New Castle Chrysler High School - Rosennial Yearbook (New Castle, IN)

 - Class of 1976

Page 1 of 240

 

New Castle Chrysler High School - Rosennial Yearbook (New Castle, IN) online yearbook collection, 1976 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1976 Edition, New Castle Chrysler High School - Rosennial Yearbook (New Castle, IN) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1976 Edition, New Castle Chrysler High School - Rosennial Yearbook (New Castle, IN) online yearbook collection
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Text from Pages 1 - 240 of the 1976 volume:

mmxxw BANLNNxwtm'mwixwmmxwxwmxcxxximvnmwxvcmxxwmmxxxxmwmxxxxvumwxmxxmwnxxxxxxxxwmxxxxxxw v 2 K 1 1 , r A .r,Y'Mv,'. fe, mmf, '.,Qk'v 'r ,-.Q , .Q1.L".. -.a THIS YEHR IS CHE 0F H KIflD X O 'U UUUUIQ . ' 42 1 19,9 'F-r - N -1,'vt' 'Ya P :H ff?-'kk . T 91 ': K . -V - -' -3 .' 5.Hi.'--.lf,,xL!X.i1mql ,' 4 'A 'uf 1 -1, , wf-w2 :, vggrg5', -1: . BSL , :QQ wgfgijli ' M15 ' Q -Gif? 52,-5-12.16, Jw!-311 ig!-sf-,-Abe: -1-L 18 ' ' V , .,. X K L -r R X g , " ,qv vu 1-1 .S ln order to let Glenda Brown vote in "Free Fare", rock band from Florida the senior class elections, Tammy Lock- visited New Castle for two concerts, one ridge makes sure that she is registered for a school convocation, and the other and has not already voted. ' the next evening. Agp 'tg Xia . EH. 'i,9gE' Remembering is really what celebrating is all about. Remem- ber thejoyous occasions that happened last year, last month, or even last night. Memories of the good times will never leave. but there is one way to catch memories before they are only history e--e- celebrate. lt is hard to celebrate something before it hap- pens, so planning to celebrate in the future is hardly worth your while. Let us celebrate our great moments now for no one knows what lies in the future. Surveying her hand-built, coil pot for rough sports and foreign particles, .lean- , ,K ette Frazier gives the finished product ' her final inspection. 4 Q 'T' Q ,Q M, V 1,5 J L A vm Q y 'fS,:Q,l.' ., - 'L'f ' , w r .mv A, W " Y Q, o M '1-935 "'. L gf fi" 'W' , 'irlg rw 4 . . if .'m"..,'Q , , 'Q' 'Q 'X my iffgilf 7 W5-7, ' N '- I 5 TW 1 . g f ' 1 V A 'A uf X ' "L A A L, f 'fr f --1 ' ' "" if.. 1 L ' ' , 1 gr , . as ' ' A - 'Lx 'Z , Ur, ' ' .,,, of . Qff 1 'W H V If ef ' af' ,. . we - 9, o fe if of fr Wig,-aiifaf a 'i . r , A i 3 I ' ,5fQ1.'.ji 'K' if V 'Z ,V ,V . t K V Q ff A . , sf. Ng. ',-. wqfmf , ri X , , W, - ,.,, 'V . - g ' , ' gifijil W ' r 9 we ,, I W, U 3' ,Q A Y kiltitkk ' WiVA4 ,KA of W K , 'gk f f ' ' -4011 .5 1, Q' . ,xr 'D V fr, ,JJ ,LL M , efqqf ,fr .,, . 1, .:,., 'aw 1 -V. Q21 2 0' 4 v-yxlflf yfrd K' ., n -W . -if fr., 1,30 .1. gy w' ' o 3 9 e ' 7 'L' .wav ' Q fa' "ef -Q ' ff: , . If W1 399' N WH ,- "' "' ' !x,2gxfA,,,iQ,,XN'ith their first year of band campghgf 2 ,qfF,2,,,:'f 7,1Q".j A , k ' J ' ". , 5 A, , H t. ,gg ,1 lhmd them. Tony Marcum and Jenmter ' V- 7'f'A"'K f ' ' Hoke introduce Jay Taylor to iirst year ' 55 af ' if ofband camp. ' 'W ?if9f?Y1f?"'fi', 'aww 1' '. I ' gf 1 ' ' , ' Q' A ' "', V M 'V , 1' 1 NZML, A . f- lf? ,, . r T, , ,',' f ' 4 :?iflLv I 1 .5,, ' W i KL 5y,::5V?353,rf-"whiff ,, A Z fi, .gifxgz . ,L!Au , Q lJ,3g ,zz-ffg' Q ' EMMA ' ' - , w ,rw W e H . i WM A f -A . . , ,A,m-Q-.,. W W 4 A , . Y ' j ,ss , 1, Y Q' vm' fp ' , -, i ' 'T 1 Yr g , , Q, Mx I M uf " I w 'dz-I wfilwjj. mf Q . mfwwf ' ' 5' ' 'J' A ,F gp. R . 1. '-www Q 1 jf' . f ' ' ,no ,,,. gr , -' V - 4, f W M. dm .M :Mn V L, f - i i ' ' - - V ' V L? Y F - ' - 1 ' 'V 'fin l - 1.-W ' ? I lf" 5 'Q--K, ,, wiv Q ' V in 1. NNW W xg, Q If H .mf 17: hw 'Qw5'z"q, J 3 6 Y Y , -, , z-w : ,ef ww- j 47' , :,, -win . W 'uv A ' :qw f '.5',LfQ -4, ng V .6 K M , Fr :TE A W 1' v F42 f . . ,,,,1 . , , V figs?" ," 5. 21 ' ' :Q i 7545 155 3 1 ME L B X W , " ,- .5 Ls.-..--rwnm ' " ' ,mv - A . Y xy.. V B.: H ,F 'fe wiw , Q- ' ,M N . . A 3 A K 'M ' s 1 H 6 .Q gut. fr. it l ,EM N , .,, ,gi - 'fb 'Il-" ' r 5 . . 3 ,X 4- . iPhoto by Jamie Marcamj What happened last year? You probably took "Jobs" and "Sports" in English, and this year they un- loaded the "heavies" on you. Or you squeezed your way through Ac- counting and Business Law until you decided not to further your know- ledge of business, so you went on half-days. Could it be that you sat V suffering through algebra last year waiting to get into something easier like geometry, then proofs came along? Keeping up with the chores is an important part of farm life and feeding the cows their daily meal is one of Karen Clark's chores on the farm where she and her parents live. In this day of modernization where machines do much of man's work on the farm, Alvin Givens Ends he must employ "old-fashioned" methods and still do some of the work by hand. Adding much of the beauty to Henry County are the scenic locations of the many farm- lands which occupy a great deal of the rural areas surrounding New Castle. 2 figfeki 3123? f- W-nw 1 , W . 'fsffvfgfxv-jpg 'WH MW, ' W 5, :ff!:?"R""5d?m ,ffl W' ' 1 . ,J 4 -f.,5'.-. 5 ' QM u 1 1 . . A f..14:if' ,, , fa..- Mazda, " 1 vm U .HMM K V U 51.5. fa, , 514, 1 IL 4,- flu?" is X w :v21.'1s-gv Q3 V,,. 'fi' ff'MW2f75x"w ti if ' "Qb.1i3tw, . 1 , W 41221 - ' .5g'ig'f,'f' gf? 3' ,, ., U , . t W , wt J.. QQ , sp f f?.if2.li 2 n R 11: , a, 'Q ,gh iyyfgrf , E 3' J- J 1, gi, I if H .3 L ' 'fig , My A11 L 11' - 4? - wg? aj? '25 . , '. g . ' , A-K-. -"Q , 3 'K A v S1 ,dk V' r,,f,.fJ A Q . ,, W, I , . 2 53.5.74 , L Nb K, 'aflffg ", 1 z - 1' 5, 1 Q 'W -fry, X ,. mf.. w YQ. W .4 . 1-,, 74 Q W ,f'5:, 'S v I .df Q! ya.. FV, .v' , x Q.-,,-A ,U 4 .zqxaf neg, 4 :mv .a4,',Q -f,'fgwiiAffi.f'Qf1W 6 ' fb A Q In I I f ,R a ,,4 Celebrating at the pep session before the Richmond game are the "Super Seniors" whose cheering that night added much ex- citement to the hard fought ball game. Why is this year different? Perhaps you just like to "celebrate," regardless of the occasion. Much is worth cele- brating: a quintennial homecoming, a winning football team, being a Senior or Junior or even a Sophomore, the band's third place finish in the State Fair contest, your birthday, the volley- ball team's sectional win, the nation's bicentennial anniversary and on and on That's why this year is one of a kind and you should celebrate. .,-'gwNf'Bh.Nv!'!n'x P 5... anti' r . N. : x . M g s !!lIq!!E!Il!l .1 :Ura ' tl TWA ii 'wwmkwvmmi nl.. ,.,, jgqhtf., w P9 'Q gi '1 ' . ",-' '5?:JJ2fi:+ N, - 4 C, ,fy 1 - E . ,u,7ge:,f-i, 2f RNQQ ETT gba' D t 7 M ?vf1NV3 T JYMXV i ,, B Q, We is V 1 tk i ., 4,,Q - 5-ffwi' 4 f .EI ., 5 :da . L ix A 1 a 1 a t -f , L t t 4 X xi, ' 'ras' --'I.'- - , ' ,EPP 7 ' - . A :- T AEE rf When the siren is sounded, it is hard to tell "Get out and enjoy yourself! Have fun! whether to get under the desk or go outside, Celebrate!" Partying is the most common but this time everybody made the correct form of celebration and that means there decision and went outside. has been a lot of celebrating going on. xvkv kvkvkyk fveykv VQYEVG During a time out, Co-captain Dan "Wally" Coleman receives a bit of useful information from Head Coach Twyman Patterson. H i we S Regardless where you look, the past or the future. you are going to find events are much different from those that are happening now, Times are changing and a lot more is going to happen. These may' be for better or yyorse so be sure and celebrate while you have the chance. "This year is one ofa kind celebrate!" Learning lllich's theory' in sociology de mands a larger place ol' study' and the stage in the auditorium worksjust line. do . U, fr 4 , erei fills? T ii Q . ,mfffvvr l tnmf. Q ' , ffl i s g,-" :, X-,sn W Before French class. Dura Webber und Keith Shudrick lake lime out to luke part in u friendly arm-wrestling mulch even though it is two arms uguinst une, Juniors ure second in line to select their English classes which is ulviuys ai hussle for teachers und students at the heginning oflheyeur. Q 1 ,Y ' . , m, N , 44 st-'y',, I., 'Mx' . , EW 5111 in N ml 1 ng x nl! Q' m use ll'-an 'ng m' 'Ill' Wk lllillll . Im , II 335 - ui!!! nn mu: U 7 gl! 'X -I J i 4 E V ,Q, W . ., ' W ' i 2 2 1 O 5 wang ' C M-usnifvg 5 5 1 ,,. 1 , 7 1 o . N . ' 4 VA If Q ' an 1 " Swmmgm Humming Vu 1 I I r A , wffr- .EWW Q 1 4 h 3 ,bill 1 0 3 ' 2 x Z B 3 2 ' , 3 5 - . Q D E 3 X T .1 -V 3774 :Wt i 5 . 4 x Q 3 ...ffbv fi K D C Q 'sn upoon 'W 1 ISATI- '- - ff- ma ' E rv o Y F,-,.... l A AND LD H 5 A -r. , - .fi I ,' " f, H ,. ,11vfg,',fr,..'i?gl,i5hgAW W A ' W ' 'T .1,2Iv5-fi,-u 5,1 gd. - K ii AA vbik t JXw , M, 1, ' .ivy 'S It Ne' 'I-im, , l4',1 "'f5'3 o f, .fl ?11:ff- 'Q 1 AlV,Vy7fi,w'qgv" I - V-iffqliialf, , X . , , 4 .- 94- We :Vim F 'QM H 7 8 . 'A 4-A Believing in what you do is an important factor in order to be successful, and our Trojan gridders proved this with a win over Muncie Southside in the homecoming game. iPhoto by Rick Rinehartl . . -, ,., M, A-so if i ,Q 'i Smiling proudly, Katie Edwards, with her escort Mike Edwards, accepts the crown and roses after being presented as the l975 Homecoming queen at the halftime of the Trojan-Rebel football game. .Q ' ff 'ia Coming home to see old friends and discussing past memories are all a part of the colorful spectacle that grasps the hearts of post-graduates and brings them back to a place that holds remembrances of a time when 'they were in school here in New Castle. Classes, clubs, and organizations spent the pre-homecoming week constructing floats with everything from goal-posts to Venetian blinds. While several students spent Homecoming eve putting last min- ute touch ups on their float entries, other future grads danced to the music of "Sky King" in the Girls' Gym. Early the next morning, the floats, cars, and the Trojan Band formed into one of the most color- ful homecoming parades yet and made their way to the high school. In the midst of the beautiful October afternoon, our Trojan gridders met the Muncie Southside Rebels, chalking to their successful 1975 season another victory, 39-0. Adding to the weekend gala, was the crowning of Katie Edwards as the 1975 Homecoming Queen. Homecoming '75, the fourth reunion for CHS and NHS grads, seemed to be a duplication of five years ago with beauti- ful weather, a beautiful queen, and a vic- tory by our Trojans. Old spirits were refurbished and new ones commenced as homecoming 1975 became a memory. Hours of hard and devoted work usually pay off, and the seniors of '76 found this to be true as their red, white, and blue Bicentennial float won first place honors in the homecoming parade. C " 'films fs limmef rum At 3:00, June 4, 1975, the bell rang and summer vacation started, from then until 8:15 on August 25, 1975, most students left books and studying behind and began to enjoy a rest from the normal routine of school. Various activities lay ahead of the students as many had plans for trips, camp, jobs or summer school. Students attended FCA camp, yearbook and newspaper workshops, band camp, cheerleading camp and several sports camps, depending on their areas of involvement in school. These camps gave them ideas to organize their various clubs and ac- tivities. Those involved in 4-H clubs around the county found judging was just around the corner as they neared the completion of their projects. Many took part in fairs, exhibits, contests and the different levels of judging connected with their clubs. A total of 435 CHS students at- tended summer school, taking advan- tage of the opportunity for another class or earning an extra credit. Stu- dents were enrolled in such courses as Driver's Ed., Biology, U.S. History and Government. During the vacation, students found summer jobs which helped supply them with money for vacation spend- ing. Many found jobs mowing yards, working on farms, lifeguarding at public swimming pools, babysitting or working at local stores and res- taurants. Mostly, summer was filled with everything the students like best, find- ing time for a favorite sport or hobby, being with friends, riding around, being alone to think, catching up on the favorite soap operas, or just doing nothing at all. Finally, after three months of vacation and leisure ac- tivities, students prepared to start back to school and begin the long wait for next summer. 18 'l fw fr?--""' . ,. 1' . -4- .vs it 4, 41' M bw-f w R P r ' if nv. " . , - -.. - X S1 .-' Bnishing up on his tennis game is Chuck Kern as he plays a few sets at Memorial Park in the hot summer sun. I Taking advantage of the special coke glass offer at Mac's is Brad Knotts, as Jennifer Hoke fills his order. Y Brenda Green enjoys a warm weather bike ride through Baker Park. 19 15 nl- P L UQUQUEJ Not only students, but faculty members also get involved in convocations as Mrs. Manning helped out in the "Sports for All" convocation. Presenting the welcome is Jeff Can- non, serving as Master of Cermonies for the Achievement Day convocation to kick off the homecoming celebration. A pep session is successful only when students get involved and yell. Here, stu- dents show their enthusiam as they sup- port the team with their cheers. 'S ,W , , . X, ' he A! E36 In 1776, two hundred years ago, New Castle, as we know it today, was non-existent. It was only through the westward expansion and opening of the midwest some 50 years later that New Castle and other surrounding com- munities became symbols on a map. Within 150 years, New Castle went from a forest with a handful of Indians to a thriving industrial city in central Indiana with a population of approx- imately 22,000 people. This year we found many interesting occurences in our city such as: businesses' coming and going which helped and hindered the overall em- ployment and economy. . . . a new organization at Chrysler High School called SAC put on a ban- quet for the senior citizens. . . . a large number of high school kids got involved in the mayorial race, which was a mud-slinging campaign. . . . the reassignment of city employees took place after the election. . . . the library expansion. These are a few of the many hap- penings during our 1975-76 school year which affected a great number of our students at Chrysler High School. One of o kind REPORT z-- m .urvwv zz- E' ii S I Q I ! Fw A '1 W i VV HCYS IM AN KATHY Being honored is something which a lot of people look forward to. In this time of student numbers, I.D.'s, income taxes, computer tests and grades, we need to take time to honor those people who have excelled scholastically, in citizenship, and in leadership. Although it is impossible to cover every award, we have tried to represent each area of interest and education in CHS. OPTIMIST HONOREES - For 20 years the National Optimists have sponsored Youth Appreciation Week, honoring high school students on a qualitative as well as quantitative basis. Sixteen Chrysler High School stu- dents, chosen by department heads and vocational educators, represented each department for excellence in effort as well as achievement. All 16 honorees were honored together at a banquet at the First Christian Church. 'iv T S e I I f 24 Representing the science dept., Mark Overmeyerg boys' athletics, Tim Miller, girls' athletics, Rita Sanders, social stu- dies, Sharon Hurdg New Castle Area Vocational School, Christi Daltong home ec., Teresa Becklund Reeceg art, Linda Mark, math dept., Debra Bertramg vocal music, Alan Denneyg instrumental music, Bruce Thompsong vocational health dept., Sheila Whiteg business ed., Mark Hast- ings, English, Brett Ray, NFL, Jeff Cannon, foreign language, John Acker. it L, Q 4 - AFS TRIP ABROAD- Walt Chambers "I learned about the American Field Service during an AFS bus-stop week- end the summer before I applied. The first step was being approved by a local selection committee through a series of interviews. My application was sent to New York at the first of November, and I learned that I was accepted at the end of February. I had no idea where I was to go, meaning that they can send you anywhere in the worldg Asia, South America, etc. I learned I was going to Germany at the end of May, and didn't find out my town or family until the middle ofJune." "On June 27, 1975, I flew fron Indianapolis to JFK in New York. Once there, I attended an orientation camp at C.W. Post College. Next we were on our way to Copenhagen, Denmark arriving there at 3 a.m., We then founc ourselves heading to Hamburg, Germany for another orientation camp. The mair purpose of the camp was to teach hov to speak German."' "The first week was terrible, whicl is not uncommon among AFSers. M3 family was very nice and I love then very much. I found the kids over then very mature and at night we'd go tc parties or to the Disco, and a couplt of times we went bar-hopping." "The trip wasn't a vacation, it wa an experience which changed me verj much. Here at home AFS hasn't stopped I became FORSCO president and I an a member of the local AFS chapter I still learn from my experience and suppose that I'll never stop learning from it. I enjoyed it." SPIRIT MAN - Tim Reeves "Getting involved after taking it easy for two years of high school mad: it a bit more bearable and exciting Perhaps the best part of my senior yea' was playing the role of Spiritman. Al though my interpretation of Spiritmar was a little more conservative than thosn of the past fa reflection of the school? spiritj, the thought was still behind the job. I only tried to set an examplt the other students would follow, and sc that they would get involved in the game." "I think I got what I expected fron high school. However, if I had to do i over again, I would try to do what 1 should have done, instead of what Q wanted to do. All in all, high schoo has been good to me and I am sure these three years will not soon be for otten " S TROJAN MASCOT- Rick Gwinn I was chosen to be the Trojan Mascot ause of my success in football. Being Lcot, a person has to learn to ac- L criticism from your opponents. ie of the remarks might be that 1 have pretty legs', or someone calls a sissy, but I've learned to take it. very exciting being Trojan Mascot, ause you symbolize the whole Trojan ie." I've lettered three years on the Trojan :ball team and started 30 consecutive ies since my sophomore year. My lor year I was chosen to the All rth Central Conference team, first n All-State, and nominated to play he North-South All Star Game." DAR GOOD CITIZEN- Jennifer Hoke Voted DAR Good Citizen by her fellow female seniors, Jennifer Hoke represents dependability, patriotism, serv- ice, and leadership here in CHS. The award was sponsored by the Sarah Winston Henry Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution. "I had to take a test, after I was selected, which was judged on an area level, and I won. After this, I was judged again on a state level. The test was given to all the state DAR winners and is the basis for a scholarship." 1 ,.....,.qn-vi' ,QM BAND - lst, 2nd, 3rd in Summer Contests Fresh from their State Fair victory last year, this year's band had a new flock of approximately 50 members. The music of State Fair '75 was com- prised of a downfield on "Chant and .Iubilo" with a middle composed of "Girl Talk" and "My Favorite Things" closing the show. They started a bit earlier this summer, and four solid weeks of marching drills and musical rehearsals prepared the Marching Trojans for two back to back performances at Delaware, where they received a second, and the Winchester "Old Timers" Festival where they won the competition. Taking ,a week of rest, the bands- men loaded up for a week of cramming and woodshedding at bandcamp at Marian College. After a few finishing touches, and a caravan to boost spirits, the band got all they could ask for, receiving a third at State Fair. World Affairs Institute Nancy Stine and Cathy Coffey were chosen to attend the 29th annual World Affairs Institute held in Cincinnati, Ohio. Approximately 1,000 students at- tended the conference, with speakers from all over the world. Held the first week- end in April, 1975, tours were given for the delegates, of universities, centers, and museums. Panel discussions, films, and other projects surrounded the theme of "This Era of Independence." "The purpose of the institute is for students to better understand factors and issues within another country or current international problems, and to realize how interdependent our world is." f Wiaicyes WHAT 'J AN D WHY BOYS' STATE DELEGATES AND ALTERNATES Being chosen to attend Boys' State is an honor which many junior boys look forward to. Since it was organized in 1937, over 35,000 young men have par- ticipated in the program sponsored by the American Legion Auxiliary, and fi- nanced by Lions Club, The American Legion, and the Kiwanis Club. Through a week in June, delegates Danny Coleman, Greg Rose, and John Acker studied the fundamentals of the governmental system. They and the three alternates, Bob Caffoe, Ted Dankovich, and Jeff Vawrinek were chosen through leadership, scholastic achievement, citi- zenship and interest in government. NATIONAL MERIT SEMI- FINALISTS Dana Covey - Greg Rose Chosen by the National Merit Scholar- ship Committee on the basis of the PSAT test taken during 'the junior year, the semi-finalists were selected on a compari- son of all scores of people who took the test that year. The highest scores in each state were considered semi-finalists. After GIRLS' STATE DELEGATES AND ALTERNATES Financed by the American Legion, Kiwanis club and the Psi Iota Xi Soro- rity, Chris Dorr, Debbie Cassidy, and Diane Turchan were chosen through in- terviews to attend the American Legion Auxiliary sponsored Girls' State held last summer at Indiana State University at Terre Haute. The delegates, and alter- nates, Amy Danielson, Diane Selvy, and Beth Macer were chosen because of scho- lastic achievement, citizenship, as well as many other points that were taken into consideration. The three delegates re- ceived one week of governmental in- struction while in attendance at the camp. All in all, one of the most important things learned is the experience of meet- ing and getting along with other people. 26 N NYJ, '- . 'els 9 . fi? X' 3 , 5 l, V g , ,.. My ,yt "Y.,-1zf?vgzwa,fa:mwf A -11 X .: . , ' ,--f1"' J mai? A 1. ff , 4. -fr K QT' v , - . ' , -. fi . . -mr. '-1 W Q if . . K I-,: 'Y , M y , Miggsw Q , ft fif- 4, Q.. - A .ff-4 'A the rating forms were filled out, and the SAT's taken, a composite of these scores led to a finalist rating. For finalists, many scholarships were available through the school or place of parent's employment. "I feel being named a semi-finalist was only based on one test," said Dana,"but as an award it is quite an honor. Through my three years of high school, I have always enjoyed excelling in classes. One of my most rewarding experiences has been working on this Rosennial. Through my three years on the staff, I have seen it change into what it is today." I feel that being named a semi-finalist is a surprise." reflected Greg, "and quite an honor. Through my time here at Chrys- ler High, I have really enjoyed education. I feel my most rewarding experience has been to be able to be a member of NFL. The influence presented to me by Mr. Robbins has been quite valuable, and I deeply appreciate it. One of my most rewarding philosophical experiences was being in the respected fellowship of the Royal Order of the Rocky Mountain Social Club." Recently, Greg was one of 15 chosen as a Lily Scholar at Wabash. The award was based on class rank, test scores, and personal interviews. a at lv-rc ACHIEVEMENT DAY This year the sixteenth annual Achieve ment Day Convocatlon was held October 10 1n the Auditorium One of the ma1n students of Chrysler Hlgh School who have malntalned a high scholastic average during their high school career Twenty five seniors recelved honor Jackets maintaining a 3 8 grade average wh1le forty one seniors were awarded crests and certlficates for mamtaining at least a 3 4 scholastic average The junior class was led by 72 students who were awarded a certificate for maintaining at least a 34 average through two years of high school education The 1975 1976 Honor Jacket winners were John Acker Peggy Apple Debra Bertram Teresa Blackburn Julia Brown mg Susan Cain Walter S Chambers Cathy Coffey Dana Covey Amy Danlel son William Fuller Donald Gehlert Susan Hellman Jennifer Hoke Lynette Holiday D1annaLorton Beth Macer De Selvy Nancy Stine D1ane Turchan Jef fery Vawrmek Kathy Watt and Timothy Watters Senlors maintaining at least at 34 scholastic average were Mary Ann Alex ander Robert Caffoe Jeffrey Cannon Debra Cassidy Marilyn Catron Lisa Coleman Debra Crisp Theodore Danko vich Tamara Denney Gregory Dietz Lydia Dorr Billy Jo Edwards Katherme Edwards Jeanette Frazier Jon Goodwm Julie Hamm Helen Haven Darlene Hughett Sharon Hurd Kandi Hutson Cheryl Johnson Tom Kenrick Sarah Kratz Linda Mark Ahce MllllS Matt Morris, William Noblef Mark Over- meyer, Timothy Reeves, Greg Rose, Larry Schmidt, Mark Sidwell, David Smith, James Stawick, Elizabeth Stump, Walter Turnbull, Joyan Wisehart, John Wittler, Robert Woods, and Tana Wool- dridge. Juniors who have maintained at least a 3.4 average for two years were Rona Mischele Arnold Richard Auten Kim- berly Bailey Barbara Baker Marv Bir Joyce Browning L1sa Bunner Marcia Catron Karen Chilton Marianne Clapp Jeffrey Clark Thomas Conley Ruth Ann Cooper Kathy Crabtree Brent Crockett Carol Dav1s Darlene Davis Karen De Wltt Jennifer Duncan Janice Ellson Teresa Evans Patr1c1a Garner Lisa Geh lert James Gough Leon Grear Kimberly Gregory Tamara Grlmm and Kevin Groce Also Teresa Hamblln Christopher Hamm Kevin Hart Heather Hastlngs Brlan Hoke Wade Horn Margaret John son John Karp Charles Kern Jerry Key Kristen Kinkade Dennls Knlght Etsuko Kuhn Brenda Lorton Renee McMullen LISH McNel1s Cynthia Meek Susan M11 asheski Elizabeth Mlller Penny Myers John Neal Dav1d Neuman Dawna Nor r1s Bruce Painter Chrlstv Pasman Terri Poor Floral Rams Jerry Reamer De lynda Reese Jack Riggs Debra Roberts Jeffrey Sahlberg Paul Schmidt Brenda Schuffman M1ck1 Sells Brian Stawick Ronald Turnbull Janet Tyner Jana Watt Cindy Watters Dara Webber and Ken neth Wells STATE COMMISSION SCHOLARSHIPS With college educatlon coming up many juniors and especially semors look to scholarships as a source of finance for their continuing careers One of the means of finance IS the State Commission Scholarshlps These awards are given in annual amounts which range from S100 toS1400 but which may not exceed the cost of tultion The Commission committee re views financial ituatlons of applicants and also looks upon the student s scho lastic performance while in high school Winners are announced by the end of the fiscal school year 7 5 Y 9 5 . , . 7 . 7 - 5 . 7 Y 5 Y Y Y . , . a 1 . , . s . , , . . , . - , , 4 7 ' a 1 7 7 - 9 I 7 . 7 , - 5 Y 1 7 . . , . . , Y 5 5 . . , . , . - ., . . , , 1 . v ' . , . , . 5 . s . 9 ' ' Y . 9 5 , ' 7 , . . , . . , . . , , , 1 1 ' . 1 W ' , 7 - 1 1 1 , , ' - , . . y , . 1 1 1 1 ' , . , 1 1. . , . , Q , - PUFPOSGS Of this affalf WHS to h0U01' the anna Sanderson, Rita Sanders, Diana . 1 I ' I I 1 , , I , . ' , - 1 1 o 1 , 1 1 1 7 7 1 . , . .. ' , , - . . . ' - 1 - 1 Q n , , , . . 1 G . , . , . . Y . I . . s . , - . . . 7 7 . , . . .. . 7 . , . .. U . . . ,- . p , , - ' 5 7 , , g , . , . 7 , . - , . y . . .7 . 27 W1 JETS WAHATJ7 A ND VV PHY Student Guests of Rotary Covermg many areas of achrevement 1n CHS thls year erghteen senlor boys were chosen as Rotary Guests Each palr of guests attended the weekly gathermg of the Rotary Club for a luncheon and program Representmg the male s1de of the Semor Class were John Acker Bob Caffoe Jeff Cannon Walter Chambers Dan Coleman Alan Denney D1no Fox Blll Fuller Matt Morrls T1m Reagan Greg Rose Davrd Sm1th Walt Turnbull Rrck Gwrnn Todd McLaren Jrm Stawrck John Wrttler and Robble Woods warm Cavahers Drum and Bugle Corp Davrd Owens There are many dlfferent fields of musrc whrch are open to people today One of the most rapldly growmg areas rn muslc IS the Drum and Bugle Corps bands Last fall Davrd Owens arranged for an aud1t1on and was accepted to the Chrcago Cavalrers one of the natxon s leadmg groups I guess Ive always been lnterested rn musrc but It wasnt untrl seven years ago that I started playlng trumpet Through practlcmg at least two or three hours a day and w1th the encourage ment of Mr Langdon Mr Shauver and fellow band members I have won a few honors such as the sophomore and Junlor band awards whlch entltled me to attend a muslc cl1n1c at Indiana Unrverslty the past two summers I frrst found out about drum and bugle corps by llstenlng to some corps records that Shauv brought ln last sum mer I attended two corps shows last mr' summer and upon seerng these ll con vrnced me that I would somehow get mto the corps After arrangmg for an audltlon I was accepted by the Chrcago Cavalrers who rn 1975 were ranked erghth rn the U S In the past 28 years the Cavalrers have won the Ill1no1s State Amerrcan Leglon and the V F W t1tle 17 trmes ll natronal t1tles and have performed for every Presrdent smce Ersenhower In splte of all the work that wxll be rnvolved I thmk the experlence and trarnrng w1ll prove every valuable I plan on attendrng college near Chlcago and I would lrke to teach or wr1te music but Im always open to conslder any as my career I wrll have to remember those who have helped me out when ever I needed help such as Mr Shauver Mr Langdon and all the other teachers students and anyone else who helped me through these growmg years DECA1n Competltlon One of the many successful New Castle Area Vocatronal organlzatlons was DECA fD1str1but1ve Educatron Clubs of AITICFICHH Thls past wlnter the group competed and won seven honors rn a contest that was conducted wrth the 1ntent1on of measurmg members sk1lls 1n SpCC1flC marketrng act1v1t1es Held at Ball State Unrverslty the local DECA chapter competed agarnst nrne other chapters for honors ln thtrteen events In the contest first and second place fmlshers then advanced to the state competltlon F1rst place wlnners ln state progress to the natlonal competltron held 1nCh1cago The competltron was judged by com petent busrness managers four bemg from the New Castle area. Winners for the New Castle DECA chapter were as follows: FIRST Parliamentary Procedure Team Chalrman Cary Rlggs Sec retary Debbre Purvrs Treasurer Greg Warner John James Scott Crab tree and Patsy Peavre FIRST Human Relatrons Decrslon Makrng Team Bob Hall John Tyner and T1m York FIRST Merchandrsrng Spelhng Test Teresa Hamblm SECOND Merchandlslng Declslon Makmg Team Debbre Lowe Candy Roblnson and Kevm Whary SECOND Publrc Speakrng Melvm Murphy SECOND Sales Demonstratlon Jeff Lantz THIRD Newspaper Advertrslng Lay out Tony Reynolds OEA1n Competltlon Another of the successful New Castle Vocatronal organrzatlons was OEA fOf flee Educatlon Assoc1at1onj Members of the local chapter part1c1pated 1n the reglonal competltron held ln Conners vrlle last February The partrcrpants competed rn twenty seven events wrth ten offered only at state competltlon level Seven members of the local OEA chapter advanced to the state competrtlon held 1n Indranapolls Progressrng to state were Accountmg I Joyce Brownmg Accountmg II Mark Hastlngs Stenographlc II Dtana Lorton Typmg I Patty Rlchardson Typrng II Donna Potts F1le Clerk Llsa Howard FIRST Job Intervrew D1anaLorton West Pomt Nomlnatlon Doug Bowers After many areas of consrderatron Doug Bowers was grven a congresslonal nommatlon to attend West Pomt Mrlltary Academy 1n West Pomt New York if . - - , . . . 1 U G v 1 . . . . 9 9 ' . . . , ' , . . L I 9 9 9 9 9 " H 'K ' -. ' . . . .5 I , W v 9 s s ' ' ' 1 n 1 9 ' 9 5 9 2 L ' ' 1 ' 9 9 ' K lk H 7 5 5 I . l . T 1 Y 7 - V . , . , , . 5 . . , , , . . . . ' 99 ' . N , . . SS ' ' 1 ' is . - , l . . ' . . G . 9 3 X . . . . , . i . , I . . . . . I I ' t, pOSS1bll1ty 1n muslc. Whatever I choose . . . , . . , . , . - . . 1 , g 1 Q l ' ' I , ' . 1 1 , -1 ' ' ' 7 1 1 1 1 1 ' 9 Gi 9. ' 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 . . . , . ' ' , , , 9 7 7 1 ' ' 1 1 1 , 1 I 9 . I 1 . , . , , 7 I 1 1 1 1 , . . . . Q, - - ,, . . . . . , .. - ' . . . - ' , ' if 1, .. ', hj,.,fQr'3-21 I F, fi '- 1 - A' 28 i ,U Q, 4 rs- 4, s I . N G9-,Li , ., 'The process is somewhat involved. Vhile still in California, I contacted a entleman in Pasedena about West Point. Ie gave me instructions and the moti- ation to try for an appointment. The rocess required me to send transcripts 'om high school, SAT scores, three :tters of recommendation, and a per- Jnal history. Once this was received y the Congressman, he looked it over nd arranged a meeting for me with ie special Academy selection committee. 'he committee questioned me for ap- roximately 25 minutes. Fortunately, I :ceived the nomination, and now have ie opportunity to be accepted." "The reason I wanted to try this is ecause of what the Academy has to ffer. I'll have the opportunity to travel, 1eet people, and do things a regular allege could not offer me. West Point as a nine year obligationg you have :ur years of college, and five years 1 the regular Army. I also had a rother who attended and he said that lest Point is a unique experience nd very rewarding." Besides his classes Doug participated 1 several extra-curricular activities. While t CHS he lettered in tennis, took part 1Thespian productions, and debated. Naval Academy Nomination - Jim Stawick Upon' receiving an interview with men rom the Naval Academy, Jim Stawick vas nominated by 10th District Con- gressman Phil Sharp, to attend the United States Naval Academy in Annapolis, vlaryland. "The idea that I might attend the Slaval Academy came through the ef- 'orts of one Richard Leitch, a very Jrominent figure in the community of New Castle. He started the idea with various letters to the Academy, mostly to the wrestling coach. It was followed up by my father, Gerald Stawick, who spent a lot of time setting up an in- terview with the men from the Academy. I was interviewed in Richmond, and fortunately, they returned a very favor- able report. Approximatley six weeks later, I received word that Phil Sharp, 10th District Congressman, had nomin- ated me to be accepted by the Naval Academy. Being accepted means a four year education at Annapolis, and also serving the United State Government for five years upon graduation." L.S. Ayres Art Show - Courier- Times Patio Show Once a year, around January 15, the Art room becomes immensely busy as students realize it is time for the L.S. Ayres Scholastic Art Awards Show in Indianapolis. The show is put on every year for high school and junior high school students all over Indiana. It is one of the main art high-lights of the year. Joe Durbin, Bryant Whitted, and Kent Odle were nominated for honor- able mentions and their work was dis- played later in February in the L.S. Ayres and Company Auditorium. Earlier in the year, several art stu- dents entered their work in the Courier- Times Art Patio Show, This year's show was judged much more strictly than those of the past. More work was not accepted due to the demands being a little higher. Winning first place monetary honor was Bryant Whitted, Alice Millis won a second and third monetary honor. The Patio Show was sponsored by the Henry County Art Association. Family Leader of Tomorrow - Kelly Woodward With all the emphasis on the Wo- men's Liberation movement, Kelly Wood- ward did his bit for the Men's Liberation movement. He became the first male to win the Betty Crocker Family Leader of Tomorrow title. "I was totally surprised when I heard that I had won. I had been taking a lot of kidding about it. I don't think that my mother believed me when I picked her up from work. But she said if I could do that well on a homemaker's test, I ought to do better at home." Kelly became interested in this test mainly because it could lead towards a scholarship. Eleven boys took the test along with twenty-nine girls. He was named Family Leader of Tomorrow by scoring high in a written knowledge and attitude examination that was given to high school seniors throughout the country. Kelly received a certificate from General Mills, who sponsored the Betty Crocker Family Leader of Tomorrow test. State winners received a 51,500 college scholarship and the runnerups received a S500 scholarship. The state winner traveled to Washington D.C. for a tour and interview. The interviews determined the All-American Family Leader of Tomorrow who received a 55,000 college scholarship. The national interview was conducted by the Science Research Associates of Chicago. The local Betty Crocker test was conducted by two C.H.S. guidance counselors, Miss Evelyn Rentchler and Mrs. Ann Poer. The test covered areas such as finan- cial management, parenthood, social activities, and nutrition. ..,,,.f .... ,sry , .M-1 . 29 WAX NB AW WEE Showing off his outfit in front of the class is Bob Smith, representing one of the popular fashions among the boys. Sophomores Pam Worthington, Teri Hagerty and Karen Moore found com- fort in casual clothing. W ,,,,, , n-ffwnwd I Lf' 30 Short hair cuts and soft blouses were stylish this year as junior Jana Watt found out. An excellent example of current fashion trends is .lana Crisp as she portrays the overall look of l976. - A s , amz., '01, MToday almost anything goes." Thi: was found to be true among the student: at CHS as they discovered many nev styles and fashions. Skirts were longer, shoes weren't sc big and clunky, the layered look wa: common, and denim was still the big favorite. This year, with the longer lengths skirts and dresses were more popular Ruffles were an added feature and be came a favorite hemline. Scarves ant belts were welcome accessories as tht finishing touch for an outfit. They alsc helped stretch the wardrobe and perket up an old outfit. Shoes didn't have such tall heels al though platforms were still found on manj feet. The emphasis this year was on com fort. Earth shoes were the new fad ant it seemed as ifeveryone had a pair. Sweaters, vests and shirts were em phasized as the layered look, and stu dents found they helped warm up a colt classroom. This look was good for anj outfit, and it was well liked by students. Denim, because of its versatility, dura ability and comfort, was the best seller It seemed to come in all shapes ant sizes. Faded and pre-washed denim wa in demand. There were many specia features in blue jean fashions, including patchwork, tucks, buckles, contras stitching and detailed pockets. Glasses and hairstyles changed too Glasses changed from small to big. Wir' frames were still popular, but the big plastic frames began to take precedence Hairstyles had somewhat of an orienta infiuence with bangs becoming mort prominent. Curly and short hairstyle became more common. The boys follower the trend too, getting permanents ant layering their hair. Clothes reflected the attitudes of stu dents. The favorite look was casual carefree, and styled for comfort. Enjoying her lunch is Cheryl Boyd as she exhibits one of the popular fashions among the students at Chrysler High School. fwwlfi'-3x'W7f' 1: Q was 3 , :f"'fvQfr",mQ, fr .f ,, , Wa., 1353.3 .Ny ,in -mu mi? -1- ., 4. -. -l lf5,J, 'ii j: 4 , RR, 595: - ,,. i , A , L"A IA War- ' wx aj 4- L Q-My 4' Y 'WffWW'f4h 'Z' 3 - - mafia, ,. , Wuqmw - L, - . X Y H Q Z I .A 4 ' S f av ,, 4 A .3 Wt "fs "--- . ..,. ex bl "Curtain, five minutes!" "My make-up, someone check my make-up!" "Who put the grass skirts back last night?" "Make-sure that set in Act II holds up tonight." "Tell the tech. guys to check the spotlight in the third scene!" "Let's get the ferns in the right places tonight!" "Where are those coconut shells?" "Break a leg, tonight!" "Thanks!" "Quiet backstage!" There are a few coughs out in the audience, but otherwise complete silence. Then there is applause as the conductor makes his entry. The over- 5 ? I I -f D I 11 ture starts . . . the curtain opens . . . the lights come up and someone sings. Two months of rehearsing are put at stake. Night after night of mem- orizing, carry-out meals, and late night homework, hammering on sets, paint- ing flats, and armloads of props, com- pliments and criticism from the di- rectors, numbering and organizing of tickets come to an end. One might call the musical a sacrifice. The people in- volved call it dedication. "South Pacific" to this day remains in the top ten of long-running musicals on Broadway. The Chrysler Thespian Troupe and Music Department pre- sented this war-time libretto as a re- sult of rigid schedules, sacrifice, and sheer determination. The two South With hours of preparations set on the line, the show goes on with David Dennison playing the part of Emile de Becque, a rich French planter, and Sherry Kuhn, as Ensign Nellie Forbush of the United States Navy. Sea islands were brought to life by an experienced cast who filled the parts of a rich French planter, a female en- sign, and a mis-informed Navy lieute- nant, as well as many supporting roles. The foundation of character as well as excellent set, ticket, prop, costume, and make-up, recreated the scene as one of America's favorite musicals, "South Pacific," was reacquainted with the audience. Directing the Rogers and Hammerstein Musical were Dennis Eller, supervising stage work, and Charles Craig, leading the orchestra and vocals. Buzz Adams QBruce Atklnsonb knows the real reason that Billls Ulm Barry wants to go to Ball, leading into "Nothing Like A Dame." Despite the ribbing of his fellow men, Luther Billls takes credit for another fine job done by the Blllis Laundry. One of 0 kmd REPORT elif During a future flashback of Chrys- ler High's 1975-76 school year, C.H.S. alumni might recall most viv- idly the homecoming, the dances, and the sports events. What they may fail to remember are the decisions which helped to shape their total character. At the time, those decisions may not have seemed monumental, but they were instrumental, in helping a student become what he was destined to be. These were not just the normal questions of whom one should date or what sport in which to participate, but also decisions as to whether to buy those cigarettes or to spend some time at a favorite type of party. At first, the alumni may recall that New Castle was boring, but if they really think back to the 1975-76 school year, they will remember that for some, boredom was relieved at the common week-end parties. "Hey! My parents are out of town tonight!! Come over and we'll have a party!" , . . "What have you got?" . . . "Not much. Bring your own." "Pm not old enough to get that kind of stuff." . . . "I've got a connection." . . . "That's cool!" . . . "Come on over around 8." . . . "Later." Going out on the town, drinking, smoking, and experimenting with drugs was a common fad but one which could prove harmful. A way to relax and be a part of a social life while getting a weekend high was a part of the 1976 era. It was a challenge to go out and do something, get away with it, and at the same time, get blown away. Parties were a good way to get a lot of kids together and to have ai good time, and to break the dull life in New Castle. 34 eel be che. What these students often failed to consider was the other side of the matter. Not only was drinking illegal, but it has been proved harmful. C11 Over half of all people killed in drunken accidents were teenagers. Q25 There were over a million teenage alcoholics in the United States. Teenage drinking was looked down upon by society even though over one third of the high school students in the nation got drunk once a month, many times in the presence of their parents. The effect of alcohol slowed down re- action times which made driving hazardous and resulted in statistics showing that teenage drinker arrests have tripled in the last decade. The most dangerous aspect of drinking was that the drinker could sub-consciously have a need for alcohol. Over 70 per- cent of all alcoholics began to drink in their teenage years, not knowing what they were getting into. Alcoholism could only ,end in rehabilitation or death, either emotionally or physically. ,In 1976, it was estimated there were 1,300,000 teenage alcoholics. The de- cision was yours. While deep into thought, Alex Cole sits and re- laxes in a nearly deserted hall. fposed picture! f. 51 57 vb. -..., .W 1 .fa f N.. :fi -.ffwd After deciding on "Tropical Par- adise" for the 1975 junior prom theme, the committees started manv hours of preparation for the prom night, May 17. Committees had been working hard, but there was still so much to do on the eve of prom. Many interested juniors kept busy setting up decorations until 11:30 p.m. and then returned the day of the dance for the last-minute details. The halls created a jungle effect with tropical fruit, wild elephants and ferocious tigers. Upon entering the girls' gym, students crossed a bridge covering two bubbling, little ponds. The gym was excitingly decorated with palm trees, fruit baskets, and colorful flowers. Decorations were outstanding and set the mood with a tropical atmosphere. Couples started congregating at 8:00 p.m., ready and excited to dance to the music of "Lone Star," a popular rock group. Upon entering the "Trop- ical Paradise," the couples could have their pictures taken in the theme's setting by Reid's Studio. Refresh- ments were served throughout the evening in the East Cafeteria to pro- vide breaks for the band and the hot, thirsty dancers. After couples enjoyed three hours of hard dancing, excitement mounted for the prom queen candidates and escorts until Katie Edwards was crown- ed the 1975 Junior Prom Queen by her escort Greg York. As the evening of prom continues to roll on, Jodi Hagerman and Jim Langdon enjoy them- selves while they get down on the music from the rock band Lone Star. Queen candidates and their escorts are Debbie Crisp and Brad Woods, Katie Edwards and Greg York, Jennifer Hoke and Brad Knotts, Kandi Hutson and Walt Turnbull, Jara Masters and Mike Cook, Sharon Troxell and Rondal Ber- tram, and Joyan Wisehart and Bob Smith. 36 -we . ....,- ,,.,m 1- ,-...n..f1sa......ws-.t....-sa-:JW W 1 Y... s A Night In A Tropical Paradise as if f W Katie Edwards ex crowned the 1975 Prom Queen by her escort Greg York. citedly smiles after being , .. ' an KKK. Q s N s 3 5 w v N V . Q ,Sf egg-, , . I i bl Q,,- mss yu vs s ,Q s wa ss ,ny x ss suxff 1- , K su Hs, . n f-Q 4 ' ' ff' 1' if , 1 Y ' 1 i l 3 . i l , 7 A-we 411, , f Anxiously awaiting the decision of the queen are' Kandi Hutson and Greg Chappell, Jara Masters and Mike Cook, Nancy Stine and Rick Gwinn, Gay Strauch and Ron Turnbull, Debbie Tyner and Jim Meyers, Jana Crisp and Scott Goodwin, Beth Miller and Bruce Wadman, Suzanne Horn and Chris Sell, and Cheryl Boyd and Henry Downs. ' IQQ Q ,pf tag saga 'M A so fs" ft 'f 1 ii- fv, if Q I 'A 3 HBV! "Love is if she asks you to the winter dance." In addition to the usual tradition that the winter dance is the "girl ask guy" dance, the leap year also encouraged the girls to get the special guy to escort them to the dance centered around the romantic theme "Love is . . The date February 21 gave the decor the perfect "hearts' hop" effect. Upon entering the hall by the cafeterias, couples passed through red, white and pink streamers forming a heart shaped cascade. To the right, the windows were covered with name tags that were heart shaped Valentines between two cupids. Throughout the halls, hearts were dangling from the ceiling accompanied by streamers and flowers. Two major attractions in the cafeteria were the flowery fountain and the kissing booth. The entrance to the gym was a romantic love tunnel which added to the atmosphere of love. White trees covered with hearts were spread throughout the girls' gym with para- chutes hanging above, almost hidden by colorful flowers and balloons in red, white, and pink. After the couples admired the decorations, they congregated in the gym to dance to the music of Hot Ice for approximately three hours until time for the coronation during which Mike Cook crowned Jara Masters the 1976 Winter Dance Queen. Throughout the evening many couples en- joyed dancing to the music of the rock band Hot Ice. Jara Masters excitedly smiles while Mike Cook crowns her the 1976 Winter Dance Queen. 39 YCUDEIIE r LiFE iI'l NA? "To the Rosennial: . I am the youngest son of a middle-class family in Saigon. My father is a retired Elementary School Principal. He is also owner of a rubber plantation in Tranlong County - thirty miles north-west of Saigon. All my brothers and sisters have college-education, except one in the Army. In Vietnam school boys' and school girls are separated. In some new high schools like mine CLUONG VAN CAN H.S.J there are boys and girls, but we study in different classes in two separated buildings. Not all students can study in public high schools. All those listed public high schools have very hard entrance exam- inations and so, only the good students can enter. The boys' high schools have the atmosphere of a military school. All students wear uniforms and have hair cuts. Self-government and group-responsibility are applied. And if a student violates schoolis discipline, usually the whole class will be punished. Every high school student is also a militiaman. So, besides studying in classroom, we have to take a military basic training course which includes of using weapons, fighting tactics and first aids. The high school educational program in Vietnam is much heavier than in the United States with many difficult and tricky examinations. Each student has to study two foreign languages: French and English, and high Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry, Literature The seniors 'have to study some subjects that are not taught in high schools in other countries, such as philosophy and calculus. But they lack the practical and really useful subjects like driver training, business education, mechanics . . . which are taught in American high schools. The Vietnamese public high schools produce a type of intelligent and good behaviored students, but they are quiet, reticent and unfamiliar to the real life outside schools. There is not much freedom and fun in a Vietnamese high school. The only three occasions for ceremonies, sports games and parties in a year are New Year Dav, Graduation Day, and School's Memorial Day. Unlike the American students, most of the Vietnamese students dont have a chance or time to have a girl for boyj friend until they graduate from high school. The school boys have to study hard to death because if they fail in an examination they have to join the Army right away, and they may be killed on battle fields or become handicapped. They are always depressed by the terrible war that lasts more than twenty years in their suffering country and effects directly on their lives and their future. Schooling in a public high school is a pride, and exemption from military service is a favor for the good students, it also means exemption from danger and death. But it's also a hard time. There is no thing to enjoy, there are only things to worry about!! Although I lived in the war for several years, I didn't have to face the Communists. Like other high school students, I was in the militia and was armed but I've never shot a bullet. I left Saigon a few hours before it was taken over by the Communists. A helicopter of U.S. Marines saved us in a very dangerous situation at TanSonNhut International Airport and brought us to a war ship on the Pacific Ocean. After a long and hard trip we arrived in the United States in July, 1975. Going with me were other seven members of my family: my brother Phuc, my brother Xuoi, and his wife and four children. My brother Phuc had been in Indiana before. He graduated from Indiana University in 1972 and had a friend in New Castle: Miss Carolyn Hiatt. So, Miss Hiatt sponsors us to New Castle and helped us to begin a new life over here. My brothers and my sister-in-law found new jobs, and all the kids go to school. I continue my education as a senior at Chrysler High School and also work part-time as a burger chef at Mac's hamburger restaurant. Like other Vietnamese refugees, I had a hard time adjusting to the new life with many difficulties caused by language barrier, weather change, and culture shock But with the help of very nice teachers, counselors, and other people, I finally overcame these problems. The only one problem that still remains is the mental problem. I'm always missing my Mom and Dad, my brothers, sisters and my friend in Vietnam. And at school I always have the feeling of being lonely and isolated among the strangers. That's the greatest unhappiness of my life, now." Stacy Pham FRIDHY DET 31 Throughout each day of our lives so many things happen, some captured in memories while others are forgotten in the past. In the future, only the spectacular events will stick in our memories while we forget the ordinary happenings. This year this special section, "A Day in the Life," is trying to recapture the day in and day out life style so memories can be locked in the future - not only the past. Friday, October 31st, was chosen for 'the day in a life' because it likely would be a typical day at Chrysler High School. By saying a typical day, we mean students would be coming to school, going to. classes, cutting classes, eating lunch in the cafeteria, going out to eat lunch, sitting through the dull boring afternoon classes hoping and praying that they may flex,daydreaming about evening plans and finally being the first -person to leave the high school parking lot. We only anticipated a few main events like the last football game against Kokomo with a Halloween dance afterwards, and a convo in the Auditorium, but we were pleasantly surprised with the t.p. job done on Mr. Dicken's room, the Rosennial staff singing to Mr. Patterson, and the employees at Mac's dressing up in costumes to help celebrate the Halloween night. And during this typical day, five photog- raphers were busy taking over 300 pictures will still so many things left out. There are very few entirely original ideas throughout the world, in fact credit must be given to the 1975 TALISMAN which in turn borrowed this idea from the LIFE magazine. While working on this new section, we realize that it is not so important how or where the idea originated but rather how each of us can benefit from it with the use of our own ideas. The picture of the sleeping students begins and ends the day, like the hands on a clock, while others events are recorded throughout the hours. It is hoped that this section will bring to mind the often taken-for-granted things which are a large part ofthe days in our lives. 42 Q.-fm 3 P' ,Be 2 if X , ,ff - ff! B.. all .4 .ea J Nm J? SSW K' kk: - .fl I .. af , f Trying to pull herself out of bed after a long night's rest, Sydney Coleman de- cides to catch a few more winks of sleep. A donut shop is a very popular place for breakfast as Tony Marcum realizes when he is called into work at 6:30 a.m. After seven hours of sleep, Greg Brown starts out his daily routine by shaving. Getting ready for school can be a hassle especially when you're running late and you still have to take down your hair, but Tami Jarvis seems clam while she adds a finishing touch to her eye make-up. 44 THRU THE RUUTIHE Enjoying a pleasant breakfast Mindy and Lydia Crawford are being watched by their younger sister. 32521 51.v,,, fs' .. ' '!'- fffnif pn ff Ny 1' ' , ,fr , .,.. . . , Walking provides good exercise and Jim Atkinson takes advantage ofit. ,,..- Mike Cook is concentrating on a surprise L Sociology Test given by Mr Koger eseesazseggg The cafeteria provides a place to relax for some juniors like Beth Miller, Clyde Smith, Sherri Chitwood, and Suzanne Horn. A t.p. job is done on Mr. Dicken's room and Walt Chambers is trying to tind the way to his desk. 3 The band practice room always provides an area where the girls can reflect upon their beauty as they prepare for the game. Chris Dorr retires early like many other students due to the SAT test which will be given the following morning. rv? v"'!L'f ' 'f:'1"'W i DHRHNESS DESEENDS ,, ,rag , .rigs , , tw :S - ti aww S, - are-f V 4 S l i f fi? 2.1 I . 3 N, , its 1 y 3, ii' ,- ,fx l ,- .5 , i ,-,ff f ' ,i" fe 1- 1 if 1 ,L h . J .3 mf ,ni ol Q ,g . 1 .9 t gw ' -wx , ,, ir., - A .X ,, in Q A ai of 11 J' af? ' Bw 15 rx . , , ,, A 5 5 v, f ?f Q f ' w fri .P Eff. Running through the band tunnel, Coach- es Twyman Patterson and Lance Rhodes anticipate another Trojan victory over Kokomo, making the record 7-3. As a part of celebrating Halloween, Lisa Leffingwell dresses up as a clown at Mac's the popular hangout. mann . , ,, V P 1 PSM Peacefully Sydney Coleman returns to slumber after a typical day in the life of 'aft Fw A my a CHS student. Wit t , I V t ,ti v 4 H . . W1 I l li J 1-. ur x ,,,.. fn , -, 4, -ve -5 9 X345 "" R ,QL . 'it-iw 1 als M , ra , X5 Q", ff" ' K1 ,kit , W I , A X W I .3 ' I , - f " up ' lv 5 rg ' 'K M ' "' '-Q vi 'E " 'fs' NA M' lex' L MA jf Q' 5651 rn - in x' 0 Q 1' l-'fi 'Z 'Jima Eff- 'FN Y' Z-' ,. sf' 1 5 at Mn- ' 'E3.,+m,.., .ff 7 -' My 5 W Y w wfT . A .J 0-----"" 1 vi' fi Ns"'f'1 A jf ", ' ..i ' M?'rW"""" A f V ' ""' .1 +41 Q .Ev rf' xr 4 ' , wwf,- U '. 1 v 'h I .. liiwigwkli,-5,l'3,:'I7': - 1? . 'Q -- iw zf ,,w'4wf- f . .- .- 1 ' x. A . ' --.L 1fQ:,--.,,,- 4 J ., f' Q w -w It Y v 'N 9 bwzgfwh-ijiigu "' f. 4 'y. ,.a""h.Q'1'M'3 .4 f- J 'V ' W ,Di ' 4, E v x Q V4 5 - . 2 as " , X , 1 A" 'KEL Q 3.6 41 Q Q91-Mfmmi, fm' fm r Q mm' , X R' ' Q. In ' '.':4:.7'5f"5,"-Q . 4 Q I X - . N .J - ,g"f'Qg,.,tQi'Q - qfmr:,:"', CQ fn N Q U ,JT df- - N, ,eg .,. -fi x V ' . 'N J "' Q ' 9 ' . ' x QQ if X 1 'fix , , X, : I . X 7" I LAg'X 43.0 , . .ff " s Q-w a' , :Lffi v . M 1 f ' x - 5 i ' , 1 V j Ar f L' N A -sr.. ,AQ 9 V-'X M! n-my ' . ,Q QT' 'fr ':' 1 After 12 long years of education, suddenly everything whirled by too rapidly for the seniors. The busy week started out on May 30 with the Sen- ior Breakfast sponsored by the School Food Service staff. The recognition convocation came next that same Fri- day afternoon, and many seniors were honored by the school and community with awards and scholarships for out- standing academic and athletic achieve- ments. Marie-Joelle Tisserand pre- sented the school with a flag from her native country of France and bade farewell to the friends she had made during her stay. Sunday was the next day of activi- ties for the seniors. On the hot after- noon, seniors took advantage of their long gowns to conceal their shorts and T-shirts. Aware of the heat, Rev. Robert Sherrill addressed the seniors at Baccalaureate with a brief message entitled "What's New For You?" The entire service lasted only 35 minutes. It was another hot and humid night, June 4, 1975, with storms predicted, but the seniors' spirits were high. Brent Taylor, one of the four valedictorians, and Tom Hamm, salutorian, were stu- dent speakers for Commencement. The 353 seniors received their diplomas and were declared graduated. At that mo- ment, everything seemed to change. The juniors, who had been awaiting this moment with eager anticipation, were overwhelmed with the realization that they were "the" seniors. The graduated Class of 1975 faced this moment with mixed emotions, hesitating to leave CHS and their close friends behind, but eager to meet the future and ready to start a new life. The last activity for the Class of 1975 was the Nightclub Party held in the Girls' Gym. "A Thousand and One Nights" was the setting for the Night- club, and couples danced to the music of Exile and Faith. Surrounded by sand dunes and cam- els, couples enjoyed eating food fur- nished by the sponsor of the Nightclub, the New Castle Chamber of Com- merce. Chrysler High School principal, William E. Lehr, was dressed as a sultan and flanked by two slave girls. The week ended as abruptly as it had arrived. For the graduates, CHS was now a memory, but for the Class of 1976, it began their senior year. Greg Rose, usher for the 1975 commencement, stands by to give seniors Bobby Boyd, Brenda Myers, Brent Taylor and Gary Wadman their next cue. 2 , A at I LD 'T .2 : cu DS C L C5 GJ L6 rx 50 Attempts to Assassinate the President Threats of assassination returned to the news, once again, as two attempts on the life of President Ford were made within a short period of time. While shaking hands with well-wishers in Sacramento, California, on September 5, 1975, Lynette "Squeaky" Fromme pointed a Colt .45 revolver towards the President. Fromme, a follower of con- victed mass murderer Charles Manson was wrestled to the ground by secret service agents while Ford was rushed from the scene. The second attempt on the President's life was made on September 22, 1975. Sarah Jane Moore fired a shot at Ford outside a San Francisco Hotel. The bullet passed within six feet of Ford's head. He commented on the two incidents by stating that "it is something you have to live with." Nixon's China Visit Stirred Controversy Former President Richard Milhous Nixon revisited China in February of 1976, the scene of his diplomatic triumph of 1972. Nixon was the first foreigner of any consequence to meet with Hua Kuo-Feng, the successor to the late Chou En-lai. The Chinese government made arrange- ments for Nixon to travel on a Chinese jet. Earlier invitations had been turned down by the former President due to ill health. President Ford reported that the visit had nothing to do with foreign policy and that it would not produce any com- plications with foreign affairs. Some felt that Nixon's visit would hurt President Ford's 1976 campaign that began with the New Hampshire Primary in February. Cincinnati Reds - '75 World Champions Upon winning four out of seven games of the World Series, the Cincinnati Reds clinched the 1975 World Title in Boston's Fenway Park. Three days of heavy rain postponed the sixth game but the baseball fans found the wait well worth it. With the Reds a little over-confident of winning, the Boston Red Sox evened the series, taking a slight advantage with the next game to be played in their home park. The Reds led 6-3 into the eighth inning, when Bernie Carbo hit a homerun with two men on to tie the game at six apiece. Boston catcher Carlton Fisk hit a home- run in the bottom of the' 12th inning and Boston tied up the Series 3-3. In the concluding game, the Red Sox took a 3-0 lead, but the Reds came back when Tony Perez hit a homerun with Red's catcher Johnny Bench on base. Pete Rose singled in the tying run in the seventh inning, and Joe Morgan hit the winning run in the ninth inning. The Reds were met in Cincinnati by thousands of people that flocked to the heart of the downtown area to celebrate the 1975 World Series victory. Patricia Hearst Ordeal Climaxed One of the most hectic searches came to an end on September 18, 1975, as Patricia Hearst was captured by au- thorities after more than nineteen month of evasion. Patty Hearst was indicted, along with William and Emily Harris, by th- Los Angeles County Grand Jury, oi eleven counts of robbery, assault, am kidnapping. Miss Hearst's defense law yers maintained the point that she wa "brainwashed", and new evidence wa brought up, showing that a bank film o a robbery had been edited. A 56 pag. document written by the Harrises an: Patricia Hearst seemed to contradic the brainwash theory. The notes indicatec that Hearst voluntarily joined the SLA CSymbionese Liberation Armyl sevei weeks after her abduction. :Qs Wit., if.. -' - 5 t New Castle Declared Disaster Area City Hard Hit by Ice Storm With continued cold weather and ainy conditions, county residents awoke n February 5, 1976, to find virtually verything under a layer of half an inch f ice. Many schools and businesses were losed due to hazardous conditions as lectrical power lines fell to the ground, ot being able to withstand the weight if the ice. Tree limbs blocked many treets throughout the storm, and many amilies remained without heat or lectricity during the ordeal. New Castle Mayor Gary Marcum notified Governor Otis Bowen and more than one hundred National Guardsmen moved in to help evacuate families and clear out debris. New 'Castle was de- clared a disaster area, as Henry County was one of the hardest hit sectors of central Indiana. Non-renewal of Dr. Turchan's Contract New Castle Community School Super- intendent Dr. Donald 'Turchan was in- formed by the Board of Trustees on January 27, 1976, of its intent not to renew his contract which had and ex- piration date ofjune 30, 1976. t w.. 'K ,xv ,V -4. ' s f n.J-dai Turchan, who had been superintendent in the New Castle schools for the past ten years, said that the Board had in- formed him that they felt a conflict of personality had developed between him and the Board. Dr. Turchan had been hired as assistant superintendent of schools in 1965, and Awas named super- intendent in 1966, succeeding the late Rexford G. Wright. National Cemetery Bill Passed and Signed A bill to convert ground at the New Castle State Hospital into a national cemetery was brought forth in the 1976 session of the Indiana Legislature. The bill stated that Governor Bowen may take up to 200 acres of land at the New Castle State Hospital and give it to the federal government for use as a national cemetery. The acceptance of the bill could give three million dollars for additions to the hospital grounds, money already appropriated by the Legislature. Representative Thomas Cole- man stated that the bill would cause the building program at the State Hospital to accelerate and improve so that there would be no further thought given to closing the hospital. Governor Otis Bowen signed the bill after its passage through both Houses. I as g Q-..., , x! ,,-.- ' mU,, , M.-7-."r.'r""'-x-J' p . ,J-rf' 1' T A ff' I' , .4-J' --4851, 2 x " f -' Q - V . . A an -.s ' . . L, . y .L , W it D -if in Q I 1 - 17 X , in . - ' ' ' 6 ' if sa li .5 ' - ., .. t- ' 'Wat .. - -ef. ,Ar I' 'fin Mu.-ug' may N 51.3, K m r, 1 i. ' H '- , 51 . w, .VJ , . HA. ..,.',. , . ,. e .' y .f 'g4..x,J,- ..' Q' 0.44 x 4 n'.' H,-' . v , . - . f .,gi.Wh . . nAv,,,,., M .,,' .kwa s,1.' wwf. NJ- nj. PAQ un, +,,'. , . Q., jg... 57,11 - . . ,us .. Q., f Q ' Q . , 5 - X Kg If J. 7 ga U ' 'Refi' 3 QM. M, 'sg' 2,9-1s'f fag2: uf Ml 3 - fl+4-Wifi? f if 7 Zklvsigigw Wf A. V LV .,, ' ww iff LW Ll ffl MM P A Jill llllU r'-' fn EEE 1976 marked the third anniversary for the phase elective English pro- gram. There was one major change involved, that being with the soph- omore class. Instead of choosing their classes' in the manner of the juniors and seniors, sophomores were given a guided balance of classes. There were twelve weeks each of speech and writing with six weeks of American Values, all required this year. In this class, students learned to form, develop and clarify their values. Sometimes "game" situations were used to help students realize what their values were. The juniors and seniors played a large part in deciding what they wanted to. study and where their needs were. In good humor Mr Hostetler grins at a stu dent's idea. MR. STEVE DICKEN: B.S., M.A., English, Senior Class Co-sponsor. MR. DENNIS ELLER: B.S., English, Drama Director, Assistant Speech Coach. MISS FRANCES HALBERSTADT: A.B., M.A., English, Rosennial, Phoenix, MR. RICHARD HOSTETLER: B.S., M.S., Speech, English, English Department Chairman, MR. JOHN J. NEAD: A.B., L.L.B., Eng- lish. MR. H.L. RISLEY: A.B., M.A., English, BibleClub. MR. JAMES ROBBINS: B.S., M.A., Speech, English, Debate, Student Congress and Solo Coach, NFL Sponsor. MRS. JUDITH SORRELL: A.B., M.A., Eng- lish, National Honor Society. MRS. KATHLEEN THOMPSON: B.S., M A Speech, English, Speech Coach. MR. DICK WILLIS: B.S., M.S., English. lLlllul lzEl llL T5 at S-Ska? y M . , , ., .fp-wmv? t--ve-ru Students anxiously await their fate when reg- istering for classes. There was a wide variety of classes to choose from. Some popular classes were Death and Dying, Man Under- standing Man, Research, Philosophies of Life, and Rock Poetry. New choices this year included Adventure, Suspense and Mysteryg Newspaper Readingg Public Relationsg Advertisingg and Reader's Theatre. Field trips showed that teachers were willing to venture outside the classroom for first-hand learning experiences. There were many such trips, from a funeral home to learn about funerals for Death and Dying to visiting an elementary school to tell stories the students made in a creative writing class. The phase elective program is flex- ible in that new courses can be added or old courses can be dropped to suit student needs and desires. A wide assortment of books allow students in Expanded Reading to read what they want. 55 l N 1 1 I -, -Y- A 1 New activities and more emphasis in new ideas helped improve the 'oreign language classes. Second year Spanish classes talked about Spanish countries, etiquette, Christmas, and going to school. A ield trip, taken to a port in northern indiana, gave the students the op- Jortunity to talk in Spanish to the :aptains of the ships. A few of the :opics that the third year students Lalked about were shopping for gro- :eries, going to the doctor's office, and getting to know Spanish people. Fourth year students talked about iating, marriage, and funerals. An :laborate funeral was presented by the students. Also discussed were fes- :ivals and Spanish food. The stu- dents prepared a typical Spanish meal consisting of several courses. All of the Spanish classes worked with songs, skits, games, and the :raditional birthday celebration of Cuba's patriot Jose Marti. lilwzrzg U -...XQW studied French high schools, the French Revolution and some ex-French colonies around the world. Greatest emphasis was placed on conversation in the third year French classes. An in-depth study of Paris and a dis- cussion of France in the two World Wars were included in the course. French students in their fourth year continued working on all skills with the emphasis on a pre-college intro- duction to the Humanities. Special activities for the French classes in- cluded songs, skits, T.V. news broad- casts, and a trip to an Indianapolis French restaurant for the seniors. The Latin teacher, Miss Sharon Gregg, was a new face in the lan- guage department. Her second year classes talked about the origin of the gods, English derivatives and the history of Rome. Latin III and IV discussed the Roman calendar, Roman laws, and the lives of Roman rulers. Finding that foreign culture is often very similar to our own, Mrs. Tabares and Wade Horn dance the "El Bimbo." Q., . Xggg J-fi x . s it-rw., "C'est terrible" says Mrs. Vanderleest as she listens to her students tell about what they did last night. af. MR. DWIGHT FRAZE: B.A., Span- ish, Driver Education, Athletic Train- er. MRS. AGNES TABARES: B.A. B.S., Ph. D., M.A., Spanish, FORSCO, Sociedad Honoraria His- panica. MRS. STEPHANIE VANDER LEEST: B.A., M.A., French, Eng lish. MISS SHARON GREGG: A.B. M.A., Latin, Junior Classical League 57 1 Variety in the program of the social studies department gave the students the opportunity to choose what they would like to study. In the U.S. History classes, those students who wanted to learn more about the colonial period and the major wars took option one. Study- ing the Roaring Twenties and the depression was also a choice opened to the students. Another option was one about the Civil War, slavery, and civil rights. Students enrolled in the Govern- ment-Economics classes had the op- portunity to learn about elections, making the most of money, and the stock market in option one. If the study of the Constitution and law enforcement interested the seniors, option two was available. The pres- ident, his powers, inflation, and in- vesting was the last type of class that government-economics students could take. All government students had the opportunity to work at the city may- oral election and attend city council and school board meetings. Mr. Rhodes laughs when someone says that one of his students has become "an oasis on the desert of education." 58 Sociology students dealt with the concept of "Who am I?" The emphasis in this course was on poverty, crime, and the family. The students took field trips to reform schools, prisons, and the state hospital. A symposium on economics was held with special guest speakers. The major 'projects were Halloween and Easter parties for State Hospital residents. Psychology was introduced for the first time to the Social Studies de- partment. Motivation, frustration, mental health, and the person as an individual were the major topics dis- cussed. In November, all Chrysler High School students had the opportunity to attend the musical comedy film "l776', at the Castle Theater in New Castle. The film was a new type of learning experience for the students. N MR. LANGAN HAY: B.A., M.A., Social Studies. MR. JERRY KOGER: B.S., M.A., Sociology, Psychology, Department Chairman, GolfCoach, Morale Club. MR. VANCE MEIER: B.S., M.S., Social Studies, Physical Education, Driver Education, Assistant Basket- ball Coach. MR. LARRY MEYER: B.S., M.A., U.S. History, Assistant Basketball Coach. MR. ROGER MILLER: A.S., B.S., Social Studies, Election Chairman. MR. LANCE RHODES: B.S., U.S. History, Wrestling Coach, Assistant Football Coach. x 3 Mr. Miller orders his students to stop ft , doing everything in order to listen to -3 ' M one ofhis terribly funnyjokes. ' 1 ., lUl'C. MA S h Teaching his first year at Chrysler High School, Mr. Meier warms up for a lec- After being put in the stocks by his students, mischievous Mr. Koger flashes a smile to all ofhis loved ones. l l 'fps 3 Mrs. Pat Millis, art aide, keeps a watchful eye on art students. Mrs. Millis was a great help to all students in art classes this year. Mr. Zeigler explains the details about tinishing a clay project. Clay was one of many projects accomplished by students. A-x l I COI'll. Art classes brought out many in- dividual talents in students this year. The classes were divided into three levels: beginning art, advanced art and a class for advanced students with independent projects. The art department opened up a new field to students during the year, stressing the five senses. Students were given the opportunity to taste, smell, touch, see and hear many objects used in everyday life and create a project from their senses. Mrs. Pat Millis, art aide, divided the classes in half and instructed one hall' while Mr. Zeigler instructed the other. Students were able to sell their projects by joining Art Club. The annual Art Club sale was an oppor- tunity for the students of Chrysler High School to buy finished art pro- ducts. The money from the sale went ' I .5 s into an art scholarship fund for stu- dents who plan to continue their art education in college. Another new project was experi- mented with this year as the art de- partment made every Thursday a studio day. This day was set aside for students wanting to work on per- sonal projects. A few studio days were set aside for visiting artists. Any student in school had the opport- unity to meet and watch these artists as they worked in their particular field. The music department at Chrysler High School gave students a chance to increase their talents in the field of mu- sic in many different ways this year. Throughout the year, students were able to participate in band, vocal groups, and orchestra. The band was involved in many activities including concerts, athletic MR. WILLIAM D. ZEIGLER: B.A., M.A., Instructor and Head of Art De- partment. MR. ROBERT SHAUVER: B.S., M.A., Elementary and High School Instru- mental Music. MISS SANDRA MARTZ: B.S., M.S., Jr. and Senior High Vocal Music, Madrigalsand Swing Choir. MR. B.A. LANGDON: B.S., M.A., Studio Orchestra, Supervisor of Music. events, convocations and the State Fair Band Contest. Students spent many hours striving for perfection and unity. Madrigals, Swing Choir, Chorale and Girls' Choir were very active this year, participating in events year round. Madrigals and Swing Choir presented a Community Sing, while all vocal groups sang in the Spring Con- cert in May of 1976. The Orchestra was very active, spending many hours during and after school practicing their music. Another project raised money to buy new uniforms for the expanding or- chestra. The orchestra also played in f,W'W ' 'W' is Y . ff i ff' fl concerts throughout the year. ...A .5 E ,..-'M V ki ,,, t ' I t ,sl ,.,. .fs if . if .. -ls., +A, I ., sf l ,sk 1 ISL. : . stef.-Ellis 111. 1 .,l4.,? "ag W.. f w,.,.l 'ia 'sl 2 K it Mr. Langdon listens carefully as orchestra member Debbie Wilkinson adds final touches to her music. The orchestra worked long and hard during the year. Mr. Shauver explains the importance of keep- ing quiet during band modules. According to Mr, Shauver, most band members can get rather windy at times. MATH AND SCIENCE Mathematics in Chrysler High School consists of three major areas: Algebra, Geometry, and Analysis. Algebra classes were involved in making figures out of graphs with the use of Algebra. Later in the year they conducted a probability lab where they employed experiments to figure odds. This was also the first year Algebra students were introduced to proofs of equations. Geometry was based on the "Akey Foundation" invented by Mr. Wayne Akey. The Akey Foundation tried to make geometry more interesting to the students. Once a week, students came in for small group sessions, which were usually a way of making geometry a fun experience. For a six- weeks project, students decorated a Christmas tree with three-dimensional geometric models. In Analysis, students listened to lectures, worked graphs using equa- tions, and did assignments. In the spring, students were able to compete in the National High School Math Test given in March There were also courses offered in Machine Shop, Business, and Con- sumer Mathematics. These dealt with math specifically applied to certain areas. Covering new material can sometime get "heavy" for some students. Realizing this, Mr. Grimes takes time to answer a question. MR. WAYNE AKEY: B.S., M.S., Geometry, Consumer Mathematics, Chess Club. MR. HORACE COOK: M.S., Math, Assist- ant Athletic Director, Ticket Manager. MR. RONALD C. GRIMES: B.A., M.S. Algebra, Machine Shop Mathematics. MR. L.B. LANGFORD: B.S., M.A., Anal ysis, Business Math, Driver's Ed. if 4 fi 1? ig-A , , at ft i,,.-nw. -- K W . 1 t. 6 A 1 'V ' ' , I Q s 8 ,g 0 , x is 1 i S' 5? 'A ' 0 s .- J., , K in . ,V f.. W 1' gi a 1 ' , 1 ' q ' Q ' Q, :H 0 , .q fy Q .A , . S 3.1 X I '5' x as 'sf' e I 0 h D 5 Y X ii' . V, ., Q 1 gs 13.2 - if +21 Q ,QW 4 , 5 . Q O rn - : D Q Q 1 4 ,sn With the increasing availability of the calcula- tor, whether or not students can use them in class is becoming an every present concern. Obviously teachers do employ them as Mr. Akey uses a calculator to solve a problem. With all the modern teaching methods now in use, some teachers choose to use the method of assigning problems from the book. In his Algebra class, Mr. Cook gives an assignment from the text. f sf. up X , lg, L Teresa Lawrence finds it helpful to take notes in her Algebra class MATH AND SCIENCE Looking over the lab work of Tammy Paschall and Donna Bell, Mr. Chris Renner gives help when needed. , " .V .1 K . .eg , , ,.,,. k, - f ..l. u.,.1.f, - 1 Hands fly up when Mr. Gary Cox, physics in- structor, questions his students. 64 15 3 il K, . 1. , " ' A L V K-4. N --t:.i4..A. 2,.l.,, nanfcsovrf 5'-hvlfggy ng.. vnmnu ,...A. . ,4 in MR GARY COX: B.S., M.A., Integrated Science Physics Science Club. MR. ROBERT E. FURBEE: B.S., M.S., In- tegrated Science Biology, Science Club. UN' MR. CHRIS RENNER: B.S., M.S., Chemistry, Science Club, Senior Class Sponsor. MR. ROSCOE ROGERS: B.S., M.A., Science Advanced Biology, Boys' Intramural Basketball Senior Class Committee. MR. WILLIAM WILT: B.S., M.A., Science. The science courses, offered to the students of Chrysler High School, let them pursue interests in biology, chem- istry and physics. Courses varied, but one could usually find students hard at work in the classroom or busy apply- ing their knowledge in the laboratory. The people enrolled in the Inter- gratcd science course were completing the science requirement for graduation and learned about the encounters with science in daily life. The material was covered in many ways and the students often viewed videotapes to learn the subject matter. Biology students became better acquainted with nature through study in the testbook and laboratory. In the classroom, students worked on their own part of the time. They prepared themselves for tests and took them when they were ready. In the lab, bio- logy students were shown many of the wonders of nature, such as viewing cell division under a microscope. Working diligently, Danny Lowe completes the written portion ofhis lab. People involved in Advanced Biology followed a curriculum covering various areas of biology with emphasis on the human body. One of the highlights of this course was the complete dissection of a fetal pig in the lab. In the chemistry courses, Mr. C. L. Renner instructed pupils in the chemi- cal, aspects of science. Persons in the Chemistry "CH course worked with chemical equations and molecular theories in classg while in the lab, stu- dents carefully prepared chemical reactions. Those in the regular chem- istry courses were shown applications of chemistry in daily life and how chemistry was related to the other areas of science. Physics was a senior course in which the study of heat, light, sound, mechanics and many other areas were covered. Lab work varied with the sub- ject being studied, but precise measure- ments were used to collect accurate data. DLIISINESS MISS JEAN STELLINGWERF: B.S., M.A. Business. MISS GLORIA CASTELLUCCIO: B.S. M.A., Business Education, Varsity Cheerlead- ers, Girls' Track Coach, Morale Committee MR. LEN SMITH: B.S. Business Manage- ment, Salesmanship, Distributive Education Co- ordinator, DECA Sponsor. MR. CECIL G. POWELL: B.S., M.A., C.O.E Coordinator, Advanced Typing, C.O.E.-O.E.A Sponsor. MRS. CAROLYN TODD: B.S., M.A., Short- hand, Intensive Office Lab, O.E.A., Senior Class Co-Sponsor. MR. REX BROOKS: B.S., M.S., Accounting, Business Department Chairman, Baseball Coach. MRS. MILDRED DONOVAN: B.S., A.B., Business, Co-Chairman of Recognitions Book. MRS. DOROTHY GOLLII-IER: B.S., M.A., Business. MR. WILBUR V. VEACH: B.S., M.A., Busi- ness Education, Driver Education, Cross Coun- try, and Track Coach. MR. TED L. MOYER: B.S., M.A., Advanced Accounting, Business Law, Chairman of Re- cognitions Program. The 780 students who enrolled in business courses had a variety of class- ses to choose from. After learning the basics, the begin- ning typing classes improved their knowledge with speed and accuracy tests. Units on letters, manuscripts, invoices, and envelopes were not un- common in the course. Advanced typ- ing classes continued to improve and reinforce the skills they had already learned. Those students enrolled in the Advanced TypingfOffice Machine course received four week's training in business filing. The Office Machine course was a lab-type class with stu- dents working at their own pace in a weekly rotation plan. After acquiring a knowledge of the basics, accounting students worked on sets containing forms of actual checks, invoices and deposit slips. Business law classes dealt with to- pics such as criminal law, the court system, contracts, and insurance. Field trips were taken to an actual trial and to the prosecutor's office. Students also had the opportunity to donate blood at the hospital. In the first year shorthand classes, students learned the basic shorthand outlines. read, worked on brief forms, dictation, and transcription. Second year students worked toward increasing their shorthand speed and then transcribing it into mailable copy. All shorthand classes practiced on the Envoy dicta- tion machine. Lesia Lewis, a senior, checks her finished copy for any errors that she might have made. I . t.-,tl , .- V fx " e F MES Ng ,- t We ,, Meisiizi "asv .itji?fiT5's 'iii' v x g R . 1 ft.. 54. 2-1 e Fallon can add numbers in a hurry on alculator in Office Machine class, Students V learn to use other machines. whisk-vw t ,wf W K Y 237 M 55 , ,. A 'wet ge ' F Eff f 'Ml 1, 9, M gt W -'w , 1 W 19 5:Q?f'if'5??5? if QC' ,fu . , ,, -17 Q -Qiffffi m " , rf., N S" L! ll '5- 41' hw. ed Chrysler High School's physical education department changed its ap- pearance by adopting the co-educa- tional phase of learning. For the first time, boys and girls participated in the same activities. Some of the first semester was taken up by the physical fitness test. This test measured the students' skill in all fields of the physical education pro- gram. The rest of the first semester was filled with activities such as running, flag football, soccer, archery, tennis, power and recreational volleyball. The second semester, weather per- mitting, included tumbling, relays, games, softball, golf, tennis, and large sections of gymnastics, track and field and basketball. A wide variety of new sports were initiated at CHS. .. . .N Holly Poer and Sharon Beasley take a breather during the course of a physical education volley- ball practice session. Physical Education classes went Co-ed this year as both boys and girls played volleyball and many other activities together. ,S-.4 41 MR. SAM ALFORD: B.A., M.S., Physical Education and Driver Education, Head Basket- ball Coach, F.C.A. Sponsor. MRS. JANET MANNING: B.S., Girls' Physical Education, Softball and Tennis Coach, J.V. Cheerlead- ing Sponsor asm ..-sv .-.-9 ...- 7' PRACUCAL ARES S Tailoring and re-styling clothes is one of many areas covered in the sewing classes. In the areas of practical and voca- tional education, young men and women learned skills they could apply to daily life and work in industries. There were many new experiences and also many rewards in seeing a job well done. The choices were wide and de- signed to try and conform to the stu- dents' needs. Home economics allowed students to learn skills to be used in the home and on the job. This area was no longer limited to girls as many boys enrolled in the Bachelor's Living class and others. In this, boys could experience the joys of the kitchen as well as other skills that could come in handy in daily life. Foods classes involved more than just the cookies and cakes, as indi- Bending over backwards to help a friend, Lori Freeburg aids Julie Eade with her sewing. viduals got help with the money, prep- aration, and time that went into put- ting food on the table. There was also emphasis on proper nutrition. In the sewing related classes, girls were given an opportunity to mend and re-style clothes or tailor new ones. Every year, the sewing classes also put on a fashion show. Buying of fabrics and careers in the textile industry were also discussed. Other classes included Consumer Education where people discovered how to use their money wiselyg Family Living where students got a better understanding of family relationshipsg and Home Care of the Sick where they learned how to care for the ill. 69 P:lACEiCAL A?E5 This mural which was constructed mainly by the drafting classes was done by Scott Frost, Gerald Shipley, Ron Blessinger, Brett Strukel, Kerry Odle, David Shell, Alice Millis, and Diane Selvy. For the students looking toward a career in architecture, design, and en- gineering, drafting courses offered guid- ance and instruction. From the begin- ning to the advanced classes, students found the course to fit their needs. "We're working hand-in-hand with the community and school corpora- tion," commented Mr. David Crafton who was in charge of this department. This was proved true in many forms, such as a painted design for a doctor's office, a mural which could be viewed just outside the senior commons area, and even the planning of districts for the school corporation. Mr. Crafton also made the drafting room a project in itself. The walls were painted by students to show some examples of drafting in use. Other areas of study involved read- ing and interpreting blueprints, design and model building, drawing, lettering and working in situations which called for problem-solving. When a problem is encountered while drafting Leon Loveless takes time to ponder solutions 70 Chrysler High School's practical arts department offered many new classes in the field of industrial and vocation- al education. Classes ranged from woods to metals and electronics to automotive work. Machine shop taught students how to use and' operate some industrial machines. Students were able to bring objects from home and repair them. On occasion, local industries brought in items needing repair. Students also repaired cars and motorcycles. Metals classes worked with sheet metal and bench metal making trays and car ramps. Students also worked in the foundry and welding. Electronics classes went into many extensive sections, including a section on soldering. Students learned to solder printed circuits, terminal strips and bus bars. Part of the first semester was spent on making electronic toys. Power and Transportation classes learned to rebuild small engines and then became skilled in repairing fuel systems, automotive electric work and brake systems. Students brought in their own cars for small repairs. Auto Mechanics class went into more complex auto repairs than the Power and Transportation classes. Students learned to change transmissions, install new clutches and some rebuilt auto- mobile engines. Woods classes made many small projects, such as bookracks or small guncases. Members of the classes learn- ed to work on a lathe, radial arm saw, planer and jointer. Junior John Cashdollar works on fi printed cir- cuit in Electronics class. The class is working on a section on soldering. MR. DONALD GEOZEFF: B.S., M.S., Me- tals, Sponsor - VICA HC". MRS. MILDRED T. GARNER: B.S., M.A., Home Economics. MR. MURL CANRES: Machine Shop, VICA UDB. MRS. JERI HARTER: B.S. Ball State, Home Economics. MR. JON L. WILLIS: B.S., Industrial Educa- tion, Beginning Building Trades, Junior Class Sponsor. MR. BERNHARDT BEGUHN: B.S, M.S., Industrial Arts. I lgl, I f I I . f F -.f.ff..., WH tl! P:lACIiCAL ARES 5 , sl if :ff 5' , if . t my M .-Y .Hi -W -f-"' .pn-"""" ' , st ' as .. A 1 rr if W V .MX .tta5..,M:zt - fe al . ,f'ci'f21'. A N 5 w 1. 5' i M ' E V - 7 .ws 1 .- . Qggf A ' 3 -, , 114 MR. DONALD B. GILES: B.S., M.A., Power and Transportation, Auto Mechanics. MR. DAVID L. CRAFTON: B.S., M.S., In- dustrial Education, Drafting, Reserve Base- ball. , MRS. PHYLLIS KLIPSCHZ B.S.2 M.A., Home Economics Department Chairman. MR. RAY VULGAN: B.S., M.A., Vocational A .vs l.C.T., Co-op and Vocational Welding, VICA xx ' Sponsor. l ' 72 I Y ,.1f. g, gf A el as 1 i il- ' . A ,yr if - l I - -l ...II ' . f - x i ,J, l" ' fri ' 'Q '- ' . E ' ii 'i v-I ' f zlx- i s 3 ' ' I . .,.p ,Q N .W 1 . ' ' - I ua at l t1i .Z"'+ QI ' " ., .,tf: ',g,I ll . , -v .rf C ' - . wa: 1 N-V , 4 ' f f-fjjg, x ' - A, A :,,::"ft:u2 Wfg'i,d?" 5-4 9 . ., z 1 rg,-wg 'S v "Y" uw '- 1' . 'A .A 57,533.3 ni 71-...I l ,f..:ffq ' - . Y if .V ,., 'ff-Q-1 5 -1-. S ff. "" 'av .fx . f zz T, -ll t Q62 , Q b Q -in 7 xv 51 , K f.....i, -' ' : ' ' Q-"men,-' ' ' ' V-1 . . fu, ff. ,gr . fd. . ,U 3 .I 'Egg'-V' -. 4, - Q ' :-J. .1 - ,K V A im. V- . , ,, .Q Z il 1' 'T f' Riff-S.. s , 51" -' '11 .- a ' ffici- 2 . 33' -f'2f'Q1 it .W A . As -A-fam., -' ,Q . - f 4g,,5,Qf. . . t .V V .6 " C aw: x , W iv v xx 3 ' , li 23 Z ' a "M w.,,q. ff The Building Trades classes build a house each year and then sell it. At their current project, Mr. Underwood pauses for a question while instructing students. ,- i ff I Q t , 4 fe Woods classes offer the student an extra alternative for developing a skill. Tony Penn braces a project for Jeff Catey. ,I p MR. JACK E. RENNER: B.S.g Industrial Ed- ucation Chairman, Placement Director. MRS. SHIRLEY F. SMALLEY: B.S., M.S.3 Health Occupations, Health Occupations Club. MR. GLENN M. UNDERWOOD: B.S., M.A.g Vocational Building Trades, sponsor VICA ..D.,, MISS MUZETTA GUYMON: A.B., M.S.1 Home Economics, HERO sponsor and coordi- nator, , MR. ROBERT L. JOHNSON: B.S., M.A.g Photography, Electronics, Electronics Club sponsor. Students in Home Maintenance classes were able to bring in broken objects, such as furniture, from home and repair them. The class taught stu- dents how to take care of and main- tain a home. Again this year, Building Trades built a house. The house took about half a semester to plan while com- pletion of the house was scheduled for late March or early April. ,,.i-...f KAA' ' N---u 7 .a- , ..t,.a, TERRY CADDELL: B.S. Social Studies, M.A. Special Education, North Campus. 4,-4' - ,J : ff S, 1 hifi, LILLAH BLOCK: B.S. Physical Education, M.A. Special ' . A-4 Education, North Campus. Q M f , 5... CECIL TAGUE: B.S. Physical Education, M.A. Social Stud- ies, North Campus. ' SARA BROOKS: B.S., M.A., Social Studies, North Cam- pus. DONNA CASS: B,S., M.A., Elementary Education and Special Education, North Campus. KAREN JOY: B.S. Psychology, M.A. Educational Psychology and Psychometry, North Campus. KAREN PAVY: B.S., Special Education. . Sgt ,.,,,, ,Q rw: t , . if l ii Pill , J. M vw., I Q , 4. Mrs. Karen Pavy instructs two of her special education students with magazine reading. A special education student stands behind her class's bi-centennial tribute. The flag is on the wall in the Special Education Room. a we .T Students at the new North Campus discuss plans for their play, "School Days," with Mr. Cecil Tague. North Campus students spent about half a semester planning for a play. The students are shown designing scenery for a play. lm Chrysler High School 'expanded its limits by testing experimental educa- tion at the new North Campus. The North Campus gave special students opportunities to continue their educa- tion. The campus is located north of the Henry County Memorial Hospital. The students of the North Campus were kept busy with many activities. They spent about half a semester work- ing on a play entitled "School Days" to be put on for a Hernly fourth grade class. The play was written, di- rected and the scenes built by the students. The directors tried to plan a field trip every other week while bowling on the alternate week. Some of the field trips were to Brown County and the Ball State Planetarium. The building was completely re- modeled and reprinted on the inside by the students. The students ahd directors also planned open houses throughout the year for people to get a,chance to see what it was like. Special Education went into its sec- ond year at Chrysler High School with Mrs. Karen Pavy as the teacher. The students went through a general academic course along with many spe- cial activities. The students spent about half a semester making bi-centennial flags on the walls of the special educa- tion room. Another major activity was the students' participation in the spec- ial Olympics. .l -8? 75 Qhministratiun The New Castle School System may have. seen the last of a few things this year. With all probability the school system will discontinue the com- puter scheduling and grading. This was done as the school corporation looked towards more economical use of money. Materials costs will prob- ably be lowered either by more con- servation or by charging fees where none were charged before, such as in the science lab. The School Board constantly tried to improve the educational process through their available means. Two more elementary schools were being planned to replace the outdated build- ings. The Board also regulated and controlled costs, which played an in- creasingly important part oftheir roles. The goal of the School Board was to become the "best school system in the statef' stated president Richard Hoover, and they are well on their way to doingjust that. Q During the course of the year, the School Board had a disagreement with the Teachers, Association over notifica- tion for transfer ofteachers. The School Board policy is to notify the teachers 30 days in advance except in the state of an "emergency" State law requires that there be discussion before transfer. In this particular instance, the teachers were not given the said 30 days notice. Therefore, the Teachers' Association filed an unfair labor practice complaint against the board on October 28, 1975. According to Mr. Steve Dicken, pres- ident-elect of the New Castle Educa- tion Association, the teachers wanted to protect their rights and have some input in solving the problems encounter- ed. "By taking the action we did we hoped to avoid future problems," said Dicken. When asked about the pro- ability of a strike such as teachers '76 were forced to resort to in Marion, Lafayette, and Ft. Wayne, he said, "Our action filing the unfair labor practice complaint shows that teach- ers will pursue the avenues left open to them. We seem to have a Board sincerely interested in keeping other alternatives open." School Board president Dick Hoover commented, "We are not professional labor managers." As the budget gets tighter, the corporation will have to cut down on costs where it can. Some- times this may mean the elimination of a teaching job. Costs also are being cut in several other major areas. The matter was settled out of court as the Board agreed to meet the relief action of the complaint in a written statement dated December 31, 1975. The Teachers' Association then agreed to dismiss the unfair labor practice complaint. Mr. .loe D. Kinnett: B.S., M.S.. Assistant Prin- cipal. Mr. Franklin Kovaleski: B.S., M.S., Director of Physical Education, Recreation and Athletics. Mr. William Lehr: A.B.. M,A.. Principal. Mr. Twyman Patterson: B.A, M.A., Counseling, Football coach. Mrs. Ann Poer: B.S.. M.A.. Counseling. Miss Evelyn Rentchler: B.S., M.A., Counselor Chairman. Mr. Robert E. Rinehart: B.S., M.A., Counsel- ing, PVE Co-ordinator. -V Mrs. Judith Smith Registered Nurse, School Nurse. Mr. Michael J. Cassidy: B.S., Safety Officer. W A mann-:xxx . 'W 1 'K 8 get 9 f ' A -VL -:Santas ' 5 ,s tl- 1 v f at ef Secretaries are FRONT ROW: Pa- tricia Coleman, Janice Noll. BACK ROW: Sandra Decker, Con nie Loveless, Mrs. Beverly Hanhenhoff: B.S., M.A., Practical Arts and Continu ing Education Director, Area Vo cational Director. ' if it ,, , if 'qv A , . ' are I , m. ll' .- fl , K , fr i , W' an rg I i l N 3-iv As Dr. Donald Turchan makes a suggestion, V Mr. Eugene Lacy listens intently. Mrs. Dorothy Pfenninger, Mr. Richard Hoover V and Dr. Mark Smith are ready for a discussion. 1 -V ',.' jfiffw' - 4 1 A 1 , w, ff Q, 4' w:,g?ilgf 1f , iz Q1 62242532-:u1. mn 1 'V V.: ,r A 1.4 QWat?:eI , fri' - If , ,, .1 If -, ,. . 3 h .A x in if 9 ww ' Q4 kg , ish! i 1 Q X E , ol Y Ax A 5' lfs fl 'l , L 3 ,, , K to g ' ':g.,:'Nv' w-W X f f K1 ' fe A of ' 9.53 4 lr.: 3 t .Az 9 H - ' L -f S- r - .,, .,,. S I, Q, I 5' L A X.. School Board member Mr. l.L, Bunton, listens as do School Attorney James R, White and' Assistant Superintendent Arthur Grimm. 77 MRS RUTH CREECH: B.A., MLS Librarian. Qhministratiun "Hello, Chrysler High School." Secretaries were needed to take care of all paper work, telephone calls, and the duplicating material. Mrs. Helen Porter, officegrnanager and secretary to Mr. Lehr, was the supervisor over all the secretaries at C.H.S. In the general office, Mrs. Edith Ingram was the re- ceptionist, switch board operator, and was in charge of the duplication machine. Mrs. Margaret Williams was secretary to the counselors and handled all student records. Mrs. Cheryl Razor took care of all attendance. Secretary to Mr. Kinnett was Mrs. Mary Arm Dunn. In the athletic office, Mrs. Jewell Thornhill was athletic secretary and Mrs. Nancy Craig was the bookkeeper for the school. For the vocational wing, Mrs. Margaret Bow was industrial arts secretary, Mrs. Georgette Pope was the practical arts secretary, and the voca+ tional secretary was Mrs. Brenda Leduc. Janet Keener was a Project Hope secretary. The cafeteria staff again undertook the duty of feeding the,C.H,S. student body. The idea of three different choices of meals was continued from last year. Milk shakes were something new to the meal for the sophomores. The C.H.S. custodial staff had the task of keeping the school clean. Teacher aides were handy for teachers when there was too much work. Aides were in study areas, cafeteria, general office, library, art classes, and the Science Resource Center with duties of typing, attendance, and supervision. at ,- rf-- .'f ai' M 5" if ' . N U I 1 .4 . ' rf .: , ., sea. V X 'psig my ' 1, ig V , Xi K J i N g 1 , , -- t .j i S A ' at -V I K 6 xx I I B , 1 A J N CAFETERIACSTAFF MEMBERS are FRONT ROW: Haiycon Bertram, Lucille Rinschfopai Vaught, Wanda Crabtree, Pauline Church, Isabelle Hitchcock. MIDDLE ROW: Lottie Hoots, Catherine Kadel, Shirley Swindell, Nancy Faurote, Iva Jean Bell. BACK ROW: Gay,Keith. Marilyn Kasten, Charlene Fowler, Donna Jean,Smith, Betty Bell,wRose Marie Steele. ' it tgarf , L ggsim vi x -nuts i ,ff-' f' 'N I .,...1l"' M vm js I l 1' ...- If . 2 A- 2 .J S ' JAYTIME CUSTODIANS: ltampergf 1 X Flossie Sidwell, ,owl B -, Q ww, 'I , , W1 ' ' A ,int 'ef E - :2.ifif5!.i it-,z-5545, . i 5. Y, :J . 4 5' Er Vi- i -L af1if"""'7'X li i TEACHER AIDES FRONT ROW: Vickie McWhorter, Pat Millis BACK ROW: Julie Walls, Lynn Meier, Romelle Stone, Lily Wright Marilyn Montgomery, Ruth Stamper, Dianne McDanell. Ray Howell, Wilburne ..-1 ,v SECRETARIES SEATED: Edith Ingram. STANDING: Margaret Williams, Brenda Leduc, Jewell Thornhill, Nancy Craig, Georgette Pope, Margaret Bow, Helen Porter, Cheryl Razor, Mary Ann Dunn, Janet Keener. While in the school library, Senior Brent Bron- nenberg puts the card catalog to good use by searching for the title ofa good book, .1 -1 .35i'? 'Hr Iillfienuncg titrojjeno QQQE IEUUQUU Solid hitting and good pitching were the keys to the success of Trojan base- ball 1975. The record was twelve vic- tories against ten defeats. For the first time in three years, the sectional was won. Coach Rex Brooks had good ma- terial to work with because eleven let- termen returned this year. In the season opener at Rushville, five homeruns and fourteen hits were collected to preview the rest of the sea- son. The game was won fifteen to four over Rushville, On eight occasions during the season, New Castle scored ten runs or more. Madison Heights was a victim of merciless Trojan hitting and pitching. The visiting Pirates could only manage two hits the whole game against winner Chane Tower and re- liever Rick Gwinn. Hits were collected in every inning save the fifth for New Castle. Leading by a score of five to zero, the locals came to bat in the bot- tom of the sixth. After two outs and no runners on base, six runs were scored on five hits. Chuck Sumpter blasted a homerun with two men on base to end the slaughter after six in- nings due to the IHSAA ten-run rule. Two conference victories were taken this season. Anderson was whitewash- ed by a score of 10 to 0. Tower had an outstanding game as he gave up only two hits and struck out eight. Marion was shut out two to zero. Besides be- ing the winning pitcher, Terry Craig also drove in both the team's runs with a double in the fifth inning. Larry Free- burg made an outstanding defensive play in the first inning by throwing out a Marion runner from deep right field. Freeburg patrolled the out-field well 82 In ' ff'..LFZ ' ipnfw 'wfq' Q 433g Qluvntia H' Varsity, FRONT ROW: C. Riggs, B. Teel, M. Booher, T. Miller, T. Reagan. MIDDLE ROW: T. Lavarnway, D. Combs, K. Terrell, K. Shadrick. BACK ROW: Coach Rex Brooks, C. Tower, T. York, L. Freeburg, T. Craig, R. Gwinn, C. Sumpter, Coach Bill Wilt. enough to earn himself a place on the all-conference team. Craig was named all-conference designated hitter. He batted .500 in conference play. The first game of the sectionalwas a tough one for New Castle. Knights- town was edged out six to four. Home- H runs were hit by Tim Miller in the fourth, Tim Reagan in the fifth, and Craig in the sixth for the winning mar- gin. F reeburg again made a tremendous r throw from right to home to catch the runner scoring from third. Later in the afternoon after a threat i of rain, Blue River was defeated by M a score of fourteen to four for the 5- championship. The eventual sectional champions scored in every inning ex- i cept the third. Six runs were scored f in the fourth. Tower gave up five hits and struck out fourteen. Advancement in the tourney was ended the next week in the regional. State finalist Indianapolis Marshall won five to two. Terrell hit a home- run and a double and Cary Riggs col- lected two hits including a triple. 1 Freeburg led the season's hitting with a .347 batting average. Receiv- ing a trophy for a team-leading seven- teen RBI's was Craig. Dale Combs was named the most improved player. Leading the team with runs scored was Reagan with nineteen. Riggs had eleven walks to top the team. Ten and three was the B-team record under the direction of Keith Mercer. The summer league team was nineteen and nine. These fine showings along with many returning lettermen should give Coach Brooks success in the years to come for Trojan baseball. E r 5 is Q 5 Cl 1 iRONT ROW: T. Barr, D. Sutherland, C. Lacy, D. Hamm, K. Groce, E. Ervin. MIDDLE lOW: M. Gross, C. Sells, P. Cook, B. Wasson, R. Upchurch, J. Riggs. BACK ROW: Student Ioach Kevin Horan, J. Atkinson, S. Larrison, T. Dankovich, J. Shaffer, K. Hart, D. Stanley, Ioach Keith Mercer. Jubilation reigns as Terry Craig hits a homerun against Blue River in the sec- tional championship game. 83 X .. """-nr' - ' .. ., f' 4 . , , .gm b , X X ' 1 , Wmma Jii: x. QA 4, rw ' "STV Nb ' 'YM W f .M 1' 11 vm: 1 Q.: QMN4 W ,. W r. cw' fi 1 ,.,,,m,a,.g-u. , gmxv. if wg., V " 9 5 Wm, H Q N 4 W'f??:f ,,,.,v,,,,4M Q -.1 A 43- ' :Ei ,gg SX - x ., A -4 1 ' fi ' if golfers finish even por IONT ROW: J. Koger, J. Vawrinek, B. Caffoe, B. Hamilton, B. Strukel, Coleman. BACK ROW: Coach Jerry Koger, J. Frost, S. Goodwin, B. Hamilton, . Brown, T. Fike, M. Hagerty, D. Coleman, T. Thalls. Trojan linksmen had a fine season 7 they finished with a misleading ven win and seven loss record. Some 'the best rounds in recent years were ayed by the golfers only to be beaten I a few frustrating strokes. This was the last year for outstand- g New Castle athlete Tom Fike. He 'ove, chipped, and putted a seventy- fo in the conference and a seventy the sectional to become medalist in ith very competitive matches. Four consecutive victories were ken in the middle of the season. The iumphs were over Connersville, lackford, Richmond, and Muncie entral. The last three meets were 'opped by a total- of fifteen strokes. he conference meet was held at New astle this year, but this was to no ad- Lntage as a fifth place finish was ored. At the sectional the golfers issed a regional berth by two strokes ith a fourth place finish. . g 4: i U-.. tt +1.31 .ex ff ax WM v--Bw 41-4 B V . , srl... W, -J J ' '1-riff -1 v r we-.W 'L gr --iff' J.. -t-:wwf . "L A ' "'fif'.f... A f'fl'iw'-we-ff Q.. .1 "Nil , 4. ...agen , "1a'a.t-sig'-"4'3'3241,g,.f-,.f Qjfggg - Q th-if::1 ". I"',," . , . ."g 'ffi-IL. 1 up .sh f , ,T . ,. -whfigf' -3- ,.- -. 4 - Mlgwwfifsmfi J H "Sl-W ,-ir.-. 2-' :f v.:,YM." 1.1 . lt'-' " s' . -' V mi to . 'fgsgin ,wr--. u M .1 .eg A .. ,' 5 .wr '-ss. ' '- f An example of the fustration this year was the meet against Marion. The best competitive round of the season was shot by the locals. Fike had a 74, Jeff Frost 75, Bob Caffoe 77, Dan Coleman 79, and Todd Thalls 83, for a total of 305. An unexpected 70 was shot by Marion's fifth man to win the match forthe Giants. Varsity letter winners besides Fike were Coleman, Caffoe, Frost, Thalls, Bob Hamilton, and Mike Hagerty. Fike received a trophy for most valu- able player and Caffoe for most im- proved player at the end of the season. The Junior Varsity brightened up the year as they posted a ten win and two loss season. Only losses were to Ander- son and Marion. Coach Jerry Koger had three return- ing lettermen along with promising players from the B-team for a another fine season in 1976. -wi --wig-f1...f.f,1 . Chipping the ball onto the green and hope- fully in the cup is Jeff Frost, playing his last season for the linksmen. TUHUIIWULWIIIEZS QUHE Tillalllllli UIHUUSSTULHE The underclassmen seemed to be the key to success in a very tough and com- petitive track season for the thinlies who were coached by Wilbur Veach. The young hustlers started their season well by trotting past rival Connersville in a close 65-62 battle. Once again, they left Shenandoah back in the start- ing blocks by passing the Raiders, 74-75. Later, each meet became more of a challenge after some of the tracksters suffered from a number of injuries. In the Big Five meet at Noblesville, Bob Boyd's powerful stride was altered when he pulled a hamstring in the finals of the 220 yard run. Then, Scott Raines reinjured a previously damaged knee from the past football season, curving his shot putting to a minimum. Finally, David Smith lost his footing in the final Using all of his available energy, Doug Morris crosses the finish line ahead of the other co- petitors in the New Castle Invitational. 5 . . running of the high hurdles. Nevertheless, Craig McGrew brought a little daylight back to the scene for the Trojan runners by setting a school record in the two mile run at 9:48:6. Also, David Smith attained another school mark for the 1975 trackmen with a 14:9 at a meet in Greenfield. In the sectional, New Castle took fourth place while Richmond stepped ahead to win it. Over-all, the Trojans came up with three sectional cham- pions - David Smith in the high hur- dles, Doug Morris in the half mile, and Scott Raines in the shot put. Also, New Castle placed eighth in the conference. The 1975 award for the outstanding trackman of the year was given to Da- vid Smith. Scott Raines received the award for the outstanding fieldman. Up and over the barrier is Tim Reeves doing his imitation ofthe Fosberry Flop at the New Castle Invitational. Reeves walked away with athird. f'a 1, ,iii 'S Af w 1 86 FRONT ROW: T. Neal, D. Wells, W. Perdue, S. Shopp, M. Boatright, B. Davis, B. Boyd, J. Kirby. SECOND ROW: J. Kirby, J. Teel, B. Smith, T. Judkins, J. Barr, J. Bassett, G. Shipley, D. Gehlert, S. Ditton, Coach William Williams. THIRD ROW: Head Coach Wilbur Veach, J. Wilson, B. Ray, B. Conners, S. Raines, D. Morris, D. Buchanon. BACK ROW: Mgr. J. Barker, T. Reeves, C. McGrew, D. Smith, P. Jolley, C. Kern, Mgr. T. Disbro. ' Si: ...nu ........-.---.-,.. . - hiiihitn--44'... . .-Q " Stretching out farther and farther, Mark Boatright is air-borne in another attempt which later qualified him for the sectional. 87 -xv, Q HARRI R5 DNE STE AHEAD The Trojan harriers have once again built up a winning team this season, posting an 8-4 mark. Coach Wilbur Veach's harriers chalked up an extra win to last yearls 7-5 record by tromping over Noblesville in a three way meet. Leading the varsity squad again this year was Craig McGrew. McGrew was the individual winner of the Union City Invitational where the team also received 88 first place honors. With many other winnings to his record, Craig was selected as the harrier's most valuable runner. Trailing behind him in many meets as the number three or four man, Bob Davis was chosen as the most improved runner. As a whole, the cross country team placed third in the sectional and twelfth in a rough regional match-up. 3 Tfyi v- . , . 'x- 'v. :ii Irs- 'Q-5' 4,25 v3?41',- '1 as-ff .L A-fs giy gag ..:. , . , .ng ,.,,f, A M r, is f, 5 I V Q : ff ' " . . , 5 "- .'4",, 'lr B-ie, ' we ,f . M , is ., , , Szfiiwliihv--'f'.'f'9"3x T AV, "ww -f ij s V 313.1 :fa 3 1' ., - Y ' V egglhfikafl ' ,Q'i:f t Q14 wg '-M .- T wt' Q' ' , , .mt 1531, 'K .f ,733-f?.3,v Q ' .. I, fem, -L -4 . A- -. ef QU. i.. ,Q I .. V. .QA-was rag' , Ly fy: , -sf . xsif-,V ,.. 737525,-L, .. fit.: ' .-45? TI , .,1.,,gf' A 6+ 31,2 fs gif. i t f, , ,x3,ig.ig-VL? V ,,i,i?.ig! 11'-5 A. r . fax .,' V ' 171.3 A. . Sf" "' . :. Q" 54' so - ,. s f sw W ' T , ' 1. a?iQG'2gf7,' W ' - ' ' ,, ' fr v. , sf ' x. f mega .f ft X N. - M... e'sg:g.fG.g, 1 ft Y -if , 14,612 54. ,M f , ' K. l ff '1 X .3 f ., 5, ' 1 X 1' ' 2- -QV5 " P , V EX. . tx 'aww -nw.. ,gh :J v .fa it W' "Wa-i'f A L "Q - 9 ,il g ii S1 ' . ' , . . mf :tis fs 5 We X' .V K ,',i1":"'f ,'i5','z .ay C. fi: - A Q 4, V . -,g,w4.na.-.- 2 D . . ,M ... , Ya? X 1' W W, Ni -7 me ., "V fr- - - -- f ' ,n -2 ' 'wig'-1: ii.. fs. f V ' 9, '34, -5-., 'Zinn "M ' ' 'V Q. , 4 fig" .'77it :if FV' .i f-1a'Tf"f'. Q 1.. it s 'C'5'5:"C .,. ' .A fr x 7'gaQfg'Yf.i t. 1 . T . 1:feig.f115.'-Q-fanfic is zf',i,f ,M ffifsz' .,'J'5gTMf' , 1 Y Y 4' '75 -'ll ,mil . ' , g V rv ,fr-fQ'fl .JV v . , ,l lg- 'i Fffitf .77 ' f J 'if' 49 . - . A V an :M ,Lit FAQ: ht Q ,?c:.3A, Y ' if 'g , 9123- , I .., 1- : 1 1 ,.MMA ,A 'VW V ,V',.,i.Vt ,., , H H.. ft. . 5 ' 4' 'fir K 'S 'sr .AY-I . . 1 . .L ' 4 : Q ,ye . '- , . 'r f gal, f I 15. Exploding out of the starting line, the Closing in on an opponent, Jack Kirby harriers race to defeat Greenfield. and Ron Turnbull stretch out their strides. .. . ". .5153 4 L ' lr Qin at I '.f , , ' ' Aw-Q72 , ' 'b lt - . F 'fx ' K 1',,q.,,.,.. ,sie . W, WH L AL ,,..4 5,.Vi,g6g,3g-lyekvlw ak "QQ xv . ., , N I ir., V .,. JW ' f Q . , -T' , ,kL. ,, ,xy , 1-Y ks - -wi K. W Wfsflfi ,,', ,i , s"Tk'7-' yin,-1 '- Q. W f T W'l:l.'1 " Q12 FRONT ROW: S. Shopp, W. Perdew, B. Davis, C. Davis, J. Kirby. SECOND ROW: B. Sewell, J. . M. Cook, D. Gehlert, K. McClure, L. Meese. THIRD ROW: B. Smith, J. Kirby, J. Row, M. ' 'N L, Schwinn, M. Page, S. Mitchell. BACK ROW: Coach Wilbur Veach, R. Turnbull, J. Eckerty, Zr9T"h'Zf' A352 i ' 3 B. Ray, C. McGrew, D. Morris, K. Hart, Mgr. D. Shell. ' , . 'Y , . .- ,. ' 3?.f'5f3mg'1jaZ...4'p-ug f. .: -. v . .. ,t ,M N 5, 1. J .W ' L 'Tl , Under the watchful eye of Coach Veach, - 3. iw , A. Kevin Hart grasps for his ticket. ' ' Q as T ' .f3"ifgf,,,,- .Y " t. 'vw 4. Q Q., rf ' M ll xi- "T ' asf' ' r ,gf.f . f fQ, .f'1C'.:, 1 ' , . , i5'L,yW..,,3Ww,m,.,gi,.,.,g..... .,, . .. .. .XAi"L.1:A sei! " Zim 4' .ss ,M wet.,w. rw . 4?1'g.g.g5f.1?i?1n'giif"egH'W im '..1,yimvf'6jk2il1:i,.f."5:g.ww-n 'e .QL- 13.-1-'Wiki fi' ici' 'N"5f".,1fff-"fafw'i . 'TJ' 3,519.74 ETTEIQS BACK I E'SW ' Coach Bill Walker's strong varsity tennis team has proven to all other fall sports clubs that they are still in "the swing of things" by marking up a 10-7 seasonal record overwhelming last year's l-ll mark. The netters also ad- vanced into the semifinals of the sec- tional. In the finals, however they were finally stopped by Richmond by a score of 5-0. Co-captain Greg Rose had an out- standing season as the number one singles man, only giving away three defeats. At the end of the season, he was awarded as the most valuable player. Playing underneath him as the number two singles man, John Karp was selected as the most improved player. In the doubles action, John Cashdollar and Doug Bowers traveled to Richmond dur- ing the season for the Doubles Tourney. They left Richmond with a fourth place honor to their credit. With this being his first year with the netters, Coach Walker should be proud of their achievements and will hopefully duplicate them next year. He will lose three Trojans this year due to graduation, being Greg Rose, Doug Bowers, and Brad Taylor. FRONT ROW: C. Zlebold, J. Cashdollar, B. Taylor. BACK ROW: Coach Bill Walker J. Karp, D. Bowers, C. Horan, G. Rose, J. Gough. played by Cashdollar. Agile and aggressive, number two man John Karp should prove to be a leader on next year's team. Teamwork is the name of the game Doug Bowers and John 1 I l 1 v ,. J. iv M g 9,32 A if is xx .fi .4 90 C .4-al 4, ,sig , P31 . qui' W :- llsmgllsope Qneoln tide Mm CQ c-JQCEQGJQ Excellent blocking was important to this 5ear's team as guard Scott Raines runs Interference for quarterback Steve Ditton. The word success best describes the football season. Coach Twyman Patterson worked four years to bring winning football to Ncw Castle. A record of seven wins and three losses, which was the best record in ten years, proves that success. ln the conference. the Trojan record was four and three for an upper-division finish. Theilirst four games were won for the first time in 25 years. New Castle gained state-wide recognition as U.P.l. rated the Trojans as high as fifteenth during the season and A.P. gave an honor- able mention to the team in their final poll ofthe year. Lafayette Jefferson played here for the first game of the season. The Trojans received the kick-off and on the first play from scrimmage. Steve Ditton scored an 80 yard touchdown. However. the score was called back due to offsides on the offensive team. Later in the first quarter. Dino Fox broke three tackles to score the first touchdown. The extra-point was blocked. The Broncos scored in the first half on a fumble recovery. The extra-point kick was good, which gave them a seven to six advantage at the half. Co-captains Dan Coleman and Rick Gwinn gave a spirited pep talk in the locker room. A determined New Castle came out for the second half and Ditton scored the go-ahead touchdown from the seven yard-line. Chuck Sumpter kicked the extra point. With 1:04 left in the third quarter. Coleman scored the final touchdown of the evening. The extra point was good and the final score was 20-7 for the first victory of the season. Fox had an excellent game at tailback. Both Chuck Kern and Coleman had a good running game through .leffs defense and playing excellent defense themselves. Making some great defensive plays in his first varsity contest was Jim'Atkinson. Revenge was dealt to Connersville as -the Spartans had a string of three straight victories against New Castle. Dino Fox opened the scoring with a five yard run in the first quarter. Chuck Sumpter's kick was good. Connersville came back with a touch- down immediately and the score was tied by the extra-point. That was the end of the Spartan offense. Merciless- ly, three more Trojan touchdowns were scored. The go ahead touch- down was in the second quarter with a l3 yard run by Steve Ditton. Next, in the second quarter, Chuck Kern scored from the two. The final score came in the third quarter as Ditton went into the end Lone from the one yard-line. Sumpter booted the extra- point all three times to make the final score 28-7. The defense, led by linebacker Dan Coleman, allowed only 144 total yards and seven first downs to Connersville. The offensive line, consisting of Jim Atkinson, Pat Cook, Brent Grider. Rick Gwinn, Scott Larrison, Scott Raines, and .lim Wil- son, opened holes the entire game for the Green and White running backs. Fox and Kern again had out- standing games. Another opponent was defeated by New Castle as Rushvillc became the third victim. Dan Coleman scored the first touchdown on a three yard run. The extra-point was kicked by Chuck Sumpter. .lim Atkinson went 52 yards on a pass from Steve Ditton for another touchdown. Sumpter Added his second extra-point. Ditton scored from the ten to give a 20-0 Trojan advantage at the half. The iext score came in the third quarter is Dino Fox scored on a two yard 'un. The extra-point was converted. Rushville scored on the last play of he game from their six yard-line. With the Lion extra-point, the final :core was 27-7. New Castle gained 258 yards rushing and ll9 yards massing as Steve Ditton led the offense. The offensive line again received iraise from Coach Patterson for their iutstanding play. lt is interesting to tote that the 'Trojans were penalized l48 yards in the game played at lushville gridiron. Muncie Central gave New Castle t good scare in the fourth game of he season played at the Bearcats' ield. A driving rain was responsible or the poor playing conditions at he stadium. The first score came vhen Steve Ditton made a four yard 'un across the goal-line on the first Trojan drive. Bad breaks prevented wo New Castle touchdowns and the ,core at the half was 7-0. The Trojans hreatened in the third quarter when t Central player intercepted a pitch- rut and scored on an Sl yard run. The score was tied by the extra- xoint. Fortunately, Chuck Kern fought Varsity Football Team, FRONT ROW: D, Clemens, S. Frost, F. Garner, D. Fox, J. Taylor, T. Miller, R. Gwinn, D. Cole- man, J. Wittler, D. Luellen. SECOND ROW: L. Loveless, C. Kern, S. Larrison, D. Beck, J. Wilson, M. Boatright, G. Shipley, J. Atkinson, K. Shadrick, B. Buntin, S. Raines, P. Cook, S. Ditton, R. Smith, D. Combs. THIRD ROW: J. Troxell, R. Ziglar, B. Troop, R. Per- dew, J. Patterson, J. Meyers, J. Reeves, P. Frost, K. Raines, H. Brown, T. Sloan, S. Coleman, B. Barker. BACK ROW: Head Coach Twyman Patterson, Coach Calvin Duff, G. Webb, B. Phef- fer, S. Pfenninger, D. Clemens, D. Sutherland, K. West, T. Barr, M. Wood, G. Stonerock, Coach David Pryor, Coach Lance Rhodes, Coach Dan Boarman. his way in for the winning touchdown as he led a drive down field in the fourth quarter, scoring from the three. Chuck Sumpter added his second extra-point. The stubborn Bearcats had not given up for the evening. With seven seconds remaining, fourth down, and the ball on the Trojan ll yard-line, the Muncie quarter- back passed into the end Lone. Mark Boatright was in position to bat the ball incomplete and prevent the borne team from scoring. The final score was I4-7 for victory number four. Kern was excellent as he churned through the mud for the needed yard- age in that final scoring drive. An excellent defensive game was played by lineman Scott Raines. A conference championship, an undefeated season, and a playoff berth would depend mainly on the out- come of the Richmond game. played on the home field The Red Devils were the third ranked team in the state. The game was a zero to xero tie until midway through the fourth quarter. A Trojan fumble on their own 25 yard-line set up the visitors' score. The Green and White offense threatened to score many times, but a sustained drive was never mounted. The final score read 7-0 for New Castle's first defeat of the season in what many spectators thought was the best high school football game they had seen in years. The defense was exceptional, hitting hard and forcing three Richmond fumbles in the first half. Tim Reagan returned to the lineup after being hurt in pre- season. Steve Ditton and Reagan al- most completely shut-off the Red Devil passing attack to their all-state end. It was obvious that the Trojans played their hearts out in that very close loss to Richmond. Homecoming was the occasion at Anderson. as New Castle rolled to their fifth victory, spoiling the Indians' festivities. Pat Cook scored the first touchdown on a 54 yard pass play from Steve Ditton in the first quarter. Chuck Sumpter split the uprights for the extra point. The score remained the same until Ditton scored on a quarterback keeper, up the middle with nine seconds left in the ball- game. Sumpter added the extra-point for the final score of I4-0. This victory assured New Castle of a .500 season, the best showing in eight years. An expected minor letdown after the Richmond game made the score close. The always physical Trojans held Anderson to only 74 total yards. Chuck Kern and Scott Raines played excellent defense. Another good offensive game was played by Ditton, the quarterback. The Trojan romp over Muncie South was the highlight of Chrysler High's fourth homecoming celebration. The Rebels could never mount an offensive drive, and New Castle scored at will all afternoon. Chuck Kern scored two touchdowns, including an interception for a 23 yard six pointer. Dan Coleman, Dino Fox, and Steve Ditton also reached the end Lone. 5:31 .IU final score of 39-0. The whole team had a fine showing for the alumni and the fans. Jim Atkinson, Brent Grider, and Jim Wilson had excellent ballgames. Ditton carried the ball I5 times for l-19 yards and passed for another 123 yards. Very cold and windy were the con- ditions for Logansport's Homecoming game against New Castle. Three times in the first half the Trojans had chances to score, only to have the opportunities killed by penalties or mistakes. The Berries scored in the fourth quarter on a broken play. Their quarterback eluded three tacklers to pass for the touchdown at the line of scrimmage from inside the Trojan 24 yard-line. The two point conversion was success- ful to make the final score a frustrating 8-0. The loss took New Castle out of the conference championship race and the playoffs. Playing excellent defensive games were Dan Coleman and Brent Grider. Grider seemed to be in the Logan backfield all evening. Marion was the next opponent as the team traveled for the second week in a row. The Trojans played one of their finest games of the season, but to no avail as they lost the contest. Leading in the fourth quarter, New Castle had a fourth down and an Q9 i "inches to go" situation inside their 45 yard-line. The try for the first down failed and Marion took pos- session with time running out. The Giants moved the ball in for the score and the conversion to win the game 13-12. Scoring New Castle touch- downs were Steve Ditton and Tim Reagan. The offensive line played a commendable game, opening holes and blocking. Another fine perform- ance was given by quarterback Steve Ditton. Brad Knotts did an excellent job filling in for injured Chuck Kern at the flanker position. , The final contest of the season for the 1975 Gridders was against winless L . 0 G9 u Kokomo. The Seniors, playing their last high school football game, led the charge against the Wildcats. Dino Fox sprinted 64 yards for the first score of the game. He later went 46 yards for another six points. Steve Ditton scored three times and Tim Reagan twice: Jim Atkinson and Mark Boatright each scored once. Chuck Kern replaced the injured Chuck Sumpter for the extra-point kicking. Kokomo scored three times 'during the game to make the final totals read 60-20. This was the highest total for a New Castle team in over 25 years. The offense scored nine of the eleven times in which they had possession. Dan Coleman and Rick Gwinn played bruising defense. Gwinn ran ll yards on a guard option play. The game was a fitting end to the season. Trojan football players received many honors after the season was concluded. Senior Rick Gwinn was named to the U.P.I. All-State team as an offensive guard, and junior Chuck Kern received honorable men- tion as a linebacker on the same team. This was the first time in many years that a New Castle football player had gained state-wide recogni- tion. Both of these players were also named to the All-North Central Con- ference team at their previously men- tioned positions. Also named all- conference were senior Brent Grider as a defensive tackle, senior Chuck Sumpter as a placekicker, and junior Steve Ditton as a defensive back. Junior Scott Raines received all- conference honorable-mention. This was the greatest number of all-con- ference selections for New Castle since 1970. At the fall sports banquet, Dan Coleman was named "Trojan of the Year." The outstanding offensive player was Steve Ditton and the outstanding defensive player was Chuck Kern. Jim Atkinson received the Most Improved Player awar- Tim Miller was cited for his excelle' mental attitude and dependability. Tl Demonstration Squad Player of tl Year was sophomore Herbie Brow The elected co-captains were Colemz and Gwinn. Two victories were taken by tl Junior Varsity team this season. Tl always undermanned team clobberm an unbeaten Greenfieldsquad 18- Scoring touchdowns were Tom Bai Herbie Brown, and Mike Wood. Tl team's other victory was over Ric mond, the first time in many yeai The reserves trailed Richmond un the last five minutes of the gan when David Sutherland picked I Brown's fumble on the one yar line and scored. This made the sco 13-12 in favor of the Devils. Ba made the two-point conversion Il the victory. Noteworthy performanc for the Colts on defense this seasc were by Tony Broyles, Duane Clemen Jay Patterson, and Kent Raines. Mai stays on offense were Barr and Scc Pfenninger. Many players on the l team were able to gain varsi experience due to the success of tl varsity squad. This experience will I doubt help in building the foundatit for Trojan football next year. The record again was seven wi against only three defeats. The loss were to highly regarded teams. Ric mond was a state play-off finali: and Logansport was rated througho the season by the polls. Marion w ranked during the early part of t' season. The losses were by a tot of only 16 points. New Castle scort a total of 214 points to their opponer 76, for an average of 21.4 to 7.6 p game. Fourth place was the fini in the conference and in the pla off district, fifth place was the finis Coach Patterson was assisted by D. Boarman, Buzz Duff, Dave Pryt and Lance Rhodes. Reserve Football Team, FRONT ROW: L. Loveless, R. Perdew, M. Wood, T, Broyles, P. Frost, H. Brown, B. Troop, D. Sutherland MIDDLE ROW: G. Webb, K. West, K. Raines, M. Hurst, T. Sloan, J. Reeves, D. Clemens, T. Barr. BACK ROW: Coach David Pryor, J. Meyers. J. Patterson, B. Pheffer, G. Stonerock, S. Coleman, B. Barker, S. Pfenninger, and Coach Dan Boarman 94 Pl l v I gr-uf-fw sn. - .pg-. . - f .ft , .. , t- , .av A. f.-.ixm,1-...es4.4.m- Q nav,-1 sr .az ,w,1v.1amwmx:wennxmnn.w,nx-munnxtvr-.. I3 LCD TEARS Wrestling has taken a complete turnaround in the last four years since Lance Rhodes became coach. Eleven dual meets were won for an unbeaten season. This was the best record in 13 years since the undefeated season of 1963. The sectional crown was taken along with runnerup placings in the conference and the regional. Since last year's midseason loss to Noblesville, the record is seventeen wins and a lone tie for a string of eighteen straight without a loss. The Reserves coached by Calvin Duff fin- ished ten and two with losses only to Muncie North and Muncie Central. On the way to an unbeaten season, the grapplers accomplished the first win over Richmond in 13 years. Co- captain Jim Stawick won by a forfeit at 98 lbs. Frank Geortz decisioned his opponent in the 105 lb. match to make the score nine to zero. Mike Cook, 126 lb. co-captain, gained a superior decision by a score of 14- 2. A decision was gained by Rick Smith at 132 to follow-up Cook. The victory was clinched with pins by Jeff Taylor at 138 in 1:59, Pat Cook at 155 in 4:30 and Walt Turnbull at 167 in 5:44. With Scott Raines' pin in 4:36 and New Castle forced to forfeit the heavyweight class, the final score was Trojans 42, Red Devils 26. An undefeated season does not come easy and to prove that were the last two meets of the season. The next to the last meet was pulled out in the final weight class. Yorktown was leading 21-13 going into the 155 pound match. Pat Cook then started the Trojans rolling by earning a decision. Next Walt Turnbull pinned his op- ponent in 1:36 to change the lead at 22-21. Alvin Givens was beaten at 177, putting the Trojans down again, but Scott Raines won by a -forfeit at 185. That made the score a 28-24 New Castle lead. Under pressure, Brent Grider came through with a win at heavyweight to preserve the triumph. In the final meet against Hagerstown, the score was tied going into the 155 pound match. Pat Cook again responded to the pressure with a superior decision. Turnbull pinned North Central Conference most valuable wres- tler, Jim Stawick, is being declared the winner in the 98 lb. regional final. 95 his opponent in 1:02 at 167 lbs. Raines and John Carnes pinned their opponents in the final two matches to clinch a 43-26 win and an unbeaten record for the wrestlers. Stumbling in mid-season at the Columbus Tourney, defending champ New Castle finished fourth. Only two champions, sophomore Frank Goertz at 105 and Scott Raines at 185, were crowned. Depth helped New Castle be runners-up in the North Central Conference meet. Jim Stawick repeated as 98 lb. champion and Scott Raines won at 185. Second place finishers were John Row at 112 and the 167 pounder Walt Turnbull. Five other wrestlers placed either third or fourth for a. total of nine finishing at least fourth. Two year champion Stawick was honored as the most valuable wrestler in the conference. No competition existed in the sec- tional this year. The hosts scored 148 W points with the closest contestant 13 LUNG YEARS 45 points behind in the four team field. Green and White wrestlers participated in 22 matches and came back a winner in 19. Nine Trojan wrestlers won sectional titles along with two runners-up and a third. The following weekend they placed second in the regional behind strong Pendle- ton Heights. Regional champions were Stawick. Pat Cook. and Raines. At 105 pounds, Goertz was runner-up and along with the other three qualified for the semi-state. Also placing were Jeff Taylor in third at 138, and earn- ing fourth place was Row. At the semi-state, some of the best com- petitors in the state took part. Stawick and Raines both were runners-up to advance to the state finals,-Stawick placed fourth losing two of his matches in overtime. Senior co-captain Jim Stawick fin- ished with a 25-4 record, Frank Goertz ended at 19-4-1. 9-8 was junior John Row. Frank Lee was 10-5-1. The other COIII. co-captain Mike Cook closed his last season at 14-5. Junior Rick Smith was 15-6. Senior Jeff Taylor in his first year of varsity competition was 13-8. Bob Bunton ended his junior year 8-7. Junior Pat Cook ended at 15-6. Four year letter winner Walt Turnbull ended at 17-5. Junior 177 pounder Alvin Givens was 4-12. With his only loss in the semi-state, junior Scott Raines finished at 22-2-2. Senior Brent Grider wrestled for the first time since junior high and ended up 2-8. On the Reserves, Joe Stawick defeated all of his opponents for a 12-0 record. Paul Stawick closed at 10-2 also for the B-team. Only five Seniors graduated this season. With the underclassmen and promising wrestlers coming up, New Castle had almost nothing to worry about for the 1977 season and should have power for season's to come. This match was the 185 regional championship as Scott had to go into overtime for the win. ' f I ik..g'5 4' .g 1.11 V FRONT ROW: Coach Calvin Duff, managers C. Brown, W. Wilson, J. Masters, S. Sidwell, and Head Coach Lance Rhodes. BACK ROW: B. Grider, W. Turnbull, P. Cook, J. Taylor, F. Lee, J. Stawick, J. Row, F. Goertz, M. Cook, A. Givens, R. Smith, B. Bunton, and S. RAines. After getting a takedown, Mike Cook works for a fall against his foe from Muncie North. 97 t muvxg. .. .2-":"w 'a . ,. 'us' of ff. l ' . 2 645 ' N 5 l I f. l N N . I pk . 'ligglfifw 'M ' W . A i may 9. an ii :fr ,ps uv" 0... X.x. J . .... I 4 A We H' R' . 'K ,Q Q . V 'i w 432 Q K kt 5- H J . - . EW: "" 2- -V 5 " ' ilk' -V W fr" 'A T' W "uv, :in "'i" f.-v2:'i.' '5l'. ' - - H W ,M m,ff -4 3-S. Q 1. 3 . . , Q,,,,,,,.,. ...- ,,,-A . .f t- V . -. - Into the water goes Jeff Sahlberg on his way to win the 500 yard freestyle. FRONT ROW: J. Coy, R. Franklin, J. Pierce, R. Barr, R. Lavery, K. Cox. SECOND ROW: B. Easter, C. Olsen, B. Burgner, M. Wyatt, D. Byers. THIRD ROW: R. Wyatt, J. Sahlberg, S. Larrison, J. Lauer, D. Gehlert. FOURTH ROW: Coach Dave Kreiger, K. Woodward, J. Ratliff, J. Wade, L. Grear. The Trojan Tankers blasted away .o another l2-4 season. Under the guidance of a new head coach, the Fankers beat the always powerful Connersville team and became the irst team to win the Shelbyville Relays. Coach Kreiger was very happy with the swimmers and feels that :ach gave the best to his ability. One bad note of the season came during the third meet. Every upper- classmen was left disappointed when the meet with Greenfield Central was cancelled due to "Rookies" being in- itiated on the return bus trip from Many records were set over and over in seven events. Only four records still remained on the books from previous years. Chris Olsen set the .nr ' 1 4... 'Y x .U r Jerry Wade receives his award at the North Central Confer ence Meet.. ' v ii' J! ' ' 4532: ssazzz same me "' 'bis Essay:-::::::':::::"EE::!' az! g '35 .. .. iiiiggjagziii zzz: , t diving record at a mark of 242 points, nearly 40 points over the old record. Jim Lauer broke the one minute barrier with his 58.6 seconds per- formance in the 100 yard butterfly. Using all four strokes combined, Scott Larrison swam to a new 200 yard individual medley record. Jerry Wade stroked his way to claiming two records in the 200 and 500 yard freestyle events. In both relays, the 200 yard medley and the 400 yard freestyle, records fell well below the old stan- dards. Along with striving to become record setters, the team was made to contain greath depth. Team captains Kelly Woodward, Jim Ratliff, and Jerry Wade served as a great help to the new members. Jeff Sahlberg and Randy Wyatt were strong contenders in distant free-style events. Don Gehlert took his share of first place ribbons in the 100 yard breast stroke. Brad Burgner and Leon Grear were strong second men in their events. Swim meets, however, contain more than swimming. The divers are people with great coordin- ation and plenty of guts. Dennis Byers, Chris Olsen, and' Jim Ratliff filled each qualification. Their practice time was spent jumping off the board over 100 times a practice. Jim and Chris did the hardest possible back dive in their performance. Coach Kreiger felt that the team would be even stronger in 1977. Only two swimmers were graduating and there were four promising freshmen to take their places. dl elirn 13 TD Ii W You Only one starter returning from last year's 7-15 squad, and another difficult schedule dimmed hopes of any Trojan success in 1976. However, optimism existed because of-the hiring of Sam Alford as the new coach. Coach Alford and his right-hand man Vance Meier came to New Castle after four successful years at Martins- ville. Enthusiasm for basketball and intensity in his task to improve the Trojan program were two qualities that he brought with him. This, along with expected hustle and dedication from the players, made Green and White basketball something to go see. The record this year finished at 10-12. Larry Meyer coached the Junior Varsity to an even 10-10 season and a Holiday Tourney championship. The first triumph of the season was over Knightstown, 61-58. North Central lost to the Trojans next by a score of 67-65. Visitors from the far north were Highland. The third straight was taken 68-58. After four losses, Noblesville was the next victim, losing 48-42. New Castle was the runnerup in the Anderson Holiday Tourney. Connersville was beaten in the afternoon, 65-49. Anderson out- lasted the Trojans, 60-56. Shelbyville and Winchester were clobbered in the same weekend, 62-44 and 99-62. The rematch with Connersville was no prob- lem with an easy New Castle win. Muncie Central struggled in their loss by four points, 53-49. At least eight players saw action in each ball game. Coach Alford freely substituted to rest a starter or send someone in to correct a mis- take. Starting most of the season were Dan Buchanon, Tim Reagan, Todd Thalls, and John Wittler. David Smith and Chuck Kern switched off at a starting forward position. First off the bench was either Mark Boat- right or Doyle Clemens. All players on the Varsity and B-team were able to see plenty of playing time. Inter- esting to note was that all varsity team members had scored by mid season this year. During regular season play, Senioi John Wittler led in scoring and fielt goalshooting with 15.7 and .480 aver- ages respectively. He was also leading rebounder, averaging 8.9 a game. Sen- ior Tim Reagan repeated as top assist- maker with a 5.4 average. Collecting the most recoveries was senior Dan Buchanon, The leading free throvl shooter was junior Todd Thalls, burn- ing the nets with a .827 average at the line. A second straight Holiday Tournej crown highlighted the Reserves' season They pulled one out in the after- noon over Connersville, 47-46. The third victory in a row over Richmond was taken for the championship. Lead- ing in scoring this year was Tony Guffey with a 9.8 average. The B- team players will add to the Varsity as they had good height and displayed excellent shooti-ng this season and should improve for next year. Vt-v 'V ,, .Q .V ,V +4l?l ,gl , Pulling down another rebound, John Wittler battles his own player Todd Thalls in the North Central contest. The man with the towel is Sam Alford trying to explain a play during the game at North Central. IW? tw, if 75 ufwis-,+. f4!++'w 101 ff Sectional drawings placed New Cas- tle against Blue River in the first round. The Vikings suffered through a losing season but played unspired basketball with the larger school, Pull- ing away in the fourth quarter, the Trojans won 83-63. Wittler scored 24 points and pulled 15 rebounds to overwhelm the smaller visitors. In the semi-final round, Eastern Hancock was the next opponent. The Royals had lost only twice during the regular season and were one of the Favorites to win the crown. Be- hind in the fourth quarter by as much as nine points, Eastern fought back and forced New Castle into overtime. Double-overtime came when the Tro- jans failed to score in the final sec- onds. Eastern won 70-68 in double- overtime. GETTI TID NOW YOU Dan Buchanon goes up for two of his 14 points against Lafayette Jeff. Junior Varsity, FRONT ROW: Mgr. T. Sloan, J. Koger, R. Perdew, D. Suther land, C. Lacy, Stat. W. Horn. MIDDLE ROW: J. Southerland, S. Pfenninger G. Webb, B. Wasson, C. Davis. BACK ROW: Coach Larry Meyer, J. Meyers J. Patterson, B. Pheffer, G. Brumley, and T. Guffey. Varsity, FRONT ROW: Mgr. B. Caffoe, Stat. B. Fuller, Mgr. G Coach Larry Meyer, Head Coach Sam Alford, Coach Vance Meier, Mgr. T Sloan, Stat. W. Horn. BACK ROW: M. Boatright, J. Boyd, K. Hart, T Thalls, D. Smith, J. Wittler, D. Clemens, C. Kern, D. Buchanon, K. Shadrick. D. Combs, T. Reagan. Kennedy FRONT ROW: C. Johnson mgr., M. Tabares mgr., M. Strukel, T. Eversole, L. Murray, C. Mercer, L, Thrall, V. Sparks, K. Bland, J. Mayfield mgr. SECOND ROW: S. Poynter mgr., J. Howe mgr., D. Covey, J. Antic, R. Sanders, J.l Frazier, M. Cox, B. Weddle, P. Bowman, J. Austin mgr. BACK ROW: Coachl Cindy Crane, L. Hill, J. Fallon, L. Meek, S. Heilman, J. Shadrick, P. Thrasher, J. Short, D. Tompkins, N. Grider, Head Coach Linda Stairs. If there ever was a year for making history, this was it for the Girls' il Basketball team. They earned a place in the record book by winning the first Girls' Sectional tournament at Blue River. New Castle and Blue River both were favored because of their winning records and the close game between the two during the regular season which Blue River won 48-46. New Castle defeated Tri High in the first game by a score of 56-16 with sophomore Leslie Hill equaling the all- time single scoring game of 30 points. New Castle downed Cowan 46-36 in the semi-final game with Rita T Sanders breaking the singles game total with 31 points. The record pre- viously had been held by Susan Wil- liams, also from New Castle. Rita also broke the season scoring record. In the final game against Blue River, New Castle thoroughly con- fused Blue River's offense by placing Carrie Mercer on their leading scorer, Cynthia Ocker in a man-to-man de- fense. Ocker could only manager two points for the game and those came aTr from the free throw line, compared to her usual seventeen point average. With high hopes, they advanced to the Knightstown regional to once again meet Mt. Vernon. Mt. Vernon had earlier beaten New Castle 26-47. The game was a hard fought battle but the Trojans still came out on the short end ofa 40-42 score. 'This was a rebuilding year for the Trojans who lost four of their first five games. Rita Sanders was the only returning starter. They finished the season with a ll-6 record. The Junior Varsity had a very good year by winning 12 and falling only to Yorktown. The Junior Varsity was coached by Cindy Crane and the Varsity by Linda' Stairs. K ...wi M EIIIFIIIQ AQ IK AIIIINIIIIIIIIE TIF IIEIIIINIIIIIIIINIIIIIIIIIS IIIIEIIIIE IIIIMIIII IIIII IIIINIIIIIIIII IINII IIE S IIF YYIIIIQIIIIE The highlight of the Girls' Track season was the first North Central Conference Girls' Track meet on May 4. Even though it rained, Marionwon the meet with host New Castle finishing third with 60 points and two individual winners. Susan Heilman won the high jump, clearing 4 feet and 7 1 18 inches. Susan consistently placed in the high jump throughout' the year. Rita Sand- ers was New Castle's other winner by tossing the softball a distance of 161 feet and 3 inches. Others placing in the NCC meet were Arnold and Webb, 80 yard hurd- lesg Smith and Kendall, 100, Strauch, mileg Arnold and Covey, 2203 Sanders and Rhodes, shot-put, Kendall, long jump, the 880 relay team, and the 440 relay team. Although there were many outstand- ing individuals, the team finished out the year with 3 wins and 4 losses. 104 The team was coached again this year by Gloria Castelluccio. With some good singles players and some fine doubles teams, the Girls' Tennis Team finished with a 4 win, 5 loss record this season. They lost a large portion of their team to grad- uation, but with help from Coach Janet Manning and their natural talent, they had a fine season and sent the doubles team of Cathy Coffey and Nancy Stine to the regionals. Playing in singles throughout the year were senior Brenda Myers, juniors Nancy Stine and Cathy Coffey, sopho- more Cari Fike, and freshman Leslie Hill. Playing doubles were juniors Lisa Cogemam, .Iara Masters, Nancy Adams, Jennifer Hoke, and Karen Clark, and sophomore Becky Bronnen- berg. Coach Manning is looking for- ward to a good season next year with many returning veterans. i . 'GT .maga- . , Q6 'i f 3941 QI! K.. . , . ge . ,V . , 1 -15.-'V Y' ' K ,,,.. L. . , 0 , ' .1 t ' ,-.z 1 ,W , I Qt -1-5, gg , U , ,' . . i gg-C, ' ' If-.2 -we ana- .A Q53 iw 3 fy. ff.-li, 'I vii, 4,w.A2e.f.jZ-A 5 f av: I , A lla ' .. y,,A, A " I WNW V 'ialfngx - 5 J' 4 Fx- 1 mi' ,4".- ' r ,Mig mu F .. , W A .Q 0 6 v 1 A at lailifv cgi ' Q' A 1 he I 'fa km' " . ,av I 35 on :F if 5 " ' wi ' 1 X ' mi, we t 'P .s-. .r 3 . ,am - z fb .X l U VM: M bm' ,275 h if'-1 1 Q," -'If I ' if gviicfi' gf, . Q25 "ei 9 uf, .. itiiiiiigfwj' . :L-' LLL ZH' " -1" Q '.N,,C1't '- "I 1.54 Q" ,ff---' , f .,,, I, ' . M i f..t-we gf, .I Q - ww EQ-vi. -V . .1 -N94 W' Qgtrgfiti K" I ' , Q .af W If . Z, , .4 fag-'-JQ ff- , . ,wa I 5, J V ,., , 'H Hg,-' ' , Wgjl., ij, ff, fag S"f,Q A ' 1, ' 'ii ' ,- ,.-a,,""'?2v.f-' ,Q-if 4' , f . A ,,,4,,J,x .Hy .-t . ., M, . . .1 1 -. V I-.Q ,I ... if . , j , g -..- .I 1.53. ff, xml' ft -' k5,'.tgf-4, fr- ":f'5,'?' ' ' f 1 15,5 ,g'fn'v3-'y Ali ggi-f 1' Q., .- ,, I '. ' N 11, :,. ,. Mg, 1 5 ,fwwv A If., .XM 1 lwgtvmfgk ,qifggh 1,2 1 L .,.,.. . 1. ,.. I. . 1, inf jc.. ' ' -. 'Jn 1 p. , , W . a i.-,wgfg .,h . ,mn ! 1 of-W' -W vw 24- "' rw, f rf, , i ! - 1. 0 ,.' N N' V.. if Q' , Q . iw , . . A Wed . -rr gp ug' , 15:- . j ,,.,4,,., ,QQ T ,mi G . , , 1:1 ,4wfj'g,Z11.,.:'f.:,:h.,,vg..,.: ."L-f-V 5- 'fern ,F g -'sim . .-'Rafi .edimsll l 4 -gytv,-W,t,A.f,L . 'ig' W.:-J w ga.: . , ' - ... fa " . ,v J fnifigftgk' ' :m"i'7f,:V - ZX! K' 3393. ' D . " , ,, PM ' 3 ' . , . -f ' I .fi 4 ,- :ff a :5 1 A ..--u..... No.0 Showi ior Su SCH- ff' " A 4 A --f' 1 . . Q ' 11" fa! qy 5 ff H4 Q f ,r in 1' pq 'l I 5 1 f . 5 Q I ml K i Q IM fl f Q ' ' I G 1 ' l r 'I' '15 , 'J' L J. - " K f M5 M avnz, I 'r :5 24 - ' X 1 I 'ur f nf A 'ff .WV . .if gf M V 1 v A I' f an k ' 0 ' j X l , Y NW F! ' 1 , ' , I 3 at fi gd '34 , I A Q I is fe T N 5 , W! Q1 ' , H X' ,A , f ' I 4 FRON D. Co J. Hu A.H ROW: ROW: T ROW: Coach Gloria Castelluccio, S Hellman R Sanders K Webb R Kendall P Goff vey. SECOND ROW: P. Rhodes, S. Mllasheskl B Luellen C Mlller K Kinkade S Arnold B. Baker THIRD ROW J Carlton M Cox D Thompson M. Regner E Wallace K Rabenstem V Keaton FOURTH ver, S. Coleman G Strauch K McKee C Kmkade BACK '.1xrf,,3 ,. Q. gf., 1, -1. gaping: .C 319.5 eQQaf-mm-fkgmfvghmrpya- Fdi5gSgfg43njSPte!Q1ibfifT0ra1fQ,mg. esmggvf-QLQJQQQ FRONT ROW: s. Cain, J. Hoke, L. Coleman c Coffey B Myers L schelhuser BACK Row 5f.w.y.gQ,Q:3.,Irv:ffl: J. Masters,.C. Fike, N. Adams, N. Stine, K. Clark B Bronnenberg L Hrll Not pnctured IS Coach Y Janet Manmng. .,..--1 ur If v f 3 Q -' 1 90 I Q lx 5:3 gf V. R' Q X, Q Q. -Q -1 "1l'fg' If .91 Qgffa il U13 ' It took three years but they finally lid it. The Girls' Volleyball team :aptured the sectional crown. They :eat Hagerstown in a semi-final match 0-12, 15-4, and 15-2. They went on .o defeat Blue River in straight games, 15-12 and 15-9 in the final match. ln '73 and '74 the Trojans had ad- ranced to the finals but both times Blue River had come out on top. ln the first round of' regional play, .he spikers downed Greenfield Central out couldn't quite pull it off against Yorktown. They lost the first game 10-15 and failed to score the winning point in the second game and lost 14- 16. Three seniors finished their high school volleyball careers with that final match: Cathy Coffey, Dana Covey and Nancy Stine. The Spikers finished the season with a 10-6 record: the Junior Varsity had a 4-6 record. The Volleyball Team is coached by Glenda Gibson and Linda Stairs. S- 1? 'Q Senior Dana Covey goes up for a spike while ophomore Chris Johnson looks on. F . name., W . y --J .. ...g..-..,...m..........,....,..,.,.,...,... 'fi 1 - "Baa ' With a serve like a bullet, team captain Dana Covey lets one loose. Senior Nancy Stine sets up the ball while senior Cathy Coffey prepares for a spike. Nh, . . FRONT ROW: T. Groce, L. Thrall, K. Bland, T. Eversole, T. Brinson, C. Davis, C. Johnson, W. Wilson. SECOND ROW: M. Maddox, P. Bowman, M. Strukel, S. Acker, D. Wilhelm, J. Hurd, J. Kern, C. Kin- kade, C. Coffey, Coach Linda Stairs. BACK ROW: B. Trieschman, L. Hill, D. Covey, J. Shadrick, N. Stine, L. Freeburg, J. Popplewell, N. Grider, J. Fallon, Head Coach Glenda Gibson. 107 Leslie Hill repeated her performance at the state swim meet by being the only New Castle swimmer to advance to the championships two years in a row. Hill placed ninth in the fifty yard backstoke. This year was the first year for the Girls' North Central Conference meet. New Castle placed sixth out of eight teams in the meet. The team got off to a slow start but finished with a 4-7 record. Several meets were lost by a very small margin of points, and they also swam against some very strong and well- balanced teams. Coach Cheryl Huse felt that girls' swimming was becoming a very strong competitive sport. The AAU program has helped build the swimming program with such strong freshmen as Dee Dee Fox, Janet Fowler and Cindy Sahlberg. Coach Huse expects a well-rounded team for the 1976 season with outstanding swimmers such as Les Hill, Penny Myers, Alison Modaff, Dee Dee Fox, Janet Fowler and Cindy Sahlberg. The Girls' Softball team had a very successful and a very short season. Their season was one of the shortest at CHS as they played five games and only three schools. There was a shortage of schools that participated in the softball program in this area. They had a good season of four wins and one loss and although upset by Knightstown, they came back to de- feat them later on in the season. The team was coached by Janet Manning. The Girls' Gymnastics team was going for an undefeated season and they started out strong by downing i 451515 j 4 f at '55 5 . i 1 anxiousl watc ,N anus: ffoeuglmf 'A W i'Ql5.t.irr?t'?? Richmond in all three levels. They won the Blackford meet by taking the intermediate and optional levels but lost the beginning level by two points. Their high hopes were stopped by Anderson when New Castle lost the beginningand intermediate levels by afew points. The Intermediate team won the sec- tional crown for the second time with Holly Poer winning the all-around title. Other first place winners were Amy Danielson in beam, Sandy Dug- ger in vaulting and Debbie Trainor in floor. The Optional team placed second under rival Richmond with Suzanne Horn qualifying for regional by placing second in the unevens. In the regional at Columbus, the Intermediate team placed third. GUUUQ' QfpQn'U'o GQ G9 CD53 Q'5U'n'omgg 'RONT ROW: L. Hill, A. Modaff, B. Conklin, C. Sahlberg, L. Stackhouse, . Fowler, V. Keaton. SECOND ROW: J. Wasson, D. Fox, K. Alexander. BACK KOW: P. Kieswetter, D. Burgner, J. Woodward, L. Gehlert, S. Dugger. NOT 'ICTURED: A. Feeley, C. Fike, K. Kinkade, P. Myers and Coach Huse. FRONT ROW: Mgr. C. Johnson, T. Miller, S. Rifner, J. Masters, J. Smith, C. Mercer, B. Weddle. SECOND ROW: A. Hammond, J. Frazier, C. Linsey, J. Duncan, R. Sanders, Coach Janet Manning. BACK ROW: Mgr. J. Austin, K. Gribbons, D. Tompkins, P. Rhodes, S. Arnold, M. Howe. FRONT ROW: T. Groce, R. Edmondson, S. Stawick, G. Strauch, D. Fox, B. Caffoe, B. Lee, B. Thompson. SECOND ROW: A. Fox, C. Sahlberg, D. Trainor, K. Horn, A. Bateman, H. Poer, L. Williams. THIRD ROW: T. Miller, B. Conkin, K. Hutson, C. Coffey, S. Dugger, M. Regner, T. Berfanger. BACK ROW: S. Booher, A. Danielson, S. Hom, N. Stine, M. Smith, S. Amold, B. Carter, Coach Rae Ferrell. NOT PICTURED: Mgrs. K. Showalter, R. Mullins. 109 QUUQJCQUQQQUQQW U WV 9350 3 'gf' Y: 5,1 - , , . , L .1 V , I ' - . - 53? '. , I , , f'.::v5fa,Q,.'1,-ifzrg Hey ,W " '- ' X' W 7'i-' ,ik'2f'- DCE . .5 . . , ,, 5 ..,. , , ....,, ,..,:,..v f. r A ': vi!-Mig! 'A .sifvt-wx,:,::,'rp I '? - - . '1 , ' ly ' ' T W 'WM Building school spirit was their objective id they worked hard all year to build at spirit to back all the Trojans. They :lped get the spirit moving at the pep :ssions and braved the cold at the football tmes. They attended a summer cheerlead- g camp and practiced deligently all year N perfect their routines and yells. Varsity leerleaders were Kandi Hutson, David ee, Robbin Edmondson, Suzanne Horn 1d Jana Crisp. Junior Varsity cheerleaders ere Dara Webber, Sandy Dugger, Abbey oodwin and Gay Strauch. Sponsors were loria Castelluccio and Janet Manning. CHS had other Trojan backers. They ere the Athletic Director, Frank Kovaleski, 1d Assistant Athletic Director in charge 7tickets. Horace Cook. These two gentle- .en were responsible for all the equipment 7 our teams and all those minor details J one ever seemed to notice, such as buses, teals, uniforms, and tickets. It was a hard fb but they got it done. ? '. " fi adlffl. 1-wt l ,,..f hile performing one of his various duties, Mr. Kovaleski linds time watch the wrestling match, ith a smile on her face and a victory on the way, Gay Strauch ows her enthusiasm for the Colts. 9 -.B Cheerleading sponsors Gloria Castelluccio and Janet Manning cheer the team on to victory. The varsity squad, consisting of Robbin Edmondson, David Lee, Jana Crisp, Kandi Hutson and Suzanne Horn, show their stuff. Tm 7 55 ' .1:T,i'V W makp L' A-QL, 'gfx Mg J if on ,'r,' J fibxzaw' U :lx A K gbgj Junior varsity squad consists of junior Dara Webber, sophomores Sandy Dugger, Gay Strauch, and Abbey Goodwin. f 3 I5 22 24 Y, fs Q 1 .. if Z1 m H R9 -S2 -V as 4 Q2 'Z 5 ,5 A 5 0 9 I 31 i , . M . B 1' 9 X x 4 wg , 5 Sf? M hx .g .io ai ' '. ,Q 5 if 31,2 ,2 9 - - ,l,:.w Av 1 pf' , if l -, 4? Q, nrt ' ":Fl5"Q, , oil ' at x "'-+......,,- . 6 Bill Fuller tries to concentrate on a layout due on an upcoming deadline. - Dana Covey, co-editor, works on perfecting her graceful movements for the Rosey convoca- tion. 116 t s 1 lf ak X.- Q I GD KJ -.I NJ LU -I KJ ? fF : 1 eff Q, .,,fgf , i S , 5 A , 55 1 2 ? 5 ., . W -1 1 f""'3. members encourage IT3..-,, . 3, LOOK BHCK HDD CELEBRHTE Concentrating on improvement, the 1975-1976 ROSENNIAL staff began their work in the spring of ,75. Ads, sports, new ideas, and eye-catching layouts were the main interest in the spring with new concerns building up as the seasons changed. The school year finally arrived and the staff concentrated on the sale of their book, kicking it off with the annual Rosey convocation, which once again proved to be a big success and sales booster for the yearbook. Besides the subscription drive, the staff worked on building a float for the homecoming parade, but finally they found time to concentrate on the Rosey. The staff was divided up among the sections, and the ROSENNIAL was more quickly completed and more individualized. The goal of the staff was to make the yearbook one of a kind, and this became one more reason to celebrate the 1976 year. MEMBERS OF THE ROSENNIAL STAFF: FRONT ROW: L. Coleman, D. Knight, B. Wadman. SECOND ROW: J. Hoke, L. Cain, M. Morris, B. Fuller. THIRD ROW: J. Watt, L. Meek, T. Poor. FOURTH ROW: H. Hastings, L. McNelis, B. Hoke, B. Baker, N. Adams. FIFTH ROW: K. Watt, J. Marcum, D. Neuman, B. Brasich, B. Macer. BACK ROW: L. Holaday, T. Reeves, W. Chambers, F. Halberstadt - sponsor, D. Comer, D. Vertram. Not pictured are the co-editors ofthe ROSENNIAL Dana Covey and Diane Selvy. Q33 ...i 549' 4. tes' .-C . CMU PHOENIX MEMBERS - FRONT ROW: J. Kirby, K. Woodward, D. Crisp, L. Webb, A. Danielson N. Stine, P. Bruton, S. Leitch, J. Wisehart, J. Kirby. BACK ROW: P. Cook, S. Arnold, K. Hart T. Grimm, K. Bailey, Luanne Fox, B. Denny, J. Lines, and N. Grider. 1 --..u... . 4...a girl' O gy With the help of the thesaurus, Kim Bailey and Debbie Crisp find the proper word. HUEWWX H063 UWUEMWED Trying to get away from straight news this year, the Phoenix staff had many new ideas for the bi-weekly school newsmagazine. With a deadline to meet every other Wednesday, they worked hard and made the Phoenix something every student looked for- ward to reading each time. Yet, for the staff, there was also time for laughter. With a guitar on his lap and a lot of pounding, Pat Cook along with Kevin Hart, both members of the staff, sang jingles about the Phoenix staff. Another humorous incident occurred at the first of the year. Upon receiving the paper from the printers, the staff was quick to notice a mistake on the cover. Instead ofan undefeated football team, Chrysler High had a team "un- deated and ready." Concert Line, with the help of WNAP, was new this year, and in- formed students of concerts being held in this area. Glad Ads were also a success this year, along with Critics Corner, Aunt Fern, and other humor written by Susan Leitch. Last summer, Joyan Wisehart and Linda Webb, co-editors, attended a Journalism Camp for one week at Ball State. Joyan studied editorial manage- ment, while Linda worked on both layouts and designing. Other members of the staff included Nancy Stine, business manager, Pat Bruton, Luanne Fox, and Kandi Hut- son, advertising managers, Debbi Crisp and Kim Bailey, news editors, Tammy Grimm and Shelly Arnold, feature editors, Amy Danielson and Kevin Hart, sports editors, Beth Denny and Kelly Woodward, student life editors, Susan Leitch, photographer, and Jeff Kirby, .lack Kirby, Joy Lines, Pat Cook, and Nesa Grider, reporters. Miss Frances Halberstadt was advisor, and Elana Allen was their typist from the C.O.E. program. Joyan Wisehart and Kandi Hutson glance through the many pictures taken by Susan Leitch, the staff photographer. 119 ,193 ,, ki.- JY' sy W x egg?-A, W .. QL K' v Q? " ix V Y,-u 24.3 ' V A VY.- .. K I QQ. A x fi ' ' 5 ' Fil x W 3 - f , 1 W ""l 14 i, Sue Milasheski, an active member in Morale Committee, and Christy Pasman stand by the Trojans yelling them on to victory -. ' 'v 4 Linda Mark ug, ,artistic ing pep signs 44 ' ,chool spirit T?" 5.2 IALE COMMITTEE MEMBERS are FRONT ROW: S. Showalter, S. Heilman, W. Chambers, B. :r, L. Wittler, B. Lorton, S. Bates, K. Watt, and S. Milasheski. BACK ROW: T. Reeves, P. Burton, Mr. uger, B. Dennis, and R. McMullen. E QQ MORALE COMMITTEE With the concept of trying to bring school spirit and unity into CHS, Morale Committee was active at the beginning of the year. They painted signs, planned activities, and con- structed a float for homecoming. How- ever, the work of the club did not meet the expectations of several athletes and students, thus, spirit descended. Morale Committee was in charge of sock hops, pep sessions, and special days such as Crazy Shirt and Socks Day and Farmer's Day. Officers were Tom Kenrick and Walt Chambers, co-presidentsg and Susan Showalter, secretary-treasurer. Com- mittee chairmen were Sue Milasheski, sport signsg Pat Bruton, "feeling good" signs, and Amy Danielson and Tim Reeves, pep sessions. Rick Gwinn was chosen Trojan Mascot and Tim Reeves, Spirit Man. Mr. Jerry Koger was sponsor ofthe club. 121 BIBLE CLUB The Bible Club celebrated its twenty-fifth anniversary this year. Although the club was small in num- ber, the members were dedicated and enthusiastic. Officers Kent Mognett, president, Brent Crockett, vice-presi- dentg Debbie Wilkinson, secretaryg and Sandy Brown, treasurer, led the group through the year. The club began in 1951 at the re- quest of the students and since then has had four sponsor including the present sponsor Hobart Risley. In addition to its traditional cookie sales, the club sold Christmas post cards and various gifts items this year. A Christmas party and a spring picnic were a few other activities the group engaged in. This year, as always, the Bible Club stressed the use of Bible literature in its program and gave consideration to BIBLE CLUB i MEMBERS OF BIBLE CLUB FRONT ROW: S. Brown, D. Reese. BACK ROW: B. Crockett, K. Mognett, Mr. Risley - spon- sor, T. Dellinger. 122 careers related to religion. The read- ing of various versions of The Bible was encouraged and once again the organization purchased a book for the library at Chrysler High School. CHEERBLOCK A newly formed organization this year, Cheerblock attracted many students at Chrysler High School who generated spirit throughout CHS. Painting signs to back sports and attending the athletic meets as an or- ganized group were two ways of en- couraging spirit. The group added to their organized look with matching green tops to back the Trojans on to victory. Lots of yelling led the group through an exciting year. The officers of the club were Linda Mark, presidentg Sue Milasheski, vice-presidentg and Kim McClure, secretary-treasurer. Vickie McWhor- ter was the sponsor ofthe club. FELLOWSHIP OF CHRISTIAN ATHLETES The Fellowship of Christian Athletes was a popular club again this year. Both boys and girls in a variety of sports were active members of the club which met regularly. The group usually opened the meet- ings with a large group, then broke off into smaller groups to trade ideas and stories about Christianity in ath- letics as well as discuss other areas of being a Christian. Senior Bob Caffoe was the captain of the organ- ization for the year with Kevin Hart as captain-elect, Dan Coleman as treasurer, and Nancy Stine as secre- tary for the club. MEMBERS OF FCA FRONT ROW: J. Stawick L Mark M Cook Mr Peka SECOND ROW Mr Al ford, T. Miller, B, Fuller, B. Strukel, B. Caffoe. THIRD ROW B Ray C Sumpter T Dankovleh BACK ROW B, Hakes, J. Barker, T. Reagan, D. Coleman, J. Wilson D Shell .I Wittler R Gwinn .I Eckerty K Hart Mr Mier. lr -K 4- s w M , 10? ' - .,9lbk 3 J 0 - 6 Q ' 'fy 1 ' Qs L 4 5 L. C ' . Y Q 'Z 4' , 0 xg-A. VJ 2 J Q Q 3 wen. V ' ' s.. ,5 , f if Wu , R, :ff 5 Y M. . f P Q , --4 - ' ' K.. T' . ' b W N' f ' 4 ,A v fs . Q 4 Q '1':'ld1, S. 2332! is 'iff U MQ 3211 -gk ., 'F S." ,Wy 1" A Q. U 5 , . . 4: X s ,., 5 Ein , "' '. 3 - , ,.f . 3. 929' 9 xW,, i f .. A. '. 1 , .mu 'N -- , '1 "J?'ff4"!"?f" ff' ' ' . , 'L 22:2iif3i"t' ,.,.,... K ., N... 1 .Q Nggk Y ,Ere 'U nd tillalllk TIEJQJQQUUQU-'UEJUIR FQQQGUUQU With the membership of many soph- omores, FORSCO began the year with eagerness and a busy schedule, in hopes of achieving their goals for the year. Many long hours and hard work went into FORSCO's first project of the year - the building of a float for homecoming. With the theme that the U.S. is the "Melting Pot of the World," the float represented the many countries of the world. The members were costumed in foreign outfits, and the float placed third in the contest. On October 20, the annual foreign food sale was held with delicious French, Spanish, and various other pastries for sale. Members later sold candy in January as another money- making project. Foreign Student Weekend was held November 7,8, and 9. Nine students from different parts of the world who were living in homes throughout Indi- ana attended the weekend. Various activities included class visitations, a reception in the West Cafeteria, a sight- seeing tour throughout New Castle, and a party in the Memorial Park shelter house on Saturday. However, the most important event and goal of FORSCO was the two separate trips planned for the summer. For the Spanish FORSCO members, a trip was planned to Mexico, and for the French members, a trip to Canada. FORSCO earned money as a club and worked diligently as individ- uals in attaining money for their trips - a reachable goal. Officers were Walt Chambers, presi- dentg Tom Kenrick, vice-president, Diane Turchan, secretaryg Maria Ta- bares, vice-secretaryg and John Acker, treasurer. Mrs. Agnes Tabares was sponsor of FORSCO. 124 ll it 3 I FORSCO MEMBERS - FRONT ROW: K. Watt, C. Davis, M. Tabares, T. Jackson, L. Spaulding, C Kinkade. SECOND ROW: C. Crabtree, D. Turchan, D. Reese, P. Hyden, M. Cox, J. Nicholson, D. Wilkinsor T. McCaffrey, S. Acker. THIRD ROW: T. Stephenson, J. Thurman, L. Wittler, T. Lawrence, D. Eschen brenner, C. Pasman, C. Gayer, K. Johnson, Mrs. Tabares. BACK ROW: W. Horn, J. Acker, B. Crockett K. McKee, T. Hagerty, T. Carter, A. Modaff, L. Koger, K. Craig, K. Ray, B. Macer, S. l-leilman, E Selvy, W. Chambers. ,5 , Ma Y K. ' 1 1:22 v- , . fmw- r , K ' 9 S i 5, x - nf, 3' in . Q.: ji' K My, s .. .., ... ,, M -". ,Q .Q '- 5 A ,. ,nr .Ag 3'-wg. - -ffzf-Qu 'N' '.q, -176, Q 'MR . x-wx ,K A , ww. 2, 1 , TL,'f""'1UfAg:"Y'fY',.1,,., lf'4Z'y',?f3-1' Q15'iQ,gQQw, ' X14 sin, K A it VH-: H... af ' A' '- .bg Lf- ,,+,3, if -aff 4 ., x 'x . ' X gs , f A -1 2gaff?' -1 gg' A' M N f f. 'A A V, ' QQ Q X91 A V fff' ' b 5 sf '. ' 1 my A gr F A , - ,Q 6 I .Qs . Fwy , blkgev W' W4 I-. W1 S "GL W .. n-5 3. K - -Aw Q A , , 'uf fl" ,. giryfx. ,MQMJQ-Yfa,, aff 'x4 .cy , 1 Y A J' 1 ,f 1 'M x 'bfi if , g uk. fx a TM. M., lf? ip 4 -Q .,, - -vm , qw A "Q . faq 1 I K X.-r' S.H.S. MEMBERS - FRONT ROW: K. Watt, D. Turchan, D. Crisp, J. CHESS CLUB MEMBERS - FRONT ROW: Mr. Akey, D. Hamiltc Hoke. L. Coleman, Mrs. Tabares. SECOND ROW: B. Fuller, D. Bertram, J. Ford, J. Cummings, D. Steproe, Mr. Grimes. SECOND ROW: S. Stork M. Morris, J. Acker, S. heilman, and W. Turnbull. M. Temples, J. Cassidy, B. Crockett, M. Thalls, B. Noble, and T. Thompsc 126 6 s l ll I 'X W i tl E Q lllillllllklllll MAKING llli MW IL MEMBERS FRONT ROW: D. Davis, J. Miller, D. Edington, P. Kiesewetter, J. Renfro, K. Rabenstein ECOND ROW: T. Galloway, M. Wyatt, Miss Gregg, P. Worthington, C. McConnell, G. Strauch . Moore, N. Paul. THIRD ROW: B. Thurman, B. Winningham, G. Easter, B. Hinshaw, L. Strickerj I. Regner, N. Young, B. Wallace, K. Gribbons. BACK ROW: S. Rigney, M. Temples, M. Page, I. Thalls, M. Werling, J. Crandall and J. Cassidy. JUNIOR CLASSICAL LEAGUE Learning more about the "Roman way of life" members of JCL enjoyed many activities this year. In Decem- ber, the annual feast of the Satur- nalia was observed. JCL members celebrated the event by singing Latin Christmas carols to nursing home re- sidents, and enjoying a party. The Roman Banquet was held in April, and JCL members dressed in togas and other Roman attire for the occasion. Senior, junior, and sophomore members took on the roles of masters, while freshmen were slaves for the day. Members held their own Olympics with chariot races, javelin throws, and other games. Officers were Candy McConnell, president, Pam Worthington, vice- president, Gay Strauch, secretary, and Karen Moore, treasurer. Miss Sharon Gregg was sponsor. SOCIEDAD HONARIA HISPANICA Expanding their knowledge of the Spanish people and customs, the group attended a Wider Horizons project in Indianapolis, which fea- tured the flamenco guitarist, Agustin Castellon, known throughout the world as Sabicas. Jose Greco, famous Spanish dan- cer, was the main attraction on an- other field trip. "Spring in Spain" was the theme of the Boston Fla- mence Ballet as the society ventured to Indianapolis in March to view the exciting performances. Sociedad Honaria Hispanica recog- nizes- students with high academic achievement and excellent perform- ance in Spanish. Officers were Diane Turchan, president, Kathy Watt, vice- presidentg Bill Fuller, treasurer, Beth Macer, secretaryg and Debbie Crisp, vice-secretary. Mrs. Agnes Tabares was sponsor of the club. CHESS CLUB Chess Club competed in six meets this year with North Eastern, Rich- mond, Laurel, Rushville, Conners- ville, and Monroe Central. Officers for the year were Jeff Cummings, president, Bill Noble, team captaing Steve Storkel, secretary, and Joyce Ford, treasurer. Mr. Ronald Grimes and Mr. Wayne Akey were sponsors. 127 C?-LOCGJJGSJI NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY By volunteering their services, members of National Honor Society helped the school in many ways. Dur- ing Homecoming, the society spon- sored a reception in the East Cafeteria for past members of NHS. They also contributed to the school by keeping the outside and East lobby bulletin boards up to date, decorating the Christmas tree in the East lobby, and promoting a Christmas toy drive for underprivileged children. NHS began the year with thirty- two senior members, but additional members joined in the Spring. They were initiated at their annual Spring Banquet, where they learned that an NHS student should possess the qualities of character, scholarship, leadership, and service. First semester officers were Debby Bertram, president, Julie Hamm, vice- president, Kathy Watt, secretary, and Helen Haven, treasurer. Mrs. Judith Sorrell was sponsor. STUDENT ACTION COMMITTEE SAC began its first year as CHS's school government, although it actually was started last year. The SAC gov- erning body consisted of thirty mem- bers, six representatives and four of- ficers from each class. Its purposes were to establish communications be- tween the student body, faculty, ad- ministration, and community, to de- velop student leadership and participa- tion, to foster school spirit, and to pro- mote the best interests of CHS. SAC initiated four standing com- mittees: the advisory caucusand the senior, junior, and sophomore com- mittees, which pertained to activities of each class. They also sponsored the Student-Faculty Christmas party, helped with the buffet for senior citi- zens, and were active in the planning of Winter Dance in February. Officers were Beth Macer, president, Becky Bronnenberg, vice-president, Becky Hoover, secretary, Cheryl Lind- sey, treasurer, and Bill Fuller, School Board representative. 128 W WDC Q-'U WWI I Q X if 5 ll I l 1 NHS MEMBERS are FRONT ROW: J. Vawrinek, D. Gehlert, B. Fuller, J. Acker, K. Watt, J. Browning, and D. Lorton. MIDDLE ROW: B. Macer, D. Bertram, J. Hoke, M. Catron, D. Sanderson, D. Turchan, H. Haven, and T. Blackburn. BACK ROW: T. Watters, S. Hellman, S. Showalter, N. Stine, J. Hamm, C. Dorr, R. Sanders, and T. Wright. Wicke is "working" for the senior class he Student-Faculty Christmas party spon- :lby SAC in December. NHS member Julie Hamm puts the finishing touch on the Christmas tree in the East lobby. AC MEMBERS are FRONT ROW: D. Crisp, J. Hoke, J. Lines, B. Hoover, N. Grider, nd T. Berfanger. BACK ROW: B. Fuller, N. Stine, B. Macer, J. Acker, C. Craig, J. frisp, J. Marcum, and R. Jackson. H HI-IRD DH? HT THE OFFICE INTENSIVE OFFICE LABORATORY Walking into C122 between the hours of twelve and three this past year, one might have thought he was visiting an actual office. Along with the many office machines, the room consisted of several desks. Each desk was equipped, not only with a stack of papers and a typewriter, but with personal belongings and a nameplate. The place was the Intensive Office Laboratory. It was an in-school, sen- ior level area vocational education program for those interested in a career in office occupations. During the three-hour block of time, the atmosphere and standards of IOL were based on conditions comparable to an actual office. Each student had the experience of working with different career objectives in a simu- lated office atmosphere. Members of IOL had the oppor- tunity of listening to several guest speakers on such topics as banking, job interviewing, and telephone man- ners. The group also ventured to In- dianapolis and visited the IBM and Blue Cross, Blue Shield companies. December was a busy time for the students. They hosted a Christmas Tea for the business department fa- culty. Members also gave a special Christmas party at the Children's Home in Knightstowng and for them- selves, a Christmas party was held in the home of Mrs. Carolyn Todd, co-ordinator of IOL. In February, members sponsored their annual Valentine Tea for the faculty. Membership in OEA is required for all students in IOL, and members had the opportunity to participate in local, regional, state, and national activities. In order to make money for their activities, the group sold candy and candles. Finally in May, IOL students took a deserving and enjoyable trip to Kings Island. Officers for the year were Tammy Milliner, presidentg Donna Potts, vice-presidentg Debi Pitts, secretaryg Mark Hastings, treasurerg Lisa Cross, Donna Potts does a variety of office work during the afternoon in IOL. 130 reporter-historian, and Lavena Rus- sell Cooper, parliamentarian. Mrs. Carolyn Todd was sponsor. COOPERATIVE OFFICE EDUCATION First National Bank House hold Finance . . . Coca-Cola Bottling Company . . . News Repub- lican .... These were just 21 few of the many places of business where COE students were able to work this year as in previous years. COE is an area vocational organ- ization where students learn through actual experience and have a chance to also earn wages. Mr. Cecil Powell was the sponsor. Since members of COE were also members of OEA, they were able to participate in local, regional, state, and national contests. To earn money for these trips, members sold candy, and during home basketball games, they sold coke at the con- cessions. On May 18, the annual Em- ployer-Employee Banquet was held at Welliver's in Hagerstown. Officers for the year were Elana Allen, presidentg Dianna Lorton, vice- presidentg Debbie McGuire, secre- taryg Cristi Dalton, treasurerg Sally Schmitt, historian-reporterg and Pam Waddell, parliamentarian. IOL MEMBERS A SITTING: P. Miller, M. Hastings, T. Milliner. STANDING: T. Pitts, B. Goodson, D. Pitts, D. Potts, L. Cross, Mrs. Todd. ll 1114 I Q. X.--M - H 5 , Q' ll I 1 f t ,if 2.55621-5, , fi - af . F' g .,....-.. iw, M,g,if5-,rl-. .,., .-. ti 0 ' 1 :yd s wf' ef "'-3-vvfn 1 -'7?:s f9'vs,, ' ..-2,QI- . -'L -- .f 1' ' ,LSP - 1. V- :gf2tff,.-,. ' Qtj-1-1-:-ri. 72,1 3g,f,w . . R. " A f K - If11..,uE:+ "' "' ""'j-Qfiii-T I ' 2 . . w::'f2'?I5Y29f. -s i 1 323' 1' 1 fy rf-14.4 " 'fit ' aw-i 1' ani, .Aid "' 'Jar' -.. . . A as MQ... OE MEMBERS - FRONT ROW: C. Utt, P. Groce. SECOND ROW: M. Hoffman, L. Howard, A. lexander Kissick, M. Catron, J. Browning. BACK ROW: E. Allen, D. Lorton, D. McGuire, C. Dalton, Schmitt, P. Waddell, and Mr. C. Powell. .A Dianna Lorton seems to enjoy typing "perfect" papers for her boss, an attorney. 131 v ? 24 BLUES UF AMERICA il 5 , T 2 I, X Q ', ,W AI' 145:51 ' -.6 ,QQ wut my gi: , , lu f. , 1 lla. - ,lggwff W gi. ,, N V, 1:15 -ig? gr, X W. Hg f' l YZ, H '-fl -w ii ' fuzzy +55 . A . .. I. 1 QV. iw , Wi, Spa Qu if DECA member Tlm York waits on a wegg, Y' mer at a local shoe store. 'ere employed this year. nf' '54 0695! nie. l- W A DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION CLUBS OF AMERICA With action-oriented classwork and on-the-job training in the field of marketing, members of Distributive Education participated in DECA. Of'- fered through the New Castle Area- Vocational School, its main purpose was to prepare students to become gainfully employed in a marketing situation this year. One of the club's money-making projects was the selling of candy in December. Profits were used to finance trips to the district elections and the district, state, and national confer- ences in which they participated. DECA members sponsored a Christ- mas party for 30 children at the Knightstown Soldiers' and Sailors' Homeg and at the end of the year, DECA held their annual Employer- Employee Banquet. Mr. Leonard Smith was club sponsor. Senior of- ficers were Tim York, presidentg John James, vice-president, Candy Robin- son, secretaryg Melvin Murphy, trea- surerg and Lisa Douglas, public rela- tions. .Junior officers were Teresa Hamblin, president, Debbie Purvis, vice-president, Janet Tyner, secretary, David Wells, treasurer, and Theresa Stephenson, public relations. OFFICE EDUCATION ASSOCIATION OEA was composed of IOL and COE members and juniors interested in either of these two programs. The main purpose of OEA was to urge students to participate in annual con- tests to compete in the area of office skills. Levels of competition were area, regional, and state. The national contest was held in Topeka, Kansas, during May, and the parliamentary procedures team which placed first in the state was entered in the com- petition. Members held their Regional Nine skating party on January 29 at Muncie. Sponsors were Mrs, Carolyn Todd and Mrs. Cecil Powell. 133 HOME ECONOMICS RELATED OCCUPATIONS Providing an opportunity for stu- dents to engage in social, food and homemaking services, HERO con- sisted of eleven seniors. Along with classwork and job experience, HERO members also participated in chapter activities. Students served refresh- ments for the Area Vocational School Open House and operated the con- cession stand for the elementary track meet on October 6 and 7. The Em- ployer-Employee Banquet was held at the end ofthe year. Officers were Debbie Cheek, presi- dent: Yvonne Thompson, secretary, Sheila White, treasurer, and Juanita Fonzer, public relations. Miss Muzetta Guymon was sponsor. The group also ran a tailoring shop so the members who were interested in tailoring could gain experience in that area. HEALTH OCCUPATIONS Members of Health Occupations gave their time again this year to local services around the community in re- turn for the valuable on-the-job ex- perience they received. A variety of jobs to suit the diverse membership EN Y in the organization were found and filled. On-the-job training was the nucleus of the club, but the organi- 1 zation also met as a group under the supervision of Mrs. Shirley Smalley. l l l Marcia Givens lends lydelpihg X to a resident of gloca nurse g home. lt' ECM 9 04 S get-r E' 91 . V . B S Q V. uctiii t K , Q Y A ' -fr, 4 1 rig . V. mm vm - 2, . X L, V. V i fi A Vi , i ox' ,Q - f- ff- . ff- .. 56? 'aft S .... f ,gif -gb: V .. ' QQ? lj 5 is 1- V "ff, V gg. , 'gli' -2 I HERO MEMBERS FRONT ROWZ L. Thompson, J. Williams, M. Per- MEMBERS OF HEALTH OCCUPATIONS FRONT ROW! D. Hughelt dew P Williams, J. Bassett, D. Hasty, and Miss Guymon. BACK ROW: D Cheek S White, S. Roseman, and Y. Thompson. L. Catron, B. Green, S. Cain, P. Apple, T. Wooldridge. MIDDLE ROW L. Semler, M. Hall, K. Pew, D. Arthur, P. Hinebaugh, M. Crawford, S Wilson, S. Troxell, S. Wooldridge, J. Tow. BACK ROW: M. Givens, A. Wolfe S. Thompson, J. Swim. A man spends her tailoring shop in town. 'or 135 , ,,,. Q L,,,. .,. azsfgz-mfgzgazfwsv iiiisgwggfiiis-fir 5,?if15-!,f.fl'Iii1ZLf.i ,. ' :Q Teii'i'EvfQ w v f'-k L Y ll' . .,.f-mmm, f Y I tx R . " k 1 ' Q :PJ .., W"- .wg ' ' W? N K' VXf', "" W"Q" "hW 'W ,.., i i'ff 'AVKL 'KKKVVL 2 'KVV 5 f gf I' M . ' ' , ,U A. i,. ,. . , , W , ' V,.. A,,,, 'IT zk..'L M" ,. ., . ,,,i W W , ,Iggilggzaw::z:mf,1W-fgigfg,::, ,m.zL...,,. ,,.,,,v, ,- S V, L.,k Q gkk in i K V NA I A',.. '+V' ,iagg ' j .b,. - -A-- yi W, , ,,Wj . I L 0fganlzaufansfsold H11d 1'7"-1' '- 11'fs'fi1'l?f' A' i't'1ll'r 31215 , ,fi Ki"""Lb 3152- T' ' ' Elm: 71' 3 --Q-,- '-1.A v 1 FEM JZ. , ..,,, it Tw 5xg3 . gh. fix, and Of ing istudems in fh5QQi?gHniz8- f10nSa zw212fE iQsCQ0sHwed for IhQ1 rQ w0fk- both in I X L to- in as 2 Year, Ray VH122n SziO?1S0fCd Q 6ondL1CtcdQ K', gfoup whik:gq.M url ICA 21 VICAQ fail 2-S kiiiia '1:-'-:1:'-1J If 3: ii ri K l ? ,kik i 41 g sf 2 x '5 4, Q3 gl 5 1 M P It 5, ,. ' ,Q , 3 miwaf. i h inf "k 7' ' " i'A i "A DV if 1-wg .A - x ', .A . N. ,,. W' f' f - ' i '4.11152-iuzzizzzgizgss,szxazsfl ',,". 1 - , L 5 'A ,,: H , K ,, -- --'L W , -K Fa Rf f Paffefiq5i??52f1Q1??i6!ifBiiBaker- chilazglafsoukru Row11 M . Afmsfmrg M. fciemenfsgglfm5fe11efs, -sg Pad em fnAeKi,gsRow: K. mug,-5,.:'1'Ltvi: k , - '-,.:--- I , , 5 '1i'f.:pLi,L,w - , , 1 . f ' bJess1GQfiEi !i2nv0n, T- Mad1som1BrlHQfr4H,C- 'W1mmQrf fiJ Q41QSaA - D+Nea'- A-Af . V. lFilrslr--lnoundl Experience ILQOIUIS PRACTICAL VOCA- TIONAL EDUCATION The Practical Vocational Educa- tion program at Chrysler again at- tracted juniors with the opportunity of working on a salary basis. Under the direction of Richard Rinehart and Phyllis Klipsch, the organization carried through the idea of develop- ing good work attitudes in class to prepare the students to enter voca- tional classes as seniors. The girls in the club volunteered their services of child care at the state migrant day care center at the state hospital. Others' in the club performed various duties and received valuable experience. Activities such as luncheons and trips added the icing to the cake for tue members of the club. The or- ganization also met each day to get organized and discuss their ex- periences. ELECTRONICS Known for dedicating their services to the school and community, the Electronics Club gained even more technical education by working in Bundy Auditorium this year. Doing all the lighting and sound for all the activities in the auditorium, except the television work, the group proved to be a real asset to the community. Robert Johnson, sponsor of the club, along with president Jerry Paul and secretary-treasurer Ray Neal, helped members perfect their work and develop new techniques with the aid of the auditorium equipment. CHANNEL ll Providing students with the oppor- tunity to develop skills in broadcast- ing, developing individualized tele- vision instructions for the classroom, broadcasting educational program- ming to New Castle, and providing the community with services in pro- gramming were the main interests. Led by Al Oliver, sponsor of the club, and Blaine Landers, Randy Cole, Natalie Rust, and Shari Brown, officers for the group, the organiza- tion was once again as asset to the school. Many programs from all types of athletics and a number of other types of activities, both educational and entertaining, were broadcasted over Channel ll by the staff. PRACTICAL VOCATIONAL EDUCATION members: FRONT ROW: Robert Whittle, Diana Haynes, Bob Elsbury, Callie Hughes, Sherrie Pierce. SECOND ROW: Linda West, Lana Tucker, Randy Brumley, Carol Becklund. THIRD ROW: Ernie Troxell, Tony Stearns, Greg Ayres, Clinton Hill. FOURTH ROW: Ed Short. Tony McGuire, Terry Maloyed. BACK ROW: Bob Williams, Mike Jones, .Ioe Crawford. if A Ev lufiurslr- clolss Work ai' C 7 . ,.-, :ff H , ex I. ii., , ..., if - .fe:,4.' , . 4 -. , . M- if 'ffi'41t rf':w f.a'..a.TT"m'. . .' - '- " A U - " .Ai?.:fl . -A 'We ., -"'.5-We : ' ' . , y y, -A, A -, P-45... if-Z -A Q 'i . With a steady hand, Brent White and Russ Cory perfect a picture,as Brad Hakes focuses in. - ,J Ray Neal and Jerry Paul add a few special effects to a performance. MEMBERS OF ELECTRONICS CLUB: D. Stanley, D. Smith, R. Upchurch, R. Neal, C. Wimmer, R. Thompson. L. Brown, K. Viars, J. Paul, R. Johnson - sponsor ofthe organization. EZ L, MEMBERS OF CHANNEL ll: FRONT ROW: D. Johnson, B. Wilson, B. Norris, P. Trese, J. Miller, G. Brown. SECOND ROW: P. Davis, D. Sutherland, C. Gayer, S. Brown, B. Landers, N. Rust, C. Cole, J. Fadely, J. Cory. BACK ROW: S. Pierson, Mr. A. Oliver - sponsor, G. Warner, A. May, R. Cole, J. Popplewell, R. Cory, K. Key, C. Smith. 139 the world ls Q stage Thespian Troupe l597 acted through another successful season of perform- ances this year under the direction of Dennis Eller. Educating students in the area of theatre arts and pro- moting theatre in the school and com- munity by presenting plays were Mr. Eller's main concerns. The students endorsed him with their line perform- ing techniques. "Our Town," the winter play, was a new change of pace for the organization in that it used no scenery and was a more serious type ofplay. "Rally Round the Flag, Boys," the group's first production of the year, was an appealing comedy centered around Lieutenant DiMaggio fvice- president, Matt Morrisj who had his hands full in a small town, along with having problems with his girl friend Csecretary, Valerie Franklin.J Other actors, such as treasurer of the organi- zation, Nancy Adams and president, Jeff Cannon, added more comedy to the performance. Various backstage crews also made thegplay run smoothly, as in costumes headed by the costume mistress for the club, Diane Selvy. Opie Dalrymple Ueff Cannonj, stops to explain the facts of life to a few ofhis friends. MEMBERS OF THESPIANS ARE FRONT ROW: B. Stump, M. Morris, J. Cannon, D. Selvy, N. Adams, D. Eller f director, V. Franklin, P. Niles, A. Millis, R. Perdew. SECOND ROW: L. Fikc, E. John, A. Danielson, D. Crisp, B. Macer, S. Leitch, A. Dcnney, D. Bowers, C. Smith. THIRD ROW: D. Davis, M. Garvin, J. Neal, B. Anderson, G. Easter, L. McNelis, K. Miller. BACK ROW: T. Grimm, K. Kinkade, B. Hacker, J. Renfro, L. Whittler. . .Jil ffl... . . L15 '53 lgifnililg- E3 23 ' 1' .L ' i 'QW DJ' ix- Q 2 L s 3 r 5 R 19 lg 2 . Mirza" ii ' ' sl '?l'g9':'iwf' I f, r ' .1 itil! Alan Dcnney prepares to try out a few of his own make-up techniques before the play. John Neal attempts to "grin and bear it" as he is made up before a production. . . . . ' -..A A s . A 'L , ,., , I , ,V A W fl .lwgt 4-,- . .,qt,H. - , f- ' ' - fzrggfigfvlwfr .. M4 .f . if T imy Danielson Qlefty is at ease with the help 'fa make-up crew member Cindy Watters. 141 SUUQQESS aklhlllla ll?llEQ QlhllllTiTllQlhll2 Illilllfg IMI 1ll'llflllIlE 'llfllll Qll? 1lFIlHlllEllIl? TTQIlMlGlLlllES Once again, the Chrysler High School NFL team talked up a winning year while piling up more awards. Under the direction of four coaches, the team received more individual help which contributed to their success as well as the team's. Sponsor of the club, James Robbins. coached indi- viduals in the areas of debate, student congress, discussion, radio, and extem- poraneous speaking. Kathy Thompson, co-sponsor, worked with students in the area of poetry and impromptu. Dennis Eller was engaged in perfecting students in oratorical interpretation, dramatic interpretation, and also humorous interpretation. Original ora- tory was Richard Hostetler's area. The year began for the speakers with a welcome back picnic in Baker Park. Throughout the year, the NFL mem- bers worked hard in individually ac- cumulating points to move them up to higher degrees in the Forensic As- sociation. Both as a team and as in- dividuals the members received out- standing recognition. Activities such as sponsoring the rock group "Free Fare," selling neck- laces, and selling car service coupon books provided the group with money to help them through the season. The officers, Jeff Cannon, presidentg Greg Rose, vice-presidentg Susan Heilman, secretary, and Bill Fuller, treasurer, also moved the team. 9' ' . . .., 'F' . . ,. " ' Q g i.,-ef s ,,,,,i-'rf' l . Hg 'T' K J ..-Y' ' - +,-M,-H ,W .ff ' K . www.-f K I , gzwg - -ij. , t e Wh , A. . MW ,Qi .v--, . . - , s, f . " , . J , 5' raQl'w7K?l',iw s ' F, t, J+1f1S'e+1- ' .. ,f:. M ff' 'Hair Q -M55 4' ani? ' ima ' egfzrlf' .rf-' -I at , f fa +5 sy, ff,i1W'fj,, F .6-r-Of , 34' if X .,V. V.-KV. . . ,, . . .,.,, i tqwv, , - ji - f ES' i V' - vi ,V f '-iff"',1TffQ1-Q-f2.,QQlQk'qi 'Q A .vi.f3 i - -fav l. aff .tv ' , me 11- -' - -'tQ':1"-wj:.Ng:5:t'4:Am39' V 51" 7' .Y .. ,.-fi ...---"' ,,.4--"""M' ,..,m 'Md' M ,, , Asf uszvxmsfvez f ff:-vi' ,3 Amy Danielson dips for some punch at the N.F.L. Christmas party. , 5+--r vi MEMBERS OF N.F.L.: FRONT ROW: J. Robbins - sponsor, S. Hellman, J Cannon, G. Rose, B. Fuller, K. Thompson - sponsor. SECOND ROW: A. Millis J. Acker, S. Leitch, G. Strauch, C. McConnell, J. Renfro, D. Davis, B. Thurman THIRD ROW: B. Russell, T. Grimm, D. Norris, B. Stump, L. McNelis, M Howe, A. Danielson, K. Miller, S. Schweir, FOURTH ROW: R. Turnbull, J Renfro, N. Adams, M. Garvin, S. Storkel, C. Coffey, V. Franklin, D. Cassidy BACK ROW: G. Easter, J. Karp, R. Perdew, E, John, J. Crandall, D. Gehlert Mark Garvin thinks over a question presented Varsity debater Greg Rose presents another one by John Cassidy at a practice debate ofhis perplexing questions. 143 1 I .TW Followln The chorale group, composed of stu- - - dents who have knowledge in music Fw 6 F 6 6 H m and vocal fundamentals, performed music of many styles and periods. By doing this, the members were exposed. to music from various periods of his- tory and an experience was provided for the students to perform more ad- vanced music. Miss Sandra Martz was their new director. Officers for the year were Alan Denney, president, Dawna Norris, vice- presidentg Valerie Franklin, secretary, and Brett Ray, treasurer. SWING CHOIR Made up mostly of Chorale stu- MEMBERS or sw1NG CHOIR are FRONT ROW: s. Hurd, K. Mogneu, L. Powell, c. dents. the Swing Ch0if PCff0fmCd and Smith, J. Smith, D. Cummings, V. Franklin, A. Denney. BACK ROW: M. Morris, C. Lindsey, J. Studied music gf popular composers! The organization served as a "publid relations" group by providing music for various city and county organizal tions. The group also participated in a Swing Choir contest in February and received first place rating for theil efforts. Neal, K. Gregory, R. Woods, D. Sanderson, B. Atkinson, J. Bell, G. Warner, B. Miller, P. Niles. MADRIGALS Synonymous with quality in singing, the Madrigals group, under the di- rection of Sandra Martz, brought back memories of the renaissance period once again. The group participated in several contests throughout the yeal which added to their learning experi- ences along with the community ant school performing experiences they had MEMBERS OF MADRIGALS are: L. Fox, P. Niles, K. Chilton, B. Atkinson, J. Lines, J. Reamer, . d C. Green, C, Laurie, D. Norris, C. Smith, C. Loveless. Obtame - MEMBERS OF CHORALE are FRONT ROW: K. Alexander, L. Powell, J. Bell, P. Muncy, D. Cummings, L. Atkinson, T. Taylor, C. Smith, D. Sander- son, D. Davis, T. Berfanger, D. Norris. SECOND ROW: V. Armstrong, S. Dugger, L. Gehlert, L. Black, K. Piper, K. Laurie, R. Steele, F. Vannoy, B. White, E. Collier, P. Reynolds, K. Chilton, B. Dennis, C. Loveless, T. Grigsby. THIRD ROW: M. Caine, C. Lindsey, A. Farley, K. Gregory, P. Garner, K. Mognett, P. Niles, M. Thalls, J. Trent, A. Denney, V. Franklin, B. Miller, B. Caldwell, B. I-Iumbles, J. Hurd, J. Jones, B. Bowman. BACK ROW: L. Maze, B. Stump, L. Fox, J. Lines, J. Smith, G. Warner, D. Owens, B. Ray, C. Laurie, J. Atkinson, H. Braswell, S. Peacock, J. Hurd, V. McCorkle, K. McClure, D. Hacker. 144 6 .- , , - ...L ""'M + Qs' fH,w.,.41z.b ..f4,1gyL17w,- .... k .A . , ,. ,, ,O - Q f-.W . ,... . ,-. .. ,.-.,.- I-.32 X Hwy. 95. 3. 4 ' . 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Yifgffbgfyk avggfei-. ,www . . -4?i,Al5,1v 'TTI' K ' -V' wJ-FSL? ,airy I, '1'5I',' fry' ' 1,21 gwa' v 4 .Yi -" f - Q fb 5' 4 Iwi.: Q , ,sf ,,,. x xx f 'If .259 Qi .1 E. " . ac ,L 3 - -gg ,Qi-,. Y A1 V . 'yja any 513. .N ,QL .ry MMA 'err EF ii . .,g7.,.r gg Q A Se, ,fir . 4.2 A. . W:-5 is fe r f 1 .rl . ,gf A ,562 - W ...xy Q.. ,ft 0 , 4- " ,JY . -kv Q-:ig 5521 Hifi? , :xii ,193 Nfkgl. ,HX ffl? .,g,,.- M135 .1311 vii , "iff Tig: Qifgj fa? -95" viii QE., if .W A Liga Wiiif, as W1 , ii A .A X 1 , -' If Bell Eigfifgfgaptufe during the'?QChiristf,, A Q' ,, 4 If W Y , Shop oiadgoomiids of .Q POM-PONS With the "Spirit of 76," thirty- one Pom pon girls opened every home basketball game with a Bi- centennial pre-game show. They al- so performed five half time shows dealing with the '50's, Christmas, Valentine's Day, and Seniors. Pom-pons participated with the band during the summer, per- formed at the football games, and took part in the Christmas convo- cation. After practicing hard every day after school, the members had a well-deserved slumber party in May to end the year. Miss Vicky McWhorter was choreographer and director. Captains were Jennifer Hoke and Sarah Kratz, Pom-ponsg and Lyn- ette Holaday, Flag Corps. ORCHESTRA Playing both classical and modern music, CHS orchestra stu- dents were able to experience all types of music. Members com- peted in solo and ensemble contests at Ball State University in Feb- ruary, and the full orchestra con- test in April. In the spring, the students toured the elementary schools and gave concerts to en- courage younger children to parti- cipate in and appreciate music. To raise money for uniforms, or- chestra members sold magazines and records, Officers were Dy- Lynda Reese, president, Leann McDonald, vice-presidentg and Carol Davis, secretary-treasurer. Mr. B.A. Langdon was director. A x 2 I K f N E s Q dl? if 7 v , A 3 . .5 . I , ,w si- 1 f ., 3. X xmsxg f .fi ' 'Z 'si X v ' '- wtf ..'. . L.. 4, NAV. f-1 , ' A H tw , Ag, .- ya- -...- ag . . lil., 3:1 , . -11, , ,. , ., , .x . JZ . , H -Aw, 1 2 . - -.. Q -,. . ' - V 4 1 w-M ---.A , xg ' .- ,.:, ,!,,,,gg, K. b 151 1' i ', fit' 3 .' ' 4,2 f' , A ' 57 V ' OHL ' 'K 1- '- POM-PON MEMBERS are FRONT ROW: B. Green, D. Green, P. Wicke, T. Jarvis, J. Hoke, S. Kratz, L. Holaday, D. Byers, and N. Adams. MIDDLE ROW: J. Morera, D. Norris, B. Miller, J. Longfellow, M. Green, S. Beasley, S. Acker, B. Caffoe, and S. Boggs. BACK ROW: P. Jones, J. Tyner, P. Myers, B. Hoover, N. Young, C. Craig, B. Denney, S. Peacock, M. Regner, and B. Baker. 146 4 I ORCHESTRA MEMBERS are' FRONT ROW: L. Grear, D. Reese, C. Gayer. S. Thurman, R. Regner, D. Chapman, T. Slagle, C. Pasman, R. Schuffman. and 'K. Moore. BACK ROW: M. Tabares, D. Wilkinson, R. Donica. S. Brown. T. Hacker, M. Albrecht, B. Atkinson, L. Talavera, M. Goodwin, and L. McDonald 4 4 i 3 1 .Ili i. l A -A , gtk -si A N, , if - - - .1 .Y 3 'Y to in 4 H- "2 . V559 ,. W Q- , 'Q 1 V , 'u f W t Y If: Y ' Ki, 3' 7 Q5 x 1 ts.. J "- ' 11 f fit? J f,fZQg 212- 4" ' . " fav: "1 jp lg Xia. . 1 ,,,,- Pom-pon members Nancy Adams, Beth Mil- ler, and Tammy Jarvis enjoy entertaining at the Christmas convocation. I Leon Grear and Shari Brown perfect their talent by practicing hard in the orchestra. N 4, L :gm ,,, L 'TWH Ui o ,gh ,U 9, V, wy ,JUr,,W'4 L, ,Vw '3. C , 2. - ilk 5 o 'N .- x V" DN ff K K A, I M 1' 'Q fx- Q ,V 'Gi O W J V U C . We 'J ,, X Arr sxl s -" 5, Q is LJ 'Q Aw' ,W ' ' W ,t yzskfy ,. ' Qs 6 'Ml M759 K Q z WJLQ ' 'F - 5' .Q ' am: - fm Y..-91 fir 'SEQ M, Q 551 A a loud blast fro parade. IT! ,5 'Q' ,3 .2 , 3, w, .., The Chrysler High School Trojan arching Band, under the direction of Jbert Shauver, proved their excel- lce and dedication once again this ar by capturing third place honors in e Indiana State Fair competition. Beginning the school year early by acticing during the summer proved to effective for the organization al- ough a lot of work for the members. md camp, along with its initiations, as one summer high-light for the md along with various contest honors received. By the time school began r the rest of the students at Chrysler igh School, the band was well on its ay toward another successful year. During the school year, the organiza- Jn not only worked on more per- ction and new techniques, but also :rformed at many of the athletic and ,cial events that evolve around Chrys- r High School and the community. Being one of the largest and most :tive clubs at CHS, the band con- antly drilled and strived for the word perfection." The enthusiasm through- it the community toward the group ided to their desire for perfection id strengthened the harmonious Jund at Chrysler High School. kcmm - Ze?" J: 1 . f, ,XM . it 5.. if I 'Q ,ri K -43514. . ig, 4 -...,, Schuffman leads Debby Tompkins and Schuffman through their initiation at band camp in August of 1975. 4. BAND MEMBERS FRONT ROW: L. Coleman, K. Edwards, C. Dorr, A, Armstrong, C. Lindsey, M. Smith, D. Caster, N. Paul, P. Kiesewetter, L. Maze, T. Kendall. SECOND ROW: T. Grimm, B, Schuffman, T. Poor, B. Bronnenburg, S. Coleman, L, Patterson, D. Tyner, B. Carter, T. Carnes, H Ziebold, L. Ayres, S. Kilgore, T. Shelton, C. Mercer, B. Weddle, C. Smith, J, McClure, D. Tompkins. THIRD ROW: D. Modlin, J. Irwin, B. Noble G. Webb, M. Davis, B. Thompson, C. Hacker, B. Hacker, J. Renfro, S. Elkins, C. Bittner, B. Bateman, J. Catey, B. Anderson, M. Wyatt, M. Wilkinson, T Lindsey, B. Bunton, D. Magers, M. Garvin, D. Pitchford, B. Stump. FOURTH ROW: J. Neal, K. Viars, A. Denney, D. Owens, M. Morris, B. Wadman, M Cox, K. Bailey, J. Miller, R. Cook, B. Thompson, J. Roberts, A, Feeley, J. Gough, R. Bogue, E. John, S. Pinkerton, J. Vawrinek. BACK ROW: T. Marcum T. Taylor, J. Marcum, J. Bassett, G. Easter, A. Givens, D. McQueen, B. Atkinson, D. Knight, J. Taylor, M. Green, J. Renfro, L. Crawford, L Hubbs, E. Wallace, J. Carlton, C. Gray, E. Cox, R. Perdow, R. Woods, J. Patterson. 149 H i S 150 4 1 ,,. . j,1.,E.,, LV? I f ... M 7 WL If F s .bf U Q U J vvrni x x Q' N1"Vx1X's xp. x R .4-3. x ,xv I-.TWIN ,.Q, Q " 'Ns xvfn s was-YQ xx, 5 x . -H . x sm ,QQ ,fx kvfwx x-kv 2 NN ,.,,, 1 f-'I .8 Us 'M' W v-aff P MTI P RACT I C E MA Mary Anne Lynn Alexander fliissickj i 152 PERFECT Diane Turchan and Brad Taylor willingly practice during the orange passing contest at the SAC Christmas, party. Seniors failed to defend their title as they came in third. John Robert Acker Nancy Lyn Adams Anita Gwen Akers Elana Hope Allen Debra Ann Amonett . X Randall Keith Amonett Peggy Lea Apple Anita Gail Armstrong Bruce William Atkinson Jerry Ellis Atkinson Jennifer Jane Austin Gregory Paul Ayers Richard Dean Bach Gene Robert Baldock Jennifer Ann Bassett Fostena Marie Beck John Daniel Beck, Jr. Teresa Irene Becklund fReesej l Julie Elaine Bell Lucille Rosanna Bell Darrell Ray Bertram Debra Ann Bertram Shirley Diane Black Teresa Ann Blackburn Ronald Blessinger Beth Ellen Bolk Mark Wayne Booher Douglas Henry Bowers Jesse Milton Boyles Thomas I-l.T. Brock Brent Lee Bronnenberg Glenda Charlene Brown Gregory Lynn Brown Julia Lynn Browning Patricia Ann Bruton Daniel Lee Buchanan Dana Lynn Byers Robert Brian Caffoe Susan Eileen Cain Cynthia Lee Caldwell Jeffrey Edward Cannon CLASS FACTS Class Colors: Light blue and dark blue. Class Flower: Rose. Class Motto: "Today we dream dreams for our future, tomorrow we start to make these dreams come true." Class Officers: CPICTURED AT LEFTJ Lisa Coleman, treasurer: Debbie Crisp, secretaryz, Jim Stawick, president. Not pictured, Kelly Woodward, vice-president. 100th Graduating Class at CHS. .XS P rs -. ' V . J t rx , . is f .,Q 'X wr 31, ,f r., -151 '-,'.'QmifZ if Vicki Lea Carter Debra Susan Cassidy Lisa Kay Catron Marilyn Faye Catron Sue Ellen Caudill Walter Scott Chambers III Deborah .lean Cheek Karen Regina Clark Doyle Lee Clemens Cathy Lynn Coffey Daniel Ray Coleman Lisa Ann Coleman 153 Floyd Elden Collier, Jr. Debra Lea Comer Lucille Rebecca Conrad lSemlerJ Michael David Cook John Russell Cory Gail Lorraine Coursen Bobby Joe Covey Dana Lee Covey Scott Fritz Crabtree David Morris Craft Anita Kaye Crandall Kit C. Dean Crane INS PIRATIONAL PAINTING Signs around CHS provide spirit for Tro jan athletes. Tim Miller and Dan Cole man paint inspirational signs. Daminda Elaine Crawford Debra Lynn Crisp Lisa Ann Cross Darrell James Cummings Cristi Elaine Dalton Harrison Fredrick Dalton Amy Elizabeth Danielson Theodore Joseph Dankovich Lucy Evelyn Davenport Diana Marie Davis Mark Evan Davis Hershel Alan Denney 154 l Tamara Lynn Denney Joseph Matthew Dickson Gregory Foster Dietz Lydia Christine Marie Dorr Joseph Anthony Durbin James Curtis Eckerty Billy Joe Edwards Kathryn Louise Edwards Niki Nadine Edwards Joseph Lee Elkins, Jr. Steven Ray Elmore Robert William Elsbury Julie Ann Emmons Regina Lynn Ferrell Sandra Kay Fletcher Keith Alan Flowers Juanita Lorraine Fonzer Teresa Lynn Foster Dino Patrick Fox Valerie Anne Franklin Florence Jeanette Frazier Larry Ejner Freeburg David Scott Frost William Michael Fuller Floyd Allen Garner Robert Nelson Gayer, Jr. Donald Richard Gehlert David Edward Gibson Marcia Lillian Givens Rebecca Ann Goodson SAFARI CHS STYLE Untamed jungles still exist for Tammy Wallace as she finds props to portray a character during acting class. Jon Scott Goodwin Vickie Lea Grandon Carlos Eugene Gray Brenda Sue Green Catherine Joyce Green Delilah Jean Green Larry Allen Green Jeffry Joe Gregory Brent Lee Allen Grider Gary Allen Griffey Patricia Jean Groce Ricky Allen Gwinn Phillip Wayne Haas Jody Ann Hagerman Bobby Albert Hall, Jr. Julie Kay Hamm Hurshel Chaffee Hankenhoff Mark Bradley Hastings Debra Kay Hasty Helen Irene Haven Steven Eric Hayes John Michael Heck Susan Jane Heilman Cheryl Lynne Herran Vickie Lynn Hicks Catherine Sue Hinton Jennifer Lee Hoke Lynette Sara Holaday Rebecca Sue Hollen QMeltonJ Robert Ellis Horn TOWER OF SENIOR POWER When friends get together, fun is spon- taneous Senior spirit becomes a pyramid attheSACChristmas art Dy. U Y . fw- 4 THAT'S ENTERTAINMENT Putting talent and interest together, Jerry Atkinson performs with his musical group at a FORSCO party. Bret Leonard Horton Julie Ann Howe Ronald William Howe Darlene Gale Hughett Sharon Ruth Hurd Kandi Sue Hutson W- X Tamara Kay Jarvis Jay Minor Jessop V Cheryl Dawn Johnson Jami Lynn Johnson fRobertsl 3' Jerry Wayne Keener . Thomas James Kenrick - Y Richard Bland Kilgore Qlj? ' Tammi LeeAnn King C X . Jackson Todd Kirby i tw wg A , 5355- Jefferson Reed Kirby ' A Sl ' 'jx Brad Allen Knotts A Ne . if Q, Sarah Jane Kratz 1 ff , ' , '9 , ,, ' 4 Y fs. ,F ' , ' 1 A P J A l X .,5..i,mi - - - -, f-,.,3.,:f,:Qg:5: 1 A ig Y A Blaine Howard Landers A A YQ A Chester C. Laurie, Jr. ' ' -- 54:94 ' y David Wayne Lee 823. W' Q "1"f'fI"i Susan Dian Leitch ' I, 63 Lesia Kay Lewis CCampbellj f ,1. jffa , Norma Jean Lewis 5. 5 ., ,3L11AiN1.,..', , i5t,"'w , , 'lb ,- t f, lx ' bf rff, F t- ' N L 54 . , , H, 157 2 pg if M ZR f . Q W w w: .Wi . " ' " 1 I N . . . Q5 be if- 523:-.!lEI' 32' 51:-fi-' 1: : - -1111115521 ,:li':'f3fQ3ii' 75? ft-:1:kf3:i5'E , 'X .3 ,,. ,I Y, -, .Q ,W 4 , 2 it E 5 v X .lr .1 E . 2 f it T. . ,, .4 , W, , 'Qigw "it, QW rg .i'fw2 W I if 7 f Fe 724' ai ' 1 iiiiifiii' , T I , .W , if 61222 M15 H -v a jg, -3 i. :ag 5 ff-5 ' '51 12 ' if 3 . ' 3 wi xv ic K A, RQ? , Z W1 3 1, ii f N n, lg J f 4, , 'YK -, Y a ,D X 2 i" faQE...,sH ffz"""""' ,.,, W. fl, - A tls , f ., :Wu .L sf sf-v f-.A Susan Diane Lewis Tamara Jo Lockridge Phillip Jay Logston Dianna Lynn Lorton Debra Kay Lowe David Carroll Luellen Beth Ann Macer Timmy Ray Madison Terry Lee Mahaffey Willie Dale Marion Linda Lynette Mark Jeffrey Allen Marlatt Harold Massengale Jara Lee Masters Jerry Dee Mastin Terry Lee Matney Cheryl Lynn McCoy Stephen Wayne McFarland Debra Kay McGuire Richard Todd McLaren II Carrie Ann Mercer Penny Sue Miller Terry Lynn Miller Timothy Brian Miller Tamara Jo Milliner Alice Elaine Millis Rhonda Jean Modlin Joey Gene Moflitt Matthew C. Morris Melvin Douglas Murphy Michael Brent Murphy Wendell Lee Murphy Alan Dewayne Neal Allen Andrew Neal Jan Elaine New Michael Anthony Nicholson Perry Edward Niles William Ray Noble Kerry Wayne Odle Tara Ann Olsen Deborah Kay Oney Mark Alan Overmyer RUB IT IN Giving a sophomore band initiate a Karo shampoo becomes very enjoyable for sen- ior Lisa Coleman. David Aaron Owens Herman Richard Oxley Steven Ray Padgett Jerry Wayne Paul Paul Anthony Penn Thanh A. Pham Rickey Allen Pierce Deborah Lynne Piercy QAllenj Paul Acton Piercy, Jr. Scott J. Pinkerton Kathy Ann Poore Donna Mae Potts Laura Jane Powell Brett Harlan Ray Timothy Lee Reagan Timothy Jay Reeves Lewis Frank Regner Gregory Scott Reid 160 KM aww . gil , 5 Susan Kay Rifner Cary Michael Riggs Ronnie Ray Rigney Candice June Robinson Mary Alice Roe Joyce Delynn Rogers Gregory Glen Rose Shawn Elaine Roseman Brian Wayne Russell Lavena Darlene Russell Rita Darlene Sanders Deanna Sanderson Joseph Allen Schetgen Larry Dale Schmidt Sally Ann Schmitt Melissa Schofield Sandra Jean Schwier Diana Lynn Selvy Donna Jean Sharp David William Shell Tony Lynn Shelton Cynthia Louise Shermer Steven Lee Shopp Susan Ann Showalter Mark Edward Sidwell Roger Edwin Sidwell Susan Diane Sidwell Ricky Jay Slaven David Mark Smith Debbie Jean Smith Jeanitta Gayle Smith Michelle Ann Smith James Francis Stawick Nancy Anne Stine Brett Alan Strukel Elizabeth Ellen Stump Charles Edward Sumpter Jr Patricia Karen Sumpter Michael J. Sutherland Ronna Kay Sutherland Jeffrey Scott Swim Bradford Lee Taylor Jeffri Scott Taylor Jeffrey Thomas Teel William Danal Teel Il Jane Ann Thomas Bruce Allan Thompson Linda Lee Thompson Steven Dale Thompson Yvonne Thompson Raymond James Thomson James Michael Thornburg Jennifer Rae Tow Sharon Kay Troxell Diane Elaine Turchan Walter Curtis Turnball John Mark Tyner William Maurice Tyner Jr. Jeffrey John Vawrinek Pamela Ann Waddell Tammy Regina Wallace Dianna Kay Ward Marilyn Jewell Ward fSullivanj Kathy Sue Watt Timothy Eugene Waters Linda Jo Webb DO IT As a part of getting involved, Cathy Coffey, Susie Cain and other seniors have "DO IT" shirts silk screened to promote voting in the senior election. I I N9 X, BENCH ANTICS The major concern of some players some- times wanders from the baseball game as the bench becomes a good place for SIOI' ies and jokes. Julia Ann Woolsey Teresa Ann Wright Betty .lean Weddle David Lynn Weintraut Sheila Marie White Jeffrey Glen Whittle Patricia Charise Wicke Jeffrey Allen Wilhelm John Albert Williams Penny Jo Williams Susanna Caren Wilson Terry Lee Wilson Calvin Dewey Wimmer Joyan Wisehart Karen Lynn Witham John Scott Wittler Anita Louise Wolfe Robert Merrill Woods James Kelly Woodward Tana Janelle Wooldridge Curtis Lynn Yockey Timothy Lynn York Not Pictured: Christopher Lee Bryant Robert Alexander Cole Donald Niblock Frazier Anita Sue Guffey Rickey Dewavne Hill Carol Ann Jessee Michael Eugene Perdue David Dewayne Prince John Douglas Turner 163 Debra L. Watson fSperal Kevin Thomas Whary A ACKER, JOHN ROBERT: Who's Who in Foreign Lan- guages: Boys' State del.: Certi- ficate Winner: Debate: FORS- CO, treas.: Guest of Rotary, HONOR JACKET WINNER: Madrigals: Play Productions: SAC Rep.: Spanish Honor So- ciety: Spanish Club: Swing Choir: Thespians: NFL: Men's Choir: Optimist Honoree: Na- tional Honor Society. ADAMS, NANCY LYN: Girls' Tennis, Swimming: Certificate Winner: Debate: FORSCO: WYSN Staff: Play Productions: Pom-pon Corps: ROSENNIAL: Thespians, treas.: NFL: Speech. AKERS, ANITA GWEN: Gen- eral Ed. Major. ALEXANDER, MARY ANNE LYNN CKISSICKJ: Certificate Winner: Crest Winner: COE: OEA. ALLEN, ELANA HOPE: COE: OEA, pres. AMONETT, DEBRA ANN: Bus. Ed. Major. AMONETT, RANDALL KEITH: Intramural Basketball, capt.: VICA"D". APPLE, PEGGY LEA: Certifi- cate Winner: HO: HONOR JACKET WINNER: National Honor Society. ARMSTRONG, ANITA GAIL: Band. ATKINSON, BRUCE WIL- LIAM: Band: Madrigals: Or- chestra: Play Productions: Prom Comm.: Swing Choir: Thespians. ATKINSON, JERRY ELLIS: Chorale. AUSTIN, JENNIFER JANE: Girls' Basketball, stat.: Girls' Softball, stat.: Girls' Cheer- block. AYRES, GREGORY PAUL: PVE. B BACH, RICHARD DEAN: VICA "D", pres. BALDOCK, GENE ROBERT: VICA "C". BASSETT, JENNIFER ANN: HERO. BECK, FOSTENA MARIE: Prom Decoration Comm. BECK, JOHN DANIEL JR: Chorale: Intramural Basket- ball. BECKLUND, TERESA IRENE QREESEJ: Optimist Honoree: PVE,treas. BELL, JULIE ELAINE: Cho- rale: Play Productions: Swing Choir: JCL. BELL, LUCILLE ROSANNA: Bus. Ed. Major. BERTRAM, DARRELL RAY: Voc. Machine Shop Major. BERTRAM, DEBRA ANN: Cer 164 UIQ itil 99593 tificate Winner: FORSCO, v.- pres.: GAA: HONOR JACKET WINNER: Jr. Usher: Optimist Honoree: Play Productions: Prom Decorations, Food, and Tickets Comm.: ROSENNIAL: Spanish Honor Society: Spanish Club, v. pres.: Thespians: Win- ter Dance Tickets and Decora- tions Comm: National Honor Society, pres. BLACK, SHIRLEY DIANE: General Ed. Major. BLACKBURN, TERESA ANN: Certificate and HONOR JAC- KET WINNER: FORSCO: Jr. Usher: WYSN Staff: National Honor Society. BLESSINGER, RONALD: Intra- mural Basketball. BOLK, BETH ELLEN: Academic Major. BOOHER, MARK WAYNE: Baseball: F.C.A.: Intramural Basketball. BOWERS, DOUGLAS HENRY: Boys' Tennis: Debate: F.C.A.: Intramural Basketball: WYSN Staff: NFL: Speech Team. BOYLES, JESSE MILTON: Certificate Winner. BROCK, THOMAS H.T.: Foot- ball: Baseball: Intramural Bas- ketball. BRONNENBERG, BRENT LEE: FORSCO: Intramural Basket- ball: JCL, v. pres. BROWN, GLENDA CHAR- LENE: Home Ec. Major. BROWN, GREGORY LYNN: Football: Golf: Intramural Basketball: Morale Club. BROWNING, JULIA LYNN: Certificate and HONOR JAC- KET WINNER: COE: Jr. Usher: National Honor Society: OEA. BRUTON, PATRICIA ANN: Girls' Cheerblock: Morale Club: PHOENIX: Prom and Win- ter Dance Ticket Comm. BRYANT, CHRISTOPHER LEE: VICA "DH: FFA. BUCHANON, DANIEL LEE: Basketball: Track: Guest of Rotary. BYERS, DANA LYNN: Flag Corps. C CAFFOE, ROBERT BRIAN: Basketball: Basketball, mgr.: Golf: Boys' State alt.: Certifi- cate and Crest Winner: F.C.A.: Intramural Basketball, capt.: WYSN Staff: Spanish Honor Society. ' CAIN, SUSAN EILEEN: Girls' Tennis mgr.: Certificate and HONOR JACKET WINNER: GAA, treas.: HO, treas.: Na- tional Honor Society. CALDWELL, CYNTHIA LEE: General Ed. Major. CANNON, JEFFREY ED- WARD: Certificate and Crest Winner: Debate: WYSN Staff: Optimist Honoree: Play Pro- ductions: Thespians, pres.: NFL, pres.: JCL: Speech Team. CARTER, VICKI LEA: Aca- demic Major. CASSIDY, DEBRA SUSAN: Certificate and Crest Winner: Chorale: Debate: Girls' State del.: Play Productions: Thes- pians: JCL. CATRON, LISA KAY: Chorale: Girls' Cheerblock: Morale Club: HO: Swing Choir. CATRON, MARILYN FAYE: Certificate and Crest Winner: COE: Jr. Usher: OEA: Nation- al Honor Society. CAUDILL, SUE ELLEN: Health Occupations. CHAMBERS, WALTER SCOTT III: Certificate and HONOR JACKET WINNER: AFS Stu- dent: FORSCO, pres.: Guest of Rotary: Jr. Usher: Morale Club, pres.: Play Productions: Prom Decorations Comm.: ROSENNIAL: SAC Rep.: Na- tional Honor Society: Thes- pians.- CHEEK, DEBORAH JEAN: HERO. CLARK, KAREN REGINA: Girls' Tennis: Art Club: Girls' Cheerblock: Morale Club: Prom Foods Comm. CLEMENS, DOYLE LEE: Bas- ketball: Football: Track: F.C.A. COFFEY, CATHY LYNN: Girls' Tennis: Volleyball: Gym- nastics: Certificate and HON- OR JACKET WINNER: De- bate: World Affairs Institute: National Honor Society. COLE, ROBERT ALEXAN- DER: FORSCO. COLEMAN, DANIEL RAY: Basketball: Football, capt.: Golf: Boys' State Del.: F.C.A., treas. COLEMAN, LISA ANN: Girls' Tennis: Girls' Track: Sr. Class Treas.: Band: Certificate and Crest Winner: FORSCO: Jr. Usher: Orchestra: Prom Music Comm.: SAC: Spanish Honor Society: ROSENNIAL. COLLIER, FLOYD ELDEN JR: VICA MD". COMER, DEBRA LEA: FORS- CO: GAA: Jr. Usher: Morale Club: Prom Tickets and Deco- rations Comm: ROSENNIAL: Spanish Club: Winter Dance Comm. CONRAD, LUCILLE REBEC- CA QSELMERJ: HERO. COOK, MICHAEL DAVID: Baseball: Cross Country: Wres- tling, capt.: F.C.A.: WYSN Staff: Speech Team. CORY, JOHN RUSSELL: Chan- nel ll: VICA "C". COURSEN, GAIL LORRAINE: Chorale. COVEY, BOBBY JOE: VICA uDu COVEY, DANA LEE: Girls' Bas- ketball: Girls' Track: Volleyball, capt.: Band: Certificate and HONOR JACKET WINNER: Jr. Usher: ROSENNIAL Co- Editor: National Merit Scholar- ship Semi-Finalist: National Honor Society. CRABTREE, SCOTT FRITZ: DECA. CRAFT, DAVID MORRIS: VICA"D". CRANDALL, ANITA KAYE: Girls' Cheerblock: OEA. CRANE, KIT C. DEAN: Cross Country: F.C.A.: Intramural Basketball. CRAWFORD, DAMINDA ELAINE: Wrestling mgr. CRISP, DEBRA LYNN: Soph., Jr., Sr. Class Sec.: Prom Attd.: Certificate and Crest Winner: Chorale: FORSCO: Morale Club: PHOENIX: Play Produc- tions: Prom Steering Comm.: SAC: Spanish Honor Society: Thespians: Speech Team. CROSS, LISA ANN: IOL: OEA. CUMMINGS, DARRELL JAMES: Baseball: Track, mgr: Chorale: F.C.A.: Intramural Basketball: Madrigals: Play Productions: Swing Choir. D DALTON. CRISTI ELAINE: COE, treas.: GAA: OEA: Opti- mist Honoree. DALTON, HARRISON FRED- RICK: VICA "D": Machinist Club, pres. DANIELSON, AMY ELIZA- H: Girls' Gymnastics, atling, mgr.: Jr. Class s.: Certificate Winner: Cho- F.C.A.: HONOR JAC- ' WINNER: Jr. Uhser: Mo- Club: PHOENIX: Prom ring Comm.: Thespians: chTeam. COVICH, THEODORE LEPH: Baseball: Boys' State Chess Club: Certificate ner: F.C.A.: Intramural ketball: l975 Homecoming ient Chairman. ENPORT, LUCY EVE- N: Wresting, mgr. S, DIANA MARIE: Home nomics Major. S, MARK EVAN: Band: 1ceBand. Y QEY, HERSHEL ALAN: ,d: Chorale: Play Produc- s: Swing Choir: Thespians: ice Band: Optimist Honoree. NIEY, TAMARA LYNN: ls' Basketball, stat.: Volley- : Certificate Winner: Crest mer: GAA: Jr. Usher: Span- Club. LSON, JOSEPH MAT- EW: Wrestling: Band: JCL. 'Z, GREGORY FOSTER: Jtball: Certificate Winner: :st Winner: Debate: Jr. Ush- NFL. R, LYDIA CHRISTINE XRIE: Band, sec.: Certifi- e Winner: Crest Winner: lA: Girls' State, alt.: Na- nal Honor Society: Orchestra: ly Productions: JCL. BIN, JOSEPH ANTHONY: afting Major. E .ERTY, JAMES CURTIS: ack: Cross Country, capt.: C.A.: Intramural Basketball, pt.: Jr. Usher. VARDS, BILLY JOE: Crest inner: Certificate Winner: In- amural Basketball: VICA DH VARDS, KATHRYN JUISE: Girls' Swimming: 'om Queen: Homecoming Jeen: Winter Dance, Attd.: md: Certificate Winner: Crest inner: Orchestra. VARDS, NIKI NADINE: rt Major LINS, JOSEPH LEE JR.: 'om Clean-up Comm., Chrm: Janish Club. IORE, STEVEN RAY: ICA "D". BURY, ROBERT WIL- IAM: PVE, pres. MONS, JULIE ANN: Busi- :ss Education Major. F LRELL, REGINA LYNN: ome Ec, Business Major. iTCHER, SANDRA KAY: us. Ed., Home Ec Major. JWERS, KEITH ALAN: ldustrial Arts Award, Woods id Metals. QZER, JUANITA LOR- AINE:HERO. FOSTER, TERESA LYNN: PVE. FOX, DINO PATRICK: Foot- ball: Track, Girls' Gymnastics, asst.: F.C.A. Guest of Rotary: P.E.asst. FRANKLIN, VALERIE ANNE: Chorale: FORSCO: GAA: WYSN Staff: Morale Club: Play Productions: Prom Deco- rations Comm.: Thespians, sec.: NFL: Speech, sec. FRAZIER, DONALD NIB- LOCK: Industrial Education Major. FRAZIER, FLORENCE JEAN- ETTE: Certificate Winner: Crest Winner: GAA: Girls' Softball: Girls' Basketball. FREEBURG, LARRY EJNER: Baseball, All-Conference l975: F.C.A.: Intramural Basketball. FROST, DAVID SCOTT: Foot- ball: Crest Winner: Certificate Winner. FULLER, WILLIAM MI- CHAEL: Basketball, stat.: Football: Baseball, stat.: Certi- ficate Winner: HONOR JAC- KET WINNER: Debate: F.C.A.: Guest of Rotary: Intra- mural Basketball: Jr. Usher: WYSN Staff: National Honor Society: ROSENNIAL: SAC Rep.: Spanish Honor Society: NFL, treas.: Solo Speech. G GARNER, FLOYD ALLEN: Football: VICA "D". GAYER, ROBERT NELSON, JR.: Football: Band. GEHLERT, DONALD RICH- ARD: Track: Cross Country: Swimming, capt.: Certificate Winner: Debate: F.C.A.: FOR- SCO: HONOR JACKET WINNER: WYSN Staff: Na- tional Honor Society: NFL: Speech Team GIBSON, DAVID EDWARD: Basketball: Track: Cross Coun- try:F.C.A. GIVENS, MARCIA LILLIAN: Girls' Softball, stat.: Art Club: Band: Chorale: FHA: Pep Club: I-IO, v. pres: Jr. Usher. Play Productions. GOODSON, REBECCA ANN: IOL. GOODWIN, JON SCOTT: Basketball: Baseball: Cross Country: Golf: Crest Winner: Certificate Winner: F.C.A.: In- tramural Basketball. GRANDON, VICKIE LEA: Home Economics Major. GRAY, CARLOS EUGENE: Band: Chess Club: WYSN Staff: Orchestra. GREEN, BRENDA SUE: Girls' Swimming: Chorale: Flag Corps: GAA: Pep Club: Play Productions: Pom-Pon Corps. GREEN, CATHERINE JOYCE: Chorale: Pep Club: HO: Madri- gals:JA. GREEN, DELILAH JEAN: Flag Corps: FORSCO: Pom-Pon Corps. GREEN, LARRY ALLEN: Track: F.C.A.: Intramural Bas- ketbalI:VICA "C". il... ..... ...t I 5 GREGORY, JEFFRY JOE: VICA"D". GRIDER, BRENT LEE: Foot- ball, All-Conference: F.C.A.: Intramural Basketball. GRIFFEY, GARY. ALLEN: VICA "D", GROCE, PATRICIA JEAN: OEA. GUFFEY, ANITA SUE: Art Major. GWINN, RICKY ALLEN: Bas- ketball: Football, capt., All- Conference, All State: Baseball: F.C.A.: Intramural Basketball: Trojan Mascot. H HAAS, PHILLIP WAYNE: Ind. Ed. Maior. HAGERMAN, JODY ANN: Pom-Pon Corps. HALL, BOBBY ALBERT JR.: Football: Wrestling: DECA: In- tramural Basketball. HAMM, 'JULIE KAY: Certifi- cate Winner: Crest Winner: GAA: National Honor Society, v. pres. HANKENHOFF, HURSHEL CHAFFEE: Industrial Arts and Graphic Arts Certificate Win- ner: DECA, treas.: F.C.A.: VICA "C". HASTINGS, MARK BRAD- LEY: Soph. pres.: IOL, treas.: OEA: Optimist Honoree. HASTY, DEBRA KAY: Girls' Track: HERO: Girls' Cheer- block. HAVEN, HELEN IRENE: Certi- ficate Winner: Chorale: Crest Winner: FORSCO: GAA: Na- tional Honor Society, treas.: Thespians. HAYES, STEVEN ERIC: Band. HECK, JOHN MICHAEL: Boys' Tennis: Swimming: Chess Club: Channel Il: Library Asst.: Math Club. HEILMAN, SUSAN JANE: Girls' Basketball: Girls' Track: Certificate Winner: FORSCO: GAA: HONOR JACKET WINNER: Morale Club: Na- .f. tional Honor Society: Spanish Honor Society: NFL: Winter Dance Food Comm. HERRAN, CHERYL LYNNE: FORSCO: Girls' Gymnastics. HICKS, VICKIE LYNN: Girls' Choir. HILL, RICKEY DEWAYNE: Vocational Welding Major. HINTON, CATHERINE SUE: Bus. Ed., Home Ec Major. HOKE, JENNIFER LEE: Girls' Tennis: Prom, Attd.: Winter Dance, Attd.: Certificate Win- ner: DAR Good Citizen: Flag Corps: FORSCO: HONOR JACKET WINNER: Morale Club: National Honor Society: Play Productions: Pom-Pon Corps, co-capt.: Prom Decora- tions, Food Comm.: SAC Rep.: Spanish Honor Society: Winter Dance Co-Chrmn: ROSEN- NIAL. HOLADAY, LYNETTE SARA: Certificate Winner: Chorale: Flag Corps, capt.: HONOR JACKET WINNER: Jr. Usher: National Honor Society: RO- SENNIAL: JCL. HOLLEN, REBECCA SUE: Wrestling, mgr.: Art Club: Band. HORN, ROBERT ELLIS: Wres- tling: F.C.A.: Play Productions: ROSENNIAL: Thespians. HORTON, BRET LEONARD: Academic Major. HOWE, JULIE ANN: Girls' Bas- ketball, stat.: Girls' Softball, mgr.: Library Assistant: Jr. Usher. HOWE, RONALD WILLIAM: Bus. Ed. Major. HUGHETT, DARLENE GALE: Certificate Winner: Crest Win- ner: HO: Jr. Usher. HURD, SHARON RUTH: Cho- rale: Girls' Gymnastics: Crest Winner: Play Productions: Swing Choir: NFL: Speech Team. HUTSON, KANDI SUE: Girls' Gymnastics: Prom, Attd.: Win- ter Dance, Attd.: Homecoming, Attd.: Varsity Cheerleader: 165 Certificate Winner: Crest Win- ner: F.C.A.: Morale Club: PHOENIX. J JARVIS, TAMARA KAY: Pom- pon corps.: Prom Band Comm. JESSEE, CAROL ANN: Trans- fer from Olive Hill, Ky. JESSOP, JAY MINOR: Ind. Ed. Major JOHNSON, CHERYL DAWN: Crest Winner: Girls' Cheer- block: OEA: Jr. Usher. JOHNSON, JAMI LYNN: Transfer from Tri High: Busi- ness Education Major. K KEENER, JERRY WAYNE: In- dustrial Ed. Major. KENRICK, THOMAS JAMES: Certificate Winner: Crest Win- ner: FORSCO, v. pres.: Science Club: Morale Club, pres. KILGORE, RICHARD BLAND: Voc. Bldg. Trades Major. KING, TAMMI LEEANN: Girls' Choir. KIRBY, JACKSON TODD: Track: Cross Country: FORS- CO: Intramural Basketball: Spanish Club: PHOENIX. KIRBY, JEFFERSON REED: Track: Cross Country: FORS- CO: Intramural Basketball: PHOENIX: Spanish Club. KNOTTS, BRAD ALLEN: Foot- ball, Intramuarl Basketball: Prom Comm. KRATZ, SARAH JANE: Girls' Gymnastics: Certificate and Crest Winner: Flag Corps.: WYSN Staff: Play Productions: Pom-pon Corps, co-capt.: NFL: Speech: FORSCO. L f . me may LANDERS, BLAINE HOW- ARD: Channel ll, pres.: Elec- tronics Club: WYSN Staff: VICA"C". LAURIE, CHESTER C. JR.: Madrigals. LEE, DAVID WAYNE: Varsity Cheerleader: Morale Club. LEITCH, SUSAN DIAN: Girls' Tennis, mgr.: Girls' Basketball, mgr.: Girls' Volleyball, mgr.: GAA: NFL: PHOENIX: Play Productions: Thespians: Span- ish Club: Pep Club: WYSN Staff LEWIS, LESIA KAY: Band: FORSCO: GAA: Pep Club. LEWIS, NORMA JEAN: Girls' Cheerblock: Spanish Club. LEWIS, SUSAN DIANE: Home Ec Major. LOCKRIDGE, TAMARA JO: Girls' Gymnastics, mgr.: Play Productions: Winter Dance Programs Comm. LOGSTON, PHILLIP JAY: Soph. v. pres.: Track: Swim- ming: Band: VICA "C". LORTON, DIANNA LYNN: Girls' Gymnastics: Jr. Varsity Cheerleader: Certificate Win- ner: Chorale: COE, v. pres.: Girls' Cheerblock: Jr. Usher: HONOR JACKET WINNER: Morale Club: National Hon- or Society: OEA. LOWE, DEBRA KAY: Band: DECA. LUELLEN, DAVID CARROLL: Basketball: Football: Intramural Basketball: VICA "C". M MACER, BETH ANN: Girls' Swimming: Girls' Track: Girls' Gymnastics: Jr. Varsity and Varsity Cheerleader: Certifi- cate Winner: Debate: Congress: FORSCO: HONOR JACKET WINNER: Jr. Usher: WYSN 'X 166 Staff: Morale Club: National Honor Society: Play Produc- tions: Prom Decorations Comm.: ROSENNIAL: SAC Rep., SAC, pres.: Spanish Hon- or Society, sec.: Thespians: NFL: Winter Dance Food V Comm, Chrmn. MADISON, TIMMY RAY: VICA "D". MAHAFFEY, TERRY LEE: VICA"C". MARION, WILLIE DALE: In- tramural Basketball: Jr. Usher. MARK, LINDA LYNETTE: Girls' Track: Girls' Gymnas- tics: Art Club: Certificate Win- ner: Crest Winner: F.C.A.: FORSCO, sec.: Girls' Cheer- block, pres.: Morale Club: Opti- mist Honoree: Prom Decora- tions Comm. Chrmn.: Pep Club. MARLATT, JEFFREY ALLEN: Health Occupations. MASSENGALE, HAROLD: In- tramural Basketball: VICA acn- MASTERS, JARA LEE: Girls' Tennis: Girls' Sotfball: Girls' Gymnastics: Prom, Attd., Food, Decorations Comm.: JCL. MASTIN, JERRY DEE: Band: VICA"D". MATNEY, TERRY LEE: Elec- tronics Club, Intramural Bas- ketball: JCL. McCOY, CHERYL LYNN: Band: FORSCO: GAA: Library Assistant: Spanish Club. McFARLAND, STEPHEN WAYNE: General Education Major. MCGUIRE, DEBRA KAY: COE, sec.:OEA, McLAREN, RICHARD TODD II: Track: Band: JCL. MERCER, CARRIE ANN: Girls' Basketball, Softball: Band: GAA. MILLER, PENNY SUE: IOL. MILLER, TERRY LYNN: Girls' Softball: Swimming: Band: Chess Club: FORSCO: Span- ish Honor Society: Spanish Club. MILLER, TIMOTHY BRIAN: Football: Baseball: Certificate Winner: F.C.A.: Jr. Usher: Op- timist Honoree. MILLINER, TAMARA JO: Girls' Cheerblock: IOL, pres.: OEA: Library Assistant: Girls' Choir. MILLIS, ALICE ELAINE: Girls' Swimming, Track: Art Club, sec.: Crest Winner: Certificate Winner: Debate: FORSCO: GAA: Morale Club: Play Pro- ductions: Prom Decoration Comm.: Thespians: NFL. MODLIN, RHONDA JEAN: FORSCO. MOFFITT, JOEY GENE: DECA. MORRIS, MATTHEW C.: Band: Crest Winner: Certificate Win- ner: WYSN Staff: Play Pro- ductions: ROSENNIAL: Span- ish Honor Society, Swing Choir: Thespians, v. pres. MURPHY, MELVIN DOUG- LAS: Baseball: Track: Cross Country: DECA: Intramural Basketball. MURPHY, MICHAEL BRENT Ind. Ed. Major. MURPHY, WENDELL LEE VICA "C". N NEAL, ALAN DEWAYNE Wrestling: VICA "D". NEAL, ALLEN ANDREW VICA "D", NEW, JAN ELAINE: Flag Corps NICHOLSON, MICHAEL AN THONY: Track: ICT. NILES, PERRY EDWARD Chorale: Madrigals: Play Pro ductions: Swing Choir: Thes pians. NOBLE, WILLIAM RAY: Band Chess Club, pres.: Crest Win ner: Certificate Winner. O ODLE, KERRY WAYNE: Track mgr.: Intramural Basketball VICA "D". OLSEN, TARA ANN: FORSCO ONEY, DEBORAH KAY: Bus Ed. Major. 'OVERMYER, MARK ALAN Certificate Winner: Crest Win ner: Intramural Basketball NFL: Optimist Honoree. OWENS, DAVID AARON Band: Orchestra: Chorale: Pla Productions. OXLEY, HERMAN RICHARD VICA "D". P PADGETT, STEVEN RAY: In tramural Basketball: Cros Country:VlCA "D". PAUL, JERRY WAYNE: Ches Club: Electronics Club, pres. Intramural Basketball: VIC! "C", treas. PENN, PAUL ANTHONY: Ma chine Shop Major. PERDUE, MICHAEL EU GENE: Chorale: HERO, pres. PHAM, THANH A.: Academi Major. PIERCE, RICKEY ALLEN VICA "C",pres. PIERCY, DEBORAH LYNNL HO: JCL. PIERCY, PAUL ACTON JR Football: VICA: Intramura Basketball. PINKERTON, SCOTT J.: Band. POORE, KATHY ANN: Busi ness, Home Ec. Major. POTTS, DONNA MAE: IOL, w pres.:OEA. POWELL, LAURA JANE Wrestling, mgr.: Girls' Gym nastics: Chorale: Girls' Choii pres.: Swing Choir. PRINCE, DAVID DEWAYNE VICA "C". R RAY, BRETT HARLAN: Track Cross Country: Chorale, treas. F.C.A.: Intramural Basketball Jr. Usher: Optimist Honoree. EAGAN, TIMOTHY LEE: Basketball: Football: Baseball: F.C.A.: Guest of Rotary. EEVES, TIMOTHY JAY: Track: Crest Winner: Certifi- :ate Winner: Intramural Bas- ketball, capt.: Jr. Usher: Morale Club: ROSENNIAL: Spirit Man. EGNER, LEWIS FRANK: Electronics Club: Science Club. EID, GREGORY SCOTT: Band. FNER, SUSAN KAY: Girls' Softball: GAA. GGS, CARY MICHAEL: Football: Baseball: DECA: In- tramural Basketball. GNEY, RONNIE RAY: ICT. JBINSON, CANDICE JUNE: DECA. JE, MARY ALICE: Business Education Major. JGERS, JOYCE DELYNN: Play Productions: JCL. JSE, GREGORY GLEN: Boys' Tennis, capt, All-Conference: Boys' State, del.: Certificate Winner: Crest Winner: Debate: F.C.A.: Guest of Rotary: In- tramural Basketball, capt.: NFL, v. pres.: Solo Speech. JSEMAN, SHAWN ELAINE: FHA, parl.: HERO: Play Pro- Zluctions: JA. JSSELL, BRIAN WAYNE: Debate: NFL: Speech Team. JSSELL, LAVENA DAR- LENE: IOL, parl. S INDERS, RITA DARLENE: Girls' Basketball: Girls' Softball: Girls' Track, All-Conference: Certificate Winner: F.C.A.: GAA.: Girls' Cheerblock HONOR JACKET WINNER: National Honor Society: Opti- mist Honoree. .NDERSON, DEANNA: Certi- Hcate Winner: Chorale: Crest Winner: FORSCO: HONOR JACKET WINNER: National Honor Society: Play Produc- tions: Swing Choir: JCL. ZHETGEN, JOSEPH ALLEN: VICA "C". IHMIDT, LARRY DALE: Cer- tificate Winner: Crest Winner: Jr. Usher: National Honor So- ciety: Student Congress: NFL. IHMITT, SALLY ANN: Art Club: COE: OEA. IHOFIELD, MELISSA: Jr. Usher: OEA, Regional Winner. 2HWIER, SANDRA JEAN: Crest Winner: Debate: National Honor Society. ELVY, DIANA LYNN: Art Club: FORSCO: Girls' State alt.: HONOR JACKET WIN. NER: Jr. Usher: National Hon- or Society: Play Productions: Prom Publicity Comm. Chr.: ROSENNIAL Co-Editor: Thes- pians, Costume Chr. -IARP, DONNA JEAN: Art Club: Jr. Usher. -IELL, DAVID WILLIAM: Cross Country, Mgr.: F.C.A.: Intramural Basketball: Jr. Ush- er:VICA "D", -IELTON, TONY LYNN: Band. SHERMER, CYNTHIA LOU- ISE: Home Economics, French Major. SHOPP, STEVEN LEE: Track: Cross Country: Intramural Bas- ketball. SHOWALTER, SUSAN ANN: GAA.: Girls' Cheerblock: Mo- rale Club, Sec.-Treas.: National Honor Society: SIDWELL, MARK EDWARD: Certificate Winner: Crest Win- ner. SIDWELL, ROGER EDWIN: VICA"C". SIDWELL, SUSAN DIANE: Wrestling mgr.: Flag Corps. SLAVEN, RICKY JAY: VICA "D". SMITH, DAVID MARK: Basket- ball, capt.: Track, capt,: Crest Winner: F.C.A,: Guest of Ro- tary: ROSENNIAL. SMITH, DEBBIE JEAN: Home Ec Major. SMITH, JEANITTA GAYLE: Girls' Tennis: Girls' Softball: Chorale: GAA: Play Produc- tions: Swing Choir: Thespians: JCL: NFL: Speech Team. SMITH, MICHELLE ANN: Girls' Track: Soph. sec.: FOR- SCO, STAWICK, JAMES FRANCIS: Football, mgr.: Baseball: Wres- tling, capt.: Certificate Win- ner: F.C.A., Huddle Leader: Morale Club: Prom General Chrm.: Spanish Honor Society: Sr. Pres.: SAC. STINE, NANCY ANNE: Girls' Tennis, Girls' Volleyball: Girls' Track: Girls' Gymnastics: Win- ter Dance, Attd.: Homecoming Queen, Attd.: Certificate Win- ner: F.C.A., Sec.: FORSCO: HONOR JACKET WINNER: WYSN Staff: National Honor Society: PHOENIX: Prom Ticket Comm.: SAC Rep.: NFL. STRUKEL, BRETT ALAN: Golf: F.C.A.: Intramural Bas- ketball. STUMP, ELIZABETH ELLEN: Girls' Swimming, Diving, capt.: Band: Certificate Winner: Cho- rale: Crest Winner: Debate: WYSN Staff: Orchestra: Play Productions: Thespians: NFL: Jazz Band. SUMPTER, CHARLES ED- WARD, JR.: Basketball: Foot- ball, All NCC: Baseball: Wres- tling: F.C.A.: Intramural Bas- ketball. SUMPTER, PATRICIA KA- REN: Jr. Usher. SUTHERLAND, MICHAEL J.: Football: Baseball: F.C.A.: Thespians: Vocational Award: Optimist Honoree. SUTHERLAND, RONNA KAY: Office Worker. SWIM, JEFFERY SCOTT: Football: Wrestling: HO, pres.: Intramural Basketball. T TAYLOR, BRADFORD LEE: Boys' Tennis: FORSCO: Intra- mural Basketball. TAYLOR, JEFFRI SCOTT: Football: Wrestling: Track: F.C.A. TEEL, JEFFREY THOMAS: Track: Swimming: Debate. TEEL, WILLIAM DONAL: Baseball: Track: Cross Coun- try: F.C.A,: Intramural Basket- ball. THOMAS, JANE ANN: GAA: Morale Club: Prom Committee: Spanish Club: Play Productions: Winter Dance Decorations Comm. THOMPSON, BRUCE ALAN: Art Club: Band: Optimist Hono- ree. THOMPSON, LINDA LEE: HERO: PVE: Girls' Choir. THOMPSON, STEVEN DALE: Health Occupations. THOMPSON, YVONNE: HERO. THOMSON, RAYMOND JAMES: Channel Il: Elec- tronics Club: Bundy Auditorium Tech. Staff. THORNBURG, JAMES MI- CHAEL: Academic Major. TOW, JENNIFER RAE: HO, his- torian. TROXELL, SHARON KAY: Girls' Tennis: Prom, Attd,: Flag Corps: HO. TURCHAN, DIANE ELAINE: Certificate Winner: FORSCO, sec.: GAA: Girls' State, del.: HONOR JACKET WINNER: National Honor Society: Or- chestra: Spanish Honor Society, pres.: Spanish Club, treas. WHO'S WHO In Foreign Lan- guages In Indiana. TURNBULL, WALTER CUR- TIS: Wrestling: Band: Certifi- cate Winner: Crest Winner: FORSCO: Spanish Honor So- ciety: Spanish Club. TURNER, JOHN DOUGLAS: I,C.T. Major. TYNER, JOHN MARK: Foot- ball: DECA. TYNER, WILLIAM MAUR- RICE JR.: VICA "C". V VAWRINEK, JEFFREY JOHN: Golf: Band: Boys' State alt,: Certificate Winner: HONOR JACKET WINNER: Intramu- ral Basketball: National Hon- or Society: Thespians: Dance Band. W WADDELL, PAMELA ANN: COE:0EA. WALLACE, TAMMY REGINA: Jr. Varsity Cheerleader: FORS- CO: Morale Club: Spanish Club: VICA "D", Sec. WARD, DIANNA KAY: Jr. Usher. WARD, MARILYN JEWELL:. General Education Major. WATSON, DEBRA L.: Business Education, Home Ec. Major. WATT, KATHY SUE: Certifi- cate Winner: FORSCO: Girls' Cheerblock: HONOR JACKET WINNER: Jr. Usher: Morale Club: National Honor Society, sec.: ROSENNIAL: Spanish Honor Society, v-pres.: Span- ish Club: WHO'S WHO In Foreign Language in Indiana. WATTERS, TIMOTHY EU- GENE: HONOR JACKET WINNER: WYSN Staff: Na- tional Honor Society, pres. WEBB, LINDA JO: Girls' Soft- ball: FORSCO: Morale Club: PHOENIX Co-Editor, WEDDLE, BETTY JEAN: Girls' Basketball: Girls' Softball: Girls' Track: Band: GAA. WEINTRAUT, DAVID LYNN: VICA "D". WHARY, KEVIN THOMAS: Chorale: DECA. WHITE, SHEILA MARIE: Cho- rale:HERO. WHITTLE, JEFFREY GLEN: Academic Major. WICKE, PATRICIA CHARISE: Art Club: Flag Corps: FORS- CO, comm. chr.: Prom Com- mittee: Spanish Club. treas. WILHELM, JEFFERY ALLEN: Intramural Basketball: VICA "C": VICA "D". WILLIAMS, JOHN ALBERT: HERO. WILLIAMS, PENNY JO: HERO. WILSON, SUSANNA CAREN: HO: Pom-Pon Corps. WILSON, TERRY LEE: DECA. WIMMER, CALVIN DEWEY: Basketball Concessions: Elec- tronics Club: Prom Set-Up comm. chr,: VICA "D". WISEHART, JOYAN: Jr. Var- sity Cheerleader: Certificate Winner: Crest Winner: Jr. Ush- er: PHOENIX Co-Editor: Prom Queen comm. chr,: Homecom- ing Queen Chr.: Winter Dance, Queen Chr. WITHAM, KAREN LYNN: Art Club, Girls' Cheerblock. WITTLER, JOHN SCOTT: Basketball, capt.: Football: Track: Certificate Winner: Crest Winner: F.C.A.: Guest of Ro- tary: National Honor Society, Science Club: Spanish Honor Society: Spanish Club. WOLFE, ANITA LOUISE: HO: Jr. Usher. WOODS, ROBERT MERRILL: Baseball: Swimming: Band: Certificate Winner: Crest Win- ner: Prom Music Comm.: Swing Choir. WOODWARD, JAMES KELLY: Swimming Capt.: Jr. and Sr. Class V-Pres.: PHOENIX: Prom Set-Up Comm.: Betty Crocker Family Leader of To- morrow. WOOLDRIDGE, TANA JA- NELLE: Bible Club: Certificate Winner: Crest Winner: HO. WOOLSEY, JULIA ANN: Home Ec Major. WRIGHT, TERESA ANN: Na- tional Honor Society. Y YOCKEY, CURTIS LYNN: DECA. YORK, TIMOTHY LYNN: DECA, pres.: Intramural Bas- ketball. 167 ' ,f Charles Abbott, Anna Adams, Phil Addison, Karen Alexander, Gina Alspaugh, Bill Anderson, Sue Anderson, Twyla Appleby, Mike Armstrong. Vickie Armstrong, Shelley Arnold, Jim Atkinson, Rick Auten, Lisa Ayres, Kim Bailey, Barbara Baker, Bob Baker, Ronnie Baker. Bill Ballenger, Jeff Barker, Jeff Bassett, Sally Bates, Jeff Beck, Brenda Becklund, Carol Becklund, Linda Becklund, Kenny Bell. Karen Benson, Carolyn Bertram, Mary Bir, Mark Boatright, Sheila Boggs, Rick Bogue, Lisa Bouslog, Cheryl Boyd, Jeff Brammer, Harrison Braswell, Trillis Brenne- man, Becky Bronnenberg, Cindy Brown, Lance Brown, Shari Brown, Joyce Browning, Tony Broyles, Randy Buck. 168 ,'w. 'K - 6 s , .rf 1 le M 5 X 'D OUT GF THE BLUE Lisa Bunner, Bob Bunlon, Valerie Burden, Debbie Burgner, Ken Burke, Mary Burke, Joe Burris, Dennis Byers, Mike Byers. Linda Cain, Linda Campbell, Tam- my Carnes, John Cashdollar, Jeff Catey, Marcia Catron, Ray Cay- wood, Beth Chappell, Karen Chil- IOII. Sherri Chitwood, Eddie Chriswell, Marianne Clapp, Jeff Clark, June Clark, Ledda Clark, Lueissa Clark, Kathy Clarkson, Kathy Claywell. Sandy Coatie, Sherry Coatie, Randy Cole, Dale Combs, Tom Conley, Bill Conner, Mike Cook, Pat Cook, Terri Cook. With the use of unusual props, Dara Webber per- forms a successful skit for third year French. 169 Rowena Cooper, Ruth Cooper, Eddie Cox, Alan Crabtree, Kathy Crabtree, James Crawford, Brent Crockett, Roger Crowe, Chantelle Cummings. Mike Curnutte, Rex Current James Daniel, David Davenport, Yolanda Davidson, Bob Davis, Carol Davis, Charlie Davis, Dar- lene Davis. Gary Davis. Paul Davis, Robert Davis, Tammy Davis, Trent Dellinger, Becky Denney, Terry Denney, Belinda Dennis, Beth Denny. Tony Denny, Denise DeWitt, Janet Dickerson, Nancy Dickerson, Willa Dishman, Stan Ditton, Steve Ditton, Kathy Dobbs, Ginger Do- minick. Randy Driskill, Cindy Dumford, Cora Duncan, Jenny Duncan, Greg Easter, Mary Edmonds, Robbin Ed- mondson, Janice Ellson, Eddie Ervir MORNING RENDEVGUS Juniors congregate in front of the main office before school. 170 ff? ,gf WMA . -W . ftt v 1 ,, ,Q W K Tlx i t , 5 an T ' ' vi Q l-'Li-X' 'll 2- T51 Kfgysll ln, ' ' A L V , 5' if L. ,+.. f v ' " sf " rt, F QW a v ll - .. -1 '- -fu ,- A ,, m ng A, J..-me 47 ' 5 , A' 4, , 21-5 , r: 'I ff - . f A 1' K ' ' gd' Q, E1 -, .K , t . , -, l 5 JF!--las., l 3 ff- , we-1 , W ,..,,r,,n .ze ' - A A t.'t-my l l Cheryl Lindsey takes time out from a busy Linda Estes, Scott Evans, Teresa Evans, Jay Ewing, Raymond Fair- child, Julie Fallon, April Farley, Rick Fellers, Rick Ferrell. Cari Fike, Diane Flowers, Luanne Fox, Cathy Fribley, Daniel Garcia, Patty Garner, Claudia Gayer, Lisa Gehlert, Doug Gibson. Thea Gibson, Alvin Givens, Marcia Goodin, Linda Goodwin, Phyllis Goodwin, Jim Gough, Debbie Grandon, Harold Gray, Leon Grear. Tim Green, Kim Gregory, Nesa Grider, Ty Grigsby, Tammy Grimm, Kevin Groce, Mike Grose, Mike Gross, Denise Grubbs. 171 Diana Haynes, Brad Herran, Clin ton Hill, Brian Hoke, Beth Hollo way, Kim Hopkins, Chris Horan Suzanne Horn, Wade Horn. Jeff Howe, Kevin Huckeby, Judy Huffman, Callie Hughes, Becky Humbles, Blake Hurst, Jocelyn Hutchinson, Debbie Imel, Jane Irwin. Jolley, Patricia Jones, Patty Jones, Sheila Guinn, Chris Hacker, Scott Hagerman, Teresa Hamblin, Bill Hamilton, Duke Hamm, Joe Han- non, Kevin Hart, Heather Hast- ings. Roy Jackson, Rainna Jacobs, Ke- vin,Jessie Margaret Johnson, Tina Robin Jones lDavisJ, John Karp. ...ai -. Y. f ' to-11' Xl ' "Ki a ' xfgma WINTER WONDERLAND The cold weather attracts many students to Memorial Park for skating. Mary Long needs the assistance of Jeff Carpenter as she tries her skates for the first time this winter. 1 -. ,J x ll! l A, x e,v'5',s,j,,"t 172 ' W M.. , -MSX' , .,.r , it C ., r- we ef.: A ' 12 " 'lf' , J at ,A 5 , ' N I ' iz, J if J Us Y....f ., ,lf 'ilkEiS2'sA:issg::ji gf, . ww izxnif 'Iris ll vfrziw CONCENTRATION Office machines class creates a challenge for Juniors Karen Benson and Cheryl Boyd. Karen is correcting a stencil while Cheryl checks over the copy. Patsy Keaton, Vanessa Keaton, yt gf' 'XX Beth Kendall, Chuck Kern, Jerry A ,li ' Key, Scott Kilgore, Lisa Killing- beck, Kristen Kinkade, Dennis aff ' Knight. of "' ' , A ., . , vm., 4 wi f L.. . I , , ' 1, ' ,. Etsuko Kuhn, Bill Lantz, Jeff '. V Lantz. Scott Larrison. Jim Lauer, ,Q .i ' A 'A Terry Lavarnway, Pam Lawson, 1 - William Lawson, David Leath. x ay M , we Q . P ' ' 1--ales., I ' , , nr! Michelle Ledbetter, Debbie Lee, . h Frank Lee, Jeff Lee, Cheryl Lind- ,A I I sey, Donna Lines, Joy Lines, 4 i g, 5' if Roger Linville,.IeffLogan. -R f',.if? , 1, if X - 'ttf 'f 1" ."Z4i'If2" . 'ff' , 1 gizgfzk X1 I 'f Mary Long, Brenda Lorton, Cindy f Loveless, Leon Loveless, Tim f , Loveless, Chris Lucas, Brenda Lu- ellen, Doug Magers, Tim Malloy. if is ' li .352 :-, X ' gn!! K 'T 'L i- ' 1, . ga. . lg. ,' 2 W' 1 X Q2 X wi , at v , l r f 'A 4.3 ',f '1' 'Q?f,f ,wa 5 l JI ., .VM fi twill 59' :mfg Terry Maloyed, Rick Manthei, Jamie Marcum, Tony Marcum, Pat Marlow, Kenny Massengale, T .lim Mastin, Penny Mattix, Kim 1 .t I McClure. .Q Y' fic 1 . K . Ah- ' i Z Cl 1 'ini t".: ,gl r ' f f 4 - Debbie McCutchen, Tony Mc- ' , 'W,,,fF' :aff Guire, Richard McKnight, Renee J' FA. ",,f. mrw1' N - '- "' , 'Q' McMullen, Jim McNelis, Lisa Mc- A, I ,ig in ?',,f.. 3g, y .1 ,541 Nelis, Dale McQueen, Lynn Meek, Y ' f' ' iii iiti S k'9'5'f is V fi. , Am ' Larry Meese. 1, fam, I f" we ,X 7 L, tgp ' sff11...' 1 il k, .. 173 Kenny Melton, Sheila Melton, Phil Miers, Sue Milasheski, Beth Mil- ler, Charlotte Miller, Kim Miller, Denise Mix, Becky Modlin. Kent Mognett, Terry Moore, Julie Morera, Doug Morris, Penny Myers, John Neal, Ray Neal, Tim Neal, David Neuman. Dawna Norris, Kim Norris, Fluff Olden, Bruce Painter, Christy Pas- man, Laura Patterson, Suzanna Peacock, Tim Peal, Patsy Peavie. David Penticuff, Rick Perdew, Debbie Perdue, Wayne Perdue, Bruce Petty, Vernon Phelps, Jeff Piercy, Kevin Piper, David Pitch- ford. Doug Pdindexter, Terri Poor, Jim Powell, Starry Poynter, Tammy Pribble, Richard Prince, Roger Prince, Debbie Purvis, Lester Rad- ford. Barbara Raines, Bobby Raines, Scott Raines, Myreda Rains, Ra- mona Rains, Jim Ratliff, Jerry Reamer, Wendy Reed, DeLynda Reese. Jim Renfro, Jana Retz, Tony Rey- nolds, Pam Rhodes, Patty Ri- chardson, Jack Riggs, Rick Rine- berger, Debbie Roberts, Randy Roberts. WADMAN HEADS CLASS OF 77 The 1976 Junior class officers are Todd Thalls vice president Bruce Wadman president and Nesa Gnder secretary Roy Jackson treasurer is not pictured 174 Christmas. UNDER THE LIGHTS Spotlighted on the stage at the Christmas convo, Greg Easter conveys his sour feelings towards N 1 .,'f,. A l i . 1 "xi--' .., V f' W ff I X IR 1? fr. Vp if 1 N gk , Ak-, H 1 f- 23 - J 1 J :ff ,KQT A fl - V ef Q- x , Ll ,L ff at i 1 , at Q J ,, 4 ' ' 4' Q1 ' ' A f'- if A . , , 5 T ' 2 ive my 'r it 4' :fl tt J., J .. . Iaqgg' ..., , 5 E XVV, 4 , E 4-D 'Sq A N , Q , le!! . M 1 1,1 M y V ,F ,. 1 T, A In M , 3 -1 -mi I Keir : in , 1 'P ly-,.f'1 " " . .' ,ig fy- it I. --" t :'. :, . , an . 'J-I f l J. at - f M J A' A if fllx W. ' . Q4 -' af ,I '43 ' Y may ,fa t 'l 5, , ,j' -- ' 4 4"" "5-J si: "VP: u if M , 1 4 A 1-f? i'l'i3i"'i:Eil if . is . 4 , ,.. 1 , EAA ' ,. ,f , 3, -1 ., ,aa . K A E . . , 83.5, . .A J' A T id -f" " f - ' J -, A - 'f' J T 1 t I A' "ga .111 - " LZ I D A Q.. uf - V. T. i ' if ' J. L .J - lf, ,X tp X L f X 'M , o X' ,5',s --J I, x . "3 , , J xi , 1 we -4 X V " 1 J 'ihlt-ig A R 'tv f l ' 1 .. --", 1 M E- ' . If f , ff I M v' J -4 W ,N G A , - f' Q N M J' lx H A f 5. Wx F i W , . 3 b f li X ' f it , ' f i r f V 1-f A ' 'Ai' V452 A G 1 :ll'i..,u? N' 4 4 1 ' X i . l i f 'T , f' t -Q S J M 1 A ' 5 . it 'P' 'S fx 5' "' if J ' i? 2i..e- 71's , V' 1 - f, , 3, 4-, J - g.. 1 , K' A X ffm' K ,X In 1 K , -5, g, :. . N 1 lxx' 'EN FZ if If V ' G 74 ll " IW' Q 111 I " ' Y' S 'Sli J' ' :PQQ - ' ' ' t ' ly wkga-5 J ,A lv. . Av , Wm John Row, Jeff Sahlberg, Leesa Schlehuser, Paul Schmidt, John Schroth, Brenda Schuffman, Bart Scott, Chris Sell, Micki Sells. Keith Shadrick, Jeff Shafer, Brian Shapiro, Lana Shelley, .lay Shel- ton, Sherry Sheppard, Gerald Shipley, Ed Short, Darlene Sid- well. Debbie Slaven, Bob Smith, Chris Smith, Clyde Smith, Darrell Smith, Mindy Smith, Rick Smith, Kevin Soliday, Tammy Spencer. Dean Stanley, Paul Stawick, Ja- nice Stegner, Lee Stephens, Theresa Stephenson, Joey Stock- ton, Jeff Stoffer, Anita Stone, Shawn Stone. Tim Stonerock, Debbie Stults, Kim Summers, Jeanette Swift, Maria Tabares, Cathy Taylor, Donald Taylor, Todd Thalls, Teddy Thomas. 175 Rhonda Tinch, Chapel Tower, Ernie Troxell, James Troxell, Marty Troxell, Lana Tucker, Leonard Tungate, Ron Turnbull, Janet Tyner. Ronnie Upchurch, Bob Vannatta, Kevin Viars, Sharon Vores, Jerry Wade, Bruce Wadman, Jim Ward, Sheila Ward, Gregory Warner. Jana Watt, Cindy Watters, Dara Webber, Tony Weintraut, David Wells, Linda West, Tom West, Paula Whiles, Mike Whittle. Mike Wilkinson Donna Williams Derrick Wilson Jim Wilson Carol Wrmmer Bruce Wmningham Steve Wolf Jill Woodward Randy Wyatt ftifff J .,5"a, L J J a s ,. 1, y -- 9 . ll gh Q' , , is iii' ,f,., f,,:, P i . Q- ,JZ ' -ffii ' - - ,- XG, 'Y JUST ANOTHER DAY A yawn expresses Sally Bates' enthusiasm for class studies. 176 ANN, WW we QAM!! 'im-0 Helen Ziebold Ronnie Ziglar I A K A331 .fav 'E' 'i YN PWA.. W ,ON , t,.zf.:f" , .-j'.'fg,t . Us -e L , A X255 Jaffe' K as !Ki?a3l A SST' ' :ll Wal. M , L aw df' it 24-, "' H 'A f ii? viii - ggi K V' -1' 4 1 ' A vi,-N A iii gi .Q V :tl ' ,-sr f , g - ,S - - XA gm., . Q if - . Vs its if , '-J 0-1 . ' -1' 2 V R e M F 15' 'fx " I -va -1-I 25 i 'Ll ,,, rm. .W . vxkqfrv ff ,. Q1 V 'uf' -' Y. -., ...,..,,g ' " i s ' ' ...L is " , M , .1 f, -vii, M., .V I r -.il I P4 lv-f I N , 1 i -AI 1 , - . f' Ji 'A "T" for 1 A ff A fi gwiibiy l f - 'H re F.. Q' 1 pw n w .Q 2 WE ff ' 1 22 . X . .J Cl J ,,.. Z, i 5 t ' 4 W h , il Q X a.f:fIf3:i:31'2:1:1:41-1 f f ' i ' 39 y i ? "" on fl , ' fi l l "ii,-it' I ' F ' " " fins-E E: if?E??i?"' rw ' 'E 'irm ,sing-0: af. , :Eg if W , ,A l In as ,Ui , S . ...' . A . f wig ,M J, , A H i5li4'-fi i ,A iii, DJ if, , f""' ol? , I K .J -ii ,11vf.,,f-if 'X , D- + A S . f 'ffiwfsa -.UUA 3 ,x I.. ,I . at . f bk, 7 sg'f,j':im.:. at 1: -Q X of FIXED FACES The expressions of Tony Russell Jay Taylor, and Dale Steproe re- veal signs of boredom, concentra- tion, and daydreaming. Kenny Abshire, Susan Acker, Me- lanie Adams, Rose Alford, Tony Alley, Troy Alley, Duane Alsip, Christella Asberry, Larry Atkin- son. Marisa Bailey, Alan Baker, Tim Baker, Debbie Ballard, Sandy Bal- lenger, Sharon Balsley, Tom Barr, Paul Barrett, Bart Barricks. Dean Bartels, Doug Bateman, Mark Batt, Lisa Baughey, Sharon Beasley, Yolonda Beatty, Dale Bell, Donna Bell, Doug Bell. Jim Bell, Kenny Benbow, Jim Bennett, Krista Benson, Teri Ber- fanger, Kathy Bise, Carol Bittner, Lisa Black, Terry Blackburn. Terry Blake, Teresa Blankenship, Debra Blevins, Aaron Bogue, Beth Bowman, Rickie Branscum, Bren- da Bratton, Danny Bray, Herbie Brown. 177 Rodney Brown, Sandy Brown, Gale Brumley, Rita Brumley, Barbara Burden, Jim Burger, Brad Burginer, Patty Burlton, Gail Bur- ton. Tammy Bustle, Brian Byrd, Beth Caffoe, Brenda Caldwell, Sherrie Cargile, Julie Carlton, Jeff Car- penter, Becky Carter, Ronnie Carter. Tammy Carter, John Cassidy, Kelly Caster, Tamara Catron, Teddy Caywood, Scott Choate, Lynn Clapp, Dean Clark, Duane Clemens SOLITA RY , : Aim . 'Q ' ' rf. , , , ri, ,V . ' ' 'SIMM uffiwill 'Q . L A 5 ' tVV.,w,-xg G ul., ,V mafia ? QV - :egg Q .ima . mf s V , . if-..+ . V A ,:. sr 'f ,V V-,, A . , 1 4' , 4- B' VB sf ,, -V 1 4 .3 A a - B ' , ' r 3 -V V 2 A VV 4 J ff" J - B ' B' f 4' . if fi' M iz V V. -' B' QV - V V1 x G JF A , , --, .rt M K, l A Z: X .T-L gf' 5 . V ,J .J '- l ' N 4 . '55 . V4 . Q i Y if K f ' f 'Q . - U: 2 X f , 4 -le Z . ' 5, ,V, ., ahah Q B . . A the fm VV M X IV' ' ' l .. - ., - , V. rw ' 5 'V B J .. . , . f""f ff"5- 1'?' 4fst1 1 'V H . -V pl G W ", C " Ailiihf. Nfl" 11:1 V Biz, iffigf 43 J V 552- ' 'sw 0, " ,pf , ef: if . -g 1 151 fir? ' 243, f " yy - f ea, B - A 2 1 1 'P df ,, .e , . - BB M V f lv V1 J ,L A., q ., A, .V J R I A-W: A A 7 1 . N V, .. , , 9 u if , - VG- ,V ,. .L -'-,, , 'K tiff ' ls, -B . I gifg- ' V ' ',:' , ' - .J 'Y -B s fx fkz f Y uv J Q Q B A ' ' ,i B ,Pt-Qs ' Y'.e,V,f . f B mf' Q ,kilt , 'S X. - ' B V 9 ,, ' "N, . fr , 3. ' f x ,- ' ye V Q ? . -. V ,- 4 V1 VV V I L N X '-'51 .V A A-Q lta, Va .' 'N' l ' ,N V . V w 'F . ' V "' f rl . . lim' ""i"?'1'fBtV:,, V.. V . 3 ., ' . .5 , . ,. , -, W ..:r ,, V. 1 , 'B' f in grf 'I 5 , , f n ,'i,1:.V., :At 'lf - 1 J V 1 E + r JP, :we-V Eff B f 'f f 'B -' B " w i B ' V 4 f -f B J is Vi . ' . Ji' B .. f' ' J if B ,, ff 'Vg' of - T. ,V ,, "' V, NV ' ' ' V V B gi, ' :L . , ft ,, A1,lB.,"s,k' , M' I-i ' sl I If . ' vii "' tffff B 1, y. fi ff: K, o 1 . , V W. A -f ,a. Q. Q ,Xe 4 , ,. . X wh -1 .ii '- K Y 'X, vi 7 ,N Xqiffqgij Pi 'li I ' A D Q B V . ,' .1 jp! V ' , V V , Q , ' ' I 'l Bf B ' a s . ' -J ,W ' 1 L ' BU ci B V . mn CONFINEMENT In the reflection of afternoon sunlight, Jamie Logston walks through the halls with an atmosphere of solitude. Brenda Cmehil, David Coatie, Karen Cochran, George Cole, Steve Coleman, Sydney Coleman, Ed Collier, Ramona Cook, Kevin Cooney. Mike Cooper, Jay Cory, Tammy Cory, Brian Covey, Mary Cox, Rhonda Crabtree, Kathy Craig, Jeff Crandall, Lydia Crawford. Jana Crisp, Danny Criswell, Don Criswell, Donna Criswell, Tim Cross, Jeff Cummings, Jeff Dab- ney, Paul Dagley, Christine Dance. 178 -J l 1 l - , 1 , V V V tml:-:'Cmi,V, . V ' 5W:'i"'fBLil5l5r..i:1iisiil 'JY ai'5fii..':-VVV' 'f'-1V?5"'flf'A V .. , . V- , .. ., 5-'Qi-55i.a2l'fEV1',.. ii-'V'wVVi if " V ' f" 5' VV f?1f:e -, '15 V H 5 B 'T i 1 C 2 F i J A ' iff ? ffffr. fa 4' " I ilu. ' ' 'Q' E B V, . S11 B1B g' J. "H: B .2 ' fi 1 --- V ' VB ': l. , Ei'f'P ,Lil f' V, ' -if " V ,, me V it J s'-VV. , C we l - -C f , l , ,gt VT' 'X -- V .-ff' I f Wifrs 1 1 ,V , , -..sw , - 1' , C ,fafa N.,- ru 'B. ?'f5'm- i -fe At. 4 " f V B B'1.s,Q gf:,.l::,'Z5 ' -, fa: ., i 22 YJ , , ff ' --1+--:gi 3519 :Fm 4 B : -fm. Mb Ng. " -fs' - an 'A J-l"' ', iq-gg L' -V -um ,, - , If , ' " V' : fx " A Y' " "Q, 'Bl " ' , vi. . ii .321 W fit. df- . E A l 3 , V' ,LQ ' B ' ' 35 , 1 'B Q V1 B, 55, - Y' u 4 'V V n Q. , f -1 V V J .V wi, , Buy- A XA' , K J it X, , I 2 i"B Q ' ' . Q' if lv' - + ' ' - - V f :QB :ip , 3 S - ,V,, Q V - , B N . Q 5 A V '- A M . x A, g Mg, ',,,:.'y FAV , 4'vig,Lw, If , ., : , .f M A: ,., a t v Q ,V ,w t , 3 Q , - - -V Q5 rffg, V t Va , Biff ' ,V 2- f J 1' B' 1 ,, .. .5 -V K V.. Q ., B 1- .vs V, A P:-' T j , Q. I, 'xt' 'V -' ' ,' gt B "-7 Ty, -3 , V,f' 3 - , I . V , 3 V KV 'NA J .WJ f i T, ,V ., , l , K x wifi . VV . , 1" ' J ," 'v ' ,.. . J I-Ta, for . ' B xr i K 'I1 'fBli1 UV V " t 'z 7 . -ffitfif A lvfhlrf' . N rv, we-it Y Im: ! 'su .,..f"" .ae J t., A r M' -"7 ff' " O. 9 ,, '95 4' 'VY ' ' Hh2l'5,.?'fF3E17:1v- , V4 1"i'al' n It H x 1" in fi ir QQ 'W' W' .-4 ,A 'l jill ' 'V , - ji ' i I ' f""ai-M: , ff-1 h'Qv - A bf. 1 Haiti- K. W FOOD, GLORIOUS FOOD FORSCO Foreign food sale is one of the most looked forward to events of the year. Marianna Regner sells the mouth watering de- lights. -r f X! r Mike Daniel, Dan Davis, Elizabeth Davis, Gary Davis, Kim Dean, Brenda Denney fPeavlerJ, Kim Denny, Ronnie Denny, Jeanne Dick. Greg Dickerson, Larry Dickey, Tricia Dishman, Brian Ditton, Da- vid Dobbs, Kim Dudley, Sandy Dugger, Becky Dumford, James Durbin. Larry Dutrow, Julie Eade, Dan Edington, Jim Edwards, Sue El- kins, Dottie Eschenbrenner, Tim Evans, Tanya Eversole, Jerry Fadely. Autumn Farley, Kim Farris, Ann Feeley, Gena Ferguson, Jeff Fer- guson, Connie Ferrell, George Fer- rell, Elisa Fike, Joyce Finch. 179 CHS CONNECTION, Wiring a receptacle is the task that Integrated Science students Paula Muncy and Yolanda Beatty receive in lab. Fred Fletcher Billy Flowers Con- nie Flynn, Carmitta Fonzer, Greg Ford, Joyce Ford, Donnie Foster, Rick Fox, Lori Freeburg. Jay Frost, Perry Frost, Tracy Galloway, Teresa Garner, Mark Garvin, Becky Gideon, Frank Goertz, Teresa Goff, Abbey Good- win. Mike Gorman, Mary Green, Joe Gregory, Karen Gribbons, David Griffin, Brenda Grigsby, Donald Groce, Kelly Groce, Kevin Gross. Randy Gross, Denver Grubbs, Tony Guffey, Bryan Hacker, Deb- bie Hacker, Teri Hagerty, Greg Haggard, Greg Hall, Susie Hamilton. Annette Hammond, Eddie Hasty, Dave Hermenet, Becky Hicks, Jeff Hicks, Leslie Hill, Bruce Hinshaw, Debbie Hollen, Becky Hoover. Kelly Hopkins, David Hosea, Al- legra Howard, Mary Howe, Pat- ricia Howe, Lisa Hubbs, Tammy Hughes, Mark Hunter, Janice Hurd. Marty Hurst, Pam Hyden, Terri Igo, Theresa Jackson, Eric John, Charlene Johnson, Chris Johnson, Kim Johnson, Theresa Johnson. 180 ,, 1: 3 I fl W " Lf 3 1 E- 'F it - -N x , , gg?:,3'!El , V ,tiili , 4 f V .... , J.. -in " E V id l ,, Af", Af 'fe' ,435 ' t, 'wg' , 9 " ' , , N-i'31li'4 , 2 5- as 4 1031, g A ' . K, ,E ' , , l ax aw c f .5 ,j,1,, 'v-.. " 1' . "fix :sf Q-gt , 5- , is ,.. .N tx 1 'W ' - ,s A f a ' 'f'?1- 11 " ff Hi Q ' Nl ' 1? ,X Q 1 il . ,-:QQ 'S :ft 4 f 1 ' I 4- -.. " .. Y A . ,I ft na -1 . aka -. ' W1 yr ' , tl. ' 1 M -'A rt'n 'il Fkia will ah ' T NQ lf rs N 4 2. f- - it ,l t gg: -1:81, e . s...u-43 ' i J' Jc314t':.:.r A 41:1 x K 11" an f.. Y 2 . A . " 1 F' 5 s- .-"ll if . ,JN it ' , Nr my ii g f lvl F in . . . " i-Y.: it A f s. 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I .lx W ' Girly, v' ,f t tt- G tl ttf -tau. at -.rn ttf! .1 if STILL LIFE T Sharon Beasley becomes oldier as she performs vocation. ,lid xx 'Novo .fa L N.. 'X , GQ ak' cud' X David Jones, Sandy Jones, Beth Judge, Stewart Karrick, Kathy Kasten, Teresa Kendall, Greg Ken- nedy, Penny Kiesewetter, Carlyle Kinkade. Jeff Koger, Lisa Koger, Chris Lacy, Mark Landers, Mike Larri- son, Kelly Laurie, Teresa Lawrence, Treva Lawson, Bruce Lee. Judy Lee, Tina Lee, Tim Leslie, Tom Lindsey, Danny Lingenfelter, Jamie Logston, Jackie Longfellow, Debbie Love, Danny Lowe. Jackie Lowe, Julie Lowe, Vivian Lowe, John Mahaffey, Jeff Mar- cum, Rhonda Marcum, Rex Mar- tin, David Massengale, LeAnn Maze. CRAMMING The end of the semester means the school year is half over, but it also means an extra work load. Lisa Thrall takes advantage of her Independent Study time to catch up on excess homework. 182 hi . L Q ga j i rf u , 1 ,- 1 , if W, N ,A . sit gg . . ,J , itrffif A +. 2, , . E., , 1 5 . 'fl .3 UW -nv A sf ,. ,ii ff W N iQ I s ,Arif rx 1' .V Lf- ! . 4 . ,5,Xi.,,I',f H 1 e. l WNW W - XG 'TV' V is, A-.'f', y . We ,iw 1 I I . , in J , , ...gf-Y A P, . .A er, ev. a .Q .5 t ' 1: 'f i Til' 'g Q . 1 ' ,W , r , aaaa -.Sv-f R sr fn' 1 Kiev 1-Q 'i A :Q 42 W X if 1 i' . r-. 1 2 an 'e af st- Has, M ., F 1 Ai C .. 3, it H, ,W H . +G x , x" Wg x q - V , l-gl .. u F' , J, r if 1 1 M. L 1 4. ' "'i r . f AQ' v fi ' 55 ar '6 ' 'V , . , f , . W 4- I 'gf .1-1 -r ' A ,lg J J Q f - wr J Q - - W r ,J f F . ,- , ' 'fs ti' XY N J ' 1 1 if' fi 1 I W E i fl 'gf gf. ' l fu, n ' 19 Q 'le . 1 is ii , J, s rv-' 'X ' 451, it . 3 4:46 :Si , j, X 2: tk Q hi il nav. Q ' fr f , . , fx! X' 01334 Wifi! ' 5 CLOCKING IN One of the many new experiences sophomores receive at C.H.S. is signing in. Late arrival, Teresa Goff, punches the timeclock before being admitted to class. Teresa McCaffrey, Jane McClure, ' Kelly McClure, Misty McClure, Candy McConnell, Jeff McCork- hill, Denise McKee, Kelly McKee, w iv Jim Meyers. Paul Miers, Jamey Miller, Lisa Millis, Fernando Minglana, Steve , Mitchell, Alison Modaff, Debbie I Moore, Karen Moore, Lisa Mor- gan. , is Rhonda Mullen, Paula Muncy, Teresa Neal, Debbie Nicholas, Jennifer Nicholson, Rose Mary Norris, Frank Northcutt. 'ft . Debbie Murphy, Leann Murray, fi Kirby Northcutt, Lillie Nunn, Kenton Odle, Mike Odle, Chris i Olsen, Kim Orr, Brad Padgett, .f Mike- Page, Tammy Paschal. A Jay Patterson Larry Patterson ii th li ri 'fig' Joey Paul, Niancy Paul, Randy Perdew, Frank Perdue, Mike Pe- try, Scott Pfenninger, Carolyn Phares. ,-3, 1 l,'p 15 o u n I5 u A CHQ", 'ffl' '1'u'0' 'iff 'I5 . .pf4-SQ-,r:'5:-1-:-:iz-:-:-zf:-5 ' V X Y I, 'u Brent Pheffer, Eddie Pierce, Me- lody Pierson, Tony Poe, Holly Poer, Larry Pratt, Karen Raben- stein, Joe Rackow, Kent Raines. Kim Ray, Jeff Razor, Larry Reamer, Dan Redman, Sandy Reed, Jeff Reeves, Marianna Reg- ner, Mike Regner, Jan Renfro. 183 I LOVE A PARADE Long hours and hard work from many stu- dents resulted in several beautiful floats for the Homecoming parade. Dottie Eschenbren- ner smiles at the crowd while riding the float sponsored by FORSCO. Pam Reynolds, Mark Richey, Stanley Rigney, Chris Riley, Rick Rinehart, Kirk Robbins, Jim Ro- berts, Perry Roberts, Ellen Row. Tony Russell, Jenny Schetgen, Mike Schwinn, Brent Sewell, Dee Shafer, Todd Shafer, Cathy Shaver, Greg Shears, Jeff Shears. Sheila Sidwell, Gary Simons, Rhonda Slagle, Tony Sloan, Allen Smith, Bruce Smith, Clifford Smith, Debbie Smith, Teresa Smith. Wyona Smith, Deena Soliday, Jody Southerland, Laurie Spauld- ing, Steve Stanley, Joe Stawick, Bob Steele, Steve Stegner, Dale Steproe. Gary Stockton, Cinda Stohler, Greg Stonerock, Paul Stonerock, Steve Storkel, John Stotler, Gay Strauch, Libby Stricker, David Sutherland. 184 A t' A 1 ,, flu rt gf' f wg r ' ,, . W 6: fb 4 v t it I V 5 q ' T ' . N H J ., 5 A-at rf ml , k 7 .Yi ' ,X 4 ' X' f , 9, 1 if 1 33- A Ai! f f' 4 " wx. f . 1 fr? T", fe.: 5,1 J A 'T if 'Eff ' 'A 5 w Q.. N 4.32 lf? Ss U 235 I 'Rf 9 lr 8' X Qtek, , r at . A l it 0 AV A19 Rn 'gi' 4 my fm fs V. M ,, , s ,Q , y - ,A i, -w -' . 1 ,A ' . fa - , gg, .3 , 4 al? -at ..4, , - , , ,, , , A t ,, A M .- . . ,,., , , ,. .. ff? it li M" W - -if J' 7 , Q , W "ily W , r ft QM 'QW y l W 'I , . . . is I 4,- ' , U 1 i , , ,Ly -MASSQE - , 1 7 f S f f -'J -'i S' - 231' 1" 'I " 3 ' I ff' S? 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' A' ,Qi ' ' 4 ' A, if ,u2'r.?1 1' I '-2 qi" ' ' " '," 5 N, ' ,Q-ft .' V A . . HJ 1'frA' '-"mf Afi N3 1, 'ft ,ffl W mt Pg" E ,f ' ax mf ,Q f xl , ' 'IPM Wk ' .. ff N A. A A 9 AH- r W tl Af ' A P' 'i ' '. : Ni' Lk- f A, ,- ,-, . ,W d,,. ,N 1 . 1, M .,,- ,E 1.2, V' gy . ,. Q L' 'f A1 it A- 'A J "1 l 'A fe -:- .' ,. K- V 1 gf, r l A ,Q -:Ar ,, Aw , . A Af A' ll ff? st? - -'ff' A J 'w.,xA 2 lil' ee. 2.15, J , TAM, E , .V X, .fl g ,yy VK Q Al , Q, V5.7 ., . A - B713 KA J Y , t l , -, i- i1At,f4A,3":l 1 'if 7 'fr i 'Ati if Q ut-.':Z'?'.', , r uf A . ' :Z , , - . ' . , ......-I VA "lA"-lflfi-Wil' sf' ..i in l mi x SJHE' X. ll liar "v I 1 2 f', A ,,. 'A ' ' A " ' 'Y ,l - A .. . , ' if , 'xi J 1-Z" ' A 'K gif ' , 1 -,Ar . . 1 1. ' K - ,Q . Af , - :fm a,-,W V Ziyi zligf A' i . ,Vi A . Ag, Al O ,, . H A H . , i5fi'f5 BA' 1 , 1 , V W ,, - ,, ,z:i.A' A. , ,. I , . , A, A kg,-,a,.,Q,,, A " ly tl Wx ,A 1 tx.. .. .J u ff X :"' -. S A f ' we- . ' 4 -J 1 1. "- ,QA , JA. . ,AMA.,53, ,Q . 41 . 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'f ' 3 . -, AA! 6, , l ,elf , 'N J" f. - " ' - - K 'tot 'Q-wJ5 i 'L it 'B' XV .K I l: Jew - ' . . ' - Q" ' N AZ' 4 "'7' A M.. . W i ' il I V' Wi? if Q 7 t l' f W ' ' ifl' 'L " !5 'n:i1'J WA -. M' nl I .iff I ii 1" .fr y ,, .4 'B ..-2 2' 1' ' - 'i , 'N ' y -v' Q31-iiyf ,ft .g EAP, P-, y 5 , , H K 5,"i'!'fj-1351, 1 ' i 4-. -,t -, Nw president. "' ' at . .ai-'f""' "tl f,. Rfk ' H K, A wx 'rl it John Sweigart, Randall Sweigart, Greg Swim, Phil Tackett, Jay Tay- lor, Terry Taylor, Julia Teal, Mark Temples, Mark Thalls. Tony Thomason, Barbara Thom- son, Mark Thornburg, Lisa Thrall, William Throop, Brett Thurman, Jay Thurman, JoAnn Thurman, DebbieTompkins. Yvonne Tower, John Trent, Brenda Troxell, Debbie Tyner, Kenny VanMatre, Fred Vannoy, Janet Vaughn, Tim Viars, Lisa Wadman. Linda Walker, Beth Wallace, Billy Wallen, Bobby Wallen, Tom Wan- nemacher, Donna Ward, Bill Was- son, Jody Wasson, Gilbert Webb. Terri Weddle, Mike Werling, Anna West, Kelly West, Kim Wethington, Brent White, Jim White, Karilyn White, Tony White. Allen Whiteman, Bryant Whitted, Diane Wilhelm, Debbie Wilkin- son, Dona Wilkinson, Tony Wil- lett, Charles Williams, John Wil- liams, Lisa Williams. Yvonne Williamson, Jolynnda Wilson,,Saundra Wilson, Wendy Wilson, Lisa Wittler, Mike Wood, Sandy Wooldridge, Pam Worth- ington, Jim Wright. April Wrightsman, Mark Wyatt, Leslie Yockey, Nan Young, Rick Young. HEAD OF THE CLASS Incoming sophomores had their first represen- tation at C.H.S. this year. They chose Lisa Koger, treasurer, Sydney Coleman, vice-pres- ident: Jana Crisp, secretaryg and Eric John, 185 186 . Hx, 1 KW f l tl T I I E 1 See the 1976 Plymouths 8: Chryslers At DAVIS- BATES INC. 2451 Broad St. Phone: 529-1505 Sally Bates, Jim Bates CONVENIENT 1-HOUR CLEANERS Main 8L Indiana 15th 8: Broad Dale McQueen, Bill Hamilton 188 1 X 'N"'Xean. LOVELESS CONSTRUCTION 1004 Broad sr. Phone: 529-5520 Tim Loveless Better Food For Less CRIDER,S DRIVE-IN Corner 3 8: 38 N. Phone 529-5602 For Orders to Go Mike Whittle, Diane Ward Ace is the Place JACOBS ACE HARDWARE 1318 Broad St. Phone: 529-5303 Bob Smith, Joyan Wisehart, Susan Leitch, John Acker Complete Selection of Floor Coverings and Custom Made Draperies LIVING ROOMS INC. 2006 S. Memorial Dr. Phone: 529-0206 Don Denison, Anita Wolfe, Tami Jarvis 190 The Best in Good "Down Homev Cooking THE APPLE COBBLER 314 Parkview Dr. Phone: 529-7388 Joe Dietz, Kevin Piper, Mike Kirby, Mike Davis, Kenny Eaton Looking For That One Car? We Have it at BILL BRUCE FORD, INC. 221 N. Memorial Dr. Phone: 529-2537 Bob Caffoe, Bill Fuller Keep Up To Date With The Latest Styles in Men's Fashions GOODWIN- POPE 1309 Broad St. Phone: 529-1801 Tony McGuire, Brent Bronnenberg ALL OCCASION SHOPPE New Castle's Most Unique Gift Shop 471 S. Memorial Dr. Phone: 529-3200 Greg Dietz, Linda Cain 1 Doug Bowers, Cindy Terrell N""'T .Jff 191 AT BURGER CHEF You Have ,em the Way You Like 'em Try Our Works Bar With Your Steak Platter State Road 3 and Trojan Lane Mark Boatright, .Brad Knotts, Lora McDonald . . m'r--.NNN ?6"' Every Community Has An Outstanding Insurance Agent. In New Castle It's THORNHILL DAVIS INC. 309 Parkview Dr. Phone: 529-3030 Mike Davis, Twyla Appleby, Gina Williams, Mike Kirby The Store as Varied as Your Needs BEN FRANKLIN St. Rd. 103 and Riley Rd. Phone: 521-0376 Jane Thomas, Connie Tabor F, IGI Shoes Styled to Suit the Times and Taste McSHURLEY'S SHOES Broad and 14th St. Phone: 529-3618 Joe Moffitt, Linda Jacobs :NME Fresh Fruit and Vegetables AYERS MARKET 1883 S. 14th St. Phone: 529-4388 Randy Ayers, Greg Ayers 193 Fill Your Future With Security, Open an Account CITIZENS FEDERAL SAVINGS 8L LOAN ASSOCIATION 112 S. Main St. Phone: 529-6530 Cheryl Johnson, Rita Sanders 194 Vw , FEDE The Best Pizza With Fast Carry-Out Service TOP HAT DRIVE-IN 2502 Broad St. Phone: 529-1129 And TOP HAT II 1637 Q Ave. Phone: 529-3399 Eddie Cox, Doug Bell, Jeff Vaughn, Bob Brasich SERVING EDUCATION THROUGH SPACE DIVISION PRODUCTS I OPERABLE WALLS FOLDING PARTITIONS FOLDING DOORS COILING PARTITIONS Modernfold An American-Standard Company New Castle, Indiana. 47362 Our People Make It Better PIZZA HUT 1649 S. Memorial Dr. Phone: 521-0591 Marianne Regner, Nan Young Home of New Castle Roses FOREST H. M EEK FLORIST 490 Indiana Ave. Phone: 529-2560 Lynn Meek, Cynthia Meek, Lisa McNelis From Our Closet to Yours . . . Fashions for Juniors and Teens THE CLOSET 1323 Broad St. Phone: 529-0306 Beth Denny, Susan Caldwell, .Ian New The Trojan Discount Center LOGSTGN AUTO SUPPLY 2904 Broad St. Phone: 529-6608 Phil Logston, James Logston, Jamie Logston Keep Rolling With Tires From NEW CASTLE TIRE STORE 1124 Broad St. Phone: 529-5804 Bucky Horn, Tony Shelton Your Home Begins With ine urni ure rom SCHUFFMAN,S FURNITURE 1500 Broad St. Phone: 529-4000 ARTHUR TREACHER'S And BONNIE,S HOME- MADE ICE CREAM THE PFENNINGER AGENCY, INC. 1220 Broad St. Phone: 5 29-6400 er, Your Service Minded Plymouth-Valiant Dealer NEWBY-PAUL MOTOR CO 1517 Broad St. Phone: 529-5990 Jeff Coates, Joe Huddleston, .Ioe Paul, James Garner, William Paul, Byron Paul Y, f 5 X ' if ', fbwiw ' ,fri Y , 0 FENNELL ADVERTISING Gifts, Premiums, Trophies, Specialties 2011 Bundy Ave. Phone' 529 1705 Karen and Krista Benson The Place to Have Your Prescriptions Filled DENTON'S APOTHECARY Old Fashioned Service In a Friendly Atmosphere 1824 Bundy Ave. Phone: 529-2456 Helen Haven, Brad Taylor, Diane Turchan 199 CS STEAK HAMBUHGEHS HUUSE 1669 S. Memorial Dr. 715 S. Memorial Dr. X Marks the Spot For Younger Men's Clothes X MARK 1310 Broad St. Phone: 529-9721 David Neuman, Jeff Koger, Kevin Piper, Tim Miller Instant Credit For Young Adults SMITH'S JEWELRY 1306 Broad St. Phone: 529-4601 Kandi Hutson, Suzanne Horn, Robbin Edmondson, Nick Goar, Van Goar Find the Latest In Men and Women's Clothing 1333 Broad St. Phone: 529-4302 Mark Overmyer, Jeff Cannon Hot Donuts, Cookies, Rolls 8: Danish Pastry JACK'S DONUT SHOPPE 2410 S. 14th St. Phone: 529-2956 Jeff, Jamie 8: Tony Marcum 9 3 5 93, Robert D White CKOWN AND WHITE 1201 Race St. Phone: 529-2020 Mark Davis, Robert D. White 24 Hour Banking FIRST NATIONAL BANK 14th 8a Broad St. 600 S. Memorial Dr. 14th 8a Riley Rd. Phone: 529-3130 Steve, Danny and Basil Coleman Greg 8: James Rose, Jeff8L Dick Shafer, Jeft'8L Bruce Koger Containers to Fit The Customers' Needs DIAMOND INTERNATIONAL CORP. Diamond Containers Division 1132 S. 14th St. Phone: 529-0890 Mary Bir, Cindy Watters, Joyce Davis, Norma Taylor, Carol Raines 203 W.R. Anderson, Jr., Terry Miller, Bill Noble ROYAL INDUSTRIES BRAKE PRODUCTS DIVISION Wdillltttl Compressors And Accessories 24 Hour Service NEW CASTLE ENGINEERING Box 568 Phone: 529-7473 Connie New, Gail Coursen There is Always A "Best" Place For Everything BILL CHAPIN INSURANCE 201 N. 12th St. Phone: 529-0002 Gail Byers, Ruth Hayworth, Paula Whiles, Tami Spencer, Steve Chapin li- I A Ei' sr- X A E f K 5 I II I 5' IADVERTISING DESIGNERS AND OFFSET PRINTERS MISTER PRINT INC I g-I 529-7491 ' I-.v.:1I35VFlIEMI GST cu ' We're Number One MORRIS CHEVROLET , 200 S. Memorial Dr. Phone: 529-2900 JeffVawrinek, Lisa Coleman, Rick Gwinn, Jennifer Hoke Where the Price is Right, Quality 8a Service . . . Tops! 1701 S. Main St. Ph ne: 529-7701 Edd Printers Q Llthographers 521 -0000 Looklng for Qual1ty'7 Feel Confident Shop HENRY CGUNTY OFFICE SUPPLY 1122 Broad St Phone. 529 0825 Katie Edwards, Lynn Mark, Don Miller -ll ' gk' fav od We Have GlfIS For All Occaslons REDELMANS 1900 A Ave Phone 529 0401 Lynette Holaday, Betty Luke 1 '11 1 x v fl ' 1 -' 1 1 sg R - 1 1 ' 1 1 I 7 The Best Buy IS Quahty If You re Partlal to Good Furnlture Shop Us Flrst BRAMMER FURNITURE 235 S. Main St. Phone: 529-2911 Bob Bunton, Tony Marcum, Jeff Brammer 207 , , fm, ,mi if, r I IITi5ffeX ' Iffzfsffw LY?lbwl1f'i1ryf0f1 The Firestone Store is Your Headquarters for Tires and Appliances in New Castle FIRESTONE 1618 Broad St. Phone: 529-8993 Tim Madison, Steve Shopp, Steve Padgett 208 ,4-.- A j'fff1-3,t5:LT33'1 Law mum ,-..q-if-'-'.:-J FAMOUS RECIPE FRIED CHICKEN 2101 Grand Avenue Phone: 529-6278 John Trent, Jerry Atkinson Gary Peavie K as vw Ph' V ,' ,, V D: QQ Jw? if-VJ 551 , in wif' 'J I 2-.J -Mfn"" 5 I 'V iii iii ,,', -' Jif,,iji'i7ffffiis'tii.'l,'fill 4 3 Vff gif, No Need to Worry - ,L --4 f'ffff'tfi'ffi fgfifi ' l" '95 -W 77 "'e1l" J - 'A 5' i Miller Has Just the Right Monuments at Moderate 1, Prices C' 5 MILLER A MONUMENTS 1 2016 S. Memorial Dr. Phone: 529-0703 Bret Horton, Lisa Catron Keys, Locks 8a Alarms HERPGLSHEIMERS LOCK at KEY 2025 Grand Ave. Phone: 529-8445 Ted Dankovich, Chris Horan Diane Selvy, Gene Selvy, Alfred Davidson ar i t Sporting Goods, Inc. PAYNE VILLAGE SHOPPING CENTER 1812 RILEY ROAD 0 NEW CASTLE, IND. 47362 PHONE: 131 71 529-8511 Dino Fox, Jeff Swim Be One ofthe Millions Of People Who Are Enjoying Something Different At LONG JOHN SILVER'S 520 S. Memorial Dr. Phone: 521-2684 210 Quality Name Brand Furniture, Carpet, and Appliances for Every Room In Your Home HOLTHOUSE 1431 Broad St. Phone: 529-6135 Penny, Tammy, Sc Ed Keisewetter XX You'll Find More to Read At RlLKIDh4CHREf mwsmmsr Open Daily: 7:30 A.M.-9:00 P.M Diane Selvy, Doris Zachary, Walt Chambers The Original Refresher Course' Hlstory Engllsh When man needed transportatlon he mvented the heel When man needed warmth he dlscovered frre And when man needed real refreshment he mvented the real thmg Coca Co a Coca Cola tKoka Kola? Coke CKokeJ trademarks WhlCh ldentlfy the same dark colored del1c1ous carbonated soft dnnk Thls LlI'11C1ll6t3Sll1l'1g I 02 soft dnnk grves ll real refreshment pleasure fun 1 quenches th1rst 1tS the real thmg Math. Man X IS workxng IH the sun Man Y IS worklng rn the shade where 1t1s 920 Both X and Y then have a bottle of Coca Cola Cldeally served at 3409 Construct an equatlon Poetry Its the real thmg Its the real thlng In the gack of your Thats the way rt m1n should be What youre hopmg What the world wants Is the real thmg Is the real thmg Qu, X+Y+ refresh1ng Coca Cola X+Y thlrst It s the real thmg Coke COCA COLA BO TLING CO INC New Castle Indrana Q O V 0 0 - ' r G , ,. , ' , - , x, ' ' our It ' , , , The C as ic bottle. . W I . . , . . . I , . . . . l I I I f Z 0 Whereitis Q20 tofind, 1 x tosee, ' I - , w.v. f-,VJ I ' . Q LZ 0 r , I , I I I I I Trade-mavke . 1 Q D, O Read The Courier-Times COURIER TIMES 201 S. 14th St. Phone: 529-1111 Walter Chambers, Walt Chambers For All Grocery Shopping Needs DAVIS FOOD MARKET 1712 Broad St. Phone: 529-6095 And DAVIS NORTH END MARKET 452 N. Main St. Phone: 529-9920 Jerry Mastin, Donna Sharp Always A Fine Selection of Watches And Jewelry HARMON HOY JEWELER 200 S. 14th St. Phone: 529-5932 Jenny Schetgen, Jeff Whittle, Dave Sweigart oper les unlimited Inc. 529-6464 1 004 BROAD ST. Tim Loveless, Pam Wargny Your Home Appliance Center COPELAND'S APPLIANCES 1559 Broad St. Phone: 529-8350 Rex Criswell W.. ..,,, Living Is Easier In A Mobile Home Built By New Castle Homes. Home of Trojannaire, Saginaw and Bellaire NEW CASTLE HOMES 432 N. Memorial Dr. Phone: 521-0788 Brett Ray, Kathy Watt win' Your Pleasure is Our Business Tackles - Lures - Licenses Baits Guns and Accessories OWENS BAIT AND TACKLE Your Authorized Zebco Dealer 1617 Indiana Ave. Phone 529-5406 Arnold 8: June Owens, Charlotte Miller 215 THE NEWS REPUBLICAN A Community Institution - Now In A Great Community 1561 Broad St. Phone: 529-0001 Debby Bertram, Debby Comer When You Fill Your Prescriptions at Barney's, You Know You're Getting Dependable Service BARNEY'S PHARMACY 803 S. 18th St. Phone: 529-7707 Donna Potts, Russell Cory 11.99 . Renrgifziw Sears . . , Has Everything Plus Satisfaction Guaranteed SEARS 1416 Broad St. Phone: 529-1340 Curtis Yockey BARR,S SUZUKI 0 3 E 4 to Vx L.-.55 gg -vm' Q "WL N, Km jf 0 fax?--' fi 7 ., iqif' nr -x n , , in M . J n F3 1 f , --- nm! JJ 'uv' I 'gmt ,ax YD 45 Midway Dr. Phone: 529-7200 SUZU KI Ric, JoAnn, 3: Kathy Barr Roofing, Repairs Remodeling Additions: Residential SL Commercial BOYD WATT Contractor 8L Builder 1829 S. Main St. Phone: 529-0514 Kathy Walt, Jana Watt Like a Good Neighbor, State Farm is There HANKENHOFF INSURANCE With Help For Your Car 8: Homeg Life 8a Health Insurance 1815 Riley Rd. Phone: 529-8244 Allen Neal, Herschel 8L Harold Hankenhoff 218 f mf Q J as ., ,, . A X.,-' , 1. gf l 1 Edwards Jeweler Your Jewelry and Photography Center EDWARDS JEWELRY 1334 Broad St. Phone: 529-2203 Steve Ditlon, Michelle Smith it ,ze McDONALD'S Breakfast Served 7:00-10:30 l720 S. Memorial Dr. New Castle, In. 47362 Mcnonalds , l IQ We do It all for youu. CQ 1975 McDonaId's Corporation Fashion is Fun At B 8L B SHOES and THE FRONT PO RCH 1326 Broad St. Phone: 529-3004 Bob Bunton, Bob Welch -S Be A Good Sport And Shop At C 8a F SPORTING GOODS 1327 Broad St. Phone: 529-0878 Lisa Black ,QW il Gif? v 11JJo011 For New GMC Trucks And Used Cars DENNEY'S AUTO SALES 2400 Broad St. Phone: 529-1307 Roy Wayne Denney, Becky Denney - 220 'The Friendly Little Shop MONA,S 114 N. Main St. Phone: 529-1421 Inga Brown, Carrie Mercer A ..... For A Place to Eat The Trojan Can't Be Beat TROJAN DRIVE-IN 2100 Broad St. Phone: 529-9447 Karen Clark, Suzanne Wilson, ' Alice Millis, Susan Heilman pn...-wnf+ I- 2 1308 Broad St. Phone: 521-2828 Chris Horan, Cheryl Boyd W r A For Great Italian Pizza and Quick Home Delivery DINO'S PIZZA S. 14th 8a R Ave. Phone: 529-1414 et Horton, Lisa Morgan Specialist in Radio and TV Repair EVERSGLE TV HAVEN 1510 G Avenue Phone 529-3547 PRESTIGE PORTRAITS by Reid's Studio Bill Walden, Your School Photographer 200 N. 12th Street Phone 529-5009 Greg Walden Al CHRYSLER conpommou 1817 I Avenue New Castle, Indiana Quality Photography Finest Quality Cards, Gifts, Wedding Stationery JAN'S HALLMARK CENTER 1332 Broad St. Phone: 529-2955 Mark Davis CATRON S STUDIO 2602 s. 14th sr. Phone: 529-6877 Kenneth Catron M GOODWIN DODGE St. Rds. 3 8: 38 224 Phone: 529-3780 Abbey Goodwin, Mark Hastings Scott Goodwin, Gene Hastings IIPPII OMF? ll tv! W :N . W H nun H mme: x fum: me. 2010 S. Memorial Dr. 1 Phone: 529-1880 John 8: Lisa Wittler .QEWWVE QQ DANA CORPORATION DANA New Castle Metal Casting Plant New Castle, Indiana Phone: 529-1560 225 COMMUNITY PRINTING 206 Index A Abbott. Charlesjr. 137, 168 Abshire, Kenny so. 177 Amr, John R. sr. 24, 26, 27, 2s, 124, 126, 128, 129, 143, 152, 189 Acker, Susan so. 107, 146, 177 Adams, Annajr. 168 Adams, Melonie so. 177 Adams, Nancy sr. 104, 105, 117, 140, 141, 143, 146, 147, 152, 232 Addison, Philjr. 168 Akers, Anita sr. 152 Akey, Wayne 62, 63, 126, 127 Albrecht, Mark 146 Alexander, Karenjr. 109, 144. 168 Alexander, Mary Ann sr. 27, 152 Alford. Rose so. 177 Alford, Sam 68,100, 101,102,122 ALL OCCASION SHOPPE 191 Allen, Elanasr. I30,I3I, 132,152 Alley, Tony so, 177 Alley, Troy so. 177 Alsip, Duane so. 177 Alspaugh, Ginajr. 123, 168 Amonett, Debra sr. 152 Amonett, Randy sr. 152 Anderson, Billjr. 141, 149, 168 Anderson, Suejr. 168 APPLE COBBLER 190 Apple, Peggy Lea sr. 27, 134, 152 Appleby, Twylajr. 168, 192 Armstrong, Anita sr. 149, 152 Armstrong, Mikejr. 137, 168 Armstrong, Vickiejr. 144, 168 Arnold, Shelleyjr. 27, 104, 105, 109, 118, 119, 168 ART CLUB 160 ARTHUR TREACHERS 198 Asberry, Cliristella so. 177 Atkinson, Bruce Wm. sr. 33, 144, 146, 148, 149, 152 Atkinson,,1erry sr. 144, 152, 157, 209 Atkinson, Jimjr. 44, 83, 93, 94, 168 Atkinson, Larry so. 144, 177 Austin,Jenni1'er sr. 109, 123, 152 Auten, Rickjr. 27, 168 Ayers, Gary 138 Ayers, Greg 193 AYERS MARKET 193 Ayers, Randy 193 Ayres. Lisajr. 149, 168 B B St B SHOES 219 Bach, Richard D. sr, 152 Baileyb Kimjr, 27. 118, 119, 149, 168 Bailey, Marisa so. 177 Baker, Alan so. 177 Baker, Barbarajr. 27, 105. 117, 146, 168, 198 Baker, Bobjr. 137, 168, 232 Baker, Ronniejr. 168 Baker, Tim so. 177 Baldock, Gene sr. 163 Ballard, Debbie so. 177 Ballenger, Bill jr. 168 Ballenger, Sandy so. 177 Balsby, Sharon so. 177 Barker, Bradley 93, 94 Barker, Jef1'jr.87, 122, 168 BARNEY'S PHARMACY 216 Barr, JoAnn 217 Barr, Kathy 217 Barr, Ric 98, 217 BARR'S SUZUKI 217 Barr, Tom so. 83, 93, 94, 177 Barrett, Paul so. 177 Barricks, Bart so. 177 Bartels, Dean so. 177 BASEBALL 1 13 BASKETBALL 100, 112, 113 Bassett, Jeffjr. 87, 149, 168 Bassett, Jennifer sr. 134, 152 Bateman, Doug so. 149, 177 Bates, Sally jr. 121, 123, 132, 168, 176, 188 Batt, Mark so. 177 Baughey, Lisa so. 177 BEALLS 202 Beasley, Sharon so. 68, 146, 177, 180 Beatty, Yolanda so. 177, 180 Beck, Jeffjr. 168 Beck, Fostena sr. 152 BECKER BROTHERS 217 Becklund, Brendajr. 168 Becklund, Caroljr. 138, 168 Becklund, Lindajr. 168 Becklund, Teresa sr. 24, 152 Beguhn, Bemhardt 71 Bell, Betty 78 Bell, Dale so. 177 226 Bell, Donna so. 64, 177 Bell, Doug so. 177 Bell, Iva Jean 78 Bell, Jim so, 177 Bell, Juliesr. 144, 145, 152 Bell, Kennyjr. 168 Bell, Lucille R. sr. 152 BEN FRANKLIN 193 Benbow, Kenny so, 177 Bench, Johnny 50 Bennett, Jim so. 177 Benson, Karen jr. 168, 173, 199 Benson, Krista so. 178, 199 Berfanger, Teri so. 109, 129, 144, 178 Bertram, Carolynjr. 168 Bertram, Darrell sr. 137, 152 Benram, Debra sr. 24, 27, 117, 126, 128, 152, 216, 232 Bertram, Halycon 78 BIBLE CLUB 122 BILL BRUCE FORD, INC. 190 Bir, Maryjr. 27, 168, 203, 232 Bise, Kathy so. 178 Bittner, Carol so. 105, 149, 178 Black, Lisa so. 144, 178, 220 Black, Shirley sr. 152 Blackburn, Teresa sr. 27, 128, 152 Blackburn, Terry so. 178 Blake, Terry so. 178 Blankenship, Teresa so. 178 Blessinger, Ronald sr. 70, 152 Blevins, Debra so. 178 Block, Lillah 75 Boatright, Markjr. 87,93,94, 100, 102, 168, 192 Boggs, Sheilajr. 146, 168, IFJ Bogue, Aaron so. 178 Bogue, Rickjr. 149, 165 Bolk, Beth sr. 153 BONNIE'S HOME MADE ICE CREAM 198 Booher, Mark sr. 82, 153 Booher, Susan 109 Bouslog, Lisa jr. 168 Bow, Margaret 78, 79 Bowen, Dr. Otis 50 Bowers, Doug sr. 28,90, 141, 153, 190 Bowman, Beth so. 144, 178 Boyd, Cheryljr, 38, 168, 173, 221 Boyd, John 102 BOYD WATT CONTRACTOR AND BUILDER 218 Boyles, Jesse sr. 153 BRAMMER FURNITURE 207 Brammer,Jeffjr. 132, 168, 207 Branscum, Rickie so. 178 Brasich, Bobjr. 117, 194, 232 Braswell, Harrison jr. 144, 168 Bratton, Brenda so. 178 Bray, Danny so. 178 Brenneman, Trillisjr. 168 Brock, Thomas sr. 153 Bronnenberg, Beckyjr. 104, 105, 128, 149, 168 Bronnenberg, Brent sr. 79, 153 Brooks, Rex 66, 82 Brooks, Sara 75 Brown, Cindyjr. 97, 168 Brown, Glenda sr. 4, 153 Brown, Gregory Lynn sr. 43, 85, 139, 153 Brown, Herbie so. 93, 94, 178 Brown, Inga 220 Brown, Laneejr. 139, 168 Brown, Rodney so. 178 Brown, Sandy so. 122, 177 Bmw, Sharijr. 138, 139, 146, 147, 16s Browninz. Joyce ir. 27, 28. 132. 168 Browning, Julia sr. 27, 128, 131, 132, 153 Broyles, Tonyjr. 94, 168 Brumley, Gale so. 177 Brumley, Randall sr. 102, 138 Brumley, Rita so. 177 Bruton, Patricia sr. 118, 119, 121, 153, 211 Bryant, Chris sr. 137, 163 Ruchanon, Daniel sr. 87, 100, 102, 153 Buck, Randyjr. 168 Bunner, Lisa jr. 27, 169 Bunton, Bobjr. 93, 96, 97, 149, 169, 207, 219 Bunton, I.L. 77 Burden, Barbara so. 177 Burden, Valeriejr. 169 BURGER CHEF 192 Burgner, Brad so. 98, 99, 177 Burgner, Debbiejr. 109, 169 Burger. Jim so. 177 Burke, Kenjr. 169 Burke, Maryjr. 169 Burlton, Patty so. 177 Burris, Joejr. 132, 169 Burton, Gail so. 177 Bustle, Tammy so. 177 Byers, Dana Lynn sr. 146, 153 Byers, Dennisjr. 98, 99, 169 Byers, Mikejr. 169 Byrd, Brian so. 177 C c or srommc cooos 220 Caddell, Terry 74 Caffoe, Beth so. 109, 146, 177 Caffoe, Robert B. sr. 26, 27, 28, 85, 102, 122, 153, 158, 190 Cain, Lindajr. 117, 123, 169,191,232 Cain,Susan sr. 27, 105, 134, 153, 162 Caine, Manhajr. 144 Caldwell, Brenda so. 144, 177 Caldwell, Cindy sr. 153 Campbell, Lindajr. 123, 169 Cannon, Jeffrey sr. 21, 24, 27, 28, 127, 140, 141, 142, 143, 153, 202 Carbo, Bemie 50 Cargile, Carlton, Cames, Sherrie so. 177 Julie so. 105, 149, 177 John 96 Cook, Michael David sr. 9, 36, 38, 39, 45, 89, 95, 96,97, 122, 154 Cook, Patjr. 83, 93.95, 96, 97, 118, 119, 169 Cook, Ramona so. 149, 178 Cook, Terri jr. 169 Cooney, Kevin so. 178 Cooper, Mike so. 178 Cooper, Rowenajr. 170 Cooper, Ruthjr. 27, 132, 170 COPELAND'S APPLIANCES 214 Cory, Jay so. 139, 178 Cory, Russell sr. 137, 139, 154, 216 Cory, Tammy so. 178 COURIER TIMES 29, 213, 232 Coursen, Gail sr. 154, 205 Covey, Bobby Joe sr. 137, 154 Cames, Murl 71, 73, 137 Cames, Tammyjr. 149, 169 Carpenter, Jeffso. 172, 177 Carter, Becky so. 109, 149, 178 Caner, Ronnie so. 178 Caner, Tammy so, 124, 178 Carter, Vickie Lea sr. 153 Cashdollar, John jr. 7 1, 90, 169 Cass, Donna 75 Cassidy, Debra sr. 26, 27, 143, 153 Cassidy, John so. 126, 127, 178 Cassidy, Michael 76 Covey, Brian so. 178 Covey, Dana Lee sr. 26, 27, 104, 105, 154, 232 Cox, Eaddiejr. 149, 170, 194 Cox, Gary 64, 65 Cox, Kevin 98 Cox, Mary so. 105, 124,149,178 Coy, Jeff 98 Crabtree, Alan jr. 170 Crabtree, Kathyjr. 27, 124, 125, 170 Crabtree, Rhonda so. 178 Crabtree, Scott sr. 28, 132, 154 107, 116, 117, 1 1 1 Castelluccio, Gloria 66, 104, 105, 111 Caster, Kelly so. 105, 149, 178 Catey, Jeffjr. 149, 169 Catron, Kenneth 224, 232 Catron, Lisa sr. 123, 134, 153, 209 Catron, Marciajr. 27, 169 Marilyn sr. 27, 128, 131, 132, 153 Catron, CATRON'S STUDIO 224 Catron, Tamara so. 178 Caudill, Susie sr. 153 Caywood, Rayjr. 169 Caywood, Teddy so. 178 Chambers, Walter 213 Crabtree, Wanda 78 Craft, David sr. 137, 154 Cralton, David 70, 72 Craig, Kathy so. 124, 129, 146, 178 Craig, Nancy 78, 79 Crandall, Anita sr. 154 Crandall. Jeffso. 127, 143, 178 Crane, Kit C. sr. 154 Crawford, Daminda sr. 44, 154 Crawford, Jamesjr. 170 Crawford, Joe 138 Crawford, Lydia so. 44, 149, 178 Creech, Ruth 78 Chambers, Walter S. sr. 24, 27, 28, 45, 117, 121, 124, 125, 153, 211, 213, 232 BILL CHAPIN INSURANCE 205 Chapman, David 146 Chappell, Beth jr. 169 Chappell, Greg 38 Cheek, Deborah sr. 134, 153 CHEERBLOCK 122 CHEERLEADERS, "B" TEAM Ill CHEERLEADERS VARSITY 111 CHESS CLUB 126 Chilton, Karen jr. 27, 144, 169 Chitwood, Sherrie jr, 45, 169 Choate, Scott so. 178 Chriswell, Eddie jr. 132, 169 Church, Pauline 78 CITIZENS FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION 194 Clapp, Lynn so. 178 CISPP, Mariannejr. 27, 169 Clark, Dean so. 178 Clark, Jef1'jr.27, 169 Clark, Junejr. 169 Clark, Karen sr. 7, 104, 105, 153, 221 Clark, Ledda jr. 169 Clark, Lueisea jr. 169 Clarkson, Kathy jr. 169 Claywell, Kathyjr. 169 Clemens, Doyle sr. 100, 102, 153 Clemens, Duane so. 93, 94, 178 Clements, Mark 137 THE CLOSET 196 Cmehil, Brenda so. 178 Coatie, David so. 178 Coatie, Sandy jr. 169 Coatie, Sherry jr. 169 COCA-COLA BOTTLING CO., INC. 212 Cochran, Karen so. 178 Coffey, Cathy Lynn sr. 25, 27, 104, 105, 107, 108, 109, 113, 143, 153, 162 Cole, Cathy 139 Cole, George so. 178 Cole, Randyjr. 138, 139, 169 Cole, Ray sr. 34, 163 Coleman, Dan sr. 11, 26, 28, 84, 92, 93, 94, 122, 153.154, 203, 231 Coleman, Lisa sr. 27, 104, 105, 117, 126, 149, 153, 160, 205, 232 Coleman, Steve so. 93, 94, 178, 203 CRIDER'S DRIVE IN 189 Crisp, 129, 141, 154 Crisp, Jana so. 30, 38, 111, 129, 178, 185 Criswell, Danny so. 178 Criswell, Don so. 178 Criswell, Donna so. 178 Criswell, Rex sr. 214 Crockett, Brentjr. 27, 122, 124, 125, 126, Cross, Lisa Ann sr. 130, 132, 154 Cross, Tim so. 178 C ROSS-COUNTRY 112 Crowe, Roger jr. 170 Cummings, Chantellejr. 170 Cummings, Darrell sr. 144, 154 Cummings, Jeffso. 126, 127, 178 Cumutte, Mikejr. 170 Current, Rexjr. 170 D Dabney, Jeffso. 178 Dagney, Paul so. 178 Dalto Dalto DAN n, Christie sr. 24, 130, 131, 132, 154 n, Frederick sr. 137, 154 A CORPORATION 225 Dance, Christine so. 178 Daniel, Jamesjr. 170 Daniel, Mike so. 179 Danielson, Amy E. sr. 26, 27, los, 109, 118, 119, 121, 141,143,154 Dankovich, Theodore sr. 26, 27, 83, 122, 154, 209 Davenpon, David jr. 170 Davenport, Lucy sr. 154 Davidson, Alfred 209 Davidson, Yolandajr. 170 DAVIS-BATES, INCORPORATED 188 Davis , Bobjr. 87, 89, 170 Davis,Caroljr. 27, 124, 146, 170 Davis Davis Davis Davis Davis , Charlesjr. 89, 102, 170 , Dan so. 127, 141, 143, 144, 179 , Darlenejr. 27, 144, 170 , Dianna sr. 154 , Elizabeth so. 179 DAVIS FOOD MARKEI' 213 Davis , Gary jr. 170 Davis, Gary so. 137, 179 Davis, Mark Evan sr. 149, 154, 202, 224 DAVIS NORTH END MARKET 213 170 Debra Lynn sr. 27, 36, 118, 119, 126, 127, Coleman, Sydney so. 8, 43, 47, 85, 105, 149, 178, 185 Co lema n. Thomas 50 Collier, Ed so. 144, 178 Collier, Floyd E. sr. 137, 153 Combs, Da1ejr.82,93, 102, 169 Comer, Debra sr. 117, 153, 216, 232 Davis, Pauljr. 139, 170 Davis, Robertjr. 170 Davis, Tammy jr. 170 DAY IN THE L1FE42 Dean, Kim so. 179 De1linger,Trentjr. 122, 170 Conkin, Beth 109 Conley, Tomjr. 27, 169 Conner, Bill jr. 87, 169 Conrad, Lucille sr. 154 CONVENIENT ONE HOUR CLEANERS 188 ' DENNEY'S AUTO SALES 220 Denney, Becky jr. 132, 170, 220 Denney, Brenda fPeav1erJ so. 179 Denney, Denney, Roy Wayne 220 Denney, Tamara sr. 27, 154 H. Allen sr. 20, 24, 28, 141, 144, 14 54 CONVOCATIONS 20 Cook, Horace 62, 63, 111 Cook, Mikejr. 169 Dennis, Belindajr. 121, 123, 144, 170 Denny, Bethjr. 188, 119, 146, 170, 196 Penny, Kim so. 179. Denny, Ronnie so. 179 Denny, Terryjr. 170 Denny, Tonyjr. 132, 170 DENTON'S APOTHECARY 199 DeWitt, Denisejr. 27, 132, 170 DIAMOND INTERNATIONAL 203 Dick, Jeanne so. 179 Dicken, Stephen 42, 45, 54, 76, 230, 232 Dickerson, Greg so. 179 Dickerson, Janetjr. 170 Dickerson, Nancyjr. 170 Dickey, Larry so. 179 Dickson, Joseph sr. 154 Dietz, Gregory sr. 27, 155, 190 DINO'S PIZZA 222 Dishman, Tricia so. 179 Disliman, Willajr. 132, 170 DISTRIBUTED EDUCATION CLUBS OF AMERICA 28,132,133 Ditton, Brian so. 179 Ditton, Stanjr. 93, 170 Ditton, Stevejr, 87, 92, 93, 94, 170,218 Ditty, Karen 74, 75 Dobbs, David so. 179 Dobbs, Kathyjr. 132, 170 Dominick, Gingerjr. 170 Donica, Robert 146 Donovan, Mildred 66 Dorr, Lydia Christi sr. 26, 27, 46, 128, 149, 155 Douglas, Lisa 132, 133 Downs, Henry 38 Driskill, Randy jr, 110 Dudley, Kim so. 179 Duff, Calvin 95 Dugger, Sandy so, 109, 111, 144, 179 Dumford, Becky so. 179 Duml'ord,Cindyjr. 170 Duncan, Corajr. 170 Duncan, Jennyjr. 27, 109, 170 Duncan, John 222 Dunn, Mary Ann 78, 79 Durbin, James so. 179 Durbin, Joe sr. 29, 155 Dutrow, Larry so. 179 Dyer, Gary 232 E Eade, Julie so. 69, 179 Easter, Bruce 98 Easter, Gregjr. 127, 141, 143, 149, 170,175 Eckerty, Jim sr. 89, 122, 155 Edington, Dan so. 127, 179 Edmonds, Maryjr. 170 Edmondson, Robbinjr. 109, 111, 170, 201 Edwards, Billy Joe sr. 27, 155 EDWARDS JEWELRY 218 Edwards, Jim so. 179 Edwards, Kathryn L. sr. 17, 27, 36, 37, 149, 155, 207 Edwards, Niki sr, 155 ELECTRONICS CLUB 138, 139 Elkins, Joe sr. 155 Elkins, Sue so. 149, 179 Eller, Dennis 54, 140, 141, 142 Ellson, Janicejr. 27, 170 Elmore, Steven Ray sr. 155 Elsbury, Robert sr. 138, 155 Emmons, Julie sr. 155 En-lai, Chou 50 Erwin, Eddiejr. 83, 170 Eschenbrenner, Dottie so. 124, 179, 184 EsP'Y. Ed 232 Estes, Lindajr. 132, 171 Evans, Scott jr. 171 Evans, Teresajr. 27, 171 Evans, Tim so. 179 EVERSOLE T.V. HAVEN 222 Eversole, Tanya so. 179 Ewing, Jayjr. 171 F Faurote, Nancy 78 Fadely, Jerry so. 139, 179 Fairchild, Raymondjr. 137, 171 Fa1lon,Juliejr. 67, 105, 107, 171 FAMOUS REC1PE209 Farley, Apriljr. 144, 171 Farley, Autumn so. 179 Farris. Kim so. 179 FEATURE, ALCOHOLISM 34 FEATURE: NEW CASTLE 22 Feeley, Ann so. 109, 149, 179 Fellers, Rickjr. 137, 171 FELLOWSHIP OF CHRISTIAN ATHLETES 122 Feng, Hua Kuo 50 FENNELL ADVERTISING 199 Ferguson, Gena so. 179 Ferguson, Jeffso. 179 Ferrell, Connie so. 179 Ferrell, George so. 179 Ferrell, Regina sr. 155 Ferrell, Rickjr. 171 Ferriell, Rae 108, 109 Fike,Carijr. l04,105,109, 171 Fike, Elisa so, 141, 179 Finch, Joyce, so. 179 F I RESTONE 208 FIRST NATIONAL BANK 203 Fisher, Kyle 137 Fisk, Carlton 50 FLAG CORPS 181 Fletcher, Fred so. 180 Fletcher, Sandra sr. 155 Flowers, Billy so. 180 Flowers, Dianejr. 171 Flowers, Keith sr. 137, 155 Flynn, Connie so. 180 Fonzer, Carmitta so. 180 Fonzer, Juanita sr. 134, 155 FOOTBALL 1 12 Ford, Gerald 50 Ford. Greg so. 180 Ford, Joyce so, 126, 127, 180 FOREST H. MEEK, FLORIST 196 FORSCO 124, 157, 179, 184 Foster, Donnie so. 180 Foster, Teresa sr. 155 Fowler, Charlene 78 Fowler, Janet 108, 109 Fox. Angie 109 Fox, DeeDee 108 Fox, Dino sr. 28, 92, 93, 94, 155, 210 Fox, Luannejr. l18,l19,144, 171 Fox, Rick so. 180 Franklin, Richard 98 Franklin, Valerie sr. 140, 141, 143, 144, 155, 231 Fraze, Dwight 56 Frazier, Donald sr. 163 Frazier, Florence sr. 4, 27, 109, 155 Freeburg, Larry sr. 82, 155 Freeburg, Lori so. 69, 106, 107, 180 Fribley, Cathyjr. 123, 171 Fromme, Lynnette 50 FRONT PORCH 219 Frost, David Scott sr. 155 Frost, Jay so. 180 Frost, Perry so. 93, 94, 180 Frost, Shirley 93 Fuller, William sr, 27, 28.82, 102, 116, 117, 122, l26,l27,128,129, l42,143,155, 190, 232 Furbee, Robert 65 G Galloway. Tracy so. 127, 130 Garcia, Daniel jr. 171 Gamer, Floyd sr. 93, 137, 155 Gamer, Mildred 71 Gamer, Pattyjr. 27, 144, 171 Gamer, Teresa so. 180 Garvin, Mark so,141, 143, 180 Gayer,Claudiajr. 124, 139, 146, 171 Gayer, Robert sr. 155 Gehlert, Donald sr. 27, 87, 89, 98, 99, 128, 143, 155 Gehlert, Lisajr. 27, 105, 109, 144, 171 Geozeff, Donald 71 Gibson, David sr. 155 Gibson, Dougjr. 171 Gibson, Theajr. 171 Gideon, Becky so. 180 Giles, Donald 73 GIRLS' BASKETBALL 112 GIRLS' GYMNASTICS 108, 109, 113 GIRLS' SOFTBALL 108, 109, 113 GIRLS' SWIMMING 108, 112 GIRLS' TENNIS 104, 105 GIRLS' TRACK 1If2 GIRLS' VOLLEYBALL 112 Givens, Alvinjr. 7, 95, 96, 97, 149, 171 Givens, Marcia sr. 155 Goar, Van 201 Goertz, Frank so. 95, 96, 97, 180 Goff, Teresa so. 180, 183 GOLF 113 Golliher, Dorothy 66 Goodin, Maricajr. 168, 171 Goodson, Rebecca sr. 130, 132, 155 Goodwin, Abbey so. 111, 180, 224 GOODWIN DODGE 224 Goodwin, Jon Scott sr. 27, 38, 85, 155, 224 Goodwin, Lindajr. 171 Goodwin, Michael 146 Goodwin, Phyllisjr. 171 GOODWIN POPE 191 Gorman, Mike so. 180 Gough, Jimjr. 149, 171 GRADUATION 49 Grandon, Debbiejr. 171 Grandon, Vickie sr. 155 Gray, Carlos, sr. 149, 156 Gray, Haroldjr. 171 Grear, Danny 137 Grear, Leonjr. 27,98,99, 146, 147, 171 Green, Brenda sr. 19, 134, 146, 156 Green,Cathy sr. 144, 156 Green, Delilah .lean sr. 146, 156 Green, Larry 136, 137. 156 Green, Mary so. 149, 180 Green, Tim sr. 171 Gregg, Sharon 56, 57 Gregory, Kimjr. 144, 171 Gregory, Jeffrey sr. 137, 156 Gregory, Joe 180 Gribbons, Karen so. 105, 109, 127, 180 Grider, Brent Lee sr. 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 156 Grider, Nesajr. 107, 118, 119, 129, 171, 174 Griffey, Gary Allen er. 137, 156 Griflin, David so. 180 Grigsby, Brenda so. 180 Grigsby,Tyjr. 144, 171 Grimes, Ronald 62, 126, 127 Grimm, Arthur 77 Grimm, Tammyjr. 27, 118, 119, 141, 143, 1 Groce, Groce, Groce. Groce, ,Tammy 109 Groce Donald so. 180 Kelley so. 180 Kevinjr. 83, 171 Patricia sr. 131, 132, 156 Grose, Mikejr. 27, 171 Gross, Gross, Gross, Kevin so. 180 Mikejr. 83, 171 Randy so. 180 Grubbs, Denisejr,132,171 Grubbs, Denver, so. 180 Guffey, Anita sr. 163 Guffey, Tony so. 100, 102, 180 Guymon, Muzetta 73, 134 Gwinn, Rick sr. 25, 28, 38, 82, 92, 93, 94, 121 122, 156, 205 Gwinn, Sheila ir. 172 H HOME ECONOMICS RELATED OCCUPATIONS 134 Hacker, Bryan so. 141, 149, 180 Hacker, Chrisjr. 149, 172 Hacker, Debbie so. 144, 180 Hacker, Tony 146 Hagerman, Jody sr. 36, 156 Hagerman, Scottjr. 172 Hageny, Teri so. 30, 123, 124, 125, 180 Haggard, Greg so. 180 Hakes, Brad 139 Halberstadt, Frances 54, 117, 119, 232 Hall, Bobby Albert sr. 28, 132, 156 Hall. Greg so. 180 Hall, Marilyn 134 Hamblin,Teresajr. 27, 28, 132, 133, 172 Hamilton, Billjr. 172, 188 Hamilton, Dave 126 Hamilton, Susie so. 180 Hamm, Dukejr. 27, 83, 172, 221 Hamm, Julie sr. 27, 123, 128, 129, 156 Hammond, Annette, so. 105, 109, 180 Hankenlioff, Beverly 76 Hankenhoff, Harold 218 Hankenhoff, Hurshel sr. 137, 156, 218 HANKENHOFF INSURANCE 218 Hannon, Joejr. 137, 172, 208 HARMON HOY JEWELER 214 Harris, William and Emily 50 Hart, Kevinjr.27,83,89,102,118,119, 122, Harter, Geraldine 71 49,171 172 HOMECOMING 17 HONORS 24, 26 Hoots, Lottie 78 Hoover, Becky so, 105, 128, 129, 146, 180 Hoover. Richard 77 Hopkins, Kelly so. 180 Hopkins, Kimjr. 172 Horan, Chrisjr. 90, 172, 208 Horn, Karen 109 Horn, Robert Ellis sr. 156, 197 Hom, Suzannejr. 38, 45, 109, 111, 172, 201 Hom, Wadejr, 27, 57, 102, 124, 172 Horton, Bret sr. 156, 209, 222 Hosea, David so. 180 I-Iostetler, Richard 54, 142 Howard, Allegra so, 180 Howard, Lisa 28, 130, 132 Howe, Jeffjr. 172 Howe, Julie sr. 156 Howe, Maryso.109, 123,180 Howe, Patricia so. 180 Howe, Ronald William sr. 157 Howell, Ray 79 Hubbs, Lisa so. 149, 180 Huckeby, Kevinjr. 172 Huffman,Judy jr. 105, 172 Hughes, Calliejr. 138, 172 Hughes, Tammy so. 180 Hughett, Darlene sr. 27, 134, 157 Humbles, Beckyjr. 144, 172 Hunter, Mark so. 180 Hurd, Janice so. 107, 144,180 Hurd, Sharon sr. 24, 27, 144, 157 Hurst, Blakejr. 172 Huse, Cheryl 108 Hurst, Marty so. 94, 180 Hutchinson, Jocelynjr. 172 Hutson, Kandi sr. 27, 36, 38, 108, 109, 111, 119 157,201 Hyden, Pam so. 124, 180 I Igo, Terri so. 123, 180 Imel, Debbiejr. 172 Ingram, Edith 78, 79 Irwin,Janejr. 149,172 J J.C. PENNEY'S 211 JACK'S DONUT SHOPPE 202 Jackson, Royjr. 129, 172, 174 Jackson, Teresa so, 123, 124, 180 JACKSON ZENDER STUDIOS 232 JACOBS HARDWARDE 189 Jacobs, Rainnajr. 172 James, John 28, 132, 133 JAN'S HALLMARK CENTER 224 Jarvis, Tamara sr. 43, 146, 147, 157, 190 Jessie, Carol Ann 163 Jessie, Kevinjr. 137, 172 Jessop, Jay sr. 157 John Eric so. 127, 141, 143, 149, 180, 185 Johnson, Charlette so. 180 Johnson, Cheryl sr, 27, ID, 157, 194 Haas, Phillip sr, 156 Hastings, Gene 224 Hastings, Heatherjr. 27, 117, 172 Hastings, Mark sr. 24, Z8, 130, 132, 156, 224 Hasty, Deborah sr. 156 Hasty, Eddie so. 180, 206 Haven, Helen sr. 27, 128, 156, 199 Hay, Langan 59 Hayes, Steven sr. 137, 156 Haynes, Dianajr. 138,172 Hearst, Patricia 50 Heck, John M. sr. 156 Heilman, Susan sr. 27, 104, 105, 121, 124, 126, 128, I, 16, 21 henry county office supply 207 Hermanet, Dave so. 180 HERPOLSHEIMERS LOCK AND KEY 209 Herran, Bradjr. 137, 172 Herran, Cheryl sr. 156 Hiatt, Carolyn 40 Hicks, Becky so. 180 Hicks, Jeffso. 180 Hicks, Vickie sr. 156 Hill, Clintonjr. 138, 172 Hill, Leslie so. l03,104,l05,107,108, 109,180 Hill, Rickey sr. 137, 163 Hinshaw, Bruce so, 127, 180 Hinton. Cathy sr. 156 Hitcltocock, Isabelle 78 Hoffman, Melinda 132 I Hoke, Brianjr. 27, 82, 117, 172, 232 Hoke, Jennifer sr. 5, 19, 25, 27, 36, 104, 105, 117, 126, 128, 129, 146, 156, 205, 232 Holaday, Lynette sr. 27, 117, 146, 156, 207, 232 Hollen, Becky sr. 156 Hollen, Debbie so. 180 Holloway, Bethjr. 172 HOLTHOUSE FURNITURE 211 Johnson, Chris so. 9, 107, 180 Johnson, David 139 Johnson, Jami sr. 157 Johnson, Kim so. 124, 180 Johnson, Margaretjr. 27, 172 Johnson, Roben 73, 138, 139 Johnson, Theresa so. 180 Jolley, Jones, Jones. Tinajr, 172, 206 David so. 182 Mike jr. 138 Jones, Patriciajr. 172 Jones, Pattyjr. 146,172 Jones, Robin jr. 172 Jones, Sandy so. 182 Joy, Karen 75 Judge, Beth so. 182 JUNIOR CLASSICAL LEAGUE 127 K Kadel, Catherine 78 Karp, Johnjr, 27, 90, 143, 172 Karrick, Stewart so. 182 Kasten, Kathy so. 182 Kasten, Marilyn 78 Keaton, Patsy jr. 173 Keaton, Vanessajr. 105, 109, 173 Keener. Janet 78, 79 Keener, Jerry sr, 157 Keisewetter, Ed 211 Keisewetter, Penny so. 109, 127, 149, 182, 211 Keisewetter, Tammy 211 Keith, Gay 78 Kenda Kenda 11, Bethjr. 173 ll, Teresa so. 149, 182 , Kennedy, Greg so. 102, 182 Kenriclt, Tom sr. 27, 121, 124, 157 Kem,Chuckjr. 19, 27,87,92,93,94, 100,102 227 201 Vlyers. Pennyjr. 27. 108, 109, 146, 174, 201 168, 173 Key, Jerryjr. 27, 173 Key, Kendric 139 Kilgore, Rick sr. 157 Kilgore, Scottjr. 149, 173 Killingbeck, Lisajr. 173 King, Tammi sr. 157 Kinkade, Carlyle so. 104, 197, 123, 124, 182 Kinkade, Kristen jr. 27, 105, 109, 141, 173,232 Kinnett, Joe 76, 78 Kirby, Bob 137 Kirby, Jackson sr. 87, 89, 118, 119, 157 Klipsch, Phyllis 72, 138 Knight, Dennis jr. 27, 116, 117, 149, 173, 232 Knotts, Brad sr. 19, 36, 94, 157, 192 Koger,Jeffso. 102, 182, 201, 203 Magers, Dougjr. 149, 173 Mahaffey, John so. IS2 Mahaffey, Terry L. sr. 137, 159 Malloy, Timjr. 173 Maloyed,Terryjr. 138, 173 Manning, Janet 21, 68,104, 105, 108, 109,111 Mnson, Carles 50 Manthei, Rickjr. 173 Marcam, Gary 50 Marcum, Jamiejr. 117, 129, 149,173,202 Marcurn. Jeffso. 182, 202 Marcum, Rhonda so. 182 Marcum, Tonyjr. 5, 43, 149, 173, 202,207 Morris, Matthew sr. 27, 28, 117, 126 144, 149, 159, 198, 232 Moyer. Ted 66 Mullen, Rhonda so. 109, 183 Mullin, Rhona 109 Muncy, Paula so. 123, 144, 180,183 Murphy. Brent sr. 159 Murphy, Debbie so. 183 Murphy, Melvin sr. 28, 132, 133, 159 Murphy, Melvin sr. 28, 132, 133, 159 Murphy, Wendell sr. 137, 159 Murray, Leann so. 103, 183 MUSICAL 32 ,127, 140, 141, PereL Tony 50 Petry, Mike so. 183 PETE'S PANT-RY 221 Petty, Brucejr. 174 Pew, Kathy 134 THE PFENNINGER AGENCY, INC. 198 Pfenninger, Scott so. 93, 94, 102, 183 Pfenninger, Dorothy 77 Pham, Stacye sr. 40, 160 Phares, Carolyn so. 183 Pheffer, Brent so. 93, 94, 102, 183 Phelps, Vemon jr. 174 PHOENIX 231 Marion. W. Dale sr. 159 Mark, L. Lynn sr. 24, 27, 121, 122, 123, 159, 207 Marlatt, Jeffrey sr. 159 Koger, Jerry 45, 59, 84, 85, 121 Koger, Lisa so. 124, 182, 185 Kovaleski, Frank 76, 111 Kratz, Sarah sr. 27, 146, 157 Kreiger, Charles 98, 99 Kuhn. Etsukojr. 27, 173 L Lacy, Chris so. 83, 102, 182 Lacy, Eugene 77 Landers, H. Blaine sr. 137, 138, 139, 157 Landers, Mark so. 182 Langdon, Bertram 28, 61, 146 Langford, Larry 62 Lankford, Rick 137 Marlow, Patjr. 173 Martin, Rex so. 182 Martz, Sandra 61, 144 Massengale, David so. 182 Massengale, Harlod sr. 137, 159 Massengale, Kennyjr. 173 Masters, Jara sr. 36, 38, 39, 97, 104, 105, 109, 159 Mastin, Jimjr. 173 Mastin, Jerry Deesr. 137, 159, 213 Matney, Terry sr. 159 Mattix, Pennyjr. 173 May, Andrew 139 Maytield, Julie 103 Maze, LeAnn so. 144, 149, 182 McCaffrey, Teresa so. 123, 124, 183 McC1aren, Richard T. sr. 28, 159 McCor Lantz, Billjr. 173 Lantz, Jeffjr. 28, 132, 173 Larrison, Mike so. 182 Larrison, Scottjr. 83, 93, 98, 99, 173 Lauer, Jimjr. 98, 99, 173 Laurie, Chester sr. 144, 157 McClure, Jane so. 149, 183 McClure, Kelly so, 89, 183 McClure, Kim jr. 122, 123, 144, 173 McClure, Misty so. 183 McConnell, Candy so. 127, 143, 183 McCorkhi11, Jeffso. 183 1t1e,v1ek1ejr. 144 MYERS FURNITURE AND APPLIANCE N NATIONAL FORENSIC LEAGUE 142, 143 NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY 128 Nead, John 54 Neal, Alan DeWayne sr. 137, 159 Neal, Allen A. sr. 137, 159, 218 Neal, Johnjr. 27, 141, 144, 149, 174 Neal, Rayjr. 138, 139, 174 Neal, Teresa so. 183 Neal, Timjr. 87, 174 Neuman, Davidjr. 27, 117, 174, 201, 232 New, Jan sr. 159, 196 NEWBY-PAUL MOTOR CO. 199 NEW CASTLE ENGINEERING 205 NEW CASTLE HOMES 215 NEW CASTLE LANES 208 NEW CASTLE TIRE STORE 197 NEWS REPUBLICAN 216 Nicholas, Debbie so. 183 Nicholson, Jennifer so. 124, 183 Laurie, Kelly so, 182 Lavamway, Terryjr. 132, 173 Lawrence, Teresa so. 124, 182 Lawson, Pamjr. 173 Lawson, Treva so. 182 Lawson, Williamjr, 173 Leath, Davidjr. so, 125, 173 Ledbetter, Michellejr. 173 Leduc, Brenda 78,79 Lee, Brenda 109 Lee, Bruce so. 182 Lee, David sr. 11-1, 157 Lee, Debbiejr. 173 Lee, Frankjr. 96, 97, 173 Lee, Jeffjr. 173 Lee, Judy so. 182 Lee, T ina so. 182 Leflingwell, Lisa 47 Lehr, William 49.76, 78 Leitch, Richard 29 Leitch, Susan sr. 118, 119, 141, 143, 157, 189, 232 Leslie, Lewis, Tim so. 182 Lesia sr. 66, 157 McCoy, Cheryl sr. 159 McCutchen, Debbie jr. 173 McDanie11, Dianne 79 McDONALD'S 219 McDonald, Leann 146 McFarland, Stephen sr. 159 McGrew, Craigjr. 86, 87, 89 McGuire, Debra sr. 130, 131, 159 McGuire, Tonyjr. 138, 173, 191 McKee, Denise so. 183 McKee, Kelly so. 124, 183 McKnight, Richardjr, 173 MCKOWN AND WHITE 202 McMullen, Reneejr, 27, 121, 123, 173 McNel1s, Jimjr. 173 McNe1is, Lisajr.27,1l7,l4l,l43, 173, 196,232 McQueen, Da1ejr.149,I73, 188 McSHURLEY'S SHOES 193 McWhorter, Vicky 146 Meek, Lynnjr.27, 103, 116, 117, 173, 196, 232 Meese, Larryjr. 89, 173 Meir, Lynn 79 Nicholoson, Mike sr. 137, 159 Niles, Perry sr. 141, 144, 159 Nixon. Richard M. 50 Noble, W 204 111121111 Ray sr. 27, 79, 126, 127, 149, 159, Norris, Bill 139 Norris, Dayvnajr. 27, 144, 146, 174 Norris, Kimjr. 174 Norris, Rose Mary so. 183 Northcutt, Kirby so. 183 Northcutt, Frank so. 183 Nunn, Lillie so. 183 O Ocker, Cynthia 103 Odle, Kenton so. 29, 183 Odle, Kerry sr. 70, 159 Odle, Mike so. 183 OFFICE 132, 13 01den..le EDUCATION ASSOCIATION 28. 3 frjr. 174 Oliver, A1 138, 139 Lewis, Norma Jean sr. 157 Lewis, Susan sr. 157 Lindsey,Chery1jr. 105, 109, 128, 144, 149, 171, 173 Lindsey, Tom so. 149, 182 Lingenfelter, Danny so. 182 Lines, Donnajr. 123, 173 1.1nes,Joyjr.118,119,123,129,144,173 Linville, Rogerjr. 173 LIVING ROOMS INC. 19.1 Lockridge, Tammy sr. 4, 157 Loewen, Roger 232 Logan.Jeffjr. 173 LOGSTON AUTO SUPPLY 197 Logston, Jamie so. 178, 182, 197 Logston, Phillip sr. 137, 159, 197 LONG JOHN SILVERS 210 Long, Maryjr. 172,173 Longfellow, Jackie so. 182 Lorton, Brendajr. 27, 121, 132,173 Lorton, Diana sr. 27, 28, 128, 130, 131, 132, 159 Meier,Vance 59, 100, 102, 122 Melton Melton . Kenny jr. 174 , Sheilajr. 174 Mercer, Carrie sr. 103, 109, 149, 159, 220 M eyer. Larry 59, 100, 102 Meyers, Jim so. 38, 93, 94, 102, 183 Miers, Paul so. 137, 183 Miers. Phil jr. 174 Milasheski, Suejr. Miller, Bethjr. 27, 38, 45, 144, 146, 147, 174 Miller. Miller, Charlotte jr. 105, 123, 132, 174,215 Don 207 Miller, Jamey so. 127, 139, 149, 183 Miller, Kimjf. 141,143,174 MILLER MONUMENTS 209 Miller, Penny sr. 130, 132, 159 Miller, Roger 59 Miller, Terry Lynn sr. 108, 109, 149, 159, 204 Miller, Milline Tim sr. 24, 82, 93,94, 122, 154, 159, 201 r. Tamara sr. 130, 132, 159 27, 105, 120, 121, 122, 123, 174 Olsen, Chris so. 98, 99. 183 Olsen, Tara sr. 159 Oney, Deborah sr. 159 Orr, Kim so. 183 Overmyer, Mark sr. 24, 27, 159, 202 Owens, Arnold 215 OWEN'S BAIT AND TACKLE215 Owens, David sr. 28, 144, 149, 159 Owens, June 215 Oxley, Herman sr. 159 P Padgett, Brad so. 183 Padgett, Steven sr. 137, 160, 208 Page, Mike so. 89. 127, 183 Painter, Bruce jr. 27, 174 Paschal, Tammy so. 64, 183 Love, Debbie so. 182 Loveless. Cindyjr. 144, 173 LOVELESS CONSTRUCTION 189 Loveless, Leonjr. 93, 94, 173 Loveless, Timjr. 173, 189, 214 Lo we, Lowe, Lo we, Danny so. 65, 182 Debra Kay sr. 28, 132, 159 Jackie so. 182 Lowe, Julie so. 182 Lowe, Vivian so. 182 Millis, Alice sr. 27, 29, 70, 141, 143, 159, 221 Millis, Lisa so. 183 Millis, Pat 60 Minglana, Femando so. 183 MISTER PRINT 205 Mitchell, Steve so. 89, 127, 183 Mix, Denisejr. 174 Modaff, Alison so. 108, 109, 124, 183 MODERNFOLD 195 Modlin, Beckyjr, 149, 174 Pasman, Christyjr. 27, 120, 123, 124, 146, 174 Patterson Patterson , Jay so. 93, 94, 102, 149, 183 , Larry so. 183 Patterson, Laura jr. 2, 149, 174 Patterson, Randy 137 Patterson, Twyman 3, 11,42, 47.76, 92, 93, 94 Paul, Jerry Wayne sr. 137, 138, 139, 160 Paul. Joey so. 183 Paul, Joey so. 183 Paul. Nancy so. 127, 149, 183 Lucas, Chrisjr. 173 Luellen, Brendajr. 105, 123, 173 Luellen, David sr. 159 Luke, Betty 207 M MAC'S HAMBURGERS 40 Macer, Beth Ann sr. 20, 26, 27, 117, 121, 124, 127, 128,1D,14l, 159, 2.32 Madison, Timmy Ray sr. 137, 159, 208 MADRIGALS 144 228 Modlin, Rhonda sr. 159 Moflitt , Joey sr. 132, 159, 193 Mognett, Kentjr. 122, 144, 174 MONA'S 220 Montgomery, Marilyn 79 Moore, Debbie so. 183 Moore, Karen so. 30, 127, 146, 183 Moore, Sarah Jane 50 Moore. Terry jr. 174 Morea,Juliejr. 174, 146 Morgan, Lisa so. 183, 222 MORRIS CHEVROLET 205 Morris, Dougjr. 86, 87, 89, 143, 174,232 Peacock, Suzannajr. 144, 146, 174 Peal, Timjr. 174 Peavie, Gary 209 Peavie, Patsyjr. 28, 132, 174 Penn, Tony sr. 160 Penticuff, Davidjr. 174 PEP CLUB 121 Perdew, Randy so. 93, 94, 102, 183 Perdew, Rickjr. 141, 143, 149, 174 Perdue, Debbiejr. 132, 174 Perdue, Frank so. 183 Perdue, Mike sr. 134, 163 Perdue, Waynejr. 87. 89. 174 Pierce, Eddie so. 183 Pierce. Joe 98 Pierce, Rickey sr. 137, 160 Pierce. Sherri 138 Piercy, Deborah sr. 160 Piercy, Jeffjr. 174 Piercy, Paul sr. 160 Pierson, Steve 139 Peirson, Melody so. 183 "inkerton, Scott sr. 149, 160 Piper, Kevinjr. 144, 174, 190, 201 Pitchford, Davidjr. 149, 174 Pitts, Donna 130 Pitts, Terri 130 PIZZA HUT 196 Platts, Gary sr. 132 Poe, Tony su. 183 Poer, Ann 29, 76 Poer, Holly so. 68, 109, 183 Poindexter, Dougjr. 174 POM PONS 146 Poor. Terrijr. 27, 116, 117, 149, 174, 232 Poore, Kathy sr. 160 Pope, Georgette 78, 79 Popplewell, Judi 139 Poner, Helen 78, 79 Potts, Donna sr. 28, 130, 132, 160, 216 Powell, Cecil 66, 130, 131, 133 Powell, Jim jr. 174 Powell, Laura Jane sr. 144, 160 Poynter, Starryjr. 103, 174 Pratt, Larry so, 183 PRESTIGE PORTRAITS 222 Pribble, Tammyjr. 174 Prince, David sr. 137, 163 Prince, Richard jr. 174 Prince, P ROM Purvis, Rogerjr. 174 36 Debbiejr. 28. 132. 133. 174 R Rabenstein, Karen so. 105, 127, 183 Rackow, Joe so. 183 Radford, Lesterjr. 174 Raines, Barbarajr. 174 Raines, Bobhyjr. 174 Raines, Kent so. 93, 94, 183 Raines, Scottjr. 86, 87, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 174 Rains, Myredajr. 27, 174 Ra ins. Ramonajr. 174 RAINTREE 500 MUFFLER SHOP 208 Ratliff, Jimjr. 98, 99, 174 Ray, Brett sr. 24. 87, 89, 122, 144, 160, 215 Ray, Kim so. 123, 124, 183 Razor, Cheryl 78, 79 Razor, READ Jeffso. 183 MORE 211 Reagan, Tim sr. 28, 82, 93, 94, 100, 102, 122, 160 201 Reamer, Jerryjr. 27, 144, 174 Reamer, Larry so. 183 REDELEMANS 207 Redman, Dan so. 183 Reed, Sandy so. 183 Reed, Wendy jr. 174 Reese, De1.y1111ajr. 27, 122, 124, 125, 146, 174 Reeves, Jeff so. 93, 94, 183 Reeves, Timothy sr. 24, 27, 87, 117, 121, 160, 232 Regner, Lewis sr. 160 Regner 183. , Marianna so. 67, 105, 109, 127, 146, 179, 196 Regner, Mike so. 183 Regner, Robert 146 Reid. Greg sr. 160 Renfro,Jan so. 127, 143, 183 Renfro,Jimjr. 141, 143, 149, 174 Renner, Chris 64, 65 Renner, Jack 73 Rentchler, Evelyn 29, 76 Retz, Janajr. 174 Reynolds, Pam so. 144, 184 Reynolds, Tonyjr. 28, 132, 174 Rhodes, Lance 47, 58, 59, 93, 94, 95, 97 Rhodes, Pamjr. 104, 105,109,174 Richardson, Patty jr. 28, 132, 174 Rickey, Mark so. 184 Rifner, Susan sr. 109, 160 Riggs, Cary sr. 28,82, 132, 160 Riggs, Jackjr, 27, 83, 174 Rigney, Ronnie sr. 137, 161 Tompkin S Susan 109 113,1l8,122,128,129,l61 Rigney, Stanley so. 184 Riley, Chris so. 184 Rinberger, Rick jr. 137, 174 Rinehan, Rick so. 184 Rinehart, Roben 76, 138 Rinsch, Lucille 78 Risley, Hobart 54, 122 Robbins, James 26, 54, 142, 143 Robbins, Kirk so. 184 Roberts, Debbiejr. 27, 174 Roberts, Jim so. 149, 184 Roberts, Perry so. 184 Roberts, Randyjr. 174 Robinson, Candy sr. 28, 132, 133, 161 Roe, Mary Alice sr. 161 Rogers, Joyce sr. 161 Rogers, Roscoe 65 ROSE BOWL 208 Rose, Greg sr. 26, 27, 28, 49, 90, 125, 142, 143, 161, 203 Rose, Pete 50 Poseman, Shawn sr. 135, 161 ROSENNIAL 116, 117, 208 Row, Ellen so. 184 Row, Johnjr. 89, 96, 97, 175 ROYAL INDUSTRIES 204 Russell, Brian sr. 143, 161,217 Russell, Lavena sr. 161 Russell, Tony so. 184 Rust, Natalie 138, 139 Sahlburg, Cindy 1os, me sa111bu1g,1e1fjf. 21, 9s,99, 115 Sanders, Rita sr. 24, 27, 103, 104, 105, 109, 123 128, 161, 194 Sanderson, Deanna sr. 27, 128, 144, 161 Schetgen, Jenny so. 184, 214 Schetgen, Joseph sr. 137, 161 Schlehuser, Leesajr. 105, 175 Schmidt, Larry sr. 143, 161 Schmidt, Pauljr, 27, 175 Schmitt, Sally sr. 130, 131, 132, 161 Schofield, Melissa sr. 161 Smith, Darrelljr. 132, 138, 175 Smith, David Mark sr, 27, 28, 86, 87, 100, 102, 161 Smith, Debbie sr. 161 Smith, Debbie so. 184 Smith, Donna Jean 78 Smith, Jeanitta sr. 109, 144, 145, 161 Smith, Judy 76 Smith, Leonard 66, 132, 133 Smith, Dr. Mark 77 Smith, Michelle sr. 161, 218 Smith, Mindyjr. 27, 109, 149, 175, 232 Smith, Rickjr. 93, 95, 96, 97, 175 Smith, Teresa so. 184 Smith, Wyona so. 184 SMITHS JEWELRY 201 Soliday, Deena so. 184 Soliday, Kevinjr. 73, 175 Sorrell, Judith 54, 129 Southerland, Jody so. 102, 184 SPANISH CLUB 102 ' Sparks, Vanessa 103 Spaulding, Laurie so. 56, 124, 184 Spencer, Tammy jr. 175, 205 Stackhouse, Lisa 109 Stamper, Ruth 79 Stamper, Wilbume 79 Thomas, Jane Ann sr. 162, 193 Thomas Teddyjr. 175 Thomason, Tony so. 185 Thompkin, Debbie so. 103, 105, 109 Thompson, Bruce A. sr. 24, 149, 162 Thompson, Kathleen 142, 143 Thompson, Rick sr. 139 Thompson, Steven sr. 162 Thompson, Tony so. 126 Thompson, Yvonne sr. 162 Thomson, Barbara so. 109, 185 Thomson, Raymond sr. 162 Thomburg, J. Mike sr. 162 Thornburg, Mark so. 185 THORNHILL, DAVIS, INC. 192 Thornhill, Jewell 78, 79 Thrall, Lisa so. 103, 107, 182, 185 Thrasher, Patty 103 Th roop, William so. 93, 94, 185 Thurman, Brett so. 127, 143, 185 Thurman , Jay so. 185 Thurman, JoAnn so. 124, 185 Thurman , Steve 146 Tinch, Rhondajr. 176 Todd. Carolyn 66, 130, 133 s, Debbie so. 149, 185 Stanley, Deanjr. 83, 138, 175 Stanley, St awick St awick 1 61 Stawick Steve so. 184 , Gerald 29 . James sr. 27, 28. 29. 48. 95, 96, 97, 122, Stawick, , Pauljr. 27, 96,175 Stawick, Joe so.96, 184 Schroth, Johnjr. 175 Schuffman, Brendajr. 27, 149, 175 Williams, Susan 103 SCHUFFMAN FURNITURE 198 Schuffman, Rhona 146 Schwier, Sandra J. sr. 143, 161 Schwinn, Mike so.89, 127, 184 SCORE BOXES 112, 113 Scott, Banjr. 175 SEARS 216 Sells, Chrisjr. 38, 83, 175 Sells, Mickijr. 27, 175 Selvy, Diana sr. 26, 27, 70, 117, 124, 140, 141, 209, 211, 232 Selvy, Gene 209 Semer, Larry 134 Sewell, Brent so. 189 Shadrick, Jackie 103 Waddell, Pamela sr. 130, 131, 132, 162 Shadrick, Keithjr. 13.102, 82,175 Shafer, Dee so. 184 Shafer, Todd so. 184 Shaffer, Jeffjr. 83, 137, 175, 203 Shapiro, Brian jr. 27, 175 Sharp, Donna sr. 161, 213 Sharp, Phil 29 Shauver, Robert 28, 61, 149 Shaver, Cathy so. 184 Shears, Greg so. 184 Shears, Jeffso. 184 Shell, David sr. 70, 89, 122, 161 Shelley, Lanajr. 175 Shelton, Jay jr, 175 Shelton, Tony sr. 149, 161 Sheppard, Sherry jr. 175 Shermer. Cindy sr. 161 Shipley, Geraldjr. 70, 87, 175 Shopp, Steven sr. 87, 89, 161, 208 Short, Edjr. 138,175 Short, Jane 103 Showwalter, Karen 109 Showalter, Susan sr. 121, 128, 161 Sidwell, Darlene jr. 175 Sidwell, Sidwell, Sidwell, Flossie 79 Mark Edward sr. 27, 161 Roger Edwin sr. 137, 161 Steams,Tonyjr. 138 Steele, Bob so. 144, 184 Steele, Rose Marie 78 Stegner, Janice jr. 175 Stegner, Steve so. 184 Stellingwerf, Jean 66 Stephens, Leejr. 175 Stephenson, Theresajr. 124, 132, 133, 175 Steproe, Dale so. 126, 177, 184 Stine, Nancy sr. 25. 27, 38, 104, 105, 107, 108, 109, Stockton, Gary so. 184 Stockton, Joeyjr. 175 Stoffer,Jef1'jr. 175 Stohler, Cinda so, 184 Stone,Anitajr. 132, 175 Stone, Romelle 79 Stone, Shawnjr. 175 Stonerock, Greg so, 93, 94, 184 Stonerock, Paul so. 184 Stonerock, Tim jr. 175 Storkel, Steve so. 126, 127, 143, 184 Stotler, John so. 184 Stitch, Gay so. 38, 104, 105, 109, 111, 127, 143, Stricker, Libby so. 127, 184 Strukel, Brett Alan sr. 70, 85, 122, 161 Strukel, Malaura, 103 STUDENT ACTION COMMITTEE 152, 156, 158 Stults, Debbie jr. 175 Stump, Beth sr. 27, 141, 143, 144, 149, 161, 198 SUMMER 18 Summers, Kimjr. 175 Sumpter, Charles sr. 92, 93, 94, 122, 161 Sumpter, Karen sr. 161 Sutherland, David so. 83, 93, 94, 102, 139, 184 Sutherland, Mike sr. 82, 161 Sutherland, Ronna sr. 161 Sweigart, Dave 214 Sweigart, John so. 185 Sweigart, Randall so. 185 Swift, Jeanettjr. 175 Swim, Greg so. 185 Swim, Jeffery sr. 161, 210 SWIMMING 98, 99, 113 Swindell, Shirley 78 SWING CHOIR 144 T Tabares, Agnes 56, 57, 124, 125, 126, 127 Tabaru, Mariajr. 103, 124, 146, 175 Tackett, Phil so. 185 Tague, Cecil 74, 75 TOP HAT DRIVE-IN 194 Tow, Jennifer sr. 162 Tower, Chapeljr. 176 Tower, Yvonne so. 123, 185 TRACK 113 Trainor, Debbie 109 Trent, John so. 144, 185, 209 Trese, Paul 139 TROJAN DRIVE IN 221 Troxell, Brenda so. 185 Troxell, Emiejr, 138, 176 Troxell, James jr. 93, 176 Troxell, Martyjr. 176 Troxell, Sharon sr. 36, 162 Tucker, Lanajr. 138, 176 Tungate, Leonardjr. 176 Turchan, Diane Elaine sr. 26, 27, 124, 126, 127, 128,152, 162,199 Turchan, Dr. Donald G. 50, 77 Turnbull, Ronjr. 27, 38, 89, 143, 176 Tumbull, Walter sr. 27, 28, 36, 95, 96.97, 126, 162 Watters, Cindyjr. 27, 176, 202 Watters, Timothy sr. 79, 128, 162 Weaver, Patricia 211 Webb, Gilbert so. 93, 94, 102, 149, 185 Webb. Linda sr. 118. 119, 162 Webber, Darajr. 13, 27, 111, 169, 176 Weddle, Betty sr. 103, 109, 149, 162 Weddle, Terri so. 185 Weintraut, David sr. 162 Weintraut,Tonyjr. 176 Welch, Bob 219 Wells, Davidjr. 27,87, 132. 133, 176 Werling, Mike so. 127, 185 West, Anna so. 185 West, Kelly so, 93, 94, 185 West, Lindajr. 138, 176 West, Tomjr. 176 Wethington, Kim so. 185 Whary, Kevin 28, 132, 163 Whiles, Paulajr. 176, 205 White, Brent so, 138, 144, 185 White, James R. 77 White, Jim so. 185 White, Karilyn so. 185 White, Tony so. 185 White, Sheila sr. 24, 134, 163 Whiteman, Allen so. 185 Whitted, Bryant so. 29, 185 Whittle, Jeffrey sr. 163, 214 Whittle, Mikejr. 176, 189 Whittle, Rohertjr. 138 Wieke, Patricia sr. 129, 146, 163 Wilhelm, Diane so. 107, 185 Wilhelm Jeffrey sr. 137, 163 Wilkinson Debbie so. 61 122 123 1 , . . . 24. Wilkinson, Dona so. 185 Wilkinson, Mikejr. 149, 176 Willett, Tony so. 185 Williams, Bobjr. 138 Williams, Charles so. 185 Williams, Donnajr. 176 Williams, Ginajr. 192 Williams, John sr. 163 Williams, John so. 185 Williams, Lisa so, 109, 185 Williams, Margaret 78, 79 Williams, Penny sr. 163 Turner, John sr. 137, 162 Tyner, Debbie so. 38, 149, 185 Tyner, Janet jr. 27, 146, 176 Tyner, John sr. 28, 132, 133, 162 Tyner, William sr. 137, 163 U Underwood, Glenn 73 Upchurch, Ronniejr. 83, 139, 176 Utt, Cheryl 130, 132 V VICA "V" 137 VICA "D" 137 Vannatta, Bobjr. 176 Vanderleest, Stephanie 56, 57 VanMatre, Kenny so. 185 Vannoy, Fred so. 144, 185 Vaughn, Janet so. 123, 185 Vaught, Opal 78 Vawrinek, Jeffrey sr. 26, 27, 85, 128, 149, 16 Veach, Wilbur 66, 86, 87, 89 Viars, Kevinjr. 139, 149,176 Viars, Tim so. 185 Vores, Sharonjr. 176 Vulgan, Raymond 72, 137 W 2.2 Williamson, Yvonne so. 185 Willis, Jon 71 Willis, Richard 54 Wilson, Derrickjr. 176 Wilson, Jim jr. s1, 93, 94, 122, 176 Wilson, Jolynnda so. 185 Wilson, Sandra so. 185 Wilson. Susanne sr. 163, 221 Wilson, Terry sr. 132, 163 Wilson, Wendy so. 9, 97. 107, 185 win, w Wimme illiam 65, 82 r, Calvin sr. 137, 139, 163 Wimmer, Caroljr, 176 Winningham. Brucejr. 127, 176 146, 185 05 Wisehan,Joyan sr. 27, 36,l18,119,163, 189 Witham, Karen sr. 123, 163 Wittler, John sr. 27, 28, 100, 101, 102, 122, 163, 224 Wittler, Lisa so. 121, 124, 125, 141, 185, 225 Wolf, Stevejr. 176 Wolfe, Anita sr. 163, 190 Wood, Mike so. 93, 94, 185 Woods, Ruben sr. 21, zs, 144, 149, 163 Woodward,J. Kelly, sr. 29, 98.99, 118, 119, 163 Woodward, Jill jr. 109, 176, 232 Woolridge, Sandra 123, 185 Woolridge, Tana sr. 27, 134, 163 Woolsey, Julia sr. 163 Worthington, Pam so. 30, 127, 185 WRESTLING 97.112 Wright, Jim so. 185 Wright, Lillie 79 Wright, Rexford 50 Wade, Jerryjr. 98, 99, 176 Wadman, Brucejr. 38, 117, 149, 174, 176, 232 Wadman, Lisa so. 123, 185 Walden, Bill 222, 232 Walker, Linda so. 185 Wallace, Elizabeth so. 105, 127, 149, 185 Wallace, Tammy sr. 155, 162 Wallen, Billy so. 137, 185 Wallen, Bobby so. 185 Sidwell, Sheila so. 184 Sidwell, Susan sr. 97, 161 Simons, Gary so. 184 Slagle, Rhonda so. 184 Slagle, Timothy 146 Slaven, Debbie jr. 175 Slaven, Ricky sr. 161 Sloan, Tony so. 93. 94, 102, 184 Smalley, Shirley 73 Smith, Allen so. 184 Smith, Bobjr. 30, 36, 87, 89, 175, 189 Smith, Bruce so, 184 Smith, Chrisjr. 45, 175 Smith, Clifford so. 139, 184 Smith, Clydejr. 141, 144, 149, 175 Talavera, Loretta 146 Taylor, Bradford sr. 90, 152, 161, 199 Taylor, Cathyjr. 132, 175 Taylor, Donaldjr. 175 Taylor, Jay so. 5, 93, 149, 177, 185 Taylor, Jeffri sr. 95, 96, 97, 161 Taylor, Terry so. 144, 149, 185 Walls, Julie 79 Wannemacher, Tom so. 185 Ward, Dianna sr. 162 Ward, Donna so. 185 Ward, Jimjr. 176 Ward, Marilyn sr. 162 Ward, Sheilajr. 176 Teal, Julia so. 185 Teel, Jeffrey sr. 87, 161 Teel, William sr. 82, 162 Temples, Mark so. 126, 127, 185 TENNIS 90, 91 Thalls, Mark so. 126. 127, 144, 185 Tha11s,Toadjr. ss, 100, 101, 102, 174, 115 THESPIANS 140 War8'nY. Pam 214 Wamer. Gregoryjr. 28, 132, 139, 144,176 Wasson, Billso.83, 102, 177, 185 Wasson. Jody so. 109, 185 Watson. Debra sr. 163 Watt, Ja najr.27,31,1l7,123,176,2l8, 232 Watt, Kathy sr. 27, 117, 121, 123, 124, 126, 127 128, 162, 215, 218, 232 Wright, Teresa sr. 128, 163 Wrightsman,Apri1so. 185 Wyatt, Mark so. 98, 127, 185 Wyatt, Randyjr. 98, 99, 149, 176 X x-MARK 201 Y Yockey, Curtis sr. 132, 163, 216 Yockey, Leslie so. 185 York, Timothy sr. 28, 82, 132, 133, 163 Young, Nan so. 105, 127, 146, 185, 196 Young, Rick so. 185 Z Zachary. Doris 211 Zeigler, William 60, 61 Ziebold. Helen jr. 149, 176 Ziglar, Ronniejr. 93, 176 229 ? 1 ,A if QF M 3 . 'N :Y 'J?21v:f 's Q i 1 3 fn -Q T: . ef93'f li J. - , X i -wg. , Eggs.. NG' The simple gift of flowers from Mr. Dicken brings joy to Mrs. Sorreli's Adventure, Suspense, and Mystery class. The moon peering from behind the clouds sets the mood for a new spring night. 230 4 -mf ri .. "Kwai f By now everyone should realize what we meant about celebrating. Think about everything that happened. There was no reason not to celebrate the events that we have seen during the the little things that nobody seemed to know about celebrating. Through our memories we can live the year all over again. Memories will remind us of the good time we had. We will never forget that this year was one of a kind. year. Even were worth 1 .f , . W 4 T H E Pril- n 2 me U' ' U 3 n T"UCker The Fflday al-mcgpation of a ggqd week. When the PHOENIX C0mCS out, classes BIC end puts Valerie Franklin in 3 festive filled with readers. Dan Coleman takes time mood during a mld day Class, fl'0m ClElSS to read the paper. 231 Lfk ...H si I I if wx ii ' , X 'N L Q X, ' D Qi .yi f 351- fy ,ig A3255 E 541.33 1 5,f ,ff ,1 -4 few .q,w l QL., if Y' 11: is W rdf-vw N315 AZ:-. s,j,Hfs . '2?uWlfvfi5,j:fvt ' D33 I f' 45. , rw- A M .MM .. , ,,. . ,A .V, .. ,. -.. Q' ' ' ni' X , f lg . , 'Q 1 if Q .K . . I. 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Suggestions in the New Castle Chrysler High School - Rosennial Yearbook (New Castle, IN) collection:

New Castle Chrysler High School - Rosennial Yearbook (New Castle, IN) online yearbook collection, 1959 Edition, Page 1

1959

New Castle Chrysler High School - Rosennial Yearbook (New Castle, IN) online yearbook collection, 1960 Edition, Page 1

1960

New Castle Chrysler High School - Rosennial Yearbook (New Castle, IN) online yearbook collection, 1968 Edition, Page 1

1968

New Castle Chrysler High School - Rosennial Yearbook (New Castle, IN) online yearbook collection, 1979 Edition, Page 1

1979

New Castle Chrysler High School - Rosennial Yearbook (New Castle, IN) online yearbook collection, 1981 Edition, Page 1

1981

New Castle Chrysler High School - Rosennial Yearbook (New Castle, IN) online yearbook collection, 1983 Edition, Page 1

1983

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