Muhlenberg College - Ciarla Yearbook (Allentown, PA)

 - Class of 1920

Page 10 of 184

 

Muhlenberg College - Ciarla Yearbook (Allentown, PA) online yearbook collection, 1920 Edition, Page 10 of 184
Page 10 of 184



Muhlenberg College - Ciarla Yearbook (Allentown, PA) online yearbook collection, 1920 Edition, Page 9
Previous Page

Muhlenberg College - Ciarla Yearbook (Allentown, PA) online yearbook collection, 1920 Edition, Page 11
Next Page

Search for Classmates, Friends, and Family in one
of the Largest Collections of Online Yearbooks!



Your membership with E-Yearbook.com provides these benefits:
  • Instant Access to Millions of Yearbook Pictures
  • High-Resolution, Full Color Images Available Online
  • Search, Browse, Read, and Print Yearbook Pages
  • View College, High School, and Military Yearbooks
  • Browse our digital annual library spanning centuries
  • Support the Schools in our Program by Subscribing

Page 10 text:

The Muhlenberg S. A. T. C. PROFESSOR ROBERT C. HORN XPERIENCED teachers were not very favorably impressed with the results of the scholastic work in the S. A. T. C. ; it was not up to the standard of the usual college work. Those men who knew how to study were at a disadvantage in a crowded study hall. They studied only as much as was absolutely necessary. They would have accom- plished much more in the way of preparation for regular college classes. Those who were not accustomed to study found no great incentive in the study-hall, and did not learn what some of them would have learned under normal con- ditions. Our corps was divided entirely on the basis of age; the “A” group con- sisted of those who were twenty years old or more; the “B” group, of those who were nineteen; and the “C” group, eighteen. Studies, with little variation, were arranged for each group. This made necessary some duplication of work in the case of individuals; for instance, some repeated a part of history which they had already studied ; or others, who had a year or two of French, now found them- selves in classes of beginners. I believe, however, this was no great disadvantage in most cases ; particularly in French, as the conversational method at least was new for them. Nevertheless, these men did not have to study as hard as the others. This method of division, however, was the only one considered practic- able in a small institution, with a limited amount of equipment and a small faculty. Some students were sent to us after the work had started or were admitted late. These men never did tit in and accomplished very little in their studies. For instance, a student, who had no French, thrown into a French class when over one half of the term had gone by, could hardly be expected to do anything else but flounder. A large number of students came who had only a commercial high school course in the way of preparation ; of these some became very satis- factory students, but as a whole, they had not the necessary preparation for sue cessful academic work. 8



Page 11 text:

In the earlier part of the term, the military work and duties took prece- dence over the academic. Absences for cause were frequent. The epidemic of influenza (altho our health conditions were unusually good) still further spoiled regular attendance. The institution of the “K. P.’s” seriously affected the at- tendance at the first class in the afternoon. In the latter part of the term the mil itary demands were somewhat relaxed and academic work had a better chance. But, by this time, those students who didn’t expect to continue college work had lost interest; while most of those who expected to continue a college course were yearning for the regular courses and the academic atmosphere. Nearly every one looked forward eagerly to the time of demobilization. Our schedule of hours had to be changed two or three times to meet the pleasure of changing commanding officers ; just after we had succeeded in ar- ranging a fairly satisfactory schedule with drill in the morning, we were obliged to change the whole plan, so that drill could come in the afternoon. The rela- tions, however, between the military officers and the college professors were most pleasant ; both students and faculty are happy in feeling that we had at this institution officers who were excellent in their work and at the same time fine and agreeable men. The conduct of the corps was excellent. There was but one serious infrac- tion of military discipline. The behavior of the members of the corps in their academic duties was most satisfactory. There was a greater tendency to sleep in class than is the case normally ; this was doubtless due to early rising and vig- orous exercise, to which many were unaccustomed. We were spared the usual pranks of Sophomores and Freshmen at the beginning of the term. We feel that the establishment of the S. A. T. C., had it been continued, would have worked well in the crisis, would have saved the colleges, would have been productive of much good for the members of the corps, and would have produced a body of good officers. But, as regards scholarship, we are somewhat dubious; and we heartily rejoice that the college may now return to its own way of doing things, with the great aim of preparing men to do their part in the life of our nation in the time of peace. 9

Suggestions in the Muhlenberg College - Ciarla Yearbook (Allentown, PA) collection:

Muhlenberg College - Ciarla Yearbook (Allentown, PA) online yearbook collection, 1917 Edition, Page 1

1917

Muhlenberg College - Ciarla Yearbook (Allentown, PA) online yearbook collection, 1918 Edition, Page 1

1918

Muhlenberg College - Ciarla Yearbook (Allentown, PA) online yearbook collection, 1919 Edition, Page 1

1919

Muhlenberg College - Ciarla Yearbook (Allentown, PA) online yearbook collection, 1921 Edition, Page 1

1921

Muhlenberg College - Ciarla Yearbook (Allentown, PA) online yearbook collection, 1922 Edition, Page 1

1922

Muhlenberg College - Ciarla Yearbook (Allentown, PA) online yearbook collection, 1923 Edition, Page 1

1923

1985 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1970 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1972 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1965 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals
FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
Are you trying to find old school friends, old classmates, fellow servicemen or shipmates? Do you want to see past girlfriends or boyfriends? Relive homecoming, prom, graduation, and other moments on campus captured in yearbook pictures. Revisit your fraternity or sorority and see familiar places. See members of old school clubs and relive old times. Start your search today! Looking for old family members and relatives? Do you want to find pictures of parents or grandparents when they were in school? Want to find out what hairstyle was popular in the 1920s? E-Yearbook.com has a wealth of genealogy information spanning over a century for many schools with full text search. Use our online Genealogy Resource to uncover history quickly! Are you planning a reunion and need assistance? E-Yearbook.com can help you with scanning and providing access to yearbook images for promotional materials and activities. We can provide you with an electronic version of your yearbook that can assist you with reunion planning. E-Yearbook.com will also publish the yearbook images online for people to share and enjoy.