Naval Training Center - Rudder Yearbook (Orlando, FL)

 - Class of 1969

Page 1 of 108

 

Naval Training Center - Rudder Yearbook (Orlando, FL) online yearbook collection, 1969 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1969 Edition, Naval Training Center - Rudder Yearbook (Orlando, FL) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1969 Edition, Naval Training Center - Rudder Yearbook (Orlando, FL) online yearbook collection
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Page 10, 1969 Edition, Naval Training Center - Rudder Yearbook (Orlando, FL) online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1969 Edition, Naval Training Center - Rudder Yearbook (Orlando, FL) online yearbook collection
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Page 14, 1969 Edition, Naval Training Center - Rudder Yearbook (Orlando, FL) online yearbook collectionPage 15, 1969 Edition, Naval Training Center - Rudder Yearbook (Orlando, FL) online yearbook collection
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Page 8, 1969 Edition, Naval Training Center - Rudder Yearbook (Orlando, FL) online yearbook collectionPage 9, 1969 Edition, Naval Training Center - Rudder Yearbook (Orlando, FL) online yearbook collection
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Text from Pages 1 - 108 of the 1969 volume:

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The responsiloiliTy Tor Trcinsforming civilians iriTo sciilors is noT Token liohTlN lov The omcers oncl rnen of The Recruil' Trciinincz Commoncl V I .1 v ff ' ' . ' ' '- ln' - - ' - Srcrny likewise The resoonsilollirv Tor ourrinc Tor-Th The necessori e'h'orT W N l Ir u I To become e'n'ecTive members or The worlcl's creoTesT lxlovv shoulcl oe I' I "' r' 1 ci prime concern or ecicn recruriz The muTucfl gool or snsTrucTor oncl Troinee shoulcl be Thoi' recruii' Troining serve To se-T The proper course cincl rnoinToin ci sTeoclv heoclincz Thus This loooli clescriloino The 1' J I .J n- , - u I ,'. '15 SN " processof recruir Troimng, is Trrlecl me .fudczle-r. 'WiThin These pages lie grophic reminclers oT many ocTiviTies-some pleosonT, some noi' so plecisoni, some e::ciTing, some rouTine, some humorous, oncl some gravely serious. in TuTure years, The Rudder ' A shoulcl evoke rnony memories of one of The mos? TorrnoTive oiml rneon- ingful periocls in n'ion's liTe, wzqe-Q-r-.H he is CE :career hlczvy mon or cs ' civilion reminiscing over his Hi'll'i'Cl'l" in The novol service. T The weel-is oncl rnonThs servecl in liecruii' Training Commexnd ore noT ecisy hui' oT necessiTy ore rigorous :incl clernoncling. The Troining is cliligenily planned oncl oclminisTerecl in orcler To develop in every Troinee The sTrengTh of chcirocTer, loycilriy oincl pc:'i'rioTisrn necessary To prepare him To clefencl his :ounTry, iTs icleczls :incl people, caQoinsT ony oggressor. A . ::5:-ij:-513:21 --:ag-,-.544-".7-gp 1.515-yg gg .s.'g'1--4-,'-4 '. rf- T. Y. -Ir' f 7, K f .,g:,-4,fg,f ,T jg-Q .1-1-'V 5s3,:g,'-'-rw dw, gf 'f' izfeiifi-zflfe+522'fsfipzgi"?4-zffflszrak,-'-'Jr1:.f:f'r'f.,,v:fw:f 1 K f ff.--r 'f' 'AMW .1 "far is " U 'T f fffvm- 1-ff-ff-U ,, , . . ,. T, Cv- ,wi 1 , . f -, .- wus' . 'z X: f N J-'.vfXrff':-- - Z'-"'Xvl'1 f"5'5.'1f"-f':'i1-Iliff" W ,"'JfffMi7J'-5. ,irw1:a5'TiHgi'Miifgiif.-1l"f:1E4-:QM-isaswfif- T T X 31-ss 1-326'A1,V21'?f':7,L.:fa1--:faf' -:mf f f if r J X. I , ,L 1 5-u , L 1 vgwgt' K V Vik Cel' rw, If u ,J nw, F 2 rf :S ,,,, L ,, E514- P 1135 as-gm mx. M- J .1 Q . .,.4.,.x .aw ,..,..,I .432 .I- Pr. 1'-, I3-L ,X L 'TY .,,n-.:.. -L U,- J. N , 1 , 1 I My if ' LY' wh in K ' 5 sl, ...Ma .-, . . :aw ...W 5 ,,.. ,, -mv. . it ls? NNW' x 'A AL X J gf H .41 L Mi r. 5 Y I N , 5 ,. r ,X . F. B P I' 4 ' n- rx.. ...y X, Q4 Rear Admlral Herman .I Kossler Commandant Suxih Naval District wgxgw -M n I V I Q 2, 1. -. A-vk,,1..-...iv--f V -fn Y V4.1 - - . N -ef' -sr-'WS' We-x ' A V 4 V , - up -gM.. ,, . .QQ -s....,.k ---211.129-u,-qgwz -,'x'--" '. L' -" x . . , . C , .. s..-..., 1-F:--Is 1.-s--f.-1 we-qw ww: -:Taz-fre -2 wfV?'iN5w.pf-,.-w?f .2 sci H! ,...,.........-.- -.rm-grpa-fJ1c-veg, - Y - '- '- ' v -' J-in-1-.seas-55-ue-if'.-4.x--,. .-.:d1r'+- api HlSTORY 0F THE NAVAL TRAINING CENTER Commissioned on July 1, 1968, the Naval Training Cen- ter, Orlando, was established to enhance the manpower training capabilities of the United States Navy. Occupying the site of the former Orlando Air Force Base, the Navy's third training center is rapidly becoming a show place among training commands in the armed forces. The Commander, Naval Training Center, is tasked with "providing basic indoctrination for enlisted personnel, and primary, advanced, and specialized training for officer and enlisted personnel of the Regular Navy and the Navy Reserve." A decision was made in the nation's capital to develop a third Naval Training Center, and on December 6, 1966, the Honorable Robert H. B. Baldwin, then Under Secretary of the Navy, announced that the city of Orlando had been chosen as the site of the Navy's newest and most modern training facility. Orlando was selected because of its year-round climate, availability of transportation, sufficient family housing, and availability of the Orlando Air Force Base under the Department of Defense Base Closure Program. The newly constructed Recruit Training Command fea- tures modern and functional buildings and presents a "campus-like" atmosphere. Commissioned with the Naval Training Center, the Recruit Training Command provides a smooth transition from civilian life for enlistees into the naval service. Additionally, the Naval Training Center is host com- mand for the Naval Training Device Center, which is responsible for the research, development, production, maintenance, and modification of air, sea, subsurface, land, and space trainers applicable to all types of mili- tary situations. Another tenant command of the Naval Training Center is the Naval Hospital, Orlando, currently a 200-bed facility. The Hospital's combined medical and dental staff of 400 supports the Naval Training Center and other military installations in the Central Florida region, in- cluding dependents and retirees. A modern "high rise" replacement hospital is planned for the future, and this facility will provide the most mod- ern and complete medical care to the ever-increasing active duty and retired military population of the Central Florida area. The Advanced Undersea Weapons School has also taken up residence, in part, at the Naval Training Center. AUWS is currently a detachment of the school at the Naval Base, Key West, Florida. The Orlando detachment is housed in a new brick structure, located on 6,100 square feet of real estate at this training complex. When construction is com- pleted, the school will encompass 109,000 square feet of classrooms, laboratories, and an auditorium to be utilized for indoctrination and classroom lectures. The Orlando detachment is scheduled to become the main school in early 1970 when the facility at Key West closes its doors. Another tenant unit is the Navy Finance Office, Or- lando, which, prior to the July 1 commissioning date, was a branch of the main office at Jacksonville, Florida. The Orlando Finance Office is responsible for disbursing sup- port to 12 military activities in the Central Florida region, and renders civilian disbursing services to six organizations. Additionally, the Center hosts the Navy Printing and Publications Service Branch Office, the Defense Contract Administration Services District, and the Resident Officer- in-Charge of Construction. Presently, the Recruit Training Command has 3,250 men undergoing training. This figure will remain constant until the fifth Recruit Barracks is completed in October 1969. The recruit population will then increase to approxi- mately 4,250. These five barracks, plus a 4,600-man mess hall, a class- room building, and other training facilities comprise the first camp of the Recruit Training Command. Each bar- racks is designed to house 12 recruit companies. The second recruit camp will be identical to the first, with five barracks and additional support buildings used for training purposes. Construction on the second camp is scheduled to begin in Fiscal Year 1969, with targeted completion date in mid-1972. The recruit population will then exceed 8,000. The two camps will be interconnected by a "central core", consisting of two 26-classroom training buildings connected by the Television Building, which houses the closed-circuit television system. Television provides a basic supplement to the academic instruction in recruit training. - --'.,.- 55.-. A - - -e..f- 4,g: gfFyqfa'-1-tZfif1-..-.g.-1:--T17-'C"""'-""'i -19-i T':"?':"'i?"i""'i'- fnigede-ihmggn .f- .-..... . . 4 . .-. . , . V , ,h.- A I ,, his -L ,. ., .14 ,- l . z a 'I Ei , 3 ,V ,v,-. 4,- ,,,. i 4 Q ,-qi,Q15Ij.,f,:,:1:?-g?Effif,?iE,i'E5.7...f,1LFf-'5:'q:zgi4, fg,":.u.-f,fSgg,L.3+.,..,cfg..,.s.:. -' , , 0 . . ,, ,AA ,. . Ur: - - 4 -.X N. '- -r"""4?s'?i'2P 4qNAf13g.YqAv2w f-3..,.y vw- I , f ,:., - -...W Q4-5.55:-,.,,- ,i.,' w-. ..A'1,,.-w. -,... ,., , , rf I 1 A Recruit Barracks Mess Hall 7 ' A ? ? Q I 3 g x 'N Q. x Q... , .k 9 ,N E ,M . -- k,4APmx-::- 15 'LP A Yak, f5Ni A fvsfifj if Y I Q X-X. X' Qvf M ,- f t Z-?Sx'-5'-'-5 Q X-W' Tai Xg+-xx-V :agX. f+-v?XQ5'm'x2Qrs-R. 'vm-crux 11- la 'NA . 1. -3 T Z-154'-v Y L: - 4 5 , ' 'v'e5"vf2i::13fF 1isS3r2'SFI117?-5Xi9Q11iv:T17-El'"'if,'f?-ff-1 xl? Tgirizi '- fr-.N fc- -Nr. . -,-. . . X. , , . , . ' Q.. '1 "fm xg-waif'-"' iii-:..,, ':3'lw3 2 ..: . .- K f'-F -'-Zeit-J 3'f"':'l"' Q55 -Y TI2ig5sI22:s:',xla--1,1 511355-u' .-.5 jQ'3.s:gqgfQ,Qf:x fri:-1' Tj: .F"?'TT5?- gf, X-Q-V mffv .vgqgv ,,-- -- - , - . . - - , --my ' A X -. 'S - - - - - - 4- , X '--- f ,,-- 3. --14-f-1 . --f - '-- - : V ff- -4 gnvx -gf v .-1. --Q 513- ,Z--:Y f , - X- . .N V -, , . ":w'...y .- rx- Y,.l ' :- f. -x . xl. V-1 ' . , A . 4, .-I ,,,--1, ,, W, -:W X ,, - - -E - 1 w i I E l I ! a I . 5 E Z f mf 1 .QES2 :vi V ,mg I . m ww f ,S wki. v 4' 1 f 1 , 111' iw W, .W wfq ,, uf .fa 47 f., .N . - xi N -. E N,,xi,W n K ,521 ' k,,'f ,mtl-I if . - iw ,I I .YZ l H, .L I -.1 1 N x fx , ','E'M.l, , . fQe',f -,131-Q 5 X , , ff H3 'f.3wl.:irL,,., 1' L , ,f -frxwgwfr .. ,Q xrwlm - MJ' 1.-I X' x f -N X X , 'fr' ' wfj. 1 A M .V mmf X NM' L4 .NV AX MN-.449 N , 1. ,. ' 14 J ,r f-.- fi ' I Q. - l . ' , + ' 'H il H-'K V mx . 1,15 . fx 1 " .A Q 'fjgily 4 A , ' ' " ' L 'v A L f ' , Vxgjfi 33" 'fx 91'm','? yi, ., ,Q , ' 1 :Mm ,f I VA, -if I v,x,f.,,' tg J, f I it ,f.,f 1. fl fa ,- vf, ' . '55 "F: 'rj' ,1:'.',,:' 4 ff' hx-vv.y ', '7 N, My - ,Katy ,I K2 f,1,j.,5,6:w. jf ,, fy f5,,1gx 1 .1 X 5 XL ,Q-,x .,. . ,f . 5 , 11 A z fy f 'I' A315 n' v ' Z, wx ,f .41 Q mu ill!!! Q rs mn umm uw wan lilllill A Q1 wx. .wa .- Q x 1 dl N Drill Graduation A 1 L 1 w THE NAVY POWER FOR PEACE Early in the seventeenth century Sir Walter Raleigh observed that "whosoever commands the sea, com. mands the trade: whosoever commands the trade of the world, commands the riches of the world and, consequently, the world itself." This principle is as true today as it was centuries ago. The startling advances in transportation and weapon technology have not lessened the importance of trade via the sea power to world freedom and our nation's prgs. perity. The sea comprises over 70 percent of the worId's surface. Over 99 percent of the tonnage imported or exported to or from the United 'States travels on the sea. Of the 77 raw materials considered strategic to our existence, 66 must be imported from nations across the seas. On any one day there are, on the average, over 2000 ships at sea engaged in bring- ing items to trade to and from our country and the friendly nations of the world. It would be impossible for our country or any friendly country to survive today without the free use of the seas. As Napoleon learned to his sorrow, "those storm tossed ships out there" were the life- blood of his country's power, and without control of the seas, defense for any length of time was im- possible. A strong Navy, now and in the future, is our only real guarantee for a defense against aggression and the threat of communism. The communists, always good students of history, have learned the importance of a strong Navy to control the seaways too. They are building a Navy at a frantic pace. Presently the Russians are esti- mated to have more than 450 submarines, having learned from us and the Germans the importance of submarines in controlling the seas from World War ll. This number far exceeds Germany's submarines, numbering 57, which almost brought England to her knees in the early stages of World War ll-and ex- ceeds the number that we presently have. ASW' IW +1 .YQZN qi "K , 1 .i 'sam Q Navy Strategy 8. Tactics In the face of the constant aggression of commu- nism, the United States has geared her offensive and defensive power to retaliate regardless of the type of aggression, be it cold war, brush fire incidents, political revolution or all-out atomic war. ln all of these areas, the Navy plays the principle part in maintaining the freedom of the friendly nations of the world. Lebanon is an excellent example. Our Sixth Fleet carriers and Marines were there within seven hours of the call for help. Our Seventh Fleet has demonstrated that aggression can be thwarted by the presence of our fast carrier attack force in and around Formosa, Korea and other Asiatic nations. Our Polaris-launching submarines spell the absolute deterrant to atomic war, providing hidden mobile nuclear ballistic missile bases all over the world capable of striking enemy bases on a moment's notice. T The Navy insures our position as the leading sea power by being strong in three tactical areas: a. Fast moving carrier task forces, dispersed in action over an area the size of New York State, capable of delivering nuclear weapons against dis- tant targets or, in limited wars, unleashing just the right amount of punch to terminate aggression. These task forces can destroy enemy targets without endangering our allies. They can also land Marine troops through helicopter "vertical envelopement" to take and occupy critical disputed areas. Today one carrier based supersonic plan is capable of de- livering explosive power equivalent to that of all bombs used in World War II. b. Highly technical and fast moving anti-submarine warfare task forces to search out and destroy enemy submarines threatening merchant sea lanes and our carrier task forces. This group combines the talents of killer submarines, a versatile air combina- tion of bombers, helicopters and fast moving car- riers, and modern, highly technical surface search ships. These units are equipped with underwater destructive devices capable of locating, homing and destroying enemy submarines. c. Ballistic missile submarines capable of unleash- ing atomic missile attacks against any target in the world from unknown, mobile and submerged loca- tions-constant hidden monitors for world peace. The Role of the Navy's Men . Control of the sea by means of the Navy's modern and constantly improving weaponry would not be possible without the skills and devotion to duty of the Navy's enlisted men and officers. In this day of electronic devices, missiles, nuclear power plants, megaton bombs, ancl supersonic planes the need for intelligent, highly trained and qualified personnel to man the ships, submarines and aircraft is now greater than ever before. To insure the "know how" that Navy men need, the Navy has an extensive school program to train today's specialists in the theory, operation, and maintenance of the Navy's ships facilities and equip- ment. Extensive training is needed in order to possess the strongest and greatest Navy the world has ever known. This schooling in some instances requires up to two year's time. Navy men are the best trained technical men in the world today, few industrial concerns give equivalent training to their people to prepare them for Industrial lobs Navy tralnlng allows Navy men to take responsible positions In lndustry upon 4-' ...nnncanm their return to civilian life. Moral Leadership The technical side of the Navy man is only part of the success side of the picture. The more powerful that weapons become, the more important becomes the will and character of the men who must use them. The advance of technology in warfare has put one item at an absolute premium-dedicated man- power. The Navy has instituted under "General Order 2-1" the Moral Leadership program, a series of discussion topics to exciteyoung men's minds with the real meaning of America and the intrinsic value of the individual human being: America's mission in the world, the specific mission of the Navy, and the desperately urgent need for men who will give their best efforts, indeed their very lives, to the perpetuation of the American ideal. Essentially the Moral Leadership program puts the total responsibility for Navy men with the line officers and petty officers who must lead these men in battle. Now, besides seeing to it that men are merely well-trained for combat, Naval leaders are charged with bringing their men to a peak of efli- ciency and keeping them there. This program is more important to our combat readiness than any weapons system ever developed. This time we are dealing with the very heart of our whole combat capability-the man. The New Concept of Recruit Training The recruit of today differs somewhat from his World War II counterpart. Today most of the men in recruit training are under twenty years' of age. These men are young and open minded: many of them are entering the Navy with a definite intent to make the Navy their career. Thus it is very im- Q portant to the Navy and these young men that their careers get the best possible start in this new venture. The transition from civilian life to military life must be smooth, indoctrination in the customs, traditions, and regulations of the Navy must be thorough. Basic Navy knowledge and skills must be taught and developed. Pride in and love for the Navy and their country must be carefully and logically cultivated. In time of peace there must be increased emphasis placed on the mental, moral and social develop- ment of the individual. He must be led to a desire for self-improvement and advancement, to a reali- zation of his status in and his importance to the Navy-a sense of belonging, and to an understand- ing of his place in a democracy as a citizen as well as a part of the Navy. He needs also to be led to a full appreciation of the American way of life and to adopt, for himself, high standards of responsi- bility, military performancefleadership and conduct. The Navy's stake in the recruit's development is tremendous. From these men will come the petty officers, the warrant officers and an important part of the Olticers of the Navy of the future. The Navy cannot be better than the men and women who comprise it. The goals set forth above are stated in terms of ideals and may never be totally realized. However, it is in recruit training that these goals are set and the roots established and nurtured. Continued de- velopment and progress, wherever these men may be throughout .the Navy, will ultimately produce the strong, effective manpower and leadership re- quired for our great Navy and its role of maintaining POWER FOR PEACEI l " A "Q'nW , . , V u , " Y, V .ru ' in u ll .fl M A y. , l ,QA . o is . ' Tung' mf' THE UNITED STATES NAVAL HERITAGE v-7 35-,M .,. , uss cousmunou AND Hms JAVA 0 nscsmnzn zs, 1812 0 V FT A ,. - I Z f Q fb" or-IN PAUL JONES set the pattern for aggressive, res- olute fighting which has always been the ideal of the U.S. Navy. The heritage of our modern Navy is a vast montage of individual maritime achievements. Whether the ship be wooden, sail, armored, or atom powered, the indomitable spirit of fighting, sea faring, American men have made our country the bastion of the free world today. To john Paul Jones went the honor of first hoisting the Stars and Stripes over an American man-of-war, the USS RANGER, of receiving the first national salute in Quiberon Bay on February '14, 1778, from France. In command of the BONHOMME RICHARD he defeated and captured the SERAPIS off Flam- borough Head, giving our Navy its famous fighting words upon an invitation to surrender, "I have not yet begun to fight." 4 I With such inspiration thousands of American sailors have followed in his wake, making individual courage collectively the spirit of our Navy. -Commo- dore Edward Preble, like john Paul Jones, filled his officers and men with esprit and fighting courage. Some of "Preble's boys" became the great leaders of the War of 1812, Stephen Decatur, James Lawrence, Thomas Macdonough. Perry swept the British sea power off Lake Erie. Hull and Bainbridge in the CONSTITUTION, along with Decatur in the UNITED STATES, established American naval power on the high seas during the first year of the War of 1812. As our nation grew in stature in the family of na- THE RETURN OF THE MAYFLOWER. COMMANDER J. K. TAUSSIG, U. S. NAVY,.LEADS THE FIRST DIVISION OF DESTROYERS INTO QUEENSTOWN, IRELAND, MAY 4, 1917, TO COMMENCE OUR ANTISUBMARINE WARFARE IN WORLD WAR I. 1 NAVAL HERITAGE AIR DEFENSE PACIFIC TASK FORCE OPERATION, WORLD WAR II. tions, so did our naval officers grow in stature as diplomats. Typical of their exploits Was Commodore Matthew Calbraith Perry's negotiations with the Em- peror of Japan in 1853-54. Our war between the states developed the same kind of fighting men. David Dixon Porter became famous on the Mississippi River. Captain Raphael Semmes in the commerce raider, CSS ALABAMA, alone cap- tured sixty-nine union ships before he was destroyed off Cherbourg, France by Winslow in the USS KEAR- SAGE. Perhaps the outstanding Civil War naval hero was David Glasgow Farragut Q"Damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead!"j, whose fleets enforced the blockade of the Confederacy. One -generation of fighting men breeds its successors. Dewey, and Sampson, our naval leaders in the Spanish- American War at the turn of the century, led and bred the naval leaders of our next war. Wilson, Simms, Hart, Taussig, and many others next guided our Navy in the defeat of the German U-boat menace and con- voyed our armies safely to France in the war with Germany during 1917 and 1918. Between the wars the Navy devoted its meager resources and manpower, ships and funds to research and development in aviation and submarine warfare. Stricken at Pearl Harbor and the Philippines in 1941, practically blockaded by German submarines operat- ing off our East coast ports, the nation built, in three short years, the most powerful naval force in the his- tory of the world. The indomitable spirit of our carrier dive bomber and torpedo plane pilots turned the tide of the war in thelPacific in the Battle of .. - af ar ' . . - - ' sg. , . . , ' . , , - . :..fs - e .a.,I ?-::i?1,i+ 2"'f f iii? I .J ,I VA, P f 1. -uf N NL 5 .,-. -.--X , --s..., N -.'- N A f vofrl ,-L .1 -lf TP' ,M -1-...vw-'Q ' i' A 1 NL it vs. H -r A- -XJEMI1. '- r'S..f.Q, at-rf",-as -In-Y -IP--Q' VLH-.P "' f " R A """f 'U' ' W' 3' """""' W3 "'7"5?1'5- -'T-5sl7"iif:g :gl3,1r-is-t.g ., 5,7 J' --QZIFI: ' 'isa Midway, June 4th, 1942. From that day on, naval power in the Pacific slowly but surely drove the Jap- anese imperial forces into their home waters. Powerful Amphibious forces, protected alike by carrier air power and our submarine forces, swept the Japanese armies off the Pacific Islands. Our fast carrier task forces de- stroyed the Japanese Fleets. Possibly the greatest air battle in the naval annals was the "Mariannas Turkey Shoot," in June 1944, in which the carrier pilots of Admiral Marc Mitcher's Task Force 58 and anti- aircraft fire accounted for most of the 346 Japanese planes destroyed. After the war the exploits of our "silent service," the men who fought under the sea in our submarines, was finally publicized. Ranging throughout the Pacific and into the very harbors of Japan itself our fighting submarines sank 214 Japanese naval vessels f577,626 tonsj and 1,178 merchant vessels f5,053,49lj tonsj, a monument to the greatest sub- marine force in history. During this period the Atlantic Fleet was rapidly breaking the back of the German Navy by sweeping from the sea the greatest submarine menace ever to threaten this nation. Our convoys were supplying the allied armies in Europe and our ships were conduct- ing landings in Sicily, Italy and finally Normandy. The greatest "two ocean" Navy in the world had played a large part in bringing victory to America and the free world. And this war, like all wars, led to the development of new inventions, new techniques and new weapons conceived by American genius and perfected by men of vision. While industry was being welded into a mighty supply force, our Seabees, underwater demoli- tion teams, amphibious sailors, marines and support- ing army divisions were being welded into a team that spelled victory at sea. Added to the illustrious naval leaders of this great Navy, King, Nimitz, Halsey, Mitcher, McCain, Spruance, Lockwood, Fletcher, over three million other officers and men also served. The brainwork, the sacrifice, the devotion to duty of generations past and present is the heritage on which we continue to build and improve our Navy. We are bound to the past only by the good that it has provided and the glorious traditions handed down to us. We are linked to the future by our responsibility to deliver to it the best we have received and the best we can produce. Victorious over Japan and Germany, there is still no world peace. Our Navy fought again in Korea for three years and the task forces are still spread across the seven seas. From Barry to Bainbridge to Burke the indomitable fighting spirit is the real strength of our naval heritage. Q 95, Et'-,i1:aT'.. 3 Pais:-fn' .55 . - - ,ABA - - -- " 'ieffnsz' ' . 1 s"':"' -'RF' " V f- 5- IRON VERSUS WOOD MARCH 8, 1862, THE CSS VIRGINIA KEX USS MERRIMACKI DEFEATS THE USS CUMBERLAND T0 USHER IN THE AGE OF STEEL SHIPS. lReproduction of paintings in this section are by courtesy of the U. S. Naval Academy Museum, the United States Naval Institute, the Naval Photographic Center, Chief of Naval Operations, the Commandant of the Marine Corps, and the Electric Boat Cornpany.l QUALIFICATIONS OF THE NAVAL OFFICER T IS BY NO MEANS enough that an officer of the Navy should be a capable mariner. He must be that, of course, but also a great deal more. He should be as Well a gentleman of liberal education, refined manners, punctilio-us courtesy, and the nicest sense of personal honor. He should be the soul of tact, patience, justice, firmness, and charity. No meritorious act of a subordinate should escape his attention or be left to pass without its reward, even if the re- ward is only a Word of approval. Conversely, he should not be blind to a single fault in any subordinate, though, at the same time, he should be quick and unfailing to distinguish error from malice, thoughtlessness from incompetency, and well meant shortcoming from heedless or stupid blunder. 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H !5.,J,ff, vs , x ' 9-H ,fy - f A ., ,' If-.v.4x,.Vj 1 - , , , ,, .f, V. :Q . .nf4g1'5aw'w'V 5, ' .f'i.., f 14, X fl ue -.1 -. 1 f, ,, , ,,,,,,f,,,!,, F X ,f,f,W, ,,!,,W,w,! , f 4,7 , ,f ,fy ,, , ,f 'ffy 7 fkl f ,Q . ,,, ,,..,.,.7,,... . I J X , ' 5, 5' 1 .' . 'Af .', ' 'VJ A I, n 'f ,, ,Vr- , 1: 1. 5.41 x 5, .. , f 2. ff wx A ,fa In xx .,f W 1 ' - 'f'1:,Iz .' ' 1 'i:7rw.':--f' 4 1-, . ' , ,. . fy 1 NAVY CREDO THE UNITED STATES NAVY GUARDIAN OF OUR COUNTRY The United States Navy is responsible for maintaining control of the sea and is a ready force on water at home and overseas, capable of strong action to preserve the peace or of instant offensive action to win in war. It is upon the maintenance of this control that our country's glorious future depends. The United States Navy exists to make it so. WE SERVE WITH HONOR Tradition, valor, and victory are the Navy's heritage from the past. To these may be added dedication, discipline, and vigilance as the watchwords of the present and future. i At home or on distant stations we serve with pride, confident in the respect of our country, our shipmates, and our families. Our responsibilities sober us, our adversities strengthen us. Service to God and Country is our special privilege. We serve with honor. THE FUTURE OE THE 'NAVY The Navy will always employ new weapons, new techniques, and- greater power to protect and defend the United States on the sea, under the sea, and in the air. - A Now and in the future, control of the sea gives the 'United States her greatest advantage for the maintenance of peace and for victory in war. Mobility, surprise, dispersal, and offensive power are the keynotes to the new Navy. The roots of the Navy lie in a strong belief in the future, in continued dedication to our tasks, and in reflection on our heritage from the past. Never have our opportunities and our responsibilities been greater. "3LivV'S"6K' I 1 V, i 'LT Regirr A V 'I 5 Q s lim BPO: E X 1 i l 25 October 1968 i X X Q Q we Commenced Training: Completed Training: CO PANY 12 W Janua,V 1ST REGIIVIENT LT Donald L. Nloseley I Regimental Commander 1 l i i i i ixsyk Q James Chance Donald Chambers Q RPOC I EPO E. lVlcAIllster, MIVI1 Company Commander Jonathan EPO Brookshire QND BATTALION CWO Howell Grimes Battalion Commander David Williams IVIAA Benjamin James Tommie Williams Yeoman First Platoon Leader 7 Img ff.-4.4.-y-,.., e,,.4.1:-X.,--.fe 1. Hn: --- df: A, ,. . i i Wi i i l ii i i 7 l i i l i i I i i I l il ll l i 1: James Alford Michael Amason John Atkinson lVlurry Bell Dana Beyerle Jimmy Biggs Ralph Brumitt Bradley Bryan Lawrence Burmaster Robert Byrum Richard Carter Eddie Cherry Jerry Chisolm Raymond Ciccimarro Barry Cole John Cox John Ellisor Gary Ferguson James Foltz Jim Freeman Russell Fulghum ' Charles Gazoo Thomas Hage Roger Hamric Charles Hodgkin 'S -1""q .4 : 'WT 'ft '-rg' Q-Q ' S-gEf-.sae-eew.: R M f' V. 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