New England College of Optometry - Scope Yearbook (Boston, MA)

 - Class of 1933

Page 1 of 58

 

New England College of Optometry - Scope Yearbook (Boston, MA) online yearbook collection, 1933 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 58 of the 1933 volume:

59?-BC-X9QI-DCAX9QIADC'Y9Q!'3CK3CAX9Q!'bC-X9Ql-DCAXQQIADC-X93 1u 1 " 1 B 5 7 ? 7 Ls 3 HUMBLY DJEDHCATIED ima G2 5 DR. THEODORE 1F. KLEHN I 2 PRESHUENT AND REGHSTRAR or THE 5 Q MASSACHUSETTS S1c1H11o101L 7 S 0112 UPTUMIETRY BY E THE CLASS 101111 l,, ff was 5 " 1 A .B 7 T? 9 5 ? E5 LS Z 10 Q Z, 1 S' Z 1 PUBLISHED BY THE UNDERGRADUATES OF S 7 THE MASSACHUSETTS SCHOOL G ,D OF OPTOMETRY 6 Q ZGYJ 5.10 63.7 Q-ID C-SEQ C-119 GYQDQQPLID C-3,7 LID 65.9 C 206831104 .VVV V-V-V VV- VV ...mx A I. 'z'.V,:, VVV V V ,, .. .V VVVVV H XXV. "HV -.,V, V V 'VV V VV' .VVVL ,. V , , lv ' 1 V V V. . '.'VV V V V V Il Y 395: ' .VV 94? fl. ,VY Y , V V V Vp I, V VVV 4x ...f . , V V . V .L . . .V VVVIVV V- VV. V' XIV ' VI -Q .,V V. ,, .V ..J,' V I V, V V V V V - V !'V V V lib: .. ,'V'.w,. .VV V,-V.VV,:.V,7 V4 V V Vw , F VVIVVV 0 . V Ry. .J F :A 4 V ""1V:W X Vu' fxx'Q'lV",V VV 5 .V " 'ull ',' I I' V. 151851, ', .V V 'Vx-'ZW fnq HE. Vqa- ' , VV. VV.-WV 1'- YVVWI Q ,' .ISP '52, .V V V-, .' V.-VV' V' V. V ---'LSL' 'J .L f-aw ,V '.AViV',l VI 1-'V , V. ' ..'V, V 'VIA' ' yi :A'rrN'!?gVj'lV.jf 5 " fuk Vi. WV ,of IVV,,VVATV U'v,1:V! .Nw ,jr ,V 1 V V V- V .VV V lr' , V, VV K. VVV4. -U., I Vw.-V 'j V."-VVVV ,V V V :V 'J'f'21pxf'.V,' .V I 4 V. V Y. :,, .',. V' :VV .1 :V V wa. V , V. ,VN ,I,4, fin-.. V .VV X ,VM H,.,V?.,Vafi 'V .5 V .V :I V, " 5,1 --Q4 AY. VV 'V VV' L':VVVVf'Af!3.Q!' V' ' VY' i' V4--N3 .VV .VVV1 V " l 1,VV,,L."V .mx V. V ' C-'-I "V ,-V.f"wV VVVVV . I ,I V -'-..-.'-1 V - X V V V V -- -- -V-VVVVV, V. V, 2- . V-W-315, V JA VV' -1 'VV . V' c Y?'l5'Y'.V' V-J '-' V ' 'f:g"VqV ,W - 'VV'V "if" ' ',.V -.,gVV1vV-,VW 'VV V I .V . .Y'.,,w.. , XMVVG Q I ' I - V 'V ' '-' VV M 'V .T V' ' -V V' ,. ,V -V ' I, ", .IVVVQ ,.. V. "V,Z"'V. -'I ..'VVV.V'2-.' 'V V. VVVHVK, I.,...,VhV,,V' m,V'.fH .1 V .. V 1 VV 'V' 4. V V VV V ,VV V If ,I N , V 155.-Q.. fl'.-V ' . V --V. ' "-21 PVQQZQV1-V V , V In ,V,Vg.ju- ,VVV - ' V- -V V ' 'VV 'J ' W, V'V V. V V1 -V V . .V-V -V H .XV I , 5. 2 V V ,. Va 7.11217 V-ww.: VVV1 .VV N Y V. .x V I V 'V' , L."-35,f!1V"1:V.l. ' 'V V V ' - V. 'V' VVVV1: I V H VV -'V"- ',',, ' VVVV -'- ,, I V ,',lLVV,4-,K '."', VVVV V I ' - V .V 1 V VU , .' .1 V V ,. . , V . ,V . V ,H .A I V VV,-V R 4 ' ,V V. V . V V 1 ,VV 'QV 'VVVQ VV lc., V V ' V Vx. V 'Vx VV4 VXI 1 . - V .V F V 1 V ' ' V . V r V VV V H ' VM V , , 5' E' . X ,1. " ' M ' "V - , VVVVVVVC, V .VV VV . 'Ll K 'V V X ' 5 ' VV 'If-fl' ,,' ' 'V . VV- VV , V rj. ' 'VU' V, V1 VV ,I VVVVVVNI .V MVV .VNV ' - VV .4 'V1""' ' V.V :,.V.VVL,V -1-V I-V ,VVV-VV , V,,' I .y5,,1 S' . V. V V. V- VVVV V55:V,b'l V-'VVV' -VV' U : "VV-' -I VV ,Lv ,'.' L-x,VV V ffmbfm V V V - "'..V.5"fPra?L,V:.g.7' 'ff EV " VV ' .VI ,VV TJ 'R .'f'.' V' -' u V A ...JV mmm. V ' V. .VV fj x 'K V WV "'l"4,' 'A-"" f V . I X, A VI- -V .Vul-,G .fy 437, .A.V V I, fl Y I V. VVVV VV,'V,V- HV ,V j V55 .Vin U 4V VV V: V ,l f ry 3509! 1 'VV VV " "SVU -WNV, V V. V VV V 1, IVV: I 5 V' '- "Will lfITi'MXHll.'.'V THE SCOPE Foster Namias, O. D. Physiological and Praciical Optics 4 Guy C. Blodgett, B. S. Theoretic Optics .l ,- Miss Alyce McCabe Secrelary to Registrar l lFa1o1u1llIt'y O.- l avid Y. Cohill, M. B., M. D. Dr. Albcrt E. Sloane Embryology and Pathology and Hygiene Physiology l l Dr. Theodore F. Klein Dean Registrar Theoretic and Practical Oplometry August A. Klein. M. D. Dr. Ralph Green Dr. Wilhelmina Svendscn Perimelry and Theoretic Anatomy Optometry l2l X uf,xX uw. ,HX ,. 1 ' - ku?-X 1. ,-V11 ' 1 I'X"p 'fff .nv-f'X A 1' X '41 1: ".3ME.f-dw , -fl- 2 1 :'i 'I!hx " 1' 'gXXQ'-gp' ,, , 1-. - N1-',. ,1 , M 1:---W 1.1 wx- Karr:- - -2 .,: -1 ,,, ,V .111 'f iafffyii' . -Cy ,ll 1 'I ' x 1 ,.W. . , ' 1 . . . . ik' 'f ' 4. f H X . . yn-, 'X' ' A , , , . . , . . , I -. ,, ,,. , , 1 K 'I , - . Y . .XJ , X. , , 1 . 5 1 ., r XY,- ,X X X X , ,, , , . . , I X 2 1 " 'bww V 1 4- .f. M ' X1 1 , . . , , 1, X , X . 'v L Hn: -, I ' ph , ' ..sX.., 4 A.. 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X . . Jn. IX .114 new , 1 1 1 -14.151 , -1 1,121 ,. 1' -1 11- j5g, .1 ""' 1 1 - 1 1 " . .'l9' X '11 X , XX'.'-x Tivldw , .,,'X f3"" X X ' X 1.4-. X -P.M,,'1 JXP, X., X XXX X.X X . '.XXXX'1t.X'gX.1 'Arn A 'lf'-. 1 Winn, -'iw A .- x"aUrvT1f I XX X X ,- 1 , hiya! X , . xy . ' H1 H. XX .X 41 , , , ,. Q V uf' 'R .w .115 1 'X l'g:'f5 X 1 . 'rf1.'!.'1:X 9' ' 11'-5 V .Ls ,t,' ' " ' :5 , 1' f 4 4l'X A n s Sl.. " 'N , 11.1 .I'f1-',.,,.,H- 1' ww M, , . '59 -,gW"1':'1:,g'l x -, -15' . ' ' ,.,1.5. bv'LuQ'l ' - ful X 1X,X X '. u 1"' , ' 1-'1 1 , ,. ,11,.,fr .t X. X , , 1,1f,,g, 11s..y.. .X XI - , 1 . vi- 1... W ' ,, 41.6 x , X -.Sui If ' WX 'fyfk-' 1241? 1"Ii,L','4f 1 ,, j'11,.l, " lk' C' 1!""'11". .52 s 'X 'I 1 r ' ',',' .1--J1. ' l'l'r'r 11. ,, . y- , ,,,, , LV u' 5 r.. ,ws - I ff aS1.f.114 1 . .-I .will I THE SCOPE Co1rtiooQNuolea1r Pathways for Eye Movements PAUL S. CLINE The study of the ocular innervational pathways have always held the in- terest of the investigator of neuro-anatomy, not only on account of the intimate relationship existing between the organ of sight and brain through its embryo- logical, anatomical and functional connections, but also because of the fact, that in disorders of the nervous system, ocular symptoms, principally as disturbances of movement or coordination, are in the great many of the cases, present. Since the memorable experiments of Vogt, anatomists have written vol- umes on the localization of function of the brain cortex. A motor area in the precentral gyrus, a somesthetic region in the parietal lobe, a visual center in the calcarine region, etc., have revealed themselves to the indomitable perse- verance of men of the calibre of Schaefer and Luciani, Sherrington and Horsley, Bernheimer and Dejerine, Tilney and Riley and so forth. It must be remembered that a cortical center for ocular movements, best thought of as a physiological rather than an anatomical entity, serves for the purpose of initiating the efferent or motor impulse to the nuclei controlling the innervation of a set of conjugate muscles associated obviously in a particular con- jugate movement, and does not preside over a single nerve or a single muscle. To the present day, three sites have been uncovered in the cerebral cortex, which are engaged in ocular gyrations. One exists in the frontal lobe, another in the occipital lobe and iinally one is located in the temporal lobes of the cerebrum. The oculogyratory area in the frontal lobe occupies a small area in the second and third frontal convolutions of the both hemispheres. This region is purely for the execution of eye-movements dependent upon the volition of the individual. Stimulation of this area results in a conjugate movement of the eyes and the head to the opposite side, vertical ocular movements. convergence and clilatationof the pupil. The frontal centers in each lobe are thereforeantagonistic, The cortical center in the occipital lobe covers quite an area of cortex, Stimulation of the angular gyrus of one side results in a conjugate movement to the opposite side, convergence, pupillary dilatation and vertical movements. Schaefer. Horsley, Bernheimer and others have shown that stimulation of the an- terior part of the angular gyrus, resulted in binocular elevation, while a similar stimulation in the posterior part of this convolution resulted in depression ofthe both eyes. The above results cannot only be produced by stimulating the angular gyrus, but also by exciting a large area in the lateral surface of the occipital lobe, and even its medial surface. The occipital center is purely a reflex center, and serves for the completion of the attention reflex arc, having for its afferent links, the optic impulses traveling to the calcarine area. The center in the temporal lobe is situated in the posterior part of the su- perior temporal gyrus 4Foersterj, while even some advocate a center located in the parietal lobe. This temporal region serves for the execution of ocular rota- tions dependent upon acoustic stimuli, and is thought to be purely a reflex center. If a center exists in the parietal lobe it probably serves for ocular con- jugate innervation in response to a somesthetic or perhaps equilibratory stimulus. Stimulation of the temporal center results in the same movements as is ob- tained by stimulating the occipital centers. l3l .1., W-1 .-.v.-, 1 , ,..'...- ,1,..,-,, -- 1,x - 1. ., .I .I, 1. 1.9" 1 jI,g'kg5I11'fgfI 'Mfg - l1,P'A" 1141 '11 .ff .1-.1-.3H"I'j--Y I. 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'I ,md I: THPIQI' UI' I '.vl,. Q, 4 1 ' 5371" 'H ' I I' -'1' 11 1 -4- r .-I "U" J .. .J A fu V W T1 . Ls V1 .1 .I II I .1 lv." 1' 'a-.',11' A?'43'I,4a,1J,1 J' 1 1. -. . A .I WI L11 'f Viikmmf, Tl.. . I4,,. 1 .lim fMiF',,5,!V A A 1 L 10 .. .111 '1u-Q71 231.1 IQWI ' 9 . 1 1111 ' A vi ' we 1" "0-'1 1.1 .V ..I ,1 . 1.--a,m mW Ir A " 1I.gI 1 ' 1-. . v . ' 111 1'V Yr . . 1-- sr ' 10 .4 I11,1. f I" 1' 11' 5-1 "W-3 "? 1 . H- 1. ' ,TW "1 r'4l,,, . .I .I. , . ,I 1. , L .- I III I.g,w 1 Iggd. JL 1 FI ,I . 1. 1- .1+:ga..1, .If-Iii' I!1Ii .AI f " ' . llwjqw . zu' U 13, .MIMA1 . ,I .Ii II- I.1x..1. 111-f. 1. 1 0 v . 1" ' .1, " .1 dug.- -' mr F ff I1. -'J -13.1-W n X v r '1. 11. ' .r .QI ',', II,1.1 " 1 1 5 '- 'm1f'. 'M 51411111--i V THE SCOPE - FUNCTIONAL DIFFERENCES In the course of investigation the following results were obtained: a. a lesser stimulation of the frontal center was required to effect a cer- tain conjugate movement than if the corresponding occipital or temporal cen- ters were stimulated. b. a similar intensity of stimulus resulted in quicker eye movements when the frontal area was stimulated, than if either of the other two was sti- mulated. c. destruction of the frontal centers resulted in an abolition of the voli- tional pathways for conjugate eye movements, but Hxation of gaze was possible due to the mediation of the efferent impulses originating in the occipital lobe. d. fixation depends upon the occipital lobe, while direction depends upon the frontal lobe. e. destruction of both calcarine areas, abolished convergence. CORTICO-NUCLEAR PATHWAYS l,Suprasegmental Pathwaysb lUpper Motor Neuronj The nuclei of the eye muscles are connected with the frontal cortex not by the regular pyramidal system, but by two systems of fibers of what Dejerinc terms the aberrant pyramidal system. known as the subthalamic and peduncular components of the aberrant pyramidal tracts. The axones of the cortical cells pass downward through the corona ra- diata in the pyramidal system, pass through the genu of the internal capsule into the mesencephalon or mid-brain. Here the fibers destined for the oculomotor and trochlear nuclei detach themselves from the remainder of the aberrant pyramidal system and pass to the nuclei of the opposite side, while the fibers destined for the abducens nucleus pass down further in the stem to the upper pontine region and pass to the opposite abducens nucleus. The subthalamic group is principally concerned with vertical movements and is associated with the muscles of the upper eyelid and the frontalis. It leaves the aberrant pyramidal system in the subthalamus, and passes backward to reach the superior colliculus. Here the fibers are redistributed and sent to the nuclei in- nervating the muscles concerned in vertical movements. The peduncular group is concerned with lateral movements of the eyes, and leaves the aberrant pyramidal system in the cerebral peduncle as two sets of fibers, known as the pes lemnisci profundus, and the pes lemniscis superficialis. The pes lemnisci profundus is situated in the basis mesencephali dorso- medial to the occipito-parieto-temporo-ponto-cerebellar tract, and is the deep layer of the aberrant pyramidal system which blends with the median lemniscus or Hllet. The pes lemnisci superficialis is situated in the basis of the mid-brain dor- sal to the fronto-ponto-cerebellar tract. These two bundles descend for a short distance in the medial fillet and proceed dordally to the tegmentum to the center for lateral movements which is believed to be the nuclus of Fuse. which is part of the triangular nucleus. From here fibers are relayed to the nuclei concerned with lateral movements. Convergence movements have been produced by stimulating an area in the frontal lobe, and also by exciting a part of the lateral convexity of the oc- cipital lobe. The aberrant pyramidal system also sends branches to the spinal accessorv nerve as well as to the upper segments of the spinal cord for the associated move- ments of the head and eyes. l4l 1 II1 W ' V .. af-41' M-.1 lfnt, 'A':'1iMl1g 51537. Mft?-1. ,,1.1,,- A U N , 331 "K ,A.1"",b1, N105 ".1:-11 1 '11 ,df 5.liaw.:-w -Q 114,-'.1.1'.1.1j .' -5- .... L1 ' v -, rx uv!! wt ww "'...., 4. 1, ,, ' , ' ' -111- . b .,.' 'I1 -- L t ' . 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" 1 4 1 11, 4.1, V - .- 1 ' X 1, ,.. .MQ 1 I I . K 1- , -111. 1,1 - Q A, 1 ,..,-,,Av:,. , , V V 'WWF , -of 1 H ' 1-I H fy ,' .YIQ 1 - 414.415 ' 1 , :L 1 -IL' A I '11 I "UT .' 0, 1' H' .. 1 - f W? M ' ' , 1' ,, i-, . 4. ' - I lm' V 'jg 'I11 1 1 ,: Q fl M1 -. V 1 W 52 . , A l.'1 1. W f 'ez 3- " Q "1 " " , -'-1, 1. 1 ,11.1. g,- f-E11,,.o 1, 1 1 1. , ,1-, ' n 'K W , I , ,, 1 M111 1 my-rgwyy. :lf I . , 1' ,1 -1 W H I 'rl-15471 , I U 1 1 N 1 1 -1,3 I ,, 1 JWUR 11 " - 1 . ' , 1 , - 1 .-,v ' Q 1n""r.1 ' ' gf 1111 A ,'1'- ' 1. 11 , 'v' .41 1-.' -"MH-.1'1p"l, 1 " .'1, ' , ' 1 .- Qhlnv' , 11,1Lg. ,-1 I 1 , 1 1 1 1 .' 1 1 "x,'-V 1 7' fi if ' 'SHN -ir? 1 fi, 1 -Av 1 J f,'1'4 . ' 'D 1 . .11 av ,411 - ,r ll-XE?-I'1,9 l uclxfy, X' I 1 I V.l11'1-'V H' 'f'11 1" I ' . 1 1 1 1-Q, 11 111 . ,' - ,,, .u ,',1ya-,M 1 .1 1 111: 1 ' , 1, , , . 1 V 1 X 1 au 1 1 . 1 1 ' 151 Pill' 51? Wlllx 'UNIT ' im 5' T", 11 1 94:1 THE SCOPE Relatively little is known about the oculogyratory control in the occipital lobe. and practically nothing about the center in the temporal lobe. The cortico- nuclear tracts from the occipital lobe pass through the corona radiata over the occipital radiation to the white substance of the cerebrum, and thence to the ocu- logyric center by way of the posterior longitudinal bundle of the tecto-bulbar tracts, which innervate the abducens nucleus, which in turn innervates the op- posite oculomotor nucleus. Bernheimer in a famous experiment has shown that the iibers of the angular gyrus decussate ventral to the cerebral aqueduct, since total extirpation of the superior colliculi did not interfere with ocular move- ments. These nbers after decussation pass to the opposite abducens nucleus, which in turn by means of the posterior longitudinal bundle and communicating fibers innervates the dpposite oculomotorius. Fibers from the temporal cortex are believed to pass down with the tem- poro-pontine group which pass through the corona radiata, thence to the su- perior colliculus, and onward to the oculogyratory nuclei. Some however, are of the opinion that the fibers from the temporal lobe pass to the pons communi- cating with the abducens nucleus of the opposite side, which sends fibers by way of the posterior longitudinal bundle to the opposite oculomotor nuclei. REFERENCES Tilney and Riley "Forms and Functions of the Nervous System" Archives of Neurology and Psychiatry, 1930 Archives of Ophthalmology, Nov. and Dec. 1930 Archives of Ophthalmology, 1932 Ranson "Anatomy of the Nervous System" Zoethout "Physiological Optics" ff? P57 - ff'2tPEGh5Qzi05!.IS3' -wwrrgimw I 7696 'Eli-EQ' I5I Huw - . 'Y KIM rl .. N-sa "1 Q' . :.r n yu I ,, an X I ' V n asf?"-' M,-1""u 'L ff .4 .' 1 I5 . 1 cl -. -Elm , -.5 '5' ,J TSW . A. W 'Ii-Ami . dv , 5" -'N 2.21-. A .. qumxr: ... Y ll 0 Wh I " 'Ms 1' ' 4, ' U". N 4 9 WM' Q lm ' 5 370.5 " Nj, 1' 1 .3 .I 'H ily. w ' V' , df, 3' 'A "W ,'-'I u!'H, Q, Mg- , I' " 'UT "f - .'F.,!i X' ' J? rw. ,. -, 'wr . .. . , -- "' ffyfiu , Zvi- "-"' ' x 'H A f' V L " 'Y"','4w ,I ',f 1,,,l A " i4F'JC' 'IH-Ill THE SCOPE THE SCOPE STAFF Bach Row: L. to R. D. Gribbin. E. Haynes, S. Litwak, C. Rowan, J. O'Brien First Row: L. to R. R. Hyland, P. Cline, H. Simons. The Scope Staiilll' Editor-in-Chief, PAUL S. CLINE Senior Associate Editor. H. EDGAR SIMONS Business Manager, DEARBORN L. SHAW Senior News, ELVIN B. I-IAYNES Joke Editor, HYMAN GOLDBERG Junior Associate Editor, CLYDE A. SEALE Associate Business Mgr., STUART WRIGHT Alumni Editor, SONIA LITWAK Junior News, DONALD GRIBBIN Circulation Manager, JOHN O'BRIEN Assistant Circulation Manager, CHARLES ROWAN ' Faculty Adviser, ALYCE M. MCCABE l6l ' X ' re l ' Us K . 1 X X.4X X. XX,fXX XX X X 1... '-'S "'X X XX ": X .X X X-X X .. 4 X' .' '7X--M511 ff X.XX,- - XIXXXXXX X WX- ,XXXX 'X "XX X'-XX. 6,1 XXX X X"XX XX..' Xi.-. 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XX X XX XXXXXXXX X X X X44 X X XXX X' t4 X X .. X .X X X X X X XX,-X.4X4X.XXX ww XX X X ' X ' X X .X X 1 X ' ' .X XXXX' 'L I X X X X 4 X WX X'f.6'tXz. X X: 1'X XX 4 X' -,XJ . 4 4 X f X ' XX4,Xr- 'EXXX X' nu -4 ' XX X X XX X X XX X . XX XXXX V34 X. XX.XXXX 4 X X ,X X . ' X X . . -XX: , .--X., "4.XX:- IX XXX' XX thru ,XX X X 4 X X XXXJXXA4XXX,.X X X ,Xu uXl,..X4H,f 'X ..X 4.4 X X-.I X4 .. 'XL4 4 X X 4 XXX . X X . .XXX '. X XX XM XXXNXXXXX- Xl-XX fi . XXXXXX X.X.XX JIXIXXX .XX.X.X' XX QW ' XX' " X X XX' XXX4-X X - .XX ,XXXX -QXL3 X :HX-git' " -I 'XXX X , X X ', , X 4 1.-. X . X - 1J1.'aXX,1.X, 14. XX ,W X X v,,X , .XX q ' ' X" X 44 ' X X X I ' I ' ,' ' fv X.X.X 'LU 4. l X X X X X . X XX' X X ' ,X XXX " fl XX X Xs'X X4.. 'X X XL X X 'X' r. X X' X XXX 'X, 4- .XX X f . U .ln I - X X X . X 'X -'X X I-' X' HX" 'Y' X I r ' . ' . X X . X X r XX, X .X ' X 'l X " 1' . X 4 XXXX X X X X X X Q X - .' N 'X ' ' 4 ' :XX X X , X' XX X 4 . 4 X X X X . X X4 HX FX ' X 3X' ' XX t "' 'X I 'gg X X4 X"XNX'X"' -417.74114 ' M ' X 4X 4X XXX.-, X, . X Xu- X 4 . Xv-- - X' ,XX XX: "HX 'V' "1" 4' fl ' ' " l "I 5' -X ' ?"'V"4 1 Xvu ..4X,-.LXXN -I' - ' - Xl' X -X XX XX. 4' 'X . Xv , V .,..XX X X 1 .L ' v J 'XX-X -'X' X X' "' .lb XX Q. ' 4.-XXXXX m4 14.14 Mg, X 4 X-XX XX X ..,X X.Xv.XX-XX4r,x X- X X Xy X.-. -4 ' XXX XXXX P,.4 X "X4. XXj 4' 'XXX .,l X-" X X ' ' " . X, XX '.XL- .. X' - ',',4,,4, X 4 X X' -'XX ' X ' "' -md. --X - gX,HX'.'-' " IX 'NYJ 'Af "15'EXg-f Xe' X Xv . ' I X 1' X ' . -. X. X Xl X X- :XX X' I ' X' XX . X. X X .XXX X.1X- - X. X X N X 4X,,X1X X' 'X XXX,5,.XXX-" XXXXXXXQX X73 XHXXXX -- .. X X , 44 XXX X X Xen. 5 " .1-'1 '.XXXi ".'fJ X' X X ' ' X -- 5 X X'XX X'X - 'X I X I XXXXX - X X. X. .. X4 , XX J ' X 'Tull' LMP ' -'X' X-' . ',, '.: 'X.X5.' l I ' ' nv .' XX 'X f v X X- mX , X " X SX 24, . ' - 'X.X XX. ,.5'X1.l X., ,X.q. XXX.. 5' XXX, X 444 X X X .XX .XX X 'x1"X"'ri A . X .Xp-:XXX XX X 'XX ..XI'X"' mi" X' IX ll-- huwl' will THE SCOPE History of the Senior Class By D. L. SHAW To-night we have reached that goal toward which we have been striving for the past two years and we pause, on this occasion, to reflect upon the mem- ories we have in common: the common aims and desires which have made our school life a most interesting and enjoyable enterprise. In Sept. 1931, forty-three members enrolled at the Mass. School of Op- tometry to begin their optometric studies and to acquire that knowledge and background so essential to a successful optometric career. Both the nature and number of our studies gave us early assurance of an arduous but interesting task. Early in the nrst semester our class was formally organized and the fol- lowing were elected to office: Pres.-Arthur Minehan of Dorchester, Mass.: Vice Pres.-John Bedell of Salem, Mass.: Sec.-D. L. Shaw of Bangor, Me.: Treas. -Raymond Perkinson of Lynn, Mass. Early in October the Pi Omicron Sigma fraternity held its pledge week. This occasion proved to be very amusing to all non-'participants and many members of our class were fortunate to become members of this organization. The mid-year examinations instilled very strongly in our minds the ne- cessity for hard work, and we returned from our Christmas vacation determined to surmount the formidable obstacles which stood between us and our goal. The first social function in which our class participated was in the nature of a formal dance sponsored by the combined Junior and Senior classes, on Feb. 25 at the hotel Statler. This dance was thoroughly enjoyed by all present. Our class dance in April was well attended and supported. We assumed the role of pioneers in that we were the first class to sponsor a like function in a night club. It was strictly informal and the occasion elicited much favorable comment. The annual visit to the plant of the American Optical Co. at Southbridge ended our activities for the year. Thus we had reached the half-way mark in our school life, and we dis- banded for the summer months with a grim feeling of satisfaction in our ac- complishments both from a scholastic and social viewpoint. In the fall of 1932 the class of '33 reassembled to resume old friendships, and to complete the knowledge of a most complicated and scientific study, op- tometry. This year the senior class has been especially fortunate in having Dr, Na- mias added to an already excellent teaching staff. As a result we feel more fully equipped, from the point of knowledge imparted to us, to follow the science of optometry. At the first class meeting of the year Ralph Gaeta of Union City, New Jersey, was elected president, D. L. Shaw of Bangor, Me. vice-president, Robert Hyland of Pittsfield, Mass. secretary and E. Perry Truesdell of Somerville, Mass. treasurer. The most commendable and enjoyable social achievement of the year was our Senior banquet, held at the hotel Kenmore. Our guest speaker for the eve- ning was Dr. Howard Doane, formerly the chairman of the Mass. Board of Ex- aminers in Optometry. Dr. Doane's contribution proved most befitting of the occasion and was fervently approved and appreciated by all present. Dr. Klein and other members of the faculty extended words of advice and their best wishes to the graduating class and this most enjoyable occasion is now only a memory. We extend our sincere thanks to our president. who was responsible for the suc- cess of our final social enterprise. Our associations have been all too short, our friendships and memories of our school life we will always cherish. l7l I J K ll. 'X V? Y? 'x '-N14 . .ff L '- 'F . .I, ip fi Q," 4 mr-i xv-V -vw bf ! I U, wx.. 1 ,-gn., wp-,. ,-www ' X 'V"L"m,xvwul-'N-.4QQ ' we. A, I "' "W ,N '. '.m' H: fl ' .,. -w,..1' xx .4 .W V. I LS -1 n . mm, H 13 .,,,.,' , A M " " Www. K v - 11.1 1.-:..f'W 1 W .1 A Y ,.,4,-Tr I"-: '. .,:Q,,!.g1i -41,5 f "',.M'. JJ' 4: ,I ' xl- v ' . . I I , .' MJ V. Q ' . '3 I' '." VM- - 'um-max 'W ' " U 1 . W Y' 1nf'1..:!. X v. vm -fn, , -'4"'.Qf , 'IL 'f ' ' . V .'-"'q-4v ' X 'iw .If , 'qw-11" ,Q . '1-, A' - W, ,W fi:-"f, Ng" " '. , . A jf' I 5, QA L' TVN' "yup fa"'f x ' ' ,,,.., ' 'xx ' , .. ,U ,., I , ,.f,x., .,,,g 1 ., x- - ' -, ., -lm!! . .lv Y- "'-l,.':'1ym ,, wh ! -ml-"' , I -M. , .K 7 'WE -1-.. If U5i1',1""-4538 f' ' "W .-"'f I .H VR :iff fifb-A+' ' 1 ' K 1 1 343 ',..2.4.! Whiz, N R, . ,gf ,- M, , ak Qkffgf if, ,I ' ,fu ,, ' A ",' r,,. .14 , ,1, ,X . K "1 1 fx-'ew 21 W... . , . ,V 41, , . " ' . 1, 14 V H412 f M . ., ,, nl-- 'r VYIWVAKE. Hlahhl'K" Wm: THE SCOPE C. NILS BLOM--"Chick" Sewell, N. J. C. Nils believes that classes should start at 10 A. M., because he is of the opinion that the gray matter works better at a later hour Gifted with a sense of humor. aipleasant per- sonality, C. Nils should make a name for himself. GEORGE P. BUCKLEY 166 Brooks Ave., Arlington, Mass. Pi Omicron Sigma Cheerful, smiling, and serious in turn. George is the champion bridge player of the class. George and Donders believe that the rc- duction of myopia is best effected by drinking better and more milk. LEONARD M. CALLAHAN-Hcdlu 80 Curtis Ave., Dalton. Mass. Pi Omicron Sigma '33 ,,, Our young student from Daltonis a real worker. A plugging student. a willing Frater- nity member, "Cal" should do his bit to make his nickname even more famous. NATHAN CIVEN Z3 l-lansborough St.. Dorchester, Mass. Civen is a creditable student. A graduate in chemistry and biology, he undertook the study of optometry with great success. Phlega matic in temperament, Nathan is assured ot success. x I a 7 ' g I, r , . ' ,ul Yr.. !.,,,- x ,H u,',512"'1'-'wif 1 A 4 1 - Hg. I Hlgfs' H ., , ,. , XMI ., 'H , t,:?M. 5 5? Mp 1. ww 'i 5' ' ' K" " 1'f'Qi: ws: , . ' , .wg I-iw 'N ' Q ww ' W-X ' , E f. 21 A' AI , H '.7Q'Ir!2EigQi ,U if -'A'-:x i ' fldlf if- ' 4 '1'f'.' if 6:1 4 1 , ,A -N TI' Q' .' ' im. 1- Y1l"19JL U' A' 5' 1' 5 il A 1, . . .H ,tw K .a 'Q . . .,1 , ,,.. 1,4 V W . N pi ,. 455-A - Ll! .0 'li . . .,, W , ,, 1,- v ff 40 .,"'!1 'J I , 4 1 H wr , H., , .. , A . A 'F 1 , , , 'J , X, ., 7: , , .YM . -H Q 1 x 11' v 1. wg' lg .1 .. x 1- ', v :..,, 1, J. " . Y X my .' 1 THE SCOPE PAUL S. CLINE 4 Almont St., Mattapan. Mass. "A scholar among scholars." Paul is the student of the class, and he won the respect and admiration of all his classmates. Success will be yours. Paul. and you will be a credit to the profession as you have been to the school. Editor-in-chief of the Scope '33 Valedictorian '33 Graduating magna cum laude ABRAHAM CODISH-"Abe" 127 Howland St., Roxbury, Mass. Abc is noted for his prowess in nullifying the arguments of others. Possessed of a sten- torian voice. he should rise to the heights of optomctry. We expect a lot from you. so don't disappoint us, "Abe". GEORGE DILLON-"Dill" 12 Westbrook St., Milford, Mass. Our young friend from Milford. is quiet and capable. He proclaims not, and he covets not. An indefatigable worker and a loyal Frat member George is our idea of a perfect com- bination. Note his smile. Pi Omicron Sigma '32-'33 RALPH B. GAETA 287 Bergenline Ave.. Union City, N. J. A sincere friend. a good scholar. and of a disposition that has made him so competent as our class president. Ralph is a lover of anatomy, fast cars, and fast hgures. You should see him solve those T. O. problems. Senior class president '33 Guardian of the Exchequer P. O. S. '33 Pi Omicron Sigma '32333 1010 1 1 ' F l' 1 1 -1 1 11. 1' ' ' 'mt' 1 -1 1 . V 113,.f' '11 1 3H'.11'14,11. 1 1 ' 'Q A '51, ' .,1,1 ,31 ,- 11 ,11 - -111,-' H.. ,Q 11 ' 1 X 111,11 'r-k' 1 1 --rv.. 1 K ' D1 1 11 1 ' r1j1 11-'Q-'1.':, ' 1' 1 . 4'1. 1 1 I-H -11:7 1 , 1. 1M 1 11 1 1 11 1 X 1 fl 1 1.1111 '1 1 Y ' qv 1. 1 11111 I '1'1 W1 1 , 1 " 11',g-','1.:'11' ' 1 1.1 , .y 1 ' 11 11iu '1 V11 1 1 11 153.1 . 4..N1 L. 11 1 f 1 5 lg , :L 1 f'1'i'51" ' ' 1 '11' 1' .I1 'T 1,.' 1 1.111 11 k ,1 1113, ' '.,'41 ' ' 111.1 1, .,H11 X - ""11'1. 11 11 11 : 11' 'Q ,1 1, "'.1 1 1 1 .11 In V11! 1. 1 ".. 1' 11 '111 1 MN. 1 .1 1 11, 1 1. 1 1 1 1, . L11 'ul f , 11 1 .I 1 1 111 1.1 . X 1 11 11,115 11-1 '1 1'-"- , 11 1 1 1 15 1 ' 1-7'1111:' . .11 1 X1 .1 11 111.11 .1 1. 1 1 "V - 1 W I1' - 111 N3',,' 1 4 ,1 1. 1I11.1f1- ' 1 ' "' X1 1 1 -'11' '.'QF ' ",'1fr' !1 ,H 1 1 J 1.,l.l5, .'1 1 , 7 11, 1,1 11 ' .1 1 ' 1 1 11 -'I 1 1 - 1 ' 1- 111 151061, ' 1 '1 1 MV,1!1.y1. 11'1.1U1 M 11 N ' 11111 5 A - 1 ' ,111,' 14' 4' 1 "1. ' ' .1 . .1 1,1111 '1.6 ', '. . 11-'1t.111Ng,1' 1111 11!1,','1 ,1 ' ' 91111 '. 111 A . N! "1 V11 1 1 1 .1 1 1 11 Hula! Ua- ,- 11 m 11 . . 1 11, 1 X ,fL.-'1 11 ' 1 '1' 1 1? im- fl 13515. MX 1' 'i'.'Vt. 1.117 lf111'C1""l'ElTRi2'i THE SCOPE JOSEPH GILEFSKY-"Gil" l7 Starbird St., Malden, Mass. Joe is the smiling member of the class Gifted with this inimitable smile. Joe is sure to smile his way thru to the pinnacle of suc- cess. Always a willing worker, and a earnest Frat member. Pi Omicron Sigma '32-'33 HAROLD M. GOLDEN 35 Plymouth Rd., Malden, Mass. Quiet and unassuming, Harold seeks no laurels. A hard-working member of the frat- ernity and in his work, Harold is .due to shine in his profession. Frat dance committee Pi Omicron Sigma '32-'33 JOSEPH HAGERTY 8 Capen St., Dorchester, Mass. Joe is a gifted writer of examination papers. A good student possessed of a cheer- ful disposition. and an insuperable earnest- ness, Joe is a credit to the class. ELVIN B. HAYNES-"Sll'r71" 14 Burnside St., Lancaster, N. H. Slim has been a real friend to all his class- mates. Quiet and sincere, in his work and always dependable. We extend our best wishes to you. and the little girl from Arkansas. Vk'hat a dull place Boston would have been, Slim, without Dana Hall! Pi Omicron Sigma Senior News Editor, Scope Staff Fraternity Refreshment Committee. l10l , 1 X1 1 1 1 1 1 1 19 1 U1 1 111, 1 1 1 ' A 1-1. ' .1" 1 ' ' 1 1- 1: 11 , K .,1 1 1 1 1 1 , 1 ' 1'11Q11EgUZ'E' . 1 11 51 ,1 14111 f 1 I 1 ' I ...Q 41,1 ., ,, .,1 A H! 1 1 xv-C, 12:11.11 111' 171.11 I :p 1Jlf.F5"'T:1ff 43311H"1 .-f1. . ne . 1 '-: 1-' -. 1 ..11. ,1.ar111,1R .11--- A -11' ,-.11-1 ,:lf'. V131 2211.15 1 '-. -11, 14 11.11, '11 11331 . ' ,111 91,41-11,+. 1.'.Q.?1 15 11-1 551111311 ' ' 'f.'f1',,'1 'i 'lj gf cg: Q11 1 .1 1fA,1U'1.1.i 'pa' 'ri'Z'.12."2i11.' 1. 1,11 ' ...ff-'Q!'1.xi'2:1l3.11421: A . . 'I .,1. "'35 ' .1 ' " ' A ' "1:f.-1-Q. '::r.'11'. 1-f' .. '1' ' 1 1 1 1 1111 '.1,:11'1jf' 1-Q",-'11,' . 'Y"C1 1 ' 1 V 1 ' ' 1.1 1 11". 1 11 1 11. Y 1 .V 1 1 1 1 1 .M 5. 1 17 1 1 I 4 1 1 1 11 11 '1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 A 1 . 1 1,.1 5. ,.' y . . I' -1',. 1 -. ,M , 111 -,-', M . 1, .4 1 1 1 11. 1 11 K . .,1' , L11 II' .,,11 1 . Y 17g . .ul 1 -1. 1 1 1.4 . 4.1 - 1'-1 51. .1 . 1.1, 1111 ' 1 u' -1 1111 ' 1 1 ,E 1 1.1. 11 11. 1 1 1 1,11 l 1 .1 1,,1 11, 1' ' 1 1 1 1 1. .,1 1 1 1 4 'MII 1111. 1 1 I .gl ,. 11. -,.11 - :fl 11 , ..11. 11 1 , .. 1 1 1 ,'. . 1 4'1 1 1 ..i11,,11 1' 'J M1111 1 f,n:.'1 1 1 1 1,1111 1 1,.1- ,,,- ,5 1, ij 1 !:1,1d.:,111 .1 ,1.,4" ..,"1' 1 . '.1'. ,11 nuff 11.1 .. 1.41.11-.1 .1-11, 1.5.5, ".1.-1 1 1 ' 1 .11 111.-1"'5' 'If' lf' .2vT1'1XVL'-. LV- ' " ' 'rVli1VMllRlII THE SCOPE ROBERT C. HYLAND-"Bob" 345 Elm St., Pittsfield, Mass. Bob is a leader and a worker, and could al- ways be depended upon to do his share whether it be the Scope. the Fraternity. or the Class. XVe will always remember your ini- mitable impersonation of Bing Crosby, Bob. Junior News Editor '32 Editor-in-chief-emeritus of the Scope Pi Omicron Sigma '32,-'33 Vice Chancellor, P. O. S. '33 Class Secretary '33 NIALCOLM K.-XYE-"Mal" 481 Gravesend Ave.. Brooklyn, N. Y. Mal is our idea of a perfect business man whether it be clothing or Optometry. Possessed of an insatiable mania for collecting a-ll sorts of knowledge. "Mal" should be an authority on something or other in the coming years. Pi Omicron Sigma '32-'33 SONIA J. LITWAK-"Sonny" 522 N. Main St., Fall River, Nlass. Sonia deserves the utmost credit for her cndeavors. Under the handicap of being in this country only a few years. she has done well. Sonny was instrumental in making the sorority a Ngo". President o Alpha Omicron Sigma Sorority Alumni Editor of Scope. Dance Committee. WARIlEN R. LOVERING 12 Evergreen Ave., Somerville. Mass. Vkfarrcn is the sphinx of the class. Perfect- ly capable in every respect. Warren chooses the background in preference to publicity Warren is certain to make the grade. Pi Omicron Sigma '32-'33 Graduating cum laude llll . l 1 THE SCOPE 21 ARTHUR NUNEHAN-UAF!" 71 Rosewood St.. Mattapan, Mass. Art is the athlete of the class. Possessed of looks. brains and ability. Art is out to make himself known. Among his accomplishment: is a new green door downstairs. Success to you. Art. Graduating cum laude. President of the Junior Class '32 GERTRUDE FRANCIS MONOGHAN-'iGQrI" 335 John St.. So. Amboy. N. J. Gert is the coy member of the class. Good- looking we'll say. and in possession of the nearest thing to a silent voice. Gert is out to wake up New Jcrsev in general and So. Am- boy in particular. and we are sure that she will succeed. Also a willing worker in the sorority. Vice-president of the Alpha Omicron Sigma Sorority Ass't Associate Editor of Scope O. A. S. Dinner Committee JOHN XV. O'BRIEN-"Obie" l3l Blake St., Mattapan. Mass. John. our friend from Mattapan has done a bit in the Scope. in the Fraternity. and in his class. Determination is his characteristic. and possessed of this. and someone recent from "Katie" Gibbs, John is sure to climb the ladder of success. Pi Omicron Sigma '32-'33 Executive and Initiation Committees. P. O. S. Circulation Manager of the Scope. EDWARD P. PADDEN-''Ptin-em-down" 28-li Central St.. Manchester, N. H. Pin-em-down intends to have a gymnasi- um in a corner of his spacious establishment in order to establish a comfortable relation- ship between accommodation and convergence. By means of several toe-holds and half-nel- sons. the desired results are sure to be brought about. thus emphasizing the need for more energetic treatment. Ed is a loyal member of the Frat. and one whom the class will miss. Pi Omicron Sigma '33 :NT 1' 11 ' 11 1' , 1 'Jr 1 1 1 1 V JP' Ill 1 S QQVMIA WC v X r 1 1 ,,, A,,, 1 ? I 111 1,111'11'1'J 11' 1 J -1 . -1. 1,1 ' 'lf 11,111.1 1.1, .1 H111 h,,13,.,'.-.11 111 1 1 1 11 1,1-.1116 .gb 11 -I 31111.41 11111 L1I11.,a 1.111 1.1.1 1 11 11 1 .1 1 . 11111111-"1.1.121.-111 1.-1111111 ' sfu ' nf ' 1 JIQQIKK' . 'I KV A, --,' 1m1" 1 iH 1 ' , 1 1 '1i'1" '.'1.11.'1 .1 1, 5 11:19 11 1 N 11 1 1 1-5.15111 in ,!3Gx1'15,1-11f',1'1Z:'q H, -'QJ' Aki' , . 1 1, , , 111.1 1 .. 1, 1 K 1, 1 x,:I1AA'y.3'll ,:Y,Jl':!1r1 an J 1 1 1 1 x 1 1 1 AN, ' 'x1'11.-159'-'1' ,VYW 1111 111.1 . ,9 . 1,11 1.1.11U 1- 1- 1 ,V1 I1 IV- 1. 1 1 1 , ,4 X111 W 1?-.xv,,1,1' 1 14.-1111 11111 1 '1. 1 1 1- .1 11 1 ' -1 '11 .1 1 . 1, K 1 11 1 1 1 ' 1 1 f 1 ' 14,11 I 1 1 if 1 1 'g 1 ' '.u'.'1' 191, N.. 1, . 11" Q Y 5 1 -1 Y .1 ' K1 ll Y 1-1,1 I 1. ,1 1 I 1 16 1 1 . 1 Y , X ul ' ' , 1 1 I w 1 xl ' 1 1 rx 1, I 1 1' 11 1 1' 1 1 1 ' . ' ' 1. .11 1 , 1 1 I . 1 1 , 1 1 v. I .1 '1 V ' 1 1,12 . . 1 ' 1 11 '1 .1 I' .1 " 1 11:1 1 '11.11- 1 1 1,,1 11- 1 1 , '11 L '11!'r 1 1 1 :1 11 1,1 ' 1 1 11 1-'11-. 1 ' 1 .I -' 1 1 11 411. . 1 W ,V 1 11-11 .1141 1 . .1 1 H .4 -1111-1.-fl"-'1:111. ' rj1I,, 111 31-11, 11, 14 1 11.131, ,1! 1. 1M 1x1 ml N111 , 'J 11:11-1, 1 1 1 1,115 - .1.,- 1 1 'J' 11.1 Q VP. 11' '1 11 A111 ' '11 . I H ' v,",'1.1 1 -1, 1 1. .,,111.,,,..-1,141 . 1 .1111 ,.1' 11.111-11.1"' ',-1251, '1'1 5111 .1-1 1 1 wr. YL-.114 C 11 In 11 1' 111111, ,V 1. .M THE SCOPE i l l I l MAURICE PENAN 58 Holt St.. Fitchburg. Mass. Our friend from Fitchburg has been con- cerned with the growing need for optomet- rists, so he matriculated several years ago. An earnest and indomitable worker, Maurice will endeavor to satisfy part of this demand to the best of his ability. RAYMOND PERKINSON-HRGy" 54 Autumn St., Lynn, Mass. How dull our school life would have been without Ray's humor. smiling countenance, and broken glasses. As we are wishing you success, Ray, we wonder what a certain Juni- or will do in your absence. Pi Omicron Sigma HARRY SADOW 135 Blackstone St., Boston. Mass. Harry is characterized by a moustache, an: by considerable optimism. Always cheerful, he is on his way to make a name for himself. whether it be in Massachusetts or Maine. Member of Class Reunion Committee NED J. SALIBA-"Slate Boards" 35 Waltham St., Boston. Mass. Ned has one secret desire, namely to give the state boarders an examination. Ned is rc- nowned from one end of Mass. Avenue to the other for his uncanny ability to tell you that this question appeared in the November board of 1916, or that question will appear in the June 1944 exams. Such an individual deserves not to go unrewarded. 131 THE SCOPE l14l WII.LlAM SCHLOSSER--HBIUIIH 482 So. 16th St., Newark, N. J. Bill's pride is his drawl. Gifted with a line sense of humor. and a good sociability, Bill will get there. He is presently experimenting to improve techniques in certain lines. Pi Omicron Sigma '32-'33 MORTON SCHOENBAUM-Hilgfortyl' 645 Eastern Ave., Malden. Mass. Morty has certainly done his share of work. Employed after school hours, and studying hard. he graduated cum laude. He is in silence and then in intermittent speech. We wish him success. Graduating cum laude Member of Class Reunion Committee Class Will Orator '33 DEARBORN l.. SHAW-'AD6Uk" 65 Otis St.. Bangor. Maine "Dcak" is our idea of a professional man, with a pleasing countenance that is his silent recommendation, "Deak" has done his bit, as Chancellor of the Fraternity. Business man- ager of the Scope. and as Vice-president of our class. Success is yours for the asking. "Deak". Pi Omicron Sigma '32-'33 Chancellor of P. O. S. '33 Class Secretary '32-'33 Class vice-president '33 Scope business manager '33 H. EDGAR SIMONS-"Hy" 24 Quint Ave., Allston. Mass. Hy is the psychologist of the class. Pos- sessed of an introspective mind. Hy is in a constant state of unraveling the optometric Gordian knots. Gifted with a brilliant person- ality. and a keen nose for the stock market. H. Edgar is sure to be seen in the journals of the future, telling us what to do, or not to do. Graduating magna cum laude Salutatorian '33 ff 1 ' 4 a. V ,,,, . v u. M U:,'n11.,:eL'.2l my -, .1 ., . 1. .111 11 . - K ...qw up Q. 14503---'f Mug ily ' ' -. . LW Ti -ff"j,'u'Q.f'S" C 'A l -91 2 H. 'gulf 's iffgw-fifiv J . H .v.' . "." WI ' 2: .. 'Sf 32, . 53,13- ll uf ,if fjgf' .'-:lf 'fm . mga 1Gfj1n. .ef Mg, ,: vt .tip J, . I- Luixlw if-f, f xxx fx. . .-.,- .-L U ., 1 V:- . I 5.1 . . . ..-. , -,f x in 1 A . ,. 4 .: FJ- 'Q 1 jx f'.'y..'r-- 1.421 . .1 Q , Aw mx ' 11. 22,135 .' . ' t., .- 1' A . 'I ' u A . 1 1 . 1 . 1. . A 5 1 1 1 ml 1-rim.. W qv M .. 1 . Xl'1,"7 .Y . ., K 1 1- I .1 '. L .,, . . Q ,J - ... N .Tu I . 1 . . '+,,':1: wg. f ' 2 1 10.1 '. ' 1 -'WH 4. W W . ' . 1 I. .5 , , . .I 1.' ' , . .. V . It . .F A . Yu 4, , Nd 1 -.. . ,xv r . . .I 1' 115 . . , 1. - .1 . Z5 . ,I . 1- . s n""' ' . . . . 1, .1.,.N,-T .. n' . .. 1"'l 4" "." . '1 1-,.1'.,', ., 'ff ,::1.e' 1 rf1'P-"'.- L11' ' .5 " "' .., ,- 1 .1 . ,., 1. u "'1,.-.A-....1n' Q. ,i.... ., I ..,, 1 wi, ex. 1. .1 '1.,-g1-,.'g-111- w.,-1' , 1- .1 53.1. ffgfQy'ar,. I .-. 4 WW.-.'qL4 1-1 H'..'55" 1 .. ,,. V, H .... .15 nw, .u ',.,..5-,g. . 4' 1. ,":"!1fVvL-.Q -ff 5:z.- ...jx ,--" 1- .iw"fifzRmf41 "v.i151 THE SCOPE E. PERRY TRUESDELL1"P9rfy" 340 Highland Ave.. W. Somerville, Mass. Quiet. studious. and always ready and wil' linggto lend a helping hand in fraternal and class activities. Perry is a real student and will surely be a success in his chosen profes- sion. We wonder how our fair co-eds could have ever managed without Perry. Class Treasurer '33 Pi Omicron Sigma '32-'33 POS Scribe '33 Graduating cum laude The following members of the Senior Class. due to an insuperable mod- esty or other reasons, refrained from having their pictures taken, and therefore are without a photographic representation. We wish to list them, and insert :i fitting remark here and there. JOHN BEDELL-"Jack" 13 Laurel St.. Marblehead. Mass. Gifted with a keen sense of humor. Lots of luck, Jack. ABRAHAM CHAs'1N 3 Sterns Vklalk. Brooklyn, N. Y. The most serious worker in the class. Vile wish you success. SOLOMON DRUCKERMAN-"Sol" 2433 85th St.. Brooklyn, N. Y. He will be remembered like Patrick Henry for his speeches. Pi Omicron Sigma '32-'33 HYMAN GOLDBERG-"Hy" 31 XVave-way Ave., Winthrop, Mass. A better pharmacist than an Optometrist, we hope. Pi Omicron Sigma '32-'33 Joke Editor of Scope. cl. PHILIP HILPERT-"Phil" 146 Balch St., Beverly, Mass. A willing student and a good humor. Lots of luck. Phil. Pi Omicron Sigma '32-'33 SIDNEY KEIT-"Sid" 435 Brooklyn Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. Earnestness and faithfulness in his work .are his chief properties. ll5l THE SCOPE NATHAN LAGER 81 Bristol St., Saugus, Mass. He wishes that knowledge be hereditary. ISRAEL MICHELSON1"Ml'ke" 67 Church St.. Lynn, Mass. Satyrical in demeanor marks the man. RALPH MULVANITY-"MuI" 31 Concord St.. Nashua, N. H. Mul will be remembered for his lengthly orations. and fine sense of humor. .IULIAN PINCKNEY--uplink" ll Brookledge St., Roxbury, Mass. "Pink" has been noted for lecturing on "what's-thefuse." JACOB RICE 26 Central St., Milford, Mass. Jacob is to be remembered for his indom- itable persistence. PHILIP STOLAR-nphtlu 9 Pleasant St., Sharon. Mass. Phil claims to be the worst student. but we disagree with him. Just another case ot vocational maladjustment. STUART WRIGHT 84 Cedar St.. Taunton, Mass. Stuart deserves credit. for his efforts as a student. Success is his in the long run. SUPERLATIVES OF THE CLASS Most popular-Bob Hyland Most intellectual-Paul S. Cline Most athletic-Art Minehan Most humorous-Philip Stolar Best disposition-Ray Perkinson Most professional-"Deals" Shaw Handsomest-Ralph Gaeta Latest to class-"Chick" Blom Best theorist-Ned Saliba Quietest-Warren Lovering Best card player-Jack Rice Most forward-Ned Saliba Best dressed-Chick Blom. Most likely to succeed-The class of 1933 Class Grind-Perry Truesdell l16l 1 I ' 4 L ff W TI-IE SCOPE Evelyn Hollander Sonia Litwak Gertrude Monoghan V Alpha Utnmiioiromi Sigma The pioneers of this organization are Miss Sonia Litwak, Miss Gertrude Monoghan. and Miss Evelyn Hollander. together with their able advisor Dr. W. A. Svendsen. The oflicers were elected as follows: Miss Sonia Litwak-President Miss Gertrude Monoghan-Vice-president Miss Evelyn Hollander-Secretary During the course of the year, the sorority increased and augmented their membership with many of the female element engaged in the practice of op- tometry, and with the wives of optometrists. Dr. Svendsen was instrumental in making a success of both the educa- tional and social side of the sorority activities. The services of Dr. Benker were secured in giving enlightening lectures. esoteric in nature. to the sorority. The sorority presented numerous exhibitions and concluded the year's activities with a dinner dance at Hotel Westminster. l17l f4.',1 -1 Y 1 . NZ 1 .'n .", "ri" 1 1 ,11. , , 1 - 'rl , ,lu 1 ., "f1 . ,., 1 X V UA '11 1 l1ll' '1 ju, , 1 I 1 ' A 1 H11!11'1',I,:,1' Hi 141. 'yi 21.4.41 2' '..f1' - 1, ,"11 1 " 11 1-.1 I- .7 11' 11.1 1 . 1 I M! 1. .1 .M 1 ,.ux.',v . I X -1.11 1 1. H 1 . Q ' ,,,:.1. .mmf -, 1.4 ' ' 192 -' .?f?ff",'1? 1 .U - ' P. 'lf ' , 1 It Q jx-Q 'f'n"X'5 . ,. . 53.52 .,, 1 2, 1 1': f'-. 111 . LQ , 1 'N' x 'Va' , " 4 . 1? mf' " 'wwf X . 1, 1 f . , WK, H .1 13' 1 EJ, X". ,' P 4l1l',y, Q , 4,,'f'1':n.5 1 . .., MJ, ,V 1 ii .Ulf ,U 1 1'1 1 J 1. 'M 5, .'1' 1 .1. l'WLSL'.'F Paster, nes. R. 3Y an, E. H OW ronstein, M. Goldberg, C. R Reilly, P. Tucker, H. Golden. M. B J Bark Row: I.. lo R. :L .wt vs u.. Q 6 -5 -vi I-4 ru .'.:.' or U ob E Au QI : O .-l 3 Goldberg. ebson. C. Seale. L. Callahan. H. utra. M. L So ckley, M. .J.Bu C2 Row: C. Pike, S. Druckerman. M. Ri wa - ':. -r: E- Perkmson. R. ni fi 6 U an .2 I-1 2 U mi .2 J: 3 G0 'U N U3 cd 5 Q ': sn O -5 -6 I: 2 D- IL' ni 5 N .C LD G E 'U V5 Q0 5 I-4 E- nl fi, U: -Q3 C-4: -II ,330 Ed!! .2 U-. H23 is M QE -In ...I VJ. ..-5 E.. D fra -5-31 Q... 'nf-A I V .VVIV 13 VVVW VID I QIV V V VH' 1"VVVV'l?.' V VV.:-IV V' VV H , IV 'VV V V I VV. ,VL Ir,-V" VV I YV' V' ' MV ' ll V ' V' "V'.. V. 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THE SCOPE Pi Omioron Sigma Fraternity By E. PERRY TRUESDELL The Pi Omicron Sigma Fraternity opened its activities for the year on Thursday evening, October 13th, with a smoker at the school for the members of the Junior Class. The guest speaker of the evening was Dr. Ralph H. Green of the Alumni and Faculty, who gave a very interesting talk on Fraternalism. Dr. Foster H. Namias, a past chancellor and member of the Alumni, also spoke on fraternal life. After a week of pledging twenty-three candidates were initiated into the fraternity on the evening of November Znd. The initiation ceremony was held at Ye Lantern Hall in Arlington. A Pledgee Frolic by way of an informal dance was held at the Beacons- field Hotel on October 27th. This dance was open to all members of the school and their friends and was enjoyed by all who attended it. In February a formal dinner dance was held at the Hotel Westminster. On December lst the fraternity unanimously elected Dr. Ralph H. Green to the position of Grand Chancellor. During the year the fraternity has sponsored a series of educational lec- tures having as guest speakers Mr. Gamble of New York, Dr. William Smith of Dorchester, Dr. James Collins of the Colonial Optical Co., and Mr. Wilson of the Wilson and Halford Optical Co. The final business meeting of the fraternity was held on May 4th at the school. The election of oflicers for next year took place. The ollicers elected for 1933-1934 are: Chancellor-Frederick T. Mills, Brighton, Mass. Vice Chancellor-J. Charles Reilly, Springfield, Mass. Scribe-Paul E. Tucker, Lowell. Mass. Guardian of the Exchequer-Milton Lebson. Hackensack. N. J. Member of the Executive Committee-Frederick E. Brucker, Jamaica Plain, Mass. - Sergeant-at-Arms-Marino Bonaventura. Southbridge, Mass. The fraternity held its annual banquet at the Hotel Touraine on May 11th. l19l Ummm:-11. 'R '1 u'11'1- 1,-" 11 ., '51 '11 Q, , 1 1 UY1 .1 5 ' 1 . . wr R, ' 1 1 1 I 1 x I 1 I 1 1, K 1 ' ' L' X 11 ' lug 3 I 1 I-4-h 5: H 1 I , '1'11a!' ' 'INY M I N-'a 1 1 - - 1 sh I ' 1 . :1..., 1, my-c 2vf"T 1 .1 1.3 -A vfj- 12" H' 1 1 " ' ,Y 1 191-41-1"-n, 1 'Ho 1 1 1 1 1 1 A -' I O a 1,1- ' , 11 , 11- gl, I 1 , ' 1 , 1 z11"!..,K V3 R' I ' K 1 1 1 -divx!" R F' 'MII 'PM f . 121 f"!s-1119 ""' 1111-,,111,111fw H ' 1 3 1 fl' Q. ' ,f ' ' H f 51' 'VIH , , 1 1 L V111 'f 1 X f I Yi I 1 1 THE SCOPE Masks: 3-w'F?T7':'l1"" . 1833 1933 Q !lLflVlC!V'QClyQC1V'S O OPTICAL LESSIINS - AND STILL AT IT ONE hundred years ago American Optical Company began the study and practice of optical manufacture. ln the years of scientific research and development which have followed, AO has accumulated a vast experience which helps us with our own problems and has enabled us to assist with the problems of those we serve. TODAY you have a problem similar to the one AO has answered for hundreds of graduates in years past-"How am I to start my practice?" We invite you to allow us to help you solve, not only this problem, but to se1've your daily re- quirements in building and holding your practice. I 9+3w3 ANIERICAN if y 0PT'CAL mm, S0U'1'HBR1DGE c0MPANY DL -' I is MASSACHUSETTS an f'.5fLf'f aTE 523,765 oo Opticax Q0 l20l 1 1 1 31 vi I 1 , ",' 111:-:?1',. ' 1 T '.,"L , .-7 ,V V- 'Y 11 1 111 1 Q- , ,4 1 ua-'v:.,1.1 rx--1.5-I 119,12 '- 1-.1 1 1 3 - 1,11 1' ,,1.. 1-'-1 -H ' 1 1 ' "' 1' vw' ' . 11' 1' 1' A 1.1 . 1-1 ..,r1 ,41,,x, I ,1 rx , , -' .1 ,L-1,u 1 g 1, 1 I -1, 1 11 1 1,1..'.'m:. gm gg, 1,01 5,15yl1,V.. 1117 yr?1gQ5, V 3. H041 1 1. , In 4 1, Jn' 1 1 . -1 - ' 1 ' 1- - ' "H f - -1 1, . ' --'1 1 - 'V 1 1,, is 1' 115 P untx in ltliiux r , HJ I MK J ' I 15.75 1 L W1 1 W ' ' ' L U er 1 ' I-x,1'fh1fl,,1 1' 1 1, '14 1 ' l ' ' 1 ,',V!4f1 f fi 1 1 , 1 1 1 ' 1 ' 1 J N 1 A H '1 1 N 1 1 1, A A 1 1 1 1 . y 1 1. A 1 J I 1 P 1 1 1 1 av . 1 n", W 1 1 1 1 152. " 1444 1 1 R A "a ' a 4' 1 1 1 12 .1 1 '11 V1 1. . -x1 -Q -1. 1 1117.11 nl V 1 1 I1 .1 v. v fvu 13 1' 1 1. I 11' .111 a 1 fl 1 1 , ,1 11' I ,V 2 VY 1- , ' s.1za 111 Ig '-? ' if 115 .-, ,j ra 11.5721 1111 . .1 ' 1 ' 235115 ' 11-:XIV "' , 1 ,II 1:+..- ' g. , 1: ,V N 1.+. ,V 11:- ,. H71 .11 ' QW ,11 1! f' A1 1 ' ' I W - J. .I,. .111 '14 111 4 - " Q'-'f.r1r1 .' 135' 151' '1-fb '- 1.52 1 , .':.-1x'-fm: +31 ,,. r' w i,i1w-11' 1- 1 1-4 r ,X K' .",V -1' ,w ' ' 1','1' Ql,pJ W -' ,Qg'1:' , -L 1 mn' ,1 1.511- 1 :AYP jfd- U "' ' '- A . ' .1 1 1 h THE SCOPE The Snape stair ILQSSQILQS4 Editor-in-Chief Donald Ciribbin Associate Editor J. Charles Reilly Business Manager Frederick Mills Associate Business Manager Clyde Seale Senior News Brewster Sedgwick Alumni Editor Evelyn Hollander Humor Editor Ralph Clements Circulation Manager Charles Rowan Three members of the incoming Junior Class will be chosen next year to round out the personnel of the Staff. The Editor wishes to avail himself of this opportunity to thank each member of the present Staff for the whole-hearted co-operation which has been afforded him during the past year. Words can hardly express gratitude to Miss Alyce McCabe, our congenial School Secretary, for the many, many things she has done and the words of wisdom and guidance which she has smilingly offered throughout the year. Please accept a profoundly sincere "Thank you" Alyce. Last, but not lease. we wish to thank our advertisers, who make our little paper possible. May we remind our subscribers that they are reputable business houses offering quality merchandise backed by their own good name who merit and will value your patronage. l21l , . . W: ,W '-V-.' 'MTS 1 P42251 1, , 4 3- 'Q V . nHg1A.,x5.,,.A N ' 5 LR I N x s., f,.,lf-W. N915 ,, fy. A -in ,- 4 4 ali . ,43- 1 - ' ,, ,. A- , H. ' VI 1 Quay N. iw: iw Rf , "', 1 r: ki if ' if-3 ," in ' V' V I V ' w WJ . .- Y, , Gm tba: 4 4 4 - I 1' .1 W 'I 1151 1 . 1 1' " f'WW741 .' .N l. ' wx ,', uv V' gm. My :N . ,.,.,., I H u J- ,,.:, fy . In w QE . , ,4,5, . 'A 1 , "v 1 1 n ..1 W x J " "1 x :mfg 1 ,, , L 1 lr ggi v U. ffl? ,.:,j , X WJ, wk! .,g .wx 4 H , :H ,,. .,f.H1 vt 'I . q,i,Q ,g'1:v J . .1 1'- 4 " .-qu '39 F, rvifif I fel, w.,, V, W, ' . ' 1 1' 'I .lv J. - , .4 -1 if r I, "lv 1 r 1 A 1 x ' ' .4 m- c ,:.r .f 14.1 'r 5 2 Q. PB z 2 e N 3 O nd U E QI E 2 U 2 bb I- tu .cw 'U 'E' U E S. .D U, :I III 5 :J 2 Ih N o. :Z E -as : G O L4 no E .E 'E -C U Z 5 .2 Q. N aa :ri 5 O r -I 3 re -ci hi I1 .2 Qi LJ fi In ... 5 O U3 .95 N N VJ L5 E .D .D ': O Q Q: .2 M G aa .ad u B l- nl vi W QI 4: no o D5 ul 1:7 .2 N 2 :s U 'C bi an Z E' -I V3 3.2 Qfu QE. bu. -EE f...U5 KJ h. 2 N .I r: o 2 -5 '.': .3 i-' wi ga N E. .1 '-UE ,fu 552 EE Dia: ,o UU :gui if UE in Egg -CE 56 -QU if 35, mn -I3 52. -E2 C . 513 ME '.:: qos 1 . DDI-1 .2 . WS 'S '95 'EZ ,211 -UO E03 .E D-.. 52 of! fr.. v: EE SU.. QI V2 .5 v ff . , ..Q, -2 ,, , us HM 11,4 - .f, :gf 44 'I' ' VI., ,A 1: 4 , S .2 ' 4. 'n ' " "vu X 'Fd' 1 V, ,- .A,aA il In n lj 1 I 1 1 I , Egg, '91 ff "J',7' Ks' " '1 4 . , X H '1 131-. ?' A' . 1 - -, 92, . ' X 4 1 1 . X v VNX 1, K 4 M if THE SCOPE Junior Class History By DONALD GRIBBIN On Monday, Sept. 19, the class of '34 assembled for the first time at thc Mass. School of Optometry. Our class proved to be the largest in the history of the school. The Junior class has been very fortunate in having Dr. Namias added to the teaching staff. His patience and artistic trends have won him the admiration of the students. He has served us well as class advisor and to him belongs much of the credit for a successful year. At the first class meeting of the year the following were elected to oflice: Arthur Collins, President. Milton Lebson, Vice-President Frederick Mills, Treasurer Evelyn Hollander, Secretary. Our class meetings have afforded us the opportunity of becoming bettei acquainted with each other. Few will forget the fiery pleas tor what were they?j of Mr. Tieri and the reports of our blushing secretary. Two well attended dances were enjoyed by the class this year. Through the efforts of Dr. Svendsen we were given several lectures by H. William Bencker, M. D., which proved very interesting and beneficial. The annual trip to Southbridge, a yearly invitation extended by the American Optical Co. to visit their enormous plant, far exceeded expectations. lt was decidedly interesting and instructive. We wish to thank the American Optical Co. and we might add, it is with pleasure that we anticipate next year's visit. Rowan is still dreaming of "Miss Southbridgef' that woman in grey. The year has pased almost too quickly, but the summer holidays will give us an excellent opportunity for reviewing and absorbing this year's work. The summer will also afford time to work on pet theories, such as Mr. Lebson's new subject "Skiamic Dynametryf' It is with regret that we say good-bye to the Senior class. To them we extend our heartiest wishes for success in their chosen profession, Optometry. l23l I X 1 4 5.551 ?? , f P Q J . ,Q-.,-, ,. v ' -'f-J:ar,-1 -- 45 Lbri I 1 Jg-215: + LW-,ftL3 f'4-'QW -"QQ Ik-F7 .,.:f 57,01 w rf 'Y' ' . "+'wf?Qf' fi'-p,."5'ff , I' .45 I, R f,1 w 1,17 ,w . ' ' - . ' Mg., W , I A - X , 'fx 1" '-l r 1 V-, 5 .1 21 v f I .r, '1 ..m K ' ' ffl ,fwg . - Syn .5 'x .- ,- ,AQ N-13.11,-Ig 1 if -Aw k ,p- .fg Y, ' I , WL Stax. in 31. 1 ' .ye .,r ' 1 . , - ff' 'lE"1E'9 .S D w ,nw .Nz vf Li s +'.-M QN-is 4 .0 if 'M 'w .VI "ITV ..,' ' -. 'x -r NX"- . X 'r x 1 1 "AH I I . . , ',, -nn- 4 1 A If Us V 3' ,312-' X 1 -.I..',! V4 6 'Q . 91 w 55 ? THE SCOPE Pictures by J. E. PURDY, I6o Tremont St. BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS l OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHER FOR THE MASSACHUSETTS SCHOOL OF OPTOMETRY I DR. FOSTER NAMIIAS The students wish to express their appreciation, and to extend their thanks to Dr. Foster Namias for his labors in their behalf. He has shown us the wide extent of the realm of physiological optics, and has given us an insight into the problems confronting the modern investigator of that field. He has handled as well the teaching of Practical Optics, which was en- hanced by years of experience, and modified by a theoretical knowledge of no mean confine. 'iThat boy of yours is a great talk- er." "Yes, indeed. He ought to make I1 BOSTON, MASS. great insurance agent when he grows up. Best Wl'ShES of DR. RALPH GREEN "That fellow certainly can make a Compliments of great Speech' DR. ALBERT E. SLOANE "That so? Then why doesn't he?" 'AI take half an hour's beauty sleep every afternonf' "You should make it longer, dear" Compliments of ,, The doctor told Brown he must DR. FOSTER NAMIAS walk three miles every.day." "Where does he take it?" "Around a pool table, generally." l24l gn- .,' 1 I 1- 51,111- j1 Ya. I., .L ,A S ,Ag r, -W., 6 f1 1 A ' KV' Z: - + 1 M. -1- --1 A .1 ul ? , 1 .l, . - 1 Q v I 1 ' "-5'1" .'.11V' . 1?- '- I-" -'.xZ'l.',,Q111, 1-.. ' , . .-31131, " g'.-- -- ,A .1 .1 .1 " 1-1 .1 .,'.,.'- ,L ,.- ' :NWI I vu 'E 'fl lwug' - X I 1 HI' - VJ! Q 12 , Y 1 -1 , 1451 ,. -J if .. -- 1" ' 1 1 132' - 1-X-' ..1 W- M A 'gi'-2, 1.. V 13.--'v . I:- 1, ii 1 -1111.111 1 1 1 5 .W ' 1 x, . 'Q F AVN 3' . ku V 4 1 1 A 1 ' EK ,J ,1 I ,x, , ffd :Li xg. K 1 W 1 w 'liz I1 W, 1 ,XY 1 1,1 xl I1 , . ..,q, , Y ny' . 1.1 1' '. ' 1lY , 1 1 541 1 , 1 1 1 Q 1 1 I x01 ' I 5 ' 1.171 I 1 .1- -,.x JV? iv'- I. 5494- J, 9 1 V., ,-,4 1 , law, 4 . -- 1"-Ps il - v',v rw mag' ' 5. THE SCOPE 5 5 5555 55 5 5 5 5 secs sem 33732 B928 BE-33 PLAN AHEAD YOU'RE not in business for just six months or a year! That's why it's important in making your plans to build a steadily increasing practice, to include an optical whole- sale source that is always dependable. ?1.,.fJ We, too, are planning ahead to be of ' B533 Maximum help to you in your work of providing Better Vision for the ILA . 35,32 Public. , ,I Choose your Wholesaler Carefully. A I :fail 5 B933 '93 'Ee-SS asm ,W CC'.oi1..oN11AiL. UPTHCAL Co. INCORPORATED BOSTON NEW YORK ROCHESTER IQ-IEE 555 5 5 5 55 5 5 555 5 553 BC-4132 S2521 W 53 ,.,I x v -4 " ' I " W g5"1-.771 ' ,. 9.!:gE.':Q'- 'Q5'iZ7."' II I ,L .I .' I. II G-. ,- ,. . :Ef'51'f mf Y iff? ' ' 1, R' " 3 ? if' JI? H, 7. '.. . 1 LMS " 11.1 'f -1 ha. fn-v M! If ":. 'V -5 ' girl. H . "W - W A gms-' -- ,.2.,. 5 - -,q..1.fn' vff- , ix I I A v . I' " " ... .-III 1, - I .w f. 51- LIN 1. . - I.,-fa. ' I J' :'V J, .A -- ,,.i':,s 'E 'Vff'h.Q"2 K I. 'l ' T! . 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I, I 1 'U' Z, I' ' U ' . uv x I I ' " I r 1 I Im' 55 2' .ij ,qI' I. if U "I I I.-y. . , I, -V5 I ' - .. I jI,sI Ie,.I df, 5 :il ' I, IVIII,-11 m '..w'.:"" .Q,.xL" fl - J ....4'I1.5X"-jf' - f HI' "-Q, 1 ' ' A ' , ' '.',1"G'5f,. 'W-W' 11' , . l H... ., - I ' 2 2 ,T J' '1' . ,. f 11 ' ,-5.71" Wig' 1 . , ,gm u ,ff V' I II. ,,. I !,IrIII . 'II I, I . ,,, 45'- - " I 'I' r v. fx. -., .I I. 'W-.far 1 C 4 THE SCOPE 1119111119 YCUHU KNUW ,, . that the shortest distance from the emmetropic eye at which no accommo- dation is required is not 20 feet, but 1 10 feet, and that this distance becomes less with the advance of age. that the absolute far point of convergence is 15 times farther than that of accommodation in the ordinary case. ..,......,that the reason why hyperopes wear apparently with comfort an overcor- rection, and the myope with a poor accommodation tolerates a full correction of the myopia. lies in the fact that a full correction of the refractive error at dis- tance is always an under-correction at near. .....,..,,,that a nominal hyperope of 5 diopters uses 1 diopter more accommodation when corrected at 13", than a 5D niyope when looking at the same distance with the correction on. Which explains why the degree of hyperopia is always underestimated by the optometer, as well as the amplitude of accommodation. , ...., ,Hthat theoretically the amount of astigmatic correction differs at near as compared with the static finding. . ..,,,,,.. that an adduction of 30 prism diopters as so recorded at 20 cms. is really an overestimation, since the effectivity of theses 30 prism diopters is only that of Z6 prism diopters. .r,, that the ordinary decentration formula is not accurate practically when using high powers in either plus or minus spheres, due to effectivity. For exe ample, a plus 10 diopter sphere when decentered 1 cm results in a prismatic ef- fect, not of 10 diopters, but of 13 1X3 diopters. and that the prismatic effect de- creases with the increase of the dioptral distance. that keratometrically a concave cvlinder produces a myopic and a convex cylinder produces a hypermetropic effect. ,Wthat the superior oblique muscle of the left eye is supplied by the trochlear nerve originating in the right mid-brain and vice versa. that the nasal wall of the orbit is the thinnest of the 4 walls. .. that the muscle planes of the vertical recti nearly coincide with the axes of the orbits. that the fundus is the only place in the body where arteries and veins can be seen in a physiological state, without subjecting a patient to a great deal of inconvenience. ....,.....,that there are 13 cranial nerves not 12 on each side as is commonly sup- posed. as the nervus terminalis, distributed to the nasal region is the latest ac- quisition. that the proprioceptive fibers to the extraocular muscles are best believed to be a distribution of the mesencephalic root of the 5th nerve. that the center for lacrimation as Well as other vegetative functions is be' lieved by the Cushing school to be in the 'tween-brain or diencephalon. q 1261 '141?'V'Q1- 41 V i 1 4111,-.H 1 mvjr . n V-L5 5.5 '." my - 'E 27. .Ki w i iv.. I-X, , " '. ,4 W il, ' if 'gm 'ff-fi , ' o-MJT f rf 2- ' L 2 4. "W" -- fx f., -. 1 1 I , , .. up I . 'w , . 3 .JXP- , , fic- I ':'-. ' 'NL' , ,x I N ji ' lx -IT ' 1 X. . 5 1 , l , . rl Ju, 5- A W THE SCOPE E EXTEND OUR BEST WISI-IES TO TI-IE GRADUATING CLASS FOR A SUCCESSFUL FUTURE IN THEIR PROFESSION. WILSON Ei I-IALFORD OPTICAL CO. 387 WASHINGTON STREET BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS HHe has the artistic temperament happily developed." 'AHOW is that?" "Only goes with red-headed girls in Autumn." "My son is making a record at col- lege." "Good: science or clsasics?" "Neither. He's such a baseball find that he's been released from all rou- tine study." Goldberg: "I suppose you did the town when you were in New York?" Kaye: "No, just the reverse-New York did me." "Do you like Wagner?" "Better than I used to. There's a lot of his music that no one would attempt to dance to." A man with a sunny disposition seldom has a hot temper. He: "My ancestors were all peo- ple of brains." She: "You must have been disin- heritedf' "You must have many queer ex- periences in the, country?" "We do. Once I actually ran across a farmer whose name was Hirmanf' The teacher was having her trials and iinally wrote the mother: "Your son is the brightest boy in my class, but he is also t he most mischievous. What shall I do?" The reply came duly: HDO as you please. I am having my own troubles with his father." Jack: "What's the most outstand- ing contribution chemistry has given to the world?" Ralph: Blondes. I f Dress Qlotlzef golf like READ S. WHITE FORMAL CLOTHES RENTED FOR ALL OCCASIONS CAPS AND GOWNS Ill Summer St., Q3 Mass. Ave., Boston Woolworth Bldg., Providence, R. I. l27l rg 1 M, 3.4-Jw' 1 ,5,,-W--5. ww l U in WH, , 2, .f1,:t""fg' ff' 1 .L .fwr' :"? : .,1i ifriwlf' L 1' ' ' I, '1 , 'ni . '-Q-cgffwif V A.-iw" ai '-L n, -'!'L'7,sg,""1" 9 , , . , , 571,1 1--. r. - ,. 1 ,,,,, :F xlppfz.. Wx .4 ,jg , 2 " 1' '25 I . - -. I ! 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Suggestions in the New England College of Optometry - Scope Yearbook (Boston, MA) collection:

New England College of Optometry - Scope Yearbook (Boston, MA) online yearbook collection, 1931 Edition, Page 1

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