Muhlenberg College - Ciarla Yearbook (Allentown, PA)

 - Class of 1962

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Muhlenberg College - Ciarla Yearbook (Allentown, PA) online yearbook collection, 1962 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 222 of the 1962 volume:

— ' |Si j BP gHB P JOf • ' ... J | - • • • - i •f i s . ... ; ' • ■ • 4.« » I ! ! i 1 i I ' • ' ' • ■ » « i « yi 1 . . » 4 , . . . . , •- f i • , , v % • t 14 k , ■ • J ' • • « 1 « 4 ■ « ■ r • • i j ' . : « • l • . . , ■ r [ • • 1 1 i • • . » v • » ■ . • • - . 1 4 ‘ t 1 ■ i •• ■ 2 , . ► « • d ir , 1 , a » 9 k+i S J i , ■ T, 4 . ■ i.i » » f,. . • « • • • -a 4 • .« 1 " ' ■ 4 4 M I • . V A » 4 • • d « 4 , ,4 r ■ • ; . . i i ’ ■ ■ ■ • i » 1 r if i i Our college years . . . the most significant and exciting part of a lifetime . . . the malleable period . . . the deciding years. The fulfillment of this potential in a vital meaningful manner stems, to a great extent, from the education, strengthened character, and maturity afford- ed us by Muhlenberg College. Our own sen- sitivity to this impetus and direction helps to create a portrait of our Muhlenberg years. Muhlenberg A montage of living and learning . of complex organization and a variety of elements • • • revealing an exciting and significant panorama • • • HUI a kaleidoscopic variety and stimulation . A painting showing the tangible and suggesting the ethereal . embodying the seen and unseen. Through the medium of originality, new experiences are communicated giving free rein to preference and taste Evaluation encourages intense thought, a feeling of growing knowledge and gratification. A work of art expressing a great variety of emotions in appreciation of its vital meanings. ' To this design and pattern we bring our own individuality creating this portrait of identification. CIARLA MUHLENBERG COLLEGE ALLENTOWN PENNSYLVANIA DEDICATION 22 The 1962 Ciarla is dedicated to Dr. Harold L. Stenger, Jr., Professor of English and Chairman of the Department of English. Such a dedication is at best a tricky and bother- some business; it is no pleasure to attempt dis- section in black and white of a man. Adding to this discomfort is the legend which grows about Dr. Stenger; nourished by sophomore English ma- jors, fed on baroque worship by junior English majors, the myth is not dispelled until senior majors, preparing for the department’s demonic comprehensive examination, look wearily up from four years’ notebooks to utter various forms of high blasphemy. The myth is of a man behind the last desk in the English office’s various clutter who looks from the desk as if from a flying bridge, bringing order to the chaos of registration, pre- examination tremblings, post-examination re- grets, personal woes; such an adjective as “pater- nalistic” would not be amiss here, and would be resented by none save perhaps Dr. Stenger. The myth too, and especially, is of a man in a class- room, teaching Shakespeare’s uniqueness and uni- versality, Shelly’s vision, Peacock’s heresy. Dr. Stenger is a scholar of the highest order, bringing to us a reverenced, comprehensive, and particular view of literature as a looking-glass entrance to man’s soul. And he is a scholar of form, definite and demanding, whether it be of our energy or our footnotes. Inspiration is what Dr. Stenger offers, and brilliance, and the great force of a mature mind. He is recognizable as a man to be admired to the fullest, emulated by us as prospective scholars, professors, leaders— as men- to-be admiring a man. 4 TABLE OF CONTENTS ADMINISTRATION 25 FACULTY AIM D ORGANIZATIONS 41 CLASSES 89 FRATERNITIES 113 ATHLETICS 127 SPECIAL EVENTS 155 SENIOR BIOGRAPHIES AND ADVERTISEMENTS 175 AD MINI STRATI OIM The Faculty Administration, ever conscious of the student’s needs and alert to the changing times of society, is continually engaged in shaping the destiny of Muhlenberg College. The student body as part of the framework within which the College functions constantly is meeting new demands and new conditions. Maintaining many activities under their own management, Student Administration provides excellent oppor- tunities for practical experience, recreation and fellowship. This is our great human asset— the bond that links the Student and Faculty Administration in all phases of student activity. iwmmammi speaks to the seniors . . . We are living in an age of rapid advances in many fields of endeavor, in a time when nations find it difficult to work together in an atmosphere to secure peace. Advances in the study of nuclear- energy have contributed much to beneficent uses of this magnificent discovery, but have also added significantly to the military strength of some na- tions, which helped compound the confusion and uncertainties of world peace. The nuclear bomb testing moratorium was broken by Russia in Sep- tember, 1961, an action which forced the United States to reconsider its program of atmospheric testing of nuclear bombs. The question of the desirability and feasibility of a national bomb shelter program has been raised. During your senior year, the United States suc- cessfully launched a manned space capsule which circled the earth three times. Programs are being planned for manned flights to orbit the moon, with perhaps a landing by about 1970. We are indeed living in an age of rapid change. Colleges in general cannot ignore these changes and their effect on higher education, now, and in the years ahead. Muhlenberg recognizes this clear- ly. During the present academic year, various pro- grams have been initiated. Last fall Muhlenberg instituted an honor system in the academic area, with voluntary signing of the honor pledge. Sign- ing this pledge is now required of all entering students. It is too soon for a final appraisal, but the honor system appears to have gotten off to an excellent beginning. It is my hope that this will become one of the fine traditions at Muhlenberg. The athletic policy which has been adopted states that our intercollegiate program will be one in which Muhlenberg will compete with those insti- tutions having enrollments, academic and athletic policies similar to ours. Financial aid will be avail- able on the same basis to all students. A thorough study of the curriculum is being made by the Dean of the Faculty, the faculty Curriculum Com- mittee, and a consultant from another institution. We hope that the final result of this study will be an improved program that will be of greater bene- fit to all students. During this academic year, construction has begun on the J. Conrad Seegers Union which, when put into operation, will con- tribute immeasurably to the social, cultural, and academic atmosphere of the college. These are some of the items with which we— students, faculty, administration, and board of trustees— have been concerned, all directed to- ward a better educational program. Muhlenberg College has always stressed a liberal arts education within the framework of the Christian gospel, a program which attempts to give a comprehensive knowledge of all phases of human experience, so that its graduates may relate themselves, in a useful and meaningful way, to their fellow men. To the Class of 1962: I extend my best wishes to each of you as you leave Muhlenberg, to take up your life work, or to continue your learning at another institution. I sincerely hope that your experiences at Muhlenberg will serve as a source of strength as the years unfold, and that you, in your own way, may make a worthwhile contribu- tion to society, in order that eventually all nations on this earth may experience a secure peace. May your pride in Muhlenberg College continue to grow. DEANS Henry M. M. Richards, Ph.D. Dean of Faculty Claude E. Dierolf, Ph.D. Dean of Men Anne G. Nugent, A.M. Dean of Women George A. Frounfelker, Jr., Ph.D. Registrar ADMINISTRATION David H. Bremer, Ph.D. Chaplain Howard M. MacGregor, B.S. T reasurer Bruce R. Romig, B.S. Alumni Secretary Harry A. Benfer, A.M. Director of Admissions Director of Men’s Dormitories 30 Charles R. Stacker , Jr., A.B. Controller Assistant Treasurer John R. McAuley Business Manager William M. Baker, A.M., Volborg Jepsen, Myrtle Renninger, John S. Davidson, A.M., Librar- ian; Ann McDermott, Mary A. Funk, M.S., Assistant Librarian; Hayden Evans, R.S., Roma E. Ziegler, M.L.S. LIBRARY STAFF 31 HEALTH SERVICE Thomas H. Weaber, Jr., M.D., Director of Student Health; Kathryn Kistler, R.N., Agnes Rit- ter, R.N. STUDENT COUNCIL Student Council serves various functions at Muh- lenberg. It coordinates campus organizations, over- sees rules of campus conduct and student ethics, allocates monies to certain groups, and concerns itself with matters pertaining to the general wel- fare of the Student Body, both academically and socially. The 1961-62 Council continued in the footsteps of the fine representative councils before it. This year’s Council helped in the formation of the honor system for academics, successfully lobbied for an extension of ' library hours, achieved an ex- tension of the Spring vacation to remove the in- convenience of holiday traveling. It also provided the widest possible publicity to all college events and began a Student Awareness Committee to gather information about Muhlenberg so that the Student Body would have a better understanding of the college and the various elements of our education. In these diverse ways Council served as the vehicle of student interest and expression. 32 STUDENT COUNCIL— Sealed: Richard Jacobs, Roy Almquist, Bruce Fryer, Robert T engler, Ralph Ardolino, Treasurer; David Bernstein, President; Jean Herr, Secretary; Karl Gimber. Standing: Thomas Turczyn, Sidney Weikert, William Crouthamel, Joel Glass, Edwin Hoffman. Missing: Charles Kuntzleman, Clifford Strehlow, Vice President. STUDENT COURT— James Pizza, Mary A. Ulrich, Bruce Allen, Chief Justice; John Meyer, Janet Fogleman, Michael Walker. Missing: Kenneth Andreozzi, Ronald Bittner, Kenneth Mauer. The Muhlenberg Student Court is the highest student judicial body on the campus and, as such, has jurisdiction over all cases appealed to it from any of the lower judiciary bodies on campus, or referred directly to it by a faculty member or stu- dent. The hearings of the court, presided over by the Chief Justice, are tape recorded and these tapes are preserved for future use in decisions on particular cases. The court hears all cases involv- ing infractions of both the academic and social codes of the college and submits its recommenda- tions to the Dean of the Faculty in the case of an academic infraction or the Dean of Men or Wo- men in a social offense. The court consists of nine students— four seniors, three juniors, and two sophomores who are chosen by Student Council upon consideration of recom- mendations from O. D. K. and the Women’s Hon- or Society. Justices must be approved by the faculty and administration and hold office during good conduct. The court also has at its disposal a board of eight investigators appointed by Stu- dent Council who obtain information on viola- tions and submit their findings to the court at its hearings. STUDENT COURT 33 34 MEN’S DORMITORY COUNCIL The Men’s Dormitory Council consists of twelve men who are residents in the men’s dormitories. The primary objective of the Council is to main- tain a study atmosphere in the men’s residence halls and dormitory areas. To this end, the coun- cilmen are responsible for enforcing all dormitory rules and regulations. The Council does not serve as a judicial body but merely as an agency to ad- minister punishment in keeping with the Demerit System as outlined in the ‘M’ Book. MEN’S DORMITORY COUNCIL— Bottom Row: Richard Jacobs, President; James Yost, Second Row: Richard Weisenbach, Frederick Eck. Third Row: William Stoudt, Edward Myer, Charles Gills. Fourth Row: Thomas Yocom, Kenneth Arndt, Ronald Barlock, Hugh Sanborn. WOMEN’S DORMITORY COUNCIL Women’s Council is the organization of the wo- men students of Muhlenberg College. Its main functions are to provide, establish, develop, and administer rules for group living and to promote high standards of honor in all matters of conduct. In addition to its administrative responsibilities, Women’s Council organizes activities for the in- terest of the women students. This past year such activities have included a Sadie Hawkins Dance, the annual Christmas Party, a fashion show, and the Spring Sing and Ring Ceremony. WOMEN’S DORMITORY COUNCIL— Seated: Kathryn Stauffer, Starr Kinney, Helen Reisen- weaver, Sandra Shupe. Standing: Diane Donaldson, Virginia Papenhausen, Jean Keenhold, Jane Kohler] Joan Middlemast, Karen Herring, Susan Vanderhyde, Ruth Terry, President. FRESHMAN ORIENTATION COMMITTEE — Bottom Row: Ellen Cook, Elaine Griffith, Jeanne Lippman, Jeanne Maraz. Second Row: Garth Koniver, Janies Monaco, Russell Harwood, Rich- ard Benveniste, David Bilheimer, Karl Gimber, Chairman. Third Row: Roy Almquist, Martin Renninger, Armand Katz, Myron Katz, Richard Lunger, George Darby, John Gilhorn. Fourth Row: Donald Eismann, Jacob Klein. FRESHMAN ORIENTATION COMMITTEE The Freshman Orientation Committee, under the chairmanship of Karl Gimber, went through its second successful year of operation. Under the program, the freshmen were divided into small groups, each under the guidance of a student ad- visor whose job it was to help the freshman reg- ister, meet his fellow classmates, and become ac- quainted with the campus as well as the academic and social regulations and extra-curricular activ- ities of the college. The program was not com- pletely intellectual, however, and the usual tug- of-war for the men and volleyball game for the women of the freshman and sophomore classes were included as well as pep rallies, dances, and home football games. The success of the committee is no accident for included in its schedule is an evaluation of itself and its program after the orientation period is completed. At this time difficulties are ironed out, new suggestions are incorporated into the pro- gram, and unsatisfactory parts are deleted or modified. With such a program the Freshman Orientation Committee was and will remain a necessary aid to the freshman adjusting to campus life. OMICRON DELTA KAPPA — Bottom Row: Robert Bohm, Karl Gimber, James Monaco, Fred- erick Busch, John Meyer, Bruce Allen. Second Row: Martin Miner, Dr. Victor Johnson, Adviser; Frederick Truitt. Third Row: Roy Almquist, President; David Bernstein. OMICRON DELTA KAPPA Omicron Delta Kappa recognizes and encourages the achievement of exemplary character and su- perior quality in scholarship and leadership. The organization seeks not only to honor students, but also to bring together representative men from all phases of campus life for discussion of issues pertinent to the welfare of the college. The past year has seen the Omicron Delta Kappa continue its interest in the newly established Honor Code, and assist the Student Government in the selec- tion of individuals to serve on the Student Court. The highlight of the organization’s year was the sponsoring of the fourth annual Muhlenberg Spring Carnival on Interfratemity Weekend. Lambda Epsilon Delta, the women’s honor so- ciety, was instituted during the final weeks of the 1961 Spring term. Its primary purpose is to honor women who have achieved success in both academic and social life at Muhlenberg. This year’s activity centered on organizing the society, writing a constitution, and designing a key. The group also assumed the responsibility of inter- viewing female candidates for Student Court. LAMBDA EPSILON DELTA LAMBDA EPSILON DELTA— Mary Swigar, President; Mary Ulrich, Janet Fogleman, Joann Reeder, Ute Lissy, Amy Hawman, Karen Herring, Margaret Gonzalez, Verna Wolf, Judith Wilfinger, Diane Donaldson, Barbara Gum, Sandra Shupe, Jean Herr, Ruth Terry, Janice Weidner. 37 CARDINAL KEY SOCIETY— Robert Bree, Donald Fisher, Ronald Low, Russell Harwood, Geor- ge Ordway, Alan Schantz, Thomas Mendham. Second Row: George Balmer, Frederick Truitt, 38 Armand Katz, Jacob Klein, David Scarborough, Thomas Kochenderfer, Steven Crosley. Third Row: Andrew Patterson, Ralph Davies, Claude Schappelle, Frederick Sherrerd, Robert Mac- Kay, Robert Brown, Michael Hoy, Roy Almquist, President. CARDINAL KEY SOCIETY Since its founding in May of 1940, the Cardinal Key Society has striven to provide service to the college. After twenty-two years, the organization has changed in size, has increased its duties, but basically the Society has preserved its objective: “That the undergraduate student should grant prestige to service.” The past year has shown a veritable doubling of the duties of the organization. In addition to guiding prospective students and guests on tours of the campus, the Cardinal Key Society has pro- vided ushering for all major College sporting events, as well as Concert series, plays, civic at- tractions and other opportunities for service in this community. Through all activities of the or- ganization, Cardinal Key men strive to serve Muhlenberg in every possible way to further a favorable impression with all who visit and with all who are associated with Muhlenberg College. DELTA PHI NU — First Roil ' : Jean McIntosh, Christina Wissler, Nancy Terry, Sherrill Smith, Carol Langle, Margaret Laich, Elaine Griffith, President; Karen Herring, Barbara Levy, Nadine Uhrich, Cathryn Schemer, Jeanne Maraz, Etna Hilliard. Second Row: Jean Herr, Joanne 39 Schaaf, Rebecca Lentz, Patricia DeLawter, Beverly Coller, Majorie Kleintop, Karin Biehl, Kathryn Stauffer, Priscilla Schlenker, Ruth Neal, Marion Brady, Louise Soil, Arlene Hinner- shitz, Florence Kahman, Evonne Schultz, Susan Ahlheim. Third Row: Dorothy Dennis, Mar- rietta Weikert, Kay Christoffersen, Sue Kloth, Janet Stevens, Rebecca Van Haste, Judith Al- bright, Nancy Andrews, Doris Hedrick, Judy Flesch, Virginia Papenhausen, Rochelle Cinque, Leslie Earl, Anne Fichthorn, Dorothy Stringer, Jean Keenhold, Joann Reeder, Judith Bur- roughs, Joan Middlemast. Delta Phi Nu is the women’s social service soror- ity whose purpose is to provide aid in college functions such as teas, dances and receptions and to provide service for the community and its charitable organizations. The sorority works close- ly with the faculty, fraternities and other organi- zations to promote charitable service to the school and the community. Delta Phi Nu was organized and granted a char- ter in 1958. The sorority is open to any girl after her freshman year who possesses commendable academic and social standing, proven qualities of capability and a willingness to strive unselfishly for the improvement of the college and commu- nity. Prospective members are expected to serve in a certain percentage of activities in order to become eligible for initiation at the end of a semester of pledging. Since its founding Delta Phi Nu has become an increasingly active organi- zation on campus. DELTA PHI NU ALPHA PHI OMEGA— Seated: Dr. Kenneth Webb, Advisor; Dean Wentz, President; John Petree, Alan Heinlein, Eugene Steffey, Fred Hossler, Robert Longmuir. Standing: Howard Marsh, Walter Boehmer, John Roy, Robert Deppe, Charles Rubinson, Robert Graff, Irvin Schmoyer, Charles Eisenhart, Michael Walker. ALPHA PHI OMEGA Alpha Phi Omega is a national service fraternity composed of college and university men who are or have been affiliated with the Boy Scouts of America. The purpose of the organization is to assemble college men in the fellowship of the Scout Oath and Law, to develop friendship and to promote service to humanity. Active since 1958, Alpha Phi Omega received its National Charter on May 14, 1962 . The organization ushers at Mopsy Day, Boy Scout Day, and at Various theatrical productions. It also conducts an annual Book Exchange and Ugly Man Contest. Community and national services include donations to several charitable organiza- tions such as CARE and the Pusan Children’s Charity Hospital in Korea. Through these serv- ices, Alpha Phi Omega serves the college and the community. FACULTY AND ORGANIZATIONS It is in the Administration Building that each student is brought under the liberalizing influ- ence of a general education. Here he is provided with an opportunity to measure his own talents and to determine his own bent. His basic skills prepare the blueprint and give meaning and de- sign to liberal arts— a discriminating judgment and a deep rooted sense of personal and social responsibility. Humanistic studies through intelli- gent leadership and inspirational teaching provide the student with an understanding and apprecia- tion of the major fields of human knowledge. To give expression and supplement the curriculum the associated clubs and organizations act as a vital and integral part of these studies to provide fuller and significant meaning. ENGLISH DEPARTMENT— Seated: Janet Stamm, Ph.D., Bessie Michael, M.A. Standing: Wil- liam L. Kinter, Ph.D., Harold L. Stenger, Jr., Ph.D., John E. Bulette, A.M., Andrew H. Erskine, Ph.D., Ralph S. Graber, Ph.D., J. Gysbert Bouma, Ph.D. Missing: Minotte M. Chat- field, Ph.D., Claude E. Dierolf, Ph.D. ENGLISH Dr. Harold. L. Stenger, Jr. Department Head This year the English department, most ably chaired by Dr. Harold Stenger, recreated the en- grossing and variegated pageant of English litera- ture. Courses in drama offered the works of play- wrights from Aristophanes and his raucous ribal- dry through Shakespeare to O’Neill’s tragedy and the theater of the absurd. Literature offerings ranged from Hawthorne, Dickenson, and Whit- man in American literature to the study of Spen- cer and of Milton. Dr. Kinter’s intriguing course in Medieval Comparative Literature viewed Dante’s commentary on the timeless journey of man in the other worlds and featured a series of reports on the medieval literary productions of the entire western world. Dr. Stamm challenged students in her courses Expository Writing and Creative Writing. Weekly assignments and class criticism provided the pressure and the sharp- ening of acumen necessary to good writing. Speech offerings and a survey of Eighteenth Century English literature helped to round out the roster. Freshman felt the pressure of a term paper and English majors surveyed the whole of English literature in their senior year and went bravely off to the comprehensive to synthesize their knowledge. While English majors drew instruc- tion from the flexible program available, under- classmen gained in organization of thought, in skill of expression, and in understanding of the major writers England has produced. 43 MUHLENBERG EXPERIMENTAL THEATRE MET — Bottom Row: Audrey Houpt, Dr. William Kinter, Adviser; Kenneth Sweder, Frederick Busch, Patricia Winter, Richard Benveniste. Second Row: Donna Markowitz, Christopher Moore, Theodore Wachs, Raymond Cooper, Linda Celke, James Monaco, Sylvia Mull, Allen Weiss, Judith Burroughs. Third Row: Barbara Van Emon, Carol Lanz, Joann Reeder, Fran Wertz, Janice Weidner, Elaine Griffith, Edri Pappenberger, Terryl Allen, Sandra Stevens, Joel Glass, Thomas Mendham. Fourth Row: Henry Abraham, James Clements, Director; Val Mahan. By some unfounded and wonderful magic, order and form are reaped from the chaos. Beauty and pathos spring up from the most obscure and seem- ingly desolate of corners. The Muhlenberg Ex- perimental Theatre does not strive to entertain, but to enlighten. The eternity of a play often plunges to the depths of tragedy, and then strides rapidly again to the dizzy reaches of high and meaningful comedy. But magic does not merely flow from grease paint or spot lights. Behind the curtain and weeks before the performance minds are working in new and excitingly creative pat- terns that are soon to be the blossom of an eve- ning. And the motivating force, the source of all inspiration in the MET, is Dr. William L. Kinter. The results of MET have been exciting as well as provoking. The pseudo-standards of a moralistic, non-existing world have fallen before the honest and searching pens of modern playwrights. And MET is the fortunate medium through which our generation can often receive the new ideas, the growing conflicts, and passing beauties. Mask and Dagger is Muhlenberg’s traditional dramatic society. Its interest lies primarily in the academic theater; in providing a large number of students with the opportunity to participate in all phases of theatrical experiences. Two plays, chosen on the basis of their literary merit and their entertainment value, are presented a year under the direction of Dr. Andrew Erskine. In addition to this policy, the club this year re- activated an old policy, that of presenting a one act play during the chapel program. This produc- tion, Sorry, Wrong Number was staged entirely by club members. MASK AND DAGGER— Val Mahan, Janice Weidner, Thomas Mendham, Audrey Houpt, Judith Burroughs, Allen Weiss. MASK AND DAGGER POETRY WORKSHOP POETRY WORKSHOP— Bottom Row: Robert Killian. Second Row: Dr. William Kinter, Ad- viser; David Gaskill, Joel Glass, Carol Suplicki, President. This year the Poetry Workshop under the chair- manship of Carol Suplicki was responsible for the publication of Window, a representative selec- tion of the work of Muhlenberg poets. It also sponsored the appearance on campus of several contemporary poets, among them Rothenberg, Kelley, Blackburn, and a group from Les Deux Megots. Next year the Workshop is looking for- ward to several projects. One is a surrealistic movie produced in co-operation with the Art Department. The other is a poetry contest spon- sored by Dr. William Kinter and Mr. Charles Hanna and judged by an eminent contemporary poet. PUBLICATIONS BOARD PUBLICATIONS BOARD— Kneeling: Victor Peischl, James Cunningham, Thomas Mendham, President. Standing: Frederick Busch, Clifford Strehlow, Martin Miner, Robert Bohm, Gerald Sweder. The publications board is a liaison group among the student publications, receiving allotments from the Student Publications Fund and the Stu- dent Council. The board serves as the coordi- nator concerning the functions of the various publications, establishing a linkage of coopera- tion both in editorial and financial matters be- tween them and improving the excellence of their management. The publications board consists of the editors-in- chief of the publications. The associate members are business managers of the publications. 48 PI DELTA EPSILON The Muhlenberg chapter of Pi Delta Epsilon was established in 1953 and since that time has grown rapidly. Last Spring the 98th initiate received his key. The purpose of the fraternity is two-fold: to recognize the leaders in campus journalism and to promote the cause of responsible journalism and co-operation between the various campus publica- tions. Pi Delta Epsilon has the duty of publishing the yearly Academic and Activities Calendar and su- pervising its distribution. The publication of the calendar has met with widespread student approv- al and has been deemed a valuable adjunct to the newly formed Student union program. The fra- ternity also sponsors and helps judge the annual Freshman research paper competition each Spring. With the help of Dr. H. L. Stenger, Jr., advisor to the fraternity, a two-day workshop was held in early March for the editorial staffs of the Ciarla and Weekly. Dr. Robert E. Huldscheiner, fea- ture editor of The Lutheran magazine was present to provide some cogent comments on the art and science of journalism. PI DELTA EPSILON— Martin Miner, Thomas Mendham, Gerald Sweder, Robert Bohm, Fred- erick Busch, Arrnand Katz, Joann Reeder, Walter Blue, Edward Bonekemper, Richard Graefe, James Monaco, President. V,- ft : k . v V Gerald Sweder Editor in Chief-Designer A yearbook must clo more than acknowledge the achievements of a senior class. It must also present a composite picture of the events and the mood of an entire academic year. A yearbook is, therefore, the product of imaginative thinking. The job of its editors and staff is to find in the events of a year a theme or a pattern which will best convey that year’s significance. The 1962 Ciarla presents a “portrait of Muhlenberg,” and this basic concept served as a guide to the book’s layout, copy, and pictorial coverage. But creativity and originality are not enough. A yearbook is also the product of diligent and pain- staking work. Every page must be planned and carefully laid out; copy must be written, edited, and typed; hundreds of pictures must be taken in order to choose the very few which will best ex- press the mood of the book; meetings with the publisher and with the staff must take place in order to guide the book’s progress; hundreds of details and unexpected problems must be worked out. This volume was not conceived and born without the pains of labor. But the many months of plan- ning and working have hopefully culminated in the publication of a yearbook that expresses the unique atmosphere and character of the college it represents. 1962 CIARLA 49 David Miller Art Editor Maimu Annus Copy Editor Armand Katz Associate Editor Thomas Mendham Business Manager Judy Decking Associate Editor 1 5 1962 CIARLA Editor-in-chief— Designer . GERALD SWEDER Associate Editors JUDY DECKING ARMAND KATZ Art Editor DAVID MILLER Business Manager . . . THOMAS MENDHAM Copy Editor MAIMU ANNUS Staff ....... JUDITH WILFINGER SANDRA URBAN WALTER BLUE FREDERICK BUSCH MICHAEL POPOLOW Sports Editor DAVID MAYER Staff EDWARD BONEKEMPER ERNEST BECKLEY RICHARD ZEIGLER Photography Editor BRIAN JONES Assistant Photography Editor ALAN SCHANTZ Fraternity Editor .... ALAN DECHERNEY Typing Editor NANCY CHARLES General Staff GEORGE DARBY JACOB KLEIN HENRY ABRAHAM ROBERT BOHM Alan DeCherney Fraternity Editor Brian Jones Photography Editor MUHLENBERG WEEKLY Martin Miner Editor-in-Chief MUHLENBERG WEEKLY— Walter Blue, James Monaco, Joann Reeder, Edward Bonekemper, Richard Ziegler, Robert Bohm, Lawrence Crouthamel. Editor-in-Chief .... MARTIN MINER Managing Editor .... JAMES MONACO City Editor WALTER BLUE Asssociate City Editor . . JOANN REEDER Feature Editor ROBERT BOHM Associate Feature Editor . LAWRENCE CROUTHAMEL Sports Editor . . EDWARD BONEKEMPER Associate Sports Editor . RICHARD ZIEGLER Copy Editors . . . MARY ALICE ULRICH ANITA LEONE Assistant Copy Editors . JANET COLBURN ILLENE DANZIGER Photography Editor .... BRIAN JONES Business Manager . THOMAS MENDHAM Associate Business Manager . JANE SEONBUCHNER Advertising Editor . . JUDITH JEFFRIES Assistant Advertising Editor . JEAN CLARK Circulation Manager . NORMAN WERTHER The Weekly’s 79th year has seen a kaleidoscope of news, feature and editorial comment. Muhlen- berg itself is in a state of flux; a new president has brought with him a dynamic and forward-looking policy for this 114 year-old institution. The Weekly has attempted to present the true pic- ture of what is happening at the College and why. The editorial page has seen a collage of opinion on the political, social and artistic values of Muhlenberg and the larger community. As Muhl- enberg has changed, the student organ of expres- sion has attempted to reflect and constructively criticize this change. The eventful year was capped with the April fool issue and the annual Weekly banquet at which time History major Martin P. Miner handed down the responsibilities of his office to next year’s staff which will be headed by former Managing Editor Jim Monaco. 53 BUSINESS STAFF— Judith Jeffries, Thomas Mendham, Jane Seon- buchner. 54 The Arcade has in the past two years expanded quantitatively and qualitatively to compel a standard of excellence for future editors and staff. In 1960-61 a new format was adopted, factors of which were a more permanent cover and binding, higher quality paper, and in general a more at- tractive appearance. Both semesters’ volumes were uniform, and combine to form a most satisfactory set. As a result, Pi Delta Epsilon, National Hon- orary Journalism fraternity, awarded first place in its national division to the Arcade. Diversification was added in the 1961, Fall issue, under the editorship of Frederick J. Kerr, Jr., and the magazine showed then that it had grown up, publishing as it did very able poetry and prose. The Spring, 1962 issue was run under the editor- ship of Frederick M. Busch, and maintained the high perspective crystallized under Fred Kerr’s leadership. It was highlighted with a sketch of, and dedication to, Dr. William Kinter, who did so much to make the magazine and its staff grow into the arts. Experimental poetry and prose showed in this last year a visionary inventiveness and, so important and often neglected by so many college magazines, the artist’s craft, his ability to amalgamate subject matter with capable form. ARCADE ARCADE— Kneeling: Janice Weidner, Patricia Winter. Standing: Frederick Busch, Editor; Leonard Fairorth, Val Mahan, Victor Peischl, Walter Blue, Henry Abraham, David Gaskill, Nicholas Sheidy, Joel Glass. WMUH— Clifford Strehlow, Station Manager; Robert George, Sidney Weikert, Nicholas Sheidy, Frederick Eck, James Cunningham, Raymond Cooper, Robert Bree, Jean Kennedy, Charles Okal. WMUH During the school year WMUH has provided varied radio programming for the entire student body as well as being a training unit for active members. Through the efforts of Clifford Streh- low, station manager, and George Allen, chief engineer, a petition for a Muhlenberg FM radio station was approved. The student managed sta- tion will broadcast a diversified program includ- ing tapes from Radio Moscow, concert music, Russian lessons, and athletic events. WMUH-FM will also give student and faculty groups, such as MET and Poetry Workshop, a wider audience for their creative efforts. The station will go into operation in September and will be permanently located in the J. Conrad Seegers Union Building. 56 M-BOOK M-BOOK— Robert Bohm, Editor. The M-Book, a supplement to the college cata- logue, is distributed to all freshmen as a special aid in orientation. It provides information on the extra-curricular activities and the social regula- tions of the college and contains the Student Council constitution, a synopsis of activities of each campus organization, a faculty directory, the complete schedule of athletic competition, and a calendar of special events. Also included is a spe- cial section containing the complete academic regulations. This was the second year that the M-Book super- vised the publication of a Student Directory, which included the names, school and home ad- dresses of all students. Changes. This theme swept Mueller House in ’62. This year for the first time, under the re- vamped program for majors, budding historians of the junior class were exposed to Historical Colloquium, a course tracing the history of his- tory. Historians of the different eras are analyzed for their handling of source material, bias in pres- entation, and affiliation to particular schools of thought. Historiography for senior majors, com- pleting the two year study in research, prepares each student for advanced thesis work. This academic year has seen the retirement of Dr. James Edgar Swain from the chairmanship of the History Department to the position of pro- fessor and adviser. Three generations of Muhlen- berg students have ample reason to know Dr. Swain as a dedicated, concerned, and conscientious teacher. Despite his international reputation as an author and membership in the Authors Club of London, Dr. Swain’s dynamic leadership and in- terests have extended in many directions. His in- novations have contributed not only to the stature of the History Department but also to the campus welfare of both students and faculty. HISTORY HISTORY DEPARTMENT— Seated: Victor L. Johnson, Ph.D., James Edgar Swain, Ph.D., Katherine S. Van Eerde, Ph.D., Joanne Stafford Mortimer, Ph.D. Standing: John ). Reed, Ph.D., Edwin R. Baldrige, Jr., M.A., Leslie J. Workman, A.1L Dr. James Edgar Swain Department Head PHI ALPHA THETA— First Row: Barbara Gum, Carol Baumgartner, John Meyer, Martin Miner, Lona Farr, James Weingartner, President. Second Row: Roger Goodling, John Superka, Roy Almquist, Malcolm Gross, Arthur Mack, David Bernstein, George Darby. The Kappa chapter of the honorary history fra- ternity was involved in the preparation of a his- tory of Muhlenberg. Several histories have already been written about the college, but none are up to date. Members of the fraternity are digging into college records, archives of Mount Airy Lutheran Seminary, and official files of the Lehigh Valley Historical Society. Although initiated this year, the project is not expected to be completed until after several more years of research. PHI ALPHA THETA ECONOMICS DEPART MENT— Seated: Henry M. M. Richards, Ph.D., John G. Voyatzis, M.A. Standing: IFilson N. Serfass, C.P.A., Edward J. Schurr, M.B.A. ECONOMICS Dr. Henry M. M. Richards Department Head The economics student faced a familiar malady: the study of phenomena rising from the satisfac- tion of unlimited wants through limited means. Since this proves often to be a vital, personal consideration, he was intrigued to see it applied to the basic structures of the nation. His introduc- tion was invariably Economic Principles, a blank- et review. After whetting his appetite, the ad- vanced student was now eager to meet the chal- lenges of Monetary Economics, Labor Economics, Business Statistics, and Economic Growth and De- velopment. The asset and liability department of the economic instruction at Muhlenberg was in the calculating hands of the Accounting Depart- ment and Associate Professor Wilson Serfass. The study of balanced sheets, income statements, part- nerships and corporations, and tax headaches were stressed. Students were also able to see the nation’s for- tunes being made and lost at first hand in a color- ful trip to New York and American stock ex- changes in the fall. The excursion highlighted the activities of the Economic and Business Club for the year. ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS CLUB ECONOMIC AND BUSINESS CLUB— First Row: Jeanne Lippman, Sandra Stevens, Starr Kin- ney. Second Row: Virginia Papcnhausen, Edward Jabs. Third Row: Robert Deppe, Janies Pierson. Fourth Row: Richard Collins, Erwin Weil. Missing: Richard Lewis, President. 59 SOCIOLOGY To know man is to know his society. The courses offered by the Sociology Department of Muhlen- berg College are designed to provide an under- standing of the intricate relationships in our com- plex society, and to prepare students for work in graduate school or for social service positions both in public and private welfare agencies. In meeting this challenge, the department has in- vited guest lecturers from many fields, with topics varying from Urban Allentown Renewal to Child Welfare Programs. Student projects have also greatly enlivened the year. Detailed maps of Allen- town occupied the talents of an Urban Renewal class, while research projects in Problems of American Minority Groups helped focus the dis- eases of society. Advanced students were priv- ileged to “go into the field” directly in conjunc- tion with the social work program. 60 SOCIOLOGY DEPARTMENT— Charles A. S. Hynam, M.S., Rev. Morris S. Greth, Ph D., Litt.D., Stephen L. Angell, M.A. Dr. Morris S. Greth Department Head SOCIOLOGY CLUB— First Row: Sherril Smith, Tobysue Rubin, Nancy Terry, Mary Wahrmahn. Second Row: Carol Krumenacker, Priscilla Schlenker, Judy Flesch. Third Row: Dr. Morris Greth, Dean Wentz, Nancy Baker, John Solliday, President. Fourth Row: Steven Myers, Mr. Charles Hynam. The Muhlenberg Sociological Society sponsored activities closely integrated to the sociology course. On the agenda have been lively discussions con- cerning jobs in social welfare, reports on domestic relations cases, and talks on child welfare. The society holds one joint meeting each year to which students from other area colleges are invited. The society, as well as various sociology classes, planned several trips each semester in order to broaden the students’ knowledge in the field of social welfare. SOCIOLOGY CLUB PSYCHOLOGY The Psychology Department has experienced a very active and productive year. As an example, students enrolled in the Abnormal and Clinical Psychology courses took memorable tours through the Allentown State Hospital, gaining new in- sights into the functions and aberrations of the mind. As a note of further activity, two members of the psychology staff are associated with clinical work at the college, in addition to performing their classroom duties. Dr. Maiser is affiliated with the Reading Clinic which serves four counties and is now open to the public. The Guidance and Counseling Clinic, whose work extends into in- dustry as well as individaul counseling, is under the supervision of Dr. Brackin, Chairman of the Psychology Department. PSYCHOLOGY DEPARTMENT— Seated: Walter H. Brackin, Ph.D., Thomas F. Lohr, Ph.D. Standing: Theodore Maiser, Ph.D., Donald K. Lauer, Ph.D. Dr. Walter H. Brackin Department Head PSI CHI— Kneeling: Bruce Allen, Martin Renninger, Michael Gaynor. Standing: Esther Goyne, Elaine Griffith, Eileen Eckhouse, Ellen Greenberg, Doris Sjostrom, Judy Vanderhyde, Susan Vanderhyde, Ann Jorgensen, Amy Hawman, President; Ruth Terry, Gloria Snyder, Diane Donaldson. Psi Chi, a chapter of the national honorary psy- chology fraternity, is the psychology organization on campus. Dedicated to the advancement of re- search and study, the organization, whose adviser is Dr. Lohr, holds monthly business meetings and sponsors various social activities. PSI CHI 64 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT— William M. French, Ph.D., Adeline E. Kreinheder, Ed.D., Jesse N. Roeder, Ph.D., John C. MacConnell, M.A. Just what makes a good teacher? With this ques- tion in mind, the future student teacher ap- proached the Education Department, as he pre- pared for his strenuous career. There were many answers to his perplexing problem, and sometimes he was pulled in just as many directions. Philoso- phies of progressivism, conservatism, disciplin- arianism revolved in his brain, and it was the student teacher who actually faced the classroom of sixty peering eyes who found that perhaps there was no one clear answer. Meanwhile, back in the projection room, he learned to thread a 16 mm film, run the tape recorder, and splice the film after he had ripped it. On his own in the local Allentown schools, he observed the master teach- ers at work as part of his “methods” induction. As a guide, the purposes and procedures of the Education department w ere clearly outlined in a booklet for future teachers’ use, published for the first time this year. Dr. William M. French Department Head EDUCATION Membership in the Education Society reached nearly one hundred students as elementary and secondary teachers exchanged their views. The club, headed personably by David Deery, dis- cussed problems, as well as values of teaching, job applications, sample interview procedures, and the like. Guest speakers enlightened the So- ciety with their own experiences, adding a spice of immediacy and personalness to the ancient profession. EDUCATION SOCIETY EDUCATION SOCIETY— Robert Killian, Melvin Jones, Larry Weikel, Arthur Motz, Donald Weaver, Richard Baer, President; Joan Middlemast, Rebecca Van Haste, Doris Hedrick, Anne Fichthorn, Leslee Earl, Mary Jo Metzger, Rebecca Lentz, Dorothy Dennis, Deborah Debus, Amy Hawman, Verna Wolf, Doris Sjostrom, Elaine Griffith, Esther Coyne, Judy Flesch, Helga Jacob, Judith Albright, Audrey Houpt, Marion Brady, Judith Vanderhyde, Susan V ' anderhyde, Carol Baumgartner, Marilyn Morgan, Ruth Neal, Patricia DeLawter, Adrienne Kunkel, Amy Tunnell, Maimu Annus, Ruth Terry, Barbara Gum, Sandra Shupe, Carol Langle, Barbara Levy. ROMANCE LANGUAGES Dr. Anthony S. Corbiere Department Head The department of Romance Languages present- ed three of the five major languages spoken today which sprang from Latin roots. A Beginning Italian course opened the beauty and music of the language to students who had long insisted on such an offering. Beginning and Intermediate French thoroughly grounded stu- dents in basics of grammar and in facility in read- ing short stories. Similar procedures were used in Spanish instruction. Second-year enthusiasts gained fluency with “the smooth, sweet language of Cervantes” as they read short stories and works by such authors as Don Juan Manuel and Alarcon. A further course indicated the growth of Spanish- American literary forms and demonstrated its con- nection to the turbulent and colorful historical- political situation on the continent. At the end of this year Dr. Anthony S. Corbiere, Chairman of the Romance Languages Depart- ment, will lay aside all of his academic responsi- bilities. We are grateful to him for the inspiration and motivation that he has provided throughout his many years of devoted service. Even in retire- ment the influence of his classroom will carry across the nation and around the world as it is multiplied by those who through the years have been his students. ROMANCE LANGUAGES DEPARTMENT— Seated: Sara B. MacGowan, B.A., Anne Marie F. Carter, A.M., Anna Marie de Corbea, M.A., Standing: Anthony S. Corbiere, Ph.D., Kenneth Webb, Ph.D. PHI SIGMA IOTA— George Darby, Carol Baumgartner, Ute Lissy, Sandra Taylor, Verna Wolf, Amy Tunnell, Anne Jorgensen, Louise Soil, Joann Reeder, Patricia DeLawter, James Monaco, Thomas Fryer, Janet Fogleman. Missing: Helen Hlatky, President. 67 Helen Hlatky, senior education major and teacher of Romance languages, presided over Phi Sigma Iota, national honorary Romance language fra- ternity, during the school year. Installed through the efforts of Dr. Anthony Corbiere in 1928, the group of superior students met monthly. The tempo and character of countries speaking Ro- mance languages was presented by seniors in papers written following original research. PHI SIGMA IOTA Dr. John W. Brunner Department Head GERMAN DEPARTMENT— John W. Brunner, Ph.D., Heinrich Meyer, Ph.D., Adolph Wegener Ph.D., Anne E. Rodda, M.A. GERMAN The German Department boasts an imaginative and dynamic curriculum. First year students learned prepositions, separable prefixes, irregular verbs and dipped into the rich wealth of German folk music. The spell of the mysterious Black Forest held second year students captive in a world of legend and folk lore. While advanced students conversed and composed in German 41, other studies surveyed German literature in detail and emphasized Goethe and the twentieth century. This year saw the addition of a language labora- tory at Muhlenberg. Dr. Brunner, head of the de- partment, was instrumental in incorporating this “room of babble” learning device into the teach- ing systems of modern languages on campus. DER DEUTSCHE VEREIN— Seated: Elaine Miller, Mary Wahrmann, Dianne Donaldson, Carol Krumenacker, Karin Biehl, Kathryn Stauffer, Virginia Macsek, Judy Flesch, Helga Jacob, Judith Rau, Joanne Weber. Standing: Edward Buss, Robert Killian, Allan Messinger, Alfred Yergey, Karl Seifert, Robert George, Thomas Hajewski, Donald Eismann, Thomas Kochenderfer. Miss- ing: Ute Lissy, President. Founded in 1924, the organization endeavors to develop a greater fluency in German and a more intimate acquaintance with German culture. A series of engrossing German films was made avail- able to the large membership during the year. Through the work of Dr. Adolph Wegener, Pro- fessor of German and now adviser of this organi- zation, Muhlenberg College became an active member of Delta Phi Alpha, National Honorary German fraternity. It is the purpose of this organi- zation to promote interest in the study of the German language and literature through lectures by prominent professors and various projects of study. DER DEUTSCHE VEREIN DELTA PHI ALPHA DELTA PHI ALPHA — First Row: Robert Kocher, Karl Seifert, Ute Lissy, Nancy Andrews, Patricia Winter, Jean Stauffer, Helga Jacob, Eleanor Jasch, Rachel Green. Second Row: Fred- erick Keller, Robert Hartzell, President; Robert George, Ronald Bittner, Thomas Kochenderfer, Allan Messinger, Karl Reichstadter, Richard Baer. 70 CLASSICS DEPARTMENT— Alice P. Tallmadge, A.M., Department Head. ETA SIGMA PHI CLASSICS Mrs. Alice Tallmadge, retired classics instructor of Cedar Crest College, returned to the academic community to fill the vacancy caused by Dr. Stev- en’s leave of absence. In a warm and personable manner she re-created the eternal charm and chal- lenge of the classics. Beginners in Greek wrestled with complexities of tense, voice, and mood and were awed at the pre- cision with which the Athenians and Spartans ex- pressed themselves. Advanced students read from the histories of Herodotus and from the famed Apology of Plato. Advanced Latin work was done in four areas: Cicero, Vergil, Tacitus, and Lucre- tius, while beginners learned to distinguish be- tween an ablative absolute and a supine. Alpha Rho chapter of the honorary classical lan- guages fraternity initiated six members and had a classical banquet at the home of Mrs. Tallmadge. The chapter was established on campus in 1931 to keep alive the spark which set the Western world aflame and to foster an appreciative feeling for tongues of antiquity. Students and faculty members came to realize more fully that the true liberal arts education begins with a knowledge of the classics. ETA SIGMA PHI— Charles Gills, Charles Eisenhart, Robert Bohm, President; Jeffrey Burnoski, Kathryn Stauffer, Mrs. Alice Tallmadge, Adviser. PHILOSOPHY Venn Diagrams and truth tables were a familiar sight to the student of Logic, as he hoped to sort out his intuition from correct forms of reasoning. Although Logic was by far the most popular phi- losophy offering, courses such as Contemporary Philosophy, and a Seminar on Aristotle created challenges for others. As examples, Contemporary Philosophy delved into the complicated works of Russell, Ay re, Dewey and Martin Buber, and the Aristotle session compared the works of the great master to contemporary writers. The main burden of the department was shoul- dered by Dr. David Reed. Mr. James Tinsman assumed responsibility in two evening classes, Ethics and Ancient Philosophy, while the religion department incorporated Philosophy of Religion and Medieval Philosophy into their schedule. Phi Sigma Tau, the national honorary philosophy fraternity, headed this year by Cynthia Ziegenfuss, engaged several speakers for various functions. A note of special interest was struck when at a meet- ing the three top papers from the Aesthetics class were read by the students and discussed by the group. PHILOSOPHY DEPARTMENT— David A. Reed, Ph.D., Department Head. PHI SIGMA TAU 71 PHI SIGMA TAU— Robert Bohm, President; David Reed, Advisor; Cynthia Ziegenfuss, Ad- rienne Kunkel, David Daniel. Dr. Hagen A. K. Staack Department Head 72 Perhaps the most dynamic department at Muhlen- berg is the religion office. No student can go through school without having had some contact with the department both in required courses and at chapel programs. And after such a contact, no student can help but feel enriched. The chairman of the department is Dr. Hagen Staack, whose imposing knowledge in a great variety of fields makes him not only an outstand- ing scholar but an interesting and stimulating professor. Dr. Staack can nevertheless always find time to discuss a problem, academic or otherwise, with a student. The religion department believes that a teacher should always be a student. Consequently they have spent three hours a week this year teaching themselves Russian. In the summer months they each prepare three original research papers, one of which is read to the others each week. All this is in addition to their own individual quests into further learning. RELIGION DEPARTMENT— Jesse R. Renninger, S.T.M., Rev. Hagen A. K. Staack, Ph.D., Rodney E. Ring, Ph.D. PRE-THEOLOGICAL CLUB— Bottom Row: Robert George, Jeffrey Burnoski, President; Fred- erick Keller, Robert Bohm. Second Row: Richard Hans, Walter Blue. Under the leadership of president Jeffrey Bur- noski the Pre- Theo Club offered an active pro- gram. Guest speakers included Dr. Boyer and Mr. Colarusso. The club also revised its constitution and sponsored a booth at the ODK Carnival. MCA began its year with a picnic. In addition to a variety of informative monthly lectures, the MCA sponsored the spring production of T. S. Eliot’s Murder in the Cathedral, a drama about the murder of St. Thomas A. Becket at Canter- bury. They held their annual art contest in April and spearheaded the drive for World University Service. PRE-THEOLOGICAL CLUB MUHLENBERG CHRISTIAN 73 ASSOCIATION MUHLENBERG CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION — Bottom Row: Ricard Weisenbach, Robert Bohm, Robert George, Frank Muhr. Second Row: Rochelle Cinque, Barbara Solt, Elaine Hobel- man, Ute Lissy. Third Rozu: Richard Hans, Bruce Allen, Wilson Devvald, Fred Thoms, Roger Goodling. Missing: Hugh Sanborn, President. INSTITUTE OF FAITH Organized in 1950, the Institute of Faith is a standing committee of the Muhlenberg Christian Association. The committee, functioning months before the actual program begins, has as its ulti- mate purpose to present, in terms intelligible to college students, the relevance of Christian faith to personal life and the great social issues of the age, by bringing on campus each year outstanding theologians. This year the guest speaker was Dr. James I. Mc- Cord, President of Princeton Theological Semi- nary, a prominant Presbyterian theologian. The theme for the three day program, “The New Man in the New Age,” included addresses con- cerning the New Age, the New Man, and the New Theology. Dr. McCord’s lectures and semi- nar discussions, which delved into the depths of modern Christianity and its criticism, stirred thoughts and aroused participation on campus. INSTITUTE OF FAITH — Bottom Row: George l’ivetz, Kathryn Stauffer, Barbara Solt, Elaine Hobelman. Second Row: Robert Bohm, Ruth Neal, Jean Keenhold, Maureen Stewart, Gail Thalmann, Ute Lissy, Chairman. Third Row: Richard Hans, Fred Thoms, Robert George, Robert Kitchen, Richard Weisenbach, Frank Muhr. ART DEPARTMENT— Alfred Colarusso, M.A., Department Head. Perhaps the most interesting facet of the Art De- partment is Mr. Colarusso himself. His intent is not only to teach his students how to draw, but also to appreciate the fine arts and to show an understanding of color and form in relation to the entire page. In such a class as Art in the Elementary School, students experimented with line, color and tex- ture, and attempted to correlate their creative works with their lesson plans. In History and Ap- preciation of Art students viewed numerous slides, many of which Mr. Calorusso had developed him- self. The art of the Classical, Renaissance, and Contemporary periods were correlated with such fine arts as music and literature to gain an overall perspective of the era. Students also made month- ly visits to the Allentown Art Museum, and utiliz- ing the principles studied in class, analyzed the collections on display. MUSIC 76 MUSIC DEPARTMENT— Ludwig Lenel, M.M., Department Head. Missing: Ralph Kemmerer, Frederick Robinson. Under the brilliant hand of Mr. Ludwig Lenel, the music department this year offered courses special- izing in Romanticism and the contemporary schools. The various trends of piano, art song, chamber music, symphony, opera, and church music were dealt with, through listening and reading assign- ments and through the inimitable lectures of Mr. Lenel. Largely through the efforts of Mr. Lenel, the Muhl- enberg Opera Workshop came into its legal exist- ence when it adopted a constitution. The music de- partment also is responsible for individual instruc- tion in the piano, taught by Mr. Kemmerer; the organ, Mr. Lenel; and voice, by Mr. Robinson. CHOIR— Bottom Row: Judith Rau, Gail Crabtree, Patricia Herbst, Priscilla Schlenker, Helen Hlatky, Elaine Miller, Roberta Heiberger, Lois Lange, Carmelia Baxter. Second Row: Janet Fogleman, Christina Schlenker, Jean Herr, Sandra Taylor, Cynthia Ziegenfuss, Charlotte Lilly, Karin Biehl, Linda Keller, Jean Stauffer. Third Row: Dorothy Stringer, Ruth Gebhardtsbauer, Judith Christman, Helen Weidhoft, Nancy Parker, Ruth Terry, Dorothea Doyle. Fourth Row: Patricia Muck, Alice Deisher, Dale Stauffer, Melvin Jones, Robert Koch, June Pearson, Marie Campion. Fifth Row: Claude Shappelle, William Nagle, David Bell, Arthur Clyde, Aubrey Bougher, Kim Williams, Richard Berlin, Russell Mauch. Sixth Row: Donald Eismann, Walter, Blue, Klaus Kingstorf, Jean Adams, Thomas Kochenderfer, Edward Greenawald, Randolph Raab, William Ayers, Richrd Miller. The Muhlenberg Choir completed its musical sea- son after extensively touring the Mid-West. In addition to the western Pennsylvania-eastern Ohio tour, the choir also gave several concerts in New York and Philadelphia. The program was a col- lection of pieces by Bynd, Brahms, Tye, Gibbons, Tallis, and Rachmaninoff, emphasizing the Ro- mantic contributions to the musical literature. CHOIR A growing and vibrant music organization on campus is the Glee Club. A highlight of the year’s activities was a free lawn concert for the student body and guests of the college. This entire concert is now available on a new long playing recording. GLEE CLUB 77 GLEE CLUB— Bottom Row: David Bell, Russell Mauch, Donald Schlegel, Robert Koch, Arthur Clyde, Director; Veronica Pritchard. Second Row: Aubrey Bougher, Thomas Atkiss, Kenneth Smith, Walter Blue, Terry MacNair, Klaus Kingstorf. Third Roiv: Ronald Werley, Steven Hatzai, Norman Boyer, Michael Heirsdorf, Randolph Raab, Kenneth Zindle. MUHLENBERG MARCHING AND CONCERT BAND MUHLENBERG MARCHING AND CONCERT BAND-Dale Stauffer, President; Majorettes: Sandra Juriis, Evonne Schultz, Elizabeth Gunther. Class of 1962: David Bell, Arthur Clyde, Richard Cobb, David Daniel, Martin Reagle, Alexander Luther. Class of 1963: Carol Baumgartner, Robert Deppe, Judith Frost, Theodore Gearhart, Ronald Hari, Edward Jabs, Matthew John, Richard Parks, Alfred Yergey. Class of 1964: Steven Berg, Robert Cunningham, Wilson Dewald, Susan Eggerstedt, Donald Eismann, Mark Geshop, Edward Hoffman, Robert Koch, William Lautenberger, Gary Legget, Michael Merkel, Alan Messinger, Blayne Olson, Barry Pearson, James Pizza, Bruce Schmauch, James Smith, Albert Sproule, Frederich Weber, Michael Weber, Edward Wolfgang, Rodney Wright. Class of 1963: Steven An- dersen, Coralie Boileau, Aubrey Bougher, Sharon Brewer, Lee Dougherty, David Gaugler, Raymond Hedger, John Henry, David Jones, Jean Kennedy, James Kirk, Burlington Latshaw, Geoffrey Legg, Carl Lehr, Terry MacNair, J. Frederich Miller, Robert Milligan. Richard Pal- mer, Peter Schmehl, Edward Simon, Stephen Smythe, Jeri Snyder, Jon Thoenbe, Barron Weand, Theodore Weiss, Ronald Werley, Kim Williams, James Williamson, Ronald Yergey, Kenneth Zindle, Dorothy Zimmerman. Under the capable direction of Albertus L. Meyers, who is nationally famous for his work with the Allentown Band and membership in the band of John Phillip Sousa, the Muhlenberg Band performs as two individual units throughout the year. During the fall the Marching Band parti- cipates at the home and away football games by presenting pre-game and half-time shows. After the football season has ended, the Concert Band prepares and presents performances on campus and in the community. COMMUTER ' S CLUB— Seated: David Schwartz, George Gill, Edward Greenawald. Second Row: Robert Killian, Jackson Cope, David Beazley, Robert Good, Thomas Baker, President; Blayne Olsen, John Solliday, Steven Myers. Integrating the Muhlenberg community and the day student is the purpose of t he Commuters’ Club. This organization acts as a consolidating factor for Muhlenberg’s commuting students by bringing them together on common ground and by acting as the representative organization for these students on campus. The Veteran’s Club functions as an advisory group for all veterans and aids in their adjust- ment to college life. The club also acts as a social organization and performs services for the school and the community. VETERAN’S CLLIB— Robert Killian, Matthew McDonald, Frank Laky, Stephen Einfalt, Presi- dent; David Schwartz. COMMUTER’S CLUB VETERAK’S CLUB This year, under the energetic leadership of club president, Gerald S. Besses, and team captain, Bruce Alberston, the chess club’s reputation on campus has grown. Two Student-Faculty chess matches were held. The first was a 5y 2 -5i 2 draw, but the second was a decisive student victory, 6-3. These were the first such matches since 1959. The club has also seen progress in intercollegiate com- petition in the Eastern Pennsylvania Chess League. After placing an unhappy last in last year’s play, Muhlenberg rose to a promising sec- ond place this year. 80 CHESS CLUB— Clifford Moyer, Arthur Barry, George Pivetz, Gerald Besses, President; Robert Marks, Michae ' Miller, Allen Somers. 7ch , v It is in the Science Building that individual ob- servation and research hold full sway. From the cold and static machinery flows unending knowl- edge for here are the very modern facilities and equipment for instruction, laboratory work and experiment. The lecture, as well as the laboratory, becomes the necessary and essential means of learning the fundamental and advanced theories, providing the ingredients for the students curi- osity. With this background the student goes out pre- pared to continue seeking the definitions and anal- ysis of the world of nature. 82 BIOLOGY BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT— John V. Shankweiler, Ph D., Robert L. Schaeffer, Jr., Ph.D., Paul W. H. Weaver, Jr., M.S., James R. Vaughan, Ph.D., John E. Trainer, Ph.D., John C. Hadder, Ph.D. Dr. John V. Shankweiler Department Head This year will mark 41 years service in the biology department for Dr. John V. Shankweiler. During these years he has given unstintingly of his time, energy, and skills through his love for the College and his dedication to an ideal of service. Even though Dr. Shankweiler will retire this year, he will continue to teach at his alma mater. Taking over as department head is Dr. Trainer, while Dr. Charles Mortimer of the Chemistry Department will assume his position as Pre-Medical adviser. During the year numerous grants in aid have per- mitted the Biology Department to carry on ex- tensive research. Also the Biology honors course, Problems in Biology, will be amplified allowing more undergraduates to participate in independ- ent study programs. In the near future Dr. Train- er envisions a space reorganization plan to provide new laboratory facilities and teaching room. PRE-MEDICAL SOCIETY— Bottom Row: Alan Decherney, Elizabeth Gunther, Jerold Kaufman, Charles Goldberg, Karin Biehl, Evonne Schultz, Dr. John Shankweiler, Advisor. Second Row: Kenneth Maurer, David Bilheimer, Armand Katz, Myron Katz, Jerry Slepack. Third Row: Lewis Broschard, Edward O’Donnell, Janet Smithson, Gerald Besses, Jon Satinsky, Janice Steigerwalt. Fourth Row: Arthur Hodes, Joseph Blood, Mary Swigar, James Devorss, Bennett Roth, Arthur Suffin. Fifth Row: David Miller, Carl Metzger, Salvatore Assorgi, Kenneth Eckhart, Stanley Aukberg. Sixth Row: Ronald Banner, Garth Koniver, Steven Greenberg, Benjamin L’ngerleider, Jacob Klein. Seventh Row: John Turtzo, Stephen Latman, Richard Lunger, John Fraunfelder, John Gilhorn, Frederick Eck. Eigth Row: Michael Miller, Michael Rothman, Barry Pearson. Missing: Gary Kushner, President. 83 The Pre-Medical Society is an organization of students preparing to enter into one of the fields of medicine and has become one of the largest groups on campus, consisting of over eighty mem- bers. Admission to the club is available to students who desire to enter one of the medical fields and have completed one year of College. The Society’s purpose is to try to acquaint students with the different phases of medicine by means of guest speakers and films dealing with some of the new and established practices of medicine. This year at the annual banquet the organization was for- mally named in honor of its dedicated founder and adviser, the John V. Shankweiler Pre-Medical Society. PRE-MEDICAL SOCIETY BIOLOGY MUSEUM EC ' i PHYSICS DEPARTMENT-Harry L. Raub III, Ph.D., Robert A. Boyer, Ph.D., Walter E. Loy, Jr., M.S. Under the vital and stimulating guidance of the Physics Department, students unravelled the fun- damentals and the intricacies of the physical world. Grants from General Electric, continued through the past few years, have not hindered progress; in fact, the quantity and quality of the department’s instructional equipment has steadily increased. Also, one of Muhlenberg’s physics courses, Atomic and Nuclear Physics, under Dr. Harry Raab has attracted nationwide attention and recognition. The course features an inte grated laboratory program in which radio-active material are used. Through such courses and additional grants, the department will keep pace with the physical complexities of the modern world. PHYSICS Dr. Robert A. Boyer Department Head Dr. George H. Brandes Department Head CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT-George H. Brandes, Ph.D., Alice T. Griffith, M.S., G. N. Rus- sell Smart, Ph.D., Ray Schultz, M.S., David N. Stehly, M.S. Missing: Charles E. Mortimer, Ph.D CHEMISTRY i I As head of the Chemistry Department, Dr. George Brandes has been the major factor in the depart- ment’s progress and development. His chairman- ship has, throughout the years, been one of in- spiration and dedication. Dr. G. N. Russell Smart assumed the chairmanship of the department va- cated by Dr. Brandes who will remain in a pro- fessorial capacity at Muhlenberg. Ambitious plans have been laid for the future, including more emphasis on Physical chemistry and work in Radiation chemistry. Through vari- ous grants from the NFS Research Corporation and industrial sources, research has been made possible again this year. As an accredited member of the American Chemical Society, Muhlenberg’s Chemistry Department strives for excellence and productivity in its vast held. The Science Club was founded for the purpose of promoting interest and understanding in the field of chemistry and physics. The club meets periodically and endeavors to bring outstanding personalities in education, research, and industry in the scientific field to the campus in order to present talks on various aspects of science. SCIENCE CLUB SCIENCE CLUB— Bottom Row: Anne Reiss, Lavinia Meinzer, Edward Schriffert, President; Cynthia Ziegenfuss, Judith Christman, Lorraine Buzas. Se cond Row: Alfred Yergey, David Kuntz, Jeffrey Parsons, Robert Karp, William Raab, Charles Robinson. 87 MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT— Robert J. Wagner, M.S., Luther J. Deck, A.M., Truman L. Koehler, Ph.D., Roland W. Dedekind, Jr., M.S., Robert K. Stump, M.S. 88 Changes have keynoted the Mathematics Depart- ment this year. A Seminar course in mathematics has offered the following diversified subjects: Complex Variable, Bessel Functions and Legen- dre Polynomials; Difference Equations; and La- place Transforms. In addition, the Vu-Graph Overhead Projector was used in freshman courses as a possible teaching aid in the years to come. Further changes have been planned for the future. An increase of courses in Statistics and Probabil- ity, as well as a prerequisite course for Advanced Calculus, called Foundations have been strongly recommended. MATHEMATICS Dr. Truman L. Koeh ler Department Head SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS — Bottom Row: Ellen Bergheim, Secretary; Thomas Fryer, Vice- President. Second Row: Duane Sonneborn, Treasurer; Karl Gimber, President. SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS SENIOR CLASS EXECUTIVE COUNCIL — Bottom Row: Brenda Hauser, Ellen Bergheim, Karl Gimber, John Meyer. Second Row: Dorothy Dennis, Roger Feldman, Alexander Luther, Duane Sonneborn, Walter Barnes, Robert Singleton, Thomas Fryer. SENIOR CLASS EXECUTIVE COUNCIL 90 WHO ' S WHO The students recognized in WHO’S WHO AMONG STUDENTS IN AMERICAN UNI- VERSITIES AND COLLEGES each year are nominated from approximately 650 colleges and universities. Campus nominating commit- tees are instructed to consider, in making their selections, the student’s scholarship; his par- ticipation and leadership in academic and extracurricular activities; his citizenship and service to the school; and his promise of future usefulness. WHO ' S WHO — Bottom Roue John Meyer, Ruth Terry. Second Row: Frederick Busch, Martin Miner, Amy Hawman, Roy Almquist, David Bernstein, Bruce Allen, Karl Gimber. m Pm CLASS OF 1962 Martin S. Abel Edward H. Algard Bruce J. Allen Roy G. Almquist Edwin L. Althouse Carl E. Anderson Richard F. Baer Walter F. Barnes Andrew W. Barton Ira E. Bash David J. Bell Benedicta Billy Ellen Bergheirn Carl L. Bleam David A. Bernstein Joseph Blood, Jr. Michael O. Bertolet H. Fred Bomberger K. Michael Bidaman Lee H. Bowker James E. Brackin Alfred O. Breinig William J. Burton Lorraine C. Buzas Albert S. Callie John D. Cameron Joseph A. Carpentier Judith I. Christman Thomas H. Christman Harold R. Cobb, Jr. 93 Carol S. Decker David P. Daniel William F. Darkcs Deborah A. Debus Thomas L. Davies A. David Deery Patricia A. DeLawter Dorothy A. Dennis James E. Devorss William B. Dodge Stephen J. Einfalt, Jr. Carol L. Emhardt Susan L. Emmer G. G. Erdenberger Leslie E. Erikson Leonard Fairorth Lona M. Farr John F. Fegelein Roger P. Feldman 95 Caroline J. Fetterolf 96 Janet L. Fogleman Edward M. Gehringer Michael W. Gayno David S. Fritch Doris A. Gangwer Thomas B. Fryer Charles J. Goetz David V. Gehris Karl O. Gimber James E. Goggin Malcolm J. Gross Margaret G, Gonzalez Theodore R. Gurniak Roger N. Goodling Thomas J. Hajewski Rachel M. Green John F. Haldeman Donald F. Greene Leonard Haltrecht Jeryl A. Hankee 98 l I Richard E. Hans Robert E. S. Hartzell Russell T. Harwood Brenda M. Hauser Amy L. Hawman Mrs. June N. Helfrich Ronald L. Hessinger Douglas H. Hieter Christ G. Hiotis Mary M. Hoffman Anne W. Jorgensen Roland T. Houseknecht Mrs. Sandra H. Jurus G. Michael Hoy Marie R. Huston Robert J. Karp Frederick G. Keller Helga K. Jacob Thomas J. Kingfield Jack C. Krause Adrienne A. Kunkel David G. Kuntz Charles T. Kuntzleman Albert B. Kunz I Gary G. Kushner Constance B. Lasslo Rebecca J. Lentz Anita L. Leone Constance L. Lewis Richard J. Lewis Thomas L. Lick Charlotte L. Lilly Alexander J. Luther Arthur J. Mack 101 Val R. Mahan Mary Jo Metzgar Carl O. Marquard John S. Meyer William Marshman Martin P. Miner Buton Mass Sylvia L. Mull Mathew W. McDonal Philip C. Munroe Victor C. Peischl Barbara A. Nace inger James R. Pierson Michael L. Popolow William A. Raab Judith A. Rau Martin F. Reagle Donna K. Reiss Martin Renninger Stanford E. Robbins 103 Linda A. Roberts 104 Charles B. Robinson F. E. Schoellhammer Ira Rosenberg Edward J. Schriffert Clifford W. Roth Carl G. Schweitzer Hugh W. Sanborn Claude E. Shappelle Mrs. Ruth E. Schaad Glenn M. Sheetz 105 Evelyn R. Simon Mrs. Patricia P. Smith Robert J. Singleton Gloria J. Snyder Doris I. Sjostrom D. G. Sonneborn, Jr. Ronald L. Sloane Kenneth A. Stauffer James F. Smith Edward R. Stevens Clifford D. Strehlow 106 I I John M. Superka Gerald M. Sweder Mary E. Swigar Stuart P. Tauber Robert G. Tengler Ruth N. Terry Fred A. Thoms Amy J. Tunnell Richard J. Uhl Mary A. Ulrich Sandra L. Urban Judith L. Vanderhyde Joleita S. Wagner Susan J. Vanderhyde Mary L. Wahrmann Jay R. Van Kempen Joanne C. Weber William J. Verzino, Jr. Janice M. Weidner Theodore D. Wachs James J. Weingartner § ? Mrs. M. A. Westbrook Linda L. Whiting Janet G. Wieder Judith B. Wilfinger Howard F. Winig Ronald K. Wolf Verna D. Wolf Edward Wolff 109 . % Cynthia T. Ziegenfuss Paul C. Zieger JUNIOR CLASS OFFICERS— Dean Wentz, Vice-President; Sidney Weikert, President; Jeanne Lippman, Secretary; Edward Myer, Treasurer. JUNIOR CLASS OFFICERS JUNIOR CLASS EXECUTIVE COUNCIL JUNIOR CLASS EXECUTIVE COUNCIL — Bottom Row: Judith Burroughs, Jeanne Lippman, Esther Coyne, Margaret Laich, Ellen Greenberg. Secotid Row: Sidney Weikert, Samuel Beidle- man, Richard Weisenbach, Fred Truitt, Michael Rothman, Jonathan Satinsky, Dean Wentz, Richard Parks. SOPHOMORE CLASS OFFICERS— Anthony Longo, Vice-President; Jeanne Maraz, Secretary; Thomas Turczyn, President; Donald Eismann, Treasurer. SOPHOMORE CUSS OFFICERS SOPHOMORE CLASS EXECUTIVE COUNCIL SOPHOMORE CLASS EXECUTIVE COUNCIL-Bottom Row: Jean McIntosh, Sherril Smith, Carol Taylor, Jeanne Maraz, Karen Carl. Second Row: Anthony Longo, Joel Glass, Donald Eismann, William Becker, Thoms Turczyn. j l rmaMiFMtMA ' UNi FRESHMAN CLASS OFFICERS— Samuel Fluck, Treasurer; David Scarborough, Vice-President; Sandra Taylor, Secretary; Richard Levinson, President. FRESHMAN CLASS OFFICERS FRESHMAN CLASS EXECUTIVE COUNCIL FRESHMAN CLASS EXECL1TIVE COUNCIL — Bottom Row: Gerald Marks, Lavinia Meinzer, James Miers, Margaret MacDonald, Kenneth Sweder, Karen Heisler, Ronald Todd. Second Row: Sandra Taylor, David Scarborough, Richard Levinson, Clifford Cage, Marie Smuldis. Third Row: Samuel Fluck, Robert Fulton. INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL 113 INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL— Seated: Karl Gimber, Phi Kappa Tan; Burton, Mass, Phi Epsilon Pi; Standing: Clifford Roth, Lambda Chi Alpha; Paul Preuss, Sigma Phi Epsilon; Leslie Erikson, Alpha Tau Omega. The presidents of each social fraternity on campus comprise the Interfraternity Council. It endeavors to promote a mutual understanding and harmony among the various fraternal organizations and regulates problems and difficulties concerning the fraternities collectively. Each year the council awards trophies to fraterni- ties for outstanding achievements in scholarship and athletics. Leagues are formed and competition complies with the intramurals. One of the major contributions of the organization was the intrafra- ternity ball which occurred in early spring. The Pennsylvania Alpha Iota Chapter of Alpha Tau Omega fraternity, established at Muhlenberg College in 1881, is the oldest fraternity on the Muhlenberg campus. The chapter has an active membership of sixty brothers and a spring semes- ter pledge class of 14 pledges. Combined, these men form a strong unit worthy of maintaining the present high morale and striving toward the lofty ideals of the fraternity. Alpha Tau Omega continues to be a leader in all phases of campus life. This year members of Alpha Iota have gained high positions on the Student Council and on the Weekly. The fraternity is also represented on Stu- dent Court, the Choir, as well as on every varsity athletic team. Parents’ teas in the Fall and Spring help maintain a cl ose parent-brotherhood relation- ship. ALPHA TAU OMEGA The social calendar of 1961-62 was quite success- ful. A Bavarian Party at Christmas Weekend and a very inspiring junior Prom Weekend were the two highlights of the social year. To the twenty graduating brothers, active membership in Alpha Tau Omega has been a rewarding and unforget- table experience. W. F BARNES D G SONNE BORN JR R E.S HARTZELL ; E SHAPPELLE DVR. GEHRIS GK.GESSNER M W GAYNOR W.C EHINGER R G ALMOUIST M 0 BERTOLET W J BURTON F W SHERRERD J.SYQST W P KRAUSS E. LMYER AM JACOBS J E PETERS RL BITTNER D A SCHOENLY R C BROWN RJ JACOBS K L ECKHART A J MARCHIONI J. P FRAUNFELDER J. N BARNES J. f MONACO J. T PIZZA T. T. KOCHENDERFER D A EISMANN W H VONNESSEN S.C.NOVAK A P SCHANTZ N M BRASSLER R C STUHLMULLER R F MACKEY E A BECK LEY R.W. MONTGOMERY G R HEMSTREET DL. JONES R S OPP C R LANGOON G A ORDWAY G F BALMER CERBERUS OFFICERS Worthy Master Leslie Erickson Worthy Chaplain Duane Sonneborn Worthy Keeper of Exchequer . . Robert Hartzell Worthy Keeper of Annals . . . Claude Shapelle Worthy Scribe T. Bruce Fryer Worthy Usher Walter Barnes Worthy Sentinel Edward Algard Public Relations Chairman . . . Ronald Bittner Rushing Chairman Richard Jacobs 115 LAMBDA CHI ALPHA R A ADAM S WEIXERT C.W ROTH R. J.SINGLETON J R VAN HEMPEN WOPLINGER J R PIERSON J 0 BRACKIN CG.MIOTIS TJKINGFIELD C J GOETZ DHHIETER DR PHILLIPS J.C.BUFF D.A.FETRER R.L. COLLINS R DEERMOUNT J G PONCHAK R A BARLOK R J ARDOLINO B A STOW WF BUCHANAN T SCHULZE A G. FAD E N FRERECKS F S MARTIN 22 ja W or- ’- ill r.i tkii 2 % g S J JS - » f| 1 RPWULFF RC LEAR RR MARTIN RB COCHRAN JMSUPERKA D.C. CAMPBELL A J LONGO A BOBOTAS J E HOWARD B P JOHNSON D T RISSMILLER M K PETERS RC SPROW P F LENNON T.C ATKISS J D SIMPSON A W YANKOWSKY DTPOUST F GREEN G F STEIGERWALT R l TODD OFFICERS President . Vice-President Secretary T reasurer . . Clifford Roth . Sidney Weikert Richard Adam Robert Singleton 117 Lambda Chi Alpha has contributed actively to the various elements of life on the Muhlenberg cam- pus. With Chi’s on Student Council, in class of- fices, and active in many campus clubs and organ- izations, Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity is indeed well represented. This year was a banner year for the Chi’s in sports, both varsity and intramural. Brothers of Lambda Chi were elected co-captains of the football, soc- cer, and basketball teams. The fraternity was also proudly represented on each college varsity team. Equally successful in intramural sports, Lambda Chi Alpha won the annual Interfraternity Coun- cil Sports Championship. This social year was filled with many memories. Both I. F. C. and Spring Weekends held special meaning and were the culmination of a very suc- cessful and outstanding year. PHI EPSILON PI This academic year was one of pride of accom- plishment for the brothers of Phi Epsilon Pi. Both fraternally and individually, Alpha Nu chapter excelled within the campus and com- munity of Muhlenberg College. Participating in all phases of campus life, this year included in our activities was the president of the student body and both the Editors of the Muhlenberg Weekly and the Ciarla. Academ- ically, retaining our traditionally fine standing, Phi Epsilon Pi once again won the scholarship trophy. In athletic competition this was another fine year as brothers participated on the varsity basketball, track and fencing teams as well as being represented in all intramural sports. This will be a social year that the fraters will long remember. Our Homecoming and I.F.C. weekends were most successful, but the height of our social calendar was Junior Prom week- end and the playing of the famous Bo Diddley at our Saturday night party. With the closing of another successful year, we are looking forward to bigger and better things for Phi Ep in the future. VUiUfel G G KUSHNER B.C.DORN B MASS J E GOGGIN N M WERTHER M L POPOLOW M E KATZ M P MINER HF WINIG D G KUNTZ L FAIRORTH R P FELDMAN A H KATZ T D WACHS S P TAUBER I E BASH GMSWEDER DA BERNSTEIN I ROSENBERG MHZEITLIN R.L SLOANE R PENNOCK S J GREENBERG M H M I GAT Z J A WEISS G? MAYER J B JURNOVOY J.D. SATINSKY R.L.STOLBER S.P.HAUPTMAN WE. SMITH DH MILLER G.H. DARBY A H DE CHERNEY MB. DRATCH A B.HODES J.D. KAUFMAN ASUFFIN Igl 3 n§ ” sJ? Mi J KLEIN RHBENVENISTE M S MILLER G S BESSES S J AUK BURG C. GOLDBERG B E ROTH J B GLASS G A KONIVER RK LEONARD K H MAURER 119 N.L BIRNBERG S S SIMENS K.A SWEDER J.SLEPACK E J BLOCH D E FISHER L R BERMAN B R UNGE R LE IDER C F INGBER P M WOLFSON G.S LUCKMAN R.SMELENSON S.H. GARBER R E KRAUSER G.D GOULD R S LEVINSON R B LOW JABEZ OFFICERS Superior Burton Mass Vice-Superior James Goggin Recording Secretary Norman Werther Corresponding Secretary .... Gary Kushner Treasurer Barry Dorn Parliamentarian Ronald Pennock Historian Theodore Wachs Social Chairman David Mayer Rushing Chairmen Gary Kushner Gerald Sweder Howard Winig House Manager PHI KAPPA TAU 120 The past year has been a very successful one for Phi Kappa Tau. In addition to being well repre- sented in almost every campus organization and sport, Phi KappaTau has placed three men on Student Council. In intramural sports, the frater- nity won the I. F. C. trophy in intramural bowl- ing. Some of the major events of the past year have included a second annual parents’ day held in the fall, a Christmas party given for some of the children from the Good Shepherd Home, and the addition of a spacious patio constructed behind the house by the new pledge class. The past year was also one of change in which the fraternity completely revised its pledging program to fit into a mature, constructive pattern necessary to a suc- cessful fraternity. The social calendar of the house was crowded with outstanding events, the highlights of which were a pirate theme for Homecoming Weekend, a Mexican Christmas party for Senior Ball, a ‘Weekend in Hell” for Junior Prom, and a Poly- nesian theme for I. F. C. Spring Weekend, tradi- tionally the best weekend, climaxed the year’s social activities. In all, Eta chapter has had a year to be proud of, and all indications promise still greater growth and activity in the future. r.KKU OFFICERS President Vice-President . Pledge Master . Recording Secretary . T reasurer Chaplain Corresponding Secretary Rushing Chairman . House Manager . Steward . Bruce Allen William Munz Edward Carta . John Meyer . Richard Baer Richard Lunger Michael Walker . . Fred Smith . Karl Gimber Robert Tengler J S MEYER R F BAER B J ALLEN W C MUNZ K 0 GIMBER W H 8RACKIN R G TENGLER A E KOHOUT M F REAGLE W F DARKES J F ROY E M GEHRINGER PC ZIEGER E P PAULES M E SHELBERT M L WALKER F E HOSSLER 121 RG JAKOUBEK 0 J WENTZ R E DEPPE J A CUNNINGHAM w J FOCHT W J HEINTZELMAN M J STRICKLAND R E KRAUSS E. K CARTA R.T LUNGER R S WILL W J HEINTZELMAN J G GILHORN D E WAGGONER PCMUNROE F E SMITH A L YER6EY D W BILHEIMER RE MILLER W R COOPER BCSCHMAUCH G L HILLER EG WOLF PJTIGHE G D LEGGETT T W FRYE DW WEAVER R P SMYSER R B STUMP H A LUBSEN T J TURCZYH J C TUROCZl A F W JANSEN QW TITUS R D CUNNINGHAM £ P HOFFMAN E P STEFFEY R D PETERS B J PEARSON S A BERG K J PlDDlNGTON J C PETREE R C SCHAEFFER R H DELONG SIGMA PHI EPSILON O F STAUFFER P G PREUSS A G SPROULE T L DAVIES RLHESSINGER A S CALLIE T M CHRISTMAN T E. KOCZAN W J GROSS EAJA8S G 8 FURST R F RISSMILLER P J SMITH P W RICE M P WEBER a R. HOLLOWS W J WR08EL G A MAUTER E W CLOUGHEN A E GRASSA F R HAVERLY F R SMOYER D C. FRY M 0 MERKEL J. F MILLER 122 A N BOUGHER A M MCOUISTON K E.ZINDLE R J MARKS R L WALTERSDORFF J A THOENEBE J S.MIERS D R BLAIR L K MILLER P W RICE J.SMIERS President . Vice-President Secretary . Comptroller . Historian . OFFICERS Paul Preuss Lanny Foulke Raymond Bauman Luther Rife . . . . . . Ronald Hari Sigma Phi Epsilon has a well-rounded program emphasizing scholarship and a good social life. Thus, besides maintaining a fine scholastic record, our social year was equally as successful. Sig Ep’s eventful year was highlighted by Home- coming Weekend when the house was transformed into a Confederate Fort complete with cannons. Junior Prom weekend was the beginning of this year’s rushing period which was to eventually bring to Sig Ep the largest pledge class on campus. Next year we are looking forward to returning to our growing brotherhood and an even grea ter Sig Ep at Muhlenberg. 124 Largest national social fraternity, Tau Kappa Epsi- lon builds its membership on a foundation of love, charity, and esteem. Zeta Eta, the local chapter, only four years old, has in that short time risen to an enviable position in every phase of inter- fraternity activity. Ranking second highest in academic accomplishment, Tau Kappa Epsilon has also been successful in intramural athletics, emerg- ing as champion in intramural wrestling. Socially, Tau Kappa Epsilon had another success- ful year of entertainment, laughs, and thoroughly enjoyable experiences. This year’s Spanish fiesta theme won her the coveted Homecoming Decora- tions Award, thereby, giving her permanent pos- session of the trophy. As always the annual Spring Weekend in the Poconos crowned the year’s events. However, most encouraging and most gratifying is our present pledge class, a group exemplifying Tau Kappa Epsilon’s standard of personal worth and character. OFFICERS Prytanis . Epiprytanis Grammateus Crysophylos Histor . Hypophetes Pylortes . Hegemon . . Kenneth Stauffer Clifford Strehlow . John Turtzo . Richard Uhl . Edward Wolff . Richard Graefe Michael Rothman Salvatore Assorgi M L ROTHMAN R F GRAEFE R J UHL C D STREHLOW K A STAUFFER S C ASSORGI M S ABEL E WOLFF W A WEBER O F. GREEN F G KELLER L HALTRECHT JWWENNER A J WEISS N.J SHEIDY R ABILLIG R 0 MUMMEY PN PAPPAS J R SAUERWElN 125 W.W CROUTHAMEL M M JOHN S J ENGELMAN H.J WEBSTER J B ROSENBERG B A LEONARD W A BLUE J A. TURTZO B J EPSTEIN B S SCHNESSEL R S BANNER R.R PENNEYS LS. CROUTHAMEL D.F. TURTZO S.F LATMAN A R MAURER M.S.6ES0FF J. KAUFMAN DJALBRIGHT PM ANSON RE SCHLEGEL R C HEDGER D J. SILVERMAN BARON 126 PHYSICAL EDUCATION Raymond J. Whispell Department Head 127 PHYSICAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT— Sealed: Jean Hecht, M.S., Margaret W. Sullivan, M.Ed. Standing: Raymond J. Whispell, B.S., Paul G. Billy, B.A., Kenneth T. Moyer, B.A., William A. Flamish, B.S, Missing: Joseph Frederico, M.A. I 130 I ,n:v Hampered by numerous injuries and unable to mount an impressive offense until the end of the season, Coach Ray Whispell’s 1961 gridders com- piled a 2-7 record. After losing seven straight games, including several heartbreakers, the Mules handily won the final two contests of the year. Against perennially troublesome Lafayette in the season’s lid-lifter, the Cardinal-and-Gray surprised everyone by taking a 13-0 lead late in the third quarter. However, the 90-degree heat began to take its toll on the undermanned Bergmen, and the Leopards stormed back to eke out a 14-13 vic- tory on the strength of a two point conversion. Having great difficulty getting started and facing the season’s stronger opponents, the Mules met defeat in their next four contests at the hands of Albright, Temple, Gettysburg, and Bucknell. The following week, in the nation’s highest scoring game of the day, the desperate Berg eleven almost pulled a tremendous upset but were nipped, 43- 42, by a tough Kings Point Merchant Marine Academy squad. Working out of a shotgun of- fense, quarterback Rollie Houseknecht completed 15 of 25 passes for 338 yards. Victory at last came to the hungry Mules when they battered hapless Franklin and Marshall, 28- 6, in a game highlighted by two long TD jaunts by Kuntzleman. He circled right end for 60 yards and a score in the first period and rambled 101 yards untouched with the second half kickoff to seal the win. With their new-found offensive mir- acle, the Cardinal-and-Gray ended the season by clobbering favored Moravian, 33-8, as the four graduating seniors, Rollie Houseknecht, Charlie Kuntzleman, John Donmoyer and Cliff Roth, de- parted in a blaze of glory. 131 THE FOOTBALL SEASON 1961 FOOTBALL RESULTS Muhlenberg Opponents 13 Lafayette 14 20 Albright 52 12 Temple 36 6 ... . Lebanon Valley . . . . 15 8 Gettysburg 22 0 Bucknell 27 42 Kings Point 43 28 Franklin and Marshall ... 6 33 Moravian 8 Won 2— Lost 7 FOOTBAIX SQUAD — Bottom Row: Richard Ludwick, Michael McLaughlin, William C. Cooperman, Daniel Poust, Sergei Novak, Richard Devett, Richard Jacobs, Ronald Barlok, Robert Martin, John Fegelein, William Heller, Stewart Simons, Anthony Longo, David Wesner, Rob- ert McKewen, Terry Haney. Second Row: Eugene Steffey, Manager; Richard Weisenbach, David Brown, Charles Kuntzleman, Co-Captain; Barry Rhody, William Burton, Samuel Beidleman, Kenneth Arndt, John Donmoyer, Roland Houseknecht, Michael Peters, John Murtaugh, Charles Gills, Gary Hiller, Philip Giltner, Lynn Rothrock, Stephen Hatzai, Ronald Wessner, Joseph Parsons, Manager; Theodore Mar- shall. Third Row: Stephen Opp, Andrew Bobotas, Clifford Roth, Co-Captain; Donald Waggoner, William Stoudt, Thomas Turczyn, Dean Lowe, Donald Rissmiller, Anthony Yankowsky, Arlin Seasholtz, Robert Schaeffer, Barry Johnson, Steven Bergmeister, Clifton Cage, Ronald Todd, Thomas Horne, Richard Biolsi, David Binder. Fourth Row: Joseph Blankowitsch, Trainer; Paul Billy, Assistant Coach; Kenneth Moyer, Assistant Coach; Raymond Whispell, Head Coach; Joseph Frederico, Assistant Coach; William Flamish, Assistant Coach; William Breisch, Equipment Manager. I SOCCER SQUAD— Kneeling: Edward Wolff, Manager; Ralph Ardolino, Charles Buff, Richard Collins, Willard Crouthamel, Four Alternate Captains; Benjamin Schnessel, Manager. Second Row: R. G. Amelio, Coach; Richard Melenson, John Rosenberg, Glenn Steigerwalt, David Sibrinsy, Turrey Kepler, David Feyer, John Koyen, John Shaver, Joseph Blankowitsch, Trainer. Third Row: Robert Fagan, Staff; Laurence Miller, William Robertson, Robert Sprague, Walter Krauss, Thomas James, John Brownlee, William Carmichael, Roger Deermount, Sidney Weikert, Ronald Krauser. A dearth of manpower and experience proved fatal to this year’s soccer squad which was coached by Rudy Amelio. The hooters finished the disas- trous season with an 0-10 slate and were able to tally only six goals in those ten contests. The high point of an otherwise dismal season for Anrelio’s hooters was a 2-1 defeat at the hands of highly tauted Rutgers. In a very close contest the Mules blew an early 1-0 lead and eventually lost in the final period. Hopes for next season are reasonably high because the entire line-up should be back in action. The starting eleven at the close of the season consisted of seven juniors and four freshmen. Outstanding among these were junior fullback Bill Crouthamel and freshman wing Turrey Kepler. VARSITY SOCCER 1961 SOCCER RESULTS Muhlenberg 0 Lehigh . . 0 St. JosejT’s . . 0 Lafayette 2 . . Franklin and Marshall 1 La Salle . . . 1 Wilkes . 1 Ursinus . . . 1 Rutgers . . 0 Delaware 0 . . . Bucknell Won 0— Lost 10 Ojqronents . 1 . 5 . 4 . 5 9 2 9 9 6 7 133 VARSITY CROSS COUNTRY T 34 1961 CROSS COUNTRY RESULTS Muhlenberg Opponents 40 Lehigh 21 27 Albright 28 26 Temple ) .... 18 Tri Meet Elizabeth ) .... 29 31 Lafayette 24 21 Moravian 35 34 . . Franklin and Marshall ... 22 Won 2— Lost 3 Placed 2nd in Tri Meet The Muhlenberg cross-country team, coached by Mr. Charles Theisen, com pleted its 1961 season with a 3-4 record. This year the team sported a new look as six freshmen supported the ranks of the returning lettermen. Especially promising were the efforts of freshman Bill Schmidt who was a consistent point getter. The Mules were victori- ous over Albright, Elizabethtown and Moravian and dropped decisions to Lehigh, Temple, La- fayette and Franklin and Marshall. This was the best cross-country season that Muhlenberg has had in over ten years. CROSS COUNTRY SQUAD— Kneeling: William Schmidt, Thomas Chuss. Standing: John Train- er, Jr., Frederick Eck, Alfred Yergey, C. J. “Chuck” Theisen, Coach. Trailing 2-0 with only five minutes remaining, the women’s hockey team came to life and staged a spirited rally to defeat a stunned Centenary squad 3-2. This important win highlighted an outstand- ing year as the team finished with a seasonal slate of 6-0-1 and an overall record of 15-0-2 since var- sity competition was inaugurated in 1959. Credit for this phenomenal record must be given to the excellent passing and co-ordination of the forward line and the continued rushing and tack- ling of the halfbacks. Outstanding throughout the season was the offensive scoring of Carol Emhardt, Ruth Smith, and Barbara Buchlolz and the fine defensive play of Betsy Kidd and Carol Kellogg. 1961 WOMEN’S FIELD HOCKEY RESULTS Muhlenberg Opponents 6 . . Moravian . . 0 9 . Lebanon Valley . 9 6 . . Moravian . . 1 14 . . . . . Marywood . . . . 0 3 . . . . Centenary . . . 9 7 . . . Marywood . . . . . 0 4 . . . Millersville . Won 6— Tied 1— Lost 0 . . 0 WOMEN’S FIELD HOCKEY 135 WOMEN’S FIELD HOCKEY SQUAD — Bottom Row: Elizabeth Kidd, Majorie Kleintop, Ruth Smith, Carol Emhardt, Lona Farr, Lorraine Buzas, Carole Newberry. Second Row: Lois Fetter, Linda Mills, Nancy Parker, Carolyn Kellogg, Barbara Buchholtz, Jeanne Clark, Karen Carl. Third Row: Carol Decker, Manager; Doris Emhardt, Linda McCullough, Janillie Fister, Mary Ann Peters, Dolores Lotz, Barbara Marley, Elsie Evanosky, Jean Hecht, Coach; Beverly Gil- fillan. Manager. If it was possible to sum up the 1961-1962 basket- ball season with a single word, “disappointing” might well be chosen. The beleaguered Berg cagers fought a losing battle with inexperience in registering but five wins in twenty-two contests. Pre-season optimism seemed justified as the Card- inal and Gray quintet rolled to an impressive 77- 62 victory over a solid Moravian squad in the season’s opening game. But tournament-bound Temple put a king sized damper on campus en- thusiasm as the awesome Owls crushed their Mule counterparts, 98-41 in the Penn Palestra. Berg stayed on the road but could not find victory until invading the anthracite belt. Here, the Bergmen righted themselves with a come-from-behind 79- 77 decision over an able Scranton University five. Christmas vacation and the Loyola Invitational Tournament brought Coach Ken Moyer’s hoop- sters to what was to be the season’s pinacle. Down 15 points at half time, the fired up Mules returned and swept their Delaware opponents off the court, 83-80. Loyola, however, proved more difficult in the tournament final. Pesky an d willing, the Mules still found themselves on the short end of a 63-58 count. Lebanon Valley sent Berg on the second leg of what eventually became a seven game skid, 85-62. Win number four came against a game, but untalented Upsala squad. Freshman Gary Spen- gler tossed in 26 points to pace the Mule’s 81-69 success. The last success of the year for the home forces was at the expense of Lehigh University. Avenging a previous loss the Bergmen put to- gether its finest team performance of the season and sent the Engineers reeling to a 73-70 setback. Next season, with the loss of only high scoring senior, Chris Hiotis, we look forward to a more successful season. | THE BASKETBALL SEASON 1961-1962 BASKETBALL RESULTS Muhlenberg Oppo 77 . . . Moravian . . . 62 41 . . . . . Temple . . . . . 98 54 . . . . . Albright . . . . . 82 59 . . . . . Lehigh . . . . . 65 79 . . . . . Scranton . . . . . 77 83 . . . . . Delaware . . . 80 58 . . . . . Loyola . . 63 62 . . . . Lebanon Valley . . . 85 72 . . . . . . Rider .... . . 82 51 . . . . . La Salle . . . . . 90 63 . . . . . Temple . . . . 88 59 . . . . . Lafayette . . . . 69 41 . . . Gettysburg . . . . 67 81 . . Upsala . . 69 83 . . . . . Rutgers ... . . 102 60 . . . . . Gettysburg . . . . . 82 51 . . . Lafayette . . . . 68 59 . . . . . Delaware . . . . . 64 73 . . . . . Lehigh . . . . . 70 82 . . . . . St. Joseph’s . . . . . 110 67 . . . . Bucknell . . 100 71 . . . Franklin and Marshall . . . 77 Won 5— Lost 17 BASKETBALL SQUAD— Bottom Row: William Jones, John Ponchak, John Superka, Christ Hiotis, Gary Spengler. Second Row: Kenneth Moyer, Coach; Dean Lowe, Roger Stuhlmuller, Morgan Brassier, Kenneth Butz, William Flamish, Assistant Coach. 140 JUNIOR VARSITY BASKETBALL SQU AD-Bottom Row: William Stoudt, Larry Blum, Charles Lewis, William Stephens, Glenn Sowell. Second Row: William Flamish, Coach; John Linnet, Allen Somers, Barry Young, Ronald Andrews, Manager. JUNIOR VARSITY BASKETBALL WOMEN’S BASKETBALL Ending their 1962 competition with a 7-3 record, the women’s basketball team experienced their best season since the squad ' s entrance into inter- collegiate competition three years ago. Exception- al teamwork and the outstanding performance of high scorers, Mary Swigar, Ruth Smith, and Janet Smithson, gave the women victories over hard fighting opponents. This season also initiated sev- eral changes in the game’s rules. The limited dribble was increased from two bounces to three, and the guards were allowed to take possession of the ball from under the basket after a goal was made. With the return of many talented starters and other promising teammates, the women look forward to an even more sucessful season in 1963. 1962 WOMEN’S BASKETBALL RESULTS Muhlenberg Opponents 36 . . . Moravian . ... 33 44 . . . . . Wilkes . . ... 23 31 . . . Moravian . ... 26 44 . . . . . Gettysburg . . ... 75 48 . . . Mary wood . ... 31 38 . . . . . Wilkes . . ... 27 48 . . . . Millersville . ... 40 26 . . . Rider . . . ... 38 42 . . . . Lebanon Valley . ... 39 44 . . Elizabethtown Won 7— Lost 3 ... 55 T T WOMEN’S BASKETBALL SQUAD — Bottom Row: Mary Peters, Diane Bachner, Mary Swigar, Joann Reeder, Karen Carl. Second Row: Ruth Smith, Elizabeth Gunther, Carole Newberry, Christina Schlenker, Judith W right. Manager. Third Row: Judith Riley, Leslie Scarborough, Barbara Bechtold, Janet Smithson, Beverly Gilfdlan, Manager; Margaret Sullivan, Coach. 141 142 mmgsgmm Although this year’s fencing team, under the di- rection of Dr. Andrew Erskine, failed to win a single match, they improved during the season and managed to capture fourth place in the Mid- dle Atlantic Conference Fencing championships. Two Muhlenberg fencers won medals. Barry Kunz, team captain, placed second in epee, win- ning nine of his twelve bouts and Ed Jabs, fencing for the first time in the championships also won a silver medal in foil. Despite a disappointing dual meet season there is reason for optimism. Losing only one member of this year’s squad, and behind VARSITY FENCING a year of experience the returning swordsmen should improve upon this year’s seasonal record. 1962 FENCING RESULTS Muhlenberg Opponents 9 . . . . Haverford . . 18 12 . Temple . . . 15 12 . . Johns Hopkins . . . 15 i 12 . . Stevens Institute . . . 15 5 . . . . . Lehigh 22 Won 0— Lost 5 FENCING SQUAD— Bottom Row: A. H. Erskine, Coach; Barry Kunz, Stephen Hatzai, Lonny Foulke, Edward Jabs, John Gilhorn, David Gaskill. Second Row: Jeffrey Parsons, Barron Weand, Jacob Klein, Craig Ingber, Richard Levinson, Kenneth Sweder, Thomas Eagan. VARSITY WRESTLING WRESTLING SQ JAT -Kneeling: Robert Schlegel, Donald Campbell, Richard Parks, Alfred Breinig. Standing: Wilford Weber, Manager; Thomas Chuss, James Yost, Charles Kuntzleman, Richard Biolsi, Paul Billy, Coach. Under the very able coaching of Paul Billy, the Muhlenberg matmen closed the wrestling season with a record of six wins and four losses. Most impressive for the Mules were 177 pound senior captain Charlie Kuntzleman and 157 pound jun- ior Tom Chuss. Both grapplers consistently per- formed well and compiled imposing 9-1 records. Ollie Breinig and Dick Biolsi were also outstand- ing in support of the team. In the MAC tournament at West Chester State, Muhlenberg was able to finish only ninth in a field of sixteen teams. This put a somewhat soiled crown on what had been a most successful season for the varsity grapplers. Although graduation will claim three lettermen, many experienced person- nel will return and the outlook for next year may be termed optimistic. 1962 WRESTLING RESULTS Muhlenberg Opponents 15 . . . Lebanon Valley . . . . 11 14 . . . . Swarthmore . . 11 9 . . . Rucknell . . . 15 13 . . Temple . . . . . 16 13 . . . Moravian . . . . . 14 19 . . . . Gettysburg . . . . . 9 17 . . . Lafayette . . . . . 13 29 . . . Delaware . . . . . 3 18 . . . . Elizabethtown . . . . 17 9 . . . . . Albright . . . Won 6—Lost 4 . . 19 The baseball squad, whose resources were swelled in 1962 by the elimination of junior varsity and freshmen teams, responded with an unsuccessful seasonal record of two wins and twelve defeats. Though individual performances were often bril- liant, the team effort was disappointing. What little glory of which the team can boast was sal- vaged in the 9-3 drubbing of neighboring rival Lehigh in the season’s final encounter. Head Coach Joe Frederico and Assistant Coach Ken Moyer have only to look toward the spring of ’63 for a revival of the Mule’s diamond skills. 147 BASEBALL SQUAD— Bottom Row: Richard Mowery, Manager; Ronald Antoniuk, Michael Smith, Michael Capobianco, Glenn Steiglwalt, Barry McCarty, Richard Cobb, Jr., Robert Kon- dle. Second Row: Joseph Frederico, Coach; Lynn Rothrock, William Heller, David Binder, Martin Manning, Gary Hiller, Thomas Koczan, Stephen Opp. Third Roiu: Kenneth Moyer, Coach; William Stoudt, Hugh Sanborn, Gene Sausser, Ralph Ardolino, Kenneth Smith, Allen Somers, Michael Peters, Joe Blankowitsch, Trainer. 1962 BASEBALL RESULTS Muhlenberg 6 . 1 . 5 . 1 . 4 . 1 . 10 . 4 . 0 . 0 . . St. Joseph’s . Wilkes . Lafayette . . Scranton . . Lafayette . Rutgers Lehigh . Albright . Moravian . La Salle . Delaware . . Gettysburg . West Chester Lehigh Opponents . 8 . 5 . 11 . 0 . 7 . 5 . 14 . 7 . 6 . 9 . 3 . 13 . 12 Won 2— Lost 12 VARSITY TRACK TRACK SQUAD — Bottom Row: Charles Marple, Lawrence Light, Kenneth Butz, Jr., Robert Waltersdorff, Raymond Sprow, Barry Johnson, George Pivetz, Jr., James Sneddon, Andrew Barton, Andrew Bobotas. Second Row: Joseph Parsons, Manager; David Kuntz, Richard Wei- senbach, Gary Luckman, Thomas Schulze, Dean Lowe, Robert Kelly, Samuel Beidleman, Thomas Chuss, Gerald Marks, Manager. Third Row: William Flamish, Coach; Ronald Wessner, David Brown, Charles Kuntzleman, Thomas Mellen, Ronald Todd, Ted Gottshall, Kenneth Williams, Daniel Puost, Christian Yost, Glenn Sowell, William Schmidt, Norman Boyer. This year’s track team finished the season strongly winning two out of their last three meets, the final defeat being a close five point loss at the hands of Ursinus. Although the thinclads were only able to garner a 2-4 record, the season produced many outstanding individual performances. Dean Lowe once again starred as a consistent point getter and established new school marks in both the low and the high hurdles. In the field events freshman Ken Butz showed great promise and form, setting new records in the discus and shot put. With a young squad, composed primarily of freshmen and soph- omores, next year a winning season is clearly in sight. 1962 TRACK RESULTS Muhlenberg Opponents 54i 2 . . Pennsylvania Military . . 76 i 9 58i | . . Franklin and Marshall . . 72i £ 39 % Lafayette 91% 72i 2 Albright 58i 45 Lehigh J . . . . 7H 2 Tri Meet Gettysburg) .... 451 , 90 ... Lebanon Valley ... 41 63 Ursinus 68 Won 2— Lost 4 Placed 3rd in Tri Meet. 149 VARSITY TENNIS 150 [Mr; . - S WlmA ' jSS Yi . 11 Marred only by losses at the hands of rivals Lehigh and Lafayette, a strong Muhlenberg tennis squad finished its competition with a 5-2 record, the best in 14 years. After the first week of play, soph- omore Richard Penneys assumed the first berth position and went on to end his first year of inter- collegiate competition with a winning record. Captain Don Schoenly supported the team equally as well with hard playing and moral support. The team’s third man, Edward Simon, though only a freshman, performed consistently well and showed considerable potential. Other team members, Morgan Brassier, Gary Kushner, Bruce Fryer, Stuart Simens, and Robert Stobler, also contrib- uted to the team’s impressive record. With the loss of only two men the Mules and Coach Ken- neth Webb can look forward to another outstand- ing tennis se ason next spring. W ' v, Muhlenberg 1962 TENNIS RESULTS Opponents 61 2 • . . . . Moravian .... • 2i 2 2i 9 . . Lehigh .... • 6i 9 9 . . . Elizabethtown . . . . 0 6 . Franklin and Marshall . . 3 9 . Scranton .... . 0 0 . . . Lafayette .... . 9 5 . . . . . Bucknell .... . 4 Won 5— Lost 2 TENNIS SQUAD— Ken Webb, Coach; Gary Kushner, Edward Simon, Richard Penneys, Donald Schoenly, Morgan Brassier. Misshig: Bruce Fryer, Robert Stober, Stuart Simens. 151 The women’s tennis team ended their season with a 1-3 record, their only victory being a 5-0 upset over Moravian. Senior Carol Emhardt was im- pressive, however, as a consistent winner in sin- gles competition. Contributing to the team’s potential are freshmen, Annika Toffer, Karen Frankenfield, and Mary Peters, sophomore, Nancy Baker, and junior, Ruth Smith. With the added experience of this season’s contests, the girls have a chance to build a strong team for next year’s competition. 1962 WOMEN’S TENNIS RESULTS Muhlenberg Opponents 2 ... . West Chester 3 2 Millersville 3 5 Moravian 0 0 . . . . East Stroudsburg .... 5 Won 1— Lost 3 WOMEN ' S TENNIS I WOMEN’S TENNIS SQUAD— Bottom Row: Mary Hoffmann, Mary Peters, Nancy Baker, An- nika Toffer. Second Row: Carol Emhardt, Ruth Smith, Karen Frankenfield, Jean Hecht, Coach. I ■ - . V The Muhlenberg golf team coached by Ned Sen- ger and consisting of six regular golfers and two alternates, closed their season with only one win- ning match against Albright and a draw with La Salle. In tournament competition, the Mules finished in 20th place out of a field of 22 schools in the Middle Atlantic Conference. With the Le- high Country Club as their home course, the Berg linkmen were led by William Darkes, David Fey- rer, Walter Focht, Robert Delong, David Becker. VARSITY GOLF 1962 GOLF RESULTS Muhlenberg Opponents 11 . . . . Albright 7 3 p2 . . . . Lafayette 14i 9 9 " . . . . La Salle 9 5 . . . . Moravian 13 5 1 2 . . . . . Villanova 12 1 9 5 1 9 . . Moravian 12i 21 9 . . . Lehigh 151 0 . . . . Scranton Won 1— Tied 1— Lost 6 18 153 GOLF SQUAD— Walter Focht, Ned Senger, Coach; David Becker, David Feyrer, Stephen Ein- folt, Michael Bertolet, Robert Delong, William Darkes. M-CLUB— Seated: Sidney Weikert, Richard Parks, Clifford Roth, Daniel Poust, Joseph Parsons, Eugene Steffey, Alfred Yergey. Standing: David Kuntz, Ralph Ardolino, Richard Collins, Wil- liam Peterson, Ronald Barlock, Samuel Beidleman, Richard Jacobs, William Stoudt, Hugh Sanborn, Charles Gills, Richard Weisenbach. M-CLUB 154 CHEERLEADERS CHEERLEADING SQUAD— Christina Wissler, Erna Hil- liard, Jean McIntosh, Elsbeth Radzio, Captain; Margaret MacDonald, Ellen Buhler, Esther Coyne. i i i f ■i ' A I i i I s i s V ■J I r ft CONSTRUCTION BEGINS . . . One of Muhlenberg’s needs, now intensified by an increasing student enrollment and an enlargement of the curriculum, has long been the dream of all associated with this College. The J. Conrad See- gers Union has now emerged into reality, and final arrangements are being completed for oc- cupancy in the Spring semester of 1963. The structure will serve as the focal point for activities outside the classroom including headquarters for student government, student publications, and a modern AM and FM radio station in addition to being the center of social activity. Indeed this welcomed addition will serve to enhance the util- ity of the campus and to satisfy the demands of its residents. ON THE J. CONRAD SEEGERS STUDENT UNION MUHLENBERG COLLEGE INAUGURATES ITS SEVENTH PRESIDENT 159 Dr. Erling N. Jensen, a mid-western nuclear physi- cist, was inaugurated on October 6, 1962, as the seventh president of Muhlenberg College. The regal ceremony held outside of the Egner Memo- rial Chapel was attended by more than 500 per- sons. Preceding the official ceremonies, a colorful academic procession led by Marshal Luther J. Deck wound its way along the tree lined path to the platform. Marching in the procession in full academic regalia were delegates from 1 1 5 colleges and universities and 18 learned societies and foundations. Also many representatives of the United Lutheran Church in America, alumni, members of the board of trustees, and faculty com- pleted the procession. In his address President Jensen pledged to meet the difficult decade ahead in the field of higher education with a strong liberal arts curriculum and with stress on the importance of the indi- vidual student. “Muhlenberg College,” Dr. Jensen stated, “has throughout its entire history empha- sized the liberal arts curriculum. Muhlenberg should continue to have at its core of curriculum the humanities, the social sciences, and the natural sciences. These are the areas of study in which the student learns to understand man as an in- dividual and as a human being, and his relation- ships with his fellow men.” In closing, President Jensen urged that the in- auguration be considered “an expression of re- dedication to the purpose of Muhlenberg College” in order to meet the problems of the present and the future and emerge as a stronger and more effective institution of higher education. ON THE BATTLE GROUNDS OF CEDAR BEACH AND THE HARDWOODS OF WEST HALL Highlighting orientation, the freshmen and soph- omore men exhibited well matched prowess in strength during the traditional tug-of-war. Armed with buckets, waste-cans, and enthusiasm, the two armies met on the battle grounds of Cedar Beach. At the signal, the tug-pull-splash-rip of the rope heralded a win for the freshmen. However, the sophomores’ spirits were not so easily drenched. After another attempt the freshmen warriors then resorted to their weapons, water-filled waste cans. Officials’ whistles sounded but to no avail, and the near massacre of the sophomores was declared a tie. The freshmen women, desirous of doing their part in an attempt to lift regulations, met the sophomore girls on the hardwoods of West Hall. In a laudable but vain attempt, the freshmen girls were forced to bow to the sophomores in the traditional game of volleyball. Perhaps the sopho- more mumu costumes frightened away the fresh- men athletic spirits. 162 The Fall production of Mask and Dagger was Sherwood Anderson’s comedy, Reunion in Vienna. The play, centered in post-war Vienna, concerned a group of old royalists who nostalgically re-assembled after a ten year exile to recapture some of their former gay, carefree life. A remnant of their former glory was introduced by the appearance of Archduke Rudolph enacted by James L. McKenna, whose main objec- tive was to re-establish his relationship with his former mistress, Elena, played by Marge Gonzalez. However, Elena had married a prominent psychologist of the new non-aristocratic class (Richard Berlin) and the ensuing triangle provided a charming, sophisticated comedy. M AND D PRESENTS SOPHISTICATED COMEDY AND HUMAN DRAMA For the Spring production of Mask and Dagger the organization chose Clifford Odet’s The Coun- try Girl. This drama of a man’s return to personal and professional respectability after a long bout with alcoholism, starred Alfred Kohout as the troubled actor, Frank Elgin, and Janice Wiedner as his understanding but discouraged wife, Geor- gie. Instrumental in Frank’s rise to a stardom he had once known, is Bernie Dodd, portrayed by Leonard Fairorth. Dodd is a young, brusque but sympathetic director who, although his main in- terest is in Frank’s career, inadvertently falls in love with Georgie. The inner-relationships of these three characters as they struggle with their personal problems, provide an electric and mov- ing human drama. 163 MET PRODUCES A UNITED STATES PREMIERE This year the MET was fortunate enough to be able to produce one of the first productions of Ed- ward Albee’s A meric a Dream and The Sandbox; and the United States premiere of The Future is in Eggs. The director of the organization, capable James Clements, directed the Dream, a riotous attack on the American comedy of conformity. The Sandbox, directed by Sylvia Mull, treated the Dream’s subtheme of old age with a rare and deli- cate poignancy that sparkled with fragments of Albee’s indefatigible humor. The last play, The Future is in Eggs, was directed by sophomore Hen- ry Abraham, the assistant director of MET. The powerful scope of this play of Ionesco’s encom- passed the very roots of man’s survival or destruc- tion, a livid conflict between love and the self- filled ego. The evening ended in a highly effective drama, when the Jaques and the Roberts, the two families of the Future, reduced each other verbally and physically into a cursed and dying mass of lost humanity. 164 Homecoming Weekend was opened with the traditional Alumni Dance held in Me- morial Hall. While waiting for the an- nouncement of who would be the new Homecoming Queen, couples danced to the music of Buddy Williams and his Orches- tra. Mistress of Ceremonies, Ellen Berg- hiein, soon alleviated the suspense, and Ellen Cook became the official reigning monarch of the weekend with her court composed of Helen Hlatky, Jean Herr, Pat Winter, and Judy Decking. Even rain and the loss of the football game to Gettysburg could not dampen the spirits of the alumni and students. Evidence of this may be found in the festive atmosphere which prevailed at the house parties and other festivities which filled Saturday eve- ning. Tau Kappa Epsilon had a double rea- son to celebrate; for after again winning first place for their Homecoming decora- tions, they were awarded permanent pos- session of the trophy. ELLEN COOK REIGNS AS HOMECOMING QUEEN ENCHANTED EVENING AT SOPH-FROSH HOP There were fairy godmothers and handsome foot- men to bow and greet the couples to the annual Soph-Frosh Hop. Although the “Enchanted Eve- ning” was just a shade disenchanted when, at twelve, the footmen lost their borrowed robes and revealed themselves as Tom Truczyn and Tony Longo, the music of Lee Vincent weaved a magic spell of pleas- ant listening and dancing. Saturday night found the fraternities in full swing to the throbbing rhythms of rock’n’roll bands, some houses combining in a joint effort. MET INTERPRETS AN EVENING IN TRAGEDY 166 U 1 J Ml B kT A Productions of MET for the Spring semester included works of Shakespeare, MacLeish, Lor- ca, and Albee. The central theme of the eve- ning was Experiments in Tragedy, in which various dramatic approaches to downfall and catharsis were presented. On a barren and some- what Elizabethan stage Sylvia Mull enacted the sleepwalking scene from Macbeth. MacLeish’s Trojan Horse, a radio play adapted by MET for the stage, was the MET’s first attempt in versed drama. The play dealt with the ironic destruction of Troy by the vengeful Greeks. Then followed a highly stylized and romantic interpretation of a scene from Garcia Lora’s Blood Wedding, set in a world of witches and talking moons. The Zoo Story, a rapidly moving and deeply tragic recapitulation into the twen- tieth century, by Albee, ended the memorable evening, with the martyrdom of one man for the purgation of another. 167 168 Couples attending the IFC dance had a double treat. Strains of dance music from the band of Charlie Messina filled the Ballroom in the Hotel Bethlehem, while a lively jazz interpretation was offered by Parke Frankheld’s group in the hotel’s Candlelight room. Tau Kappa Epsilon couped the first prize in the annual spring sing contest, al- though the other fraternities showed consider- able spirit of competition. After the ball was over, the dark and inclement weather caused the ODK Carnival to be cancelled. However, spirits were not dampened. An impromptu picnic of hot dogs and baked beans was well attended at the Frolics. Two weeks later the sun was high and hot, and the Carnival was in full swing. Who could forget it? Like the frantic search for a nail to complete a last-minute booth, the mad rush to pick up 90 “fish tickets” which had been scattered far and wide on the football field by the wind, and the moment when Jim Monaco was not satisfied with just one goldfish but swallowed (barely) two. The martyred Men’s Dorm Council withstood with heroic courage the onslaught of gooky, dripping corn-starch pies in their eyes. Even Dr. Maiser joined the merriment and was soundly pied by Mrs. Maiser. Then Karl Gimber attempted to put a chicken into orbit in a home-made capsule, but it backfired. There were many slaves who were auctioned mercilessly. Some people even walked away with two, and the dust and cinder from the twist contest settled heavily on the on-lookers. But it was all in fun. A few days later when girl slaves dragged chain and balls from class to class, the ODK Carnival was still going strong. THE SUN WAS HIGH AND HOT, AND THE CARNIVAL WAS IN FULL SWING. SING AND RING IN SPRING m. m Preparations had begun early this year to make the annual co-ed Spring Sing and Ring Ceremony a memorable event. And it was, although perhaps some parents will remember mainly the feverish dash under cover when the spring rains came. Before the May showers, however, most of the colorfully dressed co-eds had presented their pro- gram. On the agenda were the first-prize winners, Second Floor of Prosser Hall, whose theme was a sparkling and memorable “I Led Four Lives.” The Commuter Women captured second prize with an original rendition, complete with rustic aprons, of ‘Froggy Went A’ Courting.” The frantic race into space was parodied by Third Floor, Brown Hall, third-prize winners, whose timely theme “On Our Way to the Stars” depicted Colonel Glenn in his historic flight around the globe. After the ring presentation, the crowds gathered in Brown, Hall, where Mrs. Marianne Heinemann was honored by the co-eds with a gold charm bracelet for her years of service. The skies had cleared by then, and parents saw Muhlenberg in its best apparel on a fragrant spring afternoon. CAROLINE FETTEROLF Valedictorian GRADUATION 172 JUDITH CHRISTMAN Salutatorian EVOKES REFLECTIONS AND ASPIRATIONS 173 SENIOR BIOGRAPHIES AND ADVERTISEMENTS I ABEL, MARTIN S.-B.S v Natural Science. Tau Kappa Epsilon 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3; Soccer 1; WMUH 1, 2, 3, 4; Pre Medical Society 2, 3; Phi Alpha Theta 3, 4; Freshman Tribunal 2. Address: 88 Spier Road, Scarsdale, New York. ADAM, RICHARD A.-A.B ., History and Politi- cal Science. Lambda Chi Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3, 4; College Choir 1, 2; Political Science Club 1, 2, 3; Education Society 2. 3, 4. Address: Route Two, Hamburg, Pennsylvania. ALGARD, EDWARD H.-A.B., Psychology. Al- pha Tau Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, Sergeant of Arms 3, 4: Interfraternity Sports 1, 2, 3, 4. Address: 230 West Broad Street, Souderton, Pennsylvania. ALLEN, BRUCE J.—A.B., Psychology. Phi Kappa Tau 1, 2, 3, 4, Steward 3, Chaplain 3, President 4; Student Court 2, 3, 4, Chief Justice 4; Institute of Faith 3, 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Who’s Who 4; Omicron Delta Kappa 4; Psi Chi 4. Address: 223 Jackson Avenue, Northfield, New Jersey. ALMQUIST, ROY G.-A.B., History and Political Science. Alpha Tau Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-Presi- dent 3; Cardinal Key Society 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3, President 4; Omicron Delta Kappa Society 3, 4, President 4; Student Council 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3, Mask and Dagger Society 1,2; Freshman Orienta- tion Committee 3, 4; Phi Alpha Theta 3, 4; Mer- maid Tavern Society 3, 4; Who’s Who 4; Co- Chairman Homecoming Weekend 4. Address: 316 Walthery Avenue, Ridgewood, New Jersey. ALTHOUSE, EDWIN L.- US., Physics. Soccer 1, 2. Address: 240 West Oley Street, Reading, Pennsylvania. ANDERSON, CARL E.-B.S., Natural Science. Science Club 2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports 2, 3. Ad- dress: 3 East Second St., Moorestown, New Jersey. BAER. RICHARD F- A.B., German. Phi Kappa Tau 1, 2, 3, 4; M.C.A.; MET; Football Manager; Education Association, Vice-President 3, President 4; Der Deutsche Verein; Delta Phi Alpha. Address: Route Two, New Ringgold, Pennsylvania. BARNES, WALTER F., JR.- LB., English. Al- pha Tau Omega, House Manager 3, 4; Freshman Tribunal 2; Freshman Orientation Committee 4: Weekly 1, 2, 3; Mask and Dagger Society 1, 2, 3; Young Republicans’ Club, Secretary-Treasurer 3. Address: 987 Townley Ave., Union, New Jersey. BARTON, ANDREW W .-A.B., Philosophy and Psychology. Mask and Dagger Society 1, 4; Intra- mural Sports 1 , 2, 3, 4; Alpha Tau Omega; Phi Sigma Tau; Baseball 1, 2; Track 4; Young Re- publicans’ Club 2, 3. Address: 1111 Penshurst Lane, Penn Valley, Narberth, Pennsylvania. iMimfiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimimiimiimmiiiiiimimMimmiiiiiiimmiH 175 CONGRATULATIONS AND BEST WISHES TO THE CLASS OF 1962 MERIN STUDIOS 1010 Chestnut St. PHILA. 7, PENNA. .riimilllllllllllllllllllllllllllfllllllllllllllllllllllMflllllllllimilllllllllllflllllf llllltlllllllllllllllMIIIIMIII llllllllllllllllllllllllllltMllllltlllllllMIMIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIMIIIIMMIIIIMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIMIIMIIIIinillllllltlllllMIlT 176 BELL, DAVID J.— A.B., Sociology. Marching Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Concert Band 1, 2, 3, 4; College Choir 1, 2, 3, 4; Assistant Manager 3; Opera Work- shop 2, 3; Glee Club 3, 4; Manager 3, 4; Chess Club 3. Address: 1240 West Eighth Street, Lans- dale, Pennsylvania. BERGHEIM, ELLEN— A. B., English. Student Council Elections Committee 1; Choir 1, 2; Delta Phi Nu 2; Opera Workshop 2; Class Secretary 2, 3, 4; Freshman Orientation Committee 4; Home- coming Co-Chairman 4. Address: 546 Mountain View Terrace, Dunellen, New Jersey. BERNSTEIN, DAVID A.-A.B., History. Fresh- man Tribunal 2; Freshman Orientation Commit- tee 3; Political Science Conference 2, 3, Vice Presi- dent 3; Student Council 3, 4, President 4; Hillel Foundation 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Evaluation Com- mittee 4, Chairman 4; Weekly 3; Phi Epsilon Pi 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice President 2; Intramural Sports 2, 3, 4; Phi Alpha Theta 4; Omicron Delta Kappa 3, 4; Who’s Who 4; Big Brother Program 2, 3, 4. Ad- dress: 45 Pershing Avenue, Elizabeth, New Jersey. BERTOLET, MICHAEL O.-A.B., Psychology. Alpha Tau Omega; Veterans’ Club, Secretary 3; Mask and Dagger Society 4; Golf 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Weekly 4. Address: 4718 Dartford Avenue, Baltimore, Maryland. BIDAMAN, K. MICHAEL— Psychology. In- tramural Sports 1, 2; Freshman Tribunal 2; WMUH 2. Address: 2204 North Third Street, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. BILLY, BENEDICT A—A.B., Sociology. Der Deutsche Verein 2, 3, 4; Sociology Club 3, 4; Lu- theran Student Association 2. Address: 322 Clinton Street, Binghamton, New York. BLEAM, CARL L.— B.S., Mathematics. Commu- ter’s Club 1, 2, 3. Address: 325 East Lawn Rd., Nazareth, Pennsylvania. BLOOD, JOSEPH, JR.-B .S., Natural Science. Football 1, 2; Wrestling 1, 2; Intramural Sports =j|iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiii!iiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiii8iiiiiiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiaiiiii8iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiii! i i 19th STREET CARD SHOP I I S s E = 1 607 N. 19th STREET I HALLMARK GREETING CARDS FOR ALL OCCASIONS F IIII1IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII8IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII1II|||||||||||1IIIIIII||||||||8IIIIII|||||||||||HSISIIIIIIIIIIIIRII8II8III8I18IIIII . 2, 3, 4; Alpha Tau Omega 1, 2, 3, 4; DeMolay Club 1, 2; Pre Medical Club 2, 3, 4. Address: 302 Forrest Hills Avenue, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. BOMBERGER, H. FRED— A.B., German. Chess Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3, 4; Der Deutsche Ve- rein 2, 3, 4; MCA 2, 3, 4. Address: 215 Princeton Avenue, Palmerton, Pennsylvania. BOWKER, LEE H. —AJB., Sociology. Sociology Club 4. Address: 533 Maple Street, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. BRACKIN, JAMES B.— A.B., Psychology. Fresh- man Basketball; Basketball 2; Baseball 2, 3, 4; Lambda Chi Alpha 4; M Club 2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4. Address: 1055 North Twenty- second Street, Allentown, Pennsylvania. BREINIG, ALFRED O .-B.S.B.A., Accounting. Cross Country 1, 2, 3, Captain 4; Wrestling 1, 2, 3, 4; Track 1, 2, 3; Intramural Sports 1; Gamma Delta Iota 3, 4; WMUH 1, 2; Address: 1231 Sus- quehanna Road, Rydal, Pennsylvania. BREMILLER, CHARLES L.— A.B., History and Political Science. Phi Alpha Theta 3. Address: Nine Partners Lane, Millbrook, New York. BURTON, WILLIAM J .—B.S.B.A., Accounting. Alpha Tau Omega 1, 2, 3, 4; Cardinal Key Society 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4; Inter- fraternity Council, Athletic Committee 3, 4; Week- ly 3, 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Freshman Football 1; Football 2, 3; Wrestling 2; Business and Economics Club 2, 3, 4. Address: 5706 Benton Heights Avenue, Baltimore, Maryland. BUSCH, FREDERICK M.-A.B., English. WMUH 2; Arcade 1, 2, 3, 4, Assistant Editor 3, Editor 4; Omicron Delta Kappa 3, 4; Vice Presi- dent 4; Pi Delta Epsilon 3, 4, Historian; Weekly 3; Intramural Sports 3; Cheerleader 1; Who’s Who 4; History of Ideas Seminar 4; Poetry Workshop 2. Address: 956 East Eighteenth Street, Brooklyn, New York. ’JiiiimimasiiiiiiiiiiiigiunuiiiiimiiuiisimimmiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiinmimiiiuiiiimniiiiiiiiiiuiminiiiimiagiiimiisgiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiminiii’i I I = = l I — “ E i BUD E E s KIVIRT ' S i i E E llllll81llllllllllll8IIIIISRIIII8IIIIIBIIIIIg|IIIIIIIIIBIBIIIIIIBIIillBlllllllllllIIII8llllll3llllll8ll!lilllimil8II8|g|l88lll8IIBIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII88III8lll8llll»Z ' tSSflllllBlllllllllinflieilllllllllllSIBIIIIIIIBIIISGIIIIIBIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIHIIHBlIIMIIIIIIIEIIIIIIIIIIIIIBIIIIIBIIlllllllllISIIIIIIllllBIIIIIIIISIIIIIIIlIIIIIIIIIIIIIIRIIIIIIIIIIlISIIIIBIIMIIIIIlIBglllllMlllimillJ -•imiiimmmiimmiiimiimiiiimiiiimimiiiimiimsmiimiiiimiHmmmiimiimimimMmiiimiimmmnmfiiimimiiimmimmiimimBmiimiimfmimiiimmimiimimlimmimimimii in PEOPLE are NEWS Big People, Little People, Thin People, Fat People, Young People, Old People, Good People, Bad People ... § what they do . . . what they think . . . where they go . . . § how they do it . . . their Problems, their Passions, their Hopes, | their Fears, their Triumphs, their Tragedies ... in fact, all the little things and the big things that go to make | this world the exciting place it is. Seven days a week. § you can read all about it in Lehigh Valley’s | most dominant advertising media ... | THE CALL-CHRONICLE NEWSPAPERS Allentown, Pa. These Newspapers bring news about people in this wide, wide world into more than 109,000 homes every weekday! (over 100,000 on Sunday) THE MORNING CALL ’EVENING CHRONICLE ’SUNDAY CALL-CHRONICLE -TlBIIBIIIIIIIIBIISIIlIBBBBlBIIBIIflllBIIIIIIIIIBIIIIIIIBIIIIIIIBIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIBIIIIIlllllllllllllllllllllllllIllltlllBIIIIIIIIMIIIMIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIBIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIBIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIMIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIBIIIIIIIIIIIBIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIBIIIMII BUZAS, LORRAINE C.—B.S., Natural Science. Marching Band 1, 2, 3, Corresponding Secretary 2; Concert Band 1, 2, Corresponding Secretary 2; Science Club 3, 4; Women’s Hockey 4; Student Court, Investigator 4; Address: Route Two, Eas- ton, Pennsylvania. CALLIE, ALBERT S.—B.S., Natural Science. Sig- ma Phi Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, Guard, Steward; New- man Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Pre Medical Society 2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4. Address: 1983 Market Street, Bangor, Pennsylvania. CAMERON, JOHN D .—A.B., Humanities. Choir 1, 2, 3, 4, Assistant Manager 3, Manager 4; Opera Workshop 2, 3, 4; Arcade 4; WMUH 4; Class Executive Council 2. Address: 2237 Union Street, Allentown, Pennsylvania. CARPENTIER, JOSEPH A.-B.S., Natural Sci- ence. Marching Band 1, 2, 3; Pre Medical Society 2, 3. Address: 206 Cherry Street, East Greenville, Pennsylvania. CHRISTMAN, JUDITH l.-B.S., Chemistry. Choir 1, 2, 3, 4; Opera Workshop 2, 3, 4; Com- muters’ Club 4; Science Club 4. Address: 15201 9 Gordon Street, Allentown, Pennsylvania. CHRISTMAN, THOMAS H .-A.B., G erman. Sig- ma Phi Epsilon 2, 3, 4; Chess Club 2; Commuters’ Club 2; Intramural Sports 2, 3, 4. Address: 12351 2 Chew Street, Allentown, Pennsylvania. COBB, H. RICHARD. JR .-A.B., Psychology. Wrestling 2, 3; Baseball 2, 3, 4; Freshman Base- ball 1; Marching Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Concert Band 1, 2; Big Brother Program 2, 4; I nstitute of Faith 3, 4; MCA 3, 4, Chairman 4; Intramural Sports 1, 4. Address: 323 Lorraine Ave., Oreland, Penn- sylvania. CONGER, CLIFFORD, JR.-T.B., Economics. Alpha Phi Omega 2, 3, 4. Address: 1272 Ellsworth Drive, Fullerton, Pennsylvania. DANIEL, DAVID V.-A.B., History. Phi Sigma Tau 4; MCA 1, 2, 3, 4, Executive Committee 4; Pre Theological Club 1, 2, 3; Lutheran Student Association 1, 2, 3, 4, Chairman 4; WMUH 1, 2; Der Deutsche Verein 3, 4; Institute of Faith 3. 4: Band 1, 2, 3, 4. Address: 1240 East Fourth Street, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. DARKES, WILLIAM F., JF. -A.B., Psychology. Phi Kappa Tau 1, 2, 3, 4: Pre Medical Society 2. 3: Golf 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. 4. Address: South Warren Street, Orwigsburg, Pennsylvania. DAVIES, THOMAS L .-B.S.B.A., Business Ad- ministration. Sigma Phi Epsilon 2, 3, 4, Historian 3, Guide 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 2, 3, 4; Business and 177 178 Economics Club 2, 3, 4; Wrestling 1,2; Intramural Sports 2, 3, 4; Intramural Wrestling Champion 3. Address: 731 North Eighth Street, Allentown, Pennsylvania. DEBUS, DEBORAH A.—A.B., Psychology and Elementary Education. Education Society 2, 3, 4; Commons Committee, Chairman 4; Homecoming Court 2; Homecoming Committee 3; Intramural Sports 1, 2. Address: 200 East Fourteenth Avenue, Conshohocken, Pennsylvania. DECKER, CAROL S .—B.S.B.A., Business Admin- istration. Women’s Hockey 2, 3, 4; Weekly 2, 3, 4; =J 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 II 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 H 1 1 ! 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 III 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 II I ! 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Ml 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I s I 1 = 1 COMPLIMENTS OF ALLEN LAUNDRY FiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiimii? Mask and Dagger Society 1, 2, 3, 4; Business and Economics Club, Secretary 3, 4. Address: 21 South Muhlenberg Street, Allentown, Pennsylvania. DEERY, A. DAVID— A. B., English. Der Deutsche Verein 3; Education Society 2, 3, 4, President 4; Arcade 3, 4. Address: 383 Second Avenue, Phoenix- ville, Pennsylanvia. DELAWTER, PATRICIA A.-A.B., Romance Languages. Choir 1, 2, 3; Phi Sigma Iota 4; Delta Phi Nu 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3; Education Society 3, 4; Political Science Conference 2, 3. Address: 134 Church Street, Teaneck, New Jersey. iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiMiiimmmiiiiiiimiiimiiiiimimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiDiiiiiiimiimiiiiiiiiiimmiiiiiimiiiiiiiiHiiiiiimiir ' COMPLIMENTS | 1 OF | E i E 1 KERN ' S 1 1 M 1 1 M 1 1 1 1 1 1 Ml 1 1 1 ! I II II 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 E 1 1 1 M I M 1 1 M 1 1 M 1 1 ! 1 1 1 M I M 1 1 M 1 1 1 II f IM 1 1 ! I !! 1 1! 1 M M 1 1 1 1 1 Ml I Ml 1 1 m 1 1! ill 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 II 1 1 1 1 II ! 1 1 IM 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i M U DENNIS, DOROTHY A.—A.B., Psychology. In- tramural Sports 1; Canterbury Club 1; Education Society 2, 3, 4; Delta Phi Nu 3, 4; Class Executive Council 4. Address: 91 Strawberry Hill Avenue, Stamford, Connecticut. DEVORSS, JAMES E.— B.S., Natural Science. Track 1, 2; Wrestling 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Pre Medical Society 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 4; Alpha Tau Omega 1, 2, 3, 4. Address: 82 Pocono Road, Mountain Lakes, New Jersey. DODGE, WILLIAM B., JR.— A.B., Economics. Business and Economics Club 3, 4. Address: 220 Buena Vista Avenue, Fair Haven, New Jersey. DONMOYER, JOHN E.— B.S., Mathematics. M Club 4; Footbali 2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports 2, 3, 4. Address: 1507 Tremont Street, Allentown, Penn- sylvania. EHINGER, WENDELL C.-B.S.B.A., Business Administration. Alpha Tau Omega 1, 2, 3, 4; Busi- ness and Economics Club; Soccer 1, 2; Intramural Sports 2, 3, 4. Address: 13470 Proctor Road, Phila- delphia, Pennsylvania. EINFALT, STEPHEN J„ JR.- .5., Sociology. Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Veteran’s Club 1, 2, 3, 4, President 3, 4; Sociological Society 4, Presi- dent 4; Golf 4. Address: 219 North Ninth Street, Allentown, Pennsylvania. iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniEiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiimmiimiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiEiiiiitgiiniiiiiiimiiy COMPLIMENTS OF H. N. CROWDER JR., CO. | ALLENTOWN-BETHLEHEM-EASTON l 5 E 5 1 5 E = i = i - f I II 1 1 ! 1 1 1 1 1 M 1 1 ! 1 1 ! 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 III I i Ml 1 1 1 1 1 1 ! 1 1 1 9 1 Ml Ml ! I II 1 1 1 1 1 II I IM 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 III 1 1 M II 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 M I! 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i M 1 1 ! ME 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 min GOOD LUCK - E I I 1 From [ | Kwik Kafe Of ! I Allentown, Inc. 1 i 1 Automatically At Your Service 1 E 1 I FOOD AND DRINK VENDING i£ = s 5 AROUND THE CLOCK E = - 1 — E I Swift 7-1870 Allentown, Pa. | S E “ E E E E E 1 = E E I E 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 e 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 e 1 1 1 1 1 1 u i ii 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 f 1 1 1 1 1 m 1 1 m 1 1 1 i m 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 1 f 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 N i n 1 1 1 ii 1 1 1 1 1 m 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 in 1 1 1 1 1? 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 II 1 1 1 II II 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ! 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 M 1 1 II 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I I E E E E E E E E E E E E I | E E s - E E E E E E H. A. Esterly Son I ! I BUSINESS MACHINES [ E E i I 1 E E E E E E E 1 I 1 239 North Tenth St., Allentown, Pa. 1 E E 1 Phone HE 4-1275 1 1 I = E E E | 1 I I E = 1 SALES • SERVICE • SUPPLIES • RENTALS I E E 1 1 E s 1 S E = E = s E 1 E E = E = 1 1 1 1 1 n 1 1 1 g e 1 1 1 1 it 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ii 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 m 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 m 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 e 1 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 c 1 1 1 1 m 1 1 m m 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ii i m 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ir EMHARDT, CAROL L.— A.B., Mathematics. Hockey 2, 3, 4; Basketball 2, 3; Co-Captain 3; Ten- nis 1, 2, 3, 4; Cheerleading 1, 2, 3, Captain 3; Mathematics Club 2, 3, Secretary 3; Delta Phi Nu 1; Lambda Epsilon Delta 3, 4; Junior Prom Queen 3; Women’s Council 4; Women’s Dormitory Coun- cil 4; President 4; Who’s Who 4; Education Society 4; Brown Hall Dormitory President. Address: 215 Rech Avenue, Oreland, Pennsylvania. EMMER, SUSAN L.-A.B., English. Phi Sigma Iota 3, 4; Delta Phi Nu 2; Education Society 2, 3. Address: 940 Sheridan Ave., Roselle, New Jersey. ERDENBERGER, GORDON G.-A.B., English. Freshman Baseball 1; Lambda Chi Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4; Creative Arts Workshop 3; Mermaid Tavern Soci- ety 2, 3. Address: 445 Hamden Drive, Clearwater Beach, Florida. ERIKSON, LESLIE E.-B.S., Chemistry. Alpha Tau Omega 2, 3, 4, President 4; Science Club 2, 3, 4; Freshman Orientation Committee 2; Intra- fraternity Council 4, Vice President 4; Mermaid Tavern Society 3, 4; Big Brother Program 2, 3, 4. Address: 6 Dartmoor Drive, Shrewsbury, Massa- chusetts. FAIRORTH, LEONARD— B.S., Natural Science. Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; World University Service Representative 4; Creative Arts Workshop 3; Arcade 3; Mask and Dagger Society 4; MET 3, 4; MCA Drama 3, 4; Ciarla 3, 4; Weekly 1, 2, 4; Phi Epsilon Pi 2, 3, 4; Hillel 2: Pre Medical Soc- iety 2, 3; Big Brother Program 2; WMUH 3. Ad- dress: 1701 Conlyn Street, Philadelphia, Pennsyl- vania. FARR, LON A M.-A.B., History. Weekly 1, 2, 3, 4; Office Manager 1, 2; Ciarla 2, 3, 4; Hockey 2, 3, 4; Delta Phi Nu 2, 3; Political Science Club 3, Phi Alpha Theta 4, Archivist 4; Bernheim House 3; Senior Counselor 4. Address: 850 Howard Ave., Staten Island, New York. FEGELEIN, JOHN Y.-A.B., English. Football 1, 2, 3; Wrestling 2, 3, 4; M Club 3, 4; Intramural Sports 3, 4. Address: 21 Johns Vale Lane, Park Ridge, New Jersey. FELDMAN, ROGER P.— B.S., Natural Science. Soccer 1, 2, 3; Class Executive Council 2, 3, 4: Mask and Dagger Society 1, 2, 3, 4; WMUH 2, 3; Phi Epsilon Pi 1, 2, 3, 4; MET 4; Pre Medical Society 2, 3. Address: 1816 Pine Street, Philadel- phia, Pennsylvania. FETTEROLF, CAROLINE J.-5.S., Physics. Ad- dress: 1617 Turner St., Allentown, Pennsylvania. 179 180 MiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiimiiiimiimiiiiiiiimimjimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiMiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiimmiiiiiiimmiimim " THE BEST NAME TO GO BUY " | LEHIGH VALLEY DAIRY j 1000-1160 North 7th Street ALLENTOWN, PA. I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 II 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 II 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 II 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ! 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ! 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 H 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 II 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 f 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 H 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 n 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 II 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 N 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ! 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 M 1 1 M I M 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 FOGLEMAN, JANET L.—A.B., History. Choir 1, 2, 3, 4; Opera Workshop 2, 3, 4; Political Science Conference 2, 3; Phi Sigma Iota 3, 4; Student Court 3, 4; Lambda Epsilon Delta 4. Address: 823 North Twenty-fifth Street, Allentown, Pennsylvania. FRYER, THOMAS, B .—A.B., Romance Lan- guages. Alpha Tau Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 4; Class Vice President 2, 4; Class Executive Council 2, 4; Student Council 4; Phi Sigma Iota 4; Tennis 2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports 1 , 2, 3, 4; Weekly 3, 4; Track 1. Address: 530 Walnut Street, Royersford, Pennsylvania. GANGWER, DORIS A .—A.B., Psychology and Elementary Education. MCA 2, 3; Education So- ciety 2, 3, 4; Bernheim House 3; Senior Counselor 4, Address: 621 Valley Avenue, Easton, Pennsyl- vania. GAYNOR, MICHAEL W.-A.B., Psychology. Psy Chi 4; Alpha Tau Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, Public Rela- tions Officer 3; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Mer- maid Tavern Society 2, 3, 4; President 2. Address: South Main Street, Southampton, New York. GEHMAN, MARCIA M.-A.B., English. Choir, Librarian 2; Commuters’ Club 1, 2, 3; Arcade; MCA. Address: 820 Allen Street, Allentown, Penn- sylvania. GEHRINGER, EDWARD M.-A.B., Psychology. Phi Kappa Tau 3, 4; Jazz Society 1; WMUH 2, 3; Commuters’ Club 1,2; Collegians Dance Band 1. Address: 3333 B. Street, Allentown, Pennsylvania. GEHRIS, DAVID V.-A.B., History. Alpha Tau Omega 1, 2, 3, 4; Jazz Society; Young Republi- cans’ Club; Political Science Conference. Address: 106 Fountain Street, Allentown, Pennsylvania. CESSNER, GEORGE K.—B.S., Chemistry. Alpha Tau Omega 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Freshman Football; Science Club 3, 4; Cardinal Key Society 2, 3. Address: 200 Lafayette Avenue, Oreland, Pennsylvania. GIMBER, KARL O.—A.B., History. Phi Kappa Tau 1, 2, 3, 4: Housemanager 3, 4; Class Treasurer 2, President 3, 4; Interfraternity Council President 4; Student Council 3, 4, Chairman Social Code Committee 3, Chairman Freshman Orientation Committee 4, Budget and Finance Committee 3, 4; Constitution and Elections Committee 3; Who’s Who 4; Mermaid Tavern Society 3, 4; Omicron Delta Kappa 3, 4; Secretary 4; Student Advisor 3, Big Brother Program 2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Political Science Conference 2; Weekly 2. Address: 6422 Rising Sun Avenue, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. aillllllllillllllllllllllllll 1 1 llllllllllllllllll llll 1 1 llllllllllllll llllllll HIM llllllllll lllllllll IIM II llllllllllllllllll H llllilllllllllllll Mill Ml llllllllllllllll t ;iitiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii)imiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiii!iiiimiiimi£ HEMMERLY ' S | : I 23rd and WALNUT STREETS Wtii ri | ALLENTOWN, PA. | VL Uttar Jnn j | ! | 4140 TILGHMAN ST. ( Proprietors — LUCILLE and ROGER JONES | ALLENTOWN, PA. J I j E §1 FiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiir Tiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii-- GLEAN, RICHARD C.—A.B., Romance Lan- guages. Tau Kappa Epsilon, 1, 2, 3, 4; Choir; Span- ish Club. Address: 24 Metropolitan Oval, New York, New York. GOETZ, CHARLES J —A.B., Psychology. Lamb- da Chi Alpha 3, 4, Athletic Director 3; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Education Society 3, 4. Address: 210-04 Forty-Second Avenue, Bayside, New York. GOGGIN, JAMES E.-A.B., Psychology. Political Science Conference 1, 2, 3, 4; Freshman Basketball 1, 2; Phi Epsilon Pi 3, 4; Intramural Sports 3, 4; Weekly 3, 4. Address 73-31 One Hundred Seventy- Ninth Street, Flushing, New York. GONZALEZ, MARGARET G.-A.B., Romance Languages. Mask and Dagger Society 1, 2, 4; Phi Sigma Iota 4; MET 4; Lambda Epsilon Delta 4. Address: 11 Compton Avenue, Plainfield, New Jersey. GOODLING, ROGER N.-.4JL, History. Der Deutsche Verein 2, 3, 4; Lutheran Student Asso- ciation 2, 3, 4, President 2; Phi Alpha Theta 3, 4; Institute of Faith 3, 4, Treasurer 4; Pre Theo- logical Club 1, 2. Address: 901 Slocum Avenue, Scranton, Pennsylvania. GREENE, DONALD E.—B.S., Physics. Tau Kappa Epsilon; Soccer 1, 2, 3; Track 1, 2; Intramural E ' liiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiUiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii imiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiMiiiimiiiimiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinimiim CONGRATULATIONS TO THE CLASS OF 1962 MILK ICE CREAM 2200 INDUSTRIAL DRIVE BETHLEHEM, PA. Samuel D. Butz Robert J. K. Butz SAMUEL D. BUTZ AGENCY INC. 1 ★ | 32 SOUTH 7th STREET ALLENTOWN, PENNSYLVANIA GENERAL INSURANCE ' llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllimillllllllllllllllllllMIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIlT Sports 1, 2, 3, 4. Address: 60 Claire Drive, Somer- ville, New Jersey. GREEN, RACHEL— A.B., German. Education So- ciety 3; Der Deutsche Verein 3, 4; Delta Phi Nu 4; Senior Counselor 4. Address: Route Two, Kunkle- town, Pennsylvania. GROSS, MALCOLM J.—A.B., History. Sigma Phi Epsilon, Secretary 4, Pledge Trainer 4; Phi Alpha Theta 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 3, 4; Young Demo- crats 4; Intramural Sports 2, 3, 4; Pre Law Club 4. Address: 1151 9 North Seventeenth Street, Allen- town, Pennsylvania. GURNIAK, THEODORE R.-B.S.B.A., Account- ing. Commuters’ Club 1, 2; Business and Econom- ics Club 3; Newman Club 3, 4; Advisory Board 4. Address: 1129 South Howard Street, Allentown, Pennsylvania. HAJEWSKI, THOMAS J .-A.B.. German. Der Deutsche Verein 2, 3, 4, President 4; Delta Phi Alpha 4. Address: 665 Washington Avenue, Allen- town, Pennsylvania. HALKEMAN, JOHN E.-A.B., Psychology. Pre Theological Club 1, 2, 3, 4; MCA 1, 2, 3, 4; Fenc- ing Manager 1, 2, 3; Creative Arts Workshop. Address: 114 Market Street, Tamaqua, Pennsyl- vania. 181 ' -wimiiiiimiiiiiiimiiiiitiiiiiaiiiimiiiiiiHiiiiifiiiifiiiiiiamiHmiiiiiiiiiifiiimiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiimiiiEiiiigimiiiiiiiimmimiiiimiiimmimiii i I s s COMPLIMENTS TO THE CLASS OF 1962 NINETEENTH STREET THEATRE 1 1 1 a s 1 1 THE ROSE BOWL I H s I 801 N. 1 5th St, S H s I HE 7-4606 1 ! ! i i | BOWLING IS BEST | I WHERE THE j I BEST IS PROVIDED 1 I 1 • " .miiiiiiiiiimmiitiiiimiiiiianiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiesimimiiiiisiiiiiHiiiimiiiiismiiisiiiiumiiiiimnEiigHeimniiiiiHiUHSiiiiiiHiiiiimimiEimik iimimmmmmHiigiigiiiumMiimimuimHiminiinmmimmHiimEmHSBiitmmmiiigmmymniiiiniiEmimiimfmmtiiiiiEunsEiml 182 HALTRECHT, LEONARD— J3.S V Natural Sci- ence. Tan Kappa Epsilon; Fencing 1, 2, 3; WMUH 3, 4; Intramural Sports 2, 3, 4; Pre Medical Society 3, 4, Address; 835 Yeadon Avenue, Yeadon, Penn- sylvania. HANKEE, JERYL A.-B.S., Biology. Women’s Basketball 2; Lutheran Student Association 2. Ad- dress: 336 Iron Street, Lehighton, Pennsylvania. HANS, RICHARD— A.B., History. Choir I, 2; Opera Workshop 2, 3; MCA 3; Der Deutsche Ve- rein 2, 4; Pre Theological Club 4. Address: 22-26 Himrod Street, Ridgewood, New York. HARTZELL, ROBERT E.—A.B., German. Alpha Tau Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 4; Freshman Foot- ball 1; Freshman Baseball 1; Baseball 2; Mermaid T avern Society 2, 3, 4; Der Deutsche Verein 2, 3, 4; Delta Phi Alpha 4, President 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4. Address: 60 Sixth Avenue, College- ville, Pennsylvania. HARWOOD, RUSSELL T.-A.B., Social Science. Cardinal Key Society 1, 2, 3, 4; Alpha Tau Omega 1, 2, 3, 4, Social Chairman 4; Class President 2; Student Council 2; Soccer 1, 2; Golf 2; Freshman Orientation Committee 4; IFC Social Chairman 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4. Address: 1971 Maple- wood Avenue, Abington, Pennsylvania. HAWMAN, AMY L.-A.B., Psychology. Women’s Council 2, Treasurer, President 3; Psi Chi 3, 4, President 4; Lambda Epsilon Delta 3, 4; Commons Committee 2, 3, 4; Homecoming Queen 3; Home- coming Committee 4; Student Affairs Committee 4; Who’s Who 4; Education Society 4; Choir 2, 3; Lutheran Student Association 1. Address: 36 Lynne Avenue, Wyomissing, Pennsylvania. HELFRICH, MRS. JUNE N.-B.S., Natural Sci- ence. Choir 1 , 2; Executive Council 2, 3; Commut- ers’ Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary-T reasurer 4. Address: 21 Beverly Drive, Allentown, Pennsylvania. HESSINGER, RONALD L.-A.B., Romance Lan- guages. Sigma Phi Epsilon 3, 4; Intramural Sports 3, 4; Commuters’ Club 1 ; Newman Club 3, 4. Address: Main Street, Fogelsville, Pennsylvania. HIETER, DOUGLAS K.-A.B., Psychology. Lambda Chi Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4. Address: 59 Cambridge Avenue, Garden City, New York. HIOTIS, CHRIST G.-A.B., Economics. Fresh- man Basketball 1 ; Basketball 2, 3, 4; Lambda Chi Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4; Economics and Business Club 2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; M Club 2, 3, 4. Address 1315 North Fifth Street, Reading, Penn- sylvania. S«!llllllII!IIIII!tllllllllll!l!IIIIii!IIIIIi3lllllllllIlllllillIIII!IHillIlillltl!fi!lillll!IIIl!IIIIIIIllillilllllllimiI!IISilliI!lllIIIII!lllillitillll!!llilimill|| l!ilillilE9llll!IIII9Efilllig!g I 11 1 3 3 I 1 CONGRATULATIONS TO THE ALLEN ELECTRIC CO., INC, CLASS OF 1962 FROM THE 524 H AMILTON STREET CLASS OF 1963 llBESGI9flBElSeiKilElllfiIEIIIBIIIlIBIIIBlBGEIIIIIIIEIIIBiIglCIBISfIIBII!IIIBIICIBIIIIIBIfBlfilfei!IISIIIIIillllieiBIIIHIBIII!llilIIItIIIOIEeill8tlieilllll(88BfEIOBEie(IGIIIEIIflllgllll!IIIBIIIIIEGIEEBIEIIIIIIBIIII6IHaiISfBIISIIB!lll FURNISHES LINEN FOR ALL DORMITORY STUDENTS AT MUHLENBERG COLLEGE flllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllflllllllllMIIIIIIBIIIIIMIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIItlllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllM HLATKY, HELEN E.-A.B., French. Choir 1, 2, 3, 4, Librarian 3; Opera Workshop 1, 2, 3, 4; Edu- cation Society 3, 4; Phi Sigma Iota 3, 4, President 4; Lambda Epsilon Delta 3, 4; Women Commuters 1, 2, 3, 4; Big Sister Planning Committee 4; Home- coming Court 4. Address: 120 North Fifth Street, Allentown, Pennsylvania. HOBELMAN, ELAINE M.-A.B., Sociology. Choir 1,2; MCA 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 4; Sociologi- cal Society 4, Secretary-Treasurer 4; Institute of Faith 3, 4, Secretary 3; Lutheran Student Associa- tion 1, 2. Address: 2431 Secane Road, Secane, Penn- sylvania. HOFFMANN, MARY M.-A.B., English. Delta Phi Nu 2, 3, President 3; Choir 1; Tennis 1, 2, 3; Women’s Council 3; Women’s Honor House 3; Phi Alpha Theta 4. Address: 72 West Marshall Road, Lansdowne, Pennsylvania. HOUSEKNECHT, ROLAND T. B.S.B.A., Ac- counting. Football 1, 2, 3, 4; M Club 2, 3. Address: 172 Main Street, Emmaus, Pennsylvania. HOY, G. MICHAEL— TB., History. Cardinal Key Society 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports 1, 3. Alpha Tau Omega 1, 2, 3, 4. Address: 110 East Main, Lock Haven, Pennsylvania. HUSTON, MARIE R.-B.S., Mathematics. Mathe- matics Club 2, 4; Women’s Council 3; Berheim Executive Committee 3; Senior Counselor 4; Intra- mural Sports 1, 2. Address: 3135 Spangler Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. JACOB, HELGA E.-A.B., German. Mask and Dagger Society 1, 2, 3, 4; MET 3, 4; Der Deutsche Verein 1, 2, 3, 4; Education Society 2, 3, 4: Delta Phi Alpha 4. Address: 119 East Elizabeth Avenue, Easton, Pennsylvania. JORGENSEN, ANNE W.-A.B., Psychology. We ekly 1, 2, 3, 4; Phi Sigma Iota 3, 4, Vice Presi- dent 4; Psi Chi 3, 4, Treasurer 4; Berheim House Executive Committee 3; Senior Counselor 4. Ad- dress: 3721 Woodland Avenue, Drexel Hill, Penn- sylvania. 183 184 iiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiimiMimmiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiimimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimitiiiiiimiiiiimimmiimiiiiiiiimmimiiimiimmmiiiimmmimiimm CONGRATULATIONS TO THE CLASS OF 1962 EVANS HEEPS iflllllll!IHIIIIIIIIIIIIII||||l!l|||||!III||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||i||||||||||||||||||||||||f||||||||||i||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||i||||!||||||||||||||||||||f||||||||||||||| JURUS, SANDRA H.-A.B., Psychology. Band, Majorette 1,2, 3, 4. Address: 1842 Turner Street, Allentown, Pennsylvania. KARP, ROBERT J.-B.S., Physics. Phi Epsilon Pi; Weekly 1, 2, 3, 4, Circulation Manager 3. Address: 6224 North Sixteenth Street, Philadelphia, Penn- sylvania. KELLER, FREDERICK G .—A.B., German. Pre theological Club 4; MCA 4; Institute of Faith 4, Publicity Committee; Der Deutsche Verein 3, 4; Tau Kappa Epsilon 4; Delta Phi Alpha 4. Address: 322 North Fifth Street, West Hazelton, Pennsyl- vania. KINGFIELD, THOMAS ].-B.S.B.A., Account- ing. Lambda Chi Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4; Wrestling 2; M Club 2, 3, 4; Business and Economics Club 2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4. Address: North Main Street, Stewartsville, New Jersey. KITCHEN, ROBERT D .-A.B., Psychology. MCA 4; Institute of Faith 3; Lutheran Student Association 3; Choir 1; Der Deutsche Verein 3; Pre Theological Club 1, 2; Track 3; Intramural Sports 4. Address: 1106 Dreher Avenue, Strouds- burg, Pennsylvania. KOCHER, ROBERT D .—A.B., German. Phi Kap- pa Tau 2, 3, 4, Social Chairman 3, Sergeant at Arms 3; Delta Phi Alpha 4, Treasurer 4; Der Deutsche Verein 2, 3, 4; Band 2, 3, Librarian 2, 3; Education Society 3; Commuters’ Club 1, 2; In- tramural Sports 1. Address: 5951 Main Street, Fo- gelsville, Pennsylvania. KOCZAN, THOMAS E .—A.B., History. Sigma Phi Epsilon 2, 3, 4; Baseball 2, 4; Mermaid Tavern Society 3, 4; Intramural Sports 2, 3, 4. Address: 259 Water Street, Allentown, Pennsylvania. KOHOUT, ALFRED E .-A.B., English. Mask and Dagger Society 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4; Weekly 1, 2, 3: WMUH 3, 4; Der Deutsche Verein 1, 2, 3, 4; MET 4; Phi Kappa Tau 3, 4; Alpha Psi Omega 4. Address: 432 Iron Street, Lehighton, Pennsylvania. KRATZER, LAWRENCE A.-B.S., Biology. Golf 2: Mask and Dagger Society 2, 3; Executive Coun- cil 3. Address: 563 Chestnut Street, Emmaus, Penn- sylvania. KRAUSE, JACK C.—A.B., Psychology. Institute of Faith 3, 4; Veterans’ Club. Address: Box 273, Dushore, Pennsylvania. KUNKEL, ADRIENNE A.-A.B., History. Phi Sigma Tau 4; Delta Phi Nu 3; Education Society 2, 3, 4; Women’s Dormitory Council 4. Address: Route One, Weatherly, Pennsylvania. jJiliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimimiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiimiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiimiiimimmiiiiiiiMimiiiimiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiim i 1 TREXLER LUMBER CO. LUMBER - MILLWORK - PAINTS HARDWARE - BUILDING SUPPLIES NEW SHOWROOMS - 430 N. 16th St. ALLENTOWN, PA. PHONE HE 4-6251 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 n ii ■ 1 1 1 1 1 1 f 1 1 1 ii 1 1 1 n it 1 1 1 1 1 1 ii m i ii 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 mi m n ; 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 m 1 1 1 ii 1 1 1 m 1 1 1 1 1 m 1 1 1 1 1 1 m m 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1; ■ m i m 1 1 1 1 n 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 n 1 1 hi i 1 1 1 n i m 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 u i m i ii KUNTZ, DAVID G.-B.S ., Natural Science. Phi Epsilon Pi 3, 4, Pledge Master 4; House Manager 4; Track 1, 2, 4; Freshman Basketball; Cross Coun- try 1; M Club 2. 3, 4; Science Club 3, 4; Intra- mural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Education Society 4; Big Brother 2, 3; Der Deutsche Verein 2, 3; IFC Ath- letic Committee 4. Address: 67 North Street, Slat- ington, Pennsylvania. KUNTZLEMAN, CHARLES T.-A.B., Social Sci- ence. Freshman Football; Football 2, 3, 4, Co-Cap- tain 4: Wrestling 2, 3, 4, Captain 3, 4; Track 1, 2, 4, Captain 4; Education Society 4; Student Coun- cil 4. Address: 222 Main Street, Emmaus, Penn- sylvania. KUNZ, ALBERT B.— B.S., Physics. Fencing 1, 2, 3, 4; Der Deutsche Verein 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice President 3. Address: 2804 Liberty Street, Allentown, Penn- sylvania. KUSHNER, GARY G.-B.S., Natural Science. Pre Medical Society, President 4; Tennis 2, 3, 4; Ciarla 2; Phi Epsilon Pi 1,2, 3, 4. Address: 2236 Natrona Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. LASSLO, CONSTANCE B.—A.B., Psychology. Hockey 2; Class Executive Council 3; Intramural Sports 2, 4. Address 85-55 Cherry Chase Street, Jamaica, New York. LENTZ, REBECCA J .—A.B., Hunanities. Educa- tion Society 1, 2, 3, 4; Delta Phi Nu 2, 3, 4; Worn- ailMIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIilUHIHMIllllllMlimillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllimillllllllllllll i E s H. Ray Haas Co. E E 1 PRINTERS, PUBLISHERS, CALENDAR MFG. E E E i = I ★ 514-528 N. Madison Street E E I 1 I ALLENTOWN, PENNA. E = I 435-1509 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 m 1 1 1 1 1 i ilium Owen M. Bastain, Inc. CONGRATULATIONS TO THE CLASS OF 1962 LINOLEUM CONTRACTORS TREXLERTOWN, PA. riiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiii iiiimiiimiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiumiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinT en’s Tennis 1, 2; Women’s Council 3. Address: 315 East High Street, Lebanon, Pennsylvania. LEONE, ANITA L.—A.B., English. Education So- ciety 1, 2; Newman Club 1, 4; Weekly 4. Address: 175 Lincoln Road, Westfield, New Jersey. LEWIS, CONSTANCE B.—A.B., English. Eta Sig- ma Phi 2, 3, 4, President 3, Vice President 4; Edu- cation Club 3. Address: 230 South Third Street, Ouakertown, Pennsylvania. LEWIS, RICHARD J .-B.S.B.A., Business Admin- istration. Business and Economics Club 3, 4, Presi- dent 4. Address: 2526 Helen Street, Allentown, Pennsylvania. LICK, THOMAS A.-B.S., Physics. Address: 837 Linden Street, Allentown, Pennsylvania. LILLY, CHARLOTTE L.-B.S., Natural Science. Choir 1, 2, 3, 4; Lutheran Student Association 1; Science Club 3. Address: 1919 Hanover Avenue, Allentown, Pennsylvania. LUTHER, ALEXANDER J.-5.S., Physics. Com- muters’ Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Concert Band 1, 2, 3, 4, Marching Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Mask and Dagger Society 3, 4; MET 3, 4; Class Executive Council 3, 4. Ad- dress: 611 South Bishopthorpe Street, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. 185 186 I COMPLIMENTS OF | CLASSIC PHOTO LABS, INC. | New and Allen Sts. 1 I ALLENTOWN 1 1 " Your Camera Supermarket " | Mllllin IlllllllllllimilllllJI Mill 1 1 1 1 ( 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 !tl II 1 1 i 1 1 1 ) I ! 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 II : 1 1 1 i 1 1 m i ! M 1 1 1 1 1 M 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Jllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll ORLANDO DIEFENDERFER, INC. [ ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR I | Industrial • Commercial 1 1 116 So. 2nd Street, Allentown | [ HE 4-9597 | r« 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 II 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 j 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 IN 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 II I III 1 1 1 II 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 II 1 1 1 1 III 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 M 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 m 1 1 1 1 311 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 liiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii E = i | j CONGRATULATIONS TO THE I E s 1 CLASS OF 1962 | E i " E E 5 - s [ FROM THE I CLASS OF 1964 niiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiimmiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiimiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiim? iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii I CONGRATULATIONS TO THE CLASS OF 1962 E E I FROM THE ! = = I E CLASS OF 1965 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ii 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ii 1 1 1 1 1 g ii i ii 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 m j 1 1 1 1 1 ii 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ii 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ii 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 g 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 14 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 m 1 1 1 1 1 1 r MACK, ART HUR J.— A.B., Psychology. Commu- ters’ Club 1; Education Club 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4. Address: 642 Main Street, Slatington, . Pennsylvania. MAHAN, VAL R. — A.B., English. Mask and Dag- ger Society 1, 2, 3, 4; MET 4; Arcade 1, 2, 3. Ad- dress: 9520 Hoff Street, Philadelphia, Pennsyl- vania. MAKOUL, RICHARD J Social Science. Address: 635 North Thirtyeth Street, Allentown, Pennsylvania. MARQUARD, CARL O.—A.B., Psychology. Track Manager 1. Address: Route One, Box 734, Newton, New Jersey. MARSHMAN, WILLIAM V.-A.B., Psychology. Jazz Society 1, 2, 3; Canterbury Club 1, 2, 3; Soccer 2, 3; Co-Captain 4; Intramural Sports 3, 4; M Club 2, 3, President 3. Address: 1184 Dermond Road, Drexel Hill, Pennsylvania. MASS, BURTON— B. S., Natural Science. Intra- mural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Ph-i Epsilon Pi 1, 2, 3, 4, Parliamentarian 2, Treasurer 3, Superior 4; Inter- fraternity Council 3, 4; Big Brother Program 2; Pre Medical Society 2, 3, 4; Hillel 1, 2, 3; Weekly 1, 2, 3; Ciarla 2, 3, 4. Address: 128 Cornell Road, Balacynwyd, Pennsylvania. MCDONALD, MATTHEW W .-B.S.B.A., Busi- ness Administration. Veterans’ Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 4; Business and Economics Club 2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4. Address: 38 West Bacon Street, Palo Alto, Pennsylvania. METZGAR, MARY J.—A.B., Humanities. Edu- cation Society 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 4; Delta Phi Nu 2, 3, 4, Vice President 3. Address: 303 Parsons Street, Easton, Pennsylvania. MEYER, JOHN S.—A.B., History. Class Executive Council 1, 2, 3, 4; Phi Kappa Tau 1, 2, 3, 4, Finan- cial Secretary 2, Recording Secretary 3, 4; Student Court 3, 4; Political Science Conference 2; Intra- mural Sports 2, 3, 4; Weekly 3; Phi Alpha Theta 3, 4; Omicron Delta Kappa 4; Who’s Who 4. Ad- dress: 625 Maxwell Place, Ridgewood, New Jersey. MINER, MARTIN V.-A.B., History. Phi Epsilon Pi 1, 2, 3, 4; Weekly 1, 2, 3, 4, Sports Editor 3, Editor in Chief 4; Ciarla 1, 2, 3, Sports Editor 3; Publications Board 4; Freshman Soccer; Soccer 2; Big Brother 2, 3; Omicron Delta Kappa 4; Phi Alpha Theta 3, 4, Secretary-Treasurer 4; Pi Delta Epsilon 3, 4; Student Evaluation Committee 4; Hillel 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4, Who’s Who 4. Address: 135-40 Seventy-Eighth Drive, Kew Gardens Hills, New York. • l 3 ll! 9 B 8 IIISIBaiIS!S 51 Il!ll 3 l!J 335 S??ll 5 §ll 3 SiiliI 0583 llll 8 SI!!!lSII!fl 332 !l 3 ISIIlll!!!ii!?Si!iS? 9 I!l 31 S! 833 l!!! 33 IS!l!!SlS!l! 5 il!?l 33 lll 3 B!i 0 llll 33 l! 2 IIOI 3 l 361 I!?BCtIlBI 3 IJSIiBiilSIE 5 ll!I 21 l!i! 3 ! 9 l 8 !!l(l??! 3 II§IDSIBEJ 9 PS 13 ! 3 !!!i!! 5 E Frank F. Hausman Paving Co. 1229 N. Quebec Street ALLENTOWN, PA. PHONE HE 4-5263 liiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiniiiiiNiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiir MULL, SYLVIA R.— A.B., Psychology. Mask and Dagger Society; MET. Address: 17 Cedarwood Road, Wyomissing, Pennsylvania. NACE, BARBARA A.-A.B., English. Women’s Hockey 2, 3; MET, Business Manager 3, 4; Arcade Art Editor 4. Address: 38 West Summit Street, Souderton, Pennsylvania. OPLINGER, WAYNE F.-A.B., Psychology. Lambda Chi Alpha; Freshman Football; Intra- mural Sports 2, 3, 4. Address: Route 2, Box 238, Northampton, Pennsylvania. PEISCHL, VICTOR C.-A.B., Sociology. Arcade 3, 4, Business Manager 4; Intramural Sports 3, 4; Poetry workshop 2; Pre Theological Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Sociological Society 3, 4, Vice President 4. Ad- dress: Lutheran Home, Topton, Pennsylvania. PIERSON, JAMES R.— B.S.B.A., Accounting. De- Molay Club 1, 2; Freshman Basketball 1; Basket- ball 3; Freshman Baseball 1; Lambda Chi Alpha 3, 4; Business and Economics Club 2, 3, 4, Vice Presi- dent 4; Weekly 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4. Address: 585 Peace Street, Hazelton, Pennsylvania. PINK, DEBORAH E.— A.B., Romance Langxiages. Ciarla 1, 2, 3; Hillel 1, 2, 3; Big Sister 2, 3; Student Union Planning Committee. Address: 14 Overlook Avenue, Paterson, New Jersey. POPOLOW, MICHAEL L .-B.S., Natural Sci- ence. Weekly 3, 4; Intramural Sports 2, 3, 4; Folk Song Society 3, 4; Pre Medical Club 2, 3; Mask and Dagger Society 3; Hillel 3; Ciarla 4. Address: 1605 East Mohican Street, Philadelphia, Pennsyl- vania. RAAB, WILLIAM A.—B.S., Chemistry. Science Club 3, 4, Vice President 4. Address: 314 West Broad Street, Tamaqua, Pennsylvania. RAU, JUDITH A.-A.B., Psychology. Choir 1, 2, 3, 4; Commuters’ Club 3; Der Deutsche Verein 3, 4. Address: 403 North Jasper Street, Allentown, Pennsylvania. REAGLE, MARTIN F.-A.B., Psychology. Phi Kappa Tau 2, 3, 4, Sergeant at Arms 3, Social Chairman 3, 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Marching Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Concert Band 1, 2. 3. 4; Alpha Phi Omega 1, 2, 3, Vice President 3; MCA 4. Address: 2314 Butler Street, Easton, Pennsyl- vania. REISS, DONNA K.— A.B., German. Der Deutsche Verein 1, 2, 3, 4; Women’s Council 1; Freshman Orientation Committee 2, 3, 4; Class Executive Council 4; Delta Psi Alpha 4. Address: 621 Wash- ington Street, Allentown, Pennsylvania. 187 188 immmiiiimiimmmimimiiiimiiiiiiiimimimimiimiimiimmiiiiiiiimiimiimiiiimimiiimiiiimiiimiiiiimmmmimmtgmtmii:: Garrett-Buchanan Co. KEMMERER PAPER DIVISION Distributors of STANDARD PRODUCTS OF AMERICA ' S FOREMOST MANUFACTURERS REPRESENTING THE ENTIRE RANGE OF QUALITIES FOR EVERY REQUIREMENT OF THE MODERN SCHOOLROOM ★ 2030 Vultee Street ALLENTOWN, PA. iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiimiiiiiiiiniiiii .1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ! 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1! 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 II 1 1 II 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ! 1 1 1 1 1 1 ! 1 1 1 1 ! I Ml I ill 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1! 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 II 1 1 1 1 II 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 RENNINGER, MARTIN— A.B., Psychology. Sig- ma Phi Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4; Weekly 3; Psi Chi 2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports 2, 3, 4; Football Manager 1,2; Class Executive Council 2, 3, 4; Freshman Orienta- tion Committee 4. Address: 527 North Berks Street, Allentown, Pennsylvania. ROBBINS, STAMFORD E.-A.B., Psychology. Address: Mounted Route Twelve, Phillipsburg, New Jersey. ROBERTS, LINDA A.—A.B., Psychology. Ad- dress: 965 Sixth Avenue, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. ROBINSON, CHARLES B.-B.S., Chemistry. Sci- ence Club 4; Alpha Phi Omega 2, 3, 4, Correspond- ing Secretary 2, Treasurer 3. Address: 917 Roose- velt Avenue, Rome, New York. ROSENBERG, IRA-T.5., History. Phi Epsilon Pi 3, 4; Baseball 1, 2; Weeklv 3; Intramural Sports 3, 4. Address: 331 Rice’s Mill Road, Wyncote, Pennsylvania. ROTH, CLIFFORD W .-B.S.B.A., Business Ad- ministration. Football 1, 2, 3, 4, Captain 4; Lamb- da Chi Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice President 3, President 4; Interfraternity Council 3, 4, Treasurer and Sec- retary, 3, 4; M Club, Secretary 3, Treasurer 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Business and Econom- ics Club 3. Address: 601 Rose Boulevard, Baldwin, Long Island. New York. | YOU CAN DO BETTER WITH GAS = §j | GOLD STAR COOKING | REFRIGERATION | WATER HEATING 1 SUMMER AIR CONDITIONING 1 HOME HEATING 1 CLOTHES DRYING 1 SMOKELESS INCINERATION . . . 1 . . . they’re all done better with GAS. Gas is the only fully 100 1 | per cent automatic fuel. No fuss! No bother! No muss! But instant | 1 and quick response from your Gas flame, no matter what the home | | need. | i Gas still leads the parade for the seven big jobs in your home | 1 the year ’round. Visit one of our seven show rooms and see the | | latest in modern conveniences and new ideas for your NEW = 1 FREEDOM GAS KITCHEN. 1 UGI | Lehigh Valley Gas Division | THE UNITED GAS IMPROVEMENT CO. miiiiimimimimmiiiiiiimitimiiimiiiimiHimijiiuiiimiiiiimiiiiiiigmiiiiiiiiimmiiimimmiimiiimmiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimimiiiiiimiiih: SANBORN, HUGH W.-A.B., Psychology. MCA 3, 4, President 4; Lutheran Student Association 3, 4; Institute of Faith 3, 4, President 3; Bible Study 1, 2, 3, 4; Men’s Dormitory Council 3, 4; Big Brother 3, Chairman 4; Committee on Religious Activities 4; Commons Committee 3, 4; Baseball 2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports 2, 3, 4. Address: Box 202, Albany Avenue, Kingston, New York. SCHAADT, MRS. RUTH W.-A.B ., Psychology and Elementary Education. Choir 1. Address: 1054 West Union Street, Fullerton, Pennsylvania. SCHATZLE, FRED T.-A.B., Philosophy. Ad- dress: 1633 Linden Street, Allentown, Pennsyl- vania. SCHOELLHAMMER, FREDERICK E.-A.B., History. Commuters’ Club 1 ; Political Science Conference 2. Address: Route Two, Bath, Penn- sylvania. SCHRIFFERT, EDWARD J.-5.S., Chemistry. Marching Band 1, 2, 3; Concert Band 1, 2, 3; Dance Band 1; Intramural Sports 1; Commuters’ Club 1, 2: Science Club 3, 4, President 4. Address: 1244 First Avenue, Tellertown, Pennsylvania. jiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiNiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiimiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiimiiiiimiiimiiimiiiiimiiiiiiiimimiiiiu GREETINGS TO THE CLASS OF 1962 TISCIO ' S ESSO SERVICE | ALLENTOWN PENNSYLVANIA | EiiiiiiiiimmiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiimiiiimiiT iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii I COMPLIMENTS OF I THE ROSEMARK BARBER SHOP 1 ★ | I 2 BARBERS I I RUSSELL (PAUL) BEKE I I JOHN CIERI | | Sat. 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. | | Tues. to Fri. 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. 1 | Mon. Closed 1 £ = Fi 1 1 1 1 H 1 1 j 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 II I n i 1 1 1 1 1 f 1 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 II 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 f 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 M 1 1 1 m 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 M m 1 1 1 1 1 1 ! 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 , 1 1 1 , 1 1 , 1 i E I | , 1 1 1 , | | 1 1 1 SCHWEI1 ZER, CARL G. — A.B., Social Science. Choir 1; Pre Theological Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Lutheran Student Association 3, 4; MCA 4; Education Soci- ety 4. Address: Route Three, Lehighton, Penn- sylvania. SHAPPELLE, CLAUDE E„ JR.-3.S., Mathe- matics. Alpha Tau Omega 2, 3, 4, Historian 4; Cardinal Key Society 2, 3, 4; Choir 1, 2, 3, 4; Col- legians 1; Mathematics Club 3, 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4. Address: 58 West End Avenue, Somerville, New Jersey. SHEETZ, GLENN M.— B.S., Physics. Address: Star Route, Limeport, Pennsylvania. SHOEMAKER, SYLVIA— A. B., Romance Lan- guages. Weekly 2; Phi Sigma Iota 3, 4; Ciarla 2, 3, 4. Address: Danielsville, Pennsylvania. SINGLETON, ROBERT ].-B.S.B.A., Account- ing. Class Executive Council 3, 4; Business and Economics Club 3, 4; Lambda Chi Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3; Intramural Sports 2, 3, 4. Address: 188 Alpine Trail, Lake Mohawk, New Jersey. SJOSTROM, DORIS l.—A.B., Psychology. Psi Chi 4; Education Society 1, 2, 3, 4; Women’s Council 2, 3; Senior Counselor 3, 4; Homecoming Queen I; Junior Prom Queen 3. Address: 215 Magnolia Terrace, Upper Darby, Pennsylvania. SLOANE, RONALD L.— B.S., Natural Science. Phi Epsilon Pi 1,2, 3, 4; Weekly 1, 2; WMUH 1, 2: Pre Medical Society 2, 3; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4. Address: 74-18 Thirtieth Avenue, Jackson Heights, New York. SMITH, JAMES F. —A.B., Psychology. Newman Club, President 1; Pre Medical Society. Address: 802 Berwich Street, Easton, Pennsylvania. SMITH, MRS. PATRICIA V.-B.S., Natural Sci- ence. Science Club 1; Education Society 1, 2, 3, 4; Chess Club 4; Big Sister 2, 3; Marching Band 1; Concert Band 1, 2, 3, 4. Address: 416 Washington Terrace, Audubon, New Jersey. SNYDER, GLORIA J.— A.B., Psychology and Ele- mentary Education. Psi Chi 4; Education Society 4. Address: 1531 North Nineteenth Street, Allen- town, Pennsylvania. SONNEBORN, DUANE G .-B.S.B.A., Business Administration. Freshman Track 1; Mermaid Tav- ern Society 2, 3, 4; Business and Economics Club 4; Treasurer 3, 4; Alpha Tau Omega, Vice Presi- dent 4; Soccer 2, 3. Address: 1425 Beech Avenue, Melrose Park, Pennsylvania. STEVENS, EDWARD R. B.S., Natural Science. Address: 4505 Henry Street, Easton, Pennsylvania. £JIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMif E £ E E = E ACE HOTEL BAR SUPPLY CO., 1 INC. I 1 Restaurant-Hotel-Bar and Institutional Supplies | 1 Commercial Refrigeration— Soda Fountains | | and Supplies 1 I 125-127 N. 7th St. ALLENTOWN, PA. j i = I Phone HE 5-9534 Phone HE 5-9534 | 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ii 1 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ii 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 n 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ii 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 r 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 n 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 n 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ROXY LINOLEUM CO. | Floor Coverings and Venetian Blinds 1 I ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES HARDWARE AND TOYS | I 1826 Allen Street 1 j ALLENTOWN, PA. | 1 433-5875 I Fl 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 II 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 II 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 II 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 II 1 1 1 1 1 1 ( 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 189 STREHLOW, CLIFFORD D Chemistry. Tau Kappa Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, Historian 3, Epipoy- tanis 4; Omicron Delta Kappa 3, 4; Pi Delta Epsi- lon 2, 3, 4, Historian 3, Vice President 4; Phi Alpha Theta 3, 4; Weekly 1, 2, 3, Photography Editor 1. 2; WMLIH 1, 2, 3, 4, Program Director 3, Station Manager 4; Publications Board 4; Stu- dent Council 3, 4, Vice President 4; Football Man- ager 1; Concert Band 1; Jazz Society 1, 2, 3, Treas- urer 2, 3. Address: 8 Rutherford Place, Montvale, New Jersey. SUPERKA, JOHN M .-A.B., History. Freshman Basketball 1: Basketball 2. 3, 4; Co-Captain 4; Phi Alpha Theta 3, 4; Lambda Chi Alpha 3, 4; Pre Law Club 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Big Brother 4; M. Club 3, 4. Address: 236 South Sec- ond Street, Coplay, Pennsylvania. SUPLICKI, MRS. CAROL E.-A.B., English. Creative Arts Workshop, Chairman 4; Arcade 3, 4. Address: 2052-2 Westfield Terrace, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. SWEDER, GERALD M.—B.S., Natural Science. Phi Epsilon Pi 1, 2, 3, 4, Rushing Chairman 3; Ciarla 1, 2, 3, 4, Art Editor 3, Editor in Chief 4; Publications Board; Pi Delta Epsilon; Weekly 1, 2; WMUH 1, 2; Hillel Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Pre Medi- cal Society 1, 2, 3; Freshman Soccer 1; Tennis 2; M Club; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Big Brother Program 1, 2, 3. Address: 72-06 One Hundred Thirty-Sixth Street, Kew Gardens Hills, New York. SWIGAR, MARY E.— B.S., Natural Science. Pre Medical Society 2, 3, 4; Women’s Basketball 2, 3, 4, Captain 2, 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2; Bernheim House 3, Executive Committee 3; Senior Coun- selor 4; Lambda Epsilon Delta 3, 4, President 4. Address: 214 Coal Street, Nesquehoning, Penn- sylvania. TAUBER, STUART P .—A.B., History. Political Science Conference 2, 3, 4; Phi Epsilon Pi 4; Weekly 3, 4; Hillel Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Awareness Committee 4; Jazz Society 1, 2. Address: 279 Highland Road, South Orange, New Jersey. TENGLER, ROBERT G.—A.B., Psychology. Phi. Kappa Tau 1, 2, 3, 4, Rushing Chairman 3, Stew- ard 3, 4; Student Council 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3; In- tramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Institute of Faith 2. Address: 51 High Street, Sharon Hill, Pennsyl- vania. TERRY, RUTH N.- L3., Psychology. Choir 1, 2, 3, 4, Librarian 2, Assistant Manager 3; Student Union Committee 2, 3; Women’s Council 3, 4, President 4; Lambda Epsilon Delta 3, 4; Education Society 4; Who’s Who 4; P si Chi 3, 4. Address: 70 West Main Street, Ringtown, Pennsylvania. :Miiiii!i!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiii!miiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiim!iimiiimiimiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiimii!iiiiiiimimiim 190 I I FREEMANS BLENDED VITAMIN D MILK 13th Green Street Phone HE. 4-9666 miiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iimi!!iiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiimmiiiiimiii!mmiimiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiimmiiii!iiin THOMS, FREDERICK A History. Der Deutsche Verein 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3; MCA 1, 2, 3, 4; Institute of Faith 2, 3, 4. Address: 229 London Avenue, Egg Harbor City, New Jersey. TUNNELL, AMY J.-A.B., French. Phi Sigma Iota 3, 4, Secretary 4; Delta Phi Nu 2, 3; MCA 1, 2, 3; Institute of Faith 3; WMUH 4; Intramural Sports 1. Address: Dreshertown Road, Fort Wash- ington, Pennsylvania. UHL, RICHARD ].—B.S.B.A., Accounting. Tau Kappa Epsilon 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 4; Forensic Coun- cil 3; Business and Economics Club 3, 4; Intra- mural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Freshman Wrestling 1. Address: 61 Hardenburg Road, Demarest, New Jersey. ULRICH, MARY A.—B.S., Mathematics. Wom- en’s Council 1; Student Court 2, 3, 4; Weekly 1, 2, 3, 4, Copy Editor 2, 3, 4; Freshman Orientation Committee 3; Institute of Faith 3; Basketball 2; Bernheim House 3; Lambda Epsilon Delta, Secre- tary-Treasurer 4. Address: 325 North Easton Road, Glenside, Pennsylvania. URBAN, SANDRA L.—A.B., English. Education Society 3, 4; Big Sister Program 4; Ciarla 4. Ad- dress: 1335 South Boulevard, Bethlehem, Pennsyl- vania. iJiimmimimiiimmmiiiiiimiiiiiiiiimiiHiimiiiiiiimiimiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiimiiimiiiimmiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiimimiiiiiiiiiiiiiii:- ' I COMPLIMENTS OF f 1 TREXLER FUNERAL HOME Ti 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ii 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ii 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 iT: Miiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiijiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiimir. C. E. ROTH FORMAL WEAR TUXEDOS | BY I AFTER - SIX I CALL HE 2-9452 I 206-208-210 I N. TENTH ST. | 2llllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllHIHIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIII | ll!llllllllllllllll ,,, l | l ' | l " " l ' lllllll , " lll ' ,H ll , " , l ,, " l " ' ll ' l " ' l ' l " " m " != M 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 II 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 s 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 II 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 II 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 fr GERARD S. MEST PRESCRIPTION PHARMACY VANDERHYDE, JUDITH L.-A.B., History and Psychology. Psi Chi 3, 4, Secretary 4; Political Sci- ence Conference 2, 3; Education Society 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 4; Foreign Policy Association 2, 3; Delta Phi Nu 1, 2, 3. Address: 1415 Woodside Avenue, Baldwin, Long Island, New York. 191 1 Rx I | 1601 Chew Street £.1 1 ! 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 8 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 1 M 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 H 1 1 1 1 1 1 III 1 1 !! 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 II 1 1 1 1 1 m 1 1 1 II 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ill 1 1 VANDERHYDE, SUSAN J. A.B., History and Psychology. Psi Chi 3, 4, Vice President 4; Educa- tion Society 1, 2, 3, 4; Delta Phi Nu 1, 2, 3; Politi- cal Science Conference 2, 3; Foreign Policy Asso- ciation 2, 3; Women’s Council 4; Prosser Hall Dormitory Council 4, President 4. Address: 1415 Woodside Avenue, Baldwin, Long Island, New York. TONY ' S BARBER SHOP VAN KEMPEN, JAY R.-A.B., Psychology. Lamb- da Chi Alpha, Vice President 2, President 3, Stew- ard 2, 3; Class Executive Council 1,3; Class Presi- dent 2; Student Council 2, 3; Interfraternity Coun- cil 3. Address: 339 South Van Dien Avenue, Ridge- wood, New Jersey. I VERZINO, WILIAM J„ JR.-B.V, Chemistry. 1 Address: 559 Evergreen Street, Emmaus, Pennsyl- li 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 m 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 m it giiiiiiiiiigiiiigiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiigiiiiiiggiigigiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiimiiiiiiiiiimgmiiiiimimimiiiimitigimigiiimiiiiEgimiiiiiiimmiiiiiimgiiimiiiiimiiigiiiiiiiniiiiitimiimi’- Compliments i of I M. W. WOOD, INC. = FOOD SERVICE MANAGEMENT 192 niiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiigiiiiiiiiiiiiBiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiir WACHS, THEODORE D Psychology. Phi Epsilon Pi 1, 2, 3, 4, Historian 3; Psi Chi 4; Po- litical Science Conference, Vice President 2, 3, President 4; Reisner Political Science Award; MET 2, 3, 4; Weekly 1, 2, 3, 4; Band 1, 2; Ciarla 3; Big Brother Program 4; Chess Club 2; Intra- mural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4. Address: 29 Woodmere Boulevard, Woodmere, New York. WAGNER, JOLEITA S.-A.B., German. MCA 2; Der Deutsch Verein 2, 3, 4; Education Society 2, 3, 4; Delta Phi Alpha 4. Address: 1832 Snyder Street, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. WAHRMANN, MARY L .-A.B., Sociology. Luth- eran Student Association 2; Der Deutsche Verein 2, 3, 4; Sociology Club 3, 4. Address: 789 Delaware Avenue, Palmerton, Pennsylvania. WEBER, JOANNE C.-A.B., German. Der Deutsche Verein 1, 2, 3, 4; Delta Phi Alpha 4. Ad- dress: 450 Fifth Street, Fullerton, Pennsylvania. WEIDNER. JANICE U.-A.B., English. Lambda Epsilon Delta 4; Mask and Dagger Society 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 4; Alpha Psi Omega 3, 4; MET 4; Arcade 3, 4. Address: 2113 Walnut Street, Allen- town, Pennsylvania. WEINGARTNER, JAMES J.-A.B., History. Phi Alpha Theta 3, 4, President 4; Der Deutsche Ve- rein 1,2, 3, 4. Address: 339 North Sixteenth Street, Allentown, Pennsylvania. WENNER, JERRY W.-A.B., Psychology. Tau Kappa Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Executive Council 4; Cardinal Key Society 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball 1. Address: Sycamore Mills Road, Media, Pennsylvania. WERTHER, NORMAN M.-B.S., Natural Sci- ence. Weekly 1, 2, Manager 3; Pre Medical Society 1, 2, 3, Secretary 3; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4. Address: 652 Ramapo Road, Teaneck, New Jersey. WESTBROOK, MARY A.-A.B., Psychology. Ad- dress: 238 North West Street, Allentown, Penn- sylvania. WHITING, LINDA L .-A.B., Psychology. Chess Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Corresponding Secretary 4; Educa- tion Club 4; Delta Phi Nu 4. Address: 2249 Hack- ett Avenue, Easton, Pennsylvania. WEIDER, JANET Cr.-A.B., German. Der Deutsche Verein 3, 4; Education Society 2, 3, 4; Commuters’ Club 1; Delta Phi Alpha 4; Big Sis- ter Program 4; Spring Sing 1, 2, 3; Commuting Women’s Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Address: 223 Railroad Street, Allentown, Pennsylvania. immiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiimmiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimimiiiiiiiiiimmmimiiiimmiimiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiNiiimimiiiiimiimiiiiiiiiimnimm Harold Stephens Company INSTITUTIONAL PURVEYORS 414 North Fulton Street ALLENTOWN, PA. rHiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiii WILFINGER, JUDITH B English. Com- muters’ Club 1; Commuting Women 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 2, President 3; Delta Phi Nu 3; Wom- en’s Council 3; Big Sister Chairwoman 3; Lambda Epsilon Delta 4; Education Society 4; Ciarla 4. Address: Route One, Emmaus, Pennsylvania. WINIG, HOWARD F .-B.S.B.A., Economics. Chess Club 1, 2; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3; Busi- ness and Economics Club 2, 3, 4; Jazz Club 1, 2: Ciarla 3; Weekly 1, 2; Phi Epsilon Pi 1, 2, 3, 4, Parliamentarian 2, House Manager 3, 4; Hillel Club 1, 2, 3; Interfraternity Council Coordinating Chairman 4. Address: 751 Sanford Street, Phila- delphia, Pennsylvania. WOLF, RONALD K.-A.B., Sociology. Pre Theo- logical Club 1, 2, Treasurer 2: Dormitory Council 2, 3, Secretary 3; Lutheran Student Association 3, 4; Phi Sigma Tau 4. Address: 114 Penn Avenue, Telford, Pennsylvania. WOLF, VERNA D .—A.B., Romance Languages and Elementary Education. Choir 1; Education So- ciety 2, 3, 4; Women’s Council Treasurer 3; Bern- heim House Executive Committee 3; Senior Coun- selor 4; Lambda Epsilon Delta 4; Phi Sigma Iota 4. Address: 913 Penn Avenue, Drexel Hill, Penn- sylvania. WOLFF, EDWARD— B.S., Natural Science. Phi Sigma Iota 4; Phi Sigma Tau 3, 4; Pre Medical Society 2, 3; Spanish Club 3; Class Executive Coun- cil 1; Tau Kappa Epsilon 1, 2, 3, 4, Histor, Com- missar: Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Soccer 3, 4; Golf 3; Cheerleader 1. Address: 2319 Avenue M, Brooklyn, New York. ZIEGENFUSS, CYNTHIA T.-B.S., Chemistry. Choir 1, 2, 3, 4; Science Club 3, 4, Secretary 4; Phi Sigma Tau 4, President 4; Senior Counselor 4. Address: 3963 Green Street, Harrisburg, Penn- sylvania. ZIEGER, PAUL C.-B.S., Physics. Weekly 1, 2, 3, Feature Editor 3; Track 1,2: Phi Kappa Tau 1, 2, 3, 4, Editor 3; Pi Delta Epsilon Secretary 4; Intra- mural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Mermaid Tavern Society 4, President 4. Address: 1101 East Tulpehocken Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 193 uiiiiiiiiiiiBiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniii COMPLIMENTS Heimbach Baking Corp. BAKERS OF DUTCH MADE BREAD The Freshest Thing in Town 433-6265 9th and Tilghman Streets Allentown, Pa. .’jiiiiHumiiiimiiniMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiHmiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiijiiiiiiiiiiM :illllinMIIIIMillllllllllllllllllllllBgillllllIIUII!llillHIII!IIIIIIIIIIIIIilllllllBlllllllllMIIIIilllll9inillllllllllllllilllllieilllllIIBIIgiailBllllllllllllllllllBIISIIBIIllflII8IIIIIIIII!IIIIISII8«llll||I!eilOlieilll!IISIII - i " " " " " " " " " " •»•»••• " " nil I mu, „„ 1 , 11 „„„„ l „i„„i,„„i„m„iii,iii„i,„„! 1 No other anthracite gives you more heat per ton than carbon-rich Jeddo-Highland. Because it burns slowly it gives steady, healthful heat. So save on comfort. Look for this Certification Stamp on Your Delivery Ticket JEDDO-HIGHLAND COAL COMPANY JEDDO, PENNSYLVANIA i . 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 9 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ) 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ) | , 1 1 , , 1 1 1 , ),,, 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 , 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ,, | , | , 1 1 1 n 1 1 1 1 m 1 1 m 1 1 n | , 1 1 1 | g 1 1 1 , | ,,, n 1 1 1 1 ,,, ,, , 1 1 | , M ,, M 1 1 1 , | 1 1 iiiimiiiiiimimmmimimiiiiimmiiimimiimmiimimimiumsi 3 INDEX Administration 29 Advertisements 175-194 Alpha Tau Omega 114 Arcade - 54 Art Department 75 Athletic Department 127 Baseball 146 Basketball , 136 Biology Department . . 82 Biology Museum 84 Cardinal Key Society 38 Cheerleaders - 154 Chemistry Department 86 Choir — 77 Ciarla 49 Class of 1962 91-109 Classics Department 70 Commencement — 172 Commuters’ Club . 79 Cross-Country 134 Deans 28 Dedication 22 Delta Phi Alpha 69 Delta Phi Nu 39 Der Deutsche Verein 69 Economics and Business Club 59 Economics and Business Department 59 Education Department .... 64 Education Society 65 English Department 42 Eta Sigma Phi 70 Fencing 142 Football 128 Freshman Class Executive Council ...112 Freshman Class Officers 112 Freshman Orientation Committee 33 German Department 68 Glee Club 77 Golf 153 Health Service 31 History Department 57 Homecoming 164 Honor Court 33 I.F.C. Weekend 172 Inauguration 158 Institute of Faith 74 Interfraternity Council 113 Junior Class Executive Council 110 Junior Class Officers 110 Junior Varsity Basketball 140 Lambda Chi Alpha 116 Lambda Delta Epsilon 37 Library Staff 31 M-Book 56 M-Club .....154 Mask and Dagger 45 Mask and Dagger, Fall Production .162 Mask and Dagger, Spring Production 162 Mathematics Department 88 Muhlenberg Christian Association 73 Muhlenberg Experimental Theatre 44 Muhlenberg Experimental Theatre, Fall Production 163 Muhlenberg Experimental Theatre, Spring Production 166 Muhlenberg Marching and Concert Band 78 Muhlenberg Weekly 52 Music Department 76 O.D.K. Carnival ...168 Omicron Delta Kappa _ — 36 Pi Delta Epsilon 48 Phi Alpha Theta 58 Phi Epsilon Pi .118 Phi Kappa Tau 120 Phi Sigma Iota 67 Phi Sigma Tau 71 Philosophy Department 71 Physics Department 85 Poetry Workshop — — _ 46 Pre- Medical Society 83 Pre-Theological Society — 73 President’s Message 26 Psi Chi — 63 Psychology Department 62 Publications Board — 47 Religion Department 72 Romance Languages Department 66 Science Club 87 Senior Biographies 175-194 Senior Class Executive Council 89 Senior Class Officers 89 Sigma Phi Epsilon — _ 122 Soccer 133 Sociology Club 61 Sociology Department 60 Soph-Frosh Hop 165 Sophomore Class Executive Council ...Ill Sophomore Class Officers III Sophomore-Freshman Events 160 Spring Sing and Ring 170 Student Council 32 Student Union Building 155 Tau Kappa Epsilon 124 Tennis 150 Track 148 Veterans’ Club 79 Who’s Who 90 WMUH 55 Women’s Basketball 141 Women’s Dormitory Council 34 Women ' s Hockey 135 Women ' s Tennis „ 152 Wrestling 144 195 196 It is with mixed feelings that I take possession of this last page of the Ciarla. I am beset by too much to say, rather than too little, about Muhlenberg. With deep affection, I hope this yearbook, through picture and word, will say it for me. I will always look back on this past year’s assign- ment as having brought me many valuable and rewarding experiences. Portraying the past four years within the pages of this book involved much time, hard work and even some personal sacrifice of many people. To them I am very grateful. How- ever dedicated and lofty were the goals when this yearbook first took shape, with pictures missing and copy needed, layouts a problem and time running out, I must confess that moments of edi- torial stress arose to blunt the highest intent. Deviating from the traditional, I tried to make it a contemporary work of art by form and design, by composition and color. We tried to sift out the most meaningful happenings and all that these four years have made worthwhile recording. For whatever has been put down here shall remain— never to be erased nor to be written over again— but to become cherished memories. .


Suggestions in the Muhlenberg College - Ciarla Yearbook (Allentown, PA) collection:

Muhlenberg College - Ciarla Yearbook (Allentown, PA) online yearbook collection, 1959 Edition, Page 1

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Muhlenberg College - Ciarla Yearbook (Allentown, PA) online yearbook collection, 1960 Edition, Page 1

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Muhlenberg College - Ciarla Yearbook (Allentown, PA) online yearbook collection, 1961 Edition, Page 1

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Muhlenberg College - Ciarla Yearbook (Allentown, PA) online yearbook collection, 1963 Edition, Page 1

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Muhlenberg College - Ciarla Yearbook (Allentown, PA) online yearbook collection, 1964 Edition, Page 1

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