Nebraska Wesleyan University - Plainsman Yearbook (Lincoln, NE)

 - Class of 1940

Page 1 of 196

 

Nebraska Wesleyan University - Plainsman Yearbook (Lincoln, NE) online yearbook collection, 1940 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 196 of the 1940 volume:

■■■:-M:i mrc liliiiri m ■ " V J «fe Famous Favorite Of H esleyan Men and M omen Delicious Food, courteous service and the finest facilities combine with the ever present collegiate atmosphere to make Hotel Corn- husker the social headquarters for grads and undergrads alike Formal or Informal, grand ball or an after-the- game snack, your function will satisfy you most when planned for the Cornhusker. Hotel Cornhusker LINCOLN, NEBRASKA — UNDER SCHIMMEL DIRECTION Our Chancellor . . . Dr. Benjamin F. Schwartz, stands before the fireplace in his home, warms his hands, and smiles. Through his cheerful ma nner, and his keen sympathy for the problems of others, he has endeared himself to the hearts of Nebraska Wesleyan students. ' " fl .(f. Hk Dean Cuff . . . Dr. R. P. Cuff, Dean of Liberal Arts College, and Mrs. Cuff, recent residents of Texas, pose for an informal picture. As head of the English department. Dr. Cuff amuses his students with pronuncia- tions imported from the South. iv4 5 " THE SEASON ' S GREETINGS! f iCtut-e Save time and money. Come and shop with us. Avoid the crowds. Here you will find Gifts for all the family. Books, Dictionaries, Bibles, Pictures, Novelties, Stationery, Leather Goods, Candies, jewelry, Pens, Pen- cils, Pillows, Memory Books, Book Ends, Magazine Sub- scriptions, Greeting Cards, Fancy Wrappings, Novelties, for your Parties. WESLEYANN COLLEGE BOOKSHOPP Miss Hannah Jensen. Prop. 2711 No. 48th St., Bus Depot 6-1608 ' Everi thi)if For The Student " MAYO DRUG CO. The Drug Store on the Corner 2700 North 48th Phone 6-2000 HURRY DOWN TO US for your Every Need The Editor Speaks - - Hello. This column gives the editor a chance to ramble and discuss, and your only defense is to ignore, but please be kind. Your 1940 " Plainsman " makes an attempt to blend care- fully selected pictures and short, concise articles into a graphic record of the year ' s events — the ones that mean the most to you, the students of Nebraska Wesleyan. Campus life and activities are emphasized in this publica- tion which exists primarily for the students, and for the faculty which is closely linked to the student body. To obtain uniformity, the 1940 " Plainsman " has only two columns (always the same width) to the page, a step toward easy reading and attractiveness, which facili- tates the mixing of pictures and written material. Brief write-ups, blended with pictorial matter, offer a magazine type of presentation. THE PLAINSMAN Magazine of NEBRASKA WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY 1939-1940 AUTUMN EDITION. 1939 Editor. Warren E. Johnston Business Manager, James L. Tipton Associate Editor, Bruce E. Keith Assistant Bus. Mgr., Wilmer G. Woltemath New features are introduced, and those not new are given unique forms of presentation. Rush week and regis- tration are thoroughly covered, and ample space is given to freshman initiation and Kangaroo court. Entirely new are " Headliners, " headline highlights from the " Wesleyan, " the full-page style used for class pictures, the football letter- men ' s lay-out, and the " ' Press ' Goes To A Party " idea. Your autumn edition is here; so, for another month or two, please forget the time worn question, " When ' s the annual coming out? " (Continued on page 38.) 1939-1940 PLAINSMAN Autumn Edition CONTENTS Page 3 4 6 7 12 14 20 21 24 23 32 36 38 39 40 41 44 50 Camera Catches ___-_- The Edifor Speaks, ths editor _ . - - Old Main, Prof. Ethel Booth _ - _ - Rushing, Registering and Ranting ' Round, ' Vera Harvev Tweets and Twirls, Ruth Nelson - - - - " Tommy " Talks, Coach Dwight P. Thomas - Homecoming, Vivian Finley . _ _ - Peppers, Sylvia Magnuson _ _ _ - Headliners .__-_-- Freshies — a bumper crop, the editor _ - - Sophomores ------- Religion, Manon Swanson _ - . - Panhellenic Council, Vivian Finley - - - Wings Over Wesleyan, Jeanne Souser _ - - Student Governors, Rachel Stephenson - - - Inter-fraternity Council, Harvey Feyerherm " Press " Goes To A Party _ . - _ Camera Catches ------ SHOP WHERE YOU CAN SAVE EVERY DAY! IT ISN ' T necessary to hunt all over town for bargains, because you can be sure that the " Cheapper " Drug Store is selling it at the lowest pos- sible price! Look for the sign of the " Flying Red Arrow " on O Street! it leads to greater values! • DRUGS • CIGARS • CANDY • TOBACCO • STATIONERY • COSMETICS • TOILETRIES Tf ' c Kiij) Lificohi Prices Doxcn! X E CARRY complete lines of all the nationally advertised brands. Low prices every day. You always save at " Cheapper ' s " ! CHEAPPER System, Inc. 1325 O LINCOLN Conic in anil lirmcsc Around! CITIZENS STATE BANK 2650 North 48th Street CASTLE, ROPER MATTHEWS C. H. ROPER SONS MORTICIANS ' . i J tuD o tu U " D 3 EP _3 S C o °i a 1 1 t 1 at -J: o OJ " D (U CL ■ " m - . 01 J , " a : cu c -Q O 0) 01 n, C — 1- i_ nj m — ox 0)1 OJ 3 • 0) c 01 -2 •- -C JI TO S£ " = E ' S 2f.2- no XI JI £ - _ OJ c C OJ I- (TJ , 3 X .- XI . 0) c -x OJ — - D . (TJ " 2 QJ +- £ o 4- Of o " 0-„ t 1 nj u J- 1J Above — Phi Tau actives show their love for freshmen who have just registered their preferences in the Dean of Men ' s office. Russ Merrill. Don Kohl ( back to camera ) . Homer Hix and Orval Zam- zow compose one group : Paul Sweet and LaMar Dodd listen to Har- land Kelly, while Paul Larson, Gordon Gibb and Dick Bell lurk in the background. Rushing, Registering and Ranting ' Round By VERA HARVEY " Will you please take this to Miss Sloniger, the regis- trar? " " Mr. Judge, this atrocious freshman has committed the terrible crime of treading on the senior walk. " " What shall the penalty be? " " Will you come to our dinner Friday night? " The quotations listed above were just a few of the ques- tions which made the " lowly " freshmen, as upperclassmen like to call them, wish they were facing the Siegfried line single-handed instead of experiencing the first few hectic days of school. Leaving no gap for homesickness, the Y. W. C. A. started activities this year with a new idea of Big Sisters (of course, for gals only). One of their main purposes was to help the new girls get settled. Their duties even included crawling out of bed at five o ' clock in the morn- ing to meet trains. The Big Sisters were dressed in white blouses, blue skirts, and wore arm badges of blue and white ribbons. Getting settled was abandoned for awhile by som e, for- ever by others, for the more important thing called registra- tion. In order to tide them through the hectic time (I ' m an upperclassman), they were entertained at a breakfast in the Campus Nook. Here they met different faculty mem- bers, heads of their departments. After the freshmen had finished their registration, the Big Sisters again assumed their duties and conducted a tour of the campus, displaying the various classrooms and labora- tories to aid the newcomers in finding classes when school really began. Left — Norma Shepardson offers refreshments to Anna Mae Beck- with at the Beta Phi house. Ajbovc— Lois Becbe and Veinadell Greenslit seek signatures ami ndvice from Dean R. P. Cuff during registration week. Ahuve — Miss Elsif Muller, assistant to the treasurer. cumplfti_s Harriet Curry ' s registration. Dorothy Thomas, at the end of the ' " bar. " awaits htr eventual financial shakedown. A Kautz twin seated on each side of her. Anne Kaimmer smiles at somebody across the table at the Phi Mu house. Ruth Nielsen is secure ' y attached to the blonde hair at the right side of the picture. AimvE — June Moslander, Hazel Waddell and Audrey Bullock are feted by the Theta U ' s. Abovk— Dorothy Knight solicits aid from Prof. Enid Miller Hoff- man. Ribbons around Dorothy ' s left arm indicate that she acted as a Big Sister to a group of freshman girls. Varied facial cxprfs ion rtsulL ;is it »_ . .ifiisuM. i ' t;tii (II .»ifn. ' :iiKs i . n ufniip i nien luiore they ri ' isttr ttu-ir iTelert- iicf lh Ins " llier. (Continued from page 7.) Later in the week, the girls were entertained at the annual lovely Y. W. vesper tea, and an activities tea. Both afforded opportunities for getting acquainted. Varied activities were explained by members of the student body, participants in particular activities. The Y. M. boys, far above teas, held a lemonade drink as a means of meeting the other fellows. All these events were culminated in the big Y. M.-Y. W. mixer in the gym. Indoor games, requiring the skill of Annie Oakleys and others and involving plenty of charm, took the attention of the freshmen, and in turn the fresh- men took the attention of the upperclassmen — if you get what I mean. After going through the refreshment line once (or twice if possible), all departed in big bunches of two. Oh — but wait! Freshman initiation was the exciting time. Any fresh " man " or " woman " caught without his badge of rank, the green cap, anyone caught barging up the senior walk or any freshman refusing to carry an uppercl assman ' s books ended up in Kangaroo court. Presided over by a representative jury, an amiable judge, a prosecuting attorney, and even a defense attorney, the court was in full swing. Of course, the defense attorney was never allowed to utter more than tour words at a time, but the jury came up with a verdict like, " You ' re a b-a-a-a-a-d boy, " and the consequent sentence of an application of lipstick and paddle. Even though the prejudiced jury voted, " Not bad! — Not guilty " on some of the girls, the judge was forced to pro- nounce sentence of no make-up and pigtails tied with green ribbons. It wasn ' t hard for the freshmen fellows to carry books for the sophomore gals, and eligible senior men flocked about the freshies (girls, I mean) . During all this time were seen the ever-present badges of the five sororities and three fraternities on the campus, for it was the time of year devoted to rushing prospective members of social organizations. Sororities devoted much of their time to clever teas, dignified dinners, and informal parties. In this manner the newcomers formed contacts which guided them in making their choices. Fraternities specialized in stag dinners followed by in- formal entertainment and fireside chats. Activities termi- nated on Saturday when the students who wished to affilialo gathered to express their preferences. Dr. J. C. Jensen. Dean of Men, and Susan V. Lewis, Dean of Women, gave short talks to the groups. Then school really started; things happened, and there was plenty of work for everyone. Above — Willards and rushees sing for the Crescents. Below — Crescents and rushees ko into their bear dance for the benefit of the Willards. J ' ' 1 ■ ' H t ' . a Ml f %lliiill .«» Bu J .AA ' ' Vmk ' VI ii . [ ' jf i l j 10 Above — Two fresh ies take time out for a bite to eat during freshman initiation week (note the caps). Evelyn Wittenbach waves to a friend who has just entered the Coffee Shop, and Lucille Norris thinks of hot chocolate. Merle Randall applies lipstick to the lips dl ' I ' rt shmaii Don Kniil to make him more beautiful. Interested upperclas men gather around to watch the delicate operation. Above— Ruth Marion Herse holds a trophy at the Alpha Gam house, but so does Vivian Finley who tells her all about them. They just can ' t be serious in Kangaroo court. Judgfe Harland Kelly is jovial. Merle Mahr tries to appear calm. Homer Hix enjoys himself as he anticipates swingriner that weapon at Dave Coulter, the poor freshie (yeah, all tix foot three inches of him). Herman Piper shouldn ' t complain as Ions ' as he is alloweil to re- main seated, and Don Williams and Paul Johnson do nothing: more serious than explaining the significance of the Delta Omega Phi paddle. (Continued on page 42) 11 The cameraman caught Director Al Boberg in a characteristic pose when the Plainsman y;rid(iers. baml, and fans invaded York. Tweets and Twirls Tuneful tweets and flashy twirls By Boberg ' s bunch of boys ' n " girls. By RUTH NELSON Flashing silver batons twirled in the air as four high- stepping majorettes and a strutting major led the 1939 Nebraska Wesleyan Plainsman band down the center of the field at half-time for football enthusiasts this fall. Spectators thrilled with the spirit of Wesleyan at the sight of the thir ' y-two yellow-and-brown-uniformed mem- bers of the Plainsman band preceded by this year ' s addi- tion of five accomplished baton twirlers marching in rank and file to the beat of drums. The Homecoming football game, played against Mid- land, was the first big performance of the band on the home field this season. A few snappy maneuvers as high- light features included impressive weaving countermarches, series of right and left flanks and formations. The Doane Tigers were greeted on their own field for the second major event with a formation spelling " Hi. " " The Yellow and the Brown, " Wesleyan ' s grand old school song, besides many other traditional and new songs, rings out across the campus from Friday morning pep rallies in the gym, where the student body gathers to receive vim, vigor, vitality, pep and enthusiasm. " Al " Boberg, Wesleyan ' 35, directs the smartly uniformed group which inspires both team and student body at football and basketball contests. 12 Above — The band swings out at the Homecoming: program in the auditorium. The section shown includes Esther Hutchins. Ruth Creamer, Dorothy Thomas and Evelyn Coates in the front row : Ernest Hartley, John Hawthorne, Bob Gibb and Wi ' .son Field in the back row. Right — Joan and Jean Kautz or Jean and Joan Kautz, as the case may be, can ree-a-ly step. Above— Gordon Roberts and Betty Jane Evans make music. Carol Glidewell takes time out, Ruth Nelson clashes the cymbals, Paul Scott blows, and the band inspires Wesleyan students. Band- Clarinets Saxophones Althea Brittain, Loomis Kenneth Freese, Manches- Betty Jane Evans. Seward ter, N. H. Carol Ann Glidewell. Omaha Betty McMeekin, Shelby Louise Gottschalk, Benkel- Ronald Metzler, Lincoln man Gordon Roberts, Blu3 Springs Paul Sweet, Stanton Cornets Ernest Bartley, Lincoln Evelyn Coates, Indianola Ruth Creamer, Ogallala John Hawthorne, Arcadia Esther Hutchins, Burchard Dorothy Peters, Lincoln Dorothy Thomas, Rising City Bass horns French horns Homer Anderson, Lincoln Vernadell Greenslit, Stanton Paul Johnson, Tekamah Drums Jean Flaherty, Hyannis Don Littrell, Lincoln Erna Philipp, Fremont Below — That they both play French htiriis may be accitleiiUtl, but Vernadell Greenslit and Homer Anderson would place any two musical instruments side by side. Paul Johnson of Tekamah is seen at left. Trombones Chas. Greenslit. Stapleton Dwight Hamilton, Orleans Ruth Sallenbach, Friend Ellis Schlichtemeier, Nehawka Baritones Howell Cox, Ogallala Paul Scott, Wymore Drum Major Carroll Story, Lincoln Wilson Field, Lincoln Bob Gibb, Kimball Cymbals Ruth Nelson, Lincoln Glockenspiel Margie Smith, York Baton Twirlers Jean Kautz, Lincoln Joan Kautz, Lincoln Ruth Nielsen, Omaha Esther Perkins, David City Homer Hix, Stromsburg U By COACH DWICHT P THOMAS An anxious moment for the Wesleyan coaching staff. Coach Dwight later, for. the jaunt to Y rk resulted in a 16 to fi win for the invaders. «J Starting the season with two regulars and five other lettermen from the 1938 squad, the 1939 Wesleyan Plains- men won but two of the nine games played. The seven games lost were the price paid for lack of experience, speed and, in certain vital positions, weight. In spite of these great odds, the Plainsmen were true to the best Wesleyan traditions and fought well to the end of all games, in many instances outplaying superior opponents during the last two quarters. John Staten, Don Williams and Dale Magnuson were the mainstays on attack and defense. Staten was selected on Thomas and Line Coach Jerry Adams, but their aspect changed a moment Football all " All-conference " teams, while Williams and Magnuson were given " Honorable Mention. " George Carne proved to be valuable in the middle of the line. John Staten, Don Williams, George Carne, Frank Har- rington, Harry Baker, Gerald Hicks, Lee McAllister and Merle Randall, all lettermen, are the seniors who will be lost by graduation. Returning lettermen are Jim Owen, David Coulter, Milton Glock, Paul Souders, Raymond Muckel, freshmen; Lloyd Frederick. Ralph Bowmaster, Fred Hess, Byron Johnson, Dean Niemann, Ralph Currier, Russell Merrill, sophomores; Dale Magnuson, Harold Maynard, Bob Braun, juniors. 14 Wesleyan ' s Dale Mapnuson at extreme riprht. and E ' avid Coulter brinp down a man in the Sterling, Kan. trame. Rus3 Mex-rill. number 35. is on the left pnd Don Williams, number 36. in the background. Also note the Wesleyan man flat on his back. Below — Don WiHiams intercepts a Tarkio pass and. followed by rjeorpre Carne. races down the field. Rather rough this game, football — but I ' un for those vho like it and can take it standing up. Above — John Staten recovers a fumble in the Plainsmen ' s Home- coming battle. Harold Maynard, number 33. may be seen behind the Midland Warrior who was first after Staten in the race for the ball. Below — " Jarrin Jawn " Staten evades a Midland man and score» the Plainsmen ' s lone touchdown in the Wesleyan Homecoming . anip. Jerry Hicks, number 45, and Bob Braun take care of the other Warriors. 29 at Lincoln: 6 at Lincoln: 13 at Lincoln: 20 at Kearney: 27 at Lincoln: 3 at Crete: 10 at York: 17 at Peru: 30 at Hastings: Wesleyan- Wesleyan- Wesleyan- 2 Wesleyan- Wesleyan- Wesleyan- 16 Wesleyan- Wesleyan- Wesleyan- -Tarkio -Wayne -Sterling -Kearney -Midland -Doane -York -Peru -Hasting, 6 12 27 27 13 7 6 32 32 Below — The Chancellor and .owed the Plainsman g:ridders to numeroas other Wesleyan fans fol- Cret« for the Doane game. Above — Hprvey Feyerherm, representin;j: the " W " club, jcives a me ' ln llion to Dorothy KniKht, and in so doing: disc ' oses her as the " W Club Sweetheart, at half-time of the Honiecumin}, ' jiame. Bruce Keith anil Vance James, other " W " men, approve of the proceedings. r ' Left— Homecoming- rally included a torch-lite parade throujrh the llape " led by a truckload of football men — and others. omecomin; By VIVIAN FINLEY Homecoming Day, Oct. 27, began with a chapel pro- gram in the morning with Prof. Ruth Butcher giving a sports announcement of the Wesleyan-Midland game. " Doc " Mayo welcomed the Wesleyan alumni to the Homecommg celebration. Jimmy Parsons, six-year old son of Prof, and Mrs. Joe A. Parsons, was presented to the student body as the " Pep club Sweetheart. " Alpha Gamma Delta sorority and Delta Omega Phi fra- ternity were awarded the plaques for first place rankings in the Homecoming decorations, which were judged the night before. Between the halves of the Wesleyan-Midland game, Dorothy Knight, Lincoln senior, vas presented as " W " club Sweetheart. She was the guest of honor at the " W " club dance, which was held in the gymnasium after the game. This annual dance closed the season ' s Homecoming activi- ties. Head Cheerleader Dean McGee gives a hand to Jimmy Parsons. six-year-o!d " Pep Club Sweetheart. " at the Homecominir prut ram in the auditorium. 20 Peppers By SYLVIA MACNUSON The Yellers of the Brown is the name of the pep pro- moters and spirit " keeper uppers " of the campus. Every Friday they don their dazzling yellow sweaters with ths significant brown emblem in preparation of a Plainsman battle. Lyda Varney is president of the organization for the first semester. Other cabinet officers include Carroll Story, vice-president; Maxine Cope, secretary; Vernadell Green- slit, treasurer; Warren Johnston, publicity chairman. The three cheer leaders, elected at the beginning of the year, are Dean McGee, Maxine Cop3 and Evangeline Lind- blade, with McGee as head cheer leader. Membership consists of 50 members — five from each social group and five at large. All new members are on probation for a period of six weeks until they prove them- selves worthy of permanent membership. Besides planning all the pep rallies, torchlight parades and snake dances, the club conducts freshman initiation, decorates the campus for Homecoming, and plans the ath- letic banquet in the fall. In the spring they sponsor the big social event of the year, the Big Snob-Old Grouch party. Below — This man.v Pep club members appeared for a Yellers of the Brown picture. Persons pictured below a re Laura Jean Nelson, Phyllis -Jones. Sylvia Mapnuson, Audrey Bullock. Margaret Anderson, Elizabeth Jones, Roberta Kauk, Louise Gottschplk : Ardene Roliin?on, Kay Sorsensen, Elinor Soeth. Evant eline Lindblade. Mary Shumard, Noi-ma Shepardson. Vivian Finley, Herbie Waener, Warren Johnston, Faith Frampton, Marjorie Fuchser. Vernadell Greenslit, Lenora Smith, Phyllis Ke.st?rson, Alice Jayne Grosshans. Marguerite Peterson. Russell Macv. John Wise. Lyda Varney. Tiniman Streeter, Lynne Anderson. Paul Scott. Charles Greenslit, Don Davis, Carl Christensen, Gordon Olsson, John Cope, Bob Twinem and Jack Nelson. i Phi Kappa Tau Homecominc ilecoations, above, and below. Crescent decorations. I !l?J V .- BeXOW — Robf rta Kauk makes a i.-lt:in t■ep or it tVn- I h t i (.«: a :PP£- -«-,. ViV Above — D-elta Omega Phi ' s Homecoming decorations received iirst place fraternity award. Right — Cheerleaders Evanpreline Lindblade. Dean McGee and Maxine Cope show how to get results. Below — Spectators at one of Wesley an ' s first home football pames. Notice especially the popcorn chewing technique of Bill Richardson and Elizabeth Jones, and the intent manner of Harold Ellis, Jack Twi- ford, Virginia Mead and Truman Streeter. • X .- sP We also have all the important trifles for formality Tails ancl Tuxedos Men, check up on your evening clothes. There is an air of distinction about our formal wear. And it ' s due primarily to the minute atten- tion paid to the de- tails — small little de- tails . . . that make for a full evening of pleasure. Tuxedos $21. 0 Tails $25 diettSifnciP S HS 23 inomson urec oi • " - f5 S Pro -a«e; Sis A Buttresslj } WalTtn Johnston) Occasion recently arose lor ! wSeyan student to think prolan- Uitogs: this IS hard condition. ■ Margaret Thomsoij ior. had tliat between OW Main and Whit, build- ' ing are very obstinate; In tact, un- yieldlDJ X from tire shock ol the. J Girls ' N ce. !lt , Dormitory Housing 20 Annual Y.M Wesleya ' - -Y.W. Pirst Enrollment Increa Sophomores Registrati Pinrls Greatest Decrea; Mixer ! Party ilVV ; Vtee ;S » : or w t ive- . ,o :5 ome oX - V o ' ' $_ Homecoming Activities ' " To Close Toni out Same ICampu ' veelheart To Be Made " !. ' " ys program ,-e Decoration- A afd? ' " ' ' ' ' litfiule i;oniititil« .J. I jew Dining Mrs. HoUanc _.«is5! ' • ' vVt ee ' .41 ' ° ' ' " zM: . )ii ' Kelly, Take ,% ' ' ■- Wesle an Band 6am v Wiembers: Boasts 42 ' lO!. A- lia.s , e . - 4 " i " ■ - ' te- -ibcri ' -nP ' i.ienibcrs, " ■• ,ifV6 a»d u«; Tipton Honorj Freshmen Misery To End Debate Mee p j Kangaroo Court Speechit;, I ' addles, Sextets Over Today Butcher States " Tough Season " For Local Squad Thomson, Larson h Leads In Coming F Plainsman Playei s Open Stage Sea With M. Andei " son ' s " Wingless Victoi Margaret Thomson of lincoLa. and Clarence Larscn. have the leading roles in " Wingless Victory " by Maxwel. homecoming play to be given, by the Plainsmen Players c Wesleyaji university, October 27-28. " Wingless Victory " is the first ol fivt- plays on the W€ season siwnsored by Theta Alpha Phi, iiatujnal dramatic under the direction of Fraiices Goodhue Loder. It was produced by Guthrie McCliiitic with his wife, Kat neil. in the leading role. It ran on. the road and on Broadi year. The story is written in verse S form and concerm; Nathaniel, a sea , ptala, who leaves home penniless mms aft«r seven years " ab- weaithy man. VvWh i leasure of jjii Wesleyai At Recej c •Sfo xams Given For , ivil Aernautics Couree Varied Includes Subjects " Out i, " ' e i muary exaralnatloiii . around SchOTl " . or tuTv dSLss. under Dr. J. C.OJi ? tJiken Wedaesday iiiV V.o N - ..-ci v ; Senior Day On ThursdauMi ,„„ Recognition, Chapel Hi m; Deiu i Tlie traditional senior recognition day will be observed on Tinrrsday. Mov, 33. The rocoijnition ceremony : i be held In the auditorium dur- tiic Chancellor by thei and the aa iuai oration lor orator. [ This will Tlte Wesleyan Plainsmen, led by " Tiger Jawn " Staten, won their I first N. C. A. C. conference gauic I when they scored a IS to 8 viciory the Yorl: PanUier last Fri- day ni liU Staten carried Uie entire load ' tlie way of scores, piling up Wa iL-yaii ' s 16 potnis- The Mctliotiibt scori adio Play Casts Ihosen Recently Reynolds Dramas To Ee Presented Ule ball ( SEAlen thi he Yorlc threj led the ml •:pe, I I " as.s 3e tetage tor tJ Death Deals The Cards! The Death Deck " , alternative title of Nebraska Wesleyan uni- versity ' s mystery play to be pre- J sented In the Wesleyan auditor- intercepted ' ' " ° - - " tSeals the cards " to the oast In the game or -minder " . The ad ;rf.!slng commit- ] tee is " putting ts ■ .Jps " on the ;)e 50-yard lii i Dledorff col arried the bj P. K. P. Elects D. Blewfield, Merlin Merrill Booth Speaks To Chapel Grouj) O.i Local Traditions Crescents Taus Third The Delta Omega P leads the intramural points, at the close o and-pass football scasi cent fraternity is sec fKjlnts. the Phi Taus 65 points, and the are in the ceUar pes IKiinUs, With intramural fo Uie way, Intramural t start the first week e Beta Phi P Pick Dreai {By Vera H»J Like Herculca, Uke Don Juan and like Beta Phi Alpha x picked a composite woman ' s dreams. This ideal piece of 1 hava hair like Dick 1 tng down in chrcmo: his eyes will shine life ers ' , his smile. Uke nafd ' s. wiU cover a tory. This miracle m James Tipton ' s dinipl tocratlc nose of Joh: and the prominent ea ffeTBon Croft, topped BUI Dafoe compjexio To make a perfect ( miss the physique ol Freshies Who said it never rains in Nebiaska? Who said that some old timer at the edge of town goc sprinkled on once and it scared him £o stiff that even modern dancing couldn ' t loosen him up? Who said Nebraska hasn ' t had a crop since grandpa cried because the family ran out of spools to use for teeth- ing rings and he had to grow up on a wa on iheel? Well, whoever said all these things had better print a retraction ' cause it is no longer true. Regardless of what Nebraska as a whole did, Nebraska Wesleyan, at least, had a pretty fair crop in ths autumn of 1939. News leaked out recently that more than 180 freshmen presented them- selves at the treasurer ' s desk and laid down cash, checks, notes, promises, or whatever was necessary in order that they might become members of the Nebraska Wesleyan university student body. Meet the class of ' 43, truly a bumper crop — — . J Tiow 1 ADAMS, LOUISE, Waverly. ALLEN, BETTY, Lincohi, Phi Mu, chorus. ALLEN, JEAN, Lincoln, Phi Mu. ANDERSON, FRANCIS, Lincohi, Phi Kappa Tau. ANDERSON, KATHERINE E., Omaha, Bleu Thonge. ANDERSON, LOIS, Silver City. la. a bumper crop ' l n Mf ' Row 2 ANDERSON, ROY, Uncohi. ANDERSON, RUTH, Davii City. ANDERSON, VERA, Fairmont. Bleu Thonge, Girls ' Glee club, A. C. E., Y. W. C. A. ARCHER, HAROLD, Geneva. Bleu Thonge, ex emp. ARNN, ROXIE, Dermott. Ark. AUCOCK, MARJORIE, Raymond, Y. W. C. A. AYERS. NORMA JEAN, Beatrice, Alpha Gamma Delta, Y. W. C. A. 25 BECKWITH, ANNA MAE, Albion. Girls ' Glee club, Y. W. C. A. BELL, RICHARD, Beatrice, Phi Kappa Tau. BOWEN, VIRGIL, Shenandoah. la., Y. M. C. A. BOWEN, WESLEY, Craig, Phi Kappa Tau, debate. BOYDSTON. LOIS MAY, Hartman. Colo.. Bleu Thonge, band, Y. W. C. A. BRACKETT. GORDON, Lincoln, male a cappelln chorus, Y. M. C. A. BROWN, LUCILLE, Fairmont. Bleu Thonge. Row 2 BROX, JUNE, Hershey. BRUBAKER, DEAN, Kansas City. Mo., male a cappi?!la chorus. BRUSS, ROBERT, Bennet. Bleu Thonge, Y. M. C. A BULLOCK, AUDREY, Madrid, Alpha Gamma Delta. Pep club, chorus, Y. W. C. A. CARNEY, MARGARET. Fairmont. Y. W. C. A. CARTER, MARGUERITE, Lincohi, A. C. E., Y. W. C. A. CHAMBERLIN, ELDON, Beotrice, Phi Kappa Tau, male a cappella chorus. Row 3 CHINBURG, KENNETH, Oakland, Y. M. C. A. COATES, EVELYN, Indianola, Theta Upsilon, Pep club, band, A. C. E. CORNELL, ROBERT, Lt(ico:ii, Y. M. C. A. COULTER, DAVID, Lincoln. Phi Kappa Tau, football, Y. M. C. A. COWDEN, ZAY, Liucohi, Bleu Thonge. CREAMER, RUTH, Ogallala. Bleu Thonge, band, " Wesleyan " staff, " Plainsman " staff, Y. W. C. A. CURRY, HARRIET, Mankato. Minn., chorus. Row 5 DREIER, ROSE ELLEN, McCool Junction. Bleu Thonge, Girls ' Glee club, Y. W. C. A. DUNBAR, WALTER, Lincoln. EICHBERG, JEAN, Lincoln, Phi Mu, Y. W. C. A. EVANS, BETTY JANE, Seward. Bleu Thonge, band. FELDMAN, PEARL, Reynolds. FLAHERTY, JEAN, Hyannis, Bleu Thonge, band. Girls ' Glee club. FLEISCHAUER, THELMA. Friend, chorus A C E Y W C. A. Row G FREEBORN, DOROTHY, Lincohi, Willard, Y. W. C. A. T= ' REESE, KENNETH, Manchester. N. H.. Bleu Thonge, band, chorus, Y. M. C. A. FRICKE, EVELYN. PapiUion. Bleu Thonge, Y. W. C. A. GADEKEN, HARVEY, Neligh. Bleu Thonge chorus Y M c A. - A c y Au ' GANZEL, EILEEN. Otoef 1 Ucl . ' ■ GENTRY, EVELYN, Hyanni-,. Alpha Gamma Delta. GIBB, ROBERT, Kimball, band, male a cappella c ' .iorus, chorus. Row 7 GLEBE, GLEN, Crete. GLIDEWELL, CAROL ANN. Omaha, Bleu Thonge, band " Wesleyan " staff, Y. W. C. A. GLOCK, MILTON, David City, football, Y. M. C. A. GOBLE, VERLE, Hendley, Plainsman Players, chorus Y. W. C. A. GOODRICH, ALMIRA, Seneca, Kan. . Girls ' Glse club. Y. W. C. A. GREENSLIT, CHARLES, Stapleton, Crescent, Pep club, band. GROSSHANS. ALICE JAYNE, Plattsvwuth, Phi Mu. Pep club, Y. W. C. A. Row 8 GUEST. DOROTHY, Republican City. HARKLEROAD, LELA, Hemingjord, Theta Upsilon, Pep club, Girls ' Glee club. HARTWIG. LEONARD. Firth, Y. M. C. A. HARVEY. BETTY, Gering, Beta Phi Alpha, chorus, violin trio, string ensemble. Y. W. C. A. HAWTHORNE. JOHN. Arcadia, Delta Omega Phi, male a cappella chorus, chorus, band. Y. M. C. A. HAZELWOOD. HARLAN, Hubbell, Plainsman Players. HERSE. RUTH MARION. Aibion. Alpha Gamma Delta chorus, Y. W. C. A. ,, i) Row 4 DAFOE. WILLIAM, Tecumseh. Y. M. C. A DANIELS, NEVIN, Nelson. DAVIS, MAXINE. Reynolds. Bleu Thonge, Y. W. C. A. DEAS, CHARLOTTE, Independence, Kan., Y. W. C. A. DEBOER, E. ALATHA, Fairmont, Bleu Thonge, Girls ' Glee club, A. C. E., Y. W. C. A. . . , DECKER, CLYDE, Bennington, Y. M. C. A. _ j, jLt - .j " ' ' ' P D P DODD, LAIVIAR, Li?icoin, Phi Kappa Tau. S H M E F R E S H M E N 17 A ' J-f - ' - " f Ch ' ( Tl p. ( D m: ' M ,p fS O n. 28 S H M E Row 1 HERTZLER. ALICE, Sheridan, Wtjo.. Bleu Thonge chorus Y. W. C. A. HOLM. FRANCES, Kimball. Bleu Thonge. chorus. A. C. E. HOLMES. PARKE, Tekamah. chorus. Y. M. C. A. HUGHES. DORA. O NeiU. Y. W. C. A., A. C. E. HUNT, DARRELL D., Panama. Crescent, male a cappslla chorus, chorus. Y. M. C. A. HUTCHINS, ESTHER, Burchard. Bleu Thonge band Y W C. A. JOHNSON, PAUL J., Tekam.ah. Bleu Thonge band Y ]VF C. A. ROIC 5 _ y , ,- McMEEKIN, BET ' ShelbyrBleu " Thonge, band, Y. W C. A. [ McMICHAEL. WLNONA. Arcadia. Blau Thonge. MACY, RUSSELL. Beairice, Phi Kappa Tau, Pep club cho- rus, Y. M. C. A. MANGOLD, ROLLAND H., Gretna. Bleu Thonge Y M C. A. MATTOCK, GERALD, Bladen. . MEAD, VIRGINIA, Beatrice. Beta Phi Alpha, Pe ' ' ' club- Y. W. C. A. MICHAELIS, LUCILE. Uncoln. Bleu Thonge, Y. W. C. A. Row 6 MILES, ALICE JEAN, Uncoin. Phi Mu, Y. W. C. A. MILLER, CALVIN, Westerville, Bleu Thonge. MILLER. EUNICE, Atlantic, la., chorus. MILLER, SHIRLEY, Lincoln. Bleu Thonge. chorus. Girls ' Glee club. MOLES. EVERETT, Shejia-ndaah, la.. Kappa Chi, Y. M.. C MOORE, FERN, Lincol ' ii.-Y. W. G. A. ,. ' ' . ' MOORE Mb.GENEZinQotn.,.B vl Thong?, cho us S W. ' . . -• L,- J , , Row 7 Row 2 JONES. EUGENE, Wymore. JONES. PHYLLIS. Wymore. Pep club, Y. W. C. A. KAUTZ. JEAN, Lincoln, Willard, chorus, baton twirler. KAUTZ. JOAN, Lincoln, Willard, chorus, baton twirler. KESTERSON, PHYLLIS. Albion. Beta Phi Alpha, Pep club, chorus. KEUTEN, MARVIN, Grant. Crescent, chorus. KIRK, JOY, Scott City. - . ' MOSLANDER. JUNE, Fxlley. Bleu Thonge, chorus " Wes- leyan " stafT, Y. W. C. A. MUCKEL, RAY, Bloomiixgton. football. NAGEL, JACQUELINE, Lincoln, Girls ' Glee club, Y. W. C, A. NELSON, JACK, Potter, Delta Omega Phi, chorus. Pep club Y. M. C. A. H , NELSON. LAURA JEAN, Scofia. Bleu Thonge, Pep club NICKENS, GENEVA, Lincoln. NICKENS, JOHN, Lincoln. Roxc 3 KNIERIEM. HOWARD. Scrifa7ier. KOHL. DON, Madison, Phi Kappa Tau, male a cappella chorus, chorus. KUEHN. EUNICE. Murdoch. Bleu Thonge, chorus. Girls ' Glee club, A. C. E., Y. W. C. A. LARSON, CLARENCE, Douglas, Plainsman Players, Y. M. C. A. LAWRENCE, FRANK R., Lincoln, male a cappella chorus, Y. M. C. A. LEE, KATHERINE, Madrid, Bleu Thonge, Y. W. C. A. LEWIS, RUBY, Lincoln, Bleu Thonge, Y. W. C. A. Roui 4 LINDBLADE, EVANGELINE. Le.riugfo?!, Bleu Thonge, chorus. Pep club, cheer leader, Y. W. C. A. LITTLE. RUTH E., Fairmont. Bleu Thonge. Girls ' Glee club, Y. W. C. A. LOBB, SYLVIA M., Gurley, Phi Mu. LOOKABAUGH, BETTY LOU, Lmco 7!, Alpha Gamma Delta. McCALLUM, JOHN WESLEY, Bladen. Bleu Thonge. McCORMICK, ELIZABETH, Leu ' eHe7i. Bleu Thonge, Y. W. C. A. McGEE. DEAN, Norjolk. Crescent, Pep club, head cheer leader. Row S NORRIS. LUCILLE, Lincohi. Bleu Thonge, chorus. NYLANDER, JEAN, Loomis, Willard, chorus. Girls ' Glee club. OLSON. WARREN. Newman Grove. Bleu Thonge chorus Y. M. C. A. = . . OLSSON. GORDON, Gordon. Bleu Thonge, Pep club, male a cappella chorus, Y. M. C. A. OWEN, JAMES, Lincoln, football. PALMER, BOB B., Bradshaw, Crescent, extemp. chorus Y. M. C. A. PATRICK, BETTY, OgaUala. Bleu Thonge, Y. W. C. A. v- , - v ' iL ■db f F R E S H M E R E S H M E N 29 f P ' F 1 30 FRESHMEN R E , . poJ r ' - (k ' PEARSON, BETTY. Uonroe. Bleu Thonge. FEIRCE, BEULAH, Red Cloud. Bleu Thonge, chorus. Y. W. C. A. FHELPS. BETTY JANE. Superior. Girls ' Glea club. Plains- man Players. PICKERING. IRENE. S ie!ton. debat2. College council. Y. W. C. A. PIPER. HERMAN H.. West Point, Delta Omega Phi, chorus, male a cappella chorus. PORTER. BARBARA. Sexcard, Willard, chorus. POST, PETE, Leioellen, Bleu Thonge, debate. Y. M. C. A. Rouj 2 POWELL. EMERSON. Martel. FREMER, EUGENE. Benkelman. PUCKETT. ALICE. Li)ico:?i. Y. W. C. A RANDALL. GWENN. Fairbury. RANDALL. THELMA, Omaha. Bleu Thonge. Girls ' Glee club, Y. ■W. C. A. REDDING, MARGERY, Lxjons. Alpha Gamma Delta, cho- rus, Y. W. C. A. REICHWALD, NORMAN. Ode.l, Bleu Thonge. Y. M. C. A. - •• TTt. . .;...- Row 3 REYNOLDS. ADELAIDE, Beatrice. Alpha Gamma Delta, Girls ' Glee club. RIEDESEL. ARTHUR, Ogallala, male a cappella chorus, Y. M. C. A. ROBERTS, GORDON, Bhie Springs. Crescent, band, male a cappella chorus, chorus, Y. M. C. A. ROBINSON, ARDENE, Beatrice, Beta Phi Alpha, Pep club, chorus. ROMIG, ROBERT, Wiico.r, Y. M. C. A. ROPERS, WILLARD, Otoe. SCHOW, EVELYN, Elba, Bleu Thonge, Y. W. C. A. Rou ' 4 SCHRUNK. MARY, Li nch, Bleu Thonge, Y. W. C. A. SCOTT, PAUL, Wyynore, Crescent, debate, chorus, band, Pep club, Y. M. C. A. SHADLEY, MAXCIE, Lincohi, Bleu Thonge, chorus. SHUMARD, MARY, Ragan, Phi Mu. chorus. Pep club. SLAMA, LLOYD, Lincoln. SMITH, LENORA, Lincoln, Alpha Gamma Delta, Pep club. SMITH, MARGIE, York, Beta Phi Alpha, string ti-io, chorus, string ensemble, band, " Wesleyan " staff. Rou ' 5 SNARE, BILLIE, Gre£7wi, Y. W. C. A. SOUDERS. JAMES, Lincohi, football, " Wesleyan " staff. SPERRY. DOROTHY MAE, Grainton. Y. W. C. A. STAUFFER, RUSSELL, Oakland. Phi Kappa Tau. STEVENS, RUTH, E. na ' ood, Gii-ls ' Glee club. STEVENSON, ALMA FERN, Thedjord, Bleu Thonge. STEWART. BILL, Wymore, male a cappella chorus. Row G STILES. ROY, Nemaha. ' 7 STRAIN, EUGENE, Lincoln, Y. M. C. A _ _.i_ J i. C ' - STREETER. TRUMAJST, Lin coin, Phi Kappa Tau, Pep Club, J Y. M. C. A SUTHERLAND, I JORIE, " Schwyier, SWEET, PAUL, Stanton, band, chorus. TA ' VENER. BRAINARD. Oakdale, Crescent, Y. M. C. A. THOMAS, DOROTHY, Rising City, band. . l ' X t vHi Ojj ' - ' -ZJ- 1 ■ ' Row 7 M-o-f-Ji JL ' j ' . ijit. tMo ' tyt t:: . HJU . THOMPSON. RUTH. Cowles, Bleu Thonge, Y. W. C. A. THOMSON. CATHARINE. Liizco.n. Bleu Thonge. Girls ' Glee club. Y. W. C. A. THURTLE. JANE. Lincoln. Willard. TWIFORD, JACK, Glendo. " ijo.. Delta Omega Phi, Pep club. VAN CAMP, LELAND, Waverly, Y. M. C. A. WADDELL. HAZEL. Indianola, Theta Upsilon. Girls ' Glee club. Y. W. C. A. WEAVER, VETTA, Ogallala. chorus. Girls ' Glee club, Y. W. C. A Row 8 WEBB, BERNICE, TorriiigtoiJ, Wyo., Willard, chorus. WICKSTROM, LA VONNE, Oakland, Willard, Y. W. C. A. WILLIAMSON. CLARA BELLE, Beatrice, Alpha Gamma Delta, chorus, A. C. E. WISE. JOHN, Norjolk, Crescent, Pep club, Y. M. C. A. WITTENBACH, EVELYN, Beniiet, Y. W. C. A. WORTHINGTON, ELDRED, Roca. Crescent, male a cappella chorus, Y. M. C. A. YOUNG, DEAN, Darid City. F R E S H M E FRESHMEN 31 Row 1 ANDERSON, BERNICE. Gothenburg. Willard, chorus, Y. W. C. A. ANDERSON, MARGARET, Walton. Bleu Thonge, Pep club. Plainsman Players, Y. W. C. A. Row 2 AXFORD, ROGER, Lincoln. Plainsman Players, Y. M. C. A. BANKS, ROBERT, Lexington. BEEBE, EDWARD, Silver Creek. Plainsman Players, Y. M. C. A. BOLTON, JEAN, Waco, Bleu Thonge. A. C. E., Y. W. C. A. BOOTH, GWENDOLYN, Lincoln, Alpha Gamma Delta, cho- rus, Y. W. C. A. BOWMASTER, RALPH, Lincoln. Phi Kappa Tau, football. BOYLE, HAROLD, Farnam. Delta Omega Phi, male a cappella chorus, Y. M. C. A, Row 3 BRITTAIN. ALTHEA, Loomis. band, chorus. BROOKS. MAXINE, Osceola, string ensemble, violin trio, Y. W. C. A. BROWN, SARAH, Friend, chorus, A. C. E., Y. W. C. A. BROWNE, VIRGINUV, Ainsworth. Willard, Plainsman Play- ers. BRUBAKER, GUY, Kansas City, Mo., mah a cappDlla BURTCH, MARY LOUISE, Louisville, Y. W. C. A. CHRISTENSEN, CARL M., Palmer. Bleu Thonge, Pep club, Y. M. C. A. cabinet. Roiti 4 CLIFTON, KEITH, Lincoln, Phi Kappa Tau, Y. M, C. A. COPE, JOHN, Lincohi, chorus, Y. M. C. A. COPE, MAXINE, Lincohi. Pep club, cheer leader, Psi Chi cabinet, W. A. A. cabinet, Y. W. C. A. CRANDALL, GEORGE, Wiico.i;, Delta Omega Phi, Nu-med. CRAWFORD, VIRGINIA, Wymore, Willard, Pi Kappa Delta, Plainsman Players, debate, extemp., oratory, Y. W. C. A. CROWDER, BETTY, Lincohi, debate, " Wesleyan " staff, Psi Chi, Y. W. C. A. CULVER, JOSEPHINE, Beatrice, Alpha Gamma Delta. Plainsman Players, Pep club, chorus, Y. W. C. A. SOPHOMORES O P H O M O R E S SOPHOMORES O P H O M O R E S Row 5 CURRIER, RALPH, Lincoln. Crescent, male a cappella chorus, football. DAVIS, DON. Alvo. Phi Kaopa Tau. male a cappella chorus. Pep club. Plainsman Players, Y. M. C. A, DINSDALE. MRS. ALICE F., Lincoln. Girls ' Gles club, string ensemble, chorus, Y. W. C. A. DISBROW, HELEN CLAIRE, Holdrege, Willard, Y. W. C. A. DIX, VERNON, Haxtini. Colo.. Bleu Thonge, Y. M. C. A. ELLIS, HAROLD. Bloomfield. Crescent, Plainsman Players, Pep club. Y. M. C. A, ENGEL, WILLARD, Friend. Delta Omega Phi, Pep club. Row 6 FENSKE RUTH, Sunol. chorus, W. A. A. cabinet, string en- semble. FIELD, WILSON, Lincoln, band. FREDERICK, LLOYD, Lincoln. Delta Omega Phi, Pi Kappa Delta, debate, football. Y. M. C. A. FUCHSER, MARJORIE, Waverly. Phi Mu, Pep club, Y. W. C. A. FURST, IDA, Lincohi, A. C. E. GEIS. MERLE, Walton. Phi Kappa Tau, basketball, " W " club. GIBB, GORDON, Harvard, Phi Kappa Tau, Y. M. C. A. Roiu 7 GREENSLIT, VERNADELL. Stanton, Willard. Pep club, band, W. A. A. cabinet, Y. W. C. A. GREER, DOROTHY M., .4hio. Bleu Thonge, S. C. F., Y. W. C. A. GUEST, BUDDY, Repubhcaii City. HARVEY, VERA, Geritig, Beta Phi Alpha, debate, oratory, " Wesleyan " staff, " Plainsman " staff, Pi Kappa Delta, Y. W. C. A. HESS, ELIZABETH, Harvard, chorus. HESS, FRED, Harvard, football, " Wesleyan " staff. HITCHCOCK, TWILA. Jamison, A. C. E., chorus, Y. W. C. A. 32 ' ' JM 6 P. k P m ores n ' ' t m ' S f-- - ' i ' ' ' 4 " . " f 1 J». J4. W m o .a m ' " V ' ;! •»■■«:_ - kSqs . BHjk HHHBk 1 1 J? 1 33 v Ht f s ' 34 SOPHOMORES O P H O M O R E S Row ] JACK, WILLIAM, Eag!e. Phi Kaopa Tau. JACOBSON. MARY CATHERINE, Lexinqton. WiUard. Y. W. C, A. JOHNSON, BYRON, Potter, Delta Ome ;a Phi, chorus, male a cappella chorus, football, Y. M. C. A. JOHNSON, IMOGENE, Marquette, chorus, A. C. E. JONES, ELIZABETH, Wijmore, Willard, Pep club, Y. W. C. A. JONES, HELEN, Gering, Beta Phi Alpha, chorus, Y. W. C. A. KETELHUT, DUANE, Walton. Phi Kappa Tau. Row 2 LARSON, PAUL, Lincoln, Phi Kappa Tau. LeGRAND, JANE, Dallas, Pa., Phi Mu. LEMMON, ROBERT, Lincoln. LEWIS, EARL E., Lincoln. Bleu Thonge, Kappa Chi, Y. M. C. A. McNICKLE, ETHEL, Fnniam, Alpha Gamma Delta, A. C. E., chorus. McQUISTAN, AILEEN, Center, Phi Mu, Y. W. C. A. MARTIN, AMY, Lincobi, chorus, A. C. E. Row 3 MAY, CHARLINE, Falls City, Y. W. C. A. MERRILL, RUSSELL, Edgar, Phi Kappa Tau, football, " W " club. METZLER, RONALD, Lincoin, Delta Omega Phi, band, basketball, " W " club. MILLER, WAYNE, Lincohi. NELSON, MILDRED, Eisie, A. C. E. NELSON, RUTH, Lincoln, band. Plainsman Players, W. A A. cabinet, Y. W. C. A. NELSON, WINIFRED, Elsie, chorus, Y. W. C. A. Row 5 PHILIPP, ERNA, Fre7no?it, Beta Phi Alpha, band, chorus, Panhellenic council. POE, MYRTLE, Laurel, Y. W. C. A. RASMUSSEN, LOIS JEAN, Lincohi, Bleu Thonge, Plains- man Players, Y. W. C. A. RICHARDSON, WILLIAM A., Lincodi. RITTER, MARJORIE, Tilden. Bleu Thonge, A. C. E., Plains- man Players, S. C. F. cabinet, Y. W. C. A. SALLENBACH, RUTH, Frieiid, Alpha Gamma Delta, band, chorus, string ensemble. SEIVER, ARLIS MAE, Scottsb ' .uff, Willard, Girls ' Glee club, chorus- Row 6 ' SELEY, RAY B., Fi»ey, Crescent, chorus, Y. M. C. A. SHEPARDSON, NORMA, Beatrice, Beta Phi Alpha, Pep club. SHUMAN, PEARL, Liii-coin, A. C. E. SKRDLA, BLAKE, Atkinson. Phi Kappa Tau, Plainsman Players, debate. SMITH, KENNETH, Columbus, Crescent. SORENSEN, KATHRYN, Geriiig, Beta Phi Alpha, Pep club, chorus, Y. W. C. A. STEWART, JEAN MARIE, Eagle, Willard, Y. W. C. A. Row 7 STEWART, KATHRYN, Y. W. C. A. Lincoln, Bleu Thonge, A. C. E., SUTPHEN, WILLIAM, Le.rmgfon, Delta Omega Phi, Pep ciub. SWANSON. MARION, Li-ncoln, Bleu Thonge, " Wesleyan " staff, " Plainsman " staff, Y. W. C. A. cabinet. TRAUGER, DONALD, Exeter, Bleu Thonge, Alpha Gamma Beta, Y. M. C. A. TWINEM, ROBERT, North Platte. Delta Omega Phi, Nu- med. WADE, HARRIET, Dorchester, Bleu Thonge, Y. W. C. A. WAGNER, WARREN HERBERT, Washington, D. C, Phi Kappa Tau, Pep club, Plainsman Players. Row 8 i f WILHITE, VERNONA, Gordon, Y. W. C. A. ; a. ' » S WILLIAMS, HOPE, Denver, Colo., Alpha Gamma Delta, Yvu. " ' ' " ' Plainsman Players, Y. W. C. A. , V ILSON, GEORGE, Aurora, Crescent. V i iVl WINKER, HELEN, Cook, S. C. F., Y. W. C. A. vAvv - " 3FF, KEITH, Lexington, Delta Omega Phi, Pep club, " ' ■ M. C. A. ■ WYCOFF, Y WYLIE, EILEEN, Elgin, Willard. ZOUBEK, LORRAINE, Stanton, Phi Mu. " . : - ' - Row 4 NIELSEN, RUTH, Omaha, Bleu Thonge, baton twirler, ' ec Y. W. C. A. NIEMANN, DEAN, Broch, Delta Omega Phi, football, Y. M. C. A. NISLEY, ROBERT, North Platte, Delta Omega Phi, Alpha Gamma Beta, male a cappella chorus, Y. M. C. A. cabi- - C OLSON, ELAINE, Newman Grove, Bleu Thonge, A. C. E., . !b«= S. C. F. a. . - PARMENTER, GUY, Wahoo. ?-_ PERKINS, ESTHER, DaviA City, chorus, baton twirler. PETERSON, ELAINE, Holdrege, Phi Mu, Girls ' Glee club, SOPHOMORES --e s O P hi o M O R E 35 WHENE ER VOU SEE THE NAME you know that you are buying QUALITY • Victor Family Flour • Victor Cereals • Victor Cake Flour • Victor Pancake Flour • Victor Cattle Feeds • Victor Poultry Feeds For five generations VICTOR PRODUCTS have been delighting folks and they ' ll delight you, too! So — whenever you buy any of the type of products listed above — look for the name VICTOR! They ' ll make a life-time VICTOR friend of you! And you pay nothing extra — for VICTOR quality. THE CRETE MILLS CRETE, NEBRASKA Religion By MARION SU ANSON " In harmony with the Christian traditions of Wesleyan the work now being done by student organizations on the campus, operating under competent leadership, is of out- standing significance. The one feature of campus religious life that has impressed me especially is the value of the student Wednesday night prayer meeting. All of these Christian organizations are co-operating in the prayer meet- ing and of noticeable interest is the extent of its influence among alumni in all parts of the United States. It might even be said that the thing alumni remember about Ne- braska Wesleyan ' s religious influence is its wonderful prayer meeting program. Deputations that are sent out by the student religious groups are rendering a real service in this territory and are greatly appreciated by the pastors for whom they have conducted services. " — Chan- cellor Benjamin F. Schwartz. The religious element of Nebraska Wesleyan is brougnt about through classes, organizations, and meetings, all Y. M. .ind ,y. W. executives compare notes. Pictured above are Vice-President Garnett Tremaine, President Vance James. Vice- President James Tipton, and President Neva Ebright. possessing a definite purpose — bringing about a fuller Christian life for the student. Besides presiding over his classes. Prof. John Rosentrater is faculty advisor and spon- sor for the Student Christian Fellowship and Kappa Chi. The Student Christian Fellowship, organized in 1936-37, has chosen its purpose as being the manifesting of Christ ' s love as set forth in the example of Jesus in such a way as to bring the Christian spirit to the student body of Wes- leyan. Any student desiring to sign the pledge may be a member of the club. Activities sponsored by the organi- zation include the providing of leaders and teachers for many of the small churches near Wesleyan, visitation g roups, and a deputation or gospel team that holds services in near-by churches. Kappa Chi, meaning " Preach Christ, " is an organiza- tion for the student pastors of Wesleyan. Only those per- sons holding student appointments are eligible for mem- bership. The members hold regular meetings at which they discuss and study the special problems of their work. Its purpose is social as well as spiritual. Foremost among Christian organizations on the campus are the Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. These organizations strive for a bettering of the religious, intellectual, and moral welfare of their members. Highlights of the year for the Y. M. C. A. include the mixer in the gym which is 36 Dorothy Peters, Marsnierite Peterson, Rachel Stephenson, Aneeta Humphrey, and Doiis B.ewfield are on tne Y. vv. cau.n-t. given in co-operation witli t he Y. W. C. A., the annual membership drive that ends with the membership banquet, the sponsoring of the student handbook, and the annual stag at the city Y. M. The meetings of the organization, which are usually on some subject of current interest pertaining to some every- day problem, are sponsored by the different commission groups under the leadership of a student and a faculty member. The click of ping pong balls on paddles is the Carl Christensen and Helena Kilzer, standing; Warren Johnston. Connie Martin, Marion Swanson and Bob Nisley are cabinet membe ' s of Y. M. and Y. W. distinctive thing about the Y. M. room, for most any time of the day that can be heard. Working along side of the Y. M. is the Y. W. C. A. Besides having the advantage of the meetings, each girl is given the opportunity to do outside work in one of the six commission groups. During the year at the regular meet- ings, the girls are addressed by many speakers of interest. As usual, the activities of this school year again started with the Friendship tea. Then came the membership drive terminating in the traditional candle-lighting service and membership banquet. Each year at Christmas time the organization makes and buys presents for Mothers ' Jewels home at York. Each June the Y. M. and Y. W. send dele- gates to the youth conference held at Estes park. (Continued on page 38, column 2) Accredited by of Accredited National Association Commercial Schools LOOK BEFORE YOU LEAP Selecting a school is far more important than buying a new dress or suit because an edu- cation is not something to be discarded if it does not fit. It costs a lot of money, time and effort to secure any kind of education — and time, money and effort are too valuable to be spent unwisely. Too often johnny selects this school or that because cousin George thinks its a good school. Mary chooses hers on the recommendation of an aunt who knows a neighbor girl who would prefer this school if she were selecting one for herself. It is important that the right choice be made. It was to help young people in dis- covering the right school that the National Association of Accredited Commsrcial Schools was formed. Schools in this association are supervised as to courses, instructors and prac- tices. It is a guarantee of quality and satisfac- tion. Lincoln School of Commerce has been a member for over 25 years. Information concerning the Association, courses, tuition, and time required will be sent upon request. LINCOLN SCHOOL of COMMERCE W. A. Robbins, Pres. 209 North 14th St. Lincoln. Nebr. STILL THE STUDENTS FAVORITE WESLEYAN Coffee Shop POPULAR FOOD AT POPULAR PRICES Broil-o-Crill Sandwiches Home Made Pie Ice Cream Fine Coffee Hot Soups Mrs. B. J. Dickson 481 1 St. Paul 37 Panhellenic Council By VIVIAN FINLEY Most of the students at Wesleyan have heard of ' ■Panhell, ' but very few of them know what it is all about. ■■Panhell " is the name used by sorority girls to designate the Pan- hellenic council. This group controls and directs all rushing activities of sororities and sponsors three inter-sorority dinners each year. Nebraska Wesleyan " PanheH " encourages scholastic achievement by maintaining a scholarship plaque, now at the Theta Upsilon house. If any sorority earns the plaque for three years, it becomes the property of that chapter. The local Panhellenic group meets the third Tuesday of every month in the Dean of Wo men ' s office. The group is headed by a chairman, Doris Cooper, Gering senior. Dorothy Peters, Lincoln senior, and Aneeta Humphrey, Atkinson senior, hold the positions of secretary and treasurer, respectively. Offices are held in the order of installation on the campus. Alpha Delta Theta, now Phi Mu, was the first national sorority on the campus; Beta Phi Alpha, second: Alpha Gamma Delta, third; Theta Upsilon, fourth. Since Willard is a local group, it is not eligible for office. The delegates from each sorority on the campus are as follows: Dorothy Peters and Vivian Finley, Alpha Gamma Delta; Doris Cooper and Erna Philipp, Beta Phi Alpha; Aneeta Humphrey and Marguerite Peterson, Phi Mu; Louise Gottschalk and Elinor Soeth, Theta Upsilon; Doris Blew- field and Doris Matz, Willard. Each group has one dele- gate from its alumnae. Five faculty women serve as the advisory board. Panhellenic is a valuable organization to the sororities and to the campus in that it strengthens each sorority through mutual exchange of ideas, and through inter- sorority relationships increases each group ' s appreciation of the others. The Editor Speaks - - Selling power is essential for the publication of a maga- zine which utilizes advertising. Tippy has it and Connie will agree, but just who could resist Tippy ' s persuasion when his expressive forearm starts to pump and his earnest voice barks out? The picture on page 43 is a true one, for neither person knew " Press " Hoffman had any secret intentions until after the picture had been snapped. Needless to say (except to make Tippy unhappy), the face above the shoulders of James Lowell Tipton immediately underwent a transformation — one that would have halted " O " street traffic on a Saturday night. But It ' s True! An orange grove in Florida, an airport at Norfolk, a hospital building at North Platte, and approximately ' IS farms scattered throughout Nebraska, Iowa, South Dakota, Wyoming and Colorado — and all a part of Nebraska Wes- leyan ' s property! Of course you won ' t believe it, but it ' s true. Campus, buildings, and numerous lots in University Place compose only a small fraction of Wesleyan ' s 22,000 acres. Wesleyan has a farm manager whose duty it is to rent, lease, and repair property. He travels, finds tenants, and (Continued on page 43) Verle " Annie Oakley " Gob ' e and LaVonne ■■TiiKser ' ' Wiekstrom level their hardware at some unfortunate object at the Y. M.-Y. W. mixer. Every Wednesday night at 6:45 the bell rings announc- ing another student prayer meeting. Chancellor Schwartz is the leader of these weekly meetings unless he is out of town; in that case another leader is provided. The meet- ings which are held in Huntington hall add greatly to the inspirational life of the students. Next come the chapel programs which are held three days a week. Various programs are planned, each to be of some special help to the students. Chancellor Schwartz speaks to the student body every Wednesday. Other pro- grams include music, talks by faculty members, talks by Betty Patrick shoulders a shoolin ar ' n to .tro bird huntinp: at Warren Johnston ' s table as Prof. Joe A. Parsons, supervisor of all games at the mixer, looks on. Vance James. Y. M. president, is in the backKround. other Lincoln ministers and prominent men, and people well-known throughout the United States. Already this year Kirby Page and Martin Harvey have spoken. At First Methodist church, under the direction of Rev. H. O. Martin, students have a chance to keep on with their church work even if they are away from home. Besides the church services, there is the Sunday school and Epworth League in which the students are welcomed to participate. Cabinet members of the various religious organizations on the campus are listed below. Student Christian Fellowship: Max Kemling, president; Marvin Snyder, vice-president; Marjorie Ritter, secretary; Frances Jane Hatch, treasurer; Merlin Merrill, program chairman; Rachel Stephenson, social service; Lloyd Mullis, custodian. 38 Y. M. C. A. cabinet consists of Vance James, president; James Tipton, vice-president; Carl Christensen, secretary; Bob Nisley, treasurer; Warren Johnston, publicity chairman. Commission groups and their leaders are as follows: Per- sonal relations. Homer Anderson; current affairs, John Jones; vocational guidance, Byron Johnson; youth and re- ligion, Everett Moles. The Y. W. C. A. cabinet is composed of Neva Ebright, president; Garnett Tremaine, vice-president; Rachel Steph2n- son, secretary; Marion Swanson, treasui-er; Margaret Thom- son, world fellowship; Marguerite Peterson, creative leisure; Constance Martin, personal relations; Doris Blewfield, new- citizenship; Aneeta Humphrey, worship; Helena Kilzer, music; Dorothy Peters, publicity and freshman week supervisor. Kappa Chi membership includes Ernest Metzger, presi- dent; Merton Cox, vice-president; Marvin Snyder, secre- tary-treasurer; Everett Moles, Earl Lewis, Richard Dins- dale, Allan Martin, Luther Powell, James Irwin, Kenneth Nye, and Lloyd Snodgrass. Wings Over Wesleyan By JEANNE SOUSER This year thousands of university students throughout the United States will be trained as civilian airplane pilots. Nebraska Wesleyan university will train 12 students of the several thousands. Take-offs, 180, 360 landings, parachutes, stalls, banks, tail- spins, rules, and drones of engines have been constant m the minds of the 12 students since early fall. The one girl and eleven boys enrolled in the course are Jeanne Souser, Vance James, Richard Pyle, Russell Merrill, Luther Powell, Marion Caruthers, Eldon Brown, Bill Jack, Fred Zabel, and Marvin Keuten. Keith Wycoff and Ralph Clary are enrolled in the ground school cl ass. Qualifications for the course include a physical examina- tion, a $30 fee, parental consent, and elimination exams. The fee covers 72 hours of ground school training, the physical examination, and $3000 compensation insurance. Flight training is free. (Continued on page 40) A F T E R D A R K ,. ' f tn When there ' s places to go and things to do this formal season, a TUXEDO from Harveys will make your festive evenings more enjoyable. You can step into the spotlight with the assurance that your Formal Wear is CORRECTNESS in every little detail. Fine unfinished worsteds, tail- ored in MIDNIGHT BLUE, so smart for evening wear . . . wide gosgrain lapels . . . single or double breasted in the new drape styling. Dress shirt and other formal acces- sory problems are quickly solved at Harveys, where comparisons prove that You Can Co Better Dressed For Less in HARVEY Clothes. TUXEDOS 5C 22 FULL DRESS To 27.50 HARVEY BROS. 1230 O Street AT ALL TIMES GOOD FOOD Y. W. C. A. Dr. .1. C. Jensen and his class in civil aeronautics. 1432 N STREET CAFETERIA SERVICE BANQUET SERVICE } 89 1221 " 0 " STREET OUR NEW HOME j You are cordially invited to come ' in and see us — KODAK SNAP SHOTS will add much to the pleasure of College Days. Pictures made today will be treasured tomorrow KODAKS priced to fit every pocketbook Consult Us About Things Photographic EASTMAN KODAK STORES, INC. 1221 O STREET i UNI. ELECTRIC RADIO CO. j Radio Tubes, Electrical Repairs Supplies Refrigerators CAFE LUNCH Milk, Ice Cream Cheese Bread, Cake Pie 4736 St. Paul } FATHER SON i GREEN FURNACE PLUMBING CO. AIR-CONDITIONING PHONE US FOR SERVICE 6-2800 2815 No. 48th To secure a private pilot ' s license, the student ' s ability is tested in written tests in which a grade of 70 per cent must be made. The student pilots must also be able to perform difficult turns, make different landings, forced landings, vertical banks, and tailspins. At the end of the training, pilot ability is tested by a federal inspector. After securing a private pilot ' s license, students may fly anywhere and will be allowed to carry passengers; however, no fees may be assessed. Student Governors By RACHEL STEPHENSON The College council of Nebraska Wesleyan university celebrated its second birthday last October. Bom in the days of political unrest and disorganization on the campus, it has thrived amidst skepticism and struggle. Today, in spite of its infancy, it holds the loyalty of many students and organizations in the school. As stated in Article T, Sec. 2 of the constitution, the pur- pose of the council " shall be to correlate the ideals, in- terests, activities, and organizations of the student body, exclusive of matters pertaining to social organizations. " Its powers and duties shall cover all questions and activitie.s related to campus affairs. Composed of 15 members, the council is democratically elected by the Hare system of proportional representation. Four students are elected in October, and six students and two faculty members at large are elected in May. The con - stitution provides that the other three faculty members shall be the Chancellor, the Dean of Women, and the Dean of Men. Qualifications for student members include an average of one honor point per hour for the preceding semestei. participation in at least one extra-curricular activity, and a record in good university citizenship. Members of the College council for the 1939-1940 year, with the committee members elected from the student body at large by the council, are as follows: president, Al Croft; vice-president, Wilmer Woltemath; secretary, Doris Matz. Doris Matz. Dean Susan V. Lewis. Irene Pickerinpr, Sylvia Mek- nuson, and Dr. Claude J, Siiirk tal e part in a Colleg:e council meeting. 40 Elmer Artist, Tom Parkin. Dorothy Peters, and AI Crott. College council president, strive to settle a problem. Tom Parkin is chairman of the Christian student activi- ties. His assistants are Kenneth Frohardt, Aneeta Humphrey, and Don Williams. The Christian discipline committee is headed by Rachel Stephenson who is ass isted by Homer Anderson and Jose- phine Culver. Sylvia Magnuson is assisted on the Christian social committee by Helen Claire Disbrow, Vance James, Anne Kaimmer, Johnny Staten, and Glenn Stringfellow. John Jones, head of the student spirit committee, is assisted by Lois Anderson, Bob Gottschalk, Vera Harvey, Elizabeth Jones, Elinor Soeth, and Mary Kay Spaulding. Other council members are Ruby Wycoff, Irene Picker- ing, Elmer Artist, Dr. G. A. Barringer, Dr. Claude J. Shirk, Dean Susan V. Lewis, Dean J. C. Jensen, and Chancellor Benjamin F. Schwartz. We believe that it is the desire and will of each council member to promote and maintain that democratic form of government on Wesleyan ' s campus which gives voice to the minority and preponderance of power to the majority; that government which shall be of the students, by the stu- dents, and for the .students. YOUR PLAINSMAN PHOTOGRAPHER E ANS STUDIO 1215 P Street LINCOLN, NEBR. Phone 5-4146 Greeting Cards, Enlargements and Personal Photos LENA ' S BEAUTY SHOP LENA M. BARNHILL 4739 St. Paul Ave. Phone 6-5030 HOLMES GROCERY MARKET FRESH MEATS, FRUITS and VEGETABLES 2639 North 48th Phone 6-2194 Inter-Fraternity Council By HARVEY FEYERHERM Although little publicized, essential to the welfare of the social fraternities of the campus is the Inter-fraternity council. The purpose of this group is to consider matters of general inter-fraternity relationships and promote co-opera- tion among the fraternities on the campus. The organiza- tion establishes all fraternal regulations, which include such items as rush rules, eligibility, and pledging. As to its membership, each fraternity has two repre- sentatives: Al Croft and Eldon Brown, Crescent; Harvey Feyerherm and Elmer Artist, Delta Omega Phi; Kenneth Frohardt and Harland Kelly. Phi Kappa Tau. The spon- sor of the group is the Dean of Men. Dr. J. C. Jensen. Officers for the current year are as follows: Feyerherm, president; Croft, vice-president; Frohardt, secretary-treas- JVc Can Serve Our VVESLEYAN FRIENDS in • REAL ESTATE • LOANS • INVESTMENTS • INSURANCE HARRINGTON COMPANIES RALPH and DON 140 South 12th 2-3529 41 (Continued from page 11.) Every Facilitij for Evcri Function Hotel Lincoln i A genuine welcome always Ideal Accommodations for PARTIES TEAS DINNERS DANCES CONVENTIONS E. L. Wilbur ' MiDKii cr McCORMICK TYPEWRITER CO. Distributors of L C SMITH - CORONA - Allen Wales Adding Machines j WE RENT AND SERVICE ALL MAKES 11 I North 1 1th, Lincoln, Nebr. 2-2080 DRS. TAYLOR TAYLOR PHYSICIANS SURGEONS DR. CARE LD L. BUTLER DENTIST Phons 6-2257 4728 St. Paul Ave. Violence is shown in Kangaroo court as somebody " assumes the anKle. " hAlil Pele Post assumes temporary leadership as the freshmen direct the closinp: moments of Kanparoo court, and countless classmates ajrree that James Tipton should be on the receiving end of a heavy paddle. 03M N j EVENTS C ST " -THEff THE END OF RUSH WEEK — 42 Connie Maitin resigned ' y folds her arms : who can resist the per- suasion of Tippy? (Continued from page 38.) markets the university ' s share of crops. In the past year, Mr. W. K. Johnston travelled about 35,000 miles, taking care of Wesleyan ' s numerous farms, and her city property in Lincoln, Omaha, North Platte, Howells and North Loup. The farm adjoining yours back home or, if you live in town, even that vacant lot next door may belong to Wes- leyan. For all you knovif, when you go home for a vaca- tion during the school year, you may be closer to Nebraska Wesleyan property than you are at your school residence. I » » I » ! I LUMBER, COAL WALLBOARDS LATTICE, PAINTS ! SMITH BROS The Lumber Smiths 2341 NORTH 48th PHONE 6-2527 ..-a o -A ' er ' V o ( nsP sO O ' h That ' s all for now ' cause enough is enough and too much is plenty, so — Goodbye. WESLEYAN BARBER SHOP Keep Up That Neat Appearance CHAS. DEETER 4807 St. Paul Avenue DR. E. S. MATHERS DENTIST 4825 St. Paul Crook Clinic Building 6-2248 Mr. W. K. Johnston, iaini manager, of caring for Wesleyan ' s farms. heads out for another wee ' .i CROOK CLINIC PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS R. CROOK C. E. CROOK G. D. CROOK SCHOOL PHYSICIAN Office: 4825 St. Paul Phone 6-2235 43 SENIFT S STORE for XMAS GIFTS Jewelry, Novelties, Leather Goods and Xmas Cards. Wrappings and Seals of All Kinds. Box Candy too. LENSES MATCHED FOR ALL CLASSES READY SAME DAY KODAK FINISHING 2701 North 48th Phone 6-1378 DOC SENIFT GLENN ' Sirriir Our Mottv " Visit our Newly Decorated Party Room Available at Moderate Prices LINDELL HOTEL Coffee Shop SERVINC FINE FOODS on Snow White Linen Mrs. Simmons and Ruby Managers Coffee Shop Open 7 to 2 5 to 8 CHRISTMAS TOYS GIFTS ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES POPULAR PRICES • L. M. THOMAS SON 6-2363 UNI. PLACE HARDWARE The Willard sorority held a " hayloft " party one Saturday nif;ht. They Loardcd up the front door and arrived with their dates by elimb- inK a ladder to a second story window. Here Doris Matz and D ' on Kohl arrive. Pumpkin pic and cider are enjoyed by Hi Messmore, Bill Nichol, Ruth Ellis and June Scheldt. 44 COPPER HALFTONES ZIMC HALFTONES Z HC LINE ETCHINGS BEN DAY SHADING COLOR PLATES STEREOTYPES ELECTROTYPES SCHOOL ANNUALS PROGRAMS POSTERS N AGAZINES NEWSPAPERS D ISPLAY ADVERT iSE AE NTS A COMPLETE PHOTO EN I AVysie DEPARTMENT !N A COMPLETE 1PRINTIN6 PLIANT 1.3333 STATC loURNAL J PRINTING CO. When everything was over there was the problem of cleaning up the straw. Here AI Croft leans on his rake handle as Elizabeth Jones sweeps the " local color " into a pile. Frank Harrington induces Phyllis Stauffer to inquire into the contents of a milk bucket and he holds the lantern to throw light on the situation. j OF COURSE... Our 1940 PLAIXSMAN Covers again are Molloy-Made REX BUTLER BARBERS SINCE 1895 GARY Laundry and Cleaning Service SHICK SHAVER Sales Service Try a Free Demonstration 2649 North 48th 6-3494 Tom Parkin and Madeleine Alexander relax upon a rolled up rug close to the radio and, immersed in somebody ' s swing music, forget about the cameraman. 46 PHI TAU PARTY The Phi Kaiipa Tau fraternity had a party at the chapter housi Nov. 2Sth. the Tuesday night before Thanksgiving vacation. The boys brouerht their trirl friends to the house for an evening of entertain- ment to tide them over the remaining half day before vacation. CAMPUS NOOK BALANCED MEALS AT $4.00 PER WEEK It ' s time out for cider and these two couoles aren ' t the ones to stand idly by — not by a jusrful. or even half a juKfuI I Virginia Browne holds a eI ss. but Nevin " Stretch " Daniels has a whole jujr. Gen Taylor and Herbie Wagner take moderate amounts (at a time) Kenny Froharilt and Dorothy Knight are the life of any party when there ' s stepuin ' to be done. This could be a part of the Virginia Reel, but one never knows. Cafeferia, Boarding Club, Meal Ticket BANQUETS and SPECIAL PARTIES Celebrate here after Basketball Games and try our Chili — it ' s Tops! I GREETINGS OF THE SEASON I • I I t I I ( ( I • t t ■— " mwrn FROM THE FAIRMONT CREAMERY CO. PASTEURIZED DAIRY PRODUCTS Phone 6-2397 Don ' t discard that old hat! We can trans- form it into practically a new one for fall j and winter wear. Our process cleans the entire hat inside and out. Our expert blocking restores that factory finish. } The weather man saifs colder, " Time to i Jiave Heavy Coats, Suits, and Dresses Cleaned " . 47 Maybe Harland Kelly couldn ' t ho ' il that much liut Jo Culver ia Willi njj to help him try it. Eileen Wylie and Merle Randall make love — to a piece of a York i?oal post — and they really seem to enjoy it. W, A. A. PICNIC In early October the W. A. A. cabinet held their annual picnic for freshman cirls at the state W. A. A. cabin near Stevens Creek. Lucille Hrown applies ketchup (not make-up). Ruth Anderson rests between bites. Dorothy Kniiiht is in the background, and June Brox likes mustard. Billce Snare burns a marshmallow. Rose Ellen Dreier turns and smiles, and Ruth Little awaits her turn at the fireplace. iS Left — And Mrs Brar.dt. director of physical education for girls, poured, but it ' s coflfee instead of tea. Jean EichberK and Jeanne Souser take it easy and find time to chat. Hands Up- ' ' Yes I buy my clothes at MILLER ' S " A classroom vote, by show of hands, would reveal that many a smartly dressed college girl shops exclusively at MILLER ' S. IF you haven ' t done so, do shop in our beautiful, newly enlarged READY-TO-WEAR section, SEC- OND FLOOR. If you seek advice on what to wear, ask for COL- LEGE CLOTHES CONSULTANT. 13th and O Street, Lincoln, Nebraska W ' Dean Ally . . . Dean Emeritus F. A. Alabaster has a gleam in his eye, for he is en- joying one of his favorite pastimes. A moving encyclopedia, he is the person to whom students and fac- ulty alike go to find out what steps are necessary in carrying out Wes- leyan ' s customs and traditions. Dr. Shirk . . Dr. Claude |. Shirk is the most versatile member of Wesleyan ' s faculty, besides teaching the most class hours. He is a biologist and sociologist, professor, musician, accountant, mathe- matician, and has been a kindergarten teacher and a high school principal. r Nite Life Begins JVith TUXEDOS From Riiclge s $19.50 Sophisticated double-breasted tux ... in a handsome modified drape style. Tailored of fine wool with Skinner grosgrain lapels. Midnight blue. Correct in every detail! ACCESSORIES FOR THAT Van Huesen Tuxedo Shirts . Van Huesen Bow Ties NOTE OF PERFECTION 1 Swank Cuff Links 1 Hardwick Silk Hose 35 Paris Suspsnders $1 oiKi; m —MEN ' S FURNISHINGS Street Floor The Place For Tour Parties! Hotel Capital Visit the New Ballroom Just Completed Lincoln ' s Smartest Dine Regularly in the Coffee Lounge nth P Street 2-1261 RAY HEDGES, Mgr A Complete Organization of Craftsmen = N (X INCOR PRINTERS PUBLISi CRS 27l4--16Norbh46 " ' Sb ' LINC0LN,NEBRASKA Phone 6-2355 Plainsman Printers for Over Thirty Years - il To A yilotA f H One Usy L sson! We can ' t claim to know a I I there is to know about women . . , who can? But time is a good teacher, and our years of experience have taught us one thing no woman can deny. Every girl has an eye for a likely looking man . . . and his clothes. Particularly his clothes. This is logical. Most women live, breathe and think fashions . . and notice the men ' s get-ups as well as their own. And don ' t forget . . . it ' s spring and it ' s leap year . . . certainly it ' s time to look your best! HART SCHAFFNER KNOX HATS NETTLETON SHOES FREEMAN SHOES ARROW SHIRTS ARROW TIES INTERWOVEN HOSE SWANK JEWELRY KAYLON PAJAMAS MARX CLOTHES MEN ' S SPRING SUITS d3 ftS4 ffU)fpS:Sen EASTER GREETINGS Novelties, Jewelry and Candies are ready for you at the WESLEY ANN COLLEGE BOOKSHOPP When in need of Gifts of any kind, you will find a nice assortment at the Bookstore. LENDING LIBRARY of popular books- no long waiting list. We will order any Book or Magazine for you — best of service. BURLINGTON BUS DEPOT 271 1 No. 48th 6-1608 ' ' Eirri fhiiif for ihc Studcnf JOIN WITH YOUR FRIENDS ON THE WAY TO MAYO DRUG CO The I)ni( Starr on llir Corner 2700 North 48th Phone 6-2000 Lincoln, Nebraska The Editor Speaks-- Hello again. The editor couldn ' t resist the temptation to impress upon Wesleyan students the fact that it snowed this winter — 40 inches, or whatever the figure is by now — so he inserted a snow picture on the opposite page. When it greets you in years to come, many memories of the winter of ' 39 and ' 40 will crowd into your mind. Besides, the picture should be sufficient induction to make you want to shovel your way through the magazine. Sylvia may have paused to catch a breath or two when the picture was snapped, but she ' ll " Buck " up again in a minute. She has already shoveled herself into a position of assistant editor of the " Plainsman. " More snow was preserved for " ' Snow Joke " because the stuff may trickle away in another month or two. Your winter edition covers the opera, " Katinka, " male a cappella chorus, and Girls ' Glee club in the way of music; includes basketball in the realm of sports; formal parties and pictures of fraternity and sorority members in the way of social life, with " ' Press ' Goes To A Party " for good measure. Space is devoted to Psi Chi, Alpha Gamma Beta, and A. C. E. Faculty pictures in the form of " Camera Catches " appear; and, in " Headliners, " important stories from the " Wesleyan " are preserved. A substantial piece of this year ' s " Upper Crust " is pro- vided and pays tribute to campus leaders. That just about constitutes a hurried glance at this year ' s second " Plainsman " issue, so — see you in the spring, and goodbye now. THE PLAINSMAN Magazine of Nebraska Wesleyan Univers ty 1939-1940 WINTER EDITION Editor. W. RREN E. .Johnston Business Manager. James L. Tipton Associate Editor, Bruce E. Ke ' TH Associate Bus. Mgr.. Wilmer G Wolt:math Assistant Editor. Sylvia E. Magnuson Assistant Btts. Mgr., M. Jeanne Souser 56 WHERE YOU CAN AVE€{ Ef Y DAY! T ISN ' T necessary to hunt all over wn for bargains, because you can sure that the " Cheapper " Drug Store IS selling it at the lowest pos- sible price! Look for the sign of the " Flying Red Arrow " on O Street! t leads to greater values! DRUGS CIGARS CANDY TOBACCO STATIONERY COSMETICS TOILETRIES 1939-1940 PLAINSMAN Winter Edition CONTENTS Page Camera Catches -------55 The Editor Speaks -------56 ' Snow )oke ..-..--58 What Do You " Katink " " ?, Vivian Finley - - - 60 Melody Makers, Vivian Finley - - - - 65 Coal-Cetters -.--.--66 juniors -- - - - - - - - 71 The Upper Crust ------- 76 Puttin ' On The Dog, Vivian Finley - - - - 78 Alpha Camma Delta ------ 83 Beta Phi Alpha ------- 84 Crescent .---.... -85 Delta Omega Phi ------- 86 Phi Kappa Tau ---.-.-87 Phi Mu ..------ 88 Theta Upsilon -------- 89 Willard -------- 90 Headliners -------- 92 Psi Chi, Vivian Finley ------ 94 Alpha Camma Beta, Sylvia Magnuson - - - - 94 " Press " Goes To A Party ----- 96 A. C. E., Sylvia Magnuson - - - - -100 The Upper Crust, Sylvia Magnuson - - - 10! Camera Catches - - - - - - -102 Jf ' c Keep Lincoln Prices Doicn! X E CARRY complete lines of all the nationally advertised brands. Low prices every day. You always save at " Cheapper ' s " I CHEAPPER System, Inc. 1325 LINCOLN Come in iiul lirotcsc Around! CITIZENS STATE BANK 2650 North 48th Street 1 CASTLE, ROPER MATTHEWS C. H. ROPER SONS 1 • I MORTICIANS 57 vii?i . V, V Above— Evelyn M ' ' ittenbach and LaVonne Wickstrom Unow it ' ll be tough sledding tomnrrow, ' cause there won ' t be any snow (or is it :i late spring? ) . But things were different in February when the girls took time nut from play to smile at the photographer. ' Snow Joke to be confined to school routine when there ' s fresh snow in which to romp and a welcome sun beams her smiling consent. Anyway, you campus kiddies needed no further encouragement, for you acted half your age — and enjoyed it. It matters little whether you were inspired by the mercury ' s nega ' ivistic attitude (20 degrees below zero) or whether it was because as some persons claim, that neces- sity is invention ' s mamma, but you Wesleyan coeds made history when you wore boots, riding breeches, jodphurs, snowsuits and what-have-you to classes. 5a Above— Sylvia Ma;jrnuson and Alice Jayne Grosshans at extreme left. Audrey Bullock. Evelyn Wittenbach. Mary Schrunk. LaVonne Wiekstrom and Ruth Creamer just " couldn ' t see " studying in tho library when Wesleyan ' s great front lawn was so invitinE. Right — Mary Schrunk, Ruth Creamer, and LaVonne Wiekstrom are " good skates, " and to prove it they flash three pretty smiles. Above — Some of the students who took cart in the recent operatic production. Smiles abound; the men wear ' em— They couldn t let a harem-scarem! What Do You " Katink " ? By VIVIAN FINLEY To the tune of $600 for the total cost of costumes, sets, royalties, and advertising, the Nebraska Wesleyan university chorus presented Rudolph Friml ' s comic opera, " Katinka, " under the direction of Prof. Oscar Bennett. The first truly all-Wesleyan opera was given twice, at the Wesleyan auditorium Friday night, Dec. 15, and at the Lincoln high school auditorium Saturday night, Dec. 16. The production was such a success that people in several sur- rounding towns asked that it be given again, but Professor Bennett declined saying, " We ' ll have another one next year. " Esther Perkins, David City sophomore, and Ernest Metz- ger, Crawford junior, played the leading roles of Katinka and Ivan Dimitri. Genevieve Taylor, Lincoln junior, and Ross Mendell, ScottsbluflE senior, sang the comedy leads as the American husband and wife. Sets for the opera, which changed from a Russian setting to a Turkish harem, and again to a street scene in Vienna, were designed by Miss Gladys Lux, head of the art department. Costumes were made under the direction of Mrs. Clara Brandt, physical education instructor, and dances in the opera were directed by Miss Wilhemein Sprague, a dance instructor downtown. This year the speech department, under the direction of Prof. Enid Miller Hoffman, came to the rescue in full force, moved scenery, acted as makeup committee, arranged sets, located properties, and did all the behind-scenes work. Other instructors in the music department are Geralyn Walrath Bennett, violin; Pauline Slonecker, piano; Neva Cocklin, elementary piano; Irene Taylor McCandless, pipe organ; Clara U. Mills, theory and history of music, form and analysis, music appreciation, and harmony; A. L. Bo- berg, band and girls ' glee club; and Vernon Forbes, brass instruments. 6G Above — VirEil Bowen. H. Gerald Hicks. Mary Kay Spauldini;. Prof. Enid Miller Hoffman, and Herbie Warner woxild rather not be " scene " durinvr this " hold-up. " They ' re convinced it ' s a " put-up ' job. Below — Lyda Varney beautifies Ross Mendell. Doris Blewfieid " smears " Esther Perkins, and Alice Jean Miles builds a mustache for Lee McAllister as the opera cast prepares for its second performance, whiob wa-. i ' iv.n at Lincoln hivrh school audi torium. 61 V .lU -f Above — Their faces may not show it, but they ' re happy about the whole thing, else why would they sinir about it? I.KFT — Esther Perkins, lead- inir lady, led herself into the :Mimiratit)n of the audience. RiciiT— Dick Bell and Ralpii Currier are willinjr to " take it all black. " Note the polish 1 look on their countenances. 62 Above — Amy Martin ;iri.l p;iria I ' hilJiij) -;ln.w tluit tli. ' v c:iii ■! ' ■! :ilon,;r with each other even if they are members of tile same harem. BKr " v TJulli Xi. their dance. ■ ' " ' f ' yvtgpr Above— Orval Zamzow. capable flunliy. liulls a switch at Lincoln hiirh school : left. Miss Oladys T.ux made a drawincr after which an opera sceno was modi.-kd. Above — Lee McAllister looks unhappy. Genevieve Taylor smiles sweetly, and .John Jones thinks Aliah has praiseworthy merits. 63 Above — Miss Gladys Lux. Margaret Anderson. Vivian Finley, and Norma Jean Ayers build a well. We will identify the gentleman at the extreme right if you ' ll ask him to please turn around. Below — Ruth Nielsen. Laura .Jean Nelson and Ruby Wycoff dis- play their grace before the admiring gaze of Harold Boyle, Margie Smith, Ruth Fenske. Gordon Roberts, Eunice Kuehn and Byron Johnson. 64 Male A Cap pel la C ho lus First rf»w : Arthur Riedesel. Howell Cux. Guy Br u baker. Director Oscar DenrieiL, rjiuon »„iiatnueriiii, oiu i iciiui, Ross Mendell. Bernie Hodj kin. Second row: Ed WorthinKton. Robert Oibb. Gordon Olsson. Gordon Brackett. Don Kohl. Byron Johnson, Herman Piper. Third row: Ernest Metzprer. Robert Gottschalk. Richard Din -dale. Darrell Hunt. Frank Lawrence. » " ' " " - ' i - - aii:„ . .. i7„.,. i, — .. . Dean Brubaker, John Hawthorne, Harold Boyle, John Jones. Cordon Roberts. Robert Nisley. Ralph Currier Bennett, Eldon Chamberlin. Bill Nichol. uiat ' kett. Don Kohl. Byron Johnson, Herman Frank Lawrence. Leland McAllister. Foui th row: Melody Makers The thirty-fourth annual tour of the Nebraska Wesleyan male a cappella chorus, under the direction of Prof. Oscar Bennett, will begin March 24 and end April 10. A home concert on April 12 will climax this season ' s trip. Concerts will be given at schools and churches in Kansas, Wyoming, Colorado, and Nebraska. A highlight of the tour will be a half-day rest in Denver with a broadcast from station KOA that night. Special features on the programs will be vocal solos by Ross Mendell, Bill Nichol, and Professor Bennett; saxophone solos by Bernie Hodgkin; violin solos by Geralyn Walrath Bennett; and readings by Kenneth Nye. The Girls ' Glee club, under the direction of Prof. A. L. Boberg, will take its first annual tour, singing concerts at schools and churches in Nebraska. The tour will be taken March 24-29, and the girls will give a home concert on April 26. Featured on the programs will be vocal solos by Professor Boberg and Esther Perkins, and readings by Mar- garet Thomson. Girls ' Glee Club— First row: Lucile Kokes. Betty Allen. Louise Gottschalk. Alice Dinsdale, Jean Flaherty, June Scheldt. Velta Weaver. Second row: Eunice Kuehn, Elaine Peterson. Esther Perkins. Jacqueline Nap:el. Betty Harvey. Lela Harkleroad, Ruth Stevens. Roberta Kauk. Third row: Maxine Cope. Eea Goodrich. Marguerite Peterson. Ruth Little, Alatha D ' eBoer. Catharine Thomson. Helen Johnston. Fourth row: Vera Anderson, Adelaide Reynolds, Sarah Brown, Shirley Miller, Rose Ellen Dreier, Imogene Johnson, Margaret Thomson. Thelma Randall. 65 Above — Wesleyan ' s basketball lettermen take time out from the caee sport to t ' -ain their attention on the cameraman. Their ' s is not a loco-motive for lining up this way ; wouldn ' t choo ? John Staten was on the injured list at the time, but a typical action shot of him appears below. Goal -Getters The bare statement of the dismal record of four games won out of a schedule of nineteen games played would not be fair to the fine spirit and courageous efforts of the mem- bers of the 1940 Plainsman basketball squad. The record does not show the many well-played games lost by a small margin, nor does it show the many valiant individual efforts to bring about victories. Lost by graduation will be Elbert Souders and John Staten, regulars for four years, Paul Johnson, Harvey Feyer- herm, and Wilmer Woltemath. Merle Geis, Ronald Metzler, Wayne Miller, Jim Owen and Harold Maynard are letter winners who will be back for future competition. A fine record by the " B " team of nine games won to three lost gives a brighter hue to future prospects. This squad was composed of Ralph Bowmaster, Dean Niemann, Herman Piper, Buddy Guest, Guy Brubaker, Duane Ketel- hut, Brainard Tavener, Bob Romig, Dale Magnuson, and Russell Macy. 6(i Brainard Taucncr A p 5ob Pomiq ' , VfSIErW IB 1 1 Dole Aa nuson i Duanc kctclhut wF(;!Eyi5.¥ IB mm ' ' -]Q ' . 24 Dcarit Drubaker i Ralph f Boiuniostcr Above — Wayne Miller, Merle Geis and Jim Owen compose a solemn threesome at the half of the Doane game at Crete. In the backKround. Elb Souders. " Burs ' Bowmaster, Herman Piper. Darretl Hunt, and Harvey Feyerherm also look at the serious side of life. for the first half was an even, hard fouerht battle. Above — Harvey Feyerherm and Paul Johnson, featured in a picture of which meditation is the keynote. Above — Elb Souders makes invaded the Plainsman coui-t. at hand. a bivr try for the goal when Hastin ' jrs Team mate Wilmer Woltemath is near 68 Abo e— Wayne Mil ler strides out while one Tiger crouches and another .loins the chase. Above — Wilmer " Ace " Woltemath grabs for the ball in the Doane tussle at Crete. 69 70 Juniors Row 1 AIKINS, RUTH, Pawnee City. Phi Mu, Psi Chi, S. C. F., Y. W. C. A. ALEXANDER, MADELEINE. Oakland. Willard, Psi Chi, Y, W. C. A. Row 2 ARNOLD, AUDREY LORRAINE, Hawley. Minn.. Beta Phi Alpha, Psi Chi. Plainsman Plavers, Y. W. C. A. (first semester student). ARTIST. ELMER, Benkelman, Delta Omega Phi. AUCOCK, FRANCES, Raymond, Y. W. C. A. BANCROFT, FRANCES, Hebron, Y. W. C. A. BEEBE, LOIS, Linco.n. Willard. W. A. A.. Y. W. C. A. Rou- 3 BRAUN, BOB, Lincoln, " W " club, football. BROWN, ELDON, Grant. Crescent. Alpha Gamma Beta. In- ter-fraternity council, Y. M. C. A. CARLSON, MARJORIE, Omaha. Beta Phi Alpha, chorus. CLARY. RALPH, Gering. Crescent. Alpha Gamma Beta, Pep club, Y. M. C. A. CLEMENTS, CLAUDE, Benkelman. Crescent, Alpha Gamma Beta, ■■W " club, track, Y. M. C. A. .. :p ' ttiA ik JUNIORS R S . ' rU -. Row 4 HIX, HOMER, Stromsburg, Phi Kappa Tau, baton twirler. IBSER, HOMER, Lincoln. IRWIN, JAMES. Alliance, S. C. F., Kappa Chi, Y. M. C. A. JACKSON, BETTY JO, Raymond, Beta Phi Alpha, Panhel- lenic council. JONES, JOHN, JR., Crab Orchard. Crescent, male a cappella chorus, chorus. Plainsman Players, College council, Y. M. C. A. Row 1 COX, LEONA, Adams. Bleu Thonge, A. C. E. COX, MERTON M., Adams. Bleu Thonge, Kappa Chi, S. C. F., Y. M. C. A. CURTIS, WAYNE, Hampton, Delta Omega Phi, chorus, Y. M. C. A. DAVIS, DOROTHY. Bellwood. Bleu Thonge, A. C. E. DIERS, MURIEL, Seicard. Alpha Gamma Delta, chorus, Y. W. C. A. Row 5 KAUK, ROBERTA, Alma. Theta Upsilon, W. A. A. cabinet. Girls ' Glee club, Plainsman Players, Pep club, Y. W. C. A. KELLY, HARLAND. Norfolk. Phi Kappa Tau. Pi Kappa Delta, debate. Inter-fraternity council, Y. M. C. A. KEMLING, MAX V., Grant, Bleu Thonge, chorus. Kappa Chi, S. C. F., Y. M. C. A. KILZER, ROSALIE, Leba7ion, Alpha Gamma Delta. KOCH, HARRIET, Garland. Y. W. C. A. y Row 2 DINSDALE, RICHARD W., Lincoln, string ensemble, male a cappella chorus, chorus. Kappa Chi, Y. M. C. A. DOUGLASS, EUNICE, Cortland, Bleu Thonge, Y. W. C. A. FAHRENBRUCH, KENNETH, Lincoln. Crescent. FIGARD, PAUL, Seward. FINLEY, VIVIAN, Hiawatha, Kan.. Alpha Gamma Delta, " Wesleyan " staff, Panhellenic council. Plainsman Play- ers. Pep club, " Plainsman " staff, Y. W. C. A. Row 6 LaVANCIL, EUGENE, Lincoln. Phi Kappa Tau. McAULIFFE, CLAYTON, Chappell, Y. M. C. A. MAGNUSON, DALE, Cro t07i, Phi Kappa Tau, Alpha Gam- ma Beta, football, " W " club. MAGNUSON, SYLVIA, Chapman, Phi Mu, Pep club. Col- lege council, " Wesleyan " staff, " Plainsman " staff, Y. W. 0. A. MARTIN, CONNIE, Lincoln, Bleu Thonge, Y. W. C. A. (first semester student). C Row 3 FRAMPTON, FAITH. Stant07i, Willard. Pep club, string ensemble. GLINES, BETTY. North Platte. Bleu Thonge. Y. W. C. A. GROESSER. JOHN. Weeping Water. Phi Kappa Tau. Alpha Gamma Beta. GUY, MARGARET, Coicles, Bleu Thonge. Y. W. C. A. HILLS, WILMA, Gresham. Alpha Gamma Delta. J U N I J U N I O R O R S 73 -1 ,V : 74 JUNIORS R C .A A-l W - -t Xw ' -. ' l -tAt.t-t I Row 4 SMEDBERG, ELIZABETH, Lincoln. SNODGRASS, LLOYD, Sterlbig, Kappa Chi. SNYDER, MARVIN, Waverly, Kappa Chi, S. C. F. SOETH, ELINOR, Chapman. Theta Upsilon, Panhellenic council. Pep club, Plainsman Players, W. A. A. president, Y. W. C. A. SOUSER, JEANNE, Clarks. Alpha Gamma Delta, W. A. A , " Wesleyan " staff, " Plainsman " staff. Row 1 MATZ, DORIS, Cozad, Willard, Theta Alpha Phi, Plainsman Players, College council, Panhellenic councU, Y. W. C. A. MAYNARD, HAROLD, Gothenburg, Phi Kappa Tau, foot- ball, basketball, Plainsman Players. METZGER, ERNEST, Crawjord, Delta Omega Phi, male a cappella chorus. Kappa Chi, Psi Chi, S. C. F., Y. M. C. A. MILLER, LLOYD, Topeka. Knn.. Delta Omega Phi, Theta Nu, Nu-med. MOORE, RAY. Lincohi, Crescent, Alpha Gamma Beta, Y. M C. A Row 5 STAUFFER, PHYLLIS, Oakland, Willard, Y. W. C. A. STEPHENSON, RACHEL, Cairo, Psi Chi, College council. Plainsman Players, S. C. F., Y. W. C. A. cabinet. STORY, CARROLL, Lincohi, Phi Kappa Tau, Pep club, drum major, band, " Wesleyan " staff, Y. M. C. A. STRINGFELLOW, GLENN, Oakdale, Crescent. TAYLOR, GENEVIEVE ALYS, Lincoln, Alpha Gamma Delta, Plainsman Players, Y. W. C. A. MUDGE, BETTY LOU, Hordville (first semester student) MULLIS, LLOYD, Orleans. Bleu Thonge. S. C. F., Y. M. — ' C. A. PARKIN, THOMAS, St. Paul. Phi Kappa Tau. Y. M. C. A., College council. PATTON, LUELLA, Blue Springs. Beta Phi Alpha. Plains- man Players. PETERSON, MARGUERITE, Holdrege. Phi Mu, Pep club. A. C. E.. Panhellenic council. Girls ' Glee club, Y. W. C. A. president. TIF ' TON, ; AMES, Anther, Phi Kappa Tau, Pi Kappa Delta, debate, oratory, business manager of " Plainsman, " Y. M. C. A. cabinet. WALDO, HARVEY, DeViitt, Delta Omega Phi, Theta Nu. WALTER. MARJORIE, Red Cloud, Theta Upsilon, Y. W. C. A. WYCOFF, RUBY, Le.viiigton, Alpha Gamma Delia, chorus, College council, Y. W C. A. ZAMZOW, ORVAL, Lincohi, Phi Kanoa Tau, Theta Alpha Phi, Plainsman Players. Rou ' 3 PICKERING, HAROLD, Shelton, Phi Kappa Tau, Y. M. C. A. SCHEIDT, JUNE, Friend, WUlard, chorus, string ensemble, band. Girls ' Glee club, Y. W. C. A. SCHLICHTEMEIER, ELLIS, Nehawka. Phi Kappa Tau, Alpha Gamma Beta, band. SCHUCK, EDWARD G., Lincohi Crescent, football, Y. M. C. A. SHIRK, KATHRYN, Lincoln. Phi Mu, Y. W. C. A. JUNIOR J U N I O R S 75 Harvey Feyerherm .e.. - Lyda Varney y:? S (U i-vT-y . E-A-tf- ;£-tA A--u,_4:- J " Vance James I ' V ' - ' - ' - 2 ' 4X Margaret Thomson John Staten Doris Blewfield Wayne Stewart Note: Piease turn to page 101 for " Upper Cmst " story AuovE. Left — Ferdinand had nothing on G. Oliver Panzer ' cause he seems to like smellinK flowers, especially when Vera Anderson offers him a rose. Abovk, Right — " Let ' s er — . stop and make up, " says Doris Blew- field, and Harvey Feyerherm assists. Left — The photographer caught Dorothy Freeborn and Al Croft. but were they coming or going? Joe ' n ' josie College, Forget the classroom fog. Take time out from knowledge For- Puttin ' On The Dog By VIVIAN FINLEY The Nebraska Wesleyan university winter formal season, the time set apart by our collegians for dating, dining, and dancing in style, saw tuxes and formals brought out of closets, corsages pinned on, and everybody doing plenty of fancy stepping. The Alpha Gamma Delta sorority led off with a dinner which was held at the University club. After dining, the Alpha Gams and their dates " jitterbugged " to the music of Earl Hill and his orchestra. The Willards entertained their dates at a dinner in the Lincoln hotel on January 26, and Earl Hill ' s orchestra fur- nished music for the dance which followed. The next night, the Delta Omega Phi fraternity gave its annual dinner and dance at the same hotel, with Jimmy Miller and his orches- tra setting the pace for the dancers. Above — Lyda Varney and fieorjie " Bus " Knieht take a cheerful outlook on life. Above — It must be funny, ' cause Blake Skrclla ami Annu -especially Blake Skrdl.i — are hi-Iarious. Bklow — A lauKhinvi Homer Hix. amused Ruth Sallenbach, interested Neva Ebrisht, conversational Kenneth Frohardt and Adelaide Reynolds, and a " Well, if ym say so. " Wilmer Wultt ' math. Abovk — W. Johnston and A. fromething or other. .loy Humphrey are pleased ahout February 2 found the Beta Phi Alpha girls and their dates at the Lincoln hotel swinging out to the music of Jimmy Miller. After a dinner at the University club on February 3, the Crescents and their dates took time out to dance to Jimmy Miller ' s music. The Phi Mu sorority entertained their dates on February 10 in the Cornhusker hotel to the tune of Beck and Jung- bleth ' s orchestra. On February 17 the Phi Kappa Tau men closed the formal season with a dinner at the Lincoln hotel and a dance with the music of Earl Hill ' s orchestra. Above — Aileen McQuistan and Orval Zamzow do some menu perusing during intermission. Above— Helena does his part. Kilzcr liscends a stair wav. and the photographer Bjia o v— " Aw, iuit kidding. I ' ll bet you tell that to all the girls. " Maybe it ' s not original, but it seems to " hit the nail on the thumb. " Lucille Norris listens and smiles ; Paul Scott has to laugh about it. Above — A contented group — homelike, and that sort of thing — composed of Ralph Currier and Helen Jones. Doris Cooper and Leon- ard Eskew. 80 Above — Ross Mendell and Evelyn Wittenbach (back to camera), Betsey Wriubt ani! Bernie Hodekin in a happy mood. AflOVE They must be amused, or why would thev look like that V Vera Harvey and " Don. " John Junes and Virginia Crawford take it easy on the steps. Akovk — One d«juble-d " - ni J..l ii .- i ,u.-ii and Norma Shepardson. Below — Betty Jo Jackson and Gordon Roljerts " coke " up some thinK to do durinp: intermission. 81 Above — Kay Sorensen adjusts a flower for Clayton McAulitTe. Above — Harold Maynard and Jeanne Souser are for Ketting some fun out of lifp. ss = Below — A happy proup — ay gaU and joyful gents. Row I Helena Kilzer Lynne Anderson Rosalie Kilzer Norma Jean Ayers Dorothy Knight Gwendolyn Booth Betty Lookabaugh Audrey Bullock Josephine Culver Row IV Janet Currier Ethel McNicldc Dorothy Peters Row 11 Margery Redding Harriet CuiTy Adelaide Reynolds Muriel Diers Ruth Sallenbach Neva Ebrigrht Ltnora Smith Vivian Finley Evelyn Gentry Row V Opal Haupt Jeanne Souser Mary Kay Spaul Row III Genevieve Taylor Ruth Marion Herss Clara Belle Willia Wilma Hills Ruby Wycoff President Muriel Diers First Vice-president Genevieve Taylor Second Vice-president Mary Kay Spaulding Secretary Ruth Sallenbach House Manager Ruby Wycoff 83 Beta Phi Alpha President Doris Cooper Vice-president Beulah Gadow Secretary Helen Jones House Manager Norma Shepardson R.nv I Phyllis Kesterson Audrey Arno ' d Virginia Mead Marjorie Carlson Shirley Miller Doris Cooper Luella Patton Beulah Gadow Betty Harvey Row III Vera Harve» ' Erna Philipp Ardene Robinson Row II Norma Shepardson Betty Jo Jackson Marjiie Smith Helen Jones Kathryn Sorensen 8 ,f jj | f. I TH O S o - O f! t! A» " T %tJ ' y ,. ,ri ' A- - " ' J Row I Homer Anderson Eldon Brown Ralph Clary Claude Clements Al Croft Ralph Currier Row II Harold Ellis Kenneth Fahrenbruch Charles Greenslit Gerald Hicks Darrell Hunt Vance James Row III John Jones, Jr. Marvin Keuten Dean McGee Merle Mahr Ray Moore Bob Palmer Row IV Edward Schuck Paul Scott Ray Se ' .ey Wayne Stewart Glenn Stringfellow Brainard Tavener Row V George Wilson John Wise Ed Worthin -tun b- First Semester Second Semester Al Croft President Vance James Merle Mahr Vice-iiresidcnt Homer Anderson Ralph Clary Secretary Harold Ellis Wayne Stewart House Manager Wayne Stewart 85 if ' - ' Row I Ernest MetzKer Elmer Artist Ronald Metzler Howell Cox Lloyd Miller George Crandali Paul Murray Willard Engel Jack Nelson Harvey Feyerherm Bill Nichol Lloyd Frederick Robert Gottschalk Row IV Dean Niemann Row II Robert Nisley John Hawthorne George Panzer Bernard Hodgkia Herman Piper Parke Holmes Eugene Premer Arthur Hosick William Sutphen Byron Johnson Jack Twiford Paul Johnson Clarence Larson Row V Donald Wil ' iams Row III Keith Wycoff Ross Mendell Fred Zabel f f Phi j-K-tr, p .p p ts P f C ffi D First Semester Second Semester Harvey Feyerherm ' resident Don Williams Bob Gottschalk Vice-president Elmer Artist Don Williams Secretary Bob Gottschalk Vernon Thomsen House Manager Vernon Thomsen 86 Phi Kappa Tau O O O (f ft (Tj O O. JxttitMiMt ' .i - Row I Row III Dick Bell Paul Larson Ralph Bowmaster Russell Macy Wesley Bowen Dale Magnuson Eldon Chamberlin Wayne Miller Keith Clifton Thomas Parkin David Coulter Ellis Schlichtemeier Kenneth Frohardt Blake Skrdla Row II Row IV John Groesser John Staten Buddy Guest Russell Stauffer Frank Harrington Carroll Stoi-y Homer Hix Truman Streeter Bill Jack Herbert Warner Harland Kelly Wilmer Woltemath Don Kohl Orval Zamzow Members whose names were submitted ton late for their pictures to appear in the Phi Tau panel are as follows : Virgil Bowen, Merle Geis. Gordon Gihb. Duane Ketelhut. Eugene LaVancil. Russell MeiTill. Harold Pickering, Merle Randall, and James Tipton. President Kenneth Frohardt Vice-president Tom Parkin Secretary John Groesser House Manager Dale Magnuson 87 Xjr - Phi Mu jyjl. jj W CXA viAJL — President Aneeta Humphrey First Vice-president Marguerite Peterson Second Vice-president Marjoris Fuchser Secretary Anne Kaimmer House Manager Elaine Peterson Row I Row III Ruth Aikins Aileen McQuistan Betty Allen Sylvia Map:nuson Jean Allen Betty Patrick Jean Eichber r Elaine Peterson Marjorie Kuchser Marguerite Peterson Row II Row IV Alice Jayne Gro shans Kathryn Shirk Aneeta Humiihrev Mary Shumarii Anne Kaimmer Lyda Varney Jane LeGrand Vernona Wilhite Sylvia Lobb Lorraine Zouhek 88 Theta Upsilon 4 ,ow I Row II Margaret Carney Alice PayiitT Evelyn Coates Elinor Soeth Louise Gottschal!; Hazel Waddell Leia Harlderoad Marjorie Walter Roberta Kauk Vetta Weaver Luctle Kokes President Louise Gottschalk Secretary Lucile Kokes Treasurer Elinor Soeth House Manager Lela Harkleroad 89 f President Doris Blewfield Vice-president Faith Frampton Secretary Bernice Anderson House Manager Madeleine Alexander w I Jean Kaiitz Madeleine Alexantlcr Joan Kautz ' feamice Andei-son Doris Matz U i Bee be Jean Nylander ' MHi BlewlieM Virginia Browne Virginia Crawford Row IV Barbara Porter June Scheidt Row II Mary Schrunk Helen Claire Disbrow Arlis Seiver Ruth Ellis Audrey Smith P ' aith Frampton Phyllis Stauffer Dorothy Freeborn Vernadell Greenslit Mary Catherine Jacobson Row V Jean Marie Stewart Jane Thurtie Row III Bernice Webb Elizabeth Jones LaVonne Wickstrom Phyllis Jones Eileen Wylie 90 COPPER HALFTONES ZINC HALFTONES ZINC LINE ETCHmeS BEN DAY SHADING COLOR PLATES STEREOTYPES ELECTFKDTYPES SCHOOL ANNUALS PQ06RAMS POSTERS KAAGAZINES NEWSPAPERS DISPLAY ADVERTISE KAENTS A COMPLETE PHOTO ENOI AVING DEPARTMENT IN A COMPLETE PRINTING PLANT 1.3333 MATt loURNAL • - I PRINTING CO. . Wiggam ' s Columr " feb ; " foT] , ' mSlteS LUl LXpenQlll Deal, head of Wes- only one hour a week for VtA » . f f r. I On ' ' ' ' -m m . rri r» rv °rr " SS!lTaSnaIin or ..ona . ' ' fefc., ' ' «n , Op CotnttliH ' USIC To Bc DepartlT Ind. " by Dr. Albert I Dears work B found to J Cj p,,. ' f AVtie ' ' S Cn r C - —Aln Journal phlet entlUed " Study f G v ' f e ' £, 3 «i«, !i ' IrefOK. 1 ' L . 1 A„4-». F m f I college smder.!.. " 8. ° A.- v . , ' eicco LiDeral Arts; ur, I -HTOent begun i W r- ■ ' Viija av.A ' . ancasfer 5d; ;; ' - £=:= Ji: ' " - -; Hoffman Resign Posit - ■ flff : _ ' ' " ' °f the debat, " r Stales Jii ■ ? ° " Sales ,t ' " »4e ' •one Of ,h,. « Fi??: - fK-si- lumni Present Gifts ' i ' wv . «R»•:». .- ' « " • WU Physics Departn Charts, Textbooks, Photographic Filn Money, Sidereal Clock Among Present -tot ( P«a«fW ' sl " " «»» " - ec - Th «ctJon number of valuable gifts of appara d by the department of phvj, ' " the past year, aong thi ted then , ' O ' C S ' the depd itlng the Give ard Cole, of vartou photograph . ' SS, is 1 ed map of t tostgnia of lOhyslcs club. ent " iuctioo state Con ' vene The «es e•S mbition Is To ' r i Theater } Kenneth Frohardt, ' ?,. " av Campus Bigshot io ' P ' ljge » leth Frohardt was bom Oct. . at Clear Water, Manitoba, I. At present ho lives at :in. He attended AtUoson school and was active in . band, glee club, and lyli ' ' i Sistr, .tio»l VDdei?« tJiBir Ae ftVOl ,rt ,S 1« ' Vf ' , e» ' ■■ ' ants oae: " »eot ead .ntih «t». S«»» ' f c»tds ar iliW ««1 «»i ' f cen£. d VS ' r te-9° ' - ! ' ° .o ' i " ' ' " ' ° " Gampusites " To C ?§S tr i . Coke, Colorful Ense Irfocal campusites contmue U ' Otticg to classes ana « ■ - " t l - - , letli is a member of Phi •BiU frateriUty, Theta Al- ii. Plainsman Players; vlce- nt of Blue Key, senior men ' ; ry society The Bizz Whangs o Prize of the week is Nonna Jeanj North Side by Jeanne souser Ayers ' name tor Paul Murray. She j Midland, .. Or ? N, W. U ' s Administration Of NYA Proves Success Plainsmen ' Tigers Ball N.C.A.C. Meet Here 1 Unsuccessful in two conference starts, Coach Dwi drove his Plainsman hardwood performers through exte weelt as they prepared for their role of host to the D night for a contest which will bring one of them out the N. C. A. O. The Tigers dropped their only loop st Broncos hi an overtime thriller, while Wesleyan has ic THE INDEPENDENT TEAM took The NYA has been successfully first honors in the soccer baseball operating on this campus since the treasurer of the I (,o pjiament that ended last Pri- first part of 1934 under the ad- [ratemity councU; and is i q j possible five wins, ministration of Dr, E. Olcim Cal- ustness manager for " The Barbs copped five victories, len. head of the department of an " , student paper. His " i " " j xhey scored 263 points against political science. This year there Reunion is the keynote of Don Hwold Reeves. Georg e BaUey. and . .. „ ,,_ t r,y. Wilson Belka, the Tiger mentor, ' ' Eugene Haylett l iis fashioned a - 1 formidable aggregation to protect S ; the N,C.A.C. laurels earned last t season, Don Licolph, Eieane Nutz- , I man, Don Kinsey, and Leonard I Gemer also saw action against the Plainsmen last season and are again included on the Doane rt ster. Tigcn Won Last season ' s Tiger edition slap- gram. The students who have worked in my department have been generally efficient, willing, and conscientious in their efforts to do the work required of them. Instructor Benefits Meet Plaint Bo ald U Bfletzter Standing 6 ' 3 " taJ ler lends to this y ped two defeats on the yeJlow-jer- i squad most of wh seyed five, annexing the initial { t g possess. Meule nieetmg 52-32 and later fracas 35- j lettered last seasoi atcV DayCelebrationSaturday Comhusker HspIaW-D Bizx Whangs s. o. s. ' ?; ! D " " " - est SHoe coeite Wl ' ' " ' Jft, tor « ' d. -. f o ' Silts varied {to» „,» hoi ' " ' =°Pf., " ifs ' i the , . " THE WESLEY AN " COMBINED WITH UNIVERSITY PLACE NEWS 1939 Menbw 1940 Rssocoied GJeeiale Press published Era? Thunds; Cnt Place (Uncota) Nebrasto N. N. STEVENSON. Publisher SutoortpUoa rat tn Lancaster County $1.00 Outside Lancaster County $1.50 Sntered as second class matter at University Place Bra uincoln. Nfebrasiia, under act of Congress o« March 3, : Editorial Staff Too ; paper nJglit. ;esl P ™„rnonora mtsit.lon anall ! aaintv ..acUve colored , pop nice jce-nis tVi« •, CurrM G A to ' people. O 0 ee Qe) Observes.- Traditio»;S?»5%5 .vV ies.1. S-- „« iiu " -- ,,.„„ wen- — , „ Viet V „ Mf: o ' , irout 00= . _ Taven«A ir SfS Faculty For sty ' " : ' VS ' late I This Coiiiciji jiuv We three afii, n«n wee.. „: ' „f ;- .«la.t aa:f " - ' -ttae pub4«y 4 " ;? ' " " ° " iol ' ■uture,- and havL !° ' " ' ' he B., ' over the pe o ell, T ' " ' ™ ' ,r faculty, we cCto 2 uf ™ ™ ' " ■fonditotofl OMtito-e " T " " " - ■, Individual who i, ?L " " ' »■ " i " Vwe Of haniLj ' tteTr? ' ' ' - «» " ,«eW .W that ' ncUwdtiai House " " " Offered By Ne-w Courses Utrer t: .u„ For Second lei ' i " of puo- own ead. Editor-In-Chl8l Bruce E, Keith Assistant Editors Marion S. Swanson Vivian L. Pmley Associate Editor WaiTen E. Jotoiston Society Editors Jeanne Souser Sylvia Magnuson suburban Editor Carroll Story Sports Editor Fred Hess. Jr. Peature Editors Vera H trvey Ruth Creanoer News Reporters Carol Glidewell June Mosiander Margie Smith Paul Scott E% ' eiyn Wlttenljaoli Gordon Roberts WUliam Daloe Lucille Brown Adelaide Reynolds Clara Bede WiUian Betty Allen Sports Reporters Arroon Stover Dean Young Alumni Editor Gayle Van Horn, • Busiaess Staff Manager ? " !! unptes Rosenlrater Classes-, New sUat To Renew Offers Two Callen, Religion Class j Assistant BuBlneas Maiiager. Lynne «eT ' V r the courses «,me into EDITS BY bruce e. kei be«i- _„ !.; T : „,s, r --sfon ' s; ties lies idlUon. txe ■Jioi ' -. t ' -cc :; - t?crrt:»t;.-tliatl«ve • ' a " .7T O Pre. Christmas J Activities Shows Va Party, Elections with »=,,!!«STbra a Wf« J cours.- --- i pon a. ot =iWdi« at ' sea e »» ' " ! ' j«,« " TltmeOt the ei " " ' " tc nuSer «! " " Tiu of ,ftne development or John Ro=f ■ " ' . yj course is aj ,,„dcr5landM " , . two-hour e« Testament lor ' " lS£ng to TtZiZ «h ' whereby a certain fixed system of pourts is aUotted for ea , , chrisUan hoa „jfiecllve TW " " " •» of ' ■™ ,. s«- „„ „„ „t„rt„,t mnv amuire more thm a certain total during Schools Attempt Regulation several schools m. the United States have adooted prograt parUcipabon in extra-eurrieular actmtles by students Is t iated. Such regulation ts brought about by Ure establlshmenJ iriety FacultyUkes Brief Recess and no student nuiy acquire more thm a certain total during »s «r»iiments otx behalf of this practice, authorities iay »lectlng his scholastic reo Appoint Harvey,: . Z ' rSSr " f ¥ 1 • . such actlvltie! Creamer Editors . , point. •ec.Hto e™- ' : VV «ey, ' " «Se™,,6,tSX ' ?S Clark Geography ton To Fill - Presidency luson. Crofton president of th Alpha Oamni i sics dub, at t sday altemi physics lect Amor " - . - . — ipai " i J used! hoars 1 course. 1 Is which I president if tS ' yei ' Sr " ;:ht ' |r,„ „ ' = " ' %-»o;;or;.- " w;rere™:d " vf » ' UToti " «he er - 3opho»ot ' ' rcrr;:™l,- -- ' « " :.r;i=i ' --. S »e west -; ol Speate At Meet Officially Featu Chosen Editors lagnuson; sEf " S5™ " ' ES ' 3 .?■ ' •-• ' ■■- To Presidcacy " ■ " alton ■• -- publicity chalrW, " Sr ¥ " " selection. jailed . ' vacation ,j t thing ja " B- y me: rs of The aret Aiider. Juti- = a£aJ!d Saturcia " ■y nlsht. Dec, 1. , . ' ' ' y sophomore. o " « w= " !n ' :brX -;n " 1 ,,«.iB.hop spent C. hing sec- 1 mas ' ' ?! ' " J dltii.. Horace nouie o brt 3 al, ' vev of « e " P ' ae teachlni :aor8 Elector— ggLlk S thHead J 7 . f.ir Soloing • - ;ma Made For School Days roltematb. senior fromji elected president ofij cil to fiU the vacancy ' OroJt, senior irom Ca-L, 3jst wee euson eie iied i was £t Itemath. .tSiiue to discipiiJ . ' day ( at senior high ac the cani, days. He inbers m their ow wartz Am cEion wit: ' arU anno tiierence " Raters AJtend l,2 19 Members Tn Debate At ■- g ate l° " epn 1: p.eparaUon For CHOS «rsiW ' ' la. to b« ' A S J " _. , heW " .Jy gjola ' .gj j Vera Harvey, Gcriiif J and RuUi Creamer, " ' " mail, were api WesleyanQi Nips Nfibras 5 ebru ' , Vance J ' , ' ' »s- I, senior £ " » j, t U ' T he hareiy . " ttthday mstead __, «lne Nebraska Wcsle t; I ' .«•»! eclehce ' jnrioU»- Locals Rally; Halt 1 Win 3 istrai. Inst hiB» -!..:r " upo» f n: - ■was intent solo fflghl success- sight .lS« =« " ,rd-theje«uWd , e ,hO »t ,re, ' Story, Hess Now In Editorial Jobs and •r cuh. go " P while bc- SOP ' tft » , OtSht sOP " " " " „YiWh «;;J ' %?st olnt 1 " Harve B , - ' .re- - " " ' " " _j : ' The titaer ' s bell Irnlv iective last quarter N- raUv as Weslcyan ' s Plair lout " victory nwnbet lo i. current season Weones I The game was played o Wuni maples, Uie toial Wl. _, ., tor the Handle Spoit Suburban, Positions v 5ttite. tlie •loose TWO more appointments to the editorial staff of The Wedeyan were made the past week. CarroU Story, Lincoln Junior, has been appointed surburban editor, and Fred Hess, Harvard sophomore. |,l has been appointed sports editor. Storj ' IS a member of Phi Kappa Tau fraternity, pep club, drum major, Hess is a varsity tackle on the fcotball. squad, in addlton to his work In jo uroahsro. l ' ' S ie Tomorrow . . r ' " Peterson Named Pjye Ser A.C.E. President aj -i.. Admitte PKF Soc Reynolds To Fill Vice - Presidency . .i- at o» Holdreee «. " " ' of Sat ±Ii toe S ' New Membei Organization o-clO ' , ? Vlai, .wht » ' ■U»- J lJ1° ?ot x v h. i.d " ' arguer - ij,,. - fe 1 . Feyerherm. ii J hai Wilmer Wulten Pej he eniox. and Robert Iclman senior, were Jle S!L l6 li. loi 1?so ■Eh ' .Id ' ■r-r — -. ' .- « v fi. rW fifl. m.4tm vt« ' It o? " O. « ' " .. ' otA ' io? ' " O ' a , , ' ' sPPa Phi. The tt ,W ' S ' ' " or ' ' ■epZ t was made in ch V- !:.X . ««? 6 , ' ' A Cf -Sday. Feb. 2a, by Dr. so ' .iter ' ei -; 1 1 ■ .5 OUSJT; .• S ' n.ri oj ' ■fVa ' « ■Oja, lt,« «im«8 jp IHT ' -ai ' Isngcr, presideiit of the N irikiaMi ' fl » Above— embers ..i Wt- leyan ' s physics club. Alplni (iamnia r.tUi Alpha Gamma Beta BEi,ow — Memliers of the psychnlocy dub, Psi Chi, include Dorothy Peters, Lucile Kokes, Ruth Ellis, Louise Gottschalk. Maxine Cope and Lois Beebe in the front row : Madeleine Alexander, Doris Cooper. Rachel Steohenson. Beulah Oadow and Ruth Aikins in the secon i row; Arthur Hosick. Ernest Metzger, Merlin Merrill. Olan Terrell and Dr. Roy W, Deal in row three. 94 Psi Ch Bv VIVIAN FINLEY Psi Chi, national honorary psychology fraternity, was founded at Nebraska Wesleyan university in 1921 as a psychology club. In 1929 students majoring and minoring in psychology became charter members in Psi Chi. At the monthly meetings, articles in current psychological journals are reviewed, discussions are held, and demon- strations of psychological phenomena are presented. Guest speakers are frequently invited to talk before the group. Officers for this year are president, Merlin Merrill, Carle- ton senior; vice-president, Ernest Metzger, Crawford junior; and secretary-treasurer, Ruth Ellis, Bloomfield senior. Dr. Roy W. Deal is sponsor of the group. HOW TO SPEND A SUMMER PROFITABLY Ever wish you could type, take dictation, and operate business machines — or wish you could do it better? If you have, then we recommend L. S. C. Summer School. Beginning Monday, June 10. this training is available to you for twelve full weeks. If you are a beginner in commercial, you can com- plete a third or more of a full course in this short period. It is a natural for the advanced student who wishes to " brush-up. " In the fall you may wish to continue; if so, you do it without a break. If you want to follow up former plans — do so. It is always possible to return and pick up where you left off. That ' s our recommendation for spending a profitable summer. And say, It is pleasant too — no heat! For all class rooms are air con- ditioned — cool and comfortable. Regular in- structors and courses, too. WRITE OR CALL FOR INFORMATION Alpha Gamma Beta By SYLVIA MACNUSON Alpha Gamma Beta was organized in 1908 and was first known as the Wesleyan Camera Club. Since then it has extended its field to cover physics in general. Membership includes not only those majoring in physics, but also chemis- try students, pre-medics, and others showing interest in the field. The club holds meetings Ln the physics lecture room, at which time various members conduct the demonstration of laboratory apparatus. Outside speakers and alumni are often invited to the meetings to tell of their work. Many gradu- ates who have majored in physics have become prominent in research and industrial work. Active membership in the club this year includes the following: Dr. J. C. Jensen, sponsor, Francis Breeden, Eldon Brown, Marion Caruthers, Ralph Clary, Claude Clements, John Groesser, Dwight Hamilton, Gerald Hicks, Arthur Hosick, Homer Ibser, Dale Magnuson, Ray Moore, Paul Murray, Robert Nisley, Donald Trauger, Robert Schlichte- meier, Ellis Schlichtemeier, Keith Wycoff. New members recently elected include Elmer Artist, David Coulter, Paul Figard, Robert Gottschalk, Charles Greenslit, Darrell Hunt, Clayton McAuliffe, Merle Mahr, Lloyd Miller, Thomas Parkin, Harold Pickering, Ray Seley, and John Wise. Newly elected officers are as follows: president. Dale Magnuson, replacing Francis Breeden; vice-president, Dwight Hamilton, succeeding Eldon Brown; and secretary- treasurer, Ralph Clary, succeeding Dale Magnuson. W. A. Robbins, President Lincoln School of Commerce j 209 North 14th St. Lincoln T- DR. E. S. MATHERS — — , DENTIST c ook Clinic Building t ( 4825 St. Paul 6 2243 1 CROOK CLINIC PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS R. CROOK C. E. CROOK C. D. CROOK t SCHOOL PHYSICIAN Office: 4825 St. Paul Phone 6-2235 95 ' ' Life ' s Most Treasured Gift YOUR (;KA1)L ATION PHOTOGRAPH SEE OUR SPECIAL OFFERS i: A N S S T U U I () 1215 P Street Room 26 Phone 5-4146 — — -_„_.. J Keep fresJi. ouin and love! LENA ' S BEAUTY SHOP LENA M. BARNHILL 4739 St. Paul Ave. Phone 6-5030 HOLMES GROCERY (r MARKET FRESH MEATS, FRUITS and VEGETABLES 2639 North 48th Phonj 6-2194 fJ e Can Serve Oar ! WESLFA AN FRIENDS j • REAL ESTATE j • INVESTMENTS • LOANS • INSURANCE HARRINGTON COMPANIES RALPH and DON 140 South 12th 2-3529 Below — D-on ' t let appearances deceive you : the beverage served at the Crescent bowery party was nothing stronger than cider. Here Marvin Keuten and Darrel! Hunt are ready to " set ' em up. " _ .;t.Cx Below — The Gams had an incongruous party recently. Bob Romig and Audrey Bullock are interested in the music maker. 96 Above — The Gams and thuir dates, but ' me I ' lund closer inteix-.- ts than the photopra pher. Below — Crescents and their dates pet together — unless looks are deceiving. Everi Facility for Every Function Hotel Lincoln A genuine welcome always Ideal Accommodations for PARTIES TEAS DINNERS DANCES CONVENTIONS E. L. Wilbur, Mnnar cr ] OF COURSE. again are Molloy-Made OUR 1940 PLAINS MAX Covers | t i DRS. TAYLOR TAYLOR PHYSICIANS SURGEONS • DR. CARELD L. BUTLER DENTIST Phone 6-2257 4728 St. Paul Ave. 1 1 A LIFE-LONG FRIEND OF CHRISTIAN EDUCATION CHAIRMAN. BOARD OF TRUSTEES, DOANE COLLEGE FORMER MEMBER OMAHA SCHOOL BOARD j I DONOR TO NEBRASKA WESLEYAN { HUGH butler! Republican for | UNITED STATES SENATOR I .....— — — - — — — . — —_„_.._ J An Ultrafine CLEANING and Laundry Service Hal-ters • Dyers Curtain-Cleaning • Knit Goods Blocking • SAVE by using our Cash Carry Service • 6- 1679 BUTLER ' S Cleaners Dyers 4725 St. Paul Ave. Above — Alice Jayne Grosshans gets playful and Syh ' ia MaRnuson is rolled about in the snow. irS SPRING _ A N D — SPRING TIME — I s — KODAK TIME ITS FIX TO MAKE PICTURES WITH A KODAK We have Kodaks as low as $3.95 Brownie Cameras $1.00 and up EASTMAN KODAK STORES, INC. 1221 O STREET ! UNI. ELECTRIC RADIO CO. Radio Tubes, Electrical Repairs Supplies Refrigerators CAFE LUNCH Milk. Ice Cream Cheese Bread. Cake Pie 4736 St. Paul Above — Dr. Harold Lancaster. Religiuus Emphasis Week speakov. explains something to Rachel Stephenson and Garnett Tremain. T— — — — " f FATHER SON ! GREEN FURNACE PLUMBING CO. AIR-CONDITIONING PHONE US FOR SERVICE 1 6- 2800 2747 No. 48th Patronize the ' ' Plains in ait " Afhrrtizers 99 SENIFT ' S STORE — F O R — DISTINCTIVE STYLES — I N — EASTER SPECIALS NEWEST lEWELRY ATTRACTIVE WATCHES MOTHERS ' DAY GIFTS AND CARDS STUDENTS ' SUPPLIES KODAK FINISHING DOC SENIFT GLENN 2701 North 48th Phone 6-1378 " Service Our Motto " LUMBER, COAL WALLBOARDS I I 1 » LATTICE, PAINTS j I ! SMITH BR OS. Tlic Lumber SuiitJis 2341 NORTH 48th PHONE 6-2527 fr. .. ..... ■« PRACTICAL GIFTS ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES POPULAR PRICES L. M. THOMAS SON 6-2363 Uni. Place Hardware A. C. E. By SYLVIA MAGNUSON The National Association for Childhood Education was formed in 1930. The Wesleyan chapter was organized in 1937, and has as its objective the promotion of adequate edu- cational opportunities for teachers of young children. The Association gathers and disseminates knowledge of modern educational movements, promotes progressive types of education in nursery school, kindergarten, and primary grades, and works to raise the standard of professional train- ing in this field. ITiose who wish to become members must be interested in the early childhood education, meet a minimum grade requirement, and be voted in by the group. One business and one social meeting is held each month. The May breakfast ends the year ' s social activities. During the year the group has made several observation trips to public grade schools in an attempt to study different tech- niques in different schools. Last year the national convention was held at Atlanta, Ga.; three students of the department, whose expenses were partly paid by the A. C. E . attended the convention. The 1940 national convention will be held at Milwaukee, ' Wis., in April L Miss Marguerite i ' ctii dn and the pink-eyed rabbit had no diificulty keeping the children ' s attention, even with a photographer ready to shoot them. Officers of A. C. E. are as follows: president, Adelaide Reynolds; vice-president, Thelma Randall; secretary, Mar- jorie Ritter; treasurer, ' Vera Anderson; publicity chairman. ' Vernona Wilhite; executive committee, Alatha DeBoer, Amy Martin, and Evelyn Coates. Membership consists of the following: Sarah Brown. Leona Cox, Dorothy Davis, Ida Furst, Twila Hitchcock, Imogene Johnson, Lucile Kokes, Ethel McNickle, Amy Mar- tin, Elaine Olson, Marguerite Peterson, Marjorie Ritter, Norma Shepardson, Pearl Shuman, Kathryn Stewart, Mary Wise, ' Vera Anderson, Jean Bolton, Marguerite Carter, Alatha DeBoer, Thelma Fleischauer, Bea Goodrich, Frances Holm, Dora Hughes, Eunice Kuehn, Betty McMeeken, Mildred Nelson, Thelma Randall, Adelaide Reynolds, Velora Roberts, Garnett Tremain, Vernona ' Wilhite, and Clara Belle ' William- 100 The Upper Crust By SYLVIA MACNUSON It is only just that as they leave Wesleyan a tribute be paid to those members of the senior class who have shoul- dered the duties and responsibilities of leadership during their college careers. This is the first installment of this year ' s " Upper Crust. " Another set of campus leaders will be presented in the spring issue of the " Plainsman. " HARVEY FEYERHERM: Delving into the biological aspects of humanity seems to be most interesting to Harvey, assist ant in the biology department, but his top-notch work in other fields has enabled him to be elected to Phi Kappa Phi. He now serves as president of Inter-fraternity council; he has held the presidencies of College council and Delta Omega Phi fraternity. A member of " W " club, he has col- lected three letters in basketball. NEBRASKA WESLEYAN CAFETERIA Boarding club, Cafeteria at Noon, and " between meal snacks " Banquets and Dinner Parties Sunday Dinner — 12 to 1:30 LYDA VARNEY: They must like her! At any rate, members of Yellers of the Brown unanimously re-elected her to serve as president of the organization the second semester this year. Although she has never appeared on the stage, she has worked on nearly every committee and done much of the ' dirty work " in connection with play production. She is a member of both Plainsman Players and Theta Alpha Phi. Besides all this, Lyda and her piccolo make music for the band, and she is a member of Y. W C. A. and Phi Mu sorority. VANCE JAMES ' interests are many and varied. Evident- ly he has made a hobby of holding campus offices, for he is president of the senior class, president of Crescent fraternity, secretary-treasurer of " W " club. He recently relinquished the Y. M. C. A. presidency. He holds membership in Plains- man Players, Theta Alpha Phi, and Blue Key. His newest pursuit is in the field of aeronautics: he has made a solo flight. Last year Vance was editor of the student handbook. He has already earned three track letters and will again be wearing Wesleyan colors this spring. He has a controlling interest in his little " Lambie. " MARGARET THOMSON: " Tommy " finds that being president of Bleu Thonge takes time, but she also partici- pates in dramatics, one of her main loves. She is an active member in both Plainsman Players and Theta Alpha Phi. This year she drew considerable attention for her portrayal of the lead in " Wingless Victory. " She is a Purple Arqus member, and is secretary-treasurer of the senior class. JOHN STATEN: " Tiger Jawn " is Wesleyan ' s all-around athlete. He has collected four letters in football, four in basketball, and will be working for his third track letter this spring. Appropriately, he is " W " club president, and is a member of Blue Key and Phi Kappa Tau. DORIS BLEWFIELD has won no football letters, nor has she brought home any debate trophies, but she ' s made audi- ences laugh and cry by her portrayals on the Wesleyan stage. She heads her social group, Willard. Listed among her campus activities are Phi Kappa Phi, Pi Gamma Mu. Plainsman Players, Theta Alpha Phi, Purple Arqus, and Panhellenic council. She is a former secretary of College council. WAYNE STEWART has practically grown up in the speech department. He is one of the major trophy winners, being the state Old Line orator and a member of the men ' s varsity debate teams. He was both freshman and senior orator for his class. This year he has served as president of both Pi Kappa Delta and Blue Key. He " " business man- aged " the student handbook this year, and assisted the an- nual editor last year. He has served on the College council for one term, and is house manager of Crescent fraternity. EAT AND EN )OY FAIRMONT ' S ICE CREAM j ' ' THE PEAK OF (QUALITY " THE FAIRMONT CREAMERY CO. ! LINCOLN, NEBRASKA Visit our Newly Decorated Party Room Available at Moderate Prices LINDELL HOTEL Coflfee Shop SERVING FINE FOODS on Snow White Linen Mrs. Simmons and Ruby Managers Coffee Shop Open 7 to 2 5 to 8 101 Prof. Joe A. Parsons, Industrial Arts Instructor Prof. Ethel Booth, English Instructor Miss Zazel Sloniger, Registrar Dr Roy W. Deal, Head of the Psychology Department Fj 44i! ' iZ mW » ' f LOOK FOR THIS TRADEMARK when ynii buy FLOUR CEREALS CA TTLE FEEDS • It is Your Guarantee of the best quality — always ! CHICK PELLETS This year — make sure vour eliieks are gel- tin " a l alanee I ration. Feed VICTOR CHICK PEU.KTS — the srienlifirallv balanced ehiok feed. MCTOR CHICK I ' ELLETS are rich in the vitamins, proteins, carhohy- drales, fats and minerals that are essential to ehiok health and ;ro« tli and to ihe devel- opment of hens with a hi ;h |)r dnelion of ipialilv e«; ;s. That means I ' lJOU IS lo on. CONTAIN THESE GREENMELK MANGANESE SULPHATE COD LIVER OIL IODINE BUTTERMILK LIVER MEAL KILN-DRIED CORi SVIEAL Also 13 other vital Chick Feed Ingredients Vithout obligation — XOW — ivrite for our interesting new Poultry Booklet THE CRETE MILLS CRETE, NEBRASKA T e Place For Tour Parties! Hotel Capital Visit the New Ballroom Just Completed Lincoln ' s Smartest Dine llegiilarly in tlic Coffee Lounaj ' e % th P Street 2-1261 RAY HEDGES, Mgr. - pv % JL... ,d. r ;cL -Y J ' ■i rA. J. ' :: ' - ' di t.,yy -, A y ..v- - - .C l aU " rt-»ij»t-- ' i ' J-t-tx. :- J Ji-a A£-o-iAJt yf-oMs iaX. cl£ iJ ' » VV fit:! t:. ; !! Ja, A :-- ' - ' ' Quality and Service are _ . . the Rule K -i. C i,-« tA XA At. i , , y JJ . jtM- «. l« Ktx- c,.UJ THE- rprEnK irnK5(S7 P; l ' -I8 NORTH 8 " STREET PHONE 6-2355 IP AM Y LINCOLN. NEBRASKA k- -yy- i-H Co- .vt " . J . -Q - eOM- ' h C A- AAA n- »- - C ,-iv- « . C- « - nut Bq Evcrii Facility for Every Function Hotel Lincoln A genuine welcome always Ideal Accommodations for PARTIES TEAS DINNERS DANCES CONVENTIONS E. L. Wilbur, Manager ! j Visit our Mrs. Simmons j i Newly Decor. 3 ted and 1 Party LINDELL Ruby 1 j Room HOTEL Managers j Coffee Shop t 1 SERVING ! FINE FOODS » 1 Available on Coffee ! Snow Vv hite Shop Open 1 Moderate Linen 7 to 2 1 j Prices 1 t 5 to 8 ] ! LAWN MOWERS MONARCH PAINT I I GARDEN TOOLS VAL-SPAR VARNISH • NU-ENAMEL POPULAR PRICES L. M. THOMAS SON 6-2363 Uni. Place Hardware GOOD FOOD QU ICK SERVICE WESLEYAN CAFETERIA Picnic Service Reasonable Prices •••..— •• •••. EAT AND ENJOY FAIRMONT ' S ICE CREAM ' ' THE PEAK OF qVAIJTY " I THE I FAIRMONT CREAMERY CO. T.TXCOIvN. NEBRASKA Laona E. Underkofler. Professor of Biology Dr. Martin R. Broadbooks. Professor of Chemistry Ruth M. Butcher. Instructor in Speech V ! ' I ' na ;ff jj ernj; e N. Mj tbert ' Prbjffelpsor of English Rosehtrater, Professor of Religion and Philosophy GRADUATION GIFTS WESLEYAN CRESTED COMPACTS KEY CHAINS. RINGS, PLAQUES, PENNANTS, STATIONERY. GREETING CARDS, BOOK ENDS, AND GIFTS OF ALL KINDS AT ll «ieS ' t, W YTCt, 1 t ( t » » » t ( ♦ « t t • WESLEYANN COLLEGE BOOKSHOPP Miss Hannah Jensen, Prop. 271 1 No. 48th 6-1608 BURLINGTON BUS DEPOT ' Eirri thinc for the Sfiiflciif May Your Diploma bring you much happiness and success in the future years with pleasant memories of Nebraska Wesleyan University — and — MAYO DRUG CO. TJic Dnif Store on iJic Corner 2700 North 48th Phone 6-2000 Lincoln, Nebraska The Editor Speaks-- Hello and goodbye. Your 1940 " Plainsman " is now complete, or as near so as it ever will be — at any rate, the staff has stopped working so the editor decided to call it a year. It is hardly necessary for the editor to sum up the book ' s contents, for the reader can easily do that himself by glanc- ing at the table of consents of each edition, but the editor would like to take advantage of his position to say a few words and pay a few tributes. Your " Plainsman " required the time and labor of several persons, and it is only fair that the credit which is their due be given. The editor is greatly indebted to Prof. Wendell L. Hoffman for his helpful direction and suggestions which aided im- measureably in the formulation of the book. " Press " and his camera have been able to depict a school year at Wes- leyan more adequately and interestingly than it has ever before been done. The editor also wishes to express his appreciation to Bruce E. Keith, associate editor of the " Plainsman " and editor of the " Wesleyan, " for listening to the difficulties of yearbook ccnstruction and aiding in the solution of problems. The work of the editorial and business staffs of the year- book has been appreciated, as has the co-operation of the " Wesleyan " staff. Mentioned collectively here, separate tribute is paid to them in the publications section. THE PLAINSMAN Magazine of Nebraska Wesleyan University 1939-1940 SPRING EDITION Editor, Warren E. Johnston Business Manager, James L. Tipton Associate Editor. Bruce E. Keith Associate Bus. Mgr., Wilmer G. Woltemath Assistant Editor, Sylvia E. Magnuson Assistant Bus. Mgr., Alice E. Hertzler 108 Claflin ' s printing, the Journal ' s engraving, Evans ' photog- raphy for class pictures, and Molloy-Made covers have helped make the " Plainsman " something for the student to admire and keep. The editor realizes that his is not a perfect annual, but he believes it to be one which will preserve memories to be cherished by students long after they have left Nebraska Wesleyan. He has attempted to depict campus life and ac- tivities, the things of which students will enjoy being re- minded later on. Informal treatment of school life, carefully selected pic- tures, and short, concise articles characterize your 1940 " Plainsman. " Because it is published in the form of three magazines, your yearbook is allowed greater freedom of presentation than almost any other college annual. It por- trays the year ' s events as they happen. In presenting the completed 1940 " Plainsman, " the editor has no apology to make; he ' s proud of what the staffs com- bined efforts have produced, and hopes that in years to come i; will remind you of a pleasant college career at Nebraska Wesleyan. Cover picture of Spring " Plainsman " shows Wesleyan ' s Ideal Plainswoman, Aneeta Humphrey, and Ideal Plainsman, johnny Staten. 1939-1940 PLAINSMAN Spring Edition CONTENTS Page Ideal Plainsman and Ideal Plainswoman - - - 10::i Camera Catches - - - - - - - 107 The Editor Speaks - - - - - - 103 Spring Has Sprung - - - - - - 110 Publick — . Sylvia Magnuson - - - - - 112 Ayshuns, Sylvia Magnuson - - - - 114 Net Results - - - - - - - 115 They Make Tracks - - - - - - 116 Seniors - - - - - - - - 119 The Upper Crust - - - - - - 12 Big Snob — Old Crouch - - - - - 1 26 May Fete, Vivian Finley - - - - - 128 Purple Arqus, ' ivian Finley - - - - - 130 Blue Key, Vivian Finley - - - - - - 131 Headliners - - - - - - - 132 Forensics, Vera Harvey - - - - - - 134 Dramatics, Vera Harvey - - - - - 137 Pi Camma Mu, Ruth Creamer ----- 140 Phi Kappa Phi, Ruth Creamer - - - - 140 W. A. A., Clara Belle U illiamson - - - - 142 Class Officers - - - - - - - 143 Bleu Thonge, Carol Ann Glidewell - - - - 144 " Press " Goes To A Party - - - - - 145 Ideal Plainspeople, Ruth Creamer - - - - 1 50 Big Snob — Old Crouch, Sylvia Magnuson - - - 1 50 The Upper Crust, Sylvia Magnuson - - - - 151 Camera Catches - - - - - - - 152 I SHOP WHERE YOU CAN SAVE EVERY DAY! IT ISN ' T necessary to hunt all over town for bargains, because you can be sure that the " Cheapper " Drug Store IS selling it at the lowest pos- sible price! Look for the sign of the " Flying Red Arrow " on Street! It leads to greater values! DRUGS CIGARS CANDY TOBACCO STATIONERY COSMETICS TOILETRIES JVc Keep Lincoln Prices Dotcii! E CARRY complete lines of all the nationally advertised brands. Low prices every day. You always save at " Cheapper ' s " ! CHEAPPER System, Inc. 1325 LINCOLN } Come in and Brorcsc Around! t [ CITIZENS STATE BANK 2650 North 48th Street r- CASTLE, ROPER MATTHEWS C. H. ROPER SONS MORTICIANS 109 iU The photogrypher killi_ ' d X j tiinU with nne stmn-, I ' lm ' ht 11 birds in one shot, or, anyway, he captured the idea of spring on the campus. Not only did he find a number of students for the picture, but he shot the Bleu Thonpre cabinet. In the front row are Margaret Anderson, Max Kemling, Ruth Gardner and Carl Christen- sen ; second row. Mar raret Guy. Betty Glines, Marvin Snyder, Margaret Thomson, Warren Johnston, Marjorie Ritter and Catharine Thomson. Spring Has Sprung — and when spring has sprung on the Wesleyan campus, or any other campus, students seem to forget that Daddy ' s hard-earned dollars are to be used in the pursuit of higher learning. But who can blame the college student for taking a little vacation from studies in order to sun him- self on Wesleyan ' s beautiful green lawn? Beginning sometime in May, after the Nebraska snow drifts have disappeared and made way for velvet -like lawns, when the ivy again hides the walls of Old Main, students enjoy loafing on the lawn for a minute or two before classes, or to catch a deep breath before plunging into the mass of material to be mastered before final ex- aminations appear. no RIGHT— Bill Sutphen doesn ' t like rain, Ruth Sallenbach makes a cloudy day look sunny, and Keith Clifton takes the weather as it come. " . BELOW— Jean Marie Stewart, Marjorie Ritter and Ixiis Ander- son pick a lirightcr day to be outside, aiid spritiiJ fever may be the result 111 ABOVE — The bipr names in the " Wesleyan " editorial staff get together. Going around the table, we find Jeanne Souser, society editor; Warren Johnston, associate editor; Vivian Finley, co-assistant editor; Bruce Keith, editor-in-chief; Sylvia Magnuson, associate editor; and Marion Swanson, co-assistant editor. LEFT— The " top three, " Marion Swanson. Vivian Finley. ami Bruce Keith, keep things moving on a Thursday afternoon at the Uni. Place News in order that Wesleyan students may get results when they clamor for " today ' s paper " Friday morning. Publick— The Wesleyan By SYLVIA MACNUSON The year 1939 to 1940 has proven to be the high mark to date for Wesleyan publications. Under the supervision of Prof. Wendell L. Hoffman, director of publicity and instruc- tor in journalism, all publications of the Yellow and Brown have improved. The " Wesleyan " this year with its issues of the first semester of 1939-1940 received the highest rating ever ac- corded a Nebraska Wesleyan university paper in the 48-year history of its publication. Bruce E. Keith is editor-in-chief. The " Wesleyan, " one of 406 college papers submitted to the AU-American critical service of the Associated Collegiate Press, received a " first class " or " excellent " rating. Only four papers in the nation in its classification received a higher rating. The highest rating previously attained by the uni- versity paper was the one received last year and was also under Keith ' s direction. il? ■vK ABOVE -Staff reporters include Margie Smith, Armon Stover, June Moslander, Betty Allen and Dean Young, RIGHT — Serving: in minor editorial po.sitions on the " Wesleyan " arc Ruth Creamer, Carol Ann Glidcwell, Vera Harvey, Carroll Story and P ' red Hess, and don ' t let the picture, which portrays them as a happy grroup of loafers, fool ycu,, ABOVE -Gordon Roberts, Evelyn Wittenlach and I ' aul Scott give the impression that they ' re more or less busy. RIGHT — Lynne Anderson, assistant business manaKer of the student publication, and Kenneth Frohardt, business manager. Marion E. Swanson and Vivian L. Finley are assistant editors of the paper. During the first semester Miss Swanson supervised the suburban news and Miss Finley publicized the music activities of N. W. U., in addition to her " Society Tidbits. " Miss Swanson assists with the make-up, while Miss Finley handles assignments and aids in editing copy. Both assist in laboratory supervision and are competent headline writers. Associate editors include Warren E. Johnston, top-notch headline writer, and Sylvia E. Magnuson, who supervises journalism labs and helps with headline writing. During the year. Miss Magnuson covered the Pep club, College council, and collected data on the faculty opinion WTiteups. (Continued on page 148) BELOW— Clara Belle Williamson, Bill Dafoe and Adelaide Rey- nolds want ycu to believe they enjoy the work. 113 Net Results Zo ' ' ' y ai9 Elbert Souders kept the long string of conference singles championships intact for Wesleyan when he defeated De- Freese of Midland in the finals by a score of 6-2, 1-6, 6-4. Inclement weather produced an " up and down " season as far as team matches were concerned. York and Doane were defeated, while Midland achieved the first victory by a con- ference team in several years. Hastings was not encountered. Members of the team were Souders, Bruce Keith, Merle Gels, Bill Sutphen, Wilmer Woltemath and Dean McGee. Souders was undefeated in singles play throughout the season. Tennis lettermen for the 1940 season are Souders and Keith. 115 J , Kandali. otc ' h sprinter. They Make Tracks Good performances by a group of old standby seniors and a half dozen promising freshmen were the high lights of the 1940 track season. Merle Randall ' s first in the hundred at the Wayne relays and his fourth in the same event at the Colorado relays were the outstanding events of the season. This fine runner, after dominating the sprints and quarter mile among the state colleges for four seasons, had the mis- fortune to pull a muscle at the start of the conference meet and was forced to withdraw. John Staten, Don Williams, Gerald Hicks, Vance James and Bill Nichol, all seniors, aided by Everett Moles, a fresh- man, scored twenty points to place fourth in the conference meet. Staten was second in the 440 and third in the low hurdles; Williams was third in the 440 and fourth in the low hurdles; James placed third in the 220 and fourth in the 100; Hicks was fourth in the mile, while Moles staged one of the most thrilling finishes of the day to get a close second in the half mile. Staten, Williams, Nichol and James won Wesleyan ' s only first place when they handily won the relay. Other men giving good performances during the season were Claude Clements in the pole vault and discus, Don Kohl in the high hurdles and high jump, Marvin Keuten in the shot put and javelin throw, Pete Post in the high hurdles, pole vault and low hurdles, Harold Ellis in the quarter mile, John Nickens in the high jump and Gordon Brackett in the quarter mile. ivifiif x iiMiaii, luip-uijiLii fiiiiiiitri, hreiiks the t pe in tlu- lu;il neet with Hastings on the Wesleyan track. Vance James, at extreme right, grahs a second place: and Bill Nichol, at extreme left, puts on a finishing burst of speed to annex the third position as Wesleyan swept the 220 race. 1 , • 116 Don Williams Johnny St-afen Bill Nichol f Vance James Everett Moles Gerald Hicks ' , ABOVE -Don Kohl ties a huestrinvr, ami Harold Ellis puts on r takes off a shoe. ABOVE Mui-.iu K uiLi. l. ' .M. U.c : liui put. BELOW — Pete Post does some measuring before attempting to clear the bar. BELOW Claufle Clements prepsires in henvc the iliscus f jiim»- " ,J.. -m 118 Seniors Row 1 ANDERSON, HOMER, Lincoln. Crescent, band, orches ' ra. Inter-fraternity council, Y. M. C. A. ANDERSON, LYNNE, Omaha. Alpha Gamma Delta, Pi Gam- ma Mu, Theta Alpha Phi, oratory. Pi Kappa Delta, Plainsman Players, Pep club, " Wesleyan " assistant busi- ness manager. BAKER, HARRY, Lincoln, football. Rou ' 2 BARTLEY. ERNEST R.. Lincoln. Phi Kappa Tau, Pi Kappi Delta, Pi Gamma Mu, band, " W " club. BELL, ROBERT, Li?ico(n, Psi Chi. BLEWFIELD, DORIS, Dixo i. III. Willard, Pi Gamma Mu, Phi Kappa Phi, Purple Arqus, Plainsman Players, Theta Alpha Phi, Panhellenic council, College council, Y. W. C. A. BREEDEN, FRANCIS, Li7)Co(7i, Alpha Gamma Beta. BUTCHER, EUNICE, Valley, Alpha Gamma Delta, Psi Chi. chorus. Pi Gamma Mu (first semester student). Roui 3 CARNE, GEORGE, Liiicohi, Delta Omega Phi, football, " W " club. CARUTHERS, MARION, Beatrice, Alpha Gamma Beta, ■W " club. COOPER, DORIS L., Gering. Beta Phi Alpha, Plainsman Players, Theta Alpha Phi, Psi Chi, Panhellenic council, Y. W. C. A. COURTER, GLENICE, Gothenburg, Bleu Thonge, S. C. F., V. W. C. A. COX, HOWELL, Ogallala. Delta Omega Phi, band, male a cappella chorus. p=-6) ' ' - ' ' ' ' jp? ' T on , l ' - - - - " " ' ' " - . S E E N I O R S N I O R S Row 4 HODGKIN, BERNIE, Bellwood. Delta Omega Phi. chorus, male a cappella chorus. HOLBERT, MARGARET MARIEN, Sedalia. Mo.. Bleu Thonge, chorus, S. C. F., Y. W. C. A. HOSICK, ARTHUR, Stratton. Delta Omega Phi. Alpha Gam- ma Beta, Psi Chi. HUMPHREY, ANEETA, Atkinson. Phi Mu, Psi Chi, Pan- hellenic council. Purple Arqus. Y. W. C. A. JAMES, VANCE. Omaha, Crescent. Blua Key, Theta Alpha Phi, " W " club, track. Plainsman Players, Y. M. C. A. president. Row 1 CROFT, ALBERT, Cabool, Mo.. Crescent, Pi Kappa Delta. Blue Key, College council, editor of handbook, debate, Inter-fraternify council, Y. M. C. A. EBRIGHT, NEVA, North Platte. Alpha Gamma Delta, chorus, Y. W. C. A. president. ELLIS, RUTH, Bloomfield. Willard, Psi Chi, Pep club, chorus, Y. W. C, A. FEYERHERM, HARVEY. West Point. Delta Omega Phi, bas- ketball, Phi Kappa Phi, Inter-fraternity council. " W " club. FROHARDT, KENNETH, Atkinson. Phi Kappa Tau, Blue Key, Inter-fraternity council, Plainsman Players, Theta Alpha Phi, " Wesleyan " business manager. Y. M. C. A. Row 2 GADOW, BEULAH, Western. Beta Phi Alpha, Psi Chi, Y. W. C. A. (first semester student). GARDNER, RUTH, Linco:7i, Bleu Thonge, Y. W. C. A. GERD, VILLIERS R., Coo?c, Bleu Thonge, Pi Gamma Mu, Phi Kappa Phi, S. C. F.. Y. M. C. A. GOTTSCHALK, LOUISE. Benkehnan. Theta Upsilon, Phi Kappa Phi, Psi Chi, Pi Gamma Mu, chorus. Girls ' glee club, band, Panhellenic council, Y. W. C. A. GOTTSCHALK, ROBERT, Benkebnan. Delta Omega Phi, Theta Nu, Phi Kappa Phi, Blue Key, Y. M. C. A. Row 3 HAMILTON, DWIGHT T., Orleans. Bleu Thonge, Alpha Gamma Beta, band, Y. M. C. A. HARRINGTON, FRANK, Lincoln. Phi Kappa Tau, Blue Key, " W " club, football. HATCH, FRANCES JANE, Lincoln, S. C. F. HAUPT, OPAL, Lincohi, Alpha Gamma Delta, Psi Chi, Y. W. C. A. HICKS, H. GERALD, Farnam, Crescent, Alpha Gamma Beta, track, football, " W " club, Y. M. C. A. Row 5 JOHNSON. HERMAN. Gordon. JOHNSON. PAUL G.. Wood River. Delta Omega Phi, basket- ball, " W club, chorus. Y. M. C. A. JOHNSTON, WARREN E., Lincoln. Bleu Thonge, editor of " Plainsman. " associate editor of " Wesleyan, " Pep club cabinet, Y. M. C. A. cabinet. KAIMMER. ANNE, Let ibridge. Alberta. Canada. Phi Mu. Pi Gamma Mu, Psi Chi, Y. W. C. A. KEITH, BRUCE E., Curtis. Phi Kappa Phi, Pi Gamma Mu. ' " W " club, tennis, editor of " Wesleyan, " associate editor of " Plainsman, " Y. M. C. A, Roic G KILZER, HELENA M., Lebnnon. Alpha Gamma Delta, chorus, Y. W, C. A, KNIGHT, DOROTHY, Lincoln, Alpha Gamma Delta, Purple Arqus, Plainsman Players, Theta Alpha Phi, W, A. A. cabinet. College council. KOKES, LUCILE, Tekamah, Theta Upsilon, Plainsman Play- ers, Psi Chi, Girls ' Glee club, Y. W. C. A. LEHIGH, LOIS, Lincoln. Plainsman Players, S. C. F., Y. W. C. A. (second semester student). McAllister, LELAND E., Lincoln. S E N I O S E N I O R R S 121 kQ ! W . . ybi ii idiY. .- . . N» ' ni iliii iiiA trfh LaJo, ' ■UMi «« « ' • N V ! HA HHKyfl HHR. ' 3%, ! 3 ' 2 e N I O R S S E E N I O R S Row 1 MAHR, MERLE, Seward. Crescent. Blue Key, Th.na Nu, Pi Gamma Mu. MARTIN, ALLAN, Pleasant Dale, Kappa Chi. MATICKA, EMILY. Elba. Bleu Thonge, Fi Gamma Mu, S. C. F., Y. W. C. A. MENDELL, ROSS, Scottsbhiff. Delta Omega Phi, Theta Alpha Phi, Plainsman Players, male a cappella chorus, chorus, Y. M. C. A. MERRILL. MERLIN. CaWeton, Pi Gamma Mu, S. C. F.. Phi Kappa Phi. Psi Chi, Y. M. C. A. Row 2 MURRAY, PAUL E., Friend, Delta Omega Phi, Alpha Gam- ma Beta, Y. M. C. A. NICHOL, BILL, Scottsbluff, Delta Omega Phi, Inter-fra- ternity council, chorus, male a cappella chorus, track, Y. M. C. A. NYE, KENNETH E., Lincoln, male a cappella chorus. Kappa Chi. PANZER. GEORGE O.. Decatur, Delta Omega Phi, Pi Gam- ma Mu, " W " club, Y. M. C. A., (first semester student). PAYDER, ALICE, Battle Creek, Theta Upsilon. Row 3 PETERS, DOROTHY, Lincoln, Alpha Gamma Delta, Psi Chi, Pi Gamma Mu, Purple Arqus, Panhellenic council, chorus, Y. W. C. A. cabinet. POWELL, LUTHER, Lincohi (first semester student). RANDALL, MERLE, Fairbury, Phi Kappa Tau, football, track, " W " club. SCHLICHTEMEIER. ROBERT J., Nehawka, Bleu Thonge, Alpha Gamma Beta, Y. M. C. A. SLOTE, BELVA, Lincoln. Row 4 SMITH, ANNIE LAURIE, Shubert. Bleu Thonge, Y. W. C. A. SMITH, AUDREY, Hartington. Willard, Theta Alpha Phi, Plainsman Players, Y. W. C A. SOUDERS, ELBERT E., Lincoln, basketball, tennis, " W " club, Y. M. C. A. SPAULDING, MARY KAY, Bozeman. Mont.. Alpha Gamma Delta, Theta Alpha Phi, Plainsman Players. Psi Chi. Y. W. C. A. STATEN, JOHNNY, Lincoln, Phi Kappa Tau, Blue Key, basketball, football, track. " W " club. Row 5 STEWART, WAYNE, West Point, Crescent, Pi Kappa Delta, Blue Key, oratory, debae, business manager of hand- book. TERRELL, OLAN A., Cxdbertson, Bleu Thonge, Psi Chi, S. C. F.. Y. M. C. A. THELANDER, LUCILE, Denton. Bleu Thonge, Pi Gamma Mu, Y. W. C. A. THOMSON, MARGARET, Li)icohi, Bleu Thonge, Pi Gamma Mu, Theta Alpha Phi, Plainsman Players, Purple Arqus, Girls ' Glee club, Y. W. C. A. TREMAIN. GARNETT, Liuco. ' n, Bleu Thonge, A. C. E., S. C. F., Y. W. C. A. Row 6 VARNEY, LYDA, Culbertson. Phi Mu, Pep club president. Plainsman Players, Theta Alpha Phi, band, Y. W. C. A. WILLIAMS, DONALD, Farnam, Delta Omega Phi, Blue Key, " W " club, football, track, Y. M. C. A. WISE, MARY, Primrose, Bleu Thonge, Pi Gamma Mu, A. C. E., Y. W. C. A. WOLTEMATH, WILMER, Sterling, Phi Kappa Tau, Phi Kappa Phi, Pi Gamma Mu, College council president, tennis, basketball, " W " club, assistant business manager of " Plainsman, " Y. M. C. A. ZABEL, FRED, Western. Delta Omega Phi (first semester student) . C y ) 4 V; ryV SENIOR s E N I O R S 123 Al Croft i Aneeta Humphrey -w-«JU 0 ,rr. • C. J -»-l» LA.oL( iduf uJ ' j - - Dorothy Knight Big Snob — Old Crouch Harvey Feyerherm 126 Al ' .UVK A numerous hands down. ■itrinf? was pulled at the Snub-Grouch party, an. I reached for the countless balloons which floated BELOW — Snob-Grouch candidates included Louise Gottschalk, Ann Kaimmer, Harvey Feyerherm and Doris Cooper, in the front row : in the back row, Marparet Thomson, Warren Johnston and Ruth Ellis. Dorothy Knight and Kenneth Frohardt, other candidates, are not in the picture. 127 - May Fete j-O . — — 128 i ABOVE — A Mexican hat dance, with Laura Jean Nelson in the foreKi ' ound. was performed as part of the May Day festivities. OPPOSITE PAGE, ABOVE— Queen Doris Blewfield and Prince James Tipton sit upon their throne, surrounile ! by attendants, pages, flower girls and train bearers. OPPOSITE PAGE. BELOW— Wayne Stewart, president of Blue Key, crowns the queen : and James Tipton is about to receive the sceptre from Dorothy Knight, president of Purple Arqus. BELOW— Whafs May Day without the traditional May pole dance ? Girls from the physical education classes showed onlookers how it ' s done. By VIVIAN FINLEY Doris Blewfield, Dixon, 111. senior, wa3 revealed as May Queen and James Tipton, Archer junior, as Student Prince at the annual May Fete held on Friday afternoon, May 3. The procession was announced by the pages, Evelyn Wittenbach and Garnett Tremain. The daisy chain, com- posed of 25 girls dressed in white, led the procession. Senior attendants for the Queen and Prince were Neva Ebright, Anne Kainrmer, Don Williams and Homer Ander- son. Juniors were Wilma Hills, Sylvia Magnuson, Harvey Waldo and Thomas Parkin. Attendants from the sophomore class were Ruth Nelson, Esther Perkins, Dean Niemann and Ralph Bowmaster. Irene Pickering. Audrey Bullock, Pete Post and James Owen were the freshmen. Donna Crook and Wanda Gardner were flower girls, and train bearers were James Parsons and Marvin Deal. Caroline Weatherhogg was the crown bearer, and the sceptre bearer was Bobby Furman. Three dances, a waltz, Mexican hat dance, and May pole dance were presented by students in the physical educa- tion classes. In the inter-sorority sing which followed, the Willards received first place; and the Phi Taus took first in the inter- fraternity sing. Dorothy Knight, president of Purple Arqus, and Wayn2 Stewart, president of Blue Key, welcomed the newl y - tapped members of the senior honorary organizations. Following the May Fete there was a " Spring Supper Swing, " consisting of a picnic in the Wesleyan grove and an informal dance in the gym. Music for dancing was provided by Stan McCune and his 10-piece orchestra. 129 Purple Arqus members for lJt39-1940 are, in the first row, Dorothy Peters and Aneeta Humphrey : in the back row, Margaret Thomson, Dorothy Kninht and Doris Blewfield. By VIVIAN FINLEY Purple Arqus Great is the suspense at the annual May Fete when the tapping of new members to Puiple Arqus takes place. Each spring a group of girls is chosen from the entire junior class by the old members of (his honorary senior women ' s so- ciety. The selection is made on the basis of friendliness on the campus, scholarship, and participation in student activi- ties. Purple Arqus, a local organization, was founded on the Wesleyan campus in 1921. Its purpose is to promote a spirit of goodwill on the campus and to sponsor worthy activities. Each fall the Purple Arqus members, dressed in white and wearing their purple and gold capes and caps, deliver the sorority invitations to girls who are to be pledged. They also co-operate with the Yellers of the Brown in spon- soring the annual Homecoming celebration and with Blue Key in directing the May Fete. According to custom, the new members are entertained and formally initiated into this secret organization at a breakfast given them by the retiring members. At this oc- casion the little gold quiver of arrows is worn for the first time by these girls as a symbol of their merits. Members of Purple Arqus for 1939-1940 are Dorothy Knight, president. Alpha Gamma Delta; Doris Blewfield, sec- retary, Willard; Dorothy Peters, treasurer. Alpha Gamma Delta; Margaret Thomson, Bleu Thonge; and Aneeta Humphrey, Phi Mu. Members tapped for membership for 1940-1941 are Elinor Soeth, Theta Upsilon; Rachel Stephenson; Sylvia Magnuson, Phi Mu; Doris Matz, Willard; and Vivian Finley, Alpha Gamma Delta. 130 Ekjually as important and as exciting as the tapping of Purple Arqus is the tapping of the new Blue Key members, which is also one of the events of the annual May Fete. The new members are chosen from the class at large by the unanimous vote of the retiring members. Juniors who are selected to membership in the national senior men ' s honorary fraternity are judged on their personality, scholar- ship, and participation and leadership in campus activities, according to Wayne Stewart, president. The local chapter of Blue Key was organized on the cam- pus in 1926, and the first active membership was held in 1927-1928. It has for its purpose the promotion of a demo- cratic spirit on the campus. Blue Key sponsors skits given at the annual Big Snob- Old Grouch party, which is sponsored by the Yellers of the Brown, and the organization co-operates with Purple Arqus in promoting the May Fete. An initiation is held each year for the new members and at that time they are awarded their keys, a blue rectangle with an elipse inside in gold with a maltese cross upon which is mounted an eagle. After the initiation, an informal celebration is held. Blue Key members for the year 1939-1940 include Wayne Stewart, president, Crescent; Kenneth Frohardt, vice-presi- dent, Phi Kappa Tau; Al Croft, recording secretary and treasurer. Crescent; Don Williams, corresponding secretary. Delta Omega Phi; Frank Harrington and Johnny Staten, Phi Kappa Tau; Vance James and Merle Mahr, Crescent; and Robert Gottschalk, Delta Omega Phi. Tapped for membership in 1940-1941 are Claude Clem- ents, Ralph Clary, John Jones, Jr., and Glenn Stringfellow, Crescent; Harvey Waldo and Ross Mendell, Delta Omega Phi; James Tipton and Dale Magnuson, Phi Kappa Tau; and Clayton McAuliffe. l fiAALM 5 i USi IflAJL :te - ftM ,5:% Key . By VIVIAN FINLEY Blue Key membership consisted of Vance James, Wayne Stewart: Dr. G. A. Barrinper, sponsor : Merle Mahr and Franlt Harrinston, seated: and. standinir, Al Croft. Johnny Staten. Kenneth Fro- hardt, Robert Gottschalk and Don Williams. 131 ill Give Benefit Tonight Proceed To Be Used To Buy Letters; ' Program To Include Variety Of Talent night at 8 p. m. the Nebraska Weeles-an plaUuman Sana wlU pre- benelit concert to the Wealeyan auditorium. The money which ' nd receivft! will be used to buy letters for the members of the Tiie program wlU be In three parts. In the first parU which will I ' M by the band, wlU be " World Events, " arrangement by Lauren- juid Mendelssohn ' s " War March of the PriesU " from Atiialla, ar- by lAUrendeau. irr Perkins. David City sopho- |wlU open the second part of j-ogram with soprano solos, Isiird-s Song- by Scott, and Danube " by Strauss and ' g. A trumpet trio, composed er Artist, Benkelman junior, • gard, Seward Junior, and n Phelps, Lincoln aopho- will play " Triplets of the by Henneberg. Mendell, Scottsbluff sen- U sing " Morning " by Oley and " At Eve I Heard a by laly Strickland. Elmer will ptoy a trumpet solo. al of Venice " by Herbert |rke, and there will be se- i by the Plainsman Male . The trumpet trio will con- he second part of the pro- nth " Sails On a Silvery Sea " ttF ' esleyan Sweeps Oratory Clara U. MBls, Music Tutor Passes Away Friday Morning MISS Clara JL iaxiioiJU ;;.jiJii.xvji.i by f« Urania Mills Passes Away April 12 iasti St Member Of NWU Staff Since 1912 Miss Clara Urania Mills, music teacher at Nebraska Wesieyan uni- versity, was found dead in her class room at 8 o ' clock last Friday morning. April 12. she had re- moved her hat and laid down her I urse and gloves, but had not yet MLss Clara Urania Mills, teacher of harmony, history of music, theory, and piano in the Nebraska Wesieyan Conservatory of Music since 1912, died verj- suddenly in her studio al 8 o ' clock on Friday morning, April 12. She had come in i-ather in haste and had not yet removed her coat. She and her sister, Alice, had made their home at the St. Charles apartments for several years. There are also two brothers, A. F. Mills of Galena, and Mark Mills of St Louis, Mo. THE BOVLDEB AFFAEB— It Is useless U Coafih Dwlght P. Thomas and possible chances five of his veteran performers left team for so littl Of oar yesterday noon for Boulder, | teams they will I 3olo, ■wiiere the locaj outfit ' " ' 111 I ■-• -t-together, neet some of the fastest compo «. tft 4on in this section In.tlv i V» WORDS iJoulder affair .-tVt » ' Indicatic record thX ., rtllV ' ' ■df- ,nds. To,r cViOV ' , , t levethattkp ' e , o Ve leaded spriA ■ ' S _ «■ 2c»-t L ■ counto ' , and with M. Henrot Levy,, rd completelX «, i ' " s- »d ' v Harold Bauer and Adolpli WeldigrWed vreatherX ' ft ' is vi SjO ' V In Paris. She taught at Christian ,nd the track lA •j ' lo college in Bethany. Mo.. West Vir- Randall ' s ten - •jjlS ' e ' ■• K Ke Cferk ' s ginla Wesieyan university and sraj-ne last week -o. ,e « " " " Grand Prairie Seminary In Illinois ,f hat one migk ti ss tiC before coming to We s ley an. (as his first spring tf . o .ji Throughout her residence here ln,ver a good cinder ' " , University Place she has been a low start cost him -ce ' member of the First M. E. church, jj that. Randall was 9 5. ' The funeral service was held at the ourth place as the runr, o a ' . Classes In Blac ' ■ - ' On Day ••ocess Will be n,, ° TV. mortuary chapel with Rev. H. O. i,g 50-yard mark but _. . , Martin and Chancellor SclwailZo nip ' Simpson of Wayn " ' , e ! officiating. Burial was at Wyuka. i ' d ' Wesieyan has lost a Brac.oua.per-. , ,t_lEI Ay TEAM— C j j t- Faulty baton passing in | Vayne meet probably kept the k ' ' ' | raphy and geolc«y " MAT 10, 1910 Group To On Sunds sixteen members Vises CHa« . party €» t y i Stewart Takes Men ' s Old Blewfield Crowned ( t SeoVo ' ra _ _ Anderson, Axford With J. Tipton As i ?S ' on First In Women ' s, Peace p ay aenWra . etitef ' ve. 4- -aj- r„ (By av » ' Be»i»tr i P NWU Ranks Second In Meas, ,ate, Women ' s Extempoj Debaters Tie Willards, Plii Taus Place First In Honorary Societies Tap Nfew Me: Doris Blewfield, Dixon, 111. senior, was revealed as ' James ' Tipton, Archer Jmiior, as Student Prtnoe at the J-riday, May 3, on the campus on front of Old Main- Tl by the student body. . Tlie queen and prince were aimounced bv the naKes " n, " iu rt ' r " " " " • " ' - O ™ " TremlL.TiS , ,.ns fU tendants which ' ■ . e freshmen Irene Serine .» °..-)» ' , ' , ' ' : fS " -iP - ' " " " : Esther Perkins, Da ■ " wma3ter, Uncoln. " Or, i%h ■ ' ' ' ' " ■ ft?f M " J ' irH tri S JSi Of 45:2fV2 " 4, ' a Id Iwie (lo, . i present Casl T ° ;. Result .Tins !„..« i 3hi Initiates I At Meetng OS ' . Xii " ' f w ' ftiO ' ,e-s ■ ewart First Di ot « itvotft spe«: Bfo «■ » tttaS ' tjaW® ' between lot ) ' ° 0(y : 1 AC ' Jyednesday nigjjj Several worldly. sHes of " bu 9 ' Aurt e ' °voe -jji ■ ■ .o«. -■„,. «re =.-- u, .r;»e«V eSo; ,J» Walton Ltrated Gives Talk f memberfi were Initiate i Chi. natjonal honorSTv fraternity, at the regu- S Monday, . urll 1. Tlw Douglass, ■ •n McQu: and b ,,,. . ... Of--, coin; eeta Humphrey. and Anne Kalmmer, Alberta, Canada. " ' nrnTtiiii iif_il)e p y- Fioishes Floors r Spring Vacation Bmx, superintendent , 1 and his assistants „- » floors on the mainioi " t " - . ' ve r iOO»6 °1ivcVW. Boo eep V » Hold Nominal " " 4 ' ?1 ' ' " - m »l«i ' wsitv r:;e ' . ' ' ' S!ete jjeil Ve» ' ' Pros ' Bene« ' f v A» G» «rs ol . niaW S „ B»Ii4 - . .-r. - For Ideal Pe Wayne Stewart r Started the it with 3 genera] q Wrove Of a wo » Is otheni-ise Cte3 ® -I PO) t ' ndidates was held ThurJ.f ' of rr rt rnC ' ' I - ' ' " ' " »P«1 ' The final elj , " " I I " ■ be held nest Tue.-iday, mJ " ' « ol weati— V , Magnuson ToBei yUt " Associate Editor H ' a.«al ' letter » aJ ■ . 1 no«- „0«» ' , Vsc liclP ' «w» . ' Vdel l lot VaC ' „«i 8 iV«8J ' ded B.e«« evel tlie B o " -..! " !- ' ' " • ett .V BOi ,ttet8 ' (»« M ,t4B ' aeftt P ' .toe 5 «vxv ' ' 19- p,uth deW tJvls Chosen To Post On The Wesieyan - ' -:;J.ng - t.,c vics. -1 ,.av - ;V ' A- ' :? c- - m tne J. ,([ie " " t w,. .wia» .j Vllss rei pep ' cca«- Final Election „„ " " " ' ernise in, Be Held Tues yn1 -Ct: gether than seMr The primary election ;f™ " l f a woman u. J Plain. ;man and Ideal Pla; « " " » " on, in --■- ' ---- » ' of bridge ? ' • •• abnormal life ' Tue.-,day, mJ " " « he home to ten to five O ' clock. An,, ' " tie of the inte The Plainsman staff wi ' " °° ' at were deve toined in the haU of Wj " .S ' the discus ing dui ' lnif that time, and voting session will continue during the day. night, Ap; The three men and three women --. iM. ' ifl -- I receiiTOg the most votes in the l- ' ial jeartw pi-imary election will be the candl- • C I The elsction, conducted by the | r rfi ' annual staff, is to select the grad » ■• ' " Se ec « Ot Oiea ! .ppoS»« pan ' senior . l-iohited associate editor! ' ' " WjertsO " ° " j itti »chera u™ " " " l " ' ' ' ' ' ' al ' 5 ' 3n this week. She S- pteswiei» ' , vn » IS and, tlie v,.n share this office with Warren p. " !lS P ' tZ « „ i« kW .h° ' « W J " " ' ' »°. 1 »1« enlor. Who has! S ' .T oP ' !! »g 1«P « totof 3 ' - » " ' " «P ' ' = " y »» year. Il„ _ " " " " " oi floors I Mas Magnuson Is I ' ' «- r:--- " d ' Hating senior man and woman who represent the Ideal plainsmen of the Wesfeyan student body. member of pv PV eftCP .pv ce Wished and wax- Ph, Mu sorority. Pep club. Collie Ud«» - , .slai aU " " ,f as ' ' . .vi " ' vie» l?ai BOS QravJev nrM f «,.-,i-(_— » oouncU, YWCA. She is also asals- Itn " ,s£ " , . :uu- l?rl.C uity agrees l?n 2, he 1 cabin Mar coin Inet. ■} CANDIDATES Candidates for Ideal Plains- woman include AiiMta Hum- phrey, Atkinson, Aadify Smith, Harlington, and Dorothy Knight, Lincoln, Nominees tor Ideal nson Wi It Conm was installe 9. The othe :nson. Cairo cretary. Marl :oln senior, i I by Miss Pi fappy ' .ihe wesieyan uets Dest Kating in 45 I ears usan Lewis ■ " ago In the luldlne. Ideals ' To Sr Be Selected and Into Uie ' ■■Ybu ' « The primary elecUon of Wea- seem (gyan B ideal PlaUxsman and r™; " ' Ideal Plainswoman win be held -ncf e ' »°»en Soon B •I ' »o fa „, . ' ™ ' new , May 2. In thla election the stu- m-r. eouncu wfli t-v. ' « Into " tude Of dents mil write down their se- exaot " « mtddTL ' ? »P- ' lection ror these honors. The councu ' ' deciiSl ' " " " ' — !6 of the three men and Qmriirfa ' ' --v£n receiving the most shta a ' " ' council f! r on the flna honor , , ' ' ' ' « " the choice for th oedw ' " t»i ,l Uisman and Idei bear ,, ' « ' « ' • Es r , . ' ■« An will be made tl " by the L X " r ' U A ' « . %fl.,,«uil staff. In Uie fir fore the ' X ' l It- 4 „ V The Plalnsnian. a ps tlon blankT • i Pe, An will be made tl " by th« ' ° " " " " ' e( cit. , week from this list, be fflt, . ' ' - " ut « J ■ " «« f S Section Is conducted 1 or Uen nm fiual st.sff. In tlie fir foro ,y.. V ' ' t K devoted to the ' .wo InTonnatlon om ,uala selected by the st ' Ing and at th body as the " Mixilii " ! •» ' " " Weals. " flee. t ;lc PALP ' S C indidates for membership in Phi Kappa Phi. national honor- ary scholastic fraternity, were Initiated Saturday. Aprfl 30, at 5 p. m. Dr. O. A. Barrlnger. president of the local chapter, and Mrs. Ethol I Bishop, vice- president, officiated. The senior initiates were Doris Blewfield, Dixon, HI.; Harvey Feyerherm, West Poln Louise clialli, Benkelman; Robert Benkelman; Vllllere ilmer Wed- .-v " ' intr, fbi " ' " .5 ' i o Have Advanccy resc The " itb 5 ' an. are and thf, " i ' Stents Present 1 Tragedy All-Day Meet Will " - Held At Camp C- Jeus - ' Je n. ot aWe.. are o„ 7« _„ irdlness. . CJaf ' 4. ?f Aesr, aiBs = ir, ee.5: :c:n ' t ° - udent Christian Fellowship n of tS. ° ' ? ' d JiuiIot, ' .r ' T. ole Played e Williams m go to Camp Strader, o appoint ' ' ' P ' " ' ;te, on Saturday morning,! on i Slides tc- and will return the next the nrp rf ' " ' B theme of the advance to MaT " it is to be -Christian Youth U( ibove the Ordinary. " morning a group disc of Manuels. by be held, and Denver Colo, so- i will be devi It many a tear at M night, i of " Oirls in Unl- ;ers, - ' lay and Saturo ' N ' adltorjum. v tenors with , uy Kay S ' Q senior, ' lemly. ' Va l Only Four College Papers In Its Classification Win Higher Honors From ACP Hoffman-trained Journalists Improve Paper In All Divisions; Editor Praises Staff ' s, Advisor ' s, Publisher ' s Work ' ooZie ° " t! r, ' The Wesieyan with its Issues of the first semester of 1939-1940 re celved the highest rating ever accorded a Nebraska Wesleyaai unlversit paper In the 48-ycar history of Its publication. The Associated Collegial Press of the National Scholastic Press association made this announct raent this week. The ACP, with a membersliip of 550 college papers, hE headquarters at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis. Only four papers In the nation in The Wesleyan ' s classification re yed a higher rating. The Wesieyan. one of the 406 college papei rSStgrn ==i:to the All-American critical service of the ACP, received ■ff WCj|j j " - - -c eJlenf rating. The highest rating previously attame g_ ' lis It gg a " - is sthe one received last year. 1% " m BJlittt %• ■ - —.RalBlng their point award by ■ iuSt ' Ui ' mt ' 11 IS f lA-- -- - aer last year ' s is.sue, th wf mfflflm »g ' Caitt P m ' " 5 ' ' " ' = ' ' " ' ' ' ' ' H Hf ' M k « •■• r|| - division of news valu( " %0Om ' • " hS " ' " n Improvemer Sinn-l V I tlltMm - t ' " ' » 83 per cer liB-la f-, « lliliittta " " ™ writing an yie Dn,,,, ■ IHPAI™ ' " ■« " increase I etirt leva,. ? ' S 1),, " " Vfflons including headline ' %er. ' " ' ' " ■ ' o, In M ,° Slaf,. , _ ' y. make-up, departmer n, ■Oror] ,« Sv ' % Z ' l ssoo " - ffai- Editor Comments Ac tQ as iu . Ji x urse, we ' re pleased, " coir Oe v, • ' £oC; ' ' Xiip ■ « ' ' " ' » ' " ' =« ' " " - " -J g-e (,. ■ ' leicj on ' Ai t " ' ' t n most co-op " " SJS g, ' - OO Jn " " le AOrt) ' " ' " ' ' ■ ' ' " ' ' " ' ' ° " = ' ' ' ' nn g hes „,. " tfiost of the Improvement Oi t ' Of eutt! f iM- ■ ' ' however, would not ha ■ ' tn ' ' ia " «£ 1 ■ forthcoming without the ai Urfwf fes n, ' ' Prof. Wendell K Hoffman an v ' Cla d B ' " ' s unlimited amount of undei G sDnf ' Oj» ' ® A-. ' -ndlng shown by our publislic V " , ' ■or tL ' " be, ' r. N. N. Stevenson. y " « ftff, ° ' =«i t. " " ' " The impartial editor.al poke Vj N U ' pAen • Afg , oUow d by the paper has doubl O x " " ?, " ' tea ' " " " driving force in tli w ,VV v-r rt ° an Improvement of the paper. Sint 0 » " o entj, we have attempted to present tli - point of view of anyone who 6i sired to present his opinion ft publication, ever ' one has shown greater interest in the pai er. v wish to express for lli iiiiii ' " " " 0 et = " p ac» ot 12 tttCO en Ovcel - ' t.rr-irfB ' Sc- is ' Te ' ar are Knight, Feyerherm Chosen Campus Social Queen, King Willards Phi Taus Give Winning Skits; Srty Spo " °red By Yellei. Of Brown Dorothy Knight of Uncoln - „,H ' ' - „,nftS " a. urm0 t4 tl o j,, anhM»; ' -riasttoS Z , 13 •n«rt .fSredto ' ' ;d v bi86 V°a. of scao ' in ti e f « the. s.o.s We Three ,e»diDS to«e J ' CV-- « B» Well Bub ., , for polow- ,, at. the library? It consists of . rrv jjj (jje fewest number of all coWPS " avW alotiS, Have you played tiie new l -v " %itn « ;i .nv " ;. test snsen Elected honge Leader Installation of new of- « one of the high- the annual Bleu tnl-formal dinner and e held Saturday, April ?• m. at the UndeU Christensen, Palmer wUl be Installed as ' resident. Other ofti- »-presldent, Kenneth " 5 «:, ' tft L. Anderson Tops Orators idewell Named . " r To New Position tt Will Be Feature Editor On Paper frS2n ° " ' ' ' - 0 " " ha hT ' " " appointed feature I L .T " : ° « Phomor;. Miss Glidewen Is secretary of iltled " Ana mc " — , aewlleld, Dix senior, as reader; the Ta the ■Tootale-Woolsl ' Radio Program, " with Kohardt, Atlunson senior, roving reporter. Beta Phi Alpha recelve place with their present " Way Down South. " Delti Phi also received secoc with the " The Courage 1 MUler Plays Jimmy Miller and his l»nd furnished music for The gymnasium was enl W. Stewart Wins Second In Men ' s; Wesieyan Ranks With Three High Colleges V. Crawford Wins Way Into Finals Of Extemp, Al Croft Reaches Semi-Finals; J. Tipton, Stewart Honored In Debate to pick a study table tiliat -nod light bulb -or any dim 1 the lamp. To win }X u ; WW up befOTe 7;15 pjn. b lere are so many flukes an Mopetttion among students 1 ilc. fou Thwe Is no limit to Uie n f trials one can have pnovid eta ttiere first, but one who lea in after 8 p. m. is almos lin to ft e a loser. If you losi .fant to study please brmg wn light bulb. And don ' t i ur advertisers when purcl; our bWb. Thia unfortunate situation e remedied. If nothing else wrk, a small sum inight b £ldo frtan the fom- dollars i tich student shells out yearl he library ftmd. Might ever Ama yif tWa nil,,.,!,, a ftv nt 1, ABOVE— Lynne Anderson brinKs home a national trophy. RIGHT— Wayne Stewart. holdinR all the silverware ever given by the Nebraska Intercollesiate Forensic Association for Men ' s Old Line Oratory. RIGHT. BELOW— RoKer Axford. peace orator, looks up after scanning the news — probably war news. Forensics By VERA HARVEY Forensically speaking, Pi Kappa Delta placed Nebraska Wesleyan university in the nation ' s top triangle of outstand- ing speech schools. Competing successfully in the three fields of oratory, extemporaneous speaking and debate at the national Pi Kappa Delta convention in Knoxville, Wesleyan ' s delegation shared top honors with Baylor university and Redlands, Calif. N. W. U. contestants placed more speakers in the finals than the four other P. K. D. Nebraska schools together. They brought home the only two national trophies to come to this state. The silverware was won by Lynne Anderson who placed first in women ' s oratory and Wayne Stewart who ranked second in men ' s oratory. These two orators went on to the Interstate Old Line oratorical contest to place second and third, respectively. Thereby Miss Anderson and Mr. Stewart established a record in national competition never before achieved by any Nebraska school — entered in four national contests against 378 orators, they brought home one first, two seconds, one third. No other school in the United States placed in all four contests. (Continued on page 136) 134 ABOVE— Debaters Wayne Stewart anJ James Tipton decide get to work. RIGHT — Betty Crowder and Irene Pickerinjr pause for the camera- BELOW — The team of Al Croft and Ha i land Kelly in a moment of relaxation. BELOW Virginia Crawford and Vera Harvey, especially Vera Harvey, think it ' s serious business. 135 Post arfi Pete Post and Paul Scott crowd each other a little bit y Elake Skrdla and Wesley Bowen are vefdy I ' or whatever comes. (Continued from page 134) At Knoxville, Wesleyan ' s women extempore speaker. Virginia Crawford was one of six finalists out of a field of 64. Al Croft. Wesleyan ' s man extempore speaker, was ad- judged Excellent. The men ' s debate team of Wayne Stewart and James Tipton also won Excellent and Wesleyan ' s women, Virginia Crawford and Vera Harvey, won five out of eight debates. In preparation for this record, Wesleyan speakers con- tested in the following tournaments: William Jewell. Mo., where Harland Kelly and James Tipton were one of the five undefeated teams; Omaha; Baylor, Tex., where Tipton and Stewart were one of the four top teams out of 99 in the men ' s division: Moorehead, Minn., where Wesleyan ' s ora- tors, extempers, and debaters forecast their national destiny by bringing home the sweepstakes; Durant, Okla., where Harvey and Crawford ranked third and Stewart and Tipton, fourth; St. Paul, Minn., where Wesleyan ' s Croft and Kelly were one of eight teams to be selected for the run-ofT from a field of 73 after eight rounds of debate: the state tourna- ment, where Wesleyan and Hastings tied for first place in the number of contests won in the A division, Wesleyan taking the three firsts in oratory on Thursday and Hastings taking the three second; on Saturday Hastings won the men ' s and women ' s debate and Wesleyan took the seconds. In men ' s extempore speaking Hastings took their other first to bring their total to three. In women ' s extemp Kear- ney stepped in to take first, but Wesleyan took the second to bring their total seconds to three, ending the count three firsts, three seconds for each school. In B competition the tie result continued. Wesleyan ' s Croft and Kelly tied with Hastings ' team, and Irene Pickering and Bstty Crowder tied the Hastings women ' s team. According to regulation, these B championship ties are allowed to stand. In B extemp Hastings had its field day, bringing in both first and second in men ' s discussion and winning first to Wesleyan ' s second in women ' s. Roger Axford, winner of the local peace oratorical contest, went on to annex the state championship and bring up NWU ' s record to equal that of Hastings. Thus ends the year for Pi Kappa Delta under the presi- dency of Wayne Stewart. Neophytes elected for the year were Blake Skrdla. Pete Post, Paul Scott. Wesley Bowen, Betty Crowder, and Irene Pickering. Thi,s display includes trophies fur lust place in Women ' s National Pi Kappa Delta and first place in Women ' s State Old Line, both won by Lynne Anderson : and first in Men ' s State Old Line and second in Men ' s National Pi Kappa D ' elta, both won by Wayne Stewart. 136 Dramatics By VERA HARVEY When Wesleyan ' s speech fraternities, Pi Kappa Delta and Theta Alpha Phi met for the first time last fall they were impressed by the stature of their predecessors. The Tappers of the previous season had set up three new marks: a five play season, a new-talent show, and the pro- duction of recently released Broadway hits. The P. K. D. delegation had left the 1940 squad with the defense of nine state titles, the largest number of champion- ships ever to be captured by any school in one year. They had also annexed the Province of the Platte sweepstakes. Under the trumvirate of Dorothy Knight, Margaret Thom- son, and Doris Blewfield, Theta Alpha Phi presented one of the most ambitious play seasons Lincoln audiences have seen in many years. They offered Capitol City playgoers two Broadway hits never before produced on a Lincoln stage by starting the season with Maxwell Anderson ' s Pu- litzer prize winning play, " Wingless Victory, " and closing it with Randolph Carton ' s " Wuthering Heights, " the 1939 Critics award play. " Wingless Victory " featured Margaret Thomson, Clarence Larson, Lynne Anderson, Armon Stover, Kenneth Nye, and Doris Blewfield; and " Wuthering Heights " was cast with senior speech majors in the three leading characters, Ken- neth Frohardt, Doris Blewfield, and Dorothy Knight. An- other feature of this season was the new talent play, " The Death Deck, " in which only students who had never played on the Wesleyan stage were eligible to play. After tryouts, parts were assigned to two sophomores, Byron Johnson and Josephine Culver, and six freshmen, Betty Phelps, Gordon Roberts, Laura Jean Nelson, Armon Stover, Ed Worthington, and Clarence Larson. The other two plays presented during the season were " Girls in Uniform, " an all-girl production featuring Hope WUliams, Mary Kay Spaulding, Dorothy Knight, Vivian Finley, and Verle Goble; and " $1200 a Year " with Herbert Wagner and Luella Patton, Bill Dafoe and Virginia Browne, and Doris Cooper playing leading roles. This year ' s new members in Theta Alpha Phi were Doris Cooper, Lynne Anderson, Herbert Wagner, Blake Skrdla, Genevieve Taylor, and Lyda Varney. ABOVE Marsiaret Thomson in the native costume she wore for her part in " WinKle s Victory. " BELOW — Betty Phelps appears in a picture used for advertisin;;: purposes for the season ' s seci.nd perlormance. " The Death Deck. " 137 ABOVE— Harold EUis, Paul J. Johnson. Norma Jean Ayrus, Leiand Van Camp and Herbie Warner were among the cast of ••$1200 A Year. " BELOW— Maiy Kav SuauMiny comt ' oiti ono o£ the ' (Jirla In Uniform. " 138 139 Pi Gamma Mu Members of Pi Gamma Mu pictured above are, first row, Prof. Mamie Corns, Emily Maticka, Dorothy Peters, Anne Kaimmer, Louise Gottschalk, Mary Wise, Harriet Koch, Miss Lois Leavitt and Dr. Claude J. Shirk ; second row. Dr. A, V. Hunter, June Scheidt, Lucile Thelandor. Madeleine Alexander, Frances Aucock, Dean F. A . Alabaster and Miss Zazel Sloniprer ; third row, VilHers Gerd, Bruce Keith, John Jones, James Tipton, Merlin Merrill, Max Kemling and Wilmer Woltemath. In the Phi Kappa Phi lucture we find, front row. Miss Paulin? Slonecker, Harvey Feyerherm, Villiers Gerd, Merlin Merrill, and Doris Blewfield ; second row. Prof. Laona Under kofler, Dr. Roy W. Deal. Dean F. A. Alabaster, Wilmer Woltemath, Miss Lois Leavitt, Bruce Keith, Assistant Librarian Grace Lenfest and Dr. Rose B, Clark; third row. Dean B. E. McProud, Prof. John M. Howie. Prof. John Rosentrater. Chancellor B. F. Schwartz, Dr. G. A. Barringer and Dean J. C. Jensen. Phi Kappa Phi 140 Pi Gamma Mu By RUTH CREAMER Wesleyan ' s chapter of Pi Gamma Mu, national honorary social science fraternity, was started on the campus in 1926. The purpose of the organization is to embody the ideals of scholarship, scientific attitude and method, and social service in the study of social problems. Membership is limited to juniors, seniors, graduate students, alumni, and instructors who have shown unusual interest in social sciences and who have high scholarship. Offices for this year have been held by Dr. Claude J. Shirk, president; Prof. Mamie E. Corns, vice-president; and Zazel Sloniger, secretary-treasurer. Dr. E. Glenn Callen is the chancellor of the central region of Pi Gamma Mu, which includes Missouri, Iowa, Nebraska, and Kansas. Members not included in the Pi Gamma Mu picture are Doris Blewfield, Eunice Butcher, Merle Mahr, George Panzer, Margari t Thomson, Geor re Carne, Harvey Feyerherm, Allan Martin, Wayne Stewart, Betty Glines. Ernest Hartley. Dr. G. A. Barringer, J. E. Hartley, Prof. Ruth Butcher, Dr. E. Glenn Callen. Dr. Roy W. Deal. Dean B, E. McProud. Prof. John Rosentrater, Miss Eleanor Swanson and Chancellor B. V. Schwartz. SUMMER SCHOOL Phi Kappa Phi By RUTH CREAMER Phi Kappa Phi, national honorary scholastic fraternity. elects its members from the upper ten per cent of the senior class in the fall and spring of each year. Tho members are selected from all departments of the school. This year the fraternity conducted two chapel programs. On November 16, Prof. Ethel Booth spoke on ' Wesleyan Traditions. " Later, on March 7, Dr. J. W. Creighton, presi- dent of Hastings college, gave the Phi Kappa Phi address. At meetings during the year, B. Clifford Hendricks of the University of Nebraska spoke on " Examinations, " and Prof. Ethel Booth addressed the group on " Patricius, the Mystic Saint of Ireland. " In April newly elected members were initiated and hon- ored at a dinner which followed the meeting. Mrs. Laona E. Underkofler spoke on " Yosemite Park " and illustrated it with films. The annual banquet of the organization will be held June 1 at the city Y. W. C. A. Officers for the past year were president, Dr. G. A. Barringer; vice-president, Ethol L. Bishop; treasurer, Dean J. C. Jensen; and secretary. Prof. Laona E. Underkofier. Members not pictured in the Phi Kappa Phi group include Louise Gottschalk. Robert Gottschalk, Mrs. Ethol L. Bishop. Prof. Ethel Booth, Dr. E. Glenn Cailen, Miss Neva Cocklin. Prof. Enid Miller Hoffman. Dr. A. V. Hunter, Miss Vesta Keeton, Miss Gladys Lux, Dr. Claude J. Shirk, Miss Zazel Sloniger, Miss Eleanor Swanson and Prof. Alfrtd Boberg. Begins June 10 SPECIALIZED TRAINING courses offered from one point of view — practicality. Intense, thorough prepa- ration for responsible positions. A FACULTY of specialists with broad experience in modern business procedure and a thorough under- standing of the qualities required in efficient office personnel. A STUDENT BODY selected according to high scholastic standing and acceptable character. Entire group high school graduates or students with higher education. ACCREDITED COURSES meeting with the rigid re- quirements of the National Associa ' ion of Accredited Commercial Schools. Full-bodied training. YEAR-ROUND AIR CONDITIONING for health, com- fort and efficiency. Heat stops at the door . . . in- side, it is cool and comfortable. AN EMPLOYMENT SERVICE ready to help YOU secure a job when ready. Graduates of the L.S.C. are consistently preferred for responsible positions. Write — telephone — or visit for complete details . . . Do it today! Lincoln School of Commerce W. A. Robbins, President 209 North 14th St. 2-6774 Lincoln f — — ———-.———__„ Still the Student ' s Favorite Wesleyan Coffee Shop • Popular Food at Popular Prices 1 • I BROIL-O-CRILL SANDWICHES 1 { HOME MADE PIE t j ICE CREAM j { FINE COFFEE HOT SOUPS t • t ' . ii;s. 1!. .1. mcKsiiN j. ' -n st. Pnui • t t — t 141 v The W. A. A. cabinet consists of, seated, Esther Perkins, Roberta Kauk, Norma Shepardson, Elinor Soeth and Vernadell Greenslit : standin r. Ruth Nelson, Maxine Cope, Amy Martin, Dorothy Knight and Ruth Fenske. W.A.A. By CLARA BELLE WILLIAMSON Every girl who is sports minded and ambitious enough to work may become a member of W. A. A. To be an active member, a girl must earn 125 points by participating in recreational activities. She must also hav e an average of " C " in her academic work. The pui ' pose of the Women ' s Athletic Association is to promote athletic activities to the end of a higher physical efficiency, and to create a spirit of good sportsmanship. The officers for the year of 1939-1940 were Elinor Soeth, president; Dorothy Knight, vice-president; Ruth Fenske, re- cording secretary; Maxine Cope, corresponding secretary; Roberta Kauk, treasurer; Jeanne Souser, publicity; and Mrs. Brandt, women ' s physical education director, sponsor. Every year the group sponsors a number of activities. In the fall the girls held their annual picnic for freshman girls at the state W. A. A. cabin on Stevens Creek. About 35 girls attended the picnic. Something new and different was the leap year dance that was held in the gym, March 16. One of the major events that is sponsored by the asso- ciation is the intramural sports program. This year the sports were soccer- baseball, basketball, ping pong, tennis, and archery. A trophy is given to the social group that wins the majority of games. After one group has won this for three years, they may keep it. This year the trophy will remain in the W. A. A. office because some of the tourna- ments were not completed. Every three years a national convention is held. Last year it was held in Oakland, Cal. This year the district convention was held at Bloomington, 111. Elinor Soeth was the delegate from the Wesleyan branch. 142 !1) J f Class Officers I- -: o3 ;?- -b V; ' ABOVE — Junior class chairmen, Rachel Stephenson and James Tipton, smile for the photographer, or is it because Tipton bprrowed ) he photographer ' s cnart j the picturq jton tprrowed II - ' P eTLOlW — Sophomore class chairmen, VernaWell Greenslit and Ruth AL!U E 1 11. t .tIllL tL■ cLiiiiir ullini,-. iix- Warien Johnston, vice-president: Margaret Thomson, secretary-treasurer; and Vance James, president. m p i, ... BELOW — Second semester senior leaders were Bob Gottschalk. president; Lynne Anderson, secretary-treasurer; and Bernie Hodgkin, vice-president. BELOW Freshman chairmen, James Owen and Adelaide Reynolds; but who would have suspected Owen could look that way at a woman ? ' f f W Bleu Thonge By CAROL ANN CLIDEWELL Bleu Thonge, founded in 1934 and named after a Frankish tribe, has for its purpose the fostering of a healthy school spirit and providing an adequate social program for non- fraternity and non-sorority students. It encourages high standards of scholarship and participation in extra-curricu- lar activities. Meetings are held every week, and a social function every month. The Bleu Thonge formal vkfas held at the Lindell hotel, April 27. This year hour dances, started for the first time in the history of the organization, met with great success. Officers for this year are Margaret Thomson, president; Max Kemling, vice-president: Margaret Guy, secretary; Catharine Thomson, treasurer; Betty Glines, program chair- man; Carl Christensen and Marjorie Ritter, social chairmen; Warren Johnston, publicity chairman; Marvin Snyder, chap- lain; Earl Lewis, men ' s sports leader; Margaret Anderson, girls ' sports leader; Marion Swanson, scholarship chairman; and Ruth Gardner, members OPPOSITE PAGE— A table with food, a mustard jar. a fire for roasting purposes, and a portable radio — all were important features wben the barb organization picnickeii at Roberts park this spring. LEFT — We bet it ' ll be a home run, as Garnett Lee Tremain j)repares to swing. Charlotte Van Vleck and Betty Crowder are in the background. TI -yna. Jpoyai H ' you. -As,- — fAi.s Ss ) i e cin 7 fi CKil yjM- uJcre cc p c-Hy ujci -p-clloiAi BELOW — Remember the Christmas party in the Hym a few short months ago? Dr. Broadbooks, Chancellor Schwartz. Dean and Mrs. Cutf gather around the tree. 145 ABOVE — Kenneth Frohardt " mans the mike, " while Wes ' ey Bo wen and Dick Bell do some impersonatinp: in the Phi Tau fraternity prize-winning skit at the Snob-Grouch party. BELOW — It ' s all in fun. and don t they look funny (except Poody ) ? Participants in the Willard sorority prize-winninji ' skit were Doris Blewfield, Virginia Crawford, Doris Matz, Madeleine Alexander and Virginia Browne. ABOVE — Persons appearing in the A. C. picture are as follows: Front row. Miss Elsie Rice, Lucile Kokes, Leona Cox, Marjorie Ritter, Garnett Tremain, Betty McMeekin, Kathryn Stewart, Harriet Wade: second row, Mrs. Ethel Hatch, Miss Vesta Keeton, Dorothy Davis. Twila Hitchcock, Thelma Randall, Evelyn Coates, Mildred Nelson ; third row, Jean Bolton, Eunice Kuehn, Bea Good- rich, Pearl Shuman, Vernona Wilhite, Marguerite Carter, Norma Shepardson ; fourth row, Dora Hughes, Veiora Roberts, Ida Furst, Elaine 0!son, Ethel McNickle, Thelma Fleischauer ; fifth row, Fran- ces Holm . Marguerite Peterson . Adelaide Reynolds . Vera Anderson , Imogene Johnson , Sarah Brown , Amy Mart ' n . Frank Harrington drew all the cartoons which aj)pear in this year ' s " Plainsman. " Wayne Stewart lettered the " Plainsman " which appears on the covers of each edition, besides doing lettering for football and basketball identifications, and for " ' Press ' Goes To A Party. " 147 A TRADE-MARK OF QUALITY Look For This Trade-Mark Whenever You Buy • FAMILY FLOUR • PANCAKE FLOUR » CAKE FLOUR • CEREALS Whenever you see the VICTOR Trade-mark on a Product you can buy it with certainty of satisfaction. For over three-quarters of a century, " VICTOR " and " QUALITY " have been synonymous. Next time you buy Family Flour, Pancake Flour, Cake Flour or Cereals — buy VICTOR, and from then on you ' ll ALWAYS insist on VICTOR! Yet you pay nothing extra for VICTOR QUALITY. Also a complete line of VICTOR Cattle and Poultry Feeds THE CRETE MIELS CRETE, NEliUASKA Rjineinber senior recognition day, away back last fall ? Here Vance James walks under the pennant archway made by James Tipton and Velora Roberts. JOURNALISM (Continued from Page 113) Fred Hess covers varsity athletics and spices up the sports page with his column, " Plainsmention. " Jeanne Souser, during the first semester, kept the collegians in- formed on girls fpor ' s ;n " The North Side, " comm . nted on fashions, and peeked into the lives of the " Campus Big- shots. " Ruth Creamer acts as secretary to the editorial staff in addition to reporting university activities and writing " So- ciety Tidbits " the second semester. Carroll Story has been in charge of the suburban news the second semester. He has also compiled the material for the " Wesleyanites Say " fea- ture of the paper. Vera Harvey sees that all the forensic activities on the campus get into print. Carol Ann Glidewell has kept the campus clothes-conscious this past semester, besides report- ing the doings of Bleu Thonge. Both students serve in the capacity of feature editors. Staff reporters include Margie Smith, June Moslander, Paul Scott. Clara Belle Williamson, Evelyn Wittenbach, Gordon Roberts, William Dafoe, Betty Allen, Adelaide Rey- nolds, Armon Stover, and Dean Young, Taking care of the business angle of the " Wesleyan " are business manager Kenneth Frohardt and assistant, Lynne Anderson. And the result of these individuals ' efforts? Drop around White building Friday morning at ten o ' clock and note the mad congestion in the halls as the Wesleyanites clamor for " today ' s paper. " 148 ABOVE -The class is one in psychological measurements, and Faith Frampton tries to fit togrether the pieces of the Wiggly Block, while Dr. Deal, Aileen McQuistan, Garnett Tremain and Bernic Hodgkin watch her progress. Keith Wycoff, when he had the longest beard of any student on the campus, and only one and one-fourth inches ! " Everybody had different ideas concerning how it ought to be trimmed, so I just let it go. " And so, Keith Wycoff, best-bearded student on the campus, let his whiskers grow as they would. His fra- ternity brothers were quite reasonable in the matter, and, aside from jerking it a little bit once in a while, didn t seriously threaten its residence on his face before Golden Spike Days, after which Wycoff shaved it off (or rid him- self of it somehow). Continuing, Wycoff said, " Most of the girls didn ' t like it, but every once in a while some girl said she did. The first few days, with everyone gawking at me, and the itch- ing, were the most miserable. It was a good money saver and a good time saver; I got an extra half hour of sleep every morning. " A KODAK Smartest Vacation Companion You1l Meet It won ' t be long until vacation is here. Buy your Kodak now and be ready for the fun. Prices to Fit Ki ' cnj Pockcthook EASTMAN KODAK STORES, INC. 1221 O STREET LUMBER, COAL WALLBOARDS LATTICE, PAINTS SMITH BROS The Lumber Smiths 2341 NORTH 48th PHONE 6-2527 149 r- t t I I « t « « I SENIFT ' S Has Distinctive Gifts for Graduation NEWEST WATCHE5 KEY CHAINS BROOCHES LATEST JEWELRY RINGS, MOTTOES In fact, Gifts of All Kinds • GRADUATION CARDS Also All Kinds of Greeting Cards • R. L. SENIFT " On the Busy Comer " 2701 North 48th Phone 6-1378 BOB ' S COFFEE SHOP 1 4fh Cr O Street Lincoln, Nebraska Ideal Plainspeople By RUTH CREAMER Aneeta Humphrey and Johnny Staten — Ideal Plains- woman and Ideal Plainsman for 1940! The student body of Nebraska Wesleyan university selected these individtials in an election conducted by the " Plainsman " staff. Those chosen are representative of the ideals of the student body, and are chosen from the class of graduating seniors. The names of the three men and three women receiving the greatest number of votes in the primary election, held in chapel on May 2, were placed on the final ballot. Final voting was conducted May 7, the polls being open from 10 a. m. to 5 p. m. Candidates for Ideal Plainswoman included Aneeta Humphrey, Audrey Smith, and Dorothy Knight. Nominees for Ideal Plainsman were Johnny Staten, Vance James, and Don Williams. Miss Humphrey was president of Phi Mu sorority; a member of Purple Arqus, Psi Chi, treasurer of Panhellenic council, worship chairman of the Y. W. C. A. Mr. Staten lettered in football and basketball for four years, track for three years; is president of the " W " club; a member of Blue Key and Phi Kappa Tau fraternity. Big Snob--Old Crouch By SYLVIA MACNUSON ALWAYS OPEN ELCE SON LIBRARY BOOKBINDERS 2626 North 48th ♦ t DRS. TAYLOR TAYLOR PHYSICIANS SURGEONS • DR. CARELD L. BUTLER DENTIST Phone 6-2257 4728 St. Paul Ave. Dorothy Knight of Lincoln and Harvey Feyerherm of West Point were elected Big Snob and Old Grouch at the annual 1940 Big Snob-Old Grouch party held Saturday, April 13. Harland Kelly, Norfolk, as master of ceremonies, intro- duced the social king and queen of the campus as they broke through a life-sized picture of a snob and grouch. Willard sorority and Phi Kappa Tau fraternity presented the prize-winning skits and were awarded large, wooden, blue keys by Blue Key, honorary society for senior men, who sponsored the skits. The Willard skit was entitled " And the Lamp Went Out, " with Doris Blewfield, Dixon, 111., as reader; the Taus presented the " Tootsie-Wootsie Whistle Radio Program, " with Kenneth Frohardt, Atkinson, as the roving reporter. Beta Phi Alpha received second place with their presen- tation of " Way Down South. " Delta Omega Phi also received second place with " The Courage Tablet. " Jimmy Miller and his 10-piece band furnished music for dancing. The gymnasium was entirely enclosed with curtains and streamers. The ceiling was hidden by crepe paper streamers of pastel colors with a blue sky in the center. At an appointed time countless balloons fell from the sky. Chaperones at the party included Dr. and Mrs. Roy W. Deal, Dr. and Mrs. Martin Broadbooks, and Coach and Mrs. Dwight P. Thomas. The party was sponsored by the Yellers of the Brown. Lyda Varney, Culbertson, president of the pep club, acted as general chairman; Dean McGee, Norfolk, and Truman Streeter, Lincoln, were in charge of decora- tions. 150 The Upper Crust By SYLVIA MACNUSON AL CROFT gained much of his campus prominence in the forensic field. He is an active member of Pi Kappa Delta, serving on the men ' s B debate squad. This year the team of Croft and Kelly won the men ' s B in the state, won the invitational tourney held here, reached the quarter- finals in St. Paul, and reached the semi-finals in the national meet at Knoxville. Croft reached the semi-finals in the national Pi Kappa Delta tournament in extemporaneous speaking this year. He edited the student handbook last fall. His campus popularity has won him membership in Blue Key, College council, and Inter-fraternity council, of which he is vice-president. He also served as head of Crescent fraternity. BRUCE E. KEITH has several claims to glory. For two years he has edited the " Wesleyan " and has seen the paper receive the highest rating in the history of the school. He is also associate editor of the " Plainsman. " He has earned four letters in varsity tennis. Another accomplishment of importance is his membership in Phi Kappa Phi and Pi Gamma Mu. Being assistant to Dr. Callen gives him the privilege to write all over the margins on your government papers, which he does freely. He has acted in the capacity of unofficial freshman advisor in recent years. This accounts for some of the " A " grades in speech fundamentals ' class and other courses. Bruce should not be confused with the faculty, even though he has been on the campus five years! ANEETA HUMPHREY: " Philosophizing Neet " her sorori- ty sisters call her, for Aneeta is the one who can determine the solution to all your problems merely by uttering words of wisdom. She is the dark-haired girl in the registrar ' s office who greets both old and new students at the beginning of the semesters. She is an English major and plans to teach (if she can get a job!). During the past year she served as president of Phi Mu sorority; she is a member of Purple Arqus, and took charge of the worship commission of Y. W. C. A. this year. She is a member of Psi Chi and handles finances for the Panhellenic council. DOROTHY KNIGHT: " W " club sweetheart last fall, 1940 Big Snob, and president of Purple Arqus characterize the accomplishments of this all-round Wesleyan coed. Not con- tent with all these honors, she was elected to Plainsman Players and Theta Alpha Phi, carrying leads in several dramatic productions. For her senior recital Dorothy read " Holiday. " In addition to her successful career in this field, she holds membership in Y. W. C. A. and is past vice-presi- dent of W. A. A.; she also has served on the College council. Her social affiliation is with Alpha Gamma Delta sorority. KENNETH FROHARDT is the Romeo of the Wesleyan stage. He can make audiences laugh or cry. He has played several lead roles, his most recent being the male lead in " Wuthering Heights. " He is active in both Plainsman Play- ers and Theta Alpha Phi. Not only a dramatist. Kenneth holds membership in Blue Key, Y. M. C. A., and Inter-fra- ternity council. ' This year he was president of his fraternity. Phi Kappa Tau, and he managed the business end of the " Wesleyan. " WILMER WOLTEMATH: An athlete, a business man, and a top-ranking senior scholastically tell only half there is to know about " Wally. " A three-year letterman in basket- ball, he is also a member of the varsity tennis team. This year he served as associate business manager of the " Plains- man. " He received a scholarship in the graduate college of the University of Nebraska. Listed among his numerous and sundry activities are presidency of College council, member- ship in Phi Kappa Phi, Pi Gamma Mu, " W " club, Phi Kappa Tau fraternity, and Y. M. C. A. mm STORES Ever Purchase Guaranteed or Your Moiie f liefunded • FRESH FRUITS VEGETABLES QUALITY FRESH MEATS FATHER SON « GREEN FURNACE PLUMBING CO. i AIR-CONDITIONINC j • PHONE US FOR SERVICE 6-2800 2747 No. 48»h J. j EGGER TWIFORD I • GROCERIES MEATS I 2638 No. 48th St.. Lincoln, Nebr. . — ■ ———»•— — DR. E. S. MATHERS DENTIST Crook Clinic Building 4825 St. Paul I 6-2243 { , ! CROOK CLINIC I PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS { I { R. CROOK C. E. CROOK C. D. CROOK j I SCHOOL PHYSICIAN Office: 4825 St. Paul Phone 6-2235 j 1 • 151 Grace Lenfest, Assistant Librarian " .. ! Dr. B. E. McProud, Dean of Teachers College John M. Howie, Professor of Mathematics Leonard H. Rail, Professor of Economics and Business Administration Dr. E Glenn Callen, Head of Political Science and Sociology Department Mamie E. Corns. Professor of Economics and Business Administration Ethel W. Hatch, Supervisor of Kindergarten Teaching COPPER HALFTONES ZfMC HALFTOHES ZINC LINE ETCHIN6S BEN DAY SHADING COLOR PLATES STEREOTYPES ELECTROTYPES SCHOOL ANNUALS PROGRAMS POSTERS MAGAZINES NEWSPAPERS DISPLAY ADVERTISEMENTS A COMPLETE PHOTO ENGRAVING DEPARTMENT IN A COMPLETE PRINTING PLANT 1 3333 STAT( loURNAL - I PRINTING CO. tfc Can Serve Our WESLEVAN ERIEXDS m • REAL ESTATE • INVESTMENTS 9 LOANS • INSURANCE HARRINGTON C O M F A N I E S RALPH and DON 140 South 12th 2-3529 Keep fresh, oitin (tnd hreel o LENA ' S BEAUTY SHOP LENA M, BARNHILL 4739 St. Paul Ave. Phone 6-5030 Congratulations, Seniors It has been a pleasure working with You, the Faculty, and the Student Body. EVANS STUDIO 5-4146 1215 P Street HOLMES GROCERY MARKET FRESH MEATS. FRUITS and VEGETABLES 2639 iNlorth 48th Phone 6-2194 Plan a Happy Event Lefs dine out! HOTEL CAPITAL Coffee Lounge Cafe Air-Conditioned Comfort 11th P Street LIN COIN, NEBRASKA Where Qual ity and Service are the Rule TH r- 2? ' I ' -I8 NORTH 8 ' " STREET • PHONE LPmnRj " rrnKf(E7 (EaDMiiPARjTf 5-2355- LINCOLN. NEBRASKA GJ o £ j; ' £ F 01 OJ M .2 c 3 - jfi 3 -t; o tu " - 5 .y y " Si J (U ' o - o c - TO ??£ OJ £ ■- o O - E-5! - E _o -D nj ' oj _ _c C fTJ ■ 0) DO D 0) _ _ c fB T) O (U QJ D +- f 0) C C nj 13 U " C - E o - i i _c .!? U i i " D JZ IJ . C w irt o-Q -a - c — E . o - Q£- ( ) f r l — OJ it c O I— I w U u N H f 1 DC u bJD o a O o J5 :3 u J3 1 to •a c c ' 1 ra n W U 01 OJM to CD 0 c !-H - . ' O-i! a s .S - ■ " l l - to 0) c u. to -rt I flj j3 2 S i ™ to -a to J o 05 to ■S o ii c S " •- - tu H 3 C 3 CQ COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS Psychology 1. Dr. Roy W. Deal, new head of the department of psychology, has had 20 years ' experience in the Nebraska Wesleyan Teachers ' College. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Nebraska in 1931. He studied at the Uni- versity of Chicago and specialized in student personnel work, reading and study habits, and intelligence and aptitude tests. 2. Dr. Deal is a member of the following honorary organizations: Phi Kappa Phi, scholastic; Pi Gamma Mu, social science; Sigma Xi, scientific; .American Psychology association; Mid-Western Psychology association; Psi Chi, psycho- logical fraternity; Phi Delta Kappa, educational. 3. Psychology prepares the student for piersonnel work, for social service, and for teaching, and will aid in business and professional pursuits. Important also is the understanding of ourselves and others to be gained through the study of psychology. 4. Courses offered include Introduction to Psychology, Social Psychology, Psychology of the .Abnormal, Psychology of Child Development, Experimental Psychology, History of Psychology, .Advanced Psychology, Psychology of Per- sonality and Its Development, Educational Psychology, Applied Psychology, Psy- chological Measurements, Psychology of Religion. ROY W. DEAL Dean Elect of the College of Liberal Arts Students become acquainted through experiments with working conditions of psychology, mental psychology is studying sensory perception. Here, a class in experi- Graduate schools place a premium on Wesleyan students trained in small groups with a private research laboratory for ad- vanced students and two large and well-equipped laboratories for freshmen and sophomores. Chemistry Work in chemistry has both a cuUural and a professional value The discipline of scientific inquiry develops the skill required for technical achievement in industry and in research: and it strengthens character through the necessity for personal integrity in securing and stating results. The graduates from this department have been readily placed. Their undergraduate work includes part time assisting which serves to develop ability and responsibility. Courses offered include : Inorganic Chemistry, Organic Chemistry for Nurses, Qualitative Analysis, Organic Qualitative Analysis, Or- ganic Preparations, Elementary Physical Chemistry, Organic Chem- istry, and Quantitative .Analysis. MARTIN R. BROADBOOKS Professor of Chemistry Informal discussion in advanced writing workshop. Freshman English class receives its graded papers from the English postoffice. ETHEL LOUISE BOOTH Associate Professor of English English The offerings in the department of English have been planned with utmost care. Through the courses in freshman English, the department strives to enable every student to develop a form of expression — clear, forceful, unadorned — worthy of those who aspire to do useful and important work during their lives. LITERATURE Through the courses in literature it endeavors to contribute directly and richly to those who are making preparation for teaching and the ministry. It endeavors also to give direction to those desiring a real acquaintance with men and women through the ages who have spoken well and wisely. ADVANCED WRITING Through the course in advanced writing it seeks out and develops the rare gifts and talents possess ed by many Wesleyan students. The writers ' seminar extends the opportunities to those who are particularly interested. JOURNALISM Through associated courses, such as the course in introductory journalism taught by Assistant Professor Dwight Thomas, it aims to enable students at least to test their vocational interests and to assist them in finding the work for which they may be most happily fitted. V BERNICE N. HALBERT Assistant Professor of English Foreign Languages DEAN EMERITUS F. A. ALABASTER Professor of Classical Languages and Literatures MARIETTA SNOW Professor of Modern Languages CREEK Courses in New Testament Greek are offered, enabling the student to read this matchless literature in the original, thereby gaining a more com- prehensive grasp of the deep, underlying thought than through any translation. A course is also offered in the study of English derivatives, constituting a study of the copious vocabularies of the sciences, philosophy, psychology, politics, medicine, theology and the like. LATIN To meet the needs of those who have not had more than two years of high school Latin, the first year course begins with a review of essential forms and principles. This is followed by readings from The Lives of Nepos, and some orations of Cicero, with exercises in prose composition. In the second and ensuing years, courses are offered to those who are qualified, in Vergil, Cicero, Livy, Horace, and Plautus, covering philosophic essays, history, the epic, satire, and comedy. DRAMA IN ENGLISH A course is offered each semester in English, comprising mythology, and rapid reading in the best translations of some of the great writers, such as Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, . ristophanes, and ] Ienander. The modern language department of the Nebraska Wesleyan University, as o ld as the school itself, has caught the vigor and life of the languages that it studies. Professor Marietta Snow teaches Be- ginning German, Advanced German, Ad- vanced Composition and Conversation, Modern Drama, Classics, and Scientific German. The foremost objective of the modern language department is that its students obtain a mastery of their subject, and in so doing gain a sympathetic understand- ing of the people whose language they study. Instructor EVELYN WITTMAN Mrs. Wittman is making mid-western- ers realize that there is actually a nation whose people speak French morning, noon and night. She teaches Beginning French, .Advanced French, .Advanced Composition and Conversation, and Sur- vey of French Literature. GRAHAM A. BARRINCER Professor of History COURSES 1. Survey Modei-n Europe 1500-1925 2. American History 3. Ancient History 4. Medieval History 5. English History 6. Diplomatic History of U. S. 7. World Civilization 8. World History Since 1914 9. The Renaissance and the Reformation 10. The American Froctier 11 The South Before 1860. Dr. Barringer ' s assistants offer his students help in the study of maps and their relation to current world history. History It is necessary that an individual have a historical background to understand and appraise epochal develop- ments in the world today. Survey courses are offered to give this background of culture to the liberal arts student. Specialized courses are especially planned to meet the needs of prospective teachers, pre-law students, and those interested in English and the So.ial Sciences. Mathematics lathematics forms a basis for e.xtensive education in such fields as physics and the allied subjects such as radio, electrical measurements, and mechanics. It is also required in chemistry, engi neering, surveying, astronomy, and archi- tecture. COURSES 1. College Algebra 2. Trigonometry 3. Analytic Geometry 4. Solid Geometry 5. Spherical Trigonometry and Solid Anal. Geometry 6 Diff. Calculus 7. Integral Calculus 8. Adv. Calculus 9. College Geometry 10. Theory of Equations 11. Diflp. Equations 12. Mathematics of Investment IN THE PICTURE A student receives instruction in the use of the calculating machine. JOHN M, HOWIE Professor of Mathematics This course is valuable because of practice in recognizing relevant and irrelevant facts in such pro- fessions as law and education. Geography-Geology With new interest in the conservation of the natural resources, timber, soil, water, and minerals, state, regional, and federal organizations are demanding more trained geographers and geologists than are available. The undergraduate training required for such positions is offered by the Nebraska VVesleyan uni- versity department of geography and geology, and many students are taking ad- vantage of it. OUTSTANDING AUTHOR Dr. Clark is author of the books. " Geography in the Grades " , " Geography of Nebraska " , " Unit Studies in Geography " , which was listed by the . L. A. as one of the 60 best books in Education of the year, and " Geography in the Schools of Europe. " These books have been written into the courses of study of most modern public schools of America. jVIuch of her study was done at the University of Chicago and in New York with the American Geographical Society under direction of Dr. Isaiah Bowman, now president of Johns Hopkins university. Dr. Clark is listed in . merican Men of Science, Who ' s Who Among .American Women, Leading Women of America, Who ' s Who Among North -American Authors, Who ' s Who in American Educa- tion, and Educational Leaders. ROSE B. CLARK Professor of Geography and Geology Here is Dr. Rose B. Clark as she appeared last June, on the lower bridge-deck of the motor ship " Pleasantville, " " tramp, " just be- fore starting on a trip to the Far East. The itinerary included China, the Philippines, the Malay Peninsula, and parts of the Dutch East Indies. Professor Clark studied cargoes and ports, and had stirring adventures with sun and wind and ocean currents. COURSES OFFERED 1. Human Geography 2. Geography of Nebraska 3. Conservation of Natural Resources 4. Physical Geography 5. Economic Geography 6. Geography of Latin America 7. Geography of North America 8. Geography of Europe 9. Geography of Asia 10. Historical Geology 11. Current World Problems Students learn that Geography and Geology are concerned with tar more than the location of dots on a map. On numerous field trips they watch the state ' s largest cement plant in action; visit rock quarries and brick kilns in operation: see conservation projects where the long hills are laid out in great contoured patterns; and learn of rocks, soil and minerals at fir-st hand from the master teacher who knows them well No dry facts in the field trip study of Geology. Above. Left — Ferdinand had nothing on C. Oliver Panzer ' cause he seems to like smelling flowers, especially when Vera Anderson offers him a rose. Above, Right — " Let ' s er — , stop and make up, " says Doris Blewfield, and Harvey Feyerherm assists. Left — The photographer caught Dorothy Freeborn and Al Croft, but were they coming or going? )oe ' n ' Josie College, Forget the classroom fog, Take time out from knowledge For— Puttin ' On The Dog By VIVIAN FINLEY The Nebraska Wesleyan university winter formal season, the time set apart by our collegians for dating, dining, and dancing in style, saw tuxes and formals brought out of closets, corsages pinned on, and everybody doing plenty of fancy stepping. The Alpha Gamma Delta sorority led off with a dinner which was held at the University club. After dining, the Alpha Gams and their dates " jitterbugged " to the music of Earl Hill and his orchestra. The Willards entertained their dates at a dinner in the Lincoln hotel on January 26, and Earl Hill ' s orchestra fur- nished music for the dance which followed. The next night, the Delta Omega Phi fraternity gave its annual dinner and dance at the same hotel, with -Jimmy Miller and his orches- tra setting the pace for the dancers. miSlMl t ' ■ . Domestic Interlude Going to collega on a small margin is not only possible but it ' s what the honor roll students and campus leaders are doing every day. They spend $150 for tuition; $108 for room and board; $17 for books; and $25 for clothes. They earn money by working in offices, and save it by being their own housemothers. They may fui-ther re- duce the expenses with scholarsips. CHANCES TYPEWRITERS For the girl who types her way through college, Jean Schrunk, of Lynch, there are no office hours. She merely changes typewriters from one at the desk of Dr. E. Glenn Callen, head of the political science department, to the one on her study table. Beautifully lacquered nails are an essential to the coed business girl. Wilmetta Stake, Burchard, who types for John Brox, superintendent of buildings, finds time in a busy day to beautify hers. LICHT HOUSEKEEPINC For girls who do light housekeeping like Harriet Price, of Table Rock, and Maxine Brooks, of Osceola, the dishes are soon washed. Edna Cunningham, Meadow Grove, beats her room- mates to the iron and gets her skirt pressed for an eight o ' clock class. Coach Dwight Thomas came to Wesleyan in 1937 after 13 years at Hastings high school where his football teams won over 70 percent of their games and his basketball teams won over 80 percent. Graduate of Nebraska U. in 1918, Thomas was active in school affairs, being a member of the InncKents and member of Alpha Tau Omega. Coach Dwight Thomas JERRY ADAMS. Line Coach Men ' s Athletics LIGHTS IN THE WESLEYAN BOWL FOOTBALL With the loss of such stars as Johnnie Staten, Don Williams, George Carne and Frank Harrington plus several other lettermen, the competition for places on the 1940 Plainsman football team will be wide open. Only Dale Magnuson, three year man, at quarterback, appears to be certain of a starting assignment. Wesleyan will again play a schedule of nine hard games with the following teams: Tarkio, Wayne, Sterling, Kan., Kearney, Midland, Doane, York. Peru and Hastings. TRACK Last year the Wesleyan relay team took in the Hastings, Texas and Kansas relays. So far this year the Plainsmen have been represented in the Wayne and Colorado relays. Merle Randall, sprinter e.xtraordinary, is again the spark- plug of the team and remains undefeated in Nebraska College competition. TENNIS Wesleyan will attempt to keep its consecutive championship record in tennis unbroken this season. Elbert Souders, singles runnerup in last year ' s conference championships and Bruce Keith will form the nucleus of the team. Above — Wesleyan ' s basket5a!l lettermen take time out from the cage sport to train their attention on the cameraman. Their ' s is not a loco-motive for lining up this way; wouldn ' t choc? John Staten was on the injured list at the time, but a typcial action shot of him appears below. Coal -Getters The bare statement of the itcoiil of four games won out of a schedule of nineteen played would not be fair to the fine spirit and courageous efforts of the members of the 1940 Plainsman basketball squad. The record does not show the many well-played games lost by a small margin, nor does it show the many valiant individual efforts to bring about victories. Lost by graduation will be Elbert Souders and John Staten, regulars for four years, Paul Johnson, Harvey Feyerherm, and Wilmer Woltemath. Merle Geis, Ronald Metzler, Wayne Miller, Jim Owen and Harold Maynard are letter winners who will be back for future competition. A fine record by the " B " team of nine games won to three lost gives a brighter hue to future prospects. This squad was composed of Ralph Bowmaster, Dean Niemann, Herman Piper, Buddy Guest, Guy Bru- baker, Duane Ketelhut. Brainard Tavener, Bob Romig, Dale Magnuson, and Russell Macv. Y ' ■fc - V-i, -. ' i pMH ' r Above — Harvey Feyerherm, representing the " W " club, gives a medallion to Dorothy Knight, and tn so doing discloses her as the " W " Club Sweetheart, at half-time of the Homecoming game. Bruce Keith and Vance James, other " W " men, approve of the proceedings. 4 m It.. JR T ,i.n ' T HHB mJf . Left — Homecoming rally included a torch-light parade through the " village " led by a truckload of football men — and others. Homecomin; By VIVIAN FINLEY Homecoming Day, Oct. 27, began with a chapel pro- gram in the morning with Miss Ruth Butcher giving sports announcement of the Wesleyan-Mldland game. " Doc " Mayo welcomed the Wesleyan alumni to the Homecoming celebration. Jimmy Parsons, six-year old son of Prof, and Mrs. Joe A. Parsons, was presented to the student body as the " Pep club Sweetheart. " Alpha Gamma Delta sorority and Delta Omega Phi ira- ternity were awarded the plaques for first place rankings in the Homecoming decorations, which were judged the night before. Between the halves of the Wesleyan-Midland game, Dorothy Knight, Lincoln senior, was presented as " W " club Sweetheart. She w?s the guest of honor at the " W " club dance, which was held in the gymnasium after the game. This annual dance closed the season ' s Homecoming activi- ties. Head Cheerleader Dean McCee gives a hand to Jimmy Parsons, six-year-old " Pep Club Sweetheart, " at the Home- coming program in the auditorium. COURSES OFFERED . m E. GLENN CALLEN Professor of Political Science and Sociology 1. National Government. 2. State Government of Nebraska 3. Applied Sociology 4. General Sociology 5. City and Local Government 6. Essentials in National and State Constitutions 7. Comparative Governments 8. Constitutional Law and Development 9. Social Legislation 10. Population Problems 1 1 . Labor Problems 12. Criminology and Penology 13. Public Welfare and Relief 14. American Party System Political Science and Sociology 1. Graduates of the Wesleyan pre-social work course have taken work in recent years in the social work schools of Denver, Chicago, Boston, and Atlanta, Ga. 2. Arrangements are made for the pre-social work students to do volunteer work in the social agencies of Lincoln so that they may determine the field of social work which they wish to follow. 3. Wesleyan pre-law students have recently graduated from the law schools of Harvard, Nebraska, and Michigan, and are prac- ticing law in Nebraska and in the neighboring states. 4. Dr. E. Glenn Callen served the Nebraska Conference of Social Work as its president in 1935 and is still active in the conference program. 5. Recently Dr. Callen represented the United States Department of Labor and the Federal Social Security Board in conducting civil service examinations in Nebraska. The Nebraska State Capitol furnishes an interesting laboratory for students of government at Wesleyan. Richard Smith and lames Ackerman of Lincoln. Wesleyan Pre-Law, Harvard law school graduates, now practising in Lincoln. Dr. Callen in conference with students who are doing volunteer work in social welfare at the Lincoln Social Welfare Society. MAMIE E. CORNS Assistant Professor Economics and Business Administration IN THE PICTURES Above, the use of the adding machine and the recording and interpreting of accounts are being taught in supervised laboratories. Right, stenographers take dictation under actual working conditions. LEONARD H. RALL Assistant Professor of Economics and Business Administration Economics and Business Administration 1 . Meets the need of those going into busi- ness, offering a B.S, degree in business administration. 2. Offers a major or a minor in economics in the college of liberal arts. 3. Meets the requirements of those prepar- ing to teach commercial courses in high schools. Some of the Courses Offered Typewriting Shorthand Business English Introduction to Economics Principles of Ek;onomics Economic Problems Accounting Business Organization and Management Business Finance Money and Banking Public Finance Transportation Economic History Statistical Method Insurance Business Law Marketing Advertising and Selling Credit and Collections Outline for Two-Year Secretarial Course First Year English General Accounting Political Science Intro, to Economics Shorthand Typewriting Second Year English Literature Economics Business English Business Organization Shorthand Typewriting A stroboscope, constructed in the physics department shop by Francis Breeden, used for the study of objects moving at a high speed. Students be- come familiar with the operation of a large variety of measuring instruments, motors, rectifiers, and generators, . mong the latter is included a 6SKVA Westinghouse turbo-generator with complete switchboard control. ). C. JENSEN Professor of Physics and Astronomy Physics and Astronomy A ground school class under the Civil Aeronautics Authority observes the effects of wind pressure on a model airplane. Many years of research in atmos- pheric electricity moisture conser- vation and radio transmission have given Dr. Jensen nation-wide con- facts with men in his field. A registered, professional engineer under the laws of Nebraska, he is fully conversant with practical problems. His graduates hold pro- fessorships in schools like Colum- bia, Pittsburgh, .Armour, .Alabama Poly Tech, Montana, Butler, Rolla and Muskingum. Among them are radio, electrical, and aeronautical engineers, school administrators, meteorologists and Boy .Scout ex- ecutives. Below, an instrument designed to measure the lifting and dragging forces on model airplane wing sections. OUTSTANDING Last year four men with majors in phj ' sics were awarded graduate assistantships in schools like Ohio State university. University of Iowa, .Armour Institute, and Calif- ornia Institute of Technology. .All have made good. Francis Breeden. ' 40, has recently accepted an ap- pointment at .Armour Institute for ne. t vear. COURSES . Ici-li:niii-s ;n (1 7. M(m1 tii rhysii ' s IIc:it s. Histiiry of I ' hysic KUM ' tricity. S uml u. Mi t -(iroIo;r. " ,Tiid Li ht 1(1. Hailii. ElcctricMl 11. .Aiijilytical .Mi ilslircineiits .Mccliaiiics DylKllims :ni(l i;;. . (lv;iiK ' t ' (i Kleot. Motdi-s ulJil M:lKIie|-isill . eroniUitics i:i. I ' hysii-.-il Oplii ' .s Pliotojrrnpliy 14. Itcscriiitivc Astronomy MRS. LAONA UNDERKOFLER Assistant Professor of Biology DR. CLARENCE CROOK Men ' s Physician DR. BERTHA M. THOMSON Women ' s Physician Laboratory work initiates the student into the use of the microscope in histology, embryology and other biological subjects; the methods of human anatomy, animal dis- section, and physiological experimentation; and the technics of bacteriology, blood work , urine analysis, and biochemistry. Biology 1. Library of 1,725 biology volumes. 81 current biological science magF.zines, 30 complete files of most important biological magazines. 2. Equipment worth $10,000. Expensive Auzoux anatomical model of the human body, life size, and dissectible into the important units of musculature and organs. 3. Theta Nu, pre-medical honor society. 4. Twenty-nine student nurses enrolled last year, eight of whom are now in training at Bryan Memorial hospital. ' With one year of pre-nursing in any of several hospitals in the state a girl may earn her R.N. By an additional year at Wesleyan she may receive a B.S. degree. 5. Dr. Shirk ' s graduates include 73 physicians, 31 professional and research workers, and 77 nurses. Twenty-nine research fellowships have been secured. Only two students have failed completely out of the Nebraska Medical school in Omaha, testimony of the thorough preparation of the others. COURSES OFFERED BOTANY 1. (ifiieral Biiilos- ' .v 2. Field (If Bcitany .1. N:it ir( ' Stuily 4. Ei-iiUifry fi. riant Phy.siology ij. History of the Earth PHYSIOLOCY-HYGIENE 7. Bacteriology 8. Physiology and Health ft. Hygiene and Health 10. Social Hygiene 11. Home Nursing 12. Anatomy-organology 1? . Advanced Physiology 14. Laboratory Technic ZOOLOGY 15. Morphology a. general b. advanced l(i. Animal Ecology 17. Genetics and Eugenics IS. Seminar CLAUDE ). SHIRK Professor of Biology What Do You " Katink " ? By VIVIAN FINLEY To the tune of $600 for the total cost of costumes, sets, royalties, and advertising, the Nebraska Wesleyan university chorus presented Rudolph Friml ' s comic opera. " Katinka, " under the direction of Prof. Oscar Bennett. The first truly all-Wesleyan opera was given twice, at the Wesleyan auditorium Friday night, Dec. 15, and at tho Lincoln high school auditorium Saturday night, Dec. 16. The production was such a success that people in several sur- rounding towns asked that it be given again, but Professor Bennett declined saying, " We ' ll have another one next year. " OSCAR P. BENNETT Professor of Music Esther Perkins, David City sophomore, and Ernest Metz- ger, Crawford junior, played the leading roles of Katinka and Ivan Dimitri. Genevieve Taylor, Lincoln junior, and Ross Mendell, Scottsbluff senior, sang the comedy leads as the American husband and wife. Sets for the opera, which changed from a Russian setting to a Turkish harem, and again to a street scene in Vienna, were designed by Miss Gladys Lux, head of the art department. Costumes were made under the direction of Mrs. Clara Brandt, physical education instructor, and dances in the opera were directed by Miss Wilhemein Sprague, a dance instructor downtown. This year the speech department, under the direction of Prof. Enid Miller Hoffman, came to the rescue in full force, moved scenery, acted as makeup committee, arranged sets, located properties, and did all the behind-scenes work. Other instructors in the music department are Geralyn Walrath Bennett, violin; Pauline Slonecker, piano; Neva Cocklin, elementary piano; Irene Taylor McCandless, pipe organ; Clara U. Mills, theory and history of music, form and analysis, music appreciation and harmony; A. L. Boberg, band and girls ' glee club; and Vernon Forbes, brass in- struments. Below — Lyda Varney beautifies Ross Mendell, Doris BIswfield " smears " Esther Perkins and Clara Bell Williamson builds a mustache for Lee McAllister as the opera cast prepares for its second performance, which was given at the Lincoln high school auditorium. Male A Cappella Chorus — First row: Arthur Riedesel, Howell Cox, Cuy Brubaker, Director Oscar Bennett, Eldon Chamberlin, Bill Nichol, Ross Mendell, Bernie Hodgkln. Second row; Ed Worthing ' on. Robert Cibb, Cordon Olsson, Cordon Brackett. Don Kohl, Byron Johnson, Herman Piper. Third row: Ernest Metzger, Robert Cottschalk. Richard Dinsdale, Darrell Hunt, Frank Lawrence, Leiand McAllister. Fourth row; Dean Brubaker, |ohn Hawthorne. Harold Boyle, )ohn Jones, Cordon Roberts, Robert Nisley, Ralph Currier. Melody Makers The thirty-fourth annual tour of the Nebraska Wesleyan male a cappella chorus, under the direction of Prof. Oscar Bennett, will begin March 24 and end April 10, A home concert on April 12 will climax this season ' s trip. Concsris will be given at schools and churches in Kansas, Wyoming, Colorado, and Nebraska. A highlight of the iour will be a half-day rest in Denver with a broadcast from station KOA tha ' night. Special features on the programs will be vocal solos by Ross Mendell, Bill Nichol, and Professor Bennett; saxophone solos by Bernie Hodgkin; violin solos by Geralyn Walraih Bennett; and readings by Kenneth Nye. The Girls ' Glee club, under the direction of Mr. A. L. Boberg, will take its first annual tour, singing concerts at schools and churches in Nebraska. The tour will be taken March 24-29, and the girls will give a home concert on April 26. Featured on the programs will be vocal solos by Mr. Boberg and Esther Perkins, and readings by Margaret Thomson. Girls ' Glee Club — First row: Lucile Kokes, Betty Allen, Louise Cottschalk, Alice Dinsdale, Jean Flaherty, June Scheldt, Vetta Weaver. Second row; Eunice Kuehn, Elaine Peterson. Esther Perkins. Jacqueline Nagel. Betty Harvey. Leia Harkleroad. Ruth Stevens, Roberta Kauk. Third row: Maxine Cope, Bea Goodrich. Marguerite Peterson. Ruth Little, Alatha DeBoer, Catharine Thom- son, Helen Johnston, Fourth row; Vera Anderson, Adelaide Reynolds, Sarah Brown, Shirley Miller, Rose Ellen Dreler, Imogene Johnson, Margaret Thomson, Thelma Randall. Instrumental Music Nebraska AVesleyan offers the possibility of study on all orchestral instruments with such outstanding teachers as Mr. Vernon Forbes, trumpet soloist wnth the Lincoln Symphony; Mr. Paul Bieberstern, bassoon player who was selected by Sonja Henie for her orchestra during her per- formances in Omaha, and Mr. Thomas I. Mendenhall, who is a skillful teacher of and performer on the clarinet. All other instruments from the piccolo to the harp can be studied with equally fine teachers. Many ensembles are organized for performance and to give the student prac- tice in playing with others Neva Cocklin, a student of Mr. Guy Maier, elementary piano instructor. Singing Strings Geralyn Walrath Bennett is instructor in violin and director of string trios and ensemble. Mrs. Bennett is a pupil of Louis Persinger, of the Juilliard Foundation in ew York, who taught the great Yehudi Menuhin. She also studied with Richard Czerwonky, teacher, composer, vio- linist, now a professor at DePaul. String music at Nebraska Wesleyan has its founda- tion in a 16 piece ensemble which meets once each week for a two hour period. Each season the ensemble plays two concerts away from the campus, and one concert on the campus. The music played includes concertos for string groups, transcriptions of movements from symphonies, and smaller pieces from classic composers such as Bach, Corelli, and the modern composers. Mrs. Bennett ' s private students form trios which appear at teas, luncheons, and meetings in Lincoln, and give an average of one p)erformance each week during the school year. Majors in violin take two half-hour lessons per week, in conjunction with the regular courses in music, and are pre- pared upon graduation to teach in state high schools. A public recital is one of the requirements for completion of major work. String Ensemble below. Pauline Slonecker, a student of Mr. Guy Maier, of the Juilliard School of Music in New York City, piano instructor. O ■ V •S.. Forensics Three state oratorical championships were offered by the Nebraska Intercollegiate Forensic association last year. Wes- leyan won three. Lynne Anderson, women ' s champion, and Wayne Stewart, men ' s champion, went on to win another national championship to Prof. Enid Miller Hoffman ' s long string. In addition they won two seconds and one third against the outstanding orators of the country speaking in national contests. Trophies and awards of state and na- tional rankings are shown above. ENID MILLER HOFFMAN Professor of Speech The trophy collection above represents the unrivaled for- ensic record of Wesleyan speakers over a period of 16 years. 1. Fourteen men ' s state oratory titles. All other schools two. 2. Twelve national oratory titles. Compare this with record of any other school in the United States. 3. First three rankings in Pi Kappa Delta, national honorary speech fraternity, 150 member schools. RUTH MUNSEY BUTCHER Instructor in Debate and Radio Forensically speaking. Pi Kappa Delta placed Nebraska Wesleyan university in the nation ' s top triangle of outstand- ing speech schools. Competing successfully in the three fields of oratory, extemporaneous speaking and debate at the national Pi Kappa Delta convention in Knoxville, Wesleyan ' s delegation shared top honors with Baylor university and Redlands, Calif. N. W. U. contestants placed more speakers in the finals than the four other P. K. D. Nebraska schools together. They brought home the only two national trophies to come to this state. The silverware was won by Lynne Anderson who placed first in women ' s oratory and Wayne Stewart who ranked second in men ' s oratory. These two orators went on to the Interstate Old Line oratorical contest to place second and third, respectively. Thereby Miss Anderson and Mr. Stewart established a record in national competition never before achieved by any Nebraska school — entered in four national contests against 378 orators, they brought home one first, two seconds, one third. No other school in the United States placed in all four contests. At Knoxville Wesleyan ' s woman extempore speaker. ■Virginia Crawford was one of six finalists out of a field of 64. Al Croft, Wesleyan ' s man extempore speaker, was ad- judged Excellent. The men ' s debate team of Wayne Stewart and James Tipton also won Excellent and Wesleyan ' s women, Virginia Crawford and Vera Harvey, won five out of eight debates. Theta Alpha Phi pin, highest honor to dramatists. Dramatics 1. Five major plays each year. Among this year ' s produc- tions were two Broadway hits never before produced on a Lincoln stage by starting the season with Maxwell Ander - son ' s Pulitzer prize winning play, " Wingless Victory, " and closing it with Randolph Carton ' s " Wuthering Heights. " the 1939 Critics award play. Other plays were " The Death Deck. " " $1200 a year, " and ' Girls in Uniform. " 2. First Nebraska chapter of Theta Alpha Phi, national dramatics fraternity, membership open to outstanding upper classmen. Plainsman Players, Wesleyan local dramatics so- ciety, open to the entire student body. 3. Fully equipped stage, dressing and make-up rooms for major productions. Drama Shoppe, equipped with stago, lighting, etc., for study and production. 4. Classes in Acting, Stage Craft, and Play Directing give necessary fundamentals for high school teaching or background for advanced study. 5. Permanent policy of one major new talent production each year. This gives talented freshmen opportunity to play important roles without the danger of competition from the more experienced actors in the senior dramatics fraternity. FRANCES GOODHUE LODER Instructor in Private Speech and Drama Margaret Thomson in the native costume for " Wingless Victory. " DEAN B. E. McPROUD Professor of Secondary Education v DMINIS- 6. Child Lit. HIST. PRIN. T RATION 7. Social Studies OF EDI CATION 1. Problems of in Primary 1. Basic Elementary- Grades Principles Schools s. Biology 2. Kindergarten 2. Oriranization Teaching Fundamentals and Adminis- Physics and Curricu- tration of Sec- Teaching lum " ondary Edu- n. Teaching " ec 3. Philosophy of cation : Mod- ondary School Education ern, Second- Mathematics 4. Education and ary School 11. Public School Character TEACHING Art r . History of TECHNICS 12. Teaching Elementary 1 Primary- Social Education Kinderprarten Sciences e Experimental 2 Intermediate 13. Supervised Schoo ' s a Junior High Teaching PSYCHOLOGY 4 Senior High 14. Public Schoi.l OF En. SPECIAL Music Educational TECHNICS 15. Teaching Psychology of Kindergarten Methods English Childhood TEACHERS COLLEGE Nebraska Wesleyan Teachers College Training School is listed by the Journal of the National Educational association as one of the " Schools That Are Prophesies. " It is the only teacher training school in Nebraska so listed. MASTERY PLAN Under the direction of Dean B. E. McProud, chairman of the Nebraska State Board of Examiners for Colleges, the Wesleyan Training School was the first in the state to be organized on the Mastery plan of teaching. .Achievements under the plan have been striking; a pupil in grade " 2B " has read 67 books in five months ; the first semester average for reading of books in free periods is 25: during a six weeks ' period sixth grade children read more than 500 pages of material for a single geography or history unit ; eighth grade children have read more than 1,000 pages of material during a similar period. TEACHERS COLLEGE STAFF Nine full-time professors and instructors are employed in the Nebraska Wesleyan L ' niversity Teachers College, giving their time to professional courses in Teacher Training. There are also three part-time instructors. No other church-related college in the West maintains such a teacher-training staff. The Teachers College enjoys the superior advantage of a broad cultural background because of the unique fact that its academic work is carried on within the College of Liberal Arts. Teachers College students have access to all courses in the College of Liberal Arts including music. Industrial Arts The department of Industrial Arts is composed of a large shop with benches to accommodate 20 to 30 students, and separate rooms for tools, lumber and finishing. Not only is there a very adequate supply of hand tools, but also of power machinery, such as band saw, power table saw, four lathes, jig saw, and saw sharpener. A very neat office with built-in bookcases and file cabinets makes it very handy for students to study and complete assignments right in the department. At the present there is quite a demand for teachers of Industrial Arts, yet not enough to meet the demand. Many students are now in good positions who have completed the work of this department. Courses offered are: Woodwork 1 and 2, Woodturning 1 and 2, Wood- finishing, Upholstery, Engineering Drafting, Descriptive Geometry, jMetalwork and Machine Shop 1 and 2, Wood-carving, Practice Teaching, Mill-work, Shop Organization and Control, and .Architectural Drawing. JOSEPH A. PARSONS Department Head Assistant Professor of Industrial Arts and Education Kindergarten-Primary Department ETHEL WALKER HATCH Department Head Assistant Professor of Education Founded in 1897. One of the best equipped Kindergartens in the West. Kindergarten-Primary students teach two semesters, one in the kindergarten and one in the first or second grade. Thus the student has an opportunity to work with two supervisors and gain practical knowledge of teaching principles in both fields. Association for Childhood Education The Campus A. C. E. This is a national organization which promotes progressive education in the Nursery School, the Kindergarten and primary grades. Monthly meetings are held in the kindergarten rooms. For the past three years, delegates have been sent to the national conventions in Cincinnati, Atlanta, and Milwaukee. A corner of the living room and a part of the music room of the Willard sorority. On the fireplace is the scholarship cup and the blue key won at the 1933 " Big Snob-O!d Crouch " party. Below — Phi Kappa Tau living room, spacious and comfortable. A CLARA BRANDT Deoarlment Head Professor of Physical Education for Women Above — The winter gym program includes rhythm, folk dancing, and exercises for the development of grace and posture. Everywhere today public moneys are being conserved. Expendi- tures for education are being closely scrutinized ; the taxpayer is de- manding more value for less money. Whatever the wisdom of this policy, the immediate effect should be to stimulate teachers to meet the emergency. More teachers should plan to combine the teaching of Physical Education with other subjects. So many teachers in smaller schools are literally thrust into the ,g mnasium and told to take charge, with so little preparation for the work that they are en- tirely at a loss. Their immediate need is for familiarity with Physical P-ducation activities and methods of teaching. A variety of courses helpful to them are listed in the 1940-1941 Wesleyan catalog. In all courses problems of economy and operation on reduced budget will be considered. Above — Tennis is offered on the spring sports program. Pictured left to right are Jeanne Souser, Clarks; Elinor Soeth, Chapman; Rosalie Kilzer, Lebanon; and Ruth Ellis, Chester. Women ' s Athletics Above — ANNE KAIMMER, from Lethbridge, Alberta, Can- ada, who is giving an exhibition of one of the popular sports on the campus. Members of the W. A. A. will represent Wesleyan in the Telegraphic Archery Meet to be held at Wesleyan this spring To be an active member of W.A.A. a woman must earn one hundred twenty-five points, participating in recreational activities, and malting an aver- age of C minimum, in her academic work. Officers for this year are president, Elinor Soeth ; vice-president, Dorothy Knight ; recording secretary, Ruth Fenske ; corresponding secretary, Maxine Cope ; treasurer, Roberta Kauk ; publicity, Jean Souser ; and sponsor, Mrs. Brandt. The W.A.A. district convention met this year at Bloomington, Illinois, Wesleyan being represented by Elinor Soeth. A state convention will be held next year at the University of Nebraska. JOHN ROSENTRATER Professor of Philosophy, Bible. and Religion Philosophy, Bible, and Religion The department presupposes the value of help given to young persons in developing a Christian way of seeing the world ; aims to clarify the convictions of those who may be considering life service in the church; and furnishes a valuable background for advanced study. Fully accepting the results of scientific investigation, it seeks to develop the more comprehensive viewpoint and fosters earnest medita- tion upon the more ultimate meaning of life. Picture at right, REV. H. O. MARTIN, pastor of First Methodist Church, the university church. By consulting the curriculum suggested below one may get a view of the type of work to be covered by one ' who has chosen full time Christian service. For two years the course follows a quite definite outline but for the last two years yields to the requirements of the major course that is chosen. CHRISTIAN WORKERS CURRICULUM Firs Semester English (1) 3 History (3) or (7) 3 Human Geography (1) 3 Foreign Language 4 Philosophy (1) or (2) 3 Physical Education 1 First Yeah hours Second Semester hours English (2) . ' ' Histoiy (4) or (8) 3 Sociology, Applied (4).... 3 Foreign Language 1 Economics (E2) 3 Physical Education 1 17 17 First Semester English Literature 3 General Biology (1) 4 Speech (1) 3 Psychology (1) 3 Religion (51) 3 Physical Education 1 Second Year hours Second Semester hours English Literature 3 Physiology (2) 3 Speech (2) 3 Psychology, Social (40).... 3 Astronomy 3 Physical Education 1 17 IG A major may be chosen in any one of six different fields. But whatever department is chosen the re- maining two years of work would include some ad- vanced courses in English, Philosophy, Psychology. Religion, Science, Speech, and Sociology. Any fur- ther information desired may be received by request or by consulting the proper members of the ' esleyan staff. Carl Christensen and Helena Kilzer, standing; Warren Johns- ton, Connie Martin, Marion Swanscn and Bob Nisley are cabinet members of Y. M. and Y. W. Christian Service Students will find at Wesleyan an atmosphere of whole - some appreciations and sentiments, an attitude of social mindedness, and a Christian philosophy and practise. Under the leadership of the Rev. Harry O. Martin, he First Methodist church is maintained at the edge o£ the campus and is known as the university church. Sunday school, Epworth League, and morning and evening worship services are included in the regular program. Students of other denominations will find representation of their faith among the many other Lincoln churches. A student Prayer Meeting on the university campus is attended by a large portion of the student body every Wed- nesday night. Chancellor Benjamin F. Schwartz is in charge. Kappa Chi, meaning " Preach Christ " , is an organiza- tion of students preparing for the Christian ministry. The Student Christian Fellowship is a campus organiza- tion giving aid, encouragement and inspiration to students who have pledged themselves to Christian service. It also may recruit for the ministry students of intellectual and spiritual promise. Dorothy Peters, Marguerite Peterson, Rachel Stephenson, Aneeta Humphrey, and Doris Blewfield are on the Y. W. cabinet. Y. M. and Y. W. executives compare notes. Pictured above are Vice-President Carnett Tremaine, President Vance James, Vice-President James Tipton, and President Neva Ebright. One corner of the Art Studio where students are drawing from casts. Using charcoal as a medium, one student develops her interpretation of a plaster-cast head. Drawing and Design Headed by ] Iiss Gladys M. Lux, former president of the Lincoln Artists Guild, the department of draw- ing and design was newly organized this year. Out- standing as one of the West ' s regional artists, she is the only woman artist in Nebraska to have work accepted for exhibition at the New York World ' s Fair in 1939. COURSES IMiss Lux ' s courses give opportunity in creative ex- pression with work in original drawing from life, crea- tive composition, color study, public school art meth- ods, lettering, and design. GLADYS MARIE LUX Instructor in Art The Rachel Ann Lucas library, in the care of Mrs. Ethol Langdon Bishop, houses 30,000 bound volumes and 20,000 pamphlets. It receives regularly 250 of the best educational, scientific, and general magazines. In addition to her work as head librarian. Mrs. Bishop offers a course, " How to Use the Library " in which students will learn the use of the card catalog, encyclopedias, indexes, government documents and other types of general reference material. The library offers ideal study conditions with 24 large tables scientifically lighted with skylight and table lights. ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 1. Credits: From accredited high schools, 12 entrance units, 15 hours from a senior high school or a four-year high school, 9 of which are academic, as English, foreign language, mathematics, natural science, and social sciences. Two units in English, foreign language and in mathematics. Two minors of 2 units each selected from these three subjects. 2. Transcript of High School Credits: Should be sent to Registrar not later than July 15. NECESSARY FOR GRADUATION 1. English, two semesters (freshman year) of constructive English, and two semesters (sophomore year) from the lit- erature. 2. One year of Latin, Greek, French, or German, excepting in the case of those graduating with specialization in nursing. 3. Physical Education, two years, making a total of four or five hours. 4. Nine courses, selected from a list of twelve, from such sub- jects as biology, chemistry, economics, history, geography, hygiene or word study as an aid to the vocabulary, phil- osophy, physics or astronomy, political science or sociology, psychology, religion, and speech. The total credit hours earned is at least twenty-seven. In the following, the word " hour " signifies a credit hour earned by completing one hour of work in a subject car- ried one semester. An " honor point " is a credit earned for quality of work completed by the hour. For example, an A grade earns three honor points per hour, a B grade earns two honor points per hour, and a C grade earns one honor point per hour. 5. A major of twenty-five hours. 6. A minor of fifteen hours. 7. A total of one bundled twenty-five hours. 8. A total of one hundred twenty-five honor points. DEGREES CONFERRED Bachelor of Arts (A.B.) Bachelor of Science (B.S.) Bachelor of Science in Business Administration (B.S. in Bus. Admin.) Bachelor of Fine Arts in Music (B.F.A. in Music) Bachelor of Science in Education (B.S. in Ed.) Bachelor of Fine Arts in Education (B.F.A. in Ed.) EXPENSES The average non-working student at the Nebraska Wes- leyan University spends $360.00 per year. In cases where necessary, it is possible for the working student to complete a year on one-third or one-half of this amount. Information concerning work opportunities and scholarships wUl t e sup- plied by the Registrar. Tuition, per semester $75.00 Matriculation fee (payable once by each student) 5.00 Library fee, per semester 2.00 Student activities fee, per semester 6.00 Includes admission to all athletic, forensic, and musical events; subscriptions to the student publications; student health service; and dramatic club plays. There are special fees for private lessons in dramatics, and in instrumental and voice instruction. Room (average cost per week) 1.25 Board (average per month) 16.00 Tweets and Twirls Tuneful tweets and flashy twirls By Boberg ' s bunch of boys ' n ' girls. By RUTH NELSON Above — Cordon Roberts and Betty Jane Evans make music, Carol Clidewell takes time out, Ruth Nelson clashes the cym- bals, Paul Scott blows, and the band inspires Wesleyan stu- dents. Flashing silver batons twirled in the air as four high- stepping majorettes and a strutting major led the 1939 Nebraska Wesleyan Plainsman band down the center of the field at half-time tor football enthusiasts this fall. Spectators thrilled with the spirit of Wesleyan at the sight of the thirty-two yellow-and-brown-uniformed members of the Plainsman band preceded by this year ' s addition of flve accompli shed baton twirlei ' s marching in rank and file to the beat of drums. The Homecoming football game, played against Midland, was the first big performance of the band on the home neld this season. A few snappy maneuvers as highlight features included impressive weaving countermarches, series of right and left flanks and formations. The Doane Tigers were greeted on their own field for the second major event with a formation spelling " Hi. " " The Yellow and the Brown, " Wesleyan ' s grand old school song, besides many other traditional and new songs, rings out across the campus from Friday morning pep rallies in the gym, where the student body gathers to receive vim, vigor, vitality, pep and enthusiasm. " Al " Boberg Wesleyan ' 35, directs the smartly uniformed group which inspires both team and student body at foot- ball and basketball contests. -■4 i ' »Mi , " k -:i :


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Nebraska Wesleyan University - Plainsman Yearbook (Lincoln, NE) online yearbook collection, 1936 Edition, Page 1

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Nebraska Wesleyan University - Plainsman Yearbook (Lincoln, NE) online yearbook collection, 1938 Edition, Page 1

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Nebraska Wesleyan University - Plainsman Yearbook (Lincoln, NE) online yearbook collection, 1939 Edition, Page 1

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