New York University College of Dentistry - Dental Violet Yearbook (New York, NY)

 - Class of 1926

Page 1 of 228

 

New York University College of Dentistry - Dental Violet Yearbook (New York, NY) online yearbook collection, 1926 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1926 Edition, New York University College of Dentistry - Dental Violet Yearbook (New York, NY) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1926 Edition, New York University College of Dentistry - Dental Violet Yearbook (New York, NY) online yearbook collection
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Text from Pages 1 - 228 of the 1926 volume:

Hrl VOL.1 No.1 1 9 KP 2. 6 ,A " 'ad cox-YRIGH1' 1926 A ARON BLUESTONE 1flfil0I'-fIl- Chirf AI,EXANIDER Susanna Business Manager 7' ' K My M 4'-'I' I . , 1 r FOREWORD F in future years you-take th1s first Dental Violet of college history and in reminiscent mood with broadened vision mellowed by Tlme scan 1ts pages to l1ve a half hour with your old classmates listen ing to the voice of your Alma Mater calllng you to battle for the high ideals for which she stands we feel that we will have been rewarded for the tlme spent in compiling this annual. 5 5 . r U lj EJ 1 1 Il"'lll"' f I 1 "Ill IIII I -u-gv'1:i I I ,fl 'll H "H" l3l QQ 1 , f wx 'V 1 .1 qxjlq f--hx ,. , -,......- ..,.. ,,-, .-,,,.,,,.-..,-,. f' xx W ,, , W QM, ,,- ,.. ,T11'f','f'T,.v ,A A"T"T"f77""A'fT'...11.u:L1L1 ' s4.LZ1.U,....,,u,m,q ' W, Cf' .1 . vijn. ..1. ..,.,.11.fAmL1.p.ZiU4,1m xi! ---,',.,A1'Q1g' A 1,"'x-, '4:w.' Y CL" 'NM V -fx '..'lXT"ffDt'f arf, ,i ,QV4f.yijgQ,f--iff ,ia XMU j,4','41-,n'b:m?sfP fffkxp-4' fy fd fy-f5.::NlJCf.''QQLTQIQHJP3 ijmiur' " '-2F5,Q,'f,4 X , .X f , . ,ff , QM, ,X Mx K J, ,JJ.,L,, ,,,n',-Y hz! w, , mi ' '1 --N .' wg, I .1 uw '. --'-' -, , W1 1 f, . , www , "lf , ,5ff1E:w.,' ' .f it if , .-t.T1..gT1 .fi'T,L.,.LfQl?'7.jV iiifglglg,41fQ!.tlEg?g1ljf lLi11.g.:g1Q1 f717fYiwd1E?5'13Y MTW ' ffl? 31515 : 1 ' - 1 N P X V JV Rt Ng Q j W ' l ffvt' t f! M ,N t Lf gllfxx if if LY V tyt 1 iw L Mg 72' VNV? X P V ' ' V vm X, FAS tr? W t Nt 1 1 t J N ft t g ' U if JL M V, Nw ,fl 5 H + ! X , I ,MA rl gi Tir t i ,W s'r. APPOLONIA E. Q-I Patron Saint of Dentistry ' I ' O 1 1 if Fl Q z U i ft x f e S, We 'O 4. ,mv , ,WL , 7 All if t1't infiw 0 t"' -1 ,, .fvfj,1li-iq' ff fgwjf T71fH'3?7f'?2f3TU4EF3Tl3i1?i?i?FYW'iiilitfbi- S fd fjitfsl, H t "firm, 31,fz,Eg5gyfra" -T 3 SLI! L-dj ffl? TW 'lFIfff""F'1f 'f' if E41 WUI!! ' lgnjl Qgwym QE ,VI BBE? N 'lm"" ,llv 55 f ? ge ST APOLLONIA PATRON SAINT OF DENTISTRY Extract from Sacred and Legendary Act Vol III fSteverLsonj in the British M useum There dwelt in the city of Alexandria a magistrate who had great riches but he and his wife were also heathens They had no children and day and night they besought their false gods to grant them a son or a daughter to inherit their wealth Meantime for so it pleased God three pious pilgrims servants of the Lord arrived 1n the city and being hungry and weary they begged an alms for the love of the Redeemer and the Blessed Virgin His mother Now as they were thus begging opposite to the house of the magistrate his wife being astonished called to them and said What new manner of begging is this? In whose name do ye ask alms? Then the pilgrims preached to her the merits of Christ and the Virgin The woman being greatly moved by their words asked whether it were possible that the Virgin-mother of God of whom they spoke could grant her prayer to have a child? And they answered Without doubt Thereupon she called them in, and gave them alms, and meat and drink g and addressed her prayer, full of faith, to the Holy Virgin. Her prayer was heard and she brought forth a daughter, to whom she gave the name of Apollonia. "As the maiden grew up and flourished as a flower in grace and beauty, her mother ceased not to relate to her the wonderful circumstances of herlbirthg and thus she became a true Christian at heart, and with a longing wish to be baptized. With this purpose, and directed by an angel, she found her way to St. Leonine, the disciple of St. Anthony, and desired to be made a Christiang so he baptized herg and suddenly there appeared an angel holding a garment of dazzling white, which he threw over the maiden, saying, 'This is Apollonia, the servant of Jesus! Go now to Alexandria, and preach the faith of Christ'. She, hearing the divine voice, obeyed, and preached to the people with wondrous eloquence. Many were convertedg others ran to complain to her father, and to accuseher of breaking the law, but she defended herselfg and her father, incensed, gave her up to the power of the heathen governor, who commanded her instantly to fall down and worship M ,II I l""' MNH MNWMI MM MMMH H n mu mmm: 1 :mm gflg Efli E'E EE A I 5 nn mn u u mm niuu ug .mr ze'-.'-: um 1. nn in mnmunl ll nun 1 nl All I. - Q - 2 n F n umm n n n mnn 1 ' ":"f2'i5?-Tc:- nm I 1 nn u I 1 Hlll . ,wma X xiii R Q Nkgiiffhhi rf w. 5. :fm nmmnm nnuummmn mmm, nmnn n umm nm mmmnmmnnllillllt E 5 the idol set up in the city. Then St. Apollonia, being brought before the idol, made : to : , , , : : the sign of the Cross, and commanded the demon who dwelt within it to departg E ,1 and the demon, uttering a loud cry, broke the statue and fled, shrieking out, 'The : - E E Q 2 1 holy Virgin Apollonia drives me forth'! The tyrant, seeing this, ordered her to ,. - 'i be bound to a column and all her beautiful teeth were pulled out one by one with 5' 4 S -1 a pair of pincersg then a fire was kindled, and as she persisted in the faith, she was 2 'E flung into it, and gave up her soul to God, being carried into His Angels". : f S v--r We ' aj-. Y E 5.6 Q46 -Is .,-- -QE im, ,UE Fl is ,N 3 ? I l l 5 2 ' r E if' if . . ' 3 i s F ummm Aga! II ll nal H l'ul -,534 B.. II ummu -, ....,,,., ,t,.., ,,.,, ,, 'rr Qitill!'lF"9tWW!fffrf::::?i'kill-ff,'f"t,'rII,, t .li.r'11'-1-fll..!'?'1"i?iianari'lvQ'P'!!!2'!"f .. .MU .. .ture 1 II owl. n I5 1 r .x, r Qfw F, ,. ,. .-'.,'-:I ,wx HJ key r 'z f.1'5.f.1 . Q. New w V-, , ,.....-u N Z' 1 I , H xl' W fr? fl 'X 111, , 1 W 'Ht 1 ,fxl .fl nfl' I f 1, ,X W- f I, ,.., g, W H ,4 413 1 W 1 I W ' I ,lf UE U CDL, W f-I if is E I Z '02, w N "1 A-14 Q, ai - 5 this book to our dean, E : 51-i if E, Lil' 4 ., .1 .I 'Dfw' HQNCJ r l , . EF "-' iii-iliil. ..j".. , A li .I , .. 5.5 3 Z 2 E DEDICATION 2 E S E Ecfxusrz of his attainments as ai scientist and '1 - 2 2 teacher because of what he has already accomplished E E in the reorganization of our college because ofthe : E E - inspiration which has come through his contact w1th 3 5 if the student body because of the high rank WhlCh E E our college must inevltably attain under his leader- 5 5 2 1- 5 ship it is our privilege and our pleasure to dedicate ' - f - fl 5 I E 52- 'X- : iE E E E I E :: '35 E 41315 HOLMES coND1cT JACKSON, PH.D. f y ' E w 'E : 55 555: -. -3 A 51? 5 .-Q :l a 5 - . : E - ... : E .l. -I 5 E' :' - 5 3 5 1 l ll 2 25 as E55 EE 5135 :-3: 'fi' L : Q5 2 5 2 ml' Imlllg--ullllllfl-un! "" i xl jllu1u1nmnnnununnululnlnllllllu upunumummmm.m,,mm,,,,mm ..., Eu, ,mIm,..:,lm' Ku irzijcnglm ll ' ll lp n' .fnlflllllelnlllllnf gi lr-nlIuilll',,lIllllii' l- ,llill lIl M:3 nRi??15,:yE:l 53S5,p,1 I .ri hu. 1mlllllllllllIllIIIIIlllllllllllllllllllllllIll i v llluuuuummmnnnnmmunnlll . .ull in 1 ,am as l 22,1 PM - gy ' L.. lf: Sl' 1- as S E .: 2 - +4- - B - Q Q : R: . 2 5 9 f C E E 4X n n a , -E. S A- . . EL Sli i E 1 a E J ' C ' S E E fix . . . ' E f - ixiw s ': fill E ... .,T.,. Q05 -,,: VWT7: :ff-'Wi El.- 5-'4 :-: he A A E"E 5 5 f . 'Y' Z9 all 3 . gf! Eli i 'f Q gli pf "" zuzl'-lm:nW1fiQ""wSeim41lIll"'ii ""' "" W 'lf "": iff'"IIIlIllE?i?W'1E'Q5f-WIIIHI""'fJ!!""'pl . , H1 Fggm' -in " ' ' 5 nkfqww ' nw Efiwfll.- lg.. .......... .. .M.MnEy1 lf' Jjlhwl rn? 5,3 E E E45 Eh? E E z - E.. 242 dbg is 1 Associate Editor Enoch Reich l 'r Art Editor - Junior Editor : T E Meyer Friedman i ' Louis J. Kirsch A 2 S 5 Sophomore Editor EXECUTIVE STAFF Faculty Advisor -li 5 5 Pnonsson JOHN OPPIE RKICCALL 5 Editor-in- Chief AARON BLUESTONE Business Manager Alexander Siegler Circulation Manager Arthur Shapiro Freshman Editor Bernard J. Fried Oscar Caplin EDITORIAL BOARD Sffnidf Class Junigr C1455 .Nj .x p 'mn -un Fun lr' 'qu T: Ipnmunlmlmumuunlulllllllllllll II Illmunnnmmllulnlmlulmllllmlll 'UV' I' nlrdlllllu- .lm x l -' ...M f ' QElV'm-'13 .lll .IlllI.., ...I -1--'Ill'--1-'wsfI I pz.'9,tF I1 l In 1 I I I lllllllll I llll 5 llllllIlllllllllllllllllllll lllllllll s all 0. ml ' 'xxx iyylg ' Qld afg ?15 lg? E ? E E : "' E 5 E E 2 3 : E E 5 E E 2 E 2. E E I: E E 5 E : 2 5 E 5 its g'E Ex? E15 E E: E I E S E img :Aa E x E S ax jg A D. Brown L. Maibach ' - J. Blum A. Kroll A. Inerfield L. Albert tif' rf? E SF , I :E 1 I I., 3 1 l l Y Sophomore Class - . N. Stuzin S. Shandelow A. Handelsman A. Goldberger H. Shimkin J. Serxner M. Stein B. Laub J. Lieberman S. Fromer Freshman Class Jack Goodman Nicholas Klein Louis Greenberg . . -mqunu --------- Vfll ------ Ill'llll"'l ""lll"'lI Illlllllf' U'E5l!!!?!!F"!IEi'Il?'ss'i5F'fiiYa:::!?'Fflllll-fffff'ifill., H926 .ll,ffflf-flllflfl'I'tzzvviiinW1!!"l!!!!!lE:fLf l8l .VC- E 4 S I E. E. E Eli EW? S 2 ale :Eg E25 ale F i its 2 E 5,2 2 S SHE 45? 3 1 EE iii 5, . My X QV E 3 W? W2 -Q Mu M3 MZ Mu 1 2 Eli 1+ M Y' if 3' .. ,f '2 ffm: ff gTfE3NTfi aff, U w, ' JL V ' I gm Nw ' Y ,W j ,M 'Sf lx lf' Q- 'xff igf , is U1 ' gfffi QQ: 'f we l Mi grew 'f -717 '! I 'I lx X' gl I My ju X n lil mil' En' I fl U1 +2 U' HI " ltybl' 1 lcxcj! ' K IU 4 .. ' '.VIilllmlllllllmnlnlulmunlnlmnllll xl YE57 llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll .Q ' .. I... ff , j...'! ba .I xi: ,,., , 2 3 5 ,Q 5--T :ii NEW YORK UNIVERSITY E1 :E E E omfxcm or 'nm cl-IANQELLOR 5 - 5 E wnsuwo-:ora soums uzwvonx I : E : It takes a combination of science and public spirit to make a. 5 5 E profession A member of any profession is fully justified in g lllllllllll 2 looking upon his professional practice as a. means of making an E 2 5 honest and honorable livelihood for himself and his family, but it 5 lllll I Illl 'Rlll llll 1 5' 5 d' U' 0 E? 5 O Pb 1+ U' 0 O: 0 l-4 E S Q 0 C '1 0 D S 0 E 5 0 Pb D 0 P' 0 U d' P' Pb P' 0 II Ill! I I I 5 i' efficiency and e1im1na.tss the thought of using one's science for' 2 2 5 E the common good, then the practitioner fails to come up to the Q 5 ENE 5-E N 5 W5 standard of the professional man. It is because dentistry is a. 5 fx' 5 : 1 3 g : 5 g necessary and important public service, and that it is advancing 5 3 - l' g .Hg with the advances of scientific know1edge,'tha.t New York Univer- 3 : :li is Eli -fre? sity has 'welcomed the College of Dentistry into the family of its professional schools. I am glad to make my small contribution to Q H the first issue of the Dental Violet. May the class and the whole stuient body which this publication represents, be fired with the f A , 5 5 3 E ' 5 5 5 5 ' l 5 true professional spirit, which is at one with the true University M - 3 5 ' 2 ga-E Spirit. 121 E ,-:IE-E m mn u I --I 1 lu mnnuu mu Hg ' - -4,51 I E -1 fl- "PJ so K we n nu L l u u ua In In n n mx ul ll ag win, nnun If rmmmnll uulu nl II E 2x.2x?f:x A X, I -si Qi, m :ZH nn n . nn n msn nmu nnn nnlhllp g g -:. Chancellor 2 19 December, 1925 l gg IE :-i 493 Q Y ali Q95 TIE , E :E 5 --...mm nf I --'- au-'V l ""I' "" I ww'I"' '.' L3553!!!F!1F"E2l'aTWflTm:::!F"'f!!!lYT-ff.'f"r,'TIL w 1l'Z',e-f1'l'!?l?P!iEF"?'1:1z111?HFl'i5EmmH!!"F!!!!!lE:'fY,?f I I E U01 V , an If I'l 5 I fx f x . v w ' 1 ,n1':z:-new gfflT'T'7f"'T,j?Tfjfj1TTTETTTTBTE5'wTLFQ.Tl'HfM 1 Qi? V5 51211 gyjiriifiii1UTT1i1iTT'TTT'EHTUTi.'jj7f-'T1"'fjx'ffm wif Q23 fJ2f'T'f'QQ,ff:2?? WA' ff sef" 2".m :1f+f1g V' 5 2f' fvIN 2' fi A1-AW D "WJ-fifAj'i-'W' ' by "U '--'13 ' -.- v--, T, Q flfuivzqwlff, fj2if31'!'ffwFl1?Mwf',m Xf'f'if'w'fQhfp?-12, w"Iwx1iJH- if 5-x1l',f. ...,.,-....................--.............-.-.-..-.- .-.... -.M..XQ:.jyf....-,.. ....-...-.-.-..-. ...A ,... ..,-,-.,.,-.-.,.,..-.., . ,-.-- ...,,..,, I X 555 s lfwlv ' i gs Nf 1 U , .4. i l IQ I 4 l 4 19 e . M N 1 If ,5: 1 'X' 5 ip Hi 5 Q PI I I 1 M11 P Htliwxfj I W, 4 iQ4'7:. Yf.i .N4 1 . 5 ' Y g IXQXE ' 0951, z Vi 'ffSu v W 3 , fp , g 3 ' W 1 ,fi nf' J I , Q1 f j 1 I W. ' ,' I I Elia i 141: fi W UL 'lffyg 2 'ig i M! Tv, ' Uh 1' , 71 I, , 1 ,J wt UH' lp, . 1 ' 1 ' X02 ' W' :Q J L ,HM . THE HALL OF FAME 25 Y Q ',g1M 9911 L I 4 "-f' - -'f- --1 '-::g:::g:v"f--1v--'-f- -1:33-1-1---rzr--::wv"'--'-"v1'y'1 fv-'n1"--rw-'v-v----f-v---V--,-,., ..,.....,-M..... ...-w.., ...... ,..- I Li Wffsl-4I' W x -, mi? Ha f' 'i2TfQ11 f fo f9Nfl!1p'N3:i+f1,lbigUiqiQg, ,fTQifQF-112'ti43 :1fQ?5T2'ffymwuVH'f S11yda " ' L: ' 'A X ' ,-gk-Eg, '7'q"r!,"Uf,- C gg 1 ,ff C f. fx ,QD ,i 1 'fnplfl my 'ma-Aif9f""',I'x 1,1 'Ld MV F M A X U11 1 WV U :ffm I E rflgffvmgf gf QL? 1 fv 4 ,1 v IN M V N ,N fc X42 1 ! xf K, FX! I N' l I , xi- ? if Q fx ff Q ' H' 'U if LIN fm? 'E 'Q 1 uf .UU ,ll N WT fm, C1 ay 2 V Q THE LIBRARY P2 gi '1 ' W ' 1: ""' "" " f , L' M' Q .R .J Y -i 'W' ' U21 V.- Q...,. .. -.-M -,,-Wm,.- 4..N ,., ww ,,,. Twfciwxw ,,,,,,,,.,,. A LU' l , , YI ,N 7.-- f 3 A ,., .- ,., 1 1 x L x .fl- , ,I ,'v IJ XA ww, ,'1 Jr. A f ' ' N .fx ,, . 1 N 'L T W iifffigxxj lm" ' 54- -4 K-f' 4' if " ' X ". f f Q24 I ,,.L flf, , is If.: 1 +1 4 . ? 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U 'ij 1 4' W1 Q mxj mg! ,. -.W.--,,,---,. ..-m. -M.w-Q.,.7 f'?NN,W W-. -- ..., ,, -. ., LU -. - -"A ,,1if?4:i1gf:' w:f1 2 'fri -+ trJ11Fi Qff 1LEfw2fifi?LLF2 fHTw+L 'A, wx .QQ f' "Ji . ,wi X -fffapwg 'ff JM 'D 4'-fl'- 'Q V "M'JEl:N'-if t',J a.,l'f 'f U - . ffiiig- ,ii,EfpiF:1EQ:f2AL-x, 5'u TL.l3k'7. 1157 C GJ.Z..G53 U41 I 5-.ff 11' 1111. i 1 1 1 1 f 91,15 11,1 1 I! 11 111111 I 11114 111 11 'N11 111 ' 1 11111 1111,1-111 Q11 ' 1 ,EKU EVSX11 Wigs 1 11,1?15 11 1 1151 I "WJ WV 1 1 QNX! 1 MQ! 1 19:1 11 1 1f'1'l'fY 311' 1 1 111 1 '11 11 11, W 1111 . 1 411 11! , 5 W 111 1' E Xaxffl 1 Q3 MA 1 If? 11111 1 f ff? 1 111 """'N1 ,.,:1 YEWIU 10' I Lf' 115911 11532. 1 UE 11 1 ,,. xi , il 1, 1 11 1 I 11,11 1 111111 1 111521 1 N1 Rf 151 J, R1 Q1 111 1 1 1 I,- 11 .1 111 11' 111 M 1111 1 11' 111411 1111 1 1,1 fvyzll iff M1 'ffff 111,51 Jlffvg 11501 17312 -51251 15111 KX I1 Glff 1' ' ,. 7 111 11 111 1 1 1 111' 1-14 ,111 111,11 1551? 1 1 1111 17.-1 , . ' '1 11111 ENTRANCE 'ro THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 11',11'1 112 1111 1,01 1Nl -1iiiy1f1 T 11 '51 711 C 1 11113 f 1' 11151-1 g 1 1 ff 13'f'?1i1,' J C2421:Ez1E1Q11i2zzfff:111.1f11i1jm1fG1Ezj 11111fr.:qQ2fE1i1QlEfQ11,'g 1 +1 3 M, .. ., 1151 111 5 l li ii" 3 3' lug ENE if 'lg ': 'E E E E-5 E' E' .E :..- ' -" gilt? : E .1-., -1. g-...-- E 55 -.,... 9 llll IQJKDU Hat! 'f' M THE PALISADLS O grim grey Palisades thy shadow Upon the rippling Hudson falls And the mellow mingled tints of sunset Illumine now our classic halls While students gather round thine altars With tributes of devotion true And mingle merry hearts and voices In praise of N Y U Here as the evening shades are falling And gone is every care of day, We gather, and the campus echoes With laugh and shout of students gay, Thy sons, well guarded from all sorrow, Linked firm in bonds of violet hue, Forget the cares that come tomorrow, And praise old N. Y. U. ' But college friendships all must sever, And fade as does the dying day, And closest kinships all be broken As out in life we wend our way: But yet, whatever be life's fortune, Though mem'ry fail and friends be few, E E E917 'L Elf'-5 SWE EX' E gglllg a 5 52 Sli E-'LE : : :m: V Alllmr'-lllllllfjillf 'sir' n--- I xg pmmlumnnumnunmnnlullnlli 'I' - lpunuummmnum:nmnnnunlluli "" vxlu rm mmm' 'mul ,Q l I llgull IilhH'"'lll"'l'l'fllllllmf V Engllllll'"""'nlllI" alll, llhll' lll,Y2'J'l"l , :Kv,:5l .L .ll .llu.. IllllllllllIllIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll t ' 2 1 llluummmumnnnmmmnmlll . .ull in ' 1 l L .1 llsifg Eliikll Qi .1 g 'Q 5 : : 2 2 - ' E , S :z E d . . , 1 5 5 5 . E E , E Q ,rlllg - , 1 1 - Ali: . "' I 5 ME . E 1 - EA E . . . A: ? .lz 2 f . 4 l E c c . , 5 3 'K I' rl Wx We'll love thee still, our Alma Mater, :if r T Our dear old N. Y. U. Q93 ii 5-E Els il! ll rs I E 5 4. Eli 315 gig "1 II llllll ""' ' Qs I ""' ll"ll l"' ' ' "'llll"ll i ' 'I -j Illlll Ill" if'i5lll!?!lF"!!:s2iTl. '?WTW:::!?"Ffflllfi,'ll H9 ,ll'r1112-T?llF!!EV'lF'i::fiT'iiiiif'Eii'I'l22!!"ll!F!llEf'lf,Y l 161 . .I Ill. H lil,llllllllllllllllllllllllll lllllllll ull ll 'SES' lll lllllllllllllllllll ll .lil Ii J E E S'E 55 EAW: ft 5-2-E is 1' 1 2 s 5 s-.2 F 35 E E g i p THE MERGER DEAN HOLMES C JACKSON The first dental college in the world was instituted in 1840 as the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery The name indicates that in the minds of the origin- ators the manual side of the art was predominant And yet in the early minutes of the College commenting on the results of the examination of a practitioner of dentistry who desired the degree of'D.D.S. the statement appears that the indi- vidual was rejected as altogether unworthy of the honor as he showed no acquaintance with the science of dentistry being nothing but a dental mechanic This conception of the requirements of a dentist so clearly set forth by this early writer has been gradually developed as dental education has advanced during the past half century And very slowly but nevertheless definitely it has come to be established that dentistry and medicine are fields of public health service with the same scientific foundation In this connection it is worthy of attention that in one of the annual announcements of the New York College of Dentistry prior to 1908 appeared the paragraph The purpose of the institution is to educate men to practice dental surgery as a specialty of medicine therefore, the curriculum includes the fundamental departments of medicine with operative dental surgery and oral prosthetics. The lectures on the fundamental departments of medicine are specially directed to the needs of the dental surgeon". With some minor modifica- tions this might well appear in the forthcoming bulletin to be published some forty years after the above was written. Some of the older men had the vision which still is far from coming to complete fruition. The New York College of Dentistry was incorporated in 1865, it being the fifth regularly established dental college in the United States. The first session opened on November 5, 1866, with 31 students, and a faculty of ten professors and 18 clinical lecturers. In March, 1867, nine students were graduated. Owing to dissensions in the faculty the College found itself in the courts and it was not until 1869 that the sessions were reestablished. From this time until 1895 the College maintained an unbroken career of success. In 1896 disagreements con- cerning the Deanship brought the College to the notice of the regents. Upon final settlement of this matter, the College resumed its sessions which have been con- tinued uninterruptedly until this year. ' In the history of the College the name of Faneuil D. Weisse, M.D., stands as one of its pillars. He was professor of general and descriptive anatomy from NN 5 A IIll"HI1 .U Ill Il lllll 1 nmnmm mmm mmm llllnmmlllmlm 2 Mlflm E 5 E-E 1 1 I I l 1 2 '-' -' E E :SLE -T: E i s F' Q ml' III'I.r'llIllllf'tll!'m:-iq .--- I :Pwllnllllllllllllllllnllmmulllln llllll ,V - Um:umumlllulnlnnmmullmlllllll lliu'--ny?-lrmrnlljlllllll l-'- I lm' 1' I 17 1, . .- -we A nu 'nur ME .s i n. .IH llu. . I 1 1 llllll Il i Ill . -ul h. .1 Q 4 C X 1 5 sl 5 nhl? 5-E n E-2 2 2 E a Q . . E E E : ' 5 s j Z 1 E E I- as , E : E , sa. "' Z 5 A , U ., A E 515 . 'IE E 5 - , ,'E E Z , cs -. S x ' , r P ' . 535 2 U: 1865-1896 and Dean from 1896-1915. Professor Frank Abbott acted as clinical lecturer and professor of operative dentistry from 1868-1897. Professor Alexander W. Stein, M.D., was in continuous service from 1868-1896 in the department of v X :. : :1- 16,31 595 -IE 51.2 physiology and microscopical anatomy. Owing to failing health he was succeeded in the chair by his son, J. Bethune Stein, M.D., the present associate professor . of physiology in the College Well known in the dental profession in this city g ill ' were Professor J Bond Littig who served from 1869 to the time of his death , in 1907 and Professor F LeRoy Satterlee PhD M D. from 1869 until 1916 1 , . And finally mention must be made of Alfred R Starr who was professor of opera- Q 115 . if ' ' ' fu I E , . , . ., . , . E . , ,: 1 E ia r I"m:m.nq -qw? -----'--- n llI"""""jl' 'Il"""""'ll jll""ll'll" lk -- nl... ll -'fs-fqlllplll f- 7' Q 'r--1. lIII!ll1gv'-s2-.f-- ul!!! 0 - 'll..,"'flIi.., -nu 1.., "" J .. X 6 ll .,ll"'l"l..nnrr- ..ulli'l'....ll' -:sandal ll E l """" "W W" ""' ""' lf - l 11212 W 1171 U r III 1 in E tive dentistry and dental therapeutics from 1898 and Dean from 1915 until his 5 " .tlrlg llll I. death in 1924 The progress of development of the pre-dental requirements and the college 1111 1 'llll curriculum has kept pace with the demands of the State Legislature but as has been the case in medical education as well the dental schools have required the ' stimulus of outside agencies to bring them to their present state of evolution : - The passage by the New York State Legislature of a law requiring that all : - ' dental schools in the State become affiliated with universities made it imperative E - for the New York College of Dentistry to seek some university connection The E matter of affiliation of the College with New York University had been under 5 consideration for some seven or eight years On the side of the University the , authorities desired that the new school should function as a real asset since the it V, Klum llllll Council recognised that the budget of a modern dental college would not fall much 1 5 below that of 'i well-equipped medical institution Since the University Medical 2 : - College presented an annual deficit the University could not afford to take on - ' an additional liability of this sort The University authorities were finally con- : I : vinced that a Grade A dental school could be begun with the funds available from - ' 1 tuition and clinic especially since the Dental College had paid off all of the indebt- 2 : 5 edness upon its buildings. On June 30, 1925, the New York College of Dentistry E In f g if p 2 turned over to the University land, buildings and equipment worth approximately E p 1 5 gf, E S500,000, the equipment being of a character that would form the basis for the E tg IE. " ' E construction of a first class educational institution. 1 5 ' E E ll, 2 , s V' 1 E E Ng Dental education is in a state of transition from the proprietary type of the Er E E55 5 uwnmiw .lm last fifty years to that in which the dental student receives proper fundamental training in his art. In the early beginnings in medicine, surgery received special i- i - 312 Ska if 1 ...E attention and in a similar way, dentistry has magnified the technical or manual side 1 fbi of the profession. Recently the art of dentistry has moved in the direction of becoming a branch of public health service similar to medicine and the tendency i has shown itself for the dentist to concern himself with all normal and pathological 1 F conditions of the mouth. If the dentist is to be considered as a specialist in medicine, 5 it 1 5 it is quite evident that his training should include those fundamental sciences now E E 5 2 S taught in the medical school. The dentist should be thoroughly conversant with . E .. E 5-E the mouth as a focus of origin for general or systematic symptoms indicating 11 F E L 3 1 1 pathology in order that- he may recognize the need for calling the medical man into E r-w : .. - E ll E . . . E 5 g g consultation when the need becomes imperative. : 2 I L E The curriculum of the New York University College of Dentistry will be W-llfllll lllllllll llllmll llllll umm ' 'W' lllllll ll Ilillll lll lllllhl nlmmllllllll ml' I1-1155 v fl l ' mwmmrmimuuumimimmmi mu u lu mum mmm u lnf..3:92i rg-.E ' A ' gig rr A E F: - ' ' E14 SS. sa va ff 'H' 'HM Hfmmmlm umm' 'mmumrmnmmn mnnmmnmmmm nur' V Isle-kiss. fi mum mmfmur rnmrnmlnrm.-mm mn nm n rmuu mum mmrmrmmnlmnm.nUlIlllllP.cB" built upon a two year pre-dental course of physics, biology and chemistry, which ,ir V ga requirements also forms the minimum basis for entrance into a medical school in ' .1 -..-.2 2 Fl: 'F' rn 1 . . . . New York State. In general it may be said that the courses in the medlcal sciences QE given to the dental students will 'correspond in the main to those in the medical Qui LE is: i i i A A curriculum with special emphasis laid upon the oral cavity and its relations to 1 e rest of the body The teaching of anatomy and bacteriology is carried on in L r" e medical school while the physiology chemistry pharmacology and pathology fi are taken care of in the Dental building While the heads of the departments in 1 e Medical School possess supervisory control over the teaching of these subjects ,E 1 nnll gran. in Ill IF' I I' ,xg-qw!! I 'gum II I 181 , th . 3 1 th ' , , , gf - 3 A th 3 ' QW' 'lpvgm qu' ---- g L'-Z1-. ll' 'l,.,,-TSI-:rl -1 "M 1 , ' g, . ........... ....., , ,,,, ....,.. .., ,........ , .1 5 ' i'E?ll!!'!!F '!2E'.Tl ,1. mrflra:::!?"Lil-fa.ll. ,.Il' 1121-fl?...! l'f::Q111fffiiWW1!!"F!.,!ll ful xi y 1 'ln' rl'IlIIIf'1ll!IlI:gI"YllllllI: 'Illllllllllllllllllllllllllllulllllllllllllll V' i '1 'IlllIllllllllllllllllIlllllllllllllllllllllultl ulll:'Rlll?ll'1lnnIl' 'lu' I r,,, M.. 2..e-.'-w.......,,: .,,. .wfwasam QE wrong? .... lu-.-mf . .,,,, ,. Z." .-i.. ...l. ..lln.... .-.AlllllIIIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll li K? .il Ill mmmmmmmuuunuunlll .,-, " ....sll.. .h.. ai. 4 'W . in the Dental College, the Dental College will have separate staffs with teaching ? devoted solely to the dental students. Courses in the principles of medicine and of surgery have been instituted so that the student may familiarize himself with the fundamentals of medicine. The great possibilities which lie open to the dentist in the rapid development of local anesthesia is recognized in the laboratory course given in this subject upon the cadaver. It is also hoped to institute a short course in physical diagnosis, in order that the student of oral surgery may be made aware of the danger of promiscuous administration of general anesthetics and come to recognize the signs of question- able risks. The departments of prosthetic dentistry and operative dentistry are ' being reorganized in that the work of these departments is to be subdivided and put in charge of skilled experts in the various branches of the work covered by r the student. Finally it must be said that the union of the College with the University offers ' almost unlimited opportunities for advance along educational lines. The Medical College will derive advantage through the affiliation with the teaching body of the Dental College. The medical curriculum has neglected stomatology under the T assumption that the mouth was the field for the dentistg and on the other hand the Dental College was not completely in the position to supply the necessary 1 instruction in the medical sciences and in medicine and surgery. This the medical , ' mmm mm ta. ,J 1 Ai., . Illllum. un mi. ummm -' mlm uuummunnmn. : ll Lf' 5 i teachers can provide. This interrelation of instruction between the two schools is something to be desired by all first class dental institutions. : E E - f x E-as 1 . i -, I sos Ps ' f-- - , Q THIRTY-FIVE YEARS BEFORE THE MERGER CLASS OF 91 ullmulll 'ill Ill ' ull I is -S. jllllllllll I 191 ling-f"l fix I 1 Egylir. K- i x ' 1 'C 4' Tl N' we 7524 Lia! I , . il I- f. A' fl 4-,i , lf 5 ,l 'if :fx 1 ..i :ir it fi' ' 1.i'f f -un s 3 P I Lx E gl .. 5 "'2 E E 5 E - - f-Q t E gi 'val mr I 1 ICU ,K llll -4 lu. ' -ilmlllllllllllllllllll u nu ull Xl Xa? I ' V, ..lh'!.. I if ' llll A 2 N E 'fe 33 E-:E PIE ? 1 E , , v Ml E 5.21 gi-.es 5 17 E 5 L E E F E f.-1357. 'ITIHIIIUI Ill llllml llll Q EAS EE 5' 1 I' mn.:-.lull rlullrgill-...gall llmnumunmuuunnuuummlulllll Il,.mu.m.......,...,,H,,,,,,,,,,,.,,,mnl .... ,VL-Tl i,,,1Hm,,..Illm' Q 586521 lf, f,-:l.nf. 5....,1II . .,. .'D.E.A'.?0Q.,A FVIULEQ' lllln..f.!..-n: 'n ,, ' ,,,. , - aivv 4 N -1 'Iv 1 I ll llllllllllll lu n f lllllllIIllIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll - .ull In 1 .' if qw 'Ami PM S 4 as 'Q i' E 5 'E ...-. it 2 E 2 3 E E E 2 I - E : E E E E 2 .. e E ' : - E : , Q Z E A - a E 9, E : 5 3 -.A ...x - 1 E 5 4 : 2 3 2 f ' , 2 1 E E 5 f' -, X 2 ' S :A 5 ' 1 2 Ag s , ,, X 1 . Q, 4 I ': E 5 NNE :'- jgllku KW E I E K - 15 E ,Q : 'FL' 5 'E gl 6 -, ' E'J?3?1f:n:.z!Y:':"' T X' " ' h ' . IFrom an old pnntj. FIRST GRADUATING CLASS OF THE NEW YORK COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY, Q--r 9? . NA' EF: EWS wig :Qi gl QQ! ,., ii LE , ""Il'l:IIl Hug ' ll'::Ill"'H ' - n"'lll:::'I ' Il'l:I'll" lgIES!!F!FEP"SimiiEvrrr1vf::::fF"'SIMMf..I1. ..h.'.-L11-WP!!!"f't:11f1ff11Miiiwm25:!!"P!!!!!!h1'..' i201 E 2 - '-: Nestor of the dental profession of that day-was elected a trustee and director. 5 11' if -. M 1 1 ' 'CREW' 1' 1 y 118' 1. 1 llf 1 , .vfwasam am f1fm.8..Ear .lll11...11-1 1 ' HISTORICAI SKETCH 3 ,- iz-.Q NEW YORK UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY s , E CHARLES VETTER D D S E - E During 1864 certain members of the dental profession of the City of New : E ? York agitated the question as to the establishment of a dental college in New York ' - City which culminated in the presentation of a bill to the Legislature at the session .6 Z E' of 1865 for the incorpo'ration of the New York College of Dentistry The Act of E - E f' Incorporation was passed March 31 1865 Laws of 1865 Chapter 264 with : E ' the following first Board of Trustees and Directors. Mr. M McNamara Walsh - ' Rev R R Booth Dr W H Allen Dr C E Francis Dr Geo. E Hawes Dr 1 1 - Arnold C Hawes Dr E A. Mills Dr G E Roy Dr C A Marvin Dr W B E ' Roberts - 5 I Z The Act of Incorporation was amended April 3 1867 QLaws of 1867 Chapter : -- 243 as follows. The Board of Trustees of the New York College of Dentistry ,, - 5 . may confer the honorary degree of Fellow of the College of Dentistry QF C D 5 E : A : upon such persons as have made or shall have made valuable contributions to E 1 " 1 :. the sciences dentistry upon the recommendation of the Board of Professors of said D E 5 1 College with the consent of the Regents of the University. E - 1 From 1865 to 1925 there have been seventy-eight incumbent non-professional E A E E Trustees and Directors. E NE E W The Presidents of the Board of Trustees and Directors have been: Eleazer 5 X' Parmly, M.D., D.D.S., 1866 to 1869 fresignedjg Stephen A. Main, D.D.S., 1870 2 E 5-A-E to 1875 qfesignedpg William H. Allen, D.D.S., 1875 to 1882 qdeceasedp, Mr. M. gfigg 5.5 McNamara Walsh, 1882 to 1890 fdeceasedjg Hon. J. Hampden Robb, 1891 to E15 'E " : E li F 1894 fresignedj 3 F. F. Vanderveer, A.M., 1895 to 1896 Qresignedjg George Alex- 5 3 ander, D.D., 1896 to the time of the merger with the New York University, in 1925. At a meeting of the Board of Trustees and Directors, held September 30, 1865, if p , a faculty was elected for the year 1865-66, as follows: Dr. Norman W. Kingsley, K 3 , 1 E Faneuil D. Weisse, M.D.g Dr. William H. Atkinson, Dr. William H. Alleng R. Q King Browne, M.D., Dr. Charles Butler fCincinnatijg William H. Dwinnelle, gg 5 E E M.D., D.D.S., and Joseph Smith Dodge, Jr., M.D., D.D.S. Thisfaculty. did not E 5 fulfill the duties thereof, during their year of tenure, but participated with' the E E . . . . . . , 5, .. 'm: Board of Trustees and Directors 1n the discussions as to the organization of the g g college. At the meeting of January 25, 1866, Eleazar Parmly, M.D., D.D.S.-the - 3 E F, 8. I I nm.. -11 Il num: qu lrliilpllluulrlllmlllllmllluunlllllllllmli ,f Ulmununnmml1l11u111nm1m1mIll pu -up 1 myqmnu ,H nf., 1A X ll I 1 111 .1 -A ..l11l....mI in if.11111111111111......1..1......1........1.....11l ll. Wil? .fl III11111111111111umummunmnmllllui' I m .... i1il..d.ll1...llh'll11. Q 1 .TT 1: "" :I El ' " I -ff 5-5 5 s , . . . E E I E E 2 E E e 2 9 S E E 2 . c , 1. E 5 : : ' . , E 5 QE . , . . , . . . , . . . , . . . E A ' ll I , , E. 1 s 1 11 D , .. E I : , 1 ' g E ,111 . . .5 I E ' E , Lf , E 1 , , e g 61 , : 1 E " is F 'S At the meeting of February 27, 1866, it was unanimously resolved "that the mem- CM! Pia . . . . QQ 1 bers of the dental profession of the city be requested to meet, informally, with the Board of Trustees and Directors, at the house of Dr. George E. Hawes, for 35 2.5: . . . . . . - 5 - E the purpose of taking into consideration the interests and wishes of the dental profession in connection with the college." " 'lhis meeting was held on March 28 the attendance including a full repre- . .- . 1 ' sentation of the leading members of the profession of the city and after 'in extended . consideration of plans for the future of the college a Committee of Conference : , if was appointed by the representatives of the dental profession to present a Plan 1, llllllll 1 ami I I l ll Ill iw' llllllllll Eli 1 , 1.1 11 1 , . 57? l 'Z N H 3 Z1 E-5 115 11" 1111 .... 1 11 1211 . 1 Q 'i ' , .N j'll1lu lll5u7'TUI' WT lllllllllll lllllllllllllllllllllllllll llllll , 't Illlll llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllInu' """l'Yl'Ilnlll"1lIIlIl 12 'ul if-,.f? 1l,.. 12.11 .1--af--"Lim fwffvafw. llll jllllf wzafza 11 11 1--I--bum" .51 llnwil . .i. ..i . ,.lln.. ,.. IllllIllIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll li YE' tl 'IllIIIlIIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll' .- ,....ull., nr.. ..n. . - ' -ir E 5 N. .. Q I 2 E ? E E E 5 5 E E E E 5 E E 5 E E 5 E E , E ' E 1 WA , ,nal 1 il 1 tl lf X11 lil sEcoND COLLEGE BUILDING if Q f 1 231119 STREET AND 6TH AVENUE W N, H!! xl E E X! x E i ii of Organizationn embodying the views expressed at this meeting by the profes- VX E An g sion. At the meeting of April 17, 1866, the Board of Trustees and Directors E1 5 H received and considered a "Plan of Organization" presented by said "Committee l " wi of Conference". At the meeting of April 21, 1866, a "Plan of Organization" pre- lk! 'E sented b Professor Faneuil D. Weisse, M.D., A ril 10, 1866, was adopted by the ji LE Y P -5 E E oar o rustees an irectors. -' : Fi- B d f T d D' :iz 51 E At the meeting of May 1, 1866, a second faculty was elected to serve for ? ii 1866-67. During the summer of 1866 rooms were obtained for the occupancy of V A the college, in a business building, at the corner of 22nd Street and Fifth Avenue. A The plan for the conduct of the college work having been completed, the first 51 1 E session was opened, November 5, 1866, with thirty-one students, along the lines ' ' 5 of Professor Weisse's "Plan of Organization" with the following faculty mem- bers: Eleazer Parmly, M.D., D.D.S., Emeritus Professor of the Institutes of 2 5 ,E Dentistry, William H. Dwinnelle, M.D., D.D.S., Professor of Dental Science and 5 Operative Dentistryg Dr. Norman W. Kingsley, Professor of Dental Art and :sg Mechanism, JJ Smith Dodge, Jr., M.D., D.D.S., Professor of Dental Pathology E and Therapeutiesg Faneuil D. Weisse, M.D., Professor of Theoretical and Exper- ' imental Physiologyg Charles A. Seely, A.M., M.D., Professor of Chemistry and 7 22 Metallurgy. The demonstrators were: D. H. Goodwillie, M.D., D.D.S.g Dr. Pm. M. Streeter, and Alexander W. Stein, M. D. A board of eighteen clinical lecturers EG was appointed, with Dr. Frank Abbott as secretary. ' E22 ' The session closed March 18, 1867, with nine graduates who were eligible, , under a provision of the law of eight years' practice, to take the graduation exam- r JE 5 inations and degree. in The respective annual elections of professors in 1867 and 1868 effected pro- 1 I fessorial changes as follows: William H. Dwinnelle, M.D., D.D.S., Professor if Q 1 2.15 """""' H-T x mu I' 'V ll Il 1 lu, If 1054 -1- """""' '-u nl "" 'lelvlflgis-' :Eau 'i I 1 i"lll':::ll jim., " UQll!lF.l'!2iaiWWf.::!: l.!!l-.:-ml.. . ,.l....'f.:-Jll!E.l r1't..f-1-lafnimalfi'.l.!!,lG'nJ 1?-21 R-45 In 11,411 Rt, r llllll' mill: an lh ll ,lIig?',S-.H-S, .. . .1 .. -.5111llllllllllllllllllllllIllllllllllllllllIll I NE lin :mmummnn n n nll1 .I .. , , I . . 5 if f in of Dental Histology 1867 to 1868' Edward J Dunning DD S Professor of Operative Dentistry 1867-68 P H Van Der Wede M D Professor of Chem- istry and Metallurgy 1867-69 Samuel R Percy MD Professor of Dental Pathology and Therapeutics 1868-69 Alexander W Stem MD Professor of Physiology and Microscopic Anatomy 1868-69' Dr Frank Abbott Professor of Operative Dentistry 1868-69 ' On April 13 1869 the Board of Trustees and Directors elected the ofHcers of the Board and the faculty for 1869-70 Dr Stephen A Main as President of the Board and as members of the faculty Faneuil D Weisse M D Dr Frank Abbott Alexander W Stein MD and F LeRoy Satterlee MD A meeting of the Board of Trustees and Directors was called for November 10 1869 when new by-laws were adopted and the incumbent professors who were elected in April 1869-Professors Weisse Abbott Stein and Satterlee-were reaf- firmed in their positions under the new by-laws with this difference that under the new by-laws they were elected in perpetuity and not for a term of one year as under the previous by-laws adopted in 1865 On the 15th of November the session of 1860-70 was opened From 1869-95 the college maintained an unbroken career of progressive advance of educational standards From 1865-95 the college changed its location four timesg first from rooms at the corner of 22nd Street and Fifth Avenue to floors at the corner of 23rd Street and Sixth Avenueg from there to Hoors at the corner of 21st Street and Broadwayg 2' 7 Ai E : I 5 lllllllllll y- 5 , llllll unwunnmnnmumuu ww--H-'num mm num nuuuunmuiuuui uuu4pjrJ'Q-,,2.1.,,, , I H - 5-v. ff. 1, m u nu 1. munm nu u mumnwnlmlu nmnl unumn nllllul , 7 Q 5, 512 : - u. - J -..-5 . ag- E ' ' 5--.L-E !'.Hl!"In"l'!ll11lll1lIl'1""""IIlIlIImIll111llIl II llllllllllllll 11111111 1111 1111 lm 'Sw v' X X Y S ii 'v,6'f"1Q1i 1 if I 7 4 mmm ummm: zmm1mrmnnmmm.m.nnnmm muummnunmmmmmnmm nmllllllll 5 then to floors at the corner of 23rd Street and Second Avenueg and finally in 1891, 5 Hx E T. 5 to its present location, the six story building Q50 x 100 feetj, 205-207 East 23rd 'V : In 1918 the Trustees acquired by purchase the six story fireproof building 'l E Street-occupying the entire premises. 5-23 sl 1 fNos. 209-1 1-131 adjoining the old building. This addition gives a frontage of i 1 E 5 5' E E E is E E-:E 5 L 5 s E ri.: 5 7 Tl g E - E lil E E E I E .is sei "E if: P42 Eli' ld 31- 5 PIB HIE 1 E FW ' 1 2 Q 1 2 s fl FOURTH COLLEGE BUILDING - D f 23RD STREET AND 2ND AVENUE if 5 . , E S . 31111 I' um' , an 'Ill ull l H, un u I lh 13-asa I 1, ,llnulln LE I.. UE!!!!!P!1F"!12'uTii?1W1ra:::!1'F!!!11-ffa'f'r,'ll r ,,If.v'f1'r2f.7lP!.! 1'tzzirfiftf'vauiW!!"1..,!1G:l3 .. U31 X "v V 1111 fl" , 1, C ,.........., G a'1, n". ','4. f 1: . .,-"' ' f .A X 3' ,""'q, il ,V ,Jr Z '-... .. ff WF, - 4 - ihfl-WL! 1 N J Y 1 T-1232-'l-mf :Es - .,....,, ,-A.l I -L IAIIVA , .-.I 8 6 5 Ill! 41 u1"',l I 4- ., O 1' 9 X A mp J. J x , X 5 J V K' "' eq Q IU I 1 X 'P ' JH! 9 2 x N ' Q' 1' E ,f jf 5 x f I Q x I ' K l 'P' -v E s .Y x " 'Yugi ' . ,1" 'flzfzffll C. E. Marvin, D'D.s , , '-.,,,, W f H' 'ri 041.2 I . .,K"..J,1,Qp,,: Li, I 1241 ? ' WN' ik' V " .'-ww 1 up New e is wire. , if 125 feet on 23rd Street Extensive alterations were made New laboratories were , Z 7- built The various clinics such as the Operative Oral Surgery X-Ray Ortho- gii dontia and Exodontia were moved into the new building and equipped with mod- : Z .E ern appliances This change has added untold teaching facilities : - Since 1865 there have been twenty-seven incumbent professors--nine of them ' E served their terms of service prior to 1869 1 : E : Of the incumbent professors since 1865 the length of service of six is remark- E E E able Professor Faneuil D Weisse M D 1865-1915 deceasedj Professor E 5 E - Frank Abbott M D 1868-97 Cdeceasedj-he had been a clinical lecturer from : E : 1866 Professor Alexander W Stein 1868-96 resigned because of failing health ' E S -he had been Demonstrator of Anatomy from 1866 Professor F LeRoy Sat- : terlee M D Ph D 1869 to July 1916 Professor J Bond Littig D D S 1877- Q n. E - 1908 deceased he had been connected with the college from 1869' Professor a ', F.: E Alfred R Starr 1884 to 1924. E ' 5 - After 1869 prior to the election of Professor J Bond Iittig D D S to the y 2 E chair of Mechanical Dentistry in 1877 C A Woodward DDS occupied the 5 : T X Q chair from 1869-73 and C E Marvin D D S filled the chair from 1873-77 " . Q: 2 J Bethune Stein M D succeeded his father in 1896 to date Alfred R Starr . : 5 M D DD S, who had been Professor Abbotts assistant for eleven years, suc- 1 , - E A E ceeded him in 1897 and served up to October, 1924. Ellison Hillyer, D.D.S., Sc.D., gfm E who had been Professor Littig's assistant for thirteen years, succeeded him in 1907. U ARE 5 5 The Deans of the Faculty have been: Professor Norman W. Kingsley, 5 X 5 5 D.D.S., 1865-693 Professor Frank Abbott, M.D., 1869-18973 Professor Faneuil in i 5 .5 E 5 51.5 D. Weisse, M.D., 1897-19153 Professor Alfred R. Starr, M.D., D.D.S., 1915 to gli October, 1924. Professor Charles Vetter, D.D.S., Acting Dean from November, to date. From 1866 to 1891 a two year course to the degree was required, from 1891 until 1917 a three year course was in existence, and since 1917 a four year course ii .A s Q has been in effect. 5 2 The length of the college session from 1865-66 to 1895-96 was five monthsg 3 ll if-E 1924, to October, 1925. Professor Holmes C. Jackson, Ph.D., from October, 1925, 54 1 from 1896 to 1905 it was seven and a half monthsg from 1905 to 1925 it has been 5 ?3E: eight months. In 1925 an eight and a half months' course began. 5 5 Up to the session of 1903-04, inclusive, the didactic instruction by lectures g g E L, E . . . 5 E fig was given to the entire student body, first, second and third-year classmen attend- gig Tung it. I ' lum-. :fn ,1:.I111ill, 'n-il n iflilll mllllul' 1mlrnI iqllullli-ivm: annual- 'mmhx all .n. i:um..n1i ii ,i1ln i.llilmuin U91ll'llllllllllllIllIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllll ll. WE ,rl llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll hiumiivll.. di11n..llhi'9i. Sei' "Fel '- ..:.i M. Q 4 . . ' g Q Q " E E E ' Z E : - 5 s Z ' . C . 2 E :I E 5 - Q C D . 1 4 E E E A E Q 9 9 9 , - . ., i ry E N E C D! 9 M E Ex? ' I . . , ,l l E A A A 5 2 S . 1 U 1 5 1 1 I, E E f 5 , . . , . . ., , ff l : N s - , . -, - . , : 9 X E 5 . ., . . . 1 i1 X E E g ing the same lectures for the three collegiate years. In 1904-05 a graded course of E E 7 : , lectures for first-year classmen was established, attendance upon which was : H optional to second-year and third-year classmen. The second-year and third-year classmen continued attending the same lectures during their second and third year. HIE . . . . fs -s 9:2 The latter feature was imperative in order that students might be better prepared ggi 5'5 :- I 1 for the taking of the license examinations of the State Board of Dental Exam- iners these examinations commenced in 18955 than they could be were the curricu- - "" lum of the second and third-year sessions divided into two graded courses . 5 1 The curriculum has been an evolutionary one--the methods of fulfilling it 1 r having been governed by the space available in the college premises But the llllllllll ug-ax ' I llll H, I h 'B-3.551 ,lllllll lp QE C ' E.: xi , 5 1 'f . 3 . -' r sl if . as 1251 4,533 ' llll I 1 lllll 22 an I llln nnunnnnnnuunnulpnfunnnllnnu i :nannnnu llll ll N55 l lm .lnl n lnnnnnnunlnnlnn mil il 1 il' ' ' '5 fx' Q 3 A , V 1 lll ll Ill lllllllllllll WI ll 2 1 :T if' 5 NEW BUXLDING E 'Ni 5 E , .. E .. 5 A trend of the work maintained through the years is embodied in the opening para- gl: EE graph of the annual announcements, "The purpose of the institution is to educate 5,-:E E A 209 EAST 231111 smear E 'E 5 'vi E'-5. men to practice dental surgery as a specialty of medicineg therefore the curriculum includes the fundamental departments of medicine with operative dental surgery f Y 1 3 ' 5 S 5 and oral prosthetics. The lectures on the fundamental departments of medicine are X specially directed to the needs of the dental surgeon." l From 1866 to 1891 the college premises only admitted of educational work , by didactic lectures, clinics and inflrmary practice. In 1891, when the college E moved to its present building the faculty were enabled to progressively fit up lab- E S ' : oratories for practical work. Practical chemistry and normal histology were the . . . 9 E first opened. In 1894 additional laboratories were opened for the conduct of graded E 5-' E E "Practical Classes"-for first-year, second-year and third-year classmen-to afford 5 E Q'-'Q opportunities for personal work and direct demonstrations of every feature of the E - i s vii 2 1 technique of operative dental surgery and oral prosthetics. The work of the - "Practical Classes" and the plant of the laboratories have been perfected and 'X tai 'AKC its 51 5 Q E E 3 5 E E E E E : e S 1 1 E 5 ENE 345 1 E 12 E N 3 E S 5 added to from year to year. 1: i i From 1866 to 1894 students who applied for their first registration, who did ' , not hold a diploma 'from a public school or credentials from a higher grade insti- tution, were required to submit to an examination, conducted by the Dean, as to , Q! their proficiency in public school subjects - In the spring of 1894 the Board of Trustees and Directors received from , ' the Regents of the University of the State of New York a communication to the . pf, 1 effect that they would not consent to recognize the degree of D D 8 conferred : --v Q3 0911 Eli: 5.5 Q: U 1 e , 111,,,,,1, , ctutr 4 , e , ,,,, i ,,,,, ,, lu 1 , i 1 ,, ,et 1261 f IN! I... ll lnunnuumu u I ll' il In lull' mum 'ill I ,llllllllllllIlllllllllllllllllllllllllll llll I NEI? l I mmmm n Ill ni ii un' lil' ll upon any graduate who did not hold the academic diploma of the State of New York or credentials of a preliminary education equivalent thereto After a conference of Professor Faneuil D Weisse M D appointed with power to act by the Board of Trustees and Directors with the Regents office the New York College of Dentistry accepted the establishing of definite prelim inary educational requirements' she was in this respect the first dental institution J Wci- lllhl : of the country to do so It was decided to enter upon an annual progressively r1s 2 f 2 ing scale of preliminary educational requirements at this time the Regents pro- " 5 3 mulgated the Dental Student Certificate to be required to be held by students : 2 To obtain the Dental Student Certificate first matriculates of 1894-95 were to E be required to have a preliminary education the equivalent of that required for a E - Medical Student Certificate of that year first matriculates of 1895-6 the - 2 f : equivalent of 12 academic counts ' first matriculates of 1896-97 the equlvalent of Z 2 5 24 academic counts first matriculates of 1897-98 the equivalent of 48 academic 3 1 counts or the academic diploma-the Certificate earned for the above respective rx 5 : years to be filed within one year after the first matriculation ' first matriculates of 2 '- : 5 1898-99 the equivalent of the academic diploma or 48 academic counts the ' 1 5 E Certificate to be filed at the time of first matriculation Beginning with the E - 5 ly E session of 1916-17, the full 60 counts were required, the student entering without X - E f E conditions. E These requirements were rigidly enforced when, in 1897-98, the first-year ,ii E , 5 classmen numbered but fifty-eight instead of the usual previous classes of one Sf ? VI Q -E hundred or more. This small first-year class of 1897-98 brought the question of 1 E : : 5-E 512 preliminary education to a crisis-the same conditions existed in the other dental institutions of the State--and the Regents reduced the preliminary educational :,. E ' requirements for the "Dental Student Certificate" to three years of high school, or ki I : glx 36 academic countsg subsequently adding the proviso that a student not holding his 36 counts at the commencement of his second lecture session could enter the same and also his third session and take the graduation examinations at the close i 'A of his third session, his degree and also his admission to the license examinations L s E :E 1 5 l Q being withheld until two years after the obtaining of the last of his required aca- - : ..- P it l E 2 E demic counts. . 5.-E :E 2 335 During the session of the Legislature of 1901 a bill was presented without Li: 5'-bi the previous knowledge of the Regents' office or the dental institutions of the - E - E Fl! :: 2 E am: L., State-containing the provision of the immediate requirement of a preliminary --1- . . . . . E - : E g education for the obtainmg of the "Dental Student Certificate" equivalent to E 5 a 3 -E : r is Jbiqqii I' 'lm.:'IlIlIK'1l1!I 1:-:qw-I.: Illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll I' - nuuunu uuus uuimuumuumnulllil uz""l'2'mlliIlrillllln---.ml 1 if if .ma lui mf W im ... if ,,,, ,,, . ,,ll.,,,,. -, I ll , - ,u Il lllllllll ll Ill .- . ...ix V. , v., . . . - ?. 1 i D9 , I I , s 9 E E 5 - l E , E i ' , 'S E E . - 5 : : 5 E - 2 E 2 : ? as as u E E : u ,aa . E E : u is , - ,IE a lg ' , ' 5 ,pr E 9 E ' ' ly E :.- - 5 1 E E X E cc H E f E E Q 'K EA 5 s 9 s E X- 3 Ax n H I . Rf r M ' f 2 four years of high school, or 48 academic counts. The New York College of Dentistry and University of Buffalo Dental Department with the co-operation of the Regents' office opposed the bill., because of the abruptness of the transition from SUE 36 to 48 counts, with the result of the postponement until January 1, 1905, for E3 Q. the preliminary educational requirement equivalent to four years of high school, or FL! 48 academic counts, to go into effect. From 1901 to January 1, 1905, the require- 546 2 ments that had been in effect from 1897 to 1901 were continued. Since January 1, if lp 1905, the legal right of students matriculated prior to January 1, 1905, to obtain 1' 'If y the "Dental Student Certificate" under the requirement of three years of high 5 if school, or 36 academic counts, has been and is maintained, while all students 1 UE ,. H.- ...... 2,2 ......, ., .,.---.- luulll"' I V 1 "ww-Inq IIIIIIIIIIIIV' 4 ,,....93l I-fa, :...,..55W,,Hllll 1,, yin' ,nr ,W lllqpi,,,..a-fiafewnaiu llllll ,..., in ... iiui -... "" il la h ii 6 :l ull """ iiimr- .vlli'l'..llil' -inniigliif . 1271 ' ,vim lrygu 5 11653 uv i' 4 "ii iii ff- . lirst matriculated since January 1 1905 have been required to hold a preliminary E . : l' education equivalent to 45 new or 36 old academic cgunts before entering their ' -I 5 5 first session and 60 new or 48 old academic counts before entering their second 53 - session. : : The requirements to enter upon the study of dentistry was again increased - - - 5 in 1921 which was the completion of one year of work in physics in an approved - : : E high school and in addition one year of instruction in an approved college of 5 : E liberal arts and science after the completion of an approved four-year high school E Z - .- coursebased upon eight years of elementary preparation The year of college : 5 "' instruction shall be not less than three year-hours six semester hours each of ' E 1 English of biology of chemistry and six year-hours of electives from the follow- A- - : ing. a modern foreign language mathematics history technical drawing shop E 2 I : practice for admission after January l 1926 satisfactory evidence of the com- : . 5 pletion of two years of instruction in an approved college of liberal arts and ' '-1 . 2 science after the completion of an approved four-year high school course based : : L. : upon eight years of elementary preparation The content of the course shall be -1 - 5 - J E year of instruction of not less than three year-hours six semester hours each Q . - : E of English, of biology, of chemistry, of physics, and electives sufficient to make up 5 E 5 E a full complement of work for the student during his two years of college study. E g - . , f . 5 : g Ai E At the opening of the college in 1866 members of the Board of Trustees and 5: 5 if E Directors contributed about S4,000 to effect the same, which, however, carne back E K5 E :A E to them from coupon session-attendance tickets which were taken by students. E fi 2 Q During the years the college received one State appropriation fl873j of S3,75O, Q A E 215 and for one year a city appropriation of S500, and two donations from Dr. Stephen A. Main of S100 and 51,000 respectively. Outside of these items of one loan and 'g g four donations, the college has, during the sixty years, maintained an independent and self-supporting career and carried a surplus fund. There never has been F I Y KU has been party to the same-for example, in the purchase of the present college 5 f building, the transaction was in the name of Corporation, and it is so recorded. . 5 2 5 In her career of sixty years there has been at times almost the impossible to 2 5 be accomplished, and disappointments have had to be accepted. In spite of all g 5. these, by the unflinching tenacity and purpose and indomitable perseverance of her personal ownership or stock company basis. In all transactions the N. Y. C. D. I l 5 E E faculty members, seconded by the ever-ready support of her non-professorial Trus- ? i tees and Directors, the work has been crowned with success, as evidenced b the ,....... Y -. E 2 national and international reputation of the N. Y. C. D. and the outcome of the g g f' Il.nll:""l "" F Illlmlllilllllllll lllllli lllllllllllllllllllulv' ' IIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIlllllllllllllllllllllllllll ' "" Pnl: Itlugllillll l"' 'Huw K I nil-1 r...fire'--'-Ma .. ...... QQ.. r fi-"'-i------'rrv.f,f.1. ' Sai. 5 in 1' , vf , , b e 525 c 9 ifs 5-g . c D 4-1 2 - E s 5 E i ' E E E E ' ' 5 s 5 . 1 : 5 . . s , E 5 C J' ' ' E- Q ' , , ,Qt , 9 9 E. E E al E n E A E Q E s K K 9 9 Q I gi? . E12 a 5 . . 5 sql E ' . C 5. , 2 As S i 2 ' : r 5 5 Il fi V : professional careers of her alumni to be found today in every civilized country. As early as January 3, 1916, the Board of Trustees appointed a Committee to investigate the possibility of securing for the college a university relation. Ever 51,2 since that day many obstacles had to be removed, so that such an affiliation could gig mi take place. A new era was soon to dawn and on the 12th day of March, 1925, a Lg merger with the New York University was consummated. The great benefits of gl ' this merger will soon be evident to the medical and dental professions and indi- ll E rectly to the laity. The merger will give to the dental college the assistance, facili- ji ties and cooperation of the medical school in furthering research and in teaching I 1 ' the basic sciences so necessary in preparing dental students. . La gig ...ix ---'-1 f. -- ll0IIl"' f U 1 1 "lIlIll - f f-----f A--we-flrp I 1 1"'.1ts'lllIf1ifi.mfrffrfi'lititfaa1"11"IllE'1f'lt"l I1 l"' .1---.1."u1:ifi.Wafitmm..ilfvn1'ifs"in K, l"':"J.ulr- ...,"'flII... 'im n... ""' . ll I Il .. ""' '..nlll' illlllli ..i. -:un-b":"'l.vi mm 5 v I L ' T M., I f. I U' ' 13:7 '!f',j:14,' ,WM 1 I r , 1 r I 4 l I CHANCELLOR ELMER ELLSWORTH BROWN OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION OF THE UNIVERSITY Chancellor ELMER ELLSWORTH BROWN, PH.D., I,I,.D. Regisirar Bursar MII.TON EARI,Y I.OOM1s, A.M. LEROY ELWOOD KIMEALL, A.M Dean of the Faculties MARSHALI, STEWART BROWN, A.M. COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY Dean Associate Dean HOLMES CONDICT JACKSON, PH.D. CHARLES VETTER, D.D.S. I I w l29I 11 "H in WEN? my JM: IICPCQI 5114 i coUNc1L 5 i Q2 is fl 7- The Council of New York Urrrvorsrry incorporated rho 18th of April 1831 ? 2 is a self-perpetuating body consisting of thirty-two members each holding office ,- - for four years or until his successor is elected One-fourth of the members go out - 5 of office each year on the fourth Monday! of October when their successors are E 5 - elected by the Council : - j 2 ' OFFICERS . 5 2 : President--George Alexander D D LLD : 2 "'. Vice-President-Eugene Stevenson AB LLD "' E Secretary-George A Strong 1 lf Treasurer-William Morgan Kingsley A M LL D : - 5 Dale of MEMBERS Expiration of ' : Election Term - - 887 fx- :i 5125: 2 -2 Els B ,,"' E Y F 1 1 1 5,5 E E .. .. 4-1 E E s ,-..-.-c 892 898 1898 899 1903 1903 1904 1904 1905 1907 1908 1909 1910 1910 1911 1913 1914 1919 1919 1919 1919 George Alexander D D LL D John Pixley Munn A B M D Willis Fletcher Johnson A 'VI L H D Thomas Edmund Greacon William Morgan Kingsley, A.M., L.L.D. Clarence Hill Kelsey, A.M., LL.B. William Henry.Porter, LL.D. Eugene Stevenson, A.B., LL.D. James Warren Lane, Sc.B. Frank Arthur Vanderlip, A.M., LL.D. George A. Strong J ames' Abbott, A.B. Benjamin Thomas Fairchild, Ph.M. Alexander Steel Lyman, A.B., LL.B. Robert MacKenzie, D.D., LL.D. Elmer Ellsworth Brown, Ph.D., LL.D. Finley Johnson Shepard William Russell Cox, A.M., LL.B. Joseph Smith Auerbach, A.M., LL.B., Litt.D. James Aloysius O'Gorman, LL.D. Charles Hitchcock Sherrill, A.M., LL.D., F.R.S. Percy Selden Straus, A.B. 1927 1924 927 927 1926 1927 1927 1924 1925 1925 1924 1924 1925 1924 1927 1925 1924 1924 1926 1926 1926 1926 E 'ANS E , E 5,41 E : 5'-' E R .E 5-fi? 5573 3 E V llmlxgull vvflnf :I ll-qu-T: llguunlulnllnllluulmlullllll Illlllurl' -NlIIU11uluummumullnllnmlllulnlnl. tlfu----rim il:ililllllF'Ilm'4 nnarliii iiilu rrliimm I!?:,llIllllllllIIl lllllllllll I llllli ilt 'QE .el Ill lllllllllll ld ET' hliunniyiiiiil. ,d,nlr ..'lh'.1 . 4 ,Keir all .-f L. fr.. sl 12 - r , , , 5.2: 5 5 , ' S 5 5 . : E E E E E E - : : 2 2 , . ., . . E ' : E E E S , o -, . . E E 2 5 . E E qs -U , ., . . j r S 2 A 5 E 5 5 1 2 1 , . ., . . El S E Q , E 5 H , 1 - , . ., . . E 5 5111: 1 , .1., . . . 1 E03 E 1 1 E f E z X 1 : : sk? EVE 5 E ofa Fi! 1919 1921 1921 1921 1922 922 1922 1923 924 Arthur Smith Tuttle, Sc.D., C.E. Edwin Louis Garvin, LL.D. George Zabriskie, LL.B., D.C.L. Thomas Coleman Du Pont, D.C.S., LL.D. f - John Joseph Carty, Sc.D., LL.D., D.E. William Henry Nichols Sc D LLD Percy S Young B C S Cornelius Woelfkin D D Litt D LL D Nathan L Miller LLD 1926 1925 1925 1925 1925 1926 924 92 926 Es: rr- 57,11 '-fx 5 , :' 11 R l . , . . . , . ., . . 1 1 f ' , . ., . ., . . i J' Uv 'r'-wru-In e"':::'r "'-'-'-'-- 1-nv """ ' "" 'W' ' ' ""' ""' ' umlllllf' i i,11s51!!!!!!P"s1rir1 'e ,rr51F1a:::r?'F!!!11-ffr'f1.'11 11'.11111.711!!!EP"1:z11f1zmf1r511i1a:11!!!!!b:f1.,f L 1301 Ill" 7 fllf ' " '70, 'I' " "'lll. 7 " ' mi hmllil '.' lillllllllllllllllllllllllllll llnn nlmumll K WE? lllll Ill llnllll I llll llllllllll nmlli ii I m. 1' -. ihl- :':,X A' 32 ,,,,,,,,,,, H' lllllllllll N 5, 111 i f t : I E a 1 uunnlrnmp mln i ALFRED RUSSELL STARR Dr. Starr was born in New York City, November 8, 1858, the son of Dr. Ira and Jane fHuttonj Starr. He obtained his early education in the public schools of New York and later attended the College of the City of New York for two years. In 1875 he began the study of medicine at the College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York and received from this institution the M.D. degree in 1879. He then attended the New York College of Dentistry, from which institution he graduated in 1880. From the beginning of his association with dentistry, Dr. Starr was partic- ularly interested in the educational aspect of dentistry. He became associated with the New York College of Dentistry as clinical instructor in 1885 and also acted as assistant to the professor of operative dentistry, in which capacity he continued to serve until 1897. In 1897 he'was appointed professor of operative dentistry, succeeding Professor Frank Abbott, who died in that year. In 1898 he was elected to full professorship in that department and also became consulting fi F1 llll' lllllllll Illllllllll Ill Illllll lllmflflilmllllllllflllll W' llllllllllllllllllllllil lllmll mmmmun llul egg '5 lllllllllll 1 lilmnllll li 4: 'E E ?'2 ll 3 Z 2 2 E :-135 gi : : : : F E '- -." - -...g S 7 7 E Q E 5 7 E E . E 1 Nll E 'li 2 1' Y' li 1 AE E k 1 - AE surgeon to the infirmary of the college. In 1915 Dr. Starr became dean of the New York College of Dentistry, suc- ceeding Professor Faneuil D. Weisse, and in 1918 he gave up active practice to devote his entire time to college work. Dr. Starr was long and favorably known ET-a ' in the educational circles of the profession and was for many years a directive Q inHuence in dental education matters. ,, t : 2 i H111 iff: iii QE Q! 2 I K x fi iw ,f 1 I E 1 Q1 Q I4 lmlmml ,... - ................. . ..... I- 'Il lIIl"u , """ 1" 'A"' 1 ""' "" ' "" llllllllllll ' 1 or ---J 'mv if' l"' ' ""'l ""' ll f 'rel'-iw.-.-f I" in 'F.!!!!L-ff,fl,'..l.. . ,.ll!c--!!.!.EP' 1311 . lllllnln I llllllllll ll num 1m11m:11mullIlllll1l umfu mul xi M ' E qtuuu A-E .lm ww dw f1-Nw M' ' .1 " "1 '- 1-Ni. 1 -11 ' " 1 f fM11111u !f,-Ir, -VGV , , " X ' " , 1 1 gf ? T1ZlQSH'lQSlOf ,. w 2Lf 1 1 1 CASTON I ABAT I xMEs GWATHMEY I ru exsor General Ana sllzwvza I rnfesslr Condurtzue 411a1..rtlzL.1ia JAMES GXVATII MEY 41" ,J 1. J- . . , ' "'. 'Ju-J' . " T: ,yr-,xv 471.1345 Q . JJ' ,X 1, 1 V 3: . 1 I -.1 'ri .' q-. ,z Il N' i' , ll 5 A A I 1 llll 11 5' E-gig .- I E 5 E Ei? E E i: -.: 5 5 sg lf 'mm :ll lglllllmmqu Zia. pllllllllllllllllIllllllllllllllllllll llllu ,I Ugmnuumn uuummumuumm tl -ulvmmlnlz' II Ill nm. 1 ll 1:1 I " " sn- D 1 1 1 '- ll 1 1+ .1. ' .mr ..llu... -. hlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll I1 Y? JI lm llllllllllllllllllllllIllllllllllllllll .T I' ....:1ll..n111.,lhH..1. J M13 if 4f.x - - 'YV' 3?- gb E: x fi! I 1 fywy 2 f i, Z f 1 nfl' Q2 7211 fri? 77,1 ,Z b y if if JH, I ke. : - 0' 1 , Ailwf 1 12 ,M ff f M f. ff ,U : 5 gf 1 F1 L S ,1 1 J 0111 -..... ....- EW E': ff ff 15 ,fm - 1 E E 3 E ff 11111 " 112 f 5 1 5 E 5 5 11 1 1111 1 1 E E .- 1 1 1 1 W ,ff N V 1, 1 E a E 11 Eu f' ' ' 2 E 2 Y 1 M? 4 115 f X X , 1 Z 7 12' M - E 5 f 'L , ' 5 1 ' 5 5 : Z X 14 424 A f x D gs E : f ffl 1 If 5- X4 X X Laran 11 21, F Y I 441 5 E 3 1 , ff fy, 1,, f, 11 ,f f, ,f y 5 - E E ,fl ' I 1' 1 f 1 fff W P1 11, y 1 1 ,E 1 17 2 1 1? X 5 E 11 1 Q X11 Q1 gfx g 1 4 ff, 1.1 I1, I E 1 Q J f I f 1 1' f 1 I , . E 11 X . L 4 : : N E j E , 1' ' X I A 5 I 1 N 5 a..- E E 'IF 'f 5? '10 iii 2,5 E H1 i S A GENERAL ANAESTHESIA CLASS up 9? :,. 50? Snfg i El Q ' , 1 ' NK K 1' 1 .E E111 gm " """"' 1'v1r""' III' l"' 1 1 f l! ""' I -5 Ml- yi i1111!!!!!!!!F"1111i'1'?111f11:r1fs::1!1"F!!!!!1-111.'11 1 112 .f1f.2f-1!!!.! llmnl W' Ga 'I Ill Q Il Il 'S Ill 'IIIIIIII 1321 .amfa.a.a lllllf yromza in .il , . . ' 'li Illmumnnummm uunnuuunln num ull ll 257 Im ul nunnnlunn n in u nl lin' . . I. .li i . f B V. fl ' I fl . ' J T GWATHMEY M D .. f From the earliest times man has sought to assuage grief and pain by some E .. -: 2 means of dulling consciousness The Bible and the Talmud contain references to : z the ancient practice of inducing sleep by artificial means . Moses never would have .. - 5 - written that God caused a deep sleep to fall upon Adam had not the people of - 5 g E his day known something of anesthesia as we know it today An Egyptian carving E f : : dating 2500 B C has lately been discovered illustrating how anesthesia may be : E : produced by means of pressure Chinese literature also has references to the use E - of mandragora and other herbs for drilling pain During the classic era of Grecian g- -4 : literature Homer tells us that Helen of Troy puts '1-drug into the wine to lull S E Q p E all pain and anger and bring forgetfulness of every sorrow Five hundred years - E ii .Z later Herodotus wrote of the Scythians inhaling fumes of hemp which produced - f 5 - an exalted mental state followed by sleep Later on other Greek historians Dio- : A E scorides and Galen refer in unmistakable language to like practices The chron- : 5 f I icles of ancient Rome furnish similar evidence Pliny describes the employment E J 2 Q 1 - of mandragora to relieve the sufferings of those condemned to crucifixion Unques- : E E tionably certain practices and drugs that would make anesthesia safe have been E E Txjfitl I im.. 'II Illlllllll ,Ill all ullllllllllllllllllllIllllllllllllllllllllllq ,I IlIIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllu ill" INIIIT. III: mul. K fi ff, if-nm, . -fi .1 cr Q A SHORT HISTORY OF GENERAL ANESTHESIA lg, 5 5. " 5--, . . , . . : 5 E . . E : 2 E - E E ' ' ' f E E 3 - c E E .- 1 . E Q - . . 1 E 5 ' E I - E E . " n E E its ' ' : - ' 2 2 2 . , , E 1 E s 1 2 . , . ' E Efll, 2 - 3 ffxs 2 N S ' E 'is . ll ' ' f E 5 A E lost to the world following the many useless wars that from time to time have if E gf, aj blotted out civilization The art of embalming 'is practiced by the Egyptians is 5 'tg E E extinct today. Shakespeare refers to the state of anesthesia as we know it today, E E E l VE but this was probably poetic license. He makes Cornelius prescribe a drug which 2 l E 5 5 'L 3 gg "Will stupefy and dull the sense awhileg but there is No dangeruin yvhatvshow 'of death it makes, More than the locking up the spirits a time, To be more fresh, reviving". y The beginning of modern scientific anesthesia was foreshadowed by the dis- 11 1 Q covery of the synthesis and properties of ether about 1540 by Valerius Cordus and 2 3 w by Priestly's discovery of oxygen and nitrous oxide in 1772. In 1800, Sir Hum- 3 E , 5 phrey Davey stated that "Since nitrous oxide seems capable of destroying physical 5 E E-iQ pain, it may be used in surgical operations where there is no great effusion of zl: ' :- 2 E:-"-'E blood". , - :E E Sulphuric ether was used in 1805 by Warren of Boston on patients suffering with phthisis, and in 1806 in attacks of asthma. A paragraph appeared in 1818 QE--'E in "The Quarterly Journal of Science and Arts" that is usually attributed to 5 E Faraday,'in which it is stated that "when the vapor of ether is mixed with common Q air and inhaled, it produces effects very similar to those occasioned by nitrous oxide". The use of ether and nitrous oxide for other purposes than anesthesia is ire an interesting study in evolution. 5-5 The development of surgical anesthesia was a tragic story for those immedi- QE ately concerned. Henry Hill Hickman at twenty years of age becamea member kt E of the Royal College of Surgeons. He was a country practitioner in the little Eli 'M town of Ludlow, England, and made the first successful experiments upon lower 5 if I r 5 ' S ellis ...E o. . 55: 'f """ gmmu-" r 1 "'llll"lIl - fi u n f- 1 'Ig'wwlllllllllgliglmilwiEiqiwarunuglllllllllf 1:--up 1" IM.-1.. flllllllllmrrmimmfifrlfffni,mlglq1lllIIIIIWf,L"lll -- ks il":"JullllI' .n,irlill:lu. '1lIlu.i'.-I' .. li l I ll ., D lnl' inlllll' .1luilii..i. 'fllll-5""'A ,ll 1331 . 'Il 111' ' lll ' ' ltxcyl ""' 1 I 'll .. '.' llllllllll lllulunu an uunnuunuvun r sunu ununa sl ll 257 In mu .............. . . in if ' ,,l",., E 2 galllgf ? K5 3-E F '? - 1 E 3 2 gif if inimals between the years l8'7O and 1878 His British colleagues were unim- pressed by his eFforts to relieve pain and French surgeons were no more sym- pathetic in their attitude Hickman practically sacrificed his career and life in hi' attempts to gain recognition of the value of his discovery for relieving pain during evere surgical operations dying at the early age of twenty-nine Iater both ether and nitrous oxide were used especially by medical ,rtudents for inhalation to the point of intoxication or stage of excitement It remained for Dr Crawford W long a graduate of the University of Pennsyl- vania and a country practitioner of Georgia to intelli ently employ ether for surgical operations long continued to use ether in his practice from time to time but he did not publish his discovery nor make any claim,for priority until after the successful demonstration of Morton and so is necessarily deprived of the larger honor which would have been his had he been less modest Iong was not embittered as were others advancing their claims for priority and is the only one who died a peaceful death in the sixty-second year of his age In 1844 Horace Wells a dentist of Hartford Conn. discovered independently of Long the anesthetic qualities of nitrous oxide and used this gas for the painless extraction of teeth. In 1845 he attempted a public demonstration before the Harvard Medical College, which proved a disastrous failure. A sensitive man, he was overwhelmed with mortifica- tion, and felt himself disgraced. He continued, however, to use the gas in his private practice. Four years after his discovery, his reason having given way early in 1848, he died by his own hand. On March 8, 1847, Flouerens, a Frenchman, pointed out the anesthetic quali- ties of chloroform and ethyl chloride, but his observations did not attract general attention. During the same year, and independently, Dr. Simpson fafterwards Sir James Y. Simpsonj consulted Waldie, a chemist of Liverpool, who suggested the use of chloroform. On November 4, 1847, Simpson discovered the anesthetic properties of chloroform and made known the fact in a paper on November 10. William T. G. Morton, a successful dentist of Boston, and a former pupil of Wells, demonstrated the anesthetic properties of ether, as far as we know, entirely independent of Long's discovery. The ether was used at the suggestion of Charles T. Jackson, a chemist of Boston. Constant worry and anxiety that he would not be credited for his share in the discovery of ether caused a mental derangement in 1873 from which'he never recoveredg Dr. Jackson died August 29, 1880. Morton ,.s Illlhuirull E 'fi 2 its ata il' A I lll 5 E 'E E .E 5 5 Q E 2 : E E : .- 5 r . 'auf "" uv-'H "' """ "" ' " ul- L111391111..1"!!l!2TEWW!fffrf?i:!!F F....l-f1Yl,'..l.. H926 .,..'.f'i'17f..l!... li'1::?111ifffun25ii'EeaTi'2l!!' E was unquestionably the first man to give a successful public demonstration of E g 5 : r lpn ,Tm HKQWI iiliwli.-:::.'lI Ilmmumlmlunnuu null l 'Q 'lullmlllmnlnmllllulllllllllllllllll ll u:"'lvH: Elll I I l"' 'Im' x ll-1' ,lb 'W-1--"f"' ffvmfn . IM-EV l -1---'Il-W--1--rea-..n l- r'e1ff'a : I ,gym sl llr u I L V lllll I I lllll ll I III ll I 'Tl I. x . dia' gk 2 2 . . .. .. . ' ' E E-tg , ' 5 r-T.: 1 4 D 5 5 s . , . . E - A 1 , ' - : E : E C ' ' ' ' 5 E 5 . . . . , E 5 5 ' ' D Q E 5 5 ' E E 5 - 4 Q F G . 5 5 R Q , gl ll. 5 E .-2 - 4 , 2 E 5 1 2 ' ' E I Q 2 xv E 9 ' 1 9 2 E if , 3 1 9 s 9 g - I s :K N 3 . 1 E ,I E 2 ll ' E ' surgical anesthesia. This occurred in the Massachusetts General Hospital in the V 'A presence of the medical and surgical staffs, on October 16, 1846. The circumstances 1 5 E were very dramatic. .1-g Morton came into the amphitheatre late, delayed by waiting for the completion ' ' of a new inhaler. Just a few minutes before. Dr. Warren had remarked, "As Dr. 5 - Morton has not arrived, I presume he is otherwise engaged," apparently conveying 3 the idea that Dr.'Morton was not likely to appear. As he was about to proceed 1 is ith his operation, Morton entered. Amidst that sea of faces he saw not one which Q was sympathizing. Blank incredulity, or at the best, curiosity, alone was to be seen. 1 1 Warren, turning to him, remarked: "Well, Slf, y0l1r patient is ready". Adjusting 4 alla --- CMU :Z lin qi I-UE 95 'E F'5 r 9 E li ... EQS .2 ?-i 23 2 a 1, 3 4 U-ii llllll I I Y 1 um 1 i Ju n ll as II ll I ll ll In mul ,5-azz ll I u 1341 fy AIX: 'wr " 'J I I 'Ss llll I Till' I - llllllIIllllllIIIIllIllllllllllllllllllllllll I ll ll Ill Ill Illl llllllllllllllllll l l A M his ipparatus Morton calmly administered the 'anesthetic and turning to Dr. ,suriy- lll fllll ll -bi ' -. y 'U ' I , , -, , , , , , ggi X . l if :' N, H ,fi il fi ? fi l Q l 2 Warren, said: "Dr. Warren, your patient is ready". The silence of the tomb reigned in the large amphitheatre while Dr. Warren made his first incision through the skin and dissected out a large tumor, while the patient made no sign nor moved a muscle of his body. When the operation was completed, Dr. Warren turned to the audience and said slowly and emphatically: "Gentlemen, this is no humbug," and Bigelow remarked, "I have seen something today that will go around the world". A little over a month later, Oliver Wendell Holmes wrote a letter to Morton, dated November 21, 1846, suggesting that the state produced by the anesthetic should be called "anesthesia", as a term which "will be repeated by the tongues of every civilized race of mankind". In July, l868, Morton left his home for New York to reply to an article that had recently appeared advocating Jackson's claim as the discoverer of ether anesthesia. The agitation and extremely hot weather then prevailing affected him to such an extent that in driving through Central Park he lost consciousness and died while being taken to St. Lukels Hospital. Morton is the only physician in the Hall of Fame today. No new anesthetic of importance was discovered or developed for over seventy-five years. During this time nitrous oxide has been almost universally used by dentists while ether is the commonly accepted anesthetic for surgical operations, on April 27, l923, Arno B. Luckhardt, M.D., of Chicago, and his associates discov- ered and reported the analgesic qualities of ethylene QCQHU. Brown of Canada, about the same time and independently, announced the properties of the same gas. This gas is unquestionably safer than nitrous oxide, and today occupies a position between nitrous oxide and ether, both as to analgesia and anesthesia. The place it will finally occupy is yet to be determined, as it still is on trial. J, BNN? 3 J THHS l or x Ebfl :EL E fr , ll iii IE it i 0 J el .a -li i f 15' CONDUCTIVE ANAESTHESIA CLASS K' Tl' m In ll ,..... ........... ....., l Q' .- .... -wig IIIIIIUP' y -.,m,,ul . .....,.. ' ,. ,........ 2: ..... - ..,. Im ' hL- :Ln wwgr -,I 'n I pn H H mqlluml' na 1, julvl-Ld 's ?Ql!ll'!!F"!l?aa .s lwr-f:::!?'lflll-at.lll11926 .lf 11--f-ll.Jli'11:1 -im gl"1fi'laW'!llls5il l35l ll' -A"' I In . 1.lllllllllllllllllllllllllll u mn llll ll 'SE l ln mu n l .' . . I ,A 'lj fl L15 :jig-, 2. Fi: , - HAROLIJ D. Sm IOR - X- Przf sszr 2. , THOMAS DARLINGTON 5 :lg Associate Prof. ' 5 if ' 5 i. E gli T' l, 5 I I HAROLD D. SENIOR Inst. fGrussj EMANUEL I. DIAMOND Inst. fGrossj MARGARET HOSKINS Asst. Prof. fMirroj NIILTON D. OVERHOI,SER Inst. fMicraj E E E E Aff! EE A-E : E I . 5 GERALD C. PARKER NIARGARET HosK1Ns fbi 5-- E 5 E A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE DEPARTMENT OF : ,iwgtg .r ...A .Il ul.. , . I lumn Ill n .I llnunmm ll munumm ll . . ..nn ll . h. .1 gil! 1- 'E 5 E 5 E ? E 2 5 5 ' 3 E E E 5' 5 A .E in - . 'V gi 54 5 , ' ll 5 Og I ll i s ANATOMY 5 2 By H. D. SENIOR, M.D. 502 . . . . L5 The Anatomical Department of New York University, as at present consti- gi! tuted, traces its origin from the o enin of the Medical Colle e of the Universit of P S S Y I the City of New York in 1841. In 1898 the University Medical College united gl. A with the Bellevue Hospital Medical College to form the present University and Bellevue Hospital Medical College and took Over the new building of the latter, i 55 which, in its present enlarged form it still continues to occupy. a 5 Ellii pi"' H925 ""f""'5'J"'llIlilWif??Fi535'l"'i'E:'5riWllIllIH""1q qli""!'J.uil:- 'mud' 'lllllu-. "" JI.. ll - I Il ll -.IL--"..ulIlll' l liarlu' 'fllllug-l"'lJ.4I l36l 'Til S O70 E5-QS '4G'.'.T. Q....5 255 352- A90 wwe cm,-2 '-'O Ig"-'J Q:-vlfi 'll xff-:fi - mug V M: 'Jan :ffl-D' ngfb D3-I V338 3-1' rfwflii F' 752. 15 S uxnffop gist xnmg I X119 55m cf? ani C Zo.. gang EERE ws: . 'E GQ: 3-H 953 '40 esp mg? Xin,- lv T- lv-H.-fl 3555 X.llfb 2 :s Q. L4 O U1 2 5- 5-4 V UU '1 'E F' :s FY ,"X oo Xl T' to Xl 91 '-3 :- 0 F-7 :s TJ F? O E. 0 5 O EF' S. 'I 5. FY :r fb Z fb 2 '-4. O 'I F' G O CL' fb on FD III! 1 lllll luuu Ai At the time of the union of the two schools, George David Stewart, then pro- fessor of anatomy at the Bellevue Hospital College fand now professor of sur- geryj, became head of the consolidated anatomical departments. This position he vidual, Faneuil Dunkin Weisse H865-l9l5j, who upon his decease was succeeded by Thomas Darlington. In the earlier days of all three schools the anatomical department was pre- occupied mainly with the surgical application of the subject. The department of Hllllllllllllllllllllllllllll llllml l.nlllll7llluuu'uy'h, gf., III 1 unnmmmummmm:uumnunnnunui..1.MllIulni'L.aasief, r.. 3205 xmoc- g, on 20'-'sg at 'Dos-1-1 mmm P:- E'1,2,"' S',"::D'5,-1 ,-,- szsodeaema in ...Q ,,:rn..-1,.,, . 5:-w"FC""o9f- .. ?,N:f:3Q5"Z"'rbC h: :J-,-,'.24r:-Dr-B IV OwBE2ma2U" - 2.8 mvrgos- gg, L- ' IU Nhhuirr rr Zag-,gCll:5n.-5-JDO E -x3"r-f:.. V," E mC1J:1ggm-'CU Q2 : EZ'!:" nge' rn E oQ'E?,9h"D:R'32 E 'GSA Hmafgg? 5 2?-Siincsd 2 F 032' f-'FEOQ' 5 . , ... 5 fr?E92"3:"h'r 2 r-1 5' Z0 I 2253...-210300 E, 2VA":'n:2s: 5 E'59'2g5'U.53,4c'3 ' 2-Q-A:,Fc5.o.O" :- "" IJ -1 UQEFSA ' gwfi ,rig 1 gwxao 33755 3-13 3 'tgps Og-r'b',2.'. 'cg'-:'5'-5.."'?,g','f'f' 5 T1 P-' O - ages 2:5193 52:30 Q-F' S E V' np-"lg 5 of-XEC F-aff:-,.. 5 "'-of-1, r.: nf' E I-"' -ic -7' S 3,0035 'SU' E V10-1 BPUDE E ml 23, 04:-191 : ::004f+ 323m 5 7-7832.54 w. a+, 5 S Dv- 9'T'E.O- E'- BN S mis! .3 Qian gp,-D 'r' 'QCE1 -vs.: 2' fb:-' nm"U--- 1 C2130 515: Ecgoog- FFS' 'A D mx sang si lah-lm: :'::::t,, fr: ,-. In won.. "' mmmmn nmmnlmlnnrmill ' A 'sr-t., X. nnmmmnmmmnnnnnmmmmmmmm nmllllllllli. mmm WML um nmuuumiuuului WEW ..N X xxx Xe Q llllllllll u num mmummin xu.:auuullllllllllu1muumllIlll O H5 U fb :s :.'. U! P? '1 -4 5. "1 fb 5 S'-1 "1 F .- E fb Hs. O 'K E' P' E. :s rm a- fa fb :s :- fb .- Q. Hx O 'S :vw HN. ff se E 'D '1 V1 :- -4 2 2. : Ui fb E. 0: T warm 't"1'1"'5'wmmwm'1"1vwIuifuvmL mm f Q T X T xx-Q3 mullllllllllll llllllllllm - I Illllmlmm 5 XA g physiology was therefore forced, at it had been in England and in other colleges 5 g in this country, to teach as much microscopical anatomy as was needed as a pre- Ei-E liminary to the study of function. At Bellevue Medical College a separate chair " E is E """i ?'i 5 I I i LX l R E T E T, 5,3 7' E .1-1 1-1, ? E :IE ati 24: all! -A 5 - ' f HISTOLOGY RESEARCH LABORATORY 2 5 my mul -tl I llll i l I ul 1, ! ls.. lllllll Ill e i " n """""' l?Il '-"" I" "' ' ' ""l ""' ll II' Q'H5!l!!,.!F"!!::aa, QWr:ff:f::::r:: t.!!l.ffi1i1Ili. ll?.,i1'1f.-fill!!! e .! !!lQfJ l37l vim' " in 1 -w If llltizfi- . .1 ' E-.127-I 0 K . , . Wy.: 1 of normal histology was created in 1892 and the teaching of this subject was after- wards merged with that of pathological anatomy Under the department of path- ology Edward K Dunham the first incumbent of the chair organized the work in normal and pathological anatomy which continued its existence in the University - and Bellevue Medical College The laboratory work in microscopical anatomy and - embryology was latterly handled by G Reese Satterlee until the reorganization of lull: Ill' uuviiqm lllll lnulllll lllll' - the anatomical department in 1910 .. - 2 The work of some of those engaged in the teaching of anatomy in the two 3 o E1 o 93 ..- UI n I'-T' O 2. UI 'U 2. O '1 FQ O FY D' 2. 'I C E. O 5 27" W V1 U' ru ra IJ 'I ru Hs ra 'I '1 n O- F? O 5. w C3 W "I EY. n .- rs 5. ff ET UI '4 n N 'I U1 unllllllllllll Medical Violet The work of the anatomical department of the New York College of Dentistry may be outlined briefly here Faneuil Dunkin Weisse graduated at the University Medical College in 1863 the degree being conferred in the following year when he came of age He at once : - became assistant and prosector to Valentine Mott and soon afterwards became 'ET - one of the demonstrators of anatomy in the University Medical College At first 2 dermatology and surgical pathology attracted a good deal of his attention for he 5 was University lecturer in the former subject in 1865-74 and professor of the latter I W: - 1 E in 1875-76 he was also professor of surgical pathology at the New York College - 3 2 of Veterinary Surgeons from 1865 to 1875. In 1869 he founded the New York E E 5 'V 'X E - E ,xg Dermatological Society fnow the American Dermatological Associationj and, in E 5 :fl 2711 5 1875, organized the American Veterinary College, in which he was professor of gag E E surgical pathology from 1875 to 1876. E E 51112 The great and lasting interest of Weisse's life, however, was anatomy. He 2 1 E became professor of anatomy, surgical pathology and oral surgery at the New E 5 :-E surgical anatomy at the University from 1876 to 1889. His work at the New York 5-F : : York College of Dentistry in 1865 and held the professorshipof practical and EAE fi - College of Dentistry gradually came to occupy more and more of his time and he was elected to the deanship in 1897, a post which he held until his death. Weisse's well known "Practical Human Anatomy", New York, 1886, is illustrated by Q 1 A E . . . . 5 ' r 1 i supervision of the author, who made the dissections. gl 5 Q 5 The teaching of visceral and microscopic anatomy was conducted from 1869 to 2 5 Z3-'rg 1896 by Alexander'W. Stein and, from then on, by his son and successor in the 5-E - chair of physiology, John Bethune Stein. The latter, in addition to his teaching : fine photoengravings, nearly all of them original, executed by Cohn under the 2 5 Fl? -5 5 5 . . . 5 5 gi L E and other duties, was active in research. He published a preliminary study of "The Condition of the Teeth After Extirpation of the Contents of the Mandibular 2 Canal" QBrit. Journ. Dental Science 52, 947j and, in addition to many physio- 1 1 IIIH Ill llllllll ll Ulm' Wmtllllllllllllllllll lllllill llll llllllAlllHlHllllll1l we .4 Db V529 I 1. mmmmuimimmnmim. in un u num iumuiu u . .ima 4115 E 1-L v 1 ' - si, 73 . - ...f ' - E' E E it :I . " LET-E -in mmunmimmnnm mnmmmvlmmmmrumllr nnmmmumu ' , AHIT X N414 5 X v7 N , W. 'gag nnmwl nuunmnu rmuum....nnmrmnmmunnlnnimnml mmmmIllllllllL - -msd logical, pathological and historical papers, "A study of the maxillae with regard to their blood and lymph supply", Dental Items of Interest, 1908. Since then he has published a contribution to the much debated question of the manner of ter- if mination of the lymphatic capillaries in the connective tissue of the body fNew 'E York, l924j. ag In 1910 the anatomical department of the University and Bellevue Hospital Fi K' I Medical College was reorganized on a full-time basis for research and the teaching of medical undergraduate and graduate students. The accession at the beginning 3 . : is mi I-qununnll ln--IlllI"'nv 'n"'l""'lll jll"'lII'Il"'l , ,M 1 I "-1:- -b?mm lllll.1:-. X 1' 'l vii 'lull l .--... :illl l-'ll,'f'tl u:l.. ---" lil 1' .1h .,'l '---" ...alr '1-,.ll'll,fIInz: lliwmsznll 1331 M. .Ar 1 l .11 .xx- il' 11 f 1 1 P-J' ' . of the present session of a greater number of dental students than those already i If provided for, has entailed additions to the staff and some new problems of organi- M1 if zation. The proper coordination of the work of the anatomical department with NW! that of the other departments of the Dental College, is being carefully considered ' l-Hi ll ' at the present time, as it will be for some years to come. The dental students have already profited immensely by direct access to anatomical material, which hitherto has been denied to the separate dental colleges ll I1 , in the State, and the course they receive now differs little from that taken by their Q medical fellow-students. Since the physiology and pathology of the human body X can only be taught as a whole, the dissection of the entire body constitutes a neces- I , sary prerequisite to the work of both of these departments. The work in dentistry ll 'I 1111 l 1 during the first two years of the course promises, therefore, to be as broadly scien. t Iq,yl,al111 RJ! tiiic as thatlnow given in medicine. This should not only provide a better basis for 1 lm "qi the more highly specialized work of the third and fourth years, but will open a 1,Qj1Nl wider horizon for original thought and research in the years following graduation. izlml 115115 1 , 1 Xi 111 lilfll 111 'ill 1 11 11 1 il J 1 Qi M51 ami 11 , dj , , FLEX IQ - - 1411 ,411 lx 1: l fl lllx ll , , 1 ll i l l li l 11 I ,l ll ll 1, 1 U 1 11 ll 1 X lf LM M Ri! it! 1' Q 1 ills T11 fi W1 1 K gl"":E-Y? T51 g fi:-5, V mu Eff T475 i 0 g 0 ggi DrssEcT1oN RooM is K, if lt 1' ly idil ,fi lil il' ., f H, sw 1 l"'l' ,141 rf' . pf-sip, 11 1 .1 1' Q 1 1 MhJf::fs11,i'r'1f mg:-f ,114-.1J'lQ1' 15:1 vr Q.: ffji15Nii'?Q?l?X5teEisQ1,gf11fsf12:1s ce, I39I E3 :E 'IMI flml' .EJ 'CPU' I l"E A 1: ' llll l llllllllllllllllllllllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIllIIlllllllllIllIlllllIllIllllllllllllllIllllllllllllllllllll Illlllllllllllllllllll IlllllllllllllllllllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHI' 'llllllIIIIIIIIIIllllIIIIIIllllllllmllllmlllllll' ' ae emo og 'lu f. ku 11 1 i g f 1 ' IllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIIIIIUlllIIIHIIllIllIllIIlIIlIllllllllllllIINIIIIHHIIIllllllllMMIIIIllllllllllIlllllllllllllllllllllflllllIllllIlllllfilllllllllllllllllllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIllllllllllllllllllll H , 1I'Lf I E E NIE E-Ng Stl? E tg WILLIAM H. PARK -.E 1 E 5 Instructor: 212 ELIZABETH BARTIIOLOMEW 1 MARGARET COOPER E-"E WILLA C. NOBLE LILI,IAN L. HALL WILLIAM H PARK P fssor CHARLES KRUMWIEDE Ano. Prof. Assistant JULIUS KI.0STERMAN CHARLES KRUMWIEDE Instructor: ANNE DAVISON CHARLES R. TYLER MARION LESTER MAY FORBES f..-2 BACTERIOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY, IN THE DENTAL , -1-1, ,1-1 5 2 F.--G 'rm fl il! EF r 'Q Pl F E I I I l iff 5: : .. I I I E 'li E ll i s E-:E I 5 rig E , E 7 1 I' Am"...ulllIIlFIlll :-Hap---:Lg ,IInmumnmllmluulmllllllllllllll l - 'lpnunnnmmuulullulmlllllullllu ,pa--.llrlm Ill17lIIlIu....Im. N Gi'13g'9l4f " , -I ' ' ' ' .. ,, ' , -49'geIf"q Q"-E32 lz gull l II " in 'lll "'!lllllIgnf gr k1n5lilll!"'l""li"" 41 lr lhlgm' u . 1 ef: L I1 .lln.. -1llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllil I ' .I lllllllllIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllld .- ....nIl.. , u., ..e. . , Il. xx' 4 ,Etwj Emi .3 -4 W! f f ff ff fwyq 7 1 1 f 1 R G NP 'F ,, 1 1 X, 1 ff 1 ,f 15 fff ,Mft fy 1 ,, EM: M 411 f ' ff! off ,1 M4 2 Za W1 40 yi f ,,, 1 , 5 If : 1 11 5 5 E 1 , X 1 R' '-11.001 M f E E f I WA f 4 '- S - 1 1 A 5 - , - 2 E E 11 A 3 E E E - f X E 2 Z - E : i 4 if , : E 2 0 X N za E E E M f 'n I x Q I' e X E E If I " . 9 f' - 5 HI ii' 5 2 E : :I 7' f X " 5 f 0 ws' 1 1 1 f ff E S 'S 1111 11 f 14 A 124. f f 41 ,E 2 5 f f f f E 2 2 I , I 5 3 Ay 5 : , 5 if 2 5 ll? , If ' E E I'U I? E i : gflxi E ' l E I S I XX 2 A - E lg 5 l N : g :I E COLLEGE CURRICULUM WILLIAM H. PARK, M.D., and CHARLES KRUMWIEDE, M.D. When the New York University College of Dentistry became part of New York University it became our duty to teach the subject of Bacteriology as well as Protozoology and Immunology. We were immediately faced with the question what should be the scope of instruction to dental students. We cannot say that we have found a wholly satisfactory answer. It may be of interest to give some of the ideas which have influenced us in giving the instruction this year. H- Q, I u ll In ,fe-xg' I Ei' ill , , If . J. Eli IE 'lllllllll -""" ""' I ell """ I ""I l""' ""'l ""' li 'll-5 nlunup' ifIQ!!F!!!1P":II'IIT2RWerEII?'Ffflll-fivfr.'IL liI112'1--!!!!.J"WWItEIIEs:esI'F!!!!!!E:fr,J l40l ll 'T H-If .llI"' " ' -1 1' " ll X . I' 'mm zu j. 1:11 :mum .Rlgull mlmllulIIllullullllllllllllllulll nnrumlununmlululuIlllllllllllllllllllliiilzh "l'qImIn1, llgllug"'m'm x .ll ""L...ll " ..i..!.lf"""""l l9i n r. . .. . .....1 .. W .I ... ur :Tm'l" '7fl1 "ll. ..."" 'Et 'Eli a sz wi ra assi Edu., Q :E , it as E gtg :La S Q Ls E E ' , i . :E E 5 Lg tc ai ' E E E I - E E - E s E Z " E , , 5 E E 3 5 E 1 9 E 'li ' ' 2 li E 'Q I gl 7 E l E I 5 E r r-1 E yn - 3 s E I E 5 E lf lr 1 E f 5 7 . - 5 fx ,l , - I E fl l : Q E if i - E i f E l' 'E W' 52? EA-E Q r g ! STE , . :og Three primary considerations present themselves--first the cultural and general science side of the subject second the degree to which students should receive the same instruction as medical students third how far should the prac- tical application be left to the clinical courses in succeeding years What might be termed the general cultural side would comprise a general consideration of the role of micro-organisms in nature What is the distribution of micro-organisms in nature how far are they essential to our well being how far are they harmful to plants to the lower ani- mals and to man? With the time available only the most general idea of these subjects can be developed as for instance the role of microbes in the natural nitrogen cycle in food production such as the souring of cream for making butter etc Likewise the question of the infectious diseases of plants and of the lower animals could only be touched upon enough to show their great importance For instance a general idea of tick fever of cattle is important from the historical standpoint as it was the first disease shown to be transmitted by insects Although the above phases do not touch directly on dental and medical practice they may have an important direct bearing in so far as they affect food production. For instance anything induencing the price of food influences nutrition and nutrition influences body growth and dentition. In the teaching of bacteriology and protozoology there is a question which applies both to the teaching of dental and of medical students. How much time should be devoted to general biological aspects, to morphology and to physiolog- ical activities as a basis of classification, nomenclature, etc.? Should we plunge at once into the study ofthe pathogenic forms in the hope that the student would thus get a suHicient idea of the systematic side of the subject? We do not believe that this would serve and still we can hardly spare the time to study a sufficient number of types of microbes for anything approaching an adequate general bio- logical survey. We hope that the growing appreciation of the importance of micro-organisms in all the phases of life will result in all universities offering general courses as a separate subject the same as they now offer other courses in other special phases of biological science. If such instruction were made a requisite in pre-dental educa- tion, and the student came to us with a general knowledge of the importance of micro-organisms in nature, with a foundation as to the technical fundamentals of pure culture isolation and the methods of biological study, etc., we should be saved the questions we have raised in these regards. The sooner this hope is realized the better for dental and medical education. 2: si 5 E5-E is Eg? E E 3 Z E23 542 212 E---5 ? 1 ? r .. E E E 5 l 5 m 5'-.Te 1 . . . . 11 The last question, shall a dental student receive the same instruction as a ' 5 E333 illj medical student? There are roughly three sets of opinions being argued today by ' their proponents. First, dentistry should be a post-graduate specialty of medicineg ' second the instruction in the fundamental sciences should be alike for both med- t-- ical and dental students' third the fundamentals should be similarly taught but -f the courses should differ in glving the major time and emphasis and time to the - phases immediately applicable in clinical dentistry f :SE ' 2 '- -' ' Vi all i s ali lm "'-um mul -'----"- uw -"--- In "" 'l""jl' 'IW' "" Ill jll""lI'lI"' 1 'rl .lf '21 -f l41l . is :fl .:i:iJ: W' 'N Je-lllllllC11ll:nu--:qv---: ''llIIIIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll llllq ! - Illummnnm llllllllllllllllllllllllllll. an.ul':'-nm:ul1mm .TIM ,.. viii. girl- 'M-'1llIT.f wfmaaa. wrong? 'lla llui--331-'1"' .lg -il .rl lu . .a. ..n . ,.llu... -1 lllllIIIIIllIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll It ' .vi Ill llllllIIIIllllllllllllllllllllllllllld t- .....nll., . lr.. .4. . -wav-I TV? . There can be no question that the dentist should know sufiicient about the Q E purely medical phases of micro-biology and immunology to meet physicians on com- j E -?'- mon ground. The general preventive medicine aspects should receive equal consid- E-"'-2 in j eration. A dentist should be able to intelligently discuss the prevention of diph- ' 2 - theria with his more intelligent clientele. - Q 5 With the present organization of professional education it seems, therefore, V- E that the instruction for dental and medical students should cover the same general E ground, but should diverge in emphasis and the time spent on certain phases. The - S mi flora of the oral cavity, its relation to oral pathology, its bearing on systemic I.. 5 -V manifestation of disease should be presented in detail to the dental student. On the E- E 1 other hand the other sources of similar systemic symptoms should be taught, so that E' E 1 X' the dentist may no longer be accused of having his vision limited to the mouth. 1, E ', ly f Again the bearing of the flora of the mouth on obtaining material for bacteriologi- i f lli cal examination, the possible pitfalls and dangers of misinterpretation, its bearing f I if xlr on oral operations, office asepsis, etc., cannot be too thoroughly emphasized. .QQ I S til In immunology the questions of diagnostic applications, the specificity of bac- 'uf E " ,il teria and bacterial products and their bearing on specific therapy in dental practice 1-'li E require careful consideration. If xl A 3 The answer to many of the present difficulties lies apparently in preliminary ' ll 5 N 2 preparation for the subject. Time is the outstanding need and the ultimate answer ' E gf", 5 rests with the solution of the many interlocked difhculties of present day profes- E , xg E sional education. pl ll! Ri g E AE El? ' I Eli we . . T: T T ' 5 q 5 l 1 a 5 Q 02 5 2 E E 2 2 F-E P 1 mi 6 Ll sg, P.!.j K 701 i I I ' li . l Q BACTERIOLOGY LABORATORY .1 sl E ,qwmlul ........ ,Vw ........ Ilnulllp-in. .mmllnuq IIIIIIIIIIIVN -- Ill ,lrmlIllllllhllq gi wwvxlllllllllllll 411, I ,fir Jlllllllllllau.:..-:num 4. Qmlmglllllllllllllgrl, ltl '-' K N' "" i ulllt- lbilllrf .4-,".mlu. '!llll-...im .- ll v ll ., M-"..rllIIl' .1 im. '5lIllu:""'il -J I42I A " ll r ,mf - I ' W .offvaaaf fWo.f:s.Ea ly.. lhl- H-'M '41 ll M f' m IIIHT I lr-ug llillllllllll lllllillilllll flllll llllllll ' l f CHEMISTRY warm. LU ucv is f' ' 2 JOHN A. MANDEL I 1 Professor 'W 5 , CLAUS HINCK I - : Assoc. Prof., - ii E ' ' A : v 5 "il 3 HENRY H HAW1.ING 5 ff ,li Asso. Prof. 1, Xi - ' E il E is l l - I JOHN A. MANDEL HENRY H. HAWLING rf! V E I Z, E KENNETH C. BLANCHARD I BASIL SOYENKOEF ggi E-:E : E 'gig Instructor ' Instructor gli 5 E I "I y 1 ' T A SHORT HISTORY OF THE CHEMISTRY ' DEPARTMENT ' CLAus F. HINCK, Jr., Ph.D. if l I i I The history of the Chemical Department of the Dental College is an honor- 5 able one. It was here that the iirst Riintgen pictures to be made in this country 2 were produced, and throughout the years a host of students have passed through Z 5 its doors to receive a knowledge of metallurgical and chemical processes which :mg .. 1 . . . E E E E were to aid them to become roficient dentists. L.-5? :Pi-at P E E ' ' Formerly the chief interest was centered on inorganic chemistry because the is ' dentist was rimaril concerned about re a1r1n dama eg toda , ust as in medi- --f P Y P S S Y J mmm- -.mmm mnunu sumuu I' wllllllll lllllllll Ill 'ESQ'-2.3 X ,XX A .a 'W A ,I 5,4 , e E -44 Q-:za-' -Q , I ll IIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIII1 IIIIIII I I II IIIII A1A.1'4x-S., S rss NW sltl X . E X fi we QQ -.5 Q X E -' I X X T EX X F X SX ,X ,S ru: - N D X Y X v - Xi S .X S x' L -' : bs -. . X g. -5 g s mfs, - Q- XX I 5 X X N : T I A v X Si' . Q as N 4 '-.. 1 QS E 4 Q X X XYTX, K ' 25 N X - '41 ' ' is is PX S l E, E X E X Na E E X -, E E E E Xxx E E 6 E 2 x : E X 5 E ' S F N E-.. :E N 5'-'-"1 ' XX X X FS Q i 3 X 11'- . 5 E .Q I 2 X 5- E E Q5 sift 2 ' E E Q X fe? E 5 XX P ' i E E 5 ' 7 ,Q 22 XXN- 5 N Xi" S g ' Q " : - X - . . , I-x Q - 2 X XV F. an V , A 'E x Y V xxx f - : fx A A EMA 'Nt .2 5 ' A nmn Ill llllllylllfl IHQUL A .'L".M'!II1llIIllHIIIIIIIIIIIlllIIIlIlIllllI IIlIlIlIIIlIllll1I"1'llIlIilIilf s D - f e g XX- - muuummu mmunn Ill n-Tm 1 nm: nn I IIIIIL JS?" Q- f , cme, the aim is to prevent damage and thus we strive for a knowledge of the -.,, has chemical changes which proceed in the human organism, how this wonderful organ- :vi E , gg ism reacts to external influences, and how we must treat it in order that it may " I 1 u 1 u n a 1 1 n mg retain its resiliency and vigor. In short, the chief interest of the department is ' now focussed on biochemistry without neglecting the fundamentals of metallurgy , , in so far as they concern the dentist ' During the last summer the laboratory was remodelled to an extent commen- i ll ' - surate with existing circumstances to meet the requirements for biochemical work e i 1 .nu-nn Egg, um ll '41 In ll nu, If-..:-L ' -1- IH I """""" gp 4 . ' E E , . . . . .............. .....-. ,. Emil i ,ll i431 . ,, , .,i1,i,... .. 1 ffkt s 1 ftixmal A i . . 2 1 1 f ilf'- "' n ....,.f'Illll f , tix, l Eighty students can now be accommodated at a time, and the necessary apparatus and chemicals have been acquired. Since the requirements for entrance have been raised, work will commence with a study of the components of the body, then continue with the chemical processes involved in some of the chief functions of the organism, as far as they are known, finally arriving at a plastic conception of the organism as a whole. Besides the instruction of students, which is of course the fundamental duty of the department, a series of investigations will be undertaken on subjects related to dentistry. Some of the preliminary work in this direction has been started. Ex- perimental research to be successful requires, among other things, time, materials and space. The worker imbued with the true scientific spirit will always find time, and materials can be gotten in some way or other, but space is something which cannot be extended at will, and in this respect the department is handicapped. We are looking hopefully to Alma Mater to take cognizance of this fact and alleviate the cramped condition under which the teaching staff is laboring, so that it may work untrammeled and produce something worthy of our university. CHE MISTRY LABORATORY iFW'w,jfffrf?rn??TYWQFWW?ff?frfif,.rvfnx1 N 415' ' QGDXJF-ills Uvlfjtkbi i Haw M ' at ' .- ,Jf::s.-'ef f H. ,. ff " i 4-, w5'.'.wri li if 'f"'1", ,llplfft f C X Q31 iii 'f l44l in mic' m 1 levi ' ,P -4 ..., , ' lllllIIlllllllllllIllllllllllllllllllllll ul I WEEE? I munm 1 l l ll 'Q ' -- :E 5 E 25 EE-.5 T li : E .. . ' f WT ,. 4' ' -- ni .1 " up ": 'f ' 'ZW it E E3 . 1 "':,. 1' .wb 2: '-.ga 1: 5: 11 '51 , fi UI ,, T4 -. 1 as I ,Q :L cg . , , ,"'V1W':'3' 5' 1 i if 0 ' E f LEE M HURD HOWARD Fox Professor Lecturer LEE M. HURD DISEASES OF THE MOUTH LEE M. HURD, M.D. '- The diseases of the mouth are quite as important as any other special branch of medicine and should find a place in the curriculum of both the medical and dental schools, but owing to the already crowded hours it has not been done except in a few schools. we E - ' E : -Q 5 -1 sl'-.5 - Q25 is . 1 5 5 2 5 s 2 -'J : 2 Em: 'l- r.-.-.1 E :- , I I .---u I---1 llllwllll nw' s ,931 .,qu' ,, -..H I W ,...,',,...., ulnmnnlnnnmnumulnumnllllll ' 'ummmnnmunlnnuunlnnuunqu IZ.. I .lu I mm yM.:t:i,'Z.1 i541-:Fl w"--- ., ' un g., FQ 1' . "', f ll , -,r .' 12. ll Il ll, 'l illflmmjlll nl. I ? !nulllll""""ll"l Mn' Illul I ll L. in I 'Il .1 Iln- 1 Ill l 1 I Illlllllllllll I llllllll ll Il . .nl I 1 vgigy' .3 : ,far DVYPA-'i . Magi if X 41 X "'7' "rv" . f' ,U 1 V 1 , 1 1100 f f f Q, I 1 f 4 f , ff 1 ff 1 ' - :- E : WW W? , Q, f f 5.2 E I :!ffl1'7.'.igg:fl!g5.1 f ,f -.-1 EI-2:5 ffxf ' gigailflir ff X X E : E r ,,agiM ,RQ f ,E . . ax , : : 5 4 ' l':,1iQ"I4,n, ' , eg " E 2 M iw 'WA fi f A - : E 5 E fiz,lL3y',a,..1li'a i f f s S f 5 ,Ngo X Qs X. E 2 1 "W f it E 5 "' ff f ,l 1' A , X ' : E Mx! 15.19 IIN-I ,J ,F 2 1. Q E E " : .TQ t ,GH ul . 1 7 :r 1 M If ,ni f 4 X - : X , ,'f,HW2i,'ff!W! . - ik Q - : : 13 fwfr 122441, Z : : fr wwfvifa ,I , 2 E X: M 1.2, ,yn I 1 A I E : 5 1 fl , V , X! , X ff f i , ff ff ,4 f , f f E 5 E V f 1 14 ' 4 X A, f f W f f f I ' ff f ff ff, ' l , E .. X : rj , : , , : : 5 : , : X E 1 E -I 5 E 21 . E Z E f 5 E A S ia 2 : NX . W X B 5 l lf I e Hill N E , Q - ' S : X : E li 'inf E E 3 'L ,Y ' 5: - - : 1617: EWS :IE ENE mi Symptoms of general diseases are frequently located in the buccal cavity. Sometimes the early symptoms, such as in measles and syphilis, establish the diagnosis. Focal infections about the mouth and teeth are being better understood every day as the starting point of affections in the gastro intestinal tract, pulmonary, cardiac and joints, etc. Also that many neuralgias about the face and head are caused by infections in the mouth and teeth The dentist should be informed of these various mouth conditions so that he may not jeopardize himself or his patient and that there may be better co-opera- tion between the dentist and the family physician u lunll I F-im In ll I 1 u' I fs Ill ll -S-I N lluullllu auf IND i c-211 El: w ?.'i B a 5- ill' 2'l i i ' 3 iii T t at 5' s 2 ill? rp, ll lqggi-a::'l'nlgf3 6 ,ni-.lII::::lI ll 4, l45j VIII! H 'III' ' Q ugyji 'H una, nl.. I lllmlllllllllllllllllllllllll um ull ll 255' I li' .. I ' li, amp' . .. Wwrwmwf i llllllllllllllh ' , "W 0 0 , E - Q, I , Es i X s A 1 2 In Hi .A ' WQWIIIWII I 'W HKGH WH IHIUIQW - f 1 ll 1 f I E HARRY M SELDIN ' MICHAEL Moss Instructor 'A Cliniral Professor ,- F-' - BERNARD .I CIP:-:s , - - I nstructor E 5 5 2 JAMES HASBROUCK Q F 5 if Clinical Professor EDWARD B GRETSCH T i E I 5 Instructor E : if 5 : .v.. X .. : E X :I - sg -.- 1 ' ' '-' MICHAEL Moss i ' 2 5 EL? A SHORT HISTORY OF THE EXODONTIA CLINIC OF THE . , E:-f OLD NEW YORK COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY ?r E By MICHAEI.'IJ. Moss, D.D.S. F 'T Q i i 3 A room 6x8. An old barber chair with cuspidor attached. A few pair of old forceps. A cold water tap. A long towel on a roller. Such was the equipment W il ,. . A i of the Exodontia Clinic in 1888. 3 i Z I The blood from forceps and hands was washed off with cold water. Both 5 V , g I5 forceps and hands were dried on the same towel. Summer and winter the towel 2 E Z , , ,- E 5-:gi was changed once a day. The cuspidor was emptied at the end of the day, unless 335 E Q full to overflowing before that time. Such was the conception of surgical clean- ' : .. 1-J E E T E liness. , P -1 a . 5 E E 5 1 E : : 2 No anesthesia, whether local or general, was thought necessary or used. Once --: , , , ,.... a month from October to February nitrous oxide was demonstrated in the lecture I Ill Im ll' ww mwllmlliwllnumimu ww-uw-inuuiuu uummrui mul umu n I . .,-,W w . f ul"""'Pf4 yu- .i u mmuunmmnmiunimim. unmuum in ummm mlm inunul..r..1llI I 13.4595 ' s yt N t X. NP V 5-O? .XNRSA 1 A 'T --' -l .Lf -A--gg f Z"- Lii: 5 pi L - ' -it ' ' .-5 Al Q A .A jail. Q - .. 124 Q " X x " E -..-sm...-.f.E.i--rg X 5 X E ' : 5 . 1 2 5 .5- X 2-T X ,. W A S X if s I i T' ' S " , I R 2 If "":-fr-. S . u . xi xg x E 5,-E x 5 - S 5 RZ to A QNX xx xx A. ? Ei 5 .I H1 'fl H' "W" W1 'iwwnvlfgmmlmsmmimmmunummnmmnmnuumm in5,"s1"' fi Xxx- grcqa g ' nm u I n mm lm mlm ' ,Qi f00 U1 - 13:3 .Mhz When it became necessary to extract a tooth any student not otherwise 3.3 Egg engaged would volunteer to do it. He would call on a demonstrator to help him Q32 0 or not as the spirit moved him. V - This was the extent of the instruction in Exodontia that prevailed in most :- "' dental colleges at the time with slight variations In 1890 the Dean of the New York College of Dentistry heard of the work 1 , I was doing in the Dental Clinic of the Good Samaritan Dispensary and invited : me to try and improve conditions in college 'lIl"'l I Kfzp. I Ill I III h -awl HUIIIHIII l46l . sea I 5 '-vu ll """ lg-lr""1r:gi?' I "" IW" ' 4 'll' "" I ' -1 -g 11 H' 5. L J I 7 "ff flllfi ' ' 1 HESCHI- w',"' it Xl 1? if y fs Q :L A large operating room with a smaller waiting room attached was set aside " 1- for the use of the Exodontia Clinic and was made a separate department of the .. --"- Clinic. Two real though old dental chairs were bought. A dozen new forceps - were obtained and a fish boiler with a removable tray for sterilization But a clean towel was still a ram avis in the clinics The real step forward though was the 2 installation of a machine for the administration of nitrous oxide for patients will- Q Q ing to pay for it and the devising of a technic for teaching and practicing , 5 Exodontia ' 2 E 4 With the improved conditions the attendance at the Clinic increased very E .. rapidly and to such an extent that it became necessary to split it in two by creating - an Oral Surgery Clinic with Dr. Harry Dunning in charge of it At about the same time cocaine' was tried out for local anesthesia but soon 1 discarded as unsuitable " Then came the X-ray machine about l906 in charge of Drs Hawling and IeRoy Satterlee who paid with their health for the improvement they brought E about in the practice of dentistry generally and our surgery and hxodontia par- - - - ticularly 1 - 1' E Then in 1914 Prof. Fischer came over from Germany and demonstrated A 3, S and taught us the use of Novocaine Local anesthesia became a reality. Students, , 1' E 1 X g instead of, in most cases, merely watching the operations, were allowed to do them g l' 1 if 5 themselves. The patients not being in pain it became possible to explain to and E X E E 'guide a student while at work, with benefit to both student and patient. General 'i K E E i anesthesia has its place in the work of the Clinic and in the Dental Surgery , H .5 5 5 Oflice, and students have to be instructed in its use, but Novocaine is the anesthetic 5 E gli - :AE ala - EE s - 1 5 E F ' 5 . . ll 5"? L' 2 l- 112 gi--. Q11 llllli lllllilllllll llllm lllllllllllll l'W"W".llll llllll lllli Illlllll lllllhll lllllllll wg., , - Q ,ff H f -4 iw 11 mum tinimimumuummuinuilmiu um nmnu 1 numimnu Mill hi ' 1 . I 5. R . 23. 1 ' Eff at E: 'I Mjwlfrwfvw 'Lvl sb nmnnmmnmmn in mnninnmmmiilnnunrwqmgnrrq, 3 T21 NX ir? - ' 1' I lmimimnu1nnmw...m..mmnnnnnmmufmlrmimmnlmlnmm MUHIIIID - Yi? 60 VM! 22 ,SF -J' ' " H 7 592 bfi 1615 51 ,LE l he Si: 1 5 Q -1 K I l l l' 1 I l l "5 Ex'rRAc'1'xoN CLINIC ' '1 e EWS llllllllllll .T as 'lllll I l 'aww' 1- I Illllllllll 1 - me ..... .........., ..a... ,,,,, ,, lf112?l!!F!f!F"!i5aa 15fEirfrf1fs:1:!E'l..!ll1ff.'11,'I1l., 111'.1-11'P1-J?F!.1"1'i11iE1i1i11W!!"? .! !l1Ci11a,f l47l l .r- . .... " E57 xii "' . . . . . -7?- 'if is par excellence for most dental work in a clinic. It makes It possible for a student "a Q B -5 i: g e to operate without hurry and without fear of hurting the patient while the demon- ,V ,i ag 555' ,,,- Q strator is watching and guiding him in his work. .- , s To the patient Novocaine has brought peace of mind, doing away with the 2 ,Jr f traditional horror of the dental chair by assuring him a safe and painless method I 1 ' 3 of relief. - ,A Y- E In the future, as it was in the past, the aim of the Clinic will be to give the E 1 - 5 student the opportunity to acquire all the knowledge and experience he is willing ei ' ,W to absorb. 'Al Now, when cost is not the major consideration, and with a wealth of material J that no other Dental College has ever even approached, there is every reason to V ' , - feel that the students of the New York University College of Dentistry will get 4.2 i 1 lit ' the best training possible not only in Exodontia but in every branch of Dentistry. 1 :- it fm. is :ii C f The patient on the other hand will get such care, attention, and work of a quality gfjrlx , iff X f N f obtainable only in the best private practice and at a cost that is only nominal for w " Q iii Z, Qi! Q Q ,r the service rendered. -fi l e 2 -'Alix 1 i 1 il i l A N.. ly . ., 3 E. . ., V 1 '5 f tj til if X . i 1: -4+ ,W i if W nt l I 1 , 5 V J I ', ll lil, Q Xi IQ PLE 1 ,L v EXAMINING ROOM L V A ,, .-..- ...... ..... , ., .------- --::p- lunar" 1 1 '--mm., ..... .. , ,... ......... . ,, n ll f""r:1""i ni mini " "' 6 l"' '- " liiii-:rw "tv -es' in-:::"-w ' aa.:-f:::!:i PQ..!lfl,Jr.i.., H926 .,...t'f1:-fl!..! ii t.!!"P!!!!!!mJ l43l -II .If'i'i,?.... . ..... Ig ...E f. lr-QW? wiv- , :I E 5 E " I E If E 5 M EA? I i 41 M S A I !N ii a s I, ' :yfw .Q 13 ERAUVE A ND , war' 'Q SE7 f w I QEVENCIVE UI!lH'lKi 'li A A A 'E A :f ' 2 JOHN OPPIE MCCALL Ana. Prof. EDWIN B. TRIPP Supl. of Clinic SOLOMON MINK Dirertor Inlay GEORGE ELLIS Dir. Oper. Cl. fSen.j Instructor: HARRY ALBERT JACOB BLUM JOHN OPPIE MC CALL ALFRED STARR Lecturer JOSEPH ROIG Examiner 65' Dir Oper Cl. fJ'r.j DAVID TANCHESTER Examiner E. ALAN LIEBAN Dir. Root Therapy SAMUEL H. SOLOMON Dir. Man. Head SIDNEY SORRIN Dir. Periodontia Cl. Imtructors I'I"lF.gulIllIliYIl' IplmulnuImmunnmuuulnlulllllll ll 1 unnlummnunlmmnuunnnunllql , IlI:g,7IIllln1..2"l..V 1 4 I , 'u mul Hn: 'I ll 'll Iv' I I H 'lf N ' p2K,xV?I: , ' ,,g Ill., , I I I u I ll Il t . .ull h. xl 'Sak . , f 0 I ' Niii Eiffw ' ,A.x.x -XA' Q v ' ' A X X I I X if ,f ,fifk 7! ffffx J ff 49, ff I! I fff fwffl I 7,1 f ,, E : Z f ff f L 'ff I 6, ff '. ff ff 1 , A If ' f gf! I ff fffffa gf' Cf Z F '53 E S - 1- R I 4 ' 2 35 5 if 92 5-3 ,,,., 1 faf "'-1. 5 2 . 2, E E Q ' E ' 121, ZW' E E 5 , .1 2 f 5 g I ff! if 1 'l I - 5 4 :: g - .- Z! ff ,I , -1 A ff? E E Q E .1 , f 5 g 3 S 7 M MIIIIIIWIHNMIIIII Av FSM N gg E E E M E' - Q E E 7 X E 5 1: E Q W g E E W ff If M J W! f f ff f 1 I I I X j E E , I . E Qu. 5 I ,, E 5 A 1 f nf Li V 5 , .- ' .ly ' 5 I I 2 Y 1 XX ,,, f IIN! 5 : I X E 54 Q E1 5 f II ' ' 1 I 5 f ,N - E I X : N' E I If :I 5 f A 'X : K I E : , . E ANNA BRUENN SAMUEL MILLER in 1 :fp-. a s Ei? ,p I I A 5 L 5 5...-E :L- E 5 S EEE if-E 2 2 av 11 JACK CHOLODENK DAVID NASANOW ggg MORRIS COHEN EDWARD PENsoN ' E . . SIE CHARLES CRANKSI-IAW HYMAN PINES gg mi WALTER FOLEY WILLIAM REICHNER 'Q 'E DANIEL M. KOLLEN SIDNEY SOLOMON , 'E LOUIS LEROY ELIAS STICKNEY N Q" HARRY LILIENFELD ISRAEL USDAN I V? I A 5 Xp 5 1 .E Fa mi IW , ll Illllll I W- I ' 'H' 'll 1.4,-aw 1, I Ill""ll'll' l491 Q :ag 'Hu'-T-IIIIIIIF'ilr!'III":v4n---E: llgllllnllllmlllllllmllllllnlllllllllllll ll' I I UluImnumnlulnllllllllulllllllllmul ,jl:---q.---rnltllrilllllln-'jimt Ei ff el ' . ID wavy' Q 'm..nilih..lnl...ilm inn'TiIllmuuuumnmum u null ll. N23 .fl III II' QT'nu'mulillill..dllln..,lhH..i. gig OPERATIVE DENTISTRY E : - g QE JOHN opm Meow., D.D.s. E The teaching of Operative Dentistry in the dental college has in recent years ,M E been complicated through the developments of dental science. These developments, E - E while affecting Prosthetic Dentistry as well, have not necessitated the changes in ' - E the content of the Prosthetic course that have been required in the Operative E ,, 5 Department. E E In the early days of the dental colleges, Operative Dentistry, as it was then E Q S E known, consisted chiefly of the filling of cavities. Pulp Canal Therapy was E E E unknown for the reason that its possibilities had not at that time been developed. E , A tooth having an involvement of the pulp was, perforce, extracted. Similarly the v 5 A treatment of periodontal disease was virtually non-existent for the reason that so ,W '- g little knowledge of this disease was available. Preventive Dentistry was an Mi E Utopian dream, desirable, but not within the bounds of practical accomplishment. b il ' - At the present day Pulp Canal Therapy has reached a high level of attain- , ' : ment, due to our constantly increasing knowledge of Histology, Bacteriology and if ' .. E Q l f' 5 A X P f 5 l X - E 57 3 55 Y 515 512 in 5 ?"i? 5.3 51 5 E E 5 E E ? 5 5 E 533 2 -E s s Q23 565 PERIODONTIA CLINIC 4-'fig ' ' " " r 'MI .-:gi :QQ 3 I il: SPS 5-' ll I50'I i gafgipir f -I If. -- ' -p in 7 ' ., nu 5? .4 ra fa 553 5 5 5-2 Eg a ? 5 E - E 5 2 5 5 2 lllui E E Elf 5 E ilk E 2 fx: 5 . 5 gy 5 fi ' ' A E 2 , if - ' E i 2 7. E ri 'E 2.3 iii' 5'-5 a s a-E E 0- , . . 25 : '45 lli OPERATIVE CLINIC-JUNIOR DEPARTMENT Pharmacology. In Periodontia similar attainment can be pointed out, the result being that the treatment of Periodonticlasia has been brought within reach of any dentist who will apply himself to master the technique. Prophylactic treatment and Orthodontia as a prophylactic measure have been developed to a point where they indicate the practicability of Preventive Dentistry. With the development of these branches of dentistry, which obviously come under the heading of Operative Dentistry, there naturally arises the necessity for either coining a new term by which this department shall be known or of making other divisions of the dental curriculum. Whatever course we are to follow, it seems only logical that we should subdivide Operative Dentistry into its compo- nent parts with the object of clarifying in the minds of dental practitioners the various departments of their work. Let us think, then, of Operative Dentistry as being made up of diagnosis, which is concerned with the discovery of disease con- ditionsg therapeutics, which is concerned with the treatment of disease, restoration, which has to do with the rebuilding of injured dental tissues, and prophylaxis, whose object is to guard against the inception or recurrence of disease. With this division made, dentists will approach their patients with a clearer conception of the various stages through which their management of cases should lead them and the patient will thus receive the benefit of a more intelligent and efficient dental service. ax . ,. : E ess sie fhi , A 1 e A 3 V : E Q 5.53: f -E rel DQ rl gg" illi I Illllllll as I Il I d I IH ,Sw IIIIIII up .LE El: l , K7 Zi: X UU .., , x3E.:,,:.: ..., I, ,,,,,,,,.. , , ..,H,,,,I . ,E ,... :.,,.:.,5:, I ,. 5 'F!!!!llf-alll, H ll'.-1112f.7fll!.J' 3 l51l ' V Ill ,MINI " II 'l 1 ' CNC, ' lx lll 4 .. ' L' lllllllllllIlllllllllllll unnuu lllll l uli il I II nununnnnnunnnnu 111 ml if ' ..l 11111 Ill I 1 111m 11.11511 '1 ill ,AAA ,,, , , F E E 1 llll - 442042 fWf,' S .,,V 1 1 ill ogg S ex - . .r 2.4 , I Ill IIII S so i gg gi S .ff IX X S lllllll I ao WINTER . . I Z l rofessor fClznzcal m me on ' IRVING SALMAN Z Instructor: LOUIS V HAYES E 5 DAVID C BAKER FRED L WHITING 5 EDWARDI LEMBECK ' LEO WINTER 2 E 5 212 ORAL SURGERY Leo WINTER, D.D.S. : .': ' 1 I5 E :""': V 1 The history of Oral Surgery is merged with that of Medicine and General Surgery. Hippocrates, the Father of Medicine, practiced medicine which included ,1 surgery. Even before his time and prior to the years in which his immediate ill' 5 ancestors practiced the healing art, medical practice, including surgical procedures, had its place in the affairs of men. For more than a thousand years, the surgery practiced in Egypt meant some- thing to the world of medicine. The ancient Egyptian custom of embalming the dead had given these practitioners a knowledge of anatomy which, of course, was crude. Still the history of medicine shows that the Egyptians trephined the skull ll 3 -1 : .:: E. ?if:I E32 - -. 2 F: 2 E :- - 'J gg: ,--- '11 E E - 1: s- , :. -. E 1: SWS aaa i 3 ESE F 1 1 l'i 2 Z V "'l1 mfuu 1'--un'---u InlunInlumlIlmlunllllulllllllllll I' - lmulmm1111111111111uuumlllllllll ll""'ll""' llll' lllllI"" 4 -ff!-?2'3 F5522-EQ.: ww.. ' 'I' . l OW ll l U lil .ul elnlll- up r-'HH lllifxgffq 42305321 ll ,lg I 1,"- JIIII11-"Illl11,1-, 'E-Wpefrxaafg 7 -1,11 llll""""lll" all ll,111' , 'Qv,,PL 1 .11 lln.. rl 1 1 I 111 1 1 Ill 111111111 1 1 Ill l . .ull I1 1 Q: 1.22 . ' , 1 ,. . x , lrihsii E M.- "1?" 'iv' C W 5 , , , , , - H lf' Q N N 1 if I Ayffgi 767,13 i Ki? ffgi' if ,iff it X! K M1 f, f 1 KXIXI X f f 0yC! ffidifnef I if mi ' ,ff i - , Wifi' ' 1 f " ff 5 5 W7 li f ff N ,Q g E 227 V1 '01 1 ff : E 2 - V1 ' 1 ... Q E E : 1 '- as 1 E1 s '99 E - X f A f ' f E f, I I 1 'H - E E 1 W' : S E viflff , f s s 5 2 Nfl ' 1 swf f 414 ' ' 2' E 5 fi! X ,Lmffy 1 1' , Q .. : , W' f 1 "1l'11rvJ1", X X E E 5 Z, ' 1 .. E ' of ,, f ff" 'JT' ff f 'N f 1 f ,f fa, f f J swf f 5 E if X dv if ' fffy 72X 4? A,f,f' Q' f ff ff' 7? ff 1 , ' f'g!f! ff ff' 'ff E : 1: ' :- 3 2' E il Jos :1 A - A 2 X E E E 2 E A E 5 l 5 P J E I 5 2 2 3 its sf. 5 f E , : X E E 1 a S ' 5 5 K .. ' F f 5 5 . E , E I E ,A1 : f I 2 " X 2 Z f ' : - :- s ll '-' l E 5 s i to relieve migraine and to lessen epileptic attacks. They also removed superficial tumors and set broken jaws. Among the ancient Jews, surgery was not unknown, and much of what they : practiced in this connection was taught them by the Egyptians. There were arti- ficers of wooden legs as also dentists among them who made and put in place false teeth. Accomplishments of this nature show that even in this far removed period advances were made in surgery even though much of the so-called history -IE EWG .mi gif of the leech is a myth The activities of Hippocrates stand out in bold relief and are devoid of the 5 mythical He was the first to discuss intelligently and elaborately regarding frac- as .1111 1 T 11111.N ' III Sis M5 2 :Ili FQ I 9 1 1. 1 l 1 4 ii .1-4, ijts A-1 , -----. I 1 ulll ll!"' r V 1 "III "" I 'wg 11111 111' 11 -' film!!!!!F":::1a,E,'Tfaw1a:::!f1'!!!!.l-ff,f1,'.1l1 11926 ,JIT1-112-7?..Pf..' 'FEMS i521 if ll organic substances, we find that a flood of light has been thrown upon this most ,,q,!-,- ' ',,:"'lllIIF'1"- ""'U""". Ill llllfl Wlilill llll llllllillllllllllllll v ff I I, ,..l.1..,...,...... I ll.,....,.., ,ummm .1 ----. I y---. !,,,1m,,,..4-W , H I ,f 11.0.W..--.-'-nl!"1i'.n... wfwasamz fvrozga' al f,,, gi . .1.. ...A . ..llu.,. ,., llu lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll It lnuummm:munmumunumnll .J ...,. Ill.. ilu.. I ..i. 3 ': turesg he also was familiar with the structure and with the diseases of bones and 'EYQ 5 .7 of joints. Much that he Wrote in the long ago is still sound, although many of his E conclusions run counter to what modern experience has taught us. F: The stamp of truth may be afiixed to practically all the genuine work of mf ' - Hippocrates. He reported his results, good or bad as the case might be, resorting E E - to no attempt at extenuation in the narration. He described faithfully and graph- - E ically what he saw, demonstrating a clear conception of many of the surgical 5 ,, .. lesions which came to his notice. The surgical methods of treatment which he E ' :Q employed were rational. What he knew by experience he taught to others. -- Modern surgery received its greatest impetus as the result of the brilliant work 3 of Lister and of Pasteur, supplemented by the achievements of Koch and of ' 3 iii Ehrlich. Osler asserted that the outcome of the researches of Pasteur upon fer- 'i il mentation and spontaneous generation represents a transformation in the practice l if LE of surgery which has been one of the greatest boons ever conferred upon humanity. I if It had long been recognized that at times a wound healed without the formation iff of pus, that is without suppurationg but both spontaneous and operative wounds W elif were almost invariably associated with a suppurative process which frequently jf. fly assumed a putrid stage, the general system becoming seriously affected and the X patient dying of blood poisoning. So common was this occurrence that many QV lg fi surgeons feared to operate, believing that from without came the germs which gli il 3' caused the decomposition of wounds just as sugar solution, through the germs which came in contact with it, caused fermentation. A young surgeon in Glasgow, Joseph Lister, applied the principles of -N ,. .. -, 1 ,i fi Pasteur's experiments in treating cases of this kind. In the London Lancet H8673 2' i there appears the following from I,ister's original paper: 1, 1 : E "' - "Turning now to the question how the atmosphere produces decomposition of j: I 1 I ' f L 5.5 as l l 'S- -E - 2 2 E E E' 2 3 un "' aug gag 5,55 its gag f-3 Pl. w Q 743 if i 2 l li.: fi . 5 i i l 5 A I 'l ORAL SURGERY-MORNING CLINIC ' 5 , lllllllllll "" Ilnmn ' umnlll N1-5n.':i-'55-.yi 1. ',,,,m,,, - SWS ui r. ......... .,.... , .... fr lf' l!!f!25!WQ Wj'3:g'f1'1L'll.1i11y',, , H920 'JL' n1'31...ll l"H""::1:"mnl1'friQiW!1u?Fll"l"llllQpj'l I K nu ,ILQAQ im lu 1 iyililu ll i H31 '-H ll I "" 'l""' ' "'l ""' I '11-ya"':2C'fa,v llII"" Lf1s51!!!!!?F"9lmmarfff:fs:::fF'F..!!ll-ff.ff'.,'.il., i ,,l,.'..'f1'.2f-Tl!!!..' t1'::zafs'faaiiaa:1:!"F1..!!lE:'1,P my was .5 +-' to ,,5 , U 5 important subject by the philosophic researches of M Pasteur who has demon f- i f' " 1: strated by thoroughly convincing evidence that it is not to its oxygen or to any : 'E of its gaseous constituents that the air owes this property but to minute particles i--- - suspended in it which are the germs of various low forms of life long since 5 - revealed by the microscope and regarded as merely accidental concomitants of - g putrescence but now shown by Pasteur to be its essential cause resolving the E - -E I complex organic compounds into substances of simpler chemical constitution just " E : E as the yeast plant converts sugar into alcohol and carbonic acid E L. 2 i From these beginnings modern surgery lifted up its head into a clearer i Q E - atmosphere as to cause and effect and the- whole subject of wound infection from 2 : - that point on has become one of the most brilliant chapters in the history of Pre- 5 'l ventive Medicine 5 :i : Time with experience brought about importint modifications in Listers 5 2 E practice but his theory remained steadfast and accepted. Specific antiseptics were 13. E - ? devised and advised. Most of them come upon the stage passed in review before ' 5 ' medical mentors and disappeared with but a memory of their existence : Air the atmosphere which we breathe for a long time considered a dreaded - j W enemy that carried disease came to be recognized as a kindly friend when properly E : E 2 treated Surgical cleanliness a germ-free environment-such are today recognized 5 X f ' ' - - i E n - - 5 Al 2 as the essential factors in the proper practice of surgery. E 5 Efmj E Instead of having our oHice shelves littered with many varieties of so-called g I NE 2 1: E E antiseptics and our emergency kits choked with medications, we now resort to heat,. E E E l-'E to light, to soap and water and to the nail brush, while our medicinal armamen- E :. 5 ,E ' E12 tarium consists of alcohol and a few simple chemicals. :A- z -.. :' E ga:-E E25 5.5 Asepsis has supplanted antisepsis. The great underlying truth that wound . infection comes from without the wound and that it flourishes under appropriate Ek? Q 1 i conditions, but that it may be eliminated by appropriate measures, today holds I N 285 i E5 sway. l Modern Oral Surgery-that is, the type of oral surgery which we acclaim as ' E . 1 I i . E a 5 E being most worthy of the name-dates back to the advent of local anesthesia. The 5 p l pioneer work in this particular field is not limited to any one individual. 2, 5 Q ig Richardson in 1866 obtained anesthesia of the skin by means ofthe ether 5 gn: EE spray, the application of which in a limited degree, is considered correct practice E 5 to this very day. Koller in 1884' demonstrated the remarkable anesthetizin owers of Cocaine. -- 8 P - - E - : E 5 Halstead fBaltimorej in 1885 suggested conduction anesthesia, a method S E F:-.-c - gifwwp I Ilmm -mlllflm im-ni llnuuuuunmnmm llllllmg' 1nIlrjl inunn u Tull R11 in-plum. y , ..1 . ,M I m - in ill ll fn" ' gj-fvjlgi. nu m' llllrnlll .lllihml IT.llllllllllllIlllIlllllllllllllllllllllllilllllll li W-E5 ei 'IllIlllllllllllllIllllllllllllllllllllllll ig' l In .init illlll-.llhlrirn 1, A . ' . Lf vid E 3 ' S li E S , I " 2 E E 9: ' ' I E a 2 vt i E E 5 :- E , E E' E ' i . E Z S 2 - E 3 . 5 Z I5 , , . . ' 5 fl S : : : : - ' ' : : 2 - , E E Eli . . sig E fl j . . E fx E : xx 5 , : lf E . , E I e A A which is used so successfully today. Instead of injecting the anesthetic solution near the tooth to be anesthetized, he injected it near the trunk of the inferior dental nerve. I ' ' I D E-ig Cocaine, lauded as a blessing to mankind, because of a long trail of operative 5? and post-operative by-effects, maintained its supremacy merely because no sub- stitute had been found for it which eliminated the dangers concomitant upon its i employment. Many practitioners of dentistry dreaded to use this powerful anes- Q 5 thetizing agent because of the dangers coupled with its uses. i E f 345 E15 T Eli W 5 i f ffm in ' " 'H I nl. W' 1- II "" " ' l54l mf' "' 'ul' ' p I l,ll " U Q aa .:afvfvm.,a 55 wrong? g - ' ., A,41. M.-1 5 - 'Q f lx E THE SATURDAY CLINIC E Ny' E Q I E The possible and probable sequelae of Cocaine usage in dentistry caused a Q ' N2 great many practitioners to fear it, with the result that cases requiring the extrac- E g tg- tion of teeth were often referred to those who administered nitrous oxide, and E AE cases requiring surgical interference of a more serious nature were referred to a 5 .5 general surgeon who, with hospital facilities available, could operate upon his :.- : e 54? and intimate knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the buccal cavity better fitted him to operate in such cases. ,--E patient under general anesthesia, even though the .dentist realized that his specific . --5 l A new era in dentistry came with Einhorn's discovery of Novocaine C1905j, l A Y 5 3 since this product fulfills all the requirements of an ideal local anesthetic for g l 5 5 mouth surgery. And now the pendulum is swinging in the opposite direction in 3 5 :" is E E 2 'E that the general surgeon refers many cases to the dental or oral surgeon for .E-L. E '-' i 3 E 5-:EE treatment, and rightly so, as there is no one better qualified than the properly 5 :3 trained dental surgeon to care for these special lesions. It is reasonable to suppose that the earliest form of dental surgery was the E g extraction of teeth. Barber-surgeons, by means of an instrument called a key, A I b si! mul' lu ly llnmmqu J: lilllllllllllllllllllllIIllIllIlllllllllllllllllllv In'rpnInnummullulllnnlllmlllllnll ll -nlxllmillrijl Im mm' ..llnl.... i UyiillllllllllIllIlIlllllIllllllllllllllllllllllllll ll- 'GE-'7 .fl illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll Illlt lf' i H ...nll..d.llu.. hl..r. Eifzlkg 'Tv' 7?- Q .: - Ex E li 5-3 .1-'E Q E A A 5 3 E .- r 1 E 5 S 5 . 'J' 2 5 - E E 5 g A . 1 E 5 2 2 2 S E ' c E E : 3 E 2 E Z :I 5 a 5 F 5 wal: E i 5 : ll .- , W 2 s ' l E l E gfxl E 5 'V 5 2 XE l l fi 77 kv meh : f i - I E F' '3 were the earliest practitioners of this phase of dentistry. Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes in a humorous vein, wrote in effect that it was a key indeedg it may have opened the door of the sufferer in due time, but while the bolt was turning, the victim thought he was in that other place where the man must be who invented gig QE that instrument of torture. q Lg Today, the procedure is far different. The patient enters the dentist's oHT1ce f Pl-3 and is given a local or general anesthetic, has one or more teeth submitted to the ffl l 1 embrace of the forceps or elevator, looks about him and asks when you are going i l Lf to begin. 3 E 5 -1. '- --4--- in-mu-" f 'l v "'uw-u fy nnnuv' rl 'iltwllllfxwirmrwffffrfr"-'i"Ii'IIll' 'll H926 Il' "l1nuinn1WrFrf'liiirafifliillllllllbiiri' 1' - k.li"':"J.ullu:- .4..i'lllliu. 'Illu-.T ""' .. ll ll X Illl.. ""' linlllll' ..llli'l'..u. -:lllu-k""'li.f wi In.. -A 'Illini in' lllllllllllllllllllllllllll llllll :Ill ll 'E ll mm ll .ii mi "'iil', dh... .I It S115 llllllll nun ulnllilllllnu According to the oft quoted statement of Celsus The Surgeon should be young By this it is inferred that one attempting to operate should be possessed of the muscular strength the courage the sureness of hand and the keenness of eye which are assumed to be the concomitants of youth Oral surgery is a handicraft and the accomplished operator must be possessed of the qualifications which are the peculiar requisite of this art Like all other mechanical activities much in the attainment of success depends upon the natural aptitude and the physical qualification of the individual' but still more depends upon culture and experience however most of all there must be a ground work of scientific attainments which can recognize and evaluate cause and effect as based upon an intimate knowledge of anatomy physiology bacteriol- ogy and pathology Knowledge of anatomy is not acquired alone from the study of books and of charts' it should be supplemented by dissections just as bacter- iology and pathology require the microscope for elucidation and as the laboratory should supply the findings in physiology Well-matured and well-balanced judgment must guide the hand of him whose :"7 x' lllll um - skill would prove effective He may do well who is bold but he will do better who 2 E has precise knowledge and knows how to apply it The surest measure of confidence E 5 E rests with him who operates accurately knowing what he has to do and how to do it. : I 5 : E ' E 'X 2 E ' 5 E lryg l 5 - E - - llll ll 2 llllll 515 FE-we Els ,. 1 ,-1-, Fl: - : : il L., E S FIRST FACU TY EDA 1866-6 A153 g g L M L' 7 E g my I,II1.li..nllllllftlrfmni-:qu .--. : : lllnuuumnlllllmmulllnnll Illlllll ' I1luuumnnuuunlummmmmuullll ---- .ya--'Inputjlmln-..' mi xl I ff 'fl ' , Y--' silzmaa' an .1 ' ..2 .'l"1:'7l . 356,35 u.. an lln. . un Ill t I llumu u l in Il I - .ull lr .1 t 1 k3ix 3 ,PLO 'Q '1 A , as K-.e " EX - as K ' 5 -' ,. , , 2 - Q 9 9 9 , 5 . . 5 E 3 E C 1 E 5 - E g 4 c E E 2 . . , 2' E E . S 5 : ? , 4 E E E - - , , , 51 . . g 5 fx 3 s ' E Q E : i ' 5 S i 3 ' , E 1 E 5 4 2 ' ' E he 5 l Q ' E 1 5 5 A 5 '- " . -35 ...,.. ' E ale F z --. 00 gg- FTA! 1 2 E62 age ill' nlunnll 'kat lu I I I 1 Ih ra-.W I mu i , LE si '7 2 ?I' ii" i ji "al " I vllll l"' v i 4 'Ill l"l I - -5 H.. ry- S E PQ.!!LKff1'ff'1,'.... t .Alf4-f1'ff-TJ!!!.! i561 ,111 "f yy 1' 1 11 111 " ,1111:ffL, . ' 1' llIlllllllllllIllIIlllllllllllllllllllllllllll I 'GEF I unnumnmmuu u l 'Q ' . ' .lf 5 xii E EE E--: -si Eli : E E E P1111 , 1 1 M ' l RTHODCNTIA ' ' ,.,, 5 25' ' - , , "' "',- , 13,12-' " Jai, A ffya j, ii ,--1 , 2 errt A A RALPH WALDRON Asrislaizt Professor Ammtants HARRY BULI ANNA URBAN JACOB STOLZENBERG ABRAHAM LEEs HERBERT COOPERMAN A .vsislants DENNIS GLUCKSMAN NORMAN HILI,YER JEROME TRIER RALPH WALDRON ORTHODONTIA . RALPH WALDRON, DD.S. Orthodontia has been generally accepted as that science which treats of the etiology, diagnosis and treatment of the abnormal in the development of the dental and maxillary arches, and of their relation to a symmetrical contour of the face. . This science came into the dental profession as a great benefaction to man- kind, first creeping its way into dentistry in company with prosthetics, or mechani- cal dentistry, as it was called in those days, for orthodontia was then considered simply a mechanical art, but gradually this viewpoint changed. The effect of mutilation upon the form of the dental arches, caused by extrac- 17A 2 1 1, 5 1i sie r eq 111 5 Z T- 5 E .5 EQ 5-'Tl .E a i: E E : : : : 5-3-.E I' 'WJ-nu Ill qrlrflll:-E'-nga.--ir llnmunlnu1lnumummnllllllllllll ' ' llIl""'"""""""""lilnllllllllllllnll gn:--qv-T1 turn nu 'lm' , gg.- 1 .1-1 11- e1..f"'-14-"1f"'--1-1 Wffvmfe 1. . ll. .1 -11'-"' 11-f-M1111 11: 11 1- ,f vo F . . . . . . - .,'v, R: 1 'Ti' 1 . . rr F: 3 f f f ,gp ,ef,,, ,f , f , f, , X f N2 ,A 5 S R ' QWJE 3. 'f , f ffff ff i,,fjf1'5v ,flu E E 5 V, 1 f, if I , V f f 1 , , 1 f f ,, , , f ., f ff 5 E S S E ff 1 I I :: : " , 1 ff! " as E , if E E 5 ' My f 1 E 5 E " 4,7 sv" E E 4 1 f s : 'fi : 5 W : E S W M fa 2 E f ' f f X 1,1 f f 1 , 1 f , fl L ll W , f If - : 3 1 E 5 E ll 2 1 A E 5 ll 1 . E , Q1 E Z -1 S f 1 , 1 1 A 1 1 ell ? 1 XE E N 1 19 i 9 1 s 5 2 ,K :1 E 5 : E NS1 yn A l Q if' 2 N s 1 X 5 l : 0, 5: 3 2 tion and unsymmetrical growth was soon noted, because of the facial distortion which usually accompanies malformed jaws and maloccluded teeth. ' The history of orthodontia clearly indicates a progressive tendency toward a better appreciation of the biological nature of the orthodontic problem, for now EL? not only is mechanics considered but also the biological and physiological phenom- ena which are the principal factors that make or mar normal occlusion and its ,QE accompanying face form. I gig Formerly we filled a cavity with metal or porcelain to preserve the tooth p if from further decay, considering the tooth as a unit. Fortunately this point of view 3 A . has changed, and the tooth is now considered as only a unit of a series. The series 1 I 5 'sul -----1 -. ------ lllllw' 1 1 "'Illlll ,. ,.----- 2 -.t-1-1 gs ,.- 5 5 ll, dl, H rl! Alhllllll lliillif e M K, hh:---Aullllf' Isdnht .lu. 4 ylilhlt. 'lullu-7 ..-" .1 ' If li .. '.--' iirllnl' .1 lIIi"I,n. 'flllllgs-:ml .ll l571 I i Illll lyjl U A aiu - - .-.-I I I Imlllllllllllllllll nnlnu n nnulnnuxnnuuu nnunll ll My i lum nnfnnnnnnlnlllnnllnunlnl nllllnll I 1 il ill ll ull? , .., L, O - .1 1 an interdependent part of the masticatory apparatus and this a mutually dependent Q part of the whole individual The dental and orthodontic problem, instead of being , 1- --E merely the mechanical consideration of the disposition of the individual tooth 5 - 5115 : became a study of the teeth in their relation to the life processes of the living : : -'3 organism as a whole This extension of dental vision from the lndividual tooth as ' f E an entity to the individual tooth as a unit of the whole marked the dawn of the E ' realization that orthodontia is primarily concerned with a physiological problem .. : 5 rather than a mechanical one While a knowledge of mechanics will always E 3 E E have an important place in dental science we no longer attempt to employ simply " Q E : the principles of mechanics in the study of orthodontic problems E llllll 7 - In the ultimate the determining factor now is the consideration of the activi- E mlllllll lllllllluul Ek- E : -1 E gall: SUE - X, S 5 l ll 5 EE as 5 5 ll ru unni mu HH- H uuuuu u lu nummummuumu v - mf-A.. Gvsxeey 1 MQW u t mi n I mn iuniuu MI H - e - ' 'Ss , M X in -1 vu s nn' fimmnummnnn umum mmm nn umm: ' 2 vip 'N 'T X n nur uuu nr mm in n uum m 1 mmrnnmn nUllllD,A'1Y":Ei ties process and phenomena incidental to and characteristic of living tissues Today the purpose of dentistry is to assist in establishing and maintaining the normal functional activity of the masticatory apparatus as a part of the living organism The natural forms and relations of the teeth are preserved and restored in order that the normal functional activity of the masticatory apparatus may be realized The filling of a tooth the treatment of an alveolar abscess the construc- tion of an artificial substitute or the development of the supporting structures of the teeth by artificial means in fact each and every operation upon or within the teeth is governed by the same purpose, i.e., to restore the normal functional activ- ity of the masticatory apparatus as a whole. And it is because of the fact that the functional activity of the masticatory apparatus as a whole is the criterion of all dental operations, that the science of orthodontia is an essential part of the under- graduate curriculum. Time and space does not permit me to enumerate the blessings orthodontia has bestowed upon mankind, and words fail to express my feelings. I can but quote to you an eulogy by that Grand Man of Dentistry, Dr. C. N. Johnson of Chicago, wherein he most eloquently expresses his sentiments toward orthodontia by saying, "Groping at first in the mists and shadows of experimental uncertainty, orthodontia has emerged into the clearer atmosphere of a brighter dawn, where its achievements are penetrating the clouds and shedding sunshine over the hearts and minds of men. Sponsored by a small band of noble and devoted enthusiasts in the beginning, it has swept across the horizon of our professional activities till it embraces today the best energy of many earnest practitioners, with an ever-increas- ing interest on the part of the profession and the public at large." All honor to the pioneers in this beneficent art, the men who blazed the way- who went ahead and made a path through the dense wilderness of ignorance-long 5 : - : i E elk EHS E :. E 5:5 'Sl E i 4 1 Fl? L.. ,. -Q- :: 2 E 5 2 3 , 5 2 before there was system or cohesion in the movement-long before there were schools teaching the art, or societies everywhere discussing the latest and best in QE this wondrous specialty. It would sometimes seem as if the keenest and most pro- gg? gm? gressive minds in the profession had rallied to the banner of orthodontia, and were 5 QL! devoting their very lives to its development. 3, And what a blessing it has all been. Think of the countless lives it has sweetened by its beneficence. It has freed humanity from one of its most glaring l'f deformities, and has transformed the hideous imperfections of Nature into the . 7 it swf Els Ji ,',,I,,,,,,l I .T it 'I I 'll III I in ll is my gnnnuv '- M I 1: 'qi' ill," If ll -za 1' ifQlllll'l!laiWMH':vff..:ri'l.!!ll-fi-f'.,.fl ..l,..if-,fll!.4' Y!.?llGfi,,F l58l iq 'N1 u F cm' 1 I Ill -CF!-'1 gi 4 1: gf yfxit 'ri l E E ' :- 5 xl' 315 EE essence of symmetry and beauty. It has waved the magic wand of its subtle 'nrt across the distorted features of little children and lo they have come forth per- fect in the image of divinity It has relieved the aching hearts of mothers and, added to the joy and pride of doting fathers It has removed from budding youth the blight of prejudice 'md destroyed the handicap which threatened to mar 'L human life It has idded to health to beauty to opportunity to 'ldv incement It has snatched from many '1 sensitive child the honor of derision and planted in his heart the seeds of hope and confidence and courage It has given children '1 fair chance where Nature had threatened to trample them under the ruthless feet of deformity It has sweetened the lives of countless youths 1nd made possible careers of achievement and success. It has turned despair into hope and discour- agement into the very joy of life It has bv its marvelous artistry molded the human countenance into lines as fair 'is those of Apollo 'ind has changed the features of a freak into the profile of '1 god. It has wrought modern miracles great 'is those recorded in the script of ancient days 'ind made the impossible of yesterday the routine 'ind commonplace of today. It has spread the blessings of beauty and harmony over the blighted lives of myriads now on earth, and will do the same for myriads yet unborn Out of the chaos of the past-the doubt, the dread, and the despair of dis- figurementn--has come this beneficent science, to bring solace to the sons of men. And the end is not yet. There are greater achievements ahead, and the future holds high the banner of promise and of pledge. In the growing east, we see the many-tinted bow beckoning in the dawning of a better day, when "all the children of all the people" shall be brought under the blessings of this benevolent art, and the cry of despair coming from the hearts of fl f' HX mann, gg rtur1IIlliZ...m. 'lu ? E little children shall be banished from the ears of men. I r , I l I 'llqmlg .amllllllllill gi-3 I E umn uwuuu nimigquuluwmv--u-ummmuuu mmumunmm muuv ummmr -35,351-,sh XX ? f g -J - .ffifigi 4:,- , I mmm! lllm lllllll lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllunm ll.. Q. .42 LT.. ' . . R . . . ig gf . E . a " l ' A A . ' F " - F ' ' ' .. E E ' 5. E? ' 5 5 . t 5-S: . 5 1 J . -ri ' . ' ' :- 1 ' A ?':i fnlgiimi -'A H ul M t " lf, ,f 5,4 F j F-QtEZ,'5:f, I e mm mllllllhli. ..G?Zf.r42f" -4 Mi 6: 5' ll . x f I ORTHODONTIA CLINIC Q r'f"'Wllnllu wnareff'"lsesrn'i'Il'111""i'l"' 11926 l"f'"'fff:"'lnnur.nrft-est-I -"ee-e'erraiIl1l":::'-"rl 'll--IL rntdiulllm' Ia:illl"ill'll"'EIl:.ff -Q... .... '-dll. llllr l59l qv. ig N Wf.3,,Vf .f " fn' -of r7f4f,f,,fjf, ' ywfyfl 54, ff 'row ,fl f off , f x , W' HT- f ..,A.,... Q.:-:. A E A "" """IlllllllIlllllllllllllllllllllllllIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIllllIlllIIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll E 2 2 A I K E E 2 A E E g lil., E E 5 E Y ' as E E my ii'-Q. L 5 E 1 .wg v ,i . fy .- , W unlulnmnummmnmnm E . up lg i. .n llllllllll ll l lllllll Illlllll lllllll l II IIIIIIII I IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII p 5 y is E mx T Q lx -. ,I E w L .,. V E M ALEXANDER FRASER -...E ALEXANDER FRASER - CHARLES DARLINGTON' CHARLES DARLINGTON Q5 E A J E l X lil y , X E ,f 2 ' 5 S X i l E , E .. I Q S 4 E E 5172 l i i i 'I ' Professor Asst. Professor ' i ARTHUR MC QUILLAN ARTHUR lVICQUII.I.AN Louis LEFKOWITZ I ig I Adj. Prof. Instructor X U Q ' . A ' 1 THEO. J. CURPHEY JOSEPH E. CoRR ,L l E - l - Leclurer Asst. Instr. Q E --E ' ?-E E U 2 2 5.2 , PATPIOLOGY DEPARTNIENT E E ALEXANDER FRASER, M.D. 5 ?-Q The pathological department of the New York University College of Den- tistry arose from the union of the pathological department of the New York ,LG College of Dentistry with that of the New York University and Bellevue Hospital E33 f Medical College. 1 The former was in charge of the late Dr. Faneuil Weisse from its institution li ii in 1870 until June 22, 1915. In this period from 1897 to 1905, pathological his- l tology and bacteriology were taught by Dr. James Ewing, now professor of path- 5 Q ology at Cornell University Medical College. , .mg rlllllllllllll -------- q'fll """" Illlllllllvmv Im"4Il""lIl ln'i-Q:g'-1i1g"'lf-7'pr"'::iii.::- "" ,'lllIlIIIIH" "' l'is'm!lll"1"II"'Wm -f .W ill-'yi-..1fiu,Illfm H925 1l"'t' JH l"H"":""'fWr 1-1'nlnwIsWW'lll6'l '. "' KM' "" ' -:mr .nil '1llu... "" l .. ll ll V I ll ll .. ' "". .nllll' .1 lin.. -alll:-f"""ij l60 l flllll " F 1 I' ,f lcxcl "" l at .I l .- .... ' '.' llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll ll Q57 lm, .,.m.,mm,, ...nm ,mg lj ' v.,, A ', D ,' ii gflxi : S E .2 as sh V1 lil From 1905 to 1922 the subject was taught by Dr Lee and from 1922 to 1925 by Dr McQuillan now Associate Professor of the combined departments The latter of the two departments resulted from the consolidation of the New York University Medical College with the Bellevue Hospital Medical College in 1898 The pathological department of the latter was instituted in 1861 and pathology was at first taught in connection with surgery by Dr James R Wood In 1881 the professorship was given to Dr William H Welch who later was appointed professor of pathology and bacteriology at Johns Hopkins University Medical College In 1892 the chair was taken over by Dr Edward K Dunham who continued as professor after the union in 1898. The professorship of pathology in the New York University Medical College was held successively from its institution in 1852 until the union by Drs T M Markoe T C Finnel E G Janeway J W S Arnold L A Stimson and H P Loomis After the union Dr Dunham continued in charge until 1903 when he was succeeded by Dr Richard Pearce who later was appointed professor of pathology in the University of Pennsylvania Medical College and is now head of a research department under the Rockefeller Foundation After two years Dr Pearce was succeeded by Dr. Douglas Symmers who remained in charge for seven years when he was appointed pathologist to Bellevue Hospital. Dr. Symmers still retains his connection with the department as professor of gross pathology. Dr. Symmers' place was taken by Dr. Alexander Fraser who is the present head of the newly incorporated pathological department of the New York University College of Dentistry. . The course of instruction is in principle the same as that given in the Medical College. The outline followed has been chosen on the belief that the most important phase of the teaching of pathology to the student of dentistry as well as to the student of medicine lies in a thorough grounding in the fundamental principles of the subject in their relation to biology, chemistry, anatomy and physiology. The student who has mastered these fundamentals has little difficulty in applying them to the various diseases in different parts of the organism. From the practical side,' taking the view that disease is essentially a disturbance in function of the organism the various disturbances are taken up from the standpoint of etiology, f, A at .lx ll E lim!! E ig ef ,Am llll1lllflnlm.......' lllll E EEE structural basis and briefly the clinical phenomena that can readily be deduced 5 -.E from these. Though tissues from all parts of the body are studied during the course, the fundamental principles being everywhere the same, yet a special effort : - is made to favor the selection of material from the oral cavity, thus embodying 5 5 what might be called a .special course in dental pathology. A. Q r 2 - - 2 " 2 - - -' " E 'i E .. - .S I' w,mf"' III q:"fIII::':'l"":a'l lllll Illv ll'IIllllIIIlllllllillllllllillllllll ' 1 . ul. .............. mmm....m.m....,,mu ,zu ---. ,Z-::l:..,ql , .--- I lm. , .F'i".l"' ':t:."""'i'"""" ":l EM MA W l: -"""""i'i""EZ?.'"'lT 'h"lii'l'2?'e1'5ll Q 4 H - r f it I 5 .-:: EJ" i , i 1 n E . . E 5 - E 5 : . O . . . E E E ' E E A ? . .S 9 1 7 2 2 h E ' al E 2 E ' ' g 2' 2 lf S x 5 . . I S K i Q 5 F 'E 952: I- z: Lvffi N531 EVE ENE SIE ali gig 3.6 'sz Eb: - 'I ll " . lllllllllll 9 S I Ill 'III l 1 -wg llllllllll if 1, ag? g 5 Z 2 5 iii ll" il' l n 'l"""Tf7I" IIIlf5,"01 all. .-4l..ff-anti? ..... 5 i t .. l61l GEQRGE B WALLACE ' u n nw mum uuuum mum umwwnvmw- uumuuu um li u .. ... H l fxfr ,six J A- 1 m"'l".. n Z --4 fs ,nf , 5,4623 E aes " .fl ll ilu n ulu un i luuu llllllllllallllll lllllllllllluu lllllllll llll l llllllllllllllllllllllllllllll ll. A-'IE'-T SYN Qt 4: - SLE? x ' - 5 R A X Q f X 5 5 E A , 1,45 V x , , . , X 3" Y 2 E r A 'se .C : i 4 it XE - A "bg 5' .. ll Q A fi A -X5 X E me xg f a gi.. E- X . 5 s E . x 2 X N 5 jf S X sg 2 . st Y E AN X .5 2- .E X "-"5--,-1 . A Q ' ' ' ' Q Vs . x X Q X X? X Q" t K J 9 ' E Q 5 X E E - V 1 -4 Xa Q X EEL Qt , -, g Q A X Xt I 'X xt Q X X : -.112 ef Q X X mg Y x 5: 5 - ll ll"""""""""""'f"1""2""'W.., xx .-- llllillllllllllllllllilllllllllll lllllqlfllllfll ' 'QB' 5 z ,sf 17 V, S 4 ,H 1 P pl -1 A - in I li mini ummm n -. nm nn mmmml rm mmvnmmmmmln nfnllllilllli? gli Q" if if E25 K ll 5...E -.--- Q9 .5 'rm 5 E sig .E :E 'l l, if I f ' : QFWAM CEQA' 'VIMQEV 'UM liv we in I , illIllllllllIlllllIllllllllllllllllllllll ull H N577 i llu muunu munml l l . "' Al l m l X ttyl I AQ X, ,lw X WW f V57 2E f i GEORGE B. WALLACE EMIL J. PELLINI Assn. Prof. - Is KAC N EUWHITH Inrtrurt nr CHARLES VETTER EMII. J. PELLINI CHARLES VETTER Adj. Prof. DAVIEI M KOLLEN lrulruftor I rnfesrur PHARMACOLOGY IN THE DENTAL CURRICULUM GEORGE B. WALLACE, M.D. The teaching of pharmacology as a branch of experimental science is of com- paratively recent origin. Until the last decade of the nineteenth century, the cus- tomary teaching was limited to the course known as Materia Medica. Physicians of the past generations were accustomed to prepare and dispense their medicines, and Materia Medica confined itself largely to a study of the botanical origin and phys- ical properties of drugs, with a listing of the conditions or diseases for which they in ra- mill ' ' " H 'yu 1. :A in fag , I E 5 5-LE Eli ill! ..! ?Cli x ' A S al 4 f fig ....,, ,,,,.., ,..,, ,,,,, , sw iiisHlI!!..!F"a g.1 l., .!..!!lG1f4,"l '- i621 its J in " 'a 'I' .. ' ',' IIIlllllllllllllllllllllllllll umm ull 12557 I in mu ' lj ' i... ", fi: E E 2-'-:E IUIIIIIIIII llll were thought to be beneficial Explanations of the actions of drugs were either entirely lacking or consisted in assumptions which were generally incorrect During the last half of the nineteenth century there gradually developed a school of pharmacologists who by the use of experimental methods began to examine into and accurately determine the actions of drugs on the living animal There arose also the class of manufacturing druggists who supplied the drugs which the doctor previously was obliged to collect and prepare for himself I this way there came about a lessened interest in the botanical and physical aspects of drugs and a greater interest in the exact manner in which they produced their effects The teaching followed these changes slowly and it was not much more than twenty five years ago that efforts were begun in the better medical schools to secure as instructors men whose main interest was in the experimental method and who had an adequate training and modern point of vievs for pharmacological '. 9 N 'L til' . nl lllm llll " lllmllmlllll I - '-dc. , ,, gi""J4t?'s,z'.-, litmuiin in nun ui uldI...1i??g'g . . . sg J s . : 5 . . if 2 rs . :QE g H Hliwlmmnllv nmnnumlu num nl Ill 11p1lI1l"'1".a9s-TEE Ejgm XT -gl n I mnul nn n......nn n nm nmm nunn v-UlllL'5,c'?P"h-'f 'rug 2rlf::g::"l'fiv ""' I IIII nww A 1"-u IIIII II iv" .,-'E5ll!!F.?F E.!!.l7-fifl,'il. r ..l1.Z.-'1'.2f-ll..' Fliflllw 5 .- research At the present time all of the first class medical schools have independent ' : 5 departments of pharmacology manned by a full-time staff and the subject itself - g 5 has become one of the basic medical sciences The use of drugs as therapeutic - 2 a ents is no lon er an em iric one but is a rational a lication of harmacolo ical I ' S 8 P PP P S 2 2 knowledge 3 2 If the present status of pharmacology has been of slow development in the 2 E 1 E N E medical colleges, it has received still less attention in the schools of dentistry. The E W' gf ,E use of drugs in dental practise is a limited one. It is confined, in fact, to antisep- E ,xg E E tics, anaesthetics, protectives, irritants-escharotics, drugs which are used for local 5 E E l effects only. These effects, together with methods of applying the drugs can be ill 2.5 learned with no diH'iculty in a short time, and from a strictly practical standpoint, 5 : 5-:E ?-if A 2: : : might be considered all that the practitioner need know. But this knowledge gives g E to its possessor no conception of pharmacology as a science. It affords a certain 5.2 7" E . . . . . . . . . . 37 work in an approved manner, but it remains mechanical and there is no underlying . scientific basis for meeting new or unusual conditions. EE p Q That dentistry should be a learned profession and not a highly developed Q , l 3 l 5 system of mechanics is generally recognized. The view is held more and more l j E i 5 widely that dentistry should be a specialty in medicine in the broad sense of this ii f T i mechanical facility, which it is true may result in carrying out a certain piece of 7 Y 3 5 : : term. To use an example, it should not be compared to optometry, which often ?.-'E 5: E " 2 Fgq ii i- 5 5. means a mechanical fitting of eyeglasses, but to ophthalmology, which considers E :E' not only all phases of eye disease, but also the relationship of the body as a whole to eye function and disease. The acceptance of -this view means that the dental F-'E student must have a sound scientific foundation in physiology, pathology, chem- : F istry, pharmacology, comparable to that given the medical student. On this broad foundation he builds up his specialty, on which he becomes able to speak with the same authority, breadth of view and scientific exactness that his medical confrere EF exercises on a medical specialty. gf The present course in Pharmacology and Therapeutics has been arranged to gg afford the proper scientific background for rational therapy. In the second year, 2 v by means of lectures, recitations and experimental laboratory work, a general view 'A E I and understanding of Pharmacology as a whole is developed. In the third year a : ' ' if g s aqjg ,lllllllll Wa In ll H I l 152' I ulllllllll l 63 l Q utr .K P- - gi mlm ' ll 1.1 u .- E B .I j IHINTHII llI1'l:Il,'!ll' ulllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllll I ll ulllIIIlllllllilllllllllllllllllllllll ll lllll 'illlhulllll' ll 'Im' X 4 fl 4 -4 P l 4 ills ..--, fs .E-'f"...llh ""' 'ipl........ . .....i l.. W ,4 ... ..i ll- 'IFA- -fy , . . . . . ff . . C .- 'Q 5 : , , , 1 , K , E E 523 U ., E 5 E l r 4 K 4 1 1 r r K E - : 4 f - f - - - 2 E 4 1 ' 4 4 T ' 4 ' i 2 5 E g 5 A E - ll l - is i 2 Q 2 if E -2 7 IL N2 N : ll sx S x S ' 2 5 4 4, ,rg it ' LJN4 Pa af 5 5 E a I 2 'lg a 5 E -- S ' 5 ' - .. 5135.2 EE Ti ',l K n i i - -.Q EVE il: more det'1iled study 'ind 1n'1lysis of the 'ictions of drucs of especiwl impormne in dentistry is m'1de. In the lust yc'1r the therwpeutic 'lppllC'lfl0l1 of drugs to p'1tients is studied. In 'iddition therwpeutic 'ibents other tlrin drubs 'ire investigwted. 'Ihe l'1st years course while it dem'1nds the e'1reful observwtion and recordin, th'1t hoes with experimentil work is in f'1ct strictly '1 pr'1etic'1l course. Considering, the course 'is '1 whole 'ind purticulwrlg its orderly sequence 'ind development there seems no doubt th'1t it offers suitwhle trwining for '1 r'1tion'1l 'incl modern system of dent'1l therwpeuties. It g,ix es to the dentist '1 knowledge of the principles of thempy equal to th'1t of the medicwl speciwlist 'md '1 profession-il st'1ndin 'is 'i thempist to w hich he is fully entitled. CARNEGIR LECTURE HALL llllllllllll -T Fat., In l'llllIl l l llll ll 1 1- 'llllllllll ,- N5 1' l'xA ' 2 IUIIIIIIIIITIIIIVI Ill llllfl lllllll llll llllll lm lmnl i f Z E l' 5 5 E i N 5 : p I E sis s a a ,.: El! ara! 523 5 : QQ 502 Q l s. . HE FE P 2 3.1 if Z i lff Q 1 i all E 5 '- "t"' ' "" ' ' "' ' ' Us!lll..!.'!lfsiii?iue1irrffrfs:::!1f E.!l.l-wfll., i ,.ll.'.e'f-2f'lll!.i .EFYMJ l64I i- E g ll announcement for 1866-67, "The course in this department will be experimental dl. ii' I. li .H 'nl 'TTlmmnunmnmnnm 1 mu nl li W-E37 i il' in I .li 'li .mit fpwi? ' EV' X Q ily EA-52 E.-1' 512 lib Ittts:atwmaaiwfaWaaWmW.fa.rWa'WM Way W L .ftl . FJ HOLMES L. JACKSON Prufessrlr JOHN B Sraizx Assn. I mf. NIARGARET Fuasiz -lsrislarll Hovfr S HOPKINS . Assistarit Hunts C. COOMBS HOLNIES C. JACKSON llI5fT7ll'l07' JOHN BETHUNE STEIN PHYSIOLOGY AND HISTOLOGY IN THE NEW' YORK COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY FROM 1865 TO 1925 By JoHN BETHUNE STEIN, NLD. The "Prospectus" of the New York College of Dentistry for the session of 1865 states that Rufus King Brown, M.D., was "Professor of Theoretical and Experimental Physiology". The announcement of the session of 1866-67 shows that Professor Brown's title had been changed to 'KProfessor of Experimental Physiology and Microscopy". Under the heading "Physiology and Microscopyv, one may read in the 2 " : - 2 E! E 2 E 5 :I -lk EN R E EE. E :E is F 1 I E 1 E 5 5 ll 5: - - - ' 5-1. , : - 5 ' and demonstrative. In it will be presented to the eye of the student, by means of : E "IlIllll Im .- - " --.1 1 ml' InI:-ulllllf'iulimn--.r,m-:ulllpn:uI1lnInninlllInlnulllnnlllllllllll ll' - llpnnuIumm::mlmnnlulllllllunlil pta--.Ili-1..mplY'1llllln--Zim. in l 5-J , gf, 1, .fr n. . Qfwmm ..u ,:.'.'... r.. f ,Q fl :"K'x,,"g . .i .rl llu.. . 4 . Il IIII ll n i t ' - I I I llllllllllllll n ll llllllllllllln .- ..nll. li. ..i . ywykv 1 giqfpj . if x xi Q' A aa, f, f N s V' Y M 1 I :i F' L 'Q A 41 A- p 'TN . A : - '14 ' , 4 5 'a 5 W mn uv' Q -in 'll'lv'li" g - I ' llll' ' rl' Ill! T - : Kg ii' hill fiiviilli il, f 'Z : E ,, My A l.li,iiii J, all L for 1 .. E E I : 2' im" fiv I : E I: J ii 'it W X W X E E 1 I If . 5 rd E 2 Qi Q. .. S - flibvx f f X W of N' xo N L.: sy stu zu g i : " v f , av - E .H 04 4 4 J. ,,, 4 ,X ,X E : 5 : 5 - - ' Y : . I - : I Z n f I : : T - Av . K' E I E r - 1 1 g :A .: Q E E ll 2' ' 'E AE lxi ' r' : ,N 5 x . E I E H T experiments on the organs of living animals of various kinds, illustrations of the H 2 5 various functions as they are really performed in the living body. The physiolog- I E E e 5 ical phenomena, constituting the act of digestion, those of circulation, respiration, 2 E WE-, ji' 95 - - - 3.4 :Li muscular power and nervous play, as well as others of the physiological functions, Elg Emi :mi LS 31: al: 1 ' f , Z J? ' 5 2 fi . 5 , 4 can be made apparent to the eye and thus palpable to the perception of the student. The student will thus become proficient by becoming an eye-witness of the various - 5 i steps of the mode in which all the known functions of the body have been ascer- 1 tained. By this mode of proceeding all the vital properties of the living organs , I , and tissues can be easily ascertained. . - - ' . 3 EWS Ellis unsung ke-GR dull H 'X H, In 'Bti' gnmuu , .,,, ,,,, , ., LMP H.!!.lT.aul .iili..'li-i'3-if..ii.i 1651 p V-1' un 'yd In I 4 .. , .. - Illnnnnnumunnnn :umm :Ill l V57 I , ,, H ,, ' In Microscopy the mode of ascertaining the component elements of the 1 EE 1- dental structures will be fully illustrated by fresh preparations and special atten- E E 2 tion will be devoted to the illustration of the minute anatomy of the nervous ii: 5 E system E Z -' The text-books in use were D'1ltons Physiology and Beale On the Micro- E 5 Q E scope E : E Z During the session of 1867-68 Professor Browns title was again changed 2 5 5 E and he became known as Professor of Experimental Physiology and Microscopic E E E E Anatomy Q : E : In the announcement of 1869-70 the name of Alexander William Stein M D E E nu 111 appears as Professor of Histology Visce.al Anatomy and Physiology and under E the caption Visceral Anatomy and Physiology one may read The anatomy of the viscera of the body will be fully described and demonstrated upon the cadaver 1 ' r 2 . . 5 5 attention upon them exerts a decided influence upon the attainments of students". The announcement for the session of 1877-78 states that, "Those who desire . n :ME : .. is mmf llllunnnm I 2 E Physiology will be comprehensively treated and many of the functions elucidated E : E E by experiments upon living animals The histology of the various tissues of the 5 E E E body will be described and exhibited under the microscope Special attention will E E - 2 be given to the structure and development of the teeth E 'E : 5 e 5 5 The eleventh announcement 1876 states In addition to the clinics held at 5 .1 E E the College, our students have access to Charity now City Hospital, Welfare 5 fl , I :Ari :1 i AWE Islandj and Bellevue Hospitals, with all the privileges of medical students. They 5 A 5 - I 1 - E are E jig 2 can attend the medical, as well as the surgical clinics, witness all operations, etc., 5 Q - E y E : W - - 5 M5 upon the specialty of dental surgery, dislocations, fractures, necrosis, and exsec- E E tions of the maxillary bones are frequently seen. Professor Stein, who is one of 5.5 5 l 5 obtaining a great amount of varied practical information aside from much bearing : I S 35 W- the attending surgeons at Charity Hospital, will give clinics at that institution, :Az gl? where students will have an opportunity of familiarizing themselves with the ' 1 importance of a prompt recognition of syphilitic lesions in the mouth cannot be overestimated, considering their highly contagious nature and the ready manner . A , . 3 5 these hospital clinics are obvious and experience has shown that 3 , derived from - - " as yr varied lesions of syphilis, especially those of the face and buccal cavity. The E in which they may be transmitted from mouth to mouth. The great advantages - 5 E - to learn how to work with the microscope and to section and mount various tissues, Emi : can do so by entering the special classes therefor. The anatomy of the viscera of iii 5 5 the body will be described and demonstrated by recent specimens, plates and lantern E E -1-..., " "' " ' 'I' 'W 'P' U "I A I , ,. 5.4 1 in r 1 ini n 1 u ll 1: I: R I-X ' - , " ' V . 1 . A " I 'I I I mm in nu 1 u ll' ,a-5?sf H C A1 n mu nur n m . .. n n n nn n m nm: nn nn I lp ai--5.-fi.1"" slides". In 1891 a histological laboratory was established and Dr. Frank Abbott, Jr., gig was made Director. B.: EL? l 'Big s 5 ' I zqnl Et- 5 In 1895 the writer was appointed Professor of Physiology and Histology and E since 1915 he has also lectured on diseases of the mouth and directed the oral im! surgery clinic until this year 1 E" Fosters Physiology was the text-book used from 1880 to 1906 Howells , , American Text-Book of Physiology was recommended as a reference book for .lf . , TI ' . f if llfi K 2 li r lla n1llll ":P11gg"if"' H9 allr. -'Xxx"'lnl rrrmsffwwgwr.muu1glagg:"".q "tl"--3--3 ....... i53ll.pll ..., "'1ll:., -... .... "--' ' ,. II 1. ., H1 ln .. '--"' f.....Q. 'f.llf"'...l'le 1661 E ' un ' " "Hr nr' H I Qgwgmog Q51 -ali 'R 'rm Q " ,num gnf 145 Q several years Halliburtons Physiology was recommended for some time but Q I N 5 Howell s Physiology has been in general use in the department since 1906 1 5-ji In 1913 the writer visited many of the physiological laboratories in France 5 5 E : Germany Austria Switzerland England and Scotland in order to study the E '- ' E methods of teaching practical physiology in these laboratories with the view of E E establishing a laboratory in our College E E : In 1916 the writer after visiting several physiological laboratories in this : 5 E country called upon Dean Holmes C Jackson the professor of physiology at 5 Q E E his laboratory in the University and Bellevue Hospital Medical College where E I E IT he received good advice and many viluable suggestions 2 Q E The history of this branch of teaching would be incomplete without men- 5 : : tioning that The Dental Educational Council of America and the Carnegie E , 5 Foundation conjointly commended the department. The laboratory is thoroughly , , E A Q equipped for the work of the course which par illels that in the better medical E A E :l schools The laboratory can accommodate seventy-five students One hundred and - 2 Z twenty-two hours are devoted to laboratory work and one hundred and nine to lf 5 A E didactic work There are four full-time members of the departmental staff. 2 E E E When the College merged with the New York University Professor Stein 5 - 5 E became Associate Professor of Physiology in the New York University College g : 5 E of Dentistry, Dr. Hoyt S. Hopkins was appointed Assistant Professor and Miss E il E lx SAE :mi :f 5 Margaret Furse, A.B., Assistant in Physiology. The Department of Histology E ps E f 5 was placed under the direction of the Department of Anatomy. E : : : E 5 E E - X Q llyg The Department of Physiology in the New York University College of 3, E 3 5 Dentistry is now directed by Dean Holmes Condict Jackson, Professor of Physiol- 515 E ogy in the Colleges of Medicine and Dentistry of the New York University. - -, gli F' 5 5 E as a - I E E - - - - 5 ?-E 5 2 I In 'll I llll I ill' 'Il 'Illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllu l ' 1IIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll l ll' "V l Ill! TIIII Il" 1 gif? M, ,. ,, ' It ' 'I' - Q - 2 - ' 1 llllallllh..Ilui...llm'illI ug.llllnlllllllmuulnuunmnmmizmlin lit WEE-'7 .il III II' ig!! mlmllkiell..dllludh' sed 583 Aki EM, YV' 'vvr Q J . ' . , - E ' . . 5 E Q E , , , . 1 E 5 5 g . . . . , E E E - . . E E E E 7 , C 1 . C , c z , g E :I . 1 1 , E E E 1 4 1 1 . E E 3 - S u L K E ' 2 '5 . . . . " . . 2- E 5 ,X - c f E 'L E Z I S sy- , . . . EV: E X - - 4 c 1 4 - E I E E N a C 1 5 E : f :: . 4 1 1 4 2 fx E P ' - N ' 2 rl 5 X ' It e l 1 w E102-J 1: --: ,--. 2375 :GENE ass EXE 5 E 3 T Sig -,i ill' S NE :J .. - ili ' PHYSIOLOGY LABORATORY : llllllllll I .T F- C- I I I Illl' h lh ,Tw lg jlllllllll E IWI . gli Q-lg 9 'E , 'all """"' :gen """ III' "' r 1 "'lIl IIII I fp lp- UE!!!!!F.!F"!!leiiiR1tTiiJfs:::!E'll.lf-fi'fl, Il.. 1 i.lI.'..'l1i17fl,Ff.4F a:'1::e1ff1auaii.?iiTlE251!!' .l.5lllMf?1fu,f L I 1331 lcxcl I 9 g 231152 5 E :I anWgQmvfm,wmofmMmqfaIfwmWfig 5 3 .. E E -- I Q -. ,- E S . 5 E: U E - N 5 ini EVN? : CN' 5 : ,fix E 5 'X' 5 ELLISON HILLYER 5 E Hg gui 25.5 ig E12 , 5.2 S i s ELLISON HILLYER Ano. Prof. EDWIN B. 'FRIPP Supl. of Clinic DAVID TANCHESTER Examiner JOSEPH ROIG Examiner NIILTON BROWN Caxting 5:3 Inlay JACOB A. BLUHM Dir. Pros. Technic NIILTON COHEN ' Dir. Dental Ceramic AMSHEL GUEE1' Dir. Removable Bridge NIORRIS GOLDENEERO Dir. Pros. Tech nic fFre.rhmenj 5 .. ll , I E V . I 5 E IE 5 E ,lu . , V HIIIIITIIIIII ful: ::""l l"' I :Ill llllll llllll lllll llllllllllll llllllllllllllll ll' ' lg nullllulllulnllllllll lllllllllllll llll llllllll PL "" Ill? 7llIIll"'? I.IIl ll N K III. 'I.'7-::I-'-...'.-IIIIID," ,QEWWIHQG "VIO.Z3.E'9' lg...I-lllI.f......III.- .I-If lhmfx .I.. .III .III l..., , -.IullmullllumIIIIInnnummnunulll II N-47 fl IllllllllllllllllllllllllllIlllllllllllllln .- . .... ull. VIII.. .I. i iiixki Q -1 ff v w- w Dv To Na Nw w ' .,IIl- W mm- , va A A ,A fn P I I dy 5 ,1- Q - 3 l -R I I " 'IWW A ' ., ' Q W' ll I ' WI II' O O A c Q I . ,Q 3 r 1 - it 'UM .H 5 E 2 RQ Wg9 ' g l'il1jf1H'E' I Q 2 - . I g E ly Ulf, N ' xv n 'A I Lncvnfm in A Hn - E E E . - :Wk : :AM-' -Ji : IN 'I E I: A 5 :Ax I: As A If QI l EVE 2 E JOSEPH R. BURKE CHARLES ANDREWS LOUIS BLUMENI-'ELD GEO CAMNITZER JOHN CAPUTO ABRAHAM COOHAN MAX CRYSTAL FRANCIS EDELSTEIN REUBEN FOGELSON WALTER FOLEY FREDERICK GREEN JOSEPH LANDA MILTON IEVY SAUL NATHANSON DAVID OEOLER EDWARD PENSON MAX PROPPER CECIL ScHATz BENJAMIN ScHwARTz SIDNEY SOLOMON IsRAEL USDAN S Y ag. -'I 105 SL' E I I I I AWS I ' Y E l"'ll'lllIllI 3-Iv' I --'- uv' I ' "HI "" ll 'III-I wllllllv' 1IQ!!!!P!!P"s!::I'IfIEmfIfI2:::rFf''!E!!lliTIffI'fI-I'III I i681 'lull' it 'FIf5"""f""L M97 A i s www?-Eg' I1-""""'f!': .'ll'."'9.'!J ' AXNQC T731 E E 5 fx if. ET ?i-E it-5 r I gi E i s s PHOST HODOIN 'I IA Irrmsov HILLYER, D DS It is not many years ago that Prosthetic Dentistry was unknown 'is such. Dentistry wis either Operative -dealing in iinlv with the tre itment 'md filling of teeth-'md Mechlnical -covering restorations of lost parts Text books issued in the last part of the nineteenth century were devoted to Mech inical Den- tistry 'ind dealt with the subject along purely mechfinical lines. Impression methods were crude and consideration of the mouth prior to the taking of in impression was exceedingly limited. Relief of hard maxillary areas was given but little thought and atmospheric pressure retention of edentulous restorations was almost wholly depended upon. The s ereotyped air-chamber was prevalent in such cases Restoration by means of crowns and bridge-work was confined to but few types and little or no consider ition was paid to pulp canal treatment Except in the practice of '1 limited number focal infection --'is we now know it-was either unknown or but little regarded. 'Mummificationi' of pulps, a method by which the pulpal contents were removed and a paste inserted which was intended to so affect the canal contents as to render them inert, was but a poor attempt to co'pe with the infection problem. The final years of the last century showed a marked awakening in every branch of dental practice. Improvements began in both operative and prosthetic departments. The realization of the importance of oral health conditions as related to that of the general system became ever-increasingly apparent. The laity, llllllllllllllllllIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllll INE7 i 'IIIIIHIIIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll -- 0 f. iii QL T? 5 Fl - X - Illlllllllilllllllllllfllll NIH!" "'lIl1MlI!!l lllllll um QU llll lllllllllll llllllllll ml I I ll E,.: 515 mummnunun ,X t - ,j lllllillll 55 :AE 5 E 'Wim I' "'lIlllllf'uu r--'un---u puuuuununlnummuumluullllll V I - U'mummnmuumnuuumuumnll ll""'ll""' llllY'Wllllll"" I X 3 Y- l"4lr. ll l I , 1 ll ""l 141- fs- -J. g- an I , HIP 1 I 1 'Ill , , . .Q 5,4 ,- : . ,WEL p .1 Ili.. . 1 i 1 imll. li. in . .whit 1 1- . f' .. - 5 1- ?-L 1 --.5 : 5 1 t i . L . E :s - 5' E E E it 37 E g 1 1 1 1 ' 1 r gq - E E G 1 " . " . 2 1 1 . 5 - 2 . K' 1 . " . . . 5 - . . 2 K' 2 . f 2 3 an - : - I. K I C C E S : S . . . 1 E ,- E I : 1 1 . 1 . . . F: : : ' c 1 : : n 5 . . r ' ". . " . . ' A E :W : . 1 . -- E x 2 I E " A 1 1 1 1 ' E E .1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 E If E E 2 ca X ss : 1 1 , 1 1 s Q E I N i f Y ' 3 1 Iii'-1 E 3 gf : :QE 7 E E'-E EME 192 :1,: fl? 5 7 REMOVABLE BRIDGE LABORATORY 4 ' S 515. 2 2 5 F sie Em' gli sl: f i . 34' E """ I "' I 1 "' ' -5 " "1felil'll"is'rs!fii?ii.Efarf?f:fs:::3:?"F4.ill-fffiTl.. 11 ,JL.1-11'-if-Tflll...P'lF't"zfnFi'iWr'!!:fF"F!'Mi -- llllllllllllll -1- 1 421.5 In-un I l, uumil had ll -F, lumlulli ll nliilkai ul T ciiln III l'691 . kg' ll l i ll M ' 1 . if '.L..' sl: also entered into a better understanding of the prevalent conditions and by increas- I A ' ,E ing co-operation made it possible to carry to proper length many operations which -f 5-: made for the result desired -- 2 f The leading teachers particularly in the association of the Dental Colleges E : E then known as The National Institute of Dental Technics and later The ' - E American Association of Dental Schools lent every energy toward the develop- 5 E ment of every possible improvement ' A : 5 - E Consideration of oral conditions prior to the taking of an impression methods f E E T of impression taking and the materials best suited' better understanding of the ' E g 5 adaptation of restorations to fulfill the various functions more scientific treatment E " of edentulous conditions involving a vast amount of investigation and experimen- 1' : tation treatment of pulp canals with a view to their proper sterilization and filling ' ' : all these and many more elements entered into the development of what is now - 5 known as Prosthetic Dentistry Mechanical Dentistry was absorbed and the 2 : .- field greatly extended. Much more than mechanics is now depended upon for f 5 ' the results desired A broad comprehensive treatment is involved and everyistep TE -3 is one requiring painstaking care 'I he field has grown within this first quarter of 2 E 5 E the Twentieth Century so rapidly that it is now sub-divided into special fields of ? : - i : full dentures partial dentures, crown and bridge work, both fixed and removable, E 2 : - 2 E E . . . E 'T 5 I in 5 and palate reconstructions. Any one of these fields offers almost unlimited oppor- E , E E, Orthodontia, which has become such a marvelous specialty in dental practice, E 7, E E I E E I 5 lr' ' 1 : I - , - . . . . . . . . . . : i E g Alix E tunity for the enthusiastic practitioner, who is drawn to its limited practice. gkx g g ' Q is another offspring of "Mechanical Dentistry", for in its early years it was prac- :, : 5 ': 5 'S 5 5 ticed almost entirely along mechanical lines-using crude appliances. 5. 5 5 ... , ... . . . . - . . SAE g--E The field of Dental Prosthesis, in its broadening scope, will prove attractive 2:5 SIE to more and more of the graduates from year to year and it is my sincere hope 5.3 B the last. i 25 3 EE Ei F ? that we may see as great advances in the next twenty-five years as we have in ' 5 : :: 2 : - z E Ei: : -': :lt Fl'-: gi.-: ... .. .. .. - - .. ... .- : : 5 E : : It 1 r..--1 I , 1-.QI l-, -l, I 'V 'wm:.g,, lf' :gig .--- : :Paw llllulllllllllllllllllllllllulbl' I,nur,lunlullIlnullllllllllllulmllllllllllllulYluzi"'l'H: :J u ill IY LIIHI . a .dh iuiiiulul I!9illllllIlllllllll Illlli ll. fi? .fi lll ll' liqiiuni nilhisll..dillu.,lhr'ir. 9,1425 Q' ' 1 1 55- rr -E,-K : l V E '-E is-E ' E 5 2 4 I , K I H H , E lg 2 E K ' K I 2 E 2 - . 2 S 2 ': . . . - E 5 E E 1 1 1 , 1 E : : Q . : : 5 9 1 1 1 1 E : 5 2 3 . . . . . . 5 E E 5 A 3 1 1 1 li' E XAE K 11 rv. at I K ya 4 L S K : 5 X E K , 1 11 I as E I E E Xi 2 . . . . ' . . E fx.. S xy : l K I E E Al ' ' - fl ke.. -3-1 :": - : 35 Pa? Eli "E S - E E r -Qs nugunnl -T was Ill ul! dl I., In ll A. -H 1. Illlllllllll . l70l gli i 772 i 1 E 1 4 it f'i'.5lIll D IIIL ZY- " ii"lIIII lIlZF5'i "' -"!..,1f':m.i' .... ,'-1-'l'Q.lIn. i ing' '..uf-1-.,.!'l..IIrQa N M " ' " I u r' ll- E ,' " y I ll llldllll Kilim' 'ull - mlllllllllllllll llllll ll N557 III IIII IIIIII II TI ul I .. .ill :. , A, 1. se' 4 , y A V yi 1 , 0 gig f fwfffwfwr err L 5 E : V f -. E 5 A E 3 E - V ""g 4 :Rss . 4 E E E ABRAHAM L. GREENFIEI,D HENRY MUSTERMANN g - 5 E Director Asst. Director - fEA.i ABRAHAM L. GREENFIELD -A5 7 ' 7 , ABRAHAM L. GREENFIELD, D.D.S. One of the greatest aids in the art of healing is the X-ray. It has unquestion- Q ably proven itself indispensable. I p I 2 The teeth as factors in focal infection have received considerable attention. E E N 5 That diseased teeth are likely to produce infection elsewhere in the body, is uni- 5 5 E E :I ?AE5 X-RAY DEPARTMENT ggi 5 :Eg versally accepted. The radiogram is the best means at our disposal in detecting 5'-3'-E such diseased teeth. With the increase in popularity of the theory that diseased E E teeth are among the causative factors in the production of disease in remote por- img tions of the bod , came the increased use of X-ra s. As a result, thousands of .3 2-is y y at?- E E X-ray machines are now in the hands of dentists. The manufacturers' great work 5 2 ' in simplifying X-ray machines, has made this condition possible. ' Tu, yep I mu -IIIII qunmr ,qu -:ill WmmmnIIIlIlIIIIlIIuIllIllllllllllllll UlmuuIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIInululll Ia: -lv. ll Illrdlllln- 'lm an ZFX'-n E7 p lll lllll - ill ragga l 'll 'HH' - I I lllllll I I I ll ll l . .ull In I :ASQ . , f ug wil gx ' f f 'W' W wa E 'lg .- ,' 1 -is 4 1 ff! f In 1 ll E I: Ei" W WW I WW We Wm mvk WK " 'QR iiiiffrai- ....... "-' S :I Z My E E Id f ' : E E Z I. f E W I 1 I " X 5 E E 4 J 2 5 Z 5 l """'fmffffM'47 Q Z ? : E Z Q0 was X ww. A xx waNmw?x iiSRS., E Z :I , , E 4 I , X f 1 I X ,I I' : .f f . ., x A all E .. E E all E 1 E 2 yi: E f C. E be I 3 f 'L' AX I I2 All. . f ll S K S Z lb' - : K. : .. - Si ': The X-ray was discovered in 1895 by Rontgen, a German who found these 505 rays quite accidentally. Previous and up to 1895 experiments were conducted with Q6 : -ii : :QT i I EOE SLE tubes of partial vacuum. It was known that when such a tube was energized with 5 2 'mi a current of high potential, certain rays would be produced, which rays would - i -7 cause certain salts to glow in darkness Platino barium cyanide was one of the s ilts -b I ff The story goes that Riintgen was in his laboratory at one end of which was a f'i l screen coated with the above mentioned salt. At another end of the room was a tube , I - which was being energized at that particular moment Riintgen had occasion to - f Illllllmll ll 5622... Illl l' Ill I II Uh ,za-argl ll I nu ' gui . 1 . gas rg . . if i e . , . . . f , '11 "" I gen '-"'- I llvll I1"' V 1 "'lll Ivll I -g lllll 1 v l:'1?3llll..l"!!l!53lR.llF'i??TfFf!il?:f lllllff-ff-T". ll., .li'.,"i'.?'l-lllfgl a:'1i??f21fi!!"uraiifwllll' .l...llEf'L,5 l71l , ml' Hung..ullllllfi-illflnv-H-4 uv-- : :iq Ununnmlnlnumlnlululllllmllllll l Ill.n1ummmmunuinuunnmnlllllil,plz .... ,',:--.miniillllliwgllm. lima' Tim-.Uillflliirlfmlh nfiy ww ltilisi lllllnllnllllglw iv '41,3111 uhnx iMy Ex 'ii L . .n.. ...H .lln .... , -. llIIIllllllllIllIIIIllllllllllllllllllllllllll li 1.::7 . Inman.mlmmum.mmmmmll ,, - 4,,,,,n,. ,V .hy ,,,L , again ' .MQ '- '- if . . . . . .' . . . L Eg jf f . . . . . . . f 5 E 3 5 . - . . . , 2 Q E - . . . , l . , E E .- ' , 4 4 1 1 4 2 E 1 Y 7 1 I I E I.. s m E E E - . '. . . 1 : . a . : E 2 - . . . . g ' . E E. Q . . . . . . i ,- g A - . . . . , . . E NE 5 2 . . . . . . . ' ' ll N E 5 - . . .' . i f 2 J . . . . . . , . . . if E -if " . . . . . . WX 5 il Eli xy i . X ' 'if EE Ejg Illl Il lllllll lll Ill Illll llll lll llllllllll lm ul llll lllll s i : . 5 ll ..'-E 1' 1 qi .E Ulu r O f l i 'f N e 5.2 me walk across the room and was 'amazed to see 'i shadow cast on the screen when he traversed the space between the tube 'ind screen He placed his hand in the ray 'ind he saw the bones of his hand clearly outlined on the screen. Nledical science immediately began using the X-rays in their work both for diagnostic 'ind therapeutic purposes with considerable success. Dentistry how- ever was slow in adopting this valuable '1'd. 'lhe lNew Xork College of Dentistry was among the pioneers in the use of the X-ray for dental purposes. Dr. Francis Ielioy Saterlee founded the depart- ment here Under his uipable guidance the depirtment grew in leaps ind bounds until the quarters became too small for this fast rowing member of the College As near back 'is 1918 the X-rag clinic had 'i room which had absolutely no windows and was quite small Very few students could be accommodated in this small space with any degree of safetv. The orfil surgery clinic was the one clinic that chiefly availed itself of the opportunity to use the Y-ray department Yery few of the cases in the operative clinic were ever sent down to be X-rayed. What '1 difference today. We have '1 large light airy room which can accom- modate '1 considerable number of students The machinery is of the latest type. All departments send their patients to the clinic, and in this way, the students receive the benefit of the radiogram from a diagnostic standpoint. The students are also assigned to the clinic for practical X-ray work. The future for X-ray and for this department through the agency of the X-ray is limitless. The trend of thought today is to use the radiogram in preven- tive dentistry as well as for diagnosis, especially in the detection of hidden caries. There is considerable work to be done with X-rays as a healing agent. Experiments with X-rays are now being performed to help in the cure of pyorrhea and alveolar abscesses. - lllllllllllll 6-is Ill ll ll I I 4.3, 1- lnnulqn 53- 5 .I ' ,Q 2 2 f 5 .5-ig gl? ll 1 3 3 g 2 E S E : E ii Fl? ill? :Ti 3 , 2 4' 3 Ellis w . H9 5 I. 73 I 1 X11 I1 1 RF S' 1 1 1 4' 1' 111 1 11 MTB E M 1'1 1 11 3141 1.17 11N ff' ' Il,,,l..., 1,51 Mull, I1 ,,,,,.-l A 1 M "" 1 155 11: fgsfffw 1 fu 11. 1 W 11411 111 X11 111 11 . 1 1 . ., 111.1 1 , . . 1 1 1111111111111 11 ' !' ,,f-X X M ' J! 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K L1 1 1' 1 1 11 1 1 Q1 111 11 1 1 1 111 1 X ' ' 1, "' 11 1 1 I f 1 1 'LQ 11 ,ff 111 1 1,1 111211 1 1 '111 Q 11 '1 1' If 111 RW' 1'1 "1P' 17111' 1 1 1j1+ :1j ,V 11' .1 1 1 ,Q 1 17 1 111 '11 "1 11 1- ' """ X " ' 'T'11111 ff' 11 Qi1l2' 1' 1 1' 1i1 "1 11'11""1' '1' 1 111111 1 Ku' 1 '1 f1 1 'f 1 111 W111'1111'1111' A, 1' 1 1111 1 1 1 11 1115 114 11 1 X K xxby 111 X 24, 111 111 1 1111 11 111 1' 1'1'11 1 '1 1 1 '1 ' '1"f1 1'111 111""111 111 W' 1 1,1 11 1 1' 11 1 1' 11' ,1 '4 1 111 ' 11 1,'11,f1,1111 "'1'Y1 , 1 1 1" 1 11 1 1 1 11111111111 13 11 1 111 1 1 1 1 1 1 5 111 1 1 11 11 1 1 11115 1111 11 1 11111' 11,111 1 111111"?",1111 M 1 1 1 111 1 111 In 1111 111 1111111 I N411 1 1.11111 11 1 15113151-11 11 1111 111111111111 1 11 1 ::.l'!1 l1-V -L14 uw . 211 1 111 X11 11111111 1,1 1 X 1 b f 1 111 111'11 1 1111111111' 1 " 11 '11 '1 1 I 'A' ' "' I' 1 51 ""' M'1151'l1" i5"jl " '5"' 9 11f111'1 111111. 1 11 1 11 11 11111111'1 11111 1 1 111 ' ,Q uv. ,, ....,,, 4, f l v 'f I, 7 N ' 1 Y A ,,,, ,..,,.,, 7 N Q Z f ff - f 5 X . f ,,,,., A A Y ,ffm If ww 4 I ff 231 A gg xx X US ?1 ' V , I X MX' X A? ' "' W 7 W ,',' ,f 'f ,: Mr , I 4b ,fum 49511: ,,,, W H , ff GR f Q 'Wi' X ffq fliq 1' W 1 'hmkhw J, . , ' 3w'r1 W"l m"M l!iFfl ' ' WM! ,iz ' K , , ff, ' if 5 TC I 'V W W f ! W in ,a Xltf ?. W, 1? ,IM 'ff lwf b ' f V . gl - f 1, 5, "X .ff ' at ' s , f -N-4. ' in WW K' fl x V, 4Z ,, IWQ- W V : X Wfffjf l , I f f -T' ,-an ,, 5, , F-sf---L - - "':f5!'i:!57:,gEEiF - vigii: M., ,g ' "N ""f":EEE5::::!I 5-si ' I . -lllI"'35fE!i - X I X I 73 1 FN' mf 1'f'Tm 4-A M 5 'Mum . . . A N N . - . , - . V I Y- . ' 4 ' -1? "-11' A 1 - -NX -X. ,L - Y -f frrf T... -- gnh, Hy . .mTK, I W 1 ,1gS"'i?5-P E E13 5 ? ff --71:45 -X XX Q- . J Q di?f:i44,2:T, 5 M W Im ,1 '.1. wy1+W." 1. 'Qilv will, lw 1fi7'?ffuf 7 gkflinfi :Gigi " " " 1 L, Y' , , .Jr-.. wif? HQ! A 7 fue r ,125 L17 if iff? L2 Q, CX 1 3 My f aft QQ! 5 5 Quit: 1 , r. i Ugg? 5 ' 3? ,. zlilxiiiflg Q3 'fin' S'G5'7::i41-13 f'-'jixh : F 132.15 SQ i ' WlIlll""lllIlllI"'ll W I p- J - - if X-fk uf V V . A 1'w ,W - g,- ,, - E 1 El m , i jg! If F fgxijfff gfggwff ' - "XF if P -,1 3"' ' ,, Mi!-l 1 , , i .T , 4, .,, ,,,,,,x ,"',,f,',,f, gJ 'Xxx Q J TJK, fi if':.7ifi'iWbi' QENMDG iiffiil frffw-H? lP '1ir-if'?im U T, E FAREWELL OF THE SENIOR CLASS PRFSIDENT f , EE ' rg- We have reached that goal for which we have striven for four long years. i g f E We are now entering upon our chosen careers and about to assume our places as Q E E members of an honored profession one essential to the welfare of mankind Our S I : E college days so dear to us are ended now only for us to face the sterner realities E E I of life Before us lies the world-indeed grave are our responsibilities We are - E 3 E fortunate enough to be ably equipped for this battle and so feel confident to cope E 5 E E with life s problems as we meet them E Z E 5 New York University has long been recognized as one of the foremost seats of E E E - learning in the entire world Ours is the privilege of being the first class to be - E E E officially graduated under its regime We fully realize our positions as pioneers of 5 g 2' E the new branch in that university and know that our actions will always reflect - gf E 5 upon her Bearing this in mind it is our duty to conduct ourselves both profes- E 5 E E sionally and socially in such a manner as never to besmirch the fair name of our 'Q 5 E college 5 : 5 E To Dean Jackson and Dr Vetter E :- g E You have taught us the lessons. of a life devoted to the helpfulness of our E lf. E 5 A 5 fellow man, permitting nothing to prevent the fulfillment of these high ideals. : I ' - ' N ' 5 25: E Well have we learned, under your careful guidance, the meaning of professional E ' T : : vi E E 5 ethics. Whatever success may be ours in the future, we may with certainty attribute g , E S ii. to the noble example you have set. We thank you for the benefits derived from 2' E 5 E . . . . 5 -55:5 your teachings, for your keen cooperation and yourinterest in our welfare. 53,25 SAE 5 E Q .- Fa : To the Members of the Faculty E my pleasure. We have spent four important years of our lives under your careg T i we have learned well that the chief aim of dental teaching lies not in the open g 5 I E g . 5 ' i g facts before us but in the underlying principles of knowledge which we must sep- 5 1 ' 1 Space does not permit me to individually mention each of you as would be E 5 . . - : E 9 5 arately uncover. Not only have you given us a sound dental education and prac- 5 Q 5,2 tical training but you have inculcated us with the ideals essential in the makeup of ggi? :LE :' T 5--5 the efficient practitioner. Memories of you, even from the very beginning of our Emg 5 5,2 contact with you, will not fade away. Truly, you served usg truly, you helped usg and we shall not forget. FTAZQH ul ,Wm ull ll 'ru' :mum 'xl 'lmnnnlnllllluulmmmlllllllllllll ,I Illnnnluuunmuulllnmunlnnunlllll ,lah num: lung' H lugxmul ks. ' 561:31 l:f4'..'t-Lair., il rv " ". 'inf - I l 1 1 gl F'-H' fl luufl 4 1 in lm.. ,fillIllllllllllllIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll lt Y-E27 1 lllllllllllllllllIlllllllllllllllllllllllll - wil II- -1 "TT" 'YT' Q A 1 - 'Q : - J 5 -1 :LE . SE : E 5 E : . ' 5 .2 ' ' E E E I 9 s ' s . - E gg- . . E - 2 " 5 Q Q E I U 1 S 5 ' E , , R 1 : fi - I 5 ll : E . , I: A E X 2 I E E A A I F E -: ll 2 - fx 5 A f 4 N 0 2 I S rl B X C Z arrmates W5 Exe inf-3 :UE 5 2 It is for you and for me to exchange farewells. The pleasant years we have : HIE E12 spent as students here are now over. Time is now at hand when it is necessary for I 5 , : 5.1 us as a class to part. In future years, no matter what our attainments may be, our , 3 .. bonds of friendship can be but a source of the greatest pleasure and comfort to us T May we always retain only the pleasantest memories of our days together and S7 : i of our Alma Mater lv - , THEODORE REICHMAN T E - :ul ...p mm Q- lllfztzlllltn, In -vlllrllll A Igllupllllp. ififfdllil'lbraaiiiit?a:fs::sff"Ffflllai.El, H i.I.J. -cliff'"4't:::111iiFliiiriai5:!!"9!!!!!lGff'..f U51 T 19'-st in .- l ' f.afefFe.f: ara, 'zifgjrysflsnifrffi9ffWJE'fWw I 'VJ lla if' f I Fry A' AZQQJUIITTII Till 'Hmy'lTl'llLEtlY1I7Tll l uf-jgfggf' lmll'lrmljUll'llr7lTl1mr7r7g ,Alt 'je I ..fljlX, I J """"""""-'Q' Xk,,.v 113. I- iii-.. QW .N , 'life 'gag efa l Z I I ' l ii '- I l l V , , if X , ,l'QTll'lQ I VN! N, it jllyfx VN! 'fl , We ll ll I f lftlllf l' ll 'll il l 'll Url CLASS OFFICERS 1926 I royal I lf . ,. . . ,. lflfl lv lite Preszdenl, I lllaollokx lil-LICHMAN .hl'l'ft'fl1I'j'. hlmlm' I EI'I'I'II,llAUM 7 - ,- - . , . , " 'I ill lfm' 1,I'L'5ldt'I1f. AIKRAIIAINI STO!-'F 1fA'd.l'Ill't'7', Ruins: bllmcllrlalz girth 1 Cnur1fi1llw'.r. Ihrxcuxx NIAe5Ill.l,AN. NIARCY FREY 'ill' , ,l - j ll' yi f SICNIUII CIASS I-IISTOIIY 'NIR , . . . . . 'll' l ll l' VI hat a Cllillllft' lt I5 now to look haek over tllat stretch of vears CIl1I'llI"' which ' I li li l l I 'H 1 H I I ll , It 3 we were 1ll'ClISI'0I1'I1'tI onlv to looking eagerlv forward! Our satisfaetion can olllv l ll l! ' ' ' ' ll , he C0lTIII1liIISlIl'2lI'C IVII'll the time spent RIIILI work aeeompllshedg f-hut IIIIS IS enough. M lv ,l l . . . . ' . . 1 ' 'Ll l VVho wishes to deny us a full ell-loymellt ot as replete ZIIILI just a compensation? ls U7 ,ll -l, Our experienee has been IIIUCII similar to tllat of ollr predecessors, hut it can safely l jf ' ' el -. he asserted that the present senior elass has hoth seen 1llICl felt the effects of more n WJ nf ,Jfifif changes that took place in the dental L'llI'l'l1'lllIllTI I'lIllII allv otller elass this illstitu- 'fi' li' fn .' . . ' ' z Q tlon ever aeeommodated III the past. ,j U 1- , . . . L.l,-,, ,Al gg 33? 'I he hrst novelty we CIIi'0IllIIl'I'K'LI was the one-year pre-dental course, a kllld ot Avlijli, ohturator session utilized to till a spaee whiell, strangely enough, was made pur- f ,Zz posely for it. It goes without saving that all the students were opposed to it and '-'I-W r f . . . 1 . 6 f everyone else was III favor ot this one-year eourse. But at last CVCII those hlgller 'Kgs' l um have realized its SlIOI'U'0I1IIlIf"S alld have aholished If--2ll71ll1CIOIIi'LI it ill favor I IB, I z-7 K I of a two-veal' course. l - l , .... . . ,IO WIIIIC husy Nvlfll that session, hy tar the greater part ot ollr elass being at llfxl New York Iiniversity or City College at the time, we picked up additional knowl- JT llli edge on such SIIIJUCCYS as Historv, English, NIZIIIICIIILIIICS, Seienees, and so forth l ,ll lf! h .I . D I All I alld got some real inside IIIIOTITILIUUII 011 startishes, sea ZIIICHIOIICS alld other three- I l l . a 1 - w 1 ' lll, 1 le-'fred animals. But all tlllS eould not take our nllnds awav from the suh eet W'lllCll , ff l I 1 no . J 5 , i 1 A ' Wll Y l lllll , 4. if Ak- I N , ll - - is , ., C , - ll I tw lwlllllli-ifis2i51+1TWL fWlm'l"'il-ll. tiger, FQ IM gtg'Q-54-','f,','f'1 wtf". ti 53 I wwe I'Yy,11?rlwT'l ugwwl' 2f:gf'+1'rr 5'--ll3XlflQ,':'xglfq-.Lg Q llnl lls. ,WC Y I76l M ' lII'I."" ' ' ' 1 - ' "",Q'lll ' " X ff"j,. lin ll 'lm'-:5ilIrl,'pi1ijlIm um . mtndllllllnrllllllllikvl' mm lhmjl: ullmygyb-Svzi , gtrigi Q 4 - - 1 4 F 55 "' ' E S E . . .i . . - . E 'S 5 if is 'E 2 .. - . . E g E " : E K E 2 g f .. E Z : E I E : - E ' , I fe f Z :I E , - : - b if ' ' E f : E 5 C I I :: E E N 5 - ' 1 1 - f 4' s 1 4 li , ri b 5 i : ,f 1: it - 1 F? . V K. Ulf -Q . lqllllllll lllllllllll lllll lllllllllllllllllll ll' , Ill IllIllllllllllllllllllllllll " H llll -1 -V 71 Il l I llllllllIllIIIllIIIlllIlllllllllllllllllllllll ll NE? rl Ullllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll ,xllkii T,- E S EE 5 E 'XE ll ll v 'I ,lg Ui: 5 2 " "' . :,E ME I U: 5.5 BG .,.. E-ie we had 'ill expressly proposed to undertake. Rather was our interestrsharpened in that direction ' 'j With the coming of summer this phase was over Ah! the moment for the long hoped-for time to enroll at Dental College had at last arrived, it was well worth the S750 10 it cost, to experience We now began to delve into subjects more relevant to the big subject. The lectures in Operative and Prosthetic Dentistry brought us to fi closer realization of our intended life-work, it brought us face to fate with things the nature of which many of us formerly had but faint knowledge We also witnessed the won- ders and intricacies of that interesting subject, anatomy, the hardest part of it being the bones. Physiology opened up to us the absorbingly interesting phenomena of the various life processes as hemodynamics, functions of the nervous svstem, digestion, etc , as well as gave to many of us our first insight and practical exper- ience in animal experimentation Here we got real scientific instruction on the proper preparation of frogs legs, 'md became most intimately acquainted with that most universal beverage, isntonic saline Dissection inured us to some more of the hardships of life, but made us all the more tenacious of the latter at the same time In the Histology laboratory the stains used were generally very pretty indeed, and contrasted beautifully That most wonderfully progressive of modern sciences, Chemistry, revealed to us the miracles of charcoal such as the mutual, and remarkably exceptional affinities of carbon atoms, their willingness to form long chains and rings and by a little extra coaxing, diamonds. This probably accounts for the price of coal, the value of which is potentially enormous. Much useful and practical information was derived from Metallurgy fone "T" and two "L's"j which can be summed up as the science which deals with the properties of metals, their relation to a symmetrical contour of the face and their use in the arts and industries. In practical Prosthetics we gained valuable manual practice and secured that digital dexterity so important in our technical and operative pro- cedures. All varieties of cases were done in the laboratory of this department- good, bad and indifferent. Incidentally, the Operative Technique class was our first experience in painless dentistry and paradoxically enough, our best cavity preparations were accomplished here. Our sculptural skillin the carving of plaster teeth confirmed our decision to stick to Dentistry. As the year drew to a close, everyone busied himself in study fwhether he affirmed or denied the factj in order to pass oif everything at once and to spend the summer free to recuperate, unaware of course that this was the last chance to take re-examinations wholesale, after that they would cost 2155.00 apiece, each and every one of them. Thelresults con- firmed the proverb that he who laughs last laughs best, but whatever else we can say of one of our favorite subjects of this year we must admit it'covered the ground. It is to be expected that our social activities were conspicuous by their absence, becau.se this was a busy year of study and adaptation, each one trying to find out just where he stood, a few unfortunately changing their point of view as we found out later when the next lap of the course began TWA 4- I' . .,... 'E-.. 2-'Z SAE.: gi-5 E E Ai E E Fl-E 1 .-: -. .. 2 2 : : gi.: ..-.1 E - E : : .2 : -....., "- ' . 5.1 :WAI ENE . ai: A 4 t 39.6 ' Nevertheless, whatever our feelings were at the close of the freshman year - we were not downhearted I - els Q l , i i Tl E E f jp our mn I 'r"" lII'lIll"' 1 1 "'lll""I "'1 Q3 mmunf Wil'"!F"lP:aTiaiFWrrrs'l'l'F!!!"l!f-fiffr.'ll ll',1'12-f?F'!!5EP"?':::af11aF?'5iii l'P"F!"'!!MfTJ" ' '... ,Agues rl ll... .. . II loud.. ... U71 Q 78 . i 1,1llilllllllllIlllIIllIllllllllllllllllllllllllll lW'i',V lllu llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll .Q i ., I., 511: The sophomore year was the busiestone of the entire course The time was extended to 5 .30 instead of 3 .30 as it was heretofore and the carrying of conditions was forbidden although it cannot be said that they were eliminated All this was to assure smooth sailing in the junior and senior years Our predecessors must have been some navigators' we were not so bad ourselves This year was distin- guished by the altered appearance of the student body White coats made their first and last appearance then they have not been quite the same color ever since Also moustaches began sprouting up here and there and kept on sprouting for some time to come These disguises together with the appearance of the mannikin face- masks thrust upon our unsuspecting persons, were most confusing at first but they were soon relegated to their proper places in outraged nature The practical chemistry course was not dry especially since acid was con- tinually getting on our hands and fingers and even clothes In general it was very interesting to indulge in a sleight-of-hand with the mysterious forces of nature such as breaking up molecules and test-tubes Upon entering the Operative and Prosthetic Technique classes we found out to our dismay that practically everyone 25 A jig .av F! lllllllmll IIIVII Illllll llllm millllllll -1 5 had to refit himself with instruments since most of the borrowers of the same had - : IIIIII 5 5 graduated and were fitting out their oHices with them or probably exchanging them : 5 fx 5 for Ritter units or were even, I dare say, going into the dental supply business. : ' x , - I. 1 llml E E However, the elimination of the stairs from the Prosthetic clinic to the Prosthetic E 5 E . E Ill III Ill Ill lll lillll technique class will go far toward lessening this objectional form of social inter- E flex- : E course in our college life. The set-ups in anatomical articulation were good on the 5 t E lm uidni N 4 rn 'I sl UQ fb 0 0 5 52. D- Q 'L' . 5 UQ F? 5' fb -vs sl C ff FY 23" as F9 2 rn an .- .- C ID FD Q- Q o C 5 l'f ru 'I 'H 0 . Fe Q K4 E3 . U3 x'-I ff N C3 'C 'I rs FY rm ff 5' rn mn .Ax llmuu articulations were, at least, as good as the articulators. The plate-work made us gli 5'-T5 very much interested and enthusiastic about tackling bridge-workg conversely the E'-T5 - ss SIE E E bridge-work we did made us enthusiastic about plate-work. The mannikin class 5+ E V i completed the course in painless dentistry, at least as far as the patient was con- cerned. Tin plugging heightened our interest in the gold-foil filling which in turn y made us great advocates of the amalgam filling. Not an exposure was recorded ll means were sometimes necessary to make them sog the director as a further check 3 5 :: .- B 1 E performed an apicoectomy on every individual root filled. The inlay class was an 5 : Z 2, introductory and practical course for all and even an extra-curricular course for I 5 . in this classg all the root-therapy cases were highly successful even though drastic i 3 5 E many, this last elective costing an additional 55.00. The inlays were on the whole E H E 5 5 : 1-J : " ' treacherous, there usually being some catch to them somewhere, sometimes every- :, .: E-'15 whereg it is still argued by some that the margins should have been thoroughly L"'! excavated and filled. Bacteriology impressed upon all of us the paramount value - Ill llll llll I Il hllullllll ll' Wgyud e':2bzM l fl i L uni iunumnu n 1 11 nu Mill. .frigg- . A . ii sv Q .mm mm nn ummm: mmm mmnnnummnn mumum mmnmmu 'lulmnnt -P X x u -Q1 kif3?E?:lr 'I 7 4 nun I nm -1. n nn uu nmnlllllll : E 3, E E , - - of sterility in almost everything. But of all the practical courses of this semester, Ph siolo was without doubt the most interestin , thanks to the unlimited zeal E ,., Y SY S : 5 and thorough earnestness of our director in planning out, equipping and conduct- fs in that class. The s eciall intensive discourse on the brain in the lecture course 5 5 gm g P Y 3 LE of that department was astonishing, its physiology a revelation. The Operative Li lecture course contained an interesting inclusion namely, Comparative Dental ' i . . . . , , 2 R, Anatomy which took into consideration all the classes of plants and animals and ff, W. J. Br an, s ecial em :hasis bein laid on the dentate varieties. : 5 , 5 Y P I S , 3 , 1 S Q f . 545 M M . g I E315 qu lllllll "' ask 'H ' 'X Il I f ,A ug luuu Ill ' . ., , ,,,, ,.,.. , . ,,. in P..!!!lfT.ff.':iHJ. . lf,ii1'.1.fP?!!.r' .l.!!!lE:frf,P Iwi if Q" ml! my 4 A H llllllllllllll mnnm umm ll I may l ' l Qc? is The end of the sophomore year we met prepared to take our first state exam- inations for the coveted license '. KE .Q : who were already busy 'it work continuing what they had started while attending E : dental engine and how our blood tingled at the terrific din of the scalers in the : -1 process of apoxesis! bo much engrossed we could hardly keep out of the way E ' E doubt at the time taking theirs in the various cafeterias that dot old '1wenty- 5 - E E ,X : Drs. Vetter and Waldron. i ! Eli-,E The one setback and saddest event of this time occurred very early in the 5 H : 5 . . s:-1 5 515 ll Q ii E : ' E Ei? E:-..-4-E .. ..--1 - I IE 5 a The beginning of the next semester opened the second and final the practical chapter in the Academic course the first was passed and reverently laid awaw for new fields to conquer The junior year found us on the clinical floor for the most time We were E 2 being gradually coaxed into the awe inspiring atmosphere of the clinics and heart- ened to take a hand ourselves upon witnessing the divine audacity of our fellows E 2 the summer colony at the same place How our hearts thrilled at each creak of 1 - : "'Hl1lIlllllIl :mil Illllll I f Q E of the demonstrators rushing about examining the work being done By this time j : Ill 5 - moustaches had sprouted up from everywhere they were more common than : 5 5 " proper all told plural but many very singular' a few fearful others brazenly : N: E intrepid The Prosthetic clinic had 1 somewhat more placid appearance due of : E E E course to the different nature of the work Here and there could be seen students , g 5 in laboriously engaged in that most exacting antic taking a bite' others were no 5 - 5 5 third Street like the laboratories of dental mechanics. Two new major lecture : : E E -E il' El : " :,l E 5 ,AWE courses were introduced to us in this year and given by our two esteemed professors, E lla 5 - , 5 I x 5 E EQ E 5 year in the death of our dean and professor, Dr. Alfred R. Starr. 5 35 Of the practical courses we took, outside of pathology, extraction, prosthetic -A: technique, radiology, periodontia, orthodontia, impressions and removable bridge, i .. 5- 2 sl? ' 1 : 1 there was very little work to be done. In this year Mort Salomon was chosen once more President, Ed Breiling not being re-elected for the simple reason that he had left school. This time Salomon was able to bring about a successful class danceg he i refused to repeat the shortcomings in this respect in our freshman class, although 5 rm this had by no means been due to any lack of zeal on his part. 5 5 E 5 Let us now pass onward to the senior year, the beginning of the end, the end :E 5 ?:.-E of the beginning. How our chests swelled, our moustaches tickled and our amal- gams glistened! How strange the straggling bare-faced vestiges of a pristine era Fl? L : 5 E E E E g now appeared! This was indeed the proximal year--yes, proximal to the land ,-1... of heart's desire. Alas, there was still required a year's separation-but even so, g a a s l : : only a temporary stopping. Nevertheless, we got to the end by constant plugging 1 "' 'W " ' "' " ' 1-'Mm U "MII n u if ii. un 1 num nn n n 1 I I '.: " ll - Q i ' if " 'HH' H' I H' u in un mu n nm' i2s,2,fFNWa l gl nwnul uu n I m n u if I mm n nn 1 lP..2Zi:4-.ff.":' and the frequent and prudent utilization of dams that did not leak, the sole pro- vision being that we should not run out of gold. The only trouble with the auto- Ei' : EOE matics, according to the general but probably biased opinion of the class, was that . ' ld Y they were not automatic enough. 5" Q42 .,,E 2 mi The social life of this year was, as can easily be devined, the most active ' of that in any other year Under the leadership of our President Reichman assisted - 1 most energetically by the class committees a successful dance which was more . . than a class dance but a school affair was held in December at the Hotel McAIpin. 1 llllllllll Ill ch! I I l l Z3 lllllll Lx E , go! il' .li EUS li'.,.ijlIIlIUWaW'e?i,1? 3iF !lIIlI "BHP " "'QQJ?ZE"lIII 'V Illlwviq if--.1---f ...... . salt.. .... "'flI:.., ----f -n i ,f in.. '---- ff...... ..IIf"'...iu'..llhi2 l801 A ..iI. ,...i',,.,s 'Ii f 'Iiii',., .Q1:vv.m,a If A fvroazar Mlllll -I iv-ff ,II-.,., ' , ji: ge ' -. E This year is characterized by a great change in our institution a change that 5 2 3 is fundamental and radical the mergence of the institution with New York Uni- - 2 gig versity But in spite of all the consequent changes our class has met with no i g E E confusion or precipitous departures in passing from the old administration to the '-,i : E E new Our uncompleted courses are completed new courses tending toward a 2 - ' E broadening out of the dental field into its parent science introduced and a closer : E : relation of dental and medical curricula established through actual contact. f : Z3 E This has been no deviation from the undisputed purpose of the former regime E : E E in dental education the direction is the same it is just in distance gained that : E E Z these changes have already accomplished such headway and will continue to gain 2 E 5 further headway toward that arbitrary goal where each part of the whole is rele- Q. E gated to its purposeful sphere in the practical yet each is expanded in the theoret- 5 - s I E ical to its proper boundaries many of them common in the greater parent field. 5 E 5 Max we who have witnessed this freshened activation of an ideal by no means : 5 3 'E new not slacken rather let us keep abreast of the foremost of our profession so - : g 5 that any future time shall find us as capable of fulfilling our moral oblig Ition to 2 5 : 5 humanity and to our profession as the most advanced achievement of science can 2 Z 5 E make possible E E i JAX: E. 1 55 si? is 555 SENIOR CLASS COMMITTEES I : l EE B: : 5 George Goldman, Chairman Arthur Eisenberg, Chairman 5 : F 5 , , E E 5 3 ' I ' DANCE COMMITTEE CAP AND GOWN COMMITTEE A f 5 5. 5 3 5 E Alexander Levitch Samuel Schlanger 54--E ,Eli Fl: ' L : L-4 2 1' 3 E 5 D il Brow f- 2 1 1 me n cI.Ass DAY COMMITTEE fig Said Milton O. Fenkel 5--S Louis J. Kirsch Jacob Ellen . Emi E E George Goldman, Chairman 5 5 lutvggl I 'I will -ulllllf' imma. ,up alll'lmunnunlnlnmmnlulnlllllllllll V I InnumnnInnnlnlnnnmllnuullnllI lp' .--. .uplrlllnly .lIIllllI..gI',m ,l igfv:-.5 V val-e vial' ill 'Illllilm a w IW .I..' ...II .Im ..., , ' 1,1llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll II Il llmuumuunnnnnmnnmm nullLQ . ..,. ml. VII.- '.,I. Qx ' , 1. Q1 gl' . ' ' 5 E 2 E 2 1 - . ' . 5 2 s , ' g g . . - 5 T 1 E g , ' . E E E . . . E 5 ' E E I I . E xx 1 9 z it I A 'V K C : N: KEN , 5 ' E 4 E E "' 1 I 1 , 2 5 rv f A ' ' IX in i - CHARM COMMITTEE Louis A. Milstein Louis A. Berkowitz, Chairman Sidney Zeitz Qflrillanfq STE PICTURE COMMITTEE if-2 1 arm EP an cm d I. Ch ' I ali PRINTING COMMITTEE Blrnt, Shiga airmail Benjamin Libson, Chairman 54-3 Louis Rabinowitz Q Joseph Cohen 3 i, l .I 5 E 34g ,.,,, ,,,, ..... , ., ,.. ..... . ,,,,,,,,.., , X 1 ..,,l,,,,,,I ........ . ,, ...... L ......, . :-... ,. I' lilli Ill' ll -ssi':-ll. -will ll H all ll! ,,, lllluwi-f:,eii?g,II ljlluullrllnl ransom!!! Ialllf-"l...f":II:... ---- "Ml 6 .IlI..'l- ---- ,..In1'I'.,.l'l-'ffllra l81l A ff! LEO ALBERT C. C. N. Y. Violet .'lrt Slajf. l"acully Medal Ol. And it came to pass that Leo set out to emulate a Prof and in true pedagogical manner hc commenced "Now, gentlemen," to the thun- derous applause of his classmates V crowding the lecture hall to the very 'rafters. On and on he lectured through every intricacy, overcoming all obstacles. and tinally "That will he all. gentle- men". A lone remaining student staggered to his feet a moment. mind be- fuddled, spun about and fell prostrate. . ' Q .Y is M .W . u Via .M . W S' V . ,iv LEON J. ALLEN. EEA C. C. N. Y. Lee is the one upon whom we all look quite confidently as the Ora Surgeon in embryo. So much so that wc, fthe editor? are lcd to suspect. also coniidently, that the embryo will mature into a bounc- ing prosthetist. Bc that as it may. X K 1 V P -N .Yi 1 lf . I .il 'l Q , fi ' xl ' iqliii. all ix nlltmlw ll il lin: - lflifiw , pk li' r lr "wi , i, iliil Mil' ii W1 . il, jj, 1 F1 fllyf' li xl wif .-395' 1, 1 41'-. r"-q if s ,iv uf.:-if , -gc . Lee is bound to succeed. kdilbl e n now he siows 1' signs of genius. That is. ', if we may assip.,n txose 'Q cccentricities to genius. mmm E X w I Wo I Q-N M77 1 X l 2,7 WA ,I X N nl X .gi . X C if ,i Azpf E: for ve l X l, ex , I I 1, , IM' , , X A la . fl x" 1 l r 1 .ui U fr 71,1 31,1 V' 'ff R ' 'im I rl .6 V 1 th V QW, Us ' X "L-.ls . W en!! f l . Tx-A l A J I wiv ' f N ' 1 Eg. iff . . . . .wail B 'I I Xb JM. f 2 2 Q i' Wm, -- my ' lin ,I X -'Z J 'N I Kilo f f. t Q A . lUn'f":1-ll' 'f -. l . f t f f cl ..-Tzxq X X H , , if flair' ,..:.,?,1 . -.. , i 3- ,f -3'-41 af x X NZD 1' V. ,V 71 j' 'f ' ' 1 'lil f ' ' f - ' L 1 1 I f Y ' 4 1 3 Ely, i - I "' I I v ' l V f if a t i821 SAMUEL BECKER C. C. N. Y. Sam. as a man of principle, has a definite philosophy of life. This as we gather from observa- tion, may be summed up in the motto, "Never do to-day what you can leave for to-morrow." And we can say for Sam that he is faithful to his principle. That is, except in one par- ticular. Sam is a husband and father. We wonder how he reconciles this with his philosophy. L 4 i f? i 2 H v-v UK A ,, ' f 83 ,I . f LL,- .,' I 1 . gl' Ii . . w piwhwt 1 LL MMR' an I wi ,M il--1, X Ji-F W gl L r-li 1 ily! Milli l i. i V' il' Sl l' if Lim W, , i q 'Wi MICHAEI M. BERCER Xxl, i v , my .C. N. . Lvgnyillli Pax vobiscum! A decidedly re- 3 li' tiring and unassuming soul. Leave will 1' me rest undisturbed and unhin- - dered. For knowest thou not that fig! Eff he who strays slightly from the H5,I 9g.g: of Righteousness as pre- xi' ., and proclaimed by the fi-l.1l, that be invites dis- 4 .14 . Be careful . . . be X.. l- 'gg'-31'.',E2Qf1 careful . . . be cautious. ,l if ' X - g',fgR9lf5 H ?ifmUf'MiV' ..,a fy- Q17 ',"', I L- 2'ff"1,'ni'- X. N s sri fi is-ffiiiilgi r. fvf-51.1751 ' '. xiii.-'91 N4 Q 'Qwlipfgf I ','f.-J! ' 5. X 1, iii fi l A , ,. Mn, i, ' ', U 1,11 iii- K x ' : f.lvQHW ' ' ,IV , :f' .. f. 'jf , . 1' I 1'!'1-4' ., -' M M ' Xx if, ' 134 ' Q E : Y 1, .1 ' .L-.Asif 5,445 "" f"'1 .,', 1 ' x. ' 19 2. :RH Q: 6 I ' It Rf ,, , . Q., -"iw: . V, ,R Y X' ,,., X N f, ...-s ,fifyaftf 1 ' -1: - ' ff , fl ' . .N h , rj W N' .QQ I, -K AH if' xy!! milf A ' ' 1 1' , ' ,V 'ff J ' ' A7,. ' ff 'Y WI' 1 1 15 0 . X I ,f.,!1 ,M y W. Nw .., .:V,'A4.," I r , ily' I ' .N If NYJ- fin -, L? 1 'Vx '. ff ', , if + 'M wr" , 7 6 ' ' . , f' P "ffm - xx MUN ,kb 1 A V V, -LC A, -. Q .Vf Y N 3 'L - 1 .'1.' ' . X W-,R 11' 'ijnifxn .pq 'f V: .Nh 'Mil Cr, ,A Z. xy ' -I' 12. ' Q 'hw K n 'HI H-, M'.:: ' . ff ' 'f.J rw w- W SQ7.-'3'.kx . 1, 1'-H f , 211 i '1 Q, ri- X -. TX-, 'N' yx N12 ' ffm, 'Q' bff 1:7445 ' ' N'-ffif f' 9 -A fs i fig 1. " V. Y Q - N, , . i - - mf' VJ "J 1'--wi. X '- . .. 'rj' diff' I 7 ' ffl f 5.11 ff' ' X NX 'VW Yvli ' If" . Maur I! JJ! ff :IN cn, ' x , 1 ':, it-1-Au, wwf fbi g..:.'ff?Qg fax fu ki ,' ' '.Jf'f1. " E 1 ' M,1'grr?.fJN' . Ri Wx . F g,wfJNNf Y,.f ,fl gl- img 1.1, 'N ,wif I .M 1- V, .W My K 'Ii' mi 'xl I In W V., , I .. 14 .Vx lr - mr- , 5H f Wl.f ,Q . Q5 w wf w V m,-' . Q' 11- ' pf If 4' f .JV fl J! i wx V ' N 1 1 Y, ,W 1W,'f1f!f ,Y,- V ' . I R '- Nmillwfvjfjiglf , ff "'V 'f ' WIIU -,l"f9'f4!f7... ' ' - ,. H .' , 'VN I HM!! 4'lK?1g,f3f.:.5.,yW LOUIS 4. .. jfhbf V Y, .V .- .. N 'Puig' EN, f A' BERK " 1:1 . we 4 fr" ' Cflairma C, C OWIT7 I M77 ' ' EljQfL,f!, ' V 1 W. Y W Q 'PIT -w Alllr n' C, . N' Y 4' MAX- f x:3f5vLJ'f5U,' QQ- .CX , ' 1.5 I' if f' IAQQ- 'Vff,7"Jif1.a'lg" - ' V" -if? QfM1"'f" -Q' tl, ,' W 5 '9'?.:f. f. 1 YZQA HS A c0l!ld 6' Sz, "fm'j""'1. ' ,,',,,131.gN, , J ' if?Q,N'iI 17 K4 X X f 1 ' N- x 'x-Y Y L Ffud mini nptl 141 'U 7' 1. " NWQM' ' 1. 3.-'r-of- " WWA ' . 1, uns ellis Mfr' y lm ' fu Ah -'ff Va 4- A ' ' H' ' H i 1- , tru - 1, Eng Ave W xqg., V4., , - fvgfx p ' vm Q I :M , wgsz I X " Cc "'fm"'."'S' C5"'.vlfl cfsf 1.0 . fix. ' " 3 '8g:Q"ffF.1.'1. . W 'V H r Xl -Z Pfgred-'Tse mfg:-ous sgpiifngx Kigc-5 -' I X -X fr-gzfiggra CH l' A f Y 'W 1, ' . .V ani S.1'fe1ld 'Y ' FMP , ' X- ' 'dlgfw 'YR ., ' V-1 'N ' W '?"...f2fg.'x cSi,e1A,:dV-xsiqg' glgsigf jig: P LL5 BER V , I' Y V ' Bfogtlzheicrs' htxcll Wglgis f " ' X IIS-halls l C' C. N NIAN. Av A ' xwxxq KHP r wv.2w wg Aix- '1.fg1eia,.1.03' Q 'G W W 'L'QL9'f'w,:,p' ,, W ' xnggdfd famil lexus 01: . 5? :jifge,'1dis,,oaP!anh"1i11g 1. - l' .:gf,fjf,x..":9, If ' ' . Castly to omcgy and sv il 1 Sellty, Cnhbzgn2't'0n f::,Que, iight in V fl M' ,gr -.5 5,5 M, . I O yan inlthe Bro rue,-, M...-L i E51 bel. to arlie away at limut his V 1, W 9551 My !,5- more c G ay fo rohx sl, ,lv-...L I , ,Eb El nevin an Sp early z, U c of V m X .fl m f .f 'HQ 'Idsf z.m.,'f' f . 3 :on tw'--1.,:'ff14'f-lube? .www 7' -P Mm, uve L, w g? .V V likeuctnr' -11.0 :mums existhim. J , if ' f" ' S -- fin- . . Flffe' H nf horgmnn .ufffedgs vfenff. 'HF .J ,, , I V - ' fl I , V rmlt he nndnust W as Lord All X Dx ug.-1 P: ti Q ,Jt.q-.rig . -J If ' live lqlik I W V, I ' J' .4, , if I e f 11 Vp 1' 4,1 .13 V . Y .A X wh , Q -qi, .55-5 Q91 -',Z-:yy J 5 f N 4 15 Q I w. 0,5 ,3v..f.'p?.!,4, , ' Q - "- u ,J , 5 :ggi I 1. . xg . V 5 .yy . ,mx .. - -i lu- '-4.5 .jx 4 , A S. . -fig? 1 W :THX fu! -d,:.S.5f2fE 7' V . " i X I N. Q 'W-IIf":'e 'glen fy nfl I o K XL 1, I If ' V. L ' 3.5! lu gun el, 1: W! g l , 1 x KW 5 ff M ., 1' Inn ff . . .gm 'Em-P. " .L X - ff . P A' - ' 4 1 v 5 ' 11.-'1'.'-,f 4'-1: 'Lg-, hm . ' a 1 f, " T "NIJ .i5l1?Q"4- LLL ', bf-i W' 13.5 ' I'. V! X TJ ' .W 'K U, 1 11, ' ' J' J I 5 Writ? V, ' ' fi Q 1 . V , , P- , , :gli-5 'MMI -' 'g, .,., " 1 x QB K .fn 3' ' li ' Liu! . g L -.Q ff- ,E ,EN jxfjf iff -' " f f '+ mi A-J--11-..f.':f1 f ' '4 ' .' 1' f" f 15-5193.1- vi M f- A I ' Q! Alf' 'fig III 4 ix wif! , 1 1: I ' yn ' "wif 1 V '4 l Pix .fi XXXiXi:i!M777W XXX ,- ..-i,.,,,.. .-f' XgX.:XLX X X S XX, XXX .XXX . X Qsg X X, XXX XXQXX X XX.X,XX XX - .X X. simon, - 1 Xp ,'X,X W" X ' X X X, NX' XX X Gs, XX XX -Mr'-'ff fill lQ f-2 7 ' its - Mx. it K- hh' is U lf ,Xflf QXX ik XX, X , iv- -XXX-g.XX XX N X X - - ' ' i ' I ' Y' 'i rw will MEX. Vl - 2- -- . ll-ill - ,' l Ml'-" ll'lr l".-1'-'Vail' '- 'f 'fllf' ' . llllrr 1-'ill --'ik--1 ' 1 -.v-l ll -il- .. '-'.- Lg!-:11 -' f ll f. mls, 1, l Y fllll ll, ' -"il-"-i Nfl ll Elf .' ' 'Tll Xl-'.- ,-14' , l X 'qs-l 4' X:- l -Xi va, X i .. X. ll-1 l- . .i l -H: ,lbw-r 2 - li 'lllllll l lf . lfff f . .54l""l4l'- ll' - ' ll dlll lR"i'.'-- if lf . . .- llllelff- lf'-ll lv - -1- - I1"i',l-. l l -- - l i 1 l . -' g wif ll -HW -- , Xl ' lfwlll' ll- llflli-fi lf? Kilim li lil J 'lllfb 'lf " '- lf' 3 ul J ll -. fe 1 ,- w . llf llmil . .- - Q l l - ll, -Mili- .Q lr ll. llilllf-ll.-'lla' lil' 1- "fl l . ll lp' '. :lXX+ A XXX-.4 X' . . lXXXi XL? 1 L. w 'ml-sig fl' 1 , X n - lll y .. Til i -1 XX .XXX W X X :XXX iikll. IAM WX , ': i X .lX is-Q l , ,'.frX ilflkrl- M ig Will-f-l Q i -.LN l U -W Xl i- J 4'-, -Lf, 4 1-,Y-Slim 19 -, - i ,Q 5 l klym l 1 ll- Q. LH --L lk 4 it fn-", I . tg,-XX' IW -' -H ll- -fm w'. F1:-1:11 ss-ls' 1 lr' - 'gif' .l - ff 1, , . - ' . , . , , , ' ' i,fLv,L'.,fN,' -xy'N1X' ' . pl I . X'XX'l XXXN- ., . - , . . .. ., . ,,Y., X -.-ff,.d,i X A i,rE,fXiFTf,"'XX'X"XX-X sX1g.gi'-X' X' X lf,-fl i-Mft' ' fff -4 - ' " li XXX,-Xu-,.1f. i, Louis BEHMAN X WX. AXmUFS.l.0,W PX C XXM XXX X X Louis mad YQ U'k X l COLUMBIA lJN'lV.:. ora . llX-'lm - if e IC 1 , . lg ' ' AF :.r3'. j X i X ', r ing dentistry. trlildlighc hte xggld - - X DENVER fcoll-l Xl 'lk 5 have X made Il greater mistake ,iff . Vxte-Pres. UI. Prom. Comm. f3j. l ' X553 K studying anything else. In fact. ph?-T . 'X '-X Student Council f3j, Ed, U, .Q Xe-Q! thqts how Xwc all got together, .5153 - ' . ffhzef. Violet Nj, X5-def y -' 'Xll-X ,'X With the and of his features he X -25 "5Hy listen. fellows-We can't tuke gl . if fiiec xh3X.7X .X-,XS S, I could probably fake his way into K.. 'ggi your pictures for you . . . get be- ll f b 'Rift lg Vu, the manly art. although v 'E-5. X hind your publication . . . we want xy f l' ,Xzffz 1 XX X' Q-X how long he would be able ik- - l 'Lil C0py . . . subscribe . . . .'-lill q-,fi-'r'?u1FQ 'hge -, X, AX, to keep up the illusion is -2227 ' subscribe. etc .... " Ye fi - X' -X1f'JQ1i95'lf.' if., 1 t -h X 11 another story. However, a WFL X 'gr Editor, fretting and fum- X5X iff.: ,Y QQ"-XX'jXy'5L-f l i X -Xp X demure :md unaffected fel- j " , mg. scolding and harun- je X my Q-1 E-,X ' . low. the only rough char- M-425. mfg? EUIUK. engineering small ' . I " - "-' .Ju " ll-N X ncter about him being l'l'.'-rjjrh 4 X ' Q- stratugems and tactful il. A R -iff' . t 11. L. , . , , .. N lx. I Koch. -.- '-QRX . XX.,' drplomatncs puts the pep of 'IQ yi'-' ,X--QxX.f.lE". ly X .X .X 4 - X il Xcity news office into the X' Q ' '+"'X'f.'-'X'-X-X mi?-."'l.-'. .Q -f . 321- W" ""'m' E"'df"'- W 'fl sf,-'q-X 1 - 1 - Xp. --XJ'-f Qmrnmcist, v , l'. -. " I 'SEX-f" " .'1'zXaXrX'-,-Xf ig lffl 1 If '- tician. editornhldriorlf nilaiiigf il ljliaffz ' . if-Lfg, X . imrogrgies. dentist . . . und 1 'XV-,Qin 4- .aff H ' 1.31 " nr . 4 , , - --' 1.-. -f X 1 U--1 " l e - - t Zi:'ff."' S .- X,- ,'.,Xil 'I' in X-1 . X 2 '-.X-357, l - X -Eljlfx . 1 X ' - Q' f," " 9 ' K Ei, . Xl X ' ' WN :X V . X ' '-Q: -' Xllg ' .l ff -- , K l - ls l ,l iff Yi ' N i . , ' 'fi 2. V H gs' ii i 2 '1. ' Q 4 1Cl2:fi?i5- 'Et 3 55-l Q-l'7'tNfxh SXX 2' pl' U ' l l . 'Z -- 1 ' K -1 ' f w - . - ll, la 1 ' - - -'i ii lF..H-'T -, ' '- Q . i -, 1- :iie v-Z-bu' l Qt 5: , ' J ' '2 -I ' ,--if 1 ' ll 'l fgfffil 'F ' " 1' ' ' - ' '., ' ' N . - ' , Q KJ I , , , if-' .ff-','-S+ XXX - X. lil , il ' :X l -f X l --pgs, ' , .,' ' i : ' f f f, I ---1: ' "W Axe -X 4, iffi " flilfffg bb W ' I lX'j,X, ' r fl ' l"H"" ' lull ' Hitt f'X X "4 h e im L 'VW fr ' "1'f" 5 "T Nut- ..g""' .Lf.- " . -'Zlifi. ' ' --we ' ' ,., .. 5 -- ,,:.- f - ' V -' C .F-+1 ll W'X""""' i-l?4+-- ' ' .--- 11- nm- '55 dn -. XX l85l I ff I 1 1 1 I JOSEPH BLUM C. C. N. Y., N. Y. U. Violet Stud' 142. ' Who wants to be consistent? The dullards and the doctrinaires, the tedious persons who carry out their principles to the bitter end of action. Not .loe. Like Emer- son, he writes over the door of his library "Whim". He often leaves you with this thought, Thinking is a most unhealthy thing and people die of it just as . they die of any other af- fliction. f 1 1 I .N t ll A , u llllv ll ,l-il.l..1...., e N fa l l iillildllml l isa i- -fn fffff 2104 , 1 ff I . , X w elll all ' P' 'PM I l ' ' X 4. A S J df ll -vi-L S19 NATHANIEI. BODNER. A52 N. Y. U. Another of the esteemed gentry from Jersey City lending to our Campus an out-of-town flavor. Nat has become so accustomed to start his day in the wee hours of the morning that one wonders how he is going to practise dentistry. Perhaps he is in training to practise exclusively on ' . , r Night-owls. At least he A , will have to curb that ' I' 1 thunderous laughter in the small hours about four f A. M. 'X "L vi, , . .i K, 1 .R ' 9, gf I fffffWf ' aw M 4117 f, Mme f lbw . I . . 4 , l gl l. lil .. l W jf . 'til me iv l mail l lvl X wr. m sa x lx ll lixffyllll. W if li ii lll L ,lvl l.lJl,'i ikiil' wl l M ll! si' I' illll 3 'Z W wi- ,:. "iff QW? .sl - W 1 Q. ,' fi'-qi , ' - ,'fQE'x51'i-J. . wie hw.: A f - :flj'1,1,73' 9 Ka lid . 7 .. 17 Lt:gg..,' "N lx! ' x T 931' l -1 y, vj.4..,.zl V :v,..,..L,. fb WWC iqywi 5- gl, I me er .. I N A ' ' s x I iii K 1 "l ,z lk :Q fi il Wad N ff '- il 7-5 ,7 T X ' " A vf 163 .X 1 1 2 6 1 1 s ,Sf.'5"'1 .'f" .V--'11-i.3i4'2--" 5.4 ' ., d 1,1-" -as 17 ' 'A--, ' 1 11 J 1- 1 ll 6 1 9 1. 1 . .4571 A -' 1 . 1 i , ""' . 1f1 fV1 1 ! Jfjf z , I1 1-,1:11Q11111:1 ,W l711.l n f-?i-l1'.5i.1? i.1 M1 31111 11 Q11 1 132139 11511 . 11111 l'1J1l131 1 1 1-1111.11 11 ' f.11.1.'11 1 l 1 xl 11,1 Il fl? lll1l'1 1ll11'1 ill! 'i I1 5' 1-1111 I 2111.1 .1 . 1. i l -M 1lli 1. l,1 ., . 111. -li, '1 l1 1 1- .11 1 1 111111: 11 l111.1 1 f 1 1 lil? 111119 1. . 111' '11 '1 "1'l..1 ll' '11 '1 1 , W 11111111 11:1 1. 111 1 1 1' if 1 111 V ' Irs, 11 .' MW, . 11 1111 1 1 ,. . .1.. ,11.. .1. .,., .,....4.....,..1. . . AHAM H. BOGHOSIAN. B.A. CENTRAL TURKEY conuaos CAINRABJ AMER. uN1v. or nexium. 'llere is none in our class as punctilious, as incorruptiblc and wistful as Aram. Lord Nelson nd his success in battle to his emg ten minutes too early: he is fifteen minutes too early to most of his assignntions. We wish him the greatest success, the success that is due him for his most seri- ous investment of effort, energy, time, and soul. .,1 Eyhgilulllx I A via we 'W ffl W eil 11-11 if h 3 1 1 fdkk 'L 1 ,, .il .1-1 111111 Y'1ifs111'i1'?-.ff . "rg1:l'C':1. s " . L 1,4 1 I 'lil-' lif T51 .1 as " . ,111ggLi1g1f11:11,,1 ' ' , 1 X1-5121.1 - 2 1lT'. . Sl'g"i2 X 11 J 1:1113f11311'.' 1 34 ,Qf1Qj1'5Qj1,s1Q ' f 'gigs gl YG l F-N" is I 4 1 gr: I f ii' F" , N ,- ',.! 5 1 7 J. 1 1 11 Y11 .1111 -. '-1.1 1 , , ,gil 'B l all 'LH' 151 111 - 1 ' 1 1 .1211 11 2: 11 lil 1 111' ry-,Q 15 1 - 1 1 1.11. -fliz' L . axes, -- -- T'17",f- ' 1 Nj . .1311 L nl ,luke 'ffllllf - 1 ii 711 MZ, '11 111 1 1 111 1 111. Jlaffr . 'K 2 .A -. f-'l'7 ' I1 '. 2- 1 1. ,Agf- .,. -711. 1, , . 1,...1 .115 A.. . xi i1 1111 .11 1I 1 l 1 1 1, ,,,,- I ,,, i, , WMP llunilllllhll 1111 1 t , 1 11 1121 1 . 13. 1 .1 .11 '1 1 111111 1 j11f .1 1, 111.1 QXX 1 11. 1 1l111'1 111 1 1 '.'1j.1. ' '1 '1 v ll' 'L iw.:-5 1 li A 1 11 1:1 '41 , , V, H 1 . 1 XSTR1111 lf ' 1 1 1 111 11 l,5' 1 1 " fi' V1 if f 1 1.1 11,1 11 1'11-1i:.1' I f-1 .11 1lH 1"1 1 .. 'y i1.'Zl1ll1 - LQ 1 111. . .f 1' , K MH 11.1 ' 1 111' 12,1 ' 'AQ -D1 ,l 1, g 'rm 1l1ll' 111125 1 1 if 11 1 1111 11 111 f11f1i1lf1.11,f1 - -.191 l ' . ,fp - il1f114f' . 1141 1 ' - if 1 - - W, ., ., .. 111 1 E51 ' 111 5 fl' Q1.1-11111-Weis.1f9f':....11. 1, .,s, .s.i 'ff:1 -fl, ,1 1. ' 1 11 X 1. 1 x 1 ' 1117 HERMAN BRAUN, im 1 111 1. . -1 AJ 1 . 'f:2f'fg1y333,' lg N. Y. U. " 11111- 1 l il- Brownie is one of our Jcrseyites. i' V111 1 1 '. "-kf'13y.4,-- As a member of the Champion- , X 1,5215 ' .- '. F' ' "Lg, ship Intcrscholastic Cross-Country 1 ' ' 1 1,41 Team, his success was probably ,1 fb: . ' H f ,V -L due in great measure to the train- 'ib yf' 11 'Q . ' 1 ' i Q ing he derived from his regular Eff ' 1 111 runs between his home and New- , Fifi Nike ' 1 A 'E' ark where she lives. His l ' 'I :gn ' I 1 , 5,1 chief hobby is leaving in , 1 ,'11 ,.gff'ii .fig ' ' . the midst of lecture to get x" 47'-1 I . " .V ' ,Eff home early. ' 11, " 1 ' " 1,9 1-.L "' ' EE: 1' I ,.,,1"2 , N 11-'f' 1?1::l .111 1'1A'f?i,2- 7 - , g . ltli ff 1 T " i'1"7 f-"'5C1S.- 'N ' 4 1 ' 1122- 17 , ,Q 'H ' Kffiii' -1 . iN 1 1 " 'gill '.,. 2 .9 1 is 1 1 31 T1t1i".T1' lr . 4,-e-fl 51 .11114 1, ll ,1'f?1:11'.11l. .1 A v"1113g-QQ? 5.11 NL' 'll '1xl1'-QQ 1 1 1 ' i' " 4 1' 'A 11 x glifliilflillwflvlrf x 1 l1fl?f3'fL1i 1, 1 y NEMA -'fbi' , Q 1 1 9 ,1 111. 1 11:11 - i 11 1 1 U 1 v " . is 1 'I 1 ' 1. 1 f . 1 f V1 1 1 : I" '1 511212111 1 1 '1,:.Z5?, A 1 , I l. .11-Q21 1.15. 1 41:1 31. W- H12 1 .. r x g"f:, 1- :. f1'.1111.1' 'Af 1 ' 1 1-1. -' -1. . 1. '1 'ji' Q X f l 1 .li 71:1 .G I 1 .11 1, . gg, WMA - 1 1 1 1 1 l,111?1.11., . 551 If I .1! Q11 in QE'-1 ' 1111-' :PZ l 1' if ' -'Vif' -111 . 'fw .M ,. mf' ' 1 ii A A .".111':.l-3-3511: Q14 ff' f-J' ',f':iiiif5.A I1:,,1:',: 1 A fl H'f1..g:5-1151 11,1 A A1 ' E871 .J iv, ffl N 2 K .f?"' 7 if 1' ik' I I . . 'V vill as, in y Y - . Vi- f 1' .. ,H was X i ,-, H YM 'J f YH i t . X .um p .lv M 'Mig J I M ? X" f"C'if"f 1' 1 s -, X X l 'i ,. W , . .. . , I ' '- 1 iv' .ea -4' -' ' 5 . . L iw l XML IJ i i .I-r... 1 3.1: . .. " l 1 ' .L il ' " mg. . lily, I . - l uxln' if E . . l..il'.'p g4l5.fj ' ' ' nv..." fit' 1' 1 vn- J- I if . ' f ' V'-I "."-lil: Mil-"iff'l.Q iii v u 5 ii.'f-llr iif li. .pw-fi i i iii.. . if .. 1,Nf'l I.- . '..' Mwif.-1 WM, f fuyl l, 'k ji . v I -. -.I' 's"'i' -i ,ff if' Y' : Q ' ijli' i yr' iw A.-., 4 I , If -:M ,M X55 ,I 6-,fl 1,1 W 1 1 X M ,fiwxm ,JJ l Y I' ,V., H gi lklv ill. .- .. VV! m , V. X Y MGM I, Q , ' , ry 4,.y I '.s,'.'l'Y ' f f ffl ' 1 rr si x ' , .-' M NJ ' 1 . .. I. lil leg' l ,- qw!"- ,1 ., . . I 3. '31, " Well' 'li W ill' l iQ5' i1 13 .ffl . -I' , : li li gi? 'M i " H j .1 W -V 'vi 'C- fggfi-if ..g,,2,il '..' f ,li-1.1 Q ' " il l . 'ill ll iw ' -g " ff l! N,e':'sv'l'--H' f X H el' ' "2-1, :. ', 9-.L : fl ' '0'm'li.i ' x lui li iii ' DANILL BROWN li? l ?'W. lli l .1 i Y 1.11 - ilu N ii ii CN Vmlct Dance Comm. Nj Ed. H Stab' Violet Nj ere comes the thundering herd. Wonder why Dan always comes YU shmg mto class buttoning his gown just when they finish call- -Nik 4 f frm .lu'g'. " L -, f ills. Q- 5-fy. 4' ' ,L -: ",,-x'.u,-. ' - 3 , - - .mp ,rs ' . if' th roll guess he likes his specialize ' cementing orthodontic bands' again we pause to wonder why. Dan has an agreeable seri- ousness in his nature which appreciated and - spected by his pals. H o t to g f ix ' profession If 'ff if l Ar -il? Q. 'h-,rf-' l xxfvmyff. 11 f l hw 'Mir I J I ' ll' lf lllifzl ' l. .lf ,- J . if iA.f-fj..,'l.iil, , 1 ii li.Tl,1 il! 1 " ' 1 il' 1" - ' i "i i ill,l'f'f'li i ii l ii 'hind Al l if ll' Viiilwhi n A l 1 4. "1 '. r.. jl.,,liV'!l:N.1L'l 1 Wins ! i,iif'i'!lf.H7 1 H lf. 'Qi ,flivfy i 'i-! v - -'. I .. .' 1' """' 'J if X x?s 'M ii xi 'l.'if7iW 7 ' , A ' r Ill 1 ' .l.lii'fZli:"f".fiW C' ' ' Y' JN- l' 1' " -fl"4f1lfiE7?.lfi - ' e ' lfyxx " 4 1' fi rm 'FF g E' iii l - i ' 1 V J -T-9: ry , , . I 'A ,S l iiifgt Hifi asleep., They say Dan win vez. 5' ' '.', if ' 3, '- . ' ' m gf' fl iii is ' re -1 fm L if 1 lt? 4 , ugh . , Q ar 1 his ' iii? t ? X is Y If if 541 .. T kg fx., i if A . X :' 'X b . ' n Q l' I Ely' kg.-' f 3 ---i X Q. Ill f f . r Jw ax s. by ' 'I W M l I 'Q' I G I- V i 'Xl' Q Q Q Ry l f gl Qi l sl? if X Lili. 'A V if ' 2 IX X f 1 H 1 5,3 GX 'N i i li i I W in I xii il 1 V' , I Jhkl 5 ' ll i ' ' ll ' ,ll lLL. l L '-I A Ki if 21 h kt Q if J' EKU, ' 'KX NL, s ' 1 f N iq 1 'X 1 I , -wiwliii-K 1 K-'Lf Y . 'Lg-zuL,r.....::f... -' -? ,, , , ., JULIUS BURMAN e lp! DE WITT CLINTON H. S. N K. it .4 5 P ug. ' ll I " I N V ' 9'T2,f-5 Julie is our Exhibit A of the Q. ' a N. ' ' I e' benefits of Physical Culture. This . ' . - , .V-3.5 disciple of Earle Liederman has A I P ' reached the stage where photo- 'wc - ' ,, " .' graphs of his well-muscled torso I, " pf would convert thousands to a life -.il Q -YM' of Culture. To refer to Julie as ,' ' v . V , 'fr ' the class Hercules would , ,IL- . 51,2 I' - v ' jjj -' be underrating him, for 1" ,fy-. ' 23? 'QQ - ' y p ,fig Hercules is known for his A -f' . , .. 1 'tg' ' having fulfilled s e v e n -in Xi! . 1.1 lg", ' ' " - tasks. Julie has had ten "if ff! 2 N., , '-jLf?Q,i.' . . , I , -'T . . . proximals. and he has 'k 5 'Qi N ' - I-gf"J.' filled them all. Wim- Q11 ' . , - -'.' .- k ' ffl' "wi , -7f""' w ' ,,j.5',' nil ff , fx Q - 'ge -M 335' 'wgu K, f ,A -i .I I,.A'Q154l,F,L Miz. . 'if ,Eq'w,v'f " ' .s ffsii.g.iir.s,...g . p lx 2 if l l ll 222' A 4 R V! ij v. L' 4 1 -I-'ix I ' ' X317 i'sN - ., . I . Q ,. -. L, N 5. - 51 f dx. "5 f fx'-K 1 . f ' -i A Q Sl H+- l . i gh ' is' i. . '- . 3 'Q ,Z - 1 l . J l f elif' . . " cm X. .. 32 ' i N 'f if - u l f .ff .sf . '3T.'4:'v1xJ'-'QV-ix go 5 I 'UQ-Url LM X . r A4 .gf , ii ,.f-' ,Z . .fi 7 v 1 q .. V 7 X fi .rf . . -.:q.,1,f:'.-- U .1--.,fyf5'g dr ,. ff 1, , ' xx ' A 4 li '14 - V ii , i881 1 fp 'I I' ,I Q.,---'1I-r' .QIQ I - l S .'1-'fl I 1 'Z-1ff ' lf' We f 1- S. w "" W5 l"1F7'L' 1 ' f F' ,- 'f'2Z51-f':-"'.1'4- . . K -f . 1 W: if-NN-N ii -hlu .-GY' 'fix - 1 -r i .1"llf1Mf.7'l ,f f7,f'-rj' .7 -1 1 ' 'j -f My xv 1-.,, '1 X -- If .f'il:11'7A.-5Agi"-'.ffff.. 'A'q -A ' N ' 1 -1 Y' I ",. -gli' J 'Qlfff' 1 i f if- -Le.-. i A l1"?' '111l1'I I ff -I 1 'J-:f1Ij.5QI.1Q:i T1 f. 'fI1II11 . Mil' 415. l i 'il J' .4 All 'ff 'IEI'1i."III Iv1l,I'l t IIiI.I, S 1I1I11III III 1 ,-fqffn -, A - - 1 .VQ1 .'-1l1'l'f111llg1ll1 1 1111 '1 24-1'l-.lzlll 1 f l l f 1 1"15j:1Q,11 1". 1 111.1951 'M 1,l 1,.1.. . 131.1 '- 1 1.lI11'I1g,f1-, P ' Ib walk. I-IIII l1 1 li .rx-1 .11 1 , . -I 'QM . 1 1IIl111I .. , 1 , , If, 1-s1Qp,L"'- .' .. If 'il-'lF7l1 ill , 1 . l-fl? V. is . 1'llj 'M1 " 'li 31 in 'il 1 - li X - 1 FN I 1II1'I1 II-1 ,, 1 gain 5II.I ,I I I- I I , I f ,...1...., fi. - f ., ,:.l,I,- I .V,, II IIQMITZIg.NI..IiXI.IIImXi-- I--:I-1I I.I-TI-I K I.-X 111.2 lu, IIII 1I1, 1 IIII IIQ11 I ,1 IIIJ1 I f I. II11 I .-gl I ELMER F. CLEVELAND. :-1ff1- . 1 4. I. -415. Pj. IRVING B. com HI L., " . .311 ' -'KW i lji.-I I 1 wiiiiflvf N Y U ' 2 ' .,IIIMW.,l1 UNIV. or PI1"r. I .3.,I,,I - - - 1 II 1I I ' E'lq271'-13.23 4' Glee Club IU, Sgt. at Arm: K3 LASQQ 1- ' I Of the interesting gentry from " lI :L.'jeJ121f:-. and 41 -I 1- Jersey State invested with an .1I, " X 'KI Who, gazing upon this frank, ,gif ' ' " ' - over-generous Iportion of initia- I5 I m ' nfl 311 f open countenance. would believe 6'3.,Qf. U 1 '. 'f ff UVC- A ml5ChlCV0U5lY fanfallimg I Ufvfi tpf-' 1' '11 that a tongue lashes within which f.-Vg? ' ' 1 SOX! Wll05C Eflfl and IPUZFWCIDUS .1 I.1i' j!jlF 1.1.' '-l! 1 would easily set Demosthenes to fx? ' 1 Y h N twist fhf lecturer? will 3lW3Y3 ,1l ,Q gh., 'Q' f. shame and make Jules Verne and Nj: II ,' -, '-, 2 35' remember. And withal Irv leads . 1- A 11753 ' :'il'.I1 life ! - u", Munehausen appear as poor I 1 . ' , 1 a charmed life. The sword , I. - 1 IPI-3.15 X I I, second-rate impostors in '- ' '. often fell close, but never gr I ILj'..'I II gi", 52'-FL' ' the realm of the prepos- 55:3 , f ff" Struck. 1 11, ,' ll-g'IS1.l'.'17QG' FII .I s X terousI and nnbeliev:I:ble'i I I , I All -I II . 5 "H .1 .f'if.1..'f1"'.'lif.l1ifzffacaifffi .5 ffl 17fl?' .:f?g'll if Xl .gl - " ' ' disillusion all within hear- Q,Tf.g,Q::II'.- I II21 WI' Ng .,., I . lx, I -QI , ing and strangelyI enough, w - XII I .ISF I, .I N I L li Ia IIMINI 1 - .1 'L'p"pxf2f,i'i 'P - . . - heart of gold and :i real 23" if- F'I'1,If-Ypffa JI? 1' I fi' ff man. ' ., 5 'V J ,K ' 1-TNI,-ZSII ,.-'-25 Z- if 1 -I ' ' . I','13', 'W' -' '. -- " - .'f':'L 'N1l" '.' 'I A. ' ' ,ff '1Tl,':'P'7 " T 3 75-'55 2-4. , yr. - ' N -R Milf-','Ul. ' 1 ls'-.1 .1 1 tllsfl..--,e1l,. ,I 11-.lf-r,--1 N- .f .1 1 X wwf -112-1' XI I.I1!I I WJ, IIA, I I ,-I If . ll. ' r ' W y' :. 13 .-: fx ' 117,v3.y,1- 6 III. l It-5 Ili . . '- ' ,, 1 1 0 ' ,I ' ' lie.. -f'g:1 1 t x 1 f 9111K 4 X- . ly 111.1 fd 3 .. . WN1111-' 11111 1 1 l ' 1 X il' W'-2? 1- R12 .- 1 . 2' 1 '-'11 F ' X s -f X 1 is. 3414- 1 " 1 P .- ,, .. I ' EFT 'ij--"','1' ' ' Q 'J1 1:51 "':.'1', ft -1 1 ii I '-' . . vpy, X X'1 'f YQ ' 1 5, ,- .- .LD ' 'L 'f-. f' 1, I' Q' 3'-f", ' ' .- ff Ihrfi I 1' qi 11 2 1 - 1 1 1 l 1 W3 f 1 Q- -.-. -11.-1 1 1 1. Wm - ' -if 1 fl 1.1-11' S ,- .-9914 . .tl - K, 1, A ,I-,:II.I:, -QSM ww , I m.,'?, I I .N 1, of II 1,5 I jg gi, s. 1 2' j... 1- 'M' ,I1 , ... M I ,1.Iw' ,-. : I we l- ....- - ' NX -- l .1 Lgi igle fii7f"5llfl2'1... .iZ"f'-' " "'2'z'lfV2-:Q-Q 1,114 ..--Q' .Tig ". Filflli 53-T' f'1ul:':ff '- -wo. fr i A 1.1. .15-'rf-5 I .I Iktltkkg f'-I f .-.... I '-f, 5,17 ,I-I.,1.-II I . 'I3KiE.,zz......Zrf.. ' EK 4. mm. ., 'wg 1 ' ' Q .3,.iF!. g1gQQ' u' ' I l89l Wfvbirf . X Sl? i Sh! l 'lillil N' Jill! .X.,,.,., 4 ai 1 . it My 5 Milli' 'J llfqf' 'Jill ,K gllfll 1ll..gl'g.f.:'.'.' f wf'L I- zxzanlll i .iff Q If --.hai X -, 'Vik if 1. 'Ely' .N 4ii ':3:,T ,:Xk. ': vm if-W .. f:,1..t 'X " 2' I i ..,, ...,4 , ll' "V I !.,',1.. , . .-. i':'. -. NT " J. x f U , -, 5,15 .- ii' . t 4 nf, r-rw, JOSEPH COHEN N. Y. U. A clever, likeable chap: serious- minded. too-an rare possession now-a-days. No idle chatter from this ladg when he talks he says something ivery unusual -for a dental studentj. Joe is not a no- torious class character but a loyal , supporter of class activi- i"'fA ties. and that's what J' counts. He'll get along all if-, fight: no question about V, A lf- .V 11 My ,pf fy it i s f' 5.1 t "'..fs- A 'JL , ,T- . 3 A ug -J - .' 4- :JL 5 V ,A ,K f -: l 1 Y N i I' , Q 2 , lf L I 4' lhmffilllf l .0 F, V Q X, f E. ' 1 l EO' . K! XXX . .N - l 7' ' . x. 'qw w rfb ,. ' tl W f 'flig xtk' l' lil fllfl V- fxif ,Alf N K Wil .1 -'X L il: ll-viii X7 "G A .T liimlitlglll. ML., X X Ss' SOI OWION COHEN COLUMBIA UNIV lhis lanky native son of Squi dunk nr is it Newburgh h1s been aloud in our midst His scholwrly tendencies led him to high aspira tions but after fnlmg to cop the m 'il 'it his hrst ittempt h s nxtuml talents turned to other ch'1nncls A dialogue with him bexrs 1 strange mono to e but since he has so much to sly then why not listen? ,jigs We a -. f t , ft --T A- ' .7 9'- WW T We v. 'X ,. , r- f 4 l i qw ,,., 'J 'yy -QQ: '1 2-ff," S N vs XXX f-My rj, -, .XX ., Ei'-5' 'I' ' ' " l P : -sr' ' 'T ' 'f"'lf1f ' -49-Q " ' x 1' We li 'X' ss. P ' "flu 'f'-' J"" ' -,-'L ,,f..","',"'l'.3. "'-'A' .-, . ' VA 'V wh. 'fZi', 'i' ' "" -Q-will 'h' :Viv "bfi" fi- -W . -.fff .. - s . i. W f- R... ell .41 ff fm- , - . '- .l-1-.px We- J .. ,.--ami if il " IJW..--f ' ' " 1 . . H. r. " -X'i1'fl" ' f -1. s-'-as-15" ' - ' ' I," "l:',lf.l:QLf' lzrinff 1' ' "lil-.:f.,i' WJ lf 'il li . Wat . .Fl l' lf 'W -f ' .ff - , ml' gg., Xl! .p .V-, . .ll ,544 mf! " ' ll. ' xl ' 1,5 .gg Jl"'P'.H' Y. 'lull' .f '-V'f,f:l -.Pl I 1 ' ll " T l l sl' -' vw? -.VH 1 if ,. a Q 1 Y. fl' lp "W TLT - W 5. 'rf holla ,sw l l 4 if .. 'f'1"""'Pr V' l ex .ll sw.- .-JVfu..f lj-Lffi '-A. . 'll Wi. my V M , , . 1 14,1 W ,H I QM- .Ml-"1 l w 1., .- . , .' Will, "-" l" 'll 4.4'i. . 'i'l'-M .-'flip ,fjri 'iiill-l' I , 'Q N' ei' lj'!'-. ,-'fL,'fi- ,f, .Ni N'-T . wJf'l'gQi"" ii ' pl 'illm,'5i' J L ij.. -' ' ,+ , . .N . f' f'.-lr'-'lf ":7 in H "i li . i "ill 'ik " ' ' 1 J " f. ' . Lf. "'. "' .' ...QT , f 'pf"" 53" i i' if-F" ' -. "'! ':7.'ii1f'x'fWfP' "R- -. 'rs' 'if X iq" ll -, .. 'H ---- - -"-- - '- - -- W- Ah M-ru.. .- .. . - 4 i- il, V, ' I Q wif- gk 4fC.fl. NX X V - lbw JOSEPH J. COVNER, AQ w x 'i lqfill-A DONALD E' DECKER, ATQ' ,PQ - Ll 4 lkxm uuff N- Y- U- - ff E nsNss1sLAER PoLY'rscH. . M ., "'?-iiwill, ' Gite Club Ml' ' 19" 1' ' ., Don's first bid for fame was his v .I . I' .:fQjQ'.:ll' Jess also hails from Jersey and l 'EJ ' -' r',",l',',T-'WL debate with Prof. Stein in our i- 'Q' if' ' is uncontrollably 'proud of the I 'iw I I ' 4 f 4' - first year. the topic being "'I he 5 L, . "U,-FQ fact. Applylng hw m',fh0d5 of Amr -A , .I Whys and Wherefores of Tetanus 5:.,g,: S.3, "Y r 'u accountancy and astounding SWE' - 1 v ., '55 as Displayed in Sea Horses. Don pig. .wc "IQ, 1' .il a of form to the professiml. JUS 15 'KSU , -, f has claim. also. to another dns- l 5 3,523 ha i '-'1 bound to settle down to alwelll- '- .. - tinction. that of being the chlff " fi-1':.-il .u- ordered and systematic life iq- ' ' le . i "' ' authority in the class .on 5 N, .gy-gifs: '- ll, g'g,'f 'X - in dentistry. Woe unto ' M- ,pn the subject of hair tonnes. L.. !.'.Q-" U' f??gqQ5,QQijl 'fizgj ' E -. "' ' that patient who madver- - However, Don is a fine Q lu V-iuW3Eggfg,gi :'.': :iff .l' . l lf' A' tently asks Jess to explain sv. s ,- ,. A 'V - Chap' and wg gafgly pre. px 'yi--4. - wQig..?.f-" '-f H . 253' 1 . ' briefly the technique of his v . u ' ,gl I dict for him a successful .," , ,ii-Q , 1:5 ggifhifi X ,' Z bridge work. Jess is an ' Eiga V- .V I R l..-Q . and honorable place in the -W V ..!,.fi' ,tg-gtfaf xY.g1jg5ajr,. grab X -, griialist and is gognglgorih Y . ' VS5 cominunitly so foxitunfate as Q-:gi H53-.: x::t,-.la.: . 5, ifixi ' , X' ' i e a nig-t o o - 0 Hgrv , C , -- ,nf to c aim im in t e uture. , - ' 1 'W serve humanity. Nbr. " x lrwla- K l 'ig b J. . cf-T, 1- is A r 1' fl P 15" fl' Jr" A qi fix, -W gis? '- T Q as .. 'gan f-PE P f X lflilllwlslwloff ...s........- K if sl?-ff.-5 . Wi pf' , ,V - le:-93 ' 'l'-1112: ' 1 l ll . as 5- e ff I' .:' ff E 1, 5 ' C! H X :Zi I X I iffciii - Hr f '. . Q-. . . , ,, t " -' i,?,'i l ' ' ,Z ,l ri-'H - x . - l f M- IGS. 'fx 'l. . i 5'-'Q 'xu' ff' . 'X yf , 'SIR -'fffit l - l Ts' wmv' t - ' 5 . X-, 'fl l. .ll 'L I ' X32 l: C-K lf " ff 'Z N' W L ---. ' . '-71'-' 4 lil " 'Hi' , jf 'uf 'His' .4 H- .. s- -'f ' '4 If z fl' 5 5 ' f 1 " 2? 9955 ' 2 -ff J l f 4--ff W ffgfilf' . l -..n r - - 4 Q P 1 -ra-Yjy ' g' Q 'Z Y , ' ,f-,I f Q 1 ,V 9' -I3 - . ni 'fl Q X W " - lam- " H 1 X s- 5: .....-i...-J l 911 41-10- ,.1-qs-'vu-L.. fr , JOHN S. DE MERI'l"l'. lllin N. Y. U. John t.lohn to the most of' us.- Savery to a limited few! is one of the more conservative and digni- fied members of our class. He is une of those unsung heroes whose service in the l'. S. Navy during the war was followed by service ,, in another Hect whose mis- Sion was n quenching of thirst other than that for Glory. ff" .fpu ff-- ,A , 1,11 . ." lm Tl. A .I -. - l"liIElJ.-X IJOCTOHS. ll.D.S. KIESSIAN GYMNASIUM, DENTAI COLLEGE OF IMPERIAL UNI VERSITY OF THE CITY Ol' CHARKOFF VS'e of the staff frankly confess "we hardly know the lady. was so near the end of thin s when she took her place as the one and only in the class that '9 'K' really felt kind of shy. ' Quietly and most unassum- ingly taking herself about ' college. Miss Doctors gives evidence of a very serious and studious nature. PS 5 1 l . .if Q N J i,,.-- . -ws' A , . l93l 1 ', 5 ll X llwylyjl 1, HW i lx ,H Lili. X gf . Will 1 lil. lit? ' ' ills Q HA gl? If 'Z lx YZ ,EI-1 :Ei A " 'fl :L me iv . y. s in it yer- . ,ZQf1iS1,1f!g, fi ul 'ffizfw ' s"5,7:..-2 t M kiwi, mi Vital U'-' ,-:lg l f-'iii if ri Six l wil i IX N5 U, ll I 1 lily ikll- ' lr K fi IJ 'flfjff .1'El?::3 1 If 'P ,CWQI ' .if ml,-9 V if QL l n. -in ii. .--i X. i., i al ll, .y' l . ,ii l l l in hill' ,N ..I,fc1i'1.f'T'Sl'1F,'i'f'.'4""". V TT "" . 'C' -iw - -..,.-..--.n..'i..,, . ., .losl-:PI-I M. EISEN. .nz AR.I.m.R FISFNBERG A , , , ,, C. C. N. Y. . ,' "Thou shalt not waste time" is Sdrwmrv f-UNi,:ZLnL2.1nn7mttN U! fi I .loe's eleventh commandment. A ' - 'l ' ' ' Vi ll . . Chairman Cal: and Gown Cam- most consistently asslduous worker mittee IU' Zflrery ever rtfhmgted alumni? Artie is the silent partner in the S5435 laguna' tseorgtigffln ylue has b combination of Schlanger and Eis- lf W. .3 ' ' ' - y enberg-. It isn't that he.has noth- ,u this time .gotten the efficiency of ing to my, on the Commun But ,I liovgn Sgmglaflholxli he wisely lllgfers to listen , . ' - ' ' and learn. ,f this he has 1" 5ll:gY1,fliCl:2l':Uff5 of effort made a marked success, so - Q. ln n U ' that he now ranks among 'ln L.: - 1-" V -, fu those few in the class "ll .Vf 4 . ,-9 . , x. .. 1 1 1 .ll whose advice on cases is s ffvf .fm ,'g',q sought and followed. . t ' VV- fj'x'Q1:,15Q x....1 4, -. lg 544,-,H '.'f'ii' J ,,r 1 ' , -:4-.Jil x 'W x 'l' illff,-Pl ATURDRY Peclms ' x y X I, l. f 5" "W fi. '.i?a5: '- ,v I ll ml' :,i"'1lii 5 4 li. i 5- ar e ' .'e- lx . il ' v p M 5 V fb il ' V 1: I A il ig! ll ii t ml, li N fr jf ix Wu ' f li Lsuasy 51105 ' 'N ' ,. . .-11.3 ET'-T'ii'- w.m-..-------- ff .2 .1-., i ilViQ:llJ1'f- 1-E 5 U I - wi x ' ix . , .,-- v dqlx-.I-,-,i lM.:.l.... --l ---.AM l 4 . . .. l93lI r 'L fl I . xg - '5 . HV . ,tl V wi' lil' il' Qi lvl W :fl 4 -ll ill' Vlwf wi- V, . L., H 1 ft X ' lE"N4 n ll' HMT: ,Mx liliiwii il xii i Ii l 1 : " 'Fl li r k li X, LL, .Yl Ml ,K i in 'N' Y, X .Mn life-r" ' ' T x in U51 , . . -W . l ,gl "Ach Ulm M1L'1'oN o. FENKEI.. IIA! V ll. N Y . . i 5' ' ' U. or PENN. u , Wlmt he doesn't know doesn't . i Y 1' 'l bother him. In fact very little Isnt" l3fJ'cCrEnCg:':l?:l'sf:!2'm1n 3 does bother him-his protoplusin ' sm, . K. ' 7 YP I , not being so irritable as his neu- gfyft0n'ggs5irQ1"QQg,gjSffgglggrgfffgj " I rons are rctentive. In fact Ellen 1 V A , . ' ' 5k"Q" f,ff can nbgxolutely remember anything mui,u?::gra:ih7':nd0:L ,PEA nfl, typewrittcn provided .thot the hrst ,Mi rg' D? Dcmian' xcmembcr M Q pq,-5 word is not missing. Singn- gherris an nternqgivcy' - U' if v gffir . . . it lmly flmugii' 'link dfmsn t the River. Personally, the lf, il-7 ff'F2f.'.'-, allow anything nnpedimen- dreamy Nile Khnmnms ,, ,.Q,- fx . 11,2-ling!-Q.. :ivxs ailiiloscizofxlyloilgf withl Romance, Jixtgiiued t 'gflix -' "1- Rnther is this :i help since me 3 Wnysi our , ' 0 50" '73 1 ' a - much infpirotion as well sgirtoxisdiboiatxiigtrnblfiiglfsr- 'v "HJ as :ill mis printed notes . . 5 ' Q "-, I, originate from that source. Mwkcy' 'S 'dmllv ,.da'lf' x, A fhfi-Wifi, dump und murky. Give it 4 2. ,J.,i:.. n try, won't you, dear? ' ll '4j4'-igg, ' , iv - ,yfjf I Q5 A, 'A ' ' :PAN ' i ' V . l li fan. i ' KSN I ' . lin-li 1 I ' '--'fx' ,Q , , o , i fix L f if , l ' l X l dm , -" su i e .vr lll X ' 4 16, Q 2-2 NVQ ff I f 'W 2527 i all ,, tl I 1 r- i . :-.Ju -i . .-,N , . r rr X V .ity 1 .elif ',.fw fi -. ff 15 V' 1' 5 3. fwvr ' al. r : 1 T, . In w 1 f wfilll F, -. - .' 1 . ISIDORE FEHN ' C. C. N. Y. We don't doubt but that at times Fern worries about something to worry about. He has the happy faculty of despatehing gloomy rumors. If he could free himself of fear, then he would live, a fleckless spirit singing. But then ' his, perhaps, is the greater happiness. for it is that of imminent, but not quite realized, achievement. w i 3. lisa '?'T"" 95 l cults. N. man. uns., .x-in if .i . ,A MEI-IARRY MEDICAL COLLISGE Wi, Perhaps our acquaintance is too 'I ,il,,f' short to attempt the familiarity of ,J a grind concerning one of our "?J' ,gjI more mature and reserved men. 'ln -wp "l'is said though that in spite of outward appearances, Dr. Ford . 'SEQ displays a rare degree of skill in - -lf'g".'i' a death-defying and soul- invigoratingCharleston. fl f However that is quite in X L!,"' -' accord with the versatility ul. flslrfwy- ,r gilt? .1 a 'if he has flashed occasionally lem I W " .ge-.iff during the past year. QSM? Mi..m :k,1ki K i ' lil' fi .h I ff. 'gpgaizfl - ' -' ' - 5ff."if"f 'lf 'll smilie if or f f , K ,frgui i y g . 1 iff. I Ax l' '3U'fg2', f ey , ., A A1 lima N X . 'Ns,-,x E V i' K F--E if L f l . ik il l-TL - f 'X lx if-ff T A X ' if -hli ififlf f 'l 4 1 l ififff' i W1 Q ! -L I I 'W ,il ,.,3 I ffvfsyweawfsg 'H ...lf ,s ,ll Few. 1 -r . .mi , 1 .4 .. .l ' ,. ..-. , . ,,. 192 6 i Ee, 2'-Q:.22'1f3-'mf , Cl ,.. lm Rh' - . 'Q' -"X-it . .J fff ' -f A .I D ',-.J-4 X ' ' " oh W l l M UX ' 4 4Ql4-. Q 4' -: 4' . .-4 444:- . V flfiaiffg- ly , e Q 44' Q 94 , .1 4,4'4 4 4. ,!f,4l,43if.zf4 , 4 44 44 4 44 4 4 44,444 44- yel, 444' In -4404455 ju- 44 4 -' , 4,,i ,lu 444 45, '14, V .1444 LW ' ' 4 41' -1 , r 3 , ,4 r 4X'f, ,'44 -Sill ,L .444 , 44 4 4 4 444 .4 .44 444 42 - f 4:5,44,4,:, 4.444 .:44 444444444 4 1 4 td 4,4444 44 4- qw X .4 ul' ,f ., tg 4 44 or t w . M N - mam My "NJA ' ,m W 1 N Q4 'gg "QM ' w44.lf4g,l .1 ga.: .is l g" , J" ill itintrlf' 5i5.9'1f ' i il. lr If 1" H. ,fv'fHyW44 JM-3, .11 H4415 V' ,Q vi- Jw l 2 ,, v , .1 , ,' ,' I ,,4 4 - 'f'i'ii"l7J f ii r f i L' li'-ll '31 W 1 by W M4 ., lW4.l7.':a4f 1. .4 fl gin -1 -- Q 1-,fi-1 , , ,4,:,' 141 ,ia ,l4l4w,l, 4 41' 4l.., V -4 ' l4 H 4'4,'l . 4 ' 4 ..4: N 44, ' v mf .iff ,MI fl, W 'ig 4. -10 lui 4' M- arg" ,lj 4 Mx' 'N .5 .4 l,fl,llwgi.f,a H. , 'WW "LV'.44',4:.J- 'f ' 'lyifilwfiiri .. ' al I . ffl, U 'I,u"f'wv f'I.'j, V 1 f 'f 1' I lr, e. if- Ll' .- 'l wi 'l H- J-1 'A WY, f' J V64 .YJ l i ilfllii 11 'J ' N'-ffl" ,- ' ml w, 11l4 l -.f 4 ll, . -L M a ,,' ' qi. -1 .- ,lr le, .. .u - ia f. x. will ,4.,' '4 44- 4'4,, 4444543544-' l 4 4 '4. ll, ,W li ll 414 4.4, 43 , . . I 4. ' 4. i levi 44 , ' 4 l4',44' w 1,45 47 4 44 4 4444 4 4 44 44 444 : 4 444..4.4,i - 4 4 4 4 4 44 r l l i i . , , 4 -lu j., 4fy"4y14,cfl" 4 -3 -M ,' . l 'Il l ' , Amnun 1-2. Fox . . -yr. ,ff 44 Hmmm 44 FOX mx. W4 ra 45 wf , 1 44 44 . 4 4 . 44 .4 . i .f . . , .. ,: 4, 44 W1 if-":": ' N' Y' U' . l trfiglj c. c. N. Y. of Milli 4143? 'l'wo yards-'with an inch or two ,ffl i ,:"k f'1i'f5 , W, ask HU-man 3 ,lution -.3 l in 'll to 5l'?rrA'0f hmm"':ss' K-00d'fel' V ' 's' 7 vital question of the qdny, lilow 'll X: ' "L i ,. 4 lflwshw' hflpfu:'wss'4 1-Hd ffcnfly ,fifg 'A -," , many hairs make a nmstachc? He ,. -Y 4444. .44 int. A ot4ti.1t4:4iere are 4ni: au ts 444544 44 444 464444454 ..Ask D44d4 she k4mw44..4 4444?- 4 4944. Q, iff ,mfs 'n':4e'l'l"4 4 Hai" .nrij 'I-,J f.4 - 7 59 . . . Peculiar name for a girl . . . 4I- 1? 44.73 44 .4 or mst.nnce44 are 4441.15 eprive 4544 4 4 53 Dai We mme, envy him: he 44 4. Q 4,4641 ' X47 sr-t "hfny num 'Zi -v': UQ -c Hfpel?c':.Ce QQ? - ' -,'1 ' 3 knows such beautiful women and -Bl, .' I 4Q.1..L' 44 ..,. .44 -, , ,4 y omg, tieir nor or 4:4 44 ,- ,. Chnd4,m4 4 44,4 4,4,L44 44444.444444 r4 4 4 ,4 4k ,f them . 4. . vcify much ,141 4 , ,F 4 4..4 447.44 4.4 4 444 444444444 T144 ' ' 4. u f against tieir wi . Egg' ' 'V Qi, 4 4' 114, 5545. X W 4-4f4 fig 4 4 , 3-4 , gi 4 4fQiif?f '4.142,ff. 4 W ' - 4 ' "1 4 Qi' - if , 4 T- 4 f- . ,.4' 4 X-T454 44 44, 4: 44,:4N4444i flfi?-S1- ii r " 255 - . if :fl X lf 51 -ll 2ffilt5ff.aa ,ni 729.-S---l 1- .4' 'ff , 'rf-4f3i1I:'?l -g-."!,- -2 A 4 351. 1. 'L-. ':,w-1-ff!" X' ' ' fri.-T Va"p'l'fl K J f Qs! " 71-J "ffl iii S3375 4','lJ44. 1. K fi ' .' .i?i'a'1,' if ' l' ,'f'fA,. lull" ' ' 1' . " R .4:'Q4'5Q7th.Q 4 . l,6F4Q fr. 'I ' ' ' If ef-,wgl5p.'-'." , yi! 'wi' fe fl ' -- ------ aw qlqllllillfi' -Min ---..--1--J ' fiff: if 4 lX,4.44 fl, - 44 4 4 4 4 l 24144444 4 x x l- f - fm, Q 3 . 1 ,b - 1-. -me f ' fb' A . ' ' -. ' 1 ' 4 e C VCX. f 4 44, 4 " 4 1 I 4 'gli ll ,ff M If , M- 'i ---- ' X p. .-:gm ', . x, 1 5-4 'Q 4' ,fir Q - . f, ' 4 ' Q 9,-gg lim Q i ' : i . l lx infill i fr , 7 .4 . , , - i J... A v -4 X 4, 1, ':'. .',4, 4 4' w 'EQ' .,'4'4 ,A V 3 fi UW .- i , , i: ' ' l ff ll 'iff lil 1 Q4 -1 : L I-. 4 .A A: ', v 4 :ffl 'djs-'14 X, 14 -f ,,..3. -4 V 4.f - 4 1 I , 4' N4 47 wif' .4 2,44'4 54 ly l . 4-J .1, 41-14 . li y ,,i14g44-4'l ' - 44 4 :'4'3f4,4 4. 44,. -4,-44.4. 44 414 4444 44 f 4 44 - , .f' f 13' 'i ' zz Q 5 -13' ,QQ All-..!-.4 .1 , 'f ffm, ' , ':"4 , , 4 ,f if ' if s iw 44:1Gx4+.4'4, 4 QQ- 4 LL ,I 542-Igfjf 44- W 44 ' 44 4' 5. 4 4 hifi! 4 4 fl 4 4 1.,4 KK r. ,. , z1'llig.yu- - , 4 ,. , ui.. ,mm git ' H -. 444.34 44.4444 . l96l He is cost! folks. forwa lost. SAMUEL FOYER N. Y. too silent. Awake. at any Step out and mcct the Be not backward in going ridi for he who hesitates is CW Wilt alketh apart from the herdg at the fair ne'er cp. That he is good, take his wordg but still ers run deep. ooo .fs LJIL X-1 19+ 97 MARCY FREY, Ellilf C. C. N. Y. Sluden! Council Ml. Glen: Club Nj. Built like a battleship. Marcy is so powerful that he has been awarded the task of straightening up the Leaning Tower of Pisa. This strength has been of great value to him in college athletics. QMarey is Captain of our Necking 'I'eam.J Did you ever see Marcy in a bath- ing suit? No wonder he likes 'em dark. RJQJLQ fxllj, Qvqlf 0 fum - .3 J- Wl f ll fr? l l l l SAMUEL FRIEDMAN. SSN' C. C. N. Y. . The immaculate. ever smiling Sammy, hailing from the far off Bronx: n friendly soul. never dis- turbed or in the least provoked by his studies and still carrying off the bacon in that calm manner. Some one of these days Sam is going to become :ill ex- cited, get real angry, and by -, he is going tu stop smiling awhile. f Pg: at awyg f li 4 llllfmf EV Q , 2 ,V ,,,,g,H7 , . s We BURTON GOLDBERGEIK. 'MLA C. C. N. Y. Glue Club Nj. A preponderously ponderous gen- tleman. of Southern exposure, conversing convulsively in nn- comprehensive verbiage: an expo- nent of the rare art of verbal hypnotism. A passionate devotee of the Inlay and all the complexities of its tech- nique and procedure which he persists in further com- plicating tn complete con- fusion. Of the audacious genus that dares to trick the Gods of Fate and oft are scorched by their wrath. 19 1 --i-. V ey, . :aff ' ' :le 3' l' f- A 4 sy " X UK in 4 fi los l 'mx 1 i .t-I --1. 4 ..,II.-I.1:I::-." I. I I I -IIi::IKIi: If-.I.,'..H' I',I.,.I 2 I . ' - - . II 'Izjf i:.gg'I I II .ffifiii nj,-'-'l3z3ffc".v'LQ4.'?',f-341,451 ' . ' an X, If f'?g- . 'J XXX -, .I . IIIIIC.. I ,. L . I -CI.. In .II gl m .MII .II I - ...sl .. I.. NI In I0 I -LII, , II- I. ,- .- . -5 ji- I-IJ. III.I, . WM ' .i -. ,f AST -- - .I I f,-'IIM I ,QQQIL Q- .ZZ-.y?.I::1:-:III 5. , .I -- I 1,1 , I II RQ, II l.'II f.IIIII II If I i -6? its I I l :I IN I qqiw X . gf.II'.-:I ' -5 7 .1 ff " "'Q"" .mth X A '. hmmm -f 255' ff' 1 . . 4 A N5 9 1 " " i i A J lil' LII .-:IAIIII f I . I- Ahh Ilil 2'-I' illf- v. l 'fs.f.ftf?fif. .- ll l- li , - l -H7 ---M---. l 1. l i 4 ll. . .' llyfl ,Il, ,Higgs ,lf 5 -s,...II-.ME-I NI lv- - -.4 Ik -I III IQIII 01 , I -.,-Q-.gi il .-Il Ii.. I II.. II gil. ,M ,ff I XIZL,-'I I I-IIX-JI5 II ? 'ill Il-. f- Ilh "Wig 1 ll 'llhfll .I .y Mm, 1 - -' M AA . Iwsl -. .Il-IZIJI s l1' . I Il. I- MI .NI 555 ll IIl ,llf - I' .Il ll if il 'llI,:'-I-Ia.. " 1. li. -11.1 . . ill ' 43, . ' lil '-5 ' I zII il - iz.: I", UI I I-:pg i 5 l i -F--M-+1 ill lf wa- .Iaf.-:,ai.f.r'i- -l -- . ..'f-. 1- '- H i - I-'bis . -'V ' 5' Q 'M ii lllll illif-af--L'-l?'l ,' . ' al' 'i"II,li -llz - 'f l l"i . filflfifi '.'If'ff5.bF'ii3" ' " ll: 'll ' 1 " Q- l - l .- .-1 .-,-' 4-,-" Il " 'I 'I ', 'll iff' .QI l:.5'-fT52"':.'g.T.-1 gli X "V l .lg ff ' "'l if, . 5'5'- " fffii' . ' .' i,l il' 'l U' '1 i. fi."-'5" Yi. 'liii .il ill" .C "l".'fa :,-5-.1 l 4, if 'I' l llif ii " . ll - f ll' 'll' ill- - 1 . ..i'J'.i-11:1 WJ. -. z lg. fry.-. I 'lim i l ll- -'V ' 1 Wglrlj 'LQ' - Mm, . f- .,:1 a' lil 2 .. Nfl .II.I1IIIII.:l gII .lvIIIifZI. I .IIII2.I Y ll. l I. III Illfl -V QI li g'.... :g1fg-.' ........ ,,..Q s :':f1.:- hx M'-'ii' rim' ' 9- .' 1 .1 2.4-l .ff is Q" . .-' lil .Ji lj 'fi GEORGE C. GOLDMAN. fl'll.X , ff -' -'VIIII 'i l ' HENRY GHEI-INBERG. lllll X ' . . -- Ii I.Iy IIIf 1,. K -. ' 1' 5,51 'l li.II I. .1 - , wall' ' -' 'x - ' ' "1 . . N. Y. U. -, N ::,g.:II , c. L. N. Y. i , i ll -h'1F5Elllil:,' Chairman. Violet Dunn' Cmlnll. ls-ffl" . ' 4561 ' Like many a classmate of his. 3 . Il J , Y . .. , 1 . , . , l . X 1-2.1f,IfK-ff:I Nj, Clan' Niylg Cnmm. HZ. pg. iv--V'-T :f.ijj. Ilenny hai seen servicle at C. -E' Qif,i'.?'ii' 'l'l d' tl 1 t cree our ate 'V , ' -' "" jf .,. l NI. Y. z at a n llll er n sea- 'Q 9 I . , . 'Ai fi tlrcihpeilu an aimlvensurer into pro- I li --ij -hi. share ryisorts repiiesenting Ne- fill' I :-'II saic dentistry. And the udven- f I I "' dick's. He is the splendid coin- Vfixsj Y- ll ' turer is tearing at his leash. A . f- -' 52' hination of thorough student and -l 51 ,413 05-'Ii,f A swaggering. buccaneering sort who " ' I I' " 'I' earliest worker, his results If Ii i lim lr r e a k s forms. scuttrrs - , 5 y .. in both spheres nf appli- .Xl III' .Li-if-5'5- I IW'-If Lf w x i, l"I.- rules. taunts authority. and. IN. ' I, 3- g f gallon doing justice U, his If.. .1 q?lI.I5-rg-Iijifq -III X ' If strangely enough, crashes - "Fil intentions. Nevertheless, he Q ., I,f I - j A' 'QQ 'I " -if through tn victury. 'Twill mga - I is exceedingly quiet and .ix IQ 4- . I lf., 'l W 3- .' 3 suit his temperament best unassuming. and makes .il ', Iily- I-3 j-5,fEj,'A9j' 'V I to practice dentistry on the 157573 .- E- :I himself liked by his cheer- 'XII 'fl -e,lfI"' l'J,if"."f1lg . ' 'Y back of an elephzmt while jlff. I ' t f gi ful greetings and friendli- Q53 I VA3' ,:.g.'1.gk-I 'lLIfhx.IfQ'-f l. IRT ' CllllSRltglt!LlllllllJlllS in deep- e-II'I':r32.I . 'I..II-III' 'lu JF- mms U, NUI k1NII"Q ffl' - It- . .I f' est neu. ' T . , --fI1: I,,g" -Q - I Q-.j',--25,1 . Liga f .' xi. , J-ihsfs ' ,-., .,.- .v ' - ,729-f::q'.?s . - 3? .' -I . 13 . : 'ii Y ' f-.l'5l'fIif?C" ' 'Q - ' ll rgfwf :Q Q : X "i5i1Ti.'Z1.'-.1. ..:-.er -w 'ZI '5 ' 1 " ' .52 f--T'-C - ' - .VE- . wiifiii..l.-:welll -W-..... - .f Qs ' 'I,4- 5 . f ' - s s - '- ' y ' i .v l ..,, I . '- x I' ."' " i ll II ' ifififl 'V .I 4 .Leif I" ll - M . ' , I -II. NI 'I . :H ' - li' " f J? . Q. . if . l' J Isis:-I" 'li S . . f' ' Elias .5.s,-Q ,A,, f il ' . il.. ' rr 'TTL-'T -f-I i3f7lff'f'- l'-Qs . . X - .f'igi.5 if:,ilf - sz. f f .Ir I-3--IIN I -- I,-.: .1y X l 1 xx ., l -gg-I -1 :. f-. -- X F- - f 1 N C f N 1. f pw -I 4 x - IQ :P 'L-14. - , 5 .., .r-5. ,JC F K- - -nk I 2.23,-I ta - .I: .I-,Ii I I .I l I .mf Nil' '-lik ' U'.'i-".'i- '- "'1'9f' 1 1'?-'ill fl l .- - ' I .ffff-iii 'rx 'd., , Qf'- - X iL'?ifg'-lf.. I, .Qlyif--'iE" i .' .' 1-i. sl"ki"'-,5.., ', 5 l 1 ' . 1' ' ' " :--- -cf . ffiiggiffg.-., N 'Q-I, ' W 53513-j.1i:: ' --' 7,-'.f'.I nf" 'Iqfgngf-ji J' 1 - it.-ff-:-11' . ff w -1151-21 -'K . , '-j'pf.gI-Q,, " if"-.Ig.g,.,.,,...,.. -...Hu - ..1Af!. -32.-QQ' l99'I DANIEL H. HALLOCK. N119 OSSINING HIGH SCIIOOI. Glee Club Nj. And after making this world safe for Democracy, Dan settled down to dentistry. He displays equal courage battling his way with the early morning commuters from the wilds of Jersey. Dan will ever have the tendencies of a reformer, forever seriously and indignantly protesting this. that and the other imposition. Some men fear Godg others the Law: but can any one tell us what Dan is continually worry- ing about? ,, 'Gi' xx 1 'mfg "" Ulffj, f O . il '- l w .. I 1 ll .1 iii ' 'url ,qi x ' ,ul .f': l r ly' lu ..,. , i I. gg Q. y...yy ii, .El lk ll ' l- .x l 'ill' 'W ,fl lf- w , Ii N X? QV-QV...WXjF5w.si.g:q"f.',".-'r,"gj . MQ, . . ,,.. . Vx N N M HERMAN J. HARRIS xml F' CENTRAL HIGH scuoor. ' lil WJ' He comes from over the river g l' .V Knot up the riverj-Jersey. Don'g throw your chest out. buddy- .' .,,.' that's no compliment. We'll give F' 'S-El in and call quits and won't hold 'V-is pq, r . .' , ,7- it - against you. They say he's .I X75 going to specialize in Orthodonthia fy' -' i. :ind compete with Dr. Wal- ,Pj dron, If so, start now. ,-- j fgagbl'-'pgH2f" Herm-it will take a long 5 I ZA if - Qkfgivlffh tune. .ix h',3".- W 1' Qi.'.iU,,lf -:qi .VV Z gig- 15 Lil, 2 Q til 'll M lil . . ,ir-lfsiwxzfll S xfiil-15? J . . ll MS' li Vfsfd 'A .ZW mi - :N I yi , 5" " J X lv will - N . ,gn . 'Q Q i will I Sgt ,-3jg,. X . is . 1' 1--wig Qfx- -' 1 , 'N y xtrwlz' 4 Y I .p.: .15.g iw ' .J N fl ,'- af 'f-WC: my , , g, Z if-jnif 7 2 ' I. Lug! ff h ex 55. f JK if' if ,F-iff -7155? ,.,'. - .-fn L 1 fgiil :gk ' . .feia ili - v-' 4 1, n momn 'cuz WW 7 . f n A S19 12. W -' .6--2 . 1 P . K .xv ' 'W f I lx Wy! V' JM, 1 - xx nz. .X X X ' xx F w7- '-Q :fx rg E. Aff .QW Ywff-41? ' ' f lbw.. 'W W ""Q Wx W 'W'-f 'I 'fM,!A 'f,,f' lf. N 1 .ix-Qxsei w X ' M AWA:-h X -'fl 'V 'fr' ' ' 3 ' 'A ' wk. '33 ,, -, .X hm , - .1-,-Law Q..-.'.f:'q., ' 'wx 'fy' !fr,,My 'f.1lKl:,.5,p. !,: W M ,f Wy, f, ,PT ' ig, vjyx- E v 4' ., . '-Jwwwgx 'iq'3'1Tp.- , .L1 mf -' W." " My ,f Ig: Wx 'Vf....'7' - Vf 1 . fi M... 'Q W 'H I fl! X J N ,lxnxn x - KL M. :f , .fu-f' 'h ' W ,n wg in .Mx h 1if.'Vi .r l Q: 1 'wmv 'Un "T - WI' 5 Q vtj ' 1' .1 : X Huff., I X ' Q V' 'fx -5 , 1 ,. , , . L , 1f."'1u!.?! ' " In '14 'Wi 2' 2 .2 1 U M zs fy gf: ,L . . 'ew ., U1 " V "5 ' .1f:'3V:fw ff-I.'f.-V-1-' f :N V A51 9 113 If V'-'Ef,1,'i' 122315.25-r : kg 'U W1 Jilfhf' M: 'L f hh P, ?,,,U.f-'n. .ln In W, :nt .f I Q, 'uv ,lg 'f,.1, :J :L - - Y' ' 1- .- ""1 ' "' b 'Y 'r ,qs 'pq -.1 ft, ' 1"-Ff wh , Vi ---, l1!Q.:i,.' Y Ifwx-'M' , : mm. Af- :j.L.- Y. " '4 1 n' wh' M . my nf nmf f 1. Q I L., .Ll 551-1' R1 5.4 ZA.: rwl ,I X1 fm' rf' .fiq,fi,.1 M 'Qi .,.ff'H1 11.1 i4'5,'T.,'w . I 1, W-I 'v 'UE , A n 'say- M Q. lm ' . lWf"if'! "M fn'-1 '-if' " ' ,UQ ll R. , .-I ' l " .A N pr fi in If .Y:f,L",, ,' "" xl f,,' ,- M g wi" 'Y "1 ' , , , . MQ' 1.-' f.,-.f 5 g , , W 1 fl. 'nf' U f ig! flu- -1 ' ..... ' I NF'--Mf11P''xiwQTYni 1 " 'N' hhml 1. MJVIL in V,. W' IZ M- M 5 ffm . K! 5. .,.. ..,.,., ...., .. . ,. ,. .. WNW xl! .1osEPH I-IECHT W , ' lyzin wr ulconmc I-IEGIIINIAN .M ' 'X' 'X ' STUYVESANT HIGH scuoor. 2.f.'f 'Qt "W A N. Y. U. f ? 1' Joe, can you' ever forget the night gh E Glgg Chlb Nj, ti' Mirgvily' "hf'5ff:'2T55" of Ulf hmm' Dance when we .I 'r -.r He has no dogma snvc that of 1 H9 Tuff' . 'f2"'?"-'- called for yof' .to gwe yqur 31' 1' - 7 f f' . '59 cnsil himself. VW: dnn't mr- '1 " - ,N .. ff Cl It hh, ,Q W Q. . , , ,, .,,, pl mg I ,,N,., .. -3, N MEI' dgjggixlestx goslonlmxiouse 4. . V, tcnfi that hirs singing. constant and as W' Wfmlfd Wi"'.Y0"' Collar TIT- ' Q imlfbu 'XTl"'C'11m'fK Qffn"fn.?QmCS'.'fI H-,T and tw''mg'trfltvfglrfxgnlig,0:'xrSCeJ,fQ ' ,, N QE" tinuous Trilhy is as aggravating XY nr !,'! NIE 'if 'lf i., and cab and then fished ' . -t N f .- ' 3125230claffsrfqlvilssii? 'QT' TQ.. 3'-gif. Mx -'U dcspuiringly for the hand- -131,1 , ' 2 '," 'Y 15,4 tuxcdos he 3 member 1'X-ff' . fS,'!gQf':'-E'g2.,gN QQ: iikkk W ' if kffchiff which You had ' ' ' of the ' lee club I'l'xvu 5' 12" fflf . " V512 lf Ti- ' ' ij '- forgotten to take along. 'l.'?15-.X ,' , .' -g,d I , 'I . 'I . . -fin - 74 .1311 ,:f,5,-5-,pw V . , ,,- . h :Aww I l .H ,. , A,-A .4 you IIOUCL tm: tu g Lt . 1 Q , M 2'.12:ffn1ff'M - Bu' you 'hd dm" " F' . h-, em crm 3"L"l515 vfwy good h fern .sm ,T-'ryi-:',E 33' l .X ' ' 1' V "' , ' If t xcse ays .1 Tse- to g1:,1i'!,-.ixixrtvj A h ' fi 4. 'P ' Q 1.1.14 Rf M' ' Q--a.g.?1g. vm- ,Q ij 'A ',f'g53,A .X-Qu' ", ,: f ,. ,-.x U lu 1 1. kph '--A 1. - 1 :4 .W 'gf ' ' . -ff ' -xsrmgi-.ff-yyggy' 1 1 QQ?-"W 'M CE "J Q V ' Y K4Sq?hw?lI5"L'if1lI11lf .X-X 5' X I' j'hl"E 'li M f K I fw 5775, K x- ' '. "1'UNf - '1'f.-'-.X ffff 1 Vlbll ffff f. ' ':, f is . 5 1. ' n ,P 3 "-I "V n "', . ff ' "MI x 1 W! 1 y I eil Q 6 NA 1, 1 if ff ' ff "" . ' YK' 'ff' V Nz. Yi 'H n r Eh .'f H 1 . 'f' :in f -fn ' 'f -hx H wk E . XX U .. , 1 ,,- L., ,N ,LE w 1 , W X ' f ' J, 5 f Q' rf' :. n ZX 272 fy ' M ' 'N 1 " 'f'f' 7f 'xnxx 'S WW Tifx WX in ' H- ' y ' ' I -Q H '. V. 1 N T - AX V 2. rn. P- XFN .mu E 2 A 43,1 E2 QT 1----..- 3 .1 Q .,. ', .IW lxy- , I' ' 1 Q x ffLf-2'?1, - 'ff h " 5ll3i1f5l H ' ' ,. FW :HQ get -,E Q ' Q A1541 by.. x , If, j 6,1 1.3, 1 --1: 1 ' ' , :"J'q:-':.' " L -' 'bw'-1" 'f' fx '- . '- L- 1,555 ' 3 xg,, ,lm ' -'..- 'fg ixl VJ. 40' wh -. f Y: H :HFAQ 1 555-,5-X .Nl fx f nil' --- ,.41-,-H 1 L 'rf X X .1-FA 9 35: Vg. L.. : 'H '27 1 " '1.'.:'wv.,, 1 2 V -,j, ,,: 7541.-.Ag-.. V . ,',:,l.-1" ! , ,.'-'Y' 1 1,-1,5 mg. .... ' ' .,..,,,..M',',5 -1----i ---4 f.-,ii .' 41011 ' 4 t gf! x 1 .N 6 j',ixf , .,-Xiu -Q 'T ' Kg, N "f9Xij.k Q' 0 .mf f. f 1 - gf-ze Z Rr R .. . "WM, rx ' I , V, I, I., N ,J ,rf S .ell ' rl ,q'-X1 J , - V - - . '.f':, .- ,ir ' x-. -.1' f W7 Nhil X, il.-ty 1 Q.. 5 'if f ff! '- 1 ' " "X S l ...M 'N "'9:"v5.'i5' if ' VW. y fff1f1pgji'.1a,.V. QW :fl , - N . N N Y 'Xi lilhllilildill -e'll5.l?g,l-l V, W xr J! I . . , . , ., ,..:, I N 'X ,Ay nik 'L V: . i , X' A A' -14?-2 U - . . "' "- ' " "ii l ""li" 'J?lf-l".'ils' i . ll. .i ' l fi lm . 4' 'i:P1.4"',- if',,:"i',--Ms. xi i .rs it ' 'J' V' i,'.f'r' w'a'.:f' ' ' "cl-.w-s.-.. ri . . is 1 I-wi' 'if' ' 'lf if" 1!""f3 l 'i' " wi 1 all .11 if H 1 in-' fl- ,.l' wi n Y .+,. El fl fi .Ll J ,f'f"' ' X1 .Q . is ix w -,px .vi Y- A t X. if "'1','Hl f"' " ' - lhi " 'lillff " .ig-Q i W f. . i s rg 22'-Q.. wi Eww i1fQ"' r flllw is 4f :fMMl.lf' 1'?1f'g1 li I lj " .JW :gi .ml lif i . il ' iq lim'-Li J" , Q: - . ff: 1 1 Mi Q, 'sw "iil"' li-'iili ir bfi! 5- '!-' 5 'Will' r"iif . lv ll .hill " 'T 'fl r i li film .i1wf:g', Qi V .. ' 'N " l -, .- W, 1 .L-,L-'ij . i , , X " , Y' ' I l.'.-f'1.l,4. -l .' l "iq: " hiv i'gl'3v . ' ll "tl 'e ral. a lllwg. .ll g f ll.f-wr ' "' V ""'r . ll' 'Z N . ' l i 'fig-' l r i Q ',1jif."f" 'l i lifr f .f. i,..Li ig - l 13:-lj! 2,3-.j' i1.l it Y, V "Y ' yr it N gl lm., :f will .w ww r ' - . .wr . ' f i iw. ! Q ,,.,,.,f I l - l.. 1 Q H f"l,'i' 15. "fi ..... " 1.1 'Ti' "'f " sli.R!1'gj:.y:9WXIYrWlyfqfff-fTIIyr,fi3 if' -wg. J f i-.Url My If fvi jvll V 'LM HA. , . . . .. X xv , ill.-Min " Blf:N.1AM1N lIlCI.I.ICR. 'mir for me 'Q ui' LEO lIOHNl'.Y ix, KM.. '- "W f,4l'VlJ,! C. C. N. Y. 5: 1 RUSSIAN GYMNASIUM, I. What's this'lr Ben has a nian. a -' gg!" 1' Q-.f 5f'v C' C' N' Y' El me" mlm- 'll his ,'5l'i""i, Ill' , Q-"' f ul? 5 Our fellow-student of the blond ij L li - ' ' ' alleviate' of the fm' sex 3 oral 'I -' . '- , " 1' mustachiu and the aristocratic 5 1 ,4 xi., "xl-lxv Uuubiffs U35 U11.H58ff55Cd- WNW- fLNS'?, . , ', .V j.','X J4 mien. A splendid savoir faire that V"-,gif s-5 T- 'a.f'., ilu '. 'IWHS but 1' Sllfclfll Case' b'.le"c': Y -rs, has easily succeeded in nrystifymg 14 ' Ei Qjff 'i' is fguldmi' and :mf rxnhggmfx as SI- ' N ' -' "' i his classnantes anidllbegrxliriil the xi !. s ,?Z-XF ' !',I fu ' 1. ' e as :ie sccre o ie l . Q.: x N A f. I . .. ' . v ,is 181. ., .Jag ""5ffQw-. 'ffflx lf Mu' Hel' eyes .were fm' and 13" '- ' A 'N 3 i neil' "iiesceri'd2'd'onf'lorli his alu0f.,.g3llb" j,l.L Hf,l'gj.3Q' - i I :Sql J .I fy VUY film A' I H l. throne to acquire notes or 9- !,y.,'g j 3 .-iq, I 3 ,f, Her beauty made me glad. 'N . , ,V an to favor Us mth a peep S 4 I hiikwxyw 3215. ,P l -if Fig' - ac one of his shiny golal xy Z,3jg'f -7 'iggfilf Kr, Vi- ' if '- F ,. I LQ f'-' fir -' . . l' ' 1 "T pf' :. fi' ' :fi 4fi'f:.'f.'YVd i i fi -Af: ' iiicsrciffr"l1'vef"'lo':"il'is lw rfffi TR' 'N ' V1 , fp ,i masterly teuhniqueg bc it CYS. 4,1 fxll . wi ' - N'-. 5 fx fi 4- 3' 5" l: f 1 ld asting or l J ' ' 1 :Q.'-':.-f-if 3 . ', .Y 'T a G- I 4 V' ,r iv'a':iinZ bliund nrus- X l gif' 1 .iiilhtigfllln 5' Qgifivtbf , 4 .' if Iuchio. YVell done . t . . L -N 5 , I IFE' Leo . . , the savour faire. gc '.-gy 151.5 W! ,2..,f.,., . . 4. . -Aqglgaqr, ...g X, .,. ,Q t.uj14:'j C . '-1.-.2 Q'-T--, I .r1g' -Z 'f ll ' Nwj gel? . ' or iliiiif f 'F' X f--Rlgiir-.rri's"if" - ., 1' filfgey X- 'Sr , rf r If v. jaiffi ' . , .w Nxt- i - .!. A I .V ,3 X ' f ' ,. F 5 g.f?s'SF.rl I 1 .3 Us ' ' '- ,-5 .1 QQ: ff I ' 5 5 'Y , cgiili N y I fer, .fl X I n 72k ' Vi .jgirf '.:. I x ii 'I fl, .13'-ffl 2. ' Al ff" B ' ' ' X' A -'fl'Zl4tu"'- .5 3 " 'N lil' 'f'i'l. ax 3 . - ' ' 51, 5-112 H'.' FET 31.7. 4. I' 1 f 21-L5 -fflfflf 'FR " ,. EE' f ,f. .1-Q .,- l' iii ',.1', ' 4 lair? i 6 ms W1 l 'J 1. 37' I l lflr ' 'V XX i - ' w 'tr' 2"3-f 'I-'..':f': if i I 1 ' ' W? :Mill Q.. ' '.. 'il 1. 'A .IV 'ui r .iff ir 'HHH i Qt i :Q fl giiF."1gz--H - , ' -- - r :--- -- . 5. Y ,175 r "i:ifi5' ,fm-3.g-iw., . , L.: 4-fA--- . ' gf 4.10 ' -7 :'f.11'. g1'55.f5e- -ss" ' ., -'1,gf.3 A head W' rr' w W A V . wgffg, .I.'.:x.. ' l..-.-.H-.. WM?-----4 - . 1,g,.,,,,,,,..,,g41-,gt...'-"ng . .-Alf. -f,4,i4i1.".- N021 1.. li .-r X 1. Y' -vlff - 2 ' ffl' X '- ' -H 1 li' 1 -2 .: .f ., fix. '. . - . f yr' " Af f . .. MX ll -. 1 'ills' Wag., .- . ' .'j,g:1, ,11,', ,, , - ' , X .NL ', ' " .- 4 .lit nfl' 'll' lf' f will 5-21 if A .. ' C 1- T .ik lliien V -ww'-'wi if nfs. , .nc W 1 7, mv' X , , - W 'W' iff-' hx lil., .li if .W ' 'l 'f.i.1-5'-1.51 ,:1-, of Wlrfw , CY NIV' fff"52"73Q.f,1'cf -Wk , - ,' l 'f.fgl, U wliiri. X if gff'-'.',l'u7i- ' ll" .yr A W H " :MV U flpai.. li' ll i' 3 ' .fl ily. y 'lil' 1. . 253:-Q'5,'v1-.-5sj..i lil ll l' lp- . V...-s5'll'fy ' M gi ir H '-Y-! 11' f ' fl-M' ' ' yn :1 il. 1 fl y!! NI 1. y A J 4 '.:n.1jl- -l'.- l' 1, 'Y .ll f,.. I '-'il"'1 li l i f Til l ' W l 'f 'I f 'ff lr U1 in ' ' J' 1.,V ' r . :. Ii f ':,1lX'K. '. ', ..- ri wil.. Li.. 1 V. - ' W ll ll .1 .N 'P - 'l ,, !.Ii,M,,J1i-J: 4 '-.',,,l,5w -14::..f., W .- i .' -i 2 -12, 1--'-2253 ' nhl' 1 1 2 l!'i.vf5,:.., :gg W H 'I A ' f. ' - .f."::1.-'.1 l " 1 Myfyi'2.fl,l ',Q:i-ffjfgqggf I-2jj"i'fs,1j,f'E'fEll l.lW Ill Q.. ...lla-,ly 11 Lifif' H. fl fl I in-pil -:sri 1 .H-.,f,'.,g.5 X, imager! T- ll 1 l .N ryl'-" 5f..ggt'g lijzf., YE-Q5 il ' . if .lj :ifff .1--iv . .lm i 1 l fl. i M ill .... " ll V ly E :laik-I ,T ' 5 5 l 'll ij ' Hi l ifv ' . W lf'Iif'l I ' . L. .1lf.,. ...ia -gill im. l .iiiw 'ill .ff x ll .l 'Wlllf Jil'-"l fl. v - " " - ' ,-'l,.5'A - . -Y-1 . -ff 2 vo- f, -f,5-1 f -- . 'ill My W .lil le , ,....,... , ..... V i V ll HARRY HOHNICIM All 'IIA ' Anlmrrfxxl INERl"IlCI.D ix 'Q h.lgWM,, c. C. N. Y. ,MQ l N. Y. U. Right well has he earned the " 3" 1" Y l SMD' yi,,1,,i Nj. , X title as Master of All Arts. When ' 7' - lf' X-'ffl ' . I., - ,I '5 - l'.'jfl'-'V 'dministerin an anuesthetic ire- if . " "V '!":'Y'f4l' 1' Well known wnter lm mmncd ,' ll' ' l J 8 ' ' l N- ', -' V. i. f. - ' subjects und not so well known ' N paratory to removing a malignant xg H- 5 A -,1- ' .' ' I , ' ,il 4 .-WS I' 1 , ,- i. . ..r. M ' 2 1 ' wisecrucker. Always laughs loud- uw 3' Wil i. 'l' tgilertfmulali 3321125 :Slay 22 - - V' 2 est and longest. Possesses murkrd 1 55 ,11 the poor mum pain' or even beg: I I- 1.3 cnrniv.erous tcndenhcies with u snr- il 'I N.. A Y - , - 4, 1 . .W ., N f- .- mul liking for the large. lobnl.rr. :l I f ter do hs resb tle - i--fi "Q.'.ig -VI, b ' -T wnb it L If yb,l j ,f . ' ' external :xnriculnr :rppurnti f.-A fr ' lxiiflcl' 7' 1 ' QfQ', iE 5 A .4 7 V Vg. dglmmlg TEE S ho tt 4: Tgpyg " . .-.- 1 known ns ears: also is p' ,Q ' .L1".n ' H U I pm, t Hifi? n It , l often seen vigorously at- Q, rf- , .-N 'EPW' . . 'sfff .4 .i , , ji' .' ongma or' flux seems 0 '-qs'-4 , tasking some poor victiin's -1N, .f!i1f X ' ' .iw 1 . W.. V. be the srl?-.rpfmonxigfi per- 173 -,.. M shoulder' leaving an ever' E, hi. ...fly '-mf:-Q3 Qy-W X -t . U. ll'-'fuiffgfotou 'lifm.!.'.nmm.s Q ' T g lasting impression of taiieth 7. NI? . "'-WS.: il' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' 'flfjf' ff'j..,'l ' l in? ' 'l tl ' ', .k'n nnd el- Y, , lf' " ' lg I if frfi-1' itil?-'fra .A -j- '-?' .'iF .'.,'1.gg'.gf,' lliidtxiiulxlgllil. .lilies not usn- , xl j l X 5 , X , -Q , ."'v'5 . 1 'ft nlly get violent. und he- . : .. ,y,Xljy,l1lgk 1. kl55,'5:3x ' I n if:-3 -L:1"13l ,':' 9925 comes vicious only when .fly .-1 j '.-.QA ip! ke li? mistaken fur Ahe . wp, YQ.: f -f f ',3:i.,..! -. ,,. 'R ff ru . .X L n,w.'. fx' , .. -- Hx X fx. 8'Q?:.'4 ti.. Q f-. ,,e ---t,g.A,--. 'WKyiii'111ix'+f7!49Zlll l x l' . will QQ ' .5 "' X lvlhlgll'l,.'-'Neill'MW i--'-'-" r '-' K .l- Qggfgiaf. - - "ffl I .ffiwllli ' lhiffkx Sl l .. k'3fQri' , X ,.. f, -If i W A-,xi-1 bp :xl - .lb I b , .'1S-,a5,'- I vga? n wjwyt .1 ff l P 2 Wir", .. ' . 'fsxfq if 4 .3 "gl i X, l ' Ylq N i . .f 4 -1. .. . lllllllwlllllll i 'i i me ff. ' we y .1-vm .1 ll ll'll l' l ' 'file -yi.. ' f g --ew' Q. ll l iq in f v . ' - :' J fe ' . ' 1:, .ig : li. lk 1 ' QQ.: I -3 Y fl will T .Sq . i fr 'lil-'y ,pf.,j-1' 5if ,. .N . , .j'-gif." 5: .E Ag' 3 .1.:,qgx- -M v ,. f. '- ,Q I -V52-, xg ' 'f A. .','. Y . gy ..ia-SJ-lllj T723 J . f -. ,Q1"5IL' ly 'BQ 'I ' A H " xi 71'-' iii, ,QI ..fi":Q-f',2"E'5"':1 ' f ' 7' Lb, 'lf if , " ' , f"T'Qljl'f,'lf'9f-I' dl ' 55-'rf'-",r':i1-.4 1. .ff ' ' ..':,. ?P'- - 5 .. ..:f-mx. " i :jg A 1 - gl fi 75552. 'ul ' 1 i 54 1 - '.p:.. P' QW, .,,,, i .42 ,gif ' ina f5.i"':2.2:'2-'., , we :iff ff " " .- ...ii s bt- " rv i L-hc - . Q .-flS'--- " ---T-'+' ""' QA' QQ yn. ,,.,,,,. , 3.1-551.-,. 543. --l-- l-- l' ' ' ., 11031 5 1,1 1 '4. W -ff, "fill V: . l5V.Vg-Vsrif 52 V5 ,W . :V . .'fffV4"ff3iil' AA" 2 6 fi Qf -ff' H .V .Vvlgfi AA A ff "" , ' ' V YV ll E .AV V X: X X ' -- Il ' , flf , . ,V K . 'xl 1' I, , ' : f .JW "' . . x . F-' Vf .. "V .. Ji" "" ' l ,g mllllzlal. : :. ,fia1j2ff:fLf,,l VI -V ' 'r uf? .l 'lf ll Q .ir-fl - ,f if . V ,f . .V V . N in el-il ,. Nl .V 1 W- Vl j f f .VV'-'.E?l1T,-7,-f ' 1 W 'XV1i" "l X xl l ' if , -il-lf 'X l9""'7-lf fl! lf'l'fM.l,l'i . . N l ,Vfe.N V. .V llllllllml llsh' .' ll V V ' 7 , -- f.- iz fell. 'f1l'll'l fl V l r r V fl l l ' l ' ' 1 ' Q. ' l i' ff l . A - f l f llllf 1 ,I J i,,Qi.u?M:,V ll, l V lV,VV WV illl",Vl'H z tdfl W N S K l I f ll ' uw . 1 H i 'NVZ li l l l lllfx lv l" l l .lls'.'l'l ,ill ff l A M 1 VV w .l . 'l ml lil ' 1 fl 5? ' l ill . Q if i ll V , W1 .fllfllfl -li: I Y V1 l lm g ll,-.A :V -H'-fl, , jill will 1 ,V I . .V,,f. f, ,4,. .N .QV l 1' V H fh-fgl .V.rV i ln q a 15 'Vi f- 5, Villl fi 'il V V lg' 4 l'-5 ,Alf I l 'V 1' il, 'fl 1, '-iw l 'lv 'll U ill ll lu Q' W ..r-.'f?.:f 'N llfil' " l V ll l :Ml-'f V' ll lil -"f V i- 1 i"3iL-xii' lil N V ll 1V'l.f5.flV-. l l 'lllf il . l ,, ll 42- lf' - 'H' 1 . Q .- .m r . -ll 1 ll r All .lf W -:V W lx :LH iff -I' 4 .,,, . V. V' . lf-..h, - ,, ' ,V UW. f. 4.V 'V -'J lf' 'I . .. X ' ' ll, in :Q 'f QZVVLIK MV. ,.,.1 .... .',', . ...... ,,.,', 4. .'.- S.fi'flPV"' "-W1-445V-'f5i'.1Q,iX ,... .,,,'. l,',':..f.L 9. A- " -l ll Vl ! f f MARTIN 11, KAPLAN lf , VV'i'i ! will MORRIS KARCHEMSKY V ll! ,Vg 1 fl 3 M c. c. N, Y. ,gill l :fi-5, c. c. N. Y. -' "l'l'V 5' Charm Comm- f4j. ' f l 'fX 'if 5?-S Sergeant-at-Arm: fl and 21. J Al ly -gl-','ll,V-lfj'5l'..V' We remernber Marty as n fresh- V ' rf? y V3 .V T. A If :he name of Koch were gg be L if rnan. boyish ond beardless. Then 1 . AV I A lmmol-mllzed in the Hall of Fame' 1 I V "ld ' ASR --1 in the SUCiffdlpIE YEHYSIWC dwilfaihfj-Tl 6 self' 1 V ia wciluldd be ford raise regions: ,fl '.-A. '+A' 3 iis grown. e eve ope p ysn- 4 ji . x ' . ' t at 's vere er e - 7 V-2, Ii in cally, becoming an amateur boxer: V. I V V V1 ,V . V Vf, V laudV :he ligand Tigelfn of Plas. ll ., 'H4. lRV '!'. his mfllflll IICCYCUOH WHS bffffl' f f 7 -. ,. V Q . ' burgh: that he was sergeanbof- N ll , J:. '...l ' -53:3 'fps 1' Q U, than average Cwe always 'lvh ' . V nl-ms gf the class: that , ,' dl' , .. ll f,1V',g, ffl f , ,, predicted in medal for . . he l-an 2 Marathon in .4.j5'-ill 4' fgjl3in'.gl,EE-A A- 'flijg l N himb: and morally-well, 1 1 1 EJ, 'v'r weather ho: enough to vul- ' Af. W "'l"""' "iffy , 'X . 1 he will never be deported -' . . 1 , l l is 1 l ' f ' im ' 1 . I if l" . .. cnnize a bridge: that he -lx fijg lives in Brownsville. But "7 f-M v 1 e , Sm? .Wqr 21rl,.', - Q. .l'if,V. ! 'Sql' ' L Q on the basis of moral tur- 2 ' "'- if V . N 5 L 1,2 V' , . V lllflldf- 'E - "" ' we don't think it will come kf., ! fTfl -el? ' Igffijl V V .V V, , VV VV ,lV. IV GV ,!,, 1 VL to pass. 5 .18, SV . fr l iv. - f ' 2 P W f 1 "." ' Y . ' of f V,' 1 if-"il, 3' Eff 5 fiif Q9 f 5 "-i if Cl teWQfl3 Zzpglfi iu' El V V.. , ,. -7-..-,lVl.V 59 ' 5 ':2f?f 'f 1. fi " ' Vi A x -9-?lli:llil.ililyllllf 'T- -4 Ax -l' il . 'ff . 'Y H -eifstllli "" ' A K h f X fp fl l J -FW 1 '79-l El: V' VV ' . V I m 1 9 , ,V ' V N V. l, V,-ZA. 5 I-V-2.-,H V Q- - Y V V iV.IV.ViI r 'V If , fs . W 5 ' ll - V X l twig ill V . lm W i 'vit' ' ' ' QV ' J. . "' 1 1 , ' I " 551-i l ' ' , 'r ' . - 0 -17 D 2. ' ' l, riff., ,JI 5 J 3? 1 1-' Jlliie ...... U ' G ' lg x ' ---la , il f , uf. - .:. fag "ff ff'-15 2 .f ,fr 'V. Wx N - I ', ' f -,Zin ' L-C -':::. f,' 'V ','.i','gl.U f ' Z- J ,'-fl. '1'.,f,i' ' i. V 1 all 'Ili' I Via- 'il Y 'ff ., T l ' iii' itll 'T -.V V l VE- VVV,!lW X ,fn VV,V.. V 6 I' Hr. fl ,' . xii- 'a li ' l f VV V. l l --if ,, Q A V V' ll V xl l , . 6.1 VV v' -.TL Q, :MV ,lx If I 'V :f l f' S ll I fV . ff: 2 .1 'V i l "M-V 1 ll L17 V '- if .V Fi . ..-... 1 V- . rg l' . .4 7 if l- V ,.:.rf, -9 4, V l x ,QV eg i. , A. . W, ,g , W1 1 fu' :.f,.ff.p'.l., .U lyggg- V: WD ,Z --: V- -. , ew .fl . :eh-V Lev. K - ' .ll l .M L 1. 4 V V VV f 0- .ef 1 A v 1 K. l , VM' V 5. A, D477 f V1 J ,r.V ' ,i-, V I V V- ,V ,ll 1 41497 'ilfiilf M. .VP ' al. l , I l ' ' l ' .4"E'. '-lf I nfs- ,www Y..4.f-if 'il 'jimi' 1A'ilfli'lff' i M M ' ' " X 1 ' V 'filV"'f"7ffi 'sf'-V' 'N iff' 51 ':l:l'il7'l- .L lf Nu JUJJJJJ If X . "-i' L MA M 5 f V l 1o4l -,i ,. .4 ,., 3 , ..i . .U , .V , . , , l ri ,. , ,. Q., wi l r hills. i .,. iii . LOUIS KAUFMAN N. Y. U. Some folks lead charmed lives and others just get the tough breaks-all of them. l For. four years Lou has been pitting himself against Fate, never discreet . . . just pitting. 'Twas oft tough. But Lou stuck grimly to the old grind and came through comfortably. His real con- quests have not been in dentistry. il I T. in if r X AX i - .fv- -v.,-f, -'VY' Ol LOUIS J. KIRSCH, IIAE C. C. N. Y., N. Y. U. Pram Commitlee Nj, Violet Dance Comm. Nj Glee Club M2 Art Ldzlor Vzolet Nj At the eirly age of 7 months our versatile artist first gave evidence of tilent by mischievously carica turing his nurse maid on the slats of his crib He immedi itey went forth ugon .1 p career ind after studying in laris Rome and Carls bad under Mich iel Angelo and Sarah Bernhardt he favored us with his pres ence and entered upon and completed his masterpiece which you now behold Puff? 5 W, 4,5 u. r.r!- - ,wr i i iii? flfl . ll . ' Sip z 'fx P1 J fi ,wp r f v x 'W--. 1 . .- - -will - I ' ' - . ' - .U i -Q?fE 1 1 ' r Y A .' ' .1 , l LL V' "3QJ:QiI'5M" . 1 i u 'i ' ,fff . . r fi We is ff 's-,yn K e fe t A iiifif-+5 C ' X 2 Vg Mivviil J KL flflgjrlu J i in :ii it e 1 l' 1 'UP Qi R 1 , in ng: f il Q i f aff.- V ' li rl 'il 'll w 5 A I e Ii fl 1 E. iffffii' i . in Q ll il, i l Li- ' ,f 3' w!j'...i ' ii! , p w ' 1 gf 'ff ,1 'ru a ,,f M 1, , n,,1.'m.f,rv.1,v,f.r'H .',..fm!J!'f N ' f"- , ,yy I i 'fill 7 iigh .Lili X il qi ' ' rb i- i 1 'i ., .... " W 1 L 1 if c n' -. r ABRAM J. RRASNY. All ABRAHAM KROLI. li. iif,,l1m ilu. 5,5 i I w Qljgky Ti il W i'lW?W .H "i I 'I N' Y- U- I I N. Y. U. lk An imperial potentatv: in tie' rea ni V- I I A I sl 4 N K , - of Fact and Detail. lltadily he Amer Knfll Bag fnirry old Soul wnuld slay a thousand dentists for and 3 merry old mul is hc, he ,1- M. . ' une enamel rod niisplaced. Nclwarrk gave up his drum and he gnva up -'Civil lg! is to he favored with a specialist his ,mints to study dentistry. I 'Er ic --uf just vyhat speciality we are Well' so much fm- the past: at xl g.l,4:5 uncertain. lhc august gentleman hast- he hopes it is all lmssrd' .w..y,?15 'Slflffll 2' llflt 'lf Sci' nsfem With sign-painting. music, fm, WW" 0. "f mdlly We F' and dentistry to procure 1" . Qe3"jLg-MER' ences wlll M1fC'1"'l' tu lm for him his daily bread. if- fIfFlr5uiPfVf wllcfllfriltcd "n'i"g'c5' Aim butter. and salt respcc- ffl! ' -ilfif'-f"" llmy we my ' ' ' an nslnr' tively. he. unlike the rest fifffjg ,llff 'ng B"i'l"'i'5l" of us margin burnishers. if 'ji-'W7j .3,,5?fi should not have any rx- WP- I 5111.154 cus: for he-running under- j 1 Zilfliflflil-ix:- nuurisllrd. " iff J ,f.qf2fQ3,5ll i ,T .2 - ,..7i,-y,.- Q i , 1 wir nf ip.. V ki . xy? i' ' V ..-.--- - fr ,sexi V' Q l f - J '-fc O X' X l :iid : UQ . - - ,, , -. :la rv- Qi fl -- xl .iifrly .iv ' il 3 - la lfllll 'A me - l 'X a " , 1 lpn' 2- 2 i ll 1 ' 'gil l' ' .. I . ff N, l.: L .. W '. 4... lei?" ' 1 1, ' 1 . Mig." ' r !' .5'7'59' -1 ' fx ' -- , - V ' :lf - .N . - "2 1 'ann - W' 33:23, A- ..-, LK 'r' '- ,.-, ' '.5'Ip.'- L- f'.n1--- Wil' ' I lO6l . fllr' X ' I ' - - X. 15.53. fl ' gf f . N 1 X4 1 if .. ' i -. , ,X vi ' Liiifih : : " in wkx Xl N 'iviiiilii .' ,' K ' ' 1 ff," ,V wr., Am X.'f31f" l'fVf l 1 " 'Qu ' 'L ff.. ' ill " Q1 57155. Ti" 1 . 'VM lillli' f I F . , ai , . .nxXY'ir Vx: -Mmim j"-' I " , A N sk l 'ii i ,V-I - 4, ,. i , il 1 iii! 1 X . , , i V," ..- iz 'jzawl-,YH Vgflf Xl. li l 11 -- Hr-f , J ,1f1:j.ij'f- , ilfjl 'f3'f.t5ia' iili lr V1 1 .Wa V l ww' + .l.r.l.f,,g1 'frf ,ill ,mf W N: l . gig' ffl j ? ' , if im . ll- NX will 1 .' alll: X X ' H, lii5'ii'V--1ViVs l i i f i I 'ii i 'K il"L1f.'ai fg:1,llJ.l. ' ifllw, i+" V V' lx il, 'gl lff , Q- ,QU PM . fllll .il .firm-fl. X 1- K H- ,XX 5 iiiif' ,il 1-is 0 if W QU X. ll tif X X X 'X A li . X 1 'X .ln an rink: .- l if M 1 1-flifllriiif . l-lax 5 ilf-ii'- -r V -all Ni iii! .,f' 1iJ'?i-f,'f V' W 1 Fi it r lllr ll., ,Il ,5XiX.l .A lg l ll ,Jill V. .lr .A XX' I, ali ,:5lX555.lXXl all Xl 'I l1X1:l 'X ' l -lf VM. pl. :iv fu ' If 7 'QW 'f"" 1' Ii' i ' , 11" " i-:F -,-- QQM-' I ililtl. 141 1-Flexi .1 im a ' "gli .R WV si . file- ai-1 l fi nw 'J li, V Ur V ' "'i'VW iff faq V W nw' V if XVX X'! ,Jill V -w.. , ....,. .. V --'-' "" ' " ' i- ,-T':,.i,.',..r '.g.x,.- -.Q , A . " 'X in--, l 4 Mi ll . MAX LABENOWX BXSX. Um, IX V,-, il .1olV1N ix. im. imim, xi., Vifsz ll ill ' XlQlwlll,.i, COLUMBIA U. r-Q ,flg ll i RENSSELAER Pomfrncu., ,, ' llllw K ::'ifi'i':f'-33' Nycodian Art Stud' flj. V if V . Sflldfnf CUIUICH UQ- N 'f We are all can ln the same mold 1 -X 1.::- After much lprocrnstinutionl liclv- -I f ' 'x only some are moldlel. than otlltl-5. V3 VX .X , ing .meanwhile in the ministry, ,gXX:.:l1' Xl, 4, gig -if' We tllercfore make so bold as to A: uvlzmon. :uid law. Jollin took the X V' Q' "H V philosophize with Mac according- eff, 'l . 'X 'jg ':Q' HflV'5f5fmW B- M- 1- to 23d ,if , ff ld-X,V Q- -gl' ly. llc! lllm work for love: and far, 'X , . j l, btreet and proccedqd to showX up ll l' rftqll 4lV,XXX SX Q, hit thcf olihcr 3801116 hloclge Bgld , ,Vi V - 3 Ellliwfesgf Ofcgilil wllgl llfflc QR mlm'-Xfll -- xifiii X22 w i. 'i lee C MCC lvm iii ' " 1 .1 inaumfled to be iunong the :" 1,1 i V3 I ' :IQ htiilnion cilmgrlignic gill ' - f Q12 lfffldefs in Qlilss W0"k- Wifi! V ri fgQ.',l, N X.: ,li X i I , natural lmcommcl-cial lm. X X, Xful . Ins plcalsing personality, V X gifxf5 f."ijY V ' -,'- man aspirations point to 2-1-lla' X .'-'- 'fc ffl? EWU UD his fmnuill ' ilXX L1 xflfgl ill X A- X X. this as the right lmtll. X TXX X g r NIIC-ICIOI1 at Bear Mountain .XX W .i ,kg :":,llX,l Xll:,4.T?lg-,:X5.- ily. X X- 'X 3X ll ,,V :ind cmbzlrk upon his new . Ml- llriilslrfrl ,Aj XX X. X T1 4X ll.lX' onXrccrX Vwlfil IIQDQUIIIIC oun- . l 1 ,I ,X .wCL5,XX.,:g'X.XX l gill l 1 l - X licsincn .inc u tlmntc suc- , I -3 X7fM,l?l,fl, 'H-f.1,1fr - 2 - 1' " ' ff? ' in V , 'il ' I-Q '-15. 'Y VRV K . if 'ni N "WW -'NK-I-' V- 1--i.: . I . z new 1' .4 X X .f.l.f,llXX 4 Xll,Xg,3 5 n 'jll y 'Fb" v' " , ' i ,iii f':'31'f4-"ll ll' ' i ll V ,..'h, .. Vi: '4' X WNY- "ffwJV .A-A .W if 1' ' V fri 1 ' V' . . 1 1 wr i .Vf .3 14 ' . . rf " .?Qi+" 5 ' L 515 X " 43- i ' ., - l i u A Is' no Q ff f ,a , Hi . . .' l X V", f ' ll If Il 1, X Ll lV V: X V l .1139 TG' . ' ' E ' xr'-:T cf. Wu "-.wI'fV.- 1 T, " 1 - " E ' - t ? ,-xi?" -V 'N .' .-Pl' ' 'X 1" '- N ' -'il . WZ f . ii dl V .. X K 3 N 1 .V .- V 4,5 'EERE' -.V-'i'Q"1:',: .'f'1 ' -. " i ' '. V V 'ish .. -,---f V 1' 'sly .- .... f:V',V'ff.. K w 1 ' 5-, ',' . f -. . fr in X l N . . f ri ' '3 .I N . ,' lffi lV.f V5 53 yr.-.Nw 1: r, lf' ' 'T .Me " 5 " - in ,. '.:.f.1i 1VQg'jj 1'-Q . " ff SWG N3 1 K TX g'1-z..-.9 -f-ali r .1 'V ,Q 1 '-W... 'Kw ik i 'F-VfQ'-ijlig .p.:,fL. F 1 1 l. l ' .V ff "-. 7:3 '-Z" " 'lv -J'-if.': U"f?f.'f ' I rl -ff. 17- f TQ V' "ii X in, .y X . . 5 .,,.. ':E,'?-'JPL' - , 7 .- -. 'f ,- zsiw-A AV-K 'Ex' W ,.,, "vrQg:ifff..i-V1 ' -125+ l, fl J :?'fai3.I'l . '- '-+1 4,ff'f' ivl7' M! Ab? , " A - '- f.'1.fferi2fs1i:ffee J l 'll - , V. - . . if . Hg.: . ' 1. ni.. ., .135 'J' -- ,L A -3, .-651 :19-Q: l107j 4 .ri 4-VV., I .V V V, V,.jlgV.. V . . V V 1- .-fr -'iii' '- ' . "' - ..., K-"' H 9 2 'TW -".V" N-'l'V IV :TZ -,.fVf', Vi .45--Vai - f if-if!" N V NV. V V. 'NES .V lf." V V'-if Uffxa 49111-' V 11 -- X, "v' X' 'K' NV - -V. Q . VW ' V - X ll! gg fur' . . .5 'N W X V Nl V -LV V7 V ' 'fs-V,1VV' A - xggyx' " . W, P ..-gm.. VV .. llwilfvl i r J' .Qflgv I ff -if ul" V X -XX 'fl V' ' f'flV Jll"' 2LA'5E?"Lv:VV "V ' ' ff -VYl.l. XR'l-X lil-J ml' lil'-' I VA Y..r.f,l V l f l If V4..srf,'4 V ,,- V gf V,-V,.- V' 4.1: VV V V.:-' ,V M. 'li V ff "VX f -fi" .ff ff V . x - R 'X l YV l' ' 'twill ll-V Vifilr 31-- Vliii ' ' V'-'XXf'QNx Yl'Y 3f.-.- xw--QV lm Miilllliii . L.'.'V -lj'-..r--'51, .1,.: V: .v,. ' . 4 'ix A N VVX ,i lf, ' V" ,I I, Y ig Q V Vzf, -f I . 1V ifq V fn'VVV-Wil l -llVll" -V ll LY-'VVW V f ll-VV 'l' l ff-V. .r'iV- VV :'V lf-'1 V ' -f :gf -V-l -V". VliVl"'V1- ll flrw I' N x l fi' l lil!-' V l fl' V V. V -Vi e lV'--'WV V. V I V ' VNV 'il VW V V4-Vit' 1 ig W V ' V.V...V V I .VA- Vf K. lm V-ff VV Vg. G ,V '3. Il V V VVVIV VV A -': -,'- 'V ' - 'i il - Q- 4 'V -I Nfl. Wil l ll iV i. 1 V A ri' Ve-W --lf 'F 1 '- V ...Vl 1 - .V VV -MV' -7 fav 5 al l f -V ks S- U lf Mql! V. ,!..,. -Q 7 U -IV, N: I' ,QW VVQ-VVWVV-Vg V Vi-VV, Vw gpg .5 MV 'Vf?-'mp lv 1- -'Fig -1, 1 V V iVi 'V V -4-V P Va-1 . :- X lg-- .' li- - ,'l'l-. Vl' :L '. V . Vil- 3-V li sig' fl 5 Vl 1. VH. V . 'V1VV,VVVw. 'WV Vl ."V7 -.Vi-V :V ' V lilll, .Q .VJ dll "" 1'f',VifVfV.E. 1 l .-.V',:5.V1 . ' lim flh- l V-V' . li ffl. 3.f!'1'.:5 fi "1 ffl' V V ,PQ-'VC' V Iy.1'Vj.. f'f, '-1- - N ' .V'VVwV-i:i.VVV2f1-- --mn :V V' ll ' VV, iw. - . V V , V V V V - V V V V V VW, Vqgl ':. fWV:VV l V VV. V 'll' 1fV!',: ': 4 I i U V U H il ii 'i r .Mg Vmwiz-'V.Q.-F'V.'.Va5QV,F:V.-V.QVV P V. .afgV...-iw -UVA .1VV.--Vim ALEXANDER wv1'1'CH V V V Vili 1-fi'-' VM cnoncr: wAsHrNcToN U., ju 'V ' ,' ll BENJAMIN H. LIBSON ' l X VlV Vf .V Vi21:',izQ:.?,Q.5J BROOKLYN . ' W l V N. Y. U. YV .l l Q V student Caunfil WV Qif,Q-fi g . chairman, Printing comm. fn. 2 l 'fl "0"YTECH-' C- C- N- Y' Qi: f I V 'iff , L Excellence is never granted to -ll llff 4. NV f If WHS Will' dcflf SUYYUW flmf, we N? .f- ,V',V' gr. man but is the reward of labor. Vg X!K?i l'1 learned how yall are SUHCTIIIKI 'A j vb A , This principle ha? been thqmqin, 'He y' -gi fag 'lf' and ,We fake f 'S mfillls fof Lfx' QYQV . Vg Q ' V" -1. 'A ' V55 spring of Bei? Libson's activities. 'lf V 11 .5125 . l'fg.CV .jk V 'I Vfessmg 10 you fm' lent C t ln' aff: i, 1- .',,' -. " And Yet. withal. he . has that ,li j g .335 ' 'i-.Ik Nw ' tens! and our wlsh for 3 speedy 5' 1 '. -' A - 'LV "capri: du corps" which makes .Xl V' ll " ltVV,j.'.Vi' 'V V l f- WCOVUY5 Hfrwfver. our os- Vw, .3 VV ' Q him one of the boys, able V4--gil. V',QP5. .VQ ',b.:: 3" A X JJ teop'ath mfolrms us tlmtynur ,-gig: . 5- lv V -' -3 4 to join in our fun and :" fyfv . if-. 'SEZ' .4 l V ff- pnmculur mlmcm may last -- .iv-. frolic and give us the qi fl ' ' V 'r far. aiii5V..'3!3F.Vf"-3222225 1 '-'-sf-' -rf '-- i-'--1 M- -. f iflijid-2Vf'l:2MA VV. ' ' V rim and fiToh3'fC. C4311 if -Q'fV. f'? , an 50" Mm" VE ' V' ff' t'9fi?' V'Gf-il V3-V "" 5- - .Q mun n su ere rom tie ' '- 'ggi -V wa, .VJ Q'.lV- f- V"':F wg"-Q'Vf i ll-'J gl - V' same mnlady. Bear up. ,, " f f N l 15 ' 1 f gqg-Ell'2fLT 'gi -'QLVVQ -2 . VV - E b ' tl at sk r- LV.. 453 .-.i f - ' ' V- VV:-41:1 ' l fl ligrriiiziniscrililig uslinlly fiilixl. fi 'ggi V- - ,V Vlftdlmbfw'-fl ?i3.i5Ql-.i"iVV i W! V ff Vw'-QV A-V N -W -.V 'il' V - l 1 l'vV V:i 11 .Vi ' W . 'W' '5ix"5llE"fjff ll' ' FV VQ57' Ji -1 V- H XV V N k I. ,?,-:iii l- ' Vg 2, 9 V' r f , - V32 J., 1:3 X .4 g If U I1 l V, X ig. V - 25:55 - 5 'P ' 2 ' f Y' ' V f ' ffl? " ' llwl 91 ff E ? X f ' SV- V WWW bi ' My V:-V: ,,- :: '."-'iii 1 N 6 . I lw xf .M VV WWE V V-T V f' -Ui -. iV' . V - :J-fV V 69: 4 ' V12-V1.1 , ' A V , VV f K.'l'l ii 7- .f -'Vf'75"Vi2jVCVV Vlffg-giffffgi' 7 gl VV jf' 'V -" xii A - W1 ' . ' ' " ' 11f.:'r1 "lf Wi, V V 1 W 'WW' - . Q'--V." Q. 590' -V - li' Q. "' J . ?3ffQl4iQfVE"iii ' IV.-'Viifl'-'iiflff cf' ' ' V-Y' V -if 'H' 45' -' fhflfiif-' !.f3'l1:-'ln-All I fi X 'V'- L '- 'lift - V .-ix., .... ---.V ,JL Lzfllee15:'.1.-n-.-m.-.f::.5'.'..i2V1V-'Wi V l'i-1 -'L-if 1 -,..-,. -,Mg '. V' 11081 6. 5 E ,,! xl, '- 2 J 'ff ' - 1 - , ' N 558 , ,E , .4f,"- J " ff' -' " ,' 'eLCL,f9'3'f 'N as -'.,j?, ' X ' , . 17.1" ,' ' ' :QQ g 'll U 1,59 - - -- X X . .129 'X n , ' ,., ,..' . '.' ' " ' ' 1 - , " - Q3 . ' N m.4. . .. -, 17, ,f ,W :f 'rr.,. ,- , ' , . . ' X fqflli . 1-,,,, -Q, M5 ,ff f' , ff as K . W, 4- 'Nix' asa "'f ,' 1' ," T, "' Lf' " ' CZ-' -f' " - ' - ' k -1--- "L' ' , . "3-1' f fx' K i WI ,l,,H!, my H, Ai :..l All t if 1 Q - N , UVM... KN 3 , .-Hx.. fd 'My ,V Qi," ' "W K'f'5-"Wt 1 ' , .a H . q ,w , -, y ' A . .- ., 1.1 , f!W',vf,y 'f' , sg 1:21453-2 fG.'fl'?fr.'9'- ' NJ: ' U is 4 'A ' IJ' ' 'VJ'-,7-f.i" f w bfi? Z i ,Nj MH, HI , -ff-5-gr, 4 15.5-,...gg,1:, ,, . ,, 1- ' 4, 'U Wi' 4',ri4f..' .' , "'-viii'-.2" " E y.- y'1rM.Q,-,!lLJh4+ swf: fx ,,", 9, xv .. ,, -- ,',' ' yr . ,a ' wwf'-'Wiz ur n I 5, N ', I - 1l',,'w av M, " N- 5 h -f., - y 3, ,, -,Mt .4 ,- . :A I. ,- F31 ,r17 ff., . 1 'NT , 1-, ,WI-. wi , , , : ,. 5, V .1 .,:i.'j X , , N . Wil ,ff lg? 4 4 1 WV ,X L1 'll UW!! ,j,il,, ,, . Y gf, '35, . M N, -'D gr' , ,-1, 1,5',:,g,, ,N av!! f il, ilk it .5 f .V I-,,-,ff-1'-Q' .A X h' H UV. ,ljjw X ir',W.x, .Q . K I .?,,,,,f,j',ff,i 1 'EW "1f71.E, , , 17, M ,YL I ,I 'I t, xy, ' .NL X My ' v ,W W,-5 fff .-35.14 , 5,3 1 Y , 'A"" ',. Y: Mg, Qi ,.WI,S, ja' - A 'N E, all ,, ,N , ., ,f.14,.,, ,. ,, h- A , .211 ,N , , -9 1 S . lv! ' - ' Lf! XV, -fl, ,2 ,, fav v , Y - , .IM Ka' 'Eff . , , .- . ,... . .A ,lm 3127-, al I ,141 :""f. 5,13 ,Y -H 1" y ', V A h 1 4 ,NAL 4 ,f,3-1,'f4b l4',-'v C' G' UNDBERG' DD-S" 5""" .WMI- Sxg,ff'.Zfa CLIFFORD R IOVE X 'Mil ' 'H V., MEDICAL COLLEGE OF vmcmm " .if4,-If N Y ' My -M. Doc is just sojourning with che ' , X ,VM41i1f,Q! Ch - -' ' ' f class for a short period, favoring -' J, "'k 1",Q3.j Sh'urm""' Pwluff Comm- Nl- ' w s ,,, ss WP" his realm of :M ' -s 'Q ',, ..,.f..W1w.2:",3'.fz2.. :..J,'eiw1'.. 3" sv.. 'n x ,, 5- , ge xn r st ' . - Lf , ' l - n n .,,-' , Chaim of llhsosifgeslxffmguz? Corn: N- f 'MX " 'mare hwffous dark Skm. a moqc ,391 'FF J: lf, ' mutmg from Connecticut. Doc ex- " -'V 2 'za' at uctwc figure' 0' more dell' ,L 'E' A251 Ug v, postulatis with much gusto on the ' 1 Ml . -yi fmtilg ushiapfd hfingefsl than ihoic ,x f ,fi sgwl ,Q 31- ,-, - gig. ,A I V Y' f. 4 K. g 1 w xc tm 5 ' N, ,, ' ',,.'3,Qx lu K',....gI E ,nf Ifigmfsorofurfgs Slmgftilfcfx . th ' K 'V I. . gleamed. What was her un lg t .,'-iii--53, -. , X ' 1, Ugg '1'gj'1i'i'S.0f viifinaa. . f '- , 3239 ESI ,'523c',.e'1f,,.iiii5 ff-,ZF 1 4 1, 5,351 gif w exjc e was an c' c' ' 'T' f - - " ' ' , , 5 'pf' , ' 1,5 Q-V15-,,:,jXr' N .K '. dentistry when :nate ating? ,. I , ' mr sgnwl was slapping uxz fflgj' 9 !3IT.5g:5: A , 'I U were leaning happy and I , nf' fzmlinwast onlthe pmm 5 Hhj .133 ..,m1.:,..i.:Z! N V I 3 carcfrce lives. And welll -wiggzf, 1, I, s A : sg wh B 0 he water, .. ,.:, 1-5,3 in -.gg a .b . -, Say that Doc has been ' ' HX . f" -, L -' --.f -cn ' ' ' VT, ' Lf"1-'.,-f'SweS. ,mx 41, V, I somewhat of 3 Crusader I , QV 1,56 Cl1ff.'yc:u should have been V N I -Q ,111 N lwifhli I I, on the clinic floors. v .'sSQ.Q ..i V 'here' - V ,Z fAQ'Q'yi!'Q,1 V"", 'g.51ffW f , ' , "" 'iz "ASQ," . ,' P Q V 1uQff"45"' P 7 Vf Ns - ' xc," 21115: -v: .A K7 4' ' ' . , ,aa .ff f 4VQi':' 1: WSL 4- ' ' ' ,5'f-WYIZPCE77 , '1 9 ' -'11 1-.:. 1 Qi- ., , my X -- .,f,' , ' ' - Q. 'x-- , "1 A-- i-0-1-T, W' W ,-", 13493. U,-If X fb 2'5" Qgg, ' ff M y MHP? ,M-,,.-.1....,.. '- .1- 2 ,,5.gxZ-1 ,- A 1 1 1 f J , ,,f,Ej41Lf' - 'ET' , f , , .1 ff , na- 5, W: .. v iff ,, in 4 , . Mx V fflfr fjsxe 5 4 ... .af ' 1 w ff .. : A A s hh ,H . wav X , - .- 33 g ,Y Knits I 12533, f-','g.', ,Q 1, X' 'J , 1 . lf! 5. 3 2 .0:-1'..J:i .A-,7,Ef3g,,x I J xx ,F , ,yi X 'L ,, g, N . , -EE .z '-ziiiigis. 'CQQQ 2.',f :,2E,I,f.1.If' gf. V ,, . ltjj. S , '2' 0, W vfr"- a , ', s- A 1 , ,Q , .7 1-1. ,N .. .- ,- X 1 , - -1 . l' .' , 'Q ,5 .' lf, X Q X .A f X55 'lbw xfx. li N 45 " - X f ,Q J Tf2,'f? Xf 5 1 ' .T ,ff-ff -X--M .1 ff 3 'sf-5 U f f M5- 5 Af - W ,f' f K4 ,s- wb. 'mF,. u ' "4 .,-,,, -f'- , ,,A, X' ,gum ,ff ' - . 'fx ,xlr ' ,fy . fe1.2a2,NS. 71. M Q 1 I .iw ,. 1 .Q , 5 ,qw L-'K ' 3' if-' I,-g':.:,,ff5v 9 ng: V ',5If 1 iw 1"1bX2'1'i : f -LL . "' ' '-' "1f"1v5f3'E,2'ffi'? ,f .J r ZA '- . . ' . v' ' 7 7 ' -P-W-A " -l------- 1 - ,-.- 5 4 , -N 1, .g..4igi'j' 41091 1 fp ' I f 'H 'W' :I 5 N K i J'q..,,f 'if' , , ' . ., ' X52 if - ' :fm X I h 4. ,fJLj,,f?:- Mk, if . . J: -ut X M ' Qi. P . 'iff 'I :3'5'fi v1'i"ilfii'71'g'7l I ffil V Ar- T' fl. . ' t t ltlxf-L "4----.. ."'3'l' ' X i"3si""l.l'ii , 'iv f '- --,' , . A r p ' X X M3333 i , ,, r, , ' 4- .rip -, it ,lu K' Il 1 Q 1 l 4 :M l will li' it ifdlli. A .ss , MR I V. s, ,ft ,l, iwa xl' ii i, lv Xflx ,. X. X gf: f" 'l l. ll 'Xl , W , , I lf." W lil i 'Q'- ,,1,1y,fj.!' , If ,Z -t w UH yi 4 ' 'I I -lil.-' : tl-itil.. ' yr-i"':""f" Q'ri" 7lli'i ii.iiiilI i .' ..,, ' Jill- i i A ' ' 'J' .V Awffff Sgrzxws-3. ..XQlSl,-,ffQ.,-Sxfiggfgf.-jif-5AQ. fu ,yj lvl Mrcrlfxm, smuxo 4 M iff - X.l'llll'll?' N Y U ' ' Il. l.ES'l'lCR MAIBACH, M! XM' . . . t I ,i :jx W Michael boasts of a long, line of V C' C' N' Y' W, lily! iintecedcnts fmt Sunny Italy. and ff1vIz'!hSlg0' Mi. b d 'll 'i ff ic is one o tie most po lar f 'ie an is ew ut true an ' his countrymen in the cliirs. lge tried: their UNIKCI' bfvlvf and lwld: " is pleasant. modest, and quiet: the clinic patients tremble when i'2QV 35l especially is he the latter' during I-Q5fCl"5 mlm! ll - wld- Lys hai ii li' 'Exif an oral or extra-oral gunz. All Fvldfllfb' found lnlilY'CQl5fHlB HE ,xl E ffie' ,pl that we can think of in qi interesting as broadcasting. We M' ' H 'r X x x. hlun s!u'ggesting the hifzness -k I V meultion inlays to fill space ,Milky ,,p1 m'j-'QQ' ' ' tiat us name con: ores '. N -wiat e se are in a s 1" I 12?::QGr-'li ,Q t tif' his good nature alid tlie S7 I I v l good for, anyway? Nlot il ff .' i' .V ' tune he must spend in X' 'Ea , I , satistied with :inquiring 'l-, ffl . W3-' ' f 1 X , , study to pass his exams. ,' J I friends over the radio. our ' "Q, E IH: 45 V 2. 'yi fi - popular snxriphnnist has , 'fir "ff jj ' Q ji' I, df proceeded to acquire rcla- . Wi- '.ffxy,'lil . it ,R gif -2 tives at school. X j vi! ,I A N 2 i 1. ff-F ' CSMP' 5' ,' r ,Q gy- b " I1 ,, 5-.RMQJ if- ,, 1 4 1311.4 ll -gig. ji" 1 1 KD '-L iffy 1 I Ax V ,I ra I' gl f f .-..--.-- or e J ik, - -N11 V , . iNt,7,,:1f. , ,N th ,lik 76 f E r 3 1' f 'Liv' . , - nl "" 5+ V . ' Q' snip E " ll f' adv i fn ll fiflf l l . V- " . "1 , 'I I i - --Kai 47 'SQ ' ' if . 'xiii lk ,H -- - QQ 1 ' 'l -' M' F ,. ts ua, Q 1- X is if L , - if -a2ff-fizfrc :eff 1 .ri 'fi + - ' :tx , " 11" '1 ,151 i - '. ' "gig 1 i ' agp' 5 Elf, 25 W ' 4 5 -, fat. sl . ' .L " ffl ' ml ' 2 1'i'f4.:f , :1f as l Y ' ff e 'X . , pg -:an - ji, - at vii .fi 4 ' , ' V , pril- ' f' l if ' I J ' j f fi M t FH -, I vii:L.f.jlf3Y',:'Iff'-x 1 'Xl ' - ff -- r it - .wx - x 1414119 .r ... l . Net W N figaeaaflu' F rsf::f1f:E.iv'-f.ff.ffa fi i 'i f ff- 's rf' w if ' 5'l1i-+Qi-ilL- wmv xii'-Ulm ml I I S-iid". , N H-"H uk. ' ' N. ...J El li -Q li " , 5, w..7 li Mg- ,..', wi v. " -i N , i 'qi' i l l'-till JULIUS MANN N. Y. U. What Julie lacks in stature he makes up by his ardent and vo- ciferous defense of that noble community in the barren wastes of Jersey . . . Paterson. Mann looks forward to the day when Pater- son's basketball team will at least be seriously appreciated and come into its glory. May Paterson justlyere- ward its staunch defender. ll u ,,u,,u -f-. de x' ' ff 'QB X g XVV' X X M , amy. l. l , .law IRVING H. MAYO, Ollll' ll-xl, li 'ji c. c. N. Y. ,Q lil gayp. me Lncomgarailfle Hiester! eisaeeon t t 3, -' impersonate, cohutcrfgt. sariilxturle " X' or burlesque all of the faculty, :hcl studelxat bgdy .ztndf thef all- yi' ' Q tffl ugi o e a minus rn we orce. V ,v 'gf It has been our greatest delight to 'll l ggjfh collect in the student room , ,:L'Q' ,,ji3QQ1'::i of the college and watch 1" ,' Egg'-i.ifQ5.l him perform. i gi ' -4 li, -iv ' lififi' ' A ' 'fl 21 lil" 'E QQWEMW 4 WF: Qii-f-1,f1iLk54 l f Sl l'P+vl?5faa? l f 2? r- -, mi.-is+1i:l,. Rza iii!-llf AX il' fifgllil E N r .WJ QW s. 'lift i flill 'W"w,, if a,, 1 ll llllll' 1 2' lik .nh ' - X -4 i ' 'Il - fin Tw?-f ' ,, ER fi" 'f L ' C ' - -" '+WHM wnnh ' X V' 0 i few Q Q lffffml f 1131. V' rw OH xl'fxllfyllfyllfxllfxilfgl1 H - 'rev . .ww I QAAAAAAA- , .2,l"7 .ftp nw-. -L'H1..l'... ruin ' l 's fliz, f 4 - QQ- l i l . QQEW W liz. M 'Sy , 2 W ! f, .45 iffffmlfi Y Q , - - ill .N ll -lizwg'-"1T 1, 1 ' 4A"' 1 ' ff f -'.. i for 471 l 'Q liflmli fi i lulalllll llWl'7-'l ll so .' Qllllll qjlydlls W l l N my , nfl 1' l r lf W"1l,'V,'flll if My 1 i wi: NV i V- llll ll albf ii ill 'bu , -'Vi .willy ll' t li if ll' li l will ll l ll Q, ill- 'ill' llliili - 1' 1-1:1 1"T'iiil i 7 1 lf- -V fl lk will ' fl' lil 63:12 ll 'Ig-23.11" + I w ,fur it l-W1 if ..f-,ii l ,l ii v.. .flu lwwllyl iq g f'-.4",:,:jl, ,,,, ,l il f ml, Hs, 'gg Y 11,1 li f, lll1'lfl'fll-ll -I '-li-liff-11 ' All-ll? WHWMM VV l3l?'f1 ?g i ' ,i 1, f., .lilq ll-il l ll .llw ,if i, f 1 l., V 1 ff. ' l wi' Iii," '. 4 , , , ,, l L ll l l l x l . l ill I 'll "-14 A ,N--. ' ,M 'I ' 'I' " t 3'-f'-,'ff,f f .-.ff AN' 'bf' 1' if , 'g l ll lil 4 la l 2 l at i in- 'K '4 , M' In llc --1" N-:Q ,AIM lily-n " . F W ' l, l ' 'i'fgil'l1ll au: if l M, W,- ' fl il f will ly., in ll '-sill' I ll' I' ll ' ff' lx' .iff All V -'Ni' ll iff ?-g., fzvi 3 H V X ly. .. .k .4 .512-' gjiizsw i K , X, al , N MW yi If ' A D I M ff " ffwf ml Q.. D, W, lbw UQ4, WIN., JU lx., lying' lg, M' 5 .1.f ,, . '..4f.l ,'- il ,lv,,w 'i j HEHMAN c. MEISTER. UAE . . '.. li' Mil .Q-1--M, i il "fl E 2. ey, l IRWIN E. METZ AQ X l' wi : Iliff. 32.51 N' Y' U' l diffs: ' ' ill i' 'w ! 4:l'i52'1:'.'f'ff.l' C1Z5a1'nblVar.rgy Bzgkelball Team li "1 C. C. N. Y. ri 'ill' ' ' v 'U-V 113' Ufflfflfflff Nl- 1' xl"-' ,. 5' - f :' , Serretary f2j. 3 , " f fl Csifizfag' M 'a'1,fiz:f.,f-fs, f :mam wa iw l e lim ' ketbnll player and student. . . . 'if ' f f any 3 linfglilingvgrou englfffl yu fiifi 5 ' "KK fill' tl all-round. B his bri ht "ff A - ' 'i :QI ' p' X ' "l"" '5'f4 Hqvln AX., 1, mo? Y Y ' 3 pi b . ., , l, U A sure to find Irv nn the midst with l' -1 ff-1 ' Ng, 5, ' Smllf and d'camY. lllllgUl5llll'lg - t ' -. ,:.-If? 'fi his thumb in his mouth Talk l 34675 -. 'I' henvcnly looks, one' con Q U , about fncetious and precious chil- :Kid S ". . 1:i5,A?i,,3 ,lg easily glenn that he is in - -, VJ., N drenjlittle wonder that U ,A fflx ,' I 5 .53 .ll K ,V love.. We know and sym- ska, I -, -W Irv is frying go digguise N fy'--,V l .A My K W :Q hatlnze: best of luck I to 5. ' I 3 ' his .cherubic countenance jx rl ,' fIL3'lH.f'.vW." Qm52:g't QA ' 1 l YOU Slrld . . I. 5 well ICS 23+ - n ig- by hiding' behind the den- ,ill iffy Iliff!" -' Vr,Q12,,, gz- Z, 5 H, A 4 . ' awkward mcnflolllllg l121mCSf 'fffgs A tal insignia-the mustache. -' 'f 5 V121 J ,1'2Y ' I all V Y:jgL,"Q.I 1' A' .r A -' V , -155 12 lmgivpy-go-lucky guy- gli. " 7" . , f:.1., , -- ' ' , f V 'f f' X j, 'f vkpf t at's r . ,t - ijt: lf 'K'-1-5.3 'P Q f' 'th i , E P 4 V i 1 , JTQ+':f',',l" ' - 5-2 'if' Xl ,ill"fTf'- X ' K- 1 , Mfafi-,ill qw.-,.f:fll, , , W, ,, ,. psig, gui. x I aw 3zV.gz.Q.x'-.lf , ' ,i l fly :A?"1l55.'.Q,f ' ij,-15 '21, lily-ft: -::fl" ': f . V , r. ffl:-.lp . 1 , QAM, if.-x fa 131 f . " ' V ,f'f'f.'--l.L'ff5"' 5" if V' .1 ,L A ff . Q" ll .13 my,-1.,:ff'jl,' . fjfy- . K0-sf if it my f fl., r if 4 llgllklllliisilli , S -A" f' - " V " , 'A I iwdlii- J ' M ir':i,!..'i: ll, ' V -' ' J " i -film. -4-ffl, l ll A if ': - A I .-M N 6 - in xl " c'-- , ' ' ' . . , I I -i 3:7 l Y. V ffl , up A b I J xx M MF i x l it - all ,f u l l 1' :-T 1 ' N i. ,A Ti -"l'f'GLll'1E . K -' KR ' l wi 1 '- 3- Y ' 'I 3 ' -Ti' ' 1 if I, -'il if Z' ' l if N ,li ffm L I 5 " l - it-f l l ?-? "':Y2:i:- " Y J X I o 7' '. ' flpif ff.:-Q il' 4 ,QQ ll Q fs. Wiz, X i '-:iq 57' :S l l ' gvfav- 5'l".1a '5,"lf'-5 Ulliil -il ,A ." f li l i l K f it I f if 2 5vg'f2f:i-1. 1' X' 1 ' s 'llmbhw l 'Ez qfJ1pf?fj,L ' A+ ffliijsiff-5 fm, ,,, ' willful lj l .1 ' 7 f H5223- lil'-'fin ,KW V1 ' ' ' I ,-" ' W1 ,'-,v 'gi-t1l'f, 'flllull m u . ?"A1-,I 1 ' dvi' f wwf. gf, f yi' -3. - -.Ml-,I ,,,1, lm, 'i.f --f- - fl " ill A c, . -- , li' ' :rpg Lf' - e - ,sv -W 'fa' 1 g"l'f'.l'Eif1fQ-q- -' . '-1 - ' i - fi" -' N if af ' 5 53. W at- , ' l 41511-f'il ' -7 ' 'UK Ma l' f' . mlb" -WK Il 2 fl x .,1,.a ,i.f- 11121 9 2 ,,, . I .,X Ei f,'!' jan: ' '-,,V an , .'Qif XX 1 ' .X yyqx X X ' -WX. ' X XX,X',. , ,IM , Z r: , t,,,u.!X In m X X xx, . X X-. 1:12 nX.X X y . ,. A N, . . - . - XL XX IIIIIIII M ' " S I M . , . 7 S I I '1 " II' -""'L ' ' 2 - wi 'NNI II Ihlff- . 'f"I'fIII1I I' WI' "f"' f f e ' . - 3 'lI-Q I el 'I' I Iixcffl, IIIIIII,,III !I"'uIf .ff 1.1" If Si "" - I I - NI- lhlhml I 'I ,'X I.X1 ly ' ' 'X 1, I, 'X III? XX I IX II . I I I I I I ' 1 ,In--,'.f IIII I W I I I lx, WI' -I , I' XXWX X, X,1 If QI, -IX, ' , 3II1Il I III I 'HII,?a.I I' I II,III1 I5I.',XII'l'I?,:f11l Qf'7N,' f I we ww' ' 1 I , -If HI I III' fIi'ii1f12.s In ,. IIgg,IIIwII,I,, 'III III., -I Ili-I,-'Ia'II,' I"E'?3?l'..EQ'1 I .III I XXXl UIVXX XX , .X 4... t X, IIX, H .X X uXXjIX'I' XII XXXXIX.: XX ,. X XII, , 1 :XIIXX ...V :XF X X XXXIIWXX , 'WX I I III .I ,, , , ., II. ' :I I '::l . ' 1' ' . I III! IQIQ QI' I , -52 II II II I" IsI.I5" I In 'ipl I, 3' ',. QI III III, V- Ayymx - I I.I,I, III , ,X'II-,,.,II'.QI , ,.. Ifgz2Zs ' II ' I I II' .gl II? III' it 'If X' 'Half I I I VI XX XXXXX XX ,... ,. .... . l.-. ... ..,,..,.. .1............, ...W vm.. Ai, I XX XX,t" , Am ,-X :?,uQ,:'Q,:.iX.X.XT,Xji,.XXX :XXX XX X XX XX XXX X. LL X II I"z'31,I' " ,' I' ,' ,II Is V' ,II -N ' ' Q., I ' I .IX iq, ,if fy HE ,J . A f. 'XXI 'jf rm :ff -' I IX AUP XIX, HBNQXTYWXXMEYFR W HIX ADOLPH Mlsvxansnunc I II, I Il' -.. .iflwf . . . .PFI 5' - I,-' rn.-I 'np . , I .y:XSg.NI5XI Hia, No has K dr nkm. t ,XTX X Agfvjwizfi . N. Y. U. , XX-gMI,, 5 X rustic lmffmm Jn, yoladcrixlsewzf X' X :If foil Adolph is indeed the father of I I ,IDX -I, N I ark. Herb's one ambition these . . if Y - I, Vg- ml' C1359-, H0 has dCVCl0DCdX H IPL ,IJ -L N524 live years has been to cultivate ' ' ' g fi' 'K7-2-f., lm'e"ml mfcffsf, IWC" Un Wlfll .Q--If-!" 1I the practice .of Xvisiting-not su- N ' fr fvlwnh he Comfs f'I',C0nEI'Cf- QW? hp, ,XR-X,gX cm11,:-,, mumcm-,st once n week. Egg, X . X . MX imses tl trace In tame an helpnng XI X" XXf5i'- Iva? QX I-Iuw d you make out. Herb? ' . ' XX I IXIC boys and has ll'lCCllilllIClll expe- Q, ,x .:X'.gXXX X Xu.,.e 1X:i,. f Xu, Herh's southern draawla-did " ' ill. , :':f"fEXnR?iZtl"f0ve'?.a fvlllullblc md ,li f I' ' ",- " ' . ,' 'I' 0 t' 't t , -K. , , 5 Xermg ns avor. , , LI X' if- ,X.,.'.S -2, ',m"EX :'X intl! erihgoslligd 3 wilt. X, XX' J XV., I ItX1s our snncerc hope that f", I-7'-Nh - f51jQ3',5jI,X XIX .IX -:Q-PM -X X X end in south Brooklyn ' - X , 517.1 this man who has ploddcd 5 I. ,. 5 ,' g.iI-. - -I-IL' I '- Qi. once, Ta?1S-X- ' , X., I. I thrgugh the cures of at- 21.335 fe-s y ' L J,-.Q-I' ' 2jff?1fQ , ' ' . X' XX , ' ' ,' X gl ten ing to school and u 'i f' F ' Vdj. Q " 11"-e"Q1,5l:'F.N ,,- " , ,- i-. gf family Xs h 0 u l d came ' ' , XII? ' ' .57 , ","2'?'-I ' 5 , QX Sif y through wnth flying colors. .1 -Q 'QC NX: f"f,',Q5j I-. .Q'f.'.,Ii'l ,P TI I. xv.- I II- Hifi." .' .1 A 1 , d'1,f" 51f T. ."- 5.7 'Pie' ' f is N' , X13 I :X'Xx' t. l,l1Itkg .ii ' X I5 X nv? 'W' if A2 " " lf, 101, .lvl ---. it ' vflhl 'I if 951 ,ff - ,aj 9 ' " l'?5II"Ih!.'-ff,'f49 f ' 'YIM Kill, I. , fluff I'-' . ' ' X -...-1---l-1-r x llpyfl " " ' ' 'I' IF' , I YM1- X- Wg: . . P , f ,. I 'I' X X X.1Q,xNX Mfr ,Xin XXL: XX X I , 5 X 7.1 S'-I ' ' 1 I .. G Z fl Hfliva I 1 , . -' .q I5 Q? JI!!! In 'fliyL'1 . f . ,,,, IK yr. hx f W ' If - : 1: . f - W law, - f rf I5 Tl . ' gl: ' '?l7,' I' '-P ffm U L A FT Ill. X X X r I 5.1.-u-X jf J N' ':, 4 ' X .X-Xt ,X JZ., X, ix XXXIX .X I ,XXX .X X X1 Xiq X I X-,X 'X I X Qw.i b1XXXXX:, EIO, I ,X X I2,2,X xg' XQX-gt, -X :X ' ,IXIXILX 353' ' ,K I'-. 'if ' I, If -, . I I 'L lg 'Q',',-. xr ' A Q- ' if I I Tffl-.flf5,f "3 V3 fl'-jjXl g, K " I -'ff' , flfll :QL-,' l-I :Rt I-,X , J . ' Q E X- w V X . , yr, r ' ,1,.--j.',-gL:',f I . l I3-lil . A- is. '4 T 'J' ' Im ' I I2 f ,Q-I If . - f- liillif'-xg' K l HM' I, V' :N " it f l' f I N . R54 'T " ISE: -. .. .'. . fs' gil! HL V 0 ' M4 ' . , gag. 'X , - I. 1. .. ,,,-,.-, 155'--'K-.311 ... .. . ...... ..., X-NX XX.XXXX X., H131 l JOS. MILGRAM. OEKI' COLUMBIA U., C. C. N. Y. Joe came into our midst four years ago and still seems to be sore about it. We don't blame him: but nevertheless we manage to conceal our own feelings. The fact that he is a benedict might have something to do with it. though we hope not. Rather do we hope that we alone are to blame. So cheer up, Joe, and let your only troubles be little ones. "' ,I I ll, p I Aww... M ..a.-- nff V5 f' ' Jn 'l is -1. E. 1 W, ., ., f .fi ml, p i, ww fi .flux WF, , L, 1 ' .' 1 i Q . .i-L l A P - rl . dll Q " ig.-Q' .'2.'171i B s ,i f . xii Ap: --., -V: 'N' I i' if E' f,E'rii',1' fl ' Y , 'ff' .' I i ...iii , ' 'llie . E :A W 5.123 fx NEP f " ,gal 'IHS-sei 1 'll ,QV 4 Louis Mn.s'1'E1N, no Y Milf c. c. N. Y. 'wif Clan Day Committee Nj. il ,l .I Lou is the fortunate possessor of 'ft a happy disposition. By combin- . ' ing this with an apparently un- limited supply of ready "wise- IFE. -faf cracks" which he has developed 5.937 somehow within the past year, he ,f ,f has blossomed into an ama- ,-if-MT' teur entertainer. Our most in -f.f1'ih. fgqf5Q4Q'Q-.Q,E1f'y serious criticism of Lou is q ' Zfij' I that he thinks he is a K fe',j'-I 3' lQig3.7Qf' Willie Hoppe and is really :Q 'Hy' , .5 only Lou Milstein. Vg ' Q11 5 Q' ig-le, ,- yf Q51 , 41.g".:,-Q' A . -gg L14 . 1 . 4 -X f all Q ,-.!.:f.5.e:, 1 nv fs lf.-X52-411 I Q ,t ggg.j!,p?Z ,DY , KVXQI " . v 'z-.Q i .Jil Kp ,gills X -.f-4 y 1 'll ct 'V 'oo' ' QQ ' ' .r v,.' .V -il I X x ,,.L-.tw , , .1.11.-.f5'.igsfig52335-?,'I,lI',.r Y .-455' ff "5 2 f f.."'i' .1-'f:f'.:"-: . ' on - -':1"' ' ' 1" X ' ' ffl' ' - we 'ffl' -.f n A - . . . e . W IM' - ' 'fr :gr ' l' -.-'fsrf' ggi-,f W - 1 ' A p X ' tk. F- li , , .',,f. 'U ri' 1' ' ,M if' X , .fliflll Wh- 44129521 -:f'rf 1. " . -. fd X. ,2 YI.: K' vi' ' " lg- ff ,. , .' M-I yf , ,v...... , . . 4., .X H X,-mi , .5 ff! ' l, 4-' . f .. .cfff ,er - ' . .I - wg--ll . . .l it if ff if g ff . v Y, . W X X g l " lu -QA- if X 1 "1 I g.c1.fff,ru- 5 Q ..t.'f,:gr:.'., 1 N 15. . A. A i hxiikhtn WW .lf .-afw' ee l ffffifslffa-, - l lllfll ll! lv., . lliw l X fl lin fill! .fl r 'f.1s-aiwl l 1, N wi " if-fjllllylf J- l i ic. If l,'.j,l ' 'fd' A 'fa-' " V l l i l -. .i. 1 r ' 3 1-aw. WS. 5. if l' iv H 3 Mil ' ly. l" ", l In .ii ' qlf' ...ELI .Li J if ,yn 5,-'EAN KWH., ,ni fr 'Vg iw v .L ' yy el ilflllffrll' "' r f li ' 5 ,lg jk-WM. ,r J . me :EM M M W." ,J izjllqlyllf r.igg?f-' jg V Zllllllllll' 'ill' '-i:.:J-'.:'..L1i l I '.: -4 'r1,j:igf.fQ ,"Li-- +- 'ulll'.T'ff 'll 'wr' .,.. . lf. ' 'I . , ,. l il . r f3f.:"IfaZ' ll li . ' l l ,if 1 fi? reefs' f ng Y J-1 -Q W- '... ' :liz 'X X f .1 q M ,ll ' ill ' JI I l'Q:.,, Hifi .,.l...f. '.'.Q.,f'4 l Ll.: .'... :f..l ,",',.1,.': .f' "'f""' pgljllwlfilwlu QW, .-H g.. -. X .- .NMA i, . . . X-1 X .. JM . IH ' , .... .... ...f. .,.. . iii ' A H3 ' -:HU ., ' ff, " "A P, ' ..W I , ,, HUGH MCBRIEN. 1 lr. -Il . igeymg. Wg , gh HAROLD C. MACGREG0R'E,l..b f ,:':'nl'lf C' C' N' Y' l -fill" l V wi Glce cm. My. ' l l N' Y' U' nl -s'-lm?-..' ' . " -'zu'- '14 Glff Club Nl lvl -M. Gig.: ', , One of the clan Mac. Although l ' ,- r.',.1,,':q - ' . . , 'QQ 32 Ili not from the land of the Kilty an I ' 'Q-1' j'J."','.I-.':.L All llblc llclllclllllll to MllCMlllllll' "5 'fy ardent and staunch Mac, his love fg' 1.'g-f.','f gf very Hood lllltlmfdly. and ugeller' U-'Elf' N -.ini fm. dear old Erin leads to many 2 V .",:j,,3'.1,, -'-, z 'v '-'X ously accepting his Jihes. Never I R, nr, gg, i x ill' a minor feud. Hughicfs jovial r 1 .,.- I-I i lvyiaste. never want. declared l- K'- 2 , 4L.,., -1 ,k i good sense of humor and fine fel- -igQa..2-,, ' .llmlll as .llc solemnly drew .3 if 'Tia . .,f,, lowship Counted largely in K , X: . 5,51 ,Z pleee of string tenderly from his I X, ,el " l d'-'.' 'T l' . -l -' " bringing the Macs into the 'f - -V' 'l 'f 'T f mslde lwckff- H15 S0041 ,T ' fd'-'iff' fiiyj ' 3 r. "' ' 1- 1- I A1 ' - - 11i"'f ' humored laugh as he works j X'-f N M 554 ..+ l. f . on . 3:lr,i5 f,llfl,ll l M 3, supreme to the Glce Club. ,I W -N lx V995 most of Dlmc 5 1-ji'-' 'ff' "l ' 11 F A .Q r W""f"m'- 'sw f " . T. 52- ,ly H.. , ' . y ,..! ,,,, ,lr 'bgsl' lr ' 4 :1 gzllms m .gl . , , ..,Q., , y. ,gi .. 5 ' ff ,Q 3, , ga iii?-f: ,Sf-rev ,N -.nlrfgf Kfiwi ll- 1. I h .:.,75.,.W X :Flu 5 1,4 rm? I, I. E ,. i. ..l,,,1..,., . V Q. ff 4 'wf xijf-.il:l:r.'41Z'ff29lll' X 7 , M 1 'l - llllihlills-'is'l0r1f'l 49212 .....i., " I- iii' . I 1- ,wifi R i X Q h. f K A ' X 41, Vi X E .4 lj A5-,1 ., -:Pirie Y 'EEF' N . x l 11 4 Q i 1.5 1 l .1 .. ,ill v , fl' j g, ' , I ' ,,f l 'g 3, HE' - H ' . ,i 'iq 2 " ' V. - l ' Si" Q 7 J' i , . gif l l ' ' f 4.lf'vr-.-.r- 'l W 4 X lfffi Lv A lp, , .1 .l ffaaiaifeif .-il 4 E V '. , " f i If" '. "'1l.' ', 'li'-i4',7.'3:l I .'.1Q.J.',gf'-"f ."Zf li l' ' 'lik K Q 1 x '1 - ' fa 4551 '15-'if f .li 6 'rf - VSK . L Yrz'-m t, r . ' Li-'M .+ff'iz i,'2f..f "f.f:12if l . ' " -'p ail L A 5' ' '1 N Ml l j "l'.Fl-.?.4 'f"':5 Qfl- ll I 7 ' 1 lllfff . .1 l ' A xl: ,414 I MA 1- ., .. f , , . FJ P vii i . . ,i q A ,j-- 7 ..,.. J N, I f.' i.:z,i W J 'r We 'l '13-'sq new A 'N 'rr M ,rn 'D w e . 35533941-, ' 2 l ' ww . .,-, ' , ,. Q V 0 f L .f:f:'...1'l.fm, ' "2 .3125 "lj5g5j:1 I -""..gv1-I-?fg'.g2i5. ,NZM K -f"T- P 1:13- ' J ' if ff we 1- fe ine , jg-,g Q ' ...Eze ik 5 ,ji W .,5,l.1,:.,.m":12,Q . :jf 1: lQll5j JL. -Xibgz' pf 7 x fff DUNCAN MACMILLANJR.. Eilulf JAMAICA HIGH SCHOOL Glue Club Nj, Student Council Nj. The inimitable Scotchmanf Dunc has ably maintained the reputa- tion of the wary Scotch for shrewdness and wit. Mac's boom- ing baritone ran a riotons course about lecture halls for four years but finally resulted in the organization of the Glee Club which in itself gives him a claim to fame. The canny Scot is still search- ing perseveringly with flashing display of humor for his lost Freshman fis- sure burr. Q39 ,fb ml I ,Aff- BENJAMIN NAGLER C. C. N. Y. Poor Red! In a very short while, he will graduate and get his li- cense. And then what will there be for him to worry over? No longer will he have any examina- tions to fear: no sub-classes to while away spare time worrying about. A sad prospect in- deed! i h V H W ,,-L,-'Q iv . 4119-iff :fi 9 U ' -N use 5 f if, . 1 V X 1 .1 6 I was . .vw i X Vg. K '4.f,:.i, 1, Z!! I I X X . 7 lJQ',"f.-" "' -'J ' ' ' ,351 X - AX X . M X ,,,, . ,1 P i i ir -H Q ,1 'alll' rfb ' 1 i "i iv i R-'i 1 .: iiiiili: .auf ji -' i f ' ' , , , M'-1 .,.:ff' ff M ' - lx-3 imvia ' Q ' xg will 1 li, ,lgk -JJ. 1 Z 'ff ffl it ' V ' f l Mx if xi' A 7' ill ii 7 ff fl. i ' .:'j',:,-M iff' , H' .rx -. ' . -1 gil' - l""' llll 32-,Lf M W ,,,,. , f,,,,,f4 ,. 4, i , 1 X-A X Ai . i XX. X . . A ,.i Mil Q: Nw? ll-7 ' f il ll Wil ' ' V ,, ,.:v-Mir' '-l:?i'.if'j'-p:' i V, 's,i -4.:w:.t:-N' ' ,i 12 f fl y W' in Ln X li , Js.f:xjl,g-QQ-l3'j' li l is M' l 4 " iiiw' vii ' 'i'b'1.'if1, V ' 'l ' if " 3 fix . ,J 'lu' 5, f ,my i if-w W gl, Q will i il ei if l lil!-V lui ' sl ' Mlllifl , H, 'I ii ,li M A l i ,Ni i 'ii I V ii i 5. l I .A -,l""i'- 'liwlfll li, girl l l-yi ,lil 'Z -i will-all i will -ifelfl lilw l "'if ' i'r'liE'.iili:'1:5:-- ll l Hi IW till" ii lil ii 'WI , lf!! ' ,- uc., ll-E,-Q, ' E I will I jim .i 'Nl' 1 fl' , "f5Q'S-.-F h ' 'il img -'f' il 4.. '- -- L I , - -1 ' 3,115 1 x 1 g 2. .' ll If il LI 1 - I 3 i i Jr '- 'Q-if ' i' i' 1- Q' 'V Hliufii' l lil 'i4Q',,vg:'?i2i ,-ff2'.T.4f7 l i lliil :Sici- . l ,'-' . ..h, fx' N-if' r il , "l, ' , ?j'?Q5.j,1'f -gil jll Ml, 4, - 4 leafy- ill, ii ii if 'Mnhr-fr Nw ,1 1-V, ix iiilgll'ilff"l" ift lllil i i ill 5 ' iw! ,lqffw-Q Y Y A I 'U i'r, i,5:. i M1 M 4 ill' ,Q i ii! ! I " 'iii 7 i fl'J"'i All wlvvw--1'-alll? ui '.,',21,AX,::Ql1..,,r'm'f:'.",- 5 N ' W 'N xl 'lr iw JL V :ij I, 'A 'HW sx N V ,fm H V .,... ., , A .... . . .... . N H Q N! X dli,L-11fim jg.l' JACOB NOVICK Jl, .! Q DAVID M. PERSKY,1ZlM X l Vit WN F' ' -f 1 ml' - ' 1- H lv 'Y s li'G!,.f.',, N0ViCk is fluff! and 5fUdl0U5 and h. K lf Dave is the answer to an muiden's '-'11'5'f-3'4" Very Well llkfli by mils' who . "V i: :iY::ig.,f Ilruyer. if the maiden in question -QWN , know him for his unceasmg good Y Iv.':',,Z': 1,21 In happens to have a mothache' It X H H mile, l, 1HlU1l'C- As 1111 Hfdfllf Student Often NS af ,f -I Q 'fl N isn't so much his operative skill if-si .gli .ki my , nes, . ac os severu oc s o N 2. X, V - as C C wa e 8 - . - 1, ,. sy S. yn d I I k 1 :H . -1 1 k f LQ? .i f Q X h y h handl 5 his patients ,, E, Wi. ifpa igx fly, llmr fn College' HHS 'S altogether ' f ,iw Q , '7- Q as to make them like it and come if Q' j?i-fl 'HS ,:::afei2aSf,a1ws:,:a: ' r e,"illA -iiel f- -l 21325, 20' 'r"e'DT"f "Mm X' l' 4' H251--, MEN. Nz, l - f 1 .N , -' I" N 1 ron mg :ive now is ,A " -5 'f-'QQ ti- i Q55 " best fumllllff- 2 gm., whether he ought to hire 9- j :311,i71315,l 'Iiii' ' 'E "' , -,'. . "1 an assistant iii his oH'ice or 1 1' i" - ,' ' "1i?IS?'5i'5fVxif 4' ', A -9' ' -:W- " I 3 traffic cop to take care 7125 ,, fi liifl ' l 1 I y 1 if ' ,Q of crowds going in and if -'j',5 651, 55. M3557 H, X - ' A , r X ' rg l: out. 17, Hifi 151.5 ig g,t.1'. f , -,,, 1 ---54 .7 al ,ig ' 'M , if-ET:,i1a'2' ig Sail"--if ' , , fi' Q-fill' gf' F ,l5fi!fff5f ' LP ., f Q f.Y.f-wg, 3f,i11f.V-.f.' ,io Qffiff W .gf 5' V'Q'l,f'3Ih,5 3551. I I , cm ,m?M3pg , X. 'Wag R1 f j Ag -' 1-l- f Y .,,,gl+gQll,--,g1Iq,f .---ii--- k 1-' Tgxgfxaf, . gm .f Wy f 1 1 -' .5 ' T1 g,fg.4'g x f l it ,ff i A it n i 5. wal . ' ' . ' - 4' i l Q . 5 ' -L-'Y ill i i' ff f' ' ' . i . Bimini' I l lr- ,kr 'sl 3 ,lx ,ll Tiiijg if i l W - 5, iff iiifil X ,' ,, 6 lx iiif',x.Qiiiiii l u i N 'lib 5311-X " 7 - ' T-1 f' f""E: rf '-'il '13-,lf Y in 423 'gh 'V X ",,' -,-J K --"-' J- l l if E :Tai I g il ' - 'Q rd xjyll K X il fc a,l4Iii-4 52 ' gi 11' if A.-life' -'.f'-1 V l ., l l l W- casa? li 1 .V ,I '-fi' ,mglfffyh 5.5-,i::,::. , ,i,:i i ..f j . i!-vt if.: i 'ff31 'i X, t 'ill K vifiii izs l ef!-.'l'1"f5-Riff' if-7:'L '-Zi? ' f X in " ' - sh 'N' . ' ' '57'l':ii.f-i7l':f'9'i QI "'5W'sf.5'.f 1 ,N -:Ui 4.1 l, X ..-.,. :- -, tl- o.., , i ,.,.. -- n ,. ,MA Six- .535-:gf,A"Y'4i RH ' ' " ' ' vit.-Eg -jg "w npr 1 ,j 5 .4',-ggz.XEf,! , itz, -iw ,url V W, x ,- ' '59, '- ""T fr --- f 5 5' 'ff -bifQLi.lii': - A 1 '. V' ff UK i':lfLl'ff'3.li" " 'l"'f'fE?i5'lf '7 '-i"T"'-- nw' ' 1-"" . '-f.'3i'.l 2? X-'-Nu: 1 f Mbzf 5392-.E.f ' If X ' "':ga2'fl'i W A .pail 'K - , ,rn Y,,Y Ez , L1171 X i lv VI I I II I -I wh 'vi I Iv.I I v 1? ,I . -""S--X1-'f.'f'l 4,x.,f:.-'AP' -,-.- I -Fl!-I 1' - I -,.fG:1,Ix-jf-v',HI', ' I !-xgisl .I -"' .,', rg :Q 9 2 :,':I!7.LI1l3I,,v-in I,:gtgII',14,,::.1-AUIELV IA 31- -Q 1 9321- . Q. .,, - k ,gnu V 1 If " " ,, J fi ff :-'f' E '..f:gr I t - I ..5-IK M 'f'-g,:,, 1 .II-:fx WI I ' r-f-1-I I-eIf gI - ' ' 'M .15.1"'-'fwpffif' if h ' l ' I I'.f XI 1 .. -5 1-7. . , ',, f 1-21 , ff :' .- -. ' I , 1 . V: u ., "' II III If "Il ff fx I W N . I - in ll' lf -Wil - I . I. I I ll I .1-A. .I . . -,,a,,f . - 1 - - . - I .A W J' III! bl, 1 ff wwf v,lfy-4'v.,,5?. N , N, Y-K AX! X wQbwvl.,:'.lIRu X -A--3-iv C I .-:I f, X X,q.,,I-IfA,' p"QA,. 513-4 I I I 'Q I-N-.I l A XX' is X ,x X :I In . -L V I.-gf, ' I "' , My Hy-.'i.-.I-' ', i'I'IgI-ig I III IIIII II I I I I I I ' -I -' 'lI"- . I' I Ever" I 12'-:EI-'.-:IL .. - I 'I- l Illl' I-Hui fipjw- .II -3,.-11,172 " Il' 1: in I. ,I ,IIII QI i I IN :ig-1:-ilk? I I I, VII M., II' I ' I fl'f'r .f il 'M ' 'Il l-CI H 5- '-IIVQII if- I g1 :" -'II I1 Xxlk I . .II.I'1:' I If ! I I I I IX, ' gg 94,3 I II- ' I il II I I I " Y In I III ,.l, lx 'IH A ,MEI xi? I- IIII III' IIf ,fIII1IIf-I 5,212-Ie5':2" ,III I" III III I III I I '-- I III I I YI IlI I .IIII-I2 If ' I iI2I-'-eifI?I-?3' I -. 'nl' . Ill I 'll' I ' If'-ff: -Iv?" if -,III 'Iv I-1IIIIIIQ'i'Il' If YHEQIS-1 -I Ia- N 3 I .'I,I lm I 'II I'-IH FI-EeI-1b:5e.Eij-2 ' ' I-Ia, WI I- III I-II' III Ill I I II . IIIIIIIII .Is III ' Wifi-iiI I I---II.11afff1' I IIIIIiiIIwIi II '::- I- I I If I I I II -II-1' I -IfeQ1III1f:-ai If15-1-I - I III- I I I I I IQ-III I I Iflz-I :I 'I If'. "I-a.:QQ4I,. 1" ' ' I I I :-A-Aj!! . " " -"- ' "" "-K I IH- -'H --'-""---' "-' ' " 7 " wr xlgmiixu .-.ipz-'A-,.. Q-H--,--E gy.-ill-1-:'--'ilvigil- -A W- .-I 41' Iii ' i ll' f1I"M9'3?4 "i U l ll III! -f-I' , MARIO J. PIANO, Im I- -, Z ,mv 'm "Q -ii LOUIS RABINOWI1-Z, Om, III, I- IQ J.,-51.'ff33Eji'I STUYVESANT mon scHooL -Tiff 3- - II I C, C N Y, -I 4-I III' ' V-Viiiili'-i'i'fl'I Nothing worries Mario not even in Ni l- N gif' i I N " X x -,,g,---III, . . I G1 Cl 1 fn. I .- -I V- f 'I -I W-IX I the lndles' He has- bm' soft' WI' "ff N21-'5f,: ' Q, Loiiis' gxlfgllllg giggling has been ' II 6 I i iilrllg-xFii. l VFW blmwn eye? wlth long dmflp' 15313 .I --" Q 1- 'f 1 heard through our halls during fi, ,il " WI FE PINS l'15lW5 Wlllcll the l3d'QS Slm' U5 I' ' these long years and his cheerful IS" .'-' 'swim f"l'7' ' ply cannot remit' but Mano-the iii-i" Ii ' :L countenance has oft helped to Il 'lik ,731 I !:, gsggfbrclgtergvggicdhiygi lggniooif ' " ' -". '. raise the spirifs of his less giated ,' " XI 4. . I ' . . .' T' ' ' ' ' l ' I .' Z i5?,?,f' --l ,f'Q,,:I II I. 21 2321: oetgbghtygesringipeis i' I II 1 I' I ggiwlltlxziliiiiierximlongizelrii iiiiildaul! itnnlb I' - -,iz-'ei'-Fl, ffigg ". .' . .' 559: z I 'FF"' j r c r l ' ':. ?' I - 'f3:g"i4"-I' ill' -I - l , f 'ifi Mols ln kghc class' ls 'i - '-"' I w:ulv:ln'.i:e cllianglrlin ix ,I' ' -i 5.jf,., - 2'55,' I f panem' 'Fld 394 cons' Fr' I j-.5 Qi.-g,"I1I 'L " for the cracked ice conces- Lit' IH h HI l. , Q .1 ate, n dispositiqn which fj-Lift X , . :IX fl sion in Hades: and Lord' - !.v4 yy!- f 1 xl JI, ij Iyyuiawr WIN X ., gugurs well for his success ' QI- ,-il., -I :ff how many of thelll Could all his ,j.I5':I,. . - in future years. -"ga: -- -. I -:.' use boths ,h w I ,e ,,-'xzgfx-. ' -I f I I ' ' ' 'Ii 8 :II lv,-H-f . ' - .-T.: :- CQ x , I. ",'gi'i'-El I, 'I --'- -I ---II III- :iii 'ITV ' I f" "II, -all l"'i3'i'i"IQl2iQ-3355. 'F-Fi' 7- ' ' I liwlff al,ll.:.1'i:j,:l? ' ' If' II Ki VQ '.lil'P lIi " ' - 'lla If K u '32 i..-,ig 'wf llj1f2,35il1.'-1f'f Jw, Qi " 'I 2,5 X' lgl?EgYlll.:-"milf: V " .1115 . 1-1 I -I ,--',U-.-by ' I 1'fm:x-it 1 t - ' 5501, ' , I I. . ,, - -I I! W I . II- . III 5: ., 1-79 if ' -"7--1 "' I I 7 -I Tiifig ' , III I, ,-I ,, I , f , I nf I I ff 5 j III gs- :EQIII I ',.5:zI .,... - - I' .I .5 ' ,-'Qii I I , If -5 I X if 'fI-'W I' '7 Z ' I f'fIf:III ' Ag i . . l 'Zigi 'J ful if I ll.: y 1 V , L .I ,-i'iiil'l'. ' I I II' 1 43 gl- Z I f V III-I I ,Q 5- I--"n Im IIIIIII II 'f aq 7 y ,I I I I 5 mx is. fgI.-Fg fig '1f I5Ii:I'g:' Q I I If - H-if '.'- I - H... 'I-Inv--I II 'II-,+I I I' I "iw , -zsftiszq ' I N I' I Tuff 7' l M ' W 'I 1I2:,-.'I"I1:if1.-fE,' I f-Lf' W 1 Ng x ,f-'iil " ::S7'-I W 'A In '1 I'---' ti 1:1 Yi .I.I I-I. 1'-W" ! " " 'I' -I ,lf-,535 II g-- ! " ' -Irgt 1.g'l-I.'-,:- M. 13.5" 7 5' 1 if-'lif-"w '- 51 41" I- -,,. .I 4 J A I il- L --il? ffm- 3.w'.n 'Y N'-4-In-I .'... 1 ' ff fv ,ws sr -nwtffe' I -dy: -.1 J h U I. 'N I.gr -by ' M -r-fm --zz v ,, I I' --I- g 'fq - .. .J-I II I LK I In 'PIII Hifi --mln..-I..-- I - I I-um ' 11181 I 1 "- . . gilj 'l gig , " Q F: . 'if' 'liiiilf " 1 2 ' ii A iii i 4 ,iii i i 11 if qi. 1' hi M iii! -me wlgqsg, i i if ,ii ,vi i. , -i - ,yn i. - .V if I ' Q ,.-,.i . H f X H 1 .r ffl i i 'W' ,Elf ' uw i - 1 1. 3 Q r - 1 -V - in 1' ,c', Qiijfiig Mg. i li . lb M l , ifpi.-Q. iff. H, you it it X J X 9 .fl H-X " 5 W. -Vi 'TZ' Pio' ' ' ' .- 'A law? ,fi ' 'il " 'ii .4 Lf'li.M'l iiilii 'jul'-4:'f,"? ,:5?".."i"fi,. V i. f if . All . iillif 1. ei. i, M5 A iw 1 Vt Y 5, .1 .5 5.34 'lil , I-.Ml - WT' i"liY:.lSi 'I "3-ffiii ' ii' L-'IV i ji-'fliiilgli !.f:2i1'if.'2' X i Ziff ,yfffiltil H H f' 1 '14 '- ,, - ls' -. fi f i i 'iii -.IW i'E:.::J-.r2vYf' 1 f 'i i 'N 'i ',- . mi i .-fini' 1 i iii ' 'i - ' ,, 1 ,. -3. Q. v' Y-QA' ii 5-5 U N-, 'i if p ,'f.,:1 ,r f. . .wr .1 W ' 1 1 I , inf wg . ii' H it . 4 5 . . i,- :gg - -5 . -' 1 2 i J .fs1-'ww 1' N-'ii F, iii-in li iiiii ' 95 fi. 292 ' "'i'xiilli W. 'F-' f' V "FW Wifi .' ' 1 4 ...ii '.-flu . n . . . .. s .. . - i il ,i -L ,iii I ."j:.,'J':"1'. ff... , ..,,.. 4',.i...'.'. . .... .,' . :' A ' QQ' ' ' ' Nix RYQTPE,-5'j15!51XN'R 'Y.!:T"""Ej: A -5- W All f ff . " ,iz ,if lg X i '-.lf"f ,. . 5' -im' " X" ,N W ' EDW' D' MPPAPORI, Im 1 1- iw' WPC" REICH- W ni li af -. .g ezyfwiif N- Y- U- g t g, i ,F K c. c. N. Y. ,' I if f Qlfff Club Nl- , , lb '-In ' Faculty Nlcdal flj. Prom Commit- 3' it 3.,i:a7g:.' b ades of an artistic tempcra- My . , .. .1 . at ,tw UL 4,505,016 Edmm y,-DIE, Vi V '14 5 f ment. A far-off look, wand. per- Q35 .4 -Im. f 1' MQ, Vanigy B,,,kctbaH geam - - 'I :.-1 .nm 1 haps llummnng one of lschaikow- 333 3 -W , fgfjl 'Ea if T Mi, skyysf "'f'lgu"l'f mrs mfmore 9?-te-n ' 71"-7 ' X' Henny, the indefatigableg who. as-1, the inspiring O Promise Me , is . . . ,, . , , . , A vii i f. 3 mic of annum bliss to Eddie. i 1. A 3 250111182 Ulf 'HS lH"H"1dH?' "'WW1' ik . ...iii ' "Sig, jify, - -ui, And, as a lasting tribute - f' -- N ,g " . ge 0 C 'em' D WSWS' 'md math' gi' ,' i .3fq2f'cf':f' " ' 1"'-ii '- - f- to his musical lineage he uf.. I " ' 1 has had more than 0110 of .. -J ' f':'3'i.ii'i'5fi Li"i'v i 1-' founded the Glue Clulb. i. ' i ggi- lglfggigllliqglt alfseris il, I 'l Qf-i s ' ' 'i i .1 ' 4'. 4 i Q ' Af predicted that I-lenny will ZiV':i,' Z iii V J, . 1 ', ' 1' be among the pioneers of 'TFL' fj-Q N 'V -1,14 lifjiggfgvfira 5 '- nz 4.'i:,4 yJg:.1:. !55 ahnew satin if pfctitioners QQ, ,Lv 'E V"iL,7 :Ai-:5oE1.? . i ' ff, 111' - gk W 0 W1 C rw ' is',i i:gge5f3 ' x - ' Q :ek Q 'I-3 15.55 Eonaulting Dentistslvn Bill: X I LH N 4'-15-5: I , N A jltfajxi W, .jg " le as at present - , ig 1 J Vy flf Q IP . fig., rious drawlmack, anciinetlxg Q' ' .- in . ,Q .7 '5gj.5A3'fi 5,12-,,. iscufbat gurls think him W ' .me s W . . f1,ZM3 .,"g"y., ze. - A C .V f Q RXPSE Y: 'EL 'I .- ' V .Ji f'1'-3.10-Y' 'I i' ly 'lil . 5 ----- X Qisiiiigiiiff-.silll - k-1, vi kX,j ' ' if X ' ..'-,v-f.-'fri ' ' 1x.s,,,.1. Q A M ' N f:'yi,:, - A - 2 f f 1 ti f -? - 'Pin f 1 ' I i 5 We K af .5 . 1 ' if 'A Q ' Wk .F . A :m ag 'K e I, l y, V- il Jx Lx kgluglw hw- .N fi Q' ' 5 f i i Oolm xifwfwwfilwwfwfi p 9' W iw . S - i T. i , . - piweaa p 1 5 V- f - 1 v ii. x N N i. -,Q .glzlliz Q X .- R- N. 'wh .,A.,:.,5L. .. if fi: i ',i:31 '.v1if1! f Q . fl " - 55 Sffckfii ' -fiff' I . Q li ff '- 3 's3.,.: i, V4 iw' ,:1,1'.g.',' . f .,, 5,11.s..5,, f . . - 1 .' . b If vfffggg- , lr. if ., . , 11" fm' - ,F . . 1'.i..f3g1gii., X. 1 . , .Q .sf ' 6' , 1 ,. I--M 5- .-, ,3e:.g.ig -, . href- I 2 1254: ,lg ' . t. J f3k1gf2'.. f . - MJMLQIW '17- ,.. ' ss., z , Q f Z W., --fW5"i5if"f51-'.i ' i ii-f:L5i-i5!AE'f 1 f.'15f'i17iilf:?ii-b ' - ' 'if' .'5f5Q?5i I BHG... mlzbi H- 1 .-T": - F ' Ahh.. nm, -4A5,:.lg:3.h-,Its-gqi L., v 1,341 H191 o- THEODOHE REICHMAN, 'I'A'l' C. C. N. Y. Chairman, Prom Comm. 132, Pre:- idenl Senior Clan, Pnnrident Student Council 142. And' allow us to introduce our venerable class president, a most sagacious, discreet and tactful gentleman. In true diplomatic manner Ted started unos- - tentatiously and ended up with brass bands blaring. What beguiling power hyp- - notizes his classmates and , puts the instructors at his beck and call? And from his experience with the higher circles we shortly expect a dentist as Ambas- sador Extraordinary to the Court of the Kingdom of Hypoblastia. 2 QW' f ill y ., A "nun f'-'I' 1' Ai ' ni ' ., -WH L ani 1 is du fl? If f JAMES L. HITTEH. UAE U. OF PENN., U. OF PITTS- BURGH Who's that walking down the street? Who's that looking so asleep? Our own little exodontia .x i .4 1, c Wil, ii i .'ff..1if nl' P 'i i+1sr lil it M ill lil i . i, 1-my lj! l' Jig S' li i i i il M V i 1 l r il' i . .li ii. ri - ll ,L ti, ii. hanger-on-Morpheus's disciple 5: 'f' and head agent at N. Y. U. C. D. ,All a -,?7if We think Jimmie will yet turn wi ll ,""'-Qi" out to be a Frankenstein along this direction. Wake up. fJ"5'YxX-f 11Qv,5tQf3Q"i boy, the world is infected Q 'irfff' .' with PEP: fag, .i ,752 .jjffz A .3 is-. ff 1: -.yi QI WF-L 'LQ-N Q'1:-",5jiif,ii:'.l s 1 i PIX. l' rkrfiysia-F it sri. Y, N Y 3, " .H fi HW '- V ifilf wa:-Q ,. in N N iisiff K Frieda 1 -.is i 1. :yrlll my-'..-AMA Lwl vi ., .if 1 l MEN ' 'i rf? I - .Ji i F' l iigl f 5 i lil f ii f s N 1 J ' f " '3i 'i'Qq19lf 7 ii 4 5 ' f , i 5 5 . -X X I 134 wi f M Q 'f lak f X .Q -'C Iv. ' dn: V10 I . 113.1 I "49'5l"'Ip:., N :Tu F1 IFJ, T N ill l '4 .f- ' "ff Qi, ' -- s N r. x . 'l fi ' ':-l.- -X . '- ' 1 1'- .flf'Cf.ll l . V M. J . 'N 7 N ffl' 4 . " : "'l f . 'N - - . 3. , . I A .- is l. .... ff ew w N: N. Nl W X Ihr X. X XX ,X.g. X,Xf i X .fy-X -- 'X -X, - ig .- XgX.-X -1: ' - I' f. ' W' l "'f79 wx ' 'SW' Y-. :lfh W4 i ll sf ' ll " ' .' - W wi l- X.-...X 'ww if AX .i f - X4 '. .Xi ,..uX, f ' "j,X'XXX.-,X XX.-1 ' X - . X VX ..,' ' 'X :Xl .. JXll:,Xw J? ,, - J, . 1 - . l - -.uv .X ' w ' Xi. X ' 'j.:lkX lj . limi. 'L , .X ' ll W" ' XX' -ii f lj- ll fi 3 fl Xj -iffy I 1X -3-if-xX1egX4 X X4 lj .- Hi, 5 :v.'h--, -N Vwy .1 we l 1,2 ff fl ei, .He l M , we -gf if-.X.X l fl kl r ll ll- L: I . l 1-Neff .1 1' YU ll' - l l ll" 1w'w-A :XXRX XXX,XfXXX-XXI-X X X l, Xl X, XX, q,XX', .,XgXX .iX --:X r X i X Xi ir, -llf'-'I W lp wi :ji lik VX' f lg- rigsi? Um. .gear 'V . X Xe kiwi High. . yy-1' -1- .- , 'g. 1. Wliliii' .4 l'Hg"ili:'f'1 'lg if LW-SX. X i - ,-?- MMR z", Xl MXXQ-.QXIQ " r ' x "X W .3 ui, iz' ' 5' : W - I' wig f .ellie M .ff-'-.:. . i W 'J M X llnx X XX .X'rii' X JW Xp qi A151 .- .fy 'l ri 4X X X .,XX 'X' XX XX XX . XX: XXX .I li i f ., if ,fi ah Z, .1 -l -,Q-: .r QR" -,l I. X,-1 ll ' ',lf"':f,i f", 'l-3.4-3 .- Y lie l . lu? y,-lf. .rl,,-. lf , in 'fig-4 + .X f X ' W .1 ll -V 3 'RFE .'? V 'f'-CU ' . ' - TW '. ' - ' 1-af fll gff 1 ,. . X X, X , r XX X V - . W- ., L 1 ' . . - . .... .... - ..... . , ' "" 'z 1' "Qs X " jj 5X. ..., une, :WXXX X XX XX XX X . 1.5 il iii ffl, r . if .ir NNW? ' lr' l' I . , V f , -- 'wil li-'li li' wX.XXX 5,f,XfX oscaa u1cH'1'1sn. :mf Y X.-53? wifi ' iii FAS . lllf i X51 l LQi..vi.f:'mflJ. N. Y. U. --'flllflkl i l. 4 LR I' RUSENFIELD' Tm' xii X FX 'Wl.j'. Qbservc that lean, hungry look! 1 tX1Ql?'.'lf5 3 lf'Q'Q7MiX XU' OF MICHIGAN X K' Ziaclx inendare dang?-rouXsg evenX in X X ?f,6Lf EXZTXXZFXX Q3 Jhc hero of Sue's tale 'I X -X.-: X'X X.esar s ay peop c ne t ' . 'xg 1 X' X j.-IX' " IIIZC : cru'5' X h X .. Xi XX . can It be the CXXWXXXH forwknoxil XXQXEXX X X X ., X ,X hXours when hisl Zlissirilzlgit -' ' rw,-'X 'I edge and puwer? Or is it merely mr L' H X -X ,X J-A either asleep or studying or ,'- '4lfi'fCEl Al 1753, .l, ' the road to Denver? Let us give 'Wig 'Q - A'-' fi 'al l'flD5- 50th. In view of the Il Hr- 'ii -'mg h X-:EX him the buncfn nf the doubt A r " X EE he keeps. it is remarkable 'glial "ii i ' ilfll- 'Ti if N, Cfuckvrjack student and a 33- . . ' L! hlS eyelids do not cnalesee. How- 'l -' - ."'e1r'?r '- " we i 1 hard. conscientious worker it-1 ' . .' 1 . gver' d'?n'f lei US give the .ll f Syl- 'Q I NX -thatXs Oscgir. And, tive X ' ' N ' 531375732011 that E353 gifs X.. !X!.X -X' X4 ,Q -1175 X it X .lg are a most or tt' , 7 ' l X YH' D fl co e , . . ' 5, ' . -'.g3j9X'gl1' like l X ' Xl ehnmpion rubbeifbziiig shdi . 1 ' Cause fhuf 'S fm' fiill UFC ix fii-' ,, " llfifiifiyi' 'C' -..,1X:X,-,X X X . ' .X in me aim. meg, i . ., num. XAll told, he is Il ff, gr-an iT:fJt1'i,. i5 NSR ' .qX'fXfQfXX X. -. -X f ' J C43n:XCle1itin1is worker, Q-'X d,i:X " X,.5i,2f X XX XX X XX l X .XXX . .X XX ' XXX XQX ,Xl w ie ner in c ass or out. QXXX 'X fX,XX3fX .X r,X.X.X, Xii lflidli ll e ' f r i X 1 6 'SM 'll -4151.3 if 1 'l ' "" fl l -"rf: . 'il - - " .Wiilifll iilfafdf , l f gf ' r iff-vi 'fm ' ' 'WKQNy?ix'15i'l2.'-iTX1Q9lU' .1 1 Qi: 1 X 'bfi-lelgmf-A-,slliif X s Xf fqislig ' 1' . " .W ' .t I S XXXX '- 4 N E ' ' L f i X XXXXxXNE XX, f f V X if J 1 9 l X ff it 1 W e K X 7 I ff' "' ' if? 'I X. XX . , X i I .. i j .,Xfg.'Q fX'Xi 1 r X f XX . X X :XX n ,' -i X iX -X X F: if - K7 'FQ7 . -1'-'fi ' 1 . ix l il 6231-'l Hi l il Lziml . r ' W " S' Jil, N . 4:3 in X 1"-fidffh iii 5 fu I I . X "sl LA .1 0' X l ffl l . Xa: 1 N5 .. I ,N lm' ,XQQ-5? iX 1X X X Xi lX , X. X - X4 'XX .. X 5 t .Xl Q35 X X,X.XXXX A- I. V ffl - H i 1.3, H-.-.is i K K l 4 nf gwlli 4.5 1 X ., 'XJQQQ ,VA X X i f LXQ " XX .X--.f.XX1 - Q XX W X.Xf,':X:X.X:' '-E' ffl g,.:Xi"1ef'X: . . X' jQ.Xr X X . 1-f X. J Q IX X XXXXXX. NX 3 X X X At XX!!! 1 Xwul . X. 3, f'-- '.. ,- " ' .' 'l -.Ev ' ' ' Q1 X , LX - ,mia-,QiQ, ass. f.. LJ, "W M . be f ll . I i ' 4? Ew a Q3-4' f liz... 'i'l7l"l33i2Xi-flfi'? l Xxx' ' I V '- . we f' l l' --'l' 51 r l' - -l -, x-sr:-1 ' W" " F..-W .WF Lil f .55 1 1 Li5 . X ll2l1 MORRIS B. ROSIN C. C. N. Y. Faculty Medal 121. . Our authority: he is the wise owl who sits in the highest court to decide our debatable questions. Morris explained the intricacies of the law of gravitation to Dr. Ein- when he yawned and forgot what he was talking about. Look out for the women. young fellerg they bite. SALE .1-f-'-'Q' H221 l 'i 'll i-Q""L .Vi " "Vx . .. I---1:1l"'ixikwk'--viii:-'f - 3.gQ,'.y. in rr 4 'ii . N , RUBIN RUDOLPH, A210 H 1 1' ti c. c. N. Y. ', gp, Tw "Say what are you guys going to Q write about nie?" Well, Rubie. fl? ' 'i we don't know whether to be can- ' did or courteous. But you know, 1.QQj' .-w-I old man, your graduation is sure a 11' relief to the profs. A more per- .il 4 F55 sistent inquisitor they will never ,- l" : ,lgifig meet in many a moon. 4,-QQ 3,51 ,,,ff',-mx Back in the freshman days 1" N N ,f1jQ',g,iQQf yon gained undying fame. 1 K. ,' fiffi-FQ-.5x,f' you remember. as Billy 3. 4.6 'Qing " ' Westinghouse for your ad- E: l ,,4 ,ffl mittedly unlimited knowl- X: 911.1 '1- 'flfy l-ffl edge of dry cell batteries. V-'g ' 1:-f,'pQ5311 if 52 'fax-fm. x ' ffl-' G ,J 4 , fi::.Q'.lilv it '71 ' 5 4, 1 A '- V iff' . ' li M. M. SALOMON, JR.. 'l'l'I'I' BROWN UNIVERSITY President fl and 32, Student Coun- cil f3j. This tall. dark. and handsome walking ad of Finchley is of a q11iet. retiring nature. having been class president twice but retiring after both attempts to quiet the class for a meeting. His seat at leeture is always occupied-by himself, and l1is instrument case is ever replete. Thus he is earn- estly engaged at school - following in his father's f footsteps and perhaps ox- fords. 'G' f X I -,rm-L.: --11: li .11 '- . 'CL 5 .' - .ue 1123 ARTHUR SCIIINDELHEIM C. C. N. Y. A careless song with a little non- sense in it now and then does not unbecome a diligent student. When song pours from his golden throat all pause to listen. Try it your patients, Schindy, when you want to collect your bills. And that hirsute growth . . with what envy it has been viewed by his less fortu- -I lue . nate friends! Some peu- 5 .ii- 1.1- , 1. x"' ill ...ul l 1l ' 1l ll 111 1. , lil 1 ple are born with all the 1, I.: ,L k X. ' 1 l U ll! . NI I tl illif 1l111412 'l: 15311, ,l, Ili W H 1 . l ,. . 1 lit, -ill 17? hi ' 1. li 1 'iziili ' 1 , lx fl l L1 'MF' lf '1 .1 ly fl, ll l l on ni ' in -l1 .1 'fl - " 1 iii- 5 .x 11 'L 1 ' 'flifrlfim ' ' ,V V '13 -Y - q x 1., ,- ,gf :.g11.,'1 1 9-'J 'N i' 1-T i'.S51: K 1 ' li . f W - mrgfrisiiuil. e he .1 . .,ig.g1 3 f 1 K Q I Ki ., .9-I ff Q "x" . 4' W' I A 'K ' X '-TAA S' J '1 A ' ' -. ' 5-. 'il Q' ' 11 ,fr 1 '- - .11 1' F -l yi K is li. is Al:'.A '-. it :i ll i11.l5i'. 11 f 1 11 I v 1' A 1 1 - ,V 1 ,dnt K X L .N -"fi ' 1 4 :ii -, V " V -I ' if jzjx L P-:F . 11 11 1 - 1 1 . .11 11 '.g.1fff 5 , . H-.gnfuix lg m i1S4:15411x XX . X vw' M X Yii lxhbgx 1111 J 21 - ' 1 1- 1' if-1 1 :ll l 11I'y'IA' ' t 1. ' V .11 ,.,' i'-AM Rx .l.i X . ff 'i ff 1-""h . -1 -1 . -111 ww -1 1 , .11 1.?1l111 ,11l1 1' H M , 111 ' .. , 1 ' , 'Y il 1f.11-Z. ' 11 1,1 ,111 11, fx Qi' 1 X., . x 1. N11 11: '- 1... 1 1 11, 11 1 n.. 1 A11 -ff-1 .- 11 l 1 . . .. i 11 1 1, 11,1 1,1 . .1 4 A , 1 X -.ya 1 X 1. , QMH111, M , 1, ,111 1, 15111 ' ' ' 11 W '11 X' X1 1 1- xml l1 1711 ' l 1'4f1' 'f li A 11.11-1 'ff-i' ' 11 l-ill 1 - 1111."1,,,1n E?f413Ls.ef1 . il 11 111' 1 11 1 11 1 1-11 '- 1l1f'11.'11'11'1l my 1 til '11 15 11. 11.11.111-11 1111.11 1 1 .1 -1. 1 111. : 1 1x -1 .- N 1 1 '11,' X1 '1., '1l,li11Hil41' 'l j W 1 will '1- ,1.- 111 1-151-1. ,1 gf, lr. 'HQ 1, l 1l 29'-: 1 1 -15 .1 111- ,l.1l1711 11.1 v 1 1111 .1 1. ' 1 1 1 1 ,.1,L'?1f". 1 -11 '1 ' .1,1 11.11 nl, ' 'lil "'4 . ,,.1 ' 1 ll -1 "lv 1'1 l '11 s l l ' 11 ' 1 '1 . llmill 1 lilly! I i1 'ii:::t'1fi1 K ll i 'iii X 3111 l HI-'-lf '1'-I-if 1 11 - 1-W !1111.,1111.111. 1' .1 . ,111 . .1 111.1 " 1 1115 W x 11-1 ,ll . , rrjf. Q11 lx I W 1 El :Eg 41 . lvfllfll' .um gll'2jj.'Vi'14ffl?f 1 11' '111 . 11 'i1'+1-f 'f 17' '1 1 111l1 Tl-1 'li I' l111:.,1111'111. 12 1 15 ,N N , rift A i 1 gn. ,151 ML,'.',. ,X1g iw. U L11 11111111-11..11 f:-1.1 1 1111111 ' ,X11 .1,j -1.1 13' -,42 1-1 'Q 1. 1' 111 'N 1 .3 51 1, 11 1 If Q1 115 11,1 1 - A ,, ,, I V , 14.-1, 1-1. L, ' Y 1 1 1 ' 1111. 1 11 l i d --1 1 1-f1ii'1,- ,MW vm 11 11h 11 ii iii! li ii. wfyl ii Alh1'i':w'ii""11'l'11 1-17-f'i2T11!l1l-f-. Ffliiif. i'7Y,' T' ll lr-Lil i 111W "'f' RUBIN scm. xcuwn .111 .fl 'N .' 'igf1ilf. ii? 1 .1 l. 1 '-gf'E:1'E'1!1fl1'1 C C IN Y ' AM if "J 1 51111 '1'il!'5l3,'1f' SAMUEL SCHLANGER 1"1 '11 Hamm' HQ. Basketball Team gap gr!! Qown Comm. Nl. 11 lil ? ii The Cmlvfllflvllnl jack-of-all-trades Y 11 Shi 115 elthfir 3 C""5l'l'1'FY afoot 11' P 1' gn 11 1' -111 IQ master of none: Rubin fur. g,,,q .,1, -, 1.1 4,1 . Q0 ffvvlutlollizvs all dqntistry or 1 1 1 .I 11 . 1, rushes un exceptional Case De, .-K1 -, 1. -, v-- -,nm and Arne conversing mygge. ,QE " lf, Shite his other accomplishments " " 1 1 1:21 rmilsiy and profoundly on the fe' ll 31.25 11-TX ' 5 Rbuby is u capable bnskct- -' it-12 " '. if ilyggflneltrgerig, of 28 and 30 gauge 1 K1 'E . 1 4 ,' all PIHYCT- n ranking 'I ,1 1' I ' 1 1 - ' . ' 'ml Sfilfffd Out well 1 11 ,ggffja . 115 1 3 Chess player and more or :gh - 4 , A .V lt 1 Bqplpped in mech.mic:xl pro- , ,, 1: 1 11 -5.31451 fl, 1. ,sir ll N 1 -, less emciem class Hens- A, 1 frqlfncy and has thus been z" V ' 1?-Ef:ii1igjlf'1 LIN ' W, 1 mer' A l 1 he surpasses in FEC. E , ,,vA, 1 rl s.u ing easily through most 1 li 11519.19 pw? 1-11. E' 1 - the realm of love. His " the coursez BU! fl1Qn 0 1-,1,:.:1V11.,g3r1I1' 3 15.1 , 1 - Success lin the latter is qw. E' .. 3 " , 1 'lfn slmnlx dfsplflyfd lm ?',, v'1, llfi' ,ri t rllrt., M X. I compumed by 3 fm greater F. 1 A55 tlrto-retinal insight by bg. Half .., 51 X .mix : Z, I degree of specialization X x . A A-in I- A H tw ill. cpmmg, one of 'Dr. Dar- . A.i.,.,g..., a+.t1,'113,f, - however. than in the mat: Q ' -G "1.f '.'ff' l"'5tfm 5 fuvomes and 1 l q '34i11l'37H7 4? 1 ter of his accomplishments. 'Q Xl Ame S boon companion' ' X N 511 ,1f,f1f1 11g 15, 1 11,jg..31-. 1121-ffff' 11. 'Q L.. ,1,5 , 1' l.j'1'-.1 1311, 1,1:1pg.' . 111 1 ff . 1 .. . lr... .1 K AZ' P113 -1 -Tw? 1 11 1111111151-.9-771111 1 ' 1. yy-A 1. , -- - 1 lS911ll1l111-1 1. 1: li f1?sir.:"7" Q '-I If V' ' "' 1 .'l,1"'1 1 P1 '-'Falk ' 1 1 - 1 1 fll 1 A V' 11.1 . 1' f- .. , . 4 2. 2 if 1 'I f 1 . 1 'g '.1 Q51 :N 4 s . ., X1 I QW I A l ,1 1, I W .VM 'jul Il 1 f?1. 1 , lm ... Fl W1 Y K! ' I ! x I s L w U J ig ! -:f- 1 1 1 1 X1 1 1 if I y K i l 1 . 3 X' ii"i'1'm1'1'g'f , if I ' Y. .' l - 1 '51 1' E", b ' 'V 1' Q., ll 11 ..N1 ,,,- vp 1 1 1 1 , F li W '. , 1:52, '-1' 5' 1 -' .51 l. A leg?-u f, f g,1-rl, 1 1 1 1 1 X 1 ' , C M5 -b Mil f'-f-1l1115 i1'.-'Tf.'3 -""ff1F ??7'Lf, 1 i 111 if J 1.1 r fl, 7 li A1 .qi-'q. 1 1 ' 'r' 1' f"',f . 1, I Ql'.1,:'e-lr.. in-Mb. A 1 - 14 I :Y-N,-3,11 1 .Il ss K1 D M1l3I.1j111.1 ,gg 311133. gfff- I , 5, 111 , 1 fy. flu 1:11 1-' , -1-,Qi-51- 11 1 . aww lines- M ..,. T131 , fl' -L11 cf . -- 1 f X 1 X1 1-T 1 I L ff' 11, ff 1X xx' 1' 1 -. 1313151 1 1 lla.. -' it aiil-1:11.41 1111 'I' .11 lflxixl '11 - - -1 515 .1' ' 111 . --- 1- ' 1 -111-11161-.-1f - 1 - 1 1 11 1- -1g1zf5s' ' ,g:1,,, 1' U l " -111'-'iii Ll Y X "" vi w""" .1 'iflilh l 1241 iv 1 . . I. 19 2 V - I.I.. I IIiII 'I I - I che- ' -,III I .I J V 1 i V . ,ff - - gs: fm-f .X .. 5 -' .QW f , . . --iw :- . ,--9 . -yr. I ' . ,, ii- ff V H... ,,, .I I, I ., . . . V.1-W--M' gy-eil . - . if -xh: -V-il-i -- - I NJA -' ,LI ff I9 ' .,f.A1'j f 'Lf I .X li V, K dwg, K" .l, W' .., ll . .-W-'ll -'i' If M 5, L. --,.-I -fe I . I , I 5 I I X I. I wr-V ., --'LI Q'-wr'f'm1ll fl l-if - , I A 1 .ff l .-W .. N - -Mimi ll.11lis:- im' -Wx, . . - ' Vx l V22- Ml if l -Ml ll I. .'IIIl l-ly, ,l , SEII -- Il i- qw I :f--41155 I - - I ,Illll I IJ QW I-Ii f a l IlIiI-. -Il f-f-llV-VVf1- l 2 gi ll T- Q . ' 2- l'.I'1.I U I -Wil, ill CII 4-Vv,. V ii .: lm-- A-f."'l'. 1 '- ' l l - if '1 Q- ll "". lil!! " 'X l 4 3 3' -l - . IIN IvI- 1 ,'fj:i.f' ' I. - Qi-I pf 1 ' 1- NI II 'Il 'I'ri'If 'II1I. . I I Q I ll! 1. ll VV1. 1-. -QV K W- ll MV: V'p,V.I4, I 'NI I I-.:,IIV:1 ll I I WI . illll ' 1. fl l -I .Q hifi. fill' 'F V4 .'.,'gaIffl7 - lI I-I - ' If VV V . V .N I' yy -II ' - .I"i ,gi '1- 'A Ml 'J' 'i 'f.5f""s , -if ', -Vf ui MII VI I- I, ,- I' , ' l 1' II .li---1V .. al- -lil--uf l -.- -1. 4 1-:.-. if V . -'-l - ri V , r . ..l' . ll I --l Q I' '- l qi. -4 ' if f 1111--il-1 "Q7,f" VgQVl 'll 'l?Il.flll'I my VT . .ee . f-'Hllll l 'lf 'Q 'fl will - I ZIIII II--I lVVrI'I I II 'wh' IL Ill' f' "3 "Q '," .' ' " ..... 'jff , .:fl'7' "Y ff ' xv' If'-Us Q-'WV-.'!,-"I1N-f' ,:' '-r'1'.':. "" 1 '.'.-'wg' ' I . ,ill l. l 5 I ,QI III III V- .V V V V --,.. V w.. -. V . . , .,., -, ,I IL- il,-ij- 114 GEORGE J- SCHOCKET . wif. V' BARNEY scnmxrz - --I AI 5. .nfl N- Y- U- -Q7 ' ,I Qfi-'l 4- 91- if N. Y. U. ' -lfllll .:' Why did the fellows always send II!" ' A PI-Num COIIIIIII 'UI IIN? I Joe forIcnntac: points? And why. I. ng-r I5I .I V. II I, On good authority, we were given I- 'Q ll! f- 'W'-ri Billie 'l'J'..f'.?S..fi'l.'l .dxf .11 -:..:.i: -Q. -V - .., -- -':'ff'W. B-'f"': ff' -3. .65 7 ,- . ' - III ,V , -. -, V ,V -L-'A mere t . - . ' d'. I'-.QF IV-if L J' the -'esters were pmllc to take nd' ' 'I ' "QI -Q. vidual' he lilmlpzlggytgolsdicbyilt lllhdt Ii'.l:l film U94 Sys. Ji! l'l"l'fV'7e- Joe has Smfc dfvelollefl ff. -I - z ' V I he really possesses qualities that -l '- 1531- I lk-I, 'Q' ': 1' fill' 59950 'lf llumllf imdjl SUI' I -3 - ,I I QW: are worthy. We were so surprised ffl -' ." 'il.a -Y", fms ,and th""f"'gh 'purest 'Qs' 'V ' A . l - A' ' , KEN at hearing this that you ,I 'qf I -. 1 -- I l j, mIlns profession which yve -,III - 4, QIIIII could have run Us down I.. 'X I- 'EIfIIalgI5I5II4 -I-'i "JEL ' X -' II fhlllk Ollghf I0 Cnrry hm' ' ' - 3 1 Qfuf with an fender. He muy il ff. Q - 'ikiiilfffl-P III -Qfirg x I --FV wfll OH- I QI , f' not be the frivolous boy 'lf'-TIN, I' li.,-lf 3,1IiI, -I1'5E ' JI-2 ' 1 5 " J.. 3 he pretends to be: he may f ' I' . -5,I'-I Iwrfi .-..:-1-. ., - I-:1,wII- .V ' eg I I - - . .. ,,'.j lllpgs-z w i. , 5. f if Q-Gin q3l."e -'foof "' "'3"' la- ' 11' 4 I 'I f ,- L iga I I, II I :II I.I. I IesnI me present ,I yi. -,X HI. g-IIMIVL i9 if' I I, . III I ,I-A I-.II himself in his serious vein? s, I 1 5,4-U-'-I 19-.I '. .V - , - ,- - 23, ' .5 I gg - ' - ff?--F"j,f sm-r.Vy. P, V Vi 'ara s,V:f5' fb V-wks! -1-552 rlf""A -" 11' V555- -ff., , f ' . -rim?-faffv.-" -' "li-'Y if V 1-5-Q .V . - l fi fl I '-'f 1' I 3,31 5 I' I. 'f2Ix?fl.X I N '!II1II-2. S ' f' 'Ii - l ZV- '-if ' X -flak ' , I Q gglfg J' I ll 'ff ,101 I l I ffl - V' . fy . ,mg -Q. e ev- 422-J .': - - I? 2... fl. 2 K -- ', K pn' Wy 5 . 'j ' -X IA ml- :jf ' 'Qt-75" V ff X lh Rl--N .af-' V V, f- - - 5 3-'ff' 'Ill V is 2 -il V il: e . :re-1 . -. i s' 1,-.1 V l '- H' if - 317 F' - ' . if nd I- l ll- f :-I-I. I I gg Is: -- fu -II -XIV ., -1 y f 5' , HI I3-IMIQI -I 1 1-'bi-I , 4II NQIII - -I I-4 -I5IIgII"q .I- I -T I4 I I , I I IV.:Lv.S,1 :Q ,,,. ..:-11. - V F .il - - f - . l s lip., QQ I :: "1 - "li I-I-1--I IIIV 4 .-I1I5.IguV'l ' I -xl M! I ,.sQjL.-1.- .L I XX . if 'I..V1VV1.IT61 "' - h- 'QQ ' ,. Vzfli-flu ' '. f' ' -I Q-U3-' ' -' -51"f-'f7'f'7'1. JK .-se' .f - " "?'5-iff f?EgfiiQ-talk' .-,, ' 21, ' fr w V- 31 " f' 'i ' ii.. 3-if-Eli '45 Sidi!-L - ---- " .. .. - 1.-.. .V f" 3-.4-.Vum "Wy , L. A llzsy l . HAROLD G. SCHWARTZ, 'l'E'l1 N. Y. U. . Secrelary KU. Our Bridgeport commuter. Harry had better learn the secret of his rotundity before long and take proper measures. Otherwise, a few years at the chair and his assistant will be rolling him in. Speaking of rolling, if Harry's Rolls could speak, what a mean horn it would toot. Harry says that never has a girl gotten out of his . car to walk home. Of ' course not. They take the trolley. ffk fzlllfp, vv-J' 13+ is IHS C I Wrrxfhme Qin. LJ ' X . iw K 'g ' 9 G "" k A ' WMV!! I H261 SIDNEY A. SCHWARTZ Boys' H. s. "Wanted-Bright young man, over 2l, nent appearance. ambitious. anxious for advancement and not afraid of hard work." . . . If you ever run across this ad, tell Sid: he's just the man they want. Sid has little to fear for what the future holds in store for J-, him who waits. him. He has only to con- Q ' f tinue his usual summer iv, 1 occupation, remembering ., -,117 ' that all things come to AW5,'.g,. f Xu xx, l all ,rw N wi. 1 ,lk tl 'lv '15 -i Ll MEN iii i itll W is , l l li i ., ii, , In .Ili Lil i i ll it 1 x ywl 1 ii 'lil 'lf ll If ' xv ' Ili 'J' vi r, e K 1, K0 li". gimbilsyy 0.3 . ' li: 'f fi f 1 A yi T ii A-q 1 i6 .f, , an ,mt g lE?lQf3:f xi i , is n' N- - ,YV N Iigixzf, fi fl 'N iii' In Mimi 'Q WM 'hi i 52 " I ' filfa 'fi lil l- ii- .-iii? S' Joi? 19 . , , ' , Y ' ' '-1' l- ' ' If 1 ggffz ,ii i ! .Y 1 :J-52.5 roi- i l -Q! fe sf.- livin l ,L .. r , . f ,ff ' X .li 5, .I E I. .4.I i G . 1 I, I , I If ' aff1f'f7 "" . 2 6 QQ ' ,- 'QQL-'i.b:"'V,-PI if-fx :Q 5 .", jf ,X 'X Mx me -II. nlhhkx I ' -ruonoria u lr My .v.: -- I ,I 1 V. , I Q, - ' ' - Il H 6 ,f b gg? I I. , ,, X I SS' III I ,157 If "1-'if' 'sl' 'oh V - w w as .-,-'I-Vis' 'I iff V W, lf H-ff' ff yi- 'I I -i f E3-' X ' I5 Xl N' - i W' If iv- VI if .- -,"- V. f .- V.. 5 V11 T V sg I- x' ,M Iwi- ., .V , I I I . . I Iklusiix II I I I' I' AA ' 'v L.-kxmih I 'I It III! - - Tiditff-M5 :lnjqlffglzlgi I II I I: III' JI' fflslfil . itz-'.-a'kI',--12. I III V I ffl III If Ei7'1',i.,f". . Ill I vri , uf' fl, I 1.42 I 'Ii IIV QI II--riIV'V.I II 1 I , ff I :I I II? I-If I I Il i I , If wli . .f I N ' ' ' Nw k',, I I . ' if I-I,-I'II,,I ,,.,f'I I 5 ' 1 I f , , i iv r '-,' ' 1 . ,I I 2 . .I ILVMIINIII, III ilgi , III .- Iigll III! I I I -' VI 'Il' III V' I I'4"jf'f5Q'fV wlI..! " II' V III 'II' yx.. AIII ,.,.- I 1 ,II - ' If NIV -1 I" ffl . II. I' -.Ii Iv , I ,II I :I I .fig 1' I ,- In I -I ,nfl I wil", I II .Iff . ' P I7 ' In f I 'i 1 'I I ,ggi llll, ' U QV if aj-fir-1 . wi g. '11- III in II' .I ' "il ,f'WQV' I ' ' ,V H I, .A I 4. , ,Q ,,,,, , , f',l,,I i I Z A G . II :"FIrI'4 I L in N in iii ' , ,, I '.'.Vf'Fi r,g' soLoMoN scHwARTz. on-if 'Mm ARTHUR si-mrmo, ms I' -I, --V4.5-NEW C. C. N- Y- Q' ' I -1: 21 4 S - I COLUMBIA U. I I l"' D if , s 1, 1' k I is ff HfV...k :?- ' - . - V . ,I, .H MMI. brffngglfl Nilgym iso bezvcfmgsgl mY0:: I .1 Vzlgioiglesujfll. Czrrulalwn Mar In I. f fffhs i semble you more and more? And ' X Q. 'l1 f "" A paradoxical conglomeration of f s 45 ', NY, they ICU me he has WMU on as 1 -i Q- deepest and woe-begone pathos and QI " M if 'I 'he hmm and fhaffhf WHEN' ff02C SG I . ' 1 "p- the heights of nonsensical humor. ' , il ' 1' QV, and CV9fY!hm.8 Slipped hlS mind- 53'-' X V- Q , ,, - On the one hand tragically draw- sl V. 3643 951, Q' We don" bellflfe if- AS f0l' YO!!! -A ZV:,,. ,. 'iii-if - f ing forth tears of sympathy from ,' I iI',41,'g. ZIV - :Il own problems we wouldn t 'Qi - i- J I- I- - hearts of stone and on the Max f w fti-.'gI'-T, kill' IIIIVA x V , -. - II, A take it so seriously. Re- f ', ,'v, 444' . .E other why I . 1. . "Get I-M ' 123' 5. 1m .I 3-I member you were born a I ' ul off those swxynglng doors!" 1' UIQ .fl.-v. 1 I, b g fish ,4 I V V, Q b8ChC10l'. S0 ICC well , A I I, I ',.g f We suspect tis all a hoax -N I, - IEWIU - fiibwgjj-Iwi " I enough 810110. ...JV . ' Z ' ., 43, . and we have been the in- "I ,','! 5 I-'5 I-,I Ii zgi N '.V, I Nl :II .3 1 5. nocent Zuitims of a subtle -QI, ff.. .wifi ',I7f5QI 'f I ' I 341. "'Vl EV gl me 0 """"'- - "2if1.,czig.--E: , ll- , - f f .5 T' .I 4 ,'1.V-4, f-lf ' III - i If . I. d V 1 ' . , f,-igxfnfiy-" : I 5- . I It wggeSIiM5f,..l..IIlIW ' 32373 A . I , I - X -iiggfqg .. ISIIIII Mal' A x gif' ...tl I , ' -, . N V new S ' . II W" I I xii: I emi' IIIIIIWIL I iw .1 it in I F' I QI, . II I fi? ,I Q so ef, is :V f f 'I I I f ri sl -In I 'r .I-1 ,I " I' 1' -- ' , I. , ' V, i- ' i T R I ' , I I IM I - ' I R 'W Iv flip , , Imllglf 5. 'V .lg.fi'l1g.I,:-I 'X-I I " 'Img M. .1-2. . 7- . f I 1'-rfsVfV.f.,1f1sf .f I I E- .V V ,fin 'X .1 'I ,xv Q, X, W ' I jp 'j.j,, I ,I MI 1 A I guys, I: I I, I 3: , ,min I , , Z, 5,5 I :I II I I I gli I .I , N . ff! .:.-- Ili, ,x I I Ig. I I . ' , Il ,,:V,.. I: I I ' 0' 'N fx K I I V... -a x'-I II II - I. . I 4 . , H .V-- . fi -2 if f I ,. nr mfs -I ugi llht -'yy 1 I-'-'g ,I-yn, A I-II 41' ,..'-yQ..3:.y II 1 LA, I I I f , 'V ,',V-1:,- ': 'f,2i.1? 1 ' ' ' -1 ' l ,Vi,'1V,".'1,V'5Q:l 'T-:ji aim iff-:iS'53?"72 W I K' 7 ' TW - f 4:-F I , V2 ' -'l' 1' W ji' "" lj" 'f,',ii:'.-' I Q 'fx f V4 sg?-:aiu Qs. 'Vf-I I 2 +'V Vg.,,.51l ' TE Xe ,. AH , . M J 5 fr' X X-' ' 'gf 'V Ig n' -lf. E,?,..V':QI3::: :Il .V,, V . ii-1 L IC ug: ,mi-, 0 " ,.5"IA,v,f:'.,,:1 I Y- V.: :1 VFVTI. - 1: .A?:I:J: .,y,'i5erAk: . fV,- ' , -, .A I -' X lun- QA '- 'ssifa...,...::s. " ,,m...1-:.fr-..,. -'Q'-s W - A : . I1271 ljg. 3 yy j , X.. 1 W 5' y. vw' 'r r l ' jill' .ill ff pozwf ' ' who -,,. .wwf -' ,gg EN f,...:... L. yi!-k --. , . X .-if-f,, ,, IRWIN L. SIEGEL N. Y. U. hne likeable chap with a pleas- Glee Club Nj. 44 - ' . l ng personality. But say. Irv, oil up the smiling lines on your face and work them more often. We do not recommend you to the wise- 1.' 'eff 94' " V, T. .Q '1-',f, acre " ' '.uf'7I l f seg 7. P ,Q U gi., . i K , fy '1li,: -34:15 ly ' Tflfvft i ' i f" If 5 ' X' fjl .h X ., . ',..1.'9,f. 3' 1, ' 9f'F'.'l7s"f ' - f 'l V 3f,i1.f,g5,Ef5' lf ve' xr: ,' . F 1 fl lf' l V ll I 5 f f- 12 if :' lk jx .' 5 , . .L A-Z X aw, 'Hts -.-- Q S .ff ff . M.: l l N 1 ,f K f ic' -f b fi . lg if M A ,buff KLM 1 f:l27faL4n:'?,-'L .f. I, . ' .'fQe.,a. .fm-"'.. , S e. I dx group. but congeniality is a very fine attribute in a man's make-up. Stay up nights andfthink it over. -il-l ...ig 3 F q- .-42'-.ze -i l--.-...il1.. S' nl, ,V I liilx 1 'xl ll n - ln, N, lx ig , il l ' 'z ll .523 it fig l -' V xi ll wil ll WE vtliyy 'QTAMLQ tl fi llwyivfli. WE i YN :ali 1. ll lil ii i X W, .. W- f- XM, v 'LH ALEXANDER SIEGLER N. Y. U. Businexs Manager Violet Nj mes: Board, Nytodian U1 Club Nj. "Now all we have to do get Mellon Rockefeller and derbilt in one room and let lay the proposition before them and it's all settled." Al's success in handling the year book finances, photog- : raphers, Elmer's friends ' and recalcitrant instructors would make the above named gentlemen mere pawns in his hand. But say, Al, what's it all ot to dn with dentistry? '-me 1--e?""T Q M Q"-' Ml x xx li'-, Bus- " Give is 0 Van- si 4f"lf .,,i, 1 ,!','6'w ' 1. 4. . SK, fx! W in J. ly! ,' M lf Alf' 1 f wiht ,og , , 11' me xlxl ' gf' 'si X9 rin I Ng f x If X Wwe yr Il 1 ". ,f ' fl! lg' K 'L' all Q.. L1 Oval + bla K .. E X, ,H 36,1 Gul D W X y Q S wg , . .v',,SEa1 A 1 if xl . 1' -1 me c of M5 'S ' I Ll: X Y J :V l X lk W- 'I' A i x ,f X , fl W J R IH 2.1'y'll . f 4 :fm n' lf! ,ff ,', f QW ' ' Y' ,bb 1 ,gy w gh X P- ' NK I .e IM L .Ai i 1 2 6 'b,v . 'V wflyl ful ,, .,f.,1L.-f -1 l I Il Q XX- - . 1 X .Xxx i1d1Xxv 'IAN 1 A 1X Y' 1 . . Welton, 1 1 'R--N11 24,4 45 . ,,,.,,, f,,gjf.',,v 1' 'i A '1.ki'ix" X . 1 1 11 , , 1 L'y il '1 'A 1. ff f .1 'Z' 5,14 f iii ..11 K, W . 5 1 h fix .rf -1- .31 , - . -- 'ff if: e - 1 11211- X-fi' ' if ff i 'W' If f Q wh hiihgfi' Wh iii " I is -Vi Q 11- g Y 1,, ' ,- f 'ifcjl '5.11-1 y,' 1- i1,'.11'+y 1111i. 1 1. 1 ggi ,11 1 if 1 1 .11 1 il s-1 1 1 XiF1 imNiM4a 11,11-1, ' i" "" ' 7 1. ' - -1 " ivxiii- 1 rx n. -, -1,5 1 U -14 w 171 1 - -1. 3- 'N' ' 1' 'i 11' - JV' 'if' ' N 1 A S Y M1 W, 'fy 1 'N N: xiw , A. "in If 3' i"1 'V iii!-il' 1, Q 1 ' Nix "1 "' iii V31 1Vfj"f.f.' P' . 1111 1. '1 W1 E h 1 1.:i,1ig 'iii Zh!! 'if.N,1' 1: LJ 1j,'l1V'! ' 1' 515511 f' .11f . -x1 l' 12,19 ! Nfl? J. if-P '3. - 151' i id 1 1"jf1 .Ys11'-I 11" if H' 1 1' il 1 1 'W 1 11-1 if -'iii if 1 ii ' xiii 1 51+ y gif? !,i11'Y'f 1 1. 1. if 1 ' 11111. 1f1'i1 1 ivxfw ' 1 1. -1 k1!1'1i1,'.1f 1 ' fi . 11" 1' - e '- 1 '1iiiiii"'ii'Mi 1j 31. 'rfb-vh.jW Q 1.2. 1 it 1' in is . ifllf 11: -1- ' 115-fee:-1.' Y h 1" W 1 11.1 vw' E 1H111M -lp' y- "fwM,1il U . Q, 1 X11 ' . xiii 'il ff i7 iiiififlfl-xi " ii i 'J i iii N' wi li i 'J lfif " ' " '11 .,., W mf , M V , 1.t i I' I f -. ...X X. . . H. J.. I 'Wil I 1ii1i .. . -- 1 1 1- -- 11 ' 1' ,Q .-'-' ,, 1 ' gf. '1' ..11 1 4 1 I1 HMM, ff-f l xxxi Ai lm.1xh- 1 1 .1 . . ... -QR X ix 41' 11234 -P msrm-1 if QIIIINIANY 1111111 'fe "11i1.-vQ-'f'-- M-1+ ja- is fl' wq'1'.' f' l' ' ' ' " " ' ' ' ' ' ' ' 'NJ W 1 ,2bf.f':,,: 11 SAMUEL SILVER. UAE X ' 3 ,,' .'121:'5:?1'!QI'i'if I l I f0I.erM1??1A i c. c. N. Y. A i1 5 1 is 'fi..',"5fg.r': 1 s ie in tiis ss e never see ,,-1g" ' i ' f' V 1, . 1 . I . I if 5 N him around. cviifhere are you hid- ,455 . 1 '. -'-'filg bm' 'fi 3 more mfmzmgly Siffllllf Z if? . I ang, Joe? Vzhgf :IGI carat overl? ' ' .X 1. , xfgq ilalilsgaiilaxe 5:11 smepliegimagglgi i, N Q t . '- 'I tis t ' ' ' ' :lx -' 1 , . .", X "if't. ' i 'L' :Y fl -iii '- boyslgoufiie nge arici-iid maiiegohri ,',-1.5 ,- , ' 12 Q ' 4 ii qenglst should bc' . vvhnt mth 1 yfFi , 'wQi' ,-QM .K ,N gulf D ,t b ,lu H cr- 1 1,2 . N . ,,,4 calling up that certain party seven 1, .N ,.A11, Emi 'kv fll ' . ' 'mi E W' ' ow ',:Q,' ' ' 1 ' times zu day and shaving some- V 1" r,53-:. JX1 3. "" " hmm tn- play the saxophone' Gff N-54. 1 ' EQ' what less often-well whnt's the 'ii 1 , 1. - .M ,ig ' g 11 1 lavished ontliirg' wan! 1101 Q iffnyg 1. 1 - 1 1: 1 1 1 111 fs':,'.:i'1f2.'1a::.f.:'.,f.'::.':: 1- . f31jjQ1gf5,,f X11 Q P x iii, 'V , 11m1m. which wan be me Q ' 1? 313' in 1.52 2,1 I LF.-J1'gL' " 1' ,.,3j:?',f: closest shave he ever got, Q1'3. ,.X 1 S3',1. f-125-Q xiii' I iff ' 'ii 1 "' Q '- ' "1 'ffff -i1' W1 ' 'Sli 1..L1iii'f?1' 1 if 1? 1- h 1 5 ' -251' -Ef1'11-M21 g'1L', A1, to 4 tx 'Lf 5 ,1." --.45 '- A -g, 151-.'QQ,-.'i'. Sj,s'1f-21.-I. 1 . . ' X .' 1-1 , 222' ':.:1+" K- K - 1 R12-1-'11l7 .we V, 1-QL " ,l :X wal V. 75. .t ' 1:1 1e,Qg,.,u L71-. . -1 'f i'?-i":iAx'f7f7W12.' - f 'vm .01 1 se11ig111e iier 1 ' rx 1 . fi r Q ' ' 4 I,-1 1 , L K -4.5-Qi-qf1'. , , A , nk -7,.1'PA", ek - 1- ,1 A 1' ' Q ' 1 1:13 i J ,3 . . i, V In X . A 1 gbwgalf' ,1 f V . ", 13 11 1 1 1 , - 9 Q ' I ' V ' 51 N 1 ff. . 2 11 llllliilwpy 5 W Y '11 11 Q B 1 I In V X X 1' 1 U I A Ugg, M 'J-,Jai 1i X ' T . i I ' ' '1 7- 5 11 'R' T' ' i 'xi 1.1 we 1. 1. W i 'ffi I: 1 2311. 1'-.1112 EN' ii 'hui i iii i i ii -ih- in I 9323 i Limit 312 f 1 1 1 , 21.151 1' ' ,W 1 ' , 1 1+ 1111 1 1 1 K' 11,1 -3 'RQ'-1 e i 4 ' i1f1'.:- X 'iii ' " ' 0- W 1 ' .1 " 3" f ,, '1' 'f1"S- ' 'f ww, 'f'1 f 1' ' 'Y f fiffiif' 5.'zR:ff? XiHi' -1' T, H 1 1 M i 'fg-W E ggs" .1 H , - + ,x1 ::, .'1,- . -71. 'i 51 ' ' , .W x .f5S'Sfk'f2-'. 1L-- ,1 i QT- , -'J 5 59: 5-15q1'1:.., '1 rg Q1,+fi,g51.f1 ' ,-f 1 1 Mr' -ff .'i3f3,sV3'- -iiiiifhf fL':.g.f i' M - U' N 5155? W .47 53:1 ' H. - " ,1-l-, -,,,, I. , .4..,,,T,., .,,,g11,',,- . 19 , 1 h - .Q A 11291 ABRAHAM STEIN N. Y. U. The little boy with the features 1 . lj ' . W A fix '. J." 'Q lil' il N ll , 1 .49 H!-X 1 iii, Y. I tiklfli l Hin Sail xiii! 9, .2 f1im,,, '? ll l ii' li 'lil' 'iii Fl Q li ABRAHAM 1. sToFF l Q "gpg N. Y. U. Q.ll"ff ' of a Greek H---- god. lWhat did you do to deserve all this'U This prize package has been the cause of many a skip in the heart beat of a certain other student in the class whose name begins very similarly and who thought he was being called on in quiz. So he was meant for some good in this world, after all! W1 ods . th .lik A ,- cf f H15 IQ H301 Prom Comm. LU, Charm Comm. ll ' l f 142, Student Council KU. 'li . V An intriguingly affable personal- 'ig ,, ity generously endowed with Na- " 3 ture's bounty. Sleek and slick 'l . . . a dandy . . . hair ne'er ruf- JV Efyil, fled and smile ever-ready. 1 V AQflj,f-:Ti Possessed of a renowned ,',-5,-Llbf,-mf-'1 ability to seduce unsus- Q V .If 5 "'gQ3Egi'Pf.Pl', pecting instructors. etc.. to fx A iQi,g',njfi his bidding. It is conserv- 'Q 1,-f 5, I fl' 5 atively prophesied that .'.. 5,2 qc .-7 3 through his Houdini-like 'b y V!-by :i'f.ik.Z! magic the State Board Ex- V s i ' 'if aminers will hypnotically xl N L . ' run his errands. Q A ,- ' ' ' K, vx'!,,l4.f NAY Q i' 1 X Y' fill! If I X ll " ja' Rui 4 5 A4 VJ if! .X X b A i W X7 , 1 f" 9 Iii:-'Pu ... 'ei' Siffr- KAXA 'i l I f' 'a A Hn' .s.w-M A A M will flu gl j - f l i f ,pl ' ff -xii- frlllff it f x gf ' . 43+ tl-c if ,5 , Jggggg- T'9" I "iI1'f1 'i . --1--1-l 5324: ffm. K2 and 31, Vice-Pres. ag, wil- .l f 1, l IEROMI' J FAPOIOW AQ C N The sages have long praised ocean salt water for its curative powers but never have mentioned that it stimulates growth Page big boy Jerry our Gravesend Bay Life G ard Unable to use his mus u cular prowess on a football field Jerry went out for extrac tion with vim and vigor An now he wields syringe with stupefymg effect and boy when he warms p how those molars do Hy' K l ww' N-mf-rv:-f amy- i TNA SIDNEY A. TEITELBAUM. All N. Y. U. Secretary KU. L My tongue within my lips I rein For who speaks much, must speak in vain. A most admirable chap, quiet, un- assuming, the very essence of proprietry. He early displayed a marked inclination for ,-, physiology which was man- i" 4' ij ifested by his ardent de- 3 ,..f'g!,Q fl sire to sacrifice himself for ' if L . ui- . .4 if if it involved slumber and avoiding the prof And "7 since John Gilberts popu larity Sid s been modest dodging Il bevy f H CZIUUCS i iQ M ld 61+ lv.. any experiment, especially ,M w, X if l . ya 4, '41 .lf c W. .lb i, l "G s iii, in 'l , fl Vigil. 'i p cull, so ,lf .--X , .r 'Qi all 51 x V ..v. - :.f.'.---J -.e Li . 'ive-,:.,5,u if "X1l1'l4- l . , s'vT'hF A' :p w ' ., .n A I.. .mi .J . tqyn K mb ggi , IEKSEY CIW i l f z L44- ti' - X". i 4.fxf.x-. 1, - . '- N x g xx' ff N A Qflil , u fm . 'Q' - Us fill f 1 X f' A 'qrgji lil A . ,J 5-I M lclutn H lil- - . Q. w I l,1fi.1i.l'31f755"" Vx L J ,- 1531. ij'- ' , xt. - ". , l f V ,pf f fi. fin! 'ff - 'fl if ah X 5? W ' fri' . -,. r5-if SZ. 3- :II V , A 2 :: 4' 5 g - X XXMxX' ,I,,- , IIW, - I YI ik' f , , I ' xl , ffff MV " Mo II, - , , J f ' ,I f, 4 XI Wx. s JV ' ' - 2. 15+ X,-, Wm: 'I II l ., s- fin fff' I-If I' "1 I W ' +I I - 1'5" X U, I -f"'1"Hg,: ' - -' .2 X N ' M XI Wy' N3-U H fff'-I M 253735- V Aff,-,f I N Wal, iw MW 1, I L ' I 'lx Z'-Q V-' fi ' I J' , I' gd M II 'F UI! ' .- 4I, XI. IL' IW N' 1 ,l wF ,fM'rI, ffvlf ? 1' IFHRXIT II!!! flwf' In rffffi W lp-'Liv ' " ' M W J' wi I .I my ,I '-I U, I glyffsflful 1, ' WIHVQZ 1.51 -- , ,L MIM 1, I If I '1 I,lff:5"'f"NI L V W' Iffwl' ,X 7 'IiI!5,.ilII'IM ,S .I If I' 1, , . ffm' 1? pf' XM IT" 7 4. f , lv ,ff -V, , ' 'AI , ,ffl IW 'Q , in fg g. wIfIyI,wI'l I7 I Q19 If ff ,. I I I,W,H I , 'Ik ,I I 'XJ' w "' t ' " 4' - I.. -, -I' I? .'-W ' " ' IW ., M U ' '- ' - -f27?i ' ,N, Aff' 3 I1, 'x2 . 521 Uomus ,I,HEI,I,LEH' OE!!! II ,, - -,i ..,IIIF,i.I IW I II. II, I'crs5s!2::lPRAcUl?' C- C. N- Y. W7 'Ci N ' ' X' . Q, VY ' l ff 15, 'U fhf ini S9e""'H fxnmnf ' 1EQu 1'rfY A ISADORE ' I . . X -ltm .... , .. 1 A - - JI , I Morns , plmcablf, S hs -Ik' ,, , MNA I I. . V0c,1,I K, I XI I II, ,Sk I1 tion will answer H om: dily i31.S,2' Q Q, CQNNEL ' " -I'-.X X , I I Ils f., He s che. profs so n 'che qucs, 'gy' I X :MII Gln C LSVILLE H' S QI, lx, I '!, dcgregalnfis nil factwtgllyghgodgi' S . 'I 5 " ', , HIS" is lggthc s ' ' -I W MII M ,.' ' 'g ' c ' - . nt 'Y '- -'- '- 0 I ' I ' 2 fha-W3 '2,':11::S:'.,w,J :Qs 'I 2- 2Li2:.:H'LY,, 2,i,"Lz1U'1S mix F , I I I, :ls-diafVill dev0geuhfglh?' I'?7." r nDpreci'Mc: Wigffsr fricnmislmipmzyfls . .ny 9 e ' - , 11, -ev : ls ' . e I-, :R -I I ,III rgdQ intgcn::'a::1R I cnnmci 1 . Esxgcnlgllllncss are zgficrui' and :fi-f' - Ik --x-. I ,I dnstmcg puns Ultltude gf flgj "fi ,een Ins reserve, It 'fn Under. I1' ga, 5577 1:,.'k I "V new lxolrltllclngmih with 4. f I - L'-3 forgive! Kit' hhow We NE Cnsily Gi 1 ri I I- . . ,551 - ' - - ' - w 111 '-3 -. .f :I . I ,I , In-5.5 ln Dunning Q3 Indulgence IZWEHIJ A I ,l:L,.v f X M -1 u,',1'ip- , Z f 3 . excellence f "- fm. his rx xx .' aux:-v ,AI . I N , .,- ,,.-4. ., 3 . , led UI :hm , - If, I ,Iv ,3,I.,-.- M ,I Q 1"-'tsl' Aff- us to wonder :ur has Q, ,QI,4.,, :,.gg,y:j:IIjI-I II. ,I I ,. ,354 I . Giza I, gym has I-nut' I Why thc I-II! WI, , F 2 I IJ I 0' 4, -ij1:1v e.I Q gsi ly- Hffvure. ' ""0 Such V , e ,ffl 1 w - nf 'N M X4-I I Q'Yf I:f,1. Q A IEW 53 -wh ' Isvlfrgwfa f -f-' -h-it , , 'W'-1,-all H " " k15f-'ff I , , -qXMau.'If9IW ,, ' X J' if S11 fn, . M f . ff . 5 1' . TH I paiqiii I 0 43. jf , P ,' 2 I I K .ww I, fff I 1 Q, I I ff:-f I s ' I .A -.I I - '..,'- X 9 , 1 ,Q I, , J f . I 'H X Q IQ, I, I I- , I . A ,I -4 ' gg" , X ,HI1 r I ' I ' ' I, X ,Ijf A I ! - ff N I ,- by I ' I Q1 ' I M':'g.' . I A . TN , , Q I w . f X 2,1 ICE: 221. 'y i V ' 5 ' W 52 6 I ffy ' , ff, " W --, ' ' f 'iv ia," , 4 I f 1 'PWA +I IQ, .' -2,1 4 A L-fm If J, V- I ' I y, ,lg " 1 ' 1 '- zu J I, gg-,I ' 1- ' 553,-::,,,:,.J, - ...- 'T-N, ,'g If, 'Lf' 'f I, 1- I, U -I I I fx AI ....,..4', m,.,,.,,:,.. ' ul V ' C- .- . .J-13. ,I NI,-.U I' I. I-53-I-F - 'I 'V JIEI-I3 111, . ,' H321 1 X N' 1 .,' 11, .., K Za f1,7"rrv.,f. ' , . V Y '72, , 5 '--'1' A m11s,f1'4l- A 15"-' 4:,Q11.??v,, ' X0 1 2 N, My ' A Q iY'55yf'-'Ll',71 ' I w ry 1 1 A fir' VVQZA!-',",':'YQfff1 -' I 4, N' I 1U11,f1MW1 1 'fyff 'Y ' ,'jJ11: I-1 w, 1 J 1, 1 , . , ,Lv Y H1 f',11Qw 1' ffffegfk Qs' .1 'A Q --1 'W f Xyyw . '1 :L ,Af Y , fbrfv 1 ' , ' fl V' ' X TXT? , ' , -1141 .f W ' AX xr-5 -2 '1' 1 n fs - ' X .1 M X - X " ' 'mi pu' L, 5-1. .YE-xx G2 M S .1 ' 11f 111f H 1 1NX5 WQf3f F X. W 1119- M2 1 1 M111 X Nfwl WUI N A' , Y 1 - , 1 I i X, i .14-UH' f-W' 1 M H' 1f-12? QQ: W, 1 !.!1N,H wil' I "1 , ,X1 W K :kk fm MS ff 'A WL' - lwxfiy Mrff-21.111 W 1 W ww 1 5 ,Q wx , l :jf-11 iw- 34 1 - L. ! .N! 11 ,Q M1770 171- I ' V'V M'!f '1 ,XM 1,-, ., xtl. V1 .1 QAUX 1 ' ff:,'f 14-", Li' Q-Ii ' W gl.. '1 X111 411' Xwfuli. 'I 1 Q ' 111 5 1,1 W ,: fifrwxglj U' -, V. I 11 -1111 1 ff15f T' '- ' 1 'f 1 1 f 1 f1'Wl,,l3fJ',lg9.J!'1 . I , Q A ww ,fx :fi ' H g 1 11111 1 X"i?'f"f:11,L!'.JIjf' SF N V - . 1 M, - , 319,25 l!5m1'1 'ww ' 1 f 1 f - -SQ 1. 1191 -,k. H A R A Q VVAL lv nl- ,I v h 1, Ax M -151111, T511 Dio N, ' 1vA',., ' ' x. - 1 1. .Q M I le ge Y gk 1 , yy, ,I . yys 1 4,4 M iv 1 fiagods ' U- Y 4 1 ,. p . 1- . 1 11111 W ' wal 1151111 5111.-S ' 1 'Us " U' S ' '-1 'f" Xt 1 ' ' r lu -H SS I. Sihq staghrussvgn :trcng':ur nl , wav? I i In my Hl'.vi :,. , 1 1. ru 'S m ' 100 hf ah- lwxy' 92: 1-'l M' " 11 1 1 an 5,125 211 ,fw--ff 1 1 if 111 1 H5 3 515! ' 'H .rn . 0 ' E. 1.51314-1i. " M Q1- ' ' 4,, of nglnccie Caigdl fret r ,1:1:E5N5 "N fqffx ' ' -. Y .UV W1 N5 3f1,1w K 1- f- llflaimjpfcxc 'ikf:f.,j',"nl1'it -1 Q. Mu W f 1 'W W , "x11,.'i.g1 ' S- F 3, to Ula e -1 fiff 1 '-'ff ' 'I , V 4 'N1 '1 1 ' NH: -- :1 2115 . Y 4 - l. nd co nmol: CEC bl A , I . I 425 A m N NKFI . Y Z- - n5l5tc:xf3' 1 l , kfslitxgcif lit!! y' U.'MAN ,Y X ' ' . v.'fL!: I 4 5pe::c3h'cl th? tender 1 ,-1 X1 .2',i1gf'. 'P N , Y feel' Hiffk a,'jg1b.,3?s. nf 1 12 1,fif'1,"fggP fxhg. lijif, v 1 1 Q, A 4255,bZQ3ggh,'g10v.mQ11dc'2gg: 22 1 1J' ,1i 1 KQHJ ,,17y I frfffgf, W, 1 . ff- intly se imen fwthe 51:5 :ll-gable -, . .V A., , E l N1 ..1i:,3.. Q' - In ,loci evcpudeno Doha,-tts an f, X I. .- ,Q , A ,FA . .4 of t fd d ll .ftly 'Hg hi dis K,1,t-V, if f " N 5 'H 'bi-L-i-i-u. ' 'TEH , J 1 , cfedzfch crfwn at he""d If Wili ,f Pg- jf V1, 1 - , , 1 x 1 . - but D. H me is el-sist Um tix 3 ' ,. 5 1 A X .,' -335 ' af mf will "ld ' W .1 1 gs :, 1 A fl , 1 ' ' B. 4.9, 4' 11 Csuf- HQ - ,E " A I Q 1 1 - f 1 N 1, 1 - 05 1 'l 1 1EZQ rf 1 .M 1' ff 11 r Q' s ' 51 fy lf K' f 1 ' ' fu iff' :X -E! W 5 f K in j ! X I ,k,! fl Bffliyyf 'F k , . - 1 V ,-1 ' , ,X-5 x X- A' fV1-'g N I gk 'b P 4 5 'W 1 v 1 fm Wi-'41 ,vkgli i -xx Q j n H 6 ,3 - . as -1:12 1 if -' 1 'V iff if i'j1f.x -x 111, , -. u 5: 1 X 1 231 vfzsgf ffQ9fE" 1 fa Eg V 1 . 1 L .:ff s4Q:51, 1 S 3 7 1, 1 Y 1-5 QV , WL. 1 '-v-dpi , , . ,. " V ' ' -- 1 I ' 5 Q' 11 YM .1 1 H 1 L 1 11 ::,-,K K 1 A 1 ' J 1 QL 1 l 55. tk ll' 1 J L I V, - 1. 1- N ' I .' .-.. 'W 1'. 1 v P 1, -fir I- J 1111 1 1 -1+1 1 f 111 L ,,,A,, I .LN xii .-'A VIL ' NX. I IKE ,XM 'I' " A N3 ,'h'Hu,xA 'i gglr , . f, Ax ,Rh I A XX V fp t MER ,. - 1 '1', 1 ' ,,. 1 Af 1-sl L1 N A 3 'gap ,ff'1 '1'W ' ' 1-'1 - MV Xxx f1v1 ,.y 'K -- Riff' ,1 45137 Q J ' W' Q2 "L " -NH N fl sl ,Z -F' -15591 13. U3 31 1 . .QQQ 1 . i .-4f?'f't-f, .- ' 1 6 NC- 3 Q - ,,1Q.,,.g.Q:?:-,. .pf Qpjgffff f " "-f Q Q :I Q, .gf .gg ' n xl .-,Q QJX5 ff, Q'Qf Q MQTQ Q Q. Q- f Q yy - QQ ,Q ' ' l, ,.2f','f 1 ?5'g15v.- .i" ' it ' .X-xx 'YXXXY M, 49 --X.,-F auf ,Q -fl .I v4 - ,I fr, -.f-. , . ,x ,,f ,,, . -. Q..i , sv I -3,, -"P ii ii .W x f' Q, X CHQ i - -Hill' M -Q ,Q:'Q.Q W ,. ,, QQQQQ Q .JTZQQ , QQIQQ Q. X X Q .X :QQQQ QQ Q QQ QQQQQQQ QQ!! 2.-Q-.Q QQ.wfqmQQ. Q, 1 . ,..b Q A QI X, X ,,.,. X5,- N, ' l .6 lv .Z M A 2 Ai "li" 'l .. f411.'+"..1: 2sfgr."f:f S l. ' VW' NH J'fLf'?f V'-I 71.-!x'A!""" il '- li I' - ll-'l W f H 'W ,l l l lil li ll :HQ lvl! I H 'Q i Q - Q 3' ,MIL .5 Q'Q.'y ,V -.i Esi Hill' J' i n 1Q.g l ll. -- . .ll l. la. fl 4' A la -1 V. . AM 41 ii. 'llvgx y l . ' -ll All- Wi" . lfgl lr Q ff I Q X". 5, -'-'- K w gl X.: , ill Q 1:.l'i9'H1 l ii 1' 5 P"Uf'g'l'x- ' if - we QQ QQ,QlQ.rrQ-..Q- ,QQ 'Q nl 1.Q.QQQQQQ'Q1,QQ if Q IN QMQNQ ' le If, . f ,Q 7' inf ill I .iff lilf' l W W . ,-, 1 .u -wi 1 in V' I if -EWf'f i '63 ' X E7 will -,N 'QW' Q sfl i f SIDNEY J. ZEITZ. nm: 1 ' v iew .:Q4"i'liin'lh V f H , ' Th Ed! 1 a mn ym- lr , Clan Dac0:.4Q::n1:BIg:,U' . fQ'fQ . di ' 'sf Q? -il paciixy eol Tl:os:xt:xo meniber: of . ii Q,f.zwQQkQmQ Q y Q Q Q Q 1' f N the bemor Class who found Qthem- Q L ' i . . ' gfuwg' Sld already bcgms E0 Show Pmm' , QM . T Q selves unable to co-operate nn the 1 .f' ZQFQX ' UC of U19 lrvrund- Jolly. PIOSPCY' X " " assembling of this book. V l ' L ,. N35 ous prncnqoner that he will be. Q, - . Q,-Q -iQ Q0 - QQ Q,-.SQQQ --QQ Bu: we sincerely hope Qthat bis ,fQ- . ' 5Q.Q 3 U54 -.. Qi ng .. Q Easy Qgiyofezsxnnal rouQ:m: infill sgQ1 Q Q , ,,Q V J ? fi' az: .4xi..s:::f'....:..':,:f 1 , i ,fl ' 'VYU1 '. - -i 5. Mats- fWe all bwish him , ' ' .- 9 , , Q 5 Q 1,935 I , ' gig- I X ' ' oo ortune: ut some- ,-51. Q , U 4 , - l , ' -bg'-fill' if Q 1 ',' gow. ine number assigned " 1QQ 1 Q ' Q' QQ QQQQ ,Qg15g . to hum in the recent school . , ' , Q M Q, Qgjgj Q N. gf... ' draf: gives us the creeps. - -, , .. - 4 1 ,. Q ,ff Qz. ,. .2 l x V, . Q e Q X ff , .,QQeQfQ1,Q " tfi L. Q QQQ-3. 'QQl, , QQQQ ,V Q me l 4 , ., 44' ., E 1 A' ' 'if ' , , 'V-53 ',, 193'ii1'?:' A' iff Kiikiiwl L? . . , -1 3135 ' " . 8113? diff. 1. if ' frf . Q W .rw- 1: 1 ,. A . e f 1 fi . Wi lg ' ,. - 1-12,555-ii iwlwrf' N V iffy ' f' " i l . i I , 2-9 1 ' 1 ' 5523" i i M-Q X ' 'VA la . : ' i 5 wk 3 :4 EQ 5 .Q Q. , Q Q lif F "Fr ' ' l ' 'V'f3,f I . 3 1 " . P+ .-:lf 11, - , '- iz., ' . Q 7 ,Q - - Q, 51' Q Z 122555, ,3Qqf,- 1 ,-.fizg...,,. - ,. 1613 if H X " W 2 iz: . 1 -Q ' - .. I Q -. 'A .. x jj' ,Q . 'Q 'Q 1 2' l I ffigf eti L e 25, 2 ' A 6 , fri fd . " 3.41545 2' , ',i- A ff" , ff' 'T ' f ," ' 95 . ., - - ::.,, vm ' 'Zhi 14 'g 'A '- Jr .1 , .' ' ' 2 rg... . 'fi '-3 - . N' ff. '- E . W ., ,1 i fi 4 11 X' lb. '- ' -.. .,, ik-':1'4,Iii-1' if Vl I df- :.2q,.Q -.g g i- .4 ,- - QQQ.QQi Qy 'Q 4 Q NX Q,Q- :Q 1. T651-. N-., 'H' " 'M' '-41 ' QM' ."'i " 'Q , . :W -4 N. , T C.-.Emi ' "--:mfs Y, l 1124, '-' 3f'Q.1:J 134- ' " ' I.2QZ-Iii, .11-F " ' fzjgyc 1- :ERT 11341 I 'E . . 2' - E E Vg "What is it, young man ?" 5 I : 5 had not been written as yet ?" I 1 ii i if g . , ' ' ' if f 1. ' . ' S". H -I-uplllllallll xg'jggE1"1m-5yp""'lf" lIllllIll"' ' ANA I "lllIIllll 15.5 'I 'lv -- III -eff Qt ,, I IIIL, .arf-'?zI.ssf nl I' I -- I-MIIIeresiiiirIie wrrf.-f::er, I..I.If--fs.-III.. I 26 .I .'i::.wIf .l..IIIQf'I.,. ci "' 'dlbfbl' I' II II QI '47 'JI Inmnulu ulnuu h 1 I , IH.. liyslfgqm 2 CLASS PROPHECY 5 g 5 5 Possibly you may not believe what I have to tell you In fact I can hardly 5 5 : 5 expect that you will because were it not that this most unusual adventure '-1 F 2 actually happened to me I too would not have believed such things possible How- 3 : 5 5 ever in the hope that my reputation with you for sobriety and integrity will over- : E 3 5 balance whatever doubts may arise I shall try to recount my experience I : 5 5 5 Not far from the Village in the course of my wanderings in the neighborhood 5 E E E I happened upon an odd-looking shop. The window contained three or four old 3 ? 5 :,- books on an antique stand above hanging on curtains which shut off all view of E 5 5 the interior was a faded sign Books-Old and Rare ' in a corner stood a stuffed 5 5 E owl with a spyglass applied to one of its eyes evidently symbolic of something E - E 5 though I could not guess what If this was a bookshop it certainly was different E ir Eg from any other I had ever seen ueer too I thought that I had'never noticed it E E 2 E before having passed there quite often E . : E Curious to know just what sort the shop was I descended the three steps to E 5 g 5 the door which I opened At first glance it seemed like any other bookshop g , E E E although the exceedingly musty odor combined with the creaking hinges to give E E 5 X. E the impression that the door was very rarely opened. I was standing at the door, E A E f - -IM making a survey of the shop, when an old man, whom I had not noticed at first, ilk 5 Z : E If x E I Tig 5 .5 Apparently, he was not accustomed to being disturbed by customersg certainly, 2' E -5 :- El ii' ' as musty and as old and as rare as his books, addressed me with an impatient, : : 'I gli he did not seem to encourage any possible purchasers. At any rate, I apologized 515 Ez'-ri politely for interrupting him in his reading and explained that I would be delighted ggi : I l answered, "That's all right, young man. I didn't mean to be so gruff. You see, I was reading the Great American Novel, and I didn't like to be disturbed". "The Great American Novel", I repeated, "I thought critics agreed that it I i I I . K I . E E E E E E E 5 will write it in 194-4. Now he is unknown". E E gf 2 to examine his collection of books. My manner seemed to soften him, for he "Exactly," he replied. "This novel is at present unwritten. Lawrence Barton 5 .-'E "I'm sure I don't understand," I answered. - g - 5 if "It is simple enough," was his reply. "I am a collector of rare books.. Now i:.-.J you will readily see that books that have not been written as yet are quite rare. Q E It is the collection of these books that has been my particular hobby". E E Hr' IIIHl':"lIllIIlfu1ll! :IYII l"' : :Ill llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllu V' -S lllll lllllllllll llllllllllllllnllllnllnunul --ui 'vpn' :1ly'lllI'I'yl'I'.'III. xl I Q 4 4 Q Il' 1- 5 I S 1 , 9 ' . E Q : E , fl 33 , , : zik ' ' i "I, ' Ai? ' ' ,if 5 I " ' Q s s 9 - A F II , . If B k , S S :QA I , . , , I A: fx 1 , r 'K A :: "Then you have a number of such books ?" I asked, in a daze. I The old man almost straightened up with pride, looked at me steadily, and 5:2 I-nf-:f . - . 2.-E after a pause, said, "Young man, I have the largest collection of future books in 5-.Q 91.3 the country. I have books on almost every subject-and they will not be written 535 E :.. : for years to come". mi i.: I asked whether I could see the books for strangely it did not even occur ,nf I ez to me to doubt him In reply he led me to an obscure aisle in the rear of the shop 5 :N S and pointing out two large shelves told me I could examine them while he went A - ack to his reading - I I Q-fi-.1 'Il ll ll! I h I I' I I"lI II I: 135 1 I ' Illlf I U I K I ,I 5- E 2 All 5 dig QE SLE 7 ' ? l if is 1,Ie l-Wm. .... LQ? IM-EV letffliili'--ffv'fae 'f -2 Here laid out before me for my leisurely investigation was the I'uture I is ,:1 was at a loss where to begin Then the medical group and familiar names caught my eye Now let me pass over the reactions and feelings that possessed me at the time and merely list some of the books and 'periodicals of interest' their contents I could only scan hastily of course E Success in Dentistry by Dr Elmer Cleveland a rather bulky volume the greater part of which deals with the importance of being a selling talker The final chapter concedes also the advantage of a knowledge of the subject Dr Cleveland writes this book in the capacity of Commissioner of Health the first dentist to hold this office he explains . Gynodontia by Abraham Stoff the author deals at great length of the treatment-dental treatment that is-of female patients and proposes gyno- dontia as a new specialty for those qualified by experience and knowledge of feminine psychology The author takes occasion to thank Drs Clifford Iove and Barney Schultz for valuable suggestions in the preparation of the text An article in the Cosmos is enthusiastic over some of the work of Dr Arthur Fox declaring that it marked a great step forward The work is the production of a shade guide that actually matches natural teeth In the same issue is a denunciation of the tendency on the part of some prac- titioners to rely on preparations like Korega for the retention of dentures. It seems a trifle incongruous that at the present time these preparations should be so well advertised by the author of this article Sidney leitz An advertisement announcing the organization of the Rose Taxi Cab Cor- poration by the merger of two companies owned separately by Drs Rosenfield and Rosin At that time these two will still be practicing dentistry-evidently for diversion. "How to Rear a Large Family" was a very instructive volume written by Dr. George Goldman. The author shows that he is quite familiar with his subject, because of his early and very successful marriage. -2 elk 5 '55 il' si? 5E 5 3 ll I E EE 'E El? L l- " An advertisement in one of the magazines reveals that Dr. Sidney Schwartz will lead a very happy life, for he will succeed admirably in combining his vocation with his avocation. Dr. Schwartz will be proprietor of a Dental and Billiard Parlor. He advertises the slogan "Tickle the ivories while I tickle yours." I found several numbers of "The Dental News", a new periodical. It is a monthly founded and edited by Dr. Aaron Bluestone, and devoted to the news of the profession-personal rather than technical. lv ll S 5 E1 E E. E 5 -E : E 2 2 :' 2 5 5 5 uull'llI n,n ui u mimi nur villluljr-,nb:g:?7?: 1- -S :L I ll .U U ii L 1 1 umuumuui in lui lun MIlL..iiffifQ LI . A " ' ll Hill "1 V ' "" W UPU WUWWIII llllllm ""'llllIIIllllllllllllIlI llllllll I llllll HI WI I ' ' NX'P ill? "l fs' fl ll rr u u n n mn ul mm: n mm.. wmn nuumrm mrmlmmmmn mm lllq - a.-- ,- E.,-5 '13-s I E llli . : 5:2 f 'E E . s i One issue contains a letter to the editor from Alexander Siegler. He tells how, finding New York rather crowded, and deciding to open in a less populated dis- trict,,he chose-like the go-getter he is-the North Pole. Here he has the exclu- sive patronage of all the explorers, and is making out well enough, he says, to cover his rent without trouble. ' In an item concerning Dr. Burton Goldberger, we find he has made the resolu- tion never to get to his office more than half hour late. He has made this resolu- tion before, he says, but this time he means it. pinning' I kg- ' I 1 ,K llgpl nnrl --5 all: EE 5 1 1 2 .i... 1 .... , ,,,,, , ,,,, , . , is'MF"!!::5Eiili1fiiifff:::,':e"F!!!!l7-fsifi.Ll., ..llI'.l'f1',21lllF!.,' 4 H361 ' . -. ..... A..imlllllllllllllllllllllllll in umu ull li saggy lj . ., fi: :if : E L5 E E x E : r 5 :Alle ECE E-15.5 :J - ' :. ,-. " its 25 T E " : .Q-1-1 ,lg E E Y ll s g Another issue contains the announcement of Dr Mortimer Solomon s trip to Europe to continue his study of Orthodontia During his absence Dr Solomon Cohen will have the use of his office Thus we can trace the development of Dr Cohen from his first year at College when he could borrow only a spatula at -1 time to the time when he borrows a complete oHice The Bulletin of the N Y U College of Dentistry for 1950-1951 was a welcome find for it disclosed that our class will be particularly fortunate in the matter of obtaining appointments to the faculty These men are' to be congratu- lated on their successes--in 1950 that is Professorship in Prosthetics will be held by Louis Berkowitz r Professorship in Operative Dentistry will go to John I wird Al Krasny will occupy the chair of Orthodontia As Professor of Oral Surgery Ieo Allen will have able associites in Harry Hornick and David Persky V I Finally Jerome Tapolow and Harold Schwart7 are destined to be directors of the Extraction Clinics An issue of the Dental Items contains an article reporting the work being done in the treatment of the suffering Armenians Dr Milton Iienkel by his charity and unselnshness in devoting himself to this worthy cause earns the com- mendation of the profession, which Dr. Fenkel values more highly than other earnings-for example, monetary. Incidentally, there is no mention made whether the suffering of the Armenians preceded orlfollowed Dr. Fenkel's work. As for Theodore Beichman, I am sorry that I found nothing favorable to report. He will be candidate for Presidency of the United States, but, most unfor- tunately, he will run on the Democratic ticket. Even the marked success on the part of his campaign manager, Marcy Frey, in getting out the female vote will not offset this handicap. ' I was in the midst of an interesting little book, "Art in Dental Practice" by Dr. Louis Kirsch, when the old man reappeared, informing me that it was long past midnight and time to leave. l Thanking him for his favors, I left, with the intention of returning early the next day. I did return, but-and you may explain this how you please-of the bookstore there was not a trace! I, for one, shall attempt no explanation. : E i f 'E v, : ,111 5 Ax 5 lr 542 EL,-E I r I 1 5 Q E E. 1 2 'li , 52.-1 1' i -F at 'tml' 'Ill illl 'Ill' '::l .lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllu ll HIllIIllllllllllllIIIllllllllllllllllllllllllllI Vila. IV. lllll HIIII' 'null' l Natiku Rial: rl- :.1f"f--'-1r'1f'-r- ,wr .Ill flllll... ,..l --1'-'H r-'-"'-Im. -iz -Ma, - -1 . r L Q SE r ' - 1 - 5-E 2 E . 1 - - f Z s 2 ' ' - 'S 3 cc 9: . . ' - E s . ' ' .. . 5 E 5 . E . 2 I ' 2 ' E ni ' , - :Ali A ' -I ks SN . 2 ! 5 Alt . . ' , 2 me fx- . ,A : f fl E , is '- "" . -:LE Zum : U: ' ,if 52,5 RTA! Ei' E aji ENE E"S 5' I ' fa. I u n nm, ,za "1" i 5115 ,Q if ill Eli t as pr''1?3lIilllm'i5fsg"'fggi3sianlIllL"g:::"-'n 'l "'Qf5fS5"IIII'i" f1'l..:f':n :.if .... f--1-"'l. il 1 1 .I Ii .. '---- fi.....L- ,.IIf'l',..iu'..lliiEi I1373 P ill : ,- : - - 3 .. rl.-., 1 + 1 Ibm" 'oc :I 41,7 SI. .. Ill I n u l lr,-I KXE :,'.x,fi , 4 Qi ll E F WHO S WHO OF 1926 Compiled by the Editorial Sta Handsomest ......... I aird Most Accommodating. Not the Handsomest. . Berger Toreador .......... . Best Dressed ......... Salomon Class Snob .... .... Most Popular ........ fModesty forbielsj 7Voisiest ,.... Medal Men ,......... Reich Rosin uietest ..,.. Albert Most Serious ........ Grind ..... .... E llen N erviest .... .... Wzttzest ..... ..... A Fox Sleepiest ..,... .... Clown ........ ..... 7 eitz Don Juan ........... Stoif Most Meticulous ..... Darkest Complexion. . Ford Prosthetist .......... ,Horney Shortest ............ Oral Surgeon ........ 'Allen Tallest .... .... N eatest W orher ...... Schlanger CLASS TEAMS Allen-Reich .......... ......... - ......... Most Tara' y ......... Most M ischievous .... Berkowitz Fenkel Feldman Cleveland Watsky Eisenberg Siegler Foyer Goldberger Covner Kirsch Stein A. Fox East and West Elevators Berkowitz--Libson ........ .... T wo of a Kind E. L. Berman-Karchemsky ...... Bluestone-Reichman-Frey ..... Brown-Metz ............... Becker--J . Burman ..... Eisenberg--Schlanger ..... A. Fox-Foyer ......... Goldberger-Goldman .... Hammacher ana' Schlemmer . . . . Triplets Man and Wife . . . . .Potash and Perlmutter . . . . Hiss and Zinnser . . . . . The long and short of it The Gold Dust Twins . . . . .The Mayo Brothers ' 51123 EIINE El' 315 . .1 ?. E EL E Fli Em-E :lf L 14 : S e I 'I' I' 'l'.I "" Illllf VII! :MFI "" : ::l Ill llllllllll llllll lllllll llllllllllllllllllll ll' 1 In unnnlnuuunnulnlnllll lull lnvl lllullunul "-l rn' :mn rI" gl ',Il t 1 fr - ::ff"f-'--'-'f""-mfs . .....lllr..i'lllll.. .fllz f-If-"hr----lf"ffaf.- in" r - .rr r lu-.. , -4 A llllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllll I, , ...ul I r I l1-. .YL . 1 9 , . r Q i ix' IE , X - r nv - i 3 E E 9 s Q E fl, ll 'liz sl' . : K J : : il ll, f l Y F A 'F-l? G0 ' .L r3'm QE F: Elle 53: H -E p E e 5 E E I M5 T W ..--. Mayo-Sol Schwartz .... Kroll-Inerfield .... Piano--Laird ,.... Love-Schultz ............... Krasny-Stoff--Teitelbaum ....... McBrien-MacGregor-MacMillan Winkelman-Siegel ........... A. . . I tural I 11381 Qu, .....Il:e and Mike . . . . Gallagher and Shean .... Hall Room Boys . . . . . The Three Mosquitoes . . . . The Three Macs . . . . .Aconite and Iodine "- " . Ea: - -1 KTA: EFE ?l? 9:6 E'i : 2 I ll- 3? 22 Il ur. " lIIIIII""""'1'1 ik -,f : ll If f Z W ww f . + NS' ' ' vw f M M h fs- W NW ff gym 4 W W mviw W f S ,wk k l f1kQ,W,!Vi W swf Q3 W' S W KWWA QQWfWVf X ff k swf ffm, ' Q" 0 'V fn, ! 5 r' dw iw X W CW A XAQPL A 'J W M f C' fgx w U1gflE P 'M ! ' ' AM, INV Y Avvbv i Q , 'I M I? MT 41.255 X X 75' X X ffm KW ? wYk XX X Z V M X X X , f f , A X ' su X X l 1 I O 1.1 41:53 Q , X ' v ' "- ww- ---:'f - -vf W' "-"A "Y"+""""M"'K'-"""Ai""' , f f i ,-, 4-,A , -H 11 K xx, 1 F- min-A,,,NRA-lA,MxH M-K M A v ,,, rw! f-f, V., 5, -3- .--- , L N. M. 4..--ff ,Vg ,- , : f fx V N sg . N N . " X X 1 E 1i.L1""--ly . 'f?lifQ:l'?'3'C-,'Ci.1'!i'R, Fx"" l ?I-A: 'TT Y V' v A721 -TT' Qx Q67 ZR.-'42, -fr' fy 1 1 1 lf:gLgl'f--L-,1 "' Xlfwxg' V." " 2' i ' 'N' Liix I-' 1' 5- -zpi. ,L C.. ft: Xl Fffdqtf '- , f?j'l: "5 fi' ' 'fn Q A A-M'-:--'ln'-'-":'H"H --A--A ,N--X V--"K-,lv V f,..,, ,T 5-' ' ' --f ---f'--'N' ' ' ' 5 bfi: rf Wx . 1 lf. ff? r ' 11-'ni Y, 39: L AC -2 txyl ,viz Vcgffl if? ,-iii? '1 'QNX J ' 'l rin 7 3 : ' 1 gl if Fffffi E555 ,A KJ gl ii--733 i7"':Z 2332.-.gg E 2, 'KN5 irilisff ky fafg V' ' Ea f., :Q H 1AA' 1 .11 -' ff? 1' Gigi kr: - mg A- .,.. ,Y..,,M- ,,,-,, -, ,W ,WY A-,, v,-,..,,,-.-,-..-,. ,Y ., .. H Y v-.nd-A-,W H , ff Z1-1+ff-, ,,.,,4W,,,,q,,,,,,, A,,,w,, 1 ' f----.-A-H--f----Y-.TW-vw--A fAf f'--"'q,,,.4-fffff . A-:N,,.1 rf f V.-. H -f -- .- , . - '-,ff I M P-35"if"Tfg7-.?'M fx 1, 16151 :3f3Lg34ij ' ' 3j sllfsfx'-xx -lwzla, , Y' .'1l:1'C21'5:f'5'jZf',j 1 ' 'I "'- T' f -f L ' '- Ex-,LVTQYQXM f....f"'-l"liE:-1:11-ff-ff:.I.v-fI1'Z, .p :Il-1-1 ,f.g4J mr fvuwqgilliirigirfii.-,41:f" 2X,v's :,Q--ll.-lgwff ','.! J - M ,. . , M, ., .A -,, ,,,, ,..,...,.............,.-A-M-- I Will I v - ty 3 N., w. - 'W' :ig N. 2 , yi, Q, , , u. , l CLASS OFFICERS l927 l'l7'l'.Yf!lKlll, HLRMAN WlI.I.I.AIsI l"RANK1aL Serretary, MICIIAEI. S'1'A'1"r1s1AN I'z'n' President, Isixuokle Rorxmz Treasurer, FRANK Vocio C01ll1!'l'll07'5, SAMUIEI, Lolfls NUSBAUM, FRANK JAMES LUONGO, JR. HISTORY OF THE CLASS OF ,27 In the face of l923, there gathered from far and wide the now illustrious class of l927. Scholars, athletes, literary men, and business men of note were rep- resented in this glowing array of manhood. Foremost among them were the erst- while football star and captain of C. C. N. Y., the well known Jack Schtierman, with his famous press agent tagging at his heels, the renowned "Abe" Harris of Brownsville. Then, too, one must not forget that nationwide conoisseur of dress, fashion and beauty-Frank Drate of the East-East New York. Soon enough, the students became too well acquainted with their college cur- riculum. There was the chemistry of Dr. Hawling, the physiology of Dr. Stein, the histology of Dr. Gunther, the anatomy of the beloved Dr. Darlington, and the operative of the scintillating Dr. l.ePioy. In a professional school there are few activities under way to mitigate the ubiquitous monotony of the class room. Therefore, the students welcomed any thing that might offer diversity. After a prolonged and riotous session of political warfare, the class selected its tirst leaders: O'Connor, President, Wolfson, Vice- Presidentg Lamkoy, Secretary, and Colish, as guardian of the freshman vault. il it .rir 1f'ir.erf:f ...1 ljvmlllll'1251-'-.f1:rQimffe2'fiffreiiffl'Kilmer ie' Wf'f"'i7'v Us-+ir:i11li.Il'l,lll'l T Qi F fl' rt!.llimrw'-'rfpifv-f,R1?V"f'l"f ll'lU'f' l 11411 E I1421 ""'t' 'N wayne 0 l i il' 'lf ii :- , ,if W: 2' X I '1 Lf? ig The following fall classes were resumed With its forces but slightly shat- :E E,- 7- tered the sophomores began their work anew Elections again held the spotlight : 27-3 for the first half year Colish President Hugel Vice-President Shimkin Secre- 2 :E1 E E .tary and Treasurer Grace and Reifel Councillors were the successful men chosen : E : .. to act as the forthcoming leaders Then the greathidden talent of some of the - ' 5 quieter set came suddenly to the fore Like a bomb it hurled itself at the surprised 5 2 throng of students Under the marvelous leadership of Philip Wienstien and 5 : 5 Aaron Goldberger those famous pioneers of sacred music the mouth and hoof E 2 E E band was organized Following on the heels of this renaissance came also dra- 2 5 E 5 matics and comedy led by that Shakespearian character Herman Frankel assisted E 2 by his Roman bodyguards Luongo and Tardera E E Then an astonishing event took place For the first time in the history of the : r: 2 I 5 class a dance was sponsored and held Later a basketball team was organized : - E E E But we were soundly trounced by the lowly freshmen and we decided to disorganize E 2 E 5 At the end of our long sophomore year we underwent remarkable changes : E - E The New York College of Dentistry passed into history and in its place came the 5 5 - mightier New York University Then suddenly there came about an almost 2 - E E astounding event-the admittance of a young lady into the rank and file of the E g 5 ' Junior class. It was the first time in the history of any junior class that such an E .A 5 E X : : I : E E incident occurred. Soon after assembling from its vacation haunts, the class held E , : 5 5 its third election. It proved to be the most exciting yet held. The old regime was E .E : : 2 fl fx - E15 Er: E- renounced and new faces began to appear. Frankel, Presidentg Rotner, Vice- - E ' : 5 ' : S 5 -E Presidentg Stattman, Secretaryg Vocio, Treasurerg Luongo and Nussbaum, Coun- E' 5 Eli: -E 5 cillors, were elected to the offices. Clinic work became our chief social activity. - 3122 E:-: its 5 E Encouraged by its success of last year, the class held its Junior Prom at : : r T ' v 1 A 1 wise very little else was accomplished, as we were becoming acclimated to the pol- Chalif's. It was undoubtedly the outstanding social event of the season. Other- icies of New York University. Next year, we are resolved to outdo our previous W L, achievements and make our senior year a year of fame and triumph. A 3 ll! -:. .5 E- 5 5 5 E 5 : g G E g 0 World, thou choosest not the better part! E ' It is not wisdom to be only wise, igifiyztjzl 'I Im... :ul llK'ull imap- Ilglmummumuumulllnllllllllllllulgl 'ullrnnlnlnnnnlmuulmnnnunlmllllll. ill:. l lnylwu x 1 4' 3 E S i n nl D . ' 1 UI lu' 4 V Hi. .huillnlllilii Jlllinlilllll lgmill'IllIlllllllllllIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllll in xv il lll llll n' :QI Hull hill, lilllh mul hifi QX 1 - . U Q5-I ' ' , , ig : E I - 9 S 9 S 9 E : : F- 9 9 9 E : S 2 ' E E 3 . E E r: . E E 5 Z 4: . s s 9 E A . Q of E ,il ' ' I el: , . EE , E E , S ' 5 : N - , E J E Qi : ' 'A 2 A ' 5 I E e 7 5 4 And on the inward vision close the eyes, 5 , But wisdom is to believe the heart. IE Our knowledge is a torch of smoky pine C That lights the pathway but one step ahead . - Across a void of mystery and dread -lg f , Bid, then, the tender light of faith to shine." - 5 . E . .a 5-1 iff ji' .le EN-1 ale --E :ua ills all' gg :I- alg 3" f 9 E g I ' I a 5 3 l' tel- rn' H 'l 'uni 1- H null l A.. .LQIXJ i i' fly: III H431 ' E-ini lllq is--I 1 I ""' ""' ' ' ""' "" 'I 'la-Q W' lQW'l"lll5'lWmmm--yg:qi'f'ls l4fl'li-ff"f".'rul.. . .l ll-Gul If , V4 ' i E .li E E : s E E - 2 3 - 5 E E i'E 2 2 ENE EAXE ,dig 2 ii 5:5 ' unugulll Illlmmmm In H-Wmllllllllll ll ll"P2fIJiHffi'F'fsiiiiif-M5511" 'ffl l. - .lllll1Q fI' .T .."'i'W.1. ...................Q.....,.... ......,.. ' ..lllI . . y PERSONALS The class of 1927 is a singular one. Talents of its members which have been latent and repressed have at times burst forth to illuminate our sphere of action. Potential benefactors of humanity, master minds of the universe, and future leaders of men are in our midst. The responsibilities of the future have endowed their minds with an extraordinary perspicacity. "Louder! Louder! Itz, Louder!" A famous philosopher once said, "Thoughts there are, that need no embody- ing, no form, no expression. It is enough to hint at them vaguely, a word, and they are heard and seen." A In our class mere suggestions are overlooked. Speeches must' be made, and even listened to. We can forget our most famous orator to whose every word every one listened with a little thrill of expectation. Throughout every sentence, attention was on the alert to hear that speaker in his splendid superiority, seeing everything as if he saw it not, appealing, requesting, demanding, and even whis- pering, "Where is your fifty cents ?" I Say Bill as a matter of fact does it seem to you as it might appear so if you actually believed it possible? Strangely conducive as a professional atmosphere may appear to a more practical outlook on life it has not smothered our aesthetic temperaments We see evidences of artistic ability at every turn' but perhaps the most outstanding in height of spirit and sincerity is our Philharmonic Orchestra The quality of each rendition exquisite in Staccato Murderato consummate in Sonya Caprice was so delightful that the audience could constrain its emotions no longer and greeted the Pascudniak Overture thunderously Iet me congratulate the class upon its wonderful choice. I saw him' six years ago last year Murray Did you? For the most conscientious single handed venture into other worlds we must congratulate the man who has announced his intention of making a tour of the class Interesting revelations will be made and science and art is on edge Why don t you boil your case out in the sterilizer Sam? Not every person is born a genius Yet many people claim that genius may be around us unnoticed Did nature scatter some of the seeds of genius around us . Can it be possible that one of the seeds is actually in our midst? Will it blossom and germinate into an oral surgeon? i lllllllu f-1?'ll5' 1- III llH'HIw" 1 JL ff Fil.Mf ' il s fi sg E-'E E E E E E E E 5 E E E E E 5 E E E E E E : NE E15 E. E sf: EA: 5 E E E :l E E' E E 5 Sei Fl? . : 1 i .. S ' N, 5 1 9 N 9 ' a : 5 l, It E :AE 352 si ' , . 5: FY 9 9 9 U -fl 5 , li 99, If 1 H, A A E ' E if H 3 E 5 2 : , E . 5 g-2 " ' , H 263 v i ' . Q iii 2 if UL: ir.. n "-'-- ll"'llII"' v in 'lI""'Il T. 'J' -S' j 'I 'JU .. n 'gif N - . .. .II fl I. x. f 9 ..- .I - Iz:1ll..- ..l."'fllI... .... ..., -7--'l'..il : 6 .1 In. 'i"'...... if 'I - "1 ...'Ql'z 11441 g - ...: ,,f' ".. ' f Q41 m e x W 4 ,, WJ , TN W fff 7 MM Q N11 A 'M ' W K V7 A af! 5 M W fx? 'M f bf M S 7 X ff, ,ff f 9' My R KZW ZK 4" M Q -WWW W if ff' QS gf ,,, R- f 1' f ! X' + rj V w l Wh ff f f W Kqxm' X, f qG ,1i: mg 9 f my! at .Q 510 11 UV f Wil' Ji' L ' X ff f.'- 'l" ' 'A m' U SWA f . w N W1 W f vffff H" X f wvvf r V X' f" w 7! M N JW UM W W y, g f,, f m m M' x' MK X ZW LQ ' F4 4 If , 'V l K L- W LMEQV V X '1" ,V W, l W 185- Nh X sxx' w wf 'X ' A f X55 W js., X u f F .Nl H R' X , 'W M X: Ag xv WEEK, Ny 'N KN 'M Hr NX in N ,. W X MN xx N W Nqr X A .. , ,MK X J ,XM QW' if lil J X X ll R X X I 1 fx I. 1 1 A 3 I . 1 71 ! W ??f':aN 5:Qfq,, NK , Zigi-4fE3,++-i'EJ. L ' ,--I ,f Q wr, YA f fwdx' '"g-A-A-W-i.ifF1Ei55f5Kif53tE?imE:fy1,v-75v,n-:fa?fff?f::fg: wi- '- f :""'!1 sL:M1 ..U1 T14 . ffm: I+-43NLMSQ1,Ns--igggfffflfxgp Yi K -. .rf --A , y 1 , 1 V ., r - E v. I , -.X , 52ml A -w X, fNNNxQS-nY::::- Q q6E5g,vwgX srX5Ni , -fgi', . uf 2 ...Q 'rw ,Y ,g ,. X, XX--X I--. UIQJ v 1 - , , 4-H' V- 1: K -' - - M: ,f XX N . Y xx,gJf1 f,Y " 4 ' ' 'flivi-I--f 'f W ' 1121, " A- V ' , -, A ..x vu 1 f,f.f ,, ,- 5,1 ,gl X E-5' 'X Y jflxgjl' zvffi ljpgf -' 7iJA w55?55af-Nm gj,zcA,fL V .1 if 1,-rf ' S 214-4-ii ' Lit ' 3'-,fi if 14 1- 'NE 4: ' ' if -' 55 , P , X Q Y Vif-+1 if '3ii3? V fgi QJJLQ Q 2,gl -.',. ' - -4 Q fig? Q--4W X'i:'.2Al " ,V 5--ki ,F 1' ff!! f 1H.4. gffkf 1 ,ii A f Y ., f ZEN ti 'QTL QQ af-I3 KIT i 1 X 1 .2 -Q fi .. X , 5 , J kk, , ' ix , ,x 'z ul' '-fy ff E, ' 1 I Jr., :x,jQ ' a I if'.1 fgjf . X Fx-xyqx . 55551 VRF Y wif. E751 il 7375? 1, 'Q gg Ei ' ' FCEFSUS gi: We wfia Lx A fimgflfg' Vi in ' f' v ' fi l X M - 5 lQ"T,1i ' A- 71' M1 "T"'i,1 , , ' N - ,A mf, M ' 1 Y .Q ' ' ' LA WEN' ' H4 Mk Y" FE ' JJ " ' 'fwm',www:- N Zn ,ffr ciff, - " 'A 'N ,yr ,iz 51 A .!9xNi':LJ:.jflfi1 -A if 5 1 -KU I r i 1 '1 ----.F-H----w----f---1 f---- Hdfis. .,.. ., .. ., f agar -siftgg. -1 , ll' if , , , 5 P fffrfififil,pfiifkgfMilf.:--giw'ff1.- em,lv,lfrrit..3,.11gf,r.iillifW' wi ' .f ,M T S. s - ,ima tr- -1,,ri 1 512, 55,5 l. , .y V My., 5 gilt, r l TY 7"" 5 i lim' Hifi ,i l ff T I il lk 1 P l in ii W l A I' l f Illl rl li QW, 'fi .71 ai rglxi W I fill - l 'ffik All i gm ' 'wi l . l"f7't.Ql'l , X 3 i 2 iv- ,fl s. all-still CIASS OFFICERS was lim i I K H lfgii iiyfmlii President, Louis Pmuuz GREIPER Serrelary, AARON So1.oMoN Vice President, HERMAN F. Por.r,ocx Treasurer, HYMAN FEINERMAN K X Councillors, Jossvn HERUSTMAN, 0'1'ro Rirrrzea, Sc.B. j QP!! Qi j HISTORY or THE CLASS OF '28 I f 'S" On the twenty-third of September of the year nineteen hundred and twenty- ll: l gl four, there assembled in the old lecture hall of the New York College of Dentistry, V liz! the first individually selected class and the first to include women members, in the l 3: 'lil ' fl history of the institution. It was a fairly large class-two hundred and three to be 'i lj 'i accurate, and this included two women. X ll kj f After the usual time consumed in becoming acclimated to the new surround- Hi! lf Ig? ings, new work, and new faculty, the class as a whole gradually assumed its place in the work being carried on in the school. Class activities did not suffer neglect, and 'fl at the first class meeting, called by Dr. Thomas Darlington, and with Mr. Rea as acting chairman, officers were selected to execute to the class activities for scholas- h ifi tic year. Jacob Blass was chosen president, with Solomon Shandalow vice-presi- dent, Miss Olive Meyer, secretary and Maxwell C. Buchalter, treasurer. Louis 'W Greiper was elected as the class editor. fkffil f And time passed--the months rolled by, with Thanksgiving, Christmas and .- ij i New Year's as landmarks of the progress. The mid-year examinations soon came l Oli with all the glory that becomes the occasion. The results were encouraging for the ll class as a whole, for the fatalities were very few. iii I My It was at this time that a major class activity rose to take its place in the ilk sun. A Freshman basketball team was formed, with Doctor M. Frost as coach. ' Under his guidance, and with the aid of the efficient management of Aaron Solo- gilt ,kilt V7 . ., ,-l 1, C w MU KU UD rm, 7'iff,ffi"f1l"7i .Jj'1Z2i21YfI'ij'fiE1gfjY.7FT2'i'E31UETifEYZf'QQ7+l gg c,i,9T,Q!'f'l Wy 'Tg3ff'fTfi'f1iita,,.fgYg57'1fr5?j72ii3r1smqq:g:',f' lQl4j'fqbjg,,,L:,f viF,'Ql3ffffQy,rgl4ll.s-lg-llCC,fgj'w ,fig .5 limi all , ll,lllflllemgfll,ilimii'1e,i7X.'flpt1lllllIUlQjQ K Qrflf'xll1ilf'fj of .L f Xxii-iefiiizr 3' will -..fZ'2 iflmiffv 1f-5251rffif1,'I.-felis? " .ms J H l 1 l .Mnrxzinlsat..ll1tili1.-.s.,el...-s.,...- Qflrfegjljf' I1471 11481 -'lil'- l .. .1 r ---- "'ll.J'. " ,ll ' ji: ty , . 4 2 mon the team grew from the weak collection of enthusiastic students willing to j : : 1 work to achieve their aims into '1 powerful fast working organived and efficient ' : Lt.-.E . . . . . . : g g ' basketball team The faithful work the untirlng practice and the spirit that ' 5 " E imbued the men brought success They played seven games and won all of them E ' E They met and overwhelmed the three upper classes and also strong outside teams E : : - Then as a finale they met and vanquished a combination team formed from the E A : - Sophomore Junior and Senior classes This victorious Five was composed as fol- '-1 5 5 lows' A Berger guard and captain M. Mintzer forward A Solomon forward' 5 E E 5 W Crasson center and M Borkow guard The last basketball game was played E 2 5 as the feature of the Freshman dance held at the Allied Dental Council on bat- - 'E : urday March 7 1975 This dance was the first attempt of the Freshman class to - 5 5 indulge in extra scholastic social relationship : E 2 W . Z The dance committee with B Krame as chairman provided a delightful eve - T E li: 2 ning s enjoyment To many a mind there comes back enjoyable memories of this E i : first class gathering of the splendid spirit of fun and gaiety and of the atmosphere E fi T E of comradeship and fellowship Then there was the game It was a stirring battle 5 E 5 : E with neither side the winner until the last when the superior playing of the first E ,N E E 5 year men told and the victory made it a perfect night for the class of 28 E s E E If winter comes, can spring be far behind? With spring came the tension of E Q E Arg approaching faculty examinations, and the effort to close the scholastic year in Elm 2 ' N 3 5 I 5 such way as to leave no regrets. The end was nigh, the first lap almost over, and E : .. - E E E ahead loomed the first jump. Over--as far as you -can leap, and 'tis done. The E 5 E i E . . 5, 5 2 g summer vacation began and nearly all the students were soon gone. bome stayed A 2 g - - 5 5.-E to complete requirements, but the rest scatter to their homes. Their work was done. EEE 5.5 They were not now neophytes, but initiates. They were no longer Freshmen but E 3 5 E : :--: 2"- 5 r T . 1 another year. - I that they had not brought? Was it more knowledge? Was it but the knowing of E i 5 5 E A What had been the fruit of their year's labor? What took they with them N new material or had they also gotten the ability to use this knowledge, this material, as tools? If the latter, the days in school were not wasted, but the student took 5 ig- E E E 5 5 E with him a great treasure, a treasure that cannot be stolen, that cannot be given E 5 5135 away. He would come back ready to use the tools he had gained in an efiicient -i , Sophomores and they had the long summer togetherg resources for another lap, for 5 E i way in the acquisition of more knowledge. Though the honor list was the longest of any other class, the mortality was E E great, and in September of 1925, there presented themselves but one hundred and - fi Suzy: I I llm.:'glll 'itll' :lldqn 3:19 mmmuulummmumlllllllul, Hmminuunmmunnumumnuuuumll niq'TllllllIgbvl'm.E Q .r lfmm...rii lh .li lflimn llllllllll l llllii ll- Y? if In III umilliiil. 'ililu. .,lllmi.r , ME' five xt limi? F3734 ' 1' . . 'r i ' - f ' I E if 3 1 , ' , 4 1 E 2 Q , . . . f E T ' " E 3 Q E - E , b . is as E E ET . , , - , , . X 4 X 2 : 5 E , , - - ' ' E j ' X 5 , - - r ' 5 f ' 5 i 2 , 5 1 E : :: E E so S ' :rigs N , 1 . I an li .ffl sixty-seven men of the original class. This class did not now however return to 4. . . . QQ the New York College of Dentistry, but to the New York University College of gf Dentistry. They came back to find that their year of baptism had not wrought 5.5 QE them good. They were again strangers in a strange land. They would have to go gig mi through their baptism again. Nothing daunted, they began the year. They were - U still filled with enthusiasm and were imbued with strength from their summer ' ' u vacation , Their officers for the second scholastic year--this year of writing-are. Louis Greiper president Herman Pollack vice-president Aaron Solomon secretary f all ai il iii umm. I ll ak 'ul ll ll w Q ,gown IIl"l'l X12 E . 9 . 5 , , ,is ? " I 'T I" ' limi l"' 9 1 "'lllllllI ' "1 if I V' 135351l!.l"!!lsiEiWlWrff.vfQ:::!vkill-ff.fi'.rl. H925 ll'.,"112f-fflll"?'lawne5rii'E'aTE2l!!"F!!!lllE5f"i,f 1.149 1- ' rWt"" A' " A -'WD' ' in Haw- ' 94? Sri' 4 2 and Hyman Feinerman treasurer The class editor selected for this year was Ber 2 , :"-:LE nard J Fried -, -Q :E FE Time again tarried not and we now find weeks slipping by we see our old 5- i S E places occupied by new Freshmen and we see some old faces gone but the work 2 : g goes on However it is different There is a new Dean a new faculty a new atmo- E 5 Q E sphere Something tangible tells of existing difficulties to surmount of new cares E Q 5 E to worry over The rosy promise of the first year is .gone now The class does not ' E E see the goal with a halo around it Nothing -but an empty shell is left to rattle E : E E ambition in naught but a ragged banner of courage flaunts the winds of adversity : 5 5 "' It has become a struggle for existence and the air is grim Onward we strive ' E 5 - eager to win eager to achieve the end anxious to find in the culmination of '-the 5 - E work the reward of the years struggle and study and work Time will tell g : 5 5 Thanksgiving has gone and Christmas has passed a New Year come and onward E y - 5 E -E goes time-onward--and we wait and study and dream : - E - Thus ends the chronicle of the past of the class of 28 Distinguished for .. - E many things it has had an adventurous life Its career has been stormy-its path - A .1 E 5 strewn with thorns But onward it goes with time May fortune guide its steps- : , E : E safely forward and may it achieve its ends successfully and go down to posterity - E 5 : as the class of 1928 g Q S adxi EXE EXE E32 Ellis 512 QE 512 f t Q Ein Memoriam i A 5 W E E 4 gi ISAAC RAPON, '28 gg T ll Elf-3 FLE un """" L 'i' 5 5 DECEASED Emi 5 1-A g 3 E S I 2 Q JANUARY 16, 1926 I5 E :iz :Craig U lm" 'Ill Ilfiln II 'ul iq 'mnmuIInlImmlnulllnllllmllllll l 'lununIunummlnulmlululullnlll jx: 'qltllullll1lIllIl.v'ml vi a. ,Pha,.,.fl.,..2.:.,,,ulI . Q-pmvgwog fvzozza lgi..5lI1u- -J..'t -'vwtlq' l..i.Ir .qlassll . .u.. ...I .. ,Jln.... ,. lllllllllllllllIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllll It .1 llllllIIIIlllllllIlllllllllllllllllllllllln .- , .... ull.. Al... .,n. . fini E. 4 , . ' . :: A E ,g E IE :T ' ' ir: S : ' . 9 . ' 9 9 E : 3 - . , - E E - - E - E . :I E 9 ' 9 S L: A : s . 1 s - - :L 0, . X E ' :lil 5 E . - . I . a . ,- : E h : ' . 5 f E Em S . . E fxs 5 s , , 5 ri E X . I Q lg 71 K gs :D I 11?-Q in E-: ! illi ill: ,. U: Sl, EOE :lvl f oi ' 1 4' 5 1 1 E 1 I . , f E 5 4 ---u II :nn ' 'lll::III""' v 1 n"'ll?:Ill' ' .5 mn' u 1' Lfi-LE55!!!F!!F"!!lsiutii7Wrf::::?F"Fffflllf-1-InXl., Il ,li.if--fllll''F't:12f1rfiiWM4!!"Flf?!IMT'fl in 51501 4 J ,211 uv 'i H ' R 'Od . r I,-.fff?'. l..., ' '.' Illllllllllllllllllllllllll nun :Ill ll YEE17 I mum is ' I In--. :- 'pg : , . THE SOPHOMORE-A STATISTICAL REVIEW K: 5 g The typical Sophomore is about 21 years old needs a shave most of the time : 5 I E has a worried look in his eyes and always carries books in the subway E :Qt 5 E He inhabits five regions on the map Seventy live in Manhattan and the E - 2 E Bronx sixty-four in Brooklyn ' seventeen are Jerseyites ' eight live in Long Island E E 5 and eight hail from the farming districts of New York state. : - 5 E A variety of nine colleges has given the pre-dental education to our Soph- E Z E 5 omores Washington Square leads the list with 110 C C N Y sent 38 of its ' E S sturdy sons here Columbia follows with 8 St John 4 Manhattan 4 E E The lonely ones are Syracuse University represented here by our sheik Aaron P Q -2 Brown Tufts College and Harvard University get one-half apiece because they : : E A E are both represented by the same one man who is no less than Albert W Munson - I 5 2 E Finally Muhlenberg College Allentown Pa has its representative in Trace W I 5' ' Wilson V E L. 5 A most interesting fact is that no less than forty-seven high schools and pre- 5 5 E paratory schools have prepared the class of 28 for their college life ' - - E Boys High School of Brooklyn leads with 38 DeWitt Clinton is second with : E E ,X 5 30. Stuyvesant is third with 20. Evander Child and Manual Training are tied 5 Q 5 . X : E g for fourth place with seven each. South Side High School of Newark and Towns- E ', E H 4 , : E gf iii end Harris have five each. Morris High School and Brooklyn Evening High 5 l I5 l School have four each. Commercial High School and Bushwick High School follow 5 l 5 5 - y - I5 with three each. Manhattan College High School, Richmond Hill High School, - 5 xr . .2 Az: Eastern District High School, Erasmus Hall High School and the High School of E-:E Commerce have two each, and thirty-one schools are represented each by a single SAE 5 E : 2 gv--3 alumnus. They are: Bayonne High School, Hoboken High School, Passaic High Ez' E School, Technical High School, Central High School, Detroit, Plainfield High School, Cliffside, Park High School, Pleasantville High School, New Brunswick High School, Kearney High School, Englewood High School, Kingston High School, De La Salle Institute, Tappan Zee High School, St. Johns Academy, s I ' 5 5 Yonkers High School, Paterson High School, St. Johns Prep School, Curtis High - : E E School, Xavier Prep. School, Flushing High School, Fleischmanns High School, 2 E Mount Vernon School, George Washington High School, Peddie Institute, Bucha- 5 5 rest Gymnasium, Roumania, and Tarnopol Gymnasium, Poland. gmg ga: Distinguished for distance among these schools are: Tarnapol Gymnasium, 'ti' ,, ,'IH'5..'n ul! ,g-:gl 'Ivl : 'Illllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 'I' I ullIIIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllul nnl. .1111 ullll 'llIlIIllI'gA'l'l.' Nl I 7 S I .'i"'U ll'i'i"IIlllmI 'ln ZEN 3:1306 Ml- .rlllll"'l"""'ii1'. all' ll ni ll . , S, ,I e ul ln. . I nu I lll i 4 lllllllllllllll ll n mmm . in h n ,I ,QMS . QM Q I L. F. sl fi 5 2 g i E Z Z 5 , . , - E . ..... 5 2 Z . , '. , . 5 : li E , - - s f Q :A 2 , , ., . 5 I 5 : I , : lx- E ll 2 . 2 E .2 A, ' u 2 fri 2 I 5 :2 Poland, represented here by Samuel Schwartz, known for his fluency in the Greek ? 5 tongueg Bucharest Gymnasium, Roumania, with its representative Alexander f- 1 E Rosenstein. Then come in the U. S. Central High School of Detroit with Max- well Buchalten Qhis name tells what he does notj, and Fleischmanns High School, ij? 5? iii EL: way up state from which hails ye Sophomore Editor. E There are eighty men who belong to fraternities, and eighty-seven who are y - fraternal in their own way without being members of fraternities. . .- . Last but not least our class is distinguished by the presence in our midst of 3 5 y r - two members of what was once known as the weaker sex They are Alice Mer- 2 Q , hige and Olive Meyer ' - lllllllll Il ,zu I ' -a 'll' -,- wmlll Lili . 5:5 s , H 1 fy L E . ' 3 j - 4 ami is .., '. IllllIII"' I 1 "'lIl IIII I ' -5 H' wir l1511 ' gf!! 5 tist"--fwith apologies to Cervetisj. 5: E : : belief that dentistry is only a man's profession. : E 2 . 5 nitrous oxide as an anesthetic. 5 5 F . i i i 5 : 5 tree. That's "Schade"-even he adds a "C" to shade. :. 5 think of him as versatile! Q E V- 2 mal' V. i .H 'H 'lilllllIllllllllllllllllllllll i mi nl ll WEE-'7 I 6-V u l in I tml... 4 2 PERSONALS 5 . J BLASS The sturdy oak He was our first president 'incl also has the distinc- Q E E 5 tion of a degree after his name-Ph G E E 5 2 H BRESLAU A born ringleader--shrewd but calm Bears 'ln expression of com- Q Q E E placency and self-suH'1ciency K E E 2 B BRONSTEIN Inwardly energetic-outwardly meticulous-a conscientious fel- E Z E OW E 5 E E M BUCHALTER Jolly carefree and well dressed-good company the girls say - : E f W H CRASSON Noisy in clothes and otherwise-shows signs of reform-w 2 5 5 wonder why E ? E B J FRIED Wants to revolutionize dentistry by filling root canals with phil-i if E E osophy-go to it Bernie it may be better than gutta percha 5 A E 5 E C F GANUN Distinctive for his tallness and stateliness What more does a 5 E E dentist want? 5 E 5 E L P GREIPER Is our popular president To say he is handsome would not be 5 E : 2 sufficient to say he is brilliant would not be sufficient So we ll say nothing 2 5 5 W C JAFFE The man who wondered why he didnt get an honor-the pet of 5 E gil E the class. E 5 N 2 J. LAZARE. Red but not dangerous. "A musician, a scholar, but above all a den- : , 5 EWS it 1 ' ' -in 2 :gg ' A. E. LEICHTUNG. Coolness and reservedness characterize him. There ought to 5 5 5. Ella 5' E ' E be more like him. : . E E-. 51-:E ALICE MERHIGE. Not in Wonderland. She has decidedly destroyed the popular 5155 ...M- -..-.- OLIVE MEYER. A fair D. D. S.--the inspiration of sections A. B. C. J. NIURPHY. Popular possibly because of his name. We can't knock him, no matter how we try. H. POLLACK. The dentistical nightingale. He claims that his voice will replace 2 z J F. POPPER. We have something on you, Felix. We caught you studying physiol- 5 5 I 5 5 ogy at Coney Island--that's enough. Ei 5 G. P. SCHADE. His name makes us think of a peaceful place in the shade of a - .. - - - .. : 5 :Q S. SHANDALOU. Does not say much but makes up by thinking. Some like to g '-5 'E 5 1 lll" I,,WIT-ullllllfgilliill'Vim ---- : :l 'lynnnlnluullummlululllll llllllll 'I' i Ilgmulmumnuluuumlnnuulllullll ,gnu--..l,1-1, l:,,,1'I"l,,.-gym... , tsl ii mm .nl llur n -.-1 if ta : I 6, If I rl In 1 llllll ll Ill i 4 lllllllllllll lllllllllll - .ul Ii i 1 , vi. . : LFM3 E7 j L 'Q 9 fe ill: 2 ' ' - E E . . . 1 2 E , E , 2 . . 5 E 1 . E . E E . Z . . . , ' 9, : , I 3 . . . . Q f z E X .a 1 E I E ef 5 - ' - 5 As l a f K E N - - - f ff H M. SIEGEL. Approaching Howell as a limit. There are rumors that he will use y 1 his medal for an inlay. . "' N. R. STUZIN. Thinks that a knowledge of dioptrics is absolutely necessary for : : iff dentistry .... If he knows the root canal as he knows the eye, he'll be 'A Lg EU S 's l 5 1 " i e I5 . all right. W. A. XIQUES. Deserves this place even if only for his name. It makes us think , il of a sphynx. M ,- '79 'li ,Q- SCI! I S l 2 l ' 5 - A gill! f-uvwu'-will llI""1I"'m' w 'm"'l""'lIl -innfziif--42:22:52 ,Im--imp--, fm!l...!F"!!!!mWrr?frf5r:!!:?'l...l-fagil.. lf-all .li.111'-2-ll..Wftfiiiiii5iiiai'a5z!!"!!!!!l!Q:ff,,! H521 f h W7 wwf wi K l K QW N W QW Wy ' J W X Vllw- fw N trim f f L XESN X I W X W I pi f 5 N w 1 1 4 HI' K I N. F' I lm' 1un? un A .Il V E 'FV' 1 5, ..,-'.!xr-... I 1 :Q 11' X , . V, L-Lf:-fi f'-..-f., ?fi"'Xf:,2 19 'X1:" 'gig V 31 fr A, MT? 3111.2 iffijzii r - .3 , F BJP? 75751. 2 12 E31 QQ- 5. I LQJETQ 4. Kli 1... 1+ 40--.. x , A 1-ffQf93 B114 gfiiii ,V f, Q, I Q15 H f'fL'ff?i K, :fig EEQQ il -' EYE 11 ' ffl? ? l F' Q :1 1.,:vNQi lxuwil-Q: -+ l, r I ,I , 'TRN .1 J, 'f"ff'rv-:f ""f1f,:f:- ""f'fTIT,',f"' "" '.2TfTT'3'f'I'.2'g4-MCSR. -vrm:ff"fTi'T: fTTEE'iETI TT''1TlT"'-'7"'fI7"'f"'4"f7U"'iff? ,,j3'rj': li J fl,-fi.a -.g' i "" Wg 1 4,1 ' K., .Nil-l"f.-" ,gl I-.X y- wp, ,fl ,f1CdQC-if-xki .V 'NW 1'- ,- flPL'?,2i-11,11-,fill111fblp1'eElffi2'Mi1M31i, :iii A IAllllnggggjfiyil 5l1Vi!g.f..yN11.5,51.5.,1a.2,,q,ijfIeflwvlfIgin I .1 Q :.Iiz,'IfiQ,,Ig',,fq:s. 9- It 11 AA+A -It I ' I I I I f -A ' 1 9 .cami 1 ,,-gg-,5,,1 1 121,211.2 fam-:kb ,lj T' 233'-, -t to Q31 F' I iwlf --ve--i 'f-A-If r'-1, I ,P 1 I 1 i i ll 1, I -I ., 1 I I 1 Q . a I Il f Q1 ll '12, ,Hi , I W S!! ll. I I I 1 I -I' .lf 1 lf 11115 1 Ii W llxxi if it 1' li I is 1 1111 .KM CLASS OFFICERS 1929 5 .lg If 1 fx lil President, EDWARD HICKEY Secretary, GER'I'RunIe STIQNGEL ' Vice President, JACOB GOODMAN Treasurer, NICHOLAS Kl.EIN llll Couurillars, MANNING BAKER, SAM K. Korrcic in 33 1,1411 I Qs! 1- i I 'YY fjllgl 1:11 IW 11111. ,4 if , , N Y I I 11 1 lp PREbHMAN HISToI1Y 1111 ,ly llffli M1111 111 I I , . . , 1 1" lil 'lf ' 'l he year was ushered In auspiciously by an assemblage of one hundred and 'Nil milf fifty freshmen in the West Lecture Hall on September 16, 1925. On this occasion 1 . lily we were addressed by Several of the faculty of the College who gave us an insight L" 2-1, gi 'if.j A I I, into the problems and complications to be encountered in the first year of Dentistry. We were then informed by the Acting Dean, Dr. Vetter, that New York University ,f jf' 1111 93 I I had assumed control of the institution. fi? As the first class under the new system, we feel that we are assuming a burden and confronted with a responsibility. We realize what the traditions and ideals 'EWR of New York University are and hope that we shall live up to them. We know ig, that we must not only carry on the spirit of the University, but also pave the way 'I ' 0 for those who follow us. It is evident that we are entering upon a new era in the 0 1 I school, and in our unique position we shall be called upon to make many sacrihces. 'fi Up to the present our history has been short and our achievements none too numerous. Nevertheless, the class of 1929 hopes to be known as one of the great il, I classes of the New York University College of Dentistry. 1 9 N1 l ll Ili Ei e ee A1 N551 I1561 i 1 7 Zyl W1 V J X , l ' X.. ,L 'ima M- l- H l e My 'T' . .fu 3 2 , ., W . l .gf "'Ffl,,f Li llu mnluumnumm umm m nl ll 5 ww gn .51 ' +L' l QV l, ' 2? 'e - ffvf , 3 5 ,f ff, Many of the freshmen have had more than the required one year pre-dental fx E 3 work. In addition to this, the one hundred and fifty students were chosen from .1 3 group several times their number. One should, therefore, consider himself for- Q Y tunate in having been chosen' to such a group. There should be little doubt as to is Q3 the future of these students during college and after. F i Several days of idleness were followed by a plunge into the mysteries of med- . E 5 icine and dentistry. Lecture followed lecture, and quiz followed quiz, and, in a il " - short time, social connections became somethingof the dim past. During a slight 5 5 Qi interruption in the routine, we elected the omcers of the class. Edward Hickey was Z 5 chosen to lead the class as president. Jack Goodman was elected vice-president. i 3 Nick Klein was chosen treasurer. Gertrude F. Stengel was voted the secretaryship. : Y i l. Sam W. Kotick and F. M. Baker were chosen as counsellors. ggl 1 f 'lli We are looking forward to the time when we may say that we are graduates jj' W' fl of the New York University College of Dentistry. gfml q ll Tir it i flli gllf 1 ' f if vim 'i Q lg, Ir E, 1- l it Y, 'lui ' 7 U--V F li ll l , W: 3 ll ' :ell N F' Q3 si, Y gi W ' THE LIBRARY f f ww fl l "1' l fri' ' 'tA"t 'fNl'lVU'911if - it ' 1 ' vl"'w"'ll ""' "wl - -- lllll dm R li ie cdlwmm -T li. Ill M1 H926 rl".-u'zll"l' wi, 'vfllbi Fbl , ' 'lllml' - l .. ".liin. mu..- ll ll ...nr .nll."l.. . f f! Ili' fb 11571 1"llH " Iybll II I " K I4 jill I' I . - Illlulumuuunuunu mlm ll Il N-,y I I nur In K 5:51 3 PERSONALS Q 2 2 ?X'E :J"E ACKERMAN A living proof that men are but children of larger growth APTER There goes Charlie Apter with his bright ties and merry laughter BAKER. Manny is still in a daze over his admittance ABRAMSON He alone is his only equal ' BERGER The best swimmer of the anatomy class BLUTTER The strong advocate of black coffee and cigarettes ,E l: it All f I 5-III? E - :.' E i E E-'AE E:-'E E E 5 E III : I E IEW lllnm-..... i f-E E i 5 27 F...-.--a " ' . CUSHING He ll make an ideal husband--doesn t swear smoke or drink FALK Introducing the errand boy of Page and Shaw GEMsoN For the wearing apparel oft proclaims the man GOLDSTEIN The race goes to the swift Glzoss Not the author of Gross Anatomy GROPER He always gropes for instruments . HICKEY Who is the handsomest man in the class and why am I? asks Eddie JARMULNICK Battling butler Paul cherishes secret hopes of becoming a boxer KLEIN N Our treasury is in the hands of d-klein KLITSBERG. He can quote Morris by his first name. Ko'rIcK. The sleeping histological beauty. MERTURSKY. "Static"-much noise and also much smoke. MQRELLENBAUM. Our budding young poet. VOGEL. A new song, by Bill, "That Red-Headed Gal o' Mine". VOGELSON. Our cute little one-toothed baby. WEISS, M. "Our sheik is Milt Weiss-can it be other-weiss 'F' WOLL Bkos. Fred knows he's not Will by looking at his tie. STENGEL, G. What's the reason for her popularity? WING. Rather fortunate, that he alone has confidence in himself. RAPPORPORT. Our Greenwich Village guide. ' MCREDMOND. The snappy Chevrolet salesman. GOODMAN. Jack's only other mistake besides trying to become a dentist was to buy a Chevrolet. V ASSEL. Raymond came all the way from France to study dentistry and our pro- hibition laws. Ro'r1-IENBERG. The one who had the nerve to get married before an exam. RINI. As useless as a tire pump in a Hooded gondola. LEVY, H. True knowledge runs like a river-the deeper it is the less noise it Illllllll IIIII lmnymj IIII MIIIII Sf, E 3-A2 :T E. E 5 1-i 2 5. 2 E A u nmuu umnni I n 1 n I ' ' Q , - gg ' ' . Q' . 'I Ulm II I' I I IIIII II II II makes. LEVY, M. The advocate of two hours' sleep per night. if GRIFFEN. He came from No'th C'lina tuh imbibe knowledge. Em? LAFLIN. Always singin' and laughin'. 'Lg Rmsxm. The taxi-driver with the radio whisper. 5.35 GREENBERG. Cigarette grubber and jitney-driver par excellence. I CAPLIN. A man in the making-he's raising a mustache. ii -f al . E A QU, EIIIS .La . . We- ull' " H' 'lun ' III .. .'w:iI1IbCW'ig'I II If f . If "WI L. H920 I 1581 IIII Illll .jigs II MCH, ll ll Ill 'Www 'nn 1 lllll' l"lI Illlh ll 1 - ': 3. S H ' 2 THE AMERICAN DENTAL ASSOCIATION 3 , ? SHEPPARDW Fosren MD President L-- E One of the great difiiculties confronting the new graduate in dentistry IS to : - E find his bearings i E - A student often without experience enters college and pursues his course of I 3 :- instruction to the day of graduation then suddenly awakens to find that he is face : : E E to face with an unsympathetic world E - j ' He has been clothed with certain authority and commissioned to take his place - Z in the ranks of men and to assume responsibilities of service and citizenship He 5 - is ambitious to succeed It is important that this first move should be made with - ' mature and careful deliberation success or failure often depending on this initial y - f., . start He must realize that he is obligated through his profession to give his best - service to mankind The first problem he has is in finding a suitable location one 1 in which he can best fulfill the obligations of his profession a ,f :' l One of the vital questions confronting him is financial remuneration His V - g g resources usually have been exhausted by the completion of his college course E A W N This is a crucial time in his professional life To recoup his finances quickly he E i g i g is often tempted to accept some apparently flattering offer to engage in a practice ' Yin 2 4, 5 which does not regard ethics of the profession and thus places a cloud over his i X5 E future from which he can emerge only with great difficulty. He should not forget E E that when a complete and satisfactory service to the public has been fulfilled, as a if l s natural sequence the question of financial remuneration will have been solved. E We have been told that "The laborer is worthy of his hire", and again, "He A ' fl ?.E profits most who serves best". 515 "1 . . . . 5-.. F 1 The question naturally arlses, since success depends upon service, How can if t ' he best serve? First in importance is citizenship. No dentist can best succeed who confines W l I i 5 l ll his efforts to the four walls of his office. The position which he occupies in his X q community accords to him leadership. He should manifest an initiative and co- 2 L q operative interest in all advance movements of civic or humanitarian nature. 5 5 I E It has been said that every good thought, word or deed, is reflex in its action E E :-use . . . . E--E Li? and thus enriches the life of the giver. It follows naturally that the more extensive E.-E : a s 2 : f "f one's interests in his fellow-man, the more deeply the world is concerned about his : : :g i affairs. "All who joy would win must share it. Happiness was born a twin." 515 Since dentistry is his chosen life work, his supreme effort should be in that field S E my I,,IIrj'lIlllllfgl":m':',"l""'L'l IIll"'l"""lllUm""""""""'llllllll 'I' I Ulmnnnummunlllnulmlnlllllllllll "" 'UT' Ililll1IlllllI"'nml y ,T-ffm , Ally f N mini C Y Blglefifa . .lf. ..n .. ..Ilu.... ,. IlllllllllIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll I. X257 .1 lllllllllIIlllllllllllllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII' .Q . .... ull.. . I-.. ..u. . 5- 'QNX' a 1?,1A Fi . Q .-e L gd El " 2 I s 2 , E E E ' E E -I E . . 9 s E 5 5 Z - 1 E 5 E Z : ' E : a , , ' ' ' s E . 5 E s i e , ' ' l : 3 ll . fl Z 5 E I : E rig . ' A 1 E : W : E , Z i 5 - E Zi ? 5 x . E XE l , r Q s E 0 5 e XS : K ' l X : fl of activity. To obtain greatest success requires greatest efliciency. Greatest i efficiency can be obtained only by constant study and applicationg also by contact with all organized activities interested in the advancement of dentistry. E65 The young graduate should avail himself of the first opportunity to become 'E identified with local and State dental societies. They are component parts of the American Dental Association, which has a membership at this time of approxi- V i f mately 35,000, and this Association represents organized dentistry in America. In le proportion to available membership it is the largest group of organized professional 5 V E " 3 45 el! ellis ,. ......,.......,.. , ,e ..... - ..,....,. . ,s e. e I'ql:IlrlllllllIIuITf5:i:,-wl',' 43HIIUI 'lluullnluf vlhlullllllll WHIIWHV, .Ar "jp lllll!Qll1l'?Fr ma in-I-llllll I, 11", V H eq Wu- I lllxllllnhiff' 4.x-ffqmmllllll ,... gl .... kf"Q'....... rznleevmgl .fall..'ll...'f'Ell:... nh.. I .:li .,'l'---"f,.....- ,..fI! "'...l'l-'fflltii lwlieiitl H591 1-if wfulzv'if'-fiff"-WM Qffl'-W1 x - 'VM -EV -1."'1' ff??!-7,1 EE 5,2 EXE E All? 5 f ll 5A?E Q--.-E ll lllllIllllllIllIllIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllll lx-E37 l llmnnnmmmnuumumuunlli l men in the world Its sole purpose has been to advance dentistry as a profession and '1 science It contributes to all advance movements in dentistry EDUCATION Through its Council on Education and Financial Support the advancement in dental education to the present standard of efliciency has been made possible LEGISLATION The power and influence of the membership of the American Dental Association has been sufficient to force important national legislation from time to time which has been of great value both to the profession and to the public A striking example was the ability during the world war to so direct the attention of our National Government to the value of dentistry as an important independent branch of medicine that a law was passed conferring upon dentists serving in the Army the same rank and dignity as that enjoyed by the medical' profession which gave to dentistry an opportunity to greatly increase its efficiency in health service RESEARCH Probably one of the greatest contributions made to modern dentistry from the standpoint of health conservation has been through the Scien- tific and Research Commission of the American Dental Association It is through results obtained during recent years by dental research workers that not only the medical profession, but the world has been made to recognize that the dental organs, together with their adjacent structures, have an important bearing on dis- ease throughout the general organism. DENTAL HEALTH AND EDUCATION. The Council on Mouth Hygiene and Public Instruction of the American Dental Association is doing a wonderful work in educating the public, and presents through the American Dental Journal approx- imately fourteen pages each month, giving a review of their activities. This is of value to every dentist. RELIEF. The American Dental Association has in its treasury a fund of S165,000.00 at this time, which is set aside for the relief of those of its members who may become disabled and dependent. No more noble work can be conceived. DENTAL JOURNAL. Without doubt, from the standpoint of dental literature and education, the Journal of the American Dental Association is more far reach- ing than any publication of current dental literature. Every member of the Amer- ican Dental Association receives the Journal, which is of inestimable value to him as a reference book. It contains the latest observations in science and research as well as the most'up-to-date technical procedure. E r E E x g E l AX E tl ?4E sis l I : Q 5 3 r : : 1 E i - "J - . . . . . . . . :ie Q-111'-5 The foregoing is a brief outline of some of the important activities of the E E I : - 5 : 1 n 1 u n n I 'i -: E American Dental Association which justly entitle it to recognition as an asset, not 5 'pulp'slllIlIipnrl 'llmunumnmmummm: lllllllwl' lmllllInuuuumnnn mumumulllllipa-t-ulvmlllluxi,llllllr.r::nm'. 1 I I 1 m I I UI 'Ill 'l' ,1 I Mft r E f ,xv 'Q 1 rl Ilu. . n o Il I . .ull h I QA.-ta.: Digi. 3 tying. ' '-Tv-' 'WT' Q7 .1 2- fa EX . 4 ' - ,- 5- IE . . ' . 5 E 5 E ' ' , ' E 2 -- W 2 5 E ff E E 2 E .- , 2 : E E' E : -I I ' E S Y - E : E E : I E a E ' ' E' . Q : C 1 g . 3 E f ' ' - 5 I Q 5 . 5 2 2 f 5 l 2 ' ' -2 ' E 5 iii S . : ,XE 1 w : x 9 .....: only to dentistry, but to America. Ja. , , , , 1355 If the young practitioner of dentistry would hope to render the hlghest degree of eHicient service, not only to his profession, but to his fellow man, he should . I . . . . . . . . ang if-E not fail to grasp the first opportunity, after establishing his ofiice, to join his local - 5'a I E . . . . . E society, through which organization he may become a contributor to, and a mem- ami Eli ber of the American Dental Association, with all of its prestige and privileges. ' a in 1 E fi 5 5 Eli. - 1 ff EWS ' r-3 :'4 ' Em? 'M -A Il nu H, u 1 45 1 1. yuinlq, 3 . 1 um I"' "" "" ""' ' " lf1s5l!!!F!!F"!EEs1'Ei5Fffii:fH5"F!!!!ll-ff.'H'r.EIL a H J.. .."1'-?f-illlll'l'21S?f1'ii!fWfTii'aElfH51!!"lllllllEf'li.l H601 l i i . s T lL!fQ,u":r in ti ,VX fl, It r Qxifj, l -il f. ilk' g l l ll , l l y ll ii' irp rff W5 l RV il if " ,z lfgtl iff' ii 1 ! Wal will is 'ff' 1 lr ii r 1 'll ix ri 1, W' I' yy ri iylfl 1,-f . If 1 .f. 'L'Q'. .1 W, L. f Ml fl ---- .1 im Mil ill Lili 1 'lli gill' Will l Til l,1,.,'. All l i' iw' 1 fr fi ii, f i '.'i'ffN'-.. 'H ' , ,, ' WU-. . ll? THE STUDENT COUNCIL It would indeed be unjust and pretending too much to attempt at this time to write a 'Khistoryl' of the Student Council. The wherefore of this is made very evident by a few explanatory words. It is only a very short time back that the idea for a Student Council at all was evolved, and the membership of that first body was constituted of the otlicers of the various classes with Dr. Thomas Darlington as the Faculty Advisor. The results of their meetings were rather inconsequential, for they seemed to travel an indefinite path, with no distinct aim in mind. The general student seemed totally unaware of the existence of a Student Council, what with hearing nothing at all concerning it, and never feeling the effects of its efforts. But a new day for the council dawned with the election of Theodore Reich- man as President of the Senior Class. "Teddy,' seemed to feel the lack of an active student body and the need of one that could accomplish things in the right direc- tion. VVith high thoughts in mind, he got the consent of Dr. Vetter, our then acting Dean, to organize an entirely new Student Council. His clarion call brought together the presidents and councilmen of the four classes, and the process of organization began. It proceeded slowly, with short strides, but very surely, and it was hastened onward by the determination to make the Students Council into what its name implies, a representative student body, and to make it functionate properly. The iirst few meetings were satisfactory in so far as they showed the desire of the Council to accomplish things, and the taking of the necessary steps in that direction. ---f -"- V---f --'-' W- 7-A--,--W'--f "---' 1 f-y-mv-.:',:- .- . rc T,"1"'T'Ti'i'lliil:" -f 3--we -N ,V -' ,V - -fflfglf .' , 7 -ifllljife wi "yi '. Wi. ,ll,1Nj,j' r,il.i,..e X. ,Mil f V. 1 "' 1 l iw- . fl ,' J "'.':-f Nw ,rw , wwf, A f - ici li 'lllipl cf l i , t' -- , 1 H' 1" .--. f.. . N, W, , NYU! fin! , lf ,WV ,-qwy-.,y-.4 x , ,Lui X '.-, rg- I, . N .1 .i - y it A 1, ., ,Q X15 , ' e cg 4, I, -I ,ai-.,c, . , ,E512.2-131.115,zligfcl.if-..1iLQ.ii4fL.LiB.s1nSQ1i.'.'.1filll..'5fT?f,-14..iH1rf.411. toil: atlfflliy i' o ,1..j,,.7,g,g-f.71 I l Ai H n "4 l Q I M W . i Holt l, ,gi .., WW Nfl, X I ' 5. rl 'rr .J if ll i li llll ll l ,tl lf' , ,V , 1 lil fvili' 'fjx fl. H f.4,l ,1, ' ifrl, rl Q, , jk :y .X .Qld Mix ' Jfgjvl ,M xv, ' . JN ,Yr J ,,, .Nl ,-,wil A di X. Il 1, fi ll ly lliixx , i . l l ll' ii 1 ii ly yi I Q .a V nr lull r,,,. LL' M.. .i i . Ol W, ig! Wir il,,l '..'l l 2 all lc I 1 W, .H ,N ,gli ig? lrlillf ' , ,..,, r i llflll 1 ia 'li l l ljf " CONTACT POINTS " vw I 9-QW A3 l X T L9 Lfur X."F',Y"'."'X'J'! f-'N' ' 'rf-T nr "N1:"xX' ---' qw-QV M , .. A 5:1 ' K . , 1 . xl X H' "W T inf. H621 w' 1' ' A Hcscav- I in -f fm: III Qfwmx QE wrongs ln- ... I 1 I .x: . . 2 But with the change in school administration the alfiliation with New York Q T : University came on impetus to the Student Council so great as to make certain gf 52'-.5 its success Very soon after Dr Jackson took over the active direction of the ?-5 E15 I g school he addressed the council and mentioned how satisfied he was to be able to E ' E have such a body to work with He set forth to the council points where he would E : E like to see it accomplish matters which directly concern the student mentioning E I E E at the same time that if the Council could accomplish those things a great pow- ' Z : E erful future lay before it j - f E In order to bring the student closer to the workings of the Student Council E L E I it was made a regular policy to post the reports of its activities and to extend an fi' 5 - open invitation to all the students to attend its meetings - - 5 In retrospect we may hope that the bestowal of the greater and more compre- , , : . E hensive powers can only serve to make the Student Council a truly representative .. . 5 5 and governing body g 5 , -E Louis PIERRE GREIPER Secretary 5 F 5 THE VIOLET DANCE i , 5 S gl, E At the McAlpin Hotel on the eve of December ll, the first Violet Dance MS, 5 X 5 : n 5 l if-'lg was held. May the gods grant that all ensuing annual school proms have the Q ,yt 5 f 5 same degree of good fellowship and joyous fleeting hours under the jurisdiction of ' N 5 2 :Is asf 5 lg Dr. Terpsichore as the last. 5 : : iikfl ge 5 Topics such as Osteology, Physiology, and Orthodontia, and discourses on 5 - .-2 . . . . E E'-,LE fatty infiltration and the procedure of proper curettmg were taboo. It is rumored 5-A-E that an indiscreet remark from one Marcy Frey to one Ben Libson, concerning -z --E g-5 I i r 1 the return of an article that sounded much like "tickle-ator" caused a brawl . i whereby Ben Laub's eye suffered discoloration. A fine galaxy of professional students were the Dentics. And lest we forget- wr g , did not our Dean and Faculty look exceedingly well in evening clothes? One E I s 3 gentleman who tinkers with morbid appearing slides, "shuffles a mean pair of N 1 5 E dogs". Demonstrators received the best cigars Qfor five centsj that money derived 5 gig from cashed-in gold could buy. 3-if "Sid" Teitelbaum, "Abe" Stoff and "Al" Krasny masqueraded-a la Hart, 5 72-f Shaifner and Marx. Jack 'Mandel and Les Rothstein appeared muchly like two i?-4 icemen and picked on one another. The Jamaica Sheik, Ben Rosenfeld, rolled his ' '5 t n In -ul Fun 1 up -I .llmnumumnlmunlllllllllnlllllll ll Ulmummmmmmnnnmmummu ln up 1 lm jump- ul , .WT ll u' I .I --. uh Ili ,ui qu W rr J .n up an :iq .idmIil...1iiih ,.Ihi...iumin ggiilllllllllllllIIIIIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllll lk XZEEP' .nl lllllllllllllllllllIIllllllllllllllllllllllt iii' I' lm qiilli..ilIV'iia. gif. . . .f,,tf'f' ' 'rob' Eifyff- ' S 4 ' ' ' L E. - : ' 2 l- ,4., D j I . . 5 E . : i S S S 5 . ' 5 : E 9 1 1 E : E ' : Z 2 ' E E . 5 ' 2 , : ' : . 5 g Q ' A E a X 2 , l I S -n E E 3 x , Q - N4 EA E l XX :fl , yy b g B s 2' d b 5 :X -WE S 5 5 : L5-..: Don Juan'orbs and a score of maidens were won over, although "Nat" Gold's , E ". marcel gave much competition. "Moe" Wasserman's wiles were too much for Sam .' ' Uberall's escort who was taken over completely. The three Mac's fMacBrien, MacGregor and MacMillanj accompanied by Elmer Cleveland, rendered their E5 famous quartet song while Vocio conducted. All's well that ends well. So with our first Violet Dance. Although it was ,ug gs, Hf in : 3 g . E f la E - - a plain affair, good contact was present, and as the evening waxed on, one Senior -- - remarked to an enthralled Freshman, "At what time does the aifair occlude ?" 2 5 To which sage remark the yearling articulated, "I'1l bite, Docg but why broach the 3 ' subject? Some nerve!" E S ,li , "runnin: 2552:-2:1"'lgfll """ I I"' IIl"' ' ' "'l' "" I 'my unuuv usd!!!!!!1F"::::afEfartira:::ff"'!!!!!l?.ff.'fi,'2Ii.. li'.E-ff:Iillitl"r'1::a1:finri1EM::sH'F1!!!!!E:ffT,P 11631 ' g un" 't -pf. - - " -3 n Ill: gp- " ., in ,.' .. . .. ' 1,4llllllllllllIlllllllllllll llllllllllllllllllll I 'lllllllllIllllllIlllllllllllllllllllllllll if A . .. ' E .:' fxl' IIIIPT W 5 E , .- 'f 512 sa IE F l ? li A S E F E ' gi I l. , Q Z X , I 4 TUX IOR PROM When in the course of human events it becomes necessary for 'L class to dissolve the serious bands which have connected it with 'mother and to assume among the similar powers of the earth the separate and unusual station to which the laws of nature entitle it 't decent respect to the opinions of its classmates " quires that it should explain its actions. lN'1ture ordains that individuals should react in accordance to their environ- ment Can any one therefore criticize the actions of. those who were present 'lt the Junior Prom held 'it Chalif s feb. 5 1926? The ball room was beautiful. Smiles and ltughter competed with the music A friendly spirit permeated the gathering Seldom if ever was there such 'in assemblage. btudents mingled with instructors ' instructors chatted on equal terms with our Dean. lor once there seemed to be no constraint everyone was natural. Here and there our president Herman Frankel watched to see that every- thing went on smoothly. A great deal of effort must have been spent to make everything so unusually correct The dance music was very pleasing but for pur- poses of contrast '1 classical selection was play ed by '1 famous pianist. This was appreciated by all. This was another bit in the mountain of evidence to show the spirit of the class of 1927 The class is determined to establish a record in the school which will never be eclipsed Socially and academically, it has shown its calibre A class is known by its spirit and its successes, and the Class of l927 is willing to rest ' a , 4 . ... 'A-M1 X on the showing made in its Junior Prom. , K V, -Ii' 1:15. ALUMNI ROOM 5 ff - 45 1 .. I nfl 5 ?E :'-'E E E 1 , M 5 'will .fllilllll Illll"' -1 .. - - 2 .3 : '." UIIIIW' .......,w-. n.,,,,,,,,,,,,.., ,,,,,,.,,, I, nb - t 2 a? 'sail ILIIII NDI ll 'llllllll Illllglllll llllmllllllllll Umnlmillllll llll III Ill lllllxll lllllllll 'C .r"""P-. .ixfxigi x Q , A ll!!-mb. ttf s. , I .1,4V 2114152 ZViw H. mum umm ummurmm m num umnmuu u nmnu ll muumunu uaillllulni 'iq A .- :D A ai S Z., 5 as L. . 'L -5 . A i , 75 A 'Q - , u - F , F A , Q ... 5 Q I . Q. ' - . 7? Ti - E 5 ' 1 a F " E 5- - - ' Q'--2-, E ' , Q fe ' ai! ' "' ""'1"', H"T4""'l' "'l'l'I"'L'L1llLlIlM!'.'lIl1IIllllllIIl IIIII I llllllllll llllllll IIIIIIIUQIIII I ' 'Tv' 'TWYQ 5 ' x xiii? ii: -1 Wi , 5 I4 ff' 7 Y Q, ,Y I ,: ,N n nu mmm. mmmumsmnullnnmfnrmnrmmml.. mm mmumnmn nmmmmmmmm nn Hlll -- gli sms "I ll Illll """ ""' I 'fll """ l""'ll"' V ' ""l""'l ' "Ili lllllllll I' ' 'ifi5l!l!!!!F"!!r! ff-f Fiifmefl'Ffflll-ffa'rf'c.'IIl.. H9 6 A lI'.e'f1'-21f?Pl!!!EV H641 result. HV '7 "bf -lIl"' ' " 'HCYHIJ ' ., mi. .. i...m 'I L' llmnm llllllllll i Illllllllll 1 llllllllul Il I XE? . ll lllllrllllllllllllllllnlllnlnnnnuunun ul .... .. .ln . .ki XX' J E 512 iz EE 'fi ll L-.-.21 VARSITY BASKETBALL During the year of 1924-25, the various classes organized separate basketball teams which played against each other and several outside fives. With these teams as a nucleus, a Varsity team, the first in the history of the college, was organized in the fall of the past year. The team has met with considerable success, far beyond expectation, having won all its games to date and making so excellent a showing as to leave no doubt as to the perpetuation of Varsity basketball. Due credit must be given to the basketball squad who, having obtained the use of the Goddard Gymnasium of the Florence Baker Settlement House, spent two nights weekly in practice to get into that splendid form it displayed in the games that followed. The first game of the season was with the Goddard House Team, a group of considerable experience. The team spent the hrst part of the game in getting its bearings, the half ending in a tie, 18-18. However, the second half was another story, our superior passwork began to tell, with a hnal score of 48-29 as the Q iii gs , W X li i J T 'I r 'inf gli 2 2 Ei I I ll 5.5 fl? ' -E ... .two 1ll 5 5 5 2 rr JIHII I -1f"iiiii'f-'-YI?"7" fir' r rl ln.. . s I u - -ull 1-. .n al - - E E E E 5 - T .,. l - E XE lf Ex , X, 5 The next game was against the alumni team of Cliffside High School in New Jersey. Here, outweighed considerably and playing on a foreign court, the Var- . . ..' L3 luv un ,.. . FY '4 E1 U! 'H 9-7 '4 fb D- 23 .- .- 5. w m 'U na ro D- 3-3 D O- FY ro 5 E O -1 F' r'Y O E ,.. . 5' U' 'Q' F? -'T' na ui rt O -1 ru O Ha IQ ? IQ to IL EK!!! The third and best game of the season was played Friday, Jan. 22, against 5:2 ' the Cornell Medical five. This was a fast, -well-contested game, with the lead con- Em , stantly changing hands and the result in doubt until the last seconds of play. The Q ,ss fa 3 i 5 1 ... tensity of the game and the quality of play kept the several hundred spectators K roaring in appreciation. The team played as a unit and all deserve commendation. A r Particularly, it was the accurate shooting of "Chubby" Meister and the close - its 1532 HIE LE 0 : A S, f, Q P 3 l an :null -2 I as gn ull - , I lu ngawl lgmu up JE el ........, ,,, ..,... ,, 'e' ''trialF"'P"!WPfiWtlL?Ta!frf2f:':f!5"F!!l'l-at.it I1651 ii ,,,,, ,, ,........ . n FIU! "" lybll 1 ' V ll K I IM .. . .. ' L' lll111111l11111111111111111 1111111111 nl I 'LE-5? I 11111111111111111 ll nl if ' .. ' 'Iii guarding displayed by our diminutive but scrappy Berger that kept us just ahead Z of Cornell But to Solomon belongs the honor of breaking the tie In the last few seconds of play to bring the score 26 24 A dance followed the game I The score N Y. U D CORNELL Msn Goals Foul: Total - Total- Fouls Goal: E Berger lllllllll ll I I Illll UI FO n 1-I Gunshor g Solomon " 5 Borkow lllll Angello Hitzig Rosenthal Harrington Harvey 1111 lll llll 5 E E VE E XE Mintzer Reich The fourth game was played against the Jacob H Schiff Center Team at their home court Here we kept our slate clean by adding another victory The game was rather slow and poorly played the Varsity being far below its best form. Jack Schtierman, at center, made his first appearance in this game, and performed well, being high scorer for the Varsity. AE Berger G 51.5 E ' E The game ended 24-20: 5 ll - - A - : XE 55 gig Meister F F' 5 Solomon F Schtierman Borkow G N. Y. U. D. Sci-mfr CENTER C Goal.: Foul: Total - Total-Foul.1 Goals 1 1 3 2 1 5 2 2 6 2 0 4 2 ' 0 4 Koch F Schason F James C Lustberg G Gelbin C l E 2 5 Mintzer 1 0 2 , 1 Simstein 0 0 0 i'E EE As for next year, the outlook is extremely bright. The team that made so good a record in its first season is losing only two men by graduation-Capt. : : "Chubby" Meister and "Henny" Reich. To make up for the loss, much good r..-, ..-11 5-:.,.'-E 53'-Q a s ... : E E material will be available from thepresent Freshman team. Arthur Berger, '28, 52627 . 3 EZ 'eps SAE E E 35 X3 35 :E :I : .. - .. - 2 2 Sm: - .. ,L 2 E V ',,,.I:"'II r1111ll1:-:Ip v--- : ll. ,1111111111111111111111111111m11uI1111IIIll 'I' - In11111111111111111111111111111111111u1111II II 15 '--'- 11:11l11111lIlII11--LN.. su mn lnlh.,:J'illll'L',1I1IlI,LU11 I 0 . f if 1 1l 11. . I III I Il 1 1 llllllllll I ll lllll I I .11 1 1 'c 1 'mtl 5 LE' 3,214- 5? 4 ' ' ' 3 lg gl. - , ' fi ls :-- - . :fl-'-Z : 2 , 5 2 5 1 i Z 2 : E 2 . . . . E : E 2 1 5 o o o E 2 5 2 12 o o o 5 :I 2 2 4 ll 1 5 E E I 1 1 3 6 o 3 , E Q A ' 1 2 7 1 3 gi A - I E o o o E I 5 -' 0 0 0 2- E E X 5 E f 5 3 ' , E 5 E l :J ' ' - Z Ill! ss 4 1 E ' K E E 1 - 1 t D , 1 ' I s e has been elected captain for next year, and if our confidence is justified, he will lead the team to an excellent record. The schedule of games that is being an- ranged is an ambitious one, and will assure all that is to be desired in the way of opposition. mi Varsity Basketball is here to stay, and it should go far toward awakening ' E the college spirit that has been lying dormant. 2 ' Louis A Bisnxowrrz Manager lllllllll 1 as I I nl fra 1111 I lllllllll 5 - Q' . 1-. 'ff' els' E' : 5 T st a-' ill' :LE SE K 1 . , . gg I 2.2 il? I -Illl "1P35ff"' Q W1 izxill..-"l...'f'211:... ---'- ,. il 1. I 111 .1 ' --" ,.lIf "'...lu'..llkEE ci 11661 1 'E 5 0 sg? we 3 Q 5 3 n 7 X 5 xv 6 N7 f l' , I .4 Sl gil' 5 all . Qi .E .2 l .1-'-: -1-1' 111 ,. ..,. v . ini 2 llll I 7 l IIII la. lv '. ... ' IlllllllllllllllIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll lv? llnnumuuumnmumnnll I ' ...u . . .. .. V ,I Coach and Conductor, S. SINGER, Sc.B. Manager, D. HALLOCK, '26 Pianist, M. MELTZER, '28 Assistant Manager, N. GOLD, '27 Librarian, I. SIEGEL, '26 Ist Tenors Ist Basses H. McBrien, '26 G. Heghinian, '26 A. Siegler, '26 I. Vogel, '26 I. Fern, '26 N. Gold, '27 F. Luongo, '27 27ld Tenors E. Rappaport, '26 H. MacGregor, '26 Rfxbinowitz -6 Kirsch -6 Horney 26 Ch Ross 27 D. Hallock, '26 I. Siegel, '26 J. Covner, '26 M. Frey, '26 M. Pentel, '27 2nd Basses E. Cleveland, '26 D. MacMillan, '26 B. Goldberger, '26 S. Kadner, '27 5 gm" - "' A 'flf' Q , .ll bye ill I E 'lg A I f .E QF-1 Eli S6 wnmq v I 4 gg , I1 In as ll 4 I umu- lf Illlllllllmln P "I"ll r IH'lrf"'-11354 In ullllllIIlG I I .N A L: ' lil x I ' ' fx' 1? """"-nur' HIFI' ' 4 .."'lllIu . 'llln -.' ""' .. '- - ll ""' fall!!- ,i lllf "'..s "" "Full -:nn-""""" +I ' lybl Cfl ' llll ' il IIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIII I ll I ll Q57 ll .Q .l.. .. X: GLEE CLUB l'he Glee Club of New York University College of Dentistry probably had , . IQ ill. - , ,IE E-E its inception in the lecture hall quartette Duncan MacMillan started the ball 3 5 E 5 rolling by applying for and receiving the permission of Dean Jackson to organize g : 13 ng Vlr Singer of the Department of Anatomy 'ind former conductor of the New E E 5 E York University Glee Club volunteered to coach and conduct the club At the 5 E 5 E first meeting MacMillan was elected manager E E : - The first few rehearsals were attended by great inconvenience There were : 5 E 5 very few copies ofieach selection and funds were not available Dr Jackson -: - E :. attending one of our rehearsals saw our lack of musical scores and very generously i 5 - offered to supply the necessary funds personally At about this time the melodious 5 E strains of John Peel had found their way into the corridors of the school and : E 5 g as a result new applications for membership were made at each rehearsal Also g g Q 5 'it this time our manager found that he could not give sufficient time to the busi- E E ness of the organization and resigned Daniel Hallock was elected manager in Q E 5 .1 his place with Nathan Gold as his assistant The Glee Club has by this time 5 E - E mastered about fifteen selections The quartette has a repertoire consisting of - E E -E My Little Gypsy Sweetheart Way Down Yonder in the Cornfield , Lucky E 5 E . 5 Jim", "Sleep Kentucky Babe", and several others. : -s spy: E - 5 ANNE - - f I- r ig 'X E concerts. The first to be rendered before our faculty at the general faculty meet- E R 5 I IC 5 i - ing. Following this, we will sing at the chapel exercises at University Heights. : - 5 E I E In the few short weeks left to us to be together, we have arranged a series of Elm E l K S - 5 Finally, we have arranged to broadcast a program from a prominent local station. - 2 E :' 5.5 11:2 Mr. Singer, our coach, is to be sincerely thanked and congratulated for the El-E splendid results he has produced from raw, untrained material within the short space of a few months. He has worked and untiringly to make an organization of which our school can well be proud. To him all honor and the thanks of the club are due. To Dr. Jackson goes the gratitude of the club for tiding us over a very K trying period of our existence. And to the classes which will carry on this organ- I I , - 5 -.-E 5 5 E E E' E - ll E P ' I i ization go our best wishes for success in maintaining the good work. Elf lg :IE as .E zz'- ll - TENNIS TEAM e - F Q? 53 5 i Slowly and deliberately, at the expense of ceaseless criticisms, suggestions, and varied efforts view in a constructive light, the groundwork has been laid for E E the advance into prominence of varsity tennis as a scholarly activity-a sport E E F E' ' :' mn.:-IlHl,nII1! Ilxnvqnv--3:5 IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIlIInImmllIIlllllu IllIIlIllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIluIuIInIlIImIImlII V112----II:ml'IIIIV IIIIIIIIJIIIHHN 1 eff, QW IIIIr.,WM.E rA,?p' I I ilu 4 l I llllll I Ill L I I llllllllllllllllllllllIllllllllllll u III I I :11,Q.'x , 'Ami E AA. 5? ' 4 'Ca gl IE ' 5-L: a 1 ' ll !!. t C 1 E Q Z 5 1 - .- ' Z 3 ' ' , . E - E . E ' E is KC 37 I , 9 E E Xll' s ' - ' '1 : :' , , E 2 , N' , 5 l E x g . . , 2 E 4 lx , E rfb I N if SY, GC 7, GC g S I , N which is so little fraught with danger and so high in concentration of exercise as I U to be available to all professional men. Faculty coaching has been uncovered in gs 4 M2 1 ics the person of Dr. Sorrin of the Periodontia Clinic, who is a net artist of renown. S i The nucleus of the team is distributed through the various classes, D. Decker, seniorg Ben Laub, junior, and Rosenblatt and O'Connell, freshman, being men of previous competitive experience Matches have been scheduled with Washing- : U: JE EG E'5 1 ton Square College Columbia Dental College of New York and Columbia Uni- . versity respectively They re off to an auspicious start-the future looks bright : . ' for the racquet-wielders Heres Luck! . 1-P M3 2 Hn' 2 N 5 : ben :': illi I ali . y f 1 . I E - ' 24- 2.2 gig "'lIlllIIllIl x5s5f'1':"'iI'fII """ I IIII lll"' I I "Ill IIII I "II-g IIIIIIIIIII' "' 'lgMllll"!!!!51iRf5iai:!I5"Ffflllff-'f"..ll H ill.1Ii'-22-fllll"5't1iEiFFiIi 5!!"llfflllE1'I.,? REQ fl68I ff ff? x xx KJMQ rv XX f,l, g 3 '7'i - N x ! V JfNg R 4'V" .wk xg A I if 1,W'gXx A, I X w T f ' RN ff' f , fnrnifruiiigg H691 3 ' 'QENVMM 015 'l'm 7j. 'E AQ , ,gf :Ili lllll lllllll gan? sf 2 sl? E 25 12 512 5 - 2 gi Ng? BSI Gmega Founded in 1892 Beta Chapter chartered in 1892 ' fiwg' PSI OMEGA CHAPTERS BETA, New York College of Dentistry DELTA, Tufts Dental College, Boston, Mass. - EPSILON, Western Reserve University, Cleve- land, O. ZETIA, University of Pennsylvania, Philadel- p ia ETA, Philadelphia Dental College IOTA, Northwestern University, Chicago KAPPA, Chicago College of Dental Surgery MU, University of Denver, Denver, Colo. NU, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pa. Xi, Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wis. MU DELTA, Harvard University Dental School OMxcnoN, Louisville College of Dental Surgery . BETA SIGMA, College of Physicians and Sur- geons, Dent. Dept., San Francisco BETA DELTA, University of California, San Francisco BETA EPs1LoN, Tulane University, New Orleans, La. Blair ZETA, St. Louis'University, St. Louis, 0- . BETA THETA, Georgetown University, Wash- ington, D. C. GAMMA KAPPA, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor . GAMMA LAMBDA, Columbia School of Den- tal and Oral Surgery of New York. GAMMA Mu, University of Iowa, Iowa City GAMMA Nu, Vanderbilt University, Nash- ville, Tenn. GAMMA OMicnoN, Medical College of Vir- ginia, Richmond DELTA UPSILON, Texas Dental College, T' Q I ml' 'll llll I will Til lilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllu ll ullIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll jig Ill In Ill! nn' Il' 'Im' y Q37 9,151 I N I llllll I i W 1 I llll , 1 ,Lg .thin !. Ili'.ul"'ll...1liii llnl. ml 'nl 'Till'IIIIIllllllIllIIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllli ll. rl lll llllllllll lllidvl nl lm .lull Mila. 'huh Q 4 ' - life El ': - - E E T I i E : 2' S E ,, S : E Z Z E E I: E E - 1 ,, an E ' .. bg E S .C by TE : 5 "' ul 2' E 5 E kg. ME" QQ! i 2, E 5 A ' ' ' : E : X : E l E Q E E x S 2 f - E i 2 E X 5 4 N I A E N 2 2 I fx s jvfx . ff? ll 2 5 : 5 2 5 : .. E. 5 ' 2 : F-'li gi.: g i.: E, '- I l"' "' ' ' "I ""' 'llL',l"'llEIf5,9 " LF'1iH1!!!"!F"!l?F'fifi?iEuewrrvfs:':!:''l.!!llT-fe'.'f"l,EJ. A JIS.41122-1l...!'?W1'1iiFau1Wvr'f'P?51'!"Fl lim 2 . -. : E Rl-10, Ohio College of Dental Surgery, Cin- Houston E 5 Fi: cinnati Pm-Rao, Kansas City-Western Dental Col- :' GAMMA-TAU, Atlanta-Southern Dental Col- lege . lege, Atlanta, Ga. ZETA KAPPA, University of Minnesota, Min- UPs1LoN, University of Southern California, neapolis iff Los Angeles DELTA Cm, Royal College Dental Surgeons, 23,2 PHI-ALPHA, University of Maryland, Balti- Toronto, Can. Sig mf more DELTA Psr, Baylor University, College of :Q ii CHI, North Pacific Dental College, Port- Dentistry, Dallas, Tex. I ,Lg land, Ore. DELTA OMEGA, Loyola University, New 315 E-255 Psi, Ohio State University, Columbus. Orleans, La. OMEGA, Indiana Dental College, Indian- Psi ALPHA, Creighton University, Omaha, ' 5 apolis Neb. 5 I Q 5 BETA ALPHA, University of Illinois, Chicago Psi BETA, McGill University, Montreal, ' Canada 5 i 45 I! Ewa ea- ,ii " H' "mn K rw 1- n - .. .lwol il I II' i cmn. .. H701 ju -'i" f'T 113" ' " ""g1111' l111111 "' "'119w f f1 -1. """"' Y 1--rl g?7:ln.1..'i'lli' l . .. ff , llIlllIllllIllIllIIlllllllllllllllllllllllllll It ul ln IIllIllllllIIlllllllllllllllllllllllld iw ' ....11ll..d. 11.lhll.1. A I Q ' E 1 llllllllllllllllllllnl M . ! 11 lllllllllmll 1 1 . ,X Y . .- 1 ' " i w e - -iallli ill? L :f ri 5 S li , if . 1' FRATRES IN FACULTATE T 7 K ,,,! 7 , 1. a s 3'- 12 Charles F. Andrews Louis C. Le Roy Q ' 2 if E Herman L. Bull Henry Musterman E ., E James F. Hasbrouck John Bethune Stein 3 JN lwjli Louis V. Hayes Alfred R. Starr, Jr. gg r' Ellison Hillyer Frederick L. Whiting ' E'-15 Norman Hillyer -fa' FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE -' 7 Y 1926 " Herman Braun J. H. Dunham Laird 1 Donald E. Decker Marie J. Piano 'I I Daniel H. Hallock , Q 5 1927 A 1 E 'S William A. Dwyer Anthony S. Mecca Francis X. Judge Conrad Meibsuer 24: E552 Alfred A. Lanza Alfred W. Nelson iii' 5 1 2 Frank J. Luenge : : 5 ' 1928 f-E QE Sherman Asarian August J. Bastien Albert V. Hutin Charles N. Knapp 'I 'I' 'IU' ll mlm "'ul11111Iqg1uI',.x axilxxxxjx xg, o nnmm lUCJ 'aQQW.r77pa- im!- .ll llllll-Il lull ,M L14 W J ' Wm .U ll 1 Lowell A. Brown Joseph McGrath William F. Buckley Albert W. Munson 3,2 'lghomas IbCzErey Jolgn gkMprphy -is 'merson . onner . o n . ee e 5 . 2 William P.. Coors wuiiam T. Parnell .' George E. Cotsenas Reginald O. Price T E Joseph E. Fratantoni Floyd G. Rae 'f-5 1 j Charles F. Ga Nun Joseph C. Sullivan i 11 M Paul Z. Haus William Xiques KI - William R. Houk ' 5 BM llrilllnllllllllllilrlr: ....... ...,l 'Ignn1,m1-in, it 6 1ni.ul1nllll!IIlulFa::w,m,-11 ,llllllllupm MQ,-llllt' fntnlwflnllil' 'mn."'lu:li. '!lllu1.."-'JK ll 1 ll --Emir-lllll' .l linumh 'Bling ' EEE 11711 f fm : nf... -nlll .omf..a:a.a Q5 fvrolsza ln, I ,,,, ' 'A' lilIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll il 'GE-7 llllllll lnnn Illlllllllll llllllllllllll Ill ' .hi--A 5 Ei E its sf' 2 2 i E I : f s - 2 513 E'-:E E 3:3 l 2 ll Ei.:- Q53-1 E :...-..-T: ,- 361 Bw 19111 Founded irz'I6'89 QBeta Chapter chartered in I893 . A 55,7 -js. - 1. 1 H Q , ...vi i i saws CHAPTERS ALPHA University of Michigan, Dental Dept. Ann Arbor Mich. BETA New York University College of Dentistry New York N. Y. GAMMA Philadelphia Dental College Phil- adelphia Pa DELTA Baltimore College of Dental Sur- gery Baltimore Md. Merged with Uni- versity of Maryland, Dental Dept. EPSILON, University of Iowa, Dental Dept., Iowa City, Iowa ZETA, Pennsylvania College of Dental Sur- gery, Philadelphia, Pa. Merged with University of Pennsylvania. ETA, University of Maryland, Dental Dept., Baltimore, Md. THETA, Indiana University, School of Den- tistry, Indianapolis, Ind. IOTA, University of California, Dental Dept., San Francisco, Cal. KAPPA, Ohio State University, Dental Dept., Columbus, Ohio LAMBDA, Chicago College of Dental Sur- gery, Chicago, Ill. MU, University of Buffalo, Dental Dept., Buffalo, N. Y. NU, Harvard University, Dental Dept.. Boston, Mass. Xb Medical College of Virginia, Richmond, a. OMicRoN, Royal College of Dental Sur- geons, Toronto, Ont. Pr, University of Pennsylvania, Dental Dept., Philadelphia, Pa. OMEGA Vanderbilt University Dental Dept. Nashville Tenn. ALPHA-ALPHA Detroit Medical College Dental Dept. Detroit Mlich. Discon tinued June 1909. ALPHA-BETA-Baltimore Medical College Dental Dept. Baltimore Md. Merged with University of Maryland 1913. ALPHA-DELTA, New Orleans College of Den- tistry, New Orleans, La. Reorganized as Alpha Nu. ' AI.PHA-EPSILON-N0fIh Pacific Dental Col- lege, Portland, Ore. ALPHA-ZETA-Southern Dental College, At- lanta, Ga. Merged with Atlanta Dental College. ALPHA-ETA, Atlanta Southern Dental Col- lege, Atlanta, Ga. ALPHA-THETA, University of Southern Cali- fornia, Dental Dept., Los Angeles, Cal. ALPHA-IOTA, Central University of Ken- tucky, Dental Dept., Louisville College of Dentistry, Louisville, Ky. ALPHA-KAPPA, Creighton University, College of Dentistry, Omaha, Neb. ALPHA-LAMBDA, College of Jersey City, Den- tal Department, Jersey City, N. J. Dis- continued. ALPHA-MU, George Washington University, Dental Dept., Washington, D. C. ALPHA-NU, Tulane University, Dental Dept., New Orleans, La. ALPHA-XI, Georgetown University, Dental Dept., Washington, D. C. if t mu I t f'li"' ISE ll E: .- as a 5 : - Fl? :. : : : 2 2 2 2 . . Null--ullllllf'llr:ul::nv4n---:::l I'nuummulllllmmuululllullllllll ll' - llpmuuumunnulmlnmllmmlllllll ,Izu""l'1mlllrllr Wlllllumlilm . lv 5 ? - -..- - l - ---' ff dl' .il r fr ' , It y H ,ny lln, . l t 1 I I I s .ull h. 1 ' s . 'A-Y ' 's 4-1 XICIF ygy ,if X I if -NA Q., A I I I L lg fl I .. 1 -1 .. I . e - 2 : 2 E 5 : - : z 5 E Fe: : : E , " i rv E E E fu ,utr r 0 : E : 'T' q U lfklfz' I E E er! 1 ll, 4 A 5 ,X -I E -I : L 4' 1 s 5 E 1 A 1 : 'rl i ' ,W ' ' E : E , - . E 2 s X f -M f s - : : "' :s . : f, E .- - , li: , E 7 : -I 9 1 v J : "' E Q X E 1 y 9 E I ,. A 9 9 s 7 : E E Q 9 9 s 9 ' 2 " 5 f Z ' , I ' ' ' , E A E Z ! I 9 E :I I 9 1 : L-l 2 - F 5 : 'lg S E :ala Q5 I R1-ro, Northwestern University, Dental School, Chicago, Ill. SIGMA, University of Illinois, Dental Dept., Chicago, Ill. TAU, Washington University, Dental Dept., St. Louis, Mo. UPSILON, Ohio College of Dental Surgery, Cincinnati, Ohio PHI University of Minnesota Dental Dept. Minneapolis Minn. CHI Kansas City-Western Dental College Kansas City Mo. si University of Nebraska College of ALPHA-OMICRON, University of Tennessee, College of Dentistry, Memphis, Tenn. ALPHA-Pt, Baylor University, College of Dentistry, Dallas, Texas ALPHA-RHO, University of Denver, School of Dentistry, Denver, Colo. ALPHA-SIGMA, Western Reserve University, School of Dentistry, Cleveland, Ohio ALPHA-TAU Columbia University School of Dentistry New York City ALPHA-UPsILoN University of Pittsburgh School of Dentistry Pittsburgh Pa. 5 2 5 -1 els sa ill! I 5 ' Dentistry Lincoln Neb. quill 1 I .,, btw- ,A um In-'Hu I H u l Hn' A. 1 1 1- I nmmul' L1 - f ' f ' 51: hz , , 1 s , , , ia ' 5 P ' A i i ' 8 C W nu """"' Ven """ ' "' ' ' "' ""' ' 'I'I " I lfl,l'E3llll.lll"!l rIflllifilllff L..!l-fffrfn'I.l.. . .lisf-ifP!!!..F 11721. ,lf tl .45 . 1- - --i J . " ' E W . 'wif-wr,-1'l,v ow ,af ..: 1 .1 J mf-w we J PT51'mTm iifv,u'wfff.f-l 2.1121 'rl ' -Tiifff tg .f,f:g3.If.15lf1i..lLlit-ill i1""i'f?Q.. . Ei-Ei my F132 iii '53 l'e.i1fSJg- f 'Ak' agzgi: 1 ii j Qg E, fl li. - illfi t lf. 'll Q W' it .W 1 , ,ff i NJN NNE 39 .54 E ,X gal. swf "Q V i x U 1 .il tg e 3 if r ll? I if 1 ilifgl : lm ' lx? - lyli XS' l ' FRATRES IN FACULTATE 'L Charles Vetter Paul J. Osborne, Jr. ,TVJQ1 George B. Ellis John Oppie McCall HLMKC' , gexlgry Haiivl-ing Jkclseph gkrogg MN i it a J. mg am ripp a ter o ey 54 Martin A. Guastella Pasquale L. Fiscella li M N l ll, J l it i FRATRES IN UNIVERSXTATE lllsllli lv l J - Q! -e l926 1 if Duncan MacMillan, Jr. Carl Lindburg Hugh lVIcBrien Joseph Edward Stillman P U Harold Chandler MacGregor Elmer F. Cleveland 1927 'iii' I' k V ' X l S l' 5 TT 'ran ocio f rt 1ur . car mo l fyzlj Raphael Tardera 5.51 - 1928 1 le O Francis Petrie Arthur Petruzzi . O lw' Herman Kasten Francis D'In2co X R 1 7 I-,t SU 1929 SHN it John R. Waldmann Otto H. Reiser William G. Hess Stuart A. MacDonald lil lf' X 5:1114 Hu!Q"'F,57f?2: t:"'ii'-if 3 5 X H Ii I 6 W 'p.ql'fs'w! jxfiurg ir' l iv N: 1 5 ff---Sk ltgoyi faillvllailwcamus Q.?4'1g.-:g H731 e e ': if r fl 3 . , ' 4 ----I if l"'lll"' i E 1 'vllvlll ' -Q ll' f.f'1iNl!!F!4F"!!:e fW F rWerrrf:fQ::eff F,.!!l5-ff,'ff'e.'.iIi A H926 .iii.."i'-'1'i-ifi....Qi A:'1:za12f1ffelai? W 5:2!1lP1!!!!lMSfff,f H lg IULH11' alllllll I 1 X t 1 llhl 1 Illini " lin lllllfl I1 burma f!Eps1Iun Betta Q-'J'-2-5 Founded in Igor A lpha Chapter chartered in 1901 51:5 .S : 13 effrf- f' 3 5 - A : - ,f- X9 5 E ' XX-.Q7"f i E 2 2,435 5 Eff 5. 'E g 5 : rr E K .1 CHAPTERS 5 E 2' E gtg ALPHA, New York University College of DELTA, Temple University, Philadelphia Eli 5:25.-': Dentistry Dental College 5:5 BETA, University of Pennsylvania College New York Graduate Chapter 5.5 3-E of Dentistry Philadelphia Graduate Chapter : 7 ' GAMMA, Columbia School of Dental and f Oral Surgery - ei li 'I 2 1 n 1 E Q i I a E 2 e E E J E E. 5- E 5 -E F-1-E flg E u-v E E E E JL E E E Fsiewlzu -' Q5 lllllligiil wg I-Hy. AL . 'x nl l 5 5 ,I ,,, I v : ' , ,n..'H ..n .t .Ilu.... ' ij. illIIIlllllllllllIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll It YE .ll llllllllIIlllllllIlllllllllllllllllllllllld El li ....nll.,'. li., ..u. l.'Fi3tQ.ZP: . Q J I r E Q -N - Ji r 'Q ? E - -1 . . J--,: "' : : E : E E 5 E E : Q E :I E E S E Z E E E E 2 2 N E S ,E X 1 - 2, : : E f ' ' X r 2 E 2 A : 41 A , : - A g : X Z ' C 1 1 Su : V g 5 X E 'v , rn ll 2 E E ' 2 f if- , X i Z f 5 A 5 A I X vw' x :a Af : E I 5' I ' J Xa fx L X f ' x X 'K E ll 7 E 2 - - 7 12 f v - : 1 5 Ri EE ENE - 3 - 4, .--. WP: I QUE , E il.: E 1' alll il I? P52 A ILT 5.5 1 : i A E 1 5 " Q E 2 'C E E A . 4 """"' 'a.... ,ml n W Il umm ,ev-55' f"""" 4 11741 11 GW lil .Ll . - f G 1 X 1 tw .1 1 i-1,5"jj7f'jjff:3j3oji5jgj1jjgrmwzygrnzairznifirnrnatfmw 11131g3'f','-ffggii33,gg J ',,, ' 1' iii- 5.liflliA3Vr .13'i2f?-f?f"li'2fl .f'fW3ffViJ"" ff .1 1!lQ24.'.l ilfifliill W .75 ' 'hs' M .J ' gfff- .s i , 1 .. .4 l,,.,r,5'1,, ,,..l A don . 1. Ur , IL L,,, -1,. ,. . ,. ,. ,, , in . FQ:AQ,gfA?f.g.QlQggjQ3gi QQ35Mlmggvi1gy1iiiffii'ium1fll.Ull llnIinuI1:.imiuii1.1liiL5iu12E5lilfQfifljli,ff' g f . jg,,24"L,qg fries 4TT53l 'SWB xwxfw 12 I 'fl' Q l 4 .l I i if' R rw i Qi e ix? ill if Ni ffl iflrlil 'il li .X y , W Kill i will . . ll R 5 Q' I . , A llil V? llg! FRATRES IN FAcUL'rA'1'x5 Milton NI. Brown Edward I. Lembeck 'ir gf yi Jacob Cholodenk E. Alan Lieban I l .Elly II 3 , j Bernard J. Cipes Irving Salmon . l .1 ll Herbert D. Cooperman Jerome H. Trier xl if ll fl, Frederick Green Bernard W. Weinberger I W Daniel M. Kollen X' la.lt.l if-El' i iw' FRATRES IN UNXVERSITATE Ylxl i 39" fel all 1926 ill? al iqiiib Leon J. Allen Enoch Reich '-5 .JR David M. Persky Isadore A. Vogel if 192' lm-5,21 I fffl .., . Jacob Cohen Benjamin Rosenfeld -ill if 1 Jerome J. First Benjamin Schapiro Y VQ i Abraham I. Jacobs Jacob Schtierman .I . law 1928 1' . Y 'IJ' William Crasson Louis Steinfelder l Q, Reginald Moss x HM ll, . w , frm . -a?1:::Egffr"v-w"--'-'-1j:::'1af5?ie-f' , . . , "" A Q wx -KF:-'FSF-Ygi-H ' H r1J'1r11?r1r1:111L1r. ""' ITTTI ""K r.. V QW 'f.ll"llm1.,I..:'Q,:?f':1:jLf'4-'Pri ffm: .:-T1 I l ' mi "eg llffgfae-2' llll llwggxlv 1 ,ij X X X rw wx ly xr'!13m,Q,s,i,.q1T M milk, iff. muh Q1 gl. .CIVQ P., mg! Q ,J .- N751 1f1,..yQ ,yd 'rllf'," -fff"r,s -Qffmm x C, alll! avfw'-W r-1-'ll' 1'fiP-'ni , 7 lllmImlllluIImumuuununnu:Ill lui l lllll mumnnmmmummll 33 X gg' Zllpba Bmega E , E iii? 5 is a .3 E-53.2 EE as E F" 2 it ,E E E 5 E El? . i i 5 : r...... L21-1 3 EEE? . Founded in 1903 ' lata Chapter chartered in 1907 ALPHA, University of Buffalo BETA, University of Pennsylvania GAMMA, Tufts Dental College DELTA, Harvard University EPsrLoN, Georgetown University ZETA-MU, University of Maryland ETA, Columbia University Io'rA, New York University College L Alalnmvsl CHAPTERS ' u LAMBDA, North Pacific College NU, University of California Xl, University of Denver OMICRON, University of Pittsburgh Pr, University of Toronto Rx-Io, University of Minnesota TAU, University of Southern California of Den- UPsiLoN, Marquette University if 5' 'f g f ? :' E r ,i I E r if ' : I if ?4E 'Eli 'E 5... E f 1 ll Fl? : E E I 2 - - ,i-., f?1ER'U 'l' IiI'Ill--I-rrllllf 'uupI 'InnnmnunuuIummn1mmmununlllqlwl' '1 Il""""""'"""""""""""""""lillipm'""'2mllI" K'nl""'p.n rq.x 1 A 'n I I I u in Q I-ff. r Lfdezifl l I- i rl h Ilu. I I 'Ihr I i I lllllll l -in In .ull 1 in I QV f 1 'U 'f' ilaeii ,Mai 1' , . 'r s is .""': T5 2 - . . I- E 5 " E E s I E E l , E 3 - : f: E .. : E : QB E Z E E 3 E qv -n -Q, : 5 E N, T 'ith X - gli, if, L L' EWAE X 5 A " xc" fy 2 :'. NX I Wy, E E 5 i 5 E f - E s 7 E - E 'r - gf E I is : :: n s 1 N l X : X i 7 1: 9 tistry Pr-11, University of Louisville Tr-rr-:TA RAMACH, Temple University CHI, University of Michigan 'KAPPA, Col. of P. 8: S., California University Baltimore Michigan San Francisco New York Boston Minnesota ALUMNI CLUBS Toronto, Can. Philadelphia Connecticut New Jersey Washington, D. C. Pittsburgh ii S ali f--f frf' RWE r' CR: 1 E 5' - iii? ici' ,QB ali nu: 5" F E ig 1 A E Q , 5 if: 2 E E 5 are ---H """"' up-I """ I"'l"' ' ' ' ""' I gg I " f.f's?s1!!!!E!F"s:::ii'i?i"rEfrnr:rf:f::::r?'Pr.!!l-1111-e.'r.D., 4926 ifer-1wl!!!.Q"4'::zz:1f1vn.rErfr3fiis::ss"F!,!!!!G:+f.,P III Illlllll it n x ' ll I ll I t 1 Sq- I lllllll IIII . H761 - my 'Nnreullllllflllanr--iq,.--E llmllullmlllllllllllllllll ll Ill ll! I' O ' I umlllmlnllllllllmllmlllllllllll l, ll'TPlllIlIl-Tv... we f . J: px JH ' 'Ll "5 17224 ' 'rr' " ' S '-' E : E- 1: 5 E All Tlflli , 5 E 2 I-1 S E ' 5 E i J-W .. E s S 5 E 2 w ill f ill: fl rj iw lf ti xl f-"lr My are X M 2 " A X fl' "' 1 - r u - A C " FRATRES IN FACULTATE E Q X nl! N 4 li i i 5 Sidney Sorrin Jack Stolzenberg let! 515-5 E ll ' EL: FRATRI-:s IN UNIVERSITATE 2 if 5 1926 l " Aaron Bluestone H. Lester Maibach L Nathaniel Bodner Irwin Metz H ' 1 I Daniel Brown Louis Milstein wx 4 Q J. Jesse Covner Alexander Seigler , I Q E Harry Hornick Jerome Tapelow E 5 Joseph Eisen Sidney Teitelbaum S . E :E-"--.E Al Krasny 54.3 1927 Benjamin Braude Lester Rothstein 5 5 Samuel Frommer Isadore Rotner FEE Max Pentel I Frank Schuster Martin Reiffel Joseph Serxner Murray Rothman Charles Wilson sg 'S Q 1928 lg 1 ' f y Aaron Brown Max Meltzer 'fi Q" James Gutfreund Philip Popper lf? Raymond Heitlinger Jack Weinberg j lf Jack Lazare or A S ! -'llflllllll ---- -.............--. I, lr-. ..... -... .... , . 'I' umw L 'lv In - --- ---,,-- ..... .. , ,...... ................ . mg , ,,. " wr:-'. ' f X ia' ' I' 'Il "'l "ll Yr.-i- - ,lle,u' -.1-,I-f llllllllllll' K .. '-' fun, ii V XII'll-JlllllllllllIlztlnlllum1 ""' M' "" '-nu:- riiillla' .r.,".lliu. 'llllu...m' -.llllK ll ll ., "" ...nur .. li... -:ln-f"""'.j H771 ' A,I,Illlllllllllllllllllllllllll nullnl unnmlll il XQEEQ7 'Ill nnuuunnnnnnnnnnn in lllllll ,Q ' .. bl Esta Belts Founded in 1912 Lambda Chapler chartered in 1912 ,. --.-ff ... , -,, ENE 4,1 V aiu 141 fn, ' 5 ' N 3' fl:-Pi "9 E' AE sf, 2 ' 5 ff: 51-if 2:2 f 1 E A cl-IAP'rEas ll 3 -- ?.i XI, Tufts College OMlcnoN, University of Michigan Pl, Washington University ALPHA, Columbia University BETA, Fordham University GAMMA, College of the City of New York 5,..E LE.-1'-L2 Dr-:L'rA, University of Florida EPsxLoN, University of Chicago Zz'rA, New York University ETA, University of Pennsylvania E S r--S R1-Io, Worcester Polytechnic Institute SIGMA, Cornell University TAU, University of California UPsu.oN, University of California CSouthern E 5 : E is fs EE Els F- 2 3' 1 .1 - 2 - gl: a i.: 'I' lu'...TNIIIIIIf-1llllII::,:'ll"':::llI'Illllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllu V' I 'I lllllllllllllll llllllllllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII D "" Yylullllll '1lIIIIl"':l.Inl X' I iw' J' -fufrh' 9-NYM ill lllll' M ll:I---"hr-f-'-'-"axe-. it ,A Qi .1 ' 5 E L: E E " E 'E ' 5 . , l 1, Q i I gill ' 5 3 .- -. 2 gg jab, 5 U ag.. ! XE Isis X 5.955155 13 Eflx 2 if " X A lf THETA, Massachusetts Inst. of Tech. .J IOTA, University of Oklahoma KAPPA, University of Southern California S' LAMBDA, New York University College of Dentistry Mu, University of Cincinnati NU, Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn Branchl Pr-rr, University of Iowa Cr-rl, University of Wisconsin Psi, Drake University OMEGA, University of Pittsburgh ALPHA-ALPHA, University of Minnesota ALPHA-BETA, University of Denver Ci 2- GRADUATE CLUBS Q Phi Beta Delta Club of New Jersey Phi Beta Delta Club of Southern California ' Phi Beta Delta Club of New York Phi Beta Delta Club of Western Pennsyl- 5 Phi Beta Delta Club of Philadelphia vania img 'fs :ls f E l' r . E i E """"""' II -f ef' 1 lllliil m l' " "' ' Il- ff'-' ' 1- I """""' H781 :as :"'i I ill: 5- l 5 ' 4 2 1 s 5 ali - -I 'f'ff 2' """ IH' "' ' W ' "' "" I' ami 'flr1sH!!?!..1"'!::si'ii'iiimfr 'i.!!Ffrf-,'..Ii, AJ,J1-1'r'5i1!!!.QP"v1'1::Q1:1iiF?i'zma:ev'P!.!!!!Mif+l Jx 'A HIIHV' mu-ug .ll 1. E Mil E :E E-.:': ....,- if T5 3 Ev 3 592 mi 2 I 'E X if I , ':""lf'1,..,1,,.I"' mmm ,ga g fwmw '.,, 1 :IW FRATRES IN FACU LTATE Milton Levy David Tanchester FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE Burton Goldbe rger George Gooldman 1926 Charles Feldman il E E lf 542 elf 'mm .gnu -flzllflmmnnv lpIInnmumllluuIlllllmllllllllllllllul IlI'rIlllumlmmunllllllnmlllullllllllllll -nl::h:Hi:l:lIlll Illwl mt' X :I A+ iq .nil ...I ui Hy:ll'lllllllllIlllIllllllllllllllllllllllllllIll' li WEE:-f ,I lllllllllllllllllIlllllllllIlllllllllllllln 'nl .....nlI..d. ln. ll . E'-T, r 'LE ... E ' E 1 ' 5 5 E 2 E E Z - : E E g Ir S 4 lib W E fill ,lf 31 ll n I E 'fl lx ,, ,N 2 im, x U f l 6 ll l - ll lc 1 - ' l X Louis Altschuler David Goldenberg Charles Ross Herman F. Pollack Harry Breslaw Abraham H. Kurzrock Max Mintzer llllllllll l l 1927 1928 cp. MII' I l Frank R. Drate Jack Mandel Ephraim Block Jack Lieberman Hyman Feinerman Joseph Herbstman Il I ll ra-955 ll ,gunna Il E? 1 Ri gif! E53 E Q U . Q 1 I l l l l wi ......i..., .ee.,. , ,,,, ,... , UlE?fll!!.!F"!lsEf17i, 1 g5iEiirfrfrf::::!? l4!!.l-ffl11v,'rll.r ll'.11'fr-ll,.!l'e:'1':Q111fffna:2 rWa"!"?l!!lllQ"J 11791 .r mn Kiiililllillillilzlll u i alll il YE? E llnn ll .I .. .ii ell' '.' if Eau f!Eps1lun Founded in IQII Beta Chapter chartered in 191 3 A : 'NE Eli: fr E 5,149 Nwliliill-l'li"'wi ll fflsmitmhii A 1,0 p f C 1' !:y.I JM 1 umm, uallwii gi A A A' imi'iaiiiiIiutfl' 5 ll K E , l : E95 E E Ei.-i s i: 2 'E it ll ALPHA, Columbia University BETA - GAMMA New York University ZETA DELTA, Cornell University CHAPTERS XI, Massachusetts Tech. OMEGA, University of North Carolina OM1cnoN, McGill University Pl, Georgetown University R1-io, University of Pennsylvania 4 ff if Af- E E ENE its I i E S 2 s gg i? V Null--ilulllfugfll 1:-iv, .---- : NI'lmmmmyllummmimnunmuiil V' - Ugunumummuulululllllllllllllllllu "" l'l'l:llIl'tI"lllIII' "" mm. A arg" , in f.,,f :W Ill ,llll rxgpr ' ' ' '2'f'7. 5 'fkfxfi ifkx v .4 r r ' 'Yr 5 : ijt 1 E il? E 5 5 . . E 2 E 5 .E 5 - E E E E g 5 'Z E E .. E : Z E B . A " El ll, 2 : X E 'dn " 'il E : X I AQ, i 'Wx' in suv E K - EA -I sf!!! 'mix X : : gil' ii'2f, A l.i "i,'iUii 'fig 2 f is c 5 ll? I' ll, im 'pig gig, ,fl i ,- 1.4: EPslLoN, Fordham University ETA, Tufts College THETA, Boston University IOTA, Yale University LAMBDA, Harvard University MU, Emory University NU, University of Georgia SIGMA, Syracuse University TAU, Dickinson College UPSILON, College of Charleston PHI, Georgia Tech. Psi, University of Illinois TAU-ALPHA, University of Florida TAU-BETA, University of Maryland , ' :IZ :-- xffflf E172 Eh iii is , E ALUMNI CHAPTERS i , New York Alumni Chapter New Haven Alumni Chapter e New Jersey Alumni Chapter Boston Alumni Chapter 1 G0 :D frf QUE KAPPA, University of Vermont CHI, Michigan University gtg :mg ft I 5 il, i E 6 :Ulf SLS F . . it "lu-num Q11 -e" ai:---wiv ------ I-"W" ' A A "'I' "" I 'ua-: """l"" 'flyiE55li!!f!F"!Pl2?1ftEiiFiWF"'fill-ff,'1I'r,'Iii 119 ill?, tif,7fF??!!E"'?'1::fifiiiiW:!!"'l!!f9lE1flf,P H801 1 1 -' mf I ji E i e 1 Y N ,. 1 l l . -f 1, 11 ll? 1. g We 1 f - ll S g lie flxf iwfg flwi II 1 FRATRES IN FACULTATE E A. L. Greenfield Samuel Solomon M Y Sidney Solomon ll is I FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE It ll 1936 'X ll ' l'.' Q Mortimer M. Salomon Easor Ptosenfield i QQ T Harold G. Schwartz Benjamin Heller 5 2 E 1927 gig? 2 1iI.:1g111:..ff5.:.'5.iif i11:zi112iEs.,,. 99 5 H E l 91. Milton Ebin Jerome Salmowitz Isaac Rapon David Ornstein Paul Hammer 1928 929 Maxwell' Cuelialter Nathan Stuzin H H Manning Baker 51111165 Gemson ,im va V R55 fi: in .le K 5 T01 GQ S A L' 111 .JlLtDx3 'll I l' 'ull' l18l 1 I II' in lnmnln ,. illllIlllllllllllllllllllllIlllllllllllllllllll l NE? l lll ulmnm ll i ll ul 'alll' . 'hm ul fl ft 1- - . xi - E QXANQ :EI 1 E gli EEA? s g y . Sigma Bmega 3551 Founded in 1914 ' Zeta Chapter chartered in 1919 A .Av avg csv 'q1:.:,f". 1, . Z." ll 'S " ,-Q i I L Pl .ly Q mf 4 'si ' CHAPTERS ALPHA, College of the City of New York ETA, Lowell Textile School if AI' 'Ef.. 5 : , i - a ll 3 3 ?lE W 2 2 .. - 1 2 pl: . -1. , 5 2 I' "H"I:j'lIll flll! HIV l"' Ill llll Illllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll I I' ,v I ll llllllllllllllll lllllllllllllllllllllllIll 'Iz1z"'ll'1'n ullf' WIIIIII' hull... K! 'M ru -"Eg" " "" "'- if-3" mr'-9'-M 'llll rllllll l v -"1 -fl 121.111 gl J I r L- gg 5 fi S 'E a : E 5 E : 2 5 5 Z 2 ' : E , E E - 5 ? i ' 8' . :Il 3 X gi l 1 ,. X - I E Q I ' Z ,Ng E 4 - P 15, E " X 5 X ' "'- hwy? f E 5 x 3 xl ' ll 71 , . -Lg f!s.'i7: 51,5 ali E Sie E1 S E- l ai? BETA, Columbia University GAMMA, University and Bellevue Hospital Medical College DELTA, New York University EPSI-LON, Syracuse University ZE'rA, New York University College of D tistr Y THETA, Worcester Polytechnic Institute V-unuuml "" In llliru Io'rA, Boston University KAPPA, Northeastern College LAMBDA, New York Law School MU, Tufts College XI, Massachusetts Tech. OM1caoN, College of Physicians and Sur- geons, Columbia University Pi, Harvard University CII' , ln u 1 37:15 5 llllllllllli 2 E E xr? an ,ul tar ,, . , , ,., ,,,, ,. 55 lf!l1E3!ll"U"l!i2ig'ym'41if7lQ,Ffiiiic::gg1'1"A llf.f5.'Jl+ 'NL u1'3t.fll ll 1"Q1:1:1"'1u19W,QWuw!!!'!!l"l"'lIliff'f l 5, "-" ..fur: - nt. AH. - iz. ..' -... . ur. 'su ir.. , .. - I ., , ,..l ur nl . .... A az. - .." an -1 n. """ .fl CA? flszj 5 ,-, 595 :': all 51: ' o 5 2 3 4 . .ii 'I E lllll h Ap' InIIT-ulrlllriu1:nI::i:'lu...::: IllIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll llll O' llwm.,,,,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,mul za---.WEIIIEIQI ulllllllj "uw x! Il :Gig Ili -----1f' . ......llll. - llllll... ...ll-1"- '-1: 1111 6' . J.. ..n , ..l11.... -,. Illlllllllllllllll 1 NE .I III -5 - - - A F' Agia'-f . IAA" or 111 2-me L I 5 I '- Q E 0 1 E 2 i 2 5 F i 5 5 i 5 5 l l V. l lk .Q - 1 11 , K il -11 ill 1 X1 V3 , 5 l" L e , iifvl - H ' ills -0 I if 1 L 5 f X fu r g l XE , 1 1 A '5 5 if IE gl " FRATRES IN FACULTATE 1 David L. Nasanow Percy Seamon I l 1 Herbert Danziger K Y 3 - ' 1 t Q I Fiumuss IN UNIVERSITATE ll .A 1 E V ' i 5-E 1926 I ESE Samuel Friedman Marcy Frey E E g Oscar Richter F2-.---3 i. ,Q 2 2 1927 5 5 Benjamin Laub Harry Drillich Natlaan.Gold Samuel Feiigelman . EOE Benjamin Bosentlaal Meyer Weintraub N Ha Maurice Markowitz Benjamin Miller " . 1928 , ' RQ Barney Blicher Isadore Lebson ' if Aaron Sommerman Paul Krentzman bl' K it Otto Bittner Philip Schneider F ' . A Wmmnmll ..... ,Vw ,....... 'llllllllwaul H A 6 Quiulllllllllll V ..... Hmiq . . - .IQ-slllr 'ma-.lllilliit '!llu... lI - llll "" .nIIlll' 'Lulu' -:lin-f"""'IL! 11831 t ,I Ill '1 1 ucwcyl u U ulllmlll Wm llllll ll lm'm'Jl ll Ill llllhllullllllllll U Qt'-:-:,ffl1-1.4-' 1 f -A , L ff? m,Y,"j,-1 n un tnmmnnnnnmxunm m ul mn in nu will I. 1 : E , Q Tl: X I N ix Ui! 1' QQ-Q mumnnn nu num I lm nl IW 1 , EN ? l - un umm I rmunnn M-,...nn muu nm mrmlmmmmn nr. Hill . ' if , : 151 Malta Qngma 5 lg Founded in IQI7 Beta Chapter chartered in 1919 'A' 5 - ll ull UI 5 I lx 32 W mumnu M : 2 M22-gall fl llNl!Nlv ' I i f i kbxf-'F : X :.- . i ff 4. A E E ' AE NE '.-i 512 21:5 I l a ir 5 1 E CHAPTERS E E ' 5,2 ALPHA, College of Dental and Oral Surgery DELTA, University of Pennsylvania College 5:?.?-.lli BETA, New York University College of of Dentistry g g Dentistry IOTA, University of Illinois College of Den- E E GAMMA, Columbia University College of tistry fl-' D 15' t L E3 en is ry E g New York Alumni Chapter Fi: New Jersey Alumni Chapter on 2,5 E525 : H5 50? Q42 , Q5 .1 ' A H841 ,api ,-.1 ,l - pl... l L--, -.: E C i f 2' 1 E is ..-r E ELS gl? ' A lil E -.: 5 -: 2 'I 'E 5 : E I li 3 l: - 4 il 'f ---lllgluzlll Q- ' Illluzlllwu I I 'llvrllll ' w ifi-Eigllfj lllllrnllll' Lf-Q5!!!?!!F"22:slmiRlr't?irrfrf:fs:::r1"''fillfl-IfLJ., A il'U1-..1'l-ifl!!!!EWiif1'.f1fW ?rEuml22!"F?E!!!lQ'Q,P L. v ' gg ' l"" - um mania-hw-i.:xT" " 'Ulu Y - Ilnmumum mu N llllllllllllll Hu MII' " , ' H l- . - .'-'. , '--"II Il ,U I-W ' -i i T' , 4 bi i lib , .aifdu .b..nu...uu In' lllmInnlmmmumunnnunu mnl lil.. .einniill ll a . Q f FIG UQ - I - 5 .- ,',5'-'.-5 t : E - E E E 2 E - I 3 I l n 1 : 51 - il E 2 if W X E Q. f r 5 V X 2 if N g il ? it .Sr if 1 is E A X35 1 E gil? E A 5 - ' 'E ' 5 E 2 FRATRES IN FACULTATE . Nr E tx 'E W ll : g g Harry M. Seldin 5 5:5 E25 SLE FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 7 l 1926 i l Louis A. Berkowitz Edward Rappaport l 1 I ifilton OF Fenkel James L. Ritter i , I w, ' erman ox Arthur Shapir N 5 A L Henry Greenberg Samuel Silvero igl 3 5 5:10155 J- Giffdl Sidney J. Zeitz N E -4- erman Q elster i ' 5 Q I' 'E E 5 1927 : 2 5 5 ' : E Arthur Berkowitz Charles Lewis '- Herman Frabkel Arnold lVIuller T.. v V .E iii if rg Meyer Friedman Aaron Goldberger David Leichter Irving Danowitz Harold Goldberg Murray Franklin louis S. Nlishnick urniree e'es' 1928 1929 Samuel Uiberall Nlorris Wasserman Philip Weinstein Samuel Hoffman lulius A. Tiber Pj lull' "" 'lim 1 5? . lg, lf- eeee I' if a s , . Q12 ,. , , .... ...... ' I'--' -' WT Illl " - " -1 F'-4"'U:: ' galil-"1..'f':nu:..T-Q.......-31.1 x H ring" ---- 1 i..IIf"'...m'liillkJ2 l"ll..-fun: 'G' N851 A Eu- ae ai , 5- - ..i .. ' L'illllIlllllllllllIIllllllllllllllIlllllllllIll b I WEEE? lllllllllIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllld '.' 1 .. : Brita Sngma Qlibeta . LLL- e-5 Founded in 1909 Gamma Chapter chartered in I92I4 5-'Q E i .9 ' my 5 '5 ' : i - S Ml is gii , 5 - 2 ' E-E E15- E E E E 5 - ""2 gli i - 'E CHAPTERS 1 ALPHA, Brooklyn College of Pharmacy ETA, New York Homeopathic Medical Col- E' BETA, Columbia University College of Den- lege and Flower Hospital 3 E ' I tal and Oral Surgery ZETA, University of Pennsylvania College GAMMA, New YorkAUniversity College of of Dentistry 'E E 1 Dentistry THETA, Tufts University Medical College 5 E 1 E E il: li E E 51,2 3: 2 5...-: L'-'-? : E DELTA, Columbia University College of IOTA, Temple University College of Den- Pharmacy tistry EPs1LoN, New Jersey College of Pharmacy ll E -.-E E'-'li a i.: -T. : E 5 ?-E in E 'E g El g ......, ml' ,mme-.ulullllf'unillug-I., ,.--- : rw.nlunnmnInmnunmuulnllllllll llgmuummmnnllnulnmulnnllllllI WL ---l sql'nnlr'llllllln..LlmI xl iii' 'MW'-'7'ffM llli lllll WVIM le -1'--"li-f'-'i-"motif -I-MFEi'ir51el Q7 .1 ' L. YQ El Q 5 'Z 5 : i i ': Z 5 ' Z 3 " - E 2 E 1 E E g - E E 1 il ' 3 Ur - E ,Eli V 532 ,A gf: E A A, gn , ' s ., , 1 2 Eflf ' X 149667 2 ' . N E 1, Q I -1-r 'ft 2. 5- i. ESE f E f s l 2 E - . 'll'I ll kS'ax,,A4.'ll """ Aw Il' "II N 3,-ay!! Hlllpnulllllv Eu! Sli Ei? 5-3 Sill 5.2 2.3 ' 4 I 2 X, Z 3 M gli N861 5- A . i - " FRATRES IN FACULTATE xx S Reuben Fogelson is . E E - 5 3 i 5 1 . y rbi 'I I-l fl ic li 2 ,l fn ln xy Ag Israel Usdan .i -ng David Oboler 7 M- E l ' : E E - E 5 E A E Eiigx l i MX l i I lx' I l l . V 5 al ll ll' 'z 2-'AE : E ?--E FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE r N E 1926 l K Charles Berman Reuben Rudolph I 1927 i ' l 1" Samuel Colish Morris Fink fig Morris Krivorick Reuben Garr 5 E Louis Rozinsky Irving Pollack 2 E QT Morris Berger Sidney Korkes 5-"' Emanuel Rabinowitz Isadore Hugel -3 E Abraham Gralnick 5 5 1928 Jacob L. Blass, Ph.G. Ai. E. Leichtung g ' . Albert Saperstein Al. Kaufman ' A Jack Leboy Nathan Kriloff ' I C . ir i if . 1 X Il dl' fi . bl li A , ..- ..... I .... ..... , , ....... . I,,,,,,,,..- , , -..,,,,,,,,l ,F , ,....... n , ' 1... S ,W I ... fl,.'a,?5QllllIuligrm Bl5ijn,,..i...irllpIIllL.,-wi in, 3926 li. ll,., jlIIlq1ni,,....:....,m W .. T.imW,,,,ulUllwggF',ii -, X. M' "" 'mm .4-d' 'lllu..."" ,. iI Ilil .. ""...ullIl' , lim ' I ' '3llllu..""A I I 187 1 rum f igfbu ray-Ju " nr .ini-nl . i ' I!l,lillllllllllllllIIIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllll il XZEEP' hlllllllllllllllllllIllllllllllllllll Illl if i , QA 2 A ?KH1J1JHiI9blS1m1IH - 5-E F banded in 1918 l Delta Chapter chartered in 1922 2-E 1 5 - A C 1 1 is ' ee 'a ' il - X X :5',.'r S, E E i E E E AE Eff E "2'Qi:u'9 E fs 5 2 5 .Z 5 S :5 'SAE 5-LE 2-as Eli SAE L 1 . 4 2 5 3 l I , - 3 it 11111 A -:fe ESE ALPHA, College of the City of New York Sub-chapter, Atlanta Southern Dental : I Sub-chapter, New York Law School LAMBDA, Brooklyn Law-St. Lawrence Uni- gh U i 5 2 BETA, New York University School of Com- versity 5' g 1 A merce Sub-chapter, St. J ohn's Law, Fordham E : DELTA, New York University College of University E : D ' P I Columbia Universit Colle e of Den- 5 : E u- un II...--i .S - I' Hui!-.ll Ill! l,:-:lp lnnu : 'llllllIIllIIllIIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllll ' llllllIllIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll .--u qlqrl gl!!--ln' lh.Qll'u K l if-if li. I! :lin 'K'lll"'l""'lIlllli' 9' tl -i..1llln- 'l-'- -w i-I fllllp lln r l : , 6, I: I .1 ln. 1 u 1 . .nl nl.. 1 liisxxti illegal 1 . . 'r Ex -. r r : f fs , 5-E ' 3 v I Gig : E ': : E - 1 I: 2 3 - E 3 E E E : 5 5 E E 5 ' 2 5 2 . I' : ix - r ' l 5 :fb fix go E f 2 E A J A S - 2 If X E I N X 'Zyl E I 5 as 3 xxx I K W " Z if 3 ' rr ' Hia H :AE lg' fl y entistry H , y g tal and Oral Surgery '- "' EF L,-.: Eu : - 302 WG ,. E05 Q' E 5 E ill? gl il? J: El: f- 'E A l X E ' 5 , E EWS -.fc . 'wlllllllll R75-:!EElI"lljfJIl""'iSg ,I' ' llll"llll"'l' 'n"llU"llll ' 'l"T"i.L2"'"!lLfll"'lLiZ52 Illlllllllll A 1 -f 1 es:-Q .in .- lifes-22,1 51-if I if 3 2 l A ' .Luka n II r 001. 11ss1 ' 1 ,, l f v u 1, '1 'Mm' p H:-mm' islunn--:qu---T: 'pmuuumuunuunnmmmu all v 1 upummuuunnmnmnmmunmul z' "lv'.':'m1l' lIlll""1m. N! 13355 gli liull- 11 "'l'fII'ii"lIll 'IVE WEN 1715059 FVI07.Z3.,E'37' tlli11'lll":Il"'lw -1 lull . .1.. .. . ,.lln-. lllIluIllllIu1nmumnmmmuuull li my .1 llll llIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllll .- ...null . .. ..s. . A :Aging 5 AXA ' 1' f 2 ' E 52 3 Jlxi ' - 1. V A ' -fllfhlj :. fly, ,A iii , 1 74 1 XX Y e 1' 1 1 A A 1 'Q ii 1 lf ll al l W lyll lil' if "'155ff, ' V' 9, "Q, FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE N 5 1927 Jacob Friedlander Irving Yareshefsky I X H Nathan J. Sachs LAK I l ' l ,l 1928 l ll ii ,XI Simon Berkowitz William Kanner -' Samuel Frankt Abraham Schlussel i g: A .134 David L. Jasper I 1 L, 1.9 1. 5 -E , 1929 Q l-i,,.i Solomon Blutter Isadore Turersky Y.-, GYQ Harry Goldstein .rr R EE fi I v . W .1 I , 9 1 il 1 el A1 .. ,.91... ...., . ,. , , ,...... 2 , .,... , 2 1 Irlllnlllllll 'q Illznlll' illulll l'E::::Ill.l llall. llnrf 'll" z:1llf '5"'ll':11:..i 111. 6 nl I1 .'l----fl.......I.11f '1-...ll-'ffllmz in 11891 E "',fIl1'ffi mu-l'i'Zp'E'N'k7"Q'g.ll1-tEy'l 'VIWJEEV' t-Q-""e iff? iT"fl iBbu Eelta mu 1: :E - fi F aundea' in 1920 Gamma Chapter chartered in I922 as -2 E :: Jill ' mi Q I 1 'I E .. ' 5 X E LL575- 272 E ' " 5 E fs. -New 5 5 2-' : 1 ' ' 22.45" 1-.S 'I " E 5 E - ' ff 153222-1' ffl. it ii E E : : .,.--2-ffv ., 1 -. Q - ,nr : E E E llllllllllmlflllnf : 1 ' 2 imvlllzf,'i1lll1Ilm11f+,l1lw11i1 5 : A E is "" ' "" E ' E Elf ' '12 'E : E 5.4-. 5 5 .5 ii! QE Eli Els an-2 5- : W -i- si 5 l 5 5 5 i CHAPTERS - - E E ALPHA, Columbia University DELTA, New York University E 5 .1-1 BETA, College of the City of New York EPs1LoN, Fordham University fig g g GAMMA, New York University College of ZETA, Cornell University F F 2 Dentistry . Q IlI"l:..uIlllIIi1lIll llllnluunInuImullnllmlnlmulllllll 'I' 'Inunumummunmlnnullllllllmlul , lullll'1lllllli-Clam.. I amy 1 I Il ul llu. .mlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll i 4 llllllllIIIllllllIIIIllllllllllllllllllllllt . .ull lu ' I lfpukv , im.- Q .1 ' L Q sl' E 5 E 2 E 5 E 2 E 5 3 ,,, E - 3 E - E 5 a 5 E S E 5 . - X f 5 , l - X I 5 1 : 5 : E 3' i, nlIHIIi'U"' 'lIM"3'g'fgig""'iUl,W'i'UHlll""E E ! 5 Lil- l' ,Q 1 f 2 : : 2 i lnnxliliiriiii- HIM 1 E fx E A f 'I"'1lrl'llIliI"" er 7 r ' N ak: im Ill 'N ' l 1' ll 2 74 "iq ,A ln Sn G5 RNA! E WE: E92 5.5 Efli 5.2 gif S 5 5, - ., - 593 Qi i ' E 5.3 I i 1 'J N 'Z 3 y , ' 4 "'ll'IllllI jeg! """ l""'l"" V ' "'4ll""l eg lllllllw' 'A ffl!it!!!!!F!!F"e::m5fFii:f::::rr"F!!!!!lT.ffrf-E.'EIL H li',E-f1'1f-Til!!!lEF"P1'1::z111iTr51iiiEta:se"41!!!!lM:ftf,Pfl -' 11901 in 'H' "'1' 1 -eww 'Wi Plugin," lm iii' I I illllllllllllllllllllllllllll unnn nnmuull INEE-,'v i lm n an nnnu I nnln nmn nnunn unlli I I ui ,V ri ' XI SEE :L 5'f.' x 1 'WIN ..,' -L,i?:iN::i l"l,,nff"I IlfT'LII::':'I""'. IIIwwIlI1IInllllllllwlwllllull null n- . ,..........,......H..........,,..,.,,..,,,, m....,,1-2: tn, ,,,..jm. , :fi-N wmv .ui mlri :Mg rg 5.-'E'-E 5 E E - E ? E E Z E E E E - E E 2 2 2 S , E E E s 5 - E E ' 5 , ta i ii ' ri i E E X E if rs if Q ' A E XXI 'ff l 0 ' M 1 E ' - E PM t 5 Ei X 2 , E N 2 E 1 E i " i g I , ,, N' U2 t' E 5 X E 'Girly E ii 5.4. FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE SAE ' 1926 i 2 I Reuben Sehlaehter X I . '- K 5 1927 A E, Max O. Balaban Sidney Prince E Vi Barney R. Friedman Percy VV. Spaniel' Q Meyer Jacobson George VVuudulieh E E blorris Klein Oscar Siminofsky '928 Louis Itzikoff Nathan VV. Lieberman ' Martin Ellin Harry Schwartz QE Jack Isreal Samuel Rosen are gm Iii i i f 5 N54 M i f QMS is 'il ll "" - """"""""' U 5 """' "xiii ' lllll V' I 'nl Illll ' """A' L '- ----' -. - ---....-......-- ---W , Im In 'fn 'iiIIIW'i' "' 'EWS'-11 ull 'I' I, 'W Ii' "'IlIlF"-r:v'w"1d-2' w"""""'n Ki n 3, H . ' Fd Ipnnllllf I. ff' , X H N I X 1-1, 'iinlllinnll r 'Till' .-. l .-. mm, Miit'm..."'EllI.i, i t 5 .ri e,...f-,iilliriutg ieatQ.,!',!,,,!,Qi:fif, H911 . 'SHUI 45.2. .yr .. A r" .1 -"- :f"""f'iy'f ::z:""'1r.'1" """"""'""""""""""""" ""1 I" ' H' """""""""'"""""""""""' "' 'Y ----- -a 'll ..Pf1f""...fIr'- 2i:..:.fTfF""""" 'fm . .....1mN. .aImf... ...lt2v"""'""i'?fF:1.1.h "Fklf.e"'-Hia ' :LA wr Q -.,.. u m w Q53 H uv' '11 T?- Gmicrun Qfpsilun Rb: L- . .Founded in I922 Alpha Chapter chartered zn 1922 ii? :Q I : 5 ' h ' 'f:: 52 L., 'Y E . Nh "h' E E 1.3 A CHAPTERS ' 1 ' ' E " ' S ff QJ IE 5 g S i E -2 E E : E Z 3 5 : E .. - E c: E : E E 2 E E E Q I A - - X E ' 7 1 2 E X 2 EW-I 'X E I 5 5 5- 'Alu : I: : X I: f fs a fxs fx. X I l. - KX 'Eh -XV' if ' -1 , XX' 2 ' Q X' 1 'X 1 : ,AX .wh fb. : VA - -fli ,I W' qv- n-rp EIN: -Q44 'n M1 K A PK Afil.,-Pa fx , tx --:' - g : a f - 2 E ZA-E' :IE E- :Q ,A 42 r I X1 1 h , 1 5 Q 2 3 w - 5 5 rg 2' 2 3 E 1 g g i , ALPHA, New York University College of Dentistry Em- Fzzi " i f : :GN ith? 303 :E ' sig 3 45 E v-1 n mm if I" i "" ""' ' ' ""' "" ' "' fi ""l"" 5 - 'f1i55!!!?E!F"!2'2T'1E,'iifSewer?"Fffllllf-ff2fi'e.'EIL 11 MHZ',riff-ffl!!!EEF"?'1::211i?iF?iEM!!"F!!!FW! x I I 4 1914 llllf' 7 II , ' '.,'Illlmuumununnn mm Ii I 2? n nu 1 .' .. . . .. lu mug lllllllhl lllllllllllllll lm lll 'WSI Ill Ill Ill llllili :,A f i E4 57 L gi :LE 1 ci, iii ' ,E ffl: E E E F.: 1...- E-'-L-'E ...-E FRA1REs IN FACULTATE Elias G. Stickney Abraham Lees FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE - 1926 Blax Labenow Louis Rabinowiroz Irving J. Mayo Solomon Schwartz Joseph Milgram Morris Treitler 1927 5 TIN ,I E 'X Ei i 2 Fl- I.lrE?35'iii15li'-iE:p."-iif-1ll'2fi1 Q si H 'E - 5 : - 3 i E E E : f E a 2 E Li 6' i A ' MX it F' ii' E CM i 5 . E E 11-1 'if' ff? 2 ies i E AE U E 1 f X 1 il: i i I J wi? Jacob Lieberman hleyer Stein "' f' 'fu' Yif--'-:rS.f'"lIlnfimffff1'sf2bi'P"'g-gfeialv""rr:""'e 1 : ! QM 6:11 E: 5 E ii als ? L X I I ! i llllllll I I Q I Ill ' F4.!!!k.ffi11'li'..I.. a r 1931 J E 5115 EE ?...f: s 2 E 73:33 Nxt? EW: 2 ii SQL: if E-5 sie F l 5 A. if! E U gig F5 5. E E F'-1:2 " -' . Ei? its EOE PG i'-'E I ur Y LT ex! 'lr' iI'uijiIllllllf-,Ul!lIllg":1'llI!i::"IllIlllllIIIllllI'IIIllllllllllllllllllllllull ' IilllllllllllllIllllllIlllllllllllllllllllllllul l-lll Ili:lllllll--nIlIll"'il'lI' it I tl,.. rin- qi,-of- .'..1--ill L A QEJWUMI: fiv'1o.1:.Ear It-..Allni- -'- J'-m:fif.if A. ,An . ..lm..,.. -4llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll lr 'EEF' ,il lmmu,mm,mmm,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,lI ,Q - -,,, ,Mn HHH, '-,L ek 4 , A 5 2 5 Q 3 g g 1 1 Q 2 :J : 3 E - 5 E : X F: . Q - www. ,WI N it ' f ff, I , E A I lf ' f' U0 " : E ,fm file is K il gf' 1. if E A wx' ,W Q K! N la l A E 1 Zllibeta Qlpba 35131 Founded in 1917 Gamma Clzalzter chartered in 1923 1 b1, 5 ,',iQ " ,V" 36544-A. 'fl we W r I 4, 4 lege CHAPTERS ALPHA, New York' University DELTA, New Jersey Law School BETA, College of the City of New York ZETA, New York Law School GAMMA, New York University College of UPs1LoN, Union College Dentistry New York Graduate Club " GM ' 1' T " 'nn -aw IIIl"""""l 'E -VA Elk lo 5 5 - E L-312 5:2 ek 5 5 A 5 L 5 , : 3 E 5 S ' 2 E E '- " , ses A ada S16 5'i ill! l ill E il , 4 A H926 11941 U-1' mr au r ll :Umm ann I . . I. llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll K if l lllll mnnunmunnuunmull .175 S 4 5- 2 - IIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIYI llllnlllllllmll llllllullmn Illmll IIIIIIII : glxi .ENE E 'E 5 .1 EAE zz:-'E :- EE .. . 5 542 FRATRES IN FAcu1.TA'r1s 515 ? l NIOTTIS Cohen Henry J. Lllltillfeld ,I T I Il FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE l ,N A umuum mrm llmlu llwvw--wnuw n mum mum uluml . .. fy...- , ,. nl """"'J-1 u un nm-ununlmuwmununmlmlllumll I nnn I lun mmm 1 ll I . ai,,?1 5,155 'S E ??':: ' 572 E1 if - , 4 nm lilllllllilliillllllllllllllllfll ... Illllmlllllllllll lllfllllllllll lllllllllll llll 'WH IF' 2 'PF N N, 11 giigfgai ml ll I 1 ml u I nmUllllllL'3..G3" :gall ' 1927 K S. Seymour Edson i E Solomon Kadner 3-LE El-.2-E Arthur D. Berger Irving Itskowitz . ' Samuel blessenger g 1928 1929 Samuel A. Karlin Frank Mandel Jack Priceps Samuel Wald David Zipser 5 E s i i 5 3-. Z s. 5 .,?.,. E-1 KTA! EW E a :G 5-' 1 - Samuel Stein QE Egg li is : E x 5 l x , 'M lTllunllAII .II ..l will . N a,s ' s ll? ,fp q IV.-:P Q"'?"gf??'T1II"'ff""'1' 5 'll' "" : ::"' 1'-'S-':',,,"' my-iq' I mg" rr. l 195 ' ' I Nur Igjfbll I in , w 2 L ACKNOWLEDGMENT S 2 E E ' E E E 2 5 E gil 5 THE Editors wish to express their appreciation E E 3 is zlqfxxz X - to Dean Jackson and the faculty for assistance given 5 f 5 E A iii publishing this book, To Miss Eiiiiisoii of White Studios and Mi. Grady of the Commonwealth Press, for advice and help in compilation, and K 1 To Dr. J. Oppie McCall for his efforts in making 3 s 3 l i i the publication si success. Q 2 E 2 - E E E I E 5 E E .E E E 5 - 5 E El'-E ELE I' 'mug-.ullllm-.ull lv:-iq .--- : :P IlnnnunIllinIuillumlullllllllllllll li' ' Dununlunuummlnluuunnnumll 51:--lv:l'lurnr'1llllllI'Fm... n il lllll llilli i'I dlnllLl'plllIlHll'I',X 7 lt'ullullllulwlllnl iii I ' , vs, I, 1. .ni Iln. 1lllllllllllllllIlllllllllllIllllllllllllllllllll ls wr' I linumumummmunmmnnnlll . .ull li I :Snr . liisiisi piedgl Qt .4 L 'Q ?'1:- ii' Z E 2 3 E : Z i 2 ,, . W E E if E 5 A 3 S 5 : fig' E E ,fx 5 2 Ay 'IHZ' I 1 - g E :,E : - WTF: 1 ls.: EWS : 'E 5 , 5 5,3 : : 5 5 - ': ill Q Q 5 ji i l- ? 4 axis ift '4.E E. ill: ELS 9.2 i i le i l '-:umm gel """ I llll ll"' 1 ' "'IlI l"I I '1 -Q lllllllllr LMIlF5!F"!!i2iiTmEi?fiirfi:::?F''fill-ff-'fi'ii'Illi f .,lIiiii-11122fllfl'l'i:i2f11iiETiiit252!!"F4?f!!WF ' 11961 un In ICNCK ' ll al - Y.- gave EVE 513 if-112 5 I 5 E 5 -- E ,Az E 1 E '11-' . - :il ' ADVERTISEMENTS T fa G 51 5 E 15 5 A E E 'g 5 xl EE EEE Y . A 5 2 3 2"-Elf 7 -1 V lmlrj-ullllllfxolgllTian"-Ll Ilyllunn Ilulmlullllnuuulll lllllll ,Y .I - IllnIImunlmnuullulnlmnlnlllnll ,zz ---- .V:-luln!xvI'lIIIIIlu-Zum yl 5353! 1' 1,'l,-s':nfhI...1IIlL,,:? sofwmaz "VIc07.Z3.E7 k-..5llm-.f.!..-ms .,.51'.,,,.'1 .,5??Q3 pl ,XJ I: I .ll sv llu. 4mllllllIllllllllIllllllllllllllllllllllllllll s I Im mmm llllllllllllllllllllllllllllt . .ulI, A. s 78 1 ' 3 Jill: 1' . If E' - E E :x-1' 5 I: :J E : : 5 E E E E Q 5 E E 5 E E E E 2 E , ' X ' 'T Q 2 - nz : - X E E -2 A g EA - s VNS A w f N E x ' Q S : T 5 f i , - 1 I E-fi 7 1--r 2:5 vp , ,IE DIE-. EC: 'QE 5.5 PIC r g E '1 E E s E I This Volztnze of the Dental Violet has been made possible T through theeourtesy ana' patronage of oar adfuer- tisers. They have shown themselves to 3.2 be friends of the College and img l deserving of your 3 patronage 1 i The Violet anager 2 , . SD the E31 V--,,,.,,,,.., I llll m--' . ' 1 "Nu I'Il 1 'fr-2r:frjELL'lIL'Q lIIlIIl'lI"' UQ!!lfFEP"!!::2YsTE'shPiWrrffrf::::!f"'!!!!!FfQfff'ff'T.Til., H llll',T"1'l2f-Will'"?'i::Qf11i11sWM!!"f EWU H971 - NEW YORK UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY 209 TO 213 EAST 23RD STREET, NEW YORK CITY 1 I i 1 1 ,,, , THE 61511 SESSION Beginning September 1926. Four year course, leading to the degree of D. D. S. Unlimited opportunity for clinical training, Unusual advantages in Diagnosis, Periodon- tia, Orthodontia, and Oral Surgery. Post Graduate Courses. For 1'1y4b1'11n1tf011 7'6'g'II7'll,7.Ilg' 111f1111'f.r1'021, curricufzzm, arc., ADDRESS: NEW YORK UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY 209 EAST 23RD STREET NEW YORK CITY N981 kLgi X.f1h' .- T ,,, .',5,L" , f... e . FIT ESS o , ,,- 'X , , f'l!ifu'i.:.5.L .f -1-11" - 5' ': 353' . 'I 1 - ,ig f2:2- .'1.-l1".- yea n 4 ,ILA . .. .5 ig. 5.7:-.g , ,..4 . N- K, ou KNOW full 93525 " fQf7 'if, 2 7? well that the vic- I " . ., T" Y y tories of your Alma Ni KN Mater on the field of X mi .A 8 if . xm -...,,. . S. H 1,1 W V. ., 11,252 'l wi Y ,H athletics have been pos Q r Fi, : J P J el is iz. ' :L 1" L ii-S - T " I TECH ii -1 , , 2 1' f 5 N wt it 'fx YE 2 P A ' 7 ' A sr ggi: In - " -. 'ii-Q 4- X411 vi . ,fig-2, '- SP - '-L i.':1gQl: XXXgxj1X x"xii Vi Q 1 lx, 'i s.-. - - - Xe., iff 11 ' 11 al: FX DA F -Q.. ,. 7 X ' I N - H . U1 . Q G.. p-T'-QA, ,E i q i 4g 1 :C c l 1 .. 4, ..A' :el f ff - sible only because ofthe 'ull 3 L L L' . ' - 'r f,:,5 fitness of your teams. This involved the right kind of men, thorough schooling of these men by competent coaches, proper physical training, and the best possible equipment. In your college studies you have received from competent teachers that mental coaching which will fit you for the great contest of life. The results of your dental training in the practice of your profession will depend much on the excellence of your mechan- ical equipment. Superior workmanship requires and demands superior tools and materials. No competent artisan will waste his time and energy on inferior equipment. Much more essential is it that the dentist, whose profession has to do with the healing art, be properly equipped. Since 1844 The House of White has studied the needs of the dental profes- sion. Our aim has been and always will be to aid in the betterment of dentistry by supplying only the best in dental sup- plies and equipment for the profession. M Wg. , gg I . L s.,' .vJ,I Jii vfi-Q l You are assured when using a prod- 'f Q uct bearing the Trade W Mark' that H -l'i "'r"" : you are employing the best, and that Q.--:L i t ou are e ui ed to wm. imp .Willlll ll l Y q PP 4J' ,x3sf'.1-3:7-ZTSA - ft l X .. all is .r il We THE s. s, WHITE fl. -. ,f it DENTAL MFG co It f ll ' - - 5.1-pe...ggQ ai ... L .. f .ml ll li Gffaflzffi' i . W N 'fr , 1 .,-. .gre g H991 3-'V ' if 'lr 'R' 7fi1.-Y ff' 1 ' il sv ' l i gill. A05 . il I' ilikglw f 1, tilulii 5-.- "V ,A ',:.',?sj4:.Q '- - n- 1 ' - , ' 1'-ff! F'g',J,a,1y , . .Q - ' ' Xa' -I .lihizcgeii 1- Rx- ',gg!,,, - .' ' I A H I l'g..ffl:Qi4? MW' if IHS Illttel . W g 3 ' ,lf f ' f W ,fif-,.fz,g!y'g' . , . f, ilimfiii j 5, u -it 4' "Pg 2-:3',fg:1ffJqgil ,sit s Right .T'.!,:z'e 'e"f s f,-,.- . 14 .- -1, :iff ' "' fm 'i' 'l.",'g9' ffxllm nm'-mn '-- -- 7- ' -- '--12 -"15,,i 21 'I " vmlimnifllrllufilay fc- Mimi.:-ue.-f.-.'-1-::'::.'::"1T"""'f,iiIiQ A hi" il ' V' 3:-f -ww . fi . 1 'i ,fy-f'fg:-'af-W-1:if--we i W r -, ,V rf, ., - ia: - ' - 1 ' " " - 4' - A -,A -E, . ,Miz 30' " QYF ZT fh a EN -AL MVK,-:CQ wi-.1-,'.i ' rw- 'iii' ' - "HZf""Q ,-1i- i L, f-'--'- ., "2 - . 7'5'.L'fl1:"3k.'.j,,.1fL"7::L1Ti V' ' Ni ff ?' "i-,y " J xii' . A - f1-- :' -f,'1?1535vaf,1f2f-1' l 'f-'-my in lm .. fw" '!f..-,--,.t-,. ,i..,4,,-.A - 'iff' 1-H .f"'T'3""'.1 ' -5 ,, '?f'5s3y ,, aw.4:'3nf3,y 1- -lg,platawzggvggebsfg.-1fi2 ,, 51 552, TW Q5 - ,-,, gli, '13 7- xwt . 2 1 -' ,ff A Ha- H f,.,3,jf1f'f1z- 1 'v , H 1 -Wg -'gf -I--'kiZ3'i 3. . ' 4 542' 'W' ' : -1 v..:f5:!.3-, ff' .keifi-'fI.a I-il rig i z ,- U ' I:,mg,ta, '., A' I.:-2 A -,:- , , 5 gfi'i?:'14nI:- , irv - 2 nw -, ,h .' "-,A-. 4, .i. 'v r - - n- 2, ' V 2" .' ,:' ' , ' Qi. K '-'-'ii'ss.:F 22511 ',-YN, .f ff aff I lg l 9 - V ,. j I .flu it, ., .iff it I ll 'ii' I- 13 A., K ki 5:9335 jfLfi1.il.:-J .wr A "' --,sjf iii:-.I-f,.!J,, . ' iglil bzggvz ,gf-5 wif: 36,3 ', ' 4 'ENN' 'WK' 1"""'?1'iK .5 J ii -' j Q -I lg. Q 'f, ' , ,H -.-...wfte " We wi." "'!.i .J 'L A -1 - -1 1 'mal .44 'l"'fT'.':f, . . - H .. 1,1-,-A w,.g1x S1 , V- 5- ev .s ft- Q5 4. , Q - -5 ,wi f. ,..,-,cpwl-1 s"l""Wvr f-ata -:w'l'5rf: L i f if ff. use fe 3 Av .'iQ " " f". f 524-34 , , : ' '!7Jl','if'fi ' ' 1 I !-1 V Qr'f:f' -lj .' 4' f. iiESi'LCiyL!f '-' jill.. 'lv f'i'x",1f3H-" 1:5 Phi - , - 's A Y " ii 1 'gVl " Qf2 " - ,. 571.522-:af 15:1 -wtf'-f'qL '-'s:,1vg'?-':23vw2 f ' ' A'-5.6 1 , 45-5 - .:f?f7 . SQMEL- "5"4L!? -S. ""-. S" e fn " M35- """ ,, , .j,.,.,t-Y, 4-zz .,""'-M ' , -, -. -. - -we., n.e.n. K' f uf ' "i " - -Q- -i ' :!'f'f'ffrf-A-A-azasz. G gwmrqhvl- H ,. .,.c..- . th an la ' If ' E ' ' 5 .'2E'Y EE 'FTF g g- E an 5 '--, , 1E ei Z I li ,F E 55 13 H, OUR success in dentistry is dependent not only upon the professional ability which you have attained the past four years but upon correct business methods and modern equipment. ,A ,45.z,x Realizing this we have worked unceasingly to collect 7 SUCCESS and distribute data which will assist the beginner in the IN DENTISTRY . practice of dentistry, as well as to manufacture the best 1 and most up-to-date dental equipment modern science 53235222 and trained minds can produce. METHODS 1 MODERN I EOWNT i VVe only ask that you take advantage of the assistance l 'dwg 'gs-ff W we offer you. ? E.. F' EE F QE ' ' E E. E 22 f as ' V as as is as E gs gs is EE A as E I Es ai e is Q is is is is QE g 1, g is-. E 5 L: RITTER DENTAL MANUFACTURING COMPANY INC. ROCHESTER NAC Nearly Half a Century Serving the Dental Profession l2001 SZ55fEA9Cd9QB3Q453QB9C653QtDQA?BCEtDCJ53fPBDl0RC?BDC49fCL9QA'53D Equipment that takes ' ilk , .... lp by is ff 3 care of the future As you begin your practice, the Ritter TrifDent places at your disposal these highly perfected mechanical aids: fi Ritter Engine Ritter Cuspidoi' Ritter Bracket Table K E' Those not selected at the start, S THE RITTER TRLDENT may be added later. Wu And later - when your needs expand When you feel it advisable to sup' plement your skill with a complete set of low voltage instruments, you I can easily replace the TrifDent pedf l estal with the Ritter Unit. Com' E 0 ponent parts of the TrifDent are 0 transferred to the Unit, and you are allowed credit for the TrifDent pedestal. By this simple and relatively inf expensive procedure, you will possess equipment as ideally suited R11-TER to your nee s as if it were built to EQLEFISSENT your special order. ' FORSTBAUER DENTAL EQUIPMENT co., INC. Room 359 Fifth Avenue Building zoo Fifth Avenue New York QCWQJCS7b6YQJGVbGWU3VbCWQ9CS7DGYQJQS7DCYUG7bCVUCE7bCWQJl57DCVUQ l201 1 Q 3 raky in G Pc o W T 551' if The Electro Dental Unit may be built up, item by item, just as a dentist builds his practice. In this way the initial investment is conserved. "The Unit that Grows" "Growth better than Replacement" One may begin with a simple outfit and gradually build it into the most com plete and efficient of all dental operating units, discarding nothing in the process ': - F xv M si? 1 -lil . xl X M Xl N 3' .l...... M? 11' 1' li ip' H ' Q' w fl i if if H 5 H i It ai It in It e' LWAYS BUm.LD1NG -:-AL f-s CONSBRMILNG FULL PARTICULARS FROM YOUR DEALER 52021 4 Ancient Egfugfpit - Never Dreamed of the lDonc1ers of Modern Dentistru and Cabinet Desi n. ' 55 t -f 1 mul Qian. .-' V L-X s.. . LM. Y-,M , ' 'vi 1 -if Jlmerican Dental Cabinet No. 120 Q t,.' Um ..,...u...,' Cfheirs was the claq of elaborate gold and silver ornaments and furniture, but real beautu is simple and unostentatious like Jtmerican Cabinet No. 120. Cfheu spent a ,qreat deal of time embalming the dead. but little in length- ening the span of human life. American Cabinet No. 120 with its white glass medicine closets, aseptic opalite working surface. and steel draw- ers with white Puralin finish and woocl fronts, has done its part in making dentistru a wonderful science benefit to present and civilization. Have uou our catalog? lf not whq not. , Cl' he American Ca inet Co. Cfwo Rivers. lDis. l Our goods can be purchased from the dealer, in combination with chair, unit, engine, and in fact a complete outfit, on one contract on easy monthly payments. We will demonstrate our line in your city before you graduate and hope to see every member of the senior class. f2o31 WED BE MORE THAN GLAD TO Now that the days of steady grind are over-isn't it a mighty pleasant feeling to know that someone will be glad to discuss the different phases of your chosen Profession-espe- cially when that someone has been in close contact with Den- tistry for years, and knows all its "ins', and "outs" by reason of sound experience? a Yes, there's a great deal more sentiment in the professional world than the new entrant into that field at first may think. The HARVARD COMPANY-the oldest corporation man- ufacturing Dental Furniture and Equipment in the world- always has and always will maintain an interest in every graduate. And- MR. FRANK A. HAUSER, Manager of the New York Branch --will give his hearty personal attention to any problem you may place before him. If it's a position you're looking for-a location-or advice in planning your office, don't hesitate to think you're obligated in any way. Just feel you're welcome any timeg and you'll find the HARVARD COMPANY ready to supply whatever Equipment or furniture you may need--on such terms as paying while you earn. ' REMEMBER- Our showrooms and services are yours! TH E HARVARD COMPANY MR. FRANK A. HAUSER, Manager 303 FOURTH AVENUE NEW YORK 12041 There Is No Sub- stitute for Safety This illustration shows a typical "CDX" installa- tion. The wall mounting panel licrc used is of solid mal1ogany,and can be fur' nishcd at an additional cost of 5I0.00. lzosj The Victor CDX is IOOZ Electrically Safe. The Only Dental XfRay Unit Without a "Don'tf' 4'j',OOO Volts at Tube Ter' minuls. 3-inch penetration. IO1I1ll' liamperes regardless of line fluctuations. No floor space required. Hundreds of satisfied users know the wonders ofa safe, sane Dental XfRay Unit. VICTOR X-RAY CORPORATION Dental Department 2012 Jackson Blvd. Chicago THE DENTISTS' SUPPLY C 220 WEST 42nd STREE yu IOTI, 'S' FTICR you have been practicing twenty years you will ' l in orhte equipment. But 9995 have some definite iceas c 2 . when you come to equip your tirst orlice, better let us help you. The model operating rooms on exhibit in our depot will orler many valuable suggestions. They were designed by'experts and are the last word in convenience and com- pactness. Two of these model oilices are shown here. ' ' ' 'sh. It's the d mend on the equipment we turni You can always ei most up-to-date obtainable. And when you do need service you can be sure of getting it. Choose your depot as you would a professional associate. Iiet the depot's reputation for service--fair dealing and quality of products carriedg-be your guide. No depot in the country has a larger or finer stock of teeth and merchandise than this depot'--no depot is better able to serve you promptly and well. Come in and see these model offices and get estimates and advice OMPANY DEPO T FIFTEENTH FLOOR 0-I -2-3-4 5 6 T, NEW YORK Phones Wisconsin, 908 i206i ECONOMY DENTAL SUPPLY COMPANY 203 EAST TWENTY-THIRD STREET NEW YORK CITY ---uh LL, , Ain v-qzv LOUIS GUTERMAN, AGENT DENTAL EQUIPMENT S. S. WHITE RITTER ELECTRO DENTAL f2071 Back in the not too distant past, dentistry was more of a strong-arm game than a sci- ence. The best dentist prob- ably was the man with the biggest biceps. And the most efficient dental supply dealer, no doubt, had the biggest col- lection of wicked looking saws, hatchets, and sledges. But times have changed. Dentistry is now a highly spe- cialized profession, requiring the most improved instruments that scientists con contrive. For years the Bass Organ- ization, consisting of a group of experts in the dental supply field, has concentrated on its ideal-the combination of qual- ity, service, and dependability. Their reasonable prices have made friends of their old cli- ents and have attracted many of the younger dentists. Whether you want a single burr or a complete outfit, you are assured of the maintenance of their ideal. BASS DENTAL SUPPLY C0 , Inc 218 E. zard. s'r. Ashland 9237 M. BRAUDE lzosj v: or, Y' 0 6 o , .i- Gu v X vi Things You 'll Want to Know about- Supplee "Unit System" of denture construction. Aker's "One-Piece Casting" Technic. Adaptable Articulation-Gysi, Homer, Hanau Technics. Porcelain Root-Tipped Bridgework. Porcelain Jacket Crowns. Porcelain Inlaid Gold Crowns. Porcelain "One-Piece" Cast- ings Supplee Attachments oU'.i.i, XVANT TO KNOW about these modern tech- nics sooner or later. If you "bone up" on them now you will be ready for the practical problems of dentistry when you hang up your shingle. And when you want a good laboratory to carry out these teehnics for you, call on us. When you 'rein the neigh- borhoodcome andglve the Supplee new laboratories the "once over. " You'll find them modern and dif- ferent from the others. SAM,L G. SUPPLEE 8cCo. 17-19 Union Sq., New York Telephones-Stuyvesant 7470-7477 l2o91 To the Gmdzmlc.'- In these days every dollar .counts when you contemplate the equipment of a dental oHice. w We have in stock a large stock of dental equipment in mah0gmIYi STHY, and white enamel. 'l'he'prlCCS MC exceptionally low, and while -some of the articles are slightly used, it would require an expert to tell the difference from new. . Please call and have a talk with our equipment expertg he will gladly give you some valuable pointers along these lines. I We trust that we will be favored with a visit from you prior to placing your order. RUBENS'l'ElN DENTAL EQUIPNIENT COMIJANY llO West 42nd Streei New York City Telephone Bryant 8254 SZABO 555' BEER Denial S u pplz'e.r 30 EAST FOURTEENTH ST. NEW YORK CITY DENTAL SUPPLIES AND EQUIPMENT Phone Phone VANDERBILT VANDERBILT 4 0 4 3 4 O 4 4 MELROSE DENTAL DEPOT, INC. 41 EAST 42d STREET NEPV YORK CITY Corner Aladison Ave. Liggett Building Trade Ma1'ked Goods Q' Known Value Ritter Equipment Trubyte Teeth American Cabinets Steele Facings Castle Sterilizers Cnulk Products SPECIALISTS IN DENTAL EQUIPMENT Ufe plan oyfiees, suggest the decorative scheme, furnish blue prints, install the equipment free of charge Compliments yi The Royal Dental Laboratory I MASLAN KO, PRO:-iuizron 200 East 7IZU67l.Q7- Taira' Street New Yorh City I2lO1 vi A-ACE-A I. 1 + 1 11 11 11 I. 1 11 11 I. 1 11 F1 1 1 11 if I. I1 11 11 11 1 11 7 q v v Y 1 Y -v v 7 -v v vAv41-.1-ggv,:,v,:.v4:'rx:v V TLTATLTLYAALL LL I QHMMWMWWMWWWWWWWWWMWWWWWMWMMWWWMW III mm Im lllllllllll lml QQ 3: 79 L-U . ........... . ............. .... ........ . .... ....... gg ........ .. ........ .. .... 09 ..- " ' . .-I -ai un- U-- Q ESTABLISHED 1688 I PHOTOGRAPHERS EQUIPPEIJ WITH MANYYEARS EXPERIENCE FOR MAKING PHOTOGRAPHS or ALL SORTS DESIRABLE FOR ILLUSTRATING COLLEGE ANNUALS BEST OBTAINABLE ARTISTS WORKMANSHIP AND THE CAPACITY FOR PROMPT AND UNEQUALLED SERVICE 22OVVE.s'r 42-ii STREET, NEW Wax E. 0 p E r Q. 4 Es if 'E' ' 0 5' . 5: n Hlllillif :annum I 1 11 41 1 I. 0,9 millllllllllIIINIIIIIIIIIllllllllllIllllllllllllllllllllIlllllIlllllllllllllllllllllllilllllIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIF MJ 1.5 - -tv - " mul THE 1926 DENTAL VIOLET PRINTED AT STRAWBERRY-HILL PRESS OUR COLLEGE ANNUAL DEPARTMENT IS UNDER THE DIRECTION OF WILLIAM -I. MCQUEENY AT 25 WEST F ORTY-THIRD STREET, NEW YORK ROOM 620 TELEPHONE VANDERBILT 2830 ST RAWBERRY-HILL PRESS 432 WEST FORTY-FIFTH STREET NEW YORK 12121 ESTABLISHED I82O CLAUDIUS ASH, SoNS Eff Co., INC., U. S. A. LINCOLN BUILDINGS I UNION SQUARE, NEW YORK CITY ASH-IDEAL INTERCI-IANGEABLE FACINGS. ASI-I-IDEAL INTERCHANGEABLE BACKINGS. ASH-IDEAL TRUFORM COMBINATION SETS with gold cased pin Anterior Diatoric Posterior forvulcanite work. Economic value. ASH NfM TUBE TEETH. The genuine which can be ground and easily repolished. ASH REPAIR FACINGS. ASH ALL DIATORIC TEETH. ASI-I DOWEL CROWNS. For use on Vulcnite Plates. ASI-I FORCEPS, ELEVATORS, INSTRUMENTS, RUBBERS and CENIENTS. A visit to our depot will be of benefit to you. COMPLIMENTS OF UNION SQUARE DENTAL LABORATORY I UNION SQUARE NEW YORK CITY l2l3j Complimmls M S. SALOWEY R. BERK COMPLIJIIENTS OF Excelfefzz Rod Sfzop TI-Ili 149 E- TWENTY-THIRD ST. GLOBE CAF1i'l'1-IRIA NEVV YORK CITY Bfrlllfh 315 WASHINGTQN STREET , , , 121 E.TWENTY-THIRD ST. BRQOELYN, N. X . M. , NEW YORK CITY dll! IJ2.,Z PROMPT SERVICE BY DENTAL EQUIPMENTS Years of Experiefzce in D65Zlg'7Zl'7Zgg' and Equzpping Dental Ojqces ASK ANY PRACTITIONER WALLACE E. SADLER DENTAL EQUIPMENT 10 AND 12 EAST 23RD STREET, NEW YORK CITY S. E. SAMUALS, College Representative .Eslablished IQO3 214 To tfze Class gf' 1926 WE congratulate you upon the successful conclusion of your college career at N. Y. U. College of Dentistry. No matter what your future plans may be, we sincerely trust that your fondest anticipations will be fully realized. To the UlZIfL'71g'7'llIllZldfL'.f YOU, too, are to be congratulated upon the successful conclusion of this yearls work. We offer a word of wel- come, upon your return next fall, to the bigger, better Dental College. This store as always, is one hundred percent with the students and will always cooperate in every way with the Student Body. ECONOMY DENTAL SUPPLY COMPANY MR. LOUIS GUTERMAN Compliments qf Rfk Ave. Prem STATIONERS ES' PRINTERS 103 East Twenty-Fourth Street CORNER FOURTH AVENUE New York City Complimentr M CENTURY DENTAL SUPPLY COMPANY B . HU RWITZ, Praprirtat' 215 East Twenty-Third Street New York City l2l5j ESTABLISHED 1902 JULIUS ADERER, INC. .i , in 1 . 1 4 ilillllmul mW lillll'-re i 1 li , 'flilllllizlfillfllillllgii P ro d u c ts a re Insepu rn bl y Li n ked wi th Satisfactory R es ul ts MAIN OFFICE Il5 W. 45th STREET NEW YORK, N. Y. CHICAGO BRANCH 935 MARSHALL FIELD ANNEX BUILDING BROOKLYN, N. Y. BRANCH 4 COURT SQUARE VV AA IGHEST Quality Denture and Clasp Casting Golds, Inlay Golds, Solder, Plate, Wire, Lingual Bars, Orthodontic Appliances, etc. Pioneers and Always in the Forefront in F ormulating and Manufacturing Platinum - Gold Wire, Expansion Arches, etc.,for Use in Orthodontia. Scrap Gold, Platinum, Filings, Sweeps, Grindings, and any Waste Material containing Precious Metals bought at market prices or exchang- ed for Julius Aderer's Standard Products. Be Up-to-Date With the Chandler Dental Price 512.50 Accounting System Most Efficient Dental Record System Complete system. Packed in gen- uine mahogany cabinets with 200 Patients cards. One Year's Sup- ply Business Account Cards. Two sets A to Z plus set Jan. to Dec. and five other celluloid guides. The Chandler Dental Accounting System was designed to build and hold business. Its introduction is an answer to the great demand that has existed for years for a record system combining accuracy and simplicity. The most inexperienced can master its use almost immediately. Only a few minutes a day required for a com- plete and accurate record of all trans- actions. H. M. CHANDLER Engraved Stationery Printed Stationery 200 FIFTH AVENUE New YORK, U. s. A. 12161 COM PLIMENTS OI" BII,'I'IMORE CDAFETERIA ZIMNIICRNIAN 84 ALTFATICR 200 EAST TWIiN'I'Y-THIRD STREET NEW YORK CITY coMPL1nf1E,v1's OF IDEAL CAFETERIA II3 TWENTY-THIRD S'I'. NEW YORK CITY N , , , , SULTAN,S LOMPLIMILN 1 s or CHOCOLATE 5- RIEGLER LAXATIVES DENTAL DEPOT The Oldest Dental Depot on Twenty-Third Street 210 E. TWENTY-THIRD STREET NEW YORK CITY ARE SAFE AND RELIABLE Ask for Free Samplex SULTAN'S PHARMACY Northeast Corner Twenty-Third Street and Third Avenue NEW YORK l2l71 COIWPLIIIIENTS OF M. BROWN DENTAL LABORATORY 210 E. TWENTY-THIRD ST. NEW YORK CITY COMPLIIVIENTS OF VULCAN DENTAL LABORATORY SAMUEL j. HERMAN, Pnov. 14 NEVINS STREET BROOKLYN, N. Y. D R I N K , ' 5' S BEVERAGES BROWNIE A Real Clzurolaie Drink ORANGE CRUSH GINGER MINT JULEP NUGRAPE GOLDEN DWABF BEVERAGES HIRES H. KIRSCH 8: CO. 923 FLUSHING AVE. 172 COOK ST. BROOKLYN, N. Y. 12183 I c-0491 Compliments Class gf 1926 y . 1 THE COVER OF THIS BOOK IS KNOWN AS A I INDI G COVER .LVD BI.VDl.YG PR0lIl'CIu'II IH' EUGENE LEWIS COMPANY l'ZlGll'l'lI Avi-:Num TIIIRTY THIRD za THIRTY FOURTH STR!-:1 NEW YORK 5- A PHOENIX ENGRAVING COMPANY 155 -155 -157 East 16951. INEWV-YOI2K'CITY2 f2l9i You Can Get Patients F HIS to agree to more dental work, CARRY if you will show them --what dental work they requircg -Y -how they will benefit from itg -- how they will sutler should they neglect to have it rlone5 A why you recommend a certain treatment or rcstorationg -and how their mouths will look when completely restored. You can do all that with The ENDO-FORM. - It educates your patients to appre- ciate your servicesg convinces doubting patientsg -justifies the fees chargedg creates 21 desire for good dental workg helps to avoid misunderstandings, and makes a hvorahle impression on your patients. l1"1'rrlyI!N1ris! illf!'l'!'S!!'1i in building up a xm'4'r'srfizl prm'1i1'r should hafzir' a mln' qf our 24-pagr booklrt, 'VI Nfi't'SXdl:l' Whrrmuirlml in Drnml Prarlirr." 1t'sji'rr.fbr lllr asking am! ix 'worth 'ZL'l'ififlg hfbr. COLUMBIA DENTAL 8: X-RAY CORP. 131 East 23rd Street New York City DENTAL SUPPLIES 84 EQUIPMENT I - EI couzh Operailng Loom :S-QA 4:9329 . V E -7 - lx Q- c los --------- phone ,mm ap . I' - "" """ phone I Pd . - 0 N . Q ., am PR O 'I . Vanderbilt ' i 9 hi. 3 F l i Vanclerbllt n ' fzmlglcvqs Leceptxon 4L 0 lr --,-- 4043 cf----' 4044 ' YA M K, o o m um , W 0 e ra i ng l U- ' l FL oorh .6 I b rx es s um w gr so amp. - 'ce Q Y l MELROSE DENTAL DEPOT, Inc. 4l EAST 42nd STREET f f f NEW YORK CITY c'oRNER MADISON .-WENUE I,IGGli'l'T BUILDING I 220 if ,Z 1? 1. -3 Q4 Y -4 V u H. f F li r 'J W 'I E Q1 4 '. I 3 Q 5 2 i 5 5 N Q 1 75 'l E u - W, - -. - ,-, il-1- 1 - 1


Suggestions in the New York University College of Dentistry - Dental Violet Yearbook (New York, NY) collection:

New York University College of Dentistry - Dental Violet Yearbook (New York, NY) online yearbook collection, 1926 Edition, Page 86

1926, pg 86

New York University College of Dentistry - Dental Violet Yearbook (New York, NY) online yearbook collection, 1926 Edition, Page 53

1926, pg 53

New York University College of Dentistry - Dental Violet Yearbook (New York, NY) online yearbook collection, 1926 Edition, Page 180

1926, pg 180

New York University College of Dentistry - Dental Violet Yearbook (New York, NY) online yearbook collection, 1926 Edition, Page 137

1926, pg 137

New York University College of Dentistry - Dental Violet Yearbook (New York, NY) online yearbook collection, 1926 Edition, Page 103

1926, pg 103

New York University College of Dentistry - Dental Violet Yearbook (New York, NY) online yearbook collection, 1926 Edition, Page 81

1926, pg 81

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