Muhlenberg College - Ciarla Yearbook (Allentown, PA)

 - Class of 1935

Page 1 of 258

 

Muhlenberg College - Ciarla Yearbook (Allentown, PA) online yearbook collection, 1935 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 258 of the 1935 volume:

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' T • HMJfe ?{r « •» •• ' t 4W- % % K .... - X« » -v, ' •» r ‘ k» » ■««,, . i ' H» « ' ‘ " ■ » Wi - (• • • • 1 ;•» «• ' " ® ' X - H, t ' l«: ' ' ' ■’•» ■ ■ •»•• ’JViWSl !► « s " » ► , , f , - a “ ' ir 4 « XyH» V 4 ■- , V ' ' ■ ' ' ' tlfiP ' i " • »I(k»i 1 X x • 4 ' - « % ■ aik s»« • mJ ' •s .yt « .«Mr 1 ! r% i»W M • n v- ' -• . « ir • ' ' — |L ,. " .- 1 . •« •- ' ' • « %• - • ■ -• - ■ - ««• «».••»-. « - %»- ‘ v fc ■ . ft . .. 1 • ' • ' ■ . , . ' - % ✓ -».. , » . • ' ' r i « ,, • ■ ' I - :,. Wh- - ' .4 te . f-efr - v ■ v " ■ • »W ♦- - uv « ► f‘ The Ciarla 1935 UMBimrinriTir-ri as The 1935 cm wm Published by JUNIOR CLASS Muhlenberg College ALLENTOWN, PA. VOLUME 43 Dr. J. E. SWAIN DEDICATION The untiring efforts of James Edgar Swain, Ph. D., and Henry R. Mueller, Ph. D., in behalf of the Muhlenberg Co-operative Store and the College Student Loan Fund merits this dedication as a material symbol of our appreciation to two members of the faculty who have a creative interest in the activities of student life. Dr. H. R. MUELLER OREWORD If some day hence a picture or word herein contained will rekindle in you the fond memories of Muhlenberg College, then our work has not been in vain. ONTENTS I Administration II Classes III Athletics IV Organizations V Features T AFF Bernard Frank .. Francis Sheehan Hubert Bury Charles Klein Harry A. Benfer Editor-in-Chief Business Manager Advertising Manager Assistant Editor Faculty Adviser ASSOCIATES Luther Schlenker Henry Minnich William Holzer Marlin Herb Russel Krapf Robert Kerstetter Lester Wolfe Walter Harrison Herbert Gorin John Brokhoff Frederick Eagle Joseph Nagle John Kanyuck Lloyd Moyer John Gosztonyt Myron Warshaw ADMINISTRATION BOARD OF TRUSTEES Term Elected by the Ministerium of Pennsylvania: expires 1934 Rev. A. Charles R. Keiter, D.D Lebanon 1934 Dr. Robert B. Klotz Bethlehem 1934 Rev. J. Frederick Kramlich Royersford 1934 Rev. John H. Waidelich, D.D Sellersville 1934 Mr. Harry I. Koch Allentown 1934 Dr. Howard S. Seip Allentown 1935 Mr. Frank D. Bittner Allentown 1935 Mr. Oliver N. Clauss Allentown 1935 Mr. Charles F. Mosser Allentown 1935 Dr. George F. Seiberling Allentown 1935 Rev. Franklin K. Fretz, D.D Easton 1935 Mr. E. Clarence Miller Philadelphia 1936 Rev. Charles E. Kistler, D.D Reading 1936 Rev. L. Domer Ulrich, D.D Wilkes-Barre 1936 Rev. Frank M. Ulrich, D.D Philadelphia 1936 Dr. J. Conrad Seegers Philadelphia 1936 Rev. E. F. Bachman Philadelphia 1936 Mr. Ralph H. Schatz Allentown Elected by the Board of Trustees: 1934 Mr. John J. Kutz Reading 1934 Mr. Peter S. Trumbower Nazareth 1934 Mr. Russell K. Laros Bethlehem 1935 General Harry C. Trexler Allentown 1935 Mr. Reuben J. Butz Allentown 1935 Mr. George K. Mosser Allentown 1936 Mr. John E. Snyder Hershey 1936 Mr. William M. D. Miller Allentown 1936 Mr. Burton C. Simon ... Philadelphia Elected by the Alumni Association : 1934 Mr. Lawrence H. Rupp Allentown 1935 Mr. George B. Balmer Reading 1936 Dr. William A. Hausman Allentown Deceased . A WORD IN TIME. It seems necessary again and again to send out some message to the students of Muhlenberg College which shall serve as a word in time. The nature of the time and the character of the present must determine what this word shall be. The outstanding fact of the present is the effort of our country to enter into a new era on a foundation that shall be sound and strong. This effort should engage the attention and move the thought of every student. Its purpose is to do away with destructive selfishness. All of our business and our whole economic order have been deeply upset by a rugged but mistaken individualism. The new slogan is cooperation. In business, in industry, in commerce, in agriculture, and, in short, in every operation of society we need mutual understanding and mutual concession. If we fail to live outside of our- selves and to live for others, we shall not only harm them but also ourselves. The coming social order must be built on the foundation of actual brotherhood and of considerate and just love. With this ideal now before our people, which ought not to be hindered by the recalcitrant forces, it is necessary for college students to begin to cultivate the new conception in their college life before they enter into the world. We want a new group of men to go out who will confirm and help to establish the new or der in which the social conscience is paramount. As you read the pages of this book and see what the college looks like, may you remember the ideals which ought animate those who come under its beneficent influence. My hope for you, of the class of Nineteen hundred and thirty-five, and for all who have gone out from us and will go out, is that they may be champions and leaders in the new social order. John A. W. Haas. Rev. John A. W. Haas, D.D.,LL.D. President; Professor of Religion and Philosophy. Born at Philadelphia, Pa., August 31, 1862. Prepared at Parochial School, Zion’s Church and Protestant Episcopal Academy; A.B., University of Penn- sylvania, 1884; A.M. and B.D., Uni- versity of Pennsylvania, 1887 ; Mt. Airy Theological Seminary, 1887; Graduate work, University of Leipsic, 1887-88; D.D.. Thiel College, 1902; LL.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1914; LL.D. Augustana College, 1917 ; LL.D. Gettysburg College, 1922 ; Fourth President of Muhlenberg Col- lege, 1904; Phi Beta Kappa; Omicron Delta Kappa ; Member of Author’s Club, London. T ( Robert C. Horn, Ph.D., Litt.D. Dean ; Mosser-Keck Professor of Greek Language and Literature. Born at Charleston, S. C., Sep- tember 12, 1881. Prepared at Charleston High School; A.B., Muhlenberg College, 1900; A.M., Muhlenberg College, 1903; A.M., Harvard University, 1904; Ph.D., University of Pennsyl- vania, 1926 ; Litt.D., Muhlenberg Col- lege, 1922, Graduate Work, Johns Hopkins University, 1900-01, Harvard University, 1903-04, 1907-08, 1919, Columbia University, Summer of 1923, L T niversity of Pennsylvania, 1925-26 ; Professor of Greek Lan- guage and Literature 1904; Assistant of the President, 1922-30 ; Dean, 1930 ; Omicron Delta Kappa. George T. Ettinger, Ph.D., Litt.D. Dean Emeritus ; Professor of Latin Language and Literature. Born at Allentown, Pa., Novem- ber 8, 1860. Prepared at Private School and the Academic Department of Muhlenberg College; A.M., (Valedictorian), Muhl- enberg College, 1880 ; A.M., Muhlen- berg College, 1883 ; Principal of the Academic Department of Muhlenberg College, 1884-92; Ph.D., New York University, 1891 ; Professor of Latin and Pedagogy, 1892-1917 ; Dean of Muhlenberg College, 1904; Professor of Latin, 1917 ; Litt.D., Muhlenberg College, 1920 ; Dean Emeritus, 1930 ; Member of the National Institute of Sciences, the American Philological Association, and the Archaelogical In- stitute of America; Phi Beta Kappa; Phi Gamma Delta, Omicron Delta Kappa. Stephen G. Simpson, A.M. Rev. Robert R. Fritsch, D.D. Professor of English Bible and Religion. Born at Allentown, Pa., September 10, 1879. Prepared at Allentown High School, 1896 (First Honor): A.B., Muhlen- berg College 1900 (First Honor) ; A.M., Muhlenberg College, 1903; A.M., Illinois Wesleyan University, 1907 ; Ordained 1915 ; Graduate Work, University of Pennsylvania, 1910-13: Instructor of Greek, 1907-08; Instruc- tor of Modern Languages 1908-15 ; In- structor of Religion and German, 1915- 21 ; Professor of English Bible and Religion, 1921 ; D.D., Wittenberg Col- lege, 1929; Travel in Europe, Syria, Palestine and Egypt, 1927-28-30. Librarian, Professor of English. Born at Easton, Pa., May 4, 1874. Prepared at South Easton High School : A.B., Lafayette College, 1899 ; Graduate Work. Columbia University, Summers of 1903-04-05 ; Instructor of English, 1911-14; Elected Assistant Professor, 1914 ; Elected Professor ; Phi Beta Kappa. John D. M. Brown, Litt.D. Preston A. Barba, Ph.D. Florence T. Saeger, Professor of English. Born at Lebanon, Pa., December 2, 1883. Prepared at Lebanon High School; A.B., Muhlenberg College, 1906 ; Mt. Airy Theological Seminary, 1910 ; Litt.D., Wittenberg College, 1922; Graduate Work, University of Gren- oble, Summer 1914, University of Pennsylvania, 1926-28; Instructor of English, 1912: Elected Assistant Pro- fessor. 1915; Elected Professor, 1920; Tau Kappa Alpha. Professor of German. Born at Bethlehem, Pa., April 7, 1883. Prepared at Allentown High School and Bethlehem Preparatory School ; A.B., Muhlenberg College, 1906 ; A.M., Yale University, 1907 ; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1911 ; Graduate Work, Yale University, 1906-07 ; University of Pennsylvania, 1908-11; Heidelberg University, 1909; University of Munich, 1910 ; Univers- ity of Berlin, 1911-12; University of of German, 1922 ; Modern Language Goettingen, 1912 ; Elected Professor Association : Goethe Society of Amer- ica ; Deutscher Verein. H Albert C. H. Easig, M.S. Asa Packer Professor of Natural and Applied Sciences ; Professor of Geology; Secretary of Faculty. Born at Reading, Pa., September 18, 1887. Prepared at Reading High School ; B.S., Muhlenberg College, 1909; M.S., Muhlenberg College, 1910 ; Graduate Work, University of Pennsylvania, 1925-28 ; Instructor in Chemistry, 1913 ; Elected Professor, 1920 ; Pro- fessor of Geology, 1926 : Secretary of Athletic Committee ; Executive Secre- tary of Alumni Association ; Execu- tive Secretary of Alumni Fund Com- mittee. Isaac Miles Wright, Pd.D. Professor of Education ; Director School of Education. Born at Scio, N. Y., March 7, 1879. Prepared at Belmont High School ; B.S., Alfred University, 1904; Pd.M., New York Universit y, 1914; Pd.D., New York University, 1916; Elected Professor, 1917; Phi Delta Kappa; Ex-Grand President, Phi Kappa Tau; Omicron Delta Kappa ; Found in “Who’s Who;” Member Allentown Board of Education. James Edgar Swain, Ph.D. Professor of European History. Born near Indianapolis, Ind., August 20, 1897. Prepared at Rockville High School, 1917 ; A.B., Indiana University, 1921 ; A.M., Indiana University, 1922; Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania, 1926 ; In- structor of History, 1925 ; Elected Professor, 1926 ; Pi Gamma Mu ; Phi Alpha Theta. Henry R. Mueller, Ph.D. Professor of History and Political Science. Born at Marietta, Pa., July 21, 1887. Prepared at Lancaster High School ; A.B., Muhlenberg College, 1909; A.M,. Columbia University, 1915; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1922 ; Graduate Work, Columbia Univers : ty, 1914-17 ; The Sorbonne, 1919 ; Elected Professor of History, 1920 ; Phi Alpha Theta. Anthony S. Corbiere, Ph.D. Professor of Romance Langauges. Born at Nice, France, March 8, 1892. Ph.B., Muhlenberg College, 1920; A.M., University of Pennsylvania, 1923; Ph.D., Universtity of Pennsyl- vania. 1927 ; Graduate Work Colum- bia University, 1920-21 : University of Pennsylvania, 1921-25 ; Centro de Estudio Historicos, Madrid, Fall of 1925 ; The Sorbonne, Summer 1926 ; Phi Kappa Sigma ; Sigma Delta Chi ; Associated University Players ; Presi- dent of Lambda Chapter, Phi Sigma Iota ; Mentioned in “Who’s Who in American Education;” National His- torian and National Editor of Journal of Phi Sigma Iota; Member of Torch Club. Harry Hess Reichard, Ph.D. Professor of German. Born at Lower Saucon, Pa., August 27, 1878. Prepared at Oley Academy, Read- ing, Pa.; A.B., Lafayette College, 1901; A.M., Lafayette College, 1906; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1911; Graduate Work, University of Marburg, 1903 ; Johns Hopkins Uni- versity, 1908-11 ; Elected Professor of German, 1925; Tau Kappa Alpha; Deutscher Verein. Rev. Charles B. Bowman, A.M., B.D Luther J. Deck, A.M. Professor of Economics and So- ciology. Born at Parryville, Pa., October 9, 1873. Professor of Mathematics. Born at Hamburg, Pa., February 7, 1899. Prepared at Lehighton High Shcool ; A. B., Northwestern College, 1896; B. D., Drew University, 1900 ; A.M., Northwestern College, 1903; Grad- uate Work, University of Wisconsin, Summer 1910 ; University of Chicago, Summers 1912 and 1914: University of Pittsburgh, Summer 1922 ; Elected Professor of Economics and Sociology, 1922; Pi Gamma Mu. Prepared at Hamburg High School ; , A.B., Muhlenberg Col’ege, 1920; A.M., University of Pennsylvania, 1925 ; Graduate Work, University of Pennsylvania, Summers of 1921-23- | 24 ; Instructor of Mathematics and Physics, 1921 ; Elected Professor of Mathematics, 1926. Carl Wright Boyer, Ph.D. Professor of Education. Born at Mt. Carmel, Pa., November 26, 1897. George H. Brandes, Ph.D. Prepared at Keystone State Nor- mal School ; A. B. Muhlenberg Col- lege, 1923: A. M., New York Uni- versity, 1924; Ph. D., New York University, 1930; Kappa Phi Kappa; Phi Delta Kappa. Ira F. Zartman, Ph.D. John V. Shankweiler, Ph.D. Professor of Chemistry. Born at Oswego, N. Y., April 10, 1895. Prepared at Oswego High School ; B.Chem., Cornell University, 1918; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1925; Pro- fessor of Chemistry, 1926; Sigma Xi; Phi Kappa Phi ; Alpha Chi Sigma ; Sigma Gamma Epsilon. Professor of Physics. Born at Lancaster, Pa., December 18, 1899. — Prepared at Lititz High School ; B.S., Muhlenberg Col ' ege, 1923; M.S., New York University, 1925 ; Ph.D., University of California, 1930; Sigma Xi ; American Physical Society ; Amer- ican Association of Physics Teachers. Professor of Biology. Born at Huff’s Church, Pa., July 22, 1894. Prepared at Longswamp High School and Keystone Normal School; B.S., Muhlenberg College, 1921; A.M., Cornell University, 1927 ; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1931 ; Instructor of Biology, 1921 ; Elected Professor, 1928 ; Sigma Xi. Rev. H. P. C. Cressman, A.M. 11 : , , ■ ; i ■ ! 1 Chaplain, Instructor in Sociology. Born at Weatherly, Pa., October 28, 1889. Prepared at White Haven High School and Al ' entown Preparatory School; A.B., Muhlenberg, 1913; Mt. Airy Theological Seminary, 1916; A. M., University of Pennsylvania, 1926; Graduate Work, Columbia Univer- sity, 1920; University of Pennsyl- vania, 1920-21, 1923-1926; Instructor in History, 1919-20; Instructor in So- ciology, 1920-21, 1933- ; Instructor in Religion, 1921-1928 ; Student Pas- tor, 1926 ; Alpha Kappa Alpha ; Pi Gamma Mu. Joseph S. Jackson, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of History. Born at Liverpool, England, Sept- ember 22, 1899. Prepared at Davenport High School ; A.B., Iowa University, 1923; A.M., Iowa University, 1924; Ph.D., Uni- versity of Pennsylvania, 1932; In- structor of History, 1926 ; Assistant Professor of History, 1928. Harold K. Marks, A.B., Mus. D. John C. Keller, Ph.D. Professor of Music. Born at Emaus, Pa., May .12, 1886. Prepared at Allentown High School ; A.B., Muhlenberg College, 1907 ; Mus. D., Muhlenberg College, 1930; In- structor in Music, 1913; Elected Pro- fessor of Music, 1920. Assistant Professor of Chemistry. Born at Sydney, N. Y., Mav 7, 1898. Prepared at Johnson City High School, N. Y. ; B. S., Colgate Univer- sity, 1921 ; Ph. D., Cornell University, 1926; Graduate Work, Cornell Uni- versity; Professor of Chemistry, 1927 ; Alpha Chi Sigma; Sigma Xi. I Harold E. Miller, M.S. Assistant Professor of Biology. Born at Union County, Pa., Nov- ember 18, 1895. Prepared at Lewisburg High School ; B.S., in Biology, Bucknell University, 1920; M.S., in Biology, Bucknell Uni- versity, 1921 ; Graduate Work, Uni- versity of Chicago, Summers 1924-27, 1929; Assistant Professor, 1929; Chi Beta Phi. Truman Koehler, A.M. Walter L. Seaman, A.M. Russell W. Stine, A.M., B.D. Assistant Professor of Religion and Philosophy. Born at Leba- non, Pa., October 28, 1899. Prepared at Allentown High School ; A. B., Muhlenberg College, 1922; A. M., University of Pennsylvania, 1924; B. D., Mt. Airy Seminary, 1927 ; Grad- uate Work, University of Pennsyl- vania, 1924-1928 ; Instructor in Reli- gion and Philosophy, 1927 ; Elected Professor, 1931 ; Alpha Kappa Alpha ; Torch Club. Assistant Professor of Mathe- matics. Born at Bethlehem, Pa., August 3, 1903. Prepared at Bethlehem High School ; B.S., Muhlenberg College, 1924; A. M., University of Pennsylvania, 1930 ; Graduate Work, University of Penn- sylvania, 1927-33; Instructor in Mathematics, 1927 ; Assistant Profes- sor, 1931. Assistant Professor of Romance Languages. Born at Erie, Pa., April 21, 1876. Prepared at Cleveland High School ; B.L., Western Reserve University, 1897 ; A.M., Columbia University, 1926; Graduate Work, Alicante, Spain, 1925; Columbia University, 1925-26, Summers 1929-31-33 ; Instructor in Romance Languages, .1926 ; Phi Sigma Iota. Roland F. Hartman, A.M. Instructor in Business Adminis- tration. Born at Allentown, Pa., April 7, 1906. Prepared at Allentown High School ; B.S., in Business Administration, Le- high University, 1928; Ph.B., Muh- lenberg College, 1931 ; M.A., Lehigh University, 1933 ; Graduate Work, Columbia University, 1933; Instruc- tor in Business Administration, 1931; Kappa Phi Kappa. Ephraim B. Everitt, A.M. 1 i 1 " ! 1 . ' Instructor in English. Born at St. Mary’s. Md., December 19, 1902. A.B., Penn State College, 1925; A. M., Penn State College, 1928; Gradu- ate Work, University of Pennsylva- nia, 1928-1933 ; Instructor of Eng- lish, 1928. Instructor in English. Born at Cumberland, Md., May 13, 1900. Prepared at Oxford High School and West Chester State Normal School; B.S., Haverford College, 1922; A.M., Haverford College, 1928; Graduate Work, LMiversity of Penn- sylvania, 1928-32; Instructor of Eng- lish, 1927. Lawrence J. Reimert, B.S. Instructor in Physics and Mathe- matics. Born at New Tripoli, Pa. Prepared at Slatington High; B.S., Muhlenberg College, 1932 ; Graduate Work, University of Chicago, Sum- mers 1932-33 ; Alpha Kappa Alpha. Harry A. Benfer, A.M. Registrar. Born at Lock Haven, Pa., October 24, 1895. Prepared at York High School ; A. B., Albright College, 1915 ; A.M., Al- bright College, 1916 ; Coach of Ath- letics, 1925-29; Treasurer of Athletic Committee; Faculty Adviser of Ciar- la ; Registrar, 1930. William S. Ritter, B.S. Oscar F. Bernheim, A.B. John Utz, A.B. Coach. Born at Wilkes-Barre, Pa., September 19, 1908. Prepared at Wilkes-Barre Cough- lin ; A.B., University of Pennsylvania ; Graduate course in Education ; Temple Law School, two years. Physical Director. Born at Allen- town, Pa., May 17, 1892. — Prepared at Allentown High School and Allentown Preparatory School ; B.S., Muhlenberg College, 1916; Coach of Athletics, 1919-21 ; Physical Director, 1919. Secretary, Treasurer. Born at Mt. Pleasant, N. C., November 16, 1868. Prepared at Academic Department of Muhlenberg College; A.B., Muh- lenberg College. 1892; Elected Treas- urer and Registrar, 1907 ; Elected Secretary, 1919. 3n iftemnrumt REV. JOHN A. BAUMAN, Ph.D., D.D.— Professor GEN. HARRY C. TREXLER, LL.D.— Trustee MR. CHARLES F. MOSSER— Trustee MRS. GEORGE K. MOSSER— President Muhlenberg Auxiliary God of the living, in Whose eyes Unveiled Thy whole creation lies. All souls are Thine; zee must not say That those are dead zoho pass away, From this our zvorld of flesh set free; We know them living unto Thee. — Ellerton CLASSES s E N I S O In a few months our class of ’34 will pass another milestone on the road of life, — graduation. Just beyond that point all of us must leave the highway which we have trodden with the carefree crowd of our contemporaries to pass into the jungle of life and cut our own trail. We have long looked forward with eager anticipation to this occa- sion. From the time we entered college, Commencement has loomed before us as a beacon, a goal of effort, an inspiration to scholarship. For it is a prelude to new dignities, new responsibilities, and the classes which have preceded us have established high standards which we have endeavored to emulate. It has been a happy season of growth to us this period of our college days, wherein we have learned the lessons of social adaptation and perchance, have by constant contact with friendly criticism developed our better natures. There will always be a pleasant memory and a warm spot in our hearts for the people with whom we have played, studied, worked, and associated in our Col- lege days. It is sad to part, to break the ties which we have formed, and to face t he time when we shall not see our friends daily as we have been accustomed to. How- ever, I am sure that every member of our class, when he looks back on his Muhlen- berg College days, will see passing in review the faces of those with whom he asso- ciated ; and in leaving the hallowed walls of dear old Muhlenberg we bid faculty, students and friends the poet’s farewell. “Adieu! such is the word for us ’Tis more than word, ’tis prayer They do not part who do part thus. For God is everywhere.” — Gordon S. Feller SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS First Semester President William H. MacMillan Vice-President Frederick K. Krauss Secretary Samuel F. Stauffer Treasurer Lester T. Smith President Vice-President Secretary Treasurer Second Semester Gordon S. Feller Herman F. Krooss Frederick K. Krauss Lester T. Smith Class Colors Black and Gold Class Flower Black-Eyed Susan mmmmm he Senior Statistics JAMES A. ANCSTADT Allentown, Pa. A.B.; M.C.A. Cabinet (2,3), V.- Pres. (4) ; Lutheran Students’ Assoc. (1,2); Chapel Choir (3, 4) ; Band (3, 4); German Club (3,4). RUSSELL S. BEAZLEY Lancaster, Pa. A.B.; Eta Sigma Phi (3, 4) ; Alpha Kappa Alpha (3, 4) ; Chapel Choir (2, 3,4). HAYDEN F. BECEL Lehighton, Pa. Ph.B. ; Band (1,2, 3, 4): M.B.A. (4). JOHN H. BENNETCH Lebanon, Pa. A. B. ; Weekly Staff (1, 2, 3), Senior Assoc. Editor (4) ; Class Honors (1, 2, 3). FRANK J. BIANCA A0 Patchogue, N. Y. Ph.B. : Interfraternity Council (3, 4) ; Football (3) ; Junior Prom Com- mittee (3) ; Class Monitor (3) ; Ciarla Staff (3); Intra-murals (1,2,3). ANGELO P. BIANCO 0KN Hazleton, Pa. Ph.B. ; Mask and Dagger, Pres. (4) ; Manager, Freshman Football. JOHN D. CARAPELLA Allentown, Pa. Ph.B.; Phi Sigma Iota, Sec.; Phi Alpha Theta, V.-Pres. ; Kappa Phi Kappa ; Alpha Kappa Alpha ; I.O.U. Representative; Ciarla Staff (3); Class Sec. (3). CHARLES W. CARTER 0KN Langhorne, Pa. Ph.B. ; Football (1, 2, 3, 4) ; Basket- ball (1) ; Varsity “M” Club, Sec. (4). CARL C. CLAYTON 0KN Park Ridge, N. J. B. S. ; Pre-Medical Society ; Mask and Dagger. ROBERT H. DILCHER 0TQ Allentown, Pa. B.S. ; Interfraternity Council, Pres. ; Pre-Medical Society ; Science Club. DAVID C. DRIES Strausstown, Pa. A. B. ; M.C.A. Cabinet ; Lutheran Students’ Assoc. HAROLD E. EVERETT Catasauqua, Pa. B. S. ; Science Club ; Mask and Dag- ger (1,2,3); Pre-Medical Society; Basketball (1). EDWIN M. FAUST Fullerton, Pa. A. B. ; German Club (2,3,4); Eta Sigma Phi (3,4); Phi Sigma Iota (4); Kappa Phi Kappa (4). EDWIN A. FEINOUR Allentown, Pa. B. S. ; Class V.-Pres. (1); Basket- ball (1,2); Kappa Phi Kappa (4) ; Intra-murals (1,2,3). CORDON STANLEY FELLER Danielsville, Pa. A. B.; Student Council (4); Class Pres. (3) ; junior Oratorical Contest Winner; I.O.U. Alternate (3); Eta Sigma Phi (3, 4) ; Class Honors (3) ; Alpha Kappa Alpha, V.-Pres. (3, 4) ; German Club, Pres. (3,4) ; Mask and Dagger (1, 2, 3), Sec. (4) ; Assoc. M. C.A. Cabinet (1,2). WILLIAM J. FETHEROLF, JR. $KT Steinsville, Pa. B. S. ; Football (1). HERBERT C. FOSTER ATQ Philadelphia, Pa. B.S. ; Business Mgr. Weekly (4) ; Business Mgr. Ciarla (3) ; Varsity Baseball Mgr. (3); Pre-Medical So- ciety (2, 3). WILBUR A. FOSTER, JR. Mountain Top, Pa. B.S. JOHN B. FREEMAN Catasauqua, Pa. A. B. ; German Club ; Eta Sigma Phi ; Phi Alpha Theta. HOMER L. CEHRINCER Emaus, Pa. B. S. ; Pre-Medical Society; Science Club. RICHARD F. CRAMLEY ATQ Binghamton, N. Y. Ph.B. ; Football (1, 2, 3, 4) ; Varsity “M” Club (2,3,4). WALBERT S. CRASLEY 0KN Allentown, Pa. B.S. ; German Club (3,4); Kappa Phi Kappa (3,4); Ciarla Staff (3); Intra-murals (1,2,3). HORACE N. HEIST A0 Vera Cruz, Pa. Ph.B.; Baseball (2,3,4,); Varsity “M” Club ; Intra-murals. RAY C. HELD, JR. 0TQ Allentown, Pa. A.B. ; Mask and Dagger; Ciarla Staff (3) ; Intra-murals. JOHN S. HEMMERLY Allentown, Pa. Ph.B.; Mask and Dagger, Pres. (1, 2, 3,4). JOHN WILLIAM HOLLENBACH 1 KT Allentown, Pa. A.B.; Omicron Delta Kappa, Pres.; Kappa Phi Kappa ; Debate Squad ; Head Cheerleader; Class Honors (1, 2,3); German Club (2,3,4); Mask and Dagger (2,3,4); Chapel Choir (1, 2, 3) ; Junior Oratorical Contest. ARTHUR H. HOTTEL Allentown, Pa. A. B. ; Eta Sigma Phi (3), Pres. (4); German Club (2,3,4). WILLIAM T. HUGHES Easton, Pa. B. S. ; Freshman Dance Committee; Chapel Choir (3, 4) . GERALD JOHN JACOBY Pottsville, Pa. A. B. ; Lutheran Students’ Assoc.; Eta Sigma Phi ; Alpha Kappa Alpha ; Ministerial Club. RALPH C. KEEPORT 0TQ Reading, Pa. B. S. ; Alpha Kappa Alpha; M.B.A. ; Debate Squad; Science Club (4). ROBERT R. KING 0KN Summit Hill, Pa. B.S. ; Chapel Choir ; Pre-Medical Society. RUSSELL H. KISTLER Philos Lenhartsville, Pa. A.B. ; Basketball (1) ; Track (1, 2) ; German Club (1,2,3); Vigilance Committee (2) ; Band, Drum Major (1.2.3) . WINFIELD A. J. KISTLER Slatington, Pa. Ph.B.; Kappa Phi Kappa, Sec.; Band (1,2, ,3, 4). WOODROW W. KISTLER 0TQ Allentown, Pa. A.B. ; Track (1,2,3); Class V.- Pres. (3) ; Ciarla Staff (3) ; Mask and Dagger. ALBERT T. KLOTZ ATQ Forty Fort, Pa. Ph.B.; Football (2,3,4); Baseball (2.3.4) ; Kappa Phi Kappa; Varsity “M” Club. Treas. (3), V.-Pres. (4); Chapel Choir (1). FREDERICK K. KRAUSS Red Hill, Pa. Ph.B. ; Football (1,2,3); Intra- murals ; M.B.A. ; Student Council ; Class V.-Pres. (4). HERMAN E. KROOSS 0TQ Kew Cardens, L. I., N. Y. Ph.B.; Class Honors (1,2,3); Editor-in-Chief of the Weekly; Phi Alpha Theta, Pres. (4) ; Alpha Kappa Alpha, Sec.; rnterfraternity Council: Student Council; Ciarla Staff (3). W. CERHARDT LEAMAN DKT Bethlehem, Pa. B.S. : Science Club ; John Marshall Club; M.B.A. ; Track; Junior Ora- torical Contest ; Chairman of the Dyad. GAETANO LUPOLI Philadelphia, Pa. A.B. ; Lutheran Students’ Assoc. WILLIAM H. MacMILLAN DKT Philadelphia, Pa. A.B. ; Chapel Choir (2,3), Student Mgr. (4); M.C.A. Cabinet (1,2,3), Pres. (4) ; Class Pres. (4) ; Ciarla Staff (3) ; Lutheran Students’ Assoc. V.-Pres. (3); Freshman Tribunal; Band (3). PAUL L. MARZOLF Shiremanstown, Pa. Ph.B.; Phi Alpha Theta; Alpha Kappa Alpha ; Kappa Phi Kappa ; Student Body Pres. ; Senior Assoc. Editor of the Weekly; Ciarla Staff (3). ROBERT E. MENTZER MT Reading, Pa. Ph.B.; Omicron Delta Kappa; Phi Alpha Theta, Sec. ; Senior Assoc. Bus. Mgr. of Weekly ; Interfraternity Council (3,4); Editor, 1934 Ciarla; Freshman Tribunal (2) : M.B.A., V.- Pres. (3), Pres. (4). JOHN T. METZGAR ATQ Easton, Pa. Ph.B.; M.B.A., V.-Pres.; Track; Chapel Choir ; Interfraternity Council ; Basketball, Asst. Mgr. HAROLD F. MILLER 0KN Palmerton, Pa. B.S. ; Basketball (1); Tennis. HOWARD R. MILLER Philos New Ringgold, Pa. Ph.B.; Varsity “M” Club; Kappa Phi Kappa; Student Body Treas. ; Student Council ; M.B.A. ; Football Mgr. (3). KENNETH D. MOYER Philos Orefield, Pa. Ph.B. RUSSELL D. NEHF 0KN Allentown, Pa. Ph.B.; Varsity “M” Club; Football (2.3.4) ; M.B.A. (2,3,4). FRED D. OBERLANDER Syracuse, N. Y. A. B. ; Class Sec. (3); Phi Sigma Iota, Treas. ; Student Body V.-Pres. POMPEI L. ORLANDO 0KN Bethlehem, Pa. Ph.B. ; Kappa Phi Kappa. MALCOLM M. PARKER 0TQ Freehold, N. J. B. S. ; M.C.A. Cabinet; Editor Freshman Handbook (3,4); Chapel Choir (4) ; Intra-murals. CLARENCE I. PUTT Allentown, Pa. A.B. ; Band (1,2, 3, 4). CONRAD W. RAKER ATQ Allentown, Pa. A.B. ; Class Sec. (1) ; Chapel Choir (3.4) ; German Club; Debate Mgr. (4); Student Body Sec.; Omicron Delta Kappa; M.C.A. Cabinet (3,4). DAVID S. RAUB Allentown, Pa. B.S. ; Pre- Medical Society. LEON ROSENBERG $EIT New York, N. Y. Ph.B. ; Football (1, 2, 3, 4) ; Basket- ball (1,2,3); Interfraternity Council (3) ; Student Council 14) ; Chairman, Junior Prom. LAWRENCE B. RUPP ATQ Allentown, Pa. Ph.B.; Basketball, Scrub Mgr.; Golf (2 ) ; Field Book, Bus. Mgr. (21 ; John Marshall Club. CHARLES F. SCHAFFER Allentown, Pa. B.S. ; Chapel Choir (1,2, 3, 4); Pre-Medical Society (2.3,4). A. MARK SCHAPPEL Allentown, Pa. A. B. WINFIELD L. SCHWARTZ Schuylkill Haven, Pa. B. S. ; Assoc. M.C.A. Cabinet (1) ; Science Club (1,2,3), Pres. (4); Chemistry Laboratory Assistant. WALTER L. SCHWENK, JR. Allentown, Pa. B.S. JULES B. SELDEN Philadelphia, Pa. Ph.B.; Football (1,2); Student Council (3) ; Student Body Dance Committee (3) ; Intra-murals (1, 2, 3). MONROE E. SHACK Newark, N. J. B.S. ; Basketball (1,2); Pre-Medi- cal Society (2,3,4); Intra-murals (1,3). KENNETH B. SHIFFERT Allentown, Pa. B.S. ; Class Honors (1,2,3). ALFRED L. SHOEMAKER Schnecksville, Pa. A.B. ROY E. SHUPP Philos Brodheadsville, Pa. A.B.; Interfraternity Council (3, 4) ; Band (1, 2, 3, 4) ; Intra-murals (2, 3). ROY F. SIEGEL 0TQ Saylorsburg, Pa. A. B. ; Kappa Phi Kappa, Pres. ; Eta Sigma Phi ; Alpha Kappa Alpha, Treas. ; John Marshall Club. MORTON I. SILVERMAN $EH Allentown, Pa. B. S. ; Omicron Delta Kappa ; Alpha Kappa Alpha ; Pre-Medical Society ; Debate Squad, Capt. ; Ciarla Staff (3) ; Senior Assoc. Editor of the Weekly. ARTHUR SIMENSKY [ En Brooklyn, N. Y. Ph.B.; Class Sec. (2); Baseball (2); Interfraternity Council; John Marshall Club; Intra-murals. HAROLD SIMENSKY Brooklyn, N. Y. B.S. JOHN F. SMITH 0KN Stockertown, Pa. A.B. ; Football (1,2, 3,4); Track (2): Kappa Phi Kappa (3), Treas. (4) ; M.C.A. Cabinet (2, 3), Sec. (4) ; John Marshall Club (3,4); Intra- murals (2,3,4); Varsity “M” Club. LESTER T. SMITH ATQ Easton, Pa. A. B. ; Football Mgr.; Class Treas. ( 1 , 2, 3, 4) ; M.B.A. ; John Marshall Club ; Interfraternity Council. HERMAN P. SNYDER Coplay, Pa. B. S. WILSON C. SNYDER Coplay, Pa. B.S. nm aiMTnwi — ii — rriw BM aaBBWpg aWCT BB— i ARWEN T. SPANGLER, JR. Fullerton, Pa. B.S. ; Kappa Phi Kappa; Band (1, 2,3,4). BYRON R. STAUFFER Ringtown, Pa. A.B. ; Eta Sigma Phi (3), Sec. (4) ; Lutheran Stude nts’ Assoc. ; German Club (3, 4) ; Ministerial Club (2, 3, 4). SAMUEL F. STAUFFER Ringtown, Pa. A.B.; Alpha Kappa Alpha; Class Sec. (4) ; German Club (3, 4) ; Luth- eran Students’ Assoc. (1, 2, 3, 4) ; Ministerial Club; Freshman Tribunal. EDGAR D. STECKEL 0KN Cementon, Pa. Ph.B. ; Kappa Phi Kappa, V.-Pres. ; Vars’ty “M” Club; Baseba’l (2,3); Basketball ; Interfraternity Council. LLOYD H. STERNER A0 Allentown, Pa. Ph.B. ; Football (1, 2, 3, 4) ; Basket- ball (1,3.4); Baseball (2,3,4); Varsity “M” Club. HARRISON D. STRAUB ATQ Ridley Park, Pa. A. B. ; Class Pres. ( 2 , 3) ; Track Mgr. (3) ; Ciarla Staff (3) ; Omicron Delta Kappa, Sec. ; Kappa Phi Kappa. HARRY B. UNDERWOOD $KT Bangor, Pa. B. S. ; Pre-Medical Society (2, 3, 4) ; Science Club (2,3,4); Assoc. Cheer- leader (4) ; Class V.-Pres. (2) ; Inter- fraternitv Council (4) ; Ciarla Staff (3); M.C.A. Cabinet (3,4). RAY F. WAHL 0KN Northampton, Pa. Ph.B.; Band Leader; Kappa Phi Kappa; M.B.A. WILLIAM C. WALLITSCH Allentown, Pa. Ph.B. ; Mask and Dagger. D. L. WARMOUTH Port Jervis, N. Y. A. B. FREDERICK F. J. WAVREK Catasauqua, Pa. B. S. ; Football; Track; Cardinal Club; Mask and Dagger ; Varsity “M” Club ; German Club ; Student Council. WALLACE H. WEBSTER, JR. ATQ Allentown, Pa. Ph.B.; Assoc. Cheerleader; John Marshall Club (3,4). ALBERT WEINER $EII Irvington, N. J. Ph.B. ; Football (1, 2, 3, 4) ; Basket- ball (1,2,3, 4); Track (1,2); Base- ball (1,2, 3,4); Varsity “M” Club, V.-Pres. (2), Pres. (3), Treas. (4) ; Omicron Delta Kappa (3), Pres. (4) ; Class Pres. (2). LUTHER WENNER Allentown, Pa. Ph.B.; Ciarla Staff (3) ; Mask and Dagger (3), Sec. (4) ; German Club. ARMON M. WILLIAMS $KT Bangor, Pa. A.B. ; Student Council ; Basketball Mgr.; Ciarla Staff (3); Class Pres. (2); John Marshall Club (3); Alpha Kappa Alpha ; A. A. Board of Con- trol. ASA H. WOHLSEN $KT Stroudsburg, Pa. A.B. ; Chapel Choir ; Inter fraternity Council ; Assistant Baseball Mgr. ; Mask and Dagger; Weekly Staff; Alpha Kappa Alpha. GEORGE 0. ZANGER Allentown, Pa. A.B. ; German Club (2,3,4). O M 2 c The opportunity to lead comes to almost every individual sometime in the span of his career. This same opportunity in leadership comes as often to a group of individuals as to a nation. As our third collegiate year draws to a close, we. as the coming Senior class, must face and assume the leadership of our college. For three years we have been building towards this goal — in studies, athletics, and along social lines. And in entering into this last year of college work we have no alternative. We must set the example for the entire student body in every phase of our collegiate work. We will be looked up to: we will be Seniors. We must be all that the word implies. But we must realize this fact. Within another year we will be graduated. We will then have the task of applying that leadership we learned in college in earning our daily bread. Never in the history of the world has it ever needed leaders as badly as it does now. The college has untold opportunities for us to learn and our ultimate success is dependent on how we have applied and will continue to apply ourselves. We must not fail ourselves or our college. ■R. E. Mattson President Vice-President. Secretary T reasurer „ President Vice-President. Secretary T reasurer First Semester Joseph J. Zamites Edward B. Latta Sidney H. Koorse John C. Gosztonyi Second Semester Rudolf E. Mattson Rudolf Koster Ray R. Brennen John C. Gosztonyi Class Colors Orange and Black Class Flower Marigold a l ft e e e FRED S. BLANK Telford, Pa. A.B. Baseball (2) ; German Club (2, 3) ; Eta Sigma Phi (3) ; Freshman Trib- unal (3); Intra-murals (2); Varsity “M” Club. WILLIAM BLOOM Lavallette, N. J. B.S. Football (1,2,3); Baseball (2); Basketball (1). a £ A- c L ft C teen RAY R. BRENNEN $KT Allentown, Pa. A.B. Varsity Debating (2,3); Forensic Council (3) ; Pre-legal Club (2), President (3) ; Band (1, 2, 3) ; Assist- ant Director, Band (3) ; Band Man- ager (2, 3) ; M.B.A. (3) ; Tau Kappa Alpha (3). JOHN R. BROKHOFF ©rQ Pottsville, Pa. A.B. Tau Kappa Alpha (3); Eta Sigma Phi (2,3); Manager. Freshman De- bating (2); Freshman Debating (1); Varsity Debating (2, 3 ) ; Senior M.C ' . A. Cabinet (3); Forensic Council: Lutheran Students’ Assoc. (1,2,3); Deutscher Verein (2,3); Ministerial Club; Band (1,2,3). a l u e a WEBSTER E. BROWN Green Lane, Pa. Ph.B. CHARLES P. CRESSMAN Allentown, Pa. A.B. M.C.A. (1,2,3); Mask and Dag- ger (2,3); Deutscher Verein (2,3); Lutheran Students’ Assoc. (1,2,3) ; Football (1, 2, 3) ; Eta Sigma Phi (3). ct l ft e JOHN DEITRICH Reading, Pa. B.S. Varsity “M” Club (3) ; Science Cub (2,3 ); Secretary, Science Club (3) : Football (2, 3) ; Baseball (2, 3) ; Basketball (1) ; Intra-murals (1,2,3). Pre-Medical Society. FREDERICK EAGLE Catasauqua, Pa. Ph.B. Associate Business Manager, Ciarla (3) ; Deutscher Verein (3). MYRON E. EICHNER $KT Philadelphia, Pa. A.B. Football (1,3); Chapel Choir (2, 3) ; M.C.A. (3) ; Ministerial Club (1, 2, 3) ; Lutheran Students’ Assoc. (1, 2,3); Intra-murals (2,3). a 6- i l n e o e e u JAMES FENSTERMACHER Bowers, Pa. B.S. Deutscher Verein (2,3). LESTER E. FETTER Telford, Pa. A.B. Eta Sigma Phi (2, 3) ; Deutscher Verein (2,3); Ministerial Club (1,2, 3); Lutheran Students’ Assoc. (1,2, 3); Dramatics (2,3); Track (2,3); Baseball (2) ; Class Honors (2). a l u e a BERNARD FRANK Allentown, Pa. Ph.B. Editor-in-Chief, 1935 Ciarla ; Fresh- man Debating (1 ) ; Varsity Debating (2, 3) ; Forensic Council (2, 3) ; Pre- legal Club (2, 3) ; Secretary-Treas- urer, Pre-legal Club (2) ; I. D. U. Contest, First Place (3) ; Muhlenberg Play Writing Contest, Second Place ( 1 ). J. WILLIAM FRITSCH Allentown, Pa. A.B. Eta Sigma Phi (2, 3) ; Deutscher Verein (2,3). MAURICE S. GEARHART Allentown, Pa. A.B. Band (1,2,3); Mask and Dagger (2,3); Pre-legal Club (2,3). RICHARD CILIBERTY Philos Hempstead, N. Y. B.S. Band (2,3). N. HERBERT GORIN $En Philadelphia, Pa. B.S. Band (1,2,3); Ciarla Staff (3); Pre-Medical Society (2, 3) ; Intra- murals (2,3). JOHN C. GOSZTONYI $KT Bethlehem, Pa. A.B. Class President (2) ; Class Treas- urer (3, 4) ; Inter fraternity Council Treasurer (3) ; Mask and Dagger (2, 3) ; Treasurer, Mask and Dagger (3) ; Forensic Council (3) ; Freshman Dramatics: Weekly Staff (3); Ciarla Staff (3). a in e O’ HENRY BOWERS CROVE Baldwin, N. Y. A.B. Mask and Dagger (2, 3) ; Lutheran Students ' Assoc. (1,2,3). WALTER R. HARRISON Philadelphia, Pa. A.B. Lutheran Students’ Assoc. (1, 2, 3) ; Chapel Choir (2, 3) ; Ciarla Staff (3) ; Ministerial Club (1,2,3); Eta Sigma Phi (3). WILBUR L. HEMSTREET ATQ Allentown, Pa. Ph.B. Debate Manager (3) ; Track Man- ager (2) ; Assistant Business Manager, Ciarla (3) ; Chapel Choir (2, 3) ; Mask and Dagger (2, 3) ; Inter fra- ternity Council (3) ; Forensic Council (3) ; President, Forensic Council (3). £ a l tt e MARLIN L. HERB Hegins, Pa. A.B. Deutscher Verein (2, 3) ; Ciarla Staff (3); Weekly Staff (2,3); Eta Sigma Phi (3) ; Pre-legal Club (2, 3) ; Band (1,2,3); Baseball Assistant Manager (2). CHARLES T. HERMAN Elizabethville, Pa. A.B. Lutheran Students’ Assoc. (1, 2, 3) ; Ushers’ Assoc. (1,2,3); Commons’ Staff (1,2,3). e u WILLIAM C. HOLZER Allentown, Pa. A.B. Class Vice-president (2) ; Pre-legal Club (2,3); Eta Sigma Phi (3); Class Honors (1, 2) ; Ciarla Staff (3). JERRY HOROWITZ $En Brooklyn, N. Y. A.B. Pre-legal Club (2,3); Intra-murals (2,3). — WWW JU WWfJJ ■BHHH a o l u e i JOHN KANYUCK 0TQ Nanticoke, Pa. A.B. Weekly Staff (1, 2, 3) ; Football (1, 2,3); Ciarla Staff (3); Intra-murals (1.2.3) ; Lutheran Students’ Assoc. (1.2.3) . Football (1,2,3); Basketball (2,3). e e u ROBERT D. KERSTETTER Hamburg, Pa. A.B. Lutheran Students’ Assoc. (1, 2, 3) ; Ministerial Club (1,2,3); Freshman Debating; Varsity Debating (2,3) ; Band (2) ; Assistant Director, Band (3) ; Choir (2) ; Mask and Dagger (2) ; Weekly Staff (2); Ciarla Staff (3) ; Deutscher Verein (2,3); Asso- ciate Cheer Leader (3); Forensic Council (3) ; Student Librarian (3) ; Pre-legal Club (2,3). SAMUEL KIDD $KT Souderton, Pa. A.B. Football (1,3) ; M.C.A. Cabinet (2, 3); Lutheran Students’ Assoc. (1,2, 3) ; Basketball (1). a C CHARLES A. KLEIN Bethlehem, Pa. Ph.B. Kappa Phi Kappa (3) ; Dentscher Yerein (2. 3) ; Assistant Editor of 1935 Ciarla ; Class Honors (2) ; Class Secretary (2). SIDNEY H. KOORSE $En Newark, N. J. Ph.B. Class Secretary (3) ; Intra-murals (2, 3) ; Pre-legaf Club (3). e c n RUDOLPH ROSTER Huntington. N. Y. B.S. Mask and Dagger (2,3); Social Science Club Secretary (1,2,3); As- sistant in Biology Laboratory (2,3); Science Club (3) ; Weekly Staff (1, 2) ; Pre-Medical Society (3). RUSSEL L. KRAPF Pittston, Pa. A.B. Tau Kappa Alpha (2, 3) ; President, Tau Kappa Alpha (3) ; Eta Sigma Phi (3) ; Assistant Baseball Manager (2) ; Weekly Staff (1,2,3); Ciarla Staff (3) ; Lutheran Students’ Asso- ciation (1,2,3); President, L.S.A. (3) ; Social Science Club, President (1,2,3); Debating (1,2,3); Mask and Dagger (2,3); Vice-president, Mask and Dagger (3) ; Forensic Council Treasurer (3) ; M.C.A. Cab- inet (3); Press Bureau (2,3); Deut- scher Verein (2, 3) ; Freshman Trib- unal (2); Intra-murals (1,2). a t Ids c a JOHN S. KUNTZ 0KN Allentown, Pa. B.S. Interfraternity Council (3) ; Pre- Medical Society (2,3). RICHARD P. KUNTZLEMAN Tower City, Pa. B.S. Class Vice-president (1) ; Band (1, 2, 3 ) ; Freshman Tribunal (3) ; Intra- murals (2, 3) ; Deutscher Verein (3) ; Science Club (3) ; Commons’ Staff (2,3). teen. JOSEPH ALLEN LACOE 0KN Clark’s Summit, Pa. A.B. Chapel Choir (1); M.C.A. Cabinet (1) ; Ministerial Club (1, 2, 3) ; Foot- ball (1,2,3); Intra-murals (1,2). EDWARD B. LATTA AT £2 Hawthorne, N. J. B.S. Football (1) ; Scrub Cheer Leader ( 2 ). GENE J. LEPORE Sea Isle City, N. J. Ph.B. Football (1,2.3); Basketball (1,2, 3) ; Varsity “M” Club. MAX LEVINE Newark, N. J. A.B. Football (1,2,3); Scrub Manager, Basketball (2) ; Class President (2) ; President, Varsity “M” Club (3) ; Freshman Tribunal (2). a 6- i a L U e I MICHAEL D. LISETSKI Northampton, Pa. Ph.B. Baseball (2,3); Varsity “M” Club (3) ; Kappa Phi Kappa. MILTON LOWY Allentown, Pa. B.S. Pre-Medical Society (2,3); Deut- scher Verein (2); Debating (1,2). 6 C U GABRIEL M. LUCAS Philos Forest Hills, L. I. B.S. Chapel Choir (1,2,3); Mask and Dagger (2, 3) ; Deutscher Verein (3). EDWIN MALETSKY Allentown, Pa. A0 B.S. Intra-murals Verein (2,3). (2,3); Deutscher l u e a JOSEPH C. B. MARKLE Allentown, Pa. B.S. Dramatics (2, 3) ; Varsity Baseball; Pre-Medical Society. LOUIS J. MARQUET ATQ Philadelphia, Pa. Ph.B. Junior Assistant Manager Football; Track. RUDOLPH E. MATTSON Allentown, Pa. A.B. President, Junior Class. J. EDGAR MILLER Bernville, Pa. Ph.B. Muhlenberg Business Association ; Intra-murals ; Lutheran Students’ Assoc. (1,2,3). i v e a i O’ |OSEPH C. NACLE A0 Allentown, Pa. Associate Business Manager, i u e [ LLOYD MOYER I KT Allentown, Pa. A.B. Deutscher Verein; Varsity “M” Club; Football (1,2,3). e e u a 6- ■ u e a 4- l 14. teen. Intra-murals; Deutscher Verein. d a i ft e PAUL RUBRECHT Allentown, Pa. Ph.B. LUTHER N. SCHAEFFER Shillington, Pa. A.B. Band (1,2,3); Deutscher Verein (2,3); Lutheran Students’ Assoc. (1, 2, 3 ) ; Class Monitor (1, 2, 3) ; Minis- terial Club (1,2,3); Eta Sigma Phi (3). LUTHER SCHLENKER Allentown, Pa. A.B. Deutscher Verein (2,3); Choir (2, 3); Band (1,2,3); Ciarla Staff (3); Eta Sigma Phi (2,3). FRED J. SCHLICK Philadelphia, Pa. B.S. Weekly Staff (1,2,3); Choir (2, 3) ; Band (1, 2, 3) ; Science Club. l u e a £ TITUS R. SCHOLL Hellertown, Pa. A.B. Eta Sigma Phi (3) ; Choir (3). FRANCIS L. SHEEHAN Allentown, Pa. Ph.B. Freshman Football ; Business Man- ager, Ciarla Staff (3); Weekly Staff (1,2,3); Pre-legal Club. a i n e 0 l it e teen. ■HHHRSfS a 6- 0 i It c e e it f t v e Intra-murals. a £ o L U Lutheran Students’ Assoc. ecu JOHN T WOLF Northampton, Pa. Pre-Medical Society. l v e LESTER C. WOLFE A© Allentown, Pa. B.S. Mask and Dagger (2) ; Deutscher Verein (3); Class Honors; Ciarla Staff (3). a £ c JOHN YARSHINSKI McAdoo, Pa. B.S. Football (1,2,3); Science Club. jOHN H. YERGER MT Reading, Pa. A.B. Tau Kappa Alpha (2) ; Secretary- Treasurer, Varsity Debate Team (3) ; Forensic Council (2) ; Social Science Club (3); Weekly Staff (1); Pre- legal Club (2). l u e teen, DONALD M. YOUNG A0 Bethlehem, Pa. Ph.B. Football (1,2,3); Tnterfraternity Council (3); Intra-murals; Varsity “M” Club, Dance Committee; Class Officer (2). WILLIAM A. YOUNG Coopersburg, Pa. B.S. JOSEPH J. ZAMITES Wilkes-Barre, Pa. A.B. Deutscher Verein (2) ; Choir (2, 3) ; Freshman Basketball; Football (1, 2,3); Intra-murals; Junior Class President. Junior Associate Editor Weekly. Regardless of whether or no the epithet “soph” may be construed to mean sophisticated or sophomoric, we have succeeded in entering into those portals which the idealist might term the highroad to success, or, at the very least, that attainment of a baccalaureate degree. We must proceed in a spirit of cooperation, and adopt an attitude of altruism rather than of egoism. As members of an institution which must, by virtue of necessity, become an integral part of our lives, it is our duty to contribute toward the furtherance of that institution’s ideals, and, in a large measure, ordain our- selves to the promotion of its merits. We may accept as our solemn duty the responsibility of adding to its value and putting something of ourselves and our interests therein. Muhlenberg will, to a great degree, reflect us as a whole, hence we must make that reflection one of symmetry and real worth. The individual must not conceive of his college as being an existence wherein he attends certain prescribed activities, nor must he attempt to subordinate his college to his own interests, but rather make of it the scene of the furtherance of his personality, the means of development of a certain diversification of ability, and a mold, whose intricacies he may take part in, and through the application of himself as a whole, use in the development and enlargement of his character. As president of the Sophomore class, I am but a representative of you, my associates, and can but hope that you may reecho my sentiment and participate in the erection of a Muhlenberg in which the criterion of spirit, thought, coordina- tion, and ability are predominant. — Bill Saalfeld “ffl TiWrrffiMITTTil HWIHWl BBSS BBSM™ First Semester President William Saalfeld Vice-President Theodore Fischer Secretary a William Pfeiffer ' Treasurer Donald Hatisman President Vice-President. Secretary Treasurer Second Semester .William Saalfeld Karl Lehr Robert Decker Donald Hausman Class Colors Orchid and Pink Class Flower Sun Flower Sophomore Statistics WALTER M. ABELE Allentown, Pa. B.S. NORTON L. BEHNEY 0YQ Reinerton, Pa. B.S. ; Freshman Tribunal; Pre- Medical Society. WARREN BELL Northampton, Pa. B.S. HAROLD BIRNS OEri New York, N. Y. Ph.B. ; Weekly Staff ; Asst. Track Mgr. ; Intra-murals. BERNARD BLAC KMAN 0KN Riverside, N. J. B.S. ; Weekly Staff; German Club; Class Honors (1). JOHN W. BLEFKO Slatington, Pa. B.S. CEZA P. BOLEZ Allentown, Pa. A. B. DAVID C. BOOTH A© Patchogue, L. I., N. Y- Ph.B.; Football (1). NELSON F. J. BRAMER 0YQ Nazareth, Pa. B. S. ; Band; Weekly Staff. WILLIAM D. COLEMAN Rajahmundry, India A.B.; Band (1,2); Chapel Choir (1,2); German Club (2). STOVER CROUTHAMEL Perkasie, Pa. A.B. ; Band; Lutheran Students’ Assoc. ROBERT C. DECKER 5KT Stroudsburg, Pa. A.B. ; Debate Squad; Mask and Dagger. HMWJft! RUSSEL H. DERR $KT THEODORE FISCHER 0 KT Denver, Pa. Germantown, Pa. B.S. ; Chapel Choir; Pre-Medical Society. A.B. ; Chapel Choir (1, 2) ; German Club; Mask and Dagger; Freshman Debating; Tennis (1); Intra-murals HARRY H. DOUGHERTY (1,2); Freshman Vigilance Commit- tee (2). Allentown, Pa. B.S. KENNETH GEGGUS FOLLWEILER Slatington, Pa. RALPH H. EBERT Ph.B. New Tripoli, Pa. A.B. ; Chapel Choir. JOHN FRICKE A0 West Orange, N. J. ALBERT ERDOSY Ph.B.; Football (1). Northampton, Pa. FRANCIS EVERETT GAUMER 0TQ Ph.B. Easton, Pa. HOMER M. FALSTICK Ph.B.; Band (2); Weekly Staff. Allentown, Pa. MARVIN R. GEIGER A.B. ; Mask and Dagger ; Track. Schnecksville, Pa. B.S. STEPHEN C. FARRIS Bethlehem, Pa. ALFRED GESCHEL Allentown, Pa. B.S. ; Football (1,2); Basketball (2). Ph.B.; Football (1,2); Intra- murals. ROBERT FENSTERMAKER QYQ CHARLES P. GOLDSMITH $KT Slatington, Pa. Catasauqua, Pa. B.S. ; Band (1,2). B.S. ; Pre-Medical Society. r irniuim— LUTHER A. COUCHER Northampton, Pa. B.S.; Band. OLIVER C. GRAVER Allentown, Pa. a B.S. WALTER H. GUIGLEY Mohnton, Pa. A. B. ; Lutheran Students’ Assoc. ; Ministerial Club ; Debate Squad. C. KEELY HAGY, JR. ATQ Allentown, Pa. Ph.B. ; Intra-murals. WALTER J. HARLAND 0YQ Philadelphia, Pa. B. S. THOMAS L. HARTMAN Allentown, Pa. B.S. ; Football (1); Basketball (1). DONALD A. HAUSMAN Allentown, Pa. Ph.B.; Weekly Staff ; Class Treas. ; German Club. WALTER W. HEINTZELMAN Allentown, Pa. Ph.B. ALBERT P. HERZENBERG $EII Franklin, N. J. B.S. ; Tennis (1); Intra-murals. JOHN H. HESS, JR. Catasauqua, Pa. B.S. ; Band. HERBERT L. HILTON, JR. Allentown, Pa. Ph.B.; Tennis (1). LEONARD C. HODCKINSON ATQ Belleville, N. J. Ph.B.; Football (1); Basketball (1) ; Scrub Mgr., Football; Chapel Choir ; Mask and Dagger ; Intra- murals. CLARENCE A. HOLLAND Freeland, Pa. B.S. ; German Club. EDWARD T. HORN, JR. Tokyo, Japan B.S. ; Pre-Medical Society. W. FRANK HORSCROFT, JR. Bethlehem, Pa. B.S. FREDERICK W. W. JAXHEIMER Philadelphia, Pa. A.B. JOSEPH S. KEIPER 0YQ Easton, Pa. Ph.B. ; Band ; Weekly Staff. JOHN J. KELEHER Bethlehem, Pa. Ph.B. ; Intra-murals. JULIUS J. KISH McAdoo, Pa. A.B. CHARLES H. KLINE, JR. Allentown, Pa. A.B.; Freshman Debating. ISADORE KLITZNER Slatington, Pa. Ph.B.; Band (1,2), Second Asst. Leader (3). EARL A. KOCH Allentown, Pa. Ph.B. ; German Club ; Tennis ; Mask and Dagger. GEORGE R. KOEHLER Bethlehem, Pa. A. B. ; Football (1,2). MAX KOHN $EII Plainfield, N. J. B. S. ; Intra-murals; Baseball. ROGER W. LACHMAN East Greenville, Pa. B.S. EDWARD M. LEEFELDT ATQ Trenton, N. J. B.S. ; Football (1). KARL M. LEHR Allentown, Pa. Ph.B. ; German Club. WILLIAM J. LEIFELD Pottsville, Pa. Ph.B. CHARLES LICHTENWALNER.JR. ATQ Lansdale, Pa. B.S. ; Football (1,2). FRANKLIN D. MARSTELLER Emaus, Pa. B.S. PAUL C. MATTHIESEN Trenton, N. J. JAMES T. POWERS Northampton, Pa. Ph.B. A.B. ; Band. HUBERT C. MEYERS Philos Hudson, N. Y. JOHN P. RAKER ATQ Shamokin, Pa. B.S. ; Chapel Choir. A.B. RICHARD C. MILLER OKT Shiremanstown, Pa. KARL R. REINHARD Ph.B. ; Chapel Choir ; Weekly Staff ; Coplay, Pa. M.C.A. Cabinet ; Lutheran Students’ Assoc. B.S. ; Chapel Choir. CLINTON NICKEL OKT PHARES 0. REITZ Pleasant Valley, Pa. Leek Kill, Pa. B.S. A.B. GEORGE HENRY OSTERMAYER, JR. CHARLES W. RITTER Camden, N. j. Allentown, Pa. B.S. B.S. FLOYD A. PAULES Lansdale, Pa. CLARENCE H. RITTER A.B. Allentown, Pa. WILLIAM F. PFEIFER Ph.B.; Mask and Dagger; John Marshall Club. Leechburg, Pa. A.B. ; Chapel Choir ; Lutheran JAMES A. ROCOKOS ATQ Students’ Assoc. ; Ministerial Club ; Paterson, N. J. Football ; Band ; Weekly Staff. B.S. WILLIAM F. SAALFELD 0KN Ramsey, N. J. ERNEST F. SEEGERS Philadelphia, Pa. Ph.B.; Band; Class Pres. (2). A.B. LLOYD J. SANDT 0TQ Emaus, Pa. A.B. ; Football; Intra-murals; Basketball. MORTON SHER Allentown, Pa. A.B. ALFRED W. SCHAEFFER New Tripoli, Pa. DAVID T. SMITH 0YQ Treichlers, Pa. B.S. ; German Club. Ph.B.; Weekly Staff. JOSEPH L. SCHANTZ Quakertown, Pa. THOMAS 0. STROHL, JR. 0KN Bethlehem, Pa. A.B. ; Chapel Choir (1,2); Foot- ball (1,2). Ph.B.; Chapel Choir. WARREN C. SCHLECEL Allentown, Pa. FRED G. THOMAS, JR. A0 Somerville, N. J. A.B. ; Freshman Debating; German Club. Ph.B.; Band; Weekly Staff; Ten nis. EUGENE G. SCHNECK Schnecksville, Pa. JAMES H. TURRELL ATQ Wilkes-Barre, Pa. B.S. Ph.B. ; Scrub Mgr., Baseball. KENNETH F. SECHLER Allentown, Pa. LOUIS J. VARRICHIO Allentown, Pa. A.B. Ph.B. ; Intra-murals. i i iiM iiiiii— B aagBMn M i. | niiraiBBnHnMBBHHHHd HENRY C. WAGNER Allentown, Pa. Ph.B. THOMAS H. WEABER, JR. ATQ Allentown, Pa. B.S. ; Football (1); Basketball (1). HAROLD H. WEINER $En Irvington, N. J. B.S. ; Football (1,2). AUGUSTINE C. WEINHOFER Allentown, Pa. A.B. JOHN E. WHITTEKER St. Thomas, Virgin Islands A.B. ; Weekly Staff (2); German Club (2) ; Mask and Dagger (2). GEORGE CARRELL WIKOFF Trenton, N. J. B.S. ; Football. CHESTER H. WOODRING Hazleton, Pa. Ph.B. ; German Club. HERMAN D. WUCKER New York, N. Y. B.S. ; Pre-Medical Society. rirrmiftTniifc ii i ii nM i KHc»aieniflBBaBBneaHBaBMHHi SOSiEDGSaSBBU SnBaaPBaHHHi As striking as was the change between the old, worn-out, undemocratic, laissez faire era of constant price warfare, and the new, diplomatic, conservative, yet liberal era of cooperative economic action, so is the change which has taken place at our institution in the past year. We, of the freshman class at Muhlen- berg, have entered into an epoch just as startling as the one in which our country entered with the approach of the “New Deal " . We have established friendship and good will not only among ourselves, but also among our fellow upper classmen, a goal toward which probably all of us centered our ambitions before we entered these halls of learning. The first success of the year, namely, the Freshman banquet, set a precedent toward which all of us devoted our strongest efforts since it brought with it a stamina not only to gain new friendships among our classmates, but also to renew friendships which had been slightly worn off due to the close of the “rush- ing season”. If education has failed us in every conceivable way except in the form of social adaptability, then we have gained an ultra-modern feature for the perpetuation of our career which will take us far into the realm of business success. This, I believe, should be characteristically predominant in any man who is going to college and is preparing for the world which lies directly before him. Possibly our only regret in school today is the fact that colleges do not present definitely outlined and planned administration in social development by way of curriculum. There is reason then, for our feeling content since we have mastered what is equally as important as academic instruction, namely, social tact and ease which will interpret themselves fully only in the world which we contact. — Carl J. Hessinger wm First Semester President Vice-President. Secretary Treasurer William H. Rogers ...Frederick A. Dry Alvin Butz Harry Hauser President Vice-President Secretary Treasurer Second Semester Carl Hessinger „ Edwin Geissinger Harry Curl Harry Hauser Class Colors Black and Blue Class Flower Pansy BMHMDnaHBHBHHHHHHMBMHI p nnfnniTT—wa in ti iiwwi— 11— — d . neBSK -— — Tir il|i II II I T j I i liiW— ■ tJF- ?AtLLx£ ' i fi T 1 Freshmen Statistics EVAN REID BARTLESON ATQ Lansdowne, Pa. Ph.B. ; Football (1). ROBERT CASWELL BAUDER Lansdowne, Pa. Ph.B.; Football (1). LUTHER T. BEHLER Allentown, Pa. Ph.B WILLIAM H. BEHRINGER, jr. ATQ Allentown, Pa. B.S. EDWARD DIEHL BENNER 0KN Allentown, Pa. B.S. ; Band. JOHN J. BIANCO 0KN Hazleton, Pa. MILTON M. BLOOM FEII Newark, N. J. Ph.B.; Football (1). GEORGE S. BOYER Allentown, Pa. B.S. ; Band. GRANT BROWN Hempstead, N. Y. B.S. ; Football (1). JOHN R. BROWN Easton, Pa. Ph.B. ALVIN H. BUTZ, JR. Allentown, Pa. A.B.; Football (1). THOMAS ALFRED CASTAGNA 0KN New London, Conn. B.S. A.B.; Chapel Choir. j. CREIGHTON CHRISTMAN Allentown, Pa. A.B.; Band. BERNARD L. COHEN OEII Glen Cove, N. Y. Ph.B. ; Freshman Mgr. of Football. JAMES M. COYNE MT Allentown, Pa. A.B. HARRY A. CURL Philadelphia, Pa. A. B. ; Chapel Choir ; Mask and Dag- ger. GEORGE DePUE, JR. A0 Phillipsburg, N. J. B. S. CHARLES F. DIEHL OKT Lehighton, Pa. A. B. ; Mask and Dagger. FREDERICK AUGUSTUS DRY Kutztown, Pa. B. S. ; Band. EDWARD FRANCIS FARRELL A0 Catasauqua, Pa. Ph.B.; Football (1). KARL H. FENSTERMAKER Allentown, Pa. B.S. A. DONALD FEYRER Allentown, Pa. B.S. ; Band. ANGELO A. FIOROVANTI A0 Plainfield, N. J. B.S. MERRITT FRANKENFIELD MT Bethlehem, Pa. Ph.B. DONALD F. FRY Bethlehem, Pa. A. B. ; Mask and Dagger. EDWARD CHARLES GALLAGHER Allentown, Pa. B. S. CHARLES L. GARRETSON ATQ Hawthorne, N. J. B.S. ; Football (1); Scrub Mgr. of Football. EDWIN W. GEISINGER A0 Allentown, Pa. B.S. ; Football (1). MILTON CELMAN $EII Newark, N. J. Ph.B. DONALD A. GIBSON $KT Lansdowne, Pa. Ph.B.; Football (1). LEONARD C. GOOD Mountain Top, Pa. A. B. FREDERICK J. GREGORIOUS $KT New York, N. Y. B. S. WILLIAM P. GRIFFIN, JR. 0TQ Stonington, Conn. Ph.B. EUGENE GROSSMAN DEn Allentown, Pa. A.B. LUTHER A. GRUVER Pipersville, Pa. A.B. OLIVER H. GRUVER ATQ Allentown, Pa. Ph.B.; Football (1). HERBERT N. HAAS $EII Summit Hill, Pa. A. B. ; Football (1); Freshman De- bating. ISAAC HANNA Allentown, Pa. B. S. HARRY A. HAUSER Palmerton, Pa. Ph.B.; Class Treas. RICHARD S. HECKMAN ATQ Summit Lawn, Pa. Ph.B.; Football (1). RICHARD W. HELD Allentown, Pa. B.S. CHARLfS FREDERICK HERWIG ATQ Allentown, Pa. B.S. CARL JOHN HESSINGER Allentown, Pa. B.S. ; Chapel Choir. LOUIS A. HIBIAN 0TQ Nanticoke, Pa. A.B. SIDNEY JAFFE 0 En WILLIAM W. LAING 0KN Allentown, Pa. Cliffside Park, N. J. Ph.B. ; Scrub Mgr. of Basketball. Ph.B.; Football (1). HARRY JAY KAMAN $EFI GEORGE EDWARD LEGG ATQ New York, N. Y. Paterson, N. J. B.S.; Football (1). B.S. ; Band; Football (1). JOHN FRANKLIN KELLER, JR. Foglesville, Pa. A.B. FREDERICK C. LORISH, JR. ATQ Allentown, Pa. B.S. THOMAS L. KENNEDY A0 Allentown, Pa. Ph.B.; Football (1). RICHARD G. McKITTRICK A0 Catasauqua, Pa. Ph.B. ERNEST A. KNAUSS Allentown, Pa. B.S. ; Band. GEORGE MACHAJDIK Topton, Pa. A.B. FRANCIS T. KNOUSS 0TQ GEORGE W. MARSHALL Bethlehem, Pa. Delaware, N. J. A.B. ; Mask and Dagger. B.S. GEORGE A. KOHLER, JR. F. EUGENE MARTIN A0 Egypt, Pa. Ph.B. Phillipsburg, N. J. B.S. JACK J. LaBOLD 0TQ Allentown, Pa. B.S. ; Band. JOHN MICHAEL MARTIN Allentown, Pa. B.S. MICHAEL MASTONY JOSEPH L. NOSAL Scranton, Pa. Allentown, Pa. Ph.B. B.S. CHARLES B. MAUCH DKT FRANCIS S. PAULES Hellertown, Pa. Lansdale, Pa. A.B. A.B. ; Football (1). STEPHEN MAYROSH A0 WALTER J. PAULES Easton, Pa. Slatington, Pa. B.S. Ph.B. GEORGE MELLK ROBERT H. PETERS Newark, N. J. Ph.B. Ashley, Pa. B.S. ; Band. J. KENNETH MILLER Allentown, Pa. GEORGE L. PHILLIPS Mohrsville, Pa. B.S. ; Band. B.S. VINCENT MONICA DALE M. POSEY ATQ Orange, N. J. B.S. Christiana, Pa. B.S. HAROLD D. NEHF ROBERT L. PRUTZMAN Allentown, Pa. Allentown, Pa. B.S. A.B. JAMES WILLIAM NIXON Allentown, Pa. RICHARD HAUSMAN RAUCH Noxen, Pa. B.S. A.B. DONALD A. NOLL LAWRENCE M. REESE Bowmanstown, Pa. Silverdale, Pa. B.S. ; Band. A.B. JOHN L. REINER Pitman, Pa. A. B.; Football (1). CHESTER E. RETTEW, JR. Allentown, Pa. B. S. PAUL H. RICHARDS Bangor, Pa. B.S. WILLIAM H. ROGERS I KT Spring City, Pa. B.S. ALVIN ROY $KT Stillwater, N. J. Ph.B. ; Band. ARTHUR P. RUTMAN Catasauqua, Pa. B.S. ; Football (1). JOSEPH SANTOPUOLI 0KN Hazleton, Pa. A. B.; Football (1). HENRY JOSEPH SATSKY $Eri Newark, N. J. Ph.B.; Football (1). SAMUEL SCHADT 0YQ Allentown, Pa. B. S. THOMAS J. SCHEIRER Allentown, Pa. B.S. EDWARD B. SCHIFREEN Allentown, Pa. Ph.B. FLOYD A. SCHLOSSER Hellertown, Pa. B.S. MELVILLE B. C. SCHMOYER Allentown, Pa. A. B. ; Band. ALEXANDER G. SENOFSKY Catasauqua, Pa. B. S. ROLLIN C. SHAFFER Williamsport, Pa. A.B. ; Chapel Choir. FLOYD E. SMITH, JR. Newton, Pa. A.B. J. ALLEN SNYDER Allentown, Pa. A.B. JOHN P. STUMP New Castle, Pa. A.B. ROBERT A. SUTTON GAIL WINTERMUTE Allentown, Pa. East Mauch Chunk, Pa. B.S. A.B. CARL TILWICK 0TQ HERBERT D. WITTMAIER Easton, Pa. Allentown, Pa. Ph.B. B.S. GEORGE B. WOODRINC CORDON EIDELL TREISBACH Allentown, Pa. Allentown, Pa. Ph.B. Ph.B. HOMER A. YIENCST FRANCIS LEIGH WAINWRIGHT Archbald, Pa. Shrewsbury, N. J. B.S. B.S. ISRAEL A. S. YOST Phoenixville, Pa. EARLE C. WALBERT A.B. Allentown, Pa. RANDALL W. ZERBE Ph.B.; Football (1); Band. Tremont, Pa. MAX N. WARNER ATQ A.B. ; Football (1). Reeders, Pa. ALLEN L. R. ZIECENFUS B.S. Allentown, Pa. Ph.B.; Band. J. RITNER WEAVER Allentown, Pa. LLOYD N. ZIMMERMAN $KT Shiremanstown, Pa. B.S. Ph.B.; Football (1). WOODROW W. WENDLING Philos DEAN ZWEIER Wescosville, Pa. Quakertown, Pa. B.S. ; Scrub Mgr. of Football. Ph.B.; Football (1). ATHLETICS AL KREUTZ Asst. Coach JOHN UTZ Head Coach A Resume of the 1933 Football Season Muhlenberg College may well be proud of the record attained by the 1933 Card- inal and Gray football team. This grid aggregation enjoyed the most glorious season witnessed at Muhlenberg since 1926, the year that “Haps” Benfer’s eleven turned in a record of seven triumphs against three reverses, includ- ing wins over Lehigh and Temple. Six victories and three defeats was the record attained by the mighty 1933 Muhl machine under the tutelage of Head Coach Johnny Utz and his able assist- ants, A1 Kreuz and A1 Young. This rec- ord is even more significant when one considers that two of these six triumphs were chalked-up against two very for- midable eastern college elevens — Penn State and Lehigh. By virtue of a Gettysburg defeat at the hands of Franklin and Marshall, Muhl- enberg finished the season in a Be with the battlefield team for the Eastern Penn- sylvania Intercollegiate Conference grid championship, each team having won three conference games . In his first campaign as head mentor of ’Berg’s gridsters, John Ludwig Utz proved himself to be a very efficient ■■■■ coach. Johnny, of the blond hair and ubiquitous “schnozzle,” came to Muhlen- berg with a great record behind him. Blond Johnny will be remembered as a tackle and the colorful captain of the 1929 University of Pennsylvania football team. Following his graduation, he coach- ed the Freshman team and later the Junior Varsity at his Alma Mater and was also, for a time, coach at West Phil- adelphia High School. L SMITH 34 Varsity Manager SCOTTY RENWICK Trainer Utz was assisted in his first season at Muhlenberg by Albert Kreuz, former University of Pennsylvania star fullback, who handled the backfield men. Kreuz, who was on the Quaker eleven of ’23, ’24and’25, and who stayed with his Alma Mater as assistant coach until 1929, was one of the most accurate kickers Penn has ever had, as well as one of the best line-buckers. It was his three-point placement in 1925 which gave the Quak- ers their only victory over Yale. Alan Young, as Freshman coach and scout, was also an invaluable member of the coaching staff. Young, another Penn graduate, had coached football for four- teen years before coming to ’Berg. He had tutored teams at Episcopal Academy, Haverford School and, during the war, tt.h KOEHLER 36 KLOTZ 34 LEVINE 35 at the Naval Base Hospital overseas. He is one of the best scouts in the east. In connection with the coaching staff, we must not forget the work of “Scotty” Renwick, veteran Muhlenberg trainer. It is the “Scotchman’s” nimble fingers which keep the boys in shape. No game would be complete without his familiar squat figure on the bench, ready to dash on the field to “patch up” the boys in case of a mishap. Forty-two men reported to Utz early in September as candidates for the varsity eleven. From this squad there was de- veloped the best football combination that Muhlenberg had seen for some time. Starting with a wealth of material left from the 1932 varsity and some promis- ing boys who played on the Freshman team of that year, Coaches Utz and Kreuz developed a smooth-working ma- chine which swept through an extremely difficult schedule with a very creditable showing. “Reds” Weiner, veteran, sorrel-topped, triple-threat quarterback, playing his last season as a wearer of the Cardinal and Gray, was the outstanding pillar of strength in the Muhl offensive. Consist- ently throughout the campaign, he tore through the line, skirted the ends, punted spirals advantageously, and tossed for- ward passes with equal ability. Four times during the season “Reds” crossed the enemy goal line. In addition, he con- verted the point after touchdown on four occasions and place-kicked three beauti- ful field goals out of four attempts to hang up thirty-seven points for his team. Weiner tied two Rose Bowl rivals — Newt [ •ggaraaesii i i 1 imma— — — GRAMLEY 34 Wilder, Columbia center, and Bill Cor- bus, Stanford’s All-American guard — and also Cavanaugh, of Villanova, in the number of field goals booted to lead the nation in that department of scoring, each player having successfully place-k ' icked three. In recognition for his great all- around playing, Weiner was given hon- orable mention on the Associated Press’ All-American and All-Eastern football teams for 1933. He was also signally honored at the annual football banquet of the Cardinal and Gray when he was elected honorary captain for the 1933 season by his teammates. Fritz Wavrek, always an outstanding performer but given the chance to carry the ball infrequently during the 1933 sea- son because of a bad leg, developed into one of the greatest blocking backs ever to cavort for ’Berg on the gridiron. When- ever a hole was made in the Utz-tutored forward wall, Wavrek was right there to plug it up. His tackling and blocking made possible most of the gains made by the ball-toters. On pass defense he was outstanding. Dick Gramley, short, chunky blocking back ; Gene Lepore, speedy ball carrier and pass snatcher and “Jiggs” Koehler, sophomore fullback, also scin- tillated in the backfield. The line, developed by Utz, with its aggressive “paperweight” guards, Tim Watkins and “Reds” Young; its rugged smashing tackles, Chris Riley and Charlie Carter ; its hard working, accurate, snap- perback, “Maggie” Levine ; and its fast, rangy wingmen, Joe Rodgers and A. WEINER 34 CARTER ’34 BLOOM ’35 “Beans” Dietrich, was the best in Con- ference circles and played heads-up foot- ball consistently — blocking plays, open- ing holes and throwing the opposing ball- carriers for losses. Muhlenberg vs. St. Joseph’s In the opening game on Friday even- ing, September 22, the Utzmen took on St. Joseph’s for a tune-up game. Favored to win by a big score, ’Berg, not exerting itself unduly, proved too strong a foe for the Crimson and Gray and tripped the Hawks, 12 to 0. A twenty-eight yard sprint by Weiner and a blocked kick by Lou Sterner were directly responsible for the two touchdowns. One of the biggest crowds ever to witness a football tussle on Muhlenberg field turned out to see the Muhls auspiciously lift the lid on their so-called “suicide” campaign. The ’Berg- men outplayed Coach Emid Thomas’ ag- gregation throughout, although the first downs were only seven to six in the Muhls’ favor. Muhlenberg vs. Lafayette Lafayette, ' Berg ' s ancient rival in grid competition, came next. A strong run- ning attack coupled with forward passes at strategic moments netted Coach Herb McCracken ' s gridmen three touchdowns, thereby vanquishing a stubborn Cardinal and Gray eleven in Lafayette stadium, Easton, on September 30, by a 20 to 0 score. The Leopards were the far superior aggregation and succeeded in outplaying the Muhls at every turn, amassing eigh- teen first downs to Muhlenberg’s six. The Utzmen put up a valiant defensive battle, however, and in the latter part of the RODGERS 35 SMITH 34 NEHF 34 game threatened to score as the result of a forward pass attack, Weiner to Wikoff and Weiner to Gramley. Muhlenberg vs. Fordham While still not fully recovered from the stiff contest with the Leopards, the Muhls faced the powerful Fordham machine on Fordham field, New York City, on October 7, and were swamped by a 57 to 0 score. The Rams, coached by “Sleepy Jim” Crowley, one of the immortal Four- Florsemen of Notre Dame, and including such All-American stars as Les Borden, Captain Ed Danowski, Ralph Wolfen- dale, Walt Uzdavinis, Frank McDermott, Jim Cowhig and John Del Isola scored an approximate average of a point a minute despite the almost impregnable Muhl forward wall. Danowski proved to be Fordham’s strongest bulwark while the great defensive play of Wavrek and “Jersey” Bloom was outstanding. Wei- ner’s steady brand of football, andKlotz’s amazing punting were outstanding Car- dinal and Gray features. “Bull” Geschel, sophomore halfback, made ’Berg’s only first down against eleven for the “League of Nations” aggregation. The entire Muhl squad saw service in this game and acquitted themselves creditably despite the lopsided score. Muhlenberg vs. Penn State In one of the major upsets of the Eastern gridiron campaign, on October 14, at State College, the Utzmen, behind a fiercely charging line led by Riley and Watkins coupled with inspired defensive play by Lepore and Wavrek, achieved ■i LEPORE ’35 ZAMITES ’35 YARSHINSKI ’35 ■ a richly deserved 3 to 0 triumph over Coach Bob Higgins’ Nittany Lions. This was the first time that Muhlenberg had ever conquered Penn State. It was a breath-taking forty-one yard field goal by Weiner that brought ’Berg its victory in the final period of the game. The Muhls registered six first downs while the Lions could garner only two more than that number. Muhlenberg vs. Gettysburg An open date the previous Saturday and overconfidence handicapped the Muhls at Memorial field, Gettysburg, on October 28, and Coach Hen Bream’s Bul- lets upset the dope and emerged vic- torious by a score of 9 to 6. Only after a raking-over between the halves did ’Berg get over its sluggish, dazed attitude. Then Leon Rosenberg and an aroused Weiner led the Muhls to a last- minute touchdown, advancing the oval from midfield. The Bullets made eight first downs while ’Berg could only tally seven. Muhlenberg vs. Franklin Marshall Although the Nevonians broke into the scoring column first when “Tubby” Ehr- ensberger place-kicked a field goal late in the initial quarter, Muhlenberg rallied strongly in the second period and chalk- ed up two touchdowns in rapid succession on Muhlenberg field, on November 4, to defeat a heavy F. and M. eleven, 14 to 3, before a large crowd of Alumni and Dads’ Day spectators. Weiner, for Muhl- enberg, and Mike Karvasales, for Eff and Emm, displayed fancy dodging, speed, and ball-carrying all afternoon. Every FARRIS ’36 YOUNG ’35 RILEY ’35 Cardinal and Gray player distinguished himself in his particular position. A beau- tiful forward pass, Weiner to Rohn, early in the second period was good for twenty-two yards and then “Whitey” scampered fifteen more for the first touchdown. Later in the same period Weiner ' s punt went out of bounds on the Roses’ 8-yard mark and F. and M. was forced to kick from behind its own goal line. Here Dietrich crashed through and blocked the kick, the ball rolling out of bounds on the Possums’ 3-yard stripe. On the first play Weiner circled right end for the score. “Reds” converted both attempts for the extra point. The Utz- tutored forward wall played brilliantly, on one occasion stopping the Nevonians after they had advanced the ball to ’Berg’s 2-yard line. Coach Alan M. Hol- man’s proteges, however, made eleven first downs to the Muhls’ seven. Muhlenberg vs. Ursinus Muhlenberg’s gridiron gladiators cele- brated Armistice Day, on November 11, and staged another flaming finish to shade a plucky Ursinus eleven, 3 to 0, on Patterson field, Collegeville. Midway in the final quarter, Weiner unleashed a toe as true as a navy siege gun and booted a twenty- four yard field goal to decide one of the hardest- fought grid battles ever staged between the two colleges. Two passes, Lepore to Weiner and Weiner to Wavrek, then two line plunges and an- other pass, Weiner to Lepore, put the pigskin in position for the field goal. Muhlenberg outscored Coach Jack Mc- Avoy’s team in first downs, ten to four. m WAVREK ’34 KEEBLER ’35 STEICERWALT ’35 Muhlenberg vs. Lehigh Behind the brilliant leadership of Weiner, Muhlenberg’s football eleven dominated the scene at Taylor Stadium, Bethlehem, on November 18, and admin- istered a humiliating 10 to 0 setback to the proteges of Austey Tate in a duel waged on a slippery gridiron. It was the first Muhlenberg victory over Lehigh since 1930, when Weiner’s brother, “Mickey”, captained the Muhls, and was only the second time in history that ’Berg had held the Brown and White scoreless. Weiner was responsible for all of his team’s ten points, registering a touch- down, kicking the extra point and place- kicking a twenty-five yard field goal, his third of the season. Not far behind this leadership was the lightning fast line that opened up big avenues for the Muhls’ perfectly clicking backfield. Standing out brilliantly in toting the ball were Weiner, Lepore and Koehler. Great blocking by Wavrek, Gramley and Lepore made many gains possible. ’Berg, moreover, cannon- aded aerials at strategic intervals which resulted in substantial gains. The Muhls outplayed and outclassed their opponents from whistle to whistle, during which time they tallied nineteen first downs to Lehigh’s one. So aggressive was the ' Berg outfit that the Tatemen were thrown for a total net loss of forty-six yards via scrimmage. ■■■■■■■ Muhlenberg vs. Dickinson The season ended on November 25 when a big Dickinson eleven came to Allentown and fought stubbornly to hold the Cardinal and Gray to a 7 to 0 score. It was ’Berg’s fourth consecutive victory and the sixth of the season. No score had been made by the opposition in the last three games. Throughout the entire fracas, staged in ideal football weather, the Red Devils, coached by Joseph H. McCormick, fought the Muhls obstinately and only yielded in the third quarter when a forward pass, Weiner to Wavrek, and short gains by Wavrek and Weiner resulted in the only touchdown of the game. Weiner place-kicked the extra point. The Muhls registered nine first downs while Dickinson could garner only two. Individual Scores Pts. after Field Tds. Td. Goals Total A. Weiner 4 4 3 37 Sterner 1 0 0 6 Rosenberg 1 0 0 6 Rob n 1 0 0 6 Total 7 4 3 55 Eastern Collegiate Athletic Conference 1933 Season Won Lost Tied Pet. Muhlenberg 3 1 0 .750 Gettysburg 3 1 0 .750 F. M 2 2 0 .500 Ursinus 1 2 1 .333 Dickinson 0 3 1 .000 ROHN ’35 ROSENBERG ’34 DE1TRICH ’35 AL. YOUNG Freshman Coach Freshman Football The 1933 Frosh gridmen had a rather inactive season as far as their_ schedule was concerned. The short schedule did not, however, detract from their usefulness ; for daily they worked out with the varsity, helping Coaches Utz and Kreuz to whip the Muhls into shape. Their heavy line and speedy back- field furnished plenty of opposition for the varsity in practice scrimmages. In the first game of their brief schedule the Little Muhls battled Coach Art Frei- tag’s powerful Allentown Prep school eleven to a stalemate on Muhlenberg field on Friday afternoon, October 13. Al- though the Cardinal and Gray did not display a polished offensive, it, neverthe- less, offered an impregnable bulwark on the defense. Farrell and Brown led the Muhl Yearling’s attack. In their second and last game the Frosh bowed to the Lehigh neophytes on Sat- urday, October 28, in Taylor stadium, Bethlehem, by a 13 to 0 score. Fumbles and the failure to take advantage of the breaks proved to be the downfall of the Youngmen. Using the Rockne system, Coach Paul Calvert’s Lehigh Frosh made both scores in the third period — the first, the result of a pass, McCoy to Peet, from the 25-yard line, and the second by Fair- banks on a 25-yard run. Many of the boys on the squad showed unusual promise. Some of the out stand- ing members of the squad were “Scrap- per” Farrell, who barked the signals, con- sidered by Pop Warner as one of the best scholastic backs in the state in 1932 ; Tom Kennedy, a fullback ; Don Gibson, husky left halfback; Bill Laing and Joe San- topuoli, who alternated at right halfback; Grant Brown, Evan Bartleson, Dean Zweier and John Fricke, wingmen ; Lloyd Zimmerman, Lloyd Sandt and Ed Geis- inger, tackles ; Henry Satsky, Milt Bloom and Harry Kaman, guards ; and Randall Zerbe, pivot man. These men can be ex- pected to put in a strong bid for varsity berths next season, and no doubt some of them will appear in the first-string line-up. JOHN UTZ Head Coach LEVINE ’35 Asst. Manager WILLIAMS ’34 Varsity Manager A Resume of the 1934 Basketball Season Coach Johnny Utz’ 1934 Cardinal and Gray cagemen accomplished wonders on the wooden way by achieving a record of eleven triumphs and six reverses for the best court campaign enjoyed by Muh- lenberg since “Haps” Benfer’s 1925-26 fioormen chalked-up an identical record. In this campaign “Blond Johnny” made his debut as a cage mentor and the team showed the results of his expert drilling. With exception of the Lafayette, Le- high, and Penn A. C. tilts the Muhls con- fined their activities to Eastern Pennsyl- vania Collegiate Conference competition. In the scramble the ’Bergmen gained un- disputed possession of third place, the highest position ever attained by any Muhl team since the loop was enlarged. The Cardinal and Gray entry, although one of the smallest clubs in the circuit, was undoubtedly the fastest. The Utzmen launched their 1934 cam- paign rather unimpressively on January 6th in the Eddie Plank gym at Gettys- burg by dropping a 35 to 22 decision to the defending Conference champions. Hen Bream’s proteges got away to a big lead in the early stages of the fracas and never let up. The Bullets were out in front at halftime, 22 to 11. Cuchran was high scorer for the Muhls, stripping the nets for seven points. In a whirlwind finish, the blue and white-clad cagemen of Franklin Mar- shall eked out a 26 to 25 victory over the Utzmen in a bitterly fought tilt on Janu- ary 10th at the Maple Grove field house, several miles west of Lancaster on the Lincoln Highway. Roddy, substituting for Captain Haller of the Nevonians, who was carried off the court in the clos- ing seconds of the game, dropped in a free throw to provide the margin of vic- tory. The Possums were leading at the midway mark, 16 to 9. Cuchran again played brilliantly, scoring eleven count- ers. Flashing a strong offensive attack shortly after the start of the second half, the ’Bergmen dealt-out a 45 to 36 licking to “Fog” Smith’s Albright quintet on January 13th in the Allentown High School palestra. At the half-way point the Muhls sported an 18 to 13 advan- tage. Sterner, Rodgers and Blank found the basket for thirty-two points, four less than the entire Lion team was able to garner. Outplaying their opponents from whistle to whistle, the Utzmen defeated Walter Halas’ Drexel cagemen, 32 to 19, on Jan. 17 in the Allentown High School palestra. At halftime the Muhls led, 23 to 12. Farris and Rodgers showed up well for the Utzmen. Staging a gallant second-half come- back after trailing 18 to 6 at the mid- way mark, the ’Berg cagemen forged ahead, 22 to 19, only to lose out to “Hooks” Mylin ' s Lebanon Valley floor- men by a score of 27 to ' 23 on Jan. 20 in the Allentown High school palestra. Rodgers and Cuchran played stellar roles for the Muhls. Facing one of the country’s leading cage teams in a charity tilt for the benefit of the Allentown Community Cafeteria on Jan. 31 in the Allentown High school palestra, the Utzmen turned in their greatest triumph by defeating the crack Penn A. C. basketeers, 29 to 21. Oppos- ing the ’Bergmen were such ex-collegiate luminaries as Jim Peterson, former Penn ace and now pitcher for the Philadelphia Athletics ; Barney Berlinger, Penn’s famed all-around athlete of several years ago and Olympic decathlon champion ; Joey Schaaf, former Penn captain and intercollegiate scoring champion. At one stage of the initial half the Muhls led the Pennacs, 12 to 4, but the Clubmen slashed ’Berg’s lead to 14 to 13 at half time. In the closing minutes of the game, however, the Utz-tutored quintet began to click and the ex-collegians were left behind. Farris and Weiner starred for the Muhls. In a see-saw battle which saw first one team leading and then the other, ’Berg took revenge on Franklin Marshall, haging-up a brilliant 39 to 31 victory in a fast contest played on Feb. 3 in the Allentown High school palestra. ’Berg led the Nevonians at the half, 14 to 12. Rodgers was high scorer, garnering thir- teen points. With Sterner caging three sensational held goals in the last minute of play, the Cardinal and Gray forged way ahead of Lafayette to defeat the Maroon, 29 to 18, on Feb. 7, in the Allentown High school palestra. At half time the Muhls held an 11 to 8 advantage. Sterner and Saalfeld scintillated for ’Berg, although they only played ten minutes of the sec- ond half. By a sensational last minute rally the utzmen defeated the Albright cagemen, 29 to 26, on Feb. 10, in the Reading Y. M. C. A. for the Muhl’s second win over the Parsons in 1934. With thirty sec- onds left to play and the score dead- locked, 26 to 26, Saalfeld was fouled. He calmly stepped up to the charity stripe and scored the point which as- sured ’Berg of victory. Rodgers, Cuch- ran and Farris were the Muhl’s high scorers. In a nip and tuck battle which had the spectators on edge from whistle to whistle, the ’Berg quintet defeated “Horse” Chase’s Ursinus Bears, 32 to 28, on Feb. 14, in the Allentown High school palestra. In the second session the Muhls overcame the 17 to 12 advan- tage held at halftime by the Collegeville courtmen. Rodgers, with eleven points, led the Cardinal and Gray scoring. The Muhl basketeers rallied in a thrill- ing second-half drive to down the pass- ers of Drexel Institute, 32 to 25, on Feb. 17 in Philadelphia. With Cuchran tally- ing eleven points for the scoring honors of the encounter, ’Berg came from the short end of a 14 to 10 count at halftime to score twenty-two points in the sec- ond session to gain its sixth consecutive triumph. The pennant aspirations of the Car- dinal and Gray faded on Feb. 20 in the Allentown High school palestra, when Johnny Cico, Gettysburg forward, scored two double-deckers in the last five min- utes to provide the margin of victory for the defending champions. The score was 31 to 27. Trailing 17 to ill at halftime the Utzmen spurted in the second half to knot the count at 24-all only to have the Breamites finally win out. The playing of Saalfeld, Weiner and Rohn was out- standing for the Muhls. Saalfeld caged twelve points to lead the ’Berg scorers. The Muhls ran into some unexpected opposition from Lafayette on Feb. 21 in Memorial gymnasium in Easton but the Cardinal and Gray managed to win, 28 to 23, for their second triumph over the Marquis in 1934. The two teams were deadlocked, 13 to 13, at halftime, but then Lafayette forged ahead and, with only three minutes to play, led the Muhls, 22 to 19. Rapid-fire field goals by Rodgers, Saalfeld and Cuchran again enabled the Muhls to overcome the Maroon lead. Saalfeld was the out- standing player of the game, chalking up eleven counters. Hitherto unvictorious in Conference competition the Ursinus Bears snapped their long losing streak on Feb. 24 at Collegeville by snaring an unexpected 43 to 37 triumph over the Muhls. ’Berg’s STERNER ’34 KEEBLER ’35 A. WEINER ’34 defense cracked completely and the Utz- men trailed throughout the entire con- test. Ursinus was leading. 21 to 13, as the first half ended. Saalfeld led Utz’ scorers with fifteen points. With the Brown and White cagemen displaying their best form of the season, the ’Bergmen were decisively defeated, 55 to 36, on Feb. 28 in Taylor gymna- sium in Bethlehem. The Muhls started out fast and at one time in the initial half led the Engineers, 14 to 6. Lehigh rallied, however, and at halftime held a 23 to 20 advantage, which they gradual- ly enlarged in the second session. Saal- feld again was ’Berg’s best point-getter, ringing in ten counters. Although holding a 19 to 16 advantage at halftime, the Flying Dutchmen of Lebanon Valley could not withstand the second-half rush of the Utzmen who copped a thrilling 40 to 39 decision on Mar. 3 in the Lebanon High school gym- nasium. With the score tied at 38 to 38 and less than a minute to go, Rosen- berg, a Cardinal and Gray substitute, caged the deciding field goal in the last fifteen seconds. Saalfeld and Cuchran set the pace for the Muhls, garnering seventeen and ten points respectively. With a whirlwind finish ’Berg over- came a three-point disadvantage to de- feat Coach Bartlett’s Brown and White quintet 25 to 24 on Mar. 7 in the A’len- town High school palestra. Saalfeld, forded while attempting a one-hand shot, made good both charity tosses and then FARRIS 36 followed up with a goal from under the basket to place the Muhls in the van. Lehigh was ahead as the first half ended, 13 to 12. Saalfeld, Blank, Weiner and Steckel showed up well for the Utzmen. This game marked the last basketball contest under the Cardinal and Gray for Weiner, Rosenberg and Steckel. EASTERN PENNSYLVANIA COLLEGIATE CONFERENCE (Standing at close of 1934 season) Team Won Lost Pet. Gettysburg 11 1 .917 Franklin Marshall 8 4 .667 Muhlenberg 7 5 .583 Lebanon Valley G 6 .500 Albright 5 7 .417 Ursinus 3 9 .250 Drexel 2 10 .167 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS d 03 .2 C 2 CD CD rg C 3 m " 3.2 C 2 m d 2 O O o O Sh O o CL a o fr Cm !L E " CL Rodgers G-F 34 569 40 23 42 103 Saalfeld G-F 24 315 38 24 35 100 Cuchran C 33 501 41 15 29 97 Farris G 31 457 26 16 32 68 Blank F 27 304 18 20 35 56 Weiner G 31 477 11 15 36 37 Sterner F-C — — 9 5 10 23 Lepore F IS 143 6 10 12 22 Rosenberg G 18 120 2 2 7 6 Rohn C 10 78 2 2 3 6 Steckel C 5 45 2 0 1 4 Skrovanek G-F 10 55 1 0 0 2 Keebler C-G 6 20 1 0 1 2 Totals.. 197 132 243 526 507 STECKEL 34 CUCHRAN 35 Opponents Scoring 191 125 237 SI METZGAR ’34 Freshman Mgr. Freshman Basketball 1934 FROSH CAGE RESULTS Jan. 13 — Muhlenberg, 30; Allentown Y.M.C.A 24 Jan. 17 — Muhlenberg, 20; Herbst Cardinals 21 Jan. 20 — Muhlenberg, 26; Fairview Ponies 19 Jan. 31 — Muhlenberg, 21; Allentown Prep. School 32 Feb. 2 — Muhlenberg, 29; Herbst Cardinals 28 Feb. 3 — Muhlenberg, 24; Morton A. A 22 Feb. 7— Muhlenberg, 25; Lafayette 37 Feb. 14— Muhlenberg, 37; Shaeffer-Max 35 Feb. 20 — Muhlenberg, 21; Freeman’s Dairy 35 Feb. 28 — Muhlenberg, 19; Lehigh 25 Mar. 7 — Muhlenberg, 23; Lehigh 24 Totals 275 302 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS Goals Fouls Points Zweier 27 15 69 Grossman 22 17 61 Laing 12 12 36 Santopuoli 14 6 34 Kennedy 10 12 32 Farrell 13 4 30 Knouss 1 1 3 Totals 99 67 275 n tn c 3 w GEORGE HOLSTROM Coach HERBERT C. FOSTER, 34 Varsity Manager A Resume of the 1933 Baseball Season The 1933 Cardinal and Gray baseball nine fell one game short of achieving a .500 percentage for the season. Rainy weather prevented the Muhls from taking their regu’ar daily work-out on numer- ous occasions and this probably was one of the main causes of the team’s prolong- ed batting slump. “Horsey” Heist, ’34, returning to college after one year’s absence, hurled masterful ball, toiling on the mound in every game for the Hol- strom-coached outfit. The main kick of the Muhls was supplied by Lou Sterner, ' 35, third-sacker, who walloped the ball hard and often. Three Sophomore s held down regular positions on the team throughout the campaign — namely, Mike Lisetski, at short- stop ; Freddie Blank, in the left pasture ; and Joe Rodgers, in the center garden. Of course the services of Vince Takacs, “Dank” Giltner and Stan Carney, who graduated in 1932, were greatly missed. Muhlenberg vs. Lafayette The Muhlenberg College 1933 diamond edition picked on a tough foe for its in- augural encounter and dropped a 7 to 6 decision to Coach Bill Coughlin’s Lafay- OMBBOI ette College nine in a game played in Easton, on April 19, in near-football weather. A double-play in the ninth in- ning nipped a ’Berg rally, enabling the Leopards to nose out the Muhls. R. H. E. Muhlenberg 001 100 220 6 9 3 Lafayette 131 000 llx 7 10 1 Batteries — Heist and Weiner; Millard, Davis, Grynkewich and Wermuth. Muhlenberg vs. Haverford In the season’s opener on the home diamond, the Cardinal and Gray tossers tamed Haverford, on April 22, to the tune of 4 to 1. Heist hooked his pitching slants on a biting wind to hold Coach Roy Thomas’ Main-Liners to five hits, while striking out nine batsmen and not issuing a single base on balls. The Muhl hurler was really deserving of a shutout as Haverford’s only tally came as a re- sult of a pair of ’Berg errors. R. H. E. Haverford 000 010 000 1 5 2 Muhlenberg 020 001 Olx 4 8 2 Batteries — Nicholson, Tripp and Hagar; Heist and Weiner. KLOTZ, 34 A. WEINER, 34 May 6 — Muhlenberg vs. Penn A. C. at Allentown rained out. May 10 — Muhlenberg vs. Swarthmore at Swarthmore rained out. May 13 — Muhlenberg vs. Penn State at State College rained out. Muhlenberg vs. Lehigh Bunching hits with Brown and White errors, the Holstromites turned back Coach Bob Adams’ Lehigh University nine by the score of 6 to 4 in a game played on May 17, on the home diamond. Heist toiled on the mound for the ’Berg- men and, although reached for one more safety than the Muhls were able to col- lect off the delivery of “Chip” Dow, the diminutive Lehigh righthander, the Muhl ace was invincible with men on bases. R. H. E. Lehigh 200 000 200 4 8 5 Muhlenberg 201 300 OOx 6 7 5 Batteries — Dow and Ock, Heist and W einer. Muhlenberg vs. Penn A. C. In a hard-hitting tilt the Penn Athletic Club’s diamond athletes, coached by Amos A. Strunk, nosed out the Muhls, on May 20, at the Philadelphia National League ball park, by the score of 5 to 4. Base blows were numerous throughout the fray, the longest being a homer by Lou Sterner, who drove the “apple” far into the deep left-field bleachers. R. H. E. Muhlenberg 100 110 100 4 12 3 Penn A. C 010 101 llx 5 13 2 Batteries — Heist and Weiner; Walsh, Reynolds, Ushka and Harwi. Muhlenberg vs. Temple In a game interrupted on account of heavy outbursts of rain the Temple Uni- versity nine defeated Muhlenberg, 7 to 5, on May 27, in Philadelphia. Both hur- lers, Heist, for the Cardinal and Gray, and Eddie Cramer, for the Cherry and White, pitched effective ball. For the first five frames Heist allowed Coach “Pep” Young’s Owls only three hits. In addition, the Muhl righthander turned back ten batsmen at the plate. R. H. E. Muhlenberg 100 004 00 5 6 6 Temple 001 002 04 7 9 4 Batteries — Heist and Weiner ; Cramer and Patton. MATUSKA, 33 KUNTZ, 33 NIXON, ’33 BLANK, ’35 HEIST, ’34 Muhlenberg vs. Lafayette Playing before several hundred Old Grads on Alumni Day, June 3, the ’Berg tossers were humbled by the Lafayette college nine behind the superb twirling of their ace, “Dodo” Davis. Cardinal and Gray errors were responsible for several of the Maroon runs. Joe Markle, Sopho- more hurler, started on the mound for the Muhls but was chased in the second canto. It was his first appearance in a Muhlenberg uniform. Heist replaced Markle and pitched fine ball for the re- mainder of the distance. R. H. E. Lafayette 210 100 003 7 17 2 Muhlenberg 000 000 200 2 7 4 Batteries — Davis and Wermuth; Markle, Heist and Weiner. Muhlenberg vs. Lehigh A big Lehigh Alumni Day crowd saw its Alma Mater’s baseball nine go down to defeat by the score of 8 to 4 on June 10, in Taylor Stadium, losing for the RODGERS, ’35 second time in the 1933 season to Coach Holstrom’s Cardinal and Gray tossers. Erratic fielding by the Brown and White paved the way for several of ’Berg’s runs. Heist was touched liberally for hits but he tightened in the pinches and was given peerless support by his mates. Seven Muhls, who helped make baseball history at their Alma Mater, sang their “Swan Song” in this game. It was the final appearance in a Cardinal and Gray diamond uniform for Captain Bill Nixon, Joe Matuska, Sam Shimer, A1 Kunz, Johnny May, “Spike " Saalfeld and Johnny Mitchell. Coach George R. Hol- strom also terminated his coaching career at Muhlenberg with this victory over the Brown and White. Holstrom ' s personal- ity, character and pep will be greatly missed in the future. R. H. E. Muhlenberg 002 020 301 8 15 3 Lehigh 010 000 030 4 11 1 Batteries — Heist and Weiner; Dow, Glick and Ock. STERNER, ’34 SAUL, ’35 SHIMER, ’33 MARKLE, ’35 LISETSKI, ’35 Individual Batting Averages Sterner G. 7 A.B. 24 R. 8 H. 11 Pet. .458 Blank 5 19 4 7 .368 Lisetski 7 30 3 10 .333 Matuska 7 24 3 7 .292 Weiner 7 30 4 8 .267 Shimer 6 16 3 4 .250 1 leist 7 21 5 5 .238 Nixon 7 25 2 5 .200 Klotz 6 15 1 3 .200 Kunz 4 14 0 2 .143 Rodgers 6 18 2 2 .111 Markle 1 0 0 0 .000 Saul 1 0 0 0 .000 Bloom 1 1 0 0 .000 Saalfeld, O 1 1 0 0 .000 Team Ave 7 238 35 64 .269 Varsity Manager Herbert C. Foster, ’34 Assistant Managers Russel L. Krapf, ’35 Marlin L. Herb, ’35 Scrub Managers Joseph Assed, Jr., ’36 Jas. H. Turrell, ’36 STRAUB ’34 Varsity Manager HEMSTREET ’35 Asst. Varsity Manager A Resume of the 1933 Track Season Despite the fact that a lack of finances necessitated action by the new Board of Athletic Control curtailing the major part of the 1933 track schedule, the Cardinal and Gray was represented at both the Middle Atlantic States Collegiate Athletic Association track and field meet, and the Central Pennsylvania Collegiate Track Conference meet. Coach “Scotty” Renwick, however, was permitted to en- ter only three men in this competition. Despite the lack of quantity, the quality of the three Muhlenberg trackmen was unquestionable. The scarlet-clad track and field team from Rutgers’ University swept through the twenty-first annual M. A. S. C. A. A. track and field meet without very much opposition May 12 and 13, Wiliam- son field at Franklin and Marshall College in Lancaster, and succeeded to the title that Manhattan College did not defend. The stalwart band from the banks of New Jersey’s Raritan river gathered up a total of 42 points whi ' e its chief competitor, Lehigh University, coukl score only 36. In order behind Lehigh were Swarthmore, 30 points ; Lafayette, 29; Dickinson, 16; St. Jos- eph’s, 13 : Johns Hopkins, 12 ; Muhlen- berg, 9 ; F. M., 8 ; Drexel, 6 ; Delaware, 5 t 2 ; Gettysburg, 4 2 ; and Haverford, 2. “Winnie” Welsh, ’33, copped all of the Muh ' s’ nine points. He placed first in the 880-yard run with a time of 2 minutes I and 1.4 seconds for a new school record, and took second place in the one mile race, Franklin Miller, of Swarthmore, coming out first. Don Schlotter, ’33, and Jack Requa, ’34, were ’Berg’s other rep- resentatives. Coach “Scotty” Renwick’s “vest- pocket” track team terminated its abbre- viated 1933 schedule by copping four first places and one second place for a total of 23 points, to finish fourth in the class “A” competition of the annual C. P. C. T. C. meet held on May 20, Biddle field Dickinson College in Carlisle. For the second time in two years Dickinson and Franklin and Marshall tied for first honors with 43 points each. Bucknell finished in third place with 25 points : Muhlenberg, fourth with 23 points ; and Gettysburg, fifth with 20 points. In the finale of his collegiate endeavors on the cinder path, Welsh was entered in the three distance races. This bespectacl- ed, diminutive long distance star carried off the high individual scoring honors of the meet by winning both the mile and two-mile races and taking second place in the half-mile for a total of 13 points. Schlotter also ended his collegiate en- deavors with a remarkable performance. He grabbed both the century and furlong races for a total of ten points. Individual Records M.A.S. C.P. C.A.A. C.T.C. Total Welsh 9 13 22 Schlotter 10 10 SCHLOTTER ’33 WELSH ’33 REQUA, ’34 Muhlenberg College Sports Schedule BASE BALL— 1935 April 24 — Bucknell at Lewisburg. April 25 — Penn State at State College. April 22 — Lafayette at Easton. May 5 — Penn A. C. at Allentown. May 9 — Swarthmore at Swarthmore. May 12 — Temple at Allentown. May 16 — Lehigh at Allentown. May 26 — Penn A. C. at Philadelphia. June 2 — Lafayette at Allentown. June 9 — Lehigh at Bethlehem. TRACK— 1935. April 27-28- — Penn Relays at Philadelphia May 16 — Triangular Relay Meet. Lehigh, Lafayette and Muhlen- burg. May 19— C. P. C. T. C. Meet. M. A. S. C. A. A. Meet. TENNIS — 935 April 14 — Swarthmore at Swarthmore. April 18 — Lafayette at Easton. April 21 — Lehigh at Bethlehem. April 26 — Dickinson at Allentown. April 28 — Albright at Reading. April 30 — Moravian at Allentown. May 5— Ursinus at Collegeville. May 8 — Albright at Allentown. May 10 — Franklin and Marshal at Al- lentown. (Home games to be played at Oak- mont Tennis Club). VARSITY FOOTBALL— 1934. September 19 — St. Joseph at Allentown. October 6 — Lafayette at Easton. October 13 — Lebanon Valley at Allen- town. October 20 — Albright at Allentown. October 27 — Gettysburg at Allentown. November 3 — Franklin Marshall at Lancaster. November 10 — Ursinus at Allentown. November 17 — Lehigh at Bethlehem. November 24 — Dickinson at Carlisle. VARSITY BASKETBALL— 1935 January 5 — Penn A. C. at Philadelphia January 9 — Drexel at Allentown. January 12 — Lafayette a tEaston. January 16 — Albright at Reading. January 19 — F. M. at Allentown. January 26 — Penn A. C. at Allentown. February 2- — Drexel at Philadelphia. February 6 — Lebanon Valley at Allen- town. February 9 — Gettysburg at Allentown. February 13— Ursinus at Collegeville. February 16 — Albright at Allentown. February 20 — Gettysburg at Gettysburg. February 23 — Ursinus at Allentown. February 26 — F. M. at Lancaster. February 27 — Lafayette at Allentown. March 2 — Lebanon valltey at Ahn- ville. March 6 — Lehigh at Bethlehem. FISCHER ’36 COOPER ’33 HILTON ’36 A Resume of the 1933 Tennis Season The 1933 Cardinal and Gray tennis team, although winning only two of its seven matches (one terminating in a deadlock), displayed such progress in the advancement of that sport that Muhlen- berg College was invited, for the first time, to send a team to participate in the National Intercollegiate tennis tourna- ment. Opening the season against St. Joseph’s, Philadelphia, on April 24, the ’Berg netmen deadlocked the Crim- son and Gray, 4 to 4, darkness term- inating the competition. The Hawks held the edge in the singles, while the Muhls reigned supreme in all of the doubles matches. The ’Berg racquetmen were subdued by Lehigh on April 29 in Bethlehem by a 6 to 3 score. The Brown and White edged out the Muhls in both the singles and doubles matches. The opening home match of the sea- son for the Cardinal and Gray was staged on May 1, at the Oakmont Ten- nis club, with Moravian as the opposi- tion. The ’Bergmen easily took the match, 5 to 2. The Muhls held the edge in the singles, but only broke even in the doubles matches. Bucknel! took a 4 to 3 decision from the ’Bergmen on May 12, on the Al- lentown Fair Ground courts. The Bisons copped two out of the five singles matches and made a clean sweep of the two doubles. The Muhls dealt out a severe trouncing to Lafayette on May 5, in Easton, scoring a 7 to 1 victory over the Maroon. ’Berg won five of the three doubles, the third doubles match resulting in a draw. Coach Caruthers’ Lehigh “racket- eers” nosed out the ’Bergmen on May 18, at the Oakmont Tennis club, 5 to 4. Each team won three singles matches but the Brown and White gained their advantage by copping two out of the three doubles. The Bucknell netmen defeated the Muhls, 7 to 2, May 23, in Lewisburg. The victors won all three doubles matches and four of the six singles. SINGLES Player Won Lost Hilton 7 0 Coooer 5 2 Miller 3 3 Herzenberg 2 3 Fine 2 4 Seegers 1 2 Fischer 1 4 Koch 0 1 DOUBLES Won Lost Tied Hilton Cooper 4 2 1 Fischer Seegers Ill Fine Miller 2 3 0 Seegers Fine 0 2 0 Fischer Herzenberg 0 2 0 — ttyw ■HU INTRAMURALS FOR THE SEASON 1932-1933 Champions ALPHA TAU OMEGA COMPOSITE SCORES Basket Playground Volley Tennis Track Total ball ball ball Alpha Tau Omega 80 50 70 29 35 264 Theta Kappa Nu 80 70 65 20 25 260 Cardinal and Gray 82y 2 55 45 24 23 229 Phi Kappa Tau 65 45 50 26 28 214 Phi Epsilon Pi 65 65 55 16 11 212 Delta Theta 55 60 55 21 8 199 Theta Upsilon Omega 45 35 45 23 17 165 Philos 60 40 35 16 7 158 RESULTS OF THE 1933 INTRAMURAL TRACK AND FIELD MEET Event Winner Time 100-yard dash Harland, T. U. 0 10.4 sec. 220-yard dash Wilkinson, A. T. 0 24.1 sec. Quarter-mile race Marquet, A. T. 0 57.2 sec. Half-mile race Latta, A. T. 0 2 min. 18 sec. One-mile race Latta, A. T. 0 5 min. 16 sec. Two-mile race Singer, D. T 13 min. 35 sec. 120-yard high hurdles Marquet, A. T. 0 18 sec. 220-yard low hurdles Marquet, A. T. 0 28.4 sec. Running high jump Leemer, P. K. T 5 ft. 6 in. Running broad jump Harland, T. U. 0 20 ft. 8 in. Pole vault Keebler, Philos 9 ft. 8 in. Shot put Wavrek, Card. Gray 36 ft. 3 in. Discus throw Beemer, P. K. T 106 ft. 9p2 in. Javelin throw A. Weiner, P. E. P 147 ft. ORGANIZATIONS The Student Council Representing, as it does, each fraternity on the campus and having one representative from each forty non-fraternity students, the Student Council is well fitted to act as the supreme governing body of the students and as the medium through which the will of the students is voiced. It is this organization which welcomes the incoming freshman and attempts to instill in him the spirit of Muhlenberg; it makes and enforces freshman regula- tions; it is the executor of the Student Body Constitution, and at the end of the second semester it brings to a close the social season at Muhlenberg by spon- soring an annual Spring Student Body Dance. PERSONNEL Officers Paul Marzolf Fred Oberlander Conrad Raker Howard Miller ... Frank Bianca Gordon Feller Frederick Krause IT. Edward Krooss Paul Marzolf Howard Miller Russel Nehf Fred Oberlander Conrad Raker Leon Rosenberg Frederick Wavrek Armon Williams President Vice-President Secretary .„ T rea surer Members Delta Theta Non-Fraternity Non-Fraternity Theta Upsilon Omega Non-Fraternity Philos Theta Kappa Nu Non-Fraternity Alpha Tau Omega Phi Epsilon Pi Non-Fraternity Phi Kappa Tau “M” Club The Varsity M Club has been in existence at Muhlenberg for eight years, having been organized in 1925 by Coach Wood. Its membership is representative of the best at Muhlenberg, for a student becomes eligible to join immediately upon earning his varsity letter — in itself a most distinctive achievement and equal to any scholastic honor in the mind of the wearer. Along with a commendable history of constant advancement and influence in athletic circles, the Club serves Muhlenberg by contributing to the maintenance of the college recreation hall, Band, and Student Loan Fund. Evidenced by the manner in which it is continually kept in use, the recreation hall serves the purpose denoted in its name. The M Club contributes to the social season at Muhlenberg by sponsoring an annual M Club dance. This year the dance was held in December at Ye Olde Country Club and proved to be highly successful. President Max Levine Vice-President Albert Klotz Secretary ...Charles W. Carter Treasurer Members Albert Weiner Seniors Juniors Sophomores Angelo Bianco Fred Blank Steve Farris Charles W. Carter William Bloom George Koehler Herbert Foster John Dietrich Dick Gramley Harold Herzenberg Albert Klotz Herbert Hilton Harold F. Miller Gene Lepore Harold 0. Miller Max Levine Russel Nehf Michael Lisetski Leon Rosenberg Lloyd Moyer Lester Smith Si Padolin John Smith Christopher Riley Edgar Steckel Joe Rodgers Lou Sterner Rodger Rohn Fred Wavrek Neil Steigerwalt Albert Weiner Donald Young Tim Watkins Faculty Members Coach John L. Utz Prof. Harold Marks Prof. Albert Fasig William Ritter Prof. Luther J. Deck Harry Benfer Prof. John Shankweiler William Renwick The Muhlenberg Christian Association The primary purpose of the Muhlenberg Christian Association is to develop Christian character and manhood and to foster a spirit of good fellowship among the members of the student body. In addition to this spiritual objective, the M. C. A. has several other more concrete functions, such as the editing of the Freshman Bible, the welcoming program for the incoming freshman, and the supervision of pep smokers and pajama parades held preceding important foot- ball games. This year the Association sponsored an entirely new kind of Freshman Week program. In addition to a large campfire and reception in the college grove, the college Y. M. C. A. arranged for several trips to local points of interest for the benefit of the freshmen and also a theatre party at the Nineteenth Street Theatre. PERSONNEL Officers William M. MacMillan President James A. Angstadt Vice-President John F. Smith Secretary Malcolm M. Parker Treasurer Rev. Harry P. C. Cressman —Faculty Advisor Members Russel Krapf Samuel Kidd Harry Underwood Edward Latta Conrad Raker Myron Eichner Rodger Rohn Roy Shupp Frank Radcliffe Der Deutsche Verein Der Deutsche Verein or the German Club is Muhlenberg’s oldest and most democratic organization. It was founded upon a desire to achieve a better ac- quaintance with the literature and customs of the Fatherland unattainable in the classroom. Under the able direction of Dr. Preston A. Barba and Dr. Harry Hess Reichard the club has become an institution which amply fulfills the ideals upon which it was founded. It meets every two weeks with all business and activities conducted in the German tongue, thus bringing the students of the German Depart- ment to a closer and more appreciative acquaintance of the language and literature of the Teutonic people. Although this organization probably has more loyal and active members than any other upon the campus, and is, to a great degree, social in its nature, it is strictly an honor society. Membership requirements are superior grades in the study of German and at least two years of work in that department. Officers First Semester Second Semester Alfred Shoemaker ... James Angstadt Walbert S. Grasley. Luther Schlenker .. Vorsitzender Vize-Vorsitsender Schrift fuehrer Kassenwart Gordon Feller Luther Schlenker Charles Klein Arthur Hottel Vorsitzender Vize-Vorsitsende r Schrift fuehrer Kassenzmrt James A. Angstadt John Brockhoff Frederick Eagle Lester Fetter Theodore Fischer Donald Hausman John W. Hollenbach Charles A. Klein Richard Kuntzleman Gabriel M. Lucas Lloyd Moyer Charles Roth Warren C. Schlegel Alfred Shoemaker Luther Wenner Lester C. Wolfe Members Bernard Blackman William Coleman Elmer Fahringer James Fenstermacher John B. Freeman Marlin Herb Arthur H. Hottel Earl A. Koch Robert A. Laubach Edwin Maletsky Frank E. Radclifife Alfred W. Schaeffer Luther Schlenker Byron Stauffer John E. Whitteker Joseph J. Zamites Fred Blank Charles Cressman Edwin M. Faust Gordon Feller Walbert Grasley Clarence A. Holland Robert D. Kerstetter Russel L. Krapf Karl M. Lehr J. Edgar Miller Conrad W. Raker Luther Schaeffer Frederick Schlick Samuel Stauffer Chester Woodring George O. Zanger t. The Pre-Medical Society The Pre-Medical Society is one of the newest and yet probably the most active organization on the campus. Students expecting to enter the medical pro- fession and satisfactorily completing their first year at college with the attainment of at least a C average in Freshman chemistry, and having elected in their Sopho- more year courses required for entrance into medical schools, are admitted to membership. To Dr. John V. Shankweiler goes the credit for the organization of this group in 1931. During the two years of its existence it has enjoyed probably more activity than any other organization on the campus. The society secures prominent local medical men to lecture to its members together with several illus- trated lectures throughout the year in the form of educational moving-pictures and slides. Annual visits to health institutions, hospitals, and medical schools, also form an important part of the society’s program as planned by Dr. Shankweiler. The Pre-Medical Society looks forward again this year to a very active season with the continuation of its former policies and the further development of its beneficial aspects. PERSONNEL Officers Harry B. Underwood President Monroe E. Shack Vice-President Robert H. Dilcher Secretary Harold E. Everitt Treasurer Dr. John V. Shankweiler Faculty Advisor Members: Norton L. Behney, George C. Brong, Carl Clayton, Russell H. Derr, Frank DiRuggiero, William Fetherolf, Charles Goldsmith, Herbert Gorin, Walter J. Harland, Albert Herzenberg, Clarence Holland, Edward T. Horn, Rudolph Koster, John S. Kuntz, Chas. Lichtenwalner, Milton Lowy, Joseph Markle, Flubert C. Meyers, Joseph Mintz, Forrest G. Moyer, Clinton Nickel, Ernest Papp, David S. Raub, Karl Reinhard, J. A. Rogokos, Charles Schaeffer, Morton Silverman, Francis Tomaine, Myron Warshaw, Thomas Weaber, Donald Weinsheimer, John Wolf, H. D. Wucher. Honorary Member: Prof. H. E. Miller. The John Marshall Club The John Marshall Club was organized on the campus in 1932 by students interested in the study of law. The purpose of this organization is to foster an active and progressive interest in the legal profession. Interesting lectures and legal discussions are planned for all of the meetings. At some time during the present year members of the club will present a mock trial in assembly for the entertainment of the student body. PERSONNEL Officers Ray Brennen President John Yerger Vice-President Robert Decker Secretary-Treasurer Dr. Henry R. Mueller Faculty Advisor Ray Brennen Bernard Frank William Holzer Earl Koch W. Gerhard Leaman Francis Sheehan Lester Smith John H. Yerger Members Harold Birns Donald Hausman Gerald Horowitz Sidney Koorse Clarence Ritter Morton Slier Wallace Webster Robert Decker Marlin Herb Robert D. Kerstetter Edward Latta Lawrence Rupp Arthur Simensky Armon T. Williams Mask and Dagger Mask and Dagger was founded on the Muhlenberg campus in 1931. Its purpose is three-fold : to produce plays, to interest students in theatrical work, and to discuss current questions of interest concerning the theatre. Last spring the play “Like Falling Leaves” was produced quite successfully through the co-operation of Cedar Crest, and this year the Chimes Club of Cedar Crest is again co-operating with the Mask and Dagger in producing a number of plays. There are no standard requirements for membership in Mask and Dagger, for it is not strictly an honorary organization. Applicants must, however, prove their ability to appear on the stage before an audience and must signify an active interest in drama. A faculty committee composed of Dr. Brown, Dr. Zartman, Dr. Jackson, Prof. Simpson and Mr. Coder, acts as an advisory body to Mask and Dagger. PERSONNEL Officers Angelo Bianco President Russel Krapf Vice-President Luther Wenner Secretary John Gosztonyi Treasurer Members John Hollenbach Asa Wohlsen John Hemmerly Jack Hemstreet Leonard Hodgkinson Clarence Ritter Theodore Fischer Woodrow Kistler Ray Held John Whitteker Carl Clayton Charles Cressman The Lutheran Students’ Association The Lutheran Students’ Association of Muhlenberg College is a member of a nation-wide group which is represented in practically all universities and col- leges. Its establishment upon our campus is of recent date and is partly the result of a conference of the L. S. A. which was held here in 1932. Since that time it has taken into its group Dr. Fritch ' s Discussion Hour and the Ministerial Club. This year it is offering to all students three series of lectures in charge of Rev. Stine, Dr. Brandes, and Dr. Fritch. Muhlenberg Night, which is held once a month, is part of the L. S. A., and this year the students living in the dormitories are invited to attend a short devotional period held every Tuesday night under the auspices of this organization, which also takes charge of the tabulating of Chapel attendance. The Lutheran Students’ Association takes this opportunity of inviting all of the students on the Muhlenberg Campus to join with them in the carrying out of their ideals of decency, honesty, morality, and the building of Christian charac- ter. Honorary Members Dr. John A. W. Haas Reverend Flarry C. Cressman Reverend Russell Stine Reverend Robert Fritsch Officers Russel Krapf President Edward Horn Vice-President Russell Beazley Secretary Luther Schaeffer Treasurer Members: Charles T. Herman, William H. MacMillan, Myron T. Eichner, Walter R. Guigley, Walter R. Harrison, Samuel E. Kidd, William Pfeiffer, J. Edgar Miller, John Bennetsch, Byron Stauffer, Henry B. Grove, Richard Miller, Charles Cressman, Robert D. Kerstetter, Gaetano Lupoli, Frank Radcliffe, John Brokhoff, Russel Krapf, Luther Schaeffer, Russel Beazley, Gerald Jacoby, Randall Zerbe, Frederick Gregorius, Homer Yiengst, Julius Kish, Russell H. Derr, Edward Horn. wamm C 3 Q — 1 — The Muhlenberg Weekly During the past year the Weekly did not endeavor to accomplish any radical changes from the policy of the staff immediately preceding it. In- stead of attempting sweeping changes, the staff of the Weekly thought it best to improve the changes already made. Toward this end the news policy be- gan to lay more stress on club news and prewriteups, because it was be- lieved that the Weekly left the press too late to make general news inter- esting. Some individuals thought that out-of-town football games were em- phasized to a point of extremity. How- ever, the presence of a new coach and the excellent showing of the team in the fact of what was termed a “suicide” schedule led to the belief that football deserved a greater share of publicity than it had received here- tofore. Home games were not covered in proportion to away games because of the fact that a large portion of the student body was unable to attend out- of-town games in spite of great in- terest in the team. In keeping with the general attitude of college newspapers, columns were used extensively. Profiles attempted to give a picture of what its writer thought to be the biggest news of the week in a manner which departed from the general run of straight news writing as found in the metropolitan newspapers. Because the student body believed that columns should be by all means diverse, the staff accepted this point of view and attempted to break away from the would-be Walter Win- ched columns so universal in collegiate circles. To this end. Torts and Re- torts and Hobo Reminiscences were introduced along with Profiles and Stage Whispers. Torts and Retorts was intended to impart a humorous tone to the Weekly without getting into personalities, and Padolin’s well- written column became one of the best features of any Weekly. Stage Whis- pers, it was believed by the staff, would be especially interesting to the eighty-five percent of the student body interested in dramatics. The makeup was not changed from the excellent system put into use last year. The balanced page remained predominant although the focus make- up appeared occasionally. Front page news continued, as conservatism would suggest, to remain the same each week. A six-page issue became the rule rath- er than the exception, a condition not previously known. The Weekly takes this opportunity to thank the staff for its splendid co- operation and also the faculty and the student body for their excellent sup- port. THE STAFF Editor-in-Chief IT. Edward Krooss Business Manager Herbert C. Foster Faculty Supervisor Dr. Anthony S. Corbiere Senior Associate Editors Morton I. Silverman John Bennetch Paul L. Marzolf Senior Associate Business Manager Robert E. Mentzer Junior Associate Editors Russel L. Krapf Luther Ziegler Fred J. Schlick Marlin Herb Junior Business Associates John Gosztonyi Francis Sheehan John S. Kanvuck Sophomore Business Associates Fred Thomas Ernest Seegers Francis E. Gaumer Sophomore Harold Birns Donald Hausman Richard Miller David Smith Reporters Bernard Blackman Joseph Keiper William Pfeifer John Whitteker fessional work, which was personally supervised by Mr. Baliban. The Schlechter Printing Company, Allen- town, and the Pontiac Engraving Company, Chicago, 111., have made possible the presentation of the staff’s ideas in engraving, printing, binding, and covers. Arthur Sharp of the Pon- tiac Engraving Company must be given credit for completely servicing the 1935 Ciarla. The staff wishes to acknowledge, in the deepest sincerity, the splendid co- operation and assistance received from all departments and from its connec- tions with the business world in the publication of this Ciarla. Ciarla This year’s Ciarla differs from that of previous years in that it has dis- continued the usual art work intro- ducing the various divisions of the book and employs in its stead a com- plete photography theme, using a window motif and specially treated photo-combinations. This Ciarla has been intended to be a simple one, using silver and black as its color scheme and having dull black printing as the background for the photography work. In the arrangement of groups, views, and individual photographs, the staff has called upon the Merin- Baliban studios for the necessary pro- ■ Editor-in-Chief Bernard Frank Assistant Editor Charles A. Klein Editorial Staff Myron Warshaw Luther Schlenker Robert D. Kerstetter William G. Holzer Henry A. Minnich Walter R. Harrison Marlin L. Herb Russel L. Krapf Lester C. Wolfe Business Manager Francis L. Sheehan Assistants Joseph G. Nagle John Kanyuck Frederick Eagle Jack Flemstreet Advertising Manager Hubert Bury Assistants John C. Gosztonyi Lester C. Wolfe Lloyd Moyer Photography Editors N. Herbert Gorin John Brokhoff The Band Officers Faculty Adviser Dr. George H. Brandes Director Ray Wahl Assistant Directors Ray Brennan Isadore Klitzner Drum Major Russel Kistler Personnel Trumpet — Henry Brader John R. Brokhoff Isadore Klitzner Robert Peters James Powers Alvin Roy William Saalfeld Arwen Spangler Clarinet — Hayden Begel Edward Benner George Boyer Dale Case Fred Dry Robert Fenstermacher Maurice Gerhardt Herbert Gorin John Hess Jack Fabold Morris Marsteller Kenneth Miller Fawrence Reese Melville Schmoyer Floyd Smith Fred Thomas, Jr. Gail W intermute Allen Ziegenfuss Saxophone — Nelson Bramer Ray Brennan Joseph Keiper Donald Noll Samuel Schadt Flute — Marlin Herb Luther Schlenker Alto — Clarence Putt Thomas Scheirer Earl Walbert Trombone — J. Creighton Christman William Coleman Donald Feyrer Luther Gougher Richard Kuntzleman Roy Shupp Baritone — Donald Weinshimer Tuba — Winfield Kistler Ernest Knauss Frederick Schlick Percussion — Stover Crouthamel Francis Gaumer Richard Gilberty George Legg Luther Schaeffer Standard Bearers — James Angstadt George Woodring Librarians — James Angstadt Russell Kistler George Woodring As time goes by there is a constant change in all things. If it were not so, there would be no progress. This year one of the most radical changes, that this campus has ever seen, has shaken up the band. Heretofore the band was organized somewhat on the order of a caste sys- tem. Seniors were the priveleged mem- bers and the incoming freshmen were forced to take whatever was left. This year, however, all of the applicants were accepted solely on their ability. When the men were assembled for their first rehearsal, they were given separate auditions. Each aspiring musician was required to play a cer- tain strain of music, his tone values and execution being adjudged by two auditors seated in an adjoining room, who neither saw nor knew the identi- ties of the men whose abilities they judged. The reason for these auditions was twofold : first, to determine whether or not the applicant was a sufficiently skilled musician to become a member of the band, and, secondly, to assign a position to each successful applicant. In this way each man re- ceived a fair trial. Insofar as results are concerned, the students now entertain an entirely new attitude toward the band. Up to this year, the band received very little sup- port from the student body and was the butt for much derision on the part of the students. This year, however, these jeers have turned to praise, not only for the band’s improved repor- toire, but also for its much-improved marching which has been sadly neg- lected in the past. 1 $ A ■ lHA . 3. I The Chapel Choir hearsals. They have also been supplied with uniform black bow ties which greatly enhance the appearance of the choir vestments given to them last year. This organization has become well known throughout the state and neigh- boring states as well. Evidence of its popularity may be seen in the number of engagements filled during the year in such cities as Allentown, Bethle- hem, Easton, Stroudsburg, Reading, Philadelphia, Trenton, N. J., Wil- mington, Del., and New York City. Director Under the capable leadership of Dr. Harold K. Marks, the Muhlenberg college chapel choir has become one of the most active and progressive or- ganizations on the campus. This year the membership of the choir numbers approximately forty men, all of whom have participated splendidly at re- hearsals and in enriching and inspiring the Vesper services conducted every Sunday afternoon in the Egner- Hartzell memorial chapel. In the large repertoire of this organization we find the works of such composers as Bach, Handel, Mozart, Brahms, Mendels- sohn, Protheroe, Bortnianski, and Whit ford. This year the members of the choir have been excused from physical edu- cation as a measure of compensation for the time which they spend at re- Dr. Harold K. Marks Student Manager William H. MacMillan First Tenor — Richard Miller Joseph Zamites William H. MacMillan Malcolm Parker Russel Beazley Karl Reinhardt Charles Schaeffer Second Tenor — Theodore Fischer William Hughes George Koehler John Hollenbach Hubert Meyers Thomas Strohl Albert Ursin Ralph Ebert Carl Hessinger ■ First Bass — Frederick Schlick Harry Curl Titus Scholl Joseph Schantz William Coleman Walter Harrison Lloyd Moyer John Yerger Thomas Castagna Second Bass — Russel Derr Winfield Altemose Myron Eichner Luther Schlenker Conrad Raker Rollin Schaeffer Robert King William Pfeifer Asa Wohlsen Debate Due to the fact that only one man was lost from last year’s debate squad through graduation, a successful season in debating has been anticipa ted for this year. Last year ' s schedule was rather strenuous, including such teams as Temple, Villanova, Susquehanna, Lehigh, Gettysburg, and Albright, but on the whole, the team gave a splendid account of itself. One of the high-lights of the season was the Muhlenberg victory over Temple, by a team composed of Brokhoff, Kerstetter, and Heist. This year the squad is fortunate in having as its coach Mr. Ephraim B. Everitt of the English department at Muhlenberg, who figured prominently in debating and in oratory at Penn State. The question selected for the season is as follows : Resolved, that the government should own and operate all banking institutions in the United States. The schedule for the year calls for approximately fifteen varsity debates and for four freshman debates. The straight two and three man American system will be used in all of these debates. John Hollenbach Bernard Erank Morton Silverman Joseph Keiper Squad Robert D. Kerstetter John R. Brokhoff Ray Brennan Conrad W. Raker Russel L. Krapf John H. Yerger Ray F. Anderson The Forensic Council Through the efforts of the coach of debating, Mr. Everitt. and the debate manager, Jack Hemstreet, the Forensic Council was founded on the Muhlenberg campus in 1932. It is the purpose of this organization to encourage, govern, and aid debating and oratory at Muhlenberg. Although the Forensic Council is quite new on the campus, it has already gained great popularity, and is well known for its practical methods of conducting debates. The Council has taken special interest in freshman debating and is planning a rather extensive schedule in order to pre- pare men for the varsity team. To become a member of the Forensic Council, an applicant must participate either in one Freshman debate or one intercollegiate debate, or take part in an oratorical contest here at Muhlenberg. PERSONNEL Officers Jack Hemstreet President John Carapella Vice-President Herbert Hilton Secretary pro tem Russell Krapf Treasurer Members Ray Brennan Bernard Frank Russell Krapf John Brokhoff Jack Hemstreet W. Gearhart Leaman John Carapella John Hollenbach Morton Silverman Gordon Feller Robert Kerstetter John Yerger Oratory The Pennsylvania Intercollegiate Oratorical Union was founded in 1910 for the purpose of stimulating a greater interest in and broadening the scope of forensic activity. The membership of the organization is limited to the state of Pennsylvania and includes such institutions as Muhlenberg, Albright, Ursinus, Bucknell University, Franklin and Marshall, Gettysburg, Lafayette, Allegheny, Waynesburg, Juniata, Thiel, Geneva, and Grove City College. Due to the fact that the representatives of the majority of these institutions were not prepared to compete for the state championship, the annual state contest was canceled this year for the first time in the history of the organization. This year ' s representative of Muhlenberg in the state contest at Geneva College was to have been Mr. Bernard Frank, ’35, who was awarded first place in the annual college oratorical contest in January, at which time he competed with Mr. Gordon Feller, ’34, Mr. Robert D. Kerstetter, ’35, and Mr. John W. Hollen- bach, ’34. Under the able instruction of Dr. John D. M. Brown, head of the English Department and for twenty-three years coach of oratory, Muhlenberg orators have placed first twelve times ; second seven times ; and third three times in the state contests. To Dr. Brown goes all the credit for the effective training behind this unusually sustained forensic success at Muhlenberg. ; H m £ | Tau Kappa Alpha Tau Kappa Alpha, national honorary forensic fraternity, holds the honor of being the first strictly honor society to be organized at Muhlenberg. The local chapter was formed in the spring of 1926 through the efforts of Arthur Gillespie, former coach of debating, and was granted in recognition of Muhlenberg’s singular success in the fields of forensic endeavor, debating, and oratory. The chapter here at Muhlenberg has always been small and consequently a Tau Kappa Alpha key has become all the more valuable. It is the aim of this fraternity to recognize excellence in public speaking and to make membership a fitting reward for forensic activity. PERSONNEL Officers Russel Krapf President John H. Yerger Secretary-Treasurer Fratres in Facultate Dr. John D. M. Brown Dr. Harry H. Reichard Fratres in Coi.legio John R. Brockhoff Russel L. Krapf John H. Yerger Kappa Phi Kappa Kappa Phi Kappa, national professional educational fraternity, has behind it a remarkable record of achievement throughout the six years that it has been established at Muhlenberg. The requirement for membership in this organization is a minimum grade of B in at least six hours of work in Education during the first semester of activity in that department. The local chapter seeks not only professional contacts but also social contacts. Topics of interest are discussed at all of the meetings, and with the interest and enthusiasm which are manifested, Kappa Phi Kappa is assured of continued success. ! » i First Semester Roy Siegel Edgar Steckel Winfield Kistler John Smith Angelo Bianco John Carapella Edwin Faust Edwin Feinour Walbert Grasley Robert Heimbach John Hollenbach Fratres in Facultate Dr. Isaac Miles Wright Prof. Roland Hartman Dr. Carl W. Boyer Fratres in Collegio Officers President Vice-President Secretary Treasurer Members Winfield Kistler Charles Klein Albert Klotz Michael I.isetski Paul Marzolf Howard Miller Pompei Orlando Second Semester Roy Siegel Edgar Steckel Winfield Kistler John Smith Roy Siegel John Smith Arwen Spangler Edgar Steckel Harrison Straub Ray Wahl mmmmm Phi Alpha Theta Phi Alpha Theta, national honorary History fraternity, was organized at Muhlenberg for the purpose of recognizing excellence in the study of history, and to elaborate upon classroom discussion. This organization meets on the last Thursday of each month at the home of one of the professors, and at these meetings the members take an active part in discussions not only of historical value but of political and economic value as well. An undergraduate, to be eligible for membership, must have at least a junior rating, must have to his credit twelve semester hours of history, must be majoring or minoring in history, and must have achieved superior grades. Fratres in Fa cult ate Dr. James Edgar Swain Dr. Flenry R. Mueller Dtr. Joseph S. Jackson Fratres in Collegio H. Edward Krooss President John C. Carapella ...Vice-President Robert E. Mentzer Secretary-Treasurer John B. Freeman Paul S. Marzolf A OAK Omicron Delta Kappa, national honorary fraternity for men which recognizes outstanding participation in campus activities, was founded at Washington and Lee University in 1914 and came to the Muhlenberg Campus in 1930. It has, since that time, constantly endeavored to bring about and live up to those standards which it advocates. Its principles are three in number : To recognize a high standard of accomplishment in collegiate activities. To consolidate the most representative men in various lines of college activity. To bring the faculty and student body to a closer understanding. Fratkes in Facultate Dr. John A. W. Haas Dr. George T. Ettinger Dr. Robert C. Horn Dr. Isaac M. Wright Registrar: Harry A. Benfer Fratres in Collegio John Hollenbach President Albert Weiner Vice President Harrison D. Straub Secretary Dr. I. M. Wright Treasurer Albert T. Klotz Russel Krapf Robert Mentzer Armon Williams Morton Silverman Conrad W. Raker Phi Sigma Iota Phi Sigma Iota, national honorary Romance language fraternity, holds the distinct honor of being the first language fraternity to be established on the campus. The chapter meets once a month, at which time papers of interest are read and discussed by the members. To Dr. Anthony S. C ' orbiere goes the credit of having established this frater- nity on the campus. In addition to being president of the local group. Dr. Cor- biere also holds the office of National Historian of the fraternity. PERSONNEL Officers Dr. Anthony S. Corbiere President John Carapella Secretary Ered Oberlancler Treasurer Members Dr. Anthony S. Corbiere Fred Oberlander Prof. Walter A. Seaman John Carapella Louis Cuchran John Yaccaro Edwin Faust Alpha Kappa Alpha Muhlenberg College has the honor of having founded Alpha Kappa Alpha on its own campus. On May 1, 1930, mainly through the efforts of Rev. Russel W. Stine, the philosophy clubs of Muhlenberg and Moravian Colleges united to form a national honorary philosophical fraternity. The chapter meets bi-weekly at the home of the national president, Rev. Russel W. Stine. Topics which have a philosophical interest are discussed in meetings. An interest in philosophy and scholastic achievement form the main requirements for membership. The colors of Alpha Kappa Alpha are madonna blue and white, and the fraternity’s publication is “The Philosophy.” Fratres in Facultate Dr. John A. W. Haas Rev. Harry P. C. Cressman Rev. Russel W. Stine Fratres in Collegio President Vice President Secretary - Treasurer Winfield Schwartz Morton Silverman Samuel Stauffer Armon Williams Russel Beazley Gordon Feller Edward Krooss ... Roy Siegel John Carapella Gerald Jacoby Ralph Keeport Paul Marzolf 1 Eta Sigma Phi Alpha Rho chapter of Eta Sigma Phi was formed on the campus in 1931 as an outgrowth of the Classical Club, the oldest student organization at Muhlen- berg. The aim of this fraternity is to keep alive an interest in the classics and to foster an appreciation of the ancient languages. The local chapter of Eta Sigma Phi meets once a month in the Seminar Room of the Library, at which time topics of interest relating to the Classical languages are discussed. The scholastic requirements of the organization are very high. Two years of either Greek or Latin with three years of the remaining one of these languages are required for entrance in addition to a certain scholastic attainment measured in the form of grades. Fratres in Collegio Arthur H. Ilottel President Gerald Jacoby Vice-President Byron R. Stauffer Secretary Edwin M. Faust Treasurer Russell S. Beazley Arthur H. Hottel William G. Holzer John R. Brokhoff Gerald Jacoby Walter R. Harrison Elmer E. Fahringer Luther F. Schlenker Russel L. Krapf Edwin M. Faust Roy F. Siegel Luther M. Schaeffer Lester Fetter Byron R. Stauffer Titus R. Scholl John B. Freeman Charles P. Cressman Albert A. Ursin J. William Fritsch Marlin L. Herb John V. Yaccaro Fratres in Facultate Dr. George T. Ettinger Dr. Robert C. Horn Dr. Harry H. Reichard Dr. Robert Fritch Rev. Russell W. Stine The Inter-Fraternity Council The Inter-Fraternity Council, representing every social Greek Letter group at Muhlenberg, is recognized as one of the most beneficial organizations at the college. Jt supervises fraternity “rushing " and it attempts to stimulate scholastic fraternity standing by annually presenting a cup to that fraternity which has achieved the highest scholastic record during the year. It also con- tributes to the social calendar by sponsoring an annual “Pan Hellenic” or inter- Fraternity Ball during the winter season. PERSONNEL Officers Robert IT. Dilcher Roy E. Shupp Frank Bianca John Gosztonyi President .Vice-President Secretary T rea surer John T . Metzgar Members Alpha Ten Omega Lester T. Smith Jack Plemstreet Robert E. Mentzer Phi Kappa Tan John C. Gosztonyi Harry B. Underwood H. Edward Krooss Theta Upsilon Omega Robert IT. Dilcher Luther K. Ziegler Harold F. Miller Theta Kappa Nit John S. Kuntz Edgar Steckel Morton I. Silverman Phi Epsilon Pi Arthur Simensky Myron E. Warshaw Frank Bianca Delta Theta Lloyd H. Sterner Donald Young Roy E. Shupp Philos M. Winfield Altemose Kenneth D. Mover ..A • •• Pennsylvania Alpha Iota Chapter OP Alpha Tau Omega Fraternity founded 1865 Chapter installed 1881 Number of Chapters 94 Publication “The Palm” Sky Blue and Gold Colors. PERSONNEL Fratres in Facultate Oscar F. Bernheim Dr. Robert C. Horn Prof. Albert C. H. Fasig Dr. Harold K. Mark: Roland F. Hartman Dr. J. Edgar Swain Fratres in Coi.legio 1934 William S. Ritter Herbert Foster Conrad Raker Richard Gramley Lawrence Rupp, Jr. Albert Klotz Lester Smith John Metzgar Wallace Webster, Jr. 1935 Harrison Straub Wilbur Hemstreet Louis Marquet Edward Latta 1936 Donald Weinsheimer C. Keely Hagy, Jr. John Raker Leonard Hodgkinson Charles Ritter Edward Leefeldt Ernest Seegers Charles Lichtenwalner Thomas Weaber 1937 James Turrell Evan Bartleson Charles Herwig William Behringer, Jr. Frederick Lorish John Brown George Legg Charles Garrettson Dale Posey Oliver Gruver James Rogokos Richard Heckman Max Warner Pledged Pennsylvania Eta Chapter OP Phi Kappa Tau Fraternity founded 1906 Chapter installed Number of Chapters 43 Publication “The Laurel” 1917 Colors. Harvard Red and Old Gold PERSONNEL Fratres in Facultate Dr. Carl W. Boyer Prof. Charles B. Bowman Rev. Harry P. C. Cressman Dr. Ira E. Zartman Dr. John Y. Shankweiler Rev. Russel W. Stine Dr. Isaac M. Wright Fratres in Collegio 1934 William Fetherolf John Hollenbach W. Gerhart Leaman William MacMillan 1935 Robert Mentzer Harry Underwood Armon Williams Asa Wohlsen Ray Brennen Myron Eichner Clifton Gant John Yerger 1936 John Gosztonyi Lloyd Moyer Alfred Smith Samuel Kidd Robert Decker Russel Derr Theodore Fischer 1937 Charles Goldsmith Richard Miller Clinton Nickel G eorge Boyer James Coyne Charles Diehl Merritt Frankenfield Donald Gibson Frederick Gregorius Charles Mauch William Rogers Alvin Roy Floyd Smith Lloyd Zimmerman Pledged Delta Beta Chapter OF Theta Upsilon Omega Fraternity founded 1924 Chapter installed Number of Chapters 17 Publication “The Omegan” 1928 Colors. Midnight Blue and Gold PERSONNEL Fratres in Facultate Prof. Harry H. Reichard Prof. Harold C. Miller Fratres in Collegio 1934 Robert Dilcher Ray Held Ralph Keeport Raymond Anderson John Brokhoff Norton Behney Nelson Bramer Robert Fenstermacher Francis Gaumer Walter Harland William Griffin Lewis Hibian Francis Knouss Pledged Woodrow Kistler Edward Krooss Malcolm Parker Roy Siegel 1935 John Kanyuck Forrest Moyer Luther Ziegler 1936 Joseph Keiper Franklin Marsteller Paul Matthiesson Lloyd Sandt David Smith 1937 Jack Labold Sam Schadt Pennsylvania Epsilon Chapter OF Theta Kappa Nu Fraternity founded 1924 Chapter installed Number of Chapters 49 Publication “ ' Theta News” Colors Argent, Sable, and Crimson .1930 PERSONNEL Fratres tn Coi.legio Angelo B ianco Charles Carter Carl Clayton Walbert Grasley Robert King Mfred Rreinig Dale Case John Kuntz Bernard Blackman Edward Benner John Bianco Thomas Castagna Pledged 1934 Harold Miller Russel Nehf John Smith Edgar Steckel Ray Wahl 1935 Roger Bachman Roger Rohn Frederick Storch 1936 Thomas O. Strohl William Saalfeld 1937 George Kohler William Laimg Joseph Santipouli EMMn 6 0 Alpha Nu Chapter OF Phi Epsilon Pi Fraternity founded 190-1 Chapter installed 1932 Number of Chapters 35 Publication ‘‘The Phi Epsilon Pi Quarterly” Purple and Gold ■ ■ ' .11 i ■ lift .. Colors. PERSONNEL Fratres in Collegio 1934 Leon Rosenberg Morton Silverman 1935 Arthur Simensky Albert Weiner Gerald Horowitz Myron Warshaw Sidney Koorse 1936 Harold Birns Nathan Gorin Albert Herzenberg 1937 Max ICohn Morton Slier Harold Weiner Milton Bloom Bernard Cohen Milton Gelman Eugene Grossman Pledged Herbert Haas Sidney Jaffe Harry Kaman Henry Satsky Delta Theta Local Fraternity Fraternity founded 1898 Publication " The Delta Theta Bulletin” Colors. Purple and Gold PERSONNEL Fra ter in Facultate Prof. Luther J. Deck Fratres in Collegio Frank Bianca Sherwood Evans x Edward Maletsky Joseph Nagle John Rehfus Charles Roth 1934 Horace Heist Lloyd Sterner 1935 John Trainer Philip Wagner Robert Weidner Lester Wolfe x 1936 David Booth Frank DeRuggerio Francis Tomaine 1937 George DePue Edward Farrell Angelo Fiorvanti Edward Geisinger Donald Isaldo Pledged x Privil edged John Fricke Fred Thomas, Jr. Thomas Kennedy Eugene Martin Stephen Mayrosh Gordon McKittrick Vincent Monica Philos Club Local Fraternity Fraternity founded 1926 Publication “The Philos Journal” Colors Blue and Gold PERSONNEL Russel Kistler Howard Miller Winfield Altemose Henry Brader George Brong Grant Brown Pledged. Fratres in Collegio 1934 Kenneth Moyer Roy Schupp 1935 Richard Giliberty Russel Keebler Gabne Lucas 1936 Hubert C. Meyers 1937 Woodrow Wendling FEATURES A L E N D A R 1933 NOVEMBER 1933 SUN MON TUE WED THU FR1 SAT " z- % ©.. 12 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1011 12131415161718 192021 222324251 2627282930 April April 2 — (No) Beer allowed to flow on our Campus. ’Tis said. April 3 — Tennis team starts practice at Fair Grounds. April 4 — Grays cinch the basketball championship of intramurals. ’Berg takes over Temple in both sides of dual debate. April 5 — Judge Seabury to be Commencement speaker. Page Ex-Mayor Walker April 7 — Our new coach is “Johnny” Utz. April 12-19 — Here’s the Easter vacation. April 19 — Coach “Johnny " Utz calls Spring football practice. Lafayette beats ’Berg, 7-6. April 22 — That Man “Heist” pilots ' Berg to a victory over Haver ford. April 23 — Bernard Frank (O. E.) wins A. Z. A. oratorical contest in New York April 24 — ’Berg Racketeers tie St. Joe, 4-4. April 26 — Dr. Swain’s book “The Struggle for the Control of the Mediter- ranean Prior to 1848” comes off the press. Mr. Everitt appointed new debating coach. April 28-29 — Muhlenberg acts as host to Intercollegiate Newspaper Associa- tion 16 collegiate newspapers represented. April 29 — ’Berg loses to Lehigh, 6-3. May May 3 — “Like Falling Leaves” makes its debut. May 4 — Morton Silverman elected captain of next year’s debating team. May 7 — ’Berg trims Moravian 5-2. (Editor ' s note: In what?) May 8 — Prof. Albert (Toot) Fasig elected head of Eastern Penn. Athletic Conf. May 11 — Paul Marzolf elected Pres, of Student Body. May 12 — Winnie Welch cops mile and 2nd place in mile in M.S.C.A.A. meet. Tennis team loses to Bucknell, 4-3. May 15 — Tennis team defeats Lafayette, 7-1. May 17 — ’Berg baseball team defeats Lehigh, 6-4. May 20 — Penn A. C. just beats ’Berg, 5-4, in close battle. Welch and Schlotter take 4th. place in Central Penn. meet. The Choir has a Dutch lunch and a keg of beer at Dr. Marks’ farm. May 25 — Seven initiated into O. D. K. at a banquet at the Hotel Americus. May 26 — Two hundred couples dance to the strains of Mickley Meyers and his orchestra at Dorney Park. BBHBB June June 1 — The first day of the month. Meeting of the Board of Trustees. June 8 — Senior Reception at Hotel Traylor. Junior Oratorical contest won by Gordon Feller. The Seniors run wild at their Class Day program in the grove. The Forensic Council gets under way. Ray Brennen presents the famous constitution. June 3— Alumni meeting. ’Berg trims Lafayette in the final game of the season. June 4 — Baccalaureate Sermon by Dr. Haas in the Egner-Hartzell Memorial Chapel. June 5 — Commencement Exercises and the Seniors go forth to conquor the world. Judge Samuel Seabury delivers an inspiring address. George B. Ammon, valedictorian and George W. Heintzelman, saluta- torian, strut their stuff. September September 18 — Dean Horn opens Freshman Week. Paul Marzolf gives the Frosh the low-down on the much dis- cussed regulation. The English department entertains the tir t year men at an examination in the afternoon. A1 Kreuz signs at backfield coach. September 19 — Some students settle accounts with Mr. Bernheim and some defer the day of reckon ing. Dr. Merkle gives the Frosh the once over and decides it ' s going to be a great year for pills. September 20 — The Frosh discover how dumb they are during the Psychology exam. Dean Emeritus Ettinger talks to the neophytes (Warshaw wrote this) about Fraternities. The facts of life are revealed to the embryo college men by Dr. Shankweiler. The Faculty performs for the above mentioned new comers in a play which tries to prove that professors have souls. The awe stricken Freshmen then enjoy some food. September 21 — All the college activities are explained to the boys. The M. C .A. treats to a theatre party. After which, the Fresh- men visit the Fair. The Freshmen are reported missing and are later found in the cattle show. September 20— Dr. G. FI. Braudes opens the college term officially with address. The Utzmen get off to a flying start, defeating St. Joseph before an overwhelming crowd. September 25 — The Dean’s list announced with twenty-seven on the Honor Roll. October October 7 — Fordham surprises and barely ekes out a 37-0 victory. October 9 — Rushing season starts. Frosh wonder what it ' s all about. October 13 — The Frosh team holds Allentown Prep, to a scoreless tie. October 14 — College Day address by Dr. J. C. Seegar of Temple. ' Berg defeats Penn State in one of the biggest upsets of the season. Reds Weiner boots the field goal that turns the trick. October 16 — The college celebrates the victory. October 20 — Maggie Levine, Irish exchange student, elected president of “M” Club. November November 4 — Dad’s Day and ' Berg trims F. M. in best game of the season. November 7 — Senior “A” men get unlimited cuts. November 9 — ( 1 . K. T. wins Interfraternity Scholarship award. November 11 — Weiner’s second field goal of season is enough to beat Ursinus in another Dad’s Day victory. November 16 — Nine men initiated in to E. S. $. November 18 — ’Berg makes it a doubly successful season by beating Lehigh, 1 0-0. “Reds’ ” field goal puts him in the national lead. (That night) Boys take Lehigh ' s goal posts — $121.00. November 22 — Three men initiated in to A. K. A. November 25 — Dr. John A. Bauman, Professor Emeritus, dies from injuries received in automobile accident. November 25 — ’Berg defeats Dickinson, 7-0 to end the most successful season December December 5 — Dr. George H. Brandes tells of the harmful effects of alcohol— and ten boys sign the pledge. December 6 — The Pre-Medical Society sponsers a lecture on the venereal diseases. Eight men initiated into the Kappa Phi Kappa. December 7 — The College Board of Athletic Control votes against Intra-Mural football. December 11. — Frank and Kerstetter emerge as the victors in the junior elimination ' s contest. December 13 — Freshman Intra-Mural debating gets under way. December 14 and 15 — “Knight of the Burning Pestle " presented in the Science auditorium. Joe Markle rises to great heights in his May dance. Christmas vacation and home with sealed books. January January 10 — ' Berg loses first game to F. M. by a point. January 13 — ’Berg defeats Albright. January 11 — Band gives concert, with Klitzner as soloist. January 12 — Mystery of the Dorm, telephone. January 17 — Board of Trustees decides that co-education is definitely out. Bankers lose business. ’Berg takes Drexel in conference game. January 18 — Frank wins F O. U. elimination contest. January 20 — Lion found upon campus. January 21 — Lion is removed — another mystery. Time out for exams. January 31 — ’Berg defeats Penn A. C. aamimn xare a -msyiSf cuar: r ?;r rm.tE VA " L ;r: A-ajB. r g- .;? February February February February February February February February February February February February 3 — F. M. is beaten by ’Berg at High School Palestra. 7 — Sterner’s last minute goal beats Lafayette. Pre-Med. society visits Temple. 9 — Debate team splits with Lehigh. Chapel Choir presents concert in Wilmington, Del. 14 — ’Berg defeats Ursius. “Legs” Leibensperger ' s Frosh defeat Shaffer Max. 15 — O. A. K. taps Klotz, Krapf and Williams. 17 — ’Berg conquers Drexel in Philly. 19 — Latta elected head of Pre-Legal group. 20 — Coach Utz announces Spring football for March 9. ’Frosh lose to Freeman’s Dairy. ’Berg loses to Gettysburg in High School Palestra after close battle. 21 — Pre-Med. Society learns about scientific criminology. Saalfeld again stars as ’Berg defeats Lafayette for the second time this season. 24 — -’Berg loses to Ursinus. 28 — Haps and Prof. Deck issue averages of various campus groups. Seniors seem to be smartest (in studies). March March 1. — D. K. T. wins interfraternity scholarship cup again Board of Trustees announces reorganization of Prep. School. Saalfeld elected Sophomore president. Matson elected Junior president. March 3 — Rosenberg’s last minute goal beats Lebanon Valley and assures us of third place in league. March 4 — Rumors begin about various dance bands to play at Dyad. March 7 — Press Bureau statistics one rehearsal. Maggie certainly helped to put ’Berg on map. March 7 — ’Berg beats Lehigh, 25-24 in the most exciting game of season. Saalford sinks winning goal. A great season, “Johnny.” March 8 — Krapf, Ziegler and Kanyuck to represent ’Berg at Spring conven- tion of Newspaper Association. Intra-murals start off with basketball. Student body approves of three new ammendments. March 12 — Senior class elects Feller life president. Klotz’s towel is burned to a crisp. March 13 — Intra-Murals going strong with upsets galore. March 14 — Rumors of Johnny Utz signing a three year contract appears in the newspapers. March 15 — The Dyad plans are disrupted until further notice. March 17 — St. Patrick’s Day. (The Phiep throws a party to celebrate). First scrimmage of the year. Spring fever is upon us. March 19. — More rumors about the Dyad. Rudy Vallee and Paul Whiteman both insist on playing for the occasion. March 20 — Class meeting decides the burning question. The Ciarla editor wonders if Warshaw is ever going to complete the calandar. March 21 — First day of spring. Jack Rehfus discovers that Socrates has been dead for centuries. March 22 — Flash. The Ciarla discovers that Johnny Utz has not yet signed his contract. More stringent rules announced for incoming freshmen classes. March 26 — The boys are still scrimmaging. March 28 — Easter vacation begins and silence prevails over the campus. Even Schlick goes home. c !z;oo Luther and Forrest. Brader with his Pepsodent smile. Just pals. We forgot who gave us this pic- ture. Jerry resting for a good argument. Fetter preparing for English. Fic- tion class. Joe College. Joe takes an historical tour. 1. Strange Interlude. 2. The big milk man from the coal regions. 3. Aristotle Bloom and Socrates Riley looking at the birdie. 4. Jackie and his canine. 5. Mannie, ex-’35. 6. Mahatma Mintz (with the hat). 7. Johnnie and Joseph. 8. Pop Miller. 1. The editor. 2. Nazi Schlick gives the sign to Ber- nie. 3. Pete, Charlie, and Lupoli. 4. Russ, the activity man of the clas.-i. 5. Myron thinking of the redhead. 6. The photography editor, Nathan. 7. Rog. and Archie. 8. Anderson leaning against h : s new plane. 1. Little Sonnie and Moishie Parmet. 2. Rev. Minnich at home. 3. Joe Zamites, first semester Junior Class prexy. 4. Here is Elmer. 5. The referee of referees. 6. Titus of Hellertown. 7. Holzer, all tied up. 8. The Gearhart twins with either Maurice or Martin on the left and e’ther Martin or Maurice on the right. 11 1. The World’s Champion and his friend, Tucker. 2. Dick the barber. 3. Cressman on the rail. 4. Intestinal Fortitude Brennen. 5. The Freshman Debating winners and the coach. 6. Lester resting in his garden. 7. Two embryo ministers. 8. Pat, de guy from Long Island. 9. Some important members of the Ciarla Staff. 2 if 1 ft 1 % ' I A 1. Haps giving the boys a smile. 2. A night view of the chapel. 3. The L. S. A. invades Kutztown. 4. Warming up the old soupbone. 5. 6, 7 and 8. Webster and Smith va- cationing in the Yellowstone National Park. 9. Kinks for a couple of days. 10. The junior class contributions to the baseball diamond. 11. Maggie, Albie, and Charlie. 12. The old master. 1. Four very sedate seniors. 2. The President and Teedie Simp- son watching practise. 3. A very interested spectator. 4. The Lafayette game. 5. The frosh entertain. 6. The M. 7. A1 Kreutz pepping it up. 8. The band in an odd moment. 9. The band arrives at last at the “spirit meeting.’’ Si " IH Ml 51 III in n.„ uSlSBj 1. Muhlenberg 3 — Penn 2. Muhlenberg 3 — Penn 3. Muhlenberg 3 — Penn 4. Muhlenberg 3 — Penn 5. Muhlenberg 3 — Penn 6. Muhlenberg 3 — Penn 7. Muhlenberg 3 — Penn 8. The Penn State T. U. State 0 State 0 State 0 State 0 State 0 State 0 State 0 O. house. 1. Just before the F. M. game. 2. The band welcomes the visitors. 3. THE BAND. 4. Wallie and Jimmy in action. 5. On the bench. 6. See the pretty helmets. 7. The cheerleaders up in the air. 8. The band forms the M. 9. The prexies of the two institu- tions and Mr. Esser, president of the Berg Alumni. j, L ■ ill .A A •Lift, . «JEfl iWiir It 4 1. A view from the Library. 2. The Frosh pose as workingmen. 3. Two more freshmen labor. 4. Between classes. 5. Winter on the campus. 6. The Junior Class meets to discuss the European situation. 7. Muhlenberg-Dickinson. 8. Ray Brennen ' s boys pose for the Morning Call. 9. Did you ever see a dream walk- ing? 10. Even the faculty must play. 1. Students preparing their studies in the Library. 2. The California Anderson in a rare pose, studying. 3. Our beautiful Gothic structure. 4. He is thinking, of Koorse, he is. 5. Moonlight in Benferland. 6. Lucas plugging and Radcliffe — ? 7. Must be an astronomy class. 8. Just another Weiner. 9. The Ciarla Ghost Camera snaps Butch floating through the Camp- us. 10. Kroose and his boys. give FAYETTE vf ' M » ilf ] 1. Don leaves the Ad building after a tough class. 2. A twenty minute interlude. 3. The faculty on parade. 4. Basking in the health-giving rays of Sol. 5. The frosh toughen themselves for the varsity. 6. The chapel. 7. The astronomy class comes back to earth. 8. These freshmen never stop work- ing. 9. How did the photographer ever get up here? 1. Our genial Dean Horn. 2. Haps poses with the goal post. 3. President Haas and Rev. Fritsch get snapped. 4. The President in a typical pose. 5. The ladies with Don. 6. Some of the boys about to enter chapel. 7. John telling Marzolf everything about the trip to Meadville. 8. Left to right : Herr Reichard say- ing “Veil, I Vould” as the land- lady, Mrs. Reichard, wonders whether or not she will get her money ; Doctor Swain polishing his master’s shoes and dreaming of the old days in the South ; Professor Brandes (with the beard) admiring the art of Pro- fessor Deck who is putting the finishing touches to the great masterpiece. ADVERTISEMENTS ACKNOWLEDGMENT The size of the advertising section determines the financial success or failure of every year book. Because we realize this and because we feel that our book is a success, the 1935 Ciarla Staff takes this opportunity to express its sincere appreciation for the generosity displayed by its advertisers. Compliments of the MEALEY AUDITORIUM PHONE 7171 M. S. Young Co HARDWARE AND SPORTING GOODS PHOTOGRAPHIC SUPPLIES AND CAMERAS ALLENTOWN, PA. Official Photographers j for j | THE CIARLA I | i 1 and the { j t Class of 1935 i | Special Rates I to Students MERIN-BALIBAN Photography | I 1010 CHESTNUT STREET j PHILADELPHIA I The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia Located in the residential suburb of Mt. Airy Undergraduate School Leading to the DECREE OF BACHELOR OF DIVINITY Graduate School, in its own Building, Leading to the DECREES OF BACHELOR OF DIVINITY AND MASTER OF SACRED THEOLOGY CHARLES M. JACOBS, President FREDERIC W. FRIDAY, Registrar. The Cooperative Store IS OPERATED FOR THE BENEFIT OF MUHLENBERG COLLEGE STUDENTS We Appreciate Your Patronage ••■••• j HUNSICKER CO. 17 North Seventh Street ALLENTOWN, PA. WHOLESALE CIGARS, TOBACCO AND CANDY CASH AND CARRY OR SERVICE » i i A Savings Account is the shortest route to future independence THE MERCHANTS NATIONAL BANK ALLENTOWN, PA. i i i i I I • i i J ♦ i i i j i i i ! PRINTERS AND PUBLISHERS Class Catalogues and Annuals Proceedings, Pamphlets and Periodicals CALENDAR MANUFACTURERS H. RAY HAAS CO. 514 North Madison Street Allentown, Pa. WHOLESOME — NOURISHING — PURE Allentown Dairy Company Milk DRINK A QUART EACH DAY ACTS AS Executor, Trustee, Guardian, Etc. UNDER GOVERNMENT AND STATE CONTROL Established 1855 ALLENTOWN NATIONAL BANK ALLENTOWN, PENNSYLVANIA Mrs. j. S. Burkholder Robert L. U. Burkholder J. S. BURKHOLDER FUNERAL DIRECTOR Established 1895 Dial 6807 816 Linden Street ALLENTOWN, PA, H. I. KISTLER OPTOMETRIST JEWELER Fine Jewelry and Watch Repairing 1025 Hamilton Street Allentown, Pennsylvania BUSES for Private Parties, Athletic Team Trips, and Class Study. They’ll take you anywhere. Phone 3-3329 I LEHIGH VALLEY TRANSPORTATION COMPANY I4TH GORDON STREETS ALLENTOWN, PA. HOTEL TRAYLOR Catering to Banquets - Luncheons Private Dances DANCING EVERY SATURDAY NIGHT COFFEE SHOPPE DE LUXE Most Modern Dining Room Radio in Every Room Free Parking GUY A. LONG, Mgr. j j i r Compliments of MILLER CANDY CO. INC. — • i » I l m i • i I i i - H. L. HILTON Successor to STANDARD STATIONERY CO. HATS CLEANED SPORT SHOES CLEANED AND DYED PETE THOMAS 1037 Hamilton Street I Call 3-9429 j Phone 2-0357 We Call and Deliver ANSONIA CLEANERS I We Press, Clean and Dye. TAILORS BY TRADE— NOT BY | SIGN j We Match Pants i 128 N. Seventh St. Allentown, Pa. j f Compliments of the LEHIGH BRICK WORKS i -••ijl » The College The Extension Courses . The Preparatory School . . Three full courses leading to degrees, Arts, Science and Philosophy. For pre-medical students the biological course is unsurpassed. Study while you teach. The College is making a large contribution to the advancement of education by offering courses at night and on Saturday. These courses lead to the several teachers’ certifi- cates and to the college degree. The attendance for 1923-24 was 1104. The Teachers ' College is held for six weeks during the Summer. Summer Session, July 2- August 9. Winter courses open October 1, 1934. Prepares young men for any college or university, but chiefly for Muhlenberg College. Situated on the campus in an excellent new, fireproof building. No better college anywhere. MUHLENBERG COLLEGE ALLENTOWN, PENNSYLVANIA John A. W. Haas, D.D., LL.D., President Harry A. Benfer, Registrar Oscar F. Bernheim, Treasurer Isaac M. Wright, Pd.D., Director of Extension Courses Zoll inger-Harned Company The Department Store in the Heart of Everything ALLENTOWN, PA. RABENOLD FUNERAL HOME 116 South Eighth Street Allentown, Pa. Phone 9616 Compliments of Keiper’s Pharmacy 41 North Seventh Street Allentown, Pa. Specializing in SMART APPAREL FOR YOUNG MEN MORRIS PARROTT 616 Hamilton Street Allentown Compliments of the LEHIGH CANDY COMPANY AMERICUS HOTEL 325 Rooms 325 Baths Main Dining Room Cafeteria Banquet Hall — Capacity 800 Dancing in Ball Room every Saturday evening Admission 50c. and Tax CATERINC — ANYTIME — ANYWHERE i I -• Established 1810 The 1935 ClARLA is an example of the high standard of quality in workmanship and materials, which is a part of our school service. Distinctive Printing, Originality and Service are combined to produce superior annuals and maintain a reasonable budget. Schlechter ' s Printers 540 Hamilton Street Allentown, Pa. ' v ., ' - ■- -P -•»% • ' tij V 1 .■ ' 9tr ' h + - + -■■ 4- ' - T .. • -«l r % . • -n ir- ' «• •»» i. . -.. ..., Zm - •• . ! . , t -‘ m. y ‘ i j»- »■. 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FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
Are you trying to find old school friends, old classmates, fellow servicemen or shipmates? Do you want to see past girlfriends or boyfriends? Relive homecoming, prom, graduation, and other moments on campus captured in yearbook pictures. Revisit your fraternity or sorority and see familiar places. See members of old school clubs and relive old times. Start your search today! Looking for old family members and relatives? Do you want to find pictures of parents or grandparents when they were in school? Want to find out what hairstyle was popular in the 1920s? E-Yearbook.com has a wealth of genealogy information spanning over a century for many schools with full text search. Use our online Genealogy Resource to uncover history quickly! Are you planning a reunion and need assistance? E-Yearbook.com can help you with scanning and providing access to yearbook images for promotional materials and activities. We can provide you with an electronic version of your yearbook that can assist you with reunion planning. E-Yearbook.com will also publish the yearbook images online for people to share and enjoy.