New York University School of Education - Education Violet Yearbook (New York, NY)

 - Class of 1931

Page 1 of 255

 

New York University School of Education - Education Violet Yearbook (New York, NY) online yearbook collection, 1931 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 255 of the 1931 volume:

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' sky ,E I fl .xg '- Wa, n , , Tho 1931 Education VIOLET Published by me School of Educafion New York UniversH'y New York 5IQ1'6'A.X'6'AX'6'AbZ'0'2Ql"s7A22'G7A2E C ' ht me TS5'ifbARD EDUCATION VIOLET Murray W Goldenberg' Editor TABLE GF CCNTENTS UNIVERSITY FAC U LTY S E N I O R S C LA S S E S ACTIVITIES LITERARY ATHLETICS ADVERTISING ASSISTANT DEAN Looms 8 To +he man who symbolizes +he Spiri+ of growlh wi'rh which lhis School of Eclucalion is now imbued, a man who is hohored by all who know him -we clec.lica'I'e 'rhis book. Nlsw Yomc UNxv1zns1'rY IN 1831 10 NEW YORK UNIVERSITY Founded in +he CH'y of New York April Eigl'11'een+h, Eigl1'reen Hundred and Thir+y-one Hisfory of New York Universify HE nineteenth century was rendered distinctive by the development of the individual. and with this development New York University began its career. The spirit of the time became reflected in a group of men in New York City, who conceived the idea that there should be a university to serve all the people. Such was the plan of these founders who contemplated a college, an engineering school, a school of law, school of medicine, teachers' college, and department of graduate study. The protest against existing educational institutions became a forward move toward a higher goal. The earliest records that can be found are of certain meetings of nine citizens in New York City, December 18, 1829. This work proceeded slowly, and on October 15, 1830, a council was chosen by share-holders from the members. The following were chosen: Reverend james M. Mathews, General Morgan Lewis, Honorable james Tall- madge, Honorable Albert Zallatin, Valentine Matt, M.D., Edward Delafuld, M.D., and Myndert Van Schaik. ' Meanwhile the committee had chosen a sub-committee, which included men of eminence in New York City, to attend a Convention of Education on October 20 to 23, 1830, for the purpose of obtaining views of Educational Experts in establishing the University and also to promote the motto of "Education for All" throughout the nation. Meetings were held in the Common Council Chamber of the City and represen- tatives of many institutions were present. Many problems were discussed and views given by leading Education authorities. New York City was selected as an ideal place for the new institution. The University secured its charter on April 21, 1831. The original plan had pro- visions for six separate divisions, but it was thought not feasible to launch all of these. In the fall of 1832 at Clinton Hall, Nassau and Beekman Streets, New York University held its first session. There were eighteen professors and one hundred and fifty-seven students. A new site was acquired at Washington Square, in 1833, and the cornerstone was laid. On july 16, 1833, work on the new building was interrupted, and classes did not open until 1835. Of the graduates, more than one-half entered ministry, and one- fourth law, which showed that the University was educating for the learned professions. In 1835, at the request of the University Council, Honorable Benjamin F. Butler, Attorney General in jacl-:son's Cabinet, published the plan for organization of the law faculty and a system of instruction in legal science. The plan provided for a three-year study course and was adopted by the faculty in 1838. Mr. Butler was elected Principal of the Faculty. There were twenty students in the department at this time. Provisions had been made for a medical college, but this did not open until 1838. Dr. Valentine and john W. Draper were put in charge. The Medical College was established at Stuyvesant Institute, 659 Broadway, on the site of the present Broadway Central Hotel. It was semi-proprietary in nature. There were two hundred and thirty- nine students the first year, from twenty-seven states, in 1850 there were four hundred students. In 1851 Stuyvesant Institute was sold and a lot was bought on Fourteenth Street, the present site of Tammany Hall. In 1866 the Medical College moved to New York Hospital and in 1869 moved to premises near Bellevue Hospital, where it now stands. The faculty made a great contribution in 1853, by securing an act legalizing dissecting. For the first fifty years, only the law and the medical colleges were developed. The College never numbered more than two hundred and was far from modern. The instruction was good and the standard of scholarship was high, but there was little spirit. There was no college community and no dormitories. The Eucleian Society 12 was founded the first year of College, and various fraternities and a Lacrosse team were formed in the seventies. Financially, the first fifty years were disappointing and the University was not paid for until 1853. The founders had looked for benefactions, but these did not come, and though there was some endowment, the income from this was not sufficient. Tuition fees were abolished in 1872, but the income was so low that it was necessary to ask for it in 1876, when the situation became serious. The University was forced to mortgage the Washington Square Building, and in 1877 it had to suspend session. The history of New York University centers from some centennial centers, and it owes it to Henry Mitchel MacCraken. He entered as Vice-Chancellor in 1885, with a keen sense for the University and saw clearly that in order to maintain true develop- ment, three things must be done. 1. A new site for the college, where dormitories could be built. 2. Reorganization of school where semi-propriety could be brought under university control. 3. Raising of endowment to send college on. He also went ahead with the movement of the acquiring of University Heights, the present home of the college. This was begun in 1890. At first he contemplated five or six acres on uptown section. In July, 1891, after becoming Chancellor, he secured option on Mali Estate, East 179th Street. Numerous citizens began to contribute, and by May, 1892, two hundred thousand dollars had been promised by citizens of New York. Ohio Society of New York City appointed a committee to help the Chancellor for securing funds for an athletic field. The efforts brought about the establishment of Ohio Field. Work was begun in 1893, and Founders Day was celebrated in the fall of 1894, contrary to expectations of many. The Elective system was adopted after the freshman year. In May, 1895, came the gift of the Memorial Library trust, a known library at University Heights. The ofiicial occurring of University Heights occurred on October 10, 1896. Gould Hall was presented in 1896. In March, 1900, the University received the gift of establishing the Hall of Fame for Great Americans. Kennedy Bequess, in 1910 made possible the establishment of extinguishment of mortgage. The College moved to University Heights. In 1894, Washington Square was torn down and the first eight fioors were rented to a publishing Company. The ninth, tenth and eleventh floors were occupied by the Law School, and the tenth floor was also occupied by the School of Pedagogy. The problem of reorganization came about and the basis for the question of a new site. First to be organized was the college. The Graduate School was opened at Washington Square. In 1866 a statute forbidding bestowal of degrees of M.A., M.S., Ph.D., Sc.D., except upon examination courses, given by the Professors of the University. There was no endowment for this work. Classes were small, thus giving Professors time for degrees. In 1889, the Law School was taken from the University Council, and Dean Austin Abbott was appointed, and in 1891 under his great leadership the school became of high standard. In 1895 it merged an evening division enrollment of the school. In the first year, five hundred and twenty-seven students were in the three-year evening course, The day division was a two-year course. School of Pedagogy was opened in 1870, and many students wanted to enter, and were allowed to attend as auditors or non-matriculators, but were not given credit. 13 Resolved to expand this to Doctor of Pedagogy and Master of Pedagogy, this was the first school ever established that occupied some plan as law or medicine. Women's advisory committee helped furnishing rooms and establishing professional courses. Medical College existed as proprietory until 1817 because ownership of school lay in several hands as a business venture. , Requirements of three-year course in medicine in 1872 made proprietors less profitable. On March 1, 1897, upon the recommendation of the Medical College, the University took charge. On August 7, 1899, the University consolidated with two of the oldest colleges of veterinary in the city, under the name of the American Veterinary College. The School of Commerce, Accounts and Finance was established in August, 1900, the result of the general movement in Europe and the United States for commercial education. It was for the purpose of training the young men for standards of profession that the University applied for this school. In 1903, the collegiate division opened a school which is known as Washington Square College. Another faculty division was opened for Pedagogy in Science, in june of that year. It had recommended to the Council that graduation from any recognized college of arts or science should be made a condition of matriculation for either degree of Doctor of Pedagogy and Master of Pedagogy. This recommendation was adopted by the Council and thereby shut out many teachers who desired to work for degrees and who were unable to go to an existing college. The collegiate division was opened for the purpose of the meeting needs of classes for students. Different courses were given late in the afternoon and Saturdays for the benefit of the teachers. In addition to reorganization of the five new schools, two others were-opened. The women's law classes were organized in 1889 to give a course of lectures on different principles of law for business. This was for women who did not have any regular time to take their law courses. The summer school was opened in 1895 at the University Heights. This has continued to the present day. The opening of the schools were for two reasons. 1. A desire for teachers in New York City and all of its vicinities to obtain dif- ferent courses of studies in summer school. 2. A great belief that this would not be good to close such academic courses at the University Heights, therefore courses of instruction were given during the summer at the Heights. . Chancellor MacCraken on resigning in 1910 might have looked back with won- derous pride upon the school at the end of the twenty-fifth year. During his time the faculty had grown from one to eight, and then rose from ten to two hundred and fifty-six. The number of students under direct control was ninety-one to four thousand one hundred eighteen. The amount of fees that were collected was from one thousand four hundred thirty-three dollars to three hundred seven thousand four hundred seventy-two dollars. The volumes of books in the library rose from nine thousand to ninety-seven thousand. The income of the University was increased from twenty-six thousand two hundred eighty-three dollars to four hundred thirty-four thousand three hundred seventy-eight dollars. The expenditures were from twenty-seven thousand two hundred seventy-five dollars to four hundred forty-one thousand seven hundred fifteen dollars. The property from five hundred forty-seven thousand five hundred dollars to five million two hundred eleven thousand three hundred twenty-one dollars, He had transformed a small dwindling college and a couple of unrelated prepara- tory schools into a large university that teaches thousands of students, and ranks twelfth in size among the American institutions. 14 Hislory o'F +he School of Educalion The School of Education was opened forty-one years ago in 1890. It was then called the School of Pedagogy, and for the first twenty years it granted Doctor of Pedagogy and Master of Pedagogy degrees. At this time the school occupied the ninth floor of the Main Building, where it remained until 1922. From 1890 to 1903 the Bachelors degree was not required, that is, the school was giving graduate degrees to undergraduate students. In 1903 this practice was stopped and the School of Pedagogy admitted only those with baccalaureate degrees. Registration wavered between 250 and 400 students. The School of Pedagogy granted Bachelor degrees up until 1912, when Wasliington Square College was established. At this time the school was purely graduate and rarely exceeded 500 students. The Dean of the School from 1903-1918 was Thomas M. Ealliat, now Dean of Meritus College. From 1918 to 1921 the position of dean was unoccupied. On February 13, 1921, Dean Marshall M. Brown took oflice. During these two years the School of Education almost disappeared, for in 1920 there were only 121 registered. Dean john W. Withers became dean of the School of Education coming from St. Louis public schools. In his first year he made three vital changes: 1. He changed the name of School of Pedagogy to School of Education. 2. He changed the degrees to Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy. 3. He established an undergraduate division and a program leading to Bacca- laureate 'degree in Bachelor of Science in Education. The undergraduate division was wholly concerned with the last two years of college courses. There were no courses at freshman and sophomore level .until 1925. This I5 brought a striking increase in the School of Education. They established for the first time the following divisions: 1. Department of Business Education. 2. Department of Vocational Education. 3. Department of Personnel Administration. 4. Department of Teachers College and Normal School Education. 5. Department of Physical Education and Health. 6. Department of Music Education. 7. Department of Art Education. Four of these departments, Vocational Education, Business Education, Music Educa- tion and Physical Education, were established for the first time in the history of the school on the freshman and sophomore level. In 1924 the University bought and remodeled the present Commerce Building, and in 1925 the School of Education Realty Corporation purchased for use of the School of Education three buildings and Square front. This was made possible for' use by sale of Realty Corporation bonds to faculty, students, and alumni of School of Education. This -brought in :l5250,000. Departments were added and included in plan of 1924 but established later were Creative Education, Religious Education, English Education, Mathematic Education, Social Studios, Science, Foreign Language and Literature. There was a tremendous increase in faculty. In 1920, besides Dean Witllers, there were four members of faculty, in 1930 there are exactly eighty-eight in the School of Education faculty. Registration for year of 1921 was 141 students, there are now over 7,500 registered in the School of Education. In 1928 new land was purchased and building started. The construction was started in March, 1929, and in the year 1950 the College School of Education has come to the front and today it is occupying the building that it desired above all others. 16 UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF EDUCATION I8 -Q. THE HALL or FAME 19 STUDENTS ACTIVITY BUILDING 20 COMMERCE 21 -5 gl 5 ' ', K 5 ,f 1 519- , '. fr THE MALL 22 .il X' MAIN BUu.D1NG 23 HALL OF PHILOSOPHY 24 GOULD LIBRARY 25 CAMPUS SCENE 26 'fx '. fl '.KN , 1- ". r . v "1 . . A J5' QYl?"ff i M .f Y EP xv! 'T Qu' . ' -- 'A' " A-,- .v -f-, -if 'F 1:5 .--..A--1-----4: 1 1'-T: 'K-"--1 ' W' 'qibw :,:. 2 ,- - 4 ' , , ' 2- 'N'-'1".:-: 1'-is fr.gjQ1g'3 -2 -' 5 1 .J-2'-zsiii-:iv--3 -. , "rm 'rf -f"-- . if ,nf ,, ffizgf --- .-7.1 -3,-"' .4f,.3,.f5. '5 R.-.Lf -gig., , Y. .-wq,,,.T. ,p"'H- ' . ,.f,-. , . -. Q.. .,, ,,,f-.Sq vw. 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"'1f6t,3,?.,:- - vii'-' V? '54 959'-1 T- ' . ,,62f.f...,2g.?:?Qr-' .T-' ' ' - " -' .:- 1 -- -,es-1'---were-w':f1. ' .- . ,- L . W.-in-i.-V ,--.1-5 A if'-f L Z17'- ."-l Wy" -v""" v A ,.... . ,1 F ' H A r' .A - " 35Qj1?1f-I f' IQ, 5-3 A -if fu al'-'..: 5,4 ',, P1 5 f I az, NA"--' f fL', :E '5 -.1 :fi 'W 5 .v,,: 2-'vi' I "gli 2 :jg 'gf Ig 35, 51 .. - . - -fr'v-MW.. mu n 4 vu: ' . M mmf f' mx 1 ...,,,,-, L A ........- ,ar V? Cfivfajf "Ii x' ,J PW' MQW, Nu v ., A -- v n Q.-N 'Tj' :lf .f-3351 Q Re, ,, 'WNW J. I 1 IW ,Jgff sum, I A I V ,J I N Q44f1w'35MfQ'sl, EP , '51-rffn' 'W ' - U Wm-1 if Meri? J? ,Y Wu N agrnuw "' vv mv!" " TM ,ww 'yah-v.v'J,-ul 'P 4 -4 he x L vt N kv H' 'Y-'Wm " ' , ' - .1-' f' M .4,3.W , 1'-Ii-j'?,g,3gJffjiNQ14xiQ61AdugnI-,4,r!-g-,,nv-',i- , . . .... 4-11 -' fmfxu,--.Pile , , FACULTY CHANCIELLOR ELM 1211 E. BROWN 28 NEW YORK UNIVERSITY OFFICE OF THE CHANCELLOR WASHINGTON SQ E. EW YORK To the Education Violet: The Violets which have been sprouting in the several schools of New York University in the past few years have been so attractive and so informative that I am particularly glad to hear that the seed has been sown for such a publication in the School of Education. Knowing the way in which the School of Education goes into whatever it undertakes, and recalling especially the way it is now bending every energy to live up to the standard set by its new building, I am confident that the new publication will be one in which the whole University will take pride and satisfaction. May I congratulate you upon the project and wish you all success and happiness in its consummation. fda Chancellor n lDaie 1892 1898 1898 1899 1905 1908 1909 1911 1913 1914 1919 1919 1921 1922 1926 1926 1927 1928 1928 1929 1930 1930 1930 1930 1931 1931 1931 Council of New York Universiiy OFFICERS Prefidefzt ,................,......,......... ............,..........,........................,.........................,.......... F RED I. KENT Vice-Preridemf ......................1... ,,...,..... W ILLIAM MORGAN KINGSLEY, A.M., LL. D. Sew1elaryPro Tempo:-e ,,.... ..................,....,. H AROLD OLIVER VooR1-us, Sc.B., A.M. Treamrer .........,....,.,............,... .............. W ILLIAM MORGAN KINGSLEY, A.M., LL.D. MEMBERS of Election Expiration of John Pixley Munn, A.B., M.D. ....................,..,. .......,.......,,............ . Willis Fletcher johnson, A.M., L.H.D. ....... .,... . Thomas Edmund Greacen .................,...........,.......... .... William Morgan Kingsley, A.M., LL.D. ...... Frank Arthur Vanderlip, A.M., LL.D. ................. . james Abbott, A.B ...............................,..................,.,,..,,,............. Benjamin Thomas Fairchild, Phar.M., Ph.G. Elmer Ellsworth Brown, Ph.D., LL.D. ................. . Finley Johnson Shepard ................................................................ William Russell Willcox, A.M., LLB., LL.D. ....... Percy Selden Straus, A.B., D.C.S. .................................. . Arthur Smith Tuttle, S:B., C.E. ..,,,.,.....,.............,........ . Edwin Louis Garvin, A.B., LLB., LL.D. ...... . Percy S. Young, B.C.S. ..................................... . Albert Eugene Gallatin ..,............................,......,.. Frederic A. Juilliard, Litt.B. ..........................,,.. . William Whitlock Brush, Sc.M., C.E. ...,.,... . Thomas Williams ................,........................,,,............ Charles Walter Nichols ..........,.........,.,.,.,..., Fred I. Kent .....................,,....,...............................,... William Henry Hamilton, A.B. ................ . Edmund L. Mooney, LL.B., LL.D. .,,................. . Arthur Butler Graham, LL.B. ...................................... . Arthur Stimson Draper, B.S. in M.E., A.M. .,........ . Irving Husted Berg, A.B., D.D. ........,....................... . David Sarnoff, Sc.D. .,...................,..........., ..,,.......... . Thomas John Watson .....,......,,,......... ASSOCIATES OF THE COUNCIL joseph Smith Auerbach, A.M., LL.B., Litt.D. john Carty, Sc.D., D.E., LL.D. Walter Edwin Frew Nathan L. Miller, LL.D. Ormond Gerald Smith, A.B. john Bond Trevor, A.M., LL.B. George Zabriskie, LL.B., D.C.L. 30 Twwz 1932 1931 1931 1934 1933 1932 1933 1933 1932 1932 1934 1934 1933 1932 1931 1951 1933 1931 1932 1933 1933 1932 1932 1934 1934 1934 1934 New York Universi+y Sena+e OFFICERS P,-eridenr ,,,,..,.,,,,,,,A,,.,........,,.,,,,,.,,,,,,A,,,,,,,,,,,, . ............. E LMER ELLSWORTH BROWN, PH.D., LL.D. Secrelary .............,...............................,.........,...,,. ...,...... A RCHIEALD LEWIS BOUTON. LITT.D., A.M. Director of the University Prerr .,,...,... .......,.,....... A RTHUR HUNTINGTON NASON, PH.D. Director of Public Occariom ...,.....,... .....................,,................,........................... A LVIN C. BUSSE, A.M. I MEMBERS ELMER ELLSWORTH BROWN, PH.B., A.M., Dean of the Facullier U MARSHALL STEWART BROWN, PH. B., A.M., Dean of the Faculfrer College of Arif and Pure Science! DEAN ARCHIBALD LEWIS BOUTON, LITT.D., A.M. PROFESSOR HORACE W. STUNKARD, A.M., PH.D. QTerm expires 1934J College of Erzgineerirrg DEAN COLLINS P. BLISS, PH. B., A.M. PROFESSOR ALEXANDER HARING, C.E., LL.M., J.D., fTerm expires 1934J Graduate School PROFESSOR JOHN MUSSER, PH.D., Execurioe Secrelary PROFESSOR CARLETON BROMN, A.M., PH.D., fTerm expires 1933J School of Law DEAN FRANK HENRY SOMMER, J.D., LL.D. PROFESSOR EDWIN D. WEBB, B.S. IN PED., LL.M., J.D. fTerm expires 1953J Medical College , DEAN SAMUEL ALBURTUS BROWN, M.D., D.P.H. PROFESSOR WARREN COLEMAN, A.M., M.D. School of Commerce, ACFUIIIIIJ, and Finance DEAN JOHN THOMAS MADDEN, B.C.S., A.M., C.P.A. PROFESSOR ARTHUR H. ROSENKAMPFF, B.C.S., C.P.A., fTcrm expires 193-4J Wa.rhir1g1ou Square College DEAN JAMES B. MUNN, PH.D PROFESSOR HOMER A. WATT, PH.D., fTerm expires 1932J Gracllrafe School of Bfc.rirre.rr Aclmirzirlraliorz DEAN ARCHIBALD WELLINGTON TAYLOR, A.M. PROFESSOR MARCUS NADLER, SC.B., J.D. lTerm expires 19355 School of Retailing DEAN NOIXIRIS A. BRISCOE, PH.D. College of Deulixlry DEAN ALLEN T. NEWMAN. SC.M., D.D.S. PROFESSOR GEORGE B. WALLACE, M.D. QTerm expires 1933J College of Fine Arm DEAN E. RAYMOND BOSSANGE, PH.B., IN ARCH. fProfessional vacancyJ Urzizferrity Extemion Dizrifion DIRECTOR RUFUS D. SMITH, A.M. Summer School DIRECTOR MILTON E. LOOMIS, A.M. 31 DEAN JOHN T. WHITHEIIS ,1 NEW YORK UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF EDUCATION oFFlcE OF THE DEAN WASHINGTON sQuA E. New vomc December 12, 1930. To the Education Violet: Cordial greetings to all members of the graduating class of 1951! Soon the end of another academic year will be reached and each of you will join the great host of men and women who have graduated from New York University and its School of Education. I want you to know that the full friendship and best wishes of the Dean and all members of the faculty of the School of Education will always be yours, wherever you may go and in whatever form of educational service you may engage. Let me also assure you that if in any way, at any time, we can help you to enlarge the scope and increase the value of your service to education, we shall be glad if you will let us do so. We hope and believe you will continue your active interest in the School of Education and the University, and will do what you can to improve its work and enlarge its usefulness. Very cordially and sincerely yours, I Dean. 53 Dean George E. Payne EAN GEORGE E. PAYNE attained his Ph.D. degree from Bonn University, Bonn, Germany. . Before coming to New York his home was in Glasgow, Kentucky, but now the Yankee State claims him. He received his A.B. degree from the University of Chicago, and also is a member of Phi Beta Kappa. Dean Payne is Assistant Dean of the School of Education and is in charge of the curriculum instruction. He is editor-in-chief of the Educational journal of Sociology. Bibliography An Analysis for Practice in Health and Accident Prevention, A Complete Plan of School Instruction. in Accident Prevention, We and Our Health, four volumes fwith John D. McCarthyj, Principles of Educational Sociology, Health and Safety in the New Curriculum Qwith Dr. Louis C. Schroederj, Education in Accident Prevention, Educa- tion in Health, Education in Accident Prevention with Methods and Results, Method and Measurement of Health Education, Science Readers, Books I and II fwith Henry R. Barrows and Louis J. Schmerberj, Red Feather's Home Coming fwith Howard R. Driggsj, Red Feather's Adventures fwith Jane Giffordj, An Experiment in Alien Labor, Editor-in-chief, journal of Educational Sociology, Vol. I, II, III, Principles of Educational Sociology-an outline, Elementary Science Readers, Books III and IV fwith Henry R. Barrows and Louis Schmerberj, The Story of Aviation Qwith Henry Barrowsj. 34 Dean Millon Early Loomis EAN MILTON EARLY LOOMIS comes from Cleveland, Ohio, but now resides in Westheld, New jersey. Besides being a graduate of the Western Reserve University of Cleveland, where he received his A.B., he also received his A.M. from the University of Wisconsin. Dean Loomis is a member of the Phi Beta Kappa and Phi Delta Kappa fraternities. His associations with the school are varied. He is Assistant Dean in Charge of Business and Finance, a member of the Faculty Committee, Professor of Education, and a teacher in the field of Government in Department of Social Sciences. 35 Dr. Herman Harrell Horne GOOD man is always welcome, is a fitting manner of talking of Dr. Herman Harvell Horne, who came to New York University in 1909 as Professor of Philosophy and History of Education. Besides the position he still retains, Dr. Horne is a summer school lecturer, a member of committee on Graduate Standing and Instruction, and a member of the General Committee of the School of Education. He has written "The Philosophy of Education," and "The Psychological Principle of Education," and "Idealism in Education," besides many other books. The Doctor received his A.B., and A.M., from the University of North Carolina in 1895, both his A.M. and Ph.D. from Harvard and his L.L.D. from Wake Forest College, North Carolina. Besides being a member of the New York University Philosophical Society and an honorary member of the Menorah Society, he is a member of Phi Delta Kappa. 56 Professor Jay Bryan Nash ORTUNATELY for us, Professor jay Bryan Nash decided, in 1926, to leave Oak- land, California, where he had held various civic positions since 1911 and come to New York University. p Here, he has been both Associate Professor and Professor of Physical Education. In 1930, he became Professor of Education. In 1911, he received his A.B. from Oberlin and in 1927, his M.A. from New York University. At present, he is chairman of the Department of Physical Health Education and Editor of the Monograph Department, besides which he is a member of Phi Delta Kappa. Among the text-books he has written are: "Organization and Administration of Playground Recreation," and "Course of Study in Physical Education for Public Schools" which has been issued in five pamphlets. Frequently he contributes articles to the journal of American Physical Education Review, Camp News, and the North American Review. He lives in Long Island City at present, although his birth place is New Baltimore, Ohio. 57 Dr.'Ned Harland Dearborn R. NED HARLAND DEARBORN came to New York City from Couneauty- ville, Pennsylvania. He received his B.S. degree from Columbia University and his M.A. and Ph.D. from the same University. He is a member of the Kappa Delta Pi and Phi Delta Kappa fraternities and also of the Acacea Club, Columbia University. He is the director of the Institute of Educa- tion and Professor of Education. Dr. Dearborn 'is the author of the following: "Introduction to Teachingng "Oswego Movement in American Education"g the co-author of "Social Studies in Teachers' Col- lege and Normal Schools. I 58 Dr. Ambrose Leo Suhrie ORN in New Baltimore, Pa., Dr. Ambrose Leo Suhrie came to New York Uni- versity in 1924 from Cleveland, Ohio, where he had been the Head of the School of Education. In 1911, he received his A.M., and a year later his Ph.D., from the University of Pennsylvania, while six years previous, he had received his Ph.B. and his L.L.D. in 1919 from the john B. Stetson University. Besides belonging to a number of fraternities, Dr. Suhrie is the head of the Teachers College and Normal School Educational Division, President of the Eastern State Asso- ciation for Teachers which is a Regional Conference including hundreds of teachers from institutions in New England and the Middle Atlantic States, and is attended annually by 800 administrative oflicers, professors, teachers, and 1,500 students. Although the Editor of "New Possibilities in Education and Problems in Teacher Training," he is the author of two text-book series for Public Schools, "Experimental Determination of Educational Method." 59 Dr. Charles Emile Benson E may well feel proud to have had Dr. Charles Emile Benson with us for the past eight years. Born in the state of Iowa, he spent a good many years in Nebraska, in which University he received both his Bachelors and Masters degrees. His Ph.D. he received at Columbia in 1922. He spent a year in Washington, where he was Superintendent of Schools. Wliile living in Missouri, he was head of the Department of Psychology and Education, at the Teachers College, Cape Girardeau. He was Dean of the School of Education in the University of Oklahoma from 1922-23 and during the summer of that year, he was the director of the Summer Session. Since then, he has held various positions in the psychology department of New York University. He has been professor of Educational psychology and Mental Hygiene since 1925. At present he lives in Montclair, New Jersey, and commutes daily to and from school. 40 Professor Charles Edward Skinner ROFESSOR CHARLES EDWARD SKINNER resides in Leonia, New Jersey, hav- ing come there from Newark, Ohio. In 1914, he received his B.S. in Education from the University of Ohio. Two years later, the University of Chicago gave him his A.M., while in 1923, he got his Ph.D. from New York University. From 1922-1923, he was an instructor of Educational Psychology at New York University. For the next two years he was a Professor of Education at the Miami University, however, since then, he has been with us. Besides being the Chairman of the Faculty Committee in Student Affairs, he is a member of the Student Council and the Managing Editor of the Educational Service. With the collaboration of Gast, he has written "Phychology" and "Readings in Educational Psychology." He is the co-author and editor with Dean Withers and Miss Greks of "Story and Study Reading Series." 41 W Dr. Waller Barnles ROM Fairmont, West Virginia, came Dr. Walter Barnes in 1928 to New York University as Professor of English. Since then, Dr. Barnes has become Editor of the Educational Service and Faculty Advisor to the Education Violet Year Book. He has three degrees, each from a different University, an A.B. from the West Virginia University, an A.M. from Harvard, and a Ph.D. from New York University. He is a fraternity brother of all who belong to either Phi Kappa Psi, Phi Beta Kappa, or Phi Delta Kappa. Among the books he has written' are: "The Chi1dren's Poets," "Types of Children Literature," and "New Democracy in the Teaching of English." He was editor and com- piler of Palgraves' "Golden Treasury" in 1915. 42 Dr. John Elmer Nc-:Collins R. JOHN ELMER NECOLLINS comes from Colonial Hill, between Illinois and Wisconsin. However, he prefers to think of the latter as his home, since he spent most of his life there. He received his B.A. degree from the University of Wisconsin. He is a member of Delta Upsilon, Phi Delta Kappa and Sinfonia. Besides being the author of several Glee and Chorus books, Dr. NeCollins is the Director of the Bureau of Educational Service. 43 Dr. Philip Wesc:oH Lawrence Cox, Ph.D. R. PHILIP WESCOTT LAWRENCE COX came to New York University in 1925 as Professor of Secondary Education. His former home was in Malden, Massa- chusetts. He now resides in Maplewood, N. J. Dr. Cox belongs to Kappa Sigma, Kappa Delta Pi, Phi Delta Kappa and is an honorary member of Pi Gamma Mu. He received his A.B. and A.M. from Harvard and his Ph.D from Columbia. Dr. Cox is a member of the Advisory Committee of National Survey of Secondary Education and Chairman of Committee on Graduate Standing. He is also head of the Department of Secondary Education. He is author of the following books: "Curriculum Adjustment of Secondary Schools"g "Creative School Control"g "The Junior High School and Its Curriculumng "junior High School Practices" fwith Professor Langj. He is editor of the junior Senior High School Clearing House Magazines and Asso- ciate Editor of journal of Educational Research. 44 Dr. Willard P. Ashbrook R. WILLARD P. ASHBROOK resides at New Rochelle, New York. He received his B.P.E. from Springfield College. In 1930, New York University conferred upon him the doctorate degree. Dr. Ashbrook has his time pretty well taken up with various fraternal organiza- tions rhat he belongs to. He is a member of the Masonic Lodge, New York Physical Education Society and Phi Delta Kappa fraternity. Dr. Ashbrook has written the following articles: A Method of Selecting Students for Teacher Training in Physical Education, Training Recreation of Our Foremost Leaders, Value of Physical Education Courses to Teachers in the Profession, Stunts for Rainy Days, and Outline of Orientation Course for Major Students in Physical Education. Most professors and instructors have their pet saying and mottos. Here is Dr. Ashbrook's motto: "One more hill before I quit." 45 Mr. Frank Lloyd R. LLOYD hails from London, England, and has been at New York University since 1926, coming here from South Western College, Kansas, where he was Professor of Physical Education and Psychology. He received his B.S. in Physical Education in 1923 from Springfield College and then A.M. in 1924 from Clark University. Mr. Lloyd belongs to Pi Gamma Mu and Phi Delta Kappa fraternities. He is head of Curriculum on Physical Education, also teacher in Physical Education and Health. 46 Professor Malcolm Edgeworlh Li'H'le EVEN years ago, Professor Malcolm Edgeworth Little came here from Columbia Teachers' College to take charge of the Biological Sciences in the Department of Biology, in Washington Square College. Since then, he has helped actively in the Anatomy and Physiology and Elementary Biology divisions. His chief interest is research work in tissue drafting and thyroid. He has written a book relating to this subject called "Laboratory Manual in Comparative Anatomy." Born in Louisville, Georgia, he received his Masters and Bachelors degrees at Colum- bia University. At present he lives in Queens. 47 Floyd R. Eas'I'wood R. FLOYD EASTWOOD resides at Rochester, New York. He studied at Springfield College and was graduated in 1922 with the degree of B.P.E. He later studied at Clark University and at New York University, receiving his M.A. at the former institution. He will receive his Ph.D. from New York University in June. Mr. Eastwood is a member of the following fraternities: Kappa Phi, Kappa Delta Pi, Phi Delta Kappa. He is also aimember of the following societies: American Academy of Political and' Social Science, American Physical Education Association, National Education Association. P Notable among the articles he has had published is "A Study of Subject Matter, Material, and Methods in Health," which appeared in the journal of Educational Sociology in May, 1930. 48 John James Schoonhoven OHN JAMES SCHOONHOVEN has been a member of the New York University, School of Education faculty for one year and has proved both to his fellow members and students that he is capable of his position. He received his A.B. from St. Francis College in 1893 and his M.A. from St. Francis Xavier a year later. Mr. Schoonhoven did graduate work in Philosophy in New York University in 1908. Since 1921, however, he has been a member of the Research Information Service of National Research Council. He is a fellow of the Royal Microscopic Society of London, England. i At present, Mr. Schoonhoven is a teacher of Physiology of Activity and is the Graduate Advisor in Physiology. 49 Miss Margarui+e Hussey LTHOUGH a Californian previous to her coming to New York University, Miss Margaruite Hussey makes her home in Park Ridge, New Jersey. She is an honorary member of Kappa Delta Pi in Columbia University where she received both her B.A. and M.A. For several years, Miss Hussey was connected with the Department of Hygiene at Wesleyan. At New York University, she is in charge of the Health Program of the School of Education. 50 l Julian L. Archer R. ARCHER received his A. B. degree at Ohio University in 1921, and his Master's degree at Columbia, 1924. He is a member of one social fraternity, Theta Chi, and three honorary professional fraternities, Phi Delta Kappa, Kappa Delta Pi and Pi Gamma Mu. Before coming to New York University he was Associate Professor of Education at the Alabama Polytechnic Institute. His early experience was primarily in the field of secondary education in which he served as a high school instructor and vocational counsellor for three years and a high school principal for two years. 51 OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION OF THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION JOHN WILLIAM WITHERS, PH.D., LL.D ............................ Dean,' Dean of the Summer School ENOCH GEORGE PAYNE, PH.D ....,.....,............................................................................................ Afriftant Dean MILTON EARLY LOOMIS, A.M .......................,. AJ.ri.rtant Deany Director of the Summer School RALPH EDGAR PICKETT, PH.D .......... ............................................................ S ecretary of the Faculty JOHN ELMER NECOLLINS, A.B ...........,. .......... D irector of-the Bureau of Educational Service NED H. DEARBORN, PH.D ......,................ ,....'..... D irector of the Inftitute of Education ARTHUR DUDLEY WHITMAN, PH.D ......I..... ......................... S uperuifor of Student Teaching WILLIAM A. GORE, A.M ............,......,......... .,............ D irector of the Bureau of Appointments COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY The Dean, Assistant Deans, and Secretary are members, ex-ofiicio, of each committee DEAN WITHERS, Chairman ............ ...................,......................... ............... G e neral Committee ASSISTANT DEAN PAYNE, Chairman Committee on Undergraduate Adminion: and Student Standing MR. NECOLLINS, Chairman ,.....,....................... Committee on Educational Placement and Service PROFESSOR SKINNER, Chairman ...... Committee on Faculty, Student, and Alumni Relation: PROFESSOR SPEER, Chairman .....................,....,..................... Committee on Publication! and Publicity PROFESSOR COX, Chairman ....,..,, Committee on Graduate Admiffionf and Student Standing PROFESSOR SUHRIE, Chairman ..................... Committee on Curricular Adjuftment and Rezfifion PROFESSOR MEARNS, Chairman ..................,. ...................,..... C onlmittee on School Relations DEAN WITHERS, Chairman ............ ...,........ C ommittee on Building Planx 52 SENIORS A. Raymond Turpin UST as Zangwill called America the melting pot of nations, so may we Iittingly call New York University the melting pot of America-of American students. Eager to be melted and remelted to their ambitions, young men and women come here from all directions, North, South, East, and West. It is from the famous West where men are men and women, feminine--from Brush, Colorado, to be exact-that A. Raymond Turpin hails. He is verily a son of the West, tall, straight, and tanned by sun and winds. As to his past, he called Brush Union High School his alma mater. He also spent one year at Progressive Series Teachers' College, St. Louis, Missouri. Now in his senior year here, he is president of his class, Vice-president of the Sinfonia, and an active member of the Student Council as well as Kappa Phi Kappa. When Mr. Turpin receives his Bachelor of Science Degree in Music, he hopes to supervise the reaching of music in the public schools of New York. His favorite hobbies are going to musical concerts and seeing good plays-the ideal one being "Green Pastures." In the fields of sports he keenly enjoys tennis, baseball and basketball. He is an eager worker, always ready to give his time and energy to class problems. 54 The Class of l93l RADUATION is quickly approaching and soon the class of 1931 will leave the period of prepa- ration and enter the more serious business of life. Memories of friendships formed, obstacles met and over- come, and ambitions attained lit into a compact and harmonious whole-through which clearly shines the greatest asset of all-a lone and undying devotion to the traditions and ideals of the School of Education. The purpose of our class is to become men and women who will seek truth, resent injustice, and work with and for those intangible values of life about which the poets have sung and for which the prophets have president 1, 2, 3 died--in short, to serve humanity. L. HARIIINGTON Some may ask what did we do in our last year? Since we are Seniors, which means that we are wise and knowing in the customs of our school, we participated in all the activities in the form of socials, parties, Senior Week, Prom, and many minor affairs. Suffice it to say our school life will leave many memories with us of our trials and tribulations and as an incentive to greater heights this little hill we came over will serve a glorious purpose. 55 Auf Wiedersehn Like a ship we have been a-sailing, On a tempestuous andsometimes a calmer sea, Now we are soon to anchor, On a port for ambitious We. The waves are becoming calmer, The sky above is still blue, Reflections of the harbor Are like dreams which will surely come true. The four years of sailing have ended Our destination has been reached at last, But 'tis strange that the soft and rosy hue of the harbor Has disintegrated into its elements somber. Pray, permit not illusions to deceive us, Our journey has not culminated at this heterogeneous main Striving to reach the harbor has not been in vain For here are the proper constituents which by effort can ' be combined to suit our aim. SALLY LIPSCHUTZ 56 ABERNETHY, GRACE E. ADLER, JUDITH AFFELDER, KATHERINE Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science New York City New York City Pittsburgh, Pa. ALBRIGHT, EDITH A. ALEXANDER, VIOLA G. ALLYN, WILHEMINE E Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Easton, Pa. Brooklyn, N. Y. Goshen, Conn. Commercial Club, League of Woinen ' ' ' fig? 57 ANDERSON, LENA C. ANGELI., ALBERT D., Ir. ARTHUR, JESSIE Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Red Bank, N. J. Bloomfield, N. J. Marawan, N. J. BAKER, ROSCOE W. BAKERMAN, FLORENCE BALLEN, EVELYN Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Norfolk, N. Y. New York City Sag Harbor, N. Y. 58 pl S li' 5 V BANKS, MONTY BARRY, ANN MARIE BAUMEL, MORRIS Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Brooklyn, N. Y. Bridgeport, Conn. Ozone Park, N. Y. Varsity Basketball, '29, '39, '51 BERGMAN, ANNABELLE BERNSTEIN, FLORENCE BESSER, GLADYS L Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of- Science New York City New York City Ridgefield Park, N. J. Mathematics Club Y m 59 BETTINGER, SELMA S. BIRNS, ROSALIND BISSEL, CHARLES R. Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Brooklyn, N. Y. New York City New Brighton, S. I., N. Y Palette Club BOLLINGER, D. LUCILLE BORODKIN, MARIAN P. BOROW, JOSEPH Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science New York City Brooklyn, N. Y. Astoria, L. I. r I! 60 1 i ,z M -1 BORTELL, PEARL BRANDONISI, ALFRED A. BREITENBACH, RUTH A. Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Reading, Pa. Yonkers, N. Y. New York City N. Y. U. Physical Education Kappa Delta P.g Pi Lambda Lenders Corps. Thetag Newman Clubs-1950- 19313 League of Women, 1930-1931 BRODY, SYLVIA BROWN, ELIZABETH L. BROWN, MARTHA E. Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science New York City jamaica, N. Y. New York City Athletic Representative for the French Club, Dramatic So- School of Education cietyg 1927-1928-1929-19303 Palette Club, Vice-President 61 l BRUCH, WILLIAM U. BURNETT, EMILY MARIE CAESAR, TILLYE Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Little Neck, L. I. Brooklyn, N. Y. New York City League of Wcmmen fPrcs.J Commercial Teachers' Club CALLEY, RUTH A. CANEPA, GILDA CARD, RUTH PEDLEY Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Mountain Lakes, N. J. Brooklyn, N. Y. Elmhurst, N. Y. Newman Clubg League of Wfomen 62 CARR, THELMA CHARTOCK, SAMUEL Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Brooklyn, N. Y. New York City Commercial Teachers' Associa- tion: New York Univ. Daily Newsg Social Committee CIRELLI, ALBERT MARTIN CLARK, BERENICE Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Brooklyn, N. Y. New York City Kappa Delti Pi CHRISTIANSON. THEO. Bachelor of Science New York City CLEXWELL, MARGARET G. Bachelor of Science New Philadelphia, Ohio Home Economics Clubg Vice- President, New jersey State Club, 1930 l 6 3 COHEN, MILDRED COHEN, THEODORE COOK, DONALD K. Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Brooklyn, N. Y. New York City Hazleton, Penn. Z :D E all E Commercial Education Club Chorusg Bandg Orchestra: Student Director of Band 3 Sinfonia COOK, MARY COUNSELLOR, JAY R. CRESCIMANNO ,GRACE F Bachelor of Science New York City Bachelor of Science Brooklyn, N. Y. Physical Education Leaders Corpg Freshman Swimming Team Bachelor of Science Brooklyn, N. Y. Newman Club Home Economics Club 64 '-45? . , l CURTIS, MAUDE CUTTRIS, ELIZABETH L. CUVIELLO, JOSEPH M Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bridgeport, Conn. Newark, N. J. West New York, N. J. Orchestra 3 Sinfonia D'ALESANDRE, ELSIE E. DAVIS, ALYS LILLIE DAVIS, MARTHA W. Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science New York City Wliire Plains, N. Y. Wlmite Plains, N. Y. Italian Club "-S-5 65 DE HEGH, CLAUDE Bachelor of Science Woodridge, N J. DE MEO, PETER Bachelor of Science New York City DELEHANTY, SALLY G. Bachelor of Science Brooklyn, N. Y. President of Home Economics Club, Newman Club, League of Women Vice-President of Student Council, Feb.-june, 1930 DEMBITZ, LILLIAN Bachelor of Science Highland Falls, N. Y. Varsity Hockey Team DENKER, PAULINE DEUTSCHMAN, MIRIAM E Bachelor of Science Brooklyn, N. Y. New York City A if Menorah Society, Orchestra 66 DEVENDORF. EMMA E. Bachelor of Science Oswego, N. Y. DOBSON, DOROTHY C. Bachelor of Science Niagara Falls, N. Y. all A Vice-President Onimod, '28 '29, '30, '31g Senior Dance Committee, '30g Chairman Onimod Spring Dance, '30g Chairman Onimod Thanksgiv- ing Dance, '30 DINGER, KATHERINE Bachelor of Science Port Richmond, N. Y. Newman Clubg Secretary of Soph Classy League of Women DOLINER, HENRY Bachelor of Science Brooklyn, N. Y. DJORUP, HAROLD Bachelor of Science Brooklyn. N. Y. Q X Kappa Phi Kappa DOUGLASS, GRACE A Bachelor of Science Suffern, N. Y. 67 DUNCAN, LUCY AGNES DVORYAK, GEORGE W. EATON, FLORENCE P Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science South Cairo, N. Y. ' Farrell, Pa. Raleigh, N. C. Violet Literary Staff Palette Club EPNER, MORRIS l-IYMAN EPSTEIN, ETI EPSTEIN, KATHERINE Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Brooklyn. N. Y. Bronx, N. Y. C. New York City l Tennis, Golf l l l 68 FEINSTEIN SAMUEL FELDMAN, WILLIAM FERGUSON, ERNEST Bachelor otf Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Brooklyn, N. Y. Broolilyn, N. Y. New York City u B A Glee Clubg Varsity Showg N. Y. U. "Gaines" FERRITER, HELEN FIEDLER, WILLIAM G. FINKELSTEIN, TOBIAS Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Connecticut Union City, N, J. Brooklyn, N. Y. Phi Delta Kappa Commercial Teachers' Club Summer School Frolic Comm. l 69 FISHER, ANNE E. Bachelor of Science Corona, N. Y. League of Womeng Dancing Clubg Italian Clubg Menorah FOLEY, CATHERINE M. Bachelor of Science Scranton, Pa. Newman Clubg Home Eco- nomics Club 3 FISHER, MARION G. FLANAGAN, C. E. Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Rochester, N. Y. Newburgh. N. Y. UFORBES, VIRGINIA ERIEDMAN, ANN E Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science New York City Brooklyn, N. Y. 70 YLVIA M FREYDBERG BESSIE MAE GAMBERTON, RHODA B FRIEDMAN, S . , Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Yonkers, N. Y. Granville, N. Y. Passaic, N. j. GARDNER, HELEN M. GEATING, EDNA MAY GILBERT, HAROLD J. Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Flushing, N. Y. Ashland, Pa. Brooklyn, N. Y. Home Economics Clubq League Palette Club? Aff History of Womeng Newman Club Groupg Christian Association 4 -W 71 GILLINGI-IAM, D. C. GLASER, MORRIE GLATTER, WILLIAM Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Atlantic City, N. j. New York City Brooklyn, N. Y. Sinfoniag Band Rifle Teamg Glee Cluh GEATZEL, ANNE F GOLDEN, CLARA K. GOLDFARB, DORA Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Paterson, N. J. Bronx, N. Y. C. Rutherford, N. J. , Home Economics Club 2 . 72 GOLDFEDER, HILDA Bachelor of Science Brooklyn, N. Y. President, Woinen's Physical Educ. Organizationg Member of Student Councilg Varsity Hockey Teamg Health Service Committeeg Advertising Com- mittee of Violet, 1931 GREENBERG, ISABELLE Bachelor of Science Bronx, N. Y. GOLDMAN, BENJAMIN Bachelor of Science New York City GREENBERG, R. BIBBY Bachelor of Science Brooklyn, N. Y. i GOTTLIEB, DIANE New York City Bachelor of Science League of Wfomeng Commer- cial Teachers Ass'ng Commer- cial Students Club GREGORY, ESTHER G. Bachelor of Science Princeton, N. J. Home Economics Club 75 GROSS, CLAIRE Bachelor of Science New York City GROSSMAN, IRVING Brooklyn, N. Y. Bachelor of Science School of Education, Track Manager, '30 Varsity Gym Tc-am I. GUNDERSDORF, A. J Bachelor of Science Union City, N. J. Sinfonia HANSON, ADELAIDE E. HARVEY, LORETTA T. HECHT, IRVIN Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bloomfield, N. j. Elizabeth, N. J. Bronx, N. Y. Alumni Association 74 L O l HERSCHER, EMANUEL HESSION, MAE RICE HOLMES, LINCOLN W. Bachelor of Science, B. C. S. Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Far Rockaway, N. Y. Denver, Colorado Huntington, N. Y. HOROWITZ, MORRIS HOWARD, GLADYS KING HOWELL, EVELYN R. Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Augusta, Maine Brooklyn, N. Y. Newark, N. J. Commercial Teachers Club School of Education Basket- ballg Leaders Corps L l 7 5 i ,wi l HURST, KATHERINE A. L. HUTTEMEYER, H. F. JACOBS, JOHN T. Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science New York City Wallkill, N. Y. Bench Grove, Tenn. Alumni Association JACOBS, LILLIAN JOHNSON, ELIZ. W. KANTOR, JULIUS Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science New York City I Jamaica, L. I. Brooklyn, N. Y. 76 KAPLAN, LILLIAN PEARL KAPLAN, MAX KARASIK, LEO Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bayonne, N. J. Brooklyn, N. Y. Brooklyn, N. Y. Menorah Societyg Orchestra Glee Clubg Bandg Orchestra School of Educariong Track Team KARFIOL, SELMA RUTH KATZ, SAMUEL KAUEMAN, SHIRLEY Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Wlhitestone, L. I. Brooklyn, N. Y. Brooklyn, N. Y, Sec. of League of Women '28g Com. Teachers Club L l Y l 77 KAVIER, ROSE KELDER, MONICA BUSH KENNELL, ARTHUR F. Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science New York City Coytesville, N. j. New York City 2 '-D B Vice-President Ph. Education Student Organization and Sen ateg Senior Prom Committee Vice-President Senior Class President Phys. Educ. Dept 2 years KELLY, M. AGNES KIRNAN, FLORENCE M. KLATZMAN, ABRAM Bachelor of Science Master of Arts Bachelor of Science Yardley, Pa. Brooklyn, N. Y. Brooklyn, N. Y. Graduate Clubg Alumni Assoc. Leaders Corp. fr- Q if - 78 KLAW, MILTON S. KOFFLER, JACK KOPOLOV, SARAH Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science New Brighton, S. I. New York City Far Rockaway, N. Y. KOWSKY, ESTELLE D KRAMER, C. R. KRINSKY, LEON, U. Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Brooklyn, N. Y. New York City Brooklyn, N. Y, Vice-President junior Class School of Education Basket 313 Honorary Varsity Soccer ball, '50-'51, Senior Class Team Basketball, '31g Basketball, junior Class, '30 79 KUPFER, IRVING, KWIAT, LOUISE FRIEDA ' LAGOT, RAFAEL Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Brooklyn, N. Y. North Bergen, N. II. Arroyo, Porto Rico N. Y. U. Band LANDERS, MARIE LANDON, ELIZABETH J. LA PORTA, JOHN Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Brooklyn, N. Y. Binghnnipron, N. Y. New York City 80 I, LERNER, ZULIE 'LESKO, iALBERT JOHN ' LEVIN, ETHEL Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Brooklyn, N, Y, Wallington, Pa. New York City Delta Mu Delta LEVINE, YETTA LINDSLEY, BEATRICE L. LOPMAN, SHULAMITH Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Brooklyn, N. Y. Binghamton, N, Y. Vlfalton, N. Y. Menorah Society 1927-28 Deutscher Verein 81 LITTMAN, HERMAN LOCILENTE, ADELINE LONGO, ANNA JOANA Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Brooklyn, N. Y. Brooklyn, N. Y. Brooklyn. N. Y. 'lf E T T Q ll' School of Education Basket- ball Teamg Wash. S. Col. Baseball Teamg Memcber of Physical Educ. Leaders Corps LUCY, LEROY JOHN . Bachelor of Science New Paltz, N. Y. LYNCH, MARGARET V. Bachelor of Science New York City Assistant in Student Activities of N. Y. U.5 President of League of Women Commit- tee of N. Y. U., 1930-51g Vice-President of League of Women Committee of N. Y. U., 1929-19303 Member of Home Economics Clubg Sec. of Home Economics Club, 1928-293 Member of League of Women ' MAGEE, EILEEN Bachelor of Science New York City S2 MAGNA, HENRY JOHN MALESON, ROSE Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Brooklyn, N. Y. West New York, N. J. MANTZ, HAROLD C. MARSHALL, LOUISE Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Orwigsburg, Penn. New York City Kappa Phi Kappa ' Sr. Class Treasurerg Art Edit- ' or, Education Violet, 1931g Ominod Club MALLEY, KATHLEEN Bachelor of Science New York City MATEOSIAN, FLORENCE Bachelor of Science Teaneck, N. J. Member of The Armenian Club 4 l 83 MATTHEWS, JOSEPH P. MATTER, RUTH VIRGINIA Bachelor of Science New York City MCCALLUM, GLADYS Bachelor of Science Millburn, N. I. Bachelor of Science East Orange, N. J. MCCARTHY, ETHEL IRENE Bachelor of Science Yonkers, N. Y. fl? A Newman Clubg League of Womeng Usher during Regis- tration MATTICE, GORDON W Bachelor of Science New York City MCDONALD, DOUGLAS Master of Arts New York City 84 MCGEE, RAE MCKINLEY, JOHN LARRY MCNABB, ANNA VIOLA Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Jackson Heights, L, I. Richmond, Va., Newark, N, J, fp A New York City Newman Clubg League of Varsity Track and Boxing Womeng Home Economics Squad Club MCPARLAN, CATHLEEN M. MEGLATHERY, NORMAN IWERCER, MADELON New York City Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bethlehem, Pa. Lanclenberg, Pa. Secretary, Palette Club Gym Team 1? 85 MEYERSON, LILLIAN Bachelor of Science Brooklyn, N. Y. MILLER, TILLIE Bachelor of Science New York City MICHNOFF, RUTH A. Bachelor of Science Brooklyn, N. Y. Commercial Education' Associ- ationg Social Committee Fresh- Year, N. Y. U. Daily News MINACCI, FENN Bachelor of Science Cunnan, Conn. Philadelphia, Pa. MILLER, MARJORIE Bachelor of Science Irvington, N. -I. MOAT, ELLEN MORRIS Bachelor of Science Spring Valley, N. Y. New Hartford, N. Y. 86 MOLLER, CHARLOTTE A. MRAZ, ANN MUCHNICK, ALEX Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Crestwood, N. Y. Winheld, L. I. Brooklyn, N. Y, NEUNER, ULRICH, JOHN NEWBERRY, INEZ NEWTON. GRACE Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Port Chester, N. Y. West New Y0fk, N- J- New York City A Z E Commercial Club: Alumni Association I L NIEBUHR, JOHN NUSSENBAUM, FRANCES OREMLAN FREDA Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Brooklyn, N. Y. Bridgeport, Conn. New York City Menorah Societyg Commercial Education Club ORR, ADA OSLANKER, PAULINE PAGE, GLADYS CLAY Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Gloversville, N. Y. New York City Bridgeport, Conn. 88 PAUMEL, MORRIS PARAGUS, ALICE PASNIK, HELEN Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Sqif-nge Ozone Park, N. Y. Bafyonne, N. J. Bronx, N, Y, League 0 Women, Newman Clubg Glee Club PAULSON, ELIZABETH J. PEACE, JAMES S. PIERCY, WILLIAM Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Cliffside, N. J. College Point, N. Y. Brooklyn, N, Y, Sec. Ed. Ass.g Newman Club 89 PIRHALLA, JOHN J., jr. POPS, BEATRICE LEONIE POVISH, S. GEORGE Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Duquesne, Pa. Bronx, N. Y. Shamokin, Pa. A LID A K 1' QUINN, KATHLEEN RAIFMAN, MARCIA REESE, LOUISE ROSE Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science New York City Brooklyn, N. Y. jersey City, N. J. Home Economics Clubg League of Women 90 REID, WILLIAM E. REVHEIM, GUNI-IILDE RICHARDS, ALTON Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Brooklyn, N. Y. Brooklyn, N. Y. Astoria, L, I, RICI-ITER, MIRIAM RIGGER, HANNAH RISISKY, NATHAN Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Mount Vernon, N. Y. Binghamton, N. Y. Bridgeport, Conn. f ,l 91 RJAWSKY, JOHANNA ROBINSON, STELLA ROBINSON. SYLVIA Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science New York City Brooklyn, N. Y. Brooklyn, N. Y. Commercial Teachers Clubg Social Problems Club ROHRBACHER, RUTH ROLF, MARGARET F. ROSENBAUM, FLORENCE Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science New York City New York City New York City Swimming 92 ROSEMAN, MIRIAM Bachelor of Science L. I., N. Y. RUBIN, BEN Bachelor of Science Pittsburgh, Pa. Band, I928"31Q A. Capella Choir, 1930-'31g Dramatic Society, 1928 8 ROSENBERG, CLARA ROTI-I, CLARA ROSE Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Brooklyn, N. Y. Long Beach, N. Y. Commercial Teachers Assoc.g Member of Delta Mu Delta Commercial Students Club RUDERMAN. LILLIAN IDA RYAN, THERESA CLAIRE Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Somerville, N. J. Goshen, N. Y. 93 ::!3..-- . SARGOOD, ADELAIDE M. Bachelor of Science New York City Home Economics Clubg League of Women SCHADEL, JOSEPH C. Bachelor of Science East Orange, N. J. Sinfonia Band 1, 2, 3, 4g Business Manager of Year Bookg Ed. Violet Scrollg Assistant Man- ager of N. Y. U. Band 2, 3 SALTMAN, ALEX SADOVSKY, HANNAH Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Seattle, Wash. New York City O A T Southern Club Sinfonia SCHLEPP, RUTH CAROL SCHLESINGER, LILLIAN Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Brooklyn, N. Y. West New York, N. J. 91 SCHLESINGER, SELMA SCHOR, ANNA Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science New York City New York City 5, T A Dramatic Clubg Menorah SCHUMAN, HANNAH SCHWEITZER, CARL Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science New York City Brooklyn, N. Y. 95 SCHROEDER, HELEN A. Bachelor of Science Brooklyn, N. Y. Varsity Hockey, 1929-1930 Varsity Hockey Captain, 1930 19315 Intra-mural Basketball 1929-1950 SCOTT WILLIAM C. Bachelor of Science Union City, N. J. Manager of Gymnastic Team, 1950-31g Gym Squad, 1929-30 SEIDMAN, HENRIETTA A. SHACHTER, JOSEPH Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science New York City Brooklyn, N. Y. SHAPIRO, MORRIS SHEIB, IRVING ISRAEL Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science BF00klYI1, N. Y. Chatham, N. J. Radio Clubg Medley Contrib- utorg Spanish Cluhg Thomas Cluhg Liberal Club M. .1 ff, tw. SHARHOLTZ, SERENA Bachelor of Science New Brunswick, N. J. Circulating Committee of Vio letg Physical Education Organ izationg League of Women SHURBERG, SARAH Bachelor of Science New Britain, Conn. gl - I l 96 1 SIEGAL, PEARL SILVERMAN, ALTER SIRKIN, BELLE PHYLLIS Bachelor of Science Brooklyn, N. Y. Bachelor of Science Bronx, N. Y. Bachelor of Science New York Qity Commercial Teachers Assoc. Deutscher Vereing Treasurer Dramatic Society of Menorah SMITH, L. GERALDINE SPAHR, CLAYTON M. SPAR, SALLY MYRA Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Brooklyn, N. Y. Lancaster, Pa. Elizabeth, N. J. Bachelor of Science A Z A Senior Representativeg Co - Editor Physical Educ. Paperg Varsity Hockey Teamg Photo- graphic Committee of Violet 97 STEINBUCH, MARION M. STEINHARDT, JOSEPH H. STERRITT, ELIZABETH C Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Hollis, N. Y. New York City Clifton, N. J. STIT'I', LAWRENCE C. STORM, HAROLD C. SWANSON, KATHRYN C. Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Altooina, Pa. Pleasant Valley, N. Y. Brooklyn, N. Y. Sin onia 98 TARVIN, BESSIE TERRY, LAURA GRACE THOMAS, FLORENCE M. Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Brooklyn, N. Y. Yonkers, N. Y. New Castle, Pa. Vice-President Women's P. E. League of Women, School of Organizationg Student Council Education, 2 years Orchestra, Women's Physical Educational 1928-1931 Organ'ng Circulation Commit- tee of Violet, Social News of Physical Education Paper THOMPSON, JOHN E. TOBIN, DOROTHEA E. TRIFSHICK, SARAH Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Brooklyn, N. Y. Elmhurst, N. Y. New York City Secretary Soph Class 99 TROXELL, CLIFFORD F. TRUMBULL, CHRISTINE E. TUNNER, ETTA S. Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Allentown, Pa. Bernarclsville, N. J. Roselle, N. J. Sinfonia TURPIN. A. RAYMOND UNTERFORT, HENRY H. VAN BURKALOW, E Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science B1'ush, Colorado New York City New York City Kappa Phi Kappa Z B T Senior Class President, Student Trackg Varsity Show Councilg Vice-President, Sinfonia V l l 100 VARNI, AGNES DOLORES Bachelor of Science Newark, N. J. Onimod Club, '28-'29, New- man Club, '30-'31g President Women's Physical Education Organization, '29-'50g Mem- ber Student Council, '29-'30, Representative to National P. E. Convention, '30g Chairman of Committee for Revision of Curriculum, '30 WAGNER, MAMIE Bachelor of Science New York City VOLLMER, MARGUERITE Bachelor of Science New York City League of Wfomeng Violet Scroll WAITE, HAROLD E. Bachelor of Science Hazleton, Pa. Sinfonia Band, fi Years VREELAND, ALPERT Bachelor of Science Rocky Hill, N. J. Kappa Phi Kappa G X Freshman Football, '271 Fresh- man Track, '28g Varsity Track, '29 WALTER, ISABELL Bachelor of Science New York City Senior Editor of Education Violet 101 WEED, RUTH BUDD WEILL, DAVID WEINSTEIN, JOSEPH B. Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Norwalk, Conn. New York City Brooklyn, N. Y. Recording Secretary of The Industrial Arts Club of N.Y.U. WEINSTEIN, RUTH P. WEISSENBERG, ANITA WELCH, DOROTHY M. Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Brooklyn, N. Y. Corona, N. Y. Brooklyn, N. Y. Z KD League of Wonmeng Dancing Varsity Hockey, junior Class Physical Education Organiza- Classg Menorah, Italian Club Basketball Team tiong Varsity Soccer Team, '29g Violet Photo Committee 102 WELSCHER, IRVING WENTWORTH, CATH. L. WERNER, HELEN Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Brooklyn, N. Y. East Orange, N. J. Bridgeport, Conn. Vice-President Home Econom- Commercial Education Club ics Club, 19303 Secretary of Menorah WHELAN, RUTH HELENA Bachelor of Science Newark, N. J. 2 G B Member of League of Women 3 Member of Daughters of American Revolution Senior Class, 1931 WHITE, CLIFFORD C. WHYTE, DAVID Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Oscawana-on-Hudson, N. Y. Firthcliffe, N. Y. l 103 WILGARD, TILDA WILLIAMMEE. WILLA C. WILSON, GRACE Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Brooklyn, N. Y. Claysville, Pa. Brooklyn, N. Y. Commercial Teachers' Club WINTER, MAXINE P. Bachelor of Arts Muskegon Heights, Mich. WITZIG, I-IERMAN, jr. Bachelor of Science Union City, N, J. Captain, Varsity Gymnastic Team, 1929-'30-'31g Intercol- legiate All-Around Gymnastic Champion, 1929-'30-'31, U. S. Olympic Team, '28 104 WOLDMAN, JENNIE Bachelor of Science Brooklyn, N. Y. E E T WOKODARSKY, JANET WOOD, LILA WRIGHT, IMORE P. Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Brooklyn, N. Y. Flushing, L. I., N. Y. DeLand, Florida Home Economics Clubg Ram eses Club WRIGHT, WILI FRED L. Bachelor of Science Franklinville, N. Y. YANSON, MARGARET E. J. Bachelor of Science Long Island City, N. Y. l 105 YARRICK, ELSIE Bachelor of Science jersey City, N. J. W W7 YOUST, LILLIAN OTTUN ZALOWITZ, MURRAY D. ZANDRI, LEVIO G, Bachelor of Science Brooklyn, N. Y. ZIMLICHMAN, LOUIS Bachelor of Science Brooklyn, N. Y. Menorah Society, Social Prob- lem Clubg Philosophical Soci etyg Commercial Teachers Club Ph.G., Ph.C. Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Ridgefield, Conn. Elizabeth, N. J. Dialecticg Violin ZIMMERMAN ROSE R. ZUCKER, S. STANLEY Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science New York City New York City 106 , '-A I 4 x' ,y 3 av 'V n. . .QP "Q 'fgxi X ' A 'V ' ,NS- N gs' nyc, - .9 l 1 I 4 - 2. H Jia' :J 5 . A15 Y' ,Q 'K N 133 V5 .919 Xu 1 .V-L.. . -.- . : " ' ,U m .4 '41, V f' ' 'Q V. M V .5 I 5 Q , A ct ' v iw' 4' al '1 'r 5 r 1- , ., , , U. + J, I. 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PTE " i ' " 28' " 1' Aw, , '. arf f- . 1 'Vw A V Ve: r' 4,3 I, V, 4 "Z, v'-IV' ' ' , .' lx , ' ' V 'r W'JYf1ihiNllr,AA .I ' t"mx14- Q' 41' ' 1' 1 M -' f, 'P.ef-Vvfgrwi.,-. -,gn V , ,- , Q- -. K VV V ' , V-'I " .aw---v!,.V... .-'L ' ,' -1, " " ' f X '- '-1' V-V -ner' -1, ' ,'n'V,-'1fvV"u.-V.'V J- - .- 1 ,'j'-'4YJ"f-I.v.?'. .J.u:1-,:Vvf.?z'E.. ?'f..4gf,-fu ! X 71" ,., !. 5, A " " c,E51. - -Ewa ' - - -. -,m f g Z1 , ,.,..,r 1,4 , - ,' ' ' .' " E 3. J ..,.-, ,: . L - - 1 - 1 V V -V V V V N, . 'ff V -nl V. V .V -.ny 1 :y,3.,wx :v.1w.1:--,VV-V.-.',.' V -1 ,. -- V, , ,. , - V --U, V.: -'-F. -.4 JK"-X"'4":Q,.1.k 1 '1q':+.-.AV "1 Viwl- nf f' - -1- , .., ve-1 . ,Q V VV.. V 15 V,-My..QM,Lg,q.V-V,-qpgggggggft,,4.s,? ...HQ . CLASSES Murray Waller Goldenberg BORN leader is rare. The junior Class of the School of Education is fortunate to have such a man for its president. He is Murray Walter Goldenberg. He hails from New Utrecht High, where he left a long record of activities. He has wisely continued this program at college. Some of his activities are: N. Y. U. Varsity Boxing and Soccer Teams, coach of the Physical Education Boxing Club, Editor-in-Chief of the Education Violet, and President of the Violet Scroll. In athletics he has been active in football, basketball, track, and baseball. Athletics, however, are not his sole interest. In fact, he may be classed as one of those versatile individuals who balance their daily program with a variety of wholesome pursuits. Science holds a keen fascination for him. At one time he worked as a pharmacist. john Dewey is his favorite author, the study of philosophy, the occupation of his leisure hours. With his time so closely limited, Mr. Goldenberg finds ample opportunity to romp with the bevy of youngsters who are happy to call him uncle. He is a Brooklynite, a lover of home and children. We are not crystal gazers, but we can predict that the Education juniors, with so able a leader, will climb to hitherto unartained achievement. 108 Junior Class President ...,................ .......,,...A.......................................... M URRAY W. GOLDENBERG Vice-President ........................... ..................,...................... A NN RUPP Secrelary and Treasurer '.........,,.. ...................... M IRIAM PEARLMAN Faculty Advisor ...................................,...........................,...................,... DR. CHARLES E. PIEPER HE junior Class is open to all students of junior standing in the various departments of the School of Education. The club aims to promote friendship among the class- mates and to bring the students in the departments of the school in contact with each other socially. Plans are made for holding meetings every other Wednesday, alternating with socials. For the first time in the history of the School of Education a junior Prom was given this year. Those in charge of the Prom were: William Dyckes, chairmang assist- ing him are Sarah Kapalov, Biagina Migliore, Miriam Pearlman, Vincent Reilly, Irving Reich, Edward Solotar. The junior Class undertook the responsibility of compiling the first Senior Year Book of the School of Education-namely, the "Education Violet." judging from the activities of the class, it is agreed upon that the junior Class is the most active of all classes in the School of Education. This makes them sure of their lofty perch on the top rung of next year's ladder. 4 109 Junior Promenade V ARCH 6, 1931 is a date that will be long remembered in the School of Educa- tion. It was on that date that the first successful class formal was held. The Juniors, Class of '32, turned out 104 strong to celebrate the event. At 9:30 P.M., the festivities began. The receiving line, composed of Dean and Mrs. Payne, Miss Vollmer, Mr. McDonald, Mr. Murray W. Goldenberg, Miss Lipschitz, Miss Migliore and Mr. William Dykes, welcomed the guests as they arrived. Dancing started almost immediately to the tuneful offerings of the Hotel Hollywood Orchestra. Every one entered the spirit of the occasion and things buzzed along merrily. At a quarter to twelve the floor was cleared while the tables were set and the com- mittee placed the favors. At midnight, Mr. Edward Solotar conducted the promenade which was led by Dean and Mrs. Payne. Much to Ed's embarrassment, he and Miss Migliore, as the most popular couple of the class, had to pass through the gauntlet formed by the rest of the guests. Then all went to their respective places and stood to sing the "Palisades," - At the conclusion of the meal, Mr. William Dyckes, as chairman, welcomed the guests and introduced as the Speakers of the evening, Dean Payne, who congratulated the class for its spirit and cooperation in inaugurating this custom, Miss Vollmer, who expressed pleasure at the success of the affair, and Mr. Goldenberg, the class president, who complimented the class on its social and scholastic activities. Then one by one the members of the committee were introduced to the group: Miss Migliore, in charge of guests, Miss Perlman, publicity, Miss Rupp, hotel arrangements, Mr. Reilly, favors, Mr. Reich, program, and Mr. Solotar, music. The tables were removed immediately following the speeches and dancing was continued. judging from the expressions and actions of the promenaders everybody had an enjoyable time. One even went so far as to state that the school would never be able to duplicate the affair, but wait till the Senior Prom! ! ! 110 Ira Zasloff FTER much persuasion on the part of a reporter, Ira Zasloff, a prominent Sophomore of the School of Education was at last cornered and he consented to grant an interview. Mr. Zasloff is a regular New York University man, having finished the pre-collegiate course which the school offers and then immediately having entered the School of Education, where he has been for two years. As a Freshman, 1929-1930, he was a student delegate to the Physical Education Senate, and with the insignia of Sophomore placed upon him, he entered into various other positions such as: President of the Sophomore Class and Treasurer of the Physical Education Senate. He is a member of the Kappa Phi Kappa, Sigma Tau Phi, and the Education Violet Scroll. Upon receiving his Bachelor of Science in Physical Education, he will go into health work. He is an eager participant in Sophomore class activities, sincere in his duties to the class which he has served to the utmost of his ability. 111 Sophomore Class NE of the most progressive organizations of the School of Education is the Sophomore Class. The officers are: Preridenl ........................ ...........,.............................. ......................... M R . IRA ZAsLoFF Vic-e-Preridefzf ..,,,...... ............ M R. ERNEST FALKOWITZ Secretary .............,........... .............,,...... M iss HELEN GEtsT Faculty Spomor '............ ..........................................................................,......... D R. N. ANDREWS The organization is composed of approximately 300 members. Meetings are held every other Tuesday. The meetings usually take the form of a social, but the business affairs are transacted. The main purposes of the Sophomore class organization is to get the sophomores acquainted, to assure school spirit, and to promote pleasant social relationships. The class was organized in September, 1929. At its first meeting, it succeeded in interesting a large number of the group. The class displayed much enthusiasm by attending the activities for that year, namely: the Freshman Acquaintance Dance, Christmas Dance, and Farewell Dance. The spirit after that semester did not waiver, and the class continued to carry on with success, but it was surpassed by their colorful and cheerful Hallowe'en Dance. Their opening welcome dance was the gala affair of this year. It was a faculty- sophomore dance, given for the purpose of acquainting and promoting friendship be- tween the professors and the sophomore students. It may readily be said that the sophomore class is showing much school spirit. It is aggressive and successful in all its undertakings. 112 l Samuel Gelman HERE is something shady about Samuel Gelman, president of the Freshman class- it is almost immoral to chalk up an A in both activities and chemistry, but this paragon of all virtues achieved that somewhat difficult feat. His early metamorphosis is beclouded. It is problematical from whence he ema- nates, but one sees in him a still existent affinity with the drifters from the Bowery, and in his discourses with them in the vicinity of the Student Building, there is a familiarity that bespeaks more than a vicarious knowledge of these gentlemen of leisure. "My early education, or lack of it," said Mr. Gelman, "was obtained at Stuyvesant High School." And what activities did you participate in," we pursued. Our modest Mr. Gelman shifted from one leg to the other, smiled and after a cross-examination that would put Mr. Steuer to shame, we finally drew from the Frosh president that he was actively engaged in football, baseball, track and swimming. He is reserved and serious at times, and at others, his boisterous mien is irrepres- sible. We have it on good authority that he spends his summers keeping people from drowning at Coney Island. He is somewhat timid of the opposite sex, does not dance socially, but wears blue shirts and ties, is a congenial sort of person, and girls, he isn't at all bad looking. 113 Freshman HE welcome the Frosh class received from the School of Education was a never-to- be-forgotten affair. Starting with the registration period, the incoming students experienced contact with the faculty-a very hurried contact-and after walking around and around with papers, books, and registration forms, the students were registered and started upon their college career. e Frosh of the.School of Education missed the traditional form of welcome, but what they missed was compensated by other activities. The Physical Education organiza- tion welcomed their Frosh, with a dance. The Student Council arranged teas and afternoon dances. The Student Building housed many Frosh in the company of their classmates and upper-classmen. The activities of the Health Service were directed at the Frosh under the care of Doctors Lawton, Berg, Hanson and Twiss. The Athletic Bureau arranged physical activities in which Frosh participated. A wonderful welcome from the first day! A great future is in store for the Frosh class if they carry on as they have begun With these leaders to guide them they have a good start for the year. ' 114 . ,IV -.5 -. .ini Ik. f-. .4 4. 1 .1 ' -I I f 'JL In Q. dz' 4-I-' V .ff l ,V4 4 .I u K I 1 I-1 a w. .'..': fnfrnb :Q .. ,V 1 1 A .f. . . . " -- ..., , , 4:-4-4, A 1444 '42 -4 . , Q 4, - va.. -:, 5..?1:f"'-'j.'..'-IH' 154 .4 . .f- 5.4427 4 '-1. 4 4 4 4 .Q . V- .. 4 .- ..g: 1,-,qi 4. , ..,:V V 1 --'Qz ,' A - - J ' fig, .'u. I. 11 ,II I,I?wI.f',-if 4::'Q'-- 'I 'E?.Z'y- j TQ Jw'-t',:r , If-Vg . r 4151. 'QV 'I ,'5-,- If 54. I , V4Ik .,V V3,..'iI,. fy! ' . I if. jar: I ' f,.VgS4-', AVQILQVQQ: V 4 V :44..gx V. .4 VM l , 5: , 0 .L4HV.j,5V I..-VV ,V. 4 I... CV V, V .444 5 ,QI-E I 11.94 . MA. ,YI -! .-t il, 1-"f: '44 ,-I ',fbf.,g., tw- 1315151 I5's.5..g, x5.4-4':5wifg,' - I 4. 44:.::.e-: 44:4 . 41.4.4 .W-I. ,QS .,,. ., r' , . .,: .,. 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ACTIVITIES Sfudenl Council HE Student Council of the School of Education is a co-ordinating agency which has for its purposes cooperation between the Faculty and promotion of Student Activities. Membership is awarded in the form of a representative from each recognized and approved body of students. The council has the interest of the student body at heart. It carries on social activities, health service and educational service and has charge of the Students' Building. It is a capable body, headed by energetic officers. 'K Alumni Association .....,.......,............ .,...,........ I DA ST. JOHN OYE Commercial Teacher's Club ............ ....l............. P ETER AGNEW Graduate Club ......................,....,....... ....................l..,............... L EWIS ELHUFF Home Economics Club .............. .,,......,...................... S ALLY DELEHANTY Junior Class .................................... .,............ M URRAY W. GOLDENBEIIG Kappa Delta Pi ....................,. ,.......................... S AMUEL A. PETERS League of Women ...,.,........,......... ......,...................... E MILY BURNETT Men's Physical Ed. Org ............ .......... R ICHARD BLECHSCHMIDT Palette Club ..........................,,,...... ,...................... M ILTON STORCK Phil Delta Kappa ....,............. ...,...,.... H ERBIERT D. HARPER Pi Lambda Theta ............. .........,.,..,,........ R UTH FITZELL Senior Class ..............., ..............,.... R AYMOND TURPIN Sinfonia ....................,.. ............. H AROLD LUCKSTONE Sophomore Class .,,,.......................... ............................. I RA ZASLOFF Southern Club .......................,................. ,.....,.....,,..,... L . PAUL MILLER Women's Physical Ed. Org .....................,,...... ..............,..,...... H ILDA GOLDFEDER Secretary of Student Affairs .................,.....,..,,..... ............ M ARGUERITE VOLLMER Faculty Committee on Student Affairs ............ Administration ...........,..,.,.............................,,...,,............ OFFICERS Prarldefzt ................ . .............,.......................,,... . Vive-Prefideni ......... Secrelary ................. Treafllrer ......... 117 ............CHARLIES E. SKINNER ............MILTON E. Loomis ............HERBERT D. HARPER .......................GORDON E. BAILEY ,,..........MARGVUERlTE VOLLMER .............LEsL1E HARRINGTON Alumni Associaiion Object--The object of the association is the cultivation of fraternal intercourse among its members, and the advancement of the honor and interests of New York University Alumni. The Alumni Association was organized in 1927 under the leadership of Dr. john Loftus, Principal of Public School No. 80, Brooklyn, and now includes approximately three thousand members.. During the three or four years of its existence it has taken the initiative in the establishment of a large number of alumni chapters in many towns of several states. It has published a quarterly magazine known as "Educational Service." This worthy organization contributed one hundred dollars to the erection of the new Education Building. It has had three annual luncheons, each attended by approxi- mately eight hundred people. It cooperated with Dr. Maximillian Rabus in the painting of a portrait of former Dean Ballier of the School of Pedagogy. This painting was given to the School of Education at the time of the annual luncheon in 1950. 118 '--f' """" OFFICERS President ,.................. .4.............,.............. .,........ C H ARLES H. CHENEY Vice-Prefident ........ ........................ J AMES C. BAY Vice-Prefidefzl ...................... ......... ..................................................... H E RBERT D. HARPER Vice-Prefidenr .4,.............................................,,.......................4..,...,.,......,..............,..,... LUCILLE NICAL ClJairman of Family Commillee on Alumni Relation! ,..... ROBERT K. KISSACK Seeremry ................................................................4..4...........,.........................4..,................. EDNA STEBBINS Treezmrer .......... ......... J oHN N. ANDREWS DIRECTORS OLIVE JONES SETH CARKIN JOSEPH NOONAN CLAUDE HARDY RHEA BOARDMAN MARY E. STONE JOHN J. LEFTUS 119 I ,fu ' 33' ,Ll 5' The Sludenls' Camp "Nestled 'neath the shady trees Lies our camp so dear Where the Lake Sebago flows Sparkling far and clear." EMORIES of "our camp so dear" that lies "on Sebago's shores" are running here and there, stirring emotions, pulling strings, making one feel that he should visit camp-talk to Judd Miller-look at the lake-sit at the fire circle -run to the athletic Held--eat in the Mess-hall and sleep in one of those perfectly ventilated bungalows. Through the generosity of Professor Nash and the help of .Miss Vollmer, the camp is made available for student groups. Students who have taken advantage of this opportunity have recommended a visit. to camp as a cure for "Urbanitis." It is a rough road that leads from the highway to the spot on which the camp is located. In that spot is a circle of rocks and around that circle have occurred greet- ings and partings that have formed and sealed friendships. That rocky walk from the Saddle-Back to the lake has left bruises and other feelings with those who have walked its path. That little by-path to the mess-hall-no need to say anything about that. If only I could walk around that camp at this moment I would not feel lost. 120 Sinfonia HE National Music Fraternity, Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonio, was founded in October, 1898. Beta Epsilon Chapter was established in New York University Department of Music on December 21, 1928. OFFICERS Supreme Comzcilmmz and Family Adzfiror ',... ...... .......... G O RDON E. BAILEY Preridefzr ........,,,,.............,.............................,........,,...,.......... ........... H AROLD LUCKSTONE Vice-Prefidem ...... ........... R AYMOND TURPIN Trearurer .......... ...............,... S AMUEL EvEs Secremry ........ ........ L . CLINTON ELEY Hiftorimz ....... .....,..,..............................,.,,.,,......,...............................,..,... W ILLIAM O'TOOLE LIST OF ACTIVE MEMBERS WALTER BRETNALL RICHARD NEUPERT GORDON BAILEY DELMAR FISHER LAWRENCE STITT HORACE BUTTERWORTH JOHN W. HERB RALFE ADLER JOSEPH CUVIELLE HAROLD FLECK ARTHUR JONES SIGMUND MICHOTTA DONALD MUSOORVE ALEX STEINBERG HAROLD LUCKSTONE A EDWARD POWERS SAMUEL JONES EUGENE REID J. ELMER NECOLLINS ALEX SALTMAN WILLIAM O'TOOLE ALBERT CLARK JOSEPH SCHAEDEL NORMAN LLOYD L. CLINTON ELEY FRANK LUKER HAROLD WAITE CLIFFORD TROXELL ARTHUR GUNDERSDORFF MORRIS GLASER RAYMOND T URPIN ARTHUR LILLICRAP Christmas and music week programs are given every year, at which times Sinfonia presents not only familiar works but new or rarely heard music. In furthering the cause of American music, the music week program consists of products of American composers and original compositions by members of the chapter. A series of Saturday afternoon teas and several dances is given. The activities of the fraternity also include two meetings and dinners each month. 121 HeaH'h Service xx AVE you had your Health Examinationn? How many times have you been asked this question? The health workers are always ready for more people to examine, advise, and treat. In spite of a busy schedule, they have made a strenuous effort to reach every student and faculty member in Education. To meet the staff of Doctors is compensation enough for the time spent in the Health Service Ofhce. Drs. Louis I. Berg, john R. Twiss and Eilif Hanssen, are among the best consultants to be found in the city. The project is a new one. Started under the direction of Dr. S. U. Lawton in September, 1930, it has grown to a point where more room and apparatus is necessary. To meet this situation, extensive additions and improvements have been planned for the coming school year. 122 Kappa Dc-:Ha Phi OFFICERS Preridenz ................... ,,...........,................ ................... S A MUEL PETERS Vice-President .......... ........... S TELLA B. FINNEY Secretary ..................,.................... ............... W ILLA WILLIAMME Treamrer ........,.................................. .. .................... FLOYD R. Efxsrwooo Correfpondilzg Secretary ............ ......,,..,.............4........ C ORNELIUS JAARSMA Historian ......................,..,,................. ,...,......... F REDA J. GERWIN WINNING Cozznrelor ..A.............A.............,..... ..... ......,..... ..,.............................. P R o Fisssoa JOHN CREAGER HE KAPPA DELTA PHI is a national honorary educational organization with a com- plete membership of thirteen thousand members. The fraternity was organized last Spring at the School of Education with twenty-two charter members and has rapidly grown to its present distinguished roll call of one hundred and twenty-five active members. Eligibility for membership depends upon scholastic standing in the upper quartile, the completion of twelve hours of work in' the School of Education, interest in education, and desirable social qualities. The program for the past year included two initiations, the Hrst one being held at the Hotel Albert, while the latter was held at the Hotel Lafayette. At this time forty- seven members, including Dean Withers, were ofiicially accepted. Most outstanding has been the Laurette Dinner held at the Town Hall Club, which several nationally- known educators attended, including Dr. Dewey, Dr. Thorndike, and Dr. Bagley, all of whom are members of the organization. Besides these activities, the organization pub- lishes a quarterly magazine, which is of interest to people in the educational field. 123 Kappa Phi Kappa Alpha Omicron Chap'I'er APPA Pl-II KAPPA is an Honorary, Professional, Education Fraternity. It is a member of the Professional Interfraternity Conference, which gives it national recognition. Membership is by invitation only. The purpose of this fraternity is to promote the cause of education by encouraging men of sound moral character and recognized ability to engage in the study of its prin- ciples and problems. For the furtherance of the above purpose, the fraternity empha- sizes social intercourse, scholarly attainment, and professional ideals. The Alpha Omicron Chapter of Kappa Phi Kappa was .installed in New York University on May 12th, 1930. Bi-monthly meetings have been held to plan a program of activities. By-laws have been formulated. One initiation has already been held, bringing in to the fraternity six new members. The personnel represents many depart- ments in the School of Education including the following: Physical Education, Music, Secondary Education, Psychology, English, Arr, Elementary Education. 124 OFFICERS OF ALPHA OMICRON CHAPTER Praridezzf .........,............................ ..,,,..,...... ......,,,...,.................................. L I ESLIE M. HAIXIIINGTON Vive-Prexidezzt ........ .,......... H AROLD PERRY DIQIGGS Sec:-efary .A.,,............ A...AA....................... W . EUGENE RLID Trea.rzn'er .......... .....A...... N ORMAN L. BROMBACKLP Hiffm-ian .A.................. .......,,...... .........AAA.......A.A..,.......................,...........,........ A . S. CROOKIR Famlfy Admw -.AAA..AAA.. .................,....,.........,,,,,....,,....AA.A,.....AA...,.,,............. G ORDON E. BAILLY CHARTER MEMBERS DEAN JOHN WILLIAM WITHERS, '91 DR. CHARLES EDWARD SKINNER GORDON E. BAILEY FORREST EDWIN LONG CHARLES DELNORTE WINNING EDWARD H. FULLER, '23 LOUIS ALEXANDER PARKER, '29 NORMAN L. BROMBACKER, '30 CHARLES THOMAS COWAN, '30 AINSWORTH STETSON CROOKER, HAROLD PERRY DRIGGS, '30 WILBUR H. N. HAMJI, '30 EDWARD TALBERT MILKIEY, '30 '30 W. FRED ORTH, JR. CARLTON H. REILLY, '30 IRVING DAVID BERNSTEIN, '31 EDWARD F. DONNIZLLY, '31 JOHN JOSEPH FOLEY, '31 LESLIE MARONEY HARRINGTON W. EUGENE REID, '31 ARTHUR RAYMOND TURPIN, '31 JOHN H. RING, '32 JAMES REYNOLDS VAN DIENBURGH 32 HOWARD FRANKLIN KINNAMON 33 IRA ZASLOFF, '33 NEW MEMBERS HAROLD ERHARD DJORUP, '31 IRVIN H. TRINCHER, '32 HAROLD CORNELIUS MANTZ, '31 WILLIAM GEORGE PIERCY, 30 ALBIZIIT P. VREELAND, '31 GEORGE SPACHE, '32 125 Phi Della Kappa I-II DELTA KAPPA is an honorary educational fraternity for men organized for the purpose of developing a more complete professional consciousness, social leader- ship, and productive scholarship among educators. It has existed as a national fraternity under its present organization since 1910. New York University is repre- sented by Rho Chapter, in which approximately four hundred members have been initiated since its inception. Of these, three hundred are active in the affairs of the Chapter. Membership is by invitation, and only those students whose achievements in the School of Education place them in the upper quartile are considered as candidates for membership. Because research is one of our guiding principles, nearly all members are carrying on investigations and experiments in the field of education. It is hoped that leaders will be developed in the various branches of education and that public school education will be promoted scientifically. To this end Rho Chapter offers an award of one hundred dollars each year to the member who in the opinion of the Chapter produces the best thesis. . ' Regular meetings are held monthly during the scholastic year, to which prominent educators are invited to address the Chapter and to present research problems in which they are interested. Dinners and social meetings are held at intervals. A news letter is published three times a year, which keeps the members outside the Metropolitan area in touch with the current activities. OFFICERS Prerident ................,..., .........,.......................... ,.......... H E RBERT D. HARPER Vive-Pre.ridef11 .......... ........... R UDOLF S. KRIVANEK Secretary ..........., ....................... I RA M. KLINE Treasurer .................... ......................... R ALP!-I BATES Historian ......................,... ............... P Aux. W. SCHLORFF Edilol' Rho Newt .....,..,... ............. H EREERT A. TONNE Conductor ........................ ...................... H ERMAN A. ERNST Faculty Spomof -.... ........ ............ D E AN E. GEORGE PAYNE 126 Pi Lambda There I LAMBDA THETA, a national honorary organization for women in the educational field, is represented at N. Y. U. by Rho Chapter. The founders of Pi Lambda Theta were desirous of establishing in the various institutions interested in the general practice of education a lofty code of professional ethics, high standards of honor, and of promoting such social interests as will further these ends. To foster these ideals, chapters have been organized in all the important schools of education throughout the country. Rho chapter of N. Y. U. received its charter in 1925. Pi Lambda Theta is a closed sorority in that membership is by invitation only. This organization numbers 196 members, who represent various educational fields. The program for the year provides for lectures on educational topics, round-table discussions of classroom problems, reports on the work of members, and social meetings at which informal contact with others in the Held of education may be made. OFFICERS Preridenz .................. .....................,,................. ............... R U TH F1TzE1.1. Vice-Preridenz ................................................... ..........., E DITH SCHLUETER Correrponding Senretary ............................... ............ M ARTHA KUHLMAN Arrirtant Correrponding Secretary ............ ................. M ARION GILL Recording Secretary ..,....................................... ....,......... M Rs. VIOLA ELIA Trearurer ................................ ............. M ABEL FARLEY Keeper of Rerof-dr .....,........ ............. E DNA Sramsms 127 The Graduale Club HE Graduate Club is organized to provide social contacts and professional activities for its six hundred members. Students who are taking graduate work in the School of Education make the membership, which represents all phases of educational service from all parts of the world. With such a variety of experience and interest in the graduate group, the programs of the Graduate Club have been meeting a real need in the University life of its members. This year's program was an extension of the excellent series of activities conducted by previous officers. One hundred and fifty members attended the Sociological Lecture given by Dr. Ellwood, and two hundred enjoyed the Roof Garden Party. The occa- sional informal social gatherings were very popular. The lecture of Dr. Shaw of the Department of Philosophy of the Graduate School of Liberal Arts, afforded a professional attraction followed by an informal get-acquainted period. The friendly luncheon held at the Daffydil, in the Village, was attended by one hundred and forty. Dean and Mrs. Withers, and Dr. and Mrs. Payne were guests of the occasion, and several members of the faculty joined the group. The remaining year's programs called for two educational meetings and three socials. The Graduate Club feels that it is compensating for the loss of some of the personal contacts that it necessitated by the rapid growth of our School of Education. OFFICERS Pireridemf ..... I .......................... .,........................... ........... ......................... L E W 1 s ELHUFF Fir!! Vice-Prefiden! .............. .................................... M ARY T. MCDERMOTT fChairman of Social Committee, Second Vive-Prerident ...,........ .............,,.......................,........,.........,...... J uuus YOURMAN fChairman of Educational Committee, Secretary ..........., ..,...,..,..,.............................,...., L oursrs E. SPRINGER 128 --'T"j "I"iw at va, .,.. Glee Club ECENTLY, the Physical Education Department through its Education Bureau set about organizing a Glee Club. Direct charge of the club was put in the hands of Irwin Hecht. From a group of five who showed up for the first meeting it grew to some twenty-four members. The North Studio of the Students' Building has been used for practice. The peculiar thing about this Glee Club is the purpose, or better, the several pur- poses behind it. It was formed with the idea of having it accompany a group of speakers who are to go about to various schools and clubs making addresses on the subject of Physical Education and Health with the idea of increasing the prestige of that profession. Secondly, it was to afford recreation for those participating, and thirdly, it was felt that by securing students from the Department of Music Education to direct the singers, an excellent opportunity for practice teaching would be afforded. The Club at first limited itself to practice of the old favorites such as "Love's Old Song," "The Old Oaken Bucket," etc. Then efforts were extended to the field of negro spirituals, following which the newer popular songs which lend themselves to harmony were tried. After a fair amount of success has been attained in these fields the club intends to work on the University Songs and then expand their work as they see fit. 129 The Mc-zn's Physical Eclucalion Organizalion HE Men's Physical Education Organization was formed in 1927 to carry on student activities. Its purpose is the formation, control and direction of student initiative through cooperative and constructive activities and research and the encouragement of closer faculty-student relations. All extra-curricular activities are governed by a policy forming Senate which has its work divided into bureaus. The Edffmlimml Bnremx has in part the following divisions: The Bi-monthly newspaper for the Physical Education Departmentg a Tutorial systemg a Speakers' Bureaug Curriculum Committeeg Registration Committee, Publicity Committeeg Employ- ment Committeeg Personality Rating Committee. The Athletic Blrreafz is in direct supervision of the Athletic Activities. Some of the outstanding features are: the putting of the Intramurals on an intensive scale, disregarding the difference between the so called major and minor sportsg giving the stu- dents more chance to compete in Intercollegiate Athletics, and fostering Athletic Clubs and general Athletic Activities for camp trips. The Social Bzzreaff has charge of the Physical Education Social Room on the fourth floor, It manages a social schedule of two dances and a camp bus trip each semester, besides arranging smaller social functions. The Phyrical Therapy Section is concerned in the furtherance of its own profes- sional and progressive standards in its specific field of Physical Therapy. Special lectures, speakers, and a general education program is in progress. The General Committees are many. Among them are the Leaders' Corpsg Life Saving Corpsg Key Committeeg and a special Gala Week Committee. 130 Physical Educalion The Physical Education Student Body is represented in the Senate by eight class representatives, two elected by each class and four Ofhcers elected at large. Prernlenr .................,............ 1 .........,...............A....................,........................ RICHARD BLECHSCHMIDT Vice-President ...... .... ........,..,...,.................... N A T TILEM Secretory ............................................... ................................................................ P AUL SCHEM Treafnrer .,......,..................................,.... ...,................................................................ I RA ZASLOFE Senior Clam Rep:-e.re:m11i1fe.r ......................,. LOUIS GREEN AND HENRY DOLINER junior Clan Repre.renmzizfer ,............. .,........ j OE BLUTREICH AND YUSTIN SIRUTIS Sopiaonzore Clan R6'pl'E,l'6I1ldfi1f6.f IRVING TRINCHER AND GEORGE WOLPIANSKY Freflonmn Clan Reprerenfofiwer ......... ARTHUR BODKIN AND CHARLES O'NE1L1. BUREAU AND SECTION HEADS Ednmtiomzl Bnrenn .......................,...............................,...................,..,................. L. JOSEPH CAHN Azblelif Bm-eon .................... ..,............... N ATHANIEL TILEM Social Bm-eau ...................,.,....... ,..,....... N A'rHAN1E1. BENcH1N Playrica! Therapy Section .....,.. ........,... T HADDEUS B. ERNEST Family Advifor ....,...............,.. ............ PROFESSOR LLOYD 131 Physical Educafion Women's Organizalion HE P. E. W. O. was organized in 1927. The Organization came as a result of many activities which were in need of centralization. At that time there was built into the organization the purpose of orienting the women inthe Physical Education Department in the professional spirit and the code of ethics of Physical Education. The athletic, social, and educational activities of the organi- zation are means to this end. Every girl upon entering the department of Physical Education becomes a member of the P. E. W. O. OFFICERS President .....................,,.................. ..............,..,............. .............. H 1 LDA GOLDFEDER Vine-Pferizlenf ,,,.,......,.,...............,.... ............................. B Essns TARVIN Correrpondifzg Secretary .............. .............. M ARION OCHAMPAUGH Trearuref -........ ...................................... ................................... S Y Lvm DORF Family Sponror ............,........... ................ E MMA R. FRAZIER 132 League of Women HE League of Women in the School of Education was organized in 1927, to carry on work similar to the Leagues in the other schools of the University. The league has three representatives as members of the L. O. W. Council. This Council is a medium of control for all Leagues in the University. As an aid to seniors who are in financial need, the council has established a scholar ship. To make the girls feel at home, the League emphasizes social activities. All women undergradutes in the School of Education automatically, upon registra tion in the school, become members of the League of Women. President .................. Vice-Preridezzt .....,... Secretary .................,.,. Treamrer ................ Family Spomorr ..,........ OFFICERS .......EMILY BURNET GARDNER VARNI O'CONNOR ..........MISS WHITE AND Miss EMMA FRAZIER 135 Teachers College and Normal School Associafion HE 'Teachers College and Normal School Association arose from a small organization formerly known as the Eastern States Conference of Normal Schools and Teachers Colleges. The officers now include: Preridenf .....,.,,.,....,,...................,.................... ....,...... A Mskosu L. SUHRII2 Vive-Preridenl .............. ....,...... WILLIAM C. BAGLEY Rerording Secrezary ............... ......... N ED H. DEARBORN C0l'l'EJ'p0lIdi11g Serrelary ........... .,............ F RED M. RICHMOND Trearm-er ................,...........,,..............................,.......,................I.....,.,........ CAROLINE E. MCINTIRE The organization is functioning for several purposes. It proposes to promote ac uaintance and common understanding among the members of the administrative an instructional staffs and among the student bodies of institutions for the professional education of teachers in the Eastern Statesg to promote understanding and cooperation between teacher-training institutions on one hand and public school authorities on the otherg to interpret to the public the significance of the servicc of professional schools for teachers and to present to the public a more adequate statement of the legitimate needs of these institutionsg to encourage the serious and constructive study of the prob- lems of normal schools,-teachers' colleges, and University Schools of Education, and lastly to develop a body of dependable literature on the objectives, the policies, and the programs of service of the professional schools for teachers. There is no set meeting time for this organization. However, an event that is anxiously anticipated by each member is the Annual Spring Conference. This year, the meeting was held at the Hotel Pennsylvania, New York City, on Thursday, Friday and Saturday, April 16, 17, 18, 1951. At these Conferences, the topics chosen for dis- cussion were limited in scope and very sharply defIned. Preparation was intensive, reports compact, and general discussion pointed. Although the name of the organization specifies "Eastern States," membership to the association includes representatives from all parts of the country. This organization is one of rapid growth and constructive accomplishments. 134 Soufhern Club HE Southern Club was organized in 1928 for the purpose of bringing the South to N. Y. U. and N. Y. U. to the South. The ideals of our University are so splendid that we are glad to carry them back to the Southland. On the other hand we believe there is a great contribution to be made by southerners to N. Y. U. This organization is desirous of fostering a spirit of friendliness on the part of those from the Southern Statesg of developing amiable co-operation amongst the students of the Southern States and those from other sections attending the Universityg and of promoting the mutual well-being of the students of N. Y. U. All students and faculty members from south of the Mason and Dixon Line are eligible for membership in the Southern Club. The club is a functioning organization in the winter timeg but operates mostly in the summer. At the spring meeting definite plans are made for the enrollment and general well-being of the students from the South who are registered in summer school. Special attention is given to students who are coming from the South for the first time. Early in the summer term a get-together meeting is planned for all Southern students and faculty members. In keeping with the traditions of Dixieland, the singing of Southern melodies and the eating of watermelon are the outstanding features at these gatherings. ' OFFICERS Preriderzt ........... ...,..,.................,....,,..., ....,.,...... L . PAUL MILLER Secrelary ................. ........................... M ARY C. EMORY Faculty Spomoi -............ ........... D EAN E. GEORGE PAYNE 135 PaleHe Club HE Palette Club is one of the youngest societies of the School of Education, having oHicially begun its life on March 8, 1950. Despite its short existence, it is recog- nized as one of its most active organizations. It aims to promote among art students the opportunity of fostering social relations and interest in the arts. Membership is voluntary and may be applied for at any time during the school year. It consists of students enrolled in the department of art education, and includes active associate, and alumni members. , y During the past year the club has invited several speakers, among whom were: Mr. Wellington H. Tinker of the intercollegiate Y. M. C. A. of N. Y. C., Miss Alice F. Stokes, acting head of the Department of Interior Decoration of Textile High School. and Mr. Herbert A. Fisher, jr., who addressed the members on subject concerning art education. The club dances and socials have been so successful that a most elaborate program has been arranged for the coming year. 136 OFFICERS Pferldeur ...........,..... .........,..............Q...AA. ,..,,,,,.....,,,,. M I LTON STORCK Vue Praridenf ......,V. .,.,.......,,......... M ARTHA BROWN Seuemry ....,...,,,,.. ......Q... K ATHLEEN MCPARLAN Tfeawn-er ..., ......,,....,.........A..,....,.......... ...A....,,,,,..,,,.....,,,.,..,,,,........,...,......,,,,.... F R ANK BURZOTTA MEMBERS OF THE PALETTE CLUB FRANK S. BURZOTTA MAIXTHA E. BROWN AMELIA E. CAMPANILE DOROTHY COYNE KAY A. CULLINAN GLADYS DE MARTINI MATILDA DEWES DOROTHY EIGELDERNER HERBEIKT A. FISHER EDNA M. GEATING ESTELLE H. GILLILAND MARTHA KRAMOEE EDNA MAGINLEY ESTHER W. MATURRI KATHLEEN MCPARLAN ADELINE C. LOCILENTO JACK S. LUBOEF EMIL PANDOLFI JOHN PITTARO 157 GRACE L. PFLUGER FLORENCE E. QUINN DOROTHY M. SCHNYDER ARLEEN K. SHORE SOPHIE STOJANOUSKI WILLIAM SADOFSKY SAUL SILREREERC MILTON STORCK GRACE TARCIONE CORINNE TROST HERBIEIRTA WAGNER EDNA ZIEHLEIN FLORENCE P. EATON MYER BARKIN RANDOLPH AURELL HELEN STANLEY LILLIE STAVROW ANNE PARMET Home Economics Club of New York Universify OFFICERS Prexidenl ..........,, .,............,.................... ..........., S A LLY DELIEHANTY Vice-President ......... ........,.............. A NNE RUPP Secremry ............. ....,,........ B IAGINA Mrcuoiuz Treafurer .......... : ,..,,,,,.....................,......................................,.,,.....,......................... BEATRICE WEINER HE New York University Home Economics Club stands out as a most unusual organization, both for its achievements and for the character of its members. It aims to furnish opportunity for the further study of the ideals of Home Economics and of the profession of Home Economicsg to develop leadership among the studentsg to promote fellowship in the Home Making and Home Economics Department, and to furnish opportunity through organization for social life. In the three short years of its existence its fame has spread throughout the entire university. Membership includes any student of Home Economics in New York University who desires ro join. The organization is an affiliated member of the National Home Economics Association. 138 ANNA DIANA NANCY Russo BIAGINA MIGLIORE PEARL HIRSCH BEATRICE WEINER ELEANOR SCHWARTZ MIRIAM EPSTEIN EUGENIA D'ANNUCCI HELEN GEIST GOLDIE BRODY LEONA MONTALBANO VIOLA MAXWELL MARION MIGLIORE SYLVIA SAMOVITZ GRACE WILLIGAN ANN RUPP PEARL COHEN REBECCA SINGER ESTER GREGORY SYLVIA COHEN ANNA RAIA CATHERINE FOLEY MEMBERS 139 JOSEPHINE DUCK CATHERINE WENTWORTH HELEN GARDNER ALICE KEHOE DORA GOLDFARB RUTH WEINGRAD RENEE ROSENTHAL MARY FRISCH BEATRICE WILDE EVELYN LERZIAN EVELYN RIZZO SALLY DELEHANTY MARGARET KENNEDY ISABELL WALTERS MURIEL WHEATLY WINIFRED REILLY BERTHA KUHN MARY COOK JUBA SCHAUEBERBAR LUCY TESCIONE CATHERINE OIROURKE Phi Della Sororily HI DELTA was organized at New York University, October 25, 1919, as the social sorority Epsilon Sigma by Effie Dooling, Florence Sullivan, Catherine Kirwin, Anne Hulse, Hazel Saunders, Ruth Marsh and Lucy Bryant. October 25 is regarded as the founding date although the name Phi Delta was not chosen until December 7, 1927, when Epsilon Sigma afhliated with Alpha Delta Omicron of New York State Teacher's College at Albany. The objects are to create a friendly spirit among the girls of the institutions represented, to uphold the honor spirit of the institutions, and to develop the abilities of members for most effective college life. Beta chapter of Phi Delta has maintained a high scholastic record and several of its members have been elected to Phi Beta Kappa, Delta Mu Delta, and Gamma Epsilon Pi. The ofhcial publication of the sorority is a magazine known as the "Phi De-lt" and is published bi-monthly. Colors are black and gold. The flower is the yellow tea rose. Beta's chapter house is now located at 19 West Eighth Street, New York City. l-'lil Scroll VER since the Yearbook of the School of Education was inaugurated, it was a cher- ished hope of the founders to form an Honorary Society of the book which would be composed of those members of the staff who had shown themselves worthy to be members. As the book neared completion, Editor-in-chief Goldenberg made this ambition a fact by asking twelve members of the staff who had shown the greatest zeal and enthusiasm in their Violet activities to become charter members of such a society which would be called the "Education Violet Scroll." The twelve who were picked out were not only chosen for their untiring efforts in behalf of the Yearbook, but also on a basis of scholarship, and their personal char- acters. To become a member of the Yearbook one must have an average of at least B, and must possess character traits comparable with those of the highest type of N. Y. U. student. The other major requirement is untiring and loyal service to the Violet. The ofhcers of the Scroll ate: MURRAY GOLDENBERG .....,... .,..............,. P reridenl VINCENT M. REILLY .,....... ......... V ice-Prerideut ALFRED FELLNER .......... ......... T rearnrer ISIDORE REICH .......... .......... S ecvelary Dean Loomis, Professor Barnes, and Miss Vollmer were elected as Honorary mem- bers of the Scroll in appreciation of the fact that their efforts helped the Yearbook attain the high standard which we think it has. The remaining members of the roster are: William O. Frankle, Saire Isenberg, Nathan Benchin, Al Charger, Ira Zasloff, Howard Kinnamon, joseph Schaedel, and Edward Solotar. 1-fl The New York Universily Band ERE they come! See them step! Those "fast stepping Violets" in their fascinat- ing uniforms, marching to a fast tune made the spectators at the football games crane their necks for a glimpse. Full of pep and ready for their job, the band opened the program for every major football event on our schedule for the past few years. To begin their season the band members answered the call at Farmingdale in September and "worked out" under the direction of Maurel Hunkins. Keen competition among the band for the best places in the line-up, daily rehearsals and drills, and the "ole swimmin' holef' kept the bandsters busy. The Band, with Albert V. Damato as Drum Major and Edward Feidbauer as Student Leader, marched upon the field, and with the football team, started the Gridiron assault, which was very successful. The end of the football season opened the concert tour and the performance of the Band is well known. The members are proud of the Band and there is no doubt the graduates will have fond memories of their contacts with this organization. We dedicate this page to the boys who, leaving the portals of this institution, carry with them the best wishes of their Alma Maters Musical Organization. 142 4 'U .?"v M iff' . Wg' L 3 3 Q! h.11"".19sl . 4,r-.MWF A . 1, W W -Mk' Wm Lum! Mwliiiw .. fw 5.Ff5M :Hm?Qai.zW .El 'V S sw .wqlwq . .34 M M v ,W fri' 4 'fgQM '5f'fW"Q15f3 .aw- mn. 'R 1 1 ..v,.pfh,.'R,1,mdfdQirQf . ,g j 'n 'x . 41 ,w f swf .rw N51 ,J M", 4 1 4 W.. 1 M- ww ' 'V 391. , M? 71 E 'mlihfss r .,,,vf'5 ,, nv zpkfgq ', ni ' J mn. vqvlxqlgm, in xxx r"'3 ' YV . W .. Rv .Lim as .vw A . M Hag." .N .1 x 5 n i na, HL 'iq H. . v ww' Y' ' N .w af.-N' WM v "'cx..'s- QW ' , I-'v Jft" W, ,'w.7.'f5'rf-1. .3 1' .:m ICT, 4 1 . -' 1 . X flgL'l'5 Q." I QQ? 'g.'q:x'-1' 02,1 mf- .2 .U v'1""l' N311 " Aw W" rw-"' -1 "4-' ,.,L . . -.. - '?w1,-.1ffQ.,.fff"':Sw, -"f,..,.M,:"i1.aw. 'ff ' M" if 2 5 'Q 5. .RV 'ali wr:- . ,,, ' Af w,.,5'n1,f -,I -. M. Q. 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In 1 1 .,-,f ,-., .. .u... . mx . 3, .v,., ,. .ig fum . f . ' G.--1'-. - Tax. " .J- X f , I rsvp.. N. .6.'tn5V.H!fL., .1 Ll ,.,'.'.ygW4:g. Ig ,yt . 'I-. 1 fl ,rw '. f M - -. :Q-,yt! ,. '.-. M' Ay, . -1 I' U " 7 142 . 931 ,-.A ' "ms -'1::'fff':, 'I fx' 4 V 7- 1, ' 51 'MP .wf""f'i4lx.1!-fli " V, ..:?' . .- - .' ' 34 f v f . LIT?IV'-H-:'!-'-1.-A,"Twlf-.I I -NV' . 'f ' . - 1.-. - . I -21Uv:'f '- W! Q." ' . ...I ,,A '- ,.. x ...ww W Z ,.v tl -J. H' :w x M 1 g-, ,A izmxjl ' 1-VT.-1,,.3f-xr k L.-, .' 'J . l 4- : Y.: - ' '-. .- . - "j - 4, ' .54 .. ,g 'A , . S. M . Hr '. 4, 'f,:,. 1?-,u..2k4.?:f-.w -JN . ,- f.. .J . .- , 1 "lr 15.1 nw x. '.,,. Y. -' " It .f s ' - ' - H ' 'A'-1-'Q' V.. -H. ,. w .A . - 4 f H . .- Y., -.w - 'X--gl. xi. .I V N ,J .- N ,,, . x ., , M . ,. . ...I r...r LITERARY The Seniors Say Good-Bye HE termination of our scholastic career is fast approaching-vain regrets will not help us bear our separation from the School of Education. We are considered by undergraduates super-seniors, bending underneath the weight of wisdom we have gathered. So far are we removed from the dim memories of Freshman days that the students who now ambulatc in the corridors of N. Y. U. meet with our daily disapproval. 'Tis claimed WE were more of sober mien and meditative mind. Likewise, NVE suf- fered persecution in those days ere Freshman rules were barred. But enough, 'tis idle to speak! Was there ever a class like ours? And only eight hundred and nineteen of us left, blase, overeducated and grown cynical in our knowledge. We hobnob with the profs, and among ourselves patronizingly discuss their failings. Oh, well, we cannot all be good. - Perhaps, in this last public appearance of ours it would not be out of place to give a word of advice to the undergraduate body. Bear this in mind! Nothing is ob- tained without effort. Aim high, this is a stimulus to attain the goal to success. Four years ago, graduation was merely an illusion. Now that the illusion will soon be an actual occurence we are at a loss for words with which to express our feelings. After all, the time we spent at New York University has been in preparation rather than in accomplishment and we feel that this preliminary training will render us more capable to cope with the great struggle that we shall encounter in real life. Still, our Alma Mater has grown to be a part of us, and our last farewell cannot be spoken with- out a feeling of deep regret and sorrow. Our gratitude can only find a poor expression verbally. It is only by accomplishing the work the School of Education has fitted us for in an honorable manner that we can hope to reciprocate partially. In these times of public stress when industrial and technical questions must be answered and political problems cry out to be solved we shall have our duty to perform. It depends upon our performance of this duty in accordance with our ideals as to whether or not N. Y. U. shall be proud of us. And we hope that the feeling of pride will always be justified. THE Emroa. 144 "A Mis Jovenes Paisanos" EN LA CIUDAD DE NUEVA YORK. La vida aqui diccn muchos, Es trabajar y dormirg Pero veo a mis paisanos Que se pueden diverrir. Muchos jovenes que vienen, Y por eso es que nos dicen, Que no pueden esrudiar. Aqui se pueden hacer De un oficio o profesiong Y solo hay que tener, PACIENCIA a RESOLUCION. Debe el que quiera embarcar, Preparse de antemano, Porque aqui hay que luchar, Y ser siempre AMERICANO. Y todos los TRIUNFADORES, En este Campo fecundo, Podran ser CONQUISTADORES, En cualquier parte del MUNDO. Y asi podrzin levanrar, El buen nombre a Puerto Rico, A su PUEBLO preparar, Y hacerlo PROSPERO y RICO. A Maria Isabel fReciennaciclal Acosrada en tu cuna de querube muy graciosag Haciendole a tus Padres un gran papel, Tu maclre sonriente y carinosa, Me dijo! 11an6 Maria Isabel." Es tu nombre de estirpe castellana, Que cuando puedas pensarle por si sola, . Te encontrarzls que aunque naciste AMERICANA, jamas podrzis negar ser ESPANOLA. 145 Armislice Day a+ New York Universiry Sfuclenls Honor 'lhe Dead By GEORGE W. DVORYAK ODAY we are here and tomorrow we are gone. Today we are heroes acclaimed by the public and cheered by the mob, tomorrow our corpses rot and the mob has found new heroes. America is so busy in developing her resources, expanding her financial stability, and molding better citizens that she frequently lacks time to stop and ponder upon the past. But America, despite her "go-getting attitude," does stand by on Armistice Day and pay honor to those brave men who have fought in the fields of France, lighting for individual liberty, for popular democracy, and for international peace. Every year when this day comes, Americans dolf their hats at the stroke of eleven and for one minute they pause to pay homage to those who have died for a noble cause. This year America paused to honor her dead as she has often done in the past. Throughout the nation the speed of industry was slackened. In some cities this day was celebrated more appropriately than others. Bands, parades, speeches, and banquets reminded those who had forgotten that, though men were gone from our midst, memories of them are still in, our hearts. Here at New York University students and faculty both stopped in their work and joined the nation in honoring the heroes of our country. Elevators stopped, classes were temporarily suspended, and everyday thoughts were banished, as thoughts of the struggle for democracy filled the mind. The scene was most impressive. The silence which filled the buildings reminded one of the silence of a cathedral. If there had been an organ in the school to resound with the sad music of the Requiem or "Nearer My God to Thee," we could not have been more impressed. If we had never stopped before in contemplation of the meaning of this holiday, we could not but stop this year. The scene that met the observer's eye was most touching. Here was the student whose heart is usually so occupied with lectures, grades, and credits, here we saw the student and instructor as they met on common ground. All we saw on that day was mankind pausing to pay homage to mankind of yesterday. We recalled those heart stirring words of Edmund Burke, "Society is a noble compact between the dead and the living, and the unborn." The part played by New York University on this day showed that our college is Hlled with Americans who are united to the Americans of yesterday by a strong and sympathetic bond. We have honored our fellow countrymen. Perhaps some day our countrymen will also honor us. Let us remember the words of Daniel Webster as we honor our countrymen: "I was born an American, I live an American, and I shall die an American." 146 "Al Tea+ro" Mama, dice Margarita, "Al teatro quiero ir Con Violera mi amiguita Y poderme diverrirf' Su mamita, Dona Ana Le dice con atencion: "Que al teatro va manana, Si ella aprende su lecci6n." Margarita muy atenta, Aprende bien su leccion, Y se halla muy contenta, Porque va a la funcion. Ya para ir a la cama, Le dice a su mama, Que le guarde el boleto y el Programa, Que le trae su papa. Ella vestida sencilla, Se va en busca de Violera, Quien la espera en la taquilla, Y le compra un bolero de lunera. Las dos muchachas muy lisras, Son las primeras a entrar, Para hablar con los artistas, Y el espanol pracricar. Las dos se olvidan del nombre, Del teatro donde estan, Y le preguntan a un hombre, Quien las mira con afan. Loco y complacienrc el hombre, Les dice de buena fe, Que el teatro tiene el nombre, Del buen santo "San jose." 147 A Conlrasl IFTH AVENUE is decked out in gala attire. Smart, inviting shops with their vari- colored displays of perfumes, jewelry, shawls, gowns, are filled with eager shoppers. Brisk throngs of happy people crowd the already crowded street. Smiling-all of them-tall, thin men who look like fashion plates, pretty women in luxurious cars, apple- cheeked children clad warmly. Even the sleek, well-groomed dogs in the cars look on the world with a cheerful benevolence. Colorful, laughing, noisy, crowded-that is Fifth Avenue! A few short blocks away, a street is also crowded. But a grim silence hangs over all. Here, too, are all kinds of people-tall, short, old, young-but all are shabby. Not a smile appears. All have faces that are set and pale, eyes that lack luster. Their steps are slow and indifferent. This is not a crowd of happy holiday shoppers. This is only a mere handful of New York's large army of homeless and hungry, waiting to form a bread line! Only a few short blocks away from lively, luxurious Fifth Avenue, in the wealthiest city of the world! Youlh OUTH is not a time of life: it is a state of mind. It is not a matter of red cheeks, red lips, and supple knees, it is a quality of imagination, a temper of the will, a vigor of emotions. It is the freshness of the deep springs of life. Youth means a temperamental predominance of courage over timidity, of the appetite for adventure over the love of ease. This often exists in a man of fifty, more than in a man of twenty. Nobody grows old by merely living a few years. People grow old only by deserting their ideals. ' Years wrinkle the skin, but to give up enthusiasm wrinkles the soul. Worry, doubt, self-distrust, fear, and despair: these are the long, long years that bow the heart and turn the grieving spirit back to dust. Whether sixty or sixteen, there should be in every human being's heart the lure of wonder, the sweet amazement at the stars and star-like things and thoughts, the undaunted challenge of events, the unfailing child-like appetite for what next, and the joy of the game of living. One is as young as his faith, as old as his fears, as young as his hope, as old as his despair. In the central place of one's heart is an evergreen tree, its name is Love. So long as it flourishes, a person is young. When it dies, he is old. In the central place of every heart is a wireless station. So long as it receives messages of beauty, hope, cheer, grandeur, courage, and power from God and from fellowmen, so long is one young. 148 Wheels The pollen In the flower, The root In the earth, The bud In the twig, The twig In the branch, The branch In the trunk, The trunk In the ground. The seed In the ovum, The embryo In the womb, The babe In the crib, The youth In his bloom, The girl In her grace, The man In his strength, The woman In her glory. All end In the grave, All end In the ground. Wheels Within Wheels Of Life Ancl of Death, Of Hope and Despair, Eternally spin. G 149 Perpetual motion The mystery of od. Washingfon Square Park NTERESTING pictures, beautiful pictures, ugly pictures, pictures-scenes, portraits, caricatures-not in Dresden, Munich, or the Louvre, but in Washington Square Park. The park is a legend of Little Old New York. The barren trees whisper to each other and laugh at the human wrecks who sit on the benches, at the jovial students, at the pensive students, at the nursemaids with their precious charges. They laugh because they know that life is temporary and that time, which we try to overtake, eternal. Three men are sitting on a bench near the Fifth Avenue entrance. One of them is youngish with blond hair and bleary, blue eyes. He attempts to read a newspaper that was left by some more fortunate beingg but he is fretful-he gazes after each passerby -perhaps hunger gnaws at his heart. The other two are too far gone. They are older and age needs reposeg so they sleep-blissfully unaware of the hubbub about them. Two boys are talking about Mr. Blank, their history prof. They imitate him, they mimick him and discuss him mercilessly. Poor man-his ears must be burning red. A uniformed nurse-maid is conversing pleasantly with the policeman. The living bundle in the handsomely arranged carriage begins to cry and the woman bids her friend adieu. Pictures-portraits, scenes, caricatures-not Dresden, Munich, or the Louvre-but Washington Square Park. Ghosfs Mad memories remain like ghostly ghouls To haunt the earthly shell that once was theirs, They lurk and hide in half-forgotten lairs And make of us sad wretches and sick fools. o Spiril' HERE is a certain Hymn that begins: "Work for the night is comingg work for the day is done." Our School is slowly emerging from the darkness into the light of day. It has had many struggles, there are struggles to comeg but as it has over- come obstacles of the past, it will overcome them of the present and future. What will aid us in our battles? Money? Yes. An excellent faculty? Of course. All this and more. But most of all, that element which has created nations and then saved them all from annilihation. It was present at the beginning of civilization and will always be present in the years to come. It is heard amid the cheers of football, basketball and base- ball games. It is felt in the heart of every loyal student and lighter. "Spirit"-the spirit of New York University. From obscurity it has lifted us to light. The night is gone and we must work harder than ever before to keep the mists away, Thus we can show spirit-the spirit which counts in the end. We must put action into every letter of S-P-I-R-I-T. ' 150 To 'I'he Down to the sea you go, my friend, Down to the sea in a ship. You view again the cobalt frame Of Africa's northern tip. You view again Sahara's sand, You search for treasures rare, You walk again with ghostly kings And ghostly ladies fair. You walk along the Corridors Of thousand years of fame, You penetrate the Morocco-land, A thousand years the same. Down to the sea in a ship you go, Down to the sea again To see, to hear, to learn, to know Of places, things, and men. Moods Moods are strange, bewildering ghosts Of other things, of other dreams, That flicker, change and go, like hosts Of butterflies a-wing it seems. Oft times, like sunbeams bright and gay They dance upon your brook of thought While every wavelet seems to play A tune that brooks alone are taught. On a sudden, flowers dieg Their lilting minstrelsy, it fades, And cold, grey snowflakes swiftly fly To still the brook in leaden shades. Moods are strange bewildering ghosts That never seem just quite at ease, They change their homes, their hosts, Like trembling butterflies, like bees. 151 Friend Who ls "Going Again" The Sea ahdl I have gone down To the sea, For it is there That I belong. ' With the sun, With the waves, Buffeting the fog The winds and rain. And when the winter comes And snow is everywhere, I can find A peaceful cottage By the sea! Watch the ocean Creep up closeg Watch the moon, Who pulls it backg Watch the little Fishing vessels Come and go. I will live ' And I will play On the white sands Of the beach. Where wreckage Piles up high On stormy days. And if the waves should call I would gladly go, Submerge myself, And drink The salt sea's spume. Dkmudon Dusk had descended and the impetuous wind Whipped me as I followed the path Where the underbrush cut into my tender flesh Eagerly I pushed onward 'til my veins swelled And my blood spurred like hot, bubbling lava. As I neared the rendezvous, I feigned indifference Turned laggard and made a casual approach. Urge to surprise lightened my foot steps And I entered the Garden of my Utopia Where another entwined herself about the Idol I had come to worship. A 152 I Help Read a Paper in +l1e Subway Sat a woman with a paper And a sanguinary grin. And I wondered what had made her Double up her double chin. There was a vacant seat beside her, And I got it, quite by chance. My head moved across her shoulder, And I merely took one glance. "Read about the infant murder" Headlines sprawled across the page, Six men killed by a falling girder, The result of the spite of a man in a rage. Suicide of a big stock broker, Big ship lost with all aboard. Captain dies, denounced by a stoker, England mourns the death of a lord. Pistol used on a court attendant: House of a judge blown up in revenge: Opposing council killed by defendant: Baby choked by means of a sponge. Policeman lives a little longer, "Shucks," a woman said, "How can a man get any stronger With three bullet wounds in his head?" And as my eye roved over the page I saw an item which read, "The present is a most civilized age," In view of the facts, well said. Day Dream A tur uoise lagoon of sky, Withqbanks of peachbloom Warm and tender as caresses Hung low, While high o'erhead Through sun-warmed, tree-cooled paths I saw A solitary bird t V Winging West through the Drowsy blue Of the heavens. 153 Pensive Sighf Sit still a moment, woman or man, to see, Observe the movement of Pan, in whirling ecstasy Mayhap Nature's right against our artificiality. Color bright of green, cover of all Earth's gift Sombte black a-swishing over all to place a pall O'er our mad dance-that dance of Death that which no greater spectre leers. Twirling in mad agonies, around Kaleidoscopic swound You men, you wo-men do a prance in gayety The one the other mirrorlike-you stare and back again The stare-self visioned sordidness That Dance-that trance of frenzied joy With Bared fang or tooth canined you yell A Laughter cadenced deep from Hell My heart responds O, yes in fair-for your sad plight, unrequite there In all gay sparkle you do seek a moment's peace from mundane care Blue happy day-it can be yours--a thought, a shrug For a silken vice-renounce, renounce, while you yet may O Man and Woman all astir Renounce, once more all harlo' joy Of vain and ftippery living well-wisdom's not yours 'Tis mine to tell Mine by the side head sunk on chest a visioning well. Doff red, don white-a new garbed chasreness know Stay white in soul, nor not in show. h Mom ZALOWITZ. Romance ROOKLYN BRIDGE is rather too bold a background for a girl, especially if the girl is small. Perhaps she wasn't aware of her surroundings, though. She belonged before a glowing fire-place that would illuminate her eyes and make her mouth smile. Nevertheless, she was standing near the railing of the bridge, dejected, forlorn, and utterly unhappy. I am by far too romantic to pass by such a picture without wishing to find the creator of it. Hence, I walked over to the girl and said: "Can I help you, Miss?" She turned ever so slightly and lifted her dark eyes which, I now saw, were brimming with tears, "No, thank you." Not only am I romantic, but the girl was very charming so I tarried awhile and said, "Are you sure?" "Yes, quite sure. He'll never find her I'm certain." And she started to cry softly. "Who can't find whom ?" I inquired puzzled. She looked startled. "Why don't you know? I lost my little dog while walking across the bridge. My husband has been gone fifteen minutes searching for her. Oh!" she ended joyously, "here they come now. He's found her, he's found h-." I didn't wait for the end, romantic fool that I am. 154 Eyes Wild and Unfa+homable When eyes have met yours and you have drunk them deep A longing has seized you that cannot be appeased When all the cards on the table you have thrown face upward with one heedless sweep You sacrifice realities for a dream that will not leave you surceased-You have met her, that glamorous lady aglitter with tinsel. You ne'er regret her Though she's stolen away your calm to leave a black hollow a stencil in your heart. We walked through the halls of stately palace of Wonder and she gazed at the walls and I at her hair I spoke and in mind each word was one costly blunder For she frowned but once and to me 'twas despair. We strolled and we gazed and to her in all fair resemblance to princess' their beauty was bare, of joy I knew nothing of pain I knew much, each step that kissed Earth roused in me an Envoy of sorrow, a vague unutterability And thus did we pass the day all so sweet, to her a faint pleasure-to my poor tortured brain a gloried conceit. To Poised Child-Woman I wandered in and sat me down A seat so vacant then I turned Around and looked with a slight frown, And my eyes learned in widened joy Your too brown, kind eyes. We spoke and I did feel serenity and charm and peace Eternity did pass and I was floating in all imagery in Nice, with a blue sky, All held in bondage fair by her kind voice. Ah, Maid, so fortunate is your brave man to have you for 'self ensconced For you have learned that secret old and spirit bold you blaze the trail, all beauty of womanhood do you unveil And man is bound as o' long ago. My dear, so clear is my view since speaking of Life's woes Thus do I think but of you I In pleasant friend for me. Motu ZALOWITZ. 155 Upward Confidenring I'm here, a youth, all buoyant, a'kicking up my heel in glee I'm to sip all Howers, I'm to taste the spray of ranged sea I'm a swaggering through the field, I'm so proud of Life in me Why, youth alone can Love enfold, bestow a hearty glad embrace- The World is Youth's Love-Why that's me. Yet now I'm wondering is all Mine-Youth has left a mark in Time Children came and up did shoot in growth and I'm a weaker than before Do I still count Life All just mine Indeed, I eat and drink and whistle through my teeth and my eyes But do are sparkled yet I own this Terra as O'yore? I sit and query, eyes towards sky, thoughts on high for things below. Gray, wrinkled throat and hands, palsied movement, gone Iron bands of biceped strength-My legs are weak beneath, It seems I must bequeath that heritage Of length of years to those behind-a heritage that Life did dredge with me a blind usurper here For now what matters Life a jade, or vivid motley round my knee Now I can see Youth Age-Age Youth they one remain-But Life is Free of all ' Mom ZALOWITZ Tol Love ove and have lost is the theme of the day, But to have loved and never to have won is a dreadful delay, For loved ones I've had many and many for play, But the one whom I love looks other ways. I see The Like And The The The To r her in my dreams and in my books, inspiration of my thought, the spirit of my heart, an angel from above she flies down to earth, alights on the ground with a gleeful mirth. buds of the green spring resemble her, undulating wavelets honor het, sun looks down and saints her golden hair, esemble nature and the song of the lyre. Around and around I see her wander, Agai n and again she sees me not, She knows not that I exist, nor my desires, For she is the spirit of Heaven and I of earth: And Never the Twain Shall Meet. SAL 156 LY LIPSCHUTZ "Swee+ Margari+a" Life here in this city I enjoy with great emotion, Since I met a girl so pretty, Who loves me with much devotion. She has a beautiful face With cheeks of apple-redg She dresses very nice, And makes me to lose my head. Her manners are rciined, Her poise aristocratic, Her language very fine, And yet she is democratic. When I call her in Spanish, Her name sounds like Juanita, Then I put sugar in English, And call her "SWEET MARGARITA Melody The thin Wavering note Of a violin Pierces a leaden silence: A pleading drawn From out the air. The mere wisp of a melody. Almost imperceptibly The sullen rumbling Of an alien theme Swells in volume, Until the melody Is like a risen sea: A ursurping And a conquering, Drawing to an end In a. chord Which lingers In the momentary Tribute Of silence l57 Les'I' We Forgel' By GEORGE W. DVORYAK, '31 OOPERATION is one of the finest things in the world. In college it is due to class spirit prompted by an ardent love for one-'s Alma Mater. Many college students who graduate every June, leave their Alma Mater with a tinge of regret in their hearts. Others forget their school as soon as the gates of the university close upon them and they find themselves face to face with the problems of a career in life. What attitude shall the class of '31 take toward New York University? Will we, as members of that class, remain loyal students who will leave these walls of learning with regret too great to be expressed in mere words, or will we eagerly await the opportunity to get out of school and forget all about it? Shall we be loyal to our school or shall we forget her? Shall the memories of the happy hours spent in class under the guiding influence of sympathetic teachers urge us to cooperate with the school in the future just as we cooperate with dear old N. Y. U. now? "To be or not to be!" That is the question. Shall we be loyal to those sacred traditions which we leave behind us or shall our University be merely a matter-of-fact institution that has fed us on sugar coated pills of. wisdom for four years? After spending four years within these walls we must have an affection for the school. Memories will always arise before our minds. We will see once again those happy pictures of campus life, our beloved teachers, our dear friends and those envied good times which brought us so much pleasure. We will feel towards our University as the Greeks felt toward the State. We shall feel proud as we display our class keys and say "Gee, if we could only be back there once again!" Like the Romans we shall guard our diplomas which certify that we are citizens of that most noted empire, knowledge itself. We shall think of our caps and gowns in the same manner that the Romans thought of their togas and their arms. Our school shall occasionally bring joyful memories to delight our weary minds. Ellis Gimble said that the success of his business was traceable more to the loyalty of its employees than to any other single factor. So the success of any university must depend upon the loyalty of its graduates. The success of the graduates may be determined by the loyalty of the university to them. We are comforted with the thought that our school will not desert us, that she will not push us into a world of hard knocks without trying to help us adjust ourselves to men and life. Shall we treat our University as it shall treat us or shall we neglect her like the ungrateful son who forgot about his mother when she suffered in the hour of need? No! We can not turn our hearts away from our University whose very traditions assist in the molding of ennobling qualities in its students. We shall be as loyal to our University as she is to us, We shall cooperate with her in the future as she has cooperated with us in the pastg only we shall repay her labor with more loyalty and more cooperation. When we think of loyalty to New York University we shall adopt the motto of Socrates who said "Never too much!" You have won our hearts, oh Alma Mater! May the gods reward you for all that you have accomplished for our welfare! May our love for you increase with the passing years! May we never forget the word loyalty! 158 PUBLICATIONS MURRAY W. GOLDENBERG 160 Murray W. Goldenberg HE Year Book Board for the 1931 Education Violet was not satisfied with medioc- rity and so when the plans for the book were made, Murray Goldenberg was chosen editor. Nor was Murray satisfied with mediocrity--witness, The Education Violet for 1931. His experience on the Varsity boxing team had taught him how to make every blow tell, and he attacked the problem that arose in connection with the produc- tion of the school's first year book with the same gusto. He was determined to lay foundations for the future volumes, so that the task of coming editors would be made easier. He had the wisdom to welcome suggestions and the willingness to cooperate with his fellow-editors. He created interest in the undertaking, promoted the circula- tion, solicited advertising, organized a staff and produced a book which may well serve as a pattern for succeeding Violets. He has merited our respect for having executed it in a way to do him and the school credit. The 1932 Violet, to which he is going to give advisory assistance, will profit by what he has already done. Energetic, ambitious, willing, careful, far-seeing-Murray is all of these. It is not hard to read his horoscopeg he will be a success in other things as he has been in this. 161 Eclucaiion Violei' T LAST the wish of the many School of Education graduates has been fulfilled, and that wish was to have a year book to which they might look at in years to come to bring back old thoughts and many incidents of the days they spent at college. What was at first expected to be a failure by many, turned out to be a huge and overwhelming success and this success was brought about only by hard work and many, many hours of this hard work to change failure to the bright success that the Education Violet has attained. It is quite a different thing for an editor and his editorial board to walk into a well-organized system of an established year book than it is to set the machine going and keep it going after having one setback after another. The work may have been made considerably easier if it was the wish of the editor and his assistants to repeat the "features" of any number of other year books, but it was the choice of the men and women of the board to work untiringly and unselfishly so that every bit of the book would be original. This is probably the appropriate place in which to mention the wonderful work and efforts of Murray W. Goldenberg, the first editor-in-chief of the first volume of the Education Violet, for, as it was stated before, it was not only necessary to organize his assistants but it was also necessary that he obtain the co-operation of every student in the school. Now that a function, or we will say a vital point in any school has begun it is necessary to instill in those depended upon by the editor to carry on the work, that at one time was prophesied by some to be a failure, and if possible try to raise the standard set by the 1931 Education Violet, to unlimited heights. It has been expressed by the select few who have seen the "features" of the Educational Violet before they have been assembled that never before has any new year book come within the calibre that this book has attained. We hope that the students will appreciate this bit of work for which the members of the staff have had hours of tiring but enjoyable labor, the many setbacks, which were put to rout, and the handicaps under which all of this was carried on. On the other hand, the editor-in-chief and his board of editors wish to express their thanks to the many students who took Part in the various activities in the school so that news was created which, after all, goes to make up this fine annual and we hope that it will meet with the approval of our select student body. As does the future "Ed" Violet editorial staff wish for the same student spirit that it has received this year and that the future Educational Violet will push on to reach greater heights. 162 Educ:a+ion Violc-2+ Sfaff MURRAY W. GOLDENBERG Edilor-in-chief ASSOCIATE EDITORS IRA ZASLOFF HOWARD KINNAMAN ORGANIZATION COMMITTEE IRA ZASLOFF-EJUOI' BESS MIGLIORE BEATRICE WEINER ELEANOR SCHWARTZ-Affifldill PEARL HIRSGH HELEN GEIST LITERARY COMMITTEE SARIE EISENBERG-Edizor MURRAY NORDLECHT SELMA KAPLAN JUDITH KRONENBERG-AJIf.ffd7Zl GEORGE DVORYAK SENIOR COMMITTEE ISAEELLE WALTERS-Edif0f WILLIAM FRANKLE-A.fJi.f!d7Zl Blass MIGLIORE VINCENT REILLY-Anifmazr MARION MIGLIORE PHOTOGRAPHIC COMMITTEE HOWARD KINNAMAN-Edilor JEFF PETRACK RUTH WEINSTEIN PETER STOPEN-AJ'J'i.flcZ1I! SALLY SPAR MIRIAM PERLMAN HOWARD WILKINING ADVERTISING COMMITTEE ISIDORE REICH-Edirol' AL FELDNER-Aififlclflf GEORGE FORSTER BUSINESS COMMITTEE JOSEPH SCHAEDEL-Ivfdfldgw' EDWARD SOLOTAR-Affifmnt ALBERT CHARGER CIRCULAT ING COMMITTEE EDWARD SOLOTAR-Md77dg6l' SAM GELENTER DAVID GINGOLD BEss TARVEN-Afffifdfli SERINA SCI-IANHOLZ GRACE WILLIGAN JEAN D'ANNUCCI HONEY SGI-IUMAN SPORTS COMMITTEE BILL DYKES-Edil0f HILDA GOLDFEDER A IRVING WELCHER NAT BENGHEN-Affiflmzt PEARL COOPER WILLIAM FRANKLE ART COMMITTEE HAROLD MANTZ-Editor FRANK BURZOTTA Secretary lo the Editor FLORENCE QUINN-Afiifldfll GRACE PFLUGER SONDRA G. MYERSON 163 Fw 9-2 w,gd.,g yu LL VV: MW D V V .,. K, .fm l -I VV .V V ...VV VVV ' KS- V -' Vwazgv . ' VV 4 -4. V I - , V? ' if-',1 -' V Vtf. V51-V A V . . 5 5' -if-V X' .. 7, V- V ,.,,V',,f,gV VV NV . . .V A V V 4 - , V . V K .VV-f V V , . V J 3.11 Vf' ,'r'kl"I1'W3. . .V Af V V,VHV?y 'V ff-M-V . V I , VM J A EV I ,V 2 I Q L V we ep" 93553 ,- my . ,P x ,h if Q , WILLIAM 0vlg:.r'.-sz Meow c. nwzz 'sz " am znumf 31 2 ' Tllf V VIOIET' V , 'BUARD .0950 f V Q rc-mean, 51 V' j 2 .wuz Q V , mwupo 'sz A mem-?3. 'A 4 4 5 'V Q 5 . 'J Va 'lik , lmllue KMLTBQ-T .ll 1:10095 pfygyf- il . fi - 1 L 4 . Y? 1 4. :K gf . K , 3V V J , r 4 V t..'V1 1 V f , V V V . V ' ,MSE-V. W VV 'KV -V Vw- V 323 V' Vp' ,gg V V. 1 V,-,fUV+.V, uf. . ,LUV-'Q VHVf' A ynf V' x . "L - ., fr 3 ',, ,J If ,f nf 'A k, F Q .fy YV-1.535 gmfgg Vg,g!Qjg1gV, , mwmo mom : 4' V 3915: 1-- 4 ,4 Q. V -A-V. WV: if-1 - ' 'ww.V:- X ' V- '14 V' V 14- Vf L - 434'-.-' :Ng .H V V ry x 1 VV? -f f' V J 1' V. ' ff -" . '5gs4,..V 1, V. - 23- H e,-im V ,c V. V f . A - -:VW V V ,V-f.Vw'H 14 ,V S-Q W, V-up ..:V. M jg- -- - fe- V . ,. M YV' 'UVLAVVX2 -.V- -V .9 w M. V: 'V 51" fffw . V V5 V 'V zrk ' i V ' V - :Pl '5fVf!igS. liqg-,gl K V gwfffg' - 1 1 ,-my fired- X wa - X - " xr :'.kffxf1fV in-if S- V.--s gd - -,Vf ' V .H "mx V, -V' 1 3 J V' . V' 91 . .V .A 'V .,.5j1sVL 1-1.55 - I VIOLET BOARD OF EDITORS ' 164 E The Physical Educafion Sun' HE Physical Education Sun is a bi-monthly newspaper, published for the students of the department of Physical Education under the Bureau of Publicity of the Men's and Women's Organization. This newspaper is the only newspaper in the country known to distribute physical education news exclusively. The first issue of the paper was printed on October Sth, and distributed on October 6, 1930, to all the students and faculty members of the department, graduate students and the alumni. The news published in the paper is of the following nature, the happenings at conferences which have been attended by the members of our faculty, sport events in which the department has been a participant, lectures by authors on news of interest to the profession, interesting and important notes on discoveries in the field of Hygiene, Physical Education, and Medicine, and other facts of importance that may interest those in the department. Originally the newspaper was intended to be a two-sheet copy, but due to the in- crease in activities of the students of the department the issues were increased to a three-sheet edition, then to a four, and, at present is a live-sheet newspaper with added features of editorials by some of the most prominent men in the profession. At present plans are being made by which we may correspond with graduate members of the department located in foreign countries such as China, South America, the Philippines, and Europe. EDITORS A. CHARGER S. SPAR ASSOCIATE EDITOR F. A. JACKSON ASSISTANT EDITORS ' T. MACRINI H. WILKENING FACULTY ADVISOR PROFESSOR F. S. LLOYD 165 The Ediior Wishes io Thank R. ROBERT W. KELLY of the Cloister Printing Corporation and Miss Margaret Vollmer, Secretary of Student Activities at N. Y. U., whose many suggestions and reassure in troubled times contributed much to the success of the Violetg Mr. Dexter White, Mr. Charles johnson, and Miss Bessie Ellinson, of the White Studios, who managed the thousands of details in photographyg The Staff, who contributed not only their time to the production of the book but a composite personality, which left the Editor not a little sentimental when, at the completion of the work, shop was closed for the last time. MURRAY W. GOLDENBERG, Edilor-in-Chief, Edlzmlion Violet, 1931. 166 ATHLETICS VARSITY FOOTBALL, 1950 Foo+ball, I930 ARMINGDALE reports varied so much that the undergraduates hardly knew what to be- lieve. On the one hand, enthusiastic Alumni were praising the team to the skiesg on the other, the more pessimistic sport scribes were making gloomy forecasts. The "Super-Sophsi' and "Vio- lent Violets" had no power, and no experience. Witlm all these conflicting statements com- ing from the "Front," everyone looked forward to the first game. Hobart fell a victim in a lop-sided battle which warmed the hearts of the majority but caused the pessimists to bewail the fact that it was not another 77-0 affair as had been the first meeting with Vermont the year before. The next two or three contests did not definitely win over the cynics. By this time, however, the students were pretty well satisfied with their "Gridiron" representa- tives. The Fordham tilt, though the sports writers had "told us so," was a disappointment but the brilliant showing against Carnegie the very next week not only redeemed the team but boosted their stock far above its previous high. Two 7-6 defeats at the hands of Georgia and Colgate, rated as two of the best teams in the country, failed to dim the ardor of the N. Y. U. rooters and the close of the season found them still laud- ing their men and predicting miracles for the squad and disaster for their opponents-next year. 169 i I IIA Nt Y. U.-35 Hobari-0 In spite of the fact that the score was so one-sided, most of the Violet followers were disappointed in the first showing of the year. True to the predictions of the "Experts," the team lacked experience. Of power, drive, and speed there were plenty, but the Sophomore backfield lacked polish. Hobart's entire season of playing netted only one touchdown. The first quarter' ended in a scoreless tie. The Violet line managed to smear a good many of the Hobart rushes but the backfield seemed to find some difficulty in getting under way. In the second quarter an inspired backfield "just busted loose," Tanguay ripped and tore through the Hobart defense for two touchdowns, while Bill and Bob McNamara each scored once. The half ended 28-0. The third quarter was more or less even, having as its only distinction an attempt at a field goal by Tanguay. So unusual an event should be justly recognized. In the fourth Tanguay again broke through for a score and Chick decided to give his substi- tutes a chance. joe La Mark should come in for his share of glory, while Ashton and Galbraith of Hobart did their bit to make the game more interesting. 170 N. Y. U.-4I W. Va. Wesleyan-6 The second game against somewhat better opposition still failed to impress the spectators, though Wesleyan was fairly smothered by the Violet cohorts. Wlien Cliff Battles of the Orange and Black made the 65-yard run for a touchdown in the first quarter, it looked as though it might be a tough game. Meehan didn't wait long after Battles made his run before he sent his first team in. From then on, in spite of the brilliant playing and ball carrying of Mr. Battles, the game was lop-sided. Tanguay managed to score soon after he entered. The second quarter was much the same as the Hobart second, while the entire second half was the unsuccessful attempt of a worn out group of players to keep a "machine" from scoring. Tanguay added three more touchdowns to his record, while La Mark, Dunn, and V. Connor each crossed the goal line once. La Mark showed improvement over his work in the Hobart game. In this game N. Y. U. established a rather hard mark to shoot at by completing 10 forward passes. 171 nz laura 4 4"-'J 1' - A- - N. Y. U.-20 Villanova-6 With Tanguay out of the line-up, due to a leg injury he had received in the West Virginia Wesleyan game, it seemed that the Violets had lost some of their vio- lence and must resort to deception to make headway. The press-agented brilliance of thc Wildcats was conspicuous by its absence and the game from the very beginning was rather dull. La Mark made two beautiful runs of 36 and 43 yards, one on a fake pass and the other on a smash through right tackle. Scores were rather scarce as compared to the two previous games. Gardner accounted for the visitors' only score on a pass in the second period, while La Mark made the grade twice and Bob MacNamara once for Alma Mater. Both McNamaras were consistent ground gainers for the Meehan men, while Casey, Geisler, and Gardner performed best for the "Cats." Bob's punt average of fifty yards was a big factor in the Violet attack. H2 ' HI L H ba l . N. Y. U.-38 Missouri-0 Once again a game that failed really to test the Super-Sophs. Missouri came East admittedly a poor team. At no time did the visitors come closer than the 20-yard line. The work of Nemecek and Chalmers, though good in the previous games, was by far the best of the season in this game. The Violet line showed tremendous power on both offense and defense. In the second half, however, the Tigers suddenly uncorked a beautiful passing game, which for a few moments seemed to have the Violet players stopped. They scored four first downs but failed to take advantage of their opportunities. Hubert Campbell of the Tigers showed exceptional ability in his punting. La Mark, McNamara, and Tanguay, as usual, did the tallying. The latter, though playing only during the second and third quarters, scored three times. The feature of the game and the nightmare of Bill Corum was the playing of "that line." Concannon, Schneider, Murphy, Greenblatt, and Hugret did themselves Justice. 173 N. Y. U.-0 Fordham-7 How tragic! A fumble and "Au Revoir" to our clean slate. At worst the game should have been a scoreless tie but, as goes the old alibi, "the breaks were against us." Both teams showed wonderful line work and neither backfield seemed able to pierce the sturdy defense of their opponents. In spite of this, the field generals in- sisted on making it a rather dull game by consistently hammering the forward walls. Chalmers and Grenblatt joined the casulty list, and jim Murphy was carried off the field unconscious. Probably this was to avenge the injustice he had done in scoring a touchdown after Elcewicz had recovered Tanguay's fumble on the N. Y. U. 4-yard line. The only feature to this hard game was the fact that some 78,000 customers stood in the same number of seats. This game had no individual stars. 174 p e , ' ' V ',LX,xTJ'E - - 1 ' . T . . - ?"zf'1: H'.w'3,,. -rn - ,Aish ' T T , s ' ' N. Y. U.-20 Carnegie-7 p Filled with fuming fury by Fordham's feat, the vehement, vengeful Violets vigor- ously and violently on a rip-roaring, raging rampage, ran the touted Titan team ragged. What a victory! The Super-Sophs showed the stuff they were made of by smash- ing through the powerful Carnegie team to a cleancut decisive win. Once again Tanguay was missing from the line-up. But-this was Bob McNamara's day. Inspired to the "nth" degree Robert cut, slashed, twisted, and smashed his way through the big Plaid team. The rest of the backfield seemed to have been bitten by the same contagious "pep" bug which had got Bob. joe La Mark played an exceptional game at Quarterback. To add to his achievement, he also scored two touchdowns. The Violets tallied in the first, second, and fourth periods, while Steffens' squad made the grade only in the second quarter. Nemecek and Herman La Mark also gave very good account of themselves and that same line that held Missouri and Fordham still seemed almost puncture-proof. 175 N. Y. U.-6 Georgia-7 Two such grilling contests as those with Fordham and Tech told on the Violet line. When Georgia, with a splendid season record and a wealth of such players as Maffet, Smith, Downs and Roberts, came to the Polo Grounds, "that line" found its hands full. The visitors, in a beautiful exhibition of versatility, out-passed, out-kicked and out- rushed Chick's congregation. N. Y. U.'s backs apparently could not break loose, while Georgia had freedom of the field. However, with the cooperation of Dame Fortune, the Violets were able to hold the Georgians at the most critical moments. In the second quarter, a Hash of offensive prowess put Nemecek 8: Co., in the lead by 6 points. The "Crackers" answered in the next period by collecting 7 points. Again, in the last three minutes, N. Y. U. "pulled a Sherman." They marched right through Georgia for some 60 yards and it was only Roberts' interception of Tanguay's pass that saved the visitors from defeat. 176 . . i r ... l e A N. Y. U.-2 Georgetown-0 For two years Georgetown had had the "Indian Sign" on the Meehanmen. For two successive years an inferior team had somehow, inexplicably, eked out victories over a better team. But on November 15, Lady Luck decided to turn her back on the Hoyas and give N. Y. U. a break. It was just such a day as would call for a break. It was a Navy football day- wet ball, wet grounds, and rain. Everything was set to aid in the establishment of a new fumble mark. The Violets excelled in kicking and slipping, the Hilltoppers were supreme in their rushing and fumbles. Neither team stood much chance of scoring. Hence, the break. Bordeaux in completing one of Georgetown's 9 fumbles, permitted N. Y. U. to recover on their opponent's 7-yard line. Four rushes availed little and the ball went to the visitors. Scalzi, their Quarterback, dropped back to kick to safety but accidently stepped out of the end zone and donated 2 points to the Violets' already large total of 0. Later a last minute attempt of Scalzi's to win with a forty yard drop kick fell short. 177 A . ., W, , I .5 - s . hz .. ..A N. Y. U.-33 Rulgers-0 What should have been one of the hardest games on the schedule, if last year's showing had been a good indication, was merely a "push-over" for N. Y. U. Grossman, fpardon--Rutgersj could do nothing with the powerful offense of the Violet forces. McNamara, Joe La Mark, McDonald, and Tanguay took turns running hither and thither with the ball or throwing it back and forth to each other. They tried 31 passes and completed 19, for a total of 362 yards. Their rushes added 200 more. No individual stood out among the New Yorkers, though Grossman outshone the rest of the Scarlet team. Probably the queerest feature of the game was the total of 184 yards for penalties against N. Y. U. and 50 yards lost for the Scarlet. As one writer puts it "rushing yardage" . . . "Umpires and Referees-254 yardsg N. Y. U. and Rutgers-217 yards net." 178 N. Y. U.-6 Colgele-7 Fight? And how. When a team comes to New York with the sole purpose of "walloping the living daylights" out of N. Y. U., they've got a job on their hands. That's exactly what Colgate wanted to do. A smashing victory would clinch their claim to the Eastern title. The game had hardly started when Macaluso and Orsi, with rushes and a forward pass, crossed the N. Y. U. line for a touchdown. The Maroon horde was full of fight and the Violets, apparently in awe of Colgate's reputation, had all it could do to hold them in that first quarter. When, in the second period, Macaluso was stopped dead twice in succession, Chick's men began to perk up. By the third quarter Colgate was tiring and the Violet machine seemed to be saying to itself, "Who is this guy Macaluso ?" The last period found N. Y. U. almost as good as new. They were outplaying Colgate, then a pass by Tanguay, and a touchdown by La Mark put the Violets again in the running. The Violet rooters went mad. But Orsi, the Colgate tackle, blocked the kick for the point-and the season was over. I 179 Foolloall, l930-3I N. Y. U ............. ........ Q -35 Hobart College ........................................,.... 0 N. Y. U ............. .. ,....... 41 W. Va. Wesleyan University .....,..... . 6 N. Y. U ............. .........,. 2 O Villanova College ....................................... 6 N. Y. U ............. ..... . ...38 University of Missouri ........................ 0 N. Y. U ............. ........... 0 Fordham University ........................,........ 7 N .Y. U .....,..,.... ........... 2 O Carnegie Institute of Tech ................ 7 N. Y. U ............. ........... 6 University of Georgia ................. .,... 7 N. Y. U ............. ........... 2 Georgetown University ........................ 0 N. Y. U ............. ........... 3 3 Rutgers University ..................... .......... 0 N. Y. U ............. ........... 6 Colgate University ................ .......... 7 Cazpmin ................ ......,........ J ERRY NEMECEK Coach .............. ............ J OHN F. MEEHAN 180 "Over-Emphasis" OW that another season of football has passed, we hear that sport being verbally dragged over the coals again, this time by no less a personage than Dr. Nicholas Murray Butler. Probably because it was he who started it this year, we have heard more than ever about it. In fact, some writers treat it as though it were a "scoop" A little common sense and exercise of memory will bring to light the fact that every year there has been some sort of post-season rumpus. It's not new. It's merely a boring repetition of the pendulum swing to the opposite extreme-"no gate money." To us it seems rather foolish. Elimination of the gate receipts would, for all prac- tical purposes, kill the other athletic activities. Except for basketball in the Middle West and the East, there is no other sport that seems to be able to support itself, let alone others. The large gate receipts have more than justified themselves. How could the alumni ever hope to support college sports as well as football does? Why limit the audience to grads and undergrads? Is each college game a secret ritual? If the people wish to pay as they do and feel that they are getting value for their money, why not continue to let them? It's not just the thirty men on the squad, but the whole under- graduate body which benefits by the sports and intra-murals supported by football income. If we cut out proselyting and discontinue athletic scholarships, then the root of whatever evil there is will have been eliminated. It's alumni meddling that brought about that situation. It's the so-called "paid athlete" who is supposed to give one insti- tution an advantage over another. Let's put him out and we'll have better games and possibly bigger receipts. There are plenty of good men in college not only willing but anxious to go through the drudgery of practice for just the glory of it. . l8I VARSITY BASKETBALL 1930-31 l Varsi+y Baskefball N spite of the fact that it had lost several stats through graduation, this year's court squad made a fine showing for itself. It undertook the hardest schedule to be played by any Violet five in several seasons and lost only five closely contested battles of the fifteen in which it en- gaged. Manhattan, third in Eastern ranking, was responsible for two of these defeats while Ford- ham, C. C. N. Y. and Pittsburgh each took one. Almost at the beginning of the season, the Cann quintet was in danger when an inspired "setup" known as Stevens Tech was just nosed out in the last minute of play. The fighting spirit shown by the Violets in coming from behind to save the game was just what the doctor prescribed. From then on the team had the confidence it needed. Outstanding was the victory over St. john's College. This was one of the greatest upsets in the sport. St. john's was rated almost a 2 to 1 favorite. However, to do the Redmen justice, they just happened to have an off night while the New Yorkers were feeling pretty good. Monty Banks was the individual star of the team, with Nemecek, Seigle, Lofft and I-Iugret pushing him hard for top honors. Monty, by the way, is one of our Education boys. Though Banks, Lefft and others will be lost to next year's team, Coach Cann will not lack for material. The 1930-31 Baby Violets were a crack team. In a schedule which included St. john's, Fordham's, Manhattan's, and C. C. N. Y.'s Freshman teams besides several of the best High School and Y. M. C. A. teams in the city, the yearlings performed nobly. Not one defeat was registered to mar their recordg and every defeat was decisive. There were no two ways about it. The Freshmen turned out a team of world bearers. For next season, Hagen Anderson canlt be kept off the squad. If any one were to be credited with the lion's share of the Frosh victories, it should be he. In playing a beautiful game at guard position and still being high scorer of the team, he proved himself thoroughly capable of taking up the reins where Newblatt and Banks left off. Lancaster and Liebowitz performed ex- cellently as forwards while Gletzer turned in a splendid record both defensively and offensively. With a little more polishing Lefft will be there fighting for a regular berth at center. No Sir! There will be no dearth of material for the 1931-32 Varsity. l 183 Violei' Tossers Subclue Villanova by 39-2I New York University speeded up considerably and defeated the Villanova cagers, 59-21 at the 102nd Engineers Armory. The Violets did its best playing in the first half, piling up a 23-15 lead. joe Hugrets' jumping at center, and the fast running plays of Lou Werner and Monty Banks were the winning factors for N. Y. U. Lou Werner was the high scorer for N. Y. U. in its sixth victory out of eight games. He made live field baskets, four in the opening half, and a pair of fouls for 12 points. Monty Banks and jerry Nemecek each were tied for second honors with nine points. Action was slow through- out the second half, N. Y. U.'s defensive playing holding Villanova. In the preliminary game the N. Y. U. freshmen trounced the Bronx Union Y. M. C. A. for their fourth straight victory. Anderson of N. Y. U. was high scorer with 11 points. Violets Overvvhelm Lafayette Passers The Lafayette College basketball team was no match for the N. Y. U. live and suf- fered one of its worst defeats in years by a 57-15 score. The Maroon passers made but four field goals during the entire game, so closely were they guarded, while the visitors had little difiiculty in finding the basket, getting fourteen field goals with Hicks, an Easton boy, Banks, and Nemecek of football fame, leading the attack. Both coaches used practically every man on the squad, coach Lorenz, of Lafayette, in the hope that Leopards would keep the score down, and coach Cann, of the visitors, to look over his players, as this was the first game of the season for the visitors. The half score was 20-9. New York went into the lead at the start and was never in danger. During the second half, Lafayette made but one held goal and four fouls. N. Y. U. Team Upseis Toronio by 40-I4 N. Y. U. won its 3rd consecutive game of the season by repulsing the University of Toronto 40-14 in an international contest at the 102nd Regiment Armory. A gather- ing of more than 500 saw the Violet regulars make an impressive initial home appearance. ' Lou Werner with four field and two foul goals, was the high scorer and fea- tured the N. Y. U. offense. Hal Lefi't and Monty Banks were next with six points. The entire squad saw action. Riggs registered Toronto's first point in the second half on a free shot after about 10 minutes of play. As though this was the signal for a Violet scoring spree, the regulars were sent into the fray and immediately proceeded to pile up points. Nemecek gave Lefft a pass near the basket which the latter made good and soon after Banks' field goal was followed by Wernerls single pointer. With a few minutes to play, Hines' goal from scrimmage gave Toronto its last tally as the game closed. 184 Violei' Quiniei' Downs S'l'even Tech by Single Poini' The N. Y. U. basketball team defeated the Stevens Tech five by a split second be- fore 2,500 fans in the latters gym in Hoboken. The score was 25-24 and the victory kept the Violet slate clean, but for a few minutes everybody in the gym thought that Stevens had won. Roger McLean tossed a basket from mid-court apparently in the last minute of play, with Stevens trailing by one point. Oliicials after a huddle, announced, however, that the throw was started after time-had been called, and the goal accordingly was disallowed. It was explained that the blank cartridge in the timer's gun had failed to explode when he sought to signal the end of the game. In consequence all the spec- tators thought the battle was still on. The N. Y. U. quintet had a narrow squeak after apparently sewing the game up. Witli but 3 minutes to play the Violets led, 22-16 Stevens rallied and although N. Y. U. also managed to score, the Violets entered the final minute but a point to the good. Instead of playing safe, the New Yorkers tried for another goal but a poor pass allowed McLean to take the ball for his sensational shot. Manhaifan College Beais Violels in Benefii' Game The Manhattan-N. Y. U. game was close throughout. Fouls featured the first half with McCormick and Kelleher scoring field goals. These baskets were all registered with the aid of Shaird, who made the play possible by passing to a spot and finding his men ready. The half ended with Manhattan leading 10-8. Banks and Nemecek combined brilliantly at the start of the second half to give N. Y. U. life, but Leonard, McCormick and Kelleher, the stocky center galloped through despite LefTt's efforts and soon led, 15-12. Werner and Banks gave the gathering an- other breathless moment, scoring fouls to bring the Violet within a point of the jaspers, but Kelleher made good on a foul attempt as the final gong sounded, beating the Violets 17-15. N. Y. U. Quiniei Tops Siubborn Ruigers 30-26 The N. Y. U. basketball team overcame a stubborn Rutgers quintet 30-26, at the 22nd Engineer's Armory and registered its fifth consecutive victory of the season. The Violet led, 15-10' at the end of the first half, largely through the brilliant shooting of Banks. Rutgers fought its way into the lead midway of the second half only to drop behind as the Violet put on a desperate closing rally. Banks started the second half for N. Y. U. by caging his fifth goal of the game as he went crashing into the circus seats. Siegel's long shot made the score 19-16. Rutgers was playing fast basketball and Giulder put the New Brunswick team only a point behind, his one handed shot from the side dropped in. Finally after the score was tied at 22-22 Rutgers went ahead by a two point margin. Nemecek at this point got busy, by caging a goal and one foul putting N. Y. U. ahead. Werner made a foul shot and Siegel scored from under the basket and Nemecek's two foul shots ended the Violet scoring. For the final three minutes N. Y. U. froze the ball. V 185 Georgefown Loses +0 Violefs by 34-3I Holding off Georgetown's closing rush, N. Y. U. basketball team scored a hard fought 34-31 victory at the 102nd Engineers Armory before a crowd of 1,200. A list- less first half was succeeded by a second period that fairly streamed over with excite- ment. Captain Wald Morris of the visitors scored 16 points, and joe Hugret, N. Y. U. centre, took scoring honors for his team. The N. Y. U. team held a 22-19 edge at half time. On the rebound from defeats suffered in rapid order at the hands of Pitt, Columbia and Manhattan, the Violet flashed its best brand of court work this season. A quick passing attack engineered by Captain Nemecek, Hugret and Banks, culminated several times in baskets by the forward men. In the Hnal minutes of play, when one point separated both teams scores, Banks lifted a basket and the New York five played safe. As the game came to a close Hugret made good a foul shot. PiH'sburgh Too Good for Violefs A slump in the team's work after the Rutgers victory brought defeats at the hands of the Pittsburgh and Columbia fives. Pitts western style of play pierced the Violet defense at will, to win 40-22. New York tied the score twice in the second half, but the dizzy pace set by Pitt was too much for the Violet. Pittsburgh with its sweeping "pick off" plays led by Albright and Kowallis was just a bit too good for our boys, although Banks and Nemecek played hne defensive games. Washingfon and Lee Bow +o Violefs Three consecutive defeats did not affect the team's morale, judging from its appear- ance in the Washington and Lee and Georgetown battles. The Conn. team played its best game to emerge victorious over a tall W. 8: L. outfit that had compiled an enviable record before losing to the Violet. The final score was 39-26. As usual Monty Banks played a stellar defensive and offensive game which was a thing of beauty to watch from the spectators point of view. Violef Beafs S+. Johns in Year's Biggesi' Upsel' With a 27-23 licking at the 102nd Regiment Armory, the varsity basketballers brought St. john's red-shirted quintet to the end of its long victory trail that covered twenty-four games. When they dig into the mothballs for records of Violet basketball teams and when they look for Violet heroes, the five that downed St. johns in that thriller of thrillers will be remembered as the best. Cocky and confident, with all the elan and poise of a conqueror, the red shirted outfit from Brooklyn was as good as it felt and acted. But the Violet team had spirit and fight and Monty Banks. It is unfair to heap the lion's share of the game on one player, but the 4,000 who saw the game gave it to Banks. Short and stocky, he raced about the court, making and shooting passes in a manner that upset the losers. The visitors had a bewildering attack, but the Violet five man defense baffled it. After shaking off the first minute nervousness, the Cann coached five swung into its stride and clearly outplayed the losers throughout parts of the final game. 186 Manl1aHan Rally Defeais Violel' 23-2l The Manhattan College basketball team dehnitely proved last night that if a team makes enough baskets the foul shots are unimportant, and in doing so the undefeated jaspers ran their string of consecutive triumphs to sixteen with a fine victory over a gallant N. Y. U. five by a score of 23-21. Manhattan made good in only two of its nine fouls, whereas the Violet players sank nine out of fourteen. Manhattan, however, in true workmanlike manner, realized the full value of the two-pointers to score ten baskets, while the proud conquerors of St. johns were held to six. The second triumph this winter for Manhattan over N. Y. U. was decisive despite the closeness of the final score and despite the alarming fact that N. Y. U. led the green-clad players 7-0 at the outset. Shaid and Hasset then piled up 8 points to make it 10-8 in favor of the Violet at the half period. The lead see-sawed in the second half, with but a minute to go McCormack sunk a two-pointer in from the center of the court, giving the Manhattan five a two point lead. Fighl' Violetl Quinlef Loses Final Game lo C. C. N. Y.-29-24 The victory over the Violet quintet rested at the end of a trail thicketed with the cramp of the Lavender outfit, the dour face of a fate that made eye-last misses of Violet shots and the bedlam of 6,000 fans and the varsity found the going too rough. It was a sad end to a season that was marked Saturday after Saturday by a battling series of ups and downs. Yet against C. C. N. Y. the varsity rallied after making a miserable start and pounded down the stretch with as brave a show of courage and grit as any Violet team has ever shown. Held to a single score from the floor in the first half and facing a 15-7 handicap going into the second period, Howard Cann's team picked itself together, and fought within hailing distance of the Lavender time after time, and at the end threw a scare into the hysterical City rooters by climbing to within 3 points of the City College lead. Violel Quinlel Nosecl Ou+ by Slrong Ram Five-27-26 Some 4,000 fans who sat in the 102nd Regiment Armory were treated to numerous thrilling pictures by jerry Radice, whose brilliant playing gave his team the victory and by Sammy Siegel whose total of 12 points just fell short of enough to win. Wliile the Violets were trying for and missing the basket, their rivals were making good connections. Hurley and Putzer were credited with four points each, Red Weiss chalked up a goal and a foul and jerry Radice came through with two points. The half ended at 15-8 in favor of the Ram. The Violet began to End the basket in the second half, and the lead see-sawed until Radice's long heave clinched the game for Fordham in the final seconds of play. 187 PM is Q., . Q' 'Fir F, ' Ev . i C . -kv VARSITY TRACK, 1930 Ouicloor Track ITH Harry Schneider at the tiller the ship of the N. Y. U. track team will swing into the turbulent waters of one truly stormy schedule. With Coach Von Elling as ship builder, how- ever, the chances of the team's foundering in the storm are weak indeed. With Schneider and jones entered in the shotput, Von Elling has a compass that will set the crew well on the route to victory. Resnick, as a potential first in the weight throw, and Sid Elstein, former junior javelin champ, will form the steel plates that will take the buffers of the waves of competition and cast them off as mere lappings of the tide. Maloney, stellar miler of the violet group, will be the steel pointed prow of the ship, which will cut through competition as the Leviathan cuts through the waves that beset its paths. Krosney and Fogel will be the wheel that will keep the ship straight on its all con- quering course, for it is a rare thing for a team to have two such truly fast sprinters, while Sandler, sturdy two miler, may be likened to the motor which keeps faithfully pounding away until the ship comes into port. Harry Hoffman, broadjumper and 220 man of interscholastic fame, will be the portholes, through which one may see victory approaching but is perfectly safe from any onset of the fighting waters. Roach, Pumphry, Trachey, and Sandler, will be the gyroscope that will reduce to a minimum the chance of any of the crew getting seasick, for this is practicaly the fastest mile relay in metro- politan sections. And joe Hickey, former miler, will be assistant navigator to Von Elling, and between the two of them there is no doubt that the ship will come in. There are several promising candidates who will come into notice as the vagaries of the sea of competition are met, and these can be called the radio, of which there is not much to be heard until something happens to the other parts of a ship, and something has to be done in an emergency. 189 Track I-IE Violet varsity track team, 1929 I. C. 4 A. indoor champions, was forced to be content with fourth place at the title games last winter. The Violet minus the valuable services of Captain Phil Edwards and Fred Veit did not possess the strength to check the advances of the strong Cornell, Pennsylvania and Harvard teams. N. Y. U. scored fifteen points in the intercollegiate meet, and Captain Sol Furth completed three years of competition in I. C. A. A. A. A. indoor meets with an all-time scoring record of twenty-five points, surpassing the record of eighteen points made by Princeton's Hills from 1923 to 1925. Coach Emil Von Elling's charges won the Metropolitan A. A. U. indoor title and also took a prominent part in the various indoor club and college meets in New York, Boston, Philadelphia and Canada. In the outdoor season the Violet cinder path team won from Georgetown, Colgate, Rutgers and the Army in dual meets. At the I. C. -1 A. meet in Cambridge the N. Y. U. team scored seven points. Captain Sol Furth placed second in the running broad jump while his teammate Dave Myers finished third in the javelin throw. In the indoor season the Violet trackmen captured ninety-seven first place medals, seventy-one second place medals, and sixty-three third place medals. Track, I930 N. Y. U .............. .......... 7 1-1X3 Colgate ........... .......... 5 4-273 N. Y. U .............. .......... 7 1-3X4 Army ................... .......... 5 4-1f4 N. Y. U .............. .......... 9 7 Georgetown ......... .......... 3 8 N. Y. U .............. .......... 8 7-5f12 Rutgers ................ .......... 5 4-U4 I. C. 4 A. Meer, Cambridge, Mass. 2nd in Broad Jump 5rd in Javelin Penn Relays First in hop, skip and jump, second in broad jump, second in distance medley relay championship, second in 4-mile relay championship, third in discus throw, third in shuttle hurdle relay, third in freshman mile relay, fourth in 2-mile relay, third in sprint relay, fifth in shot put. Captain ...................................... ............................ S or. FURTH C oarla ........... ............... E MIL VON ELLING 190 Varsily Indoor Track HE Track team gave a wonderful account of itself in the indoor meets this year. For the second year in a row the Violet athletes took the Metropolitan A.A.U. track title. It is the only college team to have this honor. Chuck jones, Schneider, Fogcl, Sandler, Barker and Grodman along with the Medley relay team accounted for a total of 27 points to capture the meet. Though once again the team failed to recapture the Inter-collegiate AAAA indoor championship, it managed to place fifth. jones tallied four points with a second place in the shot put, Rezneck three more with a third in the weight event while Schneider, Krosney, and Maloney managed to make the final tally twelve points. Jones, Krosney and Barker again came through in the National A. A. U. Cham- pionships and, with a point from Nat Lerner, compiled eight points to tie the New York Athletic Club for third place. Other consistent N. Y. U. men performing unattached were Spitz, Nordell and Singer. Spitz, as everyone already knows, set a new world's record in the high jump when he beat Harold Osborne at the Metropolitan meet with a leap of six feet seven inches. Singer has been taking most all the sprint events run in the Metropolitan area this season while Nordell has placed consistently in the longer runs. 191 VARSITY BASEBALL, 1930 Varsify Baseball HE 1930 squad turned in one of the best rec- ords that any Violet diamond team has made in years. Of the 22 contests engaged in, the team won 15 and lost seven. Standing out were the victories over Columbia, St. john's and Rutgers. The Fordham combination broke even, while Army, Pennsylvania, Holy Cross, N. Y. A. C., Yale, and the Quantico Marines beat the Violet warriors. Coach McCarthy's outfit scored one hundred and forty-six runs during the season, while hold- ing their opponents to one hundred and two rallies. The team's batting overage was a fair .259. There will be quite a call for new material this year. The graduation of most of the veteran infielders leaves McCarthy with the difficult task of filling their boots. Coach Robert's freshman nine, however, turned in a promising record of six victories and three defeats. All three losses were at the hands of powerful teams and by the narrowest of margins. The cub team will be able to furnish some fairly good material for this year's pitching staff. Bob McNamara, the galloping, line-smashing sophomore back of the 1930 Gridmen, is a pitcher of no mean ability. With him will be John Symanzyk, a southpaw artist, Zignor, Herzog and Shearer, another left hander. The addition of jimmy Lee, who operated behind the bat so successfully for last year's yearlings, will be a great asset to the Varsity bat- tery squad. The rest of the infield will probably ,V , be taken care of by some of last year's substitutes. 5 For the outfield, the frosh furnished some excellent material in the shape of MacDonald, one of Bob's football mates, and last season's slugging sensation, "Babe" Boggini, who will aspire to fill Kastner's old patrol in center field. If only that infield can be patched up we'll have a dandy team for 1931. 195 Baseball HE varsity baseball team won fifteen games and lost but seven. This was one of the best records turned in by a Violet diamond team in years. In 1922 the N. Y. U. ball team won seven and lost six games. In 1923 the Violet diamond combination won thirteen of the twenty games played and in 1924 and 1925 the varsity outfits lost four out of nineteen games each season. Nine games out of a program of twenty-one games were lost in the 1927 season and the following year the team won fifteen of the twenty diamond encounters. Last season the McCarthy-coached nine won-sixteen of their twenty-two games. The 1930 outfit tallied one hundred and forty-six runs while their opponents crossed the Violet home plate one hundred and two times. The team had a hitting average of .259. Victories over Columbia, Manhattan, City College, Duke, Villanova, St. john's, Rutgers, Stevens and the alumni were the bright spots on the 1930 record. The Violet won twice from Colgate and also twice from Georgetown. Coach William V. McCarthy's team broke even with Fordham and the Quantico Marines. Holy Cross, Pennsylvania, the N. Y. A. C., the Army, and Yale won from N. Y. U. Baseball, I930 N. Y. U ...,...,..... ,,.................... 3 Alumni .......... N. Y. U ............. .,.... ..... 1 0 Columbia ......,...... N. Y. U ............. ............ 4 Manhattan .......... N.Y.U N.Y.U N.Y.U Colgate .......... Yale .................,................. Quantico Marine ............... ..,.... N. Y. U ............. .,.......... 3 Quantico Marines .,,.,.,..... ........ N. Y. U ............. ...... ..... 5 G eorgetown ......,............... ....... N. Y. U ............. ............ 3 Stevens Tech. ..................... ....... . N. Y. U ............. ............ 4 Univ. of Pennsylvania ........ ............. N. Y. U ............. ....... .... 1 1 St. john's ...................................................... N. Y. U ............. ............ 5 Army ................. Q14 inningsj N. Y. U ............. ............ 1 2 Duke ..................... ........,,................... N. Y. U ......... .... ............ 1 5 Villanova ............. ....................................... N. Y. U ............. ............ 7 Colgate ...,,..,.... ............. Q 14 inningsj N. Y. U ............. ................. 3 Fordham ....... ..................,...........,....... N.Y.U N.Y.U ............. ...... N.Y.U Rain 3 ,......16 N.Y.U ............. ..........,. 1 2 N.Y.U N. Y. N.Y.U C 4 plain ....,.,.... C oath .............. 1 U ............. ...... .... 9 0 Princeton Holy Cross ....,....... City College Rutgers ..................... Georgetown ........... Fordham ............. N. Y. A. C. WARREN MAYELL ...............Vk7ILLIAM V. MCCARTHY Frosh Sporls N freshman sports the N. Y. U. athletes managed to present a good showing and helped to assure the varsity coaches of valuable material for future campaigns. The frosh football team won from St. john's Prep, Mackenzie School, Eastman Business College, Bellefonte Academy, Vermont Academy and the Rutgers Freshmen. Both Dean Academy and the Fordham University Freshmen defeated Coach Arthur H. Roberts' cub eleven. The Maroon yearlings won from the N. Y. U. eleven in a post- season charity contest. The showing of the Frosh Basketball and Football squads set a standard almost too high for other Frosh teams to try for. The court record of nine games won of the nine scheduled games, not to mention other minor engagements was hardly better than that of the Pigskin rustlers who lost but two of their engagements. The 1930 cross- country Frosh team went undefeated in dual competition, and the 1930 yearling baseball squad showed six victories for three defeats. The '31 Frosh Cross-country and Track Qwe really should say 'arty squads, though not active at the time of this writing, have a lineup that should take all of its meets. With Spitz in the high jump event, Twomey and Nordell in the mile, and Lamb, the former inter-scholastic quarter-mile champion, most any coach would be satisfied. But there also are Zarembe and Itzkowitz of the grid team out for weight throwing and other former scholastic stars to round out the group. In Fencing, Boxing and Swimming the Freshmen have shown excellent material, but aside from the coaches' report of material on hand there seems to be very little information as to any definite activities of these squads. 195 Boxing HE VIOLET boxers won from Syracuse, M. I. T., West Virginia, and Bucknell. Coach Fred John's team lost close decisions to the Army and to Western Maryland. Captain Dan Pinsky and Yustin Sirutis of the N. Y. U. boxing outfit won inter- collegiate titles at the meeting of the Eastern Intercollegiate Boxing Association at Phila- delphia. Pinsky won the 125 point crown and Sirutis was awarded the heavyweight title. Pinsky won sixteen straight hghts in his three years of college boxing. Ten were won via the knockout route. Boxing, I930 N. Y. U ............ .............. 2 Western Maryland .......... ........ 5 N. Y. U ............ ......... 7 Syracuse ........................ ........ O N. Y. U ....,...,... ......... 3 Army ............................ ........ 4 N. Y. U .........,.. .....,... 6 West Virginia ......... ........ 1 N. Y. U ............ ......... 4 Manhattan ........... ........ 0 N. Y. U ............ ....,.... 5 Bucknell ......... ........ 2 N. Y. U ............ ,,.,.... ..... 5 M ass. I. T. ........ ........ 2 In+ercollegia+es 125-pound Clmnzpiozz ......,......,,....,,,,,...........................,.......,....... ............ D AN PINSKY Hearyweiglvl Champion ............... ........,........... .,........ Y U STIN SIRUTIS TEAM Captain .......................,., .............,.......... ..................., ...........,... D A N NY PINSKY ED MARMEL MILT HUTNER DAN PINSKY YUSTIN SIRUTIS HARRY SLOMOWITZ GEORGE FORSTER JACK GOLD WILL MCKEON NED BERNFIELD MURRAY W. GOLDENBERG HARRY COHEN JOE SALGANIK EDWARD BLAU HENRY MASSARI SID MESSER Manager ....................................... .,........................................... G EOROE Sci-IWARTZ Coach .......... ......,..... D OCTOR FRED JOHN 196 Washington, the 101 st N Lacrosse OACH Albert Brisotti's varsity lacrosse team won ten matches and lost three. 'lhc Violet twelve bowed only to the Army, the Crescent Athletic Club and to Rutgers Victories were scored by the N. Y. U. team over Lafayette, Union, Stevens, Lehigh the New York Lacrosse Club, College of the City of New York twice and . Y. N. G. Cavalry team twice. Lacrosse. l93O N. Y. U. findoorj ....,....... ................ 7 101st N. Y. N. G .....,..... ........... 1 . N. Y. U. Qoutcloorl .............. ........... 6 101st N. Y. N. G ........... Q .......... 2 N. Y. U .....,.,........................... ........... 6 Lafayette ......................................... ...,....... 1 N. Y. U .............. ........... 2 Crescent Athletic Club ........... ........... 7 N. Y. U .............. .........,. 2 Army ................,..,..........,......... ........... 7 N. Y. U ......... ........... 7 Union .,.......... ........... 5 N. Y. U ............,. ...... 4 Rutgers .............. ........... 7 N. Y. U .............. ........... 9 C. C. N. Y .......................,......,........ .. ...,,.. 1 N. Y. U ........,..... ...,. .,,., 5 N ew York Lacrosse Club ........,. ...... - 'i N. Y. U .............. ............ 6 Stevens Tech. ........................ ........... 3 N. Y. U .,..... .,.... ....,...... 5 C . C. N. Y .............. ........... 2 N. Y. U ......... ........... 5 Lehigh ....,,.,,.,...... ........... 3 N. Y. U .............. ....... . .. 5 Washington ..........................,...,.................. .. 3 C a plain ........... ......... Coach .......... JACK DIfliGAN SAM ARONOWSKI CHET GABULOVI2 JOE FORSCHER MAT. JAVRIN DANIEL MEYERSON MIKE BIZCKMAN ED CHESTER PAUL MATLIEIN Sin BETHIL DIEEGAN Team GEORGE NEWMAN NATHAN BENCHIN SAM Ron-1 JOSEPH SHACTER SID Sl-IRIEBIEK HARRY MANIN TEDDY ROSEN Sm KELLY PAUL BERMAN ED MATLEIN 197 RT BRISOTTI Tennis HE New York University varsity tennis team once again won the New York State Intercollegiate crown when Captain Stanley Harte and Captain-elect Walter Swaybill won all their doubles and singles matches in the tournament at Union. The Violet amassed a total of forty-nine points. Canisius was second and Cornell, Union and St. John's College were in a triple tie for third place. Swaybill won the singles title from Harte in four sets. Swaybill and Harte won the doubles championship by winning from Peckolf and Pusatrari of Canisius. In dual matches the Violet won twelve and lost but one. Coach Gerald B. Emer- son's pupils won from Holy Cross, Pennsylvania, Stevens, Yale, Washington and Lee, Boston University, Rutgers, Army, Villanova, Colgate, C. C. N. Y. and the alumni. Harvard won from the New York team, 6 to 3. Tennis, I930 N. Y ..... ..... ............... 3 A lumni ............. ........... 3 N. Y. U ........... ............. R ain Swarthmore N. Y .......... ............... 9 Holy Cross ................................... ........... 0 N. Y .......... ......... 8 Univ. of Pennsylvania ........................ 1 N. Y U .......... ......... 9 Stevens ............................................ ........... 0 N. Y U ........., ,........ 5 Yale ..............,.............................. ........... 4 N. Y .......... ......... 8 Wash. and Lee .......... ........... 1 N. Y .......... ......... 8 Boston University ......... ........... 1 N. Y .......... ......... 3 Harvard ..........................,. ........... 6 N. Y .......... ........ ..... 7 R utgers ........ .......... ........... 2 N. Y. U ........... ............. R ain Lafayette N. Y .......... ...... - ....... 9 Army .............. ........... 2 N. Y. .......... .......... 7 Villanova ....... ........... 1 N. Y. .......... ............... 8 Colgate ............. ........... O N. Y ........... .......... ...,......... R a in Fordham N. Y. ............................................................. 5 C. C. N. Y. ............................................... . 5 New York State Championships. Won both singles and doubles Championship Team STANLEY HARTE ALEX MILLER WALTER SWAYBILL LEO BATTAU PALMER SEELY SIDNEY BLAUSTEIN SYDNEY BERGER EARL BROOKS SIDNEY SELIGSON JACK MASEN HAROLD GOLDMAN Captain ............ ..........................................,........................................ S TANLEY HARTE Coach ........... .............. G ERALD B. EMERSON 198 Varsiiy Swimming-I930-I93I HE New York University Natators though indulging in the longest and hardest schedule of their history, has come through with flying colors in the great majority of its meets. However, the material does not come up to the standard of the team that swept through to victory in the intercollegiate championships last year, as many of the out- standing swimmers were lost because of graduation and scholastic dilhculties. In spite of the fact that the team is so handicapped, such individual stars as Capt. Frazer, Buckly, McShane, Gittenstein, Bicunis, joe Kahn, Greenthal, and Weidman have contributed greatly toward placing the team on the roster of the victorious. Gittenstein performed the outstanding feature of the season by breaking the school record in the quarter mile. Buckley has won many meets with his stellar splashing in the backstroke. Greenthal has been acclaimed as one of the most proficient men that ever took off from a diving board. The team to date, has won six meets and lost two. SCHEDULE jan. Ryder College ..................... 31 jan. Army .....................................,. 52 jan. johns Hopkins .,................ 16 Feb. Union .........,.......... ....,.... . 21 Feb. Lafayette ......... ........... 1 6 Feb. Fordham ..,...... .......... 4 4 Feb. Cornell ...... ,.......... 3 3 Feb. Manhattan ......., .......,... 1 5 Mar. M. I. T. Mar. Franklyn and Marshall Mar. Eastern Collegiate Champions Mar Intercollegiate Champions 199 Gymnaslie Team HE Violet Gymnastic Team, led by Capt. Herman Witzig, U. S. Olympic star, National Intercollegiate Titleholder, National A. A. U. parallel bar champion, and individual high scorer of the Eastern Intercollegiate Gymnastic League, is making a highly creditable showing in the race for the E. I. C. G. L. Team championship for this year. Last year the team was defeated by Navy, Dartmouth, Temple, and Army, but registered wins over Princeton and Colgate, getting tied for fifth place in the team stand- ing of the League. However, Witzig won the Intercollegiate all around title, and also the parallel bar, horizontal bar and sidehorse titles. This year he has missed scoring a perfect score twice by only a few points, taking four firsts and a second in the Army meet to make 23 points out of a possible twenty- live, and four firsts and a third in the Temple meet. Coach Wilson has developed a better group of supporting stars for this season and, consequently, the team has been on the winning side of the roster in the majority of its encounters. The Hrst meet of the season was lost to Princeton, but the inexperience and nervousness of the Sophomore aces was a vital factor in this defeat. This was shown when the squad came back to defeat both M. I. T. and Dartmouth the following week- end and, seven days later, defeated the strong Army team, and tied a high-powered outfit from Temple. Second only to Witzig in scoring ability is Duane Grant, the diminutive Soph ace who has improved greatly in the sidehorse, parallel and rope climb events. Though very inexperienced when he came out for the team, he has now developed into a danger- ous contender for championship honors. Julius Kantor has also aided the Violet cause materially, while Frank Bernstein, "Swede" Nostrand, "Ernie" Lopez, Fred MacQuire, and "Looie" Pack, round out the rest of this well balanced outfit. Bernstein is 1 letter- man of last year, whose strong forte is the sidehorse. The team's schedule follows: Feb. -N. Y. U ......................... ..... 1 6 Princeton Feb. -N. Y. U .......... ........... 2 8 M. I. T ...... . Feb. -N. Y. U .......... ........... 2 9 Dartmouth Feb. -N. Y. U .......... ........... 3 3 Army .......... Feb. -N. Y. U .......... ........... 2 7 Temple ...... Mar. -N. Y. U ............................... Navy ............ Mar. --Individual Championships of the E. I. C 200 Varsity Fencing NDER the leadership of Captain Hal Picket, the Fencing team closed its 1931 season of dual competition with a record of five victories and four defeats. Wittenberg, Boston University, Massachusetts Tech., Colgate and the University of Pennsylvania were victims of our swordsmen by good margins. The losses, how- ever, were heartbreaking. By a margin of 1 QONEJ point, each a 9-8 score, the team bowed to Harvard, Yale and Columbia. Still there was no alibi for the 12-5 defeat at the hands of Princeton. The Tigers were just too good. Captain Picket, and the sophomore star, jose De Capriles, were oustanding per- formers. Jose did nobly, not only with the foils, but with the Epee. Walter Grautoii' also fought in both these classes. Di Giacinto, Rose, Goldenstein, Zimet and others rounded out the squad, the last three being Saber men. The team is entered in the Intercollegiate fencing championships and from the showing they have made in their individual combats they should give a good account of themselves. The Frosh Fencers promise some excellent material for next year. just sit back and waitg they'l1 show up better in '32, 201 Rifle HIS year's record for the Violet Rifle Team was a splendid one. In the regular dual meets the Violet "Gunmen" won all but one contest. The team deserves what praise may be heaped upon it. Our team tied with the City College of New York for honors in the fourth annual shoulder-to-shoulder, Eastern Sectional rifle matches for the national inter-collegiate championship at the Commonwealth Armory. Both teams attained a total of 1,299 points in the three positions. Harry A. Mannin of N. Y. U. was high individual scorer this year. ' A glance at the scores of the teams competing will bring to a realization the ability necessary to reach the position the team attained this year. Congratulations are in order. TEAM AHERNS ZSUFFA MANNIN SPINNER STOUTENBERGH MERRELL QMgi-.Q 202 Cross Counfry NDER their new Captain, Sam Kestenbaum, the Violet harriers aspire to new heights this year. To hear the squad and some of the followers talk, the National Championship is as good as ours. Barker and Grodman, who have both been performing well indoors this winter, will be on the squad again. Both with Kestenbaum are counted to score consistently for the Violet. Demler, Lerner, Hutner and Twomey are other members of the squad who can be depended on to give the judges worthwhile reasons for stopping their watches. It looks like a pretty good year. 1930 MEETS N. Y. U ...,....... ........... 1 5 Villanova ........... ,..,,.,,.,.. 4 0 N. Y. U ........... ,..... ..... 2 1 Rutgers .......,,.................. ............ 3 4 N. Y. U ........... ........... 1 8 Carnegie Tech ......... ..,,........ 4 7 203 Golf AST year for the first time since 1927, New York University was represented by a golf team in intercollegiate competition. Golf had been dropped by the board of athletic control at the close of the 1927 season due to lack of interest on the part of the student body. Like many other things as soon as an activity is dropped the interest grows. The popularity of the game grew so rapidly that an informal team was organized last season with the consent of Albert B. Nixon, Graduate Manager of Athletics. Three matches were played during the season with colleges in the Metropolitan District. The Violet representatives winning two of the three matches. In the first meet Rutgers proved entirely too strong for our inexperienced team and walked off with an 8 to 1 victory. For the final two meets teams from Fordham and St. John's were outclassed by a much improved Violet 'team. New York University won both matches by the score of 5 to 1. An exceptionally difiicult schedule has been arranged for the 1951 Violet golfers. Prospects for a splendid team look very bright. TEAM J. SANFORD GILLEN ........... ,.,....,...,...., ........ ..,......................,.. C 4 p min FRANK SULLIVAN .......... .............. 1 lffamzger H9301 T. VICTOR KINGHAM ...............,............... ....................................... 1 Mamzger f1931j STANLEY HARTE VICTOR CESTONE ROBERT DUNCAN LAUREN LESSER 204 Co-Ed Hockey HE co-ed varsity hockey team successfully completed its schedule this year with a rec- ord of five victories, one tie, and two defeats. Their defeats, one at the hands of Connecticut Aggies and the other by Manhattanville, were avenged. Connecticut Aggies were set back in another match, and Manhattanville defaulted a scheduled return meeting. Beaver offered an exciting game, which ended in a tie. It should have been a victory for N. Y. U. but-you know how it isg breaks and all that! The Violet Lassies enjoyed a trip to Virginia late in November. There they vanquished the William and Mary squad. Seeking a new thrill they returned from the Southland by boat. Some were thrilled. The splendid playing of Captain Helen "Pat" Schroeder and Lillian Dembitz on defense was probably the biggest factor in the Violet victories. But don't forget the forward line! Somebody had to score to win the game. 205 l Co-Ed Baskelball HE outlook for this year's feminine court squad is certainly none too bright. Last season the team just managed to hold its head above water by winning seven and losing six games. Graduation took the former captain Mildred Lindeblatt out of competition, which was a big enough loss in itself, but what hit hardest was the decision of the Physical Education Department to limit the varsity competition of girls enrolled in its ranks. This move cost the team its present captain, Eileen Magee, its Assistant Manager and center, Alice Tesar, and a number of other stellar performers. It is hoped that Coach Foley will be able to draw sufficient material from the teams competing in the intra-murals. Helen Schroeder and Rose jaboolian are the only regulars to weather the storm but they are an excellent pair to use as the core of a new sextet. SCHEDULE january 12, Scudder School, at home. February 7, William and Mary, at Williamsburg, Va., 13, St. Lawrence University, at home, 17, Long Island University, at home, 18 Upsala College, at home, 21, St. joseph's College, at Brooklyn, 28, Connecticut Agricultural College, at Storrs, Conn. March 7, Savage Institute, at home, 10, Hunter College, at home, 13, Beaver Col- lege, at jenkinstown, Pa., 20, Adelphi College, at home. 206 Co-Ed Swimming EADY, go! They're off-to add to their list of victories. Undefeated in 1930 the Violet mermaids bid fair to repeat this year. All members have been prac- ticing regularly at the Church of All Nations. Although this team is also afiected by the ruling of the Physical Education Depart- ment the team still has a strong line-up. Hettie Schnee is both captain and manager. As team mates she has Florence Levine, Iris jakobb, Ada Monroe, Maxine Bracket, Sadie Zuckerbetg, Edna Lewis and Lisa Lindstrom. Miss Lindstrom is holder of the Women's National Long Distance Swimming Title. She's some girl. Under the guidance of their coach, Miss "Frankie" Froatz, the squad tackled a schedule which included Hunter, Savage, Swarthmore, Passe Nissen, Adelphi and Sar- geant. To be exact if undefeated this season, the team will have gone five years without a defeat. 207 The School of Educalion in Sporls NCE settled in its new home, the School of Education seemed suddenly to expand in every direction. Music, Psychology, Physical Education and Health, Home Economics-all departments seemed imbued with new life. But such growth was not limited to intra-mural activities. Outside activities grew, and pre- dominant among these were Sports. In the past, while Commerce and Washington Square were indulging in extra-mural sports, the School of Education seemed to have its right to such activities curtailed. This year, however, finds it inaugurating a new policy. The Student Council has set aside a definite fund for the encouragement and maintenance of athletics. This fund was turned over to the Physical Education Organization to be handled by that body through Mr. N. Tilem. The following pages contain a record of the activities operating under this fund. If one will stop for a moment to consider the fact that prior to this year only a basket- ball team was active, he will realize the extent of the progress made within the past six months. Such unusual progress, due to exceptionally efficient organization, gives promise of a bright future for all such activities in the School of Education. 208 Yus+in Sirulis HE School of Education is very fortunate in having for one of its students a young man who can surely be chosen as an ideal type of American athlete. Yustin Sirutis, a junior in the department of Physical Education of the School of Education is the man to whom this high praise is given. A "plugger" at everything he attempts, always looking ahead with a smile, and finest of all he is straightforward, and always ready to assist one in trouble. ' Brooklyn Technical High School was the scene of Yustin's prep school days. He served Tech with his characteristic whole-hearted spirit. He was a mainstay on the football team for several seasons in the capacity of right tackle. In the spring Tech again saw Sirutis on the baseball diamond, as pitcher for the school team. The blond giantis ambitions were not exhausted be- cause in his senior year he led several thousand men as president of the General Organization of the institution and in other capacities of the school organization. The scene now shiftslto N. Y. U. In his freshman year Sirutis was attracted by the call for boxing team candidates. When the coach saw 6 feet 4 inches of healthy man- hood answering his call, he knew there was one sure championship for N. Y. U. Al- though strange in his new surroundings he went on with a dogged determination to make good and went through the season as a light-heavyweight without a defeat. Fate cheated him out of the intercollegiate championship when the University was not to be represented at the finals. The same year the freshman sensation pitched on the Uni- versity baseball team and drew a great deal of comment and watching when he pitched a one-hit game against a very strong opposing team. In his sophomore year Sirutis represented N. Y. U. in the heavyweight class of the boxing team. Again he showed his mettle by going through the season with an unblemished record, this time to win the supreme honors, intercollegiate heavyweight championship. Popular among his friends at college as he was at prep school, Yustin was chosen to represent his class in the Student Senate. 209 1 Educa+ion Baske+baII HIS is not the first venture of the School of Education into inter-collegiate basket- ball. It is, however, the best organized, In "Red" Wolf the team has found an excellent coach. "Red," an exceptional player himself, is a student in the Department of Physical Education. About the small nucleus of Seniors who formerly represented the School, "Red" has gathered a group of sophomores and juniors who show ample ability to take up where this year's team leaves OH. So far this squad has given a fair account of itself. It has tackled a resonably difii- cult schedule with a vigor that bodes ill for the rest of its opponents. Though defeated in several close, hotly contested games, notably those with C. C. N. Y., Commerce, and St. Francis, the quintet wound up its season with a creditable record. It is hoped that in the future more men from the Music, Art, and Secondary Educational departments will come out for the team. 1930-31 SCHEDULE 1 i Nov. 26, St. Francis, Dec. 5, Columbia Pharmacy, Dec. 10, Jamaica Training, jan. 9, Montclair Normal, Feb. 27, jamaica Training, March 6, Montclair Normal, March 13, Columbia Pharmacy, March 7, Brooklyn College. 210 Educaiion Swimming Team HE swimming team shows great promise for the coming season. There are many former high school stars practicing under the able coaching of Mr. Eastwood, who is to be commended on his excellent work. It was largely through the efforts of Manager Solatar and his assistant Falkowitz that the team was started. Though they encountered some dilhculty in securing a pool, they hnally made arrangements for the use of the 60th Street Pool. Mondays were the only days set aside for practice and, to make even that one practice, the fellows have had to rush to and from classes at the Square. In spite of the handicaps, the squad has turned in a good report for the season. A glimpse at the schedule will show the dilliculty of the task they undertook. SCHEDULE, 193 1 Brooklyn Central 12nd Teamj, 23rd St. Y. M. C. A., West Side Y. M. C. A., Flush- ing Y. M. C. A., Prospect Park Y. M. C A, Bartholomew's Church, Montclair Normal. 211 Educaiionl Soccer HE Hrst soccer team to represent the New York University School of.Education was organized by Mr. Samuel Portnoy, Physical Education, '33. It was through Mr. Porrnoy's efforts that a schedule of four games was arranged and played this past fall. The team was tutored by the ever reliable Mr. Nat Tilem, who developed a well coached combination in a rather short space of time. Mr. Tilem is to be commended for his tireless efforts in seeing so fine a project through its infancy this past season. In 1930 the outfit was forced to be content with one victory, two scoreless ties, and one defeat. The soccerites defeated a strong St. john's college eleven 1-Og were held to scoreless ties by Seth Low junior College and the New York Stock Exchangeg and suffered their only setback at the hands of the Brooklyn City College contingent. Future plans include games with State Teachers College at East Stroudsburg, Pa., a Faculty-Student game, N. Y. Stock Exchange, Panzer College of Physical Education and Seth Low junior College. At the time of this writing the complete schedule is not as yet available. 212 Educalion Handball Team NOTHER of the newcomers to Education sports circles is thc Handball team. Under the management of Les Kaplan, it has developed remarkably. Witlm Scheiber, Schachter, the Bernstein brothers and Les himself, the school is well represented. Because of lack of opportunity to meet other collegiate teams, an unusual list of opponents was compiled. Among them are jamaica jewish Center, Knights of Colum- bus, Brooklyn Elks, Cooper Union, jewish Community House QBrooklynJ and the Brooklyn Union. Temple. The opening victories over Cooper Union and the Elks were tempered by a 4-1 trimming at the hands of the Community House. 213 School of Eclucaiion Fencing Team GROUP of young men and women sallied out last semester to organize and sup- port a Fencing Team. Now at last after many handicaps their splendid adventure has succeeded. En garde! Fencing, that gay old and fascinating sport with its lightning thrusts and flashing parries, with its ever demanding agility, stealth and poise is back again in N. Y. U. Thanks to the wholehearted cooperation of the Department of Physical Education which has made Fencing a part of the School of Education Intramural activities. The students have taken complete advantage of this opportunity to acquire that "essential balance." Thanks to the untiring, unselflsh encouragement of Coach Hyman Krakower and his "never say die" assistants Bob Schick and Al Mirelman. A squad of quite capable foilsmen have been slowly but steadily developed, and soon, in the very near future, Coach Kralcower has promised that negotiations will be made for tournaments with City College, St. johns, Townsend Harris and other available teams. The members of the Fencing squad are: JAMES MORREI. MURRY FELDMAN NAT ROSEN EARNIE FALKAWITZ JOE B. ROTHENBERG JOE HAMMER CELIA STRAUSS EILEEN MAGEE GERT YESELSON IDA KAPLAN HELEN POSNER EDNA GRIEE KATHRYN HAWKINS MILDRED ROSENZWEIG MEN ARCHIE CHESNEAU HARRY WEISBERG HARRY WEINER DOMINIC MARINELLO SAMUEL KLEINSTEIN BEN LEIBOWITZ WOMEN RENEE MARTIN MONICA CZURLES RITA WEISS CAROLYN Moss CHICK RYDEERG SYLVIA DORE JUDITH LICHTERNSTEIN SI-IERRY MOROWITZ 214 HARRY WEINBAUM VICTOR GOLDEERG WILLIAM GUTSCHMIDT AI. MIRELMAN BOB SCHICK MARY C. MURRAY RUTH MITTLER KATHERINE NOLAN ADELE LEVINE BARBARA JONSTON JANE HARTINS SYLVIA JACOFSKY MERIAM PERLMAN i Educafion Gymnasfic Team HOUGH the School of Education has had Basketball and Soccer teams before, the "Gym" team is a new departure. It was organized at the beginning of the Fall semester, 1930. - Unlike the other teams, the "Gym" squad was not formed primarily for the pur- pose of competition but for demonstrations. It is intended that a series of exhibitions be given at various secondary and normal schools, in order that the work at New York University in Physical Education and Health may be better known. Mr. Rodgers, the coach, has assembled a team that would, if it did enter competi- tion, give an excellent account of itself. Irwin Trincher, the sophomore manager of the team, feels that a group capable of making such a great advance as this one has in such a short period is worthy of representing the school. 215 School of Eduoalion Boxing HE School of Education has its boxing confined to intra-murals at the present time. This sport was organized at the beginning of the Fall semester, 1950. The Boxing squad, like the "Gym" team was organized for the purpose of demonstration. It is intended that thc squad will give its first demonstration on March 20, 1931. Mr. Murray W. Goldenberg, the coach, has assembled a fine group of men, that are very anxious to learn the art of self-defense. He claims that before long certain men on the squad are bound to be artists. Among the outstanding men on the squad are: Forster, Blau, Zoble, Friedman, Marinello, Haggerty, Vidaiv, Loeb, Macrini, Sisano, and Held. 216 Eclucaiion Volleyball Team N attempting to introduce into collegiate circles the sport of Volleyball, the School of Education organized a new team this fall. The fact that no other educational institutions, as such, supported Volleyball teams made it necessary to inaugurate the sport at N. Y. U. by arranging a schedule with a number of Y. M. C. A. teams. In all, fourteen games were scheduled. Some of the visitors had formidable com- binations, among them Bedford, Prospect Park, and Newark. A group of men such as were gathered to represent the school in a sport new to them could hardly have been expected to make such a splendid showing against these experienced teams as these men are doing. They have forced the best of the visitors to extend themselves to the limit to win, and if it had not been for their lack of experience, they would have turned the tables in several of the more closely contested games. Witlm Allon, Blechschmidt, Tilem, Farber, and Sandelman, all set-up men, and Benchin, Blutreich, Dyckes, and Schaeffer fSpikersj all due back next year, we will have quite a team. Eclucalion Track Team LANS are under way for the formation of a School of Education Track Team. Witlm the able Phil Bernstein as coach and some added assistance from "Happy" , Furth, the team will not lack for good handling. "Wl1itey" Grossman, acting as manager, has announced that the squad will be in for a difficult schedule. Two out-of-town meets have been arranged! One on May 2, at East Stroudsburg and the other on May 9, at Springfield. The pre-season enthusiasm indicates a large turnout for the first practice. Let's go. 217 Inframural Acfivifies N extensive intra-mural program, the first in the new program of the school, has been arranged under the expert guidance of Nat Tilem. His policy is one wherein all activities come under .the same heading. There is no differentiation between the so called major and minor sports. All sports occupy the same prestige and prominence. The first term saw the completion of the handball and basketball tournaments. Handball was capably managed by Les Kaplan and run off in a successful manner. The basketball tournament, under the guidance of Irv Welsher, came to an ending with the freshman class victorious. Listed in the sports for the second term we find the rest of the following activities. Volleyball .............. ' .......... WILLIAM DYCKES Indoor borelmll ..r,,... ............ H YMAN LITTMAN Indoor mme ..r.,,.. ........... P HILLIP BERNSTEIN Temzir .............. ...,.,................... H ERMAN GAST Boxing ,,...,.,,. ........... M URRAY GOLDENBERG Wi-errling ............., ,...... .... ......... D o M INICK MARINELI.O With this varied program the manager of activities has tried to offer an opportunity for participation of every student in one or more of the activities. The only thing that remains is for the students to take advantage of this opportunity, and sign up for the different tournaments. If the program comes to a successful end more activities will be arranged upon student requests. For further information consult the athletic director. 218 ROSTER Senior Class School of Education Abbot, Florence ............. ................,.................... 1 091 Margaret Street, West Englewood, N. J. Abernethy, Grace ............... .........,..........,.,.. 5 04 West 55th Street, New York City Adams, Martha .............., .....,.................. 2 58 Riverside Drive, New York City Adler, Judith ...,..................... .....,..... 8 01 West End Avenue, New York City Adlerman, Florence ...,...,....... .........,. 6 96 St. Marks Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Affelder, Katherine .,............. ...........,........ 5 825 Bartlett Street, Pittsburgh, Pa. Afros, Jacob ........................... .......... 1 O04 Montgomery Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Aginsky, Bernard Albright, Edith ............ Alexander, Viola. Allen, Zoe ....................,.. Allyn Wilhemine ...........2685 University Avenue, New York City ..............................,........ 700 Ferry Street, Easton, Pa. Maple Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. .......... 135 Deer Hill Avenue, Danbury, Conn. Conn. Anderson, Hanna .............. .......... 5 58 Seventh Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Anderson, Harry .......,... ...............,. K ew Terrace, Kew Gardens, N. Y. Anderson, Lena .........,... .............. 1 27 Hudson Avenue, Red Bank, N. J. Anderson, Signe ............ .....,......... 4 407 Fourth Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Andrews, Emily .................. .............. 3 45 West 50th Street, New York City Angell, Albert, Jr. .......... .......... 2 72 Franklin Avenue, Bloomfield, N. J. Arthur, Jessie ................... .............. S agamore Apartments, Cranford, N. Baer, Joseph ..,...............,.. ..,......... 1 254 Stebbins Avenue, New York City Baker, Roscoe ....................... .............. 3 4 Fairview Avenue, Huntington, N. Y. Bakerman, Florence ...,.......... ...............,........ 9 6 82nd Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Ballen, Evelyn ..........,........... ................ 9 732 75th Street, Ozone Park, N. Y. Banks, Monty ,..,............... ..........,... 1 13 Harrison Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Barad, Martin .................. .......... 3 33 Albany Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Barbera, Emanuel ............... ..........107 Troutman Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Bardonsky, Irving .............. .........................,.... 1 576 76th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Barney, Miriam .............. ............ 1 62 North Seventh Street, Newark, N. Barry, Ann ................... ............... 2 83 Orange Street, Bridgeport, Conn. Bass, Henry ............. ..............,,.... 9 O70 178th Street, Jamaica, N. Y. Baum, Sophie ............. ...,,....... 1 20 East 85th Street, New York City Baumel, Morris .............. ,.......,..... 9 731 81st Street, Ozone Park, N. Y. Bazar, Edith ................. .............. 5 31 Cleveland Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Bechtel, Laura ............ ................. 1 441 Turner Street, Allentown, Pa. Beder, Joseph ............. .......... 1 647 Union Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Bellos, Lottie .................... .......... 1 760 49th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Bennett, Pearl ............... ........... 3 67 Lincoln Place, Brooklyn, N. Y. Benninger, Willard.. Swan Street, Paterson, N. J. Benter, Charles .................... ............. 2 51 Edgemont Terrace, Teaneck, N. Benvie, George .................... ....................... 6 065 Broadway, New York City Bergman, Annabelle ............. ............. 5 15 West 110th Street, New York City Berman, Charles ......... .............2675 Valentine Avenue, Bronx, N. Y. Bernstein, Bella ................... ..........,.......... 2 707 Morris Avenue, New York City Bernstein, Florence ..,........ ............ 9 22 East Seventh Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Bernstein, Irving ........... ................... 4 24 West 24th Street, New York City Bernstein, Laura ............ ............. 1 560 Amsterdam Avenue, New York City Bernstein, Phil ........... ................ 1 995 Ocean Parkway, Brooklyn, N. Y. Besser, Gladys ................. ............... 1 11 Cedar Street, Ridgefield Park, N. Bettinger, Selina ............ ........... 1 998 Nostrand Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Bingham, William ............ .............. 2 36 East Sixth Street, Oswego, N. Y. Birnbaum, Hyman ............ ................1745 Fulton Avenue, Bronx, N. Y. 220 Birns, Rosalind ......,...... .............. 1 70 Second Avenue, New York City Bissell, Charles ...-.---- -0 ........................ Sf. George Gardens, N. B., S. I., Y. Black, Adele ...,.................,.. ......,......................... 9 7 Jackson Avenue, jersey City, N. J. Blackburn, Flofenge ,....A.,,... .............. 4 0 SOl.1fl'l. Second Avenue, MI. Vernon, Blavatnlk, Minnie ,44,4,,..,,. ...................... 1 486 Flatbush Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Blondin Agatha ,,,,,,,,,,,, ............................. 1 48 Bradley Road, Burlington Vt. Blninin, Morris ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, ............ 7 04 Bay Street, Stapleton, S. I., N. Y. Bollinger, Lneile ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, ......... 7 28 West 181st Street, New York City Bolton, Clara ,....,,,,,,,,,,,,, ...............,... 2 9 Central Avenue, Wellsboro, Pa. Bonn, Milion ,,,,,,,,,,,, ................ 1 293 Ocean Parkway, Brooklyn, N. Y. Boiow, Joseph ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, ........................,,............ 5 30 36th Street, Astoria, L. I. Bonell, pearl ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, ........,. 3 56 South First Avenue, Mt. Vernon, N. Y. Bothwell, Bessie ,eiiivliiii ............ 1 2 Pennsylvania Avenue, Newark, N. Bower, Mniy ,,,,,,,,,,,,,, .......,..... 9 9 Carnegie Avenue, East Orange, N. Bowken Doris ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, -556 Beach 113th Street, Belle Harbor, N. Y. Boye, Evelyn v.--.--.----"-'.,-'-v.' .........,........-.-- 3 Mountain Avenue, Summit, Brandonisi, Alfred ....... ....... Braun, Marie ........,.............. Braunstein, Philip ............ 59 Lincoln Avenue, Yonkers, N. Y. Wierfield Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Kelley Street, New York City Bieinelel, Samuel ,,,,,,,,,,,,,, .............. 1 824 Washington Avenue, Bronx, N. Y. Breitenback, Ruth ............ .................... 1 210 Clay Avenue, New York City Brennan, Dorothy ............ .............. 7 0 County Line Road, Amityville, N. Y. Bresel, Lillian ................ .............. 9 65 Whitlock Avenue, New York City Brody, Sylvia ...................,..., ...................,....... 9 60 Fox Street, New York City Brown, Elizabeth .............. Brown, Martha ............, Brown, Thomas ............ Bruce, Edna ................ Bruce, Guy ...........,...... Bruch, William ,............ Bueschel, William ............ Burdick, Harry .............. Burger, Cecelia .............. Burke, Catherine ,......... Burke, Margaret ........... 164th Street, jamaica, N. Y. Haven Avenue, New York City ...........128 Brinkerhoff Street, Plattsburg, N. Y. 53rd Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Morris Avenue, Summit, N. J. Hudson Street, New York City 15th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Cumberland Avenue, Verona, N. J. Union Hill Avenue, Peekskill, N. Y. West 12th Street, New York City West 153rd Street, New York City Burke, Marie ................. ........ ,.......... 4 9 Highland Place, New York City Burnett, Emily ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, ..................... 6 O9 Monroe Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Butterworth, Horace ........... ..,.......... 2 O48 31st Street, Long Island City, N. Y. Caesar, Tillye ...................... ............................ 2 002 Avenue J, Brooklyn, N. Y. Camson, Emil ................ ............... 5 808 13th Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Canelna, Gilda ............... ............... 1 05 Central Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Card, Ruth .............,.... .,............. 4 6-10 88th Street, Elmhurst, L. I., N. Y. Qeilbeig, Erie ,,,,,,,,,,, ...... ............ 1 1 1-50 130th Street, Ozone Park, L. I. Carr, Thelma ii,,,,,,,,,,, ........... 7 62 New jersey Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Career, Evelyn ,,,,,,,,,,, ....... 2 8 South Maple Avenue, Glen Rock, N. j. Casey, Albert ....................... ................................. 2 23 High Street, Orange, N. J. Calley, Ruth ............................... ............ 1 7 Morris Avenue, Mountain Lakes, N. J. Cavanaugh, Elizabeth .............. ........... 7 4 Winaut Street, Port Richmond, S. I. Ceres, Joseph ,----,-------,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, ...................... 3 15 Orange Street, Newark, N. bl. Charry, Augusta ................ ................ 6 14 Saratoga Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Chartock, Samuel .............. Chittim, Charles .......... Chizner, Jennie ....................... Christian, Lewis ........................... Christianson, Theodore ............... Empire Boulevard, Brooklyn, N. Y. Montague Place, Montclair, N. J. Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, N. Y. ...........461-4 Fourth Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. ..............1857 Victor Street, New York City 221 Churco, Pauline ............ Cirelli, Albert ............ ....,......602 Franklin Street, Clayton, N. Y. Hull Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Clark, Berenice .............. .............. 1 0 Sheridan Square, New York City Claster, Mildred ............ ....,..,.. 9 1 Central Park West, New York City Claxton, jane .................. .,.,,............................ 5 46 Broadway, Paterson, N. J. Clewell, Margaret ............. .......... 1 38 East Clay Avenue, Roselle Park, N. j. Clyne, james ......................... ......,............ 7 901 Colonial Road, Brooklyn, N. Y. Cochran, Dorothy ,,,.......... ............, 4 0 Prospect Terrace, East Orange, N. J. Cogovan, Gladys ............... ........................ Q .,......... R . C. No. 1, Belmar, N. Cohen, Harold ..,,........... ....,.................. 9 2 Avenue L, Brooklyn, N. Y. Cohen, Mildred .,...,.........,.. .......... 1 597 Carroll Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Cohen, Theodore ..................., ............,.,.. 4 13 Herzl Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Coleman, Winifred .............. ..................... 1 210 Elm Street, Peekskill, N. Y. Coman, Clara ....................... ............. 7 341 Amboy Road, Tottenville, S. I. Coningsby, Elizabeth ........... ............. 2 20 Roseville Avenue, Newark, N. Conway, Hugh ................... .............. 6 5 Sailly Avenue, Plattsburg, N. Y. Cook, Donald ........... .,...,...., 2 11 Dayton Street, Ridgewood, N. J. Cook, Mary ..................,.... ........... 2 27A Monroe Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Copeland, George ............. Copeland, Theseus ........., Correa, Emerita ............. Counsellor, jay .............. Cousins, Mabel .............. Cowan, Charles ............. Cox, Samuel ..... ..................... Crescimanno, Grace .............. ..............148-11 87th Avenue, jamaica, N. Y. ........122 Johnson Avenue, Tottenville, S. I. Broadway, Ridgewood, N. ........597 Bainbridge Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. State Street, Potsdam, N. Y. Hillcrest Terrace, Veront, N. 166th Street, Flushing, N. Y. Blecker Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. ....1Z7 Carroll Avenue, Mamaroneck, N. Y. Croake, Thomas ............................ .......... Cruise, William ............................... Cunningham, Margaret ............... Curtis, jane ...................................... Curtis, Maudo ........................... Cushman, Helen ................ Cuttriss, Elizabeth ....... Daily, Esther .................... Dahlin, Patrick .............. D'Alesandre, Elsie ............ Depolito, Salvator ..,......... Darcy, Natalie ................ Davis, Alys .............. l.. Davis, Martha ................ DeBeck, Ethel ................ DeBenedictis, Phyllis .......... Dedow, Elizabeth ........ Del-Iegh, Claude ........... DeKay, Grace ................. Delehanty, Sally ............ Demarest, Violet .......... Van Buren Street, Passaic, N. J. ............515 Nelson Avenue, Peekskill, N. Y. 13th Street, Hoboken, N. j. Cottage Street, Bridgeport, Conn. Broad Street, Stratford, Conn ............878 South 14th Street, Newark, N. J. 316 Glenwood Avenue, East Orange, N. ,333 Langdon Avenue, Mt. Vernon, N. Y. .,........177 Macdougal Street, New York City Sullivan Street, New York City 78th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Park Avenue, White Plains, N. Y. Park Avenue, White Plains, N. Y. ...,..128 South Parkway, East Orange, N. J. ............2339 Prospect Avenue, New York City E 5-IP-4 U2 r-lu: Eos 5? Wm E5 ,HQ gr' O? oo n.o 15 one ogg 2222 55w5 185, Glen Head, Sixth Avenue, Brooklyn, . 777 UUUUUUUU 55222000 dmgmprzzg 32oD0r9? v - ::"g-J"5u.9g gW3rw m' ...mg warn:-4 E9vm5w5E -. .., a3ZQgP25 QR5a222? 2252222 2522 229 2E22222g z v-ligg' 24222232 REHQQOQ2 01:12 S3 'Tl-21:2 'Pagan- sn ,,:N9D- rn X1 QQ- f-vmlif' QD 3, wcgzrn 44 N7-'IFS U"D""'rb v- Q FDD Drn?T'oU'f43 Q-.4 H50 C1 cnfP.5fDmEb-0 ::',P-fnmpafvcm rn DQ' 0... rb"Ur:'.rn4 7-'UQ ,"'Or'nrnggC',3- m:'PegPg Hw?QPa4g 83'S"'tIJ-no 55555523 'dos-40OD5'Q,':, Pg:-39.?4y1y2.5" za. 252222222 595555555 Van Duzer Place, Warwick, Dixon, Charles ............ Djorup, Harold .......... Dobbie, Margaret ........... Dobson, Dorothy ............ --------.---....395O 65th Street, Woodside, L. I. ...........271 Parkside Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Pierrepont Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. West Eighth Street, New York City Doods, Edward ................ .............. 2 2 Fairview Avenue, Port Washington, N. Y. Dolinef, Henry ,,,,,.,,,,.,,,,,,,.,,,,,,,, ............................. 2 795 East 7th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Dolingky, Alexander ,,,,,,,,,,,,,, .......,...... 6 32 Coney Island Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Doll, Edna ................................. .--..........-..... 2 01 Garfield Place, South Orange, N. J. Doust, Marjorie .,............. .............. 3 5 Bay View Avenue, Jersey City, N. J. Donnely, Edward ........... ...................... 1 458 80th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Douglas, Grace .,.........,...,,,,........ ................................................................. S uffern, N, Y, Doyle, Rhoda fMrs.J ...,........ Dragunas, Andrew ............. Dressner, Stella ................ DuBoff, Phyllis ........... Dudas, Walter ............. Duncan, Lucy .................... Duryee, Katherine .............,. Dvoryak, George ............ Eaton, Florence ................ Ecker, Norman ............ Eckert, Frieda ............... Edie, Marion .............,... Edwards, Emlyn .............. Ege, Sarah ............................ Ehrenreich, Frances .....,...... Eisbrouch, Lillian ........... Eisen, Gladys ................ Eisner, Joseph .............. Elmore, Lillian ............ Epner, Morris ............... Epstein, Eli .......................... Epstein, Kathryn ............. Eveland, Ida .................. Hallica, Angelina ........... Farber, Milton ..,............. Feinberg, Beatrice ........... Feinstein, Samuel ........... Feld, Maurice .................,... Feldman, William ............... Fellner, Abraham ........... Perry Avenue, New York City Menahan Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. ..........1527 East Fourth Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. ..........544 West 157th Street, New York City Jewell Street, Garfield, N. J. ...............1614 East 12th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Glenwood Avenue, East Orange, N. Irving Place, New York City Edgecomb Avenue, New York City ...............3524 DeKalb Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Essex Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Arthur Street, Yonkers, N. Y. Mott Street, New York City Morris Place, Hillside, N. ..........122 Colyer Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. ..............1045 Hoe Avenue, New York City .............1754 Union Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Avenue D, New York City ...........171 Union Street, Flushing, N. Y. ..............2127 Dean Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Clay Avenue, New York City Linden Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Locust Avenue, New Rochelle, N. Y. Sixth Avenue, New York City ...........1070 East Seventh Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, N. Y. Webster Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Speedwell Avenue, Morristown, N. J. ............5416 Snyder Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Heyward Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Ferguson, Ernest ..........,.. .....................,............... 8 941 204th Street, Hollis, L. I., N. Y. Ferguson, Mary ........... 82 North Arlington Avenue, East Orange, N. J. Ferriter, Helen ............ ......................... 6 16 South Avenue, Bridgeport, Conn. Fiedler, William .............. ............................................ 9 21 Cottage Place, Union, N. J. Field, Jessie ,.............,..... ....,......... 1 44 South Second Avenue, Mt. Vernon, N. Y. Fielstra, Emily ....................... ............. 3 916 Packard Street, Long Island City, N. Y. Finkelstein, Tobias ......,...... ,....................... 1 O2 Rutledge Street, Brooklyn, N, Y. Fisher, Anne ..,.................... ......................... 2 O0 Corona Avenue, Corona, N. Y. Fisher, Hollis ................ ......................... L arge Avenue, Hillsdale, N. Fisher, Marion ............. ..................... 3 4 Queens Street, Rochester, N. Y. Fisher, Delmar .................. ............... 1 O8-24 69th Drive, Forest Hills, N. Y. Fishman, Samuel ............. ,............. 2 OO Tapscott Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Fishman, Seymour ............... ,.............. 2 731 Ford Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Fitzpatrick, Kathleen ............. ..........155 East 45th Street, New York City 225 Flanagan, Catherine ...........,... F lechner, Hyman ........... Fleck, Harold ............... Foberg, Anna .............. Foley, Catherine ............. Foley, john .................... Park Place, Newburgh, N. Y. Home Street, New York City .,........1-458 Pennsylvania Avenue, Tyrone, Pa. Norden Street, New Britain, Conn. Quincy Avenue, Scranton, Pa. Sixth Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Forbes, Ruth ................ ....,......... 3 29 Park Avenue, East Orange, N. Fox, Genevieve ..,............ ....................... 7 70 Ocean Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Freedman, George ............. ................................... 2 Eldridge Street, New York City Frers, Friede ...................... .............. 1 08-16 85th Avenue, Richmond Hill, N. Y. Frese, Marion .............. .3961 Carolin Street, Long Island City, N. Y. Freydberg, Bessie ........... Frichtel, Helen ........... Friedman, Ann .......... Friedman, Sylvia ............ Furniss, Helen ......... Gaier, Charles .................. Gall, Mollie ............................. Gamberton, Rhoda ............ Gardell, Walter .............. West 110th Street, New York City ...,.........8701 Ridge Boulevard, Brooklyn, N. Y. Sutter Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Hawthorne Road, Yonkers, N. Y. Bush Avenue, Port Chester, N. Y. ..,............213O Mapes Avenue, New York City .,........1853 East Third Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Orchard Street, Passaic, N. J. jersey Avenue, Elizabeth, N. Gardner, Helen ............... ............ 3 8 North 36th Street, Flushing, N. Y. Garnsey, Evelyn ............. .............,..................... 1 0 Platt Street, Derby, Conn. Garrett, Harold ....,.,........ .,.....,....,,...................,, 4 0 Argyle Road, Brooklyn, N. Y. Garrison, Mary ............... .......,.. 2 4-74 29th Street, Long Island City, N. Y. Gaul, Henry .........,....... ............... 2 0 Eastchester Road, New Rochelle, N. Y. Gearing, Edna ............. ..........,........,......... 1 138 Walnut Street, Ashland, Pa. Gelb, Lillian ................. ,............. 6 22 Rockaway Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Gilbert, Harold ............... ............ 7 67 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, N. Y. Gill, Marian .....................,.,... ............,.... 2 18 Prospect Place, Brooklyn, N. Y. Gilligan, Michael ..................... ................ 1 O42 East Drinker Street, Dunmore, Pa. Gillingham, Dorothy ............ ............... 2 2 South Richards Avenue, Ventnor, N. Ginsberg, Morris ...................... ...,.......,..,.,. 4 32 Belmont Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Glaser, M. ......................... .......................... 1 38 Ludlow Street, New York City Glatter, William ............ ..,........... 4 74 East Fourth Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Glatzel, Anne ................... ..................,. 2 2 Sherman Avenue, Paterson, N. Glenn, Elizabeth ............ .................., 2 540 Boulevard, jersey City, N. J. Glennon, Mary ................ ................ 2 19 17th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Goldberg, Solomon .......... ................... 2 24 Osborn Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Golden, Clara ........................ .................... 2 855 Claflin Avenue, New York City Goldenberg, Ruth .............. ........... 1 111 New York Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Goldfarb, Dora .,............. ............ 1 7 Delafield Avenue, Rutherford, N. Goldfarb, Hannah ............ ............ 3 60 Clinton Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Goldfarb, Leah ............... ............. 3 60 Clinton Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Goldfeder, Hilda ................ ................. 7 58 Hendrix Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Goldman, Benjamin .............. ............ 1 359 Findlay Avenue, New York City Goldner, Burt B. ............... ........................ 4 8 Fabyan Place, Newark, N. Goodell, Leon .................. .......... 7 0 Maple Avenue, Maplewood, N. Goodwin, Frank ............. ............ 1 30 St. Pauls Place, Brooklyn, N. Y. Gordon, Kaiser ............... ................... 4 5-45 46th Street, Woodside, L. I. Gottlieb, Diane ............... ............. 9 0 Vernon Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Grabow, Lewis ........... .......................... 2 3 Cedar Street, Hempstead, L. I. Graham, Anne ........... .......... E lizabeth Carteret Hotel, Elizabeth, N. Graham, Jessie ................ ...............,.. 5 6 Mackay Place, Brooklyn, N. Y. Greeley, Francis .............. ................ 1 60 East 62nd Street, New York City Green, Alice ................ .........,., 1 03M Waverly Street, Yonkers, N. Y. 224 Green, Mary ............................. Greenberg, Rebecca ............ Greenberg, Isabelle .......,.... Greene, Louis ..................r. Gregory, Esther ...,....... Gross, Claire ......,................ Grossman, Irving .,............... Gundersdorff, Arthur ............ Haemer, Olivia .,.....,..,........... Hagan, Agnes ...'................ Haight, Esther .............. Hall, Margaret ,............ Ham, Laura ..................., Hamburger, Sam ............. Hamilton, Mercedes ........... Hammer, William ......... Hammond, Carolyn ...... Hanley, Dorothy ............. ..............Sailors Snug Harbor, Staten Island, N. Y. 80th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. .............19O0 Grand Concourse, New York City ............287 East 34th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. ,.........118 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, N. J. East Fifth Street, New York City Quincy Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. ............295 Palisade Avenue, Union City, N. J. Euston Road, Garden City, L. I. Elliott Avenue, Yonkers, N. Y. 23 West 13th Street, New York City Bradley Avenue, Camden, N. .....8747 Woodhaven Boulevard, Woodhaven, L. I. West 150th Street, New York City Ovington Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. ...........856 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, N. Y. Dean Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Wood Avenue, Bridgeport, Conn. Hannon, Anna ............. .............. 9 11 Belmont Avenue, Youngstown, Ohio Hanson, Adelaide .......... .................,....... 2 7 Grove Street, Bloomfield, N. J. Hare, Adele ........................... ................. 5 11 Lenox Avenue, New York City Harrington, Leslie ............... ......................... 4 3 West 12th Street, New York City Harris, Ethel ........,.............. .............. 8 11 St. Nicholas Avenue, New York City Hartnett, Mary .................. .................................... 6 1 Cleveland Street, Orange, N. J. Harvey, Loretta ................ ....................... 5 18 West End Avenue, Elizabeth, N. J. Hasselstrom, Harriette ........... ........... 4 97 North Arlington Avenue, East Orange, N. Haver, Edna ............................. ................................................... 3 0 Post Street, Yonkers, N. Y. Hawley, Arja ...................... ........... ........... 7 O 1 Jefferson Avenue, Elizabeth, N. Hay, Marion ............. .................... 1 01 Prospect Street, Woonsocket, R. I. Hecth, Irvin .............. ....,................... 2 790 Grand Concourse, New York City Henderson, Eva ........... .............. 1 O North Fulton Avenue, Mt. Vernon, N. Y. Henry, Everett ................... ........... 2 99 Davis Avenue, West North Brighton, S. I. Hepbron ,Adele ............... ................................. 1 33 Summit Avenue, Summit, N. Herscher, Emanuel .............. ................ 2 313 Mott Avenue, Far Rockaway, N. Y. Hess, Evelyn .............,,........ ............. 1 7 Washburn Park, Rochester, N. Y. Hession, Mae ................ ............ 2 21 Sherman Avenue, New York City Hester, Helena ............. ............ 3 84 East 193rd Street, New York City Heyer, Irma .................... ......................... 1 6 North Avenue, Elizabeth, N. J. Hicks, Ruth ......................... ........................... 1 07 Waverly Place, New York City Hingsberg, Thomas ...... Hoag, Dorothy .................. Hoenig, Clara .................... Hoffman, Harry ............ Hollander, Bertelle ............. Holley, Alice ...................... Holmes, Marian ............... Holmes, Lincoln .............. Hopkinson, Alice ............ Horne, Pauline ............ Horwitz, Morris ............... Hough, Henry ............. Hosmer, Harriet .............. Howard, Gladys ............... Howell, Evelyn ............ Hurst, Katherine ............, .............3970 Amundson Avenue, New York City . .................. 108 Chestnut Street, Flushing, N. Y. ............112-38 14th Road, College Point, N. Y. Milford Avenue, Newark, N. Lincoln Parkway, Bayonne, N. J. West 153rd St., New York City Bonn Place, Weehawken, N. J. F. D. No. 4, Huntington, N. Y. Tuscan Road, Maplewood, N. J. ...........1773 Park Place, Brooklyn, N. Y. ...........2348 71st Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. ............................Westhampton Beach, L. I. ...........644 Somerset Street, Johnstown, Pa. Highland Avenue, Newark, N. J. Harmon Street, White Plains, N. Y. East 52nd Street, New York City 225 Huttemeyer, Herman ............ Hyams, Tess ............................ Iffrig, Janeth ...................... Immerman, Janice ....... Ivins, Sarah ................... Jablin, Sadie ............ Jacobs, Beatrice .......... Jacobs, Frida ........... Jacobs, John ............ Jacobs, Lillian ................ Jacobsen, Martin .......... James, Constance ............ James, Katherine ......... Janssen, Betty .............. Jellinek, Harry ............... Joelson, Karen ,..................... Johnson, Elizabeth ...... Jonas, Grace ....................... Jones, Clarence ........... Kahn, Bertha ............... Kaiser, Emily .................. Kallmeyer, Evelyn .............. Kane, Marion .,,.,............ Kaplan, Harold ............... Kaplan, Lillian .............. Kaplowitz, Selma ........... Karasik, Leo ................. Karfiol, Selma ............. Karmiohl, Louis .,........... Katz, Helen .................. Katz, Samuel ................... Kaufman, Shirley .......... Kaufman, Arthur ......... Kaveny, Helen ............ .............147-55 Hoover Avenue, Jamaica, L. I. ............1705 Gates Avenue, Brooklyn. N. Y. ............1052 East 29th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 49th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Irving Place, Summit, N. J. Avenue N, Brooklyn, N. Y. Grant Avenue, New York City Hoff Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. .......,....173 Indian Neck Avenue, Stanford, Conn. .. .............. 1266 Sheridan Avenue, New York City ............341 Market Street, Perth Amboy, N. West 51st Street, New York City .....,.......................................,..Woodbridge, Conn. Crescent Avenue, Leonia, N. J. ............324 Grier Avenue, Elizabeth, N. 45th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. ...........109-48 157th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. East 117th Street, New York City ............1735 Monsey Avenue, Scranton, Pa. Kane Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. .............172O Stephen Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Prospect Street, South Orange, N. J. Salem Road, Elizabeth, N. J. ..............2146 81st Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Avenue C, Bayonne, N. Crown Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 147 Herkimer Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. East 17th Street, Whitestone, L. I. ...............2013 83rd Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Howard Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. .........,..,6418 19th Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. ............1647 44th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. ............148-20 89th Avenue, Jamaica, L. I. Valley Road, Montclair, N. J. Kavier, Rose ................. .............. 1 617 Nelson Avenue, New York City Kaye, Samuel ............... ........... 1 O41 Forest Avenue, New York City Kelder, Monica .......... ..........,.......... L emoine Avenue, Coytesville, N. Kelly, Agnes ...................... ...................,...... 3 43 Franklin Avenue, Nutley, N. Kennedy, Margaret .........,, ............. 4 76 Washington Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Kennell, Arthur ........................ .................. 3 63 West 51st Street, New York City Kennington, Charles .............. ............ 2 67 Weeguahic Avenue, Newark, N. Kilbride, Eleanor ...................... ...,......... 8 75 Orange Street, New Haven, Conn. Kimmelman, Abraham ............. .............. ,,.,....... 9 1 9 Kelly Street, Bronx, N. Y. King, John .................................... .............. 8 83 Greene Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Kirk, William .....,.................. ............... 4 76 East 28th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Kisco, Frances ............ ................ 7 74 Arctic Street, Bridgeport, Conn. Klaw, Milton ............... ............. 4 18 Jersey Street, New Brighton, S. I. Klein, Adolph ............ ................ 1 238 Ward Avenue, New York City Klein, Louis ....,...,,.,...... ........................... 1 455 Fulton Avenue, Bronx, N. Y. Klock, Henry .................... .............. 1 18 South Liberty Street, Orwigsburg, Pa. Klotzman, Abram ............... .....,............ 3 392 12th Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Knabe, Mildred ......................... ............. 2 121 Forster Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Knippenberg, Mabel ............. ..................... 4 24 East 39th Street, Paterson, N. J. Kohl, May .......,................,....... ..........,.............................. R . D. No. 2, Newburgh, N. Y. Kopolov, Sarah ................ ............... 2 424 Dickens Avenue, Far Rockaway, N. Y. 226 Kornhauser, Leo ................. Koschorreck, Viola ........... Koss, Louise ..................... Kowsky, Estelle ............. Kozlofsky, Harry ............... Kralik, Regina .........,,....., Kramer, joseph .............. Krinsky, Leon ............ Kuehn, Ottilie ........... Kuhn, Harold ............. Kupfer, Irving ..................... Kurlantzick, Harry ........... Kwrat, Louise ..,............... Kymer, Evelyn ........... Lacot, Rafael .,............. Laefsky, Lenore .............,..... Laemmle, Matilda ............. .. Landau, Irving .........,...... .. Landers, Marie ............... Landon, Elizabeth ........,.... LaPorte, john .........,.,...... Larson, Geraldine .............. Latour, Harold .........,,.... Layton, Lillian ..................... Leachman, Constance Leadbeater, Dorothy ............. Eaton Street, Elizabeth, N. I. Alexander Street, Newark, N. J. Smith Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. ..........1976 East 13th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. ............738 Jackman Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. . .,...............,.... 53 Pomona Avenue, Newark, N. J. Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, N. Y. 368 East Seventh Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. .......167-02 Highland Avenuejjamaica, N. Y. ..............3705 90th Street, jackson Heights, N. Y. Quincy Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Main Street, Paterson, N. J. ............686 Center Street, North Bergen, N. J. 80 Clinton Street, Bloomfield, N. J. West 25th Street, New York City ...........1639 Fulton Avenue, New York City ................4458 Cayuga Avenue, New York City ...........1702 West Sixth Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Henry Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Albert, New York City East 138th Street, New York City Pierrepont Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. .......,.....,.258 East Sixth Street, Oswego, N. Y. Green Street, Allentown, Pa. ............149 East 40th Street, New York City Main Street, Johnson City, N. Y. Leader, Nathan .................... ............................. 1 768 Monroe Avenue, Bronx, N. Y. Lee, Marjorie ................... ............. 4 7 Washington Street, Long Branch, N. Lefkowitz, Bertha .............. ............ 5 E. Mahoney Avenue Mahoney City, Pa. Leibensperger, Grace ....,...... .........,,......,............ 7 21 Linden Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Leland, Arthur ............... 127 West Seventh Street, Mt. Vernon, N. Y. Lenaghen, George ............. .................. 1 9 Locust Avenue, Rockville Centre, L. I. Leshefsky, Johann ............. ............................ 1 620 80th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Lesko, Albert ...............,... ............... 5 1 Alden Street, Wallington, N. j. Levi, Selma .,,................ .......... 2 7 West 72nd Street, New York City Levine, Yetta ............... ................. 6 65 Crown Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Levinson, Rose ........... Lerner, julie ........... Levy, Sol ........................ Levy, Vivian ..................... Lieberman, Hyman ........... Liebling, Louis .........,........... Liflander, Natalie ......... East Broadway, New York City ...........112 Rockaway Parkway, Brooklyn, N. Y. Keap Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. ..........123 West 74th Street, New York City Second Street, New York City ............6-10 East Second Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. East 22nd Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Lillywhite, jesse .................. .............. 2 347 Foster Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Lindenthal, Dorothea .......... .... .......... 8 H oward Avenue, White Plains, N. Y. Lindsley, Beatrice .......,. Lindwall, Ruth ............... Lipkowitz, Frances ...... Lipman, Shulamith ........... Li pschutz, Jacob ............. Liss, Bertha ................... Littman, Herman .......... Locilento, Adeline ............ Longo, Anna ........,........... Lucy, Leroy ................... Jackson Street, Binghamton, N. Y. ............302 Temple Street, New Haven, Conn. Seymour Avenue, Newark, N. 581 Fulton Avenue, New York City East 70th Street, New York City ............2787 Kingsbridge Road, New York City Ralph Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y, ..,.........6306 20th Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y, ..............1657 75th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. N, Y, 227 Lundell, Evelyn ................ Lynch, Margaret .............. Lynt, Barbara ............... Lyon, Blanche ................ McCallum, Gladys .............. McCarthy, Ethel ........... McCarthy, Mary ....,...... McCloy, Evelyn ..,.,.......... McCormack, Mary ....,......... McDermott, Mary .........,..... McFadden, Anna ........ .. ................ 9805 38th Avenue, Corona, L. I. Heath Avenue, New York City South Broadway, Yonkers, N. Y. ............124 Prospect Avenue, Mamaroneck, N. Y. Parkview Drive, Millburn, N. High Street, Yonkers, N. Y. Bridge Street, Willimantic, Conn. ............128 Renwick Street, Newburgh, N. Y. ............306 West 15th Street, New York City Broadway, New York City Ridge Avenue, Allentown, Pa. McGann, Paul .............. ........................, 2 65 Grant Avenue, Grantwood, N. McGee, Rae ........................ ..................... 3 210 81st Street, jackson Heights, N. Y. McGrath, Kathleen ............ ............... 4 58 South First Avenue, Mt. Vernon, N. Y. McHugh, Thomas ............... ............. 3 17 Gregory Avenue, West Orange, N. McKinley, John ............ ........,.,.. 8 80 St. Nicholas Avenue, New York City McLaine, Ellen ...................... ........................ 2 6 East 63rd Street, New York City McNamara, Marie ............... ........................ 1 640 Chapel Street, New Haven, Conn. McParlan, Chahleen ............... ...,................................. 1 6 East 96th Street, New York City Macaluso, Jennie .................. ,............ 8 005 Roosevelt Avenue, jackson Heights, N. Y. MacCallum, Marion .......... ................... M aplewood Apartments, Hempstead, N. Y. Mackay, Eleanor .............. ....,,,...,.. 2 30 South Second Avenue, Mt. Vernon, N. Y. MacKenna, Susie ............ ..................................................................................... T hiells, N. Y. Macklinus, Ruth ........... ....................... 3 35 Levisohn Place, Englewood, N. J. MacNabb, Anna .............. ........................... 3 2 Hansbury Avenue, Newark, N. J. Madden, Katherine .... North Walnut Street, East Orange, N. J. Magilligan, Agnes .............. .................................. 1 35 Bergen Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Magna, Henry ................... ' ......................................... 550 Argyle Road, Brooklyn, N. Y. Maleson, Rose .............. ........... 4 99 Bergenline Avenue, West New York, N. Mallach, Aubrey ........... Mallon, Angela ............. Mentz, Harold .................. Margram, Harold ......... Marmarosch, joe .............. Marshall, Beatrice .......... Marshall, Louise ........... Martin, Nora ..................,........ Mateosian, Florence ........... Matter, Ruth ....................... Matthews, joseph ......... Mattice, Gordon ........... Mattson, Adella ,........... May Lola .......................... Meade, Helen .................... Meehan, Catherine .............. Meehan, james ........,............. Meglathery, Norman ............. Meidman, Harry .......... Meier, Clara ........................ Melendez, Prospero... Mercuer, Madelon ............... Meredith, Frank ........... Merehew, james ........... Meserve, Eva ................ Meyer, William .......... ................. 1295 Central Avenue, Far Rockaway, N. Y. ............... 16 Overlook Place, Port Washington, N. Y. West Market Street, Orwigsburgh, Pa. ...........2208 Eighth Avenue, Astoria, L. I., N. Y. Sterling Place, Brooklyn, N. Y. ..........123 West Seventh Street, New York City East 178th Street, New York City Coleman Street, Bridgeport, Conn. Copley Avenue, Teaneck, N. Grove Place, East Orange, N. West 178th Street, New York City Marble Hill Avenue, New York City ...........122 Church Street, Freeport, L. I., N. Y. N. Y. Occident Avenue, Stapleton, S. I. Snyder Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. ,..........208 North Miller Street, Newburgh, N. Y. Vine Street, Bethlehem, Pa. .............1089 East 165th Street, New York City Beaumont Place, Newark, N. Broadway, New York City Bruce Road, Montclair, N. 47 Tremont Place, Montclair, N. J. 8642 Woodhaven Boulevard, Woodhaven, L. I. Pennington Avenue, Passaic, N. Seventh Avenue, Astoria, L. I. 228 Michnoii, Ruth .....,. Mignogna, Milton. .,.... . Miller, Miller Miller Miner: Miller, Miller, Anne ............. Fletcher ....... Marjorie ..,,. Mary ....,..........., Pearl ..,........................ Tillie ..................... Miltenberger, Everett. Mmacci, Fenn ..............,......... Minogue, Evelyn ............ Mitchell, Helen .,,.,.......... Moller, Charlotte ........... Molony, Myrtle ............... Monk, Stella ................. Moore, Grace ............... Morresy, john ........,.,........ Morrissey, james ............ Muchnick, Alex ............., Munder, Meyer .......... Murray, Mary .........,..... Myerson, Lillian ............,, Nathan, Caroline ........... Nathanson, Ann ............. Nelson, Robert ............ Neuman, Harvey .........,. Neuner, Ulrich ........... Newberry, Inez ....,...... Newton, Grace .........,.,..... Nicholas, Dorothy ...........,.. Nicholas, Elizabeth ....,....... Nickerson, Mabel .......... Nickles, George .............. Niebuhr, john .................. Niemtzow, Lillian .............. Nixon, Grace ...........,........ Norton, Avis .........,...... Nourse, Ruth .................... Nuffer, Anna .......................... Nussenbaum, Frances. Nyquist, David ................ Oakley, Elizabeth ........... Oberg, Eva ..... 1 ........,........... Odell, Georgia ................. Oehlschlaeger, Louise ........... Oliver, Paul ..,,,.,.............,,,....., Olsen, Edith ....................... O'Malley, Kathleen ........... O'Neill, john ................... Oremland, Freda ............ Orkin, Louis ................. Orr, Ada .......................... Oslinker, Pauline ............ Pagan, Bessie ...,,,......... 78th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 155 Farragut Road, Hastings-on-Hudson, N. Y. Lincoln Street, Montclair, N. j. Carroll Street, Hudson, N. Y. Delmar Place, Irvington, N. ......................Sheridan Avenue, Ho-Ho-Kus, N. j. North Eighth Street, Allentown, Pa. Grant Avenue, New York City ............1725 Emmons Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. ,.........1351 South 57th Street, Philadelphia, Pa. ............21O Midwood Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Westervelt Avenue, Tenafly, N. 1. Lincoln Avenue, Crestwood, N. Y. Walnut Street, Peekskill, N. Y. ..............1006 Gerard Avenue, New York City Colonial Terrace, Nutley, N. .......,...308 Liberty Street, Long Branch, N. Amackassin Terrace, Yonkers, N. Y. .............71-73 Amboy Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. ............975 East 179th Street, Bronx, N. Y. West 13th Street, New York City Schnectady Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 54 West 78th Street, New York City Amherst Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. .......,...653 East 52nd Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. East 91st Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. M. C. A., White Plains, N. Y. ....,,,.......1421A Boulevard East, West New York, N. J. East 12th Street, New York City Avon Place, Amityville, N. Y. Kenwood Avenue, Worcester, Mass. Stratford Road, Brooklyn, N. Y. 771, Terryville, Conn. ...............1215 Fulton Avenue, New York City Vought Avenue, Freehold, N. J. Madison Avenue, Paterson, N. J. Central Avenue, St. George S. I., N. Y. ..........Glen-Fulton Apartments, Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 163rd Street, Flushing, N. Y. State Street, Bridgeport, Conn. Williams Avenue, Teaneck, N. Beach Avenue, New Dorp, S. I., N. Y. Carpenter Street, New York City East Fourth Street, Mt. Vernon, N. Y. Sunset Lane, Tenafly, N. Hillside Avenue, Nutley, N. J. Bunton Place, East Milton, Mass. Boulevard, Jersey City, N. .....,,.,.1620 University Avenue, New York City Elsmere Place, New York City ........,..475 East 145th Street, New York City East State Street, Gloversville, N. Y. ............1615 Walton Avenue, New York City Park Place, Brooklyn, N. Y. 229 Page, Gladys ............ Palmer, Martha ,........ ..........735 Park Avenue, Bridgeport, Conn. 58th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Paparozzi, Frank .............. .................................. 7 2 Main Street, Lodi, N. Paragus, Alice ............... ...,.,..,. 1 34 West 21st Street, Bayonne, N, Parker, Stanley ............. ........,........ 6 52 East 5th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Pasnik, Helen ............... ............. 2 43 E. Mt. Eden Avenue, Bronx, N. Y. Pasquill, Elsie ..............., ............ 2 46 Milford Street, Manchester, N. J. Parker, Carl .................. ................. 6 7 East 175th Street, Bronx, N. Y. Paulson, Elizabeth .......,.. .,.............,..,.,.... 3 32 32nd Street, Woodcliff, N. J. Peace, james .................. .......... 2 0-34 127th Street, College Point, N. Y. Pfau, Sarah ...................... ............... 1 443 Boon Avenue, New York City Pfisterer, Adolf .............,.. ..........................., D orsey Lane, Hyde Park, N. Y. Pickering, Florence. Piercy, George ............ Pichalla, john .........r Pops, Beatrice.. ...... .. Portnoy, Rose ........... Povish, George ............. Lincoln Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. ..........121 St. Marks Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Irving Place, New York City 320 Sheridan Avenue, New York City East Fourth Street, New York City Fourth Street, Jersey City, N. Powell, Marion ............ ................... 1 4 Second Street, Manhasset, L. I. Prindle, Winifred ........... ..,......... 4 61 Vose Avenue, South Orange, N. J. Prior, Katherine ............... ,.,........... 5 0 West 72nd Street, New York City Pulik, Lee .........,,,........... ............... 7 017 Bay Parkway, Brooklyn, N. Y. Purdy, Helen ..............,,. ............. 3 9 Stewart Street, Amsterdam, N. Y. Quinn, Kathleen .............. ............,.,............... 6 73 Broadway, New York City Raber, Florence ........... .................. 8 090 88th Avenue, Woodhaven, L. I. Raifman, Marcia ...........,.. .............. 1 153 East Ninth Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Randall, Mary ............... ............... 8 5 Highland Avenue, Yonkers, N. Y. Rashby, Ruth ............ Ray, Margaret .......... ................. 2124 Harrison Avenue, Bronx, N. Y. Hawthorne Avenue, Yonkers, N. Y. Reefe, Rose ,..........,,,.. ............... 2 72 East 39th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Fccher, Harriet ............. ....,...... 2 16 West 100th Street, New York City Reich, Abraham .......... ............. 8 08 DeKalb Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Reid, Wfilliam ............. Reilly, Virginia .......... .. ............... 1438 Ocean Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. .. .................... 205 West 88th Street, New York City Reiser, Florence ........... ............ 7 62 Westminster Road, Brooklyn, N. Y. Reiser, Nathan ........... Remington, Helen... .. ..................... 126 Harrison Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. .............1373 Boulevard East, West New York, N. J. Resnick, Louis .................... ................... 1 639 East Third Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Revheim, Gunhilde ............ ................................ 5 71 46th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Richard, Mary ................... ................... 9 45 Teller Avenue, Bronx, N. Y. Richards, Alton ......... ................. 4 61 Third Avenue, Astoria, N. Y. Richards, Catherine ............ .......... 1 25 Harrison Street, East Orange, N. Richter, Miriam ................ ..................... 3 25 Rich Avenue, Mt. Cernon, N. Y. Rickard, Isabella ..... Risisky, Nathan ......... Rjawsky, Johanna .... Roantree, jean ............ Arlington Avenue, jersey City, N. J. ............180 Greenman Avenue, Newark, N. Ruger, Hannah .............. . George Street, Bridgeport, Conn. Crotona Avenue, Bronx, N. Y. 2 North Tenth Avenue, Mt. Vernon, N. Y. Roberts, Miriam .......... ......................... 2 964 Perry Avenue, New York City Robinson, Stella ........ Robinson, Sylvia ....... Rolf, Margaret ........... Romaine, Emilie ............... ............237 Rutledge Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. ..............1948 69th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Devoe Avenue, Yonkers, N. Y. Rodner, Bernard .............. Rohrbacher, Ruth ........... .. ........... 3185 Fairmount Avenue, Bronx, N. Y. Broadway, New York City Clifton Avenue, Newark, N. 230 Romano, Juliette ........,.,.. Thompson Street, New York City Rooga, Lester ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, ............ 7 3 Hamilton Avenue, White Plains, N. Y. Rose, Luella ,.,,,,,,,,,,,,.,,,..,,, ..i,.................... 4 1 Cornell Avenue, Yonkers, N. Y. Rogeman, Miriam ...,.,..,,,,,,, ....,...................... 2 07 Beach 69th Street, Arverne, L. I. Rogenbgum, Florence ,,,,,,,,,,,, ............ 2 South Pinehurst Avenue, New York City Rosenber Clara g, t ................. Rosenberg, George ..,......... Rosenbrock, Bertha ..,,,. Rosenfeld, Isabel .......... Rosensweig, Julius ............. Rosenthal, Renee .......... Rosenwach, Philip ............. Roth, Clara .........................,..... Rothbart, Joseph ........... Rothstein, Abraham... Rowold, Matilda ................. Rubin, Ben ...................,..... Ruddiman, Helen ............... . Ruderman, Lillian ............,. ...... Rundquist, Grace ........... ...... Rutman, Harry ............ Ryan, Gladys ........... Ryan, Helen ............ Ryan, Rhys ..................... Rydberg, Lilly ............. Ryland, Gladys ........... Sabella, Rita .................. Sackter, Milton ................ Sadovsky, Hannah .............. Salsano, Catherine ....... Saltman, Alex ................. Samworth, Sarah ........... Sandelman, George ..,........ .,..... Sandholf, Henrietta .... Sarason, Bertram .......... Saxe, Eva ........................ Scalzo, Muriel ............. Schaedel, Joseph ........... Schectman, Philip ...,.... Schindewolf, Frances Schlepp, Ruth ................. Schlesinger, Lillian ..... Schlobohm, Olga .,....... Schmidt, Matilda ........... Schneider, Mina .............. Schneider, Victor ........... School, Sue ......,....................... Schopper, Christiana ............. Schor, Anna ....................... Schreiber, Lester .................. Schriebman, Bessie ............ Schroeder, Helen ........... Schucker, Norma ........... Schultz, Phyllis ..................... Schuman, Hannah ...,.......... Seigel Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Phelan Place, New York City ...........1718 Norman Avenue, Evergreen. N. Y. ............740 Howard Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. ...........2208 Pitkin Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Park Avenue, Rutherford, N. J. Rutgers Street, New York City ...........209 Atkins Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Wyona Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Lincoln Place, Brooklyn, N. Y. ...........107 Gleane Street, Elmhurst, L. I., N. Y. 22nd Street, Union City, N. J. Southfield Road, Detroit, Michigan Frelinghuysen Avenue, Somerville, N. J. .......1594 Hayes Avenue, Jackson Heights, N. Y. West 25th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. West 47th Street, New York City Henry Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Gramercy Park, New York City .............3304 Rochambeau Avenue, New York City Temple, New York City 65th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. . ............. 127 Irving Street, Hartford, Conn. ...........112 East 17th Street, New York City ..........109 St. Marks Place, Brooklyn, N. Y. .. ...................... 913 Tinton Avenue, New York City .. ............................... 567 East 28th Street, Paterson, N. J. ......1303 Coney Island Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Division Street, Trenton, N. J. .. .................................... 975 Walton Avenue, New York City ............266 North Fulton Avenue, Mt. Vernon, N. Y. View Avenue, Mt. Vernon, N. Y. .. ................... 225 West Fourth Street, New York City Ridgewood Avenue, Newark, N. J. Tyler Street, Trenton, N. Linden Boulevard, Brooklyn, N. Y. 574 Bergenline Avenue, West New York, N. .. ................................ 70 Radford Avenue, Yonkers, N. Y. 246 Madison Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 57 Manhattan Avenue, New York City Monroe Street, New York City ..........32O Fairmount Avenue, Jersey City, N. J. Castle Avenue, Spring Valley, N. Y. Second Avenue, New York City Sullivan Place, Brooklyn, N. Y. ..............101-58 98 Street, Queens, L. I., N. Y. Carroll Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. East Pottsville Street, Pine Grove, Pa. West 93rd Street, New York City ............616 Empire Boulevard, New York City 231 Schure, Rose ...,................. Schweitzer, Carl ............. Scott, William ............ Scully, Helen ............... Ocean Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. East Seventh Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Palisade Avenue, Union City, N. J. ............128 Valley Stream Road, Larchmont, N. Y. Seanor, Reah ......,......... ...................,............ 4 55 McKen Avenue, Monossen, Pa. Seidel, Roland ............ ........... 5 2-55 42nd Street, Long Island City, N. Y. Seidell, joseph ...........,..... ......................... 2 475 Tiebout Avenue, Bronx, N. Y. Seidman, Henrietta ........... ...............,........ 2 O21 66th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Seifert, Helen .................. .......... T he Crossways, Far Rockaway, N. Y. Schacter, joseph .................. ................... 2 792 Ocean Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Shanholtz, Serena ............... ........... 2 1 Kirkpatrick St., New Brunswick, N. Shannon, Edith ............... ..................... 6 5 Glen Avenue, Glen Rock, N. Shapiro, Jennie ............... ............... 1 511 College Avenue, New York City Shapiro, Morris ............., ....................... 7 70 Schnectady Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Shapiro, Rose .............. ............................ 1 515 West Seventh Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Shea, Mary ......................... ............. 5 02 Van Cortland Park Avenue, Yonkers, N. Y. Sheib, Irving .......................... ........,.................,.................. L afayette Avenue, Chatham, N. Sherbowsky, David ........... .......................,....,........... 1 651 Park Place, Brooklyn, N. Y. Shirley, Anne ................... .............. 7 49 Sandford Avenue, Newark, N. Shurberg, Sarah .............. Siegal, Pearl ...................... Silverman, Alter ............ Singer, joseph ............ Sirken, Belle ....,........... Skillin, james ..... . ......... . Skrivanek, Rudolf ............. Slotter, Sarah .................... Smith, Edward ........... Smith, Isabel ............... Smith, Geraldine .......... Smith, Milfred ..................... Solomon, Maxwell ............ Solomon, Sidney ........... Soomers, Arthur ............ Sorenson, Lillian ................ Sorrenson, Gabrielle ............. Souter, Sydney ..................... Spahr, Clayton ................ Spar, Sally ..................... Spencer, Harold ............. Spencer, Thelma ........... Springer, Louise ..............,... Stanton, Josephine ............ Stark, Gustave ................. Steinbuch, Marion ............. Steinhardt, joseph ............. Stern, Blanche ................. Stern, Fannie ......................... Sterrite, Elizabeth .......,....., Stetler, Edith ............. Stewart, David ........... Stipek, Mildred .............. Stitt, Lawrence .......,........ Stoller, Benjamin ............... Storm, Harold ................. Broadway, New York City ..........76O Hunts Point Avenue, New York City ............529 South Fifth Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. East 51st Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Linden Boulevard, Brooklyn, N. Y. High Street, Newark, N. J. Magnolia Avenue, Arlington, N. ............559 Tecumseh Avenue, Mt. Vernon, N. Y. ..........160 Highwood Avenue, Glen Rock, N. J. Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, N. Y. ...........512 West Orange Street, Lancaster, Pa. Harrison Street, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 79th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 65th Street, Woodside, L. I. Barrett Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. ...........5l7 East 26th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. West 59th Street, New York City Whittlesey Road, Trenton, N. Anna Street, Elizabeth, N. Miller Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. O. Box 115, Huntington, L. I., N. Y. Wooster Street, New York City Broadway, New York City ............280 East 21st Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. West Sixth Street, Bayonne, N. J. ..........198-17 100th Avenue, Holiis, L. I., N. Y. .............2028 Valentine Avenue, Bronx, N. Y. East Third Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. ...........1205 Fulton Avenue, New York City Union Avenue, Clifton, N. J. Nyack, N. Y. Beach Avenue, Bronx, N. Y. .............1951 First Street, North Bergen, N. J. West 125rd Street, New York City ...........966 Schnectady Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Valley, N. Y. 232 Straub, Harold ............. Stuart, Paul ..................... Sugerman, Pinkus ........... Sullivan, Frank ............ Graham Avenue, Paterson, N. J. Weequahic Avenue, Newark, N. J. 79th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. West 102nd Street, New York City Swanson, Kathryn ........... .............. 5 23 Second Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Tarr, Phoebe ,,,,,.,,,,,,,.,,,, .,.......................... 1 96 Main Street, Geneva, N. Y. Tarvin, Bessie ,,,,,,,,,,,,.,. ,.................,..... 5 67 Barbey Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Tekulsky, Dora ,,.......,., ............... 7 51 Flushing Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Terry, Laura .............. .............................. 3 0 Post Street, Yonkers, N, Y, Terry, Louise ................. ........... 2 20 West 140th Street, New York City Thomas, Florence ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, ............ 1 411 Delaware Avenue, New Castle, Pa. Thompson, Mildred ........,.. ................. 3 015 33rd Street, Astoria, L. I., N. Y. Tirendi, Winifred .........,..... ...................... 8 1 West 12th Street, New York City Tobias, Gertrude ...........,.. ............ 6 1 Sanford Avenue, Flushing, L. I., N. Y. Tobin, Dorothea .............. .............. 5 3-18 92nd Street, Elmhurst, L. I., N. Y. Tompkins, Mabel ............ ,................... 1 104 Howard Street, Peekskill, N. Y. Trifshick, Sara .,............ .......... 6 38 Crotona Park South, New York City Troidl, Emily ..................... ............................................................,..................... J utland, N. J. Troxell, Clifford .............. .............. 2 222 North 13th Street, Allentown, Pa. Troxell, joseph ............ ........................................................................... C armel, N. Y. True, Harriet .......................... ................. 1 7 Riggs Place, South Orange, N. J. Trumbull, Christine ........... ........................... 2 9 Essex Avenue, Bernardsville, N. J. Tunner, Etta ..................,..... .............................. 5 50 East Second Avenue, Roselle, N. J. Turim, Violet ................ 147 Beach 34th Street, Edgemere, L. I., N. Y. Turpin, Raymond ............ Ugelow ............................... Unterfort, Henry ....................... Valien, Helen .................................... VanBurkalow, Elizabeth ........... Varni, Agnes ................................ Vogel, Hilda ............................ Vollmer, Marguerite ............... Von Storch, Ethel ............... Vose, Grace ......................... Vreeland, Albert .............. Vroman, Clarence ................ Wagenheim, Harold ............... Wagner, Mamie .................... Wagner, I-Ierberta ........... Waite, Harold .............. Walden, Helen ............ Waldman, Edith .............. Walker, Evelyn ................. Wallen, Edward ............... Walsh, Frances .................. Watkins, Frederick .............. Weed, Ruth ...............,......... Wegner, Berta ......,................ Weinberger, Arthur ........... Weinstein, jacob .............. Weinstein, joseph ........... Weinstein, Ruth ............... Weisbard, George ........... Weiss, Mercedes .............. Weissberger, Morris ......... Sullivan Street, New York City Daly Avenue, New York City ...........210 East Tenth Street, New York City Canaan, Conn. ..........305 West 18th Street, New York City Ingraham Place, Newark, N. J. North Broad Street, Peekskill, N. Y. Broadway, New York City Fairview Street, Yonkers, N. Y. Shelburne Road, Burlington, Vt. ................Washington Street, Rock Hill, N. Richmond Avenue, Amityville, N. Y. Waverly Avenue, Newark, N. Elliot Place, New York City Cedar Street, Ridgefield Park, N. J. ..........255 West Fourth Street, New York City 262 81st Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Seventh Avenue, New York City 37-13 Hillside Avenue, jamaica, L. I. East Third Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Nagle Street, Paterson. N. J. Street, Greenlawn, N. Y. East Avenue, Norwalk, Conn. ...........202 Frankfort Street, Frankfort, N. Y. Hewes Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Greene Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 580 President Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. .............1219 Union Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 83rd Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. ..............1063 26th Street, Wilwaukee, Wis. Second Street, New York City 255 Weissenberg, Anita ...... Welch, Dorothy .................. Wells, Jeannette ............ Welsher, Irving ..........,............. ...........157 153rd Street, Corona, L. I., N. Y. 36 East 19th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. ..........197 Woodside Avenue, Newark, N. J. Grand Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Wentworth, Catherine ............. . Werner, Helen ......................... Wertheimer, Harold ............. ..... Wexler, Frances ...,.......... Whelen, Ruth ............ White, White, White, White, Alice ................ Clifford ...........,.. Olive .............. Saul ......................... Whittington, Ruth ............ Whyte, David ................. Wledman, Irving ............... Wilgard, Tilda ................. Williammee, Wilda .........,.... Williams, Mary ................ Williams, Samuel ........... Washington Terrace, East Orange, N. Capitol Avenue, Bridgeport, Conn. Colfax Street, Scranton, Pa. ....4807 Surf Avenue, Sea Gate, Brooklyn, N. Y. Keer Avenue, Newark, N. ..............5743 Wyalusing Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. N. Y. ........,.............Oaklawn Avenue, Glen Head, N. Y. Willoughby Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. ...........270 Fairmount Avenue, Jersey City, N. J. Roosevelt Avenue, Dumont, N. J. East 161st Street, New York City ...........,1678 East 19th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 2, 54 Claysville, Pa. ..........3-41 Clinton Avenue, New Haven, Conn. 50th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Williams, Virginia ...... .................................................... M ain Street, Buchanan, Va. Wilson, Grace ................... ...................................... 4 02 75th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Wittleder, Katherine ............ .......... 1 71-12 Higbie Street, Springfield Gardens, N. Y. Woldman, Jennie .............. ...............,... 2 176 East Seventh Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Wolff, Mortimer ........... Wolodarsky, Janet ......... Wood, Lila ............................. Wodward, Ladorn ............ Wright, Alice ,,,.............. Wright, George .......,..... Wright, Imore ..,,,,..,....... Yanson, Margaret ............. .,... Yarrick , Elsie ................... Youst, Lillian .........,........ Yourman, Harry ........... Zacharias, Louise .......... Zalowitz, Morris ..........., Zandri, Levio ................... Zimlichman, Louis ............ Zipperman, Charles .............. Zubow, Zucker, Hazel ....................... Samuel ............... Zutler, Elias ................. 542 51st Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, N. Y. ............43-15 158th Street, Flushing, L. I., N. Y. Ralph Avenue, White Plains, N. Y. Walnut Street, Westfield, N. J. 50-O5 Jamaica Avenue, Jamaica, L. I. West 137th Street, New York City ........310 Grand Avenue, Long Island City, N. Y. Ege Avenue, Jersey City, N. Washington Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Fifth Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 19 Harding Avenue, Clifton, N. ............419 Washington Avenue, Elizabeth, N. Conn. Howard Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. ...........127 Pendleton Street, New Haven, Conn. West 86th Street, New York City Avenue 'D, New York City ............112 West 61st Street, New York City 234 Adler, Helen .................. Adler, Ralfe .....................,... Agmarizick, Evelyn ............. Ahlefeld, Gladys .............. Aliver, Louise ....,.......,... Allen, Dorothy ............. Alter, Eli ........................... Arbert, Henrietta .......,.,... Arington, Jessie ...,,,...,. Auster, Leah .............. Baker, Elsie .,.............. Barba, Frances ..........,... Balthaser, Frances ........... Barderisky, Irving ......,.... Bargelski, Charles ..,,,....... Behren, Lillian ......,,..... Benchin, Nathan ......... Bender, Lois ,............. Berger, Fannie .,............ Bennett ....................... Berkman, Sylvia ........... Bertiner, Helen ........,,,. Bernyk, Alexander .......... Birkner, Lydia ............... Blau, Edward .....,.,.,.. Block, Fannie ........... Block, Irving ,.............,,.. Blaud, Kathryn ................. Blumenthal, Beatrice .......... Boller, Gene .,.,,................... Boyd, Violet ..,................ Brauer, Esther ........,. Brandt, Sylvia ,.....,.... Bratcher, Emmit ..,....... Bromham, Mary ...,,..... Bullock, Viola .,............. Burzotta, Frank ............ Carroll, Anna ........... Casper, Ruth ................... Castner, Charles ........... Canin, Lillian ........... Cardove, Marco ........... Casey, Ann ..............,...,,,,,.... Cash, Marion ...........,..................,.,. Chamberlain, Marion ........,.,.., Chase, Alice .......,...,.................. Chesneau, Archie ............. Chrisman, Mabel .............. Churco, Marie ............... Chapin, Ruth ............ Junior Class School of Eclucaiion Riverside Drive, New York City 50th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Kip Avenue, Rutherford, N. J. ...........10121 129th Street, Richmond Hill, N. Y. West 16th Street, New York City Smith Street, Peekskill, N. Y. 32nd Street, New York City, care of Rubin West 89th Street, New York City Prospect Stret, White Plains, N. Y. ...............1812 Arthur Avenue, Bronx, N. Y. Orange Road, Montclair, N. J. West 32nd Street, New York City Broadway, New York City ............,...1576 76th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. ,.,.......28O East 135th Street, New York City East 12th Street, New York City East 31st Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Montgomery Street, Valley Stream, L. I. Ralph Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Conn. ...............2243 78th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 62nd Street, New York City Rosedale Avenue, New York City SchaeiTer Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 27th Street, Astoria, L. I. 39 Elm Street, Orange, N. Y. ...............949A Greene Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Hemlock Place, New Rochelle, N. Y. Simpson Street, New York City ......,......1559 Southern Boulevard, New York City Gregory Avenue, Passaic, N. J. .............5235 Boulevard, North Bergen, N. ...........1818 Davidson Avenue, New York City ,............101-102 17th Place, Queens Village, L. I. ...........1-49-25 11th Avenue, Whitestone, N. Y. ..........2588 Seventh Avenue, New York City ..................,...585Park Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Prospect Street, White Plains, N. Y. Empire Boulevard, Brooklyn, N. Y. Christopher Street, Montclair, N. 16th Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Lawrence Street, Flushing, N. Y. Wilkins Avenue, Port Chester, N. Y. Ocean Parkway, Brooklyn, N. Y. Glenwood Avenue, New Rochelle, N. Y. Sunset Avenue, Lynbrook, N. Y. ..........1665 Grand Concourse, New York City ............78-11 Kew Forest Lane, Forest Hills, L. I. Caryl Avenue, Yonkers, N. Y. Broadway, New York City 235 Chervin, Louis ................... ............,. 2 521 Mermaid Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Chryanowski, John .......,..... ............... 5 7 East Baldwin Street, Bloomfield, N. J. Clark, Nellie ...................... ............... S outh Shore Apartments, Freeport, N. Y. Clifton, Russell ........... Cohen, Pauline ............ Cohen, Max ................... Conlan, Edward ............... Conroy, Miriam ............... Consoli, Angelo ............... Costello, Jane ...........,,... Cother, Avis ...........,...... Cowlin, Eleanor .................... Cranstorm, jeonette ........... Cropacy, M. R. .,............ . Crosby, Helen ..,............ Crosby, Metelle ........... Culhane, Edith ............ Daly, Gertrude ............ D'Annu:ci, E. ...... . Davi, Lily ............................ Dewes, Matilda ...,.............,... Deichelmann, Frances ...... DeRose, Charles .........,..., Dernody, Margaret ............. Demeter, Elsie ................... Diana, Anna .................. Dixon, Onida .......,............ Disanza, Thomas ............. Divone, joseph ............ Forest Avenue, New York City Pine Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. ..........1l9 Miller Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 18th Street, Flushing, I... I. ..........,.552 East 198th Street, New York City Fifth Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 26 East 52nd Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. South Broadway, White Plains, N. Y. Lenox Avenue, New York City Gifford Avenue, jersey City, N. J. Broadway, New York City 516 Dayton Street, Ridgewood, N. J. Saratoga Avenue, Yonkers, N. Y. Locust Avenue, Danbury, Conn. ..............55-20 West 150th Place, Flushing, N. Y. East 119th Street, New York City 55th Street, Astoria, L. I. Ogden Avenue, New York City 10 Livingstone Street, Rhinebeck, N. Y. 65 Boyd Avenue, jersey City, N. Deming, Hazel ....................... .. ...................... .. North Ninth Street, Newark, N. J. ..............90-57 54th Avenue, Elmhurst, N. Y. Roselle H. S., Roselle, N. ..........916 Flushing Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Summit Court, Tottenville, N. Y. Crotona Avenue, Bronx, N. Y. 422 East 117th Street, New York City Dorfler, Rena ................ .............. 2 15 Raymond Street, Hasbrouck Heights, N. Dorman, Frances ........... ...................................... 5 09 Rutland Street, Westbury, L. I. Doty, Frances ............... ................. 5 09 Rutland Street, Westbury, L. I. Duncan, Ethel .,....................... .........................................,........................... R D No. 5, Cranbury, N. J. Dyer, Muriel ................................. .........,..................................... 1 25 Marvin Avenue, Hempstead, L. I. Dyckes, William Kieffer ...........,............ 127-02 95th Avenue, Richmond Hill, Brooklyn, N. Y. Eckstei n, Gertrude .........,.... Edelstein, Evelyn ............. Edinburgh, Rose .............. Edwards, Arline ............... Egry, Helen .................... Elstein, Sidney .............. Eckert, Frieda ............... Epstein, Sylvia .............. Erickson, L. ............ . Erskine, Agnes ............. Etzel, Agnes ............. Falco, Teresa ........ 1 ........ Farabegoli, Ella ........... Farr, Harriet ................... Foulk, Elizabeth ............... Felcher, Abraham ..,.............. Feldbauer, Edward .............. Feldman, Sol ....................... Fisher, Hattie ..........,..,.. . ...... .................................... 6 04 Madison Avenue, Paterson, N. I. Irving Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. .........600 West 159th Street, New York City Manor, N. Y. .....,......52-18 79th Street, jackson Heights, N. Y. 560 Grand Concourse, New York City Essex Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Wade Street, jersey City, N. J. 60 East Valley Stream, Valley Stream, L. I. Winfield Avenue, jersey City, N. J. 59 Walnut Street, Montclair, N. J. Avenue O, Brooklyn, N. Y. West 24th Street, New York City Broadway, New York City ............252O Ocean Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. East 157th Street, New York City Lawrence Street, Yonkers, N. Y. Keap Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. ........496 West 156th Street, New York City 256 Fischer, Susan ',..,,..44,........A ................. 1 223 46th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Fitzgerald, Thomas ............. ----------- 1 52 Lewis Avenue, Westbury, N. Y. Fleck, Harold ....,.....,..,-,,,,A ......................... 6 73 Broadway, New York City Flynn, Henry ...,.,,.....4. .......... 2 07 Columbus Avenue, New York City Forster, George Arrrrrrrrrr ,................. 2 53 East 45th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Forrnor, Edna ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, ............ 5 2 Main Street, Port Washington, L. I. Fox, Rosalie ..,,,,,,,,,,,, .............. 1 890 Crotona Parkway, New York City Franlrol, Ruth ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, ............... 2 95 Convent Avenue, New York City Frankie, William .................. ............ 1 20 East 88th Street, New York City Freeman, Marjorie .............. ......................... 2 9 Pierce Street, Rahway, N. J. French, Mjlfgn ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,. .................. 1 3 East 11th Street, New York City Fuchs, Miriam ................. ........... 1 361 Findlay Avenue, New York City Fuhnnan, Elizabeth ,,,,, .,.......................... 2 83 Spring Street, Trenton, N. J. Gabryzeska, Elizabeth ............ ..,........................... 4 0-15 69th Street, Woodside, L. I. Galburt, Maurice ..............,... .........,.. 1 935 West Seventh Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Gall, Gertrude ................... ................r.......... 7 501 Sixth Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Garry ............................ Gastwirth, jack ............ ,..........104-32 88th Avenue, Richmond Hill, N. Y. Hendrix Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Geist, Helen ................... ........................... 1 52 Court Street, Newark, N. J. Gelenter, Sam ............... ....................... 9 54 Eastern Parkway, New York City Gleich, Sydney ............. ...............................,. 9 5 West 50th Street, Bayonne, N. J. Glespen, Marion .............. ........... . ..11 Herndel Avenue, Hudson Heights, N. Gluck, Evelyn ......................... ........... 1 490 Shakespeare Avenue, New York City Goldenberg, Murray ............... ........................... 1 604 78th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Golden, Rose ........................... .......... , ..1601 65th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Goldner, Burt ..................... ...................... 4 8 Fabyan Place, Newark, N. J. Goodelma, Belle .............. Gottmann, Emil ........... Grant, Edith ...................... Adel Avenue, Bronx, N. Y. Glenmore Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Highland Avenue, Yonkers, N. Y. Greenberg, Reuben .............. .............. 1 540 West Eighth Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Grierson, Agnes .................... Grimshaw, Russell ............... Calvin Street, Bridgeport, Conn. ..........187 Crowell Avenue, Staten Island, N. Y. Grochal, Blanche ............. ............ 1 0716 117th Street, Richmond Hill, N. Y. Grumbrecht, Helma ........... ............................... 5 13 44th Street, Union City, N. J. Haddist, Romano ............ ............................... 1 455 Jesup Avenue, New York City Hanley, Dorothy .............. ............................... 4 50 Wood Avenue, Bridgeport, Conn. Hansa, Alouise ............. 124 Mamaroneck Avenue, Mamaroneck, N. Y. Hasbrouck, Frank ........... ........................................ 5 05 12th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Hemingway, Harold .... Hershma, Dora .................. Helfman, Mack ................ Henderson, Robert ....... Herman, Beatrice ........... Parkside Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 15th Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. ..............2541 Olinville Avenue, Bronx, N. Y. Chestnut Street, Flushing, N. Y. Seventh Street, New York City Hershkowitz, Mabel ........... .............. 1 988 Amsterdam Avenue, New York City Hichenka, Louis ............. Hinmon, Harriet ............ Hirsch, Pearl .................. Hirsch, Ella ................ Hooper, Milton .............. Horowitz, Birdie .........,... Horowitz, Morris ............ Hyman, Abraham .......... Harris, Freda ................. Hartridge, Doris .............. Hine, Anna, Mrs .......... ............444 East 95th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Bellevue Place, Yonkers, N. Y. Crown Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 50 West 197th Street, New York City Summit Street .............1545 West 11th Street, New York City ............1092 Newport Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. ...............2239 Pitkin Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Linden Boulevard, New York City 81st Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. ..........577 Madison Avenue, New York City 237 lsenberg, Saire ............ Bay 34th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Jackson, F. A .............. .......... 7 321 Fourth Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Jacobsen, Marie ...........,.. ...................... 9 4 Fourth Avenue, New York City Janowitz, Robert ............ ................. 6 28 Vanderbilt Avenue, New York City Johnson, Leona .............. ........... 1 12-08 91st Avenue, Richmond Hill, L. I. Jones, Arthur ............... ...............,................... 2 35 Wooster Street, New York City Jones, Samuel .............. ............ 4 6 South Franklin Street, Valley Stream, L. I. Joy, May, Mrs ............ ......,..................... 9 Chapman Place, Irvington, N. Y. Kaler, Bertha ............... Kamer, Lulu ........................... Kammerer, Estelle ............. Kaneny, Helen ....,........... Kaplan, Lester ............ Kaplan, Selma ............ Kaskel, Joseph ............ Katz, Louise ............ Kayser, Alma .............. Keating, Maude ............. Kelly, Elizabeth ,............. Broadway, New York City 364 57th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. ............233 Schaeffer Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Valley Road, Montclair, N. J. ...............2992 Avenue T, Brooklyn, N. Y. ...........186 Graham Avenue, Paterson, N. J. Central Park West, New York City Bergen Avenue, Ridgefield Park, N. J. West 43rd Street, New York City Lamartine Avenue, Yonkers, N. Y. West 12th Street, New York City Keenan, Leanna ...,.......... ............. 1 505 East Fourth Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Kellogg, Lucia ............ Kelly, Emily ............ Kelly, Grace ............ Kelly, Helen ........... Kelly, Myrna ............... Kennedy, Fred ........... Kennedy, John ........... Killian, Agnes ............ Klansky, Ben ............... Koch, Mario ................. Kolar, Edward ..,.............. ..... Kurchstein, Edna .......,... .......... Kurlick, Lillian ............... .......... Lagos, Carmen ...................... ..... Lawler, Wilhelmina ............ La Rue, James .....................,. Levitas, Anivea ............... Lindrath, Ida .................... Lloyd, Norman .................,.. Lombardi, Catherine ....,........ Longman, Elizabeth ............... Lovelock, Janet .................... Lynagh, Marie ................. Lucihin, Elevea ............... Luchnick, Nathat .......,... Lundell, Evelyn ................... Macauly, Elizabeth ............ May Corneila...I ..........., Mailler, Marion .............. Morgan, Mary ................. Mantel, Elizabeth ............... Marten, Harold .............. Mattel, Louis ,........,.......... Matlure, Esther .................... McArdle, Catherine ............... Archer Street, White Plains, N. Y. Avenue J, Brooklyn, N. Y. Highland Avenue, Yonkers, N. Y. Raymond Terrace, East Norwalk Locust Hill Avenue, Yonkers, N. Y. ...............North Corona Avenue, Valley Stream, L. I. Fifth Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Spruce Street, Bloomfield, N. J. 203 Fulton Avenue, Bronx, N. Y. .............22-02 122nd Street, College Point, N. Y. 27th, Woodcliff, N. Riverside Drive, New York City 1831 White Plains Road, White Plains, N. Y. East 22nd Street, New York City East 30th Street, New York City Emerson Street, Woodmere, N. J. West Ninth Street, Newark, N. J. ..........2515 Bedford Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. West Fourth Street, New York City Bridge, N. Y. 147th Street, Flushing, N. Y. ...............6834 Clyde Street, Forest Hills, N. Y. Hancock Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Park View Avenue Hendrix Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 38th Avenue, Corona, N. Y. West 13th Street, New York City ............1049 Sterling Place, Brooklyn, N. Y. N. Y. ......................Ramsey H. S., Ramsey, N. J. East 17th Street, New York City Flenimine Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. ............12S2 Evergreen Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. ...................Roosevelt Jr. H. S., Elizabeth, N. J. West 82nd Street, New York City 258 McCarthy, May: .........................., ------'---- 1 15 Palisades Avenue, Union City, N. J. McDermott, Mildred .....,..,...... ................... 7 98 Madison Avenue, Paterson, N. J. McNay, Flora ................. Meigs, Marion ....,.......... jolenam Avenue, Tottenville, S. I. ................Care of Y. W. C. A., Passaic, N. J. Mesnikoff, Nathan ............... ............. 3 72 Kingston Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Mewkrll, Edith ,,.,,,,,,,,,,,.,,,,,.,,. .............................................................. N ew Paltz, N. Y. Meyerhuber, Nettie .... Emory Street, jersey City, N. j. Migliori, Biagina ............. .............. 3 10 Bleeker Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Migliori, Marion ............. ............... 5 10 Bleeker Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Miller, Laura ............ ........... 1 56 Remer Avenue, Newark, N. Miller, Anne .............. ............,.. 5 77 Sutten Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Millet, Alfred ................ ................,............... 5 9 Oak Street, Amityville, L. I. Mitchell, Vera ,,,,,,.....,,,,,,.,, ............... 8 6 Tonnele Avenue, jersey City, N. j. Mohlenhoff, Emma .,............ -4---'------------------.-- -.--.. 3 8 O8 Victory Boulevard, S. I. Moore, Alvida ...,.,....,......... ................ 9 9 Maple Avenue, Sea Cliff, L. I. Morris, Helen .......................... ..................... 2 63 Fifth Street, jersey City, N. Montalbano, Leona .............. .................... 2 18 Rogers Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Mosteller, Nellie ............... .............. 1 O3 Wisner Avenue, Newburgh, N. Y. Muller, Fred .................... ............. 1 41 West Fourth Street, New York City Murray, Cecelia ........... ........... 7 609 Fourth Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Nash, Frances ..................... ....................,.......................................... E lmsford, N. Y. Neubert, Richard .............. .............................. 2 O Irving Place, New York City Norris, Anna .................. ............... 4 07 East 136th Street, New York City Nyberg, Elma ...................... .................,.,,.....,................................ 4 0 City Hill Street O'Brien, Margaret ................. .......... 4 5 Park Avenue, Mt. Vernon, N. Y. O'Connor, Rosemary ............... ..................................... 1 89-O6 115th Avenue, St. Alvans O'Hara, Kathleen .................. ............................. 1 Lincoln Avenue, White Plains, N. Y. O'Hara, R. J. ...................... ................................................. 9 1 Heine Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. O'Hare, Marion ............ ........... 3 West 101st Street, Apartment D, New York City O'Leary, Kathleen ............ ...............,................... 1 732 East 19th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Oliver, William ...................... .................................................. 2 83 Chestnut Street Olsen, C. G. ................................. ............ 3 28 15th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Ottermann, Adelaide ............... ............ 8 543 88th Street, New York City Paudol, Emil, jr. ............,..... ........... ...........................,.. 2 4 -45 23rd Street, Astoria, L. I. Park, Catherine .................. ................................. 1 18 East 17th Street, New York City Patrano, Muriel ............ .............. 4 22 South Second Avenue, Mt. Vernon, N. Y. Patton, Edith ........................ .................................... 1 7 Sherman Place, Ridgewood, N. J. Pearlman, Miriam ............ ..................... 2 522 Ollinville Avenue, New York City Pelenger, Grace ............ East 140th Street, New York City Perry, Myrtle ................... ................................ 4 21 Park Avenue, Leonia, N. J. Peters, Fred ........,....................... .............. H awthorne Gardens, Mamaroneck, N. Y. Petralia, Antoinette ............. ..,..............................................................,,.. 6 549 77th Place Phelps, John ,......,...............,. ................... 2 68 King Street, Port Chester, N. Y. Phillips, Zadie ............... ............ 1 2 Monroe Avenue, Mamaroneck, N. Y. Pucininni ..................... ................. 2 12 Sanford Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Picker, Olive .............. .................. 1 755 Clay Avenue, New York City Platkin, joshua ......,....... ............. 8 74 East Eighth Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Purvis, Flora .............. .............. 5 18 Madison Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Powers, Eddie ........... Praper, Martin ......... Quinn, Florence ........... Spring Street, New York City ...........937 Cross Avenue, Elizabeth, N. J. Halliday Avenue, Yonkers, N. Y. Quinn, Margaret ,......,.,,,,,, ................. 6 128 Spencer Avenue, New York City Quirk, Frances ............... Amackassin Terrace, Yonkers, N. Y. Rakatzky, Wilma .............. ............. 4 1 Prescott Street, Bridgeport, Conn. Reich, Isidore ................. ...........317 Rodney Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Reid, Wilson ............ Reicher, Mae .................. Reilly, Vincent ............. Remsen, Kae ....4............. Ruhman, Samuel ............. ......... Rigviard, Rose .............. Schaefer, William ................ Schaffner, Elizabeth ......,..... Schauman, Moe ................ Schem, P. .,.,...........,...... . Schoenfeld ....................... Schulman, Gershen.. Schwartz, Eleanor ...... Sesley, john ................... Selfman, Al .............. Selfman, Irving ........... Senior, Anna ...................... .... Serapira, Gertrude ............... Sluldon, Alice ................... Shalram, I. ................... . Siegal, Max ..................,. Silberstein, Ida ............ Sanger, Arthur ............ Singer, Ed .................. Singer Rebecca ............. Sirutis, Justin ......,.............. Sisino, Salvatore .............. Slater, Helen ................. Smith, Gertrude ............... Smith, Helen ................ Smythe, Anne ........,............ Smith, Millicent .................... Snomberger, Evelyn ........,.. Salotar, Ed ........................... Souffrant, Dorothy .............. Sperling, Dan ............... Stark, Sylvia ................., Sternman, Rita ............. Riverside Drive, New York City ..........2074 Belmont Avenue, New York City ............111 West 82nd Street, New York City Lenox Avenue, White Plains, N. Y. Court Street, Newark, N. J. 10 Hemingway Avenue, New Rochelle, N. Y. gggggwwwwmwwwwwwg esta-::o5?,32S232000S-N g5'UQQ.5'.-ommmmDgm.g:n,N -,mg2f"fbJ-f.::,:1j::5g,,,3ap,P TQPFFQHSZSSFEQOFF o l-'.S.32opU" Z'PPdU' PiIZ'.',,2'.garazZ'?pIwafQ '2:am50r.sf2S1E2aE .:f-Dm-zszrzmz-:Cav-.-..D so-...55"'zESB,,,5:1mf'0::,D Ez2Si5iZ?zDEEPZM sNisEs3si'b-51,2552 : g:r-If ' : Igzi: fmmmoai waabuigaaggaums mpZNuiU.0-HD. XIDN EO' F, moo-v rvg-55 googtaif 2i3"DxlN,'Z'1aD2gm'4X,p5mw 04-2x1-bv-140 D-pp wee?-' :!f'Do-"""-'T-"U '- 3'-.:::"'m uDDv-I3"'J"D'u,SDp'5..:R4 gr-1 .-.2 tnmcn3,f,g,-2-4 cngmws .HS n..f-f.-.g4m2rb5q:,..,,-,' Q- 2 mm..m...:-M..t-.p.zz. :'g222::-"'v:F,g2'mmg2a,,, 5"""':'-"'s:' ZF"-':1 14 Q4WwW92wwnWwmmg, QGESBQSBB 3233--oz 5.?9e?r9e5-e?e,'f+'9-1?-t:9,g.QQ-2 a5QQQmQqzSs2:q594 fnuwvDvD,Pg.Q,PpvXvD'-pjgvgepo so ,, v-1 ZZZZZQZZZZZZZZZZS KKKKKFwKN55KK5wK5 ZZ? KKK H V-I! ME O2 ITE 55 cn? "UZ Rio 3+ l KN 'UA F0 fbi-1 Zfw :rf ::':r' M... IJ' Z4 -Q K5 Maple Terrace, Spring Valley, ...........1216 Jefferson Avenue, Brooklyn, ..............1291 East 10th Street, Brooklyn, Linden Boulevard ............306 Sandol Street, Glendale, L. I. 47th Street, Union City, N. J. 50 East 104th Street, New York City Coney Island Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Spring Street, Paterson, N. J. S. Boulevard, Bronx, N. Y. Locust Hill Avenue, Yonkers, N. Y. Tinton Avenue, Bronx, N. Y. Fox Street, Bronx, N. Y. Cypress Street, Newark, N. J. East 109th Street, New York City Powell Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Grand Street, New York City ....,.....1687 Linden Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 107th Street, Corona, L. I. Riverside Drive, New York City Grand Avenue, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. N. Y. ...............3337 97th Street, Corona, N. Y. Prospect Place, Brooklyn, N. Y. ..........193O Webster Avenue, Bronx, N. Y. Heath Avenue, Bronx, N. Y. ...............1922 Crotona Parkway, New York City 101 Morris Avenue, New York City 15th Avenue, Paterson, N. J. ..,........,512 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, N. Y. 240 Stern, Faythe ................... Strachman, Gussie ....... Strauss, Helma ............... Strong, Madeline .....,.,. Talvenxan, Lempi ............. .... Tamke, Charlotte .............. Tashman, Lenora ......... Taylor, Minnie .............. Ternan, Dot ................ Thaler, Harriet .............. Thomson, Mildred ..... East 27th Street, Paterson, N. J. St. Nicholas Avenue, New York City ...........441 Dunham Avenue, Mt. Vernon, N. Y. Parker Avenue, Maplewood, N. J. ..........829 Fort Hamilton Parkway, Brooklyn, N. Y. Wolf's Lane, Pelham Heights St. johns Place, Brooklyn, N. Y. Claremont Avenue, New York City Logan Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Florence Park, Stamford, Conn. ..........145 West 12th Street, New York City Thompson, Harry ............. ..... ......................... B o x 417, Huntington, L. I. Temain, joseph ............. --.-...---.-.-..-.----...----..-..... 1 525 Lehigh Street, Easton, Pa. Triniler, Iris .......,............ ........................................................... 1 700 Crotona Park East Tracy, Margaret ..............,,.. ............ 1 57 South Second Avenue, Mt. Vernon, N. Y. Treadwell, Catherine ........... ,...............................................,............................. 1 45 Smart Avenue Trowbridge, Mabel .............. .....,..... 5 O South Franklin Avenue, Valley Stream, L. I. Trombley, Edith ................ .............................. 2 72 South Broadway, Yonkers, N. Y. Tullick, N. I ................... .... .............................. 2 1 5 jackson Street, Hempstead, N. Y. Turkin, Elizabeth .............. .............. 6 32 Van Cortland Park Avenue, Yonkers, N. Y. Varni, Frances ................ .............................................. 8 O Ingraham Place, Newark, N. J. Varanok, Sam ............,.......,. ......,......... 2 60 East 91st Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Vidain, Theodore ........ Vinigelis, Helen ............ Vogel, Max .........,........,.... Wagner, Mildred ....,......... Walter, Isabelle M. ...... . Watkins, Fred ................. Watson, Dorsette ......... Wear, Helen .................... Weil, Sylvia ................... Weinberg, Esther .........,.. Weinberger, Edna ............ Weiner, Beatrice ........... Weiss, Miriam .......... Wendorf, Doris ............ White, Rose ..................... Whiteman, Ida .......,............ Wolfson, Charlotte ............... Wrigley, Arthur ................. Williams, Olatee ............... Wilson, Aaron ........,...... Williams, Feranda ...... Young, Harold ............., Yoselowitz, Celia ......... Yanella, Arthur ............. Zell, Baer ........................... Ziruls, Dorothy .............. .............2304 Crotona Avenue, New York City Barley Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 84th Road, jamaica, L. I. ............l825 Andrews Avenue, New York City East Ninth Street, New York City N. Y. West 150th Street, New York City West jackson Avenue, Middletown, N. Y. East 27th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. East 13th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. ...........250 West'103rd Street, New York City Central Avenue, jersey City, N. J. Mt. Hope Place, Bronx, N. Y. 14 West 61st Street, New York City .............118O Crown Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 42nd Street, New York City 48th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Linden Avenue, Elizabeth, N. ...........615 West 186th Street, New York City ............1425 Grand Concourse, New York City ...............Board of Education, Yonkers, N. Y. Austin Place, Port Chester, N. Y. ................1505 Boston Road, Bronx, N. Y. ..........3356 Hulc Avenue, New York City Franklin Avenue, Nutley, N. Cassidy Place, New Brighton, S. I. 241 Aaronson, Esther.. ..,.... Sophomore Class School of Eclucalion 521 Willoughby Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Abel, Bernice .......................... ............ M idland Parkway, jamaica Estates, L. I. Ardizzone, Antoinette .......... ..................... 2 93 Grove Street, New York City Arkirman, Al .,.,,....,........... ............................... W inter Street, Mahwah, N. J. Aurell, R. ................. ............ 2 89 East 203rd Street, New York City Barkin, Myer ................ ................... 1 7 Hyatt Street, St. George, S. I. Bassewitz, Julius ............. ............ 3 73 Ralph Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Bauman, Louis ............ .........,, 3 130 Perry Avenue, Bronx, N. Y. Bellinger, Lulu ................. ................................,. K ing Drive, Floral Park, L. I. Belovsky, Simon .............. ............. 4 51 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, N. Y. Beeker, Frances ................ ............................... 1 37 West 110th Street, N. Y. C. Bennis, Rosalind ............. 1476 Shakespeare Avenue, New York City Berman, Emanuel ........... .....................,.... 2 46 Avenue B, Brooklyn, N. Y. Bernstein, Minerva ..........., ......,................. 1 8 East 199th Street, New York City Bessin, Rose .............,........,. .,............ 1 412 East Seventh Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Bialor, Jennie ............... ............ 6 35 East Park Street, Long Beach, N. Y. Blitzer, Victor ..,,... Bordfeld, Alice ........... Boston, Bernard .............. Borlick, Olga ................ Brady, Goldie .............. Brady, Veronica ............... Brown, Lois ................... Brown, Miriam .....,..... Burroughs, Viola ............ Carnpanella .................... 53rd Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Avenue N, Brooklyn, N. Y. . ...,............. 1418 jesup Avenue, Bronx ,N. Y. Fourth Street, Passaic, N. J. .....50O Hawthorne Avenue, Newark, N. .......499 West 175th Street, New York City Virginia Avenue, Manasquin, N. ..12O Glenwood Avenue, jersey City, N. J. .,.......... 7908 Tenth Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. ............28-46 Second Avenue, Astoria, L. I. Canfield, Ceylon .............. ........................................................ C happaqua, N. Y. Carter, W. E. .............. .............. 1 61 East 22nd Street, New York City Cathcart, Agnes ..........,.... ................... 1 100 Post Road, Scarsdale, N. Y. Cahill, Emma .................... ........................... 7 141 70th Street, Glendale, N. Y. Charger, Albert ............... ............................... 2 041 66th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Choate, Elizabeth ........... .............. 8 319 Audley Street, Kew Gardens, N. Y. Cohey, Alice ................. ................ 2 55 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, N. Y. Cohen Abe .................... ............... 9 41 Intervale Avenue, Bronx, N. Y. Cohen Beatrice ............... ................ 1 968 78th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Cohen, George ............ .............. 1 O0 Rodney Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Cohen Samuel ............ ........... 3 05 East 30th Street, New York City Cohn, Henry ........................... ........................ 1 5 Bank Street, New York City Cohn, Sylvia ................................. ............. 2 157 'Ocean Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Coppersmith, Henrietta ........... .................. 5 O Wanda Place, Forest Hills, N. Y. Corostoshevsky, Hyman ............ ................,... 1 67 Havemeyer Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Diario, Anthony ..................,.. ................................ 9 8-10 Hayes Avenue, Corona, N. Y. Dennisston, Edna ................ .............. 1 52 Morris Avenue, Rockville Center, N. Y. Diamond, Pauline ............... ...,........................... 3 55 Troy Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Dickerman, Harold ........... ............. 7 113 19th Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Dietz, Freda .,..,,...,..,..,..........., .................... 8 O11 88th Street, Glendale, L. I. Dunbarg, Edward ............... .................... 1 19 East 23rd Street, Bronx, N. Y. Drosihn, Anna ................. .......... 5 40 Bainbridge Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Duggan, Mary ............ ............ 5 24 East Seventh Street, Plainfield, N. Eckstein, Dave ............ ..................... 4 7 East 112th Street, New York City Ellis, Helen .............. .............. 1 3 Academy Street, Pleasantville, N. Y. 242 Engle, Margaret ..,....,.... Central Avenue, Orange, N. Epstein, Miriam ....A......... ...........,... 5 36 Central Park West, New York City Falkowitz, Ernest .....r..... .-,-----......-.......... 5 13 Hart Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Farley, Lillian ,,,,,.,,,,,,,,, .................... 8 4 Adams Street, Hoboken, N. J. Feinstein, Anna ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, ............ 1 675 Walton Avenue, New York City Fenring, Edna ..,..,..,,.... Finck, Grace .,......,..,..... Finney, Gerald .........,.. Fish, Beatrice .............,. Fishman, Seymour ....... Fletcher, Sheldon .........,. ----- Forcey, Ella .......,.,.......... Furth, William ........... Gaier, Charles ...,.,..,.......... Gancles, Benjamin ............. Gary, Lillian ....................., Garvin, James .............. Geist, Helen ............... Geller, Florence .............. Gloverman, Jack .................. Gono, William ............... Greenblatt, Helen .,...... Gustanson, Marion ......,.,.., ..... Gutschindt, William ...,.......... Hammer, Joseph ..........,....... ..... Hamaford, Harry ........... .,......... Harsch, Rosalie ,........ . Harris, Juanita ............ Hartwig, John .,........... Hassan, Ysaye ............. Hayes, Mary .................. Hayman, Golde ............... Havlink, Frederick ............ Held, Israel ......................,. ..... Held, Marion ........,................ Hellman, Mildred ....... Hold, William ..................... Hofrichter, Maurice... Hoyan, Anne ,............... .......... Hopkins, Bernard ............... Hubbell, Owen .,............ Hughes, Mary ...........,. Irre, Emline ....................... Jones, Arthur ................., Josephson, Selma .,.......,. ..... Kamer, Florence ..........., Kaplowitz, Benjamin ......, Kastenbaum ...................... Keller, Janice ,................. Kersic, Anne ........................... Kersteller, Helen ...................,.. Kmnamon, Howard ............... Kirk, Anna ....................... ......,.603 Evergreen Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Euclid Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. .............1370 University Avenue, Bronx, N. Y. ....,....,227 Palisade Avenue, Garfield, N. ................2731 Ford Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. ....,...........1279 Bergen Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. ........50 Ten Eyck Street, Valley Stream, L. I. 78th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. ..............2130 Maples Avenue, New York City .................Woodmere Club, Woodmere, L. I. ...........204 West 118th Street, New York City N. Y. Court Street, Newark, N. J. South Park Street, Elizabeth, N. Vermont Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. .......8806 Parsons Boulevard, Jamaica, N. Y. Gordon, Josephine ............. .......,... ' ' .. ............... 1249 Bay Ridge Parkway, Brooklyn, N. Y. Myrtle Avenue, Irvington, N. ........1669 Madison Street, Ridgewood, N. Y. ............171 East 96th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Koscuisko Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Leland Avenue, Plainfield, N. 104 Rhance Avenue, East Rockaway, N. Y. Herkimer Street. Brooklyn, N. Y. ......8726 114th Street, Richmond Hill, N. Y. Beek Street, New York City Park Avenue, Woodcliff, N. J. ............2045 Gleason Avenue, New York City ...........3356 Decatur Avenue, New York City .........1916 Grand Concourse, New York City 14th Street, College Point, N. Y. 35th Street, Woodcliff, N. J. East 26th Street, Bayonne, N. ...........6408 19th Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. .....................Hotel Shelton, New York City 175th Street, Jamaica, N. Y. Prospect Street, Passaic, N. .........609 Garfield Avenue, Jersey City, N. East 21st Street, New York City Palisade Avenue, Bogota, N. J. Johnson, Christen ............... ..... ,, ............... 221 Leichester Street, Port Chester, N. Y. 84th Road, Jamaica, N. Y. 52nd Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Street, Park Ridge, N. J. ......,1451 Washington Avenue, Bronx, N. Y. Atkins Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. West 13th Street, New York City West 11th Street, New York City Broadstreet, Bloomfield, N. ........3O Locust Hill Avenue, Yonkers, N. Y.' 5 Kleinstein, Samuel ...... Kark, August ..................... Latey, Henry ................. Lambert, Arthur .............. Lands, Minnie .................. Lawler, Lauretta .............. Lee, Mabel ..................... Lesure, Viola ........ Levine, Adele ............... Levine, Mark ................ Liberti, Ralph .................,. Lipkowitz, Frances ............, Lisman, Samuel ............. Lucenti, Mary .............. Lyke, joseph ............................ McClintack, Mary ........ Mairine, Demstoile ........... Madden, Agnes ............... Marcavetak, Louis .............. Marcus, Michael ............ Margerum, H. ..................... . .............1514 Sterling Ridge, Brooklyn, N. Y. 83rd Street, Elmhurst, N. Y. 4, Briarcliff Manor, N. Y. McDougal Street, New York City ............867 West 181st Street, New York City Lincoln Avenue, Glen Rock, N. j. ...........5O0 Riverside Drive, New York City Park, N. Y. Loring Place, Bronx, N. Y. ............2928 West 21st Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. East 114th Street, New York City Albany Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. ............656 East 170th Street, New York City Broadway, New York City Orchard Street, Elizabeth, N. J. ........Map1ewood Apartments, Hempstead, L. I. Mott Street, New York City 90th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Suffolk Street, New York City ............2391 Bedford Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Union Street, New Rochelle, N. Y. Margalis, William .............. .................... 8 5 Adams Avenue, Port Chester, N. Y. Martin, Ken .....,................. .............. 4 7 Pocantico St., North Tarrytown, N. Y. Martin, Marguerite ............ ............. 1 911 Homecrest Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Martin, Renee ................. .............. 1 34 West 66th Street, New York City Mazzarella, john ............ ................ 3 317 Barnis Avenue, Bronx, N. Y. Myerson, Sondra ..............,... ........................... 6 4 Hester Street, New York City McDermot, Margaret ............ McGurk, Elizabeth ....,,....... Marasca, Medira ........... Metcalf, Norma ............ Mitchelle, Catherine ............... Morowitz, Sherry ................ Morris, Evelyn ............ Mormcle, Rose ................. Mute, Antoinette .,,.............. Musgrove, Donald ...... Myers, Arthur ................... Nathanson, Henry .............. Crescent Avenue, jersey City, N. J. Hudson Street, New York City West 122nd Street, New York City Merlehave, C ..................., .................................... 1 15 35th Street, Woodcliff, N. J. Ten Eycke Street, Valley Stream, N. Y. East 17th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. .............138 East 16th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. .....................Glenwood Landing, N. Y., Box 205 ...............Oceanside Road, Rockville Centre, L. I. Tinney Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Amherst Street, East Orange, N. J. Independence Avenue, Freeport, L. I. Main Street, Paterson, N. J. Ma.rtenese Street, New York City Nelson, Evelyn ................. ........ Nesdale, Mary ............. Newman, Marian ......... East 90th Street, New York City .. .............. 119-14 Union Turnpike, Kew Gardens, L. I. Newman, Mary ............... . ........................... 282 Nilkes-Barie Street, Easton, Pa. Nourse, Dorothy ........... Nyquirst, Martera ........ ........230 Bay Ridge Parkway, Brooklyn, N. Y. Williams Avenue, Teaneck, N. J. O'Connor, Dorothy ........... ............ Olmstedd, Ida ................. Otto, Anne ..................... Parke, Evelyn ............... Parker, Helen ............... Parker, Sheard ................ Pearlman, Edwina .............. Petrak, Sam ......................... Pfeiffer, Marlon .............. 2 36 Olivet Street, Bay Ridge, Brooklyn, N. Y. Prospect Street, East Orange, N. J. West 81st Street, New York City ..........674 West 161st Street, New York City Rockledge Place, Yonkers, N. Y. Oak Street, Amityville, N. Y. 340 Nelson Avenue, New York City ................2066 73rd Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Lincoln Road, Brooklyn, N. Y. 44 Portnoy, Sam ........... Prentky, Jas .............. Pirovano, May ............. Radofsky, Abe ........4... Reiter, Miriam ............ Riehl, Marion ....,........, Riley, Winifred ............... Rivkind, Esther ........... Rizzo, Evelyn ................. Rabinowitz, Anna ............... Rosenberg, Hilda ........... Rosiello, Marion ......... Rosen, Nathan .,,.......... Ruglio, Martin ............ Salzberg, Paul .............. Scarulla ............................... Schmidt, Hyman .................. Schumann, Margaret .............. Schwende .......................,.. Seager, Jessie ....,................ Segada, Estelle ,........... Sevlim, Max ............ Shapiro, Sidney ........i....... Sharkey, Margery ...,....... Shint, Sara ...................... Siegel, Irving ............... Siller, Estelle ................. Silverman, Ben ............ Singler, Mary ............... Slavin, Benjamin ......... Smith, Etta ..........,.......... Squires, Mary .,............. Stein, Frances ............... Steinberg, M. ....... . Stine, Lillian ............ Stoken, Hilda ............... Strassner, Carl ...... . ..... . Stopen, Peter ..............,. Sybell, Lawrence ..,.......... Tait, Marion ................. Terzian, Evelyn .......... Tobin, Anna ................. Torbohm, Harold .......... VanDyke, Mary .,......... Waranoff, Peter ........... Weber, Christian ........ Weinbaum, Harry .............. Wohlberg, Harry ........ 587 Gravesend Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y Fayette Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. io xo "l ET 71 Q. tn FY 'W fb fn D o o Q. ff. Q. 0'-3 .9 '14 L o LII KP 5 :J o P1 be 4 FD D z: .P UU "I o ':.1 34 Z '4 :EL 5200 55'-" siorh- mpg UXIQQH X1 '11 e55 '-T:-.av 929 338 223 Www "iv-1'-1 888 EEE 74'4'4 FFP '-4'-4'-4 lb. as xo ox O15 U3 ff tn F. "1 Q fb rf U5 P1 o o E SC 'D 5 ..,....................Crystal Lake, Midland Park, N. J Harding Terrace, Newark, N. J ...108 Buena Vista Avenue, Yonkers, N. Y. Central Avenue, Passaic, N. J. ...........970 Bedford Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Harrison Street, Belleville, N. J. .............8325 159th Street, Jamaica, N. Y. Fulton Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Wallace Avenue Campbell Avenue, Hackensack, N. ...............2321 Linden Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Noble Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. ..........305 Mt. Eden Avenue, Bronx, N. Y. 102nd Street, Corona, L. I. Elmore Place, Brooklyn, N. Y. 79 South Maple Avenue, Ridgewood, N. J. Staye Road, Monroe N. Y. Fern Avenue, Lyndhurst, N. J. ..............2110 123rd Street, College Point, Garden Street, Poughkeepsie, SA McDonough Street, Brooklyn, 25th Street, Jackson Heights ...........495 Haylcinson Avenue, Brooklyn, .............185O East 12th Street Brooklyn, . Hemlock Street, Brooklyn, ...........................Rockledge Manor, Yonkers, ............964 East 27th Street, Brooklyn, Warwick Street, Brooklyn, 50th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 3 LL 2 aa 2 S9 E 55 Q. 5-5' 2 Q? E 55 ' 'w Z ZS 2 ag 5 1 EF 2 ZZZZZZZZZZ 552555555235 7 112 Dean Street, Brooklyn 3 Morris Crescent, Yonkers . Varick Avenue, Brooklyn, Marcy Avenue, Brooklyn, Dahill Road, Brooklyn, N. Clinton Street, New York City ZZZZZZZ KKKKNKK 2222222 :E53333 iiyyggf '-IO HN 'ZLLQEW rn C.:Ol't7'4C', Fmfmnge as ADP' bis OES? E 5555115 :i-2 : fi 5 NQEV' Tgawsi: Pgvswii D5 Nlsgl-4 C205 E .... 5'ND'-100353, AD-sn-JA n, bgwgiiv-lil-4:3 Ammo' O fiunifuggw D9 Os 2 5 b2m?a ff-940grn4 2335 E2 32:3909- x'ePa' na Zgageg? PY 3222223 mr- '- 3544355 aaaefaa KKQQNKN 16 Grant Avenue, Brooklyn, .......................................... 77 Rodney Street, Brooklyn, N. Y, 24 5 Wohlidka, Alice ............... Wolfe, George ........................ Wolfson, Benjamin ............. Work ...................................,..... Woulf, Philip ...........,..,. Young, Mabel ...........,,.. Zaner, Abraham ..........,.... Zucker, Eli .............,,....... Zasloff, Ira .................. apter, nathan ..,......... aro, katherine ................. bachelder, louise ....... baletin, helen .......,......... barsky, ruth .................. bensinger, emily ............... berger, maude ............... bernstein, selma .......,. blecker ............................ bohen, marie ............. bozer, isidore ............ caldwell saidee ,........,. caraci, jane .................. carlson, ethel ...........,. cirincione, joe ........... clyde, edythe ,............ cohen, frances ........... connolly, leo ............. depietto cosime ........., doress, alice ................ doress, sylvia .........,...... dorfman, sophie ............... eaton, gladys .........,...... eckhardt, josephine .......,...... eldridge, rebecca .............. elfenbein, ethel ............ feldman, murray ............... fencsak, john .................. finnegan, d. r .......... flynn, agnes ............. ' .. folk, leonard .............. fowler, florence ......... galanti, rosaly .............. gruduez, edmund ............ grasso, benjamin .............. haight, frances .............. hall, lydia .................... .............2355 33rd Street, Long Island City, N. Y. ...........1562 Washington Avenue, Bronx, N. Y. ...........748 Saratoga Avenue ........,..265 Jackson Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. , Hempstead, L. I. ...........469 Herzl Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. ...........725 Forest Avenue, 61st Street, joralemon Street Freshman Class School of Eclucaiion J Westfield, N. Brooklyn, N. Y. Columbia Street Brooklyn, N. Y. 525 Tinton Avenue, Bronx, N. Y. Yale Street, Maplewood, N. J. Cottage Avenue, Mt. Vernon, N. Y. Seymour Avenue, Newark, N. Pennsylvania Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Summit Avenue, Summit, N. J. Kearny Street, Newark, N. Broadway, New York City Vermont Street, New York City .................. 705 jefferson Avenue, Grantwood, N. J. East Seventh Street, New York City Sixth Street, Bridgeport, Conn. West 19th Street, New York City Belleview Avenue, Port Washington, N. Y. 546 Bryant Avenue, Bronx, N. Y. jewett Avenue, Staten Island, N. Y. ...........1411 University Avenue, New York City Maple Street, Great Neck, N. Y. jamaica Avenue Pitt Street, Bloomfield, N. J. Pitt Street, Bloomfield, N. J. Dickinson Avenue South Park Avenue, Rockville Center, N. Y. East 28th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 19-40 Union Turnpike, Kew Gardens, L. I. 28th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. ..............3028 East Seventh Street, Brighton Beach, N. Y. Main Street, Garfield, N. Y. Centre Avenue, Westwood, N. J. Fleet Street, jersey City, N. J. ............105O East 15th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Ordnance Court, Bridgeport, Conn. Grove Street, Lodi, N. j. East Baldwin Street, Bloomfield, N. j. Bank Street, New York City L. I. ...........218 Norman Street, Bridgeport, Conn. 246 hardy, jennie .............. hart, lorerta ........,......... heckman, charles .......... hertner, marie ................. hessler, magdalene ............ hochstule, paul ............... hoyland, alice ,............ juliver, irving ............ kessler, marian ....,.......... king, jessie ........................ kreig, Winfield ..................... kuhn, george ................... kuppendorf, howard ............ lamere, Clare ...................,. lasher, katherine ............ lawlor, kathryn ............... leibowitz, aaron ............. levine, f rances ..........,. libbin, bernard .......... lindenman, ben ............. Union Avenue, Rutherford, N. J. ............8427 122nd Street, Richmond Hill, N. Y. 56th Avenue, Elmhurst, N. Y. East 18th Street, Paterson, N. J. Manhattan Court, Nutley, N. J. Ernst Avenue, Bloomfield, N. J. Post Street, Yonkers, N. Y. Eastern Parkway, New York ............630 Seventh Street, College Point, L. I. East 45th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Broadway, New York City Forest Avenue, Glen Cove, L. I. Willoughby Street, Newark, N. ............8555-118th Street, Richmond Hill, L. I. ..............37-21 80th Street, jackson Heights, L. I. ............1228 Bloomfield Street, Hoboken, N. J. Belmont Avenue, New York City Riverdale Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. East 172nd Street, Bronx, N. Y. Lafayette Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. lindstrom. lisa ............ ................................. 1 327 84th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. loss, william, jr ............. ............... 1 45-20 Lincoln Avenue, jamaica, N. Y. malozzi, evelyn .............. ................... 8 25 East 230th Street, New York City meckler, marcus ........... ................. 5 9 East 100th Street, New York City manville, l. p. ................ ......................... 9 Brookfield Place, Pleasantville, N. Y. master, bernard .............. ................ ...... 9 1 South Seventh Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. mcauley, genevieve ........... ........................ 1 22-11 11th Avenue, College Point, N. Y. mehnert, gwen ................ .............. 4 2 East Forest Avenue, West Englewood, N. J. mendel, augusta ............ .......................,...... 1 208 Park Avenue, Bridgeport, Conn. miller, ida .......................... ............................... 4 Park Avenue, Madison, N. murphy, elizabeth ............. .........,,,. 9 4 MacDougal Street, New York City nedorost, elizabeth ............ ................................ 4 737-98th Place, Corona, N. Y. orchanian, grace ......,..... ...,....,................. 9 66 Park Avenue, Woodcliff, N. o'reilly, irene .................... .......,.... 1 50 Madison Avenue, Spring Valley, N. Y. ougaurlian, george ............ ............ 4 41 West 124th Street, New York City pollack, julia ......,............ ........................,.... 1 71 Willis Avenue, Bronx, N. Y. ohman, florence ............ ............ 2 12 St. Ann's Avenue, New York City paine, furice ................ ............................................................. T erryville, Conn. reynold, elva ,.............. .............,,.............................,............ M ontrose, N. Y. rodrian, dorothy ............ ..................... 4 15 Fourth Avenue, Gatwood, N. J. rowan, john ................. .,.......................... 1 O4 East 81st Street, New York City rybar, elsa ..............,,.......... .................................. O naker Ridge, New Rochelle, N. Y. samavitz, sylvia .................... ......... C are of Sabel, 1190 Tinton Avenue, Bronx, N. Y. schaehter, benjamin ............... ............,.........................,........ 6 4 Rush Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. scheurir, george ............. schneiderman, bertha .......... segal, rosllyn ........................... shaeter, tred ..................... shaftel, ed ..................... shapiro, miriam ............. shea, joe ......................... shea, kathleen ............. slatter, bernice ........... spitzmiller, ruth ............. . stancliffe, virginia ........ Broadway, New York City East 93rd Street, New York City ,..........1434 East 22nd Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. ............2792 Ocean Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Taylor Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. East 123rd Street, New York City Heath Avenue, New York City .502 Van Cortland Park Avenue, Yonkers, N. Y. Coffrey Avenue, Far Rockaway, N. Y. 85th Street, Woodhaven, L. I. West 105th Street, New York City 247 A stavran, lillian., ......... ........... 3 O6 West 109th Street, New York City suffin, beatnce ............ trenkle, beatrice .............. ...........2315 Grand Avenue, Bronx, N. Y. Oakland Avenue, Bloomfield, N. J. tanklefsky, m. .,........ ................... 1 219 Gilbert Place, New York City targione, grace... 440 15th Street, West New York, N. J. thomas, horlan ................ ...................................................................... A rdsley, N. Y. trahnham, w. a. turkwell, lora ...... ...........441 West 151st Street, New York City Cottage Avenue, Mt. Vernon, N. Y. tupper, manon ................ ................... 6 5 Forest Row, Great Neck, L. 1. urevitz, alexander ........,,.... .............. 8 39 Garden Street, Elizabeth, N. 1. vantassel, raymond ............ ............................ 3 3 Maple Avenue, Suffern, N. J. vermaid, willie ................ ............. 3 64 West 26th Street, New York City weeder, eva ..........,..,,.... .......,...... 2 94 Dotowar Avenue, Paterson, N. I. weiner, harry .................... .................. 1 511 Lincoln Place, Brooklyn, N. Y. Weinstein, blanche ............. ............ 2 701 Grand Concourse, New York City wilde, beatrice ................. .................... 8 0 Sylvan Street, Rutherford, N J. willigan, grace ...................... ........................... 1 36 87th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. zimmerman, Irene ..... ...... ...........,... 1 9 3 Martense Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. ADVERTISEMENTS YEAR BOOKS . . . THIS VOLUME SERVICED AND PRODUCED BY R. W. KELLY YEAR BOOK DIVISION Producing a year book is by no means the work of a day, nor simply the assembling of type and plates . . . it is that of hard work, intelligent cooperation and service. Your editor gathers material and facts for the text . . . that is quite a problem. And, wisely, he seeks the service of a printer to help and to give him intelligent cooperation. Often, this service goes beyond the mechanics of printing. It reaches the highspots of editing and management. 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Suggestions in the New York University School of Education - Education Violet Yearbook (New York, NY) collection:

New York University School of Education - Education Violet Yearbook (New York, NY) online yearbook collection, 1931 Edition, Page 30

1931, pg 30

New York University School of Education - Education Violet Yearbook (New York, NY) online yearbook collection, 1931 Edition, Page 144

1931, pg 144

New York University School of Education - Education Violet Yearbook (New York, NY) online yearbook collection, 1931 Edition, Page 178

1931, pg 178

New York University School of Education - Education Violet Yearbook (New York, NY) online yearbook collection, 1931 Edition, Page 55

1931, pg 55

New York University School of Education - Education Violet Yearbook (New York, NY) online yearbook collection, 1931 Edition, Page 227

1931, pg 227

New York University School of Education - Education Violet Yearbook (New York, NY) online yearbook collection, 1931 Edition, Page 205

1931, pg 205

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