New Jersey College of Medicine - Journal Yearbook (Jersey City, NJ)

 - Class of 1970

Page 1 of 206

 

New Jersey College of Medicine - Journal Yearbook (Jersey City, NJ) online yearbook collection, 1970 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 206 of the 1970 volume:

Ii-iA'z3i6LD JEGHEFZ5: MI ii "How shall I go in peace and Without sorrow? Nay, not Without a Wound in the spirit shall I leave this city. Long were the days of pain I have spent within its walls, and long were the nights of alone- nessg and who can depart from his pain and his aloneness without regret? Too many fragments of the spirit have I scat- tered in these streets, and too many are the children of my longing that walk naked among these hills, and I cannot Withdraw from them Without a burden and an ache. It is not a garment I cast off this day but a skin that I tear With my own hands. Nor is it a thought I have behind me, but a heart made sweet with hunger and with thirstf' Kahlil Gibran, The Prophet THE CLASS OF 1970 OFTHE NEW JERSEY COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 7 PRESENTS JOURNAL 1970 VOLUME XI , , ' -up an---u.1 ' JOURNAL 7970 ACADEMICS .... CAPTIONS . . . ASSISTANT EDITOR LAYOUT .... . . EDITOR-IN-CHIEF .. . ' ' 'LQAIQ Iviiilcurd ' ' ' ' ' 'tml LAJAQCI BUSINESS MANAGER ............ ...... John Middleton PHOTOGRAPHY ...,...............,.. Richard Molteni, Editor Dan Tartaglia Richard Lombardo Peter Rotolo Paul Smith Robert Davis, Co-Editor Robert Becker, Co-Editor Ronald Pallant, Editor Robert Ranley Ed Freedman Roy Cioletti Craig Brown Paul Hetzel " ' ' 'AAfI15l1y'ML,Lg TABLE GF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION ADMINISTRATION FACULTY SENIORS UNDERCLASSMEN i f ACTIVITIES xx I :.- I. 'YIII gg JII' mjlgl from bold researcl prudent selection, PATRON5 scrupulous testing come products that matter 185 Q L, ff- : , X X .X-. ,fi , .pzgaimf ' ,, Xt W, ., . ' " 14,333 H W ' 1 1-Sa . 1 YAAY .-. f ' 1 1 uX -ffX,1X.g':'vf51 V , ' Cf., 2:32211 Ubhsam 1 ...uru- 1'::,L"i:3f'f9'f 4 Y , , , , Y Y . , Y w www H , . X E ' 'X Y X W Q, W 24, N 1532, '--" ' H Y ' X X XX. ,, , , M, X , .fi XXX 551 X V X ' I. ,X Av..-' ,- V, J N, ,, 2W'!" - .5 -LEX fl V , iw, , ,f .Yr-.w , A'?jgfLf:,? Lfit 1 . .Zvi 9. ? ,. , U, '-1 vr , ,, .ua 1 - ,gg .- fx 'X' -'X --N X-'+,X2 '?"X'f.7--,XJ. qu, up ng1""- an QW t . 5 X , ,Q 'J wg :im 'xgfaggrx .Xegafg-' Q 335 343C'3,rf 5'f52? fc "ff :elif '-i f W ri H - ,QX ff -X X 1- . ' W, "'XN.f X f'n'N Y HH' 'Q' -' g fir V Aklmgfgk Q I gk J ,V .",',..X,,,,w . 1 vig P . -- ' - , -11 ss: Y.,-X X f 'ml is 'Y , 1, af"419'f,,,f'4QQi5f-f K . 5 I f -QX ,XX X grs4gfX?,,X.1,XXY.JX, 'Z NX, 1 H xo ' -Q gf: -' i+ W 'H ,- 2, 1' we fb f iw. f H: ,A ,,XX , Xw X :LX ,XX r 'QSM - 1 Q ,Q ,5,XaF,:'5FI'1Xk,XXsX 4 if XX 1, -X XX XX X X: ' nh A ff? , ,. ,-1- 5 S ,' .K ff ' "' 3'm".r.- " ' , 1 JT' N X- .ps-'.,1" 1'4f": .i-'X If ' i k ' 1 T 5' '1 'ffjfff - Q f , X ,, fm: , ,,X,X1X ig,Li4+5X'NM5X:. .. XX,?gfaguXJifNiXQlX,XXXWTXXXX X X3 X , 2 F ,- X X q 'N ...lf , V. XX, ',1J:,f3,.: li. lf. 5 X, - ,, 1 -1 ,Q . f- ,.,.',g'j. X X, , Xrffff-'Xg,5f',f",i N gf v'X5,', - ff k f flgsf f-Lfftgif . s f gg figs: f f 'V'- ' ' 'E-2'fgi-' X X , fgii X 1 : If'-' ff!" fx 3g2"5f25.'k i' 1 ,X ' g1Y"rXv.' - -. .X X .X QV, ??X DEDICA TICJN The most essential part of the student's instruc- tion rs obtained as I believe, not in the lecture room but at the bedside Nothing seen there is lost the rhythms of disease are learned by frequent repetition its unforseen occurences stamp them- selves mdelibly In the memory .... " Oliver Wendell Holmes 1867 Banal eulogles and praises are far beyond his sphere His mind does not quicken with dreams of chalrmanshlps and academic titles. His spirit is not elated by the factual paraphanalia of the sciences and their advances The wards, the operating rooms, and the amphltheatres all remain foreign and threatening to him And yet through our years he has remained a defender by his incessant and de- manding nature of the highest ideals of the prac- titioner and Indeed all of medicine. By incorpo- rating Into himself and unselflshly sharing with us the greatest of all medical virtues-the total synthesis of Art and Science-he has earned the devotion of each of us throughout our days of practice. He alone carried the seed of success in medicine, and to each of us he freely gave lt, and aided it to flour- ish Our lives were changed by him, our minds and medicine enriched and still we continued to neglect his virtues He who has given so much of himself, has all too often become an object of our anger, mistrust laughter or ignorance. Abused often and rewarded seldom, he has re- mained steadfast In his desire to teach the medical unity of science and humanity. Amidst the blows of our Indifference he has remained unshaken. And so with gratitude for his patience and en- durance and sorrow for his frequent neglect, we the Staff and Class of 1970 proudly dedicate this THE PATIENT. s THE HONORABLE WILLIAM T. CAHILL GOVERNOR OF THE STATE OF NEW JERSEY wjfii- ' 1' 'A -. V gn.. if 2 5. I ' Aw. f "ii-fi"-N" - S, f' ,.. gaaa r. ,,..gf. as 5 21 yy. A PM K If W- ,ygigwh 5 '1 N, T., ,t A. I xl f ' ' . . . . . an is H fr f-ish' K7"vw+m"3,NX--. 'T ifig, . ,3,....1.i3',3a.1a mm? -I, .. U gg j 4 ff f '3f..,N T 1' .ffm ...:" . . " ' "--W.-.-,-.-4-I -uv. -'- 10 - '2 ,- 1.-.. .- , S.. 4 ri 6' . " , ... ' .tr if 14, -, ' ' f . fi M if , ,' V ' .-se: , , ::1 . .- ,. , -:f ,- ' 1:22a-wr ff.-V: 1-1 'M M-f 'G pw W4 1 1 -'K . ..J,-'iw 'liihl-az.-Wig? "' --2 , 14: K..-1:5-5i5? .L ' EQ., ikvtiag-338, 4 1 -. A ,, . ,...v L .- ,Q , . A .5 'L' 9 Q--fan -. - . ,wx ..'f'2,,-1.-,,:f:Q!f12.fLZ'ff?1'2Q:'fA'-TZfi-.Sfvj sik: -, ."?-Eelf"M':nf2Z-'-i',?.f'b11f'rzf:1T'ff"' ,,15M'23 Mi' ' 35,1-gg:-,lr-1'-4,". g'-1'.7-'wAFL- . -- fi?-. ' 1-Q2 tix Al -'Q X, ' f I 5 I, ,I 4 'N I f 5 -il N X5 5- ,Q 'iii x X 4 T - ,Q . ,c., Q.-.rw '1 - F: 1,-'55, 'gp A.-.s-.f 5 E3'?51t1"Ef 155, , g-.1 1 fa. 'fx S 's aid ck , ai. I C za". in, -2' 4 I ' KfL121,5,5, ..:, . -U. Qu, f.Laf1-avaff? P:-3. -, 1.-vf --1.Q,:-1.1xi:,Qg:.P.es-- .. fn. -W., f,,L- f ,-'fi-I - 1 5 'Y " ..-,. A - f, ix. . 5-, 3... .f wil? ' -.5555 ' : L, .'5::?5 ' . -:g"i7"".fWrifgQ,j111lfl? ..':-csv ' ' . 1. -lxzkfi-.x - .ff 21 ya W S 5 4651 , r f'1qCfQ -L X -J" 'SV'if'5' 'X wif' M ef N it-fsf,Q'xv ig' qkkqfix in gjwv LWQ3 -1' 'fl'-.fivkxm 'Cd -' N, Q, .- QW M W Q 15 'rw' w ., I . 4. K - 11 3, 1 'gf Hx xi + mf ff A- Q 'ff 'ig ' -4' 375 i 'fgf--" 25, N s- 'r ' - .1,.'L z-F4121-1,.4:T+ 1,5 1. 714 ' s sg- 'if T -1 ., -1 'Q-rg f 5-'Z Wim , 5145, Q ,- 1,1 SQ., : i-- i , 4- - .- R 5 ,-izf1g4.y5zy'4+1'-'-Y.,ff.- -J'-:' -'Zi '.--My -M ' 1fs".4 -. .- ,gf - .- f ,,-:ffm v- - '-swf-1.,.., .gy 1 - " 4 4 'Dv X 5 XE!!! NEVV JERSEY COLLEGE OF MEDICINE AND DENTISTIQY IOO Dear Graduates of our Class of 1970 NE I am delighted you are dedicating this issue of the Yearbook to your patients. This is an unexpected honor which they so rightfully deserve. I am sure, in obtaining a medical history, you have never interviewed a patient who claimed that he presented himself to the teaching hospital in order that some young and aspiring student might have sufficient clinical material from which to learn his profession. Rather, they have come in pain, with bleeding and broken bodies , or with any one of a thousand symptoms and afflictions known to man. They come in fear, with anxiety and with the torment of heavy hearts: they come not with compassion but seeking compassion. They believe that the hospital has been created for them, not for us, and they expect the medical profession to stand ready to give, not to receive. By dedicating this issue of The Iournal to your patients , you have sensed and expressed this compassion: you have acted worthy of graduating physicians . We, your elders and your teachers , admire you for this mature insight. By your conduct we also know that you fully appreciate the rightful balance between patient care, education and research - the trinity of our profession. Consequently, by the dedication of this volume to your patients , once again your class , following the illustrious lead of the nine classes which have preceded you, has reassured us and society around us, that the pro- fession of medicine in the future will, indeed, rest in good hands . May l wish you every personal joy and professional success in the wonderful practice of medicine which binds -us all together. ially , obert R. Cadmus , M .D. President ssnosm stsss wARK,N..1. ovnoa BGARD JAMES E. DINGMAN MARTIN GERBER OF TRUSTEES GEORGE F. SMITH CHAIRMAN ORVILLE E. BEAL !, ,.WW, I I TTT I , NOT INCLUDED WILLIAM H. LANG RICHARD DRUKKER MEREDITH C. GOURDINE ALAN SAGNER w um, 4 RULON W. RAWSON, M.D DEAN ARTHUR J. KAHN, Ph.D. ASSISTANT DEAN FRANKLIN C. BEHRLE, M.D. ASSISTANT DEAN CHARLES R. REAM, M.D. ASSISTANT DEAN . HUGH G. 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V ' Q:55'l1ifi9 Q 4 U41 5,'3B'142359.a'.:i4,g,gE.' V . . '-:,:if1.'51 x '- ' 1 '1' - 'f '.1W x11 "ix9 ' I . 1 -' vi! 2:52-3.63-ie"2?'L:':':,A,,'.E" ' ff Q" A , JW! 'QF'-i 11-'11-am -ffw-ff f , fi-ri T- --:Tl fi' ','f.J',3L'1"jf bk 0, - ln? ,Q J,::-q,1-4g1.:y,,- .v V 'lj ".21.f Jf- 455 'Z -, 1 ', ':,::2!',C1 jr ' 3 11:35,-fjg-L,--iff, O' So much emphasis Today is being placed upon cell funcTion wiTh all iTs biochemical ramificaTions ThaT iT is overlooked, even by Those who should know bef- Ter, ThaT a docTor musT have a basic familiariiy wiTh The sTrucTure of The normal body. IT is equally True ThaT knowledge of AnaTomy on a microscopic and ul- Tramicroscopic level furThers undersTanding of The ac- TiviTies of organs and The disease processes which beseT Them. For a momenT, leT us examine ThaT area of morphology which, incorrecTly, represenfs The enTire field-Gross AnaTomy. There are few medical specialiTies which can be pracTiced wiThouT some foundaTion in This subiecT. For The surgeon who needs more deTailed knowledge, This goes wiThouT saying. For oTher pracTiTioners, wheTher percussing The chesT, palpafing The abdomen, exploring The pelvis or sTudying an X-ray plaTe, The posiTion of The organs and Their relaTions To each oTher musT be known. If The foregoing appears To be an oversimplifica- Tion, iT was merely infendecl To indicaTe The place of Gross in These changing Times. Only a relaTively few years ago There was an overwhelming emphasis on The dissecTion course. Much Time was spenT in a frequenTly fruiTless search for minuTe sTrucTures which were of liTTle pracTical value. CounTless hours were wasTed in memorizing The names of every ridge and groove on The bones. The exacT origins and in- serTions of The muscles were assiduously commirred To roTe, noT because iT really made sense buT because iT had been done for generaTions pasT. UnTorTunaTely, of all These deTails, only a fragmenT were reTained. Today, we are aTTempTing To emphasize Those Things which have clinical relevance-a relevance which we Try To demonsTraTe by early exposure To clinical siTuaTions. Early in his firsT year The sTudenT is shown how To examine The exTremiTies, The chesT and abdomen. He is encouraged To observe surgery and child birTh and, when possible, To aTTend posT mor- Tems. IT is our belief ThaT, alThough we require far fewer deTails, The sTudenT will reTain whaT is impor- TanT and will undersTand how To apply This informa- Tion To The TreaTmenT of paTienTs. l Think iT is also perTinenT To indicaTe The Tremen- dous changes which have occurred in research paT- Terns during This generaTion. There are relaTively few "AnaTomisTs" in The world Today. Our inTeresTs in This DeparTmenT are varied and are represenTaTive of whaT is going on everywhere. They range from The conTrol of Thyroid funcfion To reproducaTion and The fields of ferTiliTy and sTeriliTy, from The role of The Thymus in organ TransplanTaTion To The effecTs of chemicals and baromeTric pressure on embryonic developmenT, from The localizaTion of higher brain cenfers affecfing emoTion To ulTrasTrucTural changes resulTing from experimenTal procedures. In each case, Though sTill in ofTen preliminary sTages, There will evenTually be applicaTions To paTienT care. E. Lawrence House, Ph.D. AcTing Chairman DeparTmenT of AnaTomy 13 Anatomy was our initiation to medical school. We came fresh from college-bright-eyed, dedicated, and ready to work, vve thought. And then the fun began. After a brief speech by Dr. Bocabella about how we shouldn't worry about things academic, off we went to meet our cadavers. Remember how gallantly we offered our dissecting partners the honor of making the first incision? What a beginning for a career of .. great medical healing! ln the days and weeks that followed, we found out what a ding-dong practical was, and how long a written exam could be. And can we ever forget those lectures by Dr. Curtis, briefly reducing three-dimensional anatomy to a two-dimensional blur on the blackboard? We learned that Dr. Miranti, with Dr. Net- ter's help, could explain lust about everything there was to anatomy, in about eight hours or so. But most of all, we I learned anatomy. When sophomore year rolled around, we had a new depart- ment head. We now faced what some called the "double jeopardy" course-sophomore clinical anatomy. lt turned out to be a re-hash of first year anatomy, and suffered from or- ganizational problems. But the review was helpful and only mildly traumatic. As we look back now, what can be said about the value of what we went through in these two courses? The answer seems obvious-to treat patients one must know how patients are put together. And many of the acts we will be performing as physicians will be based onthe anatomy we learned in our first months in medical school. E. LAWRENCE HOUSE Ph.D., ACTING CHAIRMAN ANTHONY BOCCABELLA, Ph.D 14 fag., . .-Ex X X N 45.3 LW , o ,I Fa: 5' 'L GEORGE KozAM, D.n.s., Ph.D. PAUL MIRANTI, M.D. ALLAN SIEGEL, Ph.D. ELIZABETH A. ALGER, M.D. JOSEPH TASSONI, Ph.D. 3,1 M b"'f'1'1' "wmHYFTf' ' ' Y ' , N , , Y MN M , Y Y Y M . L.,, , , , , 'M Y Y Nw uefifgfl, , , 1' , 3 N X Y, , QQ.. um, , ,X W , , , xxx 15? ""' Y Y Y ,mm , , x M N W W Y Y rf El 1 rx ' , V 4rv,,,,,,,,,,,s,,,,,.1 Y - -v. , ,. , ,fn if um ,, M1 M,-f ,' f f 1, , gig. rd 2 1 . 'Q 111 , 4 aff, 'J 'U if -1 , ww, X , ggi k.L. , my fu ' 1 ' ' - f ff Q 5 'f M ,V- , , ,f.,,.,A, ,, . dgagl ,X W.,-M.. . ' f it 1,31 ,. ,V Q FD W Mig? 4 1 I , M ' 5, 0 ' , 4- -4, 'Pe .,.Q1 W UK , I ' Y 'iiigff fsgfjvgh W R v 'wi"H1 1'uw?I1.u "FWHM ' v 1 . we , X ,, we ' Q5 'L pv- -H4, "J mm MNH Y ,M ,,1',,",,Q1WH ' ' Q ,R , W MQ.: 3 M A Ffa. ink ci p- nf, e A t 'gk lt '5'3"'- Like every other medical school in the United States, the New Jersey College of Medicine is taking a critical look at its curriculum. ln this time and place it is particularly appropriate that our school should be doing this. As a new institution being established in the midst of a decadent city, which can no longer be indentified as a viable community, we have unique opportunities for innovations in education, service and research. The staff of the Department of Biochemistry wants to be a part of this adventure. No matter how discordant we may be on the ultimate form of the curriculum, students and faculty alike agree on one ob- iective: the medical school experience of a student must be shortened. Toward this end we must grapple with three related problems: CU the indentification of a "core" curriculum, C25 en- couraging the student to have an early, continuing, and sig- nificant exposure to research and independent study, and l3l giving the student an early, continuing, and coordinated clinical experience. The Department of Biochemistry is helping to achieve the first two obiectives. Our greatest frustration, on the other hand, is realizing some role in the student's clinical training. Regretably, the biochemistry professor seldom sees the student again after his first few months in the medical school. With such stratification in medical education, it is small wonder that both students and faculty begin to question the "relevancy" of certain parts of the curriculum. We of the Department of Biochemistry want to change this situation. We want to be involved in the total educational experience of the student. What should be the role of biochemistry in the education of tomorrow's physicians? Certainly it cannot abandon its respon- sibilities to provide the student with relatively simple models of analytical biology early in his training. Likewise, it must con- tinue to help the student develop some of his arts and skills for self-education. With more elective time in the new curriculum we can anticipate closer relationships with the iunior and senior students. Equally important, we will also encourage interaction with the interns, residents, and clinical fellows, I am persuaded that this group of very busy young men must take much more initiative in suggesting innovative experiments in the medical education. The Department of Biochemistry will be responsive and will do all within its capacity to assure the achievement of our common goals. W. R. Frisell Professor and Chairman 17 As winter approached, the transition from Anatomy to Biochemistry suggested that Spring was a long way off. Biochemistry was a pushover if you: KAI had total recall, KBJ ac- tually enjoyed West and Todd, or ICJ had ever won an Emil Fischer Look-Alike contest. Kudos go to Dr. Raymond Garner, chairman of the department and Professor Emeritus of the Pepsi Generation, whose lectures were, despite our earlier grumblings, superbly organized and well-delivered. Dr. Katy Lewis deserves more than recognition for time spent keeping the laboratory in working condition, she was by far the most likeable and helpful of all. With regard to other lecturers, one could only be astounded by the conciseness and alacrity of Drs. Wanamaker and Perry, and, of course, who could forget Dr. Sherr's sagacious wit? Many of us are still waiting to apply our knowledge of gibrellin and that essential butterfly enzyme to the care of our patients. Spring finally did approach, and, as the pipe smoke cleared, we realized that, despite a major academic exodus the preceding year, Professor Garner and Company had pieced together a reasonably good course which was to serve as another conerstone in our preparation forthe clinical years. N. EC.-- . .0 . i t I-L-.. -ft ' ' , - .-.-4..TihL Wilhelm R. Frisell, Ph.D., Chairman, Katherine Lewis, Ph.D mtl, """'T ' '. r 1353:- f 'a l' Wthl' . , Seated L. to R., Katherine Lewis, Ph.D., Dr. Shapiro, Dr. Van Buskirk. Standing L. to R., Stanley J. Sherr, Ph.D., Robert G. Wilson, Ph.D., Michael A. Lea, Ph.D., Wilhelm R. Frisell, Ph.D., Chairman. i,1. 5 , 3' mi f it .Q 15' FN . 1 J gt H r. 1' gli K 1 T fl Y ' 4 , ..,, 1 ' I ml. K '1 'N LL,-V fi iw : 'E' 1 - V. cr-. ' CE. N- --- -Y gk -- 1 --'--- 1: f:-3-nv-vw ' , "gru- f ' ,4 -.BW-2 ,LN 1.. ' I: , , . 'w i , X L. dk, G 5 1 isa. .1 uf,, IK 1 A- .. +2-rv ,fm 6 9 if -'nz-.,.f Ewq Q, Q-Q52 ' f - ,ag '. ,V - 5, H 5 5. T is f- - M ?i , ...n ',-1? 71' if? '7 . ' ' 9KRQ:'Lw:':1, .. vi'-:f'x-in H - " -'-r gps,- 4. , WCA .-. mm 'Ati H ,ji-',,93g, 1 175, . .f ,fir sf SQA! pm'-H . ,. , ,, Mwn. x F' 1 1 .,.n 1 Q. -,. y,:,f,g V , 'lk vm. , 'if' :xy ,. wfwnf :P 2 1 ,:Z1'3fg'.g"g,gJ'f' .Jiffy E 55 4 .,:- Je- v -ff . FSS- wg.. Q.'3'3xfiC7EL,':1:' , . -- H,,1.fV. ufrgv ' 4T..'f,1Q Q ,, . ..,,.. ,,,4, A Agwa., X 'X K .?L3wfjg'1', .fx-155.51233 ctw:-f.a15":,. - -',i3li1J'ef.f-.. , V X 1,51 The role of the physiologist in the care of patients in our medical school environment is similar to the part played by the best man in a wedding party. He knows he is performing a necessary function but he also knows he isn't going to be there for the most interesting part of the action. The physiologist's responsibility is to research and teach the normal function of the body. The medical student learns, with the assistance of the physiologist, how the finely tuned human machinery sounds when it is functioning properly. Later, he learns, with the assist- ance of others, to diagnose and treat or repair those parts or systems which develop malfunctions. He acquires a characteris- tic mental skill and agility, based on his knowledge of what is normal, which leads him through logical and sequential reasoning to proper conclusions and actions for the benefit of his patients. The reward for we physiologists in this game is to observe the development of this mental characteristic in students, to hear and see them apply their knowledge and skill for the betterment of a patient's health and to know that we contributed to the development of that skill and knowledge. Strictly speaking, the medical school physiologist rarely has direct contact with or influence on the care of patients, however, through what our students do subsequently we feel we make a very significant contribution to the health care of patients in our community. More indirectly, the physiologist continuously seeks new information concerning the mechanisms responsible for health and disease, He shares his knowledge with people who ultimately are responsible for patient core. Thus, the interchange of information and ideas at this level also is a contribution to the health care of patients. Dr. D. F. Opdyke Professor and Chairman 21 Physiology was, for most of us, the first real exposure to a science of apparent precision and logic. Parenthetically, it was also The first exposure for many of us to the land beyond the Applachians. We were psyched out by The Principles of Fick, Curves of Starling, and Laws of Dalton, and by such goings on as Dr. Nolasko sticking microelectrodes into tiny hunks of meat. Even The precise reproduction of a certain diagram of the sequence of cardiovascular events proved to be a hang-up for some of The Troops. However nonsensical as much of this seemed to be, reflec- tion from a safe vantage point somewhere above GB might reveal that perhaps there was some useful relationship be- tween a dipole and a left bundle branch block onthe EKG, be- tween an FEV1 and the three pack a day man, or between the enterogastric reflex and a Bilroth I in The GI bleeder. Could observing accurately, reflecting soberly, deducing logically, testing conclusively, and following up assiduously actually fit in there someplace between the chief complaint and the Discharge Summary? And as far as "the literature" goes, can any basic science division match up against such clinical pearls as the probability of finding a toolbox fcomplete with toolsj and a lightbulb lwith a blue dotl in the rectum? CYearbook Series of Physiology l966J. One can always criticize, and rightfully so, the lack of correlation of the material with X-rays, fluoroscopy, clinical laboratory procedures, or lGod-forbidll a real patient. The fact remains that most of the material the Physiology Depart- ment presented to us can now be applied to our own patients, even though this fact was then cleverly camouflaged under laws, curves and principles. ..,. rm-A Ti Yf,, ,Elie ,i,, .ei - Mif 2e-7l7f'.ii- gCiiii'n"i' DAVID OPDYKE, Ph.D., CHAIRMAN Seated L. to R. DAVID OPDYKE, Ph.D., CHAIRMAN, J. Ph.D., T. FRIGYESI, Ph.D., Standing JOHN BAUMAN, 27 Ill, M.D. B. NOLASKO, M.D., FRANK FERRANTE, Ph.D., DR. SCHNEIDER, JOSEPH BOYLE, .IOHN BULLOCK, Ph.D. i -QLD Mx , ag v w ww 5Q"'2L.i 'Q W: H 11 ww! ,. ,B , 1a:,.?,,.f ' . . ,.-.f T, 59 i 3 J I A vmp: MICROBICDLCDGY ., W-..-ar :-'A' .mu.rm,': ' .lm .nznru.v:m::,:::',meJw,-'-,HW .W : - 1 1 1.L,,5N. w 1 H M HH H ,3 , A .,- M? U me ,a-id0'!"""" Vt..-.A ,V M. H -J J, ih.!,i,',i,F-tim 1 ' o.:,..,' X' ' ' V , ' ' , - r ati- l iz s l LF v.i , -W.-F,,5t,,,5,,. , . , vs r , ,xii ti ' 1' 1. :bm W W. N,Ri53.tJ,r, M ws. it, .4 4. it-941555-ii,, it-i ,fm it , if f A vit it ti . vitizsgii nah rislfl gs wr ll t gl' . !Z'ff,im 2itXif.i.C-' '- ' ,wt:"'f.! i i gitfetgjtt,-f.5.gai. i R . i'4'.l?Yi:i-P , .t.v.4,'i . QQ, wg.-Jr' 'iv'-gr-, stty:-rl 9521. - tt,,-:mf :tm '-'ri' f l . '.iul.ii.' " ' i S Er 'if ., l The role of the Department of Microbiology in patient care could be most accurately characterized as preparative and supportive. The preparative function is concerned lil with the presentation of the basic principles of immunology, allergy, transplantation, autoimmunity, microbial structure, replication and genetics, and mechanisms of chemotherapy, C21 with the illustration of these basic principles in infectious disease with particular reference to pathogenesis, laboratory diagnosis, epidemiology, prevention and control. Together with in- terrelated material provided by other departments in biochemistry, anatomy, physiology, pathology, pharmacology and preventive medicine, the student should be prepared to apply this knowledge as he encounters infectious disease in the patients under his care as he progresses through the clinical clerkships. The supportive role in patient care is the primary responsibility of Dr. Kaminski, the Director of the Bacteriology Laboratory, who holds a joint appointment in the Departments of Pathology and Microbiology. Assisted by several experienced bacteriological technicians, Dr. Kaminski is in charge of the isolation and identification of microorganisms from clinical specimens submitted to the laboratory and the de- termination of the sensitivity of the micro-organisms to antibi- otic and chemotherapeutic agents. Formal instruction in the practical aspects of clinical microbiology occurs during the clerkship in pediatrics when, in the mornings for one week, each student works closely with Dr, Kaminski. ln this period the student learns by actual experience how the specimens are processed, how infectious agents are isolated and identified, how antibiotic sensitivities are deter- mined and how the results may be interpreted. As an expert consultant, Dr. Kaminski is available to all students throughout their clerkships, to the house staff and to the attending physicians. As a member of the Hospital Infec- tious Disease Committee, Dr. Kaminski is able to provide essen- tial information on which effective iudgements designed to control hospital infections can be based. ln addition, Dr. Kaminski is aware of the special interests of the other members of the Department of Microbiology in phage typing, in mycoplasma, in Virology, and in other areas and can call upon them for assistance when required. Dr. Bernard A. Briody Professor and Chairman 25 Microbiology! We heard about it almost from our first days as freshmen medical students. The grapevine said it would be our toughest basic science course, and so it was for most of us. We were told that all we had to do to pass the course was to pass the final exam. It soon became apparent that this would not be particularly easy. The course content seemed to include everything necessary to make us Ph.D's in microbiology. And how many hours did we spend in that overheated lab? As time went on we found out that it did make a difference whether or not your afternoon conferences were given by Dr. Briody, for he was the source of most of the information needed for the exams. Of course, now that we have progressed to the comparative safety of the clinical years, we can look back and recognize that, with the exception of the highly arbitrary criteria for passing or failing, microbiology was one of the better courses we encountered. The lectures and labs were well attended by both faculty and students. We certainly cannot complain that we were not exposed to enough immunology! Nor were we short-changed in other aspects of the speciality. .When iunior year finally arrived, we found out that some of the "stuff" we had learned in Microbiology could actually be used to treat patients. Occasionally, it came in handy to know what organisms were most likely to be responsible for a pa- tient's infection. Knowing what antibiotics to use in a given case became practical knowledge rather than memorized trivia. In short, we found that in Microbiology we had acquired a basis to help us make clinical decisions later on. And maybe that was what the course was all about in the first place. v 4 i TT iitji' 'ku' 2' Y i it , fri' , v ' 'ra i T 'H ' ll tf' i Y' L 1f'f7"L H11 . ' ' " , 3: Al i. .. gp i , '- ,e. 't, , 'F f 5 ' 7 9 g', . , "'-Q.':'-.- 'Y . 1: . xii' ' V X it Eid, f . I --i ui, . Y? 3 ,N i l iii ' ' leg, ' Ht'-, ix vigil' 'ii I E, 2. 1. ,. . i T 2 it ss. . ZZ ugh 41 ,Y i 4" it 'ljsslli if ' f L i glltfil i. . -i-I asf: , , T ti' i -ii, i 1 4 , asm . x it i ig it it BERNARD BRIODY, Ph.D., CHAIRMAN Seated L. to R. Geoffrey Furness, Ph.D. Bernard Briody, Ph.D., Chairman Pasqual F. Bartell, Ph.D. Standing, Marvin Schwalb, Ph.D. Emmett Bassett, Ph.D. Arthur Krikszens, Ph.D. Roswell Coles, Jr., Ph.D. Lawrence Feldman, Ph.D. . W wk W , Q if-as 2 ff n ZIGMUND KAMINSKI, Ph.D :fue-faasfgll :",jji 9'-'- Lu 'L www, PA THOLGGY 5 Uri, fi' I' , ., g . ,gd , ,Q , , G ,--f' A F . 4. 4 5 4 . X 1 The primary purpose of a physician is the care ofthe sick. A pathologist is a physician and, in the last analysis, everything he does is directed to that end. The understanding of the na- ture of illness is in reality the obiective of pathology whether it be approached as an investigative or diagnostic problem or a combination of both. In practice a pathologist is closest to the immediate problem of a sick individual when he is concerned with the evaluation of a biopsy. Until recent years biopsies were usually thought of only as a means of determining the presence of and type of neoplastic, or possibly pre-neoplastic process. This is still a maior part of a pathologist's work and one that is very ob- viously critical forthe patient in terms of life or quality of life. Twenty or twenty-five years ago when the evaluation and significance of cervical carcinoma in situ became a maior problem, a large number of young women were subiected to total hysterectomy because of atypical cytologic changes in the cervical epithelium. lt may well be true that an unknown number were thereby spared the later development of a disas- trous disease, but it is equally true that a large number were condemned to barreness with all the distressing personal problems that may change the quality of life. It has required careful study by a large number of pathologists to refine diagnostic criteria to the point where more accurate evaluation may lead to the best possible treatment for non- treatmentj of the individual. The increasing utilization of biopsy methods, particularly electron microscopy, in an understanding of many renal diseases has allowed the clinician to estimate prognosis with a high degree of accuracy and, in some instances, to select therapeutic approaches guided by the fine structural altera- tions observed by the pathologist. There still exists a curious misapprehension that a pathologist arrives at interpretive decisions by some sort of semiautomatic process. Many biopsies, it is true, can be in- terpreted without any information about the patient. But many cannot be made meaningful without full information of the clinical manifestations of the problem. All of this demands of the pathologist that he have a sound basis of clinical medicine and that he be thoroughly imbued with the hallmarks of the conscientious physician-a deep personal concern tor the in- dividual human being who is the reason for our professional existence. Hugh G. Grady, lVl.D, Professor of Pathology 29 "ln the last analysis, only if we remember that the physician is the servant of his patient, not his master, will we be filling the high and unique obiective of our profession which is to ef- fect the greatest good for the human person under our care." -Hugh G. Grady, M.D The biggest pair of eyebrows we had ever seen before en- tered the lecture room, quickly followed by an unmistakably Irish face. They belonged to Dr. Grady, professor and chair- man of the department. His iob was to intimately acquaint us with the enemy-disease and death. He did this and more, for it was here that we first began to experience the human implications of the profession we were studying. Molecules live in test tubes, the patient at autopsy once laughed and cried- and all too often drank. Ernesto C"Focal-Local"I Salgado taught us about kidneys and arteries, and left some of us with the impression that most subjects in pathology are definitely indefinite. Mohammed C"Five things are important. Number two is .. ."I Khan delivered several marathon lectures on the liver and the eye which taxed our cluneals, but were informative. William D. Sharpe is, in the last analysis, William D. Sharpe-red han- derchief, Htrusty' Hamilton railroad watch, and seventeen piece buttoned-down wit. He will be loved by some, hated by others, but forgotten by none. 30 WILLIAM SHARPE, M.D. HUGH G. GRADY, M.D., CHAIRMAN .. 'T' .- ug .g-I ri lisi , OSCAR AUERBACH, M.D -of .M f.- . 'E 5 f' ERNESTO SALGADO, M.D., Ph.D. MOHAMMED KHAN, M.D. ww W FRITZ TASSY, M.D. DAVID DREIZIN, M.D. Kr,,-'ri 5 -: u W fm' 1 ' W W ,,, 1 iam ug I -, Pharmacology is a discipline which has relevance to people in general, since it is from this branch of medical science that the physician must gain a proper rationale for the intelligent and informed use of drugs. In prescribing for a patient, con- sideration must be given not only to the action of the drug, but also to the length of time it will be effective, dose-response relationships, absorption, metabolic fate, excretion, and side effects. At the present time, this information is gained primarily in the first instance from animal studies, but the ultimate phar- macological usefulness of a drug must depend on its being thoroughly tested as a clinical agent both for safety and ef- ficiency. The Medical Pharmacology course at the New Jersey College of Medicine and Dentistry is designed to provide a learning experience for sophomore medical students to qualify them to deal with problems in pharmacology in the clinic. Students are given a firm background in the principles of phar- macology and the pharmacodynamic properties of drugs, with the aim of correlating clinical science with current information on the pharmacological aspects of basic drug action. The course, therefore, provides a bridge between the basic sciences and clinical disciplines. A series of fundamental lectures in pharmacology is present- ed supplemented by laboratory classes, clinical demonstra- tions, case presentation, and individual and group conferences. Included in the subject matter are topics in basic principles of pharmacology, autonomic pharmacology, action of drugs in the central nervous system and peripheral nervous system, psychopharmacology, cardiovascular pharmacology, diuretics, gastrointestinal drugs, endocrines, narcotics, chemotherapy, prescription writing and laws regulating the use of drugs in man. Laboratory classes are provided to give practical experience in bioassay, drug metabolism and experiments demonstrating hemodynamic responses to adrenergic and cholinergic drugs in animal experiments. Laboratory demon- strations illustrate principles and practical applications of local and general anesthesia. Clinical demonstrations and case presentations are used to relate the basic pharmacology to actual clinical problems in drug therapy. Students are divided into small groups for case presentations at the bedside, ward rounds and observation of techniques for monitoring the action of drugs in patients. Clinical demonstrations include dialysis procedures to illus- trate principles involved in the absorption and distribution of drugs across membranes. Actions of adrenergic drugs in pa- tients with cardiopulmonary diseases, and pharmacological responses to L-DOPA in Parkinson's Disease are demonstrated in clinical sessions with small groups of students. Case presen- tations cover topics in pharmacogenetics, chemotherapy, psychopharmacology, toxicology, and endocrinology. The ultimate goal of our teaching in pharmacology, therefore, is to provide an educational experience which will help the student develop sound and critical clinical iudgment in the proper use of drugs in disease states and to give him a useful background from which he may approach his patients with the assurance that he will have ready the knowledge to avail himself ofthe best form of therapy to treat particular sit- uations as they arise. D.D. Bonnycastle, PhD Professor and Chairman Department of Pharmacology 33 Pharmacology represented the last chapter of the basic sciences as we eagerly anticipated the upcoming clinical years. lt was the department's iob to give us a firm background in the general principles governing the activity and uses of drugs and to impart to us the ability to critically evaluate the utility of new drugs. ln two short clinical years we have seen innovations with new drugs and the fading of older ones. ln view of this fact it appears that the ability to evaluate new drugs shall be the most important contribution Pharmacology could impart to us. Only time will tell, but one has the feeling that this obiec- tive was accomplished. Although Pharmacology had its weak points and anesthetiz- ing moments, it succeeded in getting the subject material across without threatening anyone's academic lite, by giving fair exams, and by offering labs which were more pertinent than any up to that time. Little did we know at the time that the true meaning of this discipline would be taught to us by the patients we were to r A-JA ' Hsrmgemglk see. To see an individual breathe easier after relief of his pul- DESMOND D. BONNYCASTLE, M.D. PI1 D monary edema, to see one relieved of pain or an agitated pa- CHAIRMAN tient become tranquil-these were the real lessons of Phar- macology. i Elf Seated L. to R. Eileen Eckhardt, Ph.D., Desmond D. Bonnycastle, M.D., Ph.D., Chairman: Mary Mycek, Ph.D. Standing, Dr. Kaul, George Condouris, Ph.D., Henry Brezenoff, Ph.D., Duncan Hutcheon, M.D., Ph.D., Sheldon B. Gertner, Ph.D., David S. Von Hagen, Ph.D. I , ' , :' , 'FEL-3 l X X ,y x fin' aw, 'J 1 i V A , S A ,I --- a, , A ., 4 . , iw ' ' ' :Ba iq -:gl-. ' ff 17 g ,, A I-'ii' ,A 'HI Y , 3 V gw 'gf' ', 1 - -- - ' ns. ,V W mx..- 'Ji Y- --- "sip 7 I-' ' 723 31 gi -, -if ' ' , Fa i- --1 2 - A ' 1' 'rx- '- 'wfgigezmwsz f . Y - x V 1' ' if Z ., ' N i. 'X , '45 , -- :rj 2 ' . , ' I , ,. wi ' , . -,, -7, 'LIPBF ,r V. Qf -L5 , I , ' . 5 , ' 1- ', , , I' . -:sul- 12"g,- .ig " , ' .L . I ' -- , - ,,-,-17-ggz' '-1-5,-,vmlffvr-,,75fvvgg5ygffw--,f .. Q V , "J',NzNI' , J ,4 ,fx ,1,!,H,',,,-, L , 1-. , I , 2' . ,,4 .,f,, ,, H ,U.,,M .MV , .t,,., ,,! W,-,g,': ,,, - p , ,,, , - , Em ,fi M . ., ffiffff ,gfiiff ,pg 'ir 5: ' ,Q ' M y Y 'M 'im w .., - , :fps-N . W. -j',,y .:- Le-' 1.1, . i,,.E,"i?'h ':-:if2L1'i:' irrlvi r "Z2'?if3i5ELi,.:?sf A555 DLP ..x.. ., .Ae J QF' V- 7 'flew ' uf?" . wk . , , f 1 41-Q ' Q pg, ., wa, Lqgzeizssxgx- f . 'W I- I imzf-W " " f 'IME ,,,121:,? 19 Maw Qsfriwf 'gl ' -: -5. . ' 13 aw: , wi' --.xw , U7 was ,, 455,- if' V1.4 Q1 351: .,,,, 5,5 1,543 ,f 2 , f 32i'11'41EiE ' , lg 15' J:-E 1535 3 ,W 1,M1.w,n? -E. Sf? gmvivgg- 1 ' ,W 113' ? f E4.iZff,W'Q 'Q 5 -4:5-rf. .4 Ly- --f K .' mb, 1 ', I -'35 , If ,M yi ,u ,fQuii i13?,'5Y' ,' Q ' ' Q, , ' 1-'1-f1iEfEgf.1kE,'c,x.f Qlifiikiaaiakfvc mf , F? 5,5 , r ,, Mi? ',, V5 U r , e 4, , 41 tv! N A qv. 1 NIH 5,1-. , , 'P S 5 1 3 E1 , X ,il , Q-Q '4 Af: ann' P ,ww M- K gl, , K' I , , va , 1:1 ,fx .A4m,l,7, W, Q7-' ' 1 uss'2"Vwi' ',, , ' 3-W 5,-L 541. 1K Q5 4 , Eg' , 4 , 1' va' , x NL! 1 haf . ,- ' L M: Ei 5 35 OBSTETRICS AND GYNECCJLCDG No where more Than in Olosfefrics and Gynecol- ogy does The pafienf need The combined services of The physician as Teacher and healer. Healfh surveyor, cancer screener, dieTary insfrucfor, sexual counselor, surgeon, reliever of dysfuncfion, pain and fear are involved. Some of These services The pafienf seeks, ofhers she should be persuaded To accepf. The pa- TienT may need guidance in her roles as loved one and lover, moTher To be and mofher and The focal poinf of The family. No Therapeufic program aimed aT susfaining or resforing healfh will prove enfirely effecfive unless iT is designed in lighT of The paTienT's ToTal siTuaTion. Technical skills save lives and resTore funcTion. Proper guidance prevenTs disease and aims aT inTegraTed safisfying performance. Harold A. Kaminefzky, MD. Professor and Chairman 37 The Ob-Gyn Department's activities began during second year Physical Diagnosis at St. Elizobeth's Hospital. The instruc- tions in diagnostic techniques and a brief exposure to the problems of labor and delivery were followed by some limited practical experience during our iunior clerkship at the some hospital. Although a "hands off" attitude prevailed, we gleaned an occasional service case. Other aspects such as Dr. Andreson's "coffee rounds" and Dr. Clitheroe's iournies on the hormonal path through the garden of A. O. will remain foremost in our memories. However, we felt then that there was always next year. Senior year arrived and, having heard ot the knowledgable and willing house staff and the activity at Martland, we an- ticipated the encourited with enthusiasm and "pruritis digiti." Although the house staff's teaching left something to be desired, on the delivery floor things were hectic. The penthouse or bullpen was always a hotbed of controversial issues until someone knocked on the door and said, "Warm up, next one's yours." The other rings of activity, namely the Gyn ward and the clinics were less hectic but informative. In addition to our exposure to the subiect, one cannot omit mentioning exposure to men such as Dr. Riva, a physician and teacher admired by all. Those of us who knew Dr. Breen can- not help realizing the loss to the school which his departure meant. Before we knew it, our introduction to Ob-Gyn had come to a close. For those entering the speciality it was a beginning, and to the rest of us a memorable experience. A1 l J JAMES L. BREEN, M.D. l - . ..4 " .A ll. , H . M41 rx W, it Q A t ZDENEK KUBES, Mp, HAROLD A. KAMINETZKY, M.D. CHAIRMAN . "J E13 . 4 . 4 J' ,,.. ' 931 un ur ' I , ,, mm, ,, L, ry 4 Q, f Eifl illllll l Sliillll 1 l EAM ' ' 4 i' K. um . f . -. : I A I ,,-1 ' ,f " m ' I I' E I . fs: ' ix glzmlll gal- A x 314 -it "' 1 V H' 3' 'S ' 5x""" .M-' fm ,Q ,www 1. ,1 ,fx X V -R. W , Egg K. 4? 1 ggfjfz- ' 24 ' . . -.fl...l ' c fl! 4 l-,.g, 1.1 wr! JOHN H. CLITHEROE, Ph.D. Z 'Rei ' PAUL S. ANDRESON, M.D. HUMBERT L. RIVA, M.D HERIK CATERINI, M.D. At the heart of medicine must dwell an abiding concern for the welfare of patients. Unfortunately, the wisdom of this premise has not always been honored-especially of late. Without question, the emergence of medicine as a science and the increasing pre-occupation of medical educators with research have spawned a climate highly favorable to the ad- vancement of knowledge. Nevertheless, this has been a mixed blessing, for it has also produced a waning of that precious element of personal regard for human suffering which characterized the physician of yore. lronically, in producing better scientists our schools of medicine have often created diminished physicians. The shift emphasis from concern for the sick individual to concern about his disease has been gradual, subtle, and doubtless unintentional, but it has not gone unnoticed. Indeed it is the basis for most of the dissatisfaction of patients with the present state of medical care. Still, there is hope on the horizon. Exhortations for a change in attitude are becoming increasingly evident from within medical ranks as well as from without, and it is heartening that among the loudest of voices raised in protest are those of the current generation of medical students. This bodes well for the future. ln the final analysis, the patient is truly the tulcrum of medicine. Physicians and students alike must never lose sight of this, for dedication to the cause of patients is at once the source of great strength to the profession as well as the key to lasting personal satisfaction for those who labor in its vineyard. Franklin C. Behrle, M.D. Professor 81 Chairman Department of Pediatrics 40 ,gl J ,anis ,, ii if fix fits. it iw 1 ,Q is ...le if wi' ,gt tsiwgg ii 5 +4 X an 1 :ivy 4 -.. ,X m5"X X X HM - 121923. , XQQSLXX X 'WXXXX gm 1 XXWBXXXXXXX XXQL , XX ' gy 'XXX' wg X M X -L. " YE? , KF 1 ' swag' 'X 'X 'XXXZCQQXX 'X1igggXX'X H XQXQMLQQL X Xvgzzffnf, XX X XX':fX1XXvsZNXX' X :g um fqgvf X1.1:sL Qk X fff X X' X X. W. XX X XX" .X is ' 'ii X X ' 'ifggg ' ' 5 ,1,f, ,. Lia. 4 X H ' 237' 'X -. X f tb ,X , 'V'XT5lk' Y XX ' 1 X ... , iii' iff X XX f MX .X XX - ,X-mars' X W' XX fm'-1 ir '. 3 XXX U N , HXMXX Wriggsri, X33fgg,'?'4f'mX' X! XQQXXXMXXX X X ' , . -fa , ... ,. X 'Xne M -..QLX . .pm MN, . ' -2.7 'X-TW? Xt fm 'sta .. ,,XX.XX:. ax 'fr Av, ., .51 4 I ". 1: gf ws :X . ,X gy-2' X " 1 X 1 ' J ff. 5 jf X I P T ff X Q5 1 ,N X Ex XX 5 e X X 3 fm wg,-.,f,1ff5-:X .. .ds .X 1 ' -BER ff . gig J' 115.1 X' my X X ' ' H X Ci- ' A, L ag.. ufi X :XE X , fy., ,XXX 'XXX 155 1 . Nw, X X tg 'Ia X 'XXHX1 'Nr' .- ':' Hx: M511 X, wXX15:fs3f,X11:zfX X'X' XXgaj3, 'X g X :QQ -' Qqxt .-,X w,,a1XX-:X1u:XX XXX "-: QXXQX qw- H XM L' X 232' A if' X X X XXX X X ' XX X X ' X X XX -,-XQXXXX X XXZAXXXXXX, X X .M X gf aes X X X XX X X X X X X XX - " XX sz-WX X X fXX.,X.X, kffiggfu X fa: 'qw in mmf X ,mia W IW X 'XX XX XX '-X .XX X r:XX X,XX....X..a.mM Who can forget his first introduction to acute medicine on 3- south and 3-north? Traumatic, perhaps, when contrasted with the controlled rambling pace of the V.A., but an arousing oasis for students eager to see disease from its origin. It was a wel- come change to have a case that was a first MHU admission for a 2V2-year old female rather than a seventh EOVAH ad- mission for a 78-year old male-a beginning at the beginning, the satisfaction of unadulterated illness, But more than academics was at hand. More than ever was the emotional in- tertwined with the intellectual consideration of medical care, for what could be more disheartening than a helpless child? What could be more noble than restoring reasonable health to this child? And what could be more amazing to an EOVAH trained Junior Medical Student than to admit, work up, treat and discharge a patient cured, in one week's time! Perhaps the only happening that stupefield more was Dr. Kushnick's rounds, which were about as far from the classical "shitting dullness" as one could get. Few will forget, when asked by Dr. K., "What else might the patient have?" the lull before the cerebral storm. How many students, when asked if he did the 12 tube test on the CSF reported in the 1965 Nor- wegian Journal of Pediatrics, thought, but dared not say, "Why, no, that one iust slipped my mind." Replying iust, "No," would seldom provoke a diatribe thought, and the student would be last seen scurrying toward the library. Enthusiasm ran high in the department and everywhere was a desire to teach. Almost no one will ever forget that the right heart shadow disappears in right middle lobe pneumonia. And no one who was there will forget that a certain Senior's reply, when asked to name the condition of the baby with the very large head, was "Microbody?" Clinical Associate Professors Duffy, Halber, Jennings, Perkel, Rumsey and Statman along with Clinical Assistant Professors Alexander, Antillon, Charles, Ford, Hudson, Leer, Marano, Mintz, Panzer, Raffetto, Ross, Venin, Vogt and Willner all deserve mention. How else will everyone know they were there? THEODORE KUSHNICK, M.D. L..ys,.x,...s, , , FRANKLIN C. BEHRLE, M.D., CHAIRMAN i l il -- I . 'i-' it I I ' Q 1 fit" A V My X - NHEAJ ' p i . I it ll V 1' ill 2 I l Q. I' l K-5 ' ll lu I l of I is it is xii I ' Q ' Q ASUNCION A. RELOZA, M.D. BURTON FINE, M.D. BARBARA A. GLISTA, M.D. JOAN A. ARBOIT, M.D. J. EASTON, M.D. PAUL A. WINOKUR, M.D. Y 'T ' x M --Q1 , 51,55 1 1: - "L I ' l .- . bg M Q ag, ." ,, , . ' , V: V' 15,7 ,,u,w,w,???E, xg 5. gvql f' ii:-f , ' H 1- A A SF H 11, Evj5...a:Wv .1 .w if A - ,aiigf-f.Q 3 - um .. 'L I . LEONARD P. VITALE, M.D. T F 1-3l'15355i 11'-zjggfjn . -.nf-J, H. E125 1? jiifgfkwgf 1 .. .vfx-gag: 1-f,,'f"2H, Sq. P.-.pk-5--,:i'5aF'1 'vwm-11 rf f 1.9-.fi.g.,':k -ff3'2,'?-71.1-K. 1 wlrffgx , .,.. W . ,2gf,,, 1 -if 2:??.53fv,gf 'MM Y Hi' 'YL . '?51fQ'2f,?, The "psychiatric" care of the non-psychiatric patient-the patient whose primary condition is not defined as psychiat- ric-rieither is nor should be a monopoly of psychiatrists. ln- stead, it should be every doctor's iob. Perhaps this component is better termed the "verbal side of medicine." Aside from history-taking and direction-giving, the verbal side of medicine is primarily concerned with the management of two major entities, anxiety and grief. Most of the physician's patients are anxious, their anxiety is usually a result of their symptoms, but often is a cause, or both a cause and a result. Many patients, and their families as well, suffer from grief in anticipation as well as in its direct expression. ln the immediate, or physician-relieving, management of anxiety and grief, simple reassurance is probably better then nothing, but it leaves a great deal to be desired. The scientific management of either requires much more than reassurance. it requires first of all empathy, which is not the same as sym- pathy, and is more than compassion. An empathic response, a proper empathic response, requires time, and that's the real rub. It requires time that connot be used as well or anywhere near as well by anyone else on the medical team as by the one physician who is perceived by the patient as primarily respon- sible for his care. For that reason, if for that alone, it is poor medicine to try to save time by immediately passing the troubled patient on to the psychiatrist or to the priest or to the nurse or to anyone else. Later, maybe, if referral is indicated, but only after the key physician has taken the time, the em- pathic time, to understand the indications. Unhappily, the verbal side of medicine is not easily measured, and it can virtually be avoided without risk either of malpractice or of looking bad on the chart. From this limited viewpoint, "talking medicine" is, relatively speaking, a luxury. And when money and manpower are in short supply, as at Martland, the luxuries are likely to be overlooked. Not that "talking medicine" really is a luxury. On the con- trary, l think it's the maior factor that stands between us- physicians-and a computerized, depersonalized medical technology of the future, with the physician spending all day at the console watching the printouts as a radiologist watches the viewbox. That threat, and all that's implied with it, make talking medicine no luxury. lt may be the key to our survial as a profession. By the time you finish your residencies, there will be many changes in the distribution of medical care. Some of these changes, such as the continuing trend towards super- specialization, are likely to reduce even further the emphasis on talking medicine. Martland, with all its limitations in both money and manpower, has already moved too far in this direc- tion. Perhaps tha1's why it's the place to start doing something about it. Knight Aldrich, M.D. Professor and Chairman 45 Although we had waited a long time for a chance to prac- tice clinical medicine, our first experiences two years ago were met with varying degrees of trepidation. We had to adiust to dealing with patients instead of basic science professors. This transition shook some of us up because it meant our abilities to communicate and empathize had to be used as they had never been before. We each rushed ahead with our own personalized physician identity crudely created from past daydreams and old novels. We treated patients and we related to them with varying degrees of success. In our haste we did not see ourselves developing into the doctors that we are now. Part of our development was of course due to our increased sophistication in clinical medicine, but so much of what we are now is due to the patient and the way he interacted with us. Not until Psychiatry did we have a chance to examine the physician-patient relationship as a prime mechanism in the for- mation of ourselves as doctors. On Psychiatry, with its less demanding schedule, we learned in depth not only about the patient as a person but ourselves as well. Alcoholics, who were handled so routinely on Medicine, became individuals capable of expressing and eliciting strong feelings when seen on Psychiatry. We began to understand for the first time how the patient was shaping out indentities. He was developing our sense of empathy as we listened and understood his agonies and failures, or he was hardening our receptivity as we heard his deceit and recognized it as such. While on Psychiatry many of us discovered contemporary problems that plague our society, but which had been far from us because of the cloistered medical school environment. We had seen the end result of social decay at Martland, but on Psychiatry we began to gain reasonable first hand insights as to why such a mess existed. We had long sessions with heroin addicts Cwho were upset because their I2 year old brothers were on dopej, abandoned children fwho told us about all the presents they hoped to received at Christmasl, teenagers on LSD Iwho swore that their minds had not been destroyed and that their attemped suicide meant nothingh, unwed mothers fwho claimed it would never happen againj, and Viet Nam veterans Iwho talked unintelligibly through a psychotic hazel. Many of us had been hardened by the cheapness of life as we found it in Newark. Psychiatry served to remind us of how tremendously deep and complex each human life can be, and how valuable it is. ln effect, the patients seen on Psychiatry have confronted us with our own weaknesses as well as those of society. The psychiatric patient has increased our awareness of the world we are about to re-enter, but more importantly, he has led us to introspection and critical self-evaluation of our roles in medicine. GOOD-BY HARRY, WHEREVER YOU ARE!!! 46 DAVID ABEL, M.D. ...ij f I if 1 '. yfzgx it I I elsif! 524, pi.: yr , C. KNIGHT ALDRICH M. D., CHAIRMAN Ll... I tw if W, . W- .. I tl V sf WILLIAM A. LAYMAN, M.D, HAROLD S. FELDMAN, M.D., Ph.D RTON L. KURLAND, M.D. 3 n 3 1 i L 1 we if"aT R ' 1 LEO SHATIN, Ph.D. ALVIN FREIDLAND, M.D. ANGELO DANESINO, PhD. JOSEPH L. MORROW, M.D. ROBERT ADAMS, M.D. BY POPULAR REQUEST . , . KENNETH BERMAN, M.D. GOOD OL' HARRY 1 B' .Lf 1 71 -B? ,wa 1.52 , - 1. wslfazff ' ' " '11 , iw," , 1 lp: aff fi - 1 I 1' , . 1 lrfili 1 1 1 1 11-,,f1,1 F 1 1,,g,11,11'1.1fg1,1 1 1. -.1,fi, - 1,1-'-2242. JT' "i , '. ' 1. A -. . . 2 ,fqyg , gli A,- .. 'f '- 511.1 '1 1 F':,f.-11-ru" , , f.,--wer ,,,11,11,.1fgf" in , f 1 Q 1' 11115592 ' 1 1, '.1-1211131 " if , 511, ffgfwf " 1 1 ifffxxf 72 51" 1, ' 1-4. 1.1151 1 - ' 111-L1 ,- 1 '1L1'l 1 , f Y 1.1, 1, :K , x 1. 5 ,E 1. 11 - ,-4 'v 1 1-.. 'f' 1 fe: ' 'L' ff? ' 1 N . - -' I1 1 11 1 1 f ,Y ,gg 1. ., 1 1 1 Fi: ., M 1 1 1 11515 - ,, 11' 1 1 1 1.2 1: 1' ' - 1 V gif 4Vf:,'1, .i Y X WN ,U Pu. X mp ' W 1 3? ' " it 1 iii? t 1 1 fn 1 ' 1 1 1 1 ,V 5 , .y,F,, , Mn?-' 31555: 11.-' m 1 1 1 1 13" f ' ,. V I S Y Y ,, ., 3 111 dwtwz, 1-'39 - A9113 115 ' 111111: ' ' ' 1 , ' 31- 7 1' w: ' ' A' .1 . J' Y ' St 1 V. -1-.1 L,-lfliiria, 1' 1?iF11TW' 1 1 1- fy '62 ,. pm, Zh . 1 1 1 The goal ot any medical school service must be to set an example of excellence Tor The undergraduate, postgraduate and community physician. Medical excellence can only be measured in terms of patient service. Therefore, the role of our Surgical Service is to render patient care as close to the ideal as possible to patients with diseases correctable by sur- gical means. A common view ot surgeons is otten dominated by The drama of the operation. Alton Ochsner, a famous sur- gical educator, once said, "l can train a man to operate in six months but iT takes six years To train a surgeon." Thus, in pa- tient care on a Surgical Service, the diagnosis of The disease, The selection of patients Tor operation, The preoperative prepa- ration, postoperative care and follow-up care probably equal or exceed in importance The operative act itself. ln carrying out our tunction as surgeons in This institution, it is my hope that we will constantly improve our ability To es- tablish or confirm diagnoses, to identity those patients who cannot tolerate surgery, to select accurately the most physio- logical and appropriate procedures for the disease under treatment, to conduct The operation precisely and to carry the patient through the postoperative period with a thorough understanding of the physiological and biochemical changes which we have created. To obtain these goals, the surgeon must interrelate with all of the other specialities but must be well enough trained and broadly enough based so that he can adequately evaluate not only his own competence but also the validity ot consultations he receives. Dr. Beniamin F. Rush, Jr. Professor and Chairman 49 Essentially, for the student of surgery, any teaching hospital should provide an abundance of clinical material, a variety of surgical methods and opinions, adequate contact with patients and their problems and, especially, a full measure of discus- sion, instruction ond student involvement. The attempts of Dr. Lazaro and Dr. Malfitan to achieve these goals have been greatly augmented by the addition of Dr. Beniamin Rush. How- ever, the basic lack of varied clinical material, the almost com- plete lack of discussion, instruction and involvement on the part of a considerable number of the house staff and the in- completeness of the patient-doctor relationship in this atmos- phere still leave extensive areas of possible improvement be- fore Martlancl deserves the binding title of "teaching hospital." Unfortunately, those members of the house staff and faculty that have shown duty above and beyond their call number few. But the fact stands that those few, because of their ex- ceptional ability ancl time-consuming effort, have, even in the face of immovable obstacles, given us the opportunity to achieve certain goals on the basis of our own ability and in- dustriousness. Q i, N +V V V gg i, Vi,,i,i ,ic ,i lii'1f,agDiVVg ii it Ifiifi-ics 3, fi it it ,L-13 7,163- U ' ' "SS i f ig.-'Ii, ' -uzseig ML , V- , , -' S 7' 5 A 5 'Ili' li' it digg, :Mil it i, Q, qt l . i :L-fl"f3'- " 'W i tag -1 ,QE ll r rt 't x FLV-: 'f"1': . , H i n V 'iwftii its .'?fiQI, .' lvgf'-as3i7'.if?7 " :ml l - T'-fi ' l ' T ' tif f-Vf gl .-l , - x V. fi '- 21-f fi - f :fi iii f V -X 5 :- ,Q "f t , ,- " ef,:f:v'1ii5:e l '-32:5 l j If, 1 . ff, '53 fwv, 5 T ' . V , gy qqi: '- 'Vit ies?" Vit - "5 I-P1 R ., N :fi':"QQ"iXfizl' .ig titty 1 E. "f - 3 :li -. 2. ' if' lf' A' -nfs, ,l , , ,K , . ,,. . V ,Y ,.. - L ix, -7 .7 JR ,Xxx I -, W, ,1---4 -.:,..Y -Eng- . 1,3 , Q- ' f , V: , A i 'za 'iff -"i""'5 eva ft' .f" 1 Vl igfiqfi, V- - J 'Sitka S, 5 , , i 1 ,fig ' fkffifg ,' '-I ,i .r' ' iii ,T , Q V if it '-flllt..i ' A t. .i, ,f,Qg.-V Wy, X ,,, Z 52: -1' ii' - .-,. A 'V A V . 1- x, 4: R H A if i N i., Ns- .. 4, -1.155 f- - rein' i5wQ'l .Y ..-.-ii-iff-, , , Ns W Vi i ifiiisi tiff-ggi' if , Jlszug -iw. V Uv . Sears, f . , S -vga, l- t 4 -5-- BEN ERIC J. LAZARO, M.n. W 't JAMIN F. RUSH, M.D., CHAIRMAN 5 ., 1, WV ,L J- QV .QA . X 1' I' EV, . H -- , ,, N -1 -V '!f ' ",! ' VV -f r ' - I i V Vx X E? ,M ni ,i iV 1:11 2 1 U T' x.'..' 1 Z Q ' , ' , 4. - .gf ' Vi-5 -Q I L5 fi' A ' - fm A' l' ' . "' QQQP' -1 . 12' 5.1 I"i-2 .i . a , f Mx' ,Aim 1 ' ' 1: , -A 9-XY' 'ix -ff' 1?-3 f AX-A xgyg l ., g .J V - nm : x 'LES ,. All Y , , , V fJ'i?AN " A f J' J, 'F -A 'Tw ' ' H4 f 'iii 5-.,, 5 JA KUNIKATA HAMADA, M.D. VINCENT SCUDESE, M.D. ,.,.,.. .V ,,: ALBERT H- I-EVY, M-D. JOSEPH J. SEEBODE, M.D. - ET57,-15 3-1-' A K.: in: A".A.q5g,,: .i T, Y if N ,. Q 'Y ,F ' A' X A ' u' il. Q AA "1 J i 'N ' . 0455352121 Q J 9' T, - ' ' -" . ,rl Y :J ' "L-J 4 ' X, ,.,. Y if Y.. A . ' Q' XX ' V! 'x 5 P . X , I X ,J I '--Q-'Q VIL L X 2 W X V: . A f , Ex Q ' f -Eff!" r 'V' ,fxfg rf V ,W 'lg-1 f ' ri A., v K. A ' ALPHONSE A. CINOTTI, M.D. Q FM' ' ' J A , , A ,W E, 7, ,E ,, ' N .Sf "X H -:-iff ' 125525 ,l1'T"T75i '7??4f"?'f'Zfif'f' Q' 1. " . ii?-" I - ' 1 A J ,-'15 ' Iffffid-1 f ' A . 1 M " 'Z H i J fl , 2' ' A-1 f--M3335 A 'll 7' FY ,. " 'L 4 - V. 1 " ' -J H , - 5- lr '-g f f-' ,1 1 :emi ' -. 'E Jff' , H ,rf-5 -Y X :E vb, ,If 4 -,V .fr - V 'l l :E4:I..i ' '- V4 v '31 bf' , -my jg A 1 A A f f' - H A ' O ' . V ' .- jvifiiifv- x Q.-:gi A :A J A -gum , in M v , , ,5.-,msftzf-1L:jAf,lpj gl- ' T. , fl' .1-. V .4 5.33. 4 Q ,,- '-'f.f,f JOSEPH J. TIMMES. M.D. JOHN J. KNIGHTLY, M.D. NICHOLAS J. DEMOS, M.D. PN: ' r "il , iff . , .SLM ax ' 1 . ' +1-Q,fQf"afA CHRISTINE E. HAYCOCK, M.D. HARRY A. KAPLAN, M.D. 1 .. .E ,I ,1 In I XE , mf. ,,,. .L A I If . , I I W, .2 , 'Q ' I , J :V 1-.. , R' EUGENE GARROW, M.D. 1osEPH J. AMSTER, M.D. I 7--jr I l - I '- I V , I , I ,X I -. i I EEEE A W E 1 E Tfwx 'ii X" I wa . 'Wm all .NL ,.,Ei. 4 I , ..,,:,,,l,. , EP N gwlh , fl 31 1 R ' " " I I K -, 'N A 3 w.i:u,,,,, WILLIAM K I I fu. U..- ,, f-3:-rw 'Y i SME I M- 1 I ,L , - WEISSMAN, M.D. MADHAV H. KAMAT, M.D. SIDNEY KETYER, M.D. gi I. V: Q '37 Q . :E 5, - M I Af. I I as-Q E., , I 4 ' fiC L..- X N MONICA L. ALENIEWSKI, M.D. MAXWELL MALAMENT, M.D 1 RICHARD C. MALFITAN, M.D. R 7 .. , 1, , 2, ' ,L j 13,6 Y N 1 , EZ QEWQ Lf 1 ,. ,VY A .,A,' ,gY,.:.g:,Am-1-,,H ' , f in . -M - z, - Ti N ' ,-A-4 w e ' . E " ii' ,Q E R iw 'i31,':,' S xr A lfjf ff , f 1' -f 4' Uflfr If x-. ' IRVIN E. SADOFF, M.D. 'Wig IX-160 ma if' ' i R Li f " ll JW VK Y Qjwigk W5 f tn ,V 1 1 wwf 1351: .q w -3,4 .. . -Q Y- A A " A 1371 ! 5521, 1 "cu'.4'1M 5" 5345, ff , -, .sw fm , ,. E. . . 1 ,-'S Y 1- 51: -.- M 1 .f Map wig, .fs gf ,. , - . ' 4 EJ I ff R R. Jovsuss, M.D. -Hx ,Q 0, 17 ..x :Z "" aw wg? v,,.!-N 355, gggg ,gn-,.. OSCAR SERLIN, M.D. ANITA FALLA, M.D. JAMES M BLACKWOOD, M D f ' :S if NAE KWAN CHEUNG, M.D. M. HENLEY, M.D. S. BONGIOVANNI, M. D. l ,L A' ROBERT B. EDELMANN, M.D. PETER P. POULOS, M.D X The Department of Medicine at this Medical School has three inseparable and complementary responsibilities and functions: education, research and patient care. Its activities are centered at the Martland and East Orange Veterans Ad- ministration Hospitals. Involvement with the community is sub- stantial. One direction is indicated by the recent affiliation with the Newark Beth Israel Hospital. The educational responsibilities start practically the day the student arrives at the Medical School, and increase through the four years of the present curriculum, the internship, and the residency and speciality training periods. They include continu- ing education and programs for practicing physicians. The student's involvement with patients and his responsibilities also increase each year and, as an interne, he is the patient's physician. During the subsequent years, teaching responsibili- ties of the students and house officers also increase and so do the opportunities for participating in the development and application of new diagnostic and therapeutic methods and procedures. Further, students, house officers and faculty en- counter at first hand problems of urban American and can play an active role in the handling and prevention of some of them: malnutrition, alcoholism, drug addiction, environmental pollution, social and economic problems as well as health problems. The research programs of the Department are varied and range from clinical studies relating to delivery of health care to fundamental studies involving only bench work. These research programs are essential to the Department of Medicine. Participation of students, house staff and faculty en- sures a spirit of inquiry, a willingness to doubt dogma and a determination to learn and to extend knowledge and to apply lf. The Department of Medicine participates directly in patient care in many places. The most obvious are the medical wards and the Coronary Care Units. The Department also has a large share of the responsibilities for Ambulatory services, the Emer- gency Wards, the Ambulance Service and the Holding Ward. In addition, the Department collaborates in the Drug Detox- ification program and in the care of patients admitted to the Psychiatric Ward. Participation in the development of satellite health centers and in preventive programs is planned as is ex- tension of the concept of comprehensive family health care so effectively initiated by the students. The Department is now providing a measure of direct care for the population in the area immediately surrounding the Martland Hospital. It can increase the scope of its patient care activities and must do this without hindering the fulfillment of its other responsibilities and functions. It must seek to improve the quality of the patient care that is delivered in its hospitals and clinics. Progress has been made at the Martland Hospital. A more modern out-pa- tient facility is being built, new equipment is coming into Radiology and the Laboratories, there is more equipment on the wards, additions to the faculty are being made. Much remains to be done. We need more nurses, more clerks, more technicians and more orderlies and we also need improved and increased facilities of all types. Progress to date is only a very small step forward. The quality and quantity of patient care do depend on fac- tors such as facilities, equipment and perhaps the ameni- ties. However, in the long haul, patient care depends mainly on the physicians who, as students, as house officers in their formal training period, and as practicing physicians and teachers, are determined to strive for excellence in helping the sick, in preventing disease, in developing new knowledge and in applying it. Francis P. Chinard, M.D. Professor and Chairman K c v ..e,,c ,,.,,WV 1:' .iitig light fjfiiae - 4'-C-v-' On no other service was the patient-physician relationship more real and no where did we learn more from our patients than on Medicine. Physical Diagnosis offered us the long-awaited first ex- posure to the patient. Having conquered the enigma of Dr. Schwartz's 43-page schedule, we set out for various hospitals around the state to apply our recently acquired skills. As we listened carefully for the nebulous "fttt ta da ruh" we could not help breathing easier when the patient would interiect, "Hey doc, why don't you try listening over here for aortic in- sufficiency?" Junior Medicine at the V.A. showed us that we could still learn something from a cirrhotic's l5th EOVAH admission. We waited in trepidation for Dr. Leevy's rounds. One can still hear Dr. Leevy asking, "What are this man's urine porphyrins?" Although we learned how many milligrams of sodium are in an egg, we also become aware of a question which we shall ask ourselves over and over again in the future- "What can we do for this patient?" For some, Medicine at the V.A. was the SMA-l2, interesting ward chiefs, and less interesting patients. For others it was disposition problems, cof- fee and donuts, and late night sessions with the microscope. To all it was a beginning. Senior Medicine at Martland gave us an entirely different perspective. As acting interns we were given the opportunity to see and treat acute medicine, female medicine, first hospital admissions, and the chance to really manage the patients our- selves. Dr. Nussbaum's excellent course in Lab Medicine did not prepare us to interpret lab results such as "quantity not sufficient," "tube too full," or "IV running." Our patients presented us with problems of differential diagnosis such as "the miseriesf' They also made us acutely aware of social problems such as drug addiction, poor nutrition, welfare, etc. Although it had its frustrating moments, in retrospect, the ward medicine rotation at Martland was where the action was and it gave us the first semblance of professional confidence. One could go on and on mentioning those professors from the Department of Medicine who played such an important role in our education and rightfully so. But let us reflect back to the statement above: "What can we do for this patient?" and pause at this time to ask ourselves, "What did this patient do for us?" t 1 Q7 EDDY D PALMER M D X X ALLEN B. WEISSE, M.D.: TIMOTHY J. REGAN, M.D. JAMES A. McA'NULTY, M.D . A K X NL .ff 4-Is MURRAY NUSSBAUM, M.D. LEWIS A. BRODKIN, M.D. ' Y V 15... A - ARTHUR s. GLUSHIEN, M.D. . Q FRANZ s. STIEGLMAYR, M.D. y .. E Qgf-i- -Y-4: f 1 --0 4 , ., -. - ' +R- I - , . .- -. ...,, .Y YW, Y m ' L- 7' ' ' ' ' " ' ',,. " 5' -3 1 L R 1 J . K TSM yr, 2 U . ' A A Qu - ' 1 V 'S' Y 4 1 " L MAURICE J. SMALL, M.D. 57 ? 1' 3- A1165 ,f A 'fZL??'. Y ' "hu-5 ff-QF." 1 I ...ta . i P A vi f K Q5 ' A ,X I Fu v T 1 ,LH -X STUART BASKIN, M.D SIDNEY TRUBOWITZ, M.D. PHILLIP O. ETTINGER, M.D. KENDRICK P. LANCE, M.D. DR. YUZON DR. TAN MICHAEL GUTKIN, M.D. Raymond A. Troiano, M.D.: Frederick A. Pereira, M.D.p Molvin X Cole, M.D., Fidel V. Exconde, M.D. his ua' ,I if I ' ' . :Ie V f A1 V! eg-'i JACK H. DADAIAN, M.D. Reggae 1 RICHARD M. EFFROS, M.D. GILBERT E. LEVINSON, M.D. is I D, 1, I I E ALFRED MARGOLIS, M.D. , A I I I NICHOLAS Y. LIM, M.D. ANTHONY S. KING, M.D BUNYAD HAIDER, M.D. RICHARD G. CO, M.D. wL'L:W I ,MMI Nm.. , L 'SQ . GEORGE .I. STEPHENS, M.D. I L R, J , X AGRIPINO RELOZA, M.D. WILLIAM LOWE, M.D. 60 I fi I I -I Iv X. GADIEL SMITH, M.D. '47, pez ' . ,, """'Q -ww . I W HM I I ,MI VICTOR GROISSER, M.D. ALLAN THOMSON M D mv--f 5 X 2 I RALPH MILLER, M.D. LUBA STEFANIWSKY, M.D. x 'Gil Q H E I 1 1 I M A ,,N 1 1 1 qE.1f1E31e'1- 11 I 1 'K I 5 ' is .N ,1-A 2 I -,, V, 1. JJ - ' All ' 1 ' : , 1- 1. nr , . '1is.'.'11, 113 1, 5- ' - 'fn A -M 1 ' E 44 1 E K 2542? Ru mic 35 Ji 5 -' E , X 4 5 i:a'vUX 'MW' 'N ii "iff .L u1,'.:g5fA 4 14 L I ' V I " 1 " 'A ' f " 1 AM w 11 f 1 5? I1 ' as , 5 1 f 1 ' Y -9? f S , 11 f ' wx 1 N 1 x 1: 1 . 2 .,:.Ei 1141, " , ' 1 1 CARLO rAMBuRRo,M.n. xv 11 J ' ' 5 2- E' ' .,,". W fl wl 1 'I 7 1 Y X11 I a 11 1 WILLEM TEN HOVE, M.D. f-1-T f 1 --- - f N if ' "QE 11 N1 'rf EY 1 F 1 55 E if MIB' ' 1 14' -- 1 1...1,.1,-. 1 5.1 1 -, ' Q ,1:- , .- '1' ,, - 1: 1 " .Qw ' if 71 '!'1'11'! if ' . 3 Y - 1 .11---W , ,. if--1 1 V . 1 11 1 .1 Qf- , A f' yy.-1" 'jj ,Q Q mmf f. jig? 'M' 4- 1' i 1 ff 4 11. !f7?T"f 1 ' ' ' 1 'lfkkiqfiffif 2 T, 1 f' E Qf f2f?i 31 ' 'I-.. Lggf .' , . 5. 2' 21 1455?-L 5, -, - ' fEx9Tif:':fwi1i 1 ,, , F W111, -w Q Ffiylnf ,g: - a,1.'---Pfffff 1 '1L.,1 " a.- 1-m. 1 1-5 1 11e.,g fx 112 "iv-lflx. ' 'X J ' f 53-yin' , V 3 E 4 GEORGE LORDI, M.D. HERMAN BIRKNER, M.D. 1 cf ELIZABETH MUNVES, Ph.D. JOEL CANNILLA, M.D. J a 1,.1 " , L 1 14,4 'Z ' E sl. fi! ' 'Sf 'AJ 1' 21 1 1 . 1 I V 1 l --"1 L E 1.11 51 3 'Y ' ' ,111 111 1' 1, 'iii' -. - .4251 N ,1 ,n 1 -543,-12. , -. .,...." "1.'.,,, ..i.4:w,-. -."' ' " , , 1 1 'X I YI I' The New Jersey College of Medicine and Dentistry has made a unique commitment to the community in which we reside. The agreements among the medical school, state ancl community call for the college to initiate a program for comprehensive health care for the medically deprived areas of Newark, said program to be carried out with the help and approval of a Newark Health Council which is made up of providers of health care and community representatives. Nine of the latter directly relate to the Division of Health Care of the Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine. The Department will present to the Newark Health Council a position paper with recommendations which will serve as the initial step in formulating a full proposal for a network of com- munity based health centers each relating to a specific back- up hospital. Additionally, the Department of Public Health is develop- ing several divisions relating to specific community problems. These include a division of epidemiology concentrating on in- fant mortality and a division of pollution and toxicology con- centrating on trace metal poisoning. This is particularly impor- tant in Newark where lead poisoning is a maior problem. A substantial drug abuse unit is involved in detoxification of addicts, referral to a variety of treatment modalities and then extramural evaluation of the various treatment units. Because of the efforts of nine senior medical students we have developed a program for high schools consisting of sur- veillance of drug abuse, lectures, small seminars, and an evaluation of the impact of the education programs. Thus, the Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine is deeply involved in problems plaguing the com- munity around us. Donald B. Louria, M.D. Professor and Chairman DONALD B. LOURIA, M.D CHAIRMAN PUBLIC HEALTH AND PREVENTIVE MEDICINE xf' 6 nf LEON SM ITH, M. E WAYMON C. LATTIMORE, M.D. Y! X, 1 , V -Y -I - , ,, , , H2181 r :SI ,M ' w Tl V 11 1 gk N , - , W .HCA - ,ff ,K - 7 EDWARD WOLFSON, M.D. IN MEMCDRIAM A J 31 Li if 73 X5 5- xx : Z 31 1 r X jf V 5 i x I SA' '3'zT'SQ'N"SEZ9:E7EI5gZQQ 124ISLRXFSv'NZGiKN1vlirJFik?'bW'T'SV.N-f"X.k MI I Hi-SITIZD-525F:XZ'ifli 15117 IZHG f'J211J??i'C5251i"1.iW 243 4 lil' N76-1-'K.Z:3 711 E47 G! -lu TIA 1.77 T 4' JUDITH KOREK AMOROSA, M.D LONG ISLAND UNIVERSITY I JOSEPH T. BAGAMARY, M.D. RU TGERS UNIVERSITY , A 'li if . S' 1111-121 1.2 A E 1.151311 11-1! 111,1111Q 11 1 11 mga 11 ' 1 Y 5, 11 F 11 e1 1 jizfgu ' 1111 110511 31 1 1153.1 11 11 1 1 5 1 1 X 51111 W 11 1111 1111115-1 1 X? 1 X X 211. ,Q , 11 115 1.1111 'Fifi 4.11f 1 F if? 1 1 151421 W 11, 6153111 1,131.5 W 1 1 1 ,A -.a. 1,313 1.1111-1.1 'z. 211 111 1522 11" I .' 1 11114' 1111 1.31111 , 1 1 1 11,W11,U W -:A 1 1-1 1 1 '1 1 1111, 1 11 1 , .1,g,gx .. A 11 W Z, 1 5 ' 11' 1 "1., 1 1 1 11' rf M1521 3111 1 , , 111111, i - i,:g 1 E11 1V111W15151,1!11 1 Q ,111- ,HV - 1 ,s 11 2 11 1 11p 11111 ROBERT C. BECKER, M.D SETON HALL uN1vERs11Y 1 1111 1 1 M I , 1 , 1 1 X' ,f. 11 -,131 'E '1'11 1' 1 11 31 111' 1 111 'i1'11 1 1 1 1 1 11 11, '1 11 1 1 1 214 11111 11 ALFRED P. BERTAGNOLL, M.D. UNIVERSITY OF NOTRE DAME " Effgisgu X RICHARD H. BLUM, M.D. THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY JOHN J. BORKOWSKI, M.D. SETON HALL UNIVERSITY QQ n 0 A "H "hz X J f E X , igwm ,. H. 1 H5511 1 ,N X81 PAUL M. BOTHNER, M.D CORNELL UNIVERSITY M.l.E., CORNELL UNIVERSITY f9 WMM Pilww V., CRAIG S. BROWN, M.D. MURRAY STATE COLLEGE H7123 f , 'f ,,. . ,, ,n .1 ,Q ' Lf.-' ' . ,Q,ec.jpgf. , . 47, 'oo' If "x L V M- x ' N " .adj E - 52? ,Q 'gifs-Ezg -oc o,.-my-1 7,4 ,V-5 ' figfdt' ' 'hfin-Q M 1 w,,'H1!'1M,!.! W 'M 21.12 H .,-,,. W Wi, .rig ,Q E 1,,,'w.,,,r, , , U 2 f- seam , W THQ, W1 r X my A Q Mft , Y V ' 55, w A 11 35 Q, ms r , M MW nm, Wg v N W mf: ,M HL. 'E ,, ,, A U, ,N ,. ,NW ,N mi, A H59 ' , gf 1" , "f x w Mg... . i 'ri f A X 13615: j' ' +1 .'-x N,,,7,e L -v 11 Iwi.. X A .M gf .-'i:1LJ'.' f " f 531.3 , QXWRT' FLORINDO J. CELONA, M.D BOSTON COLLEGE .5 1 vw ,. , ,. , 1 1- i X PAMELA S. CHAVIS, M.D. COLLEGE OF ST. ELIZABETH f'! io- "wq',,ff Q5 X S,4, ,X X ,g,,,,5X3,, , Xa X 'IQ'E?, ' ,X, V,MX,,x,,X-,-XfX4Q,QX,, ,, , w,,",5m,. win- ,, Ed. Nfl, ,X fail a, X,, X,, 2 ,, ggX4,," X'5',,,gt -w,, .s?5!E:. ,, Wm, ,, .. X X? iii, ,, 31' , ' ...zz ,W ,, ,wg ,XX XX XX, , ,XX 4 , ,fl " iziffi. 1, 37' 'Sir' " 'f 7'?'3"" 'EFX TTT' , ET TT X X ,, , ,, N. ,rw ,, , sm' ' ' ' B ,-21, , ,ww ,W , , ,.:::::. ' , , , , , XXX X X a XX 'MM M ,, ROY R. CIOLETTI, M.D BROWN UNIVERSITY 1 L X , , x' ,L 1, IIT -T., -I ' I I 'xV"IIuI DANIEL J. COLETTA, M.D. VILLANOVA UNIVERSITY r Icfana. IIII Hi: 11 vs II- I I- -I Im, I II I "I I III I I . I I ,Y .,.I.ff1,,, - iT3i,W.-3: II I f ,I I . IIISW Q II :I III II X , I :I IIIIIQIQIQIIX III: I mf' IZII " I I, I -fi? If Y ,I I I 21 Ig' I 'II H II I I II WI III" .J II If, , I I I Y, vga, wx , Sy, Q X Ia, II FJ 'fi . 1 ,1 U 1 1 Nu M-H U A ,1 - ,Sig f , WH., H 11 W U , ,, -IL, . V, N. W 1 ,w w W ' I N- . I 'Y' wil 1 M H .E WILLIAM J. CURLEY, JR., M.D sr. PErER's COLLEGE gg l i ROBERT B. DAVIS, M.D. COLBY COLLEGE w ' ' w Q I ,N ,X 135359 -Q-W-' '- M ,- .flaw aw: M' ,5.,?g?i!j', , Qi , . fm, F ,gf 1-, ,ii , 'EX-zz." ' xa,'g33w as Hg., m ,- - -If f ' f' v' V' R ,ww ,Qi ' 2551 ax f S m JEREMIAS T. DUBYK, M.D LASALLE COLLEGE E-W, fi w MARK M. EULE, M.D. A 5 MARIETTA COLLEGE -.sh 6 ' f .r .f" :H K -7. , fi ' H A, '5-'-T:- " 4l xiii: ,A , FRANK H. FISH, M.D uNlvERs1TY OF ROCHESTER ARTHUR M. FLIPPIN, M.D. WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY shi" zw W. E w B fi 5 ,. Til' , iii I- " Y Y. 4- t , 2, , Y if-. ggi - 5' x JOHN J. FOTE, M.D. PROVIDENCE COLLEGE 4 1 -1 yy X D, V, M-I'-g,,,Ca-F245 f' ' 515.9 ft : 1 Xvjg., is , . , EDWARD W. FREEDMAN, M.D. UNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTER 5 i W 1 I 'W .2vgw':, ,- ' 'fi ,Y 1. 1, v"w'HN ' -9224 - ,e ! . ' f" "ff .. . .4..a'Af"' ' In 'wwf- ,,K .. 3 iifx- ' i5'fi7E?'7K ' ' - ' ' f - 3 F777 - - ,Q 1 AW,,j,giM., Jig' gg , fx L9 1 ..,.. , , ,, I. , .. I Ulf ff . -. ,,,. .r V I , , 39 V4 mwllwuw 5.-if 1 1: I II 4Ww:H,,.11EQV V 554 I, 9 I A X QB 1 .As I I1 W 1 . A . .., ... , f I xx, Il I , Q1 Sf, If ,, ' ws, f i l Vgffgw,Mgg..p,,3NgI ww ,W,,'-'vL,eL"..'I .w 5 I 15? - :Gs If: mia.. , , . J ,, , rm, ,I 'v . , Y up fzl Jin :xg f -ij. ,H In U ' ' ' gg' ., . :Iky Q 'ii , , I I lf! Elf -if ' ggg,.1I 1 2 ,Ig "' 1. ., A J -.35 ' ' ' ' is Vw Nw. , l'v5g,2I. , x1 gy, -gf . Q-' , ,- 5 l . . ' " ' - T ' ,. -, K-Z., I ,wa 1 11-2,24 . Eff- "YE ' . ' , .- -:- : U- fl' 'gi ' , J -Q, I' 'fm' f f :fp , ,-1 -' ,WI ,. Z 2-1' , VN V. Gaza 1 I- J, I .Y nw . 23.-. F- ., 'gig , , -122 N .1 A. ix, 2' ' ' - , 5 -541 - " ' iii '. I " -' W ,, ,,v,,- 5, A . .1 . 1 , A , ,.1.u-.:- -- ' H Q '. ' ' ' . f Y M' f ,N . f . , . 11 415 BRIAN L. GRIMMETT, M.D. VILLANOVA UNIVERSITY .,z,.i liz- I I I I I E355 wp ' I 5 fi-'ff I I z, 11 ' .' I ,'f'1:" L E 7.9, I' , Nm. . 5 T, Ll PAUL C. HETZEL, M.D. RUTGERS UNIVERSITY A A H .. Vw M ,, -- . .. ' 'if 7:-vf QU Y ,w ,1 4-A ,LY ,M ' i ' ' ,W , .35 W. A, YA, -,-vi i-YY -L.-,.,, ,..., -,, .ww I - -f ' 41 K A A 2. fm, H mu, '-1 ,H , 1 f' I ,vw ,. f sd ffw-G 1 L.C5?'1,.1 f 1 ,,g4i:feH.,' , '1 I f ' A, I N215 5' W-1 1' N I 1 114- 3112 . ,Ti f yi- JOSEPH A. HOLAHAN, M.D MANHATTAN COLLEGE i F 1 6 ALAN D. HUGHES, M.D. ST. PETER'S COLLEGE ' WSH W "'E41i5" ' 'W T1 TY Y' W-ssvwge, ,wg,1, :gi 1 Mmm 11,1325 H1 K W Mi . L M I Wk 1,1 K ,N H -Li - -4 FRED H. HYER, M.D. BROWN UNIVERSITY L'-f11'T?1Z15f'.ie?iE SEI 1 ,iz Y 1 V' ,F if i . -53- IL.. .1 - y . L . U u.. ,,, ' - Y A --2 Q 5 539 .El Jig' -Q6 -fx Q: ll' ,- R? ,-Q75-Hf?.b:'A'g 'Q , W 4 .3g,.5r.j , ' -:E-:-:.'::gf,-'id , . 33- -:tif-gf,-w,..g.g1-gg - .' H .I ,,..f ,Aus .... w, mf ,- .,-,-,---yy-T5 ' M7 N " ,,:-:f::- WT, ,,- .-,. 1 I PIETER J. KETELAAR, M.D. PROVIDENCE COLLEGE ,ww 531, , mi ,JW ABL -,L JE. Hu ww 1 . ,. ww ' H -V H V xv Fira' GEORGE KIHICZAK, M.D RUTGERS uNlvERs1rY '- :fa f 15 ,:. vs' , ., FJ ff 4 -53' THEODORE J. KRAWIEC, M.D. UNIVERSITY OF NOTRE DAME w cf Q - ef: w X Tx :Qin M ..X..5, ,t My - 1 ,5 5 " fi: ., 5 A ' ,f Mfif ,W it HM LEWIS T. LADOCSI, M.D. NEWARK COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING tba STEVENS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY RONALD LAKUSIEWICZ, M.D. 32 ' T I' V-,, . 1 ,A w ,X M ww . K .- fu is Q, x 52 fri r fi -MY 5555 1, my 12- ' W '-. 1 5 S fefl 1 uw H 1, H .xsWiEmJ u. ' figs 54392 , , w Wm.. RICHARD J. LOMBARDO, M.D TRINITY COLLEGE v . ' 4 isiwuxu 3 X : . 2' . 5, , Q r Q ww- wmv N 2: i 1 Q , Q., ' . 1 f fl: N551 U 551 W., ,- Nw W, - gk - 55, '55, 4 aug .I -iz .El rj NANCY LYNCH MARINAN, M.D. FORDHAM UNIVERSITY " YT - Y -' QHIWMY ,, .ff 3giY34?YjYYvYYMY ,Q kJAI.'g3Sg'f Y -ig - YYYLTM gh- :iffy NYY. Y q Y Y 15+ Y NYY Y' ' N v Y K9 Y YY ,- YYQYY Y Y 'MY Y J "ii 4 Y Aa .. ,W iff,-Q ""' K ,., i f .f ffial 'Sify " ".w-.ff-:7:':"'f ' 55, 'sgff 32 Hmm? 94 - M51 Y if-2,. ,Yg:.ffS1Y1liTi7?..,'U , f' Q I f' Y Y Y1Y,Y'x,, '1 Y L- ' W- gl ,.g,'qf:,'f.7:'aaY . ,Aga ,Y . f . ' -FTZ'Qif-,Y-E'1SrgQ1E1' 53 -' . N31 f' , ' W ' ' " ' Y -'Si .'- '. ' Y. W4' V 5 1:12 -:Em wif:-,:j?i"i ni-'Y X , ' Y ,.!m'3P'fY' ' f N 1 ,. ' , 'LY Y' Y?sY?g,L ' Y D 1' A , ... -2' Ln: . .YZ-'72 Y' V.,-. '- -5'WS.- V , " ' ' ' 2 , . .Q -E-,'3' YYY- , " z :i " -U9 m- AY-' ' ,, . ,lx . ., H l ,gy ' - 23 WY I 'Wm -L, ' . S. ' X Y 1 4' 1 1 .' J? .5 :YI 1. Y-Y-,YY , ,, X -f" : :- . SY YNLW PY-5 Y YJ W H W Q wig ffii -Q qfzn Q ,,., if ,J sqgiiam :iz wg A ms, AAWMHJ ga gf af? Q32 5- wg ,ui If , , i W NE .- TQ, 3: H' THOMAS J. MALEY, JR., M. D. LASALLE COLLEGE MJ? msnnug BURTON MAYROWETZ, M.D RUTGERS UNIVERSITY . :za JOHN R. MIDDLETON, M.D. COLLEGE OF THE HOLY CROSS W N ,, ,L H ,,HL LH .PLL i ,glee L Q 15, X ,N ,gg Q " - my 1 fy, " L 2 Sang 2 ,xt ' flu . l 3 ww 2 :ew , Eg: a Q 1 .... Li 2, V'- 6 :aj L if ww ww L mm ., -,D -L , H' Lz.c,j",, ,- Ar T31 si Lfxeii s.. ,f W ' 1 L fgfg W L-Lug xl' ' ' 4 F5253 x Li L LL bi H2 L !A.F3 U 'A s 1 wwufgkif M153 , , ,pa N H F12 W :sq if X ,X 1 W WM 11 uv .Em 9- H51 -Q-. V I... M , . vw, frat., ww Im ,EI I M 1 JACK R. MILLARD, M.D. PRINCETON UNIVERSITY It, Q i f,,. -om RICHARD A. MOLTENI, M.D. FAIRFIELD UNIVERSITY I E Q5 X f k'IQ'I? I Aff If!--I X I AIII .. .A 1" Fig 7 ' 13, " ,. ' - , N lf"-M" 1,214 -'--A -A A f - i -- Mgj., U, U W 5 133 -www. My N ww- ul Wx Wgw,.12,131-, "' Adv" Fil" 'Y H il, gg My, M" ,fi Q Q 4 H' H 'HN""HN' .yi Q , V Y W Ez aim if -..N ' 1 X Tm ,Nw S 1 wg ANTHONY J. MURE, M.D sr. PErER's COLLEGE 4, -J NU-ll., - 3 'fe-1' ' ?"' g'3i1ip,?Q6': ' 1 1.-fi g, -,4q, J A ,, , ' N N ,A . 1 l k- W- -- .4 ir L -1 U W- 1, - Lfiilzf GEORGE W. NEMETH, M.D. UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH v'w"' +1 f Y 1 -W ---T I, If, -.-1 Q ' I-gif' I K I A 'il 'fn 'T I I 3, 5. I ' LW, I ' M x ALBERT F. OLIVIER, M.D MANHATTAN COLLEGE R w s - VLA 2- i L Z ' ,NMMA H if ' A" 4 N Q. A X 5' ' 'A :sr 1 'A 1' V 5 E. I 1 up 1 NOEL H. OLSEN, M.D. BATES COLLEGE L., , ' wwf, 'wgww www ff. X -'S N N ' .1 I-"Ui w r Y ww . lm i?a?Ei'f wr E55 V ,EM N5 wuz, H W 22? it 1 wg? ,,. . .- .,.,.,, N155 w ' my fi 23552953 J. ,. ff 4'-111: -. Q- A .nit W q1YU v-'f'?' .r wrgu 3,2355 , 1 Wu, new, RONALD D. PALLANT, M.n. !Y,' Q- "Ll Y mm W, H, GL! ,W :eg Qi,-VE' 7 5 Y 5 ,A 1 :-'ls 1 g Mg U zu m 5 C Z 5. :u 'L' 5 -4 W "wif MN usa. rt-via wl ik la 5 5,6 153' - , 7. . , , E N, lg H 'A" Wai. ' 'E A ' " i ,,Z. g ' FafH'15l! fig I JOHN .I. PAULHUS, M.D. UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT I ' W vvvf: -W' T 1-:ff -.fm if-. pm-, sw , 'HT' d FRANCIS A. PFLUM, M.D GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY MICHAEL T. PLANTE, M.D v1LLANovA uN1vERsnY - -S MICHAEL W. POZEN, M.D BRANDEIS uN1vERs:rY P' ROBERT L. RANLEY, M.D. RUTGERS UNIVERSITY mf: 1-li 1 Ea' V W ff H ew, ,N Qu 1 x 1 HJ -- ' "i3H:'wW ' N 5,1 X35 EFX, L, ., N,,, 'g-Mg sg g'mf,v-V ALBERT L. RAY, M.D RUTGERS UNIVERSITY ROBERT H. RECK, M.D. FAIRLHGH-DICKINSON UNIVERSITY IQW F Q p g,wgW.u , 1' N gg I , ,A X, , fl. w , irq ,,.- E E Vs 5 I ,W ,B w 1 L , 55: .2 V YV, , 5: 5111? Mfg, , ak GEORGE E. REYNOLDS, M.D. VILLANOVA UNIVERSITY ,J ye. H I xi 'qi V -c -5 s .4 will am i ' 1 , -fi ' ,N a Ti. ' , ,'Q,i-311: I A V 7 . , mfg. ,V - V , ,. M4 -MLW E K 0 , M HJF1 5- Jn an 1... -JM PETER J. ROTOLO, M.D. .4 wsu-1 ST. JOHN'S UNIVERSITY E ?'f2EEw Y I ROBERT J. RUBANO, M.D. sr. PETER'S COLLEGE E MXL . - , A f 1 1 , lvll ., .1 1x 'V' "-- ,,,,,,, , Y, ,, 1 ' ki- 'fnewaf-M?,.. : :f W ' T.. 1 lh' nm ax:'1-,ff'5 - ?Ef!'1z'-x 1 fi -1 ' ' wk " 1 1 ,G 1 f ff? A - .- 511 1 1 1H11 1 .fy ,T A! ,. , 2-sq-fu A, -1 -g y ., , 2 1 V ' r P V ' . s 1 U l 11,21 :L 2:54 ,' 'V .,-' Q7 " '4'Q,1'?l:' 1 A ' 1 mi M 1 11 1 EUGENE I. SACKS, M.D RUTGERS UNIVERSITY ,Q L X1 1 gk 1 15 . , : .. T JETGF' ,. . X ,- f'1"5v::If 1 ,L 7.2.-. .11 -1 . ,NM A, , . .. E ' x ag 1 4 E 1 , g 951 , 1 1 1,6 14 ,Ji 1115, xi 2 12, I A 1: . 1 2 fi 1 fl f Q, 1 5 s ' x' ' 4 v: ,JV gwfggaf '11W1 1X1ff1i""'s ,fu H13 , A ' ' -' 1'-.'.. . :-Z L-' -. j: g1:.1zei .-If 4' "" ' Z. f-11312: 1725 ff?"'i3':l4.,:." T'-,,-"1':f'3312.fvf Q-LFQ:-r EQ . 111,, 51 4 .5 1 '1 1 1 11 .' .un 1 1,4-1 a11111! 1 1 421,141 H ' L3 .-Qi . 'mei' , 5, t.'7q,:,r.gf , V ,3 :'5igq'fQf5,-mar v -. L, . 1 "'11511f ' 532651- N 5'H5f:g?5f, K' W . lf., Q-,,..1 - .. 1. ,Q-1 - --.151 ra. , "'f:32ilf31f : ' ."' 'QI ,.:.g.,5..v5ig1.:Zr 411 ,N vb-1 .-We-1: .,, -.J : 'Syl :I .. . F V. 1 ,J 1 H -- , ,, . -. 1.135 ,ff kklh 4,1 me 'Q . A, N I H32 N X X5 1 vm rinwfh ' 'wg ,X I Q 1 V 'ss I, -1 1 11, ' 411. T, Q x 'K f X ,Q I- 511,11 A w f V I v lisa" X . .-.114 Q1 ,I wx hx: 111111111 1.1 ,4 1 21.1 ww ,H 1 1! n 1,15 1! H1296 11 1 1 14: 9 if ' ff 1 JOHN C. SCHAEFER, M.D. CORNELL UNIVERSITY 1 J" s ,1 1-Q11 V.. M gas" - -Y M 'vx X- av 11 5" 1 . 1 ' 1' f f "Wy M ,L .1--0-N.w'i"-f-H361 1 -1., . 4- .-6.-1-'-1az-up-.:,::-1-,.1a'. ' r' ' -5 Y , 1" g V ' 1 ,-'.:g13.f,5.-,.- 55':fQp:- v ,f i 1 , ' P ' 1 1 Y nz, 121' 1 . J: fLL if 1r PAUL H. SCHENCK, M.D. MUHLENBERG COLLEGE N znilfl ,Q vw ' H , iii.: NWN W M Him! X -l M 1 M Mi Wg sv.: Mig", MM L T55 1 ' W2 ,xi 1:--A: - ' N- 5:1 X 152 . w 1 N ,jay 15. N w F,-. .V MA-4 B' Le f 11 Ag, ,111 1 1 5y.,-.w 1 Mfg ' 11':.f'y -1.1 111v1n -11 11,1 .Fx .ew 4 , ' jig. V ,gum 9 "Lg 1 I , 1 M FERDINAND R. SCHWARZ, M.D LAFAYETTE COLLEGE , 5, M i 455' ff11g11. 1, .- .,g1""" 1 7.1 1 ' 1- I 3' 11 2, Q ,QQ I I Q F! 'I 151 'vp '1 ,,- fe gr 1 13: . V Q-A J, ,....Y, YQ. Y ffk 7 -- E PAUL S. SMITH, M. D. PARSONS COLLEGE .-r:AQ-ra?--T?-.-.-,,w I 571' 4 1 4 E 1 J 'ii' 'L-Saannihfln N W M N M M JAMES R. SPADONI, M.D uNlvERs1rY or Nome DAME gim fu-z , V gym A 5' A L, , BURTON L. SPEISER, M.D. QUEENS COLLEGE 6 1 V 2E 0 -af? M1-EM' M" I ix TV JAMES L. STAMMER, M.D. PENNSYLVANIA STA TE UNIVERSITY 117 RQ!-ww 'nm . 5 Afww, 4? ,. T- -I '- """'fMY Li , M mm .M , ,un-H 1, W ' 'Www V , ,U M vu'uwf',",1jQ1",, gg- ,, i '.-H ., . T U ' -1, vm - F ,U-if 1 N .f W -4-uf Wa? KENNETH G. STERN, M.D. RUTGERS UNIVERSITY B.PH., RUTGERS COLLEGE OF PHARMACY , Q- 7-NEW E35 1' 'H 1 2, -ij fi? 1111315 1111155 111 1 - ,124 1111221 11: 1111 11215 11111 1 A1 111.1111 1 11 11. 11 1.35'111f11 'QL 4,1 'ii 'SQ 1 if V 1 1 11 1112. " 1311 1 1 1 - 11 1 V 1 1 1 1 I - 11'1 21 1 1 1 , 11, 1 W 1 11 1 N 1 7 1. . 15 525 'fi 355111 111111QEi,, 111 11 las 1. 1 " ,, 1 .11 '.a- ?.2Q,.S.z":.f ff 'ig 11 11 1 11. r 1 -fm: 1 W' - 11 , 1 ., , Q, 11. an 111"11'1 :rf . "1111 1 'mffv 1 11 K3 J 11-1 11111111 41. in 1 A11 '11 11 MY'-11 X .Jak 1 111 111 -1111 11 1111521 1 -- 11 11 Y .su 11 313111111111 - 5211 no 111 1311 1 ' ' 1 ii! 1 5511 I gr 2 f' 1' f"fA ,Au 4, L-... 5. -5.-1 -A 1 w M 5 M, . 11 5, wr -wiw , 1 M5 -- 557 'M fm l 1 PHILIP A. SWIANTEK, M.D , SIENA COLLEGE 4.1 ., , ,.,-1 XML, . V ,. E, ,U gig? gi. - , fLf"'. , W ,,,,'h j, RAYMOND F. TAYLOR, M.D. T..-,. W, YY 1' ' 1 Y ? YQ Q YY Y i Y V 4, l g,-Y VY N - Y Y. Y, I 0 YE! 'I L-YY -Y .., YA, , Y Yr' "Y YYY Y YY Y Y RY U.S. MERCHANT MARINE ACADEMY Y Q1 1, V P X YY YY- Yi? YYY E fall, . .rl-,fi ,Y Y . 1:1 , I, J 1 5 3 ,K 159: Ygt , . Y ' E 75. I'.i2aYli . YI' YYWN , . V 7iT'a". Q' fG'1f-Y- .-,:,,.4 -.nw ,gm - . ..,,, ,Y s A r v.,Y V: '1 YY ,if E ii? mb ff Y 4 :fe v 0, kc Yy'1'g'-2-6 YQ A Cifzg-, L Us a Y ...- M L YY-a.,",gf X .Y"YI,- a'f2fYHf:1,3fff2g3 -Y 'f.'.XY nz Yej5jY.,-'Y4':- A L Ygzwwr QYYY YY:-uf Y G:-,1 :Hp ' , WYYY-. YY..!Y . YYY I.'..'3L5fb4gJ'l'i-Ynl' ' Qgygif:-k1,Q1'fyi,..Q.Y-JZ! xg.-, '1:Y 355- -Y Q5 1-Y-g -f ' -,f - A -YY :L Y rl' rf b-mfr' ' . Q .,.Y'-:re " 'f1'h'f--' Y Q L1 ' -,L .gtg YY-1-.1-wY.Y':.e . -..-:::f.:e.m YYY ' - -. Q- '.Y.Y3f- " .,SF5"l"f" Y I il ' Y Y -YE.. ,. p,YYY.,YYY-3515 .1-4,1-4.-Yr Y 5 zn'g2Yaf,4.-::.:i-, " YYY ' 1 Y ,.k,Y,..YY.,.3..,Y-5, -..v,Y. Y -. l , . -Arm in Q YM.: Yfli ' ' wx: Wu- " 5' MP V' Y 'Y 'W ,.',,: " i Y ,f YY X YY im- 1 -a Y , Qgm YYY'j1Y.Y1QjY'!w, ,ff YYQQY' ' Y WY YY uYa,i"E'252 YY ' ,W ' ssiizif ajr' -Y Y 'N YY YY .YYYYY Y Y :sa Y Y ,gsm Y 5 Y Y "M 7 K Y Y l ,r . E, Y 'Y YM 'Y QQNYY YY YY .YY ' Y YYMTV Y YY Y' 'ululg N I 'Y Y VY Y 3 ,Y B, V M, My W ,L,, ,,--M, M, PETER J. THOMPSON, M.D GETTYSBURG COLLEGE 1 4 ARTHUR J. TORRE, M.D RUTGERS UNNERSHY l X I A J ,, AT DAVID L. WALRATH, M.D HAMILTON COLLEGE CURTIS M. WILLIAMS, M.D. VILLANOVA UNIVERSITY W H..g1,"-,.,' , 5 Tj' - I ' ' 2 I v , ,,:,LA,,, f I 1 ff-H1 ,:. :,, - --'PT I , '4-- . ' S3217-h' I ,A X 4' 5535 I I , iiiagiy' 5 ' I - X .mu I I I I 'ff ' H m -'Q IIT" '-TVZKW. 7 1 7 wr H' ?1:fp"?i1E!L""' ""' 2FfW"F"'?fL.?731'-'ii'-If ""'RY'1E'Fff " '15-BI' WHT' V-9' BY "HH Nffsiifm 'WT' is wzefffimf 'W' IQ" igbfglf ' ' E T I I I I 355 ' ' H ,,Ag,S3WI " - M I I :TH Y zgiggk. 5 ,IN Q U Y 'se wir JILLW i Hu, XQQEIQQ I N ,+'4kIl'ifm II' ' H , 1 , V if R' ' fn H gn- X, Aa H M- J, W - I I Izgiiqiq-img mwjggg 5 N ' IH I X Ni lg I w H55 M Lt, , AU-. , ' .1- vi KE J. .. N s.,- JOHN F. WOLSKI, M.D TEMPLE UNIVERSITY LEWIS D. ZINKIN, M.D YESHIVA uN:vERs1TY ' W-sv r HONORED FACULTY The Class of l97O wishes to extend our thanks to all those teachers who, by virtue of their exceptional ability to teach, organize, and relate, helped make our education worthwhile. Many of these individuals have been honored in previous yearbooks, therefore, we would like to take this opportunity to single out new acquisitions to the faculty and younger members of the teaching staff who we feel are worthy of recognition. BENJAMIN RUSH, JR., M.D. a long awaited arrival . . . a surgeon at the helm interested in teaching surgery and a corner- stone around which a strong department shall hopefully evolve. 138 MICHAEL LYONS, M.D. . . . his comments in the realm of clinical pathology added per- spective and completeness to many a con- ference. l" l . li-"fi it t f ti. W. it i -I MICHAEL GUTKIN, M.D .... a gentleman whose intelligence, friendliness, and hard work made junior medicine worthwhile. ll f.. W BUNYAD HAIDER, M.D. . . . an asset to the , school, an asset to us, an asset to the science of clinical cardiology. STUART BASKIN, M.D .... his lucidness helped put the electrolytes into solution. 5, l RICHARD CO, M.D. . . . a rare combination HERMAN BlRKNER,M.D .... living proof that of vast clinical knowledge, mastery of the NJCM can produce a physician and teacher literature, and above all, the ability to teach. ofthe very highest caliber. FIDEL EXCONDE, M.D. .. . his humor and FLOR YUZON, M.D. . . . with enthusiasm and interest in feUCl"if19 helped US fl"f0U9l1 fhe availability he single-handedly carried maze of P'-'1il"WUY5 and 'racis- Martland's department of gastroenterology. NAE KWAN CHEUNG, M.D .... a fine word chief and CI compassionate surgeon. i ii ': lvl i l ' -3 1 an DONALD LOURIA, M.D .... with yellow pocl and the desire to build, he mode the trip JACK DADA'ANl M.D- H - G first rate from across the river and added new dlmen- Cnnicion who helped fined the gap left by Sion T0 The DePU"l""'enl of Pul-'hc Hecllfh and Dr. Laurenzi. He will be remembered by all. 140 Preventive Medicine. 1' i i 1 l 5. A SPECIAL TRIBUTE Hugh G. Grcidy, MD., Professor ond Choirmon of DeporTmenT of PoThology since 1957 broughT To The New Jersey College of Medicine o keen inTeresT in medical educc1Tion ond on impressive bockground in The science of PoThology. IT wcis under his Tuieloge ThoT we The grciduc1Tes of 1970 ond The closses preceeding us received our bosic ToundoTions in The orT ond science of medicine. Perho ps The mosT impor- Tc1nT ond losTing Iession which vve gleaned from our brief exposure To Dr. Grady is ThoT we cis physicions serve hurnciniTy TirsT ond science second. On This The eve of his reTiremenT os choirmcin, we exTend our sinceresT Thcinks. T gg: lx ith Newark? MY l-Ui The friendly world of Freud The only place where there are THE 8 WONDERS OF N . J I C. Q They always get their man. operator more diseases than names. A nice place to visit. . . Wall the owner of a red Mustang licence IOU 375 please call h Of Salmonella Und Shigella but no one should live The world's largest storehouse CHAIN OF CCJMMAND We salute These personalities- some in True sincerity, some element of absolute sat their contributions in making Marfland "the hospital it ist Cardiac WHAT? We don't have a Dr. Pacemaker here! What do you mean White T with an ire-for oclay." -:im-1k.,,gs1.m , ,, H .... We, Going up? Going down? Where the hell ore you ornado? Previous employment? Chief of Biological Warfare. If I can find them, can you read them? Q-n f'-wsf-wwf is vii .5 53,1 Q' iiiiia, 'K Q, gg, . " 1' iii? wifli'l"1i452'lllgi',i,QfEfgg . Y f 1 fi .i flffi -"A . 1 - i 'MS ' J Y fl ii iii 4 Q - , ' tiff? e 11TH ,, ,,, f -1. W gg.nn.,m, - 1-ami' A , 2 - 1 , , , s ni. i ' -.as f Lgl. " E " , , 1 , -wk F iii e he 1Q,WnL,ii1 Riggs ! N lil? in i 1 s 1 A i in ll l i , . ,ig i wig W" , in F i'f2'Si . i 1, . 4, ii Y ,, 4, il i .. 'ii Q, A L . i XX tg, ' l ' N 'ii i l bi ii. W ...W Kitty, next slide please. Kihy? Kitty? Miss Wilson! H' Y , f i 4 V QNS-Sink Test. 143 HEARD r T IN THE CORRIDQRS l 1 "My what's open?" '7 7 " 7 ' T "'?ffF""f5"'-"-"7""fW'S'i 1- ' ,, ' ' 4 -ji., 1 .iii gf ,. ai' Y if :Jil A , Mgt, ,typ wt it , 4. . "" "' ' Y V V .' .l l'f'-"f1.r!1l-'- v i t All AL' gay -i 1 L Zigi .egg-117.3 I Fiiyfkj :mi .I ' ? , :Eli T A-if :- 11, V.:-,ri i ., 1 , . 'uri t tgiwtrlilal r ,V "Yes, automobile accidents. A pel- I . vic exam STAT!" 5 l ILE "I come to you not as your classmate, nor 535 . leader, nor class president, but rather as your King!" 'N ' w "Is this student: ' A. Having difficulty with the n if: 1 finger to nose test. , ,N ' ss B. Wording off the Voodoo. 1 C. Suffering from acute Proc- . talgia fugax. t , D. All ofthe above." - l f f' f ff ' f "This 17p-with hairy Zebra ears, "Are you sure it points to the side of reported in the Taiwan Pediatric the lesion?" Journal CTPJJ in 1944 .... " 144 I 1 NEWARK, New Jersey, The sTaTe's Iargesi ciiy and a major Transporiaiion, commercial, and indusirial cenfer of The Greafer New York Metropolitan Area. The seai of Essex counfy, if is locaied in norfheasfern New Jer- sey on The Passaic River and Newark Bay, abouf nine miles west of New York CiTy, which lies across The Hudson River . . .,' "Some 18,000 people are now crowded into cr wiih on rcldius of abou? cz mile and 0 half." "V' 'L "If there is anything of which Newark officials are proud, if is their record in Federal Housing and urban renewal programs." . Iwi. S' -lf 'I47 iii i I "Yet Negroes cite 'bud housing conditions' most often when they were asked to choose clmong fifteen possible underlying causes of the 1967 disorders." 1 "Almost o Third of The city's Total supply of homes ore sub- standard or clilopidofecl, ond i'r is poor people, mostly Negroes and Spanish-speaking people, who live there." I4 "Housing experts and planners tend to focus on dwelling units and tracts of land rather than people, because buildings and geographical delineation are more man- ageable statistically." 150 "Every census from 1790 fo l900 revealed that ai' leosr 90W of The Negro population lived in The Soulh. After The Turn of 'rhe century Negroes began io move from The South to The Norfh, cmd from rural To urban areas. lI'k if : A Aw Only six out of every one hundred Newark pupils read above The national norm." 151 rw Bl "MorTlc1ncl is The major source of medical care for The poor in the center of Newark." fi 'u :kv 7 ' .13 LQ? , A D. -.-J -'-- l'L-..--.fi-,,, . 'H ' - M .3 , .fizxkl ,-' 1 " V Y -Li, 15 'w ,nig:1. ' .,,- , I , .3252 aqffkxf - H . ,. 1.-A-:-4. J I gif Y . .-I 4 Nx,.L- Hx X ' 1 .H lb -J 2,l1 QU X X , 0 4A" , i ' I V ,j ' I 'I ' ik I -A ' , si , eff " i ww I L. A N991 l f t l f it "According to 1966 statistics, Newark has the highest ma- ternal mortality and VD rates in the country, highest infant mortality rate in the nation, and the highest rate of new TB cases for all cities. Newark ranks seventh among ten leading cities in the country in the total number of drug addicts." - -- -v-1 , H. Y, -- in TEVMQQQ ...1.Q-. E731 -. .,. f :N - Jw,- .. 1 :fx 7,-,, -. n-,,-,, 1.. A AQ- f-- .WMV .1 '1"Q-ff , n ' ,w'1' .f ..:-gm, ,1,'!w3,' .aah ' . 113151: 2 . - ' .1,.- :. 5- E:-,lu Y:-.,.,,1,11.q, - 1 t',.,,q-A . 1 Q si ' A ' QQ I u . 331 I' 'bw N Sw . ' A f 326 1 , P 11,5415 Q' . .5 Q,.,3 .. , .: Q I 1 ' , If wr ' -. x 1 ll , , rv HH? -1 . L C 15 W 1 I li' ' a -1 ""'f3lf! 'I E M "' . f-Ilim T LE in 11 F , L Q :nu 7'-f, V ww 1 N! 1 54fFWr1 Q' '1 f f A 4 fl , I V . - W I Y , ,ggi 1 lx, I -gif' 5-J, ' 'g.,, -. 5'gl x J. , Q- Q ,Q -,fi A 1 3 L-Aj ,kt X, ' T r 4:5 X 5 r it ,S , ,v , X-V , " ' 1 L, , 43"-'. . 3? j ,gig-A Y .. - 'A I I F' " , ,1 FH, 741 5 TNT 'i V - , Y .-1 ' , V, "4 ., Li!E"'.'i' . Y V Y . f .' . v , ' 1 ,f?,f,: f7?j:'Er1l:g.if'.L,: 1 , . ' Z , 1-V , Ai .1 "'-, .T"v5TC'.b , " '-,,, I L : . - , i , .Y 1,-.ld-,1,1,'- t '5-1-Tr... - K - , rl . ., . . -Y ' ,, 1 'A94"'4-2'9" "' .1 ' - -ff?-ff: iigf-,--'ll 1 if A K 6 4 . UAE , - -'AI' -'4f""'. "D'7""'?'5f"'5'L"Ii ,V E., .fs:.1...fr?-1gi-G94-?4U4'5'f"f'E"1 ' ' T " Y' 2: 'V' W .Nga-.va'f5F??PA I7 158 ' 4 tg t :T 11 x VW , Y Y-5-. 'x - R, -.--l -'PFQ4 .xx 'ul ' " ...,.--.T . , f V. K, A: -Q6 ' I Newark in 1970 is a beleaguered city, full of allegations and accusations toward its political leaders and police, distrusted by The Black maiority, despaired by the White minority, and despised by Those who must work in it or travel Through it daily. Yet Newark is where the New Jersey College of Medicine and Dentistry decided to "resettle" during 1967. This decision was not welcomed by all and has been listed as a contributory factor in The July 1967 riots. The Medical School is attempting to grow and improve in a city considered by some to be beyond repair. Yet the losers in all the political double-talk and despair are the resi- dents of Newark. We, as medical students, were confronted by the residents ot Newark as our patients. To deny the area, housing, and welfare problems of our patients is to deny reality 1970. ' We presented this pictorial not as a vehicle ot further despair and depression but, hopefully, To increase our understanding ot our patients so that patient care, Martland Hospital, the New Jersey College ot Medicine and Dentistry, and the city of Newark might improve. l l ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS All quotes used in this Photoessay were from the Governor's Select Commission on Civil Disorders. Report for Action. CRobert D. Lilly, Chairmanj. Trenton, New Jersey, 1968. " Collier's Encyclopedia, Volume 17. M New England Journal of Medicine, Volume 281, No. 23. 160 tl' THE EVENING NEWS newark, NJ., Thursday, January 22, 1970 lVIedical College Revision By PETER CARTER EVEIIIIIQ News Tfllllllll UIIFQUU TRENTON - Gov. Cahill said today there will have to be some modifications in the planned construction of the N.J. College of Medicine and Den- tistry in Newark. lhc governor at his first press conference since taking offloc Tuesday also indicated he will require some modification in the plans for greatly expanding the Rutgers University Medical School. The total estimated cost rise CLASS GF '71 ..1 1 'zii 4' M 'wma Qi J fi . .4--1 . Q- M' "Mag ,, 1 v tw -45: f , 166 r CE CLASS OF '73 .x.-...QT 5 KV' ' 1 '1f'fa4l..',,.w ' - f5Tff?f7'TN'1'NII5 P -11 Mm- , . gnxi' "'W"' 7 Q ' xx Q .,.r, , -.vez - 1514+ if 'F F' ' air i LT 5f?5S.V 133,525 1-. -r 'Q-Q' V -'QL-A 35? N ,-. " V, ' -1.-. gy4Q'wS?C ' ww x. f ,5,E'MQ,g2'- 1 -lfgggfg fa-. X. -'wszafsf-M. m ., ., .s..MA ...Q JV, ' ' fs Q, 'f ,.a.:1f..f .. ." ' . J gg, 1 .. ,, .35 R. ':a Gyp, V' f', "P-V ' 2. . - '1:1.L.., j J- 4- 'W' ii ' 1? 135 4. , 4 My . sf... -Q,-- . .., -- .1 , . Gp., -- - Ai QSM- 5,1...g-fwgiwz-5g'..4f4,-.,fg:gVj,L,A -Ji-535. wQpf5'4"4-aiwx. 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'w .gb V2'NisVgg.L5fw::.2.x--:r-.5 . . .Q - . .- swf.. .,4. ,Q -gg-tg., ,rg-V5.1--V-. ' gf!" -5 .gi ss .54 A--.I-2. I M V 1. "" aff, ' if " .4 ., ,,.'-' .ae-QS..-V -f- -' Q - .1 - - - -X ...S-u-ax -rw 1' g-3--. M - .-v. 1 -F-In 1 U 1, 4.-r 2,4-...,,4.-ggi.-.Q 'Q-xrgyxf-55-Q 8. wr , K FQ 1 F951 LQ. - Q - J 'ali . xt 1.1. gm ,"'- V., gc -H 'W-.ww ws 3 ' ---I?-2-G, A.:-,w,2X'f -'AR'--f-'tx -x " ,i:fff3g1p.:':,9-1..Aw'3-X . n e hw - ' - -. 2 '-fEQ?f:1'.:"2!EgW- JW' '11 S- -' 49.5, Qgugvq ..g,31x-,ff ,bgjklzqigkx - 'V " 1:::Vfs5--1331515-g5F.iW?-1 -L -'-zsr.. .ifqp-Hr"!'.:'Q '-Q' ip- ,:.'. 1555173 QA4Qi?1B'.x'f 'QQ'-:pw aV.:a,sfrQpS:? ,gggivg 3 1' gfiiui ,,:f. gn CQQQ .- .5-'-mgflfrf -'Q - ,mx-. -f f.:-f Y ':. V7--LMP' 2- EJ. ' Two years ago The STudenTs aT The New Jersey College of Medicine designed a Family-orienTed com- muniiy healTh cenTer sTaTTed by medical sTudenTs cmd TciculTy of The New Jersey College of Medicine. This cenTer was envisioned To serve Three purposes. l. To provide Medical STudenTs wiTh The oppor- Tuniry To broaden Their conTacT and knowl- edge of urban medical and socio-economic problems Through The rendering of quoliTy medical services To The Newark CommuniTy. 2. To provide a model Tor involvemenT of medical sTudenTs in The delivery of qualiTy healTh care. 3. To provide basic science sTudenTs wiTh clinical conTacT guided by Third, TourTh year medical sTudenTs, and FaculTy. The basic sTrucTure of The Family HealTh Care CenTer revolves around The healTh Team concepT. Each family aT The Clinic is assigned To ci Team of sTudenTs consisTing oT a sTudenT nurse, freshman, sophomore, iunior and senior. The senior medical sTudenT is in charge of The Team and wiTh his facul1y supervisor is responsible Tor The heaITh care of The family member. This insures conTinuiTy beyond The graduaTion of any one specific class. The healTh Team is advised by Three physicians, an inTernisT, a surgeon, and a pediaTrician, assigned To The nighT ThaT The Team is on duTy. These licensed physicians assume legal responsibiliTy Tor The pa- TienTs. AdcliTional consulTanTs, including a social worker, psychiaTrisTs, public healTh nurse, and die- Tician are available for The Team To uTilize. 172 FAMILY HEALTH CARE CENTER E N A "AA ., if ,, K 1 TH , meaftj ' ,V xv. I !N,3,v15:5134l51 ' lil ' r 'V 3 . KZ ' i A ' 11 E 1 I-, e gg J J,f'g11'1Q4!'g,,guglf, M , 4? - Ni, If, ,,'j,,'gl.g,,L 'gg -I 1: I , . 1 3 W .- A is EAE, ildfl X , 5 s ,H ' - ' 1 I ij.-Y . ' -. ' l 75,4-A-' ' ' I ,ivy ' , t , ' ' ' ,ff L ,. ' 1 , X w , f,,, . H 'Ag' ' N g 52 A E L , F, , HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT DRUG ABUSE PROGRAM The High School Drug Abuse Program was con- ceived during the summer of i969 by Richard Blum. What started as a small attempt to disseminate basic information about drug use and abuse to local area school youth developed into a maior proiect encom- passing the talents and resources ot the Department ot Public Health and Preventive Medicine and its division of drug abuse. Under the guidance of departmental chairman Dr. Donald Louria and the division director Dr. Edward Wolfson, the program consists of tour parts. Firstly, an extensive response questionnaire covering all aspects of drug use and knowledge is administered to a selected high school. Dr. Louria or Dr. Woltson then delivers a lecture to the student body followed short- ly by seminar sessions conducted by the medical students. Finally, a follow-up questionnaire is ad- students involved in the program Blum, John Middleton, Frank Fish, Richard Molteni, Robert Davis, Ed- , Eugene Sacks, Michael Pozen, and Dr. Paul Jordan. ministered. The include Richard Barry Maltzman, ward Freedman STUDENT GOVERNMENT Paul Hetzel President Dave Wa Irath Vice-President Larry Pizzo Treasurer Paul Raffer Secretary F. Behrle, M.D. Advisor 1 y . ,r-'--v - -- -Af l' - ' Vi A ' - .' ' 1: RQ-'A' l ' -1, ' f i cf .1 1 ff STUDENT AWARD XX The Nevv PhYS'C'g 1 S.A.M.A. --if-"'-' ET . , 6 , , ? W tw, uubnu 4 -QM FUND RAISING HUSBAND ,,,,,.....----N---I-' ' " PUBLICATION W.A.S.A.M.A. J W5 1-1 w 1 ,Q W .., ,Jw . M!g5A!H.,, M ' ggi, ?5,m,,,g F: -. 1 'lf wiki? ' H 5fQfmWw"'1'wggi,yv.su,fag:Q..Qu,1, miw?.1nQV1'1.YFWE,w1gg A- 'rv , fig, -J .ff ' gf AES w W ' sr u f Q g Qa5e 5 ,5g55wv Y, ,fum 'Q , C8 .lack Millard , "EY Q ,, ,53fL3::,. is WQWQQEVQ ifgglw Wm, fE,Qfiwg5g,,i'f?3m1 H , X, ,Q I 22455 N " H,0'Fij?1'Q"1l,'a'lg'Eg,2fc1EfHu 1' X '3?37Q5F"'-Tgffww, f'1-' v 4.. W- M, -.5-wrwv rxfffssf. 'lui E! , I M ii W5 , ' 'P' '. A I' ' 1' 'V ' ' 4 . y Q 1 - rf i, 1 p w - iiigtfjg-All Q ., ' I . W . E ' sf 1,4 M,,,, mHi:Lg.i,f, . W. ,A ,E .lff lf " ' ' , ff ' ..+iE"i7' i ' ' Q ' V any , ,X . - ' gx' Q 'Y v A '-X9v'v'2g:T M--'HN A--. ' M229 mul ,iw-1B,!"mWQQ.Q"1 i 1,5 . W ,f 'wg' 'QV' N "1 Wm P MM M I .7 f? E Y. X N I H , ggi A ,Nm Y V' F 'gm'w,1,',,1,jHHvul'uwll'i I . . ,m TM 5 M - ,M 4 N A, 176 R. B. Davis 27' EL.. f i lr-4 ' , xl, Ah QQ Q3 :ii ' "X John Middleton Rich Molteni Ron Pallcnt .Q i X sUiY4!4?9g I ,-A f- W 177 . A . 4 ,.:.w I .' , A -K . .g..j'mfj,.j,,Fv',.fg 1 'ff H-,fl-s t.. ' . 'T "Mk ' C CN TRAS T Karen Filkins Richo rd Waldman George Wilkinson Paul Raffer Alan Pefer John Ambrose . , vm, '.':.w.nwa ff M.B.A SfonclingsfFirs1Rouncll: MACY DAY BALLOONS SPHINCTER OF ODDI ......... 2-3 ........O5 C, Richard Waldman Commissioner J STEATORRHEA ..... .... 5 -o cnRc:LE OF wiius . .. .... 4-1 A GANGRENE ......,.. ,... 2 -3 l MALAISE ............. .... 2 -3 i .1 - il RUGBY NJCM NJ CM NJCM NJ CM NJ CM CORNELL 19 COLUMBIA 18 HAHNEMAN 3 SO. JERSEY 0 TEMPLE 8 Dr. John Clitheroe Foculfy Advisor WHO'S WHO IN THE PERFORMING ARTS AT MARTLAND R in II In "Promises, Promises" I 5. . I " I 7 J I a 14 ' HB la ! 2 I1 .gl , 'swf A 1 X I 73 AJ L it P I I I 1 ' Ei ln"Hoir" In "Oh Calcutta!" '5 Once again . . . islll , :ff Tris V e 1 "How sweet it I 1 all ' -V-VI . We JE, fi .. -:4s-faces,-K h-Ming , 6 I Us-nik .,., - 'ai' . V ' ww' 421' ' "" fps Z9 Nia- I ' - ' 7, -I Qi... I - '1I'2l4-'Il-Il I1-' ,5!:L'lfT'5x'f5' WJ1 , ' , 'limi-'Jf, '-"xf9ff'f3,'ig 'I 5 ' fl 'fl'f2r'fE:ll. Y , In "The Odd Couple" s I 180 In "l om Curious, Yellow" Tony Boy and Roy the Rope In "The Brotherhood" POTPOURRI What do you mean "work?" That's not in our contract. a aff f-1 V fa, ' wwiilf , T 1? 1 "1-f ' . -, w-1 gs i. J- EE ' ,Q --1 -3 ' g.. QQEL . X Each , , , to their . . . OWU ,gl ,iiiv W i, ' j , 7 - Q' --1 - ' ' . ,A xx ,ff-V , Q.: 1514 i gg-m.uI.,w, !Q ii NQNNAX .wgfzfig i Y 12' 1 1. Ei 15 53'-Ti, .iv :if :T J 2 , W' ' ' N V '-3314 'fall I-v931f"?ff., ll W: ' 'Eg 'Y ' 'A f H M vrhyh ,1q',Vf, 2- ,- 3? wg: If .,3Ewu,.3gq .ui ,W 3,555 iw' ,, Q - - 255.55 55? 175 S' Y 'Y H 5 Y ,fgfiiz Q' ,mx l ' '-'J . 5- R 395, - 522: 7. 1 . 5 TL. ,P rw 51 E 'r3ifiE""?Z1'u,r'u,r'i Z 1555? 23541 'gif 3 My G' 3' W 'QW' ,ge ' WAP' is 3 5 I.:--A - . A - ' ', :U Z H , 'Y 'V -1' 1 M ' ,A Q, Y zz, r- 1 , 5 : 'I iii- " ,1 f ' 1 it N w 'R 1 1' V- 1 Awruz. 4' 5 ,, ,ff F' -Jig, Y ,V , u, N .1 at Vik ,53 0 , VM- ,ar 3 KW, Q. V :U ,W :naw . . '-twins.. .-1.-W '. H ,. Pr ' f ' A5 r gifs, if - 1 x 2 7 ,y - Q '- M 'f 1!J?fG 1 -Hemi Vw ,f1,fa 4fg:: W W f' In-'?? i- Lfgn, ,H A H A L! N frm- gpg H Q? f " W' ,, M. ' .riff I I ' ' I If YOU Clin f Cure em, IOIH em- "Matched a1'Mclr1lcnd, eh. H i , " -"7flff1s ' 1 1: f R- 'med ww "TUl'I1 YOUI' hefld Gnd C0U9h, PIBGSB-H "And you see, the first maneuver is descent' l82 "So this is where they keep the new X-ray equip- "I left my spleen in Son Francisco." menl. ll ,T iiqjwmi " 'H' 4 "I could swear I parked here this morning." "Did anyone see the new intern? ll l 83 I .ij fag! Q -in - -Zguwm ., ig . Y, z- " Wg ' is HUSQM- 'V' XE HW' K e v V--ii x if V, -Y Fug, 3 ,.:..f 1 . 1 : ,.-iii? , 'G' W , qw 122, V W, 1. Em V-YP52: M ,, ' Qi 'gf "" X A 2 H -,, WM fi in S1191 R mam- 1, Y-:M 1. MW A-ww-K 1-'ui , rl vi i Ji' , ' fi A ,, :I . , . fu r. 'iss Mp- 'A ' " ' fi' rr .W A W f f- H35 H. dw, ggi lujiyi . ' , , l' 3 wr ' X ii - "I said VENOUS ligation!" ff - 142 25-Tfiibi Iwi wgrtmfzgi' A . 1 ' , lun, ,mi ,,'H,+x,, ,V if, -i., This year we experienced a rapid iurnover in faculty. 184 M 532 ei ' lla ,,,- "You say there's an opening at Hopkins?" "I zaid AMBULATE not FLATUATE!" A PATRONS NEW JERSEY CCLLEGE OF MEDICINE ALUMNI ASSOCIATIGN U Y Mr and Mrs Edwarg,-11 W' 'Earn A Lvgggh' m-, in 1 1 g-U QM., if "T """ aff.. .,..-- via 5+ if Q.. ef- M. W, 52211 A E- 54 ,.. 15.- 5-'QS , gf' Lliiw E. L ,ii 7, Q, -r 32 ef-fs, .. .mu V3 i, Kwi- f e 'ww E382 :TQ V..- Q! ,4.:,,., ! .-e F.. L. Fu- W..-. w F... .ggi sz 1 ,, . 'v 1 4 ?x E: -H .w MQ, K Am -aw S., 6359! P3 A 4' SX www Q + . FACULZLSY AND FRQEN - ,"V , . 'K f A L . . ' 9' if A V ' ' h I M' 7ifEQ fill 1 ,V . Franklm -C. Be.r e, V-fDQ- . p.EEEheodo re,aKQu.s,1 +n1Aeqxf,fLM,fD?. gE, ,,, . ' 11 1, Bleib6?"g, , ' ' ' , , f ' , , 4. 1 A . , 'fgf T' li l DA'-SP4 M'S-fAnfh0hY V- A ' 1- F Q i ' 1 f . ra ' V , J .L ,g -' 'A-Q 'ag' , Man 2 N ggzjiglj' -fizjgwj-jj ,,A- Q H215 Qligiifjt ':13gf'f':iLfg1-3 fr- wwf yy. J 'A ,,5"v'- age gy, 1Deg!1jlQ ndA,D.mBgonnycqs le,A Ph D ,X V .1 - .'l ' A i - -- ., fsgephe. f5RQ,igLo,.Merame',M12fB:'fa V 5 ' A 5 'P if "' ' 4 - 12' 2 5 P ,W - F' : , y . W. 24 2 ' l' l' b'M WMU 3 'Befiiird A. iBriodYr 'Phl M D i 53 +1 ' ,Q ' ' " -A ,v ft - - . 22: ROQSI' H- B r0dki 61'M-QD. A -- '2'1 ' ' Qufizisgiiaf-"J 'ww 1551 - 3125 vii? Hs'-'Li L 5 A ' ' fiiff wr M KKMAM AWWWBIQW E ' A . if -,, I kg Y - 'egg M? 1 A W Wrga Y ,V -ass' "- - ww fisfffgglvf , V' 553355 V-Y-F 9 1-'Ql7 n'B UH0C lSffPITHD- . Ell zclbeTh'D. MunY95k.l1l'g. 4, ' ,V i . V -' V i11 l 4 .V Rgoberi' R. C qg?:lmus,,: . xi ' H 5' ' l A fx , Q ' T H9055fC9ferf'niL2MLH1532 1 . ' V 'fbiwigd' ' iiz ff V- 'Hal f- ' ' 3.2517 . .Q f 'f:l31e2.QTf?E2? T A 1'Tf"fe2a A si F ard M. D. ' ' Q' ' 4- '- ff' 'i , f 1 " ' ' H 5 - 1' fY'. 1 7 'Y"K ,," - wfg w iaf Fifi? ' A!159L"'5e A' C"'0H" MD' Q 5 A RQfeQ!F'2 E1 ieQ-Ui ' ' - ' ' . Q 1" H' Clltheroe' Ph'D'x 113 Jwrgw rw AL- 91 ' . A - ' ' , A 4 D' 5 'J 'Jack H. Dadaiqnf Q 'fy lllumbe D A A 2 NICHOIGS Jia Dem0Sr'M-D- Bbnidmjik Mi g D , Em.. 1 F1 L' Nf' ' Q 1 .m ' 'L'L' :1'5 "5l' 1 " H 311 .,-MTI' I 7 'I " ' ' - vf! 1 " 'T --WI 1 ,,.,,. H N '.,. 36255 31 f15sE1if?ii?-Wlhf V . -1!V. N . .f M 4 g ssv egg: 4 gxg, t J. 5, 1' , f g, , fin 255 , figsif 1' ' X 51 Q ' ' 7 N W . ' , m' "" -'1k Barbara A-,GIfl'5fQ1i?MQ r 1 rlha m Qs5f45h0 ffr5fQf ' Hugfh G4-Grady, Q Carlo H. vTambU-H01 M.D. - . . , l l - ',AQELQIQHHZHwrschlggerg, Phi? 4 ' Q X Y 1' Q. V -3- ' ' . 1, 4 ' 7.3535 '.-, x 4 gf.TEf:g,'?' V?'fx f5,E'7Ih5fF'r-,, 1 H - hers, L 113,912 ' . .' at J 4, ' Zggfm?qfn.d C. Ka-mmggliig Ph,LD. M . ' ifgn 14. ,V Harry A.1.Kafpgju ni Q'Q- Q . .,A. A il . ' . 5 Y 1 ' , A Mqfrvm A. : E mg D q . , 1 1-"rn, -1 ,A ' A , , g g J- lS9V6 n1 J ' .: i - if " H 1 f , -"W f, f ' H . ' A 'f?5 ' , -' . ' f . V, f DR. AND MRS. HARRY W. SMITH And DR. AND MRS. JOSEPH L. T. YOUNG COMPLIMENTS OF ST. JOSEPH'S HOSPITAL PATERSON, NEW JERSEY RULON W. RAWSON, M.D. DEAN AND VICE PRESIDENT BEST WISHES TO THE CLASS OF T970 FROM WASAMA CONGRATULATIONS AND IMMEASURABLE success COMPLIMENTS AND BEST wlsr-:Es To THE TO THE CLASS OF 1970 CLASS OF 7970 FREDERICK A. PEREIRA, M.D. ORGANON INC, WEST ORANGE, N.J. 07052 PHARMACEUTICAL AND DIAGNOSTIC PRODUCTS OF QUALITY BEST WISHES from V ITA OS L Qc U.: I 5 , A I 1 rn I- f 5 70 1 I I 7 N. J. ORTHOPAEDIC Y, x' O 9' WANG?- DEPARTMENT OF MEDICAL EDUCATION Compliments of . KNOLL PHARMACEUTICAL COMPANY ORANGE, NEW JERSEY . . . serving the medical profession for more than sixty-five years , ' . L: ' 55-:zfq af: s. . -'TTI'-'I+ ..f,'--fpirg-X ' , . if '-.,.--iig lsfghfi' ' - 1 'K 5- Q.. ' -1. fav:-z-.':teisg 7 V-afilrf - -""r1Ll'5QfF it Il 1 M' .-ff1..,f-- " :ef':4-x:-f-f1"-",-- .-'.11.gfif-1 5-:Li Qt 'Q ' i ev- .ef "' -, A4-.ts ." i5.1,f'4-:i"f5Sefiwzgf'-7 fvffefn ' Zu 5 -if -ff f'G1""' : ' - he an ' r 5. 'Y "f . .1-i l' "1 ... f' 3:.LT"t it '5"L- ' if ' I . A "" 45. i'f i-53954 V- ' L A- , I ---fr' . ""'-1 ' . I 'ii ' - V Q..Lu,4- 'I if 7 i - if I . I iw Ili' S 1 - ' u e Q ,. . 3 ,:, fi... . 1 w-.:, gy. I U 'I' v,, N L24 . 'A-'nl--gf-' L-,gag-I :- u . . U I 51. 75 if ' ' F 'A ' TLT' iieei-f5'.,fT'Hn'l35Tf L' ' "- mia,-"t'.: Q' "',Y5f..', ' ggi fr" .f,, ' f' .A ' ,"'55g'3 ,P if W., me, 3' C1155-gigs" Vwzzif-, 1 ,, -1 . "" A 1-21 rgmsgzv' V m fof5.i 4, -'SWL 'Q-f?'f'S' 'fi' iq.'f1.g:'f'ng2A:..:-L. ' - gf ,. giv e , .,,. rin" . f-Qu 'pw' i .Q 1.14--w'.1+9f'1:+': . g"i'1.."',g.'f' .n 'w4.fmw:"' " "'1".'L" ' SAINT BARNABAS MEDICAL CENTER LIVINGSTON, NEW JERSEY Saint Barnabas Medical Center, with a heritage of more than 104 years of service, is a uniquely designed 800 bed Center iust 35 minutes from Broadway. The Medical Center offers a broad and comprehensive Training program in approved internships, residencies in various specialties, and fellowships in various departments, all under the supervision of qualified members of the teaching staff of the Center. In addition to a monthly stipend of 5l5530.00, single interns receive a furnished QV2 room apart- ment, married interns receive a furnished 3V2 room apartment. Residents and fellows receive the same living quarters with a graduated increase in stipend. ADDITIONAL BENEFITS: The entire House Staff receives Blue Cross, Blue Shield, Rider "J" and Major Medical Insurance Cfor House Staff and Eligible Dependentsj, Medical Liability Insurance, Life Insurance, two weeks vacation per year for in- terns and three weeks vacation per year for residents. For further information, write Dr. A.A. lslami, Director, of Medical Education, Saint Barnabas Medical Center, Old Short Hills Road, Livingston, New Jersey, or telephone C2012 992-5500. SainT Michael's Medical CenTer of Newark, one of The counTry's oldesT general care hospiTals, is also among The mosT modern- as evidenced by our STaTe-wide repuTaTion as a leader in cardiologic medicine, The comprehensive healTh care TaciliTies we offer, and, The challenging programs in medical science and educaTion provided Tor The beneTiT of our inTerns and residenTs. As one of your aTTiliaTed neighbors in The GreaTer Newark area we wish you success in your eTTorTs To become valued members of a noble and viTal profession. SAINT MICHAEL'S MEDICAL CENTER 306 HIGH STREET NEWARK, NEW JERSEY 07102 from ever-expanding Roche research have come... Menriumg fchlordiazepoxide plus water- soluble conjugated estrogensy Valium0Tablets tdiazepaml lniectable Valium tdiazepaml Libriumg tchlordiazepoxide HCIJ Libraxw fEach capsule contains 5 mg chlordiazepoxide HCI and 2.5 mg clidinium Brj Taractane tchlorprothixenel Marplane tisocarboxazidl Noludara 300 tmethyprylonl Roniacolw tnicotinyl alcoholl - C9 Tigan ttrimethobenzamide HCll Gantanol tsulfamethoxazolel Azo Gantanol tEach tablet contains 0.5 Gm sulfamethoxazole and 100 mg phenazopyridine HCIJ Gantrisin Q tsulfisoxazolej Azo Gantrisin tEach tablet contains 0.5 Gm sulfisoxazole ,and 50 mg phenazo- pyridine HCIJ BBYOCCBQTBDIBJIS KB-complex and Cl C9 Today man's therapeutic hope often lies in a chemist's flask, a physicist's spectrophotometer, a biologist's electron microscope. With these and othertools of investigation, creative scientists such as those in the Roche research group endeavor to extend man's control over disease and to reap for him the rewards of better health and longer life. Rochet LABORATORIES Division of Hoffmann-La Roche Inc. Nutley, New Jersey 07110 from bold research, prudent selection, scrupulous testing, come products that matter thi x",,! 5 193 The sfclff and admin isfrafion of NEWARK BETH ISRAEL MEDICAL CENTER exfend besf wishes fo fhe class of T970 PHYSICIANS PLANNING SERVICE CORP. Group Adminisfrafors For NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF RESIDENTS 81 INTERNS Congrafulaies the Class of 7970 Physicians Planning Service Corp. 7780 Raymond Boulevard Newark, New Jersey 07702 623-0666 Malpracfice Insurance for Physicians, Praciice Loans, Car Purchase Discounfs, Disabilify Insurance, Advice in many Economic Areas, Life Insurance, ST. MARY'S HOSPITAL T35 SOUTH CENTER STREET ORANGE, NEW JERSEY 07005 PROVIDING CLINICAL AFFILIATION FOR NURSING DEPARTMENTS FELICIAN COLLEGE AND RUTGERS UNIVERSITY CORNELL SURGICAL CO. CompIefe Line Medical-Surgical Equipment Supplies 224-6IsT STreeT VVesT New York, N..I. Areo Code 2OI-865-7729 CORNELL FOR SERVICE GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY Medical Sysfems Deparfmenf 52 Commerce Sfreef Springfield, New Jersey 07087 Telephone: 379-4865 Affer Hours Service: 379-4868 Sales and Service: X-Ray equipmenf, Films, Accessories, Cardiac C0mPIIme"f5 Monifors, Pacemakers, Aufomafic Filing Sysfems TV Image Transmission. of PASSAIC GENERAL HOSPITAL P 350 Boulevard ALLERGY LABORATORY SERVICE Passaic, New Jersey 742 CLINTON AVENUE NEWARK, NEW JERSEY ALLERGY TESTING ALLERGENIC EXTRACTS AUTOGENOUS VACCINES COMPLIMENTS of ST. JAMES HOSPITAL 155 Jefferson Sfreef Newark, New Jersey 'i Overlook Hospital Summit, New Jersey Salutes the Graduating Class of The New Jersey College of Medicine and Dentistry ll Q. I CONGRATULATIONS TO THE CLASS OF T970 .- .X ff? Vbiflmb ,NV , 5' I M ff' ifcflaftq-I 5 JERSEY SHORE MEDICAL CENTER-FITKIN HOSPITAL Nepfune, New Jersey A MEMBER COUNCIL OF TEACHING HOSPITALS ASSOCIATION OF AMERICAN MEDICAL COLLEGES me . ,pq-0 42 Ffa 411 ."""'! . X shy: . 1, ml ,K 1 E. .v rl . 3 . . QW .4 'U ak! .,.......x w ? 'R if , ll I "-55' 1 Q , , V I W W Wm, L.......L2.....i,Y .V if .i,.i.w ,1,. N .ggi 4 'GQ J: , 4 Q Q?" Y 14 1 W ' s s. Vi., x .D 2? N. ,I- E. 'c, 4.1 f-1 V 3 .e Ii as pf L- ge .K 72' if f-i ' :k :SJ Pie? 72:1 ,V Ji fx I I , c r N -a .2 213 . M 3:1 Q 4 Jn? pm ,xv I 5 1 "5 T53 -151 gi ' ?'J ffl fi . c 5, 293 1:3 2. "How often have you sailed in my dreams. And now you come in my awaken- ing, which is my deeper dream. Ready am Ito go, and my eagerness with sails full set awaits the wind. Only another breath will I breathe in this still air, only another loving look cast backward, And then I shall stand among you, a seafarer among seafarers." Kahlil Gibran, The Prophet


Suggestions in the New Jersey College of Medicine - Journal Yearbook (Jersey City, NJ) collection:

New Jersey College of Medicine - Journal Yearbook (Jersey City, NJ) online yearbook collection, 1966 Edition, Page 1

1966

New Jersey College of Medicine - Journal Yearbook (Jersey City, NJ) online yearbook collection, 1969 Edition, Page 1

1969

New Jersey College of Medicine - Journal Yearbook (Jersey City, NJ) online yearbook collection, 1970 Edition, Page 9

1970, pg 9

New Jersey College of Medicine - Journal Yearbook (Jersey City, NJ) online yearbook collection, 1970 Edition, Page 182

1970, pg 182

New Jersey College of Medicine - Journal Yearbook (Jersey City, NJ) online yearbook collection, 1970 Edition, Page 43

1970, pg 43

New Jersey College of Medicine - Journal Yearbook (Jersey City, NJ) online yearbook collection, 1970 Edition, Page 44

1970, pg 44

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