New Kent High School - Iliad / Cavalier Yearbook (New Kent, VA)

 - Class of 1935

Page 1 of 40

 

New Kent High School - Iliad / Cavalier Yearbook (New Kent, VA) online yearbook collection, 1935 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 40 of the 1935 volume:

,J»w THE CAVALIER NUMBER ONE PUBLISHED BY THE STUDENTS °f NEW KENT HIGH SCHOOL NEW KENT COURT HOUSE, VIRGINIA Foreword No one is more aware of the imperfections of this book than we who have spent many hours in editing it. We have attempted to portray accurately the life of the New Kent pupils, and, we beg you not to be too harsh in your criticisms. If, in years to come, this little book serves to recall happy days, pleasant memories, and old friendships it will have served its purpose, and we shall not have labored in vain. j» ■ Faculty WILLIAM JENNINGS COX A.B., William and Mary; M.A., William and Mary; Principal; History and French. EDNA WILKINSON SOUTHALL GLADYS BRADENHAM UFP B.S., Farmville Teachers College; Summer Session, William and Mary; Assistant Principal; English, Biology, Chemistry. Normal Professional; Harrisonburg State Teachers College; Fifth Grade. GEORGE McLEOD HODGE A.B., Newberry College; Mathematics, Science. CLARA ANN PHIPPS Normal Professional; Fredericksburg State Teachers College; Fifth Grade. AUDREY MARIE HYATT ELIZABETH G. COX B.S., Harrisonburg State Teachers College; Summer Session, Southwestern State Teachers College, Oklahoma; Eng¬ lish, History, French. Normal Professional; Farmville State Teachers College; Summer Session; Wil¬ liam and Mary; Fourth Grade. LINDA WILKINSON BOCK MARY CHRISTIAN B.S., Farmville State Teachers Col¬ lege; Seventh Grade. Normal Professional; Farmville State Teachers College; Third Grade. KATHLEEN FENNELL A.B., University of North Carolina; William and Mary College; Seventh Grade. CORNELIA CRUTE Normal Professional; Farmville State Teachers College; Second Grade. 4 JUDITH B. CARTER Normal Professional and three years of degree work; Fredericksburg State Teachers College; William and Mary College; Sixth Grade. BEULAH BOSWELL Normal Professional; Fredericksburg State Teachers College; Summer Session, William and Mary College; First Grade. [ Mm fJSIp k mwrm jliri yj-iu .iAai iH tsWP ■ +|. • r r v NEW KENT HIGH SCHOOL, NEW KENT COURT HOUSE, NEW KENT, VA. The June Class of 1935 President . Vice-President . Secretary-Treasurer .... Valedictorian . Salutatorian . Third Honor Student ... Cecil Wall .. Violet Batkins . William Bailey, Jr. . William Bailey, Jr. William Richardson, Jr. . Sue Bradenham CLASS MOTTO Life Without Learning Is Death CLASS COLORS White — Salmon—Green CLASS FLOWER Gladiola CLASS ROLL William Bailey, Jr. Violet Batkins Kenneth Boswell Sue Bradenham Virginia Davis William Richardson, Jr. Katherine Turner Cecil Wall Parish Walls WILLIAM R. BAILEY, JR. “If I cannot do great things, I can do small things in a great way.” Hail to our most versatile man! Bill has taken part in so many activities and has won so many honors that he has been voted the most popular boy in school. All during his four years here he has held some responsible positions and has acquitted himself well. His good looks and friendly manner have won a place for him in the hearts of all his class mates. VIOLET BATKINS “A gentle maid of rural breeding, By nature first and then by read¬ ing.” Violet is our Latin and French shark. Unselfishness characterizes her. With her cheery smile and accommodating manner she has won a host of friends. KENNETH BOSWELL “He hath an expression of sleep upon his brow.” If you are looking for an easy¬ going, friendly sort of person who is always ready for fun, yet is re¬ liable when serious moments arise, here he is. Nothing seems to worry him—not even his numerous girls. But—you know the old say¬ ing—“They all flop sooner or later.” SUE BRADENHAM “She does the little kindnesses which most people leave un¬ done.” Sue is our fair-haired, blue-eyed lass. She has not only a charm¬ ing personally, but also unusual student qualifications. She is serious, gay, dependable, and thorough in her many duties. In every sense she is an ideal senior. VIRGINIA DAVIS “A friend to those who need a friend, A pal to make things go.” We can’t imagine Virginia with¬ out her talkativeness, but many a dull moment is brightened by list ¬ ening to her. Her sweetness of dis¬ position and unselfishness have made her a real pal and class mate. WILLIAM WINFRED RICHARDSON, JR. “If he will, he will, and you can depend on it, If he won’t, he won’t, and that is the end of it.” William is one of the old relia¬ bles of the class. He has taken an active part in many school activi¬ ties and has worked well. He is also one of those students who has always had well prepared lessons, but was willing to lend a helpful hand to class mates less fortunate. He usually has fine opinions, and is never afraid to express them. KATHERINE TURNER ‘‘Neither too careless, nor too sad; Neither too studious, nor too glad ’ Whenever Katherine comes into our midst, we are conscious of her poise and quiet dignity, and with her amible disposition she radiates happiness and fun. Katherine is conscientious and capable, and ac¬ complishes every thing that she sets out to do, because she pos¬ sesses a deep strength of character and great determination. CECIL WALL “As brim full of mischief and grit and glee As ever a human frame can be.” Cecil is a mixture of mischievous fun, foolishness, and a light vain of seriousness. Whether it was in dramatics, athletics, literary, so¬ ciety, or social functions, Cecil al¬ ways took a prominent part. With her dependability and willingness, she has won her way into the hearts of us all. PARISH WALLS “A face that speaks all gentle thoughts, A voice that is kind and low.” A sunny disposition coupled with mischievous eyes typifies Parish. We know her to be fun loving, yet sincere; jolly, yet serious when the occasion demands. Much of the secret of her contentment lies in the fact that she has spent much of her time making friends and being a friend to others. The Staff EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Edith Pomeroy ASSOCIATE EDITORS Elizabeth Walls Katherine Turner Bill Bailey, Jr. BUSINESS MANAGER Virginia Davis ASSISTANT BUSINESS MANAGERS Eaton Harrison Audrey Walls Last Will and Testament With four years of good fellowship, in which we have all shared in care-free companionship, we have naturally formed traits and habits which are peculiar and individual. There are people and standards which we love and cherish, and it is with a heart full of love and regret that we give up our old life, but as Tennyson says, “The old order changeth yielding to the new.” With this in mind, as we make our debut in the ever sur¬ prising future, the Class of June 1935, both collectively and individually, would leave those things peculiar to us to those who follow along the path which we have trodden, in the hope that they may be used to the best advantage and held in memory of those who have gone before. We, the Class of June, Nineteen Hundred and Thirty-five, being of sound minds and strong wills, do hereby set our hand and seal to this our last will and testament, thereby declaring all previous documents null and void. FIRST—To the School Board of New Kent County—we will our very best wishes and sincerest appreciation for making this beautiful build¬ ing possible. SECOND—To the members of our faculty we leave hearts full of love for their patience in dealing with us through many troublesome times. THIRD—To our esteemed principal, Mr. W. J. Cox, we leave our kindest regards for his friendly help and service. FOURTH—To the Cavalier and all school activities we will sin¬ cere wishes for a bright future. FIFTH—To the New Kent High School, as alumni, we pledge our individual support to all your future activities, and we will pledge our¬ selves to continue to uphold the standards and ideals for which you stand. ARTICLE I—Bill Bailey, Jr., leaves to Marvin Minter his undying love of geometry. ARTICLE II—Cecil Wall wills to Aurelia Jones her date book, with the hope that Aurelia may make a better job of keeping her dates straight than she did. Last Will and Testament (Continued ) ARTICLE III—Kenneth Boswell leaves to Richard Weber his art of prevaricating. ARTICLE IV—Violet Batkins has a canary, a gold fish, a guinea and a collie. She has heard Edward Parker express a desire for a pet, so, not knowing which he would prefer, she has taken a chance on pleas¬ ing him with the guinea. ARTICLE V—William Richardson, our “sky-scraper, " very reluc¬ tantly leaves a few of his inches to our “dwarf” Paul Layfield. ARTICLE VI—After much consideration and due thought Sue Bradenham has decided to give her raven locks to Elsie Parker. ARTICLE VII—Parish Walls bestows upon Edith Pomeroy her studious look. Too bad she could not leave it to all High School students. ARTICLE VIII—To Ella Mae Fisher, Cecil Wall leaves her art of captivating the West Pointers—and we don’t mean the “Keydets. " ARTICLE IX—Kenneth Boswell, has after much persuasion, con¬ sented to reveal to Malcolm Christian his secret rules on “How to make Love.” ARTICLE X—Virginia Davis bestows upon Frances Allen her flirtatious ways. ARTICLE XI—Violet Batkins bequeaths to Mae Willie Parsley her curly locks. ARTICLE XII—Sue Bradenham wills her babyish ways to Jean Martin and Margaret Clark. ARTICLE XIII—Parish Walls wills her sunny disposition to Esther Timberlake. ARTICLE XIV—Katherine Turner leaves Lorraine Crute a re¬ served seat in a ’33 Ford roadster, with this warning—“don ' t talk to the driver!” ARTICLE XV— Bill Bailey, Jr., leaves his cute little basketball suit, together with his nifty dance steps, to John Walker. ' Trophecy It all happened one day about the first of May. As I walked down the street, I was thinking of the future of the Seniors of the June Grad¬ uating class. If only I had the power to glimpse into the future? What pitfalls, what joys were in store for my nine classmates who were about to set sail upon the stormy sea of life? But—och! I had been so wrap¬ ped up in my thoughts that I had bumped into an elderly man. My startled glance rapidly took in a pair of kind blue eyes, and a wide, pleasant mouth. “I’m very sorry ' I stammered. “I was so deep in thought that I did not see you.” “Quite all right,” he answered kindly. “Something seems to be worrying you, my child. Perhaps I can help. Do you mind telling me what is troubling you?” I hesitated. Should I tell this kind old stranger of what I had been thinking? He was so courteous, so sympathetic, that I decided that l would. “I was wondering about the future of the Seniors in the June grad¬ uating class of New Kent High School. I was wishing that it were pos¬ sible for me to see into the future of my classmates and warn them of possible dangers. They are so carefree, so young, and so optimistic that I’m afraid for them.” “You shall see into the future, my dear,” replied he, not unlike a fairy godmother. “Come with me.” I followed him into a brown store apartment building. In one of the rooms was a large apparatus resembling a telescope. At the far end of it was a huge lens. Just in front of the instrument was a chair. “This machine,” explained my new friend, “enables one to see into the future. Would you really like to see what Destiny has premeditated for your friends?” Last Will and Testament (Continued) r ' x o ARTICLE III—Kenneth Boswell leaves to Richard Weber his art of prevaricating. ARTICLE IV—Violet Batkins has a canary, a gold fish, a guinea and a collie. She has heard Edward Parker express a desire for a pet, so, not knowing which he would prefer, she has taken a chance on pleas¬ ing him with the guinea. ARTICLE V—William Richardson, our “sky-scraper,” very reluc¬ tantly leaves a few of his inches to our “dwarf” Paul Layfield. ARTICLE VI—After much consideration and due thought Sue Bradenham has decided to give her raven locks to Elsie Parker. ARTICLE VII—Parish Walls bestows upon Edith Pomeroy her studious look. Too bad she could not leave it to all High School students. ARTICLE VIII—To Ella Mae Fisher, Cecil Wall leaves her art of captivating the West Pointers—and we don’t mean the “Keydets.” ARTICLE IX—Kenneth Boswell, has after much persuasion, con¬ sented to reveal to Malcolm Christian his secret rules on “How to make Love.” ARTICLE X—Virginia Davis bestows upon Frances Allen her flirtatious ways. ARTICLE XI—Violet Batkins bequeaths to Mae Willie Parsley her curly locks. ARTICLE XII—Sue Bradenham wills her babyish ways to Jean Martin and Margaret Clark. ARTICLE XIII—Parish Walls wills her sunny disposition to Esther Timberlake. ARTICLE XIV—Katherine Turner leaves Lorraine Crute a re¬ served seat in a ’33 Ford roadster, with this warning—“don’t talk to the driver!” ARTICLE XV—Bill Bailey, Jr., leaves his cute little basketball suit, together with his nifty dance steps, to John Walker. ' Prophecy It all happened one day about the first of May. As I walked down the street, I was thinking of the future of the Seniors of the June Grad¬ uating class. If only I had the power to glimpse into the future? What pitfalls, what joys were in store for my nine classmates who were about to set sail upon the stormy sea of life? But—och! I had been so wrap¬ ped up in my thoughts that I had bumped into an elderly man. My startled glance rapidly took in a pair of kind blue eyes, and a wide, pleasant mouth. “I’m very sorry,” I stammered. “I was so deep in thought that I did not see you.” “Quite all right,” he answered kindly. “Something seems to be worrying you, my child. Perhaps I can help. Do you mind telling me what is troubling you? ” I hesitated. Should I tell this kind old stranger of what I had been thinking? He was so courteous, so sympathetic, that I decided that l would. “I was wondering about the future of the Seniors in the June grad¬ uating class of New Kent High School. I was wishing that it were pos¬ sible for me to see into the future of my classmates and warn them of possible dangers. They are so carefree, so young, and so optimistic that I’m afraid for them.” “You shall see into the future, my dear,” replied he, not unlike a fairy godmother. “Come with me.” I followed him into a brown store apartment building. In one of the rooms was a large apparatus resembling a telescope. At the far end of it was a huge lens. Just in front of the instrument was a chair. “This machine,” explained my new friend, “enables one to see into the future. Would you really like to see what Destiny has premeditated for your friends?” ' Trophecy (Continued) cX " “Yes, yes!” I exclaimed. I sat down in the chair; the professor turned a switch, and a glaring light blinded me. 1 closed my eyes. When I opened them, off through the lens, I could see a large city. People thronged the pavements below; airplanes circled overhead; skyscrapers loomed every where. As I gazed, I saw an airplane swoop down and park on the roof of one of the tall buildings. Out stepped Parish Walls, a daring young aviatrix. She hastened into the apartment house. An elevator whisked her down to the thirteenth floor. She knocked lightly at a door and a butler let her in. She was led into a spacious d rawing room. There sat Sue Bradenham, now Mrs. Cartier De St. John. She had marreid a big oil millionaire. This picture gradually faded away. The next picture I saw was that of a large hospital. In the operating room was that important senior— Bill Bailey. He was a great Surgeon. Helping him was that resourceful young lady—Cecil Wall. The hospital faded away and a small, exclusive shop appeared. Above the door was the sign—“Turner’s Dress Shop.” In the window were the latest models. Katherine Turner had become a great designer. Her shop was in Paris, the center of the fashion world. The scene again shifted, a large newspaper building loomed up. In¬ side was the editor with a shade over his eyes, his shirt sleeves rolled up and a pencil over his ear. It was Kenneth Boswell! Helping him, as general “ad” solicitor was Virginia Davis. The newspaper office was gone, now I saw the interior of an immense courtroom. A great case was going on. Who was that lawyer pleading so earnestly? Yes, it was my classmate William Richardson. The next was a country scene. Out in a country high school I saw Violet Batkins expounding the rule for the formation of the past indefi¬ nite. The scene faded away. I gratefully thanked the kind old professor. I was thoroughly satisfied with what I had seen. Class ‘Toem When the school’s last lesson is mastered, And the classes are tested and tried; When the stupidest student has vanished, And the dullest has stepped aside; We shall rest—and, faith, we all need it! We shall rest for a moment or two, Till the wonderful School of Experience Shall set us to work anew! Then those who have gone shall be happy; They shall pass through life’s higher grade; They shall face the world’s difficult problems With countenance unafraid; They shall pass through each test as they meet it. At the sounding of duty’s stern call; They shall work every day—when they have to— And never be tired at all! And only the big world shall praise us, And only the big world shall blame, Though we work for the joy of the winning, And climb up the pathway of fame; For each in his separate calling, His separate thought must express, As he follows the gleam as he sees it To the goal that to him means success. —Selected ' Where’s Grandma?” A THREE-ACT COMEDY By PRISCILLA WAYNE And WAYNE SPRAGUE Presented at NEW KENT HIGH SCHOOL By THE CLASS OF JUNE, 1935 On NOVEMBER 9, 1934 THE CAST IN ORDER OF APPEARANCE Gretchen Blake, a young wife . Sue Bradenham Bob Blake, her brand new husband . Bill Bailey Jack Worley, Gretchen’s brother . Kenneth Boswell Carol Worley, Gretchen’s sister .. Cecil Wall Midnight, a “chocolate brown” houseman . William Richardson Dahlia, wife of Midnight .... Virginia Davis Arline Truesdale, the girl Gretchen wants her brother to marry. Parish Walls Grandma, an old lady who first of all wants to be young; and second of all, is quite content to “be her age” . Katherine Turner SCENES OF THE PLAY Act I. The living room about noon on a Sunday. Act II. The living room, evening, several weeks later. Act III. The living room the next morning. Time: The Present. Place: The living room of the Worley home. Directed by MR. G. M. HODGE Junior Class President . Vice-President Secretary . Treasurer . OFFICERS ..... Richard Weber . Malcolm Christian . Jean Martin . Clint Pomeroy MOTTO u Success comes to those who lahor )} FLOWER Tulip COLORS Green and Gold JUNIOR ROLL Boys Malcolm Christian Paul Layfield Marvin Minter Edward Parker Clint Pomeroy John Walker Richard Weber Girls Frances Allen Margaret Clarke Lorraine Crute Ella Mae Fisher Aurelia Jones Jean Martin Mae Willie Pars ley Edith Pomeroy Esther Timberlake Sophomore Class OFFICERS President . Vice-President Treasurer . Secretary . Garland Bailey Pearson Binns John R. Curie W. Raymond Davis Charles DeShazo Terrell L. Ellyson Eaton Harrison Eugene F. Kincaid Daniel McKay James Mountcastle James Munden . John R. Curie Ruby Chadwell Walter Talley Alma McCann MOTTO u Looking Aloft” FLOWER Trailing Arbutus COLORS Pink and White SOPHOMORE ROLL Patty Jones George Parker Temple Pomfrey Russell J. Riggs Walter Talley Ruby Cecil Ruby Chadwell Lillian Davis Ella Mae Gary Virginia Hogan Martha Holawak Mae Hughes Alma McCann Thelma Pitts Thelma Pomfrey Ellen Taylor Virginia Stewart Hattie Timberlake Dorothy Walker Alma Walls Elizabeth Walls Audrey Walls Norma Williams Anna H. Woodward ; sM . . ' ifw « ' -- t , y s ®$ 8 |SHfe . 4 ws MBfllliB simW W ' % ' f «» t-.ytr i®7 ' illwL £ A ®» j ifZr jig , J P « flPSHR 51 : ■ ■ Freshman [lass President ... . Frances Fisher Vice-President . . Nora Lee Robinson Secretary . ... Garnett Tunstall Treasurer . . Ruth Ford MOTTO “Good, better, best, never let it rest, Until the good is better, And better is the best.” FLOWER White Carnation COLORS Blue and White FRESHMAN ROLL Lawrence Christian George Wood John Figuly Ella Britt Wilson Hogan Ethel Dabney Kenneth Kincaid Frances Fisher Willard Lipscomb Ruth Ford Tyree Mountcastle Elizabeth Kalinchak Alton Melson Frances Kubich Clarence Retting Margaret Kalinchak John Richardson Jane Luck Garnett Tunstall Marjorie Martin Robert Taylor Orlena Parkinson Llerman Walls Albert Williams Nora Lee Robinson baseball The 1934 baseball team which won five out of nine trials and scored 80 runs against the opponents 54 is being succeeded this year by a snappy fielding and hitting combination which has no apology to make to any of our former teams. The present team lost all of its regular pitchers and catchers, and these are the only departments which the team has to worry about, although McKay with his smashing victories of 20-9 over Toano, and 14-9 over Morrison, which is a class B school, gives the 1935 team much confidence. BASEBALL SCHEDULE—1934 New Kent . . 4 Atlee . . 5 New Kent ... . 22 Charles City . . 5 New Kent . . 8 Shanghai .. . 3 New Kent. . 14 Williamsburg . . 5 New Kent. . 6 Morrison. . 11 New Kent . . 9 Morrison . . 11 New Kent . . 3 Toano . . 5 Atlee ... . 4 New Kent . 9 Williamsburg . . 5 80 54 Boy’s Basketball The New Kent; basketball team had a most successful season, having won five games in eight attempts. In all of the games in class C com¬ petition New Kent won by large majorities, defeating West Point, Cen¬ tral, and Toano by especially decisive scores. The encounters with the class B schools, Matthew Whaley and Smith-Deal Massey Business Col¬ lege, were likewise successful considering their superior rating. BASKETBALL SCHEDULE New Kent. . 23 West Point . . 7 New Kent . . 33 Central . . 16 New Kent . . 19 Matthew Whaley. . 20 New Kent. . 35 West Point . . 12 New Kent. . 45 Central ... . 30 New Kent ... . 17 Matthew Whaley . . 31 New Kent . . 16 Smith-Deal-Alassey . . 22 New Kent . . 35 Toano . . 9 223 147 Girl’s Basketball The girls have been playing competitive basketball for five seasons and have had many trials and tribulations. This season promised to be the most successful one that they have had, but due to their lateness in scheduling games only three were played. However, the girls do not feel discouraged, and since the team is now in good condition and only one player is to be lost next year, they are looking forward to an exciting season in ’36. 1935 SCHEDULE New Kent . . 19 Charles City Outside Team ... ... 27 New Kent... . 48 Toano ... ... 6 New Kent . . 50 Toano . ... 8 t School Songs Joy-ous—and ev-er loyal— Let us boost for our “Old High” Let ev’ry heart sing,— Let ev’ry voice ring,— There’s no time to grieve or sigh; It’s ev-er on-ward,—our course pur-su-ing,— May de-feat ne’er—our ar-dor cool,— But u-ni-ted, We will boost for her, our Old High School! With a step that is steady and strong, For Old New Kent High march along. True to the colors we bear— Dark blue and white so fair. In bonds of true fellowship That the days and the years cannot sever, United in friendship we stand, For school, for friends, for Alma Mater for ever. Tempus Fugit SEPTEMBER 6.-—“School days, school days,” etc. - - - - An enthusiastic group of stu¬ dents—enthusiastic I repeat—assembled to begin work for the new school year. 10.—Katherine Turner came to us from New Jersey. 12. —Pamunkey Literary Society was organized with William Bailey, Jr., as president. 13. —Elizabeth, Margaret and Elsie walked many weary miles trying to secure ads for the “Cavalier”—no luck—no credit—sore feet. 31.—The first issue of the Cavalier was published—a successful paper— we hope. OCTOBER 26.—First school dance of the season—a huge success. NOVEMBER 9.—“Where’s Grandma?” If you had attended the Senior play, you wouldn’t have had to ask. 20. —Bill, Edward, and Paul were exiled by the “fair” sex, after publish¬ ing an article in the “Cavalier” entitled “What I dislike about girls.” 26.—Frances Lipscomb, aided and abetted by Margaret Clarke, eloped. 28.—The Reign of Terror returns—blood is ruthlessly spilled—the guil¬ lotine workes over time—the Thanksgiving turkeys must be killed! DECEMBER 21. —-Christmas tree—Christmas program—Christmas treat—and Christ¬ mas HOLIDAYS! 25.—Santa Claus visited all good children. 26-3 1.—Parties—dances—trips ! JANUARY 1.—Resolutions made to be broken. 3. —Back to school, to work, work, work. 10.—Boys basketball team swamped Central 45-30. 30. —English I class saw movie “David Copperfield.” 31. —Exams! Wailing and gnashing of teeth heard. FEBRUARY 4. —Final grades published! More wailing and gnashing of teeth. 14. —Hearts are exchanged—paper ones. Tempus Fugit ( Continued ) j 15.—Second term officers for Literary Society elected. William Rich¬ ardson new president. 22. —Girls celebrate Washington’s birthday by losing game to Charles City outside team of basketeers. MARCH 8. —New Kent defeats Toano and Charles City in spelling bee. 9. —Elizabeth Walls disappears suddenly! “Jack” Walls calmly walks in and assumes her responsibilities. Mystery surround the disap¬ pearance—“Jack” refuses to talk! 13.—Girls defeat Toano sextet 48 to 6. 15. —Addition to school completed! Moving in began immediately. 16. —Edith Pomeroy wins fifth place in spelling match held in Richmond. 21. —Epidemic of fever commonly known as “Spring Fever” breaks out in school. No deaths reported. 26.—Library ordered closed by Mrs. Southall—motive—you ask her yourself. 28.—Will Rogers did NOT appear in the “Legend of Sleepy Hollow.” APRIL 1.—The “Cavalier” got cute and played a joke on all of us. 16.—Rah-rah-rah ! First ball game—home boys beat Morrison. 23. —Mrs. Southall returns after absence of three weeks. 25 —New Renters represented in Literary Contest at Williamsburg. Tyree Mountcastle wins second place in public speaking contest. MAY 1. —May Day—flowers, fairies, dances ’n everything. 7. -—Dedication program. 8. —Senior Surprise—“make me a child again just for today.” 10.—Junior Jubilee—fishing, weiner roasts and fun aplenty. 22. —Senior exams! Weak hearts, cold hands, hot brows, and empty heads. 31.—First annual makes debut. JUNE 2. —Baccalaureate Sermon. 3. —Graduation Exercises—“On Our Way Rejoicing.” Staff Votes on Faculty VMirror First Second Prettiest Miss Mae Christian Miss Fennell Most Original Miss Hyatt Miss Phipps Everybody’s Friend Miss Boswell Mrs. Cox Most Intellectual Mrs. Southall Mrs. Bock Most Attractive Mrs. Upp Miss Crute Wittiest Mr. Cox Miss Boswell Most Polite Miss Nannie Christian Mr. Hodge Most Dramatic Miss Hyatt Mrs. Carter Most Musical Mrs. Cox Miss Hyatt Most Typical Teacher Mrs. Southall Mrs. Carter Most Stylish Miss Mae Christian Mrs. Bock Most Popular Miss Crute Mrs. Upp Best Dancer Miss Hyatt Mr. Hodge Best Fisherman Mr. Cox Miss Phipps Cutest Miss Hyatt Mr. Hodge Most Athletic Type Mr. Cox Miss Fennell Most Dependable Mrs. Southall Mr. Cox THE SENIOR CLASS OF NEW KENT HIGH SCHOOL Presents " Quo Vadis” JUNE 3, 1935 Salu tat or ian ... William Richardson ACT I Mary . Virginia Davis Inez . Parish Walls Jerry . Cecil Wall Mildred . Violet Batkins Katherine . Katherine Turner Wisdom . Sue Bradenham Vision . Ruby Chadwell SCENE 1 French Officer ... George Parker Prisoner ... Marvin Minter Priest ... Clint Pomeroy SCENE 2 Indian Girl . Elizabeth Kalinchak SCENE 3 Negroes . Nora Lee Robinson, Raymond Davis, Lillian Davis SCENE 4 Lil, a gangster girl ... Frances Allen Red, a gangster . Kenneth Boswell Cop ..:. George Parker SCENE 5 Boy Beggar . Garnet Tunstall SCENE 6 Prisoner... Paul Layfield SCENE 7 Girl . Frances Fisher Boy ...:. Tyree Mountcastle SCENE 8 Alice .:... Marjorie Martin Ben Bolt....,..Kenneth Kincaid SCENE 9 Old Fashioned Girl...Jean Martin Old Fashioned Boy. . Edward Parker SCENE 10 Colo nel, Old Gentleman. Russell Riggs Maggie, an Old Lady.Elizabeth Walls ACT II Class President . Class Secretary . Senator .:. Toastmaster . Prophet . Poet . Presentation of Mantle and Acceptance . Valedictorian . . Cecil Wall . Bill Bailey, Jr. . William Richardson . Violet Batkins . Kenneth Boswell . Katherine Turner Cecil Wall to Richard Weber .. Bill Bailey, Jr. Fun Miss Hyatte: Is there a word in the English vocabulary with all the vowels in it? Edith: Unquestionably. “Are you Hungary.” “Yes, Siam.” “Den Russia to the table and I’ll Fiji.” “All right, Sweden my coffee and Denmark my bill.” Malcolm: After I wash my face I always look in the mirror to see if it is clean. Marvin: I don’t have to. I look at the towel. John Curie: Coming down stairs looking very worried— Mother: What’s wrong, John? John: Oh, Mother, I just found a feather in my bed, and I’m afraid that I’m going to have the chicken pox. Mr. Cox: Thelma, who followed King Edward VI of England? Thelma: Queen Mary. Mr. Cox: And who followed Mary? Thelma: Her little lamb. Mr. Hodge: And now if I were to be flogged, what would that be? Tyree: That would be corporal punishment. Mr. Hodge: And if I were to be beheaded? Tyree: Oh, that would be capital! Virginia Hogan: (in English Class) Mrs. Southall, why do you ob¬ ject to the Ah in “Ah, the fish,” when you approve of the ho in “Ho for the hot potato?” Mrs. Southall: Er-r-r well, you see it’s this way—you don’t ah fish but you do hoe potatoes. Miss Hyatt (holding first period class) : There’s one thing I want to compliment this class on. You are a very progressive class. If the students continue to come in as they have for the last ten minutes, we’ll have a full room by the end of the period. THE CAVALIER Published Monthly by the Students of New Kent High School New Kent, Virginia BOARD OF EDITORS Editor-in-Chief. . Frances Allen Assistant Editor . William Richardson Literary Editor . . Katherine Turner News Editor . Mae Willie Parsley Community Editor . . Lorraine Crute Athletic Editor . .Bill Bailey, Jr. Assistant Athletic Editor . . Elsie Parker Joke Editor . .. Elizabeth Walls BOARD OF MANAGERS Business Manager . . Edward Parker Assistant Business Manager . . Kenneth Boswell Assistant Business Manager . REPORTERS . Margaret Clarke Members of English III Class TYPISTS Kenneth Boswell Vivian Lacy THE CAVALIER ANNUAL SUPPLEMENT NEW KENT COURT HOUSE, VIRGINIA, JUNE,1935 Dedication Program Held May 7 On May 7, the eight room addi¬ tion which has been in the course of construction for the past six months, was formally presented to the School Board by the contrac¬ tors. This is the second advancement that has been made in public edu¬ cation in New Kent between the years 1930-35. Five years ago the original building was dedicated with much pomp and show. No one present realized that in a very short time he would again have the opportunity to attend another public school dedication on the same spot. However, with an ever increasing demand for free educa¬ tion, and a large number of pupils in attendance, it became obligatory to provide more room if the high standard of education in New Kent was to be upheld. Therefore, the citizens, with characteristic re¬ sourcefulness and energy, carried through a program calling for in¬ creased educational facilities. The program was opened by Superintendent Clarence Jennings, who paved the way for the other speakers by explaining in a few words the purpose of the dedica¬ tion program. The main address was delivered by Dr. Sidney B. Hall, the Super¬ intendent of Public Instruction in (Continued on Next Page) 4-H Club 1934-35 The New Kent High School 4-H Club has made rapid progress dur¬ ing the past year. The members have taken unusual interest in the corn, garden, pig, flower, forestry, and poultry clubs. Programs are held on the third Wednesday in every month. The annual picnic will be held the sixth of June at Lake Ely. The officers of the club are: Garnet Tunstall . President Violet Batkins . Vice-President Walter Talley..Secretary-Treasurer Senior Surprise The Seniors had kept a secret under their hats for almost two months—yes, really. Eut on May 10, the Senior Sur¬ prise was sprung. Back to their short dresses and rompers—they were little tots once again. With their bow ribbons and lolly pops they looked like kindergardners. After the regular business meet¬ ing of the Pamunkey Literary So¬ ciety was completed, the program was turned over to these little “Kiddies.” The opening number of the pro¬ gram was “The Three Little Pig¬ gies.” Next followed the drama¬ tization of “Little Sally Ann.” One of the cutest of the chil¬ dren, Sue Bradenham, had a chance to air her feelings and tell the teachers just what she thought of them. Each Senior recited a nursery rhyme—that is, all except Parish Walls, who forgot hers, and broke into a fit of uncontrolled emotion. Cecil Walls, by her Last Will and Testament, had a chance to will her cherished possessions while still alive. Perhaps the Seniors expected beautiful gifts, but because they were such little tots, and because Katherine was so small and inex¬ perienced in the art of buying, (Continued on Next Page) Who’s Who in High School Most Popular .1 Prances Allen ( Bill Bailey, Jr. Most Polite ..j Violet Batkins ( Edward Parker Best Looking .1 Mae Hughes ( Bill Bailey, Jr. Wittiest .1 Elizabeth Walls ( Kenneth Boswell Most Loquacious .. [ Parish Walls ( Daniel McKay Best Students. [ Edith Pomeroy 1 Bill Bailey, Jr. Most Stylish J fue Bradenham ( Malcolm Christian PAGE 1 Improvements in New Kent High Since 1930 One hazy September morning in 1930 great excitement stirred the air. The new eight room school building, recently completed, was the scene of much commotion. The late-sleeping residents around New Kent Court House were aroused by the noise of children screaming and yelling. It was the first school day in New Kent High School. Since that first morning when so many children first came to New Kent High School, many im¬ provements have been made. From a building amid weeds and wild grass, there has developed a much larger building with beautiful grounds surrounding it. However, this growth has not taken over night for no “Rome can be built in a day.” It has taken five years of untiring energy to accomplish so much. Soon after the building was completed, the grounds were ploughed and grass seeds were planted. A drive way was built in the front of the school and chains through posts were put around the lawn. About the same time, a flag pole was set up and a flag has been flown ever since. As many of the county people felt that undernourished children should be given free cocoa, a cafe¬ teria was erected in which to pre¬ pare it. The cafeteria has also been used to prepare food for the various classes to sell in order to make a little extra money. In 1932, beautiful draperies for the stage were bought. In order to finance this venture, advertisers of the county had their ads on one of the curtains. This has added a great deal to the appearance of the interior of our school and has been appreciated very much. At first our library was very small—in fact, it contained only books brought from the other schools in the county. A book so¬ cial was held and citizens of New (Continued on Next Page) PAGE 2 THE CAVALIER ANNUAL SUPPLEMENT Edited by THE ANNUAL STAFF SENIOR SURPRISE (Continued from Page 1) only those little trifles so dear to the hearts of children, were given to them. Bill received a mirror. He is really a handsome little lad, so the daily use of the mirror should help him to keep those good looks. To our dear little Sue was given a stick of candy, not because she likes candy especially, but because the giftorian wanted to give her something to match her sweetness. Parish received a set of books to build the “dream house” that we have heard so much about. A sporty little red roadster was given to cute little Cecil. When she out-grows her kiddie car, she’ll have something to take its place. Kenneth has had a weakness for girls since his “goo-goo” days, so to Kenneth was given a cardboard brunette. Perhaps when he grows up he’ll prefer blondes, but we can’t be responsible for the whims of males. William was given a lock of blond hair tied with a pretty bow of blue ribbon. Perhaps it was his own when he was a mere babe in arms—Perhaps. Have you ever heard of a wee tot who just loves sandwiches— real he-man sandwiches I mean? Well, the giftorian held out a big tuna fish sandwich, and one of those kiddies just rushed for it. Who ? Our shy little Virginia. Speaking of a shy person, the giftorian had a time finding some¬ thing for our shy little “bunch of Violets” Batkins. The little dear is so timid, cunning and bashful that something had to be found that would please her and attract the attention of her little school¬ mates. And was her gift attrac¬ tive In its way—yes. It was a dainty bunch of onions. The program was ended to the childish strains of “On the Good Ship Lollypop.” IMPROVEMENTS IN NEW KENT HIGH SINCE 1930 (Continued from Page 1) Kent County donated books. Other books have been bought by the various classes. At the present time our library contains 1,700 volumes. To provide space for these books, the bookcases were increased to double their size. Now there is plenty of room for books as well as magazines that have been donated by interested patrons. At first, there were only long tables bearing the marks of long usage, in the library. Later they were painted. Now they have been replaced by six lovely library tables which are very convenient. One of the improvements of the interior of the building has been the hanging of window shades in the rooms. These keep out the sun and add to the attractiveness of the rooms. In 1934, the Senior Class left forty dollars with which to buy shrubbery. The shrubbery con¬ tributes much to the beauty of the building, but the flowers plant¬ ed along the highway by the fifth graders play their part in the beau¬ tification of our school. It was evident from the first year that the building was too small, so in 1935, eight more rooms were added. The new space en¬ ables each teacher to have a home room. Now the Juniors and Seniors have a comfortable home room with modern desks. Mr. Cox has an office separated from the library. With the addition of eight new rooms, there is no class room on the stage, and now the entire stage can be used for programs and prac¬ tice for programs. The Juniors and Seniors aren’t the only ones who have new desks. The first and second grades rule supreme amidst their new furni¬ ture. Even the old laboratory can boast of the new chemistry equip¬ ment, which has been of great benefit to the science classes. At the same time the building was enlarged, the heating system DEDICATION PROGRAM HELD MAY 7 (Continued from Page 1) % Virginia. Dr. Hall had chosen a subject very near to the hearts of his young audience—“The Rights of Children.” In developing his topic he dis¬ cussed three main factors: 1. A child has the right to be born well. 2. A child has the right to be reared well. 3. A child has the right to have a good education. Other interesting talks were made by J. A. Anderson, State P.W.A. Engineer; Raymond V. Long, State Architect, and C. E. Nuckols, Contractor. The building was formally re¬ ceived by Mr. E. E. Harrison, a member of the New Kent School Board. Mr. W. J. Cox, principal, ex¬ pressed in a few words his appre¬ ciation of the splendid cooperation shown by the pupils and teachers during the construction of the building. The program ended with the singing of the school song. was also enlarged to heat the new rooms. To protect all of these improve¬ ments from fire, fire-extinguishers have been provided. Very recently, the baseball nine played their first game on their new diamond. It is situated be¬ hind the school, with the home plate near the woods. Too, the new bleachers make the baseball fans more comfortable. As the old song books were tat¬ tered and torn, new ones have been bought. There is no excuse why the students can’t sing now. Last, but not least, is our new secretary. Heretofore, the students have had to do their own typing, but now New Kent has a secretary. The good old days of harum- scarum typewriting are gone. Now one may see that this school has been greatly improved since its erection, but there is still room for improvement in the future. ANNUAL SUPPLEMENT THE CAVALIER Page 3 Editorial As the years go by and N. K. H. S. grows larger, both in num¬ bers and in spirit, it is natural that it should grow materially. Our dreams are not “air castles in Spain” anymore. Those Alumnae who visit Alma Mater this Commencement will be impressed by the numerous im¬ provements and wonderful growth of our beloved school. The student body has enlarged greatly. Attrac¬ tive flowers and shrubs now adorn many places that were formerly bare and unattractive. The most positive proof of our growth is visible in the form of the new addition to our school. The “Cavalier” notices too that the improvements are not only out¬ standing in the more commercial interests, but also in the spirit and cooperation of the student body and faculty. We prophecy that next year will be the richest and fullest in the history of N. K. H. S. May Day Five times has Mother Nature bedecked herself for the most glorious day in the spring—May first—since New Kent has been operating. And five times has New Kent chosen the most beau¬ tiful maidens within her realms to represent her on this gay occasion. In 1931, when New Kent cele¬ brated its first May festival, Miss Evelyn Walls was chosen to reign supreme on May 1. The grades un¬ dertook to entertain the queen with dances, songs, and pageants, and they have continued this custom every year. In 1932 and 33 the same fair queen, Miss Myrtle Hughes, held court on May 1. In 1934, there were so many lovely maidens from which to choose a queen, that the task proved rather difficult. Miss Ade¬ laide Clark was finally chosen. With the arrival of May 1, 1935, the choice of queen had narrowed to two fair ladies—Miss Elsie Parker and Miss Mae Hughes. Miss Elsie Parker was chosen queen, with Miss Hughes as her maid of honor. New Kent desired something dif¬ ferent this year, so the court was enlarged to contain twenty girls. For the first time the royal queen marched under lovely flower chains and ascended a flower bedecked throne. After a short speech of welcome to her humble courtiers, she sat on her throne and watched with royal dignity the entertainment provided by the children of her kingdom. At the conclusion of the fete, health certificates were presented to all five-pointers. At Our School The buildings are the finest, The students are the kindest; The voices are the sweetest, The teachers are the neatest, At our school. The skies are the bluest, The friends are the truest; The grass is the greenest, The children are the keenest, At our school. No one is the meanest, Mac is the neatest; Elsie is the queenest, And Paul is the leanest, At our school. Lorraine is the tallest, Tyree is the smallest; Jane is the lightest, And Garland is the mightiest, At our school. Ruby is the funniest, Cecil is the cunningiest; Jean is the blondest, And Sue is the fondest, At our school. The Seniors are the fewest, The Juniors are doest; The Sophomores are the mumest, And the Freshman are the dumbest, At our school. The songs are the peppiest, The cheers are the heppiest; The teams are the luckiest, The ball ground is the muckiest, At our school. The lessons are the tightest, Work done is the slightest; Play time is the handiest, Holidays are the dandiest, At our school. The Challenge “The ’ayes’ have it, so we will start immediately to work. Now I want each and every one of you to try, really work as you never have, for we must not, and cannot, start this and let it go under. As you have already decided to have competition, I think it a wise plan for the boys to try against the girls. This will make the contes¬ tants more enthusiastic.” So it was decided on a March morning that a strict competition between the boys and girls in high school would begin. The aim was to see which side could and would raise the most money for this Annual. The 15th of April was set as a finishing date. The losers were to plan a big banquet for the winners. Twenty days to race, twenty days filled with enthusiasm! “Whose ahead?” rose the cry everywhere, no one knew, or, in fact, no one would tell. The girls, feeling that the boys had them beat, really planned for the loser’s penalty. Monday, April 15, arrived. No one knew the results. The girls knew how much money they had, and they were keeping it a secret. The boys were doing the same. When the final check-up came, the boys begged for more time. This startled the girls. Did they really have as much as the boys, or were the boys just trying to show them up ? After much discussion it was de¬ cided that the 15th was the dead¬ line, and that no quarter would be given. The girls kept quiet, hating to hear the results, feeling shamed after much hard work—but—what a shock! “The girls have tripled the amount that they were supposed to have raised.” And the boys—where are they? Again a shock! “The boys are still in the first lap of the race. They are so far behind that they don’t even know that the race is over.” What a gay occasion! We will have to give the big bluffers one thing—they certainly had us fooled. Page 4 THE CAVALIER ANNUAL SUPPLEMENT The Pamunkey Literary Society The organization at New Kent High School that has been the most successful, and the one from which the pupils have derived the great¬ est benefits, is the Pamunkey Lit¬ erary Society which was organized in 1930. The pupils have realized from the very beginning that the suc¬ cess of the society depended on their willingness to cooperate, and splendid programs have been given twice a month by them. Many people do not realize the real value of this society. Some have the impression that it is an extra - curricular activity that draws the student from work. This idea is entirely erroneous, however. The Pamunkey Literary Society is just as important to the pupils development as any class that the pupil may take. It developes the talents that are latent in a child that perhaps even he is not con¬ scious of possessing. It teaches him to speak in public and to think quickly and coherently on a given subject at a moment’s notice. He is given a chance to hold offices, and he learns how a meeting should be conducted correctly. All of these things train him for the time when he has to take his place in the world of work, and make him a better citizen by sending him out equipped to cope with problems as he shall meet them. The Society also bears expenses of those who enter contests at Wil¬ liamsburg sponsored by the Vir¬ ginia Literary and Athletic League. In order to encourage students who serve on programs, three points are added to the English grade of those who do well. A year ago there was a surplus in the treasury of the Society. By popular vote the students decided to have a big “blow-out.” The af¬ fair was such a success, that Mr. Cox decided that the society could sponsor a similar entertainment every three years. First Term Officers William iBailey, Jr. President Katherine Turner .... Vice-President William Richardson. Treasurer Jean Martin .. Secretary Richard Weber Parish Walls J Sgt.-at-Arms Second Term Officers William Richardson ........ President Sue Bradenham ...... Vice-President Frances Allen . Secretary Marvin Minter . Treasurer Eugene Kincaid L.Sgt.-at-Arms James Mountcastle j Senior Hall of Fame Bill Bailey, Jr. . Clarke Gable Kenneth Boswell .... Lowell Thomas William Richardson . .. Richard Barthlemess Sue Bradenham . Helen Hayes Parish Walls . Grace Moore Cecil Wall .. Florence Nightengale Katherine Turner . Kate Smith Virginia Davis . Betty Boop Violet Batkins . Betty Crocker From Better to Best “To be, or not to be—that is the question.” In 1931 New Kent had its first school paper, the “Odds and Ends.” This paper, though small, and not the best that a school the size of New Kent could wish for, held its own for three years. “Cowards die many times before their death, but the valiant taste of death but once.” It seemed as if this paper had seen its best days when school closed in June ’34. The Senior Class of that year had not upheld the standards of this “Odds and Ends” as it should. There had not been a particular- time set aside for work on this paper, so slowly but surely “Odds and Ends” was dying. With the death, however, there was a rebirth. When the new term ’34 and ’35 began, New Kent saw a new paper, a new staff, a new director and even a new name—the “Cavalier.” The new paper steadily improved through the year, and the eighth and last issue finally went to the press. The ninth issue grew into this—our school Annual. And now “To be, or not to be —it is not the question,” any longer. We have reached the con¬ clusion—and a noble conclusion it is—To be—yes—to be the best in the land. The Jolly Junior Jubilee Annual Outing Successful Affair All tiny acorns do not grow to be great oaks. Some of them rot in the ground; other acorns spring forth into tiny trees, but insects cut them down. Still others grow to be quite large trees, but blight kills them. Something of this nature hap¬ pened to the Junior-Senior recep¬ tion. Plans for a big, glorious reception were flourishing beauti¬ fully, but the north wind came and killed them. Of course it was too cold to go to Buckroe on May 10th, so the dreams of a sunshiny week¬ end on the beach were shattered. However, all hopes were not killed, and a delightful afternoon in Richmond was planned. The Juniors and Seniors left school at 2:30 with high hopes. As soon as they arrived in Richmond, the Sen¬ iors were escorted to the National theatre to see “The Devil is a Woman.” After an enjoyable afternoon there, they were taken to the Oriental Restaurant to dinner. Judging from the laughter that rang across the table, the dinner must have been enjoyed by every¬ one. To “top off” the affair, the Juniors and Seniors went to the Loew’s theatre to see A1 Jolson and Ruby Keeler play in “Go Into Your Dance.” Tired, but happy, the Seniors and Juniors returned home to dream of the wonderful time they had. N. K. H. S. Student Wins Place in Speaking Contest New Kent High School took a big step upward in the oratorical world April 25, when Tyree Mount¬ castle, our representative to the Virginia Literary League, won sec¬ ond place in the oratorical contest. The contest was held at William and Mary College. Representatives from all of Tidewater Virginia participated. c Autographs j ' I ' . JL-a-i r t£-a Q ..k4i- _ j Vr % x.i. ? { dtsPL t, J .. . A ' fMU — z —-—— - - We Wish to Thank the Following Friends for Helping us to Make this Book Possible Chesapeake Corporation. .West Point, Virginia Mr. P. P. Johnson. .Quinton, Virginia Mr. G. M. Hodge. . Providence Forge, Virginia Miss Beulah Boswell. ... Barhamsville, Virginia Miss Kathleen Fennell. .Quinton, Virginia Mr. W. L. Jeffries .. .Forshee, Virginia Dr. Stevenson. .Richmond, Virginia Mr. Carter Graves. .Boulevard, Virginia Mr. R. M. Treble, Jr.. .West Point, Virginia Dr. C. B. Bray.. .West Point, Virginia Bradley and Boswell. .Ellyson, Virginia Miss Clara Phipps. . Lanexa, Virginia Mr. Robert Taylor. . New Kent, Virginia Mr. Kaley Crump. .Tunstall, Virginia Mr. G. H. Barnett. .Providence Forge, Virginia Mrs. E. E. Harrison. .Tunstall, Virginia Mr. L. B. Frayser. ...Tunstall, Virginia Mrs. M. H. Eames. ..Quinton, Virginia Mr. R. E. Bradenham. . Barhamsville, Virginia Mr. W. W. Timberlake. .Newport News, Virginia Mr. Jim Dean. .Barhamsville, Virginia Mr. E. T. Mountcastle. -----...Mountcastle, Virginia Mrs. Fred Bock. .. Holdcroft, Virginia The Franklin Printing Company, Inc. Newport News, Virginia l vv CuR I s_ UJe. ' T v v V ' f —- 1 y • " . t ■ ‘


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