Natick High School - Sassamon Yearbook (Natick, MA)

 - Class of 1963

Page 1 of 174

 

Natick High School - Sassamon Yearbook (Natick, MA) online yearbook collection, 1963 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 174 of the 1963 volume:

NATICK HIGH SCHOOL NATICK, MASSACHUSETTS - % ABLE 0 FCONTENT Dedication . 4 Class Advisors . 8 Faculty . 10 Seniors . 22 Clubs, Groups, Activities . 78 Student Groups . 95 Athletes . 115 Awards. 139 DEDICATION We, the Class of 1963, lovingly dedicate this, our Senior Yearbook, to Mr. Francis J. Collins. A graduate of Boston Latin School, Boston College, and Boston State Teachers College, Mr. Collins joined our faculty in 1955 as a teacher of mathematics. In 1958 he was elected head of the Mathematics Department. He has also been a member of the Football Coaching Staff for several years. A kind, gentle, and understanding teacher and coach, he has endeared himself to all. Our best wishes to him and to Mrs. Collins for continued health and happiness. IN MEMORIAM IN MEMORIAM PAUL GURNEY The faculty and students of Natick High School were shocked and grieved to learn of the sudden and untimely death of one of our classmates, Paul Gurney, in an automobile accident in Maine during our February vacation. A kind, gentle, and friendly young man, Paul was very popular at school and had looked forward to graduation and admission to college. We shall always remember his friendly smile and happy manner. CLASS ADVISORS Mr. Edward J. Bransfield Miss Mary D. Ciannavei Our sincere thanks to Miss Mary D. Ciannavei and Mr. Edward J. Bransfield who have guided us through our high school years. NURSE Mrs. Mildred Brown SECRETARIES Mrs. Dita Petro Mrs. Harriet Grimes AUDIO-VISUAL Thaddeus F. Nowak LIBRARIANS Mabel E. Harris Mrs. Bernice Oldfield Mrs. Lucille E. DeMelle Iplgg ll§i IH1 sw.: % : v:v ' ' ■ n .-. ' .. ; ; ...top ■ Mrs. Harriet M. Helen E. Connolly Goudet Edward J. Rooney William R. Secord Ralph E. Sloan Jr . - i: : m •Kft •:xo ■ m John J. Harrington, Jr. VtV ENGLISH DEPARTMENT Emily L. Shannon J. Jerome Minton Nancy A. Bonazzoli Marie P. Donahoe Patricia F. Buckley a • riffle?! Harry L. Garnett Mrs. Susan M. Gray Ethel M. Ward i 0 Mrs. Ruth Colombo Anne-Marie Levesque k • Thelma V. Hamm Helen E. Dalton LANGUAGE DEPARTMENT Esther M. Harrington Mary D. Ciannavei 15 IHI l ■a aKm: mmz ■• ■■ b %0 ' BSga- pfV • - :; i If ' 1 .? »A ' .v.r‘s warn J W WB -- j f4 .,: •! -aT , y wi Henry J. Plausse Daniel J. Bennett SOCIAL STUDIES DEPARTMENT John Carroll 1 !m rr -•• !•? Frank J. McNally Mrs. Rosalie Connor jj JE M ' Sf ' ' fl ■ ■||jj 1 ■I 1 J mm M mrwsm v % I •- w I I i P » m ; hRSa , 4 K . ' v ' ' • v ' . ...V - ' -:.:::: - ■ 2 V. :‘-r. w: -£? SB£ -. ■ V . . r i sg -•;’ •• flp@i •v : :• • ' ■ . :.:: ■■ d .. Jfg! i ( s il- : K- I k CJWjk ▼ » » V .1 » " ill I f MSlP r = v 3 • ■ ' • Francis W. Marcoux Hugh D.. O’Connor " Ub ' fi Stau Anthony E. DeFelice t f — MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT Francis J. Collins § 35h£ : v. -.r; v; •• rawwSOMwtT c ;. ' v.•:•:• .■: . :•:• vftg:• mam.: t : • ;v-y 3«6 •: :: J|L r itei V .,§3, :: lit if ? ■ Wfc-. V 40 jj Ml? •A " 4 V “ 4 ' a H if . Hi Lucy S. Almasian Mrs. Margaret Hutchinson Eleanor M. Johnson jMwm Kv mmmmm ' A; I 4 f VP Walter L. Maher mm ■mm SCIENCE DEPARTMENT Wendell F. Bennett Louis F. Colombo Tassos P. Filledes Charles T. Marso Raymond F. Biedrzycki William J. Genova Mary R. Leavitt David J. Anderson 4 • ' : -- v - ■ ' ' - BUSINESS DEPARTMENT Drown Mrs. M. Ann McGuiggin Margaret R. Connolly . Chellis Christine Camougis Marion L. Pothier V Wildbur William J. Anderson John S. Mitro A. Thibault INDUSTRIAL ARTS DEPARTMENT Arthur G. Sticklor Charles G. Woodhams Raymond E. Bryant James F. O’Sullivan Mrs. Dorothy V. Rankin Richard C. Mannix Roger E. Wilder Mrs. Evelyn B. Kuske Beverly M. Poulin Jf::-.: !«o K 255« ”ii. c : c :: ox-:. -: ;£S g . :: ' •. y. ' . .: WM PHYSICAL EDUCATION MUSIC DEPARTMENT Robert A. Whelan Ena M. Tillson Joseph D. LoPresti Leo D. Bachini Gloria I. Vasile PRESIDENT " Kenny” . . . popular . . . pet peeve, messy hair . . . sharp dresser ... Yale or Wesleyan . . . loves French IV ... reserved . . . likes to talk at meetings . .. knows how to get the teachers talking . . . S.L.G. . . . flirt . . . has a kind word for and about everyone . . . " Tough darts”. KENNETH JUE CLASS GEORGE BATTEN . . . Yoh . . . P.J.M. sandwiches . . . member of A period . . Honor So- 440 yard 600 at Brookline ... Gorgeous bright future Best VEEP ever babysitting . . . summers rower PRESIDENT ■ pi ■ m y »: ; •sy»V SECRETARY vivacious . . . friendly . . . member of Honor . . neat as a pin . . . pretty clothes . . . cheer- . hard worker for our class . . . will make a «it§s ■ ; fTA 5 :: $£ • ' • • •. ■ ffiCoN ct ' Sza iaBK § m I U. 4ptl - n| ANN COLLINS OFFICERS MICHELE FELDMAN tremendous cheer- icere . . . beautiful admired by all . . . " Did Oh that Spanish!” . . . ac- real friend. " Del-Del” . . . always a smj leader . . . excellent student clothes . . . great treasurer you do your Math? cepts responsibility TREASURER 25 DEBORAH ALEXANDER One of the three sisters . . . Italian food . . . Jordan Marsh . . . " What mean kitten?” . . . Leonardo . . . " Who’s getting seasick?” . . . beards . . . interest in the Navy . . . loafers . . . beautiful eyes and hair . . . freckles ... " I got a letter yesterday” . . . cheeseburgers . . . mad bottle collector. JUDITH AITKIN Judy . . . Wellesley ... " Is all that smoke coming from under the hood?” . . . H 2 0 major . . . quite apt to be lost Tues¬ day Period F . . . Discreetly? . . . sarcastic . . . planning a trip to Florida . . . Period G enthusiast? . . . car? . . . writes poetry? NANCY ADAMS Fatima ... 75 miles per hour in the church parking lot . . . one of the three . . . interested in the Navy . . . " Which class ring?” . . . summers at Cape Cod . . . Yale . . . a West Natick girl . . . knee socks ... no dentist bills . . . Friendly’s . . . looking forward to her college years. SHERRILL ALLEN Sherri . . . Rainbow girl . . . hails from West Natick . . . short skirts . . . safety patrol . . . drive-in . . . good class sup¬ porter . . . those fights . . . quiet . . . shy . . . good friend . . . wonderful classmate. SUSAN AMBLER t Partial to the name Bobby ... a great cheerleader . . . clothes galore . . . beautiful blonde hair . . . Black Ford convertible . . . Chemistry ... " I have so much homework to do” . . . " Spart” ... pretty eyes . .. always friendly. LINDA ANDERSON A friendly smile . . . good friend . . . hard-working classmate . . . likes to eat . . . many interests in and out of Natick ... good luck. JOHN ARENA Jackie” . . . football ... a tough little center . . . captain of Kamakzai . . . ::ten seen in a hotel Oldsmobile with Mike . . . Hyannis with the boys . . . swimming on South Street . . . ambition :o own a Corvette . . . likes a good joke and can tell one . . . well dressed . . . rest of luck in the future. CHARLES BALDWIN " Charlie” . . . works at Robert Hall . . . visited UN during summer . . . wants to teach history . . . heading for Bridge- water State Teachers . . . Oh, that tuba . . . those band field trips ... a happy future for " Chuck”. FRANCIS BARDELLINI A happy-go-lucky fellow . . . never too serious . . . good story teller . . . likes cars and clothes . . . what’s to eat? . . . loves homework . . . fine friend . . . loyal classmate ... lots of luck. mmmm jiff RUSSELL BAYLEY Russ . . . lifeguard at Bates . . . loves to twist . . . great on skiis . . . " Where is the party?” . . . lots of fun . . . flirt . . . always a smile . . . ' What homework?” . . Oh, that Philadelphia trip! . . . ioves conferences. .. good sport. DONALD BARTLETT Student Council president . . . Honor Society . . . pleasing personality . . . capable leader . . . serious about his work . . . Tufts . . . well liked . . . always pleasant . . . good athlete . . . fine friend . . . works hard for the good of our class . . . successful career assured for Don. STANLEY BARNES Basketball . . . cafeteria marshall . . . blonde hair . . . watches the lunch line sitting down? . . . knows how to pass vocabulary tests . . . must really adore algebra . . . girls, girls, girls . . . best of luck. AGNES BELLEFONTAINE " Hi” . . . friendly . . . likes clothes . . . retiring . . . neat . . . sports fan . . . many interests . . . good friend . . . loyal rooter for our class . . . good luck always. 1 JEANNE BELISLE " Val” . . . cute . . . petite . . . Wellesley Inn . . . full of fun . . . not crazy about school . . . lots of friends . . . trips to New York . . . sisters . . . South Natick . .. works hard for our class. SUSAN BEADER " Sue” . . . All-State Band . . . often seen in M 7 8 . . . marvelous on the flute and piccolo . . . quiet . . . loves music . . . good drummer . . . played at B.U. in summer vacations . . . likes to skate . . . hopes to teach music. PAUL BELLOFATTO Always a laugh . . . humorous stories by the hundred . . . fabulous driver . . . takes school seriously, though . . . Stop Shop . . . weight lifter . . . sure to be successful in his chosen field. DAVID BENJAMIN " Benjy” . . . football ... an enthusiastic skier . . . likes to laugh . . . one of the boys . . . handsome . . . freckles . . . likes to scoff the sophs . . . third lunch . . . baseball . . . Natick Ski Club ... a good friend ... a sure success. BRUCE BENNETT Happy-go-lucky ... no worries . . . doesn ' t overwork . . . likes sports . . . girls . . . sense of humor . . . welldressed . .. loyal classmate ... good luck. m aiiiiii ■x y-y. S; 5 ?? =£V : aSSS: :■■ . r:-» air £saE Sas ' -iMe a: vo ■ .yr B JUDITH BENNETT Judy” . . . blonde . . . always smiling . . . Nantasket . . . Stop Shop . . . ;ufety patrol . . . Cape Cod . . . New Hampshire .. . . football parties . . . M:ddlesex never eats lunch . . . " Staying urier; DONNA BIAGETTI Bright . . . Pretty . . . willing worker . . loves people . . . capable member f Saasamon Board . . . Student Council . . Safety Patrol . . . Honor Society . . . never idle . . . University of Mass. . . . assured of a successful career. ■Sr: ■1 DAVID BERMAN Hi . . . very bright . . . argues about anything with anyone . . . bowler? . . . great sense of humor . . . loves Jazz, Jazz, Jazz . . . Homework? . . . Why bother? . . . Off to college . . . bright future . .. good luck. ■ ■ ELAINE BESHANSKY SANDRA BERKOWITZ No cares . . . giggles a lot . . . bubbling personality . . . black car . . . full of fun . . . gorgeous clothes . . . Jordan Marsh ... a black car . . . many friends. ADELE BERANYK Such beautiful hair . . . loves animals . . . Pizza . . . Oh, those letters from the air force . . . Jordan Marsh . . . expensive clothes . . . " What are the boys doing tonight?” . . . likes gym . . . Eyes? . . . likes seafood .. . Union House. Joined us in junior year . . . wonderful personality . . . many friends . . . can’t do a forward tumble . . . developmental reading . . . likes clothes . . . Jordan Marsh . .. good luck. - S. JANICE BORGER Janni . . . next to the littlest of the big cheerleaders . . . pep . . . vigor . . . vim . . . loves food . . . partial to basket¬ ball . . . frequent trips to Boston . . . broken zippers . . . knows how to have fun . . . will make a wonderful nurse. PETER BOATES Great guy . . . loves cars . . . willing worker . . . good looking . . . hard worker . . . pleasant disposition . . . will go far . . . lots of luck in your chosen field. BEVERLY BITZER " Bev” . . . smart dresser . . . first to get the news at lunch . . . very special interest in the army . . . loves long week¬ ends . . . 400 letter . . . Saturday night at the movies wdth Marcia . . . plans to live in Maryland. wM ausss » wm THOMAS BOUZAN Tommy’ . . . twin . . . basketball and mashed potatoes . . . always good for a laugh . . . shy with girls . . . generous friend . . . " donkey” . . . happy future. RICHARD BOUZAN " Dicky . . . twin . . . basketball . . . cute . . . nice smile . . . never stops eating . . . works at Ken’s . . . Tough . . . ambition — diploma . . . Burdett . . . good luck. CYNTHIA BRADEEN B eautiful blonde hair . . . interested in art . . . many different hair-dos . . . quiet . . . soft-spoken . . . essence of neatness . . . efficient . . . likes the boys . . . clothes conscious . . . appears shy . . . nice to know ... a certain success. JANICE BREEN " Jannie” . . . lovely clothes . . . parties . . . art . . . loyal worker for ’63 . . . model ... art school . . . dancing . . . personality plus . . . long weekends . . . friends galore .. . always happy. f the top students . .. First National ick . . . those many trips to Boston slikes shopping . . . wears beautiful s . . . petite . . . East Natick . . . ... nice smile . . . pleasing LAWRENCE BRAYTON Wonderful build . . . wavy hair . . . Demolay . . . can’t stand noisy girls . . . likes girls . . . food . . . parties . . . plans to enter air force . . . Southern Methodist . . . will major in math . . . lots of luck, Larry. ■ ■ y g ■ ' ' ' ' i BARRY BROSS Great fun . . . happy-go-lucky . . . loves life . . . many friends . . . likes girls . . . sports fan . . . keeps a party going . . . success in the future assured. JANE BROWN •e " . . . hat department at Zayres . . perb dancer . . . library aide . . ierful friend . . . interest in Welles . . famous for being late . . . love: : chicken and vanilla coke. ■ ' WMyZkm- % 1 s -v m ife S .:: - mmmm i hmmssm I m B : M B . V 1 It M . .......... ■ : GAIL BROOKE Trip to Italy . . . her ’56 Chevy Taxi . . . " It’s been too long.” . . . longlasting friendships . . . many interests . . . " We Three” . . . " Postman, where are you?” . .. Labor Day. 31 j jjuSSoftR Vi, :: -msm 1 pfeilS • ■■ -‘A ■ ' WrS . •: MICHAEL BURGESS " Mike” . . . good things come in small packages . . . nice smile . . • likes the girls . . . hopes to go to college . .. hasn t decided on career . . . not crazy about homework ... best wishes for success. Most sincere . . . liked by all . .. has that natural look . . . loves music, dancing, Duxbury, football games, and Old Cape Cod . . . those brown eyes . . . always willing to help others ... if you’ve never met her, you’ve been left out. JAMES CAMPBELL Jim . . . quiet? . . . shy until you know him . . . good friend . . . Blue Olds . . . full of fun . . . North Natick . . . girls ... Ho-Jo’s friend ... great fun. LINDA BRYER Likes clothes . . . neat . . . chic . . . loyal worker for our class . . . lots of friends . . . sense - of humor . . . pretty hair . . . success in your chosen field, Linda. DAVID BUTCHMAN Dizzy ... Tab Hunter? . . • trip to Washington . . . summers as a camp counselor . . . Beulah . . . one of the boys . . . ribs??? . . . collegiate dresser . . . cowlick . . . blue eyes . . . what happened to Duck Pin? . . . plans to be an engineer. " T- GEORGE BRYANT Quiet . . . shy . . . sincere . . . nice to know . . . not crazy about school . • • good friend . . . few worries ... no immediate plans ... lots of luck. BESSIE BUSWELL FRANK CAPIZZO I athlete baseball , . . football . , . . . just name it . t . . . wonderful guy . 1 spirit. . . Honor Society . . . plans college . . . should go far . . . our . . Frankie. . hockey Frankie , . great popular PAUL CARON . . a cute Indian . . . . a great personality . . . . pinned? . . . one of the boys . . . generous . . . likes to sing in the shower ... a real credit to N.H.S. Wrestling . . with the girls loves parties . MICHAEL CARR summers at ft • • • " Mike” . . . " Bucky” . . , Winthrop . . . Irish charm . . . " the fullback” . . . known for his amusing tries to get something for . . lectured by his friends at . partial to blonds faces nothing lunch . Island? • • • • • . Long CHARLES CARSON 3cc " . . . playboy . . . cut-up ... no jn rest in school . . . some car! . . . strrt: out of trouble ... no cares . . . v L settle down some day. STEPHEN CARROLL Likes the girls . . . short haircut . . . quiet? . . . good looking . . . nice clothes . . . Oh, those sandwiches at lunch . . . Ford convertible . . . skin diver from way back . . . likes Norwood . . . hopes to go to college ... good luck. CHARLES CARROLL Charlie . . . quiet until you know him . . . plans to be an illustrator . . . " Have you read my latest satire?” . . . can be seen at Coop . . . likes a certain girls’ school . . . will eat anytime . . . " Julius”. 33 MICHAEL CHIACCHIA Full of fun . . . great practical joker . . . could be an excellent student . . . too busy having a good time . . .. likes to eat . . . cars . . . girls . . . anything for a laugh .. . keeps us entertained. ROBERT CHERVINKY Often seen, but seldom heard . . . likes the girls . . . neat dresser . . . cars . . . food . . . study periods . . . homework . . . loyal rooter at games . . . best of luck. GARY CASALY " Gar” . . . likes darkroom photography . . . " Give up?” . . . neat dresser . . . drives a 62 Buick . . . Sea Stories . . . Casey’s . . . piano . . . Chinese food . . . works at Natick Five . . . Bill Black’s combo . .. good luck in college. ' : ' ' JUSTIN CIRRONE " Voe” . . . shy? . . . loves physics class . . . The Bidder . . . Ken’s . . . Wayland interest . . . drives 59 Buick . . . fancy dresser . . . " Hey, Grease . . . How about a double date?” . . . fancy dresser . . . good luck. VINCENT COLONNELLI Sharp wit . . . classy dresser . . . de¬ chromes cars . . . Python . . . Vin . . . certain blue-eyed junior . . . likes sports .. . loves study periods .. . spends Sunday mornings in winter in the snow? ROBERT COOLIDGE Wonderful person . . . great friend . . . always lending a helping hand . . . Star Market . . . likes third lunch, trains, streetcars . . . Maine . . . Carole . . . " Our Hearts Were Young and Gay.” . . . best of luck. ELSA COPPELLOTTI 5-r irkling eyes . . . soft voice . . . short :-ack wavy hair . .. bright smile ... very foendly . . . determined . . . trustworthy plenty of insight . . . hard worker good dancer . . . lovely clothes . . . with the needle . . . good cook. RUSSELL CUDMORE Tr ck star ... co-captain .. . high hurdles . . interest in the junior class . . . Tnnarn . . . red convertible . . . gay ... well liked ... neat. RICHARD COTE Likes track . . . quiet in school . . . plenty of friends . . . sincere . . . good looking . . . nice clothes . . . many interests out¬ side school. KAREN CROSSMAN Brown eyes . . . soft voice . . . friendly . . . nursing school . . . music scrap book . . . roller skating . . . good dancer . . . kind friend . . . neat dresser . . . third finger, left hand. STEPHEN COTTER ' ' Burny” . . . South Natick boy . . . quiet at times . . . great hockey player . . . skips practice . . . many female admirers . . . Safety Patrol . . . " In a minute.” . . . What happened to the black convertible? RICHARD CRISAFULLI Telephonitis . . . such sweaters . . . great halfback . . . track star . . . likes to hold up the wall in Academic II . . . dark hair . . . chocolate cake . . . has a way with the girls ... a sure success. wm. U ANN CURRAN Quiet . . . shy . . . neat . . . wonderful friend . . . pretty hair . . . nice clothes . . . willing worker . . . sports enthusiast ... should go far. M W MARGARET CUNNIFF " Meg” . . . white sweater . . . Nee officer . . . plans for Boston College Future Teachers’ president . . . trips . . . nice smile . . . good pal French . . . Girl Scouts . . . happy great potential. ROBERT CUNNINGHAM blond . . . Shy ... so tall . . . blond . . . Cross Country captain . . . contagious smile . . . indoor and outdoor track star . . . Cleveland . . . grape juice . . . hot tub . . . loves to play ping-pong . . . good luck at Ohio. ROBERT DANIHER friendly . . . makes homeroom in of his teeth . . . likes girls . . . :ood . . . how about homework? LINDA DARLING Lindy” . . . black hair . . . brown eyes . . . happy . . . patient . . . determined . . . sense of humor . . . Honor Society . . . musical ability . . . piano . . . likes to arrange music ... A WBZ Nine- o’clock Scholar ... college ahead. m IHK1 PATRICIA CURRY " Pat” . . . soft voice . . . friendly smile . . . industrious worker . . . reliable . . . that neat, s turdy backhand writing . . . good grades ... a future teacher . . . elementary education . . . Neetega . . . good taste. ::,r3 mmmmi :: ' .■•■x :. : :-x::: xx-y .■.W .V. ' .-A.v ••ASSN SALLY DOGGETT Honor Society . . . little red putt-putt . . . front page . . . spends the summers at West Dennis . . . Boston English . . . West Natick . . . great in gym . . . Univ. of Mass, on March 17 .. . best of luck. RONALD DAVIS Friend keeps out . . What quiet DALE DAY Jordan Marsh . . . one of the gang . . . likes to work . . . hair never out of place . . . quiet . . . friendly . . . wants to be a nurse ... good luck. DONNA DOLL Nice to know . . . lovely eyes . . . pretty hair . . . neat always . . . outside interests . . . Cadillacs? . . . " Have you done your bookkeeping? " . . . secretary in a bank ... good luck. ROBERT DONOHUE . . . friendly . . . " Lover” . . . games . . . weekends in N. H. I:kes to cry . . . football party . . . to roam Boston . . . food . . . cars girls . . . life is just a bowl of THEODORE DOLAN Popular with the girls . . . B perioc terrific personality . . . loyal friend witty . . . likes poetry? ... si succeed. DARLENE DUFFY Partial to the name Eddie . . . one of a kind . . . " May I talk to Rhonda? " . . . what a summer . . . those Sunday drives! . . . neat. . . attractive . . . remember that PJ party? DIANNE DUFFY " Dee” . . . the other of the kind . . . Elm Farm . . . green convertible . . . Who’s Roddy? . .. beautiful hair . . . true friend . . . fun . . . great talker . . . lots of friends. SUSAN DUBOYCE First National . . . always talking . . . terrific personality . . . F period . . . friendly . . . beautiful sweaters . . . wants to be a secretary . . . success is assured. THOMAS DUMAS Merry disposition ... no worries . . . hates to get up in the morning . . . works at times, but enjoys life . . . hopes to make college. THOMAS DONOVAN Crew-cut . . . trackman . . . seen with Frank and Johnny . . . quiet only to those who don’t know him . . . girls . . . Kingston Trio . . . water and snow skiing enthusiast . . . college bound . . . best of luck. JANICE DUNBAR One of two . . . short hair . . . contagious smile . . . vigor . . . vim . . . personality plus . . . good athlete . . . fine friend . . . good luck. RHODA ELKIND Likes ice skating . . . great bowler . . . studious ... a lot of fun . . . light green Skylark . . . great little helper . . . sports fan ... Ice Capades . . . Mr. Anderson’s office. JEAN DUNBAR interest in the air quick . . . popular dislikes shoes . . . may your future be athletic KATHLEEN DUNLOP " Hi” . . . popular . . . attractive . . . likes the boys . . . likes to eat . . . clothes . . . hair-dos . . . loyal supporter of class affairs ... good luck. WALTER FAIRBANKS Studious . . . sincere . . . good sport . . . nice disposition . . . quiet . . . likes sports . . . cars . . . books . . . headed for college ... good luck. FRANK FEDE black hair . . . friendly loyal friend . . . not a . . . shy . . . conservative . . . pizza . . . gum . . . : eyes . . . patient . . . e Natickite .otball star MARION FABIANO One of the top 15 . . . petite and sweet . . . Geronimo . . . lower academic . . . always has a joke . . . big brown eyes . . . hockey games . . . Union House . . . the Haunted House . . . always JUDITH FILLMORE " Jud” . . . loves expensive clothes . . . sings and dances . . . Rainbow . . . Pinkie at Leonard Morse . . . short and sweet. . . Wellesley Library ... an angel . . . " Lil Kid” .. . quick trip to Nantasket ... half-pint halfback. JAMES FIEBER Our illustrious basketball manager . . . Safety Patrol . . .. science fair . . . rifle club . . . chess . . . community leader . . . Demolay ... guitar player. mmm ill mm ■ zfwM FRANCIS FITZGERALD ' ' Big Kid” . . . football honored by receiving Tom Mallery Award . . . food hockey . . . " FWankie” . . . Honor Society . . . likes to water ski Ivy League . . . girls . . . fantastic sense of humor ... great personality ... Princeton. MARTHA FITZGERALD Leonard Morse . . . sense of humor . . . Revere . . . interests at- Northeastern . . . beautiful brown hair . . . partial to the name Dave . . . sings in duet . . . C period lunches . . . epitome of cute¬ ness. LINDA FERGUSON Artistic . .. has a way with small children . . . loves animals . . . patient . . . kind . . . black eyes . . . gum chewer . . . sympathetic . . . good friend . . . boys ... cars... sports. RICHARD FLINCHBAUGH Dick . . . ambitious . . . hard worker . . . courteous . . . Univ. of Maine . . . engineering . . . sailing . . . hunting . . . fishing . . . indoor track . . . blue . . . Honor Society ... success assured. RICHARD FOSTER Dicky . . . drives the little bomb . . . influence with law? . . . friendly . . . always has a smile . . . one of the boys DEANNE FLYNN Neat.. . likes clothes . . . loyal supporter of class affairs . . . outside interests m any . . will make a good secretary . . . lots of luck. ROBERT FONTAINE Tin . . . " Hey, Ace,” . . . hobbies include skin diving . . . sharp dresser . . . National Guard . . . fountain . . . nice will enter service. voice LINDA FRAIZER Yankee fan . . . blue . . . Suburban Free Press . . . Q.M. Lab . . . always happy . . . never quiet for very long . . . pretty eves... sincere friend. MICHAEL FRANCIOSE That green machine . . . Petunia . . . wild . . . friendly . . . fun to be with . . . hopes to own a Corvette some day .. handy dandy .. . great sport. JOAN FOURNIER , . . sense of humor " ' Maxine along well with ever yone . . . neat sews well . . . onion rings . . . £ places . . . engaged . . . sports fan lots of luck. BARBARA FRAZEE " Barbs” . . . cute . . . helpful . . . parties . . . Framingham . . . letters . . . Washington, D.C. . . . " Girly” . . . that trip from Maine! . . . Cape Cod? DIANNE FREDERICK Farley’s . . . Pontiac . . . the service . . . Ten-pin bowling . . . Leonard Morse . . . convertibles . . . lovely blonde hair ... jokes ... sure success. STEPHEN GALLANT " Muggsy 33” all scholastic fullback . . . one of the touchdown twins . . . state shot-put champ . . eats seven dinners ... no phone . . . lots of girls . . . likes cheerleaders . . . parties . . . coaching ambition. SHARON GARLAND Likes Johnny Mathis . . . Framingham State . . . assistant at Senior Play . . . Washington, D.C. . . . likes bowling . . . a special laugh . . . lunchtime . . . " scutterbotch”. Tom . . . The Sable . . . always a laugh . . . another clever wit . . . industrious . . . suave . . . some haircut . . . good fun to be with .. . bright future. : JAMES GARRETT ; boys . . . Wayland . . . Yellow . . good student . . . sharp . hit with the girls . . . fine .. very quiet. MARCIA GARRY Personality plus . . . " cute kid” beautiful clothes . . . late for gyrr very sincere . . . always cheerful neat . . . dependable . . . likes a time JUDITH GHILANI Petite . . . sparkling brown eyes . . . can be found where the boys are . . . The Barone . . . trips to Univ. of Mass. . . . beautiful sweaters . . . changing hair styles ... coffee houses. SANDRA GIFFIN beautiful red hair . . . friendly nice clothes . . . pleasant per- . . Frank . . . ducks . . . full of mischievous . . . loads of fun smile . scnality SANDRA GEORGE One of our tallest girls . . . brown eyes . . . happy-go-lucky . . . likes parties . . . dances . . . enjoys cards ... a lively talker ... flirt... a certain boy. mxi Jrtt; Wfflm m : , WHOM •Saras ■ • - JAMES GOMES " Pepper” . . . friendly . . . lots of girls . . . Count Dracula . . . Ashland interest . . . last tackle in Framingham game . . . lots of pep . . . shows great promise. RHONDA GOLDBERG Cute . . . beautiful clothes . . . short . . . friendly . . . infectious laughs . . . interest in junior class . . . Lafayette Radio . . . Newton . . . Mister Donut . . . not too studious. STEPHEN GOLDBERG Steve . . . curly brown hair . . . Grades? . . . sleeps in school . . . Nash Rambler . . . Thunderbird . . . Math, anyone? ... You can have it... good luck. LORNA GOULD Romantic . . . Easter Bride . . . friendly . . . attractive ... no worries . . . Eddie . . . good worker . . . bright future . .. much happiness. CHARLES GRADY Cool Ford . girl friends student . . . to succeed . . nice sweaters . . loves fun irt . . . nice bui conscientious. many good . sure SgsK- ' - ANDREW GOODSPEED A typical ’enry iggins . . . terrific sense of humor . . . Trinity College . . . wants to study law . . . baseball . . . very collegiate . . . " drew” . . . quick with the quips . . . pet peeve a fluffy white sweater. THOMAS GRADY re stling . . . track . . . " Mouse” . . . ■■xe eyes . . . Natick Ski Club . . . sincere . . neat . . . likes a good time . . . temper . . . Irving . . . many friends. MARGO HAMILTON ricod . . . Dartmouth weekends . . . shy _ . Humanities . . . Susie . . . Puget Sinmd . . . Lady Godiva . . . insatiable rite . . . " Don’t move, I’ve lost my JOHN GREENQUIST Perpetual smile . . . blue derby . . . fanatic bowler . . . stage manager . . . math quizz . . . " Greeny” . . . Friday night at Sellew’s ... a collection of sweaters . . . spaghetti sauce . . . laugh¬ ing eyes ... everyone’s friend. LOIS HALBERG Epitome of neatness . . . terrific person¬ ality . . . cute . . . Jordan Marsh . . . West Natick . . . Class of I960 heart interest . . . beautiful clothes . . . European trip. DAVID HALLETT Blond hair . . . Ford convertible . . . a way with the girls . . . the Cape . . . good looking . . . big tease . . . gum chewer . . . pest a times ... great guy. CHRISTINE HALL Always a big smile . . . " Peeps” . . . cousin ... a Falcon . . . B.U. . . . slight . . . disagreement with State Trooper . . . jokes ... a certain frat pin . . . " red ’ ... future nurse. 45 iiip ■ ... mm JEFFREY HARRIS Mr. Drowns supply officer . . . business law . . . ’56 Ford . . . Champion waltzer . . . nice clothes . . . B.U. next year ... dry sense of humor . . . restauranter. PATRICIA HANSBURY Pat . . . friendly . . . bright smile . . . knitting . . . sewing . . . singing . . . Leonard Morse . . . easy going . . . sympathetic . . . likes to work with ceramics .. . artistic. LEONARD HARPER Good sport . . . active in athletics . . . loyal rooter or N.H.S. . . . works hard . . . good friend . . . likes cars and girls .. . good luck. MARY HELPIN Blonde . . . tall . . . lovely smile cute . . . friendly . . . lots of poise ambitious ... a W.T. Grant’s girl loyal to Canada . . . likes to swim knitting .. . parties. DANA HERMAN Tim . . . redhead . . . gymnastic . . a passion for worms . . . . . daily drives . . . one of sincere friend . . . good luck. SALLY HASTINGS leavens!” . . . Jackson . . . . . loves camping . . . Rainbow s to read . . . Michigan . . . . . stuffed rabbits . . . Merit . . Girl Scouts . . . Junior Red vegetarian. MICHAEL HICKS " Hicksie” . . . interest at Wheelock . . . well known in Wellesley . . . loyal class¬ mate . . . fiery red hair . . . quiet and shy . . . summers in New Hampshire . .. Scuba diving . .. good rifleman. JOHN HESS Q_:et . . . studious . . . good friend . . . • rks hard for the class . . . has a wry eose of humor . . . hopes to enter the ser-ice . . . best of everything. CHARLES HEWSON . . . foreign cars . . . quite an . . . terror on the road . . . . . . sincere . . . many girl . . jokes . . . fun . . . nice to • ' Chuck’ appetite modest friends know. FRED HOPF liny ... great appetite . . . jovial . . . just a growing boy . . . snappy dresser . . . nice to know . . . never worries . . . doesn’t take school too seriously. ALAN HUGHES Left us to go to Brookline at half year . . nice to know . . . good student . . . peasant . . . motor bike . . . girls . . . food ... best wishes for success. CHARLES HOMER Lazybones . . . don’t hurry . . . don’t worry . . . there’s always tomorrow . . . great talker . . . could be a top student .. . blond .. . friendly. jpilll v : - : ::x::::::: 7 gm §§ii —V.V.’-v.v.-. .:: %gi§ tvMwIvWIv ' :.:s7.: «5 ' 5rs ; : |J§ K z+.y.wifrA ss: WvsvXvd i. ' ..; . .v.v.v .v,v.s l BBreS sBggB ggiB $ims msm} ;.;• . •• MARIE INTINARELLI " Mia” . . . just came to us this year from Marion High . . . Jordan Marsh . . . likes to twist . . . sharp dresser . . . quick .. . good worker . .. good luck. mmm JUSTIN HUGHES Baby Huey ... a certain girl . . . best football captain ever ... an accomplished public speaker . . . the other half of two great ends . . . interested in inter¬ national politics . . . headed for Harvard. ROBERT Bobby . . . likes pai . . . very neat . . . Stop Shop ties . . . magnetic personality irties . . . likes clothes his brother’s car . . . loyal to school activi- full of JUDITH JOHNSON Capable . . . petite . . . sews beautifully . . . good student ... a certain boy friend . . . wedding bells . . . fine friend . . . keen sense of values. CATHERINE JONES . . Cappy . . . Tiger Jones graduate from Mr. Anderson’s office purple gang . . . black bomb . . . 1 chest . . . known to skip classes first to all four lunches. i issmi ' A " ; ' :’ ' Vvl pgg x-r.:-:--:: :• cS3m$c|m3 IHi |gll " : :•••• CAROL Yr . . . viva do :es a goo othes . . i ns. PM | ALICE KAISER ' Hi, kids,” . . . good friend . . . loyal class worker . . . likes clothes . . . neat . . . many interests . . . secretarial future . . . good luck. eastp DAVID JOSSELYN ,ey . . . liked by all . . . South Natick . big things come in small packages . yellow Mercury . . . what a laugh terrific imitations ... " Stone” JUDITH KADLIK Oldsmobile . . . wild driver beach pal . . . loves clothes . . houses . . . Union House . hard ... hopes to go to B.C. . jas a haunted . works ' ROBERT KAULBACK Sports fan . . . car enthusiast . . . not crazy about school . . . likes girls . . . food . . . parties . . . looking forward to graduation. JOSEPH KEANY Pete” . . . weight lifter par excellence . . . nicknames galore . . . one of our truly big boys . . . football, hockey at the Oblates ... red light. -Vrtsv.vry .. BARBARA KAUFMAN Came to N.H.S. this year from Glen Cove, N.Y. . . . excellent student . . . likes cooking . . . records . . . horseback- ridine . . . can’t understand our accent. MARGARET KELLEY Peggy . . . reddish hair . . . honest . . . a gopd mixer . . . chatterbox . . . likes bowling . . . parties . . . fast music . . . likes working with needle and thread. 9W VERNA KEIGHLEY " Punchy” . . . vivacious . . . good cheer¬ leader . . . petite . . . likes gallant men . . . penapple sherbert . . . Number 33 . . . jazz . . . Minnesota . . . Chandler’s next. WILLIAM KEEZER Bill . . . Down South Natick way . . . studious . . . musically inclined . . . reads and writes ■well . . . shy . . . good friend ... headed for college. BEVERLY KELLY Beautiful red hair . . . look-a-like sister . . . great fun . . . many funny jokes . . . fine friend . . . loyal classmate . . . secre¬ tarial hopes . .. best of luck. JOHN KELLY Blushes easily . . . hot rods . . . open roads . . . sense of humor . . . great stories . . . fine friend . . . not crazy about school. . . watch him . . . good future. STEPHEN KELMAN Very quiet . . . loves jazz . . . often with Matt . . . has that lucky tough . . . likes to work? . . . the factory ... a true friend . . . wants to be an interior decorator. 50 . ELIZABETH KNOWLES Quiet . . . nice smile . . . very friendly . . . pretty . . . lots of clothes . . . nice to know . . . loyal to class . . . headed for business college. MMmm m m M _; MARGARET KENNEY r -gy . . . daily hot fudge sundae Wellesley Inn . . . beautiful smile :d. food, and more food . . . ki rake brother’s car friendly Nice to know . . . kind . . . good disposi¬ tion . . . nice clothes . . . many friends . . . secretary . . . outside interests many and varied. sip iiliii ; ..... I mmmbxp VIRGINIA LAMONT Soft voice . . . nice smile . . . long brown hair . . . bright eyes . . . friendly . . . . . neat dresser . . . roller knitting . . . cooking . . . :al. .. loves to dance. skating THEODORE LARIDIS Ted . . . originator of many nicknames . . . hornblower . . . white Ford ... all aughs . . . cute senior interest . . . likes sports ... many pantomines. ■ JOHN KYRKA Good student . . . hard worker . . . lots of fun . . . friendly . . . many interests . . . likes cars . . . girls? . . . clothes . . . sports . . . food . . . headed for college. ROBERT LEFTER ’v.v ' -.- .-s .y. •—. Machine . . . can usually be found on a basketball court . . . quiet . . . sincere friend . . . loves cool music . . . believes in wearing elastics for good luck . . . biggest hands in school ... on to prep school ... good luck. PAUL LAURO track star . . . Simmons . . nice manners . . . kind disposition . . . a future dentist . . . Si Football . green car fellow . . legiate . . Patrol. JULIA LEFEBVRE Neat . . . likes clothes . . . laughing eyes . . . pretty hair . . . good pal . . . friendly . . . interested in clerical work . . . addi¬ tion to any office. Doug . . . popular ... ’55 ' Coop ... a radio ham . . . i looking forward to graduation probably enter service . . . lots K I ,,, ARTHUR LIPMAN Excellent student . . . scientific mind . . . many interests outside . . . will probably be an outstanding engineer . . . lots of luck. DAVID LEVINE Who, me?” . . . loud . . . capable . . . loisy . . . over-enthusiastic about some hings . . . simmer down . . . girls? . . . 4oney? ... on to Univ. of Penn. jmJ . . . loves music . . . fine voice . . . pedte . . . thoughtful and generous . . . li- bow . . . loves to read . . . wants to secretary . . . excellent student . . . itaral friend. THOMAS LOVEZOLLA Benny ' ’ . . . quiet (at times) . . . quick ■ :n comebacks . . . witty remarks . . . hat’s it to you? You writing a □ook?” . . . Oldsmobile •. . . temper? RICHARD LOCKHART " Ricky” . . . " Oh, sure,” . . . basketball . . . fine stature . . . shy . . . loves fun . . . parties . . . not too popular at home after report cards . . . hopes to enter Univ. of Mass. MARCIA LOUGEE Friendly . . . quiet . . . nice car . . . wild driver . . . pizza . . . pretty smile . . . dependable ... a friend at all times . . . never discouraged . . . wants to be a secretary. CHRISTINE LOFTUS Blue eyes . . . beautiful hair . . . under¬ standing . . . quiet . . . fashionable . . . determined . . . loyal to friends . . . wants to be a good secretary. RUTH LOSCO Pretty . . . vivacious . . . lovely red hair . . . personality plus . . . flirt . . . beauti¬ ful smile . . . popular . . . Safety Patrol . . . Future Nurses . . . plans to train at Malden Hospital ... best of luck. 53 JOHN MacKINNON One of our more quiet members . . . seldom heard from . . . likes shop work . . . good friend . . . many pals . . . out¬ side interests ... good luck. , - v i grxmg-. ■ i-f.vNKs. xt-Ki.-.-: A HELEN LUMSDEN Lump . . . cute . . . green eyes . . . boys ... ’55 F ord . . . parties . . . loves to laugh . . . hockey games . . . boys . . . Anything left to eat? . . . Jordan Marsh .. . haunted house. DANIEL MacDONALD " Danny” . . . quick wit . . . nice guy . . . loyal friend . . . not academically inclined . . . looking forward to June 10 . . . cars ... parties ... sports. res £ ?££ £ , . - mm mm ■“‘y . ' . ..v. DEITCHE MAFFEI . . . nice clothes . . . many parties . . . isn’t . . private phone . . . " Petite” . . . cut likes the boys . . crazy about work pretty smile. LINDA MAHON " Benito " . . . " Skippy Peanut Butter . . . petite . . . neat . . . pretty clothes . . tap dancer . . . daily rendezvous? . . interest in Class of ’60 . .. June? CATHERINE MADDEN " Sissie” . . . always cheerful . . . spends much time in AD28 . . . nice smile . . . friendly personality . . . gum chewer . . . likes to eat... many friends. PAUL MARSH Basketball . . . Cocoa . . . Jones’ . . . i certain underclass student . . . " Swampy’ . . . tough . . . curly black hair . . . inter ested in a good time ... popular. •y. v.y, ft OQ O PPp O j rJlliii JEAN MANSELL . . . Saturday Art Classes . . . blue ; . . . ringing laughter ... no cares cheerful . . . quick wit . . . sports fan likes food ... boys ... cars. JANET MARINELLI never a hair out of liny . . . cute place . . . meatball sandwiches . . . . . pizza . . . hates smoky places New Year resolutions ... nice smile BARBARA MARTIN " Barb” . .. always smiling . . . strawberry blond . . . summer parties . . . Friday nights at Friendly’s ... a black Impala . . . blushes easily . . . Washington, D.C. birthday parties ... summer vacations. JOHN MARTIN Johnny” . . . pal of the Bidder . . . foot- r-all and track . . . quiet . . . shy . . . -eight lifter . . . good friend . . . week- rnds at Donohue’s cabin . . . headed for North Texas State. • • 7.... . . :: JEAN MARSO Peanut . . . tiny . . . cute . . . ever-present smile . . . bubbling over with energy . . . hard worker . . . loyal supporter of our class . . . parties . . . Woolworth’s . . . Drum and Bugle Corps. 55 i JOAN McCONNON " Joanny” . . . one of a large family . . . starched blouses . . . Lafayette Radio . . . friendly . . . Italian food . . . auburn hair .. . Newton-Wellesley . . . will make a fine nurse . . . makes her own clothes. RICHARD McCARTY ' Dick” . . . always happy . . . hearn laughter . . . warm friend . . . good stu dent . . . Likes the girls . . . parties . . cars ... food ... headed for college. SHERRY McCOLLEM Interest in the air force . . . usually found in the lunch room . . . " Whose big brother?” . . . Thanksgiving . . . golf course . . . open house . . . parties . . . big sister. PAUL McKECHNIE blond hair Barbershop Quartet blue eyes . . . red and white Buick shy . . . imitates J.F.K. . . . bullfrc the pool Wellesley College. LINDA McLEOD Bright smile . . . sparkling eyes . . . friendly . . . sympathetic . . . patient . . . sparkling diamond . . . willing worker . . . weekends in Vermont . . . wedding bells. TO?®? GERALD McGARRY " Mac” ... big boy . . . blushes easily . . . likes to tinker with cars . . . lots of friends . . . First National . . . not crazy about hard work. b ' rrco • r ' :o»x : • v. " .••• • • • • Is , A % m mm - CHARLES McMANUS Kerry” . . . defensive football . . . Honorable No. 1 Son . . . loves a good time . . . weekends at Hyannis . . . skiing enthusiast . . . wonderful smile . . . neaded for St. Anslems. NICOLE MERCEREAU " Nicki” . . . always smiling . . . bubbling personality . . . would you speak slowly, please? . . . likes French boys and American boys . . . France’s loss was our gain . . . beautiful clothes . . . masters three languages... cute. PAUL MESLIS Harvey” . . . good guy . fan . . . very quiet . . . loves fu dresser . . . likes girls . . . Bab; borrows cars? . . . likes haircuts IS ' ' lift i 7.V v -‘ :: :: . 4 - • • ■ ■ ..... : V ■ :3 .3 mm H i ■ ' ; .B S — g mmsism EDWARD MORASH A real brain . . . gets everything without my effort . . . good looking . . . friendly . . hard worker outside of school, too .. nice guy. _ MARIE MONTALBANO Monty montana . . . Natick Five and Ten . . . fashion plate . . . great story teller . . . loves a joke . . . will make an attrac¬ tive addition to any office. r. :Y-:7:; -T-I - vv ... • msm — Ay mm - - ' m : m m :Y,Y •: : . lililiil:! m i Ml t [g i; m-l Jmm. J wr-■■■■■■ Wvx ■ " i mm h MV SUSAN MITCHELL " Sue” . . . Main St. Pharmacy ing . . . cute . . . friendly . . . sweaters . . . Bentley . . . many hairstyles . . . twin nieces. KATHERINE MOYNIHAN " Katie” . . . cute ... great talker . .. likes eye shadow . . . hairdos . . . nice clothes . . . popular . . . giggler ... no worries .. . tomorrow is another day. V • _ DONALD MORRILL Good disposition . . . kind friend . . . always happy ... no worries . . . willing to lend a helping hand for any worth¬ while class project. JUDITH MORRISON Beautiful clothes . . . very artistic Saturday Art Class . . . talkative . . . story teller . . . likes a good joke popular . . . enthusiastic. MAUREEN MULVEY " Ma,” . . . secretary for Mr. Sticklor . . . loves spaghetti . . . active in sports . . . likes to talk fast . . . friendly . . . attrac¬ tive clothes . . . plans to be an executive secretary. DIANNE MUNYON ' Di” . . . sociable eyes . . . freckles scott . . . bli of confusion partirs . . . pretty summers in Swamp- . . always in a state what next? JOHN MULLIN Small in stature, but not in ment . . . good sport . . . ca: . . . food . . . music . . . b party? ... on to college . . . STEPHEN MURPHY " Stevie " . . . cars . . . the gang ... no girls . . . too quiet . . . seldom heard from . . . could go far . . . plans on col¬ lege career ... good luck. JOHN MURPHY " Murph” . . . crash . . . likes to ride with :ne top down . . . believes in ghosts . . . neat dresser . . . shy . . . handsome . . . reat sports fan . .. famous? THOMAS MYERS " Bear " . . . cool T-bird . . . penguins . . . always supplied with candy . . . good ■ looking . . . blushes easily . . . smooth JEROME NELSON ... popular . .. future dentist. One of our more quiet members . . . often seen, but seldom heard . . . serious . . . South Natick . . . can take a joke . . . likes to tell tall tales . . . good luck. ROBERT MURRAY Bob . . . good student . . . great talker . . . Safety Patrol . . . works hard for our class . . . plans to be an engineer . . . on to college . . . much luck. Wm A» ' Cute . . . twin sister . . . dainty . . . pretty hair . . . nice smile . . . good friend . . . never a dull moment . . . contagious laugh . . . should go far .. . good luck. IIP DIANNE NYGAARD " Stoneface” . . . sunburned tooth . . . tuna fish . . . Espanol . . . interests in Saugus . . . ice . . . quiet . . . ' ’West Side Story” . . . summers in New Hampshire. ■ y A- V- DANIEL O’LEARY w JAMES NICHOLS Noisy neighbors . . . drives blue conver¬ tible . . . flirt . . . Coop . . . Nicky . . . summers at York Beach . . . hot rod fan . . . California . . . Florida . . . Herter’s. PATRICIA NOONAN Pat . . . sparkling brown eyes . . . red hair . . . easy-going . . . likeable . . . gay laugh . . . fun . . . Jordan Marsh . . . bowling . . . horseback riding . . . green ... Fisher Junior College. Twin . . . cute . . . likes guns . . . track star . . . skiing . . . shy . . . reserved . . . no girls . . . blue Falcon . . . television fan ... on to college. MAUREEN O’LEARY ROBERT NOEL " Noelly” . . . " Knuck” ... ski enthusiast . . . remember the Olds ... a certain blue-eyed girl . . . wrestling team . . . always a smile ... Ken’s. ' sssaffimi - .-.V j-SfelcfecSwS SS ' : SSpg SSK ■ W- Sgfegg jviv- 0X0 XsfOZiW -;-: » vy • : «.«.v.•.•-•: spgg KENDALL PEASE " Weasel” . . . great quarterback . . . one of the boys . . . loves parties . . . fast Ford . . . Espanol, anyone? ... I am not a flirt... great friend. MICHAEL ONORATO Handsome ... ’56 Ford . . . Jones’ . . . sh :t put ... all four lunches . . . heading :: r Burdett . . . likes food . . . snappy uresser. RICHARD PARRIS Dick . . . one of the cross-country gang . . . Boucher’s Brownies . . . 20,000 ft. under the rippler tank . . . the speed of light . . . bowling . . . Honor Society ... writer’s cramp. LAWRENCE PENSWICK " Barry” . . . very witty . . . likes hunting fishing, girls . . . tall and handsome . . engineer to be . . . artistic . . . hare worker ... loyal friend. CYNTHIA PERLMAN " Cind” . . . prematurely gray . . . inter¬ ests in B.U., Northeastern, Univ. of Mass. . . . BB6 . . . horror shows . . . excellent student . . . water skiing . . . summer weekends . .. clothes ... Walnut Hill influence. DAVID PEOPLES Peeps” . . . great member of the track team . . . personality plus ... ski en¬ thusiast . . . lots of fun . . . driving side¬ ways ... Univ. of Mass. y-yy. m ■ : m ■ W, Hii : ; WILLIAM PETRIE Maynard . . . wildman . . . cars . . . loves to eat . . . swimming parties . . . human siren . . . Cape Cod . . . trip to the Emerald Isle ... great friend. ELLEN PHILLIPS " El” . . . Carbone’s ... a pocket full of jokes . . . Leonard Morse . . . great comic . . . marvelous personality . . . future nurse . .. top bun, anyone? PAUL PETERS Scored 100 points in football . . . captain of baseball . . . quiet ... a certain junior . . . sincere friend ... tremendous stamina . . . pool? . . . hopes to be a teacher-coach . .. luck to one of the greatest. WILLIAM PHILLIPS Bill . . . Kennedy’s at Shopper’s World . . . enthusiastic bowler . . . summers in New Jersey . . . Plymouth . . . great on puns . . . QM Lab . . . lots of fun . . . Good student... should go far. JOHN PERRY John came to us as a junior . . . left us in senior year . . . came back to graduate . . . friendly . . . likes us better than the south ... good luck. RICHARD PICARD " Pic " . . . cafeteria marshall . . . flirt . . . conservative . . . fast boat . . . likes to water ski . . . sports fan . . . serious . . . sincere . . . nice smile . . . football manager. BARRY PORTER likes hockey . . . Arts and Crafts . . . ' remendous at pool . . . cokes and potato chips diet . . . barbershop . . . handsome ... weight lifter. ANN POLHEMUS Soft voice . . . very quiet . . . blond . . . likes sports . . . Hornets . . . camp . . . three retakes . . . YWCA . . . swimming . . . winter weekends. JANE PISTONE " Mouse” . . . " Gina” . . . petite . . . pretty . . . dainty . . . " Star” . . . beautiful eyes . . . wants to be a nurse . . . she is a princess . . . loads of fun . . . good luck. 63 . : csvc-x-r .... . .V : : .yV ' .vIw.vXs; FRANK PIKE Reserved . . . quiet . . . likes sports loyal supporter of all school activities business bound . . . nice friend . . . of luck. gas DIANNE PICKERING Excellent student . . . Honor Society . . th genius . . . contagious smile . . cirirty laugh . . . grand friend . . . attrac nve ... nice clothes... good luck. NICHOLAS PIERRO " Nicki” . . . witty . . . nice smile friendly . . . loves animals quiet . . . good looking groomed . . . best of luck always well ROGER PRITZKER Weatherman . . . interest in electronics . . . sense of humor . . . enjoys sports . . . bowling . . . pool . . . boating . . . water skier . . . plays a swinging trumpet. JOSEPH PRYOR " Pickle” . . . big Joe . . . modest . . . All American . . . one of two great ends . . . popular . . . double lunches . . . eight bottles of milk . . . basketball captain . .. B.C. here I come! MARYELLEN PREVEAR Quiet soft spoken . . . brown eyes . . . light laughter . . . charm . . . chatterbox . . . a helping hand . . . one of those women drivers... patient TV fan. Baseball star . . . football . . . good athlete . . . fine disposition . . . nice clothes . . . good story teller . . . wonder¬ ful sport . . . fine friend . . . good luck. PHILLIP QUATRALE " Buff” . . . shy? . . . chief at Jones’ . . . hockey fan . . . Hampton Beach, anyone? . . . one of the boys . . . T-Bird . . . French class . . . dentist . . . college bound. MARY RANERI Lots of clothes . . . interests at M.I.T . . . pizza . . . guess who doesn’t have i license? . . . East Natick . . . Jordar Marsh ... ski weekends in Vermont . . good friend. I 64 JOHN REARDON Not crazy about books . . . handsome . . . nice clothes . . . happy smile always . . . fine friend . . . good sport . . . food, anyone? JILL RIERDAN Excellent student . . . Honor Society . . . top scientist . . . hardworker . . . beauti¬ ful hair . . . charm . . . poise . . . dignity .. . should go far ... good luck. LANA REID Sharp eye for clothes . . . beautiful hand¬ writing . . . diligent worker . . . Honor Society . . . future teacher . . . sweet . . . loves potato chips . . Irish temper . . . pretty jewelry. MERLE RICKLES Always talking . . . dangling earrings . . . very excitable . . . Chinese food . . . cute pins mile . . . blue frosting . . . pizza . . . animal lover ... easily confused. 65 vV ' Xv JUDITH ROBERTS Judy . . . shy until you know her likes a thousand stars . . . skating skiing . . . french fries . . . blue . . of interests ... many friends. JOSEPH ROBICHEAU " Hoey” . . . handsome . . . wei . . . wrestler . . . track man . . . . . . parties . . . always happy . you writing a book?” CLARA RODRIGUEZ Clara came to us from Columbia . . . mastered English in no time . .. excellent student . . . fine friend . . . loyal class¬ mate . . . fine secretary . . . best wishes. ROBERT ROURKE Came to us from Connecticut. trackman . . . friendly . . . easy- runs five miles a day . . . Univ, . .. successful career ahead. LINDA ROBINSON Always smiling . . . very tall . . . . . . secret police . . . many cousins seen at Friendly’s . . . Rainbow . . . ' to sing . . . Cape Cod summers friendly ... likes skiing. — ▼ , PAMELA RUSSELL " Pam ”, short, petite . . . neat. .. cute interest in the navy . . . Zayre’s . . . 1 sweets . . . very artistic . . . talented sensitive . . . lots of luck. mm p§I»P! : CARL ROVINELLI . . . South Natick . . . beautiful smile . . . . . sincere . . . cc ti” . . . chemistry MATHEW ROVNER . . . little, big flirt . . . great person- , . . wants to be a radio broadcaster livens up any party . . . likes to ... forever joking. Sif ' P twist : •-»•■ - -- mm iNa BRENDA SABEAN Those pajama parties . . . bubbling per¬ sonality . . . great art student . . . popular . . . smart . . . willing worker . . . good cook ... college bound. PENNY SALLINGER 5 sports . . . basketball . . . wonder- al . . . enthusiastic . . . wants to physical education . . . full of pep ood classmate. • : " ffn- -V ■•■.A ' ”. WaKj.WwS-A‘a%- ■X ' aJS A MARY RYAN pretty blue eyes . . . great talker Cute . . . has connections in Wellesley always good for a laugh . . . full o . . . successful career assured. 67 •:;B1 333SS§H MAXINE SALVIN Talented artist . . . Honor Society . . hard worker . . . pleasing personality . . college interests . . . popular . . . friendl nice to know ... will go far. CAROLYN SANBORN " Cal” . . . the look of a model . . . undescribable laugh . . . those letter . . . artist ... a mile . . . blue Tempest . . . terrific dancer . . . found where there is fun. : ■ ROBERT SAUNDERS Raises rats for Advanced Biology . . . band . . . fickle . . . quiet . . . unlimited number of puns . . . future doctor . . . jolly ... blushes beautifully. EDWARD SAVILONIS . . has a way with girls . . . quid . many cars . . . tumbler . . tumbled himself into a broken collar bone . .. best of dispositions. Eddie JAMES SANFORD . blond . . . handsome good athlete . . . likes ree . . . likes sports . . Quiet neat . ROSEMARY SAVILONIS Likes music . . . driver education . . . pleasing personality . . . quick wit . . . blue Falcon . . . food . . . winning basket¬ ball games ... G.A.A. meetings. WILLIAM SLAMIN Oldsy . . . jeep . . . good natured . . . mechanical . . . sharp witted . . . likes Public Speaking . . . seen in Wellesley ... lots of luck. ROBERT SELLARS One of our biggest boys . . . grand smile . . . great football player . . . unfortunate injury . . . anxious to learn . . . winning ways. NANCY SLAUTA Always smiling . . . Jordan Marsh . . . flirt . . . personality . . . originator of S.C.C. . . . short and sweet . . . wond er¬ ful dancer . . . pretty eyes . . . B.C. . . . actress . .. soloist. MARK SHAVOR Good things sometimes come in small packages . . . hopes to go to Burdett . . . musical . . . pleasant . . . loyal friend . .. hard worker for our class. HELEN SHERIDAN " La La” . . . partial to airmen . . . works at Friendly . . . Irish eyes ... ski enthusiast . . . southern accent . . . hates to bowl .. . Christmas vacation. 69 iWA; ' " , V " | Ah . ■ m m. ■•; ■ 2is IRVING SLAVID " Irv” . . . handsome . . . friends galort . . . what sweaters! . . . British . . . rad;c ham . . . great party crasher . . . never at a loss for words . . . " also”. RICHARD SPURLING One of the gang . . . blond . . . reserve . . . food . . . cars . . . girls? . . . parti: . . . sly sense of humor . . . looking fa ward to June 10. ANNE SPINNEY " Nancie” . . . Tuesday nights at C.Y.O. . . . bubbling personality . . . cute . . . great imitator . . . navy ... air force . . . Brookline .. . sincere friend. " Ed” . . . " Spike” . . . likes to bowl . . . orange sneekers . . . future teacher . . . memory like an elephant . . . shot put ... " Sol” ... drives a big six. EDWARD SOLOMON LARRY SMITH JUDITH SPLANE " We Three” . . . pizza . . . pretty hair . . . Labor Day . . . constantly smiling . . . says what she means . . . partial to G.I.’s . . . shorthand . . . Nellie the Green Bomber. " Larr” . . . Smitty” . . . many girls . . . likes parties . . . cars . . . sports . . . school? . . . homework . . . tries to impress you as shy . .. lots of luck. v-s m . ' juHNt sapn| Wtm fa pm imiiii mm- KENNETH STONEMETZ " Ken” . . . would do anything to get to Maine . . . pet peeve is Wellesley . . . loves to water ski . . . loves gym . . . not about homework. crazy MARTIN STANHOPE Quiet . . . reserved . . . likes cars . . . motorcycles . . . anything mechanical . . . good in shop . . . serious . . . industrious ... good friend ... loyal classmate. WILLIAM STEWART Coop . .. nice smile . . . pleasant to know . . . quiet . . . unassuming . . . always courteous . . . very neat . . . hard worker ... sports fan ... on to college. DANIEL SULLIVAN Tomorrow is another day . . . Dan i for today . . . not a care in the world no worries, friend . . . never hurry everything will work out. MARK SZPAKOWSKI Extremely intelligent... brilliant speaker of the abstract . . . fourth and fifth dimensions . . . adores science fiction . . . modest. .. shy ... should be very success¬ ful in college. B gj w X ' ARTHUR STUART Likes to travel . . . greatest desire to be a forest ranger . . . will see him some day in a national park . . . handsome . . . fashionable .. . agreeable. 71 ERIC THORESEN Quiet . . . shy . . . very serious about school . . good student . . . nice car . . . works hard outside . . . many interests . . . nice guy . . . loyal rooter for ’ 63 . LESLIE THORPE Breezy . . . cool . . . everybody’s friend . . . many interests outside . . . likes everyone . . . friendly guy . . . nice to know ... good luck. LINDA THOMPSON Beautiful hair . . . Coop . . . Friday at Friendly’s . . . Bobby . . . white Pontiac . . . enjoys sleeping . . . friendly . . . talkative ... 21 pairs of shoes . . . look¬ ing forward to hairdressing school. DEMARIS TOPPING Blond . . . blue eyes . . . track . . . basket¬ ball . . . the Celtics . . . Cousy . . . Dra¬ matic Club . . . determined . . . skin diving . . . Olympic Champ? . . . will work hard. JANICE TEAGUE Petite . . . loads of clothes . . . always where fun is . . . talkative . . . haunted houses . . . Framingham . . . loves to dance . . . beautiful eyes . . . Black Edsei ... future hairdresser. FLORENCE TREFRY Likes to be called Margaret . . . dough¬ nuts . . . Harry Belfonte . . . future elementary teacher . . . hazel eyes . . summers in N.H. ... likes to sing. 72 ROGER TRUE Big boy . . . Honor Society . . . Brown . . . great athlete . . . fine fellow . . . wonderful disposition . . . very loyal to N.H.S.... should go far. ROBERT TULLOCH Pleasant . . . kind . . . good friend . . . loyal classmate . . . works hard . . . never in trouble . . . tinkers with cars . . . good mechanic ... lots of luck. COSIMO UBALDINO Came to U.S. from sunny Italy . . . mastered our language . . . lovely smile . . . charming manners . . . friendly . . . soft spoken ... good looking Latin. WAYNE UHLIN Pretty blue eyes . . . blond . . . likes mud puddles . . Natick Ski Club . . . part ies . . . flirt . . . License? . . . Hyannis . . . college bound ... good luck. GAIL UHLIN Cute . . . cheerleader . . . Jordan Marsh . . . parties.. . . U.S. Army . . . loves clothes ... a true friend . . . Snow Prin¬ cess .. . likes to eat. MARTHA UFFORD " Uffy ' ' . . . " Bunkie” . . . worries . . . one of our majorettes . . . very sincere . . . Jordan March . .. beautiful hair .. . plans to be an airline hostess. Bjjpi a.,. . WS S. m:: ' ' ' ' 11 Mi wmm Xn J JSS PETER VANWORMER The Dutchman” . . . " Worm” . wrestling . . . wavy hair . . . witty plans to be a forest ranger . . . C . .. powerless steed . .. great joker. JOHN WARREN White convertible . . . weight lifter B.I. . . . water skiis . . . comic books brains . . . Honor Society . . . ca driver . . . skeptical about women dr . . . golf . . . blushes great guy. j A MARGARET WALSH Peggy” . . . Christmas at Jordan’s . . . sincere . . . neat . . . those morning runs for the bus . . . certain comments seems quiet . . . lavender icing . . . clever with the needle ... fine friend. CAROL WADLEY Friendly . . . sense of humor . . . good sport . . . pizza . . . Wellesley . . . flirt . . . great seamstress . . . bright smile . . . infectious laugh . .. those eyes! BARBARA WAPLES Ford ’56 . . . likes auto races . . . Monks Cleaners . . . likes to argue ... a certain senior . . . cute . . . many friends . . . lots of luck. usig »AV MARTHA WEBB One of our most active classmates . . . future teacher . . . excellent student . . . works hard . . . Sassamon . . . Safety Patrol... good friend. BARBARA WELLER Long blond hair . . . antique jewelry . . . Brandeis . . . interests are many . . . always dieting . . . knows about true friendship . . . innocent smile . . . flirt . .. beautiful clothes. GRACE WENTWORTH Leonard Morse . . . friendly . . . beautiful clothes . . . artistic . . . likes the boys . . . nice smile . . . Italian Food . . . sharp wit... neat... scholarly. ELIZABETH WILSON " Betty” . . . laughs at everything . . . Tuesday nights . . . hospital worker . . . pretty eyes ... a ray of sunshine ... a future nurse ... assured success. PETER WILLIAMS " Pete” . . . tall. .. red head . . . excellent student . . . French scholar . . . quiet . . . talented pianist . . . Boston Symphony . .. sense of humor ... will go far. ■. ' ■ v.V vv-wot-.wX 1 c-X . wWM mg mgMm m ..... . . f- • : ::: - : • ...■••‘•I WV. ' rtW.v.v . ' .V.V rt-. ' .v.v.S ' . ' Xv.v. ' .- • ■Wvvxo.-Xvx :■ ■ If.-. •VrtV.VAV.VW. ' .V.W A " $ S| RICHARD WICKLUND " Dick” . . . automobile fan . . . likes to tinker around cars . . . good in shop . . . fine disposition . . . good friend . . . lots of interests. 4 ■ BRIAN WOOLEY Good looking . . . romantic Mr. Anderson’s office . . . . . a certain girl ... 1 .. . laughter ... lots of fun .. always in likes poetry d . . . cars mmm. JUDY WILSON •owl... Willy ... " the bomber’ e ,.. The Charleston .. . swing skating lessons . . . " Jud” . . . . ' three Blind Mice” . . . . summers in N.H. mg . . sincere temper BARBARA WITTEN A wonderful friend . . . hardes for our class . . . Honor Sod Safety Patrol . . . Sassamon .. . j it, Barb does it . . . great ath college bound. :WB PATRICK YOUNG ious grin ... big heart . . . friend . . . lots of fun . . . e of humor ... no enemies [atick ... good luck. ftflH DANIEL YAZBEK 63 Corvette . . . ■ . . likes to bowl . . nice smile . . . . lots of luck. Trackman . . . to be a doctor B..U. next year to Long Island . AUGUSTINE ZACCAGNINI Good looking . . . sensitive . . . fine clothes . . . nice car . . . lots of friends . . . Latin temperament. . . quick temper .. . likes to eat. IN THE ARMED FORCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA DONALD BOTTOM Don came to us from the sunny south . . . we certainly liked having him . . . redhead . . . blue Tempest . . . c ollegiate ... successful career ahead. LEONARD WHITE Lenny . . . nice car . . . life of any party . . . mechanically inclined . . . loved parties . . . girls . . . shop . . . best of luck in your future life. NOT PHOTOGRAPHED William Hardy Dorothy Connor (Mrs.) ACTIVITIES CLASS OFFICERS KENETH JUE . . . Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Football 1; Track 1, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 1; Honor Society 3, 4; Student Council 1, 2, 3, 4; Executive Board 3, 4; Yearbook Sub¬ scription Committee 4; Prom Ticket Committee 3; Class President 3, 4; Nurses’ Aide 4; Barbershop Quartet 4; Musicals 3, 4; Boys’ State Representative 4. GEORGE BATTEN . . . Baseball 1, 2; Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Track 3, 4; Honor Society 4; Executive 2, 4; Vice-President 1963; Senior Play Ticket Chairman 4; Science Fair 2, 3, 4; • Auxiliary Fire Department 4; Student Council 4; " N” Club 4. MICHELE FELDMAN . . . Glee Club 4; Sassamon Board 4; Student Council 1, 3, 4; Cheerleader 3, 4; Executive Board 3, 4; Nurses’ Aide 3, 4; Usherette, Junior Prom 3; American Field Service Committee 4; Sophomore Dance Refreshment Committee 2; Decorating Committee, Prom 3; Class Treasurer 4; Football Dance Committee 3, 4; Decora¬ ting Committee, Cotillion 4. ANN COLLINS . . . Safety Patrol 3, 4; Glee Club 2; Honor Society 4; Student Council 2, 3, 4; Prom Decorating Com¬ mittee 3; Cheerleader 3, 4; Class Secretary 4; Executive Board 3, 4; Princess, Junior Prom 3; Prom Decorating Committee 3; Decorating Committee, Student Council Dance 3. NANCY ADAMS . . . Tennis 4; Future Nurses’ Club 4; Prom Committee 3; Yearbook Literary Committee 4; Usher¬ ette, Senior Play 4; Publicity Committee, Senior Play 4; Science Fair 3, 4. JUDITH AITKEN . . . Basketball 2; Girls’ Athletic Associ¬ ation 2, 3, 4; Sassamon Board 3, 4; Sassamon Literary Staff 4; Future Teachers ' 4; French Club 3, 4; Humanities Club 4. DEBORAH ALEXANDER . . . Glee Club 1, 2; Senior Play 4; Humanities Club 4. SHERRILL ALLEN . . . Prom Committee 3; Usher 3; Publicity Committee, Senior Play 4. SUSAN AMBLER . . . Sassamon Board 3; Student Council 2, 3, 4; Executive Board 2, 3, 4; Class Officer 2, 3; Pep Club 2, 3, 4; Nurses’ Aide 2, 3, 4; Cheerleader 3, 4. LINDA ANDERSON . . . Refreshment Committee, Cotillion 2; Decoration Committee, Prom 3; Future Nurses’ Club 3; Spring Art Festival 3; Jazz Dancing 1; Glee Club 2. JOHN ARENA . . . Football 2, 3; Prom Decorating Com¬ mittee 3. CHARLES BALDWIN . . . Football 1; Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Orchestra 1, 2, 3, 4; Co-Chairman, Junior Prom Ticket Committee 3; Yearbook Literary Staff 4; Science Fair 2. FRANCIS BARDELLINI . . . Golf 4; Audio Visual Club 1; Cotillion Committee 4. STANLEY BARNES . . . Baseball 1; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Football 1, 2; Track 3, 4; Cafeteria Marshall 4. DONALD BARTLETT . . . President, Student Council 4; Football 4; Track 2, 3, 4; Executive Board 4; Decoration Committee, Prom 3; Sassamon Subscription Committee 4; ”N” Club 4; Co-captain, Outdoor Track 4. RUSSELL BAYLEY . . . Hockey 1; Band 1; Glee Club 4; Senior Play 4. SUZANNE BEADER . . . Band 3, 4; Dramatic Club 4; Dance Band 3, 4. JEANNE BELISLE . . . Future Nurses’ Club 4; Decorating Committee, Prom 3. AGNES BELLEFONTAINE . . . Fashion Show 2; Guidance Library, 4. PAUL BELLOFATTO . . . Ticket Committee, Senior Play 4. DAVID BENJAMIN . . . Prom Committee 3. BRUCE BENNETT . . . Ticket Committee, Senior Play 4; Cafeteria Marshall 4; Sassamon Board 3, 4; Auxiliary Fire Department 4. JUDITH BENNETT . . . Safety Patrol 3, 4; Sophomore Dance Committee 2; Decorating Committee, Prom 3. ADELE BERANYK . . . Typing Committee, Yearbook 3. SANDRA BERKOWITZ . . . Yearbook Typing Com¬ mittee 4. DAVID BERMAN . . . Track 2, 3, 4; Band 1, 2, 3; Honor Society 3, 4; Sassamon Board 3, 4; Senior Play 4; Science Quiz Team 4. ELAINE BESHANSKY . . . Yearbook Typing Committee 4. DONNA BIAGETTI . . . Safety Patrol 3, 4; Honor Society 6 3, 4; Sassamon Borad 2, 3, 4; Senior Play 4; Student Council 1, 2, 3, 4; Prom Chairman 3; Yearbook Subscription Com¬ mittee 4; Sadie Hawkins Dance 2, 3, 4; Get-acquainted Dance 3, 4; Cotillion Decorating Committee 4; Secretary, Student Council 4; Future Teachers’ Club 3, 4; Editor-in- chief, Sassamon 4; Humanities 4; Executive Board 3. BEVERLY BITZER . . . Sassamon Board 4; Yearbook Sub¬ scription Committee 4. PETER BOATES . . . Industrial Arts Fair Committee 4. JANICE BORGER . . . Cheerleader 3, 4; Executive Board 2, 3, 4; Yearbook Subscription Committee 4; Sophomore Dance Committee 2; Secretary, Sophomore Class 2; Nurses’ Aide 3, 4; Pep Club 1. RICHARD BOUZAN . . . Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Gym Club 3. THOMAS BOUZAN . . . Basketball 1, 2; Golf 2, 3. CYNTHIA BRADEEN ... Art Club 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 4. MURIEL BRADFORD . . . Sassamon Business Staff 1; Homemaking Club 1. LAWRENCE BRAYTON . . . Glee Club 3, 4. JANICE BREEN . . . Yearbook Art Committee 4; Prom Decorating Committee 3. GAIL BROOKS . . . Yearbook Typing Committee 4; Business Service Club 4. BARRY BROSS . . . Football 1, 2, 4; Baseball 1; Gym Club 2, 3, 4. JANIE BROWN . . . Library Aide 3, 4; Business Service Club 4; Senior Play 4; Usher 4; Fashion Show 2, 3, 4; Junior Prom Decorating 3. GEORGE BRYANT . . . Radio Club 3. MICHAEL BURGESS . . . Science Fair 2. BESSIE BUSWELL ... Pep Club 4. DAVID BUTCHMAN . . . Baseball 2; Football 2, 3, 4; Track 2, 3, 4; Student Council 3, 4; Decorating Committee, Prom 3; " N” Club 4; Yearbook Subscription Committee 4; Science Fair 2. JAMES CAMPBELL . . . Cotillion Ticket Committee; Senior Play Ticket Committee 4; Photo Club. FRANK CAPIZZO . . . Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Hockey 1, 2, 3, 4; " N” Club 3, 4; Executive Board 2, 3, 4; Yearbook Committee 4; Prom Committee 3; Cafeteria Marshall. PAUL CARON . . . Decorating Committee, Prom 3; Wrestling Team 4. MICHAEL CARR . . . Baseball 2; Football 2, 3, 4; Execu¬ tive Board 3; Decorating Committee, Prom 3; Glee Club 3; Yearbook Literary Staff 4; " N” Club 3, 4; Science Fair 2, 3; Spring Musical 3. CHARLES CARROLL . . . Decorating Committee, Prom 3. ROBERT CHERVINCKY . . . Football 2; Track 2, 3, 4; " N” Club 4. MICHAEL CHIACCHIA . . . Football 2; Track 1, 2, 3. JUSTIN CIRRONE . . . Baseball 1; Cross-country 3. ROBERT CLAWSON . . . Basketball 3, 4; Safety Patrol 1; Student Council 1; Prom Committee 3; Play Reading Com¬ mittee 4. VINCENT COLONNELLI . . . Football 3, 4. ROBERT COOLIDGE . . . Senior Play 4; Glee Club 4; Spring Musical 2, 3; Dramatic Club 2. ELSA COPPELOTTI . . . Girls’ Athletics 1, 2, 3, 4. RICHARD COTE . . . Track 2, 3, 4; Cross-Country 3. STEPHEN COTTER . . . Hockey 2, 3, 4; Tennis 2, 3, 4; Safety Patrol 3, 4; Honor Society 4. RICHARD CRISAFULLI . . . Football 2, 3, 4; Track 2, 3, 4; Sassamon Board 4; Stud ent Council 4; Executive Board 3, 4; Senior Play 4. KAREN CROSSMAN . . . Future Nurses’ Club 3, 4 - Glee Club 2, 3, 4; Prom Committee, Musical 4. RUSSELL CUDMORE . . . Track 2, 3, 4. MARGARET CUNNIFF . . . Honor Society 4; Future Teachers’ 3, 4; Humanities 4; G.A.A. 2, 3, 4; Safety Patrol 3, 4. ROBERT CUNNINGHAM . . . Track 1, 2, 3, 4. ANN CURRAN . . . Glee Club 2; Junior Prom Ticket Com¬ mittee 3; Fashion Show 3. PATRICIA CURRY . . . Sassamon Board 3, 4; Future Teachers 3, 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. ROBERT DANIHER . . . Track 3. LINDA DARLING . . . Honor Society 3, 4; Glee Club 2, 3, 4; French 4; Humanities 4. RONALD DAVIS . . . Football 2; Baseball 3; Junior Prom Ticket Committee 3. DALE DAY . . . Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Future Nurses’ Club 4. SALLY DOGGETT . . . Sassamon Board 3, 4; Senior Play 4; Executive Board 3, 4; Prom Decorating Committee 3; Yearbook Subscription Committee 4; Dramatic Club 4. THEODORE DOLAN . . . Industrial Arts Fair Committee 3; Art Club 3. DONNA DOLL . . . Girls’ Athletics 1. 4 ROBERT DONAHUE . . . Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Track 1, 2, 3, 4; Senior Play Ticket Committee 4; Prom Decorating Committee 3; Sophomore Dance 2. THOMAS DONOVAN . . . Football 1, 2, 4; Track 1, 2, 3, 4; Senior Play Ticket Committee 4; Prom Decorating Committee 3. SUZANNE DUBOYCE . . . Glee Club 2, 3; Business Service Club 4. DARLENE DUFFY . . . Glee Club 1, 2. DIANE DUFFY . . .Glee Club 1, 2; Business Service Club 4. I THOMAS DUMAS . . . Radio Club 3; Audio Visual Aide 3. JANICE DUNBAR . . . G.A.A. 2, 3; Gym Club 2, 3, 4; Girls’ Athletics 2, 3, 4. I JEAN DUNBAR . . . Girls’ Athletics 3, 4; Gym Club 3, 4; G.A.A. 2, 3, 4. j RHODA ELKIND . . . Sassamon Business Staff 3, 4. MARION FABIANO . . . Safety Patrol 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 1; Sassamon Business Staff 3; Student Council 1; Executive Board 2, 3, 4; Yearbook Subscription Committee 4; Prom Decorating Committee 3. || WALTER FAIRBANKS . . . Science Fair 2, 3. FRANK FEDE . . . Football 4. JAMES FIEBER . . . Safety Patrol 4; Science Fair 2; Chess Club 1. J JUDITH FILLMORE . . . Girls Athletics 2; Safety Patrol 3, 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Honor Society 3, 4; Sassamon Board 3, 4; Executive Board 2; Future Nurses’ Club - Science Fair 2, 3, 4; Yearbook Subscription Committee 4; Cl] Senior Play Ticket Committee 4; Prom Decorating Com¬ mittee 3; Glee Club 3, 4; Sophomore Dance Committee 2: Musicals 2, 3, 4. FRANCIS FITZGERALD . . . Football 2, 3, 4; Hockey 1, 2, 3, 4; Safety Patrol 3, 4; Honor Society 3, 4; " N” Club 4; Sassamon Board 3, 4; Executive Board 4; Science Fair 1, 2, 3, 4. I MARTHA FITZGERALD . . . Glee Club 4. 1 RICHARD FLINCHBAUGH . . . Track 2, 3, 4; Science Fair 2, 3, 4. I DEANNE FLYNN . . . Basketball 2, 3, 4; G.A.A. 2, 3, 4; Girls’ Athletics 2, 3, 4; Gym Club 3, 4; Sassamon Board 3. j ROBERT FONTAINE . . . Glee Club 1, 2, 3; Gym Club 1 RICHARD FOSTER . . . Sassamon Board 3; Senior Play 4; Cafeteria Marshall 3, 4. I LINDA FRAIZER . . . Glee Club 2; Pep Club 4; Prom Refreshment Committee 3. MIC HAEL FRANCIOSE . . . Football 1; Sassamon Board 3; Gym Club 3- ‘I BARBARA FRAZEE . . . Girls’ Athletics 2, 3; Glee Club 1, 2, 3; Sophomore Dance Committee 2. • A rn DIANE FREDERICK . . . Glee Club 2; Business Service Club 4; Graduation and Class Day Usherette 3. WILLIAM FREDERICK . . . Baseball 1; Golf 2, 3, 4; Wrestling 4; Glee Club 1; Yearbook Literary Committee 4. THOMAS FULTON . . . Prom Decorating Committee 3; Science Fair 1; Band 1. STEPHEN GALLANT . . . Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Track 2, 3, 4; Baseb all 1; Basketball 1; Executive Board 4; " N” Club 2, 3, 4; Cafeteria Marshall 2. SHARON GARLAND . . . Honor Society 3, 4; Sassamon Board 3, 4; Senior Play 4; Prom Invitations 3; Future Teachers’ Club 4; Yearbook Subscription 4. JAMES GARRETT . . . Band 1, 2, 3. MARCIA GARRY . . . Debating 2; Glee Club 1, 2. EDWARD GARVEY . . . Cafeteria Marshall 1. JUDITH GHILANI . . . Senior Play Usherette 4; Sassamon Board 3; Cheerleader 1, 3, 4; Prom Decorating Com¬ mittee 3; Yearbook Subscription Committee 4. SANDRA GIFFIN . . . Dramatic Club 1; Pep Club 4; Cotillion Decorating Committee 1, 3; Prom Decorating Committee 1, 2; Glee Club 1, 3; Girls’ Athletics 1, 2. RHONDA GOLDBERG . . . Tennis 3, 4; Business Ser¬ vice Club 3, 4; Dramatic Club 2. STEPHEN GOLDBERG . . . Prom Decorating Com¬ mittee 3- JAMES GOMES . . . Football 3,- 4; " N” Club 4; Prom Committee 3; Cotillion Committee 4. ANDREW GOODSPEED . . . Baseball 1, 3, 4; Glee Club 1, 4; Student Council 1; Senior Play Cast 4; Yearbook Subscription Committee 4; Barbershop Quartet 4. LORN A GOULD . . . Girls ' Athletics 1; Prom Decorating Committee 3; Homemaking Club 3; Business Service Club 4; Knitting Club 1; Art Club 1. CHARLES GRADY . . . Track 3, 4; Weight Lifting 3. THOMAS GRADY . . . Track 4; Gym Club 1; Wrestling 4; Senior Play Ticket Committee 4. •JOHN GREENQUIST . . . Safety Patrol 3, 4; Senior Play Cast 4; Prom Publicity Committee 3; Usher at Graduation 3; Ticket Committee, Senior Play 4; Executive Board 4; Science Fair 3, 4. LOIS HALBERG . . . Girls’ Athletics 2; Senior Play 4; Executive Board 2 , 3, 4; Musical 3; Future Nurses’ Club 2, 3, 4; Yearbook Subscription Committee 4; Prom Deco¬ rating Committee 3; Guidance Librarian 4. CHRISTINE HALL . . . Girls’ Athletics 2; Senior Play 4; Prom Decorating Committee 3; Senior Play Ticket Committee 4; Clinic Aide 4; Future Nurses’ Club 3, 4; Musical 3; Science Fair 2. DAVID HALLETT . . . Track 1; Band 1, 2, 3. PATRICIA HANSBURY . . . Girls’ Athletics 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. LEONARD HARPER . . . Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Safety Patrol 2, 3, 4; Orchestra 1, 2, 3, 4; Senior Play 4; Prom Deco¬ rating Committee 3. JEFFREY HARRIS . . . Senior Play 4. SALLY HASTINGS . . . Safety Patrol 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 1, 3, 4; Sassamon Board 2, 3; Senior Play 4; Future Teachers’ Club 2, 3, 4; French Club 3, 4; Play Reading Committee 3. MARY HELPIN . . . Arts and Crafts Club 2. DANA HERMAN . . . Girls’ Athletics 2, 3, 4; Treasurer, G.A.A. 3; Gym Club 2, 3, 4. JOHN HESS . . . Track 2; Tennis 2, 4; Senior Play Ticket Committee 4. CHARLES HEWSON . . . Hockey 1, 3; Cafeteria Mar¬ shall 3. MICHAEL HICKS . . . Football 1, 2; Science Fair 3; Senior Play 4. CHARLES HOMER . . . Science Fair 2. FREDERICK EIOPF . . . Decorating Committees 3, 4. ALAN HUGHES . . . Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Orchestra 1, 2, 3, 4. JUSTIN HUGHES . . . Baseball 1, 2; Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Hockey 1, 2, 3, 4; Prom Decorating Committee 3; " N” Club 2, 3, 4; Boys’ State 3. ROBERT HYOTTE . . . Prom Decorating Committee 3; Class Registrar 3; Sophomore Dance Committee. MARIA INTINARELLI . . . Glee Club 2, 3. CAROLYN JOHNSON . . . Guidance Librarian 4; Usherette, Graduation 3. JUDITH JOHNSON . . . Glee Club 2, 3, 4; Musical 3; Science Fair 2, 3. CATHERINE JONES . . . Sassamon Business Staff 3, 4; Glee Club 4; Executive Board 2; Senior Play Ticket Com¬ mittee 4; Library Aide 2; Senior Play 4. DAVID JOSSELYN . . . Radio Club 4; Senior Play Ticket Committee 4. JUDITH KADLIK . . . Executive Board 4; Pep Club 3; Usherette, Class Day 3. ALICE KAIZER . . . Sassamon Business 2; Business Ser¬ vice Club 4; Prom Decorating Committee 3. PETER KEANY . . . Football 2, 3, 4; Track 3, 4; Hockey 1. W ILLIAM KEEZER . . . Band 2, 3, 4; Dance Band 2, 3, 4; Science Fair 2; Industrial Arts Award 2, 3. VERNA KEIGHLEY . . . Majorette 1, 2, 3; Cheerleader 4; Musical 2. MARGARET KELLEY . . . Business Service Club 4. JOHN KELLY . . . Cafeteria Marshall 4; Glee Club 1; Football 1; Sassamon Board 3. STEPHEN KELMAN . . . Band 2, 3, 4; Orchestra 2, 3, 4. MARGARET KENNEY . . . Sassamon Board 2; Prom Committee 3; Junior Executive Board 3; Business Service Club 4; Senior Play Ticket Committee 4. ANDREA KLARIK . . . Prom Committee 3; Pep Club 3, 4; Sophomore Dance Decorating Committee 2. ELIZABETH KNOW’LES . . . Sophomore Dance Decorating Committee 2. JOHN KYRKA . . . Radio Club 4; Weather Club 2, 3, 4. VIRGINIA LAMONT . . . Usherette, Senior Play 4. THEODORE LARIDIS . . . Wrestling 4; Junior Prom Usher 3; Science Fair 2; Cotillion Publicity Committee 4. PAUL LAURO . . . Football 2, 3, 4; Track 2, 3, 4; Safety Patrol 2, 3, 4; Student Council 4; " N” Club 4; Executive Board 3; Yearbook Subscriptions 4. ROBERT LEFTER . . . Basketball 2, 3, 4; Graduation Usher 3; Cafeteria Marshall 3. DAVID LEVINE . . . DOUGLAS LIMDEN . . . Baseball 2; Radio Club 3, 4. ARTHUR LIPMAN . . . Safety Patrol 4; Honor Society 4; Senior Play Ticket Committee 4; Yearbook Subscription Committee 4; Science Fair 2, 3, 4; Science Seminar 4. PHYLLIS LITCHFIELD . . . Girls’ Athletics 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 3, 4; Sassamon Board 4; Future Teachers’ Club 2; Humanities Club 3, 4; Musical 2, 3; Sistet 4. RICHARD LOCKHART . . . Baseball 1; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Executive Board 2; Science Fair 2; Audio Visual Aide 1. CHRISTINE LOFTUS . . . Senior Play 4. RUTH LOSCO . . . Play Reading Committee 3; Sassamon Literary Staff 4; Girls’ Athletics 2, 3, 4; Future Nurses’ Club 4; Humanities Club 4; Science Fair 2, 3, 4; Yearbook Typing Committee 4; Library Aide 3; Cotillion Publicity Committee; Junior Prom Decorating Committee 3. THOMAS LOVEZOLLA . . . Football 2, 3; Hockey 1; Student Council 1; Cafeteria Marshall. JEAN LUMSDEN . . . Girls’ Athletics 2, 3, 4; Sophomore Dance Decorating Committee. DANIEL MacDONALD . . . Senior Play Ticket Com¬ mittee 4. CATHERINE MADDEN . . . Girls’ Athletics 1. DETCHA MAFFEI . . . Gym Club 4; Business Service Club 4. LINDA MAHON . . . Girls’ Athletics 2; Glee Club 3; Future Teachers’ Club 2; Prom Decorating Committee 3. JEANNE MANSELL . . . Sophomore Dance Decorating Committee 2; Prom Committee 3; Yearbook Art Committee 4; Art Club 4; Library Aide 2, 3. JANET MARINELLI . . . Yearbook Subscription Committee 4; Sassamon Business Staff 3, 4; Pep Club 2; Future Nurses’ Club 3; Yearbook Typing Committee 4. PAUL MARSH . . . Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Football 2. JEAN MARSO . . . Business Service Club 4; Usher for Junior Prom 3; Usher for Senior Play 4; Senior Play Ticket Committee 4. BARBARA MARTIN . . . Executive Board 3, 4; Pep Club 2; Science Fair 2, 4; Future Nurses’ Club 3, 4; Prom Publicity Committee Chairman 3; Usher, Class Day and Graduation 3; Sophomore Dance Decorating Committee 2. JOHN MARTIN . . . Baseball 2; Basketball 2; Football 2, 3, 4; Track 3, 4. SHERRY McCOLLEM . . . Girls’ Athletics 2; Senior Play Ticket Committee 4; Pep Club 4; Junior Prom Decorating Committee 3; Fashion Show 3, 4. JOAN McCONNON . . . Saftey Patrol 2, 3, 4; Future Nurses’ Club 3, 4; Senior Play Costume Committee 4; Knitting Club 1. PAUL McKECHNIE . . . Glee Club 2, 3; Junior Prom Usher 3; Senior Play Ticket Committee 4; Barbershop Quartet 4. LINDA McLEOD . . . Election Checker 3; Business De¬ partment Clerk 4. KERRY McMANUS . . . Baseball 2, 3, 4; Football 2, 3, 4; " N” Club 4; Executive Board 4. NICOLE MERCEREAU . . . French Club 3, 4. PAUL MESLIS . . . Baseball 2, 3; Football 2. SUSAN MITCHELL . . . Future Nurses’ Club 3, 4. MARIE MONTALBANO . . . Business Service Club 4; Safety Patrol 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 2; Junior Prom Decorating Committee 3; Executive Board 3; Senior Play Publicity Committee 4. EDWARD MORASH . . . Weight Lifting 3. DONALD MORRILL . . . Track 3, 4. JUDITH MORRISON . . . Prom Decorating Committee 3; Yearbook Art Committee 4; Senior Play Publicity Com¬ mittee 4; Art Club 1; Student Council 3. . KATHERINE MOYNIHAN . . . Girls’ Athletics 2, 3, 4; Girls’ Athletic Association 2, 3; Senior Play Publicity Committee 4; Prom Decorating Committee 3- JOHN MULLIN . . . Senior Play Ticket Committee 4; Audio Visual Aide 1. MAUREEN MULVEY . . . Girls’ Athletics 2, 3; Industrial Arts Clerk 4. DIANE MUNYAN . . . Executive Board 2; Senior Play Ticket Committee 4; Usherette, Senior Play 4; Prom Decorating Committee 3- JOHN MURPHY . . . Football 2, 4. ROBERT MURRAY . . . Safety Patrol 4. THOMAS MYERS . . . Science Fair 2, 4; Executive Board 2, 4; Weather Club 2; Senior Play Ticket Committee 4; Science Fair Committee 4. JEROME NELSON . . . Junior Prom Decorating Com¬ mittee 3. JAMES NICHOLS . . . Band 1, 2; Stage Craft 1, 2, 3, 4. ROBERT NOEL . . . Hockey 1; Glee Club 1; Wrestling 4; Gym Club 4; Science Fair 3. PATRICIA NOONAN . . . Tennis 3; Library Aide 3, 4; Business Service Club 4; Graduation Usherette 3; G.A.A. 3, 4; Humanities Club 4. DANIEL O’LEARY . . . Track 2, 3, 4. MAUREEN O’LEARY . . . Cheerleader 1; Executive Club 2; Senior Play Ticket Committee 4; Musical 2; Pep Club 1. MICHAEL NORATO . . . Football 2; Track 3, 4; Weight Lifting Club 3. RICHARD PARRIS . . . Track 2, 3, 4; Safety Patrol 3, 4; Science Quiz Team 4; Science Fair Honorable Mention 3; Science Fair 2, 3, 4. KENDELL PEASE . . . Baseball 1; Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Hockey 1, 2, 3, 4;. Track 2, 3, 4; ' N” Club 2, 3, 4; Executive Board 3. ' LAWRENCE PENSWICK . . . Baseball 2, 3; Football 1; Hockey 1; Junior Prom Decorating Committee 2, 3. DAVID PEOPLES . . . Track 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 1; Senior Play 4; Yearbook Subscription Committee 4; Class Clerk 3; Ballotman 2. PAUL PETERS . . . Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Football 1, 2, 3, 4; " N” Club 3 4; Yearbook Sub¬ scription Committee 4. WILLIAM PETRIE . . . Track 1 2, 3, 4; " N” Club 4. ELLEN PHILLIPS . . . G.A.A. 2, 3; Glee Club 2, 3, 4; Sophomore Dance 2; Prom Decorating Committee 3; Science Fair 2; G.A.A. 2, 3, 4. WILLIAM PHILLIPS . . . Golf 3; Executive Board 2, 4; Science Fair 3, 4; Track 2; Honor Society 3, 4; Safety Patrol 4. RICHARD PICARD . . . Basketball 1; Football Manager 3, 4; Cafeteria Marshall 4; ”N” Club 4; First Aid Teacher 4. DIANNE PICKERING . . . Senior Play Usher 4; Science Seminar 4; Sassamon Business Staff 4; French Club 3, 4; Prom Invitations 3; Honor Society 3, 4; Safety Patrol 4. NICHOLAS PIERRO . . . Football 1, 2, 3; Musical 3, 4. JANE PISTONE . . . Safety Patrol 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 1; Sassamon Board 2, 3; Senior Play Cast 4; Executive Board 2, 3, 4; Future Teachers’ Club 4; Sophomore Dance 2; Prom Decorating Committee 3; Science Fair 3, 4; Yearbook Literary Staff 4; Subscriptions 4. BARRY PORTER . . . Football 1. WILLIAM PRESUTTI . . . Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Hockey 1, 2, 3, 4; Executive Board 3; " N” Club 4. MARYELLEN PREVEAR . . . Basketball 2. ROGER PRITZKER . . . Band 2, 3, 4; Weather Club 3, 4. JOSEPH PRYOR . . . Football 2, 3, 4; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; Yearbook Subscription Committee 4; " N” Club 3, 4. PHILIP QUATRALE . . . Safety Patrol 2, 3, 4; Science Fair 2. MARY RANERI . . . Glee Club 1,2; Senior Play Usherette 4; Cotillion Committee 4; Sophomore Dance Committee 2. JOHN RAPPA . . . Track 2. LANA REID . . . Glee Club 1, 3, 4; Senior Play Reading Committee 3; Usherette, Senior Play 4; Honor Society 3, 4; Future Teachers’ 3, 4; Library Aide 3, 4; Science Fair 2. MERLE RICKLES . . . Sassamon 2, 3, 4; Usherette Senior Play 4; Prom Publicity Committee 3; Senior Play Publicity Committee 4; French Club 1; Science Fair 2. JILL RIERDAN . . . Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Honor Society 3, 4; Sassamon Board 2, 3, 4; Executive Board 3; Science Fair 2; French Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Prom Ticket Committee 3; Usher, Class Day and Graduation 3. CAROL RICHARDS . . . Library Aide 3; Prom Deco¬ rating Committee 3. JUDY ROBERTS . . . Safety Patrol 2. JOSEPH ROBICHEAU . . . Football 1; Track 3, 4; Wrest¬ ling 4; Senior Play Ticket Committee 4; Yearbook Literary Committee 4; Christmas Cotillion 4. JOHN ROBINSON . . . Football 2; Track 2, 3, 4; Year¬ book Subscription Committee 4; Science Fair 3; " N” Club 4; Executive Board 2, 4. 84 ANN POLHEMUS . . . Band 1; G.A.A. 1, 2. LINDA ROBINSON . . . G.A.A. 3, 4; Band 3, 4; Senior Play 4; Humanities Club 4; Science Fair 2, 3; Yearbook Subscriptions 4; Executive Board 2. CLARA RODRIQUEZ . . . Business Service Club 4; Yearbook Typing Committee 4; Prom Publicity Committee 3; Musical 4. ROBERT ROURKE . . . Track 4. « CARL ROVINELLI . . . Wrestling 4; Prom Usher 3. MATTHEW ROVNER . . . Track 3, 4; Sassamon Board 4; Senior Play 4; Sassamon Literary Staff 4. PAMELA RUSSELL . . . G.A.A. 3, 4; Glee Club 2; Future Nurses’ Club 4. MARY RYAN . . . Business Service Club 4; Executive Board 2; Prom Decorating Committee 3; Senior Play Ticket Committee 4. BRENDA S ABE AN . . . Glee Club 3; Sassamon Board 3; Senior Play Cast 4; Executive Board 2, 4; Junior Prom Decorating Committee 3; Yearbook Literary Staff 4; Musical 2, 3. PENNY SALLINGER . . . G.A.A. 2, 3, 4; Hockey 2, 3, 4; Science Fair 2, 3; French Club 1, 2. MAXINE SALVIN . . . Guidance Library 2; Junior Prom Publicity Committee 3; Play Publicity Committee 4; Usher¬ ette, Senior Play 4; Yearbook Art Committee 4; Art Club 3; Dramatic Club 2. CAROLYN SANBORN . . . G.A.A. 2, 3; Yearbook Literary Committee 4; Future Teachers’ Club 3; Science Fair 3; French Club 1; Prom Usher 3. JAMES SANFORD . . . Track 3, 4. ROBERT SAUNDERS . . . Football 2; Hockey 1; Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Science Fair 2, 3, 4; Dance Band 3, 4; Senior Play Ticket Committee 4. EDWARD SAVILONIS . . . Gym Club 1, 2, 3. ROSEMARY SAVILONIS . . . G.A.A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Usherette, Senior Play 4. ROBERT SELLARS . . . Baseball 2, 3, 4; Basketball 2, 3, 4; Football 2, 3, 4; Science Fair 2. MARK SHAVOR . . . Cafeteria Marshall 3, 4; Usher, Thanksgiving Game 4. HELEN SHERIDAN . . . Executive Board 3; Prom Deco¬ rating Committee 3; Pep Club 4. WILLIAM SLAMIN . . . Hockey 1. NANCY SLAUTA . . . Glee Club 4; Sassamon Board 3, 4; Executive Board 4; Yearbook Literary Staff 4; Yearbook Subscription Committee 4; French Club 2, 3. IRVING SLAVID . . . Track 3, 4; Science Fair 3, 4; Radio Club 2, 3, 4; Wrestling 4. LARRY SMITH . . . Wrestling 4; Yearbook Literary Committee 4; Science Fair 2, 3. EDWARD SOLOMON . . . Baseball 1; Football 2, 3; Track 2, 3, 4; Safety Patrol 4; " N” Club 4; Executive Board 3; Graduation Usher 3. ANNE SPINNEY . . . Senior Play Publicity Committee 4; Library Aide 4; Future Nurses’ Club 3; Sassamon Business Staff 4. JUDITH SPLANE . . . Executive Board 2. RICHARD SPURLING . . . Radio Club 2, 3, 4. KENNETH STONEMETZ . . . Track 2, 4. ARTHUR STUART . . . Basketball 2, 3; Track 2, 3, 4; " N” Club 4; Senior Play Ticket Committee 4. DANIEL SULLIVAN . . . Stage Craft 3. MARK SZPAKOWSKI . . . Safety Patrol 3, 4; Honor Society 3, 4; Yearbook Literary Committee 4; Science Quiz Team 3, 4; French Club 3, 4; Humanities Seminar 4. JANICE TEAGUE . . . Sophomore Dance Committee 2; Junior Prom Committee 3; Industrial Arts Fair 3, 4. LINDA THOMPSON . . . Glee Club 2, 3, 4. ERIK THORESEN . . . Radio Club 2. LESLIE THORPE . . . Weather Club 2, 3; Glee Club 1. DEMARIS TOPPING . . . Library Aide 3, 4; Glee Club 1; G.A.A. 2, 3, 4; Dramatic Club 2, 3, 4; Musical 3, 4. 85 FLORENCE TREFRY . . . Glee Club 3, 4; Prom Invitation Committee 3. ROGER TRUE . . . Baseball 1, 2; Football 1; Track 3, 4; Hockey 1, 2, 3; Band 1; Safety Patrol 3, 4; Honor Society 3, 4; Executive Board 3, 4; Orchestra 1; Sassamon Board 4; Senior Play 4; Class Officer 3; Science Fair 2; Science Quiz Team 3, 4; Junior Prom Decorating Committee 3. ROBERT TULLOCH . . . Basketball 3, 4; Band 3, 4; Dance Band 3, 4; Glee Club 3. MARTHA UFFORD . . . Band 3, 4; Sassamon Board 4; Senior Play 4; Majorette 3, 4; Executive Board 2, 4; Year¬ book Literary and Typing Committees 4. GAIL UHLIN . . . Sassamon Board 3, 4; Senior Play Usherette 4; Student Council 1, 2; Executive Board 2, 3; Prom Decorating Committee 3; Cheerleader 1, 3, 4; Year¬ book Literary Staff 4; Class Officer 2; Nurses’ Aide 2, 3; Yearbook Typing Committee 3, 4. WAYNE UHLIN . . . Glee Club 2, 3, 4; Science Fair 3. PETER VANWORMER . . . Track 3; Wrestling 4; Science Fair 3, 4. KATHLEEN WALLACE . . . Glee Club 3; Executive Board 3; Pep Club 3; Usherette, Senior Play 4. CAROL WADLEY . . Senior Play Costumes 4; Home¬ making Fashion Show 2, 3; Future Nurses’ Club 2, 3, 4; G.A.A. 2, 3, 4. MARGARET WALSH . . . Safety Patrol 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Senior Play Ticket Committee 4; Yearbook Literary Committee 4; Science Fair 2, 3; Honor Society 3, 4; Sassamon Board 2, 3, 4; Senior Play 4; Humanities Club 4; Junior Prom Decorating Committee 3; Class Elections 2, 3. BARBARA WAPLES . . . Sophomore Dance Committee 2. JOHN WARREN . . . Golf 2, 3, 4; Track 2, 3, 4; Band 1; Honor Society 3, 4; Basketball 1; French Club 2, 3; Executive Board 2; Science Fair 2; Science Quiz Team 4. MARTHA WEBB . . . Band 1, 2, 3, 4; G.A.A. 2; Senior Play Ticket Publicity Committee 4; Future Nurses’ 4; Science Fair 2; Junior Prom Ticket Committee 3; Yearbook Literary Committee 4; Sassamon Board 3, 4; Honor Society 4; Safety Patrol 2, 3, 4. BARBARA WELLER . . . French Club 4; Science Fair 2, 3; Band 1. RICHARD WICKLUND . . . Track 4. PETER WILLIAMS . . . Safety Patrol 3, 4; Honor Society 3, 4; Junior Prom Decorating Committee 3; French Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Science Fair 1, 2, 3. ELIZABETH WILSON . . . Sophomore Dance Committee 2; Junior Prom Ticket Committee 3; Art Club 2; Christmas Cotillion 4. JUDITH WILSON . . . Safety Patrol 2, 3, 4; Executive Board 2, 4; Senior Play Ticket and Publicity Committees 4; Honor Society 3, 4; Glee Club 4; Science Fair 4; Future Nurses’ Club 4; Yearbook Subscription Committee 4; Musicals 3, 4. BARBARA WITTEN . . . G.A.A. 2, 3, 4; Safety Patrol 3, 4; Honor Society 3, 4; Sassamon Board 2, 3, 4; Junior Prom 3; Yearbook Subscription Committee 4; Executive Board 2, 3, 4; Sassamon Board Assistant Editor 4; French Club 4; Dramatic Club 4. BRIAN WOOLEY . . . Baseball 1; Basketball 1; Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Sassamon Board 4; Executive Board 3; Senior Play Program Committee 4; " N” Club 3, 4; Muscial 3; Prom Committee 3. DANIEL YAZBEK . . . Track 3, 4; Football 2; Basket¬ ball 1. DONALD YOUNG . . . Baseball 1; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Tennis 3; Science Fair 3- PATRICK YOUNG . . . Hockey 1. AUGUSTINE ZACCAGNINI . . . Student Council 1; Football 1. SENIOR PLAY PYGMALION On November 16, 1962, the Class of 1963 proudly presented George Bernard Shaw’s immortal Pygmalion. Because of the exactness of character involved in the casting of this play, most high schools refuse to attempt this production, but under the capable direction of Mr. Harry L. Garnett of the English Department, the cast slowly rounded into form, and the performance was generally regarded as one of excellence. Jane Pistone as Eliza Doo¬ little, the curbstone flower girl, turned into a society queen; Andrew Goodspeed as the English dialectition, Henry Higgins, who works this miracle of metamorphosis, and David Levine as Eliza’s father, Alf Doolittle, truly earned the ovations they received. Mark Szpakowski as Higgin’s friendly enemy, Colonel Pickering, was just right as the typical dignified Englishman, helping Eliza when Henry’s temper made her feel all was in vain. Sally Hastings as Higgin’s irrepressible mother put him in his place, much to the delight of the audience. The other characters, the Einsford-Hills, Mrs. Pierce, and the bystanders, brought out the characters of the leads beautifully with their portrayals of the common folk of London, keeping the play moving at a quick pace right from the first act. The success of the play made all involved proud to have been a part of the whole. u . ,4nte r W 1 • 1 1 _ t l m t I CHRISTMAS COTILLION bat i ni in SNOW QUEEN MUSICAL " THE GUY FROM VENUS rr I _ ;_L ' .-.fTv - i j p .Jr a? . - ■ - 1 ♦ . " 1 . . ----- - -, :r:or :; »j I ?1 S »1 gi-ffl ••• On Friday, April 5, the musical groups of Natick High presented " The Guy from Venus”, under the direction of Mr. Leo Bachini for the music and Mr. Harry Garnett for the dramatics. Don Starr Linda Stacey Roland Jack Wilson Mrs. Mack Mr. Ream Marge Harry Mr. Romano Mr. Statton Mr. Trimble THE CAST Arnold Bellefontaine Nancy Slauta Peter Kaufman David Channell Brenda Sabean Charles Robinson Deena • Baram Ronald Monaco Clifton Freligh Vincent Harper John Harper Mark Kriger Kurt Herber Laurie Whitehill, Ava Baram, Beverly Adams, Holly Walter, Geraldine Snyder, Sharon Burns, Maureen Picard. The Chorus The Dance Band When Adonis stepped out of his space craft on earth, he stumbled onto a near-bank¬ rupt department store filled with old, trusted, faithful employees, slid into two budding romances, tripped over a villain and his henchmen, and fell for a rather helpless young lady. After many songs, dances, and witty remarks, the situation changes. The store is on a paying basis; all the faithful employees have jobs; the romances are in full bloom, the vil¬ lain is destroyed; and the helpless young lady is kissed goodbye. 93 SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS .Kenneth Jue .. George Batten . Ann Collins Michele Feldman PRESIDENT . VICE-PRESIDENT SECRETARY . TREASURER. SOPHOMORE CLASS OFFICERS PRESIDENT . VICE-PRESIDENT SECRETARY ... TREASURER . Mark Raider John Ignacio Betsy Markle Louise Gross JUNIOR CLASS OFFICERS PRESIDENT . VICE-PRESIDENT SECRETARY . TREASURER. Arnold Bellefontaine . Ellen Sigalove— . Barbara Levine . Nicola McKeen STUDENT COUNCIL Front row: B. McEvoy, B. Markle, N. Fuller, D. Biagetti, D. Bartlett, D. Butchman, S. Ambler, M. Raider, A. Collins, B. Levine. Second row: R Fishman, M. Feldman, R. True, V. Whittemore, K. Jue, N. McKeen, A. Bellofontaine, L. Gross, D. O’Donnell, Mr. Sticklor. Back row: R. Crisafulli, J. Ignacio, D. Willis, R. Lucas, J. Hughes, D. Bernardi, P. Lauro, R. Hayes. EXECUTIVE BOARD f SOPHOMORE EXECUTIVE BOARD Front row: B. Adams, A. Bransfield, L. Gross, J. Ignacio, M. Raider, B. Markle, J. Fualkow, E. Bergner, D. Sinclair. Second row: J. Lang, M. Powers, L. Doran, G. Lipofsky, P. Chapman, V. Whittemore, D. Chiacchia, D. Bixby, H. Grady, L. Peterson, V. Symonds, K. Kyan. Third row: L. Trinkley, D. Darling, R. Tinsler, S. Hersey, R. Long, D. Mardo, L. Cooplestone, C. Ficellota. 99 HONOR SOCIETY Front row: J. Rierdan, J. Wilson, S. Hastings, K. Jue, L. Darling, J. Fillmore, J. Warren, M. Walsh, R. True, D. Biagetti, D. Pickering, S. Garland. Second row: C. Sibley, S. Kaufman, B. Levine, S. Doggett, J. Adams, E. Wiltenberg, E. Pipe, M. Rickies, A. Lipman, B. Witten, P. Williams, F. Fitz¬ gerald, G. Batten, M. Szpakowski, D. Berman, R. Karlin, P. Drucker, P. Williams, P. Litchfield, A. Collins, D. Baram, J. Synder. Third row: L. Martin, L. Hayes, B. Weller, L. Reid, B. Martin, M. Feldman, M. Cunniff, G. Wentworth, M. Webb, K. Coolidge, B. Swenson, P. Sallinger, B. Sabean. Fourth row: P. Kaufman, R. Murray, D. Bartlett, L. Szpakowski, A. Goodspeed, R. Finchbaugh, J. Fitzgerald, J. Greenqu ist, W. Hadden, R. Tiberio, P. Lauro, R. Hayes, R. Budnick, P. Stevenson, F. Capizzo, R. Dininio. Back row: M. Hicks, R. Parris, R. Lucas, C. Robinson, E. Morash, A. MacGinnis, S. Cotter. SASSAMON LITERARY STAFF Front row: M. Okun, L. Gross, K. Jue, J. Riordan, B. Witten, D. Biagetti, S. Garland, P. Curry, D. Berman, C. Hilliard, P. Litchfield. Second row: J. Filmore, K. Linton, A. Bransfield, H. Grady, J. Adams, E. Roberts, M. Feldman, M. Webb, M. Cunniff, L. Reed, F. Fishm , C. Perlman, E. Markle. Third row: J. Wilson, A. Walsh, J. Aitken, W. Kloper, R. True, F. Fitzgerald, M. Kriger, V. Harper, G. Durfee, N. Slauta, J. Pistone, S. Doggett. SASSAMON BUSINESS STAFF Front row: M. Palli, C. O ' Brien, D. Pickering, K. Fontaine, K. Wallace, M. Ufford, B. Bitzer, G. Uhlin. Back row: Mr. Anderson, B. Nichols, J. Wright, D. Gresty, N. Spinney, C. Sanborn, G. Brooke, J. Marinelli, M. Bradford, L. Nold, W. Kloper, B. Bennett 101 SAFETY PATROL Front row: S. Hastings, M. Fabiano, J. Greenquist, M. Cunniff, B. Witten, D. Biagetti, P. Lauro, J. Fillmore, F. Fitzgerald, M. Montalbano, J. Bennett, D. Pickering, M. Bradford. Second row: B. McEvoy, J. Wilson, E. Bransfield, E . Fishman , R. Losco, E. Roberts, J. McCollem, L. Martin, B. Swenson, B. Murray, R. True, K. Coolidge, N. McKeen, P. Sallinger, M. Webb, P. Losco, M M. Szpakowski Walsh, N. Hayes, A. Collins, J. Pistone. Back V. Harper, B. Manyon, J. Fieber, J. Fitzgerald, A. Mahaney, M Kreeger, P. Williams, E. Solomon, P. Clawson, W. Phillips, A Lipman, P. Monaco, Mr. Filledes. CAFETERIA MARSHALLS j. ' -v ' .v tow W ,X. Xyswos-aw.icw ' X. XXOiJvjic w. X xv x NURSES ' AIDES Front row:B. Second row: Back row: E. McEvoy, D. Baram, M. Adam, A. Collins, M. Campisi. K. Jue, M. Feldman, N. McKeen, S. Ambler, J. Borger. Hall, S. Blum, M. O’Sullivan, E. Sigalove, M. Hayward. ■ : v.: LIBRARY AIDES Front row: L. Martin, D. Topping, D. Mitchell, C. Sibley, M. Haywood. Second row: M. Lewis, N. McManus, P. Drucker, L. Nold, N. Glover. Top row: Amy Watts, Nancy McManus, Mary Fallen, Suzanne Blum, Elaine Pipe, Nancy Hasting - Bottom row: Judy Wilson, Judy Fillmore, Barbara Martin, Pam Russell, Marcia Adam BUSINESS SERVICE CLUB :: . Front row: D. Frederick, M. Brady, M. Kenney, B. Swenson, K. Horton, A. Quigley, S. Duboyce, D. Duffy, Miss Chellis. Second row: E. Beshansky, J. Kent, J. Brown, A. Kaizer, R. Goldberg, C. Bardellini, J. Marso, M. Kelly, D. Stevens. Third row: M. Ryan, L. Rosenblum, C. Grillo, L. Gould, M. Montalbano, C. Rodriquez, L. Walker. HHli DRAMATIC CLUB Front row: J. Olenick, S. Barker, L. Hochberg, D. Topping, D. Baram, S. Kaufman, N. Hayes, L. Hazen, B. Levine, C. Sibley. Second row: S. Beader, S. Finkelstein, P. Williams, C. Brown, E. Roberts, H. Grady, S. O ' Hara, G. Madden, G. Carnegie, J. Fleming, S. Doggett, A. Bransfield, D. Reach. Third row: N. Gregg, S. Garland, M. Roberts, T. Mallon, E. Phillips, W. Kloper, J. Greenquist, R. Coolidge, V. Harper, S. Bradley, L. Low, M. Hardy. STAGECRAFT f • • : : .x Mx Front row: M. Feeley, R. Mostecki, P. Thompson R. Bamford. Back row: R. Sawyer, R. Doucette, G Churchill, R. Wisner. AS;.; CLUB CLUB b Front row: G. Uhlin, M. Ufford. Back row: C. Rod¬ riquez, R. Losco, S. Berkowitz, S. Bryer. 107 YEARBOOK SUBSCRIPTION COMMITTEE Front row: S. Garland, D. Biagetti, M. Webb, L. Robinson, L. Halberg, M M. Cunniff. Second row: J. Fillmore, J. Ghilani, S. Doggett, N. Slauta, S. J. Borger, J. Wilson, A. Collins, J. Pistone, M. Fabiano. Back row: R. True, D. Peoples, P. Peters, A. Goodspeed, K. McManus. . Feldman, B. Martin, Berkowitz, S. Ambler. A. Lipman, D. Levine, YEARBOOK ART Front row: Maxine Salvin, Janice Breen. Second row: Judy Morrison, Elaine Beshansky, Jeanne Mansell. 108 MAJORETTES Bonnie Wilson, Linda Zachilli, Linda Fahey, Martha Ufford, Suzanne Blum. BAND Front row: L. Fahey, C. Paine, M. Okun, M. Webb, B. Wilson, M. Hardy, S. Blum, S. Caron, M. Keezer, P. Hammond, R. Coffey, R. Glashow, E. Malick, H. Cox, M. Ufford, J. Davidson, L. Zac- chella, M. Powers, L. Robinson, S. Gustavson. Second row: Mr. LoPresti, M. Schulman, K. Kimball, E. Seaholm, N. Hayes, L. Millen, M. Curewitz, J. Mastro, C. Robinson, D. Slack, K. Everett, S. Kelman, M. Raider, S. Bryan, K. Coolidge, E. Wiltenburg, R. Saunders. Third row: G. Porter, R. Jansen, C. Sibley, B. Nichols, P. Williams, P. Stevenson, V. Harper, D. Brandt, W. Hadden, J. Whalen, E. Stone, B. Blumenthal; D. Wright, R. Tibbetts, M. Hayward, A. Watts. Back row: R. Hall, P. Rheinhart, D. hughes, G. Wells, T. Stephens, A. Hughes, C. Baldwin, R. Tuccoch, T. Casey, P. Grupposo, T. Miller, J. Harper, D. Young, S. Beader. 109 Seated: Patricia Hansbury. Mrs. Kuske, Madeline Frye. Standing: Gail Flumere, Lynne Rosenblutn • " • FRENCH CLUB m-. Front row: J. Pistone, D. Pickering, D. Alexander, L. Darling, M. Walsh, N. Hayes. Second Miss Hamm, J. Aitken, M. Rickies, N. Mercereaux, S. Hastings, D. O’Donnell, E. Roberts, row: M. Cunniff, M. Szpakowski, L. Halberg, P. Williams, V. Harper, M. Hayward, R. True DANCE Front row: W. Hadden, K. Everett, C. Robinson, S. Bryan, S. Kelman, P. Stevenson, W. Keezer, J. Mastro, N. Hayes, C. Fraliegh, S. Beader, M. Kaufman. Second row: R. Tulloch, A. Hughes, P. Grupposo, D. Hughes, F. Miller, J. Harper, T. Stephens, G.‘ Wells, K. Lowden, C. Sibley, S. Gustavsen. Third row: P. Hammond, R. Glashow, R. Saunders, R. Coffey. CAPELLA CLUB BOYS D. Mardo, J. Lewis, D. LeMarbre, J. Adams, N. Stone v : L. Goldman, D. Moore, N. Sims, W. Kloper. gs Efe tairt ' f. . . J . :• rv - — i- 3c . -=T - Front row: P. Mullen, S. Townsend, L. Condron, C. Jacobs, B. Wall, G. Carnegie, C. Brown, S. Neus, G. Smith, S. Young. Second row: D. Darling, K. Gay, C. Wharton, P. Chapman, J. Fischer, K. Coleman, B. Tash, S. Paquette, M. Daniels. Third row: N. Aitken, P. Phinney, B. Swenson, S. Biggart, A. Fadanelli, P. Curry, D. Day. 113 tt+xv :. -v. .•» aP -• ■; ... GIRLS CHOIR Front row: M. Lewis, R. Coppellotti, R. Yanofsky, D. Maron, T. Bixby, D. Paul, B. Adams, L. Winters. Second row: D. Sinclair, S. Taylor, R. Symonds, R. Clow, L. Doran, V. Marathas, N. Heald. Third row: M. Roberts, J. Freeman, D. Sobel, C. Gavin, C. Wright, D. Chiacchia, K. Sanders. 1M V . ; .at safes CWMI P K m VARSITY FOOTBALL Front row: D. Graham, R. Nation, R. Lowden. Second row: Coach Whelan, P. Lauro, R. Crisafulli, B. Wooley, D Butchman, F. Fitzgerald, G. Batten, K. Pease, J. Pryor J. Hughes, B. Sellars, R. Donohue, M. Carr, P. Peters S. Gallant, Coach Bennett. Third row: Coach Collins, T Hawes, D. Mercer, J. Hall, J. Kiley, J. Murphy, F. Fede J. Arena, F. Capizzo, J. Gomes, D. Benjamin, B. Bross P. Keany, K. McManus, W. Presutti, D. Bartlett, T. Dono¬ van, J. Martin, P. Hall, R. Boudreau, G. Bowles, D. Gerber, D. Picard, Coach Stehlin. Fourth row: E. Morris, A. Dye, J. McGrath, F. Smith, R. Hayes, D. Brousseau, T. Smith, G. Pease, E. Deeley, S. Knight, T. Gilbert, R. Lucas, R. Hennigar, W. Pettingell, D. Boardman, C. Lavers, D. Kelly. CROSS COUNTRY Front row: W. Fowler, R. Rourke, S. Dubosky, R. Parris, L. Smith, D. Moore, F. Sims, F. Walker, W. Brown, L. R. Cunningham, W. Smith, R. Penswick, J. Craig, J. Szpakowski, T. Kelly, F. Ross, P. Halpin, Coach Bransfield. Mitchell. Back row: L. Priore, R. Condron, P. Irving, Coach Edward Bransfield, in only his second year as the Natick High School Harrier mentor, turned in a successful year in 1962. His runners led by Co-Cap¬ tains Dick Cote and Bob Cunningham tied for the top of the Bay State League, their only defeat coming at the hands of Co-Champion Wellesley. Despite the loss, Natick still retained a share of the championship as Needham, also tying for first, dropped Wellesley from the undefeated ranks. Except for the defeat incurred at Wellesley, Na¬ tick’s record was unmarred, as the Harrier septet racked up a total of seven victories. By far, the most exciting of these triumphs came at the expense of visiting Needham High School. Setting the stage for this conquest was Needham’s six year unbeaten skein, which represented six championships and nary a loss in the history of Bay State League cross country. Na¬ tick was equal to the challenge, however, as they be¬ came the first team to hand Needham a loss, triumph¬ ing, 26 - 29. It should be pointed out that despite the loss to Wellesley, one Natick star shone brightly. Junior Jim Craig flashed over the Wellesley hills and dales in record time, winning the race. Also, at the Bay State Conference Meet, held at Walpole, Natick placed two men in the top ten, five in the top twenty-two, as they finished a close second to the same Wellesley team. Bob Rourke, fourth, and Jim Craig, sixth, were the Natick top ten finishers. A little farther back in the field came Dick Cote, thirteenth, Bob Cunningham, twenty-first, and Dick Parris, twenty-second. The fine performance turned in by the junior varsity indicate a good season next year as well. Coach Bransfield will have a nucleus of Bob Penswick, -next year’s captain, Steve DuBosky, Warren Fowler, Doug Moore, Ty Kel¬ ly, and Bill Smith, all of whom turned in excellent times the last few meets. 122 . ik mr VARSITY BASKETBALL :-v; J. V. BASKETBALL Front row: Coach J. Carroll, D. Wilson, N. McKewen, J. Ignaccio, J. Wight, J. Ghetti, W. Ball, J. Wilson, Manager Snell. Second row: R. Thoreaux, S. Chapman, T. Mandino, R. Leach, D. McGowan, P. Vitalie, M. Tomasetti, L. Carr. The JV team kept pace with the varsity, compiling a record of 13-4. Steve Saradnik, Butch Wright, Wal¬ ter Ball, and Neil McKeown were all excellent, making next year’s prospects bright. Front row: D. MacGregor, R. Tulloch, W. Pettingell, J. Pryor, P. Marsh, R. Lefter, D. Bernardi. Second row: J. Fieber, K. Jue, R. Budnick, P. Peters, S. Barnes, R. Sellars, J. Lockhart, D. Young, T. Bouzan, Coach Christie. VARSITY BASKETBALL This year’s basketball squad, captained by Joe Pryor, captured the admiration of Natick residents as no team has done since the championship team of ’57. Picked for sixth place in the Bay State League by the sports writers because of a lack of experience, they breezed through their first nine games, finally ending the season with a record of 17-3, finishing in the semi¬ finals of the Tech Tourney. The boys had that intangible thing known as spirit that so often differentiates between a good team and a great one. At forwards, Paul Marsh and Bob Lefter were consistent and Lefter reached his heights in the tourney where he gunned 28 points in two of the three games. At the guards Dave MacGregor and Dave Bernardi proved tenacious defensive players and capable shooters, while Bill Pettingill proved him¬ self one of the finest backcourt men in the league. At center, Captain Joe Pryor, the spark of the team, in game after game almost singlehanded turned defeat into victory. Joe proved himself the finest all-around player in the league, rebounding, scoring, and drib¬ bling, the only big man in the league capable of going from base line to base line to score. On the bench Bob Sellars, Bob Budnick and Bob Tulloch were all excel¬ lent with Tullock being one of the best 6th men. The games were exciting, especially the big ones. The boys were great and all-in-all it was a tremendo us year for basketball at N.H.S. HOCKEY ••• Mil ... ... • " w-u. if ii iI V i m : : .-r-. ' : •• x ' S 5E»1 Front row: T. Hawes, K. Pease, J. Hughes, M. Carr, F. Capizzo, S. Cotter, F. Fitzgerald, P. Schneekloth. Second row: B. Yeomons, G. Hall, P. Bacon, P. Hall, S. Knight, T. Gilbert, R. Hayes, J. Kiley, H. Garvey, T. Van Tassel, M. Prince, T. Franciose. Despite the fact that Frank Capizzo’s football injury laid him up on several occasions, this year’s hockey team compiled an admirable record of 5-7, with a tremendous victory over Framingham and Bay State League Champs Walpole. Outstanding seniors were Ken Pease, Ricky Scheekloth, Justin Hughes, Frank Fitzgerald as well as Frank Capizzo. Our best wishes to Mr. Frank Marcoux, hockey coach, who is retiring from coaching this year. 125 VARSITY BASEBALL ■ ■ B. Pettingell, D. Benjamin, J. Coleman, P. Peters, T. Bowles, K. McManus, B. Budnick A. Lipman, B. Peoples, J. Belliveau, J. Pryor, V. Ignacio, S. $aradnick, T. Van Tassel Back W. Presutti, Coach Carroll BASEBALL Front row: D. Holbrook, G. Bowles, B. McCormick, J. Walsh, P. Thereaux, S. Chapman. Back row: R. Condron, J. White, R. Leach, J. Fitzgerald, R. Benjamin, R. Miscia, Mr. McNally. Front row: J. Sidelis, J. Warren, Mr. Vaughan. Back R. Omerso, R. Sharon, M. Benes. S. Phillips, R. McGillvary, R. Long row The Natick High Golf Team, lead by John Warren and coached by Mr. Walter Since only one member of the team next year promises to be an outstanding one for the team. Returning will be Bobby Powell, Jim Coffey, John Sidelis, Bob McGillvary, and Rick Omerso. season was a senior Front row: Coach R. Whelan, D. Bartlett, R. Crisafulli, D. O’Leary, J. Robinson, R. Cudmore, P. Laure, W. Petrie, R. Chervincky, D. Warren, G. Batten, S. Gallant, R. Cunningham, A. Stuart, R. Peoples, R. Flinchbough, E. Solomon, Coach E. Bransfield. Second row: D. Berman, M. Onorato, R. Parris, P. Keany, F. Fede, J. Warren, G. Batten, S. Gallant, R. Cunningham, A. Stuart, R. Rourke, D. Yazbek. Third row: D. Graham, B. Peoples, R. Nation, J. Craig, G. Gunner, R. McGovern, R. Tiberie, W. Hadden, R. Penswick, D. Archibald, M. Kriger, R. Hennigar, W. Smith, M. Durkin, M. Sincock, W. O’Brien, L. Smith, P. Robinson, R. Mosteki, D. Moore. Fourth row: F. Ross, D. Horka, W. Traber, T. Trainor, R. Wright, P. Grupposso, D. Brien, R. Boudreau, O. Bross, R. Wright, R. Baker, P. Stevenson, W. Lamount, D. Merson. 132 Rovenelli, D. Ward, 1. Slavid, A. Dye, J. Dada, E. Stone, R. ass, r. eno 133 [Wv GIRLS ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION Front row: E Fi shma Back row: Miss Tiiso J. Dunbar, C. Sibbly, D. Herman T. Malon, N. Tullock, N. Hayes GIRLS ' FIELD HOCKEY NATICK ] Htfva Front row: N. Sorensen, N. Nettleton, D. Flynn, R. Savilonsi, N. Grover. Second row: Miss Tillson, M. Abrams, J. Richardson, D. Chiacchis, D. Hewson, P. Klein, S. Townsend. GIRLS ' JV FIELD HOCKEY Wm Front row: B. Stuart, M. Keezer, J. Arthur, J. Hasgill, S. Nolan. Second row: Miss Tillson, C. Wharton, G. Rourke, F. Kenneally, B. Rundgren, P. Murphy, L. Copplestone, D. Sinclair, M. Mercer, P. Doucette. 135 5■ ' ' ' : f BASKETBALL D. Chiaccia, N. Tullock, N. Gregg, R. Savilonis, J. Nahlor, P. Sallinger. Second row , E. Bransfield, K. Horton, N. Nettleton, A. Polhemus, A. Seerey, Miss Vasile Front row: K. Robbins GIRLS ' JV BASKETBALL J. Ignacio, J. O’Neil, G. Rourke, M. Littlefield Front row: M. Murphy, M. Doucette, B. Rundgre Second row: K. Robbins, A. Bransfield, D. Wright, J. Washington, M. Mercier, A. Seavy, Miss Vasile MSI Mf IK 4 w h fi : i N ' . : vrs 4 WINTER SPORTS AWARDS R. Cunningham, R. Cote, J. Craig, S. Gallant, K. Pease, F. Fitzgerald, J. Hughes. 142 mmmmm FUTURE I, , SCIENTISTS N DU ST RIAL ARTS AWARDS . Plfil INDUSTRIAL ARTS FAIR | ... ‘ .. . . . . . The annual Industrial Arts Fair was held in the gymnasium on May 21 and May 22. There were varied exhibits in the fields of Art, Arts and Crafts, Business subjects, Power Mechanics, Technical Drawing, Integrated Physics, Woodworking, Homemaking and a style show. Music was provided by the Natick High Dance Band under the direction of Mr. Joseph LoPresti. Members of the Future Nurses’ Club were present as well as pupils of the Industrial Arts classes in the two junior high schools. All participants are to be congratulated on their exhibits. CLASS HISTORY The history of the Class of 1963 began in September of I960, when we were re¬ united after a year at different junio o could foresee in that group of fledgling sophomores such d an football player over ten other A with t a soloist of our potential ssmates starting on the varsity foot of the team that, as seniors, would win us a league champ As a class, we were adjusting quickly to high school life; in short months. we had met and conquered the eighteen-minute lunch, mid-year exams, jsi®!ed lockers one-way traffic, and the two-minute gym shower One of our classmates claims the world recdrd for this, showering and dressing in one minute, fourteen and three-tenths seconds 18m 1 vR FAjftw NICEST SMILE CLASS CLOWN BEST MUSICIAN MOST VERSATILE » F i r BIGGEST FLIRT FRIENDLIEST 5» » x v s w . ' S PRETTIEST EYES PRETTIEST CUTTEST MOST LIKELY TO SUCCEED BEST DANCER MOST INTELLIGENT MOST COLLEGIATE MOST SINCERE MOST FUN jMCV BEST ACTOR ACTRESS -40S lw4j,nW BEST ATHLETES WITTIEST nt T Ic cj + BIGGEST APPETITE t K, iAi MOST POPULAR mm® CLASS PICNIC CLASS Parents, Teachers, and Friends. As President of the Class of 1963, I consider it both an honor and a privilege to welcome you to our Class Day Exercises this morning. Although this is an important event in our lives, it is merely a pre¬ amble to a long and arduous journey which we all must take. Each stu¬ dent has his own destination to reach. Thanks to the invaluable efforts of our capable teachers, not to mention our parents, we have been given encouragement and faith in ourselves for the future. Through hard endeavor and the knowledge that others have confidence in us, we shall strive to our utmost to make you poud of the Class of 1963. Kenny Jue CLASS WLL In accordance with the traditions of Class Day at Natick High School, we, the graduating Class of 1963, being of 321 sound minds and bodies do hereby present this, our first, last, and only Will and Testament. We hope that the following articles will serve as remembrances of us and that you, our esteemed teach¬ ers and tolerant underclassmen, will accept our bequests in the spirit of fun with which they are given. To Mr. Hennigar, we leave a year of almost perfect behaviour as an example for all succeeding classes to emulate. To Mr. McManus, we leave our fondest wishes for continued success as Vice-Principal. To Miss Dalton, we leave a life-time supply of black mourn¬ ing bands for the solemn observance of all future Ideas of March. To Mr. Collins, we leave our patented " Gozinta” process which will some day rank with Hiron’s Formula and the Py thogorean Theorem. To Mr. Wendell Bennett, we leave a copy of " John Ciardi” so that he may further appreciate his ripple tank. To Miss Shannon, Miss Poulin, and Mr. Harrington, we leave our sincere thanks for helping us to make our yearbook the most inspiring one ever published. To Miss Ciannavei and Mr. Brandfield, our class advisors, we simply say thank you, for no words can express our deep appreci¬ ation for the superb job they have done in managing our class af¬ fairs for the past three years. To Mr. Dan Bennett, we leave our Cockney accents in the hope he will put them to good use in his Public Speaking classes. To Mr. Plausse, we leave a home-delivered Boston Globe so that he won’t have to wander around the Lower Academic build¬ ing looking for a newspaper. To Mr. Garnett, the director of our record-breaking senior play, Pygmalion, we leave our heartfelt thanks for many long hours of hard work that he put in so that our production would be wor¬ thy of a full-page writeup in the Boston Traveler. To the Juniors, we leave the task of measuring up to very high scholastic, athletic, and creative standards. To the Sophomores, we leave the week of final exams, if they thought the mid-years were bad. To all underclassmen, we leave the five extra days of sd that, due to circumstances beyond our control, they did not miss. To the faculty, we leave the Juniors and Sophomores with : hope that they may do as good a job with these students as thr have done with us. In addition to the above-designated articles, certain depart seniors wish to make the following personal bequests: We, Deanne Flynn and Rosemary Savinonis, leave our letic ability to our cousins, who can’t do anything. I, James " Pepper” Gomes, leave my name to any Indian wi enough to keep it. ] L Lorna Gould, leave my bottle of sunlight to Barbara Cook, she desires to use it. I, Michael Franciose, leave my regular detention hall sea: my cousin. I, Penny Sallinger, leave to Ellen Bransfield at least three tra inches to " Heighteen” her chances in basketball. I, Dick Crisafulli, leave to Doug Brien my inability to secrets from Mr. Whelan, secrets such as missed track work and numerous dates. We, Homeroom A116, leave an autographed picture of Calabro to Mr. Bennett. We, the senior members of the sports teams, leave Mr. H with one half the equipment he should have. I, Cinci Perlman, leave French — forever. I, David Josselyn, leave the shine of my heather-blue cycle to Dave Newcomb. We, the members of the A-period International Rela Class, leave Bosnia and Herzegovina to the northern half Sakhalin Islands. I I, Merle Rickies, leave to whoever wants it, my wrap-ar skirt that doesn’t wrap. I, Ted Laradis, leave a book of gestures to Mr. Thibault. We, Marcia Garry and Beverly Bitzer, leave our lunch pi and jammed lockers to anyone who can get away with it for as as we did. I, Paul Peters, leave a bill for a broken window and stitches to the school. 158 We, the members of the E-period International Relations class, leave to Mr. McNally ten per cent of all royalties collected on our soon-to-be published book, Five Hundred Ways to Purge a Bothersome Fly , or, Mr. McNally Strikes Back. I, Meg Cunniff, leave to any new Safety Patrol Commission¬ er who can control it, the upper floor of the Math-Science Build¬ ing. I, Dave Hallett, leave my shir-tail to anyone who can keep it tucked in. I, Paul Marsh, leave my fade-away jump shot to Dave Mac¬ Gregor. I, Adrea Klarik, leave my bottle of Lady Clairol to the Cam- pisi girls. We, the members of Brownies International, leave our fudge pan and fudge factor, which is the length of your slide rule divid¬ ed by the number of the page you’re on, to the Juniors, wh o will need them to live up to our brown standards. I, Martha Webb, leave my picture-taking ability to the producers of Candid Camera. I, Kenny Jue, leave to the cafeteria cooks the original recipe for American Chop Suey. I, Bob Noel, leave my car to anyone who wants to go to New Hampshire and get it. We, the members of the Advanced Biology class, leave to Mr. Filledes an unlimited supply of rats and a scoreboard. I, Nancy Slauta, leave my Monopoly board to Peggy Hardy. I, Linda Bryer, leave my title, " the shortest girl in the class’, to any girl who thinks she can measure up to it. I, Don Bartlett, would like to leave the assembly in the usual manner — stand, salute. I, Donna Biagetti, leave to Mr. Sticklor, an electronic com¬ puter with a thousand hands to take my place as his private secre¬ tary. We, Janice Borger, Susan Ambler, Michele Feldman, and Ann Collins leave Mr. Mannix a tie-rack for his unlimited supply of homemade ties, and to his mother we leave enough material and thread to supply him with ties for the coming year. I, Thomas Myers, leave to any member of the class of ’64 my 47.8 in. parking space outside the cafeteria. We, Ruth Losco and Sherrill Allen, leave to any brave student of the Class of ’64 our unauthorized D period study. I, George Batten leave my P.J.M. sandwiches to Ted Miller. We, the wonderful cast of Pygmalion , leave our Oscars and Emmys to the Juniors, who will probably never win any of their own. I, Clara Rodriquez, leave my accent to Miss Perez to give to any deserving first-year Spanish student. I, Dave Levine, leave my linguistic ability to any underclass- man who can meet th e qualifications of having already flunked at least two years of language. I, Joan McConnon, leave to my younger sister Marianne, who will be a sophomore thirteen years from now, my three-year pass which excused me from taking Gym. I, Barbara Weller, leave in my Thunderbird. I, Bob Lefter, leave my nickname " Mr. Machin” to anyone with the same outstanding profile. I, Barbara Witten, leave my ability to throw " wild parties” to any Juniors in search of a quiet evening at home. I, Jeff Harris, give Mr. Drown’s office back to him. We, Mary Ryan, Judy Bennett, Judy Roberts, and Mary Ran- eri, leave our gossip table to Rosalie Fornaro and three other jun¬ ior girls who really don’t have anything better to do. I, Pete Keany, leave a dust pan and broom to Ricky Nation to clean up certain Oldsmobile. I, Judy Fillmore, leave my nickname " half-pint half-back” to any safety patroller who has the courage to stop the lunch line. I, Joe Pryor, leave my ability in Spanish to Tim Gilbert. We, Lana Reid and Jill Rierdan, leave our banking genius to Ramona Heinrich and Nancy McManus. Good luck! I, Bill Petrie, leave my wild-man voice to Jimmy Kiley. We, Janet Marinelli and Helen Sheridan, leave to any deserv¬ ing junior girls our title of " black sheep”. We, the members of Homeroom 213 leave our thoughtful Christmas mural to Mr. Biedrzyski, with hope that next year it may win honorable mention. We, the members of Natrick High School’s first French IV class in many years, leave Miss Hamm with the hope that more students will take advantage of our pioneering. I, Peggy Walsh, leave my brother Jim to the Guidance De¬ partment. He needs them! I, Dick Parris leave my sister Sandra to the Guidance Depart¬ ment. She needs them just as much! We, all the seniors not mentioned herein, leave, to all the jun¬ iors not mentioned herein, the remaining vestiges of our short but brilliant stay at Natick High School; the books which now bear our name, the deserted Safety Patrol posts, which will most likely remain deserted, the overdue library books, the unsigned tardy slips, 173 slighty-used gym uniforms, and other significant relics of a bygone era. In witness, whereof, we the members of the Class of 1963, have set our hand and seal here on this sixth day of June, in this year of Our Lord one thousand nineteen hundred and sixty-three, declaring this to be our Last Will and Testament. I, Ken Pease, leave an elocution book to Mr. Marcoux. We, Jean Marso, Deanne Flynn, Ellen Phillips, and Alice Kaizer, leave our dirty dishes to Lynne DeLong. We, the members of English 401, leave John Ciardi. I, Sally Doggett, leave my one door sedan to any junior who is Accident prone. We, the members of P.S.S.C. Physics, leave our ripple tank to Miss Ward. Maby she can find out " how it means”. I, Frank Capizzo, leave my headaches. I, Peter Williams, leave the high C natural which I broke on the school piano to anyone ingenious enough to fix it. 159 I, Dick Picard, leave to Dennis Gerber the job of managing Fitch our bubbling enthusiasm and good nature, next year’s Bay State Football Champs. Fitch our bubbling enthusiasm and good nature. We, the 1963 cafeteria marshalls, leave to next year’s cafeteria I, Larry Smith, leave my membership in Major Mudd’s Lost marshalls, the right to let their friends sit five at a table and cut Battalion to Lord Bubblebrook. in the lunch line. We, the members of homeroom S215, leave a coffeepot to Signed: Richard L. Parris Mr. Colombo; perhaps how his morning coffee will taste better Margaret Walsh without any leftover sulphuric acid in it. Witnessed by: We, Janice and Jean Dunbar, leave to Debbie and Dottie Marie P. Donahoe CLASS HISTORY The history of the class of 1963 began in September of I960, when we were re-united after a year at different junior highs. Who could foresee in that group of fledgling sophomores such diverse celebrities as an All American football player, over ten other All Scholastic athletes, five National Merit Scholars, and a soloist with the Boston Symphony Orchestra? Since we were showing extraordinary talents even then, probably many were aware of our potential. Fall of our first year already found three of our classmates starting on the varsity foot¬ ball team. These boys formed the core of the team that, as seniors, would win us a league championship. As a class, we were adjusting quickly to high-school life; in a few short months, we had met and conquered the eighteen-min¬ ute lunch, mid-year exams, jammed lockers, one way traffic, and the two-minute gym shower. One of our classmates claims the world record for this, showering and dressing in one minute, fourteen and three-tenths seconds. Our biology classes supplied the science fair with many in¬ teresting and profound projects: Tom Myers was awarded first prize with " Food Preservation by Radiation”. Jill Rierdan and Richard Parris showed such great scientific aptitude that they were invited to participate in the Quartermaster Science Seminar. This was another case where classmates fulfilled their early potential, for as seniors, Jill and Richard placed first and second in physics. Although student politics in our class has been traditionally marked by upsets and surprises, our efficient senior class officers, Kenny Jue, George Batten, Ann Collins, and Michele Feldman, were already respected members of the Student Council. That spring, Ann and Michele, as well as Sue Ambler, Janni Borger. Judy Ghilani, and Gail Uhlin were elected cheerleaders. They were among the group that placed second in the Bay State cheer¬ ing contest in our senior year. Another activity in which our class was excelling was journaliam; four sophomores were chosen to be editors of the Sassamon. We returned to NHS as juniors with a year of high-school experience under our belts and with great enthusiasm for what was to be our greatest year up to that time. Showing what an academically strong class we had, many of us were exposed for the first time to college-boards and other national tests. Linda Dar¬ ling, Sally Hastings, Mark Szpakowski, Peter Williams, and David Berman did so well that they became National Merit Scholars. Twelve others were awarded letters of commendation for their excellent performance. It is interesting to note the following statistic: of the senior members of the National Honor Society of the boys were on some varsity team; numbered among these were five team captains. We continued our fine athletic performance throughou: that year but, unlike most classes, we not only won trophies we also donated one. When Chick Welch of the Natick Herald was ill last winter, our classmates on the indoor track team initiated a collection for a trophy in his name to be given annually to the most improved track man. Spring of our junior year saw our classmates receiving num¬ erous individual honors. Kenny Jue and Justin Hughes were elected as our representatives at Boys’ State. Roger True was i awarded the Harvard Book prize and Sally Hastings won a French award in addition to the Wheaton Club prize. Merle Rickies won first prize in a Spanish test for all of New England. That season also saw a great class effort, our prom. Practically everyone in the class worked on this project and their efforts re- i suited in a climax to our junior year. As we stand here today and reflect on our senior year, it is difficult to give sufficient recognition to each event. Traditionally, the first affair of the senior year is the class play, Bernard Si.aw’s Pygmalion, was the real manifestation of the talent our class had already displayed in two consecutive musicals. The classic comedy is an unusually ambitious play for high-school production, but Jane Pistone, Andrew Goodspeed and the sup¬ porting cast were equal to the task and made it a tremendous art¬ istic and financial success. In February, an art exhibit was held at the high school which Cynthia Bradeen won first prize in oil painting and also was awarded the grand prize. After entertaining the entire school with a concert, Peter Williams was selected to appear as guest soloist with the Boston Symphony Orchestra. In sports, victory was nothing new to Captain Justin Hughes and the football team; most of the boys had been winning for two or even three years. This year they won so often that they tied for the league championship, and romped over Framingham 44-6. Individually, high-scoring backs Steve Gallant and Paul Peters were All-Scholastic, and Joe Pryor was All American. Our cross-country team, led by Bob Cunningham and Dick Cote brought further honor on our class. Not only did they win Coach Ed Bransfield his first conference championship, but they also became the only team in history to beat the perennial power, Needham. In winter sports, our basketball team surprised everyone by giving freshman coach Charles Christie a tie for second in the tough Bay State League. In Tech Tourney play, Captain Joe Pry¬ or, who broke precedent by being named most valuable player two years in a row, led the team to Boston Garden and all the way to the semi-final round before being edged by Class-B champions, Winthrop. The last NHS hockey team for retiring jach Frank Marcoux finished in the middle of its league. They showed that with injury-ridden captain Frank Cappizzo in the line-up, they could play well enough to shut out the then un¬ defeated state champions, Walpole, 1-0! On Bob Whelan’s in¬ door track team our classmates had been dominating the Met League for three years. This year, led by Paul Lauro and Russ Cudmore, they piled up an all-division record of 397 points while remaining undefeated for the second straight year. The wrestling team, coached by Bill Genova, failed to win any match¬ es, but it was clear that losses were due more to inexperience than to lack of skill. In March, there was the Science Awards Assembly at which Dianne Pickering, William Phillips, and Arthur Lipman, last year’s first prize winner in chemistry, were awarded their pins for having participated in the Quarter-master Seminar. Bob Saunders and Jill Rierdan received plaques for their projects: " Bone Devel¬ opment’’ and " Generation and Application of White Noise and Audio Analgesia’’. In closing, the class would like to thank our wonderful of¬ ficers - Kenny Jue, George Batten, Ann Collins, and Michele Feldman - for their leadership. Most of all, we extend our sin¬ cere thanks to our class advisors Miss Ciannavei and Mr. Brans¬ field. Now the history of the class of 1963 is rapidly drawing to a close. Next year many of us will be at other schools furthering our education, but for many others this will be the education that will carry them through life. But regardless how our paths may diverge, the spirit of the class of 1963 will always bind us together. Jill Rierdan and David Berman GRADUATION DAY WELCOMING SPEECH Parents, Teachers, and Friends. It is my privilege, as President of the Class of 1963, to wel¬ come you here this evening to our Commencement Excercises. This is a great and wonderful moment for us all. As members of the Class of 1963, we have gone through many experiences together in our childhood and as we grew old¬ er and began to-mature. We have always been a close-knit group of students, something which very few classes can boast of. To¬ day is the climax of all our years together as friends and class¬ mates. The memories that many of us cherish and will always keep are every one — here with us now. I imagine you parents once experienced the same feelings as we, who are graduating now, feel on this momentous occasion. We hope that once again you may recall your graduation day, and that we may do the same in the future while watching our own children graduate. We are about to enter into a world of opportunity and pros¬ perity. Today there are not too many countries that without youth, there can be no future. In a few hours we, the Class of 1963, will go our separate ways, leaving life-long friends behind for perhaps only a few years, perhaps forever. But life does not stagnate; it moves in a steady, unabated flow. With the departure of old friends, comes the making of new ones. If we were to stand still and attempt in any way to withdraw from just one facet of life, then we would become lost in life ' s complicated process. The world is a challenge. Life is a challenge. Youth can be afraid of neither. I welcome you all in sharing with us, the Class of 1963, one of the most memorable and exhilarating events of our lives. Kenny Jue UNITED STATES -i ' AvV V , ’ , XvX ' X ' v ' - , A‘AVAv ' vIv! ' ' vX ' AV ' VyVVA-A , A- ' . •• 8 fl| , ! „:s, ' ' f;j xl 33 Sk. jHPRte : i ■RT 7 ' « • : - • •. . ! vXv‘v X ' , - ' ' ' Av ' v;-X ' X .‘COXv!v X , W5j !X , . ' Av ' ' vXvj ! , ' X . . ' .• .•.W.V.’ ' V. ' .w. .-.• V « A .V. -• • •.■. .w ' . . ' .W AV 1 . ' ., , . ' .•-•- .- ■■•.- v v« » . ' ■. .■■•■•■■.■.:•■•.•.•.■■■■■ ■ . ■• %V I 1 • .•••. . ... ' .••fl I v. ' -.ss•.’■ X-XO. s-X " -.-,-.;X ' ..X-Xa vX V I’Xv - ' ’ .VWA ' AV A av SOCIAL ASPECTS What do we really know about other nations of the world? When we mention Cuba, their arises in our minds a picture of ships, planes, and Soviet Missiles which may or may not be there, ind in our imaginations, Egypt is a confused blending of ancient pyramids and a ruler who is determined to control that part of the •vorld. While our reason tells us that this conception of these Lands must be distorted, it is all too easy to base our judgements of _ country on the details w r e hear most frequently about it. In a similar manner, some people in other countries have ceveloped an image of the United States which is as equally far removed from reality as our vague nations of Cuba and Egypt. They visualize a people who are rich, money-mad, inconsiderate, end uncultured. The American people seem to consider them¬ selves infallible and innocent of any wrong doing. And yet, the Europeans and Asians and Africans have heard of incidents in¬ volving dark-skinned delegates to the United Nations. They have .‘.card of incidents in which Negro students were ridiculed and attacked when they tried to attend schools which had previously been all-White. Some of these " misconceptions” have a ring of truth to them. We shall never be immune to attacks on racial issues until we have eliminated the distrust, hatred, and misunderstanding which cause these embarrassing incidents. But we .are appalled at some of the other notions which roreigners entertain about us. Where did they get these ideas? A conference of foreign students held at Cornell expressed the opinion that the press is often at fault. They felt that many nations of the world, especially the African ones, are misrepre¬ sented by our press. They, in turn, receive a misleading picture of the United States as a land of self-righteous philosopher-kings who have a monopoly on the moral virtues of goodness and rightness. Impartial newscasts abroad with a minimum of self- righeousness will do far more for us than self-praise. The press must be made to realize the importance of accurate, uncolored, unprejudiced accounts of conditions, happenings, trends, and personalities. Two years ago, an American visiting in Sweden found teen¬ agers racing about in hot and drinking illegal liquor, while the nation as a whole was in a turmoil over several recent outbreaks of teen-age crime. These misguided teen-agers are no doubt little different from their counterparts in other countries, but what is shocking to as Americans is the fact that Swedish public was very much inclined to blame this situation on influences from the United States. These troublesome teen-agers, through records, radio. Western and gangster movies, and television serials, have received an image of America as a civilization of deserate emo¬ tions, flashy materialism, and excitement for its own sake. Social workers in Sweden acknowledge that there are several factors with¬ in Swedish society which are responsible for the development of teen-age crime, but they also maintain that the American movies, telivision programs, and radio are not a good influence. Children from lower class homes or homes where the parents do not take proper care of the children are most stimulated to imitate the movies and TV. This is not to say that the United States is responsible for juvenile delinquency in Sweden or anywhere else. However, it is disconcerting to think that the image of the United States is such that the first question asked of an American visitor is, " Do you know the Cartwright brothers?” The good influences of American movies and TV are not often exported because they do not sell so well as more violent scenes. However, the day will come when we must decide whether material profit is worth the sacrifice of our education. Another way in which outsiders form their opinions of the United States is through direct contact with individual Americans. The American tourist has long been the world’s most celebrated and, at the same time most laughed at gad-a-bout, and Americans, in general, have long been known for their fretfulness when cus¬ toms and manners differed from their own. The tables are now being turned as visitors from all over the world are pouring into the United States in response to a joint government-industry " Visit USA” campaign. The Parisian who was provoked because a roadside restaurant in Indiana did not serve wine is now better able to understand the annoyance of a American who can’t find a malted milk in Paris. And as they rush from city to city, museum to museum, trying to crowd as much as possible into their short visit, Europeans are beginning to realize that the American rushing through the Louvre in twenty minutes is not so uncultured as he seems. Thus we are improving our image abroad by helping others to know us as we really are and by destroying false impressions of us by promoting better understanding. Sally A. Hastings OUR SCIENTIFIC LEADERSHIP The word science almost immediately calls to mind the space exploits of this country, and in this respect the United States’ image is very good one. The United States is recognized as the leader in space exploration. Since October 1, 1957, when Russia orbited its firsuSputnik, we have forged ahead in both practical and purely scientific studies of space. Just a few months ago many of us were able to see television broadcasts from France and Eng¬ land which were transmitted via the Telstar satellite. Mariner II revealed more about the planet Venus than had been learned in all the previous years of man’s history. The United States is behine in manned space flights, but even here it has gained prestige be¬ cause of its policy of opening its flights to the public. America likes to think of itself as a practical nation, but it has made great contributions to pure science. Science is exper¬ iencing a terrific rate of advance and most of this is concentrated in the United States. 80% of the pure science in the West is being done in America. Californians like to point with pride to the fact that California has had more Nobel Prize winners than the Soviet Union. In fact, the scientific picture in the United States is so good that Britain is beginning to be concerned about the emigration of so many of its top scientific men, 12 % of its Ph.D’s, to America. However, the real American genius lies in applying science, in doing things, producing. In this it has no equals; the United States enjoyes unquestioned leadership in practical, applied tec¬ hnology. Charles Percy Snow has said of America, " You used primitive applied science quicker than anyone else to make num¬ bers of articles, and in the scientific Revolution of this genera¬ tion you made goods on a scale no one has before.” America has long had this capability of applying technology directly to practical needs. The Soviet Union has tried to imitate the United States here, but with little success, and this fact is recognized abroad, as illustrated by a story that was circulated in Europe years ago. An American labor delegation, traveling in Rus¬ sia, came to a huge, ultramodern factory. When asked who owned the factory, the workers replied that they did. " We won every¬ thing here,” they said. The American then asked whose were the few gleaming new cars parked near the factory. " Oh, the commis¬ sars use those, ’ was the reply. Next year, a Soviet delegation came to an American factory, and learned that a business tycoon, Johc Smith, owned it. They then turned to the great ocean of parke: cars nearby, stretching almost to the horizon, and asked who owne: them. " We do,” the workers replied. " You mean you ride in them? 4 the astonished Russians asked. " Well, who else?” was the reply. Mass production is just one example of the United State, genius for applying science to man. Such devices as the transistor and loser, inventions of American industry immediately foun: use in a great variety of areas, from weapons systems to medicine A loser was used to cure a retrical tumor only months after the loser was developed. However, it is in the field of food production that the United States’ image is most impressive. Farm technolor is extremely efficient in this country; 8% of the United Starts labor force produces all the food America needs, and more. As enormous surplus exists, and this is truly astonishing in a wor.d which is chronically hungry. Technolohy has given the Um:t: States a high standard of living and has flourished within :ha standard. It takes a certain economic level to support a technolog and thus there is an uneveness of technology between advance: and backward economies which can sometimes act unfavorably ■ the United States’ image. A Brazilian peasant might favor ne Communist Party in his country because he feels that it can gen only from the betterment of the peasants, while rich Ameriar interests can only lose if the peasant’s lot is improved. Nevenc:- less, thi s is a back-handed tribute to American technology; Ameri¬ can technology is too good. Technology has made America what it is, and the counrr.ii of the world seek to imitate the United States. Why this is so m very well explained by Arnold Toynbee: " For the great non-Werr- ern majority of the human race, being modern, scientific, ui democratic, are so many ways of going Western way of life? Ti answer is in the four words of proverb: ’Nothing succeds _M success.’ ” fl Mark Szpakowsk: 164 % THE FOREIGN AID Recently, the United States Government granted a huge foreign aid loan to Brazil. This grant was essential to help oppose communist groups operating in Brazil. However, our government gave this aid, fully realizing that most of the Brazilian people will never feel the influence of this loan. The Brazilian government will use the money for financing heavy industry to bolster the economy, not directly to raise the standard of living by buying food or providing better education. At the same time our govern¬ ment is trying to combat communism, communists have infiltrated much of the Brazilian Labor Party and at the time of the loan, an international meeting of Communist delegates was held in Rio de Janeiro with the permission of the Brazilian government. This incident does not decry the granting of foreign aid by our govern¬ ment; it rather strengthens the purpose of aid. Foreign Aid is subdivided into two types, military and economic, whose main purpose is to combat the spread of Com¬ munism in the Free World. Military aid is given to free nations not only to protect them from intimidation by a Communist force but also to keep order within the countries themselves where sub¬ versive groups wreak havoc with unstable governments. Remem¬ ber the aid the United States has sent to the Congo through the United Nations to bolster the weakened government? Economic aid is used to secure the image of America in for¬ eign countries, developing nations by raising the standard of liv¬ ing and creating educational facilities to make the people self- supporting. It tries to eliminate the ignorance, poverty, and dis¬ content upon which Communism thrives. Many nations look to the United States for this aid because they feel that as a rich nation, it is our duty to help them reach our level of wealth. The effectiveness of foreign aid is the subject of a report by the Clay Committee, a civilian committee headed by General Lu¬ cius Clay. In the report, the committee tells of two types of situa- tions which make the effectiveness of foreign aid doubtful. The first type is seen when we spend years supporting a country fin¬ ancially and economically, only to have the country rebuff us by turning Communist or by nationalizing all the industry and turn- CONTROVERSY ing Socialist. We are actually in a race in Central and South America, where we are trying to educate the people and raise the standard of living, before the governments change in make-up and force us to start all over again. The second problem in the effectiveness of foreign aid is caused by dishonest foreign governments. Most of these countries play the game of " Foreign Aid Blackmail”. The rules are simple: (1) Ask the United States for a huge loan with little intention of repaying it; (2) When they refuse you, tell them you will have to turn to Communist help and perhaps become entwined in the Communist system; (3) Take your money back home with you. These foreign leaders use the money for all aypes of projects, such as building a summer home or palace at some exotic spot or buying most of the land in the country to control economically as well as politicaly. Many suggestions have been made in the Clay report to make foreign aid more effective. I feel that one of the best proposals is to create a foreign aid institute where we could learn more about the customs and philosophies of the underdeveloped nations. With careful study we can best interpret the needs of these countries. Some of the peoples we deal with have a different idea of freedom from ours. We must be careful to change their beliefs make many resistants to change. Financial advisors could also be sent to decrease the amount of wasteful spending in these countries. Finally, I suggest that, more than money, we send more tractors, machinery, food, medicine, and technologists, not only to eliminate this wasteful spending, but also to bolster our own in¬ dustry by having the United States manufacture these items under government contract. Indeed, if we are to eliminate the poverty and discontent in many of these nations, we must support the American image by sending foreign aid. When education and happiness are brought to all the people of the world, they will surely be living with dem¬ ocratic ideals in a free society. Roger B. True 165 AMERICAN YOUTH OVERSEAS Of course, the Crossroaders have run into many problems. The biggest ones have been a " cultural shock”, which comes with an absence of all familiar things and customs, and illness caused by unfamiliar and unpalatable food and unsanitary conditions. The social customs in some African nations were very rigid. For ex¬ ample, one government official who walked on sacred ground re¬ ceived a spear in the back. America’s segregation problems has been of great interest to Africans who have seen it used as propaganda not only by the Russians, but also by the colonizing French, to show that their brand of imperialism is not so bad after all. For the Crossroaders, living in Africa is quite an experience, for the whites become the minority and the Negroes the majority. Negro members of the Crossroads group have found great difficulity in " explaining” segregation to the Africans. The Peace Corps tries to improve world conditions, to help foreign countries meet their need for skilled manpower. For ex¬ ample, when the British pulled out of Tanganyika, Peace Corps technicians filled the gap. Members attempt to make friends at the grass roots, for it has been stated that we are winning the governments and losing the people. The Peace Corps does not aim to revolutionize the world, not to carry the " white man’s burden” in " underdeveloped countries.” To make the Peace Corps as independent of pressure as pos¬ sible, it has been kept separate from our foreign aid programs. Peace Corps running expenses per year, according to Senator Hu¬ bert Humphrey, are less than the cost of firing one Atlas missile, even one that does not work. It is hard to keep the cold war out of the question, but the Peace Corps is not there to stop Communism, although people say that if we had really wanted to help mankind, we would have done this long ago. The Peace Corps works only on projects that are requester by the host country, and that meet certain specifications. However these are sometimes carried out in cooperation with other organ.- zations, such as mission groups, CARE, or International Volun¬ tary Services. Corpsmen work on projects in health, education agriculture, and rural development. Peace Corpsmen are door , not advisors. The Peace Corps has sent English teachers to the Phil¬ ippines, community development workers to Chile, agriculture workers to St. Lucia, teachers to Ghana and Nigeria, nurses, doc¬ tors, and laboratory technicians to Malaya, and public heaH- workers to Thailand. As you can see, the Peace Corps wants people with spec::.. talents or experience. However, many of the projects do not re¬ quire a college education. In fact less than half of the first 4800 applicants had completed college. Peace Corpsmen undergo intense training, for the direcrcrs of the Peace Corps realize that the American is the final produr: of centuries of civilization and technology, while the African. ::r example, is the child of stagnation and colonialism. The America will have to spend all his time with his African counterpart, beux a friend, a teacher, a leader, a critic, and, above all, a student. Hr must be careful, for he will be judged wherever he goes. The po¬ tential for frustration is high, and the volunteers came to real_:c that they are making only a small dent in the problems and wj not be around to see the results. Work overseas is, nevertheless, a rewarding life for the young people who represent America in the improvement of world. We all should certainly be proud of them, and I know tine students of Natick High will have much to contribute to the sa_-ie goal, using their talent to spread the cause of freedom. I Linda Darling 166 POLITICAL AND MILITARY INFLUENCES Last year, when Robert F. Kennedy was touring South East Asia, he spoke to a group of college students in Indonesia. When he had finished, one student rose and questioned him on the United States economy, describing it as " monopolistic capitalism ’. Over one-half the audience erupted into applause. Mr. Kennedy then asked, " You are well-educated. What is it that you understand to be going on in the United States that fits this description? " The students sat down. Mr. Kennedy then addressed the rest of the audience. There was no response. Later, shortly before he was to leave Indonesia, he held a seminar for thirty students, five of them Communists. They also called the United States colonialistic and imperialistic. Mr. Kenne¬ dy then asked one student, a Communist, about Hungary and Ber¬ lin. The response - " Don’t discuss detail. " After the meeting, five students came to Mr. Kennedy and told him of their agreement with him. He asked why they hadn’t spoken up at the seminar. " You just don’t say that sort of thing among students. ”, was the reply. Upon his return to the United States, Mr. Kennedy talked to several exchange students from South America. He found that the children of South America were being taught about the nine¬ teenth century United States with the great monopolies and trusts, and this was the impression that they were left with. Obviously, this shows that the United States is failing in an area where Communists are succeeding. The image that the majority of a young country receives from the leading nations of the world will tend to push that coun¬ try towards either democracy or communism. Thus, we can see the importance that the image of a country holds. Although some people in foreign nations know and recog¬ nize sports or entertainment figures, they receive the real image of a nation predominantly through its leader and his policies. Politically and militarily, President John F. Kennedy has greatly affected our image abroad. On the national level, his decisions in regard to the steel industry and the problem of in¬ tegration have demonstrated to the other nations of the world the attitude of the United States toward many problems that they themselves must face either now, or in the future. On the international level, President Kennedy has boosted our image to the highest point that it has achieved since the end of World War II. His action during the Cuban Crisis startled, shocked and changed the outlook of many people. Ever since World War II we had been rather sleepy. The Communists had started to move and we didn’t seem to be able to stop them. In 1949 Nato was formed to stop the advance in Europe. It succeeded. Then Seato and the OAS were formed. This was fine, but the people of the world were still seeing, hearing, and feeling the Communist march. The United States wasn’t doing anything, at least, anything that was being effective against this Communist barrage of propaganda. In 1956 the United States suffered a blow that did untold damage to our world image. This was Hungary. Radio Free Europe had told the people of Hungary that the L nited States would support them if they revolted. The Hungar¬ ians knew they had no chance against Russian tanks and artillery, but with United States aid, they felt they had a chance. They revol¬ ted and the Russians withdrew, waiting for the United States reaction. Hungary pleaded with us for help. Then a reply was sent, " We will give you twenty million dollars worth of aid in cotton. " The Hungarians were crushed by the news. Then Russians came back and retook Hungary. The Cuban Crisis has restored some of the confidence foreign nations once held in us, for we finally had stood up and told the Russians, " That’s enough! Now get out. " It proved that we were willing to fight for what we felt and knew was right, and that the Communists could not do whatever they pleased. Now that Russia realizes that we will not sit still while thev 0 try to overrun us, they have become a little more wary. The big¬ gest problem that they, along with the United States, must now face is nuclear weapons. It has been estimated that by 1970, twen¬ ty nations will have obtained nuclear weapons. This fact, which the Russians are completely aware of, is pushing the United States and Russia to a nuclear power agreement, for we both realize that with so many nations gaining weapons, only a major disaster could follow and possible the end of the world. Thus, our only hope lies in a test ban and disarmament treaty. Once we achieve this, we will be hoping that our image is strong enough to influence the other nations of the world into following our example. Therefore, both politically and military our aim should be to acheive this test ban and nuclear disarmanent agreement, tor if this world is to survive this seems to be our only hope for a true peace. John C. Warren 16


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