Mount Union College - Unonian Yearbook (Alliance, OH)

 - Class of 1942

Page 1 of 136

 

Mount Union College - Unonian Yearbook (Alliance, OH) online yearbook collection, 1942 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1942 Edition, Mount Union College - Unonian Yearbook (Alliance, OH) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1942 Edition, Mount Union College - Unonian Yearbook (Alliance, OH) online yearbook collection
Pages 6 - 7

Page 10, 1942 Edition, Mount Union College - Unonian Yearbook (Alliance, OH) online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1942 Edition, Mount Union College - Unonian Yearbook (Alliance, OH) online yearbook collection
Pages 10 - 11

Page 14, 1942 Edition, Mount Union College - Unonian Yearbook (Alliance, OH) online yearbook collectionPage 15, 1942 Edition, Mount Union College - Unonian Yearbook (Alliance, OH) online yearbook collection
Pages 14 - 15

Page 8, 1942 Edition, Mount Union College - Unonian Yearbook (Alliance, OH) online yearbook collectionPage 9, 1942 Edition, Mount Union College - Unonian Yearbook (Alliance, OH) online yearbook collection
Pages 8 - 9
Page 12, 1942 Edition, Mount Union College - Unonian Yearbook (Alliance, OH) online yearbook collectionPage 13, 1942 Edition, Mount Union College - Unonian Yearbook (Alliance, OH) online yearbook collection
Pages 12 - 13
Page 16, 1942 Edition, Mount Union College - Unonian Yearbook (Alliance, OH) online yearbook collectionPage 17, 1942 Edition, Mount Union College - Unonian Yearbook (Alliance, OH) online yearbook collection
Pages 16 - 17

Text from Pages 1 - 136 of the 1942 volume:

, flf fdwfilee Editor .....,. .. ,lil Briggle Bus. Mgr ..... g ny Branghdm ,- gi "'!1a" .f -w :JPY Y 1 f ' 'nb' 5, 1 ' V 1 5' -, ,,,, ., A . ., ,, , V- --ma, V W'5'Hr: :KT .- fy A Lu., 4 V ' .Y 1.1-H ..,V.. l V 2 - :V .ferggf , ' A A, W I - A J -, L. , , , .. , A 1 V ht, lr V, V A ,Q f Vf r I V V' ' ' 1-lj ff. rV 1 .VA .' '.f ,VJ , . -yi. ' 1". V--ff ., ,Vi2'- .Ag . -V 1 . wif. V -41- , -V 1 V '- , 1 iw' F A .-v 2- ' ... ", if H' , ff,- IL'-.' ,tif ry I , -r Qt ' ui'-Q I .5:a5'jl'f'j'. V A .'-.-:VV AV -, u f' -,,f1,,'1T.a-2 V 'V ' ' -9' ' ., ' V ' V V 1 If? '- 5 rr .,- W4 -'ily ' . - I VJ ,, " V' v n- g .n., 1 , .-.": Y , 42' A . . V. ' ' - - , , :r X' ,Vg 1 - V V1 J, 4 -.3--9' - Aff Jrws..-..,,9I 1-5: V -4 ' , , V ' ' -'P ' I 1 gi A, :I R ' X, ,il , - , V H X ,':1J'tI,' K" .: .W-2,92 V .1,-' 'gi - " r,3,.' A its 5. -,4- '9-,rft-'I , , , ' -'44 ' 2 A .'A" w--45, L L -1 f .I,.: :Aim-A': ffiV f -'P' 4 " 'f NV 3' A - H 'iw ' 'A 1 - V ' :-- - - 1 ',-V -,L , 1 .I H , " ., -' - ,rs-gp: ,WV 175. , J- 4. -SJ-. - I bg X' li f-1.7 311,155 .Q7JA,fi, V iw 1 -.-V . - ..-ff-:V.w l, . IF, ,,,,, in 4.4 .,., f 2 .ff fel' 5 Lrg i' '19 f M A V r. K' - V Q ,!, , nr . ,,- 2 - X, J . fn.. ,.',.1 21,5 .- :maui fiffff ' A .gn- .,f 95, fx 4 19 a 'f'-fr -- .,,f, - V. ,Q-H2-f wg, -' . wi . , "nl f- 1, .V . ,K :Wav VJ" 5.12: r Xgqg '- - . . , TQ. Q, 'gf ,- , FQ, X,, 51,7 fiwf-Nw -I "'fi"??if?h T'5f'7Vi'3'3lif:7'3ye5Lf v5..,'4fA W""'1' '-F V ' ' . fr' Y . , " vi 1 'ia' , X X J f ' f f-G' '-' , A ji, XX 1 f. L ,Y Hmm - X A 510 Q - 1 X -- kr -' " LC " -Y ,rl--Q - - 3 A -iw ' X, V 4 - A -' ' Q A , 1 4 .4 , " ' -l' Jr " iffvii am: ,,,.1 W ,X X..,, . XX .X -g ' V ' w""1Q' ' p -" A ' ' .- QQ! x A ,5 , ,- ,, .,, ,L - -ff - .x W , 'fn' jl',.,lfW ' iq, , l -'X I A X ,. ' . . . Exif? 1, ' ' 5 , -. X M- - --.f,,-1 1 'L - 5-19-?E'lv.x 5 ' - E' 7 .. ' ' md , . V -, ., X K , '4 ' , X' n NX.. - Y' ' 5 .X bw .H X , 1' X, X , v 1 ul- .1 -V X XL, QE, - '- 5 ,Xgaipj F' A- ' -V ' 7 X ' ' 4:4 ' " 7 ' ' - . ,U in :. -:P 11 g H g , :,X- ...gift ,, A H - 1, I, ,ja - ,X , , X X f 5, Q , ,.X. .X .TX It N ' 'A' ' -7 or 4 'M' 'ff- , . Liiff' " ' ' A' " lf- 'QQ-. ' . -4. 42 , ' ' . v - -'i , -I - . 'fyga -Q, ' .. "' 'T P. J ' ,, 'I 4 'aw ' v' f. Q ..- u " . 5-. lk S -1 - ,, -. , ,n , W - H 1 , ' 144' ,M 1 l- ., a--1-,L g -1-4. L-:EQ - X. . . -, 1.1p?Qix'1' if' - -iwf-G-f wfl' .J A -I .,f , v , ' -f 1' ' ' J 'QI 1 ' Y ' 4'-'-A in 4 Y- .," , 1 , , . IA 1 4 L' VF 4-x1,., ' ,N Vgj,X,A ' . 'fifv-we X . ,, ' , ,. 'Q '- ' 'A W?-Egg' X ' ' M, X X X .'.X,XX-,ali 11 - 4.,1f:.'- -.Q -+V P , " . :Jw X- X 1 ., gfyr V , I' L, IMAX, . .5 ., f' V " . ' ' ..", - 14 ':'5-If-"iw, 1 1 .,fv:,,' X H f. 'WT - A ' A' 'mf --iw 'zf1'iw"f ' ' ' "1 ' H 17' .X J A , X l A X X - . -f -.43:. .. .1"f"!fq':"vff.--K - X5 , - . 1 A .JA 1 XX. . MXL' -A - A -X V-.Ag-13, - - .ny . C1 .. FX. I I n 4 u . I M , Q-'Qi' C '- um . V' -' Q- .MSXXXQ X i.4i.qX,, . '- , fl' .,.'Xj, . - ' , ffv2f2l.i ' . " 1 - .-12,-"ff - 1 F42-f',9,- ,1. 5 "k:Efff.:1-Q1'ff,5'..g- I , -'jiri '13, ': v. i . . I 7 I Al - If 1 x X , J . X x 1 fx? if f .JL A 'f4.X: P I " , , ' " Ui . ,wg- Y.17"'5 , . gg: H 0143" ' FG- zl ff ' .' , C m."+X.' x-' .1 , 1 T., "inf .f f . ' 15 53? .K ' -Jjr, 'M " r 1 -,:,:....1,- ,X W l I V' - 1 w ' w 1 ,u Av w , X X , 1 w , I 1 ET. Typical Mount Union campus shots in- clude: Chapman Hall looking glamorous under a blanket of snow . . . The tour drum majorettes who believe in putting their best toot forward-and keeping it there . . . and speaking of feet first, what about the next two pairs of size elevens or twelves. l L All'l,..4. fri' l H l l -Em, Although the Observatory is the scene of many mathematical exploits, during the spring there is only one equation: boyJ,- girlzlove. The couple above is typical of the twosomes seen strolling on campus. 4 FUBEWUBD To the small liberal arts college and to its future success we dedicate the i942 Unonian. Mount Union and small colleges like it will need a strong backbone to weather the educational storm that lies ahead. To us who have known the intangible unworldliness of a small school, the future of this particular type of educational opportunity is very precious. lt is difficult for us to believe in a mechanized process of education that will make everyone a specialized automaton. During the days that will come, in the tragedies that are in store for many of us, and throughout the dismal routine of daily living we will need much of the spirit and strength that we have found during our undergraduate days in a liberal arts college. Probably the true realization of all that Mount Union has meant to us will not come until, in a moment of tragedy, we find that everything is not lost so long as we have a faith in our way of living, a sense of values, and a belief in the meaning of truth. These things have we learned in four years at Mount, and these things we shall cherish and fight to secure for the future generations of the world. ln a sense, Mount Union has given us wings that will enable us to soar over many barriers that were before insurmountable. And it is as if eternal strength were stored in those wings. May we always find it in ourselves to live up to the heritage ofa liberal arts education. ln an effort to honor some of the intangible phases of a small liberal arts college and to provide a store house for those memories that will ever keep us young and strong, we present to you the l942 Unonian, ql F PBEXY War has brought difficult days to all liberal arts colleges. ln cz time when young men and women are needed so urgently in industry, in the armed forces, or in some other kind of government service, the only excuse for the con- tinuation of colleges and college life is the contribution that can be made by them, both to the present need and the future requirements of- the nation. The cessation of hostilities will present the people of the United States with some of the gravest problems, political, social and economic, that any nation has ever faced. These will need for-efficient handling the wisest leadership and the best- informed public imaginable. For this reason the government is cooperating in the effort to keep, all colleges functioning satisfactorily throughout the emergency, and to this larger task of national defense the liberal arts colleges are dedicating them- selves whole-heartedly. The record of Mount Union College this year will show many changes in the familiar pattern, and some new departures, due to this cooperation with the government in national defense. But she is still a liberal arts college, with high standards of scholarship, and an individual concern for each student. lt is with real pride, therefore, in the past record of Mount Union College, and her present achievements, that we commend to you this story of the year's activities. Charles B. Ketcham, President CHARLES BURGESS KETCHAM, B.D., A.M., D.D. President, Mount Union College llprexyll and wise guidance are perpetual inspirations to a student body, faced with the problems of today. Ketchom's confident leadership MELVIN W. HYDE, A.M., PI'1.D. Dean of the College Professo r of Education HELE Assis N B. RUDIN, AM Deon of Women font Professor of English GEORGE FRANKLIN LAMB, A.M. BENJAMIN FITTS STANTON, A.M., L.H.D. Professor of Geology Associate Professor of Education With Mount Union, September, 1905 With Mount Union, September, 1915 ISAAC HEADLAND, A.M., S.T.B., Ph.D., D.D. GEORGE ARTHUR CRIBBS, A.M., Ph.D. Professor of Religious Education Emeritus Professor of History With Mount Union, September, 1914 With Mount Union, September, 1916 JOSEPH MEHOLLIN SCOTT, A.M., Sc.D. ROBERT ELIHU STAUFFER, A.M., L.S.B. Professor of Biology Professor of Greek Language and Literature With Mount Union, September, 1918 With Mount Union, September, 1920 FOREST JAY SHOLLENBERGER, S.M., Ph.D. ERIC ALEXANDER ECKLER, A.M., Ph.D. Professor of Physics Professor of English Language and Literature With Mount Union, September, 1918 With Mount Union, September, 1922 MARY WAGGONER ECKLER, A.M. Associate Professor of English Literature With Mount Union, September, 1922 WILLIAM MCLENNAN MORGAN, S.M., Ph.D. OHMER HAROLD ENGLE, A.M. Professor of Organic Chemistry Associate Professor of Biology With Mount Union, September, 1922 With Mount Union, September, 1925 LOUIS ABEL PAPPENHAGEN, S.M., P'h.D. ROBERT DEAN WRIGHT, A.M. Professor of Chemistry Professor of Physical Education With Mount Union, September, 1925 With Mount Union, September, 1925 ll ALBANUS BLAINE KITZMILLER, A.M., P'h.D. ARTHUR ENGLEBERT, A.M., Ph.D. Professor of Psychology Professor of Modern Languages and Literature With Mount Union, September, 1927 With Mount Union, September, 1931 LUTHER ENOCH WARREN, A.M., Ph.D. HARRY GELTZ, A.M. Professor of Education Assistant Professor of Physical Education With Mount Union, September, 1928 With Mount Union, September, 1932 RICHARD CHARLES HILDNER, A.M., Ph.D. HARLEY HERSCHEL ZIEGLER, A.M., Ph.D. Associate Professor of Mathematics Associate Professor of Philosophy With Mount Union, September, 1934 With Mount Union, September, 1936 ANN EASTON KERR, A.M. KATHARINE A. GUNNELL, A.M. Instructor of Economics instructor of English Language and Literature With Mount Union, September, 1935 With Mount Union, September, 1938 fi? HTA: ., sv 1 1 JOHN WINCHESTER GUNNELL, M.F.A. Assistant Professor of Speech and Drama With Mount Union, 1938 PAUL ROBERT MURPHY, A.M. HENRIETTE D. EYNON Assistant Professor of Modern Language Assistant Professor of French With Mount Union, September, 1938 With Mount Union, September, 1938 RICHARD HALLOWELL HOPPIN, A.M. WILLIAM ALEXANDER MABRY, A.M., Ph.D. Instructor of Piano and Theory Associate Professor of History With Mount Union, September, 1938 With Mount Union, September, 1939 fl I3 1 . If' A , I I ' .A WILLIAM FREDERICK MILLER, B.D., M.S.M. GERALD FERGUSON, Mus.B. Professor of Music Instructor of Voice With Mount Union, September, 1939 With Mount Union, September, 1940 WERNER A. BOHENSTEDT, Ph.D. YOST OSBORNE, Litt.M., B.L.S. Visiting Professor of Economics Reference Librarian With Mount Union, September, 1940 With Mount Union, September, 1940 RICHARD E. SLITOR, A.M., Ph.D. VIRGINIA QUINN, S.B. Associate Professor ot Economics Graduate Assistant of Biology With Mount Union, September, 1941 With Mount Union, September, 1941 FRANKLIN P. MacKNIGHT, P'h.D. SARA DOODY, A.B. Assistant Professor of Geology Assistant Professor of Physical Education With Mount Union, September, 1941 With Mount Union, September, 1941 '15 VERNA ELIZABETH LOWER, A.B. Registrar OSCAR WALTEN DUNN Field Secretary DEAN BENSHOFF, A.B. Purchasing Agent ROBERT HERMAN CARR, A.B. MARTHA GRANT ENGLE, A.B. Business Manager Catalog Librarian - J A 5- f - L I5 MARGARET CHURCH, A.B. KENNETH HELICHER MCFALL, A.M Assistant Treasurer Alumni Secretary NETTIE MAY HOUSEL PERRY FIRESTONE KING, S.B., M.D House Manager, Elliott Hall Chairman of Student Health Service IIFFICERS SENIOR CLASS President .................. Kenneth Gempler Vice-President ......,..... Louise Schmittle Secretary .........,...... Warren l-lartsough Treasurer ......... ....... J ennie Morgan JUNIOR CLASS President .................... Isabelle Galanot Vice-President .,....,......... Richard Sanor Secretary ,.,...........,..... Margaret Collins Treasurer ......... ....... R ichard Mayer SOPHOMORE CLASS President ........................ George Corey Vice-President .............. Elisabeth Smith Secretary ............ ....., H enry Hansen Treasurer ......... .,..... L anke Harsany FRESHMEN CLASS President ,........,,............. Anne Stewart Vice-President ................ Robert Fuller Secretary ,...,.,,........ Dorothy Carpenter Treasurer .......,, ,,........ l-l erbert Cutler . P' in 'Xt f ll ' 1,-, -.mT. ....., ,Q .,i 1 C' g',1?'ff DUATES . . . And now although hardly a "calen- dar-full" of time has passed since they arrived bag and baggage for the first time at the portals of Mount Union, these serious-thinking, less violently ambitious people find themselves four years sleepier -and seniors. For a long time now, being a senior has meant to them the epitome of loftiness. Now it means wearing a black robe in chapel every so often, checking with the Registrar on their hours of D, and at- tending their last Washington's Birthday Ball. These Seniors are beginning to wish that they had taken more snapshots or saved more of the old "Dynamos." But then, the memories of tour never-to-be- forgotten years hardly need many re- minders. The memories one cannot record in pictures are often the ones that have meant most. At Mount, there has been time for more than classes, activities, fun, dates, and athletics. College has shown the seniors how to know people intimately. That know that it is personalities, not buildings and fine equipment, that make a real college and that will keep their class of l9-42 often returning to the old stamping ground at "dear Old Mount." ..1. I .am , -Cf! '31 - - " 1 -., -1- ffl-' f' nf' ff .Q 'fn-,g,q li .2 V- iz , " "'1 -' 5. f,f'573.:' , Q 'A 5,pk.wjf,-'E " ' ?1',- V." 'fylqi' ,'.'g.'f1' 2 g ,fr X vw: .m. , ,7'g'4?,f2, L-. JI ff. , 1 , - 4 - , ff " fl- - T' 4,-. ,.- I iiffgv. 'W QM - JJ! ,cqztiii-flu 321: .W 14711 . V- A . L ,N M., -, , . ' va-'xii-'zfv A '1 , ,. ' .12 " -1' ' ' , --.- ,rf .- ,- , . 1- Y. '2,-ff+Frf-+-:ff - 'ml' V 4 lk 'Zh' ,',i1H'f:2f'gg,-'H i L. -Q. A' -1:55843 ' 'gg ' 1,1199-",gf'6:' T. gg-jf . .1 4-. Af' 1 wa- ,,, ,, In 4 1 'gf-I S' 1 ,. W -- vw- .- ,-,,,k ,A .vs :L -554:-,,, fr: V- ,- ---ra.:-. fs.-f rw. K" if V , .-M, , ,A,f,:f 7 .nf-,. ' - " 7'fJ'1.-flfffylgx Tiff 4 :ffl-'Y' t '- MK V. . ,V ., . "" f 6 - W ..,, V-.v ,,.YLI3.Y,f4.5hfEAi-v,!.' -N ,.Y,.m 0 ' , 1--.gfi-13 'lf . , A - ,gn-5 gf.. 4 ffj. . f,:.'l .AZ Yi , , . A I 'x V . V-X . 'Z 1 1 ,Q-.Q-,aff T , CLAUDIA FERGUSON ASHELMAN, A.B ....... Dormont, Pa., Alpha Chi Omega WILLIAM DONALD ALEXANDER, P.S.M ..... Canton, O., Sigma Alpha Epsilon JOHN BEAZEL, S.B ............,.......,...........,.... Canton, Ohio, Alpha Tau Omega DAVIS EUGENE BOSTER, A.B ......... ......................... B eloit, Ohio, Sigma Nu MARTHA JANE BOWEN, A.B. ................ Martins Ferry, O., Delta Delta Delta WILLIAM GEORGE BRANGHAM, A.B ............. Warren, Ohio, Phi Kappa Tau WILLIAM FRANCIS BRIGGLE, S.B ......... Canton, Ohio, Sigma Alpha Epsilon DONALD MARVIN BROWN, S.B ...... ........... C anton, Ohio, Phi Kappa Tau HARRY ARTER BROWN, S.B. ,....... ........, A Iliance, Ohio, Sigma Nu GEORGE FRANKLIN CAIN, S.B ...... ....... E ost Liverpool, Ohio, Sigma Nu C O O C C 1l CECIL HOWARD COLEMAN, A.B ................. Alliance, Ohio, Alpha Kappa Pi MARY JANE COLLINS, A.B .... .,.,. N ew Philadelphia, Ohio, Alpha Chi Omega MARGARET TERESA CONWAY, P.S.M. ........ Alliance, Ohio, Alpha Xi Delta ROGER DIVILLE COPE, S.B ............ .... ....................,................... S a lem, Ohio WILBUR EDWARD COUCHIE, A.B ........... Salem, Ohio, Sigma Alpha Epsilon DUANE WEBSTER CRIST, A.B ......, ,......,............ A Iliance, Ohio, Signet GORDON LESLIE DESHLER, S.B ........ ....... E ost Liverpool, Ohio, Sigma Nu GLEN WATSON DICKEN, S.B ........ .....,..................... A Iliance, Ohio LIONEL ARTHUR DIFFORD, S.B ..... ....... Alliance, Ohio, Phi Kappa Tau ROBERT KARL DOMER, A.B ........ ....... C anton, Ohio, Sigma Nu CLASS 0F 194 Ashelmon Alexander Becnzel Boster Bowen Bronghom Briggle Brown, D. Brown, H. Coin wp' f Adiia... if 1 lint-dd! 'T' Coleman Collins Conway Cope Couchie - Crist Deshler Dicken Difford Domer JOANNE MAY DRAKE, A.B ........ ..... E ast Palestine, Ohio, Delta Delta Delta ARTHUR FRANZ DUNDON, S.B. .................... Alliance Ohio, Phi Kappa Tau ELLEN ELIZABETH ELDER, S.B .... -. LOIS ANNE ELLE'l'I', A.B .......... ....... SELENA ELIZABETH EVANS, A.B ......... EMMA JANE FLOYD, A.B ............... RICHARD DUANE FOLTZ, S.B ....... GEORGE HENRY FREETAGE, S.B ..... .........................-...Salem, Ohio .-....,.-.-..AIliance, Ohio, Signet ........Niles, Ohio, Alpha Xi Delta ......Warren, Ohio, Alpha Xi Delta ...........East Canton, Ohio, Sigma Nu ..........Sebring, Ohio, Alpha Tau Omega LOWELL CLAYTON FRESHLEY, A.B ..... .... A Iliance, Ohio, Alpha Tau Omega KENNETH ERNEST GEMPLER, A.B ..,.....,.. Alliance, Ohio, Alpha Tau Omega JOHN WILLIAM HAAS, P.S.M ....... EUGENE LOUIS HAIDET, A.B .......... KENNETH FREDERICK HANES, S.B -.....Navarre, Ohio, Phi Kappa Tau .........Alliance, Ohio, Alpha Tau Omega .....East Liverpool, Ohio, Phi Kappa Tau JOHN HART, S.B. .......................................... Alliance, Ohio, Alpha Kappa Pi WARREN HARTSOUGH, S.B ........ FREDERICK JOHN HELD, S.B ........ DALE DELORUM HIXON, A.B ,....... .......Canton, Ohio, Phi Kappa Tau .....-..,-.................Canton, Ohio Ohio REBECCA JANE HOWE, A.B. ..,..... ......... M ansfield, Ohio, Alpha Chi Omega DONALD OWEN HUNTER, S,B ................. Alliance, Ohio, Alpha Tau Omega NANCY Ei.oisE INGLIS, A.B .............. .Youngstown, Ohio, Delta Delta Delta CLASS 0F 194 Drake Dundon Elder Ellett Evans Floyd Foltz Freetoge ' Freshley Gempler 1 l lll il 4, l W, ...N Haas Hoidet Hanes Hart Hortsough Held Hixon Howe Hunter Inglis , L. 23 wiNoNA BELL JAMES, S.B ........ ooms MAY JoHNsoN, A.B ..,.... ......-..-.Chesterland, Ohio -.-.-.....AIIiance, Ohio, Signet RICHARD AULD JONES, S.B. ............ .............. A Iliance, Ohio, Sigma Nu VIRGINIA MAE KENNEDY, P.S.M ............. Canton, Ohio, Alpha Chi Omega HELEN ELIZABETH KOEHNLEIN, A.B. ............ Massillon, Ohio, Kappa Delta WILLIAM GRAYSON LAPPERT, A.B ................. Barnesville, Ohio, Sigma Nu MARY COLETTE LINS, A.B ....... ......,..... D etroit, Michigan, Delta Delta Delta MIRIAM CHAMBERLIN LOVELL, A.B...WeIlsburg, W. Va., Delta Delta Delta BETTY JANE LYNN, P.S.M. .................. Summitville, Ohio, Alpha Chi Omega CAROLYN MACKENZIE, A.B ......... ............ M unhall, Pa., Alpha Xi Delta RUTH ANN MCCONNELL, A.B .,.,................... Alliance, Ohio, Alpha Xi Delta WILLIAM ALBERT MCCREA, S.B ......... Pittsburgh, Pa., Sigma Alpha Epsilon ALOHA DORMA MCGREW, A.B. .................... Alliance, Ohio, Alpha Xi Delta HAROLD THOMAS MILFORD, A.B.. ..................,............ Canton, Ohio MATILDA MAY MILLER, A.B ........... ........ C anton, Ohio, Alpha Xi Delta BENJAMIN LEO MINKIN, A.B ........ .....,..........,........... C anton, Ohio ci-IARLOTVE MOREY, P.s.M ....... ..........,................... A Hacmce, ohio JENNIE MORGAN, A.B ..,.............,.................... Alliance Ohio, Alpha Xi Delta WILLIAM FREEMONT MORRIS, A.B ......... EDWARD DONALD MOSSER, A.B ..., Alliance, Ohio, Alpha Tau Omega Newell, West Va., Phi Kappa Tau CLASS 0F 194 James Johnson Jones Kennedy Koehnlein Loppert Lins Lovell Lynn MacKenzie . 37,21 , . ev- 2 I'-1.1 3 ,dvi l 6 McConnell McCree McGrew Milford Miller Minkin Morey Morgan Morris Mosser ,,, iw, 25 KARL DALE ORWICK, A.B .......,.. MYRON NYCUM PALMER, S.B.... FLORENCE ALBERTA PEET, P.S.M ...... RUSSELL AYER POXON, SB .......... CHARLES ADAM RITZ, P.S.M ...... ANTHONY LUCIEN ROSE, S.B ...... EDNA SARAH SAPP, A.B ...............,,L RUTH LOUISE SCHMITTLE, A.B.. JOHN JAMES SCHORY, S.B. ..,.... .. JOHANN SCHULZ, S.B. ...... . ...Alliance, Ohio, Alpha Tau Omega ...............WiIkinsburg, Pa., Signet ...,,,..Alliance, Ohio, Alpha Xi Delta Painesville, Ohio, Alpha Tau Omega ,.........,.......Canton, Ohio, Sigma Nu ..Canton, Ohio, Sigma Alpha Epsilon ...........L...,.....Ravenna, Ohio, Signet ....Saltsburg, Pa., Alpha Chi Omega .Canton, Ohio, Sigma Alpha Epsilon Rochelle, N. Y. MARY ELIZABETH SHILTS, A.B ..,...... MARY PHYLLIS SHU'l'l', A.B ........ CORNELIA SOTCAN, A.B ........ JODINE JUNE SPARKS, A.B ....... ......Hudson, Ohio, Alpha Xi Delta ........Alliance, Ohio, Alpha Xi Delta ........Alliance, Ohio, Alpha Xi Delta ......Canton, Ohio, Delta Delta Delta HAROLD WADE SPIES, S.B ..A...,....,.. ,.,...... A lliance, Ohio, Phi Kappa Tau WILLIAM WAYNE STEINER, S.B. KENNETH GEORGE STOFFER, S.B .......... .......Louisville, Ohio, Phi Kappa Tau ...Homeworth, Ohio, Alpha Kappa Pi THELMA ELIZABETH TOURNAY, A.B ........... Massillon, Ohio, Kappa Delta MARY JEAN TRADER, A.B .,........................,................ Alliance, Ohio, Signet RUTH ALICE WAGNER, P.S.M ...,....... North Canton, Ohio, Delta Delta Delta CLASS 017 1942 Orwick Palmer Peet Poxon Ritz Rose Sapp Schmitfle Schory Schulz Shilts Shutt Sofcan Sparks Spies Steiner Stoffer Tournay Trader Wagner 27 JUNE LILLIAN WARREN, P.S.M ........ ...... A Iliance, Ohio, Signet WILLIAM RICHARD WERNER, S.B. .................................. Uhrichsville, Ohio JOHN RUSSELL WOODARD, A.B. .... Steubenville, Ohio, Sigma Alpha Epsilon DOUGLAS FULLER WRIGHT, A.B. ..,.......... Sandusky, Ohio, Phi Kappa Tau CLASS 0F 194 Warren Werner Woodard Wright UN Illll CLASS The junior year is the year of glory for the collegiate who is no longer a wide- eyed freshman or a restless sophomore, but instead a forward-looking adult. Any- one who peers beneath the level brows of the junior looks into the self-satisfied eyes of a person who knows where he is going and is well on his way. Usually the sophistication has grown a little more careless and has become much, much more becoming. The junior is old enough to wear un- pressed tweeds and to get away with it. He is old enough to take the presidencies of campus organizations, the editorships of the yearbook and newsheet and all the other glories of the junior year at the ninety-five percent work and five percent honor ratio, he is young enough to have a glorious time, wondering, but not worry- ing, about the future which is to him changing and unpredictable, but ever exciting. Here's to the members of the Class of '43, may the days of their lives be as happy as the days of their Junior year in a liberal arts college. 'X-. !. ,gf L .445-v 1--.m'.i ,AQ 1 " .4. ,Pty f- .-QL . av- . 'J 1 W? .ang 1, ,- i.L- v V' gl, . n . v . , 7 ' If!! HV '-WP" U37 1 I A F w I F PS 53 'liij 'Z J' .H. Lillian Addicott Galen Andrews George Ball Marjorie Banks Stanley Baughman Doris Bauman Sigrid Bergwall ' Donald Biery Martha Blum Jack Burnheimer Ralph Campbell Rachel Clark Curtis Coleman Margaret Ann Collins William Dakin Virginia Day Myrtle Denton Yvonne Desautels James DeWitt Winthrop Difford Edwin Dugan Niles Faulk Lita Fernandez Chalmer Ferris Doris Flynn Isabelle Galanot Kathryn Glenwright Eleanor Haidet Lanka Harsany Shirley Herbert Warren, Ohio, Alpha Xi Delta Steubenville, Ohio, Phi Kappa Tau Lisbon, Ohio, Phi Kappa Tau Alliance, Ohio Akron, Ohio, Sigma Nu Warren, Ohio, Alpha Xi Delta Alliance, Ohio Alliance, Ohio, Sigma Nu Canton, Ohio, Alpha Xi Delta East Sparta, Ohio, Phi Kappa Tau Alliance, Ohio, Phi Kappa Tau Alliance, Ohio Alliance, Ohio, Alpha Kappa Pi Alliance, Ohio, Delta Delta Delta Alliance, Ohio, Sigma Nu Alliance, Ohio North Canton, Alliance, Ohio, Ohio, Alpha Chi Omega Kappa Delta Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio, Sigma Nu Alliance, Ohio, Phi Kappa Tau Alliance, Ohio, Alpha Kappa Pi Canton, Ohio, Sigma Alpha Epsilon Alliance, Ohio, Delta Delta Delta Cleveland, Ohio, Sigma Nu Alliance, Ohio Alliance, Ohio, 'Delta Delta Delta Alliance, Ohio, Alpha Xi Delta Alliance, Ohio The Bronx, New York, Kappa Delta Cleveland, Ohio, Alpha Xi Delta W J U 1 N I 0 R S -34 Elizabeth Heskett Robert Hirst Elisabeth Hitchcock Robert Hively Max Hostetler LaVern Jackson Charles Joachim David Jones Robert Lee Jones Robert William Jones Dorothy Kearney Joanne Keitter Kathryn Ann King Howard Kitzmiller James Knight Florence Lamb Robert Lane Jane Lemke Robert Limbach Mary Frances Lindesmith Roberta Lobb Ruth Longsworth Helen Lower Richard Mani Mary Marquis Richard Mayer Allan McGaw Winston McHenry Timothy Meehan Howard Miller Massillon, Ohio, Delta Delta Delta Louisville, Ohio, Phi Kappa Tau Sandusky, Ohio, Alpha Xi Delta Salem, Ohio Canton, Ohio, Sigma Nu Mingo Junction, Ohio Youngstown, Ohio, Alpha Tau Omega Akron, Ohio, Phi Kappa Tau Steubenville, Ohio, Sigma Nu Alliance, Ohio, Sigma Nu Cleveland, Ohio, Delta Delta Delta North Canton, Ohio, Delta Delta Delta Lakewood, Ohio, Delta Delta Delta Alliance, Ohio, Alpha Tau Omega Pittsburgh, Pa., Sigma Alpha Epsilon Cleveland, Ohio, Alpha Xi Delta Canton, Ohio, Sigma Alpha Epsilon Canton, Ohio, Kappa Delta Massillon, Ohio, Alpha Tau Omega Alliance, Ohio, Delta Delta Delta Canton, Ohio, Delta Delta Delta Cleveland, Ohio, Delta Delta Delta Lisbon, Ohio, Signet Canton, Ohio, Sigma Alpha Epsilon Arnold, Pa., Signet Alliance, Ohio, Sigma Nu Lakewood, Ohio, Signet East Liverpool, Ohio, Phi Kappa Tau Alliance, Ohio, Alpha Tau Omega Greentown, Ohio, Sigma Alpha Epsilon 4 4 J U N - I 0 R L S I f 36 John Mumaw Allen Murphy George Myers Vivian Newacheck Robert Nidy Marian Nimmons George Poda Robert Poto lra Rainsberger Wilbur Reash Benjamin Rider Marian Robinson Curtis Rockhill Philip Runyon Richard Sanor Rudy Schlott Eleanor Schneider Robert Schoeneweiss Marjorie Scott Catherine Sheatsley Clifford Shields Doris Skinner Elisabeth Smith John Sponseller Jack Stafford George Stephan Arwood Sterrett Mary Stout John Talaba Charles Trupe Youngstown, Ohio Barnesville, Ohio, Phi Kappa Tau Greensburg, Pa., Alpha Tau Omega Louisville, Ohio, Kappa Delta Greentown, Ohio Plymouth, Ohio, Delta Delta Delta Jamestown, New York, Phi Kappa Tau Alliance, Ohio Carrollton, Ohio, Sigma Nu New Waterford, Ohio, Sigma Nu Cleveland, Ohio, Signet Alliance, Ohio Hartville, Ohio, Sigma Nu Toronto, Ohio, Sigma Nu Beloit, Ohio, Signet Canton, Ohio, Alpha Tau Omega Uhrichsville, Ohio, Alpha Chi Omega Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio, Sigma Nu Alliance, Ohio, Signet Alliance, Ohio, Alpha Xi Delta Unionport, Ohio, Phi Kappa Tau Youngstown, Ohio, Alpha Chi Omega Youngstown, Ohio, Kappa Delta Alliance, Ohio, Alpha Kappa Pi Willoughby, Ohio, Alpha Tau Omega Louisville, Ohio, Alpha Tau Omega Akron, Ohio, Phi Kappa Tau Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio, Alpha Chi Omega Alliance, Ohio, Alpha Tau Omega Brookfield, Ohio, Alpha Kappa Pi J U N I 0 B S TTI 38 Mary Tucker Gerald Underwood Alice Von Storch Jean Waller William Work Barbara Weimer Walter Wichern Earle Wise Eugenia Zima Alliance, Ohio Waynesburg, Ohio, Signet Yonkers, New York, Alpha Chi Omega Alliance, Ohio, Alpha Xi Della Salem, Ohio, Sigma Alpha Epsilon Alliance, Ohio, Alpha Xi Della Canton, Ohio, Phi Kappa Tau Canton, Ohio, Phi Kappa Tau Geneva, Ohio, Alpha Chi Omega SIDPIIO IIBE CLASS Two years of the "unholy hour" slip by, and sophomores through half-closed and half-sophisti- cated eyes begin to see dimly that the world contains much, much more than sophomores. Every once in awhile a serious thought slips out and frightens everyone in the vicinity, who immediately thinks of brain fever and calls a doctor. Soph- omores are those unadjusted, pseudo - adult youngsters who find themselves no longer a freshman and not yet on upperclassman. By this time they have de- cided on the career of their lives. Their ambitions are un- bounded. The only thing that worries them is that they must wait two more years to begin this climb to fortune. "Dis- couragement" is not in the vocabulary of the sophomore. lt is weak to be discouraged, and ci sophomore is never weak. They know more than they really like to admit, but with a little coaxing lvery littlel , they will air quite a portion of their knowledge. Probably by the end of the year they learn the real dignity of their advanced years, but by that time they are juniors, and juniors are above that sort of thing. True it is that sophomores are the ones who decide to de- vote a summer to reading all of Plato, for they have just learned that Plato wrote books. The fact that they usually decide to be a bus boy at Yellowstone or a waitress at Cape Cod for the summer does not defer them from their ambition to read Plato. They take the heavy volumes along with them and read while lying on a beach or while climbing a mountain. It is fun to be a sophomore, fun to be sitting on top of the world, fun to be young enough to wear ear muffs without feel- ing silly, and fun to be writing a novel that someday will take the world by storm. Perhaps sophomores are happier than they will ever be afterwards. 41 42 FRESHMAN CLASS Freshmen arrive at school en- thusiastically ready and willing for everything, even for study- ing and Wednesday chapels. A month after school begins they have changed their hair-do, their eyebrows, their nickname, and their philosophy of life. Their persistent clamor is for excitement and fun. At dances they step on their own feet, their partner's feet, and the chaperons' feet, that is, if they ever reach the chaperons' corner. They have bull sessions till all hours and have not yet learned to cram efficiently for exams lso that they remember the information only for the necessary two hour periodl . Freshman women create a stampede in the ranks of upper- class men. Upperclass women have two desires on such occa- sions: lll to keep their cus- tomary dignity, f2l to trip the little freshman vixens on their way down to meet a senior date. Either freshman men are too bashful to date, or they have a "girl back home." The "girl back home" usually lasts for about two months, after which time the young man wanders around in a daze for awhile and then dives into his books to the exclusion of everything else. About May of the freshman year, the young man begins to realize that the little blonde from Chicago who sits in front of him in chapel looks like a lot of fun. With this sign, he shows his first glimmer of his ever being anything but a freshman. lt is a tradition that the freshmen go through a week designed by Student Senate to level any bumps of superiority that may remain in, on, or around the head of any of these erstwhile high-school seniors. This week is climaxed by a mud - slinging, back - breaking tug -of -war between freshman and sophomore men and a stu- dent rally for punishing those who have broken the Student Senate Rules for Procedure for Freshmen. By the end of the freshman year, the poor, slightly shaken, animated remains of the human cells have learned much, one fact in particular: that enough is enough of any good thing- even being a Freshman! 43 1-'--r CL "Variety is the spice of life" may be trite, but it is an expressive way of saying that belonging to several different organizations is an education in itself. ln extra-curricular activities, Mount Union offers outlets for those with journalistic inclina- tions, administrative and executive talents, legisla- tive minds, musical leanings, and logical tongues. Wholesome, well-integrated and all-around grad- uates is the true objective of the extra-curricular program at Mount Union. Arbitrary fraternity groupings ordinarily create o lack of unity in the student body. These various groups are united by the different organizations composed of people bound by similar interests and talents who work together in a common under- taking. To be sure, there are additions and corrections as well as a few subtractions, that might unite more efficiently the present extra-curricular schedule, yet the liberal arts program at Mount Union is ade- quately supplemented by the "outside-activity" pro- gram as an outlet for varied student talents. First Row: Sikula, Jones, Wise, Briggle, Brangham, Hoidef, Sparks. Second Row: Skinner, Davis Stout, Lins, Payne, Wifteman, Leonard, Johns, Nimmons. Third Row: Miller, Jackson, Humphrey Holmes, Doty, Couchie, Robinson, Gloss, King, Lomb. First Row: Skinner, Haidef, Ball, Wright, Loppert, Stephan, Howe. Second Row: Schmitfle, Gloss, Carr, Davis, Morey, C. Morey, Stout. Third Row: Knisley, Lutz, Clyde, Miller, Dew, Showeker, Sparks, Sikulo. Fourth Row: McHenry, Slates, Couchie, Brown, Wichern, Bond, Steiner Unonian Life as its exists on the Mount Union Campus is portrayed interestingly and accurately in the Unonian. The alumni, students, and prospective students find pleasure in the living events that till its pages. Dr. Richard Hildner and Mrs. Katharine Gunnell are advisors for the publication. EDITORIAL STAFF Editor-in-Chief ...... ..,...,.......,.......................... W illiam Briggle Senior Editor ......... ....... J odine Sparks Junior Editors ....... .................,.,.....,.... ....... W i lliam Wark Richard Mani BUSINESS STAFF Business Manager .....................,.,..s.. , ............. W illiam Brangham Associate Business Managers ....... ................ E arle Wise The Dynamo, the Mount Uni David Jones on newspaper, is issued weekly in the interests of the college. The Dynamo Association is the governing body for the paper ln addition to the Association, there is a large staff of reporters with Dr Englebert and Mrs. Eric A. Eckler acting as the advisors. EDITORIAL STAFF Editor ........s.,......... ................................. Assistant Editor ....... Junior Editors ........ .,-...-Douglas Wright ....,.Rebecca Howe ........Roberta Lobb George Ball Feature Editor ............... .............. J odine Sparks Sports Editor ,................,...... ................. G eorge Stephan Women's Sports Editor ................................ Mary Jane Shaweker Society Editor ...............,..,....................................... Doris Skinner BUSINESS STAFF Business Manager ........,......,..............,............... Grayson Loppert Assistant Business Manager ...... ,........ H arold Smith Dynalno First Row: Stephan, Crist, Haidet, Couchie, Coleman, Talaba. Second Row: Harsany, Shields, Meehan, Fiegenschuh, Thompson. First Row: Thomas, Jones, Doty, Dr. Ziegler, Hansen, McGow, Schneideri Second Row: Smith Parrish, Echols, Skinner, Hercule, Pembridge, Tournay. Third Row: Bond, Corey, Schrader. Business Highlights . . i "Business Highlights," a student publication published by members of the economics department, provides a concise digest of current affairs obtained from approximately sixty business periodicals. The publication is distributed to libraries, high schools, colleges, and universities in Ohio. ln all there are five hundred copies distributed each month. Dr. Robert W. Bailey and Dr. Werner Bohnstedt are the faculty advisors. STAFF Editor ....................... ..................................... E ugene Haidet Assistant Editors ........ ........ W ilbur Couchie, Grayson Lappert The three Gospel Teams that now represent Mount Union College trace their ancestry to the first similar groups which were first organized in 1924. Each team is composed of a captain, four or five students from all classes, and an advisor. Each year the team chooses a topic which serves as a theme for the entire year. Worship services, forums, and panel discussions are conducted in churches of all denominations. The captains are James Doty, Henry Hansen, and Allan McGaw. Dr. Ziegler, Dr. Ketcham, Dr. Romig, and Reverend Bair advise the group. Gospel Teams . . First Row: Dr. Ziegler, Crist, Couchie, Difford, Dr. Murphy. Second Row: Deshler, Jones, Doty First Row: Lindesmith, Marquis, Ellett, Thompson, Hatton, Addicott. Second Row: Thomas, Davis, Lobb, Robinson, Zima, McEwen, Echols, Smith. ICM. CA. . . The Y.M.C.A. is a national association of college men organized on Mount Union's campus over thirty years ago. The group seeks the social, intellectual, and spiritual development of students. The association attempts to establish Christian character in young men of the college. lt cooperates with the Y.W.C.A. in sponsoring Stunt Night and Religious Emphasis Week. Dr. Harley Ziegler and Professor Paul Murphy act as counselers. OFFICERS President ...,.............. ......................... .,.,... W i lbur Couchie Vice-President ............ ...... ........... .......... R i c hard Mani Secretary-Treasurer .....,. ...... W inthrop Difford The Y.W.C.A. emphasizes the "Christian" in its name in all activities. lts aim is to have an organization where girls can forget their affiliations and be united in their desire to follow the National Y.W. purpose. The association sponsors Progressive Dinners, and a Christmas Pageant. Its members par- ticipate in numerous Regional and Area Conferences. OFFICERS President ............ ......................... ........ L o is Anne Ellett Vice-President ....... ........ C laudia Ashelman Secretary ............ ............ D oris Bauman Treasurer ......... .............. M ary Stout ICWCCA. . . First Row: Dr. Mabry, Schneider, Thomas, Mosser, Difford, Skinner, Dr. Slitor. Second Row: Domer, Davis, Stout, Muench, Leonard, Payne, Witreman, Sikula, Wright. Third Row: Fogo Hatton, Holmes, Miller, Robinson, Lamb, M. Stout, Tournay, Koehniein. Fourth Row: Wilcoxon Wise, McGaw, MacHenry, Shulz, Brangham, Orwick, Steiner, Harsany. L n... 4 -., A . First Row: Desautels, Lasse, Madam Eynon, Sotcon, Weaver, Willman. Second Row: Weimer Tournay, Trautman, Carr, Morris, Show, Tarvin, Wilcoxon, Gehm. International Relations . . The International Relations Club, under the leadership of Dr. W. A. Mabry, has made an "all-out" effort in the last three years to present the world panorama of current events to Mount Union students. Freedom of thought and speech maintains the democratic key note to the panel discussions. During the last year the club sent delegates to the Ohio Valley Regional Conference at Kent State. The Spring Party is the main social event sponsored by this group. OFFICERS President ............... ...............t........ ........ E d ward Mosser Vice-President ....... ............ L ionel Difford Secretary ..........,. ....... E leanor Schneider Treasurer ...... ......,. J ean Thomas The members of the French Club have been exceptionally active in campus affairs this year. Early in the first semester they conducted a week-long drive tor the relief of the Free French. Students with a "B" average or better in French are eligible for membership. Mrs. Eynon acts as advisor to this group. OFFICERS President ............... .....,............ ........ C o rnelia Sotcan Vice-President ....... ....... H elen Weaver Secretary ............ ......... A ileen Lasse Treasurer .......,. ........ E dmund Fiocca Le Cerele Francais . . First Row: C. Morey, Church, Stout, Nicholson, Trader, Smith, Heskett, McKee, Weimer, Bowen, Graening. Second Row: Conley, McEwan, Pembridge, Dew, Wagner, Lutz, Johnson Morey, Dager, Peet, D. Johnson, Jinkner. Third Row: Professor Ferguson, Hansen, Schrader Brooks, Shively, Newacheck, Mayhew, Warren, Bechler, Bond. Fourth Row: Poda, Burner Runyon, Doty, Spencer, Ritz, Wintzer, Kieffer, Merry, Fiocca, Jones. 1 1 1 A Capella Choir . . The chorus of approximately forty-tive members is chosen and directed by Mr. Gerald Ferguson. The choir arranges special programs for Christmas, Easter, and Commencement. One ofthe highlights ofthe year was the concert given in the Epworth Euclid Church of Cleveland, Ohio. The choir also visited many surrounding cities, giving concerts in each city. OFFICERS ' President ................. ....................,,.. ......,. C h arles Ritz. Vice-President ..........., . ..... ....,... David Jones Secretary-Treasurer ...... ...... M artha Blum The band, under the direction of Mr. Beach, made a great showing this year at the football games. The band also played at all basketball games and pep meetings. A feature of the year was the concert given by this organization. OFFICERS President ................. .........,........ .............. C h arles Ritz Vice-President ......... .............. W illiam Wark Secretary .............. ,...... M arianne Littleton Treasurer ........ .,..... H award Miller Band . . First Row: Dr. Engle, Shilts, Wichern, Hirst, Lins, Coin. Second Row: Foltz, Deshler, Sfoffer Haines, Spies, Dr. Scott. First Row: Dr. Morgan, Rider, Schneider, Werner, Coleman, Dr. Poppenhogen. Second Row: Hively, Underwood, Wichern, Hirst, Schultz, Schoeneweiss, Reosh, Burgett. Phi Sigma . . Alpha Beta Chapter of Phi Sigma, a national honorary biological society, was installed at Mount Union in l928. The purpose at this organization is "To promote and foster interest in biological sciences and to encourage original research on the part of its members." Annually Phi Sigma presents, to the mast outstanding pre-medical student of the year, the Lichty Medal. Dr. Joseph M. Scott is the advisor for this organization. OFFICERS President ........................ ......,,..... ,... ........ W a l ter Wichern Vice-President .......,........... ...... A ustin Hammond Corresponding Secretary .,.... .............. M ary Lins Recording Secretary .........,. ........ E ugene Whipple Treasurer .........,.............. ....,....,. R obert Hirst Alembroic Society was organized in i932 for the promotion of interest in chemistry and chemical research. The fraternity brings to the campus every year several important chemists who lecture on the latest in chemical ad- vancement. To be eligible for membership a student must have sixteen hours of chemistry with an average of "B." Faculty advisors are Dr. L. A. Pappen- hagen and Dr. William M. Morgan. OFFICERS President ................... .......,......... ....,... R i chard Werner Vice-President ............. ...... A ustin Hammond Secretary-Treasurer .......c ..........,.,.. B en Rider Alembroic . . First Row: Dr. Mobry, Dr. Ziegler, Deon Hyde, Mosser, Dr. Slitor, Dr. Kitzmiller, Miss Lower. Second Row: Tournoy, Skinner, Johnson, Robinson, Zima, Lins, Lemke, Marquis, Ellett. Third Row: Lcippert, McGaw, Bronghom, Hoidet, Benshoff. ,A xl In-A First Row: Lins, Dr. Shollenberger, Dr. Ketchom, Deon Hyde, Dr. Eckler, Mosser, Second Row: Miss Lower, Professor Murphy, Dr. Morgan, Professor Hoppin, Dr. Poppenhagen. Third Row: Tourney, Johnson, Hoidet, Shutt, Conwoy. Pi Gamma Ma . . The oft-quoted inscription of the Master Teacher, "Ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you tree," is the motto of Pi Gamma Mu, honorary society for students ot social studies at Mount Union. lt was established by Leroy Allen in l924. The Ohio Zeta chapter was organized on June l, l934. The purpose of this society is to instill in its members and, through them, in the general public a scientific attitude toward current social problems. OFFICERS President .....,......,..,.. ...............,. ....... E d ward Mosser Vice-President ............. ...,.... E ugene Haidet Secretary-Treasurer ........ ........ V erna Lower Psi Kappa Omega is a local honorary fraternity, the members ot which are chosen tor their character, personality, leadership, and scholarship. An average of ninety per cent is required of seniors, and an average of ninety-six per cent of juniors. This is the oldest society on the campus. The membership cannot exceed tive per cent of the student body. Dr. Forest Shollenberger is chairman of the organization. Psi Kappa 0mega . . First Row: Beozel, Andrews, Deshler, Stephan, Work. Second Row: Wright, Lopperf, C. H Coleman, Colemon, Bechler. First Row: Kennedy, Addicort, Inglis, Horsony. Second Row: Lemke, Bowen, Schneider, Morgan Inter-Fraternity Council . . The Inter-Fraternity Council was formed to bring about a closer relationship between the fraternities. To achieve this goal the president and treasurer of each fraternity meet together once a month. The Council also establishes rules and regulations concerning the pledging of incoming freshmen. The outstanding function carried out by the Council this year was Greek Week, which included mass pledging. For betterment of the organization, representatives are sent to the national and regional Inter-Fraternity Councils to learn methods of bringing about closer group relationship. Dean Melvin W. Hyde acts as advisor to this group. OFFICERS President ............ ......................,.. ....... G o rdon Deshler Vice-President ....... .................... ........ G a len Andrews Secretary ......... ...... W illiam Briggle Treasurer ...... ...... G eorge Stephan Two representatives from each sorority make up the Panhellenic Council. The purpose of this organization is to make and enforce rushing rules, to maintain inter-sorority standards, and to promote good will among all the girls on the campus. Membership is held in the National Panhellenic Council, and the local chapter is represented at national meetings. OFFICERS President ............... ................... ........ N a ncy Inglis Vice-President ....... .......... M artha Blum Secretary ............ ....... V irginia Kennedy Treasurer ...... ............ J ane Lemke Panhellenic Council . . Q 1 V K. A F, 1? 3 is 1 62 First Row: Sparks, Lindesmith, Bowen, Morgan, Zima, Lins. Second Row: Herbert, Addicotf, Glenwright, Desoutels, Marquis, Lamb. First Row: Morgan, Knight, Beazel, Branghom, Zimo. Second Row: Koehnlein, Corey, Johnson, Coleman, Galanot, Fiegenschuh. Women 'S Student Council The Women's Student Council is an executive council which coordinates all women's activities that are promoted by campus organizations. Under the guidance of Miss Rudin, the organization strives tor the highest standards of honor and integrity in personal conduct. The council sponsors the Co-ed Prom, a party for freshman women, a trip to the opera in Cleveland, May Day, Vocational Guidance Day, and a breakfast for senior women. This organiza- tion is the donor of a scholarship for women. OFFICERS President ........... ..........,.............. ........... J e nnie Morgan Vice-President ...... ...... M artha Jane Bowen Secretary ,.......... ...c......... E ugenia Zima Treasurer ........ ......., M ary Lindesmith The Student Senate, the legislative group tor the entire student body, is composed ot one representative from each sorority, fraternity, and non- traternity group. The manifold activities ot this group have included the sponsorship ot lectures, college dances, and the supervision ot freshman activities. The Senate added to a colortul Homecoming Game by reviving the old custom ot making tloats rather than house decorations. OFFICERS President .......,.... ..,.,..................... .........,.... J o hn Beazel Vice-President ...... ................... ............,... J a mes Knight Secretary ...,..... ........,..,,,....,.., W illiam Brangham Treasurer ....,.,. ........ C laudia Ferguson Ashelman Student Senate . . First Row: Lins, Skinner, Howe, Herbert. Second Row: Addicott, Desoutels, Bowen First Row: Desoutels, Lins, Sapp. Second Row: Addicott, Lobb, Horsony, Herdle. Women 's Governnzent Board The Women's Government Board controls the conduct ot women students during their dormitory lite, and by a liberal and intelligent government promotes the ideals ot the college in high character and good scholarship. During examinations, the girls welcome the spreads given by the associa- tion, lthe "dorming" slips handed out weekly are not welcomed os readilyl . Through the help ot Dean Rudin and Miss Housel, the organization sponsors such annual affairs as the birthday dinners, and the Thanksgiving and Christmas dinners. OFFICERS President .................. ........................ ...... R e becca Howe Vice-President ............ ................. ....... D o ris Skinner Secretary-Treasurer ....... ....... S hirley Herbert The purpose of W.A.A. is to interest all women students of the college in athletics for women. Upon registration in college each girl becomes a non- active member ot this organization and is permitted to participate in the seasonal athletics and the social program. The executive body ot the organization is a board composed of two members from each sorority and from the signet club. OFFICERS President .............,.... .................. ............... M a ry Lins Vice-President ............ ....,......... P hyllis Shutt Secretary-Treasurer ..,.,.. ......... Y vonne Desautels Women 'S Athletic Association First Row: Sotccm, McConnell, Morgan, Bowen. Second Row: Ellett, Sparks, Lins. First Row: Lins, Howe, Morgan, Elleft, Sparks. Second Row: Deshler, Loppert, Boster, Beozel Wright. Lauriger . . Lauriger, the women's senior honorary society, has for its motto, "Merit through service, and service through merit." This year the members of Lauriger exemplified this aim in sponsoring the landscaping of the terrace behind the Student Union Building. Teas for the freshmen and new students were given to introduce them to campus life and to campus leaders. The women of Louriger are chosen by a faculty committee and by the active members of Lauriger for their character, scholarship, and leadership. OFFICERS President ...............,,,.. ...........,.................. R uth Ann McConnell Secretary-Treasurer ....................,....,...., .......... C ornelia Sotcan MEMBERS Martha Jane Bowen .........s......,........,..... ....,.. M ary Lins Lois Ann Ellett .,...................,.........,............. ...... J ennie Morgan Jodine Sparks This year ten outstanding students were honored by selection in "Who's Who among Students in American Colleges and Universities." Character, leadership, scholarship, and future potentialities were the criteria for their recognition. Who's Who, a relatively new incentive for students, was established on a national basis only six years ago. MEMBERS John Beazel ....... ......................... ..,.... Gene Boster ............. . .. ..... ..,.. .... . . . Gordon Deshler ,...,.. Lois Ann Ellett ....,,.. Rebecca Howe ...... Grayson Lappert Mary Lins Jennie Morgan Jodine Sparks Douglas Wright Who 'S Who . . ,QT +L 8 Fraternities and Sororities Fraternities and sororities are to Mount Union what women are to men, what juice is to a lemon, and what T. Dorsey is to a trombone. This relation- ship is greater than the relationship between whip- ped cream and pumpkin pie, it is more than a gar- nish or an added feature. The infusion has resulted in' advantage to both sides. Yet, inherent within the fraternity system is the great danger ever involved in a closely united group. Always to be considered as paramount is the relation of the individual to the group. If the group is to live up to the cornerstone of American democracy, the individual must be the reason for the group and never merely the means to an end. The fraternity system symbolizes more than groups of men or women living closely together with a common purpose to get more men or women to live together with them. Fraternities and sororities are more than "Hell Weeks," "cat talks," "bull- sessions," singing, paddles, and practical jokes. A fraternity is something that cannot be written about, it must be lived with to be understood and truly appreciated. lLong may it endurell Alggpiocw Tffizw Cwyiffizifegjw Q Q The oldest fraternity on Mount's campus, Alpha Tau Omega has kept a record of many years for activity and participation in every school activity. ATO's are listed on both the newspaper and annual staffs, "Business High- lights," in athletics, in the choir, and on many committees around school. Stunt Night this year was won by the ATO's. Winners in sports also, the lchapter has taken the Class A volleyball and the ping pong crowns in fraternity competition. Favorite song of the chapter-and sing it well they do-is the new "ATO Sweetheart Song." A loyal and steady fraternity, Alpha Tau Omega's record in Mount Union activities is as good as it is long. First Row: Kitzmiller, Morris, Freshley, Gernpler, Haidet, Beazel, Freetage, Orwick, Hunter, Poxson, Joachim. Second Row: Stephan, Kacarab, Zellers, Calvin, Myser, Myers, Limbach, Gwim, Gorey, Thompson, MacBain, Hall, France. Third Row: Ewing, Smith, Fuller, Fiocco, Stafford, Kutch, Moore, Taloba, Grecu, Newmyer, Wolfe. Fourth Row: J. Brunt, Hershay, Conrad, Meehan, Ryan, Fahnert, Hobbs, Brunt, Zimmerman, Simpson, Rastetter, Schlott. Fee 5, A I . I,,f9f . A 91,l,,i Q w.sf.lrae OFFICERS Worthy Master ......,. ........ J ohn Beazel Worthy Chaplain ....,......... ....... E ugene Haidet Worthy Keeper of Annals ....... ....... R udy Schlott Worthy Scribe ...,.................. ...,.... R ussell Poxon Worthy Keeper of Exchequer .......... George Stephan Worthy Sentinel ....... ........ George Freetage Worthy Usher ....... ...... K enneth Gempler Founded at Founded at Virginia Military Institute - Mount Union September i l, i865 1882 Sigma Alpha Epsilon . . The SAE's this year are probably most proud of their big winter formal, the Marine Ball, held on the "third deck" ballroom of the house. Gordenias and favors were given all the girls. Favorite song of Ohio Sigma is "Violets," well-known generally os well os in Sig Alph circles. Participating in most of Mount's extra-curricular schedule, the Sig Alphs concentrate hardest on intra-murals. A Sig Alph is editor of the "Unonion," and the chapter is represented on the "Dynamo" staff. 'll "Hail, Sigma Alpha Epsilon. is the shout of many of Mount Union's versatile men. First Row: Faulk, McCreo, Rose, Briggle, Schory, Lone, Woodord. Second Row: Shuck, Work, Catchpole, Berner, Murphy, George, Miller. Third Row: Merry, Morison, Warner, Bechler, Doty, Robort, Swartz, Cook, Barnard. Fourth Row: Sloan, Kutler, Kieffer, Spencer, Harrison, Mani, Couchie, Farmer, Knight. f . 'xx ZA MJ' 5 OFFICERS First Semester Second Semester Eminent Archon William Briggle ..........,................,,. William McCrea Eminent Deputy Archon Richard Mani ...........,...................... William Briggle Eminent Treasurer William McCrea ..,............................... Harry George Eminent Recorder Richard Mani ...................................... Richard Mani Eminent Correspondent William Wark .................................. Robert Harrison Eminent Herald Robert Sloan ...................,........,.....,..... James Knight Eminent Chaplain James Doty .......................,.,.................. James Doty Eminent Chronicler Russell Woodard ,...................,.,.,......,.. Robert Sloan Eminent Warden Jack Warner ...................................... Founded at University of Alabama Tuscaloosa, Alabama March 9, l856 William Merry Founded at Mount Union Alliance, Ohio i885 .EI 3" AT" L . E'i,l, Walk by the Sigma Nu house any day of the week, and you will hear the enthusiastic "Roughneck Song" shaking the rafters, for Beta Iota of Sigma Nu has a loyal and alive chapter on the campus. When the Sigma Nus are feeling more dignified, the beautiful "White Star" is their favorite song. Having to its credit this year both the A and B tournaments in the first round of basketball, the chapter has a fine record in athletics. The football, basketball, and other teams have an excellent Sigma Nu representation. The Sigma Nus boast other outside activities, the most prominent of these being the business management of the "Dynamo." "Loyal and true to dear old Sigma Nu" is the best expression of the chapter's fraternal feeling. First Row: Corbi, Moushey, Runyon, Woods, Slates, Hamlin, Heacock, Slusser. Second Row: Foltz, Cain, Hammond, Richard Jones, Deshler, Boster, Lappert, Domer, R. L. Jones. Third Row: McVey, Root, Reash, Ritz, Mayer, Shoeneweiss, Benjamin, H. Smith. Fourth Row: Brown, R. W. Jones, Brooks, Sell, Rockhill, Ferris, Biery, Dakin, Pugh, Hostetler. Fifth Row: Wintzer, Bolander, Willman, Goris, Rainsberger, Mack, Meeker, Fiegenschuh, Newshutz, Addison. Sixth Row: Mahan, Marks, Bandy, Kettle, Getzinger, Bauman, Cope, DeWitt, W. Smith, Canfield, Ewing, Hill. O fry 'Q IUC QQ 'fra Jig! -I" xi o OFFICERS Commander ....................,...,,.......,. Lieutenant Commander ,...,.. ...Gordon Deshler .......Harry Brown Recording Secretary ....... ........ C halmers Ferris Treasurer .....,.................. Corresponding Secretary ...... ...... Chaplain .................,...... Sentinel ........ ...... Marshall ....... Founded at Virginia Military Institute Lexington, Virginia January l, 1869 .....Eugene Boster .Grayson Lappert ...Richard Mayer Robert Lee Jones ........James DeWitt Founded at Mount Union Alliance, Ohio i892 I 75 Phi Kap a au . . The brothers of Phi Kappa Tau comprise one ot the most representative groups on the campus, for Epsilon is a chapter ot presidents, athletes, journalists, and thespians. Phi Taus preside over Pi Gamma Mu, Phi Sigma, the International Rela- tions Club, Dip and Strike, and Alembraic. The editor ot the "Dynamo" and the business manager of the "Unonian" are Phi Taus, the athletic record ot the chapter includes the touch football title for this year. A Phi Tau played the leading role in "Night Must Fall," the college tall dramatic production. The social lite of Phi Kappa Tau was heightened by a glamorous Carnation Ball held last November in the ballroom of the chapter-house. When good Phi Taus gather, they sing the "Rambler's Song" for fun, and the inspired "Brothers" for the true spirit behind the chapter. First Row: Haines, Brown, Wright, Haas, Andrews, Mosser, Brangham, Steiner, Hartsough. Second Row: Spies, Dundon, Wise, Burnheimer, Wickern, Hirst, Shields, McHenry, Campbell, Ball, Jones. Third Row: Schwenson, Worhner, Cornish, Young, Holder, Bond, Poda, Crewson, McFarland, Sterrett. Fourth Row: Dordea, Schrader, Ashbrook, Morelage, Murphy, l-leastand, Tidd. Fifth Row: Opter, Evans, Moore, Rite, Arnold, Pinkerton, Shaweker. Sixth Row: Rubright, Tarbi, Marshall, L. Dittord, W. Diftord. do 3 xl Q ill 'Evil ' u 4 N of ,J Mi ', I' I fill ml - fn Q! "9 ff . I A A President ...........,. Vice-President ........ Sec reta ry .......... Treasurer ..............., OFFICERS ---------------.-.----.---Galen Andrews Sergeant at Arms ....... ......... Chaplain ...........,..... Founded at Miami University Oxford, Ohio March l7, l906 --,.-..Edward Mosser .-.,.-.,---John Haas -Clifford Shields Ralph Campbell .-----.-.-..David Jones Founded at Mounr Union Alliance, Ohio l9l 5 Alpha Kappa i . . Alpha Kappa Pi members this year have conducted a campaign of participa- tion-in athletics, in academic activities, and in general campus affairs. The Senate and the lnterfraternity Council have their A.K.P. representatives, and the chapter is represented on the staff of "Business Highlights." A scientifically minded group, the A.K.P.'s boast laboratory assistants in physics and chemistry. Academic achievement in the chapter carried it to the top of fraternity averages last semester, and gave Alpha Kappa Pi the scholarship cup. "Old Rose" is the chapter's favorite song. First Row: Hart, Sponseller, C. Coleman, Coleman. Second Row: Stuffer, Trupe, Hansen. fAKlls President ............. ......................... Curtis Coleman Vice-President ........ ...... D avid Wilson Secretary .......... ,,.... Treasurer ...... Chaplain ........ Historian ....... Founded at New York City New York March 3, l926 .John Sponseller ..-.....Cecil Coleman --......Charles Trupe ........-...John Hart Founded at Mount Union Alliance, Ohio l 929 s lpha Xi elta . . "We're all good sisters, Each one the other's friend." This song, popular with Gamma chapter of Alpha Xi Delta, expresses well the spirit of the group. At Homecoming time the Alpha Xis were in a particularly singing mood, "The Indian Love Call" might well have been the theme song of the chapter because of their picturesque and prize winning Indian float drawn by big horses in the Homecoming parade. Mary Shilts, chapter president, was queen of the day, and gave the Alpha Xi Deltas one more reason to remember Homecoming for l94l. Originality spiced with fun was the keynote of one of the fall rush parties that staged a return to rural life and the simpler pleasures. At the old- fashioned country party quaint sun bonnets, big red apples, sugar cookies, and tatfy made an excellent background for the rushing of the day. First Row: Mrs. Yaggi, Peet, McConnel, Shutt, Morgan, Shilts, Floyd, Evans, McGrew, Miller. Second Row: Blum, Bauman, Addicott, Herbert, Weimer, Sheatsley, Wafler, Carpenter, Johnson, Crowley. Third Row: Shaweker, Thompson, Davis, Voelm, Barcus, Hall, Davies, Sikula, Glass, Gibbons. Fourth Row: Madison, Carr, Warther, Lutz, Voelker, Pritts, Hitchcock, Harshman, Hesser, Whittimore, Mani. O ,,,.,.f .f,.W-,,,,. ,N a! f"""g" 'P' .lbllfll . m e ,, F V 4 OFFICERS President .......... ........................ Vice-President .......... Recording Secretary ........ Corresponding Secretary ....... Treasurer ........................... Marslnal ........ Chaplain ....... Historian ....... ....... Founded at Lombard College Galesburg, Illinois April 17, i893 -.-.----Mary Shilfs ----....-Jennie Morgan ..... Jane Floyd ..-..--Dorma McGrew ---.--Florence Peet .--s-----SeIena Evans ---.-.----.-PhylIis Shut? .Carol MacKenzie Founded ai' Mount Union Alliance, Ohio 1902 elta alta elta . . "Tri Delta True, we'Il dream of you and love you when college days are o'er." To the strains of "Leibestraum" Delta Nu of Delta Delta Delta sings these words of their favorite song. The Tri Delts, at one of their rush parties this fall, sang and danced gaily to the fascinating South American Conga rhythm of "One-Two-Three, Kick." Introduced by the Tri Delts, Conga lines soon became popular at All-College dances. With Jodine Sparks as president, the chapter won Stunt Night with a skit showing what the "alter ego" of each of us is doing while we go prosaically about our daily work. A favorite pastime of Delta Nu is making up appropriate Tri Delta words to favorite tunes. A feature of the Hawaiian winter formal was the chapter's singing "Blue Hawaii" with Delta words. First Row: Collins, Bowen, Drake, Wagner, Sparks, Lins, lnglis, Lovell, Galanot, Longsworth. Second Row: Nimmons, Kitzmiller, Keifer, Donenwirth, Lindesmith, Payne, Lobb, Johns, King, Hamlin. Third Row: Heastand, Martin, Stout, C. Johns, Smith, Littleton, Burton, Church, Davis, Jones, M. Kitzmiller. Fourth Row: Schnek, Leonard, Muench, Johnson, Davidson, McNeil, Pinkerton, Trexler, Davies, Fowler. si Nil, , X E Libs.. P Liv' rf' EA OFFICERS President ............. ............................ J odine Sparks Vice-President ......,....................... Mary Colette Lins Recording Secretary ...,.. Miriam Chamberlain Lovell Corresponding Secretary .....,.................... Jean Stout ..--..Nancy Inglis Treasurer ...............,......... Marshal ........ ............. R uth Wagner Chaplain ....... ,...... M ortha Jane Bowen Historian ....... ........... M arie Weast Founded at Founded at Boston University Mount Union on on Thanksgiving Eve, i888 December 4, l9l4 lpha hi mega . . "Alpha Chi, how we love thy name, Thou art ever and always the same." Alpha Eta of Alpha Chi Omega, under the leadership ot Mary Jane Collins, showed originality in their activities ot the year. Live turtles as favors at a rush party and the antics of Minnie Chi and Mickey Omega in "The Night Club ot Mice" presented at the annual Stunt Night were evidences of this. A Las Vegas House party was an important part ot the social program for the year. The Alpha Chi's made their name in sports when they forged ahead to win the Mount-Ball tournament. As a chapter project, Eleanor Schneider supervised the making ot a map ot the United States showing the location and pictures of all the chapter houses of the fraternity. This summer Mary Jane Collins was sent as Chapter delegate to the national convention. First Row: Schneider, Zima, Schmittle, Howe, Collins, Lynn, Ashelman, Kennedy, Lamb. Second Row: McEwan, Dew, Tremelin, Skinner, Stout, Fogo, Knisely, McKee. Third .Rowz Hatton, Nicholson, Marshall, Detweiler, Dulabahn, Scofield, Mayhew, Humphrey, Miller, MacBurney. Fourth Row: Young, Cheney, Wilcoxon Holmes, Von Starch, Texter, Cameron, Stewart, Morey, Ellsworth. o9e Aff! me-M OFFICERS President ............. ..,...........,....... M ary Jane Collins Vice-President ...........,....... Corresponding Secretory ..........,.. Recording Secretary ......... Treasurer ...............,.. Historian- ..... - Lyre Editor ....... ...... Chaplain ....... Founded at DePauw University on October 15, 1885 ----.-Rebecca Howe -Claudia Ashelman --.Louise Schmittle .--,--,.Doris Skinner -.,-,..Eugenia Zima .Virginia Kennedy -.---.FIorence Lamb Founded at Mount Union on June iii, 1920 Kappa elta . . "Kappa Delta's Own White Rose" The big acquisition ot the year tor Alpha Beta of Kappa Delta was the beautifully furnished suite of rooms in the new Student Union Building. With a pleasant and cordial Open House the K. D.'s presented their new house to the campus guests. Thelma Tournay was chapter president first semester, and Jane Lemke served in that office during the second semester, Rushing for the Kappa Deltas hit a high spot at the backwards party. Guests arrived buttonecl down the back and in time to say, "Good-bye." Dinner was served from desert to appetizer, and "Hello's" were exchanged as the rushees backed out the door. The scholarship cup for second semester of l94O-4l was awarded to the Kappa Deltas. First Row: Russel, Lemke, Lanka Harsany, Smith. Second Row: Bica, E. Harsony, Whitmer, Rinker, Newacheck, Wang, Koehnlein. his 5 1 pf! it W OFFICERS First Semester Second Semester President Thelma Tournay .................................... Jane Lemke Vice-President Jane Lemke ..................,............. Vivian Newacheck Secretary Yvonne Desautels ........................ Yvonne Desautels Treasurer Helen Koehlein ............................. ...... J ean Mowls Editor Elisabeth Smith ................................ Elisabeth Smith Founded at Founded at Virginia State Normal Mount Union October 23, l 893 l 924 Signet lub The Signet Club was organized in i934 at Mount Union to give the unaffil- iated men and women a chance to participate socially in campus life. The group has grown considerably in strength and membership this year. Besides providing social activities for its members, the club sponsors athletic teams for the inter-fraternity contests. President ............. Vice-President .....,. Secretary .......... Treasurer ....,.. .,.,....-.Duane Crist ...--.-Jean Thomas ....--Grace Echols .....Kenneth Snode 'BE' First Row: Snode, Echols, Crist, Ellett, Herdle, Shoffner. Second Row: Bodner, Denton, Clyde, Hummer, Lower, Snode, McCann, Scott, Rapp, Parrish, Johnson, Third Row: Sonor, Cope, War- ren, McGaw, Burgett, Underwood. raternity and Sorority Presidents There are few molders of public opinion on campus who are more import- ant to campus life than the handful of men and women who serve as sorority and fraternity presidents. It is their duty to think first of Mount Union and then of their particular group in relation to the whole. Theirs is a job of much responsibility, courage and a will to work. A successful fraternity is not a matter of mere chance. Careful plans must be laid, and the president has much to say about these plans. To be a sorority or fraternity president is to realize that the office holds about ninety-five per cent hard work and five per cent glamour. First Row: Sporks, Shilts, Collins, Lemke. Second Row: Briggle, Gempler, Coleman, Andrews. 89 ,vT.,. J , 1, U 'lx ' - QD --,L ,..-. ' lffw dr Q' in .Q A EJ A ' r' K -1 ' - J -wwf fi J " 'Y' 'r L 2 , A V 1 .U 1 .f '?, in xii: ,, N :s'v A, -gg? xv f' '2.g-YY-YQZNA S'7'!T2f g' , A' .A . 5, '!-Nik-Ly f V V . L N M hifi as fn 41 ' 7' 1 M ' y V' ' 5 v - El , L .L ff? X I ff ek' uf' Nu . ,fl The athletic tradition of Mount Union is one of good sportsmanship, good fellowship, and good health. From activity in the service classes to the top game in any of the sports' schedules, the aim is to play the game wholeheartedly and to win. The men's athletic department, under the direc- tion of Robert D. Wright, is centered at Memorial Hall, where basketball holds the spotlight during most ofthe year. ln the spring and tall, the stadium is the scene of football and track. Under the leadership of Miss Sara Doody, the women's athletics till Morgan Gym and vicinity with basketball, archery, tennis, hockey, and every sport that makes for an interesting and alive program. Everyone has a chance to be athletic at Mount, for an extensive intramural program is open to both men and women. Frequently some of the greatest battles ore won, not on the battlefield or football field, but elsewhere. Such was the case this year as "Brownie" fought and won the most important game of his life. Thrown for o heavy loss by a tetanus infection resulting from facial injuries suffered in the W. and J. game, Harry Brown struggled in the shadow of his own goal-line for fifteen days. Harry then began to surge for- ward, and climaxed the drive with the pay-off touchdown, his appearance on the sidelines for the closing game of the season. Hf1ffvGe'f2 Hard hit by the inroads of the draft and defense industry, which kept several potential first-stringers from returning to school, and also beset with several early season injuries, the Purple Raiders were forced to play through the season with approximately o twenty-man squad, one of the smallest squads in recent Ohio Conference history. Under these circum- stances, our undermanned squad made a very creditable showing. Even though only one victory was recorded, all of the opposing teams were given many anxious moments before the final gun. Highlights of the season were the 40-O shellacking of Hiram, the 7-6 loss to Marietta on Homecoming, the valiant goal-line stands against Wittenberg, the defending Conference champs, which forced them to play real ball to eke out even a 7-O victory, and the closing battlesagainst Ohio Northern and Muskingum. Prospects for the future are more rosy. lnexperienced sophomores comprised the bulk of the starting lineup in every game. With a year of experience behind them, these boys should continue the improvement shown in late season games. Karl Schroeder Pugh attempts on off-tackle drive. Mount halts Mc1rietto's thrust at line of scrimmage. Sell threatening Moriettcu's debilitczted line. Sell storms slumbering secondary. FO0TB LL HARRY BROWN "Brownie," in spite of bad breaks, has always held to the spirit of the game. GEORGE FREETAGE All the backs tor the past three years have found "Spanky" an almost insur- mountable barrier to the goal. WlLLlAM MCCREA "Mac" was always good for sixty minutes ot bruising line play. MYRON PALMER "Nicky," along with "Spanky" and "Mac," braced the front wall of Moun'r's line. CLIFFORD BOLANDER "Bo" was injured early in The season, but he made up for lost time upon his return To The backfield. SCOTI' SMITH Scott played a bang-up game at tackle, and added considerable 'fo Mount's line play. '4-:QL lj BEN SIMPSON Ben did a fine job during his first year ot varsity football. JACK STAFFORD Jack cleared the way for the other backs to carry the ball. HARRY GEORGE Harry's line play was outstanding: a worthy example of the saying that dynamite comes in small packages. WALTER GETZINGER "Getz" was on the receiving end of most of Mount's passes. CHARLES MEEKER "Chuck's" chief contributions were his punting and line plunges. ALAN MILLER "Al's" pet play was his "end around" which usually netted a sizeable gain. RICHARD MYERS "Dick" was anofher stalwart in The frontline. ROY NEWSHUTZ Roy played at the Tackle post this year. PAUL PUGH Poul was on the pitching end of most of Mounf's oeriol thrusts. CHARLES SELL "Chuck" wos ci daring broken field runner. ERNEST STARR "Ernie" continued his fine ploy from his high school days, and his record at tackle is still one of the best. First Row: Getzinger, Meeker, Myers, Palmer, McCrea, Freetage, Brown, Stafford, Starr. Second Row: Wilson, Newshutz, Miller, George, France, Newmyer, Sell, Pugh, South. Third Row: Coach Geltz, Lane, Hobbs, Kitzmiller, Smith, Schroeder. ll --I .-5 nh. 9 34 912.75 l l T First Row: Ewing, Myser, MacBain, Runyon, Wolfe, Zellers, Hamlin. Second Row: Fiocca, Fuller, Schuck, Kieffer, Spencer, Brown, Weimer, Addison. Q? I,,. ,Q I Z af Q -Q .HPS ' XE V 'ffl R -. 'w , P x A Q .f 'U 1. -, ,D -,-' . ' ' L 1 Y, E 1 I Ylyig' 4 .1 2 Wx 5"w Q .A -. f:., .'+4:' , 'ij :ff'F374"'T""' V ' 1545-Q-dp f 2 r ' '. 'y 1 .I 1 ,.. 'V .S , ff'-f Q 2 .in i ' f .... g . ? .i 3-L ' g ,fy rin- 1 'Kgs f I A Fx mx. in Y 1 , gl ,' ! ' 1 5, P f .Q- E ,Aw ,T " L mf' l . 4. ,'.,: F 1 E J 1 ' ' ' . jim 'sr S' sell? s AL r+. -ff f Y F " .." V --. - 1 5 , QJ N 1:5-T. - -gif , f ,ff Q fx NX . -f-- " Q f ' 'I' ' 1 T If , , i , ,. .J ,Q N X Q x L Basketball . . For the second consecutive year, the Mount Union basketeers were the toast of the state. Re- peating as both State and Conference cham- pions, the "Purple Raiders" chalked up seventeen triumphs in eighteen contests. Such a feat is re- markable, not only because the defending champs are a marked team where-ever they play, not only because Coach Wright had only six re- turning men from last year's squad of thirteen, with the rest being untried sophomores, but also because some of the toughest teams in the state were included among the victims. ln bowling over these teams, Mount outscored the combined op- position by an average of approximately seven- teen points a game-55-38. Championship teams, however, are merely tradition for Mount's basketball teams. Mount Coach Robert D- Wright Union is the home of the first intercollegiate bas- ketball game, and this tradition has continued throughout the years. Since Coach Bob Wright began coaching the Mount basketeers in l925, Mount Union teams have chalked up 225 victories as against 62 reverses. ln so doing, the Mounters have won the Conference championship six times, and the mythical state title three times. The outstanding highlight of the season was the 57-40 rout of the Wooster "Scots" before an overflow throng at Memorial Hall. This victory not only knocked Wooster off the top of the heap, but restored our team to the top spot in both standings. ln a beauti- ful exhibition of shooting, "Poppy" Joachim and Rudy Schlott led the attack with eighteen points each. Stan Baughman was not far behind with a magnificent job of re- trieving balls oft both bank boards. Jim DeWitt was the most heroic figure on the floor, as he played an excellent game despite the handicap of a torn knee cartilage. Bill McCrea played the greatest defensive game of his career, frequently breaking up Wooster fast break attempts. Other highlights were a 58-4l triumph over Ohio University, which last year end- ed as runnerup in the National Invitational Tournament at Madison Square Garden, the 72-45 rout of Ohio Wesleyan, a perennially top notch quintet, the twin upsets of Kent State by scores of 32-29 and 47-41, the hair raising 47-45 victory over Oberlin, and the amassing of a 78 pointtotal in the rout of Heidelberg. The season ended with a 77-43 triumph over Kenyon at Memorial Hall. i f .dr VI , . V . 4 1, I ' vu Ai, 1 , LD , K. fi,' ,Wu . .' ? V YF- V il ,' , x x 7 -, fx 'JN Uh, :-- i ,QR 'ff We 5 ., mf, ,Mg , A ' 1 .,a if ,gk fi' . F' FF Y? K I CHARLES JOACHIM . . . Chosen for a first string berth on every All-Confer- ence and All-State team for the second consecutive year, "Poppy" has been one of the greatest basketball players ever to wear the Purple Raider uniform. WILLIAM MCCREA . . . "Mac" came into his own as the defensive star of the team his last year. STANLEY BAUGHMAN . . . "Little Stan" was also honored on the All-Con- ference and All-State selections for the second straight year. JAMES DeWlTT. . . "Jim" distinguished himself for his aggressive play and scoring ability. ' WILBUR REASH . . . "Gabby" could be counted upon at any time to replace one of the first team and give a good account of himself. CURTIS ROCKHILL . . . "Curly" was short but mighty. RUDY SCHLOT-l' . . . "Rudy" was noted for his classy one-handed shots. He wastalso rated on the All-Conference team. BEN SIMPSON . . . Ben was a steady player. WILLIAM ASHBROOK . . . Bill has shown promise of developing into a fine player. ROBERT COPE . . . Bob's chief asset was his height, which he used to ad- vantage under the bucket. GEORGE EWING . . . George showed a lot of promise during his first year. HARRY GEORGE . . . Harry will be fighting for a first string position next year. WlLLlAM HEASTON . . . Bill is another first year man. First Row: Coach Wright, Reash, McCrea, George, Ewing, Mgr. Bond. Second Row:Heaston Schlott, Baughman, Cope, DeWitt, Joachim, Ashbrook. 04 Mount Union in action against Marietta and Heidelberg Freshman Basketball Squad Mount's basketball picture is brightened by more than the championship teams of the last two years and the seven or eight lettermen who will prob- ably return in the tall. Coming on is enough basketball talent to keep that title right in the arms of our old Alma Mater. This talent is displayed in the picture below of the freshman squad. This year their activities have consisted mainly of drilling steadily at the skills ot basketball and playing the prelim- inaries to the varsity home games. First Row: Fioccoa, Fuller, Wintzer, McVey, Grecu, Brown. Second Row: Mgr. Mahan, Moore, Shield, Schwartz, Coach Schroeder. BIIYS TB LS VOLLEYBALL Much skill in the art of volleyball is needed to win a game as well as the spirit and enthusiasm of the Sigma Nu's. First Row: l-lostetler, South. Second Row: Pugh, Bos- ter, Lappert, Brown. TOUCH FOOTBKLL Torn shirts and bruised elbows were common accompaniments to the touch football competition this fall. The Phi Tau's came through to win. First Row: Andrews, Steiner, Bond. Second Row: Wright, Marshall, Hartsough, Mosser, Jones. PING-PONG The ATO's play ping-pong with a vengeance as was shown in the inter-fraternity tournament this winter. . First Row: Thompson, Gempler, Hunter, Freshley. GIRL I TB A NEBRASKA BALL Two teams of girls and a ball that is at least two feet in diameter plus a net and a gym floor means action, and that describes the Nebraska Ball tour- nament when the Tri Deltas capped the honors. First Row: Lins, Lobb, Inglis, Heskett. Second Row: Davis, Sparks, Monteith, Lindesmith, MOUNT BALL The Alpha Chi's looked pretty good on the gym floor this fall when they took the Mount Ball com- petition in their stride. First Row: Marshall, Miller, Hatton, MacBurney. BASKETBALL Broken fingernails, double dribbles, and forgotten plays decorated the gym during the girls' basketball season. This was won by the Tri Delta's. First Row: Davis, Heskett, Sparks. Second Row: Lins, Lobb, Lindesmith, Inglis. 107 0B SPUBTS . . . TRACK A Again the crying need of the track was not quality, but quantity. Pos- sessed with some very capable track men, Coach Geltz molded together a team which was not lacking in first places, but lost out only because there were not enough men to capture seconds and thirds to win most dual meets. The few consistent point winners gave a good account ot themselves in the Big Six Meet, which was held at Oberlin on May l'5 and l6. First Row: Ewing, Kitzmiller, Stephan, Jones, R. Jones, Schoeneweiss, Miller. Second Row: Gemp- ler, Meeker, Heastand, Joachim, Baughman, Getzinger, Ashbrook, Jones, Coach Geltz. TENNIS The Mount Union tennis team, composed mostly ot lettermen from last year's squad, played a schedule of seven matches. The most interesting ot these were the home series with our traditional rivals, Wooster and Kent State. Rainsberger, Willmon, Boster, Brown, Biery. MOUNH QU -:if MoUNw UNf ggxfia KA M OU '!"l' 109 X x x -4. 23" l'I0 Q MENG Homecoming at Mount meant something new this year. Instead of the traditional house decora- tions, each sorority and fraternity entered a float into the competition. But Homecoming means more to Mount Union than floats, football, parades, fra- ternity dinners, open houses, and old grads. There is a spirit of good fellowship about the campus that enhances and makes anew the bonds of old friend- ships. The additions to college property, the new faces on the campus, the "gossip-y" account of the year's happenings from an undergraduate-all these are part of Homecoming for the alumni. lt is fun to be an undergraduate at Homecom- ing, but the real joy of the day will come when, as an alumnus, we relive our college life and find each year adding to the memories of our days at Mount Union College. 1-1 Queen: Mary Shilts. Court: Jean Thomas, Emi- lene Harsany, Joanne Drake. 2 W m mm f l UN AN EE 'QI ' I f A .L- T' Vada Homlin, Colette Lins, Rebecca Howe, Helen Harshman, Lita Fernandez, Joanne Drake. Taking the motto that seven anatomies are better than one, the Unonian staff elected from the feminine ranks of Mount Union College a composite queen. For the figure of the composite dream girl Miriam Chamberlain Lovell was chosen. Helen Harshman and Joanne Drake were selected for eyes and legs. Vada Hamlin's pert nose, Colette Lins' dimpled smile along with Lita Fernandez's hair add the finishing touches to the beauty of the queen's face. The personality of "Becky" Howe completes the composite Unonian Queen for l942. Queen: Mary Frances Lindesmith. Court: Eleanor Schneider, Elizabeth Hitchcock, Jean Wafler, Isabelle Galanot, Eugenia Zirna, Elizabeth Heskett, Martha Blum. May Day in all its traditional loveliness was the keynote of May 16, l942 at Mount. Queen Mary Frances Lindesmith and her royal court ruled the English pageant and The customary events of May Day. Z Z 99 4 ,. i 1 1" ,,, , 'E 1 MARY FRANCES LINDESMITH 1 V f Z Q Q P I r I MARY SHILTS Senior Class Beauty ELIZABETH HITCHCOCK Junior Class Beauty ELAINE SMITH Sophomore Class Beauty o X CLASS BEAUTIES HELEN HARSHMAN Freshmen Class Beauty INDEX WILLIAM ALEXANDER, Class President, I, Choir, 2, College Trio, I, College Play, 3, Band, 2. CLAUDIA ASHELMAN, Y.W.C.A., I, 2, 3, 4, International Relations. JOHN BEAZEL, Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities, 4, Football, 3, Golf Team, 2, 3, 4, President of Student Senate, 4. MARTHA JANE BOWEN, A Capella Choir, I, 2, 3, 4, Lauriger, 3, Band, I, 4, Women's Student Council, 3, 4, Methodist Youth Council, Z, 3, 4, Dynamo, I, Y.W.C.A., I. WILLIAM BRANGHAM, International Re- lations, Pi Gamma Mu, 3, 4, Business Man- ager of Unonian, 4, Fencing Team, 4, Intramurals, I, 2, 3, 4, Student Senate, 3, 4. WILLIAM BRIGGLE, Editor of Unonian, President of S.A.E., 4, Intertraternity Coun- cil, 4, Unonian Staff, I, 2, 3, Junior Edi- tor, 3. DONALD BROWN, Dip and Strike, 2, 3, Unonian Staff, 3, Dynamo Staff, 4, Fenc- ing Team, 4. HARRY BROWN, Varsity football, 2, 3, 4, Varsity Basketball, 2, 3, Junior Prom Chair- man, 3. GEORGE CAIN, Intramurals, 3, Track, 3, Phi Sigma, 2, 3, 4. CECIL COLEMAN, Intramurals, I, 2, 3, 4, Business Highlights, 4, Y.M.C.A., 4. MARY JANE COLLINS, Women's Student Council, 4, Y.W.C.A., I, 2, 3, 4, Unonian, 3, Women's Government Board, 2, Presi- dent if A.C.O., Women's Athletic Associa- tion, . MARGARET CONWAY, A Capella Choir, I, 2, 3, 4, Band, 3, 4, Psi Kappa Omega, 4, Y.W.C.A., 3, 4. ROGER COPE, Y.M.C.A., 2, 3, 4. WILBUR COUCHIE, Dynamo, 2, 3, 4, Unon- ian, 4, President of Y.M.C.A., 4, Busi- ness Highlights, 2, 3, 4, Economics Assist- ant, 4, Intramurals, 2, 3, 4. DUANE CRIST, Intramurals, 2, 3, 4, Var- sity Tennis, 2, Y.M.C.A., 4, Vice President of Junior Class, Business Highlights, 2, 3, 4. GORDON DESHLER, Phi Sigma, 3, 4, Pi Gamma Mu, 3, 4, Y.M.C.A., 2, 3, 4, Inter- traternity Council, 4. GLEN DICKEN LIONEL DIFFORD, International Relations, 3, 4, Y.M.C.A., 4. ROBERT DOMER, Debate Team, Varsity Football, 2, 3, Dramatics, 3. JOANNE DRAKE, Y.W.C.A., I, 2, 3, 4, Women's Athletic Association, 3, 4, Wo- men's Government Board, 4. ARTHUR DUNDON, Delta Pi Alpha, 2, 3. ELLEN ELDER LOIS ANN ELLETT, President of Y.W.C.A., Pi Gamma Mu, 3, 4, Lauriger, 3, Women's Student Council, 2, Who's Who in Amer- ican Colleges and Universities, 4. SELENA EVANS, Y.W.C.A., 2, 3, 4, Yale Harvard, 3. JANE Fi.oYo, Y.W.C.A., 1, 2, 3, Dynamo 2, 3. RICHARD Fourz, Phi Sigma, 2, 3, 4. GEORGE FREETAGE, Varsity Football, 2, 3, 4, Intramurals, I, 2., 3, 4. LOWELL FRESHLEY, Intramurals, 1, 2, 3, 4. KENNETH GEMPLER, President of Senior Class, Phi Sigma, 3, 4, Delta Pi Alpha, 3, 4, Track, 3, 4, Intramurals, I, 2, 3, 4. JOHN HAAS, A Capella Choir, 2, 3, 4, Band, 3, 4, Y.M.C.A., I, 2, 3, 4. EUGENE HAIDET, Pi Gamma Mu, 3, 4, Psi Kappa Omega, 4, Y.M.C.A., 4, Dynamo, 3, 4, Unonian, 3, 4, Editor ot Business High- lights, 4, Track, 2, Intramurals, I, 2, 3, 4. KENNETH HAINES, Phi Sigma, 3, 4. JOHN HART, Physics Assistant, 2, 3, 4. 1 .I INDEX WARREN HARTSOUGH, Intramurals, I, 2, 3, 4, Secretary ot Senior Class, Y.M.C.A., 3, 4, Dip and Strike, 3, 4. FREDRICK HELD, Band, 3, 4. DALE HIXON, Dip and Strike, 3, 4. REBECCA HOWE, A Capella Choir, I, Pres- ident ot Women's Athletic Association, Y. W.C.A., 4, Women's Government Associa- tion, 3, 4, Dynamo, I, 2, 3, 4, Women's Student Council, 4, Who's Who in Amer- ican Colleges and Universities, 4. DONALD HUNTER, Golf, 3, 4, Basketball Manager, 2, 3, Y.M.C.A., I, 2, 3, Intra- murals, I, 2, 3, 4, International Relations Club, I. NANCY INGLIS, Women's Athletic Asso- ciation, President ot Panhellenic. WINONA JAMES. DORIS JOHNSON, A Capella Choir, 2, 3, 4, Gospel Team, 2, 3, 4, Psi Kappa Omega, 4, Pi Gamma Mu, 3, 4, Y.W.C.A., 3. , RICHARD JONES, Football Manager, I, 2, 3, 4, Track, 2, 3, 4, Intramurals, I, 2, 3, 4, Y.M.C.A. 4. VIRGINIA KENNEDY, Y.W.C.A., I, 2, 3, Band, I, 3, A Capella Choir, I, International Relations, 4, Panhellenic Council, 3, 4. HELEN KOEHLEIN, Y.W.C.A., 2, 3, 4, French Club, 2, 3, International Relations, 3, 4, Women's Athletic Association, Gospel Team, 2, 3, 4, Student Senate, 4. GRAYSON LAPPERT, Intramurals, I, 2, 3, 4, A Capella Choir, I, 2, Economics Assist- ant, 3, 4, Business Manager ot Dynamo, 4, Who's Who in American Colleges and Uni- versities, 4, Dip and Strike, 3, Pi Gamma Mu, 3, 4. MARY LINS, President of Women's Ath- letic Association, Lauriger, 3, 4, Y.W.C.A., I, 2, 3, Women's Government Association, 3, French Club, I, 2, Who's Who in Amer- ican Colleges and Universities, 4, Psi Kappa Omega, 4. MIRIAM LOVELL, Y.W.C.A., 2, 3, 4, Women's Athletic Association, Vice Presi- dent of Dussell Hall. BETTY LYNN, A Capella Choir, 3, 4. CAROL MacKENZIE, A Capella Choir, 3, Y.W.C.A., I. RUTH ANN MCCONNELL, Y.W.C.A., I, 2, 3, Lauriger, 3, 4, Student Senate, 3, 4. WILLIAM MCCREA, Varsity tootball, 2, 3, 4, Varsity I, Basketball, 2, 3, 4, Secretary of Junior Class, 3. DORMA MCGREW. HAROLD MILFORD. MATILDA MILLER. BEN MINKIN. CHARLOTTE MOREY, A Capella choir, 1, 2, 3, 4, Unonian, I, Dynamo, 2, 3, 4, Y. W.C.A., I, 2, 3, 4. JENNIE MORGAN, President ot Women's Student Council, Panhellenic Council, 3, 4, Class Officer, 3, 4, Lauriger, 3, 4, Who's Who in American Colleges and Universi- ties, 4. WILLIAM MORRIS. EDWARD MOSSER, International Relations, 2, 3, 4, Pi Gamma Mu, 4, French Club, 4Business Highlights, 3, 4, Intramurals, l, 2, 3, 4. KARL ORWICK, Intramurals, 3, 4, Interna- tional Relations, 4, French Club, I, 2. MYRON PALMER, Varsity Football, 2, 3, 4, Physics Assistant, 4. FLORENCE PEET, A Capella choir, 1, 2, 3, 4, Y.W.C.A., 1, 2, 3. RUSSELL POKON, Football, I, Intramurals, I, 2, 3, 4. CHARLES RITZ, Tennis Team, 2, 3, 4, A Capella Choir, I, Z 3 4, Band, 3, 4. 20 INDEX ANTHONY ROSE, Dip and Strike, 3, Un- onian, 2, 3, Band, 2, 3, 4, Geology Assistant, 3, Intramurals, I, 2, 3, 4. EDNA SAPP, Y.W.C.A., Z, 3, 4, Women's Athletic Association, 4, A Capella Choir, I. LOUISE SCHMITTLE. JOHN SCHORY. ' JOHANN SCHULZ, Alembroic, 3, 4, De- bate, 3, International Relations, 3, 4. MARY SHILTS, Phi Sigma, 3, 4, Women's Student Council, 3, President of A.X.D. PHYLLIS SHUTT, Women's Athletic Asso- ciation. CORNELIA SOTCAN, Lauriger, 3, 4, Le Cercle Francais, President, 3, 4. JODINE SPARKS, President of D.D.D., Lau- riger, 3, 4, Women's Athletic Association, Dynamo, Junior Editor, 3, Senior Editor, 4, Chairman ot Student Chapels, 3, Secretary- Treasurer of Women's Athletic Association, 3, Y.W.C.A., Senior Editor ot Unonian, 4. HAROLD spies, Phi sigma, 3, 4, Y.M.C.A., 2, 3, 4. WILLIAM STEINER, Y.M.C.A., 3, 4, Inter- national Relations, 3, 4, Dynamo, 2, 3, 4, Intramurals, I, 2, 3, 4, Fencing Team, 4. KENNETH STOFFER, Phi Sigma, 2, 3, 4, Student Senate, 2, Y.M.C.A., 3, 4. THELMA TOURNAY, French Club, I, 2, 3, 4, Y.W.C.A., I, 2, 3, 4, Panhellenic, 3, Phi Sigma, 4, Pi Gamma Mu, 4, Psi Kappa Omega, 4, International Relations, 3, 4, Homeletic Club, I, 2, 3, Gospel Team, I, 2,3. MARY TRADER, I, 2, 3, 4, Dramatics, 2, 3, 4. RUTH WAGNER. JUNE WARREN, A Capella Choir, 2, 3, 4' pmmofics, 1, 2, 3, 4, Y.w.c.A., 3, Bond, 3f RICHARD WERNER, President Alembroic, Dynamo, 4, Y.M.C.A., 3, Chemistry Assist- ont, 3, 4. RUSSELL WOODARD. DOUGLAS WRIGHT, Editor Dynamo, 4, Who's Who in American Colleges and Uni- versities, 4, Interfraternity Council, 4. Before l close the l9-42 Unonian, l would like to thank all those members of the Unonian staff who helped to make this publication possible. To Miss Jodine Sparks ancl Miss Kathryn Ann King, l express my sincere thanks for their excellent cooper- ation. As we reminisce in years to come, it is my hope that this book will recall to our memory the four great years which we spent at Mount Union. May Mount Union and it's traditions live on and on in our fond recollections. -William Briggle Editor, l942 Unonian 22 IIUII SPIIN S0118 FULL PAGE AD Morgan Engineering Company The Gray Printing Company Dimit Brothers Photographers HALF PAGE AD Boston Store Galanot Steel Products Company QUARTER PAGE AD Alliance Clay Products Company Alliance Machine Company Alliance Porcelain Products Company Amerman, James L. Canton Hardware College Inn Consumers Market Cope Electric Company Cope Furniture Company Dime Savings Bank of Canton lsaly's, Mount Union Lembright Grocery and Baking Company Columbia, Morrison, Mount Union, and Strand Theaters Ohio Public Service Palm Garden, Inc. Schaeffer-Black Company Spring Holzwarth, Inc. Stark Transit, Inc. Stern and Mann Company EIGHTH PAGE AD Alliance Builders' Supply Company Allott Hardware A and M Transit Company Auld, Robert Jr., lnsurance Agency Bay, John E., Insurance Agency Cassady and Turkle Cunningham Furniture Company Damascus Nurseries Dye Pharmacy England Drug Company IIUB SPIINSIIBS EIGHTH PAGE AD Eynon-Guthrie lnsurance Agency Farm Bureau Fertilizer Plant Fiegenschuh, Karl F., Jeweler Hart, William L., Attorney-at-Law Hillgreen, Lane and Company Klein and Roderick S. S. Kresge Company Mahan Music Store Miller's Flowers Mount Union 'Sc to Sl .OO Store Ohio Provision Company J. C. Penney Company Perskey's Mount Union Market Q. P. Hamburg Shop, Alliance and Canton Sears Roebuck Company Stahler's Barber Shop Stewart Brothers Company Supreme Dairy Company Transue and Williams Forging Corporation SIXTEENTH PAGE AD Alliance Hardware Company Art's Jeweler and Clothier Bowman Hardware Company Frank Corbi's Band Dannemiller Grocery Company Dumont Athletic Company Hatfner, Carl J., Jeweler Johnson Furniture Company Kline, Paul, Men's Furnishings Koch Floral Company Miller, Nevin, Dry Cleaning Mount Union Cleaner Mount Union Coal Yard Saffell-Hively Printing Company Seidner's Flowers Spencer Service Station Sunnyside Dairy Company Superior Wallpaper Company Union Avenue Glass and Paint Company I2 :-,.g-- . . ,K-, 3, f .. . . me-., . Q vi ,Q 59,5-Q j 2: -A.'1'Af, -A - " ,. .f.,.-5-..?'3, U- .- .'-'-Av-' "-" "U J',' f ,. Ah,.r,L,.z,.. . ez' " 'gli' ' x -. ....,. . .. ' 1.4,-G shim . .1:1ig::,,gf.p' 25,1-ilfj ,, ...'L'.a:':-sz Exif .njhiif ., vfwgqz " ' " I' ' girl .:. vi" ' -'-" 1' I L 3.3111-, wg, . , 'r....n. 5, ., ,. x. ,"'.5!1-'-'fZ"Q'f - ':'fft".. 3 Aglaire. -1...-, A., .'-,vig ffm-.fzj-i14x,g-,H-nf4-:A-:"' 0 '21, 1. .if 4-nas, ,pg ,J " 14-53gg5,',!E.f'1fajQ. 9 ,.g,1,,i, . ..-gy ..-.Y .K v , Q, .-:.,.4,., ,, it .' gf-wif: ' "..331Ef"-5'3""'.5f:5?' . f'ffEf,ff'."7?-'.:1: L . ' 11' 1 1r"N.. -.g-,.- .. Q45 .Ur A Ffag -'-, -.QQ 7 . . ". 1 ,:?'L'.'?r5fi .., 1.1: ,E . -- --,'..,- . .' 1,1 ..:,-f-, fu. ' 1'-lf' .. J., . THE CI-KNTU E GHAVINI' ELECTHUTYPE C CANTON-A-KRON- Bun -YouNesTowN 4l0 Thlrd Si' S E Mefrgpolifan Bldg. Frlci Bldg Home Savings 3 Loan Bldg 4 4 -Y 4 4 4 4 4 Ae jug AMERICAN SPIRIT, ,, Traditionally American.-is the spirit of Loyalty which is now so evident in the hearts of all Americans--a neces- sary part of our Victory Program. " 75,45 4 4 4 4 4 4 'Y X- ' K' 03- N : f1,f' 1: 24 kfr, Q ,' I iu:L?.,'1i: ig ff X f .5274 ff i t iffy , A f W fefka nf ' jr ef M :QS M' ll: ,..a. 4 -' QE- J skis - TT- Q NW- A-7 I ax!! . - EN I U, N - IZ? Va' ' -.'-. X X 'X -NI"v""' J NX 'Nt 47'-LX 'fi 'TFLZ MNN 5 NRI :f x x xx I, - ffm- f ' Q 'tldfffzi' N- NI NIT in . lr ,45 5 ' N' ,G 7' 3332- X ljm. X ff? I I 5 I ii' ef emdss sssss Gm' N R ' 'X 3A 'JKT-'J ' xv fx Y IN df XEQM-K rzgbx N JM X OYALTY finds itself in another role, that Which The Gray Printing Co. proudly feels to its many friends and customers. Whether it's peace-time or War, you will find us ever on THE GRRY PRINTING guard, always eager to use our price- less experience of 52 years-and our modern and highly diversified equip- ment to give your complete job, su- perior guality at an economical cost. UUMPRNY LARGEST PRODUCERS OF SCHOOL ANNUALS IN THE STATE 'k 'k 'A' 'I' 'A' 'A' 'A' 'A' 1' 'A' 'A' 'A' 'k 'k i' 'i ir 'k 'k


Suggestions in the Mount Union College - Unonian Yearbook (Alliance, OH) collection:

Mount Union College - Unonian Yearbook (Alliance, OH) online yearbook collection, 1938 Edition, Page 1

1938

Mount Union College - Unonian Yearbook (Alliance, OH) online yearbook collection, 1940 Edition, Page 1

1940

Mount Union College - Unonian Yearbook (Alliance, OH) online yearbook collection, 1941 Edition, Page 1

1941

Mount Union College - Unonian Yearbook (Alliance, OH) online yearbook collection, 1951 Edition, Page 1

1951

Mount Union College - Unonian Yearbook (Alliance, OH) online yearbook collection, 1952 Edition, Page 1

1952

Mount Union College - Unonian Yearbook (Alliance, OH) online yearbook collection, 1954 Edition, Page 1

1954

1985 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1970 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1972 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1965 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals
FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
Are you trying to find old school friends, old classmates, fellow servicemen or shipmates? Do you want to see past girlfriends or boyfriends? Relive homecoming, prom, graduation, and other moments on campus captured in yearbook pictures. Revisit your fraternity or sorority and see familiar places. See members of old school clubs and relive old times. Start your search today! Looking for old family members and relatives? Do you want to find pictures of parents or grandparents when they were in school? Want to find out what hairstyle was popular in the 1920s? E-Yearbook.com has a wealth of genealogy information spanning over a century for many schools with full text search. Use our online Genealogy Resource to uncover history quickly! Are you planning a reunion and need assistance? E-Yearbook.com can help you with scanning and providing access to yearbook images for promotional materials and activities. We can provide you with an electronic version of your yearbook that can assist you with reunion planning. E-Yearbook.com will also publish the yearbook images online for people to share and enjoy.