New Rochelle High School - Rochellean Yearbook (New Rochelle, NY)

 - Class of 1925

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New Rochelle High School - Rochellean Yearbook (New Rochelle, NY) online yearbook collection, 1925 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 154 of the 1925 volume:

1" THE R$CCEEELLEAN 2139 R0 CHELLEAN for 19 2.5 $6 PVBLISHED DY 755 SENIOR CLASS cf Tho, HIGH SCHOOL at NEWROCHELLE,NEWYORK F oreword mthiiowh where he must blaze his own trail and place his Owii iiiilestOiies. This year a milestone has been placed in the life of every Senior, and we, who graduate, must separate; for our individual 147927193 compel each to 'choose his own path. And yet, as we stride forward, each on his own path, at times we look back in order to final 0W bearings more clearly; and as we look back we all shall see this common milestone, marking the spot where our paths divided. Aiid as we catch sight of this gleaming object iii the dimmess 0f the past, each one, be he rich man, poor man, lawyer or thief, will turn his course more sharply toward the white light of truth and will strive more earnestly to attain it. And if we shall come together once again in the clearing at the end of our course; if, after wandering far and wide through dark- ness and tangles, we shall see each other in the bright glow of truth, each will say to the others, "It was the bright glow of that mile- stone back there, where our paths parted, that guided MS on to this beautiful spot? Then if this book shall mark our common mile- stone it will accomplish its purpose. r l 10 everyone there comes a time when he must go on into the ' MwJ QQWE 14W K , .4 4mm Book I The School Book II The Classes Book III Organization Book IV Publications Book V Social Book VI Athletics Book VII Advertisements En mt. Olliffnrh SS7. Igraghnn Hrinripal nf New Enthellp Qigh $rhnnl, thrnugh mhnar influvnte 1112 11mm hnu able mart dearly in 51mm nur ihmla, the 52mm Glam hthiratw this imam nf "Eh; IRnrhzllean." 10 ll IN MEMORI AM SARA- KETCHAM TEACHERWFRIEND MCM XXIV BOARD OF EDUCATION WILLIAM A. MOORE, President GRACE B. PINE, Secretary HUGH GOVERN ARTHUR T. LEON E. IRVING HANSON ALFRED E. BARLOW FRANCIS X. FALLON JAMES H. ANDERSON VIOLA F. GOOD ESTHER E. SCHOFIELD VIRGINIA K. WILSON, Asst. Sec. Sthcrintendmt of Schools ALBERT LEONARD, A.M., Ph.D., Litt.D. S1rtper1'nteirtdmfs Assistant MARY R. CHAMBERLAIN FACULTY OF THE NEW ROCHELLE HIGH SCHOOL Principal CLIFFORD S. BRAGDON, A.B., Bowdoin; A.M., Columbia Dean of Girls LOUISE E. FLAGG, Physiography A.B., Radcliffe; A.M., Columbia ELLEN C. ABBOTT .................................... English A.B., Vassar; Ph.D., Yale. ALICE ADAMS ................................................ Latin A.B., Radcliffe. RUTH ALDRICH ........................................ English A.B., Cornell. ALICE G. AMIS ...................... Physical Training Savage School. HARRIET P. BACHE ................ Home Economics B.S., Teachew College; Columbia. REGINALD P. BAKER ................ Mach. Drawing Pratt Institute; Teachers, College. MARY E. BARR .......................... General Science A.B., Albion. FLOYD J. BARTLETT ...... Head of Englixh Dept A.B., Yale. LULU G BIRCH ........................................ English Ph.B., Cornell. OSWALD F. BLACK .................................. Biology B.S., A.M., Columbia. MARI; W. BOWERS ...................................... Latin A.B., Ohio Wesleyan. WALLACE B. BOWMAN .................... Commercial A.B., Randolph-Macon. VVINIFRED G. CARPENTERV...Laf'ZI11, Sr. Adviser A.B., Smith. H. A. CHAFFEE ........................................ English Ph.B., Brown. MARGARET M. CHRISTIE ................ Mathematics A.B., Trinity; A.M., Columbia. 15 ALICE V. CHRISTY ................ Physical Training A.B., Illinois. GLENN B. CHRISTY ........................ Wood Work A.B., B.Mu., Illinois. VIRGINIA B. CLARY .................................. English A.B., Goucher. HARRISON T. CODAY .................................... Latin A.B., Harvard. GRACE E. CRENNAN ........................ Commercial B.C.S., New York University. FLORENCE M. CROSBY .................... Mathematics A.B., Vassar. VVINFRED H. Dom .......... Head of Math. Dept. A.B., Michigan; Potsdam Normal. MARY DU BOIS ............................................ French A.B., A.M., Ohio W'esleyan. HENRY G. DURFEE .................................. History A.B., Williams CLIFTON T. EDGERLY....HCUd ovarcnch Dept. A.B., A.M., Dartmouth; Ph.D., Yale. SELMA C. ENGELBREKT ........................ Drawing Bachelors Diploma Fine Arts, Teachers, College. ELLA FIFE ........................................ zMafhematics Cornell. EUGENE F. FLAHERTY ............................ Spanish A.BA, Colgate; A.M., Columbia. ELSIE MAY FLINT .......................... Mathematics A.B., A.M., Brown; Ph.D., Columbia. ANTOINETTE J. FOSTER ............................ English A.B., A.M., Radcliffe, Columbia, St. Lawrence. ELIZABETH E. FOSTER .................... Commercial New York State Normal; New York Uni- versity. NANCY M. GLEASON .............................. English A.B., Oberlin. NOEL D. GODFREY ...... History, Senior Adviser A.B., University of Maine; A.M., Co- lumbia. ANTONIA G. GRANT .................................. French A.B., Smith. HENRY J. GRAYBILL ................................ Biology A.B., A.M., Franklin 81 Marshall; Co- lumbia. THOMAS J. GRIFFIN ............................ Chemistry B.S., Dartmouth. JEANETTE C. HALL ...... Hgad 0f Comm? Dept. A.B., Syracuse; B.C.S., New York Uni- versity. SEYMOUR HANDY .................................... Hixtary A.B., Syracuse. PAULINE HAYES ........................................ Mimic A.B., Wellesley; Northwestern University. ARTHUR B. HUSSEY ................................ Phyxics A.B., A.M., Bates, Brown, Columbia. CHARLES I. JOHNSON .......... Phyxz'cal Training B.S., Wesleyan. CLARA V. JONES ...................................... Spanish A.B., Oberlin; A.M., Columbia. BERNARD A. KEENAN .................................. Latin A.B., A.M., Brown; Ph.D., Harvard. ADELAIDE LECOUNT..............v.........1Watlzcmatics A.B., Mt. Holyoke; A.M., Columbia. EDGAR S. LELAND ............................ Mathematics A.B., Trinity. EDITH S. LORD .......................................... Spanish A.B., Boston University. HERBERT B. NICHOLS .............................. History A.B., George Washington; A.M., C0- lumbia. BERNARD B. NYE .............. Supervisor of Music American Institute Of Music; DANIEL P. OyBRIEN .............. Physical Training Savage School. LESLIE E. OSTERHAUDT .................. Commercial B.C.S., New York University. ALMA G. RUHL ............................................ Latin A.B., Barnard; A. M., Columbia. CHARLES E. RUSSELL ................................ Civics B.S., Brown. ROSETTA E. SHEAR ................................ English A.B., Vassar; A.M., Columbia. ELSIE L. SMITH ........................................ English A.B., University of Kansas. MARY L. SNOW ........................................ English A.B., Cornell. J. L. SPELLMAN ................................ Commercial B.S., Syracuse. ETHEL STROHMEYER .............. Home Economics Pratt; Teachersy College; Columbia. EDITH M. STURDEVANT .......................... Biology B.S., Tufts; A.M., Columbia. CORA H. W. TOWNSEND ................ Mafhcmafics A.B., A.M., Brown. ETHELWYN WARDLE ...................... Mathematics B.S., N. Y. State College for Teachers. HENRY G. VVELLMAN .............................. History B.S., Harvard; A.M., Columbia. DEWITT D. WISE .................................... English A.B., Dickinson. MILDRED H. LAWSON ............................ Librarian A.B., Pd.B., State College for Teachers; B.L.S., State Library School. CAROLYN F. WALLACE .............. Asst. Librarian A.B., St. Lawrence. CATHERINE O'HARE ............................ Secretary B.S., Elmira. RUTH WILSON ....................................... Secretary A.B., Connecticut. - ELIZABETH B. COOKE ...... lercln'oom Director 17 HISTORY OF THE CLASS OF ,25 HE Class of 125 has a history which is not. only memorable but also credit- able. ,25 has always aimed for high scholarship, a keen interest in athletics, and support of all other school activities. In these ideals it has not failed, but is able to unfold a history perhaps superior in quality and quantity than that of any other preceding classes. As Freshmen, when it numbered about four hundred, the class was organized soon after entrance into New Rochelle High School in the Fall of 1921, with James Caldwell as president. The privilege of organizing earlier than usual was granted because of its great enthusiasm to be an active class. The class had a large repre- sentation in the Scholarship Club when the Freshmen members were admitted after Mid-Years. In addition to this, ,25 gave much competition to other classes in ath- letics. At this time the foundation of its reputation which was soon to become stronger was established. In its Sophomore year the Class of 25, led by Marshall Swearingen, strove with all its might to obtain higher standing in scholarship, athletics and non-athletic activities. It successfully planned the first Sophomore Party ever given in New Rochelle High School; the custom Which has been adopted ever since by all Sopho- more classes. In athletics the boys carried off the honors by winning the Champion- ship in class football and baseball, and also tying for the hockey championship. The girls were equally successful in the athletic held, for out of live interclass sports they were champions in three: baseball, basketball and tennis. Besides this, the Sophomore class was the first one in the history of New Rochelle High School to edit its Class issue of the thurple and VVhitefl The class was not satisned in its Junior year to have merely the regular two leading eventsathe Prince-Junior Declamation Contest and the Junior Promaso it arranged to have a concert given under its auspices by the Hamilton College Musical Clubs. Because of the great financial success of this concert, the class was able to put over a most attractive and interesting Junior Prom. The success of the class in its Junior year was partly due to the enthusiasm and the untiring efforts of 18 our President, Joseph Nesbitt. The boys upheld their honors in athletics by having a large representation on the football squad, which won the county championship for the first time in many years. As in the Sophomore year, the girls were able to give to the Class of ,25 three championships in volley ball, baseball and track. This year, its Senior year, the Class 0f 25 has been listed very high because of its increasing interest in aiding the school in all types of work which would be of benefit to the students, and which would remedy any weaknesses arising in the student body. Partly through the efforts of the Senior class the new method of cam- paigning for candidates, which has proved very favorable, has been permanently established. The Seniors also had some part in the formation of the new traffic regulations, which have been made almost into a perfect system. The class also prides itself on being the first one which has as its president a girl, who has proved to be an excellent leader. Those who have been the representative body of the Senior class are: President, Alletta Morton; Vice-President, Adrian Ehler; Secre- tary, Else Kauzmann, and Treasurer, Robert Farlow. One of the leading social events of the year was the Senior Dance, which was held on Thanksgiving Eve. The Senior Play, the Senior-Faculty Party, Class Day and Commencement were made four memorable events. So far in athletics the girls have managed to win the cup in tennis and basketball, only losing the volley ball championship. On varsity teams our class has always been able to enlist many members. This year the champion cross country and hockey teams have had on them worthy repre- sentatives of the Class of ,25. Besides this, all but two of the girls who received varsity letters in basketball this year were Seniors. The spirit of co-operation which has always existed among the members of 125 has been a constant guide to the class. One proof of this is that the entire Senior class subscribed to the Year Book. This is a record which far surpasses any 3ther class and which has set a record for the school. The Senior advisers, Miss Carpenter and Mr. Godfrey, should be highly praised for the work and time they have given to the class. Through their guidance the Senior class has been able to uphold its ideals of high scholarship, athletic interest and support in all other school activities. Although each Senior seeks higher ambitions, he will forever look, back upon New Rochelle High School as a school which has not only prepared him scholas- tically but also has given him a clear view of life in business and social activities. It is with deepest regret, therefore, that the Class of 25 must leave New Rochelle High School, the school which has unfolded to all the true meaning of real com- panionship and good sportsmanship. Each Senior will be proud to say in later years: itI am a graduate of New Rochelle High School lU VICTOR ABATE West Point IKViCI, He has lots of pep At every step; This worthy trait Has Victor Abate. BRIGHAM ALLEN Mass. Institute of "BrigU Technology Handsome, large and tall, N0 slouch at basketball. As a Spanish expert he is still obscure; As a baseball pitcher, his fame is secure. MARGARET ALLEN Connecticut n'Peggyu Some girls specialize in business, Some prefer to teach, But whatever her profession, llPeg" will be a peach. EMIL ANGELON Brown University "Smiley" Never in a hurry, Never in a flurry, For what he cannot do today Tomorrow will afford a way. 21 Spanish Club; Radio Club. Class football, ,23. Class basketball, 24. Baseball squad, 25. G. O. Varsity football squad, l24. Varsity basketball, 23, 24. Varsity baseball, 23, ,24, ,25. Varsity track squad, 23, 24. Captain baseball, y25. Scholarship Club; Radio Club; Spanish Club. Junior basketball team. School squad basketball. French Club. Lost and Found Committee. G 0 Baseball, 23. Baseball, 25. Dramatic Club ; Spanish Club. RUSSELL BENSON Columbia If you waited to hear him speak Class basketball, ,22, 123, 724. V . . Baseball, 24. You wouldnt know he was about, Basketball, :24, :25. He only speaks twice ,n a week, Spanish Club. But that wonlt put a good man out. Orchestra. FRANK BERNARD Chicago University A quiet youth of medium size, He's one Of the best of guys. Triangular debates, ,23, 24, ,25. . , Senate. Let fools the studlous desplsey Scholarship Club; French Club; Nothing's lost by being wise. Dramatic Club. PHILIP BERZON Columbia A man of books, Ya he's no grmd! Class basketball, ,22, ,23, ,24. BM full 0f fun, ; Orchestra, ,22, ,23V 24. As you will fmd. Spanish Club; French Club. MARCUS BLECHMAN University of Virginia A fellow who might well succeed As a Bowery Bouncer, Contributions to P. 81 W. But weld much rather hear him Poster and Publicity Work. As a radio announcer. G. O. 22 HERBERT L. BORGZINNER Cornell "Barf; Triangular debating team, 24, 25. Secretary of Senate, ,24. An all around good fellow, Board of Governors Chess Club. . - . Chess team, 24, 25. A thoughtful-lookmg lad. Chorus of HPepita.H We predict for him SUCCCSS Library Club; Dramatic Club; When he leaves this place a grad. Scholarship Club. ERNEST HENRY BREHAUT Tufts rhShrimPn Senior Play. Does he laugh? Well, I guess, Varsity squad basketball, 72, H65 champion at the art; Foifha1214324 And I predict some day Junior Baseball, 23. Heyll laugh his sides apart. Class basketball, ,21, ,22. Scholarship Club, 321, 22; Dra- matic Club; Spanish Club. DOROTHY N. BRINDZE Barnard HDOW Interclass baseball, 24. Conscientious in work Interclass basketball, ,25. Dramatic Club. And cheerful and keen, Asst. Librarian Dramatic Club. She would like to go down Library Club; Traffic Squad, In a submarine. ,25; French Club. DOROTHY CATHERINE BROPHY Dot Columbla Dramatic Club; Libra'ry Club. Shds charming and attraCtiVE, Play Selectmg Comm1ttee, Drah In social life quite active; matlc Club' She has her part in school, too, As students as a rule d0. MARTHA BRUNING Syracuse rrJWartyH B h Id th' ' f 25, e O 15 miss 0 Traffic Squad. Shes surely nice, they say; . Second class basketball team. Then may her own ambition thrwe, Dramatic Club; G. 0. And bear fine fruit, some day. A NTHONY CALANDRO New York hColIie" University Rather dark and tall and quiet, With hair so nice and wavy; Perhaps heill be an admiral In Uncle Sammiek Navy. Baseball; Interclass Basketball. JAMES S. CALDWELL Business School To serve his fellow-students, To do whatever is righty To be old Gristede's partner Chess Club; Dramatic Club; He strives with all his might. Spanish Club; Senior Play. ANTOINETTE CAM ILLONE "Annettcil Annette has sung in the Glee Club, She also has studied French, French CIUb; Glee Chlb' And this is her main ambition To teach at a piano bench. 1 Baseball. G. O. ARTHUR CANTOR Columbia G. O. A nice, sociable youth J With both lad and lass, Ba5?ba11 squad, 94 y Senior baseball, 25. It s surely a pleasure To have Art in our class. MARGARET CARLAFTES Savage M 11091051 Class basketball, ,22, ,23, ,24, ,25. Class baseball, 23, 24. ' Have you met this sport? Class track, ,24. She is just the sort Vollev ball ,23 To enter any game French Cliib, ,23, ,24; Traffic And seek athletic fame. Squad, ,25; G. O. FRANK W. CHOFFLETTI "Fuzzyji Noble thoughts inspire his mind To be the greatest of mankind; Of mirth youill notice not a trace Scholarship Club; Dramatic Is stamped upon his serious face. Club; Spanish Club; G. O. ALICE LUCILLE CLAUS Smith Kleltlh She has the very nicest smile And helps the class teams all the while. Court of Honor; Dramatic We wonder if it is because Club; Scholarship Club; G. 0. She is akin to Santa Claus. 25 NESBIT E. COCKBURN He runs in the spring, He runs in the fall, That's why he can run The fastest of all. VIRGINIA ELIZABETH COOK Barnard Ihlimmy " Who doesn't know her and all she has done? . Always sincere both in work and fun. Virginia's a scholar and an editor, too; But just wait and see. that's not all she can do. JOHANNA B. COOKE 'hCoolaicW She has climbed scholastic ladders, From the bottom to the top, In reviewing her accomplishment We donyt know where to stop. CARLTON JOHN CUQUA hCuke" A hurdler he is, A hurdler hehll die. A wonderful fellow, A regular guy. 26 Mount Holyoke Dartmouth Football, 23, ,24. Track, ,22, 23, ,24, ,25. Captain track team, 25. Basketball, 25. Athletic representative of Class to G. 0. Council, ,24, y25. Secretary of Track Cluby y25. Varsity basketball squad, ,25. Editor-in-Chief P. Sz VV., 25. Treasurer of Class, C23. Junior Prom Committee, ,24. Second Dramatic Club Play. Senior Play; French Club; Scholarship Club; Library Club; Cheer Leader, 24, V25. Sedy of G. 0., 25; G. O. Coun- cil; Secyy of Senate; Glee Club; Library Club; French Club. Class basketball; Class baseball. Dramatic Club Play; Senior Play; hPinafore"; HPirates of PenzanceyH Scholarship Club. Track, ,24, 25. Class football, ,23, ,25. Track Club, 24, 25; French Club; Senate; Orchestra, ,21. DOROTHY DALE Barnard, ,26 aDOtu Here,s a damsel, very nice, XVho has brams that W111 suffice, Senior volley ball team. AS a friend she Will surpass French Club; Dramatic Club; Other members of this class. Scholarship Club. ALBERT DAMMEYER New York KAZU Unlversity Second team football, 23. On the football held he strove for fame, Junior football. And always played his hardest game. h?gsgrbzasfeliggil. In class he usually paid attention, Orchestra, I22, ,25; Spanish Thats why he never got detention. Club, 24; G. O. VIRGINIO DANIEL DE PIERRO Cornell "Riclzieu Doesn't bother with athletics C t t , - rossecoun ry eam. For he hasnt any tlme, G. 0'; A.; Spanish Club; Because he wants to be a success. Scholarship Club. So I guess that ends this rhyme. AGNES E. DEVITT Packardhs Business School Oh, shehs not severe Or foo austere, Spanish Club; Scholarship Ma; success be near Club; G, O, In her career. 27 HOWARD C. DINGEE, JR. Columbia School hrFrits" of Journalism When you need a dime He's not stino . Freshman track team. by h Orchestra. A dandy lad Senate, 22. Is Howard Diugee. CHARLES EDWARD DONOVAN "Charlif Mass. Institute of Technology A cross-word puzzle Hend is he, 180033311: g2??- - , rew squa , . It 15 too bad, I m. sure. Glee Club; Radio Club; Span- As he never does hls homework, ish Club; Senate. His teacher's looking for a cure. CHARLES EMIL DORNBUSCH Columbia Charles Dornbusch is our literary light, As a man of letters he shines very bright.Library Club. He knows all books from cover to cover Scholarship Club. And of rare editions he is a lover. NANNETTE DUFFY mm? Ab t th' ' 1 th' '11 b 11 ' shit 1551: 15;: t:lla-l Spamsh Club. a we axe r00 0 ' Dramatic Club. She helped her class in basketball And plays on the piano well. 28 DOROTHY EDWARDS Frances Robinson UDaSu President Scholarship Clgb, ,25. It is agreed that to our eyes ttPuyple 8z White,, Bulletm Staff. Dorothy does seem quite nice; ChggerggnggirrgigtcteeClub Play It wouldnt be a great surprise Senior Plgy Committee If all came true that we surmise. Dramatic Club, 24, 25. Volley ball, 23. Traffic Squad; G. 0.; Library Club; Senate. STANLEY EDMUNDs Columbia Rd Vicc-President G. q, ,24. At hockey heys formidable, T raffle Cgurt,C0un611- At football, too, you see, Eaifgltyzzssteik He wants to go to Columbia Crew Shuady, ,22', ,23, ,24. And earn a big M. D. Interclass track. Interclass basketball. Dramatic Club; Radio Club. ADRIAN A. EHLER Dartmouth a301, Our ttBoys" a class celebrity Vichresident of Senior Class. And our editor so bright; Junior Prom Committee. To make our Year Book famous Senior Dance Committee. He stayed up late each night. Baseball Manager, y25. French Club. Senior Ring Committee. Junior Issue P. 81 W. Editor-in-Chief of the Year Book. SARAH ELLIS Training School "Billy" Harlem Hospital A girl that is quiet and shy, Glee Club ,21- ,22, ,23, 124- And her best she is sure to try; Eggglizilggbtlgil; ?sz nghorus Sarah Ellis is such a one HPirates 0f Pgnzangelv Who still can have lots of fun. 29 JEROME ENGEL New York University llfew'yll Jerome is a cheerleader and gets up on the stage; He really makes cheering quite the rage. He's agile and quick and slim as a reedy In studies and sports he takes the lead. VIRGINIA S. ENSELL Froebel League "Ginny, Allow me to introduce to you This comely maid with eyes so blue; We know of no work she cannot do, But shels always gracious and smiling, too. ESTHER ERIKSON Columbia A skillful musician is Esther, No doubt she has proved it to all. If you wish, however, to test her, The orchestra kindly recall. ROBERT E. F ARLOW Columbia "Bab" Bob Farlow is the senior artist, Of all designers hes the smartest. He sits up lmost every night To draw with all his main and might. 30 Cheerleading. Scholarship Club, Library Club; Dramatic Club. Dramatic Club Play Committee. Traffic Squad lsergeantl. Scholarship Club; Dramatic Club; Library Club; Orches- tra. Dramatic Club; G. 0. Council; P. 81 W., 23, ,24, 25; Year Book Staff. Manager of Track. Junior Prom Com; Dance Com; P.8zW. Senior Jumor Issue FRANCES ELIZABETH FENTON Vassar bass SchplarshiplClub; French Club; Every day shels bright and gay Library Club; Dramanc Club. And at her work feels no dismay. Eglglggrtbglftlgzcggmizgegzs HSassU will prove a loyal friend, Volley ball, ,23, 22;, 2,5 ' One on whom you may depend. Baseball, 23. JEANETTE FERRY New York K703" Training SChOOl Class; basketball, ,22, ,23, ,24, ,25. Shejs jolly and shels popular; SRZEISEES CIUb; Traflic Squad, Athletic, too, It seems; Class! basEball, ,23, ,24. Youlll fmd that shels a member Track, 24- Of many senior teams. Scholarship Club, 22, ,23, ,24. ELLEN M. FISCHER lrElla'J A student of the business course, lTis whence her knowledge gains its source. 0 wise and happy is Ellen Fischer, And all good things we sure do wish Library Club. her. ' JOSEPHINE FOSTER . Wellesley "Jon There is a girl whom we all know, Scholarship Club; Senate: Dra- Her 1;: llame is Foster, we call her 13.212136- E21131: ac??? X? gillilll l, Class baseball, Class basketball; Her part In every sport and game Class volley ball; Class ten- Has brought the Class 0f 25 fame. nis; Varsity basketball. 31 L015 E. FRANCKLING N. Y. Institute of Musical Art A songster with a steady eye, Glee Club; French Clgb; Arts and Crafts Club; HPlrates of Shehd land an arrow where shed try. Penzanc6h Senior Flower She might appear at the Hippodrome Committee? Scholarship Club. Or make the noiseless metronome. - E CHESTER FRENCH Columbia Habla Vd. e1 Espanol, hKChestyh like to say. P 'd - , t S h C1 b, 25. As President of the Spanish Club rgzlxggam iiignd crgw. He takes the cake away. PAULINE FRIEDMAN New York "Pollyamuf University Shehs done her best, As have the rest, G 0 And in marks this year past ' ' She was far from the last. MURRAY C. FUERST Fordham Law School Murray has a line of talk To which every one surrenders; In twenty years perhaps well find Him selling us suspenders. Senate. 32 DORIS IRVING FUKUSHIMA "Def Tennis, track and volley ball Have Doris at their beck and call; In other clubs she takes a part, Supporting them with all her heart. Hunter College MORTIMER H. FURTSCH Columbia "Mort" Demosthenes Of New Rochelle, He talks at quite a wonderful rate, For he can win an argument And he just loves a hot debate. JOHN FRANKLIN GALBRAITH When it comes to high lights Along the Social line, Here,s one place he does shine. FRANCIS Jl GANNON Columbia lfBubsl, In future years when the fire bell rings, W'e'll heave a sigh of relief; For everything surely will turn out all right With llBubsy" as our HFire Chief.H 33 Vice-President French Club, ,25 Dramatic Club; Library Club. Asslt Mgr. basketball, 224. Volley ball, 23; Tennis, 23. Senior basketball. Mgr. basketball, ,25. Debating teamy 23, :24, y25. Speaking Contest. Scholarship Club; Senate, Dra- matic Club; Spanish Club; Library Club. P. 8z W. Staff, 123, 24. Cross-country, ,22. Though he doesnlt star 011 athletic heldsqrack, ,23. Crew, 25. Second Varsity football, ,23. Class football, 721, y22. Class basketball, y23, l24. Penmanship Club. Asst. Mgr. basketball, 23, 24. HUGH H. GARDNER Columbia Mike Track Club; French Club; Hugh's the class inventor, Trafflc Squad. Makes inventions by the ream; Track, 24' , , . Cross-country, 24. We hear that he 5 been trymg now Crew squad ,24' 25. . To make boneless ice cream. Banker, School Savings Bank. h PEARL GARFEIN N. Y. Institute of Musical Art Pearlts the one to charm the ear EWRCh Chlb? Glee C1319- XVith music that we Tove to hear; Plrates 0f Penzance. . . Volley ball team. Her playmg IS so soft and sweet, Senior Flower Committee. To listen surely is a treat. Scholarship Club. ARTHUR I. GAVRIN City College rrAmbitious" of N. Y. A soldier of fortune is Arthur A f . , Trafflc Squad; House. encer of worId-w1de renown, Cross-country A11 inn-lunged, Iong-distance runner, Track. A11 alI-around man about town. ERIC GEHLEN Dartmouth ttSuccess comes to him who strives? Baseball squad, ,2, !23. He strov'e with all his might; Football squad, 24' And for 1115 own good I shall say, Crew squad, y25. I hope that adage is right. Dramatic Club; French Club. 34 RODNEY GIBSON, JR. Princeton, 26 0 R0 d1, He wants to play dramatic roles, p . 4 . . Dramatic Club; Trafhc Squad; P.rhaps hke Franms Bushman, French Club. How sad ,thill be if he only plays Crew, ,25. The rolls we buy from Cushman. BARBARA GIFFORD Vassar "B arbgw XVhen other maidens bobbed their hair Barbara kept her light-brown Sedy Scholarship Club, ,24. tresses. Dramatic Club; French Club. She keeps her mind upon her books Senior Play Committee. And shows great skill in choosing dresses. UIARTHA L. GRINGOLD ".Marth Many a curl has Martha, Many a bright HHello"; She's one thafs very studious Among the girls we know. Dramatic Club; French Club; Senate; Glee Club. ABRAHAM GOLDSTEIN Columbia Zilbc" Class baseball; Class football. Football squad. Here,s another football man, Varsity football. He fought for New Rochelle. C1355 basketball. If he works for himself as he did for usgiiiigwgisigggfl. 22' H511 be sure to get 011 WCH- Spanish Club: French Club, 35 FRANK JACKSON GRANGER Georgia lrfack" Tech. You know all about him, . For he is no stranger. DE23aellibCIUbi Senate, Span- VVhat can I tell besides That his name is Frank Granger? GRACE MARIE GREGORY HGracieJi Here is another Hood student, , . 0 Spanish Club; Penmanship We really must confess? Club ; , Scholarship Club. If she will always be prudent Volley ball team, :22, ,23. She will be a success. ELIZABETH GUION Vassar HBettyll Her dimples deep, her manners sweet. Her friendship one would strive to Scholarship Club; Dramatic keep, Club; French Club: Her music echoes through oneis mind; Senior Dance Committee. . . , P. 8z W. Staff. A more charming girl one He er could find. . CARL E. HANSON Herels a fellow VVhO,S up in the world, Awfully lanky and tall; Class football ,22 ,23 :24. We think that he would best succeed Second team, ,2;- , , As teacher for study hall. 36 HELYN HATFIELD Penn Hall "Redll There is a gay girl Whols known in these parts, Her namels Helyn Hatfield, And she has won our hearts. French Club. ELEANOR R. HAYDEN She has an oratoric bent, This pretty little maiden; Some day therelll be a lawyer Called Eleanor Hayden. Dramatic Club. Prince-Speaking Contest. CATHERINE HELMRICH n K a yu A wealthy sailorette she will be With such a name on her family tree. She, herself, will pilot her boat, French Club. Her riches will make it a palace aHoat JEANETTE MARY HENDERSON N. Y. llJeme University She is earnest, she works hard To be a commercial llsecretairefl Hair, brunette; complexion, fair, To one and all she's a good pard. Penmanship Club; Spanish Club. CHARLES HERMANN Here's one who may, in the course of time, Cover himself with glories. He'll be known throughout the world As a writer of bedtime stories. RALPH K. HEYMAN Cornell A good debater, Freshman Debating Team, y22. Not an athlete bold; Asst. Baseball. Mgftt 24' , , Var51ty Debatmg, 24, H311 be m the Senate French Club, Scholarship Club; hEre the years make him old. Senate; Radio Club; Chess Club; Senior Play. MARGARET L. HILL Pine Manor "P 471' President French C1ub,j25. M g t1 d , Lost and Found Commlttee. . ayr ta: q elrtture tatic' Dramatic Club; First Drama'mc 'e er sntl es ecs , Club Play. Shed be a hlt for sure Banker, 325. In a career dramatic. Trafflc Squad. RUTH A. HILL Dana Hall r. - Senior Ring Committee. Amone us. all She s,moft cum Scholarship Club; Dram. Club; Excels 111 many ways, 7 Year Book Staff; French The hccllo plays 11ke Orpheus lute Club; Arts and Crafts Club; And always captures A,s. Orchestra; Traffic Squad: Dramatic Club Play; Senior Play; Hand Book Staff, ,25. 38 MARION CATHERINE HOLBY Mount . r' Tonmsz Holyoke Commend this maiden for her wit, Who has a way of using it That makes one say, to, Tommyis bright." Let none dispute that this is right. SYLVAN HOROWITZ Cornell "Toby; Baseball is his favorite sport, For others he has no time, For he will be a Senator And make his name sublime. MARY ELIZABETH HOUSTON Parsolfs School of Fine Arts Oh, hereys a maiden whom they say Dramatics helps in every way, Interior decorating Will Her own desire for life fulfill. "Ginv League Why they call her madamoiselle Everyone should really know; For though she hails from New Rochelle She leads each Paris Fashion Show. 39 VIRGINIA RICHMAN JAMES Froebel Library Club, Spanish Club; Junior P. St W. Committee; Junior Prom Committee; Senior Dance Committee. Class track team, 23, 224; Class i baseball, ,23, y24; Class volley ball, 24; Class baskets bally 23; Varsity basketball, 23, ,24, ,25. Baseball team, 23, 24, iZS. Tennis team, 23. Scholarship Club; Dramatic Club; Glee Club. Dramatic Club. G. 0. Representative, 21, i22. Library Club, ,24. Soph. basketball team. Soph. tennis team. Dramatic Club; Senior Play Committee; Freshman tennis team; Soph. Party Committee. VICTOR JOHNSON New York Umverslty Roses are red, . . Violets are blue, ScholarshIp Club; Spamsh Club. B b 11 S d, 23, ,25. Einstein's a wise bird, ase a qua beic" Johnson is, too. BROOKE W. JONES Exeter Kloncsieu XVhen this Year Book becomes so Varsity football, 724' famous Crew squad, y25. . That in his grave, poor Shakespeare Year BOOk Staff;'L1brary C1,ub; groans Senate; Debatmg team, 25; Dramatic Club; French Club; For its fame therer be some reasons Trafflc Squad; Senior Dance And one is surely HBrookie" Jones. Committee. HERBERT KAHAN Columbia rrH If Varsity basketball squad, ,22, W 23; Varsity team, 23. V24. He may not be husky Captain Varsity team, y24, 25. And he may be small Class baseball, ,23, 24; Class H ,, , football, ,23. BM tweet-twa Kahan Year Book Staff; Scholarship Knows basketball. Club; French Club. ROSE JEAN KAHN Wellesley KbR. 031 Rose. a flower liked by all, Library Club; French Club; Ouf school she will adorn Dramat1c Chlb; Scholarshlp Club. Sweet as grows on any lea Ever free from thorn. 40 VIRGINIA ELIZABETH KARR Art School "Betty Betty is such a Winsome lass, She has held many offices in our Class; She is known by all as a fine athlete And in sportsmanship she canyt be beat. ELSE KAUZMANN VVeIlesley "JockU Our Bullethfs Editor is Else, Class offices held by the ream; 111 athletics she surpasses all others For she ,5 been 011 every class team. LARN ED KETCHAM nLaru Michigan Good looking and straight, He's dressed mighty well; Angelic he seems, But you never can tell. ELIZABETH KINGSBURY Skidmore "BettyU We found her 011 the tennis team And will agree her stroke is mean; If the future comes without its ills VVeyll have another Helen Wills. 41 Varsity squad, 23, y24y ,25. Class basketball teamy 22, 23. Volley ball, 24; tennis, y24; baseball, 24. Year Book Staff: sec'y of Class. 22, ,23; V.-Pres., ,23, 24; Pres. Honor Court, 24, y25; Asst. Editor of P. 81 XV, Junior issue; Class debating team, y25; Varsity debating team; Senior Dance and Junior Prom C0m.; Dramatic Club; Library Club; G. O. Secyy-Treas. of Class, y22; Treas. Class, '23; Sec'y Class, 25; Scholarship Club, 22, 25; Vice-Pres. Scholarship Club, 23; ,24; Editor of Bulletin; Dramatic Club; Library Club; Junior Prom SZ Senior Dance Committee. Freshman basketball team. Varsity basketball squad, 22, 23; Varsity basketball team, ,25; Capt. tennis, y23, 24, 25; Class volley ball, 23, ,24, '25; Capt. 25; Class baseball team, Q3, 24; Class track team, ,24- Honor Court, G. 04 Track Club. Track team, 524, ,25. Hockey, ,24' Trafflc Squad: Junior Prom Committee; G. O. Tennis team. G O IDABELLE KNOWLES Savage uSPUj-H Like the water from the pump, Spiffy Knowles comes on the jump. Varsitv Basketball' Dramatic As center she can get the ball, Cluh; Trafflc Squgld. For she is quick as she is tall. FREDERICK KOPF Rensselaer Polytechnic When that blue card comes around, . And to Hunk weyre getting ready, EgggizlrlshCungmb. The blues get lots of others, But HF" never stands for Freddie. FRANCENIA LANGLEY Law School trFrauj; In athletics she works away, I'm'sure she practices every day, spglellifaltecmb; Dramatic CIUbI She'ieipnxgrtisythe larks and keeps up Senior bhsketball. And still shefs quite happy and gay. MARION GERALDINE LE PORE N. Y. U. ttMadicti Four successful years she now has had, We wish her many more; . Scholarship Club; Spanish Club: When she serves a boss with pen and Penmanship Chib- pad Hetll count on Miss Le Pore. 42 REBECCA LESCHINSKY N. Y. U. HRay" May your days be bright and happy And your eyes be always snappy G 0 And your manners never Happy And your brains be never nappy. ELIZABETH JANE LEWIS ercHy" In Givinv answers shebd excel, IF shebwoul'd 0 so far Libxary Club; Dramatic Club; g , Trafflc Club But Elizabeth's a quiet mouse, She is no talking star. GEORGE T. LIcHT Yale Not 50 short, Class football, ,22, ,23. Not so tall Executlve Commlttce. , French Club, 24. But 3 Pretty good guy, Exchange Editor P. 8: w., ,23. Whobs liked by all. Radio Club, ,22, 23; Traffic Squad, 23. MORTON L. LINER N. Y. U. Mum as a mouse, Never boisterous nor gay, French Club. But you never can judge them G 0 When they come that way. 43 VERA RITA LION N. Y. S. College 'chcVJ for Teachers SheYs a Lion with her lessons, At History, at HBear"; A Lamb with her possessions- A Menagerie quite rare. HAROLD GEORGE LIPPOTH HUW He doesn,t play base Nor foot nor basketball, 5 But when the ice has frozen He answeris hockeyis call. ELIE LOIZEAUX iiTimii Now here is Elie Loizeaux, Heys always just the same, It's quite an education To learn to spell his name. KATHERINE LOTZ Packards ttKayii Business School In sports and in studies uKay" makes her mark, But nevertheless sheys quite ready to lark, And we predict that in the end Katherine will have many a friend. Mandolin Club. Sedy Mandolin Club, ,24, ,25. Dramatic Club. Basketball team, y22. Football squad. Cross-country squad. Crew squad; hockey. Iiiterclass football. Interclass basketball. Library Club; French Club. Crew squad, "22, ,23, Varsity crew, 24, ,25. Varsity football, 24. Spanish Club. Scholarship Club. G. O. JOSEPH J. LUKAcs HJWU Pi 8z W. Business Mgr. I v t P. 8: W. Bulletin Business Mgr. 111363;: yam; t G. 0. Council; Radio Club. n O . a ree , Scholarship Club, 24. On a polished desk Dramatic Club. Kiloeill" rest his feet. Crew, ,23; Varsity crew, y24, 25; football, y23; Varsity, ,24. Spanish Club. FRANK LUX "Hank" Althoy you see his name is Lux We cannot say heys light, But weyd rather use some Ivory Flakes To make our laundry White. G. O. DAISY M. MACCAFFIL This Daisy is a timid flower, As daisies are, they say; G. 0. Although she hasnit been here long, We hope that she will stay. ETHEL MAY MALCOLM SON A shy and bonnie lass is she, As sweet a one wcid like to be, And all her friends are sure to know G- O' The kindly deeds she can bestow. 45 VINCENT MANCUSI Fordham MICUOSZW He doesn't like to study, Spanish Club. He's as quiet as a clam, Freshman basketball. But just because he acts this way ' D0es1ft make a guy a "ham? IQHN MARCHETTI Columbia A fellow Whose report card 15 almost always hA"; He may have a system That we'd like to take away. JOSEPH ANTONY MARIANO, JR. hfFirfW Notre Dame , - 11 - n Hes 111ckn211ned Flrpo, Spanish Club. But whats 111 a name? Crew. The hFirpo" you see here G. 0. Is gentle and tame. CARMELA MARTORANA New York "M ill 11W University Chatter, chatter, just ca11,t stop, Always on the jump and hop; Baseball team, When merry giggles flll the air Spanish Club; G. 0. You know Carmela must be there. EVELYN JEAN MAY "EWEU Cornell Some will be poets or modellers of clay, What Evelyn will be is hard to say; nessee Or run off typed letters for aged John D-. LILLIAN MAY iiL. 0? Her working ability Has given her fame, Though she is a scholar Sheys a sport just the same. Wellesley EVERETT MAYER Wharton 'CMz'leeii Mike Mayer is a basketball player And also a famous guard, When pucks come sailing thru the air He blocks with his body hard. NICHOLAS MAYER Columbia "Ni: 12 U iiNick" can twirl a wicked pill, That goes right across the pan; Him make the Yankees fan. 47 She,ll either teach Music in East Ten- Perhaps some day we'll stand and watch French Club: Dramatic Club. Class volley ball, ,24, i25. Class basketball, ,24, ,25. Year Book Prophet; Year Book Jingles; G. 0. French Club; Dramatic Club, Scholarship Club; Senate; 1. Chess Club. Class football; Class hockey Varsity hockey, 24, ,25. Radio Club. Class baseball. Varsity basketball, ,24, I25. Capt. Soph. basketball. Baseball, 25. Football, ,22, ,23, 24. Class baseball, ,23. Soph. football, 22. EMANUEL MILLER "1W am'zif ttMannie" has a prominent trait That gives right with his name; In anything he ever does, Youtll fmd hetll ttPlay the Game." W. WEBB MOFFETT Renssalaer Pblytechnic, ,26 About this fellow named above Therets little we can say Except that he grows better Every day in every way. ALLETTA MORTON Savage Herets to our President, so loyal and true, Steering our ship of State over the blue; Neyer was an athlete so willing to strive As Alletta, to bring fame to dear y25. AUGUSTA MOTZKIN HGuf A champ in history we have in class, Her name I need not tell; If you guess ifs Augusta Motzkin, I'll only say, HWell, well? 48 Class basketball, t22, ,23. Class baseball, 23. Baseball squad, 2?. Basketball, 23, ,24. French Club; Library Club; Dramatic Club; Radio Club; Scholarship Club. Class baseball; tennis, 25; Yea: Book Staff; Sergeant Trafhc. Squad: Asst. Mgr, track, ,24 President Senior Class; Varsity. basketball, 22, !23; Captain. Varsity basketball, 24; Staff Sophomore Issue Pt 8: VV.; Captain Track, ,23; Captain. Champ track team, 24; Cap- tain champ volleyball team, 24; Captain volley ball team 25. G. 0. Council; Sedy Athletic Committee; Captain Class basketball, ,22; Chair- man Senior Dance Committee ; Triangular Debate, y25; Li- brary Club; Glee Club; Dra-- matic Club. Scholarship Club. Penmanship Club. ANNA J. MURPHY New York "ferryd University Modest, capable, charming and sweet, A friend like that you cannot beat; A very good student, a sportsman, too, And a manner thatls gentle, resistless and, true. KENNETH P. MURPHY Cornell Hillurjrlzy" To be a reporter for the Standard Star, Eggl'lggpstifftx23 ,24. l,iis ambition is not love; Asst. Mgr. of football, '23. He 11 please us all by wr1t1ng up A. A. Council. The news of Tuckahoe. ALBERT K. MURRAY Cornell n A In As the French Clubls former president Pres. French Club, 24. We like him more and more; Scholarship Club; Senior Dance UParlez-vous Francaisf he says each Commutee; G' 0'; Crew. day, ltOui, oui" and ltAu revoir." JOSEPH NESBITT Columbia lilocu Class President, Junior Year, , 1 f 11 Senior Dance C0m.; Junior Joes a popu ar 6 er, . Prom Com; Hamilton C011- M-G-R of basketball, cert Com The school will miss him awful Football sqtlad, 24' 25; Varsity When he dont come back this fall. hockey, '24; Basketball Mgr.; Class basketball, y23; Tri- angular Debates; Senate. 49 DOROTHY ODELL erotu Dot is a girl whom we all would like To have as a friend throughout our life; Mandolin Club; French Club, She is dark and jolly, as true as steel, Freshman basketball. . . . G. 0. She Wlll meet w1th success; let tlme reveal. SHIRLEY OLLENDORF National Park "5. Ofl Seminary Shirl Olle d f, h ' . h t, . Th2, wa Engrthst :21: S or Dramatic Club; Scholarshlp y a, . 5v , Club; French Club; Library However, she doesnt mlss a thmg, Club; G. 0. Although itls in her eyes. VICTOR S. PETERFREUND New York "Petal; University Hereys to V. S. Peterfreund, And Im sure when he grows old That if hes elected Congressman Heyll knock the country cold. Traffic squad, ,24, 25. JANET ANNA PETERSON Columbia "Anny Tall and graceful, bright and slim, Secly Junior C1355; Jr. Prom . . . . . Committee; Library Club; She trles to 'do her WO'Ik w1th ylm, Dramatic Club; Spanish Club; Friendly smlle and ham qulte light, Scholarship Club; Glee Club; In everything shelll be all right. Trafhc Squad. 50 ARTHUR PETERSON "Omf A football enthusiast is Arthur, A baseball player, too; For one who knows once said of him, HA born infielder, tried and true? LEWIS J. PINTO Wiew" A good debater is Piiito and A worker as a rule, For What he has done in the Library Club Is known throughout the school. Cornell JACK POLLOCK "ZekeU Dartmouth If ever you hear of an actor, The receiver of world-wide acclaim, YouAll notice his name is familiar As Pollock of New Rochelle fame. MARTHA PRATT VVellesIey To one so wise, To one so learned, Despite her size, All eyes are turned. 51 Scholarship West Point, !26 Baseball. Varsity; Football Squad; Track. Orchestrai Capt. Soph. Class Football. Capt. Junior Class Football. Crew Squad. Interscholastic Debating Team, ,24; ViceKPres. Senate, y24; Pres. Senate, AZS; Sec'y-Trcas. Spanish Club; Senior Rep. P. 8; XV. Bulletin; Dramatic Club; Chess Club; Library Club; Spanish Club; Scholar- ship- Club. President Dramatic Club. Senior Play; Glee Club; Sen- ate; Library Club; Scholar- ship Club, y24; Spanish Club, ,24, 25; Prince-Junior Con- test, ,24; G. 0. Council, 25. Club; Dramatic Club; nYear Book" Jingles; A'Year Book" Prophet; French Club; G. O. BARBARA REDDING Mt. Holyoke IABanI She's a ver r unassuminU Girl Senior tennis team- VVh d esii't tri e f0: ibmie Dramatic Club; French Club. O O . S V 'a i Senior volley ball, 25; Second But by playing on the Senior team Senior basketball. She won it just the same. Traffic Squad; G. O. JEAX ROANTREE Antioch If you'ire feeling blue or ill, Jean will surely cheer you; Class basketball, :24. In work or play she's there with a will, French Club: G. 0. It's a joy to have her near you. MILDRED ROUGE New York i'lllz'gz'i University Amid the rush of these noisy rhymes, t W'e discover this maid who is quiet betimes; What a wholesome way to make us SChOlarShiP Chib- all say, G' O' - HThis restful manner and pace will 7! Pay- CHARLES L. R005 Columbia nCharlie" h 1 R . d' b g, Spanish Club; Orchestra; Traf- 01: 3 3123,11 00:- 15 a :a 10 11 he tLieut.i ; Scholarshlp Club; 11 a er 9 grea renown, Dramatic Club; played for You cannot furnish another one Second Dramatic Club Play; With skill to play him down. G. O. 52 MARTIN JOSEPH R051: .BAUM TTVIarfyU HeTs known at home as a radio drone, Scholarship Club; Radio Club; And in school as a short-hand king; Dramatic CIUb; Chess Chlb- s Intericlass basketball. But he beats them all on the held of Baseball squad. b311, Senate; G. 0. Where he has a powerful swing. ERNESTINE M. RUMPF Barnard TTEmieTT She is the only Ernestine 111 all the Senior C1355; Scholarship Club; Spanish The Scholarship Club is where you'll Club; G. 0. find This earnest little lass. KATHPRINE A. SAUERZAPH Packarde irKayU School We do not lznow Just whom to blame When a girl whds sweet Has a sour name. Spanish Club; Dramatic Club; G. O. ELIZABETH SCHAEFFLER Froebel "B 0551 League ' or ' ; , Lost and Found Bureau; Glee She 11 CO hack g0 Ehild 1233:1373, 7 Club; Arts and Crafts Club; To teach in sc 00 in c 1 15 ways French Club; HPinaforeT, The little people of the town, Chorus. And thercfore be of great renown. 53 BEATRICE SCHEIN N. Y. U. 113 601: A quiet personality Is noticed in this maid, But maybe in reality She isxft quite so staid. u n x; , nmw" HELEN C. SCHMIEG Columbia She's an all round good sport Of the very nicest sort, And weyll miss her peppy way After graduation day. JEANETTE SCH MUCKLER "Jean; Quiet and gentle; W611 remember her name As having added to New Rochellek fame By working, studying and supporting the teams; And of hopes and ambitions, ,tis said she has reams. ISABELLE SCHNEER Sweet Briar 'Belle J $1165 not athletic, But whowould care; We like her smile And her golden hair. 54 French Club; Dramatic Club: G 0 French Club; G. O ANNA SCHULMAN N. Y. U. In typing, Anna, you take the lead, For thirty-one words is your speed; If you have thls pep 111 other thmgs, Penmanship Club; Spanish too, . Club; G. 0. well never be able to keep up w1th you. ELSIE LOUISE SCHWAB U Bi 1W Though Elsie is of the quiet sort Everyone knows that shds a good sport. She pegs away at all her work, There,s nothing that she tries to Shirk. MARGARET M. SCH WARZ rrPngyu Let me here present to you A maiden fair and blond, Who all her work can ably do, And of social life is fond. Scholarship Club; Dramatic Club; Spanish Club. PATRICIA SEACORD ttPattytl Arts and Crafts Club tVice- W d t k1 her ambition, i PresJ ; French Club. :1 onf t :OW e antt sa . Freshman basketball; Soph. er u u e W C y, champ. team; Soph. track; But we have this suspicion, Soph. baseball; Varsity bas- She will get along 0. K. ketball, ,25. 55 LOUIS SEIDENSTEIN N. Y. U. When the call goes out for basketball Louis Seidenstein tears down the hall; C1355 baskeiball teani. :22, ,23; And youlll rarely hear them raise the 24; Var31ty team, 2.5. G. O. howl, HLouis Scidenstein has made a foul? MARJORIE SELMAN WMarju For 2111 we know or have ever yet heard, . , Business Staff of HPepitaP Here 5 a girl With mind not second or Picture Committee of Year third; quk; French Club; Scholar- She may rise on soapboxes in New ShlP CIUbg York Prince-Junior Contest. 5 Or grow wealthy inventing a timeless fork. JOHN W'M. SHEA W'omwij Johnny Shea is a jolly old boy S h 1 h. Cl b S . h CI b . C oars 1p 11 ; pams u . And a wonderful worker, they say , Asst. Manager basketball, .23, In assisting to manage the basketball ,24, G. 0. team He lost not a single day. ALICE S HEPARD Smith 37ch She can bluff with agility rare, Tennis team. . Her lessons are done at her ease; yeriiittESOk Staff Picture Com- But Alice, take carey 0h, do beware, Dramatic Club. Of Profs with their college Dis. 56 HARRY SILVER Fordham Harry Silver is made of gold, Which fact his name may deny; Spanish Club;Sch01arship Club; He has before him a very high goal, Qhess Club; Radio Chlb: W'eyre sure he,ll get there 50011 or 6' Oi die. RAYMOND C. SIMONSON Stevens Inst. "Ray" of Technology Here is another radio bug, Our Class is full of them; And if they are like Simonson, Theyill all turn out great men. Radio Club; Stamp Club. G. O. MARGUERITE SPIDELL Froebel League Beneath a lucky star Our Marguerite doth stand; For talent and good fortune Travel hand in hand. French Club; Scholarship Club; Arts and Crafts Club; G. O. MARTHA STERNAL 'UWm'fau ' 'oh 1 d ' d ', . . A Simle to- 110 t a C Cu 3 ay Glee Club; iiPepxta'i; Dramatic A disposmon kind and gay, Club' Scholarship Club. A voice like Tetrazini's own, TrafficSquad. Refined in both technique and tone. 57 HAROLD SUNSHINE Pennsylvania It sure is tough To have a sis of fame; Scholarship Club. But he should care, G' O. For whafs in a name? LORRAINE SUNSHINE 5mm French Club, Scholarship Club; Sheys a queen in athletics, 11381212132131 22:: G3? silclghnd- A dream 1n aesthetlcs;,, team Varsity basketblall; first We foretell for Sunny team Varsity basketball; Somenotable rise. "PepitaN; Class volley ball, ,22, 23, ,24; Class basketball, y23, y24, 125; Class baseball, !23, ,24, !25. ALBERT M. SWANK Muhlenberg "Swankyei French Club; Dramatic Club; hSwankyh is a cheerful guy, , a u - - . n, Scholarship Club; Chess Club, Hes Got the V01ce Wlth the Smlle , Ass't Mgr. track; Class base- When it comes to being an optimist, ball; Class basketball. Hes got us all beat a mile. JACK TALBOT New York University Library Club; Traffic Squad; HIS middle names emClenCyh Varsity baseball squad; Senv Refute that if you C313 ate; Class basketball; Scholar- Heres a fellow who W111 be ship Club; Assht Business The HIdeal Business Man." Mgr. P. 8: W. 58 PAUL TALMEY Yale trBudu Indulging in the sport of kings, Senior Play; Senate; Dramatic , - , Club; French Club; Property We know you 11 find h1m best, Mgr. hTickless Timeh; Chess Some day he may become a champ, Club. For heys a whizz at chess. ELIZABETH THOMPSON Stanford "Timmy; University For all the A,s on your report . Wehd gladly give the joys of sport; gramatxc CIUb' Wehre glad you came and settled here To add some pleasure and some cheer. CHRYSTAL H. TODD Cornell hChryf y 1 t 1 t G. O. Presideht; Library Club; A: egcg 16:1 'athfeg A. A. Commlttee; G. O. Coun- n ?P am 0. few, cil; crew, '24, :25; football, We all Ilke Chrls h24; Dramatic Club. And you do, too. CLARENCE O. TUCK Harvard Bub Class football, ,22; Class base- Mary had a little lamb, ball, h224; Igasegall Asst. 363n- . , h f . ht; agar, , 4; oot all second ar- B Ye'thmk you Hligd t1 a t: rlg sity, 23; football first Var- u flint got no 1. '3 am, sity, ,24; Scholarship Club; He 5 got an appetlte. French Club; Dramatic Club; Senior Play. 59 DOROTHY MARY VALENTINE HDOF, Here is a wonderful tttrailer," Who found that her task was light; May what she has learned never fail her In doing her work Hjust right? MARION B. VALENTINE ttMass" Some make life quite laborious In order to be meritorious; Not so with our ttMass," she,s up with her class, Tho' she shrinks from becoming no- torious. IRENE VAUGHAN nRene" Tall and also slender Hair thatys rather light And quietness to lend her The charm that makes her bright. MARY XVALLACE Some make it in Eve years, others in three, But here is the type for the Phi Beta Key; Thot a scholarship candidate, Marys no grind, When it comes to athletics, therets none of her kind. 60 Junior Prize Speaking Contest. Scholarship Club; Ring and Pin Committee; Penmanship Club. Dramatic Club; French Club; Scholarship Club; Year Book Staff; Class baseball; Class volley ball; Treasurer of French Cluby y23, y24; ttPe- pitaH ; Assistant Basketball Manager, : ,23; HTickless Time? French Club; G. 0. Scholarship Club; Library Club; French Club Treasurer, ,24, 25; Dramatic Club; Class baseball; Class volley ball; Captain Traffic Squad; Class basketball. CLEVELAND WEBSTER Cornell ' CIem J When he plays his harp PIEpIe algl lVVhite Staff, 22; , . ditor uletin, ,23; Orches- We afe under a spell, tra, 23, 24, V25; HPirates of That hes 3 E116 fellow, PenzanceU; Dramatic Club. I'm here to tell. RUTH B. VVEINER N. Y. Training "LVinnie" School Ruth VVeiner Goes ri ht on her wa ,- D g . y French Club; G. O. VX 1th never very much to say, She always seems to keep in mind What wise men counselled ere her time. WALTER F. VVIENER Amherst 'WVz'enicJJ If you need a debater call Wienyj, Dramatic Club; Sengte; Schol- If you need a player call Walt; arshlp Club; Varsxty debatmg team: Columbia prize speak- But do not put all the blame on him, ing; Senior Play. Cause it wasdt his own fault. JESSIE VVENCK Wink a ' ' Library Club: G. 0. Council; $00211 a: EemlI-lil,n thzsvzlm, , Class basketball, 25; Senior 00 a . ng15 goo a gym, Play; Class Vice-Presldent, Better wlth a ball to toss, ,22, ,23; French Club. Best at putting things across. ARTHUR W. WHITE Columbia llProfessorls" hobby is chemistry With that he likes to putter; Spanish Club; Chess Club; Some day helll find for us, we hope, Traffic Squad; G- 0- Synthetic peanut butter. EDYTH WHITAKER Pratt "Witty Herels a lass who is bri ht and a , . - - g g y . French Club; Dramatm Club: Who 15 ever helpmg you on your way , G 0 Her eyes are like enchantments true ' - And catch you in whateler you do. ELIZABETH VVISSEMANN Syracuse lchttyJ; She can talk a mile a minute W'hen conversation comes along ; She will always be right in it, If our prophecyls not wrong. Dramatic Club; G. O. DOROTHY XVRIGHT Cornell llBuddle . - French Club; Mandolm Club. Dorothy Wright, small and bright, Senior second basketball. True as steel, let time reveal, 0 And as a scout there is no doubt She does her best, with true scout zest. CHARLES ANTONIO YAMARONE RYaHW 501 e e 1 h .d n p.096: ave somequeerl eash Basketball, ,23; basketball, '24 But hls 1dea of heaven . , v , Scholarshlp Club, 22, 23, Span- Is to be far beneath a sea ish Club; French Club; G. 0. Of Heinzk Fifty-Seven. FRED W. ZAUNER "PeanutsU His hair is no longer plastered down, That fashion has gone along; So when you see him you caIft say, HAnother good man gone wrong? XVIILIAM L. JENKINS Columbia "1611113" When a loud speaker set costs a dollar And great singers are more in de- "Pirates of Penzancef Part in mand, h hPepita"; Year Book work; Our Bill will be heard hon the air" Glee. Club: Dramatic Club: And his fame will be sung der the Spamsh Chlb; Semor Play. land. WILLIAM MARSH Yale hBillJJ French Club. 5 . . .' v ' k 11 ,2. B111 Marsh IS not so very tall $133553 tZZSmCth; baseball, Alld th HOt very short, Interclass football, '24, 25. But we fmd that we can say of him Hehs always a good sport. 24. 63 JINGLES WRITTEN BY: XVILLIAM JENKINS MARTHA PRATT ALBERT SWANK EVELYN MAY BETTY GUION ERNEST BREHAL'T RUTH HILL All Photographs by Odin. OFFICERS OF THE CLASS OF 1925 ELSE KAUZMANN ROBERT FARLOW ALETTA MORTON ADRIAN EHLER 64 LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT OF THE CLASS OF 1925 ments in the various lines of scholarship, athletics, and social successes, after having experienced the complete metamorphosis of Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors, and before matriculating into an entirely different curriculum of intellectual environment and understanding, since we have no serious intentions of departing from our ever-to-be-remembered Alma Mater without consecrating and dedicating some perpetual and ineffaceable monuments to the cherished memory of the fond recollections of our incomparable professors and noble fellow students, do hereby declare our last will and testament. FirsteWe take it upon ourselves to grant to the source of our vast store of knowledge, namely, the school: tU A complete set of BURGLAR-PROOF LOCKS for use 011 the boys, gym lockers. m The installation of up-to-clate Turkish baths and swimming pool. CD The beauty of an untrampled lawn. SecondeBecause 0f the intense love we hold for the Juniors, Sophomores, and OTHERS, WE feel that our generosity should not be withheld in the slightest way, and therefore bestow upon our schoolmates some gifts of intrinsic value: m T0 the class of 1926 we leave our worthy classmates whose intense desire to remain with their school surpassed their ability to satisfy the Board of Regents, and our best wishes in their attempt to equal our accomplish- ments. tzy T0 the class of 1927 we demise the pride and prestige that become the bearing of upper-classmen, hoping that in the course of their next two years they shall have acquired the aforementioned pride and prestige in as great and deserving a measure as the class of 1925. CD To the Class of 1928 we concede the honor and privilege of instructing the new freshmen in the mysteries of being frosh, and we also give this class the honor of rising early and accompanying the easily misled classes of 126 and ,27 to school. Among the many admirable qualities which the class 0f 25 possesses is GENEROSITY, and to show how great our generosity is, we shall feel greatly honored in being the first graduating class to present any gifts whatsoever to the incoming frosh. Ml T0 the class of 1929 we bequeath Miss Wilsonis cow bell, the gym. teachersl whistles, a squadron of Kiddie Kars, our class colors and the privilege of sleeping until 12 oiclock noon. FourtheTo the following organizations, individuals, et cetera, we also feel duty bound, and therefore present: t0 T0 the traffic squad: A set of silent policemen and a complete outfit of purple uniforms. m T0 the girls, basketball squad: An orange grove back of the gym so that they may be well supplied at all the games. Oi T0 the next G. 0. President: An adding machine on which to tabulate the votes in favor of adjournment. m T0 the library: Some much needed turnstiles for exits and entrances. tSl To the kitchen squad: A plot behind the school on which to raise their vegetables. PostscripteWe almost forgot the conditioned STUDENTS and therefore take this opportunity of wishing them a few score happy vacations between their remaining years at High School. WE, the illustrious class of 1925, made famous by our magnanimous achieve- Pax Vobiscum, CLASS OF 1925. PerSLorraine Sunshine. lAbe Goldstein. 65 LIFE ON THE RADIO WAVE; YO HO AND A BOTTLE OF BEVO! winter time tbest radio timeL at night time, you may still hear bedtime stories over the radio. During the lapse of time, from this time to that time, our one time graduates have risen to fame. So at this time, for a short time, we will ttry toy give you a good time in memory of the old times by means of a timely radio program throughout the country. Timer! Scorer! Bang! Lets go! Little Willie Jackson is now tuning his Super-ooile-whistledyne ta forty-hve tube sety. Brrrrrrr-zzzzzzz-Bang! Nhas just played the harp for you. Ladies and gentlemen, this is Joe Nesbit, J A. N. of N.-R.-2-5 of the New Rochelle High. Before continuing our program from our station, we announce our program for to-morrow. Josephine Foster, the eminent physical educator, will open our program at 7 :00 A. M. with the usual gym class for flat-footed and toothless Civil War Vets. Then at nine A. M. the Osmosis Quartet Oneaning they have risen from the bottom um will entertain LU you. This quartet is composed of such great singers as Russell Benson, violinist, singing first base; Marion Valentine, the HHumming Bird? short- stop, and the operatic stars, William Jenkins and Martha Sternal, second base and pitcher Cirom pitch, i. e., do-re-me, eth, respectively. They will be accompanied by that famous ivoryeteaser, Philip Berzon, at the ltPee-ah-erfl Then for a half an hour, 9:45-10-15, Virginia Cook, a prominent actress, playing the leading part in that Broadway Success, the Great Floating Caseu from nRum Rowf, will address you on 11How to Play Poker." At 10:15, Webb Moffett, llsaxophoniestfl will render tasundem some numbers on the ukelele. From 10:30-10:45, Jack Talbot will give you the inside llinfdl on Rum Running, which is now a national sport. But please do not send for samples; we need all weive got. Then at about 10 :50, George Licht and Howard Dingee, 11The Fun Makers of Broadway? will swap llcracksll for your entertainment. N ext you will be favored by ltseeingil Albert Dammeyer play several violin solos on his comet. At eleven-thirty there will be a debate on the question, ltResolved: That there should be a law passed for the purpose of aiding lock-jawed clams? On the affirmative are Walter Weiner, Murray Fuerst, both prominent politicians, and Betty Karr, the HWoman Governofl of New York, V alternate. On the negative, Herbert Borgzinner, Senator from Askosh, 111.; Frank Bernard, the prominent criminal lawyer, and Lillian May, the famous lady surgeon, alternate. Then at about 1:15 P. M., Mary Wallace, the distinguished molarist twhatever that meansL will llpullli a speech entitled llExtracting Saw Teeth? Following this, Harold Sunshine, the ltcoalman tenor? will warble a few numbers, 7 among which are HIive got de razah, man, ant youse got de neck.H At 2 :30, Albert Murray, advertising ltartistef, will draw another of his famous llHo-Lee Hosieryil f ads. It is surely a rare treat to hear this eminent artistls brush scratch along the canvas as he paints his beautiful modells face. At 3:00 P. M. Miss Anna Murphy, private secretary to Frank Lux, president of the tholdhnkle Pork Co," will speak on her experiences while working for such a distinguished business man. At 3 :30 P. M. we will give you, from time to time, progress being made in a eross-country aeroplane race across the U. S. between Lorraine Sunshine and Janette Ferry, high class and world famous aviatrices. The customers may be assured of a great race. At four olclock Jean Roantree, the well known playwriter, Will discuss her latest play, llThe Stolen Kiss That Cost Three Teethfi At four twenty-five Miss Augusta Motzkin, who has arrived home from Paris, will give some expert advice on 11Femi- nine Raiment? She is a buyer for the very exclusive Malcolmson and Gregory 5 Shop on Fifth Avenue. We will sign off till seven olclock, when we will broadcast a joint recital by Mme. Nannette Duffy and Doha Antoinette Camillone, both noted singers from Orpheus Hall. Following this, Ellen Fischer will talk on 11How to keep that school girl complexion? From eight olclock till this station closes down, we will broadcast the dinner of the national teachersl convention at the Hotel Frijol eSpanish for ! HOY, mates! Sometime in the future time, say in ten years time, in the 66 hbeanU, owned by Edith Whittaker. Among the celebrated people who will be present are Martha Bruning and Elizabeth W isseman, teachers, who will give a talk on IIOur Trip to Syracuse in a Ford Ten Years Agol, tthe Ford suggests rattling good humory The other speakers expected are Martha Gingold, a very famous teacher of Chicago ; Ernestine Rumph, noted instructor of Law at Vassar; Mar- garet Schwarz, secretary of regents at Albany, and Daisy Macafhl, the well known botany expert. Elizabeth Lewis, who recently returned with her secretary, Elsie Schwab, from Paris on the S. S. Stutter, will speak on hIIow to iFOX, the Sharks and lBullsT on Wall Street So That They May Become Gentle lLambsl and ISquiru relsI ,, tassociated with nutsy I have also been asked to announce the names of the officers for last year, which are as follows: President, Frederick J. Kopf; Vice-President, Sarah Ellis, the well known professor A.M., A.B., LL.D., Ph.D.; Secretary, Ruth VVeiner; Treasurer, Pearl Garfein, great music supervisor of N. Y. State. Later in the evening, the teachers will be entertained by such celebrities as: Helyn Hatfield and Dorothy Brophy, the famous singers; Marion Le Pore, ltanestheticil dancer, will wiggle a few selections; Martha Pratt, illustrious lady humorist, will entertain with a speech for both sides of the argument, HHow high is up, and if so, why so :w We cannot take any more time with this announcement and we will now listen to that great business man and owner of the Baloon ta paper which has risen with great speedy. He has just returned from his trip around the world and will tell you of the celebrities he met while thus spending his iIshekelsil in this tfoolishy manner- Mr. Brooke W. Jones. IlGood evening, everyone. It certainly is great to be back in the United States after being all over the world. Well, Ilm supposed to tell you about the trip, so I might as well begin now. IIOn the aeroplane that took me across whom should I meet but an old friend of mine. He was on his way to the International games to beat a certain record made by some great Finn back in the old days. I certainly enjoyed my talk with Eric Gehlen and was mighty sorry to part with him. lIVVhen I arrived at England I noticed that I had forgotten a few necessities. So I inquired as to the best place to procure them. and was directed to the largest department store in London, lGibson and Lippoth? They also have branches in New York and Paris. After getting these few necessities I left for Paris. nThere I met Robert Clements, a very rich old gent who is devoting his life to the Boy Scouts. He has given quite a small sum of money to organizing the Scouts in some of the smaller countries. lIUp in one of the highest and most beautiful parts of the Alps is situated Dorothy Wrights school for girls. This school is now world famous and girls from all over the world study there. III did not stay in Switzerland long but immediately left for Madrid. While there I heard Chester French, the President of the Spanish Literary Society, give a talk. IlIn Madrid I also had the pleasure of attending a concert and hearing Cleve- land Wrebster, harpist, and Esther Erikson, pianist, give a recital. Cleveland and Esther are now making a tour, giving recitals in all the great cities. II had to go to Berlin, which is quite a city now, being noted for the manu- facture of toys. Our Ambassador, Carl Hanson. took me through the factory of Emil Angelou, who is doing a good deal of exporting to the United States. In Berlin I had the pleasure of meeting Frances Fenton and Evelyn May, who were making a tour of the world. IlOn my way to China I stopped off in India and saw some old friends of mine. The firm of IHerrman and Donovani are putting over some sort of an electrical pro j ect and seem to be making quite a success out of it. IIIn China I met Cyril Dennerlein, who is the head of a great importing con- cern, and was over in China making a few good buys. III was mighty glad to put my foot on the United States again at San Francisco. 67 But I received the surprise of my life when I learned that Vincent Maneusi was Mayor of the city. ItAt Denver I called on Kenneth Murphy, who has made quite a name for him- self as the most capable lawyer in the West. nI stopped off at Chicago to see the World Series and who should I find as star of the game but Adorica Feola, who is pitching for the Chicago Cubs. HI thought that my trip would not be complete unless I visited Harvard Uni- versity. Their two largest coaches are Joseph Mariano and Eli Loizeaux, coach of the crew. IBefore closing I would like to advise everyone who enjoys good plays to see Dot Edwards and Ruth Hill in their newest Broadway hit. Good night? Station . Before announcing the next feature I wish to announce that word has just arrived that Everett Mayer has just won the auto race at Miami, Fla. Station L. Y. M. E, London. Margaret Hill, a prominent American Social Service leader, has just told of the conditions of living in the limehouse district. Next you will hear a talk by Virginia Ensell, relating her experiences in China. She has just returned to this country in the submarine U-Z, owned by Dorothy Briudze. Before hearing Miss Ensell, I take this opportunity to inform you that Miss Anna Peterson, the screen vampire, is visiting London. She has just returned from Hollywood and she now has the best suite of rooms in the Imperial Hotel, owned by Mr. Adrian Ehler, world famous tlchain-hotelll owner. We will now hear Miss EnsellaDear Radio audience, I amaooh-ee-rrraxii at Kalamazoo. The delightful song you just heard was NWhen Pay Day Comes Around, Will You Remember Me ?ll sung by Lewis Pinto, the man with the million dollar voice. Pres- ently you will hear, ladies and gentlemen, the voices of Mr. Jack Pollock, Mr. Victor Johnson and Mr. Gannon. They will tell you in turn how they became sues cessful in business. First Mr. Pollock will describe thitfalls of the pretzel business and its crooked points? Then Mr. Johnson will tell you how he made his first million tdollars, not rublesl. Lastly, Mr. Gannon will inform you of the many duties as Private Secretary to John D. Rockefeller, Jr., the sardine oil magnate. One moment. I am sorry to say that Mr. Gannon has not arrived as yet and for a few moments till Mr. Gannon arrives I will read some of the leading sports events in the near future. Virginio DePierro, worldis Champion golfer, will soon play at Pasadena, defending his title against the dangerous rival, Victor Abate. On Saint Patriekls day there will be an international horse race between H. R. H. the Prince of Wales and Mr. Ernest Brehaut. Mr. Brehaut will ride the old hobby horse which President Cal Coolidge, our 30th President, used way back in 1925. The race will be held in Dublin and aerial accommodations may be had to all points of the United States by getting in touch with Tuck and Silver, tlHigh Class Aerial Taxi Service? owned by Clarence Tuck and Harry Silver, and located at the great Hying base at New Rochelle, New York. Mr. Gannon has arrived and we will continue now our program. ltLadies and gentlemeullaStation E. V. E., Paradise, Arizona. The election returns coming in very rapidly now are as follows: The wVVomanE Rightsb candidate, Miss Alletta Morton, is victorious by a large margin of the popular vote. This will be the first time in the history of the United States that a lady has become the first ltmanll 0f the land. Best of luck to Miss Morton and Miss Shirley Ollendorff, her running mate, who will run the country tfor better or worsey for four painful years. Louis Seidenstein, Senator from New York, was Miss Mortonls manager and much credit is due him for his hearty efforts on his candidates behalf. Mr. John Shea, Chief of the Prohibition Enforcement squad, will now give a report on ltFirewater that has gone down to the sea in sips? Mr. Shea, good evayee-ee-oo, band now, dear children, dont worry; be good little boys au'dngirls and "tomorrow I will' tell 'yOu how Peter Rabbit got out of his hole? Station F. O. B., Detroit. Miss Virginia James has just read the little folks their bedtime story and she will be on the air the same time tomorrow evening. We will soon switch over and hear the returns of the Olympic games being held at City Park, New Rochelle. New York. These returns are sent to us by wire and then to you through this station. Please stand by--. This is A-C, Arthur Cantor, broad- 68 casting the events of the Olympic games being held at City Park. These great games are being held night and day due to the great Hoodlight invention of Joseph Lukacs, and now we will broadcast the games themselves. The menls 16-mi1e bicycle race has just been won by the American representative, Arthur Gavrin, who broke all records except NAll Alone? for that is how he finished. The others arrived 47 minutes later. While the 220-yard dash is being run over, I will give you the results of yesterdayls events. Brigham Allen won fame for America by winning the high jump with a leap of 2 yards, 2 feet, 8 inches and 9 centimeters. The yrmile was won by Harold Birnie, who forced his shadow to pass itself twice in order to catch up with him. Another American, Carlton Cuqua, captured the hurdling honors in all classes. The runners are now nearing the tape in the 220-yard dash for men. Nesbitt Cockburn is in the lead with Art Peterson second, a fine and closely contested race. There seems to be confusion as to how the scores stand, so I will describe the assem- bled throng till the next event is started. In the center of the great concrete arena are Mr. Granger and Mr. Fichtel in the judges stand. To the right of this stand there is seated the Marchioness de Vervier, formerly Miss Jessie Wenck, of this city, who is attired in the latest Paris styles. She is conversing animatedly with Katherine Lotz, premiere danseuse. who has just arrived from her tour to London with her famous private secretary, Helen Schmieg. A very prominent person is standing near her, Else Kauzmann, Editor of the New York Times, who is accompanied by her social secretary, Dorothy Valentine. The alert photographer has just caught unawares New York,s society leader, Alice Shepard, as she was discussing with Robert F arlow, the world famous artist, the plan for her portrait. The runners are now set for the finals of the one hundred-yard dash. Theylre off! Count N oah Kount of China holds the lead at the 50-yard mark. He is being passed by a flying figure. It is all over. Goldstein of the U. S. has finished first, adding 5 points to the total already amassed by Americas athletes. In the grandstand, section A, is seated Miss Idabelle Knowles, business man- ager of Cookels Carefully Conducted Tours. Many prominent personages have made reservations for the next tour to the newly found tomb in Iceland, thought to be that of Bleck Jeck, the ancient Norse gum magnate, among whom are Cath- erine Holby, well-known humorist; Eleanor Hayden, the dramatic reader; Isabelle Schneer, dancer, and Agnes Devitt and Jeanette Henderson, shorthand expert and typing champions, respectively. Also present is Doris Fukishima, founder of an orphan asylum with a fund of $1,000,000. The most generous gifts were received from Vera Lion and Dorothy Odell, famous business women and trustees of the home. The last event, which I neglected to announce, was the 440-yard dash, which was a walkaway for Larned Ketchum, although he was second in his heat, follow- ig Ole Olesen, the Irish representative. Now we willaye-ee-ee-oo-oo-wa-llfeeling so bluellaThe number you just heard was sung by the Liars Quartet, composed of Messrs. Horowitz, Liner, White and Rosenbaum, all aspiring young lawyers. Charles Manson, Peck and Peckls handsome walking model, is in the station, but does not wish to speak into llrnikefl He is accompanied by Dr. Stanley Edmunds, C.O.D., B.V.D., P.D.Q. and etc., who will address you on llTwo Can Live As Cheaply As One, on next Tuesdayls program. We are now switching over to the luxurious Swank Hotel, owned by Albert Swank, sportsman, broadcasting a sports banquet. and the star of the Yankee-Browns game was the sterling playing of catcher Deeves of the Yanks. Our next announcement is that Victor Peterfruend has won the siX-day bicycle race in the amazing time of six days. That is all, thank you, and good nightaYou just heard Chris Todd, one time Stroke 0n the New Rochelle High School Crew and now coach of the Yale eights, also a famous sports critic, give you some comments on athletic happenings. Mr. Hugh Gardner, the noted banker, was to address you on llHow to teach your dollars to have sense? but due to his absence, the next number on the program will be a piano and vocal recital by Miss Dorothy Dale, the eminent pianist, and Rose Kahn, recently returned 69 arts student and singer, who has visited Europe. Station I. O. U., Toneyls Peanut Stand at the P010 Grounds, N. Y. C. n'Sweet Adeallai-neee, for youuuuawhee aeee$rrr-be sure to tune in 011 this station tomorrow, for we will present to you some of the countryis most prominent citizens, among whom are Anthony Calandro, commodore 0f the great Tuckahoe Navy Yard, who will Speak to you on a soapbox; the celebrated Jewls harpist, Kenneth Wiggins, who will dance for you; Fred Zauner, the straightest corkscrew maker known, will speak; Patricia Seacord, W omenis Champion Motorcyclist, will speak on tlHow I Average Six Flat Tires 21 VVeekll; Rebecca Leschinsky, the singing secretary, will sing for you. Katherine Sauerzapf will broadcast her weekly lesson in Spanish, and Mildred Rogge, owner of the "Bon Boris? a chain of candy stores, 5,463 in number, will tell you how to make candy for April Foolls Day. Miss Mary Elizabeth Houston will conclude our program with a report of the doings in society and business. Miss HoustonallDear Radio audience, first, I will speak on the celebrities who arrived on incoming ships today. Miss Marjorie Selman, a Yale History teacher, has returned on the Berengaria from a research expedition in Mesopotamia. On the same ship coming from London were Miss Elizabeth Schaeffler, Margarite Spidell and Margaret Allen, all famous teachers, who just came from England after speak- ing to the King and making a survey of English and Continental schooling methods. There arrived on the Homeric of the Star Line, Catherine Helmrich, famous dancer, who has toured Europe and the Orient with great success. nMiss Elizabeth Kingsbury, social leader of New York City, intends to leave for Paris some time in April to study art. W ith her may go Miss Elizabeth Thompu son, also a high light in New Yorkls T7503 HMiss Pauline Friedman, social secretary to Mrs. James Vanderbilt, has left with her on a trip to Florida on the yacht tNevasink.y On the same ship will be Francenia Langley, most famous American woman lawyer; Barbara Redding, who has won fame by her latest novel, tJulius, the Ashmany ; Grace Conklin, lecturer, and Betty Guion and Barbara Gifford, the Sawdust Twins, who have just com- pleted a successful season at the Hippodromefi Now, fellow students and others, we are now signing off from this school, where for four years tor morey we have striven to obtain that beribboned roll of parchment entitled a diploma; and before we sign off, let us assure you all that we shall always cherish our school days at the N. R. H. S. and do our best to uphold the traditions and standards obtained during our four years, stay at our Alma Mater. Now signing off. Goodbye all. ERNEST BREHAUT, ANNA PETERSON, ABE GOLDSTEIN, MARY WALLACE, FRANCIS GANNON, BARBARA GIFFORD, WILLIAM JENKINS, LORRAINE SUNSHINE. 70 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. . Most Popular . Best Looking . Best Dressed . Best Athlete . Best All Around . Done Most for Class . Most Promising . Most Efficient . Wittiest Smartest Cutest Best Dancer Class Baby Class Clown Most Musical Most Sentimental Class Bluffer Most Studious Most Dramatic Most Carefree SENIOR CELEBRITIES 1B1 Adrian Ehler 1G1 Betty Karr 1B1 Adrian Ehler 1G1 Virginia James 1B1 Adrian Ehler 1G1 Virginia James 1B1 Nesbitt Cockbum 1G1 Allctta Morton 1B1 Chrystal Todd 1G1 Alletta Morton 1B1 Adrian Ehler 1G1 Alletta Morton 181 Robert Farlow 1CD Virginia Cook 1131 Joseph Lukacs 1G1 Virginia Cook 1B1 Kenneth Wiggins 1G1 Catherine Holby 1B1 Albert Murray 1G1 Lillian May 1B1 Albert Swank 1G1 Ruth Hill 1B1 Joseph Nesbitt 1G1 Betty Karr 1B1 Albert Swank 1G1 Lillian May 1B1 Harold Lippoth 1G1 Catherine Holby 1B1 Charles R005 1G1 Ruth Hill 1B1 Stanley Edmunds 1G1 Catherine Holby 1B1 Kenneth Wiggins 1G1 Marjorie Selman 1B1 Albert Murray 1G1 Lillian May 1B1 Jack Pollock 1G1 Dorothy Edwards 1B1 Harold Lippoth 1G1 Virginia James Chrystal Todd Alletta Morton Chrystal Todd Alice Sheperd Robert Farlow Marjorie Selman Chrystal Todd Else Kauzmau Joseph Nesbitt Else Kauzman Joseph Nesbitt Virginia Cook Adrian Ehler Else Kauzman Adrian Ehler Else Kauzman Kenneth Murphy Marion Valentine Adrian Ehler Ruth Hill Kenneth Murphy Catherine Holby Kenneth Murphy Virginia James Webb Moffett Doris Fukushima Brigham Allen Johanna Cooke Cleveland Webster Esther Ericson Arthur Peterson Idabelle Knowles Clarence Tuck Augusta Motzkin Victor Johnson Virginia Cook Kenneth Wiggins Marion Valentine Francis Gannon Betty Karr Joseph Nesbitt Virginia James Brooke Jones Margaret Allen Jack Pollock Alice Sheperd Stanley Edmunds Josephine Foster Nesbitt Cockburn Betty Karr Chrystal Todd Else Kauzman Lewis Pinto Johanna Cooke C. Todd 8; R. Farlow Alletta Morton Martin Rosenbaum Frances Fenton Frederick Kopf Dorothy Edwards Abraham Goldstein Betty Karr Abraham Goldstein R. Hill 8z A. Schulman John Shea Catherine Holby Kenneth Wiggins L. Sunshine 8z I. Knowles Edward de Rochemont Pearl Garfein Jack Pollock Alice Sheperd Harold Lippoth Virginia James John Marchetti Ruth Hill Rodney Gibson Johanna Cooke Kenneth Wiggins A. Sheperd 81 M. Valentine THE JUNIOR CLASS President .......................................................................... FRED FROST Vicc-Presidmt .................................................... JACQUELINE JAMES Secretary ................................................................ MARGARET FAHY Faculty Advisers ....................................... SMRs. C. H. TOWNSEND lMR. R. P. BAKER thronged with youths forlorn, some lamenting theyld ever been born. Spoke Clothos thus, TTIt must be confessed, this is hardly fair to N. R. H. Sf, Scarce had Old Sol his journey half done when that rarity appeared, something new lneath the sun. Bright and clear-eyed came laddies and lassies, marking quite a new epoch in Freshman Classes. Said Lachesis t0 Atropos, nHerels nothing thatls weak, anaemic 0r meek, but material thatls bound to be very unique? Under Hellman and Geoghegan and Beauteous Jack James these freshies formed a tlHousell to show their high aims, and to prove first of all that they really had brains. This being done, with ardor undamped, they stooped but to conquer and became volley-ball Champs. T0 round out the first year a party was planned, which was quite a success till the gym became j ammed. As Sophomores this paragon of classes confirmed the skipper and his mates for a second-year term. The party in March was attended with zestehow many were at it could hardly be guessed. With pep still oierllowing, in the girls most of all, the Juniors and Seniors were taught basketball. Now as Juniors the Class still keeps at the fore with Fred, Jack and Peggy keeping tabs on the score. The volley-ball games with the Seniors and the Sophs ended both seasons events and established a standard for many years hence. Our joy will indeed run clear to the end if we can retain Mr. Baker and Mrs. Town- se'nd. ONE September morn in ,22 the Fates scanned N orth Avenue. The street was THE SOPHOMORE CLASS President .................................................................. WILLIAM LANE Vice-President .................................................... DOROTHY DELMAR Secretary-Treasurer ........................................ ELEANOR SIMONsON Faculty Advisers .................................................... SMISS LECOUNT lMR. NICHOLS Freshmen. With splendid school spirit they entered into school and Class activities. The Class 0f 27 organized in January, 1924, electing as officers William Lane, President; VViIIiam Valery, Vice-President, and Dorothy Delmar, Secretary-Treas- urer. During our Freshman year we had more than sixty members of our Class in 'the Scholarship Club and the Freshman debating Club, known as the House, was composed of about eighty members. The class supported the G. O. and other organizations of the school. Teams of enthusiastic Freshmen participated in inter- class sports. The varsity cross-country team included three Freshmen, and the track team, two of the class. Through the guidance of our class advisers, we re-organized this year, and introduced a new form of class government. A representative was Chosen from each Sophomore registration room by the students of the room to meet in a Sopho- more Council. This Council, headed by the class officers, carried on the business of the class. The class party held on St. Patricks Day was a huge success. The program included entertainment, dancing and refreshments. The entire entertainment was arranged and written by Sophomores. During our first two years we have established our ideals, and as a class we are determined to uphold our high standard of school spirit through our remaining years in the N. R. H. S. IN the fall of 1923 about four hundred fifty students entered the N. R. H. S. as 75 76 THE FRESHMAN CLASS President ...................................................................... LOLITA BEREA Vicc-President ........................................................ ROBERT LIPPOTH Secretary .................................................................... MARION PRICE Faculty Advisem ............................................. SMISS A- ADAMS ZMR. H. J, GRAYBILL N September of 1924 about 515 Freshmen, representing the various grammar I schools, walked very sedately through the main entrance of the New Rochelle High School. Our principal soon initiated us into the mysteries of the entrances and exits of the building, and the traffxc regulations in the halls. The Class of 1928, as a whole, has shown unusual interest in the school activ- ities. As soon as they realized the advantage of the General Organization, without any hesitation, they co-operated, eighty per cent joining. A large number of the Freshies subscribed to the ttPurple and Whitef, and their March issue was one of the best recorded in the history of the school. So many articles were contributed that much good material had to be omitted. The House, the Freshman debating society, is one of the outstanding features of our class. thcers were elected, and the honor 0? President was conferred upon Richard Eldred; of Vice-President, upon Lane Whitman, and of Secretary, upon Charlotte Claus. Many of the Freshmen are members of the Scholarship Club. With such a good start, no doubt, the Class of ,28 will be successful through the coming years. t 77 HwmIINHTITHIwmmwmHHwnwmHHwIIHlumlnmlmmm HwnwmnmHHHnuwmmHIHHwHmwHIwIIHIImummmmmmwIHHwHIVHIHH!HHIHHHIHHwHwIIHHIIHHHHHHwHHHHHHIHIHIHIIHImme Organizations uu mm I 3 E E?mm...l.,.....,.,ymm,."mm mmu. 1. H.m.mmunnmnnm,Hm mm.I. .. Hmmmnnmuu. munmm ummmummumummmvmm wIwHmmwmwHHIHwmwxmmwwHwwHHHXmwmmwwHwwHIHmwuwwIHHwwHIwxHHHwmmmmxm:xmmwHwHHHIHKHHIVHMHH mmmmmu Ea vw. 79 President, CHRYSTAL TODD Vim-President. TACQUELINE JAMES EXECUTIVE COUNCIL OF THE GENERAL ORGANIZATION OFFICERS CLIFFORD S. BRAGDON ........................................................ Principal LOUISE FLAGG ............................................................................ Dean ALICE D. CHRISTY ...................................... Girlf Physical Director CHARLES I. JOHNSON .................................. Boyf Physical Director MILDRED H. LAWSON .............................................. Faculty Adviser HENRY G. DURFEE .................................................. Faculty Adviser JOSEPHINE FOSTER .......................... Senior Athletic Representative NESBIT COCKBURN .......................... Senior Athletic Representative KENNETH ANDERSON ............ Junior Non-Athletic Representative RUTH DAVIS .................................... Junior Athletic Representative SAMUEL PULLMAN .......................... Junior Athletic Representative JAMES MCFARLANE ................ Junior Non-Athletic Representative GEORGE MUELLER .................... Sophomore Athletic Representative ANNE BARTLETT ............ Sophomore Non-Athlefic Representative ALEXANDER RAYMOND .............. Freshman Athletic Representative EDWINA WEISS .................. Freshman NowAthletic Representative JOSEPH LUKACS .............................. Purple and White Reprentative JESSIE VVENCK ........................ Senior Non-Athletic Representative JACK POLLOCK. . ................. Senior Nan-Athletic Representative 80 Secretary, JOHANNA COOKE Treasurer. MR. W. H. DOUD THE GENERAL ORGANIZATION tant factors in the student life of New Rochelle High School. Working through an efficient Council chosen by the school, it has developed into an organization of which every member may well be proud. It has proved the prac- ticability of student government in this school. During the school year 1924-1925 the G. O. has to its credit the growth of a Trafhc Squad plan which will be effective every year, making the Trafhc Squad a permanent institution. A plan was necessary which would allow the squad to be organized the first school month each year instead of having to wait until a new council was elected. A Lost and Found Bureau has been introduced and besides being a benefit to the students it relieves the office of a great inconvenience. This bureau has its headquarters in Room 111 and is running smoothly under the man- agement of five officers and a faculty adviser. In addition to these two plans the G. O. has devised a permanent system for selecting cheer leaders and has decided to award special letters for one or two years, service. For one years service a letter in the form of a purple megaphone with the white letters N. R. on it will be given, while for two years work as a cheer leader there will be awarded a purple megaphone with the white letters N. R. on it, the whole megaphone to have a white background. The campaigns for G. O. OH'lCCYS this year presented a Vivid contrast to the campaigns of previous years. Each presidential candidate chose a campaign inan- ager who spoke in the assembly concerning the fitness of his candidate for office. Posters were scattered throughout the school and genuine interest was shown by the students. Keen competition aroused, the contest became a close one. This year is the first in which one of the candidates for President has been a girl. We hope this campaign system will be continued in future years. At one of its meetings the Council authorized the purchase of a shell from Columbia University for the crew, but the Board of Education very kindly bought it and presented it to the high school. The Council has voted to have a new hand book published next September. The constitutions of several new organizations have been approved, among them the Track Club and the Court of Honor. Money appro- priations have been made for various sports and organizations as needed. The G. O. paid one-half of the expenses of two delegates from the Purple and White to Ithaca, where 3. Publications Convention was held. The Council decided to have Colonel E. Alexander Powell, a well-known lecturer and explorer, speak at the school on ttAmazing Africa, or the Map That is Half-UnrolledW and it has pro- vided four assembliesethe glass blowers, Prof. Moore from Colgate, Miss Neil- sen, who read the play of ltAbraham Lincoln," and Edward Decker of 1921 tone of the founders of the G. OJ, who spoke on Undergraduate Life in Princeton. Altogether this past year has been a valuable and an active one in the history of the General Organization of New Rochelle High School. The Class of 1925 hopes that the succeeding years will broaden and develop the organization more and more until New Rochelle High School has reached the pinnacle of success in student government. r l WHE General Organization in its third year has become one of the most impor- 81 TRAFFIC SQUAD Captain: --------------------------------------------------- SMARSHALL SWEARINGEN ZMARY WALLACE Faculty Adviser ................................................ MR. W. B. BOWMAN HE Traffic Squad is the executive division of the student governing plan. It Operates under the direction of the Traffic Council. At the head of the squad are two captains, elected on alternate years, to hold ofhce for two years. The rest of the squad consists of lieutenants sergeants and guards, each member having a definite task to perforr11.Individual 1ec0rds are kept23 and promo- tions are based on me1it. At the end of the school year, awards Will be made to those whose work has ' reached certain standalds. 82 TRAFFIC COUNCIL MARSHALL SWEARINGEN ................................................ Chairman RUTH DAVIS ............................................ ZWUHHJCW of G. 0. Council JOSEPHINE FOSTER .................................. Member of Student Body STANLEY EDMUNDs ................................. 71 icmber of Student Body MR. W. B. BOWMAN .......................................... Member of Faculty N February the G. 0. Council decided to put the Trafflc System on a permanent basis. To insure this permanency, the work was put under the charge of a Traffic Council appointed by the G. 0. President. This council keeps the records of the system, makes appointments When necessary, and acts as a court to try offenders. However, the prime purpose of the council is a co-operative one and it is hoped that the student body as a whole will come more and more to the idea that student government is possible only Where each individual does his part to co-Operate with the others. The Traffic Council is a big step toward complete student government. 83 THE SCHOLARSHIP CLUB President ............................................................ DOROTHY EDWARDS li7icc-Presidcnt ........................................................ BEATRICE SAQUI Secretary ........................... DAVID CRAMPTON Faculty Adviserx MRS. D. GRANT MR. C. L. EDGERLY MR. H. DURFEE MISS A. G. RUHL MR. C. S. BRAGDON HIS year the Scholarship Club has been among the foremost in the list of active clubs. It has not only attempted to promote interest in scholarship by ,. providing attractive meetings and other affairs of interest for those students maintaining an average of at least 8570, but has endeavored to raise money for the Scholarship Fund. Before Christmas, over sixty dollars was contributed toward this fund by Club members through the sale of Christmas cards. The club has given an entertainment by a college glee club, the proceeds of which will also go for scholarships. The annual Scholarship Club banquet has not been held as yet but plans are being started and it is certain to be as successful as last year, when 21 won- derful entertainment, consisting of tricks by Mr. John Mulholland, a well known magician and author oif xTMagic in the Making? was furnished. The membership has been satisfactory throughout the year, both upper classment 21nd freshmen hav- ing contributed a large number of members. This Club is one of Which the New Rochelle High School should be proud. 84 THE LIBRARY CLUB ACH year of the Library Club,S existence seems to be more successful. This year, owing to the fine co-operation of the members with the librarian, Miss Lawson, the Club has accomplished a great deal. The outstanding event was the presentation of the movie, HA Connecticut Yankee in King Arthuris Court? The leading social event was the annual party, at which it can be said truly that ha good time was had by 2111? Groups of the Club members have also enjoyed Visits to the Knickerbocker Press. This was both interesting and instructive. The club is very proud to have in its possession two original paintings by local artists. A very effective background for these paintings is made by the silk curtain covering the transoms at the west end of the library, which was presented to the school by the club last June. 85 LE CERCLE FRANCAIS President .................................................................. MARGARET HILL Vice-Presidcnt .................................................... DORIS FUKISHIMA Secretary .................................................. MARION VALENTINE Faculty Adviser .................................................... MRS. D. J. GRANT I vous ne parlez pas francais, you unfortunately are not eligible to join TTLe Cercle Frangaisf the organization connected with the French Department which strives to create an interest in speaking French more fluently and in studying the customs, literature, art and people of the France of today and the F ranee 0f the past. The French Clubs greatest project was the management of the Elm produc- tion of TtThe Hunchback of Notre Dame? that historical novel of France by Victor Hugo. The affair was a great success fmancially and educationally. Having the daily life and customs in France portrayed before 0116s very eyes made the condi- tions more realistic than ever before. Much praise is due Miss Ketcham, through whose efforts the French Club was established years ago and who continued as its director until her death last October. It was through her efforts that HThe Hunchback of Notre Dame, was so well man- aged. The French Club deeply feels her loss and mourns her as a teacher, friend and adviser. The club is continuing its good work under the competent guidance of Mrs. Grant and Mr. Edgerly. wLe Cercle Frangaish has done great things in the past and it expects to do even greater in the future. EL CIRCULO CASTELLANO President ................................................................ CHESTER FRENCH Secretary-Treasm'er .................................................... LEWIS PINTO V 'icc-President. ..... ALFRED HOWARD Faculty Adviser MR. E. F. FLAHERTY ht L Circulo Castellano" is among one of the fast growing organizations in the New Rochelle High School. The purpose of the club is to stimulate the natural use of Spanish, both in written and spoken practice, and to create greater interest in the customs, history, spirit, commercial life, educational systems, geography and literature of Spain and the Spanish-American countries. Member- ship is open to all students in the second or third year Spanish classes who maintain a passing average, to students in the first year who have an average of ninety per cent, and, finally, to all students who have passed the Spanish regents. The Spanish Club has had a very successful year under the efforts and excellent guidance of Mr. Flaherty, the club adviser. It has joined the Institute de las Espanas, an afhliation of Spanish clubs, and expects to derive many benehts from this organization. Although the membership in the Spanish Club is not as large as in some of the organizations, it has very active members who take part in the pro grams, thus deriving large benefits. The Spanish Club is looking forward to a bigger and better year, which it will surely have if the members take as much interest in the organization as they have this year. THE CHESS CLUB President ...................................................................... HENRY LEWIS Secretary .................................. DAVID BAKER Faculty Adviser .................................................. MR. A. B. HUSSEY LTHOUGH the Chess Club was late in organizing this year it gradually developed into a large and active organization. The policy of the Club advocates fewer business meetings and more chess playing. In the early part of the year a tournament was held, in which twenty aspiring chess players took part. From this number the five best were Chosen for the team to represent New Rochelle in the interscholastic tournament. Among the games included in the schedule were matches with Mt. Vernon, Yonkers and White Plains, in the West- tchester County Interscholastic Chess League. The interest shown in the meetings was good, and not only was a tine team chosen from the club, but also the members volunteered to teach anyone who wished to learn how to play this ancient game of chess. 88 SENATE Presideirit ...................................................................... LEWIS PINTO Vice-President ................................................................ JACK KAHN Recording Secretary .................... CLAIRE CUNEEN Corresponding Secretary ................................ MORTIMER FURTSCH Faculty Adviser ................................................ MR. H. A. CHAFFEE EBATING in our High School is fast becoming one Of the leading activities, and this years Senate was surely a going concern. The purpose of this organization is to foster interest in debating, public speaking and literary work. Under our advisers, Mr. Handy and Mr. Chaffee, whose interest and ability have greatly aided us, the Senate has not merely had a most successful year, but really a banner year. The work of the Senate has been continually before the school during its active season. The Senate,s entertainment in the assembly, consisting of a debate on the Dalton Plan of Education, was a new achievement since it brought this system of education before the students, and also since the decision involved was made by the students. The bi-monthly meetings have been most interesting and instructive. Talks given by Dr. Leonard, Professor Bohn, and others, and debates on the restric- tion of the power of the Supreme Court, the Sterling-Reed Bill, Child Labor, and current topics, are a few of the many things which have made the programs at the Senate meetings worth while. The Senate produced two excellent school debating teams which met teams from White Plains and Yonkers in an interscholastic tri- angular debate. After all these achievements, the Senate terminated its season with a banquet. . These activities have tended to put debating and public speaking on a high plane in the New Rochelle High School this year, with the result that the membership has been tripled, and the interest, enthusiasm and competition may be still greater. Such advancement and progress make the record of the Senate for this year notable, and the outlook for next year bright. 89 THE HOUSE President ................................................................ RICHARD ELDRED Vice-Presidmt ........................................................ LANE WHITMAN Secretary .............................................................. CHARLOTTE CLAUs Treasurer .................................................................... OSBORN JONES Faculty Advise? .................................................. MR. C. E. RUSSELL HE House, the freshman debating society, was organized this year and so many have joined that it has been necessary to divide it into two branches, the Blues and the Grays. The hrst preliminary debate was: tTResolved, that Crossword Puzzles have an educational value? The most important debate of the season, between the Blues and the Grays, was on the subject: TtResolved, that the proposed Child Labor Amendment should be ratihed.U The Gray team, the affirma- tive, was composed of Robert Goodman, Iabratore Nardozzi and Richard Boddie. The Blue team, the negative, was composed of Robert Smith, Margaret Molyneaux, Ronald Peckham and Irene Ward, alternate. One of the best programs of the season was the illustrated address by Miss Flagg, dean of Girls, on ttMines and Mining? INTERSCHOLASTIC DEBATING TEAM Faculty Adviser ................................................ MR. H. A. CHAFFEE N. R. H. S. Soon after the Christmas vacation the subject of the annual triangular debates was announced. It was ttResolved, that Congress shall pass the Sterling-Reed Educational Bill?y At the try-outs, which were held soon afterwards, the number of candidates was twice that of the preceding year. A com- mittee composed of members of the faculty selected an affirmative and a negative team. Under the direction of Mr. Chaffee the debaters set to work immediately. In spite of some delay because of the illness of several debaters, both teams entered the field well prepared. On March 27th, the negative, consisting of Herbert Borg- zinner, captain; Alletta Morton, Frank Bernard and Brooke Jones, alternate, met the Yonkers afflrmative team at Yonkers High School. Our affirmative team, Mortimer F urtsch, captain ; David Crampton, Walter Wiener and Josephine Foster, alternate, debated the White Plains negative team in New Rochelle. In both places the decision was awarded to the negative teams. New Rochelle did equally well with White Plains and Yonkers, since each school lost one debate. The increased popularity as well as the interest in debating shown by the students is regarded by many as a favorable omen for the future. That is why the followers of debating are looking forward to an even more successful season next year. DURING the season of 1924-25, debating enjoyed increased popularity in 91 THE ARTS AND CRAFTS CLUB President .............................................................. IDA WEBENDORFER Vice-President ...................................................... PATRICIA SEACORD Secretary .................................................................. HELEN LOBDELL Faculty Adviser ........................................ MISS S. C. ENGELBREKT HE Arts and Crafts Club was organized in the fall of 1923 under the supervision of Miss Engelbrekt. The membership was at hrst limited to twenty, but the waiting list was so large that ten more members were admitted. Membership is open only to those who are at present studying in the art department and to those who have had some previous instruction in drawing. The meetings of the club are held every W ednesday afternoon in the drawing room, and are always well attended. The purpose of the club is to study art and the various arts and crafts ; so far the principal work of the club has been in enamel, leatheretooling and gesso work. Last year the members of the club held a very successful exhibition in the school library, and it is their plan to hold another one this spring in order to show the ability of the various members of the Club to the school. Those in the club have all derived much benefit and pleasure from the organization. 92 THE TRACK CLUB President ................................................................ WILLIAM MASON Vice-Presidem ............................................ DOUGLAS FAIRWEATHER Secretary .............................................................. NESBIT COCKBURN Faculty Adviser ...................................................... MR. Di OBRIEN bids fair with age to become one of the most powerful. The paramount Object of the club is to arouse enthusiasm for the neglected cross-country and track meets, and to help the athletes to prepare for their contests. The members have requested permission to build jumping and pole vaulting pits in the rear of our school this spring. The goal to be attained and highest ambition of all is to win the County Track Championship. THE Track Club of the New Rochelle High School is a new organization and 93 THE COURT OF HONOR President ................................................................... BETTY KARR Vice-Presia'ent .......................................................... LUCILLE CLAUs Secretary .............................................................. JOSEPHINE FOSTER Faculty Adviser .................................................... MRS. G. W. AMIS It was started last year under the supervision of Mrs. Christy and Mrs. Amis. Dorothy Price was elected Chairman, and Betty Karr, secretary. Although it had but a short time to work, it did much to improve conditions in the girls, gymnasium. This year it has expanded, and while its membership is still limited to girls, it has at heart the best interests of all the school. To quote from the constitution, "The purpose of this organization is to promote high ideals and sportsmanship in the New Rochelle High School, and to be of: service to the New Rochelle High School." The biggest thing the Court of Honor has done this year, so far, is to establish a Lost and Found Bureau in the girls gym. It is to be hoped that next year, when the membership will be open to both boys and girls, the success of the Court of Honor will far exceed that of the first two years, and that it will become a vital part Of the General Organization. THE Court of Honor is a new Club, about which little is known in the school. 94 GLEE CLUB Faculty Adviser ........................................................ MR. B. B. NYE HE fact that the Glee Club this year shows the largest membership yet enrolled speaks for the constantly increasing interest in Choral activity in our school. The Chorus meets every Monday and Wednesday during the :sixth period in room 300 and the course carries regentsT credit. Each year, members of the club look forward to their public performance. For the past three years Operettas have been successfully presented. This year a choral and instrumental concert was given, when our chorus of over 100 joined with the orchestra in providing the program. The program included such numbers as selec- tions from TtFaustfi Loves, Benediction, Irish Folk Songs arranged by Silver, the dramatic cantata, ttFair Ellen? by Max Bruch, and New Rochelle High School songs. The club was assisted by two well-known New Rochelle artists, Mrs. Agnes Scott Homer, soprano, and Mr. Raymond Otis Hunter, baritone. The concert represented the highest point yet reached in the school musical activities, and shows the musical advantages gained by the students. 95 THE ORCHESTRA Faculty Adviser ........................................................ MR. B. B. NYE URING the past four years orchestral activity has progressed rapidly. At the present time we have two orchestras, Senior and Junior, which meet weekly to practise good music and perform at assemblies and numerous school and community functions. The Senior Orchestra numbers thirty-seven members from the three upper classes, and the Junior Orchestra numbers thirty- one members from the freshman class. The instruments now represented are violin, viola, ycello, clarinet, flute, saxophone, cornet, horn, trombone, piano and drums. Each orchestra member receives a grade on the monthly report as in any other subject, and one regentsi count at the close of the school year, if his work has been satisfactory. Musical instruments have been purchased from the proceeds of the musical performances and from the money which has been donated to the Musical Instrument Fund. These instruments are for those who wish to study and learn to play but could not do so unless the instruments were provided. Under the direction of Mr. Bernard Nye, Director of Music in the Public Schools, all this has been made possible, with the aid of interested students. 96 THE MANDOLIN CLUB President ..................................................................... JOHN RANGES Vicc-Prcsidmzt ...................................................... CORNELIA AUSTIN Secretary .......................................................................... VERA LION Faculty Adviser .............................................. MR. XV. B. BOWMAN HE Mandolin Club, which was organized three years ago for the purpose of promoting interest in mandolin, guitar, banjo and ukelele playing among the students, has this year added another purpose to its preamble, that of bring- ing talented artists to the high school. This work is in charge of a committee com- posed of Vera Lion, Dorothy Odell and Dorothy Wright, who secured the services of the Estrella Mandolin Club of New York City for a concert last December. Of special interest to the club this year is the fact that each member will be given one school count for satisfactory attendance at the meetings of the Club. The Mandolin Club has given entertainments at the Colburn Home for the Aged, the Night School and has assisted the French Club and the Library Club. 97 THE DRAMATIC CLUB President .................................................................... JACK POLLACK Secretary .................................................................... ALICE VVENCK Faculty Adviser .................................................. MISS R. E. SHEAR HE Dramatic Club has set a new record for large attendance and interest. Various committees have beenactive in carrying on the work. The librarians have catalogued the books belonging to the club and have reported a growing interest in the reading of plays. The notice committee has had charge of the bulletin board, of keeping the members informed about the meeting and work of the club. The play hle committee has collected reviews, pictures and notices of the current plays and have pasted new collections on the bulletin board each week. By the various committees and casts for the programs and plays, a lively interest among the members has been sustained throughout the year. As a contrast to the business, a program has been provided for each meeting. These programs have consisted of one-act plays. monologues and a talk by Mr. W. B. Humphrey. Two one-act plays have been given by the Dramatic Club, "Tickless Time? by Susan Glaspell, and ttThe Land of Heartts Desire," by W. B. Yeats. 98 SENIOR PLAY HE Senior play this year was a departure from the usual custom of present ing a play dealing with present-day life. The committee selected "The Rivals? a classic comedy of the eighteenth century by the English play- right, Sheridan. This play, while just as humorous as a modern comedy, has a , deeper element of wit. , The staging of the production also differed from the former play presented by the Senior Classf In place of the customary, realistic scenery, draperies were used throughout. CAST OF mTHE RIVALSTT SIR ANTHONY ABSOLUTE ................................................................. ....C1arence Tuck CAPTAIN JACK ABSOLUTE ................................................................... Mortimer Furtsch FAULKLAND ................................................................................................ Ralph Heyman BOB ACRES ............................... Paul Talmey SIR LUCIUS OTRIGGER ............................................................................ Ernest Brehaut FAG .............................................................................................................. James Caldwell DAVID .............................................................................. XViHiam Jenkins THOMAS ...................................................................................................... XValter VVeiner MRS. MALAPROP ........................................................................................ Johanna Cooke LYDIA LANGUISH .......................................................... Ruth Hill JULIA ............................................................................................................ V irginia Cook LUCY ............................................................................................................... Jessie VVenck 99 HIHIHHIIHHHHwHmvmmlnuwIHwwHwHIVHIHIHmmmmmmHIHIIHmHmIIHImHIHIIHHHHHHIHHIHmwmlnuwImw1mHHwwmHwwwnwwuwwnwm1wHmHlmmlmlmlmlg Book IV HIHIHIHHIHIIHHIVHIHIImHm4HuwnumwwIIHIHmull:HHIIHmlIIHIIHIIHlmlmm m mnu numunummmumunmu. H. m mHuml..H.H..H..H.,,.,, 101 STAFF OF 2THE PURPLE AND WHITE2 EDITORIAL BOARD VIRGINIA E. COOK, '25 ............................................................................................................ Editor-in-Chief FRED FROST, y26 ............. "Asmaate Editor ROBERT E. FARLOW, 225 ..... V ............................................................ , ......... Art Editor CHARLOTTE HAAS, 327 ................................................................. Asxz'stant Art Editor DONALD DEEDMAN, ,24 ......................................................................................................... Alumni Editor BETTY GUION, ,25 1 BEATRICE SAQUI, 26 2 . JAMES McFARLANE. ,25 rk ........................................................................................... Class Representatwes ALMA MAE CLARKE, '27 l GORDON R. SILBER, 227 j BUSINESS BOARD JOSEPH LFKACS, 225 .......................................................................................................... Business Manager THOMAS HOCTOR. '26 1 RAYMONP XVOLKENSTEIN. ,27 14m,fa,zf Managers VIVIEN GORDON, 27 I EDWARD STORCK, '27 J FACULTY BOARD MISS M, L. SNOWW ................................................................................................. Editorial Adviser MISS S C. ENGLFBR 2 ................................................................................................... Art Adviser MR. A. B. HUSSEY ...................................................................................................... Business Adviser BULLETIN STAFF ELSE KAUZMANN, 225.; .......................................................................................................... Editmnimcmef DOROTHY EDWARDS, ,2'31 ALFRED HOWARD, '26 . . LEWIS PINTO, 225 l --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Amzstant Ednors 1 THOMAS HOCTOR, '26 l L011; NICKERSON, 227 j 102 THE PURPLE AND WHTTE PUBLICATIONS HPurple and White Bulletini, this year because they have gone to so many conventions during school sessions. Three interscholastic leagues have our publications on their roster, two of which have registered our delegates at their annual conventions; and a third, a county league, credits New Rochelle High School as a charter member. Two students on the staff attended the fourth annual convention of the Eastern Interscholastic Publication Association, which was held at Cornell University during the latter part of November. At this convention there were represented about forty schools from New York State and Pennsylvania. Of all these schools only four, including New Rochelle High School, published both a magazine and a newspaper. It was at this conference that the combined publications of the llPurple and W hiteli and the hPurple and W hite Bulletiifl were awarded the second general merit prize. Professor Bristow Adams, the editor of Cornell University, who gave the awards, congratulated the staff on their publication output and also commented favorably on the art work and printing. All the journalistic celebrities of Cornell University addressed the students, including Professor Adams, Chilton Leonard, former editor of the Cornell Countryman; David S. Cook, the host of the conven- tion, and Willis Wing, the editor of the Cornell LVidow for 1923-24. Through their criticism and suggestions, the publications of the New Rochelle High School have steadily improved in material and set-up. In March, the Columbia Scholastic Press Association enrolled five of our students at its hrst annual convention, at which three hundred schools were repre- sented. The speakers at this meeting were men of national importance, ranking high in their particular professions. Among these who discussed ethics and j ournalism in general were: Dean Hawkes, of Columbia University; Dr. Fretwell, of Teachers College; Mr. Wiley, Business Manager of the New York Times; Dean Cunliffe, of the Pulitzer School of Journalism; Mr. Sykes, cartoonist of the Philadelphia Evening Ledger; Mr. Rival Davis, of the New York World. Here, the delegates derived much constructive criticism because of the systematic arrangement of the sectional and open meetings which were conducted by leading professors of the University. This year, through the efforts of the W hite Plains TTOrangef the Westchester County Press Association has been formed. It was ofhcially organized in. April at Mount Vernon, at which meeting three delegates from New Rochelle High School were present. This league promises to be very helpful to the TlPurple and White" staffs in future years. 1924-25 has seen a great expansion in the NPurple and White: and the TTPurple and White Bulletin? The staff has endeavored to improve the magazine in regard to its departmental organization, general appearance and increased interest to the student body. The art work, which was favorably commented upon at the Cornell Convention by Professor Adams, has done more in the direction of story illustra- tion than formerly. Unlike previous years, when it was often irregular and infrequent, this year the staff had tried to publish the newspaper every ten days. Moreover, they have attempted to establish perfect symmetry in the set-up of the first page. Besides this, new departments have been added and more recognition has been given to many activities and organizations. As a result of the conventions, the delegates have realized the inefficient way in which our staffs are chosen. There fore, they are aiming at the establishment of a system by which the staffs will be appointed by competition. As years go on, the TlPurple and Wliite,l publications will gradually improve with the increase of experience, interest and financial support of the student body. WE have certainly envied the Staffs of the uPurple and White, and the 103 "THE ROCHELLEAN STAFPW ADRIAN A. EHLER .................................................................................... Editor-in-Clzief HERBERT KAHAN .............................................................................. Business Zlimzagcr BROOKE W. JONES ......................................................................... Advertising Alanager ROBERT FARLOW ................................................................................................ Art Editor BETTY KARR .................................................................................... Orgamsatioarzs E d itor KATHERINE HOLBY .................................................................................. Athletic Editor RUTH HILL 2 ............................................................................ Senior Class Editors MARTHA PRATTS MARION VALENTIVE ................... Assf. Advertising Manager giviiimgfgggfsull .................................................................... Plzofogra 1612175 Editors JACK POLLOCK J WILLIAM JENKINS .................................................................... Assf. Business .Manager NIISS VV. G. CARPENTER ? .................................................................... Faculty Advisers MR. NOEL C. GODFREY 5 104 105 SENIOR DANCE HE most popular members of New Rochelleis younger set attended a bril- liant function, the most successful of the winter season, at Mayflower School. A large and representative gathering proves the merit of Class of ,25. We really hate to praise ourselveseweire really awfully bashfulibut we cant help admitting that we are an exceptional crowd and that that dance was the quin- tessence of perfection. We don't brag, you know, but let actions speak louder than words. But to be serious, the dance really was a wonderful success. The auditorium of Mayhower School was decorated in a dazzling and artistic fashion, in the class colors of Orange and Black. Irresistible music was furnished by ttThe Arcadians? who also gave a great'many novelty numbers, which helped in the general enter- tainment. The ever-present and ever-popular punch was served, and, as Firpo remarked to Dempsey, ttThat was some punchW Fortunately the date of the dance could not have been more opportunely chosen. All the colleges and boarding schools were having their vacations and we were very glad to see the familiar faces of our alumni among those present. It was universally admitted that everyone had a wonderful eveningeand I caift conceive why anyone couldlft have had a good time-4unless he was included among the unfortunates who didnt come. Under the skillful direction of the Four Horsemen of the Wonder ClasseAlletta Morton tchairmanL Betty Karr, Joseph Nesbitt and Adrian Ehler, assisted by many others, including Betty Guion, Bob Farlow, Brooke Jones and Else Kauzmaneeverythi11g was perfect. Mr. and Mrs. Bragdon, Miss Flagg, Miss Lawson and Mr. and Mrs. Russell Morton acted as hosts and hostesses. As I mentioned before, weire painfully bashfuldbut just the same we carft help saying: There are senior dances and Senior Dances, but this was a SENIOR DANCE. 106 JUNIOR PROM HE Junior From! Who of us does not look forward to this great social event of the year with considerable pleasure and expectation? This year the Class of ,26 is attempting to outdo what other classes have done in past years by making this dance one of the finest, from a social standpoint. The committee, whose picture you see above, is composed of Fred Frost, President of the Class of 126; Jacqueline James, Vice-President, and Margaret Fahy, Secretary, together with Ruth Porter, Kenneth Anderson and Richard Geoghegan. On account of their experience in previous class functions, the school may be sure that the task is in capable, interested hands. At the time this book goes to press, very few arrange- ments can as yet be announced, but the committee has expressed the desire to give the school a delightful dance which will be a real success, a credit to the Class and which will be recalled with pleasure for years to come. THE G. O. DANCE Osterhaudt, Mr. Chaffee, Mr. Bowman, Jacqueline James, as chairman; Virginia James, Betty Karr, Hugh Gardner, Fred Frost, Sam Pullman, Alletta Morton and Peggy Fahy arrange plans for the first dance ever to be spon- sored by the General Organization of the N. R. H. S. It was given 011 Friday night, April 24, in the High School gymnasium. Under the direction of Betty Karr, the gym was beautifully decorated in QIROUND the middle of April a committee consisting of Miss Flagg, Mr. purple and white. Prizes were awarded for a lucky number dance. During the dances, streamers were distributed, which added to the general merriment 0f the evening. Everyone who attended will agree that socially it was one of the most suc- cessful dances ever given in the High School. Great appreciation is due the committee, especially Jacqueline James, Betty ,Karr and Hugh Gardner, for their untiring efforts in making this dance a success. 'gKg, w Athletics g y .1,..Hm1.. ... ,.. .. umwmm..."Hmm ...mummy".u. ..Hm y.m.Hmmmmmmmmmmmm ................................. M 109 V. DRADDY, Captain N. COCKBURN L. BROWNELL J. DENNY S. EDMUNDS B. ALLEN, Captain A. EHLER, Mmzager C. TODD, Captain J. DENNY H. KAHAN, Captain J. NESBITT, Manager F. GRAF, Captai11 Elect N. COCKBURN, Captain R. FARLOW, Manager N. R. H. S. FOOTBALL A. GOLDSTEIN F. GRAF F. HINMAN A. HUNTINGTON B. JONES BASEBALL A. HOWARD C. DENNERLEIN CREW V. DRADDY E. LOIZEAUX J. LUKAcs BASKETBALL B. ALLEN E. BREHAUT N. COCKBURN A. GOLDSTEIN TRACK E. DOYLE F. DEL SALLE F. GRAF 110 E. LOIZEAUX J. LUKAcs E. SIMONs C. TODD C. TUCK F. GRAF A. HUNTINGTON E. SIMONS E. WINTERS L. KAHAN N. MAYER L. SEIDENSTEIN L. KETCHAM B. VALERY FOOTBALL ............ '. ............... V. DRADDY BASEBALL ................................ B. ALLEN CREW ............................................ C. TODD BASKETBALL. .................. H. KAHAN TRACK N. COCKBURN GIRLS BASKETBALL ...... A. MORTON 111 FOOTBALL year, assembled in City Park for the hrst football practice for 1924. Thus by this early start, when school commenced there were three squads daily going through signals and tackling the dummy, that terrible demon that never stays up when you want it to, and comes down when you least expect it. By October the varsity had been picked, which, under the leadership of Draddy and the coaching of Mr. Johnson, was indeed formidable. ON the first of September, hfty boys, together with the lettermen from last On October 4 the season began. Evander Childs was defeated, 7-0. Thus the team of 1924 made a good beginning. October 11 brought the Mamaroneck team here for the first county game. It also brought another Victory, 30-0. So the 0Home Townerstl went back to the HHometown 0n the mud Hats by the seaf, defeated. The next Saturday afternoon the would-be powerful team from Morris High School was defeated, 12-7. Again Draddy had led his team to Victory. A week later we journeyed up to Yonkers for the second county game. The team was escorted out into the UGoat Countryu behind Yonkers, where the game was held. The held was in terrible condition, so the game was exceedingly dusty from the start. On account of the dust and dirt which caked on the players, Kazan worked overtime with the bucket and sponge. In the last half, Yonkers, knowing the field, was able to put over a drop kick, winning the game, 3-0. Had the game been played on a different field the score might have been different. On November 1, all records for Fords and Cadillacs were shattered between here and Milford, when the team raced up the Post Road. The game started at half past ten, neither team being able to score a touchdown; so when the final whistle blew, the score was still 0-0. In the afternoon six of the team took in the Yale-Army game. The next Saturday we were bent before the sweep of Mount Vernon, 21-0. When a green oak is bent to the ground it doesn,t break but springs back with such force that sweeps everything from its path. Thus the Purple and W hite swept the powerful thite Plains team from its path to the tune of 13-0. White Plains were the picked winners; but before the game was three minutes old, the team had covered 65 yards to a touchdown. Draddy kicked the goal. And in the last three minutes of play, Cockburn tore 40 yards around end for another touchdown, making the score 13-0. This ended the season of 1924. BASEBALL EW ROCHELLE at last has a baseball team that is a baseball team! Due to Mr. Johnsonk being unable to get out the hrst week, the squad of over fifty which answered the call for candidates was divided into three groups, each having a leader. These set to work with a great deal of zest and vim, and by the end of the week received their uniforms. When Mr. Johnson came out the squad doubled its efforts to make a good showing, and the coach was happily surprised. The team he has selected is a powerful combination. Not only on paper does it appear strong, but in the games thus far played it has done nobly and has upheld the name of N. R. H. S. With such veterans as Captain Allen, De Roche- mont, Graf, Dennerlein, Hayden, Huntington, Talbot and a host of promising youngsters, the 1925 team bids fair to bring the County Championship here. CREW if one were to consider his accomplishments. llMartyll does not talk much. He does not have to. He knows what to say and how, and his men obey and respect him. ltMai-tyil has coached New Rochelle crews to Victory for many years, and will undobutedly continue to do so for a good while to come. VVheu crew practice began, February 17, a record squad of over seventy showed up. This number was gradually cut down to the best twenty-four ; enough for two eights and two gigs. Last year, the crew came in third at the Yale Interscholastic Regatta, and first on the Harlem. Six letter men from that crew are back in this years boat. From such sterling material, plus a number of last years substitutes, a winning crew should be molded. There is every reason to believe that when the N. R. H. S. boat rows at Derby, on May 9, and on the Harlem, Memorial Day, she will be Victorious. If not, we may feel confident that she has clone her level best; that she has been loyal to her work, her coach and her school. DEEDS, not words! This would seem to be the motto of llMartyll Roberts, BOYSi BASKETBALL 1TH a record of five games won and five lost, the team wound up a fairly successful season under the leadership Of Captain Herbert Kahan and the able coaching of Mr. O,Brien by beating our rival, Mt. Vernon, 17-16. They started off with an easy victory over Mamaroneck, but were then upset two games in succession by Portchester and Yonkers. After easily defeating White Plains at XVhite Plains, they dropped the second game at New Rochell by a close score. Mt. Vernon, the next team they met, easily defeated New Rochelle, 40-9. The team then dropped another game to Yonkers, but wound up the season with three straight victories over Mamaroneck, Portchester and Mt. Vernon. Ten men have received their letters: Kahan, captain; Nesbitt, manager; Graf, Allen, Mayer, Brehaut, Goldstein, Cockburn, Seidenstein and Leon Kahan. Of this number there will be two 01' perhaps three 011 the teams next yeareGraf, captain- elect ; L. Kahan and perhaps Mayer. TRACK TEAM AST year the New Rochelle High School Track Team took second place in the County Meet at Travers Island, and second in the Intersectional Meet. Five men won first places at Scarsdale in the Intersectional Meet, and so qualified to go to Ithaca for the State Championships. At Ithaca, Dave Kutner set a new State record for the broad jump, and Murray CiCyU Decker won fourth place in the hurdles. This is an enviable record, but the track team this year will try to eclipse it by winning the County and Intersectional Meets and by sending more men to the State Championships. This sounds hard, but With five letter men back and the whole school giving its earnest support it is not impossible. CROSS COUNTRY TEAM EVV ROCHELLE High School has always taken great pride in showing the records of its cross country teams, and this year proved no exception. The competition of this team is not limited to the county, but takes in New England. The team won both dual meets it entered by overwhelming scores. It continued to show fine form in the Columbia Meet, where it finished second, and in the Yale Meet, where it finished third. It also placed itself high on the list for State honors when it won the County Championship, only two points away from a perfect score. The splendid running of these men was largely clue to the judgment and interest taken by Coach OlBrien and the leadership of Captain Herbert. Credit must also be given to the men who by hard work and training are placed upon the pinnacle of success. Prospects look bright for the further development of this sport in our school. Captain Herbert and Mason will be the only ones lost by graduation; for Doyle, Church, Gavrin and Rosenbanm will be available in the future. HOCKEY HE New Rochell High School hockey team completed a hard schedule undefeated for the first time in many years. Each and every member of the team did his share towards winning the success achieved. De Rochemont, the center, by his brilliant plays earned many of the scores. King. left wing, a new boy from Toronto, was very strong and teamed well with De Rochemont. Together they made an aggressive pair and worried the defense of every team N. R. played. Goodhand, right wing, was the fastest skater and proved himself a great asset. Stanley Edmunds was the captain of the team, playing right defense and moving up to replace De Rochemont on the offense many times in each game. This helped to strengthen the team. Huntington certainly was a big boy on defense and upset many of our opponents offensive plays during the season. While Skipton was missed as goal tended on account of his being a post-graduate, that position was ably covered by Mayer. Mayer, originally a defense man, made one of the pluckiest goal guards who played on any prep school team this year. Morton and Lippoth made good in every game they played and with Dawson, W7rig11t and Olsen were the substitutes. A great deal of the credit for the teanfs success goes to them, for whenever called on, no matter how critical the occasion, they were there. All the above players, with the exception of Edmunds and Lippoth, are expected back next year, and with this material nothing less than a State championship is looked for. This year the team has been very fortunate in having the assistance and advice of a very able coach, Mr. Macfarland, as the season just past has proven. BOYSt TENNIS HE tennis outlook for the season of 1925 is very bright for New Rochelle High School. A very interesting schedule has been arranged by the school, including some of the best prep and high schools in this section. There is some very promising material to be had in the school. Wfith the help of an able faculty adviser we hope to have a very successful tennis season in N . R. H. S. GIRLSl VARSITY BASKETBALL Basketball that New Rochelle High has ever known? That is not true, accord- ing to the number of games won this year, but it is true if the game itself is taken into consideration, as it should be. This year the varsity girls have striven mainly for two things: first, good sportsmanship, and second, good team work. Both of these they have attained through hard work and faithfulness in keeping training, and so the saying above can truthfully be applied to this seasonls basket- ball. It would take much paper and ink to go into detail about the captain, Alletta Morton; but there is one thing that we must tell of and that is her excellent influ- ence upon her team, aiid her power to get the enthusiastic support of every girl. However, in praising this years team, we must not neglect to say that all of its accomplishments are due to the tireless efforts of the coach, Mrs. Christy. Those who will receive first team letters are Alletta Morton, Patty Seacord, Tommy Holby, Else Kauzmann, Betty Karr, Betty McAvoy, Ruth Davis, Lorraine Sunshine, Spiff Knowles, Josephine Foster and Doris Fukushima, manager. Those of the first team letter girls who will remain with the school are Captain-elect Betty McAvoy and Ruth Davis. IT seems to be a habit in these parts to say, tlThis is the best season of Girls, GIRLST INTERCLASS SPORTS BASKETBALL NTERCLASS basketball this year has taken on an aspect of unusual interest. I More class spirit and good sportsmanship has been shown than ever before. Also a new schedule worked out very satisfactorily. Each class team, both first and second, played every other team twice, making it a test of endurance as well as skill. The remarkable and unprecedented happened this year. The Seniors ran away with the championship, the cup and all the numerals. The second team won all of its games and rightfully claims numerals. The first team won three of four class games, the game with the second team varsity and the White Plains Seniors. To increase interest in interclass sports and to promote the good feeling between White Plains and New Rochelle, their class teams played each other. BASEBALL Along about the end of April, after the spring vacation last year, the call came for baseball candidates. Many girls turned out and practised hard and faithfully in the hot sun. Finally the week for the tournament arrived and each of the three upper classes produced a line team. The games were closely and hotly contested, especially the last game between the Sophomores and Juniors. The Sophomores finally won by a few points, but the cup and championship went to the Class of ,25 by default. TENNIS When the girls were urged to try out for their class teams in the Fall of 1924, a vast number from each class responded. The prospects of all the classes were bright, for Mrs. Amis and the captains of their respective teams had much to work with. Within a week of the tournament, the teams were chosen, consisting of four regular players and two substitutes. Two of these chosen players represented the singles group, while the other two, aided by their substitutes, played on the doubles. The tournament proved to be so close that when the final game was played it was found that all the classes were tied. In order to play off the tie, it was decided that the two singles players of each class should form a double team to contend against the other classes. The Seniors were Victorious, winning over the Sophomores with a score of 6-3 and 7-5, and over the Juniors, 6-1 and 6-2 score. T RACK The Interclass Track Tournament of 1924 was tinally won by the Class 0f 25 after a hard light with the Class of 26 to break a tie. ' The events, which were held in Rochelle Park and the school ground, consist of the following: Relay, throw and catch, 50-yard dash, baseball throw, basketball throw, hurdling. VOLLEY-TSALL The Interclass Volley Ball Tournament, which took place in November, showed up the best in form and sportsmanship in the Seniors, Sophomores and Iuniors. The scores proved to be close, thus making the contests exciting. Each team in order to win must defeat the other teams by two games each. First the Juniors beat the Sophomores by winning both games, then the Seniors defeated the Sophomores, thus making the tournament a tie between the Juniors and Seniors. The Juniors and Seniors first game was won by the Juniors, and the second game was won by the Seniors, so that it was necessary to play another game, which the Juniors won. 123 ATHLETIC COMMITTEE C hairman .............................................................. JOSEPHINE FOSTER Secretary ................................................................ GEORGE MUELLER Monday has found the committee in session and occasionally, when business demanded, a special meeting was held. The purpose of this committee is to attend to all matters pertaining to athletics, such as making appropriations, awarding letters, etc. Many were the discussions held on the question of eligibility. Another matter taken up this year was that of cheering squads. It was decided to have two squads, one boys' and one girlsl squad, consisting of six members each. A question of awarding certificates to all letter men in all sports was acted upon, and next year all those receiving letters will have a certificate to show for it. As is the custom, the following list Of classified sports is presented: MajoreFootball, Basketball, Base- ball, Crew and Track. MinorsHoekey, Tennis and Cross Country. This year has been a 'most successful as well as a busy year for the Athletic Committee. THE Athletic Committee of the G. O. has been busy, as usual. Every fourth Appreciation aiding in the publication of this issue of "The Rochellcahf; 011d especially to 1141's: Carpenter, Miss Foster, 1W7. Ostcrv- ha'ztdt, M7. Bowman, Mr. Godfrey and Mr. Baker, the Senior Class of 1925 takes this opportunity to tender their sincere thanks. F I '10 all those who so graciously gave their time and service in 125 Everybody,s Doing It! What? Why, starting a bank. account at the High School through the Educational Thrift Service at the PEOPLES BANK FOR SAVINGS Several weeks ago the High School discarded its Automatic Teller System, which had been tried for over a year with poor results, and substituted the Educa- tional Thrift Service. This new scheme took the fancy 0f the pupils at once, for it is a genuine banking system eevery pupil has his own bank book in which his sav- ings are recorded weekly, so that he feels pride in watch- ing his bank account grow. Already every member of the Freshman Class has started an account and for the week of April 28 every one of them made deposits. For six weeks the savings of one class have amounted to almost $800, while for the three upper classes the total is over $2,000. Who can estimate the value of the THRIFT HABIT thus formed during the High School ages? ADVERTIEM aaaaa T0 the Readers ITHOUT the support and co-operation of the 151mm who VV haw herein advertised, the publication of this volume would not be poxsible. DVill your not, therefore, trade with and benefit from these hrms which have shown a particular dwire to serve you, while aid- ing ftThe Rochellmaf and the New Rochelle High School? 128 GUILBERT 8K BETELLE ARCHITECTS Chamber of Commerce Bldg. Newark, New Jersey 1876 1925 Age is an asset of a business institution especially one With such Close and extensive relations to the public as insurance. It means a record of honesty in the past and assurance of fair dealing in the future. No business can attain age and success unless it is built on the rock of sound policy and good principle. Blackman 8: Couenhoven, Inc. THE LAMBDEN AGENCY, Inc. F ire, Auto and Allied Lines of Insurance 12 NORTH AVENUE NEW ROCHELLE, N. Y. Telephone 4300 STRENGTH REPUTATION SERVICE Compliments of Northficzld Constuction C0. FRANK A. HOLBY, Vice-Pres. THE NEW JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL STARRETT 81 VAN VLECK, Architects 393 Seventh Ave. New York City A Good Maws Shop to Trade With THE WALDORF SHOP Compliments of A FRIEND 505 MAIN STREET Best Known for Real Values ' Colby and McGowan, Inc. 1201 CHESTNUT STREET ELIZABETH, N . J. Printers of this Year Book Telephone 7949 Telephone 6763 CAKE BOX TEA ROOM MARY A. NASH Excellent Quality of Food and Service Private Parties Arranged for Sunday Dinner712.30 t0 3 SupperwS to 7:30 111 CENTRE AVENUE, 164 NORTH AVENUE New Rochelle, N. Y. New Rochelle, N7 Y' Luncheon Tea Dinner BEECHMONT FLORIST Kirsner Bros. North Avenue Bank New Rochelle, N. Y. FINANCIAL STATEMENT February 28, 1925 Due Depositors ........... $2,159,114.85 Assets to Meet These Deposits x Investments .............. $2,222,383.88 Cash and Due from Banks 172,750.96 $2,395,134.84 Also: Stockholders' Guarantee-- $150,000.00 Margin of safety for Depositors $386,019.99 DON'T FORGET YOUR O SVIMMING SUIT FAMOUS THE WORLD OVER Guaranteed not to shrink. Colors guaranteed not to run. Sweaters, Bathing Suits, Golf Coats, Golf Hose, Silk Hosiery, Silk Underwear All our Knit XVear guaranteed. Kept in repair free for one year. FAMOUS FAIN 490 MAIN ST. New Rochelle, N. Y. BOARD OF DIRECTORS HARRY E. COLVVELL, President County Treasurer JOSEPH W. SPALDING, Vice-President THEODORE VVULP, Vice President ROBERT J. COOPER Printing W'. S. EMBERSON, M.D. Physician and Surgeon DOMINICK GIRARDI Retired Capitalist SIDNEY NV. Insurance J. ALBERT MAHLSTEDT Lumber and Coal XVALTER G. C. OTTO Lawyer FREDERICK Lawyer CHARLES F. STEHLIN Manufacturer CHARLES XV. Contractor GOLDSMITH H. SEACORD S. W'ILSON Caesar said quered? 1 came, I saw, I con- The modern conqueror says HI work, I save, I succeed." Adopt this motto by Opening an in- terest account with us and succeed. We will pay you 470 per annum. Christmas Club Checking Accounts The Central National Bank Corner North and Fifth Avenues New Rochelle, N. Y. Our permanent home will be just opposite your High School. You Own an Automobile! We Specialize in Insuring Them! NEW ROCHELLE AGEN C qnsurance and Nothing Else AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE SPECIALISTS 234 HUGUENOT STREET Phone, New Rochelle 3600-1-2-3 SIDNEY W. GOLDSMITH ARTHUR J. DEALY President Vice-President ALBERT RITCHIE J. KENNETH HUNTINGTON Vice-President Secretary Some of the foremost men in every walk of life have gone on record as to the great benefits of. Systematic thrift-Washington, Lincoln, Roosevelt, Carnegie, Wanamaker, Rockefeller, and scores of others profit by What they learned. Open an interest account-your deposits will earn for you inter- est at 470 per annum. CHECKING ACCOUNTS The National City Bank MAIN AND LAWTON STS. NEW ROCHELLE, N. Y. Follow the Young Man and He,ll Lead You Here UR young menbs following has been built up upon the simple principle of keeping young men young. We do it by means of youthful pat- terns, youthful colors; youthful styles. For HWest Em? ttMetropoleb Sack Suits. instance-our and Our Haberdashery Department is com- plete with Dress and Sport Accessories. I. B. COHEN 507 MAIN STREET Gould Battery Service and Sales Radlo Engmeermg Rochelle Battery and Radio Service WILLIAM G. KURZ 210 NORTH AVENUE New Rochelle, N. Y. Telephone 5665 J . P. BATTERSON DISPENSING OPTICIAN Formerly Manager Meyrowitz, Fifth Avenue, N. Y. Oculistse Prescriptions Accurately Filled Binoculars Telescopes Microscopes 28 DIVISION STREET New Rochelle, N. Y. ODIN Photographer for Class of 1925 84 NORTH AVENUE Telephone 4437 The Worldes Standard of Parts Namsal Radio Corp. "Service That Satisfiesee 262 HUGUENOT STREET New Rochelle 2763 Installation Under Supervision of U. S. Government Licensed Operator JOHN 1. WILSON Pharmacist The Drug Store for Service 405 NORTH AVENUE at Hubert PI. New Rochelle, N. Y. Telephone 4959 2277 Phones 2278 Cleaners Phone 796 Dyers BLOOM TAILORING CO. LAUNDRY SERVICE CO., INC. SOL. BLOOM eh SONS, Prop. 11Service Every Day" Dry Cleaning, F ancy Dyeing Repairing and Pressing A Full Line of Gentsf Furnishings Y 315 NORTH AVENUE 338 NORTH AVENUE New Rochelle, N. Y. New Rochelle, N. Y. Damp Wash Flat Wash Machine Ironing Hand Finishing aBeyond The Alps Lies Italyh -01d Commencement Fairy Tale ALL through with high school, eh? What next? College, or perhaps a position in the business world? He1-e1s to your big success. May all your troubles be little ones. And when you find The One whdll say the sweetest ttYesh yotfll ever hear, we hope yotfll settle down in the old home town in a bright new home of your very own. VVer be right here to help you get it started. MAHLSTEDTS KATHARINE GIBBS SCHOOL Telephone 5385 SECRETARIAL 8: EXECUTIVE Training for Educated Women g 1 247 Park Avenue NEW YORK Ihnmi 5 BOSTON PROVIDENCE 151 Commonwealth Ave. 155 Angell Street Home.Made Ice Cream and Ices One-year course includes technical, economic, and .broad business training, preparing for superlox- positions. Choice Home-Made Candies Two-year course including six college subjects . . for students not desiring college, but Wishing a Blrthday and Greetlng Cards cultural as Well as a business education. Seven-months' course-executive training for 11 . . - NORTH AVENUE 5:11:56 women and women w1th busmess exper - - Attractive residence school in Boston ideally OppOSIte Flfth situated at 151 Commonwealth Avenue. The . . school is within easy walking distance of Bos- Prompt Dellvery Serv1ce tom's shops, theatres, churches, and leading hotels. A location that is both quiet and con- venient. Telephone 3202 THE BOOTERY Exclusiv6 Footwear Fine Shoe Repairing 22 LAVVTON STREET New Rochelle, N. Y. Phone 2226 Established 1900 R. W. HAWKINS J eweler, Watchmaker, Clockmaker, Silversmith Q StoresN 6 DIVISION STREET New Rochelle, N. Y. 82 MAMARONECK AVENUE Mamaroneck, N. Y. THE FRANKLIN MARKET S. S. LYKKE Choice Meats, Poultry, Butter, Eggs, Fruit and Vegetables Telephone 967 6 FRANKLIN AVENUE New Rochelle, N. Y. Telephone 2381 H. B. CLEANING 8: DYEING C0. Tailoring Pressing Repairing If Itys to Be Cleaned W7C Clean It 62 CENTRE AVENUE New Rochelle, N. Y. Makers of Class Jewelry for the Class of 1925 Warren 8a Co. 104 FULTON STREET New York PINS ENGRAVERS RINGS J . H. RANGES 5BOSTON SPA5 Fine Confections French and American Ice Cream All Orders Promptly Attended To Telephone 2274 535 MAIN STREET New Rochelle HARRIS HOCK WOMEN5S APPAREL 555 MAIN ST. New Rochelle, N. Y. Phone New Rochelle 2619 Telephone 2083 NEW ROCHELLE GLASS Company Glass Mirrors 36 LAWTON ST. New Rochelle, N. Y. S Woolf. Prop. HGlass for All Purposes" C. B. ALLEN Real Estate and Insurance 260 HUGUENOT STREET New Rochelle, N. Y. Office 746 Phones Res. 3458 o Strike the Athletic Equipment you want at 105 Nassau St., Fifth Ave., N. Y. , 513 Compliments of A FRIEND Scarfs DO you realize what an important part in the feminine costume the scarf has come to be? Last season many regarded it as a temporary fancy; today few question its permanency. ' Many women of taste and means now select their scarfs as they do their hats and shoes, to match each costume, for sport, street and evening wear. They demand the same harmony in texture, color and de- sign in the scarf as in the gown, and they are not satisfled With ttjust scarfsf, they demand ttcreations? It is to satisfy such a demand that we have been working. An enquiry at the scarf counter for a Bettinson 8a Cade scarf Will enable you to judge how well we have succeeded. Bettinson 8c Cade, Inc. THE HOUSE OF SCARFS tWhoIesale Onlw Novelty Silk and Silk Novelties 417 FIFTH AVENUE NEW YORK CITY w: w: 1. . 7ga 3wwyvqwgwrpngiwwi 3A '44


Suggestions in the New Rochelle High School - Rochellean Yearbook (New Rochelle, NY) collection:

New Rochelle High School - Rochellean Yearbook (New Rochelle, NY) online yearbook collection, 1923 Edition, Page 1

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New Rochelle High School - Rochellean Yearbook (New Rochelle, NY) online yearbook collection, 1924 Edition, Page 1

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New Rochelle High School - Rochellean Yearbook (New Rochelle, NY) online yearbook collection, 1926 Edition, Page 1

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New Rochelle High School - Rochellean Yearbook (New Rochelle, NY) online yearbook collection, 1927 Edition, Page 1

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New Rochelle High School - Rochellean Yearbook (New Rochelle, NY) online yearbook collection, 1929 Edition, Page 1

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New Rochelle High School - Rochellean Yearbook (New Rochelle, NY) online yearbook collection, 1937 Edition, Page 1

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FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
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