National Louis University - National Yearbook (Chicago, IL)

 - Class of 1926

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National Louis University - National Yearbook (Chicago, IL) online yearbook collection, 1926 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 160 of the 1926 volume:

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'xv ,fr wx! wap ' s ,A 5 4 . it ' is fr YY mn W 'Fi v Q: il!-X X Compiled by the Junior and Senior Classes 1926 The atzonafl Compiled by The Students of the National KlDCl91'g3l ten and Elemental y College 1 9 2 6 Volume Xl 5 Xe., . x- QulllllllllllllllllIllllllllolpCe , T H 14 X x 1 1 0 N A I, 11,9-'z um lllllllllIllIllIIllllllIlIil!E!5 i??' ev e O 4 -'U Q-f llllllllllIlllIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIIllllllllllllllllllllllll l llll llllllummllulla slullrsifasssea Q-.mr ' 1 v F v I . . .. 9 Valk' YQSESIEIIIIillllllllIllIIIIIIIIIIIIEIESSSESZQ-...f 'I' H IL X A T I 0 B A L 1.,,kiiiiiwlhlllllllllllllllllllIIIIIIIIHIEEEkFE5'Z?vi6A:" E 99 9 gi :N S2 fs' 9.. E ' - . My V A 4 ' E LH: 22 4 , .,.., J ..., if .L 1 - 1' ' my f ' , ww wuuyw ,zz if .fn S E , L! , X q , 5 Y if . 3,60 , , 3 : ' X H , nmwfffbwasnamwgggafmzg 57 552552 E H l 1 E A ' Y Li E f . 5 4 QQ: y- 4 . ' X 2 an ' M -'JI-WIS' .mga Mall? 2 f ' E ' N. 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'Q 1 39IiSXI'-iid'-iii-iiili23121llllllllllllllllllllllIllllflliiii-'S-iii if T H E X A T I 0 N A I. ggggigggglgllllllllnl mmmIlnllfgpggfiijgfl-Ef4i9'1Z:1Cg Pi ' 1' iff 'fl E E E To Miss Baker and the Faculty, ever full of faith and courage, E E To Trustees and Members of the Governing Board, staunch supporters of that faith, E E To Students and Alumnae, loyal and loving, g E To friends Whose hearts have opened in response to the vision, E E To all Whose gifts of art and language and money have made possible the erection E E of our beautiful new College, , E E This volume is gratefully dedicated. E E : lf - N ' 0 ad is sa'a.-:caan-xmssemlllnsxmaunlunllnnnllnuummnIIIIIllllI1nlIulllI1IlI1I1IIIInIunmmu1IImlIlmIn1IInIInmluuummmmmmnu1I1Iuulluulmneunaluluizsrsfsssfs-amass.5 ffiifigiiisiiigiii 5!EIllIIlIllllIIIllIIIIIIIIIIIIEIEEESSZLI T H E N A T I 0 N A L lf,itil'-EZEIIEIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIlllllIIl'iIEEE2?Z5'Z2 932:25 Q L . ' S: ,V - . ,,. li le! fel W 99. y Q - ..r 2 S an- -,Y If Y - Yg, ,lam - FOREWORD To g1V6 permanent evcpresalon to some of the great Joy Wh1ch We have felt 1n seemg the fulfillment of so many of our hopes and plans, the Students of 1926 p bllsh th1s volume of ou1 annual The Natlonal 'MGM-n 'V if' llllll IllIllllllllIllIIIIIIIllIlllllllllllllIllIllIIIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIIIIIIlllllIllIllIIllllllIIllIllIlIllIIllllIIIIllllIIlIlllllllllllllllllllllllllIIIIIIIIII W0 We E-TNI' 1' A IQ' Isl E if E E : E E E X A e e f ne n n nf :I E E 5 E E E f A 'I L ' ' E E ' l l E ' u , P 7 zz I In E W! Fi 24 4 J 5 li fl , se 8 is is -'- . - -- ' ' - - lu: n V. .l?Ze.1,.:f?5.'I1?i : E 5 E .i1fEa1i.xLf1?L.'5 'E 3 J If . . . 5 X ,QM no , o2Yr ,v ex 2 - - un - u Q. gs if: -a m rm 2 uf Pi P-1 O z Q- r are N: .. MG "' QQSHPEW -2 'I ' W 1LE3LiH7Q93KiS!IIElllIl!IIIIllllIlllIIllIlllllllIllIlIllIlllllllllllllllIIIIIIlllllllllllllllllllllllIlllllllllllllllllIlllllllllllllllllllllllIIIIIIIIlllllIllllllllllllllllllIlIlllllIIIlllIIIIIIIlllIlllllllllllllllllllll IIlllIlllllllllllllllllllllllllIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllll Illllll fag Q2 :9 - , an , H . . . :-I , . 2 , I 14 ' E E - . is E E - 1- -:J . 1 . I rv- 5 . 1 : . : O L ' I ' I ' If : : 3 10 2 5 E 1 E E l 2 l 1 E l H 5 E E 3 E S E 1 F 2 l V 1 1 1 g 1 : 2 : 1 1 - E 1 5 E 3 5 E Y w . 5 r 1 2 3 3 3 5 5 X r g - : , 3 1 l : i . 1 ... E H - A 'I' Tv 4 A W A . . ' ' 'l 5: ll 9' Q- ' L 1 l .. , rg . ' QS: ll :TiG?37!W5552Z'iiillilllllilllllllllllllllllllll lllllllllllllllllllllIIllIIIIllIllllIlIllllIllIIllIllllIIIIIllIIllIllIIllIIIllIllIlllIllIllllllllllllllIIlllllllllIIIllIIIlllllllllIIIllIIIIIllllllllIllIllllllIIIIlIIIIIIIIllllIllIIIlIIIllIIllIIllllllllllllllllllllllll lllllllllllllllll I II ll Q -,. .- , - -. ,.. ' - .- STAFF Ed1'0O1 Ruth Carlson Ass1stant Ed1tO1 Maly Margaret Duflield Bus1ness Managel F1 ances Swanson Asslstant Buslness Managel G1 ace Ryel son Art Ed1tO1 Vlfglhld Cohen G1 ace Rooslnan Photograph Edltor Marv Saxe Joke Ed1tOF Mlldred Kennedy O1gan1zat1on Ed1to1 Irene Parsons Llterary Cr1t1c MISS Clala Belle Baker Art C11t1c MISS May Wh1tCOH1b Buslness Advlsor MISS Mabel Kearns 1 G1 4 if IIIIII Illl IlllllllIlllIlIllllIIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll llllIIllllllllllllllllIlllllIllllllllllllllllllllllllIlllllllllllllllllllll Ill llllillllll 'WF Q B r' isis -ifihti -2365251EIIIIIIIPIIlllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIEIEZSSN Ziff T H E N A T I 0 N A L g:q,3qHm,,,,,,Mmmm.mmgggggggfmqg-3,592,255 C O N T E N T S W4 if ' 1 5 , Opening Section-School- E E Administration ....................,...i....... 17 E E ' Seniors ......,,....,,.iiv....i....,...,,.. .......... 2 8 E E ' Juniors ....,...o ,............ii..........i,,.....o.., 3 6 ' E E Freshmen. ....,, ,...,,......,o,.....,i,......,..........o,.....o,................,. 5 8 E E Activities- Z E Graduation, 1925 ......i...,,......,,,......,.....,i.....i.,,..e....e.....,.. 63 E' E .1 Convocations ....,.,....,,.....,......ei....iiv....e.....e. .,e.,...... 64 ' E E Assemblies .,,,...,.ee,...,..,..,.., i,...e.e,.,. .....,e....,.,...ee,.,.......,e,. 6 5 E E H Fire King. ....,, ..,,...e,.,.,e..... . .....e,...,ie....,ee......,...s .,...,...s,.,, 7 0 E E Circus .........,,ee,.....ei....i ii....ii....,e.... .i,..,.i,.,,.,i . ...,ee...sei....... 7 1 E E M Dances .....,ii5.v....ss.,e,,., c,.. .,ee....ievv...e,.,,,,es.,.,e....ses,....ees,c.... 7 2 E ' National's Radio Career .....,.e c...s,e , ...e,...,.ee.....,,...eee .,.... 7 3 E 5 Chaff ....,,...,,.e..,..i.....,.,.,..ei.....ee,,.,.e,..i.eee...,e,..,,ee,...eeee ...,i 7 4 1 5 : The National-"Our Annual" ..,,.....,eie..,se,...ss.....e.i ,..,. 7 5 E E A Organizations- E E College Council ,i......ii,...Ce....i.e....iii....,.....eee...........,......... 77 E E Student Government ..i.,i,...eee,.e 1 .icev.,,, e....ee.,.., ec.,.i,. 7 9 E E Choir ..i.....,,.... . .,.ii,. . ,..iiee....ee..i. e....,ee.....e ,....eee..,e ,,..,e, 8 0 E E Town Girls Association ,.,...ii.i.,.iii...iii,,...,i... ,ii.i.,,. ..iii. 8 1 E E The Alumnae Association ....,,.,iii....siis., .i.i..,.iii.,,ii.....,,. 8 2 E 5 Athletics ...,i,...i....,.is.,.i.,i..iii..,.iiY,.... 84 6 5 E Literary ...iii..,iii...i 5. ..,.ii...,i.,,..ii..... Q 92 E E Humor and Advertiseinc-nts .,i....... 100 E - : I - - -' - .. - .. - - - ... - - - .. - - - - - .. - .. .. 9' :4 .0! 10 01 - " ll itfdiiiwgaifiiiiillllllillllilllllllIllllllllIIIllllllIIllllllllllllllllllIlllllIllIIIllllllllllIIIllllMIIIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll IllIIllIIlIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIEIIIEIIIIIl.Eii'ifl1ixi?if3'F:?LE3,'b'iE Administraiion 'Fa T Bu ?s'! Q! 51 E E E E E E E E E -v S p4 X , F , I' ELIZABETH HARRISON P1eQ1dent Emeutus f.SEEGiE'?Ei? 3!?EZ-SlilllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIEIEEESSSSEIQI? 'I' H E X A T I 0 N .X I. jfigilgllillllllllIllllllllIlllllIIil5EEE5iZjQZ2?5 :Q5 ,. -- S S f?.L1llu4lHnUK.m AmLlL4UJ.LUIWv Illlllllll llllllllllllllllIlIlllIIllllllIlI'lllFlllIllaw5F1s1"N's E- 5iF E I E , E E E E ' -E 5 . . : ' E E E E E 5 .q E E - . E 1 E 1 f J , N E v ! E4 x W E i E E gy :Ag E 3 Et A E fi? ' 1 E A E Ei 2' E E 5 E1 1 E Q, - . 5 E I E fii E E+ E E5 E EE' j. E Q ,-x' fl L , ' k , ' ,Y 12 he ff: 172 FL -Wm - j . ,YTX , ur , , , -. 14.1 f"fle'51'JJJ"7fY 'Lf l- W' WY Jw . 1 '73 w ' ' '1 '4 v 'f: 'J1'W M " W' H V 1 an I . "IIT, .'...,1E-QFMCG 1 19 E a ..- 9: fa 3 ifiiii'-3isiifi2K?3523l2lll llllllllllllllllIIIIIIIIEIEFSESZAQ T H E N A T I 0 N A L 52.RiiiiifillhlllllllllllllllllllIIIllIllliIEEE5'?JE'2?ei97Z:2g 1 N E Mus. JOHN N. oRoUsE Q E E C Co-Principal of College 1886-1915 i E 2 T H E F o U N io E R s 3 N They stirred the embers of the centuries' sniouldering thought E E Into a shimmering flame that swept their paths E Clean of tangled dreams and doubts- E E One far-flung hope remained. E E Like seekers of the Grail they kept the Way, E E Through mist and cloud and forest black With under-brushg 5 E Those stretching trails that clog each human quest. Q E No star-strewn night, no gray chill dawn, E 5 No moment found their purpose lost. E ' They marched, gay, glad and strongly pressed, E To free the child from smothering bondage of age-old ideas. -Ma.rion Foster Lanphier. 9. EQ ES 13 ssczaammmasszzmr menusnunImuzmmumnumuImmunmuunmmmnumInmmuummmuuulunmlumunlmumIlnnumuu1anllnnnu1Iamlanulllsxs-srasisssriasas-asia 1 pn L I L I W fwifgmimfiffif2'"ll'"W"lllllllllllllllilsiiiifi-ff?' T H E N A T I 'U N 5 L ?i.QmaximamlIIIlllllInuIumllIlllararzszs+9ms'zme'z:zg ' Z 1 535. V V W" 54 ,Q . ,-x 2 fy! 5 5 E 2 A E E Q E E I E E if : S E E E E I A E E I 5 E ! E E E E E Q E 5 4 E i E' E i E E I 5 5 E , 1 5 E 5 E E I E I : E 4 5 E E . E E 5 E 5 l Q : : I 5 E l 5 E 1 5 2 1 A E L ,AAA ,A --, A, , ,mm ,A W1 EDNA DEAN BARER, P1'GS1dG11t 'wt M gs P55 1.1! 'N' 14 255' if U miuaaawmmgsaqfzazguumsmzslmmnmlmullInnmmmmmmmmmuulummmululanumlullulmmmuummmImululu1IumunnulInllmmlllamlllanslnlnzimafeasses-mavspsai Y - H, -WA , l V , if :xsane :amassass:mumuuummuuunassassins...: T H E 5 A T I 0 N A L .1zaazifazamnnannumnII1nuIInlnilrsrssaussmmw-new ri, ' ii i M 9 it v ' gi? , 2 - l E E 1 S l 5 2 yi 5 : K 2 T E l l E T H E T O I L E R : E ' l 3 E A shining task it was E To set this building safe Within a dream, E A shining task to Whet one's soul E For patient, self-expressive toil. E And if the years' exacting terms E Sucked at the very roots of life, E If all those priceless shimmering bits- E Long hours of rest, delighted scraps of play, E And friends, good friends and quiet talk- E Were still denied the maker of the dream, 'E Until, like all Vast, shining tasks, E The burden seemed intolerable, at best, absurd, E There still remained the courage that could look E Beyond the Sacrifice of Facts. S - E And so, it stands, the toiler's gift, E Its pastel loveliness serene and safe, E Its promise locked within two Words- E Efficiency and Beauty. E -Marion Foster Lanphier. -E E 1 5 E E E if ' 0 i Q j gg Il , 15 , gf' i5iGf.i!5J7Z'3L?5fALiC15K!l IllillllillllllllllllllIlllIIIIllllllllllllllllllllllllIIIIIIIlllllllllllllllllllllllllIIIIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIIIIllIllIIlllllllllllllllllillllill ll!iEfI2fl1'si'?ifi'3i2?L6? Q x i 65iK'-i39i5?l52i2Q4lilllllllIIllllllllllllllIIIIIEIEQQSESE:A T H E N .X T I 0 N A L EYPZQQHIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIllllllllllllliliififlii? I Q Ya. Y . an BOARD OF TRUSTEES A Merritt Starr ., ,,,... Elmer E. Jones .......E.,AEE Williain Sutherland .e,e..... Fred A. Cuscaden ,e....,. Mrs. Philip D. Armour III Edna Dean Baker Mrs. Henry M. Cooper Percy B. Eckhart .............President ..Vice-President .,.L,..Secretary .........Treasurer Alexander Friend Mrs. Andrew MaoLeish John S. Miller, Jr. Mrs. Henry Phipps ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS Elizabeth Harrison ........... ......... P resident Emeritus Edna Dean Baker ........ . Mrs. Louise Kimball .,..... Mabel Kearns .,...ee......... E Frances McElroy e.,.,..... E May Whitcomb ......... ............,....-.President .L,.....Social Director ................Secretary ,..,.....Registrar .e...e..Journalist Z Ruth Peterson ................. .i................. L ibrarian E Elizabeth Middleton ..... 0 . . E Assistant Librarians 2 Helen Ecker ......eee.............. . E Mrs. Florence S. Capron ....... ,,,..e... F ield Secretary if Z Q1 Q 2 4, 4 1i'GiiQ5:7Z'Z'?a?if?5iCilIIIIIEIIIIillllllllllllllllllllllllllllIlllllllllllllllllIllllllllllllllllllllllIIIIIillllllllllllllllIllllllIIIlllllllIllllllllllllllllllllllIllIlllllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIEIIllilllllliieiflieif tb F . LXL M4-wry -4' .Jr 15,-I? 56 ff V V yqaf' 4 MMWF L ww? '-,-,..-- If O 1 I V L .J s f f + A x ff - . , E nl x X X ' :fx A.: 'K 4 n Y x 'ff X U X xxx +1 f Nw - , T ' ! 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' -' ,I 4 n ,",,,f', "" ' ' 5 5 4 X .3 7: , 'I Lu '. ' W ,J A I-,,,-. --f--'-fl xr , lW,fE'X,1,wE'1.'! uh- Milf f ' . gilt,-ww' 'Ex A J f H :gg 5 .4 bf? f u Irlfgqikiiilyl , , .51 -ff b X V: 1 y,fHg5?,,fi, ' 'Eg?.1Jv,J, ' ,ggfg A' ' W M 'Q +V I IW UA' vw' V -,'ff"! "wQ.7 QI' L WW J 1 fr 'f xf"'A'W l' f ' 5 ' XL! X r 1,-1 MW' ' 1' Wi X Q Kimi' If 11 ,r rig! ,gli - I ' 'M , Q' iLYp.,,y',', 1 ff Y ' X f"'H'! I, ',"'fL"'.' Y -N V "E .h ' Y? ,I V "WM LFE! . f Vlf, "I W Mi "inf ' ' ' . ,Iv ' ," Tl 'xii Iii-LV , 'jug fr -1 LWZJI ,' 'i ' K 41711 . , ' f' 4 KVXN ga 4, T Q Y NW 'WQQ V ! ' 'g' 'Ai ' wf M W ,,A, 5 .Q -,A 'QQ JZ g, EH ,- M, My A 5 ' vd, S - 1 - .- - - - - - - .- - S - - 1 .- L' ei' .7 0 Pal ,- ..- .- iii?-iEsSi2 25Ei!!EIlIIIIlllllllllllllllIIIIlllEIEi95'3i3i.: T H E N A T I 0 N X I- ,.REZQQEHIHIlllllllllllllllllllllllllIIilEEEi Q?:?i?'Z: 55 ' ,I A,,A, I. A 552 Est: Q91 E ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS E E MRS. LOUISE KIMBALL MISS M. FRANCES MCELROY E 2 Social Director Registrar E E MISS MABEL KEARNS MISS MAY WHITCOMB E E Secretary Journalist E -I MISS RUTH PETERSON MISS ELIZABETH MIDDLETON E ? Librarian Assistant Librarian E Z Miss HELEN ECKEIR MRS, FLORENCE s. CAPRON E E Assistant Librarian Field Secretary E ' S s- +4 O ggi 17 gi lf: gzzaariuaizeaimuu nusnuslmlulnullnuuuuuummnnnmmmnnmnnmumumnmuIIIuIIIuIlIII1sIlllunnuunnumunnmuluIIIImuumumuuaam ululizsriferfss-Evrzss:s'lg sfwsa-is-amd: xmuluuuuuluIIlllllllllslreass-ssssii T H E N A T I 0 N X L TZ leg I. 1 L r MllllllllllllllIIIIIIIIIIIllil?2EE5'?lS'Z?:+-262:26 FACULTY MISS HARRIET M HOWARD Methods of Sllp8I'V1SlOI1 Curnculum Constructlon DR LOUIS W WEBB Psychology Educatlonal Measurements THOMAS D ELIOT Soclal Aspects of Chlld Welfare Admmlstratlon DR JOHN A CLEMENT PTIHCIPIBS of EdUC3t1OH H1story of Educatlon DR GEORGE L SCHERGER H1story Llterature MISS ANNE GOODWIN WILI IAMS Chlld Psychology Soc1ology Froebehan Llterature Dlrector Demonstratlon School Elementary Currlculum and Methods 'nl'-id f llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIllIIlllllllIIIIIIllllllllllllllIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllIlllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllIIllllllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII!IIIII! If V73 UI D 0 :B 'a '? ll' wg, av 0 0 F E il 1 ll" 5 E E ' E 5 E 5 E E DR. . , ' E E DR. JoHN E. sToUT Mlss CLARA BELLE BAKER E 5 I 5 .02 it: 18 A V, ., .... I . . . , ..., ..,,,, .... 9 X X 1'lllllllllllmulllllllllll If T H E X I 0 N 3 ll lllllllllllllllIlllllllllllll 1 I 11 6 F-? 2 O 5. aff Hg? fi D FACUI TY MISS ETTA MOUNT Folk Dancing Games Athletics DR ELLIOTT R DOWNINTG Natural Science Eugenics Child Hygiene MISS MARION LANPHIER English Composition Essentials of Speech MISS LAURA HOOPER Educational. Measurements Arithmetic in Elementary Schools DR KATHLEEN R HARRINGTON Examining Physician Personal Hygiene MISS GRACE HEMINGVVAY Children s Literature MISS FRANCES IxERN Curriculum and Methods Supervision and Conference MISS AGNES ADAMS Primary Methods, Social Science Supervision and Conference i u s i l l I f x I i1i'i'2i!31E'3a?3ESSEX!!IIIlilllI5IIlIIIIIllllIlIIIlllIllIllllllllllllllllllllllllIIIIllIllIllIllIlIlIIIlllllllllllllIllIIllIIIIllIIIIIllIllIllllllllllllllIllllIIIllIIIIIIlllllllllllllllllillllilllllliiifil E bar 3SQMi3'E5Z ?2!?51ElIIIIlIIIIIllIllIIIIIIIIIIIIEIEESESQ-..f 'I' H E N A T I 0 N A L 5lf56352HIEIlllllIllIlIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIEEEL, I Fi 53 le! li 'll FACULTY MISS ANNA MARIxT Engllsh Cornpos1t1on Manuscnpt Wrltlng Psychology MISS FLORENCE LINNELL Supervlslon and Conference MR FRANCIS M ARNOLD Interpretatxon of MIISIC Interpretatlon of Art MRS CAROLINE ROHLSAAT Elements of MUSIC Ch1ldren s Songs MISS MARGARET FARRAR Games, Festlvals Manual Play MISS FLORENCE RICE Manuf1lPlavs Games Nursery School Educamon LOUISE ST JOHN WESTERVELT Chorus MISS LOUISE SCHAFFNER Applled Art 2 4 ff? llllll llll Illlllllllllllllll I III lllllllllll IIIIIIIIIlllllIlIIllIllllIIIIIIIIlIIIlllllllllllllllllllllllllIllIIIIllllIIllllIllIIllllIIIlllllllllllllllllllllllIII Ill! IIlII! 'B T-'DH' S E E E E E I Y 1 E . . . N . , E E E . E E ' . r E . E E 2 E E E E S E : 'S - 2 E H1 E . I Q k . L E . . 2 n. E E E E Y 1 1 E . , A K k E : ' ' g I E E , , 5 I ':m-'-m-+w-M'-- . I I 5 I l E 5 r E N . E ' 'Q E E 5 . . E , I L , I V '---- f- '--- " K A V . L , in ' as 20 2: E E : - .. agiiii'-iE'Eii 5352l4!ElllllllllllllillIIIIIIIIIIIIEIEFFPIEE-.1:FI T H E N A T I 0 N A L I2,fsigimalilIllllIllllIIIIllIIlllllllllil?2?5E55ZE2?l'5i'FZ22E'i Pa S V 'N Q' I wg BV ' 0 W X 0 Tl FACULTY f MISS WILLMINA TOWNES MISS ESTELLE R WELTMAN Beglnnlngs of Flne and Industrlal Arts Nursmg Rhythms and Games MRS MAURICE LIEBER MISS M STRICKLER Cltlzenshlp Interlor Decoratlng MISS MARTHA HUTCHESON NUtfltl0D dy Qf llllllIll!IlllllllllllllllIIIIlllllllllIlllllllllllllllllllllIIIIllllllllllIIllllIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIllllllIlllllllll F E!-'Mr' 5 5 .. - 7 1 E : E 'E' - : E : I E E E E E S E E : E E E E I 5 : E E 5 . . E s E E . . . , . E E E E E E : E E E . . E E E 5 E E E E S E E E E E E E E -E 5 S L' : s E : L' : E 5- 5 . E E 5 E E E E E I E E E 5 E E S E E E E : 2 s- E E E , gi ? S 59 '74 F' 2' I" "A -'4 if5:SGiE'+SS'ii?35E3lEIIllIIlllllllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIEIESSBFESZA.19 'I' II E N A T I 0 N :K L ff,EIQEGEHIEIIIIIIIIIIIIllIlllIIIIIIIIlliI2SE5?Ei'Z'24iiF1Z:2ii fi. . 38 -Y 3, YQ? 59 v In E J 'W H- -- Qi 3 9g . I 4 . 1 v. , if 1 9 : 2 2 1 1 .. 1 Z 1 i v s Q 1 - x i , , , I .- HOUSE MOTHERS MRS STELIA IXAHL MRS CORNELIA C BURLESON MRS RENTON H CLARIx MISS JEANETTE HART MRS KATHERINE ELMORE MISS BETTY MOSELEY 'nd 9 Qi' llllll IIII llllllllllllllllllll IIIIIIIIIIIII llllllllll IllllllllllllllIlIlllllIlllllllllllllllllllllIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIlllllllllllllllllllllllIlllllllll llll Illlll Q D r' E F 5 2 : I I 5 L' ' I I : ' r Z Z I 1 5 E 4 E E . A A l,. 4 . E E - T V 1 E : I . I . f LL E E - + f ' 14 ' E -' I 1 5 I -W s E 1 1' 2 E . E E W I I E I 5 sf ' . . ,. pi QQ! -9. Q2 ii , yi Z2 22 252 Fl 9' li .. . gl! Fx" 5 E 5 E 'E - SE .3 ., 8 E I 5 5 I 5 it .. S 33' ., ill tl 0 'fi 'ur n :A- ,A . ifieigikii-?R?3E2S1EIllIIllllllllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIEIEZC354525,ff T H E N A T I 0 N A I. T " EFLZEEHIMIlllllllllllllIlllllllllllli9255331923-'i6'iZ:2i OF THE FACULTY, BY THE FACULTY, 3 Fon THE FACULTY E "Oh, Uncle Remus-Tell me a story about when Brer Fox was invisible," E E said the little boy. - Q " 'Bout when Brer Fox were inwis'ble, you say? Dat sure were funny! E E Brer Fox he went 'way up No'th whar it am berry cold an' whar dey is ice E 5 in de winter time. : E One day a nice lady wif grey hair and twinkly eyes, an' whose real home were 5 5 near de Hub o' de uniwerse, 'cided she'd go to church dat mawnin' 'caze it were E E Good Friday. E E Dis little lady started off so bright and pert like and she were trippin' along E E so smart and feelin' awful good 'caze she were a school teacher an' dere wa'nt E 3 no school dat day, you know dese school teachers feel dat way sometimes. : E Well, she didn't know how Brer Fox could make hese'f inwisible an' dat he'd i E been awatchin' fer her fer a long, long time 'caze she were so sorter proud 'bout Z E some tings. Q 'E De reason she were so proud were 'caze she came from de H ab, an' Brer Fox 5 5 bein' a southern gentleman 'dat make him mad 'an he say to hisse'f, sezee, 'Pride ' E goeth befo' a fall! Ha! Hal' 5 : Anodder reason why she ware so proud were 'case she live near Hawvard, 5 f and she have a little nephew named James what she so proud of-Mos' as proud E as dat Mis' Burleson am o' her Peter-CWhat! You nebber hear her tell 'bout : E Peter? Lo ' chile! Whar you been'?j Well-de little lady were gwine to send E 5 James to Hawvard some day when he git big. She herse'f went to Radcliffe, E : and dat am anudder reason she am so proud-dat an' gwine to C'lumbia whar - I all dem high-falutin' school marms goes. : f So Brer Fox he makes hisse'f inwissible an' what he do dat- Good Friday E Q mawnin' but trip dat little lady up-an' down she sat on de ice kerplunk! 2, : But de girls at de College whar she teach hab been so nice to her ebber since, 2 EE dat she really got de best ob dat sly ole Brer Fox atter all. : 7 She say dat dey is de nicest College girls she ebber know. Q ' Miss Linnell's accomplishments are worthy of honorable mention. Not E 5 only does she dance with skill, but also makes the most real ghost in the insti- E : tution. And now we hear that she is developing a new system of handwriting Z : which threatens to eclipse manuscript writing, since it has the additional ad- l 5 vantage of not being decipherable by any except those deeply concerned or those E E who possess an elaborate key. Anyone interested in learning more about this - ,E wonderful technique, should interview Miss Linnell in Room 219. Q E Among those interested in forming a class are the stenographers and those 2 students who scan the bulletin boards daily in search of positions for next year. ' It might be added that Miss Linnell's new development is in no way lessening E her ability as a "job-lady." Her interest in positions and position-seekers re- :E A mains constant, and the student who appears at her door at 5:30 P. M. receives X the same cordial thoughtful consideration as the one who comes first in the day. ,b-,. 23 'll . l G'1i!5:7L'3L?3:?5i5Zii,!IIlllEllllillllllllllllllllllIIIIIIIIIIlllllllllllllIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIlllllllllllllllllilIllillllllikffilre:?5f3'ICa?25?Bgi Eyes of hazel hair of brown Dainty figure copper gown Soul of valor hea1t of flame Sympathy for every claim That S Miss Baker Walnut carving golden llght On tapestry and picture bright That s he-1 oflice Love and reverence and loyalty ls each Student s Sweet memory That S their blessing Ver y near the front door Of Hauison Hall Presides a Grand Dame By the name of Kimball Though stately she be She is not too tall You soon come to know To answer the call Of not only one But rather of all The students who need her On her shoulder to bawl Or to tie on a bandage After a fall : Or get Spirits of ammon1a E For a hurry-up call- E E Or better perhaps E Ig' To chaperone a ball. E E With all of these jobs E E No wonder 'tis said E .E That a "complex" has She E 5 To be always "ahead," E 5 No dallying for her, 2 E She lies not a-bed, l E But "'TiS time for the belly" E "You're two minutes ahead." E E May be heard any day E E AS she iS answered- .E 5 And yet she remains 'g - A "Bolshevik redll' E E Or maybe, perhaps, E : An optimist led 3 E By the swift god Hermesg E E And prays that the "Head" E 5 And all of the others g Will follow the tread Of her trusty Big Ben u And perhaps be led . : , To one place in time- - , N Be it dinner or bed! li ri 24 1 v Y -n--o-- 1. - - n-u-"1-' --.. .... .- .. --u iiseseimss-zmfazassanIIllnlIIulllllllllllllllslsmsssazs . T H L ix A 'r I 0 IN A I ..,me-anemiamlmmInulnluunmgs:afmmea142eQ: ki , ii . 52 fx? , , is' , . i 1- if That s M1ss Baker. yr sr E f , , 1 E E f . I E E ' T 1 ' 2 ' E E ' - - E g , . . E E . .' L E E KK ' 77 E- E , . E E r E E 2 E E I rc as E E . . 2 . E ?li'diU37Z'Ea?2:?5iiZi5llIIllillIlillllllllllllllllIllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIlllllllllllllllIlllllllllIllllllllllllllllIllllllllllllllllllIIIIIIIIIllllllllllilillilllIlliE?5f2?!i?if3-51?LE3b'iE 4 :,, 1. l 7. --- .h 'isii-ii?25E51ElllllIIIllllllllIllllllllllIEIEES-3535.3i T H E N A T I 0 N A L fi,52626-EEE!5IIIIlllllIllIllllllllllIIlllilEiEE5 '2??Z?Z:ZiE Fi ii "But where is honorable Miss Howard?" I ask to know. 'fRoom 220-A." 'Q they narrate. 'fTo her you go find where to teach." I go and see much girls. 5 All seem waiting. f'Will I ever see the honorable Miss Howard?" I think in my mind1--. It is a so long time. Then I see her-such sweet face, it f sweet smile and kind voice! She not seem worried by talk so much girls, but E talk to me so long as I need. "Did I ever see more quiet, fine, kind lady?" I I E punctuate to myself as I go. , 5 With apologies to E 2 Hashimura Toga. :D f Sing a song of library fines, : E Fines to pay to Miss Ecker. 2 E If any girl a book delays E E Miss Ecker's there to check hor! 2 : There was a young lady, you know, f E Who bought an Easter suit for her beau, E E And then asked her friend Q E The parcel to send 5 E And enclose a Valentine so f E The donor he'd easily know. E 5 You'll hardly believe me, I trow, : E But this "Easy Mark" did go E E From place to place E E In search of a lace 2 E Valentine, elen though E E 'Twas April, 'tho yet there was snow. 5 E She was laughed at by store keepers so E E She concluded her friend was a foe, : E And buying a bunny E E She hoped that the "Johnny" E L Would shout with laughter, Ha, Ha, E E While she with a smile, hid her woe! . E E In tune with all the glories of the spring time, alive to the needs of little 5 E children, in step with every progressive move in Education is this little lady whom E ? we call our Registrar, Miss Frances McElroy. E E May we introduce the "Traveling Librarianl' of N. K. E. C., Miss Elizabeth E E Middleton. Perhaps you have met this helpful friend, with books piled high, E E enroute to Marienthal or Harrison Hall. On stormy days, and on calm days, f Q this Walking library functions. And, oh, yes, a brief-case has recently been added 'E E to this extension department of the college. E E Varied are Miss Middleton's occupations-housemother, chaperone, accom- E E panist, itinerant librarian. Diversity must be her motto. 5 Miss Lanphier-Yes, tall, queenly and dignified is she, but not too dignified 2 to enjoy a joke, heartily, nor to take a keen interest in the frivolities connected if with N. K. E. c. , Ask the Seniors of 1925 who it was who was such a perfect scream in the faculty burlesque of "The Three Bears." F: srazeasiuwmsseml 1namxauunullmumIummInInnununumnmmlmummuummI:ummmllIIulmmmuuummunumnuIuIIununnuuuuamlallulupxsvaeaaess-saisssag J, 1. F 'H W: ga OUR MAGICIAN' E.: 4. With her wondrous weird dramatic arts gl She charmeth hearts! Of homely maids she maketh dollies E For her Follies! .E W1-Siif'-i:Esiif2 t2!EiiilllllllllllllIllIIIIIIIIIIIIEIEZSE-E-Sli ...- T H E N A T I 0 N .X L -.HPQSGHIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIllllilIIllllitiiiifiiik-':Z?P1Z:1CQ'i ni F Q! av 'o N She causeth our stable Faculty My E To frisk in glee! 5 - She biddeth the ponderous overweight E E To lessen her freight! E E From Persephone and the Fire King E 5 She earned this Building! 2 E Amiablc always Cthe sweetest disposition in the world. Beloved by Children E E as well as by grown-ups.D Delightfully Enthusiastic Cover tests and everythingj. E E Fun-loving. Gracious. Helpful in every way. Just the Kind everyone Loves .... E E The End Cof the four lines, not of the virtues of Miss Hooperj E E Did you know that Miss Kern has a hobby? Although we have not had E E the opportunity of seeing her apply the principles of child training to the little E ,M 5 one whose habits and attitudes lack symmetry and beauty, we believe that she E E would transform the child as effectively as she has her hobby-namely her summer E E home, Frankernia. When Miss Kern discovered this place, it was an unat- E E tractive old farm house. Now it is a summer home of beauty, convenience and E E comfort, and it rs here that this faculty member sojourns for the vacation months. E K A E Do you know all the annual staff wanted a picture of a very good friend of i p E Miss McElroy's, but no matter how much we pestered her for it, she would only A is E blush and smile. p E However-we saw Him and Miss McElroy doesn't know we did. E T And He is just as nice looking as He can be, and we sincerely hope all the i rest will have the same opportunity we did. Then you know Miss Adams has a friend too but the staff regrets it did not see Him at Wilson Avenue Those who saw Him were more excited than Miss Adams herself and could hardly refrain from being polite and well mannered as they usually are Who leads us gently by the hand Through twisting turns of F roebel land Next lends her ard to help squeeze Through Child Psychology mysteries And when with sociology we collide Shows us pathways fair and wide? Her name rs Anne Goodwin Williams The students know her but the alumnae know her much better Just wait until you are an alumna and see! Who s it not only inquires but insists On knowing the news before it exists? Who s it sends topics to our local papers That make home folk question our innocent capers? Who rs rt? Miss Whrtcomb a plying her trade And rf practise makes perfect her fame should be made 1 G J 5 llllll Ill! IIllllIllIIIIIIIllIIIllIIIIIllIllIllllllllIIlIIIIllIIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIIIlIllllIIllllIIlllllIllllllllllllllllllllllllIlIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII Illl Illll! V 5 I' ! - :.' g : S E S : w I: : W 1 - E : f 5 T - - r S . . . . : ' E , ' t , ' , , , . E - . . . . . .. 5 1 , , ' , , E ' A E " , . . ' E X E I y X . . . . I I - E ' : . E 31, 5 ' ' k " E J 5 : , E E X - E E i if E , , , E 1 E . . g , - . . . : . S ' " 1 : , : - : 1 1 it ' S ' , ' E xr X E sn, : ,, - . . . : ' i E ' ' 'N ' ' ' '7 E Vw ' E . . : l : , , ' , : in ' - F 1 ' : ,! E - ' - : , .1 - I I . I L f r f : ' ! S' . . Z M ! E - - I I V .I V I W V . E , ' ' g S : ' ' E i - , 1 5 l+- : .' E E l 7 . . . u n ,LE v 1 E ' 2 ' fl , , Y . 0. . . , :M s f r 'J l . . , S1 1 , I I , I I . . O - 1 . ! . 1 , ' V7 fd ! 1,1 ' ' . ' 1 q yi-U. T r :dl f ' ' ' - J: ' - 'T F' l if 26 'sl 1.6 I 1" Q'- W .-A U- ! F 5 e F 5 5 'F 1 'fi L! , L, Seniors 12 SiSE?4SQii52E2-E121IllIIIIIlIlIllllIIIIIIIIIIIEIEEESSBS.fl T H E N A T I 0 N ,X L if5262323IEIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIllllllllllI5I2SE5fEq,g3g,.5gyg, SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS 1925 1926 M1ld16d Dlttman Florence Hedlgel Ol1V6 W1dd0WSOP DOIIS Leaman MISS MHTIOH Lanphler 1924 1925 Dorothy Mangelsdolf Mlldred Dlttnlan Florence Hedlger Edna Hupprech MISS MHTIOD Lanphler 1923 1924 Kathryn Snllth Hlldegard Von Barandy LOIS McCandless Vlfglnla Chase MISS MHFIOD Lanphler Presldent Vlce Presldent Secretary Treasurer Class Sponsor Presldent V108 Presldent Treasurer Class Sponsor Presldent V106 Presldent Secretary Treasurer Class Sponsor if 53' 'I E J if llllll IIIFIIIIllllllllllllllIllllIlIIIIIllllllllllllIIIIIIIIIIIIIllllIIIIllIlllllIIIIIIIIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIlllllllIlIIllIllIlIIlIlIllIII'lIllll IIII IIIIII Q D r l .iif 1 V ' fi 9' , 'Q ia' . 'Hui 3 E ll E E 5 - l or - ,e,,...,,es,.,.e,..,.e,,...,e....e.e....,,,.....e,,,...,e,....ee..,s..,.., le,.,..,e .,...., ' 5 'l. E ' W ' ,, ,,,,,eee,, ,,,,,,,, ,re,e,,r,oo,,,o,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,C,,,CCoe,,,r,,,,,,,V,-,,,,o,-,,,,,-,,,- ' - ' E 3 l l ' . .,,rss.s...ss .....,s.....r.,..,ss.,.,rsr....r,......s......, ,...,.rr.,..,,,,....,....,er,..... S e cretary E I E , ,,,r,,,,,le,,,, eee,,,,,,ee,,,reeC,,,,,,V,,,,Ce,,,,eee,,,,reeV.,,,e,,,.,,,,,,,r.eo,,,,r,eV,,re,,,, E 5 ,......9...,99...f.9,...,.9.,...9......9.9.....,.Y...........9.........,.99..... g l l 2 -- 5 l : : , 1 : S ' l E E f l E E ll l E ' 5 ll E . . E fl E .,9.....99................9......9..,...,....,.....999....,.....99,...,..........9.................... 5 li E ' ' - ' E p 5 . . . --'--e'f------fF------FF-----H------F---'-'---e--'----'-----'-e H ----"------b-H-----'-f--e'-"--' 5 ll 2 A -'ee-----e------ - '-e-----e-"-'---- A ----'----ef'e----h------'------'------'---------h--'--ee'----'---- 5 5 1' 'Q l 142 -9- 1 ' 2? 28 ,I Q 1 Q 5 , E E iEr5Zfl15?5!'I'3f6gj'3'-'UQ 45'-3 'Z P1 Q IZ 15 EI 1 ..- 'll .ggqxiggggqgnuigglmmmmmlllllglapgsggzgj T H E N A T l 0 N A L 412,539 iiamlhllllllllllllllllIllIIIlllIIIi1EEE5 122 2:2-Vi 9 .si ' S2 59: .- 'S Mlldred D1ttman Florence Hedxger Mary Rose Hellman Mlnnetta Hartshorn Edlth Johnson Paulme Ixoon MII DRED DITTMAN 1436 Foster Ave Chlcago Ill Ixlndergarten Elementary Dlploma June 1926, Ixlndergarten Pr1mary Dlploma 1925 Inn dergarten Demonstratlon Scholarshlp 1926 Presldent Senlor Class 1925 26 btudent Col ncll 1925 26 VICE Presrdent Jumor Class 1924 25 Cholr 1924 25 Raoketty Packetty House 1925 Pageant 1925 Town G1r1s Assoc1at1on FLORENCE HEDIGER 6333 Wmthrop Avenue Ch1cago Ill Iundergarten Elementary Dlploma June 1926 Ixmdergarten Prlmarv Dlploma 1925 Prl mary Demonstratlon Scholarshlp 1926 V106 Presldent Senlor Class 1926 Student Connell 1925 26 Secretary Junlor Class 1924 25 Secretary Student Councll 1925 Flre lung 1926 Racketty Packetty House 1925 Pageant 1925 Town Glrls ASQOCIHTIOH MARY ROSE HEILMAN 1003 Flrst Ave Evansvllle Ind Kmdergarten Elementary Dlploma June 1926 Ixlndergarten Pr1mary D1ploma 1925 Choxr 1924 25 26 Chalrman ben1or Brldge 1926 Pageant 1925 Flre lung 1926 MINNETTA HARTSHORN 523 Ill1I1019 Aue Ottawa Ill Kmdergarten Elementary D1ploma June 1926 EDITH IOHNTSON 2200 W 22nd St Chmago Ill Kmdergarten Elementary Dlploma June 1926 Ixlndergarten Pr1mary Dlploma 1925 The Helen Grmnell Mears Scholarsh1p 1925 Cholr 1924 25 26 Flre Ixlng 1926 Raclxettv Paoketty House 1975 Pageant 1995 Broadcast over Radlo PAULINE BOOTY 314 Thompson Ave York Neb Kmdergarten Elementary Dxploma 1926 Ix1ndergartenPr1rnary Dlploma 1975 Pageant 1925, Flre Klng 1976 iid if llllll-llllIIIIIIIIlIlllllllllllllllllllllllIllllllllllllllll lllllllllllllllllIIIIIIIlllIIllllIllIllllllllIlllllllllIllIlllllllllllllllIIIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 0 bbw' 5 gl 49,1 alfa 2 . : 1 .. - ., - - S E E - .- :-' W E 3 - E : E : - : 1 I : E E I- S E 1 S 2 E E E : : E E g S E : 2 E E : 2 E " 1 E E S : S - : - 1 - E : 3 S E E - - -n 1 3 E E E ' S ,, - E 1 E E f ' : E E : .hi E L 1 E .E : . . . : 5 E -1 . . S S :. E 1 1 1 5 E . n v E E E .- E E , .- E ' E S ' S E 1 1 '1 1 ' : - - - .- - ,. . ,. . . ,. g 1- . . -, ' ' ' 1 " 1 ' : - E . . ' . . , U ., Z . E E 1 1 1 - : 1 - 1 . - ' - 1. , - 1 , - 1 1 1 ' 1 1 1 1 1 1 ' ' ' E g 1 1 1 1 ' ' E 3 -1 E 5 - - ,. - 5 ,. . g I' 2. E -' 1 1 1 ' E E ,. . l Y. . . ' . E E 7 . ' . 1 . ' '. . ' ' , ' ' .' E- : ' - 1 ' - : E Y I 1 1 y 1 - 1 . 7- E : . . . - E 1 1 1 1 1 ' ' t 1 1 1 E g 1 1 1 1 1 K E E E 2 , . . I 5 1 1 . 1 . S : 1 1 1 - - : E ' 1 1 ' 1 ' 1 1 E E 1 1 '- . ' T1 ' ' A . . ' '2' E : 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ' E E E E E E - - E S n , .11 -. ., ' , . -1 - .- S l S E ' , ' E : ' 1 ' .Ta - .- E E S : S 1 1 r- 1 ' 5 E 1 1 , . 4 L ., , . , '51 - .. g . . ,,. . . . g E ' 1 1 ' 1 1 E E . , . - . , , . . ,. I V E-1 : 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ' ' ' 'V : : . 5 : 1 . . : E 1 -' 1 1 -' 1 ' E E E E5 G1 'ui' S :: v f ,E 1 , . ., , . . . . ,. . . K ' I 1 ' ' 1 1 ' 1 -' 1 1 sa . . . V , .4 . ,.-- i. S9 Zq 25 5" Sl Hg! " fl' 1. .5- 51 1 ri us . . - - ff ' . . . . . - - - - .... -.. - ,lg It i ,b11Z'3a?3:15. . : : : .emi .lwiiiu-avg. .1 - 11 l I Y W, ,,, , ,V S , A -J ff iisexiiisfifiiiliiil:IlIllIIIIIlIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIEIEQSE-3525f" T H E N A T I 0 N A L fgugiq3Iglmlmnlnnullllllllllmggssimif-zaeiekfieg ki ' LI -Y S, 0 fe! .e .09 9 he if ex E ' 2 : I ' l E E Vera Larson Doris Leaman E E Mary Frances Owen Virginia MacDonald E E Elizabeth Storer Kathryn Smith E E VERA LARSON, 2524 Ahsland Ave., Evanston, Ill. E E Kindergarten-Elementary Diploma, June 1926, Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, 1925, The E I Mrs. John N. Crouse Scholarship, 1925, Fire King, 1926, Pageant, 1925. gf E DORIS LEAMAN, Dugger, Indiana. ' E E Kindergarten-Elementary Diploma, June 19265 Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, 1925, i E Treasurer Senior Class, 1926 5 Student Council, 1926 g Vice-President Student Government, E E 1925 5 Choir, 1925, '26, Fire King, 1926, Racketty Packetty House, 1925, Pageant, 1925. E E MARY FRANCES OWEN, 202 E. Seventh St., Bloomington, Ind. E : Kindergarten-Elementary Diploma, June 1926, Tribune, Fire King, 1926. i 2 VIRGINIA MueDoNALD, Duluth, Minnesota. ' 5 E Kindergarten-Elementary Diploma, June 1926, Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, 1925 5 E ' Treasurer Student Council, 1925, Secretary-Treasurer Midyear Class, 1925, Fire King, E ' 1926, Pageant, 1925. E Z 1 1 - 1 - n - Q - - .u " - E ELIZABETH STORER, 6109 Howe st., Pittsburgh, Pe. ' : Kindergarten-Elementary Diploma, July 1926, President Senior Class, 19255 Fire King, 1926. E A KATHRYN SMITH., Muleehee, Texas. E Kindergarten-Elementary Diploma, June 1926, Kindergarten-Primary Diploma June 1925' The Elizabeth Harrison Scholarship, 1925 5 President Student Council, 1926 5 Student Council, Z 1924, '25, '26, President Student Government, 1925, President Freshman Class, 19245 bf Fire King, 19265 Dance Committee, 1925. . I :lf lv. P1 ' is SPEQQEEHZEQSS:illllllilIIEIlllllllllllllllllIIIIulllllllllllIllllllllllllllllllllllllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIllllllllllllllll!llllIlllIllIIIlIIlllllllIlllllllIlllllllIIllIIIIllllIllllllilllI5llllI!.Ei55fJA3e5?5f'?'31?LE52'b1E .H 35g5K7,5Zge.gi-Q-2 !' 525321llllllllllllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIEIESQSIQSZQ:if T H E N A T I 0 N A L flAziiiialhlIllIllllllllllIIIIlllllllIIiIEEE2i Izkeivfksieg ri ii E Frances Swanson Elcey Trezona E 5 Clara Tutt Olive Widdowson E E Ruth Hardy Gladys Webster E E FRANCES SWANSON, 5055 N. Mozart St., Chicago, Ill. E E Kindergarten-Elementary Diploma, June 19265 Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, 19255 Busi- , E ness Manager Annual, 19265 President Town Girls Association, 19265 Student Council, E E 19265 Choir, 1924, '25 5 Fire King, 1926 5 Circulating Manager Chaff, 19255 Pageant, 1925. E 5 ELCEY TREZONA, Ely, Minnesota. E E Kindergarten-Elementary Diploma, June 19265 Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, 19255 Fire E E King, 19265 Racketty Packetty House, 19255 Pageant, 1925. ' E if CLARA TUTT, Roulear, sask., Canada. 5 E Kindergarten-Elementary Diploma, June 1926 5 Student Government Board 5 Fire King, 1926. E E OLIVE WIDDOWSON, 2031 Sherman Ave., Evanston, Ill. , E E Kindergarten-Elementary Diploma, June 19265 Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, 19255 The E E Jean Carpenter Arnold Scholarship, 19255 Secretary Senior Class, 19265 Student Council, E E 19265 Choir, 1924, '25, '265 Joke Editor Annual, 19245 Racketty Packetty House, 19255 E E Pageant, 19255 Fire King, 1926. X E RUTH HARDY, 5747 Kimbark Ave., Chicago, Ill.. , E Degree of Bachelor. of Education, June 19265 Kindergarten-Elementary Diploma, June 19255 i E Kindergarten Primary Diploma, August 19245 Chairman Song Contest, 1926 5 Vice-President E Student Council, 1925, '265 Editor of Annual, 19255 Pageant, 19245 '25, Fire King, 19265 E Town Girls Association 5 The Mary Juliette Cooper Normal Scholarship, June 1925. GLADYS WEBSTER, 2224 Jule st., st. Joseph, MO. 0 . hi Degree of Bachelor of Education, June 1926, Fire King 1926. ?'li 5i'Ci!i7Z'3a?Ef?5iK1i!l IIlilllI6IIIIllIIIllIIlIIIIIIIIIIIIIllIIlllllllllllIllIllllIIlIllIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIIlllllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIlllIilIllEIllll!.E'5fliF2:Z?iS'3'31?LS35r'5 -f--f --f --- fff----f---- 3 : :E 5 X EsigiiiiiilililllIIIlllllIllllIIIIIIIIIEIEEE-3935.13 T H E N .X T I 0 N .K L ,ffl,ASQZEZHIHIIIIIIIIIlllIlllIIIIIIllIIIliI2SE5?Ef'ZE4i I e HISTORY OF THE NOTED SENIOR CLASS REVEALED TO THE PUBLIC Three years ago we entered the Stable door. Our hopes were high g we were ready for and expected great things. But high hopes, great expectations, and all have been more than realized in these three full years. i The hearty welcome we received at National was the beginning of an awfully good time. We put on our prettiest manners for receptions, our prettiest dresses for dances, got out our pep for assemblies, and our cash for shows. Between hygiene, parties, sessions with Student Council, theme-writing, chorus and hockey, we had a dandy time. We came back forf more. As Juniors it was our turn to help set the pace. "Chaff," a year old baby, grew to be quite a child, it was printed and appeared quite regularly. "Racketty Packetty House," we feel could only have been possible with such a class as ours. What fun we had! Fairies, funnies, fops, freaks and castor oil! The one thing in which every Junior has a paramount interest is the Spring Festival. Our lovely pageant, "Persephone," will always keep its place in our store of beautiful pictures and memories. The color, the music, the movement of swaying grain, of splashing fountain, and dawn-tinted clouds are ours. Then came commencement, and to say that it was a real National Commencement is enough. Now in our last year we are a select body, about twenty in all, but the com- motion we make would indicate more. With the help of the Juniors we made "The Fire King," a Senior project. Everyone had a chance to realize her secret ambition, "to go on the stage." Our biggest thrill at National was moving to Evanston. A dream realized! Deep in our hearts we could never really believe that we would graduate from the new College. But here we are, and all of us are looking forward to the most won- derful commencement National has yet known. -Olive Widdowson. THE DWINDLING WORLD It was a curious thing, that sudden decision of mine to drop books and brush for globe-trotting, a pastime about which I had often expressed myself in no mild terms of scorn. Yet, here I was aboard the Glorianna, heading straight for a remote port somewhere down the coast of Syria. At least, it was comforting to be off the beaten path of tourists. Very likely I would not be taxed for polite conversation for fifteen blessed months. America and its general social clatter lay securely behind me. "It 17s. I tell you it is she." I heard the smooth, soft voice slide up into the merest hint of a squeal. Then a deeper tone- "It can't be-still, it might be." "M27ght be! Flo, I tell you it is Miss Lanphier!" The soft voice had become animate with insistent confidence. "Very well, Mim, have it your own way," came the easy comfortable as- surance. I came to the surface of things with a start! Indeed it was not hard to recall the owners of those voices, but before I could speak they had turned to the leeward side. I settled back. Later in the day would do, I was too comfortable to move just now. Funny! those two so far from the beaten path. Curious, most curious, this small world of ours. "Miss Lanphier! ! !" Again I leaped into the very live "conscious" 32 HMQESZEIIIEIIIIiIIlllllIlIIIIlll!IIlllllllllll IIIIIIllllllllIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll llllllllllllllllllllllllll llllllllllllllllllIIIIIllIIllIIllIIllllllillllilllllliirjfiifeE593 'Z Pa li Q!! a 5 6 ui I Q! 5. L5g5K'q,o,i5i ?2E2iQ12llIIllIIlllllIllllllIIIIIIIIEIEQCE,-3555.13 T H E N A T I 0 N A ll ff'.-ASPEEQQHIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIllIIIIIlIli!5E55fMi'2k4ii-92:25 .ni 5. "Elcey Trezona!" I faltered. "Are all the famous class aboard?" Elcey giggled-you remember how Elcey always giggled. "No-have hope-but you'd be surprised. There's quite a crowd of us. My husband and I-yes, I'm married to Hugh Tearle-you remember Conway Tearle-well Hugh's just like him only much better looking-walks exactly like 5 him only Hugh's ever so much more graceful, and he has that same sad beau-u-tiful Q look of Conway's only with much more pers0na.ltty-no, he's not on the screen- E but he's Olive's Managerfl 2 I realized I would have to be firm if I were to stem this torrent. E "Walt a minute-do you mean Olive Widdowson? And what about her Q needs managing. I thought-" V g "What about her?'! ' Elcey's voice shot up into the most incredulous of crescendos. : llWhG1'6 have you been. Oh, pardon me! But, Olive's so well known abroad, ' Cairo, Bombay, Palmeryo-" E "So? My work-busy-you see-" I became feeble and inarticulate. : "Yes, I supposef, agreed Elcey amiably. "Well-we're all here. It was this p way. Morris Gest came across Olive one night in southern North Dakota, playing 2 Eliza in the Village Frolic. She managed the ice so efficiently he knew she had : talent. Rushing back to New York for the contract he dropped dead! Excite- : ment over his find,the doctor said. Then Hugh-my husband, you know, took 2 the job. W6,l'C a celebrated company. Olive does the heavies, Doris the-well, - Doris was always versatileg so she does any part requiring finesse except infant - roles-Vera takes those. Then"-Elcey stopped to adjust her hair and her I breath-"Then-we had to bring Fran along to keep Doris and Olive from con- - tinual frenzy over the leading man. She hated to come. She manages, writes, L and edits Pleasant Pleasantries. She's afraid the moths will get into them while - she's gone." Elcey rolled her eyes. "Moths are fatal, you know!" Elcey E stopped again. I seized my chance. E "Didn't I just see Mildred and Florence?" f "Sure-you did! Mlm does the blonde royals-Flo the brunettes!" 5 "The blonde royals?" I suggested. E "Sure-when we need a real lady for an Empress or a Queen or something E -oh, you know, Miss Lanphier!" E "Yes-es," I agreed, recalling them in the Circus at 2944. "Is that the whole E crowd then?" ' E "Oh no! Hugh needs lots of help. Efficient managers always need big 5 staffs! Hugh does. There's Kay Smith, the pressman. How she can get us Z into the papers-learned how in Buffalo, you know. Then, Clara Tutt-she's 2 an LLD now-she comes along to undo Kay's hunches and get us out of the papers. Q Oh, its marvelous g Hugh says so!" 2 "Yes, of course. Your husband must know. But tell me, where's Virginia 2 MacDonald?" E Elcey gurgled! "Oh-you've said it, Miss Lanphier. The little angel's E right aboard this here leetle canoe! She's our Interior Decorator and Scene Painter 5 and directs the shifting. That relieves Hugh. He is so-o-o sensitive, so beau-u- : utifully sensitive. The noise grates on his nerves." Elcey looked as beatific as E it was possible for Elcey to look. A t E "But, where are you going, Miss Lanphier?" Z "I-oh-up the coast of Syria after our stop at Cairo." f "Oh goodie-goodie! That'll be the kitten's snowshoes! You can come Z right along with the mob. Mary Rose is entertaining us-a marvelous week-end before we take rooms at the hotel. Olive's doing Cairo for six weeks-then we jump to Porto Rico!" ' "Porto Rico-how inconvenient." "Yes,'! sighed Elcey, "so does everybody, but Hugh arranged it." QQ "Oh-I see. Does Miss Heilman like Cairo?" C I 33 0. A .f ' ...., -, - - .. j--. -A-.I ds!b:ZE?2f?5ilZi5!lIlll!!IIEIlllllllllllllIIllllIllIIIIllIIIllllllIIIIllIllIllIIllIllllllllllllIIIlllllIllIIIllllllllllllllllllllllIIllIllllIllllIIlIllIllIIllllIllIIIllIllIIIIIllIllI:IlllilIllI!.fs2fA:i?sfS'kvL!.!.'Di 3 Oh my yes no end of things to go to She married a Spanish merchant descended straight from well I ve forgotten hrs name discovered the Pacific she says but Hugh says he was little better than a pirate' I see It s all very curious dont you think Curzous? Oh Miss Lanphrer how funny' Now Hugh has never thought that Oh yes Hugh I see' Perhaps rt rsn t then be tzckled to death Ta tal And Elcey was off in a whirl of bands and ribbons If I thought that my companions presence on the Glorranna furnished material for musing I was certainly unprepared for further testimony to our world s lrmrtatronq Had I been really prepared that near fall from the gang plank would never have occurred For as I strolled casually down that narrow board who should be gathering rn her flock with pr ofessronal expertness but Betty Storer wearing a large Cook Tour Badge I had hardly recovered when someone seized me with ecstatic shrreks It was Edith Johnson and behind her wrth thirty little Egyptians were Pauline Koon and Ruth Gall The little Egyptians were on therr way to a water picnic the good old play sprrrt of N K E C Y Mrnnetta Hartshor ne owned a steam ship l1ne mherrted rt from the widower she had mar rred and was giving them the excursion free Well this rs the last straw for surprises I moaned Such a collection of that famous clan rn Cairo of all places' Oh Cairo s climate rs fine said Edith My voice rs twice as strong as rt used to be' But here s our boat pulling in Can t you come with us Mary Frances Owen will entertarn you Mary Frances Owen' Another? I was quite weak for that closed the lrst of the rllustrrous Seniors of 19267 Yes shes a lady of leisure now. When she came there were scads of defectives in Cairo. Now there s not a one and she just rides around having a good time. Good-bye-come to see our Nursery School before you leave. I promised and then sat down on my baggage and watched the thirty little Egyptians disappear into their puffing steamer. When the very last one was safely aboard and had solemnly and dutifully waved me a doubtful if obedient adieu I could but continue to marvel at the strangeness of it all the curious dwindling aspect of the world with these seniors scattered where I had expected to have no polite conversation. 34 lb: 9 shi 'ii S -O fb. 'fl 'h Sl 3: U s X mrzmasarrsrlllumIumlllulllllulslsasssisf , T H H N rx T I 0 5 A I I..zaazimaI5lIInIIInuInrlInIIIIlurserssafmisrzme-mea iw 9 H - . . . f . ' ' U- , ' . - . , 33' , , ., . ' ' , ar W ll 1- 7 , , 7 N ' Q17 ,, . . 1. 1 ' L - , L, I 1 E 77 E in 1 -g 0, -Q I ' ' 1 an E "Well-ta-ta, now. We'll see you at dinner, Miss Lanphier. The girls will E . ,, . . . E . , . 1 . E Lu 7 - - E . f . ' I I ' ' 4 ' ' 1 1 . E f 1 f 1 W 0' l .... . E . 1 I 1 ' . V I, 1 I 1 I V 1- E ,KC T ' ' Q V , if. 77 fl ' E .' ' , 77 7 A E J ' E fl 1 ' Q 7 ' ' 77 ' ' fl ' ' ' E 7 ' I ' , 1 E . - , 1 . . , . E . , I . . E i . . ,, E rc , , 7: ' E ' a r 1 J E n ll l , L . . E f , E , , E 77 g 7 Y 7 E ' 5 1 G 4 HMQQSEHHIIIlilllliIIllllIIlllllIIlIIIllIlIllIlIllllllIllllllIIIIIlIIIIllllllllllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIllllllIllIIIlIIIllIllllIIIIIIIllIIIllIIIIIIIIIlllllllllllllllilillillIllliisifiifk 5f3'3r?A!S3b'ir'E l I Juniors I .-. i ?SQK'i3fiSii 55Z5E5!E1IIIllIIIllIIlllllllllllllIlElEiEi33i5i-fi?R 'r II E N A T I 0 N A I 1 52,gafzfsmamlslllllllllllllmlmllllersesssumsvama-page Pi ii if W A - A 5 - W E 'E 2 E " ' E ! E E - in s E .T E E I E E I1 E E 1 5 JUNIOR CLASS OFFICERS 5 , E 1925-1926 E 1 E . . . . E E W1H1fF6d W1lSOH.,. ... ... .............,,. ,,..... .. .., ,, . 1 , 1 P1'9S1d8I1t g E G9OTg13 Lee Stemper ..............,, ..., Vice-President 2 Q E METIOH Arlnstrong. ,.Q..K,. ..,..,.,.. . , . , ,, ,, S e cretary E E Alma Prange .. .. . ...........,....... , ,.. ..M 4A, ,,..v T reasurer 5 5 MISS Agnes Adams .... .........,...e....e. ..,e... C 1 ass Sponsor 5 'Q E E Q E E i E E l 5 1924-1925 5 1 E Ruth Carlson ,.,.,,.11122222.222,............... .......,....,.2,,,11 ,....,...,. P r esident E E Florence Hannnel 2.12122.12.,.....,..,,.1.11. ..,.. V ice-President E I E Eva Hanousek ....,2..,2222.222......,,...2,.,1 .......,... S ecretary E ' 5 Virgima Tourtelotte ..222222.,.2........111 ss.... .... .... T r e asurer E ' N E Miss Wlllnnna Townes 222............,2.1 ,..... C lass Sponsor E E E .1 E E i E ' E 1 E E I E E 1 E E 1 of fi 36 1 gdilisifaifiiifillllIIEIIIIEIIIIIIIIIIIIII 1 'S 2 2 'I A us lllluumllmmllulullnlllIIllmmllIIlmummm11nIum1ummIIIunIIIllIlll1IIsmna1IIllnzmfasass-sagssssm 5 1 A 9 N "5SQ? lE5i5lillIIIIIlllllIlllllllllIIIIIIEIEEQSSGA-. T H E N rx T I 0 N .X li 51? '-Eig sllhlllllllllllllllllIlIIIIIllIiI3EE25 v2?5!' I JUNIORS IN THE MAKING ,Member way back in 1924 when we as little green freshies entered the portals of N. K. E. C. just bubbling over with curiosity? We wondered what it all would be-Miss Baker, faculty, housemothers, classmates, all were new and strange to us. How different now! How we hate to think of parting from these dear familiar faces. Our school calendar as we looked at it seemed rather full with teas, reception dances, and parties of all kinds to break into our very studious life. Our fresh- man year went fast and is now nothing but a heap of pleasant memories, hosts of new friends, and knowledge stored for future use. The fall came and with it came almost all the girls back to N. K. E. C. Just before Thanksgiving we had one of our biggest thrills when Miss Baker announced in assembly that we would move into our new Evanston home the first of February. Every one entered into the spirit of "doing and giving" for our building fund. Stunts were put on which excelled many of the best shows in town. The lucky girls among us returned from the Thanksgiving holidays with a new frock for the Junior Dance to be held on the Sisson Hotel Roof Garden, De- cember fourth. It was a lovely party and thelittle porch just off the dance Hoor- How wonderful those stars were! Since the music was perfect, as well as each man there, the dance was a big success. The week after we returned from Christmas vacation there was a Director's Tea given by the Juniors, which was a very delightful affair and where we met again all our previous directors as well as our present ones. The pep meeting in January was a thing no Junior will ever forget. The shouts of joy accompanied with thoughts of moving into a beautiful new school were followed by thoughts of sadness at leaving our Stable home. So a Stable Dance was planned and was held in the college building the last night we were in our old home. The dance programs were unique, as was the whole affair, and it was a most fitting farewell to our Stable. Then we were given an unexpected vacation from the twenty-ninth of January to February tenth, which took the place of our Easter vacation, and left us only four days of Spring vacation. But we were all glad to have it, especially after all our examinations, for what could be sweeter than a recuperation at this time? The first few days at our new school were a bit upset with freshly plastered walls, a cowbell summons to classes, and everyone getting lost in the corridors, but these were all wonderful days for us. Now the Spring Festival looms before us and then Commencement, when we gain what we have striven for. But in the joy of Commencement is also the sorrow of parting with dear friends and friendly places. We will always remember the days we spent at National! 3 7 A' Wd! 1525552500IISIIIEIIIlllllllllIIIIIIIIIIIIllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIllllllllllIlllllllllllllllllI llll ll IllllIIlllllllllllllllllllillllEIlllllZE5iEiiE?i9?k ibbnr -vf 4 "5 I Y ' ' .1 -1 - r v ll--'Q' --va -an -- -1 x 35ii3iHQSQZ3'?2!E5l2IlllllIllIIIIlllllllIIlllIIlEIEE53i354... 'I ll lu N A T I 0 N .X L ...slkiziilalllllllllllllllIlIIIIIllllIlal2rZ:kFEw'4m4zi:Q"E vt Ke .1 i - 1 2 E - 5 a I i i l 1 I .I -gi .F i DO DREAMS EVER COME TRUE? a SOME SAY IN CPPOSITES l Q THEY DO! Q - I stood on the banks of the River Styx, no longer in my mortal body. 'Twas l "' darker than midnight and no sound was heard except the murmuring of the black ' g waters. At last I boarded the ferry boat and having been carried across the river E : I was put into the care of a guide on the other shore. I first visited heaven. All 2 E here was beautiful and angels walking over the golden pavements playing their f ' diamond-studded harps enchanted me and held me spell-bound at their beauty 5 E and loveliness. But I had come to learn the fate of my N. K. E. C. College friends, , : and having found St. Peter unable to answer my numerous questions I proceeded ' ? to peruse the golden tablet records. F ' Heading the list I found the names of Helen Bart, Nan Bauer, and Helen Q 2 Bosshard who had given their lives to work among the suffering children of the g E "Near East." Cecile McManus, Ruth Crucknell, Evelyn Solomon and Mary l - Wo1'thingt,on had been so overpowered by the speech from India at chapel that - E day in March that immediately after graduation they had set sail for the Indian , I shores where they worked diligently among the poor natives. Betty Neureuther, , Anita Bennett, Nina Criss, Elinor Cobiskey, Margaret Pierce, and Ruth Boots l 5 had been happily married and were given especial honor because of the large I E number of perfectly reared children which they had given to the new generation. I E I noticed that Betty had eleven youngsters and I wondered if Miss Baker and her Q E "eleven kids" had been an inspiration to her. 5 E Doris Yeaton and Jessie Scherer had won a place here through the wonderful , .E art which they had given to the world in dance. Doris, after studying for years E in Hawaii had so mastered the Hawaiian Dance that she could not be recognized i E apart from the natives, and Jessie had become so enchanted with the balloons at Q ' our Carnival that she continued to delight the world with her balloon technique. f l I Pearl Wheeler, Rosa Petry and Ethel Huttner had worked out a very unique I E mental test which could test anyone, of any age, at any time. It had been a great E E help to the entire world. Kay Range had formed a partnership with a relative I 5 of the famous Goddard and together they had traced many feebleminded families 5 E back to the Kalikaks. E E Beatrice Holscher, May Markkannen, and Vivian Katz had been very active : E in prohibiting the use of chewing gum by primary teachers. Q g Alice Gutknecht, Dorothy Long, Julia Strohm, Mary Margaret Duflield, and : : Miriam Bilger, after completing Dr. Downing's course in Nature Study had gone I E out into the world resolved to bring an 'fAnt House" into every school and they E E had accomplished wonders in making the children more acquainted with ants , 5 and nature. Ruth Carlson, Ethel Belden, and Evelyn Mattson had consolidated Z E and through their united efforts had presented every school in Illinois and vicinity E E with a pond of ducks and vast numbers of trees in order that the students might E Q know the pleasures of tramps into nature for naturels sake. - E Helen Pierce, Mary Bottigliero, Jeanette Sutliff, Sonia Hassen, and Lucille E E Fauquher had toured Africa singing in Chautauqua and had brought tears of E E thankfulness to many a native's eyes that they had lived to hear such voices. E E Selma Huttner and Bertha Koff operated a lunch room in a settlement house, E E thus giving the undernourished little ones, at least one square meal a day. Mrs. E 2 Craig, Grace Jameson, Ethel Smith, and Harriet Steadman had given their entire E E time to going from house to house in these poorer districts, soliciting children for this settlement Kindergarten. g Isabelle Minick and Agnes Hilton had studied Psychology until too feeble l to open a book. Autumn Bartholomew, Mary Saxe, Belle Hyman, Jane Gdulewicz ,Q and Lois Frost had toured the country in a Ford explaining and demonstrating ,Q the way birds fly. Louise Helz, Beatrice Lyddon, Mary Rafferty, Bessie Rumpf, Q,-i 38 gidili-:E'MEQ5ilZHllllIlillllilllll Il m I lmmm Illl I I IlmmummlmmlIIllmlmuImllInmIIlmnumllmummmmmummlmmmmmulllnzameesfs-5-aes,-:vig 0 Pi it 1 all it 1 S 1 1 1 L' S 1 S 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 S S S S 2 S S 1 1 S 1 S 1 1 5' 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 - 1' 1 S 1 1 1 1 S 1 S S 1 1 S' 1 1 1 1 1 1 E. S 1 1 S 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 S S ' ' 1 1 1 1 1 S S 1 1 1 2 1 1 S 1 1 1 1 1 1 S 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 S S 1 1 1 1 1 1 S .1 S 1 1 S 1 1 E'- S 1 1 1 1 S 1 2 S 1 S 2 3 0 5: .,. if' U sf:-ima:asmIllllInuluulllllllllllmlsiss-ssss..II T H E N A T I 0 N A I . , gggqgmnununnnnunlunlnnnrargsssmemswmea, and Martha Woodbury had assisted Penka in starting a school in Bulgaria under Mrs. J ohnson's method and had done a great deal of good giving freedom to these little Bulgarians. Although I scanned the pages closely I could Hnd no more of my N. K. E. C. College friends on these golden tablets so I proceeded to other realms. Stepping into an elevator I was carried downward with great rapidity until I reached Hades where I wandered through dark and gruesome passages until I came to a door bear- ing this sign 'fOflice of Mephistophelesf' I hurried in seeking to learn the fate of the rest of my N. K. E. C. classmates. I was not disappointed for in this thick record book I found the names of Martha Dox, Marion Blomgren, Gladys Huntley, Marion Wallace, Dorothy Trainer, and Irene Parsons who had attempted theft. They tried to steal the heart of every man they met. Ardis Hawk, Ruth Hillis, Alma Prange, and Eva Wilson had been arrested for speeding while hurrying to their respective schools. Gertrude St. Clair, Pauline Parmalee, Evelyn Anderson, Lee Huckstep, Helen Schade, and Edna McConnell were all victims of that grim destroying monster-rouge! Adele Adams and Virginia Tourtelotte had edited a paper which was the scandal of the country. Dot Allen had taught her pupils the "elephant walk" to the exclusion of all else and had thereby ruined their constitutions. Verna Altermatt, Eleanor Svaty, Mary Kay O'Brien, and Louise Irwin had refused to be supervised and therefore had failed in their teaching career. Geraldine Behensky and Zeta Gunning had married farmers but had forgotten all about their husbands and homes in their task of crossing tall green peas with yellow wrinkled ones. Frances Antink, Caroline Farmer and Mae Whitmack having become tired of teaching had driven busses between Hollywood and San Francisco until they had had a terrible collision. Winnie Wilson, Pauline Kirschten, Ruth Lesser, and Gladys Reuther had taught school in Alaska until they married some rich gold-diggers and returned to Chicago where they lived on Lake Shore Drive and squandered their wealth. Elizabeth Geshwind had written and collected poetry for lovers but when Florence Hammel, Ruth Robson and Muriel Dameron applied for some of her poetry it excited them so that they were never the same again. Frances Ward, Thelma Router, Grace Roosman, Minetta Spra i n, Rose Bolton, Mary Louise Pyott, and Muriel Court had been so over-zealous in their teaching that they had tried to push their pupils through three grades in one year and had made them unfit for further education. Irene Ambre, Margaret Hulse, Jessie MacLennan, J. Kuehmsted, and Louise Bush had ruined their children's health by using candy for a device. Dorothy Knowles and Virginia Cohen had edited an art magazine which shocked the world. . Georgia Lee was the leader of a band in which Marion Armstrong, L. Forney, Jane Bunnell, Geraldine Wagner, Vivian Needham, and Betty Shoesmith played. This band ruined the ears of a vast number of people. Signe Nelson was a member of the Juvenile Court, but she had felt so sorry for the culprits that she let them all free without investigation. Grace Birkill, Grace Finch, Corrinne McCoid, Virginia Robinson, Sylvia R. Kaminskie, Caroline Totera, and Bee Engstrand had led their respective husbands a merry chase rushing all over the country to hear lectures on the modern method of teaching school by not teaching. Pearl Bobele, Selma Eckhaus, Alice Weber and Dorothy Carnright should have taken a course in Domestic Science instead of Kindergarten work because their husband's stomachs had been ruined after the first three months of married life. As I was thus searching this book for the remainder of my classmates, I was startled by the terrific ringing of a bell-It was seven o'clock and Big Ben was warning me to get up or I'd be late for my nine o'clock. if 39 4 si S ii'C2iQ5:EE?ik5iiZi!lIIIIEIIIEIIIIIIIIllllllIllllllllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIlllllIIIIllIIIIIIIllllllllllllllllllllllllIllllllllIIIIlllllllllllllllllllllllllIllllllllllllllllllllllll lllllllllElIllEIlIIl!2E'jfls:E??if'3-31525355 r Q' X lIIllllllllllllllllllllllllll lr 0 F N 4 T I 0 N -'Q al mmmmuummmme I V e Cheer for N Is E C Great 1S he1 fame Her gnls are fightmg To uphold her name We ll all be true and loyal See he1 banners Wavmg Hlgh above the rest Red and Wh1te w1ll prove N K E C IS best S - .- - - .- .- g " - - -. - - .1 . ,. - 'I' T .- h . . 1 J 'F A O I O 5- fo :Q -. :fi if: 'al as T H J X . A ' A L Tigaaafzbss 1:14 ki .19 92 Z4 :-3 E JUNIOR CHEER SONG 5 E , ' E 5iai35v5ZE?2Q-'iifillllll:llIIillllllllllllllIIIIIIllllllllllllllllllllllIllllllllllllllllllllIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IllllIIIllllIllIllllIIllIllllIIIlIIllIllllllIIIllIIIIIIIIIIIIIllllllIllIllIillIlilIlll!iE'5E4.l!Ei?if3'5x?25?L'5'iE 4 fl Carolyn Farmer, 306 W. Lowell Ave., Shenandoah, Iowa, 3Sf E9iG2 2EE3lE'lIllIIIIllIllllllllllllIIIIIEIEEQ-14.9.35,fl T H P1 N A 'IE I 0 N A L ff,AREQZGQEHIRIIlllllllllllllIIIIIIIIIIIIHIEEEEQ' ,f-:e5vZ??i?Z:2i ri ii v Sf fa! 9 2 ill 2 .-. : ' - E Alice Gufkheehn Ruth Hillis Ruth oerleeh la hel Smith E E Mary Margaret Duflield Bertha Koff Carolyn Farmer Jane Bunnell E E Alice Gutknecht, 3321 S. Hoyne Ave., Chicago, Ill. E E Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 1926 , Town Girls Association. E E Ruth Hillis, 3521 Middleton Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio. E E Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 1926, President Student Government, 1926, House E E Tribune 1926. E E Ruth Carlson, 1126 Oak Ave., Evanston, Ill. i E E Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 1926, Editor Annual, 1926, Vice-President Town E E Girls Association, 1925, '26, Student Council, 1925, '26, Talked Over Radio, 1926, Presi- E E dent Freshman Class, 1924, '25, Dance Committee, 1924, '25. E E Ethel Smith, 7939 s. Marshfield Ave., Chicago, lll. E E Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 1926, Choir, 1925, '26, Town'Girls Association. E E E Mary Margaret DuHield, 215 Forest Ave., Oak Park, Ill. E E Kindergarten-Primary Diploma June 1926, Assistant Editor Annual, 1926, Broadcast E E over Radio, 1926, Fire King, 1926, Dance Committee, 1926, Circus, 1926, Town Girls ' E Association, Choir 1924, 1925, 1926. E E Bertha Koff, 2427 N. Kedzie Blvd., Chicago, Ill. E E Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 1926 , Town Girls Association, Circus, 1926. E Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 1926 , Christmas Carols, 1925. :N Vai Jane Bunnell, 1018 Riverview Ave., Dayton, Ohio. Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 1926, Christmas Carols, 1925. 41 :fl ee FliliiyiiiikfsliliiiillllIIEIIIlillllllllllllllllllIIIIllllIIlIIllIIIllllllllllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUHIIIIIIIIIIIIlllllIllIllIlllIllIllIIIllIIIIIllIIllIIIllllIIllIlIllllElIllEIIlllliE !E?iS'S'5GLE35iiFi 2 ' S 1 1 1 1 1 2 S 1 1 1 '1' 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 S 1 1 1 1 1 2 S S 1 1 1 S S 1 1 1 1 S S S 1 1 1 1 V S S S -'S S 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 S Z S 1 'S 1 1 1 S 1 1 1 1 -x iiiiii'-5355?-.E?35'isil2llllillillIIlllllllllIIIIIIIEIEQSSFSSZR-.ilL T H E N A T I 0 N A L .5:1kliiiiilhllIlllllllllllllllllIllIIIIlil5E25? E?4i?iZ:25 fa .hi Y i .0 11 , ff Q iv-' Lena N ewfield Rhoda Salter Jane Longan Doris Yeaton Martha Dox Mary Bottigliero Marion Wallace Sylvia R. Kaminski Lena N ewfleld, 2150 Slxteenth Ave S Blrmlngham Ala Ixlndergarten Prxmary Dlploma June 1926 Rhoda Salter West DePere WISCODSID Ixlndergarten Pr1mary Dlploma June 1926 Jane Longan 102 Gland Ave L1ncoln Ill Dor1s Yeaton 19 N Ashland Ave La Grange Ill Inndergarten Prunary Dlploma June 1926 Flre lung 1926 Town Glrls Assoclatlon 1925 Martha Dox 4924 Chlvago St Omaha Neb Ixlndergarten Pr1mary D1ploma June 1926 Mary BOtl1gl18I'O 1320 McAl1ster Place Ch1cago Ill Ixlndergarten Prlmary Dlploma June 1926 Cholr 1925 26 Mar1on Wallace 315 Oakland Ave Councrl Bluffs Iowa Ixmdergarten Prlmary Dlploma June 1926 Chou' 1925 Sylvla R Ixam1nsk1 1134 Washburn Ave Chlcago Ill Ixmdergarten Prlmary Dlploma June 1926 Town Glrls Assoclatlon ' Z 1 S 1 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 S S 2 1 2 2 S 1 1 1 1 1 Z 2 1159 if' MllellllIlllIllIllIllIIIllIlIllIllllllllllIIIIllllllllllIllIIIIllIIIIIIIlllIIIIIlll!IllIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIllllIllIllIIllIIlllllllllllllllllllllllllIlllllllllllll W0 E Bal' E : 3 1 .- : : g 1 - -, .- : I - : .. E : - E E S 2 E . . . E 7 - 1 ., ., , . E E - ,. . . - E ' 7 ' E E E - - E E S S E . . E E , , , . g 1 2 .- - 5 ,. . . : - , - - 5' 7 ' - 3 2 g : 1 2 E 2 : E - - E - -- . ' . E E r 1 2 E S 2 E E - . - 5 1 ' 'x ' r ' E - - 5 ,. . . . ,. . . . 5 : ' v y 1 ' ' : - : E - - .5-'Z E - - E . 5 E 1 f ': 1 ' E 1 - 1 n 1 E ' - . E E ' E - - - - E E : :: - - E . . . . 5 1 r , 1 E 1 ' 1 r E .. - 5 Y- - - - . - . 1. E : 1 v a - : E E E E : : - E E , . . ., , . E' E , . . . K . . K , 26 E ' 1 7 7 r ' 1 E 3 l sq . , 1 ., , . ,. - . . U . . . L ' y 1 ' lg: Eg 45 '7 51 Q5 get if QTKK' ' ' 5 Y E 5 .l?ES?if3'F13Lf'? " "F 1. fi, 'E U ir 'a as :-1 235 3 iii'-55455-i 2EE34E1lIllllllllllllllllllllllIIIEIEESSSZA,fl T H E N A T I 0 N A L ff,Z3-HJQEHIRIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIlIIllIllIiIEEE5?E'ZH 1:26 74 ff Y 5 S1 E Kathryn Hoppenyan Mary Louise Pyott Ruth Lesser Margaret Pierce E E Julia Morse Mildred Ann Leonard Frances Ward Delma Doane E E E E Kathryn Hoppenyan, 1307 W. Third St., Ashland, Wis. E E Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, July 1926. E E E E Mary Louise Pyott, 229 N. Elmwood Ave., Oak Park, Ill. E E Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 1926, Choir, 1925, '26, Town Girls Association. E E Ruth Lesser, 7302 Paxton Ave., Chicago, Ill. ' E E Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 19265 Fire King, 1926 g Circus, 1926 5 Treasurer E ? Town Girls Association, 1924, '25. E 5 Margaret Pierce, 1105 Seward St., Evanston, Ill. E E Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 1926 5 Directors' Tea Committee, 1926 3 Circus, 1926, E E Dance Committee, 1925 5 Broadcast over Radio, 1925, Town Girls Association. E E Julia Morse, 815 Washington Blvd., Oak Park, Ill. E E Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 1926. , E Mildred Ann Leonard, 817 Pontiac, Rochester, Indiana. E E Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, July 1926. E E E E Frances Ward, 41 S. Stone Ave., La Grange, Ill. :E Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 1926. Director's Tea Committee, 1926, Town Girls 2 Association. 5 5 Delrna Doane, 1131 Fourth St., Muskegon, Mich. -oi Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 1926. 43 m.'e:aa5f1z-mm iris!! lllsllltillnulllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllullmlllll lullumllllullllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllullllEllllenlllpzk-5232955-51115355 V 1 35iK'SYQS5Z 35?!ilHIIllllllllllllllIIIIIIIIIIIEIEESSQS-ZiifI 'I' H E X A T I 0 N A I. E:53-?Zi22?!Ihlllllllllllllll IlllIlllIllIilEE22? i?4i?Pl:2ii Pi Li 3: 31? A rl gi - E Marion Armstrong Edna Hupprech Alberta Myers Ethel Huttner : E Grace Jameson Edythe Franks Dorothy Long Dorothy Trainer E - Marion Armstrong, 409 Eighth St., La Grange, Ill. ' Kindergarten-Primary Diploma June 1926, Secretary Junior Class, 1925 '26' Chairman Initiation 1925 '26g Student Council, 1925 '26, Edna Hupprech 348 N Green Bav Road Highland Park Ill kindergarten Primary Diploma June 1926 Treasurer Iunlor Class 1924 20 Student Council 1924 25 Alberta Myers 257 Mt Airy Paris kentucky kindergarten Primary Diploma June 1926 Choir 1924 Z5 Z6 Town Girls Association Fthel Huttner 1737 Wallen Ave Chlcago Ill kindergarten Primary Diploma, June 1926 Choir 1924 25 26 Town Girls Association Grace Jameson Linden, Michigan kindergarten Primary Diploma lune 1926 Edythe Franks 996 Pine Qt 9 ult Qt Marie, Mich Kindergarten Primary Diploma Tune 1926 Dorothy Long, 5476K University Ave , Chicago, Ill Klndergarten Primary Diploma June 1926 Town Girls Association Dorothy Trainer, 305 S Catherine Ave La Grange, Ill Kindergarten Primary Diploma June 1926 Fire King, 1926, Town Girls Association 1434: 'abil' !lIIllIlllllllllllllllllllllllllIIlIllIIIIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIlIIlllllllllllllllllllililllIll!IIIIIIIIIIIIIllIIllIllIIlllllllIllllllllllllllllllllIllllllIIIIIIIII! W0 X' 9 Bn' ' 1' E . - : : 2 E E ' . 'S -u 7 7 3 -. .- : : E 1 1 1 : : E : : E E 1 1 5 ' . 2 E 1 - '. ' 1 1 - E : - : Y. . . l . K K , ,, ' 5 E ' ' ' '1 1 ' M1 1 1 E : - , , E ' - ' : 7 ' : - - E E E E g . . Y E E 1 T, 1. , , . E E ,. . . . . A ,L ,A I . . . E E '1 J 1 1 ' 1 7 ' E .. - - - E E .. . .. E 1 ' ' 1 '1 1 ' E E v. . . I . , , . v . . . E E - . , , ., , . , , L . E : : : :- : : - 5 . . . E E , - E . 1 5 ,. . . I 5 : - , . . : - , .- I : E E - - E 1 V . . E : K, 1 .., 1 1 1 1 1. . : .. - : : E E .. - E E , . . . : - . - T . 1 . Lg: E ' E E . - . V . . . . . i E T 1 . '1 J ' ' I - I1 ? I I J f . ., 3 . M U5 . , . . fh- - . , Q ' . . . . ' I. 4 . 44 :ef 1. -1 31 P s i . 5 a .:'+Si2 ?3i224l2lllIllllllllllllllllllllllll ILC H E 0 N 9 ll IlllllllllllllllllllllllllllI I 6 Beatrice Holscher Thelma Router Beatrice Holscher Kindergarten Elinor Cobiskey, 1511 Colfax St Evanston Ill Kindergarten Prlmarv Diploma June 1926 Fire Bing 1926 Town Cirls Association Grace Birkill, Bellevue Iowa Kindergarten Primary Diploma June 1926 Ruth Robson, Mt Vernon Ill Kindergarten Primary Diploma June 1926 Town Glrls Association Thelma Router, Cambria Wyoming Kindergarten Primary Diploma June 1926 Fire Ixlng 1926 Edna Deane Deuel 109 W Jefferson St Ixirksville Mo Kindergarten Primary Diploma June 1926 Circus 1926 Isabel Minick, 503 W Second St Washington Iowa Kindergarten Primary Diploma June 1926, Choir 1924 25 26 Jeanette Sutliif, 118 Parkside Drive Peoria Ill Kindergarten Primary Diploma June 1926 Choir 1924 25 26 Broadcast over Radio 4 2592522541 lllillllillllllllllll IllIlllIIIllllllllllIlllllllllllIllIlIIIIIIlllllllllllllIIIIlillllillllllllllIIIllllllIllllllllIllIlllllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIllllllllllll llll IIIIIP E -'55 I 6SiK'-i3'5S5'li?3E23lElllIl IIIllIIlllllllIIIIIIIIEIEZSSS-iiiif? T H E 'N A T I 0 N A L 'flQZQEESZHIEIIlllllllllllllllllllllllllli!2EE2vEs5QEg4i6'j4gZ6 Pi Y , 11: n QS! 5 4 S 'i Wi :i ,lr- E Mrs. Edith Craig Martha Woodbury Beatrice Engstrand Mae Neitz E E Jessie MacLennan Vivian Needham Jessie Scherer Ruth Boots Helen Bosshard E .- .- Mrs. Edith Craig, 512 Lake St., Oak Park, Ill. 1 Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 1926, Town Girls Associationg Choir, 1925, '26. , Martha Woodbury, Hebron, Ill. Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 1926. Br-'itirice Engstrand, 5858 S. Halsted St., Chicago, Ill. -D W kindergarten Primary Diploma June 1926 Town Girls Association Mae Neltz 125 N Bramard St Mapleville Ill Kindergarten Primary Diploma June 1926 Jessie MacLennan 812 Penn Ave Gary, Ind Kindergarten Primary Diploma June 1926 Town Girls Association 1924 25 Vivian Needham Sugar Grove Ill Kindergarten Primary Diploma June 1926 Choir 1925 26 Circus 1926 Town Girls Association Jessie Scherer, 12 Mason St Hammond Ind Kindergarten Primary Diploma June 1926, Town Girls Assoclatlon 1926 Kindergarten Primary Diploma June 1926, Choir 1925 26 Town Girls Association Helen Bosshard Bangor Wis Kindergarten Primary Diploma June 1926 'll dd if llllllllllIlllllllllllllIlllllllIIIIIIIIIIIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIlllllllllIlllllIlllllIlllillllllllllIlIllllllllllllllllllllllIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll if Qbnr E ,. v I - . . , S . . . I E E 7 ' 'J 7 ' E E . I - . . y Q E E i , . ., . E : . . . n . . . , E E ' 7 7 7 7 ' E E ' ' 7 , - E : . . . ' . . . l ,- E E ' 7 7 7 7 y 7 7 7 E E ' -7 7 f E E . - . K . 7 . . . . , l E Ruth Boots, 60 Cedar St., Chicago, Ill. . ' 7 7 7 7 ' M Si P . Q Q 7 7 ' . - i. . , , Ig: Qi if 46 92 ll ,, , , ,lf 3" 'i',gg1j'3z?3!f5.'j11H. E E 5 E .il?2i94S'T'3z?L.'5 ' F gas:-zfmfaaasuii111111111111111111111lillulslepssszaiib' T H E N A T I 0 N A L ii.EREZQEQHIHIIIllIllllllllIIIIIIIllllIlIilEEE2?ZS1Z?4i9Z:2li9 Pa . 21 .0 9 ' .Q - 6 . 9 - S - 2 2 e 1 nn E May Whitmack Louise Bush Virginia Tourtelotte Julia Strohm E E Janet Copenhaver Winifred Wilson Alma Prange V Evelyn Mattson E E May Whitmack, 707 32nd St., Billings, Mont. E E Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 1926 g Choir, 1925, '26. E E Louise Bush, 6330 Ada st., Chicago, 111. E E Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 1926. E E Virginia Tourtelotte, 619 Upper Third St., Evansville, Ind. - E E Kindoigortoiilpiimoiy Diploma, June 1926, Editor Chaff, 1925, '26, Choir, 1924, '25, '26, 5 E Treasurer Freshman Class, 1924, '25, Student Council, 1924, '25, '26. E E Julia Strohm, 351 E. Market St., Napponee, Ind. E E Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 1926. E E Janet Copenhaver, Bellflower, Ill. E E Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 1926. E E Wiiiifiod Wilson, 335 s. Humphry Avo., ook Pork, 111. E E Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 1926. President Junior Class, 1925, '26, Student E E Council, 1925, '26, Fire King, 1926 5 Town Girls Association. 3 E Alma Prange, 233 N. Cuyler Ave., Oak Park Ill. E E Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 1926, Treasurer Junior Class, 1925, '26, Secretary E Student Council, 1925, '26, Town Girls Association. -'Q Evelyn Mattson, 215 N. Parkside Ave., Chicago, Ill. Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 1925, Town Girls Association 5 Chairman Stables 5, Dance Committee, 1926. . 47 is1'c:i.a5iu-Emeassifeesil 11151119lllllmlllllllllllllllll1I111InIIlllmIIIIIIIllIIIn1II1ullIIlllllllllmllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll1llm1lll1l11lI111llllll1111llllllllllllllllellllill 11125-Masai:-1-5i1gvsi.'2x'ifE , 1 lg Fil! l F! I K? - .. f if-hzx ,. 1. 'J f: 1 6 ' ""' 3'eSi?EQ?3!Ei5lHIIIllllllIllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIEIIEEH-S955.iii T H E N A T I 0 N A L iiii-ElfiiglhllllllllllllIlllllllllllIIllilES35 Q245 22125 Pa Y 92 0 A YQ 4 N '- 1 1 S 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 S 1 1 1 1 1 1 S 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 in' 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 5' 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 S 1 1 1 1 1 1 .1 1 2 -1 1 S ' S 1 2 Z S S 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 2 2 S 1 1 1 'S 1 1 1 5' S 1 1 S 1 1 1 2 2 --. " ' A ,,,,, .,,..., i Mae Markkanen Mary Saxe Selma Huttner Do1'othy Allen Marjorie Eason Frances Antink Autumn Bartholomew Lois Wertz Mae Markkanen, 1818 Vermillion Road, Duluth, Minn. Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 1926. Mary Saxe, 2225 Ridge Ave., Evanston, Ill. Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, July 1926, Photograph Editor Annual, 1926, Chairman Circus, 1926, Tribune, Fire King, 1926, Town Girls Association, 1925. Selma Huttner, 5222 Ingleside Ave., Chicago, Ill. Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 1926, Circus, 1926 5 Town Girls Association. Dorothy Allen, 170 Elmwood Ave., Oak Park, Ill. Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 1926, Assistant Editor Chaff., 1926, Choir, 1925, '26, Town Girls Association. Marjorie Eason, 921 Washington St., Evanston, Ill. Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, July 1926 , Town Girls Association. Frances Antink, 232 N. Elmwood Ave., Oak Park, Ill. Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 1926, Town Girls Association. Autumn Bartholomew, Pioneer Apt., No. 12 Franklin St., Valpraiso, Ind. Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 1926. it - ef 1 . l '6 2 Lois Wertz, 809 S. Greenwood Ave., Kankakee, Ill. Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 1926, Circus, 1926. is fl 48 5 if if gldiagswihQSSTZHHIIIIIEIIIliIllllllllllllllllIIIlllllllllllllIIIlIIllIllIIIIIllIIIIllllllllllllllIlllIlllIIllllllllllllllllllllllll llllllIIlllllllIIIllIIllllllllllllllllllllllllIIll!!IIIEIllIl!.ZE?5fliEki?5f3'3!?LE35'5iE Q: 4. ,. in igiiwiisii-l3?2EE3!ElIllIIIIIIIIIlllllllllIIIIIIEIEESSSZA.I 'F H E N A T 1 0 N A lf 5364?-EGRIhllllllllllllllllllIIIIlllIlIiI2EE5 'Z?4E?'iZ:2g F li 'Q it E 5 E : Catherine Jane Francis Helen Bart Ruth Garretson Dorothy Berry E : Elizabeth Shoesmith Margaret Hulse Rosa Petry Arlene Fleming E E Catherine Jane Francis, 1037 Riverside Drive, South Bend, Ind. E E Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 1926. E E Helen Bart, 1213 Noble st., Chicago, Ill. 5 g Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 1926 3 Town Girls Association. E 5 Ruth Garretson, 7704 Paxton Ave., Chicago, Ill. E : Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, July 19265 Town Girls Association. E : Dorothy Bel ry, National Military Home, Kansas. E E Kindergarten Primary Diploma, June 1926. E 5 Elizabeth Shoesmith, Lena, Ill. - E E Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 1926 5 Dance Committee, 1926. E E Margaret Hulse, 942 County St., Waukegan, Ill. E E Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 1926. 2 gg Rosa Petry, 2515 Hartzell St., Evanston, Ill. :E- E Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 1926 3 Town Girls Association. 1 . . E sq Arlene Fleming, 24 Mary Day Ave., Pontiac, Mich. - H President Student Government, 19255 Choir, 1924, '25. ?lidiQ5!7Z'3M!l5i'i?ii!l IIIEIIIEIIIIIIIIIIIIllIlllIllIIIllIlllllllllllllllIIllIlllIllIIllIIIIIllllllIllllllllllllllllIIllIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllIIllIllIlIllllllllllllllllllllillllilllll!ZQ5f5A52E?if2'3z?lE3blE QA 528i52si5? ?3! ililllllllllllllllllllllIIIIIIIEIZESSSS-iii-.12 T H E N A T I 0 N X L :IHia'-ETHIHIIIIIIllllllllllllIIIIlllllliP?E?EE5fiif'E3!4i?2Z21C65 W in od f,, A 541 1 1. S - 2 S .- 2 1 - 1 Z S - - - - - .- .- - 2 .- 1 an L' S S S -I - S " "' S - L ,X --- .1- - 2 S ' - ': - - 2. 2 Z S 2 2 - 2 - 2 - S :- S S S Mary Elizabeth Roark Alice Weber Ethel Belden Gladys Reuther - Sxgne Nelson Ehzabeth N eureuther Mary Kathryn O Br1en Mabel Chadwlck Mary Ehzabeth Roark 121 W Ma1n St , G1eenv1lle Ky Ixlndergarten Prlmary Dlploma June 1926 Allce Weber 528 Orleans St Ixeokuk Iowa Ixmdergarten Pnmary D1ploma June 1926, Town G1r1s Assoc1at1on Ethel Belden 7202 Jeffery Ave Chlcago Ill Ixmdergarten Prlmary Dlploma July 1926 Town G1rls ASSOC1at1OH Gladys Reuther, 817 West Fayette Ave Effingham Ill Kmdergarten Pr1mary Dlploma June 1926 Sxgne Nelson 1409 Seventh Ave S Eseanaba M1ch Ixmdergarten Prlmary Dlploma June 1926 K1ndergartenPr1rna1y Dlploma June 1926 Cholr 1924 25 26 Clrcus 1926 Mary Kathryn O Br1en 247 Masterson Ave , Fort Wayne Ind Kmdergarten Pr1mary D1ploma June 1926 Joke Edltor Annual, 1925 Mabel Chadwxck 520 E Euclld Ave San Antonxo, Texas Kmdergarten Prlmary D1ploma February 1927 Town Glrls ASSOCIZTIOD 'nada 'if llllll IllIlllllllllllllIlIIllIllllllllllllllllllllllIllllllllllllllllllllllllIlllllllllIlllllllllllllllllllIllllIlllllllllllllllllllllllIlllllllIlllllllllllllllllIlllllllll F Qblf' Q . ' . , . . 2 E 1 ', . . ' , . E E Y ' " 'J ' . E E ' J ' '! 7 7 ' E E ' ' s 'x 1 ' E E ,. n . A . , 3 . . . l E E . V - . . I . E E E E J 'J '1 J ' E -E: Elizabeth Neureuther, 1521 Second St., Peru, Ill. E E ' ' , ' , ' 7 J . ' E 5 ' 1 7 - 1 1 1 1 2 ' E E E E 1 - E 5 7 ' 1 ' 5 . - . . y 5 I . A si , . ., . h . - . . U . . . . l J 50 ei is 9- sr' 5 i E 5' .4-me-5115. 5- 5 A, 3S:K'-i3Siii 2E22121llIIIIIllIIllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIEIEEEZSSBQ1 T H E N A T 1 0 N .X I.. Ii,QEZEGHIHlllllllllllllllllllIllllllllilEEE55 i?ifi?'iZ:If if 1 iq E M E E ff ,, 5 E 2 E f 6 Q.. 4124? E E 1 f Kilt E E gd ..,,. -. E E ' ff' if . E E f 5 E 1 I E E Irene Parsons Gertrude St. Clair Harriet Steadman Nan Bauer , E E Grace Roosman Grace Finch Ada May Ellett Eleanor Svaty E I Irene Parsons, 4401 Broadway, Gary, Ind. E E Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 1926, Organizations Editor Annual, 19265 Treasurer E E Mid-Year Class, 19255 Student Council, 1925, Circus, 1926. 2 E Gertrude St. Clair, 605 S. Cedar St., Owatonna, Minn. . E E Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 1926, Fire King, 1926 5 Circus, 1926. E E Harriet Steadman, 120 S. Maple St., McPherson, Kansas. E E Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 1926 5 Town Girls Association. E E Nan Bauer, 416 S. Harrison St., Saginaw, Mich. E E Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 1926. E E Grace Roosman, 2224 Giddings St., Chicago, Ill. E E Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 1926 g Literary Editor Annual, 19263 Chairman E E Director's Tea, 19263 Town Girls Association 3 Circus, 1926. E E Grace Finch, 500 W. Armstrong Ave., Peoria, Ill. E E Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 1926 g Choir, 1924, '25, '26. E ? Ada May Ellett, 503 s. Third st., Watseka, 111. ' Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 19265 Town Girls Association. g Eleanor Svaty, 315 Third E. St., Ellsworth, Kan. Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 1926. 35 aicziasfvz-SffesitzillllllslIllillllIIIllIllllllllIllllllmlllllllllllllllllllllllllllIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIIllllIllllllllllllllllmllmmlllllllllllllllllllllllllllIle:lllilllllEs-iraswsnrilasbrni Ge iiifii'-iiii 2 ?'2!!i!lk1IllIlllllIIIlllllllIIIIIIIIEIEEESQQ.: 'l' H E N A T I 0 N A L iii.xzaaasmalsliilllllllniilllll1Inllllisizszasmfsemazfzij ws. , -ii 'ix iw i in : E l ' E E 1 A E " E E Pearl Bobele Virginia Strickler Ardis Hawk Dorothy Carnright E 5 . . . E LE- Agnes Hilton Louise Forney Pearl Wheeler Louise Helz E E Pearl Bobele, 920 W. Fifth Ave., Gary, Ind. 5 E Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 1926 5 Town Girls Association. ' E Ardis Hawk, Midlothian, 111. l E Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 19263 Town Girls Association. E E Dorothy Carnright, 1109 Monroe St., Evanston, Ill. E E Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 1926 5 Circus, 1926 5 Director's Tea Committee, 1926 3 E E Dance Committee, 1925 5 Town Girls Association. . E E Agnes Hilton, Benton Harbor, Mich. E E Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 1926 5 Town Girls Association. E E Louise Forney, 520 N. Spruce St., Abilene, Kansas. E E Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 1926. E E Pearl Wheeler, 810 N. Jefferson Ave., Mason City, Iowa. E Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 1926, Fire King, 1926. Louise Helz, Arlington Heights, Ill. 5 Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 19265 Town Girls Association. :fit I 52 gl'di!5:H'EiK!?5ilZEE5!l lllillllilllllllll ll Illllllll lllllllll Ill llllllllllllIIIIIllllIlllllllllllilllllllllllllllllIIlllIllllIIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIlllllllllllllllIlllilllIEIIIII!EE?jf4.ltei?i5'51?LE35'ir'E igsewaasmmasassiiml11111111illulilllllllllslssssaajj? T H E N A T I 0 N A L f11,gzfziseialn1111111111111111111111llllararxszafmfzzi-sarzzmii J E Pauline Kirschten Florence Hammel Miriam Bilger Nina Criss 5 E Pauline Kirschten, 726 Monroe St., Evanston, Ill. Z E Miriam Bilger, 309 Bruce sir., sin-inini, 111. E E Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 19265 Town Girls Association. 5 E Neiva Mayall, 910 W. Macon si., Clinton, 111. E L1 IE E Neiva Mayall Evelyn Anderson Marion Blomgren Luella Rupert E Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 1926, Town Girls Association 5 Circus, 1926. g Florence Hammel, 2131 Knoxville Ave., Peoria, Ill. 5 :Lg Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 19265 Treasurer Student Government, 1925, '26, E E Vice-President Freshman Class, 1924, '25 5 Student Council, 1924, '25. E E 'Nina Criss, 902 So. 38th St., Omaha, Neb. E 5 Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 1926 5 Choir, 1924, ,25, '26. 1 E E Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 1926 5 Town Girls Association. E E Evelyn Anderson, 452 Lincoln St., Gary, Ind. E E Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 1926 3 Town Girls Association, 1925, Circus, 1926. 5 Marion Blomgren, 5400 Lakewood Ave., Chicago, Ill. E Kindergarten-PrimaryDiploma, June 1926 5 Dance Committee, 1926 3 Town Girls Association. :: i. 'g 2 Luella Rupert, Bloomfield, Nnb. Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June, 1926. . H S! - A F4 Fa SiEi!5:7i'3.'?2f?5Siii!l lllillllillllllllllllllIlllllllllllllllll IllllllllllIlllllllllIllllllllIIIIllllllllllllllllllllllllIlllllllllllllllIlllIllillllllllllllllllIIIIIIIIlllllllllllllllillllilIlIlEE?5fii!5?5f3'313LEbiF -s .95 265:K'-i?'S5'Z ?2!Ei5lElllllllllllllIllIllIIIIIIIIIEIESSE-iii-,Zii 'I' ll E N A T I 0 N A Ii 511.kliiliiililllllllllllllllllllllllIIlllilEEE5' fZ?4i6iZ:26 it Q gd 4 E E Lucile Faulluher Helen Pierce Ethel Tallrnan Gladys Huntley E E Dorothy Knowles Georgia Lee Stemper Virginia Cohen Geraldine Behensky E E Liioilo Fauqiihor, R. F. D. No. 5, Evansville, Ind. E E Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 1926, Choir, 1924, '25, '26. E E Helen Pierce, 4423 N. Seeley Ave., Chicago, Ill. E E Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 1926, Choir, 1924, '25, '26, Town Girls Association. E E Ethel Tallmon, R. F. D. No. 2, Fostoria, Ohio. E E Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, July 1926. E E Gladys Huntley, 1730 Forest Ave., Wilmette, Ill. E E Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 1926, Secretary Town Girls Association, Choir, 1925, E 5 '26. E E Dorothy Knowles, 816 Crescent Place, Chicago, Ill. E E Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 1926 5 Town Girls Association. E E Georgia Lee Stemper, 1408 Gum St., Evansville, Ind. E E Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 1926, Vice-President Junior Class, 1925, '26, Cheer E E Leader Junior Class, 1926, Student Council 1925, '26, President Mid-year Class, 1925, E E ' Secretary Student Government, 1926, Circus, 1926. E Virginia Cohen, Fredericktown, Missouri. Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 1926. Art Editor Annual, 1926. if ui if 1 K Geraldine Behensky, 627 Jackson Blvd., Oak Park, Ill. Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 1926, Town Girls Association, Choir 1925, '26, 54 ?" iiieieusui-rafiesicixsl lllsllltilllllllllllllllllllllllllllIIllIllIIIIlllllllllllllllllllulllllllllllllllll IIllllIlIllIlllllllllllllllllllllllIllllll I llllllllllllllllllllllllllllIII91III5IIllllissifiaiffs-2-Fi2a1Si,':a'iii 1 2 --. QE sl 4. 35:5q1J53,,i-5i35g5EgmulnlnumuIlllllllllnilgiqgfgfgi:E, T H E N :K T I 0 N A 1, -iiifafiqalhllllllllllllllllllllllIlllllilgi5i5?2E4i'?5f-fiifltfii if W H fuf Q51 E E Adele Adam Mary Anne Karcher Caroline Totera Mary Ryburn E 3 Bessie Rumpf Lucile Molison Beatrice Lyddon Geraldine Wagner : E Adele Adam, Arlington Heights, Ill. 5 5 Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 19265 Circulation Manager, Chaff, 1926, Town Girls E E Association. E EE: Mary Anne Karcher, 42 Marion Ave., Mansfield, Ohio. E ? I Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 1926. E E Caroline Totera, 2321 Fullerton Ave., Chicago, Ill. Q E Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 1926 3 Town Girls Association. E E Mary Ryburn, 703 N. 29th St., Billings, Mont. 3 E Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, July 1926. E E Bessie Rumpf, Rt. 5, Baraboo, Wis. : 3 Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 1926. E E Lucile Molison, Malcom, Iowa. E E Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, Lune 1926. 2 5 Beatrice Lyddon, 1804 w. snare si., Rockford, Ill. Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 1926. ,Q Geraldine Wagner, Fredericktown, Mo. ?, Kindergarten-Primary Diploma, June 1926. 55 . If i 'Gi!5Q7i'3a?3kgiiillIIllEllllilllllllllllllllllllIllIllllllllllIllllllllllllIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIlllllllllllllllllllll llllllllIIIIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllillllllfii' 3A:i9if'1'3z?L532'il?i .1- . ,...... .. - ..-. --. ....,,.... .. ,, 7.1 3145iwiiii-23535231illIIllIllIIllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIEIEEESH9 T H E N A T I 0 B A l, 11.,smfazmdlallIIIIllllllllllllllllllllllalisikfk1134261296 vu n 555 -1. 00 ? 1 1 sa ' cl? F? 1- ' .- - - - nn - Q .- - - - - 1 - " 2 " .- Q - .- - .- - -1 - - - Catherlne Best Irene Ambre Lee Huckstep Paulme Parmelee Verna Altermatt Zeta Gunnmg Edna McConnell Velda Jury Cfxtheune Beat 1011 Douglae bt Ale'candr1a Mmn Iundergarten Prlmary Dlploma June 1926 Irene Ambre Hyslop Place Hammond Ind Ixmdergarten Prun-ary Dlploma, June 1926, Fire lung 1926, Town Gnls Assoclatlon Lee Huclwtep Eol11 Mo Ixmdergarten Prnnarv D1plOlT1a June 1926 Cholr 1925 26 Town GITIS Assoc1at1on Paulme Parmelee 1325 South 36'rh Street Omaha, Neb Ixmdergarten Prlmaly Dlploma June 1926, Flre Ixmg 1926 Tovsn Glrls Assoclatlon Joke Ed tor Chaff 1925 26 Verna Altermatt 419 W 61st Place, Chlcago, Ill Ixmdergarten Prlmarx Dlploml June 1926 Town Glrle Aasoclatlon Zeta Gunmng 951M Edgecomb Place Chlcago, Ill Ixmdergarten Prlmary Dlploma June 1926 To n GITIS Assoclaflon Ixmdergarten Prlmary D1ploma, June 1926 To n Gxrls Assoelatxon W Velda Jury Washburn Ill Klndergarten Prlmarv Dlploma, June 1926 1re Kmg, 1926 Z 1 E E 'C lv ', L. ., A 4 , n E E ,. V - . . X, U E E 1 S 1 1 ' E E , - K , . , , - . . E E 'S I , 'z , ' . E 5 ,. . . s . . , ' . . . E E C ' 1 . 1 1 1 1 1 V ' E E - 1 4 '1 1 1 ' E 1 , Q L 1 f , . E 3 ,.. Y - . ' . . . v. l V . . . E ' ' 1 1 1 ' ' 1 E ,- 1 5 . , , . E Q ,. , , - . V, . 2 , 3 , . K M . . ' E E E E ' 1 1 ' E E ,. , , - . . y 3 W . A . X. . E 2 Edna McConnell, 111 Conkey Ave., Hammond, Ind. E ,. . . K l . . . - ' ' ' ' A Zi w Q M 1 1 ' 1 52 . . . . . if ' L 1 S F . :gi 56 1124 if llllllIll!IllIIIIIlllllIIIIIllIllIllllllllllllllllllIlllIIIIIIlllllllIlllllllllllllllIllllllllllllllIIlllllllllllIllllllIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIillllllll 16 95'-'NV Freshmen fs! Mi ' E .vl i3sQsz'.smsmefaa2Qsa1llllIInuuIumllllllluulslassssssL3 T H E N rx T 1 0 N A L 1gzaaimamnmmmunnInI111ulnlrszasssfmfaaliazfpeg 25 uf Ya 5 FRESHMEN CLASS OFFICERS 2 5 1925-1926 2 E Clara Locke. ..... .............. P resident E E Jane Shelly ........,ll,f. .,,.,.. V ice-President E E Kathryn Reintges ...l ...... Secretary E E Myrthel Strand ........ ,,,-,,,, T reasurer E E Miss Laura Harper ....... ,...., C lass Sponsor ? - N 52 Po .02 fy 58 if afazeasnz-amsssemu ma:u:funnmlnumummmnluuummmmnmmuumnumuumummmuInnmummunnuuummmmm mnunnlllluluuammmuuunzmfaessfz-amssrsia 9 N iiiiliiiiiilllIIIIIIIIIIlllllllIIlIIllIEIEiSirSi3i,.ifl T H E N .X T I 0 N .X I. iii.iiiliiiilhlIllIIIIllIIIIIIIlIlIIlllllIiIES!55 '22+'i I ei'- MID-YEAR FRESHMEN Somewhat bewildered by the numerous scaffolds, paint pots and other ob- structions, as well as by the highly excited and happy upper classmen a new class of thirty-nine entered National's new home. We were lost just as many times as the juniors and freshmen, but felt relieved when we found the right classroom. Some of us had been down in the college building on Michigan and knew why the old girls were so excited and overwhelmed with the joy of being away from soot, smoky air and noise. We felt right at home the first day and joined in with them to show our joy of being the first class to enroll in the new building. We have not organized as a class, but will enter with the incoming freshmen in September, and so beware, because a double dose of pep and brightness will do-well, upper classmen, wait and see. We love N. K. E. C. and hope you will all love us. RIPENING OF THE HCREENINGSH To most of the universe September 11, 1925, was perhaps just another of those common, uneventful days that merely combines itself into a week. To almost one hundred and fifty girls representing practically every portion of this same universe, however, there will never be another such day, for it was Freshman registration at N. K. E. C. Unlike the common idea concerning Freshman classes, We new-comers were not petrified to the extent of shaking, but signed our names on innumerable cards and took our I. Q. tests in the best of jolly, friendly spirits. That night when everyone felt a sense of relief that the "First day" was over, some very kindhearted individuals sponsored a party at Avilla House in order to make us feel at home, an affair which went beyond that for it made us feel Hwantedf' Not long were we to remain inconspicuous, for by upper classmen dictation we scraped and bowed, sang and danced, argued and debated on undebatable subjects, mailed laundry boxes and made beds, but never were we seen without the baby cap on our heads and the rattle in our hands. At the end of initiation week We were happy to have gained the name of "good sports" and much impressed by our formal admission into Student Government. Then we decided it was time to organize, to prove our worth, and to do our share in the school of which we were now actually a part. Accordingly, with much enthusiastic interest we unani- mously elected our temporary class officers to the permanent positions of Presi- dent, Vice-President, Secretary, Treasurer, and Social Chairman. Under the leadership of the Misses Clara Locke, Jane Shelley, Kaye Reintges. Myrtle Strand, and Jeanne Forsythe, respectively, We starteld out to accomplish things-of course, with the advice and assistance of our popular class sponsor, Miss Hooper. And we are only hoping that in the eyes of others We did accomplish things. The originality of the class has been displayed in more ways than one. The production and sale of attractive little red books containing the names and ad- dresses of the entire student body and faculty has proved invaluable to both the class treasury and the purchaser of the book. Desiring in some way to help in the furnishings of the new college, the Freshmen presented Miss Baker with a check to be used for a desk chair in her office. The clock in Miss Hooper's office is also a gift from the class. The Thanksgiving Festival, Song Day, and Christmas offerings for charitable institutions all had our most hearty support. The highly successful Freshman Informal dance, under the management of an able com- mittee, was held at the Evanston Country Club on the night of April the tenth. Always ready, always Willing we have tried to be. Someone has been complimentary enough to say that ours is one of the best Freshman classes National has ever seen. If what we have done in the past merits that praise, what we are going to do in the future cannot do otherwise than give the class of '27 a good name, and unexcelled reputation, and the right to be an example to and a leader of other Freshman classes to come. 59 1 1 2 4 'ffikiiiiiillllllillllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIIllIlllllllIIllllllllllllllllllllIllllllllllllllllllllllIlllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllIlllllllllllllllIlllIIIIEIIIIEIIIIIIZETSEEEEifiiv Q 55 r l 3 Q 5 N0 if .Q- 4 Eli -6 FQ 09 K7, ,Nag f -.y SD ,-. V cs , I PO ... as 2 Q. 4: .20 53 n-4 Q CG CD . P1 2 LYS fo an : Q -o CD F-4 -:J : i S O M wa ir 6311118 ssel 3 CG 13, HS QI' f X 1 W Fl E5 5 v-4 4 Q. Hanse ELG Johnson, M Lillian Granger, orothy D 8 OO M K ithryn 1 Runstron Ri th Stevens S6 OU L TY 21 Stoeffhas, ook, Helen 1. nB Hele den, ey yH oth OI' Dameier, D l ceney y I1 2 .18 Lu! 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Q5 OMG: :log 'QME 'E3,gii"lg -U ,,:1i'f'E2iS4 3 'CCONU :GIA CD v-4 ,-4 2 011 g F k Marv OOD M a bel M TCSS T U 2 .D l IIE' OI' .M O 'O GJ 2 E .-4 x H K 1I1 I'II1 A L6 as 5 avis, l STIIIC C F h Verna Covey Dagn Fd erger l 'll fl if 0 S 2 l 5 E E T il 0 Q 4 ll :Y 5'Hafifiifiiigiiiivlg!IlilllllillIIllllllllIllllllllllllllllIIIlllIIIllllllllIIIIIllIIlIIllllIIllIIlllllllllllllllllllllllll llllllllllllllllllllllllIlllllllllllllllllll lllllllll F F 'M3g?', M L - A - E Q Bottom Row-Cath , i Wilcox, G ' C , l, J Forsythe, Th M i i , 1, f , z 1' , ar Al , Mary Burnett, Virginia Barte, Geneva , f , Gu n, Ada Merke. Second Row4Leah Bruns, Sy via Beckwel, Kathryn Kin , rs. olmey, Lillian , -il W , L Shobac , ildr C o , Elva Osb W, Thelma Gower, Mi dred Tengdin lizabeth Reinhardt, Lois Scharf, Lorena Polloc , Ela i Top Row-Elizabeth Pardee, Rober ath ' Cook, Mi dred D ' re ora is , , 35 Mi dred Schneb . 5 .3 -f W f 5 X 14, . is . ., ifwgnamanmmumunnii' e 'Q H yfl QiijiiiT'T, .HHH ,Q ml H I iumimiilii lulu lummulllllllnnnmimlmmmullniiilislngerssaswseeeseasg ff D H-7 Q95 6 QL A Vf,,', E E E , 'E 5 ' 5 E .-, P., 2 1 E f I . . . , . . . . ' Q Bottom Row4Donna Mowry, Naomi Roy, Alice Ling, Rose Fourth Row-Mildred Ixatz, Rosalind Charm, Edith Manierre, I 'E Kant.er, Helen Hover, Dorothy Graves, Jeanette Phelps, Josephine Lawrence, Marian Fish, Anne Rosen, Mary Hemb, F, E Marie Polkus, Eleanor Bartlett, Lorain Andrejeski, Rosalie Beatrice Clark, Mary Salerno, Marjorie Lyle, Alcinda Maggart, 5-1 E Buddinger, Harriet Ling, Elizabeth Peabody Dorothea Dean. Dorothy Titus Mary Catherine McDonald, Virginia Schlect, t ,,,, n S 2 1 ,I , EE- Frances Morrow, Martha Ellen Day. E Second Row-Mildred Kennedy Kay Reintges Grace Schertz , E 1 Q r . - - I , V gn.: E Alice Stolz, Grace Ryerson, Charlotte Doolittle, Gladys Fiqh REW gut? Slottfwr' Mildred Rogilsf Aungfhai' Elvgly H E Morris, Laura Adams, Helen Bracewell, Eva Roy, Marjorie Lan? Hi gm y3hFTe7erg6lf1EdIm1g!AITc611331 ,bile I ngelffmt E E Andurski, Valborg Nyden, Marguerite Kinney, Minna Green. muse rwmi ar Otte I S' muon X me 9 tg' mum E E McCo1d Petr Mutch Al Pegg, Eugen a Hill E Third Row-Lillian Olmsted, Frances Ash, Helen Gray, Mary Sixth Row-Kirk Algeo, Jane Shelly, Evelyn Telford, Irina E Alice Kirtley, Helen Wise, Florence Weber, Alta Eshelman, Keith, Virgene Hembroff, Alice Snedecker, Eleanor Wylie, Laura Meins, Mary Alice Penfield, Helen Alexander, Mary Mildred Jacobson, Dorothy Livingston, Rosalie Mar , Hummel, Rowena Noe. Beatrice Henderson. L. L.. .L e , .... , .,..,. .... .. iliEk7!WS5?i2?iQiEiIIillllliIllIlllllIlllllllllllllllllllllllll Illlllllllllllll lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll Illl Illl lllllllllllllll lllllllllllllllllll lllllllllIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIlllllIIIllllllllllIllllIlllllllllllllllllllllIllllllllllllllIllllllllllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHII!IIE,'FLKsa!Pe,qee!45955 siii'-i?s1iii?i325?S1ElllllllIllllllllllllllllIIIIEIEEEE-iii T H E N A T I 0 X A I, QgagiqglgllmlIllllnlI1nIIImlllrgggg5gimg,224i9!Z:2eg Pi V We 0 'QE f Q E E E in 5? S1 13 59 7 1 V 312 F EMOFMES R ..- S 1 1 - .- - S 2 - - 2. S - 3344 MICHIGAN' QLVD, "Lev Mfuse' vous: E PowDERfH E xEEE'eufEl, E 'N 3.0 MINUTES FROM-THE C - YLL TMEE9' You VIVDFW THE I-COKE R CLOCK' scewi GIRLS' 0E1v1ovS WHT! OV ScfrooL 753 mg! N1 ,, CANDY -S7'orP1- ., X ' 4 YT X V NDY STORY: 135 2 4 i fx 0 K C' 1 Qi' x 1 G Q-Q1 D lflVOVl.E.S' di-e "" "5?'f!lIIlIllllllllllllllllllllllllllIIIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIII1IlllllllllllllllllllllllllIlIllIllllllllllllllllllllllllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIKIIIIIIRWF x' bbw' E l 5 any E E 'rv + -L E E E 5 A, - -L . . E V1 un QU U- '- n- 'J ' S E . , 7 5 E F79 ' 'i2Q7,2.,x N 1 E 5 'm I 5 E 5 a ' 'W ' CR ' E 2 X N" O la A E E 1 ., , K, A Q E E - . W A , n gg E E B53 1 Q I . 3, .Ja E N V A --- 5 9 . -1 ni, -. I ,.,...-.... 5 g x 7 F , mu V -5: E ' 51' . E "2 I' f Q' in ab g - 'V ' 1 A ' vi ' ' ZQZ Qi 452 F' if: ..., . . .... . . - f . . ' " X Y Rx 3 AX 1 I Y . yy X 2 f w , P , 1 : 'X - ' 1 3 x 'X 1 X fX 4 N 5 1 , , . JA . X "Q 1 QI Q Y W N .' 5 x V l e E x f Y x ' . 'Lx I ' F +. I I X l , f f--59 I V 1, W I 2 K as . , I , I i ' 'NK . 1 R i Q E ,Xl-Nz, X A' XQAX .X V , n , ..,7....N - 5 ei Lf gl ff ! I ' v ,l " ' :gill ii.-4?-V Y Ffh Xi 1 4, 4- 1- 'F' l X14 Q12 4 P wi,f 1ff " r,L:i 14 ,flf fd Mw 'X"f" limit: 4 Ll J! -,E lawn fglf f llqi x Us A 21 gn A QQTLI Uf fp' J---Z-lf! Qifwda QLLSEL Xi -Wmffef V VE X ,. f' , . --- - A .75 ,f ' A l'f'!?,5 21 ', ' Q l4'.1"Q,izA." ' I M " fffh-IfI" ! 1 J' n "ff - I ,. - ,W H fm, 'W A1Q,IZJ.lv- ' Ifa7L'fff1f if i'f'wff' " ' 1 F f f 4'5'?4"fri :W Wi , ff':f"5ff!il if Yf ' 4 'QFJIVJ-17' gf N xg Q f ' ' 'H fl' I gfgwi-wwf , H M- -. iffvf H Wy if 1 ll uh fs , 'TAIL 'gm wr' jj", tl ,Q iifii 4 ,Z - e fm ' Q 1 Q 'Pi ai H wg:-R in film" -,hY s' 1"' I law' -VHP' 1 'A CT 1vW 1 T 1 if ytuimq Et' 7 xml- ' al L A ' ,A ,W Pm 7 ki -,mf- ff Z by fy 1 VL? .fl -M , f'1?3N "V"i.., I ' f E ' I 5- ' im r ' ff 1 i gx It .I my-,, . ' r K Yj,""y',fy . 'lx ,H ' H1577 Q 5"',':"E5 f3 uf5'K' V fiw 7 ,, fm lH3'Qj'A !lf,Ig'APd V f1V 'fy 4, -f'fX I'Ej 1 J fHmw"'5V.' 'f v V "ul Nui? 1 H3 54 ff'-N , M , :ski 'Q 11 1 Y YP ' ghxm Emil' 52' I L! ,Hn I 1,1-Qfxsl' f,i,7i:'k.' 'I Iqigfff fu ' 44 I L .N 'Ji ,J V, HL! A ,K if 'Ni I',l l ' ,V JV 'VWZ14 X f N L5 ff - " vw , . If V, h -4- K I-Z 'gf ' ' K 1 ' t I :fp ,ff f-Q' U! Ev. ,W Mk, ,,-,JL -u-- - ff-14:1--L V -'-- ' , , .,..l....i+-. W..- , W, , -A,,..,4-,. Y ,-....----------M -- -- 'Y A- 241 E iggggvasgegtzxaggagqazlllilIIlIIIIlllllullllllllilsisegsgszgjf? T H E N .-X T I 0 N A L iff.kaizfimilInIIllIIIIIIIIIIIlllllllllllllilieiiifbwfa? 1 C ki A S S E M B L 1 E S Stories by Miss Hemingway ,..,.... ....... S eptember 17, 1925 Q '4Value of Travell' ,..,,....,,, .......,,.S..S..,,S...SSS,SMSSSSSSS,,SSS.S... SSSS... S e ptember 23, 1925 E Dr. George Scherger E "Dramatic Art in School" ............,ooo.,...,..,........o..ooooooooo.,.,.......,o,ooooo September 30, 1925 E VVillard S. Beatty, Asst. Supt. Public Schools, Winnetilia, Ill. E Talk S.,........c.ci..,......,..ccc..,.........ccccc,icc............cccc,........,.cccc....i.....,i.c.. ,...,.. o ctober 14, 1925 E Dr. Joseph Sibley, 2nd Presbyterian Church, Chicago, Ill. E College Council-Installation of Officers ...... .,..,... O ctober 21, 1925 E Musical Program ..,...........,e.ee.,..i..,....e,S............,ee.eeeeeee....,, ee..,... O ctober 28, 1925 E Miss Jeuel Prosser E Armistice Program ........,,eeee..,......eeeee,e........,eeeeeeee..e..,.r,..,....,,,.eeee,.e ...November 11, 1925 E Speeches on Peace and What Peace Meant, by Foreign Students, repre- E senting Poland, Bulgaria, Barbados, America. E Thanksgiving Festival. .....,...... ....................................... ....... N o vember 25, E Woi'k of Elizabeth McCormick Memorial Fund for E Child Welfa1'e. ......... .................................................... ....... D e cember 2, E Miss Mary Murphy E "Being Ready for Wo1'k on Health Standpointn .......... ....... D ecember 9, E - W Dr. Caroline Hedger E Christmas Festival ......................................................... ........ D ecember 18, E "Woman's Part in Government Affairsy' ....... ........ J anuary 13, E ' Mid-year Commencement .................................................................... January 26, E "Before The Camera"-Dr. Stephen A. Lloyd - 2 2 2 --. S ..- .S 1925 1925 1925 1925 1926 1926 9 51 Fel 55 63 'ff is iidi!5:E'3.?3e?5i?5iQ!l IIIE!llIiIIIIIllIIIIIIIIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllIIllIIllIIIIIllllllllllllllllllllllllllIlllllllllIIIlIIIIIIllIllIIllIIllllIIIIIllIIIIllllllllllllllllllllllllIllilIllEllllll.ZS5fJ.lfeH? Q B r ! F Q 257 fgsexsmszmseasasmllmnulllllululllnuxlslsms-size.iii T H E N .x T I 0 N A L ,iff,EIQEZGQHIHIIIllIllIIIIIIIIllllIIlllIIIiIES52? iEJE?3iZ:26 ka ii COMMENCEMENT 'S' 522 Qu 11 sv Q THE THIRTY-NINTH COMMENCEMENT E The thirty-ninth annual commencement, which marked the last of its kind E E to be held in Chicago, was celebrated in the First Presbetyrian Church. Q g The church with its decoration of palms and ferns giving forth the perfume E ' of snow white peonies, the organ prelude-how deeply it stirred us! The Fresh- E 2 men in their lovely white. bearing so gracefully the picturesque daisy chain, the 2 ' seemingly endless lines of gray-our Juniors-and the dignified Seniors black- E E gowned-these all added to that never-to-be-forgotten event. E lr Dr. Watters, the late president of the Board of Trustees, read the invocation. E " A few words by the President told of the Dream of our School and how thru the if loyalty and cooperation of our students and alumnae this had been realized. E , The address, a dynamic and vital message by Albert W. Palmer, D. D., ? E pastor of the First Congregational Church. Oak Park, dealt with "The Fine Art E l of Livingl'-to mold the raw materials of life, to visualize their possibilities, E , and to put forth every effort to realize this vision. E The choral music by the students under the direction of Miss Westervelt E l blended fittingly into the program. E i Diplomas were awarded those who had successfully completed the two and E , three-year coursesg and the Degree of Bachelor of Education to six who had com- E , pleted their fourth year. E Then followed the eagerly awaited presentation of Scholarships :- E A The Elizabeth Harrison Scholarship .,..........r..................................... ..-Kathryn Smith F A l The Mrs. John N. Crouse Scholarship ........ .............. V era Larson 2 - The Jean Carpenter Arnold Scholarship ............................................ Olive Widdowson E l The Helen Grinell Mears Scholarship .............................................. ....... E dith Johnson E l The Demonstration School Scholarship ...... Florence Hediger and Mildred Dittman ? The Mary Juliette Cooper Normal Scholarship ........................................ Ruth Hardy E 1 - E l E l S I E l E 2 S ln ?l 64 geiihimiELSYHHIEIIIEIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll IImmun:lmulmmmuln mumllImlluumummlmmluaiuuallullizsrfxfeasssss-mass.-:sig 9 x X 1llIlllllllllllllllllllllllII It C E X 9 I IIIIllllllllllllllllllllllll'I If 4 A 'Z 3, N it r' ' . 0 CONVOCATIONS SUMMER SCHOOL COMMENCEMENT Ju1y31,1925 Addres DeanR A Kent Drplomas There were thuty two who recerved drplomas Twenty erght recerved the Krndergarten Prrmary Drploma four the Supervrsor s Drplorna and three the degree of Bachelor of Educatron MID YEAR COMMENCEMENT january 27,1926 Drplomas There were twenty three who recerved drplornas Twentv two recerved the Krnder gar ten Prrmary Drploma and one the Ixrndergarten Elementary Drploma THE MYSTERY A Pep Meetrng had been called' But why? was the questron on the lrps of every gul Had not one just been held? And so the excrtement grew and grew untrl finally the day and hour dawned The first song of the assembly was one of our Campargn songs On you Boosters Oh' could rt then be about the new College The heart of every grrl beat an almost audrble tatoo Shortly afterwards 1n a very quret way a certarn an nouncement was made And there rose up a mrghty shout that resounded from hall to hall Thus the Mystery was solved A loan had been made and we would move to Evanston February 1 1926 At once the cry became On to Evanston and rmmedrately the song We ll have a hot trme rn Wrlmette was sung From a rather concerned assembly the meetrng became a Joyous exultant and almost borsterous one More of our campargn songs were sung but now wrth an added zeal and gust Avrlla Band came glorrously to the front wrth then gazoos and the assembly does admrt rt trred to make more norse than those gazoos So early rn the sprrng of 1925 the grrls of N K E C held therr first trrumphal march Wrth Mrss Baker the Faculty and the Band leadrng we marched joyously and proudly out of the Stable across the spacrous Avrlla terraces down Mrchrgan Boulevard to Marrenthal Hall through rts arch and hence to the Stables Campus On you Boosters was sung over and over agarn the excrtement garnrng m mentum as we marched On the Campus all class yells were heard Junrors, Mrdyears, Senrors and Freshres drd therr stuff and It was here the College be came acquarnted wrth a very peppy class known as the Freshmen Our Alma Mater was sung glorrously and then followrng, as the last song was There s a Long, Long TF9,1l,, Now our dreams have come true, and each and all of the grrls of N. K E. C. echo the words of that last song "Thanks, Mrss Baker, dear, to you " H arrzet S teadman. 65 1. 1 4 It P it Q 'P rg' Q2 ii T H r ' A T I 0 N A rr ,ifi rszs H Pi ii 52 '23 T le! 995 -ca 91' M- '9- v -- w ru yy fr tl 'E 5 5 E 5 E E E E s ...... ....,..............,....... .........,......................,....,,............................ . . E E : g : E ' . . . ' 1 - 1 ' ' ' . E E E E E E S E E E -1-' E g Address., ........,.......,......,,.,....... ............ ,........rr.r.............,.r...,,...... . . .Dr. Stephen A. Lloyd g E . E : : : : : : E il- 5 E E E E E E E ' 3 : cz ax ' ' t , .' , cz - 5 : Q ' ' ' I L. E E . an E : , , , . , , L. : , ' , rr 77 5' E - - E .1 ll ' . Q17 , ' ' E , . - .. - ' , f ' : I 7 I ' E E ." - , E E , rc 1 E : , , . , , . E E - - zz 1 ' ' ' aa E E ' E E . 1 . ' ' 1 . E E ' . . ' . . E E - 1 E E, l n. . i g . . . . . 2 E - . . . . ' E - 1 .. g - 1 ' 1 ' - E tl ,J . . 0 a E ... . , 7 . ' ' ' E Q U 1 2 - E - cc . ' ' ' ' - E 1 , 0' E E . . . . . H ,, . - E E 2 ' 2 E : . . H E E an ' ' cr 1 E fl w I C'9h'Li?.'1v,5P'4!lIIIHIII:llllllllllllllIIIIIIIIIIIIIllllllllllllllllllIIlllllllllllllIlllllllllllllllllllIllllIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIllllllllllIlllllllllllllllllIlIllI'IIIl.Illlll frflsfifiv lf -levitra? 2 3 1 L, V- ..---- . . - v .....-- -. - .,. .... if-A:iiiQEiZ ?3iEi21E1lllIIlIIIlIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIEIEEESWP ln H In N .X T I 0 IN A I .,.sizazidlnlllllllllllllllIIlIIIllllIllilfS5'e?Ef4.fv ,il Fl U? L2 ' S S - S .- - .- 1 - .- - - - - - 1 - - .- - S' 1 1 2 - - - S SEQUEL TO HTHE MYSTERY" January twentieth saw the never-to-be-forgotten meeting of the faculty and student-body in the halls of old N. K. E. C. We say ''never-to-be-forgotten" because at last our dreams and hopes had come true and were to be fulfilled. "Last fall I told you that we were going to move to Evanston in February- and so we are!" The announcement was made in just that quiet way and for a space, a hushed, quiet moment, the Whole hall was as quiet as eternity, and then with an outburst of joy one and all gave vent to the voicings of their inner feelings. After a part of the "bubbling over" had subsided, further announcement were made concerning the semester vacation, which was to be prolonged due to the lack of readiness of the new building. This, too, was met with enthusiasm by all. Following this second demonstration, Seniors, Juniors, Mid-years, and Freshmen attempted to show their appreciation of what had been done for them. The Juniors and Freshmen presented Miss Baker with her desk and chair. As Miss Baker thanked us a little lump rose in our throats, and a teardropped here and there, for we all realized after all how much more we should have done. "Boost for N. K. E. Cf' was then sung, and never before had it rung so true as now. The recessional was in order of classes, some singing, some cheering, and others just naturally rejoicing. "And amid the glad rejoicings and gay cheer A quiet face we love so dear, Shone with a beautiful light Leading us on by hei courage and might H arrzet S teadman dM:Q- S' 13 3' 1. 'Z 1 - - .- - - E , r 7 : E , s . . E E .. E .. ' - : - g E E : : 2 E 5 : - E E E E -'S E 1 1 E E : E : E E - J H. E E .. E E . 2 E - E E Z E E' ri? 2 6 tr F - . . bb sTii'dif!5:7Z'E?ERiiiiilllllIEIIIIEIlllllllIllllllllllIlllllllllllllIIIllllllllIlIIIllIllIlllllllIIIllllIIlIIlllllllllllIlllllIlllllIIIlllllllIllIllllllllllllllIIIIIIIlIllIIIIIIllIllllIIIllilIIIEIIIIll.ZE'5E3RE?if3'3i?LE5.'b r I ad 1 . 5.9 9 X "lSii ?2!E3!E1IllIlIlllIlIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIEIEES-Si-Bi T H H N A T 5 0 N 5 l- 12,52 imma:lmmnmuulIIlllllllrserszuszmfzawezsz T! l l g C H A P E L 3 Heard within a radius of two blocks from National- E "Rah! Rah! Rah! N. K. E. C. Rah!" : Do you recognize it? What! Why, It's what used to be chapel 5 it's assembly, E and in our own auditorium, too! Though good old Trinity Chapel was too good f for anyone to desire to do anything that wouldn't be done in church, yet it was 5 hard to have to sit on our hands when we wanted to clap and swallow hard when E we wanted to cheer, or sing college songs. Now we can do all these things, cheer, . clap and sing with a clear conscience, for we are having our own assemblies in our 5 own auditorium! The auditorium is a beautiful memorial to Mrs. Jean Carpenter E Arnold, a former teacher at N. K. E. C. The auditorium will hold on its floor f and in the balcony, seats for eight hundred people and if necessary the stage S can be used either as a stage or gymnasium. There will be flood lights equipped : with dimmers to enable the finest lighting on the stage. But even though we E need it we haven't a curtain for the stage! Can you picture a stage without a : curtain? We can make a curtain a reality by making out checks or presenting E just cash to the college. But to think of it, our own assemblies! We hope that the assembly speakers E of 1925-'26, Jane Addams of Hull House, Dr. Caroline Hedger, lecturer for the f McCormick Memorial Foundation, Dr. Stephen Lloyd of the Wilmette Congre- f gational Church, Dr. Carleton Washburne, Superintendent of the Winnetka 5 Schools, and Mrs. J. Paul Goode, Representative in the State Legislature, may : all return to speak in the new auditorium and find out what real National Spirit is in its own assembly. Besides the Assemblies with noted speakers we will : probably go back to the old form of letting each class have an assembly. Then, T- too, we can have the peppiest of Pep Meetings. Can't you just imagine this? E And isn't it wonderful? As a cartoonist would put it-"Our Greatest Ambition"- : the College Assembly, N. K. E. C.'s Assembly, a dream come true. - b if 67 If '1 d 4 2352kiiiiiillllllilIIIillllIIIllllllllllIIIlllllllllIlIlllllllllllIllIIIllllllIIHIIIIllllIIIlllllllllllllllIlllllIllllllllllllllllllllllil Ill ll llllllllIllllIIIlllllIIllIIllEIIIEIIIIIDRETZFELSSEQEFSKQPLQESWE I 9 x Sk? 3EEi3IEIllIllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIlElEE5rEi5i.f3I 'r II IC N A T I 0 N .ex I, fii,aaeafaazsslslmmmmnllllllllllllrsasssmem 1 e OUR FIRST STANDING ASSEMBLY Weeks of wondering, whispering and even guessing finally came to a happy ending for the Junior Class and its many friends on Friday afternoon, February twelfth. Although the day brought unforgetable joy to the Juniors, every class was thrilled with a friendly happy feeling of being crowded together for the first standing assembly in the new College Building, for which we have waited so patiently. The meeting was typical of this feeling of warm friendship toward the faculty, old students and new. One feature of special joy, was the group of four young men from North- western, who so willingly played for our songs. These four gallant men stood erect and played while hundreds of feminine eyes were upon them. Surely this was a heroic deed. The greatest interest to rnost1 of the girls was t1he rumor of the winner of the song contest of the different classes. Indeed it1 was hard to imagine who the winner might be for all the songs had been so typical of National pep and spirit but when the honor was finally conferred upon the J unrors all felt they were deserving of hearty congratulations The Judges not deernrng the honor sufficient m itself, presented the class with a baton tied with red and white ribbons This unique honor will remain with the Junior class until another class out songs them After songs class yells and speeches the entire assembly led by Miss Baker and our four N U men marched through the building much to the amazement of our many workmen who stood in doors at all sides The arm was to initiate the new College in the only fashion possible under the crrcurnstances and give Way to the surge of pep and Joy that can only be experienced by students who have become a part of just such a building as we have No one who stood m the unfinished thrr d floor and sang her Alma Mater with her whole heart will ever forget rt The Alma Mater then seemed to mean more than rt ever had before At last a great purpose had been accomplished' Irene Ambre , , ,N 1 1 . ' , . . . ' 1 I ' 1 ,N 1 1 I , I ' 1 ' 1 1 , 1 1 ' 1 . . . x . Y. . . , . 1 ,N 1 1 , 1 1 1 , 1 . 1 . . . . F K c , , 1 1 1 k 1 1 1 , 1 s. no , I 7 - sc 7 1 I 1 n . . . - ' ' . . , 1 1 , 1 ' Y 1 I 4 . - ' V -' I 1 1 1 1 1 ' b 1 11 1 0' 1. ' ' -1 ' s - ' 1 - ' . ' ' Q 1 1 1, 1 . 1 1 ' , 1 g 1 ' I 1 ,, 1 , - ' Ai H ,, , ,Y 1 . : -.- 9--S569 124 'MEQESIZEHIIIII EIIIIEIIIIIIIIIIIIII II I Il I I f IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIlIIlIIIIIIIllIIIIIIIIIIIlIIIIIIIIIIIIII:lIlI.IlllII2srJQs!s.A-rt Q Br PEP SONG CONTEST Rich man pooi man beggar man thief Doctor lawyei, mei chant chief Farmer grocer fireman cop But our Bakei s on the top So the girls from Nation l sang While the halls echoed and rang For Ruth Hardy of Normal fame Thought twould be a spirited game If each class of our college fair Would set Words to an olden a1r The Semois in their sweaters White Maiched ID first as of course was right Midyears in then purple caps Thought they d Win the prize perhaps While J uniors with the11 ties of ied Were sure that they the contest led But the Freshmen, oh, my, my, Surely did attract the eye. A most collegiate Miss was she Who led their yells so skillfully. Then the Normals, who number'd two, Were given a chance their stunt to do- Their duet was very short But they proved themselves good sports. Then the classes, each in turn, Were given trials the prize to earn. All helped sing, none stood aloof 'Till We almost raised the roof, For all thought of days ahead, When goodbyes would need be said To the place so dear to all- That dear old N. K. E. C. hall. 69 s xx X Hlllllllllllllllllllllllll T H E N A T I 0 N X I4 if.-?iiZ'ii'ell , . i . 2 1 l 1 2 7 D 1 7 7 7 I ! 7 ,7 77 . . , , . . U . . D 9 ny Y. 1 K .D , . . Q 7 1 -1 f . are v llllllllllIlH llIIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllelllhlllll 6 sr.-pf ?F-5QWi34YiiZ ?3!EilEllllllIllllllllllllllllIll 'I' II E N A T I O N .X L 22525-EQEHIHIIIllIIIIIIIIIIllIIIllllIllliI2EE5' 12?4i9Z:ZCg 11 21 M: ' FJ, ff: ui 1 1 gi JUNIORS WON It Q the good old faslnoned p e The pep vou cannot down Nat1onal pep Ndt1OI12l pep The pepplest school m town And the p e p Was su1e all the1e When H1 at We met 1n ou1 College fan FOI It am t no fany tale a1n t no fable, It Q a t1ue sto1V We ve left the Qtable Yea Nat1onal' When the powem that be had called us a To meet togethe1 111 the Alumm hall And the loom Waa elowded to the doo1 Mus Clala Belle Bal GI took the H001 And no one knew t1ll she Waa done Just wlnch Qong, the contest had Won Each of the classea some 1nent1on ea1 ned But the Jun1o1s had won the P1176 1t was lea1ned And a leal baton t1ed W1th Wh1te and 1ed Waq 01ven to them ae long as they led The college 1n smgmg and pep And who W1ll folget the tl ue IHSDIIELJCIOH The wondelful thr1ll and the new Cl6d1C2Lt1011 AQ we stood on the unfimahed floo1 above qo let S fo1 get yust vvh1ch class IN Wmmng' And let S all 30111 fOUCtl1C1 1n Q1ng1ng Cheel fo1 N lx E C Gleat IS he1 fame Oul gnls ale flgllflllg To uphold he1 name We ll all be t1ue and loval See he1 banne1Q Wavmg Hlgll above the lest Red and Whlte W1ll p1 ove N Ix E C IQ best Agnes H Llton I 1 lt E E E H 'wk . i. - ' I - I-pl E E ' ' 1 A 1 E E ' X ' 73 E E , 'rr k ' 1 I I I ' , N ' 1 A E E 7 1 1 y 1 E : 1 . . 1 E E 1 ,, 1 1 t 7 ,1 1 1 1 1 1. 7 E E A 1' " E E cz , va E E 1 ' i A 1 1 ', E E , - , E E And sanv' our Alma Mater with 1'ev'1'enoe and love' E - 11 1 - E 1, 1 ' ' 1 ' 1 ' 1 1 'S ' ' E E 11 1 1 ' " ' 1 ' E E 1 . E E ' 1 V 1 V, I, E E ' 'N V 77 E 1 Q t9 3 70 16:4 if llllllllllfllll I ll Illllll ll Illllll I llIllllIIIIIIIllIllllllIIllIIIIlllllllIIIIIIIIllllIIIIllllllllIllllllIIIIllIllIlllllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIllllll llllllllll 'B -'DI' 9 x X 1IlllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIEIEQSSSSA.I T H E N -X T l 0 N -'K I. 53349 gl IIlummmummmm1 I 1 e THE FIRE KING The children came from far and near, When the student players did appear, The student players from N. K. C. Who made the children shout with glee. They played the "Fire Kingl' with much zest For each student player did her best. The girls played here, the girls played there, In fact they played most everywhere. At every place they were royally served, Indeed most more than they deserved. And oh! the money that they made After everything was paid, Would make your hair stand right on end. Did you see the "Fire Kingf' my friend? You had a chance at Oak Park, you know. You missed a great play if you didn't go. Evanston, the South Side, and LaGrange, All came under the players' range. What was it about, you beg me tell? I'll try to answer your questions-well, A boy from his stove could not bear to part, For to do so would break his dear little heart When his father sold it, he got inside And went right along on its travels wide. He came to a shop with curiosities rare, A dog and a cat, and a cunning Dutch pair, A clown and a soldier, also Old King Cole, Who called for his fiddlers, his pipe and his bowl There was a darky, a Chink and some ducks, I declare They all came to life and performed for fair. Then the king in his court with most elegant style Met the lords and the ladies each wearing a smile People laughed, and they cried as they watched this line play Which, all said, was acted in a most charming way I beg of you all, don't forget to appear, When another good play is given next year. 71 'Q d 9 5 IIIIILIIII lllllllllllllllllIllllIllllllllllIIIIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIIIIIIIIIIIIIllIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll III! IIIIII 0 Q b V 4 : - 3 5 : - I : .. - : : : - .. : .. - .. .- .. - - .. .... -..I . .,..... .. .. .. .. . 1 ' ' . .. .. .. . ..,...... . I... ,.I. .. ., .I 1-Sziidshw'34'4:E1lalsllllllllllllllllllllllllllllelhaislniau. T H It N A T I 0 N X L ..A53-zizidlslllllllllllllllIIIIIIlIIlIlla!es:k' w.f4zQ4:QQ3 0 I I Pi 13 V W. f 2 SQ '5 512 if 93 I F 'A Z 1 - . - 2 - - - THE CIRCUS The on cus came to 0u1 new school In eally sprlng, one day Its cast was made of faeulty And students who could plav Upon the thnd H001 It was staged And hele the Clowds d1d stlay Untll the show was ovel and We chased them all away The SICTQQTIOWQ halboled many freaks The lady oh so tall Who down upon us east her eyes CMISQ Wh1lCO1Hb don t you falllb And then Mlss Fa11a1 fleak of fIG8IlCS W1th legs and feet so small But full gl own head and arms Cl1QgU1SGCl Made fun but 9031 ed us all L1ttle Boy Blue MISS Hoopel was And thlough he1 ho1n she C11ed Come spend your d1mes at th1s gl eat show, It 1S the best you ve t11ed The channel of snakes and twms, S1amese Dlew 1nanV to the11 Q1ClG VVh1le a lJ3,IGlD3ICk 11de1 mth hel stunts Was cheered f01 he1 b1ave 11de W1th1n the audlence was found A pa1r qu1te queel to see Mlss Baker and her leven k1ds Was funny as could be She fed her youngest ehewmg gum W1th none could she agree' The I11sh lady and he1 lologue Just added to ou1 glee E : 2 E - - - E : 2 un- ... - E E .. ... - : E : E : : I : E E - : E : E E E : E E E E E E E : g : - : E E - : E . E E . . : E I I I I E 1 u - 1 2 an : I a : I E : I s I I : : : .- E I I I . 5 : . . ' : : . . -I E I I 5 E . . ' I E E I I I I I 5 : ' - . E - : ' -1 - E E : ' ' ' - : - E E - . g - , - E I L ' 5 3' 1 E I I L I I E 5 2 - 3 I L I I I I 5 .. - ' 1 2 : I 2 -1 T I . . : 1 1 1 - I . . . . : 1 1 5 ' 1 7 - - : - . 5 I I , 5 5 . . : - : : 'fa K 7 E E - E S 7 ' h ' ' : S : 5 S E I ' I ea E 5 . . . .' E : ' f ' ' 5 E E H . . 1 E : I I ,N I I I I E : - a ,' as : E I I I I I I , 5 " ' . . g l 1 1 1 5 I ' ' 'Ka I I7 E V . . 5 . . - I I I I T , g : . ' . . g I . . . . , Y . I W E 1 ' 2 : .- ' . . . E : I I , , I : ' I . . : - E I I ' I L I I 7 E . 1 . E :Il ss :E- - " gg .: - - I 1 5 Q - W I , I , .1 A . 52 ' P Q! . lb fa I -- II- S is E v. -14 if "W '?E'E?E.,e. : I P E .5it!i?if3'39Lf " of 12364 fri? lllll HlllllIlllllllIIIllllllllllllllllIIIIIIllIllllllllllllllllllllllIllllIIIlIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIllllllIllllllllllllllllllllllllllIIIII! H0 9-'DIV E THE DANCES E E We dressed in greens and pinks galore g E To go and dance on the South Shore. - .- E - .- : E Sweet cider and some good fried cakes E E The last remains of Sir Stable-O! E And through each room they slowly roamed E 2 Till the cider keg up and foamed. E E Those gingham programs-Oh Me! Uh Me! 5 -Dorothy Allen. isfxziasssvigaagq51IInlIIIIIIIlnllllllllllllglgggggggg T H I-1 X ,X T I 0 N' A L ff.ki-EzimalhllllillllllllllIlllllllllllliiigiiikvakifiaieii fi 53 An orchestra of wondrous fame 64 Gave forth its echoes rare, Q While Gypsy fortune tellers worked To lay the future bare. E95 And so, with clowns and freaks and shows, E E And bootblack onthe stair r- E We laughed and laughed and laughed and laughed- 2 E-j And had a circus rare! -Grace Roosman. E E 'Twas near Thanksgiving eve, you know, E E And scores of us were on the go, E E High up on the roof garden hall 5 E The merry girls had planned the ball E E And at the Sisson-that gorgeous night- E E Everything went off just right. E 5 Our chaperons were jolly too, 5 And helped us find enough to do : E Until the orchestra stopped, we danced, -if E And as the evening advanced 5 E The music said to end the lark, E 5 So home-to South Side, Evanston, Oak Park. E g The time soon passed and winter came E E And a Stables Dance at last won fame. 5 E We cleared the Hoors and swept the hall E 5 And, actually, that was not all. 2 ' Were fed to us-but not on plates! E 1 The College girls were proud to show E A circle dance and nimble feet :. l Cleverly helped for many to meet E : The friends of others at the school 5 Where all are friendly, as a rule. E It was a lively, different dance E 5 And none of us were afraid to prance. E Q And in our memory books will be E : E : :: ,E 6 S ?s it as 22 -. .- 2' M 2, ' ll ' SEEQQEHMZESSEQHIIIIIEIIIEIIIIllIIIIllllIllIIlIIIllIIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIIlllllllllllllllllIlllllllllllllllllllllllll llfsllll vt- 2693 .ms-i 25?s1illllllIlllllllllllllllllllllilsiss 535,113 T H E N .X T I 0 N .X L 412,ggagfggqglgllllllllllllllllnlnulluigpgg55 gwas-sz,-' V Pi it I Ea ft E E 'E E E E E E 1 E E E S S E E - E E 4 I tx if 'ei NATIONAL'S RADIO CAREER When the radio came into vogue, it opened another field for National-that of telling kindergarten stories in such a way that all the children from all over the country, who had radios would listen to them. W. G. N. was the station from which National broadcasted at five-thirty on Monday and Saturday afternoons. Not only children, but grown-ups as Well, listened in and from the reports received all seemed to have a good time and enjoyed National's entertainment very much. Of course, many little things, aerial and terrestial, went Wrong at times, but through it all National came out on the top. Even our president, Miss Edna Dean Baker, had her ups and downs in broadcasting. One day she was to broad- casting a story over the radio. Her voice Was low and clear as she spoke through the megaphone and her expression perfect. She had visions of the animated faces of her little listeners as she told her story. When almost through with it she was rudely startled by one of the men of W. G. N. who came rushing in and said, "Miss Baker We are so sorry, but a certain lever controlling the megaphone outlet was neglected to be turned on and all your broadcasting was of no availll' And so Miss Baker had to begin all over again to satisfy the little ears and big ears Who were tuned in on W. G. Nfs Wave length. By the Way, aren't ears funny things? But they are useful We'll all admit. However, that's getting away from our story and that would never do. But to go on-many girls of National have broadcasted their songs and stories over the radio, and each tells of the funny sensation that went from the tips of her toes to the top of her head when she talked or sang to her unseen audience. They had only their imaginations to help out when they tried to visualize their listeners, but that was enough for isn't that one of National's characteristics- her Wonderful imagination? The lucky girls who broadcasted from W. G. N. for National Were:-Virginia Tourtelotte, Mildred Dittman, Charlotte Borges, Edith Johnson, Ruth Carlson, Gladys Huntley, Jeannette Sutliff, Georgia Lee Stemper, Mary Saxe, Mary Margaret Duffield, and Dorothy Allen. And so National's daughters go on, Hspreading the joys that they have learned from their glorious Alma Mater." Student-"Doctor, will you give me something for my head?" Doctor-"My girl, I Woulcln't take it as a gift." First Grade Teacher-"Why Weren't you at school yesterday?" Little Sambo-"Ah-Ah-Ah-my mother had to cook." Teacher-"Did you have to help her cook?" Samba-"Ah-Ah-Ah-had to eat it." Teacher-"Next time tell your mother to cook on Saturday." 74 S -Q 'D EHFHMHWMEQiiftilllllillllilllllllllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIlllllllllIllllllllIllllllllllllllllIlllllllllllllllllll llllllllllllllllllllllllllllll IllIllIIllIIIIIIIIllIIIIIllllllIllIllIIllElIIlilIlIIlZEr5fli!!i?if1'5z?LE.?bir' l ' 1 .im ,MA . i l i 1 i 1 i l l 1 r l l 1 l l i fl V. :QW ll an ,v 3SiK'-iii i ?'2EE5iE'IlllI!lllllllllllIIIIIIIIIIIEIESSSSSE-.fi3 T H li N A T I 0 N A L 5151? ifhlhlIllllllllllllIIIllIIIIllIllilEEE5 'ZE 2:35 CHAFF-NO LONGER FROM THE STABLES 2 We have come from the South, from the familiar, dear Stables, to the more E northern parts. No longer does the swish, swish of passing traffic on Mich Boul " dull our ears to the more delicate sounds around us, no fraternity houses lurk : in ambush close by, the enticing sign of Everitts' Drug Store is noticeably lacking- E Our surroundings are different. Yet, amid the new environment, one thing 5 remains a constant source of titulary reminiscence: we still have Chaff, without the E Stables. E Noble professors, studious youths, even some practical minded college maidens 5 have asked in dubious tones, "How can that be?" These people are the prosaics, ' the unimaginatives who worry themselves to death over delightful discrepancies, E preferring, instead, their absurd realities. There are two ways of dealing with : this class. 2 First: Answer the question with your most disarming smile, "Why, it blew E out here, of course," and laugh merrily. The Prosaic will generally see his mistake 5 at once, and join in the burst of mirth which has greeted your sally. The second E way, is we confess a bit abrupt, one might even say rude. But one must maintain : his position, even at the risk of being boorish. When asked the foolish question, Q do not answer. Remain standing in a rigid yet dignified manner, looking thru 5 and thru Cnot atb the questioner until he becomes purple and apologetic. Then, - in a gracious manner, walk quickly away, remembering to come down on the heels 2 Hrst. . : But, seriously Cbecause this is supposed to be enlighteningb Chaff is the product . of the Junior Class of the National Kindergarten and Elementary College. Begun ' in 1924, and published for the first time in February, the paper has become a per- 5 manent publication, appearing six times during the school year. It endeavors T to spread in a frank, interesting, non-partisan way all the news, scandal and 5 wise cracks of the student body. . ' Its staff is composed of the editor, first and second assistant editors, business manager, circulation manager, and joke editor. Reporters cover certain terri- 75 1, 4 k QT1i'GZi!5:7L'2?z?iRLQEHQIIIIIEIIIliIllIIlIIIIIIlllIIIIllIlIIIlllllllllllllllllllllllll lllllllllllllllllIlllllllllIllIlIIIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIlllllllllllIIIIillllllllllIIIIlllilllEIllll!2E'5El1fei?EfZ'3fGLQ?.'25iF fx tories in their write-ups, and gifted individuals are Cthank fortunel inspired at infrequent but joyous intervals to contribute cullings from their fertile brain. Famous sayings, opinions on timely questions, class-room jokes, social events, teas, dances, parties, personals, references, chapels, vespers, organizations- these are some of the things that make Chaff. The painless method of extracting from each student's case money the sum of fifty cents insures regular publications and meets expenses. Oh, it's a great life being on Ye Staff! Engagements, rumor of Straight A Students flunking, word of Miss Kearns having a leisure minute, the approaching dance, past, present, or likely-to-be dates and crushes-All these things hint of news to our news noses. And do we work! But then, itls all Chaff to us. -Virginia Tourtelotte. HTHE NATIONAL"-OUR ANN U Moving into larger, greater, more pretentious quarters Spurred us upward, onward in all branches of our school. Thus we find the annual has larger grown and prospered, And it strove to keep up with this tried and worthwhile rule. AL Ruth, our jolly editor-in-chief, has guided forward, Leading to a vision clear and worthy to attain, And our faithful faculty, Miss Baker, Kearns, and Whitcomb, Time and labor oft have squandered for our year-book's gain. To produce this volume all the staff has worked together, Yes, there's Swanson, Duffield, Parsons, Roosman, Cohen, Saxe, And the freshmen, Ryerson and Kennedy, who all have Singly, and together turned out work by stacks and stacks. We have added some new feature in most ev'ry section, And we've christened this, our year-book, with the name we love. Yet, though we have worked and worked and worked, it could be better g So we hope that next year's class will reach a mark above. Wa 76 oy:X'i3'SiiEE?3!23!EllllllllllllllllIIIIIIIIIIIIEIESSSSSBA.ff 'r H E N A T I o N A I. -IETEZEZQIMIlllllllllllllIIlllIlllIIlIiIEi5E5 i?f?5?FM2Q E ll .4 i 2 I R . ' Q'H5h?E2LE:i5iZH!lIIIIEIIIIEIIIIlllllllllllllIIIllullllllllllllllllllllllIllllllllllllllllIIIIHIIHIIIIIIHIIIIIIIHIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIINIIIIIIIIIIIIIHHIlllllllllllIllllllilIll?IlllllZE'5f2faE?i2i'39L.E3Z'-'Sir ,, 6 X s x 7 ' . . x , I 1 A 2 xl A 1 'Xxx I V xx 4 x X fx- . X ff 1 - 1 ff 4 X I I 5, ' E X N T xx x V R 1 , - v . xx Q, . ' f , ty P! 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'-1P?i Lv.--In L. , l W' :Jw-f-T fm- A L- r x - wif W I ia , I qw H, W -' 4 A x , 5 I' K, a M1 l Qi' - , Z.-:ff f j Hg e 'Q Wxlak .V ' "' 'if JE ' 'f -' 'f 1 1' P A , -K N, ,Q W ,W 2-M , '34 T v ., ., f- - f ' ' - J A: 7,5 as kg, .MQ 1, .4 Aff ' , , -9' 1 FV-ll Hi' , ' A W1 L K T- "' 1 ' 'fm' X ? 1 qw ,,, 1+ --- f'H F I ,slw ,vbnllhx I " lest! X p f l is Vx f" .ll If ::AI,?veA1Iii:IXEfg,.Y, 5 x. If-E Q I gl " MY' R, Q' 'NL 7' : ',: ,Ubi , 4 ' 'lr L :EW '1.y. "1 ' M f"! V S,"'f!":21 11 . .Jw - .f- -,,-n L , .fx 1 rf' 'gg Ay, l., , ' 'Vs N J kA,l.4 . mn fyiupl Qi ,I Lflltmi. K I ,fglv xl: ia9,f,iHf:,kll Y lllkiglgyxi i '- PL X ,if S- gf V ,. .. I-L' If + 1, Q v v V x ff 11 W , f ,gk - X -4:1 , 0954. ,fm f ' 1 I , --Fx-V H in Z: xfqf .. Y ,,,,., ---Y wif- '-- ' -i Y 'v L , .-,W.,,,H,A..AM A A A 'sEQi ?352!4lEIIllIllllllllllllllllllllIllEIE i15.i1l T H E N ,X 'I' I 0 N .X L ilfiivieliiilhIlllllllllllllllIlllIllIIlIiI5SE5 Q?A'l. COLLEGE COUNCIL Olll old fallllllal bturlent Counc1l 1s no n1o1e' But 111 1ts place we have the College Counc1l the salne o1gan1zat1on just a new na111e O11Qf1112,tQCl 111 1915 at the bl1ggQSlf1Ol1 of M1bS J GSSIG WIHTGI a st1o11g and enthus1ast1c n1e111be1 of the Sen1o1 Class the COL1DC1l has gl own each year 111 st1ength a11d lDflUGHCQ so that at the DIGSGDT t1n1e W1th 1ts large a11d 1ep1esentat1ve n1en1be1sh1p of both faculty and students It has ea1ned tl1e t1tle of College Cozmczl The DUIPOSQ of the Counc1l IS to Cl1bCl1 s 111atte1s pe1ta111111g to the welffue of the College It b1111gs faculty a11d students togethe1 c1eat111g 1 feehng of lllullldl helpfulness a11d coope1at1on The 111E'E"L1I1gS JDl16lHSQlVGS a1e a11 IDQIJIIHTIOI1 and 111 tallnng OVQI then own plans and p1oble1ns the gnls ga1n an e11thus1f1s111 and 1nte1est Wh1cl1 has done 111uch to c1eate tl1e t1ue Nat1onal qplllt Its 11ot1ons .11e not arb1t1 a11ly ca111ed out but ale 1nade 1n the fOII11 of 1eco1nn1endat1ons a11d tl1e11 1efe11ed to the student body fO1 app1oval 01 IGJGCUOII A new plan to be ca111ed out th1s V631 was the monthly College COL111C1l Assembly at Wh1ch t1111e all n1atte1s pe1ta1n1ng to tl1e College VSOl1lfl be fJ1GSG11JEGLl to the student body f0I then cons1de1at1on At the 51st COllf1C1l Assembly the 1nen1bers of Cou11c1l VVQ16 fo1111ally 111tIOCll1CGCl to tl1e students and 111 an IIHPIQQSIVG ce1en1ony the OTHCQIS NVGI6 1naug,u1ated to a VSIY n1yste11ous bnthday d11111e1 111Vste11ous because no one seemed to know whose bnthday It was Afte1 a g1eat deal of guessmg on the pa1t of everyone and CO1'1Q1ClE'1 able hllltlflg a11d helplng on the palt of M1s Ixnnball 1t was finally d1scove1ed that the pa1tV was 111 celeb1at1on of the te11tl1 bnthday of Cou11c1l Toasts WQIG then 1n O1 der 2lI1Cl the palty came to a glouous end 111 the EYPIQQNIOH of rnany w1shes fO1 the co11t111ued success and long hfe of COUI1C1l IH the hfe of the Co lege As usual, Counc1l th1s V631 aga1n Sp0I1S01eCl the beaut1ful Thanl1sg1V1ng, ELI1Cl Chr1st111as fest1vals, Wh1ch have been a part of the College 'CI3,Cl1flO11S fO1 many years past At Thanksg1v1ng tune the gn ls b1 ought then OHQI 1ngs of canned goods frults and Vegetables Wh1ch were g1ven th1s year to the Ma1y C1ane Nu1se1y, Wh1ch IS a DIOJGCL of Natlonal and a most worthy cause Then at Chrlstmas t1n1e, the usual beaut1ful and IIHPIGNQIVG SGIVICQ was , i 1 W I . . I , , . . I . . I . ' 1 x 1 V ' 1 L I I. '1 I I. N- I - I I I 1, 1 .Yu I IX I I' I -1 I I .I I I I I I . . .I I III III I .I I I I. . . I I I I ., I II Iv L7 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I . I K-I. . ll - I Il I I. I I I m7 1 I' Iv L ' I I A I ' T . h V ' ' SC V ' N 7 ' 1 i' 1 I - 1 1 L .L S C 1 1 ' 1 1 C 1 1 I 1 1 1 1 ' 1 ' 1 c C ' 1. 1C 1 1, " ' u 1. .N 1 '1 1 v ' C1 , 1 1 1 C I 1 1 C 1 1 i . Q 1. I . v T1 I In co11nect1ion with the NOVGIIITJQI' 10th n1eet1ing, the n1en1be1's sat ClOWV11 I . -1 I I 1' ' 1 ' .T I I I -' 1 I IM v 7 I 1 M. I I u I 1 I I I N. I 1 I I x 7 I I. . I I . I I In , I , I , , , , I., II I 1 1 ss Q Q I I- K I L I 1 ' - 1 ka T I II S' ' ' I 1' 1 1 I' f .' - . Is, 1 7 f 7 1 ' I ' i , I 77 6 m , l -was ikiiikiillllllillIliIlllllllllIIIIIIllllIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllll11111 1111111 IIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIllIllllllllllllIIIIIIEIIIIEIIllllkiifiififik uzsnf ohex'-i:d'35iZ 35El-llilllIlllllllIIIllllllllIIlllIEIEiSi'Si5i4.if'P T H E N A T I 0 X ,X L ii,5352533lhlllllllllllllllllllllllllllIiIEEE5?Z25f,2p,,,- 62:5 E a Z carried out, the girls bringing their gifts of toys to be distributed to the various missions in the city. A new feature was introduced this year-that of a Gift Shop conducted by Council. Toys were bought at wholesale prices and sold to the girls without profit, thus making it more convenient for the girls themselves and making it possible for them to give more durable toys than would have other- wise been possible. Appreciating the fact that there has always been a scarcity of college songs, Council devised a plan to supply this need, arranging for a contest between the different classes and organizations to bring out the best available songs. The assembly period of December ninth was set aside as a Song Assembly, each class presenting its group of songs. A committee was appointed to act as judges and the Junior Class is now the proud possessor of the engraved baton awarded as a prize for the best song. The enthusiasm and success manifested in the contest no doubt is an indication that the Council has set a precedent which will be followed for many years to come. At its first meeting in Miss Baker's new office, the Council members had a little insight into the treat in store for them in helping to plan the larger activities in connection with its new surroundings. . Now that our new College home is a reality, Council will have a double challenge, that in keeping with the ideals of the past it may strive on to greater things in the future. And with the growth of the College, so may Council grow from year to year upholding the ideals and traditions of our glorious Alma Mater. The membership of College Council consists of- OFFICERS Kathryn Smith CSeniorD ....,,.. ....................... .,............. P r esident Ruth Hardy CNormalj ........ ....... V ice-President Alma Prange Ctluniorb ........, ........ . .Secretary Jane Shelley QFreshmanj ..,.... .................................... ......... T r easurer 2 O lx E E Miss Baker .....,.... E M1-S. Kahl ......... E Seniors E Elizabeth Storer E Mildred Dittman E Olive Widdowson E Doris Leaman E Frances Swanson 24 W 41 Mrs. Kimball ...,.... .. Miss Whiticomln .......... ....... P ublicity Secretary Miss Lanphier ...,.,... Miss Adams ......,.. Miss Hooper.. ..... .. Faculty Members Juniors Anne Myers Mona Rangecroft Helen Dean Winifred Wilson Georgia Lee Stemper Marion Armstrong Ruth Carlson Virginia Tourtelotte Emmy Lou Geppinger Arlene Fleming President of the College Social Director and Junior Mid-year Sponsor ' Sponsor Sponsor Freshman Sponsor Student Government Sponsor .............,............Sen1or ..........................Jun1or Freshmen Clara Locke Kathryn Reintges Myrthel Strand ll U 'H 78 4. lf' 3 iiEi!5:7L'H.?E:?5iiiE-iillllllil IIEIIIllllllllllllllllllllllIIlllllllllllllllIIIIlllllllllllllllllllllllllIIlIllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIIIlllllllllllllillllillllI!EE75ELLE?E!'3'3:?2E?,'2'A io g-J 'T 4: '14 ri ,.. sSii 2EE!ilEllllllIlllllllllllllllllIIIIEIEL.s3i3i.:f1 T H E X ,X T I 0 X .X I4 if,53562555lhllllllllllllllllllIIIIIIIIIHIEE!'Y' . 1su.f!l92:2Il'5 S3 'U - nn - - S .- Z - S - - - -1 - - -u -1 - - - - L' - 2 - - - - - Q 1 1 L' Q :- S 2 .- S' 2 - - - - -u - S -u 0. Lg. if A2 25 it U In si Q . Qs g i 4- 'il i Po. f E .1 1 I - STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION E E The Student Government Association is what the name implies-student Q f government and participation in all matters concerning the girls living in the f - dormitories. The officers of the Association are: : Z Arlene Fleming. ,,..........,..,...,,o.,...,,oo,....,,ooo.,,.,,,i,,.,ccc...,oo ..,.oo....,cl.. P resident 2 - Ruth Hillis ............,clol...,ccc ccc...,., V ice-President E : Georgia Lee Stemper ....cccc ....,ooo.... S ecretary E E Doris Leaman ..l........cco.s ...c.,..,,oc,.. T reasurer E : Florence Hammel .....o ..,,ooi T ribune of 2A : ' Clara Tutt ,,..........c..,,, cl..... T ribune of 2B Z 5 Kathryn Smith .......,......ccc .r,,c.,,,. T ribune of 3A E E Mary Frances Owen ,,r.,r..c ,,..,c, ,,,r..,,,,,,cc,.,,,,c,, ,c,cc.rrcc..,,cc..,.,c,...,,,.... T 1 ' ibune of 3B E E Mrs. Stella Kahl ....,,,rrr,....rr,cr.c.,,.,crrl...,.,,c,.,,,rcr..,,.c,r,,.,rrr.,,.cc..,crcc...,ccc..., Faculty Advisor E -j The initiation and probation of all the new girls was the first event of the I I year. The Freshmen proved to be fine sports in their willingness to do every- Q : thing that was asked of them by the upper classrnen. They were given various : 5 things to do, such as wearing baby bonnets and carrying rattles and bricks. After 5 E thestated time of probation was over the girls were formally initiated and became 5 E full-fledged members of the Student Government Association. E f The next important event was the Christmas party in Avilla House, held T Q- after Christmas dinner in Main and Thomas dining rooms. The guests were L 5 greeted by the Christmas tree and Santa Claus. There was a present for everyone : 5 and all voted it a lovely party. 5 E A tea was held in Peabody for the graduating Mid-years. Music and enter- y : tainment was furnished by the girls. T 2 The school moved from Chicago to Evanston in February. At the beginning E 3 of second semester the Secretary and Treasurer, Betty Storer and Mary Stoddard, 3 did not return, so it was necessary to elect two girls to fill these offices. The 1 President returned to school, but was unable to stay because of illness and the -- V Vice-President took her place for the remainder of the year. The mid-year girls entering in February were initiated and given a hearty 79 QI IIIIIEIlllillllIllIlIlllllllllllllllllllllllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIllllllllllllllllllllllIIIIIIIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIlllllllllllllllllllIIllllllllllIIIIllllIllIIIIIIIEIIIIEIIIIIIEESEQE?i23'3i?LS53v'fQ 9 v u 'ii gsexamarms:samlllllllllllllulmllllllllslsmssssmS T H E N A T 1 0 N A L f iaaeafsmszmlmmnmmunlullllllrsesssemmwrzfzg welcome, even though they said their probation week was the severest of any ever N :sl held. Pai 9? 3 . it Election was held in April to elect Student Government Oflicers for next year who are as follows: A, p p , 'Q Mary Margaret Duffield ..e...... .,.e.......er,..,...rr.,....,.,,,..,.,.., P resident 1 : Luella Rupert .......,....r.r....,re e.....,oor.......e.......,i.r V ice-President , E Virginia Bartel ...rie...,e,i..... ....., ,... ,r,i,,...,r.r.....rrr.,...,..,,,,.,,,,v,r S e c retary 5 E Lucille Mollison .r.r.,....r......,.,..,..,,,.,.,..,.,.i....,ii....,,erri...,,.r,...,,,er.i...,r.,...,.,r,,.,..,,,,,. Treasurer E E Mrs. Kahl, our advisor gave a luncheon inthe Narcissus Room at Field's E E for Miss Baker and the old and new ofiicers of Student Government. 3 E The girls all live up to the ideals for which Student Government stands and E E it is their interest and cooperation that makes such government function in our E E College. 5 E THE DIRECTORS' TEA E Q 'fThe Junior Class of the National Kindergarten and Elementary College ? E request the pleasure of your company at tea, Saturday, January Ninth, at four 5 E 'o'clock"-thus read the invitations which had been sent out to one hundred and " E fifty directors. E E The long planned for day had now arrived, and Avilla House, which was to E E be the scene of this social function was decked in its best. Great bowls and baskets E E of flowers stood all about and a cheery, crackling, hearth fire was waiting to welcome E E in the coming guests from the dull, gray day without. All was in readiness, the Za E dainty serving tables were weighted down with their appetizing array of dainties, E 5 and the water in the large silver urns steamed impatiently. Would they never E -E come? E Ah! The tinkle of the door-bell! 2 E Our guests had begun to arrive and they continued to stream in, to be met : E by Winifred Wilson, president of the Junior Class, and Miss Adams, Junior Class 2 E sponsor, at the head of the receiving line. Then, the Juniors, who were present E E in large numbers, found their own directors, the directors found their own Juniors E E and oh, what a jolly social time ensued! E ? : Tea, for the time being, forgotten, was soon recalled, and Miss Williams, f E who so sweetly poured at one table and Mrs. Clarke, who presided most graciously 2 E at the other, were kept more than busy at their task. When all was over, and the Z E large, spacious rooms of Avilla began to be visible again, the Juniors departed E E smiling, for this tea, for which they alone were responsible, had been a success. f E CBut right here I would like to whisper a secret to you. The Juniors were the E E sponsors of this tea, but if it hadn't been for the kind and efficient advice and aid E E received from Mrs. Kimball and Mrs. Clarke, who were ever ready to offer their E E assistance, goodness only knows where the Juniors would have landed with their E E tea. But don't breathe that to a soullj E E The Junior Directors' Tea had been a great success! : 9. .4 iii 80 5752412562335ELXHSIIIIIIEIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIlllllIIlIIIllIIIIIlllIIIIIIIIIIlIIIIIllllllllllllllIIIIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll mlmuumuummmmumllulllmumlealulaulullnzswaesas-s1ass:b'as 5? 953 -4 gb 5 - 'S S .- .- S S if lb: 15 .4 6SiK'-iEQS5i ?2E2i9E1lllllIIllIllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIEIESSESSS T H E N -X T I 0 N 5 le ' FHIRIII mllllllmllIIlllllrsfsssssmfmsezfzas We 'Q I I 4 fi E E 5 E E E o H o I R 1 E l E "Oh, wasn't it beautiful!" E' 5 E E E E "I've never enjoyed anything so much in all my life!" E E "Why, I think that was Wonderful!" I 5 E E These were only a few of the many expressions heard at the Orrington Hotel E Q when the choir girls sang at the banquet of the Governing Board of N. K. E. C. E E The program consisted of "In a Boat" by Grieg, "Summer Suns" by Rubenstein Z E and "In a Cradlef' an Irish folk song arranged by Moffett. As there are many ' E talented girls in the school several solos were sung. Grace Ryerson sang Schubert's E E '4Serenade" and Jeanette Sutliff sang "The Wood Pigeon" by Leeman. Z3 E The choir consists of sixty girls picked from the school because of their musical E E talent. They lead the singing in Chapel and take the leading part in the festivals. E E In the Thanksgiving Festival, the choir girls led the procession of girls carrying : E their offerings for the children of Mary Crane Nursery. And at Christmas time, E. E it is a beautiful sight to see the girls dressed in gray robes and carrying the candles 5 E of light, coming down the aisle singing Christmas carols. E E I E E E , g! .gg .. 29 E: V 81 '- . ii EYHQQHVLBQERLSEEEMIIllillllilllllllllllllllIIIIIlllIIlllllllllllllllllllllllllIlIllllllllllllllllllllllllllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIWIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIllIllllllllllllllllllllllillIIEIllIl!2?EElE3feS?ifP31ZE55'iE 6 -'I --f-v. ' ---n-yn v- I- --.-- I 1 ' ' " . V -- . - . . - . -2e5Giais?.LK-1344: elsllllllllllllllIllIlllllllllalhzisiyiaaj T H In N X T I 0 N 'X L ..,sizizqill5IIIIIIIllIIIIIIIIlIlIIlIllllalEEEk?E'2T 11 Q 2' a 4 TOWN GIRLS ASSOCIATION Frances Swanson OOOOOOOOOOOO...nO,,,,I.........,.................,n,..O,.OOOOnvnnnOOOOnnOI,O...n,,.,.....,.I....,. President Ruth Carlson ..,....,eO,.Oeennnnen,ee4.....,,.....,...,.,.......,, .. I.,..., ...,,.ee,..,e,eneee,neeeee,.,n.,.. V ice-President Gladys Huntley ..,n.,ee,eenneneneen.,e,e.......l.......,.........,,.,......,.,,.,,,.nee,nee,enneneeennnn ,ee,.,,... S ecretary Ethel Bruns .......,.......n,.OnnnnnOOO.I.n..OO..,.,.........,...,..........,...,,.n,..ene.,..eeeenenee,,e,nnee...M.,n Treasurer M1 s Ixlmball Sponsor Th1s IS statlon T G A Evanston' Good mormng everybody and How Do You Do' In case you don t know T G A It IS the pepplest club up at N K E G Oh' yes 1t s up now you know we ve moved' We I6 all sub u1ban1tes and I th1nk proud of the fact Nevertheless we d1d have good tlmes down 1n the Stables Do you lemember the blanket movement? Th1s was an a1d to ralse money for our new school Each g1rl who contr1buted fifty cents had her name embro1dered 1n a square of the blanket Th1s when completed was presented to Mrss Baker Youll have to adm1t that was clever Of course, lt was Oak Park Stuff The b1g event of the year occurred on J anua1y twenty nmth We called It the Farewell Stables Dance The ldea was suggested by Evelyn Mattson who became cha1rman Her commlttee conslsted of the followlng SIX members Dorothy Allen Evelyn Anderson V1v1an Needham Marlon Blomgren Elmor Coblskey and Margaret Walker It was certamly a success shaded l1ghts clder and doughnuts peppy orchestra and most of all a happy crowd who were full of fun' Our purpose as1de from 1ts get togethel was to ra1se money for our new bu1ld1ng That nlght was the last tlme we were down at old 29th street Now that we are 1n Evanston we have lost some glrls and galned others 1n our assoc1at1on , . . . . . . ."" r f ' 7 I 4 77 7 l 1 ' , I 6 I 7 ' ' p - Q , V r v . w y . 1 1 f f , , 1 , ' I I ! 7 ' n , V , f I 1 V - , 1 ' ' 2 D 1 7 . a 1 I . L ' , ' ' I I ,7 3 ' . f . 7 1 L ' s I A ei is 1 EQZEZHE2556539IlllhllllillllllllllllllIlIllIlllllllllIllllllllllIlllllIllllllllllllllllllllllIIIIIlllllIIIIIIIlIIIIIIIIllIIIIllIIlIllllllllllllllllllllllliIIIIlIIlllllllllIllllIIillllEIllll!iE'52ii5eSE' Q B r 4. 3 Q Q -. E The spirit of fellowship and service which permeates the student body of Q 2 funds have made possible a larger school and a greater opportunity. The Eva 5 E members is open to all Alumnae who come back to renew old acquaintances and :. gSiK'SE'+i5i '3EE5!EIllIllIlllllIllllllIIIIlllII?IIEEi3-Sidi T H E N -X T I 0 N .X I. lf? ISIllllllllllIllIlIIIllIIIIIIiI!EE2i Z??E?Z:2g ri ii -r if' ai A ' ' :Pi - "I 1 2 .- " ' - ' THE ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION E E the National Kindergarten and Elementary College lives on in the lives of its 5 E Alumnae. The Alumnae Association, founded in 1893, seeks to give evidence g E of this spirit and of the fact that those ideals and attitudes toward life gained E E within the College halls are realized in a larger sense in the community, school E E and home. E : The new building in Evanston in a large part, is a testimonial to the efforts g E of the Alumnae to promote the interests of the College in its work for the better- E ment of childhood. Their faith in the Administration and their efforts to raise - E Long Memorial Room dedicated to the memory of one of their most beautiful E S E to get a glimpse of what the future National will be. E E To you who are going out from your Alma Mater this spring, the Association E E extends a cordial invitation to become a member and through this privilege of E 5 membership to carry the inspiration you have gained into a larger field of service. E E OFFICERS 1925-1926 E E President-Emily Jenkins Lloyd, 2026 Colfax Street, Evanston, Illinois. Ei E Vice-President-Jean Forsythe, 6552 University Avenue, Chicago. i E Recording Secretary-Violet Rush, Library Plaza Hotel, Evanston. E E Corresponding Secretary-Marjorie Sheffield, 429 South Kensington Avenue, La- E E Grange, Ill. E Treasurer-Mrs. Joseph J. Risch, 5403 Harper Avenue, Chicago. E E Organization Chairman-Laura Hooper, 1122 Grant Street, Evanston. E E Membership Chairman-Catherine Cretcher, 429 S. Kensington Ave., LaGrange, E E Illinois. E E Publicity Chairman-May Whitcomb, 1634 Chicago Avenue, Evanston. E V Sl it 552351255QgiiiilllIIlilIIEIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIKIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIlllllllllIlllllllllllllllllIIIIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll ll Il lllllllIIllIEIIIIEIIIIIlZH523S?5E9SGL.E'925ili mf - 9 v Eu 1 5 U 0' 5 5 J 2 "' E E E 3 S E 2 : E E : .. - E ' E : : 5 E - - E E .. - 5 : .. - - .. : : E . . . E - .- .. - . , , . - .. .- - g . 7 1 7 1 . 3 E E S S .. .. E 1 E : ' J : E E E . . . . E .. -. - E 1 1 ' E E -.- ' ' E E ' 7 ' P ' E 'S S 5 : - E E 5 : E E E . . E E T 1 S E . . . f , 8 . , , . E E -. 01 E : . , O 1 ., , . :I- - - : : E E E ' E 5 E E E : - - : - - E - - 1 -1 - 1 ' E : . . . . : E 1 -1 1 ' E E 2 : I E E 5 . E E E 5 . . . . . 5 .. 1 . .. 5. . . . . , ., n . , E E ' E , , - , . . . E .. . - E 1 , ., I . , . 5 - 51.1 E E E : : - - : . 5 E - E - . : E . 1 '1 1 ' E E --.. ' - E E , . . , , . E 5 E E E E E E 7 5 E E E . . . E ... - .- E 1 ' ' 1 P ' E - . . . .. .. . . . . - E ' ' , ., J , . E E : - E E E . v . . ' . . . E : 7 1 ' 1 ' '1 , I 1 E E ' - : - f f I r 1 1 f - : - : E f - E E E E 5 E E ..- E E 3 S E E -I 3 E E .. .. E -r . 5' A M- 1 Q or ? . 1 Lf- gl. F: F! 84 'AF .L nf in E SF' ,SQL .ITL : . 'if' V 3 I MI W1 I ' I vvW0i1U?.fuv4 v 'ir 3SiK'i?4Sii392EZ51Ellllllllllllllllllll IIIE EE-S935 'I' ll E N A T I 0 N A L AIGZEQEHIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIlllIIIIIIEIESE5?lffZEeE2'iZ2ZCi fy ES V B .1 - . -1 ' BRANCH CHAPTERS - EVANSTON Pres1dent Mrs Harry Ph1ll1ps 1100 Grove Street Evanston Treasurel Mrs Robert Jarvle 1958 Sher1dan Road Evanston CHICAGO SOUTH SIDF Presldent Jean Forsythe 6552 Un1vers1ty Avenue Ch1cago Treasurer Mathllda Mottz 5647 Dorchester Chxcago OAK PARK Presldent Mrs A H Parmelee 320 Frankl1n Ave Oak Park Ill Treasurer Mrs Clayton Clark 30 Washm ton Blvd Oak Park Ill CALIFORNIA Pres1dent Mrs Charles W Evans 116 South Catallna St Los Angeles Cal Treasurer Clarlssa Bacon 1050D Fourth St Santa Mon1ca Cal1forn1a MINNEAPOLIS AND ST PAUL Presldent M1s J D Collmson 3954 Aldrlch Ave S Mmneapohs M1nnesota Treasurer N1na Whltman 934 Grand Ave St Paul M1nnesota OMAHA Presldent Dolothv Weller 105 South 55th St Omaha Nebraska Treasure1 Dor1s Berry 3820 S 26th St Omaha Nebraska EVANSVILLE INDIANA Presldent Helen Lapp 1408 South Second Street Evansv1lle Ind1ana TIQHSUIQI Martha Keeney 1226 South Fust St Fvansvllle Ind1ana Alumnae groups 1n Ga1y Ind1ana and 1n La G1 ange R1vers1de H1nsdale Downers G1 ove and Berwyn have been very actlve though they have not organlzed as chapters 0 Ye! 95 .wi 96 0 s A o fl id! 'Z iifdfllllll IIIFI lllllfllllhlttudl llllIl l IlIIIIIIllIIIIIllllllllllIIllllllllIIlllllllIIllllllllIllllIllllIIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIlllllllllll-IIIIIIZIILTQL'.If.-17 sl'f .515 E I 57 I ,ogg EE B2 bf' . 9 P I v ,l E! .14 a tsiiii'-iEQSii 3EE5!ElIllllIl llllllllllllIIIIIIIEIEEQS-i-Bi T H E N A T 1 0 N -X L 53552-EEHIEIIIIIlIIIIIIIIIIllIIlllIIIllil2SE5 Q?biE?'2:2i wi V ii NATIONAL ATHLETICS fe! ' 533 .sq ' Come on Girls-let's go! That is the Way National goes into athletics, and Q in order to enter into them there must be a lot of pep. National has never, as 5 yet, been accused of lacking pep and she glories in her opportunities of ex- E: E pressing it. The spirit of fun was ever one of her many characteristics. Her I E girls have had many chances to uphold her standards since it was planned to 5 E establish her in new surroundings. Pep meetings and assemblies have instigated E E the march forward and many a time the old "Stables" resounded with lusty cheers. El E Even the faculty entered in proving what true sports they are. E In her old home, National did not have equipment with which to supply : E her girls, but she did not let this stop her, instead she went to places near the I E college to obtain outlets for her overflow of pep, and assisted by Miss Mount, I : she found 'eml And so we went to the Y. W. C. A. on Monroe Street in Chicago E E for swimming and many a happy hour was spent by us girls in this mermaid sport. E E But the College offered various ways to let out "pep" and some suited one, E E some suited another. Thus when swimming was vetoed by a certain group of Q 5 girls, Mother National looked elsewhere to keep her children in good spirits- E E and horseback riding was added to the list of athletics. Outside of a few weary E E bones a good time was had by all those who signed up for it, and many interesting E E experiences can be related by its followers. E E Tennis was provided for by the number of parks easily reached thru the E E efficient transportation of the city. As for hiking, the Sand Dunes always were E E a last means. E E In moving out to her new home, Mother National has settled herself into a E E much better locality as far as opportunities for building up her athletics are con- E E cerned. Out-of-door sports will certainly develop in the rural surroundings of E E National's new abode. A golf course is very near to her dormitory and often E E her girls who are so inclined can occupy their spare hours, in balmy weather, by E E playing a round of golf. E E As each new sport appears, National meets with the situation and tries to ? E make provisions and so- ' - E Z' "Come on girls-let's go-here's to National's pep!" E F Q, F7 . ii - pg, 85 Y fi?diiixlgfiRllifiillllllillllillllllIlllllllIIIIIIIIllIlIllIlllllllllllllllIllIIIIlIlllllIIllIlllIIIIllllllllllllllllllllIllllllllllllllllllllll I llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIIIllllilIIIEIllll!EE2il!Ei?5f"3'ZE5!-'52 COME ON IN THE WATER S FINF So said we all didn t we Freshmen? Along about the second week in our first semestei began our weekly fun swimming On Tuesday afternoons, any where from 12 30 on you could see girls in groups, some short and fat others tall and thin starting out foi the Y Upon arriving we could hardly wait for our turn to Jump in When ou1 tuin finally came theie we were splashing around for all the woild like mei maids The only difference between mermaids and us was that they could swim and we couldnt Oui accomplishments consisted laigely of a few strokes fiom each style and one or two simple stunts The shallow end was awfully populai foi at least four oi five weeks then we were forced into the deep end by that teiiible of teiribles dzvmg Such expressions as landing flat awful Hop scaled to death came into wide use and in the language of the slangy had a perfect wh11l Theie were iacmg dives running dives, 'standing dives some with a spring and some without but no matter what the dive some of us always went in the same and ended the same way flat' How ever we knew theie was to be a meet at the end of the nine weeks And our secret ambition was to show the world at large that we weren't quite as green as our name suggested-Freshmen rah! On our last Tuesday there was a meet, and what a meet it was. There was keen competition between the girls on Elizabeth Pardee s team and Edith Manierre's. There were races for all grade swimmers-beginners, intermediates and advanced. The various races for speed were exciting, but the races, or rather stunts, for variety were even more exciting. The two I remember as being most interesting were-the Umbrella race, and the relay swimming in clothes. The persons putting on wet clothing were just out of luck, that's all. Not only was Edith Manierre's team very happy in winning the meet, but also in receiving the wonderful silver trophy cup which is theirs until some other team wins it from them. 86 ,is .cl 2 - 2 - - - S - - Li 'Q S ' O 101 Fa 1' it . .U 'hui 5 X 'fui1Q? ?2ffi5!E1llIllIlmIIlllllllllIIIIIIEIEES-S-S33-, 'I' II H N .X T I 0 N A I. ff,ASQZQMHIEIIIlllllllllllllllllIIIlIllIiIEEEE QE:eaEw2-" --Q ,I 9 . ,av '11 N .0 iv' . .L - E Z 2 E - - : 2 S - S , - E E - S .. .. 1 4 I 1 .. J - - 2 . . , 1 i . ' 1 'v ' ' - ' : . 4 1 1 . . - N4 S . . , .K v, , . . - 1 ' - s 5 - X . , , , , . . H ,, . . . : 1 f , S J . ' . E . . . - . i , ,, - u A 1 . I 1 l 1 . . , . . . . , : . , . . : L f I ' 1' - ' : 1 1 ' E , ' ' ' l ' . . . . . ' E . . , - U. i . .V . i . I H H . E I - ' v . i ,- 77 cr I7 cc , 1: ' ' ' -1 . 1 1 7 Y ' 7 ' 2 44 ' , as , cc , ' ' H cz ' ' ax : , , . , , , , ,. , . . ',, . . . E ' ' . l E . , , - , - : 1 v l : - . .. . . , - 7 'nd as 'lfiifiiiiillllllilllliIIIIIIIIII llll ll llll III I I Ill IlllllllllllllllllIlllllIllIIllllllllIllIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllilllIIlZErjfii!ki?if3'5z?lE' 5 XX nifiQ ?2fEQIHIllllIlllllllllllllllllllllilffjgggjgi,-:FI T H E N A T I 0 X A L ffA5426-EQEHIBIllllllllIlllllIllIIlllllllritisikfiwflkaiaile GIDDY-AP The approach of winter was very evident, when the horseback riding class was first formed, on the memorable day in November. That day will always be remembered, because it was marked by a very exciting episode. Arkansas thought he was giving his mistress a treat by trotting briskly over the bridge, but his mistress did not regard it as a treat, when she found herself seated in the middle of the bridle-path, in a very crestfallen state. Paul Revere of 1925 was discovered, when a very enthusiastic young lady, in a very upright position pushed her horse onward, and clamored for first place. On the day following horse-back riding Miss Mount's folk dancing class seemed to be diminished for there appeared to be many cripples. "Ouch!" "Oh dear!" "I can't move a muscle." "I am so stiff." Such were the various exclamations. Regardless of the severe cold and snowstorms which prevailed at times the horse-back riding class could well boast of a large attendance. An acknowledgement should be made both to our very dear chaperone, Miss Peterson, and also to our riding instructor, who I am sure had a great deal of serenity, as he repeated over and over again, "Everybody ready, let's go," and after going a few yards, a call would issue forth from the rear, "Whoa! Wait a minute, Frank." Last but not least and very dear in our hearts, will remain the pleasant memor ies of our fou r-footed acquaintances: Monty, Chap, Golden Glow, Comfort, Trinket, Roxy, Rocket and Ebony. 1 87 31 si 293 if 2 e4 'S Si N 0 if ri ii G9 "!a?2f?5S41illIIIIEIlllillllllllIIIIllIIIlIIIIIIIIIIIIIllllIllllllllIIIIIIIIllIIIllIIIlllIIIlllilllllllllllllllllllIlllll IIIllIllIIIlIIIllllIIIIllIllIIIlllllllllllllllllllllllllEIIIIEIIIIl!ZErifAi:i'?if3'5x?l!E5b'iEQ :s E ::1 'fi E E J lr U el. f 9lll Il C MOVING TO EVANSTON WAS ALL ATHLETICS COMBINED It a1n't no fairy tale It am t no fable It s a true story We re leaving the stable With this verse iunning madly through our minds we hurried home from the college and began to prepare our share of the moving Trunks were being rushed by housemen to every room in the dormitory and maids were dodging the many flying boxes which were being hurled hither and thither Down on the first floor housemothers were busily engrossed in packing china and precious heirlooms that is, when they Weren t giving directions to expressmen signing for Laundry boxes and answering the incessant ring of the telephone Every girl for herself ! ! ! Each scrambled to her room and madly threw open the door which revealed a lonely little trunk to be filled with feminine necessities from five bulging drawers and a crammed closet Looking around behold! Stacks of books and magazines formed a tower of external knowledge on the table making the owner realize that they would occupy no less space in the trunk After emptying the contents of the drawers upon the floor wrinkles of worried per plexity appeared upon the owner s countenance and she went through the Hamlet like mental soliloquy To keep or not to keep That is the question With outstretched hands she stoops to conquer and the miracle begins Her right hand brings forth a notebook full of Job and Goethe while her left hand tightly clenches a ribbon tied bundle of sentiment and love Both are classics in them selves but which to keep? Well it is the space that counts and as you know letters are so easzly tucked away into a tiny corner Other such great problems presented themselves for decision befoie this Jury of one long after the rest of the world had laid its cares aside. Morning light revealed the results of the labors of the previous night. Coverless cots! Deserted drawers! Clothesless closets! A solitary ink bottle kept sentinel over the trunk which proudly bore the label- Miss Sally Smith 2532 Asbury Avenue, Evanston, Illinois Our sigh of relief when we bade our trunks good-bye had been only temporary for we found upon reaching our new Evanston home that this little trunk still presented a problem. Where to put its contents? No dressers! No chairs! No beds! No desks! But that problem was only one of the many which had to be confronted by the N. K. E. C. pioneers for the empty water pipes, cold radiators and drafty corridors were of equal inconvenience. Probably the workmen who were still busily occupied in the completion of Marienthal Hall were inconvenienced accordingly when they found their nail kegs overturned, beheld feminine hand prints upon freshly varnished banisters, and witnessed the transformation of their clapboards into hobby-horses. But the workmen, of course, couldn't appreciate the fact that the excitement and enthusiasm were due to the happiness of our new home, nor were they lucky enough to be working in the dormitory that first night when two hundred loyal N. K. E. C. girls sang proudly, "It ain't no fairy tale, It ain't no pun, We're in our home At Evanston!" -Georgia Lee Stemper. 88 A ' - - -"' - .1 -- 1 - . - ,-- - ,,,---. 3Si3i"5SS'i '25?4lEllIlllllllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIEIESL.5161.V T H E N .X T I I X A I -.isitefztui Allllllllllllllllllllllllllal!.F.EL? at' I Hi 'za 1 fe!! . Us H . . - , ' J E 7 E r ' as 2 1 . : E E J : . . 5 . L- .... E . . . . 1 . Q . L , . . . . . . Y E . . . ! E 2 ' E . E, . E E . i . . E I r 1 : . . . : .. E ' i E . . tl . . ,, . -I f . . f E 1 - . '- ,S f 1 . 'T E I . . E I 1 ' : . . . E . . '. ' . . " 2 1 E is E ' , f : - ?ll'Ei!iEHa'?3E-'iiiilllllIEIIIliIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll llllllll Illlllllllllllllllllllll lllllllllllllllllnlllllllllllllllll llllllllllllllllIllllllllllllIllllllllilillillllllkiifiiif Q br I 9 X .akSS'i '3E25lE'lIlllllIIlllllllllllllllIIIIEIEESFSSE-.iiii T H E N A I I 0 N A L iffff.EKEZQSHIEIIllllIIIIIllllIIIIlIIllIlIIi!Ei!E5 ii'2??' I 6 A "GOOD TIME" IN BULGARIA If one wants to talk about Bulgaria one must distinguish between city and village life. The city life is so much like European life including amusements, and as seventy-five per cent of our people are villagers we must take the peasant's "good time" as typical of Bulgaria. Instead of having a good time playing tennis, golf or football, swimming or going for a picnic, a Bulgarian villager thinks he is merely losing time. Of cpurse, dancing in coufples is the most devilish amusement for a Bulgarian peasant and even in some little mountain villages they put a hand- kerchief between boys and girls hands when they dance our Bulgarian dances in circle. They don't have automobiles, they don't have theatres, opera, movies, radios, lectures, they don't get delighted from the Fifth Beethoven Sonata, nor from the wonderful Raphael's or Rembrandt's pictures and Mr. Shakespeare's "Hamlet" doesn't mean anything to them, or in other words the twentieth century amuse- ments have no significance to the Bulgarian peasant. But still they have their "good time" and maybe more than any citizen because they are spontaneous and nobody is a leader, but everybody is acting. During the daytime they are all Cman and womanj working out in the fields, singing and talking and joking. At the evening time when the work is over the girls go for water to the fountain Qwhich is in the middle of the village or outsideb where the boys are waiting to see their sweethearts. Sundays and holidays are the best days for a good time. Early in the after- noon boys and girls dress in their nice, new costumes and go to the village public square Cvery often near to the churchl or out of the village to a nice meadow where the bag pipe player comes and plays for them and they dance until it is dark. Between the dances they sing Cand they know how to sing with all their voiceb or compose new songs in which everybody takes a part. In fall the girls from the village gather in the widest street as soon as it is dark and make in the middle of the street a big fire and sit around it, some of them spinning, others Crocheting. At first they work and talk until suddenly one will begin to sing and the rest will follow her. The boys begin to come and the at- mosphere suddenly changes 5 the songs begin to be more and more expressive and the jokes more and more funny. Very often the girls will sing one iverse and often then the boys will repeat it, or some one who can sing nicely will sing for them, or someone who can play Kobol Cpipej will play for them. These street parties continue sometime until the first rooster sings. Some boys go miles and miles on horseback to other villages only to be present to these parties. Another peasant amusement at this time is helping with the corn, while they are doing it the best stories and the best jokes are told. During the winter they have other kinds of parties. Some girl invites all the girls from the village to go and help her with her trouseau Cevery Bulgarian girl must have a nice trouseau before she marriesj and at these parties they have as much fun as is possible. On special days like Christmas, New Year, Easter, and First of May, they have special sorts of amusements which are absolutely national customs. Doing embroideries and growing Howers are the very best Bulgarian enjoyment. Families with girls and without gardens is something very unusual. These last two are typical amusements for city girls, too. i For ten years sports have been very popular in cities. Seventy-five per cent of Bulgarian citizen youth belongs to some kind of sports society, especially foot- ball, games, and excursions. 89 1 E J Z'Z'!a?2:?5iE?3ll IIIEIIllillllllllllllllIIIIllIllllIIIIllllIIlllllllIIIIllIllllllIIHIIIIlIllllllIIIllIIIIIIlllllllllIlllllllllllIllIIlllllIllIllllllIIIllllIIIIIIllllllllIlllllllllillllilllllliiiiiliiif Q B r O - E 1 -hexb 0 6 5 l mi 'reswmazasiummmmmlllllllllunslspsssza.11 T H E N A T I o N .x L ff5625351I3IIllllllllIIlIIIIIIIIIIIIIIKSIEEEESFEFQE-' ff e 1 I D , Q - - . , , - - -7 Q u n , , Q 7 x ' Every Sunday morning about five or six o clock no matter how cold or how hot is the weather you will see young people in groups of twenty fifty or one hundred singing and going to a peak of some of our big mountains Going .to concerts, operas, or lectures is a real good time for Bulgarian man in the city. Because our cities are not so big, we have another kind of amusement which is impossible for a city like Chicago with so many automobiles and so much move- ment. Beginning with the Capitol and ending with the smallest town you will find the same expression of the human instinct to be with other people. Every city has a special street Cvery often the street coming from a gardenj with trees at both sides, part of it with lots of lights and part of it almost dark between six and ten o'clock, which is filled with young people, all of them in couples or not, walking back and forth in a distance not longer than five blocks, meeting each other, talking and laughing. All Bulgarian amusements are expressions of some instinct and nobody realizes that a good time is necessary, so maybe that is why we do not have such an expressive word as "good time" as in English. -Renka Kassabova. The old time tardy excuse of "the clock stoppedf' or "overslept" is giving way to "I got lost in the hallsf' Why not provide diagrams of the school plans Ca la touristsj mapsj? The road to learning has its ups and downs-especially in drifted snows- so the town girls find. One girl experimented with the forces of gravity and snow to the extent that her shoe came off. lg 90 4. '1idi!.ii!7L'3a?3RliiliillIlllilllliIIllIIIllIIIIIIIllIIIllIIIIIIIIIIllllllllllllllllllllllllIIIIIIIlllIIIIllllllllIlllllIIllllIIIIllIlllllIIIIIIllIllllllllllllllllllllllllIIllllllllllllllllillllillIllliiriflifif E D r S .- asfxawsszmaaassaillllmuuuuullnllllllllslsaszs-seas.ZIPI T H E N .ex T I 0 N .x L if.-AZEZQQHIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIllIIllIlllliIEEE5? v2?e'i3?2Z:Z36 OUT OF DOORS IN A LAND .ie is O F S U N S H I N E ll Barbados, lying as it does about 13 degrees above the equator, and surrounded E by the waters of the Atlantic, has a very temperate climate, and is in an ideal E E situation for out of door sports of all kinds. Foremost among these is the sport E E of sea-bathing. On mornings or afternoons all the year round bathers can be seen E E enjoying a leisurely swim, diving from the spring boards of piers, or battling in E E the surf with huge breakers which in the end defeat them and toss them on to the 2 E white beach. E E Tennis engages the attention of a great many people, and lawns are to be found E E everywhere, where, on sunny afternoons, white frocked and flannelled figures E E are seen, and the white balls whirr to and fro on the carefully marked green E E courts. E E The masculine element is enthusiastic about cricket and football, and in E E fact, take these two forms of sport very seriously, for every little school boy lives E E in the hope of some day representing his home land in the inter-island or inter- E E colonial cricket matches. Meanwhile, there is his school or club for which he E E has to fight on the football field, and if he can not do that, he can at least yell as E 5 loudly as his lungs will permit at the close of the game, whether his team is the E E winning one or not. E E Yachting, is another very popular sport, and out on the blue waters of the E : bay the white sails of yachts can be seen, as they skim to and fro, or leisurely drift E E before the wind. E E Walking, picnicing, bicycling, all these are forms of exercise and sport indulged E g in on that little island of the Carribean, over which the North East trades blow E E merrily and where the sun always shines. E E -Vera Hunt. E i WINTER SPORTS IN POLAND E E Are you girls anxious to know, what our girls and boys do to amuse themselves -E E during the winter? I assure you they do just the same what you do, because E E they are quite so young as you are. But there is some difference too. We have E E not so many dancing halls and movies to go in during the frosty winter days f E and we study very seldom in afternoons, so we have more time for outdoor sports. E E Not having so many clubs, we have different ways to ask the company to go out. E I Simply the boy or girls jumps on the desk during the recess, and asks who wants 5 5 to go. And then they decide the time, the place, and never fail to come. Some E E of them go for skating, some for snowshoes walk, few for skiing, but many for 5 E sleigh-ride. And so do I. CIsn't it hard to believe?D It is a special thrill to slide E E down, down the hill very fast, and feel the cool air touching your cheeks and E E hear the whistle of wind as you go down faster and faster. But it is not so pleasant Z E to walk up the hill and pull the sleigh behind you. Boys can't help you, because Q 3 boys and girls are not allowed to go for sports together. CI do believe you girls feel sorry for our girls, are you?j if j It is much fun anyway especially when you get the new experience in old, Well-known sport. It happened once that I not willingly changed the old way 591 9' Ru am. - .. mndeli:i353QiiiillllllilllliIIIIllIIllllIllllllllllllllllllllIIIIIIIIIllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIlIIIIIIIlllllIIIilllllllllIIIIIIIlllllllllllllllllIIIIllIllIIlIlllllllIIIIIIIIllllllIIllIIllIllIElllIEIIlIlEh5E3i!E2?5f3'5'?L!5!-'iiin'i j f I 6SQK'5Ei2 '2523!EIIIIIIlllllllllIlllllIlIIlllElEE53i3iA.if3 T H E N A T I 0 N A L 422.gseziazamumuummIllIIIlulllrsesssafmmza-a,ge5j Pi ii 5 going down. We sat six girls on one sleigh, one on the lap of the other. I was if the last orie. Somebody pushed us and we started down. I went with them, 6 but I quickly realized I was not sitting on the sleigh. I was pulled by my sister sitting on my skirt. They dropped me half a way down. Don't you think, 533 2 girls, I was glad the snow covered way was so smooth? Anyway I was more fortu- E nate than other girls-I had to walk only half a way up. E E I am sorry, girls, I can't tell you about sliding in our mountains, where you E E go miles and miles down with wind speed. I never happened to be in our moun- E E tains during winter. E E -Jane Gdulewicz. : 5 sPoRTs IN swEnEN 2 5 Red Grange, the sleepless salesman of the five-cent chocolate bar, the rival E E of the Prince of Wales for the feminine heart in America, would hardly be capable E E of arousing a Swedish nose to turn up. The Swedish school girl's ideal is the officer, E E tall and nice-looking in his uniform, adored for his dance. To see this officer E E horse-back riding makes her heart beat faster. Of course, he takes an active part E E in horse-races, auto and bicycle-races, which all are exceedingly popular. But in E E football-Oh no! The boy starts early in the school to train himself, either to be E E an officer or to beat an officer. Swedish gymnastic is no pastime for a sugar-baby E E or girls, who, of course, are in the same class. Instead the girl finds delight in E E dancing after Dalcroze method. After school there are plenty of outdoor recrea- E E tions. In winter time, if you have a longing to make high ski-jumps, skate or coast, E E the hills and lakes give you opportunity to satisfy it. In summertime, I think : E you would enjoy swimming and fishing most, as we have many beautiful little E E lakes. For hunting and hiking the woods are wonderful. What in Sweden is E as popular as football here, is tennis. We have many real good players. Our E E king, although he is about sixty-five years old, is among our best ones. Once every Q E year he goes to France and plays against Suzanne. The general interest for sport , E is large, and it grows larger every year. -E E -Dagne Aquist. E Ti HOW we ALL FEEL In miss g E MOUNTS' ez-nss 5 2 Q E E ' E ll 5 S D.Kro S- 2 3, 92 fs M ' enemaeaiemlllllallllnlllmnlmlmllllluuImmmlllmlmllmllmlmmlllmmnlnlmmuunlmmmnmnummlmmunulllmuluummInuula:u:slulln.zsef5z'easess-sass:s'if IN THE CANDLE LIGHT It was Spring' The tall College Building which all through the winter had stood as a sentinel on the h1ll bare unprotected now stood amidst all the shim mering green of Spring Trees shrubs and vines seemed to be bursting with the message of Spring The brilliant sunshine had even brought response from the long fiozen rivei Now it gurgled and rippled over stones, dashed against rocks so that the fa1 flung spi ay might watei its banks to prepare for the fragrant spring flowers that might grow theie On such a day s this Joan a slender delicate blonde of fare beauty left her Aunt Selinas old fashioned house for school It was Joan Ethridges second semester at this Girl s College on the hill and ever since her mother s death six months before she had been living with her Aunt in Roseland Park and commuting back and forth to schoool It seemed that since the very day Joan arrived in Roseland Park she had been utterly and purposely ignored This at first had made her feel very sad and alone She had counted so much on friends since her mother's death. But Aunt Selina had filled a great vacancy and had showed her that she should be glad rather than sad at this marked attitude of the town in general. For, after all, Roseland Park society, although as a whole a well-to-do people, were an uneducated, common people, with little regard or appreciation of the finer things. Today as Joan turned the corner and started up the street toward the train she thought of the six months since her arrival in Roseland Park. She recalled the one party to which she had been invited-at the Ashby's, only two doors away. It was the first time she had met any of the young people of Roseland Park. She remembered with a smile what a keen disappointment it had been-both in the young men and girls! Not one similar taste, not a common ground on which to talk, no appreciation of the beautiful. "What could I have in common with them?" She found herself saying it out loud. She was quite startled and looked around the station to see if anyone heard her. There behind her loomed up a tall broad-shouldered man's figure. With all her courage she looked into his face-it was a handsome face with much yi U Q 51 i . Li E 1 1 1 1 1 1 S 'S 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 'S 1 1 S 1 1 1 1 1 1 S 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 S 1 1 1 1 'S 1 S 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 'S 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 9 N Y ?35E3l2lllllllIIllIIIllIlllllllllllElEiS53i5iv.:l' T H E N A T I U X A L iiI,5341535Illlllllllllllllllllllllllllll'ilEEE55 i? il! 6 si 9 gv . . . . . 0 . f N . . . . Q - Y . . 7 7 . l . . 9: I u . Q n 7 7 n -I 1 i' . . . ' E -' E ' fm- 1 1 ' E . , - . . , E . . , . . 7 . E . '. . 7 . 7 . : ' ' - 1 a . G '- E character, gray eyes, even white teeth making an attractive smile, and dark and glossy hair. She saw all this in a second's glance. Immediately she had turned and consciously looked long and steadily down the tracks for a glimpse of her train. It was coming. She then looked at her watch with undue effort, as if calculating the time to see if she would make her class. After all she knew she would, but she had to do something to take him off her mind. He rode opposite her all the way down to school. Everytime she looked up she found him looking her way, which, to say the least, was quite discon- certing. For a week following Joan saw this same young man on the same train every morning. She had not told her Aunt Selina anything about this special train except that she must make it or she would be late to class. About the middle of the second week, one lovely spring morning, Joan almost missed her train. She had a full half block to run to make it. The train had started up with a slow "chug', when she jumped up on the step of the train and caught hold of the iron rod. Then someone reached down and caught her by the arm and lifted her up to the second step. She looked up into the gray eyes and attractive smile of this same young man she had noticed each morning. "You're quire a runner!" he said, still smiling. "Chl You were watching me? Well-thank you for helping me up!" she was surprised to find herself answering so naturally. She walked into the car and he followed. It all seemed like a dream, yet so perfectly natural. They conversed and laughed together until at her station she said, "Goodbye," That evening after dinner, Aunt Selina and Joan came into the living room 93 - 1 - - - - - - - - - - : - - - .. : .- - 1 - - ... - - : : - I - w - ' - - : E - .. - .- .- .- .. .- - .. : - - .- : : I .- : : - - ... : - ... .. Q.. - .: '- S 551 'Q S if 9-. 1 G1 J EEE! iliiisllllllilIIliIllIIIllIIIIIIIlllIIIllIIIIIlllllllllllllllllllllll IllIIlllIIIIIlllIIIIlIIIIlllIIIIlIlllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllll llIlllIIIIllllllllllllllIlllilllIilIllIlEEiffflEei?if3'3zZES'5if? SX X I'IIIIIlllllllllllllllllllllll I! if 11 9 gl IlllllllllllllllllllllllllllI it and took thell usual places Joan on the footstool befole Aunt Sellna s gleat chalr Ioan sat quletly fol some tllne then she began to tell casually of the happenlngs at school of the CIHIIIHQ, glrls thele Hele MHIV lnade an appeal ance at the door Excuse llle llla alll but thls palcel Just calne QXPIGSS fol you For me? asl ed Aunt Sellna Bllng It hele thank you Mary Would you nllnd gettlng the dlnnel concelt ovel the 19,Cl1O on youl way out? I wondel what lt could bel quelled Joan She was all eyes as Aunt Sellna carefully unwlapped the package SIIVGI Candlestlcks and Baybelly Candles' How lovely' Let me see what 1S wlltten on the Cald Aunt Sellna Happy BIIJEIICITV Sellnal It s floln Flola sald Aunt Sellna Why Aullt Sellna I dldn t know It was youl bllthday today Deal Qllllfl you know I never make llluch of bllthdays nllne O1 anyone else s It s just that Flora has known llle SIHCG we WG16 school g1IlS together All O1 chcstla was conllng ovel the ladlo They W616 playln a very beautlful waltz How lllcely It all fits Baybelly Candles and a VIOIID thought .Ioan Allllf Sellna lnay I llght the candles? You celtalnly shall' Slle placed the gleamlng CHHCIIQSJCICIKS one on each slde of the narlow table behlnd the Cl2LV611DOIt As she llt the candles that sputteled lnto a gentle flame she heal d stlalns of Llebestlaulne by Llszt comlng ovel the ladlo She sank to hel footstool hel head drooped agalnst the davenport Aunt Sellna coveled For a Llttle House She casually turned the first few pages To her surprlse the tltle of the HISI1 poem was Baybelly Candles Llsten to thls Joan and she lead aloud D631 Sweet when dusk colnes up the hlll And flle leaps hlgh wlth golden prongs I place along the chlmney slll The tlny candles of my song Oh Aunt Sellna let me lead It protested Joan Aunt Selllla smlled and handed hel the book and watched her QUIGIIY as she lead Flnally Aullt Sellna lntellupted hel I hope IUHIOITOW wlll be a nlce day fol I ve lnvlted Flola fO1 dlnner We ll have hel sllver candlestlcks on the table tool Do you know contlnued she F lola refused llly lnvltatlon at filst for hel son has lust retul ned from New York whele he has SICHIJECCI hls plactlce of law Imaglne he hasnt seen hls mothel fol foul years Oh lntellupted .Ioan I thlnk I ve heald of hlln I ucllle and thc Ashby boys WGIG telllng me about hlln at the Ashby party They sald he was a prude SDGHCIIIIQQ most of hls tlme wlth hls nose ln a book He s thell best example of a D001 QDOII doesn t drlnk and says hc has no tlme fol gllls Of course that s thell ldea of hlm Oh no sald Aunt Selma He dldn t IIHDFBSS me that way wllen I saw hlnl last But you snall see for yourself tomollow nlgllt The next evenlng Joan hullled home from school so that she mlght have tlme to dl ess fol dlnner Maly had decol ated the dlnlng room table Wlth a center plece of sprlng flowers and lt all looked very beautlful ln the llght of the Baybelry Candles Joan hel self looked very lovely ln a slmple yellow gown that brought out the gold ln her halr When the doorbell finally rang Joan found herself V61y CUIIOUS to meet thls puny bookworm Flora Powell s son There was a cheery greetlng and then Joan I d llke you to meet my son Walter Powell but Joan dld not hear for she was looklng lnto the face of the handsome young man she had met on the traln At first he looked startled astonlshed then a broad beamlng smlle llffhtened hls face as he broke the sllence le E15-H1Z'I8F1UiiiltmllllIIIIlllilllllllllllIllIlIllIII.IIlIllIIIIllllllllllllllllllllllllIIIIlIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIlIIIllIIIlIIIlIlIl:lIlIIlllllfvvl 4.119.- . eu!! 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Z g 1 . 1 1 : : 1 1 : E 7 - - E S ' S 1' ' S E 1 E 2 1 1 - E E , ' 44 1 ' E E , 1 1 E H . . 1 E ' 1 E 4 I 1 1 - e 1, 1 lft y 5.1 :Q WE in 5. 94 ii ' 1 M-.Z 1. lE..il"T. - 1 ' 5 2:11.12 .-::,.": " 'f E Both wishes were granted. E E That night, long after Aunt Selina had gone to bed Joan sat up alone. She : E picked up Christopher Moreley's "Songs For a Little Housel' and read to herself E E again the closing verse of the poem called "Bayberry Candles-" E E So long ago 2 E When we were back : E In the old College. E g Remember? : E There was the breeze : -E Wafted from the southwest : E On a summer's day, E E Scented with stockyardls perfume. : E The soot and grime E E Of the factory smoke, : 35QSi'-526523425251HIIIllIIIlllllIllllIllIlIlIIElEE53i3i,f3 T H If N A T I 0 N .x L ff.ii-EZQZHIHIIlllllllllllllllIlIIllllllli!2EEli'? Q?bi?'2: E 5 I "How do you do? I'm indeed very glad to know you!" Both Walter and Joan enjoyed every moment of that evening and as they sat down to dinner Joan thought with a smile, "I never thought Ild see him in fi Bayberry Candlelight!" I Before they left Walter had asked if he might come over th feollowing evening to call and also if he might call for Joan to take her to the train in the morning. E 5 "And though unsteadily they burn g E As evening shades from gray to blue, i E Like Candles, they shall surely learn E E To shine more clear for love of you." -Elizabeth Geshw ind. E 5 REMEMBERING 5 E. It doesn't seem g : The shots in the night. E 5 Then, too, our alley vocalists, E E The peddlers. g E And the little pickaninnies E 5 Who saw many a class to E E The shade lowering stage. E g The "Del," where the E E Toasted cheese sandwich reigned. E E And the "Tea Chestl' E E When those in the Library E E These things stand for 5 - Qld "2944," and E E Are dear to us as a part of it. , E Yet isn't it grand 5 E To say, g E "Remember?,' -Geraldine Behensky. E E oLoUD LAMBS I E EE The twinkly stars are Iireflys, I guess, E And that big cloud is the shepherdess. 2 And when the wind goes woo-h E The little lambs run faster, too 4 And the man in the moon just sits and winks, 5 9 . . . PQ Q. I often wonder just what he thinks. -Agnes H zlton. gg: at wi 95 5: l 5fdi!5sE'lZ?3RiliiillIIIIEIllliIIllIllIlllllllllllIllIIIlIllIIIlllllllllllllIIIIllIIIIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIllllIIIllIllIllIIllllIllIIIllIllllllllIIIIllIIIIIIIIIllIIIIIIllIIllEllll?lllll!2E5E1iSe?if?HGlE?3l?i ' CI wonder if they miss us?j E : Also the fire drills E : Excited through the window. E 5 Little lambs are the clouds in the sky I 5 Woolly lambs that go frisking by. g f'EIFAIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIEIEEE iii-.ff T H E N Ax T I 0 X ,X L Aiii,kiigiiillhlllllllllllIlIlIlIIIIlIIIIllil!EEE? ifl'5i!Z:2 Q 9 U.. J f! ill SECOND HAND ROSE "Second hand rose Second hand clothes, Everyone knows, I'm second hand rose!" I don't know why I've never been able to get that song out of my head and I suppose it's because it seems to have been written just for me! "Second hand rose, Second had clothes," That's the part that fits me exactly. I'm a second hand rose if there ever was one! Having a big sister gives one a splendid chance to be a martyr, and when that song came into fashion I was accordingly dubbed the "Second Hand Rose" of the Winslow family and-how it clings! Rosalie was sweet and perfectly adorable and I loved her heaps, but she did have that unpleasant habit of handing me her clothes when she was through with them and it's the hardest habit in the world to break! Well, matters came to a sort of a crisis when Rosalie said in that angelic fashion of hers: ' There's no reason why that crepe of mine wouldn't make Beatrice a sweet little Sunday dress." You see I said I wanted a Sunday dress when I really wanted a dress for Sally s party. There are pecks of reasons my dear sister. I said for I happened to be present Why dearest? h Well I hate the embroidery and I don t want a square neck and that s t at That can be remedied cant rt mother? demanded Rosalie She looked so pretty as she turned to mother wrth that poutrng questioning look that I knew rn my bones that I d weaken Well began mo her How can you make a square neck round? I rnterrupted crossly Mother can do anything can t you mother? said dear Rosalie Mother started to answer when our neighbor Mrs Brewster came rn Rosalie got me out into the hallway and began rn a sugary pleading way Now be a good child Bee What difference does rt make how you look when you re so young But I began rndrgnantly I simply must have sornethrng new when Gordon comes and you wouldn t to spoil rt would you Bee? Perhaps then youll never have to wear a of mrne again She srnrled mysteriously and fixed her pretty restless gray on me Bu You know you sard yourself you thought Gordon Ellsworth awfully nice Not Gordre Ellsworth!! I cried Want dress eyes No other sard Rosalie trrumphantly Think how great an opportunity I have to impress hrm! I had weakened Well rf you ll rrp out those fool sleeves and Oh Bee you dear darling Second Hand Rose cried that sweet weedler catching me rn a smotherrng embrace Ill stand on my head over the dress and you ll look like a mrllron dollars at Sally s party honest I wasn t so sure but anyway I went upstairs and got into the surt that Rosahe had gotten for her trrp to Chicago and took a good long walk On my way back I stopped at the home of Sally my best friend We paired around together all the time and the vrtal differ nce between us was that Sallys clothes came from a brg expensive store on Washington Street while mine ! The fact was that Sally had no brg sister although she often told me that five brothers were enough to make one overlook such a slight Sally was very excrted and happy ii I! 91 ,Q W Wx A: E 2 2 - s : E E EM 259 'llhlllllllllllllllllllIlllllllIIllIIIllllllllllllllllIlllllllllIIIIIIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIIllIlIlllIllllllllIllllllllllllllllllllllllllll llll Illlll QPF E :: : : - : : - K E E E E E E E : : E E E 7 : : E H i yy , E 5 2 1 S - : E ' E E cc ra E -1 ' E E cz - 1 y 3 g 7 7 S E ar 5 1 4 1 E sr ' a ' ra - E - , . ,. 5 1 1 u . . 1 : 'i ' 1 1 E E ' 1 E : . 2 : : , cc ar : 1 , t '- : - - ! i ra , ax ' , E 2 V - n E -' KK ' 1 77 ' ' 1' , .. 1 y I n : - . . . - l I V , . . E E . . . H E 1 f f r , - E ' S E ' - , - 1 rr 5 1 7 u f f n E E cc 77 - - E E ' ' S l i cc ' - a E E t . . ' , I E 1 .- , , l. , , E E . . H . I. i 1 E X ' - f k r ' E 5 E fl t I7 1 - 1 : l E cc ' , , ' U E E ' ' S 5 cz ' ra ,' E 2 -n 1 , .. I . : 1 1 A za , 77 - ' ' za ' , ' g : I, r I 1 H - ' - 77 E ' . E E , zz - 1 - nr E : 1 f "' : E cc - n ' E 3 'v 1 E E ' - - , ez 1 , 5 ' f L f u , E E 1 - - - a , as 5 5 '- . : g , . . . . E - E 1 ' . ' E : - ' E - . .. ! - 5 E 7 " ' E fi . . . Q , A . . :ri ' - ' ' ff.: :M lb: :E 5: I ' I. 96 gg D,' ',4 W if . 1-12 f ' E E Mi? 6555?-vs 4g5,r 5g52gjjjllll'I'l'mlmmmmjlglgigggggijj? T H E N A T I 0 N A I. iii.I5532553Ihllllllllllllllllllllll llll!il?2iSE5?J5'?Ef?i3?F14: 0 She had just gotten her dress for her wonderful party. A perfect love of a shade of burnt orange with darling little godet. It was perfection. I relapsed into adoring silence while she tried it on. When I arrived home I felt just a wee bit sore and even more so when I found that Rosalie had left her job of setting the table to me, in order to walk with Gordon just because he wanted her to. I don't think he's so awfully nice anymore. The next few days flew and my dress was done. It lay on the bed where Rosalie had laid it so temptingly. I had to admit it was pretty! If only it were bran new and I had just cut the Washington Street tag off! Rosalie's own clever fingers had made the smart petal belt and sewed in each tiny pleat. "Second Hand Rose, Second Hand Clothes, Everyone knows?" I suddenly sang. Well I am completely overwhelmed! I really don't know what to do. I'm so thrilled! I really must try to calm myself and tell what has happened. It was the morning after Sally's party and I was at the breakfast table-all alone- and what should appear before me in the society column of the "Breeze", our own select little news but my name!!-in print! and a sketch of my dress! At Sally Duncans party which has been eagerly looked forward to bx Brewester s younger set a great many of the Duncan s Boston friends were present It was a very brilliant affair and we are over joved that among this select crowd the daughter of one of our oldest and best known families was able to hold her own Miss Beatrice Winslow must certainly carry off the honors for being the most charmrngly gowned person present! Well right then and there I declded I d just as soon be a Second Hand Rose as nothing! And so I promised Rosalie on the spot that I d wear her ser ge to school without a murmur All on the strength of that one 1te1n! It was all right until I found out that dear Rosalie wrote rt! Dorothy M Knowles THE CAREFREE FLOWER Little flow ret in the sun You seem to have such loads of fun Gently nodding to us now You seem to make a fairy bow Swayrng gently to and fro Beneath the winds that softly blow A joyous carefree life you lead Gr owing blowing on the mead -Grace Roosmom 4919 B! 1 E E - E - E E E E S - S S S S ..- S' 2 - S S - .- ... 2 E S - r : S S S E u B p 1 S cc 1 . ' . , 1 , 5 7 ' ' . S 1 7 1 -1 7 ' 1 1 E , 1 f V f '1 I- . . 1 1 . S 1 1 1 1 1 : - f 1 r ref I S " . . S I 1 v 1 , , , S . . . . . E 1 1 u 1 1 0 k N E ' , Y7 E ' ' 1 ' rr va E , , , , S . . . .- - 1 1 V 7 1 1 1 1 V I E ' . E ' 1 1 1 : 1 , , , , : . . . . -,: . 1 1 - i ' f. 5 L' ., E a - S E S S E S E E E E E - E'- .1...,....i . g E - E E E E E : : Z : 2 S E f E E ' 7 ' S - 5 2 S S ' '-1 ' S - Z .- ' E - S - E E . 1 E . 7 E -1 7 E . . - ' : l 7 7 E 1 1 E 7 ' E Ls: E I it , ,.. u U' 3 97 r mi 5 E I 5 5 lE'iU"Wf?9Wl4'? -'M Q 4 if llllll Ill! IIIIllllIllIllllIllIIIIIIIIIllIIIllIIIIIIIIIIIlIIIIIIIIllllllllIIIIIlllllllllllllllllllllllIIIIllIlllllIllIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIllllll.lIll.IIlIl!.. ..... , 45.1.1-.1 . .E :Mm 1 . .. - : gl 1 - : E - ... - S - .. .- - .. - .. - .. - .. E Hair-breadth escapes from busses Z ,. . Y Y .... .. .. . ......-F ...- ..,. ., .. W 3451iSEiiQSiZ ?3i25lillIIIIllllIllIllllIIIlIllIIIEIEiS5'Ei5:i I H lu N .X T I 0 B A l ..svzhiidlalIlllllllllIIIIIIIllllllllllilimkvkv:.f4asd'14:Qn2 9 2 , .H 52 S2 0 Ye! .W W !1n M- 'Q E ' E I dl N93 E -h ... 5 MEMORIES 2 E BEFORE 2 E Soot E E Grimy snow E - Black chimneys A E Clouds of smoke : The red ball of the setting sun in grey skies 5 ' Short Walks from houses to the Stables ' " Drug store, 31st Street, Cand otherj lights : House parties and college dances - - Big, full length mirrors Fraternity houses Taxi cabs Churns AFTER Quiet White snow Natural cololed chimneys Bright sunrises easily seen Flashes of the L lights on Central Tramps over the prairie to the College Nature study hikes With D1 Downing Labyrlnths of tiunks in halls Where is a mirror? No desks dressers, or closets Varnish and fresh paint Trees, real trees Chums always Vzrgzma Tourtelotte E .. E E 5 .. : I E E 5 E : ' E 5' - . - . E E - E g . E : - E l . E ' : 5 E E E S S E E : : : : : : : - : E E I ' 3 - E E : ' E 5 . . . 5 E cc an ' E : . . E : : ' . . 1 . ' E l ' ' 1 ' i A ' E H1 . 7 . E E 2 : : 2 ' . . . E .- ... . : k E : : E E E E E E E E m Q .. N 52 Shi 98 A" F5 ze! J bw ill E , ,. . .42 55" 5 E 5 5 3 ' nn 1 E 9 if llllll Ill! IIIIlllIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll IIIIIIIIIllIllIlllllllllllllllIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll Jill llllll F 5 -'D V E Pussy willows silvery gray E E Smiling through the rain 2 5 Smiling skies above, E Q 2 igSiK'-ifsiiliiliiilillIIIIII IIIIlllllllllllIIIIEIEEF-5535, T H E X A T I 0 N Hy I. IllllIIIIIIIIIIllIIIllllllfilEEE5 t?4'i3?Z:2 Pr 04 av- A P R I L M O O D S 5 5 Nod their heads and laughing say, Q E "'Tis joy we should acclaim!" E April buds all shimmery green i - Dripping crystal dew, E Awake with dawn's first golden gleam E E When stars have turned to blue! E 5 Joyous World with beauty sings, E E Earth's resounding gladness brings E E The memories dear of love! E E -Betty Geshwind. E S 2 n ,- S I :- S .- I- - , .- S 1- 5 THE SUNSET I E Oh, the beauty of the sunset E E Held me spellbound as I gazed. E E Rooted to the spot I stood there E E As my soul its maker praised. E Oh, the wonder of that sunset E E As it mingled gold with red, : E Shading into pink and purple, E Made me want to softly tread. E E Could a mortal artist paint it E 5 He would need to paint no more, : E For the echo of that painting 5 E Would bring thousands to his door. E E Yet, as God so often shows us E E What he can to us bestow E : Few are those who stop and worship, 5 In his grace and beauty grow. -5 -Grace Roosman. 2 P I gf ,J ,oy lb 99 :Q H ?liG'1i!5sE'3a?3QELQEHIIIIIIEIIIlillllllIllIIlllIIllIllIllllIllIIIIIIIllllllllIIIllllllIIIIlllIllllIllIllllllllllIIIIllIllIIIIIllllIIllllIIllIIIllllillllllllllllllllllIIlllllllllllllllllllillllilllllliiifiiii?EfZ'3zEE?2iii? A Q. .,,, bf' :iSQK'iWi?M?2E2!lE1lllllllllllllllllll I llslzeass-spas.. 'r ll IC N A T I 0 N A L IIllllllllllllllllllllllllllI 1 Pi C M o v 1 N G USE I don't like to move, do you? Makes me feel a kind of blue Leaving all the friendly faces E And those well-known traveled places. E Oh, it isn't fun to pack E Thinking that you'1l ne'er be back. E Yes, I know the place is old, Q And the classrooms ne'er would hold E All the students who are turning E Faces toward our fount of learning. E Yet "Good-bye" is hard to say E To those buildings once so gay. 5 Yes, the place was full of dirt, E And we had to be alert E Lest the little darkies scatter E All the thoughts from our gray matter E As they grinned in at the class E Through the alley window glass. E And I know the neighborhood E Wasn't really very good. 5 Ozone in the air was lacking E And we had to go horse-backin g E In the city parks for weeks E To get roses in our cheeks. E In our new home we are free, E And we all do now agree E That this place is so much better, E Even in the coldest weather. E Oh, we're glad that we came here E Where to nature we are near. E Hills and valleys we now roam E As from college we go home. E By the bridge we cross the river, E While the north wind makes us shiver, I But we gayly race along Q All a-tune to winter's song. " Ah, the country round about 5 Makes us want to up and shout E And our college great and spacious, 5 With its teachers all so gracious, Gives us inspiration new E As life's work we start to do. E Oh, I like to move, don't you? Into fields and pastures new, Where the gushing river races, i' And the sunset leaves its traces. 1, Oh, I think itls loads of fun ' If you move to Evanston. 100 gl ?.i'di!5i:EM?5E i'fZ5.ElI II ElIllilIlllIII ' MQ ci tric ti c IlllllllIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIlllllllIIlllIIlIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIIIIIIIII! ws.-mr .. Y 1 ls gSiR'4if'5iiE3?2!E3!E1llllllllllllIlllllIIIIIIIIIEIEEES-iii T H E N A T I 0 N A I. 515425 F IB.llllIllllllllIIIIIIlllIll!iI!EE!ii 2??E5?Z:3g P: if .Q '14 E Frnsr 1MPREss1oNs Q E There might be neater places E 5 With fewer cluttered spaces E I Than our college. 2 ? There might be less confusion 5 E To ruin your constitution 5 5 Than in our college. - E There might be classrooms less dusty E E Pounding and clatt'ring less lusty E E Th,an in our college. E E But there couldn't be teachers clearer E 5 Who'd make our Wayany clearer : E Than in our college. - E So donlt crab, it's better to smile, Z Tj' And a smile makes it more Worth while, I E For it's our college. : f -Agnes H ilton. E 5 E ' :ol 101 tk M SFHQHQZMEQESEMIIIIIlilIIEIIIlIIIlllIIIIIIIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIlllllllllllllllllllllllIllllllllIlllIllllIllllllllllIlllllllllllllllllllllllllll I lllllllllIIIllIillllEllIllEEiiE3fA5?iiP5!iS'53E ' 9 X X 1mnunmmumuu II me I . 'iZ,,.:af'..f IlllllllllllllllllllIlIlIIIlFl..I.:'I ..., MISS PETERSON I went into the libi ary And now about that quiet place - There s something you should know. - There sits the strangest thing- It seems to look severe and bold - As it sits there listening. - I used to l now who reigned supreme E O 61 all the p1 etty girls E But now whene er I enter there 5: My bi a1n just runs in swirls. E I thought of all the folks I knew : Who dared to sit right there : And tell us wheie to find our books f And not to talk or swear. - Then suddenly a new thought came To crowd my o er-tafced brain' I had an inspiration all at once But it could not iemain. Of course I d heaid of Helen Wills - Who wears a green shade hat' And so I thought it must be she Who d tiespassed our doot,-mat. But as I once was studying And finally was all done I glanced up mystified to find - E It was Miss Peterson. w O ? E E And now I know so plainly E I That California school : 2 Is not the only one to claim E : A green-hat maid to rule. ' x : i -Dorothy Allen.. g j' E I c 4' A E f iff pl 1, .N f lllll hi p ...ma-Les...i ii 4' f ji, 'I' ll E N A T I 0 X X L f:f'fn?.Hlz .24'2'X 2-..e!' - fi 3 o Q3 9 53 5? lb' 9 if , , 2 I Not very long ago- V i 7 ' I E Q Up at the brown desk, stern and small, E E f' k 1 E E , 4 1 1 . . 5 X ' I ' X 1 E : I i I , E , y i : 5. 5 . ' E E 7 E ' H U ?ii'diH5:hw.L?3R-5. 'lliiillllllillllilllllllllll I I llllllllll I I IIIIIIIIllllIIIIllllIIIIllllIIIIIIllllIllIIIllllllllllllIllllllllIIIllllllIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllillIll!iE'ifl4fe:?ifZ'3x?LE32i'iE rf- X - P x 1. f Y fi fl E 5 E K E - i v X 4 .X Xxx F .. I Q 'xl X f XX ' , ,I f- -5, 1 V X J . " X xxx ' 1 i i Y E AJ J 9 ? K , . XX Xa A ,xxx A Z' A fx A, VN! y X X' N Nr- . ,X r ! N3 -V,-fvg NN 3 L! L" X' H - -1 r 1 i 1 .... '7 A L 'i' 1:3 ,, X :EEE PUC '-- -U "7 1 ' -iw" W ' X- ff'-X 4 V IP' V41 ff fff Lf' NI, , 4 .G-f f ' i IW N' iw if i5F!3t?fT51e?, pT'fT'g',rf-Lf lvI 1,, ,ML A .M-1 , f 55' Eg ,g 1 W lk 4 im" be 'VI " ' 4'4QFf' 'Y if ' UN' f, f..-W-5 'lv 'NN f51.+1i' f +11 aq ml Q we 1 1':f5T K+ W wwf. .'f -f' ff 'gf' fi gil M1 f1i F -1i3' LfhgM l-i:f - --,43i1 . .H " ' "52?" fff f U, ff 2 1' , ' 'Hhff 'ffm rum" it 'kg ' 7 Wyff' af 1 fxlifijfl W -Lg A 3 m.1AW:Ia'i'- .' ' 5 :I 'T' H- W A ,,J.',i .7 ' "1 .ill , fx . 1' ,W LMA gil!-Jm:f,y15Wa.11-f. A ' '11, J-3 I m ,lik I'f'i,, I ' I ,. if ,Qui ffiflv I Jr ,. 'fffif ' -w1fff +"? A- I I , If "I I EI ' I F f' 'H ' ' 'ixlfl 'I I,-V' f W f 'u .1 4 ,' if E 1 H" NI 4, f' N Mil'-' Jiyvwiw. " 4 1 'MH fi I ' V ' Q ' - - .J wi H x 'Q N21 5' , 'riff i W + rf,,,4,.,f,, 6 f- gi-,JW il, -j,,"'.Z"'.- M 3 H , - M JY1 ,3 M , W, if- ' fha?" "gg A H U 0 R fi , L , . , F ' Q . 3 J,i5lb,1 fQ'. ' y ' ' . ' -1' lin 1' A 4 1. 1v. M M e 'ALE 3 'g.,mV,!-Q, If Q. , fljitngxinjl , .43 l - V ,ry 23.5, sw' W ii"K"fW'f'w3 ' X fu, , nffldii ' fl Malin emi i f1"wfW M159 W 'ilu V1 mf , 'f W' !2,f '1f! I Rf 1 'IL :--f Q 1, 'fix V vim., ah! J' ' gf' zfgayfqff 71.111 W F ' gfflifgc-Ki 5 f " LAX-1' -5 'WH's"5 " Q' L ' '. ' .,f':1f"' V J , "'U 4 5 i wx i Bw! L W ff 'xx fjjvz 'I iglgfff 15 11 ' Q r 'V 4 V 4 "fy ' . , A-'pi' k .2 A"" f ,, - , ilu . I ':r-..JTl. -M 1 -,. 24" X'4'3 A "W" """':"' "ill -ALMA' b 7776? -T Yum, Y 2 Boots-"Because of a sign I have to pass on my way here. . E In front of a cop- E Her fate was easily seen. 2 "Because his father and mother were Irish." 5 '11 WSQXK'-iisi i 3EESlEIllllllIllllIlllllllIIIIIIIIEIEZSS-3555.1 T H E N A '1' I 0 N :K 1- , asians:lmlmImmllnlnumlllrsrzsssmmierzszgf 35 LUNCH ROOM ETIQUETTE Yg! Don't eat: 1. Unbleached turnips I a L . Cubieal horseradish E 2 2 3. Cured eggplant E E 4. Prunes with a knife E E 5. Long-necked celery E E 6. Soup with a compass E E Mary W0rthi'ngt0nf"Where have I seen your face before?" E E Dorothy Allen-"Right where you see it now." 5 : Orchestra l97'ZI,777,77l6T-HI7111 the fastest man in the world." E E V2.0Z'f'RfSt-itHOWVyS that?" E E O. D.-'fTime flies, doesn't it?,' E E V.-"So they say.'l E E O. D.-"Well, I beat timeln E E There was a young girl named Pauline, E E Who attempted to drive a maohineg - E She forgot to stop, E - As a man was standing on Brooklyn Bridge, an aeroplane flew over him and - 2 E a submarine went under him at the same time. "What nationality was he?" E E asked Johnny. E 1 ' 'lrishf' E S KlWhy?77 - S 1 E IF MAMA HAD HEARD 5 E Little Miss Gwendolyn was discoursing affably with the rich widower who was much interested in her mother. "If I send you a doll," said Mr. Riohington, "should it have golden hair like yours'?'l ,Q Gwendolyn-"Oh nog the next doll I get must have hair like mama's-to take fa off and put on."-The Tiger. 103 g'diH5:7Z'3z?3!fiLi?ei!i lllillllillllllllllIIIlIIllllIllIlIIIIIllIIllllllllIIllIlllllllIllllIIIlIIllIIIIIIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIIIIIllllIIIlIlllllllllllllllllillll llIIl!ZE?jfl1vei9Ef3'3!?LE3b'iag - : - 0 E : E . Teaclzev'-"Why are you always late for school?" E E Teacher-"What has the sign to do with it?" E E 5 Boots-"Why, it says, 'School ahead, go slow'." g E 1 -1 1 1 1 1 1 S 1 E .. - 1 1 1 1 2 .E 2- Siva' 1' YQ VI llllllIlllllllllllllllllllll'IZ is wp J F X 0 X ff' 03 Bl IllIllllllllllllllllllllllll l"4 91' 'uf-'71 6 L E 6 3: s-4 Q1 P lb Fa ie' A 5 lllillllllllllllIlllllllllllllllllllllllll ' llllllllllllllllllllllllllllIllllllllllIIIllllllllllIllllllllllIIillllllllllIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIlllIIEllllillIIIliE5E4.Lfe?5fS'lf9LS3!-'25il?Q A E H e-"Could you take a joke seriously?" E E She-"I scarcely know you yet!" 5 E The school teacher, in trying to explain the meaning of the word "slowly," : E illustrated it by walking across the floor. : E Ellen-"Piggly Wiggly." E 5 Ink-"What do you mean?" E E Ellen-"Help yourself Y' E E C. M core-"You say you flunked in Psychology? VVhy, I can't understand it" E E Poetess-"That poem I sent you contained the deepest secrets of my soul." E Editor-"Have no fear, Madamg no one shall ever find them out through me." E M iss H art-"So Arch went away last night." Clara L.-"Yes, he's gone." sg 3SiK'-3345S-Z 2EEQ!!!IllllllllIIIIllIIIIIIIIIIIIEIESSS-iiia T H lil N .x T 1 0 N A L ff.AZEQGEHIMIlIIllllIIIIIIIIllIIlIlIIllil!EE5i i??Ei5Z:2g ki U ' A little nonsense now and then Is relished by the best of menf' I 2 -+- vi E When she asked the class to tell her how she walked, little Mabel shouted, E E "Bow-legged." E E I nk-"Ellen, may I kiss you?" E E E. Greis-"Same here. That's why I flunkedf' E E He-"Say, are you going to be busy this evening?" E E Florence-"No, I'm not." : E H e-"Then you won't be tired in the morning, will you?', . F: Prof.-"Can you prove that the square of the hypotenuse is equal to the sum E E of the squares of the two sides of this trangle?" E E Student-"I don't have to prove it. I admit it.'y 5 E H e-Cteaching her to driveb-"In case of emergency the first thing you want E E to do is to put on the brakef, 5 Helen H ubseh-"Why, I thought it came with the car. E V. Tourtelotte-"Are you the one who cut my hair last time?" p E Barber-"I couldn't beg I've only been here a year." E 0 M iss H art-"Parting must make your heart ache." I yi . :QQ Clara L.-Yes, and every rib, too." ,gz 105 5fE'.iQiE'Efa?2f?-Qifiill IIlilIIEllllllllIllIllIlllllIlllllIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllIllIIllllllllllllllllllllIllIIllllIIllIlllllllIlllllllllllIlllllllllllllllllillll I I I I I ,- fisemimmzmamsmnlllumlmmmmllnlllslsassssssgiib T H E N Ax T 1 u N ,x L fig,ggqgfagqgmIIn1I1IIIIIII1IIIIIIIlllqlgg,gg5g+5m,gWwy,gii Pi ii 92 Q1 19 53 5 Z5 is -- ' .- ll ll lllll 'f QT Hg' ii mi ' x Sf VA X-W N A.. . -1. in A' at dvds-iYZ'5SW'+!llllIIlIl1lIIllllllllllllI!IIIIIIIllllllllllllllllllIIIIIIIIlllllllllllllllllllIIIIlllllllllllllllllllll!lllllllllllIlIllllllllllllllllllllIlIIIllllllllllllllllllll-III! IIIII! 'f'10lM2'.f'k" EDM? E - : . - : : E i ff!! E E ' E : ff : E 5' ' E E E ' E E , f ' E E ff' X . , . E E I ' ' K E : E ..,. W 1- f Q: f : : K , . 4 : : ' - L '- -W f E E 5 5 I- - V wk 'W ' - S , ,, wwf E - I 'L ' T:,::-tw'-,--11 : E 1 .-fn ' 5 E LV A f : E V, '2f.sl.Aw?zf : K. . E E S 1 r . E 1 ' - : A 2 E 5 15. " , ' , 1 L - 5 1 , E E A 1 E 1 A E 5' 5 ' E -' , I if 'Q' J E E W f I 1 E us ' 2' E , I Y 5 E f A ' N' Kr" ' E 2 x I : E X V X ...f M. V E 5 ? 1' ' I 1 . 5 E , A A f 2 I f E E A E- E , : E A 5 K E E . 2 E E 1 p "' E E ' 9 1 X E E f f , 5 E k ' E E fs' E - ? r-2 Y 'se 2 Q ' B g! .Q :QQ Q1 .M Ybf 4: .5 :Qi it 35 fK'i3"+i 2i?2EE3!E1llllllllllIIllIIllIIIIlIlllEIEiSi-r355iV.i:9 T H E N .ex T I 0 N A I, 5iI,AZEZQZEHIEIIIIllllllllllllllllllllIlllilEiEE5FEf'ZH 2 35 Pi Bob C.-"Can Janet keep a secret?" 4 Herschel-"I'll say so! We were engaged three weeks before I knew a thing 'Q' about it." ' U H E The class had been instructed to write a composition on a dog. 5 Teacher-"Why, Robert! How does it happen that your essay is word for E E word the same as your brother's?" E E Robert-"It is the same dog, teacher!" E E "Is Betty Shoesmith engaged now?" E E "Yes, but I don't remember the names of more than two of the boys." E E "Willie, how long will it take you to go to the drugstore?" E "What am I going for, Mother, ice cream or pills?" 5 U: 'fYou're right," said the left shoe to its mate. E E Grace Sclzert -"I'd like to ask you a question concerning a tragedyf, E E Dr. Schergcr-"Well, what is it?" E E Grace-"What did I make on that last test? 5 ? "They're off," said Mil Cook as she viewed the inmates of the insane asylum. 2 E L. Forney-'Td like to see something cheap in a felt hat." E Clerk-"Try this one on. The mirror's at your left." E E M iss Lcmphfer-"Another book I can recommend for outside reading is E f Barrie's 'What Every Woman Knowsln E E Rosalie Marx-"That's the one for me. It ought to be short." E E: "The man I marry must be rich, brainy, and good." I E E "I seeg you expect to have three husbands." E 'Miss Westervelt-"Can you carry a tune?" I E M ildtred Dugdale-"Certainly, I can. We'll carry that one out and bury it. : 5 W l E "What's the difference between Carol Schoup and an umbrella?" E ? "An umbrella can be shut up." -Z "The next person that interrupts the class will be sent home!" "Hoo! Ray!" yelled the class. at 107 Zi if a'::.aev5,u-:fm airmail:us:uisunmnummmmmumnunumuuum IIlIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIllIIIIIIllIIlllllllllllllllllllllIllIIllllIIlIlllllllIIIIIllIIIllIllIIllIIlllll!!IIEIIIll!ZE5f5.1rA?EfI'3fz?LE35'iE 3S5K'iY'QS5ZQ??l!E5lE1IlllllllIlIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIEIEESSQSZQ.ff 'I' H E N .31 T I U X A I. if522'-EEHIHIIIlllllllllllIlllIIlIllIll!iE4SEE Q??i?'""' I AQ ii Dr. Downing-CIn the course of a lecturej-"Nature plans well for mankind's .Q needs." ? M' - - . 9 Voice from somewhere 1n the class: "Pd say so! What could be more con- venient than ears to hook spectacles over?" :gf "Have you ever seen a mosquito Weep?', E E "No, but I've seen a moth bawl." E E Conductor-"This transfer has just expiredf' 2 5 Wzfmzie-"No Wonder, therels not a ventilator open in the car." E E Pauline-"Why Chuck yavvned three times while I was talking to him." E E Classmate-"Perhaps he wasn't yawning-he may have been trying to say 5 E something." E E Ed-"Words are inadequate to express 11137 love!" E 5 Ruth Lesser-"Try candy and violets." 5 E 5 E the Freshman. "I donlt think I deserve an absolute zero." E ' "Neither do I," agreed Dr. Webb, "but it's tl1e lowest mark I'm allowed to E E givef, E E 1. Lois Wertz thi11ks Noel Diamond is o. K. E 1 - 55 3. Pauline Parmelee loves to get letters from her touring Chuck Harris. E I 4. Roberta Phillips thinks Gordon Swarthout is the best 111an on earth. E E 5. Wright Hedenschough likes Alice Weber's 'fpetitenessf' E E 6. Hub Cardenls specialty is to call up Nina Criss all the way from Omaha. E E 7. Doc Hougen specializes in writing and drawing "specials" every day to E 1 Margaret Hulse. E ! 8. Ruth Carlson loves her Pi K A. E E 9. Ellen Day will always smile when "Ink" Higgins says, "Ain't Love Grand!" E 5 10. Fred Burnett becomes spell bound with the sight of Virginia Cohen's large, E 1 blue eyes. E , 11. Edith Johnson's Ruddy is O. K. with us too. E - 12. If Margaret Pierce hadnlt gone to N. K. E. C., she would have never met E l Clive Bishop-consequently they love HL" riding and thrill over their E 1 introduction to each other everytime they so indulge. 13. Ruth Lesser's Ed Shepherd-'nuff said? IQ 14. Irene and Melville Miles take the best pictures. O 1 1 11 if 15. Frances Swanson likes the Way Harold drives his car through Lincoln Park. ii 'E -ea 108 ze: 1 1 1 Y v V . .l iif1afglwgngggfffilllllnlulllflmul llllllllllIllllllIIlllllllllllllllllllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMI 1 llllllllilfllllllllllllllkilllllllIllllllllllllllllllllllllllll IlllllllllHllliIllllliirifiiia55935925556 5 "There 11111510 have been so111e mistake in my examination marking," complained E 2. Harold Myers likes the way Helen Schade wears her hair. E 5 X X r 11ummmmlmmlllm If e T H E N A T I 0 N .X L if.-53621333IhlIlllllllllllllllllllllllllIiI!SE5 Q .. Au s. S - 1 - - - S S .- 'S E' S S S .- 2 1 .- nn - S 1 - - -u S - - S nu 1 .vt vw ii N H K S OSU HL 1. EHLTIL, In 1- V in E Q IISIEEEI Rom: -r-0 A LIFE ce'm1Ffcn7p - IIIIIIIII ,,, -IIIIIIIEI ' ,Sn EEEEEEEEEE 2 Y 7, f t If K 4 Q E Cai ' E avr' 4 ,af E . W fm- Q I WJ A X X I X Q jmfmfva THEIR OWN WNPIHGHRITV L ' " L A- TEACH wG 2 V W zorv QUIET ' BlS++oPs Rve-BYR wuw E Pm vnre' 1 0 E N0 R9ml'r'1'FwM! E ' ' WM a 0:51. g " . QQ , r ' L O if .IJ i Q A I X Q f Mpiv svluu or .zusi ness, 4'GE'T'T1NG AU M-A 1 , P E .QL YQ U B C , QJCNQWLES' PJ 10. 109 4 v lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIlllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIlllllllllllllllllllllllll lllllllllIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIIIllllIIllllllllllllIllIlllilIIIiIlIll!E5EilE?Ef?3iiQ?2Wg WSQMWQS5-Z 2i?SlElllllllllllllIlIlllllIIIIIIIEIEEE-355515 T H E N 1 T I 0 N 5 L 12,maize:lmulnmnuIIuunummsuxsssafmfmsemms 9 Q2 Fi ,ii gf .. E E E A - : : - : E : - .. : E 'g -1 : : - - : E I : : E E : E E S - .. 3 S Z 1 - 5 : I 1 E E .. - .. - : : - : v 40-' aa fi Fl: vt! ,ef 1 10 ag, ie iiidiiisififikiifiigilllIIIEIIIIEIIlllllllllIllllllIlllllllIIlllllIIIllllllllIlIlllllllIIIIllIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIIIIIlilllllllllllllllllllllllllllIIIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllEllllillllllikifiift?i5'lf1?LE3b'iE ZFisii?i?3EE5lE1llIlllllllllllllllllllllIIIEIEEESSBQ-.illI T H E X ,X T I 0 N A L :EEE 91l IIllllllllllllllllllllllllllI I 6 1. 3' it in 4 51 NJ Z 3: . f, bf' 54 MORE SPEED When our college moved to Evanston We found the trains ran slow, And we tried to think of some other way So We could faster go. Verna wanted a Cadillac, No! No!" her daddy said, 'Tll not promise you a Cadillac, But a horse and cart insteadf' To ride alone would be a waste Of horse and space ,tis true, So Verna agreed to call for Louise And Zeta and Alice too. At 35th Street Alice awaits herg In her hand she carries a whipg Along comes Verna with horse and cart A-clippety, clippety, clip. Verna sits up and pulls the reins. To the horse she cries Hwhoa! whoa!" Alice climbs up into the cart And off again they go. On, on down Michigan Boul we ride And crack! the whip goes, crack! Cricket, the horse, goes speedily, He beats a Cadillac. But when we get to Mountain Side Again we have to stop, Zeta's waiting with bell in hand Upon the mountain top. Cricket can't pull us up the hill, So we must stop below. Zeta comes down, jumps into the cart, Then off again we go. Our next stop is at Central Street, Look! here we meet Louise. Guess what she's got-a bag of oats For Cricket, the horse, if you please. Soon as Louise is in the cart We hurriedly cross the bridge, And Cricket drives up to the College Our dear N. K. C. on the Ridge. No matter what class we may have there You'1l see we are always on time, All thanks are due to old Cricket And this is the end of our Rhyme. Alice Gutlmechz' H e-"Dear, you look sweet enough to eat." Irma R.-"Where shall we go?" Dr. Downing-"I am almost tempted to give you a test today M ary Same-"Yield not to temptation. 'va She-"Don't go. You are leaving me entirely without reason ' 0 H e-"I always leave things as I find them. 111 '1ii'di!QE'3.?3RiiiiiillllIIEIIIliIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIllIIIlllllllllIIIIIIIlllllllllllllIlllllllllllllllllllllllIIIIIIIIIllllllllIlllllllIllllllllllllllillllllllllIllIllIllllllllllllllllllllll IIII Illlll Q 55 355E3i34ii?3?2EE51ElllllllllllllllllllllIIIIIIIEIEEB-F2-555.15 T H E N .X T 1 H N A L "1 2252643HlhlllllllllllllllllllIlllIlIlliIEE15' 'Z?4i 2:26 Pi ii 0 A SZ fl 2 ix E 'X A E E E E E E E E E :I E E E 5 E E E E 1 E E S : E E E , E E E E E E : IQ! 19- ""' ' ' ' :G I :LS ' if 5iiHi!51E'3a?2ELBiEHiEilllllliIllIillllllllIllIllllllllllllllllllllllIIIIIllllllIIIIIIIIllllllllllllllllllllllllIIllllllllllllIIIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll IIIlllllllllIllIIIlilIIElIIII!.2ie524.liei?Ef3'3x?LE?i'iiE 4. ,. Y X 0 5. U 9. x ! E - fs' m-2 igiik'-65455-? 2EEiSiE'llIIllIlllllllllIllIIIIIIIIIEIIQSSS-3555.1 T H E N .X T I U N A I. :5:,E,g?:malH'lIlIll'IlIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHQEEELF-,.1S'3??ie2!2i ' Ga D. Dean-"I'm afraid I flunked that make-up exam today." M inna-"Your face shows it." Q" Clerk-"Miss Doane is complaining because her picture doesn't look like her." . E Photographer-"She ought to be tickled to death it doesn't." f "My stock in trade is brains." ' E "Well, you've got a queer looking sample case." E ? "Our last month's bill was frightful," j ' Said Mary to her beau. E 5 He rose with smile delightful, I " And turned the light quite low. E Q I rose and gave her my seat, E E I could not let her stand. f 5 She made me think of mother, with 2 ' That strap held in her hand. 5 : A goat ate all our other jokes, E : And then began to run. E g "I cannot stop," he loudly said, f E "I am so full of fun." E If He-"Have you ever seen our Ski jump?" E E She-"No, but Ild love to. Will he do it before strangers?" E E -Dartmouth Jack O'Lantern. E E He had been on his knees pleading with her for half an hour. Finally he E- " exclaimed, "Don't you believe me when I say I want to marry you?" 2 E "I try to," she replied, "but I simply can't forget that you workin the Weather E Bureau." E : "A drop of ink makes millions think." E 5 Well, that depends a lot- E 5 I do declare it makes more swear 5 E When it becomes a blot. : E -Boston Transcript. 5 '1 Professor of Chemistry-If anything should go wrong in this experiment, Q 'S we and the laboratory with us might be blown sky-hi h. Come closer, gentlemen, E 1 g S E so that you may better be able to follow me. . : Z When you begin reading the letter over twice or thrice or more- E : And studying even the envelope and postmark- E E And gazing long at the opening and closing in search of some deeply hidden - meaning- E E And admiring the handwriting and the stationery- 2 And smiling a dreamy smile as you read- E E You're gone, my girl, you're gone. E E She-"You know, Jack, I always speak as I think." 5 Q H e-'fYes dear-only oftenerf' Q 5 -Burr. l Beatrice E' .-"Did you see that movie called Oliver Twist?" I Boots-"Yes, and say, wouldn't that make a peach of a book?" 113 5 afc:'.ea5a'm?seas-millllls:menullmuumuuuumlmnumlmnlllmmmmmluIImnmnmmIlmnllmnlmmmumuumllmuul:ummmluullmulazm allllszgfifesesfamasasig ,W , , A n - 35QK'SE'stiS'?3?2E SETI!lllllllllllllllllllllIlIIEIEiQ5fEi3i-... T H F N A T I 0 X X L ,,532153HIEIIllllIllllIIIIIIIIIllllIIllil2EE2?ZSTf224ii5'1Z:2g Fri ii Z5 ' 2? 0 9 5 4 RS 9 S yf 30 :Qi , A 1 Q1 Qi 1 14 l5fdiaau',.a5esisEM! lu mlslmllllllllllllIlllllllllIllIIllIIlllllllIIllllIllIImlllllllllllllllllllul llllllllllllllllllIIIllllllllllllullllllullllmulllulllllllllllIllllllallllslluuxiriz ' 'O vw? 9' bbw g5Qgr,g3,,ggg gg5gq3llmlmllmulllllllullglgpisggg .I T H E N A T I 0 N .X I. fi,-iii llhlIIIIIIllIIIIIIIIIIIIlllIllil!E!5 Q?hi?Ze2g is Q I as ga 59 al tg! gh - E 'fFoREcAsTf' E Z is for Altermatt, the beginner of things, E ifff TT ff fffffzifif l - is for Lesser, she teaches Athletics, ' E is for MacLennan who digs in her yard, E E is for Neureuther who picks up discards, E E is for O'Brien and her swell new cloak, 5 5 is for Parmalee, she's a good joke, E E is for Quizzical, women are so, 5 5 is for Roosman, she's married you know, - E S-is for Smith, world famous musician, E E T-is for Tourtelotte, a country magician, E .E U-is for Underwood, she's got a good Job, E l 5: V-is for Vandevender, who loves corn on the cob, E E W-is for Wilson, a movie star-Look! E E X-is for Xtra fine work in this book E E Y-is for Yeaton, a reader of Chaff, 2- l E Z-is for Zorn, she gets the last laugh! 5 .. S - : ..- ... " - 3 E 4 N s- fo :Qi jg all we EE Q!! l' ji P52 1 1 5 gg 2-4 e-2 ?1i'di!5:7Z'3.?24?5SiZillllIIEIIllilllllllllIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllIlllllllllllllllllllllllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIlllllIllllIllllllilllllllllllllllllllllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIllllEIIIIEIIIIIEZHEBEE?5f?5zEE?5ifi .1- - n 2 1 - E is for Belden who's about to sprout wings 5 E is for Carnright, a teacher at normal, E E is for DOX who delights in things formal, 5 E is for Engstrand, she's driving a Ford, E E is for Francis who strikes wrong chords, E E is for Gunning, a jolly good elf, E E is for Helz who laughs in spite of herself, E g is for Irwin who stands all alone, E E is for Johnson who answers the phone, E E is for Koff, a professor of Aesthetics, E '1 J -1 E . E E E E , - E E - E E ' ' , E E- KK l . 7 - E E 1 ' E E . , . E E -Agnes Hilton. E E E f S 99 ' :tl fl at wi 116 5 , ,li r To ' T ' 2 "ff4'?-'M ' 1 ef V 1 QE -1 G 6 I " - - 3 A NIGHTMARE E One Day a g1rl Whom none of us know Was told that she to Court must go For an old Farmer was 1n a hlgh feather Because she d helped herself to h1s Heather Whlle an Ambre M oon had hung hlgh 1n the sky He had watched her from a Brown Bush nearby And h1s Best Boots had been spolled by Frost But nevertheless h1s crop was lost She had earned 1t all away ln Same Before the Jury he la1d these facts One of the J urymen gave a shght Kof And asked that the verd1ct mlght be put off Whlle one of the Katz 1n the Court room there Moved out of Range of h1s Pzercmg stare Then a l1on Trazner who looked qu1te pale Set the glrl free by pay1ng her ba1l And then I heard Are you sure that s all?" And I reallzed I d slept stralght through roll call 65i fi"QY?f ? ?3f25lElllllllllllllllllll lllElEE5Ei!'ii'.: 'll H E N A T I 0 N A L ZliiliigllllllllllllllllllllllIlllllllil2i5E5 Q?4i?1?t1' 6 3 's at 3 V, X all 5 l Sidi! '2 Qffdlllllfllllill llllllllllllll I lllll IlllllllllIIllllIIllllllllIlllllIllllllllllllllllllllllllllIllllllllllllIIIlllIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll!!EZI.i.11'.,'f.-,f.sl'f.QT!3'E : the Hack bv. ax X 1IIIIIlllllllllllllllllllllll II Q T H 1' N 5 1 I 0 N 'X lt EIEEQIQEIIEIIlllllllllllIIIIIlIllllIIilEEE53 Zmi?3Zs2g Mother when I grow up and marry shall I have a husband like pap asked Mary - 1 I hope so dear said mother 1 I hope so - Gracious' said Mary as she turned away with anguish, "What a fix I am ' . ' if a?" And if I dont marry shall I be like Aunt Sue?" 1n"' He- I could dance on like this forever Q She Oh I m sure you don t mean that' You're bound to improve." UE l Pretty Nzece CBlush1ngD Auntie what would you do if you should learn that a young man was secretly inquiring about your ability as a cook?" E Wzse Aunt I should immediately make secret inquiries as to his ability E to provide things to cook my dear E Two men in a train were discussing their fine qualities. One said he had a E remarkable vision The other had remarkable hearing faculties. As they went ? went along a barn appeared on the horizon He of the remarkable vision said, E Do you see that fly crawling along the roof? E No said the other I don t see him but I can hear him stumbling over E the shingles E Dentzst "Don t worry sonny your teeth will grow in again." i Youngster Yeah' But will they gi ow in again before dinner?" E Why don t you go to the dance tonight Harold? Haven't you any flame?" E Yes dad said Harold sadly I have a peach of a flame, but no fuel." E An oak leaf fell upon my foot to walk I was not able. E Twas solid oak I ll sav it was from our extension table. E -Smiley-Wiley. E Efzczent Young Nurse Wake up' It s time to take your sleeping medicine." E Romeo- You know Slim my ancestors come over here on the Mayflower." E Stun Yeah? Mine couldn t come they hada go to Jul'us Caesar's funeral." E -Chicago Phoenix. : A new coachman was bein instructed as to the proper way to carry himself E when in service He was told to say when he drove up: "My Lord, your carriage : waits without When the time came he became nervous and yelled, "My God, 3 l 5 D Englishmen unders and American slang?" E ' Some of them do Why?l' 5 "My daughter is to be married in London, and the Earl has cabled me to E come across " E Old Lady-"What is that?" E Farmer-"That's fertilizer." E Old Lady-"F or the land's sake." Farmer-"Yes, M'am." 7. Y 1 E Ei A ' A 9 cc , Y". 7 7 9 el - u 73 ' , 1 1 - fl u I ' 1 ' Q 1 gl KK 11 E . E 1: ' 11 ' , : . -. : : ll-- l - E . . 5 at 77 : . .. A. 5 u 1 1 - 1 : 1 ' ' : E T 5 . . E - rc : '1 T n n n E lg . U . . E W 1 5 ' ' 77 5 1 - 2 ii-ll,M, 1 g : - - .-: : . . . . . .. g 1 L 1 M. E u u : : ' ' E . E ' 1 ' E ll - , 11 : . - 5 u 7Y ' cc 1 ' " 1 1 1 5 - 77 E . : : - S . 5 1 1 g 1 . 1 . 5 44 ' , ' nn " , 1 : : 2 ' E : cr 1 ' - E 7 E u 77 ' cc E 1 1 1 : M-M.. : : - . g 1 - . 1 E 7 ' 7 ' 1 .- : . : S : 5 M E . .- ' - rc 1 S W . 'S E M- : : g rr - .- E - 1 1 . " ' g - 1: 1 1 ,, .- 2 ' ' 7 : .- : : E . . : 5 . . E , 1 - E 1 - 1 .- E ' " E 11 - U . . - o t 1 1 Z T-" E 'I- .. .MM 5 Vivian K.-"Pa, I ain't got no syrup. 4 Father-"Mildred, correct your brother. M ildred-tLeaning over and peering into Vivian's platej-"Yes, you is." 117 I1 ' 4 -' Fl iii!-i'.iH5:E'3MRESTEEIIIIIlilllIillllllllllllllllllllllIIIIIllIIllllllllllllllIIIIllllIlIIIllIlllllllIlllllllllllllllllllllllIlllllllll llllllllllllllllllllllllll IIIII IllIllIIIIIIllIllIEIIIIEIllllliigifiilfigiiliiiiii 4 em ef' x :gi -1 .- ?gSiK'-iE'5ii?E?35E5!E'IIIllIIIllIIIllIllIIIIIIIIIIEIEZSSEQEQ. 'r ll E N .x T I 0 N A I . fii.gaeaaaasamllnunIuIl11II4IulIIIuuulrsexszufmmwzfzegj 50: Phones University 1095-1446 We Deliver E Colnpliments of E E D I , E E West,Side of the "LH Tracks E E soDAs-CANDIES-LUNoHEoNs E g E 1026 Central Street Evanston, Illinois Si 5 5 .oi sg, 118 ' M iiil'2i!!i7Z'E'EEEiiiiiiilllIllillllillllllllllI 'o nmunmnuu o umnnunuInIIumlInnmnmlnmmnuuunuunmuummunnulu1nuuunllnnnluuammnulnzssnesees-aftwgssrstg , X X ,,mmmmmmumm553515, 'r H E N A 'r I 0 N A I, 5921-E323I3IIIIIIlllllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIEPEEEEFDFEGEJ 1 eo f' GG f . ff 9 61135 I ll ll ,.Jl II! 9 Qamlnr Uiflw 7 C 1' QGQXID 2 'al lqlm -reall' uiaaf 5. S BQE 4 . .lil W L' 992993 Q wg' Z eoa' SPQQPQ 6 X 96, Y QQUU gee Tinker Toys M9 9 There Are 20 Kinds l 9 Quinn, Q "X E2 QQ mf Q Q Q Q for Children of All Ages For Quality Flowers and Service Try London Flower Shop 1712-14 Sherman Avenue EVANSTON, ILL. Phone, University 7542 and 632 Flowers bv Telegraph to all parts of the Country. 'IiJ"5lqeSi'iEu1"535?iE ! F1 . vi I N -x 0 v g I!! is QI 0 Q ff' M. ! . 0 ' if" l ' ' Q 1' h X v X L A. TY, :if l Qllli 1 -qw To 'gflllllf l 'mr y: mul ,HELBQ i 1 rn' sell' 9 5.4 il' 1? l will ' lgv Tim l ill , - M551 .my 6 'A .J .aaa l 19' J ' Q' 9 ,O 1 Q o I Y Q wi -V . 4 119 ll , . - ., . lf 4'1i!iH'2Y.?.Ek-fiiiillllllillllillllIIIIIIIIIIIlllIllllllllllIllllIIllllllllllllIIIIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIllIllIllllllllllllllllllllllllIllllllllllllllIllllIIIIIlIIllIIllIlllEllIlElIlll!iii'JT2i1:eEff V! 2 r . Y - ....... .. . . .....-... ...-.... .. ,, -.., ef-iii-?5Sii ?2E5i3lE'llIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIEIEEESZS T H L N ,X 'I' I 0 B A I ..,s.QeazmAlAIIllIllIIllIIIlIIIIIIIIIIlllaIE::k '4.1ez?PA:QQE ni Q Ha. IQ 59 1 A woman rushed into a grocery store and breathlessly demanded of the first clerk who greeted her: "Please give me a mouse trap. Be quickg I want to catch a car." --N ew York Times. "Father's absent-minded, isn't he?" "Extremely so! Why the other night when he got home he knew there something he wanted to do, but he couldn't remember what it was until he sat up nearly an hour trying to think!" And did he at last remember ' ." Yes-he discovered that he wanted to go to bed earlyf was had -Onas H -' Will you love me if I give up all my bad habits?" She- 'But, George, how could you expect me to love a perfect stranger? -London Answers. See the dancing snowflakes! Practicing for he snowball, I suppo ." Professor What do you know about electricity?" Student Enough to leave 1t alone One Saturday morning mother had been baking cookies The little girl next door had eaten a number but she still clamored for one more But you know that little girls cannot live on cookies mother said Oh but I don t Mrs Mar in was he quick reply I liveon Crain Stree " He was dieadfully persistent and would not take No for an answer At she was thoroughly exasperated No she declared I wouldn t marry you 1f you was the last man on earth' I don t want nothing to do with you Is that plain English? 'I s plain enough said he su1 or cheerfully but it 1sn English, you know ELS You have such strange names for your towns an Englishman remarked to one of his new American friends Weehawken Hoboken Poughkeepsie and ever so many others fully Do you l1ve in London all the time? Oh no said the unsuspicious Briton I spend a part of mv t1me at Chip in Norton and then I ve a place at Pokestogg on the Hlke H arper s M agazme A girl from the tribe of the Siouxs Was often afflicted with bliouxs The trouble she found Was down near the ground Her feet were too big for her sh1ouXs Eoanstoman S: Es' 9 5 E G'-F4 if llllll llll IIlllllllllllllllIlllllllllllllllllllll IIIIIII llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIIllIllllllllIlllllllllllllllilIlllllIIlIlllllIlllllllllllllllllllllllllll IIII Illlll f Q br : u Ito E E lf 1 7 S 2 e ' : ' r 1 " E u ay : E ff t Ser 2 E w-U . . V E E -cc ' xr E E H . ' . . . ,, " . E E K! 7 7 . t' ,H t ' S IK 7 ' ' . ti E 5 lm- E E , - rx ar E . 1 t I - E I ll 97 ll 7 ' E 5 , ' . ' . . . ,, E E I tv ' as ' 16 D cz ' ' rt ' ' 77 E 1 7 ' E 1: ar ' E 1 E . . . U . E 77 l 7 . 7 , E In . E E' ffI suppose they do sound queer to English ears," said the American, thought- E ll ' ' ' 77 E 3 5, ,,, . . . . ,Kg ' K . . p. g E E Y - - - ' 77 E E ' - -' ' E , , Lf ' - 5 YQ! - ' ili 120 fi K: 5 Nx Wx itIllllllllllllllllllllllIllll I! 9 P H F X O X X 9 il llllllllllllllllllllIlllllllI- .Y I G Hats Made to Order Remodehng it T EEM QACK' Q MQQ I K T DYOU A 1 NSA-NTEU , jig M X f The Band Box 'W 2 COOPER'S DRY GOODS, Inc 9 FROCKS AND MILLINERY 2004 Central Street 1941 Central Street NORTH EvANsToN EVANSTON A Square Deal Alma S Coel Phone Evanston 2058 Of Your Round Dollar Til" f"?35E.fE ii, ' Z 1 A A T I V A . L IJ 3.515212 J? H iffiiiiff Y A - cy ' fd l P' . - - 1 i P r Mi - oi E ' r 1 fi X E 77 I ' f E 1 E 3 f X: ' iff ff 6, E 1 g .l , , is .af . I f, E 5 l"llIIlIllIl"H 4' "' . fn 5 l E ' P 2- I Q '-' E E . . T X' N .- E E I Z Q X . K, E E 'rnlllllll' "- ,1 ij E y E . -1 2:4 E i E -ss if E 1 E ,NP N, IDP' E X E f 9 ,Pri . S -- ' E I ' E W W O O ... - E r : 1.4--X . .0 - : I E A . - l , E f Q ?f, V- ' 6, E L E Gi E i E E i E E A E E E E f E A E ' ' ' E i E A E P E E 5 E E T E E i 5. ' M arcellmg Water Wcwmg Shampoomg All kmds of M amcurmg Hazr Goods - Scalp Treatment for sale D P Georgette-Lehn W i E E n Z Speciahzmg 1n E' A 5 Permanent Waving 3 i E Hair Cutting Z -1 '14 1720 SHERMAN AVE. ORRINGTON HOTEL PM Phone University 1476 Phone University 800 ETEQZEQUESERiiiiiillllllillllilllllllIllllllllIIIIIIIllllllllllIlllllllIIIIllllllllllllllllllllllllIllllllllllllIllllllllllllllllllllll IllllllIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilIllilllluiiiifiiiEifwziiiifii E "Eugene" Method 5 E PERMANENT WAVING - E The REXALL Store 5 E 1900 Central Street Evanston, I11. 5 E WE 2 vsexfsmefmaaasazunlnumllmlmllllllllsmasssssi,212. T H E N A T 1 0 N A I, U ZaaafxmamluIumlIullullllllllllssrzssamsizm has Pa Phone, University 1104 4 Marnette Beauty Salon and Hair Shop A E LYMAN DRUG CO. E 5 maintain a separate Prescription Room 5 - E use a Double Checking system on our 5 E Prescriptions making for greater care in 5 E Phones-University 2030 and Wilmette 2262 : 5 D. S. LYMAN, R. Ph., Chemist ' E CARDS and TALLIES E 2 Garnet's E 1906 Central St. : Alcott Gift and Book 3 2 Shop E 2 SILK HOSE-LINGERIE 5 E WASH DRESSES-NOTIONS E A BOOKS FOR SALE Mrs. Alice C. Pfunder 14: if Phone, University 8660 Manager 5! 102 ll F. 122 il iir'a:ea5E'amairml IlmmenuumInummnllnuIInumIIluumumumlmullmmmllulummummsumnululuumumlummuI1nllumlumnuuammlullnza-wassas-grass,-as E 1707 Sherman Avenue E .-: The Pioneer Shop of the North Shore. E : employ competent registered pharmacists, E 5 compounding and dispensing. Q E lVe Deliver-AAnlything-Anyfwhere-A'nytzfme E E GIFTS, PRIZES, Your Nearest Dry Goods Store 5 There you will find all things dear 5 to a girl's heart- E- : 1915 Central Street E 5 RENTAL LIBRARY NECKWEAR-ETC. E afiiii'-iE!Sii 3iEi3lElllllllllllllllllIIIIIIIIIIIEIEFESQFEQ T H E N .X T I 0 N A L iii.kiiliimhlllllllllllIIllIIIIIIIlllIllil2SE55 '2E4'5?3Z226 Fa . . . Don-Cto Dorothy Carnrightb-'fWould you like to go to the settlement 4?Y7 dance. if D. C.-CAll aflutfte1'D-"Why, I'd just love to." Don-"Then buy your ticket from me, won't you?" E Old Colored M ammy-"Iso wants a ticket fo' Florence"' E E Ticket Agent-Cafter ten minutes of weary thumbing over railroad guidesl- E : iiWhG1'G is Florence?l' 5 E Old Colored lVIammy-"Settin' over dar on de bench. E E -Pzirzcclon. Tiger. E E There are metres of accent E E And metres of tone, E E But the best of all metres E E Is Ctob meet ,er alone. E E -The El7G,'7Z.Sf0NZ.flIl. E E H e-"Great Heavens. The rudder has broken off." E E A Pauline K.-"Never mind, it doesn't showin E 5 There was once an interesting poodle- E E He never could sing Yankee Doodle: E E But he'll howl and he'll cry, E E Bark, whine, and ki-yi- E E He also can lippikyoodle. E E -Erclzange. 5 E Old darkey pastor, delivering funeral oration at grave of tlre departed: E E "Samuel J ohnson," he said sorrowfully, "you is gone. An' we hopes you is gone E I where we 'specs you ainltf' E E Elizabeth N eurcuther-"Look here, Annie, I can write my name in the dust E E on this table." E g Annie-"Ah, mum, there's nothin' like an eddication, is there, mum?" E E "Lay down, pup. Lay down, that's a good doggie. Lay down, I tell you." Ei E "Mister, you'll have to say, 'Lie down, to him. He's a Boston terrier." E 2 -Onas. E 5 Kinkson, visiting a small Western town, lost his pet dog. He rushed to the g E newspaper office and handed in an advertisement, offering 3100 reward for the E E return of his companion., Later he returned to the office to have inserted, "No E 3 questions askedf' When he arrived at the office, only a small boy was to be seen. E E iiWh6I'G is the editor?" he asked. I E E !K0ut.77 2 5 "The assistant editor?l' E E "Out.'l " 5 "The printer?" E E :40ut'.1J E E ilWh61'6 has the staff gone to?" E "All looking for your dogll' -Onas. E An American officer was drilling a Russian regiment. He sneezed, and three 145 men answered, f'Here." -9- if 12 Fi Hy I -4: Tl' I 23 itfiii!5:Z'3.ERiiiillllllillllillllllIIIlllillllllllllllllllllllIIIlIIIIIllIIIIllIIllIIIllIllllllllIIIIIHllllllIllIIIIIIIIIllllIIllllIllIIllIIlllllIllIIllIIIIIIIIIIIIllllIIllIllIllllllEIIIIEIllllliififlift?if'?51?lEiB'il?Q hi QS, .-- gSiK'S34Sii 545E5l2'lIllIllllllIIlllllIIIIIIIIIIEIEEF-73535-.13 T H E N Ak 'If I 0 X .X L 2,QZQEEZQEHIRllllllllllllllllllllllIIIIIISPZSEEQEEQZQZQ-'lgti 3 11 62 Phone, Harrison 2099 Z R S . E C 0 t tu d 1 O E Edgar A. Samels, President Z Q OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHERS E E For Class of 1926 E E KIMBALL HALL E ? 306 S. Wabash Ave. E S Room 1610 T ,, 6 .41 11 124 ikffliligaikiifiill lllil llflllllllllllllllllIIllllllIllIllllllllllllllIIIIIIlllllllllllllllIIIllIllIllIllIllllllllllllllIlilllIlllllllllIlllIllllIIllllllllllllllllllllllllllIllIllIilIlKillIIIlES5f'il!E?Ef3'5!5LE3b3E ssmxwaassaalllnumnnluululuulslai..sssaiifA T H rl N ,ex 'r I o N .ex I. ill,5KiZiQHlhlllllllllllIIIllIIllIIlllIlIiI!EE5 'Z E. Marcelling Maniouring Shampoomg Faclals Hot O11 Treatments Scalp Treatments Arching Water Waving Mabel Wells Martha M mor THE ORCHID BEAUTY SHOPPE 1810 Central Street Evanston car to Broadway EVANSTON Shingling Bobbing Permanent Waving Phone, University 107 Central State Savings Bank of Evanston West Railroad Avenue at Harrison Street Telephone-University 7400, Greenleaf 1458 THE BANK OF PERSONAL SERVICE John A. Brooks, President W. L. McKay, Vice-President Carl J. Rang, Cashier Reliable Tailor, Cleaner and Furrier Maintain Laundry office-strictly hand pressing- Cleaning and remodeling of Ladies Garments. Tel. Greenleaf 126 1805 Central Street Mrs. F. M. Pratt Represents Czecho-Slovakia Art Studio of New York 632 Church St. Searfs University 3862 Imported Gowns Carlson Bldg. Evening Shawls TEXT BOOKS and SCHOOL SUPPLIES PARTY FAVORS Chandlers EVANSTON dd MK! iiillllllillllillllllllllllllllIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll llllllllllllllIllllllllllllllllllllllIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIEIIIIEIIIIID Q2 PJ -SfWiEkSi? ?2!23lE'IIllIlllllllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIEIEEQSSSif- T H E X ,X T I 0 X ,X I, 3QIQQQQHIEIIIIIIIIIIIIIIlullIIIllIIIIif2SEE,5Eif'2:?e'ial!gi'i 'E Q Q . 2 a 5: gf iiEi!5:EHMEliifillllIlillllilllllllllllllllllllIII.IllllIllllIIIlIIlllllIIllllIllllIIIlIIIIllllllllllllillllllllllllIllIIllllllllilllllllllllIllIlllllllllllllllIlllllllllllllllllllllillllillllllikriflifai?J!'3'Ez?LS3!-1317? 252 ESX THE PART or w1sDoM W Teacher-"History tells us that Tiberius once swam across the Tiber three times before breakfast." t'Alma Cwho was gigglingj "don't you believe that could be done?" Alma-"Yes, Malam, but I was wondering why he.didn't make it four and get back to the side his clothes were on." I M Roommate-"What's become of all our furniture?l' Ditto-"It's that little habit of yours of asking people to take a chair." -Syracuse Orange Peel. "Was your husband cool when you told him there was a burglar in the house?" asked Mrs. Hammer. "Cool?" replied Mrs. Gabb. "I should say he was cool, Why, his teeth chatteredf' -Cincinnati' Enquirer. E f'Has you son come home from college yet?" li ' ' , 7 I Y 77 ' I imagine so, I haven t seen my car for the past two weeks. -Lzfe. Nfiss M'0zmt-Cvery much alarmed to Ruth Lesser who has had a hard fall E on the floorj-"Are you hurt badly? Where did you strike?H : RZLlffL'fl,ll'l1'llmE3LlD-111,111 all rightg I struck on my head." Little Billy told little Bobby what he terms "only a little fibf' Bobby-"A fib is the same as a story, and a story is the same as a lie.'l Billy-JLNO, it's notf' Bobby-"Yes, it is, because my father said so, and my father is a professor at the university. B illy-"I don't care if he is. My father is an editor, and he knows more about lying than your father. Willie and Tonnny are two youngsters who are pugilistically inclined. The other day the following conversation took place: "Aw,7' said Willie, "you're afraid to fight, my mawlll find it out and lick me." f'How'll she find it out, eh?" "She'll see the doctor goin' to your home." -Onas. E Old Drzrky-fto shiftless sonj-"I hearn tell you is married. Is you'?'7 SoakCingratiatinglybf!'I ain't sayin' I ain't." Old Darky-CSeverelyj-"I ain't ask you is you ainltg I ask you ain't you is." -Life. if Lady-"Bridget, it seems to me that the crankiest ladies always get the best cooksf' Bridget-"Aw, ma'arn, go on with your blarneyf' . S - O 191 1 26 53 19' J: was X ' 1IllllllllllIlIlllllllllllllIElEiSg53i.1i:P T H E X .X T I 0 N A L 51.gziaiislhllllillllllllllIllllllllIll!E ' Y +1 CL f - 1 'W -Q, V 2 n ,Q ' I r ?. ,F f, F gufliyz I Q-ff? s a 2 1 ,V ir' 9152.25 i -X ilfiagii-H f r 'L .N N 1 Q-x Ri. it 1 fhmdigl la J N M in ' x gi .fb f u y X -"M X . . L , x j I '- ? J.. .. ' iw-W E' -- M W 1 1? - 11, J' - .....- . tc -" . ,N . it FRESH AIR and Bowmaifs Milk For rollicking, rosy eheeked health there are no better tearninates than fresh air and Bow- 1nan's Milk. BoWn1an's Milk is Nature's most perfect food. It offers in abundance all those in- vigorating elements so vital to l'LlQQgQCl health. Its ereaniy richness is a sure builder of firin muscle and strong bones. BOYVH12,1l7S Milk, fresh air, and daily exercise!- inake these a part of your daily life and see how much better you feel. Start today! Insist on AN W , FR COMPANY I LK l27 9 'V 'if llllllIII!IllllllllllllllllllIIllIIIIIIllIIIIIIIllllIIllllIllIIIIlllllllIlllllllllllllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIllllIllllIIIlIIIllllllllllllllllllllllllIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll vWF 9' Q2 Vu ga S isseawmamzaazaamnulllmllmmllmllllxleasssissi' T H E N -X T T U N -X L :aaimalnmmlmumlullllllulrseasssmtme 122255 fm a 9: 0 Y 0 . n 'I - L21 5- Phones, University 3733-4677 5 S Compliments of - : Central Confeetloner and Restaurant 1020 Central Street EVANSTON Q 2145 '50- -Fidllilllifll lllllllIlllllIIIIIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIllllllllll Illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll lllllllllIlllllIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllIlllIIIII! BBW' M rf' E 5 E E 5 . 5 E E E 5 E : E E n E Q E t E 5 E t u E ' E E 5 E E E E t COII1 311 L E 2 5 E E E E E E E E E E E E E Q s- Po 10: Q1 EZ? 12t Ee! F! F' T' 1 ' .Q . f. .. I . !'1' 7 5 5 5 ' E 5 xx X 1mmlmmlmmmmHglsiggigggi.112 T H E N A T I 0 N ,X I. AFZEQEHIEIIIIIIIIIIIIlllllIllllllllll I Another Rogers' Annual DISTINCTIVE There is something distinctive about a ROGERS, printed book. The clean-cut appearance of the cuts and type matter is the result of the skill and experience of 18 years of annual printing. We enjoy the patronage of high schools and colleges throughout the United States Who Want a distinctive book of the prize-winning class. Your specifications will receive our prompt and careful attention. ROGERS PRINTING COMPANY 118 E First Street 10 So. LaSalle Street j Dixon Illinois Chicago Illinois N 3 6 l I 1 29 el as 4: 9 Q mm Illl IlllllllllllllllllIlllllllllllllllllllIIIIIIlllllllllllllllllllIIIIIIIlllllllllllllllllllllIlllll Illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll Illllllllllllllllll In mu Q In r ,,, .-..--... - --...,, .. .. .. .. . 'N - ' :" -.-1.-- -- - ...-..-'- - ,..... .. if-h:Mi.i+mwc 4:k5l:1llllllIIllIIlllllllllllllllelhaislerie . T H lu N .K T I 0 IN .X I sqmzgdl5IllllllllllIllIIIlIIlIIIllIlals::b? '4.4:4-z 11 C Q Ka fy' at -GJ al Q51 PERMANENT WAVING Steamoil 5 A Natural, Lasting, Beautiful VVave E Special Hair Cutting E Marcelling E Telephone 9158 University Aunt Mayme s - DCIICPHTCSSCH - 1418 Central Street " EVANSTONT at E BUSTER BROWN BARBER AND BEAUTY SHOP Facial and Scalp Treatments 1908 Harrison Street Telephone, Randolph 2400 The Fraternity Shop 14 W Washington Street CHICAGO ILL. An oi' anization devoted exclusively to the production of College Society Favors. North End Flower Shop 2609 Broadway Avenue EX ANSTON ILI Phone University 6181 Helen Perkins Cafeteria 1807 Central Street EY ANSTON Tr lephont McMurray s HCIHSt1tCh1Hg Shop 1917 Central Street, Evanston Henistitching Picoting Einbioideied Woili and Linens Re 1ste1edPha11n1c1st VVL Fill Always in C haige Piescnptions Broadway Pharmacy CUT RATF DRUCS R H Xiinstiong, R Ph Phones Unix e1s1tV 4950 Wil 1660 1815 Central St Evanston, Ill l 29 9 llllllllllIlllllIIIIIllllIlllllIlIlIllllllllllllllllllIIIIIIIIIIIlllllllllllIIlllllllIlllllllllllllllllllllIlllllllllIlllIllllllllllllllllllllllllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIlllllllll Eb ' 7 E S S : Q S E 0 S S : . : . - S S S' - 7 - - 0' Q : U - : h 1 N . : x 1 A - : 4 : t - 2 - 1 S S - - 2 S 2 E E u E - S - S - 5 o .- .- 21 -1 S E E -. S E Y , v : L- 1 J- I1 L S N 4 in. A A E S - 1 . S P'-4 5211 ' ' 29:1 1 ' 3 ' Y . . .' ' Us f f L, ' 1 E S S Q 0 E S - S 2 E 2 - - E f A .J It 2 2 E tr 1' ', , 1 2: f . . 1 E , , - f 'tt . , . M3 . . . -J ' V . . 'a hi ll' :ll - 130 .I Wy 9: U iii' .5!7Z'Z?3f?5. E E VE . .:, gSQH'i3LEii 2E23!E1IllIIIllIIllIllIllIIIIIIIIIEIEEES-535.13l T H F5 N 5 T I 0 N 'X L 4162535lhlllllllllllllllllllIIllllll'i'2E55W'2?4'itPZf'Qf Pi Ray-"Mom won't let me use the machine any morefl Agnes H ilton-'WVliy'?" Ray-"I forgot to scrape the hairpins out of the back seat." rr - Science courses oft reminds us E We can help if we try, E If passing on, we leave behind us E E Notebooks for the other guy. E E . . . . . . I f E A Frenchman learning English said to his tutor: "English is a queer language. ' E What does this sentence mean: "Should Mr. Noble, who sits for this constituency, E consent to stand again and run, he will in all probability have a walkover?,' - E Mother and small daughter walking on the boulevard see a young lady with E E unbuckled galoshes flapping in the breeze. Little daughter says, "Mama, is that E E one of those bootleggers that papa talks about?" - E -The Watchman Engineer. : E "My Sallyls done well for 'erself, Mrs. Higsonf' said Mrs. Earle proudly. : E "Her Bert's father was a banister of the lawfl ' E Mrs. Higson bridled. "I don't know nothing about your bannistersf' she E f retorted, "but my Gertie's Alfred has a brother that's a corridor in the navy." E E Will-"Halloa, Henry! I got that crate of chickens you sent all right, but E 'gf next time I wish you'd fasten them up more securely. Coming from the station 5 E the wretched things got out. I spent hours scouring the neighborhood, and then E 5 found only ten of them." : E Henry-"S-s-sh! I only sent six!" f E Ruth-"Do you like indoor sports?" : E Dorothy-"Yes, if they go home early." -Baker Orange. .1 E "I'm ashamed of this composition, Charley," said a teacher one morning, E E "I shall send for your mother-and show her how badly you are doing." : -E: "Send for her-I donlt care," said Charley, f'Me mudder wrote it, anyway." : E -New York Sun: f E The Prqfessor-"You should study harder and try to take a degree." : f Freshman-"Waste of time. Ihfhen pop dies and I inherit his millions, I'll - E endow a university and theylll give me more degrees than I can use." ' 2 -Boston Transcript. - E After much excitement the Smiths had at last managed to catch the train. ' E Now when they could sit quietly for a while, they began to wonder if they ' E had left anything behind. I E Mrs. Smith gave a shriek. - E "O Harry," she gasped, "I forgot to turn off the electric-iron!" - E "Don't worry, darling," he replied, "nothing will burn. I forgot to turn Z E off the shower bath." - E Irnqnzfsitive Old Gentleman-"And what are you digging for, my good man?" - E Digger-"Money" I 3 "You don't say so! And when do you expect to find it?" "Saturday nightll' A 1 - sg Z Dr. Downin g-'fWhat is the highest form of animal life." Q1 Bertha-"A giraffe." U., it 52 Ee 131 It is sszzeasfr-arefsimnuulusalnelilillmummumuuumnmmuuunmIuI1IIuIIIIunIumnnlnumuummuu1inmmuummunuImmunummuummennauluilizsssfasses-ease,-:sie 't 25 .3 . 35iS'-i3i+S:3Z ?2523!2'IlllllllllllllllIIIIIIIIIIIIEIESSBSSA 'l' H E N A T I 0 N A L 411.gzaaeearsxmumnnmmumuIIlllraexsswmfaemauzfgea PJ. ii W 9: r,- ge ey ,gg QOIIIIDTIIIIQIYIS of 133 5 Bennett J. C. johnson ' -1 -n U 'Il REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS E 111 W Washmgton Street C HICAC O 'Telephone qtate 2210 7 G J if llllll IIIFIIIIIIIlllllllllllll llllllllllllllll Ill lllllllllllllllIlllIllIllIIIIlllllllIIIllllIlllllllllllllllllllllllll llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll IIII Illll! D 7-Du' : E - E E .1 E E E 5' E : : 5 : : E Z 3 E E : E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E 1 E E f 7 E E 1 E E V 1 ' A 1 ta 1 g! 74 '01 lb: ' 4 u, :N '22 1.3L Q' r" 'Tl Y 5 . E i 'E V 65Qg:,g3.5ggg ggg5g51lllim'mlmlllllllglgllglgggggfgggg, T H E N .X T I 0 N A L 2,52-Pai lhlllll IIIIIIIIIlIlllIIlIiI!E!5' ffZ?E'ii I 6 J 09 North End Music and MUSIC- Everyting know in Music. J EWELRY- VVatches, Clocks and Jewelry. REPAIRING Pianos Tuned, Phonographs repaired, and Clock IVork at reasonable prices. Phone, University 4272 2018 Central Street Best Wishes to Class and Fraternity Pins N. K. E. C. G RADUATES Commencement Announcements Stationery U Mayer CE, Miller Co. Spies Brothers Producers of A PROFIT PROPELLING PRINTING u 0 Manufacturing Stat1oners for more than 30 years JEWELERS 525 South Dearborn St. , Makers of N. K. E. C. Pins CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 27 E. Monroe Street Harrison Chas. J. Mayer 6725 President Af Wvabash Avenue 0 Il IEQQHTZEGSQSSEHIIIIIIEIIIIEIIIIIIIIllllllIllIIlllllllllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IllllllllllllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIlllllllllllllllllllll In numunmlmmmmnnueunsllullszs-wasess-s Q za :gl 3S:K'-SYM ZEHEHSIEIIIIIIIIIIIIIllIIIIIIIIIIIIIEIEFSSSZQ-,f3 T H E N A T 1 0 N .x L Iii,aseaf-efmmlulllllllrlnlllulIIuIlllllrsesssafmfmzazzfzg . Li .Q Sr .ff Doroth K .-"What color curtains have you?" I-1. V9 y 1 as ' iv Toot W.-"Oh, they re all shades. 4 +- .4 - - :-I 52 Dr. Webb-"Before I dismiss class let rne repeat the words of Webster." 535 Pauline K.-""Let's get out of here. He's starting on the dictionary now." 5 : Evelyn A.-"Have you any invisible hair pins?" 5 . Clerk-"Yes." 5 E M rs. Pierce-"What is a coquette?'l : S Evelyn-"May I see some?" : Ma1'y B.-"Strike one and see." E E M arion B.-"Why do you spell bank with a capital letter?'y 5 5 Bee E.-"Why mother said that a bank was no good unless it had a large Z E capital." E E Helen-Cdrowsrlyb-"It's a little thing rnade out of salrnonf' E . Mary B.-"I've discovered that the heavy end of a match is the light end." E A Sylvia K.-t'How do you know?" E I A June-bug rnarried an angleworrng 3 E An accident cut her in two. E 5 They charged the bug with bigarnyg E E Now what could the poor bug do? E I "Curses! Now for the dirty work,'l said Florence Hediger as she looked at E I the dinner dishes. E - Mrildred Dltttnzan-"Is this the second-hand store?" 'E I Clerlcft'Yes." E E JW. D.-"I want one for rny watch." E Sprig has cub' Sprrg has cub' Bloornrg flowers and long greed grass Will sood surplad the wrlderdess Teaching rs a profession Understanding what they teach an art 'IEN COIVIMANDMENTQ IN MOVIE ETIQUETTE 1 Always present a 1520 00 bill at the box office This will hold up the line thus showing your influence over the other people 2 Never go down the aisle indicated by the usher It shows subservrency 3 Always sit four rows behind the one the usher indicates becau e he un doubtedly has scrne sinister reason for trying to put you there 4 Do not rernove your hat until you have seen at least half a reel Thr rrnpresses others with your independence 5 Always talk to your right hand neighbor rn a loud voice becau e you 6 Be sure to chew Spcarrnrnt gum during the show There are trrnes when we must be constantly industrious 7 Read the conversation aloud thus showing your education 8 To show character applaud when the vrllran succeeds 9 Always sing with the nru rc It lends to the atrnosphere 10 On leaving the theater cornplarn to the manager thus shown g rndr vrdualrty ,iid 4 Q llllll Ill! 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FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
Are you trying to find old school friends, old classmates, fellow servicemen or shipmates? Do you want to see past girlfriends or boyfriends? Relive homecoming, prom, graduation, and other moments on campus captured in yearbook pictures. Revisit your fraternity or sorority and see familiar places. See members of old school clubs and relive old times. Start your search today! Looking for old family members and relatives? Do you want to find pictures of parents or grandparents when they were in school? Want to find out what hairstyle was popular in the 1920s? E-Yearbook.com has a wealth of genealogy information spanning over a century for many schools with full text search. Use our online Genealogy Resource to uncover history quickly! Are you planning a reunion and need assistance? E-Yearbook.com can help you with scanning and providing access to yearbook images for promotional materials and activities. We can provide you with an electronic version of your yearbook that can assist you with reunion planning. E-Yearbook.com will also publish the yearbook images online for people to share and enjoy.