Mount St Joseph Academy - Sheaf Yearbook (Philadelphia, PA)

 - Class of 1930

Page 1 of 132

 

Mount St Joseph Academy - Sheaf Yearbook (Philadelphia, PA) online yearbook collection, 1930 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 132 of the 1930 volume:

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I :V-ml II Q i Q 'i Wx Y w J IF w H w Y 11 Y GWOGYOGYOPLDQOOGYOFOOGWOGYOGYOGYOGSLDPKDGNNOGYO WIUIHIHIEB SHIIEBQMF Mt. St. joseph Academy Chestnut Hill Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z 2 Z Z Z PN76YO GNNUGNNOGNBDGNNUGNOOGYQGNOOGNNDGYOGNOO 900640 CVO P59 2 2 2 2 2 2 z 2 2 52 2 2 2 ,Z 2 , 2 In VV , V 4 1, 1 V VP ,,j s 1 4 , 4-A "' T V aw V VV fi - 4 -V 4 'K ' J' 'bi 52 - 14 A 51 4 A' qw -r. V. .WVVVHV ?"V -'?"n '-5-1VVmVVV. .V jj I . kg, Wag,-.. kayla- 15. t 'fi A 'L . V 2 1 ' gl ew' f .1 .35 .5 TEV -V V' vii Vf "I 17Fff . 1-V w ,, .L Vf V X '.-., -frsgf ,: '23 ,J 1 fig-:Eff-,'::V-VY' , V ,eb- ,,.. HMA. -9 ' 'YV 5 ' ' 'Q-rf-f:2lf:'1" ' ' "EwJ"" ' 3'U """" H" , Av ' ' ' t H , :A M ' Q n rgh 1 Q! , V Y , " " .. V. . v' .Q xt. 9,3 fy Q V VV , ' . V ' ill 'Wi' 0 - , . ' 1 H .fr 1 gl! N, xiii, l , V . V s wa. V Vg, ,Af W! ' A Ear- 1 V. 'H . .fV5:"' 51152. ' f" uw ' T V V f f f " - ' 2 . E251 V V fd-fins? 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V FAREWELL The years that were so swift, so fleet, have gone, And taken with them happy, joyous days, Days, which we a little sad now look upon, For we must also yield our cherished ways, The ones that we have learned to love so well, And must to our dear Mount hid fond farewell! But as we go we see before our eyes Ideals and hopes that she was wont to teach, That we in life will try to realize Since they do not appear beyond our reach, As from our hearts where gratitude does dwell Again we hid to her a fond farewell! ROSEMARY FOGARTY, '30 'twig -N I! 'J V55 J, fs Y-Epi? ,qi P " i J i J' 9 ' 5 1 9' if' y ,. Y ec - AE J'l"1 N...- VuW0s,,5z2'it 6QEN,,:J wfgsy XX fp'-f 1 L W Us , f t--+"iSey:?, stef 'Env-6 " fi 'Q "7gflg,uN9 'aw 4 'I LIDIETTE CECILIA AUSTEN Thou who hast The fatal gi t of beauty. ' 4' 47 4363 WWE E swf., Qin M Ba Q45 Q ,g F . N f 44-fi! h 4 Wifi' i 'j. W' J :i f Q Y n , K x -:I "iq ,- Lidiette is hve feet of pure sweetness. We have never known a girl before to have all the qualities ' Grandmother had" and still be a ready playfellow. She is the essence of charming reserve and sweet femininity. Lidiette is a model student also, and during her two years at the Mount she has displayed not a little talent in the secretarial Held. She has found this work very fascinating, not only because she excels in it, but because the "Commercial Room" has quite a charm for her. We have enjoyed the lively tales she relates of Central America and we have pictured Lidiette a lovely rose in the midst ol her tropical country. At present she is one of our three "New Yorkers" and she does much to uphold that city in the opinion of her classmates. We have been able to glean but little of what Lidiette plans for the future, but whether the setting of the fulfillment of her ambitions be our "great city," or a rambling home beneath a brilliant southern sky, we are confident of her success, fL.i.5l,,r1 -.- . --eq-jg, L1 'Q i, . ' '-1 . ' ' 7" 7 . , -Z-fjt: "5-.Ti?"""""'-' fs:-f - at N i f- 4 s- it i- if Q 1 . - . n M .S . '-' -- if-I f.. . A sf w 2 . ,X-gi' A lu .- -in A. x K 1-ul, ' ' ffltfll ' ' ' ' . . ' '- . 'Q- M - . T ' - , . K -VJ: A D rx 1 I ' fly rj: ' Q ...Q - .P if Jfzgbax ,- wi x., ' 1- it 1, if . . ,.-if" .. . 'iw fi' .r 4. V 1 1 ff. x 'I U ' in , i l f' W- - is fi ' i ' .. L 4 i ', I ' " ' '.--.- ff- ' . N it-ri it 1 : .t . i as el , Vo ' ' , .- , .I iff' 1, :.'L Zi!! i i' 'fl' of H fx 1, -2 i i"': I J M T4 .P 1-1-,h 5 A, e g S 45 3,2 9 , ff., 3- Q11: hy- - lg I E H ,-211 . H W wh.. - . V- l, A , '-,,j':-' 4" ",Q Q. A I 0 Tiff", QQ ,' '1 il 'fi Gt: ' x .li if 1 U ,:' ,',f:,i" ' 'G A 4' l 1 44 vs, 5:3 Y l ' a Ni' . i ' . l '., I 3 -ir.V : ' :yy ,gg . V .. . -fi 'L Y if " " ,- . . ,i D ' A h M: 'v i is :ly ,:, 'QL' . J A V V 71 V. : 1 7, I ' J 1 2,4 -4 if 5 -, 1 , , . -- , f '. -' iff FT ' V " "H . 512, f -if 'iii-4 '-11.15. 3 If 56,44 fa .ff V -f ' 4 . ' ri, H ,isa Liz , ug, 1 . gg Q. 7 Y, -' " ,V --,. , . , . . - 9 t Aj 3 ' 9' 1 " , Q' 1 I ' 45" A 'XS N I H 9 dia x LX ,J If 4- 1 , w f 923 . ifiagkgi I .- f " . - f Q Q y, gr: J, .. E 1 , 'l . it - ' s w fi -f S 4 Q l, I 5 1141152 N ff'-'JU 3-Ft? W' l l -L ' Gui'-w .1-. .flrfffgxgpm I wt fit?- IN .6 'A ,Y J., 1 JMR, w f , 29525 U A : LA 01 A IN V -. MARY JANE BENNIS fsv Brlght ax zlze mn her eyes the ga er s sm e And l1lqe the sun they elm-ne on all all e 35-3 L M.- if-B ef J' "'Y: L .0 I 'li' Q tg! G W! ,, .741 gg an fr wi J 4 5 42-11- NCIL ls o muth to ty lllllllf Muy that ont Marte knowx vulmtxt to hiiglll Pxtture a young, lldy w1tl1 lulut tyts dunplts md thc proverblal golden trcwcy and you I1 nt Btnny xcllttblc SLOIV book llLlOlIlC Her tlmool lllt has cmbx lted so mxny mttlvltlta that It would be 1 glglllflk. task to ent merate n o tlxtm ln stlmuluslup Muy txndx well towud thc l1c.1 o tht tltlw wluth pos t1on we know slut w1ll rctun wlxtrtvcl shc tlmoosu to lvtnd her tffmt. AQ 1 lunstcr Mxry mt lux xlwxy been ready to twist us lI'l our IITLICIIIOUS sthemes 1n II stuns th It tunt xltu tune ju t .xt 1 LllULll polnt some Btllllyllll 1dt.1 supplltd the e tapadc wlth tht nccdtd xtrwt ind Vlgill' Evtn 1l Benny Q untontxolldblt md t.UI1tE1glUUb glggle almost Luc us twty wt tould ntvu llnd It Ill our healtw to l7lflITlC this lov ilvlc thlld Wt lumxt IICVCI known Btnny to lout her temper and thobe of us who ale ednly Stlrred to wmtlm ut l'?Lgl11l1lll to 1e1l1z.t wh lt t prltelcsx 1 Mt thls 1 Au Rtxou Muy dCdI md muy you lmd lnfc 1 pltutnt und futndly is you luve alway blwown your tll tow ual your LldNSIlltltCN l . K" ' F -f' 'iff-Z, P1 11 Q ' 2 ' ' " f -fl-'A - r- ,. . --M .QV :Lia ' ' ' " ,.- ' A . V 1' ' f' "' 'N ' F' .QI f X' I I, P, ' V Lk Q yf lm I -. 1. ex , l .7 I si - --.- , A .M 1 ' V Mr .lv Nil fm -. A 9- ' - s 1 .M it AJ V I riff. I? NF, X 1 S - 4, 711 . .v . '.- 1 ' . :.' I 'Q 1 " T: ' - -' ' ' . ' ' E ' - ' ' " " ' ,.- V . ' x , , . . ' 1 ,l ez-l qt., ' - if - - t Sl of ' AI jr r A .2 4. x , , 1 . . .. , , ,. W rw I .. U X13 6 , mn. Y - - -. -tv - ,..- .- NL. qi., Q 1 . if . L, :az -' ' "' ri gig ,, t A Q' ' .5 " "'T 5. -- ' '55 JL , Q Q ,f.' -lf: ', "." Q!. : . ' ,A A 'li , 1' 'fill A ' ' I: V ' A x is ' 1 41 ,- ,Q-' A .. -, .,-'fb ., 1. JL 4. Av -,' , . 'Q-'nz jf-1 ..- ,- " 7 ' Qt r I . . M Q Q: .' . ' . I V" L ref' 2' 7 QL gi- ' .A .f .. swf. - ,I , ' 4 ev 4 . fig, :I . if Q' bf 5 ' .4 1 . B , 0 ,r - m- .V , . lv' J l Q , ' 05: . X' A 1' vt., mx , ,vi , f N , i s Ev I L' N 5 3 lg.: ' r- " .Q Ea' l ," N ,fy ,,.. -li 5741.1 '53, f A -,, W ' , " l . Lu i' ll ' fy A X 0' -' .,, '33 ,fa - f ' Q. r ft -.4-,,-4.2 jgg.:c,.,W, , f, , 55 gg . ,. f if ,F It .:1, G ., Ti: N . ir: V - -:H tl li - ' 21 59 'f in tl' ' l' 1 H-., ', l- ,J 71- ' " - . ra' ' '-7. LQ" ' Wt? Q". V " " Y 3:-.T .J , f. . - l . F -. - P'-f 1 4 5 L- wwf, 4 ig' , I V :XX .Q ,fl - N . 4 l . at -- - lf.. - i. f- 1- ' L-. E f 1 . . -5+ -. Q . . ':l-y-" -z -I an. " 3 .- . .- 1 .- 'lg at ' 1 t 'Y--f A' .V l lA 'N 5 l li . 5, 5 4 A 4 'At Tl 'f 5 ' sz a 1' ' f ' .' ' '. " f a ' - ' ' 's, z ' 5, ' 1 '- " f ," ll :ll f . ' L rkyfzl x I z' 'd f 1 9-11, A' t . ' 5 , 1 12 W as z 2 s ZQCQ' 5 ' ' x ' Q 5' . Ll ' sy, A. R ' t 2 ' .- ' . ' S . 1 ..' Q2 ' , A. " , 'R " ' .. S ', S.. . " " 'g 'L ' ' 1 1 "' :sn lg 's. k 5 " V, A R ' ts 1:1 . .5 1 5 6 N W - 'D '- " uf' my its-4 L "'3 fig, Q 5 Jw C WSL 1-if 'So , ...E 4 Ol " af? 'iq "W ..v ssw is ,, ,Q 92' F It 1 V flag REGINA FLAVIA BREENE 4' u 1. uv' ? ,yr And her 91471713 loc S , 'QQ n Hang on her temples ll e a golden eece On that momentous autumn day four years ago when Reglner Hrst came to our Mount we beheld a VISION of .1 daxnty blue eyed mlss wrth hair resemblmg rlvulets of llve metal A we became better acqualnted wlth thus happy marden we were confirmed ln our frrst lmpresslon of her sunny cllsposltron Regrna has charmed us often wrth that undemable New Yawk dralect She has dellghted us too wrrh her comparxsons of Phlladelphla and Flushmg Long lsland and It has not been an uncommon slght to see her hurrylng for a tram to the Emplre State Many are the allunng tales of the Brg Crty that thls enthusrastrc little malden has related to us hesrdes stones of "G U meetmgsn of St Michael! and of not a few lmportant personages of Fluslung There are rumors that Regina wlll return to the Mount ID September to yum the ranks of the College freshmen But as to whether or not she will be able to separate herself from Flushrng for another four years there IS consrderable questron However, rn whatever Regina mtends to undertake after graduatlon we Wlsh her the best of luck, for never was a classmate more deservlng of happrness I K--4-1" " 41 ' . 1' '--l'?.-- 'L 'F '. ' -1 - N- ' .-" - - f' 5: of-'Q 1' " Ar '.-.,',??-??'n5"" "'-'up :rs ' :Q JL 4 - " - ' 5 .7-V ki ' -'L ' ' ' -. ' ' ,, ' ' Ji,-ff, , --5.. I .lf ,, . I .,- " .,- ' A n EM b .A .L f-- we ... -V 1, - . ,, , .. .-. 4-. ,Nw 5 ,A ii V ' .se X .. ' E 'ff - t --t' . 553 t 1 V dn l 1 Q " t c- r P . ' - .gg ' ,rfL1.- :Pg I ,- ' . ': , 3 . 3 ' I , 4 gf '. L 21"-f 1' A M: ' !- 'L I' , v -Tj. l ' -' ..' fy'-f 2. tal -, 4. l f. . X K' -' '.' - f , ' 1,--. 5' ' "FC" l o' Y , Steiff-' ' "fl l f ef' 9' ' L. Q' 'jfir ff. N' S' ' ' . ' of 15,33 N 5 5' ff" ' 1, ' 'Vg -5 '35 A gf- , A rf' a 'Q X A ,.:.',f51 ' . bv, 1 4.1! i., 'il T., Q ,A-. . ra , 7 83. f- .W H i -I 'fb . 4 ., - , 4' if rA'1,,,-1"T ' , l .' ' A ,ga ,QT 1? Lil , 1 -xr .- .Q U ,' ' ' . , rf' A Q X . l 1 -L: " 6 IA jr -' , . f , . .ik S ly a . of 1:-,a . 1 ,, , 141.-, ,-1. 1 'I , X 7 1- B ' 9 .A --.1 .' J .. r 'r ,.- 31. " fi C4 "'-.- '. I ' ""' Q -D ' r iyvgg It A5 1-, . A in . .VP ' -.' 55.1 ,fr ra' V X 1, lv I .I ' In' Q gs! 1 JW ' 94' 5 l 4235 h re K ,- Jil'-V + ,N kg .4 Q br N f tv -' at Q 1 - 'f 11, 542. . 1"'4 ri ' ' -- , R l. . 'W ff ' . . W, - 'R fl 'l - .4 . , al. 5-E-:th - , l. M 7 r NI fe It " -W fg Q NX I I I L f11..1. EW 1 5? 1- I I 50Q'Iag m lk -ibm! r I sic .nb Jthb"'J I-II ,I q 'M' me 11 ff' H jf Br 5 4 R ng , Jigga Q., 1143: II Wf A 'R fa III I fsg 1 0 09 1' E J ,J 'll Q n I lag 1 1-A Q 'Fl 'J MARION ELIZABETH CLEARY Aly, lk' 111 Nature was here So Iuwsh 0 her More Q3 s 'That the bextowed lmtl .she had no more I f r Il h1ex1ty 1Q tl1e soul of w1t Marlon IQ among the WIKKIESY bmcc we met her four short yen 115,11 M111o11 I1 ts olten unused 11s Wlth her dellghtful qu1pe wh1eh alwaye exprees so well t L el1111 e l111mo1 ol 1 s1tL11t1on We 1re u1t tl11t nn one I1 IN ever seen Ma11on lrown her :m1l1ng countenance and unruflled L1111 ne 1 o 1 L tc ll 111 14 111 ol l100l f,,Ill tr1hul1t1o11s IVI1r1o11 ls dlwlyx ready wrth a he plng h md 1 Ltlfllllbfflllf, word I11 the held ol 1tl1let1es Mmon has nude qulte a n1me for herself Usually thls young l'1dy IN the xery essenee of d1g,111ty yet on the hockey field her enthusmsm reaches Sueh a pltch tl11t It Qend hu llyxng, hlther md yon exeltement 1.11s111g two p1nk bannerb ID her cheel-:Q MJIILJI1 Q grmt 1mh1t1o11 I5 to study medulne md we wager that there w1ll be no more tfhtlent dottm IH the prolewon th1n our imlable l1ttle elassmdte We l11ll your sunny sm1le and endearlng waya after une Marlon but you take our mlfettwn tlont 1 you It ne behmd the port 115 of Mt bt joseph II I LI WM g --.j-.., .1 I I I. 1 11 'P .. . 2' 4' -31-I: -9.-f -' -,I " 2 he - I-1 'I 'I' '-112 , I E- 'I " 'u ' f' as ' 11 , .1f"dI ' - I ,II I Q: 'Tr' Q., I MIQI I xi If ."f7 ,' -II I IICIIII me ..' I 'In I V 1 - I I I . I IL5 I iv' I :II I I I X I ,I I I.I: I I 'QI - 1 IIII,u': III Q.: ,I I Q II ,rrp I . I1 , X- - I IIfI I , I 154. I. , I . L 'T "1 . -. lil 'I - I I 'Fw ' v' I .V . 1 '- s 71111 1 W. 1 f- aff .'- :I : ' ,-"I ., gf ' . , ' 1 - ' " 1' ' 'K' .' I ' ', L ' I Y' I' L A 1 . -1 ,I I - " -L 1 I, , . 2553-. z ? at 9 If If T1 l ff' ' - 1, wry' 1 3 '11 FIT., II I .I AI. I , IqI gf' 1' ' ' : "-15 .N N I 'f -11 1 . ' -Y" KV- . B I 1 I III I II J I II ."' I' li' I I I . -.7'1'-4 .x f gIIIiI,'?III IIIIIII its' .-: I ' , 4- I' :II N - 1- S71 1 ft f Q'---1.1 J'. '- "xi-"', . .Q L' I ,II II. III . I .I . I. II ggvb n- 4fI , V ' ,x I QI . It ,gf-1 4 vl I III - .'I III' I-I? FCA JM 'V Lf. - 'T' . I -1-A12 'f-5" " 1 ""1 l - ix r1 - f' f'-:YL It "if- IIII... 1,I,1jg - X. ,- I , r. I .QI ,LA 'A . - +11 1-Q 155 '- ' H ' ' ' ' .1 " - I 3. ' "' ' - . .. A. . M , .f 1 . -1 I -. .1 If -1- -" , I 1 I-4,-1 " ar " I il f ' QQ--. 1' .J '., -. . . I .'- q'1 ' 11'-1 W " .f 1' - I 1. X, , I 'JI ' '-. I ' ' 1" ' fu J. , I A :I I' .-A ' ' XE "2 '. ' QP' ' I 1 I I t I f,II , L51-7' if-I 'W-1 lift it ' J 3-L.-'Z ' " - ' f - '. '. ' W -- ' - '. - ' " ' ' if" . I . ,, , ,' w I 7 Inf, ' I- I- ' - I" 1 -- , ' E1 ' Q .fa ".'s'f, :sk V 1 I: 3 'I I '1 '1 . I K Q h' ' 1 c ' I: 1 ' . 1 s '- 1 , z: -1 Q " ' ' 3 , ' ' 7 c'l z"z slzc' 1 S' l1's 'sc 'V' ' 2' S: 2' 2: A I ' z , 1 ' ' ' Y ' . . 1 1 fp I- III 'II - I I I I ' 1 ' I 1 ' , s 1' ' 1 ' 1 , ,I -' -' ' ' ' t. II II I .. II .I. I I . 1 s z miss 5 Q ' ' A f ' II , ' ' , 1 gas, ez' -' 2' g . 8 Y' X f"'5QU'4g1 Wh ll' A we of, 5 1 r f' f- "'f'x.,f' .1 hgwa x 'G L f 6814, airs. ,-, Q49 QE . dbzq' 'N A itll r'Af1-., 1 .9 Ygsjmg PNK ,vffift 1 fs '08 J 1,, 03.115 ,P Q v ,,3g,, Malkin! SARA LORETTA CLEARY That what she wzll she does and does so 'much That proof zs called zmpossxbxlzty gg.: I., aw? 5 3 'elif l as '3-Q' 'sf s '7 N 1.55 "' .- q rffzf-A W Wye, l 1 15 , . sql It hai been sald that time wlll finally reveal one s fllllti Here li one exceptlon to the rule Sara has been wxth us elght years and Qhe IQ st1ll as symperthetlc generous 'md slncere as we f1rst thought her to be There have been many loveQ and let loves 1n Saras llfe but rll these are small planete wh1rl1ng about one great sun one who bears the name ol that Lady of Troy whose splenchd face launched a thouQand eh1pQ ' Though' far from bemg peddntxe, Sara has managed to recelve one of the hxghest averugeQ 1n her class So good a student is she that she has never been known to fear any class She ls also qulte .1 musrclan and has done her "b1t ' to add luetre to the already famous Mount Samt Ioaeph Orchestra We Wlhh you all the success ln the world Sara, knowing that your abnllty and COIISCIEIIUUU5 ness will keep you hmgh m the Oplfllflll of your new as5oe1ateQ after you have left the Mount -'14,-larva.-1 ,.. . , ,.-,tif - ., - , - , .3 I .. - r -I ,:,.- . . T, ,..,,,7--.,:,g1'f" ..-L'z,' it .E L, xl 'fffi' , ---1 11 I ' p , - .- - " A 'Y .1 '-XUL' lj? fxgg ', 21 Nufp . 'N V A l. ' w .f1g Ng, H I .f W- ' 5 - - A , z ' lv ,, lwig- ff 5- K .Lf ' g -: - ,-if-' V -. -' ' ' - hr , - ' W 's , 5 R . X.. .L ' E fx --I. - I 1 N YF fb? M XJ 4' wl..f4 -, -'51 - .-. ' I- ' - ., . .-'."...-.. ' X. +I '-L ,.r -rf. 211 f ,, . fp 'wp' ' id Is' A., l "' ' fy 1 H,-I I .-,. , . . A l' ' 4 ? .Lim 15 4 .- 5- . -1-'Fi 'E 44' q 321 ' v ,' -'Q rj A ' 52. - ' Q.: Lf' 1' . t Hf7Q: Q ilff ggggl if ylilbuigfz , -4359 ' " rf- 1 '5 - I 5' fin: I M ,.?,.,. . I 4 , f ' ' Wg . r 17 .M f' ' " , . 9 . ' - . , , ,f. Q.. 3 . '. o . 'x ii'k1'.iFgg1 :A SEHK' .9 sf, 7 'WP' It I' ' .1 . lt V . 4gvP' of YQ 'xi Avi A 1523 " l 1 ' 9 Z' Y ' JN f, .'V- Q" f- V' . 4. . i jt fig-f. ' 5? . A Y - FC- r- ff . 5: ,' .3 1' 7 ,I- , I l '1 35:5 ,ig-. 5' Q r t 1 - y wg 9 A - I ' -f 1,111 S 'f e l l- .Q 'Y " - 'WJ-' R" an V f awk' ll I , , 4 ' ' M ,' t f' 1' f W ' 1 F' I if Z A ' - .54 X P N 4. 'f 4" . 'A l .. N H fle ffz ' ' .fl . U 1 L A :zc..I,y r sl H' . 9 I 0 F 4 E J' A v 4 A f' I Q f 1 ' -I' . 1 75, ., V . .. ,-- . . . Y- i. i Y ----r--V 1 W' . 'fl ' ' 1. "T" - A 5 XF" 1 rffff- 'gt 'pol' '51-f " Uyaili W I A if' R , - .- 4' Wi i' ' I - ,fe - ' 7 -,- . ,-7 L ' r ...p , . , , f ir - -. V 6111. ,I -N 5 b . K .1 W-J, . F- A., . 'I W f 42 It 1,- vx l--qw A 'f I.Wn5f'.,yi K M-vu 1 A ff-A it f 14' -A' . .3 ld A, . .ctr , ' .l-. , 4 i - ,ax H , , . WL, ,N 6. :I .Ib Q . N xy! Mao .., , M. ' l f f - ..-.. ' Ib!-v - . .1 . .,.: ,-.,'i..x,g5i? lg- ' ,li Sf 1 .1 . '-are 1 'ig rNq1f+Q-.sz r - . . 'ji'-' -.ff fr " . ' W 11:-,' "Ti tx ' Q., L' 'Q . ,,' 1 iv 7 'sr :N 1' U -J ,, if 5 V - . . fir- Aw- iw' ' i l' tb ' :ii 'A lS5 1.',L., . - , ' A A 3 . -Vi--" .-. mag. ff' , .4. . ,y' 1+'? fffg- . If Q. 1- ' -sf L5 ' gag' l l. N.-fi 'fl' n .M 'lg V f ix-Up. ., s ti. ie-a if -f -. 0' vtv W I- I l 5-. 'i ' , 33:7-g ' ' T1 fi'-' Sf .- 5' :Qi L.: 11-fi Sf' 1 ' v',,4:'-"fa r- . . ...Mu ' lf "":J.v , , 0 . , .Q .' . X vi' wil ,-1 -' 1 .f .D K Xe. 2. .. 4- id V .-.. if-ff., gfh-4. Q ' A ' p. 4 ' 555,-'fi ,": . it we , , se ,A 1 , ' Ll' ' ' gli 'mv' Yi: F" 'LH . " A 4" f ig!! 5 f a if 'i l ,r' 1 - .J yr ,fag in WP " I, i aft ' -1 5 ' . - . 1' 4' . wifi' Q v M ' 4 A MARGARET REGINA CONNOLLY 3' ,, -' Q S -, A . lxxv' N QQ., . 1.11: . . .ld H I '.E' 'IL 1.1 M I . -U 1 Y A tear for pity and a heart Q- . f T- 'H -' 93: Open as day for melting charity." f X , :in f 2 ' - u 51 W ,, f ,' f-sf 'u. ' 3,31 "Peg" came to us just one short year ago, but since her arrival she has lost no time in securing a place in the hearts of her classmates. Her popularity centers not only in the Senior Class, but extends to the undergraduates, as wellfhut it isn't necessary to go into detail! The talents of this miss cover diverse subjects, Her ability in solving weighty mathematical problems proves that she is a ustar pupil." ln the Art Room, one frequently comes upon "Peg" zealously bending over her china painting. Her artistic "oper magna" shows her to be quite apt, W and it would not surprise us to hear some day that "Peg" is the most famous artist of her "bustling little town." The posscssor of a strong, winning personality, "Peg" is happy and carefree, taking life as she meets it, and ignoring with her endearing, gamin smile the few rough spots. Es eciall does Margaret! buo ant gaiet arise when Saturda draws near, There is cer- P V Y Y . , . Y tainly an added attraction on that day! Perhaps it is the moving pictures, who knows? We shall part from you regretfully, Margaret, wishing you all the happiness and success in the world. May every day of your life be Saturday for you in years to come. l. 10 gl Q ' 4 - if if x' . M FK A l ,... ' an -f M t fi . 4 Y . - ,gag-,I,-rl T. V, .', v -,.,:ifx-1 -:D .Ll I . V7 , ,, W? 'I ah.: ,IAA ?.r'7r..1 A ,.-rn , , 1, . a , .aff n o Q TT P my by, :JN ff H . 1 N A V5 -5 ' -" ' - L - .' W' ' ll -,.5"9 - . ff w .i , - - . N5 xt 25. 1 . 'A g 1, ' ' pftjil V :Q '- .- 'li de ft' ' I ll ff i ' - - 'uiliiq' .- fl h, " If: -- h .Q si n l 5 1. XSL, I 4'-I -Fi. 't ' iw ,gllihgbs . 1+-A -Mrs- 7: 4 pts. , hit' 'lie ' it tt so-as or . i H2 . , .'4rJt 7- 21- 1 65' iw' 's 1. 5-'Vfrf s 1, 1 "' .' - A ' 'T-'.'i?:-J' N N' L 4 ' ' ' J U -yy f M. I ' lr! 'W hu' " it 1' I' Alf ' . ' . X I q f 1 f. 5. i ilf' .JL 1' T2 ze , F . Tf-.- " I.. 15. :ff t. -i ' 1 1 sg :Z 5 .1 c. z'fH15 14 1 . 2 5.9.5. I X 12? ,..!...- - I. b v , J .. .- 2-.1 -1 s- 1 , , 4. -1 . , , .45 V t -43:5 '. L4 J I .pl V 'ii . , ' flszgb a ' Y-23 1 fffgfla g gq if e H .- ,4' '. I hw -, -. H rvi K' ' l " 4 ' ' ' i K . -. ' f ' 9 X 7 . JU li-fi fe .gf,:-i:i,i- y I I, 'I' J 5?--. : kg ' levi ii QE.: 'i 'c "1'g . F5Q' f tap.- : . i n f ' f .g.l,', -X , ...I , .1 .Ly K' ' 'T Vi" Q' . -' i' 4' - t , gg I :QA ,: 552'-1 5 -'fri MINA MARIE D'LAURO 1 ,' S . 'GA' 192-. - 'Q .. ' 1' V 1 U X A I I I 1' .I v L: K Sumlime you catch witlmi your smile -,.-1-I - 5 . S .Q N :' 5. Gag And hold its radiance." ix ' l 'fi ' " -. 1 2 A' , Lg - ' " ,gh ,SRL ,f -. .. -- X EQ d.:wql.,'5 -' ' jail Mina's charms and appealing characteristics have won for her the title of "A Regular Girl." She is an allfround athlete. Her prowess on the hockey field and on the basketball floor, and her general ability in the "gym" are proofs of this. In debates, that is in formal ones, her jokes are just as forceful as her arguments. No amount of facts and proofs will change her opinion and usually her opponent is overcome by a flashing smile, laughing brown eyes and a decisive nod of a small, tousled head. Mina has a certain weakness, but we all have these. Still, I think we should not mind having so delightful and fascinating a one as she. Mina loves "redfheaded" people. In fact, she is determined "he" will be the proud possessor of an "auburn shock" or else "he" won't be at all. Your frankness and clever little jokes have amused us, Mina. We have learned to love your little mannerisms and to smile at your peculiar "soflikefMina" thoughts, We hope, Mina, that in later years you will ever be as fun-loving, understanding and charming as you are today. ll MW ,frm 'J .zfqq I W "' f -of 4 mf' mxvgggx-H-M 5 6ll,- MNJhgub0 A .Q QW J' Z 'fag' 'ra 1 f'Q O J'- ,J if Q 6. .I HELEN RITA DOUG HERTY She love: good rangmg converse O past and uture days "4 I U, 'F' ff 4,1 f-6 5, I dfyriaul J ff 'N rx ' N332 we ,-,, 534 fsfqfg? N134 369 ll ll-lg 'Q Q R me-f 'Y Zhu ,jg ff? Helen not surrounded by 1 group of gnrls would be 'mn unusual sight mdeed for she xs a popular mxss Her stones of the week end happenings keep hen clnssmutes well entutalned for days Wl11le fhlltlllg these ments Helen s breath supply IN 1l1CXl1dllSt1l5lL 1nd her news xnd her manner ol n.m1t1on are the best ibout the Mount But bewue of hemp tangled m .m argu ment wlth thls seennnply uneonuneable M155 for by the end of .1 h rlf hour you wxll know yourself to be sorely defeated Thus gllt of Helens lOl Ifgllllig, together w1th her busmess abxllty won lor her the posrtxon of Asslstant SOl1CIfOl ol Adxerusements for our Year Book Wlth her dwrk locks neatly tutked under 1 nwy blue beret Helen leads a chcerlng seet1on durmg M b s he1ted buketball contest Who of us nn remtnn UllEI1tl'llISl'lQtlL wlth thxs eledr eheery vo1ce spurrlng us on? The Dougherty Bllleli 15 mrde exceed1ng.,ly useful on weekdiys on Tuesdays myeterxous tllps it two thnty and on week ends when Helen IS so vely busy For lt has been mentloned that she IN popular Helen provokmgly leaves llw 111 .1 qunndary as to hex plans for the future Yet we are sure any undertaking of hers wlll be unquestlonably suteessful XL.. '- Y- . J' .1 I 4 . l :L . W . -. f . Q, NT ., . ' g Jzlpi . 1,25-if .. V. :I ,L ig A E X irxf- ,.,N: 3 1 AA" !.,' tt 7. - fs .. l. ' , 1'ff1 N5 xt 1 ' 5 3 Q- l WZ-:mf r I 5 l 'ti'-V' -- ' ' -til L ,M .' N Je l A 'l , , ag :PV ' gf: 4: ' be ...f-1' , - l' ' to JE . ' 5 ' xv, ' 1 Y ,L 17. . -K ,. -. 'N 1 r. I . In 2. ff 'lr :E 'le ,, It . - f - - ' vf-A - we - --- :P .. Q. -, ,ff ff: - s f . ' 1: Q 1 N-2' gif. r . H I - ' -if , . 5. -,r 1 R J, fi A , - X . Q 'ff'-i t X '-Ziff-ff' to i 4 , g J? ' 1 " uf ' ' 's ' -, - ' - :Q LH . axe :fl , '. " 3,5 lug la' iifwlh 1- - ,J . - ls. 1 '.'- : :.' la' Ts F2 'Il' ' ' ii- !' " l 1 4' ' l 5 C 1 ' ll u 4 , 3 H 'lf . 'Q A! X , fly. . :lf -Q v 1 J ja. ' rf 4 gi Q., :ZS r the - We 1 . " -. l V-gi - 1 -" :M-": 4 11' 9 Va ,V ,,1 ' ,K , ,Q ,-N 9 ,, rf- - it + - ' r. ff, I L 4, If .h '11, f . HI- '. .V ,,: ,'t h' E1 J If ry i" "gsf:z' Q,-W fi " - - ,A , . ...ZA ' . A ' Q Q 'gr' ' "' t l ' ' 'fl ' if 3'A 'f V Q ., A , .TJ l 1 ' 'V' p 34 gt 1: ".'Y?5y 5?-112 . .- s '. f bf ' If 5 .1 ' T J n 3 . XXI: ,IR I Sf! E Ka . 5' '-:' ' '7 7 1 is 4 p yr I , . V uf . N -s-5 rf' ' , I s . Er. -J -ri , so - Y hymn-Q gf'.f",, f, , . ty, ' - , Nm , P -.Q ' ,I t ,. 13 , - 1 ' M ry' "' , A 5 gf l 'F as .2 Rum K Q ,if 56111 5 -J .5 I-XJ u , A , 5, x In ,T H r In T I 4.1 .'. " ' ' - . I- . .' ' I 'J-I H- -1 r K K Y - 1 ' - ' 3, , ' 'ia ' ' " ':-1 1 : . --W fy- -rf 3: E :- .g , r - N, 'Jil .-.-....i... . 2 L. A , K y ' J. I K l. x 'J , ' S 1. 'S ' ef. Q ' I " ' ' 'H ' . ' 2 f ' ' . ' . ' 'Q ' 1 I ' Y, 1 ' ' s 12 ,I Fi Ni l K - f I 4+ -'A -- -'T nt - f:,. ' '-T ' ' A" IVY? ' 'f""'.'1r"'.f7"V' """"' I W " fs.. 'F N Qvllinfiav ft Q. si ' ' ll -i n ' t t ' p ' ,g. ' - M '-7, " A 5 I 4 , - V. "ij,- , ' ' 'f. 'i H. X U A 0 -4 1-rits., N I v.-15, I . A-5' ,K A, 'A'g..,- , . W .xv-it - .. J -it, x 1 O i , I vlyxi V, ' '-' ', ' Q -1 U ., .- il- ' .1 "'-'3 6, qi A as - 'Le I sg, ' fd 1: . sf' df -1 if L. 1 1 .nt rg H, z . 4: 1 li Ez, it '31-53 i ' - ' ...J E - lx i '- ' . . A1 '41 l ,. ft.,-, -V 3 I 71.5 3, f 5' Q 7 5' f l, fc ., ij lager 5 4. at?i,'.,, ff , i '- , 1 1.2!-,, ' - l 2 -.fu ' ' 'J , o Q4 .' -- -1,2 - W' s Je v I ' E-Qfltfl' ' 6 H4111 , . -7,4 .1'4' 'J , i S ' A ff- Q , ' 2 I be i it wa ia 7.-. ia is-fa .p4xl. 7? 1, ,g gl 4' . ' J ,' .-i A U . 1 . 0 JI. 'vt if A ' L 1 ..-sf fi " 5 ' A - A li - 1 3 i' i .Lt r J . 1 I :fr . 1:14 . .. "' m4 N- if -. f ugh : ' ' ln. . tiki :ni ' N Q , g.,-1-I . V - ' Pg fi.. +2 Il., . KW! f 'G "' " + . btlfh A '54 MARY BERNADETTE EDEL , Xu' .ft L Hype.. 'I lg lie- i ,521 Is. , N, i .L . "The feeling hearts ,V ,-.f. min! Simplicity of life and elegance and taste." ff " ' J, i' . G' ig 53.3 K -'Y -T-13:- 3 . 1 gf, 53: f,-L. - 'jj' We take this opportunity to present to you our Model Senior. Indeed, it is fitting she should be, since she is Prefect of the Children of Mary and President of Student Cofoperation. Mary has been a student at the Mount since she was a wee child. Accompanied by "the family," she has traversed the rural district from the wilds of Erdenheim to school daily without fail. As you may surmise from Mary's ofhcial positions, we place a great deal of faith in her, when it comes to the "big things" in Class action. Withcxiit her helpful hand and wise counsel we should have been at a loss many times in our important undertakings. When her heavy duties have allowed her time to take part in athletics, Mary has shown herself quite a sportswoman on the hockey field. Mary will always be remembered among the alumnae in the future for her unassuming simplicity, for her sense of duty, and last but by no means least, for her funfloving disposition and ready smile, all of which characteristics are so much a part of Mary that we are sure she will always carry them with her. if 13 W 'vw ' ss 1'-Tr--rf ww 'H Q ll if'--if ' -who 'fx lsglf-pall-"?A CLF lar! 'F-39-fe ,IHA f"'Q l. -.I A J'- Q ta , if 'I I nqg.-5' M offs ' 3 ,Lam V4 lvl ics: G59 W 43 S F4 3-fat ls L49 " A W X rs' A P' .nr :,J'L A Q KM' i'f ROSEMARY HELENE FOGARTY u! ml' Ia A daughter o the gods dwmely tall 'QW And most dwmely aw l S Q Rosemary for Remembrance Surely the composer of thxs phrase must have had as hrs mspxratxon just such a person as our own Rosemary No matter what seas we may traverse or what forelgn lands we may v1s1t we shall be accompamed always by fond memorles of our days at the Mount wlth thls most charming of our classmates Equally has she shared our joys and sorrows heartily has she partxclpated m our actxvltles Add to these splendld traits a physlcal attractlon agamst whlch It would be useless t compete Her flashlng brown eyes black halr soft as silk full red llps skln shghtly golden from the sun would lead us to hellcve that the warm blood of sunny Spam courses through her velns yet that thls I5 o her name helles Rosemary IS possessed of an ardent nature whlch expresses xtself to 1ts fulle t extend xn her poetry She 1 truly a daughter of the Muses and fre quently has tome to our .nd ln moments of d1re literary need, wlth her timely poetical eontrlbutlons The most sincere wlsh whlch we have for Rosemary! future 19 that the path she follows, subsequent to her graduatlon, may be a contmuatron of that heautlful lyric whlch was her llfe at Mount Salnt Joseph l -A ,. ,., 1. .,-,. .- ,Nl .W , - .fir . , 7- .- , , ,v V1H,,r-4., :ig -sa, I A .eff " J ' ' r 'f .XV .57 jg - -A lx x. Y' I l 12' x s - . - . . -.aa 'z sl-,gg 90- ' N- K b I .-, 'G 555' '- .YJ - Ig X ' -:Pi l 5 8 I ' w I 5 -s I 14' 1 - N V A .M W ,, , ' M4 5 af .' - s 5' J W Jn V 4 flu, TQ ' aff, . Q., t a t- - - L . .s .t ..s . e r. Q- -are Q., .' ,, tf' , , ' .1 x - 1 if " L?- ', .. ..- '- ': if '-f rf, 1 V, '-. X - . yq 1 J- in h 1 Lila ' xc ' 51 -. , '- , -f 'F 4- 2 s .,:, '11 7 .' ' -A at E y :il 375 - ' ' ' ' 1 71' r l 'l 1, I' ! ' , J , 9 - , ag tr- , .. .I N '1' ' .: ' ' Ta f J, r ' if 1- l f "1 5' "1 K Q V f' 'l N1-7,1-3,1 ' , f ' ' 1 v TNI" LJ ' - "A ,' - ' -' , lf: ' ' i - vs . 1 A - . -1 r a ' V -" Al L h tiff: , . , ,. .4 . : r 5 e '. 'Dfw 5 '--.'3 fs' . -. . . ,. , -. 'QQ' , 'T 6 5 1? -4811 If ,, .y C Vinh, J .KJ 1 .Q 'Tn , ,A . I., ,- i f- ' ,P . -ff V, it 'Q nc ' 4' gl. s .g Wi F l 'Trl 'ls ' 'E?'l:'5l14 V 5 in -I 'Q 'N l - 713 Q' F 3 ri A L' - if '1 EE N . Qt r 1: t f 1: 4- 1 2 .1 - ' 'il - 5 9. - ' 9-QB ' ' f 1 -' Eff ' :"'. ' ' . ,l , qs. ,f ' 1 ,- . :. Q, fl ' --A . 45 , L - .1 4 'i4h,,?' t ,- 5 . . . x., iw, In 'Q .t . , I- .' , I - ji -1 , , .. " F v'7V : , I . ta V I lit. ,N , 1 .. y f . . 'X' 1 .F I 4 Z q. hy. , . . 1, . Ez ., I -y , , ' Lf,-. H ' 't-' 1 - fir E v -was iq ": c: ' 61 1'.' : v..:u. . ,.x, w-----1---i-, ' I l l ty - x . . X . , - , V . - I g , . - ., A Y xl Q . . A ' ., Q ' . ' . ' ' . o . . t, , ' . , t, -, , :rx S I A ,L .A S ,x 4 . I I . K xx x x , t. .A . . 5 , S t, ' 14 I ,-.. -' 'I -"V:-'ff-Q 'A ':': - -1, ' W ' "H " ' If 7" ' V--fQf"3Z5?" " - - r, .sf,'-?. - - M w 13, ' , we I L,-wiv 'E x Q fflgu P- A 'r iw lz ' Q1 1 I x , N Q ' ' ." ' ' lq ll i g 5 ,qt 'U .r ,fr .,.-. fre! ,QBY0 is sf ,gf 'L' -,iw fa- -x. ,., . 0105 s a , ' Q . , . I-., QM ' . ,. 64.2 e l 1' v ' .ll If 1 'J " 'f Ffa.: L .A 4' . hs is--an A 5 , V ,fs ' fps i . iq ,,.. 3 ll -y' 'il' 'ix' 'V ffgl. .- r 'f-- is 3.- 5 ' - :J .,: 3 , ,any 4 '-, - ICO 1' 1 -- in i "-V ' i ' c- 'N "PTI .' x Y' 5 3, 2 ff ' - 4 5 Wk aff 331 Q' -' '3 " iff- ' is ' I 1 A L . :' 3.'jf-j'- Qing, a K -rs. 35 14 swf! , 5 L1--3 4 2 P I' , 3111 X ' ' i. vinifyg-Zzfli . SEIEJ5' . ' 702 Ql,,i!'9 in if-s ' H -J .r . .- jf ' ,-Ln., I .94 -.N J ' 1 ., if is fifl l- 4? wi: 'ne 24' . 1-L f W . ' ' 3 - fed ,fa s XA r -L: 7,41 I Ir. 1 , 'ff - 'Q -' --:gif i .- ,sxp ,t A r a " if . i . 2 ' 'gh' are 5 Y-f . ,aff 5 1 ' s 't ff r. Q vea- 5 in 0 MILDRED DOLORES JONES W, ' . .-1: i -. , .1 '3 If 'L ' . V g, 1 Itch h h L' -h-1 ' Q 1 5. ,, 1.1 n ,I eevful at mom s e wakes from s oft repose A 3 ,GE Q 11. '-"f 4 4. -:fi Breathes the keen air and carols as she goes." Tia ' . ,IK Q :tw A A "2 'A ' ' ' ' 5. ' f .fil Who would associate this jolly dayfscholar with the quiet hoarder of two years ago? Yet Mildred has been transformed from a sedate, unhurried resident student to a worried UD, rushing dayfscholar, scurrying for the 8.40 bus with the rest of us poor, benighted creatures. Mildred is one of the "Three Musketeers," or Inseparables who are seen so often, armfinfarm, traversing the groundsg and she is as indispensable to this trio as she is to the Class of Thirty. Mildred ranks with our most popular young ladies, and we assure you that at social affairs, she is usually "the belle of the Ball." Her genial and sympathetic nature will never permit her to be friendless, for one is drawn to Mildred's cheery presence as to a magnet. Mi1dred's sole failing, one about which she has frequently and mercilessly been teased, is her absolute faith in anything she is told. This unusual credulousness is probably due to her being the baby of the class. In the years to come, after the winds of time have dispersed us all, perchance we shall discover Mildred's chosen work, which at present, seems undecided. Qur parting wish to her is that she will attain success in all her undertakings. 15' 5 .c ! x x , -' ' , 1 v. K ' L' f 4 'Y S'-.4-ix 1' Q4 .,.,, R1 ,L . , ,Z-jg:3,?.l,1 , .Rav-w - ,- .jg sy.- N t y. -1,17 aragf- J t e ff-ana-ss' f is i is , 5 an , "' R' " - . ' ., i. . tx ' -G, I ,, ' ea iii? 1 ' L, 'z i ' 4 ' K "',l7.. 1 'uf ff fi 1 E. 63 no . vii , ,vi , '.'. , '1 -' . 's - A -- -' flu- ' . A ' lil If 1 36, - 'Ti ,Z .46 .. an 3 jp 5- I ty Q, - .-, L ,i , ..,-L. +.4.a.,,. w,i.x,rg 'egg "Wi: ' 9 T7 "' f 'li 4 1 ,- - .w 1 A: vga 5 ' M 15 1 Jw ,w 'QE'- lbmff '-:init be . ' , .. f.,v , Lu, 'it'-Q E 'J' 'L ,ul-5 .5 'zfdkjm '14, T R? ." ,. v -rg.-' : - , 51' '.., . ri If P 2 'fe 3 if 19 14 .2 V' Q 47: fl figs' -9 gf gf ll, 'N ., xltla 'fi " ' Lv s . i 95 l' 3--' -. ZF1. . -'iq-1r""' ' .,' l ' ru? -.' A -7. 2 -,, ' ' 'Tl 5 I 'V 5571" - ,G N - ' ,y eg-':f'Q ll 6 gr L ill- ' M' ' ii, ' 4: t-1 F rl A i -, 23:41 : 59p-.H pf - ls' ' 1.-:ga-1 .f -J' tg j"'isy, - ' 8 U3 it far ff r - - - 0 U " 'Kgs' ' a,-Q ,ul 'I l 'i-A V' ' ' . H 5' 'll 'h ',Q .-A K . I .1 ' If 4' j ail ,fl L k ,,, ia .. ,das 1 .5-1 qt,-3.,, i i- gt f ef- "' arf oh" l -L 41 Mn " H f ' '7 I4 QT 'nic 4' a' . S, ' 4 . -, , - f f-L i Mr f:-V.-1, R 1 .'- ' ' . ' Q, -ff 11. , U, N-ogg . V142 H , .,- -r bmi -. a ,F , krg! GERTRUDE DOLORES KELLY j f, i iqzhu , . . - .nf V' -L l ' Wt, if- J his-:' 'l, "Let the world slide, let the world go . 'Q :.1 A rg fm H fig for s if , HD"-f 1'-""."'L.',I Z' ' Gertrude has been "Snook" to us for three years and the pet name Hts her perfectly. Her "personality bob," her laughing blue eyes, her ready smile have made her dear to us as a classmate and a friend. 'LSnook" has the humor of the class of '30. Carefree, happy-goflucky, Gertrude has taken few things seriously and has worried about a still smaller amount. There is always a certain gleam in her eyes accompanied by a faint smile at the corners of her lips that mean so much to one who knows her. This smile is a part of her: without it, we should not recognize her for the Gertrude we have come to know. Her talents, too, have helped to make her a popular member of the class. She has frequently entertained us with her dancing and her reeitations, Her radio "fans" as well as her elocution pupils, appreciate her promising voice. "Miss Kelly's Saturday Morning Dancing Classes" are also popular. Gertrude came to us in her Sophomore year, but her dayfstudent friends soon persuaded her to become a Mdayfhopf' and so desert the "boarders" We hope now that you are about to leave the Mount, Gertrude. that we shall not be so unfortunate-The Class of '30 hopes to retain you and your delightful ways for many years to come. 16 txt'- ww? Nr f"""r Y- I ey 45 ,3 ,X c if 4,31 Sz 'N- -.... 'fig Qi. LS,-"o!vt,f.Nq '4 949- f BNF l X! r5i 51311 I-:gf 'S' fl! M, 154 F un ' I i LETITIA MARGARET MQCAFFREY About the corners 0 her llps The smzle that is essentzal she fb , J t?1 f may fl QV R Aa G5 'M' M ""' iz, 'SQQ A hlt of golden halr above two smllzng eyeQ two hew1tchmg dlmples and you have the faclal notes of our Margaret For four yearn we have watched her grow from a mlschlevous laughlng Freshman mto a lovely wxtty Senlor WOgglC IS a great teaser and fun maker and at our small lnformal Qoclal affalrs Woggs has always been the llfe of the party But She has alio her QETIOUS Qlde for durmg many a "free" perlod we have Qeen her golden head bent earnestly over her desk Margaret's actxvmes have embraced every phaee of school lxfe, io that now there are few departments whoae rostem do not hold M195 McCall'rey's name We slncerely hope that the Quccesses that have crowned her School days wxll follow her through llfe K.-, ,n w 4 -'fy-f'TE31, K1 fr:-, -, ' ,7 ' fx Y " -it V - f 2, 7 -,1.'.fr'f 'Jr F 1" ' n - N . .- 1. 1143: , I .,-' . M if A X 5 f ,, T 4 A- . . - 'N , K ' a . ,J 7 fwfr 'f tl' K, V 1. 1"':f - ' ' .. ' "X ", A . .A , ., , ' vt ,f - . tfjgr '-- .H ' , I . ., -Q ' eww: D. L , 'ji w b K-A Q I' U -A L Q I an 49 Q. -If 2,5-1,1 ' ,I .wr ' Y ly,-A , P' - .. -' 1... Q . ,e . W, .-... if fr' 'gg ,I - '- . . - ui r . - r ,C 1, -'5 J , YY .L 'if lx nd -. . ,A af e -l f., . 1' 2'-5 ' ' . -, "ff 1. .iff :Ls -l if- 3 f ' "Wi -- 7-gr ii .- ' A 1. :el i vgfk' .I 1" . - 3 5: ' -:ll -ip, :Qing 1 l Q l 5. Jw ,V 5: ,Ungar 5 - 5 .1 - .-yy , Q. L , , ,x-:Ty ew ' ll. 4' ' , ,lb -L . 2 ,, - . - 1 ' - --':- -1, A NLC' h I. , , A' 2 - le ' qv . -f. , 1 ,,. 1 ' ' v . - lf 1 A he , .::f:' J - , . L Y- V ' Q V... B 1 ' A fi. 1 E 2 qgcn if Q, l . - 'V 4 -L n LQ, Y ff. Al iff' 'Zvi 1, 1. 1. ','If"7 . ' "Q 'E '- .2 , '- u s . ' 5 ' DL . -N' ,fi 1.5 - 54 , -' V X ' -- li-,ill -5 he V , - 4 jf , Q- ev.-'ffi-f , ' 1 fix It if - A Eli! f 'l ' iii -T:- j-'ff fj I Q 1 li J ' lm,-. - . H552 X -h , t l e -- , so ' " ' -1 .S ,-J x -I5-V it -1, . "F R ,r. v av . -. ! -9 ' ' A ' 7 .- s I , f . :J I V v - ' H - ' f ' .- 1 A 4 . f r r . ,gk I 1. Q1 - A - :ll LQ, '. , Q It -,ff 4- - ' 5. ff-' 74- I ' ' '- Q .4575 ffa, Q . , . . K, . . . W C . . , 17 Wvif 'W Q f 5' 5 1" Q" 6: is .A ufm w muo W 'Wm Sl , N ' cl J WZ f- ,LD "' fir Er .ef gh 'R , .IQ ii, f 7-355-if r .L sf? fini ll 'lrlls ' U been is rf - .fl tags r .. A 4 MARIE GERMAINE MCMAHON mf ln, Age cannot wrther her nor custom stale Q? U P" Her m mte vavrety 'V I In Marie we had a real daughter of The Mount She Lame to us h L ln 18 a d all her hook knowledge 19 the result of her study here durmg, the list twelve years Memes dependahlllty IS proved hy that faet that she has been class treasurer SIX years presldent of the A A and captam of the Purple Team m her Semor year These latter posltzons were earned hy hrrd work IH hockey games and on the basketball floor Marle has a great mcentwe rn all sports and the mcentrve seem to he qmte satlsfled with MlCkCyS athlctlt prowess We are rather doubtful 1 to Marxes plans for the future but wrth her tenac1ty ol purpose and her ahlllty of mal-:mg firm frxendshlps we know that she wrll he successful m anythmg she undertakes It has heen sald that lf we should stop some day ID the near future, we shall find Marxc seated ID a prrvate office next to that of the town burgher shut rn by zu door hearmg the formldahle slgn "M1ss Marle McMahon Prrvate Secretary" - 'PV ' I ,. - ..-f- ' , ,.' . fa ' v-- v -,sn ,,, f' 'I' , Z . ,a K-. - i r , I. b-he -.r ., 15.10 J W ,f H - 'A y f , 2, ,. f f, l , ---' r . 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Q .N Q- 75-, 'A :ff " ' 'A nr le ' W , '.- I- Z-r 1 V., . N -, , , . l' 'gf' "Al, f f., , r ' , ., Vvf - V - P ll!-H - x , V , 1 K, ' L P1 . "' I . ' R c-' 1 , ',.Q - 'N F ' 'f 1 , l 'n N iff' - 5- B rv I f' Y ' fs., I JJ , y , ' ' -.sl r T , -. ' 'B xv- , , lg-' ,-V " ' , K , l 4 ' '.'..l l e, ' .J - fi - ' ,IH x I N i:--' fi H Z ., , ., A ' 4.21 FA .gh , , ITIL .......-.-il.-.- -1-1 V , V .. -1 ku .aayk . . .. n s 1 I I Is' I , Q - 4 is ,Al el' 5 . . - A , 51 - v is N V ' X 'I an - L! it ' as ' ' , ' ' . J l ., A - . I 18 A I YE' Q g ffl' if We-e '- -mg bm 1 Sli. 9 w U' Ylpqf 5: Jr I It A ,Ae oi J JI. "P"4'2' l me sz, r LSpg,,""7,Jfi5,v!J PATRICIA JEANNETTE McMANUS I own Tl stttclz I mould not we To lzer who asked me to 4 px qv ul V517 JD' f 5 Q 4-1- I I J' 'No sqm, 55 W 4 5, 34 I '43 XA 45" 1.1 C ,I L: V da 4' ,ks '-k.,'-.edu ' 4 ' 1 '1 wx? 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" "Y - Ig tml K :elif V 1 5 L. -A 5 t -. 1 G'-1 .-f A , 'fp' L ,.'- , , - '11, - " . P- . hx l I R ' ly ' V, 1 fr' ,r 'Q -U if 'ia r 4, ' -'L Ly? fix t ' 1 E2 V - - ' 1 ' ' . 1 v i J I . .. . . ?A,4. ' 'I' 3 4 .l I 1 ra' 0. i 1 -I H -1- ,h s ,VI H N 4- no , ' . Qi- ' "' -IFJ" '. ' NI l- J-1? Y wx: Pat 'S of the ' A - ' ass' .' oA ' 'la.':. l 5 ' 5 5 ' zs 1 ' y 1 ' ', 'V S ' 'S J ' ' .1 ' ' 'z E 1 'jr 2 . ft 5 o , . A 4 x 1 , F 5 ' 2 'K 1 ' F Q " ' s "1 A ' 1 ' '. .. 1 . 1 ' . . ' 1 ' 2 ' . ' S, 1 ' 5 ' ' ' , a' S e . Y' ' ' '. ' Q E il. " . 1 Y E I" Y, ' " lj S, ' ' ' . 1 1' as ,hen Am 1 one t1t1an halrecl l ies t our c ss t seams she hu klssecl the Blnne Stone and lmblhed just enough of It Splfll to mike her loxlhle and agxeelhle Bceiuse l her great love for Erln she may truly he called 1 dxscrplt of the Sunt xlter whom she IS n uned Patrlelas eyes slmply rwmkle W1th each newly concocted seheme md prank yet when one looks deeper lnto these pools of hlue one clearly ees kmdnes and clnrlty 1n then depths llcr ocxnhlllty and natunlness alw1ys attract compamons to her and hue m nde her 1nnumer1hle mend Throughout her four years of Aeademle llfe we h we e n lor the greater pant the unny side of Pats nature When she enters into the splrxt of any OLLJSIUII she 1 lUCVltl ly found most enthusnstlc and altogether untlrlng Hex galety IS o mntaglous th nt he h olt kept our sp1r1ts 1l1ve and made us IU splte of ourselves LILIIIC happy We feel that she wlll go through llfe earrylng rays of sunshme to the people whom, perthance old bol has mxssed Pat wnll pass wlth the rest of us through the Wlde flung portals of the Mount, but the merry rlng of her laughter wnll re echo 111 the hearts of those she leaves hehlnd l 19 s...--, ,wprgq 't L., 1,-saab? ph-4 --.Q fl' A , I ' I X W as wh if J My X ,555 uhm aw ,ps ,M nw f 5 L QP at tak! on , lg ard, ' is me ' "I s WL gd my vw Q7 pw-Q-.ai if r .gl 1 J' C. Q P l -4 f 'li' " J' CLAIRE LOUISE MATHIEU l ' In Q' In ,' ,X Starred wtth actxuty The pmt n these restless days .Q Here we have the w1tt1est and gayest llttle MISS Ill th1 whole wlde school Clalre IS our blues Chaser and ln saymg, thxs we speak from expeuente Many tlmes at 9 '40 the dull sleepxness of a eorrldor has been sh xken from IKS slumber by the figure of Clalrc draped ID a bed spread and hatted m a lamp shrde trlppmg down the hall The orxgmator of the 810 whxle maklng bed song Clalre has gharmed us with a fine elear soprano VOICC Besldes hemg our olhual gloom dlspeller Clalre 15 our xde center In basketball and centre orward on the hockey Held As to art hcr work speaks for xtself ln all wlth her many talents and cheery drsposmon Clalre IS faxrly 1nd1spenaable to the tlabs of nmeteen thlrty Although we have known Clalre for ten years and lcel that we understand her falrly well, there IS just one questxon we should like to ask What was the attractxon ln Room 467 Claxre re rather hazy as to her future At tlmee, the thinks she would enyoy the busmess world, but personally we surm1se she will take a speclal course IH 'How to care for the "Bob o link' ' ff Tf"':' ' ".,,v'x Q Vu., ' Y! T" .l,- . :V e'4, .- 9-Zip'-?: '-3'-?T"1' " - lvcf av ref r " M N ' " A' ,ww 1 ', J. , K3 Wx' ' . - fx'-,, '9 l Dk J . A " i I 2 7 W W - . 4 I 4 .- 1, ,-,ml , 4 1 'Y 1 . 9-llj .f ' l' . ls' , ,N 'f ' . Q V22 .74 ' ' . ez: f' A' " l 1 ' . "y Z, Z- H 1 : ' .. f V' 4 ' " V it 4. IV:-Eb cr- A .A l M?.:, ,. . . . .K 4 I In l I .3 'I :Atl 1 by- it ,-N " ' A Q: 2 ffl.. ilu' ff kJ, N 8 5 ' 1 W l ' ' r V ' E 3 rx" if I . A S3 ,N -,' ll yjtgpqr-'EJ ,, BA ' up 6. r ' F VY- 'J' v 4 Q - - f ,T v.: 4 - 'Apt ,gg ' jef.1a2,J ' 'QL '7' , - . r - D ,' ' 4 ' T . ' ' - . I F . ' 9 r 'S 5 Fil -- r .r- f - A -f- ' ' ' , - I 1'. . . Y 'a'l.1'.12-f- ' '1 A A it 'r . ' i2'i.,, P2 3,52 "'f' - at '- . " .2 ' " QA' ':' V . ,ENSEUU 1 ' le.. fi-11: 1 - -'. - ,'.,r 1, It 5- 'ff 4 'i p V Yi' ' 51" ,im I ix, -- - ,E . Aff? B. , ' . lk-5: 'N ,N , ' I ' 11, 4, Jilk .. . . .'. E-A L: Z I 1,4 l. -' u, S " f ,- .- i' -'l f y, , " . -r r ffl, 1 ff ..'-lt, .l ,.5'1 ,ft .AE ,jwnzxifll . 3-.1-.... gi----L ' ' x. I, Q ' V 'SS F ' X- A X1 ' A N ,. rf N I A l 7 -', ' I ' - 'V ' . l ' .. , I K s 1 . Y , ' f ' s" . , ' 5 .1 ' a' . ' ' . ' I . ' . U 20 I ly"---'g."' - R- -f-EQ, - -Q -of -rm 1 ""Vlll'c:'-if 'ff X' rf'-ull," -tm' , -seg gl me N R . . A ,-j' , A ye N i I s .1 -'u .. -wif. , -, ,ii I F'-i I E 4 L K I 5 A ' L 5 wif-vl K ' ,- V -"'-1-. ' gli! X. , ,qw , 15 -2: A 'L - 3 K ,gf-rs .i 1, -L, ' - , .rip V A - Ei ' w " 'V i-i L .- .. xxgff l ' 4, fi:2'2" ,8 Q' 1-79- ' fl 5 IZ " . yi --' "- . ' SQ' 2 ' f- f 1 " A' 1- 3 . 1 , 1 is ,,. ,A .V . J,f!g, , K -. mt , ,V . 1 IP I V. F.. W Q , ' -I A ,Lv - -A V A -V - - r as - f lg, s '.' 4 "1 -I ' ' " ,sa - ' 'LF b. ' 'Sf-E ' rgw i j, if W , ..' ra V TQ, IE: ,Llp .5 'L ki '7-. - l 'Q 5" ' -'. gf ti: , ' Q55 iv, ,- th Q. -T1 ,Qi H Q ' ' V fin- 'Y iff, 2 1? ' .. .5 Wifi' 5 55,4-5-. E, L 'fi " f GAF- , i.'2!.:' ' ' , ' E ' ' Z' i v-11 'f,..7f' gf-A " , g .Q , 1:1 . , - ,V n ,I R, .,, 5 . ' ' rfg -': - I , Alf, A 1, f', ' f "- "'sf'w?1-' - V' 49 ' Y'-F 5?-9 fl "y 2. - ,-.rm 1 13,2 ', 'I - 5. '.-. ff W 9 5 " ' Z.-"l :- GV- - ' ' 1. 'J i,-.hp q ', I . 5 ri F I Y.. git:-ll! :-is s ai l ,Ai 'EQ ' gi-31 Ei A ' . ' . 5 Tig "Q " Sy-f E' 'f f' 4' - 4 . "Ra i 4.4 ef gigef' 5 Q ,Ji . Ad .Q ,Ji u 'Il'-t p tml: . ' '. ,.' -' 11 '-,-Ju . i v-J. 1, .4 Il ' Ive l' fra- p , TQ , i 6 K sf' A, V LQ 6. -1 '-.f R. ' - gf R ,F Q ga EDITH CATHERINE MURRAY gag 23,30 f e'- , - ,Q ' i 1 A A' ' sw W1 Q ' ' my "The 'rising blusliex which her Cheek o'er spread . l A' 3' A g ':, Are opening roses in the lilies' bed." . 4 I-?1.x L '1 ' ,.,, 3, - 5 ,2 . .. , . :Q Being the one and only representative among us of the L'Smoky City," Edith is unique among the members of the Class of Thirty. We, her classmates, are not unappreciative of Pittsburgh's benevolence in sending so likeable and charming a girl to join us. Tall. supple of Hgure, and gracious of mien, our Edie is a perfect picture of vitality and superb health, Her dark brown hair is drawn into a demure knot at the nape of her neckg and at times, when, as presiding officer of a class meeting, Edith sets forth her presidential opinion on some question, her eyes flash blue Ere and the lovely color floods her cheeks-- to her dismay and our delight. As Captain of our Basketball Varsity, Edith has led the Mount on to splendid victories, as Business Manager of the Team, she has been kept busy arranging interfscholastie games: and as Treasurer of the Children of Mary Sodality, her ingenuity has been taxed in devising ways and means of wrestling "dues" from somewhat impecunious members. Wliile here at the Mount, Edie has never willingly sought the spotlightg we feel sure that it will not be long until she is a shining light in the business world of bituminous Pittsburgh. l. 21 f' U -1 . . .I ' Q-j.,:f-Az' -- ,'A .V .iw - Q . -. . YN, ,?... In . H5 .4 4. ',i17..,s'..4,9 -avg-3, . . ff-1., T .M , f-A-"elif-lg' J, " fl i ff 1? S' x -A x f K ' ' .W ' . f , ,K - . - l'rl - . ge t ,475 ,, 'H i i f T W . Q 'ta' 4 1354 i x l v lil . V . .xX W 1 '44, I ,L ' ' .1 Xu' ' - f ' 'x 4 Y 'hifi' + e.- . .. api? 1:1 "'i 'if 1 lli- 'lf' if " -.1 ', 2 . f L.. 'Gt r ' " w as V -in V Wi glq ia " t i All'f"- - f ' 1 . ,J S1 ' ,X ' 'N ., ' ' 'T 5 . 7-F 4-li: ' H e i A 5-'Lf .f if ' 5: L- ' is .' ,ia p 'vt 3 1' -aa af' , i n-I s uv. J , . f f .Lili ,, it 9 i gi E3 ' - . -1 xi ,saw .4. -1 q, ',. ' ina' -.- ii "ll, . -if .- - GZ. -V 'Q 'Q 5 ' '-.NN ri I. L5::5':j X413 " X li ,.'x d'.'L ff" QA 'l rfflel i " - : V' wA,cl5ii-73,1 Y E--,gi 1123 rs, -M, lp' :Qi "4 7 it . l". ' A W 4, TN .. :lil 1 ,7 , ,gli--'q5r. 1 i 1 ,. s . 2' 1 1 ,Z I in f .1 'E 1 fr ai' . ,Q Q 71,1 fm rw- , gaggi- :- ' , . " . .vi ', -- - ' V -- A- i Q-. T. . .P ,wil l lp V- NH'-. X L fs! 1 s , .4 - We ,af 'W v . MARY MADELEINE NOLEN Mgf, ' fli' ' M . 'f ' MQ: 'V , 'Q "Kind tongue that 'never wounded, Lui Q' .- . 1 - - H '- r Q! 11 Q-' ' 'Nr Sweet mirth that leaves no scar. :f, ' E . 4,1 ' - . . . ' 4 .1, H pc-.,-,. ,.-v is-.. E L Ts. W tr: A A q... f- "-1 - .n Even those of us who have known Madeleine intimately for four years find the time scarcely long enough in which to sing in praise of her many charms. Life will never be dull for Madeleine, Her ready sense of humor will always accompany her, finding something about which to smile on the bluest Monday. Her spontaneous, bubbling laughter, which almost overcomes her when she prepares to tell a funny story, is enough to excite 'kOld Man Gloomu himself to glee. Madeleine must indeed have been a model child, eating all her spinach and crusts of bread, , for in no other way could she have acquired such lovely curls. In so charmin and retty a Miss one would scarcel ex ect to find a keen a business if P p n Y P n p sense, yet the success of our advertising department is due largely to her untirmg efforts, strongly supported by her charming appeals. It is with fenuine regret that we sa farewell to Madeleine, but since it must be, we bid P- Y n I you "Au Revoir" not "Goodbye" and the best of good fortune in your chosen profession. 22 ' ffuxfi 2 J """' 1-t pg? x 'Al 5 of' it ffl? if sqm. apr my lxggm fm fs 51525 K gvx. egg -vx.f"" Jhg, wi 'll 44: 'N l'f If 4. -U' x 1 --fx .l ,QA 9 5' W a"a1f.v+-,, Lg 1' Q A 1' fr? Y s 'L' XA 11 'N 0 l if 9 vo I 'J' Q I A Q 4 Lgpq 'lf' fi E SARA MARIE OCONNELL N If l i 'That through them one sees the soul Sl' lr win Fifi im K 0 Eyes so transparent Four years ago rt was our pleasure to meet Sara an omewhat reserved a rather qulet but an always slncere Sara And four year htve not changed these sterllng native qualltxes Warm of heart Sara holds a very hlgh place ln our esteem but although thls qulet manner has won her many fr1ends xt has kept her from achxevmg the prommence tn the classroom that should be hers by vlrtue of her dxlxgence and mtellrgence Then too she can add to these qUr.ll1li16S a tenacxty of purpose that enables her once she begms a thmg to work at lt untzl she has brought rt to completlon There IS no Let xt go' attltude to Sara Despite the pralse she has recerved for her dzlngence and success Sxra has stood amongst us a model of srmplxclty, sxmpllcrty wxthout a shadow of shallowness ' Hers 1s a dellcate company touched nexther by the mad VOICE of selfish amhrtlon nor the pale wh1sper of mdolence Rather It 19 a company of finely wrought vlgnettes strung on the skem of fnendshrp, whose lmks are few, but whose wealth of brlllxance hold the clear tone of value welghed and fortunes acquired " I 'm " 'f S "2 - ' " ' . ' H ' I 'T ' 1,54-'-'ff'.r' '.-7-WM' ' F3 It , I - tk , I f I ' .' ' - V .' 'l - .S , A X' ' , - 'l - ph ' . X 2- f' I f- X X -' .1 .I V , ,I LV" 'qs ' I r X- ' 4 L 3 ji, ' . y -456 Q 2 , ' r . t r... ' 7: , , U 4: ff 'A ,:! l r I, .255 1. -Al Q, ,. " I- 3 4 .VY ff, 1- t-lf .- . 5. fb ,- My If may ,, t p in ,cy fl' gf 'T "ia 1f'lL"' :H - I I '1' 1 gg W A- f : - - - , 1, ' r I A"--.1 . sl , Q 3, 4 I A: . A nn ,I wh. A6 1 ' .f ,'1 - , ,fib ' T- ' '. ,Jr Lv. - ., Q. , -Lf: 1, ' 1-lf, .,. ,J, fn-nl ' 2: 3 n 1 . -' Z' I .I 71-5 1. Ja?" -, ,-.li X 511 f. 9. L971? A D n , ggi, ,. 'E Q t ' Z it' P Till, ' -A 1.1, 1' , ,E '. - . I X s -.I ' gy, 'ff' :- '- .Q 0 ' yn- 2.. .f' i. , f ,I ' , ' J . A g ks I x ,gi 3 ' 'fa 3. l ' ' - -' 1 X, Y . 'n-- Pl : p I :Ill T.. I. L 4 1531 ' . Qi, " - 14-l --, 4 as or up rf . t. .Q 5. - 7 ,ri . - V ,gg :, A , -9 A Q u ,SI .-A 1 Il 1 ' ,gl ff, .. A 14 -' ".' ,X Q .-13, 'J . .1 . 5. . arf. J -if Lf... I ,urs 'L Lx, mu -1. xj 1 1 qu - I rf 0 ,.:-. chi-J, A. f EL-,,' f I ' Q W ,1 -.1 I' f -up 3:3 A. n . ' ' ' ' -.":-A' ' , .R .. I. . I . gn .- - vs' 'E 1 ' M If 1.:' X, I an 2 '.: 2 'ff :::,,'.f,"'.' I 5 ,I A , 1 I --1 .Era :J A I I 5...-xl' -J 3 Jam ? ,-I ..,, 1, ,wr - , J, V- wp V A ,. v V id ' 2 6 ' -'Le 1-1 5 ,H I is uf, I A . 1 .. V ' 5 J. . 1 - -' 1' 5 Q1 ., ...O 1 -' 37 ' ,, ' -C iq X 'O 0' 51-, Q - 1 X . x A - , V . I? 1:-QQ..-,.. .A - 4523 ..,. --,. , r .. 1, X-i A q . ' . . A, f . , . S A: , ' , ' , ' s 2 I r . A ' ' ' . ' ' A A Af ' J., si .s . . 23 Wg...- "fzlWo-einlmc' ,N-QU .gg ,L 1' 'I -is LT'-tr lu 'sig -I' 1 NZ Jiv- l f"Q .JI A lo ,T ,x f L 5026 5 7 MARIE DOLORITA O NEILL O all tlwwe arts m which the wwe excel Ll +1 'fprv 4 of Rf? lr w yffnfii B I5 K ree? we px 131 H39 ,Ju uv' ' F rfrf-A by 74" iii? E, fe Natuvea clnef masterplece IS wmmg well If you should ehance to See a young lady nonchalantly enterxng the study hall at 8 59 you have met Dolonta and we hope you apprcuate the honor We don t know under what sxgn of Zodiac she was horn but we are sure It was an unusual one for rarely does one meet a glrl so gxfted Her talent or rather talent's are purely creauve and Quch orlglnallty as hers IS at a premlum MUSIC and hterature are her forte Wxthout the ald of a note she can command the most wwtful or the gayest melodles wlnchever fancy wxlls So remarkable IS her abnhty ln rhxs llne that we should not be surprlsed were Dolorxta to become America s foremost composer the rlval of Romherg and Fnml The proof of our conhdenu. H1 her Wrltmg ahxhty was her almost unanlmous election as our edxtor Vvlorda are her puppets, wlt her ally, and success her result From our praxee and appreuatlon of Dolonta you can be sure we are proud of her We hope always to be pmud ol her and to he able to say amly, "We were her classmatea once at Mt bt joseph " Beat wlbhes to you, Dolorlta, and may you enjoy Quccess and happlness Ld ' ,Lf ' 7, . r , . ' I . , W, A - - A..- , Y . . . 1 .A .N ,L . - :I A, - v A V- Q. I.-,Era-,-Fr., r-n,,-,,,r,. 11, L'-v 5' .gl ' to lf 'lr r V - .' fl' r W A - f 2 W N -e .- it an -- ' -7 1 Z' X ' ' ' Q J ' l .. i t - 1 le Q, 1' " ' 271 Y , v-- . - V. U A 4 4, ,... . ,f .vw ij. . K by I - - - , 4 r 1 -D 2 l 4 , A.: to :fc L. U: ,lx u ' lL Q'-4' '1 f' - -4 V' A- 5- L -- yr 1-'-- ,rl .N-. 'Y' ,sw 1 ' j r, r, u p ' ' -1 . Q ' .Q-, l' I -' f'l.l: ' A ' A LB ,ru . J ' Q -, " lp IL," Lge , w I. x Lyla v-F :C 4 Fig:-, ,LIL -.1 fa In sq: ,: . . I 9 1: " ' -. 5 n. L 2 ,1 '11 ' e 5 ' ' 0:15 " It ' 4 ity, V, W W A ' , ' 4 ,. 'Y n I4 Q: g ly- 13. ' gtg? lg N ' an ' N e f . . 1' 1- ' - P, A f F' l . r K, A ' 1 It T , A lag- 4 R, wg In ,X v . ' he 5115. 4' if ' F . W W l . , ,x . , . '-r' f f :W X lf:-1'-'C'. I 9 E 'N i- PF' I L ., me . Eg: '-or 'R , if 5,1 gf ' 5 if- r . n , F J -is - l fi ' , '-'W -14 nz . f 'agar' l ' D . 4-1 it E,:,...?1" X : if 'Ju d ' K ' , JQJC f V ni W' -- N F e fl ' " 25 S595 u , tv,-7,Lj,'Re' l-5, 1' I f. ' I-. ' - f .. . . . ' 1 . . ., fi. f W r y I , ,ix : ' Q" X 1 ' l it er! ' -W F '51, 4 ,. . ' ' .' .LA V. :A ,fu :K , HN: ,O 1-"-Q" l..-...... 4' 1 tl I xl lr' 4 Q D I 'tl , 24 A 4 W 1 K I l'ii'll'm In V' 'T'?'f-' '1 -' it ' ' " ' if 'V ' '--T-97" "'T-Vw: fs. for new I - so i , M Irs? x- .ff ' 1: 4 N5 - af' I K H - - - -fy:-L Y Q , I V 4 S. n M - .I-1:5 1 -f L . it-Q: 5 - If ' , ' -rl , - " ' 4-11 L? M ' :aj ' ,' I I ig: L 7 N 4.1 tive! 'N ' 'fm gif- 9' f. - .my we 3, .gwpifg .I KM. . .ffm .I .I -fy H 1 , A , - q I, 1 A, ,. K, ,J ,Q A- T :Exp Mya rg p-t p' JIS . zjfg k W s f lf'r.'- X -gl '-'li ' l nga Fx ' L vs .-ggi, , it X hi - "W L ,. ,:-Y' I I ,ji L -,-'I-', '.,:' 6:1 -,' -,EL X, 'iw-L Q 1 ' I ' ,P-. f-V L If A 12 I Y T I Z: p , .'5'f?:" " v ' Q, ,. gc I ,13 1 f 2' ' KU JT'-I, 'wgg -"-ff: ' ' I 'I 9 3' 90, f--Q QQ, ' 3 I - ' A Kd! "K It .A' "I" ' ' 3 P N 'b'.g - W-L a-as 1 - af . -- gn -sf-or r " I . , It 'si ?ll"l ' "7 'ff I1 ' -l Ld- if fa 'IA M Ar A 'Aggi es 5? .521 J l 'V' y h s r'--f--11':-- 5- 1 4 'if 1 1- ' " 4 i f 'T P Ee..-' - LA " '. r' lI9i' I V , Bijan . - .1 -.-. f A r-. . -U I. '1,f :sf V ' 'J Q I ','x an rf 2 . 2 9 P -4' ' P P 'iff It N I ,ff 'N . 'i V 15, MARIA SYLVIA PHILIPS p Q ke' I GR "Humor flickering hushed and wide ,. , .' ' X, 4. ':,1 As the moon on morning waters." qf h ' 4 " ' -ggi '-V " --ls! .qua 1 3- '- ' 2-"4-1 ..-'L I-li., During the past year, Marie has frequently entertained us with her numerous and varied stories. We submitted meekly to whole orations on camp life, stories of aunts and uncles who "reall aren't aunts and uncles, you know," the history of the famous "Philips sneeze"g and last, but certainly by no means least, we have listened with bated breath to her "Aubrey Stories." Every morning, regularly as clockfwork, the strains of "Can't We Be' Friends?" float out from the Senior Corridor. When the final note dies away, in a mournful diminuendo, we can be certain of the fact that the Philips' bed is made and the Philips' "Domicile," ready for the inspection. If all the folks in Allentown are as congenial and merry as Marie, that city is certainly an ideal community. Many times has Marie proven to us her inestimable value as a friend, by the countless little deeds of kindness which she has performed. Whatever blue days may come our way after june, the remembrance of her happy, dimpled countenance will cheer us, and her brown eyes will shine through the deep blue that engulfs us. None but our best wishes travel with you, Marie, and "may your heart be light, and our Y health be sound, may illfluck never know where you are to he found." I. 25' """ 1 Wig-kr ffv'xQn EQQQ J-is P T 'J' M' t We 1' 1 1 152 A ' e 'ESTQQ 'buf uh., Yitfdgxwa 'Q H-...T 9 ffl an 9 "FF:'5'a TA f"'Q 1 as J'- 1,, H V I Vg. eawdhl A qtx MARC U ERITE ELIZABETH SCHMIDT I am accustomed to hold lugh my head I even a lqmg weve Ea mg m my me g9,al f"f-531 if -QQLSFQ1 ,Lg j i. B -Lb Q .- I -'lg u, ' c ur" s 1 Yfq Wllkes Bane hd nude only one eontrlbutxon to the class of 30 hut that elty IS probably CUIlV1l1CtC.l ol the supexlorlty of qudlxty over quantlty Marguerite edme to us IH her umor year and we are enwous ol those dt St Annes who enjoyed her frrendshrp durmg, her first ten years ol sehoo llc Although she lw xery modest we hive had no dlfheulty III Cll9k,OV2llI1g Margueutes many talents In the itlllllil her pdtlenee md dlllgence have elleeted such lesults as only those two v tue rm Her dC.lIUlYdl7lC work rn the orchestra has proved Marguerutes .abllxty as a PIHIHSK whllc hcl .lvellgees III her elds work were the envy of us all M1IgULfltC IS far from pedantle however he IN reldy to play when the txme calls for pleuuxe md she does It well We h ne hopes of huxmg, Mirguerlte wlth us at college at M S for lt would be 21 plty 1l just ins we .ue lmrnrng, to .lppreuate her hne quahtres she should be taken from us Stull we know that nn whatever held MHYQLIQTICC chooses to work she wlll meet wxth success, be If here at the lvlount or ClSCWl1EIC l Q ,-1 A - . -- Y , V - . Y . , vw--u -wr -fe- Q .. , T.,.7-..f?vvi- ,. . -gif . i 3 - f. 5 '. -snr. .. In 'J J' --5' .I 51.11-M Q Ak - A Q 3 U l y ., . - IQ! - 1- .Q A ,-'jx tt, X ' J? 4-W V 4',f'f,-I Ln , , 'v, Al .-. 1 1"4f I 1' A'f.',' N W: rv -1 x .X ,L I, , l r ' ' 4. 1,35 - . - . , . Q' . 2 -' h - f -n 'A . - g, LIC ,. 1 ' " 'e L ':f'Q, ..'w Q li, ,, , .ag e fp Lg- . ,N ff I X :Z X , I -,J A . Q -' ,L : ' g ' 3 " ' r fc" ,PH 2 1" j.A 74 5 ,-:'J - i N 'Q .Ju 5 illfs Ht "' LF'-e 172 -gl . -Y-g,f1s w"1 1 1 f' 9 ' 4 1' ' Q! L 1 3 l 'mg A , ,,. -,, , y, E6 s f Y' il 1 Ira . - .L - 3' . vr'Q',rH5 1 Fc ' Q4 lar. +,. . 1 - I . 1' v l ' -. l-T-1-n f' ' 5 V' I? 5' gg W ,lf . f X A: -4 p Lil V ' N f' Q A , , .gl l ' e s! 'h ,'E 'tl Q Y 'ld' '- .- . l.,,, I " 6 vi. 2 . - ull! X , A Q, g I ,. --A v sf.: .- 1.4 ll - T l l Qin P' 1 -All ' 4 , , - f , .11 jf:-Y 4- ., l ' W ' l 4:.A--he ,:".1Z,,-L-,. r- l 3 'I , " fpff laffi Qi we e,lE ,N ,ii L-E ., N.: .5 FQ.: 4: . Q .. LA .I l .,1f...l .- .. , .4 1 l N. A, ,gf ' A - . -J Q I .5 -' I X 3? ' fi sw' ' jaw It . , 1 .. W lv , it lj A T 4 I 4 ' I If ' f ' .H J A' fl "L,..' fl .X W .I 5-5. .V " 4' - :P-I g ' N5 N 8 ' U ' me 7.51. "S: if G ,.'. ,R .,,' 55 L l l" . A X I L ir i' v'.4l ' lx C 1 ll, I IA 2 'X 3' 1 'll 7 1 Al ' I I . ' Y Th' H . - Ji. I 26 ff ,, Il Q5i..n',,QaIl.x.-3?EJFE, :E3.SE?,!, lxxo M QIIJKS M uhm ' W D ff w FQ? L MW dv., Nz f-4 D J' T42 P 'H5251 ,Wifi fx' I 0 J I. I f W" Num 5 fig JL f Ala REGINA MARIE SMITH Wllat other malden C1171 v0u id So xmmg and deluate and md? 15 N E731-. 3 L wt K -Stl Flve feet three mches of sweetness thats our ean' If you should see a group of gxrls dxscuismg, somethmg ammatedly select the one wlth the weetest smlle and you have Regma Somehow or other We have alway suspected that ean has 1 1'TlZ1g1L vlal of balm concealed somewhere about her person for never has inyone come to her with 1 cloleful tale who has left unconsoled' Regma belongs to the category of glrls who are thorough in everythmg She WKJFK: chlxgently and plays wholeheartedly but never lets the one dLt1VIty mteriere wlth the other We have quesmoned the HSPIYIY of What Is To Be," but he has not revealed to us the exact course of jean Q postgraduate journeymgs Wherever she may be, we wlsh her the Success and happzness due her earnestness 1n every undertalung l..' . - 4+ X - - ' -",:'it':::j. febba-, -, ' f-'I 'I l ' " IP"-' J- - .?..!.tjg:' -.sr-iferirnl. X Q . , I 3' rl 4 ' X Q 'F . I . -' V- " -A ' 1 ' 1: ' g ,-! I .,- . . if x . , ff , I -' . . me "'I , - K . ' gil . A J I M .A .fx , - . 'nf Ja ' ' ' . ' '.- I , .73 1 .eg 4, Y ' 3 , :jg 'I ', .. 'Q -QQ V ' I '55, i 9 .4 :. u. I A' ' - ' .- " '7' 'r" '.,.' , -' g .i ...A - - fifffq 2 , ' J 1, , K ,Q .Anza , sf. .' '- fl U 'I Us '4 A A Hs' Q' ' .T 'Lyn . . g . ff. Ik. A if.-K N : L ..,:i Q -" gf 'A 1 lc 97, .I - . ' 3 gf: '- fL ij- ' E I J ig 1 LL,n,, . I I 1, .. --5-- gZ?2- ' ' A I5 - 5215 in :yi T- N' . I ' ,- ' 1 -' Ifnzgf- - , I . r , ,,-.- ka b kg. - I ' fi.. L 0 we l Q V ' ,' .2 , ' 2 QQ I ,P '4s'?ff' his 'Ag 5-J ' "lr ' 'ii Q4 ' Q " 1, If v-.N J , lr, .Q sl, . ,td .1 ,,v' V A. I fl 1 ' gg 'f 6 I- A , . .:': Hi. A 'Y - I. 1-.txhg-1 ':e,g:.,f.. I i . 31 "' 3'?x-bf' Q3 5--:A --:fp 3 ., .jeg 55. -.41 53, I X" L.f -, -1 'fi ms" Q fm rsa Q f IW-. I' 1 A A " :'4 X S' J "9 Q" 'I '. '.. 'll I A tl -' If rf M .le .f f If ' I , N gl . ug, I- -9 I t .. ' 'I ' M9 1 :Y3..I so 1 H I ji? I I Ii rv- I - ' It rr' e I I 'YO 0" ' fe w. 4 --Eff " . I , f--f v -fx -c iz, ' E 52 '- A --.s ..,.a. . 1 ' , : ' s ' Q '. 27 "'YW'D3-2 , Ei so dn' 'Alyf ,M 525' JM' ,fx llbm an 7 QT Q f SJ bf W I1 f 9 E C, If ala'-5 'Q Qi' 'nfl' L -s"',q' '15 if Ji fain J 'N ja . W r", " 1 .1 gb 'ICA J' Q, . qf My-Q ks Q, J ff NW A f IRANCES CLARE STROEBELE 1 r y , gs The glass 0 asluon and the mould 0 orm l QQ ,I The observer o all observers ,oh To deserxbe thls small Miss adequitely IH 1 task of Heltulean propomons Clare has been at the Motxnt smte freshman days those preemus days when we formed companlonshxps whleh have lasted for four years and WlllLll we tnut wxll endune for hfe When Hrst we beheld Frances Clares merry hxown eyes md dnnty Hgure We reahzed that here was an mterestmg personage and our long a SULIIUOII has hut confirmed our first mmpresslon At first It IS true Clue seemed more subdued than the average fleshman but It was not long before her lun lovmg, natule levelled 1tsell She em he quxte dugnlhed whenever the OCCHSIOH demands It however und to see her wlth her he 1d held hlgh walkmg, through our txme hallowed corrldors IS qu1te an 1mpress1ve 1g,ht Frxnees Clare ms most f1st1d1ou5 her raven halr IS always shlnlnfe extept on those dnys when solt and fluffy alter .1 shampoo If becomes most lntraetable and she slmply tan t do ithlng w1th If her unlform IS a paragon of neatnesa and the envy of us all It 18 certain that Fortune has ,great thmgs ln store for our httle elasa mate, among them the bfllllilllt eareex ol .mother Portla You wlll always he one of our fondest memorles of the Mount, Clare, and lt ls Will! reluetante that we say 'Farewell " L ' it-' ' f L' -V '1' '-'ff ' 1 '- Hr, ' j f? " Y V :-'--.-'cz''-ssJT'1""'-'W-"TT L . i, ' 1, - ' A 5 rv I I f' ' .- fx " 4 v Y , , Q , , 1 -l ,t e 'M e, nl' ff. , X t ' n k , ' 'rail Q, -. .Q nm x . E, . me Jr, L-tx f ,FTM 1- xx M ff 25 U A, I A, .-Qf'fv' - V . ' - L . ' - Y -TQKQ , . 1 if XA ' ' 1, , ' t in ' Q A ' -I Q' f 'L 'sw , .f 19.1, 1 A .. 's 1- - A. T .-.e -f 2' for I," .- ff 'M w f 5,1 3 ' .lf .. ,. -JZ ' l ze- ec.. .- ' l 'Q if BBQ", .,w I . x x Q16 l 2 - 1 ,V In 4.5.3, 'lr .V .5 ' .L . 4 I l ,' N -g H 4 V, Q 'fid e' ll A H . iii 551 'L r 1 - 'zikl -k I , . 7"- 'QQ L L , 'f f -4' :fl h' I '-:hp K' D' -, .flag 3 - 5 M ,N l:,g a,5,.Q 4 if: ' ' " fl , 'NL 1' af" 1 1-fl' 7' ' - J EE '- UAW. . - . Q 1 - 5' 1 - 332- 5 Q-I I ax' 1 ' S ' I 1' A.. U i:.':1-r4'- 'th 3 .1 3' f 5' :WF ag . M mf- Qgvf ' - F11' ' .' ' ,g 5 , 15. ,sl Lo ' Ag: A If 5 ' WY. F - , "V4 r ,. '- - ' - ' A-,,.,., y -- . -4 9 a 1 w. 'ya ,A , , N.: I ,xlq 6 h ' ,QA ' 4' , , . 1 ., . ,M I J ' A, I x .1 if 4 , T. :-. P9 . it , , 11 Y ' L it he 'L :lf- EL h. 3 '-1' " ' -il -:x ' ,YL -:- :r- . H 'J ,L r . ' " ' . ,t at lf fw- rr '1 '. -A 1:-:-. - 1-. ' s 11 :t 1 E' YV f lQ.c r I- 2 A , . g fe .N N F .V .ae ' was .ff I , I ' .' T --A .I l l- f l 3 l e f ' ' - ' -, : ' . ' 'Q -' :-- " f ff--' ff f i- - e 1- -f ' : ' f at ,r .v .. A ' 4 G. .V 1. if K. -H in , W 4 Q .X .3, .-ry ' A-, A. 151, 'J :E 55. ----4 "L - :-1. ' , ' "2 'A L .3 K 4 5 ' Q' , A K , . z"1 . ' . Q ', , 1 J ' z ' ' f A ' ' ' ' ' sv . 4 1 ' J , 'f '. 5 is 4 ' '-f ' Q ' ' I t J Q J , 5 l ' ' Q , ' ' 5 " ' Q ' ' ' ' ' ' . I ' Q. . ' I ' C V ' I I 4 Q I 1 L' ' 28 3, , f L X ,L Lsviuhbvi vga M .. 1 .RJ Q.: I , ul 'Lv' X we BMW ggi? 5, 3 A Q21 ' .5 RQ? if f 5 4- J qv F N ft 69 .4 ELIZABETH RITA SULLIVAN as pg? Wzsdom and goodnevs are twm born one heart MuSt hold both enters never seen apart one who IS mteregtecl 111 re.1cl1ng, Lh 1r1ete1 Ulll Ellzfrhcth would pleeent an 111tr1gu1n emgma Seemg th1s tlny young perwon PFOLYCSGIDQ' unconcernedly down the Qeeond floor corrldor a casual observer would not attr1bute anythmg, to her but the meekest of drsposmons the most pawve of w1llQ Such wax our conceptxon of thm young laclys personahty when she arrlved at the Mount laet September hut after 1 few dayi lntereoume we found oureelvec ehucklmg over the amuimg llttle mecdotm whlch Qhe relited for our enjoyment In addxtlon to a keen Qense of the humorous Ellzaheth 19 g,1ftecl wrth 1n extenmve voeahulary and has the rare ablllty of phrasmg her remarks 1n the most ittmctlve mwnner Her future demgni Ehzfxbeth has not conncled to us hut we h1vc 1 l1tent Qunpxuon that In a few yearn, we hall hnd her name lwted III thxs WI e Shakespeare Wlllzam "Macbeth" Scott, Walter "Ivanhoe" Sullivan, Ellzabeth "7 ' Therefore, we wlih her only happlnew slnee Queeew 19 predestmecl for her in -.H , , ', f4,,,f 3 ,rv , -41, - -- - .,-1,14-?, lv- ' 1 1,-...-',,:?1-.. F-?'r--v..'-1,. ll . . ' 11.54, Q A , , rv - - E A , ' hwy X Z ,iz ,. X .- " ', ., Q3 x ' :4 , ff' 1, 4 ' r, :A ', ',, ' 1 ' ,F xi w - s 1 5, ' - ' 'S " af. 'V 1. . f -'15-I ' .392 , : .HD 3 X I L I 1 .f :IA A, ,-QT,-33 .7 . 1 .Q-1: - - Y ' Q , A W 1 I -Q, .:L'.-A ' F3 LTI: ' , o X . Le" , h - -S f A 1' ,D V' If :J ' U :,' fx. , ' XJ! ' 'I 'QP 1, Y- - N.. .. 'A - .1 Lg - --. , - ' W . A ll. 7: ff' NV H .2 l ggi' e. .11 I '- 1 "- l f - f. 4 gg e a 1 ' .1 na ' - 44115. 'rf - " X . 13' ' - X f' - . , -, sl Y 1 -' , ' ' in A' Ha ' J i' T 1 - w ., -. ..,. 1 :.: . ' A L- 43' "4" 'A -'T af- .594 T " , I. 1 N' ' 'NE - ' fi' QQ gg, is Y, 55.4, -' 1" - f . 42 In M. -J. . I LW .Q--. fri? ' - ' 1:1 ,, ,. S' I l 'li' 9' ' 'eff 'QE . . x 1 . 'HEY' J L I N E, L ,.a, . , .4 5 , 2' " 1. l ' :fin 1 , :Ara .N , ki, . , ,- 1, ' , 1 x 1 xl 4 R ,inf . 7. -h V., '4. E 1 Q m'. . ' ' ' f ' -951' v vi ' 'Q '. ve. . , 1 - - 15, if 3 'f - -9 ' ' . .ep-41' ' S' 5 1 -r fi ,Iii '- .. A, f Cl - -1 :Ly .u 9 ,A ', ,. L Q ? lf Y, '2 .51-.A lt" 1 ' .N J A1 :. Qi .' ' -'44 lf ah' l sir2"? if ' tl" -' , - - .' 'fy' In ' I .,' I. 1 W YH, Lf A ' ' ' "' s WE f - .. 1 -W 1 X fy ya . -f H ff ' 'H l 8 U , . 5 I if 1 'qt , ffl? '- ' . -, ' , 4 ,p W .. , A . J fly , . 1 W 2 Q - . -v 1 x - -1 1 - f 1- 4 . ' -. ' . fo 0" .1 'Q- at ' ,,- it 5- Q?-I Fx 5-Q., ' 1 , A351 . , U ., , .,, ,,.. 4To A ' "f'zz ', A "f'g . x 7 .lr x 4 29 Q,-M W N ,usa 73:4 '44,-ffl' f H any J of 5 M f1,,,f,,,. ummm W, 3 X 7 tes Cb ,J ff L -4. .ef Nagel -2 1 '-7,Qf-af. -'- as swf, Je?-Fin QEQJL QU re e , MWA Qatar! l'5Q I ax If-A Q Q t K9 elf? ' P , f 'vi' ' by F m VICTORIA AUGUSTA TOZZI ,Y Eh' ri fir. ng, So meh so ray so porgnant m her uzt ix .tl Tmle Lamwhes as xhe spea s Vlxttlllil The very n xme denote an untonquer able pmt the dblllty to Leeompllsh thrngs Certamly no more sultlble appellmon eould h ue been tho en lol thus petlte dark eyed young woman from the hummmg metropolls of New York Vue mme lrst September to pursue her studles as a Senxor Wlth her she brought to the Mount 1 breith of thwt sophrstxeauon that subtle nameless somethmg whxeh we look for m 1 daughter of Amsterdam During, the past year Vxctonz h rs treated Us to .1 great many of her lovely Stones What fanuful tales hive been eoncerved III 'chit brllllant dark held and how we h1ve marvelled at the easy flow of sometlmee stupendous words wrth which these bmm ebxldren were glven bxrth The fart that Vlktlifli was chosen Assl tmt Edltor of the Sheaf IS suffitlent atte tatxon of the tonhdenee of her elxssmates ln her journwlrsfle ablllty It dxd not surprxse us to lefun thit V1e hr been offered L1 posltlon on the staff gf one of our well known magazme ind we me eertam tlnt our Vretorxl wrll fulhll her duties Wlth the same eapnblhty th It has ever thlruterxzed her school work May your star shmc brlghtly rn the Hrmiment of sutce s Vlctorra E e ,,- --i .. , 5. .s,i.,,x,l .:. , A 't - ,il - Q - ,-. - . ,?.T 'I .. L, ,, 5: "N: -1- 0 A l - ' '1R.. I l ll .I 'A l-if F C' r .. - V N, ' le .1353 N ' -" , - x.. .A , I' 4, f ' 1 - if ' 0 ' - - 2-ff fer. S "-M H f " 'fl kg - T-e ,I hx, A - , -:ag L x A4 cg-r.' - - X , 1. I , . 5 .' . .' - bv - 1, ,- jg: , Lv cf. ig- X L' Lx' , N.,-1 ,L ,.., ' T- ' , ,. , sl' rv n. X. fr ytf' ."' ,nr Q. ' - A - "' ' 5 1 - -4 Pi QL ' ""'Hf,5g , 11' E " . A 1 2:1-r r Q tzpifaffa 1 4 4 Fi fm? .3 - ff-45 p, " ' "4 5. .T filly H N ., 'lik . e ' if QA ., '-35 3' 5:1 . N. -. T ' -- 15 L L - 1' -t:.' f ' 4. -'-- ' if?" Q I I Q. ' 8 Rl 1.v."t:4,y ' V' ' 7 131' ' , - V ' 4, , 2 .113 QA , 'T.",' lf. H I t . I 'lu 16:39 ki- tw . Q1 :f ...ij A I, - - N 1 ft-we . i --. L In l fy '4 X ti' , 14.1-: P35 2?+"'A2 'ir' rf fr, - r -f M . , , - 1 3 - I- 16 'iff .w X 'G " ' ,Q1 FQ ' V . ' 1 fr , Q A- .3lg.'f?"4-1f , P rr . 4 A1 .-,. -ri.: Q ti .L Ky, rx .043 1 'J - r me I .fr A. ,AQ , -' it s . V l Z 3:1 '1 ' " .Q A ht . ' I its - 1 ' 4 ,x-" QA lv' fl 6-In -' V X , ' . - A 'G A X fs - 'fi ll f rf 'V flu . ',, 4. I 'D I L1 Q' -- V , M - - ,V I 1 I 'L ' fm q " ' ' ' I .' . .' .' if .rm '-"1 I - .As 0 E an A -,A ' 'rall i . -. wr- A N A ,,. IE. I1-1'-I La.. . 4 035' -.....-..1....1,...., " "., 2 Sz ' 'z S ' M we ' .. ' x 'z ' 2 I 2 ' ' s- ' , ' , ' f - 1 1 ' 's, . ' ' ' ' . , - " 'z ' ' ' 30 'ZX X THE SHEAF STAFF Editor ............. . . . DOLORITA O'NEILI. Business Manager ..... ........ S ARA CLEARY Advertising Manager .... .... M ADELEINE NOLEN Assistant ........... .... H ELEN DOUGHERTY Solicitor of Patrons .... ..... C LAIRE MATHIEU ROSEMARY FOGARTY Associate Editors .... . . VICTORIA T OZZI GERTRUDE KELLY BVS VALE ALMA MATER TANDING with eager feet on the threshold of life, we pause to look back on the all too brief period of our matriculation at the Mount. As we review the events of the past four years, as we live over again the happy, neverfto-befforf gotten hours of our school days, our eyes and hearts overflow with gratitude to our beloved parents, whose love and sacrifice have opened to us the splendid opportunities of a convent education. It is they who, with fond foresight, entrusted us to the devoted care of the Sisters, to push on the Godfgiven work which, in our tender years, they themselves had begun, that work of moulding our characters, of instilling into us nobility of soul and of fashf ioning us, rather by their example than by word, into ideal Catholic women. Parents are dreamers, after all. Every mother, as she fondles the curly head of her baby, gazes shiningfeyed into the future, and there, in that golden city of Success, hazy with the mist of Uncertainty, she visualizes her child-a prince or princess among men, supreme intellectually and financially, and enthroned high on the pinnacle of Prosperity. Parents are the same everywhere. Our own mothers dreamed and prayed for the same success for us. During our high school days they made many loving sacrifices, and why?-for the realization of a dream. Our Graduation Day will be for our parents the culmination of many hopes, and the reward for countless acts of selffdenial on their part. How gratifying it is to feel that on that occasion we shall bring joy to those beloved mothers and fathers, to know that then, in ag small measure, we can repay them for their sacrifices and loving care. 33 Because of this, a responsibility lies before us. We must prove to our parents the gratitude that is deep in our hearts, recognizing in them, next to God, as the authors, the fashioners of all that is best in our life. Whatever achievements we have to our credit, whatever is our intellectual status, we owe to their parental prescienceg now let us realize our duty is to justify their faith in us by going forth to conquer whatever obstacles may arise in our path, to all that is best and highest in Catholic womanhood. So, arrayed in the armor of Religion and Culture and brandishing the weapons of Catholic Education, we pass on to more serious projects, to the more varied life of the Catholic Graduate. M. DoiLoRn'A O-'NE1LL, '30. QAQ TO THE IMMACULATE CONCEPT ION The dawn of winter day has come at last, The pure white snow descends in flurries fast, VVhile heartfelt "Aves" float upon the air,- It is thy feast, Immaculate and fair. Oh, never has a maid on this earth trod, As pure as thee, the Mother of our God. Thou shared'st the joys and sorrows of thy Son And now thou stand'st in glory, by His throne. Oh, Mary Mother, on this beauteous day, Take thou and keep our hearts and souls we pray, And, oh! protect and guide us all through life, Give strength and dauntless courage in the strife, So that, when all the work of life is done, We'll see thee face to face with thy dear Son. ROSEMARY FOGARTY, '3O. 3 4 CLASS OE 1930 CLASS OFFICERS President ....... .................... ..... E D 1TH C. MURRAY VicefPresidem .... ..... C LAIRE L. MATHIEU Secretary ..... .... M . DOLORITA OHNEILL Treasurer. .. ........................................ MARIE G. MCTMAHON STUDENT COUNCIL REPRESENTATIVES President .................................................... MARY B. EDEL VicefPresidem ........ .... M ARGUERITE E. SCHMIDT Secretary and Treasurer. ..... CLAIRE L. MATHIEU ROSEMARY H. FOGARTY Advisors .... . . . SARA L. CLEARY F. CLARE STROBELE 35 LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT CF THE CLASS OF 1930 S the day of our departure from this pleasant circle of classes and school activities becomes a dreaded reality, we, the class of 1930, in recognition of the splendid school spirit and sterling worth of our fellow students, and in order to establish an undying remembrance in their hearts, do bequeath to them the treasures which have heretofore been our cherished possessions. To our dear Mount Saint Joseph we leave our undying devotion and loyalty and the vow to emulate her in all our undertakings. To the members of the Faculty we give our boundless appreciation of their splendid work and untiring efforts. To the Juniors we leave our unusual and much lauded initiative, also the privilege of attending the College functions and the opera. The Senior dayfstudents bequeath to their successors their treasured mirror and spotless lockers, and the Senior Residents, their much abused privilege of studying in their rooms. To the Sophomores we leave the honor of caring for the August Hall of Studies with all duties it entails. The Freshmen we joyfully promote from the ranks of the green to the felicitous position of Sophomores. We, the Seniors, in remembrance of the bond of good fellowship which has existed between the Junior Class and us, leave to them our precious personal accom- plishments and possessions as follows: I, Lidiette Austen, do bequeath my love for "brass polishing" to Betty Reynolds, and my agility to Nance Lynch. I, Mary Bennis, do bequeath my cherubic appearance to Rita Harbinson and my apathy to Mary Powers. I, Regina Breen, do bequeath my golden locks to Bernice Holly and my sobriety to Mary Reynolds. ' To Kathleen Holmes, I, Sara Cleary, leave my love for orchestra and to Marie Skinner my naturally curly locks. To Marie McNally, I, Marion Cleary, leave my medical aspirations, and to Elinor Supplee my tiny pedal extremities. I, Margaret Connolly, do bequeath my neatness to Mary Lloyd and my love for private conferences to Mary Reynolds . . To Barbara Newlin, I, Mina D"Lauro, give my petite proportions, and my vivacious ways to Nance Lynch. I, Helen Dougherty, leave my loquaciousness to Nancy Fogarty and my school girl complexion to Rita Harbinson. I, Mary Edel, bequeath my inquisitive nature to Marie Skinner and to Mary Lloyd my position as Prefect of Children of Mary Sodality. 36 To Frances Glynn, I, Rosemary Fogarty, leave my ingratiating smile and my self' assurance to Nancy MacNeill. I, Mildred jones, bequeath to Kathleen Mangan the dignified cognomen of "Apple" and to Mary Cummings my abhorrence of cosmetics. To Doris Williams, I, Gertrude Kelly, leave my kittenish ways, and my dancing ability to Kathleen Mangan. To Kathleen Mangan, I, Edith Murray, leave my basketball captaincy, and my determined will to Mary Reynolds. I, Claire Mathieu, leave my perpetual gaiety to Betsy Farren and my well conf trolled nerves to Kathleen Mangan. I, Margaret McCaffrey, leave my eliin appearance to Margaret Keily and my neatly cropped coiffure to Kathleen Holmes. To Margaret Walsh, I, Marie McMahon, leave my peroxide formula, and my poise to Frances Glynn To Mildred Schu, I, Patricia McManus, do bequeath my love for Ireland and to Anna Rita Dougherty my Titian tresses. I, Madeleine Nolen, do bequeath my stern countenance to Nancy MacNeill and my tenacity of purpose to Mildred Schu. To Mary Williamson, I, Dolorita O'Nei1l, leave my linguistic accomplishments and to Barbara Newlin my privilege of using the elevator. I, Sara O'C0nnell, do bequeath my enviable smile to Betty Clemons and to Mary Powers my inferiority complex. I, Marie Philips, leave my lack of affectation to Elinor Supplee and my sylphflike figure to Ella Darreff. To Dolores Obert, I, Regina Smith, do leave my congenial nature and to Bernice Holly my unusual surname. To Catherine McGrath, I, Clare Stroebele, leave my nonchalance, and my love for the sciences to Kathleen Holmes. To Mary Cummings, I, Marguerite Schmidt, leave my love for "buses," and my intellectuality to Rita Harbinson. I, Elizabeth Sullivan, bequeath my musical talent to Madeleine Tegan, and to Marie McNally my grownfup mannerisms. I, Victoria Tozzi, do bequeath to Dolores Obert my aloofness and my love of journalism to Isabelle Armstrong. In witness whereof we have set our hand and seal hereto this fourth day of June, in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and thirty f193Oj. THE CLASS OF 1930. 37 REVELATIONS CF MCRPHEUS T ALL happened on one of those blustering winter mornings, you know, the kind that reddens your cheeks and nips your nose, but I didn't feel the cold, being still in bed: you see, it was the day after Christmas, 1940, and everybody was tired after the festivities. Lying there and staring at the ceiling, I was about turning over for forty winks before the belated breakfast bell would ring when I perceived a tiny white figure at the foot of the bed: a lovely, little lady had come unceremoniously upon the scene, a fairy princess with flowing, golden curls and gauzy garments. For a moment I won' dered if this could be a visit from "Tinker Bell," my favorite of those dear "Peter Pan" days in the long ago. Silently she beckoned me to my open window. Impelled by some magic power, I found myself floating through the air, icy with the breath of winter. I looked around for my mysterious friend, but she had disappeared. I was very frightened, soaring alone above the cityg how could I stop if I had to! There weren't brakes or anything! Then, suddenly, my fairy guide was with me again, and placing her diminu- tive hand upon my arm, she led me to the roof of the Town Hall. Like the clear tones of a bell, a very small one, her voice came to me: "I am the Spirit of Love and Goodffellowship, and I am sent to show you what each member of your class of 1930 is doing today." We were glidingthrough the air again. Sud- denly we stopped before a huge, brownstone mansion. A fire was blazing merrily in the grate and before it two curlyfhaired youngsters were busily playing with their Christmas toys. As I looked, the living room curtains parted, and a lovely, dignified lady entered and smiled down at the children with maternal fondness. I gasped, "Why, it's Helen Dougherty!" "Come," said the Spirit. I had no sensation of moving, yet the mansion faded from view, and I found myself within a Court of justice. "There is the famous young lawyer who rose to prominence in the M--- case," my guide whispered. I looked eagerly and scarcely repressed an exclamation at sight of Clare Stroebele, though I really should not have been surprised, because Clare had always displayed great argumentative powers in our friendly debates at S. J." Suddenly the scene shifted to a large sun'lit studio. Gorgeous plumfcolored drapf eries graced the room, and four or five easels stood about, supporting lovely paintings. I noticed a tiny young woman, daubing contentedly at her canvas, while another wavyfhaired "artiste" was standing before a modernistic painting, surveying it critically. The latter was Claire Mathieu, of course, but I was rather doubtful as to the identity of the other lady until Claire said, "Lidiette, do you think I should use purple or rather the deep blue on this shadowing?" How glad I felt to see that these two who had been such great friends at school were apparently working so successfully together HOW . To the halls of a large broadcasting station I was next conducted. The deep, clear tones of an announcer was informing her unseen audience that "The next number will be 38 a solo by Miss Marie Philips, the famous soprano, with Miss Marguerite Schmidt at the piano." I peeped around the corner and there before the microphone stood Margaret Connolly! From "my coign of vantage" looking into another soundproof room I caught a glimpse of the noted teacher, Miss Gertrude Kelly, of "The Kelly School of Expression," accompanied by three little members of her class. I surmised that they they were waiting their turn at the "mike," Our next stopping place was the oflice of the "New York Times." We passed, unseen, through long rows of neatly arranged desks, at which many busy typists were presiding and among them I recognized two of my former classmates, Regina Smith and Sara O-'Connell, both of whom, I know, had been in the days of yore accounted skilled artists of the keys. Soon we approached a desk where a highly polished brass plate informed us we were in the presence of the Editor. Will you be surprised when I introduce to you Victoria Tozzi as holding this important position? Her whole appearance radiated efficiency, from her quick decisive movements and assured man' ner it was evident that it was the same "Vic" of our school days. As we left the newspaper oilice, my companion drew my attention to a "Kiddies' Shop" next door, on the window of which I read two familiar names, "Rosemary Fogarty and Mina D'Lauro, Props." Glancing into the showroom I perceived the tall, darkfhaired Rosemary deep in thought at her desk, while the diminutive Mina, mounted on a chair, was arranging some dresses on the racks. Over the housetops we sped along till we came to a stop outside a huge temple of drama. From a luxurious town car stretched along the curb four stunningly attired ladies alighted. In the first, a petite golden-haired personage, swathed in furs, I recognized our demure classmate, Regina Breen, of whose social leadership I had read quite a bit in the society columns. This charming Long Island matron was evidently acting as hostess to a theatre party, you would never guess who were her guests, Sara Cleary, now an eminent lecturer just returned from a European tour, and Marie McMahon, friendly and smiling as ever. The Spirit confided to me that Marie was married and quite active socially, being Treasurer of the Women's Club of Hammonf ton. I easily placed the third guest. Her tall, graceful Hgure, laughing blue eyes and flashing dimples could belong to only Edith Murray. "Edie," pretty as ever, was, according to the whispered comment of my guide, noted for her athletic abilities which were being put to good use as head basketball coach at the West Pittsburgh High School. The play to which they were going was certain to be a good one, because the posters advertised the return of the Theatre Guild Players in a popular sketch, featur- ing Mary Bennis and Mildred Jones, whose spectacular rise to stardom the more remarkable in that it had been simultaneous. That "Bennie" and "Apple" should seek fame in the same sphere was not surprising, for they had been chums at the Mount. We peeped in at the play, and observed particularly that Mildred's brunette personality was an excellent foil for Mary's blondeness. My observations were cut short, however, as, with lightningflike rapidity, I was transported into an immense laboratory, where my eyes fell upon a titianfhaired young woman, very busy with a test tube-Patricia McManus, of course, "Pat" had 39 always evinced a fondness for dickering with the apparatus in her father's laboratory, and the prediction we girls had made at the Mount had come true, for "Pat" had won a great success as a chcmist. Near her stood an attractive young lady whose milkfwhite skin was in becoming contrast with her black hair. The latter young lady evidently was visiting Patricia, and with my usual curiosity, I curiously peered at her from behind her chair, she was talking animatedly and the swift color came and went in her cheeks. "Marion Cleary!" I mentally exclaimed, "and as youthful as ever." "Pat" was saying, "Yes, I had a card from Margaret McCaffrey yesterday. She and her husband are at present in Switzerland." With a sigh, she added, "What a lovely place for a honeymoon." "Speaking of honeymoonsf' replied Marion, "do you know that Madeleine is to be married next month?" "Not Madeleine Nolen-?" "Assuredlyg I'm to be one of the bridesmaids. Her employer is quite distressed because he is losing an excellent secretary." As we left they began discussing plans for a shower to be given for Madeleine. As we sped by the Academy of Music, my eliin guide looked at me questioningly. The beautiful, sad tones of a violin were wafted to our ears. 'LShall we go in?" "Oh, please do," I answered. A Musical was in progress and the violinist who held the audience spellbound was none other than Elizabeth Sullivan. The renown she had won was well deserved, for during our school days no one was more earnest at practice and at orchestra rehearsal than this same young virtuoso. I glanced over the audience, and beheld the smiling countenance of Mary Edel, of whose splendid achievements in Social Service I had heard much, but since Graduf ation Day I had not seen her. How I wished to go to her, but the Spirit held me back:ML'The veil of invisibility must not be lifted," she said. So I had but to content myself with a longing for the unattainable. Curiosity was rampant within me as to the identity of Mary's escort, but just then the recital ended and the entire scene faded from my view. Homeward bound, we floated along, high above the busy streets. I was weary after our journey, but my companion was as vivacious as when we had started. A bell sounded in the distance, and as we neared the roof of my home the tinkling grew into a loud ringing. As in a daze I opened my eyes to the pale gold wintersunshine and my ears to the frenzied breakfast bell. Well, it was over! My interesting visit to school day friends had been but a caprice of Morpheus, and there was I, deeply chagrined, like a tot who has been told that there is no Santa Claus. However, the philosophical side of my nature asserted itself, I hopped out of bed, smiling reminiscently and thanked the genii that had permitted me a glimpse of my erstwhile comrades' roles in the Play of Life, even though the stage had been set ' D' l d. m team an M. DOLORITA OSNEILL, '30, 40 A FEW PROVERBS FOR STUDENTS OF S. I." Study in haste and repent at time of exams. A poor student blames her books. If you be a student, study and be studious. A good student is worth a diploma full of credits. It is a wise student who can read her Latin. A credit for your studies. All that talk are not great speakers. A punishment ill done must be twice done. A lazy student gathers few credits. The more the brains the less the study. Out of ink, out of class. Absence makes the pupil duller. Better the study hall than the alcoves. ' Every girl for herself, her own credits, the Sisters for all. Class, clever, credit. Go study, young lady. School is short, yet sweet. Harp not on that dance. Wear the polish on the shoes. Leap out of the first year into the second fand so ony Never leave school tomorrow when you can leave today. One hour's study before midfyears is worth three after. Study and be studied. Smooth runs the year when the books are studied. Whatever the course, it is worth doing well. Study from year to year. Credits are not given away. Well studied, well known. Better late than later. L. MARGARET MCCAFFREY, '30 41 "WE NOTICE" That Mary Bennis realizes the good quality of Del "Monte" products. That Margaret McCaffrey prefers "Curly" hair, if you please. That, although she observes the Eighteenth Amendment, Marion finds plenty of good spirits in certain demifujohnsf' That Marie Philips spends her time adf"Myron" certain people. That "John"son is Clare's favorite president. That Regina is frequently heard humming snatches of Mr. Berlin's melodies. His first name? Why, "Irving," of course. That Lidiette seems to have been born under the sign of the constellation "Leo" That Edith is looking forward to next Easter to see what the "Bunny" will bring. That Margaret Connolly thinks "Warren" Harding's administration was par' ticularly worthy of note. That Claire is a great admirer of Nature, and studies birds intently, particularly the "Bob"foflink. That jean considers the "keel" the most interesting part of a vessel. That Marguerite never worries about missing a trolley, because a "Bus" is certain to happen along. That Helen is always thankful for any "Crumbfies" of comfort that you can offer. That Mildred always pays her "Bills" promptly. That Dolorita is greatly interested in native musical instruments, particularly the "Tomftom." That Gertrude hobfnobs with the nobility, "dukes" having the preference. That Victoria listens eagerly for the ringing of a certain "Bell," That Rosemary stands for hours watching the whirlpools and "eddies" of the Wissahickon. M. DOLORITA 0lNEILL, '3O. 42 A LIFETIME By A DIVINE AUTHOR HE Master spoke unto an angel: "The time has come when you shall play your part." Extending a paper toward him,-the Master continued: "Guard this well. It is My own composition. Try to avoid discords: they are as unpleasant to My ear as their signiicance is to My Heart. Remember, there will come a day-." The angel opened the paper out and studied the gold music notations thereon for a brief space before he attempted to play. The moment he struck the first chord there came upon the earth a soul, housed in the body of a little child. As the angel played. there seemed to be discordant tones, but he knew that he was playing exactly what was written before him. Very soon the strains of baptismal hymn reached the Master's ears, and immediately after the music assumed an air of lightneswmuch like the play of a child. Sprinkled here and there during this movement there were passages which seemed to indicate mischief, but there were no discords. While the Master listend to these lilting passages, He knew that somewhere on the earth a little hand was delving into a box of cookies or that the owner of that hand was playing a mischievous prank on a playmate. Soon the Master heard the strains of "O Lord, I am not worthy," and He smiled lovingly as He went to be received into the heart of this little boy for the first time. For quite some time thereafter the slight discords that occurred were rendered obscure by the beautiful simplicity of the angel's music. Shortly after the Boy on Earth entered the High School the music assumed a tone which indicated terrible temptations and passions which had to be overcome. There were moments during this movement when the whole Court of Heaven, save Him presiding, feared for the outcome of the composition. The Master had no fear. Had He not said that this was His own composition? Suddenly a great victory was announced by the glorious music which filled the Heavens. It seemed to resound everywhere. This glamour passage continued only for a brief space of time before another theme was introduced. This new indecisive theme gradually increased in volume as the former glorious music decreased until the latter completely replaced the other. After a short time, the music assumed a glorious strain, only to be followed by rather ordinary music. It rose again, and again was followed by the same commonplace theme. Finally, however, the higher motive emerged victorious and the entire Court of Heaven rejoiced because another boy was coming into the Service of His God. The composition suggested great difficulties and trials, but the angel who played, had a smile on his face, for he knew now that the composition would draw softly to its close. The last movement of "A Lifetime" was very soft and very calm. As the final tones died in the distance, the angel returned the composition to the Master. The 43 few drscords which he had carefully noted were scarcely discernible 1n the brightness and glory of the boy's life of perfection. Then the Master spoke unto the soul: "Well done, my good and faithful ser vant And turning to the angel: "Well done, O Guardian Spirit, you have guarded this Lifetime well." GERTRUDE D. KELLY 30 QJQ MISSING YOU I had not thought 'twould be like this- A dull and heavy ache within my heartg That I could live and laugh when you I missg Nor, oh, that it would be so hard to part! But though my grief's by busy hours assuaged And chatter with high laughter fills the day, Though times much gayer are by dear friends It seems I can't go on the same old way. Yet when the silver moon hangs far above Between the branches of the willow tree, Or when I smell fresh scents of Spring, I love, 'Tis then that you are missed the most by me. made ROSEMARY FOGARTY 30 44 RUSKIN-AN IDEALIST ACH of us cherishes his ideal of a true Man and of a true Woman, we like to think often of these perfect creatures, to picture this imperfect world as it would be were it peopled with such. We try to formulate a character sketch of these favorite "shadows"-and then we chance upon Ruskin's "Sesame and Lilies." After reading this priceless little volume, we are astonished to find that Ruskin's conception of real Manhood and Womanhood tallies with our own, the sole difference lying in the fact that Ruskin has beautifully voiced his ideals in these twin essays, he has captured the elusive words which are particularly fitted to the subject, while our pentfup thoughts cry in vain for literary expression. Alas! too often are they forever mute because, unlike Ruskin, our tongues can find no suitable words with which to immortalize our cherished ideals. Ruskin saw his point clearly, and practically forced his hearers to see it. The soul of this great modern thinker rebelled against the ignorance which threatened his generation, his beauty'sensitive nature cried out against sordidness. He craved the calm beauty of green fields and pastures, he saw only ugliness in hectic dusty streets and sooty factories. For him, "Virtue resposed in Beauty-where Ugliness skulked could be naught but Sin." Much can be written concerning the aesthetic nature of "Sesame and Lilies." The thoughts expressed are idealistic, revealing a highly developed love of good breeding, together with a deep, philosophical trend of mind. In his "Sesame," Ruskin strongly advocates devotion to good books which, he says, are the best friends a man can have. If we observe closely we shall see that the author practiced what he preached, for his lectures are sprinkled with innumerable allusions to the classics of Virgil, Homer, Dante, Shakespeare, Scott and many others, all of whose works are among the finest and will remain the standards of literature through the ages. In "Lilies," we are sensible of a beautiful respect for Womanhood and an all too novel belief in Chivalry. Ruskin realized the true sphere of Woman, and he desired to see the road to Higher Education opened to her. He possessed definite ideas as to the education of girls, the goal of whose training was, according to him, to be the development of every fine point of their intensely sensitive natures. John Ruskin imparts his views in a way which is easily understood. He chooses words which are neither pedantic nor puerile, striking always the happy medium. The ideas which he wishes to emphasize are worded with that consummate skill, that ''straight-to-thefpointedness'' which marks Ruskin as a finished lecturer and essayist. Like many brilliant writers, he is by no means faultless. He digresses frequently, sometimes wandering far from the beaten path of his dissertation, but this fault is a happy one for the reader, because whatever the apparent loss of time, we are invariably made the richer in knowledge. DOLORITA OSNEILL, '3O. 47 ' -We -'is f 4' ,.. X ' " ' f -ui'-gaezvl' 'f ' - ' , rj! 1 gp ,w -V: Q ,, ly A -f5'fw ?'iA H A f ' ggi ff fgfflf 1 f f K Mkriff' if " X L., 4 ' 'L 3 N 2 . 4- ,.-J f .f . A . 4 , . 1 I xiii 1511 K at 'r 6- -'V 'ln- - a I- Q 4 If Pl 3 fL""'v .1- x f ,, X .F , . . ' "' 14 , 1 ' L" - X gf, h 1 Ny.. 'I . My .Q fi. 1 'T' 7 .. b 2 ' " -, , y ,-Q',.2 , I. . kf ,' "h .Q ' ' W' w .X gr - X- , M X . It . a .gig -f, ' M ' + - N 1 Lf , I My an . A X i X Q' f L X. 2 3 A- X . , 1 1 . '42 lk f ,, 55, -f H . . M f . , .fa Q, , X, fy V ,- M . , R,E,f - "'faf,,:-a,fff 'ff , ' ,' .' H.. , f 4 '. , 4 , J, f -hu. ,. "BETTER HE DIE-' HE street was overflowing with people, shouting, pushing mobs, calling back and forth to one another in the vilest language, laughing loudly at vulgar shouts. In their midst were three men on horseback and their talk was of the arrival of someone whose appearance was enough to craze a people, lead them to make their temples of worship houses of amusement and of propaganda against their God. A man on a black mount appeared suddenly on the scene, about his neck was a red scarf, flying in the wind. Word of the "Red Scarf" ran through the crowd like light' ning, and a shout of "Ivan-of the Red Scarf" vias taken up. He who was thus cheered surveyed the mobs with disgust lurking in the dark depths of his eyes. He raised his gloved hand for silence. The people pressed closely about him. His horse reared and as he steadied it, he spoke rapidly in Russian. He beckoned the other three horsemen to him, and with a curt nod of his head he cropped his horse and started in a brisk trot through the quickly parting mob. Mount and all, he ascended the cathedral steps. When he gained the head, he swung easily from his steed and waited, eyes burning, while his people hur'ed insults and brandished clubs at. the marble cross which graced the church's steeple. Turning on his heel he entered the sanctuary, leaving the cursing mobs without. He glanced about the interior he knew so well. His eyes softened as at the end of the center aisle he saw the altarfrail at which he and his bride had knelt but seven years ago. He stood at the door leading to the baptistry in which they had so fondly witnessed the baptism of their tiny son. There were tears in his eyes: his Anna gone, the small bit of humanity they had cherished so, dead and cold beside her. His jaws became fixed, his eyes gleamed darkly-the work of God the All Merciful. He wheeled around to return to the waiting people. He would throw wide the oaken doors and bid them enter and tear down each beauty he had reverenced as a child. A figure was at the rail-he frowned, he had not noticed it before. It was a woman and she held a baby in her arms. He strode quickly toward her and when he was within a few yards he called, "Away, the church is about to be filled with nonfbelieversf' She did not stir. "Did you hear. Go or I shall deliver you to the people." "I heard," the voice was soft and steady, "but I shall not obey. You may deliver my child and me to your people-better he die the death of a martyr than live the life of the Godlessf' - He was silent. The child whimpered pitifully. "You are a murderess. You are willing to see your child killed. It is not natural." "For one who believes it is. Better is it for you that your son died in his infancy than live to be one of your kind." Ivan was silent. The crowds burst into the building and seeing the young woman seized her roughly. 47 "To Siberia with the Catholic idolator and her child. Let her starve without the Russian bread and eat her Bread of Life," cried one of the mob. "Gladly do I go to Siberia," she answered. "I shall find peace there with my God." He could not save her from the hands of the lawless mob, but after she had been taken from the church, he knelt at the rail at which seven years ago he had been married. "God's will be done. Rather my son dead as a Catholic than to be alive an atheist." A few minutes later, "Ivan of the Red Scarf" made his exit from a rear door, and the Godless country let a once ardent follower slip quietly from the cause. VICTORIA A. Tozzi, '30, MFE NIGHT The sun sinks slowly down the west, The flowers nod their drooping heads, Thebirds fly homeward to their nests, And children all are snug in bed. A peace and calm embrace the town, For God has drawn the night shades down. MARGUERITE E. SCHMIDT, '30. 48 VIRGIL N the midst of a world plunged in the darkness of ignorance and ruin, Publius Vergilius Maro rose to give that world the only ray of light and hope it was to have until the coming of the Messiah seventy years later. This year we celebrate the bimillenium of the birth of this man, whose immortal verse is still cherished throughout the world. Men have left superb works of art in their wake: some have erected magnificent structures, which, as long as they exist, shall stand as monuments to their authorsg others have composed music, the beauty of which has been unexcelled, but Virgil surf passes all these in that his work expresses the attributes of the artist, the architect, and the musician. In his poetry has he not left us an unsurpassable work of art?. Did he not raise ideals which were in his time almost obsolete, and which, in a measure, pre' served the morality of the race for seventy years? Finally, does not the flowing rhythm of his verse bespeak the ear of a musician? It is in his poetry that he gives vent to his emotions. It is here that we find the true Virgil, him who ranks with Homer, Dante and Shakespeare, among the greatest poets of the world. Virgil's Hrst contribution to the world of Latin literature was the "Bucolics," a group of pastoral poems written in a style reminiscent of the great Greek writer, Theocritus. Here the shepherd life, with all its intimacy with nature, is charmingly portrayed. Descriptions of the elements, of summer dawns, of green pastures and verdant fields permeate the entire work. They are so rare and so refreshing in their beauty, and come so sincerely from Virgil's soul, that up until this time their charm is unsurpassed. Added to these is the true and perfect verse of the work, worthy only of Virgil. The "Bucolics" were such a success that through them Virgil gained much recognition. It was not surprising, therefore, when after the tragic civil wars had ended and the Roman populace began moving cityward, that Maecenas should choose Virgil to write a treatise that would influence the people to remain in the country. In response to this request, Virgil wrote the "Georgics," a poetical treatise idealizing rural life, and making it attractive to those who were contemplating relinquishing their farms to go to the city. Perhaps the greatest tribute to the success of the "Georgics" would be to say that it has been classed by some of the leading critics of the world on a par with the "Aeneid," its rhythm and structure being among the most perfect in the language. After having contributed to Latin poetry two such works as the "Bucolics" and the "Georgics," Virgil, at the desire of the Emperor Augustus, began a third poem, which has taken its place among the epics of the world. This masterpiece is the Aeneid. As in the "Georgics," Virgil had a purpose in mind, so when he began the "Aeneid" he wished to arouse patriotism of the Roman people, and to foster in them a great love for their fatherland. It was the Emperor who suggested that this be Virgil's aim in writing the "Aeneid," and it was he who took an untiring interest in the progress of the work. 49 ' The "Georgics" were completed in 29 B. C. and from then on, Virgil spent all his energy on his masterpiece. It would be useless to attempt a criticism of the "Aeneid," the matter of which would be as nothing in comparison with those of great critics the world over who perhaps have had not a little difficulty in finding words worthy of expressing an opinion of this work. It may be said, however, that aside from the great tales of heroism and valor of the Trojans, aside from the long and beautiful descriptions of their travels on land and sea, there is another strain which courses through the entire poem. This is the human element which enables us to come close to these strange people of another world. The exalted and lofty style in which the Aeneid is written made the attainment of such a task most difficult. However, it is the human interest in the Aeneid that makes Virgil's appeal to the generations which have followed him. There is also a certain indefinable spiritual appeal in this poem, best exemplified, perhaps, in the char' acter of Aeneas himself, in his keen sense of duty to his father, Anchises, and to his son, Iulusg in his acquiescence to the will of the gods, and in his unflinching endeavor to accomplish that which they had designated him to do. Virgil, who could so successfully and so artfully mold these characteristics into his work, proves himself an artist, an artist who has been a model to writers throughout the ages. Dante himself declared that Virgil had been his ideal all through life, and that it was his Aeneid that inspired the Dantean description of his journeyings through Purgatory. Nor has this Virgilian influence ceased today. Some of the world's greatest poets are still producing their works under the standard that he has set up for them. Virgil, therefore, has been highly appreciated throughout the civilized world, and it is to enhance his fame and further his honor that the bimillenial celebration is being held. It is to be hoped that by this celebration, Virgil's works may be better known and esteemed. ROSEMARY FOGARTY, '3O. 50 A SENIOR'S ADVICE TO A FRESHMAN fWitl1 apologies to Poloniusj Not busy, Freshman? Come! Remember that A demon sits on idle fingers small, And yours are idle. 'Ere you do your work, Here are some precepts for your betterment. If you do 'bide by these you will do well- A stately Senior, such as I, you'll be. If Seniors speak, list! Give your thoughts no tongue, Remember, you are but a Freshman small, And Freshmen have no thoughts for Seniors' ears. Be sure you trouble not a Senior's thought When she is wrapt in silent solitude. Be courteous to your elder schoolmates, yea Be courteous, be not a familiar child. Retain what friendships you had made before You entered these staid halls of knowledge here, But these must not command your thoughts always. You must new friendships make, but so you keep Within your sphere--with just the Freshmen small. Take care you do not enter in a quarrel, Particularly with a Senior, but- If e'er you do, 'tis then your place you know, To humbly beg the pardon of the other. And should a Senior have t'admonish you Take care to listen, and attentively. Be sure you thank her for the interest shown So insignificant a child as you. And, little Freshman, you must learn to do All that "StudentfCo" rules may demand: Observe strict silence in th' appointed place, And at the signalled hour, go to class. In school, you must wear hosiery which is black, And shoes whose heels are, you'll think, very low. Discard all trinkets of the jewelry line, Unless you do, appear for Punishment Class. Take care of both your black veil and your white- And "neither borrower, nor lender be," For loan oft loses both the veil and ine, Which you must pay in consequence of this. But greater than these rules which I have told There is this greatest which you should observe: TO ALMA MATER BE FOREVER TRUE, FOR ALMA MATER HAS BEEN TRUE TO YOU. GERTRUDE D. KELLY, '30 51 PROGRESS IN THE FIELD CF SACRED MUSIC ITURGICAL music has for its purpose "to propose for the understanding of the faithful the sacred words clothed with suitable melody." The Georgian Chant, being essentially unison and moving in free rhythm, accomplishes this design in the most delicate manner. In view of the four essential requirements of art, what music ever had a more lofty inspiration, a more exquisite technical perfection, a greater unity of purpose and a nobler appeal? Conf cerning the Chant, Rockstro states: "No more wonderful succession of single notes had ever been strung into melodies so harmoniously adapted to the expression of words with which they were to be sung than the Plain Chants of the Middle Ages, especially of the thirteenth century. No more sublimely beautiful musical expression of all the depths there are in sadness has ever found its way into music, than what is so simply expressed in the Lamentations as they are sung in the Ofhce of Tenebraef' This plain song was a succession of single notes. With the development of har' mony and the contrapuntal style, Church music assumed a new texture. In place of the repetition of single melody notes of the Gregorian Chant, several voice parts were skillfully united, thereby adding both intricacy and intensity. While the composers of the North of Italy were striving for perfection in elabor' ate secular styles, the Sistine Chapel demanded a more exact musical standard. By far the greatest of the Italian musicians absorbed in this activity was Giovanni Pierluigi, called Palestrina from the village near Rome, where he was born. He spent much time studying in Rome after which he served as organist in his native town, and so successfully that he was appointed chapelmaster at Saint Peter's. He held this position for four years. In quick succession he filled the positions as singer in the Papal Chapel and chapelmaster at the Lateran and Santa Maria Maggiore. Vlhile he was employed in the latter position, the Council of Trent met to contemplate the abuses in the Church. The Council decreed that "the meaningless complications and degenerate style of singing in church music must be reformed." As a result of the appointment of a committee of eight cardinals to consider the matter, Palestrina's "Mass of Pope Marcellus," known as "Missa Papae Marcellif' was recommended as a model of purity of style. This event brought about his assignment as composer to the Papal choir. The remaining years of his life were devoted to the reform of Church music. This reform was first urged by Pius X. The foremost consideration which led him to issue the famous Motu Proprio was a burning zeal for maintaining and pro' moting the decorum of the House of God. In promulgating his regulations he had in mind to stimulate and foster the Christian spirit among the people by prudently removing those things which were dishonoring the sanctity and majesty of the temple of God. Wherever the regulations set down by the Motu Proprio have been put diligently into practice, not only have the beauties of a rare art begun to revive, but also the 52 religious spirit has begun to flourish widely. Furthermore, the Christian people, imbued more deeply with the meaning of the liturgy, have become accustomed to participate in the service of the Holy Eucharist, in sacred psalmody and in public prayers. Yet this effort of Pope Pius X did not effect a complete reformation in the liturgical music, for in certain places these wise laws were not observed. We are well aware that some have stated repeatedly that they are not bound by these laws, even though they have been so solemnly promulgated and that others, at first, indeed, obeyed them but gradually came to adopt forms of music which should be kept entirely out of places of worship. 4 Such a disgraceful condition of degradation in Church music existed for twenty' five years. On December 20, 1928, Pope Pius XI published the Apostolic Constituf tion, "Divini cultus sanctitatemf' dealing with liturgy and liturgical music. In issuing this Constitution, the Pope wished to impress upon the whole Church, the importance of such music in divine worship. By making it a constitution he gave it a more permanent and general character. "These things," it read, "we proclaim, declare and ordain resolving that this Apostolic Constitution is and will be firm, strong and efficacious, and that it receive and have its full and complete effects with no one whomsoever standing in opposition. Let no one, then, be permitted to infringe on this Constitution promulgated by Us or with rash daring, oppose the same." This, the Constitution, is binding on all clergy and laity. Pope Pius XI does not merely repeat what had already been prescribed and decreed by Pius X in regard to Sacred Music, but penetrates into and sets forth clearly the new spirit that actuated that famous document and in his calm and effective examination deduces still further conclusions, new instructions and regulations. Noting with regret the violations of the very wise laws of the Motu Proprio, petitions were received from all parts requesting a new and explicit confirmation of that document, as though there were need of a more definite sanction to make it effectual in repressing abuses. Still others, under pretext of making a new contribution to art and for other reasons of quite a different nature, hoped that now after twentyfive years it might be possible to modify some of the prescriptions of Pius X which seemed too SCVCIC. But none of that in the new document of Pius XI! Those laws which Pius X and his immediate successor, Benedict XV called the "Code of Laws for Sacred Music" were that in reality and remained such. His Holiness resolutely affirmed that "those things which so solemnly decreed . . . are to be scrupulously observed in the whole Church." The Motu Proprio, therefore has no need of further confirmation or more explicit sanction much less of change, or modification. Indeed, the experience of twentyffive years suggests quite the contrary. The Holy Father, Pius XI, is fully conscious of the regrettable failure to observe these laws in some parts of the Catholic world, he knows the pretexts and methods adopted by some to exempt themselves from them and the attempts in the name of art to bring back into the Sacred Temple and into the liturgy, the very things which Pius X banished irrevocably. 53 The editor of the "Catholic Choirmasterf' Mr. Nicola A. Montani, a leading advocate of the modern idiom in liturgical music, thus explains this attitude of the Church: "The Church does not ask that we give up modern music. She asks only that we preserve inviolate the atmosphere, the sanctity and holiness of the House of God and allow ourselves to be permeated with this holy atmosphere. She asks us to leave outside the portals of the Holy of Holies the corrupting atmosphere of frivolity, materialism and artificiality. The House of God should be a sanctuary in every way. The very atmosphere should give deep rest and comfort and proper surcease from the trials and tribulations of the outer worldg there is no question but that a devotional attitude is intensified by the proper surroundings-the very walls, the windows, the altar lamp, the mosaics and paintings--all these exterior manifestations stimulate devotion." FRANCES CLARE STROEBELE, '30, QJVE TO SPRING I heard your voice: The trill of birds from farfoif mountain high. I saw your dawn: A burst of flame across the pearly sky. I felt your breath: A fragrant thing with scents of newfturned sod. And then, I spoke A heartfelt word of gratitude to God. ROSEMARY FOGARTY, '30. 74 THE MOON MAN'S WIFE HERE lived long ago, on one of the many high hills in France, a goatfherder, his wife and their son. They had a comfortable little home, and within it all was cheery and warm. In the winter the flames danced in the fireplace. They were bright red in their friendliness and threw their laughing, prancing shadows on the walls. Then, it was when the laughs came loudest and merriest from around the hearth, that the herder's son left his home for the city, where he was employed by a large factory. Many times his mother had wept when she thought of his being alone and lonely, far from their little home. Many times too, had she chided her husband, saying he was a "goodfforfnought" because he could not earn enough to enable their only child to stay with them. The old goat-herder, when she spoke thus, would smilingly reply: "It will not hurt the boy to get some experience." . When the flowers began to bloom and the grass to grow green and soft beneath one's feet, and when the fairies changed their winter robes of brown to skiey blue and lavender, the young man returned to help his father take care of the goats. The summer, that particular year, had been long and fine, the crops green and beautiful. The result was that Autumn's advent was late, but, as if to make up for lost time, the season became so severe, the weather so stormy, that even before the usual time the herder's son had to return to his city employment. After the boy had gone, the goatfherder and his wife were doubly lonely. They would sit before the fire watching the flames dance, but how bright soever they beamed they could not dispel their sadness One night a stranger came asking for food and a night's shelter. "You are welcome," said the goatfraiser, cordially. "Come, Mother, get this stranger some food." After the stranger had eaten, he sat before the fire and told them many tales. The most interesting of these was the story of the wife of the Manfinfthe'moon, which he told as follows: The wife of the man in the moon was a beautiful fairy with long golden hair and eyes as blue as an April sky. So sweet was she, and so pleased was her husband with her, that he beamed down upon the earth each night, smiling broadly in his happiness. He loved her much, and in tribute to her virtues he would pin a brilliant star in the sky. The man in the Moon was indeed inordinately proud of his wife, and she, in turn, thought endless nice things of him. But, over the azure sky of their happiness there fell a shadow,-the jealousy of the Lady Moon's sister. Her hatred of her was so intense that she cursed her beauty and virtue, and vowed a mighty vow that she would destroy her. But alas, the Dark One needed mortal help to effect her sister's ruin. "But how could a mortal help her?" interrupted the old woman. "I do not know," the stranger said, "but I am sure if one carried out her plans one would see one's highest ambition realized, one's greatest wish fulfilled." 55' "Let us help her," cried the old woman to the goatfherder. We could ask for great wealth, so that our boy need not work. We could live as a king!" At first, the old goabraiser would hear nothing of the plan, but his wife begged and pleaded so, that finally he consented. Upon hearing the old man's decision the stranger said: "If you are to help the ugly sister you must go into the valley at midnight, so the story goes, and stand with your back to the moon and cry out three times in a large, loud voice, this word, and the plans will be explained to you." Their visitor left. The old woman peered through the window after him and when he had been swallowed by the downward path he was taking, she led her husband from the house. They did as he had bidden them and truly a fairy did come, so ugly a one that the old woman drew back in horror. This fairy told them to return to their little cottage and take three wishes, the first two of which were to concern the two sisters. "First, wish the wife of the Moonfman dead, then wish for her sister to take her place. Only a mortal's wish for such a thing can be fulfilled in Fairylandf' the Black One said. "What does one get for this service?" asked the old woman anxiously. "After you have spoken these two wishes then you may take a third wish for anything you want and it shall be granted to you," and saying this, the ugly fairy vanished. "I do not want to do this," said the goatfraiser in a sorrowful voice. "We must now. We have spoken to the Fairy. Come, let us hurry," and his wife started off. Once again in their little house the goat'raiser was defiant in his refusal to do as the fairy had charged them. Soon, however he tired of listening to his wife's words of reproach, to her wails as she begged him to do as the fairy had said. "I shall do as you say, but I do not think it just," he declared. He wished the first wish, the death of the Moonfman's wife. Immediately, the man in the moon grew sad, and lost his light as he drew each star to him. Then slowly, the unhappy widower in his pale, round house sank gradually behind a hill. When the goatfraiser remarked on the lack of beauty in a sky without a moon and stars, his wife urged him to wish the second wish saying when that was fulfilled the sky would be bright again for the jealous fairy would be shining there. So the goatfraiser wished the second wish and hurried to the window to look again at the dark sky. Its blackness was not relieved, and he stared long, with sadness in his eyes. His wife pulled at his sleeve. "Hurry," she insisted, "speak our wish to have gold, so much gold, that we might live as a king." 56 "But look!" he cried, pointing to the dull dark sky, "There is no light, the jealous fairy is not shining there." "That is because she is so black and ugly that her face cannot be seen. But worry not about the fairy, speak our wish and make us wealthy." He did not heed her words but going from the house he stood beneath the heavy sky. There is no beauty in it, he thought, without the moon and stars, there is not light for the earth below and we shall miss it dreadfully. Without a moon to gaze upon, how are poets to be inspired to write great and wonderful things. Lo! But a few minutes had elapsed when the moon rose slowly from behind a hill and when it had reached its summit the man in the moon pinned each star anew in the velvet of the sky and then settled back. As he gazed affectionately on each virtue of his dear wife, now restored to him, a smile spread over his face. The goatfraiser's third wish was granted and again there was beauty in the sky and light on earth to be an inspiration to poets and lovers through the centuries. A VICTORIA AUGUSTA TOZZI, '30. Qflfb THE NIGHT I pause, and stand, and drink in beauty of the night, A wondrous sparkling night Hr theme for poesy- With myriad stars and shining things to make it bright, And golden moon's reflection on the gleaming sea. I hear a constant splashing somewhere out of sight, And watch the sea retrieve her foaming waves with glee, The unknown depth below and great expanse of night, Depress my heart, yet seem to lift my soul to Thee! ROSEMARY FOGARTY, '30, 57 CGNCERNING ADVERTISEMENTS HENEVER I glance through the Advertising Section of any of our popular magazines, I wonder what would happen if one were to experiment with all the things described therein. If these artistically colored "ads" could be taken literally the world would indeed be a place of faultless beauty and beside its being comfortable, happy, shining and bright, the inhabitants of this perfect world would be equally as beautiful and as talented as the originators of the "ads" First there are the numerous Advertisements for decorative home improvements: paints, varnishes, awnings, linoleum, congoleum, sheets, blankets, rugs, draperies and such. ' Then the advertisements that are for the good of humanity, such as, cough drops: "Trade that cough and Mark this remedy", and liniments: "Sloan's Warms the Body like Sunshine." A popular form of advertising is the use of puzzles. One of these puzzles reads: "Find the Twins and Receive a Buick Free." It never adds the phrase, "after selling twentyffive subscriptions," or if it does, the print is so small you are almost sure to miss it. This phrase is well known to anyone who has found the twins and submitted his solution. Sometimes these puzzles read "Find the Car that is Different," or "Find the Bungalow that is Different," but the stipulation for the securing of the prize is invariably the same. One of the most famous of our "ads" reads thus: "They laughed at me when I sat down, but when I struck the opening bars of the 'Varsity Drag' it was a different story." Usually one discovers that this turner of tables has just completed an almost miraculous three months' correspondence course in music. ' Not a few of the pages of the advertising section are given over to remedies for obese creatures. They may "Roll Their Fat Away," "Wash Their Fat Away," or "Chew and Grow Slim," or if they are conscientious in the daily use of "Marmola," there's always a chance of their becoming an "After," Not an unappreciable part of this section is for the solace of those poor creatures whom nature has not blessed with curly locks. They are promised a head covered with waves and ringlets if they use "Curlrite," a waving lotion, "sold at your nearest druggists for only twentyfiive cents a bottle." You are also promised a gorgeous permanent for the price of twentyfive dollars and on the next page you are assured one equally as beautiful for only three dollars. The prices of permanent waves vary greatly, but not so the promised results. According to the "ads," whether you pay twentyffive cents, three dollars, or twentyfiive dollars, your wave will be the same. In the next "ad" you are warned against becoming a "Rumble Seat Rider." fYou will if you don't use "Toothbrite."j The Manufacturers of this product assure you that if the lonely young girl riding in the rumble seat had used this wonder tooth paste she would have been The Girl in front with the two young men. Then there's a tooth paste that can buy your hose for you. Wliat could be more wonderful? The 78 faithful use of "Ipana" will rid you of the fear of a "pink tooth brush." Another miraculous toothpaste can make you one of the live without "it" fmeaning pyhorreaj. You know, of course, that "Four out of Five Have It" because they did not protect the "Danger Line." Still another dentifrice removes the film from your teeth while establishing your popularity. Most of the space in this, the greatest part of the advertising section is taken up with lavish praise of numerous skin improvers and cosmetics. There are the preparaf tions of Elizabeth Arden, Helene Rubenstein, Dorothy Gray, Ponds and Woodbury. All promise to remake you in a very short time. Then there are cheaper preparations which promise the same results as the more expensive beautyfaids. "Ads" for alluring perfumes play no despicable part in the advertising field, these one and all, either implicitly or explicitly guarantee to bring any man to his knees, almost immediately. Indeed, a man would not be safe on the street if all or any of these delightfully illustrated appeals could be taken at their face value. Our homes might be model ones, indeed, and we ourselves might be criterions of charm if a dependable magazine would print one advertisement for the best brand of each preparation. However, it seems to me that the manufacturing concern which fools the all too gullible public the most, enjoys the most spectacular rise in sales and stock. MARY BENNIS, '30. 59 FOURNIER HALL THE CONVENT 60 CLASS QF 1931 CLASS OFFICERS President ..... ................... .... B E TTINA CLEMUNS VicefPresident .... .... B ERNICE HULLY Secretary ..... .... D OLORES OBERT Treasurer. . . . NANCY M.ACINElLL STUDENT COUNCIL REPRESENTATIVES ELLA DAREEF MARY CUMMINQS 61 SPIRITS OF THE PAST S I sat gazing by the dreamy Wissahickon, I found myself thinking of scenes that might have been acted in the great play of life, years back while the Redskin still held sway, anon the white man had come to civilize this great country. Then the Indians roamed at will under these magnificent trees, with none to tell them they must stay on any Indian Reservation and lead a life restrictive of their freedom. As I listened to the trill of a bird in the treeftop, I heard in imagination the blood' curdling yells of Indians interrupting the stillness of that bright Uctober afternoon, and I could see their arrows whizzing through the air. I turned involuntarily, but instead of some tall, naked warrior with upraised tomahawk gleaming above my head, I saw only a playful squirrel scuttling up a tree. Vxfhat might not have taken place, I thought, in the long ago under that same tree! Councils of war, dances around campfires after feasts and cremationsg tall, bronzed boys at play, wrestling with one another or having shooting matches with bow and arrow to see who could shoot as well as their warrior sires-all this could I see as if enacted before me. Centuries ago they had departed for the "Happy hunting grounds," yet I won- dered if they ever come back to these woods, revisiting the scenes of their former barbarian lives. If so, I fear they must be sad at heart to End that even the beautiful Wissahickon has been cut by roads over which race automobiles, while the toots of horns pierce the silence and remind them of the ever onward march of civilization. And I wondered would those Indians wish to take up the burden of civilization to the peace of their "happy hunting grounds" and pretend, as they followed the deer in that blissful place, that the change wrought by the white man had been, indeed, an improvement. MARY CUMMINGS, '31. 62 THE BRETGN F ISHERMAN I love the sea- The liberty It gives and takesg The lives it makes So happy and so free. On cold clear nights I scale the heights Of mountainous wavesg From briny caves I lure my scaly prey. At break of day I wend my way O'er cobbled streets To sell the treats That I have caught. The whole day long With cry and song The people passg A myriad mass That bargains for my haul. I know the sea- It means for me A strife at bestg For I must wrest My livelihood from it. QJVE CARROLL COSTELLO, '32 TO A GEOMETRY BOOK O Book upon whose problems we have put our minds, And tried to grasp the meaning of your pages, Farewell' we go to other propositions stern, We leave you to a class of younger sages. Farewell' We leave you thus with deep regret and sighs, Your theorems and your angles to remember. A Tis sad indeed to part, but raise your hopes awhile- We may return to greet you next September. 63 GERTRUDE SMITH, '32 HIS GRATITUDE T was the feast of the Pasch, and from all the countries around the sons of Juda had gathered to their Mother City. Everyone was intent upon his own affairs, and the streets were thronged with thousands of people. The merciless sun blazed relentlessly down on a small side street, where, in the midst of the milling throng, like a frail bark on a restless sea, stood a young boy, wondrously fair of face. Yet there was in his eyes an expression of wistfulness and a sadness about his mouth which would have caused wonderment to many had they the time to notice him. But nog everyone was hurrying hither and thither, too busy to be mindful of the lonely youth who stood hesitating, perplexed, not knowing where to turn. For a minute or two he stood dazed as it were, and then a lad about his own age approached and asked: "Can I help you, friend?" The boy smiled, a radiantly sweet smile, before he answered, "Yes, if you would, please show me the way to the great Temple." The lad took his hand, and together they wended their way to a cool, dark hall in the Temple. Here they paused a moment to regain their breath, and the lad, who had been watching his companion curiously during the trip, now asked why he had chosen such a time as this to come to the Temple, and why alone. If he were a stranger in the city, why did not his parents accompany him? To which rather lengthy interrogation the boy returned the somewhat cryptic reply, "I am about My Father's business." S0 saying, he smiled graciously and left the lad gazing wonderingly down the corridor after Him. just eighteen years after the scene related above, a little family in Nazareth received word of a marriage to be held at Cana. As the bride was a relative of the Mother's, the family donned their humble best and set out for Cana. Arrived there, they paid their respects to the bride and groom, a happy looking couple, and then mingled among the guests, many of whom they knew. The eyes of the groom, however, returned more than once to the countenance of the son of the family. Where before had he seen that expression, that sad wistful look about the mouth? His memory failed to aid him, but there remained always before him that face. The guests had all arrived now, so they sat down to the marriage feast. Many a light-hearted quip and jest passed down that length of board, and, as the wine was quite excellent, gay and hearty were the wishes for the bride and groom. But there was only one who noticed the gathering anxiety on the brow of her young host, as he watched the fastfdisappearing wine. Would there be enough? 64 One only heard that whisper of the troubled steward, "Master, there is no more wine." What to do? The young head of the house gazed desperately around. None had as yet noticed the shortage. His glance fell on the face of his Nazareth guest, and as he looked, he saw the Mother speak :- "They have no wine." And heard him answer: "Woman, what is that to me and to thee? My hour is not yet come." The words in themselves were negative, but oh, the graciousness of the voice, the smile that accompanied them. Turning to the waiters, she said: "Whatsoever He shall say to you, do ye." And then He spoke: "Fill the water pots with water. Draw out now, and carry to the chief steward of the feast." Even as the bewildered host was about to tell his newly-wedded bride of their first domestic disturbance, the steward approached him, followed closely by a servant carrying new wine. Leaning over him he gently chided his master for having saved the best wine till last. "But how-" began his lord. "It was He," the other interrupted, pointing to Him of the sad face, "who sits there. He bade the servants fill the water pots with water and carry it to me." And even as he spoke the thought of a long gone by meeting flashed on his mind. Ah! now he knew! It was the boy of the Temple. Had he not heard the next day of the wonderful Child who had astounded the Doctors with His questions and His answers? All the city had talked of it--This must be He! And who can say that He, in His infinite wisdom and mercy, had not somewhere in His heart the recollection of a young lad who had helped Him find His way? BETTY CLEMONS, '31, 65 TO ALL MY FRIENDS I would that I could write to each of you A poem, individual, apart, So each of you could know, for just yourself The place I hold for you within my heart But time does not permit such things for me, Nor genius-far too numerous are you all, But I remember all your little pranks and traits, Your joys, your love and friendship I recall. And I am grateful for your thought of me. And there will come a day when you shall find Unwritten poems deep within this heart And burnt in glowing letters on my mind. GERTRUDE SMITH, '32 QJVQ FGGTLIGHTS 3' Bright, and yet not vivid, Gay, and yet not true- The footlights twinkle merrily just for a chosen few. Not for the weary actors, Puppets for our applause- Not for the listless chorus, But for us who watch, because Watching them from the footlights, Their smiles and joy seem true And the colorful lights deceive us, And blinded, we get no clue Of the heavy hearts they are hiding And the sorrows they keep from view. CARROLL COSTELLO, '32 66 CLASS OF 1932 CLASS OFFICERS President ........ . . . MARIE GOSZTOYNI VicefPresident ..... .... H ELEN AZUA Treasurer ...... ..... M ARY OHBRIEN S ecre tary .... .... G ERTRUDE SMITH STUDENT COUNCIL REPRESENTATIVES ' HELEN AZUA CHARLOTTE KING 67 TO THE ACADEMY STAIRS Here when our school days still were young And all our sad farewells unsung, We played upon your scale, And rollickingly held your rail. Here oft we sat and dreamed young dreams, Planned many school girl pranks and schemes, And now we part and leave you Mem'ries of things we used to do. GERTRU QJQ THE BEES fwith Apologies to Joyce Kilmerj I think that I shall never see A creature cuter than a bee. A bee whose hungry mouth is pres't Against the lily's pure white breast. A bee that spends the livelong day Among the flowers bright and gay. A bee with golden, hoarded wealth Obtained by neither greed nor stealth. Parodies are penned by me, But only God can make a bee. MAR 68 DE SMITH, '32 IE PATANE, '32 TEN? HE auction room was only moderately filled and the bidding went on without much interest. The object over which the florid auctioneer was exhausting himself in vocal efforts was an unique necklace of wood, intricately carved. A man in the back of the room bid "Five," and it seemed as though the article would be sold at that price. Then a middlefaged gentleman entered the room. He was unassuming in appearance, but to anyone staying at the Ritz Hotel he would be known as Mr. Purcell, the multi-millionaire. It was often said of him that he had become wealthy by holding on to every penny, and now he could not break himself of the habit. Seeming to forget that money was concerned in the matter, he viewed the neck' lace with interest. He thought it a shame to let it go for five dollars, so, wishing to surprise his wife with it, he cried "Six." Then began a battle between the two bidders. "Seven," from the first man came like a shot-the interest began to quicken. "Eight," returned Mr. Purcell. He was not used to being opposed, and this man's audacity in bidding annoyed him. "Nine," nonchalantly replied the other bidder in an unruffled tone of voice. W-I-en as , cried Mr. Purcell, exasperated that anyone should compete with him. The bidding stopped. The other man pondered over the situation for a minute, then turned away. Mr. Purcell was quite satisfied. How surprised Jane would be with the gift, and ten dollars was not such a bad price to pay. "Going, going, gone," said the auctioneer, interrupting Mr. Purcell's musings. "Sold to this gentleman for ten hundred dollars." The purchaser was stunned. Ten hundred dollars spent on trifle! The thought was like a nightmare to him. Surely there was some mistake, but inquiry proved it true. The winner had offered in abstract figures, naturally thinking it was in dollars, not in hundreds. With a supreme effort of selffcontrol he completed the transaction and left. The thousand dollar necklace was indeed a surprise to his wife. ELLA DARREFF, '31, 69 THE BITTERSWEETS OF MEMQRY Misty and green was her garden Filled with the stateliest flowers- Hollyhocks, roses, violets, Never graced calmer bo-wers. But, prying into a corner I glimpsed at her breaking heart- There, in a bed black with pansies Was bittersweet-planted apart. In the midst of flowers of thought Where she supposed no one could see Her own rebellious hands had wrought The bittersweets of rnemory. CARROLL COSTELLO, '32 70 CLASS CE 1933 CLASS OFFICERS President ...... .................. ,... E T HEL MURPHY VicefPresident ..... .... B ETTY GEORGE Secretary ...... ...... R osE CUSACK Treasurer. . .......................... CLAIRE CRUMBIE STUDENT COUNCIL REPRESENTATIVES INEz RHODES CHRISTINE FACIO '71 ENGLISH ONE UST when I had thought of trying a new bulb in my reading lamp things became very much brighter, and I saw clearly many of my old friends. There sat Portia and Bassanio talking to the "Merchant of Venice" near the founf tain of Lions, where Washington wrote the "Alhambra" All three were discussing the "Legend of Sleepy Hollow," until Rip Van Winkle fell asleep hunting for Ichabod Crane, who had been frightened away by the Headless Horseman. Rip Van Winkle dreamed about the Loose Sentences which were dangling all their unnecessary phrases about, as they walked with the interesting and mysterious Periodic Sentences, while the well Balanced Sentences looked on with Gorge Elliot and Thomas Baily Aldrich, who knew so well their worth. Antonio had a great deal of trouble with his rhetoric in the Court Scene, and Silas Marner was speaking to Dunsey Cass about the value of gold, until Eppie came along and interrupted the discourse. Marjorie Daw sat swinging in the hammock, reading "America," in which it was stated that Sir john Ridd had conquered the Doones and was going to marry Lady Lorna Dooneg Edward Delaney sat watching her writing a letter to John Flemming, who had a broken leg. Suddenly the bell broke on the air, and I sprang to my feet exclaiming, "Oh! that's what I get for trying to get all the English classics into my head for exams." M. INEZ RHOADS, '33. QJQ THE SEA The sea is radiantly blue today, Each flashing billow seems to say: "Come play with me, and laugh and shoutg Oh, can't you see-the sun is out." But yesterday the sea looked sad, The clouds forbade it to be glad, It growled and grumbled all day long, There was no music in its song. But now its mood is other way, Why should I think of the bygone day? I'll dance and laugh on the silver sands, And wave a message to farfoff lands. ANNE QUIGLEY, '33, 72 SUEfANN LD MAN ARON derived more pleasure from his art collection than from any other of his illfgotten gains. Being a man of unscrupulous character, he fre- quently bought pieces of stolen art. Many of them were famous masterpieces from museums. These he hoarded in his gloomy old house. For hours he would sit greedily devouring with his eyes and evilly gloating over his prizes. Perhaps it had been painted in jest or perhaps it was the genius of the artist to create such a master- piece. The background was a Held of clover wherein stood "Sue-Ann" gazing out of the canvas with a pair of wistful brown eyes. Her skin was snow white and her beauty incomparable. One night the old man was awakened by the smell of smoke. He dashed into the library to save his treasures, but was unable to do so because of the flames. He managed to get out of the house and was running frantically to and fro when the firemen arrived. If the moment had not been so serious you would have laughed to see this old man without teeth or hair, both having been discarded when going to bed. Then to make up for this deficiency he wore quite the most youthful pair of pajamas you would care to see. Suddenly he dashed back into the house, and no one was able to stop him. Soon all hope of his returning was given up, but a few minutes later he emerged from the flames dragging some bulky object after him. There he stood charred and bedraggled with "SuefAnn," who looked slightly the worse herself. To this day it is still a puzzle to those firemen why such an old man would risk his life to save a picture of a cow. FRANCES HAGAN, '33. MQ FLCJWERS Where do the little wild flowers grow? Why is it that I seem never to know? How is it flowers in you confide? Why is it that from me they hide? Flowers so fragrant, dewfwashed, and blue, Flowers are growing, it seems, for youg My heart is yearning for one blue flower, You find myriads in cozy bower. ANNE QUIGLEY, '33, 73 HER REWARD ECLINING in a deck chair, gazing out on the blue waters, with their tiny white caps bobbing up and down before her, lay Doris. People passing by smiled pleasantly on the pretty girl, for many of them knew Doris' story. For about two years ago Doris had been stricken with some malady that doctors were unable to cure. Since then she had been unable to walk, and now her parents had consented to her pleadings to go to Lourdes. Doris iirmly believed that Our Lady of Lourdes would cure her. A few days was all the ocean voyage required, and after docking, Doris and her parents took the train for Lourdes. Soon after they arrived a novena was begun, and Doris prayed earnestly for her recovery. Every evening there was a procession and Benediction afterwards. Doris promised Our Blessed Lady that if she recovered she would become a missionary, for all her life she had longed to help the poor, ignorf ant barbarians. Cn the last day of the Novena, Doris and her father and mother received com' munion together. As they came down from the altar she felt a queer, lively sensation in her legs as if she wanted to run, and she stood up from her chair to walk the rest of the way. When Mass was over, the happy girl, for the Hrst time in several years, walked out through the warm sunshine over to the Grotto of Gur Lady. She knelt down to thank the Blessed Mother, then suddenly a change came over her, and as her body knelt there in mute thanksgiving, her soul slipped away to be forever with 't t . , 1 S Crea or 01,3 CLAIRE CRUMBIB, 33. THE SUN In the morning the sun is a radiant sight, Shining into chapel with resplendent light, Through the stained glass, as a jeweled door, It turns to mosaic the altar floor. At noon it floods the chapel with light, And makes it look so heavenly bright, My God, all the sunbeams that in the air dance, Come to thank Him, who didst their beauty enhance. At the hour of Complin, it sinketh so low, That the shadows like waves seem to ebb and to flow, And in the pews gather as for evening prayer, As the last rays of light fall on altar stair. The sunbeams are a glorious gift from above, One more tender token of God's great love. They shine alike on you and me, Inciting us, Lord, to thanksgiving to Thee. MARY H. LEIBERT, '33. 74 ' THE MOUNT AIL to our glorious Mount, the home of our happy school days. It would not be possible, by merely looking on its drab gray walls, to imagine that such happy times as we have known occurred at the Mount. These mem' ories will never fade from our minds as the years go on, and our children and our children's children study the same lessons, walk on the same paths and play the same games as we did. The Mount has watched scores of girls blossom into beautiful young womanhood. Every year the big building heaves a great sigh as it watches the blackfgarbed Sisters vainly trying to "break in" another class of those "unconscious Freshmen." Vlfhat foolish, and to their elders, annoying things Freshmen do-always into trouble, adding just one more trial to the shoulders of the already overfburdened Sisters. The Sophomores seem to have forgotten they were ever Freshmen, so disdainfully do they watch and comment on the antics of their younger and less experienced sisters. Their own Freshman year seems very far in the past now that they have joined the ranks of upper classfolk. The juniors now look forward with enthusiasm to their Senior year, and greatly enjoy having younger girls ask to wear their class pins. What would Freshmen do if they had no one to cheer for them at interclass basketball games? The Juniors cheer lustily for their sister class. And now we come to the Seniors-the dignified and stately graduates, the Alumnaeftofbe, in deep preparation for graduation-having their pictures taken, plan' ning their future, and every other thing that enters into the projects of a graduate. But as they sit before relatives and friends on Commencement Day and listen to the farewell address delivered by one of their classmates, there will suddenly come upon them the more anxious thought as to whether they are prepared to launch their barque upon the sea of life.. But, are they not well prepared? Have they not been trained at Mount Saint Joseph to face a future that is in God's hands? CLAIRE CRUMBIE, '33. 75 THE VIOLET Just a tiny bit of purple Midst a mighty bunch of green, Hiding down in earth's high grasses, Hardly able to be seen. Yet this modest little violet, Howso tiny it may be, Has sent out many messages, And this is one to me. 'Tm just one little violet From out this great huge lot, But even me our gracious Lord Has never once forgot. He has given me food and shelter, My need, my only plea, For there's a tree o'erhangs my plot, To keep the wind from me. So you must keep on praying, 'Til you alike will see Your Heavenly Father so loves you, Angel-guarded you shall be." MARGARET KOKES, 33 QJQ CLOUDS I lay on my hack and gazed at the sky, Counting the clouds as they floated by, When lo, and behold! at my steady gaze, They turned, as it were, into sheep at graze, Romping and twisting in tune with the breeze, Beautiful creatures with snowy white fleece. Lazily twining through pastures of blue. Said I: "I wish I were there with you, Leading a life full of carefree play With never a worry in all the day." ELEANOR NEWLIN, '33 76 s s 1 n. s n. s s v. OUR LIVING LIBRARY Little Women" ...... Rose of the World" .... . House of Many Stairwaysn Our Book of Knowledge" Quick Action" ........ . . . .... The 41 Freshmen . . . .M. Inez Rhoades . . . .The Academy .. . . . . . . . . .Claire Crumhie . . .Math Problems at Recess 'Partners in Crime" ...... ..... E . Murphy and E. Burke 'For Better, For Worse". . So Big" ............ . . The Terror" ........ . . Sunshine and Freckles". . The Red Signal" .... . . Spanish Gold" ........ . . . . . . .Student Cofoperation . . . . . . .Frances Hagan .Latin . . . . . .Margaret Kelly . . . . Elizabeth Burgoyne .........MarieElenaFacio 'All Quiet on the Western Front". . . .... "Dorm" after lights go out Altar of Honor" .............. Jim, the Conqueror". . . Amazing Interlude" .... . . . . . . . .Punishment Class ............Anne .Quigley Lesson Failure for Christine MARY H. LEIBERT, '33, INTERMEDIATE DEPARTMENT EIGHTH GRADE OFFICER President .... ............................. M ARY JANE STILLWAGON SEVENTH GRADE OFFICER President .... ........... .................. . M ARc:AR15T MARY KING 78 r H -M . . - '- 'gd'- 1 S 15 W. 6255- '-21'!?f' f ff" -J 4' 'X X v'bofJ?1 ,. Am 1 fax W' 5231- , l'h , I A13 f N vu? A' A -'- QQS fmfw-'f:2"'-W QAM mmf: ACTIVITIES I GFMARY mmm A BROADGABTS RADIO RBCITALS Fin rg'-C. 'Qt MV Wffpguwg X kin eq 11 .folly W 'J 3.19 I' U 2- f il s 'I' wlffsx N. ' 5 N- .Y A Jaw, 5:3 If ff 3 9 1 Qvvx 155'-is -1-QQ, Q g,.1.:-IWW g f Siu ' J' ' A V , , v I ' U if f.E,g:1i:,y-Q' 1' , N 1 -,, Y ' A 4 ' 1' 1 , A I 4.33.-1 . X A.. -. ,,v. ,,,,,, , .' , - f " 'iff ! -I '5 ,5--12? A T A u 'N '. a. I QQ, if -1 W. vi XY, V r . . 1 1 8 V, Q1 5:21, nr, ' -' LI I "if, I- 4.x it VN: 1 P V . ffl 53" w. D 1 as ' in 'x A -X My-. - - - M . .1 E ii-S'Af - A' -- i' , A :ti A .QT , 1 A I' . , 2 . .V ll q 4 3-4:5 . f ' ' 'W ' " 17-, V - ' , ' . . . ' , 5 SS-.F 1 1. I , - +' 4- G4 A 1 nv " - ' l - - - .L , ' , .1 , ' ww- W - R- - - f rr V .ff-mf' . - ffl 3-- ,-7 - - , - :Jig , J ,rf I , , V ,,: H Rv' . , in! A-ug W XFAI 41 - X , '-, '- 1' 'A M U 'Mi-AV I A A N H A :3?c,0,. - . 5 E i v ,, tv .- W F X Q- X-G MQ w, X., w jk' J I I , A ul I is lf- 2 .Q W ' tl - I Q- "" .Q uf in ,f . I ' J gg: f 1 N fl' . s I " A J - 9 f '1' 1' " x '?"5.1,iG K -X 3' 'I - - . ,, , . - . , ie ff:-1.934 -iiytfhiiff u. l T mfg:-' 0 ,k . V ' . N .1 - .Sig i ff jr N LJ , 5' ', za cf X - Y- '- A Y A :AA lg YV, '5' I ' ' , . I ' x9 -45 nj A v ' 61 , , - . -V :gi Q, x't fig, ,I ' V I . lr... . , :ff P ' - w 1 V --: e -A., 154 - 1 ,i W A V . in . W. iv, Q 'isrr f N ,ty Q - V L 1 ',. 1' - 9'?'?""'. . " -1.5 -' K ,X M m - 1 - - P- -- SE- 7 3-E k ' ' V ' , W , ' 'Cixi , - W - - 35 , A X 3' I . . V I ::-4 fl " 1 - IT ' I A , if I -' 4? bf f 'f ' - ., n v M v ' 1 Q. 3 X i, - , I , f J in 3'6" ' x,.f 7 ." 'Q Q -. :Lb W .L X I- M-Q ,A-Sril,-I ' , ' - "3 't l"ff" Q - 3 A," ' -X 5 ' , X. I' ' 9 -1 1 L' A 6 R., 'jf -L F' 3.2 'S fr- 'V ' A pn.-. " 2" f ' sr ' ' , 'V l ' -Mya 4. Xt' - ff' ' xl' , . gnu- X a i Lo X - V J, 1 E , i , - - i ' I .L " w,-""' CHILDREN OF MARY "O Angel Queen! 'Tis ours to claim For thee a 'mOtllCT,S deaver mums!" Of all the Senior privileges, that of selecting the officers of the Sodality of the Children of Mary is the most cherished. Upon our return to the Mount in September this was one of our first considerations. The fortunate Seniors were: Prefect ...... . . ....... ............. M ARY Epi. Assistants ..... ROSEMARY FOGARTY ' MARIE McMAHoN Treasurer. . . . . . . ...... ........ E DITH MURRAY Following the election the weekly recitation of the Little Office of the Immaculate Conception was resumed. The Freshmen, who were not received into the Sodality until the second semester, were as yet unable to join us in paying this tribute to our Gracious Guardian. As Children of Mary we strove for perfection in the imitation of our Heavenly Mother during the entire year, but, in the early days of March our fervor was given a new incentive in the occasion of our Annual Retreat. The memory of this last retreat at the Mount will always be a poignant one for us Seniors, and the sterling advice given us by our retreatfmaster, Reverend William J. Deacy, O.S.A., will echo in our hearts always. On the evening of the last day of the Retreat, the Freshman candidates were received into the Sodality. The reverence with which the young neophytes entered the Chapel was quite inspiring to the older Sodalistsg later, as with one voice, the candidates recited the Act of Consecration to our Blessed Lady, the flickering candles which they held revealed their earnest countenances. At the altar each aspirant ref ceived a beautiful, white'ribboned Child of Mary medal and a Manual. Yet more edifying will be our final public tribute to our Mother. On the last Sunday in May, in the calm of twilight, the Academy Children of Mary will join with the College Sodalists in a devout procession winding through the shady paths of the Mount to the Convent Chapel. There, with voices raised in Mary's praise, they will offer their loving hearts, symbolized by their bouquets of freshfculled flowers, to the Queen of the May. MARY EDEL, '30. 80 LECTURES MERICAN Catholic Women and Their Influence" was the subject treated by Dr. Walsh in his series of lectures this year. He placed before us the lives of such noble women as Mother Mary of the Incarnation, the Savior of Canadag Mother Seton, the Foundress of the Sisters of Charity, Mother Alphonsa Lathrop, "The Rose of all the Hawthorne's" together with many others whose unselflsh devotion to the cause of humanity will always remain fixed in our minds as ideals of Catholic womanhood. November twentyfflfth brought the muchfheralded and greatly admired Dr. Pauld- ing. The title of his reading, "The Ring and the Book," but it was especially alluring to the followers of Robert Browning. Dr. Paulding first discussed the poet and then the origin of the title, "The Ring and the Book." After this came the crowning glory, one might say, of the evening-the enacting of several scenes from the play. A superb actor is Dr. Paulding, and one given to detailed portrayal of his characters. For example, in his last monologue, his natural use of the ring, representing that wellfknown possession of the Pope, was very impressive. One could almost have heard a pin drop, so interested were we, and when the reading was over everyone breathed a sigh of regret that there was not more. Following Dr. Paulding by several weeks, Mrs. Barnum Brown, who has spent much time in the innermost parts of India, gave an extremely interesting illustrated talk on "Mother India." Almost as interesting as the lecture and the pictures, which, by the way, were artistically colored, was the informal questionnaire which Mrs. Brown invited the girls to give her. On the afternoon of February tenth we were unexpectedly sent to the auditorium. There was a great treat in store for us, and even though we had not an inkling of what was to come, missing two classes made our minds very receptive. Bishop Hafey, of South Carolina, honored us with a visit, and spoke to us so delightfully and convincingly that when he had finished we had almost decided to go down to his diocese to help in converting the many people living there to whom religion is unknown. It is everyone's secret desire to travel, and on the evening of the day of Bishop Hafey's visit, we found the partial fulfillment of our longing when Colonel Charles Furlong took all of us via his large touring car pictured on his slides and reels through Norway, Sweden and Denmark. We enjoyed the trip and found our appetites for travel not satisfied but rather whetted by the journey. Father Ranigan, on March twelfth, took us to China with his missionary unit. His films were very interesting and we made them almost "talkie" by answering Father's request for songs. The contrast between the places where the Sisters had been doing their truly marvelous work and those which have not yet been reached is appalling, and we feel very enthusiastic about doing our bit in giving contributions for the fur' therance of religion in pagan lands. 81 I ll l The lectures of this year, on the whole, have been most enjoyable. Their cultural content and the educational impression they leave can hardly be surpassed. The Sen' iors going out from the portals of Mount Saint Joseph will carry with them as indisf pensable aids, the valuable instruction they have received, while the other classes look forward eagerly to next year's intellectual and cultural programme. MARIE PHILIPS, '30, 82 SOCIAL EVENTS , HE social life at Mount St. Joseph has been a full and happy one for us Seniors. As members of the graduating class we have enjoyed unusual privi- leges, and certainly the College has contributed many functions which we shall hold in memory for the entertainment we enjoyed while attending them. The third day of school we had the honor of entertaining Cardinal Fumasonl Biondi, the Apostolic Delegate to the United States. He was welcomed to Mount Saint Joseph by the Novices and Postulants, who gave him a lovely reception with songs and a speech of greeting. We were listeners only, on this occasion, but we were permitted to come into the foreground when all filed down and kissed His Eminence's ring. The next Sunday evening the Freshmen were welcomed into the Academic De' partment by the Seniors. There were the usual songs, and humorous advice given to the newly made Freshmen. Then, as everyone was waiting for the traditional lemon sticks, the Seniors gave each Freshman a bottle of milk and a piece of cake. This feature caused a commotion at first, but was accepted merrily. The other classes were given lollipops. Not to be outdone, the Juniors, on the following Sunday, gave a very amusing entertainment to the Seniors. The refreshments were gumdrops for the Seniors, and chocolate straws for the others. The traditional lemon sticks seem to have disappeared for good. Further entertainment was added by the Seniors receiving red berets. Next on the program of Social Events came the Hallowe'en Party. Our hall was decorated, for the occasion, in things ghostly and weird. Eerie witches peered out of corners at the merryfmakers and seemed to question their gaiety. A ghostly sketch was given by the Seniors that further added to the creepiness. Nursery rhymes were also brought to life very quaintly. The entertainment was followed by games and the Lucky Number Dance. When the party finally broke up it was voted a great success by everyone. Soon after this we Seniors were thrown into a great deal of excitement over the longflookedffor and longedffor privilege of attending the College Senior Prom. The dance was to be held at the Manufacturers' C-lub, and for days before there was a great tofdo and a bustling about getting everything needed for the coming event. Finally THE NIGHT arrived and off the Seniors went to meet their escorts at the Club. In the vicinity of the Senior Corridor, for days afterward, nothing but the dance was talked of. The College Sophomores next gave a Barn Dance in the College gym, to which the Seniors and Juniors were invited. All were requested to don overalls or calico dresses and sunfbonnets. The refreshments were quite apropos, being doughnuts and cider. To complete the evening, the College girls went off on a straw ride, but we were not considered quite grownfup enough to be permitted such an exciting night ride. 83 The first Card Party of the year was given by the Sophomores. The day set for it dawned raining and disagreeable, but in spite of bad weather, the affair was extremely successful. A few days before leaving for the Christmas holidays the Seniors gave their Christmas Play, "A Gift for the Christ Child." It was something new in the line of Christmas plays and was greatly enjoyed. The following day the College entertained us with "The Other Wise Man," a drama which makes always and ever a strong appeal. After the holidays, the Orchestra on two occasions invited the Seniors to the Opera. This indeed was a treat, and both operas, "Samson and Dalila" and "L'Elisir d'Amore," were thoroughly enjoyed. On St. Valentine's Day we were entertained with songs, dances and games by the Classes of '32 and '33. They displayed quite a bit of hitherto hidden histrionic talent, and their efforts were much appreciated by their guests. Next the College Mask and Foil Club gave "Beau Brummel" at the Bellevue' Stratford. The cast was very well chosen, the character of Beau being especially well done by one of our own Academy Alumnae, Mary Moessner, of the Class of '26. This year we digressed from the usual plan of having four card parties, and gave instead, one big one. Our beautiful marble hall and second floor rotunda were dotted with tables of people playing bridge or five hundred. Tea was served to each table, and lovely prizes were carried off by our guests. The whole affair was a great success, both socially and financially. The St. Mary's Academy girls entertained us recently with a play entitled "Kathf leen," an adaptation from the successful stage play, "Smilin' Through." We are now looking forward to the Glee Club dance to be held in April, the annual theatre party given the Academy Seniors by the juniors, and the Academy Play, "The Sleeping Beauty." This play is a modernized adaptation of the wellfknown fairy tale. There are thirteen girls in the cast taken from the Junior and Senior Classes. Judging from other plays given under the direction of Miss Miriam Gow, our teacher of Expression, their efforts will not be in vain. This year has indeed flown by on golden wings, filled as it has been with many happy hours. It is one which we shall ever remember. With many fond regrets we shall see it come to a close. The Seniors especially regret the parting time drawing near, as they are sure that such happy days as they had at the Mount shall not be theirs again. LIDIETTE C. AUSTEN, '3O. 84 THE BASKETBALL SQUAD ATHLETICS After having been introduced to books and classmates, we opened our athletic season with the election of new officers to fill the places left vacant by the Class of '29. The girls who very capably fill these positions are as follows: President ............... .... M ARIE MCMAHON VicefPresidem .... .... C LAIRE MATHIEU Secretary ..... .... C WLARE STROEBELE Treasurer .......... .... B ETTY CLEMONS Basketball Manager ....................... EDITH MURRAY Shortly after the opening of school, the swimming pool lured us into its trans' parent blue depths, and afforded us many pleasant hours of recreation. Cn the open' ing day we started to prove our prowess as "aquatics" by plunging into the tests, which, when passed, add much to the scoring of the teams. A red cap denotes danger and forbids the wearer to venture into deep waterg a green cap, the second to be 85' secured, is a license to join the "divers" in the eightffoot sectiong and the white cap signifies superiority both as swimmer and diver. The main end in view, however, during the past few months was the alluring "Life Saving Emblems." During the summer, at the shore, we are willing to wager that many of our foremost swimmers will acquire laurels by rescuing those indiscreet bathers who venture out beyond the "Gully." Fall brought to light the longfforsaken hockey sticks, which saw us through our interfclass games, but which were reluctantly abandoned by the early arrival of winter. As a recompense for his early arrival, jack Frcmt provided us with a virginflike sheet of ice on our hockey field. Here many happy hours passed as fleetingly as our skates skimmed over the hard, white smoothness. Then, to surpass all other forms of athletics, came the major sport, basketball. Upon the realization that almost an entirely new team must be chosen, only two veterans of the team of '29 remaining, there was great enthusiasm throughout the school in the tryouts for the squad. Fifty responded to the first call for practice, out of which Miss Ford chose the following twenty to uphold the Mount's honor on the basketball floor. EDITH MURRAY. Captain Forwards SidefCente'rs Guards OPHELIA LOPEZ SENEN BETTY CLEMONS BETTY RYNOLDS SYLVIA FERNANDEZ HELEN AZUA MARY REYNOLDS RUTH MACK CLAIRE MATHIEU EDITH MCCLOISKEY DOLORES ODERT BERT1-IA CAssIDY MARIE MCMAHDN MADELYN TEGAN ANNE MURPHY CATHERINE MCGRATH fUmP'CemC1' MARIA ELENA FACIO LOUISE MOESSNER EDITH MURRAY SARA CLEARY Cur basketball season opened on Sharon Hill's new court. Here we made a fair beginning with a 53-15 score in our favor. On St. Valentine's Day we presented Mercy Academy with a wonderful valentine in the form of a victory by a score of 45 to 25. This, however, did not dampen our spirits, but rather urged us on in the hope of being victorious in our second combat with this team. Une week later, February 21, we had a favorable outcome with St. Leonard's Academy, the score being 55 to 21 in our favor. In the return game with this same team three weeks later we were again victorious. Sharon Hill Academy played their return game on our floor February 283 the final score, 52f25, adding the third victory to our list, and tying us with Mercy for first place in the League. When the final game came about on Mercy's floor March 7, we were obliged, by a margin of one point, to acknowledge our opponents the "League Champions." The final score was 5 0f49 favoring Mercy. 86 Though this means that we lose the trophy for the past season, we are confident of regaining it next year because of the dauntless spirit of those who will remain with the Mount to fight for her glory. We wish to take this occasion to extend our sincerest thanks to Miss Elizabeth Ford and Miss Mary O'Connor, whose indefatigable zeal and untiring efforts have made our sports year so unusually interesting and beneficial. EDITH C. MURRAY, '30, 87 RADIO RECITALS HE little red disc in "Mike's" face was not lit. "Mike" was just standing idle. There was nothing in the studio but a piano and a few chairs, and "Mike" knew too much about real vocal chords to bother trying to master "chair language." Suddenly a young lady entered the studio and simultaneously the little red disc became very bright. The young lady began to speak: "Good afternoon. This is Station M. S. J. A. broadcasting to you at the infref quency of once every year, through the courtesy and kindness of our Faculty. Ladies and gentlemen, this program comes to you direct from the Music Department of Mount Saint Joseph Academy, and we bring you news of the happy and educational hours which the girls have spent being entertained by some of the best known artists of our day. These recitals which are arranged by the Faculty every year prove to be a lovely diversion for the girls. "On November sixth, Baron Max de Schausensee gave our first recital. He sang several songs in English as well as Italian and French selections. More fan letters were received for 'By the Waters of Minnetonka' by Lieurance than for any other of his many selections. 'Ouvre Tes Yeux Bleus' by Massenet brought the second largest response from his unseen audience. However, according to the Academy girls, all of his songs were enjoyed immensely. "The BellevuefStratford ballfroom just rang with applause on the nineteenth of February. The Mask and Foil Club presented "Beau Brummel" and the' enormous success was partly due, so we believe, to the splendid work of the orchestra. Our orchestra is under the very capable direction of Benjamin d'Amelio, of the Philadelphia Symphonic Grchestra. Mr. d'Amelio is one of the leading directors of Junior Orchesf tras in this city. Judging from the marvelous work he has accomplished with our 'budding geniuses,' there must be some truly wonderful Junior Orchestras in Phil' adelphia. "This afternoon of March nineteenth found the Academy girls listening very atten- tively to the Misses Kilger. Their instruments, cello, violin and piano, behaved beautifully under their talented hands. As each selection was played the girls were quite sure that it would bring in the best results in the form of letters, and they were right only when they pronounced this decision on the last one, 'Humoresquef by Dvorak. Our postman was kept very busy carrying in the fan mail in praise of the trio's rendition of this beautiful selection. "Before the Lester Concert Ensemble favored our girls on April ninth, we needed only one representative of the United States Post Office, but now we have two. These two postmen came up to the door in a little Ford and carry in piles of fan mail praising these artists. Mr. Elwood Weiser, the baritone, has found a place in the heart as well as in the memory of every particular member of the audience. Mr. Weiser sang selections in Italian, French and English, and was very capably accompanied by Miss Mary Miller Mount. The other artists of this program are Mr. Josef Wissow, the 88 pianist, and Mr. Jeno DeDonath, the violinist. We have received many letters praising their work, but thus far, Mr. Weiser holds the hearts of many music lovers in the palm of his hand. "judging from the opinion most people in the audience of last year's Glee Club Concert held, we shall he wise to retain the two assistants of Uncle Sam to bring in the fan mail. This Concert is the last recital of the scholastic year, and the girls look forward to it with high expectations, which, I am sure, will be realized in the first week of May. "Ladies and gentlemen, we hope that you have enjoyed this program, which was the presentation of the Sheaf Staff of Station M. S. A. "Your announcer is GERTRUDE KELLY, of the Class of '30." 89 PATRONS AND PATRONESSES Mr. and Mrs. Ernesto Arosemena. . . . .............. . . . . Miss Elia Arosemena .......... .....Panama ..........Panama Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Armstrong ..... .... G ermantown, PH- Mr. Ramon V. Azua .......... Mr. Harry Bannon ...... Miss Yvonne Benedetti .... Miss Nancy Bradly ...... Mr. Cornelius Breen .... Mrs. Cornelius Breen ........ Miss Dorothy Brown .......... - . . Mr. and Mrs. William Brown ..... - Miss Marie Busenkell .......... Mr. Robert J. Carr .... Mr. F. M. Cleary ...... Mr. J. J. Connolly ...... Mrs. James H. Crumbie ...... Mr. and Mrs. E. F. Dareff ...... Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Delaney. .. Miss Margaret Dougherty ...... Mrs. William Doyle ......... Mr. William Doyle ..... Mrs. George A. Edel ........ Dr. and Mrs. Matthew Ersner. . .. Dr. and Mrs. William Ersner .... . . Miss A. L. Louise Fitzpatrick. . . Mrs. J. P. Fogarty ........... Mr. Enrique Geenzier. . Mrs. P. F. Glynn ...... Miss Anna Goebel ...... Miss Elizabeth Goebel ......... .. Mr. C. A. Gosztonyi .......... Mr. and Mrs. Edward H. Hahn .... .... Dr. M. F. Herrmann. . Mary A. Holmes .... . . Mary G. Jones ..... . . . M. E. Keiley .... . . Mrs. Mary B. Holly ........... Mrs. Mrs Mrs. Mr. D. Keeife ...... Mr. Keefer ......... Mrs. P. H. Kelly ..... Mr. Mrs. James J. Kenny ..... . . William E. Kerns. . . . Miss Jane Langton ......... Mr. E. F. Lally ............... Mr. and Mrs. Peter Liebert ..... Mr. and Mrs. James P. Logan ..... Miss Mary Loughrey ........... . . . . .Ecudor, S. A. . .Philadelphia, Pa. ..........Panama . .Philadelphia, Pa. ....Flushing, L. I. . . . .Flushing, L. I. . .Philadelphia, Pa. . . . . .Glenside, Pa. . .Philadelphia, Pa. . . . . . . . . Frankford, Pa. .Chestnut Hill, Pa. . .Philadelphia, Pa. . .Philadelphia, Pa. . . . . . .Tacony, Pa. ....Newark, N. J. . . . .Baltimore, Md. ......Berwyn, Pa. .. . . . .Berwyn, Pa. .Chestnut Hill, Pa. . .Philadelphia, Pa. . .Philadelphia, Pa. .Chestnut Hill, Pa. . .Mount Airy, Pa. ..........Panama .Chestnut Hill, Pa. . .Philadelphia, Pa. . .Philadelphia, Pa. . . . .Beth1ehem, Pa. .Wilkes-Barre, Pa. . .Philadelphia, Pa. . . . .Souderton, Pa. . . . .Newark, N. J. . .Philadelphia, Pa. . .Philadelphia, Pa. . . . .Bethlehem, Pa. . . . . . . Mount Airy, Pa. Highland Park, Pa. . .Philadelphia, Pa. .. . . . . .Logan, Pa. . .Philadelphia, Pa. . Germantown, Pa. . .Philadelphia, Pa. . . . .Newark, N. J. . Philadelphia, Pa. Mrs. Elizabeth Lynch ............ Mr. and Mrs. Frank E. Mahoney. . . Mrs. James A. McCaiferty ........ Miss Margaret McCafferty ...... Miss Rose McCafferty ...... Mrs. Joseph McCaffrey ......... Mr. Edward McCaffrey .......... Mr. and Mrs. L. F. McCloskey ..... Mr. and Mrs. C. McGillicuddy .... Mr. William J. McGoldrick ....... Miss Mary McGuckin ......... Miss Frances McLaughlin. . . The Misses McMahon ............ Mr. Joseph A. McMahon .......... Mr. and Mrs. Sylvester L. McMahon. . . . . . Miss Patricia Monroe ............ Mr. M. J. Murphy ........ Miss Nancy Neissen ......... Mr. and Mrs. James F. Nolen.. Mr. and Mrs. Joseph F. Nolen.. Mr. and Mrs. John Obert ...... Mr. George O'Brien ............. Mr. and Mrs. Martin O'Connell .... Miss Katherine O'Donnell ....... Miss Julia O"Keeife ............ Mr. and Mrs. John O'Neill ..... Mr. and Mrs. I. Philips ...... Mr. John Patane .............. Mrs. James V. Powers ............ Mr. and Mrs. Horace W. Reilly ..... . . Mrs. Jean Bennis Reilly .......... Mr. William Reilly ........... Mr. and Mrs. J. Reynolds ..... Mr. Joseph H. Schmidt ..... Miss Mary Schultz ....... Mrs. Anna Skinner.. Miss Marie Stillmun .... Mrs. J. A. Stroebele. .. Mr. J. A. Stroebele .... Miss Margaret Sword .... Miss Elinor Supplee .......... Mrs. Mary A. Teague .......... Mr. and Mrs. August V. Tozzi .... Mr. Victor E. Tozzi ........... Miss Helen Trudeau ......... Mrs. Carolyn Wagner . Miss Jean Wandell ............. Miss Doris Williams ............... .. Mr. and Mrs. Joseph A. Williamson ....... . . .......Logan, Pa . . Philadelphia, Pa. . . Philadelphia, Pa . . Philadelphia, Pa. . .Philadelphia, Pa Chestnut Hill, Pa . .Philadelphia, Pa . .Norristown, Pa .Germantown, Pa .Germantown, Pa . .Philadelphia, Pa . .Philadelphia, Pa .. . . . . .Logan, Pa. . .Brooklyn, N. Y. Hammonton, N. J. . . Langhorne, Pa . . Jenkintown, Pa. Meadowbrook, Pa .Mount Airy, Pa . . . .Oak Lane, Pa . . . .Ventnor, N. J . . . . .Glenside, Pa . . . .Mount Airy, Pa . . ... ...Allentown Pa 9 .Chestnut Hill, Pa ..Philadelphia Pa 9 . . .A1lentown, Pa. . . . . .Glenside, Pa .Germantown, Pa . .Philadelphia, Pa . .Philadelphia, Pa . .Philadelphia, Pa . . . . .Phi1lipsburg, N. J .WilkesfBarre, Pa. .Germantown, Pa . .Gentervi1le, Md .Chestnut Hill, Pa .Mount Airy, 'Pa .Mount Airy, Pa .Germantown, Pa . . . .Mount Airy, Pa . . . . .Glenside, Pa. New York, N. Y New York, N. Y. . . .Bridgeton, N. J. . .Philadelphia, Pa . .Philadelphia, Pa . . .Overbrook, Pa . .Mount Airy, Pa ,Ql- ,.4,., , "' V Ef44!W"mW5 ' "f-' ?'Fv" .. .... ,Nm H, U L . . 1 V V M. M E W F w w ,F af? i m' gig Q P EJB if 1 W fi. gem -MK an 4 el Yif W ADVERTISEMENTS dw!-an SQ., D5 A 2,251 E TQ fi 'I .f f N fl K' gf! 1 'F 4, gi Thmmofniwydmrnw 6353398 mv as adverts:- mldlohmadqimmnbng 'UM Shui' 4 success. um to the pmmxagz of our Readers. K 'X X251 a ve, 'QIQ57 04-1529 V 1 U A x, 5 L' 4 B- 5 a-. 'ZA f ref NS 'ffpfvi' Q.rgv-1'-fxrm Q ,f 0 f J' fm' F '1 xi X F5 Wai 414 Q if 9 Q .. 4' 5519153 J :dr V ' if KW X Ji 'W fggeiagflm Ht! D 'Vaal . ', xSsLXb limi - 1 K . ' ' - 4-if 1- M . , fb' . f ' , - . .' ,.' QV , . . X , . . M, x .3 si! . C 5 ' ' I' , ',f ' QI ., ' Wg? W., . I., 1 , . 1 13, A . 1,1 1 I J.. P' .. z..,.' . - ' ' V, f ,sl X QL Q, M A ag ' Q .A - I 1 ,V . Q3 fi' 9 V 0 , Q' L-' LLVQ fl' ' ' f tl Z, :cg , , w Y M h - 'Q ' ' w U In . . Q , X , , gulf u Lg ' .ffm-If X3 ., A 5 1 :Y lj H' -A i es He' ,N - , f -Ld V, U if ix N ,N , f 3: A v , wg- M Z ' 1 g A, N ,i E. ' 4 '. ' Q .- :fc ,al A l ' Q .f V 4 ' .:- ,.-A 4- . 111 .Qi . 1 9' gj,:,wAr'.-IE A W ff ,,f.ip:f. ,I We recommnd their prod- Q-. " E ' H , " fe-5-' .4 11:12 " I n 'NL Rm ' ' , .. ' ' '-. S 1:42 1... ' , - P- .- X , g gi !! ' U 71, 'AL ,v ' W ' y 5 A fri' ' 2 3 .,f! - re. -- . il 1 .r, , .. '. 3-4-751 ' ' - ' A ' :If A fy Q"""" , Q- V. x A , ef- f .rg I E! - iz' ' ,-, 'N .1-.', fi' 1, -I -" ' ' f X - ' ' - -f ?ju, v t- l,!l . 4, f - ,I h , , 1 Y . I , 2141" N! 715' W ag! gr' , 1 gaux' ,5 . 4 ' ' - ,lf 'r . . 'A 4 .. K.. - -, J J' f-4 5 ' egg, r ,j xi 5 ff ' , if - 1 1 1 ' x-" ,.- .. 1 ff Q E , ,- 51 + , 231 v1:: ' ' jp f' V ' K-A 1 s 6 '. . 1' N ' W ' fy . wx v .64 5+ ' ' Fm- 1 . W wwf 1 , I 'WI 42, Q Wk, J . ig, V-V L - , 4137 ' . Q N 'Av ' 'Q 1 ' all I I I ' , vt , f If 4.1. .. Law- xx x . 1 A .. , ""' . , ' 'I NCRWCCD ACADEMY Mt. St, .loseph School or Boys Germantown and Sunset Avenues CHESTNUT HILL, PHILADELPHIA 1010 Resident and Day Pupils, Elementary and Junior High School Departments Gymnasium in Charge of an Expert Master For Catalogue, address THE SECRETARY. Phone, Chestnut Hill 0688 CHESTNUT HILL CARL D'LAURO CONTRACTING and GRAY STONE . QUARRY oo. Tailor QUARRIES Germantown and Mermaid Avenues 8044 GERMANTGWN AVENUE Chestnut Hill, Phila. A CHESTNUT HILL, PHILA. OFFICE 9115. East Moreland Avenue Phone, Chestnut Hill 0498 Chestnut Hill, Phila. FGNTBQNNE HALL Mtg. Sli. .lwsepli Sclwol fm' Girls L-01405 PRIMARY AND GRAMMAR GRADES 201101 Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia R ENT AND DAY PUPILS WM. A. KILIAN HARDWARE CO. General Electric Refrigerators J' 8450 Germantown Ave. H ousefurnishings Toys DuPont Paints Telephone, Chestnut Hill 0747 George Robertson E99 Sons Landscape Contractors Florists 8339 Germantown Ave. CHESTNUT HILL, PA. A Th's book pla ned a d e ecuted 1 n n x under the personal supervision of our MR. CHARLES E. BACHMAN, JR. Class Book Specialist THE AD-SERVICE PRINTING COMPANY 207 SOUTH NINTH STREET PHILADELPHIA Congratulations Class of 1930 Q? Qbiladelpbm-Weeks - To QBQELTVBLES-Mflfgsfhlfu Phones: Chestnut Hill 3930, 3931 Thomas E, Hudson DODGE BROTHERS Motor Cars and Trucks - T .. SALES SERVICE Germantown Avenue at Willow Grove Avenue CHESTNUT HILL, PHILA. Bell Telephone Ralph A. Dickinson Electrical Contractor INSTALLING REPAIRING R A D I O 8437 Germantown Avenue CHESTNUT HILL, PHILA. 40440104 G. GLW. H. Corson Arnericals Oldest Lime Manufacturers PLYMOUTH MEETING, PA. 10'1C05'0'5 Leighton M. Cope Pharmacist PURE DRUGS GIFTS SODA PERFUMES 8401 Germantown Ave. CHESTNUT HILL PHILADELPHIA Chestnut Hill 0367 Mc LAIN FIRE BRICK COMPANY PITTSBURGH, PENNA. MANUFACTURERS Fire and Building Brick JAMES B. KING, Eastern Sales Representat 6ffQsff397fl9?ZZQ!:f,v lO5 SOUTH lem STREET PHILADELPHIA , PA. We awe the Ofhcial Uutjittesrs fofr the Mr. St. joseph Students Q School Dfresses And Gymnasium Suits Chestnut Hill 1706 Hudson Super Six Essex Super Six Winston Motor Company SALES AND SERVICE WILLIAM M. NOONAN, Manager 803840 GERMANTOWN AVE. PHILADELPHIA Joseph C. Close 5 600 Germantown Ave. PHILADELPHIA 202 Building and Loan Associations When in need of Music, telephone or write Qlinzuperatihe music Qlinmpanp S. E. Cor. 10th E3 Columbia Ave PHILADELPHIA, PENNA. Phone Ste. 4846 EDWARD 1. NOLEN Concrete Paving 7360 N. 19TH STREET WEST OAK LANE, PA. Walter A. Dwyer Coal and 'Building material T WALTER T. DW YER CHESTNUT HILL, PHILADELPHIA A. Sabia, Inc. Contractors and Builders 7203 BRIAR ROAD PHILADELPHIA, PA. In Picturesque Chestnut Hill You are cordially invited to inspect some of the choicest residences in this fashionable suburb. You cannot make any error in selecting Chestnut Hill. Our exclusive listings. Arrange appointment through JOSEPH M. JENNINGS co. Realtors "HEADQUARTERS FOR CHESTNUT HILL HOMES" 8612 Germantown Avenue Chestnut Hill 4886187 Phone: Chestnut Hill 0210 Oldest Established Tailor in the Twentyfsecond Ward H. Linaka, jr. TAILQR Liveries-Riding Habits 8622 GERMANTOWN AVENUE Phone: Chest. Hill 0634 Open Evenings E. Y. HUSTON DEPARTMENT STORE Fountain Pens 8616f 1 8 GERMANTOWN AVE. CHESTNUT HILL Pleating-Buttons Covered Hemstitcliing Bathing Suits, Munsing Silk Wear, Gotham Silk Hosiery, Vanta Baby Line, Kayser Gloves, Dressmaking and Smocked Dresses a Specialty. .Quality First Service Always Blumenthal SL Hayman 85128514 Germantown Avenue FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC FRUIT AND PRODUCE PRIME SELECTED MEATS FISH AND POULTRY IN SEASON Importers of Pure Olive Oil H oiels and Institutions Supplied BELL TELEPHONE Phone: Chestnut Hill 0862 ., I-I. IFISI-IIER . . . Undertaker . . . ESTABLISHED 1851 IAMES D. M. 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Vaccarelli Surety Bonds General Insurance 2112 ARTHUR H. MURPHY SQUARE Around N. E. Corner of 180 h S reet and Th cl Avenue BRONX, NEW YORK James Af. and C., L. MeCa1HfertV FUNERAL DIRECTORS Are the best means of economy known for beautiful fwrnishings 6126 TGRRESDALE AVENUE jefferson 4404 G. SL L, STGEL Qi .--if Meats Provisions and Sea Foods 75' SOUTHWESTERN MARKET 19TH AND MARKET STREETS PHILADELPHIA BANKING TRUSTS NORTH PHILADELPHIA TRUST COMPANY BROAD STREET AND GERMANTOWN AVENUE Above Erie Avenue PHILADELPHIA Title Insurance Safe Deposit and Storage KONOWITCI-I BROS. oRoci2R1UEs Meats and Provisions 40840 WASHINGTON STREET CAPE MAY, N. J. 34056407 PACIFIC AVENUE WILDWOOD, N. Jr Compliment! of Mfg and MVJ. fofeph McManus Bell Phone, Night Call, Memb Chestnut Hill 0960 Chestnut Hill 0459 Peznna. F. W A J. L. GILLIES Co. 8515 GERMANTGWN AVENUE, PHILADELPHIA Phone, Wzlvcrly 1796 The OAK LANE ICE COMPANY PHILIP C. REILLY, Proprietor 1719 SIXTYSEVENTH AVENUE Compliments of Mildred L. Kenney, '29 SEEDS, Bulbs - Plants Everything for the Garden, Farm, Lawn and Greenhouse. ' Catalogue Free Dec-:gan 8: McCann Real Estate in all its branches 2719 EAST ALLEGHENY AVENUE .AEDICCM-. Complimmff Uf Mrs. William R. Dougherty, Jr 'WEEKGW Compliments of MR. T. WILLIAMS Compliments of MR. GEORGE EDEL J- Fowl The Universal Cav Pletcher Motor Company STENTQN AVENUE At Price and Wister Streets Phone: Germantown 3474 'v'v'vYiVvVvVvVvYTYTVTV?VYVTVOVTVTVTVTVTV There Are Two Sides To Saving Part Of Your Income Regularly 1. It gets you into the habit of spending a little less than you earn. 2. If you deposit regularly at the Beneficial your steadily growing funds will be constantly earning compound interest. Ellie:-fl ?l,Q!4iL .SAVING FUND KENSINGTON OFFICE: 826 East Allegheny Avenue SOUTH PHILADELPHIA OFFICE: Broad Street and Snyder Avenue RESOURCES: THIRTY-NINE MILLION DOLLARS ALLALALAQALAllQALALALAlAlAlAlAlAl.A.lAlAlAlA Qliecelian Qcahemp N., 144 Carpenter Lane, Mt. Airy PHILADELPHIA Compliments of Conducted by MRS. ABIGAIL MURRAY Uhr Svifrerf vi 5h Swnb PITTSBURGH Elementary, Intermediate, and Academic Courses Preparatory Department for Boys cw UNIVERSITY AFFILIATION Martin IF.. Connor COAL BUILDING MATERIALS Germantown-Olney-W. Philadelphia Telephone Connectio Established 1886 J. L. GILLIES Dealer in OYSTERS FISH POULTRY Spectkzl Prices to Hotels and Institutions 8515 Germantown Avenue, Chestnut Hill PHILADELPHIA Chestnut Hill 4849 Theodore Fonash PAINTING PAPERHANGING DECORATING 195 E. Evergreen Avenue, Chestnut Hill PHILADELPHIA Compliments of MR. and MRS. W. R. LAVIS Compliments of MR. and MRS. H. L. SUPLEE, JR W S i 1 5 I . 2 gv Q E 5 E a 5 Z 2 1 E u 5 W .X E E ii 5 E 24 R ji w, wi I? E 3 u H E E E MmMJMM u M M WM MM MW Wmm wmM Wl 1, K 'itll ug w .W x H' 1.4, J .1 , 'A 1 . ' 1 'fb I ,V 6' 1? "" 1 6 ,N ' 'iaegxxn :S , Jw A 1 gg' V 1 , , 1 ' 1, 1 9 v wx w z 4 ,, 1 ' 1


Suggestions in the Mount St Joseph Academy - Sheaf Yearbook (Philadelphia, PA) collection:

Mount St Joseph Academy - Sheaf Yearbook (Philadelphia, PA) online yearbook collection, 1933 Edition, Page 1

1933

Mount St Joseph Academy - Sheaf Yearbook (Philadelphia, PA) online yearbook collection, 1935 Edition, Page 1

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Mount St Joseph Academy - Sheaf Yearbook (Philadelphia, PA) online yearbook collection, 1947 Edition, Page 1

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Mount St Joseph Academy - Sheaf Yearbook (Philadelphia, PA) online yearbook collection, 1948 Edition, Page 1

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Mount St Joseph Academy - Sheaf Yearbook (Philadelphia, PA) online yearbook collection, 1949 Edition, Page 1

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Mount St Joseph Academy - Sheaf Yearbook (Philadelphia, PA) online yearbook collection, 1950 Edition, Page 1

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