f i je 'U CL E 'Z A its 'nf 0 ci is I tr. I I as 'Xf- J K Q 7 N 'ng' J gg ff ""'m7'7' T T 72 - Y - ,- 54. . I .,. .,.,,...,g,..z.. . M, L..ff-M-ff? tial s ff' T .Q ff: 'viii rffs' 1 , 5 Zi, I, ,fe fu , i, . '. ,- ' . gg 511331, t' V ' V. uf f V. , mx: ' .1 fi - ' ' Q... fig p ,fir swf V.- Mm ' ilhfgliw ii ""'f-v'-sf1'21-if-'T5231,-1-:Q-.,:4Ls 'V - -' 'K-'YM ff' '-"f' "-l'-WE."-', 9 ' " ' ' I 1 ' i ' 3 r ',f?'7bif'G5?:Cf T' M ,.:.mz.:z::.fer.-,N.,'a.gw,ss,,.,w,y, ff ss'-f .f z ra-,nf ,-:,.:,.e-as s"f:f-1.-aimima?-fsqzvsvvsl' WM .W ' : fi . . . I i . ga! ,'waf'Mfw ,2 " , , M ama? -1 N f an 1 .X -- . EUCLEIAN H LL. " I move, Mr. President, that we lay the janitor on the table. " This Was a motion frequently heard in the Eucleian Society, say some of our older Alumni, in the days when the society used to meet in the evening. For when the debate Waxed hot and the debaters tar- ried too long, that worthy functionary whose duty it is to chase men into Chapel, was wont to attempt to chase the boys out ot Eucleian. But at this point he overstepped the bounds of good policy, and brought upon himselt the xvoetul accomplisliinent ot the above motion, varied occasionally by the Words, 'tor under the table. 'l This literary society has a long and interesting history to look back to. Founded in the thirties, and active throughout its whole history, it has in that alone a record to be proud of, when one con- siders the numbers of organizations that have dropped out of existence with far shorter lives than this. Moreover, on its rolls are some famous namesg Samuel Tilden, the Abbott brothers and many others are enrolled who are now as well known to the world as any Americans. VVe can hardly claim that it was due to the fact that they were mem- bers of Eucleian that they became famous, but We may say that the time they spent in old Eucleian Hall was probably as Well spent as any hours of their lives. The University holds in trust for this society the sum of 31500, the proceeds of which are almost exclusively devoted to the purchase of books for the circulating library, some ot whose wellvstocked shelves may be seen in the picture on the opposite page. By gradual years of accumulation the library has now grown to considerable sizeg and there could hardly be a better indication of the character of the socie- ty's membership than the titles of the books which the successive librarians have bought and class after class have read. The library is for its size one of the most complete and useful that can be found. This feature of the society's life and the Butler prizes awarded yearly, give to the organization a permanent character, so that it will probably last as long as the University itself. 57 J ,Illif ,J w i bf-Ls f I - rl 55 Z 5 J? . JI I . 11 ' . N '- x . 'vf' 'Ziff 1" 'arg '5-'ZFETYC'53'?'Hfz5:::5'11x Q T1i,"T - --'S'Q'5QA'55v,.-aff.ZJ-,3'fff..,'WQ,,'z?QQ:r?'1b'0ffPl5,-:".4wfi','' fw- 5 .. -- ffT--s,1n!nmanxwvw1fw--:4-W-1n""""""""11,-sw.1-- 17,-, -l V. ...QW ,., ,,,,..y,..,.,,,QM,..v J . . ,Q JW,,,.W.W R 4 ,.M...MM -..-...M . ...-:AL thj V W, ., , . x .. W w 1 A ' f- - W in " F., T' - ffffir J' R h A , J f f L -, .:eQ?5,5..:., - ,ga -4 PM Q . ...f .2 J TX LV , 5 ay 1 Lyla' rf . flylx-.Q lu .f-'ish ,,1',:u-3 :SF :jg H ? . 'R 1 '- if My A I I i"E2F? u E:-FF ' I 'PES' ugnyulggil L2 '.f ' ,Q K ' 'J ,A f' IL. f '-'N KJ J ' rf 1, I . ' 'HQ , ',g' " ' 2: f. , N I . , , .:, f V, X V' 4293 ff fi-' . 675 'f -5 f-'1 "WU 121- :Y P31 3 ' -'V I-2 r':' W ' nf""fv 1 . 3.3 1 A I .wiunw Ji, :N I , '31 .v :mx J fi.-4. fr' H 5:5 in I N l -.,. E5 V1 . ,.f. ,.,, :ff.Q:lf'-19-'i'g L17 in :ew ?i5:2f!m':iig. 'f'Ti ,fb 3 , , ZW? 59,42 Ki' H M! J ' N J 411:1 1 1 . . 1 'Mi-QQHQFQ 1141 Q ,ifq fC 1' Q1- 'J ,.L2N:"'Q' 'ffl Nik: 'Q ,.-ff r 11 'xl Q, I QQM 1' 135,13 -f , , ?,Zi' J ft :Vff .sink t , .. N ggi 1.545 K ' - Lrx-51mv,,...- Y' ,, f2 if ..,.,., -, , K- 1- 'f - . f J Z A., .,:1-f:.:.1.j.:fw- ' '7:fw-..-of H... ww ... -' -vflfibw givpw ,ff ' - ., f X f . .f-...fu-W ,,:,..k,,,ihgb . .V ., ,. ., . fr 5 1 IJ Q . ,J J. ,Avy JF, - 54+-wwrmfm W ffl ' Y ' WR V. 1 5 3.73 1 dv.. Wy A 'ff J W?" ' " " ,h,p4s' 4 ,. fm f - 1'-vyQ.f,,,. , f,,. W fl 1- V,-Q'-f, V .114 f - lf, W Praxzkiafz I, Vz'rc-Presz'11'e 71 C'07'. Seunflazjf, Ref. .Sac7'c!1zUf, CYUIISUV, - ...,, .,.-.....,.,.,.....,....M.-1.-...Frm-A..,..--.773 gf 1 .A ix, I '44 ff OFFICERS. FIRST TERM. 'FIIEODORE A. G'ESSI.ER. ORRIN SAGE VV1Gn1'1'MAN. - CH11s'1'r1R F. S. XfVlIITNlEX'. - CHARLES L. Mmm, NV.x1,'1'1zR D. LUULUAI. SECOND TERM. Joi-IN V. XRXVIN. Jo11N J. MOOIQIJEAXIJ. JULIUS A. BECIQER. HIENIIY B. SINGER. Moolmv B. GAHLS. THIRD TERM. JOHN BLIOORIIEAD. VVA1.'1'ER D. LUDLUM. LAXVRENCE VV. VVHWNEY. CIIARLRS M. Mlavlzks. EIOXVARD BILL. Elected J Lz'b1'arz'1zn, JOSIQPH B. LYMAN. Yearly. I Trczzsm-w', Jo11N H. MACCRACRIQN. J 58 if P 3 Sv E5 Members of ucleian. Class of '94. Class of '95. THEODORE A. GESSLER. JULIUS A. BECKER. JOHN V. IRXMIN. JAMES OSCAR BOYD. JOSEPH B. LYMAN. JOHN ARTHUR FUNK. JOHN H. MacCRACKEN. YVALTER D, LUDLUM. JOHN J. MOORHEAD. ISAAC HENRY KIRISY. HENRY B. SINGER Olass of '96. Class of '97, FRANCIS T. CLAYTON. HO WARD BILL. CHARLES L. MEADE. GEORGE VV. CAIN. CHARLES M. MYERS. MOODY B. GATES. FREDERICK C. SECKERSON. XVILLIAM P. HADNVEN. GEORGE F. SVVAN. GEORGE E. MAYER. CHESTER F. S. YVHITNEY. HUGH MQDOUGALL. LAWRENCE W. VVHITNEY. 'SZVILLARD J. TOMPKINS. .w 59 J' 4 X ff I, 1,4 f75f, JZ I 9 The Young Mens Christian Association X New York University. OFFICE RS. P1'uxz'zz'c:zf-j. H. MACCIQACKEN, '94. Ifzku-,P1'e.vz'n'efz1f-A. H. LIOWLAND, '95. Sacrclfzfy-J. OSCAR BOYD, '95. 7':'ua.vzn'c1'-Gxolzoiz F. SWAN, '96, 1- 60 'Sf W ,Wa J' R Oll of embers. --QBQdASDo4o- 7 QA. THEODORE B. BARRINGER, JR. JOHN V. IRXVIN. JAMES H. BLAKE. JOHN H. MACORACKEN. EUGENE L. BLAUVELT. JOHN J. MOORHEAD. VERNON E. CARROLL. JOHN E. RUSTON. " JOHN T. ATWATER. HENRY H. BANKS. J. OSCAR BOYD. MELVILLE E. OUNNINGHAM. J. ARTHUR FUNK. 7 96. VVALTER J. GREACEN. EDWARD T. MCKENZIE. CHARLES L. MEAD. CHARLES M. MYERS. VVILLARD F. OTTARSON. BRUCE G. PHILLIPS. FREDERICK C. SECKERSON. GEORGE F. SVVAN. I. PRENTICE TAYLOR. CHESTER F. S. VVHITNEY. LAWRENCE VV. IVHITNEY. HOVVARD BILL. GEORGE A. CAIN. GEORGE W. DOXVNS LAURELL VV. DEMERITT. EDWIN L. GARVIN. MOODY B. GATES. EDMUND W. GREACEN. 61 FREDERICK J. HANDY. ARTHUR H. HOVVLAND. J. HENRY KIRBY. 'WILLIAM MARSHALL ORRIN S. VVIGHTMAN. HUGH MCDOUGALL. J. HALL MCKAY. GEORGE E. MAYER. DAVID ORR. HUGO A. OSVVALD. VVILLARD J. TOMPKINS. R. STANLEY POVEY. NEWfYORKlNWVERSHW'DRAHATKZCLUB. ff IRVA Ag ORE THE SPOOK, THE SAGE, AND THE SANDVVICH , AN ILNTIRELY NEXV AND ORIGINAL COMIC OPERA IN TVVO ACTS, HY FRANK SOULE AND ARTHUR S.KENDALL. PRODUCED FOR 'l'IIE FIRST TIME ON ANY STALZIQ, UNDER 'I'I'lli PERSONAL DIRECTION OI" Mr. John L. Golden. Dzhfcfors. THEODORE B. BARRINGER, IR., JOHN I. MOORHEAD. liuszbzess jlfmzzzger. SAMUEL STIEBEL. Friday Evening, February 16th, 1894. Manhattan Athletic Club Theatre. 62 CAST OF CHARACTERS. Al jabbar, the Mighty, - Mudclh, his Servant, Bronson Bean, of Bostiin, Upson Upinit, of Utah, - - NValdo VVatkins, f'Who doesnt knowj, Poofiesh, a Ghost, - - - - - - XVatsisnam, Ogoxva, Allehazan, 1 Of the tribe of Zing Faris, I :V natives of the j Wilcls of Nowhereinparticular. Bellona Brown, a Malapropian Lancllady with a penchant for "Orcult Science," Pomona Pippin, her Niece, . Minerva, .... Aphrodite, ..... Diana, ...... Psyche Sykes, Servant to Bellona, Vesta Veazie. a Student of Theosophy. . Premiere Danseuse, . . . Louis W. Becker Henry P. Bissell. Frank McCourt. Hugh McDougall j. Hall McKay. CHORUS- csi-icnsrs HND NP:-rules. TIMIQZ-TO11101'l'OXV. Synopsis of Scenery. ACT 1?lliS'l'Z-At the House of Mrs. Bellona Brown. MR. LIONEL GORDEN. MR. THOMAS H. XVHIFFEN, 'IR MR. VERNON E. CARROLL. MR. HENRY is. SINGER. nk. JOHN J. GRAHAM. MR. 5. GEORGE LYDECKER. MR. CHARLES S. XVHEELER. ivnr. STEPHEN 1. ROSENTHAL MR. ARTHUR J. WALSCHEID MR. PERRY C. PENTZ. 11153 ANNIE PELHAM. ms. CHARLES GREINERT. Miss EUGENTE SCHUMAN. Miss LEONA CARDoNA. MR. JULIUS A. BECKER. MISS ALICE Bovii. MR. ANTONIE P. VOISLAVVSKY Eugene S. Mills. David B. Orr. E. Russell Penman. Bruce C. Phillipps. Chester F. S. XVhitney. ACT SECOND:-In the VVilds of Nowhereinparticular. .f 63 ,f:..+ -'::iL-'QQ-'rf gfzgf' ii' -fig-5' f ff ,J-r Y EN Q N E R N Q .l... ET ff 2 f---Q , 11. 1 ROLL. OI: Class of '94. F,-L 52 OFFICERS. Pres., C. XVa1l5cr' Bogczrte, '95 Yicc-Pros., I. Henry Kirby, 795. Rec, Sac., F. Crcczdcn, '96. COT. Sac., Daniel D. Tompkins, ,97 .- BRODY. FAIRCHILD. LYDECKER. MAHR. MANNING. RANDALL. SPINNER. Class of '96. CHAPMAN. CREEDEN, GRUENENTHAL. HEATH. KAFKA. MATTHEVVS. L. PINNER, R. PINNER. MEYER. ROBERTS. SKENE. 64 ZKSZKBSRS- Class of '95. ADRIANCE. BOGERT. DARLING. ECKEL. KIRBY. Class of '97. CARLSON. DWYER. FETHERSTON. LYON. PENMAN. PETTIGREW. ROSENTHL. SALMANOVVICH SCHVVEITZER. D. TOMPKINS. WHIFFEN, T l 3 M., ,lv . i 4 N 1 ' w I -1 A I 4 T 51 v 1, .al ws: 3 1 if ,N 1, li :I 5. Q ll 1 I ii 3 . 2 1 I if 1 4 V. 3. 1 'EQ .5 -., qpaxvx H14 M l I I N I 1 ' 1 x P , I V 1 I I w 1 N Dhilomathian Hall. OR four or tive years now, the Philoinathian Society has been a thing of the past. Its works, W both good and evil, are recorded, and its page in the University ledger is concluded. But its name will never be forgotten. For hear the words of Samuel F. B. Morse, H Your Philoniath- ,ii Y,.. 5 ian Hall, the room I occupied,-that room in the University was the birthplace of the Record- ? ing Telegraph." For this let the old rooin and the venerable building be held in highest hon- ' ff or by all to whom have come the beneits of Morse's great discovery! Men of New York University, our alma wafer yields to none in the respect and appreciation due to her. Let us be jealous of her honor! It saddens one to think that a room of such historic interest must be destroyed. llutthere are bright sides to the picture. Those who elect the English courses will no longer have to stare at that what?-colored wall-paper, and at the absence of the same where a stove-pipe hole was once stopped up. The future uptown student may listen peacefully and doxingly to the seventeenth account offij, how the miracle plays used to be given in Chester fel, how the Oxford quadrangles are arranged, and Qgj, what the shape of old English houses was,-and all without being rained on from the hole in the roof. The latest reports, however, say that the series of pictures found on the walls of the English rooni as on the Walls of every wellaregulated home, which represent life-infantile, adolescent, matured, andgsenile,-are postively to go uptown with the University. 65 epubllcan Club f the Umverslty ot the City of New York. GDFFIGERS. ANTONIE PHINEAS VOISLAVVSKY. HENRY HASVVELL BANKS. CLAUDE CECIL SMITH. JOHN VVATTS VVARRIN. tion at Denver, Colorado, Delegates to the N3tlOH1l Conx entmn of the Amerlcan Republican College League, I ENIH WVALSLHI lD. ANTOWIE PHINTFAS VOISLAVVSKY. - At Syracuse N Y Aprll 6th 1894 Theodore Cox of tlfls U ' 't n1vers1 y was elected President of Amerlcwn Repubhcan College League. 5-573' Ugg- X X X 'CND 'N whick Ls to 515, HVVHQ1'-Q 1.5 my I-u.orsg?n Q 'STK0J.gv'n..1.5,- aU?j-Rkwakevr jflkjjjwk-.H.,wln.1,. l Q1f'wum0I"I Q'emnA-an-KLwl3WLnM'4"N1"f"-"gl n3'B03l.- 'L.u.1xl-Lm, D "' Cole: X . C!f..',.,...lhf11i.4.AwK.g. f.',W,yoge1x, , "JW ww rzmmbmmg' Agmffj D?gzf - Demangs, I V I V I If f I , , 1 IM 44 4 , I ' - '-59:1 ,. 17 TO 1 I I L. N N 'in-f". -fy" 1? - ' .1 5' , 1 Liivgl XX I ld 'I' I ? 4F,,r1w' 7 C1121-' X KI T51 UQ'f'F1I .ggi I N iz , ,., JA 2'11 I "PF-ZIXZY COWJNCIL. Q 4 GEORGE VV. RANDALL, YQ4, - - - Keeper of Ike PQJES. I FRANCIS E. SPINNER, '94, - Hailey! Long C1112 FRANCIS L. MANNING, 794, Lover of Dfzrhawz, JOSEPH BRODIE, '94, - Prowkier of Czgarelfes. CARLOS MORALES, '94, - f776D07'f6'7' of Czlgareffex. I 5 I ORRIN IV. SNODGRASS, '95, ' BENJAMIN H. STERN, 595, EDWIN C. ECKEL, '95, - FRANK W. DARLING, '95, . 4 THOMAS F. ADRIANCE. ' Q 9 y I IUAN MORALES, SP., I- i I I 4 v w US Our f7zge1zz'ozzs Pipe-Merzder. H25 Only Low an Ofa' Brzkfr. Wlzfcher of Ike Mafcbes. Holdev' of Me S11zok'ers'Record. Long T 0712. Chaflyhon Jnhaler. YK? Xxx W7 FJ Alf! X! 1 avg 4 MX 1 A X D Q Q5 0 X ' KF A C, ,Q sgfffnfix fffgw - 4 A 1 In A m lhf f WN? A5 ' ' A 1 X f :'Q, ' f 'P i A Z." If ww ? If-1 ?,u,,,, Fu k,:,lW,,,,, ,,,: ,,n,, W x ,, , ll y ay A, ef f ' H A ,I 'II y . Mg W my may ii 9, ff M Qf W7 W 7 W My I, 9, Amgen K is A if A v -I - LERDER. JOHN E, BUsT1N', 94, Fmt Twwm SJ. ARTHUR FLUNK, ,9S- SMU d 7, 0 5 gC. V. DE CRAWLOVER, '96, ' ,- , 11 '11 1' ,- 9 QA. P, VOICE LOFTY, ,94. ' gc. MORALITY WHY CALVO, '94 , , H. N1 RA 'KED ' . A . ' O HEN ' f. Fzrsl Bassas, J 1 AC C, CT 7 94 .bcfcofzfl Bnsses,'H CU ' 94 QG. DYING SWAIN, '96, QA. I-I, HOWL AND HOWL, '95, Organ jllauyzzlfzfor, - - 0. S. VVHITELAMB, '95, Organ P8dQ9?lfdf07', - - - - YV. LEGGIE, ju., '96, The above choir is prepared to give conce ts at reduced rules for the benefit of the Organ Fund. 69 Ninetyzlgive Circle of hilosophy. GFFHCERS. JOHN S. MILL GRAHAM ,... ICXPOSTULATOR, JULIUS CIESAR ALEX. TI-IE GREAT I-SECKER, ROSENBEKG, The Materalist. NEWMAN, The Talkist. SNODGRASS, OSBORN, SINGER, . BANKS, XVRANGLER. HONORED YVYEYVYBEIQS. HOXVLAND, The Original Sinnist. STERN, The --?-ist. ECKEL, The Blufiist. DARLING, The Flunkist ORDINRRY YUYEYVYBERS. The Innocent Kid. The Smoke-Stack. . Who Lacks Application Who Knows it All. W 10 ATHLETICS he thletic Association of New ork University PRESIDENT. VICE-PRESIIJ S ECR ETA RY , . . J NV. XVARRIN, JR. TREASURER, O 1: F- I C E R S . . . 5. mm. XVALSCHIED. ENT, . . ARTHUR FUNK. . . THOMAS F. ATJRIANCE. EXECUTIMS COYVYYSIYITTSG. FOR '04,-THEODORE B. HARRINGER. ' FOR '95,-HENRY B, SINGER. FOR '96,-LOUIS BECKER. FOR '97,-IJAYI I J OR R. FOR LAXV SCHOOL,-CHARLES H. KELBY. FOR MEDICAL SCHOCJL,-FREDERICK ADAMS. FOR TI-IEOLOGTCAI, SCI-fOtJL,-THORNTON B. PENFIELD X N' .Q 1 v 1 r . , INTEILCOLLEGIATE ASSOCIATION AMATEUR ATHLETES OF AMERICA. Officers, 1894-95, !'r4.'.v1'1z'e11l, . . H. M. 'WHEELRIGHT, Harvard. I"Arc-P1'c.v1kz'w1f, IE. P. BOND, Swathmore. Sevrafnry, . E. P. ANDREXVS, Cornell. 7'2'e1zx1z1'r1', L. TRACY, Fordham. Exequtiue Qommittqq, F. M. CROSSETT, U. C. N. Y. H. A. MACKEY, U. of Pa. E. A. RUNDQUIST, C. C. N. Y. G. K. B. XVADE, Yale. L. C. BAKER, Union. Qollqqaqs of the Rggociation. AMHERST, PIARVARD, U. C. N. Y. TIQINITY. BROWN. HOISAIQT. U. of PAL U. of VERMONT. COLUMIQIA. LAFAYETTE. PRINCETON. UNION. CORNELL. LEIAIIGH. RUTOERS. WESLEYAN. FORDHAM. U. of MICHIGAN. STEVENS. WILLIAMS GEOEGETOWN. C. C. N. Y. SWATHMORE. YALE '73 nter-Collegiate EVEML 42 .24 2.47, XXVINAI-Ili. One Hundred Yards Dash. TwoEventy Ygds Dash. 0116-'liXVOI1tXii3tlg Q Hurdle. 'llxvoignty-Xeigl s Hurdle. Four-Forty Yards Dash. Half Mile R 1111. L. ll. Cary. L, H. Cary. i 4.4, H . L. XlVllllCllllS. H. L. XVilliz1111s. G. B. Slmttuuk. XX'. C. lJol1n1. Mile Run. ifigi?-flvelli 9 W V XV. H. Glenny, jr. 1 T.gQ..51.gggi.f1111 Running High jump. Putting Shut. G. R. Fearing. XXV . O. H11 link. Tlirowing Ham mer. XX' . 0. Hiclqolc. Pole Vziultiiig. C. 'I '. Buclchollz. ecords. Co1.1.1z1:1f:. 13712121-0111i ir D.-V12 i lliinugon IO sec. May 30, 1891. P1'inceto11. 21 4-5 nec. May 30 ISQI H Vgule. I5 4-5 sec. MA iw May 303 Xkile. 25 1-5 sec. A W.-Xnil1e1'st. 49 I'2 sec. May 30 1891. P1'i11cet1111 7 A?1TllI'J., 57 1-2 nec. May 31 1890 Y i 4 min., 29 4-5 sec. Wg gnMay 25 ISV Yale. 5 min., .114-5 sec. May 27 1893 Princeton Nia min., 52 4-5 sec. May 30, ISQ2 Coluxnlezi 1.22 ft., II 1-4 ini May 30, ISQI. X 6 ft. o 1-2 i11. May 30, 1892 -X'alc. K W X 41 ft., o 1-S in. May 27, 1S93. X V lOg gi'r'lYll1. May 27, 1893. H IO ft., in 1-3 i11. May 27, 1393, 74 Interzcollegiate Team, 1893. Czzjimzh, - - - - P. C, PENTZ. From tiye Ur7clerQraduatQ Qolleqez J, A, BECKER, 795 H, W. BROWN, '96, F. E. FERRIS, '93, H, F, LEWIS, '99 A, D. SNEDEN, '96, G, L, VVICKES, 795. , E, WALSCHEID, '96, P. A. YALDEN, yQ5. I From tlye Seryool of Saw: H, GRIFFITHS, ,94. M, OSULLIVAN, Y93. M, J, HORAN, ,Q3. E. R, SANDFORD, YQ4. From tlye Sqlyool of 'fryeologoy T. G. SHEARMAN, ,Q4. O 75 r I Fourth Annual Spring Field Meeting Ol" T H I2 I , AT THE I I I GROUNDS OF THE STATEN ISLAND ATHLETIC CLUB, I 73eme1zf Avelzfm and Rfclvzfzozzd Terrace, Wes! BI'IlgAfJf07I, S. I., E May 20th, 1893, at 1.30 P. M. 5 ,L . I U!f'F!CliA'.S' OF THE lWElj7'fAf'Ci. I REFEREE. F. XV. j.-XNSSEN, S. I. A. C. JUDGES. EOR 1-'JELU EVENTS :fox TRACK EvEN'1's. J. T. VAN RIPER. WM. K. GILLETT. S. L. FLEMING. L. ANDREWS. J. 1. COSGROVE. J. E. RUSTON lNLllC.'XSURliIlS. B. ll. STICRN. V. C. GATES. TRACK. Scokms. FIELD. W. W. BRUSH. N. VV. CROSBY. CLERK or COURSE. C. N. ICELBY. QXSSISTANT CLERK. V. E. CARROLL. fLNNOUNCl'1R. S'1'AR'1'ER, I C. W. MILL.-XRD. C. A. BILL. I GAMES COMMl'l"I'l5l'l. I F. E. FERRIS, '93, T. B. BARRINGER, IQ4. I P. C. PENTZ, '94. C. N. KELBY, '94 L. I J- V- IRWIN, m. J. L. CLARK, T. I j. li. RUSTON, '94. f 1 70 I I I I I I I I I NEW YORK UNIVERSITY ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION ' T0 NINETY: IVE WAS AWARDED THE ATHLETIC BOWL, AS BEING THE VIOST 100 Yards Dash 220 Yards Dash ATHLETIC CLASS IN COLLEGE. Ist, G. L. XVICKES, -SNEDEN, '96 .... -SNIQUEN, '96 .... 440 Yards Dash-WICKES, '95 ., . Half Mile RUI1-XAfAl,SCHI'1IIJ, '96 .... One Mile Run-HQRAN, '93, L ..... 220 Yards Ilnrdle-XVICKI-Ls, '95 . . . .. Two Mile Safety Bicycle-YALDEN, '95 oi HIGHESG SQORERS- nts. .. .... IO if secs.... 23 Z secs .... ....5Ssecs.,...... Running Broad jump-I-Immx, '93, L .... .. . Running High jump-Llswls, '93 .... .. Putting the Shot-O'SU1.1.1v,iN, '93, L. Pole Vaulting-VV1cK1-:s, 'QS ...... ..... ZIUID. I3 seis.. . " . 5 mm. 30 secs .... " .28 4-5 secs ..., . 6 min. 25 secs .19 fr. 2in.... .. 5ft. iigin... .35 ft. 4 in ,... . .... Sft ....... . 77 2nd, A. IJ. SXEDEN, '9 .. . end B13C1s1Q1:J'95... Iiiacixm, 95. . .. SNICDIEN, '96. .. LiRII"IfI'l us, '94, SANDFORIJ, '94, FERRIS, '93 .... BROWN, '96. . ,, 0, I2 L ..,., Points. v . Q3LI lk LI ii l, ..... " VVICIQES, '95 .,... Fuiuus, '91 .... XV,x1.sc11ElD, '96 ..... V0I0i1T, '93, L. ii ai I. is ni Ii IRWIN, '94 Ii:w1N, '94 I'ICCliIili, '95 Sixxln-'01:D, '94, L XVALSCIIEID, '96 Liawls, '93 ROISIIINS '96 Liawis, '93 Sicuclic, '96 RUS'I'4lN, '94 XVALSCHEID, '96 1 V X vi fff x N? 1 w I 21' . I V J Left End, - Left Tackle, Left Guard, Centre, - Right Guard, Right Tackle, Right End, Sophomore Football Team. FRANK HEATH, -IR., - Manager. LINE. BACKS. - E. S, MILLS. Quarter-back, A. YVALSCHEID L. R. HOFF. Right half-hack, - C. F. S. WHITNEY A. E. MUNSON. Lett half-back, C. C. SMITH. F. SKENE. Full-back, - - - E. XVALSCHEID F. F. KAFKA. SU1zs'1'1TU'1'Es. - P. B. HOUGH. C. V. DECORDOVA. C. L. MEAD XV. SEGGIE, JR. H. PRITCHARD. C. G. YVHEELER. C. C. XVOODRUFF. 79 Uptown Committee of the Faculty. IA! a :pedal :zz f'L' lifzg of Mc fhfzrlly, Acid Rfb. 29, 1894, il was 1z'af12r'er! Ma! azz fzuaouzzf iff Mc despatch zzecesszzry in order Z0 have My Ilpf0ZUll szlfr of My UIZZ-TlL'1'5ZyJ' 7'c'tIf?9f by 1101! Fall, Mc foffuwmlg' !Zfjj07'fl'07Z1lZL'llf.S' of labor 114' fmzzzk' zwzong Me llldlllblffj' fy' fha 1:llEIlff,j',50 fha! fkluf llllgfbf warn Meir 5afarz'e.v zfzrrzkztg' Ike long 'zf:zczzfz'01z.j-Extract from Minutes of Faculty. BOSS. PROFESSOR STODDARD. WH EELBARROW BRIGADE. QEMA num 1112rsz'p7'o'w'1z'e hzlv own z'111p!emcm'.v.j PROF. SIHLER, PROF. LOEB, PROF. BAIRD, PROF. SNOW, PROF. ISAACS. WIELDERS OF THE PICKAXE. fCWa11L'f Qfj91'01110f1'w1, fkfy work wcllj PROF. HERING, PROF. GILLETT, PROF MAHCRACKEN, PROF. HALL, PROF. STEVENSON. SHOVELERS. HSI..-ft? zz zfzynj PROF. BALLARD, PROF. BRUSH, PROF. PRINCE, PROF. SHAVV, PROF. MASON, T0 RUN ERRANDS. T0 BE BOSS' ASSISTANT. PROF. MURRAY. PROF. QQ TOMPKINS. TO KEEP THE FIEN FROM TALKING, fZ?y fnfX'7'71Kg' 0131156011 PROF. RUSSELL. 80 . 1 1 4 J All I WW , -A A W V i I W fi W ' PW 1 W ' I 1 I W, KW WW W Y'W WW W I W WW W? W W , 1 in, , V I V -.- W. W , .: ,,MWr'-'f. W W .5 -- .1-. , 'A ' 14 -'za'-I TWE1.-gW'j'j. - --f-f.,.fwf - -. QM , W 4. A-,A 1 W I W ,ff 1,-'G , x k -fl M , 7fWwW5"' 4fmf:'W"'W .I La x 4: :ch ' x WLIJ J F 1 YQ? 'X W Q63 W .. W W W I W ! W W I W W l 1 4 Ii Vi 1. P 1 L -1-I ...ra- THE COUNCIL Room. RQUND the lobby of the Astor Library are ranged tl1e busts of the famous men of classical antiq- uity, one feels on entering their company as though he had stepped suddenly into the world of Plato and Virgil and their fellows. Precisely the same are the sensations one feels when he passes the threshold of the Council Room of the University, but instead of the men of the remote past, whose lives and works have almost ceased to influence the world, he sees before him the faces of those whose services are still contributing to our sum of happiness or knowledge. It is the glory of a frm' Uni- versity, that besides educating the youth who come to it for instruction, it gathers about it a body of intellectual men, who by well equiped minds, devotion to learning, and the facilities of an organization founded and maintained for this purpose, are seeking to add to the common stock of useful knowledge. That the University of the City of New York should be such, was the intention of its foundersg and one who looks upon the faces of those whom this University delights to honor, will see that it has not failed to realize this true conception of a university. The names of Howard Crosby and john Hall, Valentine Mott, James Tallmadge, of Morse and Draper, and of Tayler Lewis, besides a host of others equally famous, show that a community of successful thinkers has already grown up around this institution, although but sixty years is the measure of its age. There is one object of great interest in this Council Room, which might be called an importation, because, unlike the rest of the contents of thc room, it is not native to the place. This is the desk which belonged to the famous German orientalist, Paul de Lagardeg it came to the University at the same time with his library, which is shown on another page of the V1o1,1s'1'. The desk, together with the accompanying stool, may be seen in the background of the picture ofthe room on the opposite page. One feels that with these homelike possessions of the great man, there should come to us the inheritance of his great mind, so that he seems full half our own. S1 1 111 1 11 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 . 11 , , 111 1 11 11 1 11 11 11 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 11 1 1, 11 1' 1 1 'N 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 L 1 1 F 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ' 1 1 1 1: 1 1 1 1 1 11 3 1 11 1 1 1, 1 11 1 , 1 . 1 1 1 1 1' 1 1 ' 1 E1 1 1 11 , 1 1 11 1 ' 1 J 1 11 1 1 11 11 1 ' 1 1 1 . 1: 111 1 1 1 ' ' 1 ' 1 Q 1 1 2 I 1 11 1 1 1 1, 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 f 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ff 1 1 1 1 1 1 11 1 1 111 1 1 11 11 1 11 1 1 A 11 1 1 111 11 1 11 11 1 1 11 1 1 1 1 1 11 151 111 1 , 1 , 1 Ninety:Seven Football eam. 1Wzzmzgw', BENJ. H. STERN, ,95. Conch, - H. H. BANKS. '95, Czzjrfnfu, WM. C. HACIQETT. E. VV. GREIXCEN, R. W. AIsIaOT'I', HOWARD BILL, WM. A. HUDSON, I F. MOCOURT, E. L. GARVIN, WM. C. HACKETT, J. VV. XVARIQIN, JR., T. H. XVHIl"1I'EN, J KVM. P. HA'IJNVEN, I. T. FETHIIRSTON, SUBSTITUTES. H. P. BISSISLI.. C. F. NAPIER. G. VV. DOWNS. DAN'ID ORR. WM. L. LEVV. C 17. SCHWEITZER. D. D. TOIIIPKINS. 83 Left End. Left Tackle. Left Guard. Center. Right Guard. Right Tackle. Right End. Quarter Back. Left Half Back. Right Half Back Full Back. srNGER, - BECKER, FUNK BOYD,- NEWMAN, l LUDLUM, MARSHALL n l BoGART, Q . ECKEL, - , t HOWLAND, CUNNINGI-IAM, i I Ninety:Five Baseball Team. qThe Oldest Organization in Collegep. H. H. BANKS, Captain fi!!! we um get a beffeafj. WNinety-Five mfmsms. ctk1'I'2Ll'lgGd in order of size of shoes wornD. GAMES PLAYED. - Qforgets to goj - fused to know howl - fuses his eye for a back-stopj - ffurnishes the necessary iodinej - - fhasn't timej ftook the 58th street train by mistakej studies Greek till he's " on deck" C - - Qtoo short for first basej 4 - Qtoo tall for " short "D i - Qwould rather bet on the resultj - fdoesn't believe in itl . ---- 42 New Yorks, ---- o i iNinety-Five, 9 l Ninety-Six, - o . lGame called in 3rd inning on account of darkne TBy default. 84: P' l . x , l I I 4 Mmxmxxxlwklwlll :,.,1,,,,,,, -.jg-M, 'H .e L 1- 2' 'H' " ' 552355 ' 3. Q f . Z' X xl l X ' . 44 f ., I .4 Q Lfqilrer-15553 wg H: Mpiabiicaiiorqs. SL fx X nw Q fa QK 7' 1 K if ,IQ fy I, , -7 WW v 'y f,W,,,,,,,,,,,, 'E' V Na- Z!! if W9 mf 'J -.N 1,,' A 0 bk 1 1 gl 1 p , f' 11 p rg Tg 1 Tim X xx . Y I X Wy, f gA,iwf , 5 iq N , f, 2 Q X -.X- ff' f',.,,f.- X , l ,f l: r . ?t:' E, nf. '41 :gn n f 2 1 Q 5 , Q' a ff ' I 1 VXQLET 1 " K' N a ra 9, X 1 ' 6 f1l' X? f , g 5lQ15lVyf + 'L' W : . 'LW .. 1 , Zz I 'f x '5 J' X If fl 1" 2 "4 ,- I Q41 'z x . , . 5,1 --- X4 . 1 AM, AX 1' f ,f 'F J f 23 ,gg 1 I 1 3 i 1 W I i N w Y i-- V H THE VIOLET. PUBLISHED ANNUALLY BY THE JUNIOR CLASS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK. 6F72 ,Q5 Uiolet. Volume V. Board of Qclitors. April, 1894. Qfkosefz io Wjbvfeseizf Me F7'Gf67'7ZZ.Z3f mmf 11011-F1ffz!e1'7zz'Ljf men 0f Me Classy J, OSCAR BOYD, ffu' ffvzi lfyu'iff21zJ - - - BENJAMIN H. STERN, ffm' Zflfz IGZJ - JAMES E, SMITH, ffm' Dalia Pfzfj - - FRANK IV. DARLING, UQ11' Pfzz' fflllfliflfl Dfffzzj - HENRY B. SINGER, CL'fL't'f6'lIf by ffm 11011-f7'fzfw'1z1'fJf mmy JACOB L. NEIVMAN, fnfvfw1'11ff'rfX1j ffm Szyvlmlffon'fv1'4'51'r1'1'11!J V WN 61 Editor-in-Chief. Business Manager. Histories. Advertisements. Grinds. Individual Records .All HE NIVERSITY AW REVIE I-K Juurnal uf Hutual L.Ew, and :fa Relatluns fu Elzlenna and F'ul:lIn: Welfare LONDDCILD t U72 Llmuqrglty o trye Qnty o ew Yor Under the Edltorlal SUPGIVISIOU of AUSTIN ABBOTT LL D - T T Dem of the Law School. 4 T Qflssisfeaf by FRFDERIC, L. PERHAM. 2 - ere tyrorp' 'ol " ' .v' " 'tspastt S ' ' ' ' ' nd 19 ' ' cest ' j ' ' ' . A " ' 'lx ntonorro: 1 T , Pnbfzklzm' JVIUUIAQI JYZM' Hfozzffzs in Zfzz' Ymr. . FREDERICK M. CROSSETT, Manager, 1122 Broadway, New Xork, N. Y. ' 'u 'm 1. 1, LIU ..f.. .- " ' K all 5 I Y. Q it if U 5: I 1 E E? E 4 X Q I ,I U Y? 4 RI la if hi 'E p pi I 5 g. i, ga F , E 1 4 ,..r 1 U I I I I , I II I I I ,I I I I I I I I I I 1 r I I ' I I I I I I II ,I III II II II II FII wi III I I III I I I I -,SN , fu Eff' I I I I I I I I I I Wig "2 141 Ou Qx A XXV! The Junlor Law oom If books could speak they would 111 many mstances be 1ble to tell of some VGIY stranoe and often lfxuohable GXpC11C11CCS But lOl e11te1ta1n1ng tales CO1'1l11lC1 d 1ne to the llbl 113 of the late Paul de L'1Ga1de the gleat GCIIHWH O11entf1l scholar whose books now lC1JO96 on the shelx es ofthe un1o1 Law Rcom of the U1llVCTS1tX7 Such 'L chanffe they haxe secn smce they left the qmet house of the learned Docto1' Instead of the me Lsmed SC1"LtClll1l0 of the pen they must l1sten to the oratoucal "tual tr1ps of the Colleoe students f1om Fl6Sh1Tl'l,l1 to 5611101 must hen '1p1ofesso1 who shall be nameless descant upon Chaxles the lhfth and Frederlcl the G1G1t af! :mu and last but not least are compelled to l1sten Wh1le I F1anklyn Rulhe 1SCfLllCS on law to women '1Ildp1OC1'111IlS to meek umors the he1es1es of F1 ee T1ade Desp mll not, hovveve1 ge pahent tomes' Qoon fO1 you shall come a 16Sp1tG when only 'mn OCC'lSlOU'1l SOPIIOTUOIC shall dlStllllD the qmet echoes of the l1b1a15 as he ffettmo 1ts moto1 p But about the JLl1'JlOI' Law Room L1ke all othe1 IOOITIS of the old bmldmo lt IQ XVOl thy of 1emem blance It was lllltll qu1te 1ecently IM Llbl F115 But when D1 Stox enson left the old Sc1ence ROO111,XVll1Cll D1 D1 apet had 1ende1 ed famous by ms StllC-UGS on the SQGCUOSCOIDG and h1s otl1e1 well known successes that became the l1b1a1y and 1ts predecesso1 wls tu1ned mto the Hdouble decker WhlCh lt 1S now devoted p11nc1pally to the 1nte1ests of pwndemomum downstfms and upstaurs tothe recept1on of the UIl1XfClQltj7 s most vftlufzble bOOkS,'1l1L-1 lllC1dC1lf'lllV to seue IS an excellent vantaoe g1ound fO1 Leshe Wh611 l1e wants to b1eal up '1 class meetmg It IS to be hoped that the pou e1s that be XVIH see fit to take to T1 lns Hfulem the vent1l'1to1 111 tlns room u h1ch M1 VVoolse5 has so mranved that 1t squeaks uheneve1 Ikey gets off 1 good 'Kchestnut 'ls thouoh ew en the 111 that 15 111 the IOOITI Wanted to escape 1 ,l . E if l ,L . l WL 1 1,.r:i.' Hill ' ,, 0 ffr?i'i"ftl ' 1' I t ml A wt ee- xliligg Y A . Y '. . . , C U . .b xx , L C 6 1 . g A c , . fd 'E ' 7 ' c Co - , - . C -' C ,V '. .-,ak V , , ' :AJ A ' . ' ' ' .U I . i . c 6 7 1 ' 'i ' ' I 1 V. . -. C 2. . .C - O. y L - .- .' 'nw 7. ,.. C xi1'.5 c,c . . I A 4- c .Q A .c M V ---Qqc c , I I . . - - cl . A ,y Q - X , . 1 , c c ly 'J' " ' '. .:" ",f ' .'f' l' . 4 . . . l ' ' ' c c c ' . c ' x Q A 1 7 c 1 1 . , searches in vain among the volumes of Confucius for a "Bohn,"-fand when a trolley-car goes past, .A H ' . ' . A A D C, u I ' C . ' C ' ' ' D' . " ' - ' I -: W . - Q. . ' . . c A . . . td ' 4 ' 1 A ' . 1. yd' c c c V l . 4 - -7 2.1 Lb- - Y - Q - 1 ' ' L ' ' Q Q C. - , ' ' C , 'M' '. c .2 'c' .c 1. ui ,'7- Q. '7c"c"b c EE li 89 ll H ll ie H 51 1 ll .Il 'l rl il fi lp ka' ' Y sexzmwu, 1 ZNMWQW. X x , Nigfw iff ,735 W4-SMN?Ygw,:':Q,y,.'5-,fdxiswxg Z I f .wf -ww, ,f,fe,',: ,W .SQMW 44534 . , 4-QXJQ ,Q ,, , , . fy 11,115 rfgfgf-Awgfg x ,, fszmfiw ff, , f rl '-aww " fm I f , W.-W ffm Qx fmsfdvn THE UNIVERSITY UARTERLV. Editors for the Year 1893-94, November to August. EDITOR-IN-QI-Tglff. JOSEPH B. LYMAN, JQ4. BUSHVESS JWAIVAGEK. XISSISYHZVY' BUSfzVfiSS JWAZVAGER. VERNON E. CARROLL, ,Q4. GEORGE VV. RANDALL, ,Q4 ASSOCIATE EDITORS. JOHN E. RUSTON, ,Q4 ---- Facfa Acmgue. ARTHUR H. HOWLAND, ,QS - - CSZHf7f6'71fZ.7'f67'lZfZL7'6. JULIUS A. BECKER, 795 - Peffsomzls. V CHARLES G. WHEELER, '96 ---- Exchanges and College fiems SEVENTEENTH YEAR. 91 CLASS 1841, I848, I850, l85O, I855, I859, In Memoriam. SAMUEL LOCKWOOD, DIED FREEHOLD, N. J., JANUARY 9, I894. JUDGE HUGH LENNOX BOND, DIED BALTIMORE, MD. OCTOBER 24 I893. CU. S. ClT'CIlZ'f C0m'!.D I I REV. ROBERT F. CLUTE, DIED QUANTICO, 1v1D., NOVEMBER 15, 1892. ROBERT HALSTED, DIED IIO EAST 37TH STREET, NEW YORK CITY, JUNE 14, 1893 EDWARD ROBINSON, DIED NEW YORK CITY, FEBRUARY 14, 1894. C-fI5U0ff1f 60211365 ALBERT STEWART, DIED MAY II, I893. I86I. REV. WILLIAM WHITING NEWELL, DIED PARIS, FRANCE, JANUARY 23, I894. RICHARD ALEXANDER MATHEWS, M.D., NEW YORK CITY, OCTOBER I4, I893. I868, THOMAS WINSOR, MILFORD, PA., FEBRUARY 26. I894. PROFESSOR GEORGE W. COAKLEY, LL.D., DIED BROOKLYN, N. Y.. AUGUST 2, l893. 92 I I I PERDURO. T midnight, and the swiftly fleeting year stood still, As stayed by some weird sound with phantom will It ceased to blow across a dreary desolated waste Whei'e late tall battlemented towers and mullion windowed walls were placed. That sound-ah! sadly sweeter far than any strain By Orpheus unto Pluto played, was the refrain Of spirit hosts there met to moan, to moan. The old time friends had gathered round once more alone Amidst the rubbish heaps of mouldered stone To moan, to moan. Soon from the mingled murmur rose this song:-- The past, the past, is gone, is gone, The mild days come no more for aye, The old gray pile now stands in thought alone. No more upon its wall the dying day shall gloam, Or moonlight gleam from out a tranquil sky. Mourn we its beauty gone, wail we its dear dead past, Into one dreary dirge-the last-the last. VVith scarce the moment of a change then burst the music strong and clear Sing we no more of the past. Great was its glory, long will its memory last, But before, ah vision resplendent! behold! The past is as clay, the future as gold. Ah, as we loved her laboring for her grandest aim, So though in the yonder, still we watch each loss, each gain. And now with thrilling joy we swell the anthem grand That sings the praises of that valiant, noble band Who stru gling on 'gftinst odds that few can comprehend g C Still bear her purple standard high, undaunted to the end. -C- THUFQSTON CHASE. 93 Ocmx P1 1 FIIIOXXSI B 1111 EUQ111xN P1:1x15s: MIAMI S F RILI' C, IHURSION CHASE, '93, IILNRY IDVVIS 93. I 1111x111 I-I I MXN IIIIOXNSIIII I 111x111 P11z1cs: 'IUI II N M ISA XLS 9 GEORGI NV OSBORN, '95. C FHLRSIOIN LHASEQQ3. XVILLIAM P. HADWEN,j1z DAVID ORR. NVILLARD 'I'OMI'KINS. DANIEL D TOMPKINS. THOMAS H. IVHIFFEN, JR LAW SCHOOL. SENIOR ORAL PRIZE: SI-IEPARD SCHOLARSHIP, QjUNIORj: IX'IAR'I'IN Iixsuusz, W11.1,1AM JOIIN BARR. SENIOR WRITTEN PRIZE: FACULTY SCI-IOLARSHIPS, QUNIORQ: If'1:1+:1uE1c1c E1,1.1o'1' I1-lumm. I'Imxm' M,xR'1'vN BAIRD, IR. G'IiORt5Ii XVII.I.Ii'I'S DAWSON. H,x1:o1.1s IQUWAIQD L11'1'INco'1' MEDICAL SCHOOL. GRADUATION PRIZES: VALENTINE MOTT MEDALS: NV. H. S'1'15wA1:'1'. SIGISMUNIJ Iilccli. I. I. Gorvzfxms. H. B. PAs'r1a11N,x1Q. D. XV. EIJICIAIAN. SCHOOL OF PEDACOCY. LECLERE SENIOR SCH I BLARSHI PS: MIL. C. M. IJIGIIT, Kansas. MR. E. C. LAVICRS, Peuusylvallia. MR. C. BLACK, Indiana. MR. ERNS'I' IQICIIARIJ, New Jersey. Miss Lizzie E. I-QECTOR, New York. 95 ..nq f E P w v , , , I N A WHO SAID UFORUMH? 96 i7gfLI'fj .ll ,D -mf' 53 2 X i f LRQQTM Qfff W K, wr iglqyzg ?NfH XXX V mf 1 N "' E yx M V ig? Z ,ggiyf '7 'Nm' ' 7 is NV' " WIS? .X Q 2 jj ' , ' " The 5enior's Reverie. JOHN H MACCRAC1 Ex JOIIIN F VAN RIPEI FRANCIS L MANNINO I EDDx BLAIXE EMIL If M SHR FRANCIS E SLINRER CHARLES BRLNREHAR OHN L RUSION OHD. X IRWIN OSEIH B I XMAN PEl1x L, PENLL XILIGNON' E CARROLL lHEoDORE A LILSSIER OHN J WHOORIIEAD G R PISER SAMUEL S 11L1 E1 GEORK E Lx DIICIXER THEODORE B BARRIIXLII 3 GEORO1 W RARIMLL CARLOS MORALES, Class of l Q4 C1 1.5.5 1111 R1i'f Rqck Yellow Black' Roar' Roar' RO81' N Y U Q4 C1 1.8.5 COLOILS Xellow and Black OFFICERS P1 1 51111 111 1115! Vue P1 1fs111'1111 551111111 V116 P1 L5ZdL11f 111101 0,1710 .5167 111111 C07 1 1 Sf07Lll1Z7Ig .SLLI 1 111111 11 6113117 L7 flm1s11z111' T1 e11v111 L7 1111101 11111 101111111 1 x D11y 01 111111 1011111111 x Day 1 011' 1011111111 A Day D11 LL107 1 1 1511111111011 O1 11101 C111ss Day O1 11101 C1115 v Day P01 1' bfllfld 11111111 Prapmf 75110101 C111.s01 11111 sh111r C111w D151 111111 Vhtlf O , X ,, ,J .. Y' 4Af 444 . 7 c , . , . . . , , , ,f 3 -' , , Q," - H - , , - - ,, I if . . 1 Y 1 vv 1 , - - - ' . ' ,., ' , ' 1 ' ' ' ' . ' . ' ' . - - - . - , - 71 ,- ' . ' ., ,- - , - , ,O 1 1 1, W fy . . l I y ,.,,-, - , - ,. . 1 4. 1 v sv - I - - in - - - ' ,-. , .,,' X -v 1 . '1 'A V7 - - - - - - - - AV .V ,V - x,,.,.' J 1 . 41 , - - - , , , - , - r , ...' J. EUGENE L. BLAUVELT, - - - - - - - - W 1 - Y X rv - Q1 l V - - , - - - - - - D.,., , . .- r" A . I - - , , , - - - E Ck, . I . fx . ww X ' ' 4',a ' ' ' ' " ' " ' . '. J , , it - - - V V.i .x. ' A 1 ' "" 1 . 1' - .. , - - - , - 1 ' ' ' . ' 1-1511, - - , , - - - - . . J, . ,- 1 . V , - - - .,,, , , . . 1 1 'gtg 4 V.: , A ' ' ' ' ' ' ' - If '. .. . . . , 5 X - - , , .,,, , H 1, . 1 1 is ll I I l I4 li E I i i I I l 1 l I i l i l l l l N INETY: oUR's HISTORY. Fair Reader-Let us enter together the quarters of a typical college man. 'We approach the door, all is quiet, we enter. The room which the opening door discloses to our vision is not very large, but is cosy in the extreme. An aroma of tobacco greets us as we enter, while in the grate burns a cheerful fire which crackles and snaps as the flames ascend, warming the room and dispelling with its flickering rays the gathering gloom of the twilight. Tennis racquets, lacrosse sticks, 'baseball bats, and footballs, the weapons and trophies of many a well fought contest, hang in groups or stand in various cornersg while many a picture of class, of college society, or of conquering teams adorns the walls. But other signs of college life attract our eye. There hangs a mysterious sheet, on which is printed the word fJ7'06'fLZ7lZlZI'ZlJ7Z, and below is what appears to be the "Ten Commandments." There, too, is a 'HQ4 VIOl-E'F'i lying open upon the table, while from under a pile of books a Qmzrfcrfy is disclosed. But stop--there is an occupant in the room, of whom we had not been aware on first entering. He is a Senior-a '94 man. There he sits, deep in revery, over the book he has long since ceased to study, but which still lies open before him, while the silver smoke-wreaths from his pipe encircle him with the beauty of their graceful curves. He is on the threshold of Commencement. The time between him and his entrance upon life's arena is daily shortening. As he sits his mind travels back over the past four years, and '94 in all her strength and beauty arises before him-her victories, her triumphs, her successes confront him, and he smiles as if to say, U 'Well done." Listen! The crowding thoughts must have vent, and we hear him soliloqnize as in a dream. " Far back in Freshman year how I remember passing the entrance 'examsf Now we boys are really college men-the height of all our youthful dreams-and now all too soon we must part. And how verdant we were in those long ago days! And yet even then our 100 inherent prowess and prestige shone forth gloriously. How like yesterday it seems when Church scaled the quivering flag- pole, far above the surrounding buildings, and nailed there the colors of '94 to float unmolested on the breeze, defended by an ever watchful and devoted band. U Then behold Sophomore year resplendent with deeds of daring and deviltry, See the timid and innocent Freshman, led as a lamb to the slaughter to be initated into 'Theta Tau Pi.' And yonder Proclamation,-what memories cluster there! Behold our Alma llfaiezfs halls bedecked with these, vowing vengance upon the Freshman who violated the man- dates there set forth! See too, the symbols of 9. N. E., surmounted by a Death's-head, glaring with almost hellish stare from tl1e walls around! Hark! even yet methinks I can hear the Chapel resound with the report of torpedoes and fire- crackers, to the horror of 'Fresh' and Faculty. " Many times has the '94 man appeared at Faculty meeting, and each time has his unblushing, unmitigated 'cheek' and '.gall,' carried him triumphant through the impending crisis. "junior year. Adonis in all his youthful beauty were naught beside a '94 man. While we are all handsome, still there are different degrees. Was there ever such a thing of beauty as Pisek's moustache? Was there ever a voice more fit to serenade a lady in her bower than Carroll's? Had ever mortal more ease and grace than Morales? See, our Senior stirs the fire and immediately glances at a picture, beneath which is inscribed " Big 5." The action would seem to indicate that in his mind, fire and the faces there represented were, or would be, intimately associated. But that cannot be, for we hear him say,-"Many a good time had we together and yet we too must separate." Then he continues,-H There, too, is the picture of our ' '94 Chemical Club.' What a wonder that was, and what strides we made in that department of science! How sage Barringer looks, and yet his name will ever go down to history as the ' Sloppy-man.' " L' 'We entered our Senior year auspiciously, and as students ranked as the highest. The most improved methods of recitation, the latest inventions in the line of ' cribs' were ours. We were called a class of 'sports' but I cannot see why, unless it was because each man had a special delight in his ' horses ' and took time occasionally to exercise them. 101 "Our class is notso large as when we started. Sonic have left us to take up other lines of study, some to enter business life. How inseparable are the names of Holt, Briggs, Langford, M-:Nab and others with our Freshman and Sophomore years!" But see, he nods-he has fallen asleep, and his thoughts, retrospective when awake, turn now to the future-to the end ofhis four ye irs of college life. He sees ahead the same joy and happiness as he has experienced in the past. He is in the Senior Ball-room on Class-day night. All is ablaze with light. Merry laughter floats upon the perfumed air, while to the soft music many a couple skims past him across the ball-room lloor. Beside him is one who absorbs all his attention. She is beautiful to him, and he gazes upon her with pride. She is the "Ninety-Four girl." The dance ends. She leads him forth to the Commencement platform. ln a dream he makes his speech. Amid loud applause he retires, only to be met again bythe Ninety-Four girl. She whispers to him of success in the future, of a happy career of usefulness, and admonishes him to be true to his loved A111111 ,llnfan Thus dreaming as he is, of the future, and of his few remaining col- lege days, let us leave our Senior, trusting that the hearts of all the men of his class may be as unforgetful of their college days, and as earnest as he in their love and best wishes for the class of Ninety-Four. P J. E. R., Historian. i ,sgiiliag , ' ab. an P giwlfff- no X - " llliu 102 INDIVIDUAL ECORDS Class of 1894 Q1V I T114 numbers zzzpflzczzfheszszzzfzbcate Ill collegz 54121 btfllllllllg uzlfzlht f'IL.Y01I1lllZ18a7'J l11oMAsl ALXDRIANCE 173 Pfncmc Sheet ersey Cnty A Q5 B A In PIGSS Club Sll1OklI1gC.f1L1b Atl1let1cAssoc1'1t1on Ellg11lG61l1lg Soelety F1 635111 er Athletlc IASSOCI Ltlon Q45 TIIEODOI B B xrmm ll j 226 VV 132d St1eet New Yule Clty if B IC X M C A Athlet1c Assouauon D111nat1e Assoc1'1t1on 94 Chenuml Club l1esl1man SCIGHCG P1176 Class O1atorQ25 Va1s1ty bootball Team Q25 'md Q35 Busmess Manage1 Q4 X7lOIl+l l xecutlve Comnnttee Athletle ASSOC13tlOH Q35 and Q45 D1reetor of N11 vanfr Grand Ma1shal Q45 mms Lnnx BLx11, 194 Putnam Avenue Brool 1511 A 1 X M C A Atl1let1cAssoc1at1on 94 Ch6l1'11C'l.lC1L1b Sec 1eta1y Class Q45 4111 ENE L BIAUXLLT C1esl1ll 'N QI I Y Nl C A Athe Assocnuon Member Class Day Comnnttee Mister of Ceremonies Founders D L3 Q45 C11A1x1,Es S B1a1:N1w1x1A1x 1571 'Lst71stSt1eet New Yoml Clty JP D NI C A C1me1a Club Chess 1nclCheclerClub Assutnnt Treasurm Cl 1ss Q45 USLPH PIOIJIL 195 B1OOHlgtlCCt NeW'11k Q5 A It Lnglneeuno Soclety I'resl11nanSe1enceP11Le Llbrauan Englneer mg Soc1ety Q45 VERNON L CAIROIL lenfxfly N j A all Y M C K Ducle1an At11I6t1CASSOC11tlOH Glee Club D1amat1cAssoc1a t1on Class Orato1 Q15 Clflss PI6Sld6Ut Q5 COl1CSpOTld1llg' See1et1r3 Luele1an Q35 Secretary Y M C A Q35 lreasure1 Athletlc Assoc1at1on Q35 Ed1tor 94 V1o1.1:1 BUSIDGSS Managel J1z1zrfu0 Q45 Class D13 O1atorQ45 Supeuntendent Locl er Room Q45 Presldent C lee Club Assoclatlon Q45 Member Commencement Connnlttee 11 LIUS COIIEN 340 Cherq St1eet New Yo1k C1t5 ELBER1 A l A1Pc111LD 121 5Vest SISY Street ken Yo1k C1ty Dngmeeung Soclety IHIODORI' A Cr1:ss1,1:1 71oSt N1ch0lasAVenue NeWYo1l C1ty ll' 2 Q .I fP U N F B A 1 B1g I+1Ve Ducle1an X M C A Chess and Cl1eclce1 Club V211 s1t3 Football le'un Q25 and Q35 Va1s1ty Baseb'1llTe11nQ 5 Closs Count1y Club Athlehc AQSOC1'1tlOll 'lf 2 Cf1mp1ug Club Cllss H1StOl11Il Q 5 Class Pres1dent Q35 Pxesulent l uelemn Q45 Class Day Poet Q45 l'd1to1 I aw Notes Ln1ve1s1ty Umm Ze: U Cornmemoratwe Orator Apul 18 Q4 0 . 4 . 1 . . . I . . N. 41, .,v.- 1 ' 1' fff , ' 1 ' if . rx 1 " ' 3 3 - 1 - - - . 4 4 .4 . , , . 4 , . I 4 ' 1' .' .f . . . ' 4. U, ' , 4 , 4 . ,- w 4-4-. . -4 ' 5 . 7 . ' ,' ' . xlu . .fx 11-4, R., . , 1 . . , ., . . . ., , , . . . , . 4 4 . . , . 4 .V . X 4 4 . 4. . , . . . L 1. Y C , 4, -4 . , 4 . . . . . . . . . 4,.. 4. .4 I . . ,C , , , 4- , A. ,, , ll .. .,7 4 4, c f . 4, ,4 4 . . . , . 4 , ,. , . 1 . 4 . . - I1 1 wg- , x 7 . . ., . . . 4, . 4 1 , 4 4 '- v ' Y . D 1 -l . -' . . - E 1 . , V' ,- rt ,lT. P, .. J., .12 . ,, lllC e , 1 V , ft 4 ' -1, 4 4.0 1, I I - 1 1 4, il- 1 v , I - . uw v 1 ' ' . ' ' Ll Q- Lt , , x . . .J. , Y. 1 4 . . , c , C x , 1.4 4 1- X, .. C 1 . 7 4 3 - . A 4, 'J f. 7 ' .' . 1 .' . 4 4' .', . ' .' ' - 4 ,4 4- 4 . . . . 4 . . , v 4 , , . . 4 . 4 . . . ' . X ,, 1. , . . ., . . .f., , , 4 , , . 4 4 . . 4 . 4 . . , 4 . ,,. .. . 4 4 4 . , . , , . . .., I C 4 . . . . , ,, A . . . . . , . I 7 4 . I H. 4 , 5 . , . I . N. v I . 4 . . U I . X , T , . I 4. -, 1 l - - ' 1 v v - -- 4 . . . . X 4 1 1 1 - 4 1 - x , , . . IX , X ' 1' 'W ' DI ' 1' ' : - - -- - f ' - 4 - - - 4 - - t . 1 ft, I . , C . . ., . . ., . . ,., . . J., , , 7 X . 5 4 . ' .' lx . ' -' . . . '. . ., . 4 ' 4 L 4 1. c 2, 1 . . . 4 4 . 4 - - 4 - - . , . . .4. . ,,. . . v - '- v ' ' L v " L 'y v 4 4 . 4 , . - - . 4 , , Y 4 4 I , 4 . . .. , . . . 4 c , 4 V 4 .1 A ., . A, , 4 . 103 LEON B. G1Ns1sUR1:,-51 East 118th Street, New York City. Q. 2.3 Press Club3 Athletic Associationg Lacrosse Manager Editor-in-Chief Iitlflllll. JOHN V. IRXVIN,--1070 Lexington Avenue, New York City. SF. 213 123. If. K.3 19. N. 16.3 Y, M. C. A.3 l3UClCl2t1lQ Athletic Association3 Tennis Association3 Chess and Checker Clllili '94 Chemical Club3 Camera Club: Vice-President Ath- letic Association 1353 Secretary Tennis Association 135 and 1453 President Eucleian 1453 Founders' Day Orator 145. RAL111-1 K11zBY,-Roslyn, L. I. Z. Yf.3 CP. B. K. J. GEORGE LYDECKER,-414 XVest 44th Street, New York City. LJ. 215.3 Athletic Association3 Glee Club 135 and 1453 Camera Clllbi Dramatic Association3 Engineering Society3 Class Poet 1253 Editor '94 Y1o1E1'3 Class Censor 1453 President Engineering Society 145. JOSEPH B. LYMAN,-University Building, New York City. LU. 113 Q. B. K.3 Eucleian3 Recording Secretary Eucleian1253 Corresponding Secretary Eucleian 1253 Librarian Eucleian 1453 Editor-in-Chief University Q1zaz'fur!y 145. Jo11N H. MAQCIQACKEN,-University Heights, New York City. W. F. 3 SP. B. K. 3Y. M. C. A. 3 Eucleian3 Athletic Association3 Class President 1453 Censor Eucleian 1153 Corresponding Secretary Eucleian 1253 Treasurer Eucleian 145Q Editor UniversityQ1r11rferL1f 1353 Yice-President Y. M C. A. 1353 President Y. M. C. A. 1453 Chapel Monitor 1453 Freshman Classical Prize. EM11. F. MA1111,-55 Magazine Street, Newark, N. J. 115, E. 3 E11ginceringSociety3 Corresponding Secretary Class 145. l'+'1:ANc1s L. MANN1N1:,-134 VVest 34th Street, New York City. 415. ll. A. 3 191. ZV. 15. 3 B. A. 13.3 iELlClClZ'tllQ Engineering Societyg Class Second Yice-President 1453 Editor University QlftII'fc'l'Of 1353 Class Day Committee, JUHN J. NIOORIIEAD,-310 Second Avenue, New York City. W. T.3 19. N. I-I. 3 Y. M. C. A.3 Eucleian3 Press Ciubi Dramatic Association3 Chess and Checker Clllbi Censor Eucleian 1153 Corresponding Secretary Eucleian 1253 Manager Base- ball Team 1253 Editor University Qznrrfzrgf 1253 Editor-in-Chief '154 Y1o1.E'r 1353 X7lC6-Pl'6SlCl6I1tE1lClGl3.ll1453P1'6S- ident Eucleian 1453Class Statistician 1451 Director Dramatic Association 1453 Chairman Commencement Committee. C,1111.os l5'iORAI.ES y CA1-vo,-211 NYest 14th Street, New York City. Z. S103 Q, N. E. 3 Manager Baseball TCZUIIQ 115 Class Vice President 135. PERRY C. PENTZ,-61 West 74tll Street, New York City. Yf. 24.3 Fl, N. E. 3 B. A. 13. 3 Big Five3 EUCl6l3.DQ'V21lS1L3' Football Team 125 and 1353 'Varsity Baseball Team 115 and 1253 Executive Committee Athletic Association 115 and 1253 Field Captain 1353 Treasurer Dramatic Association 1351 Canoe Club, Cross Country Club3 Chess and Checker Club3 ' Executive Committee Inter-Collegiate Athletic Associatio1i3 Presentation Orator 1453 Yi. If Camping Clllbi Captain W. T. VVheel Club3 Inter-Collegiate Team 115,125 and 1353 Chairman Senior Promenade COIllIlllttC6Q Toast-Master 135 3 President Quarterly Association 145. 10kt 1.59: Gonmm Ro11R P15114 34 l'ast43tl1 Stleet New Yo1l C1ty ll 1 O N I' IJ J b Brg FIVE Censor Eucle1an Q23 ifffwgeffq,---,--A A- A -f?f":"5I?v' ' - .W 4, , ,Vu -0 4 ,4, QA., . 53-3:,,v ,U ,J h-,A,,,,,K,.44,,.,,.7,. ,.f,. 2-ra-,4-1,-,.,-,A,af-,-C..-.-rr:-avy, n,, -If ., .4 ' f:r.:r .,.., Q 1 'N 1,713 .Alf 5 My 'X . . - f 1 - .. 3 V ' I ' I . . , ' J . 7 s . 4 57" - , as Q. 1 I . . C ' - 3' O P A -, , ,l QA H A . - tn 5 1 1 " fo ' . . .1 FI - - . . , Q . . . 1 -V ,.3 , -L 1 , ,' - o M . ' , , P' ' 7,1 ' . .1 , ' '. 13, U: ' ' . ' 1-1 rw , ' - -1 ". -4 . , ' J ' ' A , Q 1 -. A I 3 K ' .V . - ,Q 3 , I I ff l ' I o ' I I I , no - - , - . ' .. xo I U3 s I I -. . E . 1 , . N, I 3 N G ,. 0 W I . 13 4- N , 1 m ' - 3 - . - A v-s A 3, A I V, fa- . ,Q 1.4 l . ,1 L I ' C ld Q ' 1 3 1 J ' 1 ,, . Q 3 . - rn 4 - , V , , 0 , , . ,., 3. . , .1 . H, 1 A Q , Q , . X . , . . . ,, 'Q V O rw , 1 ' - ' - , H s. C .. ' . VT' , , f -' ' ' -. - . , r' I . ' .. O A a I 5 ' ' . 1 PA' . A ' - ' 3 . , M- F' -. ' - . . . , A 'F 1 4- . 1 Q 3 - ' ' ' ' " x l A . . "' ' ' . lx ,A 11 ' V ' 1 , . A H Q l . CD . . 9 N "' -. '1 " I - U . rx - me I I U ' . I Q. . Q I ' A ,Q 1 M D . 1 - 4 y. . ' 1 ' A . 1. 1 5 - , ' ' ' . , - - , - 4- fs .1 '. . . 1 .. 1 N ' 1 . 4 J ' ' . Q, I - 11 - -- ' of Q. ' ' A " 1 , K' - , 1 A 1 Y -'J , . - 3 1- U, -- . N . 3 , I - ' 4- N . . " , v Q, -1 1 ' f I M FJ I. -If Q, ' -. -- ' -. . .J 3, A 3 -. ' -, 1 r' I ' 1 . . V ' .J , A . W C ,, ' 3 1 , f . . . . N , -. . . I ' . . ' A 1 ,J -. J I - Q. . - X n 1 U 1 4 . ' Q A , xo , 1 . U -I r ' -4- I F- . L: - I -. Us A L 1 I - . s ' P - . ,. H -- ,. - '- - - ' " 1 s 4' ' rx -U ' l . 1' " - ' , 4 . ,. , A - . f 4.1 A A K Q f 3 " -1' '4 l I -. ... -.- ,. -. 4, Class H1stor1an Q13 Captrun Cross Count1y Club Q 3 l 11st P1116 A1116 RunQ 3 Q4 Cl19l1llC'Ll Club Crmoe Club V1cePres1dent Tenms I-XSSOCICLUOD Q33 L1euten'1nt W 2 XVheel Club 'I' 2 C'1n1p1nf Club Inter Colleqlate Team Q23 and Q33 Class Prophet Q43 Cha1rn1an Founders D 13 Comnnttee GEORCI XV RANDA11. 669 St Marks Avenue Brooklyn Ll Q5 0 N I P A B Class PoetQ13 Cl1ssTre'1su1er Q23 Athlet1c ASSOC11t1OH Engmeerlng Soc1ety Camera Club bll1Ul41l10 Club Grand Marshal Q43 Ass1stant Busmess Manage1 O1zrz1Z4rQyQ43 jonr. E RUSlOlN 473 lo1npk1nsAxenue Brool1l5n II 7 Q5 .41 Q' Q1 N F I 11 P B1glf1ve Y M C A Luclelan Athletlc ASSOClat1011 Df3.lll3t1C Assoc1at1or1 Chess and Clleel 61 Club 94 Cfmmpmg Club Q4 Canoe Club 94 Che1n1cal Club Glee Club Class O1'1tO1 Q13 and Q33 Class ll1sto11an Q43 See1eta1y Athleuc Assoc1at1on Q13 and Q33 Vruslty Football 'leanl Q13 and Q23 Va1s1ty Lwseball Team Q13 and Q23 Treasurer lennls ASSOC1atlOl1 Q33 Executwe Cornnnttee Athlet1c Assoc1at1on Ed1tor Un1vc.1s1ty 01147111 ly Sen1o1 Toast Master Hrnxmx SINIISON 128 Allen St1eet New Yorl C1ty Chess and Checke1 Club F11xNc1s E SPINNII 19 Mohawk Street IIerk1me1 New York 41 Q Atl1let1cAssoc1at1on Eng1nee11ng Soc1ety Smok lllg Club Cl13.1ll1l'II1 I xecutwe Comnnttee Eng1neer1ng Soc1ety Class l1e1su1er Q43 SA1111r1 J S111 ILL 310 Vlfest 1o3d Street New Yo1k C1ty M1nage1 D13H11t1C Assoc1'1t1on Q43 Class Festator jonv T V1N IQIIER o5 Maul Ax enue Passfue N J X W O N I' Class V1ce P1es1dentQ3 VICE Pres1den+ Athlet1c Assocmtwn Q3 Pres1dent Athleuc Assocl 1l1lOl1 Q33 Class lrowsuxer Q33 Class Vrce P1es1dent Q43 Secretary Qu 1rte1ly Assoelatlon Q43 ANTONII P VOISLANXVSI x 72 St Marks Place New York C1ty Q5 F A 69 N I IJ A B Eucle1an Toast Master Q23 Class H1StOfl11l Q33 P16SlClSlll. P1ess Club Q33 LdltOf Q4 X7lOlLl Q33 C lee Club ASSOCl1tlOU Q4 Canoe Club Q4 Canlpmg Club lQI'3.1l18.lQlC rXSSOC13l'.lOI1 Member Sen1o1 P1o1nenade and Cornnlenoement Co1n1n1ttees EMANJUEI F XATOI XI 1467I11st Avenue New York C1ty .41 Q5 O N F O CLASS OF 1895 9 + I I i 9 A lv Jj, 1 71 VN giigf f .x QM gf 1 L 2 11- 1 - f 'wif , Sf A -,,- 5 55 - fwggurff A Q "1-Q fk fffife - ,QP A, , -" -'ggvk-,'QN "Wf "" was jf.- 3 A sl A ' "Wul f 1 Mi? 1 " 4 - 1 YQ, 'xi 4 E' 76641, . V , V f, 502 77110 GP2 ff , , , Q is -C. J u uw N INETY IVE CLASS YELL VVah hoo Wah hoo Wah loo Wah' Boo rah Boo 1ah SIS Boom Ah' Y U 5 CLASS COLORS S11Ver grfmy and black ORRIN SAGI: WIGIITMAN JULIUS ALIAXANDER BINCKTR 'NVALIER DENION LUDLUNI HENRY BERGMAN SINGER ARIHUR HOAG IIOIIIAIND ORRIN WILIIIER SNODCRASS OFFICERS P7 eszdmz' Vzcc I fcszdmf Sem Lfmfjf H25 101 mn Onzfw J off : 0 1 1 7 7 ' 7 ' 7 Q 7 I 7 ' N. . ., '9 I T. . - C , 1 - , ------ 1 ' I. R 4 4 l - 1 - - - ' I ,J J ' . , , , , . fy 1, ------ 'V, ,,4 ' JOHN JUNIOR GRAHAM, ------- T7'mszu'e7'. 1 ' ' ' ' ' ' -J '.' - I A rl I , - ,.,., I -- I ' - ,-.-. , , . 107 N INETY-FlvE'5 HISTORY. HE time has again arrived when the multifarious doings of the class, which has won the most honorable distinction and commanded the profoundest respect on every hand, is to be we presented to the readers of the V1oLE'r. In this brief survey only a few of the multi- tudinous honors which our fffvlllll jlizzfer has seen it to confer on the class of Ninety-Five can be touched upon. But I take it that the more important ones are sufficiently Well ka f known. On the field of athletics ,QS has proven herself the mightiest class in college by repeatedly winning the Inter-Class Athletic Cup, which distinction has made her the brightest luminary in the constellation of classes Our annual dinner which was held last year at the Hotel Marlborough was an event of unusual brilliancy and splendor and marks an epoch in the history of this invincible' class organization. It was an affair sparkling with the mirth that '95 alone knows how to infuse and an evening that those who were present can never forget. Necessarily, however, I turn from these stirring events to a brief digression on some of the indi- viduals who make up this powerful galaxy, First, however, Iregret to say that many who participated in the scenes of our former triumphs are no longer numbered among the faithful. VVickes, once so gentle, Strasser, with his breezy " mutton chops, " and Robinson, "he of the sanctimonious smile, " can novv be found gloating in fiendish glee over the 'L stiffs " of the dis t' sec ing room. Shepard went to Rutgers and 108 A I turned over a new leaf. At last accounts he has turned over several more new leaves and is as popular at our sister college as he was with the fellows at N. Y. U. Ninety-Five no longer hears the kind words of advice from " Parson " Essick, who by the way, has taken to the study of law, nor do we witness the star pool shots of Yalden, who is now doing business on the Produce Exchange. M, Among the men still in the ranks, no one is more popular with the ladies than I qi-I Graham. With his auburn locks floating in the breeze, it is his wont to Ustrike an attitude " and cry out in plaintive tones: ffl would- an actor be,," ' 4 Ulf X There are two places where Osborn delights to linger, hence it is an easy mat- 'Qrragflif ter to find him at any time. One is in the little German restaurant in Clinton 'Y l Place and the other is the grimy second-hand book-shop on South Washington Square, where he loves to rumage among the heaps of motheaten tomes of for- Q gotten lore. Vogel, one of '95's latest recruits, is a H bird" in the true sense of the term, ' A according to the best slang usage of the Century Dictionary. Hehas a habit of enticing quaint little Professor Stoddard into theological discussions, to that worthy gentleniairs great annoyance. Owing to Vogel's extensive knowledge in the various branches of theology, it would be manifestly unfair to Professor Stoddard to attempt in this history a criticism of their intellectual tussles. Since the last issue of the V1o1,E'r, Becker and Ludlum, having been released from the worry of mathematics, have found time to remove the fuzzy growth from their boyish faces, and now shave regularly. Mention must be made of Marshall's latest hirsute developments. They are not unlike those the poet sings about and the gentle zephyrs woo. Since Osborn has no longer the stubby 'f yaller " things on his face, the statement that he has a countenance can no longer be doubted. Musically speaking, there are men in ,QS in every grade of culture from the mongrel, contrary bass of Snodgrass to the hovrling tenor of Wightman. The leadinginstrumentalists ofthe class are Boyd, 109 Bogert, Howland and Stern. A young lady in speaking recently of Boyd's piano playing told me that his " touch " sounded as though he were using a mallet on the instrument. Howland can play 7l6'fl7'0' every tune in the Gospel Hymns. But it requires 't Tumpy H Bogert to pick the banjo. He has a young lady pupil who, owino' to his versatility has learned another love-able accomplishment under his instruction besides picking the banjo Newman and Inn by through tl'e iiatteiy of some malicfn person becanie possessed of the idea that each had a voice It is said that they Went to a veterinary sui ffeon to have then vocies examined and the hoss doctor immediately diagnosed their cases as an over eating of free lunch In conclusion it may be stated that the writer has endeavor ed to faithfullj prominence An effort has been made to exclude all hyperbole, with what success the ieader acquainted with the subjects can best judge for himself It ma be said xx ith truth that the class as fi whole has l ept in pace with the rapid is Sala:-. ut Wu :Elin I .NE lil. W L AW ' ux nf X f 118 ev: it ' s ' , A 'tip . . . I . A . . l . - o C HW . H 4 ,, - . . . C portray the personages above spoken of and to show wherein lies their claim to ' e wi Q ' xr - xr- v . . . .a'.' 'T' J C C X strides of the University and it is safe to perdict that Ninety-Five will brings grace and dignity to the position of Senior, just as it has filled the position of junior with incomparable lustre. H. B. S., Historian. 110 ND1v1DUA1. RECORDS Class of 1895 QzV I The 7ZllllIf767.S' in fa? Qllfhffjlf Zlldlfdfl ffze collzge JLIZIX fvegzzlllzfzg wzth Me I1 0501111111 yczzf 5 JOHN P Alu X11 1' 1,1 C13 mer Street 1310011511 X M C A Camem Club Athletm ASSOC1at10I1 Hmmv HXsWLII Bxm s Yonkers N Y EI 1 Y M C A Afl1lCtlCASSOC18t1OI1 Class Hlstorlan Q15 Football Team Q15 and Q25 Baseball team Q15 'l.11ClQ'75 Couh 97 Football leam Captam Q5 Basebwll fleam LTIIUSA B11:c1ER 67 XVest 92d Street Nexx YO1lxC1fy ! W 515 A K 1.1110161311 Athlet1cAssoc1at1on Ld1to1 f?7f!l7I'Lllij Q25 Class Secretary Q25 Class V1ce Pres1c1eutQ35 Correspondm Secretary EL1Cl61311Q35 F1esl1man QCICDCC Prwe C NVALTE1 BOGAPT 103 5Vest 93d Street New York C1ty O A Y Athletlc Assoc1at1ou 93 Maha 95, Fodder Club V1ce P1es1dentEng1ueer1ng Soclety Q25 Pres1dent1'ug111eer1ng SOC16t5 Q35 Clfmss 'lreasurel Q15 Class 'loast Master Q25 Class XIICC Pres1de11t Q25 Banjo Club OSC XR 150111 ,o 5Vest 11th Street New York C1ty W 1 Q5 B K Y M C A EL1C1G13.I1 Afl1l6tlCASSOC13t1011 Fresh man Class1cal Prlze Correspondmff Secretaq lutlemn Q5 Secretary Y M C A Q5 Recordmg Secretary Duclemu Q35 Edltor ln chref Q5 X7IOLL1 Q35 V11 Lv11.L1:D CUNN1No11AM Long Island C1t3 N Y Y M C A Duolemn FR tm 'W Dx1L11wo 314 W'est 19th Street New York Clty QP 1 A Ellgllleellllg SOC16ty Athleuc AbSOC13t1OH Smokmg Club Edltor Q5 VIOLEI O e W- .. ' ' . 5' . . 'N . ' ' . '1 ax, " Y , x . 1. 1. . .. c , . . -1 f. - 1- M. f o. 1 1 . ' . " . .-' ' .4 x 1 4,4 x x, -, . . . .. . . . ., Y c. , 1 fx ' 1 x , A c K c .., cl , . c . . . r 7 , . . . . Y . . , ,y ., . . 4 . .4 . , ,. -I. . x ,i .. , . J. ., . . ., , , , ,U ' f . . 4 . . . , . , . - . . . 0. . 4 . 4. 1 1 1 Q, 1 M .- . . . . , , 7 . n , v .. . . . 1 . . , . x x, , . R. .2., , , Y . . . . . . . . A . , - 4 - . . 4 , . . . -, 1 J 1 C 1 1 ' 1 ' 1 , ... , .. ' '5. . 5 , 4 ' . ' ' ' ,4 , . . I . , A7 I ' . 6' 4 Q A . Y U J c -Y . . . . 3, ' 4 L ,4 - - 4 . A 5 44, ' ,- ',g. . . '. . .Q 1 c . V I ,,. ,., . . -. . . . . . . , . , . . 41's - IN 1 1 ' ' ' '1 1 1 ' 1 ,. - 4 Y . 4 l l l i E l l l l l 1 r E l l gl R. l f 3 ll il ll I 'l tl il li Ill il i l l l l i l l 1. lll Clmiuizs S. DIQMING,-22 East 7tli Street, New York City. FREDERICK H. Dmiixo,-22 East 7th Street, New York City. EDw1N C. Ecknr.,-354 'West 29th Street, New York City. 11. IC. ld. 3 '95 Malia, Engineering Society, Smoking Club. I. A.R'l'1lUR FUNK,-Prohibition Park, Staten Island, N. Y. 13. 9. H., JP. E., Eucleiang Vice-President Y, M. C. A. 449, Vice-President Athletic Association. JOHN J. GRAHAM,-Sea Cliff, L. I. W. T., FJ. N. lQ.g B. 11. B., Athletic Association, Eucleian, Dramatic Association, '95 Mafia, Chess and Checker Club, Class Treasurer Q3j. FREDERICK J, HANlJX',-109 West 39th Street, New York City. Y. M. C. A. 5 Eucleiang Class Orator QU. All'l'liUR H. HowLANia,--Spring Valley, N. Y. Yf. T., Q. If .Kg Eucleiang Vice-President Y. M C.A. C315 President Y. M. C. A. Q4jg Glee Club Qzjg Class Orator f2jaI1Clf3D, Prize Founders' Day Debater Qijg Current Literature Editor University Q7!fl7'fE7'Qf fill and Q3j. lsixfxc I-IENRY Kikiav,-Roslyn, L. l. Z. Yf.g Ji. lf. Kg Y. M. C. A. 3 Eucleiung Vice-President Engineering Society Q3j. LEON TJEMBERG,-ZQ6 Broome Street, New York City. VVALTER D. LUDLUM,-Hempstead, L. l. Z. 903 Q5 B. Kg Censor Eucleian C255 Vice-President Eucleian Q3j, Class Secretary fgj. jfxcoi: L. NEWMAN,-So Parkhurst Street, Newark. Eucleiang Athletic Associationg Editor '95 V1oLE'r. lV11.i.iAM MARSHALL,-37 West 16th Street, New York City. E. N. g Class Poet Qzj. GIEOIKGIE XY. Osisoiw, Wlestneld, N. J. A. 41. QF. 3 Fl. N. E., First Hebrew Prize Qzj. Mosizs ROSENHERcs,-University Building, New York City. I'IENRY B. Swuizk,-11 Ylfest 115th Street, New York City. B. A. B., Eucleiang Athletic Association, Canoe Clubg Glee Club, Smoking Club, Dramatic Association, '95 Fodder Club, Class Historian Qgjg Recording Secretary Eucleian Qgjg Editor '95 A7IOLlLT, 112 mms E SMIIII Sprmg Valley N Y A Q3 Ed1tor Q5 X7IOLE1 Q35 ORRIN VV SNODGIASS zo, SUIHD61 Axenue Nexxtrk N A Q5 Eucle1an Ath1et1c Assoc1at1on Censor LLlCl6l an Q35 Class Poet Q,5 H1 Mx SAI ml 65th Street New York Clty lf uclelan BENIANIIN H blrlls 133 Ttst qOtl1St1ECtl lXexx Yo1kC1t5 f Y' SP 19 K 0 ZV I b A B Luc1e1an ALhlet1cA550 clatlon Clwss Treasulet Q15 Cl'1ss Presldent Q 5 lLcl1tor 10711111 Busmess Mftuqger Q5 VIOLL1 Q35 Manager Freshman Football Teqm Q95 GEORGEG X7OCI'l 402 15th Avenue Paterson N A Q5 Q35 PI'G5lCl6Ilt Q15 Cllss P1es1deutQ35 Secretary C1 mem Club 5 Presrdeut Camera Club Q35 Glec, Club Q25 'md Q35 Vxce P1es1dent Glee Club Assoelatlon 45 'M .me s Wm ef- wwf 113 J A 4 . X H It ' ' I . . is v Q : . H . ' , Q Y- H . ,, y ,Z y I ' .5 1 . 5 . C . . 5 . . 3 C " . -,"-,-- , f - 3 ". 4 E I . 'mtgvyi Lg' k - ay ' 7 ' ",-Z. .Q . . .Q '. W. lg C. . ,Q T ' 5 ' . . - l c V ' I c ' A ' ZX: N l F ' f 'Q U Q L ct Y 'N Q ' L 1 L n I . ' L ,,- - , , . J. . . ORRIN S. 'XVIc:Il'1'MAN,-63 E. I3ISt Street, New York City. EF. 213 Y. M. C. A 3 Vice-President Eucleizm 5 Class Vice- ' g z ' 5 f .1 Q2 , , l . 5 . J' 4 - D -IX Y A 'H I ,Q A 5' .A " Y - ' x 1 1 --"H, ,' ' L. I-V -: . J, I: 1, 'f:h?: i ,. 'I Ji, - .sw V., , 1 13' A W " f F ,-'-.,:- ' gy 'U C .N-Q, 7 I - , Q3 CLASS OF 1896 H HL I A 'YAX4 . ' ,N , . , ., - ....-.. N I . Y, V -. -W I. ..-.. . . . , K , i , 4 Q . w I X K - 1 6 1 A I . I , f I , I 5 E i ' S' 1' Q A V 'U D I I -H ' .Q V k',A - f I ' 'H-S-' ' ' hmvh-1 " kv-Ly '66 ff f 'if R-.XV ,ir-.1 11111111111 I f lIIlw.! 'll1 -?1?-as -3 1 1 Llulfcb ,-.1 if is 5 XSN if 4 E..'W'1'11'11f1fN 1112111 1 X11 T'1'?,1 11 11 1111 M111 " S A 5' QNX' x3Fg111111P X AN1 If 1 I f- 4 Q ,Sf ..1:'-s.-w '11,-C-P 11 1 q7M'i'1?1 Nfbxffwjx new Vx J. -2 s YD... . . ,asf-Qh x fm S if,3E,9CE-D' 1 11 1 1 1 1. 1 I - I 1 1 - 11 ' 1 1 I, 1 1 1 1 1. 1 . 1 11 1 1 11 1 1 1 11 11 1 ' 1 1f '1 1 1 1 1 1. 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 11 1 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 2. 1 W 1 1 1 . , 1 1 1 Q1 1' 1 1 1 Q 1' 41 ' 1 A .... , ,,V. 1 11111. 11 , 1 1 1 1 1 ,ff Z 1 1 1 1 ff '? 'Q1i521L::"? f-'3?5"- 1 2? 11 1 , - ' f 1- , -i f ' 1 1 1 " 51 1 ' 1 nf E -2 fr: 1 1 'fif '- f1. - ,111 -x'fx.'f1.X 1 1 1 1 1 1 5 - 1-1 . 1 1 1 , 1 z 1 ,111 ,J 1 1 " :gn 1 1 11 1 1 Q N1 1, ,- fn,- 1 1 fa 1 z . 1 - 11: 1 1 1 1 " " 13,111 1 1 1 1 QW 1 1 1 1 .414 -1 Ji,-, .1 1 O' 1 T 'f11YY'fL1hA.fF1'g "' 1 ' 111-,.J'.1:C-111-2 .,1,, 5111, ' P - - N111 ' 1 1, I111. '1 1-.1-cig1'EfRie'1::-'fm 1 11 1 1 111 11 11 111 2111111 1 .v m..-1 11, 111... 11 f ' 1, .f'-1:- " - - 1 1 1111 1111 11 I" 13' . Q-11.1511 11,11131-1-11-1u1,5'f11.jar - . f 1 1 1 7'-2225123111 rem, '1 ' 7 J 1 ff: f 11 1 1 I1 Q 1 11 1111 11 +L:-,,11mg. 1 1 1 1 1 ,Li w. x. .1 1 . 5 412 - 1 ,zfsfxfa '- - '-' , ' -1 11 1111-1-111 ' i .1 , 1 1 1 1 --11 11 1 11 111111 111 111111111111 'iiiillfw 1 1 1 1 xi- ' -I - . UNM 3 111111 1 Lin, 13' 1 1 X - - 1' ii 1 1 1 1 Xfi' W -F1 Q. sf .- 11 L ' , 5":Y?f 1 0? - .' 1.'- A - . ' 1 .. .,r'X:- 1-IP' k MP!-111 N vrrei'-af 11 1 . 1 5: ,A .. .,!-H' Egg?-.n11', -5 u:-1,147 -11: 11' 1 1 . 411111 1:11612 i1 '24 rf -' 11 1,-:SL 11 1 ' 2- 1-1"1'.':,f W1-14 .Q - 111 ' L 1' w45P'1:'11'.".7'L1 1 F111 1 11 1 ,. Lwusff. -.1 11, -1111 , 11221115191-1y.1..1 rf 1 11 1 .11 sf., f--1, 0' - 111111111 , 2,31-:11:1.1f. 114115. , 11 1 11 7 11 .1 4113. 7-213,-21-fa: :11 1 pf -c:21i.:4.Sf4"""'2-f1' , '1 1 1 1 ' ! " -wg aa." 11 1 1 21,-,z '--,fa 'eg 1 1 1 "" 1- Sim NQQA -.-32 1 1 - - . . 1 1 1 1-4,-,iff 1 11- , 1 V- 11 1 ' 1 1 . I 1, 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 , 1 1, 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 - 1 1 1 . 1 V . ' 1 1 1 . 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 . 1 , 1 1 W NINETY SIX SOP!-IOYVYORES CLASS YELL Hacka racka hackm racln Ree 12111 foo' 96' 96' N Y U' BANGU' CLASS COLOR5 Yale Blue and W111tG oHxI PRI-'NTILL TAHIOR EUGENE SMTIEI MILLS FRARR HEAIH GEORGE FRANCIS SWAN CHARLES LARUE MEAD LANVRLNCE XKVOODWARD WHIINEX OFFIQER8 5 I reszdmzf 1 we Preszdwz fre 62571767 Hzstorzfzfz 07 atm I aff . 1 I "i F C yi, 7 . 3 ' I 1 'Q Y J' I IN ' 77 ' I , - "" ' ' ' Q I . , , ,,.. .... f ' - ' J 7 CHESTER FIELD SMITH VVHITNEY, - ----- Secretavy 4 ,, 4 f. 7 JR., - -----,,- ', . g X 1 . . , ""-' ' a W - . . , " -""-- . - U , J . . Y ...... , 11 4 4 I Nl ,E N lNETY:SlX'S HISTORY. ",-lrzmz 'I'Z.l'0.VQIIC' 611110. " T was in October 1492 that Christopher Aineas Columbus first set foot upon a land which was P destined to take the foremost rank among the nations of the earth, and just four hundred 'ears later, almost to a day, the class of Ninety-Six was born. Like Alexander, Caesar and eflgilmfii , 5 ,f Napoleon, Ninety-Six was destined to have an illustrious career. lhe class of Ninety-Five had been a dismal failure and the coming of Ninety-Six was awaited with great anxiety by all connected with the University,fso that it was a welcome sight indeed when the class ofgovcr sixty stalwart youths Hrst bled into the chapel of old N. Y, U., and filled to overflowing the seats assigned to the Freshman class. Hardly had we grown somewhat accustomed to our new surroundings when the poor, weak sopho- mores made a few feeble attempts to show us " who was boss," only a few attempts, however, and finally, when they had been beaten in every rush, hcart-broken and head-broken, they gave up the use- less contest. But the matter was not to rest there. On the eve of Founders' Day some of the misguided sopho- mores were so rash as to decorate the college walls with paint, green signs, etc.g later in the evening a small party of Ninety-Six men chanced to drop in, quite by accident. Seeing the body of one of the Sophs. who had fainted with fright at hearing approaching footsteps, a consultation was held and it was decided to make an awful example of him. Accordingly he was dragged to the tower on the roof, the 116 i , I I 1 flag-pole was cut down and the man was suspended over the street by a rope, while from his feet dangled a sign of warning to the rest of his misguided classmates. He was found there in the morning by Mr. Woolsey, but although every effort was made for his restoration, it was in vain. The crowning victory of our Freshman year was yet to come.LEver since Ninety-Three won the bun in its Sophomore year, Ninety-Four has looked forward to becoming the heirs of Ninety-Three, and very confidently, indeed, did they gather at the Classaday Exercises last juneg their chagrin and anger when the Bun Orator delivered it to Ninety-Six as the most popular class in college can better be imagined than described, while the victorious Freshmen made thelhall ring with their sharp, " Hacka, Racka, Hacka, Racka, Ree, Rah, Roo, Ninety-Six, Ninety Six, N. Y. U. " Even the Seniors acknowleged that the sensation of the evening was made by C. Whitney and Swan who appeared dressed in ladies' fi: ,fp evening dress, and throughout the exercises flirted desperately with 4 ' ' V ' I the handsome Seniors. lt was said that a certain law professor, who is U K popular with the ladies, was quite disappointed when he discovered " that the young ladies whom he had admired the whole evening were . p-I' A r I N ? R- ,I N. .. ,5',- r- 'L'.X - --:J '- .,',, - ' N K Ss: in .. i 'ii 1, . 1 ..f. f, .lush -A L , V' I Q . . Q. vi --- . ,V .",-g- '- ' t. I M' f' " 7 - fe-- 'sfi' liiffrf' it xg, . v Freshmen in disguise. " When we came back in the Fall after our first vacation we found many changes, a number ofthe old standbyes were gone and many new men had come among us from other colleges. But it did not take us long to settle down to work and thrash the new Freshmen. At first their size rather startled us, but one cane rush was enough to dispel that illusion. Since then we have had one or two little affairs in the Square, but as Ninety-Six was victorious in all, modesty forbids us to more than make mention of them, It is sufficient to say that we have never been beaten in any rush we ever entered. In football at N. Y. U., Ninety-Six may well assume the leading place. Although for two years there had been no team, yet under the careful management of Burthe and " Pop " Walscheid, a strong 117 I ll l I l 5 class team was organized, and it was so successful and displayed such promise that a creditable 'Varsity team for next year 'seems assured. Our elass is happy in the possessioniof the usual number of odd characters. There is Clayton, the man who was never known to laughg and Mackenzie, whose sole delight is in his camera, fthe story that he once began a recitation with 4' I press the button " is, however, probably a calumnyj. Then there is Mortimer, who consumes the midnight oil and his own vitality in eager grinding after knowledge, though of what sort he has never explained. It is awfully refreshing to the duller heads of the class to hear Ottarson explain with an angelic smile that even y i,fi I ' V-A he " don't quite understand you, Doctor l" What would the class do without l ipe' the brothers, Castor and Pollux, and yet it might be a difficult matter to affirm 3 with certainty which of the Whitney brothers " delights in prancing steeds. " Why should the historian tell of the scholarly attainments of the class ? They are all recorded in the college archives, and are after all of less value to us than is that good fellow- ship and kindly feeling which we so cherish towards one another. And so, with a hearty greeting to the classes of Ninety-Six throughout the whole length and breadth of our land, and with the hope that they may all join him in wishing continued prosperity to our class, the historian lays down his pen. "Vive la Ninety-Six. " G. FQS., Historian. 118 ndlvldual ecords Class of 1896 CN I' T114 nzwzlzrrs 111 pay 6111714515 dellofz Me colllgeyeal bbgllllllllg wzth Me ff Kfhlllllllj GEORGE N BOEIINI I3OFd.St,bI.I1 Street New York C1ty B A P Louls BLLI EI 506 XVest I57fIl Street New York C1ty if F A Dram'1t1c Assocntlon Lxecutlvc Lomm1tee Atl1let1c Assoclatlon Q25 I Lororu BUR1111. 438 Lexington Avenue New York Clty 'If 2 B A B Fuclelan Chess and Checker Club Var srty Football leam Nlmrvrr ll D QIIAPMAN 132 West 57ICI1 Street, New York Lmty Q l R wus T CLu lov 112 Cleveland Street Brool lyn Z 'I' X M C A DLICICIQU Athletlc Assoclatxon Freshman Science Prlze Cx RIL V D12 Q01 DOX x SQ W'est 63th Street New Yorl, C1ty 96 Football Feam jmrss I Llxhllljl N 3 East 18th Street Yew Yorl Clty Secretary EHU1HGCfl11g Soc1ety Pllllll LLSXNOI lll S27 Avenue D Buonne N !P I' A Class Football learn WXLIEI CTMAQLN 65 NVest 48Ll1 Street New York C1ty Z W Y M C, A Eucle1an Camera Club Freasurer Glee Club ASSOCl3t1OIl Secret1ryY M C A Q35 AMHONY F GRU1xx:N111xL 31 Last moth Street New York C1ty Englneermg SOC16ty llANlx H:lA'lH troxernols Island N Y A K F b A B Atl1let1cAssoc1at1on h,ng1neer1ngSoc1ety Manager 96 Football leam Class lreasurer kzj l ROYDON Hou Butler N I Class Football Team S H I . I I I . I I I F C O - 0 I -lA. I I i I I -J., 1 1 ' f - ,' 3 1 -, 1 ' ' V' 1' I I 4 I . ffI,- L' 'W ', - ' . '. .Q. j PK z,- f ' A , ' . 1. . .3 .' 5 'C' ga' 'V' ' ' I . I .I N 1 " M- , - - 7: . . :J Q ' 1' - I - 4 C ,. A 14, .V ,- . ' ". . , TUV' . f"'I,-' , 1. . .gf.'. .'.g' 'Q ' "5 : . ' x UT ' , . . I ?.1"vs,-224 ,l 1 '. 14 D' ' ' . I VVALLACE L. DURAN'l',-fJ3 West 56th Street, New York City. W. T. 3 Secretary Bicycle Club. I 4. r .yt '- 'Y Lv, Y ' , 'L L,.1 1- D l"aJ."",- " " . '. ..g..'. .14 'Q' Q' ' ' g C . f. . . , ' " . swf " , ,- 2 'A ' , ' . ' ' ' . f N ' Q ',j1a.,-X f- , . . . .,a.g T .'.g ' . " 3' ' ' ' 3 v rx , rw ,f I y ' I M - , J. 'lvl Y . 1 Q I, nd I 119 I u PERRY B. HOllGH.-I26 East 45th Street, New York City. Class Football Team. FRED P. KAFKA,-194 Edgecombe Avenue, New York City. A. K. E., Engineering Society, '96 Football Team, U13 Club, Editor '96 VIGLET. JERE. L1EBERMAN,-VVestchester and Cauldwell Avenues, New York City. THOMAS J. MAcC,x1:E,-448 West 57th Street, New York City. Exploring Club. EDWARD T. MCKENZIE,-Rahway, N. J. Camera Club Vice-President CID and 123, Y. M. C. A. GEORGE H. MA'l'THEXX'S,-XVHld6U, N. J. Z. Yf. , Engineering Society, CHARLES L. MEADE,-Weeliawken, N. J. Z. SF. , Y. M. C. A., Recording Secretary Eucleian Qzj. CHARLES M. MYERS,-250 'West 12th Street, New York City. Y. M. C. A., Recording Secretary Eucleian Qzj. GUSTAVE M. TVIEYER,-SQ East 77th Street, New York City. Engineering Society. EUGENE S. MILLS,-16 Maple Avenue, East Orange, N. J. A. 515. , Y. M. C. A., Athletic Association, Glee Club, Dramatic Association, A. Q. Bowling Club, Class Football Team. GEORGE T. MORTIMER.-17 Vl'elling Street, Astoria, L. I. A. 515. , B. A. B. , Camera Club, Banjo Club, Press Club, Dramatic Association, Editor '96 XIIOLETQ Athletic Association, A. QP. Bowling Club. A. ELLIOT MUNSON,-Palisades, N. J. Class Football Team. BORIS TVTAZUR,-60 Canal Street, New York City. WILLAIQIB F. O'r'rARsoN,-30 Clinton Place, New York City. Z. W. , Y. M. C. A. , Eucleian, Class Orator try. BRUCE G. PHILLIPS,-457 Macon Street, Brooklyn. SU. V., Y. M. C. A., Eucleian, Chess and Checker Club, Class President fry. L. MOIll'fZ PINNER,-1036 Sherman Avenue, Elizabeth, N. j. ROGERS PINNER.-Io36'Sherman Avenue, Elizabeth, N. J. HARRISON M. PRA'r'r,-107 West 43d Street, New York City. T. l". A. JOHN H. PRITCHARD,-Bay Ridge, L. I. Class Football Team. FREDERICK C. SECKERSON,--418 Hancock Street, Brooklyn. W. T., Y. Classical Prize. VVIN1-'RED H.' RoisER'1's,-Springneld, L. I. A. Q., Engineering Society. 120 M. C. A., Eucleian, Class Treasurer QU, Freshman F1E11FR1c1 S1 111112 329 lwioficlxxay Astoria N Y Athleuc Assoclation E11gl1'1GST1Ug boc1ety Clfxss Football loam Editor 96 X71O1L1 VV1L1.1n1 S161 12 JR -1 6 VVest 159th Sheet New York City A 2 Athleuc Association Dramauc ASSOC1at101l Class Football Team Ld1tor 96 X 1011 1 CIAUD1: C SNl1l1I Sprmg Xalley N Y A Q Athletic Association Dramat1cAssoc1at1on I3 Club Classlootball Team ISAAC bILRlNB1 RC 31 Scfmmmel Stxeet New Yorlx City JAMES H 511111121 667 Carroll Street Brookly 11 N Y Athlet1cAssoc1at1o11 GEOIQGI 1' Sum 7, 1Vest 54th Sheet BWBOUIIG A j Yf 2 X M C A President Piess and Checker Club Q15 Cor respo11d111g Secretary 1-Lucleian Q15 1l1e'1sure1 Y M C A Q D"LllC1.Q3J Class 1I1sto11anQ 5 Class Executlxe Com mittee Q15 Freshman C1ass1cal Piife P1 ElNl1CE TAXLOR VV'1rw1ck N X A W Y M C A El.lC1C1'111 Cl'1ssP1es1de11tQ5 b1ll Team EM11, WAISCHIIIJ UI1lO11 H111 IN I Q 1 A B .41 In P1es1cle11tAthlet1c Assocmation Q35 1jl"l11l2lllC Asscc1al1o11 Captain Class Football leam Q 5 VTTSILY Football Team C11ARL1Ns G WHEELEIR 596 jefferson Avenue 151001113 I1 Q 1 A Athletic Assoc1at1o11 Dramatic Assoc1at1o11 Class 1 ootball lleam Class Poet Q15 Ld1lor Un1xe1s1ty fplllll in Q Q25 Ecntor lIl Chief 96 1 IOLIII L111s111a F S XV11111w1:Y 55 Halsey Stieet 13100111311 W 1 B A b X M C A ClassSec1eta15 Q25 Corresponclmg Secretary Eucle1a11 Q 5 Chess and Cl1ecke1 Club SVS1Tl11l1lIlg Club Class 1 ootbfmll Team LAuR1.NcE W YV11111x1:x 55 Halsey Sheet Broolxly 11 11 2 X M C A 131112161111 Cameia Club SXXIYHITIIUS Club Chess and Checl er Club Treasui er Camera Club Q15 Class Poet Q25 . - - - V - 1 - I 1 rx , 1 - qc 4' ,- " L ' , , - - - 1 ' ' 1 f C 1 4 ' ' Ar", 1 ' sl' "' . ' - ' -' . ', ' ' . .fi L 1 1, .,-if-7 y 75 . . ., Y , 4 - F ' ' 7 . 4 1 U ,- 'VV fy 5 I , .1 -5 L 5 -, V. ' - Us .1 5.1 . -,., v 3 :,- lc . y - ' ,. 21- H ,-'f 0 A , , V. - 717. -71-1 ' ' 1 - ' 1 ' L:"c- '.f.'. .2. g A' 'ZQ1 1: 'f - J, 1 "' 4 1 ,- C ' , .7. C. .3 .f. 1. .31 '. gil, ' ' 2. Ali'liHUIi . VVA1,scH11D,-Unicn Hill, N. . 515. l'. 11.3 B. 41, Bp Athletic Association' Dramatic Association' Class Foot- . . , - 4 ,X 2 Q, I . - . ' L' . ,- 1. , ' ' ' . 2. C, .g ' ' ' Q ' ' ' Q 1 ' 1' sf' ' 1 1 F.: , ,.,.1,, . , ,, -1. w. 7 , 1 , 1 . ., . . ' . . . . , - , . . . ,,.. , . . . ., - , 5 V . 2: . Q Q . 1 . 5. . . Q , 5 L I . . . UU,-2 . . Y , . . fi cu. 7. . 14 .1 1 'E : . 1 1 ,' ' , 1 I x , L , c . 121 CLASS OF 1897 1 n P T i I ! ef 3 E 1 5 1 5 I 1 I 'r'r B 1 I i ,A w r 1 lvf ' ' "fm ' f.-,I f l., ' ., X ' 'Q 7'Q9:wg.f'"Qg3,3'ffQ:' X 5' g,1 " - ' ,, M ' d 1' " am- XML- gf-eggs ,Nw xr: zf, W M, '-.- XY' 551 xr 'L s ,Q Q ' JH , 'fgkqi u t mf- N -' aw- , .ta-1, 1 5 53' "I if ' . 5 'fa 5 'g i ggggv s 5 E 5 E -15.312- .fi ,gs -- ,. 4 W- ,A 1 .mf Ax - um if x ,xx -1 IJ ,, -1 S5 5 121 A551 .af- 4453" 'V' f Mg W w?gw51M 54 wsufu-?1.4my, f f d A mu- , 'P iff-"" 1-gy 15551 L .35 BLK - - 5 - Q K rf-vQgLi2-gfi'-Et 'f -- fn, - ,. .., 1 ,--f 'A "' . ,X f -2,1 . -' ' it ll: - Q, r 'ff' fu:-1:,,'- 1,-.51,5-.L+-yQ,s3:1s,-xf . 551 JQEEZFE7 Q, -' W5 "FX: ' ,i:',1'1L'g'.iQif" . gg ,!,,rA'..g.,..:1,lg-,:v,:'f.gn,,1L,:.:zzs1i:-33 Q AN -au,-,-mi'-:-: . -+-'-'l-ww.-1-.-4 ,-:'1-,:,,.,1' :.5.vf- 1-use-25:11 ' ig , 11: . .-?1:'-.-z'-Vrisii aff- -:P ,JJ ' H 1. V my., Vps: :sg:gs5?'f:j:.a,5x X -. i X Q...L, ...IL-:,f.-K, f-N , -A,-,f',-Lgqpzs -:Li ,fix Q il au 3, I .'vL-gg1'.- M, :-5.-fyqr. 5--1. Q: ' '- :img Q 'Inf 'ii if"?E344TM-"':5V'3' fw 1' :Z-5' 'T ' 2?PfF'W5?.... ' Ui' ,. , 'Qi W - -- 'Ff' 4'i3r,,...fr13'fFE:: 214517 , .f ' '- .... :.f-Fm" "5"'2a 1:55-' 31", - mx f V 's -:is i l A ' . "N" i5:'Cf,Qa2ff' - ' FQ 'lE:Zf?i?-.23 --'Y N INETY SEVEN CLASS YELL Rwzle dazzle hobble gobble GEORGE W DOWNS HONVARD B111 BIOODY B C um OH1x H MQKAX OHN W WARRIN Hu W'1h hu' 97 N 7 CIASS COLOR5 mule 'md Black OFFWERS lfeszffwzf I ue Pffszziffzf I 1 uzszfwr Hzstorzmz I oe! -': O 1 Cz a 1 C Q '97,, , .X. U! 1-AVL ' fx . x - - - J. ' , . , , ..... - - ,, ., ,H ' . JJ, ----- ------- - THOhiAS H. XVI-IIFFEN, -------- - - Sfffffflfflf. f . Qi'-.L, .... ------. ' "7 , , I r 'f O r ..... ..--- - V . ' . . , J' - - - - ------- D . - J 123 N lNETY:SEVEN'S HlsToRv. M O write the history of so magnificent a class as Ninety-Seven and Write that history well is cer- tainly a very onerous duty. Though not so large in number as some preceding classes, we yet 'Q' surpass all in appearance and intelligence. Indeed We set an example that any future class may follow without fear of subjecting themselves to the criticism and ridicule of the outside world. Our endeavor has been and ever will be to uphold the honor and dignity of old i' N. Y. U., " and to leave it on a more exalted plane by our coming. But for the History proper,-that is the recital of the facts and doings that have made our class famous throughout the college world. lVhen we entered in September last, We were indeed a splendid band,-recruits that any college might well be proud of. VVe were some forty strong, strangers to old " N. Y. U. 'l as well as to each other, but that brotherly spirit which binds together all associations of men began its Work on that memorable morning and has since been perfecting itself among us, After a few weeks' preliminary work, during which time We had had occasion to chastise the kids in Ninety-Six, and had struck the profs. all in a heap by our superior intelligence, We acted upon the time- honored custom and had our beautiful but determined visages transferred to the photographer's plate without the knowledge of the simple Sophomores. And right here a Word may be said in regard to these same Sopliomores. We have not found them the Freshman-devouring fiends tradition represents them to be, but rather quiet, peaceable fellows, who seeing with what contempt We regarded them soon tired of their petty annoyances. 124 We have not been found Wantrng rn athletrcs The hrstorran 130111115 Wrth prrde to the Freshman football team whrch has been a cr edrt not merely to the class but to the Unrver srty at large rnasmuch as rt rs the Hrst eleven that has represented the Freshman Class the entrre football season Not only has the team as a body done excellent xx ork but the rndrvrdual members hare surpassed all the play ers on the other teams Who tackles better or sharper than G3TX71IlP Who blocks 17 am" hrs opponent better than Greacen P And what vxas the cry of those poor ff K decreprt mortals wrsely called Sophomores when vre played them at Governor s Island P Wasn t rt Look out for FetherstoneP Nor are We at all remrss rn the lrne of studres Indeed our beloved Dr Murray says he does not see the use of our frttendrng hrs lectures on math mat1csfPj and rn French Orr Brll and the Hoboken Terrrer Oswaldj knock spots out of Ansome Brlly hrmself The hrstorran berng rn the Screntrfic drvrsron cannot x ouch for those rn the Arts but the reports say that Drs Band and Srhler have able assrstfrnts respectrvely rn Snyder and YV F Tompkrns But rt rs our socral qualrtres that rn vulgar pfrrlance take the cake Under thrs head there are two drxrsrons popularrty and Ofood looks Of course everybody admrts that Renny Abbott rs the most pcpular man rn the class And as to the best lookrng fellow Gates leads Wrth Naprer a close last And frnally krncl gentle darhno' Qthe last adjectrve applres to members of the gentler sex between the ages of seventeen and twenty onej reader you must admrt that takrng the class collectrvely or rndr vrdually we are the finest set of young men to be found the college World over A71 Muon' I H M Hrstorran Ex Fwd? wuts r was Ate? feast 3 3 3 ' . . . C . 7 ' C 7 Y , c ' c 7 A c 7 Q 5 - 1 - f A in ' . , , . ' . C 7 9 R. LE If X ' ' 7 ' , v 1 ' '--SQ -v ,,,fn.,.,g 1 , 1 ' - H H iii :Vial 1 ' - i' . e- - f rr, -.. .,., C - . l . . . U ' 1 C 1 a Q ' ' 9 . . I- I - r - - v I A I . . I s. v C C D - . . . . Y A . M 7, . 7 f- o ' I l 7 , , 2 1 e, . - , C - I F I . . I . . . ., . 'kfxx ' MSN' K ll A l I . W , VL' band s,, V Sita B- K, f ng . T ' - - ,T , Q-1+ , C .,'k i"-511 . ,rr f-- h 72,1 L - Q ffrg' g. ' ' ' f . -". 1 -s "" f X' NDWIDUAL REcoRDs. . Class out 1897. Rizmvlcii XVYLIE .AlZI3O'llT,--336 W'est 3oth Street, New York City. W. 'Zig Class Executive Committeeg Class Football Team. BERT1:.xM P. ALLEN,-16 East 24th Street, New York City. ALu1z1:'r A. ANIJEIQSON,--I7 lVest 43d Street, Bayonne, N. j. Ll. T. g Y. M. C. A. BENJAMIN S. B.xR1:1Numt,-226 XYest r32d Street, New York City. Arifunn C. BrzN1a1:1c'r,-167 lVest 7ISt Street, New York City, 515. F. A. g Athletic Association. How,xR1w BILL,-101 VVest 7S1h Street, New York City. Y. M. C. A.: Athletic Associationg Class Vice-President, Censor Eucleiang Chess and Checker Club: Class Football Team. Hakim' P. Bissi-LLL.,-13 East 22d Street, New York City. 41. T., Class Football Team. H1XRRX' VV. Bkoxxiv,-7oo Hudson Street, Hoboken, N. J. sb. l'. LI.: Athletic Associationg Class Historianfrjg Editor-in-Chief EJl'lfIlI QU. Gliolauu A. CAIN,-Nutley, N. tl. Y. M. C. A. 5 Eucleiang Athletic Associationg Prize Scholarship. Oswm D. CARLSON, 345 XVest 24th Street, New York City. IQICHARD B. COONS,-CI'2111fOI'd, N. LAURELL XV. DEbl1iRl'l',-Q55 Greene Avenue, Brooklyn. Grouse XV. Dowivs,-156 lVest 15th Street, New York City. Z. Elf.: Y. M. C. A. 3 Athletic Associationg Class President. josl-zl-11 A. lJlVYIiR,f.l3O lVest I47tl1 Street, New York City. joim F. FE'1'1lERS'l'ONE,-'NCXV Brighton, S. l. J. 41.1 Athletic Associationg Class Football Team, Class Executive - Committee. 126 Emxnx L GARx11x Flatbush L I X M C A Class Football Team Pr1zeScholarsh1p Moom B GA1rs 287 Tonnele Avenue ersey C1ty X Y' Crlee Club Athlet1cAssoc1at1on Censor EL1Cle13.Tl Class 'lreasurer Freshman Screncc, Prlze Prme Scholarslup ElJBlUNlD W G1 LALLB 65 West 48th Street New York C1ty ! W Class Football leam Y M C A NVILLIANI P HADxxI:x 174 Orange Road Montclarr N J QP I A Athlet1cAssoe1at1on Glee Club Classlootball learn Press Club Secretary Q lee Club Assoclatron Pleshmmn Sc1ence Prlze Prize Seholarshlp El1ClC131'l W1LL1A1u C HALI EXIT l aston Pa Q5 F A Athlet1cAssoL1at1on Class l ootball Feam W1LL1n1 A HUDSOIN Pate1son N A 2 D1 Ahh L I'Il,llOlX IQ East 44th Street New York C1ty CP F A YVILLIANI L L1:x Y 917 Seventh Avenue New York C1ty Athletrc Assoeratlon Lugmeeuug SOCl6t3 Camera Club GEORGEJ L1oN Manmroneck N Y A QP SecretaryEngmee11ngSoc1ety CHARLES A BIACC XLL 14 lhghth Avenue Nevtarl NT I A sf Athlet1c Assoerauon Class Football leam 1 fe Scholarslup AIPRFD C M XCDOINALD 4S6B109.dXXELy Paterson N I si 5' Atl1let1cAssoc1at1on Hmm M MXCDOBXLD 4S6B1oaduay Paterson N Athlet1eAssot1at1on HUCH BICDOUGAIL 326I'I8.I1COCk Street Brooklyn Fuelelan Atl1let1c Assoc1at1ou HXLL MCKAY 364L6Xl1'lQtOl1 Avenue New York C1ty B A I Athlet1cAssoc1at10n Preasurer Press Club Dl2LU1'1flC Assoc1at1on Class H1sto11an Q25 Y M C A GEORGE E MAX ut 702 East 158th St1eet New Yorl C1ty Z 'lf Y M C A Eueleran FRANCIS I MCCOURT 233 West 23d Street New York C1ty A 1 Dramat1c Assoclatron Football Team JUAN F MouALrs 211 'West 14th Street New York C1ty A Y' Smokmg Club CHAALES I D. XIILR R 1423 PEICIHC Street brooklyn A I Class Football Team HFRISERI E MEVERS 342 West 28th Street New York C1ty 515 I' A Athlet1eAssoe1at1on DAVID ORR 18 West I7th Street New York C1ty W 1 X M C A DF3.U12ltlCrXSSOC13.t1OH Class Football Team Athlet1c Assoc11t1on F1eshma11 Prrze Seholarshrp Class Eztecutrve Cornmlttee HUGO A OSXXALD 73BlOOII1f16ld Street Hoboken N I Y M C A Athlet1cAssoc1at1on EDWARD R PENMAN 184th Street Fordham N Y Athlet1c Assoc1at1on 127 4 - v V v1 7 ' . . ' ' . . , .. .... , , . , Q . ' , f X . ' ' ' . ' . 1 ,. , L,- ,I . A. ., , , , C. 1 .4. ' , ' . ', ' , , , . - .A X- vi. r .. VX . F . if ,41,- f 1 , 1' . A. , C , . ,. . , ,, , -, , ' T ' " . ' ' ' . A ,A .Q 1 . +.,J1t., , ,l.. . . ., , , .. fx 1 1 1 . . . . . . . . . 41. . .4 7 I T Y ' C Y Y ' .,. 1 ' . ' .' ' .1 Q f . x , A , . . ,. ., , . L ll- ' A rx Q - , ,Y ,,.,. , , , . t . ,- , . ., A .V T . . 4 I? . .. l . 7' ' 7 Y ' V 1 ' 7 A g, I . 4. . ' . W- c , . . - ., c . , . . . . ,, D. Y , - 7 4 v , .Y . . . ., . .1 , , t, L. . . .., , c ,l1. I Y - Q T I . .. A . . 1 , , . , . . ...J., . . -v v 5- v - , ' X' ' L x . 1 A , , , -1. . 1 ,,- , . A , . ,. .' 1 - J., ' ' .f - - . . . - . 1 ,- . Q' , . . ..1., Y , c , , .... 7 v- 'Q , ' . 1 . ' , , , x . . ., . . . ., . Y . - ,,. . . . I4 l . ,- , . . .Y y . , 7 A f , . ,,- . . , , . . .,C . 1 1 - - , A A . 1 4 l y' - - 1 . . ,- , . . . ., . , ' f-. 1 , 1 . ' f ' ' . A . 1 1 o - -, - - 1 -1 ' v . .. . Q . .,, Y . . C , , , . - ,- , , .. .... , . I. . ,- , , . . . XVAL'I'liR E. PE'I"l'l4lllICXY,-I'I2l.Cl+Z6DS3.Cli, N. J. Athletic Association, Engineering Society. R. S'i.xxi.isr Povmr,-goo Bedford Avenue, l-Brooklyn. llf. If , Y. M. C. A. S'i'iQi'iii:x B. IQOSENTIIAI.,-130 East Sed Street, New York City. Athletic Association, Dramatic Association, Engineering Society. Aiioii-ii S.ii,xiANowi rx.-98 Suffolk Street, New York City. Athletic Association, Engineering Society. I-Ii-LRMAN F. Sciiwiai'l'zi1i:,-Syosset, N. Y. Athletic Association, Engineering Society. Axiiimxr Sizixrz,--New Rochelle, N. Y. df. ff. XV. Slixxyxkn S1-iiixxiiixr.,-17 Prospect Place, Brooklyn. Z. W. Louis I. Sxrnick,-Snffern, N. Y. FF. T. Ilixxiici. D. ,FONII'lilNS,-41,3JEIINCS Street. Sing Sing, N. Y. Q5. ll. LJ., Glee Club, Athletic Association, Engineering Society Class Football Team, Corresponding Secretary Engineering Society, Prize Scholarship. XViLi.,xR1r Tomi-kiNs,-Stapleton, S. l, llf. V., Y. Nl. C. A., Athletic Association, Encleian, Freshman Classical Prize Prize Scholarship, joiix W. Xlfxkicix, JR ,Mijn l3ro:iclxx'ay, New York City. Ll. T. , Secretary Athletic Association 123, Dramatic Association Class Football 'lleainz Editor University f'bl'lHllQ Class Poet. 'l'iioxi.xs Il. Wiiiifififzx,-473 Y ' ' " " ' ' A., Athletic Association, Dramatic Association, Clas Fourth Avennc, ken X orlc City Q5. l. Football Team, Class Secretary, Prize Scholarship. 68 East 13ist Street, New York City. Y. M. C. A. , Athletic Association. Rossi-:kr S. VVioii'i'm.xx,- 128 Y v v S Class of 1894 Law SEINITORS MOSES HARRY GROSSMAN Vafaffzffov zcm OFFIQERS GLORGE WILLETS DAVISON Pnszdezzz' XVILLIAM FPEDERIL CDUIGIE 1515 Vzm fveszfirnl CHARLES A ICENMORL rl V164 fnfszziezzf GEORGE ACO1 AEOER Iwcovdznff Sewetzzrjf ALBER1 L1 ULX T1 mszznv FRTDERILK G1 ORGE WE1TEPAU, CIM! of Court OHN HENIQY MURPHX ffzvfwzfm 9 0 1 , ------ w f I 1 - . XX 1. , -'---- ,, , U f X, 'N ,Y, ----- ' . , r ...... 9 ' f- 9 ' . , - . 1 1 3 1 - f ' .I ' I 1 ' ' ' ' ' ' 15 - EUGENE BERRY, ------- C02're'sj707zdz'7zg S4w'fZzz7jv ,. ,Z ,a .------ , A . .- - 5' N 1 . , , 2 L x - ' - - ' L . . 7 - - - - ' ' ' V I w ' ' ' ' 129 Y 6 L , N NETY: OUR'S HISTORY. Ah HIC Class of Ninety-Four ol' the Law School of this University have reason to congratulate themselves on having had 3 the good fortune to be members ol' the first class which experienced the immeasurable gain resulting from the ,-, introduction by Dr. Abbott, of what might be termed the " 'thcoro-practical " system of studying the law, by means i ol' text books and cases. Among thc l'rofessoi'iate ol' the leading law schools, there has recently been a discussion as to which of the two methods produced thc hctter results, and the Faculties of these institutions have arrived at diiiierent conclu sions. It is not the purpose,-neither has this Historian any right, to discuss the relative merits of the text, and case systcmg it being rather a question to be viewed from a perlogogical standpoint, than one of strict law But he believes that he expresses the opinion ol' his class, in saying that by employing, as we have done, a judicious combination ofthe two, whatever is latent and occult in the one, is elucidated, clarilied and crystallized by the other, so that in less time, and with not so much labor, the student has a clearer and more accurate knowledge ol' the practical use and value of a legal principle. In fcw words, he studies the law understandingly. The year has seen some marked changes from the old time practices. Forexample, in addition to the change of method just 1' eferred to, the Senior Moot Court has been abolished, in order that the time thus occupied might be employed in extending the Quiz on Real Property, which has been so ably conducted by Mr. Carlos C. Alden. There are solid advantages to be derived from these so-called " Quizzcsg " but which it seems to me could more appropriately bc termed " Reviewsf' bccause it is not merely a system ol' putting and answering'interrogatories, but one which alliords to the student an opportunity for de and c clon't time f vcloping' that quality which is so necessary and so valuable to the man of education, professional men generally, specially to the lawyer-that of telling what he knows. Our Dean has ably said, " You never realize how much you know until you attempt to tell what you think you know, " which seems to mc a truism which every one must some- eel. 130 Phe U1111111 xzfy L1z111 Rana 1u m1de 1ts debut111tl1e e11'lx p11t of tlllS scl1ol1st11. x e11 'lllll b1ds fan to become 1 PGIIOCIIL tl of extenslve c11cul1t1on 1nd '1jOLl1ll'1l fuzz 1 u1!!e1111 ol 1et111l 11xx 111d 1ts 1Cl"ttl0llS to sc1e11ce 1nd pubhc xx elfa1e I 1e 111 Lsterly pen ot tl11t 111 ZZIL Jude expo1111de1 ol tl1e l'1xv Austm Abbott lS Cl1SL61l11lJle ln 1ts PTQGS 111d u11de1 h1s ed1to111l Sllpel V1blO1l tl1e1e 1S 110 doubt tl11t tl1e A11111111 xx 1ll '1tt1 1ct 111 1115, IGELCILIS bcxnf 1lre1dy 1e11111k1ble fOl ltS exaetness ol leg1l statement sc1e11t1l1c1lly put I C'1I1IlOl. help obse1v111g th1t the Class of N1ll6t3V F0111 l11veh1d111111s11 tl OpPOltllll1llGS for Stllilylllg the '1CllllllllCS of the l1xx I 1efer 11oxx to the f1e1l1t1es XVlllCl1 they l11ve l11d to 3.l1"tlyL6 the11 tl1eo1c.t1calknoxxled e by mal111gp11ct1c1l appl1c1t1on of lt to populeu q11est1ons noxv or 1ecentlx pend1110 The xceu l1 IS been ext11o1d1111r1lx p1OllflL Ill these llltClCbtlll0' and q111s1 '1lll1.1Slllg 1ssues lh1s xx as especulllx 8.ClV6l ted to by OL11 lectu1er on l11te1111t1o11al L1xv Qxx l1o by tl1e xx ax proved h1r11self 9. most ente1't11111ng gentle111an, 1s Well as 111 tble lect111c,1j He 111e11t1o11ed for ex1n1ple the recent Behung Sea CODIITOVCISY the S1lver quest1o11 tl1e lauff quest1on tl1e httmg o11t of BT17111111 xx 11 slnps lI'1 A.lll6I'lC3.ll xxaters And then there 15 that other one xx h1cl1 Wir B1a1nerd spoke of LS belllg shocltmgly ahve the HOHOILIIIQH Queen or II1xx auan que-st1o11 And so lt 1s, 1 splenchd field has been opened for exe1 C1SlIlg tl1e ObS61V2iI'1t leg1l 11111'1C-l P1 ofessor l 1ede111an IS not only an excellent authol 111d tG'ICll6l but 1ppe Lrs to be 111 Ldept 1t setthng dnhcult QLIGSTZIO 1s of law Judgmg 110111 the tlnong of ple1de1s xx ho COllS,1Cg3t6 'uound l11m Cl'11l5 The1e 11e some gentlemen Ill tl1e class xvl1o SOI1'16l.l1llGS appeeu 11nxx llllllg to 'tccept 1s 111111 the ClCt.lSlOllS of tl1c Co111t of Appe1ls 'md 1361113135 Q111 the l111guage of PUglllS11lD xx ould l1l e to h1ve 1 bout xx 1tl1 these Juusts IIoxx xx ould the odds be I wonder? Fhree 1oses 1n th1s clfmss of thorns 11e tl1e onlx deco1 11110115 xve C111 boast of VlIe 11e POOTG1 tl1111 0111 1111101 lC1l6IlClS ll tl11s ICSPCCI fc 1 they seem to l11ve xvhole bouquets but th1s lllS'EO11"I.D does not th111l thex 11e composed of such beaut1f11l ra1e 1nd exq111s1te tloxx ers Ou1s 'Lre select 1nd f1om such f11g1 lnt and exot1e gsudens' llllllk of It M1ss D111ge1flelu f1o111 tl1e cl1o1ce pl111ts lll Auburn llIlbS Voos f1Ol1l those 111 Nexx Yo1lc md Mws Her1111f flO1l1 tl1e OCClClG1lt'1lS 111 FO1TllJ5tOll6 A11d tlus dzunty el1ss 6011101111111 1 111 contr1st lll"tlx6S those jun1or Weeds sh1dy even lll tl1e Stlllllffllt of 1 SCIIIOI Yes xve have l11d 0111 elect1o11 and 21 111e111o11ble one lt xv1s Both sldes l1 ld then scouts 111 tl1e held It just the p1ope1 t1n1e As soon 1s tl1e d1te of the elect1o11 was announced tl1ey bev lll to spu1t OV61 tl1e class hlxe comets 9LllO5171lI' thelr candldates 111 true pohtleal style they da1 ted up and doxvn the 'usles l1l e CO1'1l1llfllltlC1'S th1 ough 16 1me11t1l l111es thex d1str1buted tl1e11 eloq11ence l1v1sl1ly from one GI1ClOf tl1e c.l1ss to the otl1e1 they took the cl rss 1OSt6l 111d lJGgll11l111g 1t A thex tr1veled rlght through to Z 'llld Zan '1I1Cl, bOI'1ONV1flg the eeu of the UIIXVEHY they told blood Ctlldllllg stones 1bout tl1e 0 V ff- ,.' 1- 1- '1 '-. ' , ' - .'. , - ' 7'- -' '.,' ' . I "' c 1 I 1 c 1 ,1 . L 1 . , ' '., , ' ' . . ., '11 '. . ' , .' ' , . II fi ii . L f , i., V Q . C - . . W Q . . . C Q .Q . 4. 1, . , , , K ,,c 1 . '.' . ' 1,,. '.-, ' . , , , . A.. ,' . . . ' , 5 1 , , , , , . , , 1. c Q Q ,, be L Q c . . , c , c . . ' . ' . , . ' ' . v' ,- 11 , - c 1 . - 1 L . 1 . . c L ,, E V .. . . W .Q Q . V V' V. V E . c I. ' ' I A ,c 1 t 1 L A ' gg x 4 1 c ' ' .. ' I ' I' ' 2 1' I " L I ' ' ,' "' ' D ' ' '. . fx '. ' , ., . , . , ' , . c -c . .. . I ' 1 1. c , I ', c ' r. fe Z " 'A'. ", ft ,' , ' Q I . . I ,, W. . I r. - ,. v 1 . . . Y I , , , C. 1 4 - . .Q . Y A . ' . H -. . ,, . - .. , I 1 . c - c N c I . I c ' 1' I ' c . . 'N' ' . . f . . ' , .' . I c c , 1 I 1 1. c 1 1. ' 4' .. . .11 ..H .. . . ' ' , , . 1. , I K' 1 c 1. Q' . A , ' I c 1. 1, 'If . ' . ' . V '. 14 V' ' - ' .' . 1 Y - c ,c 1 , , I x f. c I , I , 1 1 c . c 1 c . f. , . L c -I . I . 1 , l 1 , . . c x 1 ,. , , , . . ,. ., . ' - 'N ' '. 1' . V . . 1 . c . ., . L ,c , ,Q 1 . .. .- L . , . .. , . . , 1 .. . ,. . . .. C , , . ,Q ,. 6 c , . 'L ' ',"', def, 1' ' ' A 1 1 , Q '. , L 'A 'I , 'c c . ' 1' 2 2 ' ' ' ' x ' . V1 - - - 1 'Y x ,-' ' ll ' . . 4 C , ot . , 1 D . i . .. v I A . i .v l I A U.. . 1 Y , c . 1 1. 6 c , ' c ' 'f," ' 'Q I Z' ' ',c 1 , I L L 54, ' ' ' I , ' I 1 c 191 -4 misfortunes that would overtake us if their opponents should win the laurelsg twenty-six of these politicians collared the writer, and spun him yarns which caused him to wear a pompadour for a week. Space will not permit me to narrate the details of the vote, but the gentlemen of the !"i'11.ff30z11"g' flu Cj1u'M' l.clfw'.v proved the victors, and Mr. George lVillets Davison consequently occupies the Presidential Chair, and I do not hesitate to say that perhaps a better qualihed man could not have l H l t 1 l it is but due to Mr Spraffuc, the defeated candidate, to say that he deserves been selected. It was a well-foug it gi . ent . 4 . t K C, the thanks of his class for the gentlemanly and honorable manner in which he performed his duties as presiding officer last term, and in which he maintained his candidacy in this late campaign. I do not know that any hostility has been caused in the class by the electiong but I am aware that some of the members are disposed to concern themselves too much about j1vt'fz111',"!!f.v. Itis the earnest wish of this writer that every mortal in the Class of Ninety-Four may graduate in May without a symptom of antipathy in his soul, and that each to the other may be always a friend, remembering that charity of heart is a virtue which invariably merits its own reward. 1. H. M., Historian. ,-.N . H- f-4----A- W-" W- '-' Y L-fm" ' "W i 4 , V ,t ,, - f? i' " gt.. Q'5'.vwfi,Q- . , , , N .:. M f:,!f,r If -Ls' is 5 WI V' -its V ff? I - L' Y' -T :.., ' r' l says f , -..,, s- R g awk " uf 155,591 -4 ij 1 an in N sw' I, .fa W, gLw.'5,y K, . X .tl Im., f. V. ijgffv pf "gm, 1 X sf? ,f f:,,.,,., -A --x ..-4 - X - ' i sz' ---, . mr t .. L K. - 'V ' MDE 'Q 1 L . - - t t. L. ,xx I X FN -- 5 , ' .te it my-XF Y- A V ,fjg ? 'MM' i b 1313 FREDERICK AICIIELE, JAMES AIKEN, XVALTER E. ANDREW' AARON AVllU'l'IS, HENRY M. BAIRO, XIVILLIAM J. BARR, EUGENE BERRY, . 0 S, M.D., CIIARLES BIENENEELIJ, PETER BRAUNLICII, XIITO L. CALAHRESE, LOUIS S. CARLIN, IAIARRY H. COLEMAN, GEORGE W, COLLINS, M.D., JOIIN Y. CORNELL, FREDERICK M. CZARI, DAVIIJ RAYMOND DA FLORENCE H. DANLZE LY, R l"lELD, GEOROE XV. DAVISON, -IOSEPII H. DELANEY, JACOII H. DENENIIOIJIZ, CIIARLES FIRESTONE, CORNELIUS D. FLEMING, the aw Class of l 94. New York New York New York New York Yonkers Hoboken New York New York Bay Ridge New York New York New York New York Brooklyn New York New York . Auburn Rockville Centre Brooklyn New York New York New York on OO SEYMOUR N. H. GALLA LOUIS GCJl.DS'l'EIN, . JOIIN P. GOOIJSIIQ, CI-IARLES F. GOOIJNVIN, HENRY S. GOSLIEE, VVILLIAAI S. GREY, . HowAR1v C. GRIIvIfI'I'Hs, MOSES H. GROSSMAN, PAUL GROU'I', . JACOII M. GNEUELIA, . BERNARD HfXl'lN, . XVILLIAAI J. HARAION, CARL F. HfXl1'I'AIANN, FRANK J. HENIJIQICIQSLJN JO5l2l'l'l HIISRHERT, HERMAN Iil2RSKOVl'l'Z, TIIEODORE M. HILL, AIIRARI G. HIRSII, FRANR M. LIOLAIIAN, XVILLIAM H. IYES, GEORGE -I. JAIQKQER, CIIAKLFS H. IQIQLBY, . NIJ, v v New York New York Brooklyn Brooklyn New York New York Brooklyn New York New York New York New York New York Newark New York New York New York Pelham Manor New York New York Brooklyn Newark New York LTMW Wg-4-A, .,,,, ,,, YY, AY Y -- W4 i- nr f CII.'xRI.Es A. IYENMORIQ, SIIIzI:o lioxno, TIIoxI.xs KIQRL, jIII.II's IQREMER, CIIARI.Es lililSlSCll'l'A, NVARREN LESLIE, IAJL'lS H. LEYIN, IOIIN E. LoVIx'I"r, LIfI.II B. lilCIl.XRIISON, fkI.l!EK'lll1El7l,Y, . LTLRIKTII IJICYIENSON, PII. XV.Xl.'l'ER P. LINIJSIEY, IQOAIAN G. LEwIs, LIAROLD -loI-IN A. JIIIIN XV. BIIENIIAN MoI:'I'oN BI. XSIUS Bl'R'I'ON .IIIIIN H. E. LII'I'INI:o'I'fI lNIA'l"l'lSON, M.xR'I'Ix, . New York New York Oakland, Neb. New York New York New York New York Tarrytown BlOLl1lf.f:rllGE1d XVeSt Hoboken D., . New I V. BLIIEKIQIQSAN, E, MoI:'I'oN, . BIRIYCZIEK, C. lX'IlilflllAN, BIURPIIY, SIAIIIN C. Noor, FRIxNcIs IEMII. A. ,ALFIQIEII BAYARII J. NIQIRIIA, OMAIEN, . C. P. Ol'lJYlil-L L. PEUR, . York Caldwell New York New York New York New York . . liingsbridge Brooklyn New York New York jersey City New York New York New York New York Brooklyn EIIwARn PIIILLIIIS, XVILLIABI VV. PIERCE, SIxIoN O. POl,I.fJf'li, M.A., W'II.I,IAAI F. QIIIlII,Ex', EIIWARIJ S. RAwsoN, LIARRY RANTJAl.l., -IOIIN A. ROGERS, . AN'l'l'lt'JNX' H. P. RU'1'CZEliS, lQl'IJOLl'lI M. RoIIIqINsoN, O'li'l'O A. RoSAI.sIcx', j.xI'oIs RII'I'z, NVAIXFIQR B. SAIfIfoRD, lEIIwARn R. S.IxNIIIfoRI:, ,AARON S. SIIAPIRO, SAAIIIEIJ SIJI-ILEISNER, . FREDERICK XV. SIMPSON, DANIEI. O. SPRAIIUE, , FRED. STIIIIR, . joIIN A. X7AN ZEEM, . Exm.-x M. Voos, . PIIII.II' XVARII, . CIIn.RI.Es S. XVIII'I'IxIAN, FRED. G. 'WE'I"I'If:R,xI', JAMES H. YVELCII, . X7lN4.'EN'l' VV. XVox"I'IsEIQ. l4'REIJERIctR E. XVliEliS, New York New York New York . New York Port Richmond . New York Brooklyn Jamaica New York New York New York New York New York New York Elizabeth New York Brooklyn . jersey City New Rochelle New York New York Brooklyn Brooklyn Brooklyn New York Tarrytown CLASS OF 1895 LA Claw TIIEOIDORE Cox BIISS ANIIA B H HAGGFI 1Y 'VIAXER CLARENLI GOLDAIAXN ROI 1 RT S11:wAP1 S0011 VIICHAEL 105131 11 ox CE Vhss ROSAIIE I Ol W ROI ERT PAIRILK GREEN ISAAL B MARKS JUNIORS Ya!! R1pY Rom' N Y U Q5 Law Offlqers Qxeeutlue Qommlttee I 7'6.YZ6L1Fllf I 27514 View jllAZ!lIC1Zf Second V161 IILAZZIILIZZ' A1402 11,2110 bfmfizzg I 1 mmf sz ffZ.Sf0! zzm Cla! of M001 Conf! MISS LOU1-SL MUx11'O1 D FOWLER GEORLE XVILLIAM ALL ER ROIERT PAlRICIx C,wR1E1x1 RICHARD HENRX LIAIIXII S1E111LN HLNPY IxEA11NG LLON BERNARD GINSRURG BIAURICE MU1LA11x TIILOIDORI COR I1 U 1620 'J 9 o wx V' . . cq. ' 1 , . L. A ,,.-,, ' A1 , ' 1, , . ,. . ' ,3i,., ---- ,,t',V ,'4-1,,,- v 1 f -F 1 ,, - - A ' I" , , , , , - . at 14 V. .,.., ---- - JI, O. ' . ,C 1 1 1 I f 1, - - - - - C'07'7'L'Al00lZll7ZvlZg' 5C'C7'L'f!Z7j 1 - 1 1 2, - - - - . - , ,4 rf. . - '. ,,' 1 , ---.. , ' . , - - - - - - ' 'J . 1 . 1 1 . 1 1 1:1 " " N 3 15. 'A 1 f Y V1, IR. 2 v 1 X V f' . R 1 ' A f -P 1 1 K f, , 13,'5 AW, NiNETv:FlvE's Hisrollv. -ffm ND now the very hopeful band of aspirants who appeared as Juniors a very few months K if since, would like to appear as Seniors, a few months hence, and the veracious Historian it . . . presents to an expectant world a true statement-as far as it goes-of their doings. The Historian is glad to be able to say that nothing of any particular importance has 0" A H come to light during his occupancy of his very high office, So hard is the office and so l l Hi toiian begs Dardon in advance of all whom he may great the responsibiliy attaching to it t iat t ie s ' 1 6 offend in the course of his narrative-by not writing their names in the important record. It is so frightfully hard to pick out these historical items: If the writer recall that Mrs. Davis does not want her grave kept green, but prefers to be kept, pas!-fzzorfwfz, :in what Miss Fowler suggests calling 'ish barrel on the chimney-piece of her domicile, he will be called fiivolous in his treatment o a an C - , gnztv' subject. He will be called unkind if he commit to writing the fact that the gallant and ever youth- ful Tim Shea Hgures as a stump speaker on " VVonian's Rights," as " Big jay." And to remind the class of the heroic efforts of President Cox to get a quorum 'tfor very important businessf' or to speak of Miss Vice-Presid ent Haggerty's presiding one day, and asking a dozen times from all of us in general " What must I do next? " will strike the readers of the Viorm' as a letting out of class secrets. On the other hand, if the Historian deal in fiction entirely, and say of the class, as one M. G. said l2S6 1n h1s Cl1IOH1Cl6 of last ye'11 s lu11101s th1t " never d1d 1 class assemble 111 the l11sto11c old bu1ld1110f 011 Washmgton Square w1th a stronger dete11n1111t1on to dazzle tl1e world w1th 1ts legal learn111g l1e would be domof v1ole11ce to 1115 consc1e11ce a11d 11101 CVC1, 111 tl1e NVO1 ds of the P1ofesso1 to who1n ' logomachy and ' fo11sfarn1l1at1o11 a11d S1fI'1ll1'11 sesqu1pedal1an substa11t1Ves con1e as Ilatlll ally 1s does " cal'u111t5 t a Popuhst orator the H1StO113H would be gu1lty of 111 act of self St1llf,1HC'll1101l judomg by the Moot Co111t cases and by tl1e ql1lZ76S conducted by the P1 OfGSSOlS the class 1S 16SC1V1110 1tS Cl'1Zll1I10 capaclty t1ll the Semor yea1 O1 perhaps t1ll 1t can get f1o111 chcnts so111e la10e fees pe1 dazzle St1ll the class may CO11g1'1t1ll?:l.ll6 1tself o11 ll3.V1110 two hyphenated names among tl1en1 a11d O11 tl1e pos sess1on of Smock, a Whole class 1n hnnself 1n tl1e 111atte1 of Avondupos And We ll th1nk lnghly fOl the rest of OU1 natural IIVCS of M1ss Re1ffe1t whose hea1 ty laugh shows '1 non dyspepnc temperament, and of N118 L1lly who thmks sl1e has as good 1 11ght to vote as has the colo1 ed man and b1otl1e1 only sl1e ex fO1 get tl1e ll1StO11C OJ scene when NIISS I oew, d1opp1nff law for 'L 11101T1Clll1 'p1OV6d tl1at she could W1eld needle a11d th1ead fo1 the benefit of o11e Who111 sl1e ter111ed a 'conh1 med bacl1elo1 Had she sa1cl an 1111 g1ateful bachelo1 she would l1ave been more accurate fO1 when tl1e b11ttons came off l11s coat XVl11Cl1 Was tl1e next day l1e declared that he could l1ave do11e bette1 hnnself, fO1 the1e was only one tl'1IC2LC-l 111 eacl1 And wl1o so self S'lt1Sl:1GC:l as not to feel l110hly hono1ed at be1nU elevated to a seat on the bench as so many of us W616 and so dull as 11Ot to Sllllle at tl1e p01nted 16ClllCStS of ZZKZ7 mn' Q f foznzsfl to You1 Honors, that 1n 16'LCl111g the cases and 'l.l1tl1011t1CS C1f6Cl as we a1e SURI 50111 HOTIOIS W1ll they should ' incl for ou1 cl1ent on all the 130111125 at 1ssue And who at tl11s Cl1Sl1"L11CG of tune w1ll 1ep1 ess a 5111116 wl1en he th111ks of C61 ta1n 111en1be1s of tl1e class who protest1nO at a 1neet111g that they ClGSl1 ed but too SlI1OHgly to have our s1sters 111 law Grace the ban quetmff table 011 the occas1o11 of ou1 class Cl1l'11'1CI st1ll Wa111ed tl1Cl11 of tl1e cl1a1acte11st1cs NVhlC-l'1 a1e p1e valent at a class d1nne1, tl1e VV1tt1C1STl'1S and 1ns1nuat111g speeches NVll1Cl1 follow, a11d tl1e awful O1g1CS 1n . . A . C Q, u . H, C . C C g . . Q. . . G C C ' , .13 7 ' ' 7 C . . . ,,, . . .C . . . . Q C C . 73, O I . 1 , . -. . C C - . C ' bl. . , J 7. - -sq, . - S C V1 S C ' C ' ', ' ' ' C O ' - ' 'g ' C . .C an C o 7 'l' . 1 1 . o ' C ' l . 1 l , . C Q. 1 l C . ,-, V 7' presses l1er opinion on the subject with greater econo111y of words. Wl1o of tl1ose tl1at gazed at it C311 l . . J . E C 7 . ' , , 1 K , . 73 ' . C " . . 9 . 1 ' 1 C i ' c f c c ' . ' ' C l ' I . l ' C . C - lb- l ' . b C c -, . . Z ' ' . . ,, , D I, f cc . U ' . C ' . C -' ' ' , an I . xl E , . . ' ,U 4 . - . . . ,, . . C . . l 1 Q . , Q . 1 C , 7 .bn C 4 l ' ' ' -:- ' 6 c . tl .7 . . ' A Q . - ' 137 which some would certainly indulge, since wine was to be served. And perhaps the smile will broaden at the recollection that some members even the Historian most unsus Jicious of mankind thou 'ht that , , l , 2 Jerha as like the lad ' in the Jlav the f "did Jrotest too much l' and that the 1 were themselves the bad, I l , 5 l . , 5 l , mn boys whom the wine would cause to do and to say "awful things." lVho did not in spirit join the fearless fouth who inc uired right out in class " How much?l' when we were informed that we would 5 1 7 sb 9 have to buy Somebodys big book? And now, followin ' the exam ble of that fearless 'Outh who counted the cost the Historian will close . Q his narrative of great and stirring events, because he is informed on high authority that each page of the XTIOLET costs either a V or an X, and he doesn't want to grow unpopular in his capacity of Historian to the last class of juniors who will assemble in the gray and monastic old edifice which graces Wash- ington Square East. R. P. G., I'IISTORIAN. 53-4' f f 4' in l3S XVII LIAM A11 XAINIJEI1 G1 0111 1- W' A1 Gl 11, CIIARI ES 11 A111 111111111 VML111111 AS11, OSI lll B1xe11 Muon 1 BA11111 ll R1C11A1111 1 B1x11M11x1x OSEIII H 1111111 XVII 1 IAM B1 9111311 1111 lxOhX vm B111 11N1C11 11155 F Ill QASN111 11115 E C11111s111: 1o5r111 1 CLAl1lxL CllA11l E5 1 LOIITN lI1EfJL5fl1x1 D Co1x1111xo 1111.o11o111: Cox 1IXI1IlS 1 C11A1xL oI1N M D111 IDIS 1V11s S11lI1Ll 1 S DAHS, QIIARLES D1ClxLI 11,1Nx 1 91111111 F5 P DIIION NVAI ll 11 R 111x1oN, 11rx11Y 11 ESSILI1 oll of the aw Class of Ten Yo1k Tew York Plznn Held New Yo1k ew York Black1oek New Y01k Y onkers New Y Ol k 'N ew Y o1k B1 ooklyn Nyack Brooklyn ew Yo1l Brooklyn X7O111CClS Yonkele New Yo1k New Yo1k luclgexx ood P 1.111 1Xew Yo1k Brooklyn Yonkub 9 111158 EIIILI R Lx nw P1 11111 ILVEREFI, U1 1115 F11n1x1AN1x 1OSEl ll 11115111111 'X we ANNTIIL 11s111 G11L1o11x 1 F R 1.111111 1OIIN 1' BIOOIJ H1 N111 111 U1.f,EL111xN CHAI 1Es DWIG111 FOLSOA GEOl1CL 14ORl1LS 111158 Lo111sL 11 lox I DAXID F111 11311 xN, SA111111 F1111 1111AN, LLOIN la GIM1 1111 , N11-1x11 C Go1D111xN, ROI 1 111 P Gkrm, AQ111 11 111E1 Bl 111 M 1xr11 C1111 1'NlwLI1C, OIIIN 1 C11111,1 E, LOl11l 1 Glkx 1 111111 1 11 IIAGI 1 PIIOMAS Q HA1111 AN XVILI 1,111 1 I'IAl1XlOX 1895 1 114 I B1ooklx n 1'a1rytown Neweu k New Yozk New York Yew Yoxk New York New Yo1k 131001111711 191 ookly ll New Yo1k New York Yew York Yen York Ven Xoxk New X 01k 1Xex1 Yo1k Yen X 01k 'X ew York 1TGXV3.1 k New X ork New X ork B ew X 01k R . 1 , . . . 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' 7 1' 1 . "1 . . 1 . ' ' -' J Y .,: , . . . 1 " 1 W .IH - ., ,, -,,.., , ,A W, T X 7 .Y 13 ,.A,... . XVILLIAM H. HEA'I'oN, AI,I"lilED YY. I'IEKZOG, SIILMUNIJ I. I. Homo, SoLoxIoN HVMAN, MICIIAEI, J. JOYCE, josER1I H. IQRAKOXVICR, S'l'El'IllCN H. KEA'rINo, EANIIERICH ICUIIN, . MISS PAUI.lNlC1Cl'Ill.liE, SAMUEI, D. LASKY, . NIRS. DIARY M. LII.I.Y. ANIJREXX' C. LINN, MISS IQOSALIIQ IJOICXY, Miss LII.I.v S. MAAs, Jour: K. McDoNAI,o, CLARENCE B'lc'KENzIIc. EIIWARII j, McN.xI.I,Y, IQOIIICIVI' M. lXIAcNAIJf:II'r, lsAAC MARRE, - Rl'IJlJl,l,lI RIARR5, Lorls BIARX, . BERNIIARU MA'I'III.xs, -TOSICVII R. ll,XXIfIl1Zl.lm, I'lowARII RIEIILIIIXN, l,IIIs NV. BIHONICY, . RIA! RIQE RIl'l.CT.XlIX', GIioRoE V. MI'I,I.AN, FRARNR J. XIC.Xl.lS, Luo NliI.SUN, Bon New York New York New York New York New York New York New York New York New York New York New York New York New York New York lclor, Mont. Plainlielcl New York Bloomville N ew York New York Glen Cove New York Hlooom field New York New York New York New York New York New York I1I5NliY IYICWMAN, AI.IzER'I' C. PEDRICR, CI-IARLES S. Po'I'sIaAAI, TI-IoRIAs G, PRICE. XYILLIAM F. QIIIc.I.Ev, . BIISS EDITH A. REIIfIfER'I', GEoRoE VV. RE5lIl1lll, . Ro1xER'I' R. IQIQQUA, FRANR H. REUAIAN, joIIN E. RUs'I'oN, JOIIN J. RYAN.. jACo1: E. SA1.omIoN, . AIEXARDRO T. SAN'I'os. . RoI:ER'r A. SASSIEEN, . MISS FI,oRIf:NcE SCIIEIf'I'EI., O'I"ro SCHRICNCIJEI., . RoI:IQR'I' S. Sf..'o'r'r, FRAIWIS L. ScovII.I,E, TIM SIIEA, . DAX'ID SICIIERAIAN, . AIRS. BIINNE. L. Mali. SRIITI-I, CLARENCE MCK. Smock, XYILLIAM F. S'I'oNEI:RIoI:E, FoRoI's:Iz E. SUDERLEY, Nll'l1fDLfXS SPIICl,BERG-SZliZKlCI,lEY joIIN T. VAN IQIVER, . SARIIIEI. T. XY.XI,KUl', ELMICR 1. XVALSII, EAIANUI-:L F. XVORAL, CII.xRI.1c5 C. xxvllillllilllflf. New York Newark New York . New York New York . New York Roekland.Lake . New York Brooklyn Brooklyn New York New York New York New York New York New York New York . Auburn New York New York New York Glen Head New York Arlington New York Passaic . New York New York New York Newark JIINIORS 107. Monday Lecturers for the Current Year. Gctober-Rev. Ddvid Gregg, D.D. November-S. S. Pdcixdrd, HM. December-George Woolsey, MD. January-Rev. Howard Duffield, D.D. February--Rev. John Hdll, D.D., LL.D. Plpril-Benjamin H. Bdyliss. x Mdy-Rev. W. W. Htterbury, D.D 141 he School of ngineering. FACULTY. HENRY M, XXII-if CRACIQEN. D.lJ., LL, I P. Chancellor of the University CHARLES B. BRUSH, M. QE., v------ - Director of the School Professor of Engineeringg Constructiong Practice. CHARLIES H, SNOXV, CIE., -------- Secretary of the School Associate I'rofcssor Engineeringg Constructionsg Practice. DANIEL XY. IIIERING, C.IE.. ----- Professor of Mechanics and Mathematical Engineering JOIIN F, FAIR CHILD, C. IC., Instructor in Architecture and Landscape Gardening GICI PRGI2 C. MASON, CE., - - Instructor in Surveying and Drawing The czuididute for the degree of Civil Engineer must lirst have completed the undergraduate course in Science of four ycziisgxnd 1llllSf,LlIl1'lIlglllC last tlircehzive taken special erginecring studies. Forthc successful completion of these studies he receives a special engineering certilicate. This entitles him, upon the completion of one year of post-collegiate work in the higher branches of engineering, to the Degree of Civil Engineer QC.E.l. ' The work of the regular faculty of engineering is supplemented by a body of lecturers chosen from among eminent members of thc engineering profession, each of whom treats ol' some important specialty, 142 Special Lecturers for the Current Year. ALFRED P. ROLLER, A.M., C.E.g Member American Society Civil Engineers. .Szfbjecf-" Concretes and Architecture in Bridge-Building. X' MAJOR ALFRED F. SEARS, C.E. 3 Member American Society Civil Engineers LSwIl6j'KCf-K'TiI16 Engineer a Social Prophet, " E. XVEGMANN, IR., C.E.g Member American Society Civil Engineers. Subjuul-'L Points in Construction of Masonry Dams. " JOHN 1. STEVENSON, LL.D. Szzbjyr!-U The Outntting of Expeditions. " DOVVNING VAUX, A.M. .Szzbjcfi-" Landscape Gardening at the lVorld's Fair. " CARROLL P. BASSE'li'l', C.E., P11.D. .S1zQju6f-' A Sewerage Disposed of in Inland Cities, " Qlllustratedj. 143 he School of Pedagogy. FACULTY. HENRY M. M,xc'CRAClCEN, DD., LED., Chancellor of the University JEROME ALLEN, Pii.D., 1 - ---- - Dean of the School Professor of the History of Education. EDXVARD R. SHAXV, PILD., ------ Secretary ofthe School Professor of the Institutes of Education. EDGAR lJ. SHIMER, P1i.D., Professor of Psychology :uid Ethics. LANGDUN THOMPSON, PHD.. Lecturer on Educational Classics and flisthctics. SPECll3lL SFXTURDHY LECTURERS. SPRING OF 1894. -UA !6C'!f-PRESIDENT IJLLGARMO OF SXVAWTHMORE. Thrcc Lectures on " lflcrbart and His Followers. " .l!'!Cll.-PRESIDENT N.xwAl,LlS'I'ER OF IJREXEL lNS'l'ITLT'l'li. Four Lectures on " Comeuiusj' "Rousseau," Ul'estalozzi," and "Froebel. " 144 Q U W: g V Y , gi ij fv iii U ni if ,V H f Q, 14 I I M g. w ,i l fs ' I Q W I .i 5 Wi L xl V 1 I, 2 X R i .5 'i..lf1ivJ 'Tl 1 7, G I '1 nw I' . 'HT V V J . J ffgHH'lWif l 'FF?'1'l57'f ' YI HIHUIU , Iv' lf' ff? il Qlii . -LE Wfh ix L. ,U - 1 1 Y . 5-L'-4 I E UT THE EDAGOGY FFICE. JA HE School of Pedagogy is founded upon the principle that professional preparation and equipment for the work of teaching should be put on a plane with the preparation and equipment demanded for other professions. The school A is, therefore, a department of the University, is under its immediate control, and bears the same relation to it as do its ,Schools of Law, of Medicine, etc. Its degrees are accordingly granted by the University. The past decade has witnessed marked changes in teaching and in the management of schools, but the next decade will witness rnuch greater changes. It is the object of the School of Pedagogy to acquaint its students with the scientific investi- gations already made and those now making which will effect these changes, and to train its students so that they shall be able to take advantage of these investigations and put into actual and successful practice a more scientific pedagogy. This School offers, therefore, to those wishing to fit themselves to become superintendents of schools, principals, teachers in nor- mal schools, and general teachers, the broadest and most extended course of instruction in pedagogy given in this country. Great advancement and success await those teachers, who, discerning the demands of the present and the future, acquire for themselves thorough professional preparation. The graduates of the School are now holding positions of highest honor and responsibility to which a teacher can attain. Five ladies have taken the degree of Doctor of Pedagogy, all of whom are filling important positions. The School of Pedagogy, because of its aim,-thorough professional education and university recognition of that by con- ferring a professional degree,-has already attracted a large body of students from many states. It extends its advantages to all earnest men and women who seek a broad and full preparation for the work of teaching. The Pedagogy Office, a picture of which is opposite, is one of the most popular and well-thronged rooms in the entire University Building. It contains many pictures and charts, of interest not only to the members of the School, but to any one who may chance in. The School remains downtown in the building to be erected on the site of the old structureg and the students of Pedagogy, and the Law students will be the only ones to maintain the prestige of the New York University on the spot where it has stood for so many years. 145 At the cominencement of tlIe Department of Arts and Science oII the 8th of conferred as follows : Mosiss BIcckIcIc, JR., . I5oIsI5I. CIIAIII, . . M.IxIAIII.I,xN P. E. Gkosznrx EI.M,x A. BOUIQNIQ, . DAIII: BIItIIsAI.I. Coksow, JMIIQS M. CIQIINI3, . Al.IClC DAY, . LII.I.-xx M. El.I,IO'l', . S. JosIgI'IIINn GIQNIING, ELIZA A. HAIIIQIS, . K.I'I'I-IERINIQ J. KING, . ANIIIaIaw J. KINxAAI.xN, AI,I:IcI:'I' CUk'I'Is AI.AII'. GEI:'I'kUIJI2AI-I'I.IaIIx'. . S.-Xlfl. BIxIIAxI5s, . JMIIQS C. BI.,xCk, ANNA A. BI..-uk, ITURIS Boom, l,oUIs.x BIcI'ckM.xN, MARY E. CoIfIf'Ix, RoIII3Iz'r L. CoNIxN'I', THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PEDAGOGY UPON: THE DE Mi Flatlanrls, N. Y. XYIl.I.I.UI lb. l-lIcx'IgI1, ' Brooklyn, N. Y. l"I:IcIIIeI:IcIc MoN'I'IcsIcIc, PlI.lj New York City ANIJIQIEXX' TIIOAI.-xs SxII'I'II, . FIIANIQ A. Youms, Hackensack, N. J. GREE OF FIASTER OF PEDAGOGY UPON: Brooklyn, N. Y. Rah way, N. . ,l Y Newburgh, N. , Brooklyn N ' , , X . New York City Hoboken, N. J. Brooklyn, N. Y. Brooklyn, N. Y. Dctnville, Ind. HIENIII' P. VAN L ROLL HeInpstezIcl. L. I. New York City New York City ClllQ,'Zi.I1 City, Ind. New York City Moscow, Russia New York City Asbury Park, N. J. Long Island City JoII.-xNXo LEO, . lEIII'rII O. M,II:'rIN, . JULIA A. McF,xI:I,IxN, M.xI:x' F. Mom-1, . C.'X'lXlIlfllINl'i L. O'BIaIIcN, JIQNNIIE M. ScIIooNIIIxkILI:, . lYI.XliTl'1.-X J, B. 'l'llOMAS, . IIQVINII P. 'l'owNIc, . DoI:..x NI. Tow NSIENIJ, New York Ci ty. STUDENTS. JAAIIQS M. CI:.xxIc, . IXNNA V. CI:ENsII.xw, . M,IRu.xkE'I' CRUNVNSIIIIELIJ, I'IlCI.liN G. lQAI.Y, . . JoIIN D,xwsoN, . l'lANNAlI YV. D!ihIlI,'l', WN. H. Do'I'Y, .X. D. lJUNl!.XR, . xXl.ICl'I M. CIIIIQSIIILN, . Q1-L6 June, 1893, degrees were Elizabeth, N. J. . . Paterson, N. YVest Chester, Pa. New York City . . Newark, N. . Brooklyn, N. Y. XV. New Brighton, N. Y, . Brooklyn, N Y. Brooklyn, N. Y. Bayonne City, N. J. Paterson, N. J. Newburgh, N. Y. . Newburgh, N. Y. New York City South Orange, N. J. Brooklyn, N. Y. . Brooklyn, N. Y. New York City Newlmrg, N. V. . Peekskill, N. Y. East Orange, N. J CHRISTIANA GAUTIER, GEORGE B. GICRMANN, MARY M. Gll-E, NELLIE L. GODLEY, BLANCIIE HAl.SEX', MARY S. I'IAMlL'l'0N, FRANR H. HANSON, ANASTASTA HowE, . JEAN C. HlIS'l'ON, LAURA JACORI, ANNA V. JONES, MARTIN JOYCE, JENNIE C. KEENE, ELEANOR I. IQELLER, ANDREW J. IYINNAMAN, AUClUS'l'IN KNOFLAc:IAI, ELSIE NV. ICORNMANN, . AMANDA F. LANG, . ENOCI-I C. LAVERS, . ANNIE M. IJAXYTON. ANNA VAN DER ZEE TJEE, HELEN LENVI, . CHARLES W. l.IGl-IT, M. EMMA LOCKWOOIJ. S. MAY lVIARTIN, AGNES LICFADDEN, . ANNA A. MCILWAINE, GILOIQGE H. MCNlXlIi, JOHN MELVILLE, HENliIE'l"l'A MORE, . ELVA A. BETTS, . GUSSIE S. BURCH, SAMUEL DERBY, . FRANCES E. R. DOUGLA ss, ELEANOR L. MCDERMOTT, . Jainaoia, L. I. Brooklyn, N. Y. East Orange, N. J. YVhitestone, L. 1. Jersey City, N. Elmsford, N. Y. . Newark, N. J. New York City Corona, L. I. New York City Port Richmond, S. 1. Long Island City Brooklyn, N. Y. Newport. R. I. . Danville, Ind. New York City . New York City New York City New Brighton, Pa. Montclair, N. J. New York City New York City Pittsburg, Kan. Riverside, Conn. . Newark, N. J. . Newburgh, N. Y. Morristown, N. J. . Hardwick, Vt. Brooklyn, N. Y. Brooklyn, N. Y. Ehlhlrk A. NEXVMAN, . LIANNAII W. NEwMANN, LILLIAN H. NlK'l'lOl.S, . FREDERICK A. NOIl'l'lI, CHARLES XV. OLEY, . H EKMANN PIVENNINKZW ICRTII, L. MAY PINK . . RICIIAXIQLJ L. PowELI. JOHN F. QUIGLEY, EDWARD B. IQAXYSON, LIZZIE E. REGTOR, lWAl-ILON B. IQIEED, CAROLINE W. IQEIIORN, ELIEARETIAI REID, . ERNEST D. IQICHARIJ, LORETTO M. INOCHESTER, . L. LIILDA ROSE, . LIENRY R. RUSSELL, XVM. C. SANDY, . ES'l'l'1I,I,li T. B. STORMS, ELIzA1:ETH STOYER, . LILY S. SWAN, . LAFAYETTE 'TALBOT' . MAIQY A. 'POlJD, J. NVlI.I.IS TDI-LRS, . PIENRY P. VAN LIEw, A, B. BUNN VAN ORMER, JOHN J. YVELLS, lk1lRlAM E. XVI-IEELER, HARRlE'l'1'E K. XYILLIAMS, AUDITORS. Jersey City, N. J. Hempstead, L. I. Newark, N. J. New York City Brooklyn, N. Y. ERIIIA' BJCGIEIQIQIN, . CI-IRISTIANA lN'iE'l'ZGAR, MAIQIANNA RAwSoN, . F. A. RI'l'ClIIE, . JANET B. ROl2ER1'S, . Bufifalo, N. Y Brooklyn, N. Y- . Paterson, N. J. Toms River, N. J. . Freeport, N. Y. New York City Brooklyn, N. Y. Edgewater, N. J. Tuckahoe, N. Y. New York City Jersiy City, N. Paterson, N. J. . Yonkers, N. Y. New York City. Hoboken, N. J. Jersey City, N. J. Newark, N. J. Millville, Pu. Newark, N. J. New York City New York City Bayonne, N. J. Hoboken, N. J. Morristown, N. J. Paterson, N. J. New York City Shellsburg, Pa. Brooklyn, N, Y. Elizabeth, N. J. Whitestone, L, I. New York City New York City New York City Newburgh, N. Y. New York City The Day of Prayer for Colleges, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24th. This day, set apart by many Religious Denominations as a day of special pray er fo college students, was observed at the University this year with appropriate exercises. AT 10200 A.M., THE YOVNG MENS CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. AIJIJRESSICS wiakxz Mixing HY, Rrav. JOHN R DAVIES, lJ.D., of the 4th Avenue Presbyterian Church. Rm. GEORGE ALEXANDER, lJ.IJ,, oi' the University Place Presbyterian Church. AT 11:00 A.M., SERVICE IN TI-IE UNIVERSITY CHAPEL. 'ring smcmox wixs 1'R1fAc1-11-in lzv, Rm. VINCENT PISEK, '82, ofthe Bohemian Presbyterian Church. 148 FQUNDERS, DAY, 189 3. jlZl6'.YtIIfZ,jf, Ajnrif 1 Slfz. EXCFCISCS Conducted ln the Umverslty Chapel qUnder the Ausplces of the Class of 18935 17U.S'Z!L,ZlZ O ur CHAI 1 hs W' lull 1 A1411 PlCS1dCl1f of the Se111o1 Clxss Fozmdfm Day Orzzlor S D0111N5 P1 ICE fomzdam Dag Pod C, T11URsTo1x CIIASI FQUNDERS DAY 1894 llfazifzesday fljirzl ISM CUnder the Ausplces of the Class of l8Q4D ll am m Q11 the Umzversztg Ghapel Al?6LLT1ClQlS Q Q 151.1011 bg shn CV 0 JVITI ffeumdcrs ag 'poem bg 'XM 'ff ohnson I7 m the jlfllaan C1061 Ol the nver 1111 emcvmo ol awvcd seems mom the 0111161 no to be sem to n1ve1s1c1:1 Jfeghzs reLt1o11l9gqheodo1e ,dl Qessler Q11 7 p m ag ng of cwneu hone 0 umnas ur' m 5 J le emo. lanmng o wolezs bg the clmss of QM . . - . . . 2' - --.- . f 1. 1 ,, ' ' ' L '. J .,,,, - lv v 4 , 1. 1, x . 4 , ,J , - - - l I - x 1 I F F , . . ... 7 7 ' O X , ,. 1 ' . , . . 0 ,X 1 - vw Q7 lf-x Q. lf, ,p A Q-1 ' 7 f ' .., C' 9 ' ,-.fv .JI 7 '93 59 " - , . . I f , 19. , - . L- 'z -1 .I . L, C ' 1 S T H . ,LC L rn' 1 1 - Q 1 1 ,I D ' 67 'U - A -w 'X - 1 . 7 -. 1 . L - L 'W ' . :L 'TCT ' 1 1- L .1 . . I F S 'I l 11. C pulxrelslb rl Q13 1.15 f' 'I .f b 7 4 ' 7 7 C r '- l,LL9 Sixtyzpirst Commencement, 1893. UNIVERSITY OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK. THURSDAY EVENING, JUNE sth, ISQ3 AT EIGHT CJ'CI,OCK,, AT THE MUSIC HALL. COIWVIENCEMENT COMMITTEE OE THE CLASS CE '93, B. FRANKIN DEFREECE, C7!KlZ'7'7!ZI?!l. C. THURSTON CHASE PERCY BUTLER TVIGI-ITMAN. GIQAND BIARSI-IAI., ---- B. FRANKLIN DEFREECE IIISFICIJCIOIY1' QFHIIOIIS. I. LATIN SA LUTATORY OR ATION-f' Quin' llfbmffzm' IEUUZHIIZAS, !f,zj101zz'f112'. ' HENRY Incwls, New York City. II. ENGLISH SALUTATORY ORATION-'I IfVkff!zm'. " +:'TUrIrEN RIVERS Ismxcs, New York City. v ' ' 'bxcuscd f1'omspez1k1ug. 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Y 4, ff 1 11 X X 1, ,1 . , cc " , 7, , , VY ix? x Q 1121! 1 C, L rc 1. , , , 11' , D, ' ' X , Q ' 11 , 1 , 1 , , , , 1 4, . ,Hy 'M -1 , -- Y y v U . , 4 . 1 , ,I11,, , .X. 5 N cc J , ' ,- ,,, , ' ' 1 ,,'. 1' . F- 1 , , , ' I . 1 . 1- Y 1 , J 1, V J. u'n , , J,' , 11 1 ' 0' . OZ. :L N' ' 1.1 1 ., ., p -, . .. J L x x 1 L .7 5 1 D y . . r X 3 14 X' , . 1, ,,' , ' V , f , ,' , ,, I ,, X IN Q . v v . Q LT 1.4, x 7, . X. 7 'f wx 3 7 ' rw T 14 Vy,,, Y rf, y " 'nr 1 . 1 . '-' 1 I . - - 1 -T .Y - T11 ', 'l ., 'ay V ' '. E c S 1" . I 1 I I CLASS DAY EXERCISES of the CLASS OF l893, NEW YORK UNIVERSITY. JUNE SIXTH, EIGHTEEN NINETY-THREE MADISCN SQUARE GARDEN CONCERT HALL. GRDER 012 EXERGISES. fl lf'1I'7'E.S'J' , AM!! Cuff, - President C. W. :NIILLARD - G. P. PARIJINGTON C'!fz.v.v fffxfwy, F. VV. IVIALLALIEU ,1fIf.YI'L', - - GLEE CLUB C'!1z.v.v fjllflli, - - C. THURSTON CIIASE S1'11f11vf1L','2z1z'.v !I'1fm'!, N. W. Ckosm' .Piazza Sufn, - - ILIENRY LEXXIIS O7'lZf1'07l, V. CLYDE GATES llrapmmy, - P. B. NV1c:1-ITMAN Jfzzyzb, - - GLM: CLUB fJI'l7.Yt,'l1ffIf1??11, A- - - F. L. S'1'R1cK1,AND A,l,fIII,f,11.L'- 1j'g3'x Ifl'z'!!, ---------- HENRY LEWIS H1111 Ol'17fZI?lI and the awarding of the Bun to '90, the most popular class now in College - F. FAULKS 15:3 I K i 1 I i 1 I xwlfw K W Q' W In 'Mi dnm P -.f'-2.13 R5'f2'x fx, L -, Wvyl1"1x:'-fxv ' I: 'V in V V ,A ' Ju W M 5 , I -., v X r h' 1 f Ri ! 'S N 1 A' LA: six Yi I THE GREEK Room all of the graduates of the Classrcal Course of New iork Un1vers1ty Dr Bands room 1S almost as farn1l1ar as any loom they have ex 61 been 111 The ed1tors of the 'X IOLET are especrally happy to present to 1ts readers so excellent a p1ctu1e of thls room as the one on the oppos1te page One th1ng the prcture licks lt 15 tl1e fannlrar form of dear old D1 Ba1rd hrmself whose gen1'Ll face and k1ndly eyes are always above that desl-. 1n the hour of tr1al when tl1e d1re cl1o1ce has to be made between s1ffl1t readmg and say 1110 I III not pre pared to day Professor was an undergraduate Dr Fayler LSWIS was tl1e professo1 then and I used to s1t 110ht there on the back row of seats where Mr IV s1ts 11011 Ollly we had to get along xuth benches 1n t hc e da3s A vague wonder filled our souls whether fu ever horsed and tlunked 111 Greek and whether he always knew a supplementary pa1t1c1p1e when he saw It There are two thrngs that wrll take the starch out of a Freshman when he enters New York Un1ver s1ty that 15 1E anytlnnv can One 1S when he Hrst sees D1 Stcx enson conduct Chapel I2nerc1ses and the other 1S when he Hnds out from Dr Band how much he doe-sn t know by try1n0 to tell h1m what he does know i rv! W W N I lm M 1 I KK I I. O 1. 1. -JY, . .Y, U . f ll J . ' . 1 cf ' 1 w A I l . . I . . x 7 H . ! l ,r,, I. , . . C A C 1. . C' 1. 'H , is c ' ev ' ' 'IU I l - .U Q Q l Dr. Baird said to the boys of ninetybfive one day, " I used to recite Greek in this very room when I L I ' 'A--. J ' 7. I D , 7 . ac . 11 bu H-' . , - 1 ' C ' 1 - E . - . . . . gl 1 W7 1 4 Y . N i . ' O ' 7 . ' . . 7 I . 5 153 i I 1 lp . E 100 Yards Dash, 220 Yards Dash, 440 Yards Run, Half Mile Run, One Mile Run, 220 Yards Hurdle, Two Mile Safety Bicycle, Running Broad jump, Running High jump, Putting the Shot, Pole Vaulting, - Throwing the Hammer, BEST . . .REc0RDs. IO 3-4 secs., .23 1-4 secs., 58 secs., - 2 min., I3 secs 5n1in., 30 secs., 25 4-5 secs., 6 min., 25 secs., 2'Jff, 31l1, 5 ft., 5in., 341-t., 51n., 8ft,, 8in., 64 ft., Sin., A. D. Sneeden, '96, A. D. Sneeden, '96, G. L. NVicl:s, '95, J. E. Wlalscliied, '96, M. ml, Horan, '96, P. A, Yalclen, 9 IJ. L. XVicl:es, 'Q5, ' 5,- 7 T. G. Sl16l'I1'1ElI'1,'Q5 H. F. Lewis, IQ3, - M. O'SuI1ivan, '93 L T. G. Shearnian, 'Q3 F. Crossett, 'Q4 L., .., TL The above records are inserled in the X7IUl,l-1'l', not because they are anything to be proud of, but to show the men of University fum' L'lZ.V1'0" Ikon' 1'4'1ww1'.r mfg' 61' ffralwffz. lol 1393 1593 1393 1393 1593 1893 1393 1892 1893 IS92 1892 1892 this ANNUAL SPRING ENNIS TOURNAMENT for the CHAVIPIONSHIP OF THE UNIVERSITY OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK JERSEY CITY LAWN TENNIS CLUB GROUNDS 'I'hu1sf1a5 Fmday and Tue day June 1 2. and 6 1 FNIRIE5 TV W Brubh F 11 FG1115 H 1 Lexus I V Irwm C TV Bogait H K Cummmga 11 I McLeWee W Se 16 P A Yalden G L 1V1ckes G N Boehm I L Bmthe L S M1115 F RST 1' E PC1113 9 W011 6 Lost o SFLOND H 11 LSYVIS 90 'Won THIRD I L Bulthe 96 VVO11 4 Lost D '- V, ' S , , , 893. J " 1-,QS f . . ' , . L. "", . T. If' . '94 . . ' . s95 ' X' U -J ' ' , 17 L' J' n ' I n a 7 n a I ' - 96 . . ,-. . ' ,M . f' . PRIZES XVHRE AKVARDED AS FOLLOYVS: I.-4.1.1-"'.,'q. . . 1,'?i,1, f',,". 4. Lostz. -L. . ' ,' . . ,2. 15' SECOND ANNUAL BANQUET OF THE CLASS OF NINETY:FIVE. Friday Evening, March l7, 1893. WAL'PER T. SHEPARD, OUR CLASS, GREATEST THING IN TALMA NIATER, THE LADIES, - THE FACULTY, OUR SPORTS, - CLASS POEM, OUR FUTURE, At the Hotel Marlborough TOHSTS. THE W'oR1.D, - - - Toaslffzaslfr. H. H. ESSTCK. - A. H. HQWLAND. J. L. NEWMAN. - B. H. STERN. H. B. SINGER. - G. L. WTCKES. W. J. MARSHALL. - I. A. BECKER. P 154 5 N x ,MA 4.0- me Aw , ff? YM! X 'QQ 1 4s Q! X xg, f "' .pf N X W 44 M , 1 XX A ff fwh 'N' Y wf ig gwwwf W M' ggfw' V ,f 4 wk 4 2 Q' A ' MV N f A Sakai: 5, K we ig W zfezzii ,, W ,B 5 "7 'QQ W fix? X 4 'ww 'WN f X 'xtnmx f ,fa f YJXM 4 A 1 V N4 vm, -FN x.,x ,nf M' wh 423 fx f 6 Kuff? 9 ,ffyx x MAZ9' fm 'ww f xi. , 142' 'X , A f xy , f YZKXOQZMYJ, f fx A MSW? if Q96 +55 Q 1 3' N M fig? M Q! ff if f kygfwxm M f f AMX IS f XZ gif, f Xfx M My 2 Q fx yi, QSZQ 5 Xww af Q, f ff Q' vw Wm 14 X ,f fw P X X wx ww 7 f 17? 59 Rf x W f 1, X. X N M ,mx x W fm fx f YK 1 ,gk cf' 4, X V lv xi, Z im , 7 "' f ,f XY , V1 W f f x W ...4. W 1 , .' 'f 5 fx , - X ,' 15' x N N f' xx Ylglf , ff E f ' ' ,f if xy' I . . If 59 x ,dif f 4 fm, J - f f 5'T',ff',1 X K? X2 If KE ,. ,, ,W :xg x f Q , am., Q Qfxfxry, -317 , 54.-if f -' f xx Q X 7, , f ix R fm, X F x VX: i X W' If N , f X 4 '35 ff 4,,W-i, , 'L ,wflfi s 'ff -WN B X ,, 'M 1 N- 3- 'fiij-' ' ,, , SW ,gy , fs f XWQQ f K X V X -Wx. ri ,Q ,px fx 44,-,Z f ,,, M ,w,,w,-yi.-3-.1 55 Q- v -1 "if .QYBH 42: ' ' ff?-f" .. ,M , X. f , Mg, X Vx , ,A ,Q ' .J I w VFX? I . 2'-Vfwh S - ,gfeif " J"'1ff ' 'itffff x K ,. , A 455-4 - 'rv' R , f , X X- 1, N ' X ,f V Wski-ii' v 1- -' ,, 3 ' '- f' Q ' , X x.,i:.,.v,,,: , MK ? , 15 any H2554 4 f 1, X Q., , . , km 'f fm -"iif5f' ,I MX. 'Gs' ,.. I 4 " x V , WZ' ff: L f x f M V - A if . sz . x ' ' fshf bfff 45:3 ' rf' " ' iVVEi' f?f3xf.?3f'Df' X . X .1 -J x ,V f- fs , ff .QI fi S1 71" 1 ' ff A 35 'z 1, - f J ' 'z M , 4.3 1 'X Q- ,T-,,-3 .f 'f TS 3 :fx-4 ,f .4 y 4 N M tg? 1 ,if ' X V, Xia.: ,B THE Mutripuci-mon OF Ctues. 44111 opus lIffU11v,l'fffUYf.Y fwffcrb. To the Editor of the Viorizr : SIR :- I take the liberty of addressing you on a matter which I believe to be of general interest to the Univer- sity, hoping that through you what I have to say may reach the readers of theV1oL1-:'r. One of the most striking features of a college annual is the large number of clubs and societies having representation in it-organizations of every character, and with almost every conceivable aim. This is good and is very properly taken as a token of the life and activity of the students of the college. But the question arises whether it would not be an evidence of just as great activity and a great deal more commonsense, if there were a uniting of some of them under a few central organizations-a concentrating instead of a scattering of forces. With this thought in view I should like to suggest some such plan as the following, asking only that it be regarded as a suggestion rather than as a nnished scheme. VVhen a man enters college with the laudable desire of helping so far as he may, throughout his four years of college life, the enterprises carried on by the students, he has this difficulty immediately to encounter-there are a great many more organizations seeking his time and money and enthusiasm, than he can possibly join with any prospect of activity in their respective lines of enterprise. , The alternatives left to him are to engage in one or two lines of activity-athletics or music or litera- ture or photography-to the exclusion of all the others, or to divide his attention among so many claimants that he does justice to none. I believe that there are certain organizations now existing in the University which it is the duty of every student to join, such as the Athletic Association. What we want is not less, but more such g in brief, let us form an Association of Literature and the Arts. Call it what you will, but let it have financial responsibility and executive government of the student enterprises now conducted separately, and' to that extent largely unsatisfactorily by the following organizations 1 The Q7llZ7'Z'E7'6' Association, 158 the Editors of the half-defunct Forum, and the publishers of the college weekly or bi-weekly already contemplated for undertaking uptown next fall-these representing the !Z'fL'7'KZ7'j' interests of the college 5 and the Glee Club Association recently formed, the Camera Club, some time in existence, and the Banjo Clubs, and Quartettes, and Artists' Clubs for illustrating University publications, and all the numerous other clubs either already leading a comatose existence, or soon to spring up with our coming migration -these representing the fr2'ZzQtfz'c' efforts of the students. What I would suggest as to'their management is simple enough 3 it would bring order out of chaos, and, l trust, in many cases success out of failure. Let the central Association be composed of all the students who will join-and with such an organiza- tion there would be practically the same membership as that of the Atlretic Association 3 let the dues of this Association be sufficiently large to pay the 7'7H1ll7-113' expenses of the clubs under its control. Any club making a business venture-as when the Glee Club gives a public concert-would be expected to at least pay expenses, if it did not its Business Manager should be held accountable, and if the loss was found to have been unavoidable, a better financial policy should be pursued. ln short, strictly business methods should be followed, and not only mistakes prevented, but faithful service on the part of indi- viduals for the college rewarded. Then when a man enters college, there will be one organization for each side of his nature. One who seeks congenial friends socially can find them in his Fraternity g Eucleian and the Christian Association meet the needs of those who desire development respectively on their oratorical and religious sides 3 the Athletic Association asks his membership, interest, and contri- butions to the physical development of the college, and the varied interests which are included under the terms t' Art " and M Literature " ask as a unit his support, that some may not suffer from lack of interest. There will be one danger, at least, in this centralization, and that is, that when its splendid results are seen in this one case, if this plan should be adopted, there may be a demand for still more unihcation -until it is carried beyond its proper limit, and opportunity is offered for unscrupulous management and factional strife. But no such misfortune need be feared if the process is carried only so far as has here been suggested, and we may expect that if it is successful, we shall be copied in many other col- leges where the same Want is felt. At any rate we shall no longer witness the present monotonous pro- cession of organizations, which appear in the college-world only to disappear before we have time to fairly fix their names in our minds. Most of all in importance there will be a responsible organization, to prevent the posing of anything before the public as from the University, which is not worthy to represent it. The council, faculty and outsiders interested in college enterprise, may be eligible to an honorary membership, and thus render substantial financial and moral aid to us, a thing which they have often shown they are very ready to do by repeatedly helping the many organizations which now apply individually to them for encouragement. 159 C0NDlTl0Ns. The Edit0r's Advice to his Little Friends of Ninety:Eight. CHAIR OF CONDITIONS. PROFESSOR LOEB, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR MURRAY, MR SII LUV 'l'EX'l'-Bofrjli IN LTSE, - - - - .ilazzxcfk " l'0z'!11,m,My qf My Cu1m'11'm mn' Qfhc flqlllfflll' has fr pupil' 7UAl.z'f! M' 7uf1'X!.ruX! mvy lfhdtlfj. Practical Hints From Great Men. GROVER CLEVELAND: " W'e face 21 c0miz'z'z'uu, not a theory," ATDEXANDER POPE: " flwznrx and shame from no m1m'z'fz'u11.v rise." XV. E. GLADSTONE: 'L Honesty is the ITLPIIKKZYIUII of success. " QSO it's better LONGFELLOW, ffrom "I'Iyp6I'IO11Hj3 " ll Ls' ffKz.'f7'UfU.S',S'07', " VVhat has he in his hand? " fl is fhL'f7'0f4L'.V.S'0l'.U 'What has he in his hand?" K Il is Me !1ZffZU73f j21'Qfa5sw', NN'hat has he in his iathery hand? fl zlr Me professor. 'What has he in his hand? 160 to Cr If fx ff is f I ILT f 1' is ibj. Me L'121m7z'1fz?111, NP: 61111dz7z'011 . " Ma fllfhlflij' f:01mf1'fz'a1z fha c01zdz'fz2111. . . 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C . 1 . 1 1 1 . 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ,. -5 A s ' ' '---. . H WA . 1.44rg,g WHA ' I My ri. I i i i i l i i i l 'P FQUNDEITS DAY, 1894. Within yon square at sunrise I beheld A little Company of earnest men Strike spade into the sward, and stone on stone Firm place, as if to build some stately pile g And thus I mused upon the things I saw. The Lord of Agra bade them raise By Jumna's side a palace fair, Of all the world the pride and praise, Of all most beautiful and rare. To every land the message sped, " Bring forth your gems of goodliest worth, And underfoot and overhead Scatter the riches of the earth." And twice ten thousand weary slaves Through years a score and two found doom To build above the junintfs waves For Agra's beauteous queen - a tomb. Still junina's tide its tribute claims. Still shines the peerless Taj beside, E But the world holds as empty names Imperial Jehan and his bride I - So then across the Sunswept square I saw The Founders busy with their arduous task, The century's sun rose higher, and their work Grew shapelier and beautiful to see, And still I mused on what would be the end. Let not him, the wise man sayeth, Boast who puts his armor on. XVho shall tell what fate delayeth ? Actium's shore, or Marathon ? Modestly this shrine they builded, 'Mid the mad wor1d's busy press, Trusting yet to see it gilded, With the glory of success. Theirs the hoping and the doubting, Laboriug with many fears g All the triumph, all the shouting, Left for unseen future years. Day by day the walls ascended, XValls to sight and memory dear. Home of very truth intended, I Home of youths ambitious cheer. 162 ,I Year by year too xx alls ascended YValls unseen by rnort rl eyes T111 then topmost turrets blended Wrtlr the azure of the skres In these lrumbler precrncts hoary XVl'llCh our heedless feet have pressed Grew rmpelrshable glory Of earth s beautrful and best Here the tlrunderbolt was fetter ed Man s meek messenger to be Flashrng sparks wrth knowledge lettered Over land and under sea Nay but xvrth such art acquarnted VVas the work but xx ell begun Lrght rtself they grasped and psunted Wrth the pencrls of the sun H 'rnds that mrnrster rn lrealrng Mrnds that judge wrth law unstrarned I rps the xx ay of Lrfe revefrhng Here therr hlgh comnrrssron garned Hope and farth and hrgh endeavor Nur tured xx here thrs temple stands Range forever and rorever Mrd the walls not burlt xvrth hands So mused I rn the sunht square trll noon And afternoon the century s clock announced And hours sloxx xx aned toxx ard sunset ind the xx alls Were drfn and gray xx rtlr age and men smote doxx 11 Phe topmost sprres, and then the vrsron changed Oh temple xx rth the Oems of Ormus brrgbht' Oh shrrne of beauty rn remo e Cftthay Where opal skres reflect your Jcxx elled lmlrt ' A nobler tomb xxe stand xxrthrn to day' Yot here the splendor that by Jumna s srde Nlfrrks mad profusron of a sox erergn s rnrnd But rrclrer far thin dust of jelran s brlde l he treasures rn thrs sepulthre enshrrnc Here he the hopes of earlrer h'1pprer days l he smrles the sunslnne and the tloxx ers of sprrng, lo day thc. westerrng sun casts mournful rays And xx here the roses bloomed the rvres clrng' Nlore sacred than the jumn L s storred stream l he trde that here hath ebbed oeyond our l en XVhose waters xx ere 'unbrtron s b6ClxO11lllg dream YVhose drrfturg, xx ave tossed xx arfs xx ere lrvrng men' Yet oh my COIIH fades of those earlrer x ears XVho fondly strll rehearse our sprrnfwtrme s story Lo from thrs tomb besprent xx nh memory s tears Bursts forth to day the resurrectron glory ' VVe mourn the burred past but on the morrow Shall smrlrng dawn a more rusprcrous day Lfrvrng us joy rnd gladness lor our sorrow And fadeless beauty for these ashes grav' XVe mourn rn varn' lhe sunset sh'rll gr oxv drmmer To day as rn the days of long gone by And OV6lIl6'1d the self same stfus shall glrmnrer Po rngblrt, xx rthrn the self same srlent sky' , . . , ' A 5 ' , 'f . 1 1 s' ' . 4 ' C 1 1 I L C 1 , - , I D . Z . ." . ' 7 L ' - . . ' . J. . .. ,'Y..' . C Y, r . , le , , ' .' . ' C . ' ' ' 1 ,y - fx K - X -Ad, " Y Y L' V , ' fx ' .' , . ' Ar ,' V X ' , ly A - ,Vu - ' , . . , ,Q I V .. . C, lf L C , A ,X ' . . 1 -r Y r c c , x -- r f c . , C C Y r y C J' v , , - - 1 - , 1 ,D - 1 ' . ' ' ' , ' 1 . I , L Y Y . Y , r , ' - D ,. - ' , ' . ' . . , , - 1 . . , . . . . , . . . . . , , C l I Q u C W 1 I .' , 1 ' ' 'X ' ' , , , f b y f 1 :L V . cy I, . - xv , ,' x 7 , 7 L 'C . L C ' ' - " - ' . 'r 1' - .' . However years may pass, the orchard tosses In springtime air its fragrant clouds of snow, The summer's harvest all the hillside glosses, The autumn's fruitage gleams with golden glow! Still youth is dreaming, hoping, loving, sighing, Still manhood iinds the visions fade too soon, Still age, ambition dead and pleasures flying, Longs for the twilight in mid-afternoon! And these dear walls shall vanish, as the roses And lilies blooming in our youth's glad prime. But in their stead, the eye of faith discloses Eternal walls, eternal summer time! So in the square I lingered wistfullv, Till steel smote stone again, and far to north I saw the opening vision of the years, The larger life, the loftier victory, And all the voiceless prophecies fulfilled. Oh, my comrades of to-day! You, with spirits strong and bold, As you tread the new-found Way, 'What bright promises unfold! Here the Founders planted deep, We the first-fruits gathered in, You the ampler fields shall reap, You the richer harvest win ! In Cathay the bride lies dead, Silent lies the Taj, and stark. But from out the dust you tread, Lo, there springs a vital spark! Standing where the shadows hide In a life time's after-glow. Elder hands to you confide Alma Mater's weal or Woe. Cherish her, till dust is dust! God will her avenge, it you Recreant prove unto the trust Given by our N. Y. U. ! Oh, ringer of times golden bell, To years agone ring out farewell! To happier years to come, a swell Of welcome! welcome! And, please God, their coming ever shall be well! Before shall cease yon echoing chime, Perchance my weak and faltering rhyme Shall vanish, with the fading time, From out the harmonies that make our Alma Mater's name sublime! Yet ere this festival is done, Once more we shout the victories won! Once more we pledge the years begun! Once more we pledge the royal heart, the valiant hand this shrine upon! Oh, comrades of the auld lang syne, what fond emotions rise, As back to these familiar scenes we cast regretful eyes! From base to turret every hall and stairsweet memories claim! Each haunting echo to some ear speaks some beloved name! 164 ,-I lhe l:re'1rt rts secret tre'xsures xx ell the xvorld r111y never know The meanrng of the 111 'lgrc spell xvoy en rn the long ago To some drm room some trme xx orr1 place resrstless 131951011 turns One spot xvhose ardent memory on the souls alt1r burns One xvord xvhose musrc shall 'rbrde o er 111 the world s xvrld strrfe Or1e moment better far to ns than all the rest of lrfe' Fhough not xvrth hopeless saddened hearts xxe brd the past adreu 1 he bell that tolls the partrng hour pc rls xvelconre to the nexv Brrghter the future than tl1e past Yet often O11 the rnorroxx XVl1r1e hippy 111 the daxx n1r1g d'xys our hearts must turn xx 1th sorroxx hack to these t1n1e xvorn precincts back to xvhere 111 clay s of old Lrfe s rrver Howed neath cloudless skres o er srrnds of ghtterrng gold Rejorcrng rn the glory of the daxvnrng lrfe xxe 5 et Feel a strange achrn Y 111 each heftrt 'md ey es xx 1t11 tear drops xx et Gaze through the gatherrng gloom 'rfar xvrth pam no xvord cxn tell Now xvanes the hour tlns festwl conx crse endrng Noxv from these storred 11 rlls Our hecrr ts unspoken menrorrcs .rttcndrrrg 'I he vorce of duty Urlls' Ont 11113 to the xx ork that hes before us In unl noxvn years to be 1 hen xxrth to morrow s diy sprrng bre xl lllg o er Old home f'Lrexx cll to thee' fhO1lQh1'1L1I'L1 xx reath-. m Ly fide rose garl rnds perrsh In lrfe s lone desert l'1nd llre Vrolet of tl1e N Y U to chcrrsh 1Ve pledge each hutrt and hcmd ' And so XV1thll1 the txvrhght haunted square 1 vrxx these xx alls drssolxe 'rn 1 through the gloom A x orce that lrke 'r brealtrng harp strrng sobbed 1' frrexvell' and ytt 'lg'1lIl Ffuexx ell' 14'116XVG And then those statelrer and tter 1111 xx alls lhat over toxver these by 11101 tal eyes Unseen shone on r11e and from far 'Lbove A vorce glad ws 9. ser rph s nrornrnfr sonfr In Eden answered back All l11r1' All lr ul' 1 rr.rs 111 rt orrrxsox And xorces falter xx ofully to brd these walls 1 rrexx ell 1 1 if 115 162.71 JO 4 . X M. fx - i V , , C L ' 1 4- 4 , ' Q c 7"' , ' " " 1 5, C B Y - s C 1 1 -4 .4 - 1 N ' ' v 1 ' . , A I t , X . Nc '. cA 1 , 'v K 1 AC V 7 ' ' Y C 7 ' C ' C 'X , 1 - ' '1 tr ' 1 il ' ' us, I . Y , ,L " . C . q . I - ,. , ,- ' K C l-r '.'z'c ,Ae-"1 ' . ' , . 1 L , ,X . VT ' .l 1 C A 12 . , . , . . . . ' A JL C . 1 ry 1 'A 1 I I ' L A C r r . . , Of night, all tremulous with pain, there came Y, ' , . ' O - is I 1 r . Y . .1 - 1 X VA Q ' A y- , HX' ' 3 C .' ," C' f . X' ll!" Q v C . - . A. ' L ' ', . , . . ' . . " - 1 ' C 1 5 ' 1 K , 7 7 I 'c I fb ' ' c ' , c ' ' 'I 'xc ' . Y I A , 1. ' . , Y . z O- C, 4 - 4. V' 1' " , A ., Q . , , , . . t , C Y - L y V1. ?.E"T1ll5R I N., 5 f KQWKQ3 xy- X V.: K Il ,I ,I AX ,,. I-. .i. .-i -I ,Mil U 5 ms n .G-1-:f 2' -Aiixfjis. H All , Exp .Ly If Mr, if I' ' X Ill f .. "A' MINI pl ,f . M I , Ll. f i II in MMV ff ' f 47gfW1"WmGf 747' f '35-fl- XX N559 l 5 if IIIII' III I III'II'fIIf 'I I ,Ii I 'P 1Q'alIX'I 'lglh w fif' 5 I If - -I 4'-fffdaf f 'III ff I I 'IV I I II I" -4 I Q! I I I II 75:1 Spf! ,I ily ,il V q WZ? I, I!!I,"3 I 12 432, 'Wg' 'l"5l"W" xi I I 'X' A i n f? 'lI'!l"I LTh3 V 'II his fllil HIIIII I III: ,gf I MII If NW? I '1ie.l,Ill '4 gillf ' ,M Eg' yf, XM WI! .'7II'f"siQi!I 'II H I Q I I IU mixlwwilf I ,..: ' I- IIi4fwII '1lIIlI-.i Iii' 'II II I f I li Ifllllevi- ' I I '11 'Nil I I ' . IZ J- Ill ' ' I 'A W' I ' I 'I W, ,. - '-'- iam 4 1 I ,IPX IIQMII I I an Z I. ,aff .IIIIII 'lil II 1i5IlW,1'fI Q ', ,li 11. ff ,.,. ,- ,, , la. , ,nf I ..l.,f 'IIMCII I I , II iw Il IL I Hflliwgefllfi 0' ' .MII . w i ' 'V f f X I Q 'Qwllif M I IV - fl! ' if "Try on your own grind, and see if il will fitg if t tl no , len someone's else wil I." Grinds. Haw fn Ma YIIIZVA'-A70 mailer 7Uht,'7'l? My fhzfx fa!! 167 'N - ' A 1 W" "V ' "' W g I lf in future there is progress, And if learning keeps alive, And millenniums surprise us, Let the world thank '95. 2 Read these names and don't forget themg For you'll hear them soon again 3 lVe shall all of us he famous.- lVhcn we get to be great men, 3 Atwater shone in Hebrew, Whose Professor always strove, To give him hardest verses, Like wayyar Elohim ki tove. 4 't Alackf' quoth Parson Marshall once, How slow we mortals be! "A setting hen long ahead ot' men Knew specific gravity? 5 Bogert, so skinny and funny, Makes laughter for all in the collegeg And somehow or other gets through his exams., In spite of his large lack of knowledge. 6 The marks by Ludlum scored Are due to patient as- sirluityg till half-past three, He burns the midnight gas, it 165 7 l-Iere's a theorem from Newman, Deeply versed in Nature's laws: Philosophy requires that each Effect precede a cause. " Ste I-Ie S rn is the man who knows itg Vlfhen professors make mistakes Ol, corrects and says they're quoting From Pope instead of Shfzktxr. 9 Singers impromptu speeches Are brief, the soul of witg H l've nothing to add to those eloquent Remarks," and down he'll sit. IO Eckel is always a-talking, XVas talking, and will talk some But if he should ever stop talking, He'd say just as much as before. in ore 5 I1 To smoke, recite and study, Are Osborn's sole delightsg In daytime he recites and smokes And grinds and smokes at nights. I2 Banks always comes to college From one to three hours late: Those New York Central trains must go At a very lazy gait. N Naughty Orrre Wrglrtmarr Decerves hrs good professor By posrng as a student VVhen he s nothrng but a guesser I mrght ftlso call attentron To deceptrons far more shameless If I drgnrl-red wrth mentrorr Crrbbers But let them be nameless Becker rmagmes that genrrrs Is stoxx ed rn hrs lrttle red he1d And when he has stuttered hrs judgment Thrnks all that tan be has been sard If rom Graham s Ped agogrcs The thrld xx ould rather play lhan study 'rt rts lesson So too xx onld at! they sfty Boyd rs the sarntlrest student l hat Nrrrety Irve can shoxx And bxrghtest brarns 'md vrrtue logether lrtly go lloxvlarrd rs more of a shouter And xx allxs up 'tnd doxx rr everx Rebulxrng the boys for not gorng Y ll rr lllily MCA CHX Smrth may have rdrosyncracres But they re x ery hard to nab srnte At Lorlege he s exceedrngly Consprcuous for hrs absence Snodgrass thrrrks he rs ft poet Noxv one else avrees xvrth hrm Strll they never let hrm lcnoxv rt Rhymrng s a drsease xx rth hrrn Fhere are mftrry other felloxxs l would lrke to xx rite about hor I knoxv they xvrll be jealous When they find therr names left out 'Ihere are those xvhose rnoder-atron Prety sobrrety Alxx 'tys wrn our commend'1tron Never shock propr rety But urrtrl they get to dorng Sornethxrro odd or unexpected In '1 doggerel lrl-.e thrs one l hey xxrll Irnd themselves neglected jr O VV SNODGRASS I3 IQ C - -, Y . 1 . . . ? l l ' . ' x ' N ' A Y Y ' , - , . . I4 20 . uc . I , , C g ' F . D : . 1 A r' I5 21 , . . C . , L 4 Y Y . . . A C 5 . V. g . . , . . , V , . v1 . ' 1 I ' D I6 22 ' ' ' . X . C . Y an . ' , . . i . V I Y fx - U , , . C , vc - C 1 , f -L., ,vc D Q, , SA 7- I7 23 I. .e- ' . - - - rx C ' -' T: ' - - Y V. . .Q C, - , C C ., W . fs - Y . ,x V ,- - , 18 , V, C , ,1 yy Vit "n': ', '. .f. lf'.l V... I l l THE FACULTY. i i ,fl fax ,' fffzzfffzflfffy 0af1'ay.v 'Thaw' ,wnlzexf ff Ifz".Yl:1"'7IS fn 1'n1'.s'c. " THE CHANCELLOR : " His preaching' much, but more his practice Wiouoht A living' sermon ofthe truths he taught. " PROF. BAIRD: PROF. STEVENSON: PROP. RUSSELL : nk C4 ul His voice the music of the spheres So loud it deafens mortals' ears, As wise philosophers have thought, And that's the cause we hear it not. He knew what's ever 's to he known A teache1"s doctrine and his proof Is all his province and enough But is no more concerned in use Than shoernakers to wear all shoes. ' 170 PROF. PROF. PROF. PROF PROF PROP PROP HERING: ISAACS : STODDARD MURRAY: LOEB : 'A I-Ie laws, but dares not 1nake the motion. And, though I can't put off a woeful mien Will be all mirth and cheerfulness within H I dote on puns and funny lays, I love the jokes of ancient days. " " He flatters with peculiar air The brave, the witty and the fairy And fools would fancy he intends A satire where he most commends. " 1 ' Knowest thou not yet, that men commenc Thy votaries for want of sense?" SIHLER- " I was a very precocious child. I studied Latin at seven Greek at e1ght and at fifteen I 1e'Ld Sophocles PRINCE A sprmgy motion in his Gai A using step doth indicate Of pride and Joy no common 1'ltC That llushe d his spu lt . . C 7 , H . C . , .. I I H ' b tr . , . 7 lc , . . 4. ,, C . 171 BARRINGER: BLAKE: BLAUVELT: BRENNE MAN: BRODY: CARROLL: FAIRCHILD: MOORHEAD: PENTZ: STIEBEL: N INETY: OUR. " Pray quit thy vain pursuit of loud applause." f'Of this genus there exists but one species." 4' And is thy sleep eternal P " t' Name it and you can have it." "And is this youth a 4 papa P' " " Methinks he seems no bigger than his head." " My son, go SCRAPE thy hairy Visage! " Do you ask it this youth is the son ofa lord? Not at allg he takes care of the bulletin board." ' He had a thousand jatlish trielcs, VVorse than a mule that flings and kicks." He tallqeth much and would assume a manly mieu But in his prattle naught but ehildishutrss is seenf 172 BECKER: BOGERT: C. S. DEMING: ECKEL: GRAHAM: HANDY: NEWMAN: HOWLAND: C N1NETv:FlvE. " And obstinaey's ne'er so stiff, As when ,tis in a Wrong belief." 'It takes a veritable Sandow to lift a schooner. ' " He grinds exceedingly Well." WVhen from all sides by claimants I'm oppressed, With cries for filthy lucre which I ne'er possessed 'Tis then, dear ' Uncle,' that thou art my friend, And for my baubles me your silver lend." " The turf shall be my fragrant shrine." " Two oratorical young shoots Who will some day till Colonel Roberts boots." " What smothers all clamor, what deadens all din, What loosens the tongue like 'original sin'." 173 i KIRBY: MARSHALL: OSBORN: SMITH: SNODGRASS: " STERN: VOGEL: " The closest mortal ever known." I dote on Milton and on Robert Burnsg I love old Marryatt, his tales of pelfg I live on Byron: hut my heart most yearns Toward those sweet things that I have penned myself " My livelong hours in anxious cares are passed And raging' hunger lays my beauty waste." " Thus in a sea ot folly tossed My choicest hours of life are lostf, Then what hath quailed thy stubborn l:eart?,' " Thou pompously wilt let us know IVhat all the World knew long ago." " So birdlike, yet no flyer." 174 l N lNlF:TY:5lX CLAYTON : Phe little lamb of which the vfoocl book tells. GRUDNENTHAL A 5t1a110e1 animal Lries one Sule nevex hved beneath the bun HEATH lVhat s the use of XVOIli1110' Whlle you have your health? KAFKA XVIIIG poxx exful mme can thaw the flozeu Clt And fashlou hxm to humol and to NVIE MILLS He s but a bhort temove from hem-ff ff MUNSON 1th much mole 6115111213 I vteu the fi , lhan those who make the f1ay O -A O Hr 4 , V ,- C Q, 4 , ECC . . . - ' . ' c, C 1 1 c . . ' . lv 1 l , cc , Y . . ' ' 7 . O - ' H I . V 1 ,. Q . - v y -s ' ' , ' rv , an n . . ' vr . b O A I , cc ' . '. , ' N, 0- , W bhf rw , . JY 17' F.,... , ,-.,,.,.,,- su, OTTARSON : "He seems to possess but one idea and that a wrong one. " PHILLIPS 1 " 'Tis but a peevish boy, yet he talks Well. " SECKERSON 1 4' Beneath his vest a heart cloth beat, That thrills his soul with self-conceit. " SWAN : " And thus by getting oft his 'guff' He thinks to out a niainnioth bluff. " J. E. XVALSCHEID: 'tI'll 'stonish the nation and all Creation, By rushin' a thunderin' big reformation. ' C. F. YVHITNEY 1 "Ay, that's a colt indeed, for he does nothing but talk of his horse 2 ' 176 f l ANDERSON: BILL: F. MCDONALD: MCKAY: ROSENTHAL: BISSELL: J CK, NlNETY:Sl-EVEN. Tis said that fools are known by looking wise Mr. Officer! please take those Sophoinores off! " ME and ,97.H " Was there no stolen pig nor plunclered goose To tie thee up from breaking loose." " Their Voices of the loudest drones. VVith snuftling, brokenwindecl tones, Both make a Viler noise than swine In Windy Weather when they whine." l'7'7 THE SCIENCE OF THE SOUL. gl Few !l7Z.l!fL'7'S 111 Hyufzulqgy ax fl is fllllgflf af Af. Y. U. MR. MARSHALL: The lien turns her eggs, not from intuition as some philosophers assert, but ' because she has learned that the .sjuwjic g'l'l?'UI.l'j' ofthe yolk is greater than that of the white. 'TGV-pk THE PROFESSOR flifflljffllfillg' zz pflfllfpi -Iohn Adams was the Cause and john Quincy Adams the eicct. l I .N THE PROFESSOR: Mr. Handy, how would you explain the sunset to a child? MR. HANDY: 1 should say that it was a peculiarity of that shining orb. THE PROFESSOR: And how would you explain it, M11 Snodgrass? MR. SNODGRASS: I would tell the child that the sun was tired. 178 MR. HANDY ffAOZlgfZff1lf0fJI Yes, that's a good answer for a child. '36 96 J X' THE PROFESSOR: Mr. Handy, do you know the ultimate end of a mosquito? MR. HANDY: No, sir, THE PROFESSOR fjJ!zz'!0s0pkz'fzz!Qfj: Have you ever had any experience with the ultimate end ofa mosquito? MR. HANDY: No sir, only with the anterior end. fflze Professor zz6rz'z'czzZcfs his clzzzir. Class 73 dzkfzzzksezij. F 'X- QN. B. THE VIOLET was not meant to be a Handy jOkC-bOOkD.'-KEDITORD. +195 THE PROFESSOR fZ.!Z7l.S'f7'!lZ'Z'7Zg' hjyJ0Z!zfZz'czz! f77'0f70.S'Z.fZ'0llDI If it is pleasant tomorrow, I shall go to Boston. THE CLASS fcum una wcej: Hooray! -iii' THE PROFESSOR: What is the highest possible generalization you can think of? MR. NEWMAN: Eco. 179 A l I! 1 i 1 ' l fl WHAT EVERYONE WANTS TO KNOW. l l l ! ,-F...-.fv l l The kleptomaniac of '96 responsible for the disappearance of Professor Sihler's coveted lecture A manuscript? ,l 1 A 'Why ,Q7 lost every cane rush? ' as When Morales will ride the 41 li K- Goat? l lVhen Marshall had his last hair cut? I XVhcn Sir Francis Tucker will leave college? i VVhen Rosenberg will produce ffby chemical dombinationl a human babe in the laboratory? g l 4+ i When Professor Loeb ever 4' liunked " a man? l When the Furzffzzsiivill be out again? l 5. How Tompkins lost his dignity? How Professor ixfluii-ay learned to flirt? How Professor Russell believes all he says? lp 1 Why '95 prefers a Singer arid '96 a VVheeler and Wilson? 180 LOST' Ch LIICGHOI M1LC1c1el en 5 ey eblwsses, Professol Ballfud 5 achpose txssue PlOfCSSO1 5111161 s concelt P P P1 ofessol Heung 5 beardlet Professol Stocldalcl s eccennucated gl 111 Professol Russell s pull xx 1th the lachee. QS s class spoxt Yfxldeu 97 s h1ffh hat and pude B Ll bl p1est1ge Volblwwsky s knack MeLeWee and h1s poses 1n the halls The Cflpfalll ol the .St Nleholas Oul Athletlc Bowl C 0 X 1- Q . 7. L fL. . ,Q , 0.6. ,. if Q - '-r - -1 C . ' ' V " ' f,.?j 96 1 . Q. 31 -X 4 . ' - , Q. Q' . x ca H ,' ' . , , 14 s . , C Q Y 7 ' .' b . SE i-. - ' . .Q , 7 C . x '. . .' 1 924 cc ' 2' ' ' H ' . K 1 N lbl if 11 1 , I , 'I , E W N 1 1 1 ' I l Pago. I? 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, S-IO, 11, 12, 13, U, 15 16, i7. 19-32, 33, 35-54, 55-66. 07-84, 35--91. 92, 93, 94, 95 96- ,,x-..- T BLE OF C0 TE TS 182 O Subject-Matter. V1o1,1c'l', '91, I1x11'1z1N1'. CUT-X7IO1.P1I', '95. Bomcn or ED1'1'o11s. D1aD1CA'1'1oN. L11f1z or Du. A1mu'1'T. ElJI'l'ORIAI,. fJl"lf'lCERS ANIJ CQUNCIL. FoUN1pERs ANU P1u2s1DEN'1's. A1,1y:11N1 AssoC1A'l'1oN ,PHE 01.11 BUILDING SI'EAlib. C,-x1,1sNDAR, 1893-94. Tlfla Co1,Lm:1n CIIAPEL. UN1x'ERs1'1'x' FAcl11:1'1Es. IN 'run Ll1s1:A1w. FRA'1'E1cNl'1'x' 1VIA'l"I'ER. M1su1z1-1.Arw1ous ORu,xN1zA'1'1oNs A'I'lII.lE'l'IC2S. UN1vE11s1'1'Y P1f1s1.1c',x'1'1oNs. " lx Mm1o1a1M1." Pum1. P14115-NVINA1-plzs. XV1-m SA111 HFOliUIXl?H Page 97 141 I I 3 I I I IO I2 in I I Tw 1 I IO II Io I I I IDI I L I J IL2 Subject Hatter CI Ass IVIA1 II Ie SLI-Iool Ol IENIINILLRINI SQIIOOL Ol PIIIIACOI I DAX Ol PRIIIIX FOIJINDEI S DM CQIINIFNLI Nil X1 Exlzl CIS Q3 Cmss D xx GILEI Room BLST N Y U RICORDS BIG FIII' Q5 SOIIIOMOII BAAQUI I 'l I NINIS IOURINAM1 Nl WVIULIIIIILAIION Ol CIUI:s CONDIIIOINS IIII: LXBORXIORIES POEXI CU1 ilu 11 x G INDS Im WIT!-l'QT7 V W0 U E TUUI4 vs 3' 1f,l-fl'-"QI ff ffi 192 f WT-1""'r1 . ,,IfIff 51 EWG 42, , ..-.......... . . . ' , I' J 'F 2. 44- 47, ................ " " , V. 43, .........,....... ' f' I 'Lk 49 ,................. ' ' I ' '. 5, ', ...........V ...., . ...'iIc."' Ji ICS 5 , ................. ' . I '. 52 .... ........... - If 4 ' . 54, ....,............ I . . . 5 . 55, ....,......... , . . E. 50, ,,.,............. ' ' 'f as ' Q". 57, , ,......... ...,... I "' ' wx 58, 53, . .... .......,. . 1 I' P . J 6 , .................. " 6 , ........,........ 'I' 4 f 1 " - 6-4 6', ,.........,..... . . - 66, ..,.............. "-U' ' " 01'- 67- 3 y ,,,,,. ....... . II '. L" '. I 'I -IIY ' Mr ,I I X, sig , E-L - bn qs- fl :I 6555 f- '-" PQ FIX "D'+"" I ' 4 g f I A :fx 14 . -I-1 I 2 : 'rl'-Ti:""g ,', I k Y Y 1 Hy! E.. i 3 r I 1 l i, I r l l l R FLASHE5 Fleom THE CLASS Room. Prof. Stoddard Qin Engffsfzjz Mr. Irwin, what is meant by Hnuptial breaches?" Mr. Irwin: Wedding trousers, sir. Scene fC!n.r:: in Gwrffzmzj--Faust: "Der Menge Beifall tont mir nun Wie I-Iohn." Mr. Newman ffrfznsfnfffzgjz The applause of the multitude sounds to me like a hen. ii' Mr. Stern is translating from "Faust" Prof. Isaacs: Give it up, Mr. Stern, iL's too pretty to be butchered. 'xf " +9 Prof. Hering Qzzffw' czzlfzzzg 071 511' zzzfu fo 1'mf2'ff', iuiffmzzf el S7.l1g'ft' 7'C'.Sif707lSl'pI There is said to be an elo- quence in silence. xmas Prof. Hering fm Jllfcknfzziffwz Mr. Cunningham, which is larger, a foot or a centimeter? Mr. Cunningham ffldffrff zz f7ns1ra!5z17'f'qf af llzvfZ0w'j: A centimeter, of course. fffzz' Professor affzzczlbf 5 111 ilvsj . ,l 84 I l P1of S1l1ler f!1fz11s!czZz1zff Ollld 111 1111111 W'hat the dev1l' W1 Ottarson fQ7l0fZ7Z0'f7 0111 1716 0001! boolj A XVISG father IS tl1e joy of hls 11'1O'El161 P1es1dent of E11ClC1a11 Tl1e next IS 1 S6l6Cl101'l by M1 Gates M1 Gates ffrom force of kabz! Not prepa1ed s1r KX- P1of Russell Zll 660710711265 Th1s takes place 111 Rotte1 dan1 Amster dam and other places QA11 aud1ble sm1le 1S heard The P1OfCSSO1 fqmcklyl I d1d 11ot s1y Rotterdam AH1StC1Cl3l11 and otl1e1 damn places Class razzrsj P1 of Stoddard fZ7! L71 fzsfz Well 'Vlr Anderson you must have read 1t e1ther when you wx ere too old or 11Ot 3 ouno enouffh 'JVC se'1 1716 pro F5507 juzis l111115el 011 N16 back Prof Stodda1d fsjbmfznv z1fLffzfs 711510172655 Now xx l1e11 I xx 'ms 111 the 111s'1ne asylum at No1tha111pto11 The class fffllll 61ZSLllZbfL'l And who let you out? Scene Bones MHHICIIIS AHC-lf32l.lT1bllDCf Pa1l 1S The Professor What devlce 11 as U11 d by the lhnd A141 ue qlll f1ce R R Company to 01vethc llO1S6S a ICST7 M1 PISGR The Cable SO 1 l - 1 ' , TOD: NN ' 1 ,nil - ' vlxv l .U y ,O A O 8: H . . N 51- ik' f C . . 95 . . C ' , ' J: ' .- , - . 4- ' ' ' : 1 , ' ' . Q . 96 95 95- '. 'fgfjz ,1. ., " 1 Y bl 23 ' 9? Class in Latin fP1'0f Silzfw' z'ra11.vlfzf1'5j: 4' ' Hac urget lupus, l1ac can1s,'-Between the devil and the deep . ' f fb' ' 1 ' J: , 1 ' ' 1 ' - 2 2- Z , D ALXYL ' 7 gg 11 ' 1 I b . O. :-- , . , . - . Q Q x ,' I . Z ' f A 7 ' 1 L, c . . 6 lc" 4,--Y Y, ,nf Y Q , , Y Mr. Handy C1111 fi-6171101111-L'.S'JZ Now Professor, suppose you go to Koster X Bial's- Prof. Russell z'1z!w'1'zg7fz'1zg!y, plmsm' wzifz ffm Z-ff7lSf7'llfZ'07!JZ Let us assume it as true. Qf11m'Zlzej17'0fcf5s07' and ffm kll0ZUZi7lg 01165 'ZUZ-llkffi ffzu oifzw' Lgffj. 4+ " Prof. Sihler 42.11 ffl-52407302 Prince Rudolph of Saxony not only did not Wish to marry himself, but he did not Wish his brothers to marry hini. ik N' Prof. Russell: The disciples lirst provided a free lunch, or rather a gratuitous repast. fG1'0cz7z5.j -N 9? Scene, Class in History: Prof. Sihler whispers to Mr. Phillips. The latter starts to leave the room. The Professor: Mr. Phillips, I hope you don't misunderstand me. I did not want to send you on a fool's errand. pizza' ffm bazzzffjzffzyraij. , Student U0 lf2'sz'f07'j: That man over There is a Freshman. Visitor: I thought so from his appearance. I-Ie looks so much wiser than the professors. -:ewes THE FATAL PUN. Prof. Isaacs c57lZZ'!Z-llg broadlyjz The coldest word in the German language is Frohsinn. flVI67.'L'f day entire class is szqferzdzg from zz cofzzplzlvzfziozz fyf Z'1ZK??Zlg't'5ZiZ-011 mm' clziroszis of ffm Izrwr, The Pro- fessor alone esazjnm' ffm fimdly puny. I A ISU Monday Lecturers for 1894 5 October Plrtnur 1VlCG1ffert DD A I November WIIIIGTU C Roberts DD LLD December Lewis H Stlmeon MD January Elbert B Monroe MPX February Edward C Ptndrewe DD LLD Maron Henry C Watte PnD Hbrrl Henry C Potter DD LLD May C D W Brlaarnan DD : 0 CEU' Jfazzzifzy f,c'6f1l7'67'.S'.f07' 1 by-4, ,ree jirzga 141 of z' 16 lfflllifffj ..-1 V k Y l E i' 1 . , . ,, , , ii Q , n n ""' . , - .. - . 1' . Y . . "' , 3 . y . . 11- u 1 I , Q IST - V 1' T nl i i l l i i l v I l l l , Ni ffl li 1 i i, ' if l i :I i vl l l l l il. wi 'lvl 1 l l ii I i .I ' l V Y Y, AA - ,.AH,,,,,, , , .J.....,..V Y--- -7-H - - 'W' A FEW 'f 1oLET" EFFusloNs. Hzrjaee! Ninety-Four, alack Y All would-be pettifoggers, Who followed close the Germans, track In guzzling ale and lagers. Here let their bones repose in peace Unseen by mortal eye, Though here their flesh reverts to grease, Their name shall never die ! VV. li. M., 95 " Tell me what that thing is, Mike, " Asked a new Fresh. of a Sophomore, As something sort o' human like Strutted by like a swell Commodore. His Sophship, wisely pondering, Sized it Well from head to foot, Then made answer mm jJa'ucimzZz'1z- Don't make fun of it, poor thing, fm 1276115 ffCZ.f-llflfillll czmz Zrfgir Jil-fllllifl ! ' XV. M., ,QS Pisek is fond of high-priced suppers. What makes him ill ls to pay the bill, For--a secret well known-he's quite " o N N 5? VVhenever we use a " horse, T' Then Doctor Baird's sure to trip us, But then even he, of course, Don't object to the use of a Uhippos. W W 4? Once was a boy who lived in Brooklyn, He used to go by the name of Blake, He was his papa's " precious ducklin', " n his uppers H But other folks thought him a fi- fk -Y: 4: " Brief life is but our portion, " So clon't forget, dear Lyman, That he who loves without due caution, .lfay call himself a " Simple Simonf i lSS 'iff 'fir i- ' . .:i':::i, ll H517 f , f I, ff ,, 7 '5::..'I- - gg: Ilhllfl. '.1.F ggaili , pg, . 4::.- UJ5... A 1: 1 . f ml 'a ' I' fxx rv 1,-x , , X Q E:I"l , f leg, N fi, Qin!! Ms e '. HP' 655155541 igiisggna . a':'av' 4- gif--fagnigl Ilnhrgll' 2 Q, 19 Summary of the University Instructors and Students For the Year 1894-95. Depzzrlwwzf qf :Iris mm' Srzkfzzrf. Professors and Instructors, Lecturers, . . . , . Students, University College, . Graduate Seminary, School of Engineering, School of Pedagogy, Total, . . DEpfl7'f71Z6'llf ff rlfnf7'r1'1zf. Professors and Lecturers-. Students, . . . Dlj7d7f7llElZf of Law, Professors. Lecturers, . Students, . Deduct for names counted twice, Total, ....,. , . Totals: Instructors, lO2Q Students, 903. In ull, 1015, 190 24 8 166 73 32 SS 359 60 362 sl ln Q17 935 35 903 Directory of the Unlverslty CHANLELLOR s AND TRFASURER s O1 EICES, AND COUINCIL Room Washmgton Square UINIVERSIIX COLLEGE Un1vers1ty Hewhts GRADUATE SE1x11NARY VVash1ngton Squale SCHOOL OF l4 No1NEER1NG Un1ve1s1ty Hewfh s SLHOOL Ol PEDAGOGX Washlnvton Square UNlX'hRSI1Y lWEDlLAL COLLEGE, East Twenty elghth Street between Eust Avenue and East R1ver U1x1vE1zs11x l AVV SCHOOL Washmgton Square UBIVERSIIX HEIGHTS the new Slte of the Ul11VCIS1ty College and of the School of Eng1neer1ng 1S upon SedOfw1ck Avenue nudway between MOIIIS He1ghts and Fordham He1ghts Take the N Y Centml Rallway to Mo111s Heufhts Stat1on seventeen m1nutesf1om Forty second Street Or take Sutth Avenue Elevated, and New X7Ol1x and NO1 them to Fordham Hewhts Stat1on about forty rmnutes from Forty second St1 eet by ordmary t1'llI'lS, and for ty two mmutes from Rector Street by express trams The UDlVCfS1ty College IS e1ght to ten 1'1'11I1lltCS from e1the1 statlon Q - . n ,xt 1 J 1 fi T , - 1 , . Y my . . . D D ' W 1 ' . , . N ., N . .. . , , br. N 1. , ' 7 tr ' a . w V'. '. ' a ' - 1 ' "fr 1 ' - J , . T if . . -. , , , 7 3 -D 7 ' . . Q.. . , . . . f . C b K , u ' ' ., . . ' W ' D ' 7 U 1. . .. . . . - C . . . , - - - , , ' .. ' f v 7 1 I X... JI!!! Eg X END THE U ' V 1 1 Z f U Advertlseme nts ' 1 I YlTw i F X ? --li l i le i I Q I H li aye CS-'lilfort in GLASSES 55 99 1 : 0115111 'TDHB . A My 9 -: CLI Pr- P ' with its fgcstflgzer ' lt will take a firm and comfortable hold, and that without wrinkling the nose or pinching it painfully, lt can be attached to any eyeglass at the slight cost of 50 CENTS. M ANUFACTURED SOLEL V BY F SLHWXIDT -:, OPTlC kN:- 16 E.AsgST4-2,2512 NX You will make no mistake KEELAN PIANOS D Spqqial Priqqg and 'fqrnyg to Studqrxtg aim Qollqgq Soqiqtiqg. Cash Or EASY Payments- 7 ,Xi ew Endgland Piano Q0 WAREROOMS: 98 Fifth Ave., cor. 15th St., N w York. 200 Tremont St., B ton. 264 Wabash A Cl g NE TEC? Q 'QQEIEWY N4 32 JV F D IICPRIVJQQ N 5 ?5'9' x X I 7, , 9 JOHN STREE NEW ORK x. RICHARD B Locxwooo COLLEGE FRATERNITY CLASS ENGRAVER 203 BROADWAY Room 5 9 NEW YORK MY SPECIALTIES FRATERNITY AND CLASS ENGRAVING PICTORIAL AND HERALDIC STEEL PLATES ILLUSTRATIONS FOR COLLEGE ANNUALS DIPLOMAS CERTIFICATES OF MEMBERSHIP CLASS AND FRATERNITY CRESTS COATS OF ARMS MONOGRAMS ADDRESS AND LODGE I-IEADINGS BOOK PLATES SEALS DEVICES FINE WRITINGS PAPERS CALLING CARDS STAMPING EMBOSSING AND ILLUMINATING ART ENGRAVING IN BANK NOTE STYLE W k boki l QOF " C l,1X'I'l'I FIRM UF GICU. IC. - 2" m.'-,UND 0- -4- Iv n ,f T - ' " 54" f- X gg Q - Us f ,ESS - fa -I . x ' ,, ' ' . I A a V :W : ' ' I ca W - , - fix --Ll' ff ey ?6 B 9 546 ' Y! 'W 5 ff ' gf El! ' - 1' '3 ' C 'uf S , fv 'Rf' A . fx I M 9 l ' Anya' - AI flv ,QA .F . 4 IS p 'mens of my Steel Plate or in th' . UNIVERSITY OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK. UNIVERSITY QUNDERGRADUATEJ COLLEGE, at University Heights, New York City. fThe new site is upon Sedgwick Ave., about fifteen minutes walk beyond Wasliiiigton Bridge. Take N. Y. Central R. R. to Morris Heights, seventeen minutes from 42d St., or take Sixth Ave. Ele- vated and New York and Northern to either Morris Heights or Fordham Heights, about forty minutes from 42d St. or take Cable Road to VVashington Bridgej UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SEMINARY, University Heights and VVashington Square. SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING, University Heights. SCHOOL OF PEDAGOGY, VVashington Square. UNIVERSITY MEDICAL COLLEGE, East 26th St., between First Ave. and East River. UNIVERSITY LAW SCHOOL, Washington Square. The term will open in each of the above schools on or about October lst, 1894. For a catalogue of thc entire University or for a circular of any of the schools address, ' NEW YORK UNIVERSITY, Washington Square. wb ! n TO DRESS WELL QDER TE CCST CVC TO 6' -.. kj W , fa, ka gait' Ye uv 4110, o o zor1g5avswmaf0MfJH:ks . f75528l ANn 83 BROADWAY Q wemsemi RE?fZ1?'ls Q l GUAM EED UHQMU EY RETURNED Our Stock IS always composed of all the latest Novelties ln ready to wear Clothing and Furnishings A111 Gr JV AI 5 "Y" , , . -f. . - . Ad- . v - 01 h ' v Q V' ' - VA B ' ' ' H ' ' 'ff l l X x . .1 v . f O."0.0,4'Q'O . u .,.g.'.' f 'A' an . .'. . . 0.0. .9'Q.O'Q 'O' gg 3.9 4 Q'.',0,0,op5-355' ' Q ' v Q '-'.v.'.'.v.'.v - ' 0 4 A Q o o Q 4 o Q' .4 gg., :Q-2.2, Q, 02.1 3 .1 og w - - -a 'A f - - . .- Q v 0 4 Q 4 v , . . , , ,- fa . . ' X fo . X4 5 f, o o'o fo Q" . ,g.g.g.g.g ,., exif- - -'MJ .v.'. 1., , , ,.g.g.g,g.g., y , ' 102031.92-,.:o:4'a' ' '- ' 'v -,- - , ,.,--4'I'f':" . . . ' ooooffoqqqdg ., fi, sean roofs. , : .g,:?:,:,:,:,:,:,. v AH -C ,wo ogvdog.:.'.y'o:.:.::::::.. I . 2'f'Z'I'Z " - . I- - I v'f'v'o'- x,',,.,,. - V ., . 00009 1, 4 4 o Q Q o x . , ,go go,-, o:.:,:QfQ:.: Q, -, , , X - ., . ,. . ofgy, 4.0.4.0 of ' 1 , . 54, - ' 4 X . 1 . . . w . Q - I 'f:':!E2'. J '- - ' P - A .Oz-.Q l u ' ' O 0 f'o'.'.'4 , 4 N f, N ' - 'o' 0- q.g.3.g. 1 E -lp V , . r - , 339' ' ' ' ' ' ,OW 9 0 4 4 4 v 09 o'o:o'. Q Q J. Q do o 4 4 QQ' ' P I ' I' Q I l 4 A - fooooooafooooo I' '"'f'2'f?:':':':'I'I'f"''. ' I 0 l l I 0 o l 0 0 o I I . A- . YL ' W e WP 'x VL V ' - ' , - V ' ' 1 - . . , . - Y.. - l niversity of the City of New York. flbebical Department. 410 EAST 26TH STREET. Opposite Bellevue Hospital. SESSION 1694-195. REV. HENRY M. MMCRACKEN, 5D.D., LL.D., Chancellor of the University. CHARLES INSLEE PARDEE, M. QD., Dean of the Faculty. CYXLEINI DER. Term begins W'cdnesday, September 26, 1894. Election Day, Tttesday, November 15, 1894, Thanksgiving Holidays. Christmas Vacation, December 21, 1894, one week lVashington's Birthday, February 22, 1895. Commencement, Tuesday, May 7, 1895. 1 1 l CHARLES C. YOUNG. N CATERER. 6 FRATERNITIES AND SOCIETIES Q2 Supp1'ed with everything requisite for ml BANQUETS AND SPREAD5. l80 Sixth Avenue near nth Street. l 1Io1i1a1cN Ioms. MODERN EQUIPMI xt flduqrtiser Pri17ti17Q j-louse CRAWFORD BURRELL CO. 3 PRINTERS . I ART CA'I':XI-Of Ulub. COLLEGE ANNUAlS Q AR'I'IS'liIfl S'l'A'I'IONliRY. l 792 Broad street, - - NEWARK, N. J. '-1 LK 1 . 33 1 1 1 , . I 7 I L he Veta-tutogreph 1 l-f - 1 ! l Wfill enable you to make loo or more good copies 1 l fiom one uritten original written on common paper 1 with a common pen. No dirty ink rollers or sticky copies. VVM. BEVERLEY HARISON, Q l 59 Fll3"l'H Avia., Nlrilll YORK CITY. Adjustable Book Covers 5 Strong manilla paper to lit any book, zoc. per dozen 31.50 per too, postpaid to any address. Text Bookg 135, Wlyolqgalq Priqqg. l 14 t Egtablrgbed 1836 INDEMAN 5 Som 5 IANOS The Stamclarcl of Excellence Pnanos Rented sold on F2153 Mo11tl1l5 P13 ments and tal en 111 encchfmge I.1lllCIOlT13ll 81 Sons Prano Co I I l7lI t N Xllllh Bro COLLEGE OLPISQ PHOTOGRAPH ERS Broadway Corner 22d Street New York 'Wien dean Q fry EUFpnLa.1:ssER XJ X X NEWYORK 7 NX! I DRAWING R MATERIALS J PARAGON DRAWING INSTRUMENTS SLIPGUOI to 111 ether clch Instrument Qt m1pc.cl XV1lI1 om Il tme O1 K do E CO N Y Extra Quelltv German Drawmg Instruments L'1el1 ms zument stamped Fme Qnahty German Drawmg Instruments Each II1SI'.1L1lllG1ltSIZI.l1'l1J!2C.I TRADELMJ' MAPK PIDBIQ Brlstol Bofuds Traom Cloths Wfltcl C0l0lS Brushes Qllllll Wfue lhumbtacks Etc Ftp Boxwood md P11 15011 Scales lrmn les T Squares Boards Etc LIBERAL TERMS TO STUDENTS KEXIFYEL84 ESSER New YORK hmm- Q ram., l - JH FIUQ f i E2D' I3jlgEIKdI7f"' : I H I 7. VWQEQETIV f Wm' I + + assi 1 It ,pgulm M V f, X77 iii? 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You can learn to operate Tina XV11,1.lixMs ten times easier and ten times quicker than you can any Blind Machine. Tina .VVIl,1.I.-NMS has speed and znanifolding power un- equalled, does neater and better uw-rl: imma any ribbon machine can, and is the oNi.v machine having thc writing S'l'lilC'l'l.Y IN vniw. The ink problem satisfactorily settled for the first time. Types never lill. Tins lNll4l,lAMS has laeen adopted by the British W'ar Department, after severe competitive test. and we have a cash order for 3000 machines from Europe. VVe claim emphatically that, as a first-class, all-round, rapid, convenient and durable typevvriting machine, Ti-in Wll.I.lzlhlS has NO equal. VVrite for Illustrated Catalogue. THE XVILLIAMS 'l'Yl'lClYIll'l'lER CO., London Ollice, 2: Cheapside, Ill!! Hromlwny, New York City. l l l l l XV tt RKINSO " T PORTRAIT STUDIO, 239 BROTXDNMRY. INIESIIL YORK. Cor. Park Place. Take Elevator No. 1 Park Place. Only one Parkinson. No connection with any other gal- lery. The only down-town portrait photographer. Until further notice: Cabinets, 53.00 per Dozen. SPECIAL REDUCTION. Bair 30s. Dmniin in NEW YORK Is served in lirst-class style, from 11:30 a. ni. to 7:30 p. m,, consisting of Soups, Roasts, Vegetables, Com- pote, Dessert and Coffee, at 23 Washington Place. COR. GREEN ST. REJTQALIKANT UNIVERSITY BLOCK. MAN I-IORN 8: ELLISON HPOTHECHRIES. Park Ave. and -list St. Lnlrorntory, lil E. ills-it St. NEXV YORK. Apothecnriies to the N. Y. Post-Graduate Medical School and Hos pital, Manhattan Eye and Ear Hospital, N. Y. Eye and Ear Infirmary. i RK J IT1 5LOLk BO N 1 Ii GENTLEMEN S BOOTS AND SHO S OF EVERY DESCRIPTION MADE TO ORDER A M GENTLEM N S AND BOYS F NE X09 B R OA DW A Y NEAR FOURTH STREET NEW YORK REPAIRING NEATLY EXECUTED A LARGE STOCK OF OUR OWN IVIAKE CONSTANTLY ON HAND ELICIO HQDINA CUBAN MANLT- ACTURER E a fd Um-WQ rn UNIVERSITY PI ACE N EVV YORK BOXES AT WHOLESAL PRICES SPECIAL RATES TO UNTVERSITY STUDENTS 7 , E T A 1 A . I If zrgal- ' OE VI -r. A ' 9 A T l :gh f -wf T , ,I E 0015 T 5 QS lf a T . jg M 5 i ind US- '. -: J l 1 1 li H W i N l F 5 1 r N L l N il ,, Q! U 21 I 4 J 'x Q, i 4 w N 4 i gl w r 3 I , . , i w E ti vs K! A ,i ,I 'l Ei' xif H l E TEY PIA O ls enthusiastically endorsed by the Flusical Public. See them before you buy. Special Rates to Fraternities. Easy Tennis ESTEY 6: SAXE, 5 EAiEJJRP0?J4'?EETi Best Wishes Of your Outfittqr iq Gymnasium and High Grade Sporting Goods. How necessary it is that our modern hotels should be exponents of the true art of living! The St. Denis is a practical exemplification of this great principle, for here you can End not only the choicest viands the markets adord, but also pre- pared and served in the most tempting and delic- ious and tempting manner. Its enlargement during the past two years by a commodious and handsome addition, in which no pains and expense were spared, is evidence of the growing popularity of this well-known house. In its appointments, decorations, and modern equipments it is pm' e'.'ra'!!wzce one of the leading hotels of the metropolis, while the service and at- tendance are most admirable in every detail and particular. ' The St. Denis Hotel, Wi L L I A M 0 0 , Broadway and Eleventh Street, New York. 25 West 125th St., NEW YORK CITY. -aw fmfa XVII WQMZ 1 X a. . , 5 6 WT ffl ,..'-v MEM? , K, 31 LsMWg:5L Exif Mg X 1 X XXX XXX Mm ff U fx, Qs M5 ff, D52 P ff REF? 33: ' 1 Z X L- if Sw S Q 5 x N I A Zfwzff .jaw M Ma ,, xxx? . '4 ., .y115':" Ir 1 533553 GBE-E 4 7 h 3 f .. :FW 3 6 3 043533 As he thought he appeared. , TONY V. XV111 A7 f X2 Q, N-Aly -f:X I XS Aw 'Tab ,Q " X J' 'Wi As he really appeared. IN " NlRVA'NA." - rw TU 1 - HLl,l2f5Ti'5?L7HTl'?iff!IE1iXCiEQQ3STIii55E ' . - .!-A .V ' L :Ls V,L..z f Mfr y, I. IV.,.,l,4, if g f! T525 . ,wlyu K as 3 f of rc and I-QI. I i I : A V, 't,f -f V of Printers I A . If-fi. I It y - A 1, , ff df, 4, .. College of . Fi i I It 'V '." 'A D 'if I ' Annuals Th B , Q J, ,ALFfTE1NE,fAafTm.TyP5,A-,QXIm5,.,3V,g is ook- i V, I s I E 'e' 'f' Q. Ytffwzz - 3:1 1 .1 ee 'Rhe ND . Qale1xiia1's,lNovcIilc3.f a Speclalty .if-I 'Q AA-IEMBUSSINEQVPRINIINE7 pp g- -. "M i ?i5i4,fYnRK'UFr5.15E: A'A' I ' ' 'i ' I g wo m5n4,,15T5fev, 2 g of I PO N D'S EXTRACT. If you wish to take REGULAR DAILY EXERCISE, and 'not be compelled to desist from Work because of SORE MUSCLES, you must, after exercising, TI-IOROUGI-ILY RUB the MUSCLES with POND'S EXTRACT. By its use you are made QUICK and ACTIVE, and ALL SORENESS, STIFFNESS, or SWELLING is prevented, and you will AVOID the DANGER of TAKING COLD on going out after exercising. ' . , We have a book full of testimonials from the most famous athletesg to quote them is superfiuous. Almost everyone in training uses it. But don't expect some cheap substitute for POND'S EX- TRACT to do what the genuine article Will, for you will surely be disappointed. Manufactured only by I POND'S EXTRACT CO., 76 FIFTH Av:-:.,q NEW Yonx,


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FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
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