National Louis University - National Yearbook (Chicago, IL)

 - Class of 1928

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National Louis University - National Yearbook (Chicago, IL) online yearbook collection, 1928 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 152 of the 1928 volume:

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I1 -" N.. . 4 -r w L . 'vs . , X' t f 5-. , 'F . "x n 'IA' , w I 2 wi Q1 THE NFITIQNHL 'Zi I I lj ,?-Q f ' N .? - f- PM Ei LN-M. W Q 5 wan!-5 J ,, 4 fr' , D 5-Q ev g S-'ff U . ' 'v ..t E Q-'. U . 3 . - , Q - ' nv, Q1':'7L o ', '-0' '1,,'c.- ll:l.1 gl r mga Y . .24 I . . rf ' J 444 e gl ,I O .lg 3 ' I AG. '-0 'f , Fil, , . sffil' I ,YNQ 4 71 eo . .q. ' z- .g . .' 5 ffzr' L 1 V--i . asf ,J--0 Q - I I ' '. -, . ,- 06? 72.1 .4 1 1.2 ' .111 wwf' 9 The National 1928 Volume XIII Published by the Students of the National Kindergarten and Elementary College Evanston, Illinois l ay! x r M 2 4' . 5 W Staff Mary Alice Kirtley . . EditorfinfChief Harriette Youlden . . . Business Manager Ellen Esslinger . . . . Assistant Editor Ann Lawrence . Assistant Business Manager Irene Pugsley . . .... Art Editor Mildred Schneberger . Organization Editor Ruth Gray . . . . . . Literary Editor Jane Palmer . . . . . Photograph Editor Roberta Hindley . ..... Humor Miss May Whitcomb ..... Advisor Mrs. Marguerite C. Taylor . Art Advisor Miss Mabel Kearns . . Business Advisor w fr F ore wo rd O the test of trme and memory we leave The Nat1ona1 of pages of prmted matter an ep1c of a year r1ch 1n achrevement 1928 - a book - more than bound if Illllllllliill ng ELIZABETH HARRISQN DEDICATIGN To the memory of Ehzabeth Harm son we dechcate Wlth deepest ap prec1at1on The Nat1ona1 of 1928 The 1nsp1rat1on of her hfe W111 ab1de forever m the heart of Nat1onal spurrmg her daughters on to greater effort and h1gher ach1evement . .I . . 1 ' ' GL ' 19 ' GL ' 17 S 52 nl ml S4 Order 0 Boo s Adm1n1strat1on Classes 0fg3H1ZHt1OHS ACf1V1t1CS Chddren s Schools The Washout f R .............. ....,........... . The Fountain 5+ N x. 1.3 QQ 0 ' xt: 'ii f n""-'A' L QNL Q I I - :Ain J -5 .J P 5 M J, .. n a Q .5 . 5 ' 1- -0 , 'sf- .1 ,J 1 ,A -.,am ., f G Nzxrp. fifq, ' A.. 4. 1, --S-N. ' .. In 7 E 'Q , ,.- Q', ' 1,5451 4 .alsan 'I 4. , . .-. 'Q -',- .'. -3,9 4 --.-N ' I A V X x -4,1 vu-Q :ll C.1 'f '15-v 4.0 U 0' S 0.9 4 af I n lo F 'P .. lgs , n . o -1, , G 'I qzgg . v Q ' A 1- 5 FIDMINISTTKFITION A 'JW5fI'UUl v 1 S 1, r to X 'A .36 . ' 9' , . . r... Q tu? 0 - - L.- Q ,gs v f .flkusl-2 A . X' v . ffrd FQ' . 'HL "::.i1 cf ' ll. l T N , Y , J ' 1 - ., :A '- 'kb " '. 61 , "A ' 'v ' 94' r .i,?"". 'l .- ,-'4 ' l' ,' -gf. 4-.', 54 ff: 17' U11 QM 1, 1- ff 'r- ' .v vm if .- ' 0 A h I N .' bs -. Q- U -5 Q s .I c 2'f "3 THE NATIONAL R, IIIIIIIIIIIIII ml lnnlnnnunnn 1 nnnln n nnnnnnunununnllunnaullllnlllullulul uumml lllllllllllllllllllll rug? ,n,,..., .. ..,,.,t-,,y.-,,t,,w,m f,-v, - -1-Xmfmvrvm f-fff- -:ww-1-:-w:f,1:m1:v'.zzv7:'.-1:-"':1'f7m""f"ff-""1'f"1'M'Wf22'f'Fi 1 ' Qi U .Qi .1 Q . l, 51 l EV 2 it 5 1 li an Q,.Qf,-, .W ,Wx-L,,mW gg... . MERRITT STARR Board of Trustees Merritt Starr . . . . . President Mrs. Andrew MacLeish . . VicefPresident Edna Dean Baker . . . VicefPresiderLt William Sutherland . . . Secretary Fred A. Cuscaden . . . . . . Treasurer Mrs. Philip D. Armour HI William M. McMillan Abel Davis Mrs. Henry Phipps John E. Stout Fifteen in 1 EDNA DEAN BAKER President of the College THE NATIONAL 9' E mul llIllllmmllllllllllllllllmlnllllnmlululnluul ummm:ullllulllnllr j 4 To Miss Baker, the President of their College, the students here express their admiration and loyalty. In one small person she embodies the qualif ties that spell "National" for them, and with her inspiring dignity has won the sincere love of each student. F 'J i 3 lullllllmn r muluum Seventeen THE NATIONAL a -------------------------------------.------------------- --------- f Elizabeth H afrfrison HE death of Elizabeth Harrison, founder and President Emeritus of the National Kindergarten and Elementary College, on October 31, 1927, was an inestimable loss to the College and brought to a close a career which, in achievement and benefit to humanity, has few equals in our own or other generations. Miss Harrison, who was born in Kentucky in 1849, received her early education in Davenport, Iowa, and later attended the Froebel Kindergarten Training School in Chicago, the St. Louis Kindergarten Training School, Madam Kraus Bolte's School in New York and studied with outstanding edu' cators in Europe. In the early eighties Miss Harrison opened a kindergarten in Chicago and realizing the need of mothers for education in the care and training of their children she opened classes for the mothers of her kindergarten children. The outgrowth of these classes was the organization of the Chicago Kindergarten College fnow the National Kindergarten and Elementary College in 1886 with Miss Harrison and Mrs. ohn N. Crouse one of her kindergarten mothers as co principals. The growth of the College in forty one years from a handful of mothers meeting in one small room to a College with a yearly enrollment of 700 can be explained only through a realization of the splendor of the vision which Miss Harrison had caught the indomitable will with which she faced the task of making the vision a reality and the service and sacrifice which she willingly poured out to attain the goal. A brilliant lecturer Miss Harrison was one of the first women to appear on the program of the National Education Association' she was a leader in the International Kindergarten Union and many other organizations and the author of books on Child Study unsurpassed for clearness of vision and sym- pathetic understanding ofthe little child. In 1920 owing to failing health Miss Harrison resigned from the pres idency of the College and from that time until her death lived in San Antonio Texas where the end came quietly. Her work is not ended' it lives on in her books and in the lives of those she touched. Even to the students who did not have the opportunity of knowing her she is a wonderfully real person. Through contact with those who knew and loved her we have come to know her toowtall slender dark her fine eyes and her understanding smile-and Miss Bakers words have brought her close to us: Elizabeth Harrison was the most inspiring woman I have ever known. Cver and over again this tribute has been paid-I cannot suggest all that con tributed to that inspiration for like every truly great personality she eludes definition. When she entered a room no matter how silently you felt her pres ence. As you turned to look you discovered her with a look of keenest inter est in her face whether it was a little child a group of students or a work of art that she was observing. It was an intensely human face full of light especially when she smiled and often vibrant with feeling. It was the sort of face that impelled your conidences' you liked to talk to Miss Harrison. Nor was she an entirely silent listener- she contributed to the conversa tion-a word of appreciation of encouragement of joyous comradeship of 9 , I , L s I , 1 1 f f 3 3 , 7 5 7 7 f 1 J 7 5 5 7 7 7 1 1 L s L 5 1 s 1 u L f , 1 7 f 7 , Q , 7 7 9 9 L s ' 3 , 5 5 AX Q' Y uulluumr mul lllm X ' lx- ' Q l Eighteen V! THE NATIONAL wise suggestion, of humorous anecdote, for she had a keen sense of humor. She knew well how to mingle all of these until you went out of that delightful communing of spirit with a heart for anything. Out of her breadth of knowlf edge and the depth of her own interest in all of creation animate and inani mate the world over she gathered the stores of concrete illustration of vivid imagery of clear insight upon which she drew so lavishly to feed the hungry who came her Way. She believed Hrmly in the possibilities for happy and useful living of every individual and when she once discovered the capacity of a young woman she would guide her into a vital responsibility and place all the conf fidence of her own great personality behind that timid struggling young life. The same dynamic drive that we have witnessed in contact with an in dividual life was present when she taught a class lectured to a group of mothers or held a great audience under the spell of her eloquent appeal. She had an absorbing interest in children-she wanted tremendously to help child hood and counted no sacrifice too great to make for this end because she be lieved that to help childhood was to help the race the fundamental way of bringing the kindom of heaven to pass. When she spoke therefore the prif mary source of her inspiration was the depth of her unselfish desire to help every person in her audience. Through her as through a beautiful violin the great Master found a pliant instrument for the expression of spiritual truth. Someone must always sing that note she once said and so I do it. The Memorial Service Harrison Hall Sunday November 13 1927 Who of those attending will ever forget November 13 1977. To me it was a day set aside for a tribute to one whose life work has grown to be known in all parts of the world. A tribute which so wonderfully ful filled its mission that it lingered closely for many weeks afterward. The music sent out its heartffelt message and the instruments gently whispered the beautiful tribute that they had to offer. To me it said A soul is winging its way up up and upward into the heavens finding its lofty place among those whose lives have benefited mankind. Edwin Herbert Lewis of the Lewis Institute in giving the memorial address spoke to his audience in a friendly and uplifting manner. The depth and feeling he expressed could be easily grasped when one from the platform scanned the faces of the listeners. Many of us had never actually seen Elizabeth Harrison but we had pictured her from various references made by those who did know her. Now she was brought closer to us through these services by one who had known and studied her life. The address made me want to be alone with her and reach to her for a helping hand to guide me in the climb of those steep rocks of destiny that lead to the perfect life a helping hand of one who has gone before and who knows the stumble stones of experience over which to guide me. May our lives broaden Elizabeth Harrisons scope and bring to little children everywhere the joys we hate learned in the institution which is the fulfillment of her dream. May we never forget! lr. 1 7 9 9 K a 9 7 4 s 7 9 7 1. 4. 1 7 3 7 1 1 3 7 s 9 s 1 s s as 9 9 3 3 7 3 5 1 t' ZH 1 c 3 s 1. a 3 9 7 'o 'o s 3 1 9 h 9 3 1 v I Lb r. A . fllilllll lllllumur mmm: llIIIIIlllluullulullnlu:X fv 44- - i Nineteen THE NATIONAL Nv E.: - I Ill l llllllllllll lllllllllllllll IlIIIIIIlIlllllllllllllllllllllll Ill llll MABEL KEARNS, B.E. MRS. LOUISE L. KIMBALL Secretary Of the College Social Director Personal Accounting M. FRANCES MOELROY, B.S. MAY WHITOOME Registrar Director of Publicity Childhood Education Iii MRS. FLORENCE S. CAPRON HELEN ECKER Field Secretary Assistant Librarian :RRUTH V. PETERSON ELIZABETH MIDDLETON Librarian Assistant Librarian E Xlxavc of Absence 192748 1 Twenty T H E N A T I O N A L .,..,,,,. l lnlrnllllllllulllllulllull ll ulllnulnllnll I llnlllullnllu I lulllllllllulll 1 lulllll nl lllll HARRIET HOWARD M A JULIA A KIRRWOOD PH.D. Methods of Superv1s1on Problems 1n Ch1ld Development, Head of Superv1s1on Dept Mental Hyg1ene D1rector Research in Demonstratlon Schools LOUIS W WEBB PH D ANNA MARKT M A. Psyq hology Educauonal Psychology Pr1mary Techn1cs Personnel Work Dif LOUISE FARWELL PH D JOHN C MEADOWS PH.D. Ch1ld Educauon Publlc School Adm1n1stration Chlld Psychology Superv1s1on Research 1n SUPEFVISIOH JOHN A CLEMENT PH D HARRY G DILDINE PHD. Lecturer 1n Prlnclples and Hlstory HISKOFY of Educauon M... A 5?-.4 """"" lllllll Twenty-one THE NATIONAL 13' E lnluunlllv-if , , GEORGE L. SCHERGER, PH.D. ANNE G. WILLIAMS, B.E. History, Literature History of Child Education Child Psychology THOMAS D. ELIOT PH. D. MRs. MAURICE H. LIEBER Sociology Citizenship 916 ELLIOTT R. DOWNING PH.D. Natural Science Geography Child Hygiene Eugenics FLORENCE E. BOEHMER M.A. Oral English, English Composition Recreational Advisor MARTHA D. FINK M.A. Children s Literature Dramatic Play Parental Education Childhood Education CLARA BELLE BAKER M.A. Elementary Curriculum Methods Director Demonstration School 'A 2? AlunnlulllllullnulnI lmllumn umuul lnlnnn-at Twenty-two TI-IE NATIONAL W 9? :ummm uumlummnIllulIllIIlmnuunulmuuunulluumunmuununnlnja B I XLAURA HOOPER, B.A. Educational Measurements Elementary Methods FRANCES KERN, B.S. Nursery School Education Manuscript Writing, Supervision AGNES ADAMS, PH.B. FLORENCE LINNELL, B.E. Elementary Methods Supervision Supervision Secretary, Bureau of Recommendations Ji! ETTA M. MOUNT MRS. CAROLINE KOHLSAAT Folk Dancing, Games, Music Education Pageantry FRANCIS M. ARNOLD LOUISE ST. JOHN WESTERVELT Interpretation of Music Voice Training Interpretation of Art Choral Singing 1 E 'Leave of Absence 1927548 www, gvlunnnl un munmml nnnnunmuunu unmnmv Immun munulumlunluunlunln. Twentyfthree 'THE NATIONAL MARTHA HUTCHESON MRS MARGUERITE C TAYLOR NUtf1t1OD Clothmg and Text1les D1et1t1an Interlor Decorat1on F1re and Industnal Arts ESTELLE R WELTMAN R N MABEL F HOLMES B S Nursmg NUtf1t1OH D1et1t1ar1 Ji! NELLIE BALL Chlldhood Educat1on Co dlrector F1rst Grade Chrldren s School MIRIAM BRUBAKER Nursery School Educatlon Play Mater1al Dlrector Jumor Kmdergarten Ch1ldren s School EDITH MADDOX Director Nursery School The Children s School i ,' 'W' Z " 1. J W f' , ,,,. A fn, 4X flnlllll ullllllllllluullulu I I mmm muumn S' gif - ,uf Twentyffour THE NATIONAL gt., .......... -- S l an My VIOLET RUSH, B.E. WILLMINA TowNEs, B.S. Arithmetic, Social Science in the Rhythms and Games, Fine Elementary School and Industrial Arts, Director, Third and Fourth Play Material Grades, Children's School Director, Senior Kindergarten, Children's School VIRGINIA SOLBERY DOROTHY WELLER, B.S. Assistant to the Director, Director, Second Grade, Children's School Children's School 5 3 .f LOUISE O. KAPPES, M.D. STELLA WALTY, R.N. Examining and Consulting Physician Attending Nurse MARY POPE, M.D. NINA KENAGY, B.S. Examining Physician Nursery School Education, Director, Mary Crane Nursery School, Hull House All lllllllllllllllr vllllllll I lllll llll I llllllllllllllllllruuu l llll n nal! Twentyqive THE NATIONAL by!! llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllunllnlnlllunllllnnlll l lnlll l lnlnlnlln I ulluull nu ,,,,,,,,,,,,, ' :Ig MRS. STELLA KAHL Chairman of House A Head of Elizabeth Hall Ai! Heads of Halls MRS. JENNIE MILLER Head of Franklin Apartments MRS. KENTON H. CLARKE MRS. KATHERINE ELMORE Hostess Head of Gwendolyn Armour Hall Head of Avilla Hall MRS. CORNELIA C. BURLESON Miss JEANNETTE HART Head of Mary Cooper Hall Head of Annie Phipps Hall 541 lllllllllllllllllllllllll lllllllllllllf 5 'llllllllll' Y """ l-ig 'Twentyfsix X!! THE NATIONAL ullumununummmmlummmuulunummmnullumnuuuuumnr 9' E Fortyf rst Annual Commencement Wednesday june 8 1927 HE turmng of many faces toward us as we filed 1n the bobb1ng of a tas sel on the mortarboard worn by the graduate just ahead of me the cheer1ng and lov1ng sm1les of my undergraduate frrends who held the dalsy chaln through wh1ch I was pass1ng the spot of red made by a huge bowl of carnat1ons on the stage these are some of my recollectlons of our entrance ln the commencement CXCFCISCS 1n June 1927 So 1n we came and took our places on the many trered stage The pro gram IS but a hazy memory of songs speeches more songs and then the tr1p down the steps to rece1ve our d1plomas' The fear of steppmg on our long robes and maklng lt a real tr1p -or of loslng our mortarboards was a ter r1ble sensatlon but the blurr1ng of the hundreds of faces 1n the aud1ence and the lov1ng k1ndness of MISS Baker s eyes as she smlllngly gave us our d1plomas made the journey not such an ordeal after all And so we were graduated It may have been an ordlnary sort of af fa1r those th1ngs usually are ln a sense more or less allke but to us It was a beaut1ful tlme and the love that was sh1n1ng 1n the faces of all of our school frrends parents and faculty members made commencement day one that we ll never forget PRQGRAM Processlonal March from Tannhauser Wagner Invocat1on H W Prange Tr1n1ty Lutheran Church Oak Park Ill Good N1ght Czecho Slovak Folk Song Arr by Deems Taylor The GYPSICS Schumann Albert W Palmer D D F1rst Congregatlonal Church Oak Park Grant Us to Do w1th Zeal Bach Evenmg Prayer Hansel and Gretelj Humperdmck Soft Footed Snow ze Floods of Sprmg Rachmanmo Greetmgs from the Board of Trustees Merntt Starr Presldent of the Board The Snow Elgar Presentatron of D1plomas Awarding of Scholarshlps Presldent Edna Dean Baker Glorlous Forever Rachmamno Bened1ct1on Alma Mater The degree Bachelor of Educatlon was conferred upon e1ght students four recelved the Superv1sors D1ploma twenty e1ght the Klndergarten Ele mentary D1ploma and one hundred and slxty scve the Klndergarten Pr1mary D1ploma i 2 . . , . E 5 - - ss - as . ' i- I 5 : . . , . . . E 2 . 1 . , . , . -n . E Address-"Like a Tree" ......... L- E , , , , 5 Au l I n I ul num mnlmlll Inllunuululmuuulunulllllu E' fr MK H Twenty-seven THE NATIONAL xiulnluululunuIulnllllulllumlulllnunullnunnuunllllnllllnunll mn 5 . Scholarships When twentyfseven weeks of school are over, thoughts turn to the closf ing year. Among the high points of the last nine weeks are the festivals, the choosing of the May Queens, the Junior Prom, the Children's Erolic, Comf mencement and-Scholarships. To all of ,us each event holds at least one dear connection by which we remember it. Commencement, however, brings the greatest thrill to everyone in the college, then classes and exams are over-for better or for worse-diplomas and degrees are signed, sealed and ready to be presented-and the scholarships are announced! Who are more concerned about these honors than the members of the graduating classes? Scholarships are honorary gifts to the recipients in recogf nition of the hnest accomplishments of the students during the year. Last June, the Elizabeth Harrison Scholarship was awarded to Kaye Reintges, and the Mrs. john N. Crouse Scholarship to Edith Cries. Both of 'these scholarships are given to students whose scholastic standing has been superior during their courses at National and whose influence have been for the best interests of the student body. These two scholarships are given to the College each year by the Alumnae Association in loving memory of Miss Elizabeth Harrison, the founder of the College, its president until 1920 and president emeritus until the time of her recent death, and of Mrs. John N. Crouse, a member of Mrs. Harrison's first "Mothers' Class" who caught the vision, secured the financial backing, and as cofprincipal helped to establish the College. The next scholarship, the Jean Carpenter Arnold, was established in memory of one of the greatest and most beloved teachers the College has had. The recipient of this scholarship was Vera Hunte, a girl whom everyone knows and sincerely admires. The Helen Grinnell Mears Musical scholarship was established several years ago by a friend of Miss Harrison's as a memorial to a daughter whose MQ--1.-I-I..--...-.mu--.mmmmm .I----...M Twentyfeigllt THE NATIONAL 9' ix n llmumnllulluluuInInlmlnnlllmlInInInmlmlnumunmumu beautiful voice was lost to the world through her untimely death. The scholf arship is given to a student of marked musical ability, and was awarded for this year to Leah Bruns. The scholarship awarded to the Junior who is capable of doing advanced work at the college to earn her degree is given in honor of Mary Juliette Cooper, whose unfailing interest was largely responsible for the first step in financing the project for the present buildings. The student who was honored with this scholarship for her Senior year was Grace Roosman. The college recognizes outstanding ability in the school room. Recognif tion is given in the awarding of Demonstration School Scholarships which have been established since 1918, when the Hrst children's school at the College opened. At that time there were four such honors, but with the larger children's school, this has been increased to six. The girls to whom these scholarships were granted this year have been assisting in the following rooms of the Childrens School: Alma Baur-Nursery School. Grace Cassell-Junior Kindergarten. MaryfAlice Kirtley-Senior Kindergarten. Mildred Schneberger-First Grade. Alice Davis-Second Grade. Helen Christeson-Third and Fourth Grades. At Commencement, 1927, honorable mention was also made of the following outstanding students: Alma Prange, Mary Adams, Virginia Bartel, Marion Klinefelter, Clara Locke, Geneva Mangrum, Corinne McCoid, Lillian Olmsted, Irma Rath, Katherine Reeves, Grace Ryerson, Jane Shelly, and Florence Weber. jean Carpenter Arnold Auditorium Twe-ntyfnine QT!! K I Tj- .-ff., tw' Q nu!! I ,.: 'n A' ' 4 'r - 4 1. -L" +4 'I 0125, f!E2J'1- " , . -' .I -"VV 5055? ki , , - ,- . - ' xfffgflzy ,, 'u 1 n . Q H. I 0 1. .1 "Q-Q. --Zi J N-4 'K' f"'nr-' f.-, is .f .' 'Q xl: -4. . F Qlpii - Q 'X n ' , fi a -sync - f"R'rla - --, yu. I 2 QQ - ' U ffl 4 . ' ' A-1 -v CLHSSES Yhlvoqd if ww' T 1' O P . .. ,O - 4 , I ' 'Q .A 'a Q4 o sac, -V . X Q X 1 5-,Q ,i we .af 4 T49 h' 'tsl .1 'h 6 1 Je , we 1 '-. S .,f' -'v . .', .1 .P- A 'lit 4 ' . vi Q 'Y I THE NATIONAL Grace Roosman . Alida Shinn . . Marion Thompson . Miss Agnes Adams . Elinor Cobiskey . Marion Armstrong . Ethel Smith . . Mary Rafferty . Miss Agnes Adams . Winifred Wilsoii . Georgia Lee Stemper Marion Armstrong . Alma Prange . . Miss Agnes Adams . Ruth Carlson . . Florence Hammel . Eva Hanousek . Virginia Tourtelotte Miss Willmina Townes . Class Officers 192711928 19264927 19254926 19244925 'Br . President VicefPresident SecretaryfTreasurer Class Sponsor . President VicefPresident . Secretary . Treasurer Class Sponsor . President Vicefljresident . Secretary . Treasurer Class Sponsor . President VicefPresident . Secretary . Treasurer Class Sponsor lumuul vyfr uulunn Thirty four 'AW' N K mulInIIIluunmululnullIulnnummum:unlnnuumnlmnnmm History of the Seniors This last year at National has been a year which no Senior of .1928 will ever forget, for it was the year of the beginning of a real Senior Class organf ization. In previous years the fourth year class has not been large enough to organize, but, in September, finding that we numbered ten, we asked for permission to organize into a class and our request was granted. At our first meeting Grace Roosman was elected president of the class, Alida Shinn, vicefpresident, and Marian Thompson, secretaryftreasurer. Although our number is small we have fully made up for this by the quality of our members, among whom we number foreign girls as well as American girls, returned missionaries as well as girls preparing for missionary work, and experienced teachers as well as those preparing to go out and conf quer the world with their teaching. With our loyal members and our ever true and faithful class sponsor, Miss Adams, we form a group of staunch Nationalites and we feel sure that you will hear further from us as we set about conquering our worlds in the way N. K. E. C. has taught us. Our first social event of the season was a dinner given by Miss Adams at her home for the entire Senior Class. Here we found out that teaching and sponsoring a class were not the only things that Miss Adams could do, but that she could be such a charming hostess that we almost forgot to go home. However, tucking our turkey placefcards into our bags, we finally did leave, having spent a most enjoyable evening together and gotten much better acquainted with each other. The days sped past. We took part in the Thanksgiving and Christmas festivals and soon found that the first semester had vanished. In February we had a class reunion with last year's Juniors in Marshall Field's Narcissus Room. Although the crowd was not as large as we would have liked, we had a most enjoyable time talking over old times with friends of last year. Miss Baker was with us and spoke to us with her usual warmth of feeling and comradeship, and Miss Adams had supplied us each with a red carnation bouttoniere which added the finishing touch and made us look, as well as feel, like true Nationalites. In the days of February came also the event of our annual song contest. The Senior musical staff was a great success and also furnished a great deal of amusement, but although our heads may not have come through on the cor' rect notes of the staff, our voices must have hit the notes quite accurately, for our "Ginger" song was the one that won the first prize. You see, again it was quality that counted. Now the days are slipping by all too swiftly toward the fatal day. Durf ing the past year we have burned many a midnight lamp as we worked steadily toward our degrees, but we have not had our minds nor our time filled entirely by work. We have had many jolly times together and we have formed friendships which will last through the years and will be a source of inspiraf tion to us as we go forth to valiantly do our part in the field of education. As a class at school we have tried to uphold National's standards, and as we leave National now we will still continue to uphold the same standards which are now so much a part of us. We will never forget National and all that it stands for of joy and work and honest endeavor, nor do we intend to let National forget its first organized Senior Class, for we are going to make her walls ring with the good reports of the "Bachelors" of 1928. THE NATIONAL uri? 554 ummm mnumul mmm nuluunlnuunmllunuunN Tl1irty'fiUe fe Q4 THE NATIONAL -IllllllllIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIllllllllllIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll W Illllllll A .q,., . , . . ,. ,M .. , , . E. .,,. ., . .,.,,I, . U V, 5 2 ' 1175 5 .i I PAULINE HANSEN, Logan, Iowa B. E. Degree '28, Midsummer Frolic '27, Spring Festival '28. GRACE HUTCHESON, Kansas City, Mo. B. E. Degree '28, Supervisor's Diploma '28, International Club '28. KATHERYN JONES, Kirksville, Mo. B. E. Degree '28, Clee Club '28, Spring Festival '28. PENKA KAssABovA, Sofia, Bulgaria B. E. Degree '28, Supervisor's Diploma '28, President International Club '27, '28. Lois A. LEHMAN, Edwards, Miss. B. E. Degree '28, Supervisor's Diploma ,'28, International Club '28, Delef gate to Student Volunteer Convention '28. ALICE LING, Shanghai, China B. E. Degree '28, Kindergarten Elementary Diploma '28, International Club '27, '28, Spring Festival '27, '28. DoRoTHY MCCONNELL, Lockport, N. Y. B. E. Degree '28, Kindergarten Elementary Diploma '28, Student Gov' ernment Board '28, Spring Festival '28. MARY MOODY, North Andover, Mass. B. E. Degree '28, Kindergarten Elementary Diploma '28, International Club '28, Spring Festival '28. H1-------I-----w ------------Off! '----1---H 'Thirtyfsix THE NATIONAL ----l.-.. lllllIlllllvllllllllllllllllIllllllllllllIIIIIIIllIllllllllvllllllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII I WINIFRED MOORE, Hicksville, Ohio B. E. Degree '28, Supervisor's Diploma '28, Glee Club '28, Spring Fesf tival '28 LOUISE POINIER, Oak Park, Ill. B. E. Degree '28, Kindergarten Elementary Diploma '28, International Club '28, Spring Festival '28. GRACE ROOSMAN, Chicago, Ill. B. E. Degree '28, Kindergarten Elementary Diploma '28, President, Senior Class '28, Editor, "The National" '27, Literary Editor, "The National" '26, VicefPresident College Council '28, International Club '28, Spring Festival '26, '27, '28. ALIDA SHINN, New York, N. Y. B. E. Degree '28, Supervisor's Diploma '28, VicefPresident Senior Class '28, Treasurer International Club '28, Assistant Demonstration Nursery School '28. iii FLORENCE STORER, Pittsburgh, Pa. B. E. Degree '28, Kindergarten Elementary Diploma '28, President, Book Club '28, Treas., College Council '28. ' MARIAN THOMPSON, Chicago, Ill. B. E. Degree '28, Kindergarten Elementary Diploma '28, International Club '28, Racketty Packetty House '28, Spring Festival '28. MILDRED PIERCE, Epworth, Iowa B. E. Degree '28, Kindergarten Elementary Diploma '28, International Club '28, Chairman, International Club Bazaar '28. HELEN MCCORMICK, New Auburn, Wisc. B. E. Degree '28, Kindergarten Elementary Diploma '28. ......... ............., 5 ............... ...........,..,..,..,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, , Thirtyseven 4,4 oo v-4 X W O , 4' .af Q QS 'E' .wi H "'l -..4 I ' i . 1 A W ,- 'O HL 'M'- T, QR.. 11' ff A 8 . .9 . nc. I - Q 1' 5 X ,av , -9 4'- Oo . 94' 1 4,6 lr O v 1 THE NATIONAL I "'"'""""'"""'""""'"'""""""""""""'"'"'"'"""""""""""" FP 1 531 li 1 ' Class Cflicers 192711928 Helen Christeson ......... President Josephine Lawrence ....... VicefPresident Grace Cassell .......... Secretary Catherine Wilcox ......... Treasurer Miss Etta Mount ........ Class Sponsor 19264927 Clara Locke ........,. President Geneva Mangrum ........ VicefPresident Myrthel Strand ......... Secretary Sylvia Beckwall . . . ' ...... Treasurer Miss Laura Hooper ........ Class Sponsor 192 54926 Clara Locke .......... President Jane Shelley ......... VicefPresident Myrthel Strand . . ..,... Secretary Kaye Reintges ......... Treasurer Miss Laura Hooper ........ Class Sponsor 52951 ulllllllllllllllllll """"""" 3 """""" SJ Forty THE NATIONAL S-"nun lllllll llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll ez?-as Ls-, KATHERINE BARTON Ithaca, N. Y. Kindergarten Elementary Diploma '28 Spring Festival '27, '28 Children's Play '28 MONA BINGHAM Winona, Minn. Kindergarten Elementary Diploma '28 Athletic Club '28 Spring Festival '28 LUCILLE BUECHELE Chicago, Ill. Kindergarten Elementary Diploma '28 Social Chairman, Sophomore Class '28 Choir '27, '28 Christmas Festival '26, '27 Spring Festival '27, '28 Chairman of Director's Tea '28 Children's Play '28 HELEN CHRISTESON Oak Parlr, Ill. Kindergarten Elementary Diploma '28 Demonstration School Scholarship '27 President, Junior Class '28 Children's Play '28 Spring Festival '26, '27, '28 Faculty Bazaar '27 Children's Frolic '27 MILDRED DUGDALE Chana, Ill. Kindergarten Elementary Diploma '28 Dramatics Club '27 Spring Festival '26, '27 Circus '27 ALMA BAUR ' Chicago, Ill. f Kindergarten Elementary Diploma '28 Children's Play '27 Annual Stunt '27 Christmas Festival '27 Chaif Reporter '27 Spring Festival '26, '27, '28 Thanksgiving Festival '27 Faculty Bazaar '27 HELEN BROWN Grand Rapids, Mich. Kindergarten Elementary Diploma '28 Athletic Association '27, '28 Spring Festival '28 Athletic Stunt '28 GRACE CASSELL Chicago, Ill. Kindergarten Elementary Diploma '28 Spring Festival '26, '27, '28 Sec., Tonfn Girl's Assoc. '27 Sec., junior Class '28 Faculty Bazaar '27 Thanksgiving Festival '27 Christmas Festival '27 Demonstration School Scholarship '27 Children's Play '28 ALICE E. DAVIS Evanston, Ill. Kindergarten Elementary Diploma '28 Demonstration School Scholarship '27 Annual Stunt '28 JEANNE FORSYTHE Chicago, Ill. Kindergarten Elementary Diploma '28 Social Chairman, Freshman Class '26 Hallowe'en Dance Committee '26 Christmas Dance Committee '26 Governing Board Dinner Dance '28 Spring Festival '27, '28 ff 'ji sqm efwfgf? F32iQ'?2'? Jes, X 1 gf , 1 tglllauuull mnunv unum mlm lllluln Forty-one THE NATIONAL illlnllnlluu I' llllnlllllnllllllllllnlllllmllllllllullllulululullulull:null 5 s f ,. , , ,ff ff .'.' if ,,.. 13.1 l li l i l 5 . 8-Q I 1 1 i A . . il 1 1 i 1 ,ws fi ' ,l va! 3? K QQ 1 1 l l .- x , .X at 4' 1 M i Y ' X E XX at 4d 7 I 5 E . fat 9.1 ,, , , . g Q I ra Q CAROLINE FREIBERG 'A Wilmette, Ill. ' ' Kindergarten Elementary Diploma '28 Choir '28 ' Spring Festival '28 GLADYS GROSS ' ' ' Fostoria, Ohio ' Kindergarten Elementary Diploma '28 Choir '26, '27 Athletic Association '26, '27 Spring Festival '26, '27, '28 VERONICA HELD Menomonee Falls, Wis. Kindergarten Elementary Diploma '28 MINNON HIRSCH Enid, Okla. Kindergarten Elementary Diploma '28 Athletic Club '27, '28 Book Club '28 VERA HUNTE Bridgetown, B. W. I. Kindergarten Elementary Diploma '28 Jean Carpenter Arnold Scholarship '27 Sec., International Club '27, '28 Circus '27 Asst. Editor, "The National" '27 Spring Festival '28 DOROTHY GRAVES Downers Grove, Ill. Kindergarten Elementary Diploma '28 MARION HAWORTH Whitewater, Wis. Kindergarten Elementary Diploma '28 Dramatics Club '27 Spring Festival '27, '28 Christmas Festival '27 Junior Class Stunt '28 Social Chairman, junior Class '28 Children's Play '28 DOROTHY HEYDEN Whiting, Ind. Kindergarten Elementary Diploma '28 Spring Festival '27, '28 HELEN HUBSCH Winnetka, Ill. Kindergarten Elementary Diploma '28 Spring Festival '27, '28 Children's Frolic Committee '27 President, Town Girls' Association '28 Christmas Festival '28 Delegate to I. K. U. Conven tion '28 TERESA HUTTON Waukesha, Wis. Kindergarten Elementary Diploma '28 M mum!! :mum uluull R5 Fortyftwo THE NATIONAL g',,,,,,,,, I nmlmlnmlnun Iunnunummmmmnnunumulnlnlllunlllvurlgv E . - ggi? 1 SWANHILD JAHREN JANE- KESSEL - S Detroit Lakes, Minn. - - Saginaw. MlCh- ' ' 4 ' E Choir '23 I ' Kindergarten Elementary . gg '- ' I , Diploma '28 ' , ' : ' ' Dramatics Club ' X -7. A I Q Spring Festival '28 . , A " 3,1 5 E Chai? Reporter '27 - in 'Q I , 2 MARY-ALICE KIRTLEY ' 7 5 Glendale, Calif. . Q E Kindergarten Elementary ' Q Q Diploma '28 ' Y 2 E Editor "ChalT" '27 - -Y - '- 2 2 MARGUERITE KINNEY Editor "The National" '28 5 ' E E B3l'0d3. Mich. Children's Play '27, '28 ' Q E S Kindergarten Elementary Choir '27 E E Diploma '28 Circus '26, '27 - Q Q Choir '27 Dramatics Club '27 lg g Camera Club '28 Spring Festival '27, '28 . g g Athletic Association '27, '28 Demonstration School - E Q Spring Festival '27, '28 Scholarship '27 E Q Christmas Festival '27 Tribune of Armour Hall '28 ' Q Q Children's Frolic Committee E 5 '27 5 5 E Thanksgiving Festival '27 ' E Q Christmas Festival '27 ' ' ' , - 2 JEAN KNIGHT JOSEPHINE LAWRENCE ' '- ' 7 'A 2 Chicago, Ill. Marion, Ohio ' 2 5 Kindergarten Elementary Kindergarten Elementary V Q Q Diploma '28 Diploma '28 ' S E Circus '27 Choir '27, '28 N ' Q E Public Speaking Club '28 ' Q RUTH Loucics EMELINE McCOWEN ' , ' gi ' i Gloversville, N. Y. Battle creek, Mich. Ng, -2 , 3 Q Kindergarten Elementary Kindergarten Elementary ' A .--,ai 'I l -' Q Q Diploma '28 Diploma '28 ff' ' . ' Q Q Treas., Athletic Club '27 Spring Festival '28 V, QR P D ' E Q Spring Festival '28 "' , Q E 5 " f ' A ,Q -' E 5 FRANCES MORROW KATHERINE O'BRIEN M g 'K " 1 5 E E Rushville, Mo. Detroit, Mich. , A g E Kindergarten Elementary Kindergarten Elementary Q' lf , ' 1 Q Q Diploma '28 Diploma '28 l gig? " ' E E Athletic Club, Circus '26 3 1. , " 5 5 Camera Club '28 1 , ' .1 i ' Q Q 2 Spring Festival '27 1 , j . , '1 E 5 "'2e . it r g ' S hlllIllIlI llllllllll Ylllllll llllllll llllllllllIllla F ortyftlrree THE NATIONAL FK I mmu 5 F a , , , ,.,. , , l ELEZABETHHPEABODY CQEROLYN EPWERS vanston, . vanston, . Kirbdexigarten Elementary Kirlgdeiigarten Elementary ip oma '28 ' oma '28 Public Speaking '28 ChoiF'27 Spring Festival '28 Spring Festival '27 " 5'.Qf'1'ff if KATHRYN REINTGES MILDRED SCHNEBERGER f"' V E' Granite City, Ill. Arlington Heights, Ill. , 'Q Kindergarten Elementary Kilrgdeiigarten Elementary V Diploma '28 ip Oma '28 f:..f7'j. ' Athletic Club '27, '28 Spring Festival '27 Fff E! Spring Festival '27 Choir '27, '28 ff: Pres., College Council '28 Annual '28 :VZ -, V 13,0 t A Treas.. Freshman Class '26 Children's Play '28 I , ggilgrefs Elay '27 Degrilonistragion gshool - - ' ' ' '27 c o ars ip ' . 'K' ' Q Cham-'igidir 'gdf'27, '28 Thanksgiving Festival '27 ' Elizabeth Harrison Christmas Festival '27 ' ' Scholarship '27 May Queen '27 " -iai A MILDRED sl-IERER MYRTHEL STRAND Q 3 f :QI - Joy, Ill. Evanston, Ill. ,,5V Q Kindeligai-gen Elementary Kirbdeqgartenzglementary D' '28 ip oma ' Q Sumiseinfiiolig '27 Treas., Freshman Class '26 Sec., Athletic Club '27, '28 Treas., Sophomore Class '27 AAL- f--t 1 Sp,-mg Festival '23 Chairman, Town Girls' House Committee '27 " Town Girls' Executive A. 557'-' f Board '27 ' H' Spring Festival '27, '28 if Christmas Festival '27 ' 6, it I Annual Stunt '28 V , f ,,'. :ij CATHERINE WILCOX 'f ' ffl: Evanston, Ill. t , -r "fix Kindergarten Elementary Q .. " Diploma '28 .V Q Sec., College Council '28 V , i Treas., Junior Class '28 , ' ' , Children's Play '27, '28 ' ,Z Christmas Festival '28 . ' A t , gfhanksgiving Festival '27, '28 A A - f pring Festiva '27 . I International Club '28 LAURA LOUISE ADAMS, Winnetka, Ill. LOKUIZE IRWIIE,-Chicagg, llll. .28 ANNE BARRATT, Evanston, ni. Afnfgfagfizt 5Q'Q"'y 'P oma iPfTatF2ig1vEltt27H ,ZS Town Girl's Stunt '27 ac e y ac e y ouse RosALiE BUDINGER, Wilmette, 111. VALBORG NYDEN',EVa'3Swn- I"- Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 Imemanonal Club 27' 28 ' Spfmg Festival 27' 28 MARGARET PRICHARD, Princeton, Ill. RUTH CHASE, Chase, Ala. Kindergarten Elementaryia Diploma 'Zi k K' d ' t P ' . D' I '28 Student Govrenmcnt oar '28, ac etty Pigsiiirciitr i:'Iidfh'erair'Clad5 92173 Packetty House '28, Choir '27, '28, Annual Christmas Festival '26, '27, Spring Festival '28 Stunt '28, Spring Festival 28 sf ...nn Y ........, jig 2........ Forty four 'THE NATIONAL 9' s History of the juniors "Memories-memories-days of long ago." The musical lilt of a girl's soprano comes to me from the other end of the corridor. The words suggest a day three years ago when the Junior Class of '28 was beginning their reputable career at N. K. E. C. We flocked in, one hundred and fifty, from the far corners of the universe, eager, thrilled with the expectancy of what the year would bring. We seemed nearer to the fulfillment of all our dreams than we could ever possibly have been in the little town back home. To the ordif nary individual that September, back in 1925, was a cold, dreary one, as it was raining most of the time. However, Nature was incapable of dampening our enthusiasm, for at once we were plunged into such an orgy of functions that we scarcely had time to think-we were merely cogs, fast adjusting to the machinery of routine life at our Alma Mater. The days slipped by as days have a habit of doing, leaving a host of memories of the faculty members who always gave us a helping hand, the dignified, upperclassmen, cheery and full of encouraging and endearing words, to say nothing of all the new friends of our own green class who suffered through in triumph. Then, just as we had grown to love our "stables," the announcement came that we were moving into our new home. Cf course, we were happy in the anticipation of the possibility of walking on the green grass and all of thc numerous advantages of living in a suburb. Our first assembly, which took the form of an inspection tour of the unfinished building, was a memorable one, and the Alma Mater rang out true and clear. Even though we were only Freshmen, we had shared in making this dream come true. Early spring found Frosh eagerly wanting to try their wings: our atf tempts were merited by a successful informal dance which was held at the Evanston Country Club. The Senior Prom, which was held later, was lovely, and following it came Commencement week. The gay, colorful Carnival fthe festival of that year, threw into relief the impressiveness of the regular graduf ation festivities. And so our Freshman year came to an end. Freshies no longer! Bold Sophomores now-the first Sophomores in the history of the College-and madly rushing into outstretched arms of others as bold as we! At last, real upperclassmen! After welcoming our new Frosh and guiding them through the mazes of registration and getting acquainted, our attention was focused on social events. Following the faculty reception, both town and dormitory girls gave dances which met with satisfied comments. As the holidays rolled around the Sophomores gave a Christmas formal at the Orrington Hotel, and it "went over big." And do you remember Tommy and johnny, the two little boys in "The Browniesn? The annual children's play is always an outstanding event from the opinion of the audiences and there is no doubt but that the cast derive a great deal of joy in giving it. During the last semester of this year, the "International Club" came into being, with Penka Kassabova, one of our class, as its president. This organf ization has done a great deal to further a feeling of friendliness and under' standing among the foreign and Americanfborn students of the school. The Song Contest was another victory for us. How thrilled we were when the baton was given to Clara Locke, our president! Another honor chalked up for the Sophs! Cne event followed another-director's tea, circus, and others-and then Q mmunv uuumm llluulllllmlln u EQ' f if ' ' Fortyffive Y! 'THE NATIONAL 2 wmun uuuulmmnu mlllllulunlllulnl llnlum 4 2 came the festival, with the crowning of the May Queens! A description of it seems impossible, for the splendidly presented acts, reaching their climax in the coronation scene, were "on a par with those on New York City's stages," according to some who saw it. Commencement week then rolled 'round-and the days were crowded with festivities. Alumnae day, the baccalaureate sermon, the children's frolic, last minute makefup work, tests and parties-days filled with pleasure and the foreshadow of the parting that was soon to come-and then we graduated! The commencement exercises were neverftofbefforgotten-and then we parted. June the eighth was rather a sad day, as well as a happy one. This year, when we came back and found that we were nearly fifty strong, we were indeed proud to think that we were the largest third year class in N. K. E. C.'s history and determined to do big things in the Juniors' name. First, there was our dancing group. Their lovely work was much in demand, think how the College depended on them for nearly every festival and stunt that they staged. There were other things that we did, too. Our big step in carrying on the honor system-our song contest act-our parties with and for the facf ulty-and our gavel were all parts of our Junior year. fWe rnustn't forget the gavel, you know it's tied with our class colors of blue and silver, and our president Ends it most useful in carrying out her knowledge and principles of Parliamentary Procedure, gained in Mrs. Lieber's class., To our sponsors we owe our most sincere thanks for their splendid help and advice, for at all times they were not only most willing, but eager, to support every enterprise that we undertook. Miss Laura Hooper, who was our sponsor for our Freshman and Sophomore years, is on leave of absence from the College for this year, and her place has been filled by Miss Etta Mount, who has carried on Miss Hooper's work in just the same sincere, graf E cious manner that we'd already learned to love. T Z We feel that our year of 192768 has been a successful one, and to the 2 juniors of next year we want to say that we wish you the greatest growth and success-you'll need it to beat the Seniors of 1928f29! jllllllllllllllllllllll T llllllllf lllllllllll X Q Fortyfsix ' ' 1 fi 2 Lake Michigan Y K V3-IU - v Z ul ? . ull QLY 'n N M 4 E THE NATIONAL E Xillllllllll lllllllllllllIlllllIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll lllllll llll Ill 5 Class Gjjhcers 19274928 Prudence Garrett ......... President Alice Enright .... .... V icefPresident Louise Hannah ......... Secretary Isabel Raymond ......... Treasurer Miss Frances Kern ....... Class Sponsor 19264927 Gene Gallagher ......... President Sally Flood ......... VicefPresident V Isabel Raymond ..,...... Secretary Ruth Gray .......... Treasurer Miss Frances Kern ........ Class Sponsor fn Illll u lllllll """""' 5 ,ig """"" N Fifty 'THE NATIONAL BERNICE ABRAHAMSON XVinnetka, Ill. Kindergarten-Primary Diploma '28 Glee Club 27 '28 Spring Festival '28 Sophomore Stunt '28 JANE ALLEN La Grange, Ill. Kindergarten-Primary Diploma '28 Athletic Association '27 '28 Athletic Club Stunt '28 Spring Festival '28 Sophomore Stunt '28 LOUISE AREND Chicago, Ill. Kindergarten-Primary Diploma '28 Freshman Stunt '27 Town Girls' Stunt '27 Spring Festival '28 LAROLYN BALLOU Glencoe, III. KindergartenfPrimary Diploma '28 Spring Festival '28 RUTH BARBER Ft. Wayne, Ind. Kindergarten-Primary Diploma '28 Choir '27, '28 Spring Festival '27, 28 Tribune Phipps Hall Class Stunt '28 HYLA JEAN AKRE Linton, Ind. Kindergarten-Primary Diploma '28 Athletic Association '27 ' Athletic Club Stunt '28 Spring Festival '28 ELSIE M. ANDERSON Evanston, Ill. KindergartenfPrimary Diploma '28 Athletic Association '27 '28 Spring Festival ' 28 MILDRED BAISDEN Andalusia, Ala. Kindergarten-Primary Diploma '28 Choir '28 MARIETTA BARBER Payne, Ohio KindergartenfPrimary Diploma '28 Athletic Association '27 ' Spring Festival '28 HELEN LOUISE BARNES Rockford, Ill. KindergartenfPrimary Diploma '28 Athletic Association '27 '28 Athletic Club Stunt '28 Spring Festival '28 i 28 m ' J lil' Q is N I f M umm nullxlgf Fifty-one -A 'THE NATIONAL xg!!uluullnulllluu ummnumulmlllmllulllmlnmlluunulnu . - KATHERINE BARRETT Princeton, Ill. Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 i DOROTHY BARTH Lima, Ohio Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 Choir '27, '28 Spring Festival '27, '28 ' Spring Festival '27, '28 Class Stunt '27 E Class Stunt '27, '28 DOROTHY BEATTY DOROTHY BECK ' Hinsdale, Ill. Glencoe, Ill. 5 Kindergarten Elementary Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 Diploma '28 Dr1ainaticZClub '27 Circulation Editor "Chafl"' At t'c ssoc'ation '27, '28 '28 Qnngall gafl '27 Chairman, Annual Deficit 'rc '27, '28 omm'ttee '28 glri2i'3'a'27Q-i218 bl 7 Chcalirmari, TowrgGirls' House res man ssem y '2 ommittee '2 Sophomore Assembly '28 Annual Stunt '28 Sqlpring lgejtival '2gi1'g8 Spring Festival '27, '28 umor itor, " a " '28 5 SHIRLEY BENNETT JEANNE BERGMAN , Chicago, Ill. Grcenville, Miss. , Kindergarten Primary Kindergarten Primary Q ChDiploma '28 B Dljpglimga '28 2 ' '27, '28 '28 ! Toiiflifr Girls' Stunt '27 Sgghomolre Stunt '28 E 3 Sophomore Stunt '28 Dramatics Club '28 i Spring Festival '28 Spring Festival '28 l 5 : l , A ' if ' BERNADETTE Brooms CONSTANCE BIGGINS E Ft. Wayne, Ind. Ft. WaYf16- Ifld-I Z Kindergarten Primary Kindergarten Pflmafl' 3 Diploma '28 DfDl0m3 '28 g Spring Festival '27, 'za Spring Festival '28 , Sophomore Stunt '28 A V 4 Q i BEVERLY BISHOP ALICE BLAKESLEE Q MT' Denver, Colo, Wilmette, Ill. 'J in an 5- ' . Kindergarten Primary Kindergarten Primary l ' ' ' ' D' loma '28 Di lOII1-H '28 ' I . Presi?Student Government '28 Fcstixgal Choir '28 E " Q5 5 RackettyfPacketty House '28 r ipgfmg Feixtival '28 'fl '-': 5 , Q t etic ssociation '27, '28 W' A ' I Dramatics Club '27, '28 - , ". 'A ' ' Annual Stunt '28 ' ' f Circus '27 , Y ' MidfSummer Frolic '27 ' ' May Queen '28 -.t.........3:T:,., . V....,,.,,f.w.T ,.,,, -, g.-...g,,.,M.,:-i QVQSKQWC9 W 'ff as Q. gunna! uununr mlml lnulln Fiftyftwo 'THE NATIONAL nulmlllnluluulll mlmlnunuuumnuuullmlmmmmmlululr Cgkgf 2 EVELYN BOBRINK MAXINE BOWEN V -'-- :--f 7 Lawrcnceburg, Ind. Evanston, Ill. if - Kindergarten Primary Kindergarten Primary . "' ' Diploma '28 Diploma '28 Pres., Debate Club '27 Annual Stunt '28 F , 5 Athletic Captain of Elizabeth Tow'n Girls' Stunt '27 V ' ' 5 Hall '28 Spring Festival '28 I, -. J - 2 Athletic Association '27, '28 f, "r H 3 Chairman, Athletic Food ' V' an Sa s '28 + 3 Q-aff Spring Festival '27, '28 I VLVL ' '- ' Athletic Stunt '28 '- , T Sophomore Stunt '28 ' "' ' i 1 BETTY BRADFORD MARioN BROWNING i 7 as ' Augusta, WIS- Evanston, Ill. Kindergarten Primary Kindergarten Primary . - Dlplornn '23 Diploma '28 Athletic Club '27, '28 Town Girls' Stunt '27 Circus 27 Annual Stunt '28 5 Freshman Stunt '27 Spring Festival '27, '28 I i ALBERTA CAMPBELL ALFREDA CHALBERG i " 3 Chicago, Ill- Evanston, Ill. I i I Kindergarten Primary Kindergarten Primary Z Q ' , 1 Diploma '28 Diploma '28 i Q X Q Spring Festival '28 Spring Festival '28 Q ' - I i it' 'E' 31, qzl f K A ,, b,,,1 Q 5 ffl' MARCELLA CHRISTIEN EDITH COLE 1 l Burlington, Wis. Elgin. Ill- Kindcrgarten Primary Kindergarten Prfrn3rY 1 , Diploma '28 Diploma '28 3 Q Athletic Association '27, '28 Q 5 Spring Festival '28 " , 1 l i 7 FLORENCE COLE RUTH COLE ' i Rhinelander, Wis. Evanston, Ill. A . Kindergarten Primary Kindergarten Primary ' Diploma '28 Diploma '28 l Athletic Association '27, '28 Pageant Chorus '27 1 ' Spring Festival '28 - i ' Midyear Club ' A W' ' 2 i 5 A s sefr Y ' to ig,,4t, ,,rttt Q11 2 Leif" 3? um :mmm mllulu nlllluuunulllnulllnQ Fiftyfthree THE NATIONAL Illllllllllllllllllll lllllllllllllllllll llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll lllllllll llllllllfqfgg E ' T 1 ' i MARGARET COLLINS AUGUSTA COTTLOW i Knoxville, Ill. Oregon, lll. 5 Kindergarten Primary Kindergarten Primary 2 Diploma '28 Diploma '28 President, Freshman Class '28 Choir '28 Spring Festival '28 l l 'f-f1. 2 if i.A,,,1v , MARY CRUSH MAXINE DQLAN .I Wilmette, 111. Cloquet, Minn, , ' ' "" Kindergarten Primary Kirbdeiigartenzlgrimary D' 1 '23 ' oma ' ' 'V 4 Towlqp gr:-lis' Stunt '27 Athlgic Association '27, '28 2 Spring Festival '28 Athletic Sflflnf '23 QW ' ,VV RackettyfPacketty House '28 Spring FCSUVHI '28 Sophomore Stunt '28 fr CARMENCITA DORTICOS EDNA EGGERT 'gi ,.,',, 1 'i Park Ridge, Ill. Chicago, Ill. Kindergarten Primary Kindergarten Primary ' ChDipl1cEn,gia.'5g P DiploncE:f1'28'28 . i our , ageant oir 3 ye' , , f i Spring Festival '27, '28 Italian Street Singers '27 ' Dramatics Club '27, '28 ' 3 , Spring Festival 28 ALICE ENRIGHT MABEL ENRIGHT ,E GIEFICOC. Ill. Glencoe, Ill. Kindergarten Primary Kindergarten Primary " "I Diploma '28 Diploma '28 ,, ,. i Pageant Choir '27 Choir '27 1.1 : " Vice-Pres., Sophomore Spring Festival '27, '28 ,yt , ,.. t Class '28 Town Girls' Stunt '27 ,ig if: ' Town Girls' Stunt '27 X , ,,,. ' , , 5- ' ELLEN DORCAS ESSLINGER RUTH EUSTIS N' f , - Rushville, Ill. Ottawa, Ill. ' ' , . Kindergarten Primary Kindergarten Primary ' Diploma '28 Diploma '28 .M , Pageant Choir '27 Glee Club '28 " ,I ,gf Town Girls' Stunt '27 Spring Festival '28 ' ' Sophomore Stunt '28 Q 'i,',,Q',,,.j, Chairman, Annual Stunt '28 - I ' Asst. Editor, "The National" ' l, ,y,, f '. ' '28 ., Spring Festival '28 2 r 'rr W h ""i,,,."1'M"Yf""' ""f"'1,giQ.jjg,3 -' ' "' ' Q2 S T7 Q20 QQ X . M ' Mlnnuul lu I A I "" " """' """"'lN2ja Fiftyffour THE NATIONAL Xgunnn lmuunn munnul nuumrj RUTH MARIE EVANS Mt. Horeb, Wis. Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 Choir '27, '28 Spring Festival '27, '28 Class Stunt '27, '28 Circus '27 BYRD DELL FISHER Evansville, Ind. Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 Athletic Association ' 27 , Choir '27, '28 Class Stunt '28 Spring Festival '27, '28 HELEN FLYNN Omaha, Nebraska. Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 BETTY FOSTER Reedsburg, Wis. Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 RUTH FRYE Sterling, Ill. Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 Book Club '28 DOROTHY M. EWING St. Clair Shores, Mich. Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 SALLY D. FLOOD Evanston, Ill. Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 Vice-Pres., Freshman Class '27 Scc., Student Council '27 Dramatics Club '27 Spring Festival '27, '28 EMMA J. FORGETTE Evanston, Ill. Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 Glee Club Choir '28 Spring Festival '28 VIRGINIA FOUCH LaGrange, Ill. Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 Spring Festival '28 Class Stunt '27, '28 ARDELLA FURR Ottawa, Ill. Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 Athletic Club '27, '28 Choir '27, '28 Camera Club '28 Spring Festival '27, '28 "x I 1 . ff'iei'-'l'rgE..Qf""i5fs21X ' tk, :xr-lf. ribs 15115's,l.5E'?gffif?,f13-5-:f'1i.l 4:55 1. si .: .- .-. 1 . i s I l ,W , l I l ' l 1 fre' rrrrr K --'- -- ------f 5 jg -------- - - --------------------- -is Fiftyfjive THE NATIONAL 2 , CATHERINE GAFFNEY GENEVIEVE GALLAGHER Q Rockford, Ill. Evanston, Ill. E Kindergarten Primary Kindergarten Primary E Diploma '28 Diploma '28 E , Spring Festival '28 Stunt Committee '27 E I Pres., Freshman Class '27 E I Sophomore Stunt '28 2 ' Spring Festival '28 Q Annual Stunt '27, '28 5 PRUDENCE GARRETT HELEN K, GATES S Oak Park. Ill- Fergus Falls, Minn. E Kindergarten Elementary Kindgrggrlfen Primary E DiD10m3 '28 Diploma '28 E Pres., Sophomore Class '28 Sophomore Stunt '28 E Dramatics '27, '28 Spring Fgstival '28 E Choir '27, '28 E Chairman, Freshman, Frolic Q Committee '27 E Spring Festival '27, '28 Q Children's Play '28 RUTH GRAY RUTH GREEN 5 I N?W York- N- Butler, Pa. E xl Klmlefgaffefl Pflmafy' Kindergarten Primary 5 DIPIOIU3 28 , Diploma '28 E 7 International Club 28 Choir '27, '23 E ChQlf '27, ,28 , , Spring Festival '27, '28 E Spring Festival 27, 28 Circus '27 Q Annual Staff 28 1 Class Stunt '28 E 5 Athletic Club 27, 28 Dorm. Stunt '28 Q 'V Chaff Reporter '28 Q l Sec., Freshman Class 27 E 3 ' ' 4 NETTIE CRIMSON GRACE GRISWOLD E. E ' Highland Park, Ill. LaGrange, Ill. Q ' ' Kindergarten Primary Kindergarten Primary 5 5 , Diploma '28 Diploma '28 5 j 5 Choir '27, '28 5 Q I is ' i l E Y 1 2 , I MARION RUTH GRUEN RUTH HAEBERLE g ' Hammond, Ind. Ottawa, Ill. g 1 1 Kindergarten Primary Kindergarten Primary 5 I Diploma '28 Diploma '28 5 Afl'llCfiC Club '27, '28 Athletic Association '27 E ' ' ' Camera Club '28 Choir '27, '28 Q I ' Class Stunt '28 Q Q ' , Orchestra '27 Q ' 4 Circus '27 Q 4 ' RaclcettyfPacl-retry House '28 ' ? E i ' ' E F ' E V' A 'M' ' tgfifeggc 'H M '-fl?" ' ' 'rr .kannllmllllllulllll """"' l""""' """"gQ. - as Fiftysix THE NATIONAL l K... ,- , , .. L... .... ,-, , , ,.,. .. , ,.,,- z - , 1 , , : JEAN HAMACHER EVELYN I. HAMILTON - 2 Hammond, Ind. Oak Park, Ill. Kindergarten Primary Kindergarten Primary Q Diploma '28 Diploma '28 I Athletic Club '27, '28 Public Speaking Club 2 Spring Festival '28 Spring Festival '28 ' 1 i RUTH HAMILTON Arena, Wis. Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 Public Speaking Club Athletic Club '27, '28 Athletic Stunt '28 Spring Festival '28 RUTH HANSON Evanston, Ill. Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 Spring Festival '28 LOUISE HENREKSON Wilmette, Ill. Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 Treas., Town Girls' Association '27 Town Girls' Executive Board '27 Tow'n Girls' Stunt '27 Sophomore Stunt '28 Spring Festival '28 MARY HILTON Neenah, Wis. Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 LOUISE HANNAH Fergus Falls, Minn. Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 Pres., Mid. Class '27 Secy., Soph. Class '27, '28 Athletic Club Spring Festival '28 ALICE HAWKINSON South Bend, Ind. Athletic Club '28 DOROTHY HENRY LaGrange, Ill. Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 Athletic Association '27, '28 Athletic Club Stunt '28 Chairman, Athletic Dance '28 DOROTHY HODGE LaGrange, Ill. Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 Charter Member of Athletic Spring Festival '28 Association '27 Spring Festival '28 Chaff Stall '27 v I I I z I 1 I . . 4 I I ! J i I ! ' Q t I I , 2 - , ' s a l Q I i A I ' Q I I 2 -- -- - H- -f -- W'-f - A -J Xi G umumu uuulk Fiftyfscven THE NATIONAL A 'lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll llllllllY'2T A77 6, W5 '6'f'lYs Wo .stasis f,z?,Sf.,,..,,. 4:15125 'Pb L,,,V ' ELVA RUTH HOLEM BLANCHE HOOPER E i f ' South Bend, Ind. Junction City, Kan. 5 " Kindergarten Primary Kindergarten Primary E A I c ' Diploma '28 Diploma '28 E ' ' Athletic Club '27, '28 Spring Festival '28 E " . Dramatics Club '27, '28 Christmas Festival '27 Q fr' , H V , Spring Festival '28 Class Stunt Q s- . I ' Q ' ' ' ' HELEN HOYER ALICE IHRER l Manitowoc, Wis. Burlington, Iowa. E Kindergarten Primary Kindergarten Primary 5 y Diploma '28 Diploma '28 g ' Spring Festival '28 Athletic Association '27, '28 E Q Spring Festival '28 Q 1 l 5 f. , ' MARGARET JENKINS ANN JENNINGS 5 V f I ' af Mason City, Iowa Davenport, Iowa E ' Q- Kindergarten Primary Kindergarten Primary Q " I " Diploma '28 Diploma ,'28 Q l Sec. and Treas. Public E A Speaking Club i i , Mid Summer Frolic '27 E ' ' GERTRUDE JESSEE KATHARINE KEAN E Valparaiso, Ind. Evanston, Ill. Q Kindergarten Primary Kindergarten Primary E Diploma '28 Diploma '28 Q Athletic Club '27 Glee Club '28 E Book Club '28 International Club '28 Q Choir '28 Spring Festival '28 Q Spring Festival '27, '28 Pageant Choir '27 Q "ChafI" Staff '28 5 Chairman, Directors' Tea '28 E Children's Frolic Committee E '27 5 I 5 - 'f HAZELLE KETCHAM EDYTH .KEENAN , West Chicago, Ill. Virglma, Mmm. g Kindergarten Primary Kindergarten Primary E . Diploma '28 DiDl0rr13 '23 E Choir '28 E , 1 E Q57 we jj minnnmunu-mm I lllllull - Fiftywfigltt THE NATIONAL R ill I IllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIllllllllllllllllllllllllll' Z, I IRMA LABAHN EDITH LACKMAN ' ' ' Evanston, Ill. Bradford, Ill. ' ' , , Kindergarten Primary Kindergarten Primary V vi , A Diploma '28 Diploma '28 l W 2 ,,,, . 's' ..r.. "gf, "t , ni MAXINE LANGFELDER MARJORIE LANNEN i Fort Smith, Ark. Cheyenne, Wyo. ' Kindergarten Primary Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 Diploma '28 Athletic Association '27, '28 Dramatic Club '27 Book Club '28 Committee Directors' Tea '28 , Q Pageant Choir '27 Spring Festival '28 Q Athletic Stunt '28 5 Athletic Captain '28 gif' , Spring Festival '28 f I ' FRANCES LARSON IRENE LAUER A 'F' Green Bay, Wis. River Forest, Ill. ' f l Kindergarten Primary Kindergarten Primary ' Diploma '28 Diploma '28 i Choir '27 Spring Festival '28 j Pageant Chorus '27 Sophomore Stunt '28 Athletic Club '27 CATHERINE LAUERMAN ESTHER LAVENE ' l ' Marinette, Wis. Hammond, Ind. Kindergarten Primary Kindergarten Primary ' Diploma '28 Diploma '28 Treas., Dramatic Club Glee Club '28 f 't International Club Spring Festival '28 Ei "Chaif" Staff Pageant Chorus '27 ,Q Spring Festival '28 I Annual Stunt '28 Sophomore Stunt '28 FRANCES LAWTON MARGARET LEMON " ' Hinsdale, Ill. A Lagrange' Ill- Kmflefgaffefl PYIIMYY Kindergarten Primary DIDIOYUHN 28 H , Diploma '28 Edllfof of ,chaff 23 Athletic Club '27, '28 Spring Festlxfill, 28 Sophomore Stunt '28 Pageant Choir 27 May Queen '28 Treas., Student Govern' ment '28 Athletic Association '27, Freshman Stunt Committee '27 Sophomore Stunt Committee , '28 ' WV -I i -A-W W Wi W l Q'1XwfgSYswjg3 1:7 ,- 4+ . ' gy! nu 1 - num I muuuu :nun XA Fiftyfnine THE NATIONAL I I I xllkquu an ual nu vis? n' .1 4 GLADYS LEVANIUS RUTH LINDSTEDT Sprrngheld, Ill. Rockford Ill. Kindergarten Primary Kindergmften primary ' Diploma '28 Diploma '28 Treas., Dramatics Club '27 Spring Festival '28 l Sec. '28, Book Club '28 I Sec., Student Government Board '28 ' Choir '28 I Festival Chorus '27 ' Circus '27 I Festival '28 I Sophomore Stunt '28 ' ' ' 4" MARION LOOMIS ALICE M. McCABE - ' 1 LaGrange, Ill. Petoskey, Mich. - gg " ,arg ,V Kirlglerigarten Primary Kindergarten Primary ' s jf ip oma '28 D' loma '28 X ' r , , 32 Spring Festival '27 "Ral:'l'cettyfPacketty House" g ' V .-.. I CAA, Spring Festival '28 I ' E853 ' -- ' w i ' I 7 If l V I ' ALICE V. MCCABE MARIE MCCARTHY Duluth, Minn. Ch1CHg0-U1- I Kiigieiigarten Primary KlfS9HgHffCQ2gflmHfY A ' -23 ip oma I lp oma Treas., Town Girls' Associnf , t'on '28 Clahs Stunt, '27, '28 I I EMILY McCLOUD ELLEN MCDONALD Chicago, Ill. Center Junction, Iowa Kindergarten Primary KIUQCTEHYCCH PYIHHIYY Diploma '23 Dmloma '28, ' gzilgeant Chorus '27 lg0lZ?3f1fFCh9i1'l ,gg ' 'Qg prmg CSIIVII A Soplllfsmore Stunt '28 DTRUTUUCS Club '28 l V. Presi-3 Mid Year Club l '27, reas., '28 I Spring Festival '28 I I HARRIET M GURK HELEN MAAS 1 WMM, mf Redfield, s. D. Kindeiigarten Primary 2 D'p oma '28 Athlletic Association '28 f Dramatics Club '28 Dramatics Club Play '28 Spring Festival '28 ' V ' agauuannununlllllll I u 0 """' """" ' """""g Sixty THE NATIONAL R, Im, , I mlmmmnullllnlmmuulnuumIunuumnllmlulu ja? ff ,535 'ii""-"1 . ' ESTELLE MARTIN ANNE MATSON 2' "Q' Highland Park, Ill. Wilmette, Ill. . ""' fi Kindergarten Primary Kindergarten Primary '28 " V Diploma '28 Town Girls' Stunt '27 W Spring Festival '28 if -Q' 2 F I f fl? FRANCES MELLOR Chicago, Ill. Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 Spring Festival '28 Sophomore Stunt '28 MARY LOUISE MERRITT Gary, Ind. Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 Athletic Association '27, '28 "ChafI" Staff '27 Pres., Mid Year Club '28 Spring Festival '28 MARY MITCHELL Elgin, Ill. ISABELLE NAPIER Chicago, Ill. Kindergarten Primary Diploma, 28 Choir '27, '28 Spring Festival '27, '28 MARION MORRISS Oak Park, Ill. Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 V. Pres., Dramatics Club Spring Festival '28 Pageant Choir '27 Athletic Club '27, '28 Choir '28 RUTH MOREL Clifton, Ill. Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 Girls' Athletic Club '27, Spring Festival '28 Pageant Choir '27 MILLICENT MUMMERY Chicago, Ill. Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 Pageant Chorus '27 Choir '28 Spring Festival '28 ALICE E. NEWELL Ottawa, Ill. Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 '28 Spring Festival '28 '28 v ,W ax My eo, A fs ?! gf nun lllunnr muuu llllll L va Sixty one THE NATIONAL gf, .v 1 mm 2 db 4:5525 l f W : ' , A Louise M, NILLES MARY NITTERHOUSE La , ' Kindergarten Primary Detroit, Mich. jf . V Diploma '28 Kindergarten Primary , Q Spring Festival '28 Diploma '28 . ., 2' Sophomore Stunt '28 Athletic Association '27, '28 7553, ' --'- 2 Spring Festival '28 1 -5 Pres., Public Speaking Club , .. -'-' i ' '28 ' i Pageant Choir '27 ' ' Athletic Stunt, '28 f' ' ' MARY LOUISE OPPERMAN LILLIAN PADGETT Michigan City, Ind. jacksonville, Ill. V E Kindergarten Primary Kindergarten Primary .L K, Diploma, '28 Diploma '28 , , t" M1 Spring Festival '28 'S ' M ,V JANE PALMER MALAVA PARKOVITCH 'L X Ottawa, Ill. Winnetka, Ill. . ' ' A I Kindergarten Primary Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 Diploma '28 , 'QU ,M f 1' 1 Phcinlliograpxh Ed., "National" ' X ' " ' .,,. ,x At etic ssociation '27, '28 Spring Festival '28 J fe! "', i N MARCELLA PEMBERTON MARY N. PERKINS if " Dowagiac, Mich. Providence, R. I. ' f Kindergarten Primary Kindergarten Primary , Q' Diploma '28 Diploma '28 ' ' ' Athletic Association '27, '28 Spring Festival '28 H jw ' -5 Dramatic Club '27 Circus '27 I ,,.. . Festival '28 . Athletic Stunt '28 ' I gzflgeant ChCXrl.:f7 D 'X airman, t etic ance '28 ' MAXINE PERSHING DOROTHY PILLINGER 5 -I' Logansport, Ind. Kindergarten Primary A Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 Ima' Diploma '28 Spring Festival '28 If Athletic Club '27, '28 Freshman Stunt '27 ' Spring Festival '28 -J, , Athletic Stunt '28 A "'1'! 4' brllllllllll llllllllll A llllllll lllll Q Ugggf Nga Sixtyftwo 'I THE NATIONAL Rvuuuu I I llluul i ululllul slung? 5 I few: 552, Qfzf sh lnfwdp c.-. ilyzfxwxxyfvi,-Z,:1lB'Zi'-'E W ihfifi,f'f'S'firfggEi'f2ffihis,WB gjfkqs , MARJORIE PRESTON IRENE PUGSLEY Eureka, Mont. Dowagiac, Mich. Kindergarten Primary Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 Diploma '28 Athletic Club '27, '28 V. Pres., Athletic Club Spring Festival '28 '27, '28 Athletic Stunt '28 Dramatics Club '27 Spring Festival '28 Student Government Board '28 Art Ed., "National" '28 ISABEL RAYMOND MARIE REDMOND ' Evanston, ul- Chicago, Ill. Kinilefgaffefl PFUTIHFY Kindergarten Primary Diploma 28 Diploma '28 Treas., Sophomore Class '27, '28 Choir '27, '28 Spring Festival '27, '28 Asst. Ed., "ChaH" '28 Sophomore Stunt '28 Pres., Glee Club '27 Q JANE RICHARDSON HELEN RIGG E Goshen, Ind. Petoskey, Mich. Kindergarten Primary Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 Diploma '28 Spring Festival '28 2 MAXINE RITCHIE JANET E. RUSLANDER ""' M A Evanston, Ill. Buffalo, N. Y. 'wi Kindergarten Primary Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 Diploma '28 Spring Festival '28 Spring Festival '28 Athletic Club '27, '28 Doromitory Girls' Stunt '27 2 MARIE SCHLIPF ESTHER SCHRIVER I Avon. S. D. Petoskey, Mich. : Kindergarten Primary Klnflefgaffffl PYIIUHYY Diploma '28 DIPIOWIH 28 International Club '28 Athletic Association '27, Spring Festival '28 Pfesw '28 Sophomore Stunt '28 Freshman Stunt '27 Circus '27 Spring Festival '28 Dormitory Stunt'27, '28 w.::1:':1..':fL?'j?"3'tjj' jgw12::j"'jj',j:',T'p 2 QC? X ofi:,f1'?fii 7 Reefs g,-.xfxxfi.,,,'E'4, Yg Eff X X fx--riff! hw.. M yi 'Ne 'rp yl.5,y Xixfnyrjf L' llllllllll lllllllll Illlllllllllllllllllllllllll AQ ff M5 ' Nia Sixtyfth-ree THE NATIONAL E5 :num I I I I I Y unur 'THX 2 yfQEt,14 zkfftsws E N PF' rv f f so - Q I. ,,-Q,.,, f....,,.,,fH"',D"Af'f"f"'f.""""""7""""'f...... -.,......, Q Q ' ' V - ELEANOR SCHULTZ ELEANOR SCHUTZ Q Q 3 j Downers Grove, Ill. Chicago, Ill. Q Q i ' Kindergarten Primary Kindergarten Primary Q Q lDiploni,a '28 A lgliplongnl '28 Q Q I G e C '28 t etic u '27, '28 Q Q E . E PaZeantuChoir '27 V. Pres., Student Govern' Q Q Spring Festival '28 ment Association '27, '28 Q Q l V. Pres., Dramatics Club Q I '27, Pres., 'za Q Spring Festival '28 Q Q 1 E Pageant Choir '27 Q E ' ' ' it 'A it 2 ELIZABETH SEATTER ELIZABETH SHERMAN Q Q Racine, Wis. Moorcstow'n, N. J. Q Q l ' Kirbdeligartenzlgrimary Kindeqgarten Primary Q Q ' ip oma ' D' oma '28 Q Q l Athletic Association '27, '28 Athllejtic Association '27, '28 Q Q Q glee Clugh'27, '28 Pageant Choir '27 Q , ageanr oir '27 Choir '27, '28 Q T Spring Festival '28 Spring Festival '27, '28 Q l f Choir '27, 'za one Club 'za Q i Q Q "" ' . ' X RUTH SIMS ALTHEA SMITH Q Q ' fu ' . 1 5 Dubuque, Iowa Evanston, Ill. Q Q ' - Q' ,L ' l Kindergarten Primary Kindergarten Primary Q Q 1 , Diploma '28 Athletic Club '27, '28 Q Q 5 . M 2 Spring Festival '28 Spring Festival '28 Q 1 , 1 4 a aa 7 A A 1 ' L 1-- I Q Q ' ' ' b '- ' ' , PAULINE STAUFFER ARMIDA STEXVART Q Q I I Q Princeton, Ill, Evanston. Ill. Q Q 5 I Kindergarten Primary Kindergarten Primary Q Q l Diploma '28 Diploma '28 , Q 5 ? 5 Athletic Club '27, '28 Spring Festival '28 Q Q 2 2 Spring Fgstival '28 RackettyfPacketty House '28 , Q Q Q , ' Art Ed., "ChafT" '28 Q Q 1 V1 Art Comm., "The Q Q j National" '28 Q Q f Christmas Festival '27 Q Q ' Town Girls' Stunt '27 Q Q V Chairman, Freshman Social Q Q ,V V I r Committee '27 Q g ' l ' ' , MARGUERITE SULLIVAN MQRY TAUBER 1 A i Highland Park, 111. Ixcenah, Ww- , : Q f , Kindergarten Primary K1f1dFfflPlffCQ1 PUFUHYY Q , i Diploma 'za DIPIOIM 28, , , , Q 1 Spring Festival '28 Athletic Association 27, 28 Q Q ' n Town Girls' Stunt '27 Athletic Stunt, 23 Q Q 1 5 Annual Stunt 28 Q Q ' RackettyfPacketty House '28 Q Q I Spring Festival '28 Q Q 1 , Sophomore Stunt '28 Q Q t ,,., . ,, . .. ...., . , ..,,. . , Q QQ 'W""W- 54'f"iiif?' 'sole Q f Xi'gjN jx' Q Wrfcikgfsdr-Mlpff : ,I IIIIIIIKEZJ g unmnmlululululu umm mmuu I Sixtyffour THE NATIONAL um-- --u -1-----viii? ' wif 3 2 - ' ' 1, f" . ' 5:5 :M , X . : LILLIAN THORSEN FLORA My THURSTON "'-' ' 5 I Waukegan, Ill. Summitville. Ind. .QQ . 1 E - Kindergarten Primary Kindergarten Primary if 'f Z Diploma '28 DiPloma '28 f 3 - , Athletic Club '27, '28 'lf if " MA' ' Q Spring Festival '28 1, 1 ,, I ' E E Student Govt. Board '28 X N , F4 5 5 ' , --.- E E . . E E HELEN TREVER FLORENCE TRITT ' 7 E 5 Appleton, Wis. M0052 Jaw, Sask- '- 2 5 Kindergarten Primary Kindergarten Primary E E Diploma '28 Diploma '28 E E Midfsummer Frolie '27 Corres. Sec., International Q Q Club '28 Q g Book Club '28 Q 0- E E Spring Festival '28 get """' 5 5 E VERNA UPDIKE RUTH WALROND 5 Q Jerseyville, Ill. Libertyville, Ill. Q Q Kindergarten Primary Kindergarten Primary W , ,M Q Q Diploma '28 Diploma '28 ' ' Q E Spring Festival '28 Choir '27, '28 , 5 E Dramatic Club '28 E Q International Club '28 , 5, Q 5 1 ' 5 E ZOLA WEBSTER JEAN WEISS a"' ' E E South Bend, Ind. Chicago, Ill, ' , X , xxr, E E Kindergarten Primary Kindergarten Primary ' ff " 5 g Diploma '28 Diploma '28 . ' E Q Choir '28 Asst. Ed., "ChaE" '28 " Q 2 Dramatic Club '27 Spring Festival '28 , 4 - . g Q Annual Stunt '28 V ' ' 9 E E Spring Festival '27, '28 mg- 2 1: 5 1 tt-a I A 2 ELIZABETH WESCOTT ELIZABETH WHEELER 'A i 7' ' E E Alhambra, Calif. Chicago, Ill. j E Q Kindergarten Primary Kindergarten Primary r - K ig E Q Diploma '28 Diploma '28 . " ' Q S Sec.fTreas., Book Club '28 Choir '27, '28 ' 2 . L E 5 Athletic Club '27, '28 Pageant Choir '27 . '. ,V E E International Club '27, '28 Dramatics Club '27, '28 f xp -b -gf , f E Q Spring Festival '28 Sophomore Stunt '28 W ' E E Spring Festival 28 1 E : 2 ff " ...',,,- E E ' .,.: Q 5 5 3 , L,,, ', if I1' j .E s v X Qg ,734 it '-, -xi sz' N,f,NLer:f I X veit if Y Niflixxv-fj : XL, wi 54 -si f f 5 : - 'xii f1't-157 I E sa 5- ,j'1'Q1'Ll' E S351 'llllllllll llllllllll llllllll I llllllllIIllIllIllIIlllIl. Sixtyffiue THE NATIONAL ' f I 1 i I 3 , I i I I I wa ' af - fi- '. 1 , K 4 i f I f fi 'f. "Al f ,., J, , - fe ' ' . Y., , ' X 4' ,fi , ,cf ' ,.,, Lf: ..,, ,.... --,..,.,. . if 1 YQ 4. wfzv., 7 ,, Y af LUCILE E. WIEST Sturgeon Bay, Wis. Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 Spring Festival '28 VIRGINIA WILSON McKeesport, Pa. SELMA WYMAN Chicago, Ill. Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 Choir '27, '28 Pageant Choir '27 Dramatics Club '28 Spring Festival '28 Town Girls' Stunt '27 VIRGINIA ZOELLE Evanston, Ill. Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 Glee Club '28 Sophomore Class Stun Spring Festival '28 t '28 LAVINA WILLIS Winslow, Ill. Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 Pageant Choir '27 Athletic Association '27 ETHEL WRIGHT LaGrange, Ill. Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 Athletic Club 27, Pres., '28 Ath. Capt., Cooper Hall '27, '28 Sec., Debate Club '27 Pageant Choir '27 Athletic Stunt '28 Spring Festival '28 HARRIETTE' YOULDEN Butte, Mont. Kindergarten Primary Diploma. '28 Dramatics Club '27 Athletic Association '27, '28 Bus. Mgr., "National" '28 Annual Stunt '28 Freshman Stunt '27 Spring Festival '28 MADELYN CHEN Foochow, China Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 International Club '27, V. Pres., '28 Spring Festival '28 VIRGINIA HOSKINSON LEILA E. CARLSON Buffalo, N. Y. Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 Athletic Association '27, '28 Spring Festival ' 28 Chicago, Ill, Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 Spring Festival '28 Sophomore Stunt '28 were ....... ......, , ...i... Sixtyfsix ws THE NATIONAL Runnin: nnnn nnnnlln unsung v. Sophomoifes-I Continued j LUCY AGHAJANIAN, Armenia International Club '28 KIRK ALGEO, Tulsa, Okla. Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 CLYDA BARTELS, Ft. Collins, Colo. SUSY BINNS, Gary, Ind. Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 Athletic Club '27, '28 RUTH BLUEMER, Chicago, Ill. RUTH BRADFORD, Benton Harbor, Mich. Spring Festival '28, Choir '28 CATHERINE BROOKS, Evnaston, Ill. Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 MARY BURNETT, Mishawaka, Ind. Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 Spring Festival '27, '28 MARGARET CHAMBERLIN, Evanston, Ill. Spring Festival '28 ESTHER CHRISTIE, Kenilworth, Ill. Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 Dramatics Club '28, Spring Festival '28 MONA CORNISH, Chicago, Ill. Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 Spring Festival '28, Choir '28 COURTENAY DAVIDSON, Bloomington, Ill. Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 ESTHER DELBRIDGE, Marinette, Wis. Spring Festival '28 MARION DOUBT, Chicago, Ill. Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 GERTRUDE DREW, Evanston, Ill. Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 Dramatics Club '28, Choir '28, Spring Festival '28 MARGARET FEHD, Evanston, Ill. Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 Spring Festival '27 ALMEDA FREY, Bloomington, Ill. HELEN HOFFMASTER, Battle Creek, Mich. MARION HONKE, Chicago, Ill. GRACE HURST, East Manch Chunk, Pa. Spring Festival '28, Art Committee "The National" '28 ISABELLE JANTZ, Ripon, Wis. Kindergarten Primary Diploma '27 Spring Festival '27 ROSE D. KANTER, Chicago, Ill. Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 Spring Festival '27 IRMA KEITH, Kalispell, Montana Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 Spring Festival '27 HAZEL KNOX, Winnetka, Ill. Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 Spring Festival '27 MARIE LIZZADRO, Chicago, Ill. Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 Spring Festival '27 JESSIE LOBERG, Evanston, Ill. BETTY LYON, Waukegan, Ill. Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 JANE MARTIN, Watseka, Ill. LYNETTA PASKO, Mishawaka, Ind. Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 Spring Festival '28, Pageant Choir '27, Athletic Association '27, '28 GERTRUDE PISER, Mishawaka, Ind. Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 LAURENA POLLOCK, Mishawaka, Ind. Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 ELIZABETH PROCTOR, Chicago, Ill. SARAH ROBINSON, Signal Mountain, Tenn. ELIZABETH ROCHESTER, Chicago, Ill. Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 FLORENCE ROONEY, Evanston, Ill. Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 LORETTA RYAN, O'Ncill, Neb. Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 MARY SALERNO, Berwyn, Ill. Spring Festival '27 VIRGINIA SCHLECHT, Ashland, NVis. Kindergarten Primary Diploma '27 FLORENCE SCRIBNER, Evanston, Ill. MARGARET SNVEENEY, Highland Park, Ill. Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 KATHERINE TUFTS, Winnetka, Ill. V MARIE WADE, Chicago, Ill. Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 ANNABELLE WILDE, Chicago, Ill. Kindergarten Primary Diploma '28 Choir '27, '28 MARGARET ELIZABETH XVILLIAMS, Havana, Ill. Sophomore Reminiscences Will you ever forget: The thrill of trying to sing "Cheer for 'N. K. E. C.,' " our opening fresh' man assembly, when we didn't know the words? The solemn examination the Juniors gave us on April Fool's Day? Eating weenies under umbrellas when it rained at the Town and Dorm girls' beach party near Wilmette Harbor? Kaye in her plus fours-or plus fourteens-leading cheers? Initiation week--pale faced freshmen with dresses on backward and galoshes, and the bags of candy-and what candy? The Gary trip with its numerous breakfdowns? Applying for positions? '- 1 ,I -. giiginnun nninnr innun nnnnmmnnnnnnnnYES Sixty-seven THE NATIONAL wg ,,,,,,,,,,, ,ye History of the Sophomores Two years are gone, forever, and are yet with us forever. Every day of them we carry with us and every activity we participate in will be fuller for some experience we have enjoyed. Making friends has been the most precious experience of life we have all had. Together we came, strangers, with just a little tightness in our throats and a questioning feeling in our hearts. How fine all the old girls were to us! and through their trust we also trusted until we learned to stand alone. The first vacation came very quickly, after which we returned for the first time to familiar haunts and faces. Afterwards came our first competif tion, the song contest. As Freshies we were but competitors, as Sophomores we were the victors, proud to keep the honor for the Sophomore class. The second competition came in the spring when we all turned athletes. Perhaps our predecessors felt they began it, but we are sure the Athletic Association could never have had such an excellent beginning without us. Oh, yes, the dances!! We made our debut informally at the Georgian Hotel in February, 1927. Judging from the compliments fand Shekels, ref ceived it was a good beginning for a successful season. We realized, after our formal at the Kenilworth Club in the fall of 1927, what a real success is. Our prom and our very own commencement are still before us and we advance toward them eagerly looking through the already opening door into the world of adventure and romance, carrying with us our college years to enrich our future. And as we go out we hope the beloved words of our "Alma Mater" may indeed become reality and that we may "share with little children everywhere the joy that we have learned of thee." nf 2 -'J -- cmd, we - as '5opl's'5 -- resign in favor- 05- you- cas fresh ne 5 -- Long maj you endurelll an 1 -J l - .sj'fYVGI'1'T if lllllllllllllllll llllllll lllll l lllllllllllll 'll lllllllll. Sixty eight 914:-at Q 1+ H Y frm, , f-,fr J -,. -T b V , , .-13.1 1. - AZ' 'gy A ' 1,:?6:141 ,jc 'J' A ' Af J , f ff- , f ',z7afX" 'Q sf ' 331 . ffqgvg 'r f. ' . .,, 1 if , , ,V ,g 3, QA Hmfggfmw. 4 KV., af Tix, 'T-5 3,6255 ww ,VTJZL-f' 'LQ A gg." rfPs,g I 0 .I jig, 2, A -wa N ,- 'ff-A 1 xpfufri- V W A V , . u " f -, 1. ' 5, u . ff.. ffm" ,V N. '3"'4 ' qs' QJ7-' ii'-54? "3" "f.iw . ,M 5 1-J 4, I, - c f - ,E-,W , -. ' gmt az- 1,2 -wg, 'fwf if 11? - ff n A' I " F N -ffm Y "1fhf':w:wf":2:s:'z:-"as:z:1:xf-s:5:w'::,::..f.':-..3,g:z:sf i f 5 -.A :Z-g5,,,7gA f,A4,., A , fp, A ,, F' Ag: p-tz7i,,,g,I' My -af -my 'L - ' - ,B 72' , I 'I ,2 1. 'iw-f wrwf l' '53 M-1 ' 1.'?n,"' ' ' ' ' ' 'ff2J?' - 331,-kay' ' ff gg . rx -Q ' . -J' -, ., - ,, V' 1,455-fu,3,g f' 'iiv ffg , ,A 2 ' V , .. ' f " . " . ns... ,,.. ,mi At the Dunes IYHVQ -.fd o lar?-'4 0. u ,-. 'f .U -Q- ,4 ,., f 5 'if 0 .LMA 0 O ' . A 1 v N I ...W .-.. I .1 QI? Q 4 'THE NATIONAL 'IlllllllllllllIllllIlllllllllllllllllllllll llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll llllll llll E lk ig' V ... .ifq l M l ss , Class O Cers 192 74928 Margaret Collins ,.... . President Harriet Gale ...... VicefPresider1t Mary Brady ...... V . Secretary Dorothy Roesch ..... . Treasurer Miss Anna Markt ..... Class Sponsor 5:9911IIIIlIlIunumnnmmmll lllm Severltyftwo THE NATIONAL s History of the Freshmen ARLY in September we of the Freshman class, though we were strangers, organized with the purpose of making our class, under the leadership of Miss Markt, one of the finest classes of National. In Cctober, the following girls were elected as officers: President, Margaret Collins, vicefpresident, Har' riet Gale, secretary, Martha Terhuneg treasurer, Dorothy Roesch. Early in Cctober, the dormitory Sophs decided that their Frosh had not been properly initiated, so one morning, said Frosh appeared at the College wearing white cotton stockings, white workingmen's gloves, no cosmetics, and carrying umbrellas. This bright idea hit the town girl Sophomores as a pretty good one, and so, soon after, the poor town girl Freshmen were doomed to wear goloshes, their dresses backwards, hairfribbons-and to buy the upper' classmen peanuts and candy!! Woe be unto the Freshmen of the class of 1928f29, for they are going to have to pay for our suffering! After the first of the year, we found ourselves without a secretary, Martha had decided that she preferred matrimony to school! So Mary Brady was elected to take her place. Although our songs were not quite good enough to win the song contest in February, next year will ind us prepared-we'll know more what it's all about-and we hope we'll be the ones to win. Cn the evening of February twentyffifth, the Kenilworth Club, decorated very beautifully with many balloons of different colors and streamers, was used by our class for the "Freshman Formal." The cofoperation and work of the social chairman, Mildred Melone, and her committee were responsible for the success of this dance. We, who have now completed our year as Freshmen at National, hope that the many things we have learned and the happiness we have had during this year will aid in making our lives full of service and happiness for others in the future. We offer our sincere gratitude to Miss Markt and to the offif cers for the help that they have given our class, in making it a worthwhile and successful organization. Not exactly freshmen, and not exactly sophomores, are the two groups of midfyears, so they compromise by joining the most easily available class and organizing a club of their own. The entering class of February, 1928, are included in the freshman group photos, and those of 1927 have a group to themselves. Although few in numbers, the girls of '27 are a peppy, active group. The organization of the MidfYear Club was their idea, and they had it in good running order and ready to welcome the midfyear of '28 when they arrived. gl llll mlm ullulllll lllllmnulum lllllllllllnllllln-sag Seventy-three THE NATIONAL ulnn mnur Mary Martha Murphy, Florence Boyd, Annette Henrich, Marjorie Eiseman, Virginia Hall, Iris Clarke, Virginia Dougherty, Mildred Grant, Gladys Browning, Zoa Favoright Carol Crossman, Margaret Collins, Gladys Hammann, Frances Bills, Evelyn Huy, Ann Balalc, Harriet Bridges, Ruth Bihler, ,lane Alger, Hazel Anders Iva Curley, Louise Bartels, Blanche Gosling, Virginia Davis, Helen Butler, Claudine Akerlund, Betty Brenner, Florane Belinske, Margaret Callanen, Vesta Crain, Dora Mae Cazier Mary Barry, Jane Hudson, Dorothy Blaine, Betty Horsman, Marcella Ebenhahn, Al Gine Conrad, Elizabeth Dahlgren, Mary Brady, Anita Eldredge, Catharine Blackstone Kathryn Roadstrum, Geraldine Peterson, Louise Yoder, Katherine Vogt, Harriet Gale, Dorothy Shipman, Betty Rude, Mary Muessel, Marion Archias Xi! Olga Mangel, Margaret Mangold, Isabel Laing, Ruth King, Anita Jauckens, Catherine Klumph, EthelfLyle Maclntvre. Helen Reed. Eleanor Melges Sere Nordin. Violette Krause, Izetta Kern, Ruth lillson. Vera Johnson. Margaret Luscomb, Charline Leonard, Marjorie Post Helen Krause, Caroline Nicholsen, Nina Otrich, Ada Olson, Alice Nolan, Ada Iliff, Maxine LaChapelle, Mary Jacobson, Rose Anne Marshall Sylvia Peters. Dorothy Myers. Bertha Lehman. Katherine Kennedy, Mildred Melone, Ann Lawrence, Laura Leach gmummlmmlmmmmu ummr mmm llllllllxgf Scvefntyffour 6' THE NATIONAL E 5 Helen Webb, Charlotte Wells, Evelyn Schoeneman, Frances Sandell, Geneva Snyder, Jane Tanner, Edith Q Simonson, Ruth Ann Siljestroni, Florence Boyd E Margaret Speer, Helen Speer, Sarah Shapiro, Louise Shaw, Lois Steinberg, Bertha Ries, Dorothy Roesch, Q Martha Springer E Virginia Wheeler, Florence Schmus, Eloise Tabor, Florence Trenlcenschuh, Harriette Rothschild, Johanna 5 Schnuch, Marion Shadinger, Paula Stoerk E Virginia Qualley, Mary Smith, Theresa Thal, Margaret Schnute, Vardine Russell, Florence Risley i it 5 Viola Henninger, Lucia Tappan, Margaret Evans, Helen Rocltenbach, Mary Martha Hunt, Blossom Harper, Q Mzirgaret Pleasants Q Elizabeth Weart, Bernice Manuel, Roberta Hindley, Florence Steiner, Evelyn Crawford, Roberta McDonald, 5 Alece Siegel, Theresa Shean Q Ellen Skinner. Gertrude Martin, Constance Howell, Claire Walhridge, Myrtle Widmark, Marion Rymal, Q Frances Grossman E Frances Wilson, Vandela Duner, Gwendolyn Sanders. Leola Eklund, Mary Kern. Priscilla Carino, E Frances Blum 5 . Seventyffive THE NATIONAL ----------- ---- -- ----- - --------------- - ----- 2 ': Q Margaret Hanlon, Nancy Robbins, Agnes Winans, Marjorie Van Wazer, Theresa Gilligan, Marjorie Murray E Q Louise Anson, Margaret Chamberlin, Phyllis Campbell, Verna Kumle E : 1 5 S MARIAN ARCHIAS ISABEL McCLOY E E GLADYS BIDWELL REBECCA McCLURE Q 2 FRANCES BURLEY MARIAN McCOSH E 2 CATHERINE DAVIES GERTRUDE MARTIN E 5 PATRICIA DOYLE MARION MERTZ E Q MARCELLA EBENHAHN HELEN PRZYBYLSKI E E MARTHA EDMONDS DOROTHY RICHARDS E Q HELEN GOODALL ESTHERBELLE SIEGEL E E CAROL HANSELMAN LORRAINE SMITH Q 2 MARIANNA IRWIN HILDEGARDE STOECKLEY E E VERA JOHNSON HELEN STROUPE 2 FRIEDA KAUFMAN LUCY, TOWNE E JANE KELLNER CONSTANCE VON 'XVELLER E E LEONA LUDWIG HERTHA WEGNER E E GLADYS LUNDER LOUISE YODER E glunlul I num num I lllllllllnlgz Seventyfsix THE NATIONAL R illlllllll u " I Alma Mater Ring out, O voices, joyfully, To praise our Alma Mater. How gladly do we sing to thee, Our dearest Alma Mater. We praise thy standards broad and free, Long may our flower an emblem be Of courage high, and loyalty To thee, our Alma Mater. To thee we come, in thee we live, Our dearest Alma Mater. Our highest privilege to give To thee, our Alma Mater. May we, thy daughters, ever share With little children everywhere, The joy that we have learned of thee, Our glorious Alma Mater. Ztfrlununll nlluuulr mmuulu Immmumuuunmlnuuluu -R Seventyfscven Q ' 1 U P o-1 . V1 in .O 0 . - 9' . ' f. 'sal AN ' 'fna , e 'I a .,. 'r' . f A , J 'ff' . Q 1,7:' CRGHNIZHTIONS Y v 'I . v . -4 ,-f 4 ILA .il auxin.. a," ?- is Q ' 5' -v -P O r r v v 4 .L .3 when H 'V' l ' if 'T' ,Fr - -5 Q 1?-ff G 5 in fd H 2 .- f vt' "iffy ir: Qian: A' . 7 ' - , W. ,wr , r ' 4 Jia. u Q- .:.v. -, . rag? 4 La THE NATIONAL College Council Ojjllcers Kaye Reintges Uuniorj . Grace Roosman fSeniorj . Catherine Wilcox fjuniorj Florence Storer QSophomorej . . . Semors Al1da Shmn Mar1an Thompson Penka Kassabova LWIIOTS Helen Chr1steson Josephlne Lawrence Grace Cassell Helen Hubsch Mary Ahce Klrtley Soplrornores Prudence Garrett Al1ce Enr1ght Loulse Hannah Isabel Raymond Frances Lawton Beverley B1shop Esther Schr1ver Eleanor Schutz Faculty Members M1ss Edna Dean Baker Mrs LOUISCL Kxmball Mrs Stella Kahl M1ss May Whltcomb M1ss Florence Boehmer . President VicefPresident . Secretary . Treasurer Mrd 'Years Ruth Chase Mary Burnett Krrk Algeo F reslrrnen Margaret Colllns Harr1et Gale Mary Brady Dorothy Roesch M1ss Frances Kern MISS Loulse Adams M1ss Etta Mount Mlss Frances McElroy MISS Anna Markt ust suppose that JESSIE W1nter should come walkrng 1n some day' . That strong and enthus1ast1c member of the Senlor class of 15 means as much 1n our Nat1onal hlstory as the early Pllgflm fathers meant 1n the tormat1on of our present representatwe government Now you are remem ber1ng that somewhere you have heard that It was jess who twelve long years ago had the pluck and fores1ghtedness to suggest a student counc1l Wouldnt It be fun 1f she should really drop 1n on one of our present day College Councxl meet1ngs7 Would she fmd th1ngs greatly changed? Except for our new locatxon out here on the North Shore and our 1ncrease to th1rty five members perhaps th1HgS would be Just the same and she m1ght well be rem1n1sc1ng 1f we were dlscusslng a comlng Fest1val whether lt be Thanksglvlng Chrxstmas or Sprmg for these are N K E C tradrtlons She m1ght be lnterested 1n the new types of problems wh1ch confront us w1th the growth of our school Problems such as the honor system dele gates to convent1ons dr1ves for th1s and that the number of offices a g1rl m1ght hold or the number of clubs to wh1ch she m1ght belong the planmng '1 . . . , , . , . ' ' 7 3 , , - 1 1 , , .... r H - , ' 5 , 1 5 3 lllllllllllllll Illllllllllllll lllllllllllllllll Eighty on e THE NATIONAL of all types of assemblies-no doubt many of these were unthought of, or rather, untalked of, when she was president of Council. We wonder if she would approve of our recommendations to the larger group we are attempting to represent insofar as we know what they want and need? Somehow, visualizing Jessie, don't you feel as though she'd be back of us, boosting us on to a greater guidance and ingenuity? That same keen foresight which possessed her a dozen years ago-which prompted her in the formation of a representation of students and faculty which might serve as an advisory group to the rest of the students, will doubtedly ever be present as long as she may live. This year we have had suppers and good times together in the cafeteria, "entertained" the college at large during several assembly periods fat these times we trust we duly impressed the students with the solemnity of our positionj, thought and discussed a great many things, which we have in turn presented to the jurisdiction of the student body, whether in class meetings through class officers or in assembly periods through Council oiiicers. Are we keeping the double challenge of keeping with the ideals of the past as well as striving on to greater things for the present and future? This may be judged at some later time, as today, Jess Winter, coming back, might see the impress of that first Council's actions. If, at some future time, we have cause to feel a portion of the joy in achievement which that first Council now merits we shall indeed have cause for joy in the realization of service to our classmates of our beloved Alma Mater. . Kaye Remtges. Our Girls! Our girls! See them come By the hundreds down the street Faces bright eyes alight Cn they come down the street! Our girls! See them work And see them play day by day. Eager joyous frank and gay They work and play day by day! Our girls! Who knows Where they take love and light To children dear who never fear Their tender care or radiant sight! Our girls! See them go By the hundreds down the street Brave and strong hark a song As they go down the street! Edna Dean Baker. 5 , 7 3 5 9 , 3 k 7 , , fl mu mllummr muluuln 3 Eighty two THE NATIONAL X. f A mmm .lv Student Government Assocmtton The Board Beverley B1ShOp Pfreszdent Gladys Levanlus Secretary Eleanor Schutz Vzce Preszdent Frances Lawton Treasurer Ruth Barber Helen Caldwell Anne Jenmngs Mary Al1ce Tnbunes K1rtley Dorothy McConnell Irene Pugsley F1rst Semester M1ldred Balsden Ruth Barber Mary Ahce Klrtley Mar Tnbunes garet Prlchard Irene Pugsley L1ll1an Thorsen Second Semester Mrs Stella Kahl Faculty Admsor Durlng the school year of 1926 27 the members of the Student Govern ment Board felt the need of a rev1sed set of rules The rules then 1n forte had been estabhshed to take care of the needs of student Government when the College was located 1n the c1ty and w1th the change 1n lOLElt101'1 a change ID rules seemed necessary When the Board of 1927 28 met 1n September they had a set of regula tlons not new but cons1derably rev1sed to present to the students These had been carefully worked out by the members of last year s Board together w1th a comm1ttee appomted by the student body and had rece1vecl faculty approval At the hrst formal meetxng of the students the new pr1v1leges and rules were announced A demer1t system was also dev1sed and w1th the co operat1on of the students has proved to be a successful add1t1on Followmg the plan of last year the money 1n the treasury was budgeted ThlS made lt posslble for the Student Government Assoc1at1on to sponsor a party for the dormltory pract1cally every month Une of the most successful partles preceded the Chustmas vacat1on The success of student government depends upon the complete co opera t1on between students and the govermng Board Because of the splend1cl co operat1on we have had th1s year a h1gh standard has been upheld wh1ch has made poss1ble a very successful year Beveyley Blshop A uuunuur muuuu nmumumm 'M' X ,,,,mm, nuululululllllllllllllumunulumlnuulmumuululun : M , E , ,M pf, 'Nga VX E . ,Z E 2. 1 L, W, , X 5 so E 9 9 9 f 2 y E 9 9 S 2 f 2 : s E 9 T 9 Q 9 a 9 - : 1 ' E 9 E , ' ' - Q 9 E - 9 ' E 9 - 5 9 - E ' v , ' , .fb wir sr Eighty three THE NATIONAL is, ...........p,5 . . . ....-.-.. . .-..... ..-Z... .-. ....-. ..,. ........, ,. W. ,,.. t ,I 3 l l 4 i i Town Girls' Association Ojicers Helen Hubsch . . . . President Ann Barratt . . . VicefPvesident Roberta McDonald . . Secretary Marie McCarthy . . . Treasiwei Gene Gallagher . . . Social Chairman Dorothy Beck ......... House Chairman The purpose of the Town Girls Association is to bring the girls who live outside the dormitory together and give them opportunity of knowing each other. It also provides for representation of town girls on College Council, and although it is primarily a social organization it contributes toward the College in other ways. This year, combining with the dormitory students, the town girls presented a handsome table for the Alumnae room. It was planned, this year, to have business meetings on the fourth Thurs' day of every month after the Assembly period. This, however, proved rather unsuccessful because Christmas vacation, Thanksgiving and the mid' year all came on that Thursday. Other organizations, take heed! Beware of the fourth Thursday of the month. The first social meeting this year was conducted by the Sophomore Class and brought to a successful close the week of initiation for Freshmen. In fact, it was the climax of that interesting period. The meeting was conf ducted by a severe looking judge and jury, who commanded each of the girls to do some special stunt, all of which were spontaneous-"Give a discourse on why I am good looking"-"Sing like Galli Curci"-were some of the demands. You can imagine the results! 59 .......... T mn.--. ............"Q4 5 f mn Eighty four Y! ' Ilnmunuu 'THE NATIONAL R 2 The next social meeting was sponsored by the Freshmen, a clever stunt portraying a radio program, was followed by a most delicious dinner pref pared by the girls. The meeting certainly did credit to the capable Freshmen the Town Girls have this year. A card party was next. This party featured the mother and daughter idea, where each girl brings her mother, and it proved to be a great success. At this, as well as our other meetings, members of the Faculty were our guests. The Student Room, formerly the Town Girls Room, maintained by the Town Girls, is one of our prides. It is here that those girls who want to rest or to study, or play if their time is so miraculously unoccupied, may come and find the right atmosphere. At all times, one of the aims of the organization has been to bring about closer cofoperation between dormitory and town girls. It is difficult for the town girls to get together often because they live far apart, and it is even more difficult for the dormitory and town girls to get together and know each other, but it is hoped that, through joint endeavors, we may bring to' gether these two groups, giving them more opportunity to cofoperate for the welfare of the College. Helen Hubschl Glee Club Officers Isabel Raymond . . . . . . President Ruth Cole . . . Secretaryffofeasuvefr Annette Henrich ......... Librarian National has always fostered anything musical. It has had voice classes, choir and musical education courses, but until last fall there had never been a Glee Club. When we all arrived last September, we found that Miss Boehmer had plans for us in the possibility of several new clubs. If we wanted them enough to support them faithfully she would do her best to arrange them for us. And so there came to be a Glee Club. We met one day in the first semester, organized and elected officers. But we' had to have a director! We did not have to wait long, for Miss Boehmer, her usual capable self, soon found us a splendid one. Her name is Miss Reed, and she is a student at the School of Music of Northwestern University, being a member of the Northwestern Woman's Glee Club. With our director we started work on some songs, and before long we gave a short concert in Assembly! It's been fun, and we have had parties as well as work. So you can see we are glad that we organized Cthanks to Miss Boehmer,, and that we had such a splendid director in Miss Reed. Our hope, as we close the year 192728, is that next year will see the Glee Club continued and that it brings as much pleasure to its new members as this year's work has brought us. Isabel Raymond' Jalllllllll llllllllllll illllllllll llllllllllllllllllIllllllllllllllP M! Eightyffive THE NATIONAL Athletzc Assocmtzofn CD ccrs Ethel Wrlght Premdent M1ldred Sherer Secretary Irene Pugsley Vzce Preszdem Ruth Loucks Treasurer Another mfant orffanlzauon the Athletlc ASSOC1at1OH Another one that IS growmff too accomphshmg b1g thmgs for 1tself and N K E C Last year the Athlet1c ASSOCIHLIOH was a dorm1tory affan' remember the race for pomts when the Franklm g1rls won the cup and the nlght of the presentat1on when we had the b1g d1nner7 Well th1s year has seen even greater growth The ASSOCIHLIOH has gone IHKO the College from the dorm and now lncludes the whole student body It has g1ven a SQTICS of very successful dances one at the dorm and the rest at the College Last but not least It has accompllshed 1tS goal for the year a tennls court' The Athlenc Contest D1nner at wh1ch the sllver cup was awarded to the furls of Mrs Burleson s apartment was an excltlng affalr and the week end campmv tr1p held at Druce Lake on May 19 20 was an equally thr1ll1ng OLLHSIOH Loaded w1th SUILCHSCS tenn1s rackets sweaters and everythmg else lmag lnable twenty Hve g1rls w1th MISS Markt and MISS Boehmer cl1mbed 1nto the bus and arr1v1ng at the lake admlred the scenery and the cozy cottage and proceeded to employ every m1nute of the t1me Wlth the exceptlon of the few requlred by law for sleepmg 1n h1k1ng swlmmlng row1ng playlng games and s1ng1ng or toastlng marshmallows around the huge camp frre Oh yes they ate and how they ate' Was the trlp a success? Ask me' Heres w1sh1ng the ASSOC13t1OH even a blgger and better season for 1928 29 Co to lt athletes' Mary Ahce Krrtley 457 ' a E 1- E , 5 5 Y E 3 45,1 E X f 5 4' : 1 V - 12. l . . 5 ,,. . . ,, . . . D ' E c b, - . . . . E 1 1 E ' Hb ' 11 ' ' E 1 T E 1 ' E , - S .5 1 1 - E f - 1 9 Q 1 E . , . . . 5 5 - 1 3 ' E o 1 ' 1 E 1 1 ' E 1 ' 1 ' 1 5 1 1 E D , , , 5 - 1 1 Q , . . . . . 5 i 4umm.mmmmmlm lulnunr uunuun llnlnlullnlg Eightyfsix "? THE NATIONAL 9' Ek rl International Club Oficevs Penka Kassabova . . President Vera Hunte . . . Secretary Madelyn Chen . VicefP'resident Alida Shinn . . . Tveaszwev In the present day century, when Lindy can "hop" to Paris for the weekfend, when travelling has become so easy that oceans are looked at not as bodies of water that separate but bodies of water that connect us, it is impossible for any man who has a mind free from prejudices not to see that people of all races and nations are fundamentally alike, though different in habits. It is this new point of view which creates the desire for under' standing, knowing, helping, cofoperating, and enjoying one another. Men and women of today are using more and more their thinking ability and are creating institutions undreamed of in the past, such as the League of Nations, World Court, and the International Education Fellowships. Our International Club aims to help the girls who through living and working together get to know each other better, to understand, sympathize with, and help each other. We want to be good nationalists, but not Chanvinists. We want to see and recognize the good that each country contributes to world progress. This year the Club has twentyfeight members-fourteen foreign and fourteen American. The countries represented are: China, Japan, Bulgaria, Mexico, Germany, India, Armenia, Philippine Islands, Roumania, Sweden, Canada, British West Indies and the United States of America. Most of the foreign girls are going back to their native lands to teach. We know that they will carry with them the attitude of brotherhood and that because of their teaching more sympathetic and understanding genera' tions will arise, generations which will bring a challenge to progress, not through guns and war drums, but through achievements in the many phases of human experience. Vem Hume, .swf nlnlnr fzf mmm ulllllllllull lrllllllllllllig Eightyfseven 'S '. X THE NATIONAL ' Dramatzcs Club O cefrs Eleanor Schutz Premdent Marron MOIIISS Vzce Presldent Gladys Levanrus Secretary Kather1ne Lauerman Treasurer Cather1ne Klumph Chawman o Program Commzttee Helen Goodall Chawman o Membefrshzp Commzttee Another year has come and gone and no longer do we thmk of the Dra mat1cs Club as a new organ1zat1on confined to the dormltory g1rls Now It 15 a College club to wh1ch any town g1rl or dorm1tory g1rl who secures average grades and 1S w1ll1ng to play an actrve part 1n the club 15 el1g1ble The first play of season was The Burglar a one act comedy wh1ch was successfully presented 1n the assembly before a large Group of U1rls Other short plays dxrected by members of the club were g1ven from t1me to t1me Among these were SIX Cups of Chocolate presented 1n our aud1tor1um th1s sprmg by a group of the town g1rl members and All the World Loves a Lover g1ven a short t1me later by a cast of dormrtory members of the organ 1zat1on Both of these plays were recexved w1th the utmost favor We the Sophomore Class of 28 have started the N K E C Amateurs on the long hard road to b1g thmgs We wlsh them success 1n future years Eleanor Schutz xVh "XA Iuuunummluu nmnunmu llullllnummluluuulmlunuml j R. Q ...,..,..,.,- ...,..., .,...W.,,. .... ...,.. ....,, .,,..,,-,.,.,.,.,r,..... K E 5 . , E Y E . 5 ' , 5 a 5 2 ' E Q E ss 11 - g f 5 s a 5 z: o ' E 3 9 - E as - as - - - E 1 E . . . H E 7 5 ,, . . . : , 5 1 5 Q 5 , , . . . . E , . . gf Q4 21- Anmmuunununmunu mmuumr unnnuunl X 5 Eightyfeight 'THE NATIONAL 'ek unuuulInnnulllnnlInununmllluuunnununmul Q Public Speaking Club Officers Mary Nitterhouse . . . . President Jean Knight . . VicefPresident Margaret Jenkins . . . . . . S6CYCfdTy'TT6dSMT6T This is a club where the poor, shy, young things admit that they are so, and are very anxious to become a little bolder, especially when it comes to making speeches before the public. The following "Before and after taking" picture expresses our aim: BEFORE "My topic for today is, 'Why I Am in this Public Speaking Club'- Iflflflflfuhfuhfuhfl have always afafafa enjoyed afafafa I mean envied Kaye Reintges when she gets up to speech afa, I mean make an announcement and hope that afafa some day, by the end of this year afa I will be able to do the same. AFTER "Madame President and Fellow Members: You are all interested in the tour that the College is sponsoring this summer. I am sure we would all go if we had the money. The question before us, then, is how we are going to get the money. If I could have given this speech earlier I would have said, 'Save it from your allowancef As I didn't, my advice is fif you are graduating, that you ask for it as a graduation gift. If you aren't successful in your appeal, borrow the money-beg it if you must-but I don't advocate stealing. If none of these ways works, the only alternative is to save from the salary you get next year and go the following summer. Miss Kearns can tell you how to save the money without even noticing it. I hope that out of my suggestions you will find some means of making this trip in the near future. Think of all the possible results. You may find a pleasant companion who will wish to continue the friendship afterwards. Aside from that, your experiences will fill out many a conversation period when fif everj the children get through talking." There are just a few brave ones who are willing to go through a few hours of agony forqthe purpose of bettering themselves in this respect. And surprising as it may sound, we are actually enjoying the hour, though we look forward to it with fear and trembling. We hope that next year our club will be even more successful than it is this year. , Margaret fenkms. f llllllllllllf Yllllllllll lllfllllllll X Q Eighty 'nme THE NATIONAL v N ulnuumnnlunl nmmmnumnuunInummmllnuuulmulmm 6 Book Club Officers Florence Storer . . . . President Phyllis Campbell . VicefPresiderLt Betty Wescott . . . . . . Secretaryffreasurer A group of book lovers met one afternoon last October and under Miss Boehmer's able and interested sponsorship the Book Club of National was formed. We are now nearing the completion of our first and, we think, successful year. Cur membership has not been large, but our programs have been interesting and varied and each member has done her share at our semi' monthly meetings at Harrison Hall. Our aim has been to discuss books that have come out comparatively ref cently so that we may talk intelligently about new books and their authors, even though our busy schedules forbid our doing all of the reading we would like. Cur biggest undertaking of the year was the opening, in April, of a cirf culating library. Our selection of books is as yet small, but we have both fiction and nonffiction, reviews of which are now appearing in magazines and news' papers. We expect to add to our collection as new books come out so that We may accommodate more people. The members of the club wish to express their appreciation for the interest shown in this undertaking by the rest of the College. We leave the College this year feeling that we leave a club sufficiently well grounded to continue in the years to come, and with a capable group left to start in September, 1928, the Book Club of National has a most promising future. Florence Storer. Camera Club Do you know that National has a Camera Club? Perhaps you haven't heard much about us nor what we have done, but you must remember we have been in existence only since the second semester. At our second meeting we organized our club with Marjorie Post as president and Mary Brady as secretaryftreasurer, and with these capable girls as oflicers we feel that we have accomplished a lot. If you have some pictures to be developed or printed-just give them to some member of the Camera Club. You'll ind that they know a lot about it. Next year we expect to have a large member' ship, and take many excellent pictures. Don't forget to join the Club next September, folks! You'll like it! Maygueyite Kinngy. Ninety ff' 2. THE NATIONAL M1d 'Year Club C2 cers 19271928 1928 1929 Frances Mellor Preszclent Zoa Favorlght Vzce Preszderzt LOIS Stemberg Secretary LOUISE Hannah Preszdent Emlly McCloud Vrce Preswlent Margaret Hanlon Sec Treasurer Theresa Gllllgan Soc1alCl1a1rman Em1ly McCloud Treasurer The M1d Year Club was orgamzed a httle over a year ago when the M1d Years of February 1927 entered Slnce the glrls were rather confused as to exactly whlch class they belonged they orgamzed a club so that they and other M1d Years would have some place they were sure they belonged as well as someth1ng they knew belonged to them They hoped also through th1s club to become better acquamted Wlth one another The 1928 M1d Years were welcomed 1nto the Club at a tea 1n February At the second meetmg the electlon of ollicers occurred two officers belng elected from the old class and two from the new The club has proved very successful IH a soclal way The g1rls have had luncheons a beach party a card party and a theater party as well as regular monthly meetlngs As an a1d to the ten o clock scholars a clock was glven to the college as a Chnstmas present Fmnces Malloy 9' 2 llllllllllllIIllIllllllllllllIllIllIllIlllllllllIllllIllllllllllllllllIllllllllllllllllllllllll - i , , E , , , . . , . 2 f E ' Q s - Q f E ' 9 1 E , - 5 . I . . E 9 ' E 9 5 9 s 9 E ' L L 1 1 1 ' Q 1 5 Niraetyfone 5 BQMQK .mxve THE NATIONAL .......................................................................................... . f National Alumnae Association IBHE Alumnae Association of the College is organized for the purpose of keeping the graduates in touch with each other, with the College and with new developments in education. It has played a splendid part in the growth of the Collcge and without its support the present development would have been impossible. The Association year runs from September 1 to August 31, and the yearly dues are 32. Cut of these funds the Association pays for the Eliza' beth Harrison scholarship and the Mrs. John N. Crouse scholarship, con' tributes something toward the expense of publishing Cur Guidon, and entertains the students in order to acquaint them with the organization and some of its members. Branch chapters of the Alumnae Association have been established in the following cities: Chicago Chapter South-Chicago, Ill. Detroit Chapter-Detroit, Mich. Elizabeth Harrison Chapter-Los Angeles, Calif. Evansville Chapter-Evansville, Ind. Gary Chapter-Gary, Ind. North Shore Chapter-Evanston, Ill. Cak Park Chapter-Oak Park, Ill. Omaha Chapter-Omaha, Nebr. TrifCity Chapter-Moline, Ill., Rock Island, Ill., Davenport, Iowa. Twin Cities Chapter-Minneapolis and St. Paul. Wisconsin Chapter-Milwaukee, Wis. The Association needs you and you need the Association. For further information about the organization or the branch chapters, write to the "President of the Alumnae Association, National Kindergarten and Elemen' tary College, Evanston, Ill." Eva Grace Long Alumnae Room ----------------------------- -------------' v 1---------- si Ninety 'two 'THE NATIONAL R. ....... --------------------------------------------- ----------------------------------------f- 1 , Annual Deficit Who's that girl who's been selling cup cakes and ice cream bars all year? Why was she doing it? Don't tell me you don't know her! Whyf, that's Dotty Beck, and she's about the world's greatest Brick, with a capital B. All year long Dotty has struggled with the old demon L'Annual Deficit," and she has come out wonderfully victorious, not only making up the deficit, but earning quite a sum over the required amount toward expenses for this year. In fact, in many ways, although she is not on the staff, she has done more for the yearfbook than some of the staff members. Every girl in school owes Dotty a word of thanks for all that she has so cheerfully done, and the staff of the National want to here express our sin' cere appreciation for her invaluable aid. f ---------f -------------- ----------- ------------------ - ' Ninetyfthree 7 " 'WL , - I 'J PA .I s ld L .L A ' .AQ Q o3'.4 ,, .-.V . 1 ' I ,. ' - 1 A- ..!"'S- - . r S , 'JL , " .. .Y a Q ., 4 Jn , 1 f.-er , ' v e .- A 4 1 jg ru- , I f .9 , ',t I 7 -' Y ' ' F 15- -' 1. 1,11 v . ' 'Q ,,.Ks A1 I A 0 ' .J za I ' fd .. ... 1 ..1 : Q J fr , '.L,,.4k" 'jfs 'Q- Q M, 'Hg-5 4 -'Q 1 , Q - Q' A -Qc y..aSx af 2 -'ip I Q 4!, s , v.f Q. 1,'4.,. A , G.. " '-sI'14 A , . 5 . -P11543 , f,-,l io , q o J A in-. A .'.' lg v ,rf .jg---3 ff D FICTIXIITIES ly 'Rv Zig? ,,-5.!""" X Twi pq... ., !'1 .jf ogg!! 0 Q .li iv. I I L 4 I ,K-S19 W6 n"n U '-tial 'af' A .b', :lv "Elms " 'Y aAia.' v 15" I -I LQ ,R .1 A 4 ' 1 if ., 5- ' s V -1 3,1 5 Q I Y U8,H5o Oo. Y ' " 'Six 9:5 4 I , I Y 56 7 A.-. THE NATIONAL ,mum uummnuulmm nmmunumnummuummuu E n N -Wm, n ' N mv, A Y , V ,, ,. . W N.-.... -.,--. Ha-aw 1--vv-Q-v-1-s---v-w---vs-I-P -V 'er'-'-1 , sl .l A ' Isabel Rayinond, Elizabeth Young, Dorothy Beatty, Margaret Prichard, Margaret Evans, Helen Krause, Bertha Ries, Byrd Dell Fisher, Leona Ludwig, Ann Balak, Catherine Klumph Marion Shadinger, Eloise Tabor, Elizabeth Weart, Carol Hanselman, Mildred Baisden, Sarah Robinson, Katherine Barrett, Loela Eklund, Emma Forgette, Shirley Bennett, Marjorie Rettinger Zola Webster, Gladys Levanius, Mary Martha Hunt, Elizabeth Wheeler, Ruth Bluemer, Ada Iliff, Dorothy Richards, Mona Cornish, Prudence Garrett, Lucille Buechele, Gertrude lessee, Esther Delbridgc Dora Mac Cazicr, Swanhild Jahren Ruth Haeberle, Ruth Marie Evans, Grace Hurst, Lucy Towne, Ruth Barber, Miss Tegtmeycr, Miss Wester- velt, Margaret Schnute, Elizabeth Sherman, Ruth Bradford, Ardella Furr Marion Morriss, Emily McCloud, Verna Kumle, Dorothy Shipman, Gertrude Drew, Carol Crossman, Elizabeth Scatter, Millicent Miimmery Choir memhevs not in photograph: Carmen Dorticos. Ruth Grav. Polly Green, Grace Griswold, Annette Heinrich, Isabelle Napier, Sylvia Peters, Constance Von Weller, Selma Wyman The Choir Every year festivals, governing board dinners, parentfteacher meetings, February and june commencement and baccalaureate services demand the services of the choir. Every year the members of that group appear at the appointed time. Every year they sing better than they have ever sung before fat least, that is what we thinkj. But have you ever stopped to think what must take place before the choir members can come forward and acquit them' selves in such creditable manner? Many practices must be held before they can appear, and these come in after school or during vacant periods. These girls never fail to meet the demands made upon them-theirs seems to be a code of "carry on," and, no matter how tired or discouraged they may be, the special practices are held and all the necessary work is done. Each year, when some of the girls have graduated, new members step in and ill the vacancies and the choir goes on. Each year their work is better, but with Miss Westervelt's directorship and the memory of the old choir girls to spur them on-how could it be otherwise! nmnml lluulur ulnuul l I l umm Ninety seven 9? A5 THE NATIONAL Vs E lllllll lllll lllll I llllllulllnllullllllllllllllIllllllllllllllllllllllllllll k I . ..,. ...-.,..,. ...., ,.,,,. , .,,, ,. , ,, U Y, , 0 I fm.. ' P 'Z - "The National" And once again there has been issued a book recording the events of another year of rich achievement at National. - To the general student body, this book brings forth that thought-but to the staff who have worked so hard upon it, it means far more. Glimpses of snapshots recall trying experiences of attempts to get "snaps" of assembly stunts and other college performers. The sight of many individual graduate photos reminds one of the hours of work, the patience and the checking of lists that were required in order to get out "The National of 19287 And so it goes. Each member of the staff looks at this book not only with recollection of the hours spent upon its creation, but with the greatest satisfaction in the knowledge that her labor, so willingly given for her school and schoolmates, has not been in vain. She has perfected her part of a tribute to N. K. E. C. So it is with gratitude for the opportunity given them in their appoint' ment to the staff and with thanks for the support and splendid assistance of those who backed them in their work that the following girls present this book: MaryfAlice Kirtley, Editorfinfchiefg Harriet Youlden, Business Manager, Ellen Esslinger, Assistant Editor, Ann Lawrence, Assistant Business Man' agerg Irene Pugsley, Art Editor, Mildred Schneberger, Organization Editor, Ruth Gray, Literary Editor, Jane Palmer, Photograph Editor, Roberta Hindley, Humor. For the helpful criticism and able assistance of the faculty advisors, "The National" staff are very thankful. Credit here goes to Miss May Whitcomb, Advisor, Mrs. Marguerite C. Taylor, Art Critic, and Miss Mabel Kearns, Business Advisor. Ma1fyfAlice Kirtley. 4-N .X 5 fl lllllllllll lllllllllll: lllllllllll lllllllllll llnX 5 Ninetyfeight w f 'Q f '-fl! THE NATIONAL ll -wl---I--II-IIlIllllllllvllflllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIlllllfllflllllll I' !,,,..,-, ...-.......i....,......-.-...... f 1 z . . 5 ? f 41 cc 77 Cliaff Staff Frances Lawton ..... . EditorfinfCl1ief jean Weiss and Isabel Raymond . Assistant Editors Dorothy Beatty . . . . joke Editor Armida Stewart . . . . Art Editor Dorothy Beck . . . Circulation Manager Mary Louise Merrittl . - Clerks Gertrude ,lessee S Rose Anna Marshall Harriet Gale Dorothy Roesch Ruth Gray ..... Reporters Katherine Lauerman Frances Mills A change in staff usually brings about other changes, and the first aim of the 19274928 staff was to complete and put out an edition of our school paper at the end of every month. just to state such a thing sounds very simple, but when reporters as well as other members of the staff are kept in a constant whirl with club meetings, reference work, athletics, "Racketty Packettyv practices and other things, Chaff assignments come in as "the last straw that breaks the camel's back." Being Sophomores, still a little wet with green paint, we thought, after four issues of "Chaff," the amount of material in sight would require a paper the size of the Chicago Tribune. But that was a thought that went wrong, as neither time nor finances would permit such ambitions to materialize. We were given a great advantage, to start with, for the standards set by last year's staff were ones to be held up rather than surpassed. So, with vigorous energy, we all decided to hold up, boost and work. That is what this year's staff has done. But our ardent hope is that we may have paved the way so that the new staff will feel they can take several brave steps forward- Frances Lawton fl lllnum mlullul mmuunu Ninety nine 'THE NATIONAL The Christmas Festival BAGS were packed, classes were over, vacation would start in a few hoursg many would soon be on the train, homeward bound! Excitement filled the air like electricity, and faces were alight with excitement and happiness. Then all was quiet and Miss Bakeris clear voice introduced one of the loveliest Christmas festivals we have ever had. "Behold the handmaiden of the Lord, be it unto me according to thy word," she read, and the festival opened with the scene of Mary and the Anunciation Angel. The story of the birth of the Christfchild was then told, the shepherds, wise men and manger scenes appearing to illustrate it. Last, and most glorious of all, was the scene with hovering angels and cherubs blessing the Holy Babe who was to be king over heaven and earth. Through' out the festival, lovely music was sung by the choir, giving a most impressive note and creating exactly the right atmosphere. As the assembly sang "I-lark! The Herald Angels Sing," there came to each person new inspiration and love, and those who were fortunate enough to have seen the festival went out of assembly with the true Christmas feeling in their hearts. E nuumunummnnn mummy muumu nnulnxg One Hundred 'THE NATIONAL llllullmnmllllIIlIIlnllulluulnlmlmlnlllmnllnlllumlulllnllllmv of R The Spring Pageant GYPSIES, vibrant with burning and throbbing blood-dancers of lovely, slender grace-tiny, fluttering little Japanese ladies--airyffairy, silver' winged aeroplane girls-one by one-group after group-they filled the stage of the auditorium, presenting the 1928 spring pageant. ' Again a lovely thing was presented, though every one says, each year, that that year's pageant will never be eclipsed, the following year seems to be a little better. This year's production was especially fine in its lighting, costuming and the artistic backgrounds and stage settings. The dancing was lovely as ever, the songs were well doneg the May Queens were again the "high point" of the performances. To Miss Mount, the director, the College girls want to give one big vote of thanks, for their achievement is her achievement, and their praise, her praise. ff unuur uumuuuu nmlumumumllIIIuInIIn1Iunulnllnllllullln-gf i One Hundred One THE NATIONAL E X numuumumlluumIululuuuunInuumuuuuullnu 5 The Thanksgwmg F estwal NCE agarn the faculty students and Chlldfen of Nat1onal Jo1ned together to g1ve thanks through the med1um of pageantry and song for the1r many blessmgs Down elther a1sle of the aud1tor1um marched the glrls each w1th her t1ny candle sheddlng just enough rays to hghten her happy face In the d1stance the cho1r sang softly and as the students passed by 111 process1onal therr g1ftS of fru1ts and vegetables and other necess1t1es and lux ur1es for the Mary Crane Nursery School p1led h1gher and h1gher 1n the boxes and barrels unt1l they overflovx ed and heaped upon the platform 1n all the beauty of the1r autumnal color1ng Chrldren from the Demonstrat1on School br1ng1ng thelr g1ftS 1n creakrng wheelbarrows and gayly decked wag ons passed slowly across the stage look1ng wonder1ngly at the huge corn shocks pumpkms and leafy branches whlch transformed the stage mto a true harvest scene The br1ng1ng of the g1fts was followed by the s1ng1ng of harvest and Tl13.HkSg1V1Hg hymns and the program closed w1th the presentatlon of an exqu1s1te Harvest frleze Grec1an ma1dens clad 1n draperles of the r1ch hues of the harvest and bearmg lngh the trophles of field and vmeyard through thelr grace and lovel1ness br1ng1ng a new real1zat1on of the wonder and beauty of the good grfts of the earth All too soon the curta1ns closed as 1f reluctant to lude the group from v1ew and w1th a strangely solemn and upl1fted feel1ng the grrls left the aud1tor1um Natwnal s Than sgwmg Arrwes at Mary Crane . . . , Y 9 - , . 7 . . . . . . . f , 5 3 , , , ' 9 5 3 V,..,-....--.....-.. -- h, W, ..., , ,.,, . , , , vm-.. ,, .. .. ., . L r. ry al 5 I 54 IIIIIIIIlllllllllllllllllll l llllll lllllllf llllllllllllll X One Hundred Two Yr THE NATIONAL gvllllllllul F. RaclqettyfPacRetty House .ATUMBLEDCWN shack and a stately mansion-standing almost side by side. In the Hrst there lived a family of woefbegone dolls, adorned with clothing worn to tatters-in the other dwelt the noblest of lords and ladies. Where was this? On the stage of Harrison Hall-a play called "Rackettyf Packetty House"-the children's play that the College girls gave for the build- ing fund. The auditorium was crowded with boys and girls of all ages-mothers, fathers, sisters, grandmothers and brothers. Because we arrived late, it was so dreadfully crowded that we had to sit on the stairs, and we were none too comfortable, but as soon as the play started we forgot our discomfort and quite lost ourselves in its charming loveliness. From the houses on the stage came dolls, alive only when no mortal was about. The raggedy boy of RackettyfPacketty House fell madly in love with the lovely! little lady of the Tidy Castle family, and such a mixfup as did hapf pen them! The ending was a happy one, though, for she left her silks and satins and went to live in the old doll house, with all the Rackettyfljacketty folks. They were the Nlaughingestn dolls she'd ever known, she said, and they certainly had that effect on their audience, for the children shrieked with laughter at the antics of the tattered little people- especially when they imif tated the court dance of the Tidy Castle dolls, using carrots and cabbages for bouquets, instead of lovely corsages. After the opening performance in Evanston the players "took to the road" and presented the play in Hinsdale, Oak Park and on the South Side, nulllullulullIlllllunllllllIIIIIIIIIIIIlIIIIllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIlmlmlllllullllllur '. -1 glunululln lllllunuu mmnulu llul nun lIlIlnlullnlllllllllllnhg One Hundred Three 'THE NATIONAL P X lullllnlllllllllllllllllnlullInInlunmnluunmumun y i bringing joy and laughter to hundreds of little children, and dollars-piles of them-to the College. The cast of the play, made up of members of the Freshman, Sophomore and Junior classes, included: Cynthia . . . Prudence Garrett Peter Piper . . Katherine Barton Ridiklis . Gladys Towne Lady Patsy . Anne Barratt Nurse . . . Marion Haworth Princess Lucille Buechele Duchess . Alice McCabe Keg . MaryfAlice Kirtley Meg . . Armida Stewart Peg . . . . . Mary Crush Gustibus . . . Dorothy Beatty Lady Gwendolyn . Lady Muriel . Lord Rupert Lord Francis . Lord Hubert . Queen Crosspatch . Ruth Haeberle . Mary Tauber . Beverley Bishop . Helen Christeson Margaret Prichard . Catherine Wilcox f Marion Thompson Elves . . . . I Grace Cassell lMildred Schneberger Butler . Catherine Klumph Because We Looe Them "When we come to the end of a perfect year And we sit alone with our thoughts- We have memories of our mother dear And the joys that she has brought. In our days of toil and our days of pain We were guided by her kind smile-" The singing of our song to our dearest little housemother went on, but I didn't. My thoughts held me back, the realization that the time of parting was so soon came to me like a flash-and my voice wouldn't act right-I had to stop. It is after living with such an understanding personality for a year-or two years-or even three years-that separation means more than you'd ever have believed it could. Little do we think, during the school months, of many of the things that, later, we are most thankful for. The helping over rough places, the steady encouragement, the loving care when we were ill, the bits of advice, given so cleverly-all are a part of the housemother's guidance. How grateful I am-how thankful-for my housemother! She means far more to me than I can ever express in words-and if I can always live up to her ideals and to her expectations in me, I shall be content. if umulunmuumn nmmu n ummm Na One Hundred Four V! THE NATIONAL jl The Sophomore Formal OVEMBER nineteenth is a date that has not been forgotten by any one who attended the Sophomore Formal given at the Kenilworth Country Club. The decorations were most effective, pastel shaded crepe paper streamers being used to enliven the club rooms. The favors were dainty shoulder bouf quets for the girls and boutonnieres for the men. The dance was progressing as dances do when the use of serpentines became so general that for a time every one thought a Mardi Gras was being held in the club house. The "wading, was fine, and the serpentines added greatly to the gayety and color of the occasion. Fortunately the class was able to obtain the Four Horsemen Orchestra, which, though small in number, furnished peppy music for the dancers, and exempliied the old adage which goes, "Quality, rather than quantity." The chaperones included Mrs. Louise Kimball, Miss Frances Kern, Mrs. Kenton H. Clark and Mrs. Katherine Elmore. Twelve o'clock and 'LHome, Sweet Home," arrived all too soon, and the Sophomore Formal was gone but not forgotten. The Athletic Club Dance Many years ago Cinderella had a fairy godmother-remember? Well, believe it or not, we at National have a fairy godmother, too-the "Athletic Associationwl This organization is a new one, but it has started to do good work already. The club has proclaimed, to the student body at large, that the college needs a tennis court and one is appearing on our campus! The Assof ciation doesn't use pumpkins or mice to work its magic, instead it makes use of dances and other jolly things to the same end. The first of a series of dances, sponsored by the Athletes-was given at Marienthal, December, 1927. The dining room-with the aid of pennants, tennis rackets, golf clubs, skates and balloons, was converted into a very sportive looking clubroom and while the "New Trier Music Makers" sobbed out the latest hits of syncopation, the couples glided about, forgetful of past events-thinking only of the future and the new tennis court, perhaps. The Song Contest I sang-you sang-we all sang-for what? Why, for the baton, of course. fWhich, as you know, is awarded each year to the class having the best songs and the best act in the interfclass song contest., Last year the Sophomores won it, and so when the fateful date approached this year, all the other classes trembled for fear that the juniors of this year would walk off with the prize again. When the time came, though, they all put on their broadest smiles and sang their best. Each act was clever, how the judges could decide whether they liked the "Gipsy Juniors," the Seniors who hoped to be on the "staff" fand, for one time of their lives, succeededj, the cavorting Freshmen "kids," or the ultrafcollegiate Sophs is beyond us. At any rate, the Sophs won the baton for the best allfround performance. The Seniors had the best song, according to their verdict. Perhaps, if the Freshf men will "take a little bit of ginger, take a little bit of pep," they will win the coveted baton next year. 12+ .5 gd nunuu llllllnnuu mlluuulul mmlnllnlnulnlmmllnumlmlllmlulnnX33 One Hundred Five An Appreczatzon In add1t1on to the work of the Staff mem bers the Annual represents the efforts of many other students who have contrlbuted to the varlous departments and w1thout whose ass1stanc:e lt would have been 1mpos s1ble to pubhsh the hook We w1sh to ex press speclal apprec1at1on of the unusually line art work whlch was contnbuted by Irene Pugsley Helen Brown Margaret Callanen Harr1et Gale Grace Hurst Cath er1ne Klumph Sylv1a Peters Dorothy Rlchards Sarah Robrnson and Armrda Stewart and to Dorothy Blame for the attractrve border wh1ch lack of funds for bade our usrng 7 the following students, cofoperating with : a 9 1 3 I gv ll CHILDRENS SCHQCL5 Ii Huv-5: 3 V r CO' so 4 4 2: Q a o 1 .I .5 4 - OSA' v- -I Av' . 41 I Lug' t' t -'Eau , ' A, .V iv-11,5-YL A ' ' .P ',a" Q , . ' 'w'r.Qg-9, ...l ,. V if + 5.-ff ffgneglfk .- f: -.Hi .V"n ,a Y' ' .2 ' . T . ..,- " LIE? f" A 1 y -A Q a "s, :1 . 31 03149 ' 1.5-1 -. gif .Of 5 'ls.1,9.. fi? ' ' ' N?" THE NATIONAL The Clnldfren s School Hcwrzson Hall ODDLING 1D at the age of three burst1ng 1n at the age of ten they come from the busses each morn1ng are 1nspected by Dr Pope and then go to the1r respect1ve rooms Let us follow them 1n the1r trlps shall we? There goes a cunn1ng baby let s see what he does Down the corr1dor and 1nto the nursery school room he goes Off comes h1s hat and h1s coat-onto h1s own hook they go-and ch1ld bus1ly mterestecl and the room 1S lovely and cheerful w1th 1ts gay t1les cupboard l1n1ngs splashed w1th color and cunnmg tables and cha1rs of Tom Thumb SIZE The mornlng program lncludes not only free act1v1t1es but a m1d mornmg lunch of tomato or orange 1u1ce sometunes Wlth cod hver o1lQ a rest per1od when the youngsters get a few m1nutes of perfect relaxat1on and an out of doors play per1od The1r rosy cheeks and healthy appearance show the beneit of the1r nursery school tra1n1ng In the next door room we find the Jumor Kmdergarten where ch1ldren from four to five years of age attend Here the act1v1t1es are sllghtly more complex the linlshed product 1S not qu1te so lack1ng 1n techn1que Thelr many pets are all be1ng cared for by the ch1ldren even the alhgators' and the ch1ldren are maklng up happy l1ttle or1g1nal songs about the1r work and play upsta1rs we go the Semor Kmdergarten Wlth ch1ldren from five to SIX years 1S here Handwork 1S becommg qu1te fimshed the glrls are busy Getting Ready for a Play-Second Grade T n nnumnmluulnunulllummunmummnmnmnunuuuumunur 'S 'W' , , . . , ss 11 ' - E 9 ' E . . 1 3 . 1 3 g , . . E he is ready for a morning of busy work. There is enough material to keep any . . . 3 . , , ' , . , E 9 5 E f . . , . g Z - . . . . . . . 2 On . 3 . . , . . 5 , . 9 ' l ! , l ' 4 5 f :ummm ummm numlnmuuuuuuuumunnlunnulullnunudag' One Hundred Nine glnlllllll ull nl luluumluumummmlm llllllll' "l""""' X 5 V! THE NATIONAL E unlmnnunmlm uunIullllllIllInInulllululluummulmmmul 4 ,- 2 cooking applesauce for the midfmorning luncheong some of the children have a finished piece of work in the boat that they are building out of blocks-and a small group are "having fun" learning to read. First grade, second grade and third and fourth come in succession, each one becoming more and more complex in its line of activity, until, in the last room, we have boys and girls building tablefdisplays of geographical interests, and the second grade presenting a play that was Written, staged and costumed by themselves. And so the activities of the Children's School are carried on. How diff ferent from the school of twenty years ago and before-how fortunate these kiddies are to learn to live and work together, as well as to read, to write, and to "figure" Nature Study-The Kindergarten 4+ 424' One Hundred 'Ten THE NATIONAL 9' is The M my Crane Nursery School EVERY morning, down in a certain wing of Hull House, Chicago, a group of N. K. E. C. cadets, under the supervision of the directors, start the task of a morning's program at Mary Crane Nursery. They enter the building, climb the stairs, hustle into smocks and then are ready to welcome the large group of little foreigners who soon appear. The equipment is fascinating to a person who has never been in a nursery school before. Rooms filled with interesting playthings and still more interestf ing pets, bathrooms with shining tubs, low bowls and row after row of little white cupboards, outdoors a playground with 'most every kind of playground equipment-these are all a part of Mary Crane. To a visitor, one of the interesting phases of the daily program is the medical care and cleanliness that the children enjoy while in school. The medical staff is a "thorough, recordfkeeping bunch," and the children are helped in every way possible to build a body strong enough to resist all the elements that they will have to iight in their home environment. To see the child taking pride in his own comb, soap, toothbrush and towels is indeed a lesson to more than one visitor at the nursery. The children all spend the entire morning at school, have luncheon there, and their afternoon naps. This is one of the inest bits of work that our Colf lege is novv carrying on-and vve're proud of Mary Crane Nursery!! 2 l A 9 qzibwrl. G-Q5 GEC! CClJ8'l- h C aff 432 E 5 f lllllllllllr llllllllllll nunuuuumummunummuuuuuunm S3 43' One Hundred Eleven it .. . .'.1.4uuQ.. . .I " " 4:21. -x ' .. -1 5 5 W!! be 'ggi .TEXT I 0 v ":-."g', --1.1 '- Q Y O e. ' A ,""g Q 'Q-fp x 7 iw? Q! 'ss 1 0 :EP ' Q ' 4- I P Heir: X x 1 v.E,,x': T. ,,, s - ., 1 In 4 Q QL41 U 0 Q1 Q.:-449 fffi Q r 1 2, ,. . 'V 41 0 Q Tig- -T .5 THE WFISHGLIT "" 5"""'e",Q-C300 'I Q ', f' as I .tis 5 - a IL ri A' A is .ly -21' Q '- I a f Amin 1 ixfg .. r' -WI 'E S . .A , U , fa- , 4 'Z 'Q 0 po 1 L 5 OV 4 If ' p n Q ,A - N I its o il". 5 s 1 A O , -,', L ol .QA ': l THE NATIONAL llllllllllllllllllll llllllllllllllIIllIIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllfujg 5 5 :ll Lx Q ' ' M. d,l,n1:- Studying-As Was Disguised! Frances G.-"I know a good play-'All the World Loves a Loverf " Miss Boehmerfuls it a royalty play, Frances?" Frances-u0h, no! They all wear just plain clothes." Poor Freshies! Freshie fjust arrivingj -L'Is it true that the people of Chicago are stupid?" Amazed Senior-LLWhy?" Freshie-"Well, I remember reading in my geography that the population of Chicago is very dense." 1 Diagnosis Dr. Webb-LLDO Dumb Dora-"I can't think." Dr. Webb-L'That's just it!" you know why you flunked this course?" Studying-"As Is!" I P mnllllul IIIIIllIIlllulluluulmllllllllllllllllllnllllnlln One Hundred Fifteen THE NATIONAL Illulumlnuuulu nIIluulluulllIlulllnulullIluluulluuuululmn A I 1 Such Is Progress Lovers in the old days gassed on the stepg nowadays they-oh, you finish it! Farm and Fireside. "Ch, Papa, can you tell me if Noah had a wife?" "Certainlyg Joan of Arc. Don't ask silly questions." ffit,Bit5. First Student-'LI wonder how old Miss Jones is?" Second Student-"Quite old, I imagine. They say she used to teach Caesar." European Tour Topics "And what did your wife have to say when you saw the canals of Venice?" "Wanted to know if I was sure the water was turned off so the pipes at home wouldn't burst." St. Peter-"Who's there?" Voice Outside-"It is If, Peter-"Get outta here, we don't want any more school teachers." -F Purple Parrot. This little world we're livin' in Is mighty hard to beat. You get a thorn with every rose, But ain't the roses sweet? Literally Speaking Money is the most common buy word. He who laughs last has a poor sense of humor. It's a teacher's job to make the little things count. The height of fashion usually is found on the price tags. A woman is known by the company she keeps waiting. With some youthful joyriders, hugging the road is secondary. A Weiglity Matter Cn the "L" Blossom Bloom accidentally stepped on a man's foot. "Pardon me," she exclaimed. To her astonishment the man said, "Oh that's all right. I have another one!" Too True! Miss Fink, while returning examination papers-"You may pass out as soon as you get your paper." - What Chicago needs is a good detour. E nlulumulllllnlulnlllllllluunllullluulu mmunr uuuulu lllllllllrg One Hundred Sixteen an Y: THE NATIONAL nuulIllnullulIulllIuullnumuuuunur R'u,,,,.,,,, lllullullmlnlllunluullllullll ja? F 7' 'E+ Annum: muuur nmuuml ulnllluunumlmmmlmnnlulll llullllln One Hundred Seventeen THE NATIONAL llllllllllllllllllllll llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll y Moderii Self Expression "Let me see your compact," "Let me use your comb." "Is my nose very shiny?" "Do I look nt to go home?" "Does my skirt hang uneven?" "Oh, my hair looks a sight!" One hears the same expressions Morning, noon and night. Wanted: Hired Man, Immediately The stingy farmer was scolding the hired man for carrying a lantern when he went to call on his best girl. "The idea! When I went sparking I never carried no lantern. I went in the dark." "Yeah," drawled the hired man, "and look what you got." Father-"Willie, I received a note from your teacher today." Willie-"Is that so, pop? Give me a quarter and I won't breathe a word about it to mother." Mary-"I found a nickel running to the L this morning," Dot-"How'd you stop it?'l N Maxine D.-'LHOW much fatter you look in that dress, Hoyerf' Helen H. fin a figured dress!-"Ch, that's just the figure." Seeing Is Believing Gene G.-"Some of the girls will be late, as they are getting dressed after assembly." Mr. Arnold-"Yes, yes, I saw them." Flippant Phrases "I do not choose to run," said the silk stocking to the garter. "Something must be done," exclaimed the bride as she smelled her . biscuits burning. "That's another story,'I said the bricklayer as he finished his day's work. "Here's where I show my class," said the professor as he demonstrated the problem on the blackboard. "That's a new one on me," said the monkey as he scratched his back A Warning to Rescuers! , A man bravely rescued a little boy from drowning. Later when the little boy and his mother happened to meet the man, the lady said, "Are you the man that rescued my boy?" "Yes, madamf' said the man. !'Well, what did you do with his hat?" l lllll llllllflllllllllllllllllllIlllllllllllllllllllllllllll l'll"lll C nlllllll' R One Hundred Eighteen 'Vu 'THE NATIONAL mmr 5 Exjllullu u munmuuummmmlmmmlmmmmmmmmnmmmmmum j ghuuulu mmm lmmmm 1mmummmumumummumumnmlmmmnX Q One Hundred Nineteen THE NATIONAL Eg 4 Sign in Window of Shoe Store Any man, woman or child can have a fit in this store. And irz a Tailor Shop Handfpressing done while you wait. Satisfaction guaranteed! Friendly Caller-"How old is your new baby sister?" Little Girl-"I think mother said two weeks and seven ounces." Creative English-a la Hughes Mearns Buddy-'LWe're going to have chicken for dinner." Sister-"How do you know?" Buddy-"I oversmelled it in the kitchen." "Dear Teacher," wrote the little boy's mother, "Kindly excuse Johnny's absence from school yesterday, as he fell in the mud. By doing the same you will greatly oblige his mother." Billy-"Remember when we first met in the revolving door in the post office?" Al-"That wasn't the first time we met." Bill'y-"Well, that's when we began going around together." He+'LMay I have the last dance with you?" She-"You've just had it." Peg P.-"Could I see the captain?" First Mate-"He's forward, miss." Peg P.-'Tm not afraid, I've been out with college boys." College Sweetheart "Mother, that boy of ours ainft doin' nothin' at College but foolin' around with the girls." "Ch, I think not, Hiram, he's workin' hard, I know." "Afworkin' hard, eh? Then what 'do you make of this here Alma Mater he's allus writin' 'bout he loves so mu61?" im Chcm5in3 Shjles in Misses and Kisses! Vx , Mr One Hundred Twenty THE NATIONAL 3 IuIluInI-1IIIInII-IIuIuIIIIInImIIII-IIIIn-II-IIuI-..I-ummm.-.I-m...f 5' 57 nlnlIlnunlnulIlnnulnInInlulluluunnuulmnlulunln R One Hundred Twenty-one THE NATIONAL 9 In Spite of Which Remark, She Hopes to Pass! Public Accounting Class-"Did you make out questions on insurance?" Miss Kearns-"No -3' Cheers! Miss Kearns-"Wait a minute-I didn't make them out, I asked Miss Sasman to do it." Groans! MaryfAlice-"Oh, Miss Kearns, don't have her make them, she knows too much about it. " Fresh Freshman fto sophomore,-"You know more than I do." Sophisticated Sophomore---"Of course, but what made you think of it?" F. F.-"I just realized it. You know me and I know you!" Truant Qilicer-"Why isn't young jock in school?" Scotch Mother-"Because his teacher said he must pay attention or stay at home and his father says it's a public school and he'll pay nothing." If the modern girl must have a new form of adornment, why not hang a "Fresh paint" sign on her? Oracle. Cossack Dancing Little Tommy fdescribing some Russian dancers,-'LThey all sat on nothing and kicked." Hard Question-"Are you laughing at me?" demanded the irate prof fessor of his class. "No," came the answer in chorus. ' "Well," insisted the professor, "what else is there in the room to laugh at?" Pacific Weekly. 1L.... yalllllllllulmlmlmu mulmulllllllllulllllllllllll lllll One Hundred Twentyftwo Nh THE NATIONAL N ml numIllullIIInlulnullluInIllnnIIlmlnnlInInunluInIuunmmnmlmnr 3 5 hlIIlllllI llllllllll F K 1unnullumumuuullulmlnmmnluluaumunmnumuu 3 One Hundred Twentyfthvee 'THE NATIONAL Xlullnullllulnllmlmlllnnnmnnuunnullunllnumnulllluuunululull j 4 Helpful Hints for Dorm Freshmen 1. Clothes dry more quickly when hung in the windows. Hang all your laundry there to dry. 2. Maids are always on hand to clean the tubs when you finish your bath, so don't waste your valuable time and strength using the bath brush and cleanser. 3. Boudoir slippers are not allowed in this building-wear mules. We pref fer a clatter to a scuffle. 4. Smoking is allowed in the rooms only. Please keep all ashes in ash trays. Don't be sloppy with them, as it makes the maids so much work. 5. Don't fail, when shouting to someone at the other end of the hall, to mumble some words, as that necessitates repeating the process in a louder tone. 6. The rule about five minute conversations over the phone was made for upperclassmen. Freshmen are limited to two and onefhalf minutes. 7. If in doubt about any of the rules, ask for an appointment with Miss Baker to discuss thc matter. She has nothing else to take up her time. Black Magic Father treading school reportj-"'Conduct, bad, reading, bad, com' position, arithmetic, history, bad-bad-badl' What is the meaning of this, Gerald?" Gerald-'LI can't understand it, Dad. Do you think it might be a forf gery?"-Punch. -N. U. Commerce. BarefKneefCessity Little Jack Horner A Started to wiarn her That it was cold and her knees would chap. "I don't mind it," said she, "Though cold it may be, For you see, each knee has a cap." -N. U. Commerce. Three A's Little Jokes: Dotty Myer's "parking" place. You can find her there most any time. Frances Grossman's singing. Katy Klumph. "Glad" Levanius' drama. Blossom and Frances' orderly room. Cur plumbing difficulty. No School Should Be Without One MR. GERALD ALLEN, JR. Personal Escorter Tots and kiddies took to school and returned prompt in perfect condishion if received that way. Military disciplin. Rates 25 c a weak. Speshiol rates to twins. Refined conversashion. No extra charge for nose wipin? All I ast is a trial. -Chateau fMontrealj. nunmmunmllnumnummlllulunuummmmm lllllllllllllv lllllllllllllll N Q One Hundred Twentyffour THE NATIONAL YY E u llluuumluulnumnunnlmulmlInmulnllmulmunmnnmnlmur if T edge a Little Bit Take a little bit of ginger, Take a little bit of pep, Take a little bit of sunshine just to keep in step. Take a little bit of study, Take a little bit of teaching And when you put them all together You have N. K. E. C.'s rep. M f in f m - ginger, M f m f m - pep, M f m f m - sunshine, M f m f m - step. Mfmfm-study, M f m f m - teaching, And when you put them all together You have N. K. E. C.'s rep. t J llllllllllllll Ulllllllll lllllllllllllllllllllllllll lllllllIllIlllllllllIlllllllllllllllllllllqb One Hundred Twentyffive HARRISON HALL The Foyer MARIENTHAL Entrance Hall W . Q is v"7: 1 Ll 'T l,.1, - - 3C A 5 o . 4 3 fy Q I Ja r - 5 -s. Q. I I -1 .IV f , 'ff' gb L Q- , 31- THE NATIONAL luv E Inunuumumunnummlumlunulunumumlmulununllmulumlllmu 4? Intfroclucing Owr Advertisers Iii May We Suggest That When You Make Future Purchases at the Following Places of Busif ness,You Mention Having Seen Their Ad in 'fThe National" 5 if 5 2 One Hundred Tw y 'Ta' 0 V: 'Y' 1, ,gil ' 1 9 o I 4 , l - U1 .1 nan' fff"'.' "f-' Q . 1, ,, 4 bg ' Q- THE NATIONAL z .................................................-....-.-------------------------------------- J? Phones Univ. 10954446 W E D E LI V E R A N D 'Y 7 S West Side of the "L" Tracks Sodas Candies Luneheons 1026 Central Street Evanston, Illinois gf ----------------. my --------.--.---- -----------.------------------------------.---------------.--.---------.. N Q One Hundred Thirtyfone THE NATIONAL EAT WITH US ff' 4 f 71 wg I Z Noyes Strut d the 'L' Where Good Friends and Service Meet 910 Noyes St. Evanston, Ill. Gibson Casebeer Studios Official Photographers for the Class of 1928 1603 Chicago Avenue University Evanston, Illinois 2 7 1 4 ................. .Mm...-I........-U.. u-mu---:-----n-mn-u--un 0 HddTh'y THE NATIONAL ii 'ec To Our Friends at the .K.E. C. There's many a shop-and many a stop- Many a sandwich and soda-- There's many a drug-sent out by some mug- That's pure-mediocre-or maybe. But there's one little spot-where you always may stop- Where everythings built for your comfort- There's magazines you may read-or books of your creed- There's good things to eat that will please you. Sandwiches-salads and cake-enough you can't take- Hot drinks-and some that ne'er freeze you. There's nice things to wear-for your face or your hair- And Drugs-guaranteed "as the Doctor may order." There's more we could say-keep it up for a day- But there is just one thing to remember- We want you to know-that wherever you go- That none will strive harder to please you- So come again soon-morning, evening or noon- You'll find a glad hand to receive you. lanc -Martin Drug 0. Greenleaf 912 1017 Central Street Evanston, Ill- For Quality Flowers and Service Try LQNDCN FLOWER SHUP 17 12114 Sherman Ave. Evanston, Illinois Telephones University 75 4 and 632 Flowers by telegraph to all parts of the country ulmlmumv mmlnm Iululuunmlllmlmmmlmluullllllululullllllllllllllllna One Hundred 'fhirtyfthree THE NATIONAL Ik '""""""""""""'"""""""""""""""""'"""""""""""' ef Good Eood in a ' Col The W ilson Bakery lege Atmosphere 1162 Wilmette Avenue Phone Wil- 414 Coolegfs Cnphoaifds Even as N. K. E. C. is the best Kindergarten COHCEC, S0 are OU1' 1632 Crrington Ave. 5 20 Main St. bakery products just a little bet' ter than the rest. Noon until midnight fand then someb Phone University 773 Helen Perkins' GECRGE S. BECK Tea Room PLUMBING . 624 G S rove treat Most convenient Res. Phone Greenleaf 2747 EVANSTON, ILLINQIS 1807 Central St. Evanston, Ill. Permanent Waving, Water Waving Telephone: University 3660 Maifcelling, Manicuving, Hair Cutting Fmgef Waving, Shampoomg Alcott Gift and Book Shop Scalp 'Treatment I 1915 Central Street G e 0 1' g e t t e ' s RENTAL LIBRARY HAIR SHCPPE Sherman Ave. MARGARET A. HAWKINS Telephone: University 1476 EV-3-U5t0n, Iu- gg ...........,...................................................................-.--.- iiiiiiiiiuiiiiiif U i---------e---- n One Hundred Thirtyffour THE NATIONAL fx ------------ -------------------------------------'----------------------------------------------------------- ' 'B H, 22 766 5 , ARCHITECTS AND CCNSTRUCTORS U EUUUPQUHUH CF LANDSCAPE GARDENING NUVPQPUUIII-Ill When days are darkest, when hope is faintest-go QQQIIQOW among the flowers-drink in their message of peace jguflh, and be comforted. NX : UPA HI 456 Flowers are messages of love sent to us from the va If ' TRADE MARK Almighty' E We need flowers now, as never before. We are just Cvwsefycltofies and beginning to realize their true meaning. Perennial Gardens Flowers: Heavenly messengers of Peace! May Cod Located at - f give us more o them. Z 140507 Central Street, Evanston, Ill. PHONE UNIVERSITY 404 Primary Education-Popular Educator A Tbe World 'J Profeffzomzl Journal for TEACHERS - SUPERVISCRS PRINCIPALS Leads in ' New Professional Ideas UpftofDate Pedagogical Methods News Items of Educational Interest Helpful Book Reviews The Teachers' Inspiration One Year f 10 Copies f 352.00 I - EDUCATIONAL PUBLISHING Co. FLORENCE HALB, Editor 2510 Prairie Avenue, CHICAGO, ILL. One Hundred Thivtyffve THE NATIONAL We appreciate your patron' age of the past year and hope to retain your continued good Will. Yours for quality work and prompt service. LAWRENCE FAMILY LAUNDRY Telephones University 7306 Wilmette 1105 mmlunununuummmunmunr unnmmnumuummumm-mm ff 'THE NATIONAL R'nnnllnl llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIIllIlllllllllllIIllllllllllllllllllllllll f . e f J? X ' Q! in 4? f . 2 5-ik rm ff Z? ff Z , ' f r f ,2 f 4 ' 7 f f 4 I 1 f Z 1 W X f f f f 4 f , l f f f f f 4 9 f f 4 , Z 4 5 1 f 4 , f 4 4 'Z 1 , , f 1 A , , ga 533 M 45: G! V ul tif ' I A 5 szfif' 'il faflninl 'f 2 f 4 ,mimi 5 N ,Q 3,1 fS?wf55,f,2,?:,,??3:zi, 1, .1 o L -Q14 QQ 7' N' 4 v "N rn E W . u-if dt xx ' ,f H triri - Q "3 - l + gg 1 r 1 5 'Ngzim 2' H1 J I I PHOTO ENGRAVING C I O ENGRAVERS ARTISTS I6 S MARKET ST lllllllllllllll l'l I 'l 1' FRANKUN 4475 Jim-'LHave you ever heard the lazy man's song?" Jack-"No, what is it?" Jim-"Moonbeams Kiss Her for Me!" First Scotchman-NI don't believe half the stories that are told about us are true." Second Economist--T' all at our expensef, There are meters of Water, There are meters of light, But the best of all meters, Is to meet 'er at night. There are letters of accent, There are letters of tone, But the best of all letters Is to let 'er alone, 43 That's not the worst of it. True or not, they're mum! mmluu llllullluuulnmlunuumllIl5IlnmlulllllulluullIn One Hundred Thirtyfseven B31lCY'L6W1S 'THE NATIONAL 1IIIIllIIIInllllllllllllulullllllmuulnnmum mlnmummnmm:nmmnluulnlumnlllmllllll hx X Bradley Quality Books 52.5 0 BOOKS Lorna Doone ...................... Blackmore Evangeline ........................ Longfellow Three Musketeers .................... Dumas In the Child's World ............ Poulsson America First ............................ Evans 32.00 BOOKS Long Legs, Big Mouth and Burn' ing Eyes .............. KovalskyfPutnam Little Cray Doors .................... Woods Coochy Goggles ,................. Underhill Heroes of Troy ......... .......... E vans Heroes of Israel ......... .......... E vans Cld Time Tales ....... .......... E vans Wonder Stories ........................ Bailey 51.75 BOOKS In Blue Bird Time ............ Donaldson Pirate of Barataria ,.,.....,,,,.,,,,,,, Evans Trail Blazers .............................. Evans In the Animal World ................ Bailey Friendly Tales .......................... Bailey For the Children's Hour .............. 1 From a Friend of the National Kindergarten and Elementary College Why not sell: Hens by the peck? Shoes by the foot? Hammers by the pound? Houses by the yard? For the Story Teller .................. Bailey Merry Tales for Children ........ Bailey Stories Children Need .............. Bailey Tell Me Another Story ............ Bailey S C1 It l I 1: Phone: Vxfilmette 1907 We Call and Deliver 5 en or ecia ist o ' Modern Materials for Progressive P a a eor e Bros. Kindergartens and Primary Schools p g g TAILCRS THOMAS CHARLES CU. suns MADE ro ORDER 224953 Calumet Ave., Chicago, Ill. CLEANING AND DTEING : Northwestern Agents for SKILLFUL REPAIRING sa ALTERATIONS 1 Milton Bradley Company 521 Fourth Ave. Wilmette, Ill. ian lllllllllllllllllIllllflllllllllll lllllllIIIII'I''II''"""""""""""""""""""'"""""""""""""" 3 """"""""""' """"""""""""""" """"'''""'''""'''""""""""""""" 5 One Hundred Tliirtyfeiglit THE NATIONAL E -------- -------- ----- - ------- ------------------------------ ------ ----- - ---- - -------------'-------------------------'--------------------------------- - - - - - --------- Telephone: University 373314677 Our Autos Call for and Deliver All Work E Phone Hyde Park 5060 Central Cgnfgctlgngfy LCVIH E5 CO. Established 1907 and Expert Cleaners and Dyers 2 Restaurant 2 Company 133365 East 53rd Street Chicago Central SL, EV3,1'1StO1'1 Special Discount to Students and Faculty - Class and Fraternity Pins EVERY TEACHER or PHYSICAL Commencement Announcements EDUCATION IN THE GRADE E Smm,m,y SCHCOLS OR RECREATIONAL CENTERS SHOULD KNOW THE . A. B. C. of Rhythmic Training By Elizabeth Waterman, E. A. Manufacturing Stationers Price, 32.50 JEWELERS The only book that offers all the music and a complete lesson plan for Makers of N. K. E. C. Pins Rhythmlc Tmmmg CLAYTON E. SUMMY oo. PUBLISHERS 27 East Monroe Street 429 South Wabash Ave. at Wabash Avenue Chicago, Ill. 2 Chicago Explanatory Circular Sent on Request H uuuuunnuun lllllrllllllllllll l mum llnuu iunuunu n unnnu mn nnnunnn nnnunun u mu unnnnnn n unnvnnunnnunnnuununn .mmm ........ ...I ....... U., ,,., ,, One Hundred Thirtyfnine THE NATIONAL E X llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 3- Cooper's Dry Goods Inc. 1941 Central Street Evanston A Square Deal for 'Your Round Dollar Telephone: University 9158 Buster Brown Barber and Beauty Shop MATH KRIZSANITZ, Proprietor We Make a Specialty of Ladies' and Children's Hair Bobbing and Marcelling Permanent Waving 2601A Prairie Ave. Tel. University 8300 Community Kitchen 600 Davis St., Evanston FOODS OF SUPERIOR QUALITY BRANCH SALESROOMS 43 E. Oak St., Chicago 524 Main St., Evanston 115 5 Wilmette Ave., Wilmette 584 Lincoln Ave., Winnetka PHONES Superior 9437 Univ. 9323 Wil. 1880 Win. 1740 Telephone: University 1577 Classic Barber and Beauty Shop ALL WORK DONE BY EXPERTS 1711 Sherman Ave., Evanston, Ill. M. KULYAN, Proprietor Schultz 593 Nord Tailoring New Process Cleaning and Dyeing 1152 Central Avenue Wilmette, Ill. Telephones: Wilmette 320 and 321 The Agnes 'Shop DRESSES, LINGERIE, HOSIERY NOVELTIES 2020 Central Street, Evanston Greenleaf 4590 Telephone: Wilmette 467 N. A. HANNA E99 CO. Gowns f f Hats f f Sports Apparel 1168 Wilrnette Ave., Wilmette, Ill. 912 Spanish Court, Kenilworth Well trained Primary and Kinder' garten teachers are needed. One en' rollment gives services in four ofhces. Write for information. SOUTHERN TEACHERS' AGENCY LOUISVILLE, KY. L. H. Packer S. Ostiller North Shore Bootery NORTH SHORE HOTEL Davis Street and Chicago Avenue Evanston, Illinois Telephone: Evanston 6757 ,l llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll-lllllllllllllllllllllllll ll lllllllllllllr lllllllllll lllllllllllllllllllllll llllllllllll lllll lllllllllllllllngfk One Hundred Forty I THE NATIONAL EX ,,,,,,,,,........................................ - ....................................-.-.- rj? Here W e Are Again We Delzczner D 'Y ' S West Side of the "L" Tracks Sodas Candies Luncheons 1026 Central Street Evanston PHONES UNIVERSITY 10954446 6, --------------------' ---------- ----- ----------------------------------------------------------------------- X Q One Htmdvfed Fovtyfone THE NATIONAL Autographs f MC H 9 . AIIIIIlnmmllllllllllllllllllllmllllllllllllllllm mmlulunllr One Hundred Forty two A mm uumu THE NATIONAL xv ............................................................. ........................... , f? Autogmphs af IlIll'llIllvllI One Hundred Fortyftkree s 1 X, ini WAY YY? YYY! 7 ,-x ,H 7,-. li ZKEWMWMTX W Iw.. in 4 f11.1, -'K' .n ,.j11 M. 7 ' CM " 1 U .,, .1 , rw' .,. A 1 1' ,, , ' "1 'Q uh ' .wg 144 .W :.g.j ,.,.', nw , . , , 5 'jfs 'ly ' 1'.!'11r,':-'rl'-viii. ' " 'T Wu ax 'I -:fH1:i'J1:'iL':'1'x1!f 1 19-314. .1Qf, 'Y4:a.1. lx! ' A'x'1", H-v-21.1, 1 W 4 ' ..'.4,1f",g' . 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