New Britain High School - Beehive Yearbook (New Britain, CT)

 - Class of 1949

Page 1 of 192

 

New Britain High School - Beehive Yearbook (New Britain, CT) online yearbook collection, 1949 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 192 of the 1949 volume:

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A, A N , '. -1' ' Vg .?5,f.,Q.., ,fm 54- 1 ,, "' .4 .4 iammtf ,QM .,. - - '61, 1,,g7j,,, A . M., W. ., ,W Ma. - fa... A - :ITB-Q"7,,..a' "AV'fA Wx, N f , -' -QV. A W VV - 4 A ,M A, N- A 1 M. . , V ,, ,1 ' ,, M..- V L ,A AA.: r . .4 1 1 " 6 , h-.ur ' -- ,,,,,,, , BEEIIIVE 1949 Volume XXXVI Published by the Board of Publication of the Senior Class NEW BRITAIN SENIUR IIIGII SCIIO0L New Britain Connecticut FOREWORD In the tragi-comedy of life, "All the world's a stage and all the men and women merely players." The charac- ters are varied: to a select few are granted stellar rolesg most have only bit-parts. Yet, each part, rightly timed and co-ordinated with all others, makes for success. Upon this tenet rests the life of our democracy. On a microcosmic stage of school-life, students prove this truth in both their academic and their social roles. In reaching up to stardom, and hence toward greater joy in living, they ceaselessly rehearse. However, small or large, the action rates remembrance. To that end, this over- view of school life should recall each member's part here on the stage of old NBHS. DEDICATION It is with gratitude that we dedicate this, our yearbook, to Mr. Edward Recano, who has given so generously of himself as a citizen, educator, and soldier, that we may enjoy the advantages of a democracy. As amateurs on the stage of life, we look with admiration upon the accomplishments of one who has achieved stardom. Such a person is Mr. Edward Recano. It was not in his role as a well-liked instructor and energetic citizen that his performance reached its peak, but rather in his duties as a soldier, for in this capacity he deservingly earned his "Academy Award," the Purple Heart. Thus we acknowledge our indebtedness for such sacrifice which enables us to enjoy the privileges of free education. 5 Above: Art Stuff. Miss Olsson, Adviser, Leo R zew n i Ck i. Eleanor Peck. Matthew Klirrl- kiewirz, Beverly Stnvklen. Tlmmris Eldf er. Missing from pir- turo. Edward Uslilla. Right: Frank Fraprie, Ruger Pease, and Alulin Nixon, Business Man- agers. I eft: Literary Staff, Nanry Sidi-fowl. Miss Sllapleigli, Adviser, Geraldine Carlson,- Lornai Bussclte, Norma Sczivillzl, Sylvia Sun- stroem. Carol Nyquist, Carol Hulnilmerg, Mr. Hnnrahan. Advisor. 6 .1 THE BOARD OF PUBLICATION Left: Maury Aparo and Edna Za Secretaries. Below: Frances Andreclmk and C trude Neuhold, Secretaries. O? we -A In ,y 1fvgi!'5."-.Ll 3. Ll Above: Mr. Plovlmrczyk, Adviser, and Carl Burkard, Business Manager. Left: Mr. Lape. Director, Frances Sakmar and Norma Neumann, Photography Editors, Shirley Nelson, Editor- in-Chief. , I l i A ex ,U- - 1 Xyqsff 1 I f 1 ff ,, f Z f f f , f '-Nf f H N fr A if in XXX' XX 1 Q -E5 , H X ' 7 ou lf! ,L gi S f X ,sgff 4 5 " . . , ,' 'iff 3 - lf' H -. 4 .3 W ' l f , 8 f ? X W QSM? f f, ff, f f Nf vf ff f f , A N wi' I Qu ,V ,Z : ' ,Rss N", 1 X I ir!!! N!! Q- wx fx S. , N55 W 'I Q L ' Wim 1, Wli ti. 7 .. ral.-,Y t h X 1 I ix' I -Q xxxxxxfx w f- as-QSM 1 , wf , y ,M N, Y XM I -I fn UMUUII4 J 41 I X bfi K ,. Xmx YM 1 wrmx MR. VINCENT SALA Principal MR. ERNEST F. FORBES Superintendent MR. FRANK A. JAMES Vice-Principal MISS WINIFRED F. REYNOLDS Assistant Principal MISS KATHERINE A. MCINTYRE Librarian Lo ,aww ,af-4,4fLv M Nurse 'ggyfjwp MISS EVELYN KELLER Head Clerk MISS ANTOINETTE ISS NELLE T. O'BRIEN STEPHENSON Cafeteria Su ' pervzsor V 1 f. QW .ZX ' ' . ,, 7, X . H, 4 , QSRw N43 S Q ff! , ff f nf 1 f f W"ll - Q fbi" '.' N ' r'7 3' " fl 'V f P In X 1 U' , X N-'Q 'ig' ff f 'www X jg , f 7 X Nw ' CDW f ,Bug 2 ' f' ix, f . 27 ,X If ss ,ii , Y , I , - " , -9 H ' - , PAUULT COMMERCIAL Back, standing: l-r: Mr. Gilbert, Miss Waskelewicz, Mr, Srogi, Mr. Sibley, Miss Herrick, Miss Hehir, Mrs. Fresher. Front, seated, l-r: Miss Wesker, Miss Sipolin, Mr, Ames, Department Head, Miss Powell, Miss Benz. Not in picture: Miss Protass, Miss White, Miss Naughton, Miss Baer. LANGUAGE ARTS PHYSICAL EDUCATION Row 1 Miss Harrowell, Miss Glover Row 2 Mr. johnson, Mr. Debot, Director, Mr, Baylock -T HIE ESCAPE Uu Exll Nol5 Q -1 II ILO!!! '- ll lllllli lil! Ill! Seated, l-r: Miss Carrier, Latin, Miss Odin, Miss Cutting, English: Mr. Lape, Department Head: Miss Ringrose, English, Miss Benjamin, Latin: Miss Shapleigh, English. Standing, l-r: Mr. Hanrahan, German, Miss Tallard, Miss Glaser, Miss Hipelius, Miss Tormay, Miss Coates, Miss Connor, Miss Coholan, Miss King, Miss May, Miss Ducas, Mr. Plocharczyk, English. Not in picture: Miss Leahy, Latin, Miss Prest, Miss Adams, Miss Raymond, English. , ,, l xx"-if-km I Q' SCIENCE Back Row, l-r: Mr. Carlson Mr. Bystrowski, Mr. Beach Dr. Sheehan, Mr. Nords strom. Front Row: Mr Rumsey, Mr, Chase, De partment Head, Miss Saun ders, Mr. Hurley, Mr. Blake. MATHEMATICS Standing l-r: Mr. Jaffe, Miss Carpenter, Mr. Nixon, Mr. Levine Mr. Blaisdell, Miss Walker, Mr. juszli. Sitting, l-r: Mrs. Pease, Miss Weld, Department Head, Mrs. jones, .-M' INDUSTRIAL ARTS FRENCH Left to right: Mr. Davis, Machine Shop, Mr. . . Kelly, Automotivesg Mr. Ginns, Supervisory Left-right: Miss Raby, Mr. Drapeau, Mr. Smart, Woodworkingg Mr. Flood, Metal Department Head, Miss Ducas. Work, Mr. Drabble, Printing. HOME ECONOMICS Left to right: Miss Cliuttvr, Miss Hunger- ford, Director, Miss Bosquct, Miss Little- liale-s, Miss C0114-r. . , al., 155, ,W A fn, A I I, ,- nk- 'x sq. Qiy if 215 is ,S ,Q A' '5's5fmCws4.o MUSIC r. DeBenedictis, Director I J .71 'Af s .1 jf .. .,,v,,Y ....,.,,,. 0, "" . 9,21 :Psi KT? ,V 4 .,. -1 '93 7' ,QNL Pm 5 Q44 - Y ls- A 1 wi aw yi? S 5 , wr 'Wi ' 3:55 1 , 92' ",. F11 - xii. J 5'- f 'www M ... ,fu X "" 'As- ART Left to right: Mr. Malia Miss Molznmler, Mr, Kivs wetter, Mr. Eldor, Directs Miss Olsson. SOCIAL STUDIES Sealed, l-r: Miss Goss. Miss Hour, Miss ment Head, Miss Quigley, Miss Clark. jackson, Miss Proctor. Mr. Yalm. Mr. Quimby, Mr. Catlin. Mr. E. Recano. Hipelius. Snow, Mr. Grvmlwin, IDUIIIII' Miss Osteii. Stumling: Mi: Tracy. Mr. H. Recmiu. M Absent from picture: Ilflis 1 P 1 . I I ff f I M , , Af ..,."" , 1 i I 47 ,- ,ff ,C fir- ' fr .. 4 ,ig 7.11. 1 K I, , . 1 Z" 1. uv ' I X ,g - m, 7' ,N I N W8 Ong 'I ' f M FX n x VM f 5,41 X . , I W E. W , , 'W is , ' 'M W N ff 5 X Qi "2 X N X wx x ' Q 'i Q fi N 1 f if k if if X J X X ' . , X A X f EW 714 W I J IGI If ,,,,. ----A-,Y A-,Qi-M A I0 RS -Qi.. . ..... ,M 1 r V r l V 3 i I E E 5 E If y N 2 E P THE CLASS OF 1949 OFFICERS Pearlmon Lumpkin, President jane Semnoski, Secretary Robert Sunderland, Treasurer Frances Sakmar, Vice-president I6 CONSTANCE ABRAHAM Connie, the typical teener . . . col- lects popular records . . . never misses a dance if she can help it . . . reads Maureen Daly's groovy novels and articles . . . thinks, "There is no time like the present" . . . has taken a technical course with her eye on a career as a beautician. WILLIAM RICHARD ADOMAITIS Bill of the untroubled spirit . . . cheerfully takes life as it comes . . . has no immediate worries, nor does he believe in having them . . . says, "I am sure care's an enemy to life" . . . his outside interests lie in sports . . . intends to join the Navy after graduation. 24" -ali 'pl ,-AJ' KL. ,.... l 1--. " 1- fs-vw . 3 ,Q 6 gsl 1 PAULINE MIRIAM ABRAHAMSON Pa, the busy-bee . . . entertained Junior College Club . . . represents section room in Press Club and Girls' League . . . secretary of Amphion Club . . . demonstrates ucheerfulness is the mother of all virtue" . . . was rewarded by chuckles from audience in "Lights Out" . . . helps keep our oliice running smoothly . . . should be a fine nurse. WILLIAM STEPHEN AGRITELLEY Bill, the genial gridiron enthusiast . . . many a Red and Gold opponent regretted his enthusiasm before ill- ness took him off the team . . . agrees that Harry james' music is tops . . . can be found helping "Pop" in the diner . . . holds philosophy, "Let things come as they may" . . . will join Navy. EUGENIA TERESA ADAMOWICZ jean, the light-hearted . . . a majorette in the band, she twirls with grace . . . attended the New England Music Festival as part of her Musical Club activities . . . belongs to Junior College Club . . . pledging, "I will accomplish what I am able," she eagerly hopes to become a model. BEVERLY CAROLYN AHLGREN Swede, the energetic . . . marches with the Twirlerettes . . . indoor sports, such as dancing, bowling, and roller skating, occupy her main inter- est . . . knows, "Exercise is an instru- ment of good health" . . . has a happy-go-lucky temperament . . . has chosen the career of an air hostess for after graduation. ,Q 3,490 A 17 LOIS MARION ALDRICH Peanuts, the sparkling . . . illumin- ates her surroundings with her charm and vitality . . . finds delight in skat- ing to the organ music at rinks . . . a highly excitable football and base- ball fan . . . Student-Faculty Council representative . . . says, "Be merry if you are wise" . . . her intention is to become a stenographer. JOSEPH HENRY ALTERI Alt, the baseball enthusiast . . . member of jayvee baseball team in junior year . . . played ball for NBHS again as a senior . . . urges, "Let's play ball!" . . . in spare time likes to go hunting . . . sports stories rank tops with him . . . after gradua- tion plans to join U. S. Navy. 4-JF' lbx . RALPH ALMONTE Ralph, the ambitious . . . Italian born . . . likes American sports . . . basketball is his specialty . . . hasn't found time to be very active in school affairs . . . taking business course to further his ambition to be a future tycoon of the business world . . . be- lieves "he never gets good business who does not ask for it." LYDIA ANNE AMENTA Lee, the exuberant . . . proclaims, "Humor is the harmony of the heart" . . . representative for both The Bee- hive and the Girls' League . . . mem- ber of National Honor Society and of Press Club . . . lent services as library page and on ticket committee for Senior Class play . . . will some day put her charm to work while drilling and filling as a dental hygienist. I8 I ---413111. 4 Q ff v 'SCF' Q? 1f 21:-IV' f -- ie .4 mtv'-ir4if" Q' 1 WARREN JULIUS ALMQUIST Warren, the observer . . . tall, blond, camera enthusiast . . . over this Ski Club member, flashing hick- ories cast a magic spell . . . knows, "Tomorrow is another day," but thus far has not planned for it . . . how- ever, come what may, his keen per- ception will serve to advantage. ROSE MARY AMENTA Doll, the vivacious . . . has a "smile for every girl and two for every fellow" . . . made a bit part something in "January Thaw" . . . plays fife in W. B. A. Drum Corps . . . enjoys bowling or baseball, and a dance floor . . . follows a nursing curriculum in preparation for her future profession. 5, ,- J . - " 1' 4 ' ' x 1 SALVATORE ANTHONY AMENTA Sam, the air-minded . . . and we don't mean fickle . . . spends his spare time building airplane models . . . when not constructing these, he likes to listen to popular music . . . looking toward graduation it seems, "When you're waiting, every day is a week" . . . hopes to enlist in Marines and to be an aeronautical engineer. DONALD ARTHUR ANDERSON Swede, the conscientious . . . fan of Red Sox and Red and Gold . . . likes to tease, but is serious about his education . . . his short cut to good grades is "be resolved and the thing is done" . . . taking combination business and college course prepara- tory to becoming an accountant. S ANGELA BARBARA ANASTASION Angela of the friendly smile . . . knows that "friendship and love are intertwined" . . . when it comes to bowling, she's right at home . . . dances to everything from jive to rhumba . . . her favorite music, natur- ally, is popular . , . hopes business course will help prepare her for a career as a secretary. MERWIN WILBUR ANDERSON Merk of the mechanical mind . . . not that he's a robot, but is attached to anything resembling a machine . . . believes, "Silence is one great art of conversation" . . . goes for popular music . . . serves as A. A. and The Beehive representative . . . though he likes woodworking, hopes to be- come a tool and die maker. I9 ARTHUR ELMER ANDERSON Elm, the ubiquitous . . . always on the go . . . takes to horses when his motorcycle fails . . . also likes Irving Berlin and "The 12th Street Rag" . . . occasionally finds that "silence is a blessing" . . . will soon give our local businessmen competition . . . plans to enter the real estate game after graduation. FRANCES ELIZABETH ANDRECHAK Fran, the sweetly serious . . . get- ting considerable experience as secre- tary for The Beehive . . . from her business course, too . . . reads Dick- ens from choice and listens to classi- cal music . . . believes that "quiet is the most profitable of things" and strives to prove it . . . plans on a job as a stenographer. g 1 , gm 51--, ii' ' ' f . v -me 4--, 'Wh "5-s ALYCE MAE ANDREWS Linda of the quiet smile . . . col- lects records, both popular and semi- classical . . . also collects photographs and friends . . . served class as repre- sentative for the Student-Faculty Council . . . is determined "to seek, to find, and to conquer" in her field, which will be office work. RAYMOND JOSEPH ARCHACKI Archie, the man of deed . . . be- lieves, "Good nature wins the heart" . . . can be found watching those duckpins drop . . . and he can drop them . . . is fond of most sports . . . after his academic-technical course, plans to spend a year or two in the Army . . . wants ultimately to have a business of his own. JOSEPHINE ROSE ANGELO jo of the effervescent spirit . . . busy, but happy . . . has served as Student-Faculty Council representa- tive and Girls' League alternate . . . supports Junior College Club . . . for recreation she plays the piano fmostly semiclassical musicj . . . "What wisdom can you find that is greater than kindness?" . . . will enter nursing. DONALD JOESPH ARZOLITIS Arzy, the meditative . . . enjoys constructing models . . . belongs to Foreign Affairs Club . . . musical yearnings run to rhythms of Spike Jones . . . choose baffling stories of A. C. Doyle as favorite literature . . . in the future, he aims to concoct prescriptions . . . and thereby "to serve his fellow man howsoe'er he can." MARY ANN APARO Mary, the modest . . . insists, "There's a time to keep silent and a time to speak" . . . mostly does the former . . . collects postal cards as a hobby . . . goes out for swimming and tennis . . . has references for efficiency as The Beehive secretary toward her goal as a typist. RAYMOND ARZYLOWICZ R. C. A., the strong, silent type . . . possesses a never-ending supply of energy . . . makes use of it on the track team . . . goes hiking or skiing depending on the weather . . . be- lieves, "Life is too short for mean anxieties" . . . an outdoor man . . . hopes to spend his life outdoors as a geologist. p -J 20 10 14-55" STANLEY FLORIAN ARZYLOWICZ Stanley, the present day Mercury . . . whizzes along the track stretch . . . representative for his section room in the Athletic Association . . . belongs to Musical Club . . . his' leisure time is devoted to the study of nature . . . surely "nature is his book" . . . his course is academic, but he hasn't selected his profession. MARY BAGDASARIAN Mar, the small student . . . but only in size . . . represents homeroom on Student-Faculty Council and The Beehive . . . began senior year with election into National Honor Society . . . member of Senior Girl Guides and class play property committee . . . contends that "the thing to re- member is not to forget" . . . hopes to become a teacher of commercial subjects. ,A-.1 - .f1. Q,-'ii X in fx' is 2- . -A-Lis gs il 'fini' .fi'1f1W..f5 ir Q' fi' in Q ,if V.-f.,...,e, - . .sl Y. ,,.. a JACK JACOB ATASHIAN Jack of the smooth line . . . finds that "a happy nature is a good asset" in his daily life . . . enjoys Mark Twain's stories . . . listens to semi- classical music, but is not averse to any good tune . . . does model build- ing in his spare time . . . hopes to become a draftsman. EDWARD VICTOR BAKANAS Edward, the seeker . . . believes that one should "play not for gain, but for sport" . . . like Bob Ripley, is always looking for oddities in sports . . . belongs to teams not affiliated with school . . . follows an academic course . . . intends to go into govern- ment or state work. CLARA AZIZIAN Clara of the fiashing eyes-"Dark luster of thine eyes casts a spell" . . . popular with everyone, her pint-size vivaciousness and rhythmic feet find popular music a joy . . . conscientious effort in her business course will be ample preparation for secretarial work. JOAN BARBARA BALINSKAS Shorty, the cheerful . . . full of pep . . . likes swimming, bicycling, and skating . . . is proud of membership in junior College Club . . . spends much time reading and sewing . . . enjoys all types of music, especially piano and violin . . . believes in Uincitamentum amoris musica" . . . states as her intention, "to grow old." K Eg.. as -4' 21 IVY DONALD JOHN BALUKAS Don, the outdoor man . . . seeks "Nature's own classroom" . . . likes hunting and trapping . . . gets a laugh from hillbilly songs . . . some- times joins the chorus . . . quick as a rabbit on the tennis court . . . has chosen technical course in order to become an architect. LOR NA CANDEE BASSETTE Rusty of the pleasant pen . . . won a Key Award in the Scholastic writ- ing contest . . . serves on The Beehive Staff . . . active in Junior College Club, Press Club, Senior Guides, swim team, and Senior Class play property committee . . . says, "My kingdom for a horse!" . . . likes Rachmaninoff . . . hopes to enter the teaching field. , wr . . HARRY BARONIAN Harry, the sailor . . . likes boats, outboard motors, and more boats . . . runs to semiclassical music . . . tries to follow the golden rule, "Do unto others as you would have them do unto you" . . . was indispensable as lighting and sound technician for class plays and Amphion Club . . . hopes to sail the seven seas with the U. S. Navy. MARILYN KATHERINE BAYLOCK Mickey, the merry maid . . . moves skillfully about the dance floor . . . watching pigskin battles is her favor- ite pastime . . . came from Roosevelt Junior High . . . proves that "all succeeds with cheerful people" . . . hopes to turn her business course to profit as a private secretary. WINSLOW BARROWS Winnie, the sociable . . . talkative and cheerful . . . seen at various bowling alleys . . . can run up a few strikes himself . . . likes to listen to the music of Guy Lombardo and Spike jones . . . likes being known as Ha man of cheerful yesterdays and confident tomorrows" . . . intends to become a dentist. WALLACE ALBERT BEAUDOIN Wally, the worldly . . . believes, "Perseverance paves the road" . . . for relaxation likes to provide jobs for the pin-boys at the local alleys . . . rings up some very good scores . . . asserts modern swing is the best music . . . hopes to work for the telephone company after June. 22 ELIZABETH GRAY BELL Bette of the brown eyes . . . good- natured and energetic . . . knows "the eyes have it" . . . her brown ones smile . . . carries a college course . . . excels in science . . . divides in- terest between Musical Club and Junior College Club . . . likes music as long as it's Fred Waring's . . . hopes to become a nurse or physical therapist. ALBIN A RUTH BIAGIOTTI Albina, the alive . . . believes in the advice, "Be a friend to all, and all will be your friends" . . . an athletic girl . . . likes the rhythm in dancing, skating, and swimming . . . also likes the rhythm of semiclassical music . . . is taking a technical course . . . preparing for a position as a beautician. SYLVIA ANNE BERKOWITZ Syl of the perpetual grin . . . one of our cheerful library pages . . . be- longs to Foreign Affairs Club . . . fond of animals, particularly dogs and horses . . . favorite sport is swimming . . . says, "In NBHS anything can happen" . . . reads latest books . . . hopes to put her knowledge to work as a medical technician. ROBERT WALTER BIALEK Bob, the versatile . . . Key and Press Club president, National Honor Society collector, Radio Club treas- urer, and The Red and Gold Review editor-in-chief . . . likes fishing . . . practices "Do it now" . . . represented NBHS at Boys' State '48 and Conn. at Forum of National Youth in Wash- ington, D. C .... soon, engineering at Yale. ff' 23 JOAN EVELYN BERSON jo, our own Cornelia Otis Skinner . . . took lead in junior Class play . . . belongs to Foreign Affairs and Junior College Clubs . . . lives by the precept, "Battle your difliculties and ride them to success" . . . prefers semiclassical music . . . her college preparatory course serves as back- ground for radio, the career she in- tends. EVELYN SPERANDIA BIGHINATTI Eve, the easy-going . . . a good per- son to be with if you want cheering- up . . . proves that "good nature like a bee collects honey from every herb" . . . serves as representative to the Girls' League and The Beehive . . . is a Senior Girl Guide . . . hopes to become a secretary. .V 'ist -an-Q' DOROTHY BINDAS Bindy of the exuberant spirit . . . winter Ends her on a pond, making like Sonja I-Ienie . . . other seasons reserved for bowling and dancing . . . characterizes self as "full of cheer, full of pep, making friends with every step" . . . takes life as it comes . . . hopes to become a typist some day. THEODORE BI SKUPIAK Teddy, the fun-loving . , . active member of Musical Club and Senior Choir . . . keeps his eyes and ears open for sports . . . has stamp collec- tion . . . adds his voice to College Club meetings . . . at present says, "Put off today what you can do to- morrow" . . . view will undoubtedly change after he has entered college. WILLIAM LELAND BINGHAM Bill, the sports enthusiast . . . al- though quiet, really is "bound to sports for evermore" . . . his joy in life is sports, sports, and more sports . . . in school and out . . . swings a bat for the NBI-IS baseball team . . . hopes to don the uniform of Uncle Sam's Army soon after graduation. PAUL NORMAN BJORKLUND B. J., the sure . . . apparently sound waves hold a very definite at- traction for him . . . is a member of the Musical Club . . . serves as Press representative . . . enjoys any- thing to do with radio . . . hopes it's true that "the world lies open at his feet" . . . wants to enter the radio field. , -Q37 at X ARTHUR BISBERG Bis, the busy . . . reticent, studious, likeable . . . brilliant in math and science . . . spends free time seeking good camera shots and printing them . . . likes swing music for diversion . . . knows it's "never too late for de- light . . . keeps right after that college course . . . to be a chemical engineer. MARILYN IRENE BLACKBURN Blackie, the blessed . . . with freckles, good humor, and bad mem- ory . . . Musical Club vice-president and accompanist . . . New England and State Festivals . . . "Harmony is perfection" . . . elected to National Honor Society . . . makes all her clothes . . . keeps Foreign Affairs Club records and belongs to junior College Club . . . hopes to become an English teacher. TT? ,,.n' MARCUS HOWARD BORDIERE Mark, the charmer . . . holds be- lief, "Music exalts each joy" . . . president of Musical Club . . . be- longs to and is the mainstay of most of its divisions . . . also chairman of the Student-Faculty Council com- mittee for school improvements . . . treasurer of the junior Class . . . is headed for either Boston University or the service. LENORE JAYNE BOURGEOIS Lynn, the quiet one . . . however, is aware that "the day is lost in which one has not laughed" . . . collects stamps, of which she has a consider- able number . . . also, post cards . . . participates in Junior College Club activities . . . works diligently in academic course . . . plans to become a secretary. - I a r Q if k L .gg .L HENRY WALTER BORYSEWICZ Boris, the believer . . . relies on the philosophy, "Why think of tomor- row? The world has a fixed path" . . . likes bowling, hunting, and fish- ing as recreation . . . doesn't care too much about his catch, though it's often good . . . hopes to become a carpenter. MARY LOUISE BOYLE Mary Lou, the fairhaired . . . her popularity with her classmates is much greater than her diminutive stature . . . enthusiastically supports football and basketball games . . . represents adage that "nice things come in small packages" . . . will join the ranks of other business course veterans in the secretarial field. 26 rv Qin JOSEPH VINCENT BOTTIGLIERI Skip, the casual . . . fun-loving A. A. representative . . . a noted, smooth dancer . . . member, a cap- pella . . . admits that one of his favorite recreational activities is sleeping--doesn't get tired out from it . . . "Life's a passing show" to him . . . all his inclinations run to art, particularly cartooning . . . may be a future Bill Mauldin. PASQUALE NICKOLIS BOZZUTO Pat with the ready smile . . . col- lects service insignia . . . can be found at most basketball and football games . . . smooth dancer . . . chooses popular music that's real swing . . . advises, "Do not put off to tomorrow what you can do today" . . . will put his technical course to use in the U. S. Marines. 5 JOAN MARIE BRADLAU jo, the smiling blonde . . . a col- lege preparatory student . . . a mem- ber of the Junior College Club . . . relaxes to Cole Porter's music . . . knows "a merry nature finds its own reward" . . . friends say she should make art her career . . . will be a teacher in a few short years. GEORGE EDWARD BRAMHALL George of the tardy feet . . . has trouble getting to class on time . . . but covers a basketball court pretty fast . . . is quiet when not with his friends . . . likes modern Be-bop music . . . confident that "all things come to him who waits" . . . has no definite post-graduation plans. JOYCE ELAINE BRADLEY Joy, the vivacious . . . able vice- president of Student-Faculty Council, treasurer of Girls' League and Junior College Club . . . works as library page and oflice messenger . . . holds her stroke with the swim team . . . Senior Girl Guide and Starlette . . . quotes, "Who wants to be loved, let her love" . . . will teach home econ- omics or physical education. BETTY JEAN BRANN Bet of the willing heart . . . knows from experience that "pleasure and action make the hours seem short" . . . represents her homeroom for The Beehive, in Press Club, and in Girls' League . . . member of Senior Girl Guides and Junior College Club . . . musically minded, likes dancing and collecting records . . . intends to be- come a medical secretary. JOHN CASWELL BRAINARD john, rugged taker-of-goals . . . holds presidency of Athletic Associa- tion . . . took it on the chin as full- back . . . also baseball and basket- ball star . . . likes rod and gun and all outdoor sports . . . has made him- self "trained for either camp or court, skillful in each manly sport" . . . does not commit himself on future plans. ROBERT FRANCIS BRENNAN Bob of many talents . . . his fine voice radiates from all Musical Club concerts . . . points with pride to Key Club membership . . . trod the boards with the Amphion Club . . . insists, "Good humor is contagious" . . . he should know . . . swims and dances in his spare time . . . sets engineering as his goal. tiyi' ' wil 27 EUGENE VICTOR BRODGINSKI Gene, the companion of fun . . . belongs to the Sea Scouts . . . serves as a Student-Faculty Council repre- sentative . . . "A man of action and of might" . . . finds football a joy . . . is attracted toward martial beat of John Philip Sousa . . . will hear enough of this in his future in the Marines. CECILIA AGNES BRZOZOWA Ceil of the quiet smile . . . collects platters, all kinds, classical and popu- lar . . . and we don't mean dishes . . . enjoys Pearl Buck's novels . . . feels "life is not life without delight" . . . works very hard at her business course . . . hopes to make secretarial work her future. ' , Q I BARBARA JANET BROWN Bobbie of the placid spirit . . . nothing angers or disturbs her . . . believes "sharing leads to happiness" . . . furthers this belief as a nurse's helper . . . likes turning figure eights on the pond . . . belongs to the Junior College Club . . . hopes to become a professional nurse. GERALDINE JANE BUDNIK Gerry, the genial . . . formerly at- tended Mary Immaculate Academy . . . manages to keep the balls out of the alley at the rinks and never to be a wallfiower at a dance . . . observes, "The world can crumble, the world can die, I'll be contented and watch time fly" . . . hopes to be a secretary. 'X t f MARGARET JANE BROWN Peg of the candid tongue . . . her byword, "Be not ashamed to say what you are not ashamed to say" . . . likes all sports, but especially basketball . . . her rhythmic feet glide gracefully on the dance fioor . . . enthusiastically appreciates Be- bop . . . her ambition: to be a secre- tary. SOPHIE THERESA BUDNIK Zosh, the zestful . . . a very fem- inine young lady . . . one of the Twirlerettes . . . relaxing by dancing and listening to her record collection . . . likes Somerset Maugham . . . believes that "no man is useless in this world who lightens the burdens of another" . . . will become an office worker . . . and travel. 14 28 CARL JOSEPH BURKARD Charlie, the dependable . . . noth- ing ruflies his dark, wavy hair . . . Key Club member . . . served as chairman of school organization com- mittee of Student-Faculty Council and on The Beehive staff . . . belongs to Ski Club . . . six years' practice and no broken bones . . . follows ad- monition "Make haste slowly" . . . will study engineering in college. JOHN DONALD CALLAHAN Cal of the good humor . . . a noted ace on the basketball court . . . ex- presses affectionate disapproval of classmates in his oft-repeated phrase, "Crazy high school kids" . . . at any rate, he's fun . . . next year will cir- culate his charms around radio studios if he fulfills his ambition to be a radio technician. 51 ,-of xk 4. . 1 Xb .n fwg . 4, 'Y .1 -' 'ioijiiff if -g all . ,e.. f I 'ififtjpefjgvgfif . iftiiiiifiihgk 4 ,fwtgariyys at 3T'f1tgf'X '. I . '-p..gfg,'ga,,-.11 S- gli Q or 315-qw: . -.ij ., :Mx Q R: B ga, t N ff' ' J . If -' 'f s V KP' . if -I-?"'f1 sw- if is-lg. if A AK. QM' Q I , :Sk lar - -,.- t. .rs-X., I : W' ROBERT FRANCIS BURKARTH Bob, the bubbling . . . practices for that hole-in-one . . . helps support the roller-rink . . . considers the in- ventor of records his particular friend . . . takes a technical course . . . knows "patience is a virtue" and practices it . . . hopes to enter the Field of labor relations or business administration. MADELEINE ANN CALLAHAN Dolly, the debutante . . . takes time out to do her work . . . has an effervescent personality . . . spends many happy hours on the dance Hoor . . . for listening enjoyment prefers classical music . . . briefly expresses her sentiments: "A good heart is bet- ter than all the heads in the world" . . . sets as goal, laboratory technician. RICHARD WILLIAM BURNS Lefty, bane of batters . . . was cap- tain of the 1949 baseball team . . . likes all kinds of sports . . . a loyal Scot, enjoys the works of Robert Burns . . . likes dancing to popular music . . . modestly claims to be "last but not least" . . . will become physical education teacher after fin- ishing college. SOFRONI BOB CALOS Bob, the sphinx . . . interest lies in photography . . . beware his camerag it catches all . . . chooses classical music as his preference . . . states, "Silence never hurts" . . . practices what he preaches . . . his chief desire is to increase his educa- tion, and in preparation he takes a college course. .. ' f f' .Anja Yfiisysn - lx: . ,..... ,Vg -72,-,,,x 1,3 -'-- 5 29 BETTY JANE CAMPBELL Betty, the unpredictable . . . to know her is to know adventure . . . her personality is akin to her flaming locks . . . has talent for music . . . interests range from football to books . . . advises, "Love many, trust few, always paddle your own canoe" . . . hopes to go to modeling school when the business course is finished. MICHAEL FRANK CARENZA Mike, the contented . . . in fun, he's among the stars-ushers at one of the local theaters . . . like many, sports claim his spare time . . . knows the scores of all games . . . he'll answer "The call of the sea" and join the U. S. Navy after graduation. JOHN CHARLES CANNATA Johnnie of the winged feet . . . is the blurred streak on the track team . . . of him it may be said, "He did fly on the wings of the wind" . . . unlike John Charles Thomas, he doesn't sing . . . likes all sports in general . . . takes academic course . . . has no decision as to the future. I LENORE MARIE CARLIN Lin, the lithe . . . compares with Esther Williams in the water . . . with Vera Ralston on the ice . . . and with Ginger Rogers on the dance floor . . . believes that "those move easiest who have learned to dance" . . . finds pleasure in reading a good mystery thriller . . . hopes to become a typist or general office worker. JOSEPH CAP joe, the bold . . . frequently uses most convincing excuses . . . needs no excuse for his actions on the bas- ketball court . . . believes "enjoy thy- self-the one commandment" . . . wit of his classes . . . led on by patriotism and the current draft bill, plans his future in the service. LOIS ANN CARLONE Locy, the loquacious . . . likes sports of all kinds, especially a good NBHS basketball game . . . proud member of Junior College Club . . . thoroughly convinced funderstanding is the wealth of wealths" . . . Press Club membership is a start toward a career in journalism. ,X . ij, I K .g , .s ' 7 ' 'X , vi " -. 'ff ' ff-5' , - - f, V. - g,ij,f,ffl5f51-lyff tvfimi . 'ilk uv- tv 'ff 30 c ,xi G ' fu , 1' ALLAN ANDREW CARLSON Al, the air-minded . . . a little shy with strangers . . . believes "silence- a golden virtue" . . . likes to putter around cars . . . prefers outdoor sports, such as hunting and fishing . . . his ambition-to become an avia- tion cadet in the Air Force. JEAN MARY CARSWELL jean, the comic . . . taking business course . . . likes to dance . . . reads much of Edgar Allen Poe . . . came from Roosevelt junior High . . . is Girls' League representative . . . is proof that "God does not measure man by inches" . . . nor woman, either . . . has aspirations toward becoming a reporter. H'3W"t GERALDINE ELSIE CARLSON Gerry, the disciple of Minerva . . . literary editor of The Beehive, mem- ber of the National Honor Society, Junior College Club, and Senior Girl Guides . . . library page for three years . . . rides horseback, plays ten- nis-on good days, hits the ball . . . believes "the secret of success is con- stancy to purpose" . . . aims toward journalism. ANGELINA CASAROLA Angie with the talking eyes . . . sweet and soft spoken, thinks there's nothing like dancing to dreamy music . . . in her leisure moments likes to listen to semiclassical notes-for variety . . . realizing "there's need of healing in this world," she plans to lend a helping hand by becoming a I'll.lfSe. 5 MONICA JEAN CARRIER Mickey, the zealous . . . gives life to any project she undertakes . . . believes 'Ahealth and cheerfulness mutually beget each other" . . . proves this every day with her continually cheerful manner . . . enjoys the more feminine sports, such as swimming and dancing . . . hopes to become a medical secretary. VITO PAUL CATUCCI Vito, the vital . . . possesor of a sunny nature . . . puts his favorite quotation into 'practice . . . "Let a smile be your guide" . . . has been a representative of the A. A .... appeared in casts of both junior and Senior Class plays . . . member of Amphion Club . . . has acquired expe- rience toward his desire to be a prof fessional actor. 31 .2 X ik 1 'T RITA THERESA CEFARATTI Cef, the dependable . . . teachers' stand-by, having received a prize for perfect attendance . . , can be charac- terized as "like March weather, clear or cloudy, but ever present" . . . an accomplished player of the accordian . . . loves classical and operatic music . . . hopes to obtain an office position upon graduation. ANDREW CHAGLASIAN Andy, the affable . . . believes Mit is not impossible to walk on water" . . . has worked industriously in his college preparatory course . . . proud to be member of the Young Men's College Club and representative of the Student-Faculty Council . . . still trying for that hole-in-one . . . antici- pates attending the University of Connecticut. 5? LEONA MARIE CEPEK Lucky, the sports lover . . . both as observer and participant . . . re- cently elected to National Honor Society . . . representative to Press Club, Girls' League, and Student- Faculty Council . . . is "a modern girl with big brown eyes and a per- sonality twice her size" . . . will direct her business course toward becoming medical secretary. LILLIAN CHAGLASIAN Lil, the loyal . . . knows the value of friendship . . . believes "it is bet- ter to be faithful than famous" . . . one of our library pages . . . belongs to the junior College Club . . . mem- ber of publicity committee for Senior Class play . . , makes beautiful music with the eighty-eight keys . . . has qualities required for a primary grade teacher: patience and kindliness. 32 H-'Ou if -.pu MARGARET ROSE CESANEK Pigeon, the peppy . . . "Blessed with temper, whose unclouded ray can make tomorrow cheerful as to- day" . . . uses up her excess energy skating and dancing . . . for an occa- sional moment of relaxation she reads . . . served as Girls' League alter- nate . . . expects to become a secre- tary. GERALDINE ANN CHAGNON jerry, the fun-lover . . . thinks everyone ought to "be able to live with yourself" . . . sets a good example herself . . . Finds time for roller skating . . . passes many pleas- ant hours at the movies . . . likes sports as an observer . . . her prepara- tion has been for secretarial work. LEONA FRANCES CHAPONIS Chippy, the serious-minded . . . whispered from back stage from our junior Class thespians forgot their lines . . . sings with the Senior Choir . . . went to the Spring Concert in New London . . . advises and prac- tices, "Live to learn, and learn to live" . . . is a member of the Civic Forum . . . intends to take up nursing. ALICE MARIE CHRISTOPHERSON Chris of the silver voice . . . aug- ments the soprano section of the Senior Choir . . . as freshman went to the Portsmouth Music Festival . . . likes people and reading . . . member of junior College Club . . . chairman of Musical Club . . . because "in sweet music is such art" aspires some day to be a great singer. FRED CHARLES CHARAMUT Frog, the outdoor man . . . tall and blonde . . . husky football tackle seen on the gridiron every Saturday . . . hunts and fishes in his leisure time . . . enjoys dancing to the music of Vaughn Monroe . . . reading Ernie Pyle . . . believes "haste makes waste" . . . continuing his studies at Connecticut University . . . to be a forester. BETTY LEE CHURCH Skippy, the gay . . . a booster of all sports . . . belongs to Ski Club . . . also to swimming and tennis teams . . . represents Press Club . . . one of the Junior College Club girls . . . demonstrates that "sweetness of disposition charms the soul" . . . in- tends to go into merchandising or to become a medical secretary. PETER NICHOLAS CHERPAK Cherp, the cheerful . . . known for his friendly manner . . . proves that "a good friend makes life worth- while" . . . came from Nathan Hale Junior High . . . is taking a general course . . . prefers modern music . . . intends to make "Anchors Aweigh" his theme song . . . will join the Navy after graduation. ANGELO ENRICO FRANCIS CIAMMELLA Speedy, the sure . . . a fast work- er in more ways than one . . . finds time for an academic program . . . is an ardent sports fan . . . his favor- ite quotation: "How's tinks?" . . . hopes that they will be good for him when he enters the business world. X62- 33 "lure Q LEONA WANDA CIESZYNSKI Lee, the dainty . . . cautiously ad- vises, "Bestow what you may, but not your secrets" . . . finds historical novels of Kenneth Roberts fascinat- ing . . . philately, her hobby . . . likes dancing to jazz, but prefers classical music for listening pleasure . . . is undecided about a profession . . . nursing or pharmacy. RHODA LILLIAN COHEN Rho, the determinist . . . a pleas- ant blonde with scholastic ability . . . belongs to the National Honor Society . . . member of Foreign Affairs and junior College Clubs . . . serves as a Senior Guide and as The Beehive representative . . . is a tal- ented musician . . . confident that "determination is power" . . . hopes to become a lawyer. sm- KATHRYN ANN CLARK Kate, the optimist . . . says con- vincingly, "The future is never dark" . . . has courage under a shy, unas- suming manner . . . has joined the Junior College and Foreign Affairs Clubs . . . likes movies and reading . . . came here from Rhode Island . . . will endeavor to become a bacteriol- ogist. ANN MARY COLAPINTO Cal of the contagious humor . . . is taking a business course . , . is a member of the junior College Club and a Senior Girl Guide . . . likes all kinds of sports . . . enjoys popu- lar music . . . thinks secret of success is "Constancy in friendship" . . . hopes to be a stenographer Maw 34 LUCILLE MARY CLINCH Lou, the moderate . . . believes the world has a set pace: so asks, "Why hurry?" . . . is always calm and col- lected, seldom seen to get angry . . . an animal lover, especially of dogs . . . regards reading as the best relax- ation . . . her ambition is to graduate: beyond that she has made no definite plans. JACK RICHARD COLE Red, the winning . . . his hery hair, a symbol of his lively personality . . . has time, despite all his school work, to participate in sports . . . served, too, as A. A. representative . . . knows, "Though he is a wit, he is no fool" . . . the Navy will welcome him. JOSEPH JAMES COLELLA joe, the jovial . . . exercises with the track team to keep in form for the football team of which he is a member . . . lends his endorsement to all sports . . . his motto, "Love 'em and leave 'em," does not apply there- to . . . carries an academic course . . . is a potential Marine. ROSE MARIE ANN CONSTANTINO Rosie of the even temper . . . and not cross, either . . . takes dancing for her favorite pastime . . . prefers popular music to all other . . . carries an academic course . . . tries hard to "live happily and wisely" . . . intends to become a respected nurse after graduation from training. X s ANNETTE BERNICE CONLIN Andy, the sandy-haired . . . has the disposition that goes with freckles on the nose . . . one of the Twirlerettes . . , participates in field hockey and the Ski Club . . . enjoys tennis and swimming . . . dramatizes the rule, "Make short the miles with talk and smiles" . . . member of Junior Col- lege Club . . . hopes to become a medical assistant. VERONICA BARBARA COOKISH Cookie, the carefree . . . serves as a library page . . . likes the more active sports, such as roller skating, dancing, and basketball . . . favors popular songs, especially "My Happi- ness" . . . stimulates opinion that "without her smile, the world is but a wilderness" . . . intends to enter the Hartford Academy of Hairdress- mg. SALLY LOU CONNOR Sal, the ever-laughing . . . her out- standing personality has won her many friends . . . transferred from Branford High in her senior year . . . is "smiling, smiling, always smiling" . . . makes a hobby of trying to per- fect the "New Look" in dress design- ing . . . intends to become a doctor. SHIRLEY LOUISE COPEMAN Shir! of the many tunes . . . sings heartily in the Senior Choir . . . as member of the Musical Club attended the Spring Concert in New London . served on Junior Class play com- mittee . . . says, "It is only the can be true great-hearted who friends" . . . looks for a position in the secretarial field. ,,-ff" if I, V' I .Y K Z -6 35 Y JOSEPH MARIA COSTA Burpy, the gay caballero . . . senor from Lorcha, Spain . . . recalls his childhood home with Latin American music . . . an unusual camera fan who snaps current event shots . . . has knack at building solid model airplanes . . . following a college course, contends, "Happy is he who well employed his time" . . . wants to be an aeronautical engineer. DOROTHY ANN CZELLECZ Dotty of the beautiful eyes . . . finds she loves life best when she's dancing . . . knows any step from a slow waltz to a fast jitterbug . . . is proficient . . . says, "A cheerful temper will make beauty more at- tractive" . . . hopes to do office work. ...Saw ROGER JOSEPH COTE Roger, the music maestro . . . plays the violin expertly . . . adds sweet strains to the string section of the orchestra . . . a commuter, lives at Fall Mountain Lake . . . is con- vinced that "on earth there is nothing great but man" . . . hopes to pursue the study of music in college. LUCIAN HENRY CZERWINSKI Lucek, the happy-go-lucky . . . likes sports books, especially those by Bill Stern . . . follows school sports regularly . . . polkas, his favorite dance music, but also likes something slow . . . intends to become an avia- tor and take to the wild blue yonder, saying, "This is the thing I was born to do!" ROBERT THOMAS COVALESKI Porky, the adventurer . . . with riHe on the shoulder, he's off a hunt- ing . . . a lover of the out-of-doors, likes all varieties of sports . . . in music it's the modern swing that catches his fancy . . . will soon call "Bell bottom trousers and coat of navy blue" his outfit. MARY MADELINE CZUPRINSKI Tootsie, the energetic . . . always on the move . . . marching with the Twirlerettes . . . dancing to the music of Sammy Kaye . . . or just cheering our football team . . . her saying is "Life is as we make it," and she intends to make the most of it . . . her plans are indefinite . . . will probably include travel. 36 ELEANOR JANE DALBURG Red of the sunset curls . . . has a ready smile . . . is a good example of "where there's a flame, there's a fire" . . . represents her section room in Girls' League and on The Beehive . . . belongs to Pan American Club, Junior College Club, and Senior Guides . . . collects souvenirs . . . will become a nurse. JERRY ANTHONY D'APICE Jigga, lover of fun . . . in his classes "the mirth and fun grew fast and furious" . . . an ardent sports fan . . . maybe you like Spike Jones' version of Wm. Tell Overture, Jigga? . . . will lead a gay life either in the field of radio or as a tool and die maker. ARTHUR DANIELSON Art, the outdoor man . . . waits patiently for a nibble on his fish line . . . likes to "follow the hunt" . . . takes to the Old West in Zane Gray's tales . . . believes "everybody who has the least sensibility or imagina- tion derives a certain pleasure from pictures" . . . intends to prove this as a photographer. MARIO LOUIS D'AVANZO Buzz, as busy as a bee . . . chair- man of the Key Club sports commit- tee, vice director of Student-Faculty Council sports . . . member of the baseball team, Math Club, and Men's College Club . . . National Honor Society . . . attended meeting of Boys' State . . . advocates that "honor lies in honest toil" . . . will become a doctor. SOPHIE IRENE DANOWSKI Small-fry, the sunny . . . spends much of her spare time with books . . . names no favorite author, saying "He that I am reading seems always to have the most force" . . . a good dancing partner . . . treasurer of the Senior Girl Guides . . . hopes to study nursing in college. AGNES DAVID Aggie, the affable . . . music, her pleasure in life . . . sings and plays the guitar . . . enjoys Western and hillbillie tunes . matches "a song for every smile" . . . goes horseback riding . . . is carrying an academic course . . . served as Red and Gold representative . . . will become a singer. 37 . -, arvc.a-.l' ' 6 JUNE ARLENE DAVIS Shorty, the exhilarating . . . an energetic Red and Gold representa- tive . . . makes her leisure time en- joyable through listening to music . . . follows all sports closely . . . active in the Class play productions . . . sees office work and, maybe, marriage "In the garden of tomor- row." RITA JULIA DESROSIERS Rita of the continuous good humor . . . always manages to keep busy remembering "constant occupation prevents temptation" . . . is a trust- worthy Girls' League representative . . . counts dancing as one of her favorite pastimes . . . finds time to read, too . . . hopes to become a typist or hairdresser. at iw LESLIE RAYMOND DAYON Leslie, the industrious . . . be- sides carrying a technical course by day, he holds a machinist's job at Stanley Works by night . . . when time permits, enjoys deer hunting- or some phase of sports . . . warns, "He who lives by a sword, dies by the sword" . . . will be a tool and die maker. LILLIAN MARIA DICESARE LiII with the big brown eyes . . uses them for fine embroidery . . . also for accurate throws in volley- ball . . . prefers semiclassical music . . . collects records for a hobby . . . believes that "self-help is best help" . . . has a college preparatory course and will enter either the teaching or nursing iield. S I. Y ti' i Y . a ., ELIZABETH ANN DEPI NTO Betty, the busy . . . with little balls or big ones she knocks down pins enough for a good score at the bowl- ing alleys . . . likes dancing even better . . . takes a business course . . . looks forward to graduation with the thought, "Parting is such sweet sorrow" . . . is training to be a typist. SALVATORE PAUL DI MAURO Sal, the musically-inclined . . . preaches, "Music's a great and never failing treasure" . . . was Drum Ser- geant in the band . . . also played with the orchestra and Pretzel Bend- ers . . . attended '48 New England Festival . . . member of the a cap- pella and men's chorus . . . intends to join the U. S. Navy after gradua- tion. 38 Mr -J .414 ...JV ARTHUR JOSEPH DI MINNO Artie of the golden sax . . . full of personality . . . his one joy: music, because "there's music in all things" . . . we've seen him many times as student band leader waving that baton . . . member of Musical Club for three years . . . has a college course toward his future-you guess- ed-a musician. EDWARD JAMES DIXON Ed, the many-skilled . . . likes to work with his hands . . . building airplane models is his specialty . . . "A good and happy man is he" . . . is taking an academic technical course . . . likes making intricate white lines on blue paper, the drafts- men's art . . . which he hopes to use as a master. GRACE MARY DIPIETRO Grace, the lover of the arts . . . will make an ideal wife . . . sews and knits well . . . hobby is drawing . . . practical and friendly . . . one who favors classical music . . . be- lieves that "hope springs eternal in the human breast" . . . will become either a dressmaker or a typist. FELIX ANTHONY DLUGOSZEWSKI Phil, the sports-minded . . . from Nanticoke, Pa .... never misses a Red and Gold contest even though he's a newcomer . . . spends his sum- mers following baseball . . . finds jack London's books a worthwhile pastime . . . has found that "a word to the wise is sufficient" . . . plans for the future are not yet certain. JOSEPH WILLIAM DIPIETRO joe, man of good intentions . . . athletic and full of fun . . . keeps to himself except when with his own crowd . . . played on the football team in 1947 . . . his motto indicates his philosophy: "Do tomorrow what you cannot do today" . . . and to- morrow for J04i+th6 Navy. JOHN PAUL DOBEK john, the man of action . . . shows his stuff with both the basketball and baseball teams . . . snaps his camera lens just at the right moment . . . even likes his music fast . . . "Push on-keep moving" . . . hopes to build the fastest car in the world-what's wrong with airplanes, John? AF"'1"I"s. 39 """'Qb CATHERINE JOSEPHINE DOLCE Cathie, the energetic . . . her vital- ity stirs up our football cheering section . . . thinks roller skating is the best way to keep on the move . . . a good book by Maureen Daly satisfies her quiet moods . . . believes that "to each is a hidden beauty" and plans to discover it as a beautician. WESTON EARL DORNAN Wes, our behind-the-scenes man . . . important technician for Junior Class play and Amphion Club . . . interested in photography . . . likes popular music, especially "Smoke Gets in Your Eyes" . . . enjoys a good basketball game . . . "didn't get into Canady" in Senior Class play . . . believes "Humor is catching" . . . taking academic course . . . plans to work in photography. CLARA MARY DOMIJAN Clara, the diligent . . . always busy . . . serves as Student-Faculty Council representative and Senior Girl Guide . . . belongs to the Junior College Club . . . enjoys semiclassical music . . . does wonders with a paint brush . . . preaches and practices, "The good you can do, do not defer" . . . plans to attend business college. RUTH ANN DORSEY Ruth, the jocund . . . says, "Smiles are contagious" . . . eye-catching Twirlerette leader . . . lets off energy dancing or swimming . . . served as Athletic Association representative . . . member of the Musical Club and Starlettes . . . remember her as Emily in the junior Class play? . . . acted as marshal at 1948 graduation . . . plans to be a n se. J JJ! 956' .4-"" 7 fl W1 40 -iff' ELIZABETH ANN DONLON Betty, the mermaid . . . swimming a favorite pastime . . . cheers from the sidelines at all our basketball games . . . gets her daily exercise by climbing to section room 403 . . . be- lieves "amor vincit omnia" , . . tak- ing a business course . . . should make as good a fashion model as she hopes. DOLORES HELENA DOTY Dodie, the good sport . . . has made many friends in NBHS . . . is seldom seen to lose her optimistic outlook . . . believes "contentment ope's the source of every joy" . . . dancing to popular music relaxes her . . . is taking an academic course, but intends to become a secretary. 49' FLORENCE LUCILLE DREZEK Florence, the fair . . . a typical happy high school student . . . be- lieves "the secret of happiness is in doing what one likes" . . . at home, collects records, both popular and classical numbers . . . earns an occa- sional spare in bowling . . . carries a business course to prepare for office and secretarial work. 1 IRENE BRIDGET DUDZINSKI Irene, the versatile . . . has many interests . . . would make a good partner for Fred Astaire . . . sum- mer iinds her swimming . . . was a Red and Gold Review representative in her junior year . . . keeps up-to- date as a member of the Foreign Affairs Club . . . a gal with "no idle- ness, no laziness" . . . plans to be- come a hairdresser. .ffilh 4"'Mnsa:., Q15 LILLIAN MARGARET DUBOIS Lil, the carefree . . . "how cau- tious are the wise" . . . finds all popular music to her liking . . . tries out the latest steps on the dance floor . . . for exercise takes up swimming and roller skating . . . wants to work in a bank . . . may we have some samples, Lil? MAUREEN MARGARET DUPLIN Dupe of the shimmering blonde tresses . . . her outlook, "Success de- pends upon backbone, not wishbone" . . . served as representative for her homeroom to Red and Gold Review . . . takes an active interest in all sports . . . has not yet received a calling for the future. 4l V -.M 0- PETER DUBOVSKY Russian, television ace of the fu- ture . . . advances his interest in Radio Club . . . on softball team for Men's College Club . . . right-hand man in junior and Senior play pro- ductions . . . also Amphion Club . . . likes any game with teamwork: bas- ketball, hockey, or football . . . his tolerant viewpoint is that "everyone has his faults" . . . has hopes of be- coming a television engineer. CHESTER WILLIAM DURNIN Chet, the laconic . . . alternate representative to The Beehive . . . is an active member of our Ski Club . . . loves to putter with automobiles in his spare minutes . . . enthusias- tically advises, "Be always merry as you can" . . . preparation via a tech- nical course will ready him for future as an electrical engineer. . K. ,. 4. tgp ,Q Y Q ,r Q . K P F . ,I , i E . , , isa ,f . New K sawn, -- iw 211-. "1 , . i ': -i i ' i :K g,A.Qgl: rf Ii.. g. T 'A -li - A ii , 2 51' f-2' iiabfw-gg Q l- is if f' , is ii sr a 252 ' X. LT? T? lx ,gsm 2,Y'g3l .,, A .iff-555W e s ,, .N HENRY PAUL DZIOBA Henry, the builder . . . all his thoughts seem to center on building, from model airplanes to his future career . . . takes a little time out for sports, however . . . a member of our school baseball team . . . believes "ambition leads to success" . . . plans to become a contractor. ARLENE LOUISE EPPLER Eppie, the tres chic . . . works for the school as a Senior Girl Guide and The Beehive representative . . . did committee work on the junior play . . . blends her voice with the Musical Club, Starlettes, Senior Choir . . . believes "self-help begets aid" . . . hopes to be a lawyer's secre- tary some day. DORIS EISEMANN Doris, the delightful . . . her slight accent is pleasant . . . has recently joined our tennis team . . . holds membership in both Junior College and Foreign Affairs Clubs . . . em- ploys spare time in sewing, dancing, or practicing that tennis stroke . . . her motto, "No outcome is decided in a second," will serve in her teaching. IRVING JULIUS EPSTEIN Irv, the silent . . . usually quiet, his ability to make noise at the right time made him a band member . . . long popular in the Musical Club . . . agrees "there's nothing to fear, but fear itself" . . . hopes some day to be- come a pharmacist and to have his own drug store. X .wig 'r W.. gngtfgat , ...Qt-5 . 'ZW THOMAS POTTER ELDER Tom of the quiet manners . . . is The Beehive art editor . . . in spare time is busily occupied with football or basketball . . . also, employs extra minutes tinkering with radio . . . though his future is rather undecided, he hopes he's Hthe master of his fate, the captain of his soul." MARION ESMAIL Marion, the dependable . . . mem- bership secretary for Civic Forum and assistant to Mr. Depot in the athletic office . . . also an active member of Foreign Affairs Club . . . spends spare time adding to postal card collection . . . her conviction, "All things may be overcome by determination," will help her in her future career: advertising. 0 42 FAYE ETKIND Fai, the faithful . . . is Girls' League representative . . . member of the Junior College Club and active in the Foreign Affairs Club and Civic Forum . . . likes tennis, dancing, or Mendelssohn music . . . plans to go to college, but "who knows what the future holds?" MARIO FALVO Magge, the determined . . . born in sunny Italy . . . claims he will "graduate from High School or bust!" . . . has an academic course . . . hobby is collecting stamps . . . would choose popular music . . . agrees with critics that Poe's mysteries are best . . . wants to be a store owner after graduation. 13 S . ' .1 K , Vx: CY' - me A ff- -N, . ' ,-.. .4 f 5. . Eli" 'i'. -f" f K' ' l . , - .Q?i?"'f.Q. A ,Q 1 li ilrvf . I ' 5 is 591' '.,.'i I l , -I I -welfa- ROSE MARIE FAILLA Rosie, an avid NBHS football fan . . . fond of all sports, ranks swim- ming high . . . well-liked, energetic Student-Faculty Council representa- tive for room 402 . . . wondering "What doth the sweet air of the future bring?" . . . hasn't yet decided between career of typist or reporter. EDWARD DOUGLAS FARLEY Eddie, the planner . . . has good business sense . . . carried the ball to the field, not across . . . after-school work forced him to relinquish his position as manager in senior year . . . realizes "there's no dependence that can be sure but a dependence upon one's self" . . . intends to be a bookkeeper. -J VINCENT FRANCIS FAILLA Vincent, the mechanical-minded . . . we don't mean he isn't original . . . it's just that he's always tinker- ing around with machines . . . has a technical course . . . prefers the works of Mark Twain . . . likes popular music . . . believes "nothing is achieved without enthusiasm" . . . will find work as a machinist or tool and die maker. JOAN RITA FARRELL jo of the perpetually jolly disposi- tion . . . lends her sunny nature to the Foreign Affairs Club and Civic Forum . . . Mr. Depot's little helper in Safe-driving and Athletic offices . . . helps out also as The Beehive representative . . . recognizes fact that 'tall that glitters is not gold" . . . will try her hand at educating. MV 43 GEORGE THOMAS FEENEY George, enemy of care and worry . . . says, "Who knows what the future holds?" but refuses to let it bother him . . . claims Walt Disney provides his favorite reading . . . as a hobby he collects coins . . . takes a business course . . . intends to join our service- men. FELICIA MARY FILEWICZ Felicia, the facetious . . . shows herself to be "as happy as a shining star" . . . likes music from boogie- woogie to classical . , . makes use of either vocal cords or feet while en- joying music . . . utilizes good swim- ming weather . . . has taken a busi- ness course, but intends to go into practical nursing. LUCILLE THERESE FELIX Lu, the determined . . . her de- mand is "give me my diploma or give me death!" . . . can swim like a fish . . . member of our swim team . . . also enjoys dancing to popular tunes . . . is an avid football fan . . . was on the program committee for the Senior Class play . . . aspires to be a secretary or a typist. DORIS MARY FILLION Frenchy, the faithful . . . The Bee- hive representative in her home- room . . . appreciates good folk music--especially when she can cro- chet while listening . . . staunchly believes "sincerity and faithfulness are two noble things," an adage which will serve her well in reaching her aspiration: secretarial work. RICHARD WILLIAM FERRIS Hotdog . . . i'When the working day is o'er," he makes more strikes at the bowling alley than a labor leader in a coal mine . . . enjoys brisk game of basketball, usually plays guard . . . also likes sport stories and popular music . . . tenta- tively plans to be a business man. ANTHONY HENRY FIORAVANTI Tony, the remarkable . . . has proved his sports ability playing right end on our football team . . . now leads the team to victory as an effi- cient captain and powerful tackle . . . his conviction is "The world was made for actionl' . . . how true in his case! . . . has aspirations of becom- ing a dentist. 44 if-f MARY ROSE FIRLEY ,IEANNE MARIE FITZGERALD LOIS MAE FOBERG Mary, the active and cheerful . . . it has been said, "She slides o'er the rink with greatest of ease" . . . when not skating, she dances to popular hits . . . came from Sacred Heart School . . . taking a technical course in Goodwin Vocational School . . . the future will Find her a hairdresser. NORMAN ALFRED FORTIER Norm, the conscientious . . . strives for perfection in all endeavors . . . especially in his swim stroke . . . in- genuity in developing ideas produces clever, attractive designs . . . believ- ing "the eye affords the swiftest route to the mind," will make a permanent career of planning window displays. jeanne, the energetic . . . a decora- tive Twirlerette , . . swings a mean racquet . , . acted as Girls' League representative . . . holds membership in both Press and junior College Clubs . . . she feels that "when Irish eyes are smiling, sure 'tis 'Stardust' they are playing" . . . plans to enter a junior college. JOHN FOSGRAU john of the perpetual grin . . . was A. A. representative for his home- room for two years . . . is interested in sports, naturally . . . enjoys base- ball and football stories by Bill Lee . . , finds popular songs to his taste . . . says, "Rule your work, don't let your work rule you" . . . intends to go to college. Lo, the dainty . . . is quiet and un- assuming in manner . . . believes in "not much talk-a great, sweet silence" . . . served as Press repre- sentative for her section room . . . finds relaxation in movies and roller skating . . . hopes to do secretarial or general office work upon gradua- tion. LUCILLE IRENE FOURNIER Smiley, the invincible . . . winter finds her on skis . . . tackles the high- est slopes without fear . . . a com- petitor for any crown on the ice . . . dancing to dreamy ballads is her idea of bliss . . . believes "music does all our joy refine" , . . carries a business course . . . intends to become a secre- tary. , si 5 Nu xv Nw . 45 ANNE MARY FRAGIONE Annie, the ambitious . . . asks only, "Let me have my dreams" . . . but there's an academic course to be passed . . . then there's dancing and bowling and skating in the leisure hours . . . along with the hope for a career either in nursing or in the teaching profession. JEAN MARIE FREDERICK jeannie, the reflective . . . keeps her thoughts to herself . ,. . "The world hath need of quietness" . . . for pleasure time, roller skating is tops with her . . . has no fear of "13" as it's her birthday number . . . and her section is 313 . . . her objective is to do secretarial work. WARREN JOHN FRANK Warren of the well-waxed skis . . . leads the Ski Club over the snowy ground like a jet-propelled plane . . . belonged to the Musical Club for one year . . . has participated in many Amphion Club activities . . . "The future lies ahead, watch it!" is his byword . . . and the future for Warren is spelled mechanical engi- neering. THOMAS JOSEPH FREDERICK Tommy, an average American boy . . . fond of all sports . . . for read- ing he likes a cowboy story, especial- ly one by Zane Grey . . . runs to popular hits in his musical taste . . . says, "When you have nothing to say, say nothing" . . . he hopes the future will find him a hospital orderly. FRANK FRAPRIE Frape of the many facets . . . full of fun is he . . . believes in The Bee- hive theme, "All the world's a stage" . . . president of the Amphion Club, was the well-meaning, promising lawyer in "january Thaw" . . . mem- ber of Key Club and The Beehive staff, Press representative . . . ac- tive in Senior Scouts . . . plans to be an engineer. ALMA BIANCA FRIGO AI, the angelic . . . serious, especial- ly about her schoolwork . . . her diligence in her studies has culmin- ated in election to the National Honor Society . . . served as repre- sentative to The Beehive . . . be- lieves "what is worth doing at all is worth doing well" . . . carries a busi- ness course in hopes of becoming a secretary. 46 SHIRLEY ANN FRITZ Fritzie, the fascinating . . . tiny hlonde . . . says, "I'm diminutive, but I'm determined" . . . showed her act- ing ability in the Senior Class play and Amphion Club . . . a camera fan who knows all the angles for snap- shots . . . has a good collection of semiclassical records . . . hopes to be among the top fashion designers some day. THEODORE LOUIS FUSARO Fuzzy, virile and masterful . . . but says, "It is patience, not might that makes the man" . . . has an avid interest in politics and American His- tory , . . represented homeroom in Student-Faculty Council . . . says Vaughn Monroe's music can't be beaten , . . will work for a degree in law. EVELYN MARY FUCINI Eve, gracious of manner and grace- ful of action . . . gives time to the drum corps to which she belongs . . . proves ugracefulness is beauty" . . . combines article and picture to make a valuable drum corps history . . . hopes to become a "take a letter" girl for a business executive. FRANK JOSEPH GABES Frank, the dependable . . . per- forms his tasks well . . . has an inter- est in flash bulbs and cameras and all that concerns photography . . . basketball, his favorite sport . . . realizes "there's fellowship in sports" . . . will, undoubtedly, make a place for himself in the business world. MARY-ANGELA ELIZABETH FUNARI Mandy, the many-mooded . . . re- served with strangers, mischievous with friends . . . says, "Speech is sil- ver: silence is golden" and uses a good proportion of each . . . busy in Press Club, College Club, and Senior Girl Guides, and on property com- mittee for Senior Class play . . . has a college course to pave the way to the teaching profession. EVELYN MARIE GACEK Evie, the sports-minded . . . is an ardent basketball fan . . . goes bowl- ing in her spare time . . . believes that "to lose a friend is the greatest of injuries" ..., does not often lose them herself, however , . . likes popu- lar music . . . is taking a business course . . . hopes to become a secre- tary. 47 I "ia CHARLES FRANCIS GADOMSKI Buzzy, the jovial . . . came to us from Saint Thomas' Seminary . . . never without a joking word . . . is member of Young Men's College Club . . . Zane Grey gets his vote as favor- ite author . . . music-slow, fast, loud, or soft-suits Buzzy . . . advises, "Dum vivimus, vivamus" . . . his future: still a mystery. BARBARA LOTTIE GAJDA Baby, the light-hearted . . . has unusual hobby of collecting souvenirs from abroad-many a petite and at- tractive foreign doll is found in her group of oddities . . . appreciates operatic arias . . . a talented artist who believes, "Art imitates nature, and necessity is the mother of inven- tion" . . . plans to attend art school after graduation. K' DORIS RUTH GAGLIARDI Dor of the unlimited patience . . . proves that usuccess is holding on a minute longer" . . . likes a good mys- tery novel . . . played on the girls' championship basketball team in her junior year . . . her voice augments Musical Club concerts . . . upon graduation, will take up either sing- ing or nursing as a career. ELENOR FRIEDA GANTNER Ele, the pert and witty . . . outdoor girl with interests centering in swim- ming, skating, and horseback riding . . . reads Erle Stanley Gardner when weather keeps her housebound . . . believes that 'Lhonesty and intel- ligence will conquer all" . . . intends to become a bookkeeper or account- ant. 48 MURIEL MARY GAGNE Mert, the musical-minded . . . sings with the Senior Choir . . . attended the New England Music Festival . . . also, went to the annual State Audi- tion Festival . . . finds time out from music for junior College Club activ- ities . . . on ticket committe for Senior Class play . . . approves "soft music to attending ears" . . . intends to study nursing as a career. HELEN GARABEDIAN Helen, the orator . . . took part in Junior and Senior Class plays . . . belongs to Foreign Affairs, Pan American, Junior College, and Am- phion Clubs . . . served as Red and Gold representative . . . gained place in the National Honor Society . . . follows her byword, "Do what you ought, come what may" . . . plans to teach in a secondary school. 'Q :5'??!gQiQ 1 :way -v, fs1Sf?S?:1f1 , . . - 7 ,w 4-15 . . . EV, inf 'S:2,g? W qv' A k N "bh xv Xij 1 D .gr I Q "v. .. 3 .Qu i E ..Ll ,L,, Y K A 432 L fg TIF .,,,g.gtXgs- W .5 . N ,XV if f, "TVA S' f ,X 451. W WQQKX. x sz? x K1 U , - wi, '. g1,- ,. 5332 1 xr! . . I 5. J. .4 ,- u 'n ,. . a A N55 32 f X MARY ANGELINE GIANOLI Shorty, the gay . . . happy-go-lucky . . . musically inclined . . . plays the piano with skill . . . enjoys operatic and popular music . . . proud of her ability to drive a car . . . can be described as "a laughing school-girl, without grief or care" . . . is taking an academic course . . . intends to become an office worker. TED HENRY GLASKI Ted, the untiring . . . believes that "persistence always wins the day" . . . enjoys taking pictures of anyone or anything . . . spends his summers doing the Australian crawl . . . cool weather finds him watching football games . . . a devotee of music, from classical to Be-bop . . . is taking a business course to become an ac- countant. L. s WILLIAM ARTHUR GIANTONIO Bill, the benign . . . small, dark- haired, refined . . . truly believes that "man makes his own fate" . . . familiar with all kinds of sports . . . enjoys all kinds of music, especially Stan Kenton's . . . ardent in his desire for knowledge, is making a success of his academic course . . . will be- come a draftsman after graduation. PATRICIA NAN GLIDDEN Pat of the optimistic spirit . . . likes to go horseback-riding . . . also, loves dogs . . . favors the song, "A Tree in the Meadow" . . . wishes that all occupations were as nice as swimming . . . member of Civic Forum . . . believes that "experience is the best teacher" . . . hopes to preside in a classroom. PHYLLIS JANE GLABAU Phyllis of the winsome smile . . . has acted as Red and Gold repre- sentative . . . devotes spare time to collecting poems of which she already has many . . . "I am not afraid of tomorrow, for I have seen yesterday and love today" finely depicts Phyllis who plans to make a career of nursing. JOAN PATRICIA GOGUEN joanie, the obliging . . . "The world hath not a sweeter creature" . . . has many interests . . . for exer- cise she likes skating . . . for pleas- ure, dancing . . . representative of both Girls' League and The Beehive . . . being musically inclined, plays the piano . . . her one ambition is to be a private accountant. 50 NORMA ANN GONYEA Norm of the golden hair and blue eyes . . . serious and quiet, but with a Hair for the humorous . . . optimis- tic in her belief that "after the clouds, the sun" . . . glides gracefully over the dance floor . . . will turn to nurs- ing after graduation. FAITH JUNE GORFAIN Fay, the comedienne . . . brought Hoods of laughter as Mrs. Skinner in Junior Class play . . . formerly a Girls' League representative . . . member of Junior College and Am- phion Clubs . . . a talented musician, believing "music's the medicine of the mind" . . . perhaps she'll be able to prove it in her future nursing career. MARILYN DOBA GORDON Mal, the friendly . . . always has a good word for everyone . . . holds membership in Foreign Affairs and Junior College Clubs . . . recently elected Senior Girl Guide . . . likes reading and music . . . feels "nothing ventured, nothing gained"-a motto which will be of great value in her future vocation: social work. FRANK JOHN GORSKI Butch, the fleet-footed . . . gave freely of his spare hours to the track team . . . in the time not taken up by track workouts, he plays basket- ball . . . believes "you get from life what you put into it" . . . although taking a business course, he hopes to go to college. RONALD FRANCIS GORDON Ronald, the unconcerned . . . takes things as they come, for he knows "haste trips up its own feet" . . . spare time is occupied with sports . . . as far as music is concerned, Ronald thinks light opera is tops . . . is hoping his academic course will prepare him for a career as a jour- nalist. IRENE CLAIRE GORSKI Renee, the roguish . . . has a con- stantly bubbling source of wit . . . lives by the byword, "A little more smile, a little less frown" . . . likes the outdoor sports of swimming and bicycling . . . in a serious mood, she reads novels . . . she hopes her future as a home economist will be suc- cessful. 51 JOHN EDWARD GOSELIN Goose, a zealous sportsman . . . baseball and basketball head his list of favorite sports . . . proved his ability on Red and Gold teams . . . believes in the philosophy, "We make or mar our fortunes" . . . in his record collection Stan Kenton's are favorites . . . the crystal ball sees Goose wear- ing "bell-bottomed trousers." RICHARD JAMES GRASSO Dick, the good-natured . . . says, "Wit and wisdom are born with a man" . . . has good reason to be cheerful . . . distinguished himself on both the football and cross-country squads . . . served as Athletic Asoscia- tion representative for his section room . . . his plans for the future are yet to be formed. BETTY MARILYN GOSSELIN Betty, the blithe . . . petite and pretty, the size of her personality is far more than that of her stature . . . knows that "small things lead to greatness" . . . in winter months is seen on all the ponds swirling across the ice . . . enjoys dances all year 'round . . . will enter the secretarial field. ROBERT JAMES GRAY Bob, the fleet-footed . . . shows his extra special speed on both track and football teams . . . for relaxa- tion likes to listen to popular music -especially if he has his drawing material near by . . . believes in be- ing "fun and fancy free," but hopes to soon don a Navy uniform with the insigne of radioman. JOSEPH GEORGE GOZZO Goz, benevolent toward all . . . extremely active Musical Club mem- ber . . . plays saxophone in band and orchestra . . . is member of a cappella chorus . . . participated in the New England Festivals of 1947 and 1948 . . . represents his home- room in Student-Faculty Council . . . believes "he is somehow good who likes music" . . . hopes to make career of it. FREDERICK THOMAS GRAZIANO Frederick, a note-worthy chap . . . "Music is the speech of the inarticu- late" . . . it is also his whole life . . . is a composer already . . . accordian- ist . . . has played with Lenny Allen and at Washington Jr. High gradua- tion . . . prefers Bach, Beethoven, and Mozart . . . plans to be a profes- sional musician. 52 4rSJ'9 ifihzf--' i ' ' I ,...- - ""1.. MONICA MARGARET GRECZ Monica, the thrifty . . . dislikes to see anything wasted, much less, val- uable moments . . . says, "Nothing is more precious than time, yet nothing is less valued" . . . makes good at her business course . . . likes skating and tennis . . . has trained to become a secretary. STANISLAUS JOSEPH GRUDZINSKI Stan, the mighty hunter . . . goes after his game with three devices: gun, rod, and trap . . . apparently determined to get what he's after . . . he does, too . . . Stan says, "I live in adventure" . . . reads Jim Corbett . . . wants to be a profes- sional hunter and trapper. 2' 1 'V-SUM 1 E yt-.. K-gulf, tw ,u ' s,- .fk -.gi we-f "silt '33 1 '?.'?'4QTil' ' ' . 2 'il X K l fs., .Q "va, '.2ty.. . , PZ ' 'i"':4f f'?9f'l1'. .. ' 2. .L " -f -If 1: 5, we , 'ffiw 1 A -2' . ., ,N . .L 'sk'-J ' Q., . 'Q gig? 5qZ.f,-1 -eil ' gwmgffs -, 1 sgt.l,'rf' K ' -.fret is 5' ,Ni EDWIN GRESCZYK Edwin, our modern Gabriel . . . in his spare time he plays the trumpet . . . enjoys winter sports . . . skiing and ice skating preferred . . . delights in O. I-Ienry's snappy endings . . . has taken a business course . . . "Little do we know what lies before us" . . . so Edwin doesn't give the future a thought. JULIUSZ FRANCIS GRYCKIEWICZ juliusz, the judicious . . . says, "Never let your school activities in- terfere with your education" . . . is musically inclined . . . belongs to the band, men's chorus, and a cappella choir . . . likes the out-of-doors, too . . . hopes to become a composer or a music teacher. 53 MAY ELIZABETH GRIGORIAN May, the champion . . . girls' table tennis victor, 1947-1948 . . . played in Juniors-versus-Teachers game on Class Day . . . Senior Girl Guide . . . The Beehive representative . . . plays in the orchestra . . . enthusiastic member of Civic Forum . . . believes "in ourselves our future lies" . . . ambition is to go to T. C. C. and to become teacher. LUCILLE ANN GUALANO Lou, the seeker . . . lured by the mysteries of the Chem lab . . . can accomplish wonders with a needle and thread as well as with beakers . . . particularly fond of spirituals . . . "Opportunity opens to repeated knocking" . . . is determined to enter nursing, preferably at New Britain General Hospital. . M ,Q 'YW f i M '55 wr ff lf-rf: r' + s 'i "' W -vp , -. - fm 5632.4 , I NAI" , , ,. ra. ..L,.9-,gf k V. x M, A. g . xrf fx,-. f 4' "ra?"'N': rg, Q-, , X 'fr 2 4 ,JE x Q ,Q Q ,.,,1,m A eg Q. 461,54 '- ' A m, wi 5 iff? W, .. H 1 5:1 All I -W if L W M ia , ' 'A 'Y ' iv, 1-2' :W il -' 'Fgjrgi V5 Q ' ' " 'fi Ig yi 5. ' .A . uv' A fic: -f iw ' 1-',rz'f:, , . 1 , 5-wg-n. fi 'fl .roi-Q QA , . V f iv TERESA PAULINE GWIAZDA Terry, the contented . . . was mem- ber of Junior Class baseball and bas- ketball teams . . . belongs to the Civic Forum . . . came from Sacred Heart School . . . likes history . . .'is convinced that "happiness is simply enjoying where you are" . . . her busi- ness course has helped prepare her for a career as an office worker WILLIAM FRED HARRINGTON Bill, the sphinx . . . practices "silence, always" . . . would be an asset to the secret service . . . skill- ful swishing of the basketball gained him a berth on the jayvee team . . . Jack Dempsey gets his admiration as athlete and author . . , though future is indefinite, may turn ama- teur business ventures into a full time career. N'--:Q .gi-X -'-"Y LOIS MARY HALLORAN Low, the tiny . . . "Little, but not overlooked," she's Student-Faculty Council representative, Senior Girl Guide, representative for The Bee- hive, captain of Girls' Field Hockey Team . . . puts energy to use in fast game of tennis and in skating . . . in future we'll find her in white cap and uniform. JOHN HARTAN john, the generous . . . says, "It is more blessed to give than to re- ceive" . . . attends every school game . . . cheers our basketball team on to success . . . raises the dust at home plate during baseball season . . . hopes to be giving the fellows a workout as a physical education teacher. ggwg it S X x si VB' wk' 55 f 'UN HARRY GEORGE HANSEN Harry, the masterful . . . our best example that "not all good things come in small packages" . . . tall and likable ,tried football in his freshman year . . . on the track team for three years . . . when not on the run, he likes sketching . . . in preparation for his future entrance into an Art School. ORLAINE LOIS HARTMAN Tops . . . believes "success is the reward of honest eHort" . . . conse- quently is in National Honor Society . . . represents The Beehive in 201 . . . assistant stage manager of Junior Class play . . . lively member of Foreign Affairs and Math Clubs, Senior Girl Guides . . . interested in sports and painting, prefers mathe- matics . . . aims to become a math teacher. ROSEMARIE JUNE HARTZ Iowa, the optimist . . . finds it hard to suppress her natural enthus- iasm even during school hours . . . seldom a serious moment . . . has "bright spirits and bright eyes" . . . The Beehive representative . . . be- longs to Foreign Affairs Club, Junior College Club, and Camera Club . . . Englishwoman in Junior Class play . . . will become a teacher. STUART BENJAMIN HERRICK Stu, the agile . . . plays a smooth and rapid game of baseball for the Red and Gold . . . thinks athletes should "play not for glory, but for joy" . . . strong supporter of basket- ball, too . . . has prepared for col- lege . . . will direct his efforts toward becoming a doctor or a lawyer. IRENE LORRAINE HEBERT Irene of the silver skates . . . would rather skate than walk . . . always on the go . . . chuckles over O. Henry's stories . . . can be heard humming almost any popular tune . . . says, "Cold hands, warm heart" . . . studies business subjects with a job as secretary in mind. WILLIAM HERZY Bill, the G. I. of tomorrow . . . has long wished to be one of Uncle Sam's Army . . . collects unusual stamps . . . Jack London's books make a hit with him . . . because he knows "variety is the soul of pleasure," he often seeks a change . . . best of luck in the service. JOSEPH PATRICK HENRY joe, the unassuming . . . chosen for Student-Faculty Council in sec- tion room . . . conscientious member of Young Men's College Club . . . starting stamp collection . . . a sports enthusiast . . . takes college course and says, "There is much to enjoy" . . . plans to work as an accountant after some more training. ROBERT WESLEY HICKCOX Bob, the always-prepared . . . knows "a bird in the hand is worth two in the bush" . . . spends a good deal of his time with the school band and orchestra . . . a baseball fan . . . reads Bill Lee's articles . . . has not yet formulated his plans for after graduation. Z., ,swf 56 MADELINE REGINA HINCHLIFFE Hinchy of the sparkling wit . . . a young lady of many interests . . . ice skating in winter, swimming in summer, dancing, bowling, and at- tending the movies all year around . . . believes in the importance of "duty first, duty always" . . . hopes to become a private secretary in the near future. ROSE HOVANESIAN Ro of the rollicking humor . . has many and varied interests . . . collects recipes . . . enjoys reading . . . frequents the local bowling alleys at every opportunity . . . believes that "there's a time and place for everything" . . . is doing well at her business course . . . hopes to be a secretary after graduation. .Q 90"- ffft ff: .nm . A is - - ,f,.Q+,-gas 1 . V A if-93, args- fli .sax- S, ANQ'Ff1giQ-ii . EDWARD JAMES HINES Ed, the sports-minded . . . active on basketball, track, and cross coun- try teams . . . "Sports is his dish" . . . outside of school, too . . . mem- ber of the Student-Faculty Council . . . seeks to promote the public wel- fare through his own thirst for adven- utre . . . intends to go to college so that he may become an F. B. I. agent. MARGARET JEANETTE HUGHES Margie, our own Gene Krupa . . . alert and likable, enjoys beating the drums in spare time . . . a talented acrobat . . . plays a good game of basketball-also enjoys watching . . . tries to live up to the adage, "Prac- tice makes perfect" . . . hopes to be- come an orchestral drummer. A ' CAROL MARIE HOLMBERG Susie, the punctual . . . believes "knowledge is power" . . . proved it in election to National Honor Society in junior year . . . favorite spare time activity is music . . . belongs to Senior Girl Guides and Camera Club . . . work on The Beehive has given her practice for a journalistic career. JOSEPH DUDLEY HULTGREN Dud, the gentleman . . . quiet, yet with a keen sense of humor . . . prac- tices motto, "Be sure you are right -then go aheadl' . . . enjoys all kinds of sports . . . interested in construct- ing model airplanes . . . likes the novels of Robert Louis Stevenson . . . will attend college, but has no definite course in mind. 57 fav si K 2 ,I 'Iii g 'E' RALPH ANTHONY INGENITO Inge, the ingenious . . . thinks that "Life is too short for mean anxieties" . . . interested in divers sports- namely, basketball, swimming, and skating . . . will perhaps forgo prom to make corsages at reduced prices . . . or then again he may make only one special one . . . hopes to become a florist. SOPHIE MARY JACYNOWICZ Sophie, the unostentatious . . . be- lieves that "a silent worker is the best worker" . . . never misses a football game . . . for her own exer- cise, takes to skates . . . studies a business course . . . when she has a choice in the music she's listening to, picks popular tunes . . . plans to be- come a secretary after graduation. FRANK STANLEY JABLONSKI Frank, the friendly, the popular . . . general manager of all athletics at NBHS . . . affiliated with the foot- ball, basketball, and baseball teams . . . outside of school, main interests are sports and photography . . . prac- tices the motto, "If you're going to do it, do it right" . . . will turn his hobby of photography into a pro- fession. HENRY JAKOWENKO jerry, the jolly . . . knows all the latest song hits . . . heavy hitter at home plate, really has the ball flying . . . makes full use of a fishing license . . . believes you should "look ahead, or you will never get ahead" . . . plans for after graduation are un- decided. el' 4-fig' RICHARD VITO JACOBS Jake, the jovial . . . says, "Be happy if you would be wise" . . . is serious enough to carry an academic course . . . light-hearted enough to like popular music . . . prefers baseball be- fore all other sports . . . will devote his preparation to a career as a machinist. SOPHIE VERONICA JANIK Sophie, the serious . . . believes "a thing seriously pursued affords great enjoyment" . . . a likable bookworm . . . hails from Pennsylvania . . . is fond of any music, either popular or classical . . . follows business course . . . has her objective all set . . . hopes to get a position in civil service after graduation. 58 z DONALD LEON JANIS Janis, the musician . . . whole school life centers around music . . . lives with "a song in his heart" . . . has produced many a note for the Musical Club . . . member of orches- tra, band, and chorus . . . appeared in All-State Band at Portsmouth . . . plans to follow music as his career. CHESTER JOHN JASENSKI Chet, lover of nature . . . quiet sense of humor belies his interest in popular music and social life . . . Red and Gold Review representative in his section room . . . concerned with mathematics, literature, science . . . hears, "the greenwood calls to cool deep haunts away" . . . seeks them in his plans to be a forest ranger. f,- .bs .- ". . .. Q- C3 -'Isa , -L"-1' 6, .. 5.5-1.'w,' . . ,. - -V., -., . X. 'f.,'- -li 'Q' CAROLYN BARBARA JANKOSKI Swede, the pleasant . . . an attrac- tive blonde . . . with a wonderful wardrobe . . . has "a smile and na- ture that will destroy all downheart- edness . . . served as Girls' League representative for her section room . . . attends every junior College Club and Civic Forum meeting . . . has hopes of becoming an account- ing teacher. ANDREW STEPHEN JASINSKI Andy, the amicable . . . a flying enthusiast . . . a shutter-bug . . . knows all there is to know about photography . . . turns out some fine shots . . . believes "one for all and all for one" would solve all world problems . . . hopes to do a lot of traveling and own a business. THERESA MARY JANOWSKI Terry of the eternal smile . . . says, "A smile for everyone at every possible time" . . . glides gaily over the dance floor . . , enjoys all music . . . at home, collects stamps and reads who-dunnits by Agatha Christie . . . in school, one of our Senior Girl Guides . . . takes a business course for secretarial work. WESLEY JOHN JENOSKI Wett, the livewire . . . quick as a whip on the dance floor . . . can listen to jazz for hours . . . spends leisure time following sports . . . reads popular fiction . . . tries to "live each day fully" . . . follows an academic course . . . studying to be a mechanic. M it Q 5. . , .,.iA will 6 .e., 59 uh? wifi Q x ' H tu J , , , S , A , 44, Y - --,Q g.,f'S'5 '24 , -2,534 V f iii ',f- i. ggi' " iiviij' ALLAN EDWARD JOHNSON AI of the artistic talent . . . has considerable drawing ability . . . saw- ing wood is another of his specialties . . . thinks that "as nature colors flowers, so art colors life" . . . man- ages to find a little time for football, however . . . intends to become an artist or enter the business world. DOROTHY LOUISE KALINAUSKAS Dot, the word-wise . . . received the Hartford Courant, Conn. Circle, and the V. F. W. Writing Awards . . . has taken part in Amphion Club productions . . . was president of the Foreign Affairs Club . . . "Success comes to him who asks," says she . . . intends to continue her work in writ- ing and dramatics. NATALIE LOOMIS JONES Tilli, the ever-loving . . . vice- president of Foreign Affairs Club . . . belongs to a cappella chorus and Senior Choir . . . chairman of ushers in Musical Club . . . attended New and State Festivals . . . England member of Junior College Club . . . trusts in motto, "Seek honor first and pleasure lies behind" . . . will work in textile merchandising field. VICTOR ARISTADES KALINOSKI Vic, the adamant . . . follows his own advice when he says, "Naught but firmness gains the prize" . . . an active admirer of the fair sex . . . uses his voice to good advantage in the Senior Choir of the Musical Club . . . intends to become a pharmacist. 9 A JAMES HARRISON KAISER jim, the entertaining . . . strikes home with his acquaintances . . . knows no Waterloo in sports . . . is another Byron Nelson on the golf links . . . has probably read more Burma Shave signs than most of us, for he has traveled extensively throughout the country . . . his ambi- tion is to "see the world and all its treasure." ADOLPH JOHN KALLBERG Kal, the sportsman . . . wields a fishing rod with skill even if he doesn't always catch anything . . . during the hunting season, he can be found pursuing another of his hob- bies . . . winter finds him skiing . . . "The pleasure is in the seeking" . . . hopes to find his career in agriculture or dairy farming. x 60 f---v' m fir? SHIRLEY ANN KALLERMAN Shirl, sans temper, sans enemies . . . argues only for Republican party . . . saves her vocal strength for lead- ing cheers . . . believes she's a pro- fessional . . . is a well-informed mem- ber of Foreign Affairs Club and the Camera Club . . . "A loving heart is the beginning of all knowledge" . . . her goal is to be a medical secretary. ELIZABETH MARY KAMINSKY Rio of the ready smile . . . twirls a mean baton on the football field with the Twirlerettes . . , thinks danc- ing and modern music make a grand pair . . . among her sports, swimming stands first . . . believes that "living is real learning" . . . her ambition is to travel and see the world. JEANETTE SHIRLEY KAMEN SKI Jeanette of the deft fingers . . . sewing keeps her occupied when she has spare time . . . summer finds her swimming, and winter, skating . . . prefers popular and semiclassical music . . . takes a technical course . . . believes "beauty is more than skin deep" . . . but is training to be- come a beautician. GEORGE KARANIAN George, the nonchalant . . . says, "Sing we for love and idlenessg naught else is worth the having" . . . trains his eye for hunting by guessing the pitcher's style . . . rather good at both . . . taking a college course, optimistically intends to enter the business field. BARBARA MARIE KAMINSKI Bobbie, the tall . . . believes we should follow the proverb, "Fais ce que dois, advienne que pourra" . . . takes an active interest in dancing and skating . . . representative for The Red and Gold Review . . . "Long Ago and Far Away" is her favorite song . . . likes reading when she has a few spare moments . . . undecided between becoming a nurse or a Wave. ROBERT WILLIAM KARDOK Kardy of the ebullient spirit . . . believes "nature designed us to be of good cheer" . . . proves it by his happy-go-lucky manner . . . is a very good dancer . . . also interested in hunting . . . after graduation he in- tends to get into the U. S. Forestry Service. tiff.. 5 wa-evil K 61 DANIEL JOSEPH KARPIEJ Dan, the traveller . . . makes a hobby of journeying to different places . . . settling down with a good book attracts him when he's at home . . . believes that "if you seek the truth, the truth shall make you free" . . . has no definite plans for the future. ' JOSEPH PATRICK KASITUS joe, the sociable and genial . . . helps the baseball team on to victory in every game . . . argues, "He is foolish who does more than he must" . . . is the proud possessor of a large record collection . . . Peggy Lee and Doris Day are his favorite singers . . . hopes to become a cartoonist after graduation. RICHARD DICK KARZIAN Karz, the quiet . . . does tricks with his pencil . . . convincing art work . . . leading his sports parade are basketball and baseball . . . re- mains up-to-date on popular hits . . . believes 'fsuccess consists chiefly in keeping out of the rough" . . . hopes to be a physical education instructor or an artist. EDWARD WALTER KASK Ed, the efficient . . . has some knowledge of philately Cstamp-col- lecting to you! . . . a member of the Civic Forum . . . fishing season finds him with rod, reel, and hopeful creel . . . is making a success of his busi- ness course . . . says, "I know the world was made for business" . . . hopes to attend business college. 'Nw FLORENCE ANN KASEK Casey, the gay and carefree . . . says, "Let me live, and let me laugh" . . . transfers her cheerful enthusiasm to music or sports, as the occasion demands . . . elected press repre- sentative by her section room . . . hopes to find her career in secretarial work. ELEANOR MARY KASPROW Ellie, the placid . . . practices her favorite motto "Friendly words and smiles for everyone" . . . one of the helpful members of the Senior Girl Guides . . . fond of popular music . . . knows all the Hit Parade tunes . . . should make a fine secertary in a few months. 62 if EVELYN MARY KASPROW Evie, the attractive . . . blonde, of medium height . . . is a representa- tive to The Red and Gold Review and Girls' League . . . member of the Junior College Club and National Honor Society . . . says, "He who wants the kernel, must crack the nut" . . . will attend college in the hope of becoming a medical secretary. ALAN BERNARD KATZ Al, the Herr . . . sometimes a comedian, but always a gentleman . . . plays a clarinet that really sends people - neighbors haven't come home yet . . . member of Senior Choir band, orchestra, and All-State Band '48 . . . claims "happiness is in taste-not in things" . . . campus life lies ahead. BARBARA MARY KATA Bobbie, the sensible . . . an at- tractive blonde with a wide wardrobe . . . elected to the National Honor Society in Junior year . . . representa- tive to The Beehive, Senior Girl Guide, and Junior College Club member . . . advocates, "We must take the current when it serves or lose our ventures" . . . will enter field of social science. BARBARA JUNE KATZUNG Bobbie of the untiring energy . . . tall and blonde . . . realizes the truth of "what costs the least and means the most is just a pleasant smile" . . . is fond of music in the blues or boogie-woogie vein . . . intends to become a medical technician. ""..'.?' MARY ANN KATA Medge of the merry disposition . . . this little slender blonde is seen at every game as the head majorette . . . enjoys all sports, especially foot- ball and basketball . . . likes to swim and dance . . . is fond of the quota- tion, "Love me little, love me long" . . . will become a nurse in a few years. MARY THERESA KELLY Kelly, the amiable . . . ambitious toward her studies . . . professes that "happiness is at once the best, the noblest, the pleasantest of all things" . . . fond of popular ballads, soft and sweet . . . enjoys dancing . . . roots for the Boston Red Sox . . . has no definite plans for the future. 45" 'Q' 3 WINIFRED MAY KELSO Winnie of the winsome smile . . . came to NBHS from Williams Mem- orial Institute . . . enjoys reading the classics . . . it can be said of her that "gladly would she learn, and gladly teach" . . . will prove the latter part of the quotation as an English teacher. LORETT A JUNE KENURE Loretta, the spirited . . . an at- tractive small brunette . . . can be found at the swimming pools during the summer . . . enjoys dancing . . . likes popular music . . . says that "success awaits at labor's gates" . . . is making a success of her business course . . . should make a good secretary. fr-in M' N, DOROTHY ANN KENNA Dot, the delightful . . . a petite brunette who is definite proof, "Small in stature, but not in actions" . . . attends all football games, where she lends support to our team-and espe- cially her brother . . . takes academic course to prepare for a career as a nurse. LEON CLEMEN T KIRK Kirk, the dutiful . . . a camera enthusiast, is director of photography at the YMCA . . . is a talented archer . . . enjoys chemistry as a hobby . . . belongs to Men's College Club, Civic Forum, and a cappella . . . believes that "work has its own gratification" . . . will major in chemical engineer- ing at college. 64 LEO JOHN KENNA Leo, the genial . . . modest about his accomplishments on the gridiron every Saturday . . . believes that 'lit is not strength, but art, obtains the prize" . . . enjoys dancing and lis- tening to popular music . . . pursues a technical course . . . will become a member of the U. S. Marine Corps. RAYMOND JOSEPH KLEJBUK Rack of the infectious personality . . . representative to Student-Faculty Council . . . section room president . . . hits furiously on our baseball team . . . belongs to Ski Club, a cap- pella, Senior Choir, and men's chorus . . . advises, "Let knowledge grow from more to more" . . . will prepare for pharmacy work. Ai VIRGINIA RAU KLENSKE Gini, the gracious . . . served as Girls' League representative . . . member of the Senior Girl Guides, glee club, a cappella chorus, Senior Choir, Starlettes, and the Foreign Affairs Club . . . owns a large collec- tion of foreign dolls . . . likes to write letters . . . believes that "patience is power" . . . will become a medical secretary. MATTHEW JOSEPH KLIMKIEWICZ Klim, seeker of life's finer things . . . believes that "through the arts we advance" . . . member of pub- licity committee of Senior Class play . . . most of his time is devoted to art work . . .oils, crayons, water colors fthe last preferablyj he loves . . . on The Beehive art stai . . . aims at becoming a commercial artist. LAWRENCE WILLIAM KLETT Larry, shy, but personable . . . has an unassuming manner . . . has shown himself to be "a quiet man, but a good one" . . . an active participant in football and track contests . . . is interested in sports as a hobby out- side of school, too . . . hopes to make sports announcing his career. JOAN THERESA KLOSKOWSKI Ski of the flexible fingers . . . leader of our clever twirlers . . . proves that "the hand is quicker than the eye" . . . helps our cheering sec- tion at basketball and football games . . . has been custodian of funds for 203 . . . will put in her bid for the white cap of the nurse. s 1 I 1 fx 455' in ,Q Y Q. :rj A 12, A 6 Q 1-,M i v ,, L my Q, K.. A .1 . , , , L 'J sf in sf ix ' 'E ' I .,. if ms x -,Q K axis 2 8 gg x axe ra' A if 3 li, A . . .Q N giiif is t ,, t bgi 3 43 QL 1' gtg- g 4 -g:tf?g?Qt , A e ' i s F' sv 'g?'fw. . Q--Q. - ' s , ' n fxfius ' .1 :ft , sw 'Was ww, ROBERT DAVID KLIM Bob of the hearty laugh . . . a talented actor . . . was on the cross- country team in his junior year . . . says that "he who laughs last, laughs best" . . . intent on getting people to "watch the birdie, please" . . . hopes to put his hobby to good use as a professional photographer. HENRY JOHN KOBYLAS Henry, the swing-fiend . . . has developed his interest in photography into an absorbing hobby . . . an ac- tive participant in both basketball and baseball games . . . is taking a technical course . . . "Neither wise men nor fools can work without tools" . . . therefore Henry will be- come a tool and die maker. wi as I I li' T JOHN KOCHANOWSKI Koch with a heart full of song . . . as a music lover, belongs to the Musical Club and Senior Choir . . . wants everything on the up and up . . . says, "An open enemy is better than a false friend" . . . wishes to teach others the art of playing the accordian. LEONARD PETER KOSAKOWSKI Butch, the light-hearted . . . rolls up spares and strikes by much prac- tice . . . Tex Beneke and Stan Ken- ton are his favorite musicians . . . sings with the Musical Club . . . be- lieves that "action is conducive to happiness" . . . is taking a business course . . . hopes to enter the field of business management. DOROTHY ANN KOKOSZKA Koko, the hopeful . . . advises, "Look at the bright side" . . . loves athletics and therefore enjoys her gym period tremendously . . . swim- ming also gets her vote as a wonder- ful pastime . . . finds spare moments to "swing and sway with Sammy Kaye" . . . belongs to Civic Forum . . . will enter the popular field of nursing. ZYGMUND STANLEY KOSAKOWSKI Ziggy, lover of the wide open spaces . . . fishes and hunts whenever possible . . . takes his favorite quota- tion from the writings of Shakespeare . . . "To be or not to be" . . . how- ever shows no indecision in his hope to climb to the top as an engineer. J OHANNA HELEN KORZENIECKY jay, "Gay, but with dignity" . . . marches at Willow Brook Park with the Twirlerettes . . . as for music, likes "anything by Vaughn Monroe" . . . enjoys every last minute of a football game . . . dancing and swim- ming are her other spare time activ- ities . . . undecided about the future. BARBARA JEAN Koss Bobbie, pleasant and sympathetic . . . believes "the mind makes a man noble" . . . excellent academic attain- ments won her the coveted Greek pin, a symbol of outstanding ability, and National Honor Society member- ship . . . thus, her Honors Day speech on scholarship was sincere . . . active in Amphion Club, Girl Guides . . . will become a teacher. 66 udp- fm' fi . ,Q 1-.-R ft ' get piety.-af fc 513- 1 :hi r-,J why ,-,.r ' C r'1i?3i-L Yi.-.1-k.. Zig- --'fi mrzlft .413 rf'5 11 mf iiaiueifif Q- K gwmf.-F ' - K Q3 3-,+'b.Jf5 ,. Q --L X '. Kfffw-IJJQCK an-: . fs ' Q :., Y- 1 e9y:"gf. x 4 x f.v.r,-.-:-,t. ., sy., , . A , .. . EM IL PETER KOWALCHYK Pete, a touch of humor and a touch of common sense . . . says, "We learn by finding our own answers" . . . representative for The Beehive . . . one of the bright lights in the Senior Class play . . . member of Amphion Club . . . aims at becoming a chemist in the field of atomic energy. EDWARD HENRY KRAWIEC Ed, the fleet-footed daredevil . . . selects the following quotation: "I understand you wish to undertake the overthrowing of our undertaking" . . . sparkles on the basketball court . . . however, is interested in all sports . . . likes the musical medium, semi- classical . . . will be a physical edu- cation director. ' fx F. m.,.e- 11 ,357 ,kE.1:,',fE ,3.1 ,,4:fi,.':,, .qggztaw 'gi' 1- t HENRY FELIX KOWALCZYK Hank, a peace-loving soul . . . en- joys fishing in a secluded spot . . . derives his exercise from bowling and skating . . . now and then for lis- tening pleasure he tunes in a sym- phony . . . "No man can tell what the future may bring forth" . . . Hank is no exception. HERBERT JOSEPH KREITNER Hal, the persevering . . . unhappy if he's not active . . . crazy about basketball, which he plays with great skill . . . in fall this young man's fancy turns to thoughts of hunting and trapping . . . another Vaughn Monroe fan . . . believes that "per- severance holds the ship" . . . has hopes of entering college. ROSE CATHERINE KOZIATEK Shortstop, emitter of happiness . . . knows goodness is rewarded . . . born four days early for valentines, but still says, "Love conquers all" . . . is an enthusiastic swimmer . . . likes popular music either at dances or at home . . . never has a gripe, never a frown . . . intends to become a secretary. DELPHINE ALICE KROM Del, the artistic . . . musical yearn- ings are satisfied by something soft and sweet . . . interest in many things makes her a well-liked person . . . loves to dabble with a brush-be- cause she feels "art has a closeness to nature" . . . if all goes well, she'll some day be a commercial artist. X - X! 67 '09 'K' DOROTHY STESIA KRYSTOF Dottie, given to faith, hope, and charity . . . holds to the unselfish conviction that "to nurse the sick to health is in itself a reward" . . . in her spare moments she is enter- tained by Blackmore's works . . . her ambition is to become-fyou guessed itll-a nurse. RICHARD DONALD KUPEC Dick, the lively . . . hacks for the Golf Club . . . when not smacking a golf ball, he's licking stamps-of which he has a good collection . . . is a member of the Stamp Club . . . enjoys music by Sammy Kaye . . . believes, "Patience leads to success" . . . intends to go to college. IRENE BERNICE KULAS Kulie of the irrepressible spirit . . . her spontaneous enthusiasm guaran- tees her a good time on all occasions . . . believes "variety is the essence of living" . . . serves as representa- tive to the Student-Faculty Council . . . member of the Civic Forum . . . intends to enter the field of nursing. STANLEY JOESPH KURASIENSKI Stut, the score-minded . . . in- variably asks, "What's cooking, Bud?" . . . as long as it is a game, anything will do . . . plays on baseball team . . . strengthens our cheering section at football games . . . takes a general course in preparation for a business career after graduation. SHIRLEY CAROLINE KUMM Krum, the clement . . . possesses a quiet, unassuming manner . . . says, "Life is nothing without friendship" . . . belongs to the Civic Forum . . . has an unusual collection of post cards from all around the world . . . gay enough to enjoy attending dances frequently . . . will enter the business world as a secretary. MARY ANN JOAN KURNIK Handy Honey . . . likes to putter around the kitchen . . . can turn out some grand dishes . . . says, "A job well started is half done" . . . often heard humming "Little White Lies" . . . will probably be giving some office the homey touch in the not too distant future. AF'-' WESLEY LOUIS KUTSCHER Wesley, the companionable . . . is a sports enthusiast, like most of his fellow students . . . says, "Don't give up when the going's tough" . . . hasn't participated in many school activities . . . follows academic course, but is undecided concerning future . . . hopes it won't be school. LEONARD ANTHONY LABIENIEC Lennie, the lively . . . tall, blond, personable young man . . . talented musician . . . plays in both the band and orchestra . . . also active on the football team . . . says it's important to "play each game hard . . . even in the field of life" . . . has not yet decided what career he will pursue after finishing college. MW" - i " ?WiN 6 ,t V QL gafffzf 'ew 6'y.Qg,g L. 4 's eve- ,,,, og, :,. A, lif- Qglsfs' :Q Q.-,V wk ffej' 33" if jg is :Tiki W " ni. 'Q - Q fired lgvg-:is 3-Qiisf.,-wx. Qi 3 , 15,Qi'f?A "' CLARA BARBARA KWASNIK Kwaz, the clever . . . member of Musical Club . . . participated in the famous Student-Faculty baseball game . . . while serving as a library page, practices "a cheerful smile is like gold" . . . for athletic activities likes baseball, roller skating and bowling . . . carries business course for secretarial work. LAURA LUCILLE LACHOWICZ Lu, the lighthearted . . . always ready with a smile . . . tells us ardent- ly, "Music knows no nationality nor age" . . . has been a member of the Musical Club for three years . . . spare moments find her practicing her tennis strokes . . . or playing with the keyboard . . . has chosen to become a woman in white. -cd f-'Q ANNA MARTHA LABIENIEC Shorty, the aggressive . . . believes, "No action ever done, but leaves a record" . . . says skates are more com- fortable than shoes . . . makes Sat- urday's football games a must . . . "Night and Day" is her favorite tune . . . wants to work in an office after graduation. JOYCE CAROL LADZINSKI Joyce, the elevator of drooping spirits . . . her formula? . . . "She greets them smiling, one and all" . . . did her share for the homeroom . . . has been representative to the Girls' League, Student-Faculty Coun- cil, and Athletic Association . . . an ardent Frankie Laine fan . . . this busy gal has had little time to con- sider her future. 69 JOHN PAUL LA ,HAR john, the motor-minded . . . in- vests his spare time in studying ama- teur radio and high fidelity phono- graphs . . . his musical preferences are for the symphonic variety . . . believes "miracles belong to tomor- row" . . . his college course is paving the way to a career as an electronic engineer. ROGER ALLAN LARSON Swede, the imperturbable . . . acts calmly about everything except horse- back riding . . . offers a threat to Roy Rogers . . . eats heartily, by yumpin' yimminy . . . likes to watch midget autos burn up the track . . . believes "the loss which is unknown is no loss at all" . . . is undecided beyond June. ff!!- DOLORES BARBARA LA MONTE Lorry, the brunette beauty . . . her special form of recreation is danc- ing . . . can often be found at the "Y" dances . . . advocates, "Smile your troubles away" and means it . . . carries academic course . . . what she'll do after graduation is as yet a secret. JOSEPH ARTHUR LEBOURDAIS joe of the skilled hands . . . says, "We all draw a little" . . . he him- self proves this, as his fellow Art Club members will agree . . . how- ever, the drawing board does not hold all his attention . . . he is very adept at the piano keyboard, too . . . will devote himself to the latter. 70 JEAN ELSIE LARSON Jeanie of the merry manner . . . always remembers "the ability to laugh is precious" . . . welcomes an occasional bike-hike . . . knows her way around in water . . . as spectator, enjoys football and baseball . . . re- hearsed for Class Night as a junior usher . . . will enter U-Conn. . . . should make a good nurse. OLGA PAULI NE LEHMAN Olga, the placid . . . says, "Keep thy friend under thine own life's key" . . . has applied herself to her col- lege preparatory course with success . . . thereby won election to the Na- tional Honor Society . . . has all the qualities needed to become an effi- cient nurse . . . will enter Hartford Hospital School of Nursing next September. JW SANDRA JUDITH LEHRER Simi, the tranquil . . . a blazing redhead with remarkable calmness and self-composure . . . as cheerlead- er, however, gives many a spirited "rah-rah!" . . . modest member of the Honor Society . . . illustrates, "No beauty is like the beauty of the mind" . . . adds talent to Musical and Amphion Clubs . . . will major in s cholo . aiycyfbilgy-Boflf6X60 " ' JOHN PETER LIISTRO John, the jovial . . . one-half of the Liistro twins . . . says, "Happiness seems made to be shared" . . . Mac- Lean should get a Firm hold on that Olympic swim crown-John may be giving him trouble soon . . . rates modern music high . . . has success- fully pursued his business course for future as an accountant. all' 215 ARMAND DANIEL LEMELIN AI, the generous . . . believes "not what we give, but what we share- for the gift without the giver is bare" . . . on the lighter side of life, has many and varied interests . . . likes to hunt, swim, dance, and travel . . . hopes to join the Marines and see the world. SEBASTIAN CHARLES LII STRO Sebby, the easy-to-get-along-with . . . other half of set of Liistros . . . homeruns, strikeouts, grounders . . . baseball and more baseball, his spare time joy . . . advises, "Make haste to live and consider each day a life" . . . unlike his twin, likes classical music . . . career of accounting, his aspiration. 71 ELIZABETH FRANCES LESEVICIUS Betty of the gay, casual manner . . . says, "A happy heart is better than wealth" . . . she should know . . . especially enjoys the cooling fun of swimming on hot days . . . finds dancing a splendid year-round form of relaxation . . . after graduation hopes to begin nurse's training. THEODORE AUGUST LINDQUIST Ted of the abundant vitality . . . a team of horses couldn't keep him down for long . . . there is "nowhere so busy a man" . . . uses up some of his energy playing basketball . . . swimming takes care of any that may be left over . . . hopes to enter the field of insurance. MARY ANN LINOCI Mary, the pleasantly efficient . . . a whiz in anything from Latin IV to advanced Algebra . . . election to National Honor Society in junior year proved her abilities . . . prac- tices enthusiastically "A smile as long as the day" . . . though future plans include college, as yet she hasn't decided on a definite career. CAROLYN ROYCE LOOMIS Carolyn, the competent . . . able secretary of the National Honor So- ciety . . . is active in sports . . . dis- plays indefatigable energy in field hockey and swim teams . . . her in- genious suggestions add liveliness to Junior College Club meetings . . . a Senior Girl Guide, believes "life is but thought" . . . future career: a social worker. RAYMOND JOSEPH LISS Bucky . . . quiet, serious toward his school work . . . but an avid out- doors man . . . prefers the field and stream to the polished fioor . . . be- lieves "the last one in is the first one out" . . . is an active member of the Civic Forum . . . will begin his study of engineering in college next Sep- tember. THERESA ANN LOSTUMBO Terry of the artistic touch . . . en- joys drawing, and we mean more than mere doodling . . . believes and proves on canvas that "a picture is a poem without words" . . . for di- version and excitement, likes all sports . . . follows an academic course with the intention of making art her career. GENEVIEVE JEANETTE LISTRO Gwen, the gracious . . . says, "Ideals are like starsg you choose them as your guides and following them, reach your destiny" . . . a good little actress in the Amphion Club and Senior Class play . . . col- lects miniature dolls . . . talented in art . . . hopes to make costume de- signing or illustrating her career. PEARLMON MELVIN LUMPKIN, JR. Duke, the gentleman . . . cour- teous, obliging . . . efficient presi- dent of junior, Senior classes . . . Key and Musical Clubs claim him as treasurer . . . active member of band and track team . . . represents Student-Faculty Council, A. A., and The Beehive . . ., "He bears his facul- ties so meek in his great office" . . . future: music teacher-maybe. 72 ,Q 4 1 .V ,Q .Q Q--1, SE, 4,2 ' .W 13 , Q q f .4 'kgs- , f., 'Trim ,. 9 41 egg' , 4,32 Q 5 , ,. 65 :E ki Q " x Q .Si Q. x 2 wx Y - K , .Hg .- . sy 'Wx . , QQ. T. K SNES- f sa jimi M '- 5 .YY Fw?-2' 'x ' .K E- ,. f :f M ,Q ,, pr Kkigggff 5 . gg bgh.-.., .f wg W 6 , . g X is-3' x .R ig Ki: 22, g - - X X' -gg: gf QQWW' ,.Lx ,L is WILLIAM MAHER Bill, the rugged type . . . stirs up dust with the track team . . . played halfback on the football team . . . anything of the sports world holds his interest . . . believes "he runs far that never turns" . . . takes col- lege preparatory subjects, but is un- decided about plans of the future. ANNE AGNAS MALICKI Micki, the merry . . . has a ready joke for every friend . . . feels that "a world of mirth has no room for sorrow" . . . takes times seriously . . . will make a good housewife as her favorite hobbies are sewing and cook- ing . . . hopes just to be successful as a secretary. 'QM' THERESA BARBARA MAKUCIN Terry of the eternal laughter . . . believes "a smile will carry you through" . . . one of our Senior Girl Guides . . . a representative for The Beehive in 211 . . . out of school, enjoys knitting, popular music, and dancing . . . reads murder mysteries of Agatha Christie . . . in school, takes business subjects . . . plans to enter secretarial work. LEO MARTIN MALICKI Hustler, the Yankees' defender . . . keeps his ears glued to the radio for the latest scores . . . especially as a baseball fan . . . listens to modem music between sports broadcasts . . . says, "There's no smoke without fire" . . . will further his education after graduation from NBHS. JULIE ANN MALENO Meno, the domestic type . , . in- terested in culinary art . . . and she doesn't stop with fudge, either . . . handy with needle and thread . . . says, "There's no place like home" . . . if she whistles while she works, it's the newest popular tune . . . carries a business course and plans to enter secretarial work. IRENE ANN MALINOWSKI Rene, the dependable . . . The Beehive representative for 211 . . . sold sweets at Junior Class play . . . keeps up to date in Foreign Affairs Club . . . heavy hitter on junior baseball team . . . at home, collects records of popular tunes . . . contends "quietness means virtue" . . . enjoys ice skating season . . . will practice secretarial work after graduation. 74 ANN MANCARELLA Mac, the meritorious . . .one of our Senior Girl Guides . . . Girls' League and Press Club representative . . . follows through her hobby of baseball by being on junior baseball team and starring on class day . . . feels "at home at home plate" . . . takes business course preparing for secretarial work. ADA LOUISE MANIS Ada, the able . . . believes it im- portant "to strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield" . . . practices it, too . . . a native New Yorker . . . interested in church activities . . . is fond of dancing and listening to popular music . . . efficient in the studies in her academic course . . . undecided concerning her career. .W, 4 BARBARA ANN MANCHAK Bob of the many activities . . . takes a taste of each sport, but spe- cializes in none . . . takes lessons on how to be a future mermaid . . . is a good salesman for school paper by believing "humor is often of great utility" . . . takes business course to enter office work. IRENE ANNA MARCH Renie, the vivacious . . . well- dressed blonde . . . luckily possesses a large, well-chosen wardrobe . . . believes it important to "always look on the cheerful side of life" . . . pre- fers listening to popular music . . . likes movies . . . and groups of people . . . has not yet made plans for a future career. 75 .T 0 C? MARY ANN MANDUKE Mandy of the candid comments . . . says, "Silence is the genius of fools and one of the virtues of the wise" . . . is sure the greatest com- posers belong to this century . . . studies her business course with dili- gence . . . intends to do secretarial work after graduation. DONALD HENRY MARCHESI Mike, the mirthful . . . a tall blond with a sense of humor . . . unleashes it on his fellow bowlers at the alleys . . . says, "Enjoy the present hour, be thankful for the past, and neither fear nor wish the approaches of the last" . . . has made no definite deci- sion about the future. J 'fee . .f.-.ff mf. p N, 1 I-,hy 3 is ' -','f fifw' a i 1 ,fvfgw LOUISE ELIZABETH MARCINKOWSKI Lou, the energetic . . . a sports- minded gal of NBHS . . . active on the field with hockey, softball, and swimming teams . . . skims down the snowcovered hills with the Ski Club every winter . . . believes that "we should play to live, not live to play" . . . as a physical instructress will teach other girls sports. JOSEPHINE ANN MARINO jo of the "friendly word and pleas- ing smile" for everyone . . . worked willingly on making up the leads for the junior and Senior Class plays . . . represented her fellow-Girls' Leaguers at the meetings . . . has been unable to make a choice for the future between hairdressing and dietetics. CAROLE JEANETTE MARGELOT Duchess, a sincere friend . . . be- lieves "a faithful friend is the medi- cine of life" . . . as a cheerleader for Goodwin Tech, she won many ad- mirers . . . her chief recreational de- light is barn-dancing . . . and how she can swing a partner . . . looks hopefully toward a career of hair dressing. ROBERT EARL MARION Bob, the benevolent . . . an out- door man . . . can be found in the woods with a gun slung over his shoulder during hunting season, but never on a school day . . . knows when fish are the easiest to catch . . . says, "A stitch in time saves nine" . . . plans to be a draftsman. ELIZABETH BIANCA MARINO Betty, the visionary . . . her thoughts return to her native land, Italy . . . lured by Masefield's lines, "I must go down to the sea again, to the lonely sea and the sky" . . . her ambition is to travel . . . likes poetry . . . assisted Junior girls' baseball team , . . will make her way into the business world. WALTER JOHN MARKIEWICZ Markie, the amazing . . . sparks the football team on to victory every Saturday . . . a "slugger" on the baseball team . . . says, "Of all sad words of tongue or pen, the saddest are these: it might have been" . . . sets marriage as his ambition. 76 ss ll' Qi-mil' A JEAN JOANN MARSH jean, the studious . . . rewarded for her diligence by election to the National Honor Society . . . also works hard on junior College Club activities . . . enjoys bowling, roller skating, and dancing . . . believes "travel is education" . . . ambition: secretarial work. LUCY MARY MAZZARELLA Lu, the petite brunette . . . des- pite tor because of?D her soft voice, was chosen as representative to Girls' League and The Beehive . . . owns a large collection of stamps . . . likes to dance . . . says, "Today is the tomorrow that you worried about yes- terday" . . . intends to enter the business world before becoming a housewife. 'ails NORMAN DELPHIS MARTINEAU Mart, the genial . . . an outdoor man . . . likes to go camping so that he may indulge in his favorite hob- bies, hunting and fishing . . . enjoys collecting stamps . . . says, "Life is nothing without friendship" . . . plans to join the Air Force and become an engineer. ANDREA ELIZEBETH MCADOO Andy, the picture of amiability and cheerfulness . . . proves that "a pleas- ing disposition is a major factor in success" . . . member, Senior Play property committee . . . diligence in studies resulted in election to the National Honor Society . . . Press representative, Senior Girl Guide . . . hopes to become a medical secretary. 77 IRENE ANN MATCZAK Matches of the objective viewpoint . . . contends, "Short reckonings make long friends" . . . follows the middle road of the academic course . . . col- lects records for her own enjoyment, but is glad to share . . . as to what her future career will be, she makes no statement. LOIS ANN MCALOON Mac, the merry . . . adds her spark to junior College Club meetings . . . says, "It takes life to love life" . . . "would be a mermaid fair" during the summer . . . chuckles over the words of Booth Tarkington . . . plans to instruct the little ones in gram- mar school. MARY ELLEN McAULIFFE Mick of the mighty vigor . . . adds another spark to the football field . . . with her cheerleaders, spurs New Britain to victory . . . a Senior Girl Guide and Junior College Club member . . . mighty Casey of Senior baseball team . . . says, "The great end of life is not knowledge, but action" . . . will teach. MARILYN JUNE MCGUIRE Mac, the popular . . . voted into the coveted office of president of the Senior Girl Guides . . . has "the heart of an artist" . . . practices her favorite occupation, doodling, in spare moments . . . this clever doodling will some day provide her with a career, for she intends to become a commer- cial artist. SHIRLEY ANN MCCORMACK Red, the active . . . attends foot- ball games regularly . . . likes to splash among the waves . . . has ac- quired equestrian skill . . . inspired by advice, "Go far," desires to travel . . . is conquering a business course to reach her goal of being either an accountant or a bookkeeper. THOMAS KANE McKNERNEY Mac, dodger of worry . . . draws line, "East is East and West is West" . . . lends willing ears to popular music, especially Vaughn Monroe's . . . goes even past the doodling stage with a pencil . . . carries books for college subjects . . . will plan for the future in the future. 'W VIOLET MAE MCDERMOTT Tootsie of the swift smile . . . taps her foot to rhythm of boogie-woogie . . . whirls around to it on dance floor . . . member of Civic Forum . . . finds adventure and romantic tales to her taste . . . in pursuing her busi- ness course, says, "Stand fast" . . . plans for the future remain there. RAMONA MARGARET MEEHAN Ramona, the exuberant . . . ex- pands her energy as a cheerleader . . . actually does "seize the day" . . . has a vivid and sparkling personal- ity . . . is a member of the Civic Forum . . . has a good collection of popular music . . . takes technical course in order to become a beau- tician. 78 1-eff GRACE HARRIET MELANDER Pete, the reliable . . . hustles around the office and on errands . . . in her own territory, a contemporary of Hedda Hopper or the like . . . Senior Girl Guide and The Beehive representative . . . proves true, "Who- ever would be pleased and please, must do what others do with ease" . . . future medical secretary. ARLINE LOUISE MESKILL Arline, the full-spirited . . . never misses a NBHS game . . . not only a spectator . . . puts on a good display as a Twirlerette . . . "Life's too full for worry," says she . . . besides band music at the games, finds popular tunes good listening . . . follows a college course, but plans for the future are undecided. Nix Q04 kW" SHIRLEY ROSE MELLION Pat of the quick wit . . . ever- ready with a joke . . . helps keep the office and library buzzing along . . . one of our Senior Girl Guides . . . adds gaiety to junior College Club meetings . . . partial to "You'll Never Walk Alone" . . . camera fan . . . has not decided between the careers of dentistry and language interpre- tation. NICHOLAS CHARLES METROS Nick, the congenial . . . favorite spot is any dance floor . . . favorite tunes are many, especially Vaughn Monroe's . . . member of Musical Club and Senior Choir . . . believes, "Strong minds demand strong bodies" . . . aims to be among the builders as a mechanical engineer. iii ' FW 4, QQ' Jena' ,aff f'- l . m 3: fl 3 DOLORES PATRICIA MENDITTO Dolores of the dancing heart . . . oh, to whirl about the ballroom! . . . puts on a good show with the Twirl- erettes . . . likes all dance music . . . "Come and trip it as ye go on the light fantastic toe" . . . helped with publicity for Senior Class play . . . hopes to become a dress designer or a fashion illustrator. LOIS MAE MEYERS Lo, the benevolent . . . follows rule, do Hall the good you can to everyone you can in all the ways you can" . . . contributed to the work of the property committee of the Senior Class play . . . her favorite all-time song is "Always" . . . enjoys dancing and sports when time affords . . . will be an understanding registered nurse. 'ax ROBERT ANTHONY MICHALSKI Bob, the music-maker . . . makes the accordian and piano talk any lan- guage . . . manager of NBHS band . . . spends his spare time as director of Key Club and member of College Club , . . an actor at heart, partici- pated in junior Class play as medical student . . . hopes to play the real role in college. SONIA MARY MOORADIAN Sonny of the indomitable spirit . . . advises, UI-Iope for the sun after the clouds" . . . as Musical Club member attended New London festival . . . Civic Forum also claims her time . . . for active recreation enjoys rolling the ball down the alley . . . her cour- age will be put to work in future as nurse. WILLIAM PETER MIECZKOWSKI Bill, the sportive . . . says, "A little nonsense now and then is relished by the wisest men" . . . belongs to Musi- cal Club and Civic Forum . . . en- joys hunting, fishing, and swimming . . . believes in having fun, even in music . . . swing is his style . . . col- lege course, College Club , . . plans to be an electrical engineer. ANNE PATRICIA MORAN Anne of the blithe spirit . . . says, "Love, live, and life will love you" . . . lends her ever-present gaiety to the Press Club, Civic Forum, and Amphion Club . . . a three-year press representative . . . enjoys tennis, dancing, and just having fun . . . caused complications in "january Thaw" . . . aspires to enter the field of nursing. ROBERT CHARLES MILLER Bob, the composed of manner . . . one of the Ski Club . . . representa- tive to Student-Faculty Council . . . takes to the woods in the hunting season . . . also makes model gas airplanes . . . most serious hobby is photography . . . since Hevery man is the architect of his own fortune," Bob may be a prosperous photographer. PAULINE LOUISE MORRISSETTE Paulie of the musical ability . . . sings with the chorus . . . made trips to Portsmouth and New London with the Musical Club . . . is rich in talent for playing the piano . . . believes "soft is the music that would charm forever" . . . hopes to find a position as an office worker. ,- 80 , Q , I' 'W fw- X -5 ts. .- -- ig , W . , Q wp .iz ,,,Q Q 5 .KE INXS mv 1 'rx N .r ff 5 5 f-as . ' . 9 ' ix , we f f? -.53 mf 1' rf . an Aw , .K N, 1. V ' ggi 1 We x , X 2 , H23 Q 1 A ' S 1 , ff X 5 igm L , ,Q -W, Qshn ' x w w, 5 f K7 2 xt X Q -. XY' ' ., gg. gems, A .4 W M X .xg ' 1, L, . Hb.-fls-Y " M "vii ' 52351 .ws .MZ , ,xy , QSIUPX, gig xx iw 6 52. ,Q x Q, Y. . . SX -353, X sf-f if , K Rig' ik""' f w ,wx Q Y . im-:I isa. 7 N. Ni E ' 13' " Q -HX -f M-q .,,..,:f 'M pf 'Q y in ,Q ,Jw , , .. 3322551 W .A -,gk ., f i ,554 1: - . Y X 5 -1, f4r"3lP FLORENCE FELICE MYSLIWIEC Florence, the nimble . . . takes a taste of all sports . . . knows tennis forehand and backhand . . . holds highly esteemed position of Twirler- ette . . . representative for The Bee- hive . . . foe of trouble, she says, "Tomorrow, do thy worst, for I have liv'd today" . . . is a future dental hygienist. NORMA ADELINE NEUMANN Norm, the foresighted . . . among her duties are being secretary of Student-Faculty Council and of Junior College Club . . . Honor Society member . . . won Key Award in Scholastic Writing Contest . . . as The Beehive photography editor merits compliments . . . believes "good courage breaks ill luck" . . . test tubes will be her badge of office as laboratory technician. SHIRLEY DOROTHY NELSON Shirl, the gifted . . . our very cap- able editor-in-chief of The Beehive . . . vice-president of the National Honor Society and purchasing chair- man of the Girls' League . . . sings with the Senior Choir . . . a talented pianist . . . knows "tout ce qui brille n'est pas or" . . . intends to go to the Katherine Gibbs' Secretarial School in New York. PAUL GUSTAVE NILSEN Paul, jolly and frolicsome . . . likes "anything for a laughn . . . his gaiety was a boon to the junior and Senior Class plays . . . both The Beehive and Red and Gold Review represen- tative . . . active in Foreign Affairs, Musical, and Amphion Clubs . , . will staunchly defend the Cleveland Indians and Republicans . . . intends to become a minister. CQA224! GERTRUDE MARY NEUHOLD Gert, the enthusiast . . . member of the Foreign Affairs Club and Senior Girl Guides . . . representative to the Red and Gold Review and The Beehive . . . capable Beehive secretary . . . has a 'Acute little voice and a dimple on her chin" . . . Na- tional Honor Society member . . . plans to become a secretary. JOHN WILLIAM NIXON Nick, the accomplished . . . on the football squadg in the classroom, in Musical Club . . . earned election to National Honor Society . . . is ener- getic president of Student-Faculty Council: secretary of Men's College and Key Clubs . . . "Not heedless of the future," was business manager of The Beehive . . . his future voca- tion: accounting. ,I I, e a X V X 1'9" BARBARA RUTH NORTON Barb, the hilarious . . . gets a laugh out of everything . . . possesses a vocabulary of facial contortions . . . unlike the prophecy, her face hasn't frozen . . . attractive member of the Twirlerettes and Musical Club . . . typical of her, "happy am I, from care I'm free" . . . the future: "Please take a letter, Miss Norton." RICHARD CHARLES NUTHMAN Noot of the twinkling wink . . . talks little . . . knows "silence is a friend who will never betray" . . . sprinter for our track team . . . also finds time for sports outside of NBHS . . . swimming, golf, and baseball are his favorites . . . helped with lighting in Senior Class play . . . is preparing for a career in interior decoration. -Q"""!P' FRED ELETON NORTON Blondie of the mighty muscles . . . spends spare time down at the "Y" . . . haunts gymnasiums . . . demon- strates his journalistic talents on the staff of The Red and Gold Review . . . believes in "a sound mind in a sound body" . . . will train to become a "Y" physical education director. CAROL ELEANOR NYQUIST Carol, the capable . . . has more offices than a politician can handle . . . among them, Jr. College Club treasurer, Girls' League publicity chairman, literary editor of The Bee- hive, and Student-Faculty Council representative . . . her outlook, "Good actions strengthen ourselves and in- spire good actions in others" . . . will adhere to it in social work. uv" ' 83 JENNIE MARY NOVICK jen, the gracious . . . a good stud- ent, member of Honor Society . . . belongs to Foreign Affairs Club . . . domestic type . . . has culinary talent . . . "Gracious as sunshine, sweet as dew" . . . seeks training for future job in academic course . . . hasn't de- cided whether to work for the govern- ment or for an insurance company. ALBERT JOSEPH OBERMEIER Al, better known as 4'Fritz Kreisler the 2nd" . . . rates an "A" at fiddlin' . . . has played violin on stage . . . fiddles away some of his time with the Musical Club . . . believes "from harmony this universal frame began" . . . but, chooses tool and die making and not music for his career. l K IZ? ' .y ,ki . X I 1 . ' . ..f""' V., , 2 . -"' ' rFils.'5 t t ,P , g , xrggivgj, 5. i,f5,g,25,g,. ,I - CHARLES GREGORY O'BRIEN Charlie, the always-gay . . . Latin, -shades of the Romans!-his favor- ite subject . . . one of the "Charming Charlies" of room 400 . . . sighs, "Forsan et haec olim meminisse juvabit" . . . delights in his Latin class's latest project, "Cicero" . . . will not become a Latin teacher, but may take up automotive engineering in college. JACOB ODISHOOE jake, the jokester . . . full of fun . . . big league baseball is his hobby . . . bowling alleys, his favorite hang- out . . . a high score is the result of his attempts at rolling the balls . . . says, "Play up, play up, and play the game" . . . will become a radio tech- nician. ANN MARIE O'CONNOR Nancy, the ambitious . . . wears the pin of the Honor Society . . . possesses "a certain miracle of wis- dom" . . . serves as a Senior Girl Guide . . . likes football games for recreation . . . a summer mermaid . . . follows business course . . . will speak well for NBHS training in col- lege next fall. MAUREEN FLORENCE 0'KEEFE Maureen, the tranquil . . . an Irish- man without a temper! . . . an eye- catching Twirlerette . . . Musical Club member and representative to Student-Faculty Council . . . says, "Every smile is worth its while" . . . "To be or not to be" an actress . . . as fair warning to Cornell, we say she's a determined young miss. 4-0 fqfvlyp DONALD GEORGE O'DEA Don, the likable . . . plays hard at most of the Red and Gold basket- ball games . . . his one interest both in and out of school is basketball . . . advises "Love the game beyond the prize" . . . some day we'll be reading the by-lines of D. O'Dea in the news- papers as he intends to become a journalist. ANNE PHYLLIS OKULICZ Red, the skillful . . . very talented with a brush . . . gets an artistic gleam in her eye every time she meets someone . . . portrait painting is her specialty . . . says, "Hand, head, and heart go together in art" . . . member of the Civic Forum . . . hopes to make portrait painting her career. .Air B4 .-4-'SV' HELEN MARY O'LEARY Helen of the friendly nature . . . is "someone who seems to under- stand, and never fails to lend a hand" . . . cheerful and sympathetic in man- ner . . .counts swimming and bicycle riding among her activities . . . tak- ing a business course . . . intends to become a practical nurse. RICHARD VINCENT OPULSKI Polski of the carefree spirit . . . during the hunting eason, slings his gun over his shoulder and heads for the woods . . . is A, A. representative for his section room . . . advises his friends to "get up in the world and fly" . . . hopes to follow this advice himself as a pilot. 1 Q S . a DORIS MARIE OLIVIER Doris, the demure . . . dependable, serious toward her schoolwork . . . says, "Next to love, quietness" . . . was elected representative to both Girls' League and Student-Faculty Council . . . secretary of Civic League . . . well versed in culinary arts . . . for recreation, enjoys tennis, bowl- ing, and dancing . . . intends to be- come a stenographer. EDMUND WALTER ORLOWSK Ed, the speed artist . . . racing around on a motorcycle is, in his opinion, the best way to pass time . . . "All men think all men mortal but themselves" . . . all types of music appeal to him . . . pursues an academic-technical course . . . his ambition is to see the world-on that motorcycle, Ed? JOHN WALLDAU OLSON Ollie of the clever tongue . . . second prize winner in the 1947 American Legion oratorical contest . . . uses that voice in cheering school teams . . . adds to his own pep with swimming, tennis, and baseball . . . realizes "it is easier to be critical than correct" . . . will make a good salesman, don't you think? WANDA CECILIA OSIECKA Wandy, the artist . . . likes draw- ing, painting, and anything to do with art . . . says, "Good will is lasting forever" . . . serves her section room as Student-Faculty Council represen- tative . . . belongs to the Junior Col- lege Club and Civic Forum . . . danc- ing and swimming are her spare time activities . . . hopes to attend art school. 85 a AV' 3' , an '-lv dbg, . r , of 1 ROBERT LOUIS OTFINOWSKI Bob, the zealous . . . recently elect- ed president of the Civic Forum . . . enjoys sports . . . appreciates spare moments when he can get down to work with pen and ink-either writ- ing or sketching . . . "Excelsior" . . . ambition is to be a Daniel Boone and blaze the trail as a geographer and author. ALBERT JOSEPH OUELLETT E AI, the speedster . . . knows "he who drives mad, drives alone" . . . when attending the midget auto races keeps this in mind . . . puttering with radios fascinates him . . . is Press representative in homeroom . . . for the future he is torn between his two loves: midget racing and radio work. -0 LILLIAN MARION OTTAVI Lil, the pleasing . . . popularity with classmates has won her election as Press representative, also alternate to Girls' League and Student-Faculty Council . . . she's one of the charter members of our new swim team . . . though "her life holds many an aim," uppermost aspiration is to become an accountant. LEONARD JOHN PAGANO Leonard, a good sport . . . literally and figuratively speaking . . . on bas- ketball team for Goodwin Technical School . . . sports writer for his class . . . selects Bill Lee as a model writer . . . knows, "A smart sport is a good sport" . . . hopes to use his knowledge of machines in the Navy. JOSEPH ANTHONY OTULAK joe, the genial . . .advises his friends, "A merry heart goes all day" . . . accordingly, ever has a cheery word . . . an ardent shutter-ling, gets many an interesting shot when off he goes to the woods to hunt . . . or to the streams to try his hand at cast- ing . . . will be a tool and die maker. MARY ANN PAGANO Mary, the optimistic . . . says, "I live on hope, and that I think do all who enter this world" . . . seems to like footwork, since her hobbies are hiking and dancing . . . has a good time on all occasions . . . intends to leave her future to fate . . . she has made no plans . . . or many. 5 86 fix!-Er K t -. will, af tl W DOLORES ANN PALARDY Dolly, the energetic . . . says, "Never a moment holds a lull, never dismal, never dull" . . . lends her enthusiastic support to baseball and football games . . . and to anyone in need . . . finds that modern jazz suits her personality best . . . intends to do oflice work after graduation. DONALD EDWARD PARKER Don, the imperturbable . . . al- ways "cool, calm, and collected" . . . never loses his temper nor his cheer- ful attitude toward life in general . . . served as Student-Faculty Coun- cil representative for his section room . . . occupies his spare time with bowling and dancing . . . intends to become a draftsman. ALBERT BARNARD PALMER Al, the nonchalant . . . says, "Do not worry about yesterday" . . . fol- lows his own advice . . . tries to bet- ter his bowling scores every time he visits the alleys . . . most of his extra- curricular activities are out of school . . . plans a career as a draftsman. IRENE MARY PARULSKI Olly, the smooth . . . yes, on the dance floor, too . . . pushes those bike pedals for many a mile . . . if she has a flat tire, explores the country- side on foot . . . gets to as many bas- ketball, football, and baseball games as time allows . . . believes "life is as you mould it" . . . plans, indefinite. 1 l , r. rf. fu 1- . 'C I. L 5 'YPA ' 87 CONNIE ANNE PANDOLFO Tini, the active . . . serves willing- ly as Girls' League representative . . . gave up some of her study periods to work in the library as a page . . . attends the Junior College Club affairs . . . a sports enthusiast out of school . . . is "cheerful and ever- busy" . . . her future career is un- certain. JOSEPH ANTHONY PASCALICCHIO joe of the many interests . . . spends some time on each . . . col- lects stamps as a hobby . . . belongs to the Musical Club . . . is a faith- ful baseball fan . . . likes popular music . . . serves as A. A. representa- tive for his homeroom . . . believes "one reward calls another" . . . plans to be a draftsman. dw.-a Q2 271 1 .2 V .Avy nw, -A., ef Z of "w M 'Aff' 5"- ' A, .3 M Q 22, ,he RICHARD PETER PASKOWSKI Brandnew, the patient . . . believes that "little strokes fell great oaks" . . . never in a hurry to get there . . . spends his spare time profitably by making radios . . . general handy- man . . . prefers semiclassical music . . . belongs to the Visual Aid Club . . . ambition is to be a radio engi- neer. ROGER PEASE Bigs, the conscientious . . . leader- ship has won confidence of his school- mates . . . serves as Key Club secre- tary . . . scholastic ability lifted him to presidency of Honor Society, mem- bership on Advisory Board, American Red Cross . . . a business manager of The Beehive . . . as an avocation, Bigs resorts to entymology . . . should be a good representative of our school in college. PETER CRAM PATTISON Pete, the unruffled . . . knows that "care is an enemy to life" . . . dis- misses all worry . . . devotes his at- tention to baseball in its season . . . is a member of the cross-country group . . . has decided to let the future take care of itself. ELEANOR META PECK EI of abundant ability . . . charac- ter actress in junior and Senior plays . . . remember the jabbering English woman? . . . the stubborn Yankee wife? . . . member of Amphion Club . . . capable Beehive art editor . . . willing helper in Junior College Club, Senior Guides . . . believ "deter- mination reac s it al"K . proved it by Honor y l 'n...will teach r I s e ca n. n x 'r 1 . if A-""'!"' ,gulf 1- -gif JOSEPH EDWARD PAVANO joe, the upright . . . follows his own advice, "Treat others as you would have them treat you" . . . has earned his position as vice-president of the Key Club . . . fine addition to any organization . . . helped with publicity for Senior Class play . . . his plans are still uncrystallized, but his sure aim is to be an honest citizen. DINO VICTOR PEGOLO Dino, the tranquil . . . but there's nothing placid about his interest in sports . . . follows everything from football to swimming . . . served as Association representative Athletic . . . says, "Baseball is my game" . . . will work hard to become a prosper- ous tool and die maker. fum we RONALD GEORGE PEKRUL Ronny, the sociable . . . one young fellow who knows "a grin is a good investment" . . . likes popular music . . . all kinds of sports . . . and any- thing technical . . . has been prepar- ing to become a draftsman . . . hopes his course at Goodwin Tech will prove his "Open Sesame." JERRY GERALD PERELOM jerr . . . small and amicable . . . he's heading for a longer wave length . . . feels "he who travels fastest gets there first" . . . hopes that experience gained in Radio Club at NBHS will aid him in becoming a radio re- search engineer. ..4iQ..g.A:. - ..A.r 4rR"' SHIRLEY MAE PELLETIER Shirley, the graceful . . . likes nothing better than a smooth waltz on skates to the sparkling rhythm of popular music . . . in a more tranquil mood, prose and poetry of Elizabeth Barrett Browning please her fancy . . . her future: "Nursing, a worthy and honorable cause." JOSEPHINE ALICE PERLINI jo, carefree and talkative . . . in- dustrious in her studies, does home- work faithfully . . . an example that "she who sees her goal, finds a path to it" . . . spare time recreation con- sists largely of dancing . . . hopes her business course will serve her to good advantage in her future career as office worker. ROBERT GERARD PELTZER Bob, the more-than-casual observer . . . whose tongue-in-cheek humor is concealed beneath a sober exterior . . . to be found puttering amidst the jars in a chem lab . . . nods ap- proval to baseball for spare time en- joyment . . . though he agrees, A'He who hesitates is lost," has no definite plans for the future. ROLAND JOSEPH PERREAULT Rol, the sleuth . . . gets his train- ing from Erle Stanley Gardner's mys- teries . . . demonstrates his writing ability in the Red and Gold Review . . . enjoys semiclassical music . . . an optimist, believes 'fall is well that ends well" . . . has an academic-col- lege preparatory course and plans to attend a teachers' college, probably T. C. C. fab. 89 1 . ' , .4 ' W W 1 7' '- JOHN DOMINIC PERROTTA johnny, the sportive . . . main in- terests, baseball and basketball . . . doesn't care what size the ball is as long as he can play with it! . . . lis- tens only to popular music . . . inde- pendent. says, "I lead the life I love" . . . has an academic course . . . plans career as an architect. JEAN CAROL PHELPS jean, the cautious . . . illustrates that "shyness is a virtue" . . . not too shy to enter wholeheartedly into sports . . . especially likes swimming . . , listens to popular music, mostly . . . enjoys the poems of Rudyard Kipling . . . has a business course . . . plans to become a secretary or do general office work EVELYN MARIE PETOW Evie, quiet and discerning . . . cer- tainly contradicts her pet motto, "What fools we mortals be" . . . a Senior Girl Guide and The Beehive representative . . . favorite recrea- tional activity: skating . . . hopes her college course will serve in prep- aration for training to be a pediatric nurse. RAYMOND ROLAND PHELPS Ray, the practical . . . knows that "common sense is very uncommon" . . . taking a technical course at Good- win Tech . . . follows all sports close- ly . . . is more interested in affairs outside of school . . . is training to become an automatic screw machine operator. a n ,Z . ..,.. . c -gg-Q I T Mix 2 s"s V 1" " 2 W MARGARET JANE PFLUGBEIL Peggy, the peppy . . . her alert and pleasant humor is always wel- come . . . ranks Irving Berlin's com- positions as the best . . . "baffling riddles by Erle Stanley Gardner are wonderfulftause tl1ere'sva sense of mystery"' . . . however, there's noth- ing mysterious about her future- she's set on becoming a secretary. BENJAMIN PIFFERI Benny, the man of poise . , . has a smile to go with his personality . . . and many a glance casts he at beauty . . . enjoys experimenting in his chemistry lab . . . hasn't blown up anything yet . . . an avid baseball fan . . . believes "nothing succeeds like success" . . . hopes to become an engineer. 90 ivvav DORIS MARY PIQUETTE Doris. the diligent . . . works hard at her business course studies . . . enjoys dancing to popular music, but for her own listening pleasure pre- fers classical music . . . the quiet relaxation of sewing takes up some of her spare time . . . is "calm as a summer's night" . . . hopes to be- come a secretary. Joi-IN PODLASEK john, the courteous . . . a much- traveled, well-informed gentleman . . . blonde, good looking, came to NBHS from a Gymnasium, as they call high school in Wtoctawek, Poland . . . ap- preciates all music, old or new . . . "Freedom is worth the price," says John . . . hopes to be a civil engi- neer. - isM-i . 3' 3 will ,,.,, . ' gg ' , , lf .A . K , , .ff r .s 3 l K .-. .E '.efllS.a--L ml' , f Q3 X , ' ff A1515 TX 3 -f 1 . , W, .. 1 is . f I i L t..L',NLl 1 if . K Q. 'ifgg ' N :- sms , ggi A , g X NANCY ANNETTE PLACE Kitty of the sparkling smile . . . is optimistic in her belief that 'Athere's a lot of good in everyone" . . . occu- pies spare time with sewing and roller skating . . . carries a business course with the intention of becom- ing a secretary in the near future . . . hopes to become a designer later. JANET MARY POGLITSCH jan, the ballerina . . . talented dancer . . . says, "On with the dance, let joy be unconi'lned" . . . gifted on the dramatic and concert stage as well . . . portrayed the maid in junior Class play and sang in Musical Club concerts . . . member of Repertory Theater Group and National Honor Society . . . will make dancing her career. T9- 91 5 'JF H DOROTHY ANN POCK Dot, the soul of frankness . . . speaks her mind on many issues . . . is not only a Girls' League represen- tative, but is a representative high school girl . . . Ends pleasure in danc- ing that is not to be found in school- work . . . ice skating is another diver- sion . . . believes "to be pleasant is to be desired" . . . hopes to become a secretary or typist. PAUL NOLE PONTE Ponch, the courteous . . . marks the '47 New England Music Festival a red-letter occasion . . . belongs to the Young Men's College Club, band, Preztel Benders, orchestra . . . divides his time between track and cross- country teams . . . likes airplanes . . . believes "the variety of all things forms a pleasure" . . . plans to at- tend college. 9 ,,,.-'Dil ROBERT ALAN POTASKY Bob, our artist . . . his taste in art runs from drawing to woodworking . . . not to mention the related art of making music . . . the band, Musi- cal Club, and Pretzel Benders claim his time . . . attended the New Eng- land Music Festival, knowing "music is life and spirit" . . . commercial art will be his future vocation. THERESA VERONI CA RAMUS Terry, the athletic . . . swift-mov- ing member of the girls' basketball team . . . sports-minded, especially where baseball is concerned . . . be- longs to the Civic Forum . . . realizes "the spokes of effort form the wheel of success" . . . taking a business course with the intention of becom- ing a stenographer after graduation. EDWARD RICHARD PRUSINOWSKI Jinx, the persistent . . . says with determination, "To the stars through difficulties" . . . an enthusiastic golfer . . . zealously interested in photogra- phy . . . member of Young Men's College Club . . . if the way he's tackled his college subjects is any in- dication of his ambition, his study of medicine will be successful. ANTHONY LOWELL RAO Anthony, the adventurous . . . a connoisseur of fashions . . . tunes his radio dial to modern music . . . his lifetime ambition, if fulfilled, will take him to the land of senoritas and congas . . . "He travels fastest who travels alone," says he . . . ay, yi, yi! South America takes him away. X ,aaiil!'L- -...auf , +L .. .- ,fm . W -2 T5 3 is ,ea t- 1 , ""ar H if, X is "' V ' Q, M, M-.,, fn, if Et 1-J,ig:,-:wig ,gy X '44 gif 1- 55 ,iggh , it Q ,, 'TSE' , , F 42 si We . if gy- 383 49. f l . JACK ANTHONY RAIA jack, the math expert . . . pro- duces neat and perfect photos . . . belongs to Civic Forum . . . whimsi- cal wit of Charles Lamb fascinates him . . . believes "the good things in life are not to be had singly, but come to us in a mixture" . . . inter- est in math will continue in his vo- cation, accountancy. MARGARET LOUISE RECKNAGEL Peg, the conciliator . . . hospital patients appreciate her cheerful ser- vice . . . serves as Girls' League rep- resentative, library page . . . belongs to Junior College Club . . . wants an alarm clock for graduation . . . she's a goin' West . . . last summer's Ari- zona sun agreed with her . . . "Pa- tience is a remedy for every sor- row" . . . ambition is nursing. ,av ROBERT JOSEPH REGAN Smoo, the precise . . . always con- fident and self-assured . . . says, "See your duty, then do it" . . . carries over his careful precision into music, particularly in playing the drums . . . plays on our school baseball team... was on property committee for Senior Class play . . . member of Amphion Club . . . hopes to enter the television or radio field. WALTER JOHN RENOCK Woody, the unconcerned . . . does- n't believe in needless worrying . . . his chief purpose is to have a good time all the time . . . "He never thought that fame might lurk along the dreary path called work" . . . his only ambition is to join a branch of the Armed Forces. MARTIN REISNER Marty, the athlete . . . an intense liking for sports is the center around which this former Brooklynite's life revolves . . . starred on both baseball and basketball teams . . . made thirty-three points in one game . . . "To the victor belong the spoils"... on program committee for Senior Class play . . . hopes to become a physical education teacher. MARILYN DORIS REYNOLDS Freckles, the optimist . . . has a wide variety of interests and activi- ties - among them, photography, music, and fine arts . . . actively sup- ports all sports, especially baseball and basketball . . . believes in neither "delay, nor inactivity" . . . will train to become an airline hos- tess. HOWARD ARTHUR RENAUD Howie of the good humor . . . roller skating is his main outside in- terest . . . believes "as light and the day are free to all men, so nature has left all lands open to brave men" . . . hopes to see some of the aforementioned lands when he enters the Armed Services after graduation. ANNE MARY RINGROSE Ringie of the buoyant spirit . . . always cheerful and optimistic . . . is "fond of work, fond of play, bright- ly cheerful all the day" . . . serves as Girls' League representative for her section room . . . is a member of the junior College Club . . . hopes to teach physical education after graduation. dfll ,Q if . ,EQ 93 l,....,g, N0 An AGNES RIZZUTI Aggie, the singer . . . regards music as the mainstay of her life . . . singing is her chief interest, although playing the piano is a close second . . . says, "Music is the communica- tion of the spheres" . . . finds time for Civic Forum . . . hopes to study in order to become an opera singer. JANICE MARIE ROSANO jan of the wonderful sense of hu- mor . . . easily pleased, knows "var- iety's sweet in all things" . . . an athlete at heart, swims and dives like a professional . . . also a wonder at bowling . . , any music is her type . . . as a cheerful nurse she'll always be appreciated. Qfif f FRANK JOSEPH ROCCO Slick . . . rhythmic drummer of our Musical Club . . . staunchly asserts, "An ounce of wit is worth a pound of sorrow" . . . a coveted track and cross-country man . . . in extra time enjoys bowling . . . with an eye to- ward the future, hopes to go into higher education. JOHN HENRY ROSE jack, the speedster . . . Heeting cross country and track team mem- ber . . . disagrees with idea, "slow and steady wins the race" . . . broken bones don't discourage this ski enthusiast . . . Men's College Club member . . . discovered building models is good experience for one who intends to be an areonautical engineer. N .1-""' 94 352 CYNTHIA ANN ROLLINS Cyn of the soft Maine twang . . . in her year at NBHS has become ac- tive in junior College Club, Senior Choir, Musical Club, and a girls' bas- ketball team . . . played well the French woman in the Junior play... asserts, "A good heart never changes, but keeps his course truly" . . . will enter radio work. ,I ANINE PATRICIA ROUTHIER jan, the reliable . . . believes "he who is firm in will, molds the world to himself" . . . spends her after- school hours as a cashier in a local movie theater . . . belongs to the Junior College Club and Civic Forum . . . was in Junior Achieve- ment . . . has made no definite deci- sion about the future. GLORIA MARY ROVELLA Gloria with the zest for living . . . often so absorbed in activities that she forgets the time . . . hence, for- givable tardiness . . . says, "Every man of us has all the centuries in him" . . . has her wallet chuck full of collected snapshots . . . Red and Gold representative . . . has no defi- nite plans for the future. JOHN ROBERT RUSCICA johnny, the carefree . . . thinks "life is too short to be serious" . . . keen on scouting and out-door life . . . tinkers with radios . . . his musical preference is jazz . . . is very much interested in boats of all kinds . . . for him business school will follow graduation. ROLANDE MARY ROY Randee, the vivacious . . . proves there's a lot of pep in small peo- ple . . . favorite pastime is dancing . . . enjoys a novel by Pearl Buck now and then . . . believes the quota- tion, "A house divided against it- self cannot stand" . . . hopes her academic subjects will help her to become a trained attendant. FRANK JOESPH RUSCZYK Fritz, the sanguine . . . with special reference to tests . . . believe that "it's always darkest before the dawn" . . . valuable member of our track team . . . in addition, he likes bowl- ing, swimming, and ice skating . . . will not be easily discouraged in his attempts to become a civil engineer. JEAN ANN RUDY Rudy, the light-hearted . . . says, "Life is but a dream" and for her a pleasant dream . . . spends much of her spare time perfecting her swim- ming strokes . . . favors popular tunes . . . mixes pleasures with her business course . . . wishes to do clerical work after graduation. NATALIE RUSILOWICZ Nat, the kind-hearted . . . pos- sesses " a gift for gab" . . . extremely fond of roller skating . . . gets suf- ficient exercise from hiking and horse- back riding . . . says, "It is not enough to do goodyone must do it in a good way" . . . in her chosen field, nursing, she will put into practice good Samaritanship. X3 -. 95 ll DAVID WILLIAM RUSLING Dave, king of outdoors . . . a rug- ged boy who goes all out for camp- ing and hunting . . . sailing is his current interest . . . joined All-New England and All-State bands . . . "One can be a soldier without dying, and a lover without sighing," eh? . . . has a hankering to join the Marines. CESLAUS PETER SACHARKO Chet of the cheerful heart . . . A.A. representative for three years . . . extremely fond of basketball . . . in teamwork, realizes "to have friends you have to be one" . . . follows sports the year through . . . at home, designs model planes . . . is unde- cided about plans for the future. LEON JOHN RYDEL Lee of the quiet manner . . . an ardent sports fan, likes nothing bet- ter than a refreshing swim at the "Y" . . . spare time is devoted to model building . . . advises, "Know the future by the past" . . . after graduation may turn drafting experi- ence gained at NBHS into a career. RAYMOND HENRY SACHS Ray, the air-minded . . . has his mind in the clouds . . . likes every- thing modern, even his music . . . for sports, enjoys swimming and skat- ing . . . says, "There's a place for everything and everything in its place" . . . thinks his place will be "in the wild blue yonder" with the Army Air Force. LEO RZEWNICKI Leo, the artists . . . showed his talent in the publicity committee for Junior and Senior Plays, also helped with costumes . . . keeps up-to-date in Foreign Aiairs Club and Civic Forum . . . on The Beehive art staff . . . realizes that "patience is bitter, but its fruit is sweet" . . . plans to make art his lifetime work. LEO JOSEPH ST. ONGE Chunky, the cooperative . . . for- mer Maineite . . . active in many out-of-school clubs and projects . . . likes sports, especially swimming and bowling . . . has an academic course . . . with cheerful unconcern says, "Let the rest of the world go by" . . . has no definite plans for the future. 96 FRANCES HELEN SAKMAR Frannie, the beloved . . . a select Laurel State girl . . . vice-president of Junior Class and Class of '49, secretary of Athletic Association, president of Girls' League and Senior Girl Guide . . . as photography edi- tor promoted interesting poses for The Beehive . . . "There's life alone in duty done" . . . nursing is her am- bition. IRENE SAMOJ EDEN Cookie, the quiet . . . believes "si- lence never made any blunders" . . . unostentatiously follows an academic course . . . likes popular music best . . . not very active in school clubs, but enjoys our school sports . . . has made no plans beyond getting an NBHS diploma. GLADYS ANN BARBARA SALAMON Gabs of the active mind . . . nimble-footed member of our tennis team . . . adds pep to Junior College Club meetings . . . member of Civic Forum . . . thinks gliding over the ice is tops . . . has good sense of humor, realizes "there is no account- ing for tastes" . . . is considering dietetic work for her career. ROBERT WALTER SAMPL Bob, the genial . . . treasurer of Student-Faculty Council and The Beehive representative . . . talented soloist with the Musical Club . . . won Alumni Chorale scholarship... member of the '48 All-State chorus . . . "Music for the time doth change his nature" . . . hopes to continue his career a vocal' t. rf- 7502 -1 -QQ Sd-of-S2 0--'O MARY CONSTANCE SALES Mary, the amicable . . . says, "Words are easy, like the wind, faith- ful friends are hard to find" . . . her friendly manner has placed her un- der the latter category . . . can spend hours listening to her collection of popular records . . . intends to be- come a beautician. JANE MARY SAMPSON Peanuts, our typical teen . . . "Short and small, but on the ball" . . . shuffles her shoes to the rhythm of music . . . at home among the waves . . . says skating is better than walking . . . follows college course in preparation for a career as nurse. 97 S 5 'lg CLARA SARGIS Sarge, the many-sided . . . tries her skill on hockey, tennis and basketball teams . . . helped beat the teachers at baseball . . . makes those tenpins Hy in the bowling alleys . . . darted across stage as little tomboy Paula in "january Thaw" . . . makes "each day a lifetime" . . . plans to work as a hairdresser. PHYLLIS ARLENE SAWYER Phyl from Maine, plus personality . . . transferred from Brewer High during her junior year . . . extolls the virtues of Maine on the slightest pro- vocation . . . her cheerful disposition has made her many friends . . . stage manager for "January Thaw" . . . junior College Club member . . . has "personality and brains, an unbeat- able combination" . . . will become a laboratory technician. 'ilmlt JANET SARKESSIAN Sarky, the sensible . . . knows just where she's headed and makes the best of her stay at NBHS . . . en- joys popular music, and, as a hobby, collects records . . . lives by motto, "Finis origine pendet" . . . while following a business course here, she anticipates graduation from Conn. Institute of Hairdressing in the future. BARBARA ANN SCALISE Bobby of the pleasing personality . . . elected representative to the Girls' League . . . enthusiastic about baseball and basketball . . . selected as a Senior Girl Guide . . . member of Junior College Club and Senior Class play property committee . . . proves "her friendship is the sun- shine of the class" . . . has made ar- rangements to train for nursing. EDWARD HENRY SASSO Eddy, the never-complaining . . . can find no fault with his present state of life . . . says, "I love the life I lead" . . . his chief diversions are skating and bowling . . . served as Athletic Association representative for his section room . . . hopes to be- come a florist. PAUL MARIO SCALORA Paul, the businessman . . . works industriously at his business course . . . as of yet "we know not what his greatness is" . . . by no means spends all his time at homework, though . . . served as A. A. representative for his section room . . . hopes to at- tend business school after graduation. nrtris , 98 J .-P' NORMA LOUISE SCAVILLA Norm, the loyal . . . steady-eyed, determined . . . makes service her watchword . . . Student-Faculty Coun- cil representative, literary editor of The Beehive, member of Junior Col- lege and Press Clubs . . . golf scores in the low 50's make her an object of envy . . . believes, "They aim too low who aim below the stars" . . . aspires toward journalism. RICHARD WELLS SCHOONMAKER Dick, the serious . . . confesses his fondness for airplanes . . . building models and traveling in the real planes . . . is a ping-pong enthusiast . . . says his favorite motto is "I have not yet begun to fight" . . . has high hopes for the future . , . a stretch in the Navy in hopes of becoming an ofiicer. 'VCT' -ws 'VN SYLVIA RUTH SCHELIN Syl, the demure . . . excels in fine arts . . . adds lilting notes to Senior Choir . . . talented in art, discovered "the best part of beauty is that which pictures cannot express" . . . decora- tive page in library . . . Madame Vice-president of Senior Girl Guides . . . proves inexhaustible stamina by claiming golf her sport . . . desires to travel. IRENE EVELYN SCHRUMP Irene of the domestic touch . . . likes a homey atmosphere with Strauss waltzes as musical back- ground . . . for exercise, visits the bowling alleys . . . believes "better the last smile than the first laughtern . . . plans to ring the wedding bells. 99 ff? g as ,s . e , 1- f x gas!!! I NORMAN JAMES SCHMITT Smitty of the sly humor . . . cheers up Men's College Club meetings . . . also participant in Key Club activ- ities . . . is a talented pianist . . . "Music gives him great pleasure," be it either popular or semiclassical . . . will aim at a future in the medical world. ROBERT WALTER SCHULTZ Bob, the tall, dark, and handsome . . . advises, A'Do unto others, as you would have them do unto you" . . . a member of the band . . . owns a yellow jalopy he tears around town in . . . enjoys taking apart the motor and putting it together again . . . hopes to attend the University of Connecticut. fav' 1 K is , c I I ' . - x Q""'P 'W , N fi ,- 'ff -+V !.-.21 we Q 'J' 7, 1 ' v sf . - L EDA ALMA SCHWANKE Edie, the uninhibited . . . animated and full of life . . . enthusiastically cheers on the football team from the sidelines when she isn't out there marching with the Twirlerettes . . . "She capers, she dances, she has eyes of youth" . . . served as Press repre- sentative . . . hopes to become a typist. JANE JOSEPHINE SEMNOSKI Semmie of the radiant personality . . . capable secretary of both Junior and Senior Classes . . . is vice-presi- dent of the Musical Club and former secretary of Girls' League . . . tal- ented accompanist and soloist at all Musical Club concerts . . . "We will never find your equal" . . . intends to study music after graduation. ELIZABETH MARION SCOFIELD Bette, the brainy . . . won first prize in the 1947 American Legion Oratorical Contest . . . president of the Camera Club last year . . . Girls' League representative . . . member of the Junior College Club, Press Club, National Honor Society . . . active in Girl Scout work . . . is "always a true friend" . . . hopes to become a dental hygienist. JOHN JOSEPH SENALDI john, the rugged . . . throws a wicked baseball-sometimes, catches it . . . when he's after big game, he does some crack shooting . . . modern is his music . . . says, "A good con- science is a good pillow" . . . a tool and die maker of tomorrow. LOIS ELAINE SELANDER Lo, the ready . . . sheds her quiet manner once she is out marching with the classy Twirlerettes . . . however, during school hours proves Hin quiet- ness, shall lie her strength" . . . serves as Press and Athletic Associa- tion representative . . . intends to be- come a dental hygienist. PATRICIA ANN SI-IERIDAN Pat, the happy-go-lucky . . . says, "Books, 'tis a dull and endless strife" . . . interest in music as somewhat stimulated by waltzes . . . will per- haps be prescribing proper foods for her classmates who are ill from over- work some years hence . . . intends to become a dietician. 100 ,,. ND' MARJORIE JEAN SHINE Marge, the frank . . . scores on rule, "Be checked for silence, but never tax'd for speech" . . . reckless- ly takes her life in her hands playing field hockey . . . on more conserva- tive days, she settles for sewing . . . College Club member and Press rep- resentative . . . "Nurse! nurse!" pa- tients will be calling her soon. JEAN AGATHA SIENKIEWICZ Jeannie, the sensible . . . says, "Cast away care, he that loves sor- row strengthens not a day, nor can buy tomorrow" . . . helped with pub- licity for Senior Class play . . . en- joys spinning around roller skating rinks . . . but says her true interest lies in art . . . believes she can make a success of it as a career . . . will attend art school first to see. if so QIDK 'CY' ' Av,-' w.f,,, "3" NANCY RUTH SIDEROWF Nan, the gracious . . . is 'flovely to look at, delightful to know" . . . possesses the unusual combination of beauty and brains . . . elected to Na- tional Honor Society . . . literary editor of The Beehive . . . belongs to Senior Girl Guides, Junior College and Amphion Clubs . . . served as Press and Girls' League representa- tive . . . will major in psychology. LORA ELLEN SILVERMAN Laurie, the sparkling . . . as mem- ber of Musical Club, a cappella chorus, Senior Choir, and Starlettes, believes, "Music is the beauty of the ages" . . . anything from Bach to Gershwin . . . favorite poem is Wil- laim Ernest Henley's "Invictus" . . . Student-Faculty Council and Girls' League representative . . . a Senior Girl Guide . . . hopes to attend Rad- cliffe College. fi lOl f'N ANNA MARY SIENKIEWICZ Andy, the genial . . . friendly and helpful . . . enthusiastically preaches, "A happy heart is better than gold" . . . member of junior College Club . . . quite content in riding breeches and boots . . . plans to enter New Britain General Hospital for nurse's training . . . later will specialize in surgery. RICHARD KING SINKIEWICZ Sinkie, the friendly . . . has a lik- able personality that makes him many friends . . . is "a man upright and energetic" . . . spends most of his spare time building model air- planes . . . formerly a member of the Camera Club . . . is taking a college preparatory course, but intends to go into the accounting field, gli' ff' LEONA HELEN SKINGER Leona, the sister of swing . . . en- joys lisetning to any one of the num- erous records in her collection or any- one else's . . . prefers popular music, but any kind will do . . . "A good and happy nature shines, her friend- ship 'round the heart entwines" . . . is taking a technical course, train- ing to become a beautician. CAMILLE SKORUPSKI Blondie, the good-natured . . . says, "Keep right on smiling" and follows her own advice . . . an active fan at all the football and basketball games . . . formerly with the T wirl- erettes . . . for a hobby she collects snapshots . . . has made no definite decision about the future. ROBERT ELMORE SKINNER Bob, the humorist . . . livens up the Musical Club and band rehear- sals . . . was elected to the 1948 All-State Band . . . attended '47 and '48 New England Music Festivals . . . serves as Press and Student- Faculty Council representative . . . says, "Let him who knows the instru- ment, play it" . . . intends to continue his musical career. TEDDY ANTHONY SKORUPSKI Teddy, the tenacious . . . believes "ambition has no rest" . . . photog- raphy, his pet hobby . . . keeps try- ing for the perfect shot . . . has quite a few good snaps to his credit . . . likes to dabble with painting his own films, too . . . hopes to become an admiral in the Navy . . . Ship ahoy, Skipper! WIN.: ,Q-LSSH L K - W '- if fy . A V , .553 f is -'xi J' -mv 4 c if 4 , . if ' 1 , ,, X is X - CASIMER JOHN SKORSKI Kas, the untiring . . . not satisfied to remain in one place continually . . . likes to go off on short trips . . . follows up this tendency on the foot- ball team . . . to the advantage of his associates . . . says, "In sports and journeys men are known" . . . undecided about the future. LORRAINE FRANCES SLIWA Larry, the lively . . . has a zest for life with a capital "L" . . . ad- vises others to follow her plan, "En- joy yourself while you're still young" . . . prefers dancing to almost any- thing . . . goes in for swing music, too . . . intends to become a private secretaryi is 102 ff. EDWARD JOSEPH SMIETKA Smitty, the outdoor man . . . would like to spend the rest of his days where he could alternate fish- ing and hunting . . . says, "Nature never did betray the heart that loved her" . . . but as a life in the woods is out of the question, he is resigned to being a draftsman. ANNA INGE-LISA SODERQUIST Anna, the quiet . . . possesses a pass- port . . . used for her departure from native Allekula, Sweden . . . finds skating enjoyable, even far from na- tive fjords . . . says, "Labor has a bitter root, but a sweet taste . . . aims toward nursing in New Britain General or Boston's Children's Hos- pital. ROBERT SOARES Bob, the serious . . . says, "An honest man's the noblest work of God" . . . as a hobby, follows sports, amateur or professional . . . can talk his way out of anything . . . or into it . . . carrying a college course though next September's undecided . . . has hopes of becoming a sales! man. IRENE BARBARA SOMERS Somm, the capable . . . says, "If it must he done, then let it be done quickly" . . . makes time for many recreational activities . . . often does oil painting . . . fond of ping-pong . . , keeps up her spirits with song and dance . . . she threatens the medical secretary market. ADELE ANN SOHCZAK Adie, the faithful . . . loyal to her friends because "to lose a friend is a great injury" . . . great help to her baseball team . . . Civic Forum . . . likes dancing to dreamy music by jerome Kern . . . has taken a business course to prepare for secre- tarial work. SYLVIA-MARIE SONSTROEM Butch, the carefree . . . has short blond hair and a mischievous smile . . . "the twinkle in her eye reflects her personality" . . . member of the Musical Club, Foreign Affairs Club, junior College Club, and property committee for Senior Class play . . . one of The Beehive literary editors . . . went to Portsmouth and New London Music festivals . . . intends to become a teacher. lO3 i 5 fi 11" W 'Qf ELSIE ESTHER SPRANZO Shortie, the jocund . . . says, "Laughter is the nectar of the Gods" . . . enjoys swimming and dancing . . . likes the rough and tumble stories of Rudyard Kipling . . . a readily assisting library page . . . as of now, her plans for the future are repre- sented by one big question mark. jOAN FRANCES STANKIEWICZ joan, the pessimist . . . claims that "all people are born fools" . . . also, her favorite song is "You can't be true, dear" . . . for diversion, plies a needle to good advantage . . . has a business course and plans a career as a private secretary. CHESTER STANLEY STACHELEK Chet, with the smiling brown eyes . . . demonstrates that "a smile is a sign of friendship" . . . earned his let- ters in tenth grade as catcher of our baseball team . . . is homeroom A. A. representative . . . participates in baseball, football, basketball, swim- ming, hiking, and hunting . . . plans to work as a carpenter. ELIZABETH ANN STARZYK Babe of the amiable disposition . . . music plays the principal part in her day . . . a member of the a cap- pella chorus and the Oxemble . . . thinks "the sound of music is an in- spiration to many" . . . attended the New England and New London Fes- tivals . . . wishes to become a medi- cal secretary. fe Q fl . , j 2- . , A -.rim .-Q' V f.,'f ' 3 .5 s ,if-ff , -iii' r , 'Q fl- 4 "iff + Q, f S' gf f fkiiifld fix , 'I 1 Q' CARMELA ANN STANISCI Carmela, the dynamic . . . though tiny, she pours forth amazing energy . . . as a member of the Civic Forum has "A smile always upon her lips" . . . finds pleasure dancing or-in a more quiet mood-enjoys sewing . . . already the proud possessor of a dia- mond. will be married soon after graduation. DONNA LOU STEINER Lu, the musical . . . belongs to the Musical Club, women's chorus, Quar- tette, Starlettes Cof which she is the leaderb, Oxemble, and the Senior Choir . . . is a Girls' League repre- sentative . . . says, "Alas for those that never sing" . . . has not yet de- cided what her career will be . . . music, perhaps? 'wits 41" fl' 104 ...vs ERSILIA JOANNE STELLA Ceil, the elfin . . . "She's small, but mighty" . . . doesn't allow her small stature to interfere with her enthus- iastic and natural friendliness . . . serves as a Senior Girl Guide . . . does her best to attend all Junior College Club and Civic Forum meet- ings . . . intends to go to college. BEVERLY JANE STOCKLEN Bev, the gay . . . incomparable on skis . . . Student-Faculty Council rep- resentative . . . does artistic work on The Beehive staff . . . "Simple in her elegance" . . . frankness is her watch- word . . . her original evening gowns are proof of her considerable talent in the field of her ambition: designing, FELIX PETER STIFEL Pin, the popular . . . member of the band and orchestra . . . has par- ticipated in All-State and New Eng- land music festivals . . . also swings a mean golf club . . . enjoys 'build- ing model planes and swimming . . . says, A'I've taken my fun where I've found it" . . . after his college pre- paratory course, the Air Corps. DOROTHY HELEN STOLBA Dot, a small package full of vital- ity . . . "Blithe and bonnie and good and gay" . . .exudes excess energy as a cheer leader . . . has kept clippings concerning our school sports . . . looks forward to summer-and swimming . . . plays with girls' baseball nine . . . intends to become a secretary. k NORMAN MILLAGE STITHAM Stetem, lover of the wide open spaces . . . selects cowboy songs as his favorites . . . likes he-man sports for the jayvees' sake . . . reads for pleasure in the quiet times . . . be- lieves that "no man can serve two masters" . . . his aim is to join the Air Force come next fall. CLAIRE SOPHIE STREJKOWSKI Twinny, whose thoughts come in pairs . . . accepts the motto, "Good- ness and wisdom are twin born" . . . likes dancing for its own sake . . . and for the music that goes with it . . . wishes to capitalize on her hobby of taking pictures by becoming a photographer. 'ZS' 105 , sflflflll 5 1219" ,K 4 t . ' I , Q ' ' , N K - -, t ,px if' , i Nil? ' 1 , ass ? ,, me or , , "ff , V U ,X W , GEORGE HARVEY STUART Red, the optimist . . . shrugs at his academic course . . . enjoys spec- tator sports . . . goes adventuring with Zane Grey . . . cheerfully ad- vises, "Be merry for tomorrow you may die" . . . like the first George, declares that he intends to be Presi- dent of the United States. THEODORE STANLEY SUMOSKI Teddy of the trial and error . . . thinks that we should "learn by do- ing" . . . proves it by belonging to the Musical Club, band, oxemble, and men's chorus . . . likes clicking camera shutters for a hobby . . . takes a col- lege preparatory course . . . will study further to become a mechanical engineer. RAYMOND EDWARD STUPACK Raymond, the runner , . . stars with both track and cross country teams . . , the vice-president of the Radio Club . . . a stage manager for "January Thaw" . . . believes "novelty is the old in masquerade" . . . right on the ball in math . . . and with that smile , , . takes a college prep- aratory course . . , will strive to make engineering his career. ROBERT MARK SUNDERLAND Bob, "all this-and muscles, too!" . , , well-known linesman of our foot- ball team . . . won outstanding play- er's award . . , also on the baseball team . . . vice-president of the Athletic Association . . . and treasurer of the Senior Class , . . enjoys Bill Mauldin's cartoons . . . is undecided about his future. -ar", -F' 'i DOROTHY THERESA SULIMA Dorothy, the delightful . . . accur- ately described by the saying, 'She's calm, she's sweet, she's just the kind you like to meet" . . . serves as Girls' League alternate for her homeroom . . . a faithful football fan . . . direct- ed her business course toward becom- ing a secretary. CANDIDE LENORE SZYMANOWSKI Candy, the candid . . . says, "Life is not life without delight" . . . The Beehive representative . . . belongs to the Musical Club, junior College Club, Press Club, Foreign Affairs Club, and Senior Guides . . . is a talented pianist . . . sews many of her own clothes . . . hopes to attend college, but is not decided on the course. ,....t 455 ry-' 106 HENRY THOMAS TALALAJ Henry, the resolute . . . believes, "He only is a well-made man who has a good determination" . . . served as A, A. representative in his junior year . . . was assistant sergeant-ab arms for Civic Forum . . . distinguish- ed himself on the cross country team . . . a stage manager for the Senior Class play . . . undecided about the future. LEO GILBERT THERRIEN Lee, the realist . . . believes "the mind relaxes with needful sport" . . . after long hours at Goodwin Tech, seeks a swimming pool where he's much at home . , . likes ice hockey and skiing, too . . . intends to employ his technical knowledge as an air- plane mechanic. WILLIAM ROBERT TEDESCHI Bill, the artistic . , . spends a good deal of time mixing colors on his palette . . . likes to paint outdoor scenes . . . appreciates classical music . . . for his outdoor recreation chooses hunting . . . his saying is "Daily not with money nor women" . . . his plans for the future have not been com- pleted. RICHARD DARWOOD THOMPSON Dick, the flavor-master . . . should be a good catch for some girl in the future . . . proves "cookery is be- come an art, a noble science: cooks are gentlemen" . . , follows the un- usual hobby of collecting old records , . . after graduation, intends to be- come a professional baker or chef. LOIS ANN TERRY Lois, the lovely-toned . . . sings with the Musical Club, Senior Choir . . . representative to Student-Faculty Council, Girls' League . . . plays with girls' basketball and baseball teams . . . chairman of Senior Night com- mittee , . . a Girl Guide and junior College Club member . . . "Her ways are ways of pleasantnessn . . . will become a physical education in- structor. ANN-MARIE VIRGINIA THORIN Ann, the petite . . . Honor Society member with no little gray matter . . . Foreign Affairs and Senior Girl Guides member . . . reports NBHS news in the Red and Gold Review . . . representative to The Beehive . . , proves "there's grace in little things" . . , present position as dental receptionist is a step toward her goal, dental hygiene. 107 SHIRLEY ANN TITUS Shirl, the active . . . indirectly was heard from in Senior Class play- prompter, you know . . . swims grace- fully, skates skillfully, and plays ten- nis-well, just plays tennis . . . she knits! , . . Senior Girl Guide and jun- ior College Club member . . . prac- tices "make short the miles with talk and smiles" . . . prospective dietician. CHESTER PAUL TOPA Chester, the executive . . . is presi- dent of the Radio Club . . . also A. A. representative and cross country man- ager . . . is on the track team . . . a member of the Camera Club . . . "Man has conquered space: he can conquer himself" . . . has an aca- demic-technical course . . . plans career as a radio technician. .,....'wl MARION TKACZ Marion, the content . . . thinks, "It's wonderful to dream" . . . particu- larly while dancing . , . follows the latest hits, but likes them slow . . . as far as school work goes, keeps down to earth . . . is taking a busi- ness course . . . after graduation, plans to go into clerical work or be- come a typist. MILDRED JANE TRUSLOW Mil, the happy . . . works "not for school, but for life" . . . trips the light fantastic . . . skates for excite- ment . . . glues her ear to the radio for all types of music . . . follows a technical course . . . has plans to serve her fellow-women as a beau- tician. SHIRLEY jOYCE TOENNIGES Shirley of the shy smile . . . "One look from Torchy can start his heart to glow" . , . Red and Gold repre- sentative and Civic Forum reporter . . . sales manager and president of Leather-Craft. Inc . . . helped with make-up for Senior Class play . . . went to Portsmouth, N. I-l.. with the Musical Club . . . belongs to Foreign Affairs Club , . . plans to do retail sales work. JOAN RITA TUMEL joan of the ever-ready smile . . . in her, too, "good nature and good sense must ever join" . . . a willing worker and a good mixer . . . makes a hobby of collecting jewelry, chiefly of the costume variety . . . favors bracelets . . . will take up office work. ,nf l08 xi 1 , A-"7"f".fX'. 9,- L4ip5f'f,:" X-.i 'of' ,. ,vw g .. N v' , 3 up - ' i- I 1 if if 12: 43, . ' , ktrglt -E so :sf - ' K A PETER MICHAEL TUREK Pete, the amiable . . . has a good word and a grin for everybody . . . add his voice to the NBHS games . . . follows Bill Stern's writings . . . skilled with hammer and saw . . . may help to relieve the housing short- age . . . first, to the wide open spaces and help "keep 'em flying" with the Air Force, IRENE JOSEPHINE URBANOWICZ Vige, "Plenty sharp and very vitalg jitterbug should be her title" . . . you'd never guess her hobby is dancing, would you? . . . likes music that really sends . . . is hep to her business course . . . will use it as a secretary . . . if she doesn't turn to designing. . w. .315 L RUTH ESTHER TURNROSE Ruth, the quiet . . . is rather shy, but is not averse to fun . . . likes all the canine breed . . . collects miniature statues of dogs . . . and pictures, too . . . member of Am- phion Club . . . served as representa- tive to the Girls' League . . . believes "nothing is more useful than silence" . . . intends to do office work after graduation. JENNIE ANN URYGA Jean, the optimist . . . believes that "whatever happens, happens for the best" . . . collects records for the days when she can't go ice skating , . . is Girls' League representative for her homeroom . . . has a busi- ness course and plans to work in an oFlice. , .. ,ill -xi, in 'Q' RICHARD DONALD TUTKO Dick, the energetic . . . has showed his might many an afternoon on track and cross country teams . . . has a sure eye and steady heart for both basketball and bowling . . . will "blow out fire and all" as a forest ranger in the future. VINCENT ANTHONY USTACH Vinnie, the comet . . . flashes across the cinders for NBHS . . . a jovial member of a cappella and Senior Choir . . . like Macbeth, staunchly says, "l'll fight till from my bones my flesh be hack'd"-hope he won't have to take such drastic measures to reach his aspiration: civil engineering. 'I09 -A ----v ANTHONY USTANOWSKI Babe, the conscientious . . . takes his work seriously . . . has found "you never know what you know un- til you find out what you know" . . . among his recreational activities is wood-working . . . outside of NBHS has a part-time job as assist- ant cook . . . supplementary train- ing for future as a chef. DOROTHY ANN VALENTI Val, the valiant . . . undaunted even on report card day . . . says, "Never say die!" . . . urges our foot- ball team with the same spirit . . . is never tired on a dance floor . . . has her own record collection at home . . . intends to use her energy as a bookkeeper or secretary after graduation. ' , EDWARD FRANK USTILLA Eddie of the talented brush . . . has won recognition for his outstand- ing art work . . . received 550 War Bond for art contest and second place in Scholastic Art contest . . . art editor on The Beehive staff . . . helped with scenery for Senior Class play . . . believes "thought is the seed of action" . . . hopes to attend an art school. MARION MARGARET VALENTINE Marion of many merits . . . be- lieves "mischief finds work for idle hands"-keeps hers busy in a cap- pella chorus, Senior Choir, Foreign Affairs and Junior College Clubs... earned election to National Honor Society . . . herself a master of the 3 R's, will try her hand at teaching in elementary school. f A. -.-J . . we? Qi" -fit 114.529 SU. . -N Lu vi Qs .- Q Gs" , . i f is fist? , up sf, ' t EW f' 3 g et s b t i', ,5::, X S in 4,919 ,, -.13 - 11" 'sf s 'iw' ,q fllx i sl-"5 , 'siffik iikf ' :iQ'.f'f f' tibia wa s is 'f RICHARD EDWIN VAHLSTROM Dick, the dexterous . . . works with both "mind and hand" . . . adds his note to the Musical Club in band and orchestra . . . participated in l948 Music Festival . . . pushes those speed records on the track team , . . shows that he is mechani- cal minded with the Radio Club... hopes to become an electrical en- gineer. LEE DESNEY VAN GORDER Lee of the dancing feet...dancing to slow, sentimental music or lively jive is her best liked pastime . . . says, "Feet are light where the will is ready" . . . is working her way towards graduation in a business course . . . hopes to become a typist. ll0 .,, -i 1 i n I E Z Q mf' e A fs:-..g i- ' R g .2- K X :jf Xi, . I - :L :Ki Lk ,Q i. :iff S If as ss- A S LEONARD WILLIAM VARKAL Len of the ready pencil . . . likes to try his hand at cartooning and sketching likenesses of his friends . . . believes "we are paid the worth of our work" . . . art won't be his career, though it should be . . . hopes to make a success of a career as a draftsman. EDMUND JOHN VINGRIS Eddie of the happy heart . . . says, "Be content to seem what you are" . . . music is one of his ac- complishments . . . sings in the chorus of the Musical Club . . . sparks the track team on to victory . . . plans to enlist in the U. S. Air Corps after graduation. BARBARA KARIN VENBERG Barbie, the genteel . . . believes "Silence is the mother of truth"... serves her fellow students as The Beehive representaive, Senior Girl Guide, Girls' League representative . . . is a member of the National Honor Society . . . a talented pianist . . . hopes to find a suitable career as a nurse. EVELYN JEAN VOLLHARDT Evie, the mathematician . . . her unusual liking for arithmetical prob- lems has led to membership in the Math Club . . . believes "it matters not how long we live, but how" . . . as a side interest, she enjoys base- ball . . . intends to become an alge- bra teacher, RICHARD MORRIS VENTURA Kip, the musical . . . plays in the orchestra and sings with the a cap- pella chorus . . . took part in the junior and Senior Class plays and Musical Club concerts . . . member of Amphion Club . . . plays both violin and viola . . . knows "music casts a spell of loveliness" . . . hopes to play in an orchestra. RUTH ADELINE WAGNER Kitten, the clever . . . library page and representative of Girls' League and The Beehive, vice-president of the Amphion Club . . . has dramatic and musical talent . . . performed impressively in Amphion and junior Class plays . . . sang in Musical Club concerts, Portsmouth inclusive . . , expresses ideals, "The vocation -to serve others" . . . will become a nurse. I Q, Ill LAWRENCE WAIDA Larry, the individualist . . . "He did indeed show some sparks that are like wit" . . . participated in Junior and Senior Class plays . . . member of Amphion Club . . . in the musical field, is a member of the orchestra . . . was press representa- tive . . . wood-working is another hobby . . . will become a musician or woodworlrer, MARTIN JOSEPH WALSH Bun, the carefree . . . amazes everyone by making the bell . . . believes he should "take life easy" . . . but often doesn't . . . has been elected Athletic Association repre- sentative for three years now . . . is very active in church clubs . . . ambition is to be employed . . . asked, "At what?"--replied, "No one on earth knows." HELEN SALOMEA WALI CKA Bunny, the sunny . . . is cheerful and good-natured at all times . . . says, "Look on the bright side of life, it's much easier" . . . is nimble footed at dancing and skating . . . aspires to take temperatures and read charts-not to mention the pill- dispensing. DOROTHY PULCHERIA WAS Dottie, the resolute . . . says, "No problem is too great to solve" . . . one in a hundred that really appre- ciates the opera . . . knows the stories as well as the music . . . as good at bowling as at typing . . . aims at maximum words a minute in order to become a professional typist. C' JOHN FREDRICK WALSH jack, the congenial . . . is forgiven for everything except outrageous driving . . . "Not a word with him but a jest" . . . almost a contempor- ary of Bob Hope . . . all out for sports . . . Student-Faculty Council representative, Central Council mem- ber . . . will become a professional man-doctor? lawyer? Indian Chief? RONALD WARREN WAS Ronald, the collector . . . of him we say, "Little bodies have great souls" . . . inclinations lie toward collecting oddities . . . has an ex- tensive collection of stamps and coins-striving now to gather mod- ern bills . . . will no doubt receive them when he opens the business he hopes to run. 'l'l2 fu'-f 1 vi. ,pw . ZIP., A-' 'Q ,.,. 'iii- A 1g,3g,:, , 'i ' - a ,ifkag-V ffft ,- r R .S f it 1, K il X F1 we--.lu N' 'yy 1 f , S 1 sy Z L , -. N 1. . sw A31 ' , til 1 11351 i X v i' LQ- ' iris. I DONALD EDWARD WASIK Doc, the serene . . . nothing dis- turbs his unruffled disposition . . . deeply interested in sports, follows closely professional baseball . . . plays on a community basketball team . . . sketches for fun, claiming: "Art soothes the soul" . . . will put his energies to work in the business operated by his family. JOAN ANITA WEBER joan, the gentle . . . member of the Musical Club, woman's chorus, and a cappella chorus . . . partici- pated in Christmas and spring con- certs . . . went to the Portsmouth, N. H., and New London Musical Festivals . . . is A. A. representative . . . can cook without a can opener . . . "Of quiet spirit, unafraid" . . . . . . ambition: marriage or accounting Cin that orderl. HELENE KATHRYN WATROUS Shorty of the golden voice . . . loves both to play and to sing . . . favorite piece is Chopin's "Etude in E" . . . sings in women's chorus, Senior Choir, and a cappella chorus . . . is The Beehive representative and a Senior Guide . . . believes that "music is feeling, not sound" . . . plans to teach music in a high school. GRETA JEAN WEDMAN Ritz, the ever-gay . . . says, "Laughter fills the heart with gaiety" . . , is fond of swimming . . . there- fore, has joined the swim team . . . patronizes many other sports . . . enjoys an hour of mystery occasion- ally with Sherlock Holmes . . . her hope is to become a secretary. -':",..f"' EDWARD MICHAEL WEBER Eddie, the good sport . . . has a cheerful grin that reflects his per- sonality . . . says, "A cheerful life and a soaring spirit are the prime delights" . . . is a sports devotee . . . chooses a lively rhumba for his favorite rhythm . . . intends to enter a trade. ALAN DONALD WEINSTEIN AI, the unaffected . . . has the personality of a used-car salesman . . . is perhaps best known for his candid comments in class . . . be- lieves "joking and humor are pleas- ant and often of extreme utility" . . . rabid New York Yankee fan . . . intends to take up bookkeeping in business college. 'Ne M .4 R. 'r H3 C ELEANOR MAE WELLS AUDREY LOOMIS WELTON ROY EDWARD WENNBERG El, the quiet . . . has shy, but friendly manner . . . advises, "Softly speak and sweetly smile" for her winning way . . . belongs to Junior College Club . . . is a Senior Girl Guide . . . served as Press repre- sentative for her section room . . . keeps up-to-date in the sports world . . . hopes to become a nurse. ROBERT LEONARD WENZ Bob, the serious . . . blond, good- looking . . . advises, "Seek till you find, and you'll not lose your labor" . . . hobbies are sports, sports, and more sports . . . follows both amateur and professional . . . is taking a technical course at the Trade School . . . hopes to make a success of a career as a draftsman. Blondie, the amicable . . . believes "a sunny disposition gilds the edges of life's darkest cloud" . . . her small stature doesn't prevent her from taking a lively interest in sports- particularly winter sports, such as ice skating and tobogganing . . . hopes to become a laboratory tech- nician. MARGARET ANN WESSELS Peggy, the golden-voiced soprano . . . secretary of the Musical Club and member of all women's vocal groups . . . soloist in several con- certs . . . won ,48 Alumni Chorale Scholarship . . . attended '48 All- State Chorus, '47 New Hampshire Festival, and '47 and '48 All-State Music Festival . . . says, "When words fail, music speaks" . . . hopes to become a concert singer. Roy, the mechanic . . . is learn- ing all about what makes an auto- mobile go . . . hopes to prove "ma- chines have magic, if the workman has skill" . . , takes enough time off for roller skating . . . as might be expected, plans to become an auto mechanic. NANCY ANNE WILLIAMS Nancy, the energetic . . . possesses an endless supply of vitality . . . a born cheerleader . . . besides leading her section at football games, she cheered at the New Haven basketball tournaments . . . prompter for Senior Class play . . . favors music by Cole Porter . . . her motto is "smile and bring them on-laugh and let them go" . . . will become a stewardess. T-'Shu 114 . Q51 V x wa . !'.'i X W., N ,X N an , X. V :Hi sxyggl A .QQ f J " N 'fffifflfl L Qs., . . Q K - 'N W V. .ESRI Ax . ., wx 5 Na- 1 we f QW :Eff v - f- ' J K A- A ? xx .- VM 3? "1 wi: QLSQ 4.3- up .,,., 51-Q 1 x-11, gg pf.. V' .t'J :af 0 v S fx 1 R . v 'X N- v ...W ww. F, ip A Q5 y gi g -- .Q 'SYN 5 ! Q f -Q GZ? r 4 is ,tw 'J' ELMORE CARL WUNSCH AI, the man of leisure . . . is aware that "all work and no play make jack a dull boy" . . . his musical taste is for swing and popular tunes . . . an all-around sports fan . . . anticipates fulfillment of his ambi- tion, to become a marine. RICHARD ZAHACEWSKI Dick, the eternally content . . . believes we should "enjoy the pres- ent day, trusting very little to the morrow" . . . sports provide enjoy- ment for him . . , spends his spare hours practicing with the track team . . . has a technical course in Good- win Tech .... plans to go into elec- trical work. BERTHA HELEN YERSAVI CH Bertie, the gentle . . . believes "silence is sweeter than speech"... proves it by her unassuming man- ner . . . a dependable member of the Junior College Club, Bowling Club . . . selects A'Humoresque" as her all-time song favorite . . . con- fesses dancing has an attraction for her . . . says her career will be that of a medical secretary. JOSEPH JOHN ZALEWSKI Zale, the athlete . . . active in all phases of school sports . . . is perhaps best remembered for his brilliant playing on the football team . . . also a member of both the baseball and basketball teams . . . believes Hin sports and journeys men are known" . . . hopes to make a career of sports professionally. EDNA JUNE ZACK june, the efficient . . . says, "Be cheerful, for the power of a smile is fathomlessn . . . has generously given her time as The Beehive sec- retary . . . earned her membership in the Honor Society . . . is Student- Faculty Council representative, a Senior Girl Guide, and member of Foreign Affairs Club . . . will be- come a secretary. GENEVIEVE THERESA ZANIEWSKI jennie, the all-around girl . . . her friendly and pleasing disposition has gained her many friends , . . believes, "All my past life is mine no more" . . . has a variety of interests, ranging from reading to dancing . . . belongs to Civic Forum . . . hopes to obtain an office position after graduation. 116 'fills JANET GENEVIEVE ZAPATKA Butch of the many moods . . . is an A. A. representative . . . is pro- ficient in dancing . . . always man- ages to accumulate a high score when bowling . . . asks, "Is not the uni- verse strait-laced, when I can clasp it in the waist?" . . . is a talented artist . . . hopes to find an interest- ing career in art. BARBARA ROSE ZELEK Dimples, the delightful . . . "Her merry way will keep her going" . . . will be again whizzing over the ice on shining blades when winter comes . , . spends her spare time painting . . . has the talent necessary to make a career of art . . . member of pub- licity committee for Senior Class play . . . will become a fashion designer. JEROME JERRY ZAPATKA Redhead, the jovial . . . says, "One of the greatest pleasures in life is conversation" . . . practises the pleasure as his pals well know . . . a hard hitter on the baseball team . . . worked for the Junior Class play . . . a Be-bop enthusiast . . . hopes to join the naval air forces. MARJORIE ZERANSKI Margie, the mirthful . . . advises others to do as she does, "Smile the whole day through" . . . secretary of the Civic Forum, Girls' League repre- sentative, Press Club representative . . . helped make the Junior Class play a success . . . will begin train- ing next September to become a nurse. JOHN STANLEY ZAWILINSKI john of the cheery word . . . ac- quired his easy - to - get - along - with manner on his job in a local store . . . injects witty phrases in class- room lectures . . , finds "those who know how to enjoy life are'not poor" . . . hopes to have his own business. EVELYN ANNA ZERING Evy, the efficient . . . The Beehive representative, Senior Girl Guide, Foreign Affairs Club, National Honor Society, Junior College Club, Civic Forum . . . received Junior Achieve- ment Award, as treasurer of Leather Craft, Inc ..,. interests spread from sports to teaching Sunday School to collecting coins . . . proves "ambition leads to success" . . . hopes to go to college. II7 ix 4 Q I N , f' Lf TU! 'Cf .K ,Au ' A -1 V JW -xx rdf' LEONARD NAURICE ZINMAN Len, the analyst . . . Honor So- ciety member, The Beehive repre- sentative, president of the Men's College Club, member of Key Club , . . dabbles in chemistry as a hobby . . . says, "For sure no minutes bring us more content, than those in pleas- ing, useful studies spent" . . . will study medicine in college. EDWARD WALTER ZUK Red, the frolicsome . . . won his school letters in the track and cross country teams . . . his favorite weapon is his camera with which he "shoots" snapshots of his friends . . . says, "A day for toil, an hour for sport, but for a friend is life too short" . . . will study optometry in college. CHARLES JOHN ZMIJESKI Chaz, the shy . . . says, "Various are the delights of a quiet life" . . . vice-president of the Men's College Club . . . member of the Key Club . . . takes many movies and stills with his several cameras . . . hopes to become a doctor . , . will enter college next fall to study medicine. FRED PETER ZUK Fred, the nonchalant . . . has a carefree attitude about everything he undertakes . . . expresses his belief that "life is just a bowl of cherries" . . . approves of light, gay, popular music . . . is still trying to hit the jackpot . . . has no definite plans for the future. BEVERLY MARY ZOTTER Bev, the reserved . , . sings in the women's chorus and a Capella chorus . . . attended the New London Music Festival . . . a lively Cheerleader... plays the piano as a hobby . . . be- lieves in "duty first, duty always" . . . if her plans work out as she hopes, she will attend some husiness college. JUDITH DANA ZWICK judy, the effervescent . . . rattles about in her 1928 Chevie jalopie . . . busy with school activities . . . chair- man of Social Committee of junior College Club . . , Girls' League rep- resentative . . . chairman of junior Night . . . Student-Faculty Council alternate . . . library page . . . proves "a bit of laughter never hurt any- one" . . . will enter the field of medi- cine. . Pi, wand? H8 W7 KENNETH BACKLUND Ken, the cornplaisant . . . always courteous and good-natured . . . is quiet when not with the boys . . . believes "kindness and consideration for others are the marks of the true man" . . . a baseball fan, like most of our male students . . . intends to join the service after graduation. DORIS ELAINE NELSON Doris, the blonde . . . possesses a cheerful disposition and a constant smile . . . believes ucheerfulness is a virtue" . . . finds plenty of time to indulge in her favorite hobbies, ice- skating in winter . . . swimming in summer . . . hopes to go into train- ing to become a nurse. MONICA AGNES ZYSK Monica, the loquacious . . . be- lieves "one should be true to his friends above all" . . . leisure hours divided between the skating rink and dance floor . . . helps support Holly- wood's chief product by frequent at- tendance . . . a Walt Disney fan... holds a part-time job which she will continue . . . may possibly, go to college. BENTZ HENRY BANAK Captain, the strong and silent . . . beware that blonde butch haircut . . . marks a sports enthusiast . . . played on football team in tenth grade . . . interested in basketball . . . prefers waltzes to rhumbas . . . contends that "love is strong as deathg jealousy is cruel as the grave" . . . plans to go to college. RAY JOSEPH PREY Peasoup, the silent type . . . is correct when he says, "Little said is soonest mended" . . . the rest he says with his eyes . . . when with his intimate friends, however, he's full of talk . . . basketball ranks first with him . . . hasn't yet made his arrangements for after-gradua- tion. FLORINE MARY VAN GORDER Florine, the facetious . . . advises her female colleagues to pay atten- tion to their school work and to "study books rather than men" . . . Camera Club's membership list in- cludes her name . . . devotes much time to photography . . . her plans for the future are still a deep dark secret. 119 EARLE JEROME MICHLIN Mick, the industrious . . . was Student-Faculty Council representa- tive . , . for sports, makes a splash in the summer . . . whizzes down slopes in colder seasons . . . says, "Well-filled hours keep man from mischief" . . . plans to get to work right after graduation . . . and, what has he been doing? EDWARD LEONARD SZOSTEK Edward, the practical . . . very much interested in current affairs- observes the world with tongue in cheek . . . abides by the saying, "Accuracy in small things means ex- cellence in greater" . . . has been studying a business course with an aim of becoming a Certified Public Accountant. l': ', Pi ,.-.-....,.,,.f , was-.-0 . , . . , ,. A wanna 4 , .ff 0 ' 'vw .N F, AM , W .44 , ww M4 'LA ' L' 1, -::,,h 'AQ' . ' '.,1' ff. .11 W, Fxvg 22- 5,3 qw ,ff S., W M, 'Tk :JIM 51, Q .Wow , W- ,...,..fv .,WM,.,: , .... -v-, .,.. i3F: ' XS-32 -qu-u X x N. X . M ' . 5 EX Q-,Q X x X 19 N .Q X 5. VX X Xixiglg-AL I X 4 'xqsummhrw ' V ,J ' ,.'., I I R -W X Inn-unnrmnmliufnAnllllmuvfmpm,,,,,m, , ,Wk 1 ,l'm,,,.,,.- ll I ix' Y ' I 1f:iMZ1 , f .-B-wmamwmwmzxmmn-,wa - 2...-i-.1 . - .i ' f.., . A , I . '.2.....1...' ..g..T.....4:.... , . '. ' ff ..,.-..,u--4.-.-.---Q - ' I . ' . x J , , "' " 1'-, - 'lie' 'S' 513 wxgm. X13 Eg I -.- I 1: 1 ' ,, ,, l'..1'Ii'..T.T""3....... f w 4 4 ' "T"f'---""'-"f , f p 4 ,, 4u.....,............ , Q , . --T'...L4...s-.......,. I . 4 y . .,............... 3: N ---T-------- 2 1 v .- '-"--1-------+- 3 -.f K ul , TT."."Q....."T.'."""-'......l 2 3 5 2 31' - N ' 4 5 HL Mi' '-hgh' 3 1 ,L 1 if' : Q- ,,....-.-..........-...L K ' " 1 . '-.'.u' i b ...... -. ff!" ,M f x . - 1 .. ... ..-..- ...-...1..... M gf' w - 1- Pvq -W fu.-g . GXN Qu N in .. .a-........... L, . 1 I . 'A X f- . "2 , 'f ' A 3- "vi " 1 ' ' - ' ' r-'ff .sw .fr -g., f 14 , 1- ,-leg "Cl - 14,4 Zi I 4- A" v---1 4. ' . ' V' 'V K" " ' """" -, . ' 1- + A ' - '1 . "'- M 4 . as-0. b , r "' f .. 'Wm ... , Q .g,.. g1+,.EqL4.12' K I Q " .cv 5, . ,. ' -4 ' .W A 4 4 V Y ' M 41- 'v , .. 'A 'W' ,, .. 'Nt' 4 . v -.1-,--nf, . .1 " 'ii . 1 e EA f., .X k, f' . .IA 5.52. 9' -rl.. -f-..- ,- L., - L... -W .... I 9- its WL.- ....L.. ..L...h ....l... ... w L.. --fl.. LU fm 'Lrg :nk tt: Fflzg Li. LK i L. 15:1 .J ,,, ,LIZ ...L.. L.. -...L.. .J-..... s....L.,.l ,LW n---L, I L... +L.. .L..... ....L.. w " L .- ,. ' - f 9' U . - x Q. t . . . m -1. . sys ' 1 . N ,K N ' - . -,, 'Q X ' +8 Www x THE NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY While this era accords the palm to the athlete and popular favor to the public enter- tainer, The National Honor Society perpetuates the flame upon the altar of scholarship. Mind- ful, too, that intellectual superiority alone is not sufficient to safeguard the interests of individual or nation, The National Honor Society requires of its members abundant evidence of character, service, and leadership in school and community life. The motto, "Noblesse Oblige," echoes the code of chivalry. Thus, this organization is to the secondary school what the Phi, Beta Kappa Society is to the college. Since its inception in the New Britain High School in 1938, the Society has honored approxi- mately a thousand members. Of this number about twenty per cent were admitted as Juniors, who had earned the ninety per cent rating re- quired for this group. The following members appear in the pic- ture on the two preceding pages: Row 1-left to right-Patricia Gray, Ann Thorin, Mary Linoci, Alma Frigo, Lydia Amenta, Orlaine ,artman, Norma Neumann, Shirley Nelson, R ert Bialek, Roger Pease, Carolyn Loomis, Catherine Godzyk, Geraldine Carlson, Laurel Kaplan, Lorraine Gresh, Mary Bagdasarian, Ernestine Moseley, Lenore Carlin, Josephine Angelo. Row 2-left to right-Sandra Lehrer, Evelyn Zering, Lois Foberg, Olga Lehman, Jennie Novick, Margaret Murphy, Eleanor Peck, Janet Poglitsch, Marilyn Blackburn, Natalie Jones, Bette Scofield, Nancy O'Connor, Evelyn Petow, Lora Silverman, Catherine Soltis, Lorna Bas- sette, Shirley Mellion, Leona Cepek, Frances Sakmar, Norma Scavilla. Row 3-left to right-Phyllis Sawyer, Helen Many alumni of the local National Honor Society have achieved outstanding success in college and in professional life thereafter. The roster includes names important in the fields of science, economics, engineering, languages, and literature. To this honored list the class of 1949 is justly proud to add seventy-one members whose high school history presages continued leader- ship and an enriching contribution to the public life. The school and community watch with sincere interest the individual manifestations of The National Honor Society's beautiful oath: "I do solemnly vow that I will endeavor always to live my life with honor, to pursue knowledge with diligence, to serve mankind and God with humility-and if it may be granted that in some small measure I shall lead my fellow man,-it shall be upward." Garabedian, Ruth Dorsey, May Grigorian, Betty Hintz, Marion Valentine, Barbara Venberg, Jean Marsh, Andrea McAdoo, Joyce Bradley, Gertrude Neuhold, Nancy Siderowf, Carol Jan- koski, Evelyn Kasprow, Edna Zack, Carol Holmberg, Bette-jean Brann, Rhoda Cohen, Pauline Abrahamson, Doris Olivier, Marilyn McGuire. Row 4-left to right-Mario D'Avanzo, Sebas- tian Liistro, William Mieczkowski, Carl Burk- ard, Leonard Zinman, Ronald Wagner, Robert Peck, Joseph Kerelejza, John Olson, Richard Vahlstrom, Leo Rzewnicki, Raymond Liss, John Nixon, Francis james O'Brien, Robert Brennan, Robert Quinlan, James Rumsey, Robert Sampl, Richard Fearnley, Donald Wag- ner, John Liistro, Theodore Johnson. Absent when picture was taken: Clara Domijan, Norma Gates, Barbara Kata, Barbara Koss. , 1 E f Seated-l to r: Robert Bialek, Bette Scofield, Mary Angela Funari, Roland Perreault. Stand- ing-Robert Quinlan, Leona Cepek. QUILL AND SCROLL Many readers of The Red and Gold Review are unaware that the publication since 1945 has held membership in the high school journalists' international Honor Society, the Quill and Scroll, of which there are chapters in each of the forty-eight states and in many foreign nations Through surveys this group is able to report progress in the production of school publications and to provide suggestions for their improve- ment. To stimulate independent action on the part of staff members, contests are conducted with awards made for literary distinction. Membership in the Quill and Scroll entails high qualifications predicated upon the stud- ent's entire school record. First, he must stand scholastically in the upper third of the junior or senior classg then, he must have demonstrated superior literary ability in producing both purely journalistic and creative workg lastly, he must be endorsed by his staff adviser and approved by the Executive Secretary of The Quill and Scroll. The Red and Gold Review may proudly point to the fact that six of its staff have earned recognition in this elite group. GENERAL HONORS FOR THREE YEARS Honors in scholarship are awarded to those who maintain an average rank of eighty-five or over. Pauline Miriam Abrahamson Lydia Anne Amenta Josephine Rose Angelo Mary D. Bagdasarian Harry James Baronian Lorna Candee Bassette Robert Walter Bialek Evelyn Sperandia Bighinatti Marilyn Irene Blackburn Joyce Elaine Bradley Betty Jean Brann Robert Francis Brennan Carl Joseph Burkard Lenore Marie Carlin Lois Ann Carlone Geraldine Elsie Carlson Leona Marie Cepek Rhoda Lillian Cohen Ann Mary Colapinto Rose Marie Ann Constantino Mario Louis D'Avanzo Grace Mary DiPietro Clara Mary Domijan Ruth Ann Dorsey Irene Bridget Dudzinski Chester William Durnin Arlene Louise Eppler Doris Mary Fillion Jeanne Marie Fitzgerald Lois Mae Foberg Alma Bianca Frigo Evelyn Mary Fucini Helen Garabedian Norma Ann Gates Joan Patricia Goguen Monica Margaret Grecz May Elizabeth Grigorian Orlaine Lois Hartman Carol Marie Holmberg Carolyn Barbara Jankoski Theresa Mary Janowski Natalie Loomis Jones Eleanor Mary Kasprow Evelyn Mary Kasprow Barbara Mary Kata Matthew Joseph Klimkiewicz Barbara Jean Koss Clara Barbara Kwasnik Olga Pauline Lehman Sandra Judith Lehrer John Peter Liistro Sebastian Charles Liistro Mary Ann Linoci Raymond Joseph Liss Carolyn Royce Loomis Andrea Elizabeth McAdoo Marilyn June McGuire Irene Ann Malinowski Elizabeth Bianca Marino Jean Joann Marsh Shirley Rose Mellion Robert Anthony Michalski William Peter Mieczkowski Anne Patricia Moran Ernestine Viola Moseley Margaret Elizabeth Murphy Shirley Dorothy Nelson Gertrude Mary Neuhold Norma Adeline Neumann John William Nixon Frederick Elton Norton Jennie M. Novick Leonard Maurice Zinman 126 Ann Marie O'Connor Doris Marie Olivier John Walldau Olson Richard Opulski Lillian Marion Ottavi Joseph Anthony Pascalicchio Roger Waterman Pease, Jr. Eleanor Meta Peck Roland Joseph Perreault Evelyn Marie Petow Janet Mary Poglitsch Robert Alan Potasky Leo Rzewnicki Frances Helen Sakmar Robert Walter Sampl Phyllis Arlene Sawyer Norma Louise Scavilla Irene Evelyn Schrump Elizabeth Marian Scofield Nancy Ruth Siderowf Lora Ellen Silverman Richard King Sinkiewicz Irene Barbara Somers Candide Lenore Szymanowski Ann-Marie Virginia Thorin Richard Donald Tutko Irene J. Urbanowicz Richard Edwin Vahlstrom Dorothy Ann Valenti Marion Margaret Valentine Barbara Karin Venberg Ruth Adeline Wagner Helene Kathryn Watrous Raymond Vincent Wolski Edna June Zack Evelyn Anna Zering ART Joseph Vincent Bottiglieri Lenore Jayne Bourgeois Narma Ann Gates Pamela Ann Gustafson Allan Edward Johnson Joseph James Kasitus Matthew Joseph Klimkiewicz Marilyn June McGuire Dolores Patricia Menditto Anna Phyllis Okulicz Mary Ann Pagano Robert Alan Potasky Leo Rzewnicki Jean Agatha Sienkiewicz Edward Frank Ustilla Raymond Vincent Wolski BOOKKEEPING Lois Marion Aldrich Donald Arthur Anderson Mary D. Bagdasarian Marilyn Catherine Baylock Evelyn Sperandia Bighinatti Lenore Marie Carlin Lois Ann Carlone Rita Theresa Cefaratti Leona Marie Cepek Ann Mary Colapinto Veronica Barbara Cookish June Arlene Davis Grace Mary DiPietro Clara Mary Domijan Elizabeth Ann Donlon Irene Bridget Dudzinski Arlene Louise Eppler Doris Mary Fillion Lois Mae Foberg Lucille Irene Fournier Alma Bianca Frigo Evelyn Mary Fucini Joan Patricia Goguen May Elizabeth Grigorian Madeline Regina Hinchliffe Carolyn Barbara Jankoski Theresa Mary Janowski Eleanor Mary Kasprow Clara Barbara Kwasnik John Peter Liistro Sebastian Charles Liistro Anthony Vincent Luppino Andrea Elizabeth McAdoo Irene Ann Malinowski Barbara Ann Manchak Jean Joann Marsh Gertrude Mary Neuhold Ann Marie O'Connor Doris Marie Olivier SPECIAL HONORS Lillian Marion Ottavi Margaret Jane Pliugbeil Janet Mary Poglitsch Jack Anthony Raia John Robert Ruscica Dorothy Ann Valenti Dorothy Pulcheria Was Edna June Zack Genevieve Theresa Zaniewski Evelyn Anna Zering DRAFTING Chester William Durnin William Arthur Giantonio Robert Walter Sampl Raymond Vincent Wolski ENGLISH Pauline Miriam Abrahamson Lois Marion Aldrich Lydia Anne Amenta Josephine Rose Angelo Mary D. Bagdasarian Lorna Candee Bassette Robert Walter Bialek Marilyn Irene Blackburn Joyce Elaine Bradley Robert Francis Brennan Carl Joseph Burkard Lenore Marie Carlin Geraldine Elsie Carlson Leona Marie Cepek Rhoda Lillian Cohen Ann Mary Colapinto Mario Louis D'Avanzo Clara Mary Domijan Lois Mae Foberg Lucille Irene Fournier Alma Bianca Frigo Evelyn Mary F ucini Helen Garabedian Norma Ann Gates Marilyn Doba Gordon May Elizabeth Grigorian Carol Marie Holmberg Theresa Mary J anowski Dorothy Louise Kalinauskas Eleanor Mary Kasprow Evelyn Mary Kasprow Barbara Mary Kata Barbara Jean Koss Jean Elsie Larson Olga Pauline Lehman Sandra Judith Lehrer Carolyn Royce Loomis Mary Ann Linoci Andrea Elizabeth McAdoo Marilyn June McGuire 127 Elizabeth Bianca Marino Jean Joann Marsh Shirley Rose Mellion William Peter Mieczkowski Ernestine Viola Moseley Margaret Elizabeth Murphy Shirley Dorothy Nelson Gertrude Mary Neuhold Norma Adeline Neumann John William Nixon Frederick Elton Norton Jennie M. Novick Carol Eleanor Nyquist Doris Marie Olivier John Walldau Olson Richard Peter Paskowski Roger Waterman Pease, Jr. Eleanor Meta Peck Roland Joseph Perreault Evelyn Marie Petow Janet Mary Poglitsch Frances Helen Sakmar Phyllis Arlene Sawyer Norma Louise Scavilla Elizabeth Marian Scofield Nancy Ruth Siderowf Lora Ellen Silverman Ann-Marie Virginia Thorin Joan Rita Tumel Irene J. Urbanowicz Marion Margaret Valentine Barbara Karin Venberg Ruth Adeline Wagner Edna June Zack Evelyn Anna Zering Leonard Maurice Zinman FRENCH Marilyn Irene Blackburn Carol Marie Holmberg Mary Ann Linoci Margaret Elizabeth Murphy Shirley Dorothy Nelson Elizabeth Marian Scofield Marion Margaret Valentine GERMAN Robert Walter Bialek Joan Marie Bradlau Robert Francis Brennan Carl Joseph Burkard Alice Marie Christopherson Mario Louis D'Avanzo Virginia Rau Klenske Barbara Jean Koss Robert Anthony Michalski Norma Adeline Neumann Roger Waterman Pease, Jr. Norma Louise Scavilla Norman James Schmitt Ann-Marie Virginia Thorin Evelyn Ann Zering Leonard Maurice Zinman HISTORY Pauline Miriam Abrahamson Lydia Anne Amenta Donald Arthur Anderson Mary D. Bagdasarian Harry James Baronian Evelyn Sperandia Bighinatti Marilyn Irene Blackburn Joyce Elaine Bradley John Caswell Brainard Betty Jean Brann Eugene Victor Brodginski Lenore Marie Carlin Lois Ann Carlone Leona Marie Cepek Rhoda Lillian Cohen Ann Mary Colapinto Rose Marie Ann Constantino Grace Mary DiPietro Clara Mary Domijan Arlene Louise Eppler Faye F. Etkind Doris Mary Fillion Alma Bianca Frigo Ted Louis Fusaro Helen Garabedian Marilyn Doba Gordon Ronald Francis Gordon May Elizabeth Grigorian Agnes R. Rizzuti Juliusz Francis Gryckiewicz Frederick McGovern Gucken Rosemarie June Hartz Edward James Hines, Jr. Henry Jakowenko Sophie Veronica Janik Carolyn Barbara Jankoski Theresa Mary Janowski Chester John Jasenski Natalie Loomis Jones Dorothy Louise Kalinauskas Daniel Joseph Karpiej Eleanor Mary Kasprow Evelyn Mary Kasprow Barbara Mary Kata Barbara Jean Koss Irene Bernice Kulas Jean Elsie Larson Olga Pauline Lehman John Peter Liistro Sebastian Charles Liistro Andrea Elizabeth McAdoo Marilyn June McGuire Irene Ann Malinowski Elizabeth Bianca Marino Jean Joann Marsh Grace Harriet Melander Anne Patricia Moran Ernestine Viola Moseley Herbert Mussman Shirley Dorothy Nelson Gertrude Mary Neuhold Paul Gustave Nilsen, Jr. John William Nixon Jennie M. Novick Carol Eleanor Nyquist Ann Marie O'Connor Doris Marie Olivier John Walldau Olson Richard Opulski Albert Barnard Palmer Evelyn Marie Petow Janet Mary Poglitsch Robert Joseph Regan, Jr. Janine Patricia Routhier Frances Helen Sakmar Irene Evelyn Schrump Candide Lenore Szymanowski Lois Ann Terry Ann-Marie Virginia Thorin Ruth Adeline Wagner Donald Edward Wasik Edna June Zack Marjorie M. Zeranski Evelyn Anna Zering HOME ECONOMICS Josephine Rose Angelo Barbara Janet Brown Doris Eisemann Cecile Irene Gendron Florence Felice Mysliwiec Shirley Mae Pelletier Gladys Ann Salamon Barbara Ann Scalise Irene Evelyn Schrump Marjorie Jean Shine Anna Inga-Lisa Soderquist Eleanor Mae Wells INDUSTRIAL ARTS William Stephen Agritelley Ralph Almonte Merwin Wilbur Anderson Eugene Victor Brodginski John Charles Cannata Michael Frank Carenza Peter Nicholas Cherpak Arthur R. Danielson Jerry Anthony D'Apice Mario Falvo Norman Alfred Fortier William Arthur Giantonio Raymond Alfred Gustavson Adolph John Kallberg John Kochanowski 128 Stanley Joseph Kurasienski Albert Joseph Oullette Walter John Renock Howard A. Renaud Ceslaus Peter Sacharko Chester Stanley Stachelek Peter Michael Turek Roy Edward Wennberg LATIN Lydia Anne Amenta Lorna Candee Bassette Charles Francis Gadomski Barbara Jean Koss Sandra Judith Lehrer Mary Ann Linoci Shirley Rose Mellion Eleanor Meta Peck Lora Ellen Silverman MATHEMATICS Donald Joseph Arzolitis Joan Barbara Balinskas Robert Walker Bialek Arthur Bisberg Joseph John Bober, Jr. Robert Francis Brennan Carl Joseph Burkard Geraldine Elsie Carlson Mario Louis D'Avanzo Arthur Joseph DiMinno Peter Dubovsky Chester William Durnin Frank Fraprie John George Gasparini, Jr. Orlaine Lois Hartman Joseph Patrick Henry Frank Stanley Jablonski Evelyn Mary Kasprow Barbara Mary Kata Raymond Joseph Liss Carolyn Royce Loomis Nicholas Charles Metros William Peter Mieczkowski Margaret Elizabeth Murphy Norma Adeline Neumann Paul Gustave Nilsen, Jr. John William Nixon John Walldau Olson Richard Opulski Joseph Anthony Pascalicchio Roger Waterman Pease, Jr. Jerry Gerald Perelom Edward Richard Prusinowski Nancy Ruth Siderowf Richard Donald Tutko Richard Edwin Vahlstrom Evelyn Jean Vollhardt Leonard Maurice Zinman SCIENCE Pauline Miriam Abrahamson Lydia Anne Amenta Robert Walter Bialek Stanley John Borawski Betty Jean Brann Robert Francis Brennan Madeleine Ann Callahan Geraldine Elsie Carlson Mario Louis D'Avanzo Ruth Ann Dorsey Faye F. Etkind Jeanne Marie Fitzgerald Ted Louis Fusaro Norma Ann Gates Carol Marie Holmberg Natalie Loomis Jones Barbara Mary Kata Leon Clement Kirk Irene Bernice Kulas Dolores Barbara LaMonte Olga Pauline Lehman Sandra Judith Lehrer Raymond Joseph Liss Carolyn Royce Loomis Lois Ann McAloon Josephine Ann Marino Nicholas Charles Metros Robert Anthony Michalski William Peter Mieczkowski Norma Adeline Neumann John William Nixon Frederick Elton Norton Richard Opulski Roger Waterman Pease, Jr. Roland Joseph Perreault Evelyn Marie Petow Edward Richard Prusinowski Leo Rzewnicki Elizabeth Marian Scofield Nancy Ruh Siderowf Lora Ellen Silverman Raymond Edward Stupack Ann-Marie Virginia Thorin Richard Edwin Vahlstrom Marion Margaret Valentine Ruth Adeline Wagner Stanley Joseph Wolinski Leonard Maurice Zinman Charles Zmijeski STENOGRAPHY Lois Marion Alrich Mary D. Bagdasarian Marilyn Catherine Baylock Barbara Janet Brown Elisabeth Jane Campbell Lenore Marie Carlin ' Lois Ann Carlone Rita Theresa Cefaratti Leona Marie Cepek Margaret Rose Cesanek Ann Mary Colapinto Veronica Barbara Cookish Shirley Louise Copeman Clara Mary Domijan Arlene Louise Eppler Lois Mae Foberg Alma Bianca Frigo Doris Ruth Gagliardi Joan Patricia Goguen Monica Margaret Grecz 129 June Arlene Davis Sophie Veronica Janik Carolyn Barbara Jankoski Theresa Mary Janowski Clara Barbara Kwasnik John Peter Liistro Sebastian Charles Liistro Andrea Elizabeth McAdoo Irene Ann Malinowski Elizabeth Bianca Marino Jean Joann Marsh Ernestine Viola Moseley Ann Marie O'Connor Doris Marie Olivier Janet Mary Poglitsch Irene Barbara Somers Dorothy Ann Valenti Edna June Zack TYPEWRITING Frances Elizabeth Andrechak Mary Ann Aparo Mary D. Bagdasarian Marilyn Catherine Baylock Evelyn Sperandia Bighinatti June Nellie Bohman Hedwig Mary Bonczek Betty Jean Brann Madeleine Ann Callahan Elisabeth Jane Campbell Lenore Marie Carlin Lois Ann Carlone Rita Theresa Cefaratti Leona Marie Cepek Margaret Rose Cesanek Ann Mary Colapinto Veronica Barbara Cookish Quin "ali , , 5 Y X , , - Q . K x , v - fe , -aa hip, ' ' X Q' "itff1jfg'.Y'f"'-f' a rk V ' KA xi . , f-as Q sl' I 5411, .4 ,S 4. 'X Xa W y S.- x. L N., 'lf 'I YL I I I I 'il I 'll ll ll 'ul 'I ': u all 1 1I as ll uf -ll if nl Qi 'EI 15 ' 9 'l Y'- Al 'n E Q: fh Nl 34 'vl Su N: Ig- , :un 1 N-nu I . .QE N 3 h -gn X I ill gk N sal igl ll ll .-. in il ll in li! :I A if 1 4 . 5 yu 5 usa .Q Q 017.74111 lnxaanulmnlnnllli 1.111115115511111 f f I I ' I 111111111115 l llllllllllli J J I ll- A x 'i3.a.,. Q F X L: aff: W ., Q1 x Z 'Q W W f i fgyigx . N 7: Sm- v hstmxmx ..'. ,l N fl F I x " n ' ef , X h 'f 1 "7f:. " f' ' .N :,u.-wh XL! ng x, Www M 1 Yee V' 2 I X X . I X h. 'E ll: g u -E! .- .- 4 X , I X 1 V 4 g, ' : 'ii :. 5 ii f 3:7 l:. X 1. . N a- X I all . QE: , 5' I ::l I 'Q I l ff gafff If 1 an un: -u nun v ' G! CV Pnl 1 4:4 , X X K. xx x. Wu ll 'l -E :ll 325' 'll E' ,-l li ' ilu ,u 1:1 'll I O e5 1 'I l 4 X Q E in N , .Ri K P K 7 fffffiff K f f N I S: in gu- I I X mfg: w X lg " w N. lu iv! I 'I 25 El: I: w gl xx I 1 bl l.:l ,N 5. 'll' I ki' Nl Q. :I -i: 3: I . w 2: l +!: 'I , 'lg W w in 'u 'S Il ' 5. "H u Y 'I ll all I ll N O. 'II .I 'u :' 'E :E 5' 'u N -u E.: Nl 4 I , 'lf I kno "' v l0l0W'0"' " .. . ,. --aff A f .1 ' x X .,. 4fT ,,'. -"iif,g ' .'a,"u "1ww- -1 " - K. 'f .pizny , ,, , -V 'Pl V vgvlv A K ' v ,,,,..,.q I gi, . R X ' ' 4"""-'YE 2'of?'1'.-V1251.2fs:f!1:1:-fr-F--"1'fgzfc-W1'r:,v 1,'g.'a.7'5'5' " ' " ' ' - - - 11 9 ,' 'f-':r. ., 4 1 . Q, mix . A, fv fi . K 5 THE STUDENT-FACULTY COUNCIL OFFICERS john Nixon, President, Joyce Bradley, Vice-President, Norma Neumann, Secretary: Robert Sampl, Treasurer. All students in the school are members of the Commonwealth of NBHS, some policies of which are directed by a Stud- ent-Faculty Council composed of elected representatives, one student from each section room and five faculty members. Organized into five commit- tees, the Council sponsors such social events as The Harvest Hop, rally dance, Snow Ball Frolic Dance, Class Day at Wil- low Brook Park, and two bas- ketball games between the men of the faculty and the students, and an assembly featuring Chief Eagle Plume, interpreter of In- dian culture. Members have supported the athletic programs by selling school feathers and pins, and by organizing an inter-club sports schedule, collected money for the Community Chest, and added to the record library. Directors: Miss Agatha Benz Miss Abishag Benjamin Mr. Gustav Carlson Mr. Fred Drabble Mr. Chester Yahn gf? 2 ,t 3 THE GIRLS' LEAGUE OFFICERS First Row, l. to FI Nancy Peck, Tri urer, Shirley Nelson, Purchasing Age Miss Winifred Reynolds, Adviser, C21 Nyquist, Publicity Chairman: jo, Bradley, Social Chairman. Second Row, l to r: Rene jobert, VS fare Chairman, Margaret Murphy, Vi President: Frances Sakmar, Pre-side Constance jones, Secretary. In school service, the Girls' League portrays a role characterized by entertainment and beneficence. Be- cause its membership automatically includes all young women, it was not mentioned in senior write-ups. How- ever, its activities appeal to all, as it provides assembly programs-and of course, for the socialites there is the formal. Despite the seeming emphasis on entertainment, the Girls' League conducted junior Red Cross and Mile O'Dimes drives, sold tickets for the Senior Class Play and, each year provides the school wih a Christmas tree and corridor decorations. It sends get-well cards to ailing members, and donates gifts to children's homes. The goodwill fostered among shy freshmen, reserved juniors, and sophisticated seniors proves that the League merits applause at its well-deserved curtain calls. pq r 'X hu g K xkkr fvlxu A!! aff" THE CIVIC FORUM OFFICERS First Row, I to r: Robert Otfmowski, President, Julius Gryckiewicz, lst Vice- Presidentg john Liistro, Treasurer. Sec- ond Row I to r: Marion Esmail, Mem- bership Secretaryg Marilyn Reynolds, 2nd Vice-President, Marjorie Zeranski, Secretaryg Monica Shirley Toenniges, Carrier, Historiang Reporterg Leo St. Onge, Sergeant-at-Arms. Third Row, l to r: Thomas Elder, Chief justiceg Henry Talalaja, Assistant Sergeant-at-Arms. We have a small-scale governmental body in the Civic Forum which promotes responsible and eHective citizenship in the home, school, and community. Membership has ex- panded from seven charter members in 1938 to this year's one hundred. The club invites guest speakers from the city and state government to its bi-weekly meetings in the school library. In the spring City Day is held to give members prac- tical experience in the complicated machinery of our city government. The Civic Forum Award is presented annually to someone in the community who has rendered distinguished service to youth. ' THE ATHLETIC . , ""'i"2i . .Q I lgiiuqi 7 5 :3 " . J ' ,4k"Yn'nnFR'ff: ' 4 ' on-'IcERs Mary Brainard, Vice-President, -N John Brainard, President: Rob- ert Sunderland, Treasurer, Frances Sakmar, Secretary. To foster good sportsmanship and to encourage participation in and support for the athletic program, the A. A. was organ- ized seven years ago. Its outstanding events are the rallies in the auditorium intro- ducing each season's program, the annual sport dance for all lettermen, and the presentation of coveted awards. Its more than nine hundred members receive dividends in the form of reduced rates for all sport events. Because the sen- iors are nearly one hundred per ' I cent in membership, notice of ' such affiliation was omitted from senior write-ups. I 1 JUNIOR COLLEGE CLUB A h U D D t t e close of the act What next. the audience nods approval as the Junior College Club, starring in the performance, presented an informative and provocative theme. To preview the requirements for and the oppor- tunities in various colleges and professions, the New Britain College Club has organized a junior subsid- iary for about 140 girls interested in studies beyond high school. At monthly meetings, the group hears interesting, helpful speakers. Trips to nearby colleges have been arranged to give the girls an idea of campus life. The club plays a part in school welfare through contributions from its treasury to worthwhile causes. Annually in June a picnic is held-the termination of a successful and enjoyable performance. President, Margaret Murphy, Vice-President, Betty Jane Hintz, Secretary, Norma Neumann, Treasurer, Carl Nyquist, Social Chairman, Judith Zwick, Assistant Social Chairman, Patricia Corrigan. Row 1, l-r: Scavilla, Sakmar, Danowski, Thorin, Garro, Greens Boghosian Routhier, Johnson, Bagdasarian, Fritz, Hint. Nyquist, Murphy, Zwick, Neumann, Corrigan, Gagne, Fucin Paris, Jakobowicz, Himmelfarb, Boyle, Balinskas, Stella. ROV 2: Funari, Hoffman, Meehan, Cunningham, Munson, Jonel Church, Farquharson, Claffey, Recknagel, Lehrer, Hall, Claffev Jobert, Swanson, Carlson, Bassette, Sonstroem, Ahern, Achilli Chiappini, McGuire, Bohman. ROW 3: Bradley, Vance, Soc erling, Gorfain, Kasprow, Colapinto, Carlone, Amenta, Muller Welna, Kaplan, Mellion, Zager, Blackburn, jones, Sawye: Wonsiewicz, Coggins, Victor, Pandolfo, Coady, Cacchillo, Pecl ROW 4: Rollins, Gutman, Conlin, Cohen, Donnelly, Pecl Kata, Nowegrockas, Podhajski, Abrahamson, Gordon, Sier kiewicz, Adamowicz, Fumiatti, Gates, Shine, Brann, Loomis Terry, Donnelly, Valentine, Nelson, Peters, Duffy. ROW 5 Nyquist, Garabedian, Ringrose, Toffolon, Berzinskas, Dalburg Karbowski, Joyce, jurczak, McAloon, Modeen, Foberg, Zering Scofield, Carlson, Chaglasian, Scalise, Wells, Gustavsor Gryguc, Gustafson, Clark, Berson. ROW 6: Christophersor Bryson, Madrak, Kimball, Bell, Szymanowski, Klenske Brown, Erickson, Kaminski, Salamon, Eisemann, Coher Marsh, Etkind, Benke, MacVicar, Siderowf, Soltis, Beebe McAuliffe, Fitzgerald, Miller, Goodwin, Bourgeois, Bradlau FOREIGN AFFAIRS CLUB The Foreign Affairs Club shows promise as a forward-looking club. Developed from the Pan- American Club to widen the scope of interest and activity, its aim is to provide for its forty-seven mem- bers a medium for better understanding and greater knowledge of our neighbors around the world. With this goal in sight, the club has included among its many activities speakers, forum and panel discus- sions, movies, and field visits to museums. It has also sponsored an auditorium program on the United Nations. Sponsors and founders: Miss Pearl Snow, Miss Dorothy Quigley. Officers: President, Dorothy Kalin- auskasg Vice-President, Natalie jones, Secretary, Marilyn Blackburn, Treasurer, Ernestine Moseley. Row 1, l-r: Musczynski, Hartman, Bagdasarian, jones, Kalin- auskas, Blackburn, Moseley. Row 2, l-r: Routhier, Gordon, Fillion, Zering, Novick. Row 3, l-r: Cohen, Kallerman, Valen- tine, Zack, Nelson, Semnoski, Szymanowski, Sonstreoem, Dud- zinski, Garabedian, Etkind, Eisemann, Hartz. Row 4, l-r: Mussman, Liistro, Rzewnicki, Berson, Neuhold, Gustafson Klenske, Schelin, Clark, Arzolitis, Nilsen, St. Onge. SENIOR GIRL GUIDES A job to be doneg a group of efficient, likable girls to do it: that's the relationship of NBHS to the Senior Girl Guides. The group, organized in 1931 to answer the need for a school service group, serves as the Girls' League Public Relations committee. The club usually numbers about seventy girls chosen for schol- astic excellence and for school service rendered. Meet- ings are called by the director. Remember the bright and cheery waitresses at the Freshman Tea and the girls who ushered parents through NBHS labyrinths at P. T. A. metings? At Class Night and Graduation, at most public functions the guides have assisted, a good public relations committee. Row 1, l-r: Makucin, Miss Mary F. Saunders, Adviserg Schelir Vice-President, McGuire, President, Danowski, Treasurer Brann, Secretary: Koss, Mancarella. Row 2, l-r: Janowski Fillion, Gordon, Hartman, Bighinatti, Grigorian, Jones, Mel lion, Bagdasarian, Poglitsch. Row 3, l-r: McAuliffe, Loomii Gates, O'Connor, Neuhold, Wells, Scalise, Funari, Kalinauskas Cohen. Row 4, l-r: Szymanowski, Holmberg, Petow, Nelsor Blackburn, Valentine, Nyquist, Venberg, Murphy, Neumanr Sakmar. Row 5, l-r: Klenske, Titus, Bradley, Wessels, Dal burg, McAdoo, Siderowf, Silverman, Terry, Zack, Peck. Rox 6, l-r: Zering, Bassette, Carlson, Colapinto, Moseley, Stella Thorin, Scavilla, Halloran, Watrous. I :TCT D 0 o M W' lllll""'!l ia Lv If 2 n If 2 WI 5 f Lg 5 QR egg Z f 1 53 'n Q 2 Q, s,.......,X - , ,xx .. K4 THE MEN'S COLLEGE CLUB Since its organization in 1944, the Men's College Club has previewed opportunities afforded by many colleges and universities. Bi-weekly meetings enable the members to develop acquaintance with others who share their interests. At these meetings, alumni or oflicials from different schools explain the advan- Front Row 1-,. L K tages, admission, and requirements of representative institutions. Members are still talking about their visit to Yale University in December. Officers: President, Leonard Zinmang Vice-President, Charles Zmijeskig Secretary, Francis O'Brieng Treas- urer, Amerigo Scarpa. Director: Miss Ione Proctor. secretary, bxvagzftarsi J. Ostroski, A, Scarpa tr . - H , I S , easurer, L, Z . .Sow D' F- O -k - ieczkowski R Quinlan ' ' , . Peck R Michalsk- T ey J. Rachlin R, ws i, J. Rumsey. P1 ' 1 J. Detotto E. Fr l h'R . " - Biskllpiak. Th' d li an-......... .t,,. , ack ROW, I-r: R. Piorkowski, cria,..IfEllllck'-H: Malifwwski. ElrD,....ciY' - ' ' kin treasurer F nt Row, l-r: T. Johnson, F. Fraprie, J. Pavano, VIC?-Pfesldefli, P- Lum? ,g I Rl:oBialek, president, R. Pease, secretary, L. Milkeyv M- D Avanzo- Secfmd Rgw'Lkf'h12'k?teE eck, R. Quinlan, F. O'Brien L. Zinman, R- Bfeflflifn, R- Peflky' J- Nlxfmv -Ol 'C 85 i Hausman, P. Bauer. Third Row, 1-r: J. Pyle, D. Wright, E- Nefl, J- Read' J- son' 3 me jeski, A. Katz, C. Burkard, J. Rumsey, M. Andrews. Abent from picture: N. Schmitt, . Hjerpe. March 12, 1947, was opening night for the New Britain Chapter of the Key Club International under the local Kiwanis Club charter, the club directs thirty members to useful citizenship through co- operative school and community service. Among bi-weekly dinner guest speakers was Senator Raymond Baldwin, an honorary member. Further, the club sponsors benefit parties, aids the Red Cross, and sends CARE packages. THE KEY CLUB President Robert Bialek, following appointment to the International Committee on Resolutions, helped to organize a New England District. In March, members attended the national con- vention in Washington, D. C. For next year, "We build." Officers: President, Robert Bialekg Vice-Presi- dent, Joseph Pavanog Secretary, Roger Peaseg Treas- urer, Pearlmon Lumpkin. Directors: Chief William T. Shaw, Mr. Vincent Sala. THE SKI CLUB The winter wonderland is paradise for the thirty- :wo members of the Ski Club, whose aim is to en- :ourage skiing by offering instruction to beginners and to foster skill in advanced skiers. Meetings are held three times a monthg meantime ihe group competes with West Hartford and Farm- ngton High Schools and the Kingswood Country Day Left t . Presidgngggti Mr. Clarence rthur Glaeser, Nordstrom, Rich School. The big event of the year is a trip to Ver- mont in February. Officers: President, Donald Swansong Vice-President, Courtney Petersong Secretary, Margaret Donnellyg Treasurer, Donald Bilas. Directors: Mr. Clarence Nordstrom, Mr. Gustav Carlson. ard Nuthm an, Donald . Gizza, Donald Swanson 45 1. N" X 2' 7 1 . nd Hurley' SPOHSOU R1Y"'g,,,, .dent William J. ding, Dick Lasc . . , h Aivaz, Prem ' 1 wski. Stan , 1 nghi' J'-'sep . ' hael KOZ 0 Front seatgdl 15:2-Pgesldent' Bearqusegfsg inlvliiiturez Mr. Elder. V Bwheaaclmmimixxxdeli Dominick Francische 1 e 1 THE RADIO CLUB "Calling W1-JDQ! Calling W1-JDQ!" The phrase can be heard often in the shack in the north wing basement, where the Radio Club holds weekly meet- ings. Members of this group are interested in amateur radio operatingg some have made their own instru- ments although they are not yet on the airg the mem- bers get great enjoyment from manipulating the transmitter which they have built. This extra-curr1cu- lar activity may provide a fine background for any one who wishes to build a career in the promising held of radio. Officers: President, joseph Aivazg Vice-President, Raymond Beaucheming Secretary-Treasurer, William Killduffg Sponsor: Mr. William Hurleyg Trustee: Mr. Thomas Elder. 137 First Row: l to r: B. Kochol, S. Budnik, B. Aparo, J. Peters, P. Gorman, J. Fitzgerald, B. Kaminsky, R. Bernard,,Second Row: l to r: P. Albrecht, F. Mysliwiec, D. Mendtito, J. Kor- zeniecky, M. Czuprinski, L. Selander, N. Holcomb, B. Jakob- owicz. Third Row: l to r: A. Conlon, M. Anderson, N. Leva' dowski B. Paris, J. Pons, E. Szydlowska, A. Duke, L. Stank vich, Fourth Row, Cbackhz l to r: B. Ahlgren, M. Kaspro' B. Morris, L. Saunders, A. Meskill, E. Schwanke, A. Chan berlain. THE TWIRLERETTES With all of the precision of the famed Rockettes the snappy Twirlerettes took the field--and the audience-at this ydar's games. Maneuvering intri- cate designs, their marching was as admiration-com- pelling as were their white costumes, eye-compelling. The applause of the public-expressed over the air by mike-reporters--paid real tribute to the accom- plishment of the group and their instructor an made worthwhile the hours of practice spent i wheeling, turning, and determining right from lei With twenty of the girls now studying with Majc Forrest Harvey to learn to twirl a baton, the grou of actual twirlers will be increased next year. W thank Miss Harrowell for making life so pleasant. . u RS CHEERLEADE - A . J. --kk ! , Q Q ft ,! , ' ' s fl ls y it r, ta 5 First gow. Sandia Lehrepameya Gus gglOnv h R0w ' avi!!- Apog 5 Four! .Stine D Willxafqgtutei Chix hom V MA JORETTES These merry misses step out smartly to keep the band in line. Theirs is an unofficial kind of direction, but, as one of the boys remarked, "At least you keep your eyes ahead of you.7' Joan Duffy, jean Adamowicz, Mary Kata, Vera Kozyra, Joan Kloskowski. ,4 i fence sa Donngwfbi Fancy, , There S0 ' b en d Second iowiottefv Dorogxilefmani A S - r - a ery, h'rleY H Mgry Row. B15:cAuhffe, S i ,ght Lois Lugyipmefn. Mafy Ellen to fl ' Seve f on- "B-E-S-T Y-E-T" is the salute to the 1948-9 Cheer- leaders. Twice a week these thirteen, selected by a faculty committee from over a hundred, report while most stud- ents are getting up. Besides their regular program, they earned distinction in the Yankee Stadium, where, restricted by union regu- lation, they cheered from their seats and formed only an "N" in their precision marching, but they set a mark for successors. Officers: Captain, Mary Ellen McAuliffe. Director: Miss Agatha Benz. f-ffl? 'W ' . . . X 1 First Row, l-r: Miss Ev M. Coates, adviser: E. Sc field, secretary, R, Biale president, J. Rachlin, trea urer, F. O'Brien, vice-pres dent, Mr. james S. Beac adviser. Second Row, l-r: I johnson, C. Jones, S. Co mier, A. Gutman, L. Cepe M. Koppel, L. Amenta, Fenster, L. Carlin, E, Zage D. Olivier, P. Greene, IN Busceni. Third Row, l-r: 4 Rosensweig, R. Peck, 1 Stowell, D. Rosensweig, li Funari, S. Kowaleski, I Quinlan, E. French. ow, seated: Robert Quinlan, Front R news editor: Robert Bialek, editor-in- chief, Francis O'Brien, feature editor. Back Row, standing: Robert Peck, sports editor, Bette Scofield, circulation man- ager, Constance jones, advertising man- ager: Cynthia Stowell, staff cartoonist: and joseph Rachlin, staff photographer. THE PRESS CLUB Flood lights focused rarely on the Press Club disclose it to be an organization of thirty members whose duty it is to provide the Commonwealth with news of goings-on over all the miles of corridor in the building and its wings. The club consists of the business, reportorial, and editorial boards which meet bi-weekly to formulate plans, policy, and contents of successive issues of the school paper. Theirs is the big work, the selling of advertising, the multiple behind-the-scenes jobs that readers think are done automatically. 140 THE RED AND GOLD STAFF In the hands of these ten staff members lies thi final word on The Red and Gold. Theirs is the jol to cut and stretch like Procrustes himself until every story tells its tale, assumes its proper position, and i: ready for public appearance. Theirs is the job tm write the editorials that mark the educated reader to furnish features to stir the chuckles-and, as any edior knows, to take the blame for the world's ills That they have done so creditably is indicated bj their honorable membership in the Columbia ani Connecticut Scholastic Press Associations and in "Thi Quill and Scroll." 5 OUR HEARTS WERE YOUNG AND GAY A Three Act Comedy by Cornelia Otis Skinner and Emily Kimbrough Dramatized by jean Kerr Characerts Un order of appearancej Steward A A A A Robert Bialek Mrs. Skinner AA A AA A AA A Faith Gorfain Cornelia Otis Skinner Joan Berson Otis Skinner A A A A Donald Janis Emily Kimbrough A A A Ruth Dorsey PurserA ,.,. AA A A A Vito Catucci Stewardess A Janet Poglitsch Dick Winters A A Paul Nilsen Admiral A A Laurence Waida Harriet St. John A Rose Marie Hartz Winifred Blaugh A , A A Eleanor Peck Leo McEvoy A A A Robert Michalski Inspectors A A AA A Helen Garabedian Theresem A A A A A Ruth Wagner Madame Elise A A A A A Cynthia Rollins Monsieur De LaCroix Victor Kalinoski Window Cleaner A A Vito Catucci DIRECTOR: Miss Mildred Margaret Raymond fi-if A' A J X HA 1 I , I T' V-5' WYQAWMA ll Ne . Q , M K K A: 5.1 W WNW rg Msg? x TVN MK X rj-1" xg it i, A P af L x W M f V. Q Sr A x X A it 1 gg K, , Y :ik 5 , . A 1 A 7 1 N nf tg A. A i gsm' J 3' J Yi ' w K' -A V i il' A Ag A ' fi W , imuiifiii -MWF: , . ijt: A of T , ' 141 N A fn "ferr Eli- QM. K H mm . 1 -' ikvwcx A JANUARY THAW A Three-Act Comedy William Roos adapted from the novel by Bellamy Partridge Friday evening, Nov. 19, 1948 THE CAST Qln order of appearancej ...Rose Amenta Lawrence Waida ..,.....Shirley Fritz ....Clara Sargis Genevieve Listro .....,..Anne Moran ....,...Paul Nilsen JONATHAN ROCKWOOD Peter Kowalchyk MATHILDA ROCKWOOD... Eleanor Peck MR. LOOMIS ...., .. . ,......., .... F rank Fraprie UNCLE WALTER., . , , MATT ROCKWOOD . .. .Weston Dornan ,. . Vito Catucci , ..... Joseph Bober CARSON ,....,, ..... . . ..,,. . . DIRECTOR: Miss Mildred Margaret Raymond 'f Cy Y KJ Left: "There's a fire, Daddy! Right: "Aw, Maw!" Right: "Olive-s!" Left: "Mr, Husted-Mr. Rock- wood." THE AMPHION CLUB On the NBI-IS stage the real actors are members of the Amphion Club, reorganized to widen the scope of opportunities in dramatics. Students interested in phases of the stageg other than acting, have been admitted into the group, which now has full-time properties. make-up, costume, light- ing, and scenery committees, plus a stage directors' section. Every second Monday the full member- ship of fifty-one holds regular meetings. Initiated this year was the one-act play night at which three separate dramatizations were given. Also new is the organiza- tion's entrance into the competi- tive Connecticut Dramatic Festival held this year at the Teachers' College, This club's social program included several trips to the Bush- nell Memorial to see professional productions. The club aspires to "make each new effort nobler than the last." Officers: President: Frank Fraprie Vice-President: Ruth Wagner Secretary: Pauline Abrahamson Treasurer: Ernestine Moseley Directors: Miss Mildred Raymond Mr. James T. Lape 2 :W Lie, K A Lf! 1 I l l.g l l L First Row, l to r: Miss Raymond, F. Apos- talon, S. Fritz, I. Laliherte, P. Abraham- son, F. Fraprie, R. Wagner, E. Moseley, E. Peck, J. Connery, H. Bogosian. Second Row, l to r: J. Bergomi, R. Turnrose, S. Toen- niges, D. Kalinauskas, H. Cvarabedian, J. Marino, H. Adamosky, L. Aiudi, W. Dor- nan, Mr. Lape. Third Row, l to r: S. Gion- friddo. D. Wagner, V. Catucci, S. Lehrer, B, Koss, N. Siderowf, M. McAuliffe, H. Baronian, F. O'Brien, P. Dubosky, J. Pav- ano. Fourth Row, l to r: S. Kowaleski, J. Rumsey, L. Waida, P. Kowalczyk, R. Regan, J, Elder P. Belliveau, R, Wagner, P. Nilsen, R. Ventura, W. Frank. Missing from pic- ture: B. Brennan, E. Sadowski, F. Gorfain, C. Swanson, A. Moran. G. Listro, E. French, P. Cnady, C. Sargis, R. Amenta. The prnductiion of the One Act Play Con- test pictured l to r: "Trifles," l to r: Earl French, Eleanor Peck, Helen Garabedian, Peter Kowalchyk, and Weston Dornang "Rising of the Moon," winning play, l to r: James Rumsey, Lawrence Waida, Peter Bel- liveau and Stanley Kowaleskig "A Wed- ding," l to r: student director, Dorothy Kalinauskas, Francis O'Brien, Lorraine Aiudi: "A Wedding," l to r: Paul Nilsen, Joseph Elder, Sandra Lehrer, Barbara Koss. and Vito Catucci. .1 ,rr .H w u My . ,, . W J, .N , . 46 THE SENIOR CHOIR Row 1, l-r: H. Watrous, M. Gagne, D. Guzzmckas, N. Hess. Ruw Z, l-r: S. C'-ape-nmn, QI, Pug litsch, L, Chaponis, N. -Innes. AI. Bohman. Row 3, I-ff S. Smmtrm-rn, S. I,e-hrvr, H. SUUGQ-ld M. Hoffman, A. Eppler. Row 4, Lr: R, jobert. M. Blackburn, M. Valentino. N. Frisk, S. Ns-l son, M. We-ssc-ls. S. Row 5, l-r: D Steiner, A. Gutmzm, -I. Somnwski, KI. Bmzuilvy. V. KI:-nskv A. Christophe-rsrm. Row 6, l-r: R. Skinner, W. VVPICI1, NV, Umghirv, E. Vimgrix 'If .Iuhnsrm F. Lumpkin. Row 7, I-r: R. Klejbuk. N. ML-t1'sas. A, Kutl. G. Zle-gglefry S, LQOZIU, I7. Niyc-rs Row 8, l-r: T. Sumoski, V. Kaliuoski. J. Nixon. KI, Kvrvlvjzm. R. Polls. F. Chxvkvn. THE MUSICAL CLUB "Standing room only" is the usual tribute to presen- tations by the Musical Club, which, beyond pro- viding entr'acte entertain- ment for the school pro- gram, advances musical knowledge. The club is divided into sub-groups, membership in which de- pends upon individual cap- abilities. Theirs is a long series of smash hits. One group, the 49'ers, renamed annually, is an exclusively senior organ- ization, usually called the Senior Choir, many mem- bers of which become elig- ible for post-graduate music study. The excel- lence which earned the rank of superior plus in the 1947 All-New England Festival is the constant goal of these experienced singers. OFFICERS Standing, l-r: Pearlmon Lumpkin, treasurer, Margaret Wessels, secretary, Marcus Bordiere, president. Seated, l-r: Marilyn Blackburn, vice-president, jane Semnoski, vice-president. EXECUTIVE Front, l-r: Arthur DiMinno, Donald Janis, Margaret Wessels, Jane Sem- BOARD noski, Marcus Bordiere, Marilyn Blackburn, Pearlmon Lumpkin, Donna Steiner, Robert Sampl. STUDENT LEADERS Left to right: Donna Steiner, Arthur DiMinno, Donald Janis, Marcus BO,-- diere Robert Sampl, Jane Semnoski. N . at it Older than the Senior Choir by a year, the young men of the Octet, featured at all the con- certs, have sung for several private gatherings. A pocket-sized glee club, advanced in the art of harmony, they present favorites both olcl and new. The Octet is pictured above in the following order: left to right. William Unghire, Julius Crryckiewicz, Robert Sampl, Robert Brennan. Marcus Bordiere, Pearlmon Lumpkin, Joseph Kerelejza, Victor Kalinoski. In the circle to the left is Mr. De Benedictis, director of the Club. The circle to the right shows the Octet in action. Below is pictured the A Cappella Chorus. More than two hundred voices comprise the group which, after diligent weekly rehearsals, sustains the glory of NBHS in public concerts and in All-State and New England festival. 1 x 1 s 5 I Q 6 f Sits' 1 'N A . i. ' WM' ,-l..g- ,w-A A THE MUSI AQ. CLUB Their repertoire runs the gamut from ancient classical to the latest in symphonic swing. High in the billing comes the special fea- ture, the Starlettes, thirteen young women pre- ual arrangements in tempo and in senting unus ' harmony. Long a special attraction at concerts, they have made guest appearances at numerous private parties. The group is in the following ' ' h order at the top of the page. rear, left to rig t: Alice Christopherson, Beverly Lambert, Mar- garet Wessels, Donna Steiner, Joyce Bradley, Virginia Klenske. Front, left to right: June Boh- man, Rene Jobert. Norma Hess, janet Poglitsch, Ruth Dorsey, Nancy Frisk. The accompanists are jane Semnoski, and Marilyn Blackburn. Each of these groups has a student leader working under the direction of Mr. De Bene- dictis, and it is their pride that each is self-sus- taining and contributory to the whole. ' s f ' 401. ,J First Row, l-r: M. Kata, J. Duffy, L. Hall, R, Sanewsky, R. Hickcox, S. Gozzo, R. Sulick, F. Steifel, J. Kropf, C. Lynch, E. Claffey, A. DiMinno, E. Adamowicz, S, Gionfriddo, E. Bis- kupiak, D. DiNino, W. Costello, D. Borenstein, R. Ahlberg, J. Pascalicchio, A. Katz, L. La- bieniec, J. Kloskowski, V. Kozyra. Second Row, l-r: D. Janis, C. Wallen, R. Mitera, J. Gozzo, J. Grasso, D. Swanson, J. Kapustinski, R. Potasky, R. Pray, C. Ulbrick, E. Stauff, E. Cohen, THE MUSICAL CLUB BAND Resplendent in new red-and-gold uniforms with white straps, gold braid, and cockaded hats, the sixty members of the band highlighted their season by appearing at the Yankee Stadium on November 28. All season at the football games, and at the annual concert, the results of rigor- ous semi-weekly rehearsals were vigorously applauded. THE PRETZEL BENDERS Wherefore the Pretzel Benders? The fellows who formed the group in 1946 know the best answers, but their fourteen successors this year have been called "the funniest thing this side of Spike Jones." At the football games we chuckled at their performance, at the basketball games, we shrieked with laughter at them. While the humor seems instantaneous, only they can tell of the hours of work behind it. Q' L . f' - A Y . . vin-nd - ' ' -L... -. II ' S W tom Q1 XM Qi t Q' Mm N - ww . aw Xl ' '-'mu X QSNQ A : . ......... t ., v-71. 1 L3-.1 A QQV, 'Fl A' .1-1 V P, Fuoco P. Bauer, I. Epstein, S. Peterson, V. Colangelo, P. Ponte, A. Luppino, T. Sumoski j. White. Rear, Back Row, l-r: P. Lumpkin, J. Kerelejza, R. Brennan, R. Klejbuk, j. Gry ckiewicz, R. Sampl, M. Kolpak, R. Vahlstrom, D. Costanzo, A. DiCarlo, T. johnson, R. Skin ner, M. Bordiere, D, Rusling, R. Hoffman, F. Rocco, C. Wade, S. DiMauro R. Vitelli, R Rubinow, J. Bordiere. 2 2 i ww - 5 :tx Q -.o THE PRETZEL f 9 bk BENDERS 4 ga - I . iront, lvft to right: Arthur - J Ji Minno, Paul Ponte, Rob- A ' A Ii, 6' ' 1 - Q4 rt Potaiky David Rueling ohn Kapustinski Anthony uppino Back left to right ...I Q iordiere, Pearlmon Lump iumoski Sal Di Mauro up Dominic Ctmtanzo, Anthony JiCarlo , ' . , A' : 'N I . 5' Robert Skinner. Marcus 'fx 1 in, Frank Rocco, Ted Q. f - . 'kms . FN! . ...it .. ' XJ - gtg .M ' ' 'V it W " 1 f,h ai we 154 if is livginning with the rear: S. DiMauro, D. Zarowski, L. Detotto. P. Lumpkin, L. Waida, T. Biskupiak, M. Grigorian, ,I Rarzvk, Ii. Varasconi, D. Janis, R. Cote, il. Ostrowski, P. Bauer, R. Skinner, G, Froeba, T. johnson, S. Cvozzo, A. Katz R. Hirkox, A, DiMinno, Al. Gozzo, R. Mitera, R. Sulirk, tl. Kapustinski, R. Lundstrom. P. Fuoco, M. Borclie-re, D. Costanzo R. Vahlstrom. Below. left to right: Richard Vahlstrom. Robert Skinner, Theodore John- son, Pvarlmon Lumpkin, john Kapustinski, Robert Lundstrom, Dominic Costanzo, Marcus Bordiere, leader, in , fm H W 5675-M :fr .E ,gemg M S wi I k 5 fig . ll riffs? Y, - I ? S if "' KI - he ii l I . pfi, . e I l T liiggi l T A l QEFAYRSQ V, I, A l x ,if THE MUSICAL CLUB THE ORCHESTRA Forty members of the orches- tra tune their strings at weekly rehearsals and, more frequently. in patient private practice. They take the spotlight at Honors' Day assembly and several other occasions annually. THE BRASS CHOIR While horns and trumpets seem to belong to clress parade, the Brass Choir has employed them in adverituresome arrange- ments in delicate harmony until they really have something to "blow" about. n 1 Wk 2 . I CAMERA CLUB From one click to another, the camera fans of our school record the scenes and settings of our school life. The Camera Club, re- organized this year under the direction of Mr. Charles Drapeau, has offered the shutter-bugs of our school a chance to perfect their photography technique. Front Row, l to r: Jack Silk, Robert Miller, Virginia Fay, Leon Bibeau, Ray Beauchemin. Second Row: Robert Wynne, William Nipert, Mr. C. J. Drapeau, Adviser: Robert Makosky, Richard Lasch. THE BEEHIVE REPRESENTATIVES These students were elected by their section rooms to represent The Beehive in each senior room. They do much detail work for the staff by gathering information from the students and making corrections when necessary. They, too, make the annual sales campaign a success. First Row, I to r: M. Bagdasarian, J. Goguen, N. Jones, J Poglitsch, J. Farrell, R. Wagner, O. Hartman, A. Frigo. Sec- ond Row, l to r: A. Thorin, E. Bighinatti, L. Amenta, G Melander S. Lehrer, J. Novick, B. Brann, L .Halloran, H Watrous. Third Row, l to r: I. Malinowski, J. Bohman, E Zering, N. Gates, R. Cohen, R, Hartz, T. Makucin, A. Eppler D. Fillion. Fourth Row, l to r: E. Petow, B. Koss, C. Szyman- owski, S. Schelin, B. Venberg, B. Kata, E. Dalburg, G. Neu- hold. Fifth Row, l to r: J. Pavano, C. Durnin P. Nilsen, P Kowalchyk, P. Lumpkin, L. Zinman. PHYSICS LABORATORY OUR CLASSES X X W uf if DRAMATICS A I ,m...,, , 1 -', ' ... TRIGONOMETRY TYPING MACHINE SHOP HOME ECONOMICS affwcb C XPP' 908 P-'Void .X-'ZZ " 499 X ME WORKING 41 ,www 33 IZSLPERS CAZHE 5 E i 1,1 .1 P.. OYYXCE YYELYEY-S SU?-'SWS P-KOS LKB O? Y P-G95 Y-BRS! YXC9 SN 086985 CLA Sy- "' ,xr X. -C., "' vxq Afhvfwb mv 1 ' -X U'-'rx' SSDAY A UD ' B4s1fE227-,FAC ALL DLT E CL THE S'l'UDEN'l'-FACULTY COUNCIL CARRIES ON X B4 SRE TBA LL ' Y i . Left: "just the Way You Money!" Above: "Money! Money! ns!! ,Q Qff, wr 9 Q sy" Look Tonight" OUR DANCES Left: "I Want a Curl" 'I Below: "It's Easy When You Know" QQQV xx ev' Above: "This Is the Moment" f f f 643 ,iff NE, Xxw.. '7 J X' A giant falls wax XXL X61 ff N? Q94f ,X 2 F' M Baron-Band mascot IND 'l'IDI: li THE FEATURE ACT-YANKEE STADIUM L""'g2 Won't we ever start? 4 ind Here we go! , Mfg?-f ' I' e K f ' .,. ,.:.t.-?i,,' swam ""-Q-----wh. ...., M, MQQNW1 N Lil qw' hmsvf mars And on television too! N.rE if an mfr fir 49. 41 Macy's agreed with us! Now for a hotdog! i H 160 Guess we showed them! "F S 9::.,,y5,1l 1- Qgri' - . 5 1 "Full of Sound and Fury signifyingu? IDIO'F'S DELIGHT . x ..,..-1 she stood in tears amid the alien corn I "A dancing shape, an image gay, To haunt, to startle, and waylayf' , Q 3 ,: "A "In Xanadu did Kubla Khan A stately pleasure-dome decree . . I -4 A 4? "Music, when soft voices die-" "Where A Through Down to l ph, the sacred river, ran Caverns measureless to man a sunless sea." if 'ww , X POTPOURRI We g K Upwa rd E. Syale Crew I 'M pfo .,Th h U1 Derry CO aw., fhmirfee I or I Q i X R if-'-" f x ex XX. 1.5 'owe 'x we woo we A wa T h . P list,-Hin X - H zu Rub v " ,,, W n f .Q 1 .218 33 -155 fl. l""71'f'K-H' ?-.'-if-E:f,.-.1-a. 1 .W ,. :vw iv-I . ., , ww.: -gf , .Q M" 'CT 563' . QM Q ge sy X L3 Cf ,Yo Ji we L x 5, if ,QQ AI :K ff , 3 W- vm .s e ' W ,. .Q- Q 4 -V .5 ,, A W1 QW . viii , yo k new e f 7w. 1 K Top to bottom, l-r Ruthie Donald Need we Say? I wonder Bart The poor bus! Red feather Ooooh! George Sweet Music' Home run Lucille Yea, New Britain 0 331 - C 5 . .. . Vu Q xii 4 2 N. xl, M' , X 1 ff. A 5- ' b fqmii I 5 li i iekmk W I ' . - I . ' s dig gi' Q' ' f' A W I.. 'I' , -"' Q - - 1 , 13- .X 4 mv M, 1-.A E 41 gm Lp ,ipaq mffa-uh 1? 'M I 1 1 r I f ' ' 'F . a A -'ff' WL, iw! v" -2 'DI' I' 'h 5 Q X' 'V' X' lj .ff VIZ n xr. I' I" T7 I .I dl :- tif, sts 'I 'X 'Q fx' .. Q ., w 4 J N' 45. M. , , 4 Qi """' L f 4 "ZW f .. x . f' 7 4 ' --'fl '3 I l f"'.:'-' X YLY4' Q fl -' 1 xv ' ,r , , f H I I W' ff i- fl 1 J V' 4- pf Q .Q . I D I A ' In , if . f ' V 1 , f -51, I IW' , . n lk V, . 1 if lx xn f, , l f..-4 P , , ' X YN! X, 9, ' a rty .fa I W , ' X " fy ' ., Q 1. E I X, ' . ",' I, 'diff' rg 4 'Y .I M If Q? ' .0 2 4 Y Q ll X-X 3' U: V ,V , V f 'J I 1 in , M , ,fq Q !1 , Y Q .' uQ2t', L: 4' wt H , llxrfr Lf' , . , x ' 5' K ' 'T' if V X 1 2 5, .fr I 'iv r - . , . I L , re ,I . , '-x 'V U -Q , , , X x V." E A f f x g 1 iv 5+ FOOTBALL 5. A-ar 9 ML., 1-til ' A COACH BAYLOCK 1 A .Q Q fr K L 1 f. N mf' an X m 3 4, aw, 5 fx 1 f ,. A 4 J ,ff'Q""E 1948 Cm, wmnffif QW g ff ' M. Q :JV Dfw." lm I. K' First Row l to r R Sunderland W Markiewicz J Zalewski J Stalk, L. Kenna, Captain A Fioravanti L Klett R Essel L Magnoli H Krystopa W Maher. Second Row, l to r: R Egan J Olcott A Galante E McCloskey W Woodward C Peterson, R. Pons, J. Nixon, THE RED AND GOLI IN '48 New Britain High's 1948 footbz team had a successful season despi the fact that they were plagu4 throughout the season with injurie With only Captain Fioravanti an Sunderland left from the '47 squa Coach Baylock built a team whim fought the leading opposition in tl state to a standstill. The climax can when a state-championship-bour Hillhouse eleven was defeated for tl first time during the season, 19-1 Zalewski proved to be one of tl best running backs in the stateg Mar' iewicz showed his excellence as passer. Sunderland, in his new pos tion in the line, was a real sparkplu and Klett made sensational catcht throughout the year. New Britain ended the season bri liantly by beating Hartford Bulkele 37-7 with Joe Zalewski leading tl' way by making four touchdowns. John Brainerd in action against Bulkeli Final score: N. B. 37, Bulkeley 7. ld New New New New New New New New New R. Hollfelder, C. Skorski, J Kunda J Buczek Back Third Row l to r R Gaudlo J Sardo R. Zurek, D. Fliss, J,Will1s D Balmskas W Seamon L Selfel R Llckwar M Valentine E. Lubin, F. Sataline, F. Jablonski Manager 0 7 13 0 7 26 13 12 7 Joe Zalewski breaking away on one of his many brilliant runs A 1 5? af, fi in W 1, Qi rm El Wg, Q A v. f t",' af Q- f ' 4 1 Q Q X, , an ' 5, , A if 'J Q, E. Q n U3 4,,. is H an L .' 5 N k . , i N' ff' X .4 ' . ' 'VU 'f ' A " , k ' in u 1 X' I L , A-L A - 1' W M' 6 A V uv D A V s ., 5 l w , I lg: - 1 "fi fa x Y' 1 H x 170 " J. Q s Captain Fioravanti nearing the goal after receiving a pass against Stamford. uf W f E xx X95 A K .rv ,, , H 1 hs i ,LLB . 2 L 1 1 STA'lfEM1iB N gh tg 5, l ..- I mg. qwlbu-5 fi' 1 .I 34 , Di V y' --.11-.J I72 w e I BRITAIN HI CH Left to right-Mr. Recano, Mr. Sniadak, Mr. Mellion Mr. Flood, Ed Krawiec, Diok Orzech- owski, Frank Paul, Ed Staskelunas, Don Paris, jerry Neipp, Ray Prey, Tom Motto, Archie Tolis, Larry Klett, Marty Reisner, Mr. Depot, Mr. Neipp. CHAMPIONS OF 1948-49 Establishing a new record in the history of NBHS basketball, the team of 1948-49 won the CIAC championship, long coveted objective of the local five. Following the victory over East Hartford that made possible this cham- pionship, the team entered the New England Tournament at the Boston Garden. After stun- ning victories over Nashua, New Hampshire, and East Hartford, in the quarter-finals and semi-finals, the Red and Gold five were de- feated by a favored Somerville, Massachusetts, team 38-37 in the finals. In the last second of the final game Somerville was awarded a dis- puted foul which was good for the winning point and the tournament championship. New Britain was the only team to place two men, Reisner and Prey, on the All-New England team. Cap- tain Reisner and Ed Krawiec provided the scor- ing punch throughout the season for NBHS, while Tolis, Paris, and Klett controlled the backboards, the former well enough to be chosen second team All-State. Little Ray Prey was the ball-handling ace of the team whose coolness and beautiful floor game brought New Britain many victories. Of the first team only Tolis and Paris remain for next year's team. New Britain tallied a total of 1,093 points, a new modern school record. It also broke the state tourney 1. .., F xii., ..-,W we -4e..,,,m"'!"- img. scoring record for three games. BASKETBALL SUMMARY Won 16 Lost 8 Percentage .667 Team N.B. Opp. Team N.B. Opp. New Haven Commercial 65 42 WfBristol 62 40 New London Bulkeley CAD 44 34 sF'I'Bridgeport Central 45 44 New Haven Hillhouse 45 28 ""I'East Hartford 58 46 Norwich Free Academy CAD 34 31 'k'If"'Nashua, N. H. 41 28 Hartford Bulkeley CAD 24 47 'W"'East Hartford 53 37 Bristol 49 42 ""'UI'Somerville, Mass. 37 38 Torrington CAD 42 51 'I' Forfeited Meriden 51 34 'HI' CIAC Tournament New Haven Hillhouse CAD 34 45 :Wie New England Tournament Bristol CAD 33 35 Individual scoring figures: Hartford Public CAD 48 37 Player B. Fl. Ttl. Norwich Free Academy 56 49 Reisner .. . 126 106 358 Torrington 33 40 Tolis .. .. . 84 41 209 New Haven Commercial CAD 38 33 Krawiec . . ,. 79 47 205 Hartford Bulkeley 48 36 Prey .. . . 50 20 120 "'Hartford Public 59 30 Paris ..,. . 35 28 98 "'Meriden CAD 55 31 Klett , . . , 23 18 64 """Torrington 39 38 Staskelunas , , , . 2 8 16 RAY PRIQY ll-New lfxmglnml DON PARIS K f?1'S MARTY RIZISNHR CAPIAIN All-New Iimglund All Stlte B wr A .-.. IQ " ' h 'Q lf 'X f n ' ' ' 1: fl . illllf 1' it n' COACH NIEIPP TOM MOTTO A ARCHIIQ TOLIS All-Slaltc. ' Ind team 1 'Q 'n E c 5 ? i 5 ik 0 'ul LARRX'KLETT 'lr NB WB NB . 8 ' 'P , ' i 1- , .M ,ii B t NB ,N NB Q L B N i NBi,,,,Q First Row: Tutko, Butera, Maher, Nuthman, Lumpkin. Second Row: Venditto, Peterson, Hansen, Sumoski, Seamon, Maietta, Skorupski, Gryckiewicz. Third Row: Baronian, manager, Litsky, Rose, Zuk, head managerg Wright, Drzala, Barszcz. TRACK This year Coach Johnson will attempt to build a contender for the state championship out of a group of boys that are for the most part - 1949 inexperienced. The most experienced of the few veterans are sprinters Bill Maker and Edmund Vingris. BASEBALL - 1949 Despite the small nucleus of veterans re- maining from last year's team, NBHS's baseball team looks forward to another successful season. Coach Flood will have to build a team to face the best in the state around Captain Richard Burns and Mario D'Avanzo. The team will be strengthened by boys who have had some previous experience although they were not can- didates for last year's squad. First Row, l-r: Stalk, Colangelo, Motto, Goselin, Burns, D'Avanzo, Zalewski, Gardner, Ander- son. Second Row, l-r: Mr. Flood, Head Coach, Olcott, Valentine, Alteri, Paris, Reisner, Klejbuk, D'Apice, Winters, Banaszek, Mr. Sniadak, Asst. Coach. Third Row, l-r: Bingham, Olis, Kasitus, Perrotta, Restelli, Magnoli, Willis, Sataline, Lickwar, Dzwonkowski. JSSSQW- V 5 U T is it Lil, Binlf ' fff H 1 ' .. K. I W' ,,,,t . ff f :rf K. - ,O lt 11 V Q , If ylllll . w W' ,ses ' if l g M: " K fl 11, i New , I my I Y f K K ,V-,iv R P 'il W va w-f ' . t . , tl , Ny I K, kxit fl, l X, My I V , rx 7 4 - X f , k 'f - - , ' n ' ' ' 1 , l - N n r Y U14 ,Willy NB HIQA in mfg Qyifqz QB Mila QSUQ, ,B ala,-A l T14 A 5-..-r.... f , , V .jf' N31 if NB 1 First Row: left to right: Vincent Supinski, Manager: joseph Kropf, Charles Wade, Richard Tutko, Carmelo Butera, Captain: Robert Griffith, Paul Dumais, joseph Arute, Edward Zuk, Manager. Second Row: 1-r: Frank Barszcz, Manager: Richard Dt-May, john Monkiewicz, john Rose, Edward johnson, Coach: joseph Zadrowski, Walace Drzala, -lames Williamson, Chester Topa, Manager. CROSS New Britain's cross country team, because of a late start, suffered.a bad season in their 1948 campaign for state honors. Outstanding for the year's Red and Gold team were Captain Carmelo Butera, Paul Dumais, Richard Tutko, Raymond Stupack, Robert Griffith, Wallace Drzala, Lawrence Ramsdell, and james Wil- ,, 03 C 0 3:53 ,,,"'.t.2-3 ,wp we , 3 K 31" .tt 41 1 UNTRY liamson. The team, coached by Edward johnson and captained by Carmelo Butera, practiced daily, and most of its losses were by a slim margin. Best times were turned in by Butera, 11:44, Dumais, 11:56, Wolak, 12:57, Drzala, 13:08, Ramsdell, 13:11, and Williamson, 13:26. ."""' .,- ..-ff " A ATHLETIC MANAGERS 1948-49 The athletic managers are perhaps the most unsung workers in school acivities. These boys are busy at all athletic practices and games, and they do an inglorious but important job. They take care of giving out clean equipment and uniforms. They keep the dressing rooms clean and make sure that everything is in order for the games. As General Manager of Athletics, Frank jablonski takes care of the selling of tickets to games and also of the publicity for events Since the number of managers has been steadily increasing, they are able to do a more extensive job for the Athletic Department than has been done ever before. JUS! hold sl yOur breath GIRLS' ATHLETIC PROGRAM In a modern setting, the Olympic ideal of physical fitness, grace, and poise is being vitalized for girls in the extended program which aug- ments the regular physical education schedule. A variety of activities lends zest to the project and affords oppor- tunity to entertain members of other schools. Following a strenuous weekly prac- tice, the first and second basketball teams were picked for a Sports Day involving five opposing teams. A single victory was built up to a good showing in succeeding tournaments. T O the resc Ue me ball gash' 0 Tumbling with grace and safety is a nice art-as demonstrated by this group of lady tumblers in their spring demonstration, which enlisted much enhusiasm. Still in their infancy, the tennis and softball programs, limited to a single sports day each, are building to real schedules next year. Topping the closest rival by a hundred and fifty points, our girls out- bowled five other schools at the Bowl- o-Rink. The team, chosen from the forty members of the group, has had a chance to try for other matches at East Hartford and Southington. 1, Ne' gain fl 1 3 li' wal' Forehanded ww' X vs... 'M-. elfoux eh? sl' e 177 4 LL. n ,P v U I -4 h e 0' f-0' s..,,, ELK' r-Al fat X253 . r A .1 ..c-'- ' - 178 n K Q' -...- W'll.L0UV BROOK whcrc the valiant take thc field X11 XX N if ' fl l l Wh , I .1 XX 'f 'V P V M X ' WL . 1 ' Q? X f X' Q X X X 4 571' 1 ' i . 1 , N W J r n Uv n n s Sept. Sept Sept. Sept. Sept Oct. Oct. Nov. Nov. Dec. Dec. J an. Sept. C A L E N D A R 1946-1947 5-We arrive!-determination writ large upon our bright morning faces. 7-The Missing Persons Bureau still hasn't located Ted Lindquist, lost be- tween Math and English. 10-Long assignments and loads of books -our determination is wavering. Q 21-Page Emily Post! The girls meet the faculty at tea and learn that conver- sation may be food for thought. 22-Determination shattered. "Life is real, life is earnest, and the grave is not its goal." Oh, no? 7-Peggy Recknagel would have been cremated had the fire drill been a real one. 21-Leonard Labieniec translated some Latin in class in his own inimitable way. Caesar never meant it to be like this! 23-For the first time, quite a few of us were in no hurry to go home. And we had our report cards, too? 27-The Pilgrims had nothing on us. 19-Some of the boys got jobs at the Post Office during vacation . . . and the tales they told. 31-We never did find out if Nancy Wil- 1... 5-7 liams wished a happy New Year to a faculty member at midnight. For many of us, our first Formal. Those corsages and black ties . . . echoes of the French Court. Feb. 13-A few intrepid souls fared forth in the snow only to be dismissed at 8:15 because the no-school signal failed to signal. Feb. 14--We may have outgrown class Val- entine boxes, but the thought is still there. Now it takes the form of movies, Bushnell, or even a pin. March 3-NBHS bowed to Hartford Bulkeley March 12 March 17 in the baskeball tournament. Wait till we make the Varsity team! ' -The Key Club got its start at a Kiwanis Club dinner. Well, keys open. --Bless St. Patrick! "The Wearing of the Green" very prominent. The Seniors said it was appropriate for us. April 5-Biology students began dissecting frogs. What a lot a frog has over a mouse when it comes to getting a yell out of a girl! April 20-Felix Stifel gave a serious report in English, and no one snickered--too stunned. May 1--A few enterprising students have May started counting the days till vaca- tion-53 to be exact. 18-Praying mantis loose in room 48 'mid shrieking girls and scornful, inactive men QQ Fred -1 will remember. June 15-The Seniors get all the breaks-and the last week off while we slave. June 22-"Is it really over?" 1947-1948 --School does not start, the teachers are playing hookey while the Board of Education decides their fate. Sept. 10-Back to work as if nothing had ever Oct. Oct. happened, and we had homework the first day. Where did the summer go? Sept. 12-Helping and hindering the "Freshies." 1-Just a trace of the "New Look," first sported by Dolly Callahan. 3-What was the loadstone that at- tracted the fellows to the north wing, room 48? Oct. 17-They almost marked Clara Sargis absent from class. The desk was too high. Oct. 30-We were well represented at the Nov. Connecticut All-State Music Festival -and we came home victorious, too. 12-Mr. Donald Boothfs talk on Youth Hostels increaid bicycle repair business. Nov. 25-Good music sounded even better with the flashing new uniforms of the band. Dec. jan. jan. Feb. Feb. 30-Junior CALENDAR 21-"In a Winter Wonderland" super- seded "White Christmas" in the Con- cert, the war's over. 1-For a change, the "bad driving con- ditions" excuse was true for after the formal, but it didn't help some people. Night with Judy Zwick in charge. What a kid! 8-Don't fret about lack of funds. Enter the Kodak contest and win S3,500. 20-Ballots for most popular boy and girl result in new wardrobes. March 3-Bill Bingham was seen talking to a girl. March 15-Proceeds from cinema go for Sept. Sept. Sept. Oct. Oct. Oct. Nov. Nov. Nov. Nov. Dec. Dec. Dec. murals. Where, or where, is our new caf? April April May May June June J une 1-Peggy Wessels couldn't say muchg- a result of the spring concert the night before. 14-Wolves whistle out of habit, but they don't really like the long skirts. 19-"Our Hearts Were Young and Gay" is tagged a success, though the cast doubts the "gay" part at the moment. 22-Girls' League Formal: rain, of 3 15 22 24-Graduation. Our turn next. 1 9 4 8 - 1 9 4 9 3-Now that we are Seniors . . . 4-How queer the Freshman do look- and how little! 16-All the girls seem to be sprouting bangs. A new fad, perhaps? 7-A letter in the New Britain Herald calls our cheerleaders' costumes in- decent. 13-Rosemarie Hartz was seen not talk- ing. Is the world coming to an end? 20-The big tree near the North wing is cut down, it missed the building. No comment. 3-A few die-hard Republicans in room 39 the fourth period held mourning services for Dewey. 19-The Senior Class play, "January Thaw," revealed some more latent dramatic talent in Pete Kowalchyk. 23-Senior Night: for the first time the Girls' League invited the fellows. 28-Who was more thrilled? The fans in Yankee Stadium or our own school band? 6-Gerry Carlson got 99 on a trig test -Ye Gads, you're slipping Gerry! 19-"The chorus carries candles" or "Mr, D. makes his mark." 23-The Key Club turns socialite, Sena- tor Raymond E. Baldwin is its guest speaker at a dinner. J une J an. Jan. J an. Feb. Feb. Mar. Mar. April April May May J une 28 COLlI'Se. -Seventeen of our number achieved distinction by getting elected to the National Honor Society. -Plans for spending the first week of vacation at the shore--if we live so long. -Class Night-all of us Juniors were bequeathed gift,s but we never got 'eml 12-The Beehive staff funphotogenicj had their pictures taken for the nth time! 15-COLLEGE BOARDS! 1.. 1 1- -The band concert brought out the music lovers. Can it be that half the year is over already? Amphion Club plays are a huge suc- cess. Who would ever have thought Larry Waida a singer? 1-Lillian Chaglasian spoke in a loud 18 voice. We heard it ourselves. -Lydia Amenta, Shirley Mellion, and Lois McAloon enjoyed an unexpect- ed lunch in room 21. They never found out whose it was. 9-More College Board exams and few- er college aspirants. 16-Shirley Kallerman still isn't recon- ciled to Truman's winning the elec- tion. 13-Girls' League Formal. Odds are post- ed at 50 to 1 on rain. 15-Pauline Abrahamson forgot to argue. I'll bet the teachers were surprised! 1-Determination once again shows up- on our faces-this time, it's to grad- uate. Senior Prom and Graduation! We never thought we'd make it. The end of june, of high school days-and the beginning of LIFE. LIFE WITH US Q This sketch owes its apologies to Hollywood, to Broadway, to Mr. Clarence Day, to all the human race of whose moods, ideas, and deeds ours are bound to be but imitation. Originality ceased with The Creation.j Scene I-Ante Exercitationem The time is barely daybreak-seven forty- tive on a typical school day. As the scene opens, the camera flashes quickly from house to house across the city, revealing freshmen already on their way to school, juniors hastily eating break- fast, and seniors still slumbering blissfully. No lights. No action. But we have a camera! Sound: The insistent clamor of an alarm clock. The Lordly Senior: Rolling over in dead silence. Sound: Indistinct parental commands from an- other room regarding the time, the distance from the school, and the extreme indolence of the student. Senior: fshowing barely distinguishable sign of awakening, Umm. The scene shifts to the main entrance of our revered alma mater. The time is now 8:08. Students are beginning to arrive. They slide out of cars and mope along the walk, most of them burdened with books,' they mumble to them- selves or to companions. A few snatches of con- versation are picked up by the sound track. S. Mellion: Hey kids! Did you know that . . . P. Nilsen: Oh, that's crutty! P. Sawyer: Bangor is one of the larger suburbs of Brewer, Me. W. Dornan: I'm 82 and maybe 88. I've been here and there. Mostly here. S. Sonstroem: -and he . . . A. Weinstein: In 1938 he had a batting average of .327. M. Blackburn: Rehearsal at 2:00. Don't forget! R. Brennan: fmemorizingj The sin in the first quadrant is plus: the sin in the second quadrant is . . . oh, well! Sound: A bell rings. There is a mad scramble for the door. It is located and entered by all, except M. D'Avonzo and F. Stifel, who are absorbed in watching minus infinity go by. The camera backs away, and the scene fades. .4 Scene Il-Exercilatione The scene opens in a typical Senior section room. The time is 8:10 plus one second, or just after the usual last-minute rush of students trying to get to their seats on time. Everyone is engaged in the usual morning diversions: reading the sports page, looking out the window, talking about nothing in particular, calling to passing friends in the corridor, or working like mad to finish the homework that should have been done the night before. The teacher motions for silence. Teacher: Quiet! I'm going to read the morning notices. The chatter subsides, except for a few un- finished phrases. One or two of the more noble- minded half-turn their heads toward the front of the room. Teacher: If you don't stop talking, I won't read the notices at all. Unidentified Voice: Oh, boy! Teacher: I'll read them anyway, "Wednesday morning . . . Today there will be a Wed- nesday assembly. The attention of stud- ents is called to the regulation against the throwing of snowballs . . . Anyone who fails to follow this regulation will be denied the privileges of the school." fThe mingled voices of the students and teacher drone on until 8:2Sj Sound: Bell rings. The camera backs away from the crowd of students jamming the door, and the scene shifts to another familiar classroom. The time is now one minute before the final class bell. One or two ambitious students are at their desksg the rest of them are taking their morning consitu- tionals about the halls or competing to see who can find the most roundabout way to class. There are five tied for top honors. Sound: Bell ringing, coupled with running steps, growing louder. A few minutes later, the camera picks up a typical class in pro- gress. Almost everyone is trying unsuc- cessfully to look very industrious and prepared for the day's work. A few hands are raised, their owners hoping to ask the questions ahead of the teacher. Some aren't even bothering to try. The teacher calls the class to order, and within ten minutes, record time, attendance is taken: places in the book are found, and the recitation begins. Teacher: Will you begin the reading, Mr. Henry? j. Henry: Will you please repeat the question? Teacher: If you would just listen . . . Never mind. Miss Zwick, read. j. Zwick: "When the hurly-burly's done, when the battle's lost and won." Teacher: finterruptingj Halt. Cease. Discon- tinue. Desist. In other words, stop. De- velop your vocabulary, class. Miss Gor- don, continue. M. Gordon: "Tomorrow and tomorrow and to- morrow and tomorrow and . . ." On the fifth "tomorrow" the scene fades to a math class, where the teacher is explaining a new problem. Teacher: . . . then you divide by the square of this number, muliply by 5, and subtract from the first number. Dividing through again, you get X:O. Barrows: All that work for nothing. I give up. L. Silverman: Isn't there a shorter way? The scene fades again, and the camera flashes quickly through French, German, and Latin classes. Unfortunately, the sound track is too jumbled in a maze of confused tenses, wrong endings, and obscure pronunciations to be intelligble. There is a brief picture of a typing class, too, but the noise of the keys drowns out all conversation. Sound: A bell signals the end of the first period. The rest of the day continues similarly, with the possible exception of the cafeteria period: but no more need be said on that subject. After a pause indicating the passing of time, the camera returns to the section room. The time is now shortly before 2:00. Students are concentrating attention on the doors. Teacher: fnoticing same, No one is to move from his seat until I dismiss . . . Sound: Dismissal bell. The teacher ducks hastily behind her desk to avoid being trampled by the thundering herd. The camera backs away, as the scene fades on the deserted room. Scene III-Post Exercitationem Time-a few seconds after two o'clock. The scene shifts back to the main entrance, through which several dozen students step with vigor and enthusiasm. Freshmen are loaded down with books, juniors bear a few occupational badges, and seniors more without restraint, America's autocratic citizenry. Conversation is a little livelier than before. L. Amenta: That lunch tasted good in English class. Wonder whose it was? L. Bassette: Some more plaster fell off the ceil- ing of 403. j. Routhier: I wish I were back in Algebra. D. Blanar: Do I hear a voice calling through the darkness? E. Stella: Free at last! B. Kata: I'm going to try to get my homework done early tonight for sure. B. Pifferiz There isn't a team that can touch the Yankees. D. Parker: Ah! Fresh air again! Entrance fades into the distance. Several scenes in rapid succession show the typical stud- ent throughout the rest of the afternoon and evening. The sound track is able to pick up nothing original. At the home of the Lordly Senior: His Lordship Clistening to his favorite radio programj: I'll do it later. Sound: Phone rings. Student: I-Iello? Oh, I was just going to call you. Are you free Friday night? There's a dance, you know . . . Yes, but it's over by eleven, and then we can do something . . . The scene fades on the conversation. It is about 9:30. The student has just finished a telephone conversation and is about to begin his homework. Our mistake. He is just getting his hat and coat to go for a walk. Voice of Older Man: Where do you think you are going? I thought you had homework. Senior: How can I do my homework if I don't have any fresh air? We learned in science that the human system loses resistance . . . Two minutes later Older Man: That book is right about the re- sistance, all right. Go ahead out. But you be back here by 10:30, and if I don't get a good report on you at the next P. T. A. Sound: The front door slams over the whistling of "A Slow Boat to China." As our final glimpse of "Life with Us" fades away, we see freshmen diligently studying, juniors preparing to retire, and the seniors- ffilm breaksj. Lights, please ! ! 'hangin ,M L5-'a.ig3l 941325 A k ,, Kd Y ff, 'rl ' L rx frb rr r' PM r fl' 184 .qw-no-9 .A .gi -wr , I. Ng. ' , F I ki A 'V 1, W .0 u f Lap E. C. GOODWIN TECHNICAL SCHOOL -where learning is doing 07' 'fo .. A. 55. 'F Yo 10 I 'B fn., uh fs .wi Q' I i. rf Q 'O 0, n -, A .W , K ' 'J r. 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New Britain High School - Beehive Yearbook (New Britain, CT) online yearbook collection, 1942 Edition, Page 1

1942

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New Britain High School - Beehive Yearbook (New Britain, CT) online yearbook collection, 1946 Edition, Page 1

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New Britain High School - Beehive Yearbook (New Britain, CT) online yearbook collection, 1950 Edition, Page 1

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New Britain High School - Beehive Yearbook (New Britain, CT) online yearbook collection, 1951 Edition, Page 1

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