Mount Airy High School - Airmont Yearbook (Mount Airy, NC)

 - Class of 1956

Page 1 of 160

 

Mount Airy High School - Airmont Yearbook (Mount Airy, NC) online yearbook collection, 1956 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 160 of the 1956 volume:

Teen - A ger $ ». ♦ taboo Sunday movie See page 2. High Spots Big Grag Game . . » to be played Friday. See article on page 3. VOLUME XX MOUNT AIRY HIGH SCHOOL, MOUNT AIRY, N. C- OCTOBER, 1955 NUMBER {£ Mrs. Hamilton Takes Over Science Post Vacated By Mr. Frank Steed Mrs. John Hamilton, taking the place of Mr. Frank Steed, science teacher and junior varsity coach, joined the school faculty Monday, October 3. Mrs. Hamilton Is teaching class¬ es in biology and physics, and serving as homeroom teacher for freshmen in room 209. Since graduating from W. C. U. N. C. with a major in chemis¬ try, she has taught science at Beu¬ lah High School, married, and ac¬ quired three children. “I’m looking forward to teach¬ ing and have wanted an oppor¬ tunity to meet students from Mt. Airy,” she said. “1 don’t know yet, though, how the junior var¬ sity football team and I will get along!’’ Mrs. Hamilton Says she likes everything connected with science except snakes. About lizards she thinks “they aren’t so bad.” Having lived in this town for the past six years, Mr. and Mrs. Hamilton have quickly become a part of the community life. Mrs. Hamilton is superinten¬ dent of a Sunday School depart¬ ment at Central Methodist Church and her husband is coach at Beu¬ lah High. New Requirements Set For Senior Merit Awards MRS. JOHN HAMILTON . . . dislikes snakes . . . Science Teacher Resigns, Now Runs Motel The business world lias ' attract¬ ed Mr. Frank Steed, former bio¬ logy and physics teacher here. Mr. Steed, who resigned September 30, is now operating the Ranch Motel between Durham and Ra¬ leigh. “Mt. Airy is the greatest place I’ve ever lived,” said Mr. Steed, “but I feel this move necessary for the betterment ' of the family. I have really enjoyed working with football, and I will certainly miss the science students and foot- Yearbook Is Rated Excellent By Two National Associations Airmont has won a rating of A plus from the National School Yearbook Association, of Columb¬ ia, Missouri, and a First Class honor rating from the National Scholastic Press Association, of Minneapolis, Minnesota. Ratings were received recently from both associations, to which copies of the yearbook were sent last spring. The ’55 Airmont was the first edition to go to NSYAj-an organi¬ zation whose critical service deals with yearbooks only. An A rating is the highest gen¬ eral rating given by NSYA. It means HIGHLY SUPERIOR. “Coverage, general readability, and editorial excellence of the book are models, for books over the nation,” said the NSYA jud¬ ges. “We would like to carry an article on these features in Photo- litk.” This is a national magazine for school yearbook staffs. “Let us compliment you on theme selection and introduction,” the NSYA report read. “With a few improvements, we predict that you will reach NSYA’s rare AA rating next year.” The NSYA judges rated the book above average in every field of grading. They gave it its high¬ est mark on Word Content (head¬ ings, story, captions). “This sec¬ tion stands out above the average excellent book,” com¬ mented the judges, along with a grade of AA. In the NSPA grading the book scored 3560 points out of a po « sible 3699. A score of 3700 oe more would have placed the booK in All-American rating, a superior honor very few school publica¬ tions attain. “We hope to reach that top- notch honor this year,” said Misi Jean Simpson, adviser. “We are proud of both these ratings,” said Ann Allred, present editor. “The comments and cri¬ ticisms will be valuable I elp in striving for improvement thi year.” Free Yearbook Covers Go To Early Subscribers Staff Members, Advisers Attend Press Conference Ten students from the Airmont and the High Spots staffs and their advisers attended the North Carolina Scholastic Press Insti¬ tute in Chapel Hill on Saturday, October 1. Those who went from the yearbook staff were Miss Jean Simpson, adviser; Ann Allred, editor; Barbara Jester, lay-out editor; Dot Hull, Joann Southern, Ann Christian, and Ruby Hunt- Each student who subscriber to the ’56 Airmont by October 26 will receive free a plastic cover for his yearbook, said Sara Dog- gett, business manager. These covers will be similar to the ones that were sold last year for 25 cents. The subscription campaign will begin October 12. Members of the staff will solicit in the homerooms during activity period for two weeks. “A n y homeroom subscribing 100 percent will get a page in the yearbook,” said Miss Jean Simp¬ son, adviser. A deposit of two uoiiars will j be required now and the remain- I ing two dollars in the spring when | the annuals come back from the printer. 1 An additional charee of 35 uary. This means that many spring dvents will be covered this year. “The staff is planning some new features, but the extent to which they can be carried out de¬ pends on student response to the subscription campaign,” stated Ann Allred, editor. English Teacher Directs New Guidance Program New In the curriculum this year is a guidance program. It will be in full operation as soon as an office can be set up for Miss Annie Thomas, director. A student may then examine or ; r-.lly, Homecoming Queen To Be Chosen From These By Students SARAH DOGGETT BARBARA JESTER SANDRA MIDKIFF BETTE TILLEY PEGGY VOGLER Homecoming ... game to be played Thursday. See story on page 3. High Spots Talent Show ... can lead to Broadway. See page 2. VOLUME XX MOUNT AIRY HIGH SCHOOL, MOUNT AIRY, N. C., NOVEMBER, 1955 NUMBER 2 Seniors Choose Colors, Superlatives, Speakers Seniors recently chose class night speakers, superlatives, and class colors. Bud Oliver was elected histor¬ ian; Elaine Hoover, poet; Barba¬ ra Jester, prophet; and Ronnie Pruett, testator. Burton Timmons, a member of the basketball and baseball teams, and Gaye Jackson, famous for her hook shoots, were voted most athletic boy and girl. Sandra Midkiff, a cheerleader, and Jerry Dodson were chosen as most school-spirited. Elaine Fioover, editor-in-chief of High Spot , and David McCar¬ ty, president of the Hi-5. were named girl and boy most likely to succeed. Sarah Doggett was chosen pret¬ tiest girl and Dallas Phillips best¬ looking boy. Sarah Doggett aiso received the title of most popular girl, while Yearbook Adviser Writes Winning Magazine Story Bud Oliver was voted most pop¬ ular boy. Elaine Hoover and Jimmy Kirk- man took honors for best person¬ ality. Norma Draughn, a marshal and David McCarty, chief marsh- 1 , were voted most studious girl and boy. Elaine Hoover and Jimmy Ash- burn, comedians from way back, won wittiest girl and boy. The school colors, blue and white, were also chosen class colors. Coming Up Nov. 9—Southeast Assembly; Carrolls present “Masques on Parade” Nov. 10—Homecoming Parade, Game, and Dance Nov. 11—Meeting for Teach¬ ers at Winston-Salem; Holiday for All City Schools Nov. 14—Basketball Practice Starts Nov. 16—Talent Show Nov. 23—Freshman Assembly Nov. 24-25 — Thanksgiving Holidays Dec. 7 —Sophomore Assembly Student Talent To Sing For Supper For Needy Families Next Wednesday To help needy families have I food to be thankful for on ' (Thanksgiving Day the Tri-Hi-Y | l and Hi-Y are sponsoring the an- ' -i-nual talent show November 16. Thirty-three students will take | I part with piano, vocals, comedy, j ; and dance, giving variety to the I program. Ausiva Mills will be the master i of ceremonies. red for admission,” announced Shirley Clifton, “but if that is too inconvenient, 25 cents will gain entrance to the show.” Math Teacher Discovers Spy Ghosts Come Early All proceeds in the form of food will go to needy families, these to be chosen by a committee headed by Norma Draughn. Each student will be given a ballot, and will vote for his choice •David McCarty, chairman of ' n each group, the Service Committee of the Hi- j There will be a first, second, Y, and Shirley Clifton, leader of and third prize in each group. Group 3 of the Tri-Hi-Y, are pool¬ ing their efforts to make this com¬ ing " roduction a success! Also there will be a first, second, and third prize for the show win¬ ner. All prizes are to be donated Ghosts and witches made an | Recently when Mrs. Vera Tho- j arriva i f 01 the Halloween I mas pulled out a cabinet to plug season on October 29 at the Y. I in an electric cord, she suddenly | screamed. Had she seen a man 1 ' • ' 1 A Halloween paity sponsored by the Tri-Hi-Y and the Hi-Y provided entertainment o: bob¬ bins ' apples, fortune telling-, palm | “Kon-penshable food is prefer- by ML Airy merchants. Had she seen a man from Mars, a corpse, a ghost, or a monster? Jack Inman, a member of her Schools Called Investment In America’ This Week homeroom, saving I reading, and dancing. Decorations consisted of cats, p u m p k i n s, and corn Mrs. Thomas j from the terrible sight she had seen, found it to be only a spy Mr. Steed had planted in the bi- witches ology lab to check on her during | shocks. his absence. Rather than - It was a black and yellow snajce cookies and punch served for ie- about a half foot in length. Jack freshments. removed the snake Dolly Hicks and Bill Jackson won first prize as best-dressed. This is American Education er l week. The city and county schools The F. T. A. groups meeting i are working together to explain I tonight are carrying out the theme Schools-Your Invest-! “• • trick, a treat of First-place winner of an an¬ nual contest sponsored by the Nat¬ ional School Yearbook Associa¬ tion, of Columbia, Missouri, is Miss Jean Simpson, adviser for Airmont.. Miss Simpson recently received n letter of congratulations and $25 for the best article by a year¬ book adviser on the topic “We Are Proudest of . . . .” (some work on the ’55 yearbook). ' Miss Simpson’s article, titled “We Are Proudest of Our Cover¬ age,” appears in the Octobe’- is¬ sue of Photolith, with accompany¬ ing pictures of scenes around school here. The contest, announced last ! April, brought the largest re¬ sponse yet and the best group of entries in the series of contests, said the sponsors. Second-place winners were ad- I visers in Providence Central High School, Alexandria, Louisiana, and Colorado Springs High School. ! Colorado. “I am pleased,” said Miss Simp¬ son, “that our idea of what a yearbook should be is approved by the National School Yearbook Association very calmly nd put it back in its cell. Activities Room Gets Face-Lit ting the theme ;nc nt in ' America. " The city schools are using the theme “Your Investment in Fund¬ amental Learning” on ednesday. This theme is being carried out ■ m the window of Workman’s Fed- i al Savings and Loan Co. The | heme “Your Investment in Class- j • corns” is being displayed in the j window of Duke Power Co. The annual public relations dinner of the local N. C. E. A. was held last evening at the Ree- I ves Y. M. C. A. Dr. Sylvester I Green, vice-president o. Wake I Forest College, was guest speak- The local newspapers, working with the c;cy and county N. C. E. A. univ-, published articles, edi¬ torials, and pictures about work in the schools last week. Thea-tis and the radio stations have also co-operated to make the public educ ation-conscious. Owe My Hart And Sole’, Sigh The Freshmen has he School Newspaper Gets First Class Honor Rating Without the expert work of staff photographer David McCar¬ ty, coverage of school life in on- Making Curtains for the activities room, which is being convened into an office for guidance, are members of Mrs. Watt Shuford’s advanced home economic? class. At the sewing machine is Glenda Childress. The others, left to right, are Susan Boyd, Ruth Brown, Christine Matthews, Mabel King, Mrs. Watt Shuford, and M ilma Smith. In a class project the girls are doing a thorough job of interior decorating. With new office equipment provided. Miss Annie Thomas, guidance counselor, . »i . ___— x-itVi students dt be able to arrange interviews with students during onrl For the third semester over a two-year period. High Spot has beer, awarded a First Clas?- Honor rating by the National Scholastic Press Association. Rating on pa¬ pers sent in last spring was an¬ nounced recently. High Spot was one of 16 pa¬ pers out o- 56 from schools this size to he rated First Class for the second semester last year. The paper scored higher in coverage and sports writing in the spring than it did in the fall last year. The highest rating last spring came on feature stories, which were awardee extra points above to- too - two and o« jow-sew in Mrs. T e 1 Reece’s freshman English classes recently. The great groan (not grate .grown) that rent the air when the assignment to bring in at- least 50 homonyms was given soon chanced to chuckles. Anne Goad exceeded the assign¬ ment and hrought 269. Class discussion provoked mer¬ ry laughter. Jerry Starr couldn’t j decide whether to let the blood | run through a v»in, » ne, or vein. Jo Lena Cox asked if the dog slept in a kernel or colonel. Wesley Caviness reasoned that an ailing person should be pail, not pele. Mrs. Reece now hopes that the ! freshmen know which “mail is suite, " which “pai. - to by,” and ; which “quire thee knew base chants inn.” “Our suggestion to other Eng- | lish classes,” said Mrs. Reece, " is to have fun with words. It’s a ? 2 3 We Present The FRIENDSHIPS WORK, PLAY, And That Are The Chief Elements Of Our Story. 4 Joreword In this fifth volume of Armour we have tried to preserve through words and pic¬ tures a memory of the setting, action, and characters of our high school life to¬ gether. This is the M. A. hi. S. story. When time has made the vivid scenes of school days grow dim and years have almost erased from the mind those happy, carefree times—influenced by the spirit of our hones and community, our school, and the mountains that circle us--you nay take this volume from the slielf and recall, as you turn the pages, these won¬ derful day ' s that have nade our story a reality. 6 CHARACTERS . . Seniors. . . Superlatives Juniors. . . Sophomores Freshmen . .22 .24 .36 .40 .44 .47 PLOT. 50 Classroom Activities.52 Organizations. 64 School Life.88 Athletics . 11c LOCAL COLOR. 124 Advertisers.126 Index. 137 Our Final Word.140 7 1 lie mountains with their varyinj shades of color, the community with its interest in youth, our modern school building with its beautiful classrooms, our administra¬ tion, backed by many years of experience, and our faculty, who make school a real joy—these form the setting of the I ' . ' :. A. H. S. story and the happy, carefree days of our hijh school life. M. % BBS «|MEPR|k- mKg Miik k Vk A l5 i A : S v -V’T ' • ' • v wm i.. u The students at Mount Airy High School know they can rely on their faculty and administration not only for proper direction but also for sympathy and understanding. Cur faculty and administra¬ tion, backed by a record of many years of unsel¬ fish service to our school system, are well quali¬ fied to “open windows on to a wider world " for the M. A. H. S. students. Opposite page: Faculty members Mrs. Valeria Shuford,Mrs. Maxine hamilton, and Mr. Arnold Ramey catch up on the news. 14 This year the membership of the Mount Airy School Board was increased from five to seven. Mr. John Wolfe and Mr. S. A. Hennis, Jr., joined the veteran board members. Our rapidly increasing school population brings many problems for these public-spirited men, who give so freely of their time and energy that we may maintain and improve the quality of our schools. Dr. Moir S. Martin, Chairman Teacher Committee Administration Mr. R. M. Smith Finance Committee Mr. W. I. Monday Vice-Chairman Finance Committee Building and Repair Mr. S. A. hennis, Jr Teacher Committee r r ■ ■w s 0 Mrs. Juanita Barber Secretary Mr. R. M. Nelson Building and Repair Mr. H. M. Fi nch, Principal Mr. L. B. Pendergraph, Superintendent Under the leadership of Superintendent L. B. Pendergraph and Principal H. M. Finch, the Mount Airy High School runs smoothly and effectively, giving us happy years as well as a solid foun¬ dation for the future. Mr. John B. Wolfe Building and Repair Mr. W. S. Porter Finance Committee Mrs. Kate Jackson Cafeteria Manager Mrs. Kate Barringer . . . think and articulate clearly . . . U. S. History, World Problems, Civics Student Council Adviser Mrs. Mary Boyles . . no erasures . . . Commercial faculty This year we added an extra teacher in the English department and had two replacements, one in the science department and one in the commercial field. Mr. H. M. Finch . . . in touch with the classroom . . . Trigonometry, Principal Miss Ada Haymore . . . olim . . . Latin, Latin Club Adviser Miss Eva Holder . . . get it right . . . English, Journalism High Spots Adviser Mrs. Lavinia Mackie . . . y para manana . . . Spanish, World History, Senior Adviser, Spanish Club Adviser Mrs. Maxine Hamilton .. . seeing the unseen . . Biology, Physics Miss Margaret Jenkins . .. lightening calculator . . . Commercial faculty Having personalities as diverse as the subjects they teach, our faculty members offer stimulating contacts as well as limitless horizons of know¬ ledge. Mr. Charles Johnson ... on the beat. . . Chorus, Band, Hi-Y Adviser Mr. Sam Moir “. . . ah-h-h-. . . I” Civics, Physical Ed., Coaching Mrs. Lorraine McKinney .. . little lady, big mind . .. General Science, Biology, Chemistry Arithmetic, Freshman Adviser Mrs. Mary Neal . . . drill, drill, drill . . . English, Junior Adviser Mr. Arnold Ramey .. . flowers, histrionics, dates ... History, Civics, Geography, Physical Ed., Senior Play Jirecto ' faculty Our faculty is tops. Teachers work hard to give us a thorough grounding in fundamentals. They insist that we work not only to gain knowledge but also to think for ourselves. Miss Eleanor Shumaker ... try it this way ... Commercial Ms Elizabeth Reece words are important. English Miss Jean Simpson . . . for every need, a book .. . Library, Airmont Adviser Mrs. Caroline Sydnor ... equations have predicate nominatives ... Algebra, Geometry, Dean of Girls, Tri-Hi-Y Adviser Mr. Wallace Shelton . . . your excuse, please . . . English, Coaching, Monogram Club Adviser, Dean of Boys Mrs. Valeria Shuford . . . foundations for homemaking . . . Home Economics, F. H. A. Adviser faculty Our teachers are also our friends—individuaIs who see us as persons and encourage and help us whenever possible. Our gratitude and respect for them grow with years. Miss Annie Thomas . . . exams for teachers, too . .. English, Guidance, Cheerleader Adviser Mrs. Veia Thomas ... then would be . . . Algebra, Arithmetic, Sophomore Adviser I In living the M. A. H. S. story we have come in contact with interesting and inspiring personalities, forming friendships that will grow with the years. We have come to love our fellow students with their differences in personality and appearance; we have recog¬ nized the ability of some to be able leaders and others, willing followers. We will not want to forget any of the characters of our story; therefore each person has been pictured in this section according to his class. Swiftly the school years pass, bringing new friends, new ex¬ periences, growth. Suddenly we find that the thrill of becoming seniors is equalled only by the nostalgia we begin to feel for this happiest of years. Opposite page: Ausiva Mills, senior class president, models cap and gown for Jimmy Ashburn, treasurer; Wilma King, vice-president; Doris Marshall, secretary. Mrs. Barringer, faculty advisor, gives suggestions to (left to right) Ronnie Pruett, testator; Barbara Jester, prophet; Elaine Hoover, poet; Bud Oliver, his¬ torian, as they begin to prepare the speeches for Class Night, a highlight of graduation exercises. Dan Ellis, Corky Hiatt, Hubert McMillian, and Barbara Jester work hard on the set and properties for senior assembly. 24 WAYNE ADKINS CARROLL BALDWIN ANN ALLRED BILL BEAMER JIMMY ASHBURN YANCEY BEAMER ANNETTE BABER BILL BELTON BOBBY BADGETT DON BEVERLY SENIORS ARE LEADING CHARACTERS Pat Brown, who joined the M. A. H. S. Seniors late, places books she has received in her locker. WAYNE ADKINS: Hi-Y, 3,4. ANN ALLRED: Student Council alternate, 1; representative, 2; Constitution Committee, 2; Latin Club program chairman, 2; Glee Club, 1,2,3,4; Sergeant- at-arms, 4; Tri-Hi-Y, 3,4; group leader, 4; Ainnoirt staff, 1,2,3,4; Associate Editor, 3; Editor, 4; Lions Club essay winner, 1; Jr. Sr. Prom committee, 3; Band, 2. JIMMY ASHBURN: Hi-Y, 2,3,4; vice-president, 4; Hall monitor, 3,4; Latin Club, 2; Spanish Club, 4; Class president, 3; Class treasurer, 4; Wittiest Boy, 4. ANNETTE BABER: Glee Club, 1,2,3, 4; F. H. A., 1,2,3, 4; state secretary, 2; parliamentarian, 3; president, 4; Tri-Hi-Y, 3,4; Basketball, 1,2,4; Spanish Club, 3; Monogram Club 4; Hall Monitor, 4; Jr.-Sr. Prom committee, 3. BOBBY BADGETT: Baseball, 1,2; Basketball, 1; Football, 3,4; Hi-Y, 3,4; Latin Club, 2. CARROLL BALDWIN: Glee Club, 3,4; Hi-Y, 2,3,4. BILLY BEAMER: Hi-Y, 2,3,4; treasurer, 4; Monogram Club, 3,4; vice- president, 4; Hall monitor, 1,2; Student Council, 1,2; Football 2,3,4; Basketball, 1,2; Track, 1,2; Baseball, 1,2; Latin Club, 2. 26 YANCEY BcAMER: Hi-Y, 2,3,4; Latin Club, 2; Hall monitor, 2. BILL BELTON: Class president, 1; Hi-Y, 2,3,4; Foot¬ ball, 2,3,4; Basketball, 1; Hall monitor, 1,3; Monogram Club 3 4 DONALD GRAY BEVERLY: Hi-Y, 3,4. DOUGLAS BINGMAN: Basketball, 1; Latin Club, 2; Hi-Y, 3,4, DAVID BRITTS: Glee Club, 2,3; Hi-Y, 3,4; Football, 2,3; Latin Club 2; Hall monitor, 1,2,3. GARY BROWN: Football, 1,2,3,4; captain, 4; Baseball, 1,2,3,4; Monogram Club, 1,2,3,4; president,4; Hi-Y, 3,4;sergeant- at-arms, 4. NORMA ANN BROWN: Glee Club, 2,3,4; Tri- Hi-Y, 3,4; F.H.A., 1,2,3; vice-president, 3. STUART BROWN: Hi-Y, 3; Bus driver, 2,3,4. LOUISE BUNKER: Glee Club, 1,2,3,4; Latin Club, 2; Tri-Hi-Y, 3,4; Constitution, 3; Spanish Club, 4; Jr.-Sr. Prom committee, 3. David McCarty and a camera are thought of simultaneously. David photographs and develops pictures for both school publi¬ cations. ANN CHRISTIAN: Glee Club, 2,3,4; vice-president, 4; Tri-Hi-Y, 3,4; MonogramClub, 3,4; Basketball manager, 3; Student Council, 4; Candidate for Miss Mount Airy High School, 2; Queen of Hearts, 3; Latin Club secretary, 2; Airmont staff, 4; Hall moni¬ tor, 1; Jr.-Sr. Prom committee, 3. SHIRLEY CLIFTON: Tri-Hi-Y, 3,4; Basketball, 1,2,3,4; Hall monitor, 4; Latin Club,2; Queen of Hearts candidate, 2; Track, 1; Monogram Club, 2,3,4; secretary, 4. JUDY COE: Glee Club, 1,2,3,4; Tri-Hi-Y, 3,4; Latin Club treasurer, 2. IN OUR M.A.H.S. STORY DOUGLAS BINGMAN LOUISE BUNKER DAVID BRITTS THOMAS BURRUS GARY BROWN ANN CHRISTIAN NORMA BROWN SHIRLEY CLIFTON STUART BROWN JUDY COE ■ SHIRLEY COLLINS RALPH COOKE BOB DAVIS SARAH DOGGETT JERRY DODSON SHIRLEY COLLINS: F.H.A., 1,2; Reporter, 2. BOB DAVIS: Hi-Y, 2,3,4; Hall monitor, 1,2,4. JERRY DODSON: Glee Club, 3,4; Hi-Y, 3,4; Baseball manager, 2; Monogram Club, 3,4; Most School Spirited Boy, 4. SARAH DOGGETT: Library assistant, 1,2,3; Latin Club secre¬ tary, 2; Class treasurer, 1; A innont staff, 2,3,4 ' Business manager, 4; Miss Mount Airy High School candidate, 1,2,3; Home-coming candi¬ date, 3,4; Queen, 4; Piedmont Bowl Queen candidate, 3; Cheerleader, 2,4; Chief, 4; Monogram Club, 2,3,4; Jr.-Sr. Prom committee, 3; Marshal, 3; Tri-Hi-Y, 3,4; Lions Club essay winner, 3; Prettiest girl, 4; Most Popular girl, 4. NORMA DRAUGHN: Glee Club, 1,2,3,4; secretary, 4; Tri-Hi-Y, 3,4; Latin Club, 2; Spanish Club, 4; Marshal, 3; Most studious girl, 4. DAN ELLIS: Band, 1,3,4; Football, 2; Hi-Y, 2,3,4; Latin Club, 2; Projectionist, 1,2. ANN FRANCE: F. H. A., 3,4; Latin Club, 2; Office page, 3; Library assistant, 4; Tri-Hi-Y, 3,4. BECKY GORDON: Tri-Hi-Y, 3; Hall monitor, 2. CURTIS GORDON: Hi-Y, 2,3; Football, 1,2,3,4; Baseball manager, 1; Hall monitor, 3; Monogram Club, 2,3,4. BELLE HARKRADER: Track, 1; Glee Club, 2; Tri-Hi-Y, 3,4; Latin Club, 2; Spanish Club, 4; Hiqh Spots staff, 4. ROGER HAYMORE: Hi-Y, 3; Hall moni¬ tor, 3. THE YEAR IS CURTIS GORDON CARLTON HIATT ELBERT HALL RALPH HIATT Jimmy Kirkman, co-captain of the ' 56 football team, displays some of his honors-Best Sport and Most Valuable for two years. NORMA DRAUGHN DAN ELLIS ANN FRANCE JACK GILLESPIE BECKY JO GORDON HELEN HAYNES: F.H.A., 1,2; vice-president, 2. FRANCES HAYNES: Glee Club, 1,2; Latin Club, 2; Airmont staff, 1,2; N. C.S.P.A. secretary, 3; Tri-Hi-Y, 3,4; reporter 4; High Spots staff, 4; Student Council alternate, 3. CARLTON HIATT: Band, 1, 2,3,4; Business manager, 4; Hi-Y, 3,4. RALPH HIATT: Hi-Y, 3. DOLLY HICKS: Tri-Hi-Y, 4; Hall monitor,4. KEN HILL: Hi-Y, 2,3,4; Hall monitor, 1,3. ELAINE HOOVER: Assembly playwright, 1,2,3,4; Student Council, 2,3,4; Class vice-president, 3; Glee Club, 2,3,4; High Spots Editor, 4; Tri-Hi-Y, 3,4; Co-chaplain, 4; Marsha I, 3; Latin Club president! 2; Girl most likely to succeed, 4; Girl with best personality 4; Wittiest girl, 4; Class poet, 4. GAYE JACKSON: Student Council, 1; Basketball, 1,2,3 4- Most valuable, 2,3; Office page, 2; Monogram Club, 2,3,4; trea¬ surer, 3; vice-president, 4; Latin Club, 2; Glee Club, 3; Tri- Hi-Y, 3,4; Hall monitor, 4; Most athletic girl, 4. CAROLYN JACOBS: Student Council, 2; Glee Club, 2,3; Latin Club, 3; High Spots staff, 4; Tri-Hi-Y, 3,4. FILLED WITH VARIED ACTIVITIES FRANCES HAYNES HELEN HAYNES GAYE JACKSON CAROLYN JACOBS BELLE HARKRADER DOLLY HICKS RALPH HARRIS KEN HILL ROGER HAYMORE ELAINE HOOVER TIM JESSUP BARBARA JESTER MARYANN JOHNSON DEAN JONES TOM KERR TIM JESSUP: Hi-Y, 3,4; secretary, 4; Spanish Club, 4; Bas¬ ketball, 1; Office page, 3; Hall monitor, 4. BARBARA JESTER: Class secretary, 2; Latin Club president, 2; Tri-Hi-Y, 3,4; group leader, 4; Office page, 2; Hall monitor, ' 1,3; Spanish Club secre¬ tary-treasurer, 4; Miss Mount Airy High School candidate, 3; Stu¬ dent Council vice-president, 4; Ainnont staff, 3,4; Layout Editor; 4; Monogram Club, 3,4; Cheerleader, 4; Basketball manager, 3; Marshal 3; Jr.-Sr. Prom committee, 3; Homecoming candidate, 4; Prophet, 4. MARYANN JOHNSON: Latin Club, 2; Hall monitor, 2; Tri- Hi-Y, 3,4; Interstate treasurer, 3; Convention delegate, 3,4; Spanish Club, 4; Marshal, 3; Lions Club essay winner, 2. DEAN JONES: Hi-Y, 3,4. TOM KERR: Football, 1,2,3,4; Glee Club, 2,4; Hi-Y, 2,3,4; Latin Club, 2; Monogram Club, 2,3,4; Hall monitor, 1. WILMA KING: F.H.A., 4; Basketball, 1,2; Latin Club, 2; Library assistant, 2,3; Jr.-Sr. Prom committee, 3; Tri-Hi-Y, 3,4; Office page, 4; Class vice-president, 4. JIMMY KIRKMAN: Football, 1,2,3,4; Most valuable, 3; Best sport, 3; Co-captain, 4; Baseball, 1,2,4; Hi-Y, 3,4; chaplain, 4; Glee Club, 4; Band, 1,4; Monogram Club, 2,3,4; Hall Monitor, 2,3; Spanish Club, 4; Boy with best personality, 4. WANDA KIRK¬ MAN: Glee Club, 1,2,3,4; Tri-Hi-Y, 3,4; F.H.A., 1; secretary- treasurer 1; Softball, 1. CLASS WORK, FRIENDS NORMA JO LEFTWICH LOIS LEVERING ANNE MARTIN JOHN MARTIN Hours of study were rewarded for ’55 marshals (left to right) Sarah Doggett, Dieneke Nieuwenhuis, and Elaine Hoover. WILMA KING JIMMY KIRKMAN WANDA KIRKMAN DICK LACKEY JANICE LEFTWICH DICK LACKEY: Hi-Y, 3,4; Football, 1,2; Office Page, 3; Hall Monitor, 4; Latin Club, 2; Jr.-Sr. Prom Committee, 3. JANICE LEFTWICH: Tri-Hi-Y, 3,4; F.H.A., 2,3. NORMA JO LEFT- WICH: Glee Club, 1,2,3,4; Tri-Hi-Y, 3,4; Basketball, 1,2. LOIS LEVERING: Friends Boarding School, 2,3; High Spots staff, 4; Latin Club, 4; Tri-Hi-Y, 4. DAVID McCARTY: Glee Club, 2,3,4; Hi-Y, 2,3,4; president, 4; Latin Club vice-president, 2; Spanish Club, 4; Student Council Parliamentarian, 4; Ainnont staff, 2,3,4; photographer, 3,4; Chief Marshal, 3; Boy most likely to succeed, 4; Most studious boy, 4. HUBERT McMILLI AN: Band, 1,2,3,4; Business manager, 4; Glee Club, 3,4; Hi-Y, 3,4. MELVIN MARION: Basketball, 1,2,3; Latin Club, 2; Cheer¬ leader, 3; Hi-Y, 3,4; Hall monitor, 4; Monogram Club, 1,2,3,4. DORIS MARSHALL: Student Council, 1; Latin Club trea¬ surer, 2; Hall monitor, 2; Glee Club, 3; Ainnont typist, 4; Tri-Hi- Y, 3,4; secretary, 4; Class secretary, 4. ANNE MARTIN: Tri-Hi-Y, 3. JOHN MARTIN: Bus driver, 2. BARBARA MATTHEWS: F. H. A., 1,2. BOBBY MATTHEWS: Jr.-Sr. Prom committee, 3. JOAN MIDKIFF: Spanish Club, 3; Tri-Hi-Y, 3,4. FUN-ALL BECOME MORE IMPORTANT DAVID McCARTY BARBARA MATTHEWS HUBERT McMILLIAN BOBBY MATTHEWS MELVIN MARION DORIS MARSHALL CHARLES MATTHEWS LEON MATTHEWS NANCY MARSHALL JOAN MIDKIFF LARRY MIDKIFF SANDRA MIDKIFF AUSIVA MILLS MARGARET MONEY BARBARA MOSELEY MEMORIES OF THE PAST , ENJOYMENT OF Norma Draughn, in the role of a Chinese servant, receives instruc¬ tions from assembly playwrights Sybil Williams and Elaine Hoover. SANDRA MIDKIFF: Cheerleader, 2,3,4; Tri-Hi-Y, 3,4; Monogram Club, 2,3,4; Homecoming candidate, 2,3,4; Glee Club, 1,2,3,4; Librarian, 2; vice-president, 3; president, 4; Hall monitor, 4; High Spots business manager, 4; Spanish Club, 3; Most school- spirited girl, 4. AUSIVA MILLS: Football, 1; Class secretary, 1; president, 4; Hi-Y, 2,3,4; Band, 2,3,4; business manager, 3; secretary- treasurer, 4; Latin Club, 2; Student Council, 3,4; sergeant-at- arms, 4. MARGARET MONEY: Marshal, 3; Hall monitor, 4; Office page 4. BARBARA MOSELEY: Office page, 4. SHELBY NELSON: Glee Club, 1; Library assistant, 4; secre¬ tary to Guidance Director, 4. DIENEKE NIEUWENHUIS: Glee Club, 1,2,3; Student Council alternate, 1; Latin Club, 2; Marshal, 3; Tri-Hi-Y, 3,4; Constitution, 3; treasurer, 4; Spanish Club, 4; Office page, 4. KENNETH NORMAN: Francisco High School, 1,2,3; Basketball, 1,2,3,4; Baseball, 2,3. BUD OLIVER: Student Council, 1,2,3,4; sergeant-at-arms, 2; parliamentarian, 3; president, 4; Hi-Y, 2,3,4; Hall monitor, 1,2,3; Office page, 4; Football, 1,3,4; Monogram Club, 3,4; treasurer, 4; Latin Club vice-president, 2; Class president, 2; Mr. Mount Airy High School candidate, 1,2,3; Jr.-Sr. Prom Committee, 3; Class historian, 4; Most popular boy, 4. DONNA PATTERSON BONNIE PENNIX DALLAS PHILIPS TOMMY PIERCE RONNIE PRUETT SHELBY NELSON DIENEKE NIEUWENHUIS KENNETH NORMAN BUD OLIVER WAYNE PACK THE PRESENT, PREPARATION FOR THE FUTURE WAYNE PACK: Hall monitor, 2; Latin Club, 2; Glee Club, 3,4; Hi-Y, 2,3,4. DONNA PATTERSON: Tri-Hi-Y, 3,4; Glee Club, 2,3,4; Library assistant, 4; Latin Club, 2. BONNIE PENNIX: Tri-Hi-Y, 3,4; Latin Club, 3; Student Council, 1; alternated; Library assistant, 4; Basketball, 1,2. DALLAS PHILLIPS: Hillsville, Va. High School, 1,2; Football, 1,2,3,4; Latin Club, 4; Best-looking boy, 4. TOMMY PIERCE: Oak Ridge Military Institute, 1,2,3. RONNIE PRUETT: Glee Club, 3,4; Hi-Y, 2,3,4; Program chairman, 4; Latin Club, 2; Spanish Club, 4; World Peace Speak¬ ing Contest, 3; Marshal, 3; Blue Ridge Assembly, 3; Student Council president candidate, 3; Student Council, 1,4; treasurer, 4; Class testator, 4. CLAUDIA RAMSEY: Bridgewater High School, 1,2; Office page, 4; Cafeteria, 1,3,4; Delegate to Tri- Hi-Y-Hi-Y camp, 3; F. H. A., 1,2,4. DON ROSE: Pilot Mountain High School, 1,2; Hi-Y, 3,4;Foot- ball, 1,2,3; Hall monitor, 4; Latin Club, 4. HUBERT ROYAL: Football, 1; Baseball manager, 2,3,4; Monogram Club, 2,3,4; Bus driver, 4. Ronnie Pruett, portraying a poetry-spou ting office boy in the senior assembly, bids Ann Allred a formal adieu. OWEN SHELTON SHIRLEY SIMMONS JOANN SMITH SHIRLEY SMITH BETTY SNOW SENIORS ENJOY THIS LAST YEAR BEFORE OWEN SHELTON: Hi-Y, 3,4; Basketball, 1,2,3,4; Baseball, 3,4; Monogram Club, 2,3,4; King ot Hearts candidate, 3. SHIRLEY SIMMONS: Latin Club, 2; Tri-Hi-Y, 3,4; Hall monitor, 2; Office page, 4. JOANN SMITH: Glee Club, 1,2,3,4; treasurer, 3; Tri-Hi-Y, 3, 4; Student Council, 1,3; F.H.A., 1,4; treasurer, 4; Dasketbal1, 2,3, 4; Spanish Club, 3; Monogram Club, 2,3,4. SHIRLEY SMITH: Tri-Hi-Y, 3. BETTY SNOW: Glee Club, 1,2,3,4; Tri-Hi-Y, 3,4; F. H. A., parliamentarian, 4. STEVE SPARGER: Hi-Y, 3,4. GARY SUTPHIN: Hi-Y, 2,3,4; Baseball, 1,2,3,4; Basketball, 1,2; Football, 2; Monogram Club, 2,3,4. EETTE TILLEY: Cheerleader, 2,3,4; Tri-Hi-Y, 3,4; sergeant- at-arms, 4; Miss Mount Airy High School candidate, 1; Class treasurer, 3; Monogram Club, 2,3,4; Latin Club, 2; Girls ' Sports editor High Spots, 4; Homecoming sponsor, 3; Homecoming candi¬ date, 4, BURTON TIMMONS: Basketball, 1,2,3,4; Baseball, 1,2,3,4; Monogram Club, 2,3,4; Most athletic boy, 4. David McCarty enjoys his role as a rich Texan and the beauties—Frances Haynes, Janice Left- wich, Bonnie Pennix—attracted by his money. BOB TYNDALL BETTY VOGLER JAMES WAGONER ELEANOR WARREN GERALDINE WELCH STEVE SPARGER ENTERING GARY SUTPHIN BETTE TILLEY KENNETH TILLEY COLLEGE, JOB, ARMY, HOMEMAKING BURTON TIMMONS BOB TYNDALL: Class vice-president, 1; Hi-Y, 2,3,4; Mono¬ gram Club, 2,3,4; Latin Club, 2; Spanish Club president, 4; Foot¬ ball, 1,2,3,4; Mr. Mount Airy High School candidate, 1,2; Hi«h Spots associate editor, Boys ' Sports editor, 4; Hall monitor, l. BETTY VOGLER: Glee Club, 1,2,3,4; librarian, 2,4; Tri- Hi-Y, 3,4; Latin Club, 2; Band, 4. JAMES WAGONER: Latin Club, 2; Hi-Y, 2. ELEANOR WARREN: Latin Club, 2; Glee Club, 1,2,3; Tri-Hi-Y, 3,4; president, 4; Interstate recording secretary, 3; Convention dele¬ gate, 3,4; Student Council, 4; High Spots advertising manager, 4; Jr.-Sr. Prom committee, 3. GERALDINE WELCH: Student Council, 1,2; Hall monitor, 3; Marshal, 3. ROBERT WESTMORELAND: Football, 1. ELMER WHITT: Hi-Y, 3. SYBIL WILLIAMS: Glee Club, 1,2,3,4; Tri-Hi-Y, 3,4; co¬ chaplain, 4; Student Council, 3,4; assembly playwright, 1,2,3,4; F. H. A., 1; Class secretary, 3. BOBBY WITHERS: Hi-Y, 3,4; Football, 1,2. Careful study paid off for (left to right) Maryann Johnson,) Ronnie Pruett, and Barbara Jester, ’55 marshals. FRANK WELCH ROBERT WESTMORELAND ELMER WHITT SYBIL WILLIAMS BOBBY WITHERS MOST LIKELY TO SUCCEED BEST LOOKING Elaine Hoover - David McCarty Sarah Doggett - Dallas Phillips SENIORS CHOOSE THEIR WITTIEST Elaine Hoover - Jimmy Ashburn MOST ATHLETIC Gaye Jackson - Burton Timmons 36 MOST SCHOOL SPIRITED Sandra Midkiff - Jerry Dodson MOST POPULAR Sarah Doggett - Bud Oliver CLASS SUPERLATIVES BEST PERSONALITY Elaine Hoover - Jimmy Kirkman MOST STUDIOUS Norma Draughn - David McCarty 37 The underclassmen are a vital part of our story. Each of us starts up the ladder of learning as a lowly freshman, pressing toward that glorious goal of being a senior. It is in the years of being underclassmen that we build a firm foundation for future advancement and know the happy, care¬ free days of high school life. Gene Pruett and Richard Vaughn enjoy refreshment during seven minute bre ' -- 38 Patti Arrington Josephine Atkins Bonnie Belton Wayne Blue Susan Boyd Betty Jo Bray Ruth Brown Larry Cannoy Carol Atkins Don Beason Carol Brannock Dean Brown Bobby Benge Virginia Busick Eddie Bondurant John Cashwell junior . . President Vice -President . . Secretary . . Treasurer Sue Simmons Worrell Kurtz Dot Hull . . . Debby Hauser Sue Simmons places high on the pop¬ ularity list playing " April in Paris ' in the Tri-Hi-Y-Hi-Y Talent Show Anna Childress Jane Edwards Jack Childress Ishmael Forest Clenda Childress Betty Jo Ellis m v ' l m n itut i|| u M 1 1 III 1 III ImJI Richard Vaughn and Phil Smith, our two efficient projectionists, watch as a film is being run off. Susie Dobson and Melvina Clifton eagerly examine new books in the library. Class Above right: Worrell Kurtz, wing back, runs with the ball. Linda Childress Larry Frank Nelda Clifton Jo Ella Gilbert Jimmy Cox Donald Gravely Glenn East Arnold Griffith Melvina Clifton George Coble Susie Dobson John Edinger Sue Geiger Mary Goard Freddy Gray Bobby Gwyn Jimmy Haile Martha Jones Billy Hiatt Mabel King Jean Hiatt Linda Loftis Barbara Hall Roland Jones Peggy Haynes Jackie Journey If j mm finfgL . Edsel Hiatt Worrell Kurtz Tommy Mayberry and Dan Slate are famous for their pantomines. Here they do " Dear John. " Roy Hiatt Roger Lyons junior Gene Pruett Jo Ann Southern Mildred Robertson Betty Lou Starr Paul Shelton Faye Strickland Douglas Simmons Robert Thomas Marilyn Petrick Wilma Smith George Quesinberry Sara Jo Sparger Frances Shackelford Helen Steele Clara Simmons Carolene Surratt Ina Mae Hill Dot Hull Bill Jackson Leonard Johnson June Martin Christine Matthews Peggy Monday Philip Nichols Margaret Hodges Johnnee Inman Margaret Jarvis Amy Jones Linda Massey Tommy Mayberry Bobby Moody Jimmy Pell Class Larry Frank and Debby Hauser are tried by Judge Williams for Twirp Season infractions. Sue Simmons Dan Slate Peggy Smith Roy Lee Smith Edward Tickle Kenny Watson Rebecca Westmoreland Barbara Young Kathleen Simmons Mary Frances Simpson Betty Thore Richard Vaughn Jack Smith Phil Smith Jane Welch Randell Willard Sophomores CLASS OFFICERS President . . . Vice -President Secretary . . . Treasurer . . . . . Jim Baity . . Sam Inman • P e ggy Vogler Stewart Smith Minnie Adkins Ronnie Alderman Jimmy Baity Jimmy Barke r Belva Beck Donald Beck Faye Bennett Jerry Beverly Gilmer Blackburn Johnny Blue Helen Bond Nancy Bondurant Patricia Bowman Jimmy Boyles Edgar Brooks Dink Caldwell Debby Callaway Rachel Callaway Donald Cannoy Barbara Carpenter Martha Carroll Jerry Childress Peggy Childress Frances Coalson Nancy Collins James Craddock Ruth Curtis Tony D ' Amico Reginald Davis Aravaley Dawson Bena Deatherage Linda Dowell R. J. Easter Bonnie Edwards Donald Edwards Dalmar Everhart Audrey Ferguson Gay Fleming Johnny France Judy Gardner Clark Gilbert Hazel Griffeth Sophomores Faye Hall Jerry Hall Sylvia Hall Ian Harding Kenneth Harris Franklin Hawks Hayford Hawks Betty Lou Haynes Peggy Haynes Gary Henderson Tommy Hennis Betty Hiatt Margaret Hiatt Wayne Hill Harold Hodges Pat Hodges Janie Holloway Sybil Hurst Jackie Inman Sammy Inman Joe Johnson Wayne Johnson Ellen Jones Gaynelle Jones Linda Jones Raynelle Jones Steve Jones James Kingsberry Joyce Kirkman Judy Kirkman Polly Kirkman Paul McGee Fred McHone Betty McMillian Mabel McMillian Annie Marsh Clyde Martin Faye Matthews Larry Meredith Lorna Meredith Jane Merritt Ray Mills Sophomores Joy Monday James Monroe Helen Moore Louise Morris Edna Moseley Sylvia Mosely Dick Parker Gaye Patterson Carol Payne James Peoples Sara Lou Phillips Phyllis Poore Jenny Pruett Roger Puckett Don Pulliam Mary Pulliam George Quesinberry Sidney Ramsey Sylvia Ramsey Norma Ricker Delories Riddle Verona Sechrist Esther Semones Betty Simmons Richard Simmons Wade Simmons Betty Lou Smith Edward Smith Gary Smith George Smith June Smith Peggy Smith Shannon Smith Stewart Smith Roger Snow Bonnie Sparger Ernest Speight John Carl Spurlin Charles Starr Treva Sumner Faye Sutphin Ray Sutphin Duke Taylor Eleanor Thomas Nancy Thomas Vera Carl Thomas Cynthia Tillotson Jackie Timmons Gray Utt Catherine Utt Yvonne Vaughn Mary Ruth Volger Peggy Vogler Sam W all Bobby Watson Faye Watson Mickey Watson Novie Welch Don Willard George Williams Helen Williams Wayne Wilson Billy Withers Linda Worrell 46 Jreshmen FRESHMAN OFFICERS President . . . Vice -President Secretary . . . Treasurer . . . . . . Frank Lowry . . . . Linda Mills . Mildred Shelton . . Freddy Schafer Bruce Anderson Don Anderson Richard Armfield Billy Baber Tollie Barber Jim Barker Larry Beason Vassily Beketov Wayne Benge Mary Louise Blue Elizabeth Bondurant Buddy Bowman Virginia Bowman Mary Frances Boyd Richard Boyles Roger Boyles Hilda Brannock Jerry Brannock Edwin Brinkly Dorothy Bunn Ernest Burgess Edmund Burke Carrie Mae Byrd Billy Campbell Patricia Carpenter Wesley Caviness Maxie Chandler Carol Childress N 47 Jreskmen Thorne Clark Lewis Clement Rodney Clifton Rachel Collins Vance Collins Larry Combs Brenda Cooke Kenneth Cooke Robin Cooke Jo Lena Cox Margurette Craft Angelena D ' Amico Rosa Lee Dean Barbara Duncan Charles Easter Clara Edinger Barbara Edwards Johnnie Mae Edwards Carol Sue Ellis Jimmy Felts Jimmy Fleming Joan Fleming Sandra Frye Jerry Gilbert Eleanor Gillespie Anne Goad Kenneth Goad Peggy Goins Katie Gravely Eddie Gray Charles Greenwood Douglas Griffin Carol Ann Gwyn Vaughn Gwyn. Ronald Haymore Eddie Hemrick Billy Henderson Billy Hiatt Cleo Hiatt Margaritta Hiatt Mary Ann Hicks Sandra Holder Zan Hunter Ruby Hunter Sammy Hunter Jimmy Jacobs Scherer James Harry Lee Johnson Carol Johnston Margaret Jones Patrica Jones Richard Kelley Suzanne Lewis Frank Lowry Betty Jean McBride Margaret McCann Eleanor McGee Thomas McHome Bryan McMillian Clinton Martin Dennis Martin John Martin Mary Frances Matthews 48 dreshmen Sara Midkiff Linda Mills Fay Mills Annette Monday Alfred Moorefield Juanita Morrison Macon Mosely Shelby Newgent Wade Nelson Shirley Noah Julia Norman Linda Norman Alice Owens Jerry Ownes Barry Patterson Lois Patterson J. D. Paul Linda Payne Theresa Perkins Kenneth Pruett Marylene Puckett W yatt Pucket Thelma Rakes Frank Ramsey, Jr. Freddy Schafer Judith Shelton Mildred Shelton David Simmons Dianne Simmons Mike Simmons Patsy Simmons Larry Smith Sue Smith Jason Snow Margaret Spenser Don Starling Jerry Starr Guido Sutter Joe Thomas Pat Thomas Bonnie Tickle Charles Triplette Carolyn Vaughn Tommy Vaughn Irvin Ward Melbina Ward Alton Watson Betsy Watts Don Weddle Naomi Welborn Brenda Westmoreland Dougles Westmoreland Philip Westmoreland James Whitaker Mike Williams lj Carolyn Woodie Margaret Woodruff Carolyn Worrell Gail Wright Glenn Yokley Bonnie Y epp 49 The action of our story includes both the classroom work and the extra-curricular activities--organizations, routine, and special events, and athletics. Realizing that both work and play are neces¬ sary for a happy, well-rounded student, Mount Airy High School provides us with a program of development in which study, fun, and variety have their rightful places. We treasure the difficul¬ ties, successes, and thrills as well as the routine activities --they are our foundation for the anticipated sequel each must write for himself. w n The classroom becomes our world for six hours each day as we seek to open windows on to a wider world. We have received more than a wisdom obtained from books, for in this close association with students and teachers we have learned to develop our own personalities and to seek desirable social habits. The fun, as well as the preparation which has gone into each day ' s class periods, will long be a remembered part of the M. A. H. S. story--and a part of each of us. A geography class and an expanded guidance program were added to the 1954 - ' 55 curriculum. i »• MV J SOCIAL SCIENCES OPEN LIMITLESS VISTAS Larry Cannoy locates the place un¬ der discussion for his American history class. Larry Merrideth, Faye Matthews, and Sylvia Moseley, students of world history, find it is interesting and necessary t o read more than one reference for their assignments. Abetter understanding of current trends is promoted by the study of history, a living subject of interest to each student. Four teachers of¬ fer nine classes in world history, U. S. history, civics, and American problems. Janice Leftwich, (seated) Ann Allred, and Gary Sut- phin, students of Mrs. Barringer ' s American prob¬ lems class, use the Readers Guide to find additional information for their discussions. By giving his current event, Kenny Cook helps keep his civics class up to date on world happenings. 54 ENGLISH BUILDS BASIC SKILLS Dean Brown finds English sends him to the library shelves. Mrs. Reece ' s F reshman English class enjoys homonyms. Vera Mills shows Mac Moseley that although these words sound alike, they are different in spelling and meaning. Roland Jones and Linda Childress, English III students, use posters to emphasize grammatical usage. A knowledge of correct English us¬ age is the key to success in all our studies, in our future work, and in our leisure hours. Our English de - partment, composed of five instruc¬ tors teaching twenty classes includ¬ ing commercial English and journal - ism, strives to help students write, speak, read, and think effectively. Dictation and spelling are a weekly part of mastering the English language in English IV. A grading com¬ mittee composed of four superior students in each section checks the work. Three members of the com¬ mittee with red pencils ' are Barbara Jester, left; Mary¬ ann Johnson, center; and Bob Tyndall. 55 MATH CHALLENGES US Arithmetic, algebra, geometry, trigonometry, book¬ keeping, and business math--classes to meet all math needs are taught in our school. In the general and col¬ lege preparatory courses eleven classes are taught by three teachers. Above: Belle Harkrader solves a trig problem for the class. Above right: An algebra II class listens attentively while June Smith explains a problem. Right: Roger Boyles explains to Thelma Rakes and Mary Franees Matthews how he got $30.00 for an answer to his arithmetic problem. Everyone in Mrs. Sydnor 1 s third period geometry class looks on as Dot Hull (seated center) displays a new tool she has found for measur¬ ing intercepted arcs. 56 SCIENCE UNFOLDS MANY WONDERS Above Left: Faye Bennett, Grey Utt, and Barbara Carpenter, biology stu¬ dents, find the balance of life in an aquarium interesting. Above: Chemistry students Bobby Withers and B e 11 y Vogler look amazed as they see oxygen being made before their very eyes. Right: " The main thing is to have a steady hand, " explains Phil Smith to Kathleen Simmons about a comp¬ licated physics experiment. Biology, chemistry, general science, and physics are offered by our science department for inquisitive minds eager to u n d e r s t a n d natural forces at work in the world. Two instructors conduct eight classes in text and laboratory work. Above: Eddie Gray demonstrates an osmosis experiment for his gen¬ eral science classmates. 57 FOREIGN LANGUAGES REMAIN IMPORTANT A technical knowledge of Latin or Spanish, an under standing of other cultures and the origin of many of our own customs, a bet¬ ter understanding of the people who live in other countries and their literature, a deeper understanding of our own language --these are the goal of the two teachers conducting six foreign language classes, four in Latin and two in Spanish, and two foreign language clubs. Dieneke Nieuwenhuis and Jackie Boyd compare souveniersfrom Holland and Guatemala as they tell the Spanish Club about foreign schools they have attended. Playing Spanish records for a pro¬ nunciation guide, Stewart Smith and Clara Simmons enjoy struggling through a Spanish phrase. Below: These Roman lasses with a smile for the earner a are (left to right) Debby Hauser, Marilyn Pet- rick, Jo Ann Southern, and Betty Jo Bray. Below Right: " Latin is very interesting, " agree Jo Lena Cox and Sara Midkiff , as they discover in reference books new things about Caesar and the ancient Romans. 58 I I I OUR COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT PREPARES US WELL The commercial departments offer a pro¬ gram of thorough preparation for students who plan to secure office jobs and for those who want personal typing when there is space available . Three instructors hold classes in typing, shorthand, book¬ keeping, office practice, and business typing . Mary Goard looks happily at her paper when she finally gets the right answer in bookkeeping class. Sybil Williams helps Wanda Kirkman while Linda Loftis looks on in office practice class. (First Row, left to right) Shirley Smith, Margaret Hodges, Shelby Nelson, (second row) Nancy Mar¬ shall, Anne Martin, and Donna Pat¬ terson find typing to be fun. Below Right: Mrs. Boyles gives individual help. 59 HOMEMAKING AND VOCATIONAL SHOP Five classes are offered in home economics to pre¬ pare girls for homemaking as a career. This year in the third year cour se the students have as a special project the decoration of our new guidance room. Appearing in the home economics spring fashion show are (seated) Johnnie Inman, Virginia Busick, Carolene Suratt (standing) Kay Goins, Frances McHone. Home economics students (left to right) S usan Boyd, Ruth Brown, Christine Matthews, Sue King, Wilma Smith, Glenda Childress (seated), and their teacher Mrs. Shuford work hard on the drapes which they are making for the new guidance room. Busy home economics students re¬ ceive practical experience in food preparation. They are (left to right) Ruth Brown, Mrs. Shuford, instruc¬ tor, Christine Matthews, Susan Boyd, WilmaSmith, Glenda Childress, Ma¬ bel King. 60 OFFER NEEDED PRACTICAL EXPERIENCE The vocational shop department offers two shop classes, mechanical drawing, and a carpentry class. This year the boys are completing the gym and adding shelf and storage space to the classrooms. Ken Norman gains experience in the operation of a drill in shop class. Mr. Williams checks to see how Bobby Matthews and Elbert Hall are getting along with their mechanical drawing. The carpentry clas s has made many improvements around school. Bur¬ ton Timmons and Edsel Hiatt work on the new shelves for the guidance room. 61 LIBRARY, MUSIC,AND PHYSICAL Our library, staffed by one librarian and thirteen student assistants, is well equip¬ ped to meet the classroom and recreational needs of the students and teachers. 4890 books and 56 current publications are supplemented by pamphlets, film strips, and a magazine file. Wilma King and Sarah Doggett enjoy our library ' s publication section. Sam Inman (standing), Belva Beck, Sylvia Mos¬ ley, and Carroll Baldwin are busy at the refer¬ ence section. Above left: Miss Thomas, Mr. Shelton, and Mr. Ramey check new arrivals. Left: Judy Coe and Caro¬ lyn Jacobs use library materials. DUCATION ROUND OUT OUR PROGRAM The music department, which reaches ap¬ proximately a third of our student body, is composed of two classes for glee club and one for band. In these classes the student can develop his musical talents and see evidence of his work in well presented performances. Debby Calloway, Hubert McMillian, George Quesinberry, Mr. Johnson, director, and Sue Simmons, accompanist, work out a new number. Linda Mills, Patsy Simmons, Diane Simmons, and Gaye Jackson try to improve their shooting in physical ed. class. Physical education is in its second year as a required sub¬ ject for freshmen. While other departments seek to build stronger minds, this department seeks to build stronger bodies and to teach the students how to remain strong and in good health. Two instructors work with four classes daily. Play on the field is a relief from textbook work. Our story includes learning and activity --both are a part of education and both add to our enjoyment and well-rounded growth. The extra-curricular activities of our clubs, service groups, and organizations help us not only to develop talents, leadership, and co¬ operation but also to spice the more serious side of school with fun and variety. Opposite Page: Majorettes --Mary Rut! Vogler, Cynthia T illotson, and Pegg Vogler. Cheerleaders (kneeling) Sarah Doggett, chief, (standing, left to right) Nancy Bondurant, Sandra Midkiff, Barbara Jester, Bette Tilley, Mary Frances Simpson, Polly Kirkman, Debby Hauser, Helen Steele, and Judy Gardner. 64 i mm- mmm , :•- 1 ■HP ™p » 4 5«¥L i. ’ » «aw» 4 v . : ■ iir ' t’-f, eft ' ll rV frfc’ I M? ' ' ' x « « •j- ' .- • v»i ‘ ,. ' J ■V s .-t ? ' » ‘i n . ? " % a » . » " • - % • 4 „ S ' .4 ’ afeo v ip .35 ' v . - i asa?JBjgaaigSf ii .’■ -- .■ oS jlA. .Jtty ft, 7 V-p i % % »V . ' r .H y mm 5?- -- ' A ' ‘r ! 4 j OUR STUDENT COUNCIL BUILDS The student council works to improve the school and make it a happier place for the individual. Member¬ ship includes an elected delegate and alternate from each homeroom plus major club presidents. The senior committee hears violations of coun¬ cil regulations. Bud Oliver, president, maps student council plans with Mrs. Kate Barringer, sponsor, and Bar - bara Jester, vice-president. Ronnie Pruett exerts all his salesmanship to con¬ vince Harvey Pulliam that the student council pens are good buys. President Bud Oliver conducts the student council meeting. First row (front to rear): Bonnie Edwards, Sue Smith, Pat Carpenter, Ronnie Pruett. Second row: Margaret Hiatt, Edmund Burke, Sherer James, Dot Hull, Barbara Jester. Third row: Jenny Pruett, James Harvey, Sybil Williams, Debby Hauser, Eleanor Warren, Mrs. Barringer. Fourth row: David McCarty, Martha Carrol, Ausiva Mills, George Coble, Ann Christian. 66 MORALE, IMPROVES SCHOOL Care of building and regulation of traffic are major projects of the Council. Other work includes pro¬ motion of school spirit and school fun by chartering buses to out-of- town football games and by sponsor¬ ing school dances. Council Members, left to right: Sybil Williams, Ausiva Mills, Barbara Jester, Ronnie Pruett, Eleanor Warren, and Jenny Ruth Pruett lead com¬ mittees for care of our school building. Hall monitor Shirley Clifton checks a permit for Yancy Bearner. Hall Monitors, seated, left to right: Helen Haynes, Betty Jo Thore, Gave Jackson, Wilma Smith, Sandra Midkiff, Annette Baber, Faye Matthews, Carol Sue Ellis, Joan Midkiff, Sybil Hurst. Standing: Dolly Hicks, Susan Boyd, Margaret Money, Tim Jessup, Leonard John¬ son, Jimmy Ashburn, Dick Lackey, Don Rose, Bob Davis, Roger Lyons, Roland Jones, James Craddock, Jack Childress, Melvin Marion, Jimmy Jacobs, Tollie Barber, and Ian Harding. 67 LIBRARY ASSISTANTS DESERVE IMPORTANT Among the busiest and most helpful people in school are the library assistants. These students give up their study halls to do all the countless things that keep the library running smoothly. They check out books, sign permits, card and shelve returned books, write over¬ due reminders, prepare new books for shelves, type, file, inventory, and keep the library in order. Mary Moore Pulliam, Betty Jo Bray, and Marilyn Petrick help get the li¬ brary in order before the activity period rush begins. Melvina Clifton and Ann France pre¬ pare the magazine display. Bonnie Pennix and Shelby Nelson take time out for a bit of browsing at the shelves. 68 PLACE IN OUR STORY Everyone comes to the library. Assistants find plenty to do and never lack company. For five of the six library periods at least one experienc¬ ed assistant is on duty to help new staff mem¬ bers learn the library routine. Two of the stud¬ ents daily devote two periods each to library work. While they gain excellent experience, li¬ brary assistants give valuable help. | Margaret Hodges prepares new backs for the shelves while Donna Patter - son types the accession record. Miss Simpson demonstrates the lettering of books with the new elec¬ tric stylus. Library assistants Joan Fleming and Martha Carroll watch attentively. Dean Brown and Peggy Smith, sixth period library assistants, help Ron¬ nie Alderman c h e c k out a book. 69 OFFICE PAGES GIVE VALUABLE Office pages are among the busiest and most helpful characters in our story. These students give up their free periods to help in the office. Counting money, calling absentees and compiling lists, typing, mimeo¬ graphing, answering the phone, receiving visitors, lo¬ cating students ' schedules, sorting mail, running er¬ rands, making announcements --all these and other activities neces sary to the smooth running of the school are performed efficiently by the pages. Carolyn Jacobs, fourth period page, rings the bell that ends the last lunch period. During activity period Claudia Ram¬ sey, Kenny Watson, and Dieneke Nieuwenhuis check money from sale of tickets, insurance, and pictures. Johnnie Mae Inman (right) demon¬ strates the use of the mimeograph machine to Barbara Mosely and Ina Mae Hill. 70 SERVICE TO OUR SCHOOL es Haynes and Bud Oliver, second period office pages, check up on the absentees. Keeping the office during third per¬ iod is Wilma King, who finds time to catch up on some studying. Sixthperiodpages, Shirley Simmons and Patsy Clifton, make the after¬ noon announcements over the inter¬ com. Through the efficient assistance of Roy Lee Smith and Betty Lou Starr, the day ' s income always balances. 71 HIGH SPOTS REPORTS OUR STORY The Journalism class, made up of seniors with superior English grades, meets daily for both textbook work and the labor atory work of publishing eight issues of High Spots. The editor and assistant editor, elected by vote of the junior class, appoint other staff officers. Financing the paper, planning layout, writing, correcting, and rewritting stories, proofing galleys, and working with the local printers --all these efforts go into the High Spots. We enjoy without realizing the work and worry con¬ nected with each issue. Above: Editors Elaine Hoover and Bob Tyndall (second from left and right) receive instructions from their predecessors, George Wright, Jr., and Linda Cox. Below: Frances Haynes discusses a story with Miss Holder. Below Right: Sports editors Bette Tilley and Bob Tyndall type copy for their page. Sandra Midkiff draws dummy. Opposite: Elaine Hoover makes staff assignments. Below, Oppo¬ site Page: Sandra Midkiff and Belle Harkrader correct galley proofs before going to the Times office to supervise page make-up. Eleanor Warren delivers the finished paper to Shelby Newgent. 72 [I HI€H SPCTJ PoL-ljfihtd Monthly by the J ni7m fisra ■: In s of Mount Airy Hijih School — Mount $iry. North- Owe ca Itftev • a ymi ; i’.bc u copy rN,,„t,irP _ Jjjf ' ;Kv T5?7) E6 k. r r. f ,- ' - -.;, .. . ' Asnr.t -a;.(i ... V .7,7. ' s„t Tvcdai reaUn .. _. - - ;i,», torl ' i U..„v..-c FJ.wr . ’«• t. f u» -v - 6fW Si»n» Kii.:, " . ... Bed. Typ Srin 1.1 11. -V rti F,.:i.w ........ _ . . r.tfte Til.! ■ F ' lCtor! Eater . . . Eellt- lla: - B-isin. « io ,ap. ---Sar.dra Mickif! IdmiJp c. r. uJation Manage: . .2_o.s bearing Outfi.-Lt oi. ' i-.ulthcr Mstiagfcx-. ' ar i.vri ,1 co«b ' Wv«rt,«mg -Mar ago . Eleanor lvo.jjortfc-r- — .--r— A1J nita«ben: of. jocma mtbi clast I 73 AIRMONT STAFF WORKS HARD TO Ads, subscriptions, pictures, cutlines, layouts, typing, filing--these are the things which, unknown to the yearbook owners, make the annual staff one of the busiest groups in our story. The staff works around the year, planning the next year ' s edition and cover¬ ing spring activities as one annual is sent to the pub¬ lisher. Later the staff writes advertisers, corrects proofs, collects final payments, and finally delivers Airmont to eagerly waiting students. Top: Doris Marshall and Ann Christian are kept busy typing copy and indexing. Center: Susie Dobson and Dot Hull look through the files at pictures and copy that are to be used in Air¬ mont. Below: Dink Caldwell receives the down payment for an annual from Nancy Bondurant, as the campaign for orders begins early in the school year. Below Right: Barbara Jester (standing) layout editor, explains the procedure for drawing dummy to staff members (left to right) Jo Ann S o u t h e r n , Shannon Smith, and Ruby Hunter. 74 i PRODUCE THE BEST YEARBOOK YET Floor: Ann Allred, editor. Seated: Miss Simpson, advisor, Ann Christian, Barbara Jester, Shannon Smith, Dink Caldwell, Ruby Hunter, Jo Ann Southern. Standing: David McCarty, Susie Dobson, Doris Marshall, Dot Hull. Right: Planning Airmont are business manager, Sarah Doggett; layout editor, Barbara Jester; photographer, David McCarty; and editor, Ann Allred. Below: David McCarty inspects some of his equipment. 75 TRI-HI-Y ENJOYS MANY The Tri-Hi-Y, made up of junior and senior girls, adds action to our story through its part in morning devotions, talent show and food dis¬ tribution, homecoming activities, Christmas assembly, Sweetheart Dance, and interesting programs. Each ' of the four groups is respon¬ sible for specific achievements. Group III: (first row, left to right) Betty Starr, Linda Lof- tis, Betty Thore, Martha Jones, (second row) Shirley Clif¬ ton, June Martin, Margaret Jarvis, (third row) Mary Simp¬ son, Dieneke Nieuwenhuis, Gaye Jackson, (fourth row) Norma Draughn, MaryGoard, Dolly Hicks, (fifth row) Betty Jo Bray, Josephine Atkins, Mildred Robertson, and Linda Childress. Installation of the ' 56 Tri-Hi-Y of¬ ficers held at the spring banquet in¬ clude (left to right) retiring Vice- President Linda Mosely and incom¬ ing officers Claudia Ramsey, Doris Marshall, Dieneke Nieuwenhuis, Sybil W illiams , Elaine Hoover, Bette Tilley, and Frances Haynes. Group I: (standing) Ann All- red, leader, (first row, left to right) Sandra Midkiff, Debby Hauser, Peggy Smith, Wanda Kirkman, Carolyn Jacobs, (second row) Melvina Clifton, Louise Bunker, Betty Vogler, Dot Hull, Maryann Johnson, (third row) Sarah Jo Sparger, Clara Simmons, Kathleen Sim¬ mons, Susie Dobson, and Ann F ranee. 76 AND VARIED ACTIVITIES Kay Simmons directs questions on boy-girl relationships to a well qualified Danel--Mrs. Sydnor, Miss Thomas, Miss Shumaker, and Mrs. Pruitt. Group IV: (standing) Barbara Jester, leader, (first row, left to right) Bette Tilley, Doris Marshall, Wilma King, Judy Coe, Annette Baber, (second row) Jo Ann Southern, Frances Shackleford, Ruth Brown, Barbara Young, Joan Midkiff, Ann Christian, Jane Edwards, and Norma Brown. Group II: (seated, left to right) Patti Arrington, Helen Steele, Frances Haynes, Amy Jones, Janice Leftwich, Norma Leftwich, Ann Childress, (standing) Shirley Simmons, leader, Sarah Doggett, Peggy Monday, Lois Levering, MarilynPetrick, Wilma Smith, Carol Brannock, and Rebecca Westmoreland. 77 HI Y ACTIVITIES KEEP JUNIOR The Hi-Y co-operates with the Tri- Hi-Y in devotional, service, and rec¬ reational activities. The club is di¬ vided into five committees to facili¬ tate club work and increase individ¬ ual participation. Service Committee: (left to right) Don Beverly, Wayne Adkins, Bob Davis, Yancey Beamer, Roland Jones, Steve Sparger, Douglas Simmons, David McCarty. Publicity and Finance: (left to right) Johnny Edinger, Gary Sutphin, Carroll Baldwin, Ausiva Mills, Thomas Burrus, Bobby Withers. Fellowship Committee: (First row, left to right) Dean Brown, Hubert McMillian, Paul Shelton, Bobby Gywn, (second row) Glenn East, Ken Hill, David Britts, Wayne Pack, Dick Lackey, (standing) Jimmy Ash- burn. 78 ND SENIOR BOYS BUSY ' Program Committee: (left to right) Kenny Watson, Gene Pruett, Worrell Kurtz, Richard Vaughn, and Ronnie Pruett. Worship Committee: (Seated, left to right) Phil Smith, Tom- ny Mayberry, Randy Willard, Bob Tyndall, (standing) Ish- nael Forest, John Cashwell, Jimmy Kirkman. Out-going President Leon Davis (left) installs the new officers-- David McCarty, Jimmy Ashburn, Tim Jessup, Billy Beamer, Jim¬ my Kirkman, and Gary Brown. 79 CLUBS ADD INTEREST Cat in Club First Row, left to right: Rebecca Westmoreland, Linda Childress, Catherine Utt, Mabel McMillian, Peggy Vogler, Mary Vogler, Nancy Bondurant. Second Row: Nancy Thomas, Bonnie Sparger, Sarah Phillips, Dink Caldwell, Novie Welch, Linda Dowell, Jennie Pruett, Linda Worrell, Vera Thomas, Debby Calloway, Shannon Smith, Jane Merritt. Back Row: Miss Ada Haymore, Lois Levering, Linda Jones, Margaret Hiatt, Mary Pulliam, Louise Morris, Jackie Timmons, George Quesinberry, Jim Baity, Donnie Willard, Hayford Hawks, Joe Johnson, Sam Wall, Dallas Phillips. Spanish Club Seated, left to right: Dot Hull, Barbara Jester, Dieneke Nieuwenhuis, Mary Ann Johnson, June Martin, Norma Draughn, Belle Harkeader, Louise Bunker. Standing: David McCarty, Jimmy Kir kman, Jimmy Ashburn, Ronnie Pruett, Bob Tyndall, Tim Jessup, Mrs. Mackie. 80 OUR HIGH SCHOOL STORY Monogram Club First Row, left to right: B. Jester, J. Gardner, P. Kirkman, J. Smith, G. Jackson, O. Shelton, H. Steele, G. Sutphin, S. Clifton, W. Smith, N. Clifton, K. Simmons, N. Bondurant, J. Kirkman, M. Carroll, B. Belton, E. Hiatt, B. Tyndall, R. Vaughn, B. Gwyn. Second Row. D. Hauser, B. Hiatt, P. Smith, S. Midkiff, B . Moody, B . Timmons, S. J one s, T. Mayberry, P. Smith, L. Frank, R. Davis, J. Pell, T. Kerr, J. Hale, D. Phillips. Back: A. Childress, S. Doggett, M. Simpson, A. Christian, B. Tilley, R. Thomas, J. Cox, B. Oliver, S. Smith, J. Smith, B. Beamer. 3. H.A- Seated, left to right: Barbara Young, Jane Welch, Helen Steele, Wilma Smith, Annette Baber, Wilma King, Amy Jones, Sara Jo Sparger. Standing: Mrs. Shuford, Betty Snow, Joanne Smith, Mildred Robertson, Susan Boyd, Rebecca Westmoreland, Linda Childress, Nancy Collins, Patricia Hodges, Claudia Ramsey, Yvonne Vaughn, Delores Riddle, Treva Summer s. 81 ENLARGED BAND ADDS The Mount Air y High School Band is an outstand¬ ing part of our story. The band, composed of sixty-five students , meets daily in one class and during football season extra practices are held on the field each night. The band includes among its activities performances to civic groups, city and county schools as well as our high school football games. Corky Hiatt looks as amazed as the fans at the band ' s presentation. Left to right: Nancy Thomas, Dink Caldwell, and Shannon Smith earn proudly the new flags presented t M. A. H. S. by the Lions Club. 82 COLOR TO OUR SCHOOL LIFE M A M S. Matid Below Left: Harvey Pulliam, president of the band, presides over a meeting of band officers (left to right, seated) Hubert McMil- lian, Mary Ruth Vogler, Betty Hiatt, (standing) Ausiva Mills, Carlton Hiatt. Below Right: The Hot Shots, composed of (left to right) Sam Wall, Joe Johnson, Harvey Pulliam, and George Wil¬ liams, perform at many school functions. 83 GLEE CLUB ADDS A LILT The glee club provides our story with a back¬ ground of music. One hundred and thirty stu¬ dents meet daily in two separate classes and once weekly for a joint rehersal. A fifteen- minute radio broadcast is presented each Fri¬ day by the glee club and rebroadcast on Sunday afternoon. Not only does the glee club perform in special school assemblies but also before church and civic groups thus contributing to the life of our community as well as our school. The annual spring concerts, which draw attend¬ ance from our entire town, are eagerly awaited and long remembered for their excellence. Mr. Charles Johnson, Glee Club and band director, is known to our students as " Mr. Music. " A highlight of the spring concert was the presentation of college alma matas. The vivid colors of the girls ' dresses against the stage set of a college dorm added to the beauty of the concert. 84 OF MUSIC TO OUR STORY ' Carrying on the organization of the glee club are (left to right) Betty Vogler, librarian; Norma Draughn, secretary; Ronnie Pruett, treasurer; Ann Chris¬ tian, vice-president; Sandra Midkiff, president; Ann Allred, sergeant-at-arms; accompanist Sue Simmons (seated at the piano). 85 HOMEROOM 105 GIVES 100 PER CENT SUPPORT Mrs. Barringer and Ann Allred confer. Gaye Jackson demonstrates her famous hook shot. Jimmy Kirkman and Bette Tilley HOMEROOM IK p A-i fflr -i.. f V ■ •t ft Tip .te 3 [y . 86 TO AIRMONT : HOMEROOMS ENJOY INTRAMURAL SPORTS TOURNAMENT PROVES SUCCESSFUL The boys of homeroom 101 look proudly at their hard earned trophy. Bob Tyndall shows the tro¬ phy to Bill Belton, Gary Sutphin, Bill Beamer, David McCarty, Ralph Cooke, Jimmy Ashburn, Jerry Dodson, Bud Oliver, and Bob Withers. All agree that the tournament was lots of fun. Sam Inman of 204 shouts, " I ' ve got it! " while rivals from home¬ room 6 stare at Sam ' s startling catch. if® l- Jimmy Cox of homeroom 6 reaches out to snatch the ball from the fresh¬ men. The winner of the girls ' trophy was freshman homeroom 203. Miss Annie Thomas and Bonnie Edwards read the inscription while (first row) Joy Monday, Nancy Thomas, (second row) Faye Sutphin, Annie Marsh, Helen Moore, NormaRicker, Sylvia Ramsey, and Verona Sechrist look on. 87 Among all the elements of our story, none will be remembered with more nostalgia than the regular day-by-day school life events that make up our year. These typical events, both large and small, we have tried to catch for you and make permanent in words and in pictures. David McCarty instructs Sam Inman, who plans to take over the job of school photographer. 88 .. _-.. — OUR STORY INCLUDES BOTH THE ABOVE RIGHT: Bus drivers (standing, left to right) Hubert Royal, Stuart Brown, (seated) Frank Welch, Dick Parker, and Tom Glass get the students to school safely and on time. ABOVE LEFT: Randy Willard looks with amazement at the book issued to him. LEFT: The first day of school involves registration and class assign¬ ment. Dick Lackey gives serious thought to his schedule. BELOW RIGHT: Jimmy Ashburn and Tim Jessup enjoy a minute of relaxation before their next class. BELOW LEFT: Mary Goard and Steve Jones make good use of the books in our well-equipped library. 90 ROUTINE AND THE SPECIAL EVENTS ABOVE: " What will you have? " Mrs. Jackson asks Robin Cook, as another busy lunch period begins. ABOVE RIGHT: Leon Davis and Lynda Pell help create holiday spirit in Guest House Very Exclusive. The Hi-Y and Tri-Hi-Y spon¬ sor the annual Christmas play. RIGHT: Each week begins with Monday devotions, sponsored by the Hi-Y and Tri-Hi-Y. Ray Hemrick, Linda Cox, and Edwin Goad conduct an impressive Easter service. BELOW: Rain spoiled our homecoming parade, but not the game. The Bears beat Walkertown 7-14. BELOW RIGHT: Captain Gary Brown crowns Sarah Doggett, escorted by Ralph Cocke, Homecoming Queen during half¬ time ceremonies. 91 BOTH THE PEOPLE AND THE Caretaker Bill Johnson takes time out from his many duties to enjoy lunch in the school cafeteria. Elaine Hoover not only looks like a little boy but also acts like one in an entertaining skit given at assembly. Debby Hauser and Jimmy Ashburn score high in the bid for the best costume at the Halloween Carnival. DinkCaldwell entertains with an enchanting bal¬ let at the annual Latin Club party. 92 ACTIVITIES WE SHALL REMEMBER Mr. Frank Steed, former M. A. H. S. teacher gives a parting look at the butterfly collection whichheand his biology classes worked so hard on. Mr. Steed resigned in October to enter busi¬ ness . Mr. Johnson proudly holds his son, Charley, Jr. Mike, son of Coach and Mrs. Moir, is already a full-pledged basketball star. CoachSteed gave Mike a basketball so he could start practicing early. Who says teachers can ' t have fun too ? Mr. George W illiams and Mr s. Anne Pruitt enjoy the annual Sweetheart Dance. 93 TALENT SHOW ENTERTAINS AND FEEDS The annual talent show, sponsored by the Tri- Hi-Y and Hi-Y, is eagerly anticipated by the student body. Admission is food, which is later distributed to needy families at Thanksgiving and Christmas. An excellent variety of entertainment of vocal and instrumental music, dance and novelty num¬ bers is offered. Gail Wright gets everyone in the mood as she sings and dances " Rhythm and Blues. " Harvey Pulliam delights the audience with " Cherry Pink and Apple Blossom White. " (Left to right) Norma Draughn, Shirley Clifton, Margaret Jarvis, and Betty Snow pack boxes for a needy family ' s Thanksgiving din¬ ner. 94 VARIED ACTIVITIES ENLIVEN OUR STORY Our school life is made enjoyable and profitable by the many varied events and people that we shall remember with pleasure--events and peo¬ ple both important and usual. Virginia Busick models a duster she wore in the ' 55 fashion show that was sponsored by the home economics class. Chief Sarah Doggett leads in a display of spirit at a pep rally. Ways of making our food better are discussed by (left to right) Mrs. Lucy Beamer, Mrs. Salina Mox- ley, Mrs. Kate Jackson, Mrs. Alene Brickell, and Mrs. Mabel Speight. 95 ■H CLUB ACTIVITIES HELP FOREIGb SPANISH PARTY Spanish students look forward to the fun of the annual Spanish party. They come dressed in brightly colored costumes for an evening of activities centered around Spanish customs. Highlights of the ' 55 party were the skits presented by the first and second year classes and the Mexican Hat dance. These, along with games and songs, gave the students an opportunity to put into action what they had learned in Spanish class. " May I have this tango? " Ronnie Pruett asks Dolly Hicks after they had w o n first prize for the best costumes. In a skit Dot Hull (left) inquires about the Mexican water situation. Dieneke Nieuwehuis interrupts her conversation with visitor Maryann Johnson to assist Dot. For the climax of the evening ' s festivities, everyone joins in the Mexican Hat dance. 96 LANGUAGES COME ALIVE I LATIN WEEK Latin week was observed at M. A. H. S. for the first time during April, 1955. The observation was spon¬ sored by the Latin Club, which is composed of the second year students . Posters were on display through¬ out the school, and characteristic Latin mottoes adorn¬ ed all classroom doors. Club members wore Roman costumes to school one day. The fun was climaxed when the first year students were the guests of the club members at an annual banquet in the school cafe¬ teria. Two Roman soldiers, Larry Frank and Dan Slate, prove their bravery with a duel at the annual banquet . Some of the students who worked hard on Latin week relax in their colorful costumes: (Seated) Kath¬ leen Simmons , Phil Smith, Mary Simpson. (Standing) John Cashwell, Ishmael Forest, Worrell Kurtz, and Bill Lamm. " Dig that crazy Cae sar ! " says Car- roll Baldwin when he sees two im¬ portant Roman citizens, John Cash- well and Bill Lamm, in the halls of M. A. H. S. 97 TWIRP SEASON BRINGS Every year the M. A. H. S. boys look forward to twirp season, which is held the second week in F ebruary. During this week the girls are requested to pay all bills and extend all the courtesies ordinarily expected of the boys. For violators of the twirp season rules a trial is held. If the offender is found guilty, sentence is pronounced. To climax the week a Sweetheart Dance is held at the Y. M. C. A. District Attorney David McCarty presents the case against Jerry Dodson and Annette Baber. Doris Marshall assists Jerry Dodson with his coat during twirp season. Mrs. Lorraine McKinney uses gentle persuasion to influence the votes of her fellow jurors. § H J L 98 US MIDWINTER FUN Bill Belton serves his sen¬ tence--to drink from ababy bottle for three days--as Linda Cox lends en¬ couragement. " This is a stick-up! Hand over that carriage and bonnet! " says Jerry Dodson to Phil Smith and Gene Pruett as the three pay twirp season penal¬ ties. Ann Christian and Bill Tracy are crowned King and Queen of Hearts by Leon Davis and Margaret Joyce at the annual Sweet¬ heart Dance. I 99 SMOOTHNESS, REALISM MARK Gerry Brannock cautions, " Look what you ' re doing! " as she and Ray Hemrick paint scenery for the senior play. 100 SENIOR PLAY Moving smoothly and flawlessly with superb casting and acting, Junior Miss received enthusiastic applause. In real¬ istic performances the cast presented a picture of a thirteen year-old young lady who was always trying to help but always hindered--except once. In " Junior Miss " the seniors repeated, b) request, aplay presented seven years ago Complimentary tickets were sent to mem¬ bers of the earlier cast. MOUNT AIRY HIGH SCHOOL uruor A COMED, ' REE ACTS oseph Fields DIRECTED BY ARNOLD RAMEY HIGH SCHOJS-rtUDITORIUM FRIDAY EVENING, APRIL 29th Director Mr. Arnold Ramey _ A man in Judy ' s room! " provides excitement for her parents, Lynda Pell and George Wright. " Since when did that drip become your sister ? " demands Sylvia at Mary Mon ' s change of heart toward Wilma. 101 FUTURE FRESHMAN DAY, BANQUETS FUTURE FRESHMEN Future Freshman Day brings many thrills to the eighth graders who are looking at the high school for the first time. Barbara Jester (second from right) and Mrs. Shu- ford (right) show some of the home ec - facilities to rising freshmen (left to right) Ruby Hunter, Angelina D ' Amico, Cleo Hiatt, and Sandra Holder. Hl-Y, TRI-, HI Y BANQUET Mr. Charles Johnson, Hi-Y sponsor, and David Mc¬ Carty, president, discuss plans with Eleanor War¬ ren and Mrs. Sydnor, president and sponsor of the sister organization. Linda Mosely and George Wright look amazed as Reverend Mark Bessor, speaking at the annual Hi- Y--Tri-Hi-Y banquet, states, " You are a peculiar group. " Miss Ruth Minick, principal of South Main School, accepts for the future freshmen a 1955 Airmont from editor Mary Nell Parker. 102 RELIEVE OUR SPRING FEVER | SENIOR BANQUET The seniors meet at the Y. M. C. A. prior to the prom for a last class banquet. This banquet, planned for and by the seniors, is presided over by the president. Class members provide entertainment for the long anticipated and long remembered event. Faculty and administration guests attending the banquet are (left to right) Mrs. Kate Barringer, Mrs. Ann Pruitt, Mr. and Mrs. L. B. Pendergraph, Mr. and Mrs. H. M. Finch, and Mrs • Lavinia Mackie . Ray Hemrick, accompanied by Lib¬ by York, entertains at the banquet with a song. The sextet supplying entertainment at the ban¬ quet are (left to right) Mary Mon Key, Libby Finch, Ann Allred, Lynda Pell, Margaret Joyce, These seniors enjoy the food and fun at the and Jewel Wagoner. Kannn =»t 103 JUNIORS, SENIORS ENJOY The prom--with its lovely girls, handsome boys, romantic setting, and dreamy dances-- will long be remembered as a highlight of the school year. The most anticipated event of the school year is the Junior-Senior Prom held at the Y. M. C. A. following the senior banquet. The juniors, hav¬ ing carefully planned decorations, refreshments, and music, can now relax and enjoy their party. The seniors forget for a while the more serious aspects of graduation as they are caught in the romantic " Stardust " mood. Following the prom, parties were held in many of the students ' homes and climaxed by a senior breakfast at Cumberland Knob. Starry-eyed couples dance happily to the music of Jimmy Myers ' Band. 104 LONG ANTICIPATED PROM Knowing that on prom night all wishes come true, Ann Christian admires the beautifully decorated wishing well. Dancing to the theme of " Star¬ dust, " the class officers and prom committee chairmen pre¬ pare to form the dance figure . 105 ELECTIONS AND CONCERTS ADD SUSPENSE Ausiva Mills and Frances Haynes decide their campaign poster com¬ pared favorably with those of other candidates. Our school practices democracy through election of club and organization officers. The election of presi¬ dent and vice-president for the student council is held first each spring. From a list of juniors who have an 85 average on all scholastic work and 90 on citizen¬ ship, the student body chooses no more than five can¬ didates to run for president. Each candidate then chooses a running-mate and a campaign manager. A week of extensive campaigning follows, climaxed by the students ' vote by secret ballot. Elections of officers for other school clubs and or¬ ganizations follow the student council election. 4 SucK« p m. Bud Oliver combines the personal touch with poster publicity as he shakes hands with Dan Ellis during the campaign. Bud Oliver takes the oath of office as president of the student council from outgoing pre sident Libby York. 106 AND ENJOYMENT TO OUR STORY Music-loving Mount Airians responded with aesthetic " ah-h-hs " to the beautiful spring concert by the high school music department. Both band and glee club pre¬ sented, in professional man¬ ner, well chosen programs against breath-taking and faultlessly done sets. Right: Elbert Hull and the cheerleaders star in one of the glee club 1 s college songs. Below: The Chorus pre¬ sents a sacred number. Bot¬ tom: The band plays a rous¬ ing march. 107 ' . ■: ■ COMMENCEMENT CLIMAXES Commencement brings its own peculiar excitement for all --e specially for juniors and seniors. Seniors, though happy to have finished successfully their high school work, are sad to be leaving this phase of life. Nos¬ talgia and knowledge of future responsibil¬ ities mix with a heady anticipation. Juniors, still reveling in the fun of their first prom, readily take on the responsi¬ bilities of seniors. Dr. Moir Martin, chairman of the school board, presents a diploma to Jack Hall, a ' 55 Senior. The ' 55 Marshals happily prepare to mark reserved auditorium seats for commencement. The ten juniors with the highest scholastic aver¬ ages serve as marshals. 108 BUSY YEAR AT M.A.H.S. Marshals for 1955 are (front row, left to right) Sarah Dog- gett, Dieneke Nieuwenhuis, Maryann Johnson (second row) Norma Draughn, Ronnie Pruitt, Barbara Jester (third row) Margaret Money, Elaine Hoover, Geraldine Welch (back) David McCarty, chief. David McCarty Chief Marshal SEf4 ORS The senior class of ' 56 is formally installed during the ’55 class night exercises. 109 MR. MOUNT AIRY HIGH SCHOOL Ausiva Mills The fifth annual contest to choose Mr. and Miss Mount Airy High School was sponsored by High Spots in De- cember. Two candidates from each class were cho¬ sen by the staff on the basis of scholastic work, pop¬ ularity, school spirit, and participation in school act¬ ivities . SENIOR FRESHMEN Edmund Burke SOPHOMORES Sam Inman JUNIORS Larry Frank Don Starling Stewart Smith Worrell Kurtz no MISS MOUNT AIRY HIGH SCHOOL All students voted by secret ballot. Winners were announced in High Spots. Other winners have been Roger Simmons and Jeanne Gwyn in 1952, David Brown and Delores Mills in 1953, Virgil Christian and Jo Ann Palmer in 1954, and Leon Davis and Libby York in 1955. Yvonne Vaughn FRESHMEN JUNIORS SENIORS Debby Hauser Barbara Jester Dot Hull Ann Christian 111 STUDENT ROYALTY PRESIDES GRACEFULLY HOMECOMING QUEEN Sarah Doggett and escort, Ralph Cooke. The Homecoming Queen is chosen by student vote from girls nominated by the foot¬ ball team. In the primary five girls are chosen to compose the Homecoming Court. A second election from the five determines the queen, whose name is not announced until she is crowned at the halftime ceremony. Sarah Doggett Barbara Jester Sandra Midkiff Bette Tilley Peggy Vogler 112 HOMECOMING,SWEETHEART DANCE KING AND QUEEN OF HEARTS Bill Tracy and Ann Christian Each class chooses a candidate for King and Queen of Hearts. From the nominees the King and Queen are chosen by penny votes. The winners are kept secret until the crowning at the annual Sweetheart Dance, Wanda Willard Bob Tyndall Jo Ann Southern Ishmael Forest Bonnie Sparger Stuart Smith SCHOLASTIC HONORS RATE r-i Scholastic achievements are recognized and en¬ couraged by the school and by local organiza¬ tions. Seniors with the highest averages re¬ ceive medals. Junior marshals are chosen on a scholastic basis. Excellance in publications, es say writing, and contributions to school life is rewarded. Chief marshal David McCarty tops his class scholastically. Principal H. M. Finch presents the Shirley Pet¬ ers Citizenship Awards to Jerry Nester and Elizabeth York. Scholarship College Prep. Dept. Libby Finch George Wright Mr. Frank Kurtz awards the Lions Club Trophy to Dot Hull. Also receiving essay prizes are Elizabeth York, (left) Shan¬ non Smith, and Sarah Doggett (right). 114 HIGH IN OUR STORY Editor Ann Allred -writes the news of Airmont ' s A-plus rating to Mary Nell Parker, ( 55 editor. Doris Marshall, Barbara Jester, and Miss Simp¬ son examine the NSYA rating sheet and the an¬ nual. NSPA also awarded Airmont the first class honor rating of excellent Betty Yogler receives the D.A.R. History Award from Miss Marjorie Yokely. The 1954-55 High Spots won two first class honor ratings of excellent fromNSPA. Editor s Linda Cox and George Wright, Jr., (seated) look over the score book. Also eager to see are staff member s (left to right) Hill, Finch, Davis, Robert¬ son, York, Hantzopoulos, and Wagoner. Awards Commercial Dept. Wilma Loftis Betty Leftwich 115 Athletics add color and excitement to the M. A. H. S. story. Football, basketball, and baseball are the major sports at Mount Airy High School. A large percentage of students take an active part in these sports. The rest of the students take an enthusiastic interest in building the morale of the players and supporting their teams. An intramural basketball tournament is played each year between home¬ rooms, increasing the interest and participation in athletics. Chipper Calloway star 5 of BORROW OUR TROPHY CASE CHEERLEADER MASCOT Coached by Harry Monday and Ralph Cooke, the little Bears ended a season of five wins and four losses. 116 INJURIES TAME BEARS’ GROWL The ' 55 Granite Bears struggled through their most disastrous season in Mount Airy history with three wins, six losses, and one tie. Though unaccustomed to such results. Mount Airians found compensations --a strong determined spirit, some good games and plays, a host of individual stars. Jimmy Cox, Bud Oliver, and Bill Belton are only a third of the first string players lost to the Bears as the injury jinx crippled the ' 55 team. Jimmy Cox, by the time his teeth were replaced, sustained a broken leg. Left: Following good blocking around end, Bob Tyndall goes for a long gain. Below, left: Running for a gain through the Reidsville line is Dallas Phillips, tail¬ back. The Bears out played Reidsville b u t lost a close game. Coach Shelton instructs Bob Badgett; Reg Davis (back¬ ground) watches closely. 118 FOR M.A.H.S.’S WORST FOOTBALL SEASON ' 55 SCORES Mt. Airy 25.Franklin 0 Mt. Airy 0.Ashboro 7 Mt. Airy 0.Salisbury 28 Mt. Airy 15.Hanes 6 Mt. Airy 0.Wilkes Central 31 Mt. Airy 0.Gray 13 Mt. Airy 12.Mineral Springs 12 Mt. Airy 0.Tri-City 14 Mt. Airy 6.Reidsville 12 Mt. Airy 14.Walkertown 7 Breaking up the pass intended for the Reidsville end is Bear Bob Tyndall. Reidsville showed a strong of¬ fense; the Bears played one of their best defensive games. Stewart Smith goes through a hole in Walkertown 1 s line. Leading the way are Edsel Hiatt (no. 77) and two un¬ identified players on the ground. [ Jj; •. M m f P% ■ % First Row, left to right: Manager Hazel, Jackson, Slate, Watson, Johnson, Forest, Har¬ ris, Manager Inman, Kelley, Gwyn, Beamer, Manager Cooke. Second Row: Phillips, Brown, Pell, Hiatt, Kerr, Hale, Frank, Tyndall, Smith, Vaughn, Moody, Kurtz, Coach Shelton. Third Row: Mayberry, Davis, Badgett, Gordon, Pruitt, Blackburn, Cashwell, Mills, Childress, Cox, Smith, Oliver, Coach Monday. 119 EXPERIENCED CAGE TEAMS GIVE ' 55—56 BRUINS Front Row, left to right: Worrell Kurtz, Owen Shelton, Ishmael Forest, Jim Baity, Bur¬ ton Timmons, Robert Thomas . Second Row: Coach Moir, Bobby Gwyn, Bobby Moody, Ken Norman, Jack Smith, Larry Frank, George Williams. The 1955-56 cage play opened with an optimistic outlook for the best basket¬ ball in several seasons. Regulars Bur¬ ton Timmons, Owen Shelton, Jack Smith, Robert Thomas, Larry Frank, and Bob¬ by Gwyn were joined by six foot Kenneth Norman. Kathleen Simmons, a leading point maker; Gaye Jackson, noted for her hook shot; Shirley Clifton; Betty Hiatt; Peggy Smith; and Frances Shackelford returned with experience to give the girls their best prospects for several years. The players watch breathlessly as Burton Tim¬ mons attempts another basket. The Bruins de¬ feated Elkin 55-39. 120 PROMISE OF SUCCESSFUL SEASON ’55 — 56 BRUINETTES Front Row, left to right: Nelda Clifton, Polly Kirkman, Joanne Smith, Martha Carroll, Linda Dowell, Patti Arrington, Shirley Clifton, Frances Shackelford, Peggy Smith, Betty Hiatt, Gaye Jackson. Second Row: Peggy Monday, Sara Midkiff, Faye Bennett, Wilma Smith, Cynthia Tillotson, Ann Childress, Kathleen Simmons, Audrey Ferguson, Betty Simmons, Bonni e Edwards, Linda Mills. 55—56 SCHEDULE Dec. 2.Elkin Dec. 6.Elkin Dec. 9.Reidsville Dec. 13.N. Davidson Dec. 16.Mineral Springs Jan. 3.Griffith Jan. 6.Tri-City Jan. 10.Northwest Jan. 13.Gray Jan. 17. Hanes Jan. 20. Walkertown Jan. 27.Reidsville Jan. 31.N. Davidson Feb. 3.Mineral Springs Feb. 7.Griffith Feb. 10.Tri-City Feb. 14.Northwest Feb. 17.Gray Feb. 20.Hanes Feb. 24.Walkertown With only ten seconds left in the game, Shirley Clifton scores two more points for the Bruinettes. Elkin won the game by one point. 121 ' BASEBALL CLUB MAKES STRONC 1955 SCORES Mt. Airy 7 Mt. Airy 24 Mt. Airy 3 Mt. Airy 20 Mt. Airy 3 Mt. Airy 8 Mt. Airy 5 Mt. Airy 8 Mt. Airy 7 Mt. Airy 1 5 Mt. Airy 18 Mt. Airy 1 5 Mt. Airy 0 Mt. Airy 3 Mt. Airy 0 Mt. Airy 4 Mt. Airy 1 . . . Elkin . . . Elkin . . . Tri-City . . . N. Davidson . . . Mineral Springs 1 . . . Walkertown 2 . . . Reidsville 5 . . . Gray 0 . . . Hanes 3 . . . Tri-City 5 . . . N. Davidson 2 . . . Mineral Springs 3 . . . Walkertown 4 . . . Gray 2 . . . Reidsville 4 . . . Hanes 1 . . . Reidsville 2 " All you need is know-how, " says Edsel Hiatt as he demonstrates to Allie Reynolds , Jerry Nester, Jimmy Baity, and Burton Timmons how to throw a curve ball. First Row, left to right: Harris, Jim Baity, Gwyn, Wilson, Timmons, Sutphin. Second Row: Manager Royal, Shelton, Hiatt, J ohn Baity, Gal ye an, Reynolds, Brown, Nester, Thomas, and Coach Sam Moir. 122 O 00 O FIGHT FOR AA CROWN The Granite Bears led the AA con¬ ference all season until late losses to Reidsville and Walkertown made necessary a tie playoff with Reids - ville. The one run defeat ended Mount Airy ' s championship hopes and left the team with a record of 11 wins and 3 losses. Allie Reynolds led in hitting and pitching with 25 hits, nine wins, and one loss. On defense Jerry Nester made only 3 errors in 20 games. Jerry Nester, third baseman, discusses fielding problems with Gary Brown, Rayno Wilson, Zane Galyean, and Gary Sutphin. BASEBALL SUPERLATIVES Most Improved .... Gary Sutphin Best Sport.Jerry Nester Most Valuable . . James Reynolds The catcher won ' t get his hands on that ball. Owen Shelton smacked it away, to the spectators ' delight. Reidsville went on to win, however, by four runs. Sutphin Nester Reynolds 123 The Mount Airy business section, lending local color to our story, is a vital part of our lives. Many of our students are now employed part time in the downtown stores; more direct their own buying as well as their families ' to the Mount Airy merchants. Both now and in the future when our buying pow¬ er has increased, we shall remember and return help given us by our business friends. We appreciate the interest shown by local businessmen. We hope this book, which that interest helped make possible, gives a clearer understanding of our school work and life. IT ip [j When It Comes To Babies, Spencer ' s Are Specialists. MOUNT AIRY KNITTING COMPANY Mount Airy WTfTz Jpmcetii , y. baby UNDIES Always Look For The Spencer Seal. . . Baby ' s Assurance Of Comfort. . .Your Assurance Of Economy. North Carolina THE SURRY COUNTY LOAN AND TRUST COMPANY You Will Always Find A Spirit Of Friendliness And A Standard Of Service Unexcelled At This Bank Member F. D. I. C. Mount Airy - Dobson North Carolina When It ' s Time To Make Those Dreams Come True See BADGETT CONCRETE PRODUCTS, INC. Ready Mixed Concrete And Modulite Blocks Phones 778 - 779-J S. South Street Mount Airy North Carolina V. R. Hunter CASH WHOLESALE Groceries and Notions Shop at DIXIE ' S CLOTHING STORE Clothing For The Whole Family SLATE MOTOR CO. Mount Airy ' s Leading Used Car Center Mount Airy North Carolina Compliments of BARBER-ALLEN HOSIERY MILLS, INC. Mount Airy North Carolina KASCO FEED and SEED STORE Market St. Phone 490 " Satisfaction at Harvest Time " W. S. WOLFE DRUG COMPANY Prescription Druggist We Deliver - Phone 53 Mount Airy North Carolina HOLCOMB HARDWARE for Kleen-Kleen (gun type) Floor Furnaces Mill Supplies - Paints Mount Airy North Carolina TRI-ANGLE DRY CLEANERS pppbovio (Msi® 844 North Main Phone 787 Mount Airy North Carolina Mount Airy BLUE RIDGE ESSO STATION Phone 44 F. A. Williamson North Carolina HOLLINGSWORTH DRUG CO. Your Friendly REXALL DRUG STORE Mount Airy North Carolina JACKSON BROS. Mount Airy ' s First Department Store HYLTON SUPPLY COMPANY, INC. Next to the Post Office Phone 2 37 s rw«o i« Mount Airy North Carolina MOSELEY ' S SUPER MARKET Lebanon Street Mount Airy North Carolina G. C. LOVILL COMPANY Wholesale Grocery Com pi i m e nts of J. C. PENNY COMPANY Always First Quality B. O. FURNITURE COMPANY Complete Home Furnishings " A Little Better " for " A Little Less " Mount Airy North Carolina MOODY ' S TRIANGLE GULF SERVICE Road Service Otto H. Moody, Owner Com plimerits o f CARL W. STEELE Your Jeweler Mount Airy North Carolina Shop And Save At MT. AIRY COAL YARD AND GROCERY Willow Street Phone 340 or 1150 — vr 7 i ZLN JUVzr z Com pli m e nts of BARBER HOSIERY MILL Mount Airy North Carolina QUICK SERVICE LAUNDRY 407 Willow Street Operated by Mrs. Blanche Pruett Complime nts of F. REES Men ' s and Boys ' Clothing Mount Airy North Carolina Congratulations and Best Wishes To The Class of 1956 PIGGLY-WIGGLY SUPER MARKET H. M. Mills, Owner MOODY FUNERAL HOME, INC. Home of Harrison Mutual Burial Ass ' n 150 Franklin Street - Telephone 65 Mount Airy North Carolina W. G. SYDNOR AGENCY Jimmy Hadley - Jimmy Miller Insurance Service Since 1893 401 North Main St. - Phone 21 Mount Airy North Carolina G ATULAr o DUKE POWER COMPANY Com pli m e nts of FRANK HENNIS AUTO SALES West Lebanon Street Mount Airy North Carolina Compliments of BOWMAN ELECTRIC COMPANY THE SNACK BAR North South Street Mount Airy North Carolina Compliments of ROY ' S JEWELRY and MEN ' S CLOTHING Franklin Street Mount Airy North Carolina .m Your dollars, deposited in your Workmen ' s Federal Account, work hard two ways. . . for your community and You! They finance the building of homes, help your community to grow. They earn a generous rate of return, and their safety is in¬ sured up to $10,000. Your Workmen ' s Federal account book is the passport to a bigger, better future for your community .and YOU ! WORKMEN’S FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION Member Federal Home Loan Bank System Telephone 243 Mount Airy North Carolina CURRIER-WITHERS SUPPLY COMPANY Mill Supplies - Textile Supplies Jobbers of Mill Factory Supplies West Pine Street Phone 75 Mount Airy North Carolina Compliments o f LYNNE HOSIERY MILLS Mount Airy North Carolina Dept, of Justice Building For Beautiful - -Buildings - -Bridges - -Memorials U.. S. Bullion Depository THE NORTH CAROLINA GRANITE CORPORATION Since 1889 U. S. Post Office Quarriers and Manufacturers of MOUNT AIRY GRANITE The Wright Memorial Compliments of BRAY ' S RECAPPING SERVICE U.S. Royal Tires and Tubes 1219 N. South Street Phone 414 Compliments of BELKS DEPARTMENT STORE Mount Airy North Carolina HOOVER REPAIR SHOP Welding and Machine Work 800 Willow Street Mount Airy North Carolina FEDDON MOTOR COMPANY Mount Airy, North Carolina HENNIS MOTOR COMPANY Moore Avenue Phone 943 THE CHILDREN ' S SHOP " Best From Tots To Teens " Mount Airy North Carolina JESSUP-BROWN SHOE STORE Headquarters for Teenage Shoes WILLOW STREET GARAGE Complete Automotive Service Mount Airy North Carolina Best Wishes to The Class of 1956 SURRY BULB COMPANY C om pli m e nts of H. M. BRITTS - C. S. CLARK Dealing In The Best Of Used Cars STANLEY KING Photography Portraits - Weddings Phone 1040 Bring The Gang To THE DAIRY QUEEN The Best In Sandwiches and Ice Cream Com pli m e nts of MOUNT AIRY CHAIR COMPANY GRANITE CITY MOTOR CO., INC. Authorized Dealer 457 North Main St. 138 Virginia Street Compliments of BLUE-VUE RESTAURANT Highway 52 North Ope rated by Ed Banner - Bill Money Compliments of GRANITE HOSIERY MILLS Seniors! Order Your 1957 AIRMONT Now! ALMA ' S BEAUTY SHOP Over the Surry County Loan and Trust Company Phone 336 Mount Airy North Carolina Best Wishes, Seniors! BELTON ' S LAUNDRY DRY CLEANING COMPANY 737 S. Main Street 351 - Phone - 410 HERFF-JONES COMPANY RINGS - TROPHIES MEDALS - INVITATIONS E. W. Paddison, Representative TYNDALL AUTO SUPPLY Your B. F. Goodrich And Hotpoint Dealer BLUE RIDGE INSURANCE AGENCY A Policy For Every Need R. P. Jones - E. C. Collins Mount Airy North Carolina Compliments of RADIO STATION WPAQ Now 10,000 Watts ! 740 kc VAUGHN BROS . .Distributors of SEAETEST Milk and Dairy Products Come On Out And Be With The Gang! THE DERBY COTTAGE C om pli m e nts of MOUNT AIRY FROZEN FOOD CENTER Complete Service For Home Freezers THE AMANA FOOD PLAN TOWN TIRE SERVICE Firestone Tires - Recapping Phone 335 Mount Airy North Carolina fonqnrtulations to the class of 1956 F rom RENFRO HOSIERY MILLS LAMM DRUG COMPANY Your High School Drug Store Mount Airy North Carolina Compliments of HOME OIL AND GAS COMPANY Phone 2 366 Mount Airy Gas-Kerosene Fuel Oil North Carolina Compliments of Powell 1 s Grill Foy Lumber Company Davis Shoe Store Lucas Office Supply Oak Street Grill Temple ESSO Station Ed Steele Jewelry Mt. Airy Paint Store Boyles Shoe Store W. E. Merritt Company Mt. Airy Furniture Company G. C. Hauser Cash Store Wood ' s Television Appliances G. Southern Upholstery Clark Parker Lumber Company Blue Ridge Coffee Shop Granite City Electric Company Granite City Memorials Quality Auto And Hardware Store Davis Furniture Company Reeves Y. M. C. A. - See You At The " Y " Mrs. Jackson ' s - " Where The Best Dressed Women Shop " INDEX A Adkins, Minnie 44 Adkins, Wayne 26,78 Alderman, Ronnie 44,69 Allred, Ann 6,26,33,54,76,85,86, 103.115.140 Anderson, Don 47 Armfield, Richard 47 Arrington, Patti 40,77,121 Ashburn, Jimmy 24,26,36,67,78, 79,80,87,90,92 Anderson, Bruce 47 Atkins, Carol 40 Atkins, Josephine 40,76 B Baber, Annette 26,67,77,81,88,98 Baber, Billy 47 Badgett, Bobby 26,118,119 Baity, Jim 44,80,120,122 Baldwin, Carroll 26,62,78,97 Barber, Juanita 14,17 Barber, Tollie 47,67 Barker, James G. 47 Barker, Jimmy F. 44 Barringer, Mrs. Kate 18,24,66, 86,103 Beamer, Billy 26,79,81,87,119 Beamer, Mrs. Lucy 95 Beamer, Yancy 26,67,78 Beason, Don 40 Beason, Larry 47 Beck, Belva 44-62 Beck, Donald 44 Beketon, Vassiley 47 Belton, Billy 26,52,81,87,99,118 Belton, Bonnie 40 Benge, Bobby 40 Benge, Wayne 47 Bennett, Faye 44,57,121 Beverly, Donald 26,78 Beverly, Jerry Wayne 44 Bingman, Douglas 27 Blackburn, Gilmer 44,119 Blue, Johnny 44 Blue, Mary Louise 47 Blue, Wayne 40 Bond, Helen 44 Bondurant, Eddie 40 Bondurant, Elizabeth 47 Bondurant, Nancy 44,64,74,80,81 Bowman, Buddy 47 Bowman, Patricia 44 Bowman, Virginia 47 Boyd, Mary Frances 47 Boyd, Susan Ann 40,60,67,81 Boyles, Jimmy 44 Boyles, Mrs. Mary 18,59 Boyles, Richard 47 Boyles, Roger 47 Brannock, Carol 40,77 Brannock, Hilda 47 Bray, Betty Jo 40,58,68,76 Brinkley, Edwin 47 Britts, David 27,78 Brooks, Edgar 44 Brown, Dean 40,55,59,78 Brown, Gary 27,79,91.119,122, 123 Brown, Norma 27,77 Brown, Pat 26 Brown, Ruth 40,60,77 Brown, Stuart 27,90 Bunker, Louise 27,76,80 Bunn, Dorothy 47 Burgess, Ernest 47 Burke, Edmund 47,66,110 Burrus, Thomas 27,78 Busick, Virginia 40,60,95 Byrd, Carrie Mae 47 C Caldwell, Dink 44,74,75,80,82, 92.111.140 Calloway, Deborah 44,63,80 Calloway, Rachel 44 Campbell, Billy 47 Cannoy, Donald 44 Cannoy, Larry 40,54 Carpenter, Barbara 44,57 Carpenter, Patricia 47,66 Carroii, iviartha 44,66,69,81,121 Cashwell, John 40,79,97,119 Caviness, Wesley 47 Chandler, Joan Maxie 47 Childress, Ann 40,77,81,121 Childress, Carol 47 Childress, Glenda 40,60 Childress, Jack 40,67 Childress, Jerry 44,119 Childress, Linda 41,55,76,80,81 Childress, Peggy 44 Christian, Ann 27,66,74,75,77, 81,85,88,99,105,111,113,140 Clark, Thorne 48 Clement, Lewis 41 Clifton, Melvina 41,68,76 Clifton, Nelda (Pat) 41,71,81,121 Clifton, Rodney 48 Clifton, Shirley 27,67,76,81,94, 121 Coalson, Frances 44 Coble, George 41,66 Coe, Judy 27,62,77 Collins, Nancy 44,81 Collins, Rachel 48 Collins, Shirley 28 Collins, Vance 48 Combs, Richard Larry 48 Cook, Frank Robin 9i Cook, Kenneth 48,54 Cooke, Brenda 48 Cooke, Ralph 28,87,91,112,116, 119 Cox, Jimmy 41,81,87,118,119 Cox, Jo Lena 48,58 Craddock, James 44,67 Craft, Margurette 48 Curtis, Ruth 44 D D ' Amico, Angelina 48,102 D ' Amico, Tony 44 Davis, Bob 28,67,78 Davis, Reginald 44,81,118,119 Dawson, Aravoley 44 Dean, Rosa Lee 48 Deatherage, Belva 44 Dobson, Susie 41,74,75,76,140 Dodson, Jerry 28,37,87,98,99 Doggett, Sarah 6,28,30,36,37,62, 64,75,77,81,91,95,109,112, 114,140 Dowell, Linda 44,80,121 Draughn, Nouma 29,32,37,76,80, 85,94,109 Duncan, Barbara J. 48 E East, Glenn 41,78 Easter, Charles 48 Easter, Robert 44 Edinger, Clara 48 Edinger, John 41,78 Edwards, Barbara J. 48 Edwards, Bonnie 44,66,87 Edwards, Donald 44 Edwards, Jane 40,77 Edwards, Johnnie Mae 48 Ellis, Betty Jo 40 Ellis, Carol Sue 48,67 Ellis, Dan 24,29,88,106 Everhart, Dalmar 44 F Felts, Jimmy 48 Ferguson, Audrey 44,121 Finch, Mr. H. M. 14,17,18,103, 114 Fleming, Gaye 44 Fleming, Jimmy 48 Fleming, Joan 48,69 Forest, Ishmael 40,79,97,113, 119,120 France, Ann 2,29,68,76 France, Johnny 44 Frank, Larry 41,43,81,97,110, 119,120 Frye, Sandra 48 G Gardner, Judy 44,64,81 Geiger, Sue Tilley 41 Gilbert, Clark 44 Gilbert, Jerry 48 Gilbert, Jo Ella 41 Gillespie, Eleanor 48 Gillespie, Jack 29 Glass, Tom 90 Goad, Anne 48 Goad, Kenneth 48 Goard, Mary 41,59,76,90 Goins, Peggy 48 Gordan, Becky Jo 29 Gordan, Curtis 28,119 Gravely, Donald 41 Gravley, Katie 48 Gray, Edward Glen 48 Gray, Freddy 41,57 Greenwood, Charles 48 Griffin, Douglas 48 Griffith, Arnold 41 Griffith, Hazel 44 Gwyn, Bobby 41,78,81,120,122 Gwyn, Carol Ann 48 Gwyn, Vaughn 48,119 H Hale, Jimmy 42,81,119 Hall, Barbara 42 Hall, Elbert 28,61 Hall, Faye 45 Hall, Jerry 45 Hall, Sylvia 45 Hamilton, Mrs. Maxine 14,19 Harding, Ian 45,67 Harkrader, Belle 29,56,72,80 Harris, Kenneth 45,119,122 Harris, Ralph 29 Harvey, James 66 Hauser, Debbie 40,42,43,58,64, 66,76,81,92,111 Hawks, Franklin 45 Hawks, Hayford 45,80 Haymore, Miss Ada 18,80 Haymore, Roger 29 Haymore, Ronald Lee 48 Haynes, Betty 45 Haynes, Frances 29,34,71,72,76, 77,106 Haynes, Helen 29,67 Haynes, Peggy 45 Hemrick, Edward 48 Henderson, Gary 45 Henderson, William 48 Hennis, Mr. S. A., Jr. 16 Hennis, Thomas 45 Hiatt, Betty 45,81,83,120,121 Hiatt, Billy 42 Hiatt, Billy Gray 48 Hiatt, Bruce Hiatt, Carlton 24,28,52,82,83 Hiatt, Cleo Juanita 48,102 Hiatt, Edsel 42,61,81,119,122 Hiatt, Jean 42 Hiatt, Margaret 45,66,80 Hiatt, Margaritta 48 Hiatt, Ralph 28 Hiatt, Ray 42 Hicks, Dolly 29,67,76,96 Hicks, Mary Ann 48 Hill, Ina Mae 43,70 Hill, Ken 29,78 Hill, Wayne 45 Hodges, Harold 45 Hodges, Margaret 43,59,69 Hodges, Patricia 45,81 Holder, Miss Eva 18,72 Holder, Sandra 48,102 Holloway, Janie 45 Hoover, Elaine 24,29,30,32,36, 37,72,76,92,109 Hull, Dot 40,43,56,66,74,75,76, 80,96,111,114,140 Hunter, Alexander 48 Hunter, Ruby 48,74,75,102,111, 140 Hunter, Sammy 48 Hurst, Sybil 45,67 I Inman, Jackie 45 Inman, Johnnie Mae 43,60,70 Inman, Sam 44,45,62,87,88,110, 119 137 INDEX J Jackson, Bill 43,119 Jackson, Gaye 29,36,63,67,76,81, 86 , 120,121 Jackson, Mrs. Kate 17,95 Jacobs, Carolyn 29,62,70,76 Jacobs, Jimmy 48,67 James, Scherer 48,66 Jarvis, Margaret 43,76,94 Jenkins, Miss Margaret 19 Jessup, Tim 30,67,79,80,90 Jester, Barbara 24,30,35,55,64, 66.67.74.75.77.80.81.102, 109.111.112.115.140 Johnson, Mr. Charles 19,63,84, 93,102 Johnson, Harry Lee 48 Johnson, Joe 45,80,83 Johnson, Leonard 43,67,119 Johnson, Maryann 30,35,55,76, 80,96,109 Johnson, Wayne 45 Johnston, Carol 48 Jones, Amy 43,77,81 Jones, Dean 30 Jones, Ellen 45 Jones, Gaynelle 45 Jones, Linda 45,80 Jones, Margaret 48 Jones, Martha 42,76 Jones, Patricia 48 Jones, Raynell 45 Jones, Roland 42,55,67,78 Jones, Steve 45,81,90 Jordon, James 42 Journey, Jackie 42 K Kelley, Richard 48,119 Kerr, Tom 30,81,119 King, Mabel 42,60 King, Mary King, Wilma 24,31,62,71,77,81,88 Kingsbury, James 45 Kirkman, Jimmy 28,31,37,61,79, 80,81,86 Kirkman, Joyce 45 Kirkman, Judy Ann 45 Kirkman, Polly 45,64,81,121 Kirkman, Wanda 31,59,76 Kurtz, Worrell 40,41,42,79,97, 110 , 119,120 L Lackey, Dick 31,67,78,90 Leftwich, Janice 31,34,54,77 Leftwich, Norma Jo 30,77 Levering, Lois 30,77,80 Lewis, Suzanne 48 Lyons, Roger Lee 42,59,76 Lowry, Frank 47,48 Lyons, Roger Lee 42,67 Me McBride, Betty Jean 48 McCann, Margaret 48 McCarty, David 27,31,34,37,36, 75.66.78.79.80.87.88.98.102, 109.114.140 McGee, Eleanor 48 McGee, Paul 45 McHone, Fred 45 McHome, Thomas 48 McKinney, Mrs. Lorraine, Gon. Science, Biology, Chemistry, Arithmetic, 19,98 McMillan, Betty 45 McMillian, Bryan 48 McMillian, Hubert 24,31,63,78,83 McMillian, Mabel 45,80 M Mackie, Mrs. Lavinia, Spanish, History II, 18,80,103 Marion, Melvin 31,67 Marsh, Annie Lee 45,87 Marshall, Doris 24,31,74,76,77, 98.115.140 Marshall, Nancy 31,59 Martin, Anne 30,59 Martin, Clinton 48 Martin, Clyde 45 Martin, Dennis 48 Martin, John F. 48 Martin, John M. 30 Martin, June 43,76,80 Martin, Dr. Moir S. 16,108 Massey, Linda 43 Matthews, Barbara 31 Matthews, Bobby 31,61 Matthews, Christine 43,60 Matthews, Charles 31,52 Matthews, Faye 45,54,67 Matthews, Leon 31 Matthews, Mary Frances 48,56 Mayberry, Tommy 42,43,79,81, 119 Meredith, Larry 45,54 Meredith, Lorna 45 Merritt, Jane 45,52,80 Midkiff, Joan 31,67,77 Midkiff, Larry 32 Midkiff, Sandra 32,37,64,72,76, 81,85 Midkiff, Sara 49.58,121 Mills, Ausiva 24,32,66,67,78,83, 106,110 Mills, Linda 47,49,63,121 Mills, Ray 45,119 Mills, Vera Faye 49,55 Moir, Mr. Sam 19,93,122,120 Monday, Annette 49 Monday, Joy 46,81 Monday, Peggy 43,77,121 Monday, Mr. W. I. 16 Money, Margaret 32,67,109 Monroe, James 46 Moody, Bobby 43,81,119,120 Moore, Helen 46,87 Moorefield, Alfred 49 Morris, Louise 46,80 Morrison, Juanita 49 Moseley, Barbara 32,70 Moseley, Edna 46 Moseley, Macon 49,55 Moseley, Sylvia 46,54,62 Moxley, Mrs. Selena 95 N Neal, Mrs. Mary 19 Nelson, Mr. R. M. 17 Nelson, Shelby 33,59,68 Nelson, Wade 49 Newgent, Shelby Jean 49,72 Nichols, Philip 43 Nieuwenhuis, Dieneke 30,58,70, 76,80,96,109,133 Noah, Shirley 49 Norman, Julia 49 Norman, Kenneth 33,61,120 Norman, Linda 49 O Oliver, Bud 24,33,37,66,71,81,87, 106,118,119 Owens, Alice 49 Owens, Jerry 49 P Pack, Wayne 33,78 Parker, Dick 46,90 Patterson, Barry 49 Patterson, Donna 32,59,69 Patterson, Gaye 46 Patterson, Lois 49 Paul, J. D. 49 Payne, Carol 46 Payne, Linda 49 Pell, Jimmy 43,81,119 Pendergraph, Mr. L. B. 14,17, 103 Pennix, Bonnie 32,34,68 Peoples, James 46 Perkins, Theresa 49 Petrick, Marilyn 42,58,68,77 Phillips, Dallas 32,36,80,81,118, 119 Phillips, Sara Lou 46,80 Pierce, Tommy 32 Poore, Phyllis 46 Porter, Mr. W. S. 17 Pruett, Gene 38,42,79,99,1 19 Pruett, Jenny 46,66,67,80 Pruett, Kenneth 49 Pruett, Ronnie 24,32,33,35,66,67, 79,80,85,96,109 Puckett, Marylene 49 Puckett, Roger 46 Puckett, Wyatt 49 Pulliam, Don 46 Pulliam, Harvey 33,66,83,94 Pulliam, Mary 46,68,80 Q Quesinberry, George A. 42,80 Quesinberry, George Burton 46, 63 R Rakes, Thelma 49,56 xvamey, Mr. Arnold 14,20,62,101 Ramsay, Claudia 33,70,76,81 Ramsey, Frank Otis, Jr. 49 Ramsey, Sidney 46 Ramsey, Sylvia 46,87 Reece, Mrs. Elizabeth 20 Reynolds, Ray 33 Ricker, Norma Dean 46,87 Riddle, Delories 46,81 Robertson, Mildred 42,76,81 Rose, Don 33,67 Royal, Hubert 33,90,122 S Sechrist, Verona Gail 46,87 Semons, Esther 46 Schafer, Freddy 47,49 Shackelford, Frances 42,77,121 Shaw, Bobby Shelton, Judith 49 Shelton, Mildred 47,49 Shelton, Owen 34,81,122,123,124 Shelton, Paul 42,78 Shelton, Mr. Wallace 21,62,118, 119 Shuford, Mrs. Valeria 41,21,60, 81 Shumaker, Miss Eleanor 20,77, 102 Simmons, Betty 46,121 Simmons, Clara 42,58,76 Simmons, David 49 Simmons, Dianne 49,63 Simmons, Douglas 42,78 Simmons, Kathleen 43,57,76,81, 97,121 Simmons, Mike 49 Simmons, Patsy 49,63 Simmons, Richard 46 Simmons, Shirley 34,71,77 Simmons, Sue 40,43,63,85 Simmons, Wade 46 Simpson, Miss Jean 20,69,75,115 Simpson, Mary Frances 43,64, 76,81,97 Slate, Dan 42,43,97,119 Smith, Bettie Lou 46 Smith, Edward 46 Smith, Gray 46 Smith, George 46 Smith, Jack 43,81,120 Smith, James Larry 49 Smith, Joann 34,81,121 Smith, June 46,56 Smith, Peggie 46 Smith, Peggy 43,69,76,81,121 Smith, Paul 41,43157,79,81,97, 99.119 Smith, Mr. R. M. 16 Smith, Roy Lee 43,71 Smith, Shannon 46,74,75,80,82, 114.140 Smith, Shirley 34,59 Smith, Stewart 44,46,58,81,110, 113.119 Smith, Sue 40,66,111 Smith, Wilma 42,60,67,77,81,121 Snow, Betty 34,81,94 Snow, Jason 49 Snow, Roger 46 Southern, Jo Anne 42,58,74,75, 77.113.140 Sparger, Bonnie 46,80,113 Sparger, Sara Jo 42,76,81 Sparger, Steve 35,78 Speight, Ernest 46 138 INDEX Speight, Mrs. Paul Spencer, Margaret 49 Spurlin, John 46 Starling, Donald 49,110 Starr, Betty 42,71,76 Starr, Charles 46 Starr, Jerry 49 Steele, Helen 42,64,77,81 Strickland, Faye 42 Sumner, Treva 46,81 Surratt, Carolene 42,60 Sutphin, Fay 46,87 Sutphin, Gary 35,54,78,81,87,112, 123 Sutphin, Ray Sutter, Guido 49 Sydnor, Mrs. Caroline 20,77,102 T Taylor, James 46 Thomas, Miss Annie 21,52,62,77, 87 Thomas, Eleanor 46 Thomas, Joe 49 Thomas, Nancy 80,82,87,46 Thomas, Pat 49 Thomas, Robert 42,81,122,120 Thomas, Roger Thomas, Mrs. Vera 21 Thomas, Vera Carl 46,80 Thore, Betty 43,6 .76 Tickle, Bonnie 49 Tickle, Edward 43 Tilley, Bette 35,64,72,77,86,112, 76,81 Tilley, Kenneth 35 Tillotson, Cynthia 46,64,121 T immons, Burton 35,36,61,81, 122,120 Timmons, Jackie Lee 46,80 Triplette, Charles 49 Tyndall, Bob 34,55,72,79,80,81, 87,113,118,119,110 U Utt, Gray 46,57 Utt, Mary 46,80 V Vaughn, Carolyn 49 Vaughn, Richard 38,41,43,79,81, 119 Vaughn, Tommy 49 Vaughn, Yvonne 46,81,111 Vogler, Betty 34,52,57,76,85,115 Vogler, Mary Ruth 45,46,64,80,83 Vogler, Peggy 44,45,46,64,80,112 W Wagoner, James 34 Wall, Sam 46,80,83 Ward, Irvin 49 Ward, Melbena 49 Warrenn, Eleanor 34,66,67,72,102 Watson, Alton 49 Watson, Bobby 46 Watson, Faye 46 Watson, Kenny 43,70,79 Watson, Mickey 46,119 Watts, Betsy 49 Weddle, Donald 49 Welborn, Naomi 49 Welch, Frank 34,90 Welch, Geraldine C. 35,109 Welch, Jane 43,81 Welch, Novie 46,80 Westmoreland, Brenda 49 Westmoreland, Douglas 49 Westmoreland, Philip 49 Westmoreland, Rebecca 43,77, 80,81 Westmoreland, Robert 35 Whitaker, James Ferrell 49 Whitt, Elmer 35 Willard, Philip 46,80 Willard, Randell 79,90,43 Williams, Mr. George 21,61,93 Williams, George 38,46,83,120 Williams, Helen 46 Williams, Michael 49 Williams, Sybil 32,35,59,66,67,76 Wilson, Wayne 46 Withers, Billy 46 Withers, Bobby 35,57,78,87 Wolfe, Mr. John B. 17 Woodie, Betty Carolyn 49 Woodruff, Margaret 49 Worrell, Carolyn 49 Worrell, Linda 46,80 Wright, Gail 49,94 Y Yokley, Glenn 49 Yopp, Bonnie 49 Young, Barbara 43,77,81 OUR FINAL WORD BUSINESS MANAGER EDITOR Sarah Doggett Ann Allred We have tried to present in picture and in print the experiences and friends we treasure now and never want to forget. The staff appreciates the help of students, faculty, and advertisers in making possible this fifth edition of Airmont . We have enjoyed telling the M. A. H. S. story; we hope you like it. PHOTOGRAPHER David McCarty STAFF MEMBERS Barbara Jester Susie Dobson Shannon Smith Doris Marshal Dot Hull Dink Caldwell Ann Christian Joanne Southern Ruby Hunter 140 ■ I ear ima as- ird- ict- ted ete i le ed), U3 1 VOLUME XX MOUNT AIRY HIGH SCHOOL, MOUNT AIRY, ft. C-. OCTOBER, 1955 NUMBER (g Mrs. Hamilton Takes Over Science Post Vacated By Mr. Frank Steed Mrs. John Hamilton, taking the place of Mr. Frank Steed, science teacher and junior varsity coach, joined the school faculty Monday, October 3. Mrs. Hamilton Is teaching class¬ es in biology and physics, and serving as homeroom teacher for freshmen in room 209. Since graduating from W. C. U. N. C. with a major in chemis¬ try, she has taught science at Beu¬ lah High School, married, and ac¬ quired three children. " I’m looking forward to teach¬ ing and have wanted an oppor¬ tunity to meet students from Mt. Airy,” she said. ‘ ' 1 don’t know yet, though, how the junior var¬ sity football team and I will get along! ” Mrs. Hamilton Says she likes everything connected with science except snakes. About lizards she thinks “they aren’t so bad.” Having lived in this town for the past six years, Mr. and Mrs. Hamilton have quickly become a part of the community life. Mrs. Hamilton is superinten¬ dent of a Sunday School depart¬ ment at Central Methodist Church . and her husband is coach at Beu¬ lah High. New Requirements Set For Senior Merit Awards Yearbook Is Rated Excellent By Two National Associations MRS. JOHN HAMILTON . . . dislikes snakes . . . Science Teacher Resigns, Now Runs Motel The business world " has ' attract¬ ed Mr. Frank Steed, former bio¬ logy and physics teacher here. Mr. Steed, who resigned September 30, is now operating the Ranch Motel between Durham and Ra¬ leigh. “Mt. Airy is the greatest place I’ve ever lived,” said Mr. Steed, “but I feel this move necessary for the betterment-of the family. 1 have really enjoyed working with football, and I will certainly miss the science students and foot- Airmont has won a rating of A plus from the National School Yearbook Association, of Columb¬ ia, Missouri, and a First Class honor rating from the National Scholastic Press Association, of Minneapolis, Minnesota. Ratings were received recently from both associatibns, to which copies of the yearbook were sent last spring. The ’55 Airmont was the first edition to go to NSYA,-tin organi¬ zation whose critical service deals with yearbooks only. An A rating is the highest gen¬ eral rating given by NSYA. It means HIGHLY SUPERIOR. Coverage, general readability, and editorial excellence of the ] book are models, for books over the nation,” said the NSYA jud¬ ges. “We would like to carry an article on these features in Photo- lith.” This is a national magazine for school yearbook staffs. “Let us compliment you on theme selection and introduction,” the NSYA report read. “With a few improvements, we predict that you will reach NSYA’s rare AA rating next year.” The NSYA judges rated the book above average in every field of grading. They gave it its high¬ est mark on Word Content (head¬ ings, story, captions). “This sec¬ tion stands out above the average excellent book,” com¬ mented the judges, along with a grade of AA. In the NSPA grading the book scored 3560 points out of a pof« sible 3699. A score of 3700 o© more would have placed the book in All-American rating, a superio© honor very few school publica¬ tions attain. “We hope to reach that top- notch honor this year,” said Misi Jean Simpson, adviser. “We are proud of both these ratings,” said Ann Allred, p resent editor. “The comments and cri¬ ticisms will be valuable help in striving for improvement thig year.” Staff Members, Advisers Attend Press Conference Ten students from the Airmont and the High Spot staffs and their advisers attended the North Carolina Scholastic Press Insti¬ tute in Chapel Hill on Saturday, October 1. Those who went from the yearbook staff were Miss Jean Simpson, adviser; Ann Allred, editor; Barbara Jester, lay-out editor; Dot Hull, Joann Southern, Ann Christian, and Ruby Hunt- Free Yearbook Covers Go To Early Subscribers Each student who subscriber to the ’56 Airmont by October 26 will receive free a plastic cover for his yearbook, said Sara Dog- gett, business manager. These covers will be similar to the ones that were sold last year for 25 cents. The subscription campaign will begin October 12. Members of the staff will solicit in the homerooms during activity period for two weeks. “A n y homeroom subscribing 100 percent will get a page in the yearbook,” said Miss Jean Simp¬ son, adviser. A deposit of two uoiiars will be required now and the remain¬ ing two dollars in the spring when the annuals come back from the printer. An additional charge of 35 uary. This means that many spring Events will be covered this year. “The staff is planning some new features, but the extent to which they can be carried out de¬ pends on student response to the subscription campaign,” stated Ann Allred, editor. Cf lC English Teacher Directs New Guidance Program New In the curriculum this year is a guidance program. It will be in full operation as soon as an office can be set up for Miss Annie Thomas, director. A student mav then examine or ----‘ - lly, . m SC- ith ■nd ce- i oi - ng to die an, in- sc- th OOl ib- go. el- Teen - A fters t . • taboo Sunday morie See pa e 2. High Spots Big Grau Game ... to be played Friday. See article on page 3. Home coming Queen To Be Chosen From These By Students SARAH DOGGETT BARBARA JESTER SANDRA MIDRIFF BETTE TILLEY PEGGY VOGLER Homecoming ... game to be played Thursday. See story on page 3. High Spots Talent Show... can lead to Broadway. See page 2. VOLUME XX MOUNT AIRY HIGH SCHOOL, MOU NT AIRY, N. C., NOVEMBER, 1955 NUMBER 2 Seniors Choose Colors , Superlatives, Speakers Seniors recently chose class night speakers, superlatives, and class colors. Bud Oliver was elected histor¬ ian; Elaine Hoover, poet; Barba¬ ra Jester, prophet; and Ronnie Pruett, testator. Burton Timmons, a member of the basketball and baseball teams, and Gaye Jackson, famous for her hook shoots, were voted most athletic boy and girl. Sandra Midkiff, a cheerleader, and Jerry Dodson were chosen as most school-spirited. Elaine tVoover, editor-in-chief of High Spots, and David McCar¬ ty, president of the Hi-Y, were named girl and boy most likely to succeed. Sarah Doggett was chosen pret¬ tiest girl -and Dallas Phillips best¬ looking boy. Sarah Doggett aiso received the title of most popular girl, while Yearbook Adviser Writes Winning Magazine Story Bud Oliver wcs voted most pop¬ ular boy. Elaine Hoover and Jimmy Kirk- man- took honors for best person¬ ality. Nonna Draughn, a marshal and David McCarty, chief marsh¬ al, were voted most studious girl and boy. Elaine Hoover and Jimmy Ash- burn, comedians from way back, won wittiest girl and boy. The school colors, blue and white, were also chosen class colors. Hlath Teacher Discovers Spy Coming Up Nov. 9—Southeast Assembly; Carrolls present “Masques on Parade” Nov. 10—Homecoming Parade, Game, and Dance Nov. 11—Meeting for Teach¬ ers at Winston-Salem; Holiday for All City Schools Nov. 14—Basketball Practice Starts Nov. 16—Talent Show Nov. 23—Freshman Assembly Nov. 24-25 — Thanksgiving Holidays Dec. 7—Sophomore Assembly Student Talent To Sing For Supper For Needy Families Next Wednesday To help needy families have I re(J f or admission,” announced food to be thankful f or on j Shirley Clifton, “but if that is too Thanksgiving Day the TrLHi-Y I inconvenient, 25 cents will gain TI ' U " " " entrance to the show.” j and Hi-Y are sponsoring the an jnual talent show November 16. t Ghosts Come Early First-place winner of an an¬ nual contest sponsored by the Nat ional School Yearbook Associa¬ tion, of Columbia, Missouri, is Miss Jean Simpson, adviser for Airmont.. Miss Simpson recently received a ' letter of congratulations and $25 for the best article by a year¬ book adviser on the topic “We Are Proudest of . . . .” (some work on the ’55 yearbook). ' Miss Simpson’s article, titled I We Are Proudest of Our Cover- j Recently when Mrs. Vera Tho¬ mas pulled out a cabinet to plug in an electric cord, she suddenly screamed. Had she seen a man from Mars, a corpse, a ghost, or a monster? Jack Inman, a member of her homeroom, saving Mrs. Thomas from the terrible sight she had seen, found it to be only a spy Mr. Steed had planted in the bi¬ ology lab to check on her during his absence. It was a black and yellow snajce about a half foot in length. Jack very calmly removed the snake ind put it back in its cell. Ghosts and witches made an early arrival for the Halloween season on October 29 at the Y. M. C. A A Halloween party sponsored by the Tri-Hi-Y and the Hi-Y provided entertainment of boo¬ bing- apples, fortune telling, palm reading, and dancing. Decorations consisted of cats, witches, pumpkins, and corn shocks. Rather than a trick, a treat of cookies and punch served for re¬ freshments. Dolly Hicks and Bill Jackson won first prize as best-dressed. Activities Room Gets Face-Lifting Thirty-three students will take part with piano, vocals, comedy, and dance, giving variety to the program. Ausiva Mills will be the master of ceremonies. •David McCarty, chairman of the Service Committee of thg Hi- Y, and Shirley Clifton, leader of Group 3 of the Tri-Hi-Y, are pool¬ ing their efforts to make this com¬ ing ’Toduction a success! “Non-perishable food is prefer- All proceeds in the form of food will go to needy families, these to be chosen by a committee headed by Norma Draughn. Each student will be given a ballot, and will vote for his choice in each group. There will be a first, second, and third prize in each group. Also there will be a first, second, and third prize for the show win¬ ner. All prizes are to be donated by Mt. Airy merchants. Schools Called ‘Investment In America’ This Week ace,” appears in the October is¬ sue of Photolith, with accompany¬ ing pictures of scenes around school here. The contest, announced last April, brought the largest re¬ sponse yet and the best group of entries in the series of contests, said the sponsors. Second-place winners were ad- visers in Providence Central High School, Alexandria, Louisiana, and Colorado Springs High School, Colorado. “I am pleased,” said Miss Simp¬ son, “that our idea of what a yearbook should be is approved by the National School Yearbook Association.” Without the expert work of staff photographer David McCar¬ ty, coverage of school life in on- t-t— UMa mnilld nnt nnt. I This is American Education j week. The city and county schools The P. T. A. groups meeting are working together to explain j tonight are carrying out the theme the theme “Schools-Your Invest- | A. E. The local newspapers, working nent in ' America. . . , , X r r p with the c:cy and county N. C. E. The city schools are using the unit--, published articles, edi- theme “Your Investment in Fund- toriV.s, and pictures about work .mental Learning " on Wednesday. the schools last week. , Thea t ;s and the radio stations ' . ' bis theme is being carried out | haye also co . op€ra ted to make the in the window of Workmans Fed-jp U h]i c education-conscious, ral Savings and Loan Co. The “Your Investment in Class- is being displayed in the j ' n nie j rooms ' window of Duke Power Co. The annual public relations dinner of the local N. C. E. A. I was held last evening at the Ree¬ ves Y. M. C. A. Dr. Sylvester Green, vice-president oi’ Wake Forest College, was guest speak- Owe My Hart And Sole’, Sigh The Freshmen School Newspaper Gets First Class Honor Rating For the third semester over two-year period, High Spots has It has been to-too-two and o- sow-sew in Mrs. Ted Reece’s freshman English classes recently. The great groan (not grate grown) that rent the air when the assignment to bring in at least 50 homonyms was given soon changed to chuckles. Anne Goad exceeded the assign¬ ment and brought 269. Class discussion provoked mer- been awarded a First Class Honor r y laughter. Jerry Starr couldn’t Making Curtains for the activities room, which is being converted into an office for guidance, are members of Mrs. Watt Shuford ' s advanced home economics class. At the sewing machine is Glenda Childress. The others, left to right, are Susan Boyd, Ruth Brown, Christine Matthews, Mabel King, Mrs. Watt Shuford, and Wilma Smith. In a class project the girls are doing a thorough job of interior decorating. With new office equipment provided, Mise Annie Thomas, guidance counselor, will soon be able to arrange interviews with students during first and second periods, and after school. ating bv the National Scholastic Press Association. Rating on pa- [, un pers sent in last spring was an¬ nounced recently. High Spot was one of 16 pa iecide whether to let the blood through a vain, vane or vein. Jo Lena Cox asked if the dog slept in a kernel 01 ' colonel. Weslev Caviness reasoned that an pers out o- 56 from schools this! ailing person should be pail, not size to he rated First Class for the pale. second semester last year. Mrs. Reece now hopes that the The paper scored higher in ! freshmen know which “mail is coverage and sports writing in the J suite, " which “pai.’ to by,” and spring than it did in the fall last j which “quire thee knew base year. I chants inn.” The highest rating last spring “Our suggestion to other Eng- came on feature stories, which I lish classes,” said Mrs. Reece, “is were awarded extra points above ! to have fun with words. It’s a j, ;«• • ; 1 • ' « i f . V f 4.1 ,1 Vw Ik V . . •. MVk III- 1 .


Suggestions in the Mount Airy High School - Airmont Yearbook (Mount Airy, NC) collection:

Mount Airy High School - Airmont Yearbook (Mount Airy, NC) online yearbook collection, 1953 Edition, Page 1

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Mount Airy High School - Airmont Yearbook (Mount Airy, NC) online yearbook collection, 1954 Edition, Page 1

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Mount Airy High School - Airmont Yearbook (Mount Airy, NC) online yearbook collection, 1955 Edition, Page 1

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Mount Airy High School - Airmont Yearbook (Mount Airy, NC) online yearbook collection, 1958 Edition, Page 1

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