Nashua High School - Tusitala Yearbook (Nashau, NH)

 - Class of 1942

Page 1 of 140

 

Nashua High School - Tusitala Yearbook (Nashau, NH) online yearbook collection, 1942 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 140 of the 1942 volume:

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N M pn fp 'iw -N b . 4' -.11, ' ,'4f:Z1,,,, r . 5.4 3 ""fJ5H'- " ' " - 4pg',iA ,' 4,1 Qy xfflf' , W: '11 'ii 9' L " wg X , jv ' 'Q w Wg Q ' Aw? ' . .vwziilif ' wif' - '17 gf ' ik ' M41 gl' ""1 '1W.,' ,, V 1 V 1. ' 'Q' N- , F f.,,.1 'W' 1? :X ' - wg' ' . '4'.?1?: '.YHk, ', ""w?W.1 .1 ,,'gQ4'P.Si,Q. ,l'wQ L 5j! 4 W 44 4 :Q 'nw ,M . H ,G 1, M 4 ' 1 1-,V a41: '51 Q j,1i13I'M' Yi ,. as Q' A Ji -- Q E 5: 5 52 E r 5 F, Q2 E .3- .v E 94 N 5 4: lu a l Q Tu s i ta l a TELLER OF TALES 1942 "Non Nobis Solum, Sed Mundo" "Not for ourselves alone, but for the world." PUBLISHED BY THE Class of 1942, Nashua High School NASHUA, NEW HAMPSHIRE X X Foreword This year marks the twenty-fifth anniversary of our class book. In 1917 the first issue bore the appropriate name of Taps. Since then the name has changed no less than seven times. The title in 1918 was our own Tusitala, but in 1919 it changed again to Acts and Revelations. The 1920 issue carried the heading Lest We Forget, and in 1921 Doings and Undoings was the name. Commentaries, 1922, and The Swastika, 1923, complete the list of titles, for in 1924 the name was standardized to Tusitala. ln each issue there have been different pupils, different editors, and from time to time different teachers, but our purpose has always been the same. This purpose cannot be expressed more clearly or memorably than in the foreword of Taps in 1917: "If the pages of our book bring back to you the days when we worked and played together, its purpose is ful- filled." THE EDITORS MISS HELEN COFFEY Dedication To Miss Helen Coffey we dedicate this Tusirala. For thirty-live years she has given her untiring efforts and devotion to teaching the students of Nashua High School, and our own remembrances of her will be among our most cherished in years tO COITIC. THE EDITORS T W N' N ,fOfwf rf? fu 'i ,f 1 -,,,. ,M I f ff X jr -:Qu y fn ,f X A I ' X ff I ,X 6, , , f , 1 4- an fi E L g uf- 2 2 - ' . Fac ul t Ms- ' -, -- W- -...-ei' -. ,. 13. , 3 5 lf I i HEADMASTER WALTER S. NESMITH F acult 'A 'xq' i Q g li - Edmund Keefe Dorothy Dale Robert Dion joshua Ainsworth Doris S. Barnes Yvonne Bernardin Mary Bingham Myrtle Brooks Genevieve Campbell Grace Campbell Herbert Canfield Bessie Clancy Sidney Clarkson Helen Coffey Elizabeth Cornell F acult Daniel Connor Margaret Cote Martha Cramer Isabelle Dionne V ,. ,-'Q-S. rip 5.5: , 33 M ,, .,., ,,,Q M in as M X ,S QQ an we in ,e as Thelme:Doe Loretta Dolon Lillian Dowd Mary Gallagher fl nm M V K :Ez ,.:,, .V K Helen Hallisey Mildred l-lallisey Charles Harvey Forrest Hatch gg rK,3, yr di is 'f S Er ami Florence Hills Eda Hoitt Blanche Kagarise William Kennedy N tg Q Joseph Kilbane NPV un. Anthony Morandos Evelyn C. Nesmith F A 1 l u 3 F acult Joseph Lee Margaret McGlynn , lf N e ooho L :hr ..,:,.,, A S' S "R . N L Mable R Noyes A fr X f al Helen Lord Anne McWeeney Fixx ' qi K' of ii. 5' 'f ' e 3 5 William O'Neil Marion Lord Patrick Morley ... .e..,r. xeww 1 r e -We L 5"ff555g1fG . L , W- .Q fi, 3555? wus, fag , fi Leonard Paquette Raymond Pendleton Paul Phaneuf Mary Ryan Henry Sharpe F acult Mary Shea Robert Slavin Helen Small Francis Sullivan May E. Sullivan Olga Tsiantes Ruth Walstrom Webster White Josephine Williams Elmer Wilson Class Officials Senior Uf icers President - Richard Messier Vice-President - Eleanor Reich Secretary - - Anne Daukas Business Manager Eugene Molloy Junior 0 ' icers President Paul Moriarity Vice President Genevieve Pietuch Secretary - Andrea Savage Business Manager - - Thomas Pipilas Tusitala Stag Editor-in-Chief John Barry Associate Editors Barbara Hayden Raymond Fortier Richard Messier Nancy Pickering Ruth Kirkpatrick Arlene Hagerty Constance Clough Ex-officio Eleanor Reich Eu Assistant Editors Constance Fossa Thomas Hill Helen Taylor Carol Dickey gene Molloy Muriel Hunnewell Anne Daukas Charles Maguire William Hill Marjorie Ware Thomas Pipilas Nancy Pickering Joan Brewster James Anagnost Miss Cramer Miss Dowd Ar! Edilors Stuart Groves Kenneth Cross Prophets Barbara Hayden Charles Maguire Advisors Mr. Canlield Miss Cornell Miss Walstrom Miss Noyes W Student Bod , A' 1 , ,, , X L XX , X fc b 4, RFP Sir QQ QQQQQ H norfloll John Barry Barbara Hayden Charles Maguire Dorothy Bibber Dorothy Young Annie Daukas Anne Winer Joan Brewster Mary Maguire Shirley Mercer Eleanor Reich Josephine Dooley Carol Dickey Helen Lantzas Lois Littlefield Dorothy Knight Gloria Jennings Evanthia Russa Leslie Erb Jennie Pietuch Marilyn Olsen William Hill Josephine Wilson Harold Lalmond Richard Messier Constance Douville Robert Gaudette Jean Laflame Adonios Adamakos VIRGINIA ROCHELLE, Valedictorian Raymond Fortier Marjorie Ware Madeline Dube Muriel Hunnewell Gloria Turcotte Constance Clough Muriel Forrest Marjorie Pike Wanda Kayros Isabelle Luce John David Peterson Mary Fahey Eleanor Fissette Edward Soucy Marion O'Brien Lucille Buxton Florence LaRose Louise Stoehrer Thelma Costaras Irene Ricard Robert Desmarais Shirley Burnham Wilfrid Girard Rudolph Jasalavich Annette Poulin Marion Smith Michael James Georgette Girouard Helen Taylor Andrea Savage Bessie Fanos Julia Papademas Patricia Joyce Demetrios Anagnost Grace Cote Webster Vslhite Elaine Campbell Edith Harris Maurice Demers Ruth Kirkpatrick Anna Birchall George Moraros Preston Walsh Bertrand Roberge Lucille Dachos Alva Benjamin Francis Boyle Thelma Besse Rita Houde June Renihan Shirley Foster Roger Livermore Robert Ackerman Nancy Pickering Walter Kopka Anna Lusczyk Natalie Woolley C. Constance Lucier John Tamulonis Q fBalIQ+l fr'1Q i X lk f 45 31 .D--45" ,jg ix' ' P Q o t of - so aaaa i ts gg 'iff ll ' t Q- 'f l lfllc fifr Race Most Popular Boy Most Popular Girl Most Brilliant Boy Most Brilliant Girl Most Ambitious Most Apt to Succeed Most Eloquent Class Wit Most Dignified Best Natured Most Bashful Boy Most Bashful Girl Prettiest Girl Handsomest Boy Best Boy Dancer Best Girl Dancer Best Boy Athlete Best Girl Athlete Class Giggler Best Dressed Boy Best Dressed Girl Class Flirt Class Man Hater Class Woman Hater Class Actor Class Actress Class Blutfer Class Romeo Class Juliet Class Noisiest Class Bookworm Class Politician Class Clown Class He-Man Class Oomph Girl Class Optimist Class Pessimist Class Sheik Win Richard Messier Anne Daukas John Barry Virginia Rochelle John Barry Charles Maguire Joan Brewster Donald Raiche Marjorie Pike Eugene Molloy Wilfrid Gerard Beth Legallee Marjory Ware William Hill Louis Ivalis Jean Laflame Paul Moriarity Bessie Vasilas Anna Birchall John Peterson Constance Lucier Francis Boyle Barbara Hayden Wilfrid Gerard Francis Boyle Joan Brewster Bertrand Roberge Robert Dignam Patricia Joyce Donald Raiche Virginia Rochelle Eugene Molloy Donald Raiche Robert Smith Eleanor Reich Anne Daukas Anna Birchall John Peterson Place Eugene Molloy Eleanor Reich Charles Maguire Mary Maguire Virginia Rochelle John Barry Anne Daukas Eugene Molloy Constance Clough Patricia Joyce Owen Griffin Helen Paton Dorothy Bibber Richard Kemp John Peterson Wanda Lojko Robert Richards Dorothy Cunningham Lois Littlefield William Hill Patricia Joyce Eleanor Reich Beth Legallee Owen Griffin Richard Messier Dorothy Bibber Bertrand Lafrance Karl Forward Natalie Holt Anna Birchall Barbara Hayden Norman Cadorette Victor Hudon Robert Richards Shirley Burnham Patricia Joyce Isabelle Luce William Hill Show Paul Moriarity Bessie Vasilas Raymond Fortier Barbara Hayden Anne Daukas Joan Brewster Charles Maguire John Barry Anne Winer Charles Cannon Walter Clifford Marion Smith Loretta Brosor Joseph Swekla James Diggins Gloria Bathalon Joseph Swekla Georgia Caras June Renihan Paul McLaughlin Constance Fossa Leon Trottier Helen Paton Walter Clifford Edward Dumaine Anna Birchall Francis Boyle William Hill Eleanor Reich Robert Dinan Gloria Turcotte Ulysses Mocas Marcelle Prince Louis Ivalis Bessie Vasilas Regina Vassar John Gordon Francis Boyle ROBERT ACKERMAN "BOB" "All work and no play Would have made Bob a dull bog." Favorite Expression: You jerk! Immediate Plans: Work in the mill. Ambition: Machinist. Junior Red Cross III: Upper Fourth. ADONIOS ADAMAKOS "TONY" "Prince of personalily, handsome. kind. and true." Favorite Expression: Square. Immediate Plans: Devise a plan for making gasoline from water. Ambition: Go to college. A. A. Show I: Football I: Christmas Assembly II: Upper Quarter. ELIAS ADAMAKOS "LOUlE" "I watch the world qo 'roundf' Favorite Expression: Take a powder, brother. Immediate Plans: Work. Ambition: Be a successful worker. Intramural Football. Softball. Baseball. Basketball I: Volleyball I: Junior Red Cross III. ELLIOTT ADAMS HEL.. "One of the boys." Favorite Expression: Hi. Chum. Immediate Plans: To go into a machine shop. Ambition: To retire at thirty-live. Ski Club II. III: Junior Red Cross III. DWIGHT ALEXANDER "WHITIE" "For all his quietness his mind was busy." Favorite Expression: Pretty sharp. Immediate Plans: Join the Marines. Ambition: To be a machinist. Junior Red Cross III. JOHN ALUKONIS "LUKE" H1-I town that boasts inhabitants like me Can have no lack of qood society." lfavorite Expression: None. Immediate Plans: Defense work. Ambition: Army Air Corps. Junior Red Cross III. DEMIETRIOS ANAGNOST "JIMMY" "You hear that boy laughing? You think he's ull fun, But Ihe angels laugh, too. at the good he has done." lfavorite Expression: Duc to unforeseen circumstances. Immediate Plans: Night salesmanship school. Ambition: Salesman. Intramural Football: Baseball: Softball: Basketball I: Gym Festival I: Graduation Usher II: Baseball Manager and Reporter II: Junior Red Cross III: Publicity Com- mittee, Senior Play III: Publicity Manager. Baseball III: Class Prophet: Upper Quarter. DAVID ARNOLD "DAVE" "A smile that uJon't come off." Favorite Expression: What's cooking? Immediate Plans: Defense worker. Ambition: Join the Marines. Band I, II. MADELINE AVARD "MADDIE" "The lass from the Green Mountains." lfavorite Expression: Oh gosh! Immediate Plans: Business college. Ambition: Be a scientific farmer. Ski Club III: Junior Red Cross II, III. MURIEI. BAHNER ...JON "I know I am-that simplest bliss Thu! millions of my brothers miss." Iiavorite Expression: Are-you kiddin'? Immediate Plans: To loaf. Ambition: 'Ito succeed in whatever I undertake. Glee Club Ill: Junior Red Cross III. ALFREDA BARRETTE "FREDA" "Ambition is the growth of euerq climb." Favorite Expression: I'm having a swell time. Immediate Plans: Ofhce work. Ambition: Be a good stenographer. Art Club I, II: Ushering Committee, Senior Play. JOHN BARRY "SONNY" "The best road is straiqht ahead." Favorite Expression: I'm beat. Immediate Plans: Go to bed for a month. Ambition: Sports writer. Intramural Softball I, II: Junior Red Cross III: Press Club III: Editor-in-Chief Tusitala III: Upper Quarter: Class Orator. ELIZABETH JANE BATCI-IELDER "BETTY" "If you wish the pick of women take a good bachelor." Favorite Expression: Christmas Johnson. Immediate Plans: Work. Ambition: Be a secretary. Christmas Assembly I: Junior Red Cross II, III: Glee Club II, III: Ski Club III: Properties Committee. Senior Play. GLORIA BATHALON "GLC" "A pal to all and a grand qood sport." Favorite Expression: What's cookin'? Immediate Plans: Business college. Ambition: To be successful. Gym Festival I, II: A. A. Show I, II: Badminton I. II: Intramural Basketball I. II: Home Economics Club II, III: Junior Red Cross II, III, MARY BATURA "MAIMA" "It is harmful to no one to be silent." Favorite Expression: I don't know. Immediate Plans: To loaf. Ambition: Be a hairdresser. Junior Red Cross II, III. LILLIAN BEAULIEU "LILL" "She is steadfast as a star And yet the modest maiden." Favorite Expression: Solid. Immediate Plans: Find work. Ambition: Civil Service. Gym Festival I: A. A. Show I: Intramural Basketball I: Home Economics Club II, III: Junior Red Cross III. ANDREW BELANGER "BUDDY" "Better late than never," Favorite Expression: Nice kid. but who likes kids? Immediate Plans: To kill a Jap. Ambition: To kill Hitler. ALVA MURIEL BENJAMIN "BENJIE" "I'm happiest when I'm talking." Favorite Expression: Hey. Maybelle! Immediate Plans: Business college. Ambition: Civil Service. Home Economics Club III: Dramatics Club III: Junior Red Cross II. III: Gym Festival I: Athletic Association I, II. III: Upper Quarter. ROLAND BERNARD "KELLY" "Life's a pleasant t'nst1'tut1'on Let us take it as it comes." Favorite Expression: You ain't kidding. Immediate Plans: Keep working in a store. Ambition: Own a store of my own some day. TI-IELMA E. BESSE "TI-IELlVlIE" "1 am never conscious of my own wit Until I bark my shins against it." Favorite Expression: Iss dot you. Josef? Immediate Plans: Defense work. Ambition: Horticulturist. Glee Club I. II: Junior Red Cross I, II, III: Quarter. Upper DOROTHY ARLENE BIBBER "DOT" "Ah, life could he so beautiful-qet never is Favorite Expression: Sharp. Immediate Plans: College. Ambition: Marriage. Press Club III: Ski Club II, III: Dramatic Club I. II: Glee Club I. II: Tatiler Staff I. II. III: Junior Red Cross II, III: Senior Play III: Christmas Assemblies I. III: "Pride and Prejudice" III: Upper Quarter. ANNA MARIE BIRCHALL "But still her tongue ran on." Favorite Expression: I think you're mean! Immediate Plans: Work or U. N. H. Ambition: Marriage. Press Club III: Debating Club III: Dramatics Club I. II: Glee Club II, III: Junior Red Cross: Christmas As- sembly III: Senior Play: Upper Quarter. REED BLANCHARD " 'Tis far better to know that life is sweet." Favorite Expression: O. yea. Immediate Plans: Northeastern University. Ambition: Be a millionaire. Junior Red Cross III. RITA I.. BOGDONAS "BOGI" "With thee conversing I forget the wary." Favorite Expression: Don't let it worry ya. Immediate Plans: Go in training. Ambition: Be a nurse. Tumbling I: Intramural Volleyball I: Gym Festival I: Intramural Softball: Basketball I, III: Glee Club I. III: Junior Red Cross II, III. ROGER BOLDUC "BAI.DY" "There is a right waq to do euerqthingf' Favorite Expression: Hey, midget. Immediate Plans: Work in a shoe shop. Ambition: Be a machinist. Intramural Football. Softball, Basketball, Volleyball I: Track I, II: Baseball III: Stage Committee, Senior Play. RUSSELL BOLES "RUSTY" A'And did I dream and do I wake, Or did I wake and now but dream?" liavorite Expression: Hey. ierk, Immediate Plans: Army. Ambition: Millionaire. Zodiac Club l: Junior Red Cross I. II, III. EUCLID BOUCI-lER "E-UTCI-I" "Friends such as these are hard to find." Iiavorite Expression: You ain't kidding. Immediate Plans: Get out of high school. Ambition: Aeronautical engineer. Intramural lfootball. Baseball, Softball, Basketball, Volleyball. Tumbling l: A. A. Show l. OLIVETTE BOUCI-IER HOLLY" "Joy rises in me like a summers morn." liavorite Expression: I-luhf lmmediate Plans: Work. Ambition: Work in a dress shop. Art Club I: Gym Ifestival I: Junior Red Cross II, III: Usher. Senior Play. FRANCIS LOUIS BOYLE "SONNY" "How1loue to study! l l" liavorite Expression: You're solid, kid! Immediate Plans: Preparatory school. Ambition: Join the air force. Gym Festival l: Christmas Assembly I: Ski Club I, ll. lil: Graduation Usher Il: Baseball III: Press Club lll: Senior Play: Upper Quarter. JOAN BREWSTER "JOANIE" "Active always, acting ever, Witty and merry, decidedly clever." Iiavorite Expression: 'I'hat's scrummy. Immediate Plans: Swarthmore College. Ambition: To know a lot. Debating Club l: Glee Club I, II, III: Tatller Staff I, ll, Editor-in-Chief Ill: Christmas Assemblies I, II, IIIg Gym Festival l: Intramural Basketball I: Dramatics Club I, President Il: Ski Club II, III: Junior Red Cross, Pres- ident ll, III: Criginal Play Committee II, Second Prize lll: Press Club Ill: Senior Play III: D. A. R. Represen- tative lll: Upper Quarter: Prophetess. LUCILLE BRODEUR "The mildest manner and the aentlest heart." Favorite Expression: I don't believe it. Immediate Plans: Nursing school. Ambition: Nurse. Home Economics Club I: Lunch Counter III: Junior Red Cross III. LORETTA BROSOR "RED" "Wcnn7an's hair is a crown of qloruf' Favorite Expression: Oh. fiddlesticksf Immediate Plans: Oflice work. Ambition: Be a policewoman. Home Economics Club II, III: Junior Red Cross III. HELEN BROWN "CHICKORY" "Some say she does. she saus she doesn't, But we think she does. at that." Favorite Expression: Keep 'em flying. Immediate Plans: Business college. Ambition: Typist. ROBERT BUCK "ROB" "Sober, but not serious. Quiet, but not idle." Favorite Expression: ls that so? Immediate Plans: Machine shop. Ambition: Machinist. Junior Red Cross III. SHIRLEY BURNHAM "Sl-IEEKSH "Lei joy, temperunce, and repose Slum the door in the dor1or's nose." Favorite Expression: Oh my. yesf Immediate Plans: Art school. Ambition: Commercial artist. Art Club I, II, III: Decorating Committees I, II. Ill Orchestra l, II: Music Festival I: Tattler Reporter I A. A. Show ll: Junior Red Cross III: Ski Club III Costume Committee, Senior Play: Upper Quarter. JOAN BURNS "Catch Ihul qlin! of 7?7l.SCl'llil'f in her vue." liavorite lfxpression: You mouse! lmmediate Plans: Stenographer. Ambition: Wturk. .lunior Red Cross lll. l.UCII.l.lE BUXTON ULU.. Ulxrtlffll hearted and full of fun Shes sure Io ruin uou before shes done" lfavorite lixpression: Such is life! Immediate Plans: Wturk. Ambition: Successful life. Home Economics Club l. ll, Ill: Junior Red Cross II lll: Press Club III: Costume Committee, Senior Play Upper Quarter. NORMAND CADORETTE "CADDY" "Now take for example. nw case: l'L't1 ti bright, 1il7lL'IIl't'lllLll'bftll-f7." lfavorite lfxpression: Oli. nuts! Immediate Plans: College. Ambition: Politician. Debating Club ll, lll: Junior Red Cross III. ALBIERT S. CAMERON "Al," 'N "I let others worry: I have fun." Favorite lfxpression: No kidding. Immediate Plans: N. ll. U. Ambition: XVest Point. Band ll. lll: Music l7estival l, ll: Orchestra l, II. Ill lZl,AlNl2 V. CAMPBELL "Sl.UG" "Thu prelttf dimples of her cheek and thin,- her smiles." liavorite lfxpression: Oh. stop! Immediate Plans: College. Ambition: Marriage. Press Club lll: Junior Red Cross III: Upper Quarter CHARLES CANNON "TINY" ' He was so tall-ah, so tall." I'avorite Expression: What you know? Immediate Plans: Have to wait and see. Ambition: Machinist, Track II: Football II, III: Basketball I. II. GEORGIA CARAS "GEORGIE" "Athletics, my friend, is the elixir of life." Favorite Expression: Don't get excited. Immediate Plans: Telephone operator. Ambition: Happy life . Intramural Softball. Captain I, II: Basketball I, Cap- tain II, III: Volleyball Captain I, II: Gym Festival I, II: Dramatics Club II: Athletic Association Show II: Tum- bling II: Home Economics Club II, III: Junior Red Cross II, III: Senior Play Usher III. NORMAN CARON "Still water runs deep." Favorite Expression: Yes, sir. Immediate Plans: Army Air Corps. Ambition: Air Corps Pilot. Lunch Counter Ill. RITA CARON "REET" "Never troufle trouble, till trouble troubles uou." Favorite Expression: No kiddin'. Immediate Plans: Work in office. Ambition: Civil Service. Home Economics Club I, II: Glee Club II, III: Junior Red Cross II, III: Christmas Assembly III. LORRAINE CARTER "These little things are areal to man." Favorite Expression: Gee whiz. Immediate Plans: Defense work. Ambition: Nurse. Junior Red Cross II, III. LORRAINE CASE "I.ORRY" "The joy of youth her eyes displaqedf' Favorite Expression: No kidding. Immediate Plans: To take a long vacation. Ambition: Stenographer. Home Economics Club I, II. III: Junior Red Cross II, III: Intramural Basketball II: Music Festival I, II. LOUIS CHEVRETTE "CHEVY" "You have waked me too soon, I must slumber again." Favorite Expression: What's the story? Immediate Plans: Defense work. Ambition: Machinist. Gym Festival I: Intramural Basketball I. EARL CLEMENT "CLEM" "True gentleman: courteous and considerate to the vert: humblest." Favorite Expression: What's the story? Immediate Plans: Hartford. Connecticut. Ambition: Remain an old bach. WALTER CLIFFORD "SLUGGER" "Slow but sure. he won his wau into uou Favorite Expression: Cut it out. Immediate Plans: Johns Manville. Ambition: Join the Nashua Country Club. Golf I, II, III: Junior Red Cross II. III. CONSTANCE CLOUGH "CONNIE" "A perfect woman. nobly planned To warn, to comfort, and command. Favorite Expression: Ye gods. Immediate Plans: College. Ambition: Social worker. . Dramatics Club I: Junior Red Cross II r heart." H III: Press Club III: Senior Play Usher: Upper Quarter. CONRAD COFFEY "CONNIE" "For he's a jolly good fellow." Favorite Expression: Beat it. Immediate Plans: Work in a dairy. Ambition: Own a dairy. Glee Club II: Junior Red Cross II, III. CARI, COHEN "COKE" "And if thou wouldst be happu, learn to please." Favorite Expression: Hi ya, chum. Immediate Plans: Take a P. G. Ambition: Aeronautical engineer. Cvym Festival I: Band I, II, III: Orchestra I, II, III: Music Festival I, II: Track I. II, III: Tumbling II, III. TI-IELMA COSTARAS "ln her own quiet and diligent way, She accomplished her lush day after day." Favorite Expression: Quiet, kiddie. Immediate Plans: Office work. Ambition: Clerical worker. Home Economics Club I: Junior Red Cross II. III: Upper Quarter. CLAIRE E. COTE "For a belief friend look no further." Favorite Expression: Hi ya. pal. Immediate Plans: Defense Work. Ambition: Housewife. Intramural Basketball I: Ciym Festival I: Junior Red Cross II, III: Home Economics Club III. GRACE M. COTE "RED" "She seems for diqnitif composed and hiqh exploit." Favorite Expression: So help me, Hannah! Immediate Plans: Secretary. , Ambition: Receive more education. Home Economics Club I, III: Junior Red Cross II. III: Press Club III: Upper Quarter. FQ RAYMOND COTE "PUNCI-IY" "I.ife's best ioy consists in peace and ease. Favorite Expression: You're no good, Immediate Plans: To learn a trade. Ambition: To succeed in life. Junior Red Cross III: Christmas Assembly I, SPIRO COUROUNIS "Men are of two kinds, and he ls of the hind l'd like to be." Favorite Expression: Take things as they come. Immediate Plans: Work. Ambition: Art teacher. Junior Red Cross III. DEMETRIOS COUTSONIKAS "CAPTAIN MARVEL" "He tasted not the food before him Only waited on the others." Favorite Expression: Be hard and live dangerous. Immediate Plans: Manchester Air Base. Ambition: Army. Intramural Football, Softball I: Stage Committee, Sen- ior Play III. EVELYN JEANNETTE COUTURE "EVE" "Shes not a flower-not a pearl. But just a wonderful, all-'round air!" Favorite Expression: Oh-'ohl Immediate Plans: Be a nurse. Ambition: Be an air hostess. Band I, II, III: Junior Red Cross II, III. FRANK K. CROSS "KENNY" "If laughter is contagious, just stand and catch his grin." Favorite Expression: Greetings. Gate! Immediate Plans: Get out of high school. Ambition: Air Corps. Art Club I, II, III: Decorating Committees I, II, III Properties Committee, Senior Play: Junior Red Cross III DOROTHY CUNNINGI-IAM "DOTTIE" "lt is nice to he natural if uou'rc naturallu nice." Favorite Expression: So theref Immediate Plans: Work. Ambition: Beauty culturist. Gym Festival I: Intramural Basketball I, II. III, Cap- tain II: Intramural Volleyball I. II. Captain I: Glee Club I, II. LUCILLE DACI-IOS ULU.. "She is gentle, quiet. and sedate, And as a pal-first rate." Favorite Expression: Godfrey. Immediate Plans: Ofiice work. Ambition: Nurse. Press Club III: Junior Red Cross III: Upper Quarter. LANE DAMON "Hts smile haunts me still." Favorite Expression: Why. suref Immediate Plans: Further my education. Ambition: To be a second Thomas Little. Gym Festival I: A. A. Show I: Art Club I, Il. III: Ski Club II. III: Tattler Staff Ill. Reporter I: Junior Red Cross Ill: Intramural Baseball I. II: Tumbling I. II: Ticket Committee. Senior Play: Decorating Committees. Junior and Senior Proms: Christmas Assemblies I. II, III. HERBERT DANDLEY, JR. "DANNY" "A smilinq face makes many fri'emis." Favorite Expression: Yumpin' yiminy. Immediate Plans: United States Army. Ambition: Flying cadet in the Marines. Track I. II, III: Graduation Usher Il: Lunch Counter III: Decoratinq Committees, Junior and Senior Proms: Easter and Christmas Assemblies I. II. III. ...I 4.-un .. ANNE DAUKAS "ANNIE" "Her heart is like a wuuside inn." Favorite Expression: You're not kidding me. are you? Immediate Plans: Work in card shop. Ambition: Succeed in life. Dramatics Club I: Intramural Softball I: Volleyball l. II: Basketball I, Il: Drill Team ll: Glee Club I. Il. III: Music Festival: Lunch Counter I. II. III: Christmas As- semblies I, II. III: Press Club III: Chairman, Ushering Committee, Senior Play III: Class Secretary III: Tusitala Staff III: Tattler Staff I. II: Junior Red Cross III: Elk's Essay Contest, Third Prize. II: Upper Quarter. MAURICE DEMERS "MAU-RICE" "Of beauty l'm a judge- and a qood judge, too." Iiavorite lixpression: Please and thank you. Immediate Plans: Work. Ambition: Fly. Junior Red Cross III: Upper Quarter. ROBERT DEPONTBRIAND "BOB" "He loves the game beyond the prize. Favorite Expression: None. Immediate Plans: Defense work. Ambition: Join the Navy. Intramural Basketball I: Basketball I: Football I. II: Baseball I. II. III: Junior Red Cross III. BRUCE DE QUOY "DECOY" "lr's little that it matters So long as youre alive." Favorite Expression: Bulloney. Immediate Plans: To go to an aviation mechanic train- ing school. Ambition: Secure aircraft and engine mechanic's rating. Ski Club III: Pride and Prejudice III. PAUL DE QUOY "To the world he wore a bashful look." Iiavorite Expression: Oh, brother. Immediate Plans: To go to college. Ambition: Work. . Ski Club III: Junior Red Cross III. VIRGINIA MARIE DESCLOS 'AGENAH "Where theres fun she's always in it." Favorite Expression: Wal. whadya know? Immediate Plans: To secure a good position. Ambition: To be successful in whatever my work is to be. Art Club I. II. III: Economics Club III: Decorating Committee, Junior and Senior Proms I, II, III: Easter and Christmas Assemblies I, II, III. ROBERT DESMARAIS "BOB" "Intense and keen and sharp and clever." Favorite Expression: What's the story? Immediate Plans: Defense work. Ambition: To help win the war. Press Club III: Tafller Staff III: Lunch Counter I. II: Upper Ouarter. CAROL DICKEY "DICK" "Shes as modes! and mild In her ways as ll child." Favorite Expression: Gee. whiz! Immediate Plans: New Hampshire University. Ambition: Be a commercial photographer. Elk's Essay Contest. First Prize II: Press Club III: Tattler III: Junior Red Cross III: Upper Quarter. DONALD PAUL DIGGINS "DON" "He is Io be held in everlasting memoruf' Favorite Expression: O. K., Sis! Immediate Plans: Navv. Ambition: Naval Air Corps. Track I, II. JAMES DIGGINS ..DOG,. "Variety is the spree of life." Favorite Expression: Wha. suref Immediate Plans: Try to ect into General Electric. Ambition: Work for the New England Telephone Co. Gym Festival I: Track I. II: Intramural Sports: Foot- ball I. II, III: Baseball I. II, III: Softball I, II. III Basketball I. II: Volleyball I, II: Softball I. II. III Tumbling I. II. III. ROBERT JOSEPH DIGNAM "DIG" "O, wha! is that power he possesses ouer womenfu Favorite Expression: So what? Immediate Plans: To go to Senior Prom and have . good time. Ambition: To go to college and be a professional man Intramural Football I, Basketball I: Gym Festival I Football I, II, III: Tennis II, III: Ski Club II, III Christmas Assembly I: Graduation Usher II. ROBERT JOSEPH DINAN "BOB" "Merry as the day is lonq." Favorite Expression: Sakesl Immediate Plans: Machinist. Ambition: Flying cadet. Intramural Baseball I: Golf I. II. Captain III: Tattler Reporter II. Staff III: Graduation Usher II: Press Club III: Debating Club III: Junior Red Cross III: Lunch Counter III. DONALD DION "TUT" "Manners I possess that pu! my faults to rest." Favorite Expression: Solid! Immediate Plans: To work in a shop. Ambition: To play "semi-pro" or "pro" baseball. Junior Red Cross III. DRINETTE DIONNE "DRINY" "Hudson's help to humanlttfs humor." Favorite Expression: What? Really? Immediate Plans: Secretarial position. Ambition: Air pilot. Junior Red Cross II, III. EDMOND DIONNE "EDDY" "The worhinqman is the true intelligence, after all." Favorite Expression: Okay. Immediate Plans: Work at J. F. McElwain's. Ambition: To become a printer and get married. Band I. II, III: Orchestra I. II, III: Intramural Base- ball I: Ticket Committee. Senior Play III. PAUL DIONNE "With all the virtue of lhe average man." Favorite Expression: So what? Immediate Plans: Work. Ambition: To get out of school. Junior Red Cross III. PHILIP DIONNE "PHIL" "Mil strength is as the slrenath of ten Because my heart is pure." Favorite Expression: Yimminy Crickets. Immediate Plans: Earn a living. Ambition: To see the world. Intramural Football. Softball, Basketball. Volleyball. Tumbling I: Gym Festival I: Junior Red Cross III. WILI.IAM DOBENS "BILLY" A' 'Tis but one step toward mu destiny." Favorite Expression: Prove it. Immediate Plans: Work as an electrician. Ambition: To ,join the Navy. Ciym Festival I, II: Athletic Association Show I: Stage Committee, Senior Play: Baseball III: Intramural Basket- ball I, II, III: Volleyball I: Tumbling I, II, III. LILLIAN DOBROWOLSKA "LIL" "One hour of youthful ioy Is better than a lifetime of sadness." Favorite Expression: Hey, Maybelle. Immediate Plans: Recuperate. Ambition: To get into a football huddle. Intramural Volleyball I. Basketball II. III: Gym Festival I: A. A. Show I. II: Dramatics Club I: Glec Club II, III: Junior Red Cross II. III: Christmas Assem- blies II, III: Press Club III: Debating Club III: Senior Play Costume Committee III. MARY DOHERTY 'AIVIAYH "Silence is the mother of truth." Favorite Expression: You're not kidding. Immediate Plans: To work in an office. Ambition: To work at a civil service job. PATRICIA DONNELLY "PAT" "Silence is wisdom and gets friends." Favorite Expression: You ain't kiddin'. Immediate Plans: Defense work. Ambition: Nurse. Lunch Counter III. JOSEPHINE E. DOOLEY "TED" "At this she can't be beat, Keeping her books so nice and neat." Favorite Expression: Oh. boy. Immediate Plans: Work in an oflice. Ambition: Become the head of some department in a large industry. Junior Red Cross Ill: Upper Quarter. CONSTANCE DOUVIl-l.E "CONNIE" "The glass of fashion and the mold of form." Favorite Expression: What do you know? Immediate Plans: Work. Ambition: To be successful. Gym Festival I: Junior Red Cross Ill: Press Club Ill: Upper Quarter. ALBERT DOWNEY. JR. "TINY" "A pal to all. and a grand good sport." Favorite Expression: What others know should never interest you. Immediate Plans: Work. Ambition: Mechanical work. Costume Committee. Senior Play Ill. JOSEPH DRABINOWICZ "JOEY" "Ambition knows no hound." Favorite Expression: I don't know. Immediate Plans: Go to a defense school. Ambition: Learn a machinist's trade. GEORGE DRACOPOULOS "GEO" "Happy am I: from care 1'm free." Favorite Expression: Hit the line and hit it hard. Immediate Plans: Save enough money to go to college. Ambition: First a successful lawyer and then turn to politics. Intramural Softball. Basketball, Volleyball I. LOUIS DRACOPOULOS 'ADRAKO KID" "The answer to a maiden's prauerf' Favorite Expression: Yea! Solid! Immediate Plans: Work. Ambition: Become an aviator. Intramural Football I, II, Softball I, II, Basketball I. II, III: Gym Festival I: Junior Red Cross III. ALBENA M. DRASKAWICH UAL., "An amiable girl, and one of good qualities." Favorite Expression: Yeh. Immediate Plans: Work. Ambition: Dietitian. Home Economics Club I, II: Junior Red Cross II, III. JULIA BERTHA DUBE "JULIE" "Her laugh was verily a giggle. n Favorite Expression: You ain't kiddin'. Immediate Plans: Take a rest. Ambition: Get an easy job and good pay. Gym Festival I: Junior Red Cross II, III: Home Economics Club II, III. MADELEINE DUBE "BLONDIE" "A soft voice bespeahs a gentle manner." Favorite Expression: For goodness sake! Immediate Plans: Office work. Ambition: Be an accountant. Home Economics Club I. II, III: Junior Red Cross II, III: Tattler Reporter III: Ticket Committee, Senior Play: Upper Quarter. HARVEY DUCHENEAU "BABE" "1t's the mood that he's in." Favorite Expression: Solid Mac. Immediate Plans: Work in a machine shop. Ambition: Expert machinist. EDDIE DUGAS HFRENCI-IIE" "Better late than never." Favorite Expression: Gee, whiz. Immediate Plans: Get a good job. Ambition: Go places. Junior Red Cross II: Track I, II, III. NORMAND DUGAS "BEAVER" ,, "You have a nimble wit."i Favorite Expression: I-low are you? Immediate Plans: Attend school. Ambition: Politician. Tennis I: Glee Club I, II. III: Christmas Assemblies I, II. III. EDWARD DUMAINE "ISCl-IHA-BIBBEL" "For e'en though vanquished, he could argue still." Favorite Expression: I-Ie's a jerk. Immediate Plans: Work this summer. Ambition: To go to sea. Christmas Assembly I: Orchestra I, II, III: Band I, II, III: Music Festival II: A. A. Show II: Ski Club III: Senior Play. MAURICE DUMAINE "MOE" "Life is just a jest and all things show it: I thought so once. but now I know it." Favorite Expression: You ain't kidding. Immediate Plans: Going away to school. Ambition: Pilot. Intramural Softball. Basketball, Volleyball, Tumbling I. II, III: Basketball I: Track I: Gym Festival I, II: A. A. Show I, II: Graduation Usher II: Ski Club II, III. CLAIRE T. DUMONT "DUI.EY" "A soft voice bespeaks a gentle manner." Favorite Expression: Oh, fiddlesticksl Immediate Plans: Training to be a nurse. Ambition: Army nurse. Home Economics Club II, III: Junior Red Cross II, III. CLIFFORD EATON "CLIFF" "There is more innocent fun within me Then 11 casual spectator would imaqinef' Favorite Expression: Good kid. Immediate Plans: Navy. Ambition: Naval oflicer. Stage Committee. Senior Play III. LESLIE ERB "LES" "Oh, who am I' husku and hoarse?" Favorite Expression: You jerk! Immediate Plans: University of New Hampshire. Ambition: Become a successful farmer. Intramural Basketball I. Volleyball I: Wrestling II. III: Glee Club I: Original Play Cast II: Senior Play III: Graduation Usher II: Ski Club II. III: Taltler Staff II. III: Press Club III: Junior Red Cross III: Upper Quarter. MARY HELEN FAHEY "lVIAYA" "Life lies not in liuinq, but in liking." Favorite Expression: Guess what. Immediate Plans: To work. take a course in biology. and go in training. Ambition: To be a nurse. Gym Festival I: Press Club III: Debating Club I: Dramatics Club I: Tutller Reporter I. Staff Il. III: Junior Red Cross II. III: Senior Play Usher: Upper Quarter. BESSIE FANOS "BEE" "A lass there was of quiet LUfltlS.' Favorite Expression: You mean it? Immediate Plans: Work. Ambition: Court stenographer. Lunch Counter III: Junior Red Cross II. III: Upper Quarter. HAROLD FARNUM "HARRY" "l.usty, young, and cheerlu drawing breath." Favorite Expression: Solid. Immediate Plans: To take a ten weeks' course in a ma- chine shop. Ambition: To fly. - Ski Club III: Junior Red Cross III. DONALD CHARLES FARWELL "DUNK" "l am never conscious of mu own wit until I bark my shxns against xt." Favorite Expression: Whatta life. Immediate Plans: Army or Navy. Ambition: To be a general. Junior Red Cross III: Football II, Manager III: Golf II. III. ELINOR FISSETTE "ELLY" "Her voice spoke honest friendship." Favorite Expression: That's right. Immediate Plans: Rest all summer. Ambition: Nurse. Upper Fourth. ROBERT BROOKS FLETCHER "BOB" "He was a man: take him for all in all We shall not look upon his like again." Favorite Expression: I don't know. Immediate Plans: University of New Hampshire Ambition: Farmer. Junior Red Cross III. IRENE FLYNN "She was happy as the day was Iona." Favorite Expression: No kidding. Immediate Plans: Work. Ambition: Nurse. Gym Festival I: Home Economics Club I, II. III' Junior Red Cross II. III: Christmas Assemblies II, IIII. MURIEI. LOUISE FORREST "A soft voice bespeaks a gentle manner." Favorite Expression: Wait a minute. Immediate Plans: Post graduate course. Ambition: To be a secretary. Press Club III: Upper Fourth. RAYMOND EDGAR FORTIER "RAY" 'AWisdom he has, and to his wisdom, courage. Temper to that, and unto all success." Favorite Expression: Don't be so hard to vet along with. Immediate Plans: College. Ambition: Priesthood, Christmas Assembly I: Original Plav Cast II: Junior Red Cross III: Tusilala Staff. Associate Editor III: Upper Quarter. KARL W. FORWARD "Renowned for cheerful noise' Favorite Expression: What's the story? Immediate Plans: Join the Navy. Ambition: Radio operator. Junior Red Cross II, III. CONSTANCE M. FOSSA "CONNIE" "Still waters run deep." Favorite Expression: Shut up, that's all, Immediate Plans: College, Ambition: Social worker, Intramural Basketball I, II. Vollevball II: Gym Fes- tival I, II: Junior Red Cross I. II, III: Tusilala Assistant III: Senior Play Ticket Committee. SHIRLEY FOSTER "KITTY" "She's full of fun. and wittu: She's dainty and she's prettuf' Favorite Expression: I like variety. Immediate Plans: News reporter. Ambition: General news reporter on a large paper. Home Economics Club I. II, III: Junior Red Cross I. II, III: Christmas Assemblies. Decorating I, II, III: Tat- Ier Reporter II: Iunior and Senior Prom Decorating Com- mittees I, II, III: Press Club III: Publicity Committee, Senior Play: Upper Quarter. REGINALD FRANCOEUR "BABE" "You're a remarkably fine fellow " Favorite Expression: What's cooking? Immediate Plans: To make a living. Ambition: To get a few Japs. Intramural Football, Softball, Basketball. Volleyball. Tumbling I. If I H ROBERT FRANCOEUR "BOB" "A little nonsense now and then Is relished by the best of men." Favorite Expression: Be good. Immediate Plans: Work in a defense plant. Ambition: To be a machinist. Junior Red Cross III. LEO FRASER "BABE" "Sports were made for such men as he." Favorite Expression: Accomplish what you must in the shortest space of time. Immediate Plans: U. S. Marines. Ambition: Pilot. Lunch Counter II: Football I, II, III: Baseball I, III. GLORIA JEAN FULLER "GLO" "To plan, to point, to smile, to draw- She does these all without a flaw." Favorite Expression: Believe me-I know. Immediate Plans: Modeling school. Ambition: To become a world-known model. Home Economics Club I, II, III: Junior Red Cross I, II, III: Tattler Staff II. III: Christmas Assembly Deco- rating Committee III: Decorating Committee, Junior and Senior Proms I, II, III. GERARD J. GAGNON "JOHNNY" "To amuse oneself is a wonderful feat." Favorite Expression: Do as I tell you. not as I do. Immediate Plans: Civil Service and night school. Ambition: Draftsman and artist. Football I. II: Track I, II. ERNEST GARANT "ERNIE" "Ahl The doing and undoing that rogue could tell!" Favorite Expression: Curse the luck! Immediate Plans: Machine shop work. Ambition: Mayor of Nashua. Gym Festival I. my qyppflv. pp, .gf ,pm-.r.3,q4s'r,,q,.-1,,3p ROGER W. GASKILI, "ROG" "Do not neglect to keep the trumpet polished: You can shine on one end as well as the other." Favorite Expression: You know-a hooser. Immediate Plans: Business college. Ambition: Clerical worker. Band I, II. III: Orchestra I, II, III: Music Festival I. II, III: Gym Festival I, II: A. A. Show II: Prom Deco- rffing Committee I, II. III: Taltler Stall III: Senior Play I . ROBERT GAUDETTE "BOB" "A drumf a druml Gaudette doth come." Favorite Expression: Greetings, gate? I-et's syncopate! Immediate Plans: United States Army. Ambition: To be an F.B.I. fingerprint expert. Ski Club II, III: Tattler Reporter II: Junior Red Cross III: Athletic Association. NICHOLAS GEGAS "NICK" l'N1'ck was the pride of his race." Favorite Expression: Wha' cha know? Immediate Plans: Continue education. Ambition: Go to work. Intramural Football, Softball. Basketball I: Junior Red Cross III. ROMEO R. GENDRON "ROMY" "Love is like the measles: We all have to qo through it." Favorite Expression: Wellf What do you know? Immediate Plans: Business work. Ambition: Owner of own clothing store. Gym Festival I: Intramural Basketball. Baseball. Soft- ball I: Intramural Basketball II: Lunch Counter I, II: Junior Red Cross III: Business Manager Tattler III. SIMONE GENDRON "The mildest manners and the qentlest heart." Favorite Expression: Oh. boy. Immediate Plans: Nursing. Ambition: Armv nurse, Junior Red Cross II, III. THERESA GERVAIS "TESSIE" "Always a smile and a helpina hand. Wi'Ili'nq and ready to understand." lfavorite Expression: Jeepersl Immediate Plans: Find a job. Ambition: Typist. Christmas Assembly I: Gym Iiestival I: Home Eco- nomics Club I. II, III: Junior Red Cross I, II. III. WILFRID GIRARD "I ran spell all the words that l use, And my grammars as good as my neiqhbor's." Ifavorite Expression: What do you say? Immediate Plans: OH'ice work. Ambition: Stenographer. Upper Quarter. GEORGETTE GIROUARD "GEORGIE" 'iHer veru frowns are fairer lar Than smiles of other maidens are." Iiavorite Expression: Sugar! Immediate Plans: Work. Ambition: Secretary. Home Economics Club l. III: Junior Red Cross II Ill: Upper Quarter. PAULINE GLINES "BLONDlE" "And her sunnq locks Hang on her temples like a golden fleece." Ifavorite Expression: Why? Immediate P.:-ns: Move to I.ynn and work. Ambition: To be a police woman. Junior Red Cross Il: Decorating Committees I, II. III Lunch Counter III. MARIE GODDEAU "RIE" "Her hear! is as true as steel." Favorite Expression: You aren't kiddingf Immediate Plans: Take a long rest. Ambition: Telephone operator. Home Economics Club II. III: Junior Red Cross Il III BERYL E. GOGGIN "B-URL" 'AA little woman, though a very little thina, Is sweeter far than sugar. and flowers that bloom in Spring." Favorite Expression: Hi! Immediate Plans: Work. Ambition: To attend college. Drill Team II: Junior Red Cross II, III: Senior Play Usher III. GERALD GORDON "GENERAL" "Business is the salt of life." Favorite Expression: What a man! what a man! Immediate Plans: Work in my father's grocery store. Ambition: To own my own store. Band I: Orchestra I: Junior Red Cross III. JOHN JOSEPH GORDON "FLASH" "Why take life seriously- You'll never get out of it alive." Favorite Expression: Be good, will you, Sulll Immediate Plans: Work for a year. Ambition: Join the U. S. Army Air Corps. Gym Festival I: Baseball I: Track I: Intramural Foot- ball I, Baseball I, Softball I, Basketball I: Golf II, III: Junior Red Cross III. KENNETH GOVE "KEN" "His very foot has music in it." Favorite Expression: You ain't kiddin'. Immediate Plans: Temple University. Ambition: To ride around the world in a Model "A" Iford. Intramural Football. Basketball. Volleyball I: Gym Iicstival I: Christmas Assembly l: Tatller Reporter II: Junior Red Gross III: Basketball III: Tennis III: Ski Club II, III: Band I, ll, III: Orchestra I, II, Illg Music Festival I. II. SOPHIE GOY USO., "Not so serious, not so gay, But a rare qood airlf' Favorite Expression: You kiddin'? Immediate Plans: Work. Ambition: To join the girls' army. Gym Festival I: Junior Red Cross II, III. RICHARD GREENLEAF, JR. "DICK" "Speech is great: but silence is greater." Favorite Expression: It could be. Immediate Planszl Work. Ambition: Aviation. FRANK GRIFFIN "GRIF" "A diamond in the rough." Favorite Expression: It could be. Immediate Plans: Farming. Ambition: To be a good mechanic. Gvm Festival I. OWEN GRIFFIN "ll is my duty and I will." Favorite Expression: Why not? Immediate Plans: Defense work. Ambition: Mortician. Junior Red Cross III. SOPHIE GROHOSKY "SOAPY" "A woman's hair is her crowning qloryf' Favorite Fxprcssion: It could bel Immediate Plans: Hairdressing school. Ambition: To become a hairdresser. Junior Red Cross II, III: Home Economics Club III. STUART GROVES "STEW" "Clothes make the man." Favorite Expression: For Pete's sake! Immediate Plans: To get out of N. H. S. Ambition: Farmer. Christmas Assemblies I, II, III: Decorating Commit- tees I, II, III: Tattler Art Work I, II. III: Tusitala Stall II. III. HELEN GUERETTE "TINY" "Was wont to be as still as a mouse." Favorite Expression: Why? Immediate Plans: Store work. Ambition: To be successful in whatever I undertake. Glee Club I: Home Economics Club II. III: Junior Red Cross II, III. ARLENE I-IAGERTY . "RED" "Free and easy. " Favorite Expression: You know what I mean. Immediate Plans: Nurse's aide. Ambition: Nurse. Junior Red Cross I. II, III: Tusilala Assistant III. CORNELIUS HAGERTY "NEIL" "Now who's this young man I should like you to guess- With the pleasing face and the very fine dress." Favorite Expression: Chump! Immediate Plans: Office work. Ambition: Pilot. Junior Red Cross: Tattler Circulation Manager III. EVERETT B. HALL "FRITZ" :'Take me out to the airport." Favorite Expression: Oh Foo! Immediate Plans: Finish school and get a job. Ambition: Airplane designer. WILLIAM C. HARNISH "BILL" "Rejoice, O young man. in thy youth." Favorite Expression: Hi ya kid! Immediate Plans: Take a rest. Ambition: Join the air corps. Junior Red Cross III: Decorating Committees I, II, III: Christmas Assemblies I, II. III. EDITH R. HARRIS "HORACE" "Remember the Maine." . Favorite Expression: That looks like Johnny. Immediate Plans: U. N. H. Ambition: Librarian. Gym Festival I: Junior Red Cross II, III: Second Prize Tuttler Short Story Contest III: Upper Quarter. LULA HARWOOD ULU., "ln every gesture, dignity and refinement." Favorite Expression: Friendship is the most precious thing in the world. Immediate Plans: Work. Ambition: To be successful in whatever I undertake. Glee Club II. III: Junior Red Cross III: Christmas Assemblies II. III. BARBARA HAYDEN "BARB" "Imagination is the air of the mind." Favorite Expression: That's crude. Immediate Plans: U. N. H. Ambition: Scientific work. Talller Staff III: Press Club III: Tusitala Staff III: Lunch Counter III: Junior Red Cross II, III: Author of Winning Original Plays II, III: Prophetess: Upper Quar- ter. VIRGINIA HEATH "GINNY" "Be silent and safe-silence never betrays you." Favorite Expression: Oh boy! Immediate Plans: To enjoy life. Ambition: To be an Army wife. Junior Red Cross II. RITA MAY HILL "RITZY" "I will be brief." Favorite Expression: Ritzy. Immediate Plans: Work in a bakery. Ambition: Artist. Junior Red Cross II. III: Decorating Committees I, II, III. THOMAS HILL "TOMMY" "For what, we ash. is life Wllhcnttl a touch of music in tit? Favorite Expression: Heh. heh. Immediate Plans: College. Ambition: Symphonic clarinetist and teacher. Tattler Reporter I: Athletic Association Show II: Glee Club II: Christmas Assembly II: Tusttula Assistant III: Senior Plav Costume Committee III: Tennis I. II. Cap' tain III: Band I. II. III: Orchestra I. II. III: Music Fesf tival I, II. WII.l.IAM HILL "BILL" "Oh perfumed suitor. spare fha smiles: Her lhouqhls are not of thee." Favorite Expression: Squarel Immediate Plans: College. Ambition: To elope. Christmas Assembly I1 Debating Club II: Tusitalu Assistant III: Costume Committee, Senior Play III: Pride and Prejudice III: Upper Quarter. ALFRED I-IODGE "AI," "Little I ask. mu wants are few." Favorite Expression: I-Iow's ageing? Immediate Plans: Join the U. S. armed forces. Ambition: To be one of the brightest officers in the armed forces. Gym Festival I: Football I: Basketball I: Intramural Softball I: Junior Red Cross III. NATALIE I-IOLT "NAT" 'iOne universal smile it seemed of all thinasf' Favorite Expression: Jeepersf Immediate Plans: Go to occupational therapy school. Ambition: To become an occupational therapist. Tattler Reporter I: Band I. ll. III: Orchestra I. II. III. RITA B. I-IOUDE "HOODSIE" "A face with aladness ouerspreadf' Favorite Expression: Aw, gee! Wlzy? Immediate Plans: Work. Ambition: To become a masseuse. Intramural Softball, Tumbling I. Basketball, Volley- ball I, II: Gym Festival I: Junior Red Cross II. III: Upper Quarter. LUCILLE HOWARD ULU., "For she was just that quiet kind." Favorite Expression: Hi. Maybelle! Immediate Plans: Telephone operator. Ambition: To be successful. Dramatics Club: Christmas Assembly I: Junior Red Cross II. III: Ushering Committee. Senior Play III. VICTOR HUDON "YEHOODI" "I like work,--it fascinates me: I can sit and look at rt for hours." Favorite Expression: Be good! Immediate Plans: To graduate. Ambition: To ferry bombers to England. Intramural Football. Softball. Basketball, Volleyball I: Gym Festival I: Track I: Assistant Manager Football Team I: Ski Club II. III: Junior Red Cross III: Tattler Reporter III: Cheerleader III. NIURIEI. HUNNEWELI. "HUNNEY" "Skilled alike with tongue and pen." Favorite Expression: Sei gut! Immediate Plans: Peter Bent Brigham Hospital. Ambition: Army nurse. Dramatics Club I: Glee Club I, II. III: Tusitala Staff III: Junior Red Cross I, II, III: Christmas Assemblies I. II, III: Senior Play Usher: Press Club III: Upper Quar- ter. RUTH HURD "Always full of fun and pep Just a girl you cannot forget." Favorite Expression: Oh yeah! Immediate Plans: Going out of circulation. Ambition: Wilfrid Academy. Home Economics Club I. II: Junior Red Cross II. III. LOUIS IVALIS "He bought white ties and he bought dress suits: He crammed his feet into briqht tight boots." Favorite Expression: What do you know. Sharpie? Immediate Plans: To serve my country. Ambition: To be a prominent citizen. Intramural Softball, Basketball I: Football I: Basket- ball I: Baseball I. ARLENE ELIZABETH JACKSON "JACKIE" "A lady that was brisk and bold." Favorite Expression: You don't say. Immediate Plans: Work for awhile. Ambition: To be a nurse. Junior Red Cross II. III: Home Economics Club III: Usher for Senior Play III, JOSEPH JACOBS "JAKE" "A modest athlete he." Favorite Expression: You ain't kidding! Immediate Plans: Machine work. Ambition: To become a baseball coach. Football II, III: Baseball III. ARMAND WALTER JALBERT "Clothes make the man." Favorite Expression: What you do for others will not be lost. Immediate Plans: Navy. Ambition: To become a naval officer. Intramural Softball, Basketball, Volleyball I: Tum- bling I: Track I, II: Ski Club II, III: Junior Red Cross. MICHAEL JAMES UMIKE.. "What care I for tr1'fles?" Favorite Expression: What's the story, Mac? Immediate Plans: Work. Ambition: To play the trumpet as well as Harry James. Press Club III: Tattler Reporter I: Junior Red Cross III: Gym Festival I: Upper Quarter. RUDOLPI-I JASALAVICH "RUDY" "A son of the good earth." Favorite Expression: Hello, sir! Immediate Plans: Machinist's position. Ambition: Own a farm. Graduation Usher II: Cilee Club III: Junior Red Cross III: Christmas Assembly III: Upper Quarter. ELAINE JAURON "I.ANEY" ' "I'm young yet, perhaps I will qrow." Favorite Expression: You don't say! Immediate Plans: Oflice work. I Amhition: Keep on living. 1 Glee Club II, III: Christmas Assemblies II. III: Junior Red Cross III. GLORIA JENNINGS "GOGIE" "A merrq heart makes a cheerful countenance." Favorite Expression: Oh. gee whiz! Immediate Plans: Work. Ambition: To be a good secretary. Glee Club I, III: Christmas Assembly I, III: Junior Red Cross II: Press Club III: Winner Tattler Short Story Contest III: Upper Quarter. DOROTHY JOHNSON "DOT" "She seemed as happu as a wave That dances on the sea." Favorite Expression: I-Ii, Maybellel Immediate Plans: Undecided. Ambition: Be successful in anything I do. Gym Festival I: Junior Red Cross III. I.INNA GRACE JOHNSON "DOI.LY" "Girls of few words are the best girls." Favorite Expression: I dunno. Immediate Plans: Vacation. Ambition: Nursing. Home Economics Club I, II, III: Junior Red Cross I, II. III: Decorating Committees I, II, III: Christmas Assembly II, III. PATRICIA M. JOYCE "PAT" "The innocent are gay." Favorite Expression: I'm nervous. Immediate Plans: College. Ambition: Marriage. Gym Festival I: Christmas Assembly I: Dramatics Club I. II: Junior Red Cross I, II, III: Ski Club II, III: Press Club III: Upper Fourth. PAULINE JURIS "PAUI.IE" "An amiable girl of qood qualities." Favorite Expression: Prove it! Immediate Plans: Work. Ambition: To be successful in whatever I undertake. HIHome Economics Club I, III: Junior Red Cross I. II WANDA KAYROS "Smiling as if some Hy had tickled slumber." Favorite Expression: Yi! Immediate Plans: Get a job. Ambition: Fly a plane. Home Economics Club I, III: Junior Red Cross III: Upper Quarter. MARY E. KEENAN "Her ways are ways of quietness." Favorite Expression: Think so? Immediate Plans: Work. Ambition: Telephone operator. Home Economics Club I. II: Junior Red Cross II, III. RICHARD D. KEMP "Better be small and shine Than be tall and cast a shadow." Favorite Expression: Holy gee! Immediate Plans: Continue education, Ambition: Naval oflicer. Junior Red Cross III: Intramural Football III: Foot- ball Ticket Chairman III. ALECK KILONIS "JAKE" "He is a mad Greek, no less than a merry one." Favorite Expression: Beat it. Immediate Plans: Dishing out ice cream. Ambition: King of the ice cream business. Tattler Reporter I: Intramural Football, Baseball. Soft- ball. Basketball I, II: Gym Festival II: Junior Red Cross Il RUTH ELEANOR KIRKPATRICK A'RUTHIE" A'Good naturezl, aes, and studious. too, She is one of the favored few." Iiavorite Expression: Heavens. nol Immediate Plans: Ifurther education, Ambition: Writer. Press Club III: Tusttala Staff III: Tatller Staff II, III: Junior Red Cross III: Christmas Assembly I: Publicity Committee. Senior Play: Library Dance Committee II: Upper Quarter. DOROTHY MILDRED KNIGHT "DOT" "The perfect kniqhtf' Iiavorite Expression: Eekf Immediate Plans: Wagner College. Ambition: To be a harpist. Glee Club I. II: Christmas Assemblies I, III: Original Play III: Press Club III: Tattler Reporter III: Junior Red Cross III: Ticket Committee, Senior Play III: Up- per Quarter. WALTER KOPKA "WAI.I,Y" "O, to have known him, looked into his eyes. The music' of laughter lo have heard!" Favorite Expression: Why not? Immediate Plans: Get experience. Ambition: Actor. Dramatics Club Il' Track I II III Priae and Pre'udice I 1 v i 1 III: Upper Quarter. PAULINE C. KUPCHUN "POI-I.IE" "IVhal an advantage it is to be tall!" Ifavorite Expression: Oh, gee gosh! Immediate Plans: Work. Ambition: To be a model. Home Economics Club I, II: Tattler Reporter II: Junior Red Cross II. III: Athletic Association II, III. IVIAURICE I.. LABRIE HIVIAU-RICE" "For he is a folly aood fellow." Iiavorite Expression: You farmerf Immediate Plans: To work. Ambition: To be an engineer. Liym Iiestival I. JEAN LA FLAME "SINKER" "As merru as crickets." Favorite Expression: Yoohoo. Immediate Plans: Ofhce work. Ambition: Private secretary. Glee Club II: Junior Red Cross II. III: Christmas Assembly II: Senior Play Usher: Upper Quarter. ALBERT LAFLAMME "BERTIE" "Sometimes I sets and thinks, And sometimes I jest sets." Favorite Expression: Any man who creates competition for himself is a fool. Immediate Plans: New England Conservatory. Ambition: Both musician and machinist. Ski Club III: Glee Club I: Band I, II, III: Orchestra I. II, III: Music Festival I, II: Christmas Assembly I: Gym Festival I: Athletic Association Show I. II: Or- chestra, Senior Play. ANNETTE LAFRANCE "FARMER" "She entertains a good disposition." Favorite Expression: You ain't kiddingl Immediate Plans: Work or business college. Ambition: Civil Service. Junior Red Cross II. III: Drill Team II. BERTRAND LA FRANCE "BERT" "What a line he has." Favorite Expression: Boogie! Immediate Plans: Office or defense work. Ambition: To become an opera singer. Gym Festival I: Dramatics Club II: Glee Club I, II, III: Christmas Assemblies I, II. III, IRENE MARIE LA FRANCE UBUTCI-IY" "Calch that glint of mischief in her vue? That means there's somethrna doinq hu and Inq." Favorite Expression: "I'isn't funny any more. Immediate Plans: Work. Ambition: Physical education teacher. Home Economics Club I, II, III: Junior Red Cross I. II. III: Gym Festival I: Basketball I, II: Tumbling II. HAROLD LALMOND "HAL" "A mighty hunter, and his prey was work." Favorite Expression: Holy smoke! Immediate Plans: Radio school. Ambition: Radio operator. Press Club III: Junior Red Cross III: Upper Quarter. JEANNETTE LAMARRE "She that was ever fair and never proud, Had tongue at will. and yet was rarely loud." Favorite Expression: My goodness me! Immediate Plans: Be a typist. Ambition: Be successful. Junior Red Cross I. GERALDINE LAMB "GERRY" "Fashioned so slenderly. Young, and so fair." Favorite Expression: Solid! Immediate Plans: Go to work. Ambition: Keep on working. Junior Red Cross III. GERMAINE LAMB "MAINY" "Her ways are the ways of pleasantness And all her paths are peace." Favorite Expression: Solid! Immediate Plans: Work in a SEOIC. Ambition: Work as a stitcher. Junior Red Cross III. LUCILLE Y. LANCOURT "LOU" "What an advantage it is to be tall!" Ifavorite Expression: Oh my! Immediate Plans: Telephone office work. Ambition: To be a nurse. Home Economics Club I, II, III: Junior Red Cross II III. ARTHUR LANDRY UART., "Why hurry? I still have a whole lifetime." Favorite Expression: Hullo kiddo. Immediate Plans: Defense. Ambition: President of U. S. A. Gym Festival I: Intramural Football. Baseball, Soft- ball, Volleyball, Tumbling, Wrestling I: French Club I: Ski Club III. ROLANDE LANGELIER "ROLLY" "A qirl who can work A girl who can play." Favorite Expression: O. K. with me. Immediate Plans: Help my country in defense work. Ambition: Study hairdressing. Gym Festival I: Home Economics Club I. II. III: Glee Club I: Junior Red Cross II, III. HELEN LANTZAS "A yirl who quietly tuends her way And does her duty day by day." Favorite Expression: Make it short! Immediate Plans: Office work. Ambition: Secretary. Junior Red Cross II, III: Upper Quarter. PAULINE GENEVA LAQUERRE "POLLY" "A maiden never ill bred." Favorite Expression: No kidding? Immediate Plans: Work. Ambition: To be a hairdresser. Junior Red Cross I, II, III. FLORENCE LAROSE "FLO" "A mind free from care." Favorite Expression: You're not kidding! Immediate Plans: Work. Ambition: Typist. Upper Quarter. ARIVIAND LAROUCHE "To know him was a privilege." Ifavorite Expression: Oh? My Crackief Immediate Plans: Go to New York and work, Ambition: Become an experienced machinist. ELMER I.ATI-IE, JR. "BUD" "For youth is youth, and time will have it so. Ifavorite Expression: Hi ya, Kid! Immediate Plans: Trade school. Ambition: To be an electrician. DANIEL J. J. LAVOIE "J. J." "A youth there was with tt quiet way." Favorite Expression: Holy cats! Immediate Plans: Navy, Marines. or Army. Ambition: Lick the Japs. Junior Red Cross III. YVETTE LAVOIE "VICKI" "lt's an eusy world to Iiue in It you rhoose to make it so." Ifavorite Expression: You aren't kidding! Immediate Plans: Wtark. Ambition: More work. BETH LEGALLEE "BETTY" HIVQ' lintl yreal thinys are made of little things." lfavorite Expression: Guess so. Immediate Plans: Poultry farm. Ambition: Hairdresser. Home Economics Club I: Junior Red Cross II, III NORMAND LEPAGE "NORM" "A genius in the making. Favorite Expression: Well, hello there! Immediate Plans: Work. Ambition: To join the armed forces. Gym Festival I: Junior Red Cross III. EVELYN M. LEVEQUE "Evita" ' "Her smile was prodigal of summeru shine." Favorite Expression: Why, sure! Immediate Plans: Work. Ambition: Nurse. Glee Club II: Junior Red Cross II, III: Christmas Assembly II. FRANK LINTOTT "He who hesitates is lost." Favorite Expression: You aren't kidding. Immediate Plans: Buy more War Bonds. Ambition: Serve my country. Junior Red Cross III. HELEN LIOPUS "Whatever is popular deserves attention." Favorite Expression: Gimme a library slip. Immediate Plans: Defense work. Ambition: To become a nurse. Home Economics Club I, II: Junior Red Cross II, III. LOIS LITTLEFIELD ..LO,, F. "Her grin is contagious. Ever catch it Favorite Expression: Gee whiz! Immediate Plans: Olice work. Ambition: To be a success. Tattler Reporter: Junior Red Cross III: Press Club III: Ticket Committee, Senior Play III: Upper Quarter. ROGER LIVERMORE "ROG, LIVERLESSH "1 have mu work to do and I must do it." Favorite Expression: You ain't kidding. Immediate Plans: Making up sleep lost while attending school. Ambition: To live without working. Christmas Assembly I: Junior Red Cross III: Upper Fourth. X CHARLOTTE LOCKE "SHARLIE" "And she was ever stately and sedate Full ivorlhu Io be held in reverence " Favorite Expression: Ain't we got fun? Immediate Plans: To work. Ambition: To be a hairdresser. Junior Red Cross III. WANDA E. LOJ KO "PENNY" "She gives a side glance and looks down. Beware! Beware."' Favorite Expression: Terrific. Immediate Plans: Business college. Ambition: Become a journalist. Gym Festival I: Glee Club I, II: Music Festival I, II: Christmas Assemblies I, II: Tattler Reporter II. CHARLES LOULAKIS "LIGHTNING" "He is wise that talks but little." Favorite Expression: What's the story? Immediate Plans: Aviation trade school. Ambition: Airplane mechanic or Welder. Intramural Football I: Softball I. ISABELLE D. LUCE "IZZIE" "Her heart was in her work." Favorite Expression: I'm losing weight, really I am! Immediate Plans: Hurdle college entrance requirements. Ambition: Onion peeler, par excellence. lub III Ski Club II III Tattler Staff III' Press C : . 1 . Junior Red Cross III: Christmas Assembly I: Gym Festi- val I: Senior Play III: Upper Quarter. C. CONSTANCE LUCIER "CONNIE" 'AWinni'nq every heart And delighting every heart." Favorite Expression: I'm nervous! Immediate Plans: College. Ambition: Marriage. Press Club III: Ski Club II. III: Dramatics Club I. II: Glee Club I, II, III: Tattler Reporter III: Junior Red Cross II, III: Christmas Assemblies II, III: Gym Festival I: Property Committee, Senior Play: Upper Quarter. ANNA T. LUSCZYK "ANN" "Her ways are ways of quietness." Favorite Expression: Oh. boy! Immediate Plans: Office work. Ambition: Filing clerk. Junior Red Cross III: Upper Quarter. DOROTHY A. LYNN "DOTTIE" "Warm-hearted. sparkling with fun, She's sure to win you before she's done." Favorite Expression: You ain't kidding, brother! Immediate Plans: Telephone operator. Ambition: Singer with a famous orchestra. Glee Club I, II, III: Music Festival I. II: Junior Red Cross II, III: Christmas Assemblies I, Il, III: Senior Play. GLENN MACDONALD "MAC" "lf lauqhler is conlaqious. Just stand and catch his grin." Favorite Expression: Some have it, some haven't. Immediate Plans: A good aviation school. Ambition: Airline pilot. Gym Festival I: A. A. Show I: Tumbling I. DONALD MACLANE "MAC" "We're brothers all, wha1e'er the place." Favorite Expression: None. Immediate Plans: Work. Ambition: To be an accountant. Senior Play. CHARLES MAGUIRE "CHARLIE" "He will succeed, for he believes all he sails." Favorite Expression: Are you kiddin'? Immediate Plans: College. Ambition: Completely lacking at present. Press Club III: Ski Club III: Prophet III: Graduation Usher II: Tusitala Staff III: Tattler Staff II. III: Christ- mas Assembly I: Senior Play III: Baseball I, II, III: Pride and Preiudice III: Upper Quarter. MARY MAGUIRE "MAGGIE" "lVhose little body lodged a ueru great mind: NVhose pretty face lodged a very hind smile." Favorite Expression: You're very sweet. Immediate Plans: Work, hard work. Ambition: To build a modernistic house on a mountain. Dramatics Club I. II: Junior Red Cross III: Tattler Staff I. ll. Honorary Member III: French Club Vice- President Il: Upper Quarter. ROBERT MAJOR "MAJOR" "His big manly voice." Favorite Expression: Do not do unto others what you would not have done unto you. Immediate Plans: Work. Ambition: To get a good iob. CONRAD W. MARCOUX "MARC" "1 have found you an argument: But l am not obliged to find you an understandingf, Favorite Expression: What do you think! Immediate Plans: Coast Guard service. Ambition: College. Debating Club I. II. III: Lunch Counter III: Junior Red Cross III: Stage Committee. Senior Play III. RAYMOND N. MARQUIS "RAY" "His bra manly voice." Favorite Expression: You ain't kiddin'! Immediate Plans: Attend a music school. Ambition: Be a music sunervisor in public schools. Band I. II. III: Orchestra I, II: All State Orchestra II: Junior Red Cross III. VIRGINIA MARSHALL "GINGER" "W1'th all the virtues of the average girl." Favorite Expression: Why wait for time? It doesn't wait for you. Immediate Plans: Office work. Ambition: To be successful. Press Club III: Glee Club I: Junior Red Cross III: Christmas Assembly l. JEAN MCL AUGHLIN "MAC" 'ADress is the business of all women." Favorite EXDression: Take it easy! Immediate Plans: School. Ambition: Dental hygienist. Dramatics Club I, II: Ski Club Il: Press Club III: Senior Play Ticket Committee III. PAUL MCLAUGHLIN "MAC" "Better late than never." Favorite Expression: You're solid, boy! Immediate Plans: Rest. Ambition: Traveling salesman. Cheerleader II: Junior Red Cross III. BEATRICE MENTER "BEA" "Ez soshubble, ez a baskit er kittens." Favorite Expression: And I'm not kidding! Immediate Plans: Work. Ambition: Executive nursing. Press Club III: Glee Club III: Junior Red Cross III: Christmas Assembly III. RALPH MERCER "JUNIOR" "A little nonsense now and then Is relished by the best of men." Favorite Expression: Solid! Immediate Plans: Work. Ambition: Aviator. Band I, II: Glee Club III: Junior Red Cross III. ROBERT MERCER "BOB" "I utunlcc one mornrnq and found mtfself famousf Favorite Expression: You're no good. Immediate Plans: College. Ambition: Oculist. Ski Club Ill: Band I, II. III: Orchestra I. II: Music lit-stival l, ll: Christmas Assembly I: A. A. Show II: liootball l: Baseball ll, Ill: Basketball Ill. SHIRLEY MERCER 'ASHIRII' "A tutnsomv maid was she .-lnd Itur lo look upon." lTJVOl'ilK' Expression: Could bel Immediate Plans: Oflice work. Ambition: Good stenographer. Press Club lll: Junior Reel Cross III: Upper Quarter. G. RICHARD MESSIER "DICK" "fl noltcealzle man." liavorite Expression: lley. ierkf Immediate Plans: Naval or Marine Air Corps. Ambition: Naval medical oflicer. Ski Club Il, President Ill: Dramatics Club I, II: Bane l: Orchestra l: Glee Club I. ll. Ill: Graduation Usher ll: 'lltstitrla Staff lll: Junior Red Cross Ill: Christmas As- semblies l, ll, Ill: Original Plays Il, Ill: Gym Festival l: Senior Play lll: Class President lll: Upper Quarter. llAROl.D MIl.l.ER "MONK" "1 have mttwr souqhl the world," liavorite Expression: Gol-darn itl Immediate Plans: kVork for a year. Ambition: Naval career. MARGARET MIREAULT "MAG" "I Iuuqh. for hope hath happy place with me." liavorite Expression: Oh, Mac! Immediate Plans: Oflice work. Ambition: Medical secretary. Junior Red Cross ll, lll, UI.YSSES MOCAS UMOKE THE JOKE" "Love is so different with us men." Favorite Exnression: You're a yokel! Immediate Plans: College. Ambition: Enqineer. Ski Club II, III: Glee Club I. II: Junior Red Cross III: Original Play II: Gym Festival I: Football I. II. III: Track I. III: Tennis III: Intra-Homeroom Ping Pong III: Independent Hockey I. II. III. FUGENE P. MOLLOY 'ABEANIEH "Bu this face. this seemina brow of iuslice. did he win The hearts of all that he did anqle for." Favorite Expression: I-Icy, solid. hit the road? Immediate Plans: General Electric Apprentice School. Ambition: Mechanical engineer. Press Club III: Graduation Usher II: Tusitala Staff III: Tatrler Reporter I. III: Lunch Counter III: Junior Red Cross II, III: Christmas Assembly I: Gym Festival IC Senior Play Ticket Committee III: Baseball I: Golf III: Intramural Football I. II. Baseball I. II. Softball I. II. Basketball I. II, Volleyball I, II: Business Manager III: French Club I. ELEANOR MONIUS NEL.. "Once uou'd met, You could never forget." Favorite Expression: Be good! Immediate Plans: Undecided. Ambition: Graduate. EDWARD A. MOQUIN "MORE" "He laughs and fools lhe whole dau long, And life for him is but a song." Favorite Expression: If you'll always keep it. you'lI always have it. Immediate Plans: Railroad Iireman. Ambition: Railroad engineer. Ifootball I. II. Manager II. DOROTHY JENNY MORAN "DEEDEE" "Talk to her of Jacobs ladder, and she would ask the number of steps." Favorite Expression: Hello. there! Immediate Plans: Work. Ambition: To be a singer. Home Economics Club I. II: Junior Red Cross II, III. GEORGE MORAROS "When joy and duty clash, Let duty go to smash." Favorite Expression: What's buzzin'-cousin? Immediate Plans: High school defense course. Ambition: Become a success in life. Tattler Reporter I: Junior Red Cross III: Upper Quar- ter. PAUL MORIARTY "HOOT" "Be yourself the leader, not the trailer." Favorite Expression: I-li, slugger. Immediate Plans: Play baseball. Ambition: Pro baseball. Junior Red Cross III: President Junior Class: Football I, II: Baseball I. II. III: Basketball I, II, III. Co-Captain III. JOSEPH ERNEST MORIN "ERNIE" "No one knows what he can do till he tries." Favorite Expression: Foo! Immediate Plans: To graduate. Ambition: Slap a Jap. Glee Club I. Il, III. NORMAND MORIN "BILL" "He's as tall as any." Favorite Expression: You're a good kid, but who likes kids? Immediate Plans: Machine shop work. Ambition: Boss of a machine shop. Ski Club III: Band I. II. III: Orchestra I, II, III: Music Festival I, II: A. A. Show II. NOREEN MORSE "NEENIE" "Gentle of speech, beneficent of mind." Favorite Expression: I'm nervous! Immediate Plans: P. G. course. Ambition: Medical technician. Gym Festival Il: Press Club III: Debating Club I, II: Ski Club II, III: Dramatics Club II: Junior Red Cross II, III: Senior Play Property Committee. RUTH MORSE "MORSE" "Pol1'teness costs nothfnq and yarns everything." Favorite Expression: I-Iiya, kidl Immediate Plans: Work. Ambition: Hairdressing. Glee Club II, III: Junior Red Cross II. III: Christmas Assemblies II, III: Home Economics Club III. LEONARD MUNSON 'AMUNCHH "W1ith merry laughter, talh and song, and liqhtly spoken fest." Favorite Expression: You're a phoneyl Immediate Plans: Marines. Ambition: Marines. XANTHE NORRIS "ZEE" "Blythe, blylhe and merry was she. Favorite Expression: Hi, jeep! Immediate Plans: A long rest. Ambition: Work. Junior Red Cross II. III: Basketball I, II: Senior Play Usher III. MARION L. O'BRIEN "MAMIE" "lt is good to be merry and wise." Favorite Expression: Fiddlesticks! Immediate Plans: Go into training. Ambition: Army nurse. Press Club III: Ski Club II, III: Dramatics Club II: Junior Red Cross II, III: Tattler Reporter ll: Publicity Committee Senior Play III: Upper Quarter. MARILYN JEAN OLSEN "MOI," "A laugh is worth a hundred groans in any market." Favorite Expression: Oh, sugarl Immediate Plans: U. N. H. Ambition: Laboratory technician. Debating Club I: Ski Club II, III: Dramatics Club I, II: Junior Red Cross II, III: Costume Committee Senior Play III: Upper Quarter. HELEN OUELLETTE "TOOTSIE" "Always Calm and serene lVe neuer knew her the least but mean. .1 Favorite Expression: Oh, gee? Immediate Plans: Auxiliary Corps. Ambition: Designer, Home Economics Club I: Junior Red Cross III, ANDREXV PANAGOULIAS "PANA" "lVhu hurru."' Favorite Expression: What do you know kid? Immediate Plans: Help defense. Ambition: Buy more defense bonds. Art Club I: Glee Club I: Gym Festival I: Junior Red Cross Ill: Intramural Football I, II: Baseball I, II: Soft- ball I, II: Basketball I. II: Volleyball I, II. JULIA PAPADEIVIAS "JULIE" "It was as though side shadows from the features of Sappho and Mrs. Siddons had converged." Favorite Expression: How sharp! Immediate Plans: Vacation. Ambition: To see the world. Gym Festival I: Intramural Basketball I. Volleyball I: Junior Red Cross II, III: Lunch Counter II, III: Home Economics Club II, III: Ushering Committee, Senior Play III: Upper Quarter. MAURICE JOSEPH PARE "No palh of Ilowers leads to qlorqf' Favorite Expression: Get some pepper in it. Immediate Plans: Work in a machine shop. Ambition: To play professional hockey. Football II: Baseball III: Intramural Basketball II. HELEN JESSIE ELIZABETH PATON "NELLIE" "My tongue tuithzvn my lips 1 rein For who Iulks much must talk in vain," Favorite Expression: O. K. Immediate Plans: XVork in a restaurant. Ambition: Own a restaurant. Home Economics Club I, II: Junior Red Cross II, III. GEORGE PATTERSON "PAT" "All qreut men are in some deqree inspired." Favorite Expression: Aw, nutsf Immediate Plans: Graduate. Ambition: Remain a bachelor. IEONA PEl.l.ETlER "LEE" HA friend both loual and true is well worth hauinq whether old or new." Favorite Exnression: Ye gods! Immediate Plans: Get to work. Ambition: Play niano in an orchestra. Dramatics Club II: Junior Red Cross III: A. A. Show II. DESPO PENETAS "DUSTY" "She kept her counsel and went her Luau." Favorite Expression: You ain't kidding! Immediate Plans: Work. Ambition: To become a nurse. Home Economics Club I, II, III: Junior Red Cross II. III: Gym Festival I. KULA PENETAS "KAY" "Sober, but not. serious, Quiet, but not idle." Favorite Expression: So! Immediate Plans: P. G. course. Ambition: To become a nurse. Tattler Reporter II: Junior Red Cross II, III: Intra- mural Basketball I, II: Volleyball I, II: Tumbling II. JACQUELINE PERRAULT "JACKIE" "Cheerful company shortens the miles." Favorite Expression: You ain't kidding! Immediate Plans: Office work. Ambition: Nursing. Junior Red Cross II, III: Gym Festival I. MADLYN PETERS "MADY" "She that qoes sofllq :Joes surely." Favorite Expression: Gee whiz! Immediate Plans: Work. Ambition: Be a nurse. Junior Red Cross II, III. XVILLIAM RUSSELI. PETERS "PETE" "A qenius in the maktnqf' Favorite Expression: What's cookin'? Immediate Plans: To take life easy. Ambition: To help keep democracy in this country. To help keep this country safe for democracy. Junior Red Cross III: Gym Festival I: Intramural Football I, Baseball I. Softball I, Basketball I, Volley- ball I: Tumbling I. JOHN PETERSON "I-ANCE" "Oh, you have no idea what a poor opinion 1 haue of myself. and how little I deserve il." Favorite Exnression: Struttin' with some barbeque. Immediate Plans: Hollywood. Ambition: To be manager of Duke Ellington's band. Ski Club II, III: Glee Club I: Music Festival I: Christmas Assembly I: Gym Festival I: Football I, II: Baseball I: Basketball III: Intramural Football I. II. Baseball I. Softball I. Basketball I, Volleyball I, II: Tumbling I: Upper Quarter. JENNY PETROPOULOS "JEN" "Let joy. temperunce. and repose Slam the door in the doctors nose," Favorite Expression: Oh, gee. how purtyf Immediate Plans: Work. Ambition: Office work. Home Economics Club I: Junior Red Cross II, III. PAUL PIALTOS "KlR1" "Not much quantity, but good quality," Favorite Expression: Solid! Immediate Plans: Defense class. Ambition: First class machinist. Taltler Reporter I: Assistant Manager Baseball II, III NANCY MARY PICKERING "NAN" "A happq heart makes a ITGDPU Ufsaqef' Favorite Expression: No kidding! Immediate Plans: Art school. Ambition: Commercial artist. Art Club I. II, III: Dramatics Club I: Ski Club III: Glee Club III: Tusitala Staff III: Tatrler Reporter II: Junior Red Cross II. III: Senior Play Costume Commit- tee III: Christmas Assemblies I. II, III: Decorating Com- mittees I, II, III: Upper Quarter. GENEVIEVE B. PIETUCH "GINGER" "Sometimes I sit and think. And somelzmes I iusl sir." Favorite Expression: Hey Maybellef Immediate Plans: Rest. Ambition: Physical educator, Intramural Basketball I, Manager III: Debating Club II, III: Dramatics Club I: Tattler Staff II. III: Junior Red Cross II. III: Christmas Assembly I: Gym Festival I: Senior Play Publicity Committee III: Vice-President II: Upper Quarter. MARJORIE LOUISE PIKE "MARGE" "The smile of her is sweet," Favorite Expression: I give up! Immediate Plans: Nasson College. Ambition: To acquire a pleasing personality, Press Club III: Dramatics Club I: Tattler Reporter II: Junior Red Cross III: Christmas Assembly I: Property Committee, Senior Play: Upper Quarter. THOMAS PIPILAS 'AKAZZYH "The little man who was alwatfs there." Favorite Expression: Love conquers alll Immediate Plans: Enter Whipple's Academy. Ambition: To become a successful politician. Glee Club I: Music Festival I: Tusitala StaE III: Tatt- Ier Reporter I, II: Junior Red Cross II, III: Christmas Assembly I: Gym Festival I: Intramural Football, Soft- ball, Basketball, Volleyball I: Vklrestling I: Junior Class Business Manager. ARISTIDES PITARYS "THE AMBASSADOR" "For many a joke had he." Favorite Expression: Hiya, Spor-r-ti Immediate Plans: Whipple's Academy. Ambition: Army pilot, Gym Festival I: Intramural Football. Softball I: Jun- ior Red Cross III. GERARD PLANTE "Mischief sparkles in his eyes And his laughter never dies." Favorite Expression: Dern it! Immediate Plans: Army. Ambition: Draftsman. Junior Red Cross III. ROLAND POIRIER "BLONDIE" "Slow and steady wins the race." Favorite Expression: Sharp! Immediate Plans: To graduate. Ambition: To be a machinist. Junior Red Cross III. ALFRED J. POULIN "SPEED" "Over thin ice our safetq is our speed." Favorite Expression: Nuts! Immediate Plans: ? Ambition: To become a machinist. ANNETTE POULIN "NAN" "Her manner held both arace and charm." Favorite Expression: Yumpin' Yimminy! Immediate Plans: College. Ambition: Secretary. Press Club III: Home Economics Club II: Dramatics Club I, II: Glee Club I, II, III: Junior Red Cross II, III: Christmas Assemblies I. II. III: Pride and Prejudice III: Senior Play Prompter: Upper Quarter. LOUISE MARY PRIMROSE ULU.. "LoUable. happy, and sincere, To many friends she is most dear." Favorite Expression: Gee whizl Immediate Plans: Office work. Ambition: To be successful in whatever I undertake. Tatller Reporter III: Junior Red Cross II, III: Gym Festival I. MARCEL PRINCE "MARS" "He loves to Iauqh, he loves all fun. Especially when school's begun," Favorite Expression: Small but very mighty. Immediate Plans: Buy Defense Bonds. Ambition: Be the greatest machinist that ever lived. Gym Festival I: Track I: Intramural Basketball I: Softball. LUCILLE QUIGLEY "QUIG" "The jog of youth her eyes displayed." Favorite Expression: Could bel Immediate Plans: Business college. Ambition: Medical secretary, Home Economics Club I. II, III. DONALD RAICHE "DON" "Thou has! wit at will." Favorite Expression: What's the story? Immediate Plans: Join the Marines. Ambition: To kill a couple of Japs. Baseball I. II, III: Intramural Football I: Softball I III: Basketball I: Junior Red Cross II, III. JUSTIN RANDALL, JR. "JUD" "Thou art a fellow of good respect." Favorite Expression: What's new? Immediate Plans: Learn the pattern and modeling trade Ambition: Become a good pattern maker. Junior Red Cross III: A. A. Football I, II: Track I Il. III: Intramural Basketball I. II. VIRGINIA RASMOVICI-I "RAZZY" "One would think her shu Until one saw that twinlzle in her eye." Favorite Expression: Jumping catfish! Immediate Plans: Go to business college. Ambition: Be a private secretary. Junior Red Cross III. ROBERT RATOFF "BOB" "Don't let it bother you-- It doesn't worry me." Favorite Expression: Here's a penny. Go home! Immediate Plans: Join the Army. Ambition: Be a photographer. Junior Red Cross III. CLAIRE G. RAVENELLE "BILLY" "Good nature and good sense must we ioin.'i Favorite Expression: Hi. Butch! Immediate Plans: Work. Ambition: To become an aviatrix. Decorating Committees I. II: Gym Festival I: Intra- mural Softball, Basketball. Volleyball I: Tumbling I: Ski Club III: Tattler Reporter III: Junior Red Cross II, III: Christmas Assembly II, III: Co-Chairman, Senior Play Publicity Committee. GERMAINE RAYMOND "JERRY" "Music is well said to be the speech of angels." Favorite Expression: Wouldn't you like to know? Immediate Plans: Ofhce work. Ambition: To study voice. Glee Club II, III: Music Festival I, II: Junior Red Cross II, III: Christmas Assemblies Il, III. ELEANOR REICH HEI-,, "A winning way, a friendly smile, In all, a girl quite worth while." Favorite Expression: Oh, I'm embarrassed! Immediate Plans: Indefinite. Ambition: To be a good oolfer. Press Club III: Tuttler Reporter I, II, III: Junior Red Cross III: Senior Play Prompter: Vice-President III: Tusitala Staff III: Upper Quarter. STEVE RELLAS "SNAPPER" "A very good athlete he, And we hope he always will be." Favorite Expression: Be good, jerk! Immediate Plans: Join the Army. Ambition: Own a hotel. Intramural Football I, Baseball I, Softball I. Basket- ball I: Baseball I. llg, Basketball I, II, III: Senior Play Ticket Committee III. JUNE RENII-IAN "JUNEY" "A little woman thouah a uery little thing Is sweeter far than sugar and flowers that bloom in the sprinqf' Favorite Expression: Hey, Maybelle! Immediate Plans: Nashua Business College. Ambition: To be successful in whatever I undertake. Junior Red Cross III: Ushcring Committee, Senior Play III: Upper Quarter. LOIS JEAN RENNIE USNOOKSH 'iflrtions speak louder than words." Favorite Expression: Why, Daddy? Immediate Plans: Barbiyou Fashion Studio for Modeling. Ambition: To be a fashion model. Junior Red Cross I. II. III. ARTHUR REYNOLDS "ART" "He was a gentleman from sole to crown." Favorite Expression: Be good. Immediate Plans: Position in a defense industry. Ambition: Machinist. Baseball III. IRENE I.. RICARD "NICKIE" "Nothing endures but personal qualities." Favorite Expression: Geekersf Immediate Plans: Defense work. Ambition: Interior decorator. Home Economics Club I, II: Junior Red Cross II. III: Upper Quarter. LILLIAN A. RICARD "LIL" "Easy to remember-hard to forget." Favorite Expression: Ciee whizl Immediate Plans: Defense work. Ambition: Dietitian. Home Economics Club I. II: Junior Red Cross II. III RAYMOND RICARD "RAY" "The cheerful ways of men are best." Favorite Expression: Hiya, jerk! Immediate Plans: Navy. Ambition: To kill a Jap. Ciym Festival I: A. A. Show I: Intramural Football I, Basketball II, IIIg Volleyball II: Tumbling I, II, III: Wrestling I, II. ROBERT RICHARDS "BOB" "To a young heart, everything is sport." Favorite Expression: I'll be seeing you. Immediate Plans: To secure work. Ambition: Radio announcer. Football I. II, III: Baseball I, II, III. BERTRAND BENEDICT ROBERGE "BERT" "None but himself can be his parallel." Favorite Expression: Hmm, solid! Immediate Plans: Millard's West Point Prep. Ambition: To be an officer and a gentleman. Ski Club II, III: Glec Club I, II: Orchestra I. II: Music Festival II: Tatller Reporter III: Junior Red Cross II, III: Christmas Assembly II: Football I, II, III: Pride and Prejudice III: Upper Quarter. VIRGINIA ELIZABETH ROCHELLE "CIN" "Bodies devoid of mind are as statues in the market place." Favorite Expression: Gollyl Immediate Plans: College. Ambition: To fly a plane. Press Club III: Dramatics Club I, II: Cilee Club I, II, III: Orchestra I: Author, Second Prize Original Play III: Christmas Assemblies I, II, III: Junior Red Cross Treas- urer II. III: Co-Chairman, Property Committee, Senior Play: Pride and Prejudice III: Tattler Staff II, III: Vale- dictorian. CLEMENT ROMANOWSKI "CI.EM" "A cool mind works better." Favorite Expression: Deadbeat. Immediate Plans: Defense work. Ambition: Machinist. BASCIU-Ill I, II: Junior Red Cross II, III: Press Club. EVANTHIA RUSSA "EVA" V "Life is not so short but that there is always time for courtesy." Favorite Expression: Well, I'll be . . . Immediate Plans: Office work. Ambition: To become successful in clerical work. Press Club III: Junior Red Cross II, III: Upper Quar- ter. DOROTHY P. RUSSELL "DOT" "Sober, steadfast and intent." Favorite Expression: Solid! Immediate Plans: Work. Ambition: Singer. Home Economics Club I. II. III: Junior Red Cross II, III. WILLIAM RYAN, JR. "WILLIE" HFOREH Favorite Expression: Are you kidding? Immediate Plans: Defense job. Ambition: To improve the Diesel engine. Music Festival I: Gym Festival I: Christmas Assembly II: Golf II, III: Intramural Football I: Baseball I: Soft- ball I: Basketball I: French Club I. CLIFFORD SADLER "LIMEY" "And it's greatly to his credit That he is an Englishmanf' Favorite Expression: Well, how about that, now? Immediate Plans: Return to "Old Blightyf' Ambition: Fighter pilot in the R. A. F. Ski Club III: Graduation Usher II: Senior Play Prop- crty Committee III: Pride and Prejudice III: Hockey II. III. LUCYLE SALVAIL ULU.. "A daughter of the gods. divinely tall, And most divinely fair." Favorite Expression: Hey, Mable! Immediate Plans: Post-graduate course. Ambition: Journalism. Press Club Ill: Tattler Staff III: Junior Red Cross III. THEO SANSOM "Vi'gorous in all pursuits." Favorite Expression: Solid. Immediate Plans: I Nursing. Ambition: To be a housewife. Dramatics Club I: Tattlcr Reporter III: Junior Red Cross I. II, III: Zodiac Club I. ANDREA LEE SAVAGE "ANDY" "With a young and gay heart. Favorite Expression: Hey, Maybellel Immediate Plans: Summer at the beach. Ambition: Government work. Christmas Assembly I: Orchestra I. II, III: Dramatics Club II: Debating Club II, III: Junior Red Cross II, III: Press Club III: Class Secretary II: Publicity Committee. Senior Play: Intramural Basketball III, Volleyball I: Up- per Quarter. PAULINE DOROTHEA SAWTCKI "POLLY" "Please don't get me started." Favorite Expression: Is that so? Immediate Plans: Business college. Ambition: To become a typist or nurse. Junior Red Cross I. II. RICHARD ARTHUR SCHIER "PLAYBOY" "Work and pleasure can be mixed." Favorite Expression: If I dood it, I deta whippin': I dood it. Immediate Plans: Ambition: U. S Original Play licity Committee Orchestra I, II. Cross I. II, III Band III: Track mittees I, II, III. Work. Air Corps. II: Gym Festival I: Senior Play Pub- III: Band I, II, III: Dramatics Club I: III: Music Festival I. II: Junior Red Orchestra, Senior Play II, III: State VI. II, III, Manager III: Decorating Com- ETHEL SCONTSAS 'Better be small and shine, Than be tall and cast a shadow." Favorite Expression: What's the story? Immediate Plans: Business College. Ambition: To be successful. Home Economics Club III: Junior Red Cross II, III: Gym Festival I: Intramural Softball I: Tumbling I. FRANCES Sl-IAPIRO "FRAN" "M1'srhz'ef sparkles in her etles, And her lauqhler never dies." Favorite Expression: None. Immediate Plans: Work at Country Club Bread Co. Ambition: Be a nurse. Gym Festival Ig Junior Red Cross II, III. RUBY SHEAR "She was hashful and shu. But when you knew hcr, oh muf" Favorite Expression: O. K. Immediate Plans: College. Ambition: Medicine. Home Economics Club III: Junior Red Cross II. III: Ushering Committee. Senior Play. LOUISE Sl-IERLOCK "Friendship is purchased only by friendship." Favorite Expression: Gosh! Immediate Plans: Study music. Ambition: Pianist. Home Economics Club I. II, III: Junior Red Cross ll, III: Glee Club I, II. JOHN JOSEPH SIERGIEWICZ "SERGE" "The world is wide-tuhu hurry?" Favorite Expression: So what? Immediate Plans: Meet requirements for U. S, Air Corps. Ambition: Air Corps. NOEL SIMONEAU "SIM" " 'Tis no sin for a man to labor in his vocation." Favorite Expression: Ya, could be. Immediate Plans: Become a machinist. Ambition: A great machinist. Junior Red Cross III: Intramural Volleyball I: Tum- bling I. MARION SMITH ..SMI,I.,I.Y.. "I'lI speak in tl monstrous Il-Iflt' voice," lfavorile Expression: Oh. rats! Immediate Plans: Nurse training. Ambition: To become a registered nurse. Junior Red Cross II. III: Upper Quarter. ROBERT SMITH "SMlTTY" "His muscles were like iron bands." Ikivorite Expression: This time it's .1 real feud. Immediate Plans: XVorlt or college. Ambition: Army Air Corps. Ifootball I, Il, III: Vwlrestling Team I: Tumbling I. EDWARD E. SOUCY "JU JU" "He was ii man- zl man of brain and hrawnf' lfavorile Expression: Ju Ju. Immediate Plans: Machinist. Ambition: Research chemist. Upper Quarter, SOTIRIOS P. STERUIOU "SAMMY" "He loves to laugh: he loves all fun lfsperiully when sehool's begun." liavorite Expression: Be good. Jack. Immediate l'lans: College, Ambition: Become a chemistry teacher. i1,lIl1IL'I' Reporter I: Junior Red Cross III: Intramural Iiootball I, Baseball I. Softball I, Basketball I. LOUISE STOEHRER "SHRIMP" "A nwid so charming cmd ueru petit, So full of fun and very sweet." liavorite Expression: You're a crumbi Immediate Plans: Work. Ambition: To be a fashion designer. Junior Red Cross III: Decorating Committees, Senior and Junior Proms I, II, III: Upper Quarter. FLORENCE STOLZBERG "FLOSSIE" "Life is one closelu complicated tangle." Favorite Expression: Ciollyf Immediate Plans: Business college. Ambition: Secretary. Junior Red Cross II. III. PHILIP STULTZ "PHIL" "A merry hear! maketh a cheerful countenance Favorite Expression: Ah. go home! Immediate Plans: Work, Ambition: To be a long distance bus driver. Christmas Assembly I: Glee Club I: Junior Red Cross III. ARTHUR SULLIVAN "SULLY" "He was regularly cheerful ana' polite." Favorite Expression: Don't put off till tomorrow what you can do today. Immediate Plans: Start as a stockman in J. J. Newberry and work up. Ambition: United States Forestry Service. THOMAS EDWARD SULLIVAN "SULLY" "O, what is that power he possesses over women?" Favorite Expression: Maybe. Immediate Plans: Work for a year. Ambition: Join the Army Air Corps. Junior Red Cross III: Gym Festival I: Track I: Golf II, III: Intramural Football. Basketball. Softball. Volley- ball, Tumbling I. JOHN SULLIVAN "JEEP" "Tick, talkg lick, talk " Favorite Expression: Solid! Immediate Plans: To be drafted. Ambition: Air Corps, Gym Festival I: Junior Red Cross III. JOSEPH SWEKLA "JOE" "For there's jou in his heart: There are smiles in his face." Favorite Expression: Holy wreck! Immediate Plans: Work. Ambition: To marry an heiress. Junior Red Cross III: Football II. III: Intramural Football, Softball, Basketball I. JOHN TAMULONIS "TAMMIE" "I know a trick worth two of that." Favorite Expression: It could be. Immediate Plans: Not to get caught chewing gum. Ambition: To chew a pack of gum each day. junior Red Cross III: Upper Quarter. PETER A. TAMULONIS "PETE" "True as steel: il will bend, but never break." Favorite Expression: Beat it, boy. Immediate Plans: To become an aviation master mechanic. Ambition: Join Naval Air Corps. A. A. Committee I. II: Cheerleader II, III: Manager of Basketball II, III: Tattler Reporter III: ROLAND TATRO "MITZIE" "Size never shows abilities." Favorite Expression: What's cooking. good-looking? Immediate Plans: Art school. Ambition: To become a commercial artist. Art Club I. II. III: Ski Club II, III: Christmas As- semblies I. II. III: Gym Festival I: A. A. Show I: Decorating Committees I, Il, III. HELEN TAYLOR "SHRIMP" "Short but full of pep." Favorite Expression: It isn't even funny, Immediate Plans: Work. Ambition: Sail a destroyer. Press Club III: Glee Club II, III: Tusitala Staff III: Tattler Staff III: Junior Red Cross II: Christmas As- semblies II. III: G m Festival I' A. A Show II: Prompt- y , . er. Pride and Prejudice III: Upper Quarter. HENRY TRAHAN "HANK" "lull, dark. and lmndsorm Ifavoritc Iixpressionz Shes a honey. Immediate Plans: Vv'ork, Ambition: Get married. .Iunior Red Cross III: Senior Play Stage III: Baseball I: Track II. Ill. Captain III. LEON TROTTIIQR Committee 'AOnly he who ultempls lhe uhstlrd is rupulale of urhzieuzinq the Iif77DlJSSIihIi'," Iiavouite Exnression: Keep cool. calm. and collected. Immediate Plans: Work. Am"ition: Find a cute. rich widow about ninety years old. Graduation Usher II: Tultler Reporter II: III: Lunch Counter III. CONSTANCE 'I'URCO'I"I'Ii "CONNIIi" "To know her was lo love her." Ilavorite Expression: Gollyf Immediate Plans: Work. Ambition: Dietitian. Junior Red Cross II. III: Lunch Counter II. ing Committee. Senior Play III. GLORIA TURCOTTE "'I'URK" MAI!-Sfhl-L'f sparkles in her eues. And her lauahler never dies." Ifavorite Expression: Ii-gadf Immediate Plans: Rest. Ambition: To be a psychiatrist. Junior Red Cross III: Senior Play Propcrty III: Upper Quarter. IVIARCELLIZ LUCILLIi UPHAM "lVIARCY" "There was ll soft and pensive arafe A east of Ihouqhl upon her faeef Ifavorite Expression: Geef Immediate Plans: Work. Ambition: Clerical worker. Junior Red Cross II. III. Tennis II. III: Usher- Committee BESSIE VASILAS "BESS" "This is the qlft of Athens to man." Ifavorite Expression: Don't let it worry you. Immediate Plans: Work. Ambition: Physical director. 'lliltler Reporter I: Gym Festival I: Dramatics Club I. Il: Cheerleader II: Head Cheerleader III: A. A. Show I, Il: Intramural Softball I. II. Basketball II, Captain I, III, Volleyball I. Il: Tumbling I: Manager II: Junior Red Cross III. ODIESIA VASILOU "CHAPPY" "Youth is to all the alum! season of life." lfavorite Expression: Quiet. dog! Immediate Plans: l'urr1er. Ambition: 'I'o travel. l.unch Counter II: Gym Festival I: Baseball II: Track I: Intramural Ifootball I, Baseball I, Softball. REGINA VASSAR HREGGIEH A'Noi'su and small Hut ohf thu1's not ull." Ifavorite Iixpression: Anything goes! Immediate Plans: Go to New York, Ambition: Journalist. Gym Festival I: Intramural Basketball I: Home Eco nomies Club II: Junior Red Cross III. WILITRID VERMETTE "J. J." "lViee in all Luaqsf' Ifavorite Ifxpression: Pretence. Immediate Plans: Army. Ambition: Machinist. MARY A. VIRBALAS "All kin' of smllu I'OLl7'l' the lips." Ifavorite lixpression: Iiiddlesticks. Immediate Plans: XVork. Ambition: More work. Junior Red Cross II, III. PRESTON WALSH "BUTTON" "I know a trick worth two of that." Favorite Expression: I guess I showed you! Immediate Plans: Whipple's Academy. Ambition: See more of the world. Upper Quarter. DOROTHEA D. WARD "SHEA" 1, "A quiet tongue shows a wise head. Favorite Expression: Not bad! Immediate Plans: Work in an oflice. Ambition: Become a model. Junior Red Cross II, III: Decorating Committee I, II. III. GEORGE WARDNER "WINDY" "I'm modesty personified." Favorite Expression: Whatsa matter, fellows? Immediate Plans: Continue education. Ambition: Engineer. Gym Festival I: Stage Committee. Senior Play: Foot- ball I: Baseball I. II, III: Intramural Football I: Baseball I: Softball I. MARJORIE BETTY WARE "Sparkling with fun, She's sure lo win you before she's done." Favorite Expression: I'm nervous! Immediate Plans: College. Ambition: Medical Secretary. Christmas Assemblies I. II, III: Glee Club I. II, III: Dramatics Club I. II: Debating Club I: Ski Club II, III: Music Festival II. III: Press Club III: Tusitala Staff Ill: Junior Red Cross III: Senior Play III: Upper Quarter. DONALD WESSON "DON" "Greatness knows itself." Favorite Expression: How'sa going? Immediate Plans: United States Marines. Ambition: To become a Marine officer. Junior Red Cross I. WEBSTER W. WHITE. JR. "WEBBIE" A'He was a man, take him for all in I shall not look upon his like again." Favorite Expression: For the love of mike! Immediate Plans: University of New Hampshire. Ambition: Army Air Corps. all, Band I, II. III: Lunch Counter III: Upper Quarter. .IOSEPHINE WILSON HJC.. "Nice in all ways." Favorite Expression: You know what? Immediate Plans: University of New Hampshire. Ambition: Career. Press Club III: Dramatics Club II: Junior Red Cross II. III: Christmas Assembly I: Publicity Committee, Sen- ior Play III: Upper Quarter. ANNE WINER "Her charms, they are many. Her faults scarcely any!" Favorite Expression: You bet! Immediate Plans: College. Ambition: Secretary. Press Club III: Debating Club I: Ski Club II, III: Dramatics Club II: Tatller Staff III: Junior Red Cross II, III: Senior Play Chairman, Costume Committee: Up- per Quarter. PI-IYLLIS MAE WINSLOW "JAKE" "Innocent eyes and a disarminq smile." Favorite Expression: Solid! Immediate Plans: Work. Ambition: To become a model. Home Economics Club I: Christmas Assembly I: Red Cross II, III. GLORIA WOODWARD "GOKEE" "She can sing the savageness out of a bear," Favorite Expression: Think you're kidding? Immediate Plans: Marriage. Ambition: To be the best wife ever. I.unch Counter III. Junior NATALIE WOOLLEY 'ANAT" "All the goodness of u good erm." Favorite Expression: Still love me? Immediate Plans: To take a rest. Ambition: Occupational therapist. Lunch Counter II, III: Costume Committee, Senior Play III: Upper Quarter. ELIZABETH ELLA WORTH "BETTY" "Dorff let it bolher you, ll doesn't bofher me." Favorite Expression: Hi there? Immediate Plans: Nursing. Ambition: To be an Army nurse. Glee Club III: Home Economics Club I. II. III: Lunch Counter III: Junior Red Cross II, III: Christmas As- semblies II, III. GEORGE XEROTERFS "PIGEON" "Let me. then. be up and doinqf' Favorite Expression: Good goshl Immediate Plans: Art school. Ambition: To be a commercial artist. Art Club I. II, III: Junior Red Cross III: Decorating Committees: Christmas Assemblies I, II, III: Prom I. II, III. STANLEY JOSEPH YANUSKEVICH "TANNY" "Men are of Iwo kinds, and he ls of the kind I'd like lo he." Favorite Expression: Be good, Jack. Immediate Plans: Go to school. Ambition: Become a successful business man. Baseball II, III: Basketball II, III, Co-Captain III. DOROTHY H, YOUNG "DOT" "As merry as lhe day is lonqf' Favorite Expression: Oh my gosh! Immediate Plans: Go in training. Ambition: Airline hostess. Chorus I. II: Junior Red Cross III: Upper Quarter. Favorite lixprcssionz Hey, ierkl lm mediate Ambition: Succeed in life. JOHN ZERBINOS "JOHNNY" "Well miss him when he's qonef' Plans: llelp Uncle Sam. "The Choice of '4 '9 Favorite Book . ,, Kings Row Favorite Magazine . . ,. ,....... Life Favorite Movie A . 4 , Kings Row Favorite Actress , Bette Davis Favorite Actor . ., . Spencer Tracy Favorite Radio Performer .. . A ,...., Bob Hope Favorite Song V. ,. . Blues in the Night" Favorite Spot in Nashua . ,.,, , ,,,, , Rosebud Favorite Band ..., . ..., , ...... ., Glenn Miller Most Admired American Man . , General Douglas MacArthur Most Admired American Woman i i i..,. Mrs. Roosevelt .flag 9 1 fb BFRANKMN if PRINTER 19' ' 4,n.s::rmunx:m L 111111111011 +1 rc Wi 'fill 1 1 ' 9 :11, y eww at r A7 :Lui alan. g I '- , . ' ,"41 . . ,"Q1 A I lim ull 41p P!!nl,'J14l ' I ' V' 'lil 1- ilk! iiiliii ' wifi' Wy ,J Q11-V, T ,ia ili wii- ,,,Ah - V1 1- ,mo September, 19 39 May 10, 1940 october, 1940 November, 1940 January, 1941 May 2, 1941 May 15, 1941 June, 1941 December 13, 1941 Bewildered sophomores, the class of 1942 entered the beautiful but massive high school. We had no trouble at all getting lost in its maze of corridors our first few days. Members of the orchestra, including some sopho- mores, entrained for Laconia to participate in the All State Music Festival. The War was brought to our shores when we wel- comed into our junior class an English refugee, Clifford Sadler, better known to his friends as 'iSteve" or "Limie." In this month we, the class of 1942, elected our junior officers. Almost all of the students ordered class rings which they wore shortly afterward. The day all juniors look forward to, the Junior Prom, came at last. The girls surely looked love- ly in their colorful gowns and the boys didn't look too bad either. The Junior Prom is a day we'll all remember, ah, how well! Many juniors were well-counselled by vocational conferences arranged by Mr. Dion. Four of our classmates were honored by being elected our senior officers. Although it was Friday, the thirteenth, our Senior Play, June Mad, went off very well indeed, February 11, 1942 February 16, 1942 March 25, 1942 April 13, 1942 April 29, 1942 May 1-4, 1942 May 15, 1942 June 3, 1942 June 17-19, 1942 The election on February 11 shattered tradition when the class of '42 chose their second class presi- dent, Richard Messier. We elected our class Tusitala book staff. On this day a final note of a "2 to majority decided against graduation in cap and gown. The reading of the Upper Quarter announced that our highest ranking member is Virginia Rochelle. There was not much hesitation in electing our class orator, John Barry. Our prophets are Charles Maguire and Demetrious Anagnost and our prophetesses, Joan Brewster and Barbara Hay- den. "Quiet please, and watch the birdie" were the despairing words of the photographer for we had our class picture taken and wouldn't keep still. Sugar and gasoline rationing gave the students sev- eral unexpected vacations while teachers cooperated in registering. Students had leave from their classes to compete in the Noyes Prize Speaking Contest. Many seniors participated in the Dodge Contest by writing historical or biological essays. Graduation Week was welcomed with much joy and yet much sadness. The door of our uncertain future stands ajar. files 1 ll i' M N X " '17 F . RW M394-5. Qi . i 4 , ,.. aim ig , . if i IQ: y,'r 1, .iv i, ,jl E - , ., ' , f if li l dj' , Lf", ' lil r 'Ml ,lil-l my 7 , lid I Mlm We, the class of 1942, of the Nashua Senior High School, after due con- sideration, collaboration, corroboration. and confusion, as we are about to depart decrepitly Calaslj from this noble school in which we have, for the past three years. laboriously Cahemlj learned mannerisms, aphorisms, and plagiarisms, do hereby declare this our final will and testament in which we bequeath to the following all but "our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor." We do appoint as worthy executor the honorable Elmer Q. Wilson, the melodious maestro. I Mr. Tracy and the Board of Education, we leave , ,...,. ., period. II To Mr. Nesmith we bequeath the caps and gowns we didn't wear. III To Mr. Keefe-A detector to determine the truthfulness of alibis for tardiness. IV To Mr. AinsworthiA co-ed class in woodworking. V To Miss Barnes-A boys' knitting club for mass production of Red Cross sweaters. VI To Miss Bingham-An automatically changing world globe to keep up with Adolf and I-Iirohito. VII To Miss Brooks and Miss Gallagher-An indefinite supply of ink eradicator for their ever needful pupils. VIII To Miss Genevieve Campbell and Miss Tsiantos-An electric hand that gives out detention slips as soon as class delinquents cross the office threshold. IX To Miss Grace Campbell and Miss Bernadin--Priority rights on typewriters. X To Mr. Canfield-A Joe Miller Joke Book, and a collection of old hot water bottles to be converted into a new inner tube. XI To Miss Clancy and Miss McGlynn-Pupils who can think of "dates" other than proms and movies. XII To Mr. Clarkson-A 'Azoot suit," with plenty of extra pockets to keep his spare wrenches in. XIII To Miss Coffey-A bathing suit in which she can duck for golf balls to her heart's content, in the Country Club pond. AXllV XV XVI XVII XVIII XIX XX XXI XXII XXIII XXIV XXV XXVI XXVII XXVIII XXIX XXX XXXI XXXII XXXI II XXXIV XXXV To Miss Cornell-Permission to direct and produce "Gone With the Wind" in serial form: each episode to be presented in weekly assemblies. To Mr. Connor-A framed copy of his slogan: "Do as I say, not as I do!" To Miss Cote-A bust of Josephine to keep her lonely Napoleon company. To Miss Cramer-A set of Bobbie Burns' records to instruct her pupils in the correct pronunciation of Scotch dialect. To Miss Dale-More willing young men to ask the girls to the various school functions. To Mr. Dion--A variety of flashy bow ties to dazzle the female members of the faculty and student body. To Miss Dionne-''Eau-cle-Cologne" scented specimens for the benefit of her dissecting classes. To Miss Doe and Miss Frances Sullivan-A stream of impersonal personals for the Tattler. To Miss Dolan-A beautifully bound set of sugarless recipes to be used for the duration of the war. To Miss Dowd-A cast-iron wastebasket which will leave a last- ing impression on those students whose pedal extremities come in contact with it. To Miss Helen Hallisey and Miss Mildred Hallisey-Special pneu- matic tubes to shoot class texts from Room 104 to 214. To Mr. Harvey and Mr. Morandos-A bevy of gorgeous chorus girls to illustrate the finer points of the intricate shift to their youthful exponents of the block and tackle. To Mr. Hatch and Mr. Morley-A tramway that will enable them to make that hill on the way home without any difficulty. To Miss Hills and Miss Kagarise-Automatic sewing machines that will allow pupils to relax during periods. To Miss Hoitt-An :nnex to the office for her unruly students. To Mr. Kennedy-A telephone six feet from the floor to prevent the necessity of his stooping to converse. To Mr. Kilbane-A five-year subscription to the Racing Form. To Mr. Lee-A scries of pamphlets entitled The Pro and Con of Wear ng Slacks to be distributed to classes for group discussion. To Miss Marion Lord--An album of Selected Jazz Classics for Organ to be played befcre and after weekly assemblies. To Miss Helen Lord-A real cowboy from the "wild and woolly west" to assist her pupils in singing Western ballads. To Miss McWeeney-A new wardrobe of chic Red Cross uni- forms. To Mrs. Nesmith-A vacation from rationing. XXXVI XXXVII XXXVIII XL XLI XLII XLIII XLIV XLV XLVI XLVII To Miss Noyes-Mufflers for the noisy ventilators in her room. To Mr. O'Neil-A talking machine with a record of his favorite expression, "You're a good kid, but .... " To Mr. Pendleton-More worms, hellgramites, night crawlers, and other choice bait. To Mr. Phaneuf-A pair of water wings for his adventures in the United States Navy. To Miss Ryan, Miss Shea, and Miss Small-Textbooks for the preservation of the hunt and peck system. To Mr. Sharp-A license as pamphlet distributor for the National Education Alliance. ' To Mr. Slavin-More rising young bartenders who delight in skimming the foam off effervescent solutions in chemistry. To Miss May Sullivan-A dictionary of military terms to sim- plify the reading of "lm Westen Nichts Neues." To Miss Walstrom-A bottle of Fitchfs hair tonic to prevent fall- ing hair among the paint brushes. y To Mr. White-A picket fence to guard the bubbler outside his room from raucous students. y To Mrs. Williams-A stepladder to assist her in answering the telephone. Done on this 18th day of June, of the forty-second year of the twentieth century, we do sign, seal and deliver this, our final will and testament. CLASS OF '42 IN WITNESS THEREOF2 The Boy with the Wistful Eyes Joe Smith, American Dumbo JA A - N - an -.Sr :J ,l ill. ! !,l5sa? lmwxtdlimgfj 5353? LD ff Qv., ,' I, igff' ', Af f 4 , ff 2?KQ tfw1J11f5f l Dramatlcs N I -f'-E22 NL 111 6 1l'sfW5lg,'fHlHlSlimiyllmmy. R 53 R f V 1. +111 fgll,f'Lt,'r!4'-1551 ff in 1 f' vi 1 , Jamal ,'1iq,sf u fn y M Wr9Jwj,,-33511411 H51 gfgmfwfsw M ,X "'- X LT I' 4 BY RUTH KIRKPATRICK On Friday, December 13, 1941, after weeks of almost constant practice and struggling over difficult lines, the Senior Play cast emerged triumphantly to present a star performance of Florence Ryerson's and Colin C1ement's com- edy, June Mad. The play portrayed the stages through which most young people pass during the intoxicating month of June. The two leading characters, fifteen year old Penny Wood and sixteen year old Chuck Harris, were humorously and realistically played by Joan Brewster and Francis Boyle, struggling in an "in-between" stage. too old to act childish, yet too young to have their opinions valued. Dorothy Bibber acted to pcrfrction the part of Mrs. Wood, the under- standing mother, who tried to ease her daughter over the hard spots. Her husband, Dr. Wood, was portrayed by Charles Maguire, who seemed mature and true-to-life in his exasperation over the noisy antics of the youngsters. Donald MacLane as Elmer Tuttle, the local odd job man, and Isabelle Luce, as the overworked, good-natured maid, Effie, succeeded in provoking a great deal of laughter, for they made a ludicrous combination. Anna Birchall as the thirteen year old neighborhood pest, Milly Lou. also brought many laughs, mostly in sympathy with annoyed members of the Wood family and especially Mrs. Wood's younger brother, G. Mervyn Rob- erts. Acting as that attractive college freshman was Richard Messier, who displayed outstanding ability to act realistically on the stage. The appear- ance of Edw1rd Dumaine as Mervyn's roommate, that dashing sophisticate, Roger Van Vleck, started many hilarious complications involving the inexperi- enced and susceptible Penny. Chuck's father, Mr. Harris, played by Leslie Erb, was set against Chuck's interest in building gliders but later changed his mind and relented. Julie Harris, Chuck's older sister, and a charming flirt, was played by Marjorie Ware, who was well fitted to the part. Hcr alienation of Roger's affections left poor Penny disillusioned. Shirley Wentworth and her brother, Ralph Wentworth, played by Doro- thy Lynn and Rogzr Gaskill, represented typical tern agers, guests at the Wood's party. The whole play ran smoothly from start to finish, thanks to the adapta- bility of the cast and the expert coaching of Miss Elizabeth Cornell. Many were the days that Miss Cornell was seen trudging wearily homeward from rehearsals about six o'c1ock in the evening. The class of 1942 will always appreciate her efforts to make our Senior Play successful. We are grateful. too. to the other teachers and numerous student members of committees who helped in the presentation. The cooperation of all the workers produced a praiseworthy performance, of which the Seniors are very proud. PRIDE AND PREJUDICE On April 17, 1942, for the first time in history. the junior and senior classes of Nashua l-ligh School collaborated to present a play sponsored by the Rotary Club to raise money for their Crippled Children's Fund. Heretofore, the Rotarians have asked the Mask and Dagger dramatic society of U.N.H. to present a play, but this year they honored the high school students by re- questing their talent and cooperation. In spite of the length and difficult parts of Prz'a'e and Prejudice, the cast, which was coached by Miss Elizabeth Cornell. did an excellent job and succeeded in making the play a huge success. The following seniors were members of the cast, and their classmates are exceedingly proud of them: ' Charles Maguire, in the role of Mr. Bennet, acted with ease and under- standing of his part, as he sat somewhat on the sidelines watching his wife's schemes to marry off their daughters. Bruce deQuoy, as Hill, the English butler, affected an amazingly correct English accent, and retained his poise at all times. Virginia Rochelle portrayed Charlotte Lucas, the plain daughter of one of the Bennets' neighbors, who finally married Mr. Collins, an effeminate and ludicrous clergyman, whose part was taken by Walter Kopka. The two were decided misfits, and Virginia skillfully displayed her resignation to her bore- some life, while Walter's affected manner and labored eloquence brought down the house every time he came upon the stage. VVilliam Hill, as the handsome, proud Mr. Darcy, retained his mask of reserve with excellent control, while the pleasant Mr. Bingley, played by Clif- ford Sadler, displayed his charm and refinement throughout the play. Dorothy Bibber played the part of Mrs. Ciardener, an understanding and affectionate aunt. Two guests at Mrs. Bennet's ball made an attractive picture: Bertrand Roberge, in his dashing uniform, as Captain Denny, and Annette Poulin in her dainty blue gown as Amelia, his partner. t The colorful costumes of the early 19th century added greatly to the en- joyment of the presentation, as did the lovely Empire furniture in the Bennet's drawing room, not forgetting the two effective family portraits. The music was provided by members of the Nashua Symphony Orchestra and. High School Orchestra, including the following seniors: Thomas Hill, clarinet: Albert Cameron and Carl Cohen, violinists: and Andrea Savage, harpsi- chord. ' Both the juniors and seniors should be congratulated ion their cooperation and ability, which, of course, was offered voluntarily. We are also grateful to the Girl Mariners who acted as ushers on that memorable evening. ORIGINAL PLAY CONTEST Everyone was pleasantly surprised to hear that Barbara Hayden, local winner of the 1941 State Original Play Contest, had walked off with the Nashua honors again in 1942. Her junior entry, entitled "To Bed, To Bed, Said Sleepy Head," coached by Miss Cornell and presented in assembly on March 25, 1941, was received with great enthusiasm. Then the play, chosen by the State judges as one of the two best submitted from the larger high schools of the state. was performed in the finals at Laconia on May 1, 1941. In the finals Peterboro placed first and Nashua second. Seniors who were members of the cast were Raymond Fortier, Leslie Erb, Richard Messier, Ulysses Mocas, Richard Schier, and Sotirios Stergiou. This year Barbara's new play, "She Drank Liberty Tea," was also chosen winner by the local judges for its originality and historical interest. It was performed in assembly on March 16, 1942, and of the four members of the cast two were seniors: Dorothy Knight and Richard Messier. This year Miss Noyes was the coach. The play was likewise chosen by the State judges as one of the two best submitted from the larger high schools of the state. Because of transportation difficulties and an unfortunate conflict with Junior Prom, Nashua was forced to withdraw from the finals at Laconia on May 1. We give our thanks none the less to the representative from our class who created two consecutive hits in the Original Play Contest-Miss Barbara Hay- den. The New Hampshire Drama Day Eestival, scheduled to be held in Berlin in April, 1942, was cancelled this year because of war conditions. This con- test in normal times determines the two best performed one-act plays to represent the state at the New England Drama Festival. RUTH KIRKPATRICK R WU , Q05 elQ , l 9QTlf?Qj it CIU sind T W ACt1V1t1 SKI CLUB The Ski Club, originated in our junior year under the supervision of Mr. Slavin, was the beginning of our present organization. It resumed its activi- ties early in December of l94l with Mr. Kennedy as supervisor and the majority of the members seniors. With Richard Messier as president, Kenneth Cove as vice-president, and Robert Mercer as secretary-treasurer the club was kept quite busy, with both private trips to the northern slopes and group trips to places nearer home. Several trips to Temple Mountain proved very suc- cessful and enjoyable wherein much skill and talent at skiing was displayed. The members concluded their season with a journey to Gilford in which forty-five skiers took part. THE GLEE CLUB The Glee Club. under the direction of our maestro, "Pop" Wilson, has proved to be one of the most successful clubs. Every year it has participated in the Christmas assembly, which is becoming traditional and which the pupils look forward to attending. The annual concerts were given during the sopho- more and junior years but not during the senior year because of war conditions. The Glee Club has also staged Easter and Memorial Day assemblies which have won praise. The members of the Class of 1942 elected to the All-State Chorus were Anna Birchall, Anne Daukas, Muriel Hunnewell, Bertrand La- lirance, Raymond Marquis, and Marjorie Ware. Due to war conditions, the All-Slate Music Festival. which was to have taken place at Claremont this year, was cancelled. THE DRAMATICS CLUB The Dramatics Club, well led by Miss Noyes. was composed of students interested in stage acting. Frequently the members met in Room ll7, the library, or the auditorium and staged plays, sketches. and various scenes. This club served a twofold purpose. First, the members were shown their faults and the remedies for these faults, and second, enjoyment was derived out of every meeting. DEBATING CLUB THE DEBATINC CLUB During the past two years the Debating Club, with Mr. Canneld at its head has conducted many contests throughout the state. In the l94l season Conrad Marcoux and Andrea Savage were the only two juniors who took part in the debating with other schools. Andrea was on the team taking part in the Bates College lnterscholastic Debating League, New Hampshire Division. ln the l942 season, Anna Birchall, Lillian Dobrowolska. Genevieve Pie- tueh, Andrea Savage, Normand Cadorette, and Conrad Marcoux comprised the senior group. Cadorette represented Nashua in the University of New Hampe shire contest. Savage and Cadorette competed in the Laconia debate. which we lost, and Anna Birchall took part in the Dover meet where the decision went to Nashua. THE PRESS CLUB The Press Club. which was made up of senior pupils. was supervised by the senior English teachers. Miss Cramer, Miss Cornell. Miss Dowd. and Miss Noyes. The pupils worked in groups of two. each group writing the school notes on respective weeks. These were then printed in The Nashua 'l'eIegruph. The following students were members of the Press Club: John Barry, Dorothy Bibber, Anna Birchall, Joan Brewster, Lucille Buxf ton, Elaine Campbell, Constance Clough. Grace Cote. Lucille Dachos. Anne Daukas, Virginia Desclos. Robert Desmarais, Carol Dickey. Robert Dinan. Constance Douville. Edward Dumaine, Leslie Erb, Mary Eahey. Muriel Eor- rest, Robert Gaudette, Barbara Hayden, Muriel Hunnewell. Gloria Jennings. Patricia Joyce, Ruth Kirkpatrick, Dorothy Knight, Harold Lalmond. Lois Littlefield, Florence La Rose, Isabelle Luce, Constance Lucier, Glenn MacDonA ald, Jean McLaughlin. Charles Maguire, Virginia Marshall, Beatrice Menter. Shirley Mercer, Noreen Morse, Marion O'Brien, Genevieve Pietuch. Marjorie Pike. Annette Poulin, Eleanor Reich, June Renihan, Virginia Rochelle, Evan- thia Russa, Lucille Salvail. Andrea Savage, Helen Taylor. Marjorie Ware, Josephine Wilson, Anne Winer. THE TATTLER The Tattler. the school magazine, was very fortunate in having such a brilliant and industrious staff this year. The four issues which it published contained some of the best material written by Nashua High School students in many years. The editorial and literary departments are to be particularly commended. The short story contest which it ran revealed a future authoress in Gloria Jennings. Senior members of the staff included: Joan Brewster, Editor-in-Chief: Anne Daukas, Associate Editor: Virginia Rochelle, Senior Literary Editor: Mary Fahey, Alumni Editor: Robert Des- marais, Assistant Alumni Editor: Dorothy Bibber, Book Editor: Anne Winer. Associate Book Editor: Genevieve Pietuch, School Notes Editor: Barbara Hay- den, Associate School Notes Editor: Lane Damon, Exchange Editor: Ruth Kirkpatrick, Personals Editor: Isabelle Luce, Associate Personals Editor: Rob- ert Dinan, Assistant Personals Editor: Romeo Gendron, Business Manager: Leslie Erb and Charles Maguire, Athletics Co-editors: Lucille Salvail, Associate Athletics Editor: Stuart Groves, Art Editor: Gloria Euller, Assistant Art Edi- tor: Neil Hagerty, Circulation Manager: Mary Maguire, Honorary Member. C' 71155 V!!! s .Q-4-man, ""'L'wn vs.. ig Qfg -gil Q YS .Q- ,,,413 4,1 xx xx , x. , , N 3, Sim ,xff. K A -..: Q - -.M F' 4' .Q .. - j 12 L Q Q e r 4 K' W" f Y is Q 55 1 2 . gf' gf ,Q xx ,. 5 Ax - A L wif?-5 gm Q 5 +4.75 'I fx' ' N AQ. KX I ' X ,Nw Q iw ...X l fi... in gi.. . 1' 1 lcmdid lhots l:ddy Dionne Kenny Govejaloppy, und gang Dinan and Sully be- fore the prom Franny Boyle and Lu Howard MacDonald,Gordon, and Downey "Pro" Farwell After school scene "The Mnybellesn Maguire and Mocas Gloria Turcotte Barry and Mr. Slavin "The Stars and Stripes" Lunch Hour Ray Fortier A thletlcs fi. jf 'gi I fi, ' ff . 'I V '?'A?-Q,,.A'gN-L X ,ffff Z-if 21 hletic s By CIIARLns MAGUIRE and WILLIAM HILL 1939-1940 Way back in the fall of 1939, our class of 1942 first displayed its talents on the gridiron of Holman Stadium. "Hoot" Moriarty, triple-threat halfback, provided the lone bright spot, as the Purple experienced a disastrous season. "Bob" Richards, rugged guard, also won a starting berth, while the remainder of our classmates, including "Moke" Mocas, "Bert" Roberge, 'AJoe" Swekla, and l.eo Fraser, laid the framework for their brilliant exploits of ensuing seasons as members of the scrubs. As the winter of '39-'40 appeared, once again "Hoot" Moriarty assumed a starring role, this time on the basketball floor. 1-le was our sole Varsity rep- resentative that year, but Steve Rellas and Nick Loulakis received valuable ex- perience as members of the Junior Varsity. Athletically, our class Hrst gained real prominence in the spring of 1940, when four sophomores won starting positions on the strong baseball nine. Nick Loulakis' magnificent throwing arm cut down many an ambitious enemy run- ner who sought to gain an extra base on balls hit to the left lield sector. Bat- ting in the clean-up spot, "l-loot" Moriarty supplied some real power with his extra base wallops, besides turning in a creditable performance behind the plate. Bob Richards at the hot corner, and Steve Rellas at the keystone sack, con- tributed some ine defensive infield play, and few and far between were the ground balls which got through this pair. 1940-1941 Even before classes actually met in the fall of 1940, the gridiron stalwarts of the class of '42 were battling for positions at the training camp at Conway, New Hampshire. Strange reports came trickling in from the mountain strong- hold. but when the Nashua eleven took the field for their opening encounter. 'AHoot" Moriarty was at the right-halfback position, Bob Richards was at guard, and l.eo Fraser and Nick Loulakis were the ends. The club looked pow- erful and ready for a great season. but after a few early successes, the old injury Jinx struck them and dogged the boys throughout the season. The 1940-41 basketball quintet which went all the way to the finals of the State Championships at Durham before bowing to Manchester Central, was in no small way helped by the sparkling offensive play of "Hoot" Moriarty, and by the defensive play of "Tanny" Yanuskevich. Both these boys were im- mense all season long and in view of their ability and close friendship. were elected Co-Captains to lead next Year's team, That spring the baseball squad was composed mainly of members of our class. "floor" Moriarty, Bob Richards, Steve Rellas, and Nick Loulakis, all 1942 LETTER MEN regulars as sophomores, once again won starting berths and with added experi- ence and ability outdid their first year efforts. 'ATanny" Yanuskevich and "Rendy" Wardner joined with Nick Loulakis to give the club an outfield en- tirely of juniors, and incidentally three of the best fly chasers in the business. Lack of effective pitching alone kept Nashua from a State Championship last year. Four juniors were mainstays of the l94l golf team which won Nashua's sixth successive State Championship. Bob Dinan, Eddie Sullivan, Bill Ryan, and Walter Clifford gave us a splendid representation on the greens that year. Despite the fact that a number of members of our class were candidates for Coach White's track team as sophomores, it was not until the spring of our junior year that these boys gained any recognition. "Big Hank" Trahan in the weight events, Justin Randall in the dashes, and Wally Kopka and Carl Cohen in the longer events, all amassed enough points to win letters. Tom Hill, Bob Dignam, and Leon Trottier carved a niche for the class of '42' in the tennis hall of fame with some really fancy racquet swinging last spring. 1941-1942 In the summer of l94l it was decided to relieve Coach Chesnulevich of his arduous three-sport duties and bring to the city a big time coach to make Nashua a football power. Charles "Buzz" Harvey, onetime Holy Cross great, who had had phenomenal success at Saugus, was chosen for the position. Nor was it an adverse decision, for that fall Nashua was represented by one of the most powerful teams ever to wear the purple. This great aggregation scaled its greatest heights on a rainswept Holman Stadium gridiron one cold November afternoon by gaining a never-to-be- forgotten 6-6 tie with our old perennial nemesis, Manchester Central. A strong Worcester Commerce eleven was the lone club to take the measure of the Purple, who claimed their first State Championship in more than a decade. Bob Richards, iron-man guard, and Leo "Babe" Fraser, lanky, pass-snatching end. won all-state honors. Ulysses Mocas held down a position on the powerful Nashua frontier, regarded as one of the finest in schoolboy ranks. In the backfield, Bert Roberge rocked them way up in the back row with his devastat- ing blocks, and "Handsome Joe" Swekla thrilled the crowd time and again with his long broken-field gallops. Nashua High witnessed another great basketball team this year, one of which we could be justly proud. On the back-court, Co-Captains "Hoot" Moriarty and "Tanny" Yanuskevich, besides giving us one of the top defensive combinations in the state, also gave the opposition plenty to worry about with their deadly long-shot accuracy. Bob Mercer, with his fast, deceptive dribbling and accurate shooting Cremember that Portsmouth gamelj was always a scor- ing threat. Ken Gove and Steve Rellas handled the left forward assignment. and played some really great basketball on occasion. Nor must we forget the clever all-round play of "Drape John" Peterson, who deserves plenty of credit. Paced by this sextet of seniors, the Purple was once again invited to the Dur- ham Tournament, and lost out only to State-champions Dover, 37-33, after an uphill fight against heavy odds. The old familiar crack of ash against the horsehide is one sure sign of Spring, and this year is no exception as Captain Moriarty heads a whole host of seniors who have answered Coach Chesnulevich's call for baseball candi- dates. Bob Richards, veteran third sacker, is back again at the hot corner with "Horsy" DePontbriand, "Tanny" Yanuskevich and "Rendy" Wardner reasonably sure of outfield positions. Don Raiche and Bill Dobens look par- ticularly good among the pitching prospects. All this, coupled with the fact that Nashua has just about the finest high school catcher in New England in Captain Moriarty, seems to forecast a very successful season for the Purple. Captain Tom Hill leads a trio of returning netmen which includes Bob Dignam and Leon Trottier. With Tom and "Dig" combining on the doubles court, we certainly have a club that will be hard to beat. i'Hank" Trahan leads our aggregation of tracksters during this final year. "Hank" has personally gained many honors for N. H. S. during his three-year stay and as captain this year will doubtless continue to pace the other boys to further success. "Hustler" Eddie Dugas deserves a fine share of credit for his efforts as do Carl Cohen, Walter "Collins" Kopka, Ulysses "Slick" Mocas for theirs. Great work is being displayed by these fellows at the practice sessions. A host of seniors are members of this year's golf team which looks for- ward to its seventh consecutive State Championship title. Bob "Sam Snead" Dinan holds the position of captain and he is surrounded by a powerful trio of veterans, Bill Ryan, Walter Clifford, and "Handsome" Eddie Sullivan. In addition, a new set of candidates are out on the green displaying talent which will assure one of them a regular berth on the squad. They are John Gordon. "Dunk" Farwell, "Beanie" Molloy, and John Barry. The boys are doing wonders, we are told, and this season promises to break all previous records. The managers of the respective sports in 1941-1942 are: football, Don- ald Farwell: baseball, James Anagnost: basketball, Peter Tamulonis. A huge portion of praise is due the men who so generously gave their time and efforts to the promotion of athletics. It was under football Coach Charles 'ABuzz" Harvey that Nashua rolled on to victory and a State Championship this year. Ably abetting the "Buzzer" was Anthony "Tony" Morandos, who tirelessly spent many hours with our boys on the gridiron. "Pete" Ches- nulevich assumed a lion's share of the coaching duties during our stay in high school. For two years he unstintingly devoted himself to the coaching of football, baseball, and basketball, and during our final year to baseball and basketball. Many fine athletes were developed under him as he taught them the all-important rudiments of fair play and team spirit. Our track stars salute Webster "Whizzer" White for his successful efforts and attempts to form a group of championship tracksters. Our three major sport faculty managers assumed the added responsibility of synchronizing the financial and publicity departments with the athletic pro- gram. To "Jody" Kilbane, Patrick Morley, and Joe Lee goes a salute of gratitude for their noble efforts in unsung positions. Finally we hail our Superintendent and Director of Athletics, Earle T. Tracey, who revived our flagging athletic interests and returned athletics to a position of importance. For the past three hectic years, the athletes of Nashua High class of 1942 have given their finest efforts on the gridiron, the diamond, the Cinder track. the fairway and green. the basketball and tennis court. Not always were they successful: not always did they leave the fray as conquerors. But always, they have upheld our best traditions: they have played hard and clean, and victor or vanquished, always were they true sportsmen in every sense of the word. 1:1 1 ,Z ' J X Z, PI 1190 'tif 3, ' 1' " xx I ,V 1 I g li: V, f' llllllflllfjillll 'H ON THE BALL CMusicj RICHARD Muss1ER: Presenting-"On the Ball." CEanfarej MESSIER: Brought to you through the courtesy of Barry's Birch Beer, the birch beer with the fizz, and Peters' Pretzels, the salt of the earth. You have all heard of the great performance given by the World Champion Hoboes' base- ball team when they recently defeated the Hermits on the Big League series of 1952. But do you know how this great victory was accomplished? George Wardner, I-loboes' manager, says that his great pitching-catching-batboy trio of Roger Bolduc, William Dobens, and Webster White, Jr., always has a nip of Barry's Birch Beer and tucks in some Peters' Pretzels before and after every game, and just ask the Hermits whether it isn't nip and tuck for the Hoboes' opponents. So take this tip and get "on the ball" with Barry's Birch Beer and Peters' Pretzels. And now-on with our program. CFanfareD Rudyard Kipling said. "East is East and West is West and never the twain shall meet." But Rudyard Kipling or no Rudyard Kipling, tonight we have with us here in the West the spell of the East-visitors from mystic India, half-way 'round the earth. where Ulysses Nlocas is famed as the Boogie Boy of Baghdad. Amid the aroma of incense these prophets can gaze into their crystal balls and see the past, present, and future-all over the globef everybody, everything. They see all, hear all, and know nothing. fOriental music-"Song of India." Enter seers carrying balls.j MESSIIZR: Introducing the fakhirs Qfakersb of Baghdad. CThey bow all around and sit down.j ClVlusicD SEER MAGUIRE: Good evening, friends. It is my pleasure to be your master of ceremonies tonight. I have received many queries from members of the Nashua High class of 1942, asking about their former classmates after ten years of toil out in the wide, wide world. We prophets shall try to answer these questions by peering into our crystal balls. Edward Sullivan, who is in India teaching the natives the Hindu rope trick, and Elizabeth Worth, chimney sweep, would like to know what Natalie Holt is now doing. " Wf""9:WTi7-?l?pil5tU3fi3f.. i SEER BREWSTER: A gleaming reflection is slowly crystallizing in my ball. Ah, yes. I see the lobby of the Hotel Avard in New York, run by Madeline Avard. There must be a literary convention here, for I see many great per- sonalities. There's Natalie Holt, author of the non-fictional best-seller, How to play the Cymbals in Ten Easy Lessons, talking to Constance Turcotte, Flor- ence Stolzberg, and Virginia Rasmovich of Rasmovich, Stolzberg, and Tur- cotte, Publishers. And over by the grand stairway Robert Fletcher, lecturer on the life of the ant, is standing with Albert Laflamme, famous poet-author, and Evanthia Russa and Lucille Salvail, well-known women sportswriters for the newspapers. SEER ANAGNOST: Speaking of newspapers, I see Evelyn Leveque and Lucille Howard, who write "Babe Hick's Advice to the Lovelorn" in the Nashua Daily Record, which is edited by Irene Ricard. SEER HAYDEN: What's that swarm of people over in the corner? SEER BREWSTER: Oh, that's the executive meeting of the United Literary Clubs of America, headed by Muriel Hunnewell. Betty Batchelder, the first woman professor at M. I. T., and Jean McLaughlin, Librarian of Congress, are listening to Gloria Jennings the genius who almost starved in a garret writing masterpiesg but Donald Farwell, Consul-General in Liberia and author of the thriller, In the Dark, keeps interrupting Gloria. SEER ANAGNOST: It certainly is quite a gathering. There are Pauline Laquerre and Pauline Sawicki, co-authors of Fundamental Essays, this month's Book-of-the-Month-Club choice, chatting with the critics who chose their book, Mary Batura and Sophie Cirohosky. SEER MAGUIRE: Do you see anyone else? SEER HAYDEN: Yes--Noreen Morse, Marion O'Brien, Constance Lucier, Normand Morin, and Constance Fossa-all just back from an archaeological expedition to Egypt, where they have excavated the tomb and mummy of King Tut's wife. SEER MAGUIRE: Who's that over by the elevator? SEER ANAGNOST: Oh, that's Kula Penetas, the hotel hostess, showing Rita Caron, Lucile Dachos, and Carol Dickey, New York models, into an elevator. Helen Lantzas, the Ipana toothpaste ad girl, is there, too. SEER MAGUIRE: I guess that about exhausts that question. Now- MESSIER: Flash from Washington! Clifford Sadler, author of the best- seller All This and Leavenworth, Too, has just been arrested for driving on the wrong side of the street. That is all. I SEER MAGUIRE: To continue, Ernest Cwarant, the casket millionaire, de- sires to know the names of the aces in World War II who bombed Mussolini's palace and then returned. SEER BREWSTER: They were Carl Cohen, Harold Earnum, and Dwiglit Alexander. SEER MAGUIRE: Normand LePage, who invented synthetic rubber thir- teen years too late, and Leon Trottier, who runs a nursery school for girls eighteen to twenty-eight, asks how Paul "Basket" Moriarty is getting along. SEER ANAGNOST: As I peer into my crystal, I glimpse a monstrous struc- ture, a New York night club owned by Paul Moriarty and Stanley Yanuske- vich. I-Ia--inside I see a sinister group of international spies gathered around a table. Virginia Rochelle, head of the far-flung spy ring, Sophie Goy, the Mata Hari of the gang, Despo Penetas, Madame X, Rolande Langelier, Madame Y, and Madeline Peters, Madame Z, are talking to Armand Larouche and Maurice Labrie. These members of our embassy in Ireland are rumored to 'XF' '? be allied with Anna Birchall, notorious Irish revolutionist. At the next table is a gay party of screen and stage favorites. Arthur Landry, who has taken Gene Autry's place in the movies, is chatting with Theodora Sansom, Life cover girl for 1950, while Francis Boyle, screen idol, and Marjorie Ware, beau- tiful belle of Hollywood, listen to a funny story told by Karl Forward, who plays the mouth organ in vaudeville. SEER HAYDEN: Alfred Poulin, Metropolitan Opera tcnor, and Maurice Pare, successor to Jean Gabin, seem to be monopolizing the attention of Beryl Goggin, the famous divorcee. Two other noted singers, Leo Fraser and'Joseph Swekla, are resting at a table in a corner after an arduous tour of the state prisons. Near them are the theatre czars, Earl Clement, George Dracopoulos, and Richard Schier, entertaining Lillian Dobrowolska, chorus girl at the club. SEER BREWSTER: The lights are dimming for the floor show now, and here come the "bally hoo" girls, Helen Brown, Lillian Ricard, and Helen Lio- pus. They throw out roses to the crowd, and there's Steve Rellas, pearl diver, catching a flower. Now Aleck Kilonis and George Moraros, the two comedian- masters-of-ceremony, known as Tizoune and Balloune, introduce the blues singer, Mary Maguire, and the flaming torch singer, Muriel Bahner. SEER MAGUIRE: Let's leave the club before the concert and go on to our next question, sent in by Bruce DeQuoy, now in Italy straightening the Leaning Tower of Pisa, and Reginald Francoeur, Bruins' hockey star. They wonder whether any of their classmates lead as exciting and unusual lives as they do. SEER I-IAYDEN: I think so-in the polished surface of my scintillating sphere slowly emerges a scene-the Explorers Club in Chicago. A bridge game is in progress--Glenn MacDonald, who has been very busy for the last tcn years counting the Thou.sand Islands in the St. Lawrence River, and his partner, Eddy Dugas, a union organizer in Africa, are just completing a grand slam. Their opponents, Bertrand Roberge, military dictator of Shangri-La, and Ed- mond Dionne, founder of a new civilization in Tibet, look pretty angry at the kibitzing of Louis Ivalis, Valet of the exiled Hitler in Siberia. SEER ANAGNOST: Who's that sun-tanned man over by the fireplace? Why, it's Reed Blanchard, the big game hunter, boasting about the time he met Florence Larose, the great woman doctor, working among the African savages. That was the trip when he saved two men from a rhinoceros: Joseph Jacobs, the sponge divcr, and Arthur Reynolds, the airplane pilot who lost his license for scaring the animals on the Ivory Coast. A SEER BREWSTER: Roland Poirier, owner of a hot dog stand in the Sahara Desert, and Walter Clifford. who has dug a subway under the Suez canal, are listening to Reed with one ear, while Robert Ratoff, first to swim the Amazon River, talks excitedly about The Lost Atlantis, which Odesia Vasiliou has just re-discovered. Sipping some ginger ale over in the corner is James Diggins. who claims to have discovered the East Pole, discussing with Raymond Ricard, designer of the vast new Sahara Desert irrigation system, Edward Dumaine's treasure hunt to find the buried gold of Captain Kidd. Three famous en- tomologists, Andrew Belanger, Alfred Hodge, and Leonard Munson, who have just found a way to get rid of the tse-tse fly, are talking excitedly about the recent thrilling filibuster by Representatives Paul Pialtos, and Demetrios Cout- sonikas, and Senators Aristides Pitarys and Nicholas Gegas, all from New Hampshire, to kill a bill prohibiting women from wearing slacks. SEER MAGUIRE: Paul McLaughlin, soda-jerker at the North Pole,'would like to know whether he would have made more money if he had decided to take care of people's hair rather than their stomachs. SEER ANAGNOST: I can't reply to that definitely, but I can mention a few names in the hair business. I see John Tamulonis. beauty parlor turning out rapid production. Across the street Annette Poulin has a beauty salon, too, but there is no competition. because her shop is for men. Her only rival is Walter Kopka, the barber, down the street. He gets quite a lot of trade by using Maurice Demers' hair tonic and Lathe's Lather, the shaving cream of Elmer Lathe. 1 SEER MAGUIRE: Two castaways on a desert island, Nancy Pickering and Shirley Burnham, are interested in knowing whether there is any such thing as strife outside of their peaceful isle. SEER HAYDEN: There must be. Something is shaking the vision within my crystal. Ah, a moment's rest. Now I see that it was a heated argument between the Greek Coffee House owners, Philip Stultz and Clement Romanow- ski, and their competitors, Thelma Costaros, Pauline Juris, and Georgia Caras, owners of a large tea room. SEER MAGUIRE: Beth Legallee, who is still on a soap box telling people about the day when Hudson beat Nashua in a pool game, wonders whether we can tell her which members of the class of 1942 have tangled with the govern- ment. SEER BREWSTER: At the first glance I see that Helen Guerette is in a jam in the courthouse. Just at the minute she seems to be getting free of a twenty- five dollar speed line with the air of a veteran. The political boss, Pauline Kupchun, has just come into the rear of the court. She is there to get a friend out of the jail. Next door to the place of justice is the fire station. where Helen Ouellette is happily serving coffee to midnight lirealarm girls, Mary Keenan, Evelyn Couture. and Albena Draskawich, who have just returned from a big blaze at the World State building, world's tallest skyscraper, designed by Jean Laflame. Adonios Adamakos, the mad chemist who set the blaze while experimenting in his laboratory, has just been taken to a sanitarium. Nearby the engine house is the scientific museum which Lucille Lancourt built after cashing in a few war bonds. Anne Daukas, census taker, has upset another branch of the government in sending in her facts two years late. The last people trying to get in good with Washington are Dorothy Knight and Edith Harris. For years now they have been collecting antique tires, hoping to get the army interested in them again. SEER MAGUIRE: Frances Shapiro and Shirley Foster, girls that were ferry- ing rocket ships in World War II, came to us as a last resort to find what happened to Gloria Turcotte and Lois Littlefield, generals of the all-women battalion that fought in the war. SEER ANAGNOST: They are now co-chairmen selling buttons to help veterans of the war. SEER MAGUIRE: Stuart Groves, zoo keeper, and Robert Dignam, veteri- narian, would like to know whether the circus has any more oddities than they have. SEER HAYDEN: I see by my crystal that we are just in time for the last act of the Barnum and Bailey Big Tent show. Owen Griflin, the ringmaster, is diverting attention to himself while the three rings fill up. Now all is set- in ring one is the famous Frog Tumble, introduced by the tumbling team of Roland Bernard. Noel Simoneau, and Euclid Boucher. SEER BREWSTER: Ring three has a trapeze act, which is rented to Barnum by Robert Desmarais. In his troups are Julia Papademas and Joan Burns. Right now both girls are in the air. Will they make the bar? Will they be safe? SEER ANAGNOST: Sorry to interrupt, but we must hurry if we are to see the show in the center ring. It is almost over. Daniel Lavoie and Roger Livermore, bronco busters, have downed their horses, and the cowgirl, Charlotte Locke, has ridden to safety, escaping the Indians. SEER HAYDEN: Everyone is going now: the main show is over. Richard Greenleaf is trying to get people into his sideshow. He must have some good freaks in there, for everyone who isn't buying spun sugar from Grace Cote or pop corn from Patricia Donnelly is buying tickets. Outside the gate Gerard Plante is running a merry-go-round where he can see dizzy blondes. SEER BREWSTER: Let's look at the sideshow. Right inside is Phyllis Winslow, snake charnner. Beside her is Robert Ackerman, the midget. The India-rubber man, Harvey Duchesneau, has stretched out his arm and is shaking hands across the aisle with Connie Douville, fat lady, to congratulate her upon gaining two more pounds. Virginia Desclos, the bearded lady, is talking to someone. Why, it's Muriel Eorrest, a gypsy fortune teller. It's those cheap imitators like that who ruin our reputation. SIEER MAGUIRE: Marilyn Olson, married to a Russian Communist refugee, and Lillian Beaulieu, who sharpens pencils for the Waterman Ink Company. want to know a few sharp facts about Hollywood. SEER HAYDEN: I look into the ball. At first I see only the night-no, those are movie stars, not planets. On stage two Richard Kemp is directing a scene in My Little Hatchet, the scenario for which was written by Lula Har- wood and Elaine Jauron. Before the camera is Rudolph Jasalavich, who is playing thewleading role as George Washington. He has just been listening to Arlene Hagerty, cast as the town-crier. Off stage there is the call for the lead- ing lady, Black-Papoose-Grown-Big, but something must have happened to the great Indian actress. She does not appear. Instead, here comes her double, Pauline Glines. - I SEER BREWSTER: Let's watch the rehearsal a few minutes. There's Ru- dolph threatening to cut down the cherry tree. Will no one save it? Hark, I hear a roar. It's a bird, no, it's a plane, no, it's-Raymond Eortier as Super- man. Kemp is stopping the filming now, and no wonder! Here comes Eleanor Reich, oomph girl! That must be Wanda Lojko, the ice skater, with her. SEER ANAGNOST: No, that's Theresa Gervais, this year's Miss America. They just came from Donald MacLane's latest housewarming. Since he be- came a rich man acting in Clark Gable roles, he has expanded a lot socially. There are still a few celebrities there. I can see John Gordon, manager of the aging Hedy Lamarr. He has just been talking to Dorothy Cunning- ham and Edward Moquin, who have succeeded Rita Hayworth and Fred As- taire. It must be about eight o'clock-Margaret Mireault's leaving. Now that she plays Little Eva in the annual summer production of Uncle Tom's Cabin, she has to keep early hours. + SEER MAGUIRE: Let's leave Hollywood and get back to Nashua. Peter Tamulonis, the salesman of modelffairplanes, and Dorothy Johnson, who be- came a hermit because she didn't like people, are inquiring how the Y. M. C. A. has been getting along. ' SEER ANAGNOST: The association is doing even better than before. In the trophy room I can see a whole new collection of medals. There is the one of Michael James, a retired basketball player, whose medal commemorates his breaking the individual scoring record of Long Island University. Louis Chev- rette, the marble champ, has placed his bronze beside that of Donald Dion, who recently broke the Weightlifting record by lifting over seven hundred pounds. On Eh0iSl'l9I'f4'31'0 also the plaques of Joseph Drabinowicz, bowling champion of the Social Alleys, and that of Henry Trahan, who beat Charles Cannon in the ping-pong tournament. Only trophies missing are the cups of Bessie Vasilas, the outstanding woman athlete of the country, but unfortunately the YM and the YW haven't. yet combined. SEER MAGUIRE: Lois Rennie, a radio operator at Little America, asks whether we can give her a preview of what will be on the radio tomorrow. e "5"'-'.'0'7'l:'aeAfQf'i R525 6:7 ic. i SEER HAYDEN: Tomorrow afternoon-tomorrow afternoon-will bring -ah, here it is! Constance Clough, Republican national chairman, will give a speech in reference to the coming fall election. Sponsoring this great oration will be Jenny Petropoulos' Fudge Company. Following this will be the first radio performance of Albert Cameronis "Symphony in Black," which he wrote during his sojourn in the Congo. This will come to you through the courtesy of Linna Johnson's doll factory, Johnson, Johnson, and Johnson. A SEER ANAGNOST: At six o'clock the news will be brought to you by the Little Nut Company. The broadcast will begin with the testimonial of Yvette Lavoie: "La voie stood on the burning deck Eating peanuts by the peck." The commentator will let you know for the first time the result of the world marathon. It will be won by Norman Dugas, who will come in first in the record time of three years, four months, two days, and fifteen minutes. There will also be some more information about the trial of Robert Dinan, held on the charge of murdering eight caddies when he missed a two-inch putt in the national open championship. And for the million fans, immediately following the news will be the sports roundup by Armand Jalbert, drug manufacturer. Included will be the results of the tennis matches in which all eyes have been upon the famous doubles team of Thomas Hill and Dorothy Young. Wilfred Vermette, the champion wrestler, will be interviewed concerning his opinionsof the next fight of Lane Damon, featherweight boxer. At the end of the program will be more highlights from the life of Anne Winer, national bike riding champ. SEER BREWSTER: In the evening will come that comedy show advertising Ruby Shear's Scissors. It will feature The Captain and the Kids, John Siergie- wicz, Jacqueline Perrault, and Dorothy Russell, respectively. To offset this trio will be Germaine Raymond, the sweet "Oh, Diana" of the air. For the kiddies there will be a bed-time story told by Edward Soucy and Albert Downey, formerly cradle and chair testers at Spiro Couronis' Nursery Furniture Com- pany, which sponsors the program. And finally the program which will best put listeners in the mood for sleep will belflsabelle Luce's Kate Smith Hour. Her announcer, Natalie Woolley, ought to convince you, because she designs Alva's Alma Mater Slacks for her boss, Alva Benjamin, the program's sponsor. SEER MAGUIRE: Everett Hall, who is caretaker of a certain Concord in- stitution, and Marcel Prince, the president of the place, are trying to discover what Mary Doherty is doing. SEER HAYDEN: Right now she and Elinor Fissette are putting up a bill- board recruiting poster designed by the commercial artist, Roland Tatro. It shows Claire Ravenelle in a United States Army nurse uniform, beckoning. Maybe that's why Robert Majorhas joined and in the future will be a general. Watching the two girls at work are Marcelle Upham, a steeplejack, and Wilfred Girard, who is selling pop and peanuts at the Holman Stadium. SEER MAGUIRE: Eleanor Monius, who is at present a teller in a bank, has written in to End out if there is any more interesting occupation, to which she could change. SEER BREWSTER: Well, there wouldn't be much chance in opening' a tap- dancing school for boys, for Ethel Scontsas and Gloria Bathalon have already done that. Also, there wouldn't be any opportunity to gain predominance as a bullfighter, because Elliot Adams is too well known as one. There aren't many empty places left on the B. '55 M. Railroad, either. Mary Virbalis be- came a conductor on the line during the war and stayed there, while Rita Hill, who started the same way, is still hired to wave a stop sign to automobiles every time a train comes to her crossing. According to what I see in my crystal I wouldn't suggest renting bicycles built for two. Ruth Kirkpatrick had the idea Hrst. She sends Mary Fahey along with the bicycle to see that it is taken care of. And here's something else Eleanor should know about so that she won't try the same trick. Arlene Jackson is now being feted by the Fathers' Clubs because she first found out how to get money from piggy banks without breaking them. The only chance I see for Eleanor is possibly a job with John Alukonis. He does a brisk business teaching his new dance, the Hudson Strut, which he developed while walking to high school long ago. SEER MAGUIRE: Lorraine Case, who works in a candy shop, would like to have us prove that she has picked a sweeter future than those in the French Foreign Legion. SEER ANAGNOST: Heat is shimmering in the glass. The barracks in Libya appear to me. There is one soldier guarding the gate. It is Norman Cadorette. Inside there are two women. But they have a legitimate reason for being there. Leona Pelletier is the nurse, and Jennie Pietuch is the camp mother. No one else appears. It is because all the other soldiers are twenty miles away trying to persuade one of their number, Neil Hagerty, that what he saw was a mirage and not really Dorothy Lynn, Atlantic City bathing beauty. SEER MAGUIRE: Rev. John David Peterson, a traveling minister in the Ozarks, who rides his circuit on horseback, has addressed to us a letter with the intent of finding whether his spiritual help is more greatly needed elsewhere. SEER BREWSTER: Ladies and gentlemen, I see without doubt, the most corrupt city in the world. There's Mayor Paul DeQuoy with Aldermen Don- ald Wesson and Donald Diggins walking by the house of Political Boss Bill Hill, built entirely out of old number pool tickets and Pepsi-Cola bottles. They stop for some samples of gum which Loretta Brosor is distributing to lure people inside the bookie shop run by Bob Mercer and Frank Lintott. While they place their bets with Virginia Heath, they chat with other widely known persons there--William Ryan, owner of a string of burlesque horses, Virginia Marshall, dog track owner, and the wealthiest woman in the world, who made her fortune at Saratoga-Pat Joyce. Nearby are Marion Smith, heiress to the Smith Coughdrop millions, international diamond merchant Robert Francoeur, and Louise Stoehrer, who blackmailed Josephine Wilson, famous society woman, by threatening to publish her sophomore report card. Tom Pipilas, traveling tramp, and Sam Stergiou, world's three-cushion billiard champions, are lounging idly over by the door. They went broke trying to defy the law of averages. SEER ANAGNOST: What's that? I hear shouting outside. Oh, it's only the daily bank holdup. Bob Gaudette, public enemy number one, is giving orders to his accomplices, the Lamb twins, Germaine and Geraldine, to hold up Bank President Ernest Morin and teller Gloria Fuller. Everything's going smoothly, and Bank Examiner Simone Gendron looks on with approval. John Sullivan, waiting to drive the "get-away" car, exchanges cigarettes with Sharp- eyed Sherlock, Sheriff Kenny Gove, sitting in his 1932 model. Ken hasn't solved a crime in ten years, so he's a cinch for re-election. While Glamour Boy Maurice Dumaine watches this dull scene, let's wander down the street for some real excitement. SEER HAYDEN: Racketeer Roger Gaskill is beating up a "customer" in the back room of "Justin's Joint," the hamburger stand of J. Randall, where Bob Smith short-changes Donald Raiche, paroled convict, and Harold Lalmond, prison guard, who is trying to convince Don that he should go straight. SEER MAGUIRE: William Harnish, a blacksmith, is trying to find out whether there is anything more active than the jitterbug, Xanthe Norris, at Robert DePontbriand's Pachyderm and Animal Farm. SEER ANAGNOST: Well, I notice especially Conrad Marcoux, the elephant trainer, and Gerald Gordon, who is the butcher there. Both of them get around pretty fast, but they don't see as many visitors as do Anna Lusczyk and Dorothea Ward, who drive a team of horses selling rides. SEER HAYDEN: What is that dull thudding noise? Is it the old diesel engine used to clear new land? SEER BREWSTER: No, that's Kenneth Cross chopping wood to pay off a debt to Julia Dube, a meek little lady who has rooms to let across the road. SEER MAGUIRE: Robert Richards and Leslie Erb, Cotton Club workers, have given up looking in the papers and have come to us to find whether David Arnold, an Arab outlaw, Arthur Sullivan, a deserter from the Foreign Legion, and Bertrand LaFrance, a chain gang member singing "The Volga Boat Song," have been captured yet. All escaped recently. Can we tell them? SEER ANAGNOST: Yes, Louise Sherlock, the dick, has caught up to them and they were all sentenced to Alcatraz. SEER MAGUIRE: Claire Cote, who is in London winding Big Ben, and Rita Houde, a Russian Amazon, would like to know what occupation Marjorie Pike has chosen. SEER BREWSTER: In my ball is slowly crystallizing a picture of our own high school. Marjorie is trimming the hedge as payment of an election bet with Rita Bogdonas, wife of a goat farmer and mother of two kids. Irene Flynn, whose love for N.H.S. has made her stay around doing odd jobs, is helping Marjorie. There's Russell Boles, the coal man, driving his team by the building, and Josephine Dooley, the six-day bicycle racer, trying to out- distance him. Ruth Hurd, the mad alchemist, and Dorothy Moran, professor of psychiatry, are coming out the door with Helen Taylor, who has been taking a P. G. course to pass a policewoman's test. Overhead I see an airplane piloted by Wanda Kayros doing stunts advertising Gerard Gagnon's equipment with which to encumber bicycles. SEER MAGUIRE: Fine. Our next question, from Harold Miller, dish- washer at the Hotel Essex, and June Renihan, lighthouse keeper, asks what has become of Madeline Dube. SEER ANAGNOST: I see Nashua's main street. There's Madeline, a boun- cer at "The Ash and Coffee Can," with Thelma Besse, the dogcatcher, buying a newspaper from a Telegraph route carrier, Louise Primrose. SEER HAYDEN: Let's see what Claire Dumont, a boot black, is reading in the Telegraph. Headlines-"Victor Hudon, Millionaire Playboy, Missing- Where's Yehudi?" Another column is headed, "Herbert Dandley, Communist Leader, Holds Big Soapbox Rally." Here's an advertisement for Lorraine Car- ter's South Merrimack gravel for driveways and the classified page says: "Have you.r kerosene lamps cleaned at Helen Paton's, where quality counts," and also, "Marie Goddeau, expert fly exterminator, uses painless swatters." SEER ANAGNOST: Well, well, there's Frank Griffin in a street cleaner's uniform, watching Georgette Girouard give a window demonstration of the comfort of an armchair. There's quite a crowd gathered there-Philip Dionne, the Crown Hill lamp lighter, and Bessie Panos, just back from a gold-prospect- ing tour of the Rockies with Norman Caron, who never came back, and Jean- ette Lamarre, famous horse doctor, Irene Lafrance, Fuller brush saleswoman. doesnt seem to be making much progress with a laundress, Beatrice Menter. The latter is trying to talk to Paul Dionne, hired by Jack Benny to find the gasman. SEER HAYDEN: There's Alfreda Barette, pushcart owner, selling an apple to Drinette Dionne, a city park worker whose job is to keep peace among the birds, while bugene Molloy, the custodian of Greeley Park, looks on. SEER MAGUIRE: Elias Adamakos, owner of his shoeshop, and Andrew Panagoulias, his assistant, are interested to see whether there is a chance of sell- ing more shoes to farmers. SEER ANAGNOST: I can see Louis Dracopoulos and George Xeroteres, who don't need shoes for the carrier pigeons they are raising for the government. We would advise the footwear merchants to go to George Patterson, a door- to-door salesman, Olivette Boucher, a flower vender on Broadway, or Lucille Quigley, who uses up shoe leather in digging worms to sell. SEER HAYDEN: While our crystals are tuned to the agricultural world, We might as well give the boys a little extra information. Gloria Woodward is right now digging potatoes in Aroostook County. And speaking of Maine, not far off we see Raymond Cote, the typical Maine farmer, dressed in a straw hat, blue jeans, and chewing a wisp of hay. Lucille Buxton is also on a farm experimenting in growing colored eggs. Regina Vassar is milkmaid on the same farm. Forecasting to all of these people and to Clifford Eaton, a banana czar, is Ruth Morse, a very pessimistic weatherman. Fortunately for the farmers, Charles Loulakis, an agricultural expert, is around to tell them the truth. SEER BREWSTER: Oh, oh, I see trouble in my globe! The club members of Annette Lafrance's 4-H Club have escaped her watchful eye and are having a good time wrecking Canobie Lake Amusement Park. Quickly, to avoid the scene, I turn to a quilting bee. This is better. I can hear Lucille 'Brodeur peacefully telling the other farmers' wives about the wonderful football team Nashua had in 1941. SEER MAGUIRE: Shirley Mercer, hairdresser in a dog pound, is quizzing us to discover how Andrea Savage can afford to buy so many new hats from Romeo Gendron, the milliner, SEER ANAGNOST: If this will answer the question, I see that Andrea is the cashier at the telephone company in Washington, D. C. Right now, in fact, bills are being paid. Robert Buck is happy to be handing out money be- cause he always pays with his own make of counterfeit bucks. Dorothy Bibber, the lemon queen, and Elaine Campbell, the prune queen, are turning on their charms to see whether they can get an extension of time on their bill. John Zerbinos doesn't even show up. He refuses to pay a cent until the company rewrites the directory with the z's first. Now what is the matter? Everyone is running to the window to look out. Oh, I see. It is only Raymond Mar- quis, the lawn keeper at the White House, for the fourth time ejecting Preston Walsh, the leader of the Bonus Army of World War II. SEER MAGUIRE: Well, that finishes the questions and our crystals must now be recharged and laid away until we get safely back to India. MESSIER: Now that the awful truth is out, and you all know your fate, why not bolster your falling spirits with some of John Barry's Better Birch Beer and William Peters' Peppy Pretzels? Conrad Coffey, who runs the famous Conrad Coffey Calory Farm for building up failing health, says he always feeds his patients Barry's Birch Beer and Peters' Pretzels. So when you feel behind the eight ball, get into the pink of condition with Barry's Birch Beer and Peters' Pretzels. This is the honey voice of Dick Messier coming to you over station IOU, Nashua, New Hampshire. CMusicJ DEMETRIOS ANAGNOST BARBARA HAYDEN JOAN BREWSTER CHARLES MAGUIRE Graduation Exercises xfq Wwli, Xxx 1 +1517 ' ' wi 'H SVC, ', 1 WY yi ' wh- I I, ,I .Q f as gif' 'XR jpg?--Filth Class Uration Non Nobis Solum, Sed Mundo "Not for Ourselves Alone, but for the World" BY JOHN BARRY For the second time in a quarter of a century the world is at war. For the second time the United States has been drawn into the conflict. Our lives and futures now are strangely parallel to the lives and futures of the youth of twenty-five years ago. Awaiting us are the same opportunities, the same de- cisions, and the same problems to solve. That is why we have chosen as our motto the motto of the Nashua High School graduating class of l9l7, Non Nobis Solum, Sed Mundo. "Not for Ourselves Alone. but for the World." The world was here long before we were, and from history we know of the people before us who have lived in this world, and in our study of history we have followed the path of civilization from the earliest days right down to our own generation. But the greatest thing we have derived from the past is our form of government, our democracy. Greece, in the days when it was the leader of the world in culture, had the first great democracy. Then the mighty Roman nation before the days of the Caesars adopted this system of government. America, however, has achieved what both of these failed to do. We have incorporated into our democratic form of government a form of living which we call the democratic way of life, for we believe that our democracy should not stop with oflicialdom, but should go right on to the very heart of the people, giving them an equality and a freedom that are real things. We have formed a Bill of Rights. a thing which we now consider synonymous with democracy. In the past, however, we have not applied these ideas to nations other than our own. Why are we and a few other countries like Great Britain the only great democracies existing today? Why have the dictatorships and ideolo- gies come into power? Perhaps it is because in the past we have not believed strongly enough that democracy should be for the whole world! The mon- archies of central Europe with their long lines of kings and emperors like the Hapsburgs and the Hohenzollerns and the czars of Russia, these have failed. They have been powerful, but they have failed to give the people efficient gov- ernment and the human rights they sought. These rulers strove to make their countries prosperous and to promote art and literature and culture, but they did not succeed in making a free or happy people. They succeeded only as far as their personal gains were concerned. The dictatorships which appear even now to be controlling half the world have failed, too. For theirs is a govern- ment far worse than the monarchies and oligarchies: theirs is a government of brutal tyranny and blood, covered over by propaganda and lies. The people of Germany and Italy are suffering now, suffering in mind more than in body, suffering because they realize that they have lost their civilization and because they realize that the war which their fatherlands are waging now is a holocaust which may destroy every last trace of their learning and science and art. Yes, the New Order has also failed to give the world a government to equal that of America. The world needs something to hold it together. As things now stand we are headed for chaos, with every new day bringing a new theater of war. Democracy is just the thing: in fact it is the only thing that can accomplish this binding together of the world for a better and lasting peace. It is the cohesive force to bring the peoples of the world to one another and break down the barriers of race, color, and creed. It would give the common man his freedoms and the security he is searching for. That is what we are fighting for--"Not for ourselves alone, but for the world." We have been attacked by the dictatorships, whose chief aim is to destroy democracy, and it is up to us to defend it--"Not for ourselves alone, but for the world." If we as young Americans could only think of ourselves as pioneers with our greatest adventure, our greatest work, still ahead, we might more fully grasp the meaning of our motto-"Not for ourselves alone, but for the world," The idea has been stated before by our great men but not fully realized by the people as a whole. As Dorothy Thompson points out, The Declaration of Independence states that all men are created equal, not just all Americans. Lincoln in his Gettysburg Address said this "government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth." From the earth, he said, not just from America-from the earth. That takes in a lot of territory. We see then that our wise men have dedicated us to the world and to democracy for the world. We see that we must win this war to preserve the ideals that America stands for. Many men will say, "What if we do win the war? It will be the same kind of peace as last time. And besides, nobody ever wins a war." Nobody ever wins a war? Well, we can't say that Austria, Poland, Czechoslovakia, and France haven't lost their war. Now we realize the great mistake our fathers made in 1918 and 1919 when this country scorned President Wilson's idea of an international organization to preserve freedom and democracy. This -the beautiful dream of an idealist who was so realistic that he foresaw the coming of the second world war-this ideal must serve as a.model for us. We must not give up and merely say that the idea of a world-state is fantastic. It can be gained if we remember that we are fighting "not for ourselves alone, but for the world," and if we keep in mind the words of President Woodrow Wilson in his address to Congress in April, 1917: "We are now about to ac- cept gage of battle with this natural foe to liberty. We are glad now that we see the facts with no veil of false pretense about them, to tight thus for the ultimate peace of the world and for the liberation of its peoples . . . for the rights of nations great and small and the privilege of men everywhere to choose their way of life and of obedience. The world must be made safe for democ- rac . Y President Roosevelt has said, "To some generations much is given. Of others much is expected. This generation of Americans has a rendezvous with Destiny." The heavy load is on our shoulders. There will be many heroes and many heroic sacrifices, but the world expects us to be great. Other op- pressed peoples are waiting for us, for we are America. When we go out to help win the war, whether it be in the defense factory, or the armed forces, or whatever we choose, let us keep those words in mind that tonight seem so beautiful and glorious to us: "Not for Ourselves Alone, but for the World," Valedictor EDUCATION FOR LIFE By VIRGINIA ROCHELLE A class which is graduated from high school during a time when its native land is at war, necessarily faces more serious problems than the classes of peace time, That is the way in which matters stand for us, the class of 1942. Our future does not stretch ahead of us, assured and definite. Instead, we End our inclinations leading us one way, and our patriotism another. The task of enabling our country to be victorious is so great that we students feel that we must take part in the struggle now. Even the most conscientious student sometimes feels that he is failing his country by continuing his edu- cation. Somehow, studies once interesting and worthwhile now seem useless and futile because they have no connection with winning the war. However, deeper thought convinces us that education has its place, a major one. whether in peace time or war time. By education, we mean the type of training that we citizens in a democracy receive. We are encouraged to think for ourselves: in fact, that is one of the primary purposes of our education. Moreover, for us education is an activity that is beginning, not ending, at graduation time: we are eager to continue to learn as much as possible about our world throughout our lives. No, by edu- cation we do not mean the distorted, limited learning which is pressed upon the German youth. According to our point of view, an educated man is not the one who pos- sesses the greatest knowledge of racial theories, or who can sing the Horst Wessel song with the most ardor. He is not even the one who is merely acquainted with history and literature: he is, instead, the man who. as the result of his studies, is tolerant of other races and creeds, who has a thirst for truth, who is devoted to freedom, who believes in man as an individual. What a vast dif- ference there is between these precepts and those held up as examples for the youth of totalitarian states: supreme devotion to the state at the cost of re- nouncing family, truth, and God! As Gregor Zeimer says in his book, Educa- tion for Death. "American education has always been an education for life. We have emphasized a broad cultural basis, even for those who are to specialize in trades and professions, believing that knowledge of many things makes for more joy in living." Education today can in several ways help us reach our most important goal -victory. First, with high school training in commercial subjects or manual arts, many high school students of America are answering the call for more workers by immediately accepting positions in vital industries. Indeed, several of the young men and women who are being graduated from Nashua High School this evening have been working in our various industries for several weeks. As more and more men leave each day to join our armed forces, these students are stepping in to take their places. Helping in another way, two of the Class of l942 have already joined different branches of the service, and others are plan- ning to reach the first line of defense immediately. This high school training and the training which they will receive during the next few months will enable them to give valuable aid to our country. All these deserve and possess our admiration and gratitude. But what of the boys and girls who choose the second way-whose courses do not fit them for positions at this present time, or who have always planned to further their education by additional schooling? Shall they be called slackers or accused of lack of patriotism because they cannot serve now? Let us consider this problem: here we have a group which has con- tinu.ally studied languages, mathematics, and sciences with a profession in view, perhaps engineering, medicine, or teaching. Should this group surrender its hopes and ambitions to adapt itself to soldiering or to a trade? There are many of us who sincerely believe that they-should not. Young men and women who begin now to prepare themselves for a profession will be of great aid to the United States in the near future. The effective service which a trained engineer will be able to render his country will more than compensate for the years of study needed to acquire his skill. The essential service which a doctor or nurse can offer will be welcomed as soon as possible. Even now we are suffering a shortage of those trained for this work, since many in the medical profession have joined the Army or Navy. As for the lield of education, whether we are engaged in a war or not, the children of our nation must be instructed. There is a perpetual need for teachers. Provided of course that their aim is not mere personal success, surely those who study for such essential professions in time equal the service of those who work now. Moreover, further education develops a more highly trained mind and fosters qualities of leadership. Our govern- ment has realized this, for, in cooperation with our colleges, it is encouraging students to complete their educations and to train for military service at the same time by becoming members of the reserves. However, there are still other young men and women who are drawn to another branch of learning: the fine arts. Perhaps they wish to compose music, write poetry, or paint. They may be hastily and unjustly condemned for their lack of proper spirit. Before thoughtlessly branding these persons as un- patriotic, we must remember that music, poetry, and art can prove just as effective weapons as guns. Music has always been instrumental in inspiring our soldiers. From the Revolutionary War we have the stirring "Yankee Doodle," and' from the War of 1812, our national anthem, "The Star-Spangled Banner." Out of the conflict of the Civil War emerged the poetry of John Greenleaf Whittier, an ardent abolitionist, who helped the Northern cause. We have all seen the posters made by James Montgomery Flagg during the first World War to encourage enlistment. The one which first comes to mind is the famous Navy recruiting poster: "Don't read history, make it." This and other posters must have caused many young men to enlist. So we see that the persons who study these forms of art may become more valuable as com- posers, poets, or artists than they would be as soldiers or sailors. Should a young person give up his opportunity to broaden his whole outlook just to become active now? Not always: arming ourselves with education, we can all be of service to our country, each in his own fashion. A Although we may not realize the fact, education in a broad sense is some- thing about which we have been hearing a great deal in recent months. What we have heard called "morale" in reference to our soldiers and sailors is really education, social and intellectual. The United Service Organization is keeping education in the mind of every member of the armed forcs. The organization has held successful drives to collect books for our men. Fundamentally. their eagerness to learn has been shown by the fact that they prefer technical and biographical books to all others. The USO has also started the excellent prac- tice of giving men in uniform tickets to concerts and plays. These things are forms of education, for no young man can read a book or see a play with- out learning something. Social education is also important in the lives of our men. The recreation centers are accomplishing much in educating service men and civilians to understand each other. At these centers, our soldiers and sailors dance, make friends, and enjoy themselves during their short leaves. These gatherings encourage our men to forget routine and to become individ- uals again. ' Civilian morale is also kept to the desired level by education. Those who, because of their high school courses, have become well-acquainted with great literature can always find refuge there. The great poets and writers, Byron Tennyson. Dickens. and Scott, ought not to be neglected now, for they can, by the magic of their words, transport one far away from the bitterness of war. Surely such refuge is not only permissible but necessary after a wearing day. This is also an opportune time for those who specialized in business or practical subjects in high school to become acquainted with these writers, to read history, even to study a language or music. These are the things which have out- lasted war after war. When the workers return to their desks or factory benches after such spiritual refreshment, their minds are all the more alert for having traveled to a heretofore unknown land. Indeed, England's govern- ment, with its experience born of three years of war, has found that production in war factories is increased when cultural programs are provided for the work- ers and when music is broadcast throughout the different departments. The cultural subjects have a unique value in this war. As far back as Roman times, the universality of study became apparent to Cicero, the great orator: "Other relaxations are not for all times nor all ages nor all places: but studies nourish youth, please old age, grace prosperity, offer comfort and refuge from adversity. delight at home, are no hindrance out of doors. are with us during the night, when we travel, and when we retire to the country." n The primary purpose of American education, surpassing present service and morale, should be the preservation of democracy. Its greatest task is to foster devotion to our chosen way of life. Since. as James Monroe said, "a free, virtuous, and enlightened people must know well the great principles and causes on which their happiness depends," we ought to concentrate especially on subjects which can accomplish this object. A deeper study of the history of the United States, with emphasis on how our government was established, will strengthen our belief in democracy. A study of such countries as Italy and France, which have suffered in the past from corrupt government, will, in con- junction with current events, show us how to avoid their errors. This knowl- edge should increase our fervor for democracy enough to make the morbid fervor of Hitler's youth seem pitifully weak in comparison. A broad education, the result of knowledge of many branches of learning, will keep our minds from ever becoming dull or fanatical. The studying which can do this for us should be regarded as not only a privilege but a duty. Twenty-five years ago, the graduating classes of 1917 faced the same situation which confronts us today, and they were filled with a crusader's idealism and high hopes. However, during the war, all ideals and hopes crumbled. until the post-War generation became known as the "Lost Genera- tion" because of its cynical, bitter attitude toward life. This generation had x to learn two painful facts: that war is not glorious but ugly, and that one struggle was not enough to "make the world safe for democracy." The youth of that period just was not strong enough to take that blow without Hinching. That must not happen to us. If we approach only as, near our goal as we did in the first World War, we must keep tu - il -vnu with our ideals intact, for our goal is worthy of more than one trial. Learning from the experience of the preceding generation, and depending on education, we can and must suc- ceed where our fathers failed. Perhaps through education for life, we too can glimpse the vision written of inspiringly by Katherine Lee Bates, in her be- loved poem: "O beautiful for patriot dream that sees beyond the years Thine alabaster cities gleam, undimmed by human tears! America! America! God shed His grace on thee. And crown thy good with brotherhood, from sea to shining sea!" Mr. Tracy and Members of the Board of Education: We are well aware that we owe the many advantages that we have en- joyed during our last three years to your desire for us to obtain the best possible education. Whatever the future holds for us, we shall remember your help with gratitude. Mr. Nesmith and Members of the Faculty: During our high school years, which were destined to come at troubled times, you have proved more to us than teachers,-you have been friends. We shall always think of you with appreciation for that friendship. Parents: Your love and encouragement have been the steadying influences on us throughout this time of crisis. The diplomas that we receive tonight repre- sent the fulfillment of many of your hopes for us, and because of this they will be cherished by us all the more. Classmates: Because of the chaotic world we must face, we are realizing sooner than most graduating classes how happy our high school years have been. As we go our separate ways, let us carry their memory with us as an inspiration to strive even harder to regain the security which fosters such years. 5 Eff?-fj Tl ...if 92 fn ' A ' . f if " M N. W1 N l ,,,.., . . ag "N 'X ,- I ,f K X Nj" ' 0 , '. ?i'?r'f4-ac - " f' ' Y Y, ,H ,y -Qj --32.7-7-:fee ' -,A g . A L ' ' l"""'l L-1 -if: f - L 'li' '1 ' W." 'fl' ii "dy 4: A ' ' -W i' ' i illll. 1 li. . x,2 an -Q .... xr' !-' xl, V ,ww fc . ,ft ', 1" '- -it - .Ac -I, E , H ---4 q -. . ,-. , '51 PL? ' V- -- .2,Y-so:lg'-i- " 3' By MARY FAHIZY Around the corner Life will greet us Now our second stage is o'er With beating hearts, naught to defeat us Straining through the open door. Let our feet not be reluctant, Let our aims be ever high- Though the road be long and troubled Let Honor never pass us by. Memories we leave behind us Memories we treasure, too- Footsteps echo in the hallways, Emptying to wait the new. Life is ever onward surgingz We must struggle with the tide- Ebbing-flowing-always knowing Truth and Reason as our guide. We must e'er strive onward, upward For our learning's never done- Patifgntly we mark the milestones Through our stages-one by one. So the waves of Life close 'round us- Breast the tide and let's strike through Both in war and peacetime effort- All out now for forty-two. Q f f 4 lj, Y ,, J V , 'nf' ' NN f 'ip'Z+' 5' MA Autographs ,, -L .U ,, M 5 114' Jn, ,M h A, 'wwy fb. V ,ln Q, .w Ab4AL KJQTS A' 2 1.. .. ra, ' ,K-1 . H35 Qfifx' av, , n ,.:w..,,! . ,, 1 V U',u ' 'Kenai' 'j , L, H ,- J. , ,wr ,.. '- ' 'Ll' V1rY..,3,k - up- Y "' :,.' 4' 2f'+.."P' 4-21 " liy. pw m.,.'a":fa"m'?f' , , ml,-".:-mf' , , "f ,"A"f 'J' ww:'.n.4'mA?e f' ur '-I ., nE'lLT'm-4.55 5 lf x -X H. 2f,,, Q f ri' ,K F , L 'V vim B' - me w any 4.5. gf'-f A 4Z,f"-if -ff + . ,- 1 . 1 , . . L , : ' ' - Q - , f, df f--, . ,. .r. - L., - H- , ,1 ,, 22 - fn. 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