Napa High School - Napanee Yearbook (Napa, CA)

 - Class of 1927

Page 1 of 80

 

Napa High School - Napanee Yearbook (Napa, CA) online yearbook collection, 1927 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1927 Edition, Napa High School - Napanee Yearbook (Napa, CA) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1927 Edition, Napa High School - Napanee Yearbook (Napa, CA) online yearbook collection
Pages 6 - 7

Page 10, 1927 Edition, Napa High School - Napanee Yearbook (Napa, CA) online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1927 Edition, Napa High School - Napanee Yearbook (Napa, CA) online yearbook collection
Pages 10 - 11

Page 14, 1927 Edition, Napa High School - Napanee Yearbook (Napa, CA) online yearbook collectionPage 15, 1927 Edition, Napa High School - Napanee Yearbook (Napa, CA) online yearbook collection
Pages 14 - 15

Page 8, 1927 Edition, Napa High School - Napanee Yearbook (Napa, CA) online yearbook collectionPage 9, 1927 Edition, Napa High School - Napanee Yearbook (Napa, CA) online yearbook collection
Pages 8 - 9
Page 12, 1927 Edition, Napa High School - Napanee Yearbook (Napa, CA) online yearbook collectionPage 13, 1927 Edition, Napa High School - Napanee Yearbook (Napa, CA) online yearbook collection
Pages 12 - 13
Page 16, 1927 Edition, Napa High School - Napanee Yearbook (Napa, CA) online yearbook collectionPage 17, 1927 Edition, Napa High School - Napanee Yearbook (Napa, CA) online yearbook collection
Pages 16 - 17

Text from Pages 1 - 80 of the 1927 volume:

' y Ui, 5 ii- - .--Lin Lai' -1, my 33,2 ,T a- -, Lil' , is-I9 - 1 :15'?EQi 'r g-L-3? E 2,511 1 zz-lwfs' A -mzfy. fi f . 1 r! f i? N, ag X f f .fly . 2 Q J 1-1 .5 V1 Jfvv- 1 F 'm ,pm 1-flmigw-. . Y,-x-gr gf, .rw 'QB .7 , , 4.14 , -y . .J-1 N..,k,, i Q 5 L.. nr 4 F- 2 "MS'.f"fgY54v':3qg4'a ,, ., , -- I qw. '. B.g:..,-H ,, . 1 F i,,Sffj?4, ' -' - ':.,5-2.1-5-g .,.x. ff' -. K3 ry.. fm. if ' '14 ki- 4 w N '12 k A 22,19 V1.5-.L-:fi " ' , .nl-p,,-A:'1.. p H u.V.i1,,,,. A7 2 is 54 'NQQL Y Q-. ' b 41-- M f 1 73 '5 1 '.. . J -- '41 2 - ' ,431-',"'.5"'5' , K ,. - '-M11 43- -j-Ni EQ wg'-:1 I 4 g UT'--21 ,141-'m 1. - u, -.f , u .f. , B. u .,. V. ,. n -vm V V-., , V. . 51. ," 7-'. , , . , - .- 6 V "' -H.V5.33.. -- Y V as .',.,... E?-' ' V .V K . if .. - I 'F . V ii,-jj gif,--' , "ZW" -V.. ' .p -A - ""' 7"-Ni" V .512 "gd-V' ' ffm, L . . ,4 ,, 1 "','gf'Q - P- az' .. fill ' Z .fig-L V' 155.21 ' . 3 A ' ?i', ,'YI15fvvm2?fQM 1f 4fffWunWm' i ,3fQaVV9.TV,V.. VV -V, sk . .,., - f ., 7 VV '-L:,':.f, 'ff-V --: . f V' , -V 'V, ,V V 'VV .VV Vwg. V V "V V, V , VV ' ,, ' , .w,mVV'7h-L in , V- , SS' V '-.'.'."f:l1 SV. 'M LV- .uf VJ' ffIs,,.sKs. . V2g..- V V , 'V A- 41555, 5 . ,gf , V . L: .Par V 1-' Q 'f 1'l!'1L51'i 1 . WV ,. M ., , gf ' Kfii' 1--V -aj VVQQ, JV .'Mq:V,V'1 .pl..Vf'fF',Xl!,X J, .dl WV l '!jVf':'1' ..,V fm- .'-if' ,. 4+ ,lqvsp 'ya 1595 1-QV :-1.1 . gy.-,,: N "f.Qnf93H.".n. q I . my H V an-r 1 V, Vg ,gin 45 V fi. 5 ,iff .sri-V? W' ' rf' 1"g.qm . xl , unumsiill' 'Vw I ' M,-JV" 5 -1 R V1 ' "j,i?GgiV V -fzglf V L W IV 4 VV i 'J' F I' X' I" Spf' A E-MQYT, '1 . V ' fr-ff? ,.. V . .V ' 57 ' -gif" ,. , -. V .V +V 'gl ' . , ,,. V f.. J . 'V 'f.l g?V 4LT49x!!'?: WH I'l!1W:,r.Q,:4fm W V, Y 4 , , -ii-51117 iff? 737: V. ' "fy ' FWHM' I ' fm ' 'Vj'Lef'..1V H , gf,-1,4 , ' f ga1 V4',Q.i'f' ,' HV, 5 .V VVV'f'WfVN? . - - fx' V 1?-m. V ff V .P .V1 5, Y -gfwf V V N- . W'-1. N' :Vim fs . V 'lf' ' 'ill '75 fl ' FH. 3 'V Xfffi v-'-7'-.VV """"1-' ,,113,,i'V 2'l v f, J .Vg iff. A54 ,Arr 4 .'ghQV,Vg.'?"Q. , V Q 3 ,A 1' , , U 3. - 'L f, I- N?,,V,FV, li Iggy I, ,yn ..,g.11,g ' 5' ' 'ffW.fV, GL EJ: V. V 1- f':-.ig7f3 Vffy-'fy ff' ' l - Vf.Vz 3!'A.'- . V , . 1 Vs .rf '?'V -G "ff -QM J ' ,"'.fV 'y . . , ' V: - V -1 ' Vim: 4 wi ...Q 'V l- 1 V- 4 1 ' Vu V 1 V :gp . ,,.7.-7-5537356 ' , 4111 X '. graph, Lffwf +5 U' --. ::Z:,,x'L'7?T V' - 1' my .31 Nga-..:a-. 2411- 4 ,M V' ., If V 4 V- ,V , ' -Y' .V 4 ' 3 of V, - kgs 6' V f 2 if -'15 25'j,f!' 'NiMffl:.w N111 . v , fi V' VA .v' . VF- -V.-mf - '-VN 1' 17.0, ' '- ,Vp V " H- U' ls 'I' -v ' in g 'gi ,, 2 Y '11 Q ',1,'Vw.,, , ' , ' 5' ' Vs, V ' . . 59' 'V . 2 V -771 Si'9di1Itsu94 Vff'af'1NVVeVlfV.V VV "?!"fN1V'fVf1"'2"""V V 7 V 'F . 's 11 V ' ,.5VV1V""V1h 'f .fwfr iv 'L eff' - ' " TQ! 'F ' ' gm '-we .s-2gj.Vg .V sV,1VV ' .. i' fZ.y.f,l' 3 W.: f'WL'fw9'flf' ,- i,"?1f-r., .- - , f' En, ' wb 1 4-gfif v., , 'J ,?W ,,'VVV5V1f5E!1!G21fVElV f 1 ',?'1g-.ia V ,,. , . 'f V "' a 'ag' " --1-M, , V, Sf' . NV 1j,!' W. :XV U., I , 54? i -' ',' 1' 45' -"' ' ' ' iff - S: Mme Vw' 3 . ' ' .W V Q Q" . 5 Vgaf' di W ., '!k,T" xax-x-xwx--' -gfiffifl 1 ... ffqii' STE: 1 - V... ,V .Vx'1vVVV'f..Vf V , . ,. sf . V ,V :1 x. V. 12- ' -' -' V . ' Q V . V V if -H ' V, ., -"X EFI - f -V V . ' 'W V' . - V :Xl .Q .I I ' A' r,5,5i3:jk wg? ' -4.2, !AV.xvi't,g.5 ."1- ,-A i L f K' .' pw" " " ' Ti. ' 'W' ' " 'V- .VV, -,,fT:l."Z 1 f' ' fi' " Vw- ' '..?f8:Q V - ff- .1'-'QS' A521 , V .rr g1g553..p,,. .. :. 1, P 5'f'V:VVVj . , . ,V-'Gl,",n--V", f 1, fe-52.-,H , ' V u. .mg 1: 'II 'M ., A"V ' 4-jgf' ' Lgf - 'VV " . JV! wld'-:11." " W- iii, . ' ' ,?"1fVfw, .CV -,fur Y . ' 'A -'51, ,uw rj!-. W. Y af. LL ' TQ" ffiikiwfgt.. .IQLET ,Vg -NVQ , V '.V iff ' .. -1- fi .. , V- . '. ik V- -fr- V Av " f..E?4.p- fi.,j??f. F15 T :dw TM? ' ' V 1 V .. Ng. dwb bi. K v ,Y-N 71,4 23.34 V ,. V . , ':-v.' . ,u,JX'V+' ,, Va, 1 ' , . gif'-' 3. ,gg V . V .V f V ye, 5',.qgf?i-V.,,, ,fVef-gg: 1: . . . ' V V-af -L. V V ., ...,. V V . . i ,,'7..,- . .V..-..1,,, V 131'-1 - Q". V VV .V ev- w .5 . "FV -V' -gf .. X 1 ' W MW! TWT 1422539552 ilk:-..,,. '15 'Q 5'-"39:f7F'f. f I . 2,-,, , my ff'?5'ZV'f' !' ,g2,.,.:f14 -- ' 3 QV KV- . -' V' . ' V ' ?-iw,4...,.'? 2' f-V ,. ' - F" ' '55 . -71. " , . U., . U'M'f?55J'f-57'3Q . V 4' .5-, V. ,. ..,, . wgam ,K .UVM -V .R - .wr V ' . :,VVffaQVV'VV,w. 1-ew- - - pai." ? ' 'aff' ' . ' MV ', ,., YL gr V - A S 'ymv'.3.'fg,g,: Q , : - My W", ' " W 3.115 1' . ' ,1.'if.'!"'j, " .1 A . "Eff - PyTe'1'X'V 5 7-f f "' " " ' Q 4 :Hifi 1,3 W-Agn '- if ri' ' -,UW 1, ' 1'-V','f'f,G55rfV'"fm-fra Surf.. 1 ,xy ' "2 Hiifag V 2 . V. -4.12 ff? ' ' ,,. . , , V i .. wi'-.gd ,VV Ig, . A -VL gy--3 J: :bf 5. . - V- ,li --V -V . ' ...-V .- 'VV:g.Vg..5 - ,if Vg -sgg..f3g.Vf!lf - 2- ' , K Q. 4' . 'gixi-' .VVIT "VL: fffgrjrj 5 ' .-,,,5":: T- - 5 V. Q . - - . - -., ' '-. f ff Af" l 5235 " ,Y 1.1 , .1 lze. A . - f f 'S TQ V ggfjf' ' n, V.: ' ap...-Q - jffvw V -V 1 V, ww , ,L J, ,H .,,, . I , ' " H: V if I 1' '.iiQVVi"" ., ' . V 'ii " , wgzifz -w --.-S. ',g,3 .i2'f 1, V' . V V 5 , ,V .V-' , , V? ,, . 'H V- ' A :fkfj -iw V 1- I - ' Q' 'Q .:1'?1'2,'zQ , - QQ, .4 vl' 1 ' " Lu- 'fi ' .H ,-' 1 '2 ' 35: .4 ' Sfwa, fir? : V , 14 ' ' " A 2145 V 1 .' A-V' -V: r' K V1.3 ,yr +- J -'I K gi' W . A V V3-1 V 1 .V,z- -was " hp ' , ,Z ' ' ff-V" V- V V .. T 1, A f 4- ,E bv--Q..-.,g,.,,,. nm I MV: ,VW l 1 "wk im iw V ' if is . V V 1 .V . .1 .L .WZ v .V ' 3' 5, V- ' 2:31 V 'N 'Vf V J. - , . , ., - WJ 'QF' Q ' ' ' " .. , Q' . . V ww . 'V V . ff V. -a., , -'-V : -5' L, .V , w' . -V 1 V 1' V V1'..,'V,.!:i-h.-"J V-.. .- .. ', , ., V:'.'VVw- V, .V Q .,1,,,5.,-,,,, , - V , 7 . .... ,, L - . I . . -.1 , - .. x 'V Vf . V .ww A I ,ALL E: , - 3. P ,, V Alf ,.,., ,Q , - xv.:-V 535, , V rv K -- iw I Y V Vw 1' 'fs . . - '54, '.,V-- L 1 -5 . Qi., ' A A E .Vi A Q V, 'fi .' ,,F'1n,Vgjg.,Q:i:c' . "1 .,' , ' Q .. -.., ,. . , -,,,,,,,,,A, . . 1 .. v W. ww W .1 -1 IQ Qi PT T72-gk 'I +1...?'.g5'e 'f 3511 1 1,-' gq fi-36 ,x y .. Q'5.7g.35jFf'.I' 5.43.13 19 Lf 'I N. I I --'11 ...LI Ai. . .igirgi sm xg ff In 1 '1" 1 , Tw .LQ I- ,.,1'Ig:. ,Ig QIVI Tl 5I.3.zI - .. . 5'5" R.. .T 1.1.1 4-If :I.f3Iv.I I .QA fbi!! Elia z Q1-5 .. I, ri amv 3!Zq:Ir..,5'..'...Igs via .1-A I.: HQ-3e3IILy? Jigga .I I., ' ,Q?.:1.1, -I .Q I5 ,,..-HI: g I- 1.-'I- 1 .-21 1 I I .ie -1asI5.1f:.: .4.I1 pg. .I'1 +11 -1 1 I. I . II 1 I.I 15, f, .'- 1.- A5-jg. '- "7 gf' I. If . lf" 41.132 . , 1 I5 1- JI, '+--'-. ,I - 1I'., ,, -I I 3,4-11.21.111-I-5..g1II'1'I - 5. I' . .,, .t'g'.QE.eg" ' 9924: . . ' :g'v.1.pIII gf T- . V1 fy. g.I if 'tif3..' ef" 1' .' 'HV . .. w "'.'5:'-.5752-Ip. iff-H 2- .11...f.a1.'5u,' 1 f'551 .:"'M.-.4 . 1 ik.-...,3ii'f.v,. 42-1....f4. f-1 JL1.g13-25 .1. 1ffw3?i54Sg3fng 4 A' .-P Pl ' - Qi .. .w ' ,'6'1'z,i- ' Q5 ,-,-'v ,,j1-523 -'ilk 1 na. I q yu. if , If .r'.'A. jg... 2 It rf'-E152 13.452-1' I if 3 ,. . II. ,gig N,:,,.,It,, R, .. LI.,.,wL, . ,.. . . aku: ,ig Em- I .- .I WI.-.T .1I I.-.1 f 15,--4 ..I,,L, 1 M. ,,."x.I. -Ifvaaqx .., -wfga 45, . .'?'..Zig11i 1" f" f'B!IE5!z: ,F 1753-'T x ' -1 F E' 1: '35 " .' xi" ,Sf-yf 1-1 .H-'1 -1 ",1'H-- J W .- 11 .1 4 - 4-1 L-E' -P1511 ? 51:1 - LF"ftI1-1 12 11 .:".ffg:'1.1'-.-.I.,.'e3f.ls .. ' Swv -'ii 1- 5' . 1f"'.z1.1 1, aa.. -' 'P,.'f P- El!-PE-1 " 1 I -.n'-- '- 1 .I'Iff-:1- .1 ff 4321? . Q' I " 1-1- 15-1-I1u.'z2.11. 'H-.1 -.,.f 1 If- ,1 '32 f..-1 .g 12, -A . A rr ..2','1gi'?53 "i.g7g?1 ' gf5'f5 'f..G .w i 'Sg i-1 .. I -f i H1 I .1 ' 711-' 'iii-:1,Ml.!'.:.',:f - I1-11 dy ' 1 1 22 -21.111-121 fe' .f .'. f- -. s..i'- M-'w1'f-' 'L S5111 "'-iff: -'11 -i ly' 1. .f i .154 - fi- Hs '- - -511-pw 19- 7 ., ig-3?Yff..-....- ,"'..1 -2 . .. if-4" rig: 1p.,-51.3-.1-3 .3 1 ' ' ' 11 -UQ fi: . g,gl1'ii'?15g35'13s'..L-:ffx11..iS'- w a F 1 1 1-1--Q... A I 'mi 1 1 J.f:it1:. giiff' if .fr r-1 . , -.- ,XI I... .1 .- ,w I., -.pf I. V., . '. -. .I II 5 ' .-. gf -,:.. I- 5--If'1II , 1. :.g1-IfIIq.. lg. 'iff i f . ' P ' 1 . -f..l.i'.'5u11'2.ff4..v.1 5.1 . . , . 1 11 ff. 1' - . .""'i55'? ig . . .sw i1L1F1""'7f"' 5? "1 2' S ?"i:5l'9' ffl" . .J ef... I .. .,, .1 .Q . I NI. ,MMI I A, .. .I.,y'i.pIIIvI IM, . . . .1 .. .1 . ., WI... ,, . .1-. . -vu... .,,I...,. I . 591.124, g, iff 11- 1.11 ff .,.1 -SN? .. F1 .5-.4-Q -v'Sf'.',5?1..11,..-Q..-.q. .. .5 pw- fi- , L. 1 14. 35. '. :i1i'f5j'f2Fy'ff QM- .Q 15,4121 gu...1 -31. M114 1' -.Q---aaa ' .fag -'1'jfMfiQ,"1'vj'I1I,f . .ru 1 1 : g1's.??" Q -. L af.-1,-.'.ei-E g..1e.':i,.1w2j 'GS 5 gd. .I I,I ...J I,-it 1... ,I I I ..L.,. :.!,I,. .I I .I -. .I I-I .II 5. F,-.-. :fi I J... illmmga I I ,,.,uE,Iy Q15 2-.,,.L,5..1...,g1 III,,..35. .I Hi .. .l.- Z'. .HA "wr Ti 1'.vgE3"lag' gif- .1 ..Z.2f1.1f 145 li" -e'fr"'f'f2'9.Q1 1 :Q-. 1.41 1,.?11'.:-1-'-am' 1f:a'.11-SQ? 1. I . 11 1 ' ' .1 ..f-- 41,1 '. '5,- .gi g 1, -.I.g'!.a ,NI ' - Z' ., " Q---.j.f1P'.1 21-'IH -1 Sai fat", .3511-',. . . -' Alf W., f'.- "SZ -':"'.L- -41 "cJ1g,Pae1',5?951 lfif' 1 bfi -r.f1??.fff2'fi'-.:g7..12..4 f .,. . . 1.11 5. 51- me.. ff'--fif ww 551251 g.?11i"2...,1E:1.'.2f' 'f1f'f:" 'f 115'-fix ' g f f ffa QQ Tk .' 33 1S?i1Fi'-if" 35-'5i2xkL1'iQil5" Es EE' '- Zfiffi ig. 32325-.-l1?5'1"ilk-?!?S.'..-'.i .5,??.f 15: gli . . 55.1. k.,w1e'- . .S fame 5 553. -5 1.1.-gf -"Wir-'i: .f. :AQ-iq .Q .. . s L Ifi.In..f gg Q " -F' .1-', .-'1 1:-'f1-,ga-' ' :1y52If.1'.fg,'g' 11 . . 1'1'!.3a:T". 1-' uefluyff' 4?ig'f4'.' flat.. 5 ' 4 .rf-14 f 1 ,H Silvia' -24 -1 '- wgw.iE5E9F?i5ff-1:""a1wf5.2. vw .iw 1f,j1im, .fq: , .A"'A' f,:a. 13 '.1f'Yf. ' " . 'fFlJ'f?. " "f2 . ," . 1v?,' .?LH "' uuc 'W 1FM?i-rf""Hff.f-F':2Ngf,"'.--11 'ii' " :vp L-H 112 ' .1 1 1.: f'.1+s,1, 1' vw. 11- '1 . 1111 J."1..:.-sfrft.. 1r"w1'- i g,-.1 3 . .1. f: I .. M... 2 11' f""EF.if?'. " " '11 if ' ' YI- f4"' 1. 1? 1-'91 E' 3 5 .. '?5V'F'if" ' -1 951 ' ' .. 1 1 . .H-'-Y J Q 24. 195'-'1-g W .. -. 1 m.'1?f.1 n.Jfi1,gf . .- iz'-2.. , w. 11.11. 1-ff- 12.1 f1,""2eu1. 1 1 wI . ' 'f '11 g . . ' 3. .Ji 13:35 51flwf 11f1l1Q. ' " il u .sif f 1. .2f 1 1I ff::t5aff.f41f,f:. iii. 59934131 1x1 'Q1' f .1 1 1 ...FS .. 1 -41: T 11. ?.'.'WF . gi '1 f'1Uf"f35rE- 511 1 13 L. 2 "!1 .4fAf 1' lf iT"'1--fw?'Y5,11l5i'5f1. I" .a gfuigfgf I. Zyff i j ,fy-5!55fig2IE2'sg5I.' . 54f?.i,g3iigI 'fg'I:..i3Qg:i. Lgggg l .I I I4 I 1 ,- "I If. 1 -.gag 1 1' .uf -' 1 15 iff.. Q' , .I-iI ..,'?- ,fig .1 .III I ' .1 512.wgF,.xi.1..IIgiiggi . , 1 . Q"fcQgQ??1a' 'I aaigfffgg 3515 .u s1i -I 31 .bq1g. I 5gIlf55,m Iqzgigyfq an " ' 552 LF? 1 - .1 ,-::,.i - . 'F-M5-1 yi ' H:,211':'f-- , 1 ,A ' I:j'g,'i?2 1 5. f. .J uv - .QW Efrfs-.. V14 L -1 .z'-25.91. . 12601: :.:f ,'.'g," 113. ..: jg: . ,. ps ,I I, .- -I5 . Qi 54-i!I4,gI Fl, I ,II h I '. :Irv .. V I IQ.:-.. - I.. .I,II27Ii,.,,.I.3 ,- . I II5I,, I .,IiI I . M Winn Im., 1 M1 ' 110 - 4147 1" . 5' L1-1' 'f 1.."":i-131 -.--'J u 1 .1 ww 41456.11 'H .-uf J -' "-.-1.- ef :1'..:-H-xalf: -M'-- .r if .-fa.-51-3 ... -13.- ' -' : f . If -1.1,N- gl . , Ifvz 'g .2511 E fy- .1.: ' K-1 afyvgmzgf 1' MNH .gf "iw-W1-.-3. :n.,,, 11f1. ..,.r1,',r 11 I3l'1.'l . V ". 'Mir-11?3Pf" f-qi., 5'1 "-13? 'Eff' :v'3"g' gg Quispfrl f ' ' 1-g:Aj,9f?II.emgg i?'fssI1-'gig-17.,.'.5,', 4f1 .e2'.22'1I.'.lgL?1 ' 1- .. i111 iffa T if-Z-.l .Iw ...+ . 1 -' ...1 , 1. .1,. il ' 1. . .fr 'Q .1 . 13 1g ff.. "'..4fi. 1' -41' 1' ' Sz gg14ef'm.f1Qf, .11 ' 11 33' iff 1 'LI fa .wff '11'1. "1 . I-ff.. 1 :' , .1 E2 .. ' ilgi-W' 5 A-" . 4 ' gs. 1 f"""" "' """"1' 5' "" """"""" """5' " 'Q f F Ja- JI :fi 1-.1"fL1,1i,'s1 -311. . . . ,ef-1-.1 :I' ..'..., . 1F"2 EJ? I..a .:e.Ifi5'f1 I- P .51 . ylf--is 'f 215 1 .2l5'2i?L1. 151.15 '1-1+ : ' ' 1511-1-'PGQ1 : . .'sk:"51l',?11'-,::Ef. 1!'- - J ag 1'-"'9'3F'1.'.'f11.fz .2 .. 11- -4' '11-Fw'-1' 1. -, - Y'-1.35 mjflq-:.. 1. '.p:,:': fax- .-1-ffflbw A11 -1 ' 1 1, 1 , x Q 3 "-"3"'ful-" f'k?"i'5"ff'i' 1 'W' 'Si' ""Ef5"'3' ' 'I' 5"WQ- .1 '?f33'if"f"'5"'if'32 ':"H"""""i "' +51 --ff-S!! " 1 Q- ."1riff"21- ." 'H if ' M11 1' '-1 " j11"5 'N-"HL" 5 . .15 -J'-EFL U Q ' - 1 1- .11'i41f:1 WI.. "QV, . . ' A-f--1" 1 .. wa-. - . ,.35gU2:-..'i f+1".g-'I fg .V 5 2.544 A- I ig ,,g., v1f1'f - 5.5.1231 11 ,'f'2ig' ww '1?1..Q.'.? 1- . i- +gQxf. .1.. 1..r- 1-1 1' 1-LMP ."t':zf"s1'1.,:'- - 1.1-X .-- 25" 7.2.1. . Q W . 11' 1. . . ' '1 '1 .. .MIT 'W "'.1 315 N ' f'hiHg.3?i5' 1 1' -F651 Aaifrf Fifi' KE- 'J' Li' Y A. gII 11, egg?-.1 L55 I .551 11, M145-1:2-,.r1 ,I -'-. .-:1.f.,..,L.I.. 5.4, I ag.. -.1+v5fag1g.-'14'Fs:,.- -'.1?dcg+,, f1wg1...,1 ifwi. My . ggkfyi-...ig ' - - I, '1 aI 41 1 .1 .I -I Q.: - -,I .-1 , 'A I '3rrgA11j4.i14I.I Img- . 5' K- ' ' 3 . -1 . I-QHQEIGZ' . 1311 .1 -'1 5.11: . 1 1 . ...-ae . 11 ' . AQ ':?1u3fwggf1g'.- "E1f- . " F. " g:E:f.?1,' 'Sgt-QI. -'cup-.+:4,-15" 4- fz'e..Igf3-""4w. ' '!f'1u-AMI f " ' '- . .. L ' .. - .?I3.,J . l.. .1?ivi?s'4-15f'fmi1?-fic' ,ff 11f551isf" 1s11!ie'7 f5 IJ- "5 ,5Lf:E'311 f"':z . '. 111 .' "nf iq I I FILQ 4 ,I 'gQ.,.I.1g.-I gf-"f -..- sf-'Q ' z 11 2 5,r54I Q. ' '5 . limi: imp 4-Q1If-1:31 I,1..'7q, 5, 'I . - .1"1 ,aJ.a'-.df 'af '2 qwe:1 :."'p.k rw- .11 anew-' '-312:11 -' Pg' i"f '.11' '1-'H fE4'+a'1'1' 1 ag-'giflxi-1 11'WL2g1.1w1- -1 71111.-ff .1 .. 1 N' "ff fl zz'-'Haw r 1' ' 1' Vzifif .f .1 cliff v':i..f '1' . 2.2.-f4y. m'!n1- .+11. 351' A ' 1 ' "?.1r'-AB! - uv 'fuss .pf 'Q , 9? 2:91-.. IZ-IM :-.1'Wrf::.cQ4 .T -J 1.1 14 L -'Li.'z":1 fri .nw 'mir "?.".----J-..f1. 6's Bi . ,r1 eJ"zI.' . If If I LPN:-N . I4 1 yuh,-I. 3:.gLIg1z 4 .my af Q-V-.,5'-2:7 dkI,:'f U '.v-II5fg51l ' 1- ,.:fFsff.I:-I 1 N531 1.51 I-Q 5.1,,:I:: 15. I 4 P1 ' M + 'vw' ' - 1 . '.1-gig f 1 -5. I .II . 5 .-I,-91' X. . 5, 11 Q3 .- 1' - -.L iI'I -.TNT 1 - '1' I, III:v.1.t,-.1:..'1I-1IfII i .III.-5.b- ' .9 jf. 11445. - 1 3" 'qs 125525, H gviggfu af 'vi F 42 L,-Q, 151253211 s. ' f .. 1-1.12. 14 . 'if' 1 ffiiin.-.1-T Y ' , -.91 Lgff. F1410 :K .FM-,?1' ' 1.12 . -1 -' 2"" . I1 1I: 1' ' . an 454. .14f"'S'f'1I ffm.. '1j?:ifEaL1E . 1 . I 5,g'I.'E.3".j w' JI 5' lg 153' I '.ff'fjg1 "'H - - .., M,1Q Q' TWC 'f 5 ... Egg' uzg."'2g.,,5.g... 1 .vjfxi " 1 'gig 1255. .SQMIIQ mfs., I a' cgpffifgf fig 'g - flifv, 151ffff.- sf' " "il f"1' 1" '5g,'114ffi.T.s3iQ' 75?es?1ZL. fi'n"'.'1 II I.. ' 5' i g' rP.1,L!?E,.9-.Q "Fgn"1Q-13 - 5 313 .- '1wf11,.'ff.5'?3:' 11.-11 di f f? 5,64'4fQa4 12m11f.lf": -1 11'+w, '21 .1E' B w 1- ". 154. H571 1 wS??ai"v.. '1 .e,4."-1. ii-:'U:a8!'f: 1 1 5 P 1.'fvr'.fZ:'5 'wm1"'i.,.1..?? 1ff, ' .LggI 1 , .111 1 . -IS.. .. , x...1--2.4. ... .. - .. .,... ,. .LJ .,5. 4 Su Q - I.,q ,. --I., 9' .., I .. .. ,Q . .i . . . l .. JJ. xx. .1.. .. .... - " 1--I. vi!.: ,'fg'f"" ' - .IL .'31?'17 EL' 2 iiiw.. F. L.: , .pa4gi.5.gg3?4'I: :5I'lg.1'- .-.,I1.- ' ' 1 3. 1 f 11121144211 -gf'--. . .aff ,:' J".t.w.1v1 .. 1.2.1 .1 1 . Q - :wr - w ikis Q11 ,WEE 725323 .gi it II , ., 1' . - f a-4 ' 1-5. W - - 1" .Ef.Z".'fi' 1'-.1 1 V . 1 W' ' w L 7'5, . a. Q.-.'J:. 411 - - w:15'1..'.1f 1 .- .11 ggh.-A 11: -. -M':fx:,1: ::.-' - 1-. I A 'rf 'x-..if'E5'1:'?- 3I1E vii.. '-.-gi, ' 'wh AQPBF.. ' 15 fi' if . -. .z.,...mw5,.1-g-1- aI ffm, Hx... ..f,f - ."I,rf1n'saw- , -.. I- . 11 '1 .F..1,,g II 1. A i gp.-www.. .1 I-Q I4 Ig.. 11 ,..-sQ.:.I 1--' ' f - - ff 'QA' :Q-1.45 ff.. "1 1-AlTSLl'f.:.1.?-.n 115' .. ff " 15?-5.21.11 - ' + - L- .- If . I y 13. 331 Iwkggy 1. '1L,.Iia?F.' .:- ,,I1I,:?.Ie3, 2' .Ji 1- gg. 51. 111557 ., 1g',.' , 013, 'i'..4Ip1'4' 2 .1'f'5'?1.:1igf?" -' 5 'T 'Z' ' -" """-V af.. 41. 'Wm 'i?'i"" 'iii' ' Qui- iisflf - 'ii f" 'i?'s15 ' Jilfi' 'mf' -1'-A " 'TFQV-39.1. Fi' H a Qff-41 w .- "fi -I Mx... .1-: 15 ' .,91g..' , '-1219 , ' a 1 'K 1 'P .41 5 .Y -3 1 1' . .1 -1 21111-' " 1 1 "" - 1. .Y HSM.. f s:IiiI5, II 113 ffqvgqitn.-gp4I2gg5,f..,.fi . 14, 5? Twsj:,,.I....e kx Q1 - .. 1: :u.f g'ig3 '- . -:1.'-' .- -,.. '.f . A 41 1-.-aw:14 II. ,I.,. -I jx! 11'-I.. ...' I zz.. .-1 :1 ' Q - 111 'f ab L I.,I 1... -f . , In 3 '. 1. . 1 A - '23 Iz' 31? 'x I 'fffak . 1-..f.jC?'7f'1:?1 13? 55-"1y'. Wifi. 5 ' ' -Q?" 'P :f". .' 513 ,352-if.-.9""'Tf,fi5sfd'7"'fi?: ,1 'if-'51 '-3 1" ',g. 1 , . MZ' if """?:.??.5w' ' 1' -' 'iw1,+'f'51E2F'1.-.iiiih "1-1H'f.ff'?.1Q, 9' f!f'1f'if1-f .Q Q. .w -w.Af11wf- 1 egg . . "va fi.-. ' '.'1-'usgh . J' 1 Us-' 1391" 1 1.12.1-.2 df- 'va -. . 1 ' . 1 eriz.. .if f5.,.1 '1:-.,. .. f. f.ii efg,,f13' .Z-1 4 ff ' Q' -M21 ' 7--N 1 153 . s1f..1e.f. wif... -'12, ' iff- ' E . 1 Q1 g v'-1 NS ga -Q if 1 Ks. 1 .1..1 :ff .1 "f"rI. 1' '1 g.:.s.14.ei f -. f .- 1' +- .. 1' 1 -Q-vI:1sf-ff".131g1:.. f??"fi1f:f- J .. " xx? f'x"1x 1 -5347, Iigiiliwb "I ,1:Igfu "Fx L45 " ' 51' 5 .5'...Ii2I.4'35Lpi .lfZf5gh!:g,.?l.-rr 314.3- ,I I '. ' , I-1'1': 'I I' 1.53" I.: rg-i1 Hn' ' " . I.e. '2.I.-5 "Q, 'S':i'f"I T' -' u gkyif. 'IFF jk 'HQ I... . .5-51' 'Lge i"4j'f1Tz:, 5"'-7-1':Q-w 'i7Bg'e'.f' 4. 91 - . " j!"'1l.' '. .1'g "k'zII'51j1'Fi3.j,'--gif? " ' .ggg'r4 !EiY2'iE1 33 ' 'Wifi- f.3'1 . 3 1 ' f tcg . - g 1'.q 1H'F.: ig12 Qiqtf - 1... f- ' GTF 'Q .SIT 1 s ' ...Wi-127 9 " Y-1 ' -: .- .1-ik.. 1, vii5if'1.1P.i?-.,...i1..1-1 fwiiggf 1' :2g'151's.1It1z?.aEi:5f 5, -ff'-7? I. I 1: 1 :,..:I,,1k- If 5' .f'.'1Js1Igf,III 1534 i4.fIfIIg.21.,555:g 1 Iii-1.5. g,'..3II,' if win L-?i4e'g- fr-. .I ,ef 4.1.5319 1 I.I4tII.1IlI QL. .:I5..!1if.. n.I5,..,MfV1.1.I....5I...f5II.2? . ' .. .. iam " ' A ? 1. .. A 1 ' - " 1 'F xr :f1i'?S3i"eLfi.' iff- .7 Q12 .,.1 '1 qw.. - 5. 'x11..':'g1E"3"E's1315.2-1512...-1 . MQ..a:55..wx!1-- 'Q' ' .?5Zlv15'7f1 31. 'i!1T?4"'fQ3LCl",1 M- "mf . L5 - 34515 -i tif? ' TTS-""-f1..' 1? 1. Fw 'if R -.1 "FAM '5QiQii"'.a?W'lfT-.ETYIrf' f 1' iigggiff Q, 563-ff. " f'I1fQ?f3 352i22.Qf'S"f:f5g5i' Ig.5E 1 11. :--.- 12" '1 ff. ' ' QQ .ff...2f.5gf2:..g-.I. 2-21.4.1 .. --1 251:23 1 ff ' 1 .. 1 1 .1-".f'fL-md5Li'4? I - 1 -1' -2 ifh'E2.".5f1EFUwE??-1 .i.wi55K.5ai..+L'.f?542 " 5i.igf.1.1'f?F1faf4 . 1-1 , ',1" l.i,,if2.m. , ' ' I V 1 s , ,,. ll-fl I I . NAPANEE 1927 YEAR BCUK OF THE NAPA UNION HIGH SCH CDL Dedication CI' his edition of the Hapanee is dedicated to our friend Mr. Earl E. Crawford whose efforts toward educational progress and whose loqaltq to our school have won the appreciation of the students, the facultq and townspeople f.Q4i? A'lE E Facuhq E. E. Crawford-Principal George A. Strong'-Vice Principal--Biology Kara S. Whitch-er-Librarian Louise Kenagy-English Samuel HugheseShop.. Mechanical Drawing Walter Hemmerling-Spanish Esther L. l5arker!fHom'eiEcdnon1ics ' V I' Q Edythe M. Olsenfliome Economics 5 I , A Myrtle M. Kime-fAlgebra4-Commercial Department F.'A. Cunning!-Head of Commercial Department ' E. C. ConnersfAssistant Coach--Farm Mechanics Mrs. M. Hills-Chemistry and'General Science Rita A11legrini4Eng1ish and-'French p ' ' Dorothy M. Coombs-Head of English Department Sterley H. Post-fFarm Mechanics Annabel Beal-History A Leola A., Nelson--English 1 I R. W. Gray-fAgriculture . A 1 : Gladys' Beck-Physical Education and Girls' Coach I Mildred L. Crever+Art U, ' .. , Violet A. Palmefgmnglish , ,- - A . 1- Sarah A. Lynchl-Head -of' Mathematics Departineiht C. Alice Hawkins-Dean of Girls-Civics and Economics P. J. Webster-Head of Ag Department Hazel M. Collins-History Alda Kelsey-Commercial Department C. B. Youtz-Geometry and Physics R. E. Johnson-Physical Education and Boys' Coach Muriel Dunn-Latin, Spanish Ullhreej NAPANEE Eitorial What does life mean to an oyster? He clings to his rock, and this great creation whirls about him as a meaningless charybidis of oblivion. Life is barely something, offering little more than death offers. Existence is so empty, it makes little difference whether the oyster lives or not. How would we feel if life held no more for us than it holds for the oyster? We would be appalled, we would shudder at the thought of an existence that is only a degree above death itself. We pity the poor creature who cannot be endowed with the senses to enjoy music, appreciate art, nor culti- vate the friendship of his kind. We marvel at the difference between the plane of life of the man, and of the oyster. You agree with me that we are a given number of degrees above the plane of life of an oyster, and find the blessings of ex- istence in such generous profusion. Then, does it not follow that we should be motivated by the thought of the store of pleasures that await us in the higher levels of life that have not yet been attained? We have derived from the pre- ceding hypothesis that the gratifications of life are directly porportional to the degree of development. Therefore is it not reasonable to assume that the more we develop and per- fect our earthly existence, the more life will hold for us? fFourj P 'WR WMWWW - " M X Rv i . ru, ,:.:'''zvv'L'1"''."U'4:il''.".L'xg'UJ'v.fi1'l!.C.L'Elilfl 45:'gwffie'g9e:311g:,:'3:5yi1'1,"ggv3.4i54gw1-.5,nw-,-,,uw,1'. .gym X .4 my 917: .fm .WV - I :V H ,514..:w.:X,l.4Lgerm-.4.q,,W, . ,, 1,vuf nmff1ufww4 "1 1w :uwa'1:v1s g nfl' M w 5314 if J W, 3m:'w"f"1f'af1 fr :Wm Vw ll' Egirl' r'o V H' fllillll Vi? 'IE vm HZL Hwwwmf m 'V' Mfg . 2 "1" r25f5MIU165l'l5fPfeh .... ..- --11-f--"A ' I1 ' f v xkf ' ' Q ' 53,3f v.1 .s1i5,If,:f : 4 ,1 . I"- nwf f'+'a 1 'ff' 1nf1M h 1f.yn5 f. aa b - iw . 1' 'lff,'1""e,uJ W- Im 'x , ,md vsglu 1,-, --Xx X Yk'-wx ' .- ' ', gwLlIiIm!'!':!lfl qllrzwvug' QM iiwlyfw, HY ' - 'Hb f alfu mwz.f1 !riAQ lw wJw ? GNIWMl WW"W" W 'LF'!'i5?'7iiiiiii . , ,t 1' ' lbi YI' H Zifxiri' j ' 'Ymmm? H MuWWWVWwwWMMMWmw Q g ' f 1 f' nw fm -- - - QW W W , 1:1556 MLM mf 1, gzzepmpafwwwwww ww Wff H!!! f f - Iazses H w i P' I' v r J 'I I I .w , E f '! ummm- u rm- :cu ur:-1' uxrax -r.mrur-rv -:nf 'n-u an-ma: ,-1 , nn -un .--1-A-44113-5 nz- -unuu-'uxzauvs-:L-C m-a-114.11-mann, usual .-n,-nnnnucuu .swan NAPANEE Fred Graham John Foskett OFFICERS FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER Fred Graham ..... . .... . ,.,.....,,.A..... .President ............. .......,,................. J ohn Foskett Mildred Korf .....,,. ..... .... . ,,... . V ice-President .... .....,...... .Ruby Williams Virginia Ferrogiaro ..... ....... S ecretary ,...,....., .......,...... H elen Marino Kathlene Kelly .... - ..,. ..... ,.......,.... T r easurer .......... . ...... ,.... .... H i lary Helsley Bryant Fitch ..,... .. ..,..,... Sergeant at arms ..,. ....,.....,.....,...... R obert Harris Edith Owen .....l,.........,....,..,.... ,,..... . ..., Yell Leader .,.,......,.....,..... ,......., J aqueline Brentt Let us glance back in thought just four years ago, when over a hund- red quivering Freshmen entered the portals of Napa High-a new class in a new school. Gradually our fears were quelled and we found ourselves be- ing caught in that deli htf l b't' ' ' ' ' g u am 1 1ous, joyous, ever faithful spirit of Napa High. Our first party, the Freshman Reception,was a thrill that we still re- member. How friendly were the Seniors, acting as our big brothers and sisters. Ah! the various dances and events that followed in the course of time are still joyful memories. Athletics also played an important part in our high school career. The girls, as well as the boys, excelled in the many sports: basket ball, baseball, and track. The boys carried off honors-in football. Then suddenly, we were upper classmen. In our junior year we pro- duced "39 East", a three act comedy. The play was very successful, and the money we took in from it helped us to put over our Junior-Senior Ball with elaborate style. Our Senior play "Mud" by Katherine Browning Miller was greeted with enthusiasm. In the literary work of Napa High, the class of 1927 holds many honors. They have worked earnestly and enthusiastically with the Migwan, NUHS, and Napanee, ever giving their whole hearted support. A sigh of regret-and the writer speaks with all sincerity-escapes each member of the graduating class when he thinks of leaving it all but he looks forward to the forthcoming events where he may practice the many things he has learned. fFivej LUCIA MARCELLIN CARLTON MULLER CHARLES NUSSA THERESA WELLBORN ETHELYNDE ELLSWORTH BRYANT FITCH WASHINGTON MANNERING HATTIE PETERSON REVA DECKER EDWARD SCHULZE IRA McKENZIE CLAUDINE HEFLIN VVALTER HEALY FRED GRAHAM MARIE FARRES MILDRED JOHANNSEN MARY ABATE HARRY CONREY BARBARA BLANCHARD LILBURN CLARK HECTOR MAC LEAN RALPH LUI DORIS KOETHEN WILLIAM BUEHLER JOEL COFFIELD KATHLEEN KELLY MIRIAM SMYTHE EVERETT HALL NATHAN COOMBS HELEN MARINO THELMA WALLS THEODORE THIBAUT WILLIAM ROGERS MARTHA SAWYER ELAINE GIAUQUE REBECCA WETMORE MARY SCHROMBERG CARL KNOLL ARTHUR TOCKEY ALICE SHAW RUTH POLZIN PAYSON CLARK ON A WHITMAN VIRGINIA FERROGIARO RUBY WILLIAMS HAROLD FITZGERALD ROBERT HARRIS MILDRED KORF JACQUELINE BRENTT ROY FISHER JOHN BARIANI ALITA CASADY VELMA EDINGTON VERNON ENLOW WILLIAM CORUM GRETA NEWTON MILDRED PETERSON RUTH RA EDER KATHRYNE GRECO DOROTHY HANSEN CARL SWAN SON MARY McMILLAN LILLIAN ALGEO FERRIL NICKLE IRVING SCHWARTZ MARY GARDNER DOROTHY JAEKLE JOHN FOSKETT MELVIN HEIN EDITH OWEN NAPANEIE Robert Jeffrey James Raney OFFICERS FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER Robert Jeffrey ..,.......,..,... , ,,.. ..,......... - ........ P resident ............,........,............,... James Raney Genevieve Frommelt ..- ...,......... - ..... Vice-President ........ - ...A............. Clinton Melone Naomi Horne ... ..,.....,.,A. , ..... Secretary and Treasurer ,............. Dorothy Marino Donald West ...........,..... . ........... ...Sergeant at Arms ...,....... - ,.......,.,,.. Lamar Tallman Max Farrar ........ - ............. . ................. Yell Leader ..- .......... - ,,.....,.....,..... , ..... Enoch Yates We, the Class of 1928, believe that we have had a most successful term, during the past year, as the Junior Class. We placed men on the iootball, b.asketball, track, baseball and tennis teams, and girls on the volleyball and basketball teams representing the school. In the interclass athletic com- petition, our Class "A' basketball team won the championship of the school, and the Class "B's" took second 'placeiifn their -division of the basketball tournament. The Class "C" track team won the Class "C" meet, While the "A's" place second in the "A" 'sectikinbf the meet. At the time of this writing, neither the baseball games, nor the "Nuhs" regatta have been run off, but the Junior team and crew, respectively, bid fair to carry off high honors in both events. The girls, also are expected to Win their inter- class games, as they have done in previous years. During the football and basketball seasons, We conducted several con- cession sales, and made good profjitoiut of them. The Junior Play, "Apple- sauce," was in every way a successf- The cast was made up of a very suit- able group of Juniors, and was coached in an excellent manner by Miss Palmer. We took a great deal of pride in our "edition" of the annual Junior Senior Ball, and tried to make it the best ever. The gym was decorated in a very pleasing manner by the Decoration Committee. The best orchestra obtainable was selected, and the music was one of the features of the ball. And now we hope that next year, as Seniors-with all due apologies to the Class of 1927, and the Senior Classes before it--We may stand high- est in scholarship, leadership, and service of any other graduating class of the Napa Union High School. l:Twelvej J NAPANEE' Robert Boggs Gordon Dunlap OFFICERS FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER Robert Boggs ....., .... ...,....,............... P r esident ........,......................,,....,.... .Gordon Dunlap Eunice Beck ...,,........,... .,...,.,... ....,., V 'ice-President ............ ...................,. V irginia Fox Jean Cochrane ....... ...... . .. Secretary and Treasurer ..........,.... Lorraine Strohl Ed Corum ....,... ..,..... . . ...........,.. ....... Y ell Leader ................... ....,........ . Philip Manasse John Platt l.... ...,.....,. .,.... . ,.,. ,.,.. S e r geant at Arms ..,. .,....,,......,......,............ J ohn Platt In its sophomore year the class of '29 was very successful in all its ac- tivities. Each boy and girl was eager to help make the term the success that it was for the class. Several of the boys helped Napa win her high honors in football this year. The class also produced many excellent basketball, baseball, and trackmen who will do much more for the school during the next two years. The girls, too,showed good spirit when they gained several positions on the girls Championship Basketball team. Also, in interclass sports, the girls made a good showing. They suc- ceeded in winning the volley ball championship. The boys developed some very good teams for the interclass sports. They took second place in the class "C" track meet, and it is expected that they will be successful in the liaselrall games, the regatta, and the annual swimming meet. Another thing which can't be forgottcn was the annual Sophomore Hop. The Dance was attended by a crowd as Large as any that has ever support- ed a school event of the sort. With good music and lots of confetti every- on-e had a merry time. The success of our social event was due to copper- ation on the students part and more so to the willing aid of Miss Rita Allegrini, who has been our efiicient and friendly advisor since our first davs in Napa High. fThirteen1 NAPANEE W, ,, ,,,,,,,-N ,,.,,, .,,, , ,Yx,, ,,,, ,, ,. ,. . ,. . .. , ., .--. . .. .,.,...i ' 'vt-1 Robert Bornan Lowell Edington OFFICERS FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER Robert Boman .............,..................... , ........ President ............... .,- ..,..,,.,.,...... Lowell Edington Edward Hillman .................... - ....... Vice-President 1 ,......,.....,..,..... ,........, W inifred Jones Alice Banks ........................ Secretary and Treasurer .4.,.,.,..,...,...... Peggy Sheilield The Freshman class of approximately two hundred students promises to be one of the b-est classes of Napa High in more than one way. Q if 1. The Class "C" basketball team, principally composed of Freshmen, four of whom received their letters. Three Freshmen played on the Class "B" basketball team. P In the track meet the Freshmen proved superior to the Sophomores in both Classes "A" and "C", y Five Freshmen have positions on the baseball team and promise to give interesting competition to their interclass competitors. V I This class not only excells in athletics but also in scholarship, Eight- een received honor cards and belong to the State Honor Society,tWo holding office in that organization. During the entire year this class has received more honor cards than all the other classes combined entitling them to the greatest number in the Honor Society. This. is the first time in the history of the school that a freshmen class has exceeded its upper classmen in the number of honor cards. Let the good work go on. ' fFourteenj N A P A N E EE Merit Sqstem ' It is not possible to give you a better realization of the Merit System that is now in force in Napa High, than in quoting the following: "There has been a rising tide of feeling among college authorities and business and financial organizations that high schools should keep account and furnish a record of a student's character, dependibility and citizenship as well as his scholarship. In fact, several of our leading universities now require such a rating on all applicants for admission, and business institu- tions are requesting such information in increasing numbers, It becomes both desireable and necessary therefore to keep such records in Napa Union High School. To do this in an intelligent manner the following Merit System has been adopted: The rating will be made on th-e semester basis, and a merit credit will 1 e given at the end of each semester. Each student will be given 100 merits at the ieginning of each semester. For lapses in citizenship, honor, relia- ' ility, ndorality, etc., merits will lie deducted from the 100 according to the offense as indicated in the schedule below: Loss OF MERITS ' i 1. Stealing-20 or more. 2. Forgery of an excuse-20 or more. 3. Cheating-20 or more 4. Lying-10 or more. 5. Cutting classes or Assembly-10 or more. 6. Unnecessary tardiness-5 or more. p 7. Unexcus-ed absence-5 or more. 8. Rudeness, disorderly, ungentlemanly or unladylike conduct-5 or more. 9. Wanton destruction or defacing of public property-5 or more. 10. Smoknig, gambling or had language about school-10 or mnre. GRADING OF MERITS 100 or over ,....., ...............,........................,,,.... 1 90 to 100 ........,,..........,,.....,.,.,.,..................,.... 1 80 to 90 ,.........,.. ........... 2 V 70 to 80 ......,,......... ..,,..,......, .........,..........,. 3 Below 70 ,.,.......... ,......,.,.,,.......,,,............,,.,. 5 Failure For college recommendation a student must average 80 for the semest- ers spent in Napa Union High School. Students scoring an average of less than 70 will not be graduated. A record of merits will be kept by the Vice Principal and Dean of Girls, and will be rnade a part of the student's permanent recor-d.. The following committee will serve as a Court of Appeal: Vice Principal Dean of Girls Head of English Department All extreme cases will be delt with by the High School Principal. This system is the same one used in many of the other high schools throughout the state, three of them being Piedmont, Sonoma, and Santa Barbara. W frifceeyq N A P A N E E Aciivilq Period The "Activity Period" held every morning from 9:55 until 10:30 which has been a part of the schedule of Napa High this current year, allows for advisory work on Mondays, student body meetings on Wednes- days, classes and club meetings on Fridays. On Tuesdays and Thursdays the opportunity classes meet with: Mr. Strong ......,........,....... ..,............... ...,....... ............,..,.. . . ,.......... B o ys' Glee Club Mr. Youtz ........ .,,.........,...l............ , .Automobile Design Miss Crever ....,... ............,. S tagie Craft and Decoration Mr. Post ....,...... - ..........,.......,.....,. Radio and Electricity Miss Beck ..,., , ..... ...,.,.,......... C orrective Gymnastics Mr. Johnson ,............ .......,...,..... ,............ A t hletic Aims and Ethics Miss Kime ........,. .. ........ ....,............,.....,.......,i...... - ..Vocations for Women Miss Lynch .........,.... - .........,,..... - ...........,.....,. -..Good Manners, Problems of Ethics Miss Coombs ..................,,.i............,..... . .... ...................,...,............... - ...........i.......................... D ramatics Miss Palmer ................. ,....... . .... - ...- ....,.............,...........,.......,.............................................. - ...,. Debating Mrs. Hills ...,.. Chemical Arithmetic, Popular Science, Scientific Current . Elnents . . . Miss Colhns ..... - ....,. ...,....,...,................................ . ......,..,...,......,...............,.......... C ahfornia History Mr. Conners .,.. .,.. . . ,..,.. .....,,....,......,.......,.,..,.... M achine Shop Work Mr. Hughes ......... ,.......... .,,..,,.,.. ............ .............................. T h e S lide Rule Miss Hawkins ....,... ........ - ...Parliamentary Law and Practice lVIiss Nelson ............. .........,..... - .... - ....,................, - ...., E nglish Grammar Miss Parker ........... ............. - ........... 1+ 'ancy work, sewing etc. Mr. Webster ..- .,..... ...........,,.,........................ 0 ral English Mr. Gray ..,........ ,... ...,.,........,...........,.,..,.......,.. Civil Law Miss Olsen ..- .... -.. .... ...........,.. C atering Miss Allegrini ..... ...... ....,...4....,...,...,... - .,.., S p elling Mr. Cunning .... - ,........ . ...,....,...,,., ....,.... P enmanship Miss Beal .....................,...,,......,......................,. ..... .,..,......,,...,...........,............... S c hool Citizenship Mr. Hemmerling ...,..,. . ..... .... , , ....,... ...........,.....r.,... - .,.................. If lowers, their cultivation Mr. Louis E. Kahn and others ..,., .Advance Scout Merit Badge Course Miss Offutt ..,,,,....,......,........,..........,.,..... ........... N ursing, Home Making, Social work Mr. Crawford . ............,.... Personality Development, Elementary Psychology Mrs, Schalow ........,....,,.....,..... , .....,.....,........,,,. - ....,.........,.......,...,.........,.....,.,.,...... Girls' Glee Club Probably the most successful of the above classes were the Girls' and Boys' Glee Clubs. The Boys' Glee Club under the direction of Mr. Strong "put over" a very good comic openetta, besides providing entertainment at many of the student body meetings and other gatherings. The Girls' Glee Club also presented a very good operetta. The girls were directed by Mrs. Schalow. Another very successful club, organized under the direction and ad- vise of Mr. Post is the Radio Club. Early in the year this club was organ- ized out of the opportunity period class that was studying radio and elec- tricity. The club elected Arthur Tockey as president, Clifford Rawson was selected the club technician while Hilary Helsley was the very able and ef- ficient operator. The purpose of the club is to enable its members to read the wireless ccde known as "International Morse" and to acquaint them with the prac- tical side of radio communication. To facillitate the object of the club, its members donated sufficient apparatus to construct an up-to-date transmit- ting and receiving station. This station transmits on forty meters with sufficient power to make international communication possible. The in- stallation of this station puts Napa High on the map as one of the few schools that is equipped with a radio transmitting station. l:Sixteen1 NAPANEE Joel Coffield Walter Healy The Associated Student Body is the legislature of the school, and gov- erns its activities. It has a membership of nearly five-hundred students, inclusive of fourteen oflicers, elective, and appointive, who make up an ex- ecutive council, which is representative, has the confidence of the students, and transacts the business for the association. The Student Body, since its formation 18 years ago, has been a pro- gressive organization and is now an efficient one. It supports an aggressive wide awake weekly paper, the "NUHS"g A literary magazine, and this annual. A program Committee is each week, responsible for an entertain- ment, which is sometimes musical, and sometimes educational. Speakers of national repute have been included among the latter group. Each term the incumbent president of the Student Body is a member of Rotary, as a high school representative. The Association supports and sponsors the school's athletics, social functions, and dramatic productions. They are financed by student membership fees, athletic meets, and entertainments. A great deal of money is necessary to carry on student activities, therefore a great effort is made to make as much money as is possible at every available opportunity. The student membership cards are the larg- est source of revenue, and each year a concentrated effort is launched to make students realize the necessity, and advantages of purchasing them. Athletics barely manage to pay for th elmselvesg excepting some years when the school has a better than average team to attract the crowds. Just as the world progresses, our student government advances, from year to vear, to a higher degree of efliciency. Responsible officers realize their obligations to the organization they are representing, and do their work zealously with admiralrle business ability. ISeventeenj N A P A NIE iz Girls' Ledque OFFICERS FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER Reva Decker ....,.....,...............,.............,....... President .,..,.,...........,...,..,,.,. ,.... lv Iary McMillan Jane Krug .,...,... ......4.,........A. - . ..... . Vice-President ...........,..... ,....,,. . Dorothy Hansen Eunice Beck ......................,... Secretary and Treasurer ,................ .,.A.. R uth Jaekle Mildred Korf .. ....A................. .....,. S ergeant at Arms ............ Virginia Ferro giaro Jacqueline Brentt ,,....,,......,....... .... Y ell Leader ...i.......... .........,,. G enevieve Frommielt One of the most active, as well as important organizations of our high school is the Girls' League, made so, purely lcecause it has taken such rapid strides through a little effort, and has accomplished such a great deal through much cooperation. The League functions through three standing committees, the Social, under Ruth Raeder, the Welfare, under Martha Sawyer, and the Publicity under Mildred Johannseng a regular student lcody organization which as- sembles on Mondays of activity periods, every other Week, and a Council composed of officers, Chairmen of committees, and class representatives. This Council meets every Thursday preceding regular League meetings. All League officers are elected semi-annually but committee chairmen pre- side throughout the year. Activity period has been a great aid to furthering the purpose: of this association by furnishing Well attended meetings. Last year our League lacked cooperation because it was so difiicult to get the girls together after school. As usual delegates were sent to Berkeley to the annual convention. An important accomplishment of the league has l een the shipment of Dolls, under the names of Reva C. Alice Hawkins, etc., to Japan. The Welfare Committee has aided the needy around Christmas and Thanksgiving, while the Social Committee has successfully managed the Mother's and Daught- er's Banquet at which Dr. Rhinehart, president of Mills College gave an inspiring talk, the girl's jinks, and the Mother's and Daughter's Tea. On the Whole we are very proud of this organiration leecause it has shown that the girls are capalrle of gaining recognition. flilighteenl NAPANEE l The weekly paper of the Napa Union High School is called the "NUHS". The letters NUHS stands for Napa Union High School and are pronounced news, thus having a douhle significance. The paper is put out Ly the Journalism class of the school, and has the customary literary, business, and managerial staffs. This paper has been gradually improved from the orginal mimeo- graphed edition to its present size, 10"xl4" with four columns. With the ten dollars appropriated monthly by the student lxody an-d the money oLtained from the advertisements, the edition is a financial success. The ads, however, take up a great deal of space, leaving the read- ing matter rather limited. In most of the up-to-date schools subscriptions are sold to the school paper with minimized prices for those holding ASB cards. The Journalism class is now forwarding a movement to do the same in Napa Union High with the hope that a larger five column "NUHS" may he published next year. A five column paper is much easier for the editor to make up as it enalrles him to use a greater variety of types in the heads, and it also allows room for ltoxes and lcanners, all of which make the paper much more attractive as well as more valuahle. The ads, if spread into five columns, will leave more room for the news which has, in the past, been considerably cut and has made it necessary to delete many important items. Since the "NUHS" is of most vital interest to the student lrody its pro- gress should lie conscientiously sponsored by every student in the A. S. B. fNineteen1 NAPANEE ,,- Al: .:--+- Y Arthur Tockey Nathan Coombs An annual is essentially a record. The point of discussion that is con- stantly confronting a publishing staff is this-how complete shall this re- cord be? A complete record tends to complexity and expense, while on the other hand, simplicity tends to economy and concise, e-flicient product. This year's edition of the Napanee has been published under the strictest economy. This action was not an experiment but a step in the same path that many successful student bodies have followed. The pub- lishing of an annual is always a staggering blow to the student body treasury, a goodly portion of the money collected from plays, games, dances etc., is generally alsorbed by the publication of the year book. This large amount generally running well over a thousand dollars could be used to purchase athletic equipment, school ground improvements and to relieve deficiencies in other student body departments. The weight of these facts gave birth to the discussion of aliolishing the Napanee. The student body, after much discussion concluded that the annual was an indispensible part of our school makeup and consented to condense and simplify it with the ob- ject of financial advantage. The staff has carried out the wish of the student body, and has here compiled an annual at half the financial outlay of pre- vious' years. The secondary importance of an annual is the knowledge that the students obtain through its process of publication. The educational value of a yearly publication is surpassed by the quarterly which allows four different staffs too to learn the process of publication each year. The publication of annuals or quarterlies gives the students inclined to litera- ture, a chance to express their ambitions. The opportunity to write for school publications incites the strdents to their maximum. In this way many successful journalists, novelists and poets have been developed. The fTwentyj NAPANEIE various editors of the departments of this edition of the Napanee have shown the enthusiasm and energy that is always necessary and vital to a successful project, There were many students whose enthusiasm prompted them to volunteer their services although they were not memlers of the staff. Among' those who ably and efliciently assisted were Mary Belle Pritchett, Ferril Nickle, William Corum and Lowell Edington. The students and the members of the faculty in the group were the regular rrievnliers ol' the staff. llll l'l'Wenty-onel NAPANE1: llliqum-in The Migwan had a very insignificant beginning last spring, when a few of the school's writers collected their best manuscripts, gaily attached their various noms des plumes and bravely mimeographed the pages. This first edition of the Migwan did not bring material proflt, in fact it was a loss financially, but this did not discourage the proud authors and author- esses for they well knew that the large majority of literary efforts go either into the hole or into the waste basket. The purpose of the Migwan in short, is to further literary interests and ability. There is nothing more encouraging to a young writer than to have his efforts printed. Just to be able to see his own eyes in dignified lines, with the small black letters standing forth on the shiny pages Cshiny pages because we can't afford dull onesj is an inspiration to any embyro author. Those on the staff of the first Migwan were Reva Decker, Dan Norton, Claudine Heflin, Hilary Helsley, Ruth Earp, Dorothy Hansen, and Robert Waldrop. According to the present plan there are four editions of the Migwan a year. The publication is put out by a staff which consists of an e-ditor-in- chief, business manager, fiction -editor, a non fiction editor, -dramatic editor, and a faculty advisor. The staff is chosen by faculty advisors from those students, in English, having most interest in literature and showing most ability in writing. The editor in Chief is elected by the staff and appoints the business managers and other editors from members of the staff. The duty of the various editors is to gather in that material, from the English classes, which is best suited for publication. The business managers are to take care of the finances while the editor-in-chief attends to the editing of the Migwan. The Migwan, in all probability, will in time take the place of the high school annual, the Napanee. As there are four Migwans to every Napanee there would be a chance for more students to get their efforts printed. It is the wish of the English Department that the Migwan become a vital pub- lication as it encourages writing that has some literary merit. Despite the fact of its obscure birth the Migwan is bringing innova- tion into every edition and with print and colors flying it may easily say "quarter by quarter in every way I'm getting better and better." fTwenty-twol f-f,,,1u nw ww f .61 rid., f ,,u:f1fi1I"' ' WI 'W , 1, 11117, -vw-,,1 4 -'f1An'5"' "+furf'5 Mui" f 'A' f f.f. . ----' ifU'f' MLM SW "'f11R3H3L I1 ulifwnvn X' lw"YW"a L' iff WM ff , ' :v5:fg:g:: fq2f-.f PM '. ! , km 41:1 xvq. , . . A ll!! I , Nl W ax.. HY-!.q,3JgP. ' ' H . xii, . , , . . 'fHL':h., I .4 r' 1, M. awww W bf-fs ,rgglfm Y? N" r i F, if LIME I F M, H j,jf V,.., 4.52 Mr! . . 'IM - HI: 1-unit. , !'I.l ' 'f " U,g, ' RQ HW 4 -+V J A ' f 4 9 + we 1 Q4 f wFFgMFfgWFF 5 AmWygwWM IH" -fn D :J wi ' - 1' X ww .- X L Nw 'f'!f'1 LI ES N !! 'A K w fzw' 1' '-1' QQ. ' . l', . 1'11'3',f'f Q Qt ' 1 5 YQ' R U,' 'Tl W W Y .Bn .af -'H A h 4 IM i 1f 'J I 1 , - ' " "7"'f I ' jim' , A'g'I1f, ',1.j'l -lfl' K Iwi' K J! 'l"' , U':lv1U.:::- ' D! Www W, WD W ff M f-'W V 4 11 ff 4 ' ' X j" Y V 'If , I Y 'I' 'I f IW J' ' 1 f 1 f zfffffri - - Z I 1 ' 1 GQYGIOIIE-Lava nzieiims zmh Qllnhg Qu ,, lf , ,I yy 12 E, w,1,,1mf- 1, .Ji ew! -:V .' ' 1 15' ' -1-.'J - I AJ ml ' I 'T 1 Au 4, su K L wo ff 1 ,- ,-a :Q .' ,, v -'X , V. H, , :El ' -F, 1. 1. I. Lg J ,. if .L li' ' -I 'L ,,A '. li' ,glvn-lk: ' r 111 '- V 51 ,Q ' n ,T .1 I ,iq wa ,5 '- ,'1. . . 4 1 A '? 2 ,IH Y' U45 ,l.,.. . .. U N F F5 I I mi li '91-B5 -:. --- -X, NAPANEE i l 'K This year the Napa Chapter of the National Honor Society, which had its beginning a year ago, started out with four members. These four, Walter Healy, Ralph Lui, Reva Decker and Martha Sawyer, had been given the added distinction of being elected in their Junior year. Toward the close of the fall semester eight members from the graduating class were taken in. These were Elaine Giauque, Bryant Fitch, Edith Owen, Arthur Tockey, Ruth Raeder, Hilary Helsley, Dorothy Hansen, and Ferril Nickle. The members of the society are guided in their daily life by the four cardinal principles, namely, Character, Scholarship, Leadership and Service. The purpose of the society is to create an enthusiasm for scholarship, to stimulate a desire to render service, to promote leadership and to develop character in the students of the high school. The following extract from the ritual brings out the ideals of the organization-The emblem of this society is the keystone and the flaming torch. The keystone bears at its base the letters S, L, C, and S, which stand for the four cardinal objectives. As the keystone is placed by the l uilder to hold the perfect arch in perpetual stability, so the structure of our education must be held firm and true to the purposes of life by the virtues represented in this symbol. Thus the keystone symbolizes the high ideals of this Society. The flaming torch is the emblem of our purpose. To ltear forward the searching light of truth, to lead that others may follow in the light, to keep lzurning in our school a high ambition for the enduring values of life, and to serve, these purposes are symbolized in the torch. These are the high ideals of this organization, which forms a nucleus of responsible pupils. It is the highest honor in the school and is some- thing to be worked for by every student. l'l'wenty-threel NAPANEE s The State Honor Society stands for the highest ideals oi' scholarship and character. To be 'a memlzer, a student must have an unusual scholar- ship record. This restricts the membership to a choice iew. Napa Chapter 119, of the California Scholarship Federation was oiii- cially installed on April 28, 1926. Ralph Lui was the first president. Under his guidance the new society took form and was well estal lished under the second president, Starr Northrop. Walter Healy was elected president in the fall term of 1926, by a group of fifteen meml ers. During the spring semester of 1927 there were thirty-two memlzers with Hilary Helsley as president. Members of this Society are entitled to Wear the pin of the local Chapter and permanent pins are awarded Seniors who have earned mem- lership for at least two-thirds of the high school period. In addition to the pin they have the California Scholarship Federation seal embossed up- on their diploma, permanent record, and their college recommendation. Last year three Seniors were awarded these permanent privileges. They were Frieda Fullert, Starr Northrop, and Charles Raeder. The two toys are attending Leland Stanford University and University of California, respectively. We hope that the present Senior class will add to our permanent roll of honor. fTwenty-fourj NAPANEE Up to the leginning oi' the school year C1926-19275, the Press Club had not Leen very active and interest in the club flagged somewhat. To stimulate this dying interest, a formal banquet :.t which Mrs. Vingie Roe Lawton, well known authoress spoke, was held. All contributors to the year's first edition of the "lVligwan" were invited and the affair was highly enjoyable. At that time, the club had but five members and it was apparent that the membership requirement of three articles published in the "Mig- wan" was too severe. With this in view, a meeting was held and a revision of the eligil ility qualifications was made to read as follows: To be eligible for membership in the Press Club, a student must ful- Iill one of the four following requirements: 1. He must have the editorship of the "NIEHS" or the "Napanee." 2. He must have held the associate editorship of the "NUHS" and have one article pul lished in the "Migwan". 3. He must have done exceptional work on the "NUHS". 4. He niust have had two articles published in the "Migwan." To become a member of the club, the unanimous consent of the mem- bers is necessary. The Press Club has not, as yet, achieved anything noteworthy beyond a good start, I ut it is hoped that by gradually increasing club activities year Ly year and by fostering the now-awakened and growing interest in thc literary field, that some day the Press Club will become an important factor in the life of Napa High. LTwenty-flvej NAPANEE l OFFICERS FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER Ralph Lui . .,............., ..,.. , ,.,.,.... . ,Driver ,.AA ..,,,. . . ,A ,...,,, ,, .Mlrving Manasse Irving Manasse .... .. ,,.,.AA. .,......... M idiron ,,,....,,,A..... .......,...... ...,..,.,...... J i m Raney Lowell Tate ,.,....,.,,. ....,, ..., 1 st Caddy .,......,.... ,.., ,....... C h arles Martin Irving Schwartz ..l. . . ........ .,..., 2 nd Caddy ......... ..,...,..A, . ...Philip Manasse Jim Raney .,..,... .,... ...., , , .,.i .,...,,....,,,,... L o st Ball ..,.,..,.........,... ,. ,...,. Hector MacLean George Strong ..... .,..,,..,..,.. ......,.. S emi-Pro. .....,........., ..........,.,,....... G eorge Strong The Plus lfore Society, started with the original attempt to foster the wearing of plus Iores among the boys or Napa Union High. Atter succeeding in a remarkably short time, the main purpose of the society snitted to some extent, and the sponsoring or goli Lecame its main obj ective. Having started with a group of ten boys, the present charter memleers, the society now has a total oi twenty-three enrolled, among whom is Mr. E. E. Crawford, the principal. The Five Mental Hazards, that is the initiating committee, Worked out an excellent initiatory system for the new corners. George A. Strong, the enthusiastic advisor, has been one of the main advocates ole the society. A handsomely engraved cup has been presented by the Society to he the perpetual trophy for the interclass golf championship winners. As the Napanee goes to press, the tournaments have not yet leen held so the winner cannot he announced. A committee working on the establishment of a three hole golf course. In a year or two this hope may 'ce realized. As evidenced by the Student liody, this organization is a permanent oneg and an excellent one. No where else can a group of toys get together and have a real good time--incidentally with faculty members as part of the crowd. fTwenty-sixj NAPANEE ef r fe p i . c i . 'l L we is. l nn. THE GIRLS' GLEE CLUB One of the most successful ClUl3S of the year was the Girls' Glee Club, '.l'I18 g1I'lS organized under the name "N.apanee Canaries" and chos.e as their orlicers the iollowing: 1-'resident ..,. ,......,..,.s,.... .....,..............,....................,...................,..........,. .,..... .... ....... ..... - ...,..., R ll t h K n 011 Vice-Presluellt .,........ .....,........... A atnerine Greco Secretary ..,..4.......... ................,.. R uth Raeder Pianist ..r.........,,,.,,,....,..,..,...........,.,,,..,........, .......,,.,...............,.,..,,,....,,.......,.................,,.,.,.. v vinifred Jones Director ....,........,.....,...,..........,,.............,...... .,...............,,,,....,........, ,...,.,., ...,. ,......,,. - .... - ..... M r s . Schalow The club met during activity period every Tuesday and Thursday and rriday of every other week. Mrs. bchalow has acted as advisor and instructor for the girls, and it is due to her capable leadership that the girls have made such a success or their various undertakings. On May 13th the Girls' and Boys' Glee Club presented a cantata "The Mound Builders" by Paul Bliss. The cantata has an Indian background and contains some very melodious selections. Although this cantata was not a finished product, it was presented in a manner which gives credit to the directors, Mrs. Schalow and Mr. Strong. The most important project that the girls undertook this year was their operetta, "The Ghosts of Hilo." Thisloperetta yvas for female voices only. The principal characters were: Princess Le-1-la-na ......,,.,....... ...., . ..,....,..,.. ...... ..... ,....... .,... . R u t h Knoll Ju-u-le-i ............. .... . .. .......... ...... .......... . . . ,....l...,........,. ..........,.,... H elen Shively Ma-i-le .......... ........... .... ...,........ ...... ............ ,...,.,...... .,......., E u g i n i a Rutherford Ke-a-lo-ha .,........... ...... .. .... ..,........,.....,.... ..... . v......,,.,, ....., .,.. . , A l ice Keig The setting is in a Hawaiian glen near Hilo. The stage was decorated in a profusion of Lranches. flowers, and flags. In the back was a scene representing a volcano. During the ghost dances flashes of lightning, roars of thunder, crashes, flashes! and inspiring music furnished by the orchestra gave a very uncanny creepy, atmosphere that was quite in keep- ing with the plot. The Girls' Glee Club has been of the good new things that we welcome. I:TWenty-sevenj NAPANEE THE BOYS' GLEE CLUB 1 OFFICERS President ...........,.. . ,,,...,. ...,... ..... ........ . ,.,..,. .............,. . , ,...,,,. ..,...,..,,,, H e c tor MacLean Vice-President .....,. ..,......., ....,,A.......A...........,.....,.,.. ..,...........,.........,. ..,..... J o e l Cofiield Manager ..,... ,...... .... . . . .........,........ ...... . .................. W ashington Mannering Pianist ....,,..... ....... ....,,,,.,. ..,... ...... ...,....,...,...........,, .4.,,..A.. T J o 1 ' o thy J aekle Director .......,..,....... .,,.,4,............... .,........,.... ..... .,............... .,.... ............, . ...,,.,,...,...,. G e o r g e A. Strong Rollicking through a most active year with an operetta, a cantata, and many public appearances, the Boys' Glee Club has reached a standard which completely overwhelms all previous musical attempts, and sets the pace for even a more extensive program for the future in Napa High. Mr. George A. Strong, the director, has developed many excellent singers among the basses, baritones, and first and second tenors. Still the chief appeal of the sixty-five boys has keen their ability to sing to- gether. "Double Crossed", an amusing and catchy operetta, was successfully staged liy the fellows accompanied by Jules Weyand's fifteen piece orchestra. Joeiry Morgan, the well-known educator and authority on music, saw the operetta and stated that the boys knew real music, and complimented Napa High for having such an excellent club. A cantata, "The Mound Builders", by Bliss was given on Music Week by the boys' and girls, glee clubs in collaboration. The music was real Indian melody, and ltoth clubs did full justice to the pieces. Appearing at the Kiwanis, Rotary, and P. T. A. clubs a number of times, and furnishing the solo music for the American Legion services on Memorial Day, the organiration has in its repertoire songs such as "The Tinker's Song" fRol in Hoodb, "The Toreador Song" fCarmenJ, "Song of the Armorern, "Shenandoah", and "Bells of St. Mary's". Napa High and the Boys' Glee Club owe much to the untiring efforts of George A. Strong, who has been the leader of many of the year's most successful musical productions. f'l'wenty-eightl NAPANEEI The High School Orchestra this year has again been doing very com- mendable work under the leadership of Mrs. Schalow. Starting with a group of music students who were for the most part entirely new to orchestra work, she has indeed demonstrated her ability to organize a very creditable organization. Our orchestra played for all the school Plays, for the Girl's operetta, "The Ghost of Hilo" and furnished all of the music for the fashion show. They are to play two numbers at the commencement exercises, one of these numbers being the "Triumphia1 March from Aida" by Verdi. One school period is devote-d to orchestra practice each day, and one half credit a year is given for orchestra, thus showing that the head of the school realize the importance of the study of music by the students. The personnel of the organization includes Lewis Patmont, Theodore Trietas, Ona Whitman, Violing Barbara Blanchard and Winifral Jones, piano, Stoner Beard flute, Lawrence Heston and Ferril Nickle, trumpetg Ruth Orth and Lloyd Bernhard, saxophone. One of the individual members of this orchestra won the honor of being first chair man in his section of the all State Orchestra, which was organized from the best individual performers of all the high school or- chestras of the State, which played for the state principal's convention at Sacramento. A distinction which was surely a credit to himself and to his school. Several of the other members are also very capable performers on their respective instruments. The repretoire is very large and varied, including overtures, marches, waltzes, some of the latest popular numbers, and three orchestra folios, consisting of works of well known composers. fTwenty-ninej NAPANEE' The Fish and Game Club was organized in Napa High School during the opportunity Period, Mr. Conners lteing the teacher. Mr. Baade, Mr. Ironmonger, and several others have taken an active interest in the Club and have stressed the conservation of the fish and game in their many talks. The wild life of this state cannot be increased by restrictive laws. Year after year prohibitive laws have been enacted with a steadily dimin- ishing supply of game and fish. Such silly legislation as classing quail as song Lirds speaks of the conservation of this state. Only two things are necessary to increase our wild lifeg the control of vermin and the establishment of game reserves, lroth private and state owned. The sooner our legislature and the public are convinced of this, the sooner our wild life will be l rought lack into aliundance. Restrictions are neccessary for one thing, to set a reasonable standard leyond which no self-respecting sportsman should go, and to restrain the ignorant and lawless. Restric- tions alone can save wild life from extermination. The Pheasants are insect destroyers. They are the farmer's friend. The rabbit is also a very helpful animal. More rabbit skins are used in the fur trade than in anything else. The pelicans too are useful birds. Grotesque fellows in appearance'-they are strong fliers and assidious fliers. A wonderful bird is the pelicang his lill holds more than his lfelly can. We can help to save the game ty learning to know the halcits of the wood creatures, and what is needed to maintain and increase their numls er. The true sportsman is he who gives his game a fair chance and kills only what he can use without waste. Such a man does not have to move on like the bonanza farmer after he has mined the soil. or like the wasteful lumlrerman who destroys the forest, lut he so hustands the wild crratures that he may hunt successfully over the same ground year after year. LThirty1 4:4 A-ll IJ 'fl' "FQ .Xu .,,. v. wx., Ni, nr "WL 5 'W '7:,l ,-gug, gg. M :gi 4-sy: N., . "QP 5 . 1' ' 'f' ":' 4,-an i:3,,iz,'L7!3.i -1-in. ff- 'oJ'4Q7w'5fgf.,,r 151525, 4 - hh- :: - fzigx Q., Bbw. J,-M14 Y a-.jf mg! 1,1 1 1 ,- . ,ELM wg," W.. 'f I A 'fl 5' ' -wi 'I I f. '4, A' A' .f"n- 1 ,L -.2 wig, nz.- .' J? f45a!..?Q3 ,Tb N, J:x5,gg'm ,V 3.514 wfjxsf. QQ' .INN 'hi ,. Mg, 'film K.: ,541 4q,.ng44'1"Q,',,.x Q.. , uilllgzirif 'iq' r ' "-.. "nl -9: w' Biflltiiv :fu 'ng ff-' M .11 .-. ,, L I v - 'll'-1"1 P 0'if'T , .-..,,'4-5' '-'Ja"f1'N Am ix ""'f3 .Vg-HRS., I r fi, Q.. ,. 1 KM., .,n . ,,- -VL.::?L7il ,gggxfli ,fifglfgjggy 1 is 111f.s'.Q'f2s. .1-Hagan. 'as g15.,wi-'gfkrff' 2' - ' "gi:-1J:5S42f1-f7,gjl:, 51. '!g,g5.g,,'gl5.n-x,4 'X -f I, -"El5'5Gi'5:'f--1' gy wi? fimi'-,,I,'Jiv'9' 'Ji M" :.afV:a?'4 "3 4. Q"'-fM-mw- .Af rf 7 - -g."f1':1g,a:P,L ',' J 1 -u53f,:.fL .jg ff: f e. 515553.11-L Z5,ir5:.'f, Y. ' X- ,gd 'f f 12 :Wi-M-91 " '13?ffgiff'1,4?'1' ffl-1 ,4 -JM,-.:,m J, ,:.g,n:,gHfJ:..I:Af ,ak Emi? 321,75-:LL"v,Pf115'. .,n,,:,,-- JS..-nfgibfy, ,51a5g:.1?-:Wg .7 G... ,gf iq. .R Eg.. 'I ,.:g:',,a,.Eg,l Mi, A J., ,Ae .bf 1 ..,y,5 mgf z, ,-1115.-49,553.5 " "Qf!9,!g,, W Q, ' ,,,,44qgu- f:Lu:3:f:F11?,-5141 ' nga ' ff Q fi '5l6Z3ff?"i:?'1?.4. Q.. ,,-l1,::.':dbal4' GQ, gl1.:sfg9a'rI353f,,r4 1,913 .?,n1:,L,,fD -5 1.43. qff, vw .J Q -.Q1?',,i-grid? li :"":l1,"v:x 1611 QV - JFv.3f:.Q,gfT'm.1 4 X A 2, " Ii- v..L.:.,' 1 'I 4. '.:' ..,g4 -f A-2' Y -- ' "1i9"".2- L ah -IfJi'3'f'fgf"f Z X, K i- ., '..5.:e-,-,-51:4 M.. lem ,gh 6.15. lk, W V 3 ',pg.Q'3:,E, -'ffm''.Q..'f,:.3q1.eg..:,7'f-551'f - 1 ' A1 PAL- ...,L.,+E1gfgg5"J1f,,:.1q.iglniifggrlqia-- A . . . . -9-iiimw'-5Af:.'14Is.-1.155151' 'f wEf.i55'I:-gg:igLs"i'l5gigi:Q.gi,.,,, p:.-U-i if fx F R ny, 1qg.,-,.f.35g?, N' 3 X n L: 5"'5'?-ii:.2f'1'Zi'1F5tl"-- V' T75 , 1 1 W.: 5' 'NF X L.""Lv-Q"-'g-5:14-1f.'A I' .,, Aft, 'I fl A k 5 5AE:'i::1x::E,l,f:EEGIF' A" ., ""'J"f-. fX W' 1X , g,-'T 'I 3155: "V ""-.' f 'gj J , t 1. H f S" 2 -H-1's?:u:f-isalieg, "-.L , " 7 '-ff' '. ,z:ffga!9?!5iE'T:J9 , fm ,N A, f,, 0, wrff'f!?q:5.L,.gl ' ' N N 'f ' I 14' 'ff' " "f' ,:.-"" 1 Mau X N '-, ,Ill Ai ,lib 74- . 1' . ,, ,f If X ,v ' 1 I 'W' Z nl- WJ' h Ih- ' Q1 1 I N -v 3 ff I - .Ml I 8- 712 Itgrarg J 4,14 - ,rf FTA., -. :Eel ,- , ,,, X ...In -.,, .w". ,Jr L 1 I uf' j Q' V' ,A -5. V+-1 Ar: ,-.., 1 ,. ,H , , ,5, 5 n H, ,..-i- jjj?-xiii' 1 f .,r via. NAPANEE The CroSsf'Roads Hoot, you sons of Hecate! Hoot! Follow meg jeer. I am beyond your imprccations now. Sinister eyes, yellow glcams from that abyssmal dark- ness. All gone! A protegee of Bacchus Lids you farewell. There is no hell. Where am I? Hades, out of Vulcan's furnace into a worse evil! More evil, because I know not what it may contain. All is dark and unfamiliar. Come back you curs! Do your worse, but leave me here not alone. Not a sound. The Fates have left me. My late pursuers sneak off with their tails dragging in the dust. Dust! I go hack to the dust. My sins! And I was prepared to die. What do I hear? Groans, sighs to the left. Oh, Lord, a darkened cavern. From whence comes those shriekes of agony? To the right, there stretches a smooth path. Music there. The Elysian fields, and not for such as I. I follow my destiny at these cross-roads. Tantalus, here comes a worthy comrade. I plunge into the downward passage. Eyrs-eyes glowering in that nothing yonder. Hatred surges from them. Those whom I have injured, they accuse me. Who comes from out their midst? Raymond! The l onds I stole You suffered for it? Ah no, you died. Lookat me now! I slink down another flight. What is this I hear? Mother, mother dear, what have I done? I killed my mother. Died in the poorhouse, I am told. Oh mother- I see scorn in her face. Away, away! Her head droopsg she fades away. Come tack, mother! - - Another flight I descend. Who speaks? Danes! I know what you think of me. A cad, oh, yes, a cur, a damned wanton Feast. Political ambitions. You always spurned those desires, foul selfish wants. Don't point that accusing finger at me. Your brow furrows. lrut I know you are not furious, you pity me. You were too damned honest. You had to go. Why, man, you were hindering my plans, do you realize it? Behind me, Danes, your misfortune is not on my shoulders. I shudder. It lerconees cold. I am on a darkened street. Rain. Where have I seen this lefore? Where Betty and I ------ there she comes. I will hide. Where? To the right, no hereg no th - - - she sees me. It is too late. fThirty-onej NAPANEE Dearest Betty - - her stare - - - glass. Eyes, oh, stars, pierce my conscience. But I have no conscience. It is gone like the world, like my chances at the cross-roa-ds. I plunged down. Too late. Memories taunt me, haunt me! So this is hell! Bring on your devils, Old Nick. I'm a match for you. Ask them - - Betty, Danes, Raymond, all of them. Torment incarnate! Because of the cross-roads. Why don't more come? There are plenty. Make the party merrier. Ah, my wish is answered. Cries, screams, children, hundreds of them. From where do they come? Oh, the sweat shops. What are they cursing akout? Didn't I pay them? Didn't I make it possible for their miseralcle carcasses to exist longer? Of course I made money. That is what I was in the proposition for--money. You sound like Danes. Oh, here you are again, my boy. What? The dam? Too bad it broke. Lost a cool million on that deal. I certainly was mistaken when I thought poor cement would hold out. Yes, I guess a few did die when it broke. Are they the ones? Thousands of them. More than I thought there were. Still I did them a good turn. Think of all the hardships they were having. That white- haired chap, they tell me, was sweating to support eight adopted kids. Think of it. Kids. How I hate them. Squally creatures. Begone, you howling muck! I am alone once more. The downward flights are Lecoming steeper, steeper. Wind! From whence that dismal throb? Bats? Droves of them. They come, they buss, hum. Torment. Iniquitous L-rutes. Swarms of them. Misappropriations - bribes - franchise - dupes - cheates- screetches my sins! I cannot hold them, I cannot bear them longer. Those damned teasts forget nothing. Suicides. Murders, Danes would call them. The jury called the last one a murder. I was caught. The chair- serious faced. men put on the straps. Poor Morons, they never lived. Foolish of me, though, to have keen caught. Hooker would give the real testimony. He still lives. I'll wager he is calling me a poor fool. Curses upon him. What's that? Roaring. An ominous still. I am at the bottom of the steps. A throbbing, hollow whoom. Darkness. But what is that darker mass? It moves slowly this way. Slowly. What is it? God-no, He cannot ke here. It is here. It comes! Upon me! Oh, vain egotistical men to defy the All Mighty, to wilfully take the downward path at the cross-roads! Why did I not act differently? Why-why? Oh, God! Ralph Lui. fThirty-twoj N A P A N E E Ji Consideration of Life and Death All aL.out, in visible forms we may see Life tending to aid Death, and thusly Winning to the success of Its planned routine. ln all material things, Moving or immovable, Animate or inanimate, we may see 'lhese great and illy-understood Forces at work. Ever and anon Building up, tearing down, tearing down, 1-Suilding up, in rythmic succession. The plant and tree, and animal Surrender to Death and in such manner forward The greater and more perfect development Of that which is to follow In their stead. So, also, it is in the thoughts And philosophies of men. The germinal idea, minute and remote Is conceived,- A mere fancy. Then another thought is linked Within the first, strengthening the iirst And, by its .adherence The framework is begun Thus by new thoughts, new facts Brought into tranquil conjunction, The abstract thought Becomes a philosophy, Swaying the fortune-s and minds of mankind, Ever strengthening, ever growing more irrefutable. Newer and more progressive concepts are built On the construction assemkled 'Round the first, and thusly Are the great philosophies of the world Conceived and made whole. So do philosophies live and renew, Growing more powerful while -days, Years, decades, and centuries vanish Into the vast eternity of Time, And the insignificant lgasic facts are forgotten. In the startling inspirations Of the new and more new. In such a manner are great thoughts built On the varied dusts of other men's minds, As kings luilt far-feared names On the spilled blood of a servile people. Life is a greater force than Death, For Death is but the slight interruption Of an undying Symphonyg The symphony of Life Unconquerable, Of which Death is an integrate part, And the pause in the Theme And makes its further course More majestic. Theodore Freitas fThirty-three'j .N A P A N E E The Hidden Door Scene-Palestine, in the tomb of Alraham. The tomb is a cave in side of a cliH. The walls of the room are hung with old tapestries. In the lack is an old Mohammedan shrine. There is a series of stone steps on the right leading down to the cave. Time ........,.......,. .......,...... .... . . . The Present CHARACTERS Priest-Arsl-Shiek-Protectors of the tomb of Abraham. Young-Hammermill-English explorers. Priest enters and goes to the altar, lights candles and goes altout other duties-Enter Shiek-Priest turns quickly, startled. Utters a curse in an undertone. Priest: "I thought you were the infidel Englishmen, who are coming today. Are they yet in sight?" Shiek: "They are in sight, but are still at some -distance on the road." Priest. Cturns to altarj : "A thousand curses on them! Father Abraham, may they never reach the most sacred place alive. If they do, well, they shall not leave!" Shiek: "What do you mean by that ?" Priest: "You are young and have seen many horrible things, but I will show you something that will make your blood run cold. CLeads hshiek to wall at tack of cave-works stone out of Wally Qpausesj "And now that the door is open-see that dull glow? That is the golden death!" Shiek: Cstartsl : "Ah-Their hard-but could not think-" Priest: "You will see. This chamber is a veritable hall--every form of a horrible death links there. To reach Father Al.raham's tomb, one must pass through this chamber." Shiek: "Is there no way to get through this alive ?" Priest: "No! QShuts door and slides stone tack in place! Well, what do you think of that ?" QMumbles under breath and ruks hands.J Shiek: "Hold! What was that?" Priest: "Nothing!. Nothing !" Shiek: "But I heard something." Priest: "Perhaps, my friend-think you now the cursed Arulrilivers will ever find this tomb again, after what you-" Arsl frushes in! : "The English dogs are here !" Priest: "It is Allah's wish. Praise be to Allah." fThey fade into background! Enter Englishmen Young: "I've never told you, old chap, why I particularly wanted to come back to this out-of-the way place, have I?" Hammermill: "No, you haven't been too communicative." fThirty-fourfl NAPANEE Young: "I'll confess I've wondered, since you were here once. On the first trip, as I was going over this place, I noticed a peculiar hanging. 1 lifted it to see the weave and design more closely, and there beneath it- 1 was warned by the dirty hcathens to keep off, but I marked it as best l could, and then left. They have probably hidden it better now, though." Priest iapproaches from behindj : "Dogs of Englishmen-what seek ye at this most holy of holy shrines ?" Yound lturns quicklyj : "Think twice before you speak in that man- ner to your superiors. flgnores himj And now, Hammermill, let's find that door." fEng1ishmen hunt about while Arabs converse in low tonesl Hammermill: "Some of these tapestries would go well in our homes eh, Young ?" Young: "Even better in a Museum." lThey rose aboutl Young ftriumph in his voicej: "Oh, here's the mark, but where's the door?" Hamm-ermill fRushes over and examines placejz "There's the mark, all right, I. ut you must have been crazy if you ever saw a door in that wall." Young Ctaps on walll : "Sounds hollow to me. Cpausesh Wait, this rock is loose-ah, it comes out!" fPulls out stonej Priest Crushes over to walll "ln the name of Allah do not touch that wall I" Young Keyes flashingjz "More interference! Remember this is British territory." Hammermill: "Watch your step, Young." Young: "Haw! I've come to see What's behind the door. Do you think I am going to let this lunatic stop me '?" Hammermill: "I don't like his attitude, so be careful." Young: "Don't Worry about him, we have our revolvers yet." Hammermill: "All right, but be careful." fThey open the door and enter very cautiouslyj Young: "Ho, what is that gleaming? I say, this is getting inter- esting." Priest: "It is Allah's wish that they die. Praise be to Allah." fThe Shiek and Arab jump forward, at a motion from the priest, and close the door on the Englishmenj fSilence for an instant and then a hundred evil soundsj Priest Crul s hands and mutters Arabian prayersjz "Ha, Ha, The snakes and scorpions will eat well of dog fiesh, tonight." CA voice is heard calling to Prayers! To Prayers! The Priest, Shiek, and Arab bow three times toward the east and Meccaj. Curtain William Rogers Edward Schulze. fThirty-fivel NAPANEE The senior play "Mud" by Katherine Browning Miller given on Saturday, December Fourth and coached by one of the senior advisors, Miss Dorothy CoomLs, was the first play of the year, and was judged a decided success. Dorothy Jaekle as the feminist and Joel Coflield as the perpetual student starred. Elaine Giauque, Jacqueline Brentt, Nathan Coomlus, Payson Clark, Hector MacLean, and Irving Schwartz gave ade- quate support. "Applesauce" was presented by the Junior Class of '28 on April Sth. The play, in itself, was one of the best comedies ever to lge presented in the High School auditorium. Interpreted by a capable amateur cast, the production showed remarkable finish. fThirty-sixl l Qstlyleiirs A f J -J., UW 5., Eh 1 if ' r" ' ,, yr-.ue ",'fG'jI- V 'asian-1 "J if-iv W, ',X. .tiff iw? 4-' 1, L1 .-W. ' ,g.,.,,, , , IM r qv I if .l'?'5T'7' ,,., wx 'E-:f 1,4 .YY ,1 J 5. ui I' .,-, ,, -1 111' 'lm MQ ,. 4 - e I 5, w 1 1, f X ' 4 I - ' , uuff ' ,j-..,-1,,,2L,,., .?,,.'FfIL J P I 4:-'PII' :QV Ml ' : 1 :pf 42+ Q'.lW"i aff" 1L'iia'5J',..-nf" . Lab! w 'ul H4 wx' ,.4 1 5 I ,"'1 " -1-413 NAPANEE A f --1 Footlall prospects did not look very lright when the first call for practice was issued. Out of seventeen men who received Block N's the year lefore, only five turned out this year, and two of these were to lie lost l efore the season was over, due to the age limit. To much praise cannot lie given Coach Johnson, for the team he turned out with so little matcrial. The tcam won ten consecutive games lefore going down to def eat, lefore the powerful Berkeley Eleven, for the championship of Division A, North Coast Section of the C. I. F. After winning the North Bay Section, and defeating Eureka for the semi-finals of division A. The team ran up 266 points to their opponents 52, only three teams xfere algle to cross their goal line. The following men won their letters: Ends-Vienop, Donaldson, Guidotti. Tackles-Hein, Healy, Fitzgerald. Guards-Mannering, McDowell, Gould, Foskett. Center-Buehler, Captain. Half hack-Hall, Manasse, Haney, Coflield. Full back-West, Vallerga. Napa 14-Berkeley Reservcs 0 In the flrst game of the season, Napa met and defeated the Berkeley Reserves on the local gridiron, ljv a score of 14-O. The playing' was ragged on lioth sides due to the inexperience of the men. Napa 6-Modesto 0 Napa defeated the strong' Modesto Eleven 6 to O at Nami. This was a hard game, and proved to Coach Johnson that his Wen had the necessary fight. The score came in the third period as the result of a thirty-five yard pass from Coffield to Vienop. f'l'hirty-scvenj NAPANEE - Napa 54-Analy 0 Napa met and defeated Analy 54 to U at our field. Napa showed a powerful offensive in this game. With Healy, Mannering and Coffield showing to a good advantage. Napa 7-Vallejo 0 Napa defeated the. highly touted Vallejo Eleven on Tobin Field, by a score of 7 to 0. Vallejo had a team of veterans, and figured to make a bid for the State Championship. The score came in the first period as the result of a fumble by Vallejo, on their twenty yard line. After working the ball down to the three yard line where West plunged over for a score. Coffield converted. Coffield played the best game of his career, consistently gaining ground, and playing a wonderful game. Don West was not far behind Uoliield's. With Buehler, Healy and Mannering upholding the honors in the line. Napa 70-St. Helena 0 This was a poorly played and uninteresting game. The St. Helena team going to pieces. In the last half Joel Coflield was put in and told to run wild, which he surely did, finishing his colorful career in a blaze of glory. Renard Farrar played a great game at quarter. Napa 30-San Rafael 0 Again Napa s superiority was shown, when they met and defeated pan ltaiael 50 to U on the local nerd. nail and ltaney were consistent ground gamers with captain bllehlel' and nealy playing Well in trle 11119, wlllle uullalusoll played Well at end. .l1l1S was Vvicilll .l.163.1y s last game although not known at the time. 1.116 1U1lUW111g when Sblablii sci. ill, aim lie Was but 1.118 1'eSt U1 LHB SeuSOI1. lv Eat-P21 1.3-1.'f:l'l1kL1l.4l112i. LZ nor the lirst time this season lwapas goal line was crossed, when retalullla scored twice, mainly by passes. Dlll riuenler was tne only one who ledlly played Well. ne picked up a lllllflble in the nrst quarter and ran tlllrty ybl,I'US to a touch down. Napa 26-Tamalpias 0 After their almost defeat by Petaluma, Napa got down to work and started to play foot tall. They met an-d defeated Tamalpias by a score of Z6 to 0 on our field. Manasse, Hall and Farrar started in the backfield, with klein and Mannering showing up well in the line. Napa 27-Santa Rosa 0 Napa won the North Bay Section by defeating Santa Rosa 27 to 0, on Armistice Day at Santa Rosa. Haney, Vallerga and West, starred with Captain Buehler, Vienop and Mannering playing their usual consistent game. Napa 13-Eureka 7 Napa journeyed to Eureka and administered a 13 to 7 defeat to the heavy Eureka team, on a wet, slow field. West was the whole show in the lcackfield, with Mannering, Vienop and McDowell breaking through, and throwing the Eureka backs for losses, time after time. Napa 0-Berkeley 33 Berkeley defeated Napa by a score of 33 to 0, for their first and only defeat of the year. The field was muddy and slow, which was a disadvantage to Napa's light fast team. The Berkeley team av-eraged twenty pounds to the man more than Napa. The line was opened time after time by the powerful machine Berkeley showed. Although Napa lost, the fellows gave every lrit they had as they did at Vallejo and again at Eureka. Captain Buehler, West, Raney and Gould played good ball for Napa. LThirty-eightj NAPANEE Napa High was defeated in the first game of the season by Mission Hign with a Zu to 66 score. 1'k1I'I'2LI' and Swanson starred. Napas second defeat was administered Ly Roosevelt with a score of 1:1-54. rarrar starred. The second game with Mission also resulted in a defeat for Napa, by a zz-Z4 score. Ned Kay's Hayward five defeated Napa 16-18 in a close and exciting game. Napa won the first league game from Calistoga by a 33-11 score. Mac- Dermott starred. Sonoma was aLle to offer Napa little resistence, Napa winning 24-6. lianey and Buehler starred. Napa was unable to hit their stride with Vallejo, and when the final whistle blew, Vallejo was on the long end of a 11-19 score. West starred. Napa was defeated by St. Helena in the last game of the season by an 18-17 score. Napa did not have a too successful season this year due to green material. Coach Johnson did not have a single letter man to work with from last year's team. Napa was a first half teamg at the half of almost every game, we were ahead Lut did not have the stamina to show the right fight the last half. Coach Johnson is looking forward to a successful season next year, as only four letter men are graduating. Forwards-Capt. Farrar, F. MacDermott, H. Fitzgerald, C. Swanson. Center-W. Buehler. Guards-D. West, J. Haney. fThirty-ninej NAPANEE 1 Napa lost the first game of the season to Mission High by a score of 11-12. P. Manasse played good ball. The second game went to Roosevelt by a 11-13 score. K. Hall and P. Manasse starred. Napa also lost to Mission High in her second contest. bm three minutes extra had to be played, as the score was tied at the end of the flth quarter. Displaying the best form they showed all season, Napa took the Hay- ward five into camp, by an 18-16 score. E. Hall starred for Napa. Napa won her first league game by a 31-11 score. I. Manasse did the heavy work for Napa. Sonoma was victorious over Napa in the second league game by the close score of 11-12. Playing the worst brand of ball we had been guilty of all season, Napa went down to defeat befone Vallejo, by a 5-10 score. Knoll played good ball for Napa. This was the easiest game of the year for Napa, when We trounced St. Helena 25- 3. Kenworthy starred, with E. and K. Hall playing good ball. , Thle Class B's were little more successful than the A's, winning three games and losing five. Coach Johnson was also short on veteran material here, having only Kenny and Everett Hall from last year's team. Coach Johnson also looks for a good team in this class next year, Knoll and E. Hall are the only members graduating. The following men won their letters: Forwards-E. Hall, C. Martin, I. Manasse. Center-C. Knoll. Guards-Capt. K. Hall, P. Manasse, V. Raneri. fForty1 NAPANEE ,-T , - -- - Not much interest was shown in class A track this season, but the C's, were very successful, winning every meet We entered, including the North Bay section of the C. 1. F. comprising eleven schools. The team was made up of just four men, Irving, and Phillip Manasseg Everett and Kenny Hall. Phil Manasse was the star of the team making most of the points. The miemloers of the team should lze a big help to the Class A team next year, as E. Hall is the only one graduating. All four received their numerals. fForty-onel NAPANEE I Margery McCormick Miss Bneck Alice Shaw 'the girls have accomplished a great deal in the line of athletics, in the last two years,, under the able direction of their athletic instructor Miss Gladys Beck. Those interested in any phase of athletics were or- ganized under the title of "Girls Athletic Association" with a Council composed of ten officers-President, Vice-President, Secretary, Treasurer, Basketball Manager, Volley Ball Manager, Track Manager, Baseball Man- ager, Hiking Manager, and News Reporter. Miss Beck acts as their ad- visor. . The most important event of their first year 119261 was the Play Day, given in May, on the Napa High School track and field. There were three high schools participating, Vallejo, Fairfield, and Napa. There were Vol- leyball and Baselall games, and a lively track meet ended the day., . On this same day, a beautiful May Day Fete was staged on the lawn in front of the high school. Miss Ruth Earp was the charming May Queen, crowned by John Brown. A court of lovely girls in bright coloned dresses followed her. There were several dances, ending up with a lovely May Pole dance. The graceful girls on the green lawn was a very pleasing spectacle to the many on-lookers. The high school orchestra played for the dances, and Miss Beck proved to be a splendid dancing teacher as well as athletic instructor. The G. A. A. holds its regular club meetings during activity periods, on every other Friday. The Council, meeting for the purpose of arrange- ing the business to be brought up before the Q2-. A. A. as a Whole, is held the Thursday before. Q The first sport in the year is volley ball. Many girls turn out and class teams are chosen. They play for the championship of the school and num- erals are awarded to the champions. Then an honor team is chosen com- posed of the best players of all the teams. The same is done with the others: Basketball, Base ball and track. IfForty-threefl NAPANEE A silver cup, given to the Girls' Athletic Association by the Business and Professional Wonien's Club ot' Napa, is awarded each year to the class gaining the greatest numl er of points throughout the school year. Four points are given to the class coming first in volley ltall, basketball, base- ball and track. Three points go to the one coming second, two to the one coming third, and one to the one coming fourth. These points are added at the end of the year, and the name of the winning class is engraved on the cup. Letters are awarded to the individuals acquiring a certain number of points by making class teams, honor teams, hiking and decathalon tests. Ten points are awarded for making a class team, five for making an honor team, ten for taking five 5 mile hikes, ten for making at least 900 points in decathalon tests. A sum of 70 points is required for this letter. This is by no means an easy task, and only those intensely interested, and will- ing to Work hard are al-le to acquire them. At the end of the year, a G. A. A. Banquet is held, and letters, and numerals are awarded, and the cup for inter-class sport contests are award- ed to the winning class. There is dancing, and the girls always enjoy these affairs very much. Next Play Day is to be held at Vallejo, and we know that Napa will make an excellent showing. You see, girl's athletics have really become organized and we expect even better things from them next year. l l i fhortj'-fourj NAPANEE The Girl's Basket Ball Team, captained by Alice Shaw and coached Ly Miss Beck, turned out to le the pride of the whole school this year. And indeed, it should l1e. For the first time in the history of the Girls' Basket Ball Team, our girls came home with the honors every time, win- ning each game played during the season. Team work and clever passing were notalzle qualities of the team, and the scoring alility of the forwards was remarkable. The first game was played with Calistoga, on January 13, and they started the season off with a lang, winning lay a score of 33 to 7. Next, Vallejo was played on January 25, and the game resulted in a victory for Napa, at a score of 22 to 7. bt. nelena was met on February 2, and Napa came out on the long end of the score, with 19 points to St. Helena's 3. On Fekruary 8, they met Armijo, fFairfieldJ,and walked oil' with the l iggest score again, with 23 points to Armijo's 1.3. A return game was played with each of the teams mentioned, except St. Helena. The girls left the floor victorious in each case, scoring a total of 201 points to their opponents' 82. This excellent rfccrd goes down in the annals of the school as a very noteworthy one, and it is hoped that next year, the girls will le as success- ful. l'Forty-fivel NAPANEIE Many peppy and enthusiastic girls turned out for volley ball this season, and Coach Gladys beck found much good material to work with. The nets were strung up in the gym, and the girls gave their volley b,alls a merry chase, back and forth across them. Class teams were picked after a week or so of practice, then they started in in earnest. More and more skill was attained by each team, and when it came time to play oif the inter-class games, stiff competition was obvious. The games started on November 8, lasting until November 18, when the championship was announced. Three games were played with each team, and the one victorious in two games out of three, were winners. On November 8, the Juniors and Seniors played, the Juniors winning with a score of 14-21, 21-14 21-14. November 10, games were played between the frosh and sophs, the Sophs winning with scores of 21-16, 16-21, 8-21. On November 12, the Frosh and Juniors clashed. The Juniors came out victorious this time, winning with score of 21-18, 5-21, 10-21. On November 15, the Sophs and Seniors met, the games resulting in a victory for the Sophs with scores of 21-19, 21-16. On Novemler 17, the Frosh and Seniors met, and the Seniors defeated the Frosh, with scores of 8-21, 16-21. On November 18, the Sophs and Juniors met in their mighty battle lForty-sixl NAPANEIE for first place. The Sophs whipped the Juniors with scores of 21-18, 21-16, making them champions. This meant four points toward the cup. The close of the Season was celebrated by a splendid G. A. A. Matinee Dance in the gymnasium, on November 22, and the honor team seen in the preceeding picture, was announced. CLASS TEAMS ' Seniors-Ruth Raeder, Captain, Edith Owen, Claudine Hefiin, Dorothy Jaekle, Mildred Korf, Mary McMillan, Mariam Smythe, Velma Edington, Sub. Juniors-Gladys Downing, Captain, Ardis Binninger, Jean Crawford, Gene- vieve Frommelt, Virginia Maxwell, Marjorie McCormick, Mable Park, and Marjorie Hearn, sub. Sophomores-Jean Cochrane, Captain, Ruth Jaekle, Jacqueline Bishop, Madeline Kerri, Evelyn Peat, Ethel Struve, Eleanor Zimmerman, Thelma Stockton, and Lorraine Strohl, sub. Freshmen-Ruth Winfrey, Captain, Isabel Zimmerman, Clara Kuhn, Gene- vieve Martini, Eugenia Rutherford, Peggy Sheflield, Virginia Stewart, Bertha Thompson, and Isalcel Zimmerman, sub. LForty -sevenj NAPANEEI ,Yr l Basketball seemed to Le the favorite sport, and many good players turned out, making it very difficult to choose class teams. When they were finally chosen, conscientious practice was carried on for a week or two, then the inter-class championship struggle liegan. On the afternoon of April 4, the Sophs played the Frosh, and the Juniors playol the Seniors. The Sophs heat Frosh with a score of 11-6, and the Seniors won from the Juniors at a score of 14-6. On April 6, the Seniors and F rosh played, and the Juniors and Sophs, The Seniors defeated the Frosh at a score of 20-4 and the Juniors defeated the Sophs with a score of 21-6. On April 7, the Frosh and Juniors met, and the Seniors and Sophs played. The Juniors and Freshmen ended up with a tie of 7-7 and the Seniors beat the Sophs by a score of 20-5. This made the Seniors champs, giving them 4 points toward the cup. The Juniors took second place, the Sophs, third, and the Frosh, fourth, giving them 3, 2, and 1 points respec- tively, toward the cup. CLASS TEAMS Seniors-Miriam Smythe, Captain, Edith Owen, Edith Holland, Claudine Heflin, Mildred Johannsen, Dorothy Jaekle, Velma Edington, and Creta Newton. Juniors-Malrel Park, Captaing J uanice Welll orn. Anna Siiith, Gene- vieve Frommelt, Margaret Maxwell, and Janet Gillies. Sophomores-Eunice Beck, Captain, Ruth Jaekle, Marian Gillies, Evelyn Peat, Jean Cochrane, Jacqueline Bishop, Lavelle Imrie, and Jennie Bonaquiso. Freshmen-Adaline Reese, Captain, Minnie Edington, Peggy Sheflield, Ruth Winfrey, Olive Grigsliy, Virginia Stewart, and Geraldine Tepner. fF01-ty-eightj NAPANEFJ The Girl's Basket Ball Team, captained by Alice Shaw and coached Ly Miss Beck, turned out to Le the pride of the whole school this year. And indeed, it should lqe. For the first time in the history of the Girls' Basket Ball Team, our girls came home with the honors every time, win- ning each game played during the season. Team work and clever passing were notable qualities of the team, and the scoring aljility of the forwards was remarkakle. The first game was played with Calistoga, on January 13, and they started the season off with a lang, winning lay a score of 33 to 7. Next, Vallejo was played on January 25, and the game resulted in a victory for Napa, at a score of 22 to 7. St. uelena was met on Fehruary 2, and Napa came out on the long end of the score, with 19 points to St. Helena's 3. On Feleruary 8, they met Armijo, CFairfieldJ,and walked off with the l iggest score again, with 23 points to Armijo's 13. A return game was played with each of the teams mentioned, except St. Helena. The girls left the floor victorious in each case, scoring a total of 201 points to their opponents' 82. This excellent reccrd goes down in the annals of the school as a very noteworthy one, and it is hoped that next year, the girls will be as success- ful. fForty-fivel NAPANEE 1 .:-ff Many peppy and enthusiastic girls turned out for volley ball this season, and Coach Gladys Beck found much good material to work with. The nets were strung up in the gym, and the girls gave their volley balls a merry chase, back and torth across them. Class teams were picked after a week or so of practice, then they started in in earnest. More and more skill was attained by each team, and when it came time to play off the inter-class games, stiff competition was obvious. The games started on November 8, lasting until November 18, when the championship was announced. Three games were played with each team, and the one victorious in two games out of three, were winners. On November 8, the Juniors and Seniors played, the Juniors winning with a score of 14-21, 21-14 21-14. November 10, games were played between the frosh and sophs, the Sophs winning with scores of 21-16, 16-21, 8-21. On November 12, the Frosh and Juniors clashed. The Juniors came out victorious this time, winning with score of 21-18, 5-21, 10-21. On November 15, the Sophs and Seniors met, the games resulting in a victory for the Sophs with scores of 21-19, 21-16. On Novemlter 17, the Frosh and Seniors met, and the Seniors defeated the Frosh, with scores of 8-21, 16-21. On November 18, the Sophs and Juniors met in their mighty battle fForty-sixl NAPANEE for first place. The Sophs whipped the'Juniors with scores of 21-18, 21-16, making them champions. This meant four points toward the cup. The close of the Season was celebrated by a splendid G. A. A. Matinee Dance in the gymnasium, on November 22, and the honor team seen in the preceeding picture, was announced. CLASS TEAMS Seniors-Ruth Raeder, Captain, Edith Owen, Claudine Heflin, Dorothy Jaekle, Mildred Korf, Mary McMillan, Mariam Smythe, Velma Edington, Sub. J uniors-Gladys Downing, Captain, Ardis Binninger, Jean Crawford, Gene- vieve Frommelt, Virginia Maxwell, Marjorie McCormick, Mable Park, and Marjorie Hearn, sub. I l Sophomores-Jean Cochrane, Captain, Ruth Jaekle, Jacqueline Bishop, Madeline Kerri, Evelyn Peat, Ethel Struve, Eleanor Zimmerman, Thelma Stockton, and Lorraine Strohl, sub. Freshmen-Ruth Winfrey, Captain, Isabel Zimmerman, Clara Kuhn, Gene- vieve Martini, Eugenia Rutherford, Peggy Sheffield, Virginia Stewart, Bertha Thompson, and Isak el Zimmerman, sub. W LForty -sevenj l NAPANFFI l Basketball seemed to Le the favorite sport, and many good players turned out, making it very diiiicult to choose class teams. When they were finally chosen, conscientious practice was carried on for a week or two, then the inter-class championship struggle Legan. On the afternoon of April 4, the Sophs played the Frosh, and the Juniors playul the Seniors. The Sophs beat Frosh with a score of 11-6, and the Seniors won from the Juniors at a score of 14-6. On April 6, the Seniors and Frosh played, and the Juniors and Sophs, The Seniors defeated the Frosh at a score of 20-4 and the Juniors defeated the Sophs with a score of 21-6. On April 7, the Frosh and Juniors met, and the Seniors and Sophs played. The Juniors and Freshmen ended up with a tie of 7-7 and the Seniors beat the Sophs by a score of 20-5. This made the Seniors champs, giving them 4 points toward the cup. The Juniors took second place, the Sophs, third, and the Frosh, fourth, giving them 3, 2, and 1 points respec- tively, toward the cup. CLASS TEAMS Seniors-Miriam Smythe, Captain, Edith Owen, Edith Holland, Claudine Heflin, Mildred Johannsen, Dorothy Jaekle, Velma Edington, and Creta Newton. Juniors-Malel Park, Captaing Juanice Welll orn. Anne. Smith, Gene- vieve Frommelt, Margaret Maxwell, and Janet Gillies. Sophomores-Eunice Beck, Captain, Ruth Jaekle. Marian Gillies, Evelyn Peat, Jean Cochrane, Jacqueline Bishop, Lavelle Imrie, and Jennie Bonaquiso. Freshmen-Adaline Reese, Captain, Minnie Edington, Peggy Sheffield, Ruth Winfrey, Olive Grigslry, Virginia Stewart, and Geraldine Tepner. fForty-eightj NAPANEE TRACK The practice for track has started and the sunny spring afternoons are taken up with practice in high jumps, dashes, hop-step-and jump, re- lays and basket ball and volley ball throws for distance. Coach Miss Beck has much good material, and we are sure that a good record will he made this year. The play day is to be held at Vallejo, on May 6, and the day will end with a triangle track meet with Vallejo, Armijo, and Napa. It is hoped that Napa will show them some good time, and records, and we know that she can certainly "hold her own" at any rate. After the play day is over, the inter-class meet will take place, and points will be awarded for the cup. IForty-ninej NAPANEIE' BASEBALL A squad has been chosen to represent Napa High on Play Day at Vallejo this year on May G. The Picture akove represents this squad. Inter-class practice has started with much interest on the part of the girls, and teams are soon to le chosen. The inter-class struggle for the championship will then follow. fFifty1 9 Q9 Ni' ull: IIXIII I ...M X I I-M H ,rfif ly 'XX 9 I I I t I an I ' If , I fix fu? ..i . 4' xx 172 X I 1- -sg, mgghffqgii- f? JIU ea:-I III I mx Vx 'Y I I 51tySh ff da I I' XXEXXX X xxx s x ea? I XI I IIQIIIINIIIIBI I XIII X-XXX? 4, X . I JIIIW I'IIIIII'I'Ii'I, III ' 5 I I II XI II IIII IIIQII HXIIIIIIIIIIIIXX I 'ITM ,--. ,XQ X NIX TX II. IIIIIII II IAXIIQXIII III II IIII II XXX X IW- IIIIIIG' I IIIIIIIIII I I IIIIIII-I II I II IX- f I' IX ,XIII IIIMIX I XIXXX IIIIIIXIX II IIIXIIIIDIIXWX I XI :-I 'NI XXI IX IMI XIII X X IIIIIIIIIXI H ' XIXXX FI IIIIIII II'II'I'IIIIII1 ' 'f QI III II II II I' I II I II-If ' III I I I I III? II I II II' i'IIIi:IIII III I II QII IJ IIIIII 'IIII , I F 'al XIj' IIIIHI II ?IIIlIIIlI 'IIIII XX X, X " TIXXIXXIXXXXX 'XXX III! III HX, I I ' , 'I I 'IIII Xi,, I,,I I- II I I " III, IIIIII I X. I If III III I m , I III I I I III, IIQ X I I I IX X II IIIIIIIIII,,III IXI,I I' I I I" II I' I f'I II1II MI'I I I - if -:Lt I I, I IIII II II I IIIIIIII I II' , III III'wIIIII'III'III IIIIIIII I I I I-II,IIg II" -', III - r-I 'af' III IIIII5IIIIIIIXX,,,II, , 4 III III I HI I' 'Ising' IIII I I-NAIS? X, If ,Y II IIIIXIIII 'Il W II ,I I I IW" .I IIIIIEIII III IIIIIWIIIII I I -I 1 4- I IIII' IIII.IIIr1III.I,I'IlIIIII I' f I XX ,X X II X X 1 ,Q ff ' ,,f ,X .X 1. ,4,,X X X XX :XX X XX I M ff !X X XXXX YXX I7 M X - 6" X 'Ip' , , I I. QI ' 4 ying-9ef 'fFf if f XIIQ fI.Xx..XtX- Q ,X Nj. , -1 A Q. migyv K 1 Vfia, f,-.4 Lf-. EJ. .,,-Lg : "1 . - x -U I-14. F., 1 v 5 r I 1 I r 1. 5 E. 1-. 4 ll. . . 1 'gl' 1 . .gn .u . n. , i, f""iQ., ,yygr '-W: Q f ,. :vp Y.. , ' , 1.4.1. Fcktyj 2. ,,, r.. J,-,f... ' . '1!:S:-,'4J'!-, Fil fl-V , J- V fl? .X L, .3 - . rf . An. 1 ...A .:N ., , if 'iff .' 1.1 r. ' I v- I r r w w I , . :,.rEg:',., " v . ' .gi 1-13. NAPANEE Kathleen K.: "What does 'yo no se' mean ?" Senor: "I don't know." Kathleen K.: "Well, my goodness! Whom shall I ask ?" Pk Pk Pk Marjorie Hearn: "I tried to milk a cow once but I couldn't get anything." Peggy Conolly: "Maybe it was dry." Marjorie: "Oh, no, he wasn't." il: Pl: Pk An, then there is the alsent-minded student who met Hiss Nelson on the street one day and said, "Ship-ahoy" instead of "Hello". Pk H1 Pk Spanish II Student: There are just two species of wild life in South Amer- ica: the flora and the fauna. Pk 22 Pk Maybe the reason why the Vallejo Football team was so sore last year was because it had a Boyle on it. Pk Pk Pk Wash Mannering hints to prospective football players never to play with their mouths open, as they are liable to brush their teeth, after a game and run across an extra ear. Pk Pk Pk "It is never too late to say dye." said the red-headed girl. "Oh, yes it is," said the bald-headed man. Pk Pk Pk Malcolm Green: Cviewing monkeys in cage at Sacramento Parkl-It is apparent to me- Reva Decker: "Oh, I really didn't know you claimed so close a relation- ship." Pk Pk Pk Some say that ignorance is bliss, But this talk is folly- Because she stood there 'neath the mistletoe And I thot that it was Holly. Senior: "What is important about the placing of the accent, Senorita Jaekle?" Ruth J.: "To get "em in the right places." Pk Pk Ik "Oh, my!" exclaimed Mrs. Hills, who had lost her husband in a department store, 'Tm looking for a small man with one eye." "Well, madam," replied the floorwalker, "if he is a very small man you'd better use both eyes." Pk Pk 22 Judge: "You are charged with shooting squirrels out of season." Roderick Mount: "But, Your Honor, I shot them out of self-defense." Pk Pk Pk Hector McLean: "Who is the handsomest boy in school, and why am I?" fFifty-onej NAPANEE lfFifty-twofl NAPANEE Someone tried to kid Mr. Post in radio opportunity class by telling him that a tight wire artist is a Scotch telegrapher. Sk 214 Ik A student in history: "Alexander II was assassinated when a conspirator hit him with a tomb which destroyed him." Ik Pk ik Peggy Sheflield: "Have you ever read O Henry ?" Chick M.: "No, but I've eaten his candy." Pk Pk wk Arthur: "Miss Beal, I think Amundsen is a poor citizen." Miss Beal: "I don't see why." Art: "Well, he went to both the poles and never voted." 'K HF Pk Ofiicer: CStopping Harold at a cornerb. "Young man, you are running amuckf' Harold: "No, sir, this is a Chevrolet." SF Pk wk Joel Cofiield: CSticking his head into the teachers' dining roomy. "May I enter this sanctorum ?" Miss Coomks: "What was the large word Joel used ?" Mr. Johnson: "Why, he said something about a sanitorium and looked right at Mr. Hughes." Pl' Ill Sk A SENIOR'S PRAYER. I wish that I was a little rock A-sitting on a hill. A-doin' nothin' all day long But jes' a-sittin' still. I wouldn't eat, I wouldn't sleep, I wouldn't -even wash: I'd jes' sit still a thousand years, And rest myself, b' gosh! Pk Pk Pk Fat Fitzgerald: "They tell me Virgil is on the college football team." Dot: "Yes, sir, he sure is." Fat: "Do you know what position he plays '?" Dot: 'Tm not sure, lut I think he's one of the drawbacks." Dk Pk Pk Bill Jewel: "Her niece is rather good looking, eh ?" Joel C.: "Don't say 'knees is'g say 'knees are' ." Pk Pk Pk Vcrnon Enlow: "Why is a kiss over the telephone like a straw hat ?" Rae: "Because it isn't felt." Pk ,F Pk Philip: fAt track Ineetl. "My, Lut the people are numerous." Virginia Fox: "Yes and there's lots of them, too." frifry-fivq NAPANEE Irving Manasse: Cln U. S. Historyl "What was George Washington's .salary when he was president?" Miss Collins: "I don't remember." Dk ik Ik Miss Hawkins: "What is the Federal Reserve kept for ?" Bud Enlow: "To keep the Indians in Subjunctionf' Pk Pk ik Bethel: "Spreckles has got the dollars." Dot Evans: "But has he got any sense ?" wk ak Bk Can you imagine:- Senor arriving at school later than 6255? Miss Hawkins without her demerit pad? Miss Nelson winning the mile? Miss Palmer not laughing when she gets angry? P. J. WeLster explaining any subject in less than two hours? Miss Kime as a modern flapper? Sammy Hughes as a collar ad? Mr. Conners chastizing his small daughter? Mr. Johnson showing excitement at a game? Miss Kenagy as assistant scoutmaster? Miss Allegrini not upholding the law? Mr. Crawford needing a truck to carry honor cards into asseml ly ? Mr. Cunning flirting with Rose MacLean? Mr. Post dancing with Violet Edington? Miss Whitcher with a boyish lcob? Miss Lynch driving Bill Jewel's "cut-down ?" -Mrs. Gottenburg spilling the beans? Miss Parker's coupe without her te-ddy bear? Mr. Gray not calling the Ag building the main lzuilding? Miss Beck and Miss Crever not together? Miss Kelsey loosing a typing contest to John Platt? Mr. Strong stoop-shouldered? Mrs. Schalow teaching Ralph Lui to sing soprano? Miss Coombs using slang? Miss Beal as a dancing teacher? 'Mr. Youtz at loss to explain a physics problem? fFifty-seven'I QIQQQJH 67 k fW7 pccQ , dafwf 0WD NAPANE g , ,, ,f,f "5 M44 WW? ,1 uto ra hs q KQQAWM WW W 'fwffvwfl , A711 Ng 0 ff-ffvmwlff. 769 ' ff im WV y fWg f fW2wf -M ' 'jffzf L.fyz,ff,f ff- fgfff n L W7 t'7 , ' ' T .QZ'gg1l,'a,' Q , . 1 !,Xf!XLL'4liE,k N , fx X ywwmuff L 'N L' N I O 5 if 1 ' 1 '. i mx Q A 41 Q C! fi, , V li f' V, fig..-fv' .1 I fFifty4eight1 1 ki' , ' f 4 , Ab gE'QQQ v uf' . w .gg ' x H X' V 2-ig. ,I -.L fc . . ' in gg,-fi . .- 3 ',,.ffi!f-. Q 2 ' fwfr! 'e f' T: WJ., ww X -s.: ,. -ff .. r . ,,f,,. . mmpnnmm ummm an owmm .n....... .sf-.vu-. wunnvgmmu-:ey-c.-1 :-fauwnsvmxu A .v ,J 14, ...Ju-1


Suggestions in the Napa High School - Napanee Yearbook (Napa, CA) collection:

Napa High School - Napanee Yearbook (Napa, CA) online yearbook collection, 1922 Edition, Page 1

1922

Napa High School - Napanee Yearbook (Napa, CA) online yearbook collection, 1923 Edition, Page 1

1923

Napa High School - Napanee Yearbook (Napa, CA) online yearbook collection, 1926 Edition, Page 1

1926

Napa High School - Napanee Yearbook (Napa, CA) online yearbook collection, 1935 Edition, Page 1

1935

Napa High School - Napanee Yearbook (Napa, CA) online yearbook collection, 1936 Edition, Page 1

1936

Napa High School - Napanee Yearbook (Napa, CA) online yearbook collection, 1939 Edition, Page 1

1939

1985 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1970 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1972 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1965 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals
FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
Are you trying to find old school friends, old classmates, fellow servicemen or shipmates? Do you want to see past girlfriends or boyfriends? Relive homecoming, prom, graduation, and other moments on campus captured in yearbook pictures. Revisit your fraternity or sorority and see familiar places. See members of old school clubs and relive old times. Start your search today! Looking for old family members and relatives? Do you want to find pictures of parents or grandparents when they were in school? Want to find out what hairstyle was popular in the 1920s? E-Yearbook.com has a wealth of genealogy information spanning over a century for many schools with full text search. Use our online Genealogy Resource to uncover history quickly! Are you planning a reunion and need assistance? E-Yearbook.com can help you with scanning and providing access to yearbook images for promotional materials and activities. We can provide you with an electronic version of your yearbook that can assist you with reunion planning. E-Yearbook.com will also publish the yearbook images online for people to share and enjoy.