Neshoba (APA 216) - Naval Cruise Book

 - Class of 1946

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Neshoba (APA 216) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1946 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 124 of the 1946 volume:

This book is from the files of sH1Ps DATA sEcTIoN, Room 1221, Division of Public Information, Navy Department, and should be returned by borrower as soon as it hasserved its purpose. Yonr cooperation in our effort to minimize possiblities of its being lost will be appreciated, Others will want to use this l book also, ,s,d 1 :abr 'lslz -' ' 3 5 the v,' A .-ff 'f X fa ,. " fs . . Q the xstorwg E "'1.., ff' mm szdiiou mvxsmu qw In mm mro Qbu ' LAUONS uma ov r uc mg NA E?ARTNiERT.,h bo. ,f - fxxgsitvi asm 23 29, 425 YJ" Q. cviiliiiiiix 31 33 S ' e 3 . X-X., ur f - ' 'X 3 X 2 . sr -3 + 5 g X XX. ek K J w VX V Q -. ' ' X 2 3. X J.. . X 5: 'U X X- . X 3s -X M X Qs' l x , ESR SXXXXXQ X mn, Q9 X N W. X !nnlmwmXXXX Wx ' ' X A i X Xffx' XX XX -X 'X X is xx, XX Q XXXXQA W : X ,,kt Q X,.A Xx X X QNX X. Xxlrl ww.. X X- X X- -X lf 'XXX X Q g X X, ' , . X il Q X X S X. 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X AQ ,VV-W,,g -,., b gi ' W X ' , V 4 ,x K ., K .15 KW gp' V,!cT.'.,fg-H,..,.YWHQ:?IS,'E,ASM M,y,.g1VJkIkE: K ,,, ., 3 gli: Q i , KSN fr IQVLYX 9 jd.,-1 X. sy. kigQJX,, N 'MANY' K -,,vQxiyW.w?x6kg.' Y Q fx ,ax ,,,,kLVLV Q NWNN .V igifk ,., if 'W fit., . . .Q . ,... L, s Q M. ,....,,.,0,,,Lm,,.,.ff ,M W . Q gm ,.A, ,, A . f ,K Q- ,.,.f 3, S . N--A-. E,- ' V- -Nfwmfww N 44 ' ,mm 'fm .V -,yi fx -V i?i,,Q,N. -fav, Www Captain Martin J. Drury Captain Martin I. Drury, skipper of the U.S.S. Neshoba. strikes one with his affable personality, immediately after speaking to him. Prolonged conversation further reveals why he is liked so well by both his officers and crewmen. Tall, straight as an arrow, his voice is soft: but no doubt remained in your reporter's mind that when the time for action came that same. voice issued orders with th.e same unhurried modulation. -. Capt. Drury graduated from the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis in Iune 1925. As an ensign, his first tour of duty was aboard the U.S.S. New York, as communica- tions officer, making midshipmen cruises to Europe. A After two years aboard the dreadnaught, the captain was assigned to the destroyer U.S.S. Goff, and later as assistant engineer aboard the aircraft tender, U.S.S. Wright. Still in the Atlantic Fleet, but promoted to the rank of lieut. jg, Capt. Drury was transferred' to the Scouting Forces Staff of the U.S.S. Wyoming, serving two years touring the East coast and European ports. I . In 1932, he had a change of oceans when he was as- signed to the battleship Arkansas. He was in command of a Gun division. , Capt. Drury saw his first bit of shore duty 'when he at- tended the post graduate school at Annapolis. A year later he went to the Fifth Naval District, Norfolk, Virginia to work in the War Plans Gffice. A . Promoted to lieutenant, Capt. Drury was assigned as executive officer of the destroyer, U.S.S. Semmes, which was engaged in sound experimentation off the Navy's principal submarine base at New London, Connecti.cut. . Still acting as an engineer officer he again saw duty in the Pacific, aboard the battlewagon, U.S.S. West Virginia, which was hit at Pearl Harbor. In Iune, 1938 he returned to the Naval Academy as instructor in Marine Engineering, until 1940 when he was transferred to the China Station. He re- ported aboard the light cruiser, the U.S.S. Marblehead, as lst lieutenant. The equally famed U.S.S. Houston was flagship of the Asiatic Fleet. The fleet operated out of Tsingtao, China, with Iap destroyers and cruisers also making use of the har- bor. As Capt. Dmry remembers the Iapanese were outwardly very polite. ' y With growing tenseness in the Pacific the fleet m-oved further south, cruising around the many Philippine Islands. In November 1941 they were ordered to Balikpapan, Borneo, and were in that vicinity when the Iaps struck at Pearl Harbor. The Marblehead continued to operate in those waters, protecting convoys to Australia. Then on February 4, 1942, while in the straits of Madura, off the island of lava the Marblehead was hit by three 500 lb. bombs. She suffered the following devastating damages: - CID Large hole forward, well below waterline, forward part of ship flooded, with increase in draft from 19 to 32 ft. C21 Fire and flooding amidships: sickbay demolished: 1 fireroom out of commission. C31 Steering engineroom wrecked: serious fires aft:- no steering gear, steamed from Iava to South Africa, steering by engines. It was through tireless efforts of Capt. Drury, in capacity of damage control officer, that the gallant Marblehead didn't find a resting place in South Pacific waters. Not able to spare any Navy units, the Marblehead had to "run for it" alone with no escort whatever, to seek .haven where she could succor her wounds. . I She stopped off at Caylon: 'Cape Town, South Africa: making her way across the Atlantic to Recifi, Brazil. On May 4, just three months from when she was hit, the Marblehead pulled into Brooklyn Navy Yard for repairs. Capt. Drury re- ceived the Navy Cross for nearly circling the globe with a crippled ship. I Capt. Drury was assigned to the South Atlantic patrol operating from Recifi and was promoted to commander. In September 1943, Capt. Drury was assigned to the heavy Cruiser Quincy as executive officer. The cruiser participated in invasion of Normandy, and later in the invasion of Southern France by Lt. Gen. A. M. Patch's Seventh Army. For this, he received the Bronze Star. ' While, aboard the Quincy, he received his present rank of captain. Capt. Drury took command of the Neshoba when she was commissioned in October 1944. The Neshoba was flagship of Transport Division 42, when Okinawa was invaded, carry- ing members of 96th Infantry Division. ' The skipper counts among post-demobilization dreams, cruiser duty in the Atlantic, to settle down in a comfortable cottage far from the sea with his wife, Mrs. Jeannette Drury. , , -...-.i..e.Y,w..:.-,L . ....... .. ', .. ' ... , .A. ,.,,,'V , ,a, A. .... f-.: , Y A ,,.r,wg -e -7- H . - ..ge+:13'r1 1 - "1-A -w . 3 V-f f . v- - -: - -.'..:el- Captain Andrew R. Mack. By Pat D'Angelo ' Commodore Andrew R. Mack typifies 'everyone's ac- cepted opinion of what a seafaring man should look like. Lines appearing on his face could only have been put there by blustering breezes of the Atlantic and Pacific. You aren't surprised when the commodore admits that he is the third generation of the family to wear the blue and gold of our Navy. R CA grandfather was an Army colonel, however, and fought inthe Civil Warlj ' Captain Mack Che is an acting commodore, as com- mander of Transport Division 42D received his commission at the Naval Academy just a weekbefore the United States de- clared war on Germany in World War I. He was immediately assigned to the flagship of the 6th Battle Squadron, the U.S.S. New York, in charge of a broadside gunnery division. ' The fleet made no contact with the Kaiser's Navy, Qbut the ship he served on was credited with sinking a German U-Boat in the treacherous channel of Scapa Flow, Scotland. The New York collided with U-Boat 53, cutting open the sub with her propellors. f He was transferred to the United States and ready to go over again on a destroyer at the armistice. Captain Mack at- tained the rank of lieutenant during that war. ' Capt: Mack was then assigned to the battleship Kentucky as engineer officer and held that responsible post for three months before it was discovered that a mistake in orders in- correctly assigned him to that ship. It seems a senior officer with the same initials was the one for the job, which proves the Army and Navy weren't strang- ers to humorous errors even then. In 1920, Captain Mack joined the staff of Adm. Hilary Iones as communications officer, serving on the U.S.S. Con- necticut and Utah. - Adm. Jones was the first to hold the title, commander in chief US fleet. Capt. Mack subsequently became flag lieu- tenant, and the venerable battleship that we met in Port Apra, Guam, the U.S.S. Pennsylvania, served as flagship. Two years later, the commodore went aboard the battle- ship Wyoming as a turret officer. He then spent ZW years as commanding officer of the Torpedo School at Newport, R. I. He was assigned to sea duty as executive of the Decatur, then was transferred' to the destroyer which served astorpedo school-ship, because of the., modore's previous .experience in such work. P, g- . . 5 Capt. Mack took the course at'Naval War College. and remained as instructor for two years. In 1931 he was fu-,ans ferred to China as executive aboard the destroyer U.S.S. Trux- ton. While in 'China waters healso held the same position aboard the tender Blackhawk. r I ,g I Later he was attached to the armored cruiser Rochester, station' ship at Shanghai, China. I A ' . T He returned to the Statesha year later to serve atjthe Staff Naval War College as assistant director. He' was then assigned to the heavy cruiser, U.S.S. Chester, as gunnery officer, making trips to the far east. There were dignitaries aboard among them Secretary of War George Dernwho went as special representative of the President to the inauguration of Manuel Quezon, first president of the Philippine Common- wealth. The cruiser Chester did extensive traveling in South America, Panamanian, Alaskan, and Pacific waters. a In 1936, the cruiser had the honor of carrying to South America, in furtherance of our Good Neighbor Policy, the late President -Franklin D. Roosevelt. Capt. Mack recalls that off the Brazilian coast the cruiser "hove to" for a try 'at the Presi- dent's favorite sport-fishing. A ' ' , , . I He remembers the good-natured kidding that heireceivedg from the President' by catching the largest fish that day. . While he was still aboard, the Chester flew the Navy "E" Pennant by winning the short range gunnery- trophy' with ease. The cruiser's .50 cal. machine gun crew alsounder com- mand of Capt. Mack.. attained the highest score then re- corded, walking off with top honors in anti-aircraft firing. The commodore was assigned to Boston' Navy Yard as War Plans and Operations Officer on' staff of Cornmandant. lst Naval District. He received three letters of commendationi two from the Secretary of the Navy. the other from President Roosevelt, for a manual he wrote on "Cruiser Maneuvers and, Battle Tactics." , A n A V A "IH 1940. CIS Commanding Officer of the U.S.S. Erie, flag- ship of ,special service squadron, he cruised to South and Central American ports, and was also sent as delegate to inauguration of the President of Ecuador. Then came Pearl Harbor and Capt. Mack in com-mand of offshore patrolat Panama, operating with the cruiser and five destroyers. Within 16 days after war was declared, his patrol captured 36 Iapanese prisoners from the Tuna fleet that continuously fished off the Panama Canal and off Central America. Included among the catch were a commander and two lieutenant commanders of the Imperial Japanese Navy, posing as "fishermen," but in reality relaying vital information via radio sets aboard their fishing vessels. ' When the German U-Boat toll was running rampant. he was put in charge of convoying troop and cargo vessels in the Carribean. Vessels carrying oil from Venezuela and bauxite from Brazil, were some of "must" cargo that had to get through to the States. While not convoying he was kept busy picking up survivors of submarine sinkings. I-le matched wits with a Nazi wolf-pack four times in a ZV2-day running battle. The Erie didn't escape, however, and was finally tor- pedoed Capt Mack saved the cruiser by beaching her on the island of Curacao Luckily the rsland boasted an Army hos pital unit which took care of and brought through all the wounded who were severly burned Six officers and one en listed man had been killed by the torpedo March 1943 found Capt Mack in charge of a gigantic secret force that was to play an important part 1n Whipping the laps, for his force contained the tactical element of "sur- prise"-floating drydocks. Doubt existed among some of the topmen in the Navy, among them engineers, whether such a cumbersome object could weather the uncertain waters of the Pacific and ever succeed. Capt. Mack didn't argue, but went ahead and proved it could be done. It enabled our warships to be repaired right on the spot, and back in action in the space of time that before was spent in returning to a State-side port. Such a serious task wasn't without its lighter moments, as Capt. Mack discovered afterwards. The dry-dock was towed in ten sections and it looked like a veritable task force stretched out over the water. American planes spotting this strange sight reported them as Clj "Aircraft Carriers," QZD "Aircraft Car- riers in tow," CSD "Don't know what the hell they are!" . Captain Mack came aboard the Neshoba as commander of Transport Division 42, in time for staging, rehearsal, and finally actual invasion of Okinawa. CThe saga of holding to- gether an invasion fleet in the story of the Neshobaj The commodore was satisfied that at least one member of the Mack family A Ensign Robert B Mack was on hand in Tokyo Bay to witness the Japanese surrender Another son is in flight training as a Naval Cadet at Chapel H111 North Carolina Captain Mack holds the Order of Abonalderon from the President of Ecuador the Silver Star Legion of Merit along with various other medals and cam paign ribbons ' ' I I I - - i I h I - I ' ' ' I I I u l I I ' ,, - - . . . . 0 , . . , I . , . I I I I ' ' I I u I ' I I l 1 - II H . . . . , , - - 4 ' "" " ?" ' Z ""' "A Y 1 I - --- -- -- - - sm Y W - -- V ef-- T:W, , -A - , Y- H WW W CaptainEdward J. Sweeney E I .5 Passengers and crew need have no fear that the Neshoba is in unseaworthy hands. Twenty-eight years a sailor is the record of her' new Captain, Edward I. Sweeney and as one looks at Captain Sweeney they can almost hear the sound of the sea as he recounts his life. His slight New England accent and the twinkle in his eyes, which have scanned the oceans of the world, add interest to his stories which fascinate sailor and landlubber alike. At eighteen he became an Apprentice 'Seaman in the Merchant Service. His first ship was the Andrea Luckenback of the Luckenback Steamship Company of New York. All ships on this line were named after members of the Luchen- back family. For seven years the Captain stayed on the An- drea. The first three years were spent sailing between New York, Thames Haven, England, Rotterdam, Holland, and Ham- burg, Germany. At Thames Haven they used to tie up at the well known Kilbury docks, which' during this war the Ger- mans blew to bits. Regardless of any sailing hazards the Captain stuck to the sea. Three times on-his European voyages fires broke out upon the ship. They were grain or coal fires caused by spontaneous combustion and as the Captain puts it, "There was little we could do except keep all air away from the fire, the bulkheads cool and continue on our way." . The ship was finally assigned to the inter-coastal trade and carried her cargoes between the East and 'West coasts of the United States. "I was never one to stay aboard in port," the Captain states with a smile, and became familiar with all the port cities of the country. ' lt was with some regret that the Captain left the Andrea, and one can imagine how he must have felt when he learned that the ship on which he started as a Sea Faring man was sunk on Saint Patrick's day I943. He stayed with the Luckenback line, a line with which he has over twenty-three years of service. In October l932, the Captain, fulfilled a Horatio Alger ambition for it was at this time that he made the final step and became the Mater of his own ship He Captained many well known vessels, among them the Florence Luckenback which became' a war casualty in March 1942. - I ' ' , V .V A Captain Sweeney joined theeNaval Reserveiin, 1928 with rank of Lieutenant and was called to active duty as -a. Lt. Commander on the 29th of October 1941. His first duty was as First Lieutenant on the A.P.A. U.S.S. Harry Lee. It didn't take Pearl Harbor to convince Captain Sweeney that we had a dangerous enemy" on the high seas for in carrying American troops to Iceland and Bermuda, the Harry Lee was attacked by U-boats. Captain Sweeney rates an A and a battle star on his American Defense ribbon for participation in this hazard- ous task. I- A e ' At last the U. S. was ready to strike back and Admiral Hewitt .assembled a fleet of ships at Newport News, Va. to carry General George S. Patton's task force into the invasion of North Africa. The Harry Lee broke down and her crew-was transferred to the U.S.S. Calvert, with Captain Sweeney taking the post of Executive Officer. Owing to the transfer, the Calvert was two days late in sailing, but she caught upto the rest of the convoy. Passengers on this trip were untested in com- bat but destined to bgcome one of our greatest divisions, the famed 2nd Armored or "Hell on Wheels." A f Captain Sweeney recalls one incident that was different than the impending' combat. A General was standing -in the corridor as a seaman swabbed the passageway. "Move along buddy," said the seaman. The General turned in rage and spying a Navy Warrant Officer. asked, "Have these sailors no respect for rank?'.' "What's the matter with you?" said the warrant to the sailor, "Don't you know a Major when you-see one. The Calvert landed her troops in Safia and the convoy received a letter of Commendation from General Patton. Sicily was next on the invasion schedule and the Calvert took elements of the 45th Infantry "Thunderbird" Division. This Division was mainly from Oklahoma, New Mexico, and Colorado, and contained many American Indians among them Lt Ernest Childers Medal of Honor winner Comrnan do Kelly was also in the 45th and General Cushing was a passenger on the Calvert especially air attacks and Captain ' 1 ' I ll ' 1 . ' u . , . . . I I port they got Coming Officer of the c Sweeney saic l ribbon with t Marine Divis. the West Co Proceedir 27th Infantry brought his : Makin in the were the, nov tle in the Ma: Again th into Saipan o ing was reall the hills. It v lost two boat of the Pacific For his o' .of his Ship 1 Bronze Star, Pacific ribbon Captain E eight months Treasure Isla wife. But you 1 saw chances Have his No. at 0400 t his ship from 1 1 Captain Swe h anytime is a lman on how ably stay in his calibre a Capt. Drury and.Lt. Comdr. Davis "I have one ambition," Lt. Comdr. D. C. Davis of the Neshoba, says. y N 'A "I want to sit in the Cliff House over-looking the Gate, sip Martinis, and watch the Navy -ships com-e ands, 'And, it appears, Mr. Davis. will have his ambition true. He anticipates that this is the last trip- he 'willhrnake' fore reverting to his civilian status and his' job running. mortgage business in San Francisco. A ' According to a story by Rudolph Elie, Ir. of the Boston Herald, "The executive officer is universally admiredbonvshiipf board. He is also liked. This is too much for the men to 'undeii stand for nobody ever heard of both the skip er and they I P . exec being 'acceptable all around by everybody." . The exec, the working boss of the ship, sets "the toneeof the wardroom, and this tone of correct but easy .informalityjf of fellowship, of 'Let's get the damn job done and go home? is reflected .throughout the ship." - f Mr. Davis, Elie says, "looks pretty much like Esquire thinks a Naval officer ought to." He figures. "the Neshoba isn't all a boys" camp, and that everybody knows what has to be done and how to do it." ' Mr. Davis is a young-looking but graying man with-1 decidel landlubber attitude toward life He had no sea ex to call my shipping out on a coastwise freighter sea exper5 ience, and,that was just the kid urge for adventure." ' A - The exec joined the Navy reserve in 1940 and was called to active duty in August 1941 as a lieutenant Cjgj inthe in-y telligence section of 12th Naval District. ' ' A Volunteering for sea duty, he was assigned as a gunnery officer on an attack transport. He participated in the invasions of the Marshalls, Gilberts QTarc.'vvaD, and lMarianas und. fi- nally with the Neshoba in the invasion of Okinawa 6 months ago. V . . ,He came to this ship as a lieutenant commander, im- mediately assuming duties as executive officer when the Neshoba was commissioned at Richmond, California, in 1944. Now 'the commander who was educated at the Universit I . . , ,Y of California, and who attended law school in San Francisco.. is going back to his home and the fog. ' ' I X 'A ' "Fog," he says, "l love the stuff. And if anybody doeSn't like ir, well---," 4 4 c y p y - . 1.5 perience before his sea duty with the Navy-"unless you wantg : y w r i i V u 1 5 Q Q ,. , I If 3, K .12 ' . 15: if ' lf, I Her name, the U.S.S. Neshoba. Like most of her sister Attack Transports, she was named for a county in the United States. Neshoba county is located in the state of Mississippi. but the ship was built many miles away from there. One of the 130 ships of her class, the Neshoba was built by the Perm- anente Metals Corporation of Richmond, California, and launched on 7th of October, 1944. She was commissioned as a ship of the United States Navy on November 16th, 1944 be- ing sponsored by Mrs. Wendall E. Adams of Berkeley, Cali- fornia, and placed in command of Commander Martin I. Drury, USN. Commander Drury was later promoted to the rank of Captain. The conversion to an attack transport was made at-Hunter's Point Ship Yard in San Francisco. The con- version consisted of installing Navy Radio and Radar equip- ment, armament, adding welin-davits for landing craft, and the landing craft. At the conclusion of this conversion, the Neshoba was a fullfledged, ready to APA. From time immemorial, every Navy ship has had its shakedown cruise. The Neshoba was no exception. Her shake- down brought her from San Francisco to San Diego. It was during this coastal run that she attained her top speed of 19 knots. At San Diego, she was committed to Am-phibious Training at which time the new boat crews got a feel of their craft. Sheacted as flagship,for Transport Squadron Thirteen whose commanding .officer at that time was Commodore Iohn G. Moyer, USN. The training was supposed to last a period of two weeks, but sudden changes in the Pacific Fleet organ- ization made the Neshoba's entrance on the scene of action very imperative and the training was cut short. She proceeded to San Pedro, California, wheretfinal repairs and checkups took place. Ten days were allotted for this work, then she loaded with a cargo of food at San Francisco and received her first set of combat sailing orders. lust what was in store for her, ordered by Admiral Turner to return to Pearl Harbor. Captain Short, aboard the Neshoba, was named O.T.C. of fifteen ships in convoy which left Okinawa on the 5th of April and pro- ceeded to Pearl, via Guam. At Guam she was loaded with ninety Iapanese prisoners of war and sailed from Guam with her convoy on 10th April bound for Pearl. Captain Short was relieved as CTD 42 by Captain Andrew R. Mack, USN. He continued as OTC for theufremainder of the trip. The convoy arrived on time at Pearl Harbor on 22nd of April and many of the ships received sailing orders for the United States. The Neshoba was not among the lucky ones. Instead, she was ordered by AdComPhibspac to take part in training maneuvers at Maui. OTC for the training schedule was ComTransRon 19. It was during these practice runs that the Neshoba achieved the remarkable record of lowering all her boats into the water in the record time of nine minutes. Upon conclusion of these maneuvers, she proceeded back to Pearl Harbor where the wonderful orders read, "REPORT SAN FRANCISCO FOR LOADING". With very little delay, she was on her way early the next day. The 24th of May saw the Neshoba passing under the Golden Gate Bridge. Most of the crew had enough leave to go home for a few days, and when they returned from their refreshers, the 216 was ready to sail again. This time, it was Okinawa with a load of Naval Ship Repair Unit personnel. The first leg of the trip carried her all the way to Eniwetok Island non-stop. Due to unloading dif- ficulties in Okinawa, ships were held at all ports in the Pacific to wait their turn to go there. The Neshoba was held for three weeks at Eniwetok. The extreme Iuly heat did not set too well with those on board, so at every opportunity recreation parties were held ashore for the officers and men. On the 9th of Iuly she sailed in convoy to Ulithi, then to Okinawa. This trip to Okinawa did not find the same peaceful conditions as prevailed on D-Day. The Iapanese Air Force composed of the Kamikaze Corps was in full swing at the time and there was that air of uneasiness about the ship during our entire five-day stay there. She was under several air raids which did not come near the berth, but nevertheless all hands were relieved when her orders came to depart on 29th of Iuly. Once again, it was convoy duty for the 216, but one of a very different nature. She was not in a convoy of ships of her type, but was the mother ship to upwards of seventy craft, ranging in size from LST's down to Ocean Tugs. Captain Mack was the guiding hand of this convoy as it set out on that bright, clear Iuly morning bound for Saipan. During the trip, a small, but very annoying typhoon was encountered which caused many gray hair to be sprouted on various officials of the ship. But, all ships, craft, and what have you, weathered the storm, and we sailed into Saipan harbor on the 6th of August. I l Passengers were taken aboard, Army and Navy dis- chargees to be exact, and 8th oft August, the Neshoba was told to take to the Pacific. Original orders read to proceed at top speed to San Francisco, but through some change of ad- ministrative orders, the Neshoba was told to change course and head for Pearl Harbor. This order was reluctantly carried out, and once more the sun rose over our stern. But not for long, because once again, administration got an idea and passed it down to operations. Further orders added to by-pass San Francisco and report to the Thirteenth Naval Disrict. Seattle, Washington. The arrival at Seattle was heralded by a shore based ovation which made every man aboard feel just a little better. Following the debarkation of the passengers. the ship was brought over to the Bremerton Navy Yard for montorvoyage repairs, the yard workers concentrating mostly on the boilers which were in dire need of attention. Temporary repairs took one week after which, the headquarters detach- ment of the 97th Infantry Division was embarked at Pier Forty- ---- V- P.. Q-9 H two. The commanding general aboard was Brigadier General Partridge, USN. The 2l6 once again put out to sea with original orders to carry her passengers to Leyte Island in the Philip- pines. By now, this Pacific run was an old story to the crew of the Neshoba. A stop at Pearl Harbor was ordered and the 216 made her re-appearance there on September 17, 1945. Since there were only seven hundred army passengers on board the Navy found it very convenient to embark an addi- ' tional seven hundred men: sailors, marines, and seabees. These people were bound for Guam, we left Pearl on Sep- tember 20th. A three-day stopover at Guam was concluded, and the ship received her orders to continue with the 97th Infantry on to Yokohama, Iapan. All hands, officers and men, lined the rails to observe the slow entrance into Tokyo Bay. The -troops were disembarked in due time and once again, the Neshoba lay at dock, her holds and compartments empty, waiting to receive more passengers. It was during the brief stay in Yokohama that the 216 was assigned to Task Group 16.12, popularly known-in the Navy as "The Magic Carpet". Commanded by Bear Admiral Kendall, USN in Pearl Harbor, the "Magic Carpet" fleet has the specific duty of moving eligible dischargees from overseas to the United States. In Navy lingo, this known as "Good Duty", the remaining units of the F orty-Third Division were embarked at Pier Four in Yokohama,. and our sailing orders directed us to carry these men to San Francisco over the shortest possible route. The Captain and the Commodore jointly agreed on taking the Great Northern Route, which roughly is about 4,700 miles from Yokohama to San Francisco, it cuts off about 2,000 miles from the southern route. Q - Upon arriving in Frisco and debarking troops we headed for Mare Island Navy Yard for minor repairs. A Captain Drury and Lieut. Comdr. Davis were relieved of duty by Captain E. I. Sweeney, USNR, and Lt. D. M. Newbern as the executive officer, later promoted to Lieut. Comdr. This was a sad day for the crew and officers as they gathered to hear the ceremonies of their departure. The Neshoba at this time was in dry dock, its first time, and only five short days were taken in the repairs, once more she was ready for the sea and this tim-e it was to be non-stop to Guam. On this trip the crew awaited a fine dinner for the first birthday of the 'libert was granted for all hands. I don't ship, but it so happened that we a day and skipping the 15th of was celebrated on the 16th. We with Marines aboard she headed the escort of the U.S.S. Haverfield, the Yellow Sea, this was one of the made, none of the crew were used to just what we had most of the trip. dropped in the Yellow Sea about 20 mile y . anything about the liberty in Teintsin, that to anyone who went ashore there: but Q you does tell about it don't forget D-D's,-The St. Ann's, Little Club or the Balalikag' of the well known places to this crew.j M y China the orders read once more for statewide ber 5th we were underway for San Diego, Christmas and New Year's were spent Destroyer Base in Diego, awaiting more gers. They both came, we headed for Guam, uary and arrived the 26th, debarking stay in Guam brought us back to the blue' for Frisco. By this time every one was hoping be put out of active service and on March- came through. With a new paint job, sealing partments and everything ready for the old Neshoba, commonly ,known as the "Mightyj knows but if there is another war shortly This time with a new crew androfficers who just as ready, willing, and cooperative asytht will once more do her duty. She hasphadfcf in this Navy but a very interesting one, of us who were the reserves during this W for five other ships tied together. For just e Charles W. , Gnd Clifford Mackin Island for Stockton, California. She is to be a P ' ' ' I' ho 3' i V . Q 5, I .Q ' 9 5 3 W, g Q 4 I 4 i Y 4 4 X 4 X 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 X 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 X X 4 4 4 X 4 4 X 4 ' 4 4 , 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 ' ,l 4 X ..Y.:w,4X 'i .. 1 I ,. !. ! EQV 1 5 I F s, ,I 3 V r 5 3 l 1 , W I l E S gg X 3 1 l" W Y ' Y' ,i-us. J, Q ww-an 5,0 'L .. - 'jx s, 4 iz, ' ' . . ' 5 K V , "il - 1,55 wha W -. 3 Q Ex WLT' 1 W ,Q A ss? .14 '- J? r ,L X fa ,L Q.- rvh ' gt 1 1 it ash f :E if NA .- QA "WYE, W. Chaplain Dan C. 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Guam lv ,W -2 .1 E Al is 4 . 5 lil' Vs Ir 5 5: 4 WI SQ. 1 gb, N 1 1. W. 1 W 3 3 Es ff 2 E 5 2 T il 9 3 1 1 i Q M 5, N: fi H X, Xkrmsl gg ' X wxvwmrsf- f I I X 1 R f 1 E 1 Je I I I 1 .3 3 I 5 2 5 S 2 E Qi 1 S1 2 2 1 1 i 1 1 5 1 Y Q 'mln tk '1 A N Sf? 2 Y f .7991 1 I ki i 1 E 1 ' f 1 AL' Z , ii, V 1 ,E' T 1 11 - 1: 1, : 4 , ' - 1 E e I 5 if ' . mg T M J is ' , W T , ll: , ?s MP3 , . . 'x . 1 1 - 1 W f I iii ,Jia , al I 4955. ug., 14, .4v.A,q, x . X Q 2 W f 3 1 -4 H .4 I iw Wmsvw. W, Near Miss - Nov. lst attack on Bougainville Island Qkinawa-April 1, 1945 - Navy landing craft whirl around in formation fore picking up Marines and hitting the shore of Okinawa S i ,. 1 E l , so i ' ... in 5, ',,,514E4v.tfrig ii i :Epi . its use lx if' 4 yi up ,Z ,L 'S It r t f Q Y is Hi Ez: E LZ rf. . is T 5, it 5, ,'I u x 5. it Q r, gr il I, it at li: rg 2,5 5 . 4 ti ill ,Z- 4:1 H 't it 3, y l ii-1 til fs! P ,rt - M U It gl lx ,1 ts 1. ,I lil - ig , . g ' I if ,fTr'frf' . t Qtr... is it f I w Pl dTh' dB A1 ok' e aye 1r use lnawa You know how it is with the boy riding the "hot corner" in a ball game when his own pitcher is clipping the corners and the opposition is going down in one-two-three fashion. He might as well be up in the bleachers. That's the way it was with us. Our ship was in the "hot corner" closer to the beaches and lap-held shoreline than any other except landing craft and patrol vessels. Of course, anything can happen to the -fellow playing third. The pitcher might ease up or a pinch hitter line out a hot one putting the third baseman in the middle. But it never happened to us. Our side was doing the most hitting and the best pitching. Nothing came our way, so there we were-first row in the bleachers. We were so .close we could easily watch the tide of battle fthe tide rolled in and never came out.j So close, in fact, we were within easy range of light artillery. A pretty target. I It was Easter Sunday for you lucky birds back home. It was April Fool's Day for a bunch of little yellow bastards on Okinawa. It was "Love" day for us, a name probably picked up by some arm-chair sailor who has-been away from the States too long. f From my vantage point on the bridge of my attack transport I could see a large section of Okinawa's western shore line-watch our troops go into action-watch the navy's supporting fire blast hell out of lap positions- watch flame throwers burn 'em alive in caves-watch a city burn-watch a mighty air force bomb and strafe. ' A news reel in technicolor. A But I'm getting ahead of my story. Where were you the night before Easter? Seeing a show? Bowling? Going to church? In bed with your wife? You lucky bum. Considering that we were less than 100 miles from what laps consider their homeland, we didn't do too badly. You know that as long as I can eat. I'm not too perturbed. In the wardroom we sat down to the usual linen-covered? table and destroyed some Australian steaks. Through open doors we could see an expanse of choppy sea slowly turning from blue to grey as the sun turned smokey red and dropped over the horizon. From the wing of the bridge I watched the day become dusk and turn into night. The only warlike manifestation was the columns of transports and the circle of escorting destroyers-a reassuring sight-slashing their way through the sea in a purposeful manner. ' Then the ships became black shapes floating along between a dark sky and a darker ocean. Life aboard was as usual. The watches changed. Doors were closed so that no lights' showed. But we would have done that the first night out of New York or Frisco. ' X There was no discernible quickening of the pulse in anticipation of the morrow even though one of the boldest strokes of the Pacific offensive was at hand. There was a bridge game in the wardroom and the usual amount of lounging about. I was scheduled to hit the deck early so I turned in and slept like the proverbial babe., ' A messenger awakened me at 0330. What were you doing at 0330 on Easter morn? Don't tell me. - A pale moon was shining overhead as we made the "approach to the objective." That's Navy for saying we .were on. our way in to turn a nice.: quiet island into an inferno of death and destruction. There was still nothing to indicate that this was going to be THE DAY. ' 4 Dawn came as we arrived in our designated area. Weeks before, the very spot where our ship was to stop had been decided on andplaced on charts of the island. The dawn revealed hundreds of ships of all shapes 'and sizes. But the beaches remained hidden in smoke and fog. I i Here and there through the haze we made out the shapes of battleships and cruisers. , I ' Then came the warning of an air attack. A minute later all the ships to the north let loose a curtain of fire. I Tracers carved steep red arcs into the morning sky. leaping upwards toward the mushrooms of shell bursts so thick a pilot could get out and walk. And what a racket. A plane burst into flames and came down in a long glide to crash into the sea and burst into flames. It was soon followed by another. We never saw them until they were caught by the firing. Iust as suddenly as it started the firing stopped and we received the "all clear" signal. , In a matter of minutes we heard the hum of many motors. High up in the sky there were planes by the dozens, all bearing the familiar star, wheel- ing over us and over Iapan's stronghold. We were thankful. I i if As the smoke cleared away from the area, it seemed that everyf few' thousand yards there was a combat ship, and a big one, while in between' were the little fellows whose bite -and bark both are pretty big. Destroyers, escorts, gunboats, and others too many to count. s . i A I But the smoke clung stubbornly to the beachesas the troops were loaded ' into small craft for the assault. A 3 Shorly before Zero hour, the thunder of a thousand Thors shook the sea as all the combat ships in the area opened up with shell fire and rockets. The smoke along the beaches became more intense. Boat crews returning from the assault told of the shoreline and the adjacent hillsides leaping into a solid mass of flames as the Navy knocked the hell out of Okinawa waterfront real estate values. ' And it was effective. Assault troops secured their beachheads with a minimum amount of resistance, escaping almost entirely the deadly toll of lives which is the usual price of merely getting ashore. As the hourspassed, the smoke moved away to reveal an attractive island-the most promising ' place we had seen since leaving Hawaii. And that seems a long time ago. Gentle slopes were terraced in irregularly outlined but neat and vari- colored patches of farmland. The ridges and steeper slopes were crowned- by woods and heavy underbrush. Along the ridges, the silhouettes of cedar trees were duplicates of Iapanese prints. Here and there were clusters of houses, villages protected by groves of trees. White, horseshoe-shaped, 'flat- topped structures on the lower hillsides were tombs containing the remains of ancestors whom the defenders were speedily joining. , There were sugar mills with clusters of outbuildings. To our -right lay a city, the largest on the island, the capital of 60,000 persons. Smokestacks, and radio towers were outlined against the sky. As if flaunting our might before the warlords who made us eat dirt not so long ago, the ships moved in closer to the beaches to facilitate movement of cargo and troop carrying smalltcraft. The "hot corner" could have become hotter but it remained a spectator's seat at a turkey shoot. After we had moved in, our carrier planes gave us a first hand demon- stration of precision bombing, rocket firing 'and strafing on live targets. It seemed incredible that anything or anybody could survive. But men do. Later in the afternoon a Tap battery on a hillside opened up on our beach positions. We itched to take him under fire ourselves but it wasn't long before the closest cruiser's secondary battery was tossing curves at the hillside. Soon the laps were silenced. Next day one came to life again, but the second was done for good. Strange sights for a country boy. , As night fell we made ready to retire to the open sea where we would roam and come back with the dawn. Then came another air attack. Again all the ships to the north opened fire, their tracers cutting the evening into a million red ribbons. Again we saw no planes until one came tumbling down in flames to burst into a big blossom of fire in the water. The firing ceased within minutes and we got to hell out of there. We thumbed our noses on the way out, though, passing between the city and small lap-held islands-a stone's throw either way-as we headed out to sea. Again I slept soundly to be awakened too early to make another run into the beaches. Again we had the morning anti-aircraft show. Before noon, the carrier planes gave us another exhibition as they supported infantry ad- vancing across the island. It was getting to be an old story. In the afternoon, a destroyer which had hung about in our shadow leveled off at lap strongpoints, dropping phosphorus shells which burst into white clouds like cotton bolls above the green of the hillside woods. A new but grim feature was added during the afternoon as a dazzling white hospital ship anchored nearby. But my binoculars failed to reveal a feminine form along the rails. Damn!! What a war. . That night and the next day it was the same thing all over again. Iust like seeing the same movie twice. During the day we seemed to be on the seaside end of a front line angling across the hills. American trucks and tanks chased each other up and down the hilly roads and disappeared into wooded sections and villages. There was one spot near the beach where a road angled down the hill and dropped into a grove. As it emerged on the shore side of the trees it doubled back along the beach. Vehicles dashed into the trees coming down the hill at breakneck speed. Then there would be a long wait before we saw them emerge slowly and carefully, stop as if looking carefully both ways before coming out into the open and turning along the beach. - Everyonce in a while, a destroyer or cruiser would hit the jackpot up in the hills, with the payoff in big explosions and fires which we hoped were ammunition or fuel dumps. The town burned all day and heavy firing could be heard in the distance. lust beyond the beaches, flame throwers were at work, methodically going from cave to cave, dugout to dugout, house to house, carrying out a slogan og "let's not bring 'em back alive." By contrast, soldiers were swimming in t e surf. The sun was warm too. It was a lovely spring day at Okinawa. From then on, we stayed right in there at night. My slumbers were troubled as a cruiser right behind us lobbed shells over my bunk, while a desroyer off our bow maintained a steady fire of five-inch shells past my topside ear. The coming of dawn rolled back the curtains on a now familiar scene. Same noise, same shooting, same commotion ashore. The planes had evi- dentlylost interest and were busy elsewhere. I lost interest too, staying below to take up routine prosaic tasks where I had forgotten them several days be- fore. I even grabbed some sleep in the afternoon. When we finished our business I thought we might leave but we didn't. On the final night we laid down a smoke screen so thick our own boats couldn't find us. It must have been effective. Nothing happened and I really pounded the sack. But on the next day we bid Okinawa adieu. We were off again over those ever-so-long reaches of the Pacific, bound for other scenes and other missions. Here's hoping that when it comes our turn again to play the "hot corner" we set 'em down hard again with no hits, no runs, no errors, and none left on base. 3 u-gm .sup L 75 T. , .r 'ur rf ' Y .Ri Q,-s , , 'fn . 1 -'J' U-xr t'?9f' ., ' f w5+K4-f flew., wx . . Pls-fr if ,k.'.x, .,,,,,,,. 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NM K, 1, San Francaise 0 .ww yf 4f,45 f 50 fw. f f A. f Ll K X X xnQ. 1 si Qi 3 X N sxxxggx, M N k - xx Q - f 7.f'j,,'Wf xg- X - HW ' X i ' wx N,Qfsm-X N z, Qlwik 1 - ,fr-.isllk ' x x w - ZQMMV mwxx Xmwww X . . f ,ms.QmsxXxmxXxg X , XX NY SQ NN Nx , N - 1-Q1 ff - L X. W? NKXX 5 1 , . 5 Q 1 ,, A i Z' foe, 0,1252 - .. V- ..-.....--Y as :Siren sv"-ff-"' f':'T""' fic" ' T- W :""f'ii:'Q K' 5 I - V - Q ' 'H ! 'PEW " , , .. . -Y -- - f ' ' . ' .. . .. . ,.,,, -f ' 'A FZ' 4 i ' - r f. . f ., ' ,x fff-71' yy f A A ,,., A.-. -..Y TAA-A -V -x f H 2,3 1, .---,-- .fn gf , WZ, . , , . ., L , .f , f,.,f,,M,ff l W fem.. X ,.,, . fr, I ,, , , ,,. . .. .,. .9 .4 .V Adkins, I. E., Ir., 1317 S. lst Street, Louisville, Kentucky Allen, H. C., 107 Utah, Hiawatha, Kansas Allen, R. A., Valleyford, Washington Allingham, W. M., 608 South lst Street, Cannon City, Colorado Anderson, G. M., 1833 W. Santa Barbara Ave., Los Angeles, California Antwine, S., Route 4, Box 123, Okmulgee, Oklahoma . Archambeau, R. H., 14560 Stephens Drive, East Detroit, Michigan Arndt, M. O., RFD 3, York Road, Brecksville, Ohio Auton, I. C., Route 2, Lenair, North Carolina Bachle, V. M., 1604 San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas Baker, G., 144 Reynolds Street, Ozark, Alabama Ballmer, D. E., 1310 Grat Street, Lexington, Nebraska Barr, D. G., 233 21st Street, Billingham, Washington Bartholomew, M. E., 937 14th Avenue, S. E., Cedar Rapids, Iowa Beabot, W. B., Box 922, Oilton, Oklahoma Beckham, C., Ir., Box 103, 205 Sasafras Street, Dexter, Missouri Bell, I. M., Sekiu, Washington Benton, St. A., 2981 Imperial Avenue, San Diego, California Berens, E. L., 176 8th, Eugene, Oregon . ' Billions, I. C., Route 1, Taft, Tennessee Bilyeu, B. L., Walnut Shade, Missouri l Bird, I. M., 207 Hillcrest, Knoxville 18, Tennessee Birnbaum, S., 8232 Blackburn Avenue, Los Angeles, California Bivins, S. S., 2126 Oakford Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Blackman, R. W., 610 Sexton Street, Aurora, Illinois Blaylock, R. A., 1732 W. 21st Place, Chicago, Illinois Bliss, M. D., RF D 1, Houghton, New York Bluys, D. G., 5801 Esstlawn Street, Detroit, Michigan Bonham, R. A., 1450 Worthington Street, Columbus, Ohio V Boren, L. K., 3528 Lake Park Avenue, Chicago, Illinois Borgia, I., 5541 Cartwright Avenue, North Hollywood, California Bowen, W. R., Benton, Missouri Bowman, VH. O., Premier, West Virginia , Bradbury, L. W., Challis, Idaho Brady, I. T., South 6th Street, Coshocton, Ohio Brann, I. C., Clarendon, Arkansas Brase Hon, Iohn O., Ir., Brase Hon, Georgia Bray, L. M., RFD 1, North East, Pennsylvania .Breckenridge, I. W., Route 2, Savannah, Tennessee Brennan. I. M., 80 Fountain Street, San Francisco, California Broderick, A. I., 188 Louis Avenue, Elmont, New York Brooks, B. M., 1302 W. Paul Street, Tyler, Texas Broszkowski, A. S., 3049 Brereton Avenue, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania Brown, D. H., 816 North Bloodworth Street, Raleigh, North Carolina Brown, E. L., RFD 1, Rossburg, Ohio Brown, Harry I., Route 1, Grove City, Pennsylvania Brown, M. C., Floyd, Iowa Brown, P. A., Aurora, Missouri Brown S. E., 1519 Gimer Street, Indianapolis, Indiana Broimo, R. A., 43 Bradley Road, Scarsdale, New York Bruer, B. C., Dawson Wright, Missouri Bryant, R. D., c-o Perkinston Iunior College, Perkinston, Mississippi Buck, H. V., 514 Clay Street, Arkadelphis, Arkansas Buddenbaum, C. D., 1931 Ruckle Street, Indianapolis, Indiana Bude, M. A., Ir., 201 W. '40th Street, Vancouver, Washington Buenger, T. H., 268 Rioge, Winnetna, Illinois Buerger, I. W., RR 5, Box 172, Lockland, Ohio Burger, E. I., 5132 Franklin Street, Omaha, Nebraska Burnett, L. L., 2934 Ioyce Road, Kansas City, Kansas Busby, F., Conroe, Tennessee Busch, M. P., c-o E. D. Blessing, Vermillion, South Dakota Busch, T. W., 1312 South Columbia, Wenatchee, Washington Bussey, B. I., 1238 29th Street, NW. Washington, D. IC. Butler, M. L. 253 S. State Street, Indianapolis, Indiana Camp,.I., 1900 Melson Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee Carey, E. I., 416 Marcy Street, Duryea, Pennsylvania Carlos, I., 225 W. 5th Avenue, Gary, Indiana - Cass, A. R., 794 38th Avenue,.San Francisco, Califomia Caston, L. G., 710 S. -Oak Street, California, Missouri Castoro, I. I ., 1409 Beale Avenue, Bakersfield, California Center, I. N., 218 Hamer Street, Clyde, Ohio Cerchiara, A. V., 4216 Ely Avenue, 'New-York'66, New York Cesner, L. D., 1391 Minnesota Avenue, Columbus, Ohio Chagnot, C. W., 3758 Cerritoes Avenue, Long-Beach, California Chamberlain, P. E.. RFD,2,.A1bura, Vermont I- -. Chancellor, W. A., 2701 Christine Court, Fort Worth, Texas Chapin, K. SJ, 902 Parade Street.. Erie, Pennsylvania Chapman, H. K., 1231. Sth Avenue, North Nashville, Tennessee Charles, G. R., 935 SE Linn Street,-Portland, Oregon Cheesman, G. W., Ir., 243l'Hazel' Street, Beaumont, Texas Chesnulevich, P. D., 129 Bellevue Avenue, Brockton, Massachusetts Childers, H. L.,.RR 2, c-o W. S. Wiley, South Haven, Michigan Chinn, P. B., Box 695, Galt, California .. - Chlebowski, E. A., 7535 W. 62nd Place, Summit, Illinois Christensen, L. A., 1211 94th Avenue, Oakland, Ccdifornia Chuver, L., 5756 Kingsbury Street. St. Louis 12, Missouri . Cimorelli, M. I.,1'12l9 S. 8th Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Clark, R. C., 626 E.4Willamette, .Colorado Springs, Colorado Clark, W. R., Ryegate, Montana' , 4" ' ' V 1 f ' Claybdugh, I. E., 513 E. 154th Street,-'Harveyflllinois .C1aycomb, G. E., 205 Main Street, Roaring'Springs, Pennsylvania Cloutier, R. I... 60 Winter Street, Saco, Maine Claybum, G. L., Conroe, Texas g . . Cobb, H. A., 723 E. Macon Street,.C1inton. Illinois' . ' Cobb,.L. S., 2130iNorth 32nd Street, Kansas City, Kansas, Collins, H. .W., Ir., 1l5,Bank1 Street, Suffolk, Virginia. .L . 9 " ,Cpllins, T. O., Betsy Layne,'Kentucky I " ' Congleton, C. I.: 1437'N. Beckley, Dallas, Texas- - J . .Gonsidirie, R. L.,.1023 Franklin Street, Cedar Fallsflowa cGookey,-R.1G.,:Route 1, Deshlerf Ohio 3 Y' ij' f ' t ' 1 fCooksey,VD. I., 8129 San Miguel fCoombs,- L A E I 423 N' 'O 'Street'- California Corder, Paul M., 2213 Elmwood Street, Kansas City, Kansas Corona, Iimmie, 1016 N. 2nd Street, Goose Creek, Texas Cotham, R. M., 1710 Oxford Street, Shreveport, Louisiana Cotton, R. T., 77 S. Kumball Street, Bradford, Massachusetts Cousins, A. W., 23450 Sherman, Fernadale, Michigan Cox, F. C., 1008 E. 3rd, Apartment 10, Long Beach, California Crawford, H. E., General Delivery, Rockwal, Texas Crawford, M. E., Ir., 6402 S. Cheyenne, Tacoma, Washington Cristanta, A., 562 S. Bayside, Detroit, Michigan Crocker, D. B., 3450 Alsace Avenue, Los Angeles, California Crowe, P. E., 535 S. Pomona, Brea, California Croy, H. V., 247 Owyhee Street, Nampa, Idaho Cruse, S. W., 2440 Del Monte, Houston, Texas Cudd, D. E., Ir., 2519 Cochran Street, Houston, Texas Cummings, William A., Route 1, Tunnell Hill, Georgia Cunningham, H. R., Box 35, Dix, Illinois Cutner, I. H., 5000 Woodbrier Street, Columbia, South Carolina Currier, C. R., 49 Church Street, Persque Isle, Maine Curry, W. P., Slayton, Minnesota Curtner, T. D., 216 S. Alice Street, Ionesboro, Arkansas Dalbert, R. D., 2833 11th Avenue "C", Moline, Illinois Dalton, W. I., 1430 Parkchester Road, Parkchester, New York Daniels, N. G., Box 162, Hammond Louisiana N Daniels, W., 400 Woodward Street, Reading, Pennsylvania Davis, D. C., 525 Van Buren Avenue, Oakland, California Davis, E. L., Waynesboro, Mississippi Davis, H., Aluminum City Terrace, New Kensington, Pennsylvania Deveaux, R. G., 686 NW 16th Street, Miami, Florida Douglas, I. C., Route 2, Olney, Texas Dean, P. V., 824 W. Liberty, Mexico, Missouri Deets, C., ceo BuPers or Bonham, Texas Deliso, I. I., 2327 E. Somerset Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Delk, B. E., Iamestown, Tennessee De Ment, R. W., 408 W. White Street, Clinton, Illinois Dick, I. H., Ir., 735 Andover Street, San Francisco, California Digirolame, I. I., 4827 Byron Street, Baton Rouge, Louisiana Domack, Ben R., Ir., 746 S. 38th Street, Milwaukee, Wisconsin ' Donahue, R. S., 21 Benedict Avenue, Ilion, New York Dorion, O. S., 145 Westlawn Avenue, Aurora, Illinois Drew, W. F., 46 Collins, Avenue, Amesbury, Massachusetts I Drugon, A. I., 5535 W. Parker Avenue, Chicago, Illinois Drury, M. I., Navy Department, Washington, D. C. Dugan, I. R., 1-15 W. Chestnut Street, Grove City, Pennsylvania Dufrensne, P. E., 69 North Street, Clarrnont, New Hampshire Dunn, E. B., 314 Darlington Avenue, Darlington, South Carolina Dykstra, H. G., 1520 E. 75th Street, Los Angeles, California Elderkin, B. D., 626 S. Idaho, Butte, Montana A Emerson, E. L., 2432 McCarary Street, San Diego, California English, D. W., Ranburne, Alabama ' Erickson, I. M., Curtiss,-Wisconsin Ernston, R. S., 408W Chestnut Street, Virginia, Minnesota Eugee, E. H., 804 2nd Street, Somers Point, New Iersey Evans, R. K., Sr., 822 Osage, Neodesha, Kansas Fallon, W. T., 419 S. 17th Avenue, Maywood, Illinois Farwell, F. H., 10333 Stratathmore Drive, Los Angeles, California Flanagan, I. E. E., Route 2, Mountain Home, Arkansas Flentcher, Ir., 801 Union Street, McKeesport, Pennsylvania Forrest, E. H., 1 Youngs Road, Fitchburg, Massachusetts Flores, P., 420 Delagado Street, San Antonio, Texas Forsberg, F. G., 2854 Ellison Avenue, Omaha ll, Nebraska Frazier, W. B., 2204 W. Amherst, Dallas, Texas Frechette, E. F.. 296 S. Main Street, Moosup, Connecticut ' Funderburk, V. B., 110 Sanders. Street, Pineville, Louisiana Gamboa, P. A., 39 W. Cushing Street, Tucson, Arizona Garcia, C., Route 1, Box 560, E1 Paso, Texas Garcia, R. C., Box 1381, 'El Centro, Califomia ' Gaston, R. I., 1104 Cliff Drive, Newport Beach, California Gerak. W.. Box 159, Ramsen.Avenue, Avenel, New Iersey Gettle, T. V., Box 5, Carlsvad, Califomia . . - . Gill, M. D., Route 1, Box 'l51.- Norlina, North Carolina I Gillett, P. W., Ir., 4437 N. Greenview, Chicago 40, Illinois Gillingham, B. R., 12274 Harrison Road, Romulus, Michigan Glidewelli R.1A.. General Delivery. Helena, Oklahoma . Golden, C. M., 3646 S. Parkway, Chicago, Illinois 1 ' Goodman, C. I., 623W North Cummings Street, Los Angeles, Califomra Goodwin, H. C., 3415 St. Vincent, St. Louis, Missouri I . Goreki, I. FL, Ir., 1738 W. 21st Street, Chicago. Illinois' ' f ' ' Graves, I. R., Route 2, Mearha, Tennessee- V Greiner, R. C.., Russell Hotel, Pullman, Washington. Griffin, H. C.,.5888 S.rFigueroa. Los Angeles, California A Groves, I. D., 2418 Christine, Wayne, Michigan ' -, . V, ' , Grunstra, P. C.,-237 Madison Hale, I. R., Route 1, Box. 473, Hale, R. W., Hull. I- Ba, SW 15th- Mineral Texas Champaign Clifton, New -Iersey .' Texas.. ' ' 245, Poineer, C Hammond, B. Hampton, Mr Street, Hansen. W. L... 3642 Avenue 'Street Harden Harris, I . Hass, W. I., . F Hauett, ,C Haveifstick, "?'i-Mi-?!tKt'!iEit-St't'32S.1tJt'if.iJ . , ' . . .. . . Hicks. I. P., 1410 S. Bonnie Brae, Los Angeles, Califomia O. P., Ir., Box 14, Himrod, New York ' Hoff, C. G.. 468 East Minnehaha Avenue, St. Paul, Minnesota Holmes, H. G., 1332 53rd Avenue, Oakland 'l, California Holpuch, K. L., 1044 W. Califomia Boulevard, Ontario, California Holvoet, F. L' 2509 Avenue L., Ft. Madison. Iowa Howard, R. G., 1108 Iames Street, Kalamazoo, Michigan Huett, R. R., Route 5, Boonville, Indiana Inglesby, R. H., 544 E. 49th Street, Savannah, Georgia Ingram, Leo F., Cozad, Nebraska Inlow, H. R., RR 1, St. Ioe, Indiana Issacson, P. N., 508 North Buckner, Centralia, Washington Iackson, L. L., 1635 Orr Street, Memphis, Tennessee laworski, S. B., 112-50 78th Avenue, Forest Hills, New York Ieansonne, M. L., 110 Hope Street, Alexandria, Louisiana Iett, T. A., 3006 Seevers Street, Dallas, Texas Obernesser, P. I., 138 Seward Avenue, Utica, New York Obray, I. W., 519 E. 61st Street, Los Angeles, California Ochenblatt. G., 1957 69th Street, Brooklyn, New York Oermann. W. H., 604 Madison Avenue, York, Pennsylvania ' Ogle, I. O., 620 Mayfair Avenue, South San Francisco, California Okolowich, B., 292 Grove Street, Providence, Rhode Island Oliver, W. M., Ir., Davenport Road, Knoxville, Tennessee O'Malley, I. B., 30 Fay Street, Lowell, Massachusetts Olson, M. I., Route 2, Blue River, Wisconsin A Olson, O. I.,.906 E. 18th Street, Minneapolis, Minnesota Olwell, R. F., 3024 44th Street, Long Island City, New York Ormiston, I., 8812 Laycock Avenue, Philladelphia, Pennsylvania Orvis, D. W., RFD 3, Bristol, Vermont Otto, B. D., 301 W. Myrtle Street, Stillwater, Minnesota Pacific, I. P., 11 Herrick Street, Oswego, New York Padgett, L. B., Route 1, Buchanan, Virginia Pa e F. E. 3911 Aumboldt Street Denver Colorado Iohnson, Iohnson, Iohnson, lohnson, E., Capitol Hill Station, General Delivery, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma I. B., 313 Eureka Street, San Francisco, Califomia R. V., 95 Loeffler Road, Bloomfield, Connecticut W. L., Route 1, Box 364,'Kent, Washington Ionas, Theodore A., 2100 Dunsmuir Avenue, Los Angeles 16, California Iones, G. H., Natchitoches, Louisiana Ioyce, T. I., 413 7th Avenue E., Redfield, South Dakota . Kaczorek, F. T., 196 Huron Street, Brooklyn, New York Kaid, H. E., 14827 Winchester Avenue, Harvey, Illinois Keil, D. E., Route 4, Box 546, Tucson, Arizona Kelly, C. R., Box 72, Remsen, New York Kelly, K. I., 128 Endicott Avenue, Revere, Massachusetts Kelley, W. E., 3702 2nd Street, Port Lock Norfolk, Virginia Kieff, I. H., 1537 Pierce Avenue, Marinette, Wisconsin- King, H. T., 317 Highland Avenue, Manhattan Beach, California King, R. C., Route 1, Box 261, Gould, Arkansas' Kinley, C. T., Route 2, Matthews, North Carolina Kirkegard, C. L., 2682 Briggs Avenue, Bronx, New York Kisten, W. A., 14 S. Ward Street, Worcester, Massachusetts Klasek, I., 2159 W. 15th Street, Cleveland, Ohio Klein, R. E., 1745-E. McKinley, Norman, Oklahoma Kleinberg, L. M., 646 Fox Street, Bronx,,New, York Kline, C. A., 144 Male Street, Charlerio, Pennsylvania Kozick, E. G., 22 McHale Street, Miners Hill, Pennsylvania Kroger, W. H., 1107 Court Street, Sioux City, Iowa Laib, C. H., White Ranch Road, I.aFeria, Texas Land, R. N., Kulm, North Dakota Langford, Arthur L., 919 North Dalmont, Hobbs, New Mexico Laurenzi, T., 8123 Vista Avenue, Barfield Ht., Cleveland, Ohio ' Lawhorn, B. G., Cambridge, Kansas Laws, E. H., 200 Butler Street, Waterloo, Iowa LeClaire, E. I., 422-1 Yellowstone Avenue, Billings, Montana Leister, H. B., 30 Oak Avenue, Redwood, California Levine, I., 420 E. Douglas, Wichita, Kansas Liles, I. R., 3027 Wayne K., Kansas City, Missouri Linford, D. V., Box 2, Afton, Wyoming Lovell, I. C., New Windsor, Maryland Lucas, A. K., 378 Oliver Street, Memphis, Tennessee Lukerchine, A., Box 156, Hiller, Pennsylvania MacCarthy, I. B., 1515 Front Street, San Diego, Califomia Mack, A. R., 175 9th Avenue, New York, New York - Malinowski, I. I., 29 Jefferson Street, Simpson, Pennsylvania - Maple, A. G., 400 Bland Street, Canton, Missouri Marble, E. R., Ir., c-o Smelter Clubhouse, Garfield, Utah Martin, C. A., RR 4, Red Bank Road, Evansville, Indiana Martin, G. C., Meriden, Kansas Martin, L. C., Route 2, Leonard, Texas Martin, W. P., 1958 Annapolis Avenue, Baltimore, Maryland Martz, P. L., 9 Elton Street, Toledo 8, Ohio - Maursted, S. A., Lake Hubert, Minnesota Mays, T., 5538 Pearl Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Melquist, S. A., 2421 30th Avenue S., Minneapolis, Minnesota Merian, R. B., 515 Iackson Street, Seattle, Washington Merrell, I. E., Route 1, Box 224, Parlier, California Metzger, F. W., 230 South State Street, Hernet, California Michel, W. E., 4042 S. E. Lieve Street, Portland, Oregon Millar, R., 814 47th Place, Chicago, Illinois Miller, F, M., c-o RFD, Eastanollee, Georgia Mills, I. A., Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Minkus, R. F., 804 West Street, Wilmington, Delaware Mishler, D. W., 2310 Slate Run Road, New Albany, Indiana Moore, H. E., Ir., 5403 Ventnor Avenue, Ventnor City, New Iersey Moore, R. H., Route 1, Daykin, Nebraska ' Moorer, G. P., Railroad Avenue, Smithville, New Iersey - Morris, D. Q., 2015 E. Preston Street, Baltimore, Maryland Morris. G. G., 713 Webster Avenue, Portsmouth, Virginia Morrison, E. P., 1176 Park Place, Brooklyn, New York Mose, N. K., 201 Calhoun Street, Salem, Virginia - q . . . . Page, W4 K., 72 Main Street, Bighamton, New York Palleja, G. L., 826 Kelly Street, Bronx, New York Paolino, A. I., 1437 'Bank Street, Waterbury, Connecticut Papin, I. E., 494 Brook Street, Bridgeport, Connecticut Paradee, L. C., 313 Welcome, Los Angeles, California Pate, L. C., Route 1, Plano, Texas Patrizi A. A., 140 Mereline Avenue, Waterbury. Connecticut Paul, C. C., 7 S. Lyon Street, Batavia, New York V Paulus, R. E., 3 Pratt Street, Mayville, New York Pawlak, C. C., Route 1, Withee, 'Wisconsin Peirce, A. B., Cotonwood Falls, Kansas Pelosi, G. I., 3627 E. Munkwitz Avenue, Cudahy, Wisconsin Perry, Kenneth W., 811 N. 26th Street, East St. Louis, Illinois Peterson, P. W., 1234 Bradley Street, St. Paul, Minnesota Peterson, R. G., Hermansville, Michigan ' Petterson, C. G., 4533 Tacoma Avenue, Tacoma, Washington Phillips, G. L., Box 778, Powderhorn Road, Kilgore, Texas Phillips, M. C., 1621 McMinn, Street, Aliquippa, Pennsylvania Pitman, D. I., Route 7, St. Paul, Minnesota ' Pipitone, I. A., 1723 Park Avenue, Beliot, Wisconsin Piscopo, P. P., 111 State Street, Rutland, Vermont Pitkorchemmy, W., 178 St. Charles Street, Iohnson City, New York Pittsley, I. R., Box 28, Harford, New York Podolski, R. I., 15 Winthrop Street, Dedham, Massachusetts Pope, L., 1115 Compton Street, Dallas, Texas Portal, A. I., 98 Wyckoff Avenue. Brooklyn, New York Post, N. R., Main Street, Nowfoundland, New Iersey Pott, M. A., 1132 State Street, Greenbay, Wisconsin Potter, H. W., Old Mill Road, Gates Mills, Ohio Price, D. A., 1909 Togo Street, Eureka, California Prince, O. F., Route 1, Wilton, Minnesota Pullen, W. C., Route 3, Boaz, Alabama , Randolph, H. C., c-o Edwin Black, Route 2, Newmarket, Iowa Randolph, R. E., 708 W. Broadway, Glendale, Califomia Ray, M., 203 W. Peidmont Avenue, Durham, North Carolina Raney, P. I., St. Maries, Idaho ' Rectenbaugh, R. E., Orient, Iowa Redfearn, V. E., RFD 1. Scales Mound, Illinois Remley. H. M., c-o A. G. Remley, 202 E. lst Street, Anarnosa, Iowa Rice, W. N., 418 Pennsylvania Avenue. Schenetady, New York Rieger. W. D., 276 Adams Street, Oakland, California Riley, I. D., Monroe, Washington Ritter, T. A., 2198 Iefferson, Memphis, Tennessee Ritter, W. C., Box 32, River Route, Madera, California Roberts, E. T., Route 1, Newell, North Carolina Robertson, I. H., Route 11, Box 808, Tacoma, Washington Robinson, I. L., 300 W. Pettis Street, Sedalia, Missouri Robinson, Neville, 307 E. 4th Avenue, Mitchell, South Dakota Rodgers, T. R., RFD 1, Moultrie, Georgia , Rogers, I. A., Ir., 1526 5th' Avenue, Oakland, California - Rose, I. L., 1324 W. 5th Street, Sioux City, Iowa Rosenbaum, C. W., Route 3, Sayre. Oklahoma Roundy, B. D., Alton, Utah Rouse, L. F.. 1723 Shore Drive, Marinete, Wisconsin Roush, B. F., 201 Amundsen Street, Houston, Texas Rouzaud, E. G., 1710 W. 24th Street, Los Angeles, California Rovere, D. A., 5627 Cole Street, Oakland, Califomia Russell, R. D., 2152 Fifth Avenue, Troy, New York Samples, C. H.. Procious, West Virginia Sanders, R. H., 3548-A Pestalozzi Street, St. Louis, Missouri Sapp, M. G., Cottondale, Florida Sayles, Mr., Route 4, Box 90, Lockhart, Texas Scheller, R., 337 W. 7th Street, Mt. Vernon, Indiana Schenck, A. H., 2289 NW 21st Terrace, Miami, Florida Schiffer, T. A.. 517 E. Pasadena Avenue, Youngstown, Ohio Schmid, A. R., 1716 University Avenue N. E., Minneapolis, Minnesot Schnell, O. C., Route 4, Box 720, Portland, Oregon G Moslog, V., 601 lones Avenue, Cebu Cebu, P. L 1 Moss, I. K., 2834 Elm, Lubbock, Texas Mueller, G. H., Route 1, Edwardsville, Illinois Mundell, I. O., Humeston, Iowa McCarty, T. S., Ruleville, Mississippi McDonald, L. C., 1608 Lincoln Street, Beatrice, Nebraska McGlinn, T. B., 7915 Harding, Miami Beach, Florida McGuire, E. M., 1720 260th Street, Lomita, California McLoughlin, R. P., 125 Calyer Street, Brooklyn, New York McNemey, I. F., 2324 Meadow Wood, Toledo, Ohio McVicar, I. I., 1250 S. Taylor Street, Bergenfield, New Iersey Nara, W. E., RFD 1, Box 17, Bruce Crossing, Michigan Nawrocki, L. I., 513 W. Elm Street, Linden, New Iersey Nelson, B. I., Route 1, Roscoe, Texas Nettles, Iohn B., 1326 Shirley Street, Columbia 15, South Carolina Newbern, D. M., 431 N. Canon Drive, Beverly Hills, California Norris, A. L., 2443 N. Racine Avenue, Chicago, Illinois Oakman, H. I., 2900 Avenue C, Ensley, Alabama . , . , ,n - . .N...-..- 4 .emma ,. -,...-..,,-,n.- ,. ...-..... .......1........ .. ....- -.. -.. Schultz, C. G., 150 Harrison Avenue, Waukesha, Wisconsin Segar, W. R., 127 Pleasant Street, West Rutland, Vermont Self, D. F., Ir., Box 92, Rochelle, Louisiana Sellick, A. L., 46 Vir 'nia Avenue, Montclair, New Ierse 91 Y Shaffer, D. L., 311 South Street, Lock Haven, Pennsylvania Shaneberger, Sheats, I. M., Schulze, I. B., D., 152 Evans Place, Fairlawn, New Iersey 2404 E. Birch Street, Enid, Oklahoma 2018 Lowry Avenue N., Minneapolis, Minnesota Sikes, O. E., 507 Forrest Road, N. E., Atlcmta, Georgia Silseth, E. F., Ruthland, North Dakota Simpson, K. L., Castana, Iowa Smallwood, C. W., Box 417, Worthington, Minnesota Smith, C. I., Route 1, Box 808, Bessemer, Alabama Smith, I. R., Route 2, Strawberry Plain, Tennessee Smith, R. L., 6226 6th Avenue, N. W. Seattle 7, Washington Sopko, W. B., 152 Elk Street, Buffalo, New York Sparks, D., Ir., Route 14, Box 2516, Houston, Texas Spencer, M. T., 1017 N. Orleans, Chicago, Illinois A -,tcm-, ,A.,4..,n ,.uf.-:- . . -,,-f.f,r,..f-nf. .,...u1-1. sin- -one-.-X sf...--I-U ,:. -41-mzngaaenss, .-. ,,..,., .ng rg:-xL:,f.e.ef g.,.11:.31g..v.-v-- Y - . nz. -.ni ,fir V .N .. ..,, --- 11- T V ----7 V , ,, - ,-. . . . Y ----V f """'1 1 Y - -f- ' "Tk" f ' . V... -A,- 44- t 'Y's1Ri5Hf'7"'.fs,' +1 ,- , . ZW'-Gifs ft 71 ' ' 'AZfWv'W'W- 'P I A -f ft Spickarcl G. L. 1606 Freeman Avenue Cincinnati Ohio Stahl L. E. 921 Michigan Avenue Mt. Pleasant Michigan Stambaugh W. H. Virginia Illinois A Starks M. '847 S. Cypress 'Ottawa Kansas Starne.. C. R. 3728 S. 5th Avenue Birmingham Alabama Stephens P. R. 1327 S. Albert Street Allentown Pennsylvania Stick R. A. 470 Sidney'Street Madson Wisconsin Stier R. 6046 Iohn Avenue Long Beach California Strate Donald I. 1012 N. 16th Street Manitowoc Wisconsin Strater N. RFD'l Box 25 Oxford North Carolina Suchnicki E. F. 172 Palmer Street New Bedford Massachusetts Sullivan G. G. 126 Neponset Avenue Dorchester Massachusetts Swanson G. W. 1653 S. 29th Street Milwaukee Wisconsin Sweet L. I. 1632 Morton Street Muskegon Heights Michigan Swift L. R. Quamba Minnesota, ' Tanori A. A. 416 Ballona Street Inglewood California Taylor Mr. 807 C. Street Fresno California A Taylor I. R. Lincoln Kansas Taylor R L 126 Barnes Avenue Hastings Nebraska Tenorxo I D 3721 E 6th Street Los Angeles 23 California Thomas D C 6752 Olympia Avenue Chicago 31 Illinois Thompson W I Brewster Kansas Throp T E 922 W 30th Street Los Angeles California Thuman M I Nodaway Iowa Tolton R A Route 2 Corona California Tracy L I 3362 E Green Street Pasadena California Tracy W 122 E Malone Pampa Texas Trawek B L Box 54 Berr Alabama Tresdell W T Box 384 Iraan Texas Trice C E 448 S llth Street Louisville Kentucky Trodahl R M Route 3 Box 220 Chuhalis Washington True M C 796 E 9th Street Pomona California Turner C O W Route l Sevierville Tennessee Uhl L 630 Lawrence Charlotte Michigan rw . . , , oi I I I , . . . , . . . . , . . . . , , . . , . . . . . . . -. . , , . - -. . . il ' 'I I I 4 1 - -r 1 , . -. . , , , I ' ,'l I I - I , - .. . , , , .. . , . 4 . - -, . , I I ' 'I I I I ' 'I ' I . ' I l I u 6, I I I I S. 1 Q' ., . ,. , - l , . - -. I ,, . I 'I I I . Vaghi, I. P., 32 Elizabeth Street, Bethel, Connecticut Vandervort, R. W., 1741 Beleau Drive N. S., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Ventriglia, Vincent A., 226 East 116th Street, New York, New York Volzke, L. R., Herreid, South Dakota ' Vujovich, R., 5334 'Via Corona, Los Angeles, California Wade, S. S., 1629 Oregon Street, Berkeley, California Walker, R. E., 529 S. Shasta Street, Willows, California Wallis, P. B., Ir., 615 Pard Drive, Hillsboro, Texas Walters, E. A., 2245 A. Montgomery Avenue, St. Louis, Missouri Warde, I. W., 116 S. 10th Street, Wilmington, North Carolina Wasserman, M. R., 1833Mz Bridge Street, Los Angeles, California Watford, I. B., 1716 N. 19th Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Wavrin, I. F., 231 Alvarado Street, Chula Vista, California Wellbaum, I. H., 620 Martin Street, Greenville, Ohio Western, L. R., 4823 Magazine Street, New Orleans, Louisiana Whitcomb, W. E., 2808 West 27th Avenue, Denver, Colorado Wilkins, C. L., 1822 Palaski Street, Little Rock, Arkansas Williams, I. F., Ir., 1712 Ash Street, Texarkana, Arkansas Williamson, R., RFD 1, Neodesha, Kansas Wilson, C., Ir., 5230 llth Avenue N. E., Seattle, Washington Wilson, I. L., 201 West 7t.h North, Little Rock, Arkansas Wilsoncroft, D., West Decatur, Pennsylvania Winter, I. H., 17820 Russell, Detroit, Michigan Winter, I. I., Route 1, Box 52, Windthorst, Texas Withrow, R. H., RR 1, Chetopa, Kansas Wolford, B. I., 338 Saner Street, Dallas, Texas Woods, H., Ir., 223 W. 143rd Street, New York City, New York Woods, I. Ir., 775 Lincoln Street, Beaumont, Texas Wrasse, G. T., 411 E. Oakside Street, South Bend, Indiana Wright, R., 15th 6 Lenepah, Box 7, Muskogee, Oklahoma Yant, L. L., 195 Columbia Street, Salem, Oregon Zastrow, W. N., Route 2, -Wausau, Wisconsin Zimmerman, C. I., Balta, North Dakota ...Y Y ' ' ' 4-4..- ...sir-J.: ,...,3W 74 gqr - 2 1 ' ! . ,Q 45" " .. .5 f ,wg-. fu 4 f Q F "fi i 1 x '1 A I lr ' M fg sl J 11 g , fi 1? 1' FY Q, wi 1 .L af? M if 2 ff? N U' f mi I 1 ll M . L Q k ! 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Suggestions in the Neshoba (APA 216) - Naval Cruise Book collection:

Neshoba (APA 216) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1946 Edition, Page 30

1946, pg 30

Neshoba (APA 216) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1946 Edition, Page 115

1946, pg 115

Neshoba (APA 216) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1946 Edition, Page 123

1946, pg 123

Neshoba (APA 216) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1946 Edition, Page 9

1946, pg 9

Neshoba (APA 216) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1946 Edition, Page 46

1946, pg 46

Neshoba (APA 216) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1946 Edition, Page 78

1946, pg 78

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