Muskingum University - Muscoljuan Yearbook (New Concord, OH)

 - Class of 1928

Page 1 of 324

 

Muskingum University - Muscoljuan Yearbook (New Concord, OH) online yearbook collection, 1928 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1928 Edition, Muskingum University - Muscoljuan Yearbook (New Concord, OH) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1928 Edition, Muskingum University - Muscoljuan Yearbook (New Concord, OH) online yearbook collection
Pages 6 - 7

Page 10, 1928 Edition, Muskingum University - Muscoljuan Yearbook (New Concord, OH) online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1928 Edition, Muskingum University - Muscoljuan Yearbook (New Concord, OH) online yearbook collection
Pages 10 - 11

Page 14, 1928 Edition, Muskingum University - Muscoljuan Yearbook (New Concord, OH) online yearbook collectionPage 15, 1928 Edition, Muskingum University - Muscoljuan Yearbook (New Concord, OH) online yearbook collection
Pages 14 - 15

Page 8, 1928 Edition, Muskingum University - Muscoljuan Yearbook (New Concord, OH) online yearbook collectionPage 9, 1928 Edition, Muskingum University - Muscoljuan Yearbook (New Concord, OH) online yearbook collection
Pages 8 - 9
Page 12, 1928 Edition, Muskingum University - Muscoljuan Yearbook (New Concord, OH) online yearbook collectionPage 13, 1928 Edition, Muskingum University - Muscoljuan Yearbook (New Concord, OH) online yearbook collection
Pages 12 - 13
Page 16, 1928 Edition, Muskingum University - Muscoljuan Yearbook (New Concord, OH) online yearbook collectionPage 17, 1928 Edition, Muskingum University - Muscoljuan Yearbook (New Concord, OH) online yearbook collection
Pages 16 - 17

Text from Pages 1 - 324 of the 1928 volume:

m x my W jp 5? "-1 4' Q I fl, S I X ,f x 'Y Lf Q X, Q M Q I U ' ' f o fs 3 I xv. -.5 WW QM ax' Yf:,,.Q . -P' -P l XJ , 4 49 .. . X ' ,pf F ri x.f X ' ya! v s- ,, 4.. , C S? XQNV X Qs! 'fi 5 s , Q Qf 9 s. D Q THE ,TAI-IN CAL! Edited in 1926-27 by 1923 MUSCOLJUAN STAFF JAMES R. ORR, Editor ROBERT N. FRENCH Business Manager Engraved by THE AND OLLIER ENGRAVING C011 PANY C'hiczig0, Illinmis Printed and bound by THE .Ii-IAN AND STOTTLEMIRE COM PA NY Cambridge, Ohio VicwS and f'h0t0s by E. R. COX New Concord, Ohio wuaush Jumo W Ss my Z 2 , 4 musk in 90' mNQaw.cv!'l - ' Huw 2 , acccrcccq I 13.5 5 X 1 - ' VIN' l '4:-,Z aw I I X gf? ' L . 7 'xiii W' f iivY ' F 2? 2 1 w ig W Q ' , 1' 4 7 5? vi ' 'I ft if ' 1 1 N I S ' " f . ,S V---- 1,-' ' -A Q., x ... 5 5? i Q umrwnwn ww mag this humhle en- heahnr he :sz fountain uf jugg at clear, :nal spring nf menynrg rs- flerting the sfneef he- ligljt uf hugs past. 1 I '-15136 if 1 fr Q9 Izzy: L6NfiK90 I 994 fllnllege Anhhztrea t Ieiwa 4 eaiurw gil i- ix J S. . . . -,Nix gf," ,, -Ev , , 4, .V 4, 1 , , -1 I 1 1 -.,n,g-,umgr . 4- . , 1 A V l , , J .X 1 V - . if , 1 , 5 , ' A1 ' j ,X + - fl V - av 9 - . - -. "" -X , ,E , . ' .-' ' '.'1 -". 73-" .',:.-- '-'. -- ',, 7 .' 1.11 Q - slr 1 ' - -w . L A s : ' . - it ,- ,' .. rf, 413.5 -Af : -, JA m3g,g,f u , ,. - . , -3 ff. .'L , 1 I -1-11 1, ,, K -,..l,.., .. . J - ,, .N , 4, , A- I.. 4.1995 + ' k 2: " . Vw, I ' ' 5 I ' I . 4' V I 1 A 1 I 1 1 I - 1 I 2 , 2 5 I 1 - 1 . . , 5 5 2 5 - V 1 E , 4 x 2: I 55: 2 A , . 5 I 1 g ' V Q o o lf ' 5' I , 1 W rl V, ,L . , ' 5 -' . ' f ' f h if I fb, A . f , " 1 , x' Y- ,-: 4, P ' , W . ' X' I x " f ' I , . ' " fs 1 ' 'iffy .- 'A J - , -W T-,Q 151252ffi'-2:42.75--' ' - .. ' r , H , p 1:1 - . 'll ' - - V- - - Q- GWB Will W 'DGTDI CHT IOI1 X, , - x J , ,- ' I - .K . 1 ,ik ' ' - , AA, . - Y . if - V X , ' J. ' " 1, ' A 51112 1928 jliluscnljuan ' is hehicziteh run gliflisaa flllpcistine Qu-Iaucle One who has lived in a quiet, unassuming fashion to the delight of her re- stricted intimates. One who has shared fhe joys and spared' the sorrows of M J .. W' many aiding by her means the fortunes' of in- stitutions and' individuals 'F-T? To her this :college is grateful for frequent con- ztributipns in times df need. She has given some iS297,000 to- forward the we1fare'of Muskingum. May her generosity be 'remembeied kindly' by' all who- feel ,an indebtedness tg this?-our Muskingum. Ln. TTT 5U1Hus1:nlfua11 Staff E lI,'if0l'-1.7L-L"11'il?f . Associate and Art Editor Literary Editor . Literary Editor Litornry Editor Athlc'ti1' Editor Plzoto Edilor Snopslzot Editor Joke Editor fokc Editor Calclzdur Editor Czzloltdar Editor Bntsizzcss lllanagcr Aslsocirltc BIl.Sl.llt'.5'S M1 lnagvr OI'glIllfSUfltJll, Manager ,-lzivvrtising lllcmagor -il 1I'i1'1'1't'isi11g rl I 111111 gcr . James R. Orr Kenneth Carmichael . Ethel Ewing Dorothy A1111 Leeman Reed McRoberts ' . John Loucilon Clarence Thompson . 1 Muriel Thompson Anna 'Louis-e ITCYQLISOII . Albert ll. Martin '. Lois Lecper XVillia111 D. Ugilvie . Robert N, French . Xwrilllllll' C. Vlfilson Malcolm Stevenson VVayne Greenlee Robert Fowler gs- f P Gllm 51519 yi 53 . WSU! Q -ff'- Wow Conheae H . T gil' " Q ' "Q .. -, 'fi ..- . 11", if X 5. 45 ..,f 2-v '- X Mak .1 - X ill' if - . j,?lW,,.,,3,1...'4nQn3. 1-. ..- Nz a - . -K 1-, x.'U.-'i4""w V, ,mv ,AQ , 1 ga" dwi' A54 QLF4 yt, w M 111-. I i 1 'n W 7. w 1' Nb Qlllxs f Q Qu QN,f 5 If Q QMZE- Y S 1' NJN . 'fx V. Ni X . 1 - O 3 .X , wi A, ' 'ii' in FI' 1' w Y , , l x A 4 . f V l , , V n Y! , ,, , 1 ,, . , ff: . . .-f..Qn- .N 'Q 1. . E152 lftl fa,-K, , r-ii. ...B-w. pi ' ' , - . '1 - . - :L . " , - ' 4 . v V , h I V ' - A ' 1 i V - ' ' I . . l .,1,,, -.5 2 ww 'H i M Qfgixf if" QF' Mu' E kg.. :ff ., xx W ,s w eff Z H ,w W- ww ww X4 1- -pf uw H W H H Hu H 'N ww H Wx ' H H wa , , H 535 ww 5 " C ww W w M m u W H w 1 Wu sf H w w w H H w w ww ww H MW H w w ,Msg W.. H W.. L11 , w1..- -igmgi Y' in Q4 gg. 1- . L - . M ' - .hm .- .,..f.a5. Q 9, um w Nun ww u u H 1 N141 ? as 5 'T 1. mrwm w w W M ,ess , W QR L f R Z - ig , I f X ng ? MM, Q an --"" " +'11l DmIRl5TRHTIU L 1837 Nlnety Years 1927 l1xe1yone of these xea15 was S1gl1l11Ce11'11, hone xx as xx11hout 115 X1CtO1lCS and deteats 115 sueeesses and f.11l111e5 1ts comeches 1161 traged1e5 Manx of 1hese xfea1s x1e1e ye 11s of plans gone txny of hope 1JL111CC1, of s1e1111ees seennnglx Lll1dlJ'lJILL1eltLC1 and u111exx.1re1ec1 But ex e1y xef11 had 1t5 eo1npen51t1o11s, ex e1x yeell 1n1p1essee1 1he 1L1l.L11l. and told upon 1he unborn cen11111es lh1s x1.1s t1ue beeause 111ese lllllkly x1e11s l11el Lo do 1x1111 human 111111615 and 11e.11ts 1x11h lT'el1Xe117Ub1V pO1e11l.1Z11 1DLlSO11.l11t1LH 1111111 sp1r11s of men .md xx omen bemg pe1Fee1ed .1nd 1110-jLL1CC1 11110 a wo1lel ot Ellllklllllig need and of 1ppe.1l1nff O1JpUI1Lll11tX Manx of these xears xxe1e 111.1de up of Dax'5 of Small llnngs but 1l1ex dealt 1111111 glkllt 1de.1s, 111111 L1L111Zl1 p1111C1p1L5, wlth 1111111 .l1111111C and God Une of these xfe'115 sau but one 1111111 g1x e11 the L11p1Ul11fl, but o11e deg1ee L1J11lLI'1LC1 but txxo LO111l11Ll11q telt the personal IINPHC1 of 11111 o11e 111.111, md fo1 11L.lI'1V hftx vears 1111111111115 of 1e1e11e1s 11111 p1e.1ehe1s s.11 Ll11C1C1 the 111'slJlI'cltl1ll'l of 111s te.1eh111q iolloxx ed 11110 the depths and xx1111 111111 el1111bee1 1he 11e1Q1115 111 a search for 1111111 found 1he11 souls s11l1LC1 bv 1he vx11c11ery of 111S eloquenee, 111161, .1s the xxax wa5 111 fol l.1'lLl11 bx t11e blafmg gleny of 1118 1110 1hex followed 111e Q11.cl.1'l1 and 51111 the Vlilfill Qplenehd It xxas el dav of 5111.111 11111125 , .1 dav of DUO1 LqLllp1'HC11f and of no e11 doxvment ll1C1 .1 d1V of s1n.11l 111111113015 when 1V11.1S11I1'lQLl1Tl Lo11ege handed 1115 erede11t1als 1o Xk'l111Z1ll1 C1l1og1x Mo1e11e1d but It xx.1s a dw of QILEI1 51g111f Goe As xwe 11111111 11110 mnety xears of 1'10l101Zl151C. 111S101X 1e1 115 11o1 desp15e the daxf o1 SIUFI11 th1110s 1'e1nen1be11ng 11111 o111 of t11e snuggle of 511e11 dlys me 11 pcr5on.1l1t1es eame to en11e11 1he wo11d and to 117161611 the 110111011 01' the o1el111.1rxf man Of 111 llxlllg n1.1nxf books thele IS no e11e1 5o111e good some b1e1, some lI'lC1111CIL1'1l. some good some bettel, some best 111111170011 19 best xx 111eh most adequ.11e1xf dea15 XVI111 good men and wo111e11, voung Ol old 11111 book 13 best Vk11lC11 111051 f.11t11f11l1x po1'1raxs 1he p1ogre5s ol 21 xvor111xf 1l1Qt1tLl11011 fO1 1115t1t1111o11s are but the 1e11gt11e111ng Shadows ol' 1nC11x1du 115 Th15 188116 of 'lhe 1X1L1SLO1JL1d.1'l 111.l11xS 1he eo111ple11o11 of I11l1L1X xe.11s of serx1ee, mnetv xcus of eontwet xx1t11 hue pe1son.1l111e5 and the p11y of one upon 1110111111 Wfhat of the .1e111exen1ents of 11115 11111L11C.111 Xefll V XVh.1t of the 1ne11 and 11 omen of 1he future 1111 112111111 of wx ho5e feet haxe been hezud 111lOL1g11 college 11.11ls t111s xear Yvhat p1o1111se for the d.1xs to eo111e Cflll xou 1e.1d 111 the faees 111.11 xv1ll g1eet you .1s xou 111111 the p 1qe5 of 1111s bookf 1o ISSLIL sueh .1 xolume l11XO1X es glell eo51 111 t1111e, 111 ellort, and 111 monev 'lo tu111 115 p1ges should gne the 1C'1C1CI pause should LO11N11'Zl1l'l 111111 to pee1 xnto the future and SLI'1lJL1S1V seek to match the pe15o11s here presented to 111e l710151CITlS p1L's'f11l1U fo1 SO11.1'E1Ol1 as he seeks to e511111z11e the xalue of 1X1usk111vu111 1o the 1101111 tor nmetv ye 115 and St1"1X e5 to x15ua117o 115 '1c111ex ements for mnety x e.11s to eo111e The PfLSlC1L111 extends 111s eo11g1.1t111.111ons 10 the 91111 o11 the 1s5ue of 11115 XO1L11T1g and 1115 01ee11ng5 to 2111 xv11o sean 115 page5 19 . ... .. 4 . -Y 1 1 1, " 1 K-L -'Ns1g- T11 ' - 1 1 -1s'- 1 f -1 11 ' - 111- , .- ' L1 1 , ,1 ' 1, ., ,, .' 1 5 f 1 1, , , , 1 - -'1- . 1.-A.. .-., 1 ,, .' X.. ,",.., ,'. ,",, , -, 1 H, 1 ,., 1 1 1 v A 1' - 1--,s 1 . . '1.- ' - , - ' f . ' . ,, 1 1' ' -- ' 1 1 1 1 1-11 -11 1 11-1 . , - 4' . H4 15. ,' .' - . 1 , 7 --U - Ay 11 I --11 11 -1 1' 1-1- -I 1'- 1 - 11.1 1 1 41 - - 1 ' 11 1 ' 1 - .1 --1 . I 1 'I 1 1 '1 -1 . , , .' , - ', J , . , ' . . , . . I . 1, . , .A 1 .12 . 1.3 L . . . . 1 l X' . . ' .,. .. . . .,'. - . ...'.., . A 7'. L . -1 , 1 1 1 - - - 1 1 , su 1 1 - ,1 ,v yr '- '- - 1 7 1 1 1' - 'Q ' j ' ' 1' '. 1 'K 1 "'. va . 1 ff p . ,, , 4 , . , V I 5 - 1 1 'n '- Q 1 A-1 1 iv 4' 41 1 1 Q . ,c ew 1. 1 . Q k 1 1. 1 ' 'J 1,' "Q ' - 1CZ1I1CC 111 the 811112118 of the College and 111 the 1111QCI'CSllS of the 1i111g'C1OI'l1 of 1. .,, ' .'. ' , V ,, . X .f ,. 1 .H ,. ' , 1 ' ' --7' 1 11' A 1 - - - 1 --- - - 1 1 ' 1 u 1 K, , . 1 . 1 111- V1 - 1 ' '1:- 1 1 1 -' 1 1 A 1 A K 1 1-1 - 1 1 ff - . -' - . 1.. - 1.3 '-. 1 3' W I -- 1 1 . . 1 A 1 .1 , 1 ,1 ,. . 1 ,, 1 1 1 1 ,.1 K .1 . 1111 . 1 , 1. . ' . ff .. 1' ,1 I - 1' 1 - 1- - 1 A - 1 - 7 1 ' I -' - ' '--.. ' A ," -1 ' . . --1 - 11 - 1 " ' 1-1 51, -- N- 1 1' . , . ' V , I .-. 1 -I . J' - ' 1 .L. V . ' -' 11 , X Z ,F - . ,. ' V , .1 '1, 1 . - ' ' 1-'1- 1 - X. 1 . 1 , 1 . 1 1 1 1 . , 1-11. , .. - 1 , 1 . 1 . A , . '- ,, J Y' . ., 1 g . .. - . , . 1 -1. ' A - -.11 A . 1 ' --11- 1 1 1 1 - 1 -1.1 '- l 1 J - - . el . . . ' ' 'L.l. , J- 1 ,V . ,1 ' . 1 1.4 --,Z 4 1 1 ' 1 -- - . 1 . - ' 1 'J I ' '111' 1- x 11,1 1 V - -1" X. ' ' Q ' ,x ' ,x v-1 1 X '. ' C .AY . pf . ' 1' r.r - 5 ,LI , .' , . , . V . ' V. . .. . -' . - 1 k' -L 37 1 'Q - 1 - 'b- . X, ' ..,,-' - A I Q.. '-- -1-. D 1 1 . Mia if if l V vi Y ,,, .QQ R ei-"VA, ' QU, 1.....:25..oqL5L. 14: . 1.1 .r 1631-. ' BOARD OF TRUSTEES H-on. J. A. VVhite OFFICERS - - President - - - Vice-President Rev. O. H. Milli-gan - - - - - D Rev. W. ,ll Grimes, Hon. L. ,l. Graham E. A. Montgomery G. C. McConagha F. F. Frazier - - Rev. O. H. Milligan Hon. C. Ellis Moore i:Howard Forsythe 'lfDeceased Rev. W. Ll. Grimes Rev. I. C. Smith - - Rev. ,laines Best - H. W. Nesbitt - - Rev. VV. P. Aikin, D. T. Dales Kyle - I. McCall - .D. - - - - - Secretary - - Treasurer of Permanent Funds Current Expense Treasurer - - - - - - - - Chief Engineer TERNI EXPIRES 1927 Zanesville, Ohio W. T. Thompson - - Cambridge, O. - - Avalon, Pa. Rev. Ira F. Leeper - - Alliance, O. - Cainbridgsge, O. Rev. I. I. Moore - - Zanesville, O. - Cambridge, O. Rev. L. I. Gray - Jamestown, O. TERTVI EXPIRES 1928 New Concord, O. L. B. Peterson - - Steubenville, O. Cambridge, O. Earl R. Lewis - - St. Clairsville, O, - Steubenville, O. Hon. James A. White - Columbus, O. Wheeling, W. Va. Rev. S. M. Laing - - Springfield, O. Ralph WV. Mansfield - Detroit, Mich. TERM EXFIRES 1929 D. ----- E. B. Castor - - New Concord, O. Canonsburg, Pa. D. M. Ogilvie - - East Liverpool, O. - - - Xenia, O. E. A. Montgomery - New Concord, O. - Cleveland, O. Rev. S. E. Martin - - Cambridge, O. Rev. I. W. Liggit - Philadelphia, Pa. 20 FACULTY J Knox Montgomery D D LLD Presxdcnt 1904 Thomas Hosack Paden M A Ph D Jrofessom oi Iztm Emerltus 6 0 Hugh Alexander Kelsey A B D D Vxcc PlL9ldLI'lf Profuasor of Bible 1919 Leonard Johnson Graham A M lrcasurcr 1890 john Scott Cleland M A Ph D Dean of College Professm of ELOIIOHIICS 'md Busmcss Adlllllllb tl"1tlOl1 1920 Auleene Marley Jamison B S M D Dean of Women 1926 Charles Edgar Whrte M lrofcssor of Matllcmmtlgs 1920 Frank Ernest Work M A Rggxstnax Irofcssor of Hxstom 1922 Chester joseph Marshall A B M A Professor of Clwssxcal L1n uwges 192 Howard Penmngton Stemple M A Plofessor of P011f1C'l1 Scxcncc 'md Socmlogy 1927 . ' , . ., . - I 1 v . . . . 1 .. -. , .. 1'7 Y . ., . . l . 'x A 0 1 ,, , . ' , . . ,. , 1 , . ., . . K 7 Q -aw -K S' gk -X- c , . H . ., . . .' ' ' 'V , , .A. J . '.- . ., . , . . .x '. . .. J ' .Y - ,- .. .- , . ., . . .. . g .' , , . - 9: . I xl. ., H Walter Wilbert McKirahan, A.M., Ph. D. Professor of Philosophy, 1926 Charles Rush Layton, M.A. Dean of School of Oratioryg Pro- fessor of Public Speaking, 1914 Clarence Flavel Moses, M.A. Professor of Geology ,l922 Gerrit Dejong, A. B., M.A. Professor of History, 1926 John Jeffery Smith, M. A., B. D., Ph. D. Professor of Psychology, 1920 john Maxwell McCleery, M. D. College Physician and Professor of Physiology, 1924 Harry Wilson Kerr, B. S. Associate Professor of Chemistry, 1923 Willis Hamel Wilcox, M.A. Professor of English, 1925 Earle Ruskin Bryant, M.A. Professor 'of Biology, 1911 Samuel Herbert Jamison, B. S. Y. M. C. A. Secretary and Field Representative, 1926 Glbson Rexd Johnson M A Ph D Irofcsmr of Blblc 1916 Mary Augusta Stone A B seocmate P1OfCSSOl of Educxuon 1916 John Glenn Lowery M S M Dean of hducatxon Plofcssom of 1:dL1C'1.t1OI'l 1911 Mary E Sharp M A PlOfLS901 of Modem 1111 u'1e,eQ 1906 Beulah Brooks Brown Ph B M A 1909 Sarah Eleanor Steele M 'Resistant Profcsem of E11Q1lS11 1923 V1rg1n1a Lee Gibbon A B M A Instruutor 111 Publlc Speakm 1927 Mlldred Mmam Keboch A B Instxuctor m Pubhc qpewkmg 1974 Ralph Wllson Ogan A B M A Assocxatc Profcisox of 1:C1UC"L11Ol1 192v Lucy Shuttleworth Dunlap A B Inbhuctor m Modem Languages 92 I I , . ., . - .J . - - - Y 1 , . . - A. . - ' .. ' 1 , W S . , . ., . A. 4 L , . , . . " A ., - 1' ' .. g . j ., I , . ., . . . ASSOCIZIYC Professor of Enghsh, I , . l . , . t, 1 .3 . 1 . -N I 1 . . N C ,. rv ' ' ..' ' 4 r , - , . . - . ,. Q K f. , 1 5 Edward R, Dunlap, A.B., M.A. Assistant Professor of Economics and Education, 1925 Anna Rentsch Neuenschwander, A.B., M.A. Associate Professor of Modern Languages, 1919 Ruth Agnes Shaver, A. B., M.A. Assistant Professor of Modern Languages, 1923 Eduardo Pagan-Tomei, A. B. Instructor in Modern Languages, 1926 L'11ian Rogers St-ample, B. S., S. A. Instructor in Art, 1922 Anna Jeanett Closser, B. S., M.A. Associate Professor of Home I'f:COI'l0l1'l1CS, 1925 Benjamin Franklin Hall, A.B.,M.A. Instructor in English, 1926 Lucy Wilcox Instructor in Piano and Theory, 1923 Thelma Auriel Rush, A. B. Instructor in Psychology, 1926 James Garfield Ralston, M. S. Professor of Chemistry, 1919 Ferne Parsons Layton B O M A Assouate Pxofeeaor of Omtory 1920 Charles Dowme Morehead A B Graduate Manager of Athletics Asmstant Profcesor of Modem Languagce 1924 W11lard Burton Stone B S lhvmcwl Dlrcctor and AQQ1Gt'1nt Coaeh 1923 Wxlllam Flsher Lange A B V1o1a Stewart Welsh B S Dxrcetor of Physlcal Education for Wo111e11 1924 Martha Metzger Hammlton A P Instructor m Enqlnh and Home ECOIIOITIICS 1925 Mary V Bean A B Natnon Womens Dormulory 1925 Cora Isabelle Orr M A Nsewtant Profeseor of Ed11C1tlOU 925 Edgar Casner Rxchey B S Imtructor m Agrxculture 1924 George Cameron McConagha Clucf Engmecr of College , . , . ., . . . ' ' .. 1' , I l , l. , 1 . . ' Q c c '., ' 1 , . . 1 . c . . . c N 7 -. . l , . . Athletlc Dl1'CCfUf and Coach, 1923 , . . , , ' . , . v. -, 1, - - ' , :- l " . , , . . ' ' '. 1 , , :- d . , 1 - , . . . , I Grace McClanahan Librarian, 1923 Laura Ethel Caldwell, B. S., A.B. Assistant Librarian, 1924 Maxwell Patterson Boggs, A.B. Secretary to the President, 1924 Thomas Hoffman Hamilton, A.B., M.A. Director of the Conservatory of Music, 1925 William Wishart Gray Professor of Violin and Orchestra, 1912 Milo Hugo Neuenschwander, A. B., Mus. B. Professor of Organ and Pianoforte 1924 Ruby Anderson Stone, Mus. B. Piano, Harp, Theoretical Subjects, 1923 Howard Lamont Ralston, Mus. B. Organ, Piano, 1925 Jesse A. Keyser, B. S. Principal, Mathematics, 1920 janey Margaret Trace, Mus. B. Voice, Public School Music, 1922 Grace Gordon McC1-eary, A. B. English and History, 1919 Mary Winifred Thompson, A.B. English and French, 1924 Blanche Forbes, A. B. English, Mathematics and History, 1926 Jacob R. Nicholson, B.S. Physical Director and Science, 1925 Harry Kennedy Hutter, A.B. Instructor in Geology, 1926 Lelamd Andrew Robertson, M. A. Assistant Professor of Biology, 1926 Glenn B. Jeffers, A. B. History, Civics and Manual Training, 1926 Amanda Dorrance Keyser, A. B. Physical Director and Biology, 1925 l F i 1 8? LS ' .x ga S A wx- ff, 5- Vg .4 H -IW THE I .V mv M '59 Q BIT WF 'xr in , , M., NH. , -,.,7-3 ,WT W 5. 1 fi if H , . ff? . pil' v' f-QA 41 E J .mf , " iw K .5 M . 5 Af Ziff .'U3YQi-2 ,n .gi f , if 1 5 gg, Igfg-Q7 'Mi A ' Q R V '-1, ami. Nw Q? m somegonss ALL 28 NJ T459 X 4:5 Si ,M 4 vc EE x' wg B nf 4 Liv 'I i .fin -V' grim--if Am-w,..e - . Sixlg- .-5 ss.Q-.3224 , X, wif " 5 59 . of iff, W ,214 . ,Y gb 64 'ggi N Be? . , g.- my WET. ss ' sgqefff 1 if fl . -. 2S?'?5Sz1 -MU A 5, ' is if 4 QI' NAV 'F-., 1' Y ,fjfxvff f Q as an V 1,4 2 YW, 4' ,"'ifg2x I 1 2 -fm ' E 'H' Qing-QL? bw ' Ve 54: .E n I d Hu t , . is 4, Q fs 5 2 mx an , .n. ww .4 A JW ,fgwm j ig? AQ3i A Wy .Q . Y B ' .' 1 , . ' '- . ' wikis " -- - 2. r 'QZY5 ' . N v Z:-v--X" x fx ,. . I, 5' Aix if G. wwf ' e goiz Wi SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS President .... Rolland Ewing Vive Pl'L'sl'd61Lt . Dale Conley S vc-1'etcz1'y . Ruth Watson Treaszz-1'C1' . . Donald Ewino' V D Here is that worthy and august body, the Senior Class of the college. These pages immediately following are in the nature of an epitaph for those illustrious persons Whose passing we mourn, for after having been buried under impressive Com- mencement ceremonies, they shall go away. For now we see them face to faceg but then we shall see them as through a mir- ror, darkly, and shall know them as a tenuous and tenebruous memory. XVQ mourn their passingq But let us restrain our la- mentations, and reHeet that they will return as alumni, and by their presents we shall know them. 30 1111-IELYN DOROTHY Allxlbl A B Sljbllla Tm Deltl 4 Inkv Pen Club 4 She Ntoops lo Conquer 3 Romeo and juhct 4 B and M Stlff 4 Prcsxdent af Dorm Aqsoemtlon 4 PHYLLIS ALBRECHT LX B Hood College Hockey 1 2 '5 Old Man Mmnlck 3 JAMES ANDERJON A B Physics Club 3 4 MARY ARCHER A P College Orchestra French Club 1 2 3 4 Irench lldy 4 Choxal Souetv 1 3 MYR'I LE BADERISCHER A lx WLSlTl1ll1lStCf Colle L Utah 1 2 Umxersxtv of Utah 3 MATILDA A BAII EY A B Della Hockey 1 2 Basketball 1 4 Cho1al Club Glee Club Z 3 4 bpfuubh Club 1 Z 3 4 H1kmg Club 2 31 MARGARET ATKINSONQ A. B. ' ",s ' ESTHER BALRD, A. 13. Hiking Club, 3, 45 Home Economics Club, 4. , f ROBERT W. BALLANTYNE,,A. B. Football, 3, 49 .Serap Day Lezider, lg Glce' Club, '1', 2, 33 Biology, 45 Benzine Ring 3. 4: French Club, 3, 43 Il1ky,Pen Cluli, 2, 3, 43 M. Club, Pres., 45- She Stoops to Con- quer, 3, BL and M. Staff, 2g1Sfudcnt, Honor Council, 4gffY.. M. C. A. Cabinet, 3, Presi- dent, 4, ' ' ' ' . , 1 , ' ,T DEAN T. BARKLEY, ALB. B21seball,.2,,3, 45 Geolqgy Club, 4, Biology Club, 3, 4. , CLARA ELIZABETH BENTLEY, A. B. Choral Society, 1, Z, Pillars of Society, 3. ' MARY KATHRYN BENTLEY, A. B. Spanish Club, 3, Pres., 4, Choral, 1. - THOMAS R. BERKSHIRE, A. B. Sigma Tau Delta, 4, Inky Pen Club, 4, B. and M. Staff, 3, 45 Muscoljuan Staff Alpha Phi Galllllla, Pres., 4. GLADYS VVANETA BERRY, B. S. in Ed. Choral, 3, 45 Home Economics Club, 3, 45 Hiking Club, 3, 4. 32 ..---. ' . Q.. , N' - -5'--. XX ,ff G r ,S--H--.. - ' eff--..-v' xx X., x Q ,Sai MILDRED WATT BICKETT, A. B. Western College for Women, 33 Glee Club Aceompanist, 2, 4, French Club, Z3 French Play, 2, Y. VV. C. A. Cabinet, Q,Y,Pia11i5jc, college orchestra, Class Scrap Day leader, 2. 4.,f""'m " 1' , blfA5R'Ypli1M.XRT1-E . BQIQEQ5 -53. , f X Cedar Rapids, ,.., ,l"owa, Boznjdglfl. A , 'F ' Y IK' Y ill? F ii K ' BEQRTHA BROWN5LEfEl Bo,R1JArNny A. 13. - Deltaj' White A. 1, Hockey, 13 French! Club,1l,,,Z,:l3,i4Q1iHomex,Ee,onomics Club, 43 Hikiug"CI'ub, 1, French l?lay,52, 4, B. :ind,llVL St,aff,,4g'fMuSebljL1a11 Staff, Student Honor Coun16il,,3,V4, Y. W. Cabinet, Alpha P-liiffianlngai nf 'r '-.X C S' ii . f-51TiYl55iilAlfE.fBlQeYf12943-' 5i'ffiL5l9lf . , i VVest Liberty State Normal,"1,Zjf'Basle'et,b2il'l,ijf:lHikijfgIClul5,,QL, K ARTHUR MELTOLN' BQYCDCA. F131 'A Spanish Club, 2, 3, Sigma Tau Delta, 43 She Stoops to Conquer, 35 The Lady from the Sea, 45 Muscoljuan, business manager, Debate tean1,.2,,College orutor, 35 Forensic Club, 2, 3, 4, Tau Kappa Alpha, Alpha Phi Gillllllliivg Cheer-iLeader, 3, Muskingui Players, 3, President, 4, Receiver of Key Of Knowledge, 3, lllliilo' Lit.,,..l, 2. HELEN Ro1sER1i.sto,N, .B'RowN1,EE, A. B. , ' 11 Biology Club, H01118411113C0l'lOl'l1j.C-S',iClVI.ll5y .2,1,,,H,i,liing Club,,,lg Z-Zzfgtlldeiit Council, 45 Y. VV. Cabinet, Pres,,g-'StudenteVolunteer, 1, 2, 3, 43jGo1nrr1'e'nEeii1eut' Spiilicr. "" 'Sl..,-,' F so IQQIS BQROWNLFE, A. B. Class Secretary, 33 Home Economics Club, 3, 45 Hiking Club, 15 Old Mau Minnielc, 3, Muscoljuan Staff, 35 Student Honor Council, -lg Y. W. Cabinet, 3, President, 4. 33 f. .9 'X rv 1i"7'?- f. ,li'f.ff,TlZ . '- ' L- -,,x F:-:f ' N, I 1, fi 7, , , 1 lr Wim-T1 iw- l l' l Vllll i -J' .. l 'I iff' l ,, . . .lm .Mil l- . . 'rl ll +- I lu lfy Ai, f ,gil V wel il llf. ll l lll ffl, ily" lf' lil 4 ' If ii ' 14 .' ll ll 112 l 1. rl . W wil l lil: I Lf i Sli' i' ll l . l. Ill l l l ' ll ., HI .l ' llll ll 1 xliw i ,: 'I ilvifii 'Il fi lliilt l ,l ,ali . 1,1 .,i MILDRED L. BURDETTE, B. S. Delta, Home Economics Club, 4. THELMA BURSON, A. B. ' I ' ' ADA BORRIAS CAIN, A. B. Biology Club, 43, 4, 1-Iomle Economics Club, 3. . , ,G. CLENN CAMERQN, A. 'Bw Stag, Washingtoii and Jefferson, 1, 2, Pianist, Glee Club, 3, 45 Sigma Tau Delta, 4, Pianist,,coll'ege quartet, 3, 4. . ' - ,.. RALPH EDGAR CANNON, A. B. Alban, Trezisurcr, lg Sigma Tau Delta, 44, Inky Pen Club, Z, 3, 4, She Stoops to Conquer, 33 Editor, B. and M., 2, 3, 45 Muscoljuan Staff, Student Honor Council, Pres. 43 Alpha Phi Gamma., 4. ' ' I. DONIVAN CARSON, B. S. Class Basketball, 1, 2, 3, 4, Benzine Ring, 2, 33 French Club, 43 Muscoljuan Staff, 3g Student Council, 1, Y. M. Cabinet, 4, Debate Team, 3, 4, Forensic Club, 3, 4. RUTH CASHDOLLAR, A. B. A. D., ,Benzine Ring, 45 Home Economics Club, Z, 3, President 45 Student Honor Council, 4. 34 l EDWARD BANNING CH1PL13Y,JR.,A. B. Alban, Class Basketball, 1, 2, 4, Varsity Basketball, 2, 3, Varsity Baseball, 2, 3, 4, Class Baseball, 1, Spanish Club, 4, Lady from the Sea, 4, Museoljuan Players. PAUL ENOCH CLARK, A. B. Stole, Vice President, 2, Physics Club, 4, lienzine Ring, 2, 3, President 4, Spanish Club, 1, Z, Inky Pen, -lg Band, 1 ,2, 3, 4: B. and M. Staff,'3, Museoljuan Staff, Alpha Phi Gamma, Business Manager, She Stoops lo Conquer. ' EDGAR FRED COCI-IRAN, A. B. Alban, C1-oss Country, 2, 3, 4, Track, 2, 3, Captain 4, Student Volunteers, 2, Gospel Team, 1, 2, 3, 4. I. OLIVER COLLINS, A. B. Sterling College, Kansas, Glee Club, 4, Benzine Ring, 4, LILLIAN ISABEL COLVIN, A. B, Volley Ball, 3, 4, Hockey, 3, French Club, 1, Z, 3, Hiking Club, 3, 4, French Play, 1, CLAUDE B. COPELAND, A. B. Stag, Glee Club, 4. DALE E. CONLEY, A. B. Mace, Vice President, 3, 4, Class Basketball, 1, Track, 2, Glen Club, 1, 2, 3, 4, "M" Club, Spanish Club, 1, Z, Band, 1, 2, 3, Old Man Minniek, 3, Romeo and Juliet, 4, Muscoljuan Staff. 35 1, -5 ll l ll H51 ll ,E lily ll it l, l lil T 1 ll all ll, 'l wlwfff 'ii itll! J l rflll x n , "' '. "X" viz.-.-f Wtlf ,-- xwwf ' I-gi , X 1, 1 ll. K fzflf CLARENCE DAVID COTTERMAN, A. B. 'llllf Stoicg Class Basketball, 1, 23 Class Baseball, lg Class Track, 35 Cross Country, 2, Ml, I, Choral Society, 1, 23 Old Man lXfIir1nick,E.'jVg,YIi9111eoand Juliet, -lg Inter Club Council. ' l li, ,ff ' D' 1 ' 1' R l fl .ff-1 S ,gi N I iff'-'JAMES CRAW'FGRD, A.-,B. X Mace, Class Football, lg7fif'2trsity-WFo.otb,a1l,,2, 3,,+l.::i ' ll 'lil l .filfg yu QIff?LL"i fr .3 li f. il ITSQTCEELAIMEIQQ ,Ag-B. flilige, Stoieg Qhio State, 'wl.,','.ll'-.'-y.1l, ll, i l A A . M ug ,ff it l'QHyx1?1JE5jI?. loaouen, als. Q M U . arm: Tmlg, 2, 1117?5311a1g,g,3Rgi9-2g,fif1dll9!Gf,14-- I - 1, 1' 1 Q ' f"' W --...TC 1-,Mix i3i"'wTT?iiVij"f f - ' fl ll i X' Ll as "53!iij in QQ ,Q 3 HARRYxB1,NgRYTZER, Sphinx, Baseball, 2, 3, 43 "M" Club, C1555'1J1ay,f3g'4, Y, M.iCabinetg Gospel Team lf, lg Debate Team, 2, 35 College Orator, 45 Forensic Club, T. K, A., Sigma Tau Delta, 4 lil.-1 l " - EARLE E. CURTIS, A. B., Diploma in Oratory , ' W French Club, 2, Sigma Tau Delta, 43 Choral Society, 2, She Stoops to Conquer, 3 Q .1 Romeo and Juliet, 45 Oratory Rccltals. I. . M ll "t" ' . V1 ml, JOSEPHTC. DAVIDSE, fB.S. , J , MW: 5 Physics Club,,1vg'Biology Club, 1, Band, 1. I ix - fr- V Tolljll - . . ' 1 lx. ill .----a... T H Ig,-il' i Jill 'H i wary,-Trl, ,fu . WV, ,A Q. 36 ...qw , 5 TT wks, . I , I Y . 1 xx .I -.X V, -..- ,I C I -. , ,Q '--,N ----W --, PW.- I I , ,V . Y., .4 . Y Q.. .V -Nm., kd-,.. C- X., C I .1 I, .. ,. Log, 1 X .I .- , . I I .xx Q Mix MARX RFI I II DEAN A B Olno UI1lVCfSlt5 Homn ELLTIIOIIIICS Club 4 ,IOI-1NbONj DOI PX P 5 Umvcmnly of Pulnsylxdnvl Hlology Club 1 BESSIE 12 EIIIOT Al V Honu TLOHOIIIICQ Club 3 4 DONAI D H BWING A IB Cl1SS 'lrulnulm 4 Claw Baslctb'1ll 2 3' Ggolfwgy Club 2 4 Slgllll. 'I Ill IJLII1 4 Inky Pen Club 4 Old Min Mmmck 3 Romco and lillxet, 4 B 'md M Slxff 4 Nluscoljuan Staff Alplu Ilu Gwmma RONAI D G EVVING A ll ILL Clxms lI'LlHll1f'l 3 s cmdcnt 4 Inly I lb 'she Stoope to Conquu 3 I lcly I-KIOII1 the SL1 4 B 'Incl M Stuff 3 4 Mu coljlmn Stuff 5f1lClCl'llCUI1llCll Irmsurcr 4 btudzm Honor Council 4 Y M Cxbxnu I Alpha 1111 CJ'l.1T11UE1 MLlSlll1g,Ll1l1 Plavcxs BRUCE I'ERGUbON A I3 Clwss Footblll l CCL Club 1 2 3 IXIf1n1g.,er 4 Cmology Club 3 I lllologx Club 3 4 BLHIIIIC Rmg, 4 Collcgn Ouaxtct 4 Collcgg Scxtet 4 CUYI ER N I'ERGUbON A B 8111, Class Pmsxdgnt 2 Foofball 1 2 lrack 1 2 Plmysncs Club I SllllllHl1 Club I' md M Bond of Control 2 qlllClLI1tC0l1l'lLll 2 3 l'rLQ1dLnt X M 3 l.ILQ1C.lCl1t 4 37 I' - '7 4 -1 . ' , ,... , . . . . . V' - I W Q . A . , In , .. W . L' .'.. 1,1 1. .I y I ' .' I' r ,I .. A J, . .Y .,.".,A-,N 1. I , I '1 ,QLIIIII , ,I I - fflwl'-. NY. ' .. PT- '. - l' I '. 4 .1 L' , .lfvl-,I I' I, I l I I . I . - 1 4 , ,- '1 I I I , W I! I V, !iLJII.I-'I IIIII - . - . , , . 1 W , 1 . , ' ,I I -l ' I - Illll, Ii It I' I x ' I. ' V I I l' .'l'll+l'.'I IX . . 'III -, 1 . ! .'V,.I H 4 ' , wwe. I .. I. , A 0 L .. "1 ' ," , f L, V ,V y C , 3 . , 1 XL- .J ff,-I ri, , , I nf ku Q C, . . " . v ' ' . . 'f' Ai ' .1 -. H , . . 1 ' I D 1 I 1 1'! , - E -,I-, . V ' ': I ' 1 1 I - ' 'I . 1 J ' " I ' I l ' ,- - if . , C . I . , -I . -A. ,W in . Y I MX. "R . VIA ' 4 , Y V ,I xx '- I. ,,. 1 -- " ,. I . . . . ... J ' . , J . I . MII , I . .. . , , Clan. Ir . ,- , .1 I an Cll , 3. 4, Band, I, 2, - I .' H, g ,z 4' x2,l'g .. ' .kr I , , Q I fl I 1 1 I ' ' I I J 1' - ' ' I 7 I 1 ' ' . . ,' . . 1 , , x 7 D . 5 ' 1 7 I , . 1 - .' .. . . , , , . I- . .. I ,, jf", ' I f - -I . f I. -,-A ' " I rxp ..- I I A I I ,.. I I - I - J . 4 , . . C.-- f-- -AI' I - 4 -" , .' I' . -. ', '. 5- K I1 K" ' 1 1 - I I Y 1 1 3 ' ' I Y? " ' I. ' . . I . . . , .' , ' , -1. 3, 1, LI . I , ,C , , , . ,., . ., ,XILQ J., ' I . , . HAROLD PROCTOR FINNEY, A. B. Mace, Reserve, Debate Team, 2, Foreneic Club. JOHN R. GAGE, A. B. Benzinc Ring, 4. HAZEL V. GERIVIAN, B. S. in Ed. Home Economics Club, 2, 3, 4. 1 , EVANGELINE GIFFEN, A.B. Glee Club, Z, 4, French Club, lg The Great Adventure, 3g Y. W. Cabinet, Z, 3, 4, President 3. ROBERT G. GIFFEN, B. S. Alban, Glee Club, 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 35 Choral, 1, Z, 3, 4, President 43 Benzine Ring, 4, B. and M. Staff, 3, 43 Y. M. Cabinet, 3, 45 Alpha Phi Gamma, College Quartet, 2, 3, 43 College Sextet, 3, 4. W. RODNEY GIFFIN, A. B. She Stoops to Conquer, 3, Romeo and Juliet, 43 Gospel Team, 1, 2, 3, -l, Leader, 4. A 7 IRIS IRENE GILLOGLY, A.B. Home Economics Club, 1, 35 Old Man Minnick, 3. 38 l,ll-LIAN BELLE GOETZ, ll. S. in Ed. Home Economies Club, -lg Hiking Club, 43 Choral, 4. RUTH M. GORDON, A.B. lieaver College, l, 25 Hockey, 33 Class llzisketball, 3, 43. Class Tennis Team, 3, -lg Spanish Club, 3, 4, Dorm. Council, 4. NERITA I. GRANIDSTAFF, B. S. W'z1wying Bowling Green Normal College, 1, 2, Biology Club, 4. EL1zABE'rH B. GRAY, A. B. ' Basketball, l, 2, 3, -lg Hockey, Z, 3, Glec Club, l, 2, 3, 4g College Quartet, 35 College Sexlettc, 3, 45 Dorm Council, 3. HANNAH GUNIJERMAN, A.B. ' F. A. D., Home Economies -Club, 35 French Play, 33 Woniaifs League. FRANCES CATHERINE HADLY, A. B. Seaton Hill College, Penn. College for Women. MARGARET H A M IVI OND, .A. 13. Chorzil Society, 35 Home Economies Club, l, 2, 3, -lg Hiking Club, 1, 25 She Stoops to Conquer, 3, Romeo and Juliet, ll-. 39 VELVA HARPER, A. B. Geology Club, 3, 4, Spanish Club, 3, -l. W EDNA ,DEBORAH HENDERSONLB. Sw- in Ed. Home Ecouo1nicsAClulJ, 31,743 Choral Club, 3,0-l,'Hlk-li1gk.Club,, 1. , ul: ,lu V l . ' V To DNLECD. I5IESKfETT,: his. 5" ' Ohio Slate, l, 25 ,Benzilt1'd:g'RiN11g, ll. V , H W, l'j ,N , HU, A l o A l if W :lllxi Ulf V jAll.BERfrA HINES, ABQ sq lnllicl., Olxio'-Univ,g:1'sityg Bas-kgzfibgll, lg Yollcy Ballgilg Cl1YQI'Zl.L 35 Dorm Council, 3. PEAR-L AHUNNEIQ, A. . A ' ' Hockey, 25 Baslcctball, 3, ,lg Vollcy Brill, 4, Frcnbb Club, 4, Hikinng -Club, 3, 45 rench Play, 4. ' ' KENNETH I-lUTCHINSON,lB.S. Geology Club, 3, 45 Biology Club, 35 Benzinc Ring, 4. VIRGINIA THERESA IDDINGS, A. B. Delta, Home Economigzs Club, 1, Z5 Hiking Club, 1, 2, 3. 40 NXNCY 51-IXNINON JOHNSON X B Glue Club Z 3 -l l.-lltlltll Club 3 Home Egouonucs Club 3 HPI EN NANCX IOIINBUN A B qccrgtmy 1 P10-1 Doxm 4 HANNAH I ILONA lxAll A P CLdZ!.lVlllC 1 2 B1OlOI-,Y Club -l 1xA'1lllR1NT KENCITI A l Delta Glen. Club 2 3 -l Y VV Cxbxmt 3 MARGARIII REI QEX A 13 CILSQ Sccrutny 1 Sclap D Ly Luddu Llm ll 1 7 3 -l Gl Club 2 3 Prceldent 4 Homg Ecouomxu Club 1 3 -l Romeo and ll.lllCl 4 Y W C1b1nct -l College OlCl1LbtT1 VlLPlll1 lestlvil 1 2 Commcuumcut SIJLllCI' FAXE INN X 1xTNNlbOlN N B DL11u1s,cm Ol1lt7UIllXCFSllV B1OlOgy Club l EI1fAII1lH10U1bl4 IACKPX A U CLclarv1l1L Collage 1 2 Chou Ll 3 Home Lcouonucs Club Smut uv 4 -ll "' V ' f "'?IN12' ' ., ,.., f- l-- ,- vi 7 -fx 33 gf g, ,, QB - ,jg 3 '.y,.,7- 1 . , ,. yl',-- -. ,, ' . 1 1 , 1. ,,.,. . . 4, 5 .,l , E V - , ,V , ,V , ,H 5 i , ,1 , U M gg: Q25 1' SV, , W. ,1 Q Y C? :Q ' 9' , 5 Q -, 551, ' X . , 4' 5 Tx J , 5? -9- ' f 5 5' - " 'Q ll ll . ' ,, ll V,-'I ll' ff ' 4 X uw! xg W .:-, U, l l l fl llll' " ' 'Y A 1' ll ll 1,5 rs K' I' 1 , 1' . . ' , . 1 'Z ' " ' , 2 -' ' 5 , -- 4 7 - C ' C . . 4 , . h ,, . V. .. 1 . ' , 3 ' ' , . - A Y 1 . r 3 , W, . ,. , ' . J. Q . f l A . . , I , 1 y 1 ., ,Q v ' , , . 1 ,- , . A J A L 1. 4 , f. ,.. ' ' ' S " , ww ' I - - 2 ' , - . 4" ' 4 4 7' , . . ,..b , . . . Y, , . , . ' . ' , J, , .. 1 ., V , . , A, , ' , -1- f-,,- - ,1-...-,,, LL ,., - , 2 -- ' 1 1 , I . J S - - ' 1 , 'C - . . , . . , cg ,K L 1 I I . . , .2 ik I , , . , , . J '. 1 . , 1 . ' . ' 1 - V - . 1 ' 1 ' ' C , 1, Jr. V. .. . . f A A 4 ,J ., J , J , . . Y A . ' .. .. ,, . .. . I ' . 'f -. 1 - ! I i K 3 1 " l Ku! 5 C' -Y ' ROBERT S. LAWRENCE, A. B. Adrian College, Michigan, 1, 2, 3. VERNON E. LAYTON, A. B. Bowling Green Collegeg The Lady from The Sea, 4. MARGARET ALLAN LEEPER, A. B. Old Ma11 Minuiek, 35 Romeo and Juliet, 4. MARGARET ANDERSON LEITCH, H. S. F, A. D.5 Hockey, 2, 35 Basketball, 1, 2, 35 Volley Ball, 1, 2, 35 Benzine Ring, 4 C. Clubg "A" Associationp Romeo and Julietg Y. W. Cabinet, 1. WILLIAM R. LEYSHON, A. B. Stoicg WOOStC1'Q Tennis, 35 Class Basketball, 45 "M" Clubg Band, 3. MARY E LONG, A.B. Wawying Home Sconomies Club, 2, 4. EDITH LORIMER, A. B. Deltag Monmouth College, 1, 2, 3. 42 AMANDA LUCAS LOVVERY, B. S, in Ed. Indiana State Normal School, 1, Zg Biology Club, 4. ESTHER LUCILLE LOVVERY, B. S. in Ed. Indiana State Normal School, 1, 2. WALTER I. MAGEE, A. B. Gospel Team, 1, 2, 3. H. FRANKLIN MCALLISTER, A. B, Old Man Minniek, 3, Romeo and Juliet, 45 Student Volunteers, 1, 2, Gospel Team 1, 2. LINCOLN VV. McCONNELL,A. B. F. A. D., French Club, 1, 2, 3, Sigma Tau! Delta, 45 Home Economics Club, 4, Inky Pen Club, 45 Muscoljuau Stall, IS. and M..StalT, 45 Alpha Phi Gamma, Y. W. Cabinet, 3, 4. MARTHA MCCONNELL, A. B. Diploma in Oratory French Club, 1, 2, 3, -lg Sigma Tau Delta, 45 French Play, 1, She Stoops to Con- quer, 3g Romeo and Juliet, 43 Muskingum Players. SARA MARGARET McFADDEN, A. VB. Diploma in Oratory F. A. D., Spanish Club, 3, Inky l'en Club, Z, -lg Old Man Minnick, 3, Lady from the Sea, 4, B. and M. Stall, Z, 4, Muscoljuan Staff, 35 Student Honor Council, 1g Alpha Phi Gammag Violin Festival, 1, 2, 3, 4. 43 MARY ELLEN MCGREGOR, A. B. S A. D., Hockey, 1, 2, 3, "A" Association, Old Man Minnick, 3, Lady From The ea, . , , V4 ' C. LESTER McKEE, A. B. Ohio University and Carnegie Tech., Biology'Club, 4. A MARY A. MEHAFFEY, A.B. D Glee Club, -lg Romeo and Juliet, 4, "A" Association, 'Violin Festival, 2, President orm. r WI LLIAM' MOQRE MIISLIGAN, :A. B. Stag, Class President, 1, Choral Society, 3, Glee Club, 1, 2, 3, 4, Sigma Tau Delta, 4, B. 'and M. Sgaft, 2, Muscoljuan. Staff, Editor-in-Chief, Debate Team, 4, Forensic Club, Alpha Phi Gamma, Cohllege Double .Quartet, 1, c:OlT11llCHCCI11CIllI Speaker, Presi- dent Inter Club Council, Tau Kappa Alpha, 4. ' Q HAROLD N. MINTEER, A. H. Stag, Football, Z, 3, 4, Basketball, Z, Baseball, 2, 3, Class Basketball, 1, 2, 3, -l, "M" Club. HERSCHEL MOORE, A.B. Spanish Club, 1, Band, 4. JAMES D. MOORE, A. B. Sphinx, Class President, 3, Student Council, 3, fl: Football, 2, 3, -lg Class Basketball, -l, Class Football, l, Physics Club, 1, 2, 3, "M" Club, Muscoljuan Staff, Student Honor Council, 3, Y. M. Cabinet, 3, 4. 44 WILI IAM C MOORE A B mtaq 1-'ootb1ll 2 3 4 Claw BaQlxetb'1ll 1 2 3 4 M Cllb HOVVELL EDWARD MORGAN A B MILLARD RAY MORRIS B S ln Ed Ohlo Umwrslty Blue College Glce Club 4 Physxcs Club 4 Band 4 College Orcheetm 4 D IEAN NEEL A B 4 A Aesoclatlon LUCIT LE NICHOI A B Packer Collegmte Inqtmtute 1 2 HELEN A ONG P S 111 Ed Choual 2 Spamsh Club 2 3 4 Hzkmg Club Z GLADYS I OWIINS A 45 A ... I. , . . 1 ez 4 f y r 1 'I -- ' -A C Q 1 1 1 Q - I ' Delta, Bzlsleetball, 1, Choral, 1, Z, 3, 4, Glec Club, 1, 2, '3, 45 College Sextcttc, 1, 2, 3, ' , J ' . , , 5 , ,3, 4- 1. A - , .B. CELIA PARKS, A. B. Home Economics Club, 3, 45 Student Volunteers, 3, 45 Choral 4. RUTH ANN PATTERSON, A. B. M. C. Club, President, 45 Hiking Club, 3, President 4. IOHN CHARLES PAUL, A. B. Gospel Team, 2. , ' MILDRED PETERS, A. B. Wawyingf Benzinc Ring, 4. MARTHA GERTRUDE PICKINS, A. B. French Club, 13 Hiking Club, 3. JULIA FRANCES PLUMMER, A. B. Class Basket Ball, 3, 43 Hockey, 2, 33 Volley Ball, 2, 3, 45 Glee Club, Z ,3, 45 M. C Club, Hiking Club, 1, 2, 39 Old Man Minnick, 3, Romeo and Juliet, 4. - JOSEPH J. POQRMAN, A.B. Stoicg Baseball, 2, 35 Captain, 43 Class Basketball, 1, 2, 3, 45 Spanish Club, 3, M Club, Band, 3, 4. 46 EDGAR WILLIAM RAMAGE, A. B. Old Man Minnick, 3. NANCY JEAN RAMSEY, A. B. Home Economics Club, 2, 3, 4, Hiking Club, 3. ELIZABETH ROBINSON REEDER, A. B. Delta, Glee Club, 43 Choral, 2, 3, 4, 'Vice President Inter Club Council, 4. FLOYD REIGER, B. S. in Ed. Bcnzine Ring, 4. ANNA E. RODGERS, A. B. Hockey, 2, 33 Class Basketball, 2, 3, 43 Volley Ball, 3, 45 Glce Club, 4, Geology Club, Z3 Biology Club, 3, 43 Home Economics Club, 2, 3, 4, Hiking Club, 2, 35 M. C Club, She Sloops to Conquer, 33 Romeo and Ilulict, 4, Y. W. Cabinet, 3. RACHEL RAE RUSSELL, A. B. HARRY I. SCHETDEMANTLE, A, B. Track, 2, 3, Romeo and Juliet, 4, She Stoops to Conquer, 3, Gospel Team, 1, 2. 47 1 JANET E. SEVILLE, A. B. Delta: Class Secretary, 25 Spanish Club, 3, 45 Sigma Tau Delta, Inky Pen Club, 2, 3, 4, "A" Association, 4, B. and M. Stag, 2, 3: Muscoljuan Staff, B .and M. I3-oard of Control, 43 Alpha Phi Gamma. I ' . 4, ' ,ADA-B. SHYOWERS, B. in Colorado StatAe,,.Teachji:ffsQCollege, 1 W i, A . A A1l.IlgE,1:51No,lSP-Ayoigzigg ix. B. Dcltag'Glee Club, 1, 2,, 3,,4g'Co1lQgc, SextpEto,,2, -3,449 Violin Festival. -I if' ii -i ff. I . . I i ' . I LQLIIISA FERNE STONE, 11?-.YS. in Ed. MARY VIRGINIA STONE, A. B. V RUTH STUA RT, A. B. Hiking Club, 45 Choral 4. V I-IARRY L. TAYLOR, A. B. Sphinx, Geology Club, 4. ' 48 1'R11D1IRIClx I '11-IOMPSON A I Ccduullc Gcolonfv Club 4 MRS OCINA CRAT1' 11-IOMISON B 5 m Ed RU'1H THOMPSON A B 11 1 Club 2 3 1 lu Dc -I I1 Jun Club 4 French Plwy Z .J 1 md M Stall 3 -I 111usco1Ju'1ubt1l1 Qtuc1CntCounL11 3 -I Y W Cabmet 3 Xlplu P111 Ccll'l1l113. Dorm SCCYCIITQ EDUARDO PAGAN IOMFI A B Ul1lXClSlty Puerto Rlco Scmmux Lvmgc, 1711.0 gDd.11!S11 Club 4 DARRX1 VVNI I ACE 'IRAVIQ A B G1ADYb LII1 IAN TRIMBI F A B N Lt all V 5 u 11 Club A ASSOLIHIIOII IAYI' IUANV1 A 'IURNER A L Wawym B151 et B111 1 1-loclu 1 She SIOODQ to Conquer Romeo 'md Iullel H11 mg, Club 1 49 1 A 1 . , ' A . Q ' , 1 gl 1 2 "1 S 1 '- X -. f - 4, H , . , , , . . Q ' , . . FSA. D.g frcncl , ,., 4g 5ig111zL'fL Ita, 3 In':j .1 1 I , 3 U . , - 21- -. ,z : 1' g - . . - 2 P. . -ri I 1 , . .. . Q .Vfrfc " U . .Y - 1' .J 1 C, . . . -' , I ,. . .. J -, . . liaxk- Il' , 45 I-Iocked 1, 2, 35 Volley Ball, 1, 2, 35 'punish Cl b, 1, Z, 35 4, C. . 1-1 S' A . .' ' , 7 . L ' f , . J. 'U 'g 1.3: 1 3" vj, 5' , g I . Y ' 5 c -' , . , , K THOMAS I. VERNIA, A. B. Sphinx, Football, 2, 45 Class Basket Ball, 2, 45 Class Football, lg French Club, 13 -M" Club. , of folv - so ,I-IAZEL-,.RU1'H WATSOANA, A.B..f,Y Deltag Class Secrobai-y, fl,glC11TjF3fl,ll'1lY.fVV,.:,CEy.,l11il'19,t,'43 AW0111'ah7s League. ' WllXTSf??AN,'lql?. slQiin,lm. Home Economics c1L1b,,zgl3',,,4lg 4p,11qLng,,g1q1lJ,l2i Q A f . , I .. , , , . lp.,-4-3 ,:lf1vf + , 'A V ww ml A , , QLIVEfI4oU,1sE,gWATTs,,l A.ll3. Senior ljlhyl'-, 1' .fb P' A :Q " '- 1 ,W4 ' JWSY MARJAO1ffE'4lNHAR,TON,'A.iB.- . Wawvying Class Basket Ball, 33 Spanish Club, 4g.fHiking Club, 43-French Play, 3. DOROTHY LUCILLE WHITE, AB. F. A. D., Class Hockey, 1, Z, Home Economics Club, 3, 43 Old'M'an Minnick, 3 French Play, 1, Muscoljuan Staff, Y. W. Cabmct, 3, SATQAI-I FLEMTNGWHITE, A.B. s A s D Delta, Hockey TQa,1T1,"lg l3ask6t Ball, 33 French Club,"3,A4g Hiking Club, 1. A so -1-Ran GAIL WILLIAMS, B. S. in Ed. . Ohio University. MARY CRAIG WILLIS, A. B. French Club, 2, 3, 43 Home Economics Club, 2, 3, 4: Hiking Club, 1, 2, 3, 43 Romeo and Juliet, 4, French Play 4. WINIFRED FORSYTI-IE WILLIS, A. B. Geology Club, 4, Old Man Minfnick, 35 Y. W. Cabinet, 33 Student Volunteers, 2, 3, 4. MAE WOOD, A. B. Wawyng Home Economics Club, 1, Z, 3, 45 Hiking Club, 1, 2. SENIORS WHO DO NOT APPEAR ELLA MARGARET CARSON PAUL OSCAR COCHRAN ANNE FRASER DITTMAR WILLIAM EORESEY ROBERT SIMON RETTLEWELL ROBERT WESLEY LEE CLARENCE BLAIR LINARD FRANCES ADELLA MCRIBREN KENNETH LINCOLN MCRINNEY ROBERT EWINC MCOIIISTON EUGENE WALTER AMARSI-IALI. JESSE PETTY f DOROTHY RYAN ' LAWRENCE EMMETT SCHMIDT HELEN MARTHA SHEPHERD HAROLD STEELE HELEN SUTHERLAND FREDERIC LEE THOMPSON MARGIE FRANCES VVALCUTT HARRY BLISS VVALDORF 51 wvN1 - H- sn, - WMI? RQ Zh gimme Y , A j gg H arg wg A W .QIHYJQLS H gli ms!-an -3-gnffmvx-N 531- ffg fha 555 in M u , ' . ,E , as 'gg ' Ni H- ag EWU mi K5 is ' Wim wif: iff as gf ,ga if a ms' ,Q wiyxia mg M M -we H ,Q nw mx mam E Q X.. ,HMB nb. m...,.,., sm 'Mi A V sf A V L-L w H A w E ME Y K A ,f heaven-x,g3g,d.g: Q' K - 14 WS, " H: L54 W- .W Y? L4 Q .vw - W 885.5 38838 RS' 0 H 'ze .Wa .g a-2 ,W saw 3 ME as WA N Xe 1? , H K' any H, -ua. N 'Q 'mnmkm Mu- K1 sf Ei W 'awp ., in m L my-4 ,Bs W Q Wm A ss ss :ga mfg -E ,Xa 'H , m ,ss ref' -n - LM ,559 N52 5- J ' B A 55 . 53 ' fgagzi 555 vim H H Lg. W ,u - . ww Q, H I , xx ' -1 E , X Q B W W M 'JE' li H , Y. ,iq ,N H. N-LHS w- E4 S8 I R E R B. , iimsis M f . 2 E ,g B 5ffQ,sm,sfwH5a nga E 4? fx J 1 gxgiim Magi imvffw EH E55 3' U. M .1 S H rw xg gm QE , swag wg as . I' M wg Z, , ,V-,B,,s,,-,fi E. V, H was 1' 'a' m.1HfwgQ'H.. H 1- H ssmm, -- vim sg, . Sass K Z- E 5-.E 'D A 1 N ' ' 'f My f - F ' -W W UfmEm,5WVEgQlWN:1m, E KH if W , sf E . B fx H H an ff: mm- w ,. .- . , .MV Mm ,. , E5 A H M24 9525 2 Z1 Zami 55' 4? fa 'HW' E Q Q F pi vi- n r-A V , K. ., . f H my ' ' , -bs ,NJ K U 5 mffvnm -W 3535556 5352885 -ng mi y ' W, 1 ew waw.,-?,mw 5-as 5 Q. a KL 52 4' mfynmzim W 11 , - I T L n ms Q . gs E sf as an n . X ss M M ,fm W Q V -is Y H' xx x xx X XA x X53 W 'Ngffiffw gg ?sWf fe- qgkbsi -J H Q PHS union, .3 fx x . wx - X 'Tx X -- x 5 x ,XR ' x X B xxhl: C rx R. i- ii- g-If ' " fm. zf' A-53? '9 ' MZ' .,, A ,. ,Wg ...Q S , ,,. 1 un- "4 if , ,gl ., '1 5 cjjuninr Gllauas OFFICERS President ..... Alfred Garrett Vice fJl'FSfdClIf Robert Fowler .S'Ccl'qta1'y Muriel Thompson Y'1'aczsurcr . . NVayne Greenlee Freshman Classes since the days of Plato and Aristotle, and Knox Montgomery have been described colorfully. And perhaps the Class of '28 was that. Certainly they carefully memorized songs and Frosh rules from little handbooks, and listened to kindly serious talks from the junior Presi- dent, bought brilliant insignia, held pep meetings, and snake dances-in spite of the fact that the folding possibilities of a Ford were over estimated, and the City Hall mistaken for a battle scarred fort-and of course they won Scrap Day. But then, in time they laid aside their outgrown high school garments, and partook with more sane indulgence of snake dances and Scrap Day, but pointed out to their sturdy youth the football and basketball courts. During the Sophomore year some upperclassmen did stay around to help a little with football, but in '26 the1'e were several juniors in the field that gave the coaches of the all conference teams some worry. And for basketball the decks were completely cleared, and the Junior Varsity struttd off to the Conference Championship. Besides all that the Class of '28 set a precedent and founded a tradition-perhaps-the junior-Senior Prom! And then, in scholarship, '28 rates not so bad, and this is no mean Museoljuan-yes? 54 'BBS l.-.- ELEANOR ANDERSON Geologv Club 3 Spuush Llxb 2 Cor1l13 No WOl1df.l she 18 'mttttetne bm Loma to us f1LQl1 evuy mormug fxom her home on Lwt Mun Street lhree xe'1rQ wqo she mas '1 fra1l Hower from C thfornm, but has beeolne euceessfullv tl mspl mtul duly xmbued wlth tht Hello splrll the lVIl'l9lxll'l.,l1lTl mend l veh note bools, L11 boolt renews 1 los 1l eollcc txon md the other Lbbentrtls for deep md OI'1g'll1'l.l lllllllxlllg LYLE M ALLEN LllLlTllNlIy Club 3 Spun-.ll Club Z Allen 1s '1 b15 quiet fellow, who seems to have lll hum 'tll the QtOlLlSI'I'l and gnu ltr, LI1dL1l mee of 1 New lIm.,l'1ndL1 IC eustomed to the cold 1nd thc. snows lllrough hls three veftrs lene lu lx borne lnmself with 4 quietness wluch ts S remarkable 'Ls It IS eoumilent Even thougli thw 'silence h ts not 1'JCT'IU1ttCCl. ue to Lnovx hun well enougbh to hke hun 1111111 ttely it nrtkes Us rn pect htm MARTHA ELIZABETH ANDERSON Delh Home ELOIIOHIICS Club 1 2 3 Ouamt 'md demuxe blue eves th It wxll dmce gguly petlte feet tlut eeem to click ofl' merty tunm as they lrlp throur h tu hills Martle Or Qhe m'1v be nearly h1d behmd 21 huge, whlte, crwp apxon onlv 1 tmy head peeluug oer nts suff nom to cons1der the bubblmg mloraei wxhteh elm stus d'11nt1ly, yet Wll.l1 L dc lLI'1lllI'llflO1'l Wlnch bodes 1ll to any which clue to 1111'vbC11lXC It w'1Q rumored thlflllfbll the SlO1C House thu Md1l1C 1115 '1 qemus for mal mg menus for hungry men Oh yes the tall courtly Count of laus 1CHldtb there but vxe think he wxll ch H156 the blow book tale 'md Wm lnS Tuhetl 1 'A ' - H' Y ' ' ' ' ' V7 l ' ' ' , 1, . V Q7 T Y Y l 1 f . , t t t , ,- , if M t, N -W . L t f ' ' , , ,U 5 . 1, W tt, .. tt tl' I . 'Q , ' ' ' ' r -., ,, -,,,Y....4g..-,-,.t.,,--, ,, ,..,n.. . ,1, ,, ' ,,.,..,a ,, HW, 4, J ., ,, ,, ,, , . t.. . , -..,-t.,,e ,X t 2 lf, , g . , 1 . , h . , , . .' ' J f '2 ' ' , l A - -. . . 1 J 1 - ' r - ,1 J T2 h Q ' M' , . "' -' ' 4 .. c L' .' ' ' ' 1 " .Z ' .' " ' ' ' ' fe' 'z S . 2 '. , 2 .', - , - 0- - t t iq - 1- ' I A A. ' Y ' . 1 , ' Y 'i, 2 ' :ea " - ' - 1 . 1 N . v' V ,. . . 1 5 f ' . -. 1 - V . ' V '1 ' , . . . ' ,. , , . . . , . .. , . , , , . N ' r ' - 1 - . A ' - - -. .t - ' .' K . ' . . ' ' "' 1 ' ' K . . . ' : ' '. - 'z ' fc , ' - 1 C ' J ' . , , .2 2 . 4 ,- 1 , .v 2 , .. , . ,K L. . . 5 Q - ' . 1 " . c IT , ,'. . c 4 ' S X , ' Q 1' " ' 12 S ' - ' . X . X I .1 . .R I. N' ,,. , . V.,- ., N , - . , K Y T ' . . ' 2. - ' ' .' T f '. r ' f: " Y , , Y t ,. , . , 2 A. I . 1 , 1 "'.' f 15' ' . 2 ' C 2 7 . c . - Y - ' A t : X z ' -' 1 . L : , ' 4 V , , ,. , . . A, I - 1 ,J . . . . ,. . , . ' ' ' . . 2 3' ' N , 1 - ' . . L WILLIAM E. ARCHER Benzine Ring, 3. Here is a man dry and fine, and dapper in the same manner as is a late summer grassllopper. Archer is one of those per- sons who absorb knowledge here in the daytime and return to Cambridge to mull it over during the night, at least, this is presumed. He may be seen dur- ing certain hours of the day in the study room in the basement of Montgomery Hallg here he seems to acquire a final preliminary touch of wisdom to carry hi1n through the day's classes. CHARLES ELLIS APLIN Physics Club, 33 Benzine Ring, 3. "Dr, Charles Aplin, M. D." decorates a sign several years hence. The sign beckons us into a model complaint bur- eau-a doctor's office. Once inside, we discover an old M. C. friend who decided to share with us the joys of '28. Feign- ing some ailment, we discover that he is just the same jolly, good fellow, mighty thoughtful of others but a little too wise to allow anything to be put over on him! J. HERBERT BAIN Stagg Football, 2, 35 Basketball, Z, 3g Tennis, 25 Physics Club, 33 "M" Club. Bain is a staunch man, a friendly man, whose eye is quickly excited to the hu- morous gleam. No one can more close- ly approximate the appearance of a Ro- man gladiator than Bain when he is playing center. ln connection with his athletic career it might be remarked that Muskingum has never put out an athlete whose name has been more consistently mis-spelled in news write ups. And a person who can carry the nickname Betty through Academy and college with no deleterious effects to himself is to be admired. fegi MARY BIGGS Basketball, 1, Z, 33 Volleyball, 1, Z, Spanish Club, 13 M. C. Clubg Hiking Club, 1, 2. Signs of life in the Dorm? Something skidded around a corner? A giggle, a squeal, a laugh, a pursuit? No, don't bother Iohnny B. it is only Mary re- peating a cycle of her history-a prac- tical joke, a dash for freedom-capture- penalty. Some say she is sometimes serious. But that is merely a hypothes- is, never scientihcally proven. RUTH ELIZABETH BIGGER Volley Ball, 33 Hiking Club, 2, 3, The Lamp and the Bell, 3. Ruth seems to enjoy having the wind blow hard against her, and she makes an interesting silhoutte as she almost defiantly tosses back her hairg she is a sturdy person. In gym she is held to be almost an exhibitionist, and for Junior Play she has set some new standards for peppy little boys with tops and pocket knives. As to what some may think of her actions, she cares not at all. ELROY J. BIRNBACH Moody Bible Institutcg Gospel Team, 1, 2, 3. Lots of people do not know liirnbach. He is too reserved to attract everybody. But there are some who appreciate his pleasant fellowship-witness his frequent marcelle. And it is said that when the roll is called at the Methodist Church, Birnbach ehirps rigfht up. And the same is true when the Gospel Team needs a man with a sermon. Birnbach is such a peaceable fellow we forsee a life of unrufflcd happiness as the "Shepherd of some flock." GRACE BOBBITT Hiking Club, 2, 3. Grace is a friendly soul. She just adopts one, and talks and chatters and even sputters a little if the lunch for which she is waiting does not appear promising-but then she will soon re- sume talking about anything at all. Still one does not object to the adoptiong there is a frankness and graciousness in the ceremony that Batters one a little. GRACE BLACK Deltag Glee Club, l, 2, 3. Charm-the exotic fragrance of a scent-laden breeze from an orange grove, and Grace. It is in her low voice, in her dark eyes, in her general appearance of having stepped out from some Spanish home but a minute ago. "She has a lovely face." There are deeper roots to her charm than mere external attractiveness. They lie in her whimsical spirit, her intelli- gence, her appreciation and her warm friendliness. Charm and Grace-the two are one. J. RUTH BOWMAN F. A. D., Basketball, 2, 33 Volleyball, 2, 35 Spanish Club, l, 23 Hiking Club, 1, 25 The Lamp and the Bell, 3. If ever an impressible giggle is found missing from the Library, it may be found in the small person of "Ruthic". For a person who is exactly sixty inches tall and who has a funny little turned- up nose, her dependability is amazing, and she really is seriously inclined at times. What "dem black eyes" express would cure the sourest cynic's tooth- ache. You just can't help it-you have to laugh! QPlease note: She loves to cook.D "'l'vaf' ,. ,7 SARAH FANNY BROWN Delta, Basketball, 1, Hockey, 1, Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 35 "A" Association, You and I, 31 French Play, 3. Thcre's something about Fanny that sets the gypsy heart astir-a Hash of color, a snap of wit, an easy languid gesture: inviting, enticing, alluring, The wind blows her red llannel dress, there appears in the folds a football game, bands, gay banners, color movement, life. And then she becomes an Italian street girl, with bracelets, and full skirts of red and yellow, orange and purple. dancing with tambourine, or with secre- cy telling lovers' fortunes. Or she half reelines in the lzunplight. There are Turkish clivaus in the uncertain back- groundg brilliant girdles, incense, shad- ows. Inviting, enticing, alluring. CHARLES A BRADBURY Stagg Basketball. 1, 2, 35 Baseball, 13 Track, 1, 2, 3, "M" Club. Here is one man who simply cannot be accused of laziness. No matter what he is doing, its "working in there hard all the time, Charley" that is his secret of success. Bradbury is a person one can like easily, yet can like much ITIOTC with a closer intimacy. Although he com- ports himself very quietly in public, those that know him will swear that he can be IL very entertaining fellow when he cares to be. JOHN CALHOON Sphinx, Ohio State, 1, 25 Basketball 35 Band. Calhoon is noted for his dry humor, his ability to tell a joke without laugh- ing, and his very bass voiceg also for his dark eyes and hair. For diversion from his strenuous coaching activities, John plays basketball and the saxaphone. Johnnie inhabits Fort Wils'on, and it is said, haunts the wilds of Thompson. KENNETH CARMICHAEL Mace, Track, lg Glee Club, Z, 35 Sonrf Leader, 33 Band, 1, 23 Muscoljuan Staffg Gospel Team, lg College Quartet, 33 College Sextette, 3. This is Carmichael. You don't know him: you can't know all of him. Car- michael is versatile, Carmichael is hn- mrorousg Ken has been found in a serious frame of mind. He sings, paints and sketches, he is a speaker of no little ability, he laughs, and others laugh with him, he has ability enough to be asso- ciate editor of this book. All in one- Carmichael. LEONARD E. CAMPBELL Noted among a favored few for the way he can drive a car when a football game is at the other end of the road. 'Tis said that he is good at stepping on it, and a marvel at missing the corners of S bridges, a process that works up a mighty stream of pep for the game. Campbell is an independent fellowg he craves no advice. His is sometimes called a poker face, and colorful adjectives are used to describe his adeptness at a cer- tain indoor sport. B. DE GRAW CARROLL Marion College. ' Observe one of the country's huture great biologists! Majoring in Biology and ininoring in Chemistry, thafs he. How beautiful are the inner workings of the dogfish. With what gace do his nerves penetrate the body. Ah, we can trust Carroll to discover a new cell for us when necessary. But he is a good fellow, and agreeable. ,, .W,,, . ., ...- , ...W M ,. ,,,,. . . fe- 4 y-1. 4' - I. . tw Nf-v V -'ttf ' 'f . S? :: in im . Y ll..e L. 0 L. REED CLARK Mace, Football, 2, 3, Track, Z, Class Football, 1, Spanish Club, 2, "M" Club, Y. M. Cabinet, l, 2, 3, Debate Team, Z, 3, Forensic Club, Cheer Leader, 3. Grand flourish of trumpets! Enter Rcedo Clarko, the 'l'oreador, master of mob psychology, possessor of the rnaeg- netic personality. Be quiet! Let the leader speak-Out of amazing self-con- fidenee have I done il-with myself I lead cheers, I debate, I play football- there is no insurmountable object. Let the passion of the mob resound-let the leader's voice be heard. A. GLENN CLARK Mace, President, 2, Football, Z, 3, Basketball, Z, 3, Class Football, 1, Class Basketball, 1, Spanish Club, 2, "M" Club, Student Council, 1, Z, 3, Student Honor Council, 3. Why does everyone like VVootly? Is it because he is so friendly without be- ing condescending? And he is sympa- thetic, too, his very glance is straight and level and interested. He is consist- ent, one could tell it from the way he tucks a book Linder his arm and settles into his long stride, you would surmise it if you saw him at the Denison game after that cup of cold water on his neck, grab his helmet and cry "On with the Dance." And he backs a decision, with the evidence all salted down-one, two, three. Descriptions are flat, he is "Ster- ling, no more can be said." BRENDA MARCELLA CONN Spanish Club, 2, Home Economics Club, l. Dependable. Don't ask her how many of her friends secrets she knows, she will not tell, that's why she knows so many. Adaptable. She takes passing in- terest in anything and everything. Music, she plays well and sings, a hike, all set, a game, a darning bee, a discussion, Brenda will enter for the fun of it, and with a zest, unless too many are around, then her Scotch blood cries out for cool- ness aud reserve. RUTH CRAIG Bowling Green. We may be wrong, but we are willing to wager about a hundred to one that this lady intends to join the ranks of the schoolmarrns after leaving this in- stitution' of higher learning. "How do we know?", you ask. Well-her evident desire to absorb knowledge, and her systematic yet eager method of going about that businessg by a quickness of speech that is not rapidityg other more occult reasons-all these point to the fact. THORA ELIZABETH COULTER Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3g Hik- ing Club, 3. After a thing day in classes and things are all going the wrong way, it is pleas- ant to meet someone who is always the same cheerful person. This is Thora. She has had tl1e spirit of Muskingum in- stilled in her from youth and takes every occasion to show that "old Muskingum spirit." Aside from this she has made her friendship unforgettable to those nearest her. . MARTHA E. CUNNINGHAM F. A.'D.g Hiking Club, lg Dorm Coun- cil, 3. It would be hard to find a better friend than in the small person of Marty. Her qualities of sincerity, good coinradeship and "always the sameness" make her dear to those of us who know what lies under that .air of shyness. When there's something to be done, it's quite often, "Get Marty to do it", and fairy-like mag- ic seenis to move in its own way. She was an enthusiastic basketball player un- til an injured knee forced her to sit on the bench. This year the Dormitory keeps her busy smoothing out domestic troubles. You know "Bills" do require a lot of time! MILDRED DARRAH Choral Society. Mildred is one of the more musically inclined members of our class. Those who do not inhabit the conservatory will know her by her presence in the Chapel Choirg her abilities are, however, better known to those who l1ave some conserv- atory work. It has been remarked by some that music seems to be the only important interest of Mildred's life. You may be sure that this is 11ot the fault of her brown hair and eyes, many have sought to lead her interests elsewhere. RAYMOND LAWRENCE CURTIS Chemistry Club, 3. "Hello boys! How are you ?" And with this greeting, Raymond Curtis, advocate of the now famous Ato1nic Disintcgrator, enters the room. Curtis is eternally re- turning from long trips in the country to regale us with his philosophical ideas, after having delivered himself of them he immediately returns again to the coun- try. "Well boys, l'll say goodbye now." HELEN DAUGHERTY F. A. D.g Class Hockey, 1, 2, 33 Class Basketball, 1, 2, 3, Volleyball, 1, 2, 35 French Club, 2, 35 Home Economics Club, lg M. C. Club, "A" Afsociationg Student Council, lg Y. W. Cabinet, 3. Helen can be quite exasperating. She looks so intellectual that one sometimes seeks her out as an oasis in a desert of frivolity. But perhaps she will only toss her hair back, and assent to any inanity by a roll of her teddy bear eyes, and suggestively turn to her books. And yet if she chooses she can lead one's thoughts fast and so far that it is dizzy- ing, And if she sits down at the piano, she can carry -one to a fairyland, or Hades, or even to a dignified jazzland. If one wants to borrow a book for Sun- day, Brother Don has chosen Helen many a good one. RACHEL M. DAWSON University of Pittsburghg Hiking Club 25 The Lamp and The Bell, 3. Rachelg there is dignity in the name. To be sure she talks of weather and work, but is she a wee bit bored? It is said with a few friends she laughts and acts foolish, or talks seriously, and they think no less of herg but with strang- ers-.But even if one does not belong to the inner circle, it is pleasant to talk with her, because she listens so-almost with her eyes. RUTH DAVIDSON . Hockey, 1, 2, Spanish Club, lg Student Honor Councilg Y. W. Cabinet, 3. For an example of real genuineness of character, worthiness as a friend and naturalness of manner, Ruth might well be chosen, as evidenced by the regard with which she is held by both students and Faculty. She is a lover of books and music, an artist in her tastes and an interesting person to know. A member of the future race of American poets seems to be responsible for a consider- able portion of the mail from Burma, India. MARIAN LOUISE DOUDS Home Economics Club 35 Hiking Club, 3. Blue eyes, golden locks, and a win- some smile-this is Marion. She liked our class much better than the class of '29 so she left them behind. She is a Home Ee major-you remember the old saying. "The Way to a man's heart-", Marion is also one of our charming mer- maids and she aims to be another Gert- rude Ederle. Success to yO1.l, Marion, and may your swim through the channel of life be no more difficult than swim- ming to the spoon-holder! :nf JAMES TELFORD DUNCAN Biology Club, 3g Physics Club, 3. Indeed, it seems that this man is many times married, for he is much wedded to his books. If Duncan's object in life is to become scholar, he is on his way to accomplishment. His attitude seems to be: I am here to learn from books, what else should I do? Truly, he is na infall- ible guide to the material of the text- book. HERBERT C. DOWNING Glee Club, 1, Z ,3g Band, 1, 2, 33 Col- lege Orchestra, 3g Violin Festival, 1, 2, 3. One who never shouts about hiinselfg never appears hurried, never looks tired, yet the amount of work he does, both in study and wage earning, proves him con- sistently enregetic. And when some Chairman needs a violin or tenor solo, he can rely on Herbert to be there be- fore time with his notes all prepared or his violin tuned. And when the minstrel needed a semi-classical act, Herbert was the man to play the obligato, and do the bow and smile. MARY JEANETTE DUNCAN Volleyball, 25 French Club, 35 Hiking Club, 1, 25 The Lamp And The Bell, 3. Who is more truly appreciated by those who know her? Perhaps it is ap- preciation because of appreciation for this young lady is one of those who are growing great in oratory. The whole- someness of the great open spaces and the charm of a closer contact with life are delightfully blended in herg witness her frank smile, her clear thinking and her scholastic ability. W s, ' " ' " i I ORMAN R. EDGINGTON Sphinx, B. and M. Stalf, 2. One outstanding quality of Orm.an's is his deep earnestness. Whether im- bibing knowledge at the feet -of wisdom or imparting advice to his fellow suffer- ers hc goes about his work with steady persistence and quiet determination, He is intensely interested in politics and al- ways ready to present any information concerning the various candidates for election. Perhaps some of us will have the opportunity of voting for him in two years to come. As a friend he is genuine and his loyalty to the school finds him right with the teams wherever they go. MARGARET DYSART A daisy expresses Margaret. Simple, frank, open. Always she looks in ini- mediate danger of smiling-into which she falls at the least temptation. Even tempered: dc-:merit records at the Dorm, however, give come aroused, she is a daisy, mopolitan one, she spends on witness that she can be- justly so, of course, for you knowg a rather cos- it seems, from the hours French and German. VIRGINIA W. ESTERQUEST Glee Club, 1, 3, Choral, 1, 35 Hiking Club, lg The Lamp And The Bell, 3g College Quartet, l. She may tumble in the door, laughing and talking and pinning her hair back all at once. And then she'll run up stairs and chatter and giggle and laugh with the girls there. At high speed she'll talk for three minutes-then, "Well, I must get to work" she'll toss back from the cloor, and dash down again, and consume a week's work in an hour or two. She may--and again she may stalk in and slam down her books, and throw ol? her coat and go to the piano. D After a while she will sing a song, a happy song-in a contralto as strong and full and whole souled as Virginia. -,nt X: 1, ,1t-.-,- .ul 1 .HC -7, .1 . 1, ,IM K-l!lQ,.4,f.,-g...---"' xy Lf N--'X' Q -Lx N- ELIZABETH V EWING I' A D Hllxlllg Club 1 2 Spewklng of pep good all around sports, the spmee of the crowd and the hlte Betty stands at the top Youll al wmvs End her to be the persomfieatton of the lJl1YOlU, bllthe 'tnd deb0n'11r vouth we read about Then too, the lflillfl loxe Call hws nothmg on Betts method of 1ppell'1t1on, commonly heatd 'ms ttxxs tpproftch our metxopolts We '1Cl.1111lL he1 wx 'textv whrch seems to be lmntless as well as her 'ut ln ClllllVW.t ms: fllCTtCl9l111J ALICE R EVANS Htlung Club l Cuuosct ind eurloser s'1vs Ahce as she wanders llllOllQ,'l1 the W0l1ClCll1l1d of lsvchologv um tvelhng., the mvsten s of hunnn conduct Is thut lt ht in her even 'md not 'nt us lh'1t s what nukes Ahcc md hu ltnoxxlcdqc nnfornnd'1ble She h ts such a fund of sympathv 'md IIJDIC' cmtton Who nnnds hem CllQL,OVC1'Cll xx hen thex '1re llso bcmg, understood sympatheucally? And tlmt dnnple tts xx orth sotnetlnng to brtng lt out' ETHEL E EWING Geology Club 1 Z 3 Slgma T'1u Delta 3 Inky len Club 3 Hnkxng Club 1 B and M Stxff 1 Muscoljuan Staff B 'md M Board of Contlol 3 Thts lxltle gtrl whose features here ap pe'1r l1'1s '1 xery elententwl nature She ts 'tshamed of tt however and cloaks It under tl1CO11CQ behcfs and credos most znauelous to COI151ClC,1 MIS C C Catt w'1s not more r'tb1d nor lucy btone, tn condemn mon of woman s usual depend ence on man In f'1ct, IVIISS Ewmgs opnnons on thas matter are tampant and charge ntercxlessly at such 1lIusory and ephemetal qwthttes ws love and other l1'lllULlIl2ll1OI1Q of the lllxe nature And she xs entnclv e'1p1ble of lnfuntqlnmg he1 ground for her command of bellttl mg 'lnd condemnatory phrases IS most dxstressmg ., . ',' . . ., , , . .1: , ' .. y ,, - . . - 2- . , h. , , 11 - -11 f . , t 1 ' 11. l ' Ll ' ' - l: , ' 1 A 1, C C C ' 2: ' 1 1 ' r " ' ' 'c '-, . . . , , 1' c ' as 3 1, ' 5 11 ' . . D . 'J . . 1 . .r.. - '1 1 1 1 1 . 1 . ' A 'K . . 1 , Q S Q lx, ' r, -2 1 3' A 1 ne, .. . ' , . a laugh? It ts-but xt ts 21 laugh wtth T , ' f. , . . 1 K . . r , c .,. .c r ' . ' '., , ' , 1 x' - 1 1 H ' D . C C- 7 y 5 4 11 I 1 . ' rl K ,' ' 1 . t. . . , f - - - . 1. . , 4 f - ' . z . ' 1' , - 1 l f, . ., 1 , - . 1 ' ' ' 9 - . I , . .. , . 1. - ,. , ch , . C Q .. v 1 I . " u 'c c ' 1 . . - , u - 1 C ROBERT FOWLER Sphinx5 Class Treasurer, 25 Class Vice President, 35 Cross Country, Z5 Glcc Club, 2, 35 Inky Pen Club, 35 Muscoljuan StalT5 Gospel Team, 1, 2, 35 College Sex- tette, 35 Violin Festival. Long ago when this famous class was young and green, someone called Bob "Johnny-Robert". We know that he doesn't like it but nevertheless the name sticks, not in ridicule but just because We like him! He's the good-naturecl, congenial, easy-going sort of chap who falls heir to many a job Where just Plain aftability will win the point. "Busyncss" without that doubtful virtue known as efficiency might characterize Bob. just in passing, we might make note of the fact that a combination of wavy hair, blue eyes, and a sweet voice is not at all displeasing to the "better half" of the campus. ANNA LOUISE FERGUSON Deltag "A" Association, Muscoljuan Staff. Fanny is scarlet and gold. Louise is pink and blue. Dainty, Delicate. It's in her gesture as she Wraps her coat around her, or tilts her chin to avoid the double effect, or tucks back the curl of a one time bob-or indeed, dances before the Queen of the May. Letters, even,- perhaps they are scented with lavender- she writes in an atmosphere of "Romeo and Juliet", or "Hamlet" or "A Midsum- mer Night's Dream." But don't tell Foxy. GEORGE H. FRACK Sphinx5 University of Pittsburgh5 Football, 2, 35 Inky Pen Club, 35 "M" Club5 B. and M, Staff, 35 Debate Team, 35 Forensic Club. Frack aroused a lot of curiosity when he entered in his Sophomore year. 'Twas whispered around the Dorm that he was a guide in Yellowstone when the great mystery of nature gripped him. Then at that auspicious moment a vision came to him of Patton Park and the Geology Department, and through the mists, the Statue of Liberty. And so he came. And now we're proud of him. He's such a charming mixture of cave man, Sir Gal- ahad and the Public Speaking Depart- ment, Oi Doctor? 1' u 1- JOHN MURDOCH FRENCH Mace, Inky Pen Club, 33 ll. :incl M. Stuff, 2, 3, Gospel Team, 1. Muskingum is mighty luck to get this mang Indiana Normal might have, you know. Murdoeli is serious, as becomes a Gospel Teamer, consistent, as becomes a stuclentg pleasant, even frivolous at times, as becomes one with a pleasing smiley jovial, even tempered, plczmsant, expansive as becomes French, ELIZABETH NELSON FRAZER Nellie would probably come Usmilin' through" if the sky fell. If she ever gets discouraged she only smiles to others. She smiles as she energetically hurries to the library--hurries to save time for studying, and while she works she smiles-she enjoys working. And she is so generous hearted that she would share her last "A" and still smile. ROBERT H. FRENCH Mace, Vice President, 1, Class Foot- ball, lg Varsity Football, 2, 35 Glee Club, 2, 33 Spanish Club, Z, Museoljurm Stall Business Manager, Y. M. Cabinet, 35 Violin Festival Manager, 2, 3. Bob is a cheerful fellow, with at curl to his hair that makes him look s-ometinies, like a cheerful young gallant, and some- times, when it plots with his nose, like n two-year old on a spree. There must lie something behind, though, as he is business manager of this book. For some reason, known only to a few, French is consistently late for lunch. VVhether or not this has any connec- tion with his position as heir-apparent to the vice-presidency of the college, we do not know, but we are able to guess. 'fri tlaiir "1 f-H11 V- W I T 'WILLIAM MCMASTER GARRETT Albang Football, Z, 3, Benzinc Ring, 3. Bands, banners, color, mobs wailing, ,tense for the coming combat. Out of the side of the arena files a motely line of warriors. Grave they all are, but there's o11e whose gruesomeness sends cold chills down various spinal columns. laws thrust out, eyes half-closed, he charges down the Field with the same calm delib- erateness that characterizes his more civ- ilized moments. That is Poker-face Gar- ret! Wliat lies behind that mask of in- scrutability as he goes his way is a ques- tion worthy of one of his own sessions of hot debate, He talks little until an argument is started, and then watch the hreworks! . ALFRED B. GARRETT Alban, President, 35 Cross Country, 1, 2, Captain, 35 Track, l, 2, 33 Benzinc Ring, 2, 35 "M" Clubg Student Honor Council, 2, 35 Y. M. Cabinet, 2, 3. This is our honorable President! We are proud to say that everyone knows "Al" from the newest Freshman to the oldest Senior for his happy grin and never-failing "Hello". He is the sort of student who gets a lot out of his college life because he puts so much into it. When he isn't attending to his many of- ficial duties or pulling some Freshman out of the lake, he may been seen tread- ing the straight and cinder path. Rumor says that in his spare time he goes in for "Ci-afts". We respect him, we admire hirrrand best of all, we like him, ELIZABETH GIBSON One First notices dark eyes and a smile, and would be tempted to call her sweetg but that cannot be all. There is character in the nose and determination in the chin. She seems a collection of contradictions. She has common sense worthy of a grandmother, and yet she coquettes with no more malice than a two year old. Next she assumes the ex- pression -of a Buddha, but soon drops her vanity case as attractively as any. l ' 11-11 4 ..,,.-. , ....1.,.,,,4-.. . . W.. E -.1,if . '!:41.:aMJ!..f"fal.l...L.- ,, - MARTHA ALICE GRAHAM French Club, 2, 35 Home Economics Club, 1. Little, quiet, curly hair, a smileg always trying to get fat-willing even to endure a glass of milk a day. This training it appears is transfered to studying, for she's consistent in consuming' Education- al Department theory and bunk. She will be a teacher for a few yearsg but really, there's something so serene about Martha, that twinkle!-with soft white hair sI1e'll make an adorable grand- mother. WILLIAM M. GLASS The history of Mac's college life niighi sound like a young Odesseyg Ulysses, i'1 spite of all his other troubles, never had to fix a Hat tire or coax the engine of a prewar Ford. This black-haired young gentleman is really a fine friendg he has a disarming smile and a friendly manner that engages one upon first acquaintaneeg and a long'- cr friendship only improves one's opin- ion of him. VVe are glad that he caught up with our class and now belongs to us. FLORIS MARGARET GRAHAM Glee Club, 2, 33 Choral, 1, 2, 35 Violin Festival, 3. Floris is not frowningg she is merely serious, and perhaps the seriousness is accounted for by the fact that if one asks her for an opinion or a judgment, She only has to remember her conclusion. But, nevertheless, Floris is rather il happy child, happiest when practising or playing classics on piano or organ, or anticipating' it as she hurries conserv- atory-ward. .semi 0 in 'i'i1::f' 'hqgiii x 5 "' wi tipll my 1 WAYNE T. GREENLEE Stoicg Class Treasurer, 3, Basket- ball, class, 23 Geology Club, 1, 35 Spanish Club, Z3 Muscoljuan Staff. Greenlee is tall and good-looking, and wears clothes well, he has been called justly one of the handsoniest fixtures of the Stoic house. VVithout dobut he will become an outstanding business man, The junior class has realized his busi- ness acumen, and elected him class treas- urerg another evidence of his ability is the manner in which he garnered adds for this book, from this source we de- duce that his powers of persuasion are great. CHARLES R. GRANT Bost-on Universityg Basketball, class, ZZ. 3: Physics Club, 35 The .i,.2l.1l'l1J and the Ben, 3. Grant has quiet solemn eyes, worth more than a glance. Unostentatious. Brainy enough to give Dr. Ogan a pro- found opinion now and then, And he has a drawl, a slow drawl that suggests wide snow fields, endless stone walls and the countless hills ol' his Yankee New England. Interesting, JEAN ADOLF GROH Football, 3, Glee Club, 25 Phyiscs Club 25 Biology Club, 25 Chemistry Club, 1. If you ever see Lange in the dusk of evening stop in his tracks and slap his knees in laughter, you'll find the man be- side him to be that big hearty Dutch- man, jean Groh. But do not expect Groh to be humorous when some tender- heart has left his cat out of the bag labeled Biol. Lab. Groh is zt generous hearted fellow, though, it is said he sup- plies handkerchiefs when he hands back test papers and coos gently in German, "Now this hurts me worse than it can possibly hurt you, but it is for the good of the standards." 72 MARJORIE MELBA GROVES Basketball, 1, 2, 3, Volleyball, 1, 2, 3, Hockey, 1, Z, 3, M. C. Club, Hiking Club, lg "A" Association, The Lamp and the Bell, 3, French Play, 1, 3, If you were to meet "a daughter of the gods, divinely tall and most divinely fair", leading her sisters on to victory in our Freshmen days, always ready to give us a tune, holding forth in oratory, making baskets for her team, wielding a hockey stick, tripping the light fantas- tic toe on May Day, the hrst in the lake in Spring and the last to worry about the business of pursuing knowledge, it's Marge who flashes before the publie eye so often. Can you imaging her with bobbed hair or dressed in anything but the latest "little modeln? WILLIAM R. GROVES Alban, Pitt, Class Play, 3, Y. M. Cab- inet, 3, Gospel Team, Z, 3, lt has been rumored about the campus that Bill Grove has decided to make only fifteen hours of A this semester instead of tl1e customary seventeen, Alas, worse yet, he is becoming frivolous, and has taken to reading the lighter magazines: "The Bookm'an", "Harpers", "The At- lantic Monthlyu, and even "The Ameri- can Mercurylf Professor, how could you! No kiddin though- J. CLAIRE GUILER Oberlin College, Debate Teams, l, 2. The campus is not yet aware of the sterling' qualities of this youth, ac- quaintance is prevented by his previous attendance at Oberlin and by his living in Zanesville. At Oberlin Guiler made a name for himself as a debater. He is the master of a keen mind, l1is speech is incisive, and the tinge of red in his hair lends the correct dash of acerbity. We shall hear of him as an attorney, famous for cross-examination. SEP ,,,.m , as YY , t i 2. n s it L WALTER R. HARROP Sphinxg Basketball, 2, Captain, 35 Foot- ball, 2, 3g Class Basketball, lg Class Football, lg "M" Club. We really feel incompetent to say any- thing about Harrop. There is something indefinable about him, something alto- gether big, yet fine, that makes him Stand Out among meng One not only re- spects him, but also likes him. Despite his eonsuetudinary matutinal exercise of strength Harrop is one of the best liked fellows in the Sphinx clubg and his gym apparatus ought to know. All we can say is Harrop is a man. HELEN PAULINE HARRIS Geology Club, 1. Helen is always hurrying up the hill or through the hall, with something akin to determination on her face-which ac- counts for the fact that her themes are always done before time, and her lnterp. always waiting. Her program is rounded with a hike, a midnight feed, or per- chance a bacon fry. Then back she comes ready to consume more work. LILLIAN MARY HARVEY F. A, D.g Glee Club, 1, 2. After a long absence, Lillian came back this year to renew old acquaint- ances and make new ones. She is really one of the nicest persons we know and we should like to persuade her that an- other year here would be lots happier than drilling the youth of America in do, re, mi's. If she is not the center of a "bull session", she is probably making more work for the Post Office at Bing- hampton. - tnjwl. ROBERT W. HOCKMAN Alban, 1-'ilman College, London, Eng- landg Physics Club, 33 Band, 2, .35 Y. M. Cabinet, 3, Student Volunteers, 1, 2, 35 Gospel Team, 1, Z, 35 College Orchestra. We have heard of a college strong man who encainped himself as a mission- ary in China, and tossed the heathen Chinese into heaven by main force. They sailed gracefully upward, feet First, their pigtails fluttering ruefully as they slid between the pearly gates. Hockman seems to be remarkably ,adapted for a like future, he has all the qualifications: and he is red headed. MARIAN R. HESSIN Sphinx, Physics Club, lg Biology Club, lg Chemistry Club, lg Band, 1. We don't know what to say about Hes- sin. Frankly. the man is a paradox. Up to last year Hessen had assiduously de- voted himself to being' a inan-about- town, who neither toiled nor spun. And tl1is year he has enrolled in more science courses than we care to think about, and has worked steadily. The only explana- tion seems to be: Hessin has become a man. KENNETH B. HOOVER Stoicg Physics Club, 3g Biology Club. Z, 35 Chemistry Club, 3. Isn't it fortunate that there are always a few individuals to furnish amusement for that non-essential class known as practical jokers? "Red" is the good-naa tured recipient of many such tricks. He hopes to be an M. D. when he grows up and perhaps he will discover a way to prevent classroom insomnia. He may be found in Cambridge, on the road to Cam- bridge or coming home from Cambridge most of the time. ,Q , , Z LZ, 1 Suu. Ziwfffzrff if gs 132- -- 5 V LEE KEAN Class Football, 1, 2, Physics Club, 3g Spanish Cl11b, 2. While this gentleman seems to be of a melancholy and hypochondriae dispos- ition, there once in a while comes into his eyes a ghost of a smile, which shows that at least one ray of sunshine bright- ens his tenebuous disposition, though whether it be Diana or Aurora we are not certain. MARY ELIZABETH HOUSTON Wawyi11g Basketball, 1, 2, 3, Home Economics Club, 1, Z, 33 Hiking' Club,.1, Our grandmothers would have said, "My, my, my! Mary Liz is a lively girl!" That was before "Pep" was coined. Mary Liz is a rip at basketball. In fact that is how she Works up the daring to choose the sport hose she wears. And she works a little now and then,-every- one doesg but sports and sportsmanship is her Golden Text. MARGARET PAULINE KERR Wooster, 1, Spanish Club, 2g Home Economics Club, 3, Hiking Club, 33 The Lamp and the Bell, 3. It may be temperaniental folk that make life interesting, because mood fore- casting is always uncertain. But when one's frivolity has been jilted, it is a re- lief, it is a delight to come upon Pauline, for however she feels, she is quick to assume her calm, sensible, sympathic airy ready always to pick up the cue for any mood: and yet withal, stable. 1 1 1 -ll HAROLD H KIRK Glcc Club 3 Geology Club, 3 Inlx Pen Club 3 lhe 1 'unp 'md the Bell 3 B md M Staff 3 And now, dvu' rcidcrs let me present to you the mm whose column you h'tvc followed for guidwncc incl instruction throughout the ye'1r Knl OffICl'1l dis pcnset of Fireside philosophies loi th it growing independent publ1c'1t1on, the B 'md M Pondcrous pl xtitudes foi frol iesome liivolcis wilticisms to etse the minds of wemied thinlccis In his veins iuns the sup of the luiubc edible fruit of the shiub of life VIENNA KERR Hiking Club 2 3' Fhe Lamp 'tnd the Be 3. Hilwrity plays little p'1rt in the lifc of Vicnnw. '1h'it s not saying tlnt she s 'xl- togcther serious though bccrtusc she pos- sesses '1 certain sort of 'L quiet humor that carries her '1 long wily in earning for her 'ippreciitixe friends. Work oc- cupies most of her time-an unusuwl stu- dent! She is f'1ithful in "1ttend'1nce upon those things which should be essentiwl to the rest of us. Muskingum n1e'1ns a lot lci Viennu. M'1y her h'1ppiLst mem- ories rof school go with her. JOHN THOMAS LANNING Benzine Ring 3. Were Ifmning to lend himself an mir of grewter iniportince he mitglit 'ippe'1r stmve' were he slightly more tgcnial hc would be wllable. As it is he inwnages to n1'tint'1in slight quwntities of both these 'rbilitics 'md at the swine time re- main slightly aloof. Lanning fluctuwtcs between Cambridge 1nd Johnson Hall' llc pursues his scien- title courses with grewt pcrsevemnee. It is re'1lly 1 pity tl'l'l.t the Chem lab cannot commute between here 'and Cwmbridgci Q' Q-,l,ft,"'T-Q ti 'htel i,..3TH t . gg' DOROTHY ANN LEEMON F. A. D.g Muscoljuan Staifg The Lamp and The Bell, 3, I "Look hyeh now"-this is Dot. She's from Washington, D. C. No, her moth- er never let her play with darkies-but she just cayn't help talkin' that way. The accent came in her windows when she Wasn't aware-was wafted in wrapped around elphin dreams of fair ladies and tall gallants. MARY MARGARET LEECH The Lamp and The Bell, 3. They say that Washington County, Pennsylvania, has good roads. We sin- cerely hope so if Mary simply must tear around over the country burning up the miles. She does that in just about the same way she does everything else-with a vengance. And when she starts on the cookbook, visions of the most delicious creations ever beheld haunt one for months, and-well, you know what thev say about good cooks! LOIS MAE LEEPER F. A. D.g You and I, 35 Muscoljuan Staff. Affable, Bantering, Clever-one could run through the ,alphabet and still say that the half had not been told of Mus- kingunfs "airess." She is always ready to make friends and to those same friends she is both an ever increasing delight and the bane of their existence. She is the originator of many a practical joke and yet is as willing to receive as to give. Her originality never tires, her wit and humor are always spontaneous. She has led us a merry chase but then- we've liked it! ' Q37 ' 751:31 ii HELEN W. LOGAN Have you ever noticed those abnorm- ally long' eyelashes that belong to this black-haired little girl from Cambridge? Helen came back to school last year af- ter teaching for several moons and is a valuable addition to our class. She's the sort of student who usually knows what she is talking about but she isn't afraid to acknowledge 'a slip of nienlory and try to bluff it out. DELMAR LEMMAN Maceg Choral, 1, 2, 33 Glee Club, 1, 2, 3. He is dark and talented along the mus- ical line, at leastg if he were only some- what handsomer he would be a suitable l1ero for an eighteenth century romantic novel. Think of him standing under some fair lady's window gently lapping on his Xylophone, and smiling as he smiles at an audience during the ap- plause. Yes, he would be a very sue- cessful hero. HELEN E, LORIMER Deltag Monmouth College, 1. A gale of laughter rings out through the Delta House-Helen has just tried a new joke on the sisters. Of course they loyally laugh, but they couldn't do other- wise for Helen's Wit is irresistible. When one meets her on the street, it seems that a French mannikin that is approaching so chic is she from the tips of her fas- tidious boots to the .angle of her smart little hat. Versatile as she is chic, is Helen, for her interests include tl1e ath- letic realm. Yes! Have you not seen her waiting after Basketball games? And her interest isn't in the Gym either- maybe a tall young Lochinvar from Fort Wilson would be able to solve that query. ALAN C. MCGUIRE Stagg Vice President, lg Glee Club, 33 The Lamp and the Bell, 3. Al impresses one as somewhat of a dillentante-the best of clillentante-an insouciant expert in nugations. Some have used his sophistication as an accu- asation-this is mere jealouslyg some have used it in applause-that is mere ignorance. Al seems born to conduct himself well in the social manner, and a liking for the best has always justified ietself. EUGENE MANSFIELD Debate Teams, lg Forensic Club. Mansfield is one of those devouring sharks known as debaters, who opens the mouth of logic and consumes the smaller fish. Now it seems that Mans- field intends to become a preacher. Question-Is Gene going to rescue the wicked from the jetty waters of ,the River Styx with a life-line oflogic? We shall see. ALBERT B. MARTIN Stagg Band, 1, 2, 3g Violin Festival, 35 Museoljuan Staff. Able: loyal both to friends and prin- ciples, but never to the extent of chauv- inism. A friendly voice, a comfort when one has the blues. And when he himself has them-but enough of blues: despond- ency is too universal. Let us speak of friends: a friend whom all friends love: a good companion: a social man. "Say ,Tack-" , -.,.....,,,.......-,, ,, Y, ,N I, ,W 5 WILMA IVICCALL Q If you look through her glasses you Will see eyes looking straight back at you, and there will come the accustomed smile, and a voice soft and slow will say a greeting to you, and you will pass on and see soft colors, and hear a bit of soft music, and you will know what sweet dignity is. ALFRED MARTIN Student Volunteers, 1, 2, 3: Gospel Team, 1, 2, 3. Alf is quiet, kindly, a good student, not only of himself, but also of the good he can do for men. Not only is Alf a master of Greek, but also is master of a Ford: this seeming paradox illustrates his diversified abilities. No doubt a Ford will serve him faithfully after he is through school, for Alf seems destined to exert a great influence in the spiritual life of humble folk: to this his work on the Gospel 'lfeam and Student Volunteer Band attests. MARGARET MCCANDLESS one Club, 2, 3. It just naturally falls to the lot of some persons to see that the "social sea- son" is put ,across without too much agony to those concerned. Peg is 'a gifted indivdual who manages parties of all sorts with that ease of manner pos- sessed by a 'favored few. She can sing too, but, best of all, she radiates so much fun and friendliness that "Laughter hold- ing both his sides" is usually waiting just around the corner. HAZEL FAY MCCULLEY Spanish Club, 23 Class Play, 3. If it were not for Hazel, the restau- rant might not run out of Muskingum's delectable brain food so often. What- ever the hour or occasion may be, a ham- burg is a hamburg, yea, and verily much more. The enjoyment of it, perhaps, af- fords an opportunity for some of that frankness of wit, an ever-bubbling laugh usually at sorneone's expense and a gen- eral air of socialibility. It's all in the in- terpretation! SARA GRACE MCCONNELL Glee Club. Blessed are the few who are gifted with perpetual good humor-a valuable asset indeed to anyone connected with the medical profession! Grace would be an adornment to any fashion factory but we predict success for her in another held. An unusual characteristic which We might mention is her strange power of connotation. "Swanee" means noth- ing farther away than Cambridge or Ohio State. For this reason, we might suppose that Muskingum is more con- venient than Western where any Fresh- man greenness was worn off. D. WADE MCCREIGHT Sphinx, Physics Club, 35 Biology, 3g Chemistry Club, 3. A Solid man, Doc-Not opiniated, but one who can have and hold his own opinions without too much bother from the crowd. Humorous, regardful of an- other's welfare, yet also legitimately re- gardful of his own. One is sorry that this is not the middle ages, and Doc is not a son of the church. None of your ecclesiastic, dried up monks, but a portly friar, somewhat bald, kindly, sharing ale and a haunch with some hungry traveller. l L HENRY MCDONALD ljl1ySlC9 Club 2 3 1XlrlCIJOl'1'l.lCl 18 one of thofze qtnet m n wltll tlllrl fueq who Qtr tngely enouvh know how to Qnnle He doei not Seem to wouv hnnself to the extent of txl tn: hfe QCl'lOLlQlV nor IH hm entlre tune spent m CllHC.lISSH'lg the mote ponderous plnlo soplnw of existence one does not need plnlobophxee 1f one 1-, 'tble to entertain lumself sullxewntlx otherwme GLADYS A MCCUTCHEON S1J"lI1lSl1 Club l 2 Home rCOllOl11lCS Clu 1 Hllxll1g Club, 3 Brete Hwrte h1d has John O1lxllllF9l of the poke: face d'1 Vmu hm Mont lust l.2.1'lf"Ll17lI'lg DIOVOCTIIXL and vt lmse Gladys One never knows 1f he 1 belng dliagreed Vklfll Ol snnlcd 'tt yet when she 5pe'tls lt IG SVll1Dlfl11,llL'IllW Qeuouslx Fuendlv but she lxeepw too much of hemelt lllgldlf ANNA LEE McFARLAND Ann'1 lee remtnde 1 ol' the sto V 'tbout the llttle gtrl who when she ww She ww lnd she w'1Q horrld Io Cl intends she IS p1OXOlx1l1g incl vet de'1r all along the ILIIQC of hu meny ttllxmxc- moods to thoQe hte. of cloldxunm whxeh sometimes descend rather suddenlv 'lhls 12 whit m tlees her so tntexestmg you newer know' l .ww f . , , x. ' . ': ' . - ' ' 2 . ' . .f , . "1 a , , ..- ' A. .. . . , ,-, , . Zi' . 2 : -' ' ' . ,, . ,. , , h . '. R U- x . A . . J - . r J . I -u .:..A,,3 AL -. 14. -R15 5 1.- by 1 L' 1- L 4 ' V-v "V x if ck ', u .n . . . . ' . good, she was very, very good but when ' ' 1 f ' . "f 2 . C., ., .., 4" "2 h ' J'wc" v K" . 1 'v.. 1 ,-. ,.'A . . '. . y.,' T , , . , . , . . . , M . I . inf ' '- - - fn , -5, K- A- - 2 7 fl . ' ' 1, : fl ' .T ' . . 2' '- '- S3 MARY REID MCFETRIDGE' Hiking Club, 2, 3, The Lamp and The Bell, 3 . Cox has said that Mary is a Quaker, a perfect Quaker. Regular features, blue eyes, black eyelashes, very red lips. A Quaker she is from her hair parted in the middle to her little round toed shoes. She is straight, her shoul- ders are not sloped, she is dignified, but sometimes she skips a step or two, and one knows it is true that she can be charmingly gay at times. VERA MAE MCFARLANE Spanish Club, 23 Home Economics Club, 1, Hiking Club, 1. Vera is the life of the "suite set," third- Hoor Dorm. One's most studious mood cannot possibly last in the atmosphere of "Vidie's" foolishness. What that girl fails to think of to entertain her friends is hardly worth considering. Frank? Yes, but honest and almost too gener- ous. If you have failed to share some of her numerous boxes from home, you have missed a real treat. What belongs to her belongs to her friends and that's saying a lot. ANDREW McGAF'FIN Track, 2, Student Volunteers, 1 ,2, 3, Gospel Team, 1, 2, 3. O Henry died too soon. We have with us a far better character to Ht his title "The Gentle Grafteru. McGal'fin it is who purveys caps and armbands to the prasinous freshman. And when the afore- mentioned caps and arm-bands begin to disappear in devious mysterious Ways, who always has more? McGalTin. So gentle is he, that no one can be found on this entire campus to utter adverse criti- cism, not even the Freshmen. There is art! - 1 V 'm 111 f J WILBUR McLAM Mwu- Boston U11IVLlb1fy Clams B15 1ll 1 LICL1111 IS om. X,Cll1lOl'lt 1113.11 who seemo to txlxe hfc e1s1ly some people 111 fact mlm lllS VCIIIIOIIL accent fOl 1 Southun one He l1 14 m'111y L'1p1b1l1t1es hom ever we h me only to loolt at h1s ftthletxc ICC ord XV1l.l'l ll1S F1esl11111n class hls wo1lt on the Mme te 1111 lllS seemmg 'l.b1l1lV m cl Loses to eonvmcc: Oulselvei that thc1e xq -1o111etl11111, to thm man He bewra llllll'-sLlf NVllll El qL1lC'E self eonhdellee th'1t convmeeb one of 1 firm ullderplnnmq ROBERT MCKELVEY GLENROIE L MacQUEEN DtO1C ropoha of Ixcy He l'l'l? made lumstlf fwmous Lround the btolc House for 111 ph1losophy 111 mmttero of love 'md wo men ,although It I9 often wondered just where lu got llIS CXDLIICULC HL IS xx ell ve1sLd 111 h1ito1y besules l1'IVlI1g 1. Geol oqy bug 11oQs1lQ and btr1t'1 hold strange fgz5c1nat1o11 for 111111 lust now 1115 greqteot 21IlllJltlOl1 IS to lose hunsclf 111 1 remote corner of the cmth from where ln mdv 1n tmxe Ll11Clf,C a wealthv nun' Glu, Glub 1 2 3 Geoloqy Club Z 3 TMZTCQUCCII of the 1'l1LlblZ!,L,l1C cllld the Collcgmte Shme though the 1Il11I1Cdl3.tC I'ClEllIOl'lSl1lP of the two We hlvc. not yet chscovered perhups xt 1s cauee 'md ef feet Ol effect and muse fOl 1 111113-l'iCl'1C re'1llv ICQUITCQ some ruson retre No Dl1ll0SODl11C mdex to 1119 hfc 111s 15 yet been d1seove1ed buffxee ll to s1y thut XIdCOLlCCl1 was once tllten for 21 Mus 1-.xugum Freehman m a Mwrletta hotel l - , f. ,, ' " ' -. ,- - 1 K wig - ' I g"'. 2 f -N4 C '- lcelb. , , 2, 3. 1 'f , - N . ., . . A 'z 'I -2: : ' 1 ' . 1,1 , '. -1 : ' A ' ' 1 - - 1., 1 'C 2 15, 1 : 1 .' ' .' rl .',',- Q ' A' ' ' z.:-5 ' - ' . ' ' i, .' Q 'A he . c .' ' K- -. '- if 1 - - 5 yn C 'ji K i X. ' 'U 1 1 1 I ' e 1 1 I Bob is 21 two gun man from the met- Cheer Leader, 13 Baseball Mzmuager, 2, w , . F' l x . ',. L L ' c 'H u -. . I . . c X . ' 1 ' ' ' lv A 1 '- , - t-'. - J '- ,. . F 1 Q . I . . N ' . ' . A . c . , , c ' H rn 1 - ' Q , ' c e . 1 1 M -- ' . . ' ' . ' ' , . ' . . 1 . n . . . ' D . X I 1 1 1 . , . . 3 3 .f .. . ' ' . 2 z ' ' ' 1 - - ' ' ' : ' ' ' . ' 2 , ,s ' ' -. --r . H 11 - N . v 2 Y .. ' . 'V ' ' . g l ' . 85 ALLENE D. MONTGOMERY The Lamp and the Bell, 3. Allene talks, Allene smiles, Allene gig- gles, Allene scrambles all three, 'and then at the psychological second of cli- max, rescues herself with a white linen handkerchief, and a sigh "O Dear!" And if some one speaks a clever word of en- couragement, she will start all over again, if not she will clear her throat, adjust the pin with the little black and white checkered lady upon it, and open a book-for a momentg then she will scurry off to practice for a Junior Play or a recital. MARY LOUISE MERRICK VVawying Hiking Club, 1, Z, 33 Home Economics Club, 2, The Lamp and the Bell, 3. Mary Lou is a fragile little person whose books look too heavy for her to carry. She never strides, or even walks. but flips along like a little jenny-Wren. So quickly and unexpectedly she smiles, and such a trival, happy air she carries always, that she appeals to one as some- thing enchanted, a pansy, perhaps. And everything about her combines to make a Charming hostess, EMMA DEAN ANDERSON MORRIS Hockey, 1, 2, Basketball, lg Volley- ball, lg The Lamp and the Bell, 3. Her hair. The color of it and the curl. That with the tilt of her nose gives no- tice lhat here's a naughty child that really ought to be spanked. And when she decides a question-to use a comma or a semi-colon, or to go to Y. W., or to wear one of her lavender dresses, she de- cides all over, eyes, mouth and chin. To say that Emma Dean should be a lass of auld Erin if she isn't, is to promise enough for her sense of humor, her am- bition and-her hair. NELSON NEFF Alban Glee Club l 2 3 Choral 1 2 3 College Otvutet 3 Colleqe Sextette 3 Inky Pen Club 3 The Lamp and t Bell 5 B mtl M btwff 3 Student Vol unteexs, 2 3 Neff is one of those busy individual xx ho iccomplishes much vxlthout nukini '1 m'un 'tttraetion of himself, unless we take 1 r'1the1 giave phvsiounorny as '1 sign of o er mueh labor It is, hovxever often relieved by 'i smile Neff is one ol' the college quartet on the B and M Staff 'ind takes courses in Cneek Work 11 nd then take some ple isuie, be grave then smile a bit A rather e,ood philos ophy REBECCA MORROW Hockev, 1 2 Basketbill 2 Vollev ball l 2 Spanish Club l Hiking Club XVhat s all the excitement? Something is let loose again in the quiet halls of the Dorm about lights-out time. If it isnt Mary it must be Becky. When 'L person earns the 1'CDlll'1llOl'l for being a disturber ofthe peace 'md 'in instigator of deep dark crime, she is always ex- pected to furnish 'L bit of relaxation to her tired sisters' 'Ind Becky is an oblig- ing' soul. She c'1n look so innocent 'incl reserved as she goes her w1y about the campus, but try putting her in her prop- er element! JOHN GUILD NESBITT Football Mtnaegei 3 Chemistry Club 3 French Club Z 3 French Pliy 2 3 College Ol'CIlCSll"l.. Johnny will be remembered by foot- ball fins for the cubistic gesticulwtions 'incl eavortings of his Grecian figure 'ifter '1 point has been seorecl' he cuts quite '1 figure, does Johnnie, There is something eager about john- nie. He is looking for life but cannot stop to examine it: he must take it 'Ls it comes that he may rush on after the pot of gold. Here lies the irony per- haps: 1 naive curiosity never quite strong enough to satisfy itself. HOMER A. NICHOL Track, l, 25 The Lamp and the Bell, 3. Nichol might be characterized for his friendliness, when he meets you a broad smile comes on his face, and a gleam into his eyes, and he says "Hello" as though he really means it. Nichol is noted for the thoroughness with which he performs a task. His assiduity and maintenance of concentration is to be adrniredg these two qualities should carry him far in a position where stead- iness is a requisite. ROBERT H. NESBITT Basketball, Class, 23 Geology Club, 33 Physics Club, 33 French Club, 2, 33 Band, 1, 2, 35 College Orchestra. Bob's chief ability seems to be that of representing tvpes of Frenchmen to se- lect French Club audiences. There his quietness does unmask itself, his smile becomes a little broader, his curls a little less seraphic. Ah, if all the grapejuice he had drunk were wine, if all the love he had made were realy if all the lives he had led were true-ah, my friends, one never knows! JANE NICHOL Spanish Club, 1, 2, Home Economics Club, l, 2, 3. Another of the Indiana bunchg Incli- ana, where they do not confuse fun with frivolity, or study with drudgery, or rugged common sense with foo'ishness. Solid, sound, sensible folk they are, who smile but don't grin, and laugh but never giggle. r,T,si..,.-. .,......., ...UA . W -.. A ' 7 . .. ,. ..y,, .. .,-.-,..! VVILLIAM OGILVIE Stag: Tennis, 33 Gleen Club, 1, 2, 35 Muscoljuan Staff As happy as his appearance, as lucky as his smile, Bill seems light-hearted and carefree. He is quick to smile, quick to jokeg he takes his life with a dalliance. 'Bill is blessed with an outward savoir faire and an inward inherent gentleman- liness. And for all his apparent uncon- cern he is constant. GLADYS NORRIS Ohio Wesleyan, The Lamp and the Bell, 3. It does not seem possible that one small person so dainty and feminine and bashful could still be so decidedly boy- ish. "Johnny" is the only name bv which We know her and it surely Hts that mas- culine swing and low voice that seems to have been transferred over from her last reincarnation as a daredevil sort of cowboy. She is an interesting person to know, with all her droll little side-lights on human nature and her independent spirit. CLIFFORD E. ORR Stagg Football, Z, 35 Basketball, 2, 33 Track, Z, "M" Club. Red Orr-the man with the perfect poker face. So immobile in his counten- ance that when Red indulges in a jolly game of Old Maid or Authors, his op- ponents are completely baffled. Some consider Red somewhat aloof: but they are misled by the inexpressibil ity of his Visage. Indeed, his love for inanimate objects is overwhelming: it is said that he spent 1nucl1 of his time this year Fixing the F. A. D. furnace. RICHARD ORR Mace. Dick is the well-dressed young gentle- man who is the cynosure of feminine eyes as he races about in his Chrysler. His aesthetic tendencies are unusual and delightful .and his hobby-well, "Let there be light, but let it be the light", says Dick. He is unusual himself but it's the sort of individuality that is in- teresting and winning. Prove it? Try to count his friends and admirers! JAMES R. ORR Stagg Class President, lg Basketball, 1, 2, 3g Glee Club, 33 Sigma Tau Delta, 3g "M" Club, French Play, l ,2g Muscoljuan Staff. Here is a truly versatile gentleman- a man of the world, de bon gout. His ability displays itself naturally, no matter whether he is playing basketball, editing the class b-ook, or living to himself. His taste is as Hne .as his discrimination is keen, his appreciation is of the unique: the epitome, even of the rnass, is to be prized: the pearl also is small. One might say of Jim "Everything he does, he does well". Here is a man of some thought. WILLIAM REID PAUL Physics Club, 3. Bill is the sort of chap who thinks twice before he says anything but what he says he means. He wastes little time on trivialities although he and brother "Duke" are frequently seen "Fording" about in one another-'s company. Sin- cere and rather seriously inclined. he is just now more interested in covering the Science departments to become a mem- ber of tl1e medical pr-ofession than in any trifling collegiate pastime, H. LLOYD PETERS Sphinx., Baseball, 2, 35 Baseball, Class, 13 Basketball, Class, Z, 35 "IW, Club.. There are many things that might be related about Peters, illustrating his su- perb luck, his poise or nerve. Peters, a curly-headed blond, declaiming "The Congo" in Interpg Peters playing r-oll- the-hoop while a policeman, standing by, wonders if the roller should be pinched, and his luck at Ya-lo is positively as- tounding. Perhaps he is a bit unlucky at studies, but he makes up for it in love. RUTH ANN PAXTON Paintex for art's sake! Ruth has turned a new fad into something really worth while. Anyone knowing her but slightly need only look at the beautiful work she does to see there the expression of an individual personality. She belongs to the famous trible of College Corner from which many a good Muskingum- ite has blossomed forth. Ruth's a "good stick" and the longer we know her, the more certain we are of that fact. HELEN MARY PINKERTON Secretary, Zg Spanish Club, 1, 2g Stu- dent Council, Z, 35 Y. W. Cabinet, Z, 3. No, she's not as "changeable as the moon," and not too "clinging." In fact, she manages to be capable without stamping all over the place. And the way she backs up the Coast of Holly- wood, where she first saw stars, would almost make New Jersey of Halls-Mills fame wish her for champion. Looks good for Muskingum. JOSEPH CAMLIN RALSTON Alban, Basketball Manager, 1, 2, 35 Glee Club, 35 Band, 1, 2, 33 College Or- chestra. ,Toe is one red-headed fellow who can stand in the middle of the basket-ball floor during time out without blushing. That is why he is manager. Perhaps the art is acquired, perhaps it is inherent. Let's see-when joe was a Freshman, did he blush? No, not even on dates. Oh well, perhaps that explains it. ESTHER LOIS PUTERBAUGH French Club, lg Home Economics Club, Z5 Hiking Club, 35 French Play, 1. A bit quiet and bashful in tl1e eyes of the general publicg but in her own corner of the Dorm, Esther becomes a person to be squelched every now and then. For really, it is dangerous to stand on one's head on a bed, and pillow lights often arouse the proctor. She is inter- ested in music, for along with that ready - for-business - come-what-may ap- pearance, Esther often carries a violin to the practice room. ZION ROBBINS Robbins is quiet without being taci- turng for all his strength he is peaceful, only now and then being provoked into a quick rage which soon passes. He is never intrusive, but friendly when ap- proached-then a slow smile appears. Here is one good Kentuckian. 'Q 'Q' EDITH ISABELLE ROSS You and I, 3, Choral. There must be almost enough of the population of Cambridge to form a school in themselves and not from the least of these comes Edith. We defy you to find a time when she isn't ready and rarin' to go for a good time with other carefree souls. Don't think her frivolous though, because her ambition and energy are leading her along the rugged hills of oratory. CHARLES MERREL ROSS Sphinxg You and I, 35 Debate Teams, 2, 33 Forensic Club. Ross, early in his career lost his heart to debate, and ever since has suclcled at her breasts. He is eminently fitted for this arduous amonrg upon his entrance to the platform he assumes a parentheti- cal pose, and maintains his premises and conclusions with the pertinacity of a Democrat. Strangely, Merrel is the fair- est fruit that ever grew in the hills of Otsego, famous for its eauliflowers and Republicans. EVELYN DORIS RUNGER Glee Club, 1, Z, 3. A contralt-o beside a grand piano: American Beauty roses, and :L glimpse of purple velvet somewhere. Evelyn is like that: strength she has, and kindness, seriousness and gaiety-never stillness- poise and graciousness. She would al- ways have a big sunny room, with ma- hogany and snap-dragons, and wear a blue chiffon, and be always opening a door to receive guests to tea. E. LOUISE SEEMUTH Wawying Home Economics Club, 1, 2, 3, Hiking Club, 1, 2. Always talking, always hurrying, al- ways unwrapping her coat to wrap it closer, Louise. Said to be always on her toes. And everything about her quite so-no dust on her heels, ber tie and belt neatly adjusted, and her hair faultlessly waved. Unaffectedly friendly. WILLIAM R. SARCHET Glee Club, 2, 3, French Club, 2, 3, Band, 1, 2, 3g French Play, 2, 3, Violin Festival. A campus question: "Is Sarchet a Frenchman-or not?" If he is, why is he taking French. If not, why is he taking so much? Here's the low down-San Chet h.as been reading "L'Illustration", and possesses French prints and the lead in French Plays. But he is a good fel- low. It all depends: if you like your good fellows that way-well. If not, you'll like him anyway. VERNON THEODORE SHAW I Stoicg Basketball, Class, 2. He's a good little fellow, is Shaw. There's a snap and a sparkle to Shaw, some life in Shaw. When Shaw speaks, you know he has spoken, and feel it. Though Shaw is a product of New Con- cord, Shaw is Shaw, and the:-e's no one that doesn't like Shaw. MARY LOIS SHEPLER Her voice is not metallic, she does not snap off her words, nor make staccato answers, she does not belong in the commercial world. She's a bit mysticalg she answers a bit slowly, and with a wee smile, and a brief far away glance, as though she saw behind the clouds t-0 a land of dreams, or caught a glimpse of Evangeline of Acadia searching the plains, vainly-or something sweet, fu- tile and sad. JOHN E. SHEPLER Mace, Ohio State U.g Football, 1, 2g Band, 2. Q Serious in appearance. Yet when one's back is turned, he seems to stir up a scuffle-a joke-a laugh. But no, Shep- ler is innocent: he is still seriousg he will stroke his hair to show that not even one is ruffled: why, the idea! he will not even discuss the matter. And he sticks his hands in his pocket and goes on about his business-just so that he can turn up again as quietly. ' WILLIAM T. SHIVELY Maceg Inky Pen Club, 35 B. and M. Staff, 3. Shively is noted and notable for his deep bass voiceg it proceeds out of him like a muttering thunder and reverber- ates through the Interp. room and the heads of the awestruck classmates. He is also possessed -of 'a subtle sense of humor. After having made a remark he waits with a humorous yet cynical smile in his eyesg the recipients of his remarks, like the British, laugh tomorrow. asf 23 JOSEPH S. SHANE Mace, Football, 2, 33 Class Basketball, 2, 3, Track, 23 Chemistry Club, 3, "M" Club. Have you heard the latest hit? It's something like this: "Bye, Bye, ,lailbird". Some say it originated at the Gym and some say the Mace House. joe loves it! He is another athletic hero that the class is proud to claim. Football occupies his energy every season except when the jinx lands him on the bench. His fear- lessness consequently leads to many forms of activity and sometimes his ad- venturesome soul leads to night walking, When joe is near something is bound to happen and the laugh isn't always -on him, either. ISABELL SIMPSON Spanish Club, l, 2, Home Economics Club, lg Hiking Club, lg The Lamp and the Bell, 3. Sweet, but not sugary: brainy but not grinding: very agreeable. It is pleas- ant to meet her, she always looks a wel- come, .and somehow falls into ,one's mood, talks trivially, or laughs a little Crescendo, or merely looks szenrlv sym- pathic. Pleasing. MARTHA M. SIMPSON Indiana State Normal School. Next year's Dorm President. And she has all the qualities desirable in one who must grace situations varying from pink teas to chalking up light cuts. Martha is a steady person, she never tries to flit about, but walks with dignity and with childish impulses carefully in hand, she never crackles with wit, but roles out the humor in a slow drawl. To pass a word with her will profit little: one must know her. 1 l GLENNA M. SPEERS Basketball, 1, Z, 3, Volleyball, 1, Z, 3, Geology Club, 3, Spanish Club, 25 Hilz- ing Club, 1, 2, 3, The Lamp and the Bell, 3. A gentle ladyg something of the cynic always in her eyes: but her eyes deceive. Glenna entertains at Fort Wilson after dinner. Always someone: "Glenna, won't you play?" She smiles and consents. Fingers dance over the keyboard, dance ever so restrainedly. She sings in a fragile voice, a voice that seems ever about to break and scatter in fragments on the floor. i 1 ! ,r NEWELL SNYDER Sphinxg Ashland Ciollegeg Sigma Tau Delta, 35 Inky Pen Club, 33 The Lamp and the Bell, 3, B, and M. Statt, 3. His hair flaunts itself like a banner, the eyes are deep-set enough to express pain, 'a sensuous mouth droops-and on either side of it are strong lines of deter- mination. A realist-a pragmatists-an E.eipurean. Scratch the realist and Hnd a romanticistg the hedonist masks the Stoic. Ideals are uncut diamonds, some- thing new flashes with every face. MALCOLM S. STEVENSON Albany Track Manager, 1, 2, 33 Physics Clulg 3, Muscoljuan Staff, Student Coun- ei, . Mac is a meticulous, scrupulous per- son, perhaps too much sog one notices sometimes a wearied look in his eyes. He is one of those people who, when re- sponsibility is heaped upon them, accept it quietly, and with no acclaim. There is a calm gentility on his face, a sympa- thy and understanding in his eyes which we all appreciateg and something apart, within himself- ., an-1 i.1,,m. --5 BERNICE E. THOMPSON Huntington College. A woman's privilege it is to change her mind. Never mind, Betty, we'll not say any more. After a trying day of ups and downs it is ni-ost refreshing to have for a friend one whose unruffled disposi- tion never varies and is yet interesting. Such a person is Betty. Stuclious? Well, not exactly, unless it be in the paths of pleasure, sociability and friendship. ROBERT LEE TAYIOR s h' , Basketball, 1, 2, 3: Foofligall, 1, 21? 3i?XBaseball, 1, 25 T1'21Ck, li 29 M Club. Taylor is the man of whom the Fresh- men write when asked to compose a de scription of a campus personagie. HIS height, his loping walk, his multitude of M sweaters, his cheerful grin, 2llld.ll15 Gray Cwhen it rnnsj make him d1St1I:lC- tive. Besides, his athletic prowess stirs the tender hearts of freshman gll'lS,'XNl10. sadly enough, eat out their hearts in se- cret, because they know he is no longer eligible-they are too late to be luckY- MURIEL THOMPSON Della! SCC1'6f2lry, 33 Class Basketball, 1, 23 Hockey, 1, 2g Hiking Club, 1, "AU Association. Muriel-black eyes, black hair with curls achieving a prim and temestuous appearance. A Russian ballet dancer turned Italian, then cooled. Efficient- note the campus activities. Worshipper of the old radicals of Muskingum. Ver- satile, a good actress-see the last of the Borgias effect achieved by the toque. Here lies a thoughtful minion of the moon who could laugh even better than she could smile. WILLIAM CLARENCE THOMPSON Track, l, 2, 35 Basketball, Class, 25 "M" Club, Muscoljuan Staffg Gospel Team, lg Choral, 1, 2, 3. A faithful, well meaning chap. He is neither cynic nor optimist, but sensible, moderate. He never slaps one on the back, yet when spring comes is ready for a game of ball with anyone at any- time. Like Rusteni, he is a tower in the middle of a desert: a sound person, who considers solutions, and then without band or grindorgan proceecles with his Work. PAUL MCCULLOUGH THOMPSON Some of us have interest far, far away and some of us are contented with life here, but Paul seems infatuated with the fair suburb of Cambridge. His Dodge keeps the road open at all times in pur- suance of his mysterious "business," He professes to be a "woman-hater" but then so do lots of other young men. Blessed be he that keeps his :iliiairs to himself! WILLIAM M TIMMONS Maceg Track, l, 23 Spanish Club, 25 The Lamp and the Bell, 35 Debate Team, 35 Forensic Club. Timmons is the black-haired person with the persuasive tongue. With his handsoniness and powers of persuasion as his weapons he set out to seek truth and beauty: instead he has discovered what the head of the Italian Barbers Union thinks of personal liberty and the interior furnishings of the best front parlors. Whether or not Timmons is happy in these discoveries we cannot say, but he can be very entertaining' when he is so minded, and l1e himself usually appears slightly amused over something. if----l--1 -- D--Y --A--i Y.- W. L-....i.,-,, LQ 1 'LQLQQLV ' ' " ' e, - .., :: , .D, E ...Qi ,, ,, H-, - 6,31 DAVID S. TINKER Gospel Team, 1, 2. White ducks. Dark men, curly haired men should always wear white and oc- casionally carry a tennis recquet. White ducks, sharply creased, with a bright striped belt. VVhite ducks-one secs his "whole life history unfold", a tie with ends exactly even, words serenly snap- ped off, and a futile struggle to calm a head of hair. BERTHA MARIE TINKER Western Pennsylvania Training School for Nurses, Basketball, 3, Hiking Club, 3.. Not a "Big Bertha", but a petite little person with little ribbons on her hair. Yes, she was a nurse once, but she laid aside her "Graduate" white for a couple of years. And we have appreciated her' pills f-or pains, and her salves for curl- ing iron burns, and we have loved the fairy tales told from her perch on the foot of the bed. From our hearts we thank her for little helps when the works were most gummed. ll EVA MYRTLE TRUMAN Spanish Club, 2, 35 Sigma Tau Delta, 3g Hiking Club, 2, 3g French Play, l. Eva is decisive, determined, always definite. She says what she wants to say, 'and one never needs to ask a sec- ond time. She invariably comes home with that for which she started, she is too practical to covet the impossib'e. And so after a spell of real work, when Eva decides that relaxation is good for the disposition, she stacks away her books and with purposeful mien, sets out. If nothing desirable greets her, she proceeds to stir it up-a uke song fest, a hike, or merely a little Dorm gos- sip. l...41'..., ..,. , .i...L. .L LAURA WALKER Think of cameos, old as faded ivory, where Diana consented to rest after a morning's hunt, think of a smile that comes and goes as the glintings on the leaves after a raing of light brown eyes that are warmg of a cavalier Lillith in a green jacket-you have thought of Laura. And if you are a person of good judgment your thoughts have pleased you: and if you have known her you are a fortunate creature. BAYNARD TURNER Stoicg Band, 1, 2, 3, Geology Club, 3, Cheer Leader, 2, 3. And who is the man who started Freshman pep going in 1924? Who made confident parodies on saucy melodies to taunt Sophoinores? Who led whirling, pulling, yelling snake dances? and Ford smashings? and City Hall stormings? Who is more talkative than Doc? Who is too good natured and obliging to live long? Who? The man who helps the Glee Club now and then, and so boldly and consistently expresses his affection for cats-after the organ prelude. MILLICENT WALKER Maryville College, lg Basketball, 2, 33 Volleyball, 2, 35 Spanish Club, 23 Choral, 3. A girl faithful in her pursuit of duty, conscientious and straightforward in what she believes to be right is Milli- cent. She knows everyone and her friends have been steadfast in past years and will continue to value her friend- ship in future years. She is one of our "natives" and so has more than the usual interest in Muskingum. Much has been gained in her college life and much has been given in return, so, like the rest of us, she will remember it as tl1e happiest time of her life. as if' ' "iv ri -11' :wi - ,- V-, ELIZABETH WATSON Basketball, 1. There- is a certain hall of quiet presid- ed over by an unusual sort of person. Betty is a perfect God-send in helping the weaker inmates find just the right reference. She is intensely interested in social service work and spent last year teaching in a reform school. In contrast to this practical side there is a bit of an ethereal quality about her and she never lacks for originality in expressing her OXVTI individual views. EDITH VERLEE WALLACE Geneva College, 1, 29 Spanish Club, 3. All pepped up, always. Right there in the lore part of the line that marks time between McConagha Hall and the Barracks Gym. And when she goes to a Shakespeare exam her pen does an intellectual waltz over the Blue Bo-ok, arranging all the letters in their custom- ary order and all the commas in their time honored places: presto, a learned paper on Hamlet, the wicked Iago or the naughty Falstaff Hops forth. And still there's pep left fOI' the "Suite Third Floor West." 2 MCNARY JOSEPH WELCH Class Football, lg Class Baseball, 13 Cross Country, 35 "NIH Club. Welch seems to have all the strength and tenacity of some Saxon thane: he goes about everything with a pleasant yet dogged perseverance that gets things accomplished. In winter his pos- turings and glidings on the lake are a constant source of wonder, while in the fall he trots in, during the last quarter of the football games, well among the first in the cross-country race. A re- markably friendly person, too. JANE WILKIE Wauyln Y VV Cabmet l 2 Student Volunteers 3 If you have not had the opportunxtx of knovsmg, jane you have nnssed a lot She IS a soft woteed quletly movlng pet son upon whom o11e can absolutely de pond As the Prestdents. Secretary 'ts 'tn 'udent Y W worker and 'ts a stu dent she IS recommended and trusted 'md 'ts a gul she ts loved honmed tnd Jespected -'1 SARAH HARRIETT WHEATON 1' A D Trench Club 2 3 There IS one place nn New Concold Where one can bet the truth the 'twful bxutal truth the charmlng pleasmg txuth Sally And she gets away wrth It and hves to sav more T15 true she says honey because she ts from New Jersey but she axmds the usual sweet Insane figures fol every once 111 a whlle Sally can thmk of somethmg orxgtnal An all 'mound good stxclc Sally LUELLA RUTH WILLERTON The Lamp and The Hell 3 jumor Reeltal Ruth has a glggle 11 starts at her toes and hurrmes all the wav up over exery obstruction It IS l1l e Ruth guaranteed gCI'Il.1ll1C 'md practlcal For Ruth 15 prac tleal she doesnt carry manv extra pounds around Wlllll her when 'she takes notes she does xt so they need not be copied and when she sews on a button xt stays lllltll tt b1ealts 111 two Substan txal Purposeful She wlll get whetevcr she has dectded to go ,i - A ' ' 1 'af' 'n"'-an X, 11 111- 4 - 1 'Mi . ' . , . . - 1 - ' 1 1 1 , . . K . . 1, . . 7 T .e 1 . . W - V . V. . . .- - 1 . ' . "- ' 1 . . , 4. c Q ' . . c c. ' , . , 1 c., ' -' I , ' 2 4 -4 - ' ' -1 1 1 - 1 ' V 1 ' ' ' n. ' I ' . ' . ov' - . c , - Y V l . . . , , I 1 . , c , - - ' e 4 . 1 ' . . . ' , 1 , , . , 1 1 H 11 , ' . - ' I .. 1 ' . c C . . . . ' ." ' - V S . - . Z 'T ' ' ' -1 " '. , . " t ' , . I Y' , ROBERT S. WILSON Glee Club, 3, Choral Society, 3, The Lamp and The Bell, 3, Gospel Team, 1, 2, 35 Debate Team. 2: Forensic Club. Bob is a Knut". He would admit it if you asked him. He has brains, a lot of them-don't let his solemnity fool you- and he can slip more wise cracks be- tween 6:45 and 9:30 than any other bach- elor on the campus. But don't think he is not experienced. It is said that the Debate Squad were a bit worried about a date he had once, and when asked, Bob assumed his slow motion amplifier with, "Oh, I've been more thrilled than that before." Bob can do as accomplished a spasm on the piano for the Glee Club as when he dons the stiff bosomed De- bate shirt. VIDA JANE WILLS Deltap Choralg Hiking Club, 1, 2, 3g Secretary Dorm Ex. Board, If this were the day of fair ladies and brave knights, of castles old and gray, of tournaments and gay courts, of music, revelry and poetry makers, Vida would be the fairest of them all, the one for whom knights go to war, the one who rules her domain with the grace behtting a queen. Today, we may only say that even through fate bestowed upon her the qualities of a goddess, there is never a time when her most charming person- ality is not "herself", 104 WALTER C. WILSON Basketball, 35 Football, Z, 3, "M" Club: B, and M. Staff, Z, 3g Muscoljuan Staff. Do you remember when Kenyon called for Lange's babies and he sent Pinkie in, and the crowd yelled, "That's all right. He has a head on those should- ers." Yep. So "The Youngest" has. He is as good at piloting the pigskin as at steering, well, anyone who hasn't an umbrella, from Fort Wilson to the Groves House. He is famous -over the whole campus for "What's the matter with ya". For his job as the Brown Treatre Box Office man, and, to those who have a vivid imagination, for being the first good looking red head. SHIRELY MAE WRAY A little girl from "Kaintnckay". Yeah, reclc'n a C0l-Ol'21l1d mznntny taught her to talk, but an ZLI'l5l0C1'2Lt taught lier that graceful gliding step. Indeed, if there were some hoops in that tzllfeta, and El brooch at the neck, she would belong to EL century ago. SI1e's dignified without being cold-Shirley detests cold in any form-she shuddcrs ever so daitily when it is mentioned. But she is not a Vic- torian: tl1cre's too much chin, too many twinlcles and sparks in her eyes, too much sense for that. lO5 Zhzniurs 3351111 flu :Nut Qqapenr JESSE MARION BEAVON OLITA BOSTWICK COWDEN VERNA LEONE EAGER EDWARD WALTER FITZGERALD HUGH HAMILTON HASTINGS JOHN LELAND HICKS JOHN ALEXANDER LOUDEN REED MCROBERTS STEWART MITCHELL CORNELIA MARGARET MYERS HARRY EARL REMER JOSEPHINE E, STEVENSON KERMIT CALVIN STRENG DOROTHY NICHOL TIMMONS HAROLD THOMAS WILSON MILDRED LUCILLE WILSON RICHARD OTIS WOODS MRS. EDITH WORK 106 f ll, E fy f EL ! "9 Z .4 ' I fav ' A T I :f fu ba i'- Q , ,!y.. "-X f 1-iz, Q P' '0m'o'R I L Csnpltumures OFFICERS Presiderzt . . . . Charles E. Ross Vice President Samuel Gillespie Secretary . Helen Pinkerton Treasurer' . John McC0rkle Predictions of a dire future were issued upon the Freshman of '25, They were much too cocky, altogether too well poised as they stepped around the seal by the door-and when they needed squelehing so painfully, they won Scrap Day. But be it said to their credit, they did manage to tolerate upper classmen the rest of the year. And yet perhaps they saw their mistake. for in '26, they struggled manfully to afford many individual Freshman the benefit of moonlight bathing parties. Through the year, professors, and club brethren and sistern and family friends have labored and rejoiced to see various twenty-niners come out. Every once in a While we see one in G1-ee Club, football, basketball, B. and M., or a debate seanee, and already interest- ed parties have planned signals, and gathered and restrained themselves dur- ing plannings for the crown of the junior class, the Annual. And in '29, we have faith that they will recognize the raison d'etre of Seniors and leave a splendid memorial. 108 more f ba Q f? Z 9-I Akilrw FIRST ROW Lady Mckee IIICCOHALIIH Springer Monroe Secrest Montgomery SILCOND ROVV Woodburn Ixuxex MgLarrel Lomm Wxter Breckenrldge 'IIIIRD ROW Ledman Ilocknnn Mathers Osborne Brown Irum Borton FOURTH ROW Paulme llenderbon Pune Nunley Ilaverfield Shaw FIFTH ROW Monroe Eaxley Peters Dfrance Lynn Duxrxgh Caldwell SIXTH ROVK Patton Laurence Vaupel Laurence Pwtton Chrxstopher SEVENTH ROW Mehaifey Angui Lpp Huseey Morrow Montgomery Geyer 109 ' ' " ' 1 '24, - . 1 f 1, , A 'f I I I , 4 -I W 1 5 Q 5 ' Q 1 ' ,I I I I, A f ' 4 'X N -, 1 Q , I D V' A I I - ' 'Hi 4' X' . A " J L' ' .J 2 I I .. 2 ' 1 A " 1 -U '.z ' , ' , .VY f ' s 5, ' 14 I A .S lv r- G , '-Y' f 2 fn y , - 1 ,I I , N , -1 K - ' ' 1, ,YJ 41 fy, 1 , .. f 5' I . , ' I ,J f L , V ,I - A . , 1.5 , ' N , Y -' f 3, ' , ' i' ' A ,W 'Im Q I ' .,: L .1 A- N- -5 , f' Q , , ' ' I I 3 A - A A 'ik I I I f . , ,W 5 ' : .ff I Ill rf I If I V. r I g 1 I ,f 1 I - K , Qi A I' fl. :fa , - E 1 . R' Q - 2 '79 ' 4 , Q .. Alf , 7 ed I - J J i ,, 1 1 . A I 3 nf , 'Ll ' I l 1 x 1' I 13, 'J f ' I V 1 ' rx? ' 57- I ' 5 . .2 1 ,f :R - x g . f I I L-V - - h, ' I zu ' - - ' ' . f . . 1' ' -1' 7' - 4 I 1 3 V " 4 ' , I 1 Y , , 'I I 4 f V V V G , I .ws I 2 I ' I I s -4 .5 II I ' I ' ' Gi" f ' ' ' - F .. , 1 '- 1 f Q QQ - I A ., , . I' "Q-vX,.Lf' , , .- M ,, f , , - f f, . . 1 I .. 1 wh Q V- ir ' 1 6 ' - I I 'A " , I A ' A ' 4 ' ' :, , 'vf ' 7 4 b' -J ' , 'I .4 1,, 1 I , , - . L R - I of , lpn -I , f . V' ' I f ff . .N gi. 'ia Q 1 1-.g yr- ' ' I' , I '- . -L . - .IA , V' , : - ',', , X, Y -'Q:x'f'Qg 15 e . J: . . ' -....4. .--.....--1....g....,..,gi:,:L Jug.-w 1' 5- " "lf ' '- , ' , , 2 ' , , . ' z . ' Y . Y ' IT , I , , 7 7 ..Q--... , 1 , I' I "" 1 Au T 1 ' 7-7 1 '1 1 - - -- w -- f- -'-4 +1-ff K --1--.,..-J.--fr .,,.. ..,-- ,...,.. .., ,,,, Q - W, W ff".f. -. fi, -Q,r - . iii 'rf ,, 1 , 5, i, ,-. . ,ig ,A , pf' , , - ' fi' - V ,HY -lf. ,FL .s,.w fr -t .V ,I .r A .. N- , . ,. , ,L ,.M,mf,a,..,...',,.0,- .A . .,,..f,..,....,, -,-,,,,., ,LJ FIRST RONV-Adams, NVTIILHIBITI, Craft, Moore, Sloan, Marshall, Hadley. SECOND ROYV-NVzitkins, Thompson, Johnson, Rankin, Hamilton, Getzlaff, Alexander THIRD ROW-Yeates, Rusk, Nicholas, Colville, Archer, Rowland, Carlson. FOURTH RONV-Knipe, Chambers, Fullerton, Thompson, Gunnett, Merrilees, Heslip FIFTH RONV-Vinsel, Carman, Meyers, Bayless, Parks, Spencer, Miller. SIXTH ROW-Moore, Hall, Clark, Milligan, Johnson, McCarrel, lunge. SEVENTH RONV-Finley, Johnson, Miller, DeNVees, Patterson, McKibben, McCorkle FIRSI' ROWV-Cronin McGill Burns Brown Munk Boyd Delaney. SECOND ROW-Liggett Barret, Metz Bowser, Mendel Caldwell Purkey. THIRD ROXV-Bigger Kelso Gallatin McCarrell Campbell Ross Rader. FOURTH ROW-Stewart Fee Llrrick, Pinkerton Morrow Roberts Byrd. FIFTH ROW-Beach Goff File Rasey Hine Stewart. Dysart. SIYTI-I ROW-Ciffin. 111 1 .SSuplgun1ure5 Qlllllm pu gint Liappear Aikiu, Mary Margaret Applegate, Francis Alexander Baily, Edward French Haird, Paul Cody llankes, Riley Albert Bayeu, Emmanuel Malakn Bell, I-larold Bell, Ross Lawlor Bobbitt, Grace Caldwell, Charles Culley, XfVilmon Wfallaee Dittmar, VVilliam Nuttal Douds, Marian Louise Duff, XfVilliam Cummins Elwood, Emilie Margaret Espy, Paul McConnell Flanagan, Edward llolloelc Fox, Ralph Calvin Gililen, james Reviere Gillespie, Samuel Mossgrove Glenn, Elizabeth Veda Gordon, l.ois McClung 1-lardesty, ,lohn Stewart Harris, Helen Pauline Hathway, Belva Loelcwoocl l-layes, Olga Irene Hazlett, Malcolm Brownlee House, l,ulu Gertrude Hughes, Robert lrlusher, Clarence Hutter, Margaretta Hyde, Hilda ,lZl.ll'1CS, Mildred liarn, Harry Wfendell l.eeper, Elsie lota Ludwielc, Harry MeCaddon, Beatrice Viola McCall, Mildred McCann, Elizabeth Stephenson McConnell, Henrietta Mellaniel, Clive Edith Mason, Hester Marie Mayer, George Albert Montgomery, ,lewett Arthur Morris, Irene Anna Mulvey, ,lohn Morgan Morrow, Curtis Smith Neff, Will,at'cl King Noble, Thelma Bernadine Norman, William lmri Ogg, George Shannon Payne, Leota Pearl Poulton, Leo Vowleson, Robert Russell, Dorothy Maude Schmidt, Katherine Dye CMrs.j Sharp, Mabel Rebecca Shilling, Christine Snider, Ggarete Virginia Somerville, Norman Stout, Elma Virginia Stuehul, Kenneth Stull, Harold Ray Troll, Geneva Eliza 'l'runiec, Stanley VVarren, Bernice NfVarren, Edna Luella Wfarren, Gould Homer Wfhite, NVilliam NVilson VVishart, Margaret Mae NVray, Loyal Yurjevic, George Samuel llZ WIWIWI 'RHS F106 WWW P" aw + ' W H L I n 1 Q V '3- A 'Tres mam Gllasua OFFICERS Pl'C.YI'liGlIf . . . Addison Leitch V-ice Pl'c'S1'l1'C7lf . Harry .Ball SFf7'CfLll'3' Mary Wlilson 7ll'CUS1ll'C1' . . Xklilliam VVillis The Freshman class took the veil in all the innocence of their prasinous condition, but soon shed the glory of their verdancy for the more noteworthy cloak of sable darkness. After baptism in the waters of the lake they be- came acclimatized, and were more acceptable acolytes at the shrine of learn- ing. Cn the morning of Scrap Day they quitted themselves like men, in the afternoon they quitted themselves, and afterwards acquitted themselves like good sports. Their promises are bright and their hopes are high. They have much in their favor, so can look ahead with pleasure to the three fat years to come. 11-l u,-Q lk H dig 9 99 fr 4'1- x '7 TIRB1 ROYV Sl1un'11,E1 llupp TllOlllDSfbll Xlleu Butw 'Xesels Sutherland Sl COND ROYV llc-.s Mehdieg Mcfunge lone Rovllwnd Moxrv- Axkm .llllRD RONV Robbmfs G1llmxav lxompul Blltllllllll lleuyou Dorsev Grlut :FOURTH ROVV B llmex Rowe Dum FI'CI1Lll Sm1th,G1f1en Stewzut FIl'lll RONV Salud Dfnnlse Curry Strnulluml Sxmpson llaltlex Steiner SIXPH ROVV lxlrln Ge-vc.: Broun Littleton Wilson lyler xVllSOIl Sl VlN'IIl ROW Atlm'-:on Sellers Melton Torrl Becl Real Moorehead EIGHTH ROW Cmlt hagleson lrump, McAll1ster Myers Flack BIYHHS 115 ,, V ' 'V F gy Q ' if' :QL ' , A I i.-Q lu H V- ,X , . I. . - A , a , 'A 1 1 ,I 8 . .v . , ' Y , S . , .4 fu,-' X-'5', ' '11, l ' A kv I , . . , . , ig' n '.- . 2 W A . M ' 'Q I 3 .W ' ff is I .F ,J .f , I A 1 A , n 4, K. , 1 1 A 1 U 'Q ' l' ' ' ' A 'f" lx L If ,. V if ' J ., , I ' -. .J 7' . 1 - ,H If fl ,XIX X- N xv I, , 1, ,A f N., , P - , F 'lu :ff , A I , H , ill vw , ' I f . H , . 5 ' l ' 1 'A l , 'V '- 7-A ' 1 QE H . N A l J' ' I 4, N ' ' ,ZA V -. ' 3, , , I . 4 Y . Y -1- X H3 W .Q - 1, Q ' 'P' A Q . Q Q . . ,A - .K 1 V ' ,a ll ' Ji V 'H N ' 'Q K , 9 ', -9 ' ' . -3 1 l ' A 4 ' x 4 ,irijf 1, Aff N 4 7 " r f . J ' V. I X . f, . V' L q , I A Q .. N 1 Q A :Q ' 1 Q ' ' , l ' ffl, , 1 - I f f ,x -Q ' N. , , ,l 1 ff.,-'Aa' 3 . . , 1 , A , k- - ' t W. . ' " ' J- X 1,-1 ' l . , ' - -Q . , ., N wx 'A Il 'ks E .. . , I ' " I 7 I ' ' , 3 W f V 1 7 V ., ' , , ll 'P- Y ' , r if - A ' - f . N .- ', , li , if I 1' J' ' , -A 'N ' ' - Y 1 , , 1 , f , A, ' ,- ,. - ., . ',,' ,z', ".z:,m , .',, .1 4 -. -2 "' . " ""'.f' , 1 . 1, --,jf . " ' ,..' 'c- 4, . 'j' V: 1' q -' v ,H . ,"'1 - ' v 1 3 1 v 7 7 - L L 7 - lc .Q, JL ' , .' A , c, . 'c, ' l 1 ' 1 ' ' 1 -' 1 -.1 '1 ' '- ,, 'Y rl, . pl N - . 1 -:. N I . ,- 74:4 A, if J, V , .s. Y' 3., ,za V ,IL , ,, ,, Y, - -..L,..-. ,,,,n' ' ' - ' . FIRST ROWV-Parlet, Phillips, Pollock, Simmons, Thompson, Thompson, ........ SECOND ROW--Young, Gibson, Can-nzihan, Mehaffey, Brown, Chisolni, Kindle THIRD ROW-Ekberg, Ritchey, Dalrymple, Parks, Klein, Ray, Daubennieirer FOURTH ROVV-Reed, Dorrance, Beebe. VVilliams, Anderson, Chaney, Thompson FIFTH ROW-Oliver, Paisley, Gill, VVorthington, NVhite, Carpenter, Orndorff SIXTH ROW-Moore, Steffey, Hutchison, Maier, Hill, Carr, Downing. SEVENTH ROW-Finley, Barr, Goss, Schaller, Linn, . .... ...... . , Staadt EIGHTI-I ROW'-Ball, Dzmford, Ewing, Christmzm, Edgar, Foster, Grove. 116 I'lRS'l ROWV Dumm louy.,hr1clg,L Lone, lar: Pullonl Mwttllexxi 1I1nna 'IIURD ROW Houl S11 ma M ll'Nlldll Allxon Cuxxxmuglnm Nuttall FOURTH ROW O1r Cult BlOXkll Cloves C,1'ugf lxegg., lertch IIFFII ROVV Tewns FNCl'llIllLl Rxlcy Ru -ell Cox blbb Clxcvllnex SIXTH ROVV Ilmlluer Combs Ilaxtman Bowser Lopelfmcl Beclett SEVENTH ROW Douglv: Maven Pxmu, Fxoup MLCa1reIl XlcCl1y Sl1e1ma.n EICIITII ROW Ilutte1, Lveyex Semen Lclgell Lglnoxvler Iyons Ilnley 1 . ll, 4 . 'Q f T 1 . . 1 .3 .. lg-1 lf R A, .a . I f . I , K . 'C l . 1 , A vw. gh. ,gl C C C ng Q' ' ,, ., 7 . R.: 1' ' T , 'I' I rl y r-1 1 A v .. A , , l, l ., . . SECOND ROVV-Munro, -McConnell, Van Czupperu, Nliupezxr, Smith, Lewis, Gregory V. -.. c, Q-', z.'L,. ti -, 7 zu, 2, W 'I ' - Q ,, '2 ', Q j, A 1 , 4 1 . . - . . , . . , Q- . , . , - v 1 + f '1 1 - - 1 4 1 N v f - . Y. - Q , :, - ' ' , I , H, . I, 4 , ....,. . . .. 4 Y C W F A .I - - i 4 ' . I lr V i 4 'll I 2 ' 17 nw, l,, 4, a i , . L ct, .k ,...,,,, l EE. 'Sui N I l .. E.. .v H., ki - H .J if , g-ph I , ,gif ' . T, V, L, , ,. , ,,., Y i 1 f w A 'S wr? - va A ,J K cg! 1- if I -, , , , ' g I ?..cig'. .'.' 'l..fQ,g ...-'."... P -j'. .Ll . -,' in heir FIRST ROW-McKendry, WVillerton, Yurjevic, Patterson, Peters, Martin, Lucas. SECOND ROW--Giffen, Shaw, McCorniac, Ilemlerson, Conn, George, Moorelieacl. THIRD ROW-Schooley, Smock, Richardson, Talbott, Nesbitt, Malseed, McCay. FOURTH ROW-Cheadle, Blaclg, Miskimen, Clyde, Reed. Morrow, Strothard. FIFTH ROW-Forsythe, Tidd, Keenan, Wooten, Craig, Bowman, McClain. SIXTH RONV-Moore, Dye, Rogers, Mander, Dunham, Hcrlan, McVicker. SEVENTH ROW-Buchanan, Morton, CUI1I'llllgll?l1'I'l, McCurdy, Meyer, Evans, McClzmdish EIGHTH RONV-Gibb, Watson, McCleery, . .... ,.., Clark, James, Levengood. 118 -, A.-.-Y., Y, , . , , ,, ,,,, ,-,,-- --.-, ,, ,. A - ,,,,. , i- ig: k in ffliw ' l i i i I r U -1 r 9' bfi -W U ' FIRST ROW-Brill, Mchaffey, Gill, Fullerton, Nelson, Steffey, Gould SECOND ROXV-Foster, NVix1e1uzm, Peltay, Thompson, Walker, Young, Shipe THIRD RONV-Causon. Grahzun, VVillis, j'nl111Son, BL-Il, Frazier, Marshall. FOURTH ROW-Marlin, Ewing, Aikin, Patch, Maharry, Kirk, Kirk, FIFTH ROVV-Luke, King, Veruin, Mckiasters, Roman, Smith, Wilson. SIXTH ROXV-Ballenger, Minnich, .......... , Pitt, Glass, Snotts, Penn SEVENTH ROW-Hall, Snell, Ar1'owsmitl1, Beck, Hughes, Neilley, Lewis EIGHQTII ROW-Dryden, Hazard, Parks, Burton. 119 glireshman Qtmhn pu Hut Qtppenr Armstrong, Charles NVayne Arnold, Fred Barnett, Willis Skipton Bashore, William Donovan Beavon, Frances Geneva Bell, William Beumer, Eloise Anna Blackburn, Erma Loree Bond, Jessie Bostoncic, Anna Burris, john Ross Cabe, Charles VVilliam Campbell, Robert William Campbell, Sarah Crisman, Helen Bell Cubbison, Mary Ruth Curtis, Raymond Curtis, Raymond DeFord, Deane Corwin DeVollcl, Ada Dickson, Dorothy Grace Drake, Frank Birtin Forgy, Evelyn Irma Garner, Malcolm Geese, Ada Gobena, Worku Goodwin, John Russell Gordon, Helen Gray, Chauncey Harbourt, Irene Horne, Charles House, Virgil I-lull, Olyn Huines, Edward Jmnesion, Randall Kelly, Betty Jane Kurtz, Arthur Thomas Lawrence, Mrs. Robert Leeper, john Morrison Leeper, Nelson Dale Lowrey, Glenn Arthur McArdle, Agnes McCoy, Elizabeth McEwen, Carl Everett McGarr, George Lyle March, Mary Pearl Mast, Harvey Matusch, Anthony Mercer, Stella Marvelia Morgan, Louda Murphy, Daniel Halderman Morrow, Doris Nebo, Ruth Negray, Mike Paine, Mary Irene Parry, Ethel Louise Peterson, Lee Bertan Riggle, Thelma Irene Salladay, Lewis Sarchet, Albert Shuman, Helen CMrs.J Enider, Wayne Stone, Alice Louise Taylor, D-onald M. Taylor, Martha Pauline Tetrick, Mary Viola Tinker, Bertha Marie 120 lf! QQW 25 in 'Q xg f1' x ff! E ,, ,, X 12, X fi ii Acfrl VP 155 'J -T. If "'1'., .,K pf E' 'ff ifl- L1 1 ,f '- Q -L--+ X5 Z 4 -3 1 R 25,3 : -- il... -.3-.wx 1 -.H 1 , ,4- Y,,- Y .. ,ff -.,, -.,,,, 31:5 "5 'i-" , .- yi E' - -- V 1 1 5- I , Ti -, , c ap, 1, se? 1' - if" - "QL 1 an .2 :fu -' X '1 .. rf. 'w 2 2:25 ' - K ' ' ' EXT --GX - . N . 4, - 1 1 X J Y: U1 1 r dl 12' A 1 , F i f - 2 -1 .,, 2- I., 3 . 'T' ' pf -' - 'XX 1 "" ' -" " 1 -in '. 1 . , - .1 ,.f., ,, f 1 L11 13, ,x,,,----S 4 -4 lf, f .. -"-f V ' L .-. L , X 4 f , I 4- A A In ,qv A 'f' f c f X.?.--".--f , K f 1 1' 1, 4 i , fx, -, f ' I ff ,f , 7:1 :F , -7-,-1-4-F - '.-,,'1:.-g-h- - ' '.:.,,, ' .,- - .5211 "" 'Q - .. .L " -., 14:-1- ,gf af-fgtijbijw - 1:-.1 V 'TL' f fri A A. '. X WM X wk -STUD6 T GOUGRR IIIGIET lm N - j XX rx. Q. Mxnkynw W dz N x .. .5 ,951 'XX ' X Q x S iiix 1 WSF? 651112 Sluhcnt Qlnunril The Student Council was organized for the purpose of providing a medium through which student opinion might be presented to the college authorities. It is the go-be- tween of tl1e student body and the Faculty. Once every two weeks the President of the Council conducts a Student Forum when matters pertaining to student affairs are discussed. The Council is responsible for the conduct of the school in general and the regulation of such activities as Scrap Day, Pep meetings, Home Coming, Student Chest and the enforcement ol' Freshman rules. This year has been an unusually hard one because of the irregularities of Scrap Day, the extra obligation placed on the school by the Student Chest and the establish- ment of the new campus rules. The membe'rs of the Student Council are: SENIORS Cuyler Ferguson, President Rolland Ewing, Treasurer james Moore Ruth Thompson Helen Brownlee JUNIORS . Helen Pinkerton, Secretary Malcolm Stephenson Glenn Clark SOPHOMORES Margaret Wisliztrt Ellgcflf Liggitf FRESHMAN .lohn Galloway 122 W - , Ulhe 'ggunur muunnil The Honor Council is a representative student organization whose duty it is to uphold the cherished Honor System of Muskingum, to see that the system is under- stood and to treat with any violations which occur. The Honor System was organized by the students and plays a vital part in the life of every member of the school. To examinations, notebooks and all written work, each student signs, 'll pledge my honor that I have neither given nor received help on this workf' In this way he is conscious ol his own responsibility and feels free from facility supervision. Because of the unusual distinction which Muskingum enjoys in the success of its Honor System, she may well be proud of the place it has given her among the edu- cational institutions of the country, The Council is composed of two elected members and eight members who hold offices in other organizations. The olTicers are: President, Ralph Cannon who is Editor of the B. and Mg and Secretary, Ruth Davidson, the representative from the junior Class. The members are Cuyler Ferguson, President of the Student Council, Robert Ballantyne, President of the Y. M. C. A., Lois Brownlee, President of the Y. VV. C. A., Glenn Clark, representative from the "M" Club, Ruth Cashdollar, President of the "A" Association, Alfred Garrett, President of the Junior Class, Rolland Ewing, President of tl1e Senior Class, and Bertha Borland, representative from the Senior Class. 123 7 . ani! glil-I, 'ilguarh uf Gluuirnl With a clean slate, having turned a new leaf, and with an entirely new personnel the B. and M. Board of Control in October assumed the duties incident to regulating the general policy of the college weekly. At the bi-monthly meetings many matters of importance to the paper have received attention. The relative amount of advertising necessary lo hnancial success, has been investigated, control over the surplus fund left during past years has been assumed, 'and five hundred dollars of the amount placed at interestg the new editorial office has been furnishedg many details have been discussed with the Editor, and the monthly reports of the Business Manager have been received and filed, the Editor and Business Manager for 1927-28 have been selected, and their staffs chosen in conference with them. ln addition, the Board has undertaken the re- writing and recodiiication of the Constitution and Hy-'Laws of the organization, sub- ject to the ratihcation of the publishersg and has suggested that the commissions given the Business Manager be changed, as changes in organization warrants. The present board is unique in that all its members, with the exception of the Freshman representative, have served on the stall of the Black and Magenta, and its Chairman, Prof. McKirahan was a member of the first staff, and the christener of the publication. Besides Prof. McKirahan, the Faculty is represented by Miss Eleanor Steele, the Seniors by janet Seville, who is Secretary, the Juniors by Ethel Ewing, the Sophonlores by John MeCorkle, the Freshman by Gerald McGeorge. The Board of Contr-ol interprets its position as that of a trustee for the publishers, the Student Body and Faculty, and have striven to consider only their interests in the purpose of making the Black ,and Magenta representative of the college. 124 ,Q xx 9 S oc M,-fltti 19 ban' - N - -fir g? L 5 , - gsgsglgn w 5g!5.1li5gug, ,.i A Q ...5 The Y. M. seems always full of energy. Besides the usual weekly meet- ings in which an interesting discussion centers around a theme of funda- mental importance, the Y. M. has had a number of meetings in which an out:-standing business man or Y lead-er has sketched the lay of the land from his viewpoint. The association, in cooperation with a committee of the Y. VV., has successfully agitated to make Bible reading less of an exercise and more of a study. Special interest in Stud-ent Vtforld Fellowship has been both evidenced and developed by delegates sent to the Y. M. C. A. Confer- ence in Finland, and to the Conference of the Council of Christian Associa- tions, held at Milwaukee, in December, and by this means there is brought to the campus something of the attitude of other students as they consider the same international problems. Of special interest to the student body was Mr. Juan Rodriguez, a Filipino who is a conversant with the attitude of s-everal nations and well qualihed to speak on Ulnternational Mindednc-ss." The members of the Y. M. Cabinet for 1926 and 1927 are Robert Ballan- tyne, Presidentg Ciuyler Ferguson, Vice Presidentg Harry Crytzer, Secretary, Robert Hockman, Treasurer, Robert French, Membership, Harry Crytzcr, Bible Study, Donivan Carson, Handbook, john Loudon, Boys' VV'orkg Rob- ert Fovvler, Socialg Alfred Garrett, Hi-Yg Rodney Giflien, Gospel Team, Reed Clark, Self Help, Robert Giften, Music, Kenneth Carmichael, Publicity, William Grove, Devotional. 126 ag, gan. The Y. VV. C. A., the characteristic organization of the small college, seeks to see life always on the skyline of thc future, and believes that the most desirable life is three sided. So the organization strives, in the XVednes- day evening meetings, to develope responsiveness to religious direction, and to crystalize views through the stating of them. In the occasional joint Y. discussion Groups, questions of moral, social, and campus life are considered in the light of custom, and Christ's teaching. This year as a means of keep- ing the outlook wide, the Y. NV. entertained Miss Vifinifred XfVygal, a National Secretary, who is particularly interested in the XVorld Fellowship movement, and who gave several talks and conferences while on the campus. Because all wish to live pleasantly in the college world, there are the Freshman Parties, the Friendship Council Dinners with inspirational pro- grams, the Mixers with the Y. M., and the new Y. XV. room where one may go with a friend when she Wants to be cheered by gay eretonnes, wicker chairs and quiet. The Handbook, a Y. M. and Y. XV. production, valuably serves friends, both as a means of introduction to new students, and a "lest we forget" to old ones. And so the Yi NV. serves the present and the future. The members of the Y. W. Cabinet for 1926 and 1927 are President, Lois Brownlee, Vice President, Margaret Kelseyg Secretary, julia McKibben, Treasurer, Lincoln McConnell, Under-graduate Representative, Helen Pink- erton, Handbook, Helen Daugherty, Social, Van Giffeng Religious- Meeting, Helen Brownlee, VVorld Fellowship, Ruth Davidson, Social Service, Muriel Thompsong Bible Study, jane XVilkieg Nominating Committee, Mrs. Layton, Publicity, Bertha Borland: Self Help, Ruth XVatsong Finance, Dorothy lfVhite 127 Stuhent 'gllinlunteers The Student Volunteer Band has this year been building up a reputation for Sabbath morning meetings that are deeply re- ligious and spiritually challenging. The study has been of parts of the Bible especially related to missionary enterprise. Al- though membership in the organization is limited to those who have definitely decided to teach Christ in foreign lands, any other students interested in other forms of Christian service have accepted the standing invitation to attend the meetings, which may rank as the most spiritual of the day. In order to keep in closer touch with the places which will become their homes the members have listened to talks by people conversant with the tendencies in effectively developing religious life. Many letters from former members have been of inter-est and value, and have served to bring the workers of this vital enterprise into a closer union. The Conference, held at Gtterbein in December, was also a means of forming friendships for future years, and of present- ing the work in the breadth of its importance. The Cabinet, Helen Brownlee, President, Robert Hockman, Vice President, Alfred Martin, Secretary and Treasurer, are to be congratulated upon keeping the meetings thoroughly awake and vitally inter- esting. - 128 Cguspel Qleanr 'll1e Gospel T1La111 IS 1111 o1g1111fat1o11 ot eollege 111e11 who l1z1xe eo11Qe emted tl1e11 111 e-. to lesus Cl111Ct 'l he team IH 1H1l1.1tLd wlth the Y M C X tl1ele1clerbe111g 1111e111be1 oi the X M C X c.1b111et rlhe 111011 go out 111 g1oupQ of tvxo three 01 emu smglx to speak 111 1egularlv o1ga1117ecl cl1u1el1eC. 111 balJbz11l1 sel1ools,, O1 111 eo111111u111ty gz1tl1e11110N ol 1 1'Cl1g1OLlS 11z1t11re Often the te 1111 fL11ll1Sl1L'-1 xoeal O1 111stru111e11t1l 111uS1e 1f demrecl No 111e111l1er 15 pe111111tecl to go out '1s .1 1'ep1cse11t.111xe of the team Lllltll but 1S also able to put l11s thoughts 1l1tO 1 Strz11gl1t fOlVlZ1I'll well o1ga1117ecl, well delnernd Qpeeeh The men do not expect any f111.111e1.1l 1etur11s exeept that 11eeesQz1r5 to eox C1 the actual expenses of the 111p The Gospel leam 111e11 do not el:11111 to be 1111l1l9tLlS Hou ex er they do not 11s1t 11 eo111111u111tv 111th the p11111.115 ldel of l111111g Z1 good t1111e, of t:1k111U 1 111e1e vaeatlon EglLh 1111111 19 made to feel the SLI'1OLlb1lLbS of l11s re5po11s1b1l t He goes out not only 'LQ '1 rep1ese11t21t1xe ot the l.l.l:l1Sk111gU1Tl College Gospel le.1111 but also as C1 rep1eQe111.1t1xe ol lc sus Cl111Qt 129 'If 1 ' 1 I I f., 1 Y' 1 -- T' -1 '. I. 1.11. ' ' . .' ' ' ., ' ' ' ' ' " ' -' bt' . . Q' .xl 1 1 1: - ' xi: 1 w - ' 1 C 3' - ' L' I l1e not only has given evidence that he has l'1ZlCl 21 vital Cl11'isti:111 CX1JC1'lC1'lCC L f1-3 ' - f- f ll- - ,- J- -.15-J' 4 1- 'sf gf ' '- M - 130 ,em if V Mia ', Z, " ,- . U-' 5,2 - fwlrljww F H? "maa2:', W6 ix ' v :,, ,, fi . ' f if-H EQ fi? X 1 f' 'w .X Q S3112 f s' Y 8' wk X , X .,: 0 ZZ ff cnuggg WW 131 Zlgiulugg Cllluh The Biology Club holds meetings once a month for the purpose of main- taining 21 real interest in the work of the department. At this time, varied programs of interesting topics are discussed, instructive papers are prepared and occasionally a bit of social diversion is enjoyed. Dr. McCleery and Dr. Jamison have contributed no small share of their knowledge and time in giv- ing direct information from the modern field of medicine. As a special fea- ture of its work various specimens collected by major students have been on display. ' President - jean Groh 'Vice President johnson Doley Seeretziry-Treasurer Anna Rogers 132 Cllrexxmtrn Qllub Into tlus group lxnovsn .15 thc Chcmlstry Llub are 0'Itl1C1CCl the perpetra tors of those abommable odoxs that msc to lhr. hbmry 'lhe members hold 1str5 who meet to hold counmlb on the 1'1'1ySlC11Lb of the order 'Lnd to garner knowledge from more cxpcueneed 'l.lCl1CI'1'l1SlS The oH1cers of the 0lLlC1 11 L Plesldcnt Paul Clark Vxce P1L51dL1lt XX 1ll1am Garrett 13? ' '5- e ' f ' me ' R ' 5. - '- - - 'A r . , 4 Z I A ' J . L '. 1 l ' the secrets of the vilesvt mixtures. They are the advanced students of chem- ' r v , - ' - - rs 1 -' 1 1 A J C - X " ' C ' 1,:. -' . . - - C - x :i- ' , .A ' , , - . , I' ' , r gllrenrh Ulluh Ah! Maintenant nous sommes Francais. The French Club, while not a small France in itself, furnishes material for the imagination. From the mo- ment one enters the monthly meeting until one leaves, one is in a French at- mosphere. A greater fluency in the use of the French language is inspired by the interesting programsg another important achievement of the club is the sympathy it creates with France herself. The club holds a banquet each semester, and, at the first of the year, a reunion, to which all who take French are invited. Mlle Sharp, M. Morehead, Mlle. Shaver, Mlle. Orr and Mme. Dun- lap are the faculty sponsors to whom much of the credit for the success of the organization must be given. OFFICERS President - - ' - - Ruth Thompson Vice President - john Neshit Secretary-Treasurer - Maisie Chevalier 134 4 uma 4 nzunumuzs flllnh lht Home Econoxnmx Club hw Quuudccl rL1nar11blv xx ull 111 Lrcwtmg ex Crv yvu ln fact It has been necLSS lry to l1m1t thc membL1sh1p of tht Club tl11Q yc. L1 to lnqjors and 1Tl1IlOI'N 111 Homg I'Lonon11cs Monthly 1ncLt1110s .ut conducted xx hen subjects of mterest to tl11s 13LltlCL1l1I' grfmp 1rc cllstumtd Ircqucnt talks Lre rn lde by the 111Sl1L1C,tOIS md the Dcdngz C011LL11ll11"" 11121115 wx hlch pcrtaln to the art of hun1em1k1n0f 'lhe Llub 1lso pl lys .1 plrt 111 thc Soc1al calcnrlir of tht mmpuq Prcwdcnt Ruth L 1bhcloll1r VICC PI'LS1Cli,1ll Martha Anduson qec1ct'1ry El17abctl1 Lmltcx 'I re'15u1e1 A11111 Rugtrb 135 . .QI V lf- E -, - bv, v I . X l'sl' , X: I V Y ., ,.1 Y fl 1. 1 1 1 'N -If ,,- .. 1.21 1: .1 'H ' 1 4 ' : 2 8 Y - t 1 1 . .1 qc ' 7 1 ' - .C ' an interest in its work and the course of this clepartment grows more popular v V AC -i , ' : .1 .1 L-2 ' ' 1-: ' .1 "A 1 5 ' gi ' ' ' 2" z ' z " I ':z 2 ' ' 1' 1 ""l,ff" f' ' 5 zfb. l ' ag" 1 ' ' 1 ' x K 3 C n'. gi' A ----- dz ' z .. ----- -' ' . ' ' ' - -V-- z " ' C enlugg Qiluh The Geology Club meets monthly at the home of Prof. Moses, and strives to become properly serious for an hour or two in order to assimilate a parcel of information, as becomes every cultural club. "The Structure of New York Harbor", "The Conditions of Life in the Arctic, and its Geologic History", and "The Physiography of Central America" have all been studied, lectured about and the courses of their future weighed, And initiations-for an ex- pansion program has been entered upon, and it is considered wise to impress upon new members that dignity is becoming to him who convinces the Membership Committee that he is "in good scholastic standing, and interested in Geology." Sometimes the club has submitted graciously to a late per- mission for a longer social hour and refreshments. Business meetings have been necessary to decide upon a speaker to address the popular open meet- ings. Dr. Carmen of the Ohio State Geology Department, this year lectured interestingly on his study of the geology of the Grand Canyon. ln addition there have been the important and detailed plans for a trip to Mammoth Cave, which in recent years have resulted in pilgrimages to Black Hand, Buckeye Lake, or up the Muskingum River. 136 Spaniel! Ulluh All the Spanishly inclined students who have studied the language for at least one year meet in Montgomery Hall every three weeks and become for two hours senoritas and senores de Espana. They chat amiably, play games, sing songs and give programs with the greatest z-eal. It is their pur- pose to create the illusion that Spanish is the only tongue they can speak and thus accustom themselves to think it and talk it fluently. Following precedent, officers were selected at the hrst of the year. Nor- man Adams became president, Elizabeth Bentley, vice-president, and Ruth Gordon, secretary. Norman Adams left at the end of the first semester. Elizabeth Bentley became president and Mable Pinkerton was elected to take her plac-e. One of the greatest values of the organization lies in the spirit of friend- liness that is established between the professors in the department and the students. The benehts are realizd in proportion to the amount of interest shown by the students. The club has had a delightful and successful exist- ence this year. May it long continue to flourish. 137 l Sigma Elzui Bella Early this year there was founded at Muskingum a chapter of Signia Tau Delta, national professional English Fraternity. The local chapter was elected by the English majors, a constitution was drawn up, and approved by the national organization, and the local chapter received the title Omega Alpha. Fifteen charter members formed the nucleus for the years to come. The purpose of Sigma Tau Delta is to encourage the art of writing. To be eligible for membership, a person must be an English major of certain standing in scholastic attainment, and must have published at least one thousand words in some publication. Provision is also made for associate members, who need not be English majors. To encourage production there exists "The Rectangle", oiificial publication of the fraternity, to which mem- bers are expected to contribute. Criginal work is presented at thc meetings, free discussion also obtains at this time. Though the organization is but new on the campups, a high standard for it has been built up. The fraternity has before it possibilities of growing infiuence on the literary art at Muskingum. OFFICERS President ---- - Janet Seville Vice President - Ethel Ewing Secretary Lincoln McConnell Treasurer - james R. Orr Marshall Dorothy Aiken 13S 7 ', K' V :TF f g ff gnu!!! nik, ' . f f yi-JM Af G. A gll I I' LI nu. C-HIFI 4 of 139 '?'f"'f , 1 GNL 4' 'ff 'Q gp' . x L I i 1 QEJDITOQ, Lf' 5.-'- . 5-, 4 SWL WMM F HWMWW ,CET S. WWW A QUSIHLQS MJAHAQLQ QHAPSHGT' QDITGQ 5 , ASSOC. Z '7?uv4wZf,w,dg!FPm-40-J xowmwmsww. CALJENDAQ EDITOQ. 325 -41 QGALHZATION MGQ Qusmg EDITOF2. ADVEJQT 12' I MGQTHKZAGEQQ I 1-11 " M ' -f -' 'f' ,. i,,T1T'f'f'rFifff3g,.E giinxy .H V ,A-M 5'3-1y..,4A 1, m.g1.' H" H ,,,!N ,,'w""H's Mez' ' ,Lf M mflewklxwHMU'Nwlj'MgjL...q1Nl1E'gPWw"'E."NH" 'EW' HM,3W.'fatoff.N.. , 'Wo,,i.,'fN ,'HV,N,w3iw,?,11'L?jEi?!lW'QuWu1,jarML... M3 ' W ' W NJ W H ' H , . -'-. my -,,..w"y-,,5,. ' 'f, rv, Q - J . Ja' L my , N X , , X , , . V 2,i . 43 ' F ' ' 1 ' M .M V .- D X 1 , ' - , MA .A 1 ., 1 jfs.. f, .. . P - 'f' t f- 7 1""' ' T' 1' Q V Q 1 1 V, ' ' 41 1 , 7 , 5 . A 4 ,'qf'l,?:E5,, x ,S V ,wr , ' ,S NH, 'gif' 5 N - - - Y . i 1.15-' el. - VV . .ii n 4' . . wf - . L' , 2 . I N . 1 my W 1 u- ' 2,4 ' , ,Q I - ' f 5 If I 1' . 1 ' . I b lv G' 4 i '- V . ,, -fs f -A i I 1 - ' f' .?Ywi'J - ' -, , ,., . ' fgj- L . 1 u ' . . . t- . . ,. -FYTVI1 ww V' , xxx . ww ,, l' . ' f , .1 'ff ' ' E Y: -:f -uh. ,. .f H T4 my , ,V f, -Q 5 ' " . if 4, , 1 1 QNX ' ' x X. k -f ' ,V I 556631262 ,V . Q - '- V .- .f, .: x M ' n 1 Eng: 1 "' x-,, 1,,.f,it??-j 2-. qu: H ,inf I ,m,a,1f3Q 4. 5 xa- , ,elf 'xi , X 3: -. . YL: ' . - -1 5- if V 14. -. 1-su - M - QA :- , ,i ", ,L-'Y H ,l,,. f' HQ " 'FL .T 1, -M' 71, Y "ff 'Eff' '- 39 ,2 T W 9, ,- ,F nv ' Q-5 E. -.-5. .V , V Ly .lg .. ..:,:.V 21 gif' Eff, ww X ,wmv .1 xv A if , . ig-ff 4-G ...V 27' . -Ewa' L fm? -rv' :?f?.:.T...,HFQj ' T H ' .x. - , . 1' ,X ,' 1.-gzsi.. r W I 4 V .4714 K, Y 5' "' ' - 5.31 a I ? w ' Q 12. 1, ' .I rv ,X 1 'X ' 014 f. , 3: , - . A f 4 .- 1 . .3 X X JL- - ar. .4 PM. , , 4 4,5 - .'-'fr ' fu is Nga, ' as f' A-,,, hif1?i7fJ J .' Ex. , -, V 4 v' E -1 Y - Y .4. , -I . Y' rj gig. 5 gf 1453 wap 1f"- ' - 1 J- A"':w1 it -:.. '12-"ff , if Q ' 3 .r- . - o - -' ' A. 4- v ' . K " " K I N 'X ef, 142 li. mth Student expression, school publicity, journalistic training-:ill theoretic excuses for the existence of the Black :ind Mztgentn. Theoretic. But Stu- dents do not stop to think of splendid theory, they simply welcome the UB. :ind M." :is Z1 "pt-ppy little paper." So it is that the weekly coming out is anticipated not only lor the historical catalogue of services and the travel- ogues of Doc but also lor the occztsionztl kick ot' at student wit or an original, individual reztction to Z1 personal liberty problem or the cinder path in the desert. Many a literary gem it has carried-a poem, an essay, it book review, or jnjube-expressions of personalities. So for the student body the Black and Magenta strives to present sztne reactions, lor interested friends it seeks to crystztlize Il typical bit ol Muskingum ntmospliere. Editor in chief Associate Editor Associate Editor Managing Editor News Editor Athletic Editor E DITO Rl A L STA F F Literzury :uid lieziture Editor llxclizinee Editor Soitiety Editor .'Xlninni Editor .loke Editor ,loke Editor News Reporters News Reporters Athletic Reporters yi -i a Business Manager . , . .'XSfilSlIll1l. linsiness Circulation Mzuiug I2 U81 NESS MfXNfXC1liMEN'l' M :tnuger C l' ' ' Assistant Circulation Mzuinger 143 Ralph Cannon, Thonias llerkshire, Ruth rlxll0l1l17SO1l, Harold H. Kirk, Rolland Ewing, Murdock French, Newell Snyder, - Georgie Frztck, llertllzt Borland, Sara Mc'l9':tclden, Lincoln McConnell, Donald Ewing, Dorothy Aikin, - Robert Fowler, Reed McRoberts, Charles E. Ross, X'Vendell Carlson, Robert C. Gillen, XfVilli:1n1 Shiva-ly, Nelson Neff, .lolin McCorkle, '27 'ZQ '27 '27 '27 '28 '27 'ZS '28 28 '27 '27 27 '27 '27 '28 '28 '29 '29 . '28 '29 gluing 33211 fllluh The Inky Pen Club had its Renaissance this year: now again may the humblest cub reporter aspire to reach someday the position of Lord High Fountain Pen. Membership in the club is open to those who are or have been at some time members of the B. and M. staff. The club is noted for its charming social meetings, when is displayed all the versatile genius of the newspaper man. Here the dull cares of the office are forgotten, and genius bends its efforts to-ward amusement. The club truly 'furnishes a valuable medium for social contact. OFFICERS Lord High Fountain Pen - - Ralph Cannon Lord Quill Pen - - Donald Ewing Honorable Inkslinger Sara McFadden 144 ww -i 1 0 ,f 6251111 a 1 111 655111111111 71113111 P111 11111111121 19 111 h011r11"111f 1011111 111x111 fr111cr1111y 111111011 11 ab O1 1111112111 '11 Ohm No11111111 1.11111 11N111 111 1919 lhe 113911011 c111pt11 11 Mus 11111g11111 X118 1111o1por'11G1l 111 1993 '1 he 51111111115 who 5111111 1116 k1y of t111s c11g.1111f 1111111 me 1 11105111 11W I-11,1311 Qc11n11fat11 111t1111111e11t as NX L11 as u11us11 11 ab1111y .11111 exp1r1e11cc 111 Journ 21115111 111uQ1 111 '1111111 111 111 1111 111e111b11'S of 1110 Pl11D11CE111011 st111s 111fore 11111 ar1 e1111t1111 to X1 1a1 1111 C01 11111 11151g111a 'l he fr111111111 561-115 415 an 1111pet11s 111111.11115 1 111g11 1vp1 ot c0111gQ J01,1I11l1l'w1T1 on 1111 1411111115 111c1 c11cour1g1s 111 11111111111 1l1or1 T111 111111111c1Q111p IS co111poscd of 111051 pmsons 11av111g tw 111 111c1r1 511r:. YN ork O11 1111111111 pub111at1o11s 6111111 O11 thc 11111011211 111 bun 11655 sf 111C Pr1s1d111t lhomas 11 Bcrlwhue S1c1c111'y 11C'1SL1IC,I' 1x11ph C2l11UO11 13211111 11f111l2l111 M1111g 111 141011011 B01 11 LlI1Cf31H 1X1LCOl1l1C11 'S ll 1 McF1c1c1e11 P 1111 Cl111k Ro11a11d Ewmg 1111111 '111on1pso11 11111 5611116 Robert G1f1e11 130111111 11111110 1-13 , , , MW Q, X ,, W, ,,,,,,,1,, .1111 11. ,,.. A , A , 1, ,-.., ...N , V , , . ,. , 1 " ' f". - ' 1 . 7 - 1 . . ' N. . 1 . 'LI " I Y . 1 i . if - A' V 1 . , 3 W - . 1 ' 1 '1 . ' .. ' .' ' ' 1 1 1, 'QL 1. 1 ."2G1:-V ' 1 1 . , - '11, 1 ' -Q",-11 1 ' " . 1 . 4,41 .1 . I ,N 1. is . h' 31 ,,5L 1 1 , ' V 4 . 1 1 YY . ,1 'Q ', I' 1 - , '.j , ' W J . - 1 f , . , ' T1 Q1 :P 1 1 - 1 1 1 , ' r ' 1 . 1 , , ff 1 . -"g . , ' ..'1 , .. ,Q , 1 ,E ' I ' ' , '2 , ' . F315 .1 , ' U W, . ' of: " ' .5 1. ., '55 I '1- '5 -, . 58 ' V '-11711 ,1 1. 1 , , 1 XE 1 , , . X 11 'N :X 1 . I , 1 . 1 B11 - 1 1 I1 . A . N . 1 - . A I . Q . N i v . Y . Y i -- 1 1 1 1 1 1. 1 . 1 U . . . . , . ,. V Q . i 1 V . , ' L 1 L . hi Q ' - ,1 -1 -1- -.1 ' 11 '- f--. ',Z-'- -V 2 x -.1 -.1 - -'1,, , 1 1 1 A, ' -' 1 1, L C - 1. t L A -' 1 V1 - A ' r1-.1 ' .' - ' ' Y 2 1- 'r Y 4. y,fA . ' - . . . . ' - 1 ' 3 ' . . ' - , -, . Q Q . -A ' - 1 1 . , . 1 ., A , ,Z . , - . A, , . ,. . . . - . - - , , . QQ' I ZH 1. A, .' , H - Q - f' '1 ,- ' . 1 A .V . f 1 . . ., - - H 6, 1. 1 , , 4 . . 1 ---,- I. .2 1 E 'Z ' 1 2 - ' ' ' I 1 ' - 1 1, I V 4 . . Ja .q,s:nqlfz dqg '4fi"ag. 'FG' ff? .. X ,-L, .h yr WINE? !l?iHi!l!!!HIi5i' ' mm... new Q - 4'YpOALKARlGH14 :lM., Dalia d?itckfb- - . , ..,:1,:,L:.....,,. ....' " V 1 ti " A 5' tginypl at F g sg , , B glvldvo 1:0 'gif out W Jn wg IL ,I.,'afJb"?, K .9 " - -' ' H , 'X 1-A '- is - 2531-umx , P 1' g igi iif, ":' Q elszgz Pi cniQS 146 Mm riding? H rougk .f 1 OIC STUTZ 'ffxzsz hilggd ijcf Q .TITO V -mmf ...W - ,..,. -.... ., , ,M vi M., M iw' Qsffirmaiihe ghehaie 51251111 The Alfirmative team performed this year in a very pleasing fashion, the beauty of their performance lay in the fact that they did not lose one debate nor did they have a single adverse decision cast against them. The question for the season was: Resolved, that the present Governmental tend- ency to restrict personal liberty in the United States is to be condemned, was one which required clear thinking and forceful presentation, and the team demonstrated its abilities along both these lines. The Affirmative beat such teams as Marietta, and Ghio Northern, besides engaging in no-decision de- bates with Denison and Otterbein. NVilliam Timmons, First speaker for the team, is effective in his presenta- tion of the case and analysis of the question. His rich, warm, voice wins im- mediate contact with the audience. This is Timmons' Hrst year. Donovan Carson, second speaker, because of his quick, yet firm grasp of the problem was especially good in his position, as it entails the backbone of the constructive speech. The last speaker, Reed Clark fcaptainj, is a forceful debater, who drives home every point of his clearly thought out argument. As last rebuttal speaker he evidences a powerful, smashing attack on the cherished points of the opposition and succecls in pointing out the loopholes in their argument. This is Mr. Clark's second year, we can expect an equally successful season for him next year. The alternatives for the Aliiirmative team were Rusk Haverheld and Kenneth Steuchel. 148 L2 . I Q 'sin m. C33 H. DN 'O 'li-'D' CT' B Q-I" N 2 Q 6' ,Ta 4 ,-JL 3 . .li I T, 4 1 U I: ll F3 1. fir. ', ,X ' I ' ' iff lv -x.,u,Z,, xv . tg. A . , ' Ai1'QwWl.lL W, 'Q "ii--I T Q 'TS .' i S Though the Negative team had the patently unpopular side of the ques- tion, they showed their true worth as debaters by winning the decision in every debate. They defeated Bluffton and Mt. Union, and showed up well in a no decision debate with Denison. Muskingum this year won the cham- pionship in the Ohio Conference, as they did in 1924 and 1925. Although Musking'um tied for the honor with Bluttton and Heidleberg last year, the Negative was undefeated. It has now a record of victory in every contest for the last tour years. Merrill Ross, captain and 'tirst speaker, is the clearest and most logical thinker on either of the teams. He is an exceptionally good 'hrst speaker because of his clear analysis and logical presentation of the argument. This is his second year as iirst speaker, as he occupied that same position on the affirmative team last year. He has another year of debating before him. George Frack, the second speaker, has a very pleasing platform appear- ance. and an ability for a strong constructive argument. This is Frack's first year on the team. XVilliam Milligan occupies the important position of third speaker on this team. Mr. Milligan has a smooth, yet forceful manner. His ability to reason quickly and to apply his linclings to the case as a whole is useful in the re- buttal. This is Milligan's first year, and his graduation will make it his last. Eugene Mansfield and Jewett Montgomery are the alternatives for thC Negative. 149 Puppets of Propaganda Students, why are we here tonight? Men, instead of this life of ease, inste'ad of sitting l1ere in this chapel, why are you not tonight, even now, one of the million Workers with molten metals? Young women, instead of this life of comparative ir- rcsponsibility, why are you not one of the millions of homemakers, tonight toiling, directing, loving? What reason do we have for these four years of freedom from bear- ing our burdens? X1Vhat purpose justilies this temporary laying aside of our life's duties? Is not the direct purpose of these four years of study this: to learn truth? Why is this quality which we call "truth" so important? History's pages are evidence that advance, progress, wholesomeness grow from truth. Misunderstanding, suspicion, hate originate in falsity. The waters of truth furnish us a fountain of knowledge, vital to our lives as individuals, as nations, as a world. To poison the well is murder, to permit it to be poisoned is suicide. Yet that is exactly what is happening. One of the chief defects in the education of the masses is that we are not being told the truth. The wells of truth are being poisoned by propaganda, and the nations of the world lie on to suicide and murder. propaganda prostitutes public opinion. Over a long period of years it builds up certain public attitudes. Then suddenly it promotes hasty action by playing upon mankind's emotions and stifling his reason. In the words of Dodge, the psychologist, "All propaganda is captialized prejudice." Among the races, in politics, in industry, in every activity of .life propaganda thrives. In one realm it has been remarkably successful. That realm is international politics. It is impossible in one evening's conversation t-o tell the whole story of propaganda, We may, however, diagnose this disease, examine it, and prescribe a remedy if we confine our investigations to this one held of international relations. Propaganda has built up in every nation a patriotism blind to truth and justice. For half a century French school-children have been taught that France has always been right and Germany always wr-ong. English children learn that "Britannica rules the waves"-and 'always must.. Since 1870 German leaders have instilled a mad sense of honor and glory in what once were peace-loving peoples. In the great square of Berlin a university student pointed out a vacant framework .... waiting .... "A cannon we captured from the French in 1871 stood there. Today it is in Paris. To- ' 150 Puppets of Propaganda Continued 1110111111 llltls each nat1o11, through propaeanda IS p'1cleed 111th b1111d patrlotxsm unt1l 1t resembles a lo1deel eannon, 1ez1e1v to be exploded by tl1e smallest spa1k fX111CI'1CEl 18 no exeeptxon 'lno xnonths ago Colonel 111on1as D1cleson, a11 authorlty on war elllil lllllltdfy taet1cs sald I have 1e'1d nfty two An1er1ca11 school h1sto11es All have SLIIUUS Lllills ol 01111581011 and COlll1lllSN101l, 11 these are not cotrected, they 111111 endanuet tl1e peaee ol' the 113.11011 He presents scoxes of nnstalees and dehberate f3l91l1L3.tlOl1S l1be1ty lX1a,,a1111e r11'lC1 tl1e Clueago Dzuly ill'1bllI1C are eaeh 501.11605 of 111lo1111at1o11 to ox Ll hxe 1111111011 'X111e11e.1n readexs 110111 a1e so bl111ded bv the po1so11 of tl1e1r own p1opag,anda that thex CZl'1V above t11e11 ed.to11al 5LCt1Ol1 tl1e slogan Our Countu, rlght Ol wrong' llle masses ot cxery 111111011 :ue taught that Our govern ment IS always r1gl1t and that O111 Honor must be n1a1nta111ed even though It be 011 a py1a1111d ol sleulls Afte1 propagandt has so pteleed eac11 state Vtltll 1ts 1111111 explostve of 11at1onal1sm, '111 en1ot1ona1 shocle wx 111 set the 1151110115 011' w1tl1 dyna1111c ltny Eye 1 t111s shocle wh1c11 pteexpltates 11 ar IS l:L11'll1Sl'lCCl by ptopaganda Vvllkll falsehoods had aroused the masses '111 tl1e a1b1t1ary laws of e111l1fat1o11 could not stop tl1e Wo1lcl War FnQf11s11111e11 were told t11at C1e1111:.111y 11'1d erosseel 1ltlLII1l11l 111 orde1 to l.t1flCls Pngland lhe LCIDIIQ Illustrated Da1lv ca111ed tlleged 131001, that FlLI1Cll sold1e1s first entered Pelgtum and llllltefl w1t11 tl1e Bels.g1.111 tenets to stab Gellllttlly 111 tl1e bacle Any German 111,111 tell vou 11 l1y 1115 el.l1llV 1111,.1dee1 lielenun Flxe Ge1ma11 Guards clossed tl1e l1e1g1an borde1 1111der a 11.15 ol llllete a11d were shot elonn bv l71enel1 NOlCl.1C1S on Btlglilli soll flhese were the l'1b11eat1o11s of l'r11ss1a11 D1'OD1.lL1H1'lt11, used to utqe the masses 11110 War 1.3011111115 tl1e gleatest 111t1ue11ee leadtnf' the AIHCTICZLI1 people 11110 war was the stones of GLIIIIJII at1oc1tes 111 lff.lQ11.1111 llooles pamphlets and posters pulJl1sl1ed 1:1 the Alheel natlons 11 e1e sp1ead ll1lOll,Q,l10L1l A111er1ea lhese told of women hanged, men LlllLll1f.C-1 and Lllllflltll 111a1111ed by the Gellllflllb One poster I shall always IC member a l1ttle BClQlr1.11 gnl held Ollt two lJ1CCd1IlQ stumps where onee had been hands 1 erv Stas, o111e ove1 and 1 p 11 What nere the laets Lx lre1111e1 Nlttl of lttly 111 1118 Decadenee of Europe says All tl1e world behex ed the lldbllllfll IDlf1Cll1LC of the Germans was to rut off tl1e 111111115 ol' lJfllJ1C,s lllLlL was 110 t111th lll the stattntent but the most reputable thorough l1'lXCSt1l2,dl.lU1lS and each ncported 1101 a sznele case has evex been found Our most ttusted p11b11sl1e1s DOISOIICC1 ou1 nnnds w1th such lel.lS1lI1CS lust how n111el1 010111 11.11 ed11e.1t1on ua prop.1oand1? lust what ca11 we behexe I have 110 desne to er1t1e1se 0111 gen L,ll111'1C1lt It too, pe1l1aps was decewed by propaganda My purpose IS to LOIlC1L,llll1 plO1kLgel1'lC11 whatevcx the soutee As Imelgnn '1troe1t1es panned a XlNlCl pzcture to us, so pmpaeauda made the term replete w1th 1101101 to tl1e cJCI'111el.I1 111111d l1ofesso1 Muel1e1 of Baden Unlversxty re peated sto11es to HIC ol how l3L1f,l'111 e1t1Le11s to1tured fllld manned wounded sold1ers He produced 17l1010Q,I'q1D1'lS pa1npl1lets d1'lCl posters QIXIUQ exact stat1st1cs O11 111650 deeds Belg1a11 women ezept upon the battlehelds 'tt ntght after the a1111y had passed on, 111 Olllel' to steal l1e111 the dead Ol dy1n1g so1d1e1s lxnwes were alxxavs earrled, to a1d Ill seeurme a wounded 111.111 s XVl.dCl1l1g 11ng OI 111s e111ld s locleet Place yourself 111 1 l1ttle town 111 Ge11na11y N 0111 son, VOH1 b1ot11e1 you1 lover hes under tl1e sta1s bllfl-Cllllil bueldenlx .1 11o1se hope lL1l.lTI'lS someone IQ CO111ll'lfgl 'lhen a female fiend u1tl1 detrl men s money lllfl 1 blood spatte1ee1 lxI'l1lC creeps upon 111111 She robs 111111, l.O1l.l11LS 1115 body, and l1e dles w1tl1 her wultutous, l3Cl01Zll1 eyes gloatmg ovet 111111 We say Lxaggerauon' bCI1l.11I1Cl'lldl boshl But that, fellow Amerleans 19 what Belqtan atre1c1t1es meant to 0111 foe flhat ls the letnd of propaganda tl1e war Il1?lC111I1C, of Germany sp1ead a1ne1ng tts sub1eets lhe same tvpe of hes with the SCUUC 111111 of tirmq hate and str1le 11 ere told al11ee to the people of AIXILTICH and GC111121l1y M1l11a11sts 1111sg,u1eled p ttrlots d1plon1ats, and even busmess 1HlC1CSlS do 11ot 11es1 tate to SDILAC1 1nte111.1t1o11al falsehood 'auch a DI 1et1ce 15 not 111111ted to one nat10n 'lhe Ix11ss1an Genexal S1llxllOII1lll1OV the lt'1l1a11 XVFH DICIHIC1 the hngltsh pub11c1st B1z1tel1fo1d, a11d 1ecent11 a11 A111e11ca11 0lflC1Al '111 stated 1n bold prmt tl1at thev hed to tl1e people 1n OlClLl to produce that te1npe1 NV111C11 malees 101 Well N01 has propa ganda bee11 lnnxted to the Wemrld W ar Gtbbons, 111 111s text on world DO111lCS, ascr1bes 131013 1Qanda as one ol, 1f not tl1e Cl1'Cl1Ill:l1.1C11CC, lC21f.l11'1g to the clash of ar111s III tlnrty s1x dtsttnct contllctsl In sueh a l11IlI'lI'lt.I' propavanda plunges 111a11le1nd mto tl1e darkness of IQIIOTZUICC and preJud1ce Trutl1l'ul11ess 15 the 1deal of the lfldlvldllal Why s11o11ld tl11s 1deal not g1UNV to e111b1ace tl1e meat soetal rel'1t1onsl11psP I1'lCl1V1d1.13.lS ostaclze an untruthful man, gox LFIIIIILUKS Dlllllbll l11lT1 fen slander 1nd l1bel W11v should anv fz11s1tv go url 13 . ' " '.: 1 1.5 z ' - f. " I - .i 1 ' ' . I ' '-. 1 .,A .' ' , , , . ra . ' ' . ' ., , . . - 1 - . . . I I . ,, I I .I . Y . , . I . I.. I5 - 5 V . I ' - w ' IAI II' Ig. Q I II., ,Il II.: ' 1 ' sf 1 ' Q ' I 1 I, f s 1 - ' . ' ,,. 77. 1' 'V I -'s- .11 .1-s ' 1-.Iv ' s , ' - .' . . ,.. , .. , .. . ' . :.I .' ., ' 1 H I -' I I - 11 f ' A 11 'I Q ' ' I - - I 1, ' - 1 N 1 K Y 1- - .s' ' - . ' . ' - , . -, . .. .-. . . V - 1 , . - - I . . I II I I . , . . I - ., ' ' ' ' - . ' 2 If' ' 1 - z- ' ' Q " . ' 2 I ' . "IA 2 I 'X ' " f 'A A - -- I"' in 1 , I ' 1 ' s ' - s- - 1 1- V v ' - 1 r I 1 -, V' -. II - I, 'Is 1 - II ' v- V .I II.. I I v3 1 1- r 1 I. - I-Ss, I I -' - '- 1' 0' - - ss . A 1 r -s . - ' -- - -. -' ' ' . .I I I . ,',. ' I. I.I.'. .IIA I .I . .I I SI, ' I V - 1 s .1 -- - 1- ' , . ' L- - I ' I I ' - 'I I. I I I I I . I I . I, I I. 'J 3 I I I . 7 . . L - ' ' 'f . " "' , 1 1 I: 7.-1 I- .V . . I s I " 1 - 1 .1 s- -",I-. .I' ., V' , Y. J. .I .I I I. II 1 .- A . 1 ' , -I, '. II I ' . . , I D , . I.I 1-le' ' I 1' .' "C 1 ' ' ' 1 el " S." . , I, I ....:, 7. 1, ',. '.' , ' '. H , . Y' ' .. 4 ' ' t. e - 1 1 - - ' ms " 1-1 4 - - 1 ' - 1 A f .1 1 .. 1 . papers pubhshed 1t." Lloyd George and ledward Fox, an .Al11Cl'1C2KIl IlOLll'IlZ't11Sll, made ' f I- 'I-. ' V I. 1. .1 , I U . Is' ,- , I .1 : 1 -1 - .1 1 I I" Y . .. . .. 'I , SI I , II,-, I I I . , 1 f lf J., .",'.., . . .,. . ,. 1 , I', .. . - I .. I 1 . , . . 5' .' 1 f- ' ' " z, -:' 1.5 .I , u 1 'I I I' ' :wr - I I' I' ' . I, I , III. I ., 1 '- , -- - .. " 1, ' I 3. .. . 1 .. J. - . ' ' - 1 I -'sI- 1 . 1 , ,.'I .' '. I. . . . . ' - ' II 1 A f ' - . I, - , s - . -' 1' - 1 'I . . , ' . ' . -, . I I I 1, ., I . - I 1 ... .. . . . ' - . - I- , -I . .1 I - ' - '---I -' -' f.1I. . s - I1 . . U . I,, . . 'r . . . , " I ' 2 ' ' ' , - . 1 . . . . ,. - . ' . 1 f y' I .1 ,Is -- . 2 I 2 I 1 - 1-s- V "I 1 - - I II 1 -. -,- '- ff '.- ' 1 - -' 1 -- ' ' -- ' . . . D . 1 , -1I:I.. , . f '1 1 . . 11 I . . . '. I 'I 1: I - I ,I - -IIN I 1 I -I I- , ' I, e s ' - - ' I, .. . ., . . .'. . ',. "1 -. . 's ' ... -I' - - , I. .,,. ' . . ' . .,I Is , I ' , -Z ' ' 1 -. ' I 'I ... I I II If . I , I -I II I 1 . I I. I ' , I, I , I I I ' , . . -4 ."I . , I - L . ' I U - . . . . 11 - ' ' 2-I' .. . , ' - . V ' ' - . -. I IIII . I II . ' I . -. I. I II -I . I - 7.1 1 . 's ' . s 5 ' s -' s " L ' 1 v L 'K - '1 Puppets of Propaganda+Continued challenged? To severely punish those guilty of international slander will prevent such immediate causes of war as the atrocity stories and the lies of diplomats. ls it too much to hope that truth-loving peoples will found internatitmal courts to punish lies against nations? No honest judgment, no just decision, can ever be reached unless both sides of a ease are studied. When opinions clash, propaganda antagonizes each party with the prejudiced words of self-interest. Reason is stifled, the misunderstanding becomes hatred, the hatred grows, and soon all bursts into a frenzied clash. Time for the emotions to cool down and the statement of all the facts must supplant propaganda's blind appeal to passion. Our government recognizes the practicality of such a program in our relationships with France. VVhen any point of conflict arises between the two nations, an impartial Commission of Research is to investigate all the evidence. The commission is given one year to report its conclusions. During this time we agree to refrain from war. Such an agreement could be adopted by all governments. The conclusions of each in- vestigation should be given to the people through every newspaper and library within the disputing nations. In all disagreements time and education will aid reason in her noble struggle against propaganda's hasty, one-sided, emotional appeal. These remedies are preventative, they seek to extinguish the Firebrands of propa- ganda before they set off the peut-up explosives in every social mass. The primary and fundamental struggle with propaganda is in the realm of education. This readiness of the masses to burst into hatred and violence is the result of years, generations and centuries of propaganda in education. lt is a tragedy when two groups of people, each honest, just, and indealistie, are so deluded by falsehood that they tly at each other's throats. Each believes he is fighting for the same ideals of trutl1 and justice- each cries to the same God for the same aid. The deceptions forging the masses of every nation into potential war explosives must be replaced by an unbiased education. lf an International Commission of Re- search is feasible to investigate disagreements, why should it not be made permanent in order to study tl1e facts of history and report them to all peoples? Is it too idealistic to suggest that this body investigate tl1e text books of nations, discover their prop- aganda, and publicly proclaim the whole truth? These reports, favorable and unfavor- able, should be furnished to every editor and school. Then militant propaganda would no longer exploit the pages of history, but out of the experience of the ages mankind eould gain knowledge. just as history is exploited to produce a patriotism blind to truth and justice, for other selfish purposes propaganda prostitutes biology, economics, political science, and even religion. ,lust as an international education must replace the partial truths of nationalism, education in every field must embrace the whole truth. NVhen people see both sides of a question, when people know the whole truth, they cannot be prejudiced, biased, intolerant! Men! VVomen! we are students because we Search for truth. But our very search- ing sometimes leads us -off the narrow pathway of truth into the broad highway of falsehood. The very sources in which we search are often poisoned by propaganda. In all that we read or study, it is our task to discriminate between truth and false- hood. It is our duty to demand facts and proof before reaching a conclusion. Huxley said, "a conclusion which is not based upon proof is not only illogical-it is immoral." It is our opportunity to overpower this double-tongued monster who violates truth for self-gain, who makes nations powder kegs of passion, who then tosses the flaming brand of falsehood among these explosives. Shall propaganda continue to lead us into misunderstanding in international relations, in industry, in religion, and in every sphere of social contact? Or shall we unite to demand the punishment of those who lie to peoples, to help reason overcome propaganda's blind appeal to passion, to demand an education etn- bracing truth, whole truth, unbiased truth? Shall we as individuals search for and demand facts, be intellectually moral in our conclusions, and carry on an open warfare against falsifying, biased, selhsh propaganda? Or shall we toil on-slaves to mistaken ideals-slaves to ignorance-slaves to prejudice-the Puppets of Propaganda? The answer, fellow students, is yours! - -HARRY B. CRYTZER. 152 iilnrensin Qlluh The Forensic Club was organized in 1914 for the purpose of encouraging interest in debate and oratory, and to reward and honor those who had done work in that field. Since its inception its roster of members has indeed been sufficiently illustrious to convince the student body of its worthg many of' the best thinkers and leading spirits of the College are on its rolls. Membership in the elub is attained through one year's work on the debate team or a year as College orator and, hnally, by meeting the approval of the club members. The club also may bestow honorary memberships upon a Muskingum debate Coach or a 'former Muskingum debator. Members of the elub wear the triangular key given by the college to those who have completed a years work on the debate team or as college orator. Membership in this organization is prized by those who have been as fortunate as to be honored by it. The present members are: George Frack Reed Clark Merrill Ross VVilliam Milligan Eugene Mansfield VVillian1 Timmons Donovan Carson Kenneth Stueehel Rusk Haveriield Jewett Montgomery Harry Crytzer Melton Boyd Robert Wfils-on Harold Finney Dr. Ried Johnson Pro. Chas. Rush Layton ffm.. 2,5 'Clan Kappa Qllpha In 1911 Muskingum was honored admission to Tau Kappa Alpha, national honorary fraternity in debate and oratoryg the Ohio Alpha chapter was at that time installed here. Two years as varsity debator, two years as alternative and one year as debate speaker, or the position as college orator are the elegibility requirements necessary for election. The privilege of wearing the key of the fraternity is regarded as the highest honor to which a Muskingum speaker can attain. The present members are: I. Knox Montogomery, D. D., LL. D. I. Schott Cleland, A. M., PH. D. Gibson Reid johnson, A. M., PH. D. Charles Rush Layton, A. M. A. Melton Boyd Harry Crytzer Charles Merrill Ross Donovan Carson Reed Clark William Milligan 154 x ' r' Q u WUl WXWV avvwilu ' '11 Q1 ,AJ 2. U a "1 Qi , "I S - I' ,fa -qqff? .- 1 A. BAND It is the Band that plays early at football games, and like a Pied Piper is followed by all who had resolved to studyg it is the Band that plays at the half, at time out-whenever there is a knee to be taped or a little pep to be re- stored,-that plays even when it is so cold the men wear overcoats under their capes, and ear muhfs below their caps. It is the Band that leads the parade on any college circus day, and escorts the tlag to the pole on Home- coming with such music, such beauty of formation that McConagha Field almost becomes Annapolis. And on Migration Day it is the same sturdy band that repeatedly, consistently, inspiringly blares out to all Otterbein, "O Muskingum is a College". And on Armistice Day the Band is in the orches- tra box to rejoice with students at shortened periods, and to cover the en- trance of the vets-before collected at after Chapel meetings-and in time to climax their program with taps, and hold the last long note till each senti- mental tear has evaporated or run back. After the winning of a champion- ship, thc Band is a handy little aggregation to call in at the last minute- a martial overture lends quite the appealing air of a military campaign. Cer- tainly, peppy good sportsg may they soon have box seats in the gym, suits with brass buttons, caps with plumes, a Russian headdress for Director Ham- ilton, and a gold baton for Assistant Schooley. 156 MINSTREL On February 15, 1927, "Minstrel Echoes' by the Band. The most satis- fying since the days of the Ape. Burlesque, vaudeville, there was, and home- made stories with the distinctly local Havor of a distinctive collegeg and other tales with world wide, century long traveling credentials-but of course never before told by individuals with lips so rosebudish, or skin so polished a black, or clothes so very cheerful in color and modish in line, as those of Rainbow Reach, Asbestos Clark, Seasick Kegg or Lonesome McCurdy, servants to Marion Hessin, construed to be innocent and on a pleasure jaunt. It seemed to take only a carol of "Moonlight on the Ganges" by the whole crew of sailors in blue, to remind Seasick "I Never See Maggie Alone", and Rainbow of a 'Cutey Due at Two to Twon, and to cause Asbestos to pro- claim a sonnet to the fair "Elsie Shultzenheinf' half in the manner of a radio announcer, half as a Billy Sunday heart to heart talk. Very fetching. There- upon, the handsome commanders, Carmichael and 5. flhompson, dressed in white, with swords at side, joined in the epidemic of love songing with the more delicate "Chinese Moon" and "I Love a Lassie, a sweet highland las- sie"-and then Bill Ogilvie expressed his tribute-it is supposed-to a pedes- talecl lady, with his feet-chasing each other in fancy patternsgand then the whole crew rose up in Hnale. Soon the echoes began to come in. A trio of Mrs. Lange, piano, Delmar Lemmon, xylophone, and Herbert Downing, violin, caught the same gay spirit but with the sharp edges and noises softened-and the niggers hung around as Shakesperian scenery and interpreters of action. jimmy Kegg took occasion to tune his collection of saxs, and on one chosen with dilticulty, sobbed awhile. In time, after all four echoes had passed on, the crew brust forth in grand nnale, and considerably gave a last glimpse of their handsome selves,-but the scheduled remarks of Dr. Kelsey were lost in the explosion of rythmic ragtime, in time with which all marched from the building mur- muring that a "Good time was had by all." Those of the Band who, in the cause of a broader education for Musking- um students, directed this entertainment of the "other half" were George Schooley, Marion Hessin, James Kegg, Kenneth Carmichael and Marjorie Groves, pianist. 157 WO1Tl.eI'l,S Glee Any of the thirty talented vocalists known as the YV'omen's Glee Club will tell with many an adjective of the two interesting evenings a week spent studying class-ics under the direction of Professor Milo Hugo Neuenschwan- der. As they sing Wagner's "Flying Dutchman" or Schubert's "Serenade" or Weber's "Choral Cave" one never thinks of the grinding that such mystery must have required, but only the glory of it, and as they sing iFelds "NVinkin, Blynkin and Nod" with gay abandonment, one envies them the acquaintance with the kingdom of Peter Pan that they must surely have. Besides the varied selection of classical numbers, the program has been made more in- teresting by the solo Work of Miss Eleanor Aikin, violinist, Hylda Hyde, cel- list, and Mildred Bickett, pianist. Not only has the VVomen's Glee Club frequently maclg Friday Chapels enjoyable but have joined with the Men's Glee Club to give the Spring Home Concert. The Club has also taken several weekend trips to Columbus, Pitts- burgh, Cleveland and Zanesville, and has given several of its members for services in the double quartet, and double sextette formations, that have sung for Muskingum audiences both from the platform and the radio. 158 Men S Glee I11 tl1e d'1ys of 211111o1ed lxIllgl1lS NX l1o VVOIC the 'molten of 1 f'111 l1d1 del1e.1tLly e111 bro1der1ng at home, troubadours went f10II'I gl LV stone castle to eastle Slllllllllllllg on tl1e1r lyres, 'md tellmg of the b1'.1we1'y 1nd XVlSClO1ll and 5,,ene1os1ty of then lo1ds 'lhen each lo11e baud was tlltCl'ldlllLd LVVllllL Now, 11 15 C,l1ll1gCLl the dumg vo11tl1 meeecles prfmyus 1nd SCl1lI1lllCl1l., not to bwttle, but to college lild those left belnnd 'st1ll w'1nt to know the -.p1r1l of the XCIIIIIIC go M11slt111gu1ns t1o11b1do11s nent not on fool but 111 11 bus, on an E1SlCl 11111 tlnough Olllo West V1rg:,11111 'md Westem lkllll'-1VlV'll'lll 1nd by then LI1ll1llSIrl9lll punted NlV1Cl 1JlL,tl1TLS fo1 I-heh Sehool students of the g'1yetv 1nd the l1e.11tv good fellowslnp of college hte Luules the 111te1est1nq proyam cl elass1e'1l l'lllI1llJLI'H, and sleepy IIC IO SDll'1lL12'llS ind populu 2111 11l5Ll'l1CI'llS the 11111el1 pleased '1ud1ences Nvltll Ins xvlophonc solos kenneth L11 n11el1ael Xlltll lns p.1tte1 and l1lS ehallt hws grown eloquent 111 the use of d1oll 111111101 'md subtle WV1l 1nd hu. wlso entertuned w1tl1 rcadmgs Robert G1l'fen, ot the H1st lCllOl sectlon l1 ls enel11n1ed many '1 llSlCll6l xwth lllS solo work llle 1111n1be1s sung bv 1,101 l H H 11111lt0n lnve lent 1 prol'ess1on 11 d1gn1ty to the 1JI'Ogl'1l'l'll'1, '111d have QIVLII unq111l1hed DlClSlllC as has tl1e br1ll1z1nt P13110 work of Glenn C.1n1e1on, the 1eeon1p lll1St lllil solowt Non and then, when 41 httle fllftllel sparkle wws 11ecded, the Onfutet has elnppecl 111 111 flCf And so they l1'1ve e11'r1ed the sp1r1t of tl1e111selves and the school The pollcv of the Glee Club has been to welcome 111y 11 l1o haxe twlent and desnm to become 21CC1lldlI1tCd Wltll some good lllllili., 'md l.10ll'l the ehmus to choose 1 seet1o11 for dxflerent Cl1g'2lgC1UCl'ltN To lCllllC that 1101 H4l1llllfOl1 l1.1s 'l.CCOll1DlISl1CCl some real v1o1l1, 1t IS not 11e1.ess'11y to know 1l11t the club rated thnd 'nnong the clubs con testmg, 111 the State Intmeollegxate Contest but only to hear the drz1n11t1e, a1t1sl1e effects as the men have sung 111 chapel or concert 159 1 l 9 K - -1. , 'k- 5 , -4 , VY. -2 c'. Z -, 1' . A , H, ' . W,- , V, . ,..2- , A. .,L , F, . ' I. C A . . I S ,- . J. l . , , . k.. 1 , ' ,ff " 1 2 tg z"f, ' ' 1 I '. . ,' '. ' 1 ' , , Z ' . , 4 L-'. U E ' Y' ' ' , J.. , . ' '11, ' . N. .sy . .L ,H demanded encore selections, there have been many features. IDCllllZl.l' Le111n1an has 1 LK ', L. ' '.. U.. V L. V' '11 1. 'K . ', I J' . .. , ' ', . - ' -' I 1 ' , '. : 1 ",: z:..'i A 2 . CS' 1 ' ' . .K A E , 1 -' 1 2 ' 1 2 h- . 3 L. , ' . V- , K V . A 'Q , .. , 'T ' 1 ' 1 f l 1 ' Y A 1 N- I s , 2 7 v 1 - 1 5-' ,- . ' ' b. I, . 5' . 1 .. 1 . E- . - 2 A. . '- ' , . 2 'Z . 3. cu . ' , -. 1 5 1 ' ' ' ' ' -. . ' ' ' ' 1 '- " . ' - ., - College Male Quartet "Melody, Mirth, Harmony" has been the three-fold aim of the Male Quar- tet, of which three members are new-untrammeled by traditions. 'l'he boys have made several appearances on the campus, at many Chapels have hastened forth, done their vocal syncopation, and been duly swallowed up by the yawning chasm at the back of the platform, their reputation, however was established beforefwith the delightful serenade of early winter. The solos of Messrs. Giffen and Nelif have added a pleasing variety to the blend- ing harmony of the Quartet, and the piano entertainment and solo work of Glenn Cameron have given balance and charm to the concerts. Kenneth CE11'1'1'liCl1HClyS act, humorous readings and perky chalk sketches, has lent a spice to the work of the songsters. The season has been most successful and unusual, judging by returns in both experience and linance. Besides afternoon, evening and dinner en- gagements at Cambridge, Zanesville, Martins Ferry, O. and Vifheeling, NV. Va., the men have taken a Christmas trip, and from VVl1eeling broadcasted melodious New S.7CZ11',S Cheer. The members of the Quartet are Messrs. Robert Giffen, lirst tenor, Bruce Ferguson, second tenor, Kenneth Carmichael, baritone, Nelson Neff, bass, and Glenn Cameron, pianist. 160 mlm 6lll25lIfIZ1l Once upon 21, t1111e tl1ere xx'1s 1. 11nd xxl1el1 Uneen I ue Il1lCLl 1nd 111 lll1Q 11nd she wllowetl 111051 people to st1y onlv 10111 ve11s So111et1111cs the ptople VVCIL tnecl 1nd lo11elx but xxhen sp1111, enne thev 5:1011 l1'llJDX for xx l1e11 tl1e el'13s xx ere lJL'lUl1l-lll tl1e1rs xx IQ '1 ple'1s'1nt hte But 1t alw 1xs h1ppe11ed tl11t 1l1Cll. NNC1k so111e people vxho could l1e1r VOILLS 110111 souls lllClClL1l 111 oxfe1 tl1e se1s lnelden llhlllllfl QUCQI customs, o rigged clothes 01 ljllllllil the .111sts of ye'1rs souls held 111 prettv Hoxvers Ol xx1nels or trees tll tl1ese people xx ho eould l1e 11' sweet f'1r 1x1 LN songs c1111e together to tell others ln one bllflllf., c1lled 1976 lllLIL wete 11111ety wl1o could he ll 111us1e 17111111 othe1 cl'1xx11s '1nd one etlled Wllllllll VV1sl111t C1113 xxho could l1e ll more th 111 the others them 1 l 1 lped them p1 ct1ec to tc t1 O11 tx1o l1lDl1l.S Mlv txxelfth 111 thnteenth people CtlTle 1111111 l11llKllLClS of 1111les to hsten And then those xx l1o 9DC'llx thtough str1,s mel 1eeds ll el p1pes tolel hoxx qnnt Stens h 1d xxatehed Mae 1b1e come sxwtftlx xv1lelly for 1,2 1 Zlg 11, 1 111, '1 llc, De 1tl1 lenocl s o11 tl1e to111l1 Xtlllll l'jlll1ll1C heel 1111, 11, 1 ne, ll De'1th f1delles '11 1111cl1115l1t 1 ,hostlx 1eel 16 xx1nte1 Vtlllfl XXl'llSllLS d 111 IS 11C 111511 Dull 510111-1 lJeh111d the l111dens gtoxx loud Bach 'tnd forth llw the sleeletons xx lute .Rlllllllllg 1nd lLllJ11'l e1.Cl1 nndex lllS slnouel 11, 111 '1 ng hoxx 1t Ill tlees xou C1111 e As you l1e1r the bones of tl1e Cl'lllLCIS sh'1l e 1181 lt one the x lI'l1S IX The coel l11s lruleel the daxxn of diy And tl1e11 thev thought of 51311112 'md lloxve1s and sl 1es 'md ll"lDDll'lCSi 1nd tl1ey 5,111 1e'1111 the sto11es Hxdlex l11d SCLII 111 the Reel Rose the Rl'lIt.JL1Cl1l.CS the j.1sm1ne 'md the Heather lhex we1e xe1y h'1ppv t1ll suddenly they 1e111e111bered 1 letter Fseh uleowsley had xx11tte11 to 1ll hts l-llCI1ClS, xxl11eh thev htel eorne to e1ll SXl1'lDl1U1'lV l'1thet1que , and they he'11d tl1e Cly ot the Russ1 ms tl1ev saw tl1e111 Qlllllc 3, llfflt at tl1e sunhght, and 1110111 lt the long, long dnleness And 'll1C1W'lI'Cls tl1ex plavgd tl1e tlnnes SIlJCllI.1S l11d seen 111 llYllII'lCl1'1 1xhr1e 111 mv ljfllllllflll 1l1011.,l1lfS 'md Souls of T1utl1 1re 1n the trees and floxvexs and 1oel s bectus tht people 'ue not 1lloxxed to leep them lor the people tl1e1e xxo1le and struggle 'mel 1re only ctnelly trctted but they love tl1e 11111110 th'1t holds the Souls of lllllll ind see1etly tilxe some home Ihen tl1ose xx l1o hsten XVCIC very Qld l11d CHUM Q0 Clllllt that they l1e11d the XOICC of Gounod from lon long tgo lCllll1 of lf lLlQt who l1x ed 111d loxed dllfl was lemd to exerytlnng 111 God s wo1lel And 111 the people hstened 1nd 1fte1 1t was oxer thev s'1t xerv stxll tn then' gene for a long, mon1e11t for thev xxe1e both s'1d mel hwppy 161 'H 11 it -1 . . , . 1 1- 11 1 VJ 1 sf V , "tw - n o f' 4 ' 11 1 12:2 2 '11 N 1 1:9 1 ' , 2 .1 2 1 J " .1 . ' I 12 e fe , .-1 -1 1 1 ,Ji . 1 1 V - 21- -2 A 1 ., 1 K -1, , . K 15. .C , D up 1 V ,t 1 .D 2,115 1 A. , 2 . -1 1 -1 5 1 ., , 12 ' . 5 1 1' ' 1' - . 11.7, . 1 1- . r . 1 Y, . , l . 1 . , . . . ' ,. , , ,' ., 2 Y ., , . . . 2 ., . . 1 , - , 1 2 1 1 1 1 12 5 - 2 : 123 J 2 ' - ,. 2 1 1, , Y 12. -.I . ,A . 12 1 2 12' 11, 11' ' 2 151, led 1 2114 le 1 '21 . 111 'uly. 1 ft '.', f2 ' ' 2 d . . '... . ... -' 1. , .' '. . 1 . ,. U1. . .," 1 . ff. 2 1 .. 1 1 1, , e2 . . 2 1 .1 2 1 'I ? 1 - 7 1 . 1 1 "Z'1f-z- ' , :'ff-:-'.' -'-.-'.'e', 2 - Cx 1 ,-' 11 ' 1:1 '- ' 1-- -' l 1' ' 'u'-' -- ' v-f ' r L13 2 , K, ., 2 . .,g, 1 ' ' 2 1' 2 5-' , 3 1 1. ll . , ., .1 e . 1 R I , U.. , . . , . A, .. e 1 1 1 1 . - 1 pf 2 12 12 1 5 5 1 . L L11-2-1- g-2-2 ', 1 2 j ' 2k , ,But l .1 '. 2111 2 'er 1y '2 311 2 x'21y, . , c 2. 2 , 1 ' 1 1. , 1 1, j 2 5 ' Q' 2- . sc 1. 2 2 pt, 1 1 11 12, gy. A 5. - . 2 3 2 5 1 1 1 51, 11 ' 1. ' 1, , , " 1 1-1 11- - 1 1 x .,. , , C . Q ' I .C ' . L ' 1 ' .,2', 1, . ,.' ,. - E .- -- V' ,- - -1 2 , . 2 41 v ' V - 11, . , . - ,t 13. . , - " H . ' c I C 1 1 1 11 . 1 e 1 . ' . . . - 1- - 1- - - - ,ls . . , . . , s K I x 1 7 , l e.. . I I , ' . A ' -,S K- 1 is--1 4 2 Ll ,y 3-1 Z ' 2 - :df S C 1 A - 3 Y ' 1, ., xe, 2 .e 1 ' , -- 2 1, , ' 1 - ' V, ' ' ' 11' 1' - . , , , I . x . 4 1 s'x 2. e ' 4 , 1 , 1 1 ' 2 ' " 2 ' . e . ' , 2 .' " ', '3 kj " 5 1 1 - 1 1.2 2- 11 1 1' 1' Y ' T 1 KT' , ' ' " ' ' 7 v 4 ,' , 1 51 1 1 1 5 1 s 1 f 1 , . ' ' '- - 1 1 1 -1 2 2 2 2 . Cllullege Ugrcliestra One had, at times, heard mention of a college orchestra but until recently heard nothing from it. This past year has developed this moribund organiza- tion and delightfully viviliecl it. At last one has Seen it function and heard its productions. Under the guidance of Mr. Hall the orchestra has lwresented several Friday programs in chapel to the great appreciation of the student body. The organization is lusty in its rebirth and gives promise of a very potent factor on the campus. 162 4 11111112 521112112 The Double Scxtettc IS one of Profussm Ha,1111lto11 Q e11c1e1x ow, 111c1 C1 1 ery frnutful one Films ex1.11 111 11s 111fa11u, 1ts 1'l1C1OC11LS 'ue so ll'111J1'CQS1XC t111t 1t 111s iung ox L1 the 111110 both 110111 the 10111 st111o11 and 110111 the one '11 Lolumbus It 11.15 zudnd 111 111 Llxlllg the 111111 s Glu Llub pxogr 1111 a SULLLSS and has felturecl 111 the re11c11t1o11 of the 51113211 1Xf1'LtLI' F1CC1C1lt1y clel1gl1t111g 111en1be1Q 1re Q11 lW11 1111111 the XVo111e11s 211111 Mens blue Clubs 1 l1L 156150111161 15 JC. folloxxs sopranos, Nhsses 'Xl1re11c1tQ Nucl Grax '11tos, 11115565 111l11CX, Verma Spangler, tenom Mebm Q L1111e11 Fowler, Fe1guso11 11155 Messrs Lar1111e111Ll Ile, Nerf, aCco111p.f1111Qt H3I1111tO11, x1ol1111f.t Allxlll d1re1.tor, PIO fcseor I-11111111011 16 7 ' ' ' ' ' ' z " ' ' 1 J f' 'Q ' 7 - ' z 111 Friday chapel services the o1'g:111izz1tio11 11:15 come into 11111011 favor. Its 2 'z ' '-- 1 ,,-, f - 'J T .. ' A i 1 Z. 2 1 1 . - - N I - 1 5 y , 5 W - - z A . 3 A 'F' ' IIE? ' - uwvy-2 .1 -1-gg-31-rw IV, flllpnral Snnietg The beauty of sweet concord of sounds is becoming more appreciated by an increasing nuinber of students. Many have taken a new interest in the department which is so ably conducted by Professor Thomas Hamilton. Under his tutelage the Choral Society has been able to grasp the spirit of the masters in two successful productions. The Erst concert with the seventh annual presentation of Handel's "Messiah", given during the winter. This oratorio afforded Muskingum the pleasure of hearing of such solosits as NVill Rhodes, Fred Newman and jean McCrory Newman. Each year the produc- tion is increasingly interesting and worth-while. The spring concert, pre- sented the 'first part of May, was the well known work of Rossini, the "Stabat Mater". The soloists were julie Rive Lange, Cynthia Ahrendts, Robert Giffen and Robert Sawhill. These concerts have been very well received by the students and have become an established and much looked forward-to Custom. 16-1 I MW, mix F3352 3 - X SF! L, s 5 'Q Q X,x 5. -,ff x 5 lm .A H Y..-,Z W, fm I U - - ' f -- Lz f ' 1 f f 2.112155 f U s 'Y - - A . , bmi: ' 'rg' ' Xxx , A ,K , ' . .,, J W fi "- Y A L-' ?f'?' a ""-, if -N '. ' ffl L 'SL :L X lc-Q ', 125. : N:'-x Q.. 1 '-- A -- -.lf mul Tl ' an ar- ,r .... ,. ., , -Qi - 2 x " - 'K S ,- ',- ' I- -f .. .1 A -dvi Q ss ' .ug .ff 5- .. ,nil ,V , f -,Za ., t . X I, 7 - Jfjr 5 XX, x X Y :Q-A357 . ' , X g .91 , ' J - " 1 kr, - x- ' ' ..' V ,Q X , , ,bfi , , f ff! J X ff' - --.a , f" .-'.i.2f- L ' Q, Ex , 1- A - ff , "1 'c. 1. cr--- .. e I ,, ' n IIL' . I ,qw More Stamps tu ainnquep, ' ,cv-nunfz ----' Q ' 0 ,X e fl, On june 7, 1926, the junior Play Class presented f' M in Brown Chanel Goldsmith's comecl , "She Stoo S 5 51,6-,Q T 1 Y P Lfjf-5 ' to Conquer". The east, under thq competent Coach- ,!" ' i X , MQUDAY ' J'un.qi ."Z'LL. 8:OO'BH. l ing of Miss Gibbon, carried out extremely well the l spirit of the lighthearted and gay comedy, to the cle- light of all those so fortunate as to witness it. It was - an evening to be remembered, both for the Ene acting -AKOUIY CIJADEL 3 A . dis-played and the entertainment. ' TIC Kzrsf thaw-.grxuav Ilslimxiswielt Q9 N T H E C A ST Mrs. Hardcastle Mr. Hardeastle Tony Lumpkin, Son of Mrs. Hardeastle - - Kate Hardcastle, daughter of Mrs. Hardeastle Constance Neville, ward of Mrs. Hardeastle - black Slang - - Dick Muggins - - Alehouse ifriends of Tony - Ami nad ab - - Landlord of Alehouse ----- George Hastings ----- Charles Marlowe, son of Sir Charles Marlowe 3ggg,i?ry - A - Servants in the Hardcastle h First Servant ------ Second Servant Third Servant - Dolly, a maid ---- Sir Charles Marlowe - - - Jeremy, servant Of Young Marlowe Anna Rogers - Earle Curtis - Melton Boyd Martha McConnell - Clive Wfatts Harry Scheidemantle - Stewart Gunn Rodney Giffin - Ralph Cannon Robert Ballantyne - Rolland Ewing Harrv Seheidemantle Rodney Giffin - A'clrey Young - - Faye Turner Margaret Hammond Dorothy Aiken - Stewart Gunn - Harry Scheideniantle ome - ' DLE. .TUHIGQ PIAY cuss f Pl fiif' OLD MAN MI H ICK. ,,-49a-. .FRIDAY MAY 28 8 ooP!1 gfaldfl UMPEL AUDITORIUM ,Pu J S' is 11 1 11 Lorcv Nctlm 1111111111 X11111C 11111 Cc11LV Fwd M1111c11 C111 M 111 1X11I11C11 +11 D11111111111 M 1rgL D11111111111 LL111 Mr D1CfCl111OfLf M1 P1111 Mu S111'11111c1g 11155 C1 111161111 1161 Mm L1pp111Lo1t BIISS Suck KL ,iHHI11IlZk 1111 111st 11111111 P111 of 1111 19711 5L'1.SO11 11'1s pre s1111Ld b1 1111 11111101 13111 1115s 011 M 11 98 111 BIOVVI1 L11 11111 1111 p1'11 NX 15 1 s1111p1t11e11L 1JlL1L1lC of 01d lbC 111L1t111b 101.1111 0141 '1gc 111111 111tu1 O1c1 Mau 1171111 1111 NN IS out of 1111111111151 w1t11 1114 cl111c1r111 md thur 111611618 1112, 111c1cpe11d11111 111d 1115 desup for 111 1111105 1111111 1o11g1111a1 to 111111 111111gs 011 '1 Spnsc. of trlgedy 111L 111 LN XA IS 117111 1q11cQ1111cc1 111d IS 1 ClLC111I to thc LO 11,11111g 111 111188 lxeboph H C Do10t11y NVh1te Sam 111CF1C1C1Cl1 Lms Brownlee C111c11cQ Lo1tc1111a11 D116 Co111e1 HTFFX Lryt7cr D011 11d 1f.1v111g Mary McC1rego1 XX711'l1fI'Cd W1111S F1'11'111 McA111ster FC1g'l1 R1111agL P11y111s Alblccht I1'15 G111og11 1.1111 P1u111er Margaret Leepgr 167 I l v u 7, 1. o usr.mam Gbmwf- fl" ww- " ' c - ' 1 , I - z ' ' 2.1- - 1 1 - 1 - Y , ' . , , , . . , . , " ' . , - 1 1 f r. . 4 - ...1, ' " . V " 1 ., . . . , ,. -' ' 1- . . 'Q 1. . ' c ' "L. L ., ' 1 ' . J . - 20' ' ' . U' ' ' I L A "2 A , . - J 1 1 ' 1 , ,. . - ' ' . ' 1 , I 11 .. 1 ., 4 . : I ' ' .' ' .Vx Z .' I ' 1 7 L Z " 1 1.x . -1 '. . ' I . , - , . , W . ' , . L . . 1 . f' A . f 1- 1 -1 - :1 - ' - 1 -1 ' - 1 K 'K 1 1. , C 1 L ow na ' "' nurannuu 1111.1 , , N ' H , ' , ' , 1 1 L a . I f 1 -1- .IX 'vl- 1 It 1 5 . .. A - - - - - - H - - . 4 . . X U -. x I.. . x V - - - - - - - - . K 42 I A I x ---- -, ,. ,, - - - ' i" 1 , . ' . . l - - - - - - H - 2 .J X it - . .J 1 , --------- I C If ,' . 1' ' . 1 " . 1 K ' - " " - " ' -' - C ,' -A .I - - N ' 4 . A K , " " "-' . C ' I Z .1 L ---- - - - ,. ' C .......... 1 V . V X ' "--" ' 4 .C v 4 I -u 1 xg - " ' ' ' ' ' - ' 44 C - C x 1 .- 1 .A - . ' 1 - y . . .. 1. C - ' - ' ' ' ' " .. 1' .1 -'Z ' ' 'Q - ' ' - " ' ' " ,7 V ' . " . - - - - 1 , J .a c ' ' " ' " . The Senior Play Class MUSKINGU3 COLLEGE Presents Shakespeare s "ROMEO and JULIET' Brown Chapel Saturday, January 8 Tickets on Sale al Bniley's on Main McKinney's Central Dnig Store Lilltlvlllv New Cnllcurd Cantbridlllx lumen Huh Huliet The Senior Play class gave in Brown Chapel, on january S, 1927, its prcscntatiou of "Romeo and Juliet". The production was one of exquisite beauty, wherein the actors carried out the tender delicacy of the play. Much cred- it for the consummate acting should go to Miss Gibbon, coach of the play. CAST OF CHARACTERS Sampson ........ Gregory . ....... . Abram, servant to Balthasar, servant M ontague to Romeo Tybalt, nephew to Lady Capulet Capulet .......... Montague ........ Prince of Verona 5 p ...... .... servants to Capulet llearls of two houses at variance with each other Mercutio, kinsnian to the prince, :incl friend to Romeo .... . ........ . . Romeo, son to Montague . ...... ...... . . ........... . .... .- .. Margaret Leeper Harry Scliedemantle Margaret Ilzunmond Rodney GiPr'en Charles Crouch . ..... Earle Curtis Frank McAllister Margaret Kelsey Donald Ewing . . . . . . . Dale Conley Clarence Cotterman Paris, a young nobleman, kinsnian to the Prince . . . .. Peter, servant to J'uliet's nurse .................. Lady Czxpulet, wife to Capulet ................ Nurse . ........ .,.............. . Juliet, daughter to Capuplet ..... Friar Lawrence, a Franciscan . .. Apothecary . ........ ......... . Friar John, a Franciscan .... Page to Faris ., ....., . . . . . . Vernon Layton . . . . . Faye Turner . . . . . . . Anna Rogers . . . Martha McConnell . . . . Margaret Leitch , ...... Dorothy Aiken . . Harry Scheidrnantle . . . . . Mary Mehafey The Senijr Play Class 6 Oo' W l 'Sf Qbiiobik Friday Q, . January 14th 7230 P. M. usfllllffldlll llklll fl? lfll' SIMM' J BROWN CHAPEL. mum: rum sur mmm rirxrr sus Yuan- nn u....n. .i mn.,-. In-114-I Maman I ,Q " Ellie Efzxhg glirnxn the Seat " An exceedingly good presentation of llisen's "The Lady from the Sea" was given by the Senior Play Class. Sarah Macliad- den and Melton Boyd as Ellida and Wfangel respectively, displayed hue appreciation and comprehension of the parts, and displayed ability and intense dramatic power. Mary McGregor, as Hilde, added the necessary touch of lightness, and Olive Vlfatts had freshness and delicate charm as Bolette. Rolland handled excellently the dihficult part of Arnholm. Edward Chipley created a character in his portrayal of Lyngs-trand, while Clarence Linard was a good Ballested. As the mysterious Stranger, Vernon Layton was very effective. Miss Keboch, by whom the play was coached, is to be complemented on the success of so difficult a production. 169 ,1iHHl15lil11I5111lI iglzxgers The Muskingum Players is a development of a movement begun by the members of the junior play cas-ts of 1926. The organization was conceived to promote interest in the acted drama and to foster a spirit of fellowship among students of dramatic taste. Membership is open to those who have taken part in a play produced under the direction of the Public Speaking department. It is hoped that this group will become a chapter of a Well known dramatic fraternity before much time has passed. Recently a small number from this group has had at petition granted whereby the Muskingum chapter of the National Collegiate Players QPi Ep- silon Deltab is to be established. This chapter is the twenty-secondth in the country and will be installed sometime in june. The thirteen charter mem- bers are Prof. and Mrs. Layton, Virginia Gibbon, Mildred Keboch, Sarah McFadden, Rolland Ewing, Dale Conley, julia Plumer, Anna Rogers, Earle Curtis, J. Kenneth Miller, Martha McConnell and Melton Boyd. 170 7 remzli qlillug Lots of dreams go floating by-dreams of exotic Paris with its hurrying silhouetted ngures, or students moving conhdently toward lecture hall or musty library-or at night, gowned in attractive decolletes, with distinguished foreign companions, watching a drama fr-om a curtained box. But one night a year, ,a bit, a speclt of life on the Left Bank comes to llrown Chapel. March twenty-first was the night in 1926. Then one gave his pearl opera glasses only 'a fond glance, and with the rest of his house, watched Moliere's "Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme" from a democratic first floor seat. One heard resumes in English, then exclaimed at the costumes, the wigs, silver buckles, gay, graceful hoop skirts, and flowing sleeves, and was thrilled by the music, the dancers, and chanters. And then -one watched Cleonte assume the foreign prince's garb, and teach the ambitious father of the most charming girl to dance, at the same time spinning tales of his great state, until tinally the wedding was arranged, and the newly rich connected with a family of nobility-lnut, nog the disguise has fallen off, and the prince becomes only a true lover. And one listened carefully-it was not hard to follow the action, gestures are very eloquent-but if one could remember a phase to repeat with an appreciative laugh to ones companion, Voila, il est bon. Then one went home benignly smiling at the happiness of the lovers, and satisfied that he would find it easier to conduct himself properly, when several years hence he shall see the best of the Season in Paris. And he will, for under the direction of Miss Mary E. Sharpe, Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme became a Hnished production worthj of Paris. 171 aww. ,M MM., x , ff ay, f ' ,,'.I4Wf'Y'!1 W 'gf""1fg,,:imx'Ws'ax iw HS 5515, X ., N 'i 1: ,xr 172 X 1? K ,T , , ,, ,I game A if fi? 5, 1 . , ,. - , ,Z M4 49 " Q Q. 52 XV -, D-A W MW if F gi ff - is Q sv ., 'a if 5 -'gi-QQ: ui .1126 l M f Hui' ' 'iii -fa I 'gif' I ,314 ' , 'Q is 2 111 ' v ,vs 'Y' x ny . 'Q 'W 41-V1 'x 'R Q 'i ig. is gs A n q. !'M w Q f QW Jaw OCIHII Ch 173 -- , K "I I ' I ,nu X ij? ,, , . - . - g' -def, I Z X 17 Q 2, X 'Z g gf-Zfm' 5' f-x-Q ue' Q I A M Q'- KM, 143' tfjgf + Hr . 1" pw Q, .Q ww N H , , ,fm gx Q fu rf! if K w ,, X '1'9i,43f- Y v 1-1, ,K 5 4 fp -'M ' " .55 , ,Jn A. Q .- .QQ S . wh 'K . A,"-"" ' .V 9 1 , J . . Q.-m - N , ' 'Q ww- ib.-. .. L -'Q , ,- .Q , 'X Fr' , V Y. h. ,. ..l Ii 'TIA A . tg gag fa 3 F3 .-'N H ' wi' 5,5 S .4 - A ,fi"vS.' A seg, -- , L A , 1 , .I :ggi , Y, -Q. ,ug 1 - nf:-. ' I. f 1, S 'hq.,, -- f. P 4 J N . A r -'fa - J -k I f , .. --44 3. '- k'. - vguihh , ' HT -'fs f . 11' 5 . F A 3 m?-' 5. ,z-hw ii if 1 1 J 551213 Qlluh FO l' N DIED-19051 C l-l:X RT ICR ED-1925 O PFI C li R S Nlfillianl Milligan l'IZ1l'Ol1l lX'll1llil'1' - - Vice james Orr - NYillizun Ogilvig Hcrlmcrt Bain - Corrcsponcling President President - Recm'cli11g Sccrctzlry Treasurer Secretary Cuylcr Fcrguson - - - Chaplain Harvey Moors ----- Librarizln SENIORS Glenn Cznncron Claude Cupclaml Cuylcr Fc1'gL1sr,m lllilliznn Milligan Hurulcl Mintier Xvllliillll Moore -IUNIORS 1-Icrbcrt Bruin Charles R1'acll,uury Albert Martin Alun Maguire Xlfillizun Ogilvie Clillorcl Orr james Qtr S0l'HOIX'lORli5 Hzxrolrl Bell XVcnclcll Czxrlson L':n'l5'lu Fee X'Villizun l,1lI'l'lCli XVilliz1m Lynn 1-Izn'vcy Mourc licorgc MCConalm Charles Ross 175 ,JW-5r,mgm'5W.' Yw,"Wi1"4v- ,wmf11.'r,g,'1wvQ1r'v5U, .A 1 VTZWLN v Q-'vp-fm' , N35-"'7'f" X X W4 TTTSPQN ' QQ! y 1' ,PY f."1i!fuYLL Z., ,MSW .,., Q 'jM.qv,fQr".-,..I " I U f, I if X X 'Zell' if' ,J 'A ., A. , 4 I ' ' y l l , N F! , x N, f. . . 1' " ' U! ' Q 314.9 . A: ,2 "vx..g J, . .114 . X -,A 1- , " 'I , , ' x 1' ' .JU , -1, 176 . . ,A Founded Harry Taylor George Frack Robert Fowler Merle Ross - Kenneth XX'YllllZl111S Edward Bailey jewett Montgomery Thomas Vernia :Sphinx Qlluh 1910 Chartered-1925 OFFICERS - - - President - Viee President - - 'lqI'C21SL1l'Cl' - Recording Secretary Corresponding Secretary - Sargent-at-Arms - - v Historian SENIORS Harry Taylor Harry Crytzer james Moore JUNIORS George Fraek John Calhoun Lloyd Peters Newell Snyder Stewart Mitchell Merle Ross NValter Harrop Hugh Hastings Robert Fowler XVade MeCreigl1t Orrnan Edington Robert Taylor jesse Beavon SOPHOMORES Samuel Gillespie Kenneth Stuehell Charles Caldwell Raymond Wfilson Donald Morrow Edvvard Bailey NVilliam Norman Jewett Montgomery Clarence Husher 177 A., fn xxjf Y. fi I - . xi? S H4 .- '3'f N 1 1 A 46 f 6 Z t ff, , ,:x' 'xx f-,vim Y -.VxX"" '7,.. Nxxgt ' ,- "V " 'Q 'v ,. ' -' 178 gli. 39. Qllull Foundecli19l4 Chartered-1925 Mary lVlCCi'Cgm' Ruth Thompson Sarah XXfllCE1tUl1 OFFICERS - - - - President Vice President - - - 'll1'C21SUI'Cl' Dorothy Leenian - Recording Secretary Lincoln McConnell Corresponding Secretary Ruth Cashdollar - - - Social Secretary SENIORS Mary Nlefiregor Sarah McFadden Hannah Clundernian Lincoln McConnell Dorothy XVhite Ruth Cashdollar Ruth Thompson Margaret Leitch .IUNIORS Lillian Harvey Sarah XVheaton Helen Daugherty Dorothy Leenizxn Lois Leeper Ruth Bowman Elizabeth Ewing Bernice Vlfarren SOPHOMORFS Margaret XViSllZ1l't Frances Finlay Wlilma Miller Hilda Hyde ,Lois johnson Dori ithy Russell Mabel Sharp 179 ..: 4, lo., lx I 3' ' 'jf U , I1 I E' 4 W rgf Ar '77 1 If fr F'-6? "T 1 T I W 6 11121111 0111111 111111111111 1918 L111r11r111 1995 11117 11111111 11011111 1111111111 13 ll 11 1x1t11111111 111: 1111 IC 1 X11 C11 1LL 131111 1-111111 1 111111111 1111111 P11111 O1 T111 1 Q PfCS1dC11f V116 P11Q1111'11t House P1'Cs111111t '1 masurex RLLO1d1I1, S111e111x C111 1 LN1JO1'1C.11l1g 1511111111 Q.1q1X 10118 1.1111111111 13111111111 11116111111 1C1C1lll0S 141111111111 11101111 11111 1V11s011 H111 513111511 111111 111111211111 1x1111111111 1x11111 11111 N111 11111 51Xl11L r11 XV111tc 1111111 101111111 1UN1O11S M ll 1111 X1111C1so11 11111111 131111111 H1l111 1 01111111 C1111 B1111 1 OLIISL 1"C1b11so11 111111161 l11o111pso11 V1111 VX 1111 SOI HOMORES N1111 L 11111111 1111111 L1 11'1 f1111ys P1115 11111 510111 111111111111 L111111111rs 1v111111111C M1111 1X1i1N 11us1 1111111 VN 11111115 D111 01111 D611 1 Lb 181 T A ' " . 11 1' 1.l I i .41 11 1151 4' 1 7,1 1- -,M,- , '. ,ln H - - - - - .x ,Z I ,li - - - - - . .J V11 1115 ---- - - - - ' - - - - - 0'.f"1z'f 1 . ., A . ,. -,-- A k,..,Z-, 1 1 " M1 1 12 A' , " 1 ' -0' ' 6' ilfl 1- - -N 1 .1 1 L A R 1. 1 1 ' 011' ' -1 V , 'D . ' V 1-' '. 1 . B1 . 1 - 1 1 11 " - 52121 13, 4 'S 1 Q. -11' 5' ' 'l ' 1 -' 1 g 1 1, K1 1 4. 111-1 Az' 1 -'- ac ,1z.i.'c -1 .' z 1' " xi 2 1 .1 A' 1 gnu 1" '51 " 71" .' .. , A,,,. J 1 u , 1, 5, N lm F 182 :J V um 1 ' ' 5 V h - V f,-'iii' 'I 'A , ' 75 E, 234 'Q f' 4 'gf .1 fn -' H- ,v 4, ' ,-. .' ,, , ' . "1 W ' .iff iff '-r"5f:'ff, '-.,f swf.-rg r 4 2336 2' 1 ,r.:, ,4 , - . . 1 be-LFE! I 4431 2.4332 wp 1- 0 . 3.5: 5 I "., -W1-"M .l ,W -401. '2-. 'Q A in. A A Stain Qlluh Founded-1918 Clizlrtererl-1925 OFFICERS Paul Clark - - - - - Myers Creamer - - - Vice Clarence Cotterman - XVilliam Leyshon Morgan Mulvey SENIORS Paul Clark joe Poorman VVilliam Leyshon President President Treasurer Secretary NVarden Clarence COlIlQCI'll1Zl11 JUNIORS XVz1yne Greenlee Kenneth Hoover B1lyI1Z1I'Cl Turner Myers Creamer Vernon Shaw Robert Mclielvey SOPHOMORES lllorgan Mulvey XVilliam Culley Malcolm Hazlett Reviere Giffen Harold Stull Dwight Patterson XVilliam Dittmar ,Edward .Flanagan 183 I r .4 zf f '+G -ma J ' ' 35 1 1 ll v' ',, 4 u 1 9 . -.QB YE. ' ' E' A , ' " ' "IL Y .ff ' W - . L., .. .. ,,-- f A',Vf-Yu I f 41' I ' -, fl .V , f V : - - I' f I , W a 6 3 jf 3 ! Y - 3 1 - 2: N . ' ' J , . 4' 2 W' wifi H K us A ' ' M 1 . .Q XA S 4.1 . 5 x J f 'a If . r , uv uv .1 4 , ' 44 f '. .f ,ff ,gil a L. , f " Q-' my 6 1 4 . T. . ,M ,-3. 184 gllflane fllluh lounclcd 1979 Clmltnrecl 1995 Rollwnd Tum Dxle Lonlcy XValtc1 Lomm Lhallus Lrouch Ioscph Shmc OTTICERQ Premdc nt Vlcc Pres1dent Buslnuzs M1l11QC1 Semetwrx lxecpgr of thu A1 Lhu as SENIORQ Hcuold 1 lnnny Ddlg Conlq john Loudon Glenn L ar Chzuleb ClOL1l.h JUNIORS l 1 Ddmar Lemmon Mmdouh IXFLULI1 VVIHIAITI lnnmonb Xxfllll un Shu Lly h 51 me Reed c,1'1l1 Ixunnnth L,lI'1111L,l'l'l.1 Iobcp 1 Robert lirenuh XV11bur MLLan1 ohn Qheplar b0PI'IOBIO1xEb XV1lter Lonun Norm Ln Adamb C gnc L1bb1tt Hun Spuiur kcll Thompson C corgg Ogg Ned Eax ley John MCCO1 LIL 1xlVI11Ol1C1 Metz Arthul Mu nlees 185 1' -A ' - 1 i. n-I-J 1 K 'T A-1 44 M L ' Lf' g - - - - - - - 4' J 1 ., if - 8 - . x . . 1 L if - - - , ,- i ' ,.--- -' 1 Q ,- f .,. .C lk , lx 1 x - - - - n I - 5. 1 L r Q2 - - - - Y .l 'x J " 'fx' N Rolland Ewmg ,. 7' ,, . , Q, T ' ,x -1 C 1 , . .1 , ' C L.. . - , A 4, .- n '- z , .uc A A L L 4 1 ' 1 ' ' Ji , R - VV m,4- 'L I1 '0'0"n aff 3 z ' ' 3, , , Y, .,,, L Q C. . J.' 1 ,, 5 'fu "A ,ir 12 H H 4 I! wi 6 .VF 'fr , H ,- , if "E" .V N E, - . , ra N ' 1 Z ' ' 1- 5 ZA. 'xx -suv" 1, ' .. , T' ' .5 4- iffx v mm U ' w Bimilfllgill Qflub Fuu mled-1923 Lfhzwterecl-1925 OFFICERS Mary Long - - - - President Faye 'i1l.1I'l'lCI' - - Vice President Mary Louise Merrick Secretary Mary Elizabeth Houstun - - - 'I'reasurer Mae XYOOQI - - - Correspnmdiug Secretary Marjorie NVIIZLITCJII - S2ll'g'Cl1t-ilt-,ATIIIS SENIORS Nerita GrandstalT Mary limg Mildred Peters Faye Turner Marjorie XX-Vhzirtoii M are XVUQJ JUNIORS Mary Elizabeth Houston Mary Louise Merrick Louise Seemuth june XVilkie SOPHOMQRES Frzuiees Ileawm .-Xlmzl McDaniel Doris Peters flfessie Rader 187 W 1 . V Q'.q 188 x ,V Y in . bbxvb W i Founded- .Rubert Gilfen - XVilliam Garret - Malcolm Stevenson Ralph Cannon - lidwarcl Chipley Fred L'ucl11':111 Robert Hoclcnmzm :Xlfrecl Carr Oliver Beach H11 1' ry Kzlru Qlllmu fllhxlx 1925 Chzlrtered-1925 OFFICERS - - - - President - Vice President Business Mzmager - Recording Secretary C.lOI'1'C51.lOllfllllg Secretary SENIORS Ralph Cannon Robert Gillfen Eclwarcl Chiplcy JUNIGRS VVilliam Garrett Nelson Neff ett XVilliam Grove joseph Ralston Clarence 'llhompscm SOPHOMORES Ralph Fox Rusk Hzwerhelcl Tlleudme Yeates Harry Mcliee 189 M 91" 31? 3, E x 1334 .K ,ww 57 nu xg ,. W f:if'1:fwm W nc :Q get ps- W., 1. 'UE XJ xv 1 W .,, .K 5173? Z 'X .1 Q 1 Q 5-9' J fi? A . -. ' -- Q f 0 1 M 1 'Ji , , 'M-.5 ff t Q v ,f?'?I..i5. . . , U. I, . 5 f- f ,L Q flfv 'x'5'fzag3 ' f ., fuiff tlwqg, 5,15 - f-.fig 5, X U gp 3 - 'Hoi if A 4 .- ,.,,,.. . xl l HU B !! ., N Q , 111351 1 1,2 . .53 , .2 Z: ' -'T' 4 L f. gl j-"wif vw zz .bw ff? E I 1 -' ' gf mx g 3"'F iiL'jf. 'ff' if Q. " - TYR ww-r.:. ' A ' '. W" . ' .' ' 'vi' ' 7 7 :iif73---15f- ' . " 15 ' .. x -,Q M .4 .P . H. 4 ,. 1.:.::,1,g...l.. WSE- . K' ,hw aryl., K . ' . ..,., - if W HA 1 441- V .. ' ' L' ' 'MCR TQ 115 ... ,g ' ' .Q-., f ,, TS lk' G, DUKE E .ji A f .W 1 -. W A Z Zi. wg ' ix 31512-5 W.. . Q ' wil 190 . .QV 31 -sg-f x If Q J EF' f "f KAW X N1 , w w f F- IU 2 Status nf tlqletrez at Jlllluslnnguln I un gltd to report 1 llL'1ll.llfI.ll LOIICIIIIUD of 'tthletlco 'lt Mualtngum Although IVIllSlxlIl5lll1l hw but tetentlv Jomcd Olno Conference Athletxc cncleb het Ql1OW1l1g for the p1St vear hts been xerv blitlfjlllg, Out bmkclbill teun ltst season lost only one of :ts conference Snnes 'md 1115 gone thtough the present SCTSOH up to February 15 wlth but one defeat Our football team went through 1tQ enttre Qeaaon of ntne games wxthout clefett In tact 1 Mufakxngum te1n1 ll'l.S not vet been defeated m the new stadlum Our eross eountry teun has not been defeated ln 1 du1l meet durlng the three wean m Wl1lCl'l thls, bpolt 1112. been muntfnned The record m1de by the tr'1ck team hts been rather unubual 'l11el tlso ms relxtlvely new for Muskmqum but seema to be kl"OVNl!'l5 mto f1vor ttprdly We ue hndrng tt dxffleult tn the e1Ge of eold md uet Qprxng weather to st'ut outdoor btsebtll soon enough to get 1 texm well tt uned by eommencenxent tune Phe tennls courts for both gbnls md boya ate eon sttntly used when the xx eathu petnutk lhe neu hockey held back of the dormltoxx for Earle ts expected to be re1dv for use tlns tomme Sprmg Interchsi basketball tournaments for both bovq md 5,11-ls are held durmq the w ntex months md plu ground btll l0LllIl'l1T1Cl1tb for the bow durmg, the blJl1I'lLf We wexe fortunate 1l'l l'l'lV1l1g some rmlly good Qkttme, on the l1ke tlub vear for 1 few weeks many tnnee the snow coxera the lee and prevents IIS bemf, used fO1 Sklttng 'Ihere 1lwx1vQ N a marked xnterest H1 the May Dty perforlnanee unclu the CllI'L,Lt101l of Muse Welslm I feel that .1 vsholesome ia well as 111 CIICFBLUC apxru ll'lS marked the dtl'l1Ll.1C worl of tlne ye tr I'hL teuns hue dxspltyed excellent morale and l'l'1XC had the hearty support of the school bodv I feel thlt much crecllt IS due to our eoaehee 'md Qmduate xnanager for the suetesaful 1tt'unment of theee mesults Also I would com mend the good uork done bx the student xntnagetb vxho do 1 great de1l of worl for 21 werv little rew1rd I beheve everyone is convxnced th1t a fl1OlOl'lbl1gOll1Q l.lTl'l.ILllT programme m tthletxes 15 for the beat mtereats of tll concerned The YVI'll.Ll ts con Vmced that thm no true lf you eonhne your lntereita to produemg NVll'll1ll'lg' te uns On the whole we 1re proud of the ehar1cte1 of out nthletm 1nd behexe th1t thev 1re real representatnes of th best tradntlonq of Muskxnguxn J J SMI rn 191 -.,- A , -1-.. -. .n . W I I Y ,H .Vw - V . - -.., . 4. .--,.,..-- .,,.. Y. . ---1 R F - W.- 1 . 1, Y , 11 11'j'11 1 1 ' '11 , 15113511 1 1 I. - - I. H 11 '1 ' 1 I , ' 'Y K ' V ' 1 i - ' ,Q-. '12, ' fi ,-I -- 1 F .1-1 1-1 ,QQ 1,. . 1. 11 '1111 ,M '113!1M11: .2 no 1 t 4 N 5- , ,-1 1 1 1111111, W!:mw,.. I -"N ., .,, - -' .ln 1 .- .51 1 H A V , f '. ' I Q5 11 1 2 , , ' ' U A :YN A ' , 11, W A g' . I V- , , . N 1 1. 1- ' , . - , ' ,J- ' 1 1 ' 2' 11,51 1 3., , 111'11" I' - 1- 411' Y I 11 , X E ' ll " H 1ll A E, . , " - ' 1 1 1 ' ee 11 11 Q11 ' 'saga "111'11::"'111f 5 ' ' 1 11 N " 1 D U, ,1 .. : N ,Q ' 11 1' ' 1 , 11 1 , In 5 ,1 l X - ' ' l 1 " Q., 11 111 553-2 , ' . 1 L1 ' - 1 1 . V 1 . -- V 1 , , V- , l . '. I 1 -if , ' E ll "L ' lx I ' ' ' E531 , Y ' - 41 11 'Mk S' :Ei 1 l' 1 I 111 ,,,11 . 1 ,Q : ' ' ' -1 - A+ A tv-, A.-- - .., - , .... -.-. Ig. . H- ,, , 7,-A - W, . ,A I 3 2 2 " " 4 1. ' ' ' ' 1 ' ' , t ' . i K" . A 5- Y T 2 k . Y ' ' , . . X .A , .' ' . . 3 . A V ' . ' 1 . 1 " ZS 'l ' I x ' "' I. ' ". ' 2 . ' 1 2 if .' ' ' I ' 1 fz f L x ky' ' ' Q' 'A 1. . . . .1 i 1 ' ' 1 I ' , ' ,x + . . t t , . , ' ' ' Z . f ' c . ' H c Q " 'I' " I U - 5 -, - ,Z 1 L- , , A- . ' C t , , . . -, .t ak . I . 25, 2 c J I .t A C . C , x 2 .' ' ' ' . . 'u ' i 2 Q .' 2 ' 5 ' L' . . kr r' r ' I -5 ' 1. I 2 -, ' ' ' -A ' A C 5 . 2 f- . f ' ' :J-2 ' -' . 12 " 'Z ' " . " Q C ' T ' Z , ' " i. I V B. , . , , . . ' J. ' ' ., V , , . ' . , ' Y , 1 1 f - ' 5 - I 2 P . '. . 3. A , . 2 1' Q ' M 1 ' ' ' J 2 aj' 2 . . C . A . JN, 3. . . . xr A . ., . L ,- , ,C M .2 T A K , . . ,. . C ,sg , x . , 5 . I . - I ' ' - s . . A 47 . ' . - Q C 'K . . , Y t ' 1 I 1 1 - 1 A 1 x - ' .1 1 ' - - 1 I ' I ' .. t . . . 1 , , , 5 I L . 1 L . ,A , - . K I . , , .. - c , 2 . -' 1 ' z 1 - 7 2 I - ' A . 1 - tr' c ' ' " ' ' .' ' ' ' t c c ' 2, ' t ' . .' ' 1 f f - J 1 - - 1 Z. kr- " r ' 6 ' C Q 7 D 3 K . . t h 1 L - 1-r M- Z K , ' ' 1 .' . ' . ' . Z . ' 1 ' I - . , A- ' - . . f' 2 - ' 1 4 1 I ' - 2 1 x . f C v 1 1 ' y 1- f ' ' - 1 - -' - VVhen you hear the "clap locomotive" or the 'ilight 1 if ' 'ki "' "5 iilffjvz V i,,.-ki 1, if' W? I xg 'Yi 1- "V .fu 'Z' iff' 5" r me-4 s r if ' . , .. iifigf' ,- , 11.-, ,rl nf-449, ai, -z.,g.vfl,.ff ,agar ' A-gui' is ,j -5'fi:,'1w , .f ,werfr ,, .' . ' l' f ' Lf- Q '3 'ii 1 is fir" -2. 'I 'i 'l 'L H. 1"' .I . li 1 if if f fm fr 'Hifi' ' T 'iw'-fy . :J . ld , f :fe-1-H. 32' 1. ., f X' ,A -' I '24 ' + ,gl .- 1- f R if Vg- ff-N X aim! gym i 1 A: ifjwf, ,fxlgmx Q. . ? ,Luk H 5? 'H ' '- -"' .l A' " - .4 -35 ""' -' 'A 1' all 6 V i-ff . EVM! All .4 fs if .V cgi 44"-I , , . .5 ., - . .. -2 , .,. .- .-- 'ff s. ' wr- ' Q . ..v , .. .v'- - lv' I 2 , - Yfgf "sf : ggi 241' , Q- "5 ju r N atefrg ,- ., ,Q-. at ps i f 5+ f, ii"K,ijI,' I ' f P s h fl I -gg? ,t m 11' K . - F H . xl f,j.iEj2.,3?gid5.?gg,w i 451- 'R -T? l ' L rf , VE I 4 f ff' . ff, A 1 1. xg , - if ' I , F. is -VU V J 1. V 4 I AM 'X : E6 5-, Wyli e Y i iii ir, -.A ,-. VA , xv A -I ,xr r . 1 I ,4 rf. . Wk. iv. F-. ,Lu :MT , ,ia V H V H. U ,A,. V ,I .K ! .Q . , , A' , , xgfjfll.. fx V.-rl v, , ,QA ff N 3,4 ...if wg' 1, I. If, H ' . .:.. A ,hr Ji. Y 5, x. gi .if , it - Ii r 5' ,A . lg.-,J , . 1. X. f,,,f,,. 5. ,- mu.: 1 - f, V f 1' f f '. , ,Ir , Q, ' ,. , - f .l X: J ji ml 'Q - 7 ' .3 'ra .Aux X -S , E i V :Ll fi 73 .iff-"E .- 1,'.11.g " .E I - 3. ."- b 9 it ku- ri - Q '-.fda-A , J: 1.13. A ,mr ,f Q Qs , V H Y, I - -V ff-4 'rg U 1, V - .4 Y . 5. V w 1:--mfg' "-45911 'ik Ili , ' 2 Q , 'fff igg-V figs' S, jf' 'l,5?f2if'.Yi. :Ll 5 " -ss 1- .. 173' r ' A -, . ,- 1"-Vg, iz - 2 vis" ,ua '- f . - -.4 1 .f -Q' ' V 'JH ,lrmg I Effie I Tv: 1' Ag gy, .H Y' hjf N ,-draw. rv .56i.fv A I 'E' .rug .X W1 is In my-., M, ,W .QEJ 1.15, .xwitg V , 5352 4 , ,lltlktyg , fha! W ' -7 , , l 1 -ry.. ...- -,. ' , -, , . 4' 5,3 W 4 I , ...Q V A YP +-,-I is -- 'Hgh-,gig 1 .Q-'fri' A x , fi Q W SFI. 4' 5 ,U L sr 1 - V' 1? ., ' '-new M: -:fr . - . -fl .im s . I ' ' -lv a Y -1- Q.. .fl fb-54 J.-6. ,' p 'M r' ,Avi .r .L f-. 2-F 1 4' ,until U L '-1 A -'is flllieer unit Sung Elleathers songu ringing out across the stadium or in the gym, these are the men responsible for the co- ordination and harmony of the multitude of voices. Everyone agrees that the general morale of the team is easily influenced by the spirit of the crowd, and since the crowd looks to its leaders for directions, credit must be given to this group of men along with the teams for the showing made. Besides keep- ing up the pep, this squad has added another contribution in the form of some new cheers and songs which have met With unusual success. They all return next year so that if noise has anything to do with it, championships ought to be a matter of course. At any rate, we are behind you and will do our part to add to your success. 192 W Bottom Row-Conrad, Chipley, Crytzer, Captain Headley, Trotter, Taylor, Poorman Middle Row-Gabbard, VVilson, Clark, Montgomery, Peters, Beavon, Coach Morehead. Top Row-Manager Jones, VVelch, Barklay, Bradbury, Miutier, Weed, Hughes. STATISTICS OF THE SEASON W. Va. U. at Morgantown ...... 14 Muskingum ....... ..... - -- 3 W. Va. U. at Morgantown ...... 9 Muskingum - ...... --- S Capital U. at Columbus ........ 10 Muskingum ....... ........... 4 Otterbein at VVeSterville --- --- 1 Muskingum --. .u..... .... - ---10 Marietta at New Concord M- -.--11 Muskingum .................. - 9 Kenyon at New Concord ---. ..... 2 - Muskingum .......-........... 14 Ohio Northern at New Concord-- Rain, called at end of second inning Capital at New Concord --.- ..... 5 Muskingum .....,............ - 0 Kenyon at Gambier ............ 5 Muskingum ................... 6 Marietta at Marietta ........... .. 4 Muskingum ................... 5 Bethany at New Concord ....... 10 Muskingum ......... ...... 4 Otterbein at New Concord ...... 4 Muskingum - ..... .... ..... 2 Alumni at New Concord ....... 9 Muskingum - ..... ---16 Dayton U, at New Concord .... 5 Muskingum ....... ----- --- 4 Total ...................... 89 Total ....... ..... ........ 8 5 194 1 uh CAPTAIN ALBERT HEADLEY 0 oc lu the clonal C111 0 lL.1c111Q ilu 1976 16.1111 .ms 1tQ c:1pt.1111 and a Q0 l'Llllll'-vlllllg thu lllly Vatu ln 1111gl1L1 1110111111 Vlflllkll to bllllil up 111 clT1.Lt1vv battuy 'lhal lm dnl xull AS both IN KXlClCllCLKl bv Llu Ql1o11111g lm and lux lcam made lg'Z11l1Ql Qomc 0 IL sl10111cs lulllls 111 ilu Co11lL1L1uL Dogs lcfl lmucl clLl1vL1v hclpul 111111 con N11 u.1blv 111 balflmq 1l1L oppcm-1112 b.1t1c1s md much Cltflll must go to l'lI1Tl fOl IC Nl'0xx111g ll1L tc.1111 111.1 L REVIEW OI' THE SEASON W1tl1 o11ly IX mpn bank who llnlll l11cl mv IXDLHLIILL lt 111tL1 Lollcsgmle lmmball, mncluclmg just om lJltCllL.l thc outlook fm tl1g SLML111 wawnt xo b11,I1t Coach AIOOIL l1LfLLl was gncallv lCl1LXt,f.l when twcntx hu 111111 'mswmccl l1l'E Gr'-1 c11ll for practlcc 011 Mfuch 1-alll and 1t W215 11111mcl1 1tLl3 sun that llmre mls plenty ml' 131011115111- lllclflflill f0l 1 good team The wLall1c1 Wm UQCIIIIQT. the plum of the Coach fmcl 1101 much outmde p1act1cL 11.11. gotlcn bdme tln 1111t1c1l .1ppL,11.111LL .1g'1111w1 VVes1 X'rll'glI11.l LlllIVCl5llV 111 two pze '-LASOII guuu Tl1csL Qdmu pxoxuled Muse .1 LllZll1CC. tu we 111111 cadl 1111111 coulfl do undu 1 1c1l tmt, fmcl thc tcnm fllll tllLl'll'wl.lX u. c1Lcl1t bv tl1L Sll0Vv'll'lQ they maclc wqunel 11 lllllLll fll'L,LJ sclmo 011151111 llcfu L1 ww p1tcl1Lc 1 good g.1111L, lmc 11s 5, 11L NXOII up 1111111 ilu last xxngu .1 Nuns of 111l11.lcl L11111 111011 Ld tl1L Mo1111ta1nLL1's 1 one 11111 had XVorlx1x1g ml than XXLllxl'lLNSl,N b1r111Ql1l 0111 culv 111 thc SLAQOII IJIOVKK 11 211.41 .11c111 1c 1 c111.1r oltlm sms 1 The lL'1l Qll'Cl1!ll.ll of tlm team um shown when lt hcld thc shon' D'1vlO11 U111 lsllv M1111 0 1 L 1 1 Lac, tu nom ncmq l lJ'lVlOll d1cl Il 1 low game 011 0 L Htun 14.11111 suluc ll L ll1 11 thu umm num :avg 1117 vvms shown 111 the M1116 L gamu pl.1vccl wt hld.TlLll 1, wlmh tllgy won bv Ong 11111 dur 1 twulxc 111111112 b1ttlL llLll Lrccht must go to G1bb.11cl lm 111 wmll on tm mounc 111 lllS 1,.11uL L1 IC mtclncl ilu umm gf1111L A1161 Llwavx seemed to hmm loti of ruuvu IOl'3lxlllSf back ox LI the SMLQO11 LN .1 wxholc .11111 n011s1clL1111q ilu tQa111s played and the l1lZll.C'll11l to x1o1k 011, uc cm lcd Juxuhul 1n Cllllllg lt 1 s11ccnssi'L1l em-.on Lumnq oulv tl1rLc 111e11 by H1cul1mt1w11 the mospnctw for nom vmr f11L ve1y b11gl1t 191 ,:',i Y I lf,-1 '1 11 'P' 1111 J.. f, '- ,Ili .fr ,ti 1 fa 1 1 1 11,1 ' 2 . Ig 4 lx 1 1 1111flJ,'1l111 T "D '1 'f1 , llw ltu' 1' -- 1' L- - - ' f A 1.1 ftlxi' gut 'f, ' -' -V f, ' ,- 4 "' 1 --- 1 I -: in 1- .-'J -1: ' ..-. '.V 1.41 ' 1' '1 11 -1 "S lg 9 1' .V 1. ..1 ' '- '11f,f,'1g ' F1 1 1- '111- fzu ' 1 ' ' "J, f'- ' '7' '1 1' ' ' "T , " '. K' , 'ff "Z ' 'ffl' '. if ' 2'- . ' ."'L ' 31 ' tl-1111--'1 1 -.-r.-01. I V -,I 5 . V , V1 A4 ., -, ' . . N. . gi. ', vez' 1' 1: 1 '1 0111 '111 l"l l-:1 11 :1--. 1, o .vaf L fa I" -- 'I l-. " 1' 1 " f'f"x'. 1 Q ' 1 41" tt: M- K .Q 1- 1 'U 1- 1' ll A, . ,U-.. . ', . L. , .. 4,1 -'11 .-, . .'l I W 4 l i l w V.' 4. 'V W ' i 'J ,' .ll W. 3 Y .i - .,.Y-., Y, .ii it Q I .am 'E QQ .i. - tu p-, V. -it - M L . ' .im WALTER MONTGOMERY--Outfield "Speedo" was always in control of affairs out in center field and took everything offered him with the ease and grace of a professional. His return throws were true and swift, often cutting an apparent double to a single, or stopping a run after a fly- out. At bat he could be relied on t d h' h ' ' o o is s are, making a specialty of home runs. JOSEPH POORMAN-Catcher Coach Morehead never had to worry about who was going to catch for him, as long as Joe was able to put on a uniform. He had proven his ability the previous season and certainly did justice to himself this year. Beside having a good line of chatter, a pre-requisite of a good catcher, Joe ranked high among the batters of the team, tallying several home runs. His greatest honor came when his team-mates elected him as their next year's captain. HAROLD MINTIER-Third Base This season found Mintier shifted to third, where he creditably upheld his old record of an infielder. Perhaps his greatest value to the team came from his batting. B .d . L. . esi es being consistent, he was a heavy hitter and could be relied upon to f , - get on base. His absence from the squad will be keenly felt next year. ROBERT WEED-Outfield "Bob" was one of the new men on th- d e squa , playing his first year of varsity ball. His judgment of high ones was perfect, and his throws were snappy and accurate. At bat his work was as good as the average. 196 1-5 '4- '15 fNf m E1 Jx 41... ailing LLOYD PETERS Outlield Peters one of tl1e outQt'111d111g hrst year men on the sq111d, VLIS cxptblj filled the outheld 1305111011 'tawlgned to 11l1T1 H1 was 1 11st helder Wlllml a sure throw to anv spot on tl1e d11111ond Bemg a left handed batter l'I13C1C 111111 1 problem for the pttcher, and often an unsolx able p1ob1e111 15 the b'1tt111q LVfl'lgC:1 Qhow H15 e011Q15te111 hlttmg an 511111 at buntmg n1'1de 111111 1 xery efiectwe lead off 111111 THOMAS GABBARD PltC11C1 Tom wvw C1pt'1111 Headleys .1lte1nate at holdmg doxx 11 tl1e 1'JllZC11ll1b end of tl1e s.ia111e 11115 w'1s 1115 first year at v'1rs1tv work tlthough lt Wag Tl1T11OTCCl tl11t l1e l1'1Q done some lllgll Claes DllZC1'llI'lg fOr hw 1oc'11 team 111 kentucky He l11d 1 very fast dehverw md some dCCL1V1I1f, CIIIXCS whlch proxed troublesome to th opponents t ay the least Unueual for 21 D1tC11E1 Tom was albo very effectne NV1ll1 the b'1t ROBERT TAYLOR Second Baxc In the e111v p1rt of the sc'1son Bob wts Ql'1.1.lO!'lCC.1 111 the outF1eld but ww boon drafted to H11 1n a vac1ncy 'lt Qecond HN fieldmg. v1'1Q of the average the real value to the te'1111 COITIIIIQ hom 1115 1311111115 '1b1hty T'1111r1g palt 111 tlaclx at tlnfs s1n1e se'1son of the year mused 1 d1x151on of 1115 interests and 111s tune FREDERICK CONRAD F1rQt Base Red was one of tl1e most conbzstent all around phyers 011 the team covenng the spaee uound fiwt 'md t'1k1ng lfl 111 assxits c'1pably Due to 111s long 1eae11 md qulclt new of '1ct1o11 n1'111y posmble errors VVFIC prevented Hzs 4131111 was 1lw'1yQ Of the best and 1115 talk kept the feet of the team full of tight 197 wx ' 2 ff ' N 1 vrj -' " "1 , L 1 V: 1. 4, . l., I V 1,34 H ' , "Q ' I1 1.1 ' 1 4 any , . ' ' 111 . , . F . . 1 ' ' ' 1 A K. l , P' . 1 ., 4 I . I-f. ' ,- I 1 " ' 'Egg 111 11 111,11 ,1 11 1 ' ' ". f1', .15 1, :fl ,1 Q "'1' ' 11 f,'11111 if W A-vu 311 111 11 11 111 . V 3, I Y. V A Q . A, , 31:81 1 ' . 1 , ' A . '1 1. . 1 ' ' ' 1' ' - '11 ,. I 1 I 2' fl ul 25 , f: . gr- ff-,.f - ' -' 1. ' -1 - 1 1 -1 mn 11 - .' - 11 N ,1 1' 1 . 1: -1 ' -, Z 1 1-11 11 11 11 1 1 1 1 , 114,15 ' 1 E A ' tx." 'iz 3" ' - ' 1551 1 ,111 ' LL- 1 W ' ' , . . . 1 . - . - 1 lf '1 ' 1 1 1 -I: 1 1 " F' -iff .. . 1' 11 . - '13 H LGVJY .i -E. .5 ,. P 1 1111 , W Vg J X ,L , g L A. i 511,12 11,,11!11!1NT1l1: 111'UiJU i .13 1 .h ,!.111,,,11Q1Lt11l,- 1112.N 1 1- ', ' . 1 2 - . 3 2 1 ' f 2 2 '- - 1 5 ' 2 . : ' - ' . e ' 1 1 1 ' ' H L . J 2 2 ' ' ' f -- ' 2.3 - 2 K2 il '- 1. -' ' Q d f ' ' 1 c 1' J ' 4 A c . fr H . ' . 1. , . , ' . , ' ' . . :K . C C . .. ' O 3 L . '2 J ' . C : I , 1 . ' 2, - 2 . 5 . , r . . . . - V ' . ., -I . 2 . 1 1 . ,x uv- 2 J 1 :1 T ' 7 ' ' ' V C ' fy O 5 . . ', ' ' f . . T c I ' - H 1, 4 r l ' , - 1 - 2 1 2 , 2 Y 2 - . 2 , . . ' 31 1. 1 , - 7 C . C Y f 1 C ' ' ' 1 V I 5 C I 1 C C f A Q 1 11 vs Q N - . . l ' , . ' ' 1 ' - , J 2 ' 2 ' 2 2 ' 1 2 ' . 2 . , .' i ' 2 '- . ,, 1 r . . , ' 1 ' ' . . ' Z c - 4. w " V E ii I :B V ' by 24,52 ' L, il'iii7?v'l'it' , , , ,,, ,' , 1 W CHARLES BRADBURY-Pitcher Charlie was another member of the pitching staff, but because of his interest in track at the same time of the year didn't get to break into the line-up very much. He had plenty of speed and good control, which, coupled with a short, quick delivery, caused the batter no little worry. This being his first year, we hope to hear further from him in the future. HARRY CRYTZER-Right Field "Hap" was one of the few letter men that were back on the squad this year, but due to injuries the first part of the season didn't get to display his full strength. He has another year to play and ought to be one of the mainstays next season. Better luck next time, "Hap". JESSE BEAVON-Second Base Beavon was another representative of the iirst year men on the squad, and helped maintain their record of the year. He always had lots of pep and kept the rest of the team in good huguor by his chatter. Witlt lieavon covering second next year we are assured of seeing' some real ball. ROBERT HUGHES-Center Field Although "Hob" didn't appear in the games so very much he was always out to practice and worked faithfullyto do his share in building up the team. He has two years yet in which to make his letter, and we expect him among the regulars in that time. 198 F -, .4 .- .. 7 , f fy-W' . 1i.1 if, 5 -ff k I :M . , ' Z ' ,5fhlt7i1,"'lE1Tli'is:I .. M. 'Jail A' 1 ' . ',,t'!4'1'f'3!,igLh ,ff QQ . I, ,, "t ' li It 1, 11111 tigisf' ite, tit, 'Q 2, P 1? 1,5 W A .lam at 'it ve ' l , :- , - , 'v I l l , A i , If , ,, V ' f 1 1 A , 1 Q , . , ,I ' 2 . J., 1 - V I N ' ' BL ' ,R ,ff 1 - Y 1, 11 '--to AI , -1- 1 , ,' 'X 41 Nu! - - 1 ' ., ffl , Y ff' .1.1 5 W r in ' -' ' uf ' -..L 1- .1 4: 1.411 .- - Y ,-.-' .w-l GLENN CLARK-Pitcher "VVoody" was a relay 1111111 for the pitchers, and could manage 21 position in the outfield very well. l-lis work against Ottcrbein showed that there would be Zl good inan to take l-leadley's place the next season, He served as a pinch hitter on several occasions, and proved his ability with the bat. EDWARD CHIPLEY-Short Stop "Chip" is anotlicr one of our "short" men, both in position and stature. The op- position though found l1i1n anything but short when it tried to send a liner through the center of the dianmond, or 1'eso1't1-cl to inheld flies for their points, "Chip" will be around again next season and will give anybody a good race for a position, DEAN BARKLAY-Third Base Deans favorite position was down at the "hot corner", but he fitted in well any place in the in-Held. Although he did not make his letter this season, Dean ought to give somebody a good race for :1 position next' year, which will be his last year to wear the Black and Magenta. MCNARY VVELCH-Short Stop "Mae" played his first season of varsity ball this year and shows much promise of beeoniing 21 regular before his graduation. His particular strong point was picking up gronnders and relaying thein to first with a speed which cut oft many 21 runner. Many things are expected of you next year, Mae. 199 i- Y -sf - 4 I., A L V.- ,Q ,wi i,,fLf7-oi l.i'aEz4i i-ww fi -,I HW' fl, if ,. min We Um .tr its . , A55 .. mhz.- ..ff:f1 'mi . - -. '. ' L. 1 - A L. , j 115. , ' L' ' Q. , M' ima . n -1, ' WALTER WILSON-Short Stop "Pinky" was a good man at any of the infield positions, but spent most of his time at short. He was an adept at picking up fast ones and relaying them to first with plenty of speed. His quick thinking and swift action resulted in several double plays on forced runners. A constant line of chatter kept his team-mates on the alert and added much to the general spirit. FRANKLIN TROTTER-Second Base Trotter always maintained that old spirit of never letting the odds get the best of one. His steady work at second proved to be one of the strong points of the team, while his batting ability was very evident. His ineligibility during the last part of the season was keenly felt. CHARLES MOREHEAD-Coach "M0se" had a tough proposition on his hands at the beginning of the season, having only tive old men back. After several practices though, it was very evident that he had some good material on which to work. The results of his work were shown in the pre-season game with the University of West Virginia, which was played after only two-weeks of practice. The showing against Dayton, who won all of their fifteen games, does credit to Morehead's coaching. 200 OOTBHIX Bottom RCJVVihClCCCll1HQ,'llZ1, Ogg, Trunice, Selby, Ileavon, Bell, XfVil5on, Garrett, Metz Caldwell. Middle Row-Coach Lange, Minlier, DuFf, Hockman, French, Groh, Vernin, VV. Moore Larriek, Liggelt, Coach Stone. Top Row-Captain Moore, Bain, G. Clark, Fox, Harrop, Taylor, liallantyne, R, Clark Frack, Orr, Shane. Team Ashland Hiram Capital Ohio North ern U. Heidelberg Otterbein fMigratio Kenyon Denison Marietta 1 15 1926 FOOTBALL STATISTICS Place New Concord Hiram Columbus Ada New Concord NVesterville New Concord New Concord New Concord QHome Corningj Totals M. C. Opp 6 0 19 0 28 7 6 0 19 0 12 0 39 34 22 13 27 6 178 68 CAPTAIN JAMES MOORE To be captain of any of Muslcingum's athletic teams is an honor worthy of note, but here we have the only one of his kind in the history of the school-Captain of the Championship Football Team of the Ohio Conference. lf anything can be judged from the leader, it is no wonder at all that the team came through as they did. 'A,lin1" was always on the job, encouraging, advising, and assisting his mates whenever he could, and setting an enviable example for them to follow. No doubt, "jim" played the best of his three years of varsity ball this year, and ended l1is athletic career very tittingly. The 1926 Football season at Muskingum is one that will be long remembered, and one that will go down in tl1e annals of the school as a red letter year. Playing a stellar brand of ball, and furnishing' thrilling moments galore, the Langetnan plunged, passed and pushed their way through an undefeated season, winning for lVfuskingum the Championship of the Ohio Conference-the hrst football championship ever held by Muskingtnn. VVhen the squad reported for the nrst practice in the fall, it was evident that Coach Lange was going to have a wealth of material with which to work. Beside thirteen letter men from the previous season, all seemingly in the best of condition, there was quite a few new faces, recruited from the Freshman ranks of the year before. .-'Xinong this group, players of all types could be found, those with weight to make a solid line, those with speed and power from which to build a running attack, and an assemblage of kickers and pass:-rs to round out a well balanced team. VVith everybody in good spirits the work proceeded rapidly, with the afore mentioned result. A jinx seemed to follow the team during the Hrst part of the season, with the result that several of the men were forced to retire from the line-up for awhile due to injuries. In the first three games ,loe Shane, Captain Moore, and Beavon were all injured and lost at least one game each while recuperating. On the Northern trip, several of the squad had narrow escapes when their car slcidded and turned turtle. Nevertheless, the team continued their undefeated march, and when the stronger part of the schedule near the last of the season was reached, everybody was in shape to carry on, and do what no other team representing the school had ever been able to do. Although the boys themselves did the actual work in the games, we must. not forget the guiding hand that had taught them the best thing to do at the best time, and the best way to use their power to the greatest advantage. To Coach Lange goes the credit for all the intricacies of the plays used by the team, and the responsibility for getting them so eo-ordinated as to be performed without a nlisstep. 203 l?" ' 'rn ' Y v ff T,-, A s ,, . 'H , W ,' it W V .MJF .it Rtgxgwvv ti, ,i 71,244 W Avy ,,. er if t,',ulB5fW'hLtt,l.,.IalJf' Jil .2la.iLlM51Q.,L ffgllw' it-' ., ' i H i i WALTER WILSON CCaptain electj New Concord, Ohio Quarterback Weiglit 129 "Pinky" has the signal honor of being the lightest man playing a regular position in the Conference, and that on the Championship teatnl Making up in brains what hc lacked in brawn he called the plays through an undefeated season. His greatest direct asset was in throwing passes just where and when they were wanted, and in a pinch has been known to make quite a few gains by way of the quarterback sneak. GLENN CLARK CCaptain electl Indiana, Penna, End Weight 170 Consistency gave "Woocly" his place in the line-up. He could always be depended upon to do his best under any circumstances. He was on the receiving end of quite a few of NVilson's passes, and had much to do with making the NVilson-to-Clark pass the most consistent and one of the most feared passes in the Conference. This com- bination seemed to work together so well this last season that their team-mates selected the1n to carry on a double captainey next season. HERBERT BAIN New Concord, Ohio Center Weigllt 170 "Betty" came into his own this year and played a brand of ball which was hardly outclassed by any of the opposing teams. Wl'1en a play was called through center you could be almost certain there would be a hole there, with Betty leading the charge. And just the reverse was true when the plays were coming the other way,-as' he was just as good on the defense. He still has another year to play, and great things are expected of him. JESSE BEAVON Martins Ferry, Ohio Center, End Weiglit 153 Jesse is one of the versatile 1nen on the squad, playing three .different positions during the season. His main position was, center, 'where his defensive work was out- standing. Against Hiram he filled a ternunal position very ably, and the next game displayed his generalship when he called the signals against Capital. An injured shoul- der kept him out for awhile during the middle of the season but he slot back In the last couple of games. 204 5-1 gal A aw, 5 21-3 WILLIAM MOORE New Concord Olno Guxrd WClg11t 170 The opponents all remember F11 wx 1111 1 lot of respect He seemed to know just when 'md how to l11t 1 man to get the best 1csu1ts as wms cv1denccd by the holes pro duced when thev were necessary F'1ts polxcy was to EO aflu the 111111 and 1101 wvut for 111111, wl11cl1 cl1ar1cter1st1c 111 Llms for the 1dea1 1111e fl1'1I1 Tlns ww ms B111 s last year on the squad and 111s absence w1l1 le-'uc '1 place hard to 1111 ROBERT BALLANTYNE XCl11a O111o Tackle Wc1gl1t 190 Bob started 1111-. season w1tl1 'mn envmble 1eco1d 110111 1'1st year to uphold H went bevond tlns xnd 1'11'1C1C. '1 name 101 l'1IYl1SL1f as one of the blg 111LYl on the ljlgglhl team tl1e school has evu had Bob was 1 sure, 111rd tackle: and 'mecounted fo: the sloppmg of more than one potentlal touch down 1111s 11 as 1113 last ye'11 NV11l'l the team THOMAS VERNIA Wellsvllle Ol1lO End WClgl11 168 Tom rcjolned the squad last fall after '1 years xbsence w111le '111 'mlxle w1s 16 L11DE1'11ll1g from an opuatlon md from t11e Very f11St showed t11'1t t11e1e NX'1S f,O1l1g to bc some opposmon for 1 lLll11ll18.l posmon Afle1 t11e first gunc To111 was one of the 11315111 1rs 111 the ll11L up a11d hllcd 1119 posmon w1tl1 glelt clcdll to hnnself and the lc'1111 HL also has played 111s list game for the school and leaxcs another gap to bc nlled next year HAROLD MINTIER New Concord C1110 Half Back We1gl1t 161 Ioe IS '1not11e1 of the local lads xx 11o made good 1111s past se lson and also con eluded 1119 work on the squad af the end of the season Hls bxggest asset to the team came flOl'I1 111s deiensxvc wozlx 1Jl'P'l1x111g up fOlW'l1d passes bemg 111s special hobby On the oHensc Mmny showed h1s '1b1ll1V to Hnd and 111t the holes 111s HY1111 n1'Llcs had made fox 111111, and aceounted for quzte a llttle xardage nn tlns manner 205 .,.-.1.., ,,,- , , , , ,za , W A 7 JE.- , .,f.Y-,,:L-1..f -,WW .,'L,--- - TTY--r-. 1 V ' ' 1 ,Q I 1 5 -' vu, - 'LQ - ., . 1 , - '1 .,,, :L 1' 1 , , , 1 i ' 27' ' '- , . 1 'J' ' 'g'112'g-,Q ' :Af , h A 15 1 - 4 5' - v . - , , Y 1 1- - V g " 1 ' 1 1 . . 1 ' 1 11 1 - ' fn W , - 11 , , 15,1 1, . , ,1 H , is ya 1 if fa 1 - 1 . 1 1. - . 1 1 11 , 11 -1 X, - 1 111 11' ' ' N ,Q V JV. , , ' A ,Eg 11 1.1 ' V - a. . " .' 1 122 . ,.4 . ,,. V , 1 1 ' ' 1 .l " s 1 , . ' 1- A 1. ' Tl 1 1. ,w " 1 T.. " - 11. 1. M 1 ,. 11 -I ,ya I 11, if A' ,H Wi., 1. ,. 3 -,. 15 1 Q . ' ' , ' ' , ' -X 1 . 1 ' x I Y H I - . 11 . ' . ' ' ' , - w V: Y: - . - '. ' ,, 1 11 ,l L- V Q K , I A - A W1 '1 ' 1Q,n,,1 ' 1 11 ' 111 :FF , 11 , ' 'xr'- ' ,- H1 in ,1, 1 , I, N . ,,,1: r 1 .- ' 'V 1, .ll - -' YV- , ' T - w , ' :Q ,. -.f ' . L Q 0-J. . '15 1 ' ., av' X ,V 1 gl. as fr - X1 X" Mgr' 1! - :Fi L -, lj - .,. ' -ii. ,L E rf' :,,g.1' ,fy Q 'W ,- f 15 3231114 , 5541 ."-1 , J! .a Q . .JL L ' . "1 . . I Z , . ff 11 ' A , , , - 5. C I L 1 . .. ' ' Q 1 L - 1 - 1 - l 1 . 2 5- - H ! Y! ' ' T Y , . c ' k A ' ' 1 1 'c r 1 .. ' - c . . 'Z 1 n , " : , . : 1 . . f 1 1 1 . . . , X . H 11 A - N - - 4 , , 1. - f 1 1 ' 1 ' 1 . C . ' 1, , , , . ' - 1 f s 1 J ' 1 s ' - - 1 1 Q 1 1 1 . 1 . - v .1 - C ll H 2 3 Z K - - 6 . - - 1 - . . . , . . . . , O ' - ., lc V ' C 1 T ' . y . n rr ' ' . , . . . , f ' . . , c h 1 z , r 1 L ' 1 1 A ' , 1 . ' , 1 ' ff 1' ' ' -1 J ' 2 -' ' ' . . ' 'fa 1 " " 1 ' V . ,- 5 1 .1 1, , I i x . . . . 2 - 1 - 3 '-C . - : - , . z , ' ' 1 , ' f 3 1 ' 3.7 C . , C , . ss rr ' l r ' , , 1 c 1 ' c 1 , c .. ' '. f ' Q ' ' . . 's ' ' . ' ' 1 1 . . , X . ,, bc . . C . c . . 'Q l -U U . ,, . . . . N . 1 ', , r - ' 'c ' c K c ' ' 'V ., c . .,,, .g ,gg K Q all REED CLARK Indiana, Pa. Half-Back XfVeight 163 Although listed as a half-back, Reed proved to be a very versatile back-field man and during the season played at each of the four positions. His speed and snre-foot- edness qualified him as a half-backg his powerful drive and light showed as a full-baekg and his knowledge of the game fitted him for quarter-back. Besides he could kick, and added his share of points-after-touch-down by way of the placement kick. ROBERT TAYLOR Crooksville, Ohio Half-Back l1Veight 186 The famed and much feared "Mutt and jeff pass" which proved a big factor in the Muskie attack, depended largely on "Big Bob's" ability to find the open places and to receive the offerings of "Pinky", Hts ability to carry the ball after receiving it changed many short gain passes into considerable yardage. His end runs and punting were feared alike, so that "Bob" was always watched by the opposition. CLIFFORD ORR Wellsxfillc, Ohio Half-Back Vtfeight 165 "Red" played his second year of varsity ball this season and added to his record of last yearn He is responsible for what is probably the most spectacular run ever witnessed in the Stadium, receiving a kick-olf in the Heidelberg game and running 92 yards for a touchdown! His twisting type of running made him an effective open held runner. Besides he was a punter, and saved several bad situations by a lengthy punt. V JOSEPH SHANE Bridgeville, Penna. Tackle Wciglit 173 A jinx seemed to follow "Joe" around this year, but in spite of several injuries the first part of the season, he proved his worth when he did get back into the game. Breaking up plays was his chief past-time, and as 'a rule he figured in a majority of the tackles made during the game. Better luck is wished him next year, and great things are expected of him in his nnal year on the squad. 206 it -- L 7f"'Tfi 'gtg f-'--ff- in Qi. I .sa f 1 1 A H "'Gtl'Rf:X,'74w?-.'i'.-:Wx ,mga U sf U it 1. "'--'t.'1l-va . f ting, c X-of W . v -w STANLEY TRUNICE Lorain, Ohio Full-Hack Vtfeight 185 This was "Stairs" initial year on the squad, and his value can be judged from the fact that he was one of the two new men to earn their letters. Ou the otlense his " ' X ' f ' ' tl an one inan Jlunqing line drives were alwavs foocl for earns it usuallx taltin mote 1 'r . - " . , . ' ' ' U to stop his rush, On the defense his ability to analyze the opponents plays and then to break them up with a clean, hard tacltle was outstanding. GEORGE FRACK Unity, Penna. Guard NfVeight 168 Fraelc also played his hrst varsity ball this year and earned his letter doing so. Altliough not a tlashy player he could be counted upon to hold his own and give his ' ' ' - ' ' - " -'tin-' to see best for the team. VVith a years experience behind luin, we .ue txpet 5 Frack step in and till one of the vacancies lett by the graduation ot' some ol' the squad. RICHARD SELBY Martins Ferry, Ohio Full-liaclc Weig'l1t 167 "Dick" returned to the squadlthis season with plenty of that old Fight and spirit which characterized his past playing, and evidently with the idea of making it a big year. Front the results, it is not hard to seenthat he did his share toward that end. His fast, slashing drives were practically invincible, and completely battled the op- ponents at times. Being a hard tackler, he did his share of the defensive work, also. WALTER HARROP Shawnee, Ghio Guard "Harpie" seemed to enter into the spirit of the ganie more this year than last with the result that his effectiveness was greatly increased. Among the guards of the season Harrop held a high place and was no doubt one of the best seen in action this 1 He will be with the squad again next year, and ought to do a lot towards season . f bringing another season to Muskingum. Vtfeight 188 207 1- ,M , -i-W ff- Y "--'1'- -1 . W, , 1 ,X ,S, LLQZM' .EM P 1,41 Pleasant City, Ohio Martins Ferry, Ohio New Concord, Ohio Carrollton, Ohio ,eu WILLIAM LARRICK Hall'-Back ROBERT FRENCH Tackle GE ORGE MCCONAGHA End HAROLD BELL Quart crbnclc 208 'gl Weight Weight llVcight Weight 'WS' Fwy-'S-r'fv""1i:f'1 Cwmbudgg Ohm Bglluru Ohm Nhllusbum Oluo Frankfort Ccrmany GILBERT HEED lull B'l.Cl WILLIAM GARRETT Canter RALPH FOX 'lwcl le JEAN GROH Guard 209 Wu It 1 XVLIBIII l VVLI It 1 Wtlsllt Z f f'P,x7,.Siff1.' 'T 4 ""'1TMf'iW-' 'vig f"Wvf"':Q1 ywgjws fx s V mf""T'fiI - . " - I '-'L' 1 A' 14. ,- H ' . 1- I ' f ' 'Q ' Q: - ' 1 "N 4, ' 21: ' A A f V f 5 fi - - A A . .5 "3-N B.. N. 1 fw, ,A 4. ' 1 ' " ' ,K . , 1 V W -I V , , , .: ,.., . M ' ,X Y . - . ' ' 2 ' - ivy: , . fx ,X ', 1 Q , , . f ,1 if 1 ' - . , , ., V -- , i ' V' . R 15? V ' .. I . . 1 .1 , , ,I Q, ,f - .. R W n . N , ' eg, ' V fx s ' , ,v 'r ' 4 I ,g V 'A M I V ir. :Q I A Y " .a, .' ' ' " 1 ' - Mf A ' 'dig ., - ' , .5 I 1 . , . I . . 5. 4.4 1 45 i ' : . ' h A J. -N I. - K f Ii I 1 A . I, ug. ,Q -, -it 4 " - I Y f' ' ' 'W Y ,L H, A - M W ,, , H . , r. - . 1 , - -I A 1 -1 .5 -V W Hi . ' ,j ', , X g 1 66 - + - 1 c ' 2 -, ' 2 Y 50 .. , 1 A -g, x 1 gg 1 50 c i ' ' , 1 1' " 10 5 naw: 'img , I, 4, -., New Concord, Ohio VVaverly, Ohio China Philadelphia, Penna. m'm'F'?.1 - GEORGE OGG Guard CHARLES CALDWELL Guard CHARLES HOCKMAN Guard EUGENE LIGGITT End 210 Weight VVcight Weiglit Weiglit 180 167 170 16 fha 1,1 ss: VY' N115 gg' Jie vr 111, I 1-534 4 uuthall Qlumzlyes zmh anagvr 'Ihe men belund the 9tl,.,C 1n the bn show of the 1926 season' NVQ all know 111.11 thcxe 19 mme behmd 1 blg DI'OllllLllOl1 than just the pl1ve1s 1nd tl11t mueh of the sneecss depends on the ell1e1e11ey md 1lJ1l1tv of the Olg 1n1Le1s llelnnd the spect 1e11l'1r pcrfo1n1111er- of the Muslxlc clexen Clllllllg the season of 1926 was 1l1e 11 lllllllg 1nd Olgilllllllg mnde 1JO'19lblC by the tneless work of the COl.ClllIlg Stall dullllg the entue SC'l.SOll Bemcles all the ll1CLllll1lCS of the glllll. YVl1lCll muq be worked out the eo1ch must be 1ble to create plwvs QLl1llblC to hw men .md then' 1b1l1tv to cnrv them out to the best l.ClV3,1ll2l.5L '1l1L suecess of o111 eoaehmg stall' 1s 1dm11 Lbly shown 1n the 1 111etv of plus whnh the 1121111 used, Cllell one t1le111g acl V'1nt LQC of some peeuh 1r power of the tn 1m Wllll the sune men to WVOllx w1tl1 1nd '1 yeeus cxpeuenee toa,e1l1c1 much 15 to be hoped fOl the connnq ycfu IXll0lllLI bum cog 111 the 1111111 up of any te'1m IS the n1111ag,e1sl11p md eve1y one w1ll xgrec 1l1'1t thm p1s1 yC.11 s KVV '1 ease lmxdeued, non C1 lbls puce of 111 Lchmcry fillmg 1tQ place mn the 'LCUOIIS of the tum The dC.1ll'lI1ClS we1e not too 1111115 x1l1etl1er qmqll 01 lzrfgc, but that Dale 11111112 to see 1l1'1t they VVCIC all 1ltClldC.Cl to 111 111 eff1e1e11t l'I'I'1l'lI1Cl' Afte1 tl1'1t wet L,1lllC '11 OtlLllJLlIl, when the 109+ of 11s LOIl9lllL1Ld that game '14 lll9tOIV the 111.1n1ge1 could be seen 111 the small l1o111:, of the momxng lmngzng up the scpfu me DICCCS of eqmpmcnl to drv, Q0 the bovs would have eomfo1t'1ble CllllS lor the nexl DYRCIICC lust l11tlc lhmgs l1l1e that IS wlmt made Conlew 11 real man:1ge1 for .1 real team 211 'gf "'T"-170 - '-1- 1- - - 1-f 1:1-M:-41' ' -'-2717 " 1"-': 11 Y '--7+ 51 - - vw -1,11-A ,,--.111113111-- 1-V - +117-.11-v 2 , ., X. 11 . 1 ,1 . N 1.3 -1 1 11 1 , . K, 8 V . V Q L 3 ' , A A 1 1 X111 1 1 . 3 ,, 1 1 1 -w -. ,K , " - A 111 . , 1 V ' v , . "1 .' Q "1 -. 1.-' , , . ' .- t ' -'- w' , A 1 1 11 . 1 . f.. , 1 ,,- V , - - I , 1 L 1 1, . V Y - 11 Q ...... 1 , ,, W V ws 1 1 1 a '1 Q 5 ., ,. ,11 G , Y, 11 4 . ' '. 1 1 , nfs " - . . -11 I 1 3 1 ' .1 11" -1 "1 ." --HW, 1 . 1 1 mv- - 4 V , , 1 4 V 1 1 M111 W , ' 1. . 1, W 1 H 1 1 1 , Q .. . 11 1 '-A' e1 T, ,W . 1 , , V . 1 , E , ,. -0 " Y 1 'Q X, , ' A r-U, 1' 1 :1 1 sw me 1 1,, .1 . f . ' 1,- A - ' :ME -.QQ "1 ..,Q ,111 1,1 1 11. - , 1 H Y W ..:,.. ,Gr -47-W. C. ww ' - is , H X 1 1 - :.k.Tm ' 4 A," 11. ,g- 1 L ,- 4, . .---'H A ,1 .1 ' ,1f K - - f 9 ' X J' ' ' .1 ' " ' . "' . ' 5 1111--.---..L4...-.L1.1f'1,1-1 - -111-si' ,. -of , !g.,1 , 1. , , ,,,1,,,MW M .4 A ,YL Y '. ' A... 1 I . V .1 2 U- . .g i V x 1 , , ' . , ' r ' ' ' ' . ' ' I H ' 'Q 2 2 ' ' '. . . 5: , F- 1 .1.1 . Z 2 y 1 .312 , ,, V. 12- 1 -I , .1-7- 11. ,WL 1 1 .. ' ' ,- . . 1 ', ' . . ' ' . 1 . , l , ' . 1 A 1. 1 L C 1 1 . . . . , 1 C ' A ' ' x ' ' I n .' . '. 'S ' ' l ' 2 ' I 1 5 ' Y ' ' , 2 . ' 1 ' ' 1' ' r I f , 2 ,, ' ' . . 1 , Z ' 1, - - ' k - 2 1 1. .1 s MA: . . . L- . 5 1 'z . 'z'1, t '1 'e : 2- 1' - - 11 - 1 1 1 s " - 1 1 sf ' ., , , ' , C 1 , 1 1 1 . . 1 1 1 1: lc '.' .' X ' ' ' Q' ' ', . ' , ' M 1, '. - 1- LV 1 .'2- " 2 .' 1 1 -A--X ,5 1- .. 2 A 1 . 2 .f ' ' ' .fi 1 ' ' - ' ' ' 'Z ' ' E ' 1 ' ., ' r f ' In . A ' 1 . "' Q L 1, 1 5 L - . k ' ' ' 1- 2. . , 'ed 3 ' ' 1 " ' 4 ' - 1- 2 -' - . 1. "1 " is 1. 1' 1 1 .:' , 11 I . 1 r 1 Q Q 1 M . - . , ' , ' c .. 1 V , 1 . e I ' ' ' ' h I if . YY . . , - 1 1 1 . .1 . 1 - , - 1 1 . Y . , . , , - . U ., K L A ' - 1 1 Y- ' Y V 1 ' 1 Y ' ' ' 1 ' Af A 1 . , Q., bw -Q Q 4, I i xx, . 4-,,..y5 BL .13 fi ,, --43 f If . , H r. fi V 5 Kg, v -W f QW K -' ff IK, , SAE gf? mfg A : ' 'Y Y,-1' Ha . .... 4. :XQEL HSli6TBM Ohio Conference Games EE- QB. Squah ' Second Row-Montgomery, MeC.onagl1a, Bell, Calhoon, J. Orr, Lax-rick, W. Wilson, Coach Lange. First Row-Bradbury, C. Orr, Harrop, Taylor, Clark, Bain, R. Wilson. STATISTICS OF THE SEASON Heidelberg ...... ........ Ohio University -- ----- Z6 Dayton U. ,....... ..... l 9 27 Cincinnati ....... ..... 4 3 Muskingum Muskin Muskin Musking gum Ll 111 ll IU lxenyen U. ...... ..... 2 6 Muskin um Ohio University --- ..... 32 Muskingum --- ----37 Ohio Northern -- ..... 28 Muskingum --- -----43 Baldwin-Wallace -- ..... Z7 Muskingum --- ------ll Otterbein ...... ..... 2 2 Muskingum --- -----37 Dayton U. --- ..... Z9 Muskingum --- ---JH Marietta --- ..... 23 Muskingum --- -----49 Otterbein ........ ..... Z 7 Muskingum --- ..... 52 Kenyon ........... ........ 3 8 Muskingum --- -----53 Western Reserve --- .......... 35 Muskingum --- -----38 Non-Conference Games Antioch .................. ........ 8 Muskingum -- ..... Sl Capital U. ................. ..... 3 7 Muskingum --- -----38 Heinz House, Pittsburgh -- ..... 27 Muskingum --- -----S3 Wztynesburg College ....- ..... Z 3 Muskingum -- ..... 37 Duquesne U. ........... ...,, Z 5 Muskingum - ..... 22 Antioch ............ ..... 2 4 Muskingum -- ..... 44 Duquesne U. -- ..... 18 Muskingum -- ..... --30 Opponents --- .... 564 Muskingum -,, ----855 214 .V . A --M, , ,, , .1 ', if ' ' df WALTER HARROP Captun It 1r11xLS '1 bl, 111'111 to 1111 1 111 1111 1nd no doubt wewbodv w11l ugree t11'1t the 1101111011 of C1pt'11n of 11lL Ohm LUI11.L1LI1CC, Bdsltgt P111 C1111111m1115 WM well hlled 111 111011 11.1vs t1'lfl11 0111 H 111711 13101 Ld to bn 111C 1C1Cf11 c'1pt.1111 1101111118: down more 1111111 hm bharc ot' thc 110111 on nutnerous of.v1s1o11Q 'md posscssmg 1 1Je1ion111ty that 1111115 1111 ILL 1111111111 11011911 Q1lI1,111t2,' 10111 1 gl1'1.1L to 1 fo1vvf11c 1'o1 tus scason xxI'111L1' 1111s 111111 to 11111 hw 11111 111 thc gunc '1-. no ony clit could 11110 done t 1-IL 111111 by 111111 us 1 '1111 I1LXl 11:11 and 18 1 msult Olll l1o11cQ 11111 llgl THF CHAMPIONSHIP SEASON SLQ111111s,1y bv 1115, of 111001 to 101111 of 111051 who doubtpd thc Nllkllglll of the Mubqm quxntcttu of 1151 V111 thc PI'LSf.lll 111111 rcpemtcd tl1c11 '1Lt1o11 11111 LX LI1 sur pwscd tl1c111 to Quch '111 Lxlgnt t111t 111010 L111 bb no doubt 11111 111 th 1111116111 of the 1110Sl s11cDt1C11 'N to 111111 tr11L 1101111 1t1 thu lC.t11l'11 of 111 but ony of 1111 11.511 ll 111111 to thc wqu.-1d t111Q vuar IC 111os114.11s looked 1JllQ11l f1o111 1111 11111 bLq11111111g '1 hwy 111111 S1.11llJ1kl'l1Cl1lLC1 bv some othnrs 110111 thc 1710511111111 SClL1'Hl ot the 110.11 DILXIOUS soon duglopul mto a well O1L,1.l'1llCK1 SQU'1.d 'tnd sgttlgd 11111111 to the t'1'-.1 bblom l11L111 1t 1 doubtful ll:2'L11V Coach 111 1111 Co11111111QL uruld boast of 1 squ 1d ot 1111111 11utu1t11l1t1Ls 411111 1lll1L1l C1'C,l111 now to Lanuu for llls o11,'1111f1t1o11 of thc 11.1111 IITL1 du 1113111111 nt of p11ys 1v111c11 wma bust HllltCC1 to 1115 111011 Bwldu 1111 1LL,u111 nonfucngp NL11LC11.l1L thu 1'111,,L111dl1 plavud sL1L1f11 outmde Lf1l11C9', 'md 111llC111,C1 thnn st11113,111 1111111 1101111 of the 5110110181 1611115 111 thc 1r1 St1te C11SlI'ICt D111111s, t11L C1lllSlI11'1.S 11Olli1'lVs ,1 11s1t 11'1S pald to 1,lt1i1J111g1'1, NV1'1Ll't. one of t11c 11111us 111 1 1VT'1lL 1111 of one of thu qatucs Amd that 1.1'11.1S1x111U,'11l11 hm thc wt 111511111111 1l1f1 bmt bd11.1'lCGL1 Lo11L1,c tu 1111 t111t 111 111110 ll'CQ1 111 1111 c1tv no f1r tus VL 11 A1t11o11,g11 they dr111111Ld '1 11111 to 1j11C111t.'wl1L on 1111 11111 11 VVIS 11 C.Il,.fLL1 1'1t 1 111 the 2.111.011 171111.11 thc Dultu NIS-1lCC1 1lLIL and 11110 dcuwvclv deft ltcd To 1C11'1 to thc 1111111115 1n tho 11111121111 cz111111 t111e 1c1111111s the fact t1 11 c'1c11 'md curv one ot' tht 111cQc11t squ 111 11111 bg 111111 1,1111 ncx vom o 111lxC 111 X111 011311 to bp 1111 b1,,QLbt and but 11 1111 tl1.1t 1111s LX L1 worn 1111. Black '111d M11,L11t1l A11ot11c.1 C111111p1o11Q111p IS thc 5011 fol IILX1 ycarl 219 1:3 , 3 if , .F V Wh., -,Ju .N ' 1 11. 1 J- V1 Q J - 1' . ljvlfili-. ' 1 ,.- 'Y' . K' -1-...1.. 1- "1- 1"C. 'gf'1 " 1 ,'g'1,z , ' 2, C .z'1' 1 " A' - 1: 1" ' - , ' - ' -. H,:'I'.SfH'A 1 tb ' 1 "', 'L . . '. 1 - ' vf ' 5 ". . 1 ., A 2 1 1 A '.1'1' "-zll1'1f--:1'1. All 4,1 t1'z 51" f f" z '.'1 2 "1 ' 1' , 1. ' - cf ', 5' .5 1 .f 1. .1 ' fzgf 1: jig' ' ,' 1'1. 1 1. ' J, V ,K , . . ' L- . - ..,! -V 1 K-1-1 - - 1 1 '1 '1 --1 2: -12-' . -1.11 - --.Z 2 .'.l-' I af, Q - 1 1: -1 1 ' -1 1 ' e ' . XV'I 1 I , 1 ..1,- 12 - .1 . 1- 1 'h - 1 y 11, . h- - - . -, ,Av 11' ' fi, j 1 I 1- -, 1 - .- 13 ' f 1 J 1 1' S, -1' ' " 'iz .T . 1 :'- - 11 1 1:1 . - " 1 . , 'es , ' h ' ' 1 '.-1 -1- 51 -:J ky '1 K 7-1 ':"..-,- V - 1' 4711, ' " ': '11 'I 1 H1 2 1 5 I ' 'JJ 1, 1--' hh- f. --Ar fb f .-,1 1. 5- ,1 1, . VA f,-1 - - 1 S171-1 X' ,z 1 . 2 ' 1" ' ' ,1 ' 'K ' ."'-I: 1 ' 1 1' ' 1- ' ' 1 - 5 ' ' " ' ' 11 ' b-'.. "ji 2 ': . ' 11' 11' zo is. 2, ' 'S 'v , z 1'.' ,1z'." ' -A ' - , 1 ggi - , - 'fs "," 13:11-' pc' 2 . ' 1' 1 , ' " If ' 12 . . "3 ' 1 z f' 1 :,":53':f' -:th 't 21' 1 'lit' 11' V 1 . '111'L'u--- 15- '12 if --1 111. 1 - - K 122-1 Z' 'A .1- 2 ' k ' 1- 1 1-2 - ,-. . election recently appointed him as captain for next years J-5.1 if ROBERT TAYLOR Cffaptain-Electj Center Bob" succeeded in maintaining his old reputation, and ended the season with two coveted honors-that of high point man in the Conference, and being given a place on the mythical All-State team. His height with the re- man tt the center position, in getting plays started. Pos- sibly his greatest honor came when his team mates at an squ td A rf "' L C 1 r ', I I in vi , - - I ' sulting ability to get the tip-oft makes him an invaluable ,,1 ,,,,- xii, GLENN CLARK Guard "Woody" brought added glory to himself and the school when he also was named as one of the selections for the All-State team. We didn't get to see him at his best this year, due to an injured knee about the middle of tl1e season. Nevertheless, he was still able to hold down some of the leading scorers on the opposing teams, at the same time collecting enough counters himself to place him third scorer on the team. ta CLIFFORD ORR V it ii Forward ,' 'g' "Red" returned to the squad this year seemingly in it s - 1 as good form as ever, but for some reason didn't get go- ing as well as we have seen him. One occasion though, hc seemed to get in form again, and played his old time game. VVC think particularly of the game at Ohio U. where he was the main threat throughout the game but especially in the over-time period when he added those necessary points. 216 CHARLES BRADBURY Forward Bradbury had the dilticult job of taking Montgom- ery's place of last year on the team, and we must say he hlled the place well. His ability and speed, coupled with his sure handling of the ball placed him as an important cog in the team work so necessary for a winning team. Under the basket Charley was especially valuable, turing a missed shot by some other member of the team into a counter being one of favorite tricks. F . . ,j ' g't.fy6'li 4 I -I rd x ,V,, af' i " 1 I ,,,. v t t . l ,X I , . . iff'- K, WALTER WILSON Forward The power of the squad this season lay in the num- ber of men who were of about the same 'ability out for the team. t'Pinky" rated with the best as far as ability is concerned, but due to his size did not appear on the Hoor as often as some of the others. Duquesne seemed to offer some special attraction for .l.'inky, for in these two games he was at his best, especially on defense. e Qt I JAMES ORR Guard "jim" stepped into the regular line-up this season and did his share toward bringing the team through such a successful season. He had the habit of Hnding the basket at the time when a point or two was most needed, as was evidenced in the Ohio U. game when he twice brought the score from behind with a well placed shot. His defensive work is worthy of note also, for once ,lim got his hands on the ball they staid there till he was ready to let go. 217 l ,I .lr 1 . P t L. 'lvl t if' I 44? Q -T 1 pl: - r-gf. As - at , 1 V i I -., -k 'I' X ,:fV'w , v ' GEORGE MCCONAGHA Guard George made 'a place for himself on the squad that is quite enviable for a Sophomore, being one of the first men to be thrown into the game when a vacancy was made. His speed in covering the floor made him a flashy running guard, besides making him a hard man to cover on the offense. He lacked just a little of making his let- ter, but big things and better luck are predicted for him. , .5 fo WILLIAM LARRICK ., "Bill" is anoth during the season letter, Bill showed opposition for one come. Witli this Guard Il l f x I l er of thc new men on the squftcl who ' -,-- . . . ' . V -L" made good this year and was seen in action several tunes ,V , . Although he tlidn't quite make his B , that there was going to be some stiff , of the guard positions in the years to year's experience to aid him and two years yet to play, we expect to hear a lot from him in the future. 67' Af ' M 9+ 4 ' 15 A 5 A , ' 'eil I' QQ: .- - V' l i J fi l i l :ev 3 1 ff 3' JOHN CALHOUN Center "Cal" wasn't eligible for the squad till the second semester because of just entering school last winter at mid-semesters, so dicln't get a real chance to show just what he can do. His practice on the squad this year ought to prove valuable to him when he returns next ycar, and so we look forward to seeing john in action in the coming season. 218 JEWETT MONTGOMERY Guard Iewett is one of the products of the local academy and has represented Muskingum on her teams in that held. This year is his first on the varsity squad where he has shown the results of his former training in the practice sessions, and doubtless We will see him in aetion on the regular squad before his graduation, two years .,-v hence. , 1 ts ,. . 5? V it 5, ' IJFF ". - yi: f AJ, . -,,,1 I l . 2 , I t t '-1 During the games at a time out period, did it ever jfjl JOSEPH RALSTON Manager is l ' . lf at '.' l ,' Kil, t c . J i - si A rag, RAYMOND WILSON Center "Bus" came to the varsity squad also with experiences from the academy squad, and shows much promise as a future varsity man. Due to so much old material to com- pete against at the center position he worked against odds, but his progress predicts that something will be heard from him in the future, .A ' "1 oeeur to you just how that jug of water and those towels reached the team when they were so badly needed? The answer is above. Here we see one of the least heralded yet in his way a very important member ol' the basketball squad. During those long grueling practices when the men were apt to be crabby, "Joe" was always around with a smile and cup of fresh water to liven up the lagging spirit. Keep up the good work, foe, and remember that public praise is a tickle thing and does not always reach the deserving. 219 HERBERT BAIN Guard Bain started the season with a rush, playing great ball the first few games, but hit some hard luck when he suffered an injured foot on the vacation trip. Neces- sarily he was forced out of the game through the middle part of the season, but got back into the line-up in time to play the last few important games. His guarding was above the ordinary and accounts for the absence of points on the opponent's side of the ledger. HAROLD BELL Forward Bell also promises to become one of the valuable men on the squad who played his first varsity ball this year. He clidn't get into so much actual playing during the games, but the experience received from playing against and with the others in practice will no doubt make him a strong contender for a position next year. 220 I D.O'RfSfP0'R, , el l:S', S .jay , ll' iff" -,TTT Y ' -Q ' , , -. .,- -, 5: :.y wr -yt 'K , ' H: . - . , If 4, "K if-Y' :g.f-,Ap X 5 - -- 1 Y ' : - -, '. 1 Y-,L.'- .L 1 , ' --- eg, Q- ,,.f ,+' --,- E 'Tj' '-' '1f7 7 --Q-f --- f for-'W w 'r f -,,,f' 1 -' 1 . - CM: ' r l l mrarlz Squah Bottom Row-Spencer, Thomas, R. Clark, Bradbury, Captain Thompson, Llewellyn, Garrett, F. Clark. Middle Row-C. Thompson, Orr, Shane, Ingleiielrl, L. Taylor, Cochran, R. Taylor. Top Row-Manager Tomb, Davis, Carmichael, Timmons, Miller, Fowler, Manager Moore, Coach Stone. SUMMARY OF 1926 TRACK SEASON Captain-Glenn Thompson Scores Marshall ........-.-......... 44 Muskingum ................ 87 Ohio Northern University .... 81 Mtlskiligum ....-.. -..-.. 4 9 Ohio University 47 5f6g Kenyon 46K Muskingum ...... ---63 5X6 Otterbein .-,,................ 82 Muskingum --- .... ---49 Letterrnen G. Thompson D. Spencer F. Cochran R. Taylor A. Garrett C, Bradbury R. Thomas C. Thompson F.. Inglefield R. Clark J. Tomb, Manager 222 Names of Sqnul E'111ry VVc1e11 Angus 1"111e1so11, G111el1 QOC111 111 Cross Lounu r11n11111v lt 1X1L1S1x1l1Ul11'l'l l11s 111 the tvx o xea1s of 1ts ex1s1 Y tn a ence become one of t11e most 111terest111g among the ITIIHOI' sports VVh11e the footb111 team was 1112114111 a name for 1119011 last 1111 befme the ubhc e e ! these ITICI1 were out g1v111g then best fm the sehool, .md 11 ue n1adC Z1 TCLOIC1 just as IITIPICSSIX C Dllllllg the twxo ve11s of t1l1S 511011 1Xf111'w1x1l1gL11'l1 111s 11e1 C1 been defewtcd 111 .1 C1L1Z11 meet' there We1e fO1l1 p11ces to be Hlleel due to the cl1JSL1'1Cl. 110111 school 11118 Vea1 of some of the 1111111stays from last se11so11 Hou ex er, 111 111 111141 e1.1ss n1eet last year much good 111111261111 h1e1 been noueed 1nd 11111e11 1n1e1est had been 51101111 1n 11115 sport so that t11e1e xx 'is '1 good number out fol p1 1et1ee Try outs were hclel the hrst VXCC1x of Octobm 1nd the men shoxx 11 ahoxe XVLIC chosen to 1Cpresent the sehool 111 t111s spmt 'lhe H1 st meet was 11e1d 'lt Ohm 1NJo1111e111 whe1e the Muslims 11 on out bw 1 score of 26 '79 Welch 111118111110 Hrst for 1V1l191xl110L1111 Durmg the He1e1e1 belg game here Demson 5 1111114.15 XVCIC fmeed to 11111111 the sup1en1C1ey ot the Black and Magenta the seo1e 1JC11'lg 91 34 A umque fc11111e of th1s mee was t11e fnnsh staged bx L1 1r1ett Coehmn 1nd NVe1ch XX1'1L11 thev 111 H111S1'1Cf1 together, arm 111 21.1111 cox cmng the hve 11111e eourse 111 23 lTl111L1tCH cmd 15 see onds 1,116 111111 run of the se1so11 V135 agnnst fxlxlllll, hele 111th the loe11 boys 113.V111g' C111 easv tune ot 1t, Wlfllllllg bv El seo1e of 16 39 223 v' li' v HM' ' . 'I -14 ' , 9 Q - " 11 ,A 1 i. ' - 1 1 .5 W V 1' V ' VV.. 1 . 1 ' 1 .' - . , f 5 .Lb . 1: Q 2 - .':, ' ,' gif, 1 C"-', ' -2 ' ,T 1 " ' 1 1 " " .5 ' ' ' ' ' 3 ef."- C J . 1 ' - L . 8' 'C . ' 1 ' . , , A 1 .3 . 1 xx' 1 . Last fall, when the roll was called for the f1rst pI'ilCt1Cf3, it was found that 'J 1 I .1 A ll ,x ' r 'A x .' ' I .1 ' . , , 1 . , . , , ' , .. J,.. ,,v, ' ' -N.---,ff 1 .1 I -'V '-- .1 -'-1 ,- 1 - ' -.-,1- - , e 4 , 1. .Y X-A A p 'x ' l l 1 J Y 4 1 " A ' ' . ' ' " 1' . "- 1 3 -1 ' ' 2 . -- , ' 5 D 1 . A 1 41' 5 . ' 1 '- 1- . 1 lf 'v f--',-- v - -N1 - 1 '- -x 'sf ' , s V v K V C -' .l Lx " .l " ".l V. -I I ' "x ' , ' ' V , 1 4-I n C. . : 5' 1 j "2 ' ', , 1 1 . 1 I 1 Ad 1 , 1 " e , v e 1 ' V , . ' , ', , . C -1 Q z A -" f, f 'L ' , A, . .' V' ' ' ' . K - -, -. ' strongest teams in Ohio, the results of last Season do not look so very im- Naincs of Squad-Coach Doudna, Best, Lcyshon, Nichol, Bain Among the spring sports at Muskingum one which always arouscs much interest is tennis. Each spring, as soon as the courts can be gotten into shape, a tournament is played to determine who will comprise the squad to represent the school. Last year, with only one letter man back, Captain Best, there was much keen competition for the other places to be Hlled. The hnals re- sulted in the selection of Best, Bain, Montgomery, Leyshon and Nichol. Under the ins-truction of Coach Doudna, a former Muskingum star, these men developed into a team which could give any a tough opposition. Due to the condition of the local courts, most of the matches were played abroad, which no doubt put our men to some disadvantage. Playing the pressive, but when one considers the handicaps ove go to the team and the coach for the Work they did. rcome, much credit must May Muskingum tat honiej Kenyon .................. ---2 May Muskingum fabroadl Capital -- .................. -5 May Muskingum Qabroadj NVooster ....s. - -------6 May Muskingum Cabroadj Antioch --- .... ........ - ---2 May Muskingum fahroadj Dayton -.-.- --.- ----- 3 May 25, Muskingum fabroadj Bethany ----- ...- .-.- -----4 .lune S, Muskingum Cat homej Capital ---.----..- - -- ----5 -1, YG 1 V . - filo., it , ' i"'T'1ifU Gia .l Uelllllu Cllult OFFICERS President - - ---- Robert Ballzmtyne Vice Presiclcnt - - - - - Hlzirold Mintier Secrct:1ry:'l'rez1surer - VVulter Wilson Keeper of Areliivcs - - - Alfred Garrett Sergeant of Arnie ---- - Robert Taylor MEMBERS Name Class Letters Won Robert llallantyne 1927 Football C23 ljllltl Conley 1927 lfootbnll Mgr. C13 Hurry Crytzcr 1927 llziscbnll C13 3lVilli:tm Lcyslion 1927 Tennis C13 lrlzirold Mintier 1927 liusketball C13 Football C3' llzlselmll C23 .lames Moore 1927 lfootlmll C33 Willizxiit Moore 1927 lfootbzill C33 -losepli lloormztn 1927 llztselmll C13 Tliomas Verniu 1927 Footlmrtll C23 Fred Cochran 1927 'lll'2lCli C23 Cross Country C23 D310 Tl1rm11'y5tm 1927 17001135111 C33 l-lerbert Bain 1928 Football C23 Basketball C13 Teimis C13 Jesse Bezwon 1928 Football C23 Charles Bradbury 1928 l3:Lskctbz1l1 C23 Truck C13 Glenn Clark 1928 llaglilfibllll C23 Football C23 Reed Clark 1929 1109119311 C23 Track C13 V George Fruck 1928 Football C13 Alfred Garrett 1928 T1'2lCli C13 Cross COLlHtI'V C23 vVlLllCt' Hnrrop 1928 Football C13 Hnsketbal-1 C23 Clillorcl Orr 1928 Football C23 Basketlmll C23 james Orr 1928 llaskctball C23 Llgyd P0191-5 1928 Baseball C13 Joseph Shane 1923 17001132111 C23 Robert Taylor 1928 Football C23 Basketball C23 llaseb:-ill C13 Track C13 Claire r1lll01'l1I3SO11 1929 Track C13 VValtcr VVilson 1923 l?00fbHll C23 Basketbztll C13 1311195 Angug 1929 QFOSS COL1l'I1l'y C13 Edwin Ezirley 1929 Cross Country C13 Stanley Trunice 1929 . l'0OTl921ll C13 - - l-lead Cozieli 3'VillJur Stone - - Ass't Coach . FL Lange ,, C, D. lvlorchezid - 225 - Graduate Mgr, , ., S2 gllrezlpnait gliuuthall Bottom Row-Meyers, Young, Gunnett, Spencer, Peterson, Matusek, Reed, Jamison. Second Row-Coach Grimm, Ewing, Xdfhite, Bebee, Penn, Kirk, McEwen, Humes, McGcorge. Third Row-Lyons, Thompson, Kegg, Martin, Pitt, Dunham, Leitch. Top Row-Snell, Craig, McCnrdy, Bashore. Future Muskingum Champions? XVe hope so, and from the look of some of them, some of the present Champions are going to be forced to work harder than ever if they want to retain their old places on the team. It is just such groups as this that make the Coach feel better when he sees some of his best men graduating, for here lie possibilities yet untried. Under the tutelage of "Pooney" Grimm, former NVittenberg star, this squad could be seen every evening working out against the varsity, giving them some real opposition for testing their new plays and stunts. Possibly their biggest value to the varsity came when they represented, under the supervision of our scouts, the attack of the coming opponent for that week, thus helping the varsity plan an efficient defense. Next fall we hope to see every one of these men replace their green jerseys for Black and Magenta ones, and no doubt there will be a place in the regular line-up for some of them, at least. 226 4 rezlymzm ggasllet Q ll quah Bottom Ron Youn Petuson Reed llcnyon leeper 'lop Ron llulxps Gunnclt McEwen Nleholas Ixnl Gmder NVh1le the x uslty was plaungz 112 W15 throuvh a xlctorlouq 'se'1Q0n 'md W is wttraetmff moat ot the lttentmn mothu group ol basketeers w 1S Work mg just aa hard and eontrmbutecl thur shun to the buccess of the season the xaxmty fox they aftordul suli opposmon through the enure season and kept the Ch'nnp1ons nlert 111 the tune Although there were no Olltbtlflillllg men on thm squad they all haxe ffreat potent1al1t1eQ as l.Lllll1C xarxxtx matenal VV1th the prospeets bught for another sueeeeslul Samson we upeet to see some of thebe men makmg 1 name fol themselxes on future Mubk1n5,um teams 221 P' F' I' cll l 5' 5 A ,M ,,- , , - . bi k ! Y ' Y J ' N ri I I I 'Q 7 1 J i ll V I . Q C "-i F . . if 2 fa" .' if' ff af 2 , 5 f' ' .e . .- . .VU ' ' 1 ',z -' .' z - To the Freshman Squad goes much of the credit for the fighting attack of -ry... -,A . X J.. 1 I M , . . 7. - . '1 L ' 1 ' ' z I ' . A 1 ' 2 . I .L ' K , .' 7 an 'J ' 1 ':: ' 'f f 3 j P . N ' . , . ,Z 4, ,x .5 C " -A ra f Q ' A f A' " T C X. ,M-.... 11- y-. ff.. v:2'e-,1,. LN- , .ff J F , f, n ., ,. , , , J-1, ,--.- ,, M.. fn .1 , , Q- ,t X n 511 S I 1 ,--,-f.,,,3,V, .f,,Av,iU if V as NM' .Y ,. Y A -,JN -. - ,, 4-..--Qr' H' ' x 1 n .:, k, Y,---1 V Lrg -1 YY F 'xx-.J . .gym-V 228 01116 5 .HfI1B.I16'I1ICS 3330111215115 Qihletins Every year at Muskingum more interest is being shown in girl's ath- letics. Each girl is required to take at least two years of physical education. More advanced work is oitered for upperclassmen. The work of these classes culminates in the annual May Day festivities. There are three major sports offered to girls interested in this type of physical education. Hockey, the fall sport, is a new game at Muskingum, never having been played until three years ago. A line new hockey field is now being complet-cd just north of thc girl's dormitory and will be ready for use next fall. It is very likely that this game will become the major sport in girls' athletics within a few years. The winter sport is basketball, in which much interest is taken. Every year teams are chosen from the four classes. The class games are played in the barracks gymnasium toward the end of the basketball season to de- termine the championship. In the spring the attention is turned to volley ball and tennis. Gaines are played among the class volley ball teams- to determine the winner of this sport. The tennis tournament is held by the individual players rather than by classes. In summer school interest in athletics is shown in classes of swimming, coaching, and tennis. Most of the girls take great interest in athletic work because there is a goal for which they can work. Every girl who is interested in this type of work is desirous of becoming a member of the "A" Association, an honorary organization. The "M, C." Club corresponds to the "M" Club in men's athletics and -encourages girls, athletics by giving sweaters and gold pins as awards to those girls earning a required number of points in the different sports. All in all, the athletic side of the girl's education at Muskingum is far from neglected, and much credit must be given to those in charge for the work they are doing and for the results obtained. 230 Iii IG-.I Lmm L21 G1 uh The M L Llub Lonsmts of the lntter mu of thy fC111l1'I11'1L port1o11 of uhuh 18 l11111tul to thosg uhm Ulm thy uquucd llL1l'l1bL1 of pomts by Suuccbr- tullv 1'1Ix111g p ut 111 sex 1111 chllf1c11t pulls I Z1I'l1L11JL11Ol'l 111 dass b wketball hogkev 11.111115 111111113 ind sn 11171111110 eutxtlcs A gul to L.0l111JL1.C for thg Lttrac ina pm and luttcl prcscutcd hx thy gollcga ue. IS thg M Club L11cour'1ges SUPLIIOI Ibllltk 111 d.Tll'1lL11L'w md LIL111 wpurts111111s111p '1111o11g thc 111c11 of thc suhoul so thu M L Llub t1kLs 1tQ plus w1t11 thc. guls xuth P LttC.1SOl1 PrLs1dc11L HCIL11 Dwughcxtv SLc1e1a1y 'IICZISLIILI N argugt Lutgh M 11X B1ggs Mwrjorlg brovub 731 . -b 1 1 'Q' -9 lj 1 , 1:11. ,11 ' , ' " 1m1 1 1 7,22 r' U- 1,4 K . J J .Y X S1111 11 X11 11 1111111 'Y fm 142. ..,, 11, 111: .1..,11, 1 , ' .?i?L,,I"11111 ' L! ff Q1111 ff au ' H 1 "" " N ' Y. - , f' .-- 11" 11 ' ' A ' Muski11gu111's athletes. This year, hw 111c111hcrs co11s11'itL1te this orga11iz:1tio11 v '- 'lf I '-1 - 1 1 v - .wc .1 -wi --X 1- ' 5 1 ,"'- ' , 1" 'Tr' 1' ' ' .i 2' , .U Ar ki Q. f xlxl r x Y JZ- X- -',.' 1 . , 1. -. J.. .,1- H' . ' . , - r 1 C x 4 - x 5' , vi ,J 4 1 -A4 . - wr . . . A .A . j 5 ' 1 1 L 1, v. L u v 'I' -1 1 ---- - - ' 1 L - i - N - J 4 -f - v- 1 - 1 4 - 1 - 11 z'1'1"' "3 "N -1 - 1 1 ' H - " Qvssnniatinn In the girls' athletic realm the HA" Association holds a place which cor- responds to tl1e "M" Club in the 111e11's activities. It is an honorary organiza- tion and marks the highest honor which tl1e girl can attain in athletics. Girls are elected i11to 111e111bcrsl1ip by a vote of the active 111en1bers, and held o11 pro- bation for a term of one year before being adiilittcd to lull 1ne111bership. The insignia of this period of prcwbation is the white "AU, which is worn until the pledge admitted, when the red "A" is given. To this last is added for each year of 111e111bership a red bar, the highest possible reward being a red "A" and two bars. To be considered eligible for election to lTlL'l11lJCl'Sl1llJ i11 this body, a girl must be outstanding in athletics, have a pleasing personality and have a grace of carriage which is in keeping with the ideals of the organization. At pres- ent there are twelve active 1NC1NllClA:4 i11 the Association, and six on probation, making a total of eighteen girls who have won this distinction on the campus. 232 ' I ire' an -if ,i it i'ifiie la. 114 Biking fllluh The Hiking Club is an organization formed by the girls of the school to further interest in athletics and in better physical condition among the co- eds of the campus. Certain requirements must be met to qualify for member- ship in the club. and rewards are odered to incite an added and continuous interest along this line. To become eligible for membership to the club, a girl must hike at least 35 miles during the semester, each hike of a minimum distance of three miles. The distances of certain places along the roads leading out of town are known, and thus a method of measuring is provided the hikers. To win the insignia of the organization, during the college year a total of 200 miles is required. Mileage from one year does not carry over to the next, so that the insignia is symbolic of some real effort on the part of thg girl winning the right to wear it. As an added incentive to maintain interest after the insiginia has been won, a sweater is given as a reward for earning a total of 600 points, the points being apportioned as to the mileage covered. The 200 mile require- ment for the first reward nets 150 points, from which it can be seen that to earn the total required for a sweater, continual interest and action must be shown by the aspirant. This year has shown a very decided interest among the girls for the club, and nearly every day some girl or group of girls may be seen heading for the open highway. In all there are about 40 girls who hold membership in the club this year, and a very congenial bunch they seem to me, when we see them starting out for one of their walks which occasionally end up with a feed in the country and a good time by all. 233 " Y V :E Www u 1 W Q-Q . fa -Q' Y '-+-- "-- -. .1- . 15 - Jn 1 L .. -PW A xv ., , , 1 . W B H N, A w p X ' A S3 ,Z K I W v K .24 V. A M X , Hs Kb 1 ns- Q sf? 1 as Q if? 1 , 3 - Ah , ' iff Q R rg! wx -gms" I Rwzfm-,we -SE ' 5 - - 9 A , . w mm - Q- ,i'g'Q'qf' ggi 4,5114 nigga E 1 . H 5 i - - sa Q r 1 H 1 l A L Q, 3 Q 1 4 H - ' 2' tl ' ss ' in vu g H . F 1 sg 2 Q xx W- 5 . ,A .ff fx A W H x is N if M W N V nw ,Mig ,4-ff N Q5 SH W A-2 Q 'W -. A r WE' 1 Ar' V V ,K W 2 4 , ' 'f 1 A . YS Eggs? ,1 ' , .ff wr Q. H ,. . im . mi UN an 1 f ' H I E W if .. w X B' j fn "v BF-1 1 f - : " , V, ss QM b ' . b in may L, Q . . 4 61,374 . asm Qpfgm L ,323 M HE A-A S H Q, A msg A 5 E o e ,E , .E ' ig as X4 ' gl ' . K haf, H mag i kk H w ' ' V V gl WSL? B N N fp I E Bs'7f':u :mn I I ' ' " I ' A Z if E w 'H , Q 5 if H 5 5- ES' 'k .5 Q ' Q Q H H Fd! R i Q- 5 H BX! H N:- E IHEAQQQ' E H n E - ,mi 5 ' A 4 rr E 13 sm I sw H 5- E ,A Q . ,E H , I a .. -, f H , 4, Q..- I f ' ... - M mangas my W, A, 2 mm aw pw M Q an 1 gg -- 1 Q ' .. ' ' M . 1, . 5 7 , - E25 PAWB5, QQF nou.-3 w 1 .4 E fa N , . f:iE:ZE:E.:ga,,-we .-:- .., :::'A.:. ,, W- 'yi E .Q if ' 52 5 ,Q -B MV v " 9 E ' 5 E -V H fy W "Q 2- i xi ,W 1 ' - f my , Q Lg -L .N Qi Z 5 1 ..,.. " ' . -. 1 -1 5 Q-' 9 X if '- .- -.: . is - W 3 1 I . . -: , gap. U ,.?f'?s"" , ,.,f' f r' sf is ' 31 M gg E. . H I , V, . H E1 1 , 13: .1 ,L H ,A 2i5",3i n gg? .. -, . . . :ew 5 is W , . P1 1 Mm - Z, V .' AQ H --, 1 K Hqgrgff H Q yr 2-2 it . ,Z g,Qf.Y : I .. ,X V? .Z W j h o E SAY ESWEYQE-,ff f M4 1 . fs, 1 f WAQZLL QFHMANSE gg S QBACKVAQQ- .wx HW ei, W Q X gf 2 5 E H A 'lf"m1"""'5f H591 W 4 1 Q af y , - ' '- ' A . . Q ,Y ,, H145-' , 1, Q E HA-mga.. Q- -1 N- A W -f K Q em- 2 H 'Q I N -A E AT' . Mgx ":f:s:L I N E H r E Y E if E qs A, v gF,gf"y " 'H A4 - Af 5 I M Tv-gag i R -.j I-. 14 I .Q V - fs ' E if N ak Al X XE .Q NZ xx 0 an VE is if :Bi 'flag :L-55 Ji f frm " , 2 ra' 14.1. ,J -- ,mn .Aki :.: .:. :.: 3 1 :' ,.-: - if V .. V .-I , . L JE ,. .M -2 , H, Rf 'ai' "LQ" WV -f UQ - ki QQ 5' Q A65 I5 NXTL fi H P ' ai? il! . :ff , '. :-:""'ff" A A L " s ,v, -gl . ,:,,l. Y' Q32 its -Iii: fi 331 Asif., ...J 2? ' BXQZQ 3 951.5 E m Si A 234 I F J Af?fl-:SS5'E-. ff 1y'f'ff'E"'Ft2A- f i gf- :"' - ,f X 0 ' 1 . 1 WWF9HT,UR5e?7"WlWW Yii: , , 2 f - ff 9 17222 5,- "'-'M' fl , ,Pf,,!1f, nlxm' ' y iw 1' ' MH' ,I vm 1 I 9 G "'VT" lllll " ' OIIIIILGIX. 1 -S 6 11.1 0'R.-S 235 CUYLER FERGUSON liurdened with the destiny of faculty and student alike, the arbiter between two uncertain factions, harassed by minutiae, the Pericles of Muskingum! O worthy demo- crat, may thy latter years be as productive as thy foriner, they judgments so nice and thy deeds ever prompted by sincerity. WILLIAM MILLIGAN Early attaining prominence in class affairs, thence growing' into a journalist of some renown, a speaker of great persuasivcness, a leader of incn-and perhaps ot women, never has Hill disappointed his possibilities. Manifold and unfathomable are his projects, varied his ponderings and eerebrations. One hesitates to speak of destiny. A MELTON BOYD Thou enemy of periphrasis-may thy succinctness never descend into the limbo of the terse. Amidst thy many echievenients, as representative of this institution's fanie in declaniation, as master of mob psychology, as devotee to the histrionic and as leader in student agitation, thou has maintained a very desirable stateliness, a most admirable philosophy. In truth Muskingum owes much to thy provocativeness, May thy many philosophizings bring thee much joy and happiness. 236 1 if DORO1111 'W111 11., r1ro1111 one 1 IL 1 1 1 1 1 w 1 1 of 1111 111111111111 O111 11 11111011 1011111 to 111:of11171 1111 13y 1c.1s1111 of 1111 110111 110111 1111111 111 Y VV 111-1115 11s11011s11311 111 1 111 1 1111111111 101 111L 11111111 of 1-101111 10111111 11' 011 111 f11Q101J11111 111111 of 1151 111111 11 11 0 1115 13 111 01 1 p 1501 1 C1 11 111 111: 11111 13110111111 1111s1f.11131c ROB1 R1 RAI 1AN1X NL 1.111111 311110 1110111 11111111 1111111 111cyc1c 111111 1111101111111 cx11'10111111.11y so11.1 1etz1rv, f011111111 11 1111111 111 11 L9 0111 101:11 111111 1 1 1 11111111 1 21 1118 111111011111 l1J1LllL5S 11111 11111111 01111 of 1111 Inst 1111 11111 111111 Ill f1111 11111 FL? 3111, but 111 who 1l3.XL 111111 11111 1111 1 111111 11110VV s11111c111l11 131111r 1111115 11100115 Fc1111111111l1 Q1JC'11xll14 11111 15 11111111 10 191 10114111 11111 Mo111st 11111011 10 b1111g, shy 61111 111011 211 P011 W11so11 1111011 111111 011111 par11'111v X11 1111011 the 111111: for p11y11111 COI1113C1l11011 011 the 1100113111 111111 1111111111 111011111111 101 0111111111 111 11 011 the 130110111 of 1111 112115 N01 br1111a111 but posbcQQ111 1V1111 1115 lllC91St1b1C 11111111105 of KlI'l1L 111111 hood Xbo1e all 111s shyuceb 237 f 'ff - f - 'f : D 1 is 0' t1 1 vcry fCY' wo111c11 1111 111- c:111p11.- 1'l1O 11 10 11- 111:1jo1'fij1' dz., 1-M2 . .' ' :J N-.-111111 115' 1 11' V1'i".Y'121 l2'l'll :ax 1 5: -i ' . 1 '1 - I .213 V 3 ,1 V M , 7 1501-11 111 1110 1111-11 of 1111 1111111111 'l'l1c most versatile 1111111 O11 1111 11111111191 A11i111a1 14' 131: f-',1z:'1'-11l1.,'-', . ' -',z ' ' fu 'fl sec' , fi 'z " '-ner" 1, 1.' . 1 2 1:1112 '1'111 1f, 1-A1111 11 is 12 - ' 1 ' 1 -1 1 ' 1 ' :U '- ' 2 'Q1' fl v,u 11 J'x - 2 ' - lu' y 2 1 '31 V 1 4k ,' 4 , ' ' 1-1, I Y' 1-,-' 'S - 151- F- -2--,-Q xl- 2 N 1' -- - , 4.1 -1 ' . " . , , ' f' 71 Y ' '.. . A" 7 'T : .N 1 i. 1, it ? ... i -. Fi JANET SEVILLE So wistful, so soft voiced that one hesitates even to look at her for long. janet wants, almost yearns to make friends but that seemingly insurmountable barrier is al- ways there. Many would like to know her, yet that something etheral prohibits them from even approaching her. Aceomplislmient is of her nature, the abstract being of special interest. Although with a flair to the literary her ability is not limited to writing and the appreciation of the line and beautiful. Forced into prominence in stu- dent life, she has delicately forwarded her ideals, at the cost of partial disillusionment but undaunted faith. An exquisitely intricate pattern! ROLLAND EVVING Recently locating on Lombard Street our minister of finance has startled this little cosmos of ours with his ability to handle student funds. A most dilficult task amaz- ingly well done. His aptitudes have been many and diverseg a capacity to talk on many and diverse topics, a Thespian of campus-wide note, an honor student and president of his class in the senior year. Can such a one fail to win recognition in this dog-world of ours? RALPH CANNON Known to freshmen as president of the Student Honor Council and to the upper classmen as Editor of the ll. and M. Ralph has stimulated the thought of a great number on the campus. Surely nought more could be said in commendation for one than that one has been provocative of constructive thought. HARRY CRYTZ ER No mincing of words for this aspiring iconoclast. Student forum has repeatedly born witness to his distaste for all shams and social leprosy. A master of the spoken word he has gained notoriety on the debate teams, as college orator in his senior year and as an accomplished actor. Expressing quite an interest in Y. M. work he was sent to I-lelsingfors, Norway, as this college's representative. Harry still has time to in- dulge in the national pastime of baseball, being a member of the "M" club by reason of ability in this line. 238 'ff-A1 X-gl V we ,L- -. - 7 .2 K Y'-f 1" J -4 1 "N-1 -r, LJ Lit 1 WT ,Bi Ns v 5, Lv' Scrap 35513 Scrap Day, which has become an institution of annual re- currence at lX'1L1SlilHg'Lll'U, is of importance to both the Freshman and Sophomore classes, as in it is found an open expression of the natural rivalry that exists between those factions. Also, the winning or losing of the day determines for the Freshman whether he shall wear his dink until Christmas or forbear the irksonie duty at Thanksgiving. Scrap Day was built around three events this year. Dur- ing the first, a raft fight on the upper end of the lake, the Sophoniores succeeded in tossing their opponents overboard with great dispatch. The Sophomores were again victorious when their girls wriggled through to victory in the obstacle race. The taste of revenge was not denied the Freshman, as they managed to humble the Sophomore colors that waved from the liagpole just before the rush. The events of this Scrap ,Day revealed a spirit of good sportsmanship highly to be commended. Xvhen the Student Council decided that the Sophomores had forfeited the clay be- cause of failure to meet some of their obligations, the Freshman class waived this forfeiture. The respect of the school was won by both classes in this circumstance. 241 i 242 JHHHU QBHQ Exam 51311115 Lbnlulllul llsux al IS lulml rlou I1 Un Hollow uudu the dnnchcm of the Deputmunt ot Physmml FLlL1L,df1Ol'l for XVomLn Thy SLIIIULIIIKIIUSQ slaps 'UL CIOWLILCI xulh spcLt1 tom who mxxously lwut thu cum 111110 of tht Ou cn 'md 1110 Chun clxamn xxhlgh IS umctul 111 her honor An l1l1L1Nl1lHX beautlful pufcmt W ls p1csLntLd 111 1976 X d'lNllf,l1l sluwly appmmhecl the Ilcm ers mme an nkcncd bv thy Qonv of thc. buds 'lhq dlmed 11 htlx 111 thy soft bueges but thmr h Lppmub was S1'l0Ifl1XLd fm hc LVX Wmds 'ume md rl ul amd the outlook ior a glormous dw Stmm follrmncl m thu xx 11 e of the Wlnd and both endn uoxefl to bow ilu hmdq of thg cl 11 cite httlg Flowars But as m dll thuws H1616 13 mlm 1ttc1 tha Storm Slowly xuth munh diort the Nun lppuarul thmu h the the Rwmboxx 'lhc Buttmflxu Jm ously chmed and fmstcd on thc Qu ents of ilu Umm L15 G11 MM 1110111 hqhtly clxugul thu QhlldI'Ll'l to umd tha Mau Poles thL1l yculv tllbutg to 51311110 Happy T aclg on lhur xx LX to thc xx oods dlcl 1101 H1511 to bn 0u1.do11L bx the DIIILLIS md qumkly stalled tl'lL1l splltclx dmce Wlth muth 'md lmbhtcr Xouth xppcuul md 11111 Ltud to L11 thu world lts happmus lhcn c1mL thu Lnpqlu who hold hfc s futurg befurn thcm in 15HLd thlt all hh IS h'1ppmCs-5 md Joy 111 ilu SlJI'111gt1ll1L thaw gl ldlx xx LILQJIIICC1 the Sluclous of FXi.l11l1g to dnmm of mmhu c 1 Lflidxs Stephenson vs IS the Lhosen Uuun 'md shy was IOS allx lttundud bw Fun olher SCUIOI g1rls Lbthcr Fmlcy Gladxs Torn the 1Xltl'lI'XIl Og11X1L 1 x mqclme Lnlien md xfxflllli-FLCI Den 243 x. '9 4 1- L - lv 5' -' 7-I 12, -" - xx- -' Y. '-. , NX . Y' , I 'J - - ' - 'V - . .- ' IN. f' N. ' f X L X , ., . L , 1 ' V x J -- ' K- k- ' xx L A - 1 x ,v'- , - 2- ' 2 J 1: z' ' ' X' ' b' A N :J . , 1. N ' ' 1. " I x lf x L V X . ' , . .Az j ' QLA: fz: - . ,f S cd: r ' 2 - y T f y. fn- 1: 1 H 1 - x - - ' . 7 . N 'O- F ' V - ' ., . . ' p I " 1 b . A -, -1 1 Q : ' f- , Y' 'z nf f ' , z Vc- 1 x - 1 - - ' - . t' - v ' , .- v , . Q . , f 'X "L X ,x 1 . 1 - Vx' r - ' - A .V ,. ,fx '- . . . , . , , x 4 J 4 , 1 ' A ' ' . A' ' I v H, . - .1 A 1 Y. . , . b., . L L - w 1" - Q 1 1 x ' - ., . N uf X' , . X gf ram, and followmg hcr thc world wld symbol of fzur wczlthcra Q '. ,' 1 3 f . ' 1. - '-' lr, ' J' . ' oz fi, , . ' 1 'fr-f K. . C . K. 'X- A.,.- ,'.L. -' J , Z '- I '. K Z of -,- 7 . V v -.x I - 'f , - 1 y ' - Y ' 1 -- l L 1 K I C x - L . '1 ,I t 1 A M' r 'x- y ' ' .Uv Q 1 x 1 - c . n . . 4, ., , , V 'J . " . ,, . . 4 , , ' .V . , - ,. . . . . , . 1: y. " . fr Qf : fs: N 7 6 X- . , : 1 ' .3 ' Y- + QT " 2 f' ' '. L '2 L A ' z f 1 fr 5 ,Cf 17:9 .- ,f All K-" '-. W s wl ,.+fX-.--- .f.....x. XA, --,, ' L xgwcf' -. 244 1 nnic-Qlnining Qing May Day and Scrap Day are naught beside Home-coming Day in the opinion of the graduates from this college. The first two mentioned events are restricted to the anticipation of the present students but Home-coming is a bright spot in the future of all graduates. To return to marvel at the changes on the campus, the new type of student, the mutations of ones friends and the ability of the loot-ball team, all eontributq to the long'- ing to get back to where one has Spent four years, four of the best years, of ones life. Arial those who eaine back this year were not disappointed. The parade composed of Hoats and in- genuous devices prepared by forts, clubs and business men, brightened the day dull with clouds. The game was a delight to watch for the traditional enemy, llvlarietta, was decisively mingled with snow and ground earth. All were happy, even those whose lloat required that they parade with a quantity of clothing only a little more than nothing. Homecoming' Day will continue to increase in pouularity as more alumnae retu1'n. 24-5 . P11-: 1' C- -- it . -v,,f.,,,, --. x A 1 ,1 gif? J A 1 K ' pf f A , f 6 W ' ,g 5 Ay E1 , W if- "N" - ' .M 1 W, . , f 1- . --K ,FA 4: 4 4'-.'. A V1 TEE: S 5? ' 5-ff ' ,. , QM-X N .,?,..:-" 5, x, f5.'Qf --"' :5 ji ' fi 1 V1 I E 9 V- 4: A' .b-5.1 r 1 ,F -- ,. L4. ?qiXc-J . 'a ww-' . a' :Q-'N I A15 3 11 fb, JN .M if 1' X aff 'P -.fs z w W "fm I H Q a ' ' 'cm 1' 2 Q, 1 'gggg ' if I , 3 3' 1, 3 9 g ',' 5 -lr, .fl-. 4' X 5? ' J 1, 4 . N - TY B 1,1 ' ,W n -1 1 Lf '55 1- lcnwmsm . '- X -J'- fa :1 a H jr V1 Ai t --fu v 35.74 0 , ' t' 1 Q , , 4 ,, I ' ' I T' Q . f. "w1ll5l ,,,,, I f . Q 1 v ' r , .1 2 7' 1-15 'Fil .W .'IlIlllll'!f.l 4 In i -- . TL ,e 3 . .vb 5 I - 4 ' 2.3 , M . , V? A , h X L: A J ff- X A 1 '- 2 2:12 ESL' xii., 246 ig. gui. ai. gi. wh ig. iii- - A. SUMMER CONFERENCES Luke Gciicva, Xlfisconsin, is thc scene of the National Sum- mer CU1'1l:C'1'CI1CQ ol' the Y. M. C. A. zmcl thc Y. XV. C. A. lt is herg that ClGlCQ'2ltC11 from colleges and universities spend two of the most mcmorzilnlc weeks in the year in fellowship and fun. The program is a source of inspiration, the discussion group meetings on campus affairs most enlightening, the companion- ship immezisurczilnle and thc glorious Sport something never to be forgotten. 247 7 numbers' ESQ Muskingum this year celebrated her ninetieth Anniversary-ninety years of endeavor behind her, and many years of life and service lie before. This anniversary meant more than a record of years passedg it had a double signif- icance. Not only did we mark the passing of the ninety-year mark in Mus- kingum's life, but we also celebrated our firm establishment in the North Central Association with the completion of the endowment campaign, and our absorption of Franklin College. Besides its being a review of a past of sacrifice and of struggle, of prayers and pioneering, we also looked forward to the future, and confidently prognosticated success for Muskingum. The formal celebration took place on the afternoon of Thursday, March 17 and the morning of Friday, March 18. On these two days the student body, members of the College Board, and many alumni gathered in Brown Chapel for the programs. The first half of the program was made up of ad- dresses by Dr. S. M. Zwemer, J. D. Rankin and J. E. Bedford. The next morning there was pictured to us something of the earlier life of Muskingum. and something of the value of her work to the world. At this time the charter of Franklin College was formally transferred to Muskingum. A This anniversary was a symbol. lt is a milestone that marks only the miles lying behind us. The side of the stone facing forward is blank. It a challenge to forge on and set up in the future monuments even more impressive than this one. lt is a challenge'-and a reasurrzince that having done this much, We can do moreg that having progressed this far we can pro- gress further. Muskingum has taken up the challengeg she has determined to go ahead, to build and to grow. And we are sure that it can be done, and will be done. Thus we remember the Ninetieth Anniversary as impressive, not only for what we have done, but as an adumbration of the future. 24-8 ff Wf' Wlwilli C5fI'DG 0 MIWIW 240 AW 4 5 w- iufl R 7 5 Af" 1 - Wi" ,mf 9 M :lux-.y 4 I .ll lily w L '-eifl ' 'L -n r JB 75 - J :in lll!l1l!l SENIOR CLASS JUNIOR CLASS 250 SOPHOMORE CLASS FRESHMAN CLASS 251 Quzaitenig ggazkeihnll Tl1e 1926-'27 season in Basketball at the Academy proved to be one of the most successful the school has had in the last few years. Winning sixteen games out of a twenty game season, annexing the Class B. County Championship, and being runners- up in the Eastern Ohio Tournament all go to show just what was actually accomplished by the Muslcie Preps. Playing through the regular season with only three defeats, two of which were avenged, the team showed its right to enter the tournaments and contend against the best teams of the state. The first game of the season was dropped to Byesvillc, but served to show where the weaknesses existed. This game was later avenged when the lower valley boys visited the home court. Caldwell and Dover succeeded in out- scoring the Little Muslcies once each, the former being defeated in the return game, and the latter winning the Class A Championship of Ohio and playing two rounds in the National Tournament. From these few points the strength of the team can well be judged. After the regular season the team entered the county tournament at Zanesville and played its way through a series of victories to the County Championship. Two weeks later they entered the Eastern Ghio Tournament at Cambridge and played through to the semi-finals, being defeated by Toronto, who later Won the district and also State Class B Championship. With only four defeats in the entire season, two of which were at the hands of championship teams, the season may be marked as a red letter one in the history of this sport at the school. Coach Nicholson and his men deserve great praise for their success, and although several men are lost by graduation, a strong nucleus is left for next year's team in their attempt to duplicate or better the record of this year. 252 X xx It Lnu gf 0 I E 'lwfidx' I 0 N-f f i gx .XX I mg? T J n LN Q2 uv is ist' ' I gil l 5 's L6-IDD 253 MARCH, 1926 16-Tuesday. Our negative debaters outdo Mount Union yhilc our allirinative team 17 loses to Denison. Vlfednesday. The New Concord business men entertain the basketball champs in a banquet. 18-Thursday. VVC observe Founders Day. Professor Moses doubts the actuality of 19- Z0- 21s 22- 23 the pictures of dinasours shown in "The Lost XfVorld." i Friday. Mount Union proves her wisdom in not accepting our basketball challenge. Saturday. The Sophomore girls win the class eliaxnpionship. Sabbath. Vesper services. Monday. "Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme" presented as the French play. -Tuesday. Doctor Osborne of Ohio State University gives a biology licture. a w e fi V52 ,g 454 - ' , ' iii-fi. t .Zh 1 I A Nh' -hal'-,',f, 3 fi "N r .14 iii ull-'ill 5 it ., igiltla AQ 26 f 0 no Z6-Friday. Y. llfll retreat at Rix Mills. 27-Saturday. Freshmen frolic at their own little party. Z9wMonday. Negative debate team defeats Pitt Fll-fl1'11lZl.tlVC. 30-Tuesday. Doe and Mrs. Montgomery leave for the South. Glee Clubs leave for their Easter trips. 31-NVednesday. Easter vacation begins. 7 9- 12- 16- APRIL, 1926 fVVednesday. Vacation ends and elasses resume at 1:30. Friday. Seniors are overwhelmed by their privileges. Monday. G. Boone MeCreary speaks. Friday, Y, W, girls retreat to Rix Mills. Muskingum loses the lirst prerseason game with XVest Virginia U. by the score 26-1-1. 4 17-Saturday. Second game lost to XV. V. U. by the score 8-9. Relay teams participate 1Sf in the Ohio Relays. Sabbath. Vesper service. 20-Tuesday. joint Home Concert given by the Men's and the XVoinen's Glee Clubs. 33- Friday. Baseball team loses to the Capital nine 4-10. 254 ii f vi, 3 I f l5lf,l.l,' ,' l eff' lf lfl-"i " ' ""' ' l l 2 li ix f ini I I-14, ml,-'f,ff, In A 'If iff I Lili- i w " ' , i W 5 ff,:1' if ' , 'liiQ ,, XY .1 , ' xg hx" i, i. -iff -F , 'fx , Lf? 4 -, VJ! E ,A 1.1 9 if f- 96' fx llllm N -, fb Ng E55,,..'-L-. 423, I i ' ff"'Am2ll 21-Szmtnrclziy. SODllOlll0l'l'S win the lI1I1L'l'-L'l2l9S track 1110011 27-XfVcclna-sclny. Faust rcndcrccl by thc Clioral Society :incl Glue Clubs. 28-'l'linVsnl:ix'. The nioyiu "Trouble with XVivc2s" proyus io bc old stull' lo cxpvriciic Muslcingiuinilcs. 29-Fricluy. Tlw bxiscball lcmn journcys to Ottcrlusin :incl brings lifnnc the bacon I0 l .gilfslilflllllll busy in thc ll1lVllllICl Cnunlv l-liuii Schnol lrziclc nm-1 :incl Mzirslizmll xg Mnslcingnin. Vxfo win. MAY, 1926 l-Suturclny. Cupicl hits Muslcinginn: llircc L'I1Q2lQC1llCl'll:T ziiiiimimw-cl. 7-Friclziy. Senior recital by Gladys Stcyvnson. "'l'liv Scrvzinl in thc l'lousc." S-SZ1lll!'Cl1lj'. Coach Moon-lic:icl's nicn clcfvillcd by Mziribtlzi, ll-9. 12-Vklcclncsclziy. Violin livstivzil. 13-'l'l1n1'sclz1y. Violin licslivzil, 1-l-Friclzly. licltzfs zinnuzil M:-my Day scrunziclc. May llziy lI'ltCI'l'1lI'7lQll by ruin. 15-Szltnrnlzxy. Gladys Slcvonson crownccl l.XlllSlilI'IQl.ll1I'S Quucn ol' May. 18-Tuesday. XVoi'St storm in y0a1'S. XV1'21tl1 ol Gorll 20-Tliursclziy. Senior rvcitul by rlillCl1l1Z1 Rush. "1iil0stonus". Z3-Sllljlllllll. Sclioul gricvvcl by thc nlczilh of Maxim: iF?Ll'1!lCl'. 28-Munnlziy. ,luni-,nr Play, "Old Mun Minick". JUNE, 1926 6-Sllljllllfll. Sermon by Dr, VVoonliin to lhv Cln'islinn Associatioiis. 7-Klonclay. Alnnior Play, "She Storms to Conquer." 9-X'VCCll'lCSdZlj'. Alumni Uziyg thc Town is filling up. 101rlil1l'll'SLlZ1j'. COlT1ll1Cl1CCl'l1CI'llQQ SCniu1'S-Goodbye! 255 W alll i 4 l 3-E if I M 4, ggi , SLDV13 SEPTEMBER, 1926 13-Monday. Plenty of green stuff seen on the campus. 14-Tuesday. Foolish Freshmen frightened. 'WVant Ma and 15 Wedxiesclzty. Upper classmen arrive and assume control. 16-Thursday. Blue students study little blue books. 17-Friday. Our first dissipation in the form of a movie. 19-Sabbath. First taste of the new rules. liad taste. 20-Monday. First "Blue Monday" for the homesick Frosh 1 , W gl ll l Q5 ll F214 IQ -If G: g l 0 ll 1 , 5 . Fa, Freshmen Rah." The Conservatory not haunted, it is just the Men's Glee Club try-outs. 22-NIVCCIIICSCIZIY. Y. M. and Y. VV. joint meeting. 25--Friday. The Muslcie footballers get a good start for tl1e season by defeating Ashland 6-0. 26-Sunday. Sabbath. 27- Monday. Doc announces the Sabbath .Emancipation Proclamation. 28-Tuesday. Our first Student Forum was suprisingly peaceful. 29-Wedxiesdzty. "Hap" Crytzer gives his report on the Helsingfors Conference. 30-Thursday. The sun proved its experience after a week of OCTOBER, 1926 hiding. 1-Friday. One "Tux" was present at the Faculty Reception. 2-Saturday. Muslcies trounce Hiram at Hiram 19-0. 3 Sabbath. Many happy girliesg many joyous men. Doc ha dates again. 256 s let us have our Sunday 4-Monday. All day. 5-Tuesday. Heap big excitement! Frosh and Soph warriors are getting lined up for the big scrap. 6-Wednesday. Picture and Scrap Day. Ruins of the City Hall can still be seen. The Second Year boys victorious. 7-Thursday. Remnants of Scrap Day. Soph boys big meeting and a big fuss over damage done to the College and village. 8-Friday. X'Ve heat Capital at Columbus 27-8. 12-Tuesday. Student Chest Drive announced. First good weather for the tennis tournament. 13-XfVednesday. Student Chest drive in Chapel. 1-I-Thursday. Sphinx beat the Stoics in football 6-O. 15-Friday. The College picture taken. 16--Saturday. Ohio Northern is our third victim by a score of 6-0. Q 19-Tuesday. Student Forum. Agitation in favor of new Campus rules. 20-Weclnesday. Y. M. and Y. XM. meetings with discussion groups. 22-Friday. Bonfire and general pepping-up for the game. 23-Saturday. Heidelberg is our meat, The score 19-S. Vtfalter Camp Day. 25-Monday. The tirst snow of the year. 26-Tuesday. Prof. l.ayton distributes his .Lyceum Course coupons. 28-Thursday. Edgar C. Raine gives an illustrated lecture on "Alaska, the Frontier Wfonderland of the VVorld." 29-Friday. Messrs. Milligan and Boyd may nnd themselves in the coop any time now. 30-Saturday. I-lallowe'en and Migration Day combined. VVC trekked to Otterbein and found them all "wet." Another victory to the tune of 12-O. NOVEMBER, 1926 1-Monday. The Villagers frolic on the Main Street. 2-Tuesday. Flagpole Hill decorated by the furniture of the luekless inhabitants of the village. 4-Tlmrsday. Freshman Sabbath School VVeiner roast. 5-Friday. Donald Francis Tovey of the University of Edinburgh gives recital on Beethoven. 6-Saturday. Muslzingum steam rolls Kenyon 39-34. 'l.'hat's football, not basketball. F. A. D. Mothers' day, 8-Monday. Faculty reports "action" on rules. 9-Tuesday. Students vote dissatisfaction on existing rules in special student for um. What good will it do? 10-VVednesday. Home Economics exhibit in Montgomery Hall. 11-Thursday. A big day-llresident's Day, Armistice Day, with a special chapel. "Curtin" Lecture in the evening. 12-Friday. We "downed" Denison Z2-13. Muskie harriers undefeated. 13-Saturday. No game, so it must be Cambridge or Zanesville. l-l-Sabbath. Monthly chapel service. 16-Tuesday. Student Forum. Plans for l4fome Coming discussed. 17-VVednesday. Y. M. Cabinet elections. 257 XX Qx X XQXX J X? e sfsy i a -I j!- fttlf ffliltl I ? f VA ..,, - ,, 4.. , -Y NAV 19-Friday. The Homecomers start to pour into town. Pep meeting and show in the evening. 20-Qaturday. Home-coming day with all of its crowds and events. Muskingum is Conference champion by ClCl:C?ll111g Marietta 27-6. 21-Sabbath. More "foul" at the Dormitory. ZZ-Monday. A championship holiday. Ohio State coaches give their congratulations in mass-meeting. Faculty has open house Z-l-Vtfednesday. Students with a little bit of foresight leave for home on saved cuts. 25-Thursday. Turkey Dayf Dinner at Brown Chapel. Busses for neighboring cities crowded. 26-Friday. Coaches Lange and Stone given "M" sweaters. 27-Saturday. Many empty seats in classes. 29-Monday. 30-Tuesday. ' DECEMBER, 1926 1-VVednesd'ay. The Student Chest folks are "in there driving" again. 2-Thursday. Men try out for Debate Team. The school represented at Ann Arbor by Woocly Clark and at Ohio U. by Ralph Cannon. 3-Friday. The Freshies feel natural and at home during their "Kid" Party at the Chapel, 4-Saturday. The students enjoy Richard Dix'5 latest picture because they get a "Quarterback" 6-lylonday. Roy Chapman Andrews gives illustrated lecture on the Mongolian Ex- pedition. 8-Wednesday. Y. M. and Y. W. meetings. 10-Friday. Choral Society and Glee Clubs render the "Messiah" before a large aud- ience. Lange wants stronger supporters for the team, and Reed Clark makes a plea for a "solid girls' section" at the Gym. ll-Saturday. Four girls leave for a short vacation. Muskie "Basket Ears" trounce Antioch 51-8. 13-MOnday. VVeaver Bible reading contest finals held in Brown Chapel. 1-l-Tuesday. The Dormitory girls "at home" to students and faculty. Some of the younger male visitors were not so rrluch at home. 258 15 VVu1ncsdx3 C11l1S1l11'l AsQou'mon Mcclmg 16 Thuxscliv lhc '-.Lore 11 C'1p1t 11 xx ms 38 31 XV1111 1111 1X1:1.1S1x1CQ out on top 17 F1'1d'1X A11 1.11lI1LfN must Stop to m 1110 w'1y fm the wmtcr moms f N QNX I mi ggil A 1 fm' S K 5111 Q 111711 ri 011 5 ODBC 4+ JANUARY 1927 Clnlstllme 13 ll11's1.0l111l11 mp NI11S1x1I1gl1I11 '33 1'1LII17 Housn 97 A1US1II'l.,11111 37 VV lVIlC'w1J111g NIllS1x1l1g,ll111 ZZ Duqucsxm Z1 3 Mondlv Ixuyong 111 mstcc up 10 V mr mxmus to s 111 11,111 111 wmxm 1-luucluy Students 'xg un pusgnl nl Clusw Wcc111Lsc11y C1'll'IS1l L11 Assoumons get togctlxu once mom Nl1l1I'i13.V 11LQC1'l1LltlUll of R uneo md 1111. Muslmgum 111 LS our the 9 111Ll11x NXl'l1.1Lll up Huclullnug Qqu 111 -H 6 Mondw Mmv xkxleu 111L Ldx mt LQT, of thc qood me on the lakn 'lucscliy 11m 1.x111'w1x1Ci 1'11e mm Dawlon Umx C,l'wl1y -11 19 'llnunsdmy Ohm U 18 the ne xt NlL1ll11 by the SCOIC 29 77 1 111L1'u SLIIIUI C1155 plwcnis MQ wcond p1 u 111g 1 xdg flom the Cl 15 bflturclwv f.ll1Ll1111ll1 U IS smgessful 111 stopplng our vx 1.111018 lt ClI1C1'l1I1cl.1.1-13 21 1! Mondwy 1X'IllS1x111L,l1ll1 -1-1 Xl'l1lOC11 24 15 'luudu Mums studcnls 'lppc 11 ll1Dl1b11l. rec1l11 Ill Bmw 11 Ch apel v9 -- J Q z n :'. ' :-' -1. - ': .,, " 1 1 "z L'-7 ' X ' . - '13, .'. 1' 1 ' 1' 'x - A 1 . ' fl' Q Wifi I 'EL Q, ' iii f 7 ff - , ' ,wif 1 1 v W1,gf,119f, 1 5: U Q5f-11,5 2:6 Q fit ,ui 1' -fffrw ' g, 1 75' 23. Xixfg .3 V ,-,i.1 n --,Q K1 4541-QL 1' 'E e ,--T- . 5' . 5 ' gk : -7- ,f, 2 :fl Y "M f--J J' 4, V 'Wx 1 MX ...hi . g f! , 14. - , 1. A1 - I ,- -A 1' 1 AH. H V 1' Qc' gf - zu .i 121. Y ff' T T ' '- - 1 .. . .. K-, Q., ZHA -2 '1 1, z 1: 5 :tr -'Q' ' '1" g, - " f. Q Jfjz' 1 5- 2 . 'L fa ' 3 1' Aj ' 1' '. 8-I: V. La 2 " "X : .I Vit". ' fi' f fr: H 'F ,,,' ., . Z 'Qu- 1O-f fz ,:':": av: 'z zuf " L " 11-' .'.'. f .Q '-. 13-" . 7 " ' Q ' --. -1- 1-' Q"' --Q zj,"f'-,Q f - '-Sz". .-1 T' -' 1' 5 ' .' " -' fz-" 'sz 1' A .- . 7- 2 C '. .' " Q' -, I ' . 8-' 1: 5 J fi" " ' ' ' 1 . Zf 19-Wednesday. -Muskies defeat Kenyon at their home by the score of 43-26. Doc warns the boys against excess brimming. 20-Thursday. 1, Alvin Orr of Pittsburgh speaks in chapel. 21-Friday. Our undefeated football champions of the Ohio Conference receive their gold footballs. 22-Saturday. "Fat" Mo0rc's Ford got hot. He didn't know whether to let it burn or not. Moral: Know if your insurance is paid up. Tests begin. Arthur Kraft. ffiff-ifff . VMITQ 'LT B ,-,,, xlxjl X ll 4? 5' QXC3' l , ff, "Ziff X Po X xqjox 'igyrvl Q X25 , , ytmo , li? WV :4Hff, L Ni of We -is Q RN", 'Wi w- A . I -.1-Q- .if -7 -l W' ,- il pfrfm , A h-- 2 E 57 "ff 1, it -Em ' GY-PW ' i 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29. Tests, tests, and Nothing else. 29-Saturday. Muskingum again beats Ohio U. at Atlfns 37-32. 31-Monday. No classes. Y. M. and Y. VV. Circus at Brown Chapel. Much confetti consumed. FEBRUARY, 1927 1-Tuesday. The proverbial ground hog saw his shadow. 2-Wednesday. Student forum. 3-Thursday. - 4-Friday. Big Bob Ballantyne leads chapel. College Crchestra plays. Muskingum 41, Baldxvin-Wallace 27. 5-Saturday. We beat Otterbein 37-22. 6-Sabbath. Rev. Robinson of Wheeliilg speaks at Monthly Chapel. 8-Tuesday. Bob Ballantyne proves his ability as a dog-catcher in chapel, 260 VVLd111sc1ax N111 Qoncurd 11NNl1NDCOD1C and Students ex111b1t 111e11 1111111nc11111g co11r'1gL by 1lC"l1l11 11111 1111, 1,11ss H11 V1C'u1 of 1011 I1 T1111rQ111y M11Q1 1111511111 11111 1501118011 c1Lb1tLrs 1111211 111 pre :e'1sor1 contest 1 7.111es1111e F1-1d1y Doe '1T111OL1l1CC5 11111 one of 1111: co cdr, 10Q1 her drese 11 the Mld 51111151121 Frohc 11 Wai 1 111111 '111"11r 111 111 1 Leif Q111r1L1 p1o.C,r1m 5111111111 VVe mme 111f11e 1I'Ol1111l, D'1w1o11 U -1129 1-1-Mond IV l11e 11119 out of 1111 1311b11v.s 11110 jux1111es 11Qe1f for thc 11151 111110 A five 1001 111114: Q11a11 10111111 wcsl of 101111 DC111 11Ol1QC W1r111111g X 1 0 111 af I Wg! L B W1 M I11. 1 Q 'if- 'lucidu 1XI'1x 10 N exp11111s our ww11111 of p111J11111v 111 Qludent 101-11111 The 15 11111 1J1'L,il.I119 M111Qt111 1 L11OCN 1111 11111 111c11 HIC per11111ted to re111a111 111 sc11oo1 '11111rs111v 1Ve 111 11 h11lIL111. -19 23 1qr1d11 91111 OI11f71lL11 Ccmlul 11C1C1 11e1e 1-1:1111 C1y1111 1'11LQ 11111d place D11111311 Snxtette bro 1c1e1sts 110111 CO1111Tl1D1lH WAIU B11L711'd 1JCQ11'1Q S11ur111y NV1 stop 01111111111 11 Wes1111111L 57 77 NVQ zcccpt t11e1r 1n111at1o11 10 S11v 411 11011112 B111f'11d e011111111ew 8111131111 Doc ODCITS 11011 01110111111 s l1"l c11'1p11 QCIXICC N1o11c1aV lxev R 1x 11111188 s11r1s 1115 11111 111 11101111115 at 6 30 Tuudxy W1S11111,:1Ol1S B1r111c11x and Fl fl111 11o11d1v for 111e Qchool The Lf1:l1S1xlCS tmtc smut ru enge 111 dc1L11111g Dl1Cll1LSI1C here 30 18 I11d'1x T111 Men Q Cleo Club 11111s 1111111 111111 IH 111e S111e Contest held at 01110 51116 L1IlIVL1SI1,j 114-011C11V Ixc11yo11 Q smlp IS 1c111mec1 bv 1111 111l1s1x1C B'1s1xe1 towers lhe Score V115 33 .18 261 f - 1. ' Q ' " 1. - 1, 111- . 1 '. ' .c' 'g' 1 , ' ': ' 1 1 J A ' , -11 ' 11-1'c..". fc: -1' ,K ' '-AJ" , '. " ff, ':s'1? 1 1 'Du . 1 12-"2 ' ' ' 't' gf- . 1 'N1 f 1-. " cu - - -' 1- " ' ':" '. ' ' ' ' '. - ' 'z A . 1- ' 5 if . C . 1 . 1 'T,i3"T"3 1 Q7 ' 111 '1 X 'f 1. ,f7 ,71 11" 1 ' ' I 1 ' 1 V 1 I 11 ' . ' 1 11 F . , u, A, 4 X .,f 5: 71 ffl! ' 1 1-1 1X,y 7' 1 s ' " ri-11 N ff "1 X "Like ij!! A 11f ff., in f ' 1 1 ' 11' I .X .7 1 ll ,519 2 'Sf ', ' ' I , P f F11 1 ., 1 ,.",,,, .... X4 4 If , 13 ,x 1?,.' 15- ' 1.1 Iggi .' 1' i T "' ' . . 17-' f Az z"'-'z - . ' 19-ff 2 '. ' 1 .' g 'A -' :V 1 ,M--. f 1 2 ' ' ' 20-fi 1 . . 1-.14 1 1' 1 1 , . 21-11 -. 7 . , . '. 9 'c'.',i 5: ff' -Q A -' ff ' :. , 1 22- 1: 2 . 1: ' 0' " zj fe, - . ' " 25-I-'Q-fi , fn , A '. C-1' C - ' .. 2 28- , z.. ' ' '.i . '. ' ' Y J 5" . f - , " K , ft - -4 1 - 1. I 41541- 1 t 5 - Q 5' llttt 1 gg i Y?" MA Q X x Q 2.5 .,- 1-X' - .V ' ? 3 MARCH, 1927 1-Tuesday. Men's Glee Club Concert at Zanesville. 2-Wednesday. Doctor Kelsey bids us goodbye before he sails, He plans to cease following "bells?" 3-Thursday. High School Tournament guests begin to arrive. -I-Friday. First day of the High School tournament. The debate teams meet Mar- ietta and llluffton. Both of our teams win their arguments. 5 Saturday. We defeat Reserve 35-38. just another Conference Championship. 7-Monday. Holiday declared to celebrate our winning the Ohio Conference Champ- ionship. 9-Wednesday. Y. M. and Y. VV. elections held. ll-Friday. Pledging day For clubs. Mount Union and Ohio Northern are defeated in debate. Both -our negative and affirmative teams are Conference champs. 13-Sabbath. Monthly chapel. 14-Monday. Week of social hygiene leeturesis inaugurated. 15-Tuesday. Fort Maddy wins inter-fort basketball laurels. X 262 fs My 5' , ,, W!WIWl IWlWIW WE 14-2 1 5' , ff' K. ..f' My 6 4 . Q -h K 5 ,I 3 , ln El 1 . Mlost college professors have a fairly big lineg in many, we notice that it's mostly waist- me. PAGE MISS SHAVER! Je suis bon Nous sommes bonbons Tn es bones Vous etes bonbonnieres Il est beans ' Ils sont bon ton Prof. Dejong: VVho were the writers of the Publius Papers? Bill Lynn: Hart, Schalifner and Marks. Said a nifty young' nian from the city, "To prohibit 1'll say is all clippy, I'll clanee when l choose, my rep I will lose." So the girls all thought him quite spiffy. Prof. McKirahan: Now who can tell me why man is superior to woman? Lois Leeper: I suppose he is superior because woman was marle from one of his spare ribs. Nit: Can you tell me the scientific names for the members of the sheep family? Slink: Yea. Rain the old man, Darn thc old-lady, and lamb the kicl, WELL!!! Reed Clark fln one of his Chapel speeehesj: At the next game we are going to have a mens section and a solid girls section, so be sure and get into your right sections. 264 I 525 f-39999 4 Urchin: kiugum? Bob B.. S. l Hoy! llud ain'l you Bob Ballzmtyne, the guy that plays football at Mus No, my 11211110 is Smith, your thinking of my brother John Ballanlyne. VVe sigh over thc fate of Harold Bell, He told the Cop Lo go to-thunder. 265 r: wg, WLQL QLASQIDILD AQ DOGQ AQQ f-J f HAaQug.9s! 7' T L AD DOG- MCFQEXNQWM AX! Q - 0 0' ab"'7Q Q4 QE? dlllm- 2 X ' 1 f Msg 41 X , 'gf Qi ILL ' DITZfff M Q 'ff' Fifi The New Concord Fire Department was called out at Z olclock. They hastened to the scene of the fire, and aided wonderfully toward the further spread of the fire. Apples, oranges, imported nuts, fruit-cake. Come in now and avoid the rush. The early bird gets the worm.-Ohio paper tgrocei-'s adv.j ---------- ---------- quick lunch for hainhurgers and soft drinks. B. and M. G. McConagha: l'!l take the blame, for it was my car. Dean Jamison: Ah, my boy that spirit warms my heart to you. Say fellow, how come you flunked your Geology? Oh. I didn't know my rocks. She was only a telephone operator, But she sure had some lines, Prof. Ralston: Suppose you were called to attend a patient who had swallowed a heavy dose of oxalic acid, what would you administer? Bright Student: The sacrament. "Give me a sentence with the word Ivory in it." "l've a re-exam to take in Math." Once someone said, "Faith, 'Hope and Charity begin at homef' Hut this is another thing. Our Deans and reformers should not try to deceive the public longer about love, They have no love, They do not know the thrill a kiss may give- There are many kinds of kisses. There is a kiss -only a Valentino can give. Then there is a Ben Turpin kiss. Don't be a Ben Turpin. Take Physical Culture. Love is a wonderful thing. Wfhere would Bill Ogilvie be without it today? lNhere would Louie be? I leave the answer to your imagination. Love keeps the world going 'round l.ove is what young men think of in the Spring- VVitl1 many compliments to the B. and M. 267 if A 5 llll N S . . at Q Portrait of loyal co-cd l:llllTl5 student chest A Tragedy in Four Acts Act, 1. Act ll. Act Ill Act IV. Craln. Exam. Flunlc. Trunk Kate K.: You'vc been wearing XfVl1at's the reason? :L rather pCt.l1ll?ll cxpncs-non on your fact, lately llill Timmons: Oh, yes! I've been trying to look llle my photogriph for the N uscoljuan. The 'LlUIT13.l'l'S motto is "Don't shoot until you sec the rcen of thur monc , 1 . Y Prof. Dunlap: 'What's the slogan of at well lnown IJlOClLlCl'J Pete: Chcsterllclds, "They Szttisfyl' Neff: Say, why do all of the dates at the Dorm qo mto thc prlxate dlfllflg room before they part for the night? Giffcn: To get accustomed to the dark my bov "Coach Lange sure is some conversationalist 191111 he "HQ ought to be, he spent the whole fall SlfC1'lglIl1CIl1Ilg hls lmc 2 68 Q -4, 11,1-s f-"Q ujube L11 Q get 1'111l1IC.C1l 1qu111ey Fmel VVl1o1l 11'1ve 11S A College Man s So111oquy To gut, or not to cut tl1'1t 19 1111 CjL1L,N1101l ll1Ctl1Cl 11 IS uoblu 111 the 111111d to suffer 1116 '3llI1L,Q 11111 IIIUWQ ol' Oll1.l'1QCd P10 S O1 to txke 311118 lg 1111 1 1 floelx of r.l'1Q5eQ And by cuttmge 1111ss 1llL1ll2 fo cut to Qlecp A11 md by slccp to su we wmpe F1116 111141 1cl1e 11111 thc 111o11s111cl 111111141 Shocks 111.11 Hesh 15 l1P11 to t1s 1 COI1S1.1II1l1.1OI1 Dewoutly to be wlshcd lo L111. to sleep A Freshman Novel CHAI, l LR I Who IS the 111111 001111115 tl11oual1 the cloo13 'HL 1s the Doetor 'll11Q IS tl1e wont 11111655 We l'l'lVC Seen Xu Hou cm 1111 Bov L1 NrVLll now? the Doetm wks M11111 110W the Boy IN Muna IS Cryma 1111, 1JOCtO1 vlys l1e e111 Hx 1l1e B03 CHAP1 ER 11 The Doctor Hxcd the Boy l ast Q11111111c1 when Mme 13101111 NX 15 Xlgltlllg 111 the counlrv 5111. bcmme xuv much '1la.r111ed at the approwch of 1 C011 She w'1Q loo f11Dl1te11ed to 11111 'md Ql11l1111g 1er parasol at the 21111111211 she Q 11d 111 1 xuy stun tone L15 1101111 911 lm doxxnl C1g'11'Lt1L rules md '1 585120111 ot SDICQ Mal-105 college bows Qte1ltl1y and '1dept 11 l1c1, 269 - 119 .. ': h '-1'- ' 1."' "' 1' 1: 1'.f j . ' I" . - : 1' . - ' 1 - .? , . ' Z f 1 lr' ': " , A 3: . . ' uk' 'E ' z'1 ' g'zg':'s,:' -' . . - , , 4 . . , .c" . c .' 1. -z - 2 - :z 1 " . ,, ' .5 .1 ,.- Q I . . , , ., . 1 , . , , , , f' . . . , ' 1 . , . , To sleep: perclmnce to 1l1'ea111: ay, thats the stuff. MT , C ' U- - n' 1 -1 '- ': . 1 - ' 'K 'i lv -b - . . . 1. V , :. 1- ' .' -f. J ' ,- J 1 '2 .' '. , , , J K . 1'-jk - 1 :Z rl' ' ' ' 1 - , 2 1 C 1 -.1- . - . 1 2 f. .. '-'O' .1 ' ,. .f" 'l ' 1 -f- I 1 v:-- x' 1' ll 'X ' --K lx v U , , 'ec c . ' , . , . ' K J J 1-Z C -'rj 'A- fs, . . 5,-, .V U 5 L L ,A ,f Mg, 6 I .t ' I - -L ft? lgllx .ll gt .. L' ll , f rf' ,Q l ' UU ' I ,fur it V .: .t.c1u gQ,x CD Q , - qu ilt: I H3 .. 45 g Hoosier: Now over there are the polo liehls- Sweetheart: Xfvhilt could bc more lovely than a held ol' waving polo! Short Stories Date, Glance, Chill, Cat, Late, Dance, Ill, Pat, Debate, Entrance, Pill, Polecat, Gate. Romance. Kill. lywhew. Chapel Speaker: I at the bottom. A recitation a day Keeps the Hunks away. want to leave this thought with youg it is always best to start Disgusted Junior: Is that so? VVell I only wish that you would lct mc teach 'ou how to swim, 5 Prof: That map won't do. Stewdent: Why? Prof: You forgot to mark Chicago in red ink. Mugwunlp: The roommate that sleeps in the middle of the bed. Never put off today That which you have to put back on tomorrow. Moral: Never take your socks off when you go to bed. 270 egvx V N l i vw xx qilfglllm ' -ZYWIIIM 1246: ' i? 'TZ ll fiiiif A. Magi..-. 'QSSAX Nt, ' I Q - Co: XfVant mc to take your picturc? Ed: Not by a dam site! Miss licboch: Explain the origin of thc cxprcssions, "Down stage" and "Up stagclf was up and clown. "This is simply kilning mc" remarked one baking brick to anotlier, Wl1at's a college professor? HQ's the person at the college that is given the rust of thc money alter thc athletic coaches are paid off. Student: Tl1c1'c's a man to sec you, sir. l'rofCsso1'2 fwho lmsn't paid his bills.j Tell him 10 talsc a chair. Student: Hui has sir! llc has taken all of them, :mtl is carrying the piano away now. HC's from thc t'u1'nilurc company. Dean Cleland: Cin thc last class ol the scmcstcr in cconomicsj. Are tlicfrc any questions? Voice from thc rear of room: Yes, what's it all about? For Salcz A folding bed by a lady, that doubles up and locks like a piano. 271 .Lois Looper: In the lilizabctlian Ago, thc audience was in tiers, and the stage 24, , 1 a, -sgnqlc do g f ,gg 4 , , 1 X 'ii fr05sU4 Rim? W ff 'gg K , if Hai N -sd Delia L1 L a +, We mgn :Lanai h rougk f 1'-A bf' .f f . -1. ,WA ' P!-U-HX' J' X " Y, 21569 fa.Q,1l1j1 P1CmC.5 ' ' QM 5 s .i , Ai: Ngg-v:f " :g1 g.,2QS' K K. 272 ' 'FOIC STUTZ 'fixes Q: hg had it f Pd f M ll 4 ' x ! , N W' lui ? -X 2 X F X Q , - DU6WIS6m6 W7Eiish to express our appreciation to you who i1aw7e played such an im- portant part in time Publication of the H928 Muscoijuan. We are thankful for your efforts in our behalf, and we hope you will be repaid 'for your loyal support. Students of Muskingum, you will do well to patronize our adw7ertisers---they are your friends. THE STAFF 2 Kdlnhex in Cghfzertrsers 1 1Xl'lilf'1HL11LH Xihluxc Supplv Q0 111 ILXVLIIQ S10 u 1 1 S cu B11 C1 Brcmd Co Inucu Tuulq Sion 11111111 md XILILC1l111 Qowl c I uh mdx C0111-R.CtILJl'ICIV Emu Sum Suop X I 0 Cllllh 111 md 5lO1llllI1l1l Lwmbud Cluthm Q unbucl In 1 Clfllbllfl L Nux L ugy ml o D1 Homu VV Cutox Lumix LI 13lL1L Stow y 1 udx m om 11 1 1 xtxu Cox s Ntudm mx 5 ILL Txuom ul s Dummy 1 lu I n lntarpnw Ln op 0 1 11lC,I"lJll'-C, 111111111 Tim fnsl11u11 SIIODIJL 1ll'fl N 111111111 I2 nl I 11 uulxx Su Cnult L. D u Stou 1 um I 11111113111 C :num L. Sll1dXNlLll Qhoppu Cnmlnsu L'llIllC11X Hlrtlu Compmv 1-Lldlm C C M T5 Hc1H Iona TI Tx Cmclx Cc Hou dl s 1,111 Qturg TIlllLl1l':OI1 Lmdv Co 111111 md Ollxu Tha lcffmxmum lhg olmwn I lpcr Co lxlO5kl s G1OCCl3 I ICI H1 Vlux RQ xlty Co I 111L11th1l md Qons XI ul ul l'ulo1 S 1015 NILLQL Tungh Mello Goldxxxn P1ciu1w Xloomq md Russ Hd-Ignxx s Tuvdq S1010 UCI-Iuux s Shun Stow Noble Lumbu C0 S1111 Noblu 1 L D1 lttsbulbh lhcolo 1111 bum luoudhl md Bmnclt lxxl'w10I1 Bfubm Shoppy Iwd 5111 r1l3.1lNDOI'tlfll1l1 Co Ind IxxylllO11d md Co lQ1L.ll'11dSllI1 fcwphv Robclw md Co 51111 Btod um s Sturtu 'ml s Sunnv S 1 mllny md ful mdt I1 xcn C11 ocug VVWLSO11 Q Ch thm Stow XVebcr S 'NV1ll111xLm lei Ixoom Xemm Thuvlo 1c'1l Qc'm1n'11y I lx Nou Y P' 1 Ar V' '. ' V21 f " 1' .,,.1,..1...... H- A .- ". 2 j fm, ...... ---------- I - '- ,f U 'T . .1,.,.......... 6 1' 'Q ' g , ' ' ..... ------- Alle' 's . ': - 'f rc ............ 13 ' ' "2 , . ---------,- Il:1il""'s D 'l Qt' 'Q ............ --- 7 -1 I- . ......... ------- I. G. Hair Cu. ......,............. 4 1 A '2 .,.... ---------- Az Q ' , -1 if . ..........,,...... 10 M ' J S 32 . ....... A- J. H N f- " f' ': .............. 7 Y ' . ff' ' ' f ------------- 3 1 I L' ' f . CJ. .... 12 .' Q' g '- f 'z . -------- 3 1 3 - ' -V ........... 4- I V 'z 2 .. .' ..... --H----- , x fl ,,,,,,,,-- M ,,,,- Z2 LJ 2 -4 -.Tl ------------ D11 A. V. 3 yd ...........,...... 9 J' ? ' 'I Y. ' ................ --- : ' 2 z Q ' X .......... 29 ' ' - ' 'Q' ' -------- 7. A' gc . ' g Co. ........,- 4- if I 'ff ............ --- 'z " ge F ml Co. .,,.,...,... 6 if 'A ' 'fi , ' ' ' ------ fx " ' - 's 'o. ..1.......... 6 N X f ' " ----H---H Czv an C1 .................... S -.---.--- ---0 ' '. X . .15 ' ............ 14 ff ' ' -...--..-...... ------ ': 'Q - Ag- Q -f .....,....-..., 9 Vzgt firy ............. .. ...... - Ben Chicga, :md R1-0, ,,,-,---,---,- 6 P3.1'lllTlOl1l1l 1.,iCllIl'CS ............ Clr'ss11zu1's H: ' vars ...... , . ..... 7 I" 'ff ' ' iz G f 'um' C1 l ': :mc St 'und Thu: .... 23 7 ' ' 2 , .. . ' ' ..... ------ 7..".' Q ' ................,..... 24 'I 5 . 1 ' ' I 1 --------- C..":"-2 ' .................. 8 'N ".- 3 2" .--- D ff: ' -' ' -'j ..,,.,1,............ 19 'FW 72 2 . -,---,-- VVzI '- 31 glisll ......1,.,..,.,,,,. I3 " '- C ' Q' 'f -h ------- ---,H i 2 ".1 ' 7 f . C . ............ IS .- , 1 , ..,,,.,,,,,,. -,, 2 ' "' ' Q CO. ........... 22 A. E, 'Q " Co. ..,..,1.. -,------ , ' 123 ' S ' .............. 9 fr: 'Q .-1.........,,.-... --- 7' z " 2 ' Z1 c ............1. 19 ,f xff "5 ,,-,,,,,-..,,, nu-, fi I ' " f"J1'C ......--........ 7 Q V 'J' .........,.... w--------- '- I' 2 f " .......1..1.... 14 "2 2 2 ', z .......... --- Cl' H ' CO. .1............ 19 " 'z X K' ' 1 ' f .............. -,,- Q" Q2 V' K ' ........ 7 . , , if ' , 'b ,,,,,,-- ' " .' fj 1 '.' .,.,...,,,,,-.,, 9 f 1 ', ------,g-qA,--HM4.-, ---- 2. "j 1 , .........11,..1. 12 I ' Q' T' , "- 1,---- Au-, 1-z . . ..11....,,... 13 I n x . , A ' L- U-- .H ' T-, H ...............,...... 15 Ill: V. '. 7 ng ......,..... U-- 3 B. 8: E. RICHARDSON On the Square Jewelry ancl I Forget-Me-Nots I I5 W. St St. Cambridge, Ohio Diamonds, jewelry and Watches ,-f- "ti ...-4.5 -:fficz-igj QL. 1- f.,, iQ'fsE7l9'2?S5 -Q 'Rf' nk. ' i.vJ'gg.1-:ga I 9:4 'JF -fl-A I Yes, we carry Watch glasses in stock at all times. Oclcl shapes and all We Do Repairing Caoocl Clothes 6 For Men and Young Men 'fi The Cambridge Clothing Company When You Think of FURNISHINGS FOI' the l"lOITlC Remember "You'll Do Better at Bains' J. C.. BAIR COMPANY 927 E.. Wheeling Ave. Bohandy Company Confectionery All Kinds Home Made Candies Ice Cream M. gf! 'av ' I Phone 3628 624 Wheeling Avenu CAMBRIDGE -:- OHIO CAMBRIDGE, OHIO When the Students crowd into the Movie at Brown Chapel, you just know it's n O Q N n ian? Paramount Picture If its a Paramount Picture, it's the best show in town ATHLETIC EQUIPMENT College Students Whatever the sport, our complete stock assures you prompt service The Athletic: Supply Company l726-28 N. High Street, COLUMBUS, OHIO COpp0site Ohio State University? Cambridge News Co. Ben Chiesa S5 BYO- -'1 For Best Line of M . Books aciiiizggziionery O R IE S ' ' L'b . Clrculafgf mfg Fruits and Vegetables 52l Wheeling Avenue - Cambridge Ohio CAMBRIDGE, OHIO Cambridge Floral Company Flowers for All Occasions West Pike PhO7'1e 44-A Cambridge, Ohio 6 uaI1ty JeweIry Lowest Prlces ohn Bauer eweIry Store Jeweler Optzczan GUY C F ITZ M II h Clock and Watch WATCHES Repazrmg JEWELRY RA C FICAL HARDWARE yrh gl Atl: tgC Lzkely Luggage Marzetta Paznts B 0 s c h Ra d z os THE HOUSE OF SERVICE CLOSSIVIAN S Z nesv1IIe Oh1 GRIIVIIVI S SANDWICH SHOPPE The Lzttle Store Wzth th Bzg Welcome FASHION S Latest Footwear cREAT1oNs IVICHENRY S SHOES OF DISTINCTION Il h BAILEY S ON MAIN B TOILET ARTICLES SODA WATER LUNCI-IES E ythgfht G dDg1 h St ZANESVILLE OHIO Q' Q I -at- ffhe I i .I J Ever in n In e ic and Across from Court House Spor in oods Zanesville - - - Ohio . 534 1 ain Street Zanesvi e, O io , DIAMONDS . . 4 a , 'O g 7 7 ZI6 IVIain St. Zanesvi e, O io 9 . . Q I Is a Good Place Io uy A d r in a a oo ru S h New Concord -P Ohio B tween 5th and Bt re t 7 Casey ZS: Co. 31,52 OOTWEAR GJ? cambridge, ohio lr jewelry Brings Success 1- NXXXXHIII IXW 5,5 genesis Y ROB WW' Zanesville Ohio GOOD CLOTHES AND Correct Furnishings of the Better Class .l 27 Years of Honest Value Criven Truth The "Facts Qnlyn to Buy Always Fred Raymond Sr Co. Cambridge, Ohio 3? College Cabin Tea Room The only eating place in New Concord that is exclusive, catering to the elrment in the school that is interested in art and lit- erature. lt lives up to the ideals of Muskingum College, as there is no loaiing and there is no tobacco of any kind sold or used on the premises. The sole qualification for its cus- tomers is that they must be ladies and gen- tlemen. The service is good as you get in any small community, and the price charged is adjusted to meet the pocketbook of the average student. The proprietor is E, R, Cox-you know him. He has nothing to do with it except to see that every one gets a square deal. He will listen to both com- plaints and compliments of the customers in the best of spirit, in fact criticisms and sug- gestions froni the patrons are invited. Get the habit early of patronizing the Tea Room -it's strictly American. The College Caglri Opposite lhe College Cox's Photographic Studio---2nd Floor THE C t I FASHION sHoPPE GH fa Colonial Bldg. 608 Wheeling Ave. D g CAMBRIDGE, OHIO Specializing in Ladies' and Misses' Coats, Suits, Dresses and Millinery oi the better kind at Lower Prices Cor. 7th St. and Wheeling Ave. CAMBRIDGE, OHIO The Guernsey Laundry Quality, Service Since 1900 For the next Coat or Dress See Phone 2210 420-422 N. Sth St. F Cambridge - - Ohio H.-K. CANDY COMPANY 504 Wheeling Ave., Cambridge, Ohio Distributors of MORSE'S CHOCOLATES DR. A. W. BOYD Brutini ee Central Nalional Bank Building CAMBRIDGE - - Ohio The Wilkinson Tea Room Miss Wilkinson lnvites The Faculty, Students and Alumni of Muskingum to Dine with Her Telephone 2879 Comer Wheeling and Ninth CUpstairsJ CA MBRIDGE - - Ohio Q... Be Guided by This Store For Fashionable Attire To be served well-to be confident that your selections are fashionable as the present day styles indicate-shop here for everything in "Ready-to-Wear" including Shoes and Millinery, Great values in dependable merchandise are offered men. women and children in their 'respective departments. Thus Starr Attire not only inspires confidence in you-but it is eco- nomical to buy. Tl-IE A. E. STARR CCD. Ready-to- Wear for Men, Women and Children ZANESVILLE, OHIO Ask For I, Makes Brown and Brain The Baker Bread Company ZANESVILLE, OHIO Visitors are always welcome. Come and see it made. You will eat more. We are always pleased to show you through the plant 10 qtliitshurglr 'Qlhenlugiral Seminzxrg You were wise in choosing Muskingum, a School of your denomination, as your college. Be as wise in choosing your Seminary. Choose Pittslxurgli and you will be grateful for your choice. 1624 have made this choice. If you like the Muskinguin crowd, come to Pittsburgh Sem- inary where you will find more Muskingum graduates than any other one spot in the world. There were 21 here from M. C. in N326-27. WHY CHOOSE PITTSBURGH History-lt has 'l02 years. of successful and nolile history. Locationflt is located in the heart of United l'reshyterianism. Standards-'lit ranks seholastieally among the hrst in the country. Instruction-There are hve full time professors, three instruc- tors, and special lecturers. Curriculum-SA complete Tlieologieal course ot Highest Stand- ard. Lihrary-A' good one, comprising 15,000 volumes. Degrees-'l'he 'l'h. B. and Th. M. are granted. University Atiiiliationflhe Seminary has affiliated courses With the University of Pittshtlrgll, leading toward the M. A., M. S., and Ph. D. degrees. Prizes Qftered-Six are given to the third year men totalling 514300. 'l'hree are given to the third year men totaling Scholarship-One ol' 214800 is given each year providing' a fourth year Study abroad. Expenses-Tuition and room Zll'C free. Board at cost in eating club. Advantages for XVork-'lihere are many apportunities atliorded by the ."Xlleg'heny Y. M. tf. the Heinz House, The First Church Community House, etc. Pastoral assistantships and many opoprtunities for preaching are to he had. Financial ."Xid-livery hrst year man receives linancial help from the Seminary. The Board of Education provides further Financial assistance to those who need it. Cultural :Xdvantages-which Pittsburgh all'orcls are ot great im- portanee. Social fellowship among' the men is of the highest type. lf vou want a thorouffh traininaf for the ministry come to Pitts- , D Q , 1 burgh Seminary. For catalog-ue and information address President JOI-I MCNAUGHER 6l6 W. North Avenue, S. S. PITTSBURGH, PA. 11 J THE BLOUNT 81 IVIEREDITI-I CO Miners and Dealers In CAMBRIDGE COAL hone R-5 R-I 5 City Phon 3 I-IARTLEY COMPANY Operators of Guernsey County,s Largest PAINT AND AUTO SUPPLY STORE ---: The Hartley Company MBRIDGE OH C. C. Headley, M. D. SPECIALIST Eye - Ear - Nose - and - Throat- Cvmbridge, Ohio Wm. Lilienthal 81 Sons Blank Book Manufacturing Office Equipment Offce and School Supplies Special Ruling 116 E. 8th Street CAMBRIDGE, OHIO Opp. Court House Phone 2197 FI-he I-IUTCI-IISON Candy COITlp81'1y Manufacturing and Wholesale CONFECTIONERS CAMBRIDGE, OHIO Most New Concord Merchants Sell their Line ATKINS, The Jeweler HALLIVIARK STORE Watch and Jewelry Read THE JEFFERsoNlAN The Cambridge Daily for Muskingum College S P ORTS 'SMT' Southeastern Ohio's Greatest Newspaper 1.14. Yoon DEN TIS T CAMBRIDGE, OHIO X-Ray Service Phone 2272 MUSKINGUMS FRIEND Distributors for FINEST W. N. CLARK CO. QUALITY Rochester, N. Y. Prompt Service Walter English Canned Foods Specialist Repairing Fruits and Vegetables Suited to the Use of the Clubs and Forts Cambridge, Ohio Opp. Court House Station E, Box 24 Columbus, Ohio DIRECT SELLING Moores or Ross The Cream of All Creams Serve It and You Please All The Progressive Dealers in New Concord ARE SERVING Moores or Ross Ice Cream and All Creams T. F. GAULT DRUGS Stationery and Toilet Articles NEW CONCORD, OHIO DDS 'RA Y DIAETNJIDSIS HoMER W. CASTOR X' Enterprise Co-Op. Building New Concord, Ohio ' 'An Art Kraft Gift Distiuguishes the Giver' ' The Home of Artkraft Kodak Prints on Velox Paper Greeting Cards Gifts from the world over Kodaks and Cline Kodaks Candles of every size and description Imported Stationery ART KRAFT GALLERIES PICTURES and GIFTS Cambridge-By the Post Office New Concord-College Entrance QUALITY Alsovlz ALL .ix at Herff-Jones Company Deszgners and Manufacturers of School and College Jewelry OFFICIAL JEWELEIRS TO MUSKINGUM COLLEGE 5 Qualify Courtesy Service We cannot refrain from setting out prominently before you, the above three words, because they are constantly be- fore us. We insure you quality and courtesy and we have spent thousands of dollars in equipping our store in order to give you real service. Before you decide where to buy your food products, think what these three words mean. TRACKS Groceries and Meats Phone 4 and 12 New Concord, Ohio "The Yard With the Stock" FOR SERVICE and QUALITY 6359 SEE John L .-Noble Lumber Company NEW CONCORD, OHIO lf AkF PAGE Q Kleen Made BUTTER s or manded for Its Quality History of Another Year ITH real anticipation each year we all look forward to the NEW MUSCOLA ' JUAN. It always has that effort at orig- inality, has the many new faces, the many new events, the ever changing scenes on the OLD CAMPUS. Then to there is the new forward look and the more seasoned judgement of the backward look, with new appreciation of what those of other years have done and are doing. It is truly the YEAR BOOK of all ALUMNI, as well as all students. We have enjoyed serving and growing and changing with the changing years on the OLD CAMPUS. We endeavor to keep apace with the tirnes and needs on the HILL. We fully ap- preciate the splendid business that has been en- trusted to us by the students of the past year and years. We thank you and solicit your increasing patronage. The Enterprise Co-operative Co. 18 TI-IE FIRST NATIONAL BA K NEW CONCORD OHIO Capltal Stock S 50 000 00 Surplus and Undwlded Prohts 35 000 00 Resources over 500 000 00 I.. J GRAHAM Pres E A MONTGOMERY Cashxer W J CRIMES V Pres S D COX Asst Caslner We Appreciate Your Busmess The Mecca Lunch Lunches Short Orders Glenn Plurnblng C0 Sandwzches Ice Cream LICENSED Soft Drmks Hammer s Qualztu Ice Cream Satlsfactlon L O U I S C A RL O S Sanztary and Heatmg Engzneers Phon 86 L s 5K NEW CONCORD OHIO DUFF S CASH GROCERY The Home of the Square Deal GROCERIES and F RUITS Bloomer s Chocolates and N lo al Bsc xtC panys Cakes and Crackers Sludenls Welcome S I DUF BEAUTY Ralston s a d SHOPPE I BARBER Correct Servrce Prompt 12 S Mazn M Wea e R P RALSTON F Be uty Doctor P op t 19 9 - - - y , - , , - - - , , . . , . . . , . . , . . . . , . I . , . Quality-Cleanliness--Service .. ' ' - e - Bu - , 7 ld 'il' TI ! ai n i u' om ' YS. V 1' . . . . a r rie or Radios Auto Supplies Proudfit 81 Barnett H A good grocer is your best guarantee" E. L. STGCKUM High Qualify Dealer In l ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES Fffg'da'Q3jjy55,eg1A2igf1'anfeeS 56-PHONE--56 New Concord - - Q1-,io West End Grocery ancl Meat Market NEW CONCORD, OHIO Don't Forget " SUNNY " The Sludentis Friend You cannot go amiss ln buying a LGT at LJCKING VIEW Prices Reasonable With Easy Terms The Licking Wew Realty Company PHONES: 56liiWf2892-W 2892-I Zanesville. Ohio We always boost for Muskingum College Howell 19 Drug Sfvfe Zanesville, Ohio Your Patronage Solicited EARL C.. MARKERT 'Kustom Bilt Klotlies' at your price and up Afhliated Clothier and F urnisher WEAR WATSON CLQTI-IING MAIN at SIXTH For Cambridge Zanesville ---- Ohio and ZUUQSUHIQ 20 The Red Star Transportation Compan CAMBRIDGE OHIO TAKE THE RED STAR LINE LANESVILLE M1k1n conncctlone for Columbus .bpr111gHeld 'md Daxton Ohlo 6 50 1 untnl West bound 'ar lmxes Ncw Concold malmq connectxon fm Cnbhocton and Columbun every 30 nunutcs from 1 11 6 70 p m Car 1C'1XlI'l5, 10 mmutcs of the hour ind 20 1111111 s nfter he hour Tl en 7 70 p m 8 20 p m Lut c'1r fol Zanesulle wt 10 70 p m 'md 11 3v 13 nm F'uc from New Concord to Zaneswlle 63 cents CAMBRIDGE Malm connectnons for Bmnesxzlle md VVDCCIIIIQ, VV Va New Concord mst bound cflr nukes conncctuon fOl B unesvxllc Vtfheehng, 'md Pl1.tSDL1lg1'1 evc1 hom hom 7 40 1 m uuul 5 40 p m then S 40 10 40 'mud 11 O0 I 'mst c'1r fxom XV11CS1ll"lg 9 0 p m bane from New Concord to Cunbmdge 35 cents CALL CAMBRIDGE OFFICE PHONE 2514 OR HAROLD PASCO S RESIDENCE PHONE 2689 9 4 L J -' U a ' E ' r ' C o - 1 ' - 1 - Cf. 1 V ' ' ' , C M ' ' ' .., ' I. 4. . I... . . 4 f 7' . 1 L13 L. 1 . 1 Z- . ., I . . '.. c ' V Q Z.. . . C Z L . . Q ' Y ' ' ' , ' 1 ' 5 g 1 ' V Z Y, . . p ' 1 c c" ' ' Z' ' ', .fc ' " ' ' ' Z' c. . ' Z" . .f .1 . ' . , ' .fu ., . , . , 1 . . .N 1 1 .'. . . -Q 1 . 1 . -- , I - Y 1 YOUR PRINTING NEEDS FREE FROM THE GRIND of newspaper routine, our whole attention is given to the study and production of good printing - the kind that pleasesg to give you what you want just when you want it. This is a full realization of our Iong felt desire to give our patrons everything that is includedin the word SERVICE The Enterprise Company Co-op. Building Phone 142 New Concord, Ohio KHHQBOYER Electric Shoe Repairing Laces and Polishes East Main Street New Concord, Ohio S!Xh4IWCJBIJ2 Talley 61 Zulandt Everything Hot From Suits to Knickers 631 Main Street Zanesville .0 Ohio M H Q JEWELRY C CDIY S 5 T 0 R E For Quality Between Starr's and Sturdevant's ZANESVILLE : : OHIO The Best Place to Shop in Zanesville is at XVEBER'S I-IOIVIE STORE MAIN STREET Next to the Court House Bgy:K1lCXlEIlT5 For Ladies' and GentIemen's and Save the difference FURNISHINGS KROGERS NEW CONCORD, OHIO - Sa New Concord - - Ohio ARTHUR S. BRITTON, - - Manager The Patronage of Muslclngurn College Students and leaculty Is Thoroughly Appreczated at the COLONIAL and STRAND TI-IEATRE5 C 81 M AMUSEMENT COMPANY Owners FRED E JOHNSON Manager Always cz Good Show XENIA TI-IEOLOGICAL SEMINARY What Xenla Offers Students Now and For 1927 28 A Careful coordmated course of 1nstruct1on sr th lt 11 11'1tt1 L1 sulmjtct IS 1 t11c11tc1 lll one tltp ll t111t11t 15 p11111tllttl111 somt ph lst 111 tht s1111t S1111 jttt 111 t1tl1 otl1t1 tlep 11t111t11t A faculty of s1x regular professors 11111 1 Un1vers1ty Professor 111 111t11t1o11 a 111411111111 111 p111111t NIJCI 111 Thorough tra1n1n 111 EYCb6S1S t11 tt lll 11 ts t1t11 stutltnt 111 1llllL1Jt1'1LlLlll kl17I'LlL1 111 tht 114111 t 1 1 Ex 5 s O1 NL1ll1l 1 L11 L111b111,ot 1nd 11111 11111 1Ll1N 111 Ht111t11 1 xt LSIS Research method of study 11l11t11 tt1t11ts LX Q11 stutltut to use tht Ollglll 11 SOLHLCS mtl stts 111111 f1tc 110111 cltpt11dt11te up 111 Lo111111t11t111t1- A complete course lll B1b11C3.1 Archaeology fttts 1111111 t11t htltl tht 11 t 111tt1p1ttt1 of tht XVo1d Ph11osophy 111 Rehglon Apphect Chr1st1an1ty 11111 Compa1at1ve Study tl lxC11,o1o11s to p1tp11t 111t11 1111 h11ss1o11 111111 t1t1 1 11l1t1t Gymnaslum prwxleges tenms court llltl out IlOO1 ath1et1c ground Opportumty 101 Umversxty 11o1lt 1111 1111151 1110111116 Qllll mtt tt1111s 111t1 tt 5161118 ztductd t111t1o11 For Informatxon Address XENIA TI-IEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 6834 Washlngton Avenue St Louls Mo 93 . 'Ti 1 . . , - , , . ,JJ z : fJC1l1Q'5 2 2' zz - - .yg - A .- 1 ' . 1 z ' s .' " .. Jak gg. "lg" xg' ' -I Zi.-N111-rlm 1-I ' 3 1 1- 111t-' 1 1 1' gt111't-f-1111 vt-z11's111 11't-ck l.'Ci"li5l,', 10 "1 ' Hts- Jrl f z U' 2012 ' - 1.5 5. - -'. -1- .-1-1-1: .-- .11 1 -.3-'Z ,111 ' 1-2, r 1 J 1 'O-f K- , .A . , s sl V ' Y' C ' I tr'2 r es .1 'r' l . . . I ' ! ' .,. ,I ilf31'upl1erg The future of Photography as we see it, is the most astonishing thing in the scientihc world. I fulnlled this prophecy, knowing that I wiil not be here to see some of it, but hope to be able to view it from the unseen world. It will not be long before wireless and photography are linked together. Gnly the other day I saw a photograph that had been sent 5000 miles by wireless and you could scarcely tell the copy from the original. The day is fast coming when any one of you will be able to see the speaker at the telephone-the shipping agent will be able to sit in his office and watch ships plowing through the ocean wavesg by wireless he will hear their S. O. S. and by photography will read tl1e nature of their trouble. Photography will some day record our illnesses, and will diagnose the seat of the troubleg the microbc will be used in connection with the cineniatograph, and the antics of germs will be recorded. Pliotograpliy is already producing pictures in our papers by the millions and it will not be long before the whole paper will disperse with lead type, and the letter key touched in New York will compose the page in San Franscisco or London within a few seconds. In fact with photography and wirrless we need only to touch the button and the rest is done for us. Other im- provements will soon follow. lt will be an easy matter to photograph in color. Photographs will then be made without lenses. In astronomy, photography will penetrate beyond the visible stars better than thc strongest telescope, and will reveal more than we, at present, know er see about ns for there is more than we can visualize. The camera will soon be made so as to record what is above, below, beneath, through. and within. Everything will be common property to the "Power of Photography." The cinematograph will become more and more useful. lt will be applied to commercial pursuits. It will check the output of factoriesg it will assist in the weather bureau, in short, photography will map the world inside and outside. In time it is going to snpercede most of the art processes. It will produce our wall paper coverings and materials. lt will be possible to produce a pattern on any rug as well as on a plate or pottery. It will print our bank notes as well as our stamps. It will soon be practical to photograph on steel or anything cut with acids. Photo sculpture in stone and metal is now an actual fact. Photograpy has many branches. It is the right hand of art and science. Above all, photography linked with wireless, will bring about a state of peace throughout the world. It will make war impossible. May it please the Almighty that by its aid another great war will never come. Yours truly, E. R. COX, Photographer, College Cabin, New Concord, O. 24 Pay Attentzon to the Signal rll1'1lI 111l1O1cl SIUH 'lt the CIOSSIHQ' IQ just the bcllllf lb mx uthu Slgll yet It nu er falls to fxttlaet our 'ltfL11l101l md we LU VK qs clo wh tt 1t tells ue to do btop' l ook' L1stL11' Wlwf We all know vxhv It wanna of us dangu md wc lnoxx xx h tt xull happen to those xx ho fa1l to do xxhlt the Qlgfl tells then tn do 'l here are XX'l.1Ill1lg agus all 110110 the 1OlC1 ol 1 Q 1'xen busmess lb not exempt fIO1Tl danger but there d.l'L bl ns up tll tlong the road md our success depends enurely up on rexclmg mfl llltdlllg those S1g11S I ul IH thls ,tml sou xx 11l u entually ful 111 bus111esf. Xa me truel tlung the busmcss zoacl we 1c1cl Be court euus Be Iohte Be rlruthful Bt Fur Tluuk uf Others l L lfll to Serxe lhere 111 0tl'lClS of couxse but thue xull be 1111 xutel or uuclent of ue clo wx hit these slgns tell us to do STIJRT VA TS Zanesvzlle 5 Bzg Store ESTABLISHED 1879 2: C I 1 'L 'L ' C 1 ' 4' . " 'L'z f - C, ee . - J- -gl 1f '- xv, ' 1 . . . I , -' ., , . - - - ,k 1 . 1. c . , K . , ', , , nn f , - 1: VK In I N. L s. l' A .4 - J . 1' s - 1 7 - , - . . ,.z 1 4, Q' ' 'z -' . , ' Q- lf fa 2. ' 5' 1 . 1 ' 'C ' " 3 ' 1 6 ' '2 1'f- 4 f 4' '. V . - 1 s . f 4 . . . 1 , JU. . , . . , .V s . . , -' r A L, ,, 1 . ,. . .. K . ,Z -1 5 ,. - - . ,Z . K. , ,. V, xr,x ' " ' 'I A 1 K . .,,. 1. -f wx - vt . - 1 ' , - - -.v - - A . ' L L - -C 1 1 J .V , A A . . Y A L, . . , .. . , . nz ,, . - 2 1 , ', . , . ' Y X A "l'ih te' A ' ff f A . I , I . Metro-Goldwin-Mayer Pictu res ARE GOOD PICTURES OFTEN GREAT PICTURES -6 5- THE NAME CAN BE DEPENDED UPON The Talk of the Industry The Talk of the School If the sheet used on the inside of this year's "MUSCOLJUAN" looks good to you, please remember it is our CHESTERFIELD NAM EL The Standard Grade of Coated Paper Dzstrzbuted by The Johnston Paper Co 321 Sycamore Street Cmclnnatl Ohlo 27 "A Good Paper House " 1 INE annuals, like brilliant victories, are brought about by the co-or- dination of skillful generalship and trained effort. The jahn 81 Ollier Engraving Co. is Americas foremost school annual designing and engraving specialist, because in its organization are mobilized Americas leading cre- ative minds and mechanical craftsmen. TI-IE JAHN 81 OLLIER ENCRAVING CO. Photographers, Artists and Makers of Fine Printing Plates for Black and Colors 817 W. WASHINGTON BLVD., CHICAGO A APPRECIA TIO Q "5" . A . .19 CSR' 30? ug, 50 W Al 0 FOR MANY YEARS we have printed Muskingumis Junior Class Annual, The Muscoljuan, and our Business relations With the Annual Staff and College, during all these fears, have lneen mutual and satisfactory. We are proud of our work in producing this 57ear's Oolume ancl feel that the Work of this yearis Staff reflects the high stanclarcl of Muskingum College. Cczllihczn QQ Sttotlemire C0 ESTABLISHED 1908 Masonic Temple, Cambridge, Ohio 29


Suggestions in the Muskingum University - Muscoljuan Yearbook (New Concord, OH) collection:

Muskingum University - Muscoljuan Yearbook (New Concord, OH) online yearbook collection, 1923 Edition, Page 1

1923

Muskingum University - Muscoljuan Yearbook (New Concord, OH) online yearbook collection, 1925 Edition, Page 1

1925

Muskingum University - Muscoljuan Yearbook (New Concord, OH) online yearbook collection, 1926 Edition, Page 1

1926

Muskingum University - Muscoljuan Yearbook (New Concord, OH) online yearbook collection, 1937 Edition, Page 1

1937

Muskingum University - Muscoljuan Yearbook (New Concord, OH) online yearbook collection, 1938 Edition, Page 1

1938

Muskingum University - Muscoljuan Yearbook (New Concord, OH) online yearbook collection, 1942 Edition, Page 1

1942

1985 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1970 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1972 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1965 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals
FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
Are you trying to find old school friends, old classmates, fellow servicemen or shipmates? Do you want to see past girlfriends or boyfriends? Relive homecoming, prom, graduation, and other moments on campus captured in yearbook pictures. Revisit your fraternity or sorority and see familiar places. See members of old school clubs and relive old times. Start your search today! Looking for old family members and relatives? Do you want to find pictures of parents or grandparents when they were in school? Want to find out what hairstyle was popular in the 1920s? E-Yearbook.com has a wealth of genealogy information spanning over a century for many schools with full text search. Use our online Genealogy Resource to uncover history quickly! Are you planning a reunion and need assistance? E-Yearbook.com can help you with scanning and providing access to yearbook images for promotional materials and activities. We can provide you with an electronic version of your yearbook that can assist you with reunion planning. E-Yearbook.com will also publish the yearbook images online for people to share and enjoy.