Muhlenberg College - Ciarla Yearbook (Allentown, PA)

 - Class of 1964

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Muhlenberg College - Ciarla Yearbook (Allentown, PA) online yearbook collection, 1964 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 216 of the 1964 volume:

5 ufiiiiii ' iiii : t - M J V , fe=jf 4 SLs ' ! VI J ®» : ; £s " : ih ++ 4 +++++ R W.W.I K. b ({ tJ Hcr 3w ricr— 3W NC 5 — ; one mi 1964 CIARLA MUHLENBERG COLLEGE ALLENTO WN, PENNS YL VA NIA Tyiuhlanbaro is a small, liberal arts, church -nzlaJtad CoUaqa 2 V A lihv, ... so -they sou . 3 But to -those. f us mho tfiou), Vtuhienbo a CoUeqe, cs . . . binds ; raJbbite; chipmunks , squirrels . . • jHouiertny -treat in Sprmo ' StudyucjCj on. -tine, cjnass • ♦ • 6 puddUs on a rainy day 7 o. jafaboxL . . . -the bookstore. . . . lost bodp In lo ouerstuffed cloakroom . . . cff - campas hpUDQOuis mmsmm 10 Class rrmtinas . . . Commibbtze.s ■ . . ★ STUDENT COUNCIL REPRESENTATIVE SluQtNT ALFRED J. ★ DE RENEES HITCH if, " ;j f 2j££tuOr . . . decisions . . . QfrlUtiCS " for fun”. . . Spirited cheerteadefs . . . -ttuz exeiternert cf uJuviuxg- • • 14 ■M » k 16 DinzdoioL fbbliety rwXDrcfftiurm 18 T)irejt£orcfJsnpro e TxiMl n (stnzam cf odmmctirotiorxmst)) ■ • 19 Dr. French . . . Dr. Scocusi . . . Dr. daLdncje ' s humor • . 20 21 23 24 25 procnoLstenat on . . . 26 27 28 30 31 32 Dr. Janet Stamm, to begin the eulogy in negatives, is not dogmatic. She is master of the biting phrase told at the critical moment. Her mind is strong, both in its re- source and in its mastery of the extemporaneous; few can stand up against her in the verbal brawls of the seminar room. But the moving thing about Dr. Stamm is that she is not mean, nor cruel; never malicious. She is a teacher. As a teacher, Janet Stamm builds competence and pursues excellence in her students with both patience and tolerance, both of these things being special be- cause talent of mind and depth in understanding are necessarily restless and usually inconsiderate. Dr. Stamm asks questions and hears stupid answers. She assigns essays and papers, but students return to her writing in which the atrocities in language are over- shadowed only by the shoddiness of reasoning. Obvi- ously she recognizes stupidity and ignorance for what they are. But they are not the things which fascinate her. The phenomenon in which she is interested is that by the end of the hour, the week, the semester, the four years — students will distinguish stupidity and ignorance from truth. For, in spite of superiority of experience and the sometimes advantage of talent, she is content to demon- strate; to bring things clear; to train minds, not insult them. And the final result of this is to show people the value of things human; strictness and discipline, yes; rig- orous standards, yes; technique, structure, mechanics, yes. But all for the purpose of realizing a birthright. Dr. Stamm ' s courses are lessons beyond text; the scope is large and important. When Dr. Stamm teaches, two things are active. One is that she stands on a common ground with students because the problem is the ancient one: life. But the other thing is that she keeps her professional distance. The lessons are taught by an ingenious combination of the two; the challenging and moving company of a mind genuinely awed, excited, frightened by reality; and the authority and competence with which she faces problems which only start in the classroom. She is a teacher. Teaching is only what Dr. Stamm does; who she is, is certainly more complex. She is the faculty member who constantly walks into offices of the Administration and scares officials with the rigor and the argumentation of her standards. Hers is the laugh too loud in the face of pedantry. Hers is the annoying conscience, the blunt question, the unpleasantness of responsibility. Dr. Stamm is hard to live with. Not that she is a prophet come to warn the people; and not that she is a friend of the Furies. She is simply the energy with which colleges are supercharged. The forces within Dr. Stamm that are so uncomfortable to be around are the strengths by which men crawled out of the slimy swamp, stood on two feet — and began to think. It is the special thing which has made man become Man. So that her energies are the stuff of the liberal education: questions, protests, indigna- tion, amusement — reasonable hope. In appreciation of these things, the 1964 C ar a is dedicated to Dr. Janet Stamm, Assistant Professor of Eng- lish. 34 DR. JANET STAMM DEDICATION 35 DR. ERLING N. JENSEN PRESIDENT 36 T. N. Marsh Dean of the College Dr. Claude E. Dierolf Dean of Students Anne Graham Nugent Dean of Women DEANS 37 Dr. Henry M. M. Richards Economics Rev. David E. Thomas Sociology Rev. Hagan A. K. Staack Religion Mr. Ludwig Lenel Music Dr. John W. Brunner Foreign Languages DEPARTMENT CHAIRMEN Dr. Victor L. Johnson History v I Dr. Harold L. Stenger, Jr. English Dr. William M. French Education Dr. Truman L. Koehler Mathematics Mr. Alfred J. Colarusso Art nifiin Dr. David A. Reed Philosophy Dr. John E. Trainer Biology HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE Seated: Victor L. Johnson, Ph.D.; Joanne S. Mortimer, Ph.D.; John J. Reed, Ph.D. Standing . James E. Swain, Ph.D.; Edwin R. Baldrige, Jr., Ph.D.; Stewart S. Lee, M.A. PHI ALPHA THETA First Row B. Rhody, G. Myers, D. Eismann, T. Horne, E. Hoffman, Dr. E. Baldrige. Second Row R. Neal, F. Kahmar, J. Maraz, B. Volkart, M. Campion, N. Rosen, E. Pappenberger, N. Gaebler, S. Geib, K. Christoffersen, J. Lloyd. Third Row: G. Franz, E. Bonekemper, W. Dewald, W. Becker, R. Benveniste, R. Kelly, A. Somers. 40 ENGLISH F. James Bernhard, Jr.; M.A.; J. Gysbert Bouma, Ph.D.; Ralph S. Graber, Ph.D.; Andrew H. Erskine, Ph.D.; Claude E. Dierolf, Ph.D.; Harold L. Stenger, Jr., Ph.D.; Minofte M. Chatfield, Ph.D.; Robert B. Thornburg, Ph.D.; Griffith Dudding, A.M.; Bessie Michael, M.A. Seated E. Cook, C. Riegel, D. Hatch, P. Herbst, L. Levin. Standing C. Smullen, J. Decking, J. Stevens, N. Parker, F. Mann, L. Keller, K. Stauffer. SIGMA TAU DELTA I 41 ETA SIGMA PHI CLASSICS Dr. Edward B. Stevens Classics 42 Seated: Rev. Hagen A. K. Staack, Ph.D. Standing Rodney E. Ring, Ph.D.; Rev. Jesse B. Renninger, S.T.M. RELIGION PHILOSOPHY Stewart A. Shaw, B.A.; David A. Reed, Ph.D. 43 MUSIC Ralph Kemmerer, Ludwig Lenel, Frederick Robinson. EDUCATION Seated Francis Baker Hague, M.S.; Adeline E. Kreinheder, Ed.D.; John C. MacConnell, M.A.; Anne Graham Nugent, M.A. Standing: William M. French, Ph D. 44 First Row. B. Van Emon, T. Allen, A. Oakley, N. Rosen. Second Row: N. Birnberg, D. Zimmerman, Mrs. Anna Marie de Gorbea, R. Hei- berger, E. Hilliard, Mr. Martin Kopf. ROMANCE LANGUAGES PHI SIGMA IOTA Seated: Martin Kopf, M.A.; Anna Marie de Gorbea, M.A Standing Kenneth Webb, Ph.D.; Marc Heyler, C.A.P.E.S.; Aurelia M. Arre, M.A. 45 Seated Wilson N. Serfass, Jr., C.P.A. Standing Henry M. M. Rich- ards, Ph.D.; John G. Voyatzis, M.A. ECONOMICS 46 GERMAN Adolph Wegener, Ph.D.; Anne E. Rodda, M.A.; Helen Adolph, Ph.D.; John W. Brunner, Ph.D. DELTA PHI ALPHA 47 PSYCHOLOGY Seated Donald K. Lauer, Ph.D.; Theodore Maiser, Ed.D. Standing Thomas F. Lohr, Ph.D.; Walter H. Brackin, Ph.D. I I » i PSI CHI First Row B. Horne, K. Scheurer, A. Heinlein, N. Dodson. Second Row B. Herbein, R. Van Haste, S. Angstadt, B. Hawman, V. Prichard, J. Albright, C. Blose. 48 Rev. David E. Thomas, B.D.; Rev. Morris S. Greth, Ph.D.; Roger Baldwin, M A. 49 Seated Ann Kuhns, Secretary, John E. Trainer, PhD.; Alice M. Savage, PhD. Standing Robert L Schaeffer, Jr., Ph.D.; Carl S. Oplinger, Ph.D.; John V. Shankweiler, Ph.D.; James R. Vaughan, Ph.D.; Paul W. H. Weaver, Jr., M.S. 50 51 Seated Alice T. Griffith, M.S.; Charles E. Mortimer, Ph.D. Standing G. N. Russell Smart, Ph.D.; David N. Stehly, M.S.; Richard C. Hatch, Ph.D.; Harvey F. Janota, Ph.D CHEMISTRY if — 52 PHYSICS Seated William A. Barrett, Ph.D.; Robert A. Eoyer, Ph.D. Standing: Walter E. Loy, Jr., M.S.; Harry L. Raub, Ph.D. 53 LIBRARY STAFF First Row Mary A. Funk, Assistant Librarian, Mrs. Jesse Renninger, Mrs. Margaret Rocheleau, Mrs. Minotte Chatfield, Mrs. Hayden Evans, Periodicals Librarian; Mrs. Ann McDermott, Miss Roma Ziegler, Assistant Cataloguer. Second Row Mrs. Valborg Jepsen, Mrs. Monica Jones, John S. Davidson, Librarian William M. Baker, Oder Librarian. STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE Mrs. Patricia Straup, Secretary , Miss Kathryn Kistler, College Nurse; Dr. Thomas Weaber, Jr., Director of Student Health. Missing Dr. George Z. Heimbach, Assistant to the Director of Student Health; Mrs. Agnes Ritter, College Nurse. 54 Dewey L. Brevik, B.D. Director of Admissions Glenn T. Job Director of Publicity Daniel C. Springer, A.B. Director of Development George W. Gibbs, A.B. Assistant to the Director of Admissions John R. McAuley Business Manager Charles R. Stecker, Jr., A.B. Assistant Treasurer and Controller Bruce R. Romig, B.S. Alumni Secretary David M. Seamans, M.Ed. Union Director Rev. George F. Eichorn, Jr., B.D. Director of Church Relations William Savo, Treasurer; Erna Hilliard, Secretary ; Thomas Turczyn, President; Anthony Longo, Vice President. SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS SENIOR CLASS EXECUTIVE COUNCIL First Row F. Haverly, J. Turoczi, J. Petree, E. Hilliard. Second Row K. Carl, T. Turczyn, M. Kleintop. Third Row G. Koniver, J. Howard, W. Savo, W. Dewald. 57 Marilyn S. Morgan Thomas J. Turczyn John C. Turoczi I SUSAN P. AHLHEIM JUDITH A. ALBRIGHT LARS T. ANDERSEN NANCY N. ANDREWS RONALD M. ANDREWS GARY A. ANTHONY KENNETH C. ARNDT THOMAS C. AIKISS STANLEY J AUK BURG DIANE L. BACHNER 60 NANCY M. BAKER IRENE E. BARILOVITS DAVID C. BECKER WILLIAM H. BECKER ERNEST A. BECKLF.Y RICHARD H. BEN VENISTE KATHRYN R. BENZAK GERALD S. BES SES KARIN C. BIEHL NEAL L. BIRNBERG 61 CAROL L. BLOSE LARRY J. BLUM ANDREW BOBOTAS EDWARD H. BONEKEMPER III RICHARD J. BONSER NORMAN BOYER NORMAN M. BRASSLER EDWARD C. BUSS DONALD C. CAMPBELL 62 JEANNE M. CLARK KAREN J. CARL MARGOT G. CLARK EDWARD W. CLOUGHEN JEAN A. COLDRF.N BEVERLY J. COL.LER ROBERT B. COCHRAN, JR. 63 CAROL A. CONSTANTINE ELLEN R. COOK JOSEPHINE COOKENBACH RAYMOND S. COOPER GAIL K. CRABTREE LAWRENCE CROUTHAMEL JUDY K. DECKING ALICE J. DEISHER ROBERT H. DeLONG BRUCE V. DENNIS 64 CAROLYN A. DeROSA WILSON E. DEWALD NANCY J. DODSON FREDERICK J. ECK DONALD A. EISMANN. JR. ELISE L. EVANOSKY FERNANDA FANTOZZI BRUCE A. ENGLISH 65 ANNF F. FICHTHORN DOUGLAS M. FOLLWEILER KATHRYN FRANKFN FIELD GEORGE W. FRANZ DAVID C. FRY THOMAS W. FRYE DAVID L. GASKILF RUTH GEBHARDTSBAUER NADINE F. GEARHART 66 FRANCES P. GLENN JOEL B. GLASS CHARLES E. GOLDBERG EDWIN M. GOLDSMITH. Ill TED B. GOTTSHALl ROBERT A. GRAFF 67 El IZABETH A. GUNTHER CARL P. HALLENBORG DEBORAH B. HATCH BETSY J. HAWMAN DORIS V. HEDRICK ALAN R. HEINLEIN RUTH W. HARRISON DONALD S. HEINTZELMAN 68 EDWIN P. HOFFMAN 69 ANTHONY J. HORVATH AUDREY V. HOUPT JOSEPH E. HOWARD THOMAS F. HUNSICKFR THOMAS R. JAMES ATBERT F. W. JANSEN ETEANOR M. JASCH JUDITH A. JEFFREYS STEPHEN R. HUMPHERYS BARRY P. JOHNSON 70 ALLAN R. JONES BRIAN C. JONES TIM B. JONES JEROLD KAUFMAN JEAN A. KEENHOLD DANIEL A. JONES MELVIN R. JONES FLORENCE E. KAHMAR ELIZABETH G. KIDD ROBERT J. KILLIAN 71 KLAUS J. KINGSTORF STARR D. KINNEY JACOB KLEIN MARJORIE A. KLEINTOP DIANA L. KLOTH VIRGINIA F. KNORR ROBERT E. KOCH GARTH A. KONIVER RONALD J. KOVACH THOMAS T. KOCHENDEREER 72 IW JOHN E. KOYEN ANNE S. KRAJSA WALTER P. KRAUSS KAREN 1. KUCERA BARBARA R. LAIRD STEPHEN F. LATMAN WILLIAM LALTEN BERGER RAYMOND C. LEAR ROBERT H. LEH DOUGLAS E. LEHMANN 73 LAURA F. LEVIN CHARLES W. LEWIS JANICE L. LLOYD ANTHONY J. LONGO DEAN R. LOWE ROBERT F. MACKAY 74 FERN L. MANN JEANNE M. MARAZ HOWARD J. MARSH. JR. MICHAEL G. MERKEL ALLAN H. MESSINGER CARL D. METZGER JOAN S. MIDDLEMAST ALFRED L. MIKSITS MICHAEL S. MILLER ALVIN G. MINTZ MARILYN S MORGAN FRANK P. MUHR CAROL L. MUMMEY JOHN R. MURTALJGH CAROLINE A. MYSLINSKI RHEA A. NAGLE 76 RUTH A. NEAL CAROLE J. NEWBERRY LAWRENCE A. NIELSON ERNEST NORMINGTON. JR. BARRY J. PEARSON SERGEI C. NOVAK BARBARA J. PETERS MIKE K PETERS ROBERT D. PETERS JOHN C. PETREL 77 THOMAS PETRO KENNETH J. PIDDINGTON JAMES T. PIZZA VERONICA B. STEPHEN L. POHE CHRISTINA W. PONCHAK DANIEL T. POUST RANDOLPH M. RAAB THOMAS RENNINGFR BARRY A. RHODY 78 RUTH A. RICE SANDRA B. RTCE JUDITH L. RILEY DONALD T. RISSMILEFR RONALD F. RISSMILEFR NESSA ROSEN BENNETT E. ROTH DOLORES L. ROTH WILLIAM B. SAVO JOANNE M. SCHAAF 79 1 1 ROBERT C. SCHAEFFER ALAN P. SCHANTZ CATHRYN A. SCHEURER PRISCILLA K. SCHLENKER BRUCE C. SCHMAUCH ROBERT E. SCHMIERER FORREST A. SCHUCKER EVONNE F. SCHULTZ MANFRED SCHULTZE- KIMMLE DIANNE C. SELL JANE K. SEONBUCHNER GLENN K. SHERFR LINDA M. SIMENSKY THOMAS A. SIMONS JAMES D. SIMPSON JERRY M. SLEPACK BARBARA A. SINGDAHLSEN JAMES E. SMITH. II 81 JAMES T. SMITH PHILIP J. SMITH FRANK R. SMOYER RONALD P. SMYSER ROBERT E. SPRAGUE ALBERT G. SPROULE DALE F. STAUFFER JEAN M. STAUFFER KATHRYN L. STAUFFER RAYMOND C. SPROW, JR. 82 FLOYD E. STEM JANET C. STEVENS WILLIAM I. STOUDT RONALD B. STUMP ARTHUR L. SUFFIN CAROL L. TAYLOR MARY A. TAYLOR NANCY I. TERRY ROGER C. STUHI.MILLER ROBERT E. THILO 83 PHILIP I TIGHE VITALIA V. TRAGUS IOHN D. TRANSUE GRETCHEN M. TREXLER THOMAS J. TURCZYN JOHN C. TUROCZI DOUGLAS F. TURTZO BENJAMIN R. UNGERLEIDER BARBARA A. VAN EMON REBECCA M. VAN HASTE 84 MICHAEL P. WEBER MARIETTA WEIKERT ERWIN W. WEIL. IR. 85 JOHN F. WEST MICHAEL S. WIELAND KENNETH R. WILLIAMS EDWARD W. WOLFGANG RODNEY K.. WRIGHT WILLIAM J. WROBEL G. WOLF ANTHONY W. YANKOWSKY VIVIAN H. YODER SENIORS NOT PICTURED VINCENT S. AJELLO WILLIAM R. COOPER, JR. FRANKLIN W. DALE, JR. RICHARD ALAN DAVIS RONALD L. HARI THOMAS H. HAWK, JR. ROBERT A. HERVEY JOHN D. KAUFMAN ROBERT H. KINDRED WILLIAM E. MEYER CHARLES W. O ' BRIEN PETER N. PAPPAS WILLIAM R. PETERSON. JR CHARLES I. RHOADES ROBERT A. SADLER III JOHN R. SAUERWEIN ROBERT W. STENGL RONALD K. WOLF DAVID R. WONSIDLER WILLIAM WORMLEY. JR. 86 GRADUATION JUNE 7, 1964 Photos courtesy of the Allentown Coil-Chronicle Newspapers . 87 Harry A Benfer John V. Shankweiler Luther J. Deck Edwin P. Hoffman, Valedictorian JUNIOR CLASS OFFICERS Robert Milligan, Treasurer , Robert Kelly, Vice President; Sandra Taylor, Secretary , Richard Levinson, President JUNIOR CLASS EXECUTIVE COUNCIL First Row R. Kelly, S. Taylor, R. Levinson, R. Milligan. Second Row C. Smullen, N. Weltz, D. Scarborough, K. Zindle. Third Row T. Allen, R. Bauer, G. Luckman, N. Sellers. 90 SOPHOMORE CLASS OFFICERS Brian Eklund, President ■ Joseph Wetzel, Treasurer,- Phyllis Topham, Secretary , Jeff Henderson, Vice President. SOPHOMORE CLASS EXECUTIVE COUNCIL First Row J. Wetzel, P. Topham, J. Henderson, B. Eklund. Second Row: P. Carta, M. Durst, A. Armbruster. Third Row: C. Struck, D. Knappenberger, M. Ward. 91 FRESHMAN CLASS EXECUTIVE COUNCIL First Row J Rodgers, C. Price, D Miller, M. Harvey, H. Dicksen, R. Glass, R. Levin. Second Row V. Hitch, W. Hoffman, R. Byer, A. DeRenzis. FRESHMAN CLASS OFFICERS Richard Bartholomew, Treasurer , Chuck dent , Dawn Miller, Secretary , Van President. Price, Presi- Hitch, Vice 92 ACTIVITIES First Row K. Stauffer, H. Weidhoft. Second Row: J. Stauffer, C. Schlenker, E. Hilliard, Secretary; J. Maraz, B. Volkart, A. Toffer, M. MacDonald. Third Row P. Herbst, L. Meinzer, N. Parker, M. Morgan, President , J. Decking, C. Riegel. LAMBDA EPSILON DELTA Having had to salaam toward the East Campus for lo these many years, the women of Muhlenberg College led by Lambda Epsilon Delta, co-ed honor soci- ety, have begun a subtle rebellion, seeking the “Other World Beyond the Walls” and control of the campus. L.E.D. compiled a summer job inventory file; who were the biggest users of the rubber-banded, shoe- boxed aid to unemployed co-eds? Men. Who sets their feminine intuitions loose to help screen candidates for Student Court? L.E.D. Who helped bring A.A.U.W. mem- bership to ' Berg girls? Who sold rides on a tractor driven by Dr. Swain? Who auc- tioned off a day’s lab work to be done by Dr. Smart? L.E.D. Watch Out! Today the Weekly, tomorrow Student Council, next year — the world. PI DELTA EPSILON Pi Delta Epsilon exists for the purpose of self-perpetuation, meeting only occasion- ally to elect new members from the ranks of up and coming journalists and creative writers. The highlight of an otherwise un- eventful year was the Fall initiation cere- mony. President Edward Bonekemper III, dressed in the formal “redcoat” of the College’s dining room staff, led the cere- mony while several flutophone players pro- vided a unique musical touch to the digni- fied ceremony. 1- A, | 4 kv m - if Jt guji I “ Si X Hv a First Row B. Dempster, E. Kidd, B. Volkart. Second Row N. Sellers, B. Wagner, J. Decking, E. Beckley, L. Crouthamel, G. Franz, E. Bonekemper, President; J. Smith. 94 Seated E. Hoffman, Secretary , E. Bonekemper, President , K. Sweder, B. Jones, Vice President, E. Simon, Dr. Victor Johnson, Faculty Treasurer Standing J. Turoczi, T. Horne, K. Maurer, R. Levinson, G. Slepack, T. Turczyn. Missing W. Becker, F. Eck, J. Glass, C. Gills, Dr. Harold Stenger, Faculty Advisor OMICRON DELTA KAPPA The purpose of Omicron Delta Kappa is really two-fold: the honoring and flattering of male campus leaders, and the co-ordi- nating of various campus activities. Mem- bership is chosen as objectively as possible through standards of excellence in aca- demics, and by participating in sports and extra-curricular activities. The only successful project attempted by the group this year was a Boy Scout type of project which involved the operation of a lot to sell Christmas trees in order to raise money for the Foreign Student Fund. Hard physical work and an agrarian sort of honesty assured the efficiency of this operation. The efforts during the Spring semester to compose and evaluate a four- teen page poll revealing student opinion about campus matters ended up in nine piles of completed but un-corrected ques- tionnaires. 95 DELTA PHI NU A purge of the “point-less” resulted in a great decrease in the membership of Delta Phi Nu this year. The girls who had been expunged from the roll for failing to amass sufficient points for service must have been the type who could win points for daring, however, because when the time came to auction off girls for the annual slave sale at ODK ' s carnival, few of the remaining members were willing to name their prices. Some of the girls have been taking whirlpool treatments for crinks in their little fingers — too many hours of duty at teas which invariably serve punch. DPN girls also usher, guide, do volunteer work at the Allentown Hospital and entertain children at the Good Shepherd Home on special days. First Row B. Horne, N. Griswold, B. White, S. Champlin, L. Alderfer, M. L. Diehl, V. Berg, B. Marley, S. Heeremans, D. Zimmerman, M. Stewart, B. Herbein, S. Kinney, S. Taylor, J. Arthur, P. Stump, N. Gaebler, L. Pancoast. Second Row: J. Hallemcn, J. Willan, E. Buhler, P. Schlenker, N. Terry, B. Laird, N. Sellers, M. Taylor, G. DeGelleke, T. Allen, C. Schreiner, P. Read, C. Barnes, D. Bennis, K. Carl, N. Rupnik, B. Mulligan. Members of the Cardinal Key Society are to be found at all activities which require the services of ushers or guides. No group at the college shows more people to their seats, gives more directions, or distributes more programs than these men. Looking quite dapper and dis- armingly collegiate in their navy-blue blazers complete with insignia, Cardinal Key members escort prospective students and guests around the campus, euphemistically describing life at Muhlenberg. 96 ALPHA PHI OMEGA Helping little old co-eds across the dan- gerous intersection in front of the Student Union building is only one of the many unselfish acts performed by the Xi Alpha chapter of Alpha Phi Omega, the college Boy Scout troop. With their trusty canteens at the ready, the Scouts strove to " Be Pre- pared " in all situations. They earned their Fuller Brush badges by selling Christmas trees for the Foreign Student Fund. They earned their halo badges by assisting the Directors of Publicity and Church Relations, and ushering at Sunday chapels. They won their merit badges for solicitation by col- lecting donations at basketball games and for the March of Dimes, and they have fought to a man the silverfish in their dorms. First Row W. Mende, J. Ash, S. Weinberger. Second Row L. Boral, A. Heinlein, R. DeVore, B. Seifert. Third Row J. Petree, C. Wogenrich, D. Cerven, P. Klose. Fourth Row: A. Douglass, E. Reed, R. Graff, R. Rovell. Fifth Row C. Pond, President, J. Marsh, Treasurer; C. Brown, J. Schermerhorn, J. Good, Secretary. CARDINAL KEY First Row T. Kochenderfer, President, R. Low, Vice President , G. Balmer, Secretary- Treasurer. Second Row G. Hummel, J. Coley, D. Kaugher, J. Henderson, L. Crouthamel, R. Fulton. Third Row R. Gowdy, T. Preston, C. Merrill, D. Scarborough, R. Mackay, N. Brassier. Fourth Row. T. Puskas, R. Knouss, A. Falcone, J. Davies, E. Basner, W. Dinerman, R. Baurenklau. 97 Seated F. Ha verly, R. Ziegler, Treasurer; S. Taylor, Secretary , J. Glass, Vice President; E. Hoffman, President , B. Eddington, R. Levinson, K. Sweder. Standing B. Eklund, T. Horne, A. Longo, J. Howard, B. Jones, T. Turczyn, D. Jones. In spite of the vacuum of coziness in which the 1963-1964 Student Council oper- ated, it distinguished itself as being the only organization at Muhlenberg which deliberately exercised a political function. As a political body it was unique that it was both pressure group and government. Its attitude as a pressure group derived from the necessity for 1100 students to have a coherent voice in the college’s affairs, and from time to time, Councilmen lead by a deliberately tactless President Edwin Hoffman could toddle up to the Administration and walk away with the exact favors for which they half-asked, half- demanded. Student Council this year found a new pride and a uniquely high self-opinion, and thus the service it offered as coordinator of student affairs was improved. Whereas before, Council had had only huge sums of money with which to purchase its power, this year it was effective largely through its own dignity. When its directives on the Union dress rules were overridden by an ambitious Union Board of Directors, a unified Council quickly established a harsh hierarchy among campus groups during a well attended open meeting. Its day to day business was often trivial and bureaucratic but there were concrete accomplishments. A test file was set up in the Library, various judicial groups on campus were brought under the final jurisdiction of the Student Court, scholarships were made possible with surplus funds, and irresponsible budgeting by radio station WMUH was corrected. Most of what the Muhlenberg Student Council does every year is merely noisy and is more than petty. Much of the energy of its Councilmen goes into personal feuding and unstatesmenlike status-seeking. And by the end of the year, its record will read as it does this year — a book without words. The importance of Muhlenberg’s Student Council is that it is vigorous and self- conscious. Thus it is something to be reckoned with in the college’s continuing history. It is a strong force, more moral than it is amoral or immoral, so its final and oblique role ought to be that of a defender of academic freedom and a sponsor of the Liberal Arts. The Student Council is a group at Muhlenberg which can do this, being vigorous in its existence and deliberately political in its operation. STUDENT COUNCIL Hill Seated. N. Rupnik, D. Hatch, L. Scarborough, K. Maurer, President. Standing E. Simon, A. Toffer, M. Morgan, A. Anderson, M. Miller, J. Pizza. Somewhere between, but a bit to the right of bewigged and stone-faced justices and vigilante committees, sits the Student Court, the highest student judicial body on campus, next to the administration. The Student Court introduced a pre-trial hearing fashioned after the real world’s grand jury system and eliminating the old hearsay system which is still popular with some groups. The Court also reviewed the consti- tutions of all campus organizations in an attempt to develop consistency in at least one area of college life. The Court made a sincere attempt to dispel the cloak and dagger atmosphere that some claimed mingled with the smoke in their chambers by publishing an account of the nature of each case and their verdict in the Weekly. Because no names were mentioned, the accounts were rather uninteresting except to those who enjoy a good quiz game. STUDENT COURT Seated. M. Campion, P. Schlenker, F. Haverly, President; C. Taylor, P. Topham, J. Maraz. Standing: J. Petree, R. Milligan, N. Gasbarro, David Seamans, Union Director. This was the first eventful year after the transition from a perhaps too small, but warm, affectionate, and livable STUDENT Center to a cold, impersonal, unfriendly, glass-walled Union. The Union Board of Directors assumed its conspicuous role, fulfilling its purpose in provid- ing cultural, recreational, social, and educational programs for the Student Body. A recapitulation of those events would prove to be as formidable as an explanation of the students’ apathy to them. Highlighting the annual monotony was the Board ' s decision to pro- vide a dead-locked Student Council with a long overdue stimulus to revise the dress rules. However, more important to each of the members was the ever-present opportunity to be imaginative, to work ambitiously and ded icatedly, to organize, to delegate, to remember, to philander, to be obnoxious, to uphold principles, to loath, to admire, and to do nothing. UNION BOARD Thus as the Board performed, waiting eagerly for the stirring exhortations of its advisor, Homecoming, Jr. Prom, and Chad Mitchell flew past. The Association of College Unions Conference held at Drexel was the Board’s most successful party of the year. In addition to providing an opportunity for most members to enliven hotel parties with the assistance of lubricated Folk Singers, tour museums under the direction of a fast- aging hostess, and to incidentally gather bits of informa- tion that would justify their original purpose in attending, this conference also provided very lucrative reimburse- ment for “transportationists, " and an opportunity for some to “get " further “away from it all. " Returning to the domestic scene, ping-pong, bowling, and pool tournaments were scheduled only with con- siderable difficulty in the Game Room that was theoreti- cally available to students at all times. Administrative work schedules — instituted to off-set the regular eight hour recreation period — seemed to perpetually conflict with student-desired hours. Cultivating sincere and lasting Student-Faculty-Admin- istrative relationships should indeed be one of the under- lying objectives of all Union Board programs. The suc- cessful Board of Directors will neither find the answers to its problems squatting smugly behind a Union desk, nor being whispered softly at a conference, nor shaken wildly at a dance, nor measured out in unsweetened cups of coffee, but shall find them in student interest, faculty concern, and administrative responsibility. WOMEN’S COUNCIL Under the impartial gavel of tactful Florence Kahmar, Women’s Council looked after the welfare of each Muhlenberg Co- ed, sometimes even of commuters. The ma- jor contribution of this year’s Council was its creation and adoption of a new and decidedly more workable constitution, al- though much of Council ' s energy was de- voted to an extensive evaluation of teas vs. banquets for ring ceremonies, rulings on co-ed wrestling meets on the front cam- pus, and deciding whether the subscription to Sports Illustrated ought to be renewed or would the boys waiting in Prosser Lobby prefer reading Presbyterian Life next term? The council was also a successful winner in that popular campus game, “Freedom Now’’ or “Pin the Tail on the Administra- tion.’’ Seated B. Herbein, M. MacDonald, M. Kleintop, F. Kahmar, President , C. Schlenker, T. Allen, B. Mulligan. Standing J. Kohler, C. Smullen, A. Armbruster, E. Dotzel, J. Zelko, D. Roth, K. Heisler. MEN’S DORM COUNCIL Seated; W. Stoudt, F. Eck, President, J. Marsh. Standing: K. Arndt, C. Gills, J. Bowles, T. Bird, C. Lewis, W. Jones, R. DeVett, J. Davies, K. Butz. People are chosen for membership on the Men’s Dorm Council primarily because they look big and strong. Residents of Martin Luther Hall or East Hall, up before one of the Council’s Monday night meet- ings, are faced with a table of solemn brutes who look as if they eat disciplinary cases between football games. And this is the main intention of the Dormitory Coun- cil. Because for years study conditions in the mens’ dorms forced serious students to seek out places other than their rooms to study. Good study conditions are now in effect in the dorms because of sheer force and the dedication of its members. Beyond the bully role, new policy instituted this year by President Jack Eck urged the Council to ad d the job of counselor to its police role, so that the Dorm Council now sponsors scholarships, requests dorm re- pairs by the Administration, and talks pri- vately to especially troubled persons. But their main job still remains the protection of study conditions through brute force — something which is indispensable to the Liberal Arts in the 20th Century. 100 FRESHMAN ORIENTATION Although the Freshman Orientation Committee was formed only four years ago, it has quickly become one of the prestige organizations on the Muhlenberg campus. The Committee’s purpose is to aid the Freshman’s adjustment to college life rather than hindering it as the infamous Tribunal was inclined to do. Now the be- wildered Frosh not only has to contend with a Big Brother or Sister who is trying to impress him with upperclass sophistication, but also with a friendly orientation advisor who gives him aid and comfort on one hand and enforces traditional dink-doffing respect to General Pete on the other. There are many fringe benefits for Com- mittee members aside from the opportunity to become a collegiate hero symbol to the impressionable Freshmen. Fraternity men have an opportunity to get their sights on potential pledges (Horrors! Not dirty rush- ing . . .?); upperclass women can confront and evaluate the new competition; and upperclass males get a head start on the rest of the male population in the attempt to impress a fresh crop of wide-eyed, fair, young maidens. In this game, nobody loses but the Freshmen. H a Y " JH| i • Wm First Row. J. Turoczi, J. Poles, J. Petree, R. Low, J. Glass, Chairman , R. Gowdy, K. Sweder, J. Hender- son, E. Drasia, G. Koniver. Second Row. P. Carta, C. Riegel, N. Weltz, N. Sellers, N. Struck, C. Smullen, J. Decking, H. Carmichael, J. Yenchko, C. Schlenker. 101 A college yearbook is not a supplement to the cata- logue. If it is a dynamic book, it can help to create a vital image of the college to outsiders. But the yearbook has a definite responsibility to the student body whose life in one academic year it represents. A yearbook needs to be intimate and individual: intimate in its por- trayal of the people, events, and attitudes which uniquely affected the college community in a particular year; and individual in its approach to that portrayal, in the order- ing of the year ' s chaos into a coherent statement of what the school means to those who live and work in it. The guiding idea behind the 1964 Ciarla was, there- fore , to define with pictures and words the conspicuous and the subtle ingredients which gave Muhlenberg Col- lege an elusive, but very real personality as an educa- tional institution. Not all that is said (please read the copy!) is complimentary. But then that is one of the privi- leges and responsibilities of intimacy: it reveals faults as well as merits. The Ciarla was created this year by a staff, so that many diverse and sometimes highly personal definitions of Muhlenberg were contributed to the making of the final statement: the 1964 Ciarla. To these hardworking and imaginative people: Thank you. The Editor 1964 CIARLA Patricia Herbst and Carol Riegel Associate Editors Judy Decking Editor-in-Chief Brian Clayton Jones Photography Editor Ronald Low Advertising Manager Judith Jeffreys Business Manager Business Staff Catherine Baumer Patricia Camody J. Phillip Glass Judie Rudsall Fern Mann Copy Editor 103 Copy Staff Karen Heisler Marilyn Morgan Nan Sellers Barbara Wagner Typists Patricia Hoffman — Seniors Carol Swartz — Activities Ernest Beckley and Stephen Garber Sports Editors Senior Editor Judy Conrad and Fern Fantozzi General Staff Margot Clark Art Editor Anne Krajsa Albert Jansen and Tim Jones Fraternity Editors i Edward Bonekemper Editor-in-Chief WEEKLY Making a significant contribution to the total program of Muhlenberg College, the Muhlenberg Weekly made a real fine effort to cooperate with all the constituencies of the college community. The Weekly took a positive attitude — positive abhorrence of all campus developments. Noteworthy Weekly kudos went to the football coaches, the radio station, and, consistently during the year, to the administration. These groups showed their appre- ciation to the paper by sponsoring a thinly-disguised censorship bill and by berating the Weekly for continuing its tradition of irresponsible yellow journalism. The left-wing Bonekemper-Kidd-Dempster-Jones-Becker-Franz-Dewald faction of the staff were the recipients of frequent criticism for their consistently negative attitudes. And, in the true spirit of Muhlenberg, their occasionally positive statements drew criticism from other quarters. All in all, the Weekly once again satisfied no one but the staff and proved to be a millstone around the social community ' s neck. It still remains to be seen whether the Weekly can lead Muhlenberg over the brink or out of the quagmire. Judith Jeffreys Business Manager Jean Dayton Nancy Lewis Linda Keller Alma Perlis Richard Levinson Chris Moore Judy Birdsall Da vid Voron Julie Morgan Nan Sellers 104 George Franz Donald Eismann Wilson Dewald Harriet Carmichael Larry Crouthamel Karen Heisler Colette Rosenberger Barbara Wagner Elizabeth Kidd News Editor James Smith, Ron Rappeport, Jack Poles, Leslie Scarborough. Sports Staff Blakelyn Dempster Managing Editor Robert Knouss Assistant Advertising Manager % s 105 Edward Bonekemper III, President PUBLICATIONS BOARD The Publications Board is conspicuous for its inconspicuousness. Composed of the editors and business managers of the three college publications and the managers of the radio station, the Board meets to gen- erously allot reserve funds to alleviate the debts of its member organizations. This year the Board spearheaded the in- vestigation of WMUH’s proposed budget, thereby creating a political springboard for Student Council Presidential aspirant Tom Horne. However, both Mr. Horne and the radio station lost their respective con- tests. 106 First Row: R. Harper, S. Zartarian, E. Deakin. Second Row: S. Foss, J. Henry, C. Pond, D. Eismann, M. Rhoads, E. Black, Hardsick, R. Seay, R. Monaco, Station Manager. WMUH WMUH is a constantly struggling organ- ization. It operated under primitive condi- tions in the basement of the Library, and then disappeared entirely for a few months before moving into its new facilities in the Seegers Union. But, alas, the station’s troubles were just beginning. Stu- dent Council challenged the validity of some of the station’s proposed expendi- tures, and this prompted a “Council probe " into WMUH’s finances. Then al- ways looming like an active-radio cloud in the station ' s future is the possibility of ob- taining an FM license which would allow the station to broadcast throughout the Lehigh Valley. Will the struggling, har- rassed college radio station make good? Will the FCC grant WMUH an FM license? Tune in next week for another frustrating chapter. Nan Parker, Assistant Editor, Klaus Kingstorf, Art Editor ARCADE David Gaskill, Editor The best thing about the Arcade is that when it is a success, it is a private triumph and not the shared glory of a synthetic group. It is written in the isolation of dor- mitory rooms, downtown apartments and the secret places of minds no longer quite young. The Spring edi- tion contained a balanced mixture of short story and poetry, the end result being a collection of well-written, individual expression. It was the literary toleration of editor David Gaskill which attracted contributing talent. But more than this, the poetry of the editor himself had a shaping effect upon the magazine: Gaskill’s odd eloquence had rushed across the Arcade’s pages for four years and during the period of his editorship people trusted the validity of their own perceptions. 107 ALPHA PSI OMEGA Basking in obscurity, APO, not to be confused with the graduate-level Boy Scout troop having the same English initials, is the national dramatics fraternity for those actors on the Muhlenberg campus who have been affiliated with two separate dramatic societies as a performer and as a common stagehand. Considering the fact that the total number of dramatic societies at Muhlenberg equals exactly two, a per- son hoping to qualify for the fraternity must be extremely active in the theatre arts on campus. J. Rusnak, B. VanEmon, R. Berlin, L. Meinzer, J. Robertson, A. Houpt, President Seated B. VanEmon, J. Robertson, F. Fantozzi, Secretary, F. Myers, Business Manager; L. Meinzer. Stand in g R. Cooper, J. Hess, R. Post, K. Williams, R. Berlin, President, E. Gunther, J. Rusnak, A. Douglass. MASK AND DAGGER Mask and Dagger, Muhlenberg’s tradi- tional dramatic society, centers its interests primarily in the academic theatre and in providing the opportunity for all interested students to participate in all phases of theatrical experience. Two plays, chosen on the basis of their literary merit and en- tertainment value, are presented each year under the direction of Dr. Andrew Erskine. Considering this, people still drop in to see M D performances, some of which approach the memorable. Who will ever forget the night a rainstorm inter- rupted Arms and the Man? Who among us is likely to forget the gay abandon of Bell, Book and Candle ' s witty lines? At least in experimental theatre, the screaming keeps you awake — if it reaches the proper vibrations. 108 MUHLENBERG EXPERIMENTAL THEATRE They: We worship and adore you, oh Mighty Ruler and Enlightened One. You are our guide to the ful- fillment of intellectualism; we are but humble followers. Through you we escape from the harsh reality of stupidity into the magic realm of pseudo-wisdom. Our words are but symbols of the great Un- known, whirled and hurled from our mouths in a sacred presenta- tion of Nothingness. Through you we offer, not one, but divers inter- pretations to be absorbed by the learned souls of our listeners. Teach us to speak; teach us to walk; teach us to depart to the world the innermost workings of your Most Hallowed mind. He: Forzala. First Row: F. Fantozzi, J, Robertson, H. Carmichael. Second Row: B. So 1 1, L. Meinzer, P Meyers, N. Backer, T. DeGroot, J. Glass, Director, B. Van Emon, R. Cooper. Third Row J. Eck, R. Seay, R. Hollstein, P. Brown, D. Sleeves, R. Berlin. Fourth Row K. Sweder Assistant Director, J. Rusznak, Assistant Director. 109 The Choir nearly vanished this year be- cause new members were unwilling to sacri- fice potential academic standings to prac- tice, but love of music or the threat of no tour won out. Each year there is one num- ber which is impossible to learn and which everyone hates because it so painfully re- flects twentieth century cacophony. As usual, the musical bugbear was composed by the director, Ludwig Lenel, whose Lord of Lyfe surpassed his previous works in in- tricate rhythms and extremely close har- mony. Audiences are always impressed by the group’s virtuosity in singing the varied styles of Buxtehude, the American Negro, and Lenel. After a week of Southern expo- sure, the choir returned in a somewhat un- steady condition and sang a slightly off- key fragment of the concert program at Muhlenberg. Thousands of people in New England, the Midwest and the South are familiar with the skill of the Choir. COLLEGE CHOIR First Row. D. Peck, S. Wirth. Second Row P. Schlenker, G. Crabtree, S. Gerlach, E. Turnbach, L. Lang, K. Biehl, S. Barndt, L. Kusminder, V. Berg, V. Himler. Third Row: L. Stauffer, P. Herbst, D. McKeown, G. Schenck, J. Drayton, N. Charles, N. Carter, N. Griswold, Ludwig Lenel, Director. Fourth Row: P. Stu mp, C. Schlen ker, R. Gebhardtsbaruer, K. McKinney, K. Stauffer, N. Parker, H. Carmichael, J. Stauffer. Fifth Row D. Alderfer, E. Greenawald, K. Williams, A. Bougher, D. Manus, F. Gehrig, P. Brown, J. Wetzel, R. Raab, R. Mauch. Sixth Row D. Nowak, D. Degen, D. Beasley, C. Eisenhardt, D. Eberhardt, M. Jones, P. Hulac, J. Trainer. First Row R. DeVett, D. Sc h leg el. Librarian ; R. Raab, Manager; Miss Ann R hod da. Advisor , H. Weidhoft, Accompanist. K. Kingstorf, Director; R. Bonser, R. Frantz. Second Row R. Werley, D. Gaugler, S. Hatzai, C. Kalmbach, M. Heinsdort, C. Kuntz, K. Zindle. Third Row T. MacNair, J. F. Miller, K. Smith, D. Peck, C. Eisenhart, D. Fry, R. Heinzelman, K. Plitz. GLEE CLUB The freshman class is the largest single group on campus ever to have heard the Glee Club sing. The men introduced the freshmen to the Alma Mater and other eso- teric college songs at an orientation meet- ing. Attendance was compulsory. This does not mean that the men lack talent; they lack only recognition. Off- campus, they have been well-received, having appeared on Scranton’s WNEP-TV station in April. They frequently sing at churches and schools, bringing the college valuable low-pressure publicity. The club sneaked on-campus with a lawn concert at the Marsh home. The warm reception they earned seems to indicate that they ought to be given a whole assembly period to perform in early in the semester. BOILER MAKERS S. Hatzai, R. Frantz, R. DeVett, T. MacNair. no MARCHING AND CONCERT BAND Respected by musicians all over the country, bandmaster Albertus L. Meyers gets as much attention from Muhlenberg students as a Weekly editorial. Despite the intense lack of interest in his work, Meyers consistently manages to create a band — and music — out of nearly 60 musicians and 10 drummers drawn from Muhlen- berg ' s student body. The new stability and maturity of this year ' s band was due to its large number of senior members who stuck with the ' group for their entire four-year duration. This added maturity did not pre- vent the band from perfecting its Thoreauian ideal for marching formation: each to the beat of his own drummer. Particularly memorable was the band’s performance during half-time, Homecom- ing Weekend when it was allowed to march to the far end of the field, wait, and march back to its seats. Band members give all the credit for this occasion to Stu- dent Council and the Layfayette Band, without whose cooperation, they also could have played. Ill POLITICAL SCIENCE CONFERENCE This being a presidential election year, the Political Science Conference has un- dertaken an active program to keep stu- dents aware of what ' s going on in politics. In April, the conference conducted a pri- mary preference poll to determine the po- litical composition of Muhlenberg College. Most students interviewed were registered apathetic or belonged to the Know-Noth- ing Party, although there were several De- mocrats and Republicans available for comment. Early in November, 1964, the conference will take a second poll to de- termine if any significant changes have taken place in the political atmosphere of the campus. One major expectation is that the number of yawns will possibly increase due to the hot air generated by the cam- paigns. In conjunction with Phi Alpha Theta, honorary history fraternity, and with every other college in the Lehigh Valley, the con- ference risked the censure of some future McCarthy and present John Birchers by sponsoring the visit of two Russian diplo- mats to the Muhlenberg campus. R. Benveniste, C. Bell, F. Cort, J. Coley. 112 First Row: $. Taylor, J. Scheurer, D. Bennis, P. Muck, L. Alderfer, V. Berg. Second Row S. Pattison, L. Levin, E. Pappenberger, J. Harkness, B. Marley, G. DeGelleke. Third Row N. Rupnik, S. Alheim, E. Jasch, S. Christophersen, B. Dietlein, K. Carl. Fourth Row. J. Albright, P. Hoffman, N. Weltz, J. Stevens, E. Buhler, S. Heeremans. Fifth Row . E. Buss, C. Covert, C. Barnes, J. Arthur, P. Schmidt, T. Allen. Sixth Row Mr. Baker Hague, Advisor; M. Stewart, L. Gordon, D. Zimmerman. Standing, left A. Oakley, C. Mummey, C. Blose, B. Herbein, S. Angstadt. Standing, right M. Diehl, S. Haas, L Pancoast, E. Shaw, C. Wood. EDUCATION SOCIETY The Education Society, composed of those stu- dents who are encountering the significance of the Old Deluder Satan Act for the twentieth time in their education texts, plus student teachers who carry the scars of ditto ink and chalk dust, man- aged to work the film projector well enough without the aid of Ed. 13 (Audio Visual Aids) to have some worthwhile meetings. The society’s members regret that they have not yet arrived at an answer to “why Johnny can ' t read,” but as soon as they finish gluing their gold monogrammed initials on their brief cases, they promise to give it more thought. YOUNG REPUBLICANS Fellow Americans, as our country faces anew the Times that Try Men’s Souls, let us consider not only our candidate for office, the sole candidate prepared to answer his nation’s Clarion Call to Duty, but let us look beyond the man to his party, the Grand Old Party, the party of the people, the party of men who have Shaped Our Democracy, Abraham Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, Dwight D. Eisenhower; the party that still upholds the ideals of our Found- ing Fathers Preserved and made Sacred by the Blood spilt by Our Boys in countless wars; the party that helped the Weekly fill its Letters column; the party . . . First Row: S. Geib, S. Haas, E. Buhler, N, Gabler, K. Heisler. Second Row Dr. Baldrige, S. Pohe, E. Hoffman, E. Goldsmith, J. West, L. Raupp. 113 Seated: C. Taylor, S. Taylor, B. Laird, M. MacDonald, T. Frye. Standing Dr. Truman Koehler, Advisor, M. Kramer, C. Schlenker, R. Gebhardsbauer, R. Grosser, D. Mc- Keown, K. McKinney. MATHEMATICS CLUB The Math Club, devoted originally enough to " stimu- lating interest and understanding of mathematics,” was founded in 1921, 1937, and 1963. One important pre- occupation of club members is developing a formula to predict the next decline and fall of their organization. The present Math Club, however, ought to be much healthier than its predecessors since it has both founding mothers and founding fathers. Calculating females will probably assume control of the club some day, thereby stimulating a real interest in math. A renewed, campus- wide interest in statistics and probabilities has already been noted since the coming of co-education. The story of data in the raw and how to process it and a banquet in honor of retiring Professor Luther Deck highlighted this year’s program. SOCIOLOGICAL SOCIETY Sealed B. Solt, R. Rice, D. Sell, B. Ziegler, H. Missimer. Standing Mr. David Thomas, K. Kucera, P. Schlenker, R. Terry, M. Taylor, A. Krajsa, Mr. Roger Baldwin. 114 j mB SOCIETY FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF MANAGEMENT Seated: B. Schmidt, Vice President; J. Yohe, D. Kloth, Secretary, T. Mellen, President. Standing J. Willan, J. Glosco, M. Derry, J. Williamson, L. Andersen, M. Weber, A. Patterson, B. Rhody, W. Kibildis, R. Kandle, B. Coller. The Muhlenberg Sociological Association, organized in 1950, is in existence for the purpose of providing oppor- tunities for informal discussions of social problems outside of the classroom. Although a similar atmosphere of dis- cussion is ever present in the women’s dorms, the topics presented at Sociology Club meetings deal not only with the social problems of Muhlenberg ' s coeds, but also with current community social problems and the methods of combating these problems through various social agencies. Dr. George Peng, City Planner of Allentown, spoke to the group about the sociological survey and urban rede- velopment of the city. Mr. Frank Cosgrove of the Lehigh Valley Community Council planned a discussion and film on careers in social work. However, the projector didn’t cooperate, so discussion prevailed. Other professional social workers discussed migrant labor camps and handi- capped children. The group also met in the homes of Sociology professors, Dr. Morris Greth and Mr. David Thomas. Much of S.A.M.’s success this year can be attributed to Dr. Richards, the club ' s advisor, who so trustingly let the organi- zation run its own affairs. The club had some fine programs this year, and its speaker from the Federal Mediation Board was greeted by an unprecedented turnout. The big event of the year was " The Story of Productivity, " a show sponsored jointly by our organization, the Lehigh Valley Chapter of S.A.M. This exhibit by the Doall Company drew interested business men from all over the area. The club’s field trip to the New York Stock Exchange was also a success. 115 First Row R. Fulton, T. Hunsicker, J. Harkness, J. Kennedy, W. Todd, B. Wieand, D. Schlegel, J. Schaaf, F. Albright, P. Glenn, E. Schultz. Second Row Dr. Richard Hatch, Advisor, P. Nicholas, R. Wright, R. Smyser, A Yankowsky, D. Fry, D. Blair. The Science Club continues the tradition of all Muhlenberg organizations in finding a reason for its existence in “the promo- tion of understanding,” of chemistry, phys- ics, and biology. (Absolutely no organiza- tion on campus exists for the purpose of fun, although many are laughable.) The Science Club runs a small business on the side, selling lab coats, aprons, and the Handbook of Chemistry, which, if sold in the bookstore, would cost only double the price. The club also organized the Inter- collegiate Student Chemists meeting which brought students from many Eastern col- leges to the Muhlenberg campus. SCIENCE CLUB Seated E. Hoffman, Secretary-Treasurer , A. Longo, Vice President , S. Novak, President, J. Cope. Standing T. Simons, J. Mampe, J. Kirk, D. Lehmann, R. Mauch, C. Moyer, A. Romberger, G. Herber, R. Milligan, D. Stauffer, K. Faulke. PHYSICS CLUB The American Institute of Physics, or Physics Club as it is known to commoners, held a few successful meetings throughout the year with guest speakers from Bell Labs, Penn State, and Philco. Club mem- bers faithfully attended each meeting, hav- ing been encouraged to attend if recom- mendations were desired by their advisor. Term papers were required of physics majors this year and the resultant theses proved rather interesting. “Why is Heat Hot? " was the title of a profound history of heat, beginning with the type of heat generated by Cleopatra and ending with a demonstration of heat at work: a hole burned into the last page. Then there’s “Watermelon Head,” the exercise enthusiast, and the club president who blew out a $500 tube by overloading the circuit. Experimenting? 116 JOHN V. SHANKWEILER PRE-MEDICAL SOCIETY First Row: A. Toffer, C. DeRosa, K. Fran kenfieid, K. Biehi, J. Kohler, M. Kleintop. Second Row C. Metzger, G. Kaufman, J. Pizza, R. Low, F. Ingber, A. Kravitz, G. Luckman. Third Row: L. Berman, S. Garber, R. Levinson, R. Krauser, B. Meltsner, E. Simon, Dr. Charles Mortimer, Advisor , Fourth Row: R Wenrich, E. Baliantine, P. Schenck, C. Hallenborg, D. Pashman, R. McClellan, R. Kowalsky. Fifth Row: A. Maurer, R. Berlin, M. Miller, B. Pearson, J. Eck, J. Lichtman. The John V. Shankweiler Pre-Medical Society is distin- guished by having the largest enforced membership of any organization on the Muhlenberg campus. The Society tries to stimulate its members with risque movies featuring practically unclothed bodies and full of more blood and guts than Alfred Hitchcock productions. The Society also sponsors an annual frolic to some medical college and members fondly give standing ovations to speakers from drug companies after questioning them carefully and learnedly on the drug under discussion. Dr. Charles E. Mortimer, advisor to the club and to " out-group” pre-meds, handles first-aid to the prospec- tive M.D.s, applying an occasional therapeutic tourniquet by means of his Committee on Recommendations to Med- ical Schools and his signature on Medical School appli- cations. The academic year 1963-64 marked a milestone in the club ' s thirty-three year history. After an intensive, grueling examination, Dr. John E. ( " Jet”) Trainer was admitted as the Society’s only honorary member. The retirement of dear old " Shank,” the Society’s founder, injected mild nostalgia into the members. CHESS CLUB The Muhlenberg Chess Club was formed to promote interest in chess. Members are chosen on the basis of character, attendance, interest, and payment of dues. Though the principle thoughts of the players have been in queening pawns, we have been pawning queens in our effort to purchase a Guicco Piano. This year a student round-robin, two faculty-student chess matches, and participation in the Eastern Pennsyl- vania Chess League illustrated the courage and endur- ance of both students and faculty. The faculty lost two matches and the team won 3 and lost 4. The M.C.C. meets every Monday night except when studies, tests, other meetings, or basketball games intervene. Several noteworthy events kept the club in the lime- light. 1 . Carl Hallenborg set a new record of playing the Four Knights Defense in just two days. 2. Jack Cope played an Orangatang and lost. 3. B. English played the Danish (Gambet) against the French (Defense) with B. Horne. Next year the club will invite speakers to discuss the following topics of interest: 1 . Is a fianchetted bishop better than a plastered monk? 2. What is a pawn to king for? 3. Is a quick French mate moral!? 4. Oedipus and Queen Sacrifices. 5. Will a pinned queen date? 118 RUSSIAN CLUB First Row D. Pearson, Vice President , R. Newfeld, President, Rev. Arvids Zie- donis, Jr., Advisor,- T. Kochenderfer, Secretary. Second Row . J. Zamborsky, K. Williams, C. Okal, E. Buss, A. Messinger, Treasurer. Russkoye Obshchestvo is an organization founded this year to acquaint its members with Russian culture, par- ticularly emphasizing the “suffering of the Russian Peas- ants.” Connected with this is a keen interest in Russian Literature which helps one to understand better the intri- cacies of the Russian mind and language. The meetings are conducted on a high intellectual plane, often featur- ing slides by retiring Lutheran clergymen. Descriptions, such as the striking of the Kremlin clocks — bong, bong, bong — broadcast over the entire U.S.S.R. upon which the sun never sets, have inspired society members upon many occasions. Appreciation of Russian music is included in our cultural goals. The society attended a recorded per- formance of Mussorgsky ' s opera, Boris Godunov, in which the ear-shattering clamor of the giant bell, Ivan Vyeleekie — bong, bong, bong — drones out the mood of the misery and “suffering of the Russian peasants.” Lack of dues has not prevented the society from offering gas- tronomical delights to all who happen to “show.” The society ' s well organized program has made its first year a smashing success. The major requirement for membership in the society is the memorization of “hello” and “good-bye” in the Rus- sian language. DER DEUTSCHE VEREIN Seated: N. Andrews, J. Stauffer, J. Albright, H. Weidhoft, L. Keller, A. Pichaske, B. Van Emon, E. Heitmann. Standing T. Kochenderfer, E. Buss, President,- E. Jasch, C. Ernst, J. Werkheiser, A. Messinger, Vice President, P. Sutherland, W. Ligineke, R. Erdman, E. Wolf, Recording Secretary . Membership in Der Deutsche Verein, the campus Ger- man Society, is based primarily on dexterity in manipu- lating a stein full of beer while meeting near a dry cam- pus. Of secondary importance is the rapid and confident placing of omlauts and the ability to talk fluently in Ger- man while sneering at Romance Language majors. With a handful of pretzels and a stein, members of the society gathered this year for an authentic German picnic in the Rosegardens, they sang authentic German songs with Klaus Kingsdorf playing the accordion, they held an authentic German Christmas party, basking in the warmth of peace and good cheer, the latter in the form of Gluhewein (glowwine), they munched their pret- zels and washed them down with authentic German bier. There was beer too following singing, polkaing, treas- urer ' s reports, and classes. 119 HILLEL J. RakofF, M. Banner, B. Cohen, I. Weinberger, E. Basner, K. Olschansky, G. Sherer, E. Goren, R. Neufeld. The Hillel Society was formed to provide its members with the opportunity to ex- plore further the meaning of their Jewish heritage, and to encourage the members of the Jewish faith on campus to pursue their faith actively. The group participated in discussions with similar organizations from surrounding colleges and invited a number of lecturers to their meetings. The Muhlenberg Christian Association placed a triple emphasis on worship, education and service this year. As for worship, it eliminated devotions from its Sunday Eve- ning Forums, hoping that the evenings’ discussions would produce spiritual refreshment. Formal devotions were con- fined to retreats, Advent and Lenten Vespers. The group ' s emphasis on education brought the Billy Taylor Trio and the Advent Players to campus. M.C.A. members heard Dr. Bednar speak on politics and morality; they listened to a Maiser study of Freudian psychology; and sat with folded hands while Dr. Stamm discussed religion in current literature. All these study groups, lectures, fo- rums, and retreats cut into time for service, however, but they did manage to visit patients at the Allentown State Hospita I and the Good Shepherd Home. M.C.A. also talked 375 resident students into Fasting for Freedom, giving up one whole meal in the Union and sending the proceeds from Caucasian, prosperous, politically inert Muhlenberg to Negro families in depressed, politically critical Mississippi. 120 Father Sweeney, Advisor ; F. Solga, C. Cage, J. Liptock, P. Dreisbach, A. Somers, President . NEWMAN CLUB Since Muhlenberg College is a Christian college in the Lutheran sense of the word, Catholic students rely on the Newman Club to supplement their religious education and to help them get acquainted with other Catholics. The local Newman Club is the only campus organization to have more members than the Education Society. This is probably because it includes not only Muhlenberg stu- dents but also students from the Allentown School of Nursing and Cedar Crest College. This year ' s club spent much of its time tracking down Douay Versions of the Bible for Biblical Literature and the rest of its time lending Bibles to poor Protestants whose King James Versions lack the Apochrypha. If only someone could find a Staack Version, Muhlenberg would be a much happier college. MUHLENBERG CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION First Row: K. Williams, President; M. Stewart, Treasurer; L. Meinzer, Secretary; N. Charles. Second Row: C. Moyer, B. Solt, B. Burgess. Third Row: P. Muhr, C. Pond, A. Ambrose, L. Hartmaier. INSTITUTE OF FAITH Seated: S. Pace, C. Wood, P. Muhr, Chairman . Standing: C. Moyer, L. Meinzer, E. Nekarda, N. Charles, M. Stewart. The Institute of Faith annually brings to the campus a prominent theologian who discusses the relationship between Christianity and twentieth century living. Organized at the college in 1950, the Institute introduced Dr. Hagen Staack and Dr. David Bremer to the student body. This year, Dr. George Forell, professor of Protestant theology at the State University of Iowa, gave a series of lectures entitled “The Search for Meaning in Contemporary Life.” He divided the field of his search into the areas of academics, politics, and religion, losing at least half his potential audience by not searching for meaning in con- temporary sex. Fortunately, Dr. Forell was scheduled during the school day when most students are in the Student Union building anyway but since he confessed that his remarks were addressed primarily to Chris- tians, and since there are so few confessed Christians on campus, the value of his speeches was less than it should have been. 122 PHILOSOPHY CLUB The Greek philosopher Socrates once said, " The unexamined life is not worth living. " The purpose of the Philosophy Club is to give those students of diverse backgrounds who are interested in examining what Paul Tillich calls the " ultimate concerns " a chance to do so outside the domain of that all powerful goddess, the Grading System. Students who venture into this Academic Unknown of Intellectual Curiosity find both the attempts of earlier thinkers to critically understand themselves, and the tools best suited for such a journey. This year we were honored to hear a talk by Dr. Rodney Ring, official Court Jester (r of the Religion Department. We have also discussed such men as Plato, Kierkegaard, and William James. In each instance a dialogue has been carried on among mem- bers, and although a definite conclusion was not always made (and indeed philoso- phy does not so much provide Truth to be accepted as to clarify the issues), we did come away with a deeper understanding and appreciation of the problem being discussed. The Philosophy Club has not been organized to expound a simple five point credo ( " I am sorry, Shel, but we cannot have just a three letter philosophy! " — Hugh Hefner). The club has accepted no one system of thought over any other as the valid approach to reality. Rather, it has shown us that life is not either Good or Evil, but admits of many degrees. It is at this starting point that one begins to leave the realm of the unexamined life. Mr. Stewart Shaw, Advisor, P. Muhr, A. Heinlein, President, D. Rohland, C. Swartz. 123 Seated: John Turoczi, Phi Kappa Tau, Robert Mackay, Alpha Tau Omega, Chi Alpha , Kenneth Maurer, Phi Epsilon Pi , Albert Sproule, Sigma Tau Slepack, Phi Epsilon Pi; Lawrence Crouthamel, Tau Kappa Epsilon Raymond Sprow, Lambda Epsilon Standing: Jerry INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL 125 126 ALPHA TAU OMEGA The Pennsylvania Alpha lota Chapter of Alpha Tau Omega Fraternity, established at Muhlenberg in 1881, is the oldest of the six fraternities on the Muhlenberg cam- pus. The brothers of Alpha lota have been active in all areas of college activity. Members hold positions in Stu- dent Council, Student Court, Freshman Orientation Com- mittee, Cardinal Key Society, and the Weekly. The broth- ers have also participated in most of the athletic teams of the college. In the area of intramural sports. Alpha lota copped the intramural and IFC title in football and placed well in the other athletic events. The Fraternity was also awarded the trophy for Best Project in the Greek Week activities. As usual, the social calendar was crowded. The annual Parents ' Day in the Fall, the Thanksgiving Dinner for the Faculty, and the Alpine Weekend of Senior Ball mark a few of the high points of the social activities. The Fraternity looks back with satisfaction to the ac- complishments of the year and will continue to operate according to the ideals of the Fraternity. 127 LAMBDA CHI ALPHA 128 Lambda Chi Alpha was installed at Muhlenberg on October 12, 1940, through the merger of Theta Kappa Nu, Delta Theta and Philos Alumni groups. Since that time, Nu Epsilon has become a leader in many phases of campus life. The brothers of Lambda Chi have shown interest in all ph ases of campus activity. They are represented in such organizations and activities as: Student Council, Fresh- man Orientation Committee, Alpha Phi Omega, and the Choir. The Fraternity also has played an active part in the sports program of the college. Brothers of Nu Epsilon are to be found on all varsity teams. In the intramural program, Lambda Chi has been consistently near the top. In this year ' s Greek Week events, the Tug-of-War was won by Lambda Chi Alpha. Socially, the parties were consistently successful. They are among the liveliest on campus. Lambda Chi Alpha looks to the future to continue its fine record of accomplishments. 129 The Alpha Nu chapter of the Phi Epsilon Pi Fraternity has just completed another highly successful year. Academically, Phi Ep was awarded the Scholarship trophy for the tenth consecutive semester, illustrating the importance of scholarship in the Frater- nity. The Brothers also compiled an impressive record in extracurricular activities. Brothers of Phi Ep held important positions in: Student Council, Class Offices, the Pre- Medical Society, Student Court and the Weekly. Phi Ep was represented in all intra- mural athletic activities. The brothers showed a great deal of spirit in this area and fared quite well. The Fraternity was also represented on Muhlenberg ' s varsity football, baseball, track, and tennis teams. Social activities also played an important role in the Fraternity. Of special importance were the Big Weekends. Clearly, the Fraternity has enjoyed a highly rewarding year and anticipates similar success next year. This success is to be found in all areas — academic, athletic, serv- ice, and social. 131 132 The Eta Chapter of the Phi Kappa Tau Fraternity has had one of its most rewarding years resulting in accom- plishments in all fields of the college life. Phi Taus participated heavily in the intramural sports program of the college. The Fraternity copped top honors in Track, Cross Country, Basketball, and Tennis. With good standing in the other sports, the Fraternity amassed enough points to win the Intramural and IFC All-Sports Trophies. Brothers are also active in varsity sports from Football to Baseball. In addition to its sports life, the Fraternity has many brothers participating in other campus activities includ- ing.- Student Council, Student Court, Freshman Orienta- tion Committee, Union Board, Pre-Medical Society, and the Ciarla. A successful social season capped the accomplish- ments of the year. The Homecoming display was awarded top honors in the Fraternity competition. The Casino party during rushing was a memorable success. The annual Spring Weekend concluded an enjoyable and successful social calendar. 133 134 The Pennsylvania IOTA Chapter of Sigma Phi Epsilon has completed a successful twenty-sixth year at Muhlenberg and looks forward to a future brightened by the prospect of a new house. Composed of forty- two Brothers, the Chapter strives through dynamic academic and social programs for a Greater Muhlenberg and a greater Sig Ep. Sigma Phi Epsilon as a Fraternity places emphasis on the develop- ment of each individual’s potential, through scholarship, participation in campus activities, and a well-rounded social life. Scholastically, the Chapter program encourages the maximum academic achievement of each Brother. In addition, Sig Ep is represented in all phases of campus activity such as: student government, the Union Board, Band, Choir, WMUH, national honorary fraternities, and College Sports. The end of the year also saw the completion of a successful social program cen- tered on the Five Big Party Weekends and numerous other social and fraternal events. Emphasizing the importance of fellowship. Sigma Phi Epsilon participated in interfraternity events and intramural sports. Firmly convinced of the value of Fraternity life, the Brothers of Sigma Phi Epsilon look forward in the coming year to continued brotherhood growth and action. j TAU KAPPA EPSILON Tau Kappa Epsilon is the youngest of the six fraternal organizations on the Muhlenberg campus. A controversial house, Teke has an active inter-denominational policy. The Fraternity has successfully assimilated the opposing views of the brothers into a cohesive unified whole. Dem- onstrating an indifference to racial barriers, Teke has provided free board for African student Al Indeshaw, who enjoys the Fraternity’s fellowship. Completing a successful and interesting year, TKE copped the intramural bowling trophy. In keeping with its fine devotion to scholarship, Teke took second place in the inter-fraternal scholastic competition. On the other hand, without neglecting their studies, TKE’s brothers have made the house a fireball of social life. The parties are among the liveliest and most talked about on cam- pus. Always looking ahead, TKE anticipates the construction of its new house. Assuredly, Tau Kappa Epsilon has done its part to keep the name “Fraternity” alive on campus. 136 137 SPORTS First Row: Jean Hecht, M.S.; Joseph Frederico, M.A.; Lee Hill, B.S. Second Row: Raymond Whispell, B.S ; Ch arles Kuntzleman, A.B.; Kenneth Moyer, M.A.; William Flamish, B.S. ATHLETIC DEPARTMENT Raymond J. Whispell, B.S. Director of Athletics 139 VARSITY CHEERLEADERS JUNIOR VARSITY CHEERLEADERS First Row N. Backer, A. Armbruster, C. Covert. Second Row: K. Weiner, J. Pollock, M. Harvey. Third Row: C. Kennedy. 140 1963 was the final year of Muhlenberg College’s football transition from the Middle Atlantic Conference University Division to the Southern College division. Con- sequently it was the last year ' Lafayette and Temple would appear on the Berg schedule, and perhaps that was the way things should be, for the Mules went on to a 5 and 3 season record, the first winning season in three years. But it was Lafayette that gave Ray Whispell ' s squad its initial, and most memorable, victory. M aybe Dan Poust, Tony Longo and Charlie Woginrich sensed the end of an athletic era, or maybe Berg was really a better team. But the -reasons for victory are always secondary in importance to the victory itself, and after sixty minutes of ,play the score read Muhlen- berg 18, Lafayette 7. And right then the College thought it had a football team. Three games later that faith was shaken by a 33-14 loss to Gettysburg. But then Woginrich and Dave Binder took over. Berg closed the season riding the crest of an impressive three game winning streak, Binder received the Hatchet award for defen- sive excellence and Woginrich was named the East’s outstanding small college sopho- more back. But most important; Muhlenberg College in 1963 discovered that while losing was edifying, winning could be fun. 142 First Row T. Longo, A. Yankowski, B. Johnson, B. Rhody, D. Poust, C. Gills, D. Lowe, T. Turczyn, J. Mar- tough, R. Clymer, S. Novak, G. Hiller. Second Row D. Rissmiller, M. Peters, L. Rothrock, W. Shisler, R Wessner, S. Opp, D. Gysberts, G. Gould, T. Horne, C. Cage, R. Biolsi, J. Piatt, D. Binder, T. Haney. Third Row J. Creamer, J. Baker, R. Toney, T. Bird, W. Bennett, T. Whalen, D. O ' Hara, D. Brown, G. Ordway, C. Woginrich, E. Disbrow, A. Capobianco. Fourth Row: R. Cooper, D. Kunsman, D. Kech, J. Medica, A, Doug ' ass, R. Herath, G. Opperman, J. Weyruach, R. Byerm, J. Raymore, J. Piper, J. Schantz. Fifth Row Richard Mcwery, Manager Raymond Whispell, Head Coach; Charles Kuntzelman, Assistant Coach, Kenneth Moyer, Assistant Coach, William Flamish, Assistant Coach, Joseph Frederico, Assistant Coach, J. Janisak, Manager. 143 LETTERMEN Joy Ahrens Barrett Behnke David Bennett Thomas Brewer Carl Buchholz Brian Buckwalter Robert Christy John Good John Gruner John Morton Charles Price A. Groh Schneider David Seder Arthur Smith Robert Sprague David Steeves MANAGER Stephen Foss COACHES Rudolph Amelio Lee Hill SOCCER The 1963 soccer season was a winless one for the Cardinal and Gray booters. The failure to defeat any opponents can be attributed for the most part to the team’s inexperience. Although freshmen such as Chuck Price and Bucky Buchholz demonstrated skill in the sport and a determination to win, Coach Rudy Amelio ' s squad lacked the polish which comes from team members’ long experience of playing together as a unit. Lacking in depth, Muhlenberg was unable to keep pace with its competition which included schools such as Swarthmore, Franklin and Marshall, and Wilkes. The squad also lost to Haverford, one of the strongest soccer teams in the East. Said Coach Amelio about Haverford’s victory over Muhlenberg: “It is comparable to our foot- ball team playing Navy. " A more realistic slate of com- petitors and the experience of returning players ought to provide the formula for a winning team in seasons to come. 144 CROSS COUNTRY Despite the consistently fine performance of freshman, Alemayehu Indeshaw, Coach Charles Theisen’s harriers finished the 1963 season with a 1-8 record. The team was plagued with inexperience with only Bob Schlegel, John Trainer, and Tom Dobosh returning to the squad. The only win (19-36) came against Moravian with Al Indeshaw taking first place, and Jack Dickinson, sidelined earlier in the season because of an injury, showing po- tential as an asset to next year’s team. In a triangle meet on Albright ' s course, Muhlenberg placed third (59) in competition with Albright (50) and Haverford (35). The squad ended its season by compet- ing in the MAC Cross-Country championships in Phila- delphia. Although the only Muhlenberg runner to place was Al Indeshaw, the team as a whole beat Scranton and Haverford, both of which had beaten Muhlenberg earlier in the season. First Row: R. Schwartz, D. Zimmerman, D. Fritze, J. Dickinson, B. Schlegel. Second Row Charles Theisen, Coach, B. English, M. McClellen, A. Indeshaw, T. Dobosh, D. Rohland, A. Eastwood, Manager 145 WOMEN’S FIELD HOCKEY Finishing with a 7-1 slate, Jean Hecht’s hockey team had a most successful season. However, their 2-1 loss to Millersville was crushing in that it was the first field hockey defeat in five years. Nevertheless, the high com- petitive spirit and the fast action which characterizes the Muhlenberg squad was evident in its one loss, as well as its wins. Our Hockey team scored a total of 33 goals in eight games and allowed its opponents only four. Topping the point list was sophomore Jeannette Gier with 13 goals. Jean Monson and Barbara Bondi, both freshmen, scored eight and seven respectively. A highly disciplined team, Muhlenberg was almost unanimously complimented on its excellent sportsmanship, as well as its outstanding skill, during its highly successful season. First Row: L. Quattlander, B. Bondi, E. Keiber, D. Emhardt, C. Turner, M. Kleintop. Second Row: J. Gier, M. A. Peters, E. White, L. Mills, E. Kidd, N. Struck, M. Ward, D. Roth, Manager , J. Cunningham, Third Row: D. LaCoe, A. Zart, J. Monson, V. Berg, S. Miller, J. Freece, C. Newberry, Manager , Jean Hecht, Coach WOMEN’S BASKETBALL 1963-64 AWARD WINNERS Carol Bailey Emily Keiber Carol Newberry Mary Ann Peters Christina Schlenker Nancy Struck Margaret Watd COACH Helene H. Hospodar The women again held their own in intercollegiate basketball competition, turning in a 6-4 slate for the 1964 season. The fine teamwork was sparked by several outstanding players. Mary Ann Peters, who was the team’s high scorer with 137 points, and Peggy Ward together accounted for better than half of the team ' s 430 points during this season. The 6-4 record, however, belies much of the excel- lence of the team and its play. The total point margin of their losses was ten points and no loss was by more than five points, both facts showing the women to have been an even match for even their most difficult opponents. The closeness of these crucial games only points up the great skill of the Muhlenberg squad this year. 147 December saw Muhlenberg College caught in the throes of a revolutionary idea: If winning football games provided an enjoyable sensation, maybe victory on the basketball court would also prove palatable. “What the heck, we ' re in the College Division now and we can ' t watch All-Americans like Tom Wynn, Bruce Drysdale and Tom Hoover in action at Memorial Hall anymore. But doesn ' t John Linnet have some of Hoover ' s moves? That’s right, let ' s pretend he’s an All-American and nickname him “Hoover " and instead of losing to LaSalle, St. Joe ' s and Villanova by 20 let ' s beat Lebanon Valley, F and M and P.M.C. by 30. " That’s just what happened too. In fact, the Mules led by Linnet and Gary Spengler, even made the MAC College division playoffs. They lost both games but that didn ' t really seem important because the 12 and 10 overall record was a success unprecedented in the last five years. Along the way Spengler staged one of the finest exhibitions in Muhlenberg’s athletic annals. Against N.l.T. bound Temple he scored 40 points, but Berg lost. And perhaps a lesson was to be learned from that game. The excitement of having an Eastern basket- ball giant as competition was present for the only time during the course of the season. But victory was impossi- ble. Three years ago Muhlenberg had the choice of tak- ing one or the other. This season indicated that the right decision was made. 149 First R ow W. Jones, J. Linnet, R. J. Glass, M. Milles, A. Somers. Coach Stu hi muller, K. Butz, G. Spengler. Second Row C. Buch holz, N. Brassier, Third Row. Kenneth Moyer, Coach, W. Stoudt, R. Wessner, Lee Hill, 151 First Row: F. Cort, J. Janisak, J. M. Zimmerman, E. Jenkins, J. Larsen, J. Nederostek, Charles Kunzleman, Coach Second Row C. R. Lechler, J. Scher merhorn, T. Fenster ma ker, D. Zimmerman, J. Piper, C. Oswald. Third Row J. L. Schaefer, D. Degen, R. Schlegel, T. Weaber, R. Biolsi, J. Schantz. WRESTLING After two consecutive years of success the Muhlenberg College wrestling squad posted a record that fell below the 500 mark. But in compiling a 3-6-1 record Coach Charlie Kuntzleman ' s squad gained the experience nec- essary to make them authentic contenders for conference honors next year. In the last two matches of the season, against Lafayette and Ursinus, Kuntzleman used five un- derclassmen and three juniors. Rich Biolsi and freshman John Piper were responsible for a large measure of the success enjoyed by the wrestling team this year. Biolsi was undefeated in regular season matches and took sec- ond place in the MAC tournament, while Piper finished the year with 6 wins, two losses, and a draw. With Biolsi and Piper as the nucleus of a seasoned team Kuntzleman should look forward to next year with pleasant expec- tations. 152 TRACK Although Coach William Flamish’s cindermen finished the 1964 season with a 3-5 record, the squad had more than its share of outstanding individual performances. Senior Dean Lowe contributed much to the victories that the Muhlenberg thinclads did amass. He was the squad’s high scorer with 99 V 4 points and holds both hurdle records. One of the highlights of the season was the Swarth- more Middle Atlantic Conference College Division Track Meet. Muhlenberg placed a surprising second along with Dickinson College in a competing field of fourteen schools. Lowe broke the thirty-three year old 1 20 hurdle record of 15.2 by dashing it in 15.1. Charles Woginrich set a new pole vault record of 1 2 ' 6 " , breaking his own 1962 mark of 1 2 ' 5 V 4 Another notable performance during the season was that of Ken Butz who set a new shot put record of 4 8 ' 5 V 2 " . Although the squad lacked a quantity of good long distance runners, Al Indeshaw and Mike McClellan were consistent placers in their events with 21 and 2 5 V 2 per- sonal points respectively. First Row: D. Lowe, R. Wessner, C. Eisenhardt, R. McClellan, R. Christy, D. Rohland, E. Ballantine, J. Good, D. Fritze. Second Row A. Capobianco, K. Butz, D. Hall, D. Kaugher, B. Weshnak, W. Schmidt, R. Leon, R. Waltersdorff, F. Baus, J. Gruner. Third Row Joseph Blan kowitsch, Trainer; J. Janisak, C. Woginrich, R Todd, R. Sprow, T. Dobosh, R. Schwartz, M. Milles, A. Indeshaw, J. Sneddon, S. Foss, Manager; William Flamish, Coach 1 55 BASEBALL Although Coach Joe Federico ' s baseball team had its best record in eight years, the final tally of six wins and eight losses still did not make a winning season. The Mules were plagued with inconsistency, beating Scran- ton, for instance, 4-3 and losing the next day to Moravian, 10 - 0 . One outstanding game was Muhlenberg ' s 7-3 victory over the Engineers of Lehigh. This was sweet revenge for a 3-2 loss to the same team earlier in the season. The Cardinal and Gray accumulated eleven hits including a homer by Chuck Lewis and a triple by Bill Stoudt. Ralph Weisgerber, a freshman pitcher, picked up his first win of the season in this encounter. Because many team members were versatile and ex- perienced, Coach Federico’s strategy in selecting starting players was to use his nine best men. This not only en- abled him to put together the strongest combination pos- sible, but also to switch players ' positions during the sea- son. Seniors Larry Blum, Chuck Lewis, and Bill Stoudt will be a loss to the team, but capable underclassmen like Lynn Rothrock have the potential to finally give Muhlen- berg a winning baseball team. 156 First Row W. Stoudt, R. Mularz, J. Gehris, M. Merkel, B Whalen, D. Binder, L Rothrock, W. Dunkel. Second Row Joseph Federico, Coach, R. Tooker, M. Capobianco, T. Fenstermaker, F. Clark, R. McCloskey, C. Lewis, G. Steigerwalt. Third Row M. Smith, R. Haddock, M. Man n ing, W. Shisler, C. Heim, R Weisgerber. 157 TENNIS The 1964 season produced a 7-4 record for Coach Kenneth Webb ' s netmen and also established freshmen Jack Dickinson and Ray Garrison as assets to this and future seasons’ squads. The return of six lettermen was backed by the strength of these two “frosh finds ' ' to again put this Muhlenberg team in the winner ' s circle. The combination of Garrison and Dickinson was a highly successful one in doubles competition, while Gar- rison fared well alone, winning all but one of his singles matches. By the end of the season Garrison had taken over Ed Simon ' s top-seeded position. Any hopes to place in the MAC Tennis championships were cut short for Simon, Dickinson, and Garrison. Initially paired against players that later went on to win titles, the representa- tives from Muhlenberg had little opportunity to face more than one opponent. The team will miss the dependable winning of senior Morgan Brassier, but with Brassier as the only graduating member of the squad, Muhlenberg has a good chance of compiling an even more impressive record in the spring of 1965. First Row Kenneth Webb, Coach, M. Friedman, J. Henderson, E. Simon. Second Row B. Eddington, J. Dickinson, M. Brassier, S. Smythe, R. Garrison. 158 WOMEN’S TENNIS Carrying thru the winning name of the female athletes of Muhlenberg, the women ' s tennis team ended their season with a 3- 1 slate. Guided by one of Muhlenberg ' s winning coaches, Jean Hecht, the netwomen copped victories with their first three games against Millersville [ 6 V 2 -V 2 ), Drexel (3 V 2 - V 2 ), and Moravian (5-0). They lost their last game against East Stroudsburg (5-0), ending their winning streak. The outstanding player of the season honored at the All-Sports Banquet was jun- ior Annika Toffer. Other members of the team who displayed excellent ability were Mary Ann Peters, Barbara Bondi, and Jean Monson. Concluding the women ' s role in this year’s athletic season, the tennis team maintained the winning reputation of the ' Berg coeds, an enviable reputation on this campus. First Row : M. A. Peter, N. Baker, K. Frankenfield, A. Toffer. Second Row: Jean Hecht, Coach, C. Newberry, J. Monson, B. Bondi. 159 GOLF First Row D. Anderson, R. Bartholomew, R. Bonser. Second Row R. DeLong, D. Becker, Erwin “Ned” Senger, Coach FENCING A 13-14 loss to Haverford was as close as the Muhlenberg College fencing squad came to registering a victory in the 1963- 64 season. But despite a 0 and 7 team record, individual performances were often encouraging. Dave Gaskill compiled a 9-3 record in the MAC ' s post-season tournament and was named to the All Con- ference foil team. Also, next year will see the return of successful competitors Steve Hatzai and Dick Kressloff. LETTERMEN John Dickinson L. Jeffrey Dobbin Edwin Fischl David Gaskill Stephen Hatzai Richard Kresloff Fritz Krisrbergs Barron Weand Charney Weber Barry Weshnak Douglas Young COACH Andrew Erskine 160 SPECIAL EVENTS THE CHAD MITCHELL TRIO , . . 162 163 SPRING SING . . . 164 165 MUSIC AND MORE MUSIC Faculty Concert 1 67 OUR SPEAKER FOR TODAY IS • § 0 D. George W. Forell, Institute of Faith 170 i 171 Dr. Fritz Machlup, Visiting Scholar 172 The Rev. B. Davie Napier , Theologian 173 Dr. Hyman Lumar, American Communist 174 Mrs. Zelma George 1 75 The Marriage of Figaro Hansel and Gretel OPERA WORKSHOP . . . 177 MASK AND DAGGER Bell, Book, and Candle Arms and the Man 178 I MUHLENBERG EXPERIMENTAL THEATRE . . . Three Actors and Their Drama Caligula 180 TUG OF WAR 183 Homecoming Queen Susan Miller HOMECOMING WEEKEND 186 M O.D.K. CARNIVAL . . . 188 ENIOR BIOGRAPHIES AND ADVERTISEMENT! SUSAN F. AHLHEIM, A.B. 1 Hostings Drive, Merrick, N. Y. Delta Phi Nu 2, 3; Education Society 1, 3, 4. VINCENT S. AJELLO, A.B. 654 S. Filmore St., Allentown, Pa. JUDITH A ALBRIGHT, A.B 513 Meade Terrace, Shilling ton , Pa. Der Deutsche Verein 2, 3, 4, (Treasurer 4); Psi Chi 4, Delta Phi Nu 2, 3; Women ' s Council 3, Education Society 1, 2, 3, 4. LARS T. ANDERSEN, A.B. 1 E. Germantown Pike, Plymouth Meeting, Pa. Der Deutsche Verein 3, 4; Alpha Tau Omega 1, 2, 3, 4; Track 1; Soccer 3; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4. NANCY N. ANDREWS, A.B. 224 Arlington St., Mineola, N. Y. Der Deutsche Verein 1, 2, 3, 4, (Secretary 3); Delta Phi Nu 2, 3, 4; Delta Phi Alpha 2, 3, 4, (Vice President 4); Phi Alpha Theta 4; M.C.A. 1 . RONALD M. ANDREWS, A.B. 35 N. Jefferson St., Allentown, Pa. Golf 4; Track 1; Basketball Manager 2; Football Manager 1, 2; Intramural Football 1; Commuters Club 1. GARY A. ANTHONY, A.B. R.D. 2 Box 387, Harrisville, Pa. Phi Kappa Tau 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Institute of Faith 1, 2; M.C.A. 1, 2; Mask and Dagger 2, 3, 4; Union Publicity Committee 4; Pre-Theo Club 1, 2. KENNETH C. ARNDT, B.S. New Ringgold, Pa. Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Men’s Dormitory Council 2, 3, 4, (Treasurer 4). THOMAS C. ATKISS, B.S. 239 Park Lane, Massapequa, N. Y. Lambda Chi Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4; Choir 1, 2; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Science Club 1, 2, 3, 4, (Vice-President 4). STANLEY J. AUKBURG, B.S. 8128 Forrest Ave., Phila., Pa. Dean ' s List 2, 3; Track 1; Phi Epsilon Pi 1, 2, 3, 4; WMUH 2; Ciarla 3, 4 ; Weekly 1, 2, 3, 4. DIANE L. BACHNER, A.B. R.D. 2 Catfish Lane, Pottstown, Pa. Women’s Basketball 1, 2; Sociology Club 3, 4. NANCY M. BAKER, A.B. 42 Wyomissing Blvd., Wyomissing, Pa. Women ' s Basketball 1; Women ' s Tennis 1, 2, 3, 4; Honor Dormitory Committee 2, 3; Dormitory Council 4. IRENE E. BARI LOVITS, A.B. 1328 Newport Ave., Northampton, Pa. Newman Club 2, 3, 4; Education Society 2. DAVID C. BECKER, A.B. 214 2 N- Hall St., Allentown, Pa. Varsity Golf 2, 3, 4, (Captain 4); Intramural Football 1; Commuters Club 1. WILLIAM H. BECKER, A.B. 9 Ailing St., Hicksville, N. Y. Dean’s List 2, 3, 4; Who ' s Who 4; Omicron Delta Kappa 4; Pi Delta Epsilon 3, 4; Phi Alpha Theta 3, 4, (President 4); Cardinal Key 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Executive Council 2; Golf 1; Political Science Conference 3, 4; Mermaid Tavern Society 3, 4, (President 4); Weekly 1, 2, 3, 4. ERNEST A. BECKLEY, A.B. 39 Herkimer Road, Scarsdale, N. Y. Alpha Tau Omega 2, 3, 4; Pi Delta Epsilon 4; Baseball 1; Intramural Sports 2, 3, 4; Ciarla 2, 3, 4; Weekly 1, 2, 3, 4; Society for the Advancement of Management 2, 3; Political Science Conference 2, 3, 4; Mermaid Tavern Society 4; Freshman Orientation Program 4; Big Brother Program 2, 3, 4; Senior Research Seminar 4; Freshman Consti- tution Com m ittee 1 . RICHARD H. BENVENISTE, A.B. 139-18 233rd St., Laurelton, L. I., N. Y. Dean ' s List 2, 3, 4; Phi Alpha Theta 2, 3, 4; Phi Sigma lota 3, 4; Track 1; Political Science Conference 3, 4, (President 4); Mermaid Tavern Society 3, 4; Student Court 3, 4; Student Awareness Committee 2; Weekly 1, 2. KATHRYN R. BENZAK, A.B. R.D. 2, Center Valley, Pa. Women ' s Commuters Club 2, 3, 4. GERALD S. BESSES, B.S. Apt. S-727 Cooper River Plaza, Pennsauken, N. J. Dean ' s List; Class Honors; Phi Epsilon Pi; Pre-Med Club 2, 3, 4; Chess Club 1, 2, 3, 4; (President 2, 3, Vice-President 1); Weekly 1, 2, 4; Big Brother Program 3, 4; N.O.R.M. 3, 4. KARIN C. BIEHL, B.S. 64 Hillside Ave., Huntingdon Valley, Pa. Delta Phi Nu 2, 3; Muhlenberg College Choir 1, 2, 3, 4; German Club 2, 3; Pre-Med Society 2, 3, 4; Union Board Cultural Committee 3, 4; Institute of Faith 1; Senior Counselor 4. NEAL L. BIRNBERG, A.B. 110 Post Ave., New York 34, N. Y. Dean’s List 2; Phi Sigma lota 3, 4; Sigma Rho Kappa 3, 4; Phi Epsilon Pi 1, 2, 3, 4, (Vice-President 3, 4); Weekly 1, 2; Education Society 4. CAROL L BLOSE, A.B. 905 Fernwood St., Emmaus, Pa. Psi Chi 4; Education Society 2, 4; Women Commuter ' s Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Spring Sing Refreshment Committee 3. JOHN L. BLUM, A.B. 41 Park Lane, Levittown, Pa. Basketball 1, 2, 3; Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; Society for the Advancement of Management; Business and Economics Club. ANDREW BOBOTAS, A.B. 105 Mattison Ave., Ambler, Pa. Lambda Chi Alpha 2, 3, 4; Football 1, 2; Track 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Society for the Advancement of Management 4. EDWARD H. BONEDEMPER III, A.B. 65 Lambert St., Hatfield, Pa. Who ' s Who in American Colleges and Universities 4; Omicron Delta Kappa 3, 4, (President 4); Pi Delta Epsilon 2, 3, 4, (President 3, 4); Phi Alpha Theta 3, 4; Weekly 1, 2, 3, 4, (Sports Editor 2, Managing Editor 3, Editor-in-Chief 4); Baseball 1; Publications Board 3, 4, (Presi- dent 4); Foreign Student Committee 3, 4, (President 4); M-Book Editor 4; Student Representative to Faculty Committee on Publications 4; Political Science Conference 3, 4; Student Awareness Committee 2, 3; Student Union Committee 1, 2; Ciarla 1, 2; Mermaid Tavern Society 3, 4; Judicial Reform Committee 3, 4; Big Brother Program 2, 3, 4. RICHARD J. BONSER, A.B. 2536 Linden St., Bethlehem, Pa. Varsity Golf 4; Intramural Sports 3, 4; M.C.A. 3, 4; Glee Club 4. NORMAN BOYER, B.S. 4626 Naples St., Phila. 24, Pa. Dean’s List 2, 3, 4; Mermaid Tavern Society 3, 4; Choir 2; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, (Director 3); Wrestling 1; Track 1, 2, 3; Pre-Med Society 2. NORMAN M. BRASSLER, A.B. 258 Ridgewood Ave., Glen Ridge, N. J. Alpha Tau Omega 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball 2, 4; Tennis 2, 3, 4 (Captain 4); Cardinal Key 3, 4; Investigator for Supreme Court 3, 4; Society of the Advancement of Management 2, 3, 4. GRETCHEN M. BUSHNER, A.B. 235V2 S. 14th St., Allentown, Pa. Delta Phi Alpha 2, 3, 4; Der Deutsche Verein 1, 2, 3, 4; Education Society 2, 3, 4. EDWARD C. BUSS, A.B. 630 S. Bergen St., Bethlehem, Pa. Dean ' s List 3, 4; Delta Phi Alpha 3, 4; Der Deutsche Verein 1, 2, 3, 4, (President 4); Pre-Theo Club 1; Education Society 3, 4. DONALD C. CAMPBELL, A.B. 16 Helene Ave., Merrick, N. Y. Lambda Chi Alpha; IFC Coordinating Committee (Chairman); IFC Pub- licity Director; Wrestling 1, 2; Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4; Freshman Execu- tive Committee; Big Name Entertainment Committee. KAREN J. CARL, A.B. 1607 Kenneth Ave., Baldwin, N. Y. Hockey 1, 2; Basketball 1, 2, 3; Delta Phi Nu 2, 3, 4; Dormitory Council 4; Class Executive Council 1, 2, 3, 4; Union Hostess Committee 3, 4 ; Education Society 2, 3, 4. KAY CHRISTOFFERSEN, A.B. 199 Boston Ave., Massapequa, N. Y. Phi Alpha Theta 3, 4; Delta Phi Nu 2, 3; Concert Band 1. 192 JEANNE M. CLARK, A.B. 22 Ridgeway Ave., Oaklyn 6, N. J. Homecoming Court 4; Pi Delta Epsilon 3, 4; Delta Phi Nu 2, 3, 4 ; Varsity Hockey 2, 3; Education Society 2, 3, 4, (President 4); Enter- tainment Committee 3, 4; Weekly 1, 2, 3, 4. MARGOT G. CLARK, A.B. R.D. 4, Bethelhem, Pa. Dean’s Lisi 2, 3; Ciarla 4, (Art Editor 4). EDWARD W. CLOUGHEN, A.B. 1 232 Alsace Road, Reading, Pa. Sigma Phi Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, (Marshal 2, 3, Chaplain 4); Pre-Theo Club 1, 2. ROBERT J. CLYMER, B.S. 48 W. Chestnut St., Souderton, Pa. Varsity Football 1, 3, 4; Intramurals 1, 2, 4. ROBERT B. COCHRAN JR., A.B. 46 Irving Ave., Livingston, N. J. JEAN A. COLDREN, A.B. 625 Waverly St., Shillington, Pa. Education Society 4. BEVERLY J. COLLER, A.B. 519 Meadow Lane, Oreland, Pa. Intramural Volleyball 2, 3; Delta Phi Nu 2; Commons Committee 2, 3, (Chairman 3); Society for the Advancement of Management 3, 4. CAROL A. CONSTANTINE, A.B. 660 Westminster Ave., Allentown, Pa. Mask and Dagger 3, 4; Creative Arts Workshop 3. ELLEN R. COOK, A.B. 451 McKinley St., West Hempstead, L. L, N. Y. Sigma Tau Delta 4, (Secretary 4); Homecoming Queen 2; Homecoming Committee 3; Freshman Orientation Committee 2, 3; Delta Phi Nu 2, 3; Senior Counselor 4; Education Society 4. JOSEPHINE E. COOKENBACH, A.B. 9 Williams Road, Haverford, Pa. Dean ' s List 4; Varsity Hockey 1; Delta Phi Nu 3, 4; Women’s Council 3; Dormitory Council 3; Spring Sing 2, (General Chairman 2). RAYMOND S. COOPER, A.B. 46 Franklin Ave., Midland Park, N. J. Alpha Psi Omega 4; Track 1; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 4; Marching Band 1; WMUH 2, 3; Class Constitution Committee 1; M.E.T. 2, 3, 4; Mask and Dagger 3, 4. GAIL K. CRABTREE, B.S. 1881 Harte Road, Jenkintown, Pa. College Choir 1, 2, 3, 4; Education Society 4; Mathematics Club 4. LAWRENCE S. CROUTHAMEL, B.S. 311 Farview Ave., Paramus, N. J. Pi Delta Epsilon 2, 4; Cardinal Key Society 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports 2, 3, 4; Tau Kappa Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, (President 4); IFC 4; Pi Beta Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4, (Vice-President 3, President 4); Weekly 1, 2, 3, 4, (Feature Editor 3, Asst. News Editor 4). FRANKLIN W. DALE, A.B. R.D. - r 1 Trailwood, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. Soccer 1; Wrestling 1; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Freshman Recrea- tion Committee 1; Der Deutsche Verein 2; Science Club 1. JUDY K. DECKING, A.B. 1203 Linden St., Allentown, Pa. Dean’s List 1, 4; Lambda Epsilon Delta 3, 4; Pi Delta Epsilon 3, 4; Sigma Tau Delta 4; Who ' s Who 4; Freshman Orientation 2, 3, 4; Ciarla 1, 2, 3, 4, (Associate Editor 2, 3, Editor 4); Publications Board 4; Special Entertainment Committee 3. ALICE J. DEISHER, A.B. 15 Church St., Kingston, Pa. Delta Phi Nu 3, 4, (Secretary 4); Senior Counselor 4; Choir 1, 2, 3; Opera Workshop 3. ROBERT H. DELONG JR., A.B. 226 Wilson St., Pottstown, Pa Golf 2, 3, 4; Basketball 1, 2; Intramural Sports 2, 3, 4; Phi Kappa Tau; I.F.C. Social Chairman 4; Social Committee of Seegers Union 3, 4; Big Name Entertainment Committee 4; Sociology Club 4; Weekly 1. BRUCE V. DENNIS 334 Juniper St., Quakertown, Pa. CAROLYN A. DEROSA, B.S. 32 W. Somerset St., Raritan, N. J. Der Deutsche Verein 3; Science Club 1, 2; Pre-Med Society 3, 4, Weekly 1, 2; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Big Sister 2. WILSON E. DEWALD, A.B 1009 Elm St., Watsontown, Pa. Phi Alpha Theta 3, 4; Pi Delta Epsilon 4; Band 1, 2, 3; Glee Club 2; Der Deutsche Verein 2; Weekly 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Constitution Commit- tee 1; Cla ss Executive Committee 3, 4. NANCY J. DODSON, A.B. R.D. 2, Dallas, Pa. Psi Chi 3, 4, (Treasurer 4); Delta Phi Nu 2, 3; Weekly 4. FREDERICK J. ECK JR., B.S. 85 N. Lehigh St., Shavertown, Pa. Omicron Delta Kappa 4; Cardinal Key 1, 2; Basketball 1; Track 1; Cross Country 1, 2, 3; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Alpha Tau Omega 1, 2, 3, 4; WMUH 1, 2 (Chief Engineer 2); Pre-Med Society 2, 3, 4; M.E.T. 2, 3, 4; Men ' s Dormitory Council 2, 3, 4, (Secretary 2, 3, President 4). DONALD A. EISMANN, A.B. 21 Linden Blvd., Hicksville, L. I., N. Y. Phi Alpha Theta; Delta Phi Alpha,- Alpha Tau Omega; Intra mural Sports 1, 2, 4; Mermaid Tavern Society 3, 4; Der Deutsche Verein 1, 2, 3, 4, (Treasurer 2, Vice-President 3); Class Treasurer 2; Freshman Orientation Committee 2; College Choir 1, 2, 3, 4; Opera Workshop 2, 3; Marching Band 1, 2, 3, 4, (Vice-President 3); Concert Band 1, 2, 3; Weekly 3, 4; Student Council Publicity Committee 1, 2; Young Republicans Club 4; Class Executive Committee 1, 2; Soph-Frosh Hop (Co-Chairman); WMUH 2, 3, 4; Class Constitution Committee 1; Big Brother Program 3, 4; Student Awareness Committee 3, Senior Re- search Seminar 4. BRUCE A. ENGLISH, A.B. 1738 Ramapo Way, Scotch Plains, N. J. Alpha Tau Omega 1, 2, 3, 4; Cross Country 3, 4. ELSIE L. EVANOSKY, A.B. 4120 Franklin St., W. Chesapeake, Va. Psi Chi 4; Hockey 1; Delta Phi Nu 1; Education Society 1, 2; Spring Sing 4. FERNANDA FANTOZZI, A.B. 440 Seneca St., Bethlehem, Pa. Ciarla 1, 4; AA.E.T. 2, 3, 4; Mask and Dagger 2, 3, 4, (Secretary 3, 4). KATHRINE M. FAUST, A.B. 56 Oakland Ave., West Hempstead, N. Y. LOIS E. FETTER, A.B. 330 Abington Ave., Glenside, Pa. Hockey 1, 2; Intramural Volleyball 1, 2, 3; Women ' s Council 3; Choir 2; Spring Sing 1 , 2. ANNE E. FICHTHORN, A.B. Stouchsburg, Pa. Delta Phi Nu 2, 3; Chapel Choir 3; M.C.A. 1, 2, 4; Lutheran Student Association 1, 2; Ecumenical Study Group 4; Education Society 1, 2, 4. DOUGLAS M. FOLLWEI LER, B.S. 417 N. 23rd St., Allentown, Pa. KATHRYN C. FRANKENFIELD, A.B. 202 Hamilton Ave., Bethlehem, Pa. Der Deutsche Verein 3, 4. GEORGE W. FRANZ, A.B. 413 Suffolk Road, Flourtown, Pa. Pi Delta Epsilon 4; Phi Alpha Theta 3, 4, (Secretary-Treasurer 4); Sigma Phi Epsilon 2, 3, 4, (House Manager 2, Pledge Master 3, Secretary 3, Alumni Relations 4); Weekly 4. DAVID C. FRY, B.S. 10 Grove St., Oneonta, N. Y. Sigma Phi Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4; Concert Band 1; Varsity Basketball Statistician 4; Glee Club 4. THOMAS W. FRYE, A.B. 326 Cemetery St., Jersey Shore, Pa. Phi Kappa Tau 1, 2, 3, 4, (Sergeant-at-Ar ms 3); Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4; Mathematics Club 4, (Vice-President 4). 193 DAVID L. GASKILL, A.B. 737 Main St., Pennsburg, Pa. Pi Delta Epsilon; Fencing 1, 2, 3, 4; Arcade 1, 2, 3, 4, (Editor 4). NADINE U. GEARHART, A.B. 706 Stoler Ave., Lansdale, Pa. Psi Chi 3, 4; Delta Phi Nu 2, 3, 4; Spring Sing Chairman 3; Weekly 1, 2; Education Society 3. RUTH GEBH ARDTSBAUER, B.S. 2122 Oakdale Ave., Glenside, Pa. Choir 2, 3, 4; Mathematics Club 4, (Treasurer 4); Union Hostess Committee 3, 4. CHARLES A GILLS, A.B. 2122 E. Susquehanna Ave., Phila. 25, Pa. Football; Eta Sigma Phi; Omicron Delta Kappa; Dormitory Council. JOEI B. GLASS, B.S. 1021 E. Slocum St., Phila. 50, Pa. Dean’s List 1, 2, 3, 4; Omicron Delta Kappa 3, 4; Phi Epsilon Pi 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Student Council 2, 3, 4, (Vice-President 4); M E T. 2, 3, 4, (Director 4); Arcade 2; Pre-Med Society 2, 3, 4. PATRICIA F. GLENN. A.B. 1115 Greenmount Road, Haddonfield, N. J. Delta Phi Nu 3. PETER K. GLENN, B.S. 306 Cherry St., Katonah, N. Y. CHARLES E. GOLDBERG, B.S. 7239 Ogontz Ave., Phila. 38, Pa. Phi Epsilon Pi 2, 3, 4 ; Intramural Sports 2, 3, 4, (Ping-Pong Champion 4) ; Weekly 2 ; Pre-Med Society 2, 3, 4, (Vice-President 3); Political Science Conference 3, 4 ; Young Democrats 3, 4. EDWIN M. GOLDSMITH III, A.B. 104 Waverly Road, Wyncote, Pa. Phi Alpha Theta 3, 4; Young Republicans 4, (Chairman 4). TED B. GOTTSHALL, B.S. Montgomeryville, Pa. Lambda Chi Alpha 3, 4 ; Track 1, 2, 3. ROBERT A. GRAFF, A.B. 1169 Easton Road. Warrington, Pa. Alpha Phi Omega 2, 3; Lambda Chi Alpha 2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports 2 ' 3, 4; Big Brother Program 2, 3; Society for the Advancement of Management 3, 4. ALFRED E GRASSA, A.B. 225 S. 3rd St., Bangor, Pa. Intermural Wrestling 2. EDWARD C. GREENAWALD, B.S. 2410 W. South St., Allentown, Pa. Intramurals 2, 3; Choir 2, 3, 4; Institute of Faith 4; Commuter ' s Club 1, 2, 3, (Secretary-Treasurer 3). RUTH V. GROSSER, A.B. 354 Liberty Ave., Hillsdale, N. J. Delta Phi Nu 3, 4; Chapel Choir 4; Bible Study 2, 3, 4; Mathematics Club 4; Weekly 2; Spring Sing 3, 4. ELIZABETH A. GUNTHER, A.B. 915 Main St., Bally, Pa. Majorette 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball 1, 2; Pre-Med Society 1, 2; Mask and Dagger 4. CARL P. HALLENBORG, B.S. 194 Franklin Turnpike, Mahwah, N. J. Dean s List 1, 2, 3; Tau Kappa Epsilon; Chess Club 1, 2, 3, 4, (President 4); Pre-Med Society 2, 3, 4; Gig Brother Program; Freshman Advisory Committee. RUTH W. HARRISON, A.B. 6950 Germantown Ave., Phila., Pa. DEBORAH B. HATCH, A.B. R.D. 1, Emmaus, Pa. Dean s List 4; Sigma Tau Delta 4; Student Court 4. FRED R. HAVERLY, A.B. 1 Clinton St., Homer, N. Y. Harr Memorial Prize; Football 1; Intramural Sports 2, 3, 4; Sigma Phi Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, (Vice-President 4); Class Treasurer 3; Class Execu- tive Committee 3, 4; Student Council 4; Union Board of Directors 1, 2, 3, 4, (Treasurer 3, President 4); Society for the Advancement of Management 2, 3. BETSY J. HAWMAN, A.B. 36 Lynne Ave., Wyomissing, Pa. Psi Chi 3, 4; Honor Dormitory Committee 3; Senior Counselor 4; Freshman Orientation Committee 3, 4; Sociology Club 3. DORIS V. HEDRICK, A.B. 114 Garden Road, Oreland, Pa. Psi Chi 3, 4; Delta Phi Nu 2, 3; M.C.A. 1, 2; Education Society 2, 3, 4; Chapel Choir 3. ALAN R. HEINLEIN, A.B. 721 Forest Ave., Westfield, N. J. Dean’s List 3, 4; Alpha Phi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, (Secretary 2); Psi Chi 2, 3, 4, (Vice-President 4); Phi Sigma Tau 4; Constitution Committee 1; Wrestling 1; Commons Committee 1, 2, 3; Mask and Dagger 2, 3, 4; Philosophy Club 4, (President 4); M.C.A. 3, 4, (Executive Council 4); Bible Study Group 3, 4, (Chairman 4); Ecumenical Study Group 4. DONALD S. HEINTZELMAN, A.B. 629 Green St., Allentown, Pa. ELIZABETH M. HELLRIEGEL, A.B. 683 Adele Place, Baldwin, N. Y. Phi Sigma lota 3, 4; Senior Counselor 4; Delta Phi Nu 2, 3, 4; Weekly 3, 4. GLEN B. HERBER, B.S. Box 213 Fogelsi ville, Pa. DAVID F. HILL, A.B. R.D.if4 Lehighton, Pa. Lambda Chi Alpha 1, 2; Intramural Sports 3; Chapel Choir 3; M.C.A. 2, 3, 4; Sociology Club 3, 4; Pre-Theo Club 1, 2; Bible Study Group 1, 2, 3, 4; Ecumenical Study Group 4. GARY L. HILLER, B.S. 128 Centre Ave., Jim Thorpe, Pa. National Science Foundation Scholarship 4; Phi Kappa Tau 1, 2, 3, 4; Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball 2; Science Club 4. ERNA J. HILLIARD, A.B. 108 Lake Road, North Tarrytown, N. Y. Dean ' s List 1, 2, 3, 4; Who’s Who 4; Rev. Dr. H. K. Bruning Gift Fund 3; Phi Sigma lota 3, 4, (President 4); Lambda Epsilon Delta 3, 4, (Secretary-Treasurer 4); Class Secretary 2, 3, 4; Delta Phi Nu 2, 3, (Secretary 3); Cheerleader 1, 2, 3, 4, (Co-Captain); Education Society 2, 3, 4; Big Name Entertainment Committee 4. EDWIN P. HOFFMAN, B.S. 2812 Livingston St., Allentown, Pa. Dean ' s List 1, 2, 3, 4; Phi Alpha Theta 4; Omicron Delta Kappa 3, 4, (Secretary 4); Phi Kappa Tau 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Council 1, 2, 3, 4, (Treasurer 3, President 4); Class Executive Council 1, 2, 3, 4; Mermaid Tavern Society 3, 4; Marching Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Concert Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Cross Country 1; World University Service 2; Union Board of Directors 2, 3, (Chairman 2); American Institute of Physics 3, 4, (Secretary 4). PATRICIA D. HOFFMAN, A.B. 3003 Greenleaf St., Allentown, Pa. Ciarla 4; Women ' s Commuter Club 2, 3, 4; Education Society 2, 4. GEORGE R. HOLLOWS, A.B. 21 Mitchell Ave., New Brunswick, N. J. Sigma Phi Epsilon 2, 3, 4, (Junior Marshal 3, 4); I.F.C. Athletic Committee 4; Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4; Society for the Advancement of Management 3, 4. RICHARD G. HOOD, A.B. 433 N. Main St., Hudson, Ohio Baseball 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; “M " Club 2, 3, 4; Big Brother Program 3; WMUH 2, 3. ANTHONY J. HORVATH, A.B. 718 N. Kiowa St., Allentown, Pa. AUDREY V. HOUPT, A.B. 44 Roving Road, Levittown, Pa. Alpha Psi Omega 3, 4, (President 4); Women ' s Hockey 1; Weekly 1, 2; Entertainment Committee 3; Education Society 2, 3; M.E.T. 1, 2, 3, 4; Mask and Dagger 1, 2, 3, 4, (Vice-President 4). 194 JOSEPH E. HOWARD, A.B. 4104 Tilghman St., Allentown, Pa. Lambda Chi Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4, (Social Chairman 2, 3); I.F.C. Social Chairman 3; Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Council 2, 3, 4; Assembly Chapel Chairman 2, 3; Constitution and Election Committee 3, 4; Executive Council 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Awareness Committee 2, 3; Soph- Frosh Dance Committee; Junior Prom Committee; Senior Ball Commit- tee 4. STEPHEN R. HUMPHERYS, B.S. 1 1 Woodside Drive, Fairmont, W. Va. Cardinal Key Society 3, 4; Pre-Med Society 3, 4 THOMAS F. HUNSICKER, B.S 2430 Allen St., Allentown, Pa. Commuters Club 1; Science Club 4. THOMAS R. JAMES, A.B. 179 N. Main St., New Hope, Pa. Soccer 1, 2, 3; Wrestling 1. ALBERT F. W. JANSEN, A.B. 22 Park Circle, White Plains, N. Y. Phi Kappa Tau 1, 2, 3, 4, (Secretary 4); Ciarla 4, (Co-Editor, Fraterni- ties 4). ELEANOR M. JASCH, A.B. 701 Stratford Drive, Phila. 15, Pa. Delta Phi Alpha, (Treasurer); Delta Phi Nu; Der Deutsche Verein ; Chapel Choir; Education Society; Institute of Faith; Union Hostess Committee. JUDITH A. JEFFREYS, A.B. 4394 Merrick Road, Massapequa, N. Y. Psi Chi 3, 4, (Secretary 4); Pi Delta Epsilon 3, 4, (Treasurer 4); Student Court Investigator 3, 4; Delta Phi Nu 2; Education Society 2, 4; Weekly 1, 2, 3, 4, (Advertising Manager 2, Assistant Business Mana- ger 3, Business Manager 4); Ciarla 3, 4, (Business Manager 4). BARRY P. JOHNSON, A.B. 40 Lum Ave., Chatham, N. J. Lambda Chi Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4, (Treasurer 3); Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Track 2; " M " Club 3, 4, (Treasurer 3, President 4); Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Italian Club 4. ALLAN R. JONES, A.B. 220 Walnut Lane, Ambler, Pa. Alpha Tau Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, (Secretary 4); I.F.C. Coordinating Com- mittee 3, 4; Intramural Sports 2, 3, 4; Weekly 1, 2; Der Deutsche Verein 2, 3, 4 ; Alpha Phi Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, (Corresponding Secretary 3); Cardinal Key Society 3, 4; Union Committees 3, 4; Big Name Entertainment Committee 4, (Business Manager 4). BRIAN C. JONES, A.B. 104 S. Park Ave., Longmeadow 6, Mass. Who ’s Who 4 ; Pi Delta Epsilon 3, 4; Omicron Delta Kappa 3, 4; Student Council 4; Weekly 2, 3, 4, (Photography Editor 2, 3, 4; Columnist 3, 4); Arcade 2, 3, 4; M.E.T. 3; Foreign Student Committee 3, 4. DANIEL A. JONES, A B. 1691 Paper Mill Road, Meadowbrook, Pa. MELVIN R JONES, A.B. 444 S. Broad St., Lititz, Pa. Chapel Choir 1, 2, 3, 4, (Manager 4); Glee Club 1, 2, 3, (Manager 3). TIM B. JONES, A.B 442 Church St., Trenton 20, N. J. Phi Alpha Theta 4; Pi Delta Epsilon 4; Weekly 2, 3, 4, (Paris Corre- spondent 3); Ciarla 4, (Fraternity Co-Editor 4); Fencing 1; Mask and Dagger 2; Young Republicans Club 1; Political Science Conference 4. FLORENCE E. KAHMAR, A.B. 1623 Rose Glen Road, Havertown, Pa. Phi Alpha Theta 3, 4; Women ' s Council 3, 4, (President 4); Dormitory President 3; Dormitory Evaluation Committee 2; Union Hostess Commit- tee 3; Delta Phi Nu 2, 3; Education Society 2, 3, 4. JEROLD KAUFMAN, B.S. 2006 Lantern Lane, Oreland, Pa. Tau Kappa Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, (Rushing, Co-Chairman 4); Intramural Sports 2, 3, 4; Mermaid Tavern Society 3, 4; Pre-Med Society 2, 3, (Treasurer 2, 3). JEAN A. KEENHOLD, A.B 726 Ferry St., Easton, Pa. Phi Sigma lota 3, A ; M.C.A. 1, 2, 3, 4, (Executive Council 3); Dormitory Council 2; Delta Phi Nu 2, 3; Education Society 2, 3. ELIZABETH G. KIDD, A.B 2017 Berkley Road, Norristown, Pa. Psi Chi 4; Pi Delta Epsilon 3, 4, (Vice-President 4); Women ' s Hockey 1, 2, 3, 4; Weekly 3, 4, (News Editor 4); Ciarla 1; Delta Phi Nu 2, 3, 4 ROBERT J KILLIAN, A.B. 133 Gordon St., Allentown, Pa. Dean’s List 3; Delta Phi Alpha 3, 4; Der Deutsche Verein 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports 2; Mermaid Tavern Society 3, 4; Poetry Workshop 2; Education Society 2; Commuter’s Club 1, 2, 3, (Vice-President 3); Veteran ' s Club 1, 2, 3. KLAUS J. LINGSTORF, A.B 178 Bellmire St., Floral Park, N. Y. Marching Band 1; Chapel Choir 1, 2, 3; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4, (Director 4); Der Deutsche Verein 2, 3, 4; M.E.T 3, 4; Arcade 4. STARR D. KINNEY, A.B Main St., Bridgewater, Conn. Delta Phi Nu 2, 3, 4; Dormitory Council 2; Economics Club 2; Society for the Advancement of Management 3. JACOB KLEIN, B.S. 1 848 Georges Lane, Phila., Pa. Dean ' s List 3; Fencing 1, 2; Intra murals 1, 2, 3, 4; Phi Epsilon Pi 1, 2, 3, 4, (Pledgemaster 3); Sigma Rho Kappa 4, (Vice-President 4); Weekly 1, 2, 3, 4, (Photography Editor 4); Ciarla 1, 2, 3; Cardinal Key Society 1, 2, 3, 4, (Vice-President 3); Pre-Med Society 2, 3, 4, (Presi- dent 3); Big Name Entertainment Committee 3; Men ' s Dormitory Coun- cil 3; Freshman Orientation Committee 2, 3, 4; Big Brother Program 2, 3, 4. MARJORIE A. KLEINTOP, B.S. 2328 S. Filbert St., Allentown, Pa. Women’s Hockey 1, 2, 3, 4; Women’s Council 3, 4, (Vice-President 4); Executive Council 3, 4; Leadership Conference 4; Pre-Med Society; Delta Phi Nu 2; Commuters Club 1; Women ' s Commuters Club 1, 2, 3, 4, (Vice-President 3). DIANA L. KLOTH, A.B. 55 Foxhurst Road, Huntington Station, N. Y. Cheerleader 1; Delta Phi Nu 1, 2, 3; Society for the Advancement of Management 3, 4, (Secretary 4). VIRGINIA F. KNORR, A.B 522 N. 29th St., Allentown, Pa. Psi Chi 3, 4 ; M.E.T. 3. ROBERT E. KOCH, B.S. 781 5th Ave., River Edge, N. J. THOMAS T. KOCHENDERFER JR., A.B 1451 DeKalb St., Norristown, Pa. Delta Phi Alpha 3, 4, (President 4); Alpha Tau Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, (Treasurer 4); Mermaid Tavern Society 3, 4, (Drawer 4); Der Deutsche Verein 2, 3, 4; Cardinal Key 1, 2, 3, 4 (Secretary 3, President 4); Weekly 1, 2; Chapel Choir 1, 2. GARTH A. KONIVER, B.S 1145 Walnut St., Allentown, Pa. Dean ' s List 3; Sigma Rho Kappa 4, (President 4); Phi Epsilon Pi 1, 2, 3, 4, (Rushing Chairman 3, Corresponding Secretary 3, 4, Pledge Chairman 4); Track 1; Fencing 1; Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Executive Council 3, 4; Homecoming Committee 3, 4, (Chairman 3, 4); Freshman Orientation Committee 2, 3, 4, (Executive Committee 2, 3, 4); Weekly 1, 2; Political Science Conference 4; Pre-Med Society 2, 3, 4; Big Brother Committee 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Executive Council 3, 4; Society for the Advancement of Management 3, 4, (President 4). RONALD J. KOVACH, B.S. 1071 Main St., Egypt, Pa. JOHN E. KOYEN, B.S. 215 Miln St., Cranford, N. J. Soccer 1, 2; Tennis 1; Intramural Sports 3, 4. 195 ANNE S. KRAJSA, A.B. 2809 Crest Ave. South, Allentown, Pa Pi Delta Epsilon 4; Homecoming Court 4; Representative to Glamour Contest 3; Young Republicans 4; Big Sister Program 3, 4; Transfer Student Advisor 4; Newman Club 2, 3, 4; Union Hostess Committee 3, 4; Fashion Show Co-Ordinator 2, 3, 4; Sociology Club 3, 4; Ciarla 4, (Senior Editor 4). WALTER P. KRAUSS, B.S. 1406 E. Willow Grove Ave., Wyndmoor, Pa. Alpha Tau Omega; Soccer; Intramural Sports; Pre-Med Society. KAREN I. KUCERA, A.B. 1007 Ferry Road, Doylestown, Pa. Delta Phi Nu 2, 3, 4; Sociology Club 4. BARBARA R. LAIRD, B.S. 47 Center St., Pittston 7, Pa. Cheerleader 1, 2, 3, 4, (Co-Captain 4); Basketball 2; Delta Phi Nu 4; Education Society 1, 2; Math Club 4, (President 4); Honor Dormitory Committee 2, 3. STEPHEN F. LATMAN, B.S. 7134 Ogontz Ave., Phila. 38, Pa. Dean’s List 2, 3, 4; Class Honors 2, 3, 4; Pi Beta Alpha 3, 4, (Chaplain 4); Tau Kappa Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, (Hypophetes 4); Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Pre-Med Society 1, 2, 3, 4; Chess Club 1; Big Brother Program 4. WILLIAM J. LAUTENBERGER, B.S. 573 Seminole Road, Franklin Square, N. Y. Dean’s List 2; Track 1; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; Marching Band 1, 2; Concert Band 1, 2; Science Club 1, 2, 3, 4. RAYMOND C. LEAR, A.B. 419 Krewson Terrace, Willow Grove, Pa. Lambda Chi Alpha; Football 1; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Big Brother Program 2, 4. ROBERT H. LEH, A.B. Box 77, Route 1, Palm, Pa. Marching Band 1, 3, 4; Concert Band 1, 3, 4. DOUGLAS E. LEHMANN, B.S. Montauk Highway, Bridgeha mpton, L. I., N. Y. Intramural Sports 2, 3; WMUH 2; American Institute of Physics 3, 4. ROBERT C. LEITH, A.B. Box 243, Springtown, Pa. PAUL F. LENNON, A.B. 737 Glenside Ave., Berkeley Heights, N. J. Lambda Chi Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4, (Steward 2, 3, President 4); I.F.C. 3, 4; Football 1; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Big Name Entertainment Committee 3; Student Awareness Committee 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4. ROGER K. LEONARD JR., A.B. Erringer Place, Apt. 3B, Phila., Pa. Sigma Rho Kappa 3, 4; Phi Epsilon Pi 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Commit- tee 1, 2, 3, 4, (Athletic Chairman 3, 4); Weekly 2, 3; Political Science Conference 3, 4. LAURA F. LEVIN, A.B. 377 S. Harrison St., East Orange, N. J. Dean ' s List 2, 3; Sigma Tau Delta 3; Education Society 3. CHAR LES W. LEWIS, A.B. 413 Burke St., Easton, Pa. Basketball 1, 2, 3; Baseball 3, 4; Intramural Sports 4; Weekly 3, 4; Dormitory Council 4; Political Science Conference 3; Seegers ' Union Recreation Committee 3. JANICE L. LLOYD, A.B. 1725 Ryerson Ave., Scranton, Pa. ANTHONY J. LONGO, B.S. Jeanette St., Monroe, Conn. Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Lambda Chi Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Vice-President 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Council 4; “M " Club 3, 4, (Secretary 4); Physics Club 4, (Vice-President 4). DEAN R. LOWE, A.B. 130 E. Grant St., Easton, Pa. Alpha Tau Omega; Basketball 1, 2, 3; Football 2, 3, 4; Track 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports 3, 4. ROBERT F. MACKAY, A.B. 923 Southern Drive, Franklin Square, N. Y. Alpha Tau Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, (Rushing Chaiman 3, President 4); I.F.C. 4; Baseball 1; Mermaid Tavern Society 2; Freshman Orientation Com- mittee 3, 4, (Discipline Committee Chairman 4); Cardinal Key Society 1, 2, 3, 4. FERN L. MANN, A.B. 428 Fairman St., Coopersburg, Pa. Sigma Tau Delta 4; Weekly 1; Ciarla 4, (Copy Editor 4); Women ' s Commuter Club 1, 2, 3, 4, (President 4). JEANNE M. MARAZ, A.B. 574 Grant Ave., Baldwin, L. I., N. Y. Dean’s List 1, 3, 4; Who ' s Who 4; Lambda Epsilon Delta 3, 4; Phi Alpha Theta 3, 4; Senior Counselor 4; Student Council 2, 3; Class Executive Council 1, 2, 3; Class Secretary 1, 2; Union Board 1, 2, 3, 4, (Secretary 4); Choir 1; Der Deutsche Verein 1, 2; Freshman Orientation Committee 2; Political Science Conference 3, (Corresponding Secretary 3); World University Service Drive 2; Delta Phi Nu 2, 3. HOWARD J. MARSH JR., A.B. Monarch Lane, Vineland, N. J. Track 1, 2; Alpha Phi Omega 2, 3, 4, (Treasurer 4); Band 1; Orchestra 1; Weekly 1, 3, 4; Freshman Executive Council 1; Men’s Dormitory Council 3, 4, (Publicity Chairman, Fire Warden); Big Brother Program 4; Parking Committee 3, 4. ALAN R. MAURER, B.S. 28 Briarwood Drive, Glen Cove, N. Y. Dean’s List 4; Fencing 1; Pre-Med Society 2, 3, 4; Big Brother Program 2, 3, 4; WMUH 1, 2; Mask and Dagger 1, 2. KENNETH H. MAURER, B.S. 308 N. Clermont Ave., Margate City, N. J. Who ' s Who 4 ; Omicron Delta Kappa 4; Sigma Rho Kappa 4; Phi Epsilon Pi (President); Weekly 3, 4; Ciarla 3, 4; Pre-Med Society 2, 3, 4; Academic Procter 2, 3; Student Court 1, 2, 3, 4, (Chief Justice 4). jean a. mcintosh, a. . 50 Scarcliffe Drive, Malverne, L. I., N. Y. Homecoming Court 4; Cheerleader 1, 2; Executive Council 1, 2, 3, 4; Delta Phi Nu 2, 3, (President 3); Senior Counselor 4; Bernheim Resi- dent 3. MICHAEL G. MERKEL, B.S. R.D. 1, Box 484, Palmerton, Pa. Concert Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Marching Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Sigma Phi Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, (Chaplain 3, Pledge Trainer 4); Pre-Theo Club 1, 2, (Treasurer 2). ALLAN H. MESSINGER, A.B. 1001 S. 6th St., Allentown, Pa. Delta Phi Alpha 3, 4; Concert Band 2; Marching Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Der Deutsche Verein 1, 2, 3, 4, (Vice-President 4); Russian Society 4, (Treasurer 4); Commuter ' s Club 1, 2, 3, 4. CARL D. METZGER, B.S. 2469 W. 77th Ave., Phila., Pa. Dean ' s List 2, 4; Student Representative to Faculty Curriculum Commit- tee 4; Alternate Dormitory Counselor 3; Pre-Med Society 2, 3, 4, (Secretary 2, President 3, 4). JOAN S. MIDDLEMAST, A.B. 30 Haverford Road, Hicksville, L. I., N. Y. Phi Alpha Theta 4; Lambda Ep silon Delta 3, 4; Delta Phi Nu 2, 3, 4; Basketball 1; Women ' s Council 1, 2, 3, (Secretary 2); Dormitory Coun- cil 3; Brown Hall President 3; Freshman Orientation Committee 4; Education Society 2, 3, 4, (Vice-President 4). ALFRED L. MIKSITS, A.B. 57 N. 5th St., Coplay, Pa. Veteran’s Club 2, 3. MICHAEL S. MILLER, B.S. 2215 W. Norwegian St., Pottsville, Pa. Phi Epsilon Pi 1, 2, 3, 4; Mermaid Tavern Society 4; Chess Team 2, 3; Student Court 4; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4, (President 4); Pre-Med Society 2, 3, 4. ALVIN G. MINTZ, A.B. 7914 Michener Ave., Phila. 50, Pa. Phi Epsilon Pi 3, 4; Track 1; Lacrosse 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Weekly 1; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4. 196 MARILYN S. MORGAN, A.B. 2415 Woodridge Terrace, Easton; Pa. Who’s Who 4; Lambda Epsilon Delta 3, 4, (President 4); Student Court Justice 2, 3, 4, (Secretary 4); Education Society 2, 3, 4, (Secretary 4); Ciarla 4. FRANK P. MUHR, A.B. 510 Taylor St., Bethlehem, Pa. M.C.A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Institute of Faith 2, 3, 4, (Chairman 4); Philosophy Club 4; Weekly 2, 3. CAROL L. MUMMEY, A.B. 1331 Maple St., Allentown, Pa. Commuter ' s Club 1; Women’s Commuters Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Education Society 4. JOHN R. MURTAUGH, A.B. 3325 Lincoln Circle S., Allentown, Pa. Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Track 2, 3. CAROLINE A. MYSLINSKI, A.B. 1123 Pottsville St., Pottsville, Pa. Delta Phi Nu 2, 3, 4; Der Deutsche Verein 2, 3; Education Society 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4. RHEA A. NAGLE, A.B. 623 W. Market St., Bethlehem, Pa. Phi Alpha Theta 4; Delta Phi Alpha 3, 4, (Secretary 4); M.C.A. 1; Education Society 1 . RUTH ANNE NEAL, A.B. 1007 E. Main St., Millville, N. J. Phi Alpha Theta 3, 4; Delta Phi Nu 2, 3; M.C.A. 1, 2; Education Society 1 , 2, 3, 4. CAROLE J. NEWBERRY, B.S. 31 Lincolnshire Road, Webster, N. Y. Tennis 1, 2, 3, 4, (Manager 2); Hockey 2, 3, 4; Basketball 2, 3, 4; Choir 1; Women’s Council 1. LAWRENCE A. NIELSON, A.B. 1 1 Westwood Road, Little Silver, N. J. ERNEST Y. NORMINGTON JR., B.S. 1035 Lawrence Drive, Emmaus, Pa. Pre-Med Society. SERGEI C. NOVAK, B.S. 3558 N. 1 1th St., Philo., Pa. Alpha Tau Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, (Historian 4); Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Wrestling 1; Varsity M Club 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Big Brother Program 2, 3; American Institute of Physics 3, 4, (President 3, 4). PETER N. PAPPAS, B.S. 143-150 Ash Ave., Flushing, N. Y. BARRY J. PE ARSON, B.S. 529 Wyandotte St., Bethlehem, Pa. Dean s List; Phi Kappa Tau 1, 2, 3, 4; Mermaid Tavern Society 4; Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Pre-Med Society 2, 3, 4. BARBARA J. PETERS, B.S. 644 Moredon Road, Huntingdon Valley, Pa. MICHAEL K. PETERS, A.B. 72 Oak St., Floral Park, N. Y. Lambda Chi Alpha 2, 3, 4, (Social Chairman); Football 1, 3, 4; Baseball; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club. ROBERT D. PETERS, B.S. 319 First St., Port Carbon, Pa. Phi Kappa Tau 1 , 2. JOHN C. PETREE, A.B. 801 Edgefield Drive, Richardson, Texas Alpha Phi Omega 2, 3, 4, (President 3, 4); Phi Kappa Tau 1, 2, 3, 4, (Rushing Chairman 3); I.F.C. Rushing Committee 3; I.F.C. Athletic Com- mittee 2; Basketball 1, 2; Baseball 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Union Board of Directors 4, (Treasurer 4); Fresh man Orientation Com- mittee 4; Class Executive Council 3, 4; Student Affairs Committee 3, 4; Weekly 2, 3; Student Court Investigator 3, 4; Big Brother Program 3. THOMAS PETRO, A.B. 172 Spruce St., Emmaus, Pa. Sigma Phi Epsilon; Wrestling 4; Commuters Club 1. KENNETH J. PIDDINGTON, A.B. 4 Acorn Drive, E. Northport, N. Y. JAMES T. PIZZA, B.S. 41 Brookside Road, West Orange, N. J. Dean’s List 3; Alpha Tau Omega 1, 2, 3; Alpha Phi Omega 1, 2; Marching Band 1, 2; Student Representative to Counseling Committee 3; Student Court 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Big Brother Program 2; Student Leadership Conference 2, 3; Pre-Med Society 3, 4. STEPHEN L. POHE, A.B. 727 Woodside Road, Jenkintown, Pa. Golf 2, 3, 4; Football 2; Young Republicans ' Club. CHRISTINA W. PONCHAK, B.S. 32 Regency Park, Ramsey, N. J. Dean’s List 3, 4; Cheerleader 1, 2; Delta Phi Nu 2, 3; Science Club 1; Education Club 1,2. DANIEL T. POUST, A.B 121 Highland Ave., Lonsdale, Pa. Lambda Chi Alpha 2, 3, 4; Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Track 1, 2; Wrestling 1; Varsity M Club 2, 3, 4, (Treasurer 4); Intramural Sports 2, 3, 4; Italian Club 4. VERONICA B. PRITCHARD, A.B. 352 Mauch Chunk St., Nazareth, Pa. Psi Chi 2, 3, 4 ; Choir 1; Glee Club 1, 2, 3; Delta Phi Nu 2, 3; Big Sister Program 2; Bernheim Resident 3. RANDOLPH M. RAAB, B.S. R.D.4 1, Hellertown, Pa. Chapel Choir 1, 2, 3, 4; Opera Workshop 3; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4, (Manager 4). THOMAS RENNINGER, A.B. 527 N. Berks St., Allentown, Pa. BARRY A. RHODY, A.B. 137 Main St., Joliett, Pa. Phi Alpha Theta 3, 4; Phi Kappa Tau (Vice-President 4); Football 1, 2; Track 1; Society for the Advancement of Management 4. RUTH A. RICE, A.B. 640 Evening Star Lane, Cincinnati, Ohio Sociology Club 3, 4, (Secretary 4). SANDRA B. RICE, A.B. 3020 Knorr St., Phila., Pa. Phi Sigma lota 3, 4, (Recording Secretary 4); Commuter ' s Club 4. DONALD T. RISSMILLER, A.B. 2507 Eldridge Ave., Easton, Pa. Lambda Chi Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4; Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Varsity M Club 3, 4; Intramurals 1 , 2, 3, 4. RONALD F. RISSMILLER, A.B. 2507 Eldridge Ave., Easton, Pa. Sigma Phi Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4; Football 1; Intramurals 1, 2, 3, 4. NESSA S. ROSEN, A.B. 1239 Glenview St., Phila. 11, Pa. Phi Sigma lota 4; Phi Alpha Theta 3, 4; Delta Phi Nu 2, 3, 4; Homecoming Committee 4; Union House Rules Committee 3; Big Sister 3; Ciarla 3. BENNETT E. ROTH, B.S. 1344 Kerper St., Phila., Pa. Dean ' s List 3; Class Honors 3; Phi Epsilon Pi 2, 3, 4; WMUH 2; Weekly 1, 2; Pre-Med Society 2, 3, 4. DOLORES L. ROTH, A.B. R.D. 1, Stockton, N. J. Women’s Hockey 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball 3, (Manager 3); Tennis 3, (Manager 3); Intramural Volleyball 1, 2, 3, 4; Women’s Council 4. JUDITH R. ROUNDS, A.B. 326 Fulton St., Millville, N. J. Women ' s Basketball 2, 3; Delta Phi Nu 2, 3; Spring Sing 3, (Co- Chairman 3); Class Constitution Committee 1; Dormitory Evaluation Committee 2, 3; Dormitory Council 3. WILLIAM E. ROURKE, A.B. 123 N. West St., Allentown, Pa. WILLIAM B. SAVO, A.B. 157 Bedford Ave., Iselin, N. J. Class Treasurer 4; Class Executive Council 2, 3, 4; Mermaid Tavern Society 3, 4; M.E.T. 2, 3, 4, (Business Manager 4); Student Court Investigator 3, 4; Student Awareness Committee 2, 3; Political Science Conference 3, 4; Parking Committee 4; Assembly Committee 2, 3; Commons Committee 4, (Chairman 4); World University Service 3, (Chairman 3). 197 JOANNE M. SCHAAF, B.S. R.D. 2 Box 248, Millville, N. J. Delta Phi Nu 2, 3; Science Club 3, 4, (Secretary 4); Dormitory Secre- tary 1; Constitution Committee 1. ROBERT C. SCHAEFFER, A.B. 350 S. Reading Ave., Boyertown, Pa. Phi Kappa Tau; Der Deutsche Verein; Education Society. ALAN P. SCHANTZ, A.B. 5008 Castor Ave., Phila. 24, Pa. Alpha Tau Omega 1, 2, 3, 4; Mermaid Tavern Society 4; Weekly 2, 3, (Art Editor 2, 3); Arcade 3; Ciarla 2, (Assistant Photography Editor 2); M.E.T. 2; WMUH 4; Cardinal Key 1, 2, 3, 4. CATHRYN A. SCHEURER, A.B. 330 E. 7th St., Lonsdale, Pa. Psi Chi 3, 4, (President 4); Delta Phi Nu 2, 3, 4; Dormitory Council 3; Spring Sing 3; Education Society 2, 3; Lutheran Student Association 1. PRISCILLA K. SCHLENKER, A.B Silverdale, Pa. Delta Phi Nu 2, 3, 4; Senior Counselor 4; Union Advisory Board 4; Union Board of Directors 4, (Cultural Committee Chairman 4); Women’s Council 3, (Secretary 3); Choir 1, 2, 3, 4, (Librarian 2, Assistant Manager 3); Der Deutsche Verein 3; Sociological Society 2, 3, 4; Ecumenical Study Group 4 BRUCE C. SCHMAUCH, B.S. 536 N. 13th St., Allentown, Pa. Phi Kappa Tau 1, 2, 3, 4; Marching Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Concert Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Commuter’s Club 1, 2, 3; Math Club 4. ROBERT E. SCHMIERER, A.B. 305 Ashbourne Road, Elkins Park 17, Pa. FORREST A. SCHUCKER, B.S. 18 N. Pine St., Kutztown, Pa. Alpha Phi Omega; Phi Kappa Tau; Soccer 2; Golf 3, 4; I ntra mural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Big Brother Program 2, 3, 4; Commuter ' s Club 1. EVONNE F. SCHULTZ, B.S. R.D. 1, Box 61, Palm, Pa. Majorette 1, 2, 3, 4; Delta Phi Nu 2, 3, (Historian 3); Pre-Med Society 2, 3; Science Club 4; Weekly 4. MANFRED SCHU LTZE-K IMMLE, A.B. 1000 West Berlin W37, Possweg 2, West Germany Dr. Howard Weeg Award; Scholler Foundation Scholarship; Phi Alpha Theta 4; History Assistant 3, 4; Mermaid Tavern Society 4; Fencing 3, 4; Publications Board 4; WMUH 4, (Business Manager 4); Math Club DIANNE C. SELL, A.B. 209 E. Shandon Ave., Midland, Texas Sociology Club 3, 4, (President 4); Women ' s Dormitory Council 3. JANE K. SEONBUCHNER, A.B. 418 Warrenville Road, Dunellen, N. J. Pi Delta Epsilon 2, 3, 4; Freshman Orientation 2; Weekly 1, 2, 3, 4, (Advertising Manager 2, Associate Business Manager 4, Madrid Cor- respondent 3). GLENN K. SHERER, B.S. 1 15 S. Saint Lucas St., Allentown, Pa. Tau Kappa Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, (Vice-President 4); Intramural Sports 2, 3, 4; Hillel 1, 2, 3, 4, (Programming Vice-President 3, President 4); Big Brother Program 2, 3, 4; Commuters Club 1, 2; WMUH 2. LINDA M. SIMENSKY, A.B. 1185 Harbor Road, Hewlett Harbor, N. Y. Education Society 4. THOMAS A. SIMONS, B.S. Tafton, Pa. Sigma Phi Epsilon; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; American Institute of Physics 3, 4. JAMES D. SIMPSON, A.B. 402 Sussex Blvd., Broomal, Pa. Lambda Chi Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4, (Secretary 3, 4). BARBARA A. SINGDAHLSEN, A.B. 58 Ridge Road, East Williston, L. I., N. Y. Psi Chi 4; Delta Phi Nu 1, 2, 3; Education Society 3, 4. JERRY M. SLEPAK, B.S. 913 E. Durard Road, Phila. 50, Pa. Dean s List 1, 2, 3; Omicron Delta Kappa 4; Phi Epsilon Pi 1, 2, 3, 4, (Treasurer 2); I.F.C. 3, 4, (Vice-President 3, 4); Mermaid Tavern Society 4; Student Court Investigator 3, 4. JAMES E. SMITH II, A.B. 264 Cherry Lane, Teaneck, N. J. Dean ' s List 4; Alpha Phi Omega 1, 2, 3; Band 1, 2, 3, 4, (Secretary, Publicity Director); M.C.A. 3. JAMES T. SMITH III, A.B. 837 Wesley St., Baldwin, N. Y. Pi Delta Epsilon 4; Alpha Tau Omega 2, 3, 4; I.F.C. 4, (Intramural Sports Chairman 4); Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Alpha Phi Omega 2, 3, (Historian 3); Weekly 2, 3, 4, (Sports Editor 4); Union Recreation Committee 3. PHILIP J. SMITH JR., A.B. 1433 Linden St., Allentown, Pa. Dean ' s List 1 . FRANKLIN R. SMOYER, B.S. 234 Carbon St., Lehighton, Pa. Sigma Phi Epsilon; American Institute of Physics. RONALD P. SMYSER, B.S. 645 W. Sedgwick St., Phila., Pa. Phi Kappa Tau 2, 3, 4; Science Club 1, 2, 3, 4, (President 4). ROBERT E. SPRAGUE, A.B. 14 Hadland Drive, Huntington, N. Y. Phi Kappa Tau (Athletic Chairman); Lacrosse (Co-Captain 4); Soccer 2, 3, 4; Mask and Dagger. ALBERT G. SPROULE, A.B. 116-10 95th Ave., Richmond Hill, N. Y. Sigma Phi Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, (Historian 2, 3, President 3, 4); I.F.C. 3, 4, (Secretary-Treasurer 4); Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Der Deutsche Verein 1 , 2. RAYMOND C. SPROW JR., A.B. 105 New England Ave., Summit, N. J. Lambda Chi Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4, (Vice-President 2, 3; President 3, 4); I.F.C. 3, 4, (President 4); Track 2, 3, 4; Student Court Investigator 2, 3, 4; Freshman Orientation Committee 3, 4; Big Brother Program 2, 3. DALE F. STAUFFER, B.S. 1126 N. 20th St., Allentown, Pa. Sigma Phi Epsilon, (Vice-President 3); Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Choir 1, 2, 3, (Assistant Manger 3); Band 1, 2, 3, 4, (Vice-President 2, President 3, 4); Commuters Club 1, 2; American Institute of Physics 3, 4. JEAN M. STAUFFER, A.B. Route $ 3 , Allentown, Pa. Lambda Epsilon Delta 4; Delta Phi Alpha 2, 3, 4, (Treasurer 3); Delta Phi Nu 2; Women’s Commuter Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Choir 1, 2, 3, 4; Opera Workshop 1 , 2, 3. KATHRYN L. STAUFFER, A.B. 38 W. Main St., Myerstown, Pa. Sigma Tau Delta 4, (President 4); Phi Alpha Theta 4; Lambda Epsilon Delta 4; Eta Sigma Phi 2, 3, 4; Delta Phi Nu 2; Berheim House 3; Senior Counsellor 4; Student Evaluation Committee 4; M.C.A. 1, 2, 3; Dormitory Council 2; Women’s Council 3; Der Deutsche Verein 1, 2, 3; Choir 1, 3, 4; Opera Workshop 3. FLOYD E. STEM III, A.B. 2124 Liberty St., Allentown, Pa. JANET C. STEVENS, A.B. 2706 Livingston St., Allentown, Pa. Sigma Tau Delta 4; Junior Prom Queen 3; Delta Phi Nu 2, 3, 4; Education Society 1, 2, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4, (Secretary-Treas- urer 2, 3). WILLIAM I. STOUDT, A.B. 4104 Bauard St., Easton, Pa. Football 1, 2; Basketball 1, 2, 4; Baseball 2, 3, 4, (Co-Captain 4); Men ' s Dormitory Council 2, 3, 4, (Secretary 4). ROGER C. STUHMULLER, A.B. 1105 Allentown Road, Lansdale, Pa. Track 1; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4, (Co-Catpain 4); Society for the Ad- vancement of Management 3. RONALD B. STUMP, B.S. 220 Grimley St., Kutztown, Pa. Phi Kappa Tau 1, 2, 3, 4, (Treasurer 4); Basketball 1; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Pre-Med Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Big Brother Program 2, 3, 4; Science Club 2. 198 ARTHUR L. SUFFIN, B.S. 73-59 136th St., Flushing 67, N. Y. Dean ' s List 2, 3; Phi Epsilon Pi 1, 2, 3, 4; Pre-Med Club 2, 3, 4; Weekly 1; WMUH 2; Freshman Orientation Committee 4. CAROL L. TAYLOR, B.S 3321 Mickle St., Camden, N. J. Homecoming Court 3; Junior Prom Court 3; Laurel Blossom Princess 3; Cheerleader 1, 2; Delta Phi Nu 2, 3; Education Society 3, 4; Math Club 4; Union Board of Directors 1, 2, 3, 4, (Secretary 1, 2, 3); Fashion Show Co-Coordinator 2, 3; Union Decoration Committee 3, (Chairman 3); Union Hostess Committee 4, (Chairman 4); Class Execu- tive Council 1 , 2, 3, 4. MARY A. TAYLOR, A.B. 532 Pike St., Reading, Pa. Sociology Club 3, 4, (Treasurer 4); Delta Phi Nu 3, 4. NANCY I. TERRY, A.B Ringtown, Pa. Sociological Society 2, 3, 4, (Secretary 3, Vice-President 4); Delta Phi Nu 2, 3, 4, (Treasurer 3); Berheim House Executive Council 3; Senior Counselor 4; Big Sister Program 2, 3; M.C.A. 1, 2. ROBERT E. THILO, B.S. 887 W. Maple Drive, Southampton, Pa. Alpha Phi Omega. PHILIP J. TIGHE, B.S. 2131 Highland St., Allentown, Pa. Phi Kappa Tau 1, 2, 3; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; Newman Club 1, 2; Commuters Club 1; Science Club 1. VITALIA V. TRAGOS, A.B. 2423 Union St., Allentown, Pa. Sociological Society 3, 4; Newman Club 3, 4. JOHN D. TRANSUE, A.B. 306 W. Paxinosa Road, Easton, Pa. THOMAS J. TURCZYN, A.B. 740 N. Jordan St., Allentown, Pa. Who ' s Who 4; Omicron Delta Kappa 4; Phi Kappa Tau 1, 2, 3, 4; Football 1, 2, 3, 4, (Co-Captain 4); Varsity M Club 2, 3, 4; Student Council 1, 2, 3, 4; Class President 1, 2, 3, 4; Big Brother Committee Chairman 3; Parking Committee 3; Student Evaluation Committee 2. JOHN C. TUROCZI, A.B. 214 Wilton Road, Fairfield, Conn. Who ' s Who 4; Dean ' s List 3, 4; Psi Chi 3, 4; Phi Kappa Tau 3, 4, (Pledge Master 3, President 4); I.F.C. 4; Alpha Phi Omega 2, 3; Omicron Delta Kappa 4; Mermaid Tavern Society 4; Class Executive Council 3, 4; Big Name Entertainment Committee 3; Marching Band 1; Freshman Advisor 3, 4 DOUGLAS F. TURTZO, B.S. 38 E. Pennsylvania Ave., Pen Argyl, Pa. Dean’s List 2, 3; Tau Kappa Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, (Grammateus 3, 4); Pre- Med Society 2, 3; Alpha Phi Omega 1; Marching Band 1; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4, (Vice-President 3). BENJAMIN R. UNGERLEIDER, B.S. 402 Joseph St., Norristown, Pa. Sigma Rho Kappa 4; Phi Epsilon Pi 2, 3, 4, (Corresponding Secretary 3, 4); Weekly 2, 3, 4, (Circulation Manager 3, 4); Pre-Med Society 2, 3, 4; WMUH 1; Freshman Executive Council 1; Freshman Orientation Committee 4. BARBARA A. VAN EMON, A.B. 33 Leverich St., Hempstead, N. Y. Phi Sigma lota 4; Alpha Psi Omega 4; Der Deutsche Verein 4; Weekly 1; M.E.T. 2, 3, 4; Mask and Dagger 4. REBECCA M. VAN HASTE, A.B. 3235 Altonah Road, Bethlehem, Pa. Psi Chi 4; Berheim House 3; Senior Counselor 4; Delta Phi Nu 2, 3, 4; Education Society 1, 2, 3. BARBARA E. VOLKART, A.B. 602 W. Bel Air Ave., Aberdeen, Md. Phi Alpha Theta 3, 4; Pi Delta Epsilon 4; Lambda Epsilon Delta 4; Delta Phi Nu 2, 3; Weekly 3, 4, (Advertising Manager 4); Education Society 2. WAYNE H. VON NESSEN, A.B. 1078 North Drive, N. Merrick, L. I., N. Y. Alpha Tau Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, (Scholarship Chairman 4); Soccer 4; Cross Country 1; Intramurals 1, 2; Cheerleader 2; Mermaid Tavern Society 1, 2, 4; Cardinal Key 1, 2, 3; Poetry Workshop 1, 2; Weekly 1, 2; Political Science Conference 4; WMUH 4. DONALD E. WAGGONER JR., A.B. 1935 Greenleaf St., Allentown, Pa. Phi Kappa Tau 1, 2, 3, 4, (Vice-President 3); Football 1, 2, 3; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4. RICHARD A. WALLITSCH, A.B. 602 N. 12th St., Allentown, Pa. Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; Commuters Club 1, 2, 3, (Vice-President 3); Veteran ' s Club 3. MARY WARNKE, A.B. 1 14 New York Blvd., Sea Girt, N. J. Sociology Club 3; Education Society 4; Delta Phi Nu 3, 4. DONALD W. WEAVER, B.S. R.D. 1 Box 4, Andreas, Pa. Phi Kappa Tau 1, 2, 3, 4, (House Manager 4); Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Education Society 2, 3, 4, (President 2); Math Club 4. KAY E. WEAVER, A.B. Box 146, Painted Sky Road, R.D.- 3, Reading, Pa. Dean ' s List 1, 3; Psi Chi 3, 4; Education Society 1, 2, 3, 4; M.C.A. 1. MICHAEL P. WEBER, A.B. 510 Merwyn Road, Narberth, Pa. Dean ' s List 4; Sigma Phi Epsilon, (Guard 3); Golf 3; Band 2, 3, 4; Weekly 4; Society for the Advancement of Management 3, 4. MARIETTA WEIKERT, A.B. 21 W. King St., Littlestown, Pa. Psi Chi 3, 4; Bernheim House 3; Senior Counselor 4; Delta Phi Nu 2; Education Society 3. ERWIN W. WEIL JR., A.B. 159-152 98th St., Howard Beach, N. Y. Basketball Statistician 1, 2, 3; Football Statistician 4; M.C.A. 4; Eco nomics and Business Administration Club 2, 3. JOHN F. WEST III, B.S. 622 N. Glenwood St., Allentown, Pa. Pre-Med Society 3, 4; Young Republicans Club 4. MICHAEL S. WIELAND, A.B. 204 E. Cherry St. Palmyra, Pa. Dean ' s List 4; Scholler Foundation Scholarship; American Institute of Physics. KENNETH R. WILLIAMS, A.B. Kintnersville, Pa. Phi Kappa Tau; Track 1, 2; Intramural Sports 3; Mask and Dagger 4; Russian Club 4. ELMO G. WOLF, A.B. 742 N. 6th St., Allentown, Pa. Dean ' s List 4; Psi Chi 3, 4; Phi Kappa Tau 1, 2, 3, 4, (Chaplain 3); Pre- Theo Club 1, 2; Sociological Society 4. EDWARD W. WOLFGANG, B.S. 2274 Trenton Road, Levittown, Pa. RODNEY K. WRIGHT, B.S. 1401 y 2 Liberty St., Allentown, Pa. Marching Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Concert Band 1, 2, 3, 4, (Secretary 4); Der Deutsche Verein 2; Commuter’s Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Science Club 2, 3, 4, (Treasurer 4). WILLIAM J. WROBEL, A.B. 242 Lakeland Ave., Sayville, L. I., N. Y. Sigma Phi Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4. ANTHONY W. YANKOWSKY, B.S. 1045 Oley St., Reading, Pa. National Science Foundation Research Grants 4; Lambda Chi Alpha 1 2, 3, 4; Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Track 1; Science Club 2, 3, 4. VIVIAN H. YODER, A.B. 1 1 S. Halstead St., Allentown, Pa. Dean ' s List 3, 4; Sigma Tau Delta 4. Nan Parker, Assistant Editor Klaus Kingstorf, Art Editor. David Ga skill. Editor 199 FREEMANS BLENDED VITAMIN D MILK 13th Green Street Phone HE. 4-9666 AIR ENGINEERS , Inc. Eighth St. Paul Streets Fullerton, Pa. Telephone 264-2874 design service instal lotion A R CONDI T O N N G REFRIGERA T I ON AND HEATING Air Conditioning Contractors for J. Conrad Seegers Union Building 200 ARA SERVICE OF LEHIGH VALLEY Complete Food Service Catering — In-Plant Feeding 1506 So. Albert St. Allentown Phone 797-1 870 COMPLIMENTS OF THE ROSEMARK BARBER SHOP ACE SUPPLY COMPANY INC. Complete Line of FOOD SERVICE EQUIPMENT Commercial Refrigeration Kitchen Supplies and Utensils Telephone 435-9534 Area Code 2 1 5 1 25-1 27 North Seventh Street Allentown, Penna. 18101 Best Wishes to the CLASS OF 1964 from the CLASS OF 1967 CLASS OF 1964 CENTRAL PLUMBING HEATING CO., INC. 1 204 Hamilton Street Allentown, Pennsylvania Phone 433-5179 TREXLER FUNERAL HOME Established 1 860 Theodore T. Trexler Arline Rabenold Trexler 1625 Highland Street Allentown, Pennsylvania 201 MARY MAC INTOSH SERVICES ALLEN LAUNDRY 1 2th and Allen Streets Allentown, Pa. Tel. 435-9671 Compliments of M. W. WOOD, INC. FOOD SERVICE MANAGEMENT AN ENTIRE WEEK’S LAUNDRY AT REMARKABLY LOW COST 202 FRANK F. HAUSMAN PAVING CO. Unfixed IVSaifeB aoIs CoirragpanRy 314 GORDON ST. . TELEPHONE HE 4-6194 . ALLENTOWN, PA. BUILDERS’ SUPPLIES — READY MIXED CONCRETE 1 229 N. Quebec Street Allentown, Pa. Phone HE 4-5263 JUNIOR COLONY o! 915 hamilton street v allentown, Pennsylvania • VENETIAN BLINDS • WINDOW SHADES • LINOLEUM Dial 395-2061 OWEN M. BASTIAN, INC. LINOLEUM CONTRACTOR - FURNITURE DISTINCTIVE AND DECORATIVE FLOORS AND WALLS TREXLERTOWN, PA. Branch Store: 207 Branch Street, Quakertown, Pa. - 536-7939 • CARPETS and RUGS • CERAMICS • VINYL Harold Stephens Company INSTITUTIONAL PURVEYORS 414 North Fulton Street ALLENTOWN, PA. 203 The Public Service Newspaper THE MORNING CALL Hiuntmr (Chrmttrlr SUNDAY CALL-CHRONICLE COMPLIMENTS OF THE HOTEL BETHLEHEM 204 Compliments of the CAMPUS SHOP PRESCRIPTIONS CALLED FOR AND DELIVERED MEST PHARMACY PRESCRIPTION CENTER 1601 CHEW STREET-ALLENTOWN, PENNSYLVANIA PHONE 435-8026 REBER KORN CO., INC. 8 1 7 Cumberland St. Allentown, Pa. HEATING — VENTILATING Samuel D. Butz Robert J. K. Butz SAMUEL D. BUTZ AGENCY INC. 32 SOUTH 7th STREET ALLENTOWN, PENNSYLVANIA GENERAL INSURANCE TONY ' S BARBER SHOP " THE BEST NAME TO GO BUY " LEHIGH VALLEY DAIRY 1000-1 160 North 7th Street ALLENTOWN, PA. 205 Garrett-Buchanan Co. KEMMERER PAPER DIVISION Distributors of STANDARD PRODUCTS OF AMERICA ' S FOREMOST MANUFACTURERS REPRESENTING THE ENTIRE RANGE OF QUALITIES FOR EVERY REQUIREMENT OF THE MODERN SCHOOLROOM 2030 Vultee Street ALLENTOWN, PA. H. A. Esterly Sons BUSINESS MACHINES 239 North Tenth St., Allentown, Pa. Phone HE 4-1275 SALES • SERVICE • SUPPLIES • RENTALS ROXY LINOLEUM CO. Floor Coverings and Venetian Blinds ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES HARDWARE AND TOYS 1 826 Allen Street ALLENTOWN, PA. 433-5875 H. Ray Haas Co. PRINTERS • PUBLISHERS CALENDAR MANUFACTURERS 514-528 N. Madison Street ALLENTOWN, PENNA. 435-1509 206 JEDDO-HIGHLAND No other anthracite gives you more heat per ton than carbon-rich Jeddo-Highland. Because it burns slowly, it gives steady, healthful heat. So, save on comfort. JEDDO-HIGHLAND COAL COMPANY JEDDO, PENNSYLVANIA 207 COMPLIMENTS OF THE CLASS OF 1965 APGAR OIL CO. 639 E. Congress St. HEATING COOLING SERVICES GULF FUEL OIL COMPLIMENTS HEIMBACH BAKING CORP. BAKERS OF DUTCH MADE BREAD The Freshest Thing in To wn 433-6265 9th and Tilghman Streets Allentown, Pa. COMPLIMENTS OF THE CLASS OF 1966 CONGRATULATIONS TO THE CLASS OF 1964 EVANS HEEPS PATRONS BUD KIVERT NINETEENTH STREET THEATRE This book printed by VELVATONE, a special process of litho- graphic printing. Sole producers: Wm. J. Keller Inc., Buffalo, N. Y. No oilier priming firm is authorized to use the Velvatone method. 208 PRESS


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