Mount Cory High School - Shamrock Yearbook (Mount Cory, OH)

 - Class of 1935

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Mount Cory High School - Shamrock Yearbook (Mount Cory, OH) online yearbook collection, 1935 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 64 of the 1935 volume:

THE SHAMROCK ..l...- V lume I 19321-3 Published by Senior Class 0 f Mt. Cory High School Copyrighted 1935 sl-IAMITQQCK ln WE, THE SENIOR CLASS OF MT. CORY HIGH SCHOOL, DEDICATE THIS ANNUAL TO OUR PARENTS, IN MEM- ORY OF THEIR UNTIRING DEVOTION AND SACRIFICE FOR US. DEDICATION E FOREWORD IN publishing this book, we, the Seniors, hope that we are giving you something valuable to take through life. After you have parted from your school mates, we hope this Shamrock will help you remember the many friends and times had in Mt. Cory High School. EDITOR. FOREVTORD School Board acu F lty iiifl Classes 1 - ....1 ..i OUR SCHOOL LIFE Plays Glee Clubs Orchestra Athl t' Wh Wh Cl d -S p Al Ad t t CONTENTS T7 vv 11 l111 4L T7 IN 1910 our school came into existence. As time progressed and our numbers increased, we felt the need of improvement. In 1926 an addition was added consisting of a new auditor- ium, gymnasium, shower rooms, home economic, chemistry lab- oratory, class room, first grade room, and a new heating plant. QUR sc:-lcon. Ill AUTGGRAPHS , ll- .. Our Home The Senate We, the Class of 1935, extend the best of wishes to the members of our Board of Education for their untiring efforts in keeping our First Grade High School Charter. It is only through such harmonious board meetings as these men have that such high ideals in the educational field can be accomplished. We will do our best to keep their high stand- ards in action for the future graduates of our Union Township Cen- tralized High School. School Board Left to right-J. O. Kinstle, F. Crow, A. Lee, C. Roether, F. Moyer. Editor-in-Chief - Ass't. Editor-in-Chief Circulating Manager - Ass't. Circulating Manager Advertising Manager - Activity Manager - Ass't. Activity Manager Business Manager - Sport Editors Miscellaneous Editors Annual Staff Marsella Reese Arlo Kinstle Burnette Powell Don Clymer Esther Welty Maxine Reichley Betty Balister Norman King Mary Morrison Charles Strite Roy Crow Opal Edinger Celesta Amstutz Charles Guin Frank Balister Art Editor Richard Bowersox S' Earl Steinman Photo Editors lmchard Moyer The students and patrons of Mt. Cory High School are truly indebted to the Shamrock Staff, the entire Senior Class, aided by the faculty. In presenting this annual the untiring efort of the staff, in successfully meeting the many problems that confronted them, is worthy of much praise. The 1935 Shamrock wants to thank heartily its patrons for the good will and cooperation they have shown in helping make this volume possible. Their attitude has greatly encouraged us and the staff sincerely hopes that this book will prove worthy of their kind support. Instructors D. C. SIMKINS, SUPT. R- HUTTON, PRIN Science HfHf0"'!l Hays' f'0lll'lI F. THOMAS C. ROMEY H. SWAB R. ROTHHAR, Englislz, Language Lrmguage JUNIOR HIGH PRW- Girls' Coarlz. Music Home Economics Mll.f1Il'WIffIff'iC.9 M fmual Twbiniml B. WOODWARD R. FOLK T. JORDAN T. REICHLEY 2r1r1-:ini Gradvx HIL-5fl1, Gradvs 5th-Iith Grades lst-2nd Grades S Buses 1. Charles Bowersoxg 2. M. E. Wolfromg 3. Dale Crawfordg 4. Merle Keel, 5. Roy Billings, 6. Charles Henning. Chauffeurs We, the Senior Class, propose a toast to those men, who during our twelve years of school life, have carried us safely to and from school each day. The bus drivers, Whose trials and cares are many, receive few thanks for the great duty they perform. MR. BOWERSOX Custodian We, the Senior Class, propose another toast, this one to our dependable custodian, Mr. Bowersox. "Johnny" is always on the spot when needed. We have appreciated his untiring service to us. HOME RUN The Game We Played In the fall of 1924 twenty-five small and timid children entered into that new and unknown sphere of "School Life" to carry on as others had carried on before us. Of these twenty'-five, thirteen have spent their school days in good old Mt. Cory. As we advanced other new faces were added and some of the old, familiar faces disappeared. Under the guard- ianship of Miss Karg, Miss Creighton, Miss Folk, and Miss McCartney, we were successfully piloted through our first few years. Under Miss Todd we entered the "Junior High". The classes before us had not had this privilege. Mr. Hamilton, replacing Miss Todd, saw us through the eighth grade and we were fortunate in enlarging our number by three new members who have remained with us to finish their school career. With the finish of this year, we realized a new life was opened to us- "High School" into which we were about to enter-and we began to feel we were really growing up. "High School"! It loomed before us as something great and excit- ing and in the year 1931, twenty-four enrolled to be known as "Green Freshies". However, we were not the only "Green Ones" as there were two new faculty members, Miss Freeman and Mr. Dennis. Our class was i1l NORMAN KING MAXINE MARSELLA NORM REICHLY REESE It will nearly break MAX SALLY our hearts, Can she play basket- Loving, loyal and When with Normrm ball? kind, we'll have to part. Rawson 1. Pres. 4. Business Mgr. Pub. Spk. Play 4. Class Play 3, 4. Glee club 2, 3, 4. Orchestra 3, 4. Football Mgr. 2. Basketball 2, 3, 4. Kittenball 1, 2, 3, 4. Well I guess Maxine Reichly, Yes! Yes! Yes! V. Pres. 4. Activity Mgr. Pub. Spk. Play 3, 4 Class Play 3, 4. Glee club 1, 2, 3, 4 Basketball Cpt. 3, 4 Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4 Kittenball 1, 2, 3, 4 A better friend you'll never find. V. Pres. 1. Editor-in-Chief. Sec'y.-Treas. 4. Pub. Spk. Play 3, 4. Class Play 3, 4. Glee club 1, 2, 3, 4. Orchestra 1, 2, 3, 4. Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4. Kittenball 1, 2, 3, 4. CELESTA FRANK RICHARD BETTY AMSTUTZ BALISTER BOWERSOX BALISTER LESTY l'm happy, g'ad and DICK BETTS I should like to see Wee, He's not a drifter, They may not need A girl more sensilfe N0fh'iW9 WW WW' he's among the few me, but they mfght than she. Ties me' Who seeks life's 'real S0 1'll keep my head Sedy--Treas' H' S' Miscellaneous Mgr. task to do. just in sight. Miscellaneous Editor Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4- Art Editor. Ass't. Activity Mgr. Class Play 3. Basketball 1, 2, 3- Class Play 3. Glee club 1, 2. Glaa club 1, 2, 3, 4. Football 3- Pub. spk. Play 4. Class Play 3, 4. Basketball 1 2. Class Play 4- Glee club 1 2 3 4 Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4. 2 . v 2 1 ' Kibtenball 1, 2, 3, 4. Klttenball 1, 2, 3, 4. Football 1, 2, 3, 4. Kittenball 1, 2, 3, 4. Basketball Mgr. 4. Pub. Spk. 4. Kmanball 1, 2, 3, 4. organized under our sponsor, Mr. Pifer and we Cll0S6 for our class colors GREEN and GOLD. Although our work became a continual routine and rather trying at times, we spent a very happy and pleasant year together. ' The next year we assembled feeling a little bolder and a little wiser. We were unfortunate when we realized that some of our old classmates were not among us, but upon gazing around, we beheld a new and smiling face. We received Norman King, who had fallen in with us to make second, third and home bases. Also we were under the guardian- ship of two new faculty members, Mr. Simkins and Miss Thomas. We worked hard and did our best to please our teachers, but fearing all work and no play might prove harmful we indulged in a little social life under the guardianship of Miss Steiner. As time moved swiftly on and the year drew to a close, we realized before long we would be on third base and would have more responsibilities to assume 5 but nevertheless, we were pleased when we could lay down our books, realizing we were one more base nearer home plate. Before long summer had drawn to a close and we were summoned to take up our duties as "Third Basemen". Again we welcomed a new- comer, Donald Nussbaum, who has made home base with us. We also noted a new face in our faculty, Miss Swab, who took Miss Steiner's place. We organized our class under the direction of Miss Freeman. We all felt our Junior year was very successsful. "Professor Pep", pre- sented April 4, was a great success, as was the Junior-Senior banquet - lL ,--. .1 ,1i...1 May 11. We were unfortunate, however, by the loss of three classmates, Rachel Augsburger, Ralph Hall and Starr Kempf. Seniors, on home base so very dignified! So much different from our first appearance on first base. No new classmates greeted us this time, but we made the acquaintance of three new faculty members, Mr. Hutton. Mr. Rothhar, and Miss Romey. We organized our class under the supervision of Mr. Hutton. We chose the following officers: Pres., Norman King, V. Pres., Maxine Reichleyg Sec'y.-Treas., Marsella Reese. Our Public Speaking Play, "A Count of No Account" presented November 21, was pronounced a success as was our class play, "Clover Time" pre- sented in May. The banquet given by the Juniors was enjoyed by all. As we met and mingled together for the last time as Juniors and Seniors we were sorry the time was drawing near when we must part. Time has fiown swiftly on and our school life is drawing nearer the end. We have traveled such a rapid pace we have had little time to think of the life before us. As we meet tonight we realize we have reached the base which we have worked for so long. We feel a tinge of sadness and re- gret when we see ourselves on home base because we realize our school days will soon be but pleasant memories. However, as we pause for a moment to look back over our school career, we are pleased and feel we have been successful. We have been well represented in athletics, music, and other activities, and now as we go out into this great world, each going his separate way to take his place, we hope we may forever "Aim High, and Hold Our Aim". Maxine Reichlcy DON CLYMER ROY CROW CHARLES GUIN OPAL EDINGER DONNY Cnow CHAS. O'PAL In every play he is To act rather than It must have been Try and find a the cop, to talk, moonglow, friemi more true, Perhaps becmlsc, of Class Play 3. That made Charles Yon'U find you have his Sorrel top. Glee club 1. Guin gww SO- 'L job fo do- . Football 1 2 3 4, Ass't. Misc. Mgr. Ass't. Sec.-Treas of ' . . M . ' ' ' . gi-Tet C1551 zgg 4 Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4, Glee club 1, 2. High School. ' ' ' ' Pub, S k, 4, Pub. Spk. Pla 4. Miscellaneous Editor Orchestra 1 2 3 4. p y ' ' ' Class Play 3. Glee club 1, 2, 3, 4. Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4. Football 1, 2, 3, 4. Kittenball 1, 2, 3, 4. Class Play 3, 4. Pub. Spk. Play 4. Basketball 1, 3, 4. Basketball 1, 2. Football 1, 2, 3, 4, Kittenball 1, 2, 3, 4. Kittenball 1, 2, 3, 4, Class Reporter 2, 4. Class Play 4. How Did You Play The Game? How did you play when the game was on, When the odds were great and hope was gone? When the enemy team, with aim so true, Was dragging the victory away from you? When strength and speed and endurance quit, Did honor keep pace with determined grit? Did you keep the faith with the rules of the game? Did you play up square without fear or shame? Did your smile of cheer make the team your friend As you fought it through to the bitter end? Did your self-respect rise a notch or two? Are you bigger now, that the game is through? ARLO KINSTLE MARY MORRISON DON NUSSBAUM RICHARD MOYER He's got it Rmming around all Tall and Slim and NIFTY We 'mean wit. day rather shy, A gentleman maktig As't. Editor-in-chief Always funny, MP- Yet MS the 11111110 no noise. Glee club 1, 2, 3, 4- py' and gay' of amd eye' Cut Mgr. of Annual. Pub. Spk. Play 4. Pres. 1, 3. Bluffton 1, 2. pub, Spk. play 4. Class Play 3, 4. Sport Editor of Miscellaneous Mgr. Glee club 1, 2, 3, 4, Basketball 2, 3, 4. Annual. Football 3. Orchestra 4. Football Mgr. 3. Glee club 1, 2, 3, 4- Glee Club 3, 4- Football 4. Kittenball 1, 2, 3, -1. Class Play 2, 3, 4. Football Mgr, 3, Cheerleader 1, 3, 4. Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4. Kittenball Capt. 1. Kittenball 1, 2, 3, 4. Public Spk. Play 3, 4. 1 i -1- -. i1 , , BURNETTE POWELL Buzz When you, meet him any day He has a sunny manner that seems to say, He has found the hapmf way. V. Pres. 2. Circulating Mgr. Annual. Glee club 1, 2, 3, 4. Orchestra 1, 2, 3, 4. Pub. Spk. Play 4. of ESTHER WELTY PEG Tall, straight and fair Ready to help any- where. Sec. 1. Adv. Mgr. Pub. Spk. Play 3. Class Play 3, 4. Glee club 1, 2, 3, 4. Basketball Mgr. 4. EARL STEINMAN SONNY Short and small and bashful too, But he'lll outgrow it as all folks do. Cut Mgr. Glee club 1, 2, 3, 4. Football Mgr. 4. Kittenball 1, 2, 3, 4. CHARLES STRITE CHARLIE Charlie is big of heart and clean, and broad of mind. He's faithful to his friends, and to everyone he's kind. Pres. 2. Sport Editor. Pub. Spk. Play 4. Class Play 3. Football Capt. 4. Football 1, 2, 3, 4. Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4. Kittenball 1, 2, 3, 4. Class Play 3, 4. Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4. Football 1, 2, 3, 4. Kittenball 1, 2, 3, 4. How Did You Die? Did you tackle that trouble that came your way With a resolute heart and cheerful? Or hide your face from the light of day With a craven soul and fearful? Oh, a trouble's a ton, or a trouble's an ounce, Or a trouble is what you make it. And it isn't the fact that your hurt that counts. But only how did you take it? You are beaten to earth? Well, well, what's that? Come up with a smiling face. It's nothing against you to fall down flat, But to lie there-that's the disgrace. The harder your thrown, why the higher you bounce, Re proud of your blackened eye! It isn't the fact that you're licked that counts, It's how did you fight and why? And though you be done to death, what then? If you battled the best you could, If you played your part in the world of men, Why, the Critic will call it good. Death comes with a crawl, or comes with a pounce, And whether he's slow or spry, It isn't the fact that your dead that counts, But only, how did you die? Class Will We, the Senior Clas of 1935, being of strong mind and body, and desiring that our valuable possessions be justly and truthfully distributed among our successors on this tenth day of May, do declare that this is our last will and testament. First, we leave our success to all future classes who are to graduate from this dear old school. Second, we will the seats by the windows to the Juniors and the chewing gum that has been carefully parked there goes with them. Third, we will to the Sophomores our good behavior. Fourth, we will to the Freshmen our studious traits. We ask that you preserve all carvings and marks which we have left on the desks. CeLesta Amstutz wills her intelligence to Richard Coleman. We hope he has use for it. Frank Balister bequeaths his ability to get here on time to Ruth Bowersox. Does she need it? . Betty Balister wills her ability of being a riding cowbody in basketball to Doris Wagner. Hold on, Doris! Don Nussbaum wills his English book to Lyle Crow. Take good care of it be- cause it wasn't used much this year. Mary Morrison wills her ability to go with under classmen to Lena Marie Flath. Don't use it too much Lena. Burnette Powell wills his liking for red hair to Maurine King. Will she like it? Maxine Reichley wills her basketball suit to Leah Mae Reese. We hope she'l1 be able to fill it by next year. Charles Strite wills his blushing and ability to make long shots in basketball to Norman Edinger. Marsella Reese wills her ability to steal other girls boy friends to Mary Louise Whisler. We hope no one gets jealous! Earl Steinman wills his shortness to Edgar Cook. Suppose you can shrink, Edgar? Opal Edinger wills her dislike for the opposite sex to Edwin Inbody. He doesn't need it, does he? Norman King wills his handwriting to Pauline Pitzene. You'1l save paper, Pauline. Richard Bowersox wills his curly hair and football ability to Robert Morrison. You'll need more wave set, Mac. Don Clymer wills his red hair to Maxine Inbody. Do you like it, Max? Richard Moyer wills his little friend, Sonny, to Maedonna Stout. Don't be too hard on him, Maedonna. Arlo Kinstle wills his dignity to Wayne Westall. Do you want it, Wayne? Roy Crow wills his ability for Public Speaking to Ruth Krautter. Don't talk too much, Ruth. Charles Guin wills his ability to stay out late to Eugene Schwab. Will mamma let you, Eugene? The author of this document bequeaths to Ivan Billings the ability of writing class wills. In witness whereof, we, the Senior Class of 1935, set our hands and seal this, the tenth day of May, A. D. 1935. Esther Welty, Attorney. Class Prophecy On Nov. 7, 1950, Mr. Norman King, a graduate of Mt. Cory High School, was elected president of the United States by a unanimous vote, the first since George Washington. One year later he called together a meeting of his fellow classmates who had graduated with him in 1935. The purpose of this meeting was to discover how life had treated them in the fifteen years which had intervened. After all had arrived Mr. King opened the meeting with the following statement: "I wish to relate to you some of the reforms which I have made since I have been in office. The first and most important is that all schools in the United States must adopt the electric bell system. This will save electricity, energy, and health. Another reform is that there will be no more depressions. This will stop all unnecessary discussions in class. As the time is limited I will give the next speaker the floor. I'm sure Burnette is anxious to talk as usual so we'll let him be first, followed by Don and so on around the room." "I, Burnette Powell, am now a famous cartoonist. I have obtained material from my own classmates. Many of my characters for the funny paper are as- sembled before me today. I am anxious to hear what Mr. Clymer has to say." "I, Don Clymer, didn't know what to do with my life, but as I had so much practice being a cop in the school plays, I decided to take it up as a life vocation and I am now constable of Mt. Cory, Ohio, which is a very promising town. I have witnessed a terrible burglary since I have been in office. One man received a bloody nose, and another broke his little fingerg but I caught the robbers and they're still in jail. I wonder what Arlo is doing with that rope? It looks like the one I hanged a man with a couple weeks ago. What's it for Arlo?" "Mr. Clymer has made a terrible mistake. This is not a rope which has hanged people but has encircled the neck of many a wild steer and horse. I have been out West for many years and am living on a ranch of 3,000 acres. My chief hobby is raising chickens and my favorite meat is Buffalo." Betty Balister-"I have joined the circus and am now a famous rider of wild horses. I gained most of my experience in basketball by practicing on the other members of the squad. Don Nussbaum-"After leaving high school I became a bed tester in a large furniture store but some of the beds were a little hard so I resigned and became a second Rip Van Winkle. I have been sleeping for ten years, but when the call was given to come here I decided to do so. I did hate to give up eating but after all sleep is better." Charles Guin--"I always did like to hold the ladies' hands so I decided to be a fortune teller and make it my life work. It surely is great. Some of you other boys ought to try it. You not only get to hold their hands but also look into their beau- tiful eyes and see the future. It is very good money and I get many tips from it." Earl Steinman-"I got so tired of looking up at people that I decided to choose a vocation where they'd have to look up to me, so I became a paper hanger and am always on top of a step ladder. I have obtained my life's desire so I have nothing more to say." Maxine-"I was so pursued by the men that I didn't know what to do so I gave them the air and became an aviatrix, but in the end I was married in an airplane since no man on earth was good enough for me." Frank Balister-"I am considered a Jack of All Trades and Master of None. After graduation I went into the chicken business but all my chickens died. After that I became a doctor, a dentist, a lawyer, a boxer, a teacher, a broker, a clerk, a radio singer. QI made good money there. They paid me not to sing.J I became a preacher so I could marry a lot of people but now my business is an undertaker since it is a business that never runs out." CeLesta-"I haven't much to say. I always envied the girls who got rings so I turned out to be a telephone operator and now I gets rings every day." Roy Crow--"I wanted to be a kidnapper but I thought I should have a more honorable profession so I became a taxi driver. I can still pick people up." Esther Welty-"I am a worker in a beauty parlor. I always pitied the girls in Mt. Cory so I started a new system of face lifting. I have had nearly all the girls from Mt. Cory as customers. Of course they just come to show me my new system isn't needed." Richard Moyer-"I think you are all surprised to know I am superintendent of Mt. Cory High School. I have made many improvements in many things. I am proud to be a teacher of Bobby Allen Hutton, Jr., although I find he can argue as well as his father." Mary-"Because my name is Mary I thought I would take advantage of it and marry as many times as possible. I have been married six times and divorced five." Richard Bowersox-"I always loved to whistle but I never got anything but in- sults for my good attempts so I became an engineer on a train so I could blow the whistle and put my classamtes to shame." Marsella-"I always enjoyed telling people how to do things correctly so I be- came an institute speaker. I have spoken at Mt. Cory several times. The students were very attentive just as we used to be." Charles Strite-"If you will remember I was a famous player at Mt. Cory and now I am a famous coach at Notre Dame. I make my boys keep strict rules. They have to walk ten miles before breakfast and are allowed to eat only three bars of candy a day." Opal Edinger-"I am Poet Laureate of England. Most of my works have been influenced by the memories of dear old Mt. Cory." Opal Edingefr Salutatory We, the Senior Class of Mt. Cory High School, are happy to welcome our parents and friends to our commencement. We wish to thank all who are responsible for our education: First-To God from whom comes every good gift. Let's recognize God's blessing. Second-To our parents who have shown proper interest in our education. Third-To the board of education who were willing to give of their time in unselfish devotion to the cause in which the entire community might benefit. Fourth-To our teachers who have offered their services. Though they have been remunerated, yet money can never buy the true values of life which have come to us in the past four years. The class, which it is my privilege to represent, have sought to aim high and hold our aim. We appreciate every influence in this entire community which has been instrumental in molding our lives into useful characters. With these unusual privileges that have been offered to us through our beloved school, we cannot help but feel conscious of the responsibility which rests upon us. Jesus said to his disciples, "Freely ye have received, freely give." It can well be said of us that during the past four years we have freely received. And now as we face life and are to cross the threshold which will lead us into new paths in life, the challenge comes to us, "Freely give." If we heed this challenge, we shall iind that it is even more blessed to give than to receive. A life that is willing only to receive, but unwilling to give, will become as a stagnant body of water which has an inlet but no outlet. We, however, choose that our lives should be as a mountain stream which has as its source a spring which is inexhaustible and which sings and sparkles along its course, quenching the thirst of the weary tourist and transforming a desert into a garden. A small lad was brought to Jesus. He had but little, in fact, only five loaves and two fishes. A hungry multitude was present. One of the disciples asked, "But what are these among so many?"' Humanly speaking they amounted to very little but when yielded to Jesus, they were used to feed the hungry multitude. I should like to mention this the first requisite in order that we might freely give, namely, that our lives be yielded to Jesus Christ. If they are, He will use us to feed the hungry multitude which is in dire need of competent leadership today. We cannot give until we have received. Each of us will aim high for material success. Some will no doubt be more successful than others. None of us, though we have but limited material success, will be kept from giving something that is worth while. We too may be forced to say, "Silver and gold have I none but such as I have, give I thee." All of us can give to our fellowmen a kind word of encouragement. This may seem small and yet it has proven to be the secret of many a man's success. A character that is clean with a high and noble purpose in life, with an un- selfish motive will ever have much to share. The life that will think on whatsoever things are true, whatsoever things are honest, whatsoever things are just, whatso- ever things are pure, whatsoever things are lovely, whatsoever things are of good report, if there be any virtue, and if there be any praise, think on these things for they will refiect to others what we are and what we have to share. If we would save our lives we must be willing to lose our lives in unselfish devotion to the will of God and freely give to our fellowmen. CeLesta M. Amstutz Valedictory Lost: One gilded hour with 60 golden minutes in it! How many of us could claim this hour and how many of us would gladly pay a reward if it were returned? All of us are guilty of wasting these precious minutes because we have failed to be on time. Success is the child of two very plain parents-punctuality and accuracy, it de- mands that we be on time. This has been proven by the lives of many great men. General Putnam when he received the call to defend his country did not waste a minute and was therefore successful. That great military genius, Napoleon, laid much stress upon that "supreme mo- ment" that "nick of time" which, if taken advantage of, meant success in every battle. The following incident taken from his life shows even more clearly his be- lief in punctuality. When his dinner guests did not arrive on time, he began to eat without them. They arrived just as he Was rising from the table. "Gentlemen", he said, "it is now past dinner time, and we shall proceed immediately to business." Franklin said to a servant who was always late, but always ready with an excuse, "I have generally found that the man who is good at excuses is good for nothing else." Delays are dangerous, we know that Julius Caesar's delay to read a message cost him his life. "Tomorrow", is the devil's motto. When you have something to do, do it! The energy wasted in postponing until tomorrow a duty of today would often do the work. There is no moment like the present. "Better late than never" is not half so good a maxim as "Better never late". "Strike while the iron is hot" and "Make hay while the sun shines". Many a wasted life dates its ruin from a lost five minutes. "Too late" can be read between the lines on the tombstones of many a man who has failed. A few minutes often makes all the difference between victory and defeat, success and failure. Punctuality is the soul of business, as brevity of wit. Every business man knows that each minute counts. In our highly specialized industries today it is necessary that every man be in his place on time. If in a department of a factory employing 500 men, one man is late delaying the starting five minutes, not live minutes but 2500 minutes are lost. One of the greatest gains civilization has made is in measuring and utilizing time. We can do as much in an hour today as they could in twenty hours a hundred years ago, and if it was a hanging affair then to lose a few minutes, what should the penalty be now for a like oH'ense? A conductor's watch is behind time, and a frightful railway collision occurs. An innocent man is hanged because the messenger bearing his pardon is five minutes late. Again I say, "Delays are dangerous. Be on time!" From our own experience we know that when we are late it is physically harm- ful to us. If we have to hurry to be on time our circulatory system is disturbed and our nervous system upset. A basketball player who rushes on the floor at the last minute isn't able to think clearly and do his best. A student who rushes in, for an examination, just as the bell rings loses valuable time while he is trying to collect his thoughts. Be on time and save your physical exertion for something worthwhile. It is no use runningg to set out before time is the main point. "Yet though the ebbing of Time's mighty river Leave our young blossoms to die, Let him roll smooth in his currents forever, Till the last pebble is dry." But there are some things which are hard to perform on time. Saying fare- well to those with whom we have associated for the last twelve years is one of the things we would like to put off until tomorrow. Knowing that this is impossible we shall say it now to each other. We hope that we shall be able to meet often and each one will be able to gain what he desires most in life. To our teachers who have thus far guided us on our journey through life we say farewell. Although we have seemed unappreciative at times, we know that their influence will help us in our later life. And to those who are to follow us we say "Aim high and forever hold your aim" and always be on time. "But the best of life is yet to be, The last of life, for which the first was made, Our times are in His hand Who saith, "a whole I planned, Youth shows but half 5 trust God, see all, nor be afraid!" Marsella Reese "Seniors" Have you ever felt inspired To write a little poem About your classmates' characters And call it all your own? As I pick up my pencil, It isn't hard to see Our little tomboy Mary Climbing up a tree. As I keep thinking quietly, It isn't hard to view Our little friend Marsella With some definite task to do. I'm sure you'll all agree That Betty is a pal, Maxine is what I would call An all-American gal. Esther-now I must think My adjectives are few, But if I'd call her happy, Wouldn't you do it too? I'm thinking of a true friend, Do you want to know the name? Why, of course, CeLesta You all would say the same. My pencil starts to shaking When I think about the boys, But what would 'Cory ever do Without their boistrous noise? I can easily picture Donny When the teacher asks a question Say-"Oh, I thought you wanted Nusbaum To give that recitation." But when the teacher wishes to Hear Don Nusbaum recite, Donny start to talking And keeps up until night. And there is Burnette Powell- I'm sure I wou1dn't lie- If I said everyone thought him The shiek of Cory High. Did you ever know anyone That knows most everything And still has time to play about? Well, that is Norman King. Don Would you believe me if I said The Sophomores think that Charles Guin is enough to make Their hearts go pitty-pat? As I try to picture Arlo, I got this kind of view- In actions he hasn't changed a bit These many school days through. But when I think of stature I only say "dear me, "I never thought that one could change From a boy into a tree." Andfnext comes what you are waiting or Your hero, Charles Striteg When I say he plays football, I'm only expressing it light. And then I think of Sonny- Earl is his name- But he's so very little You nearly forget the same. Richard Bowersox, Dick for short, Is of the quiet type But please don't misunderstand And think it isn't right, Because he has a friend With the same name as he And also same in character, Richard Moyer don't you see. Please don't let me forget The curly haired Roy Crow, As I said his hair is curly But always just so-so. And last but not least I have a name in mind, Frank Balister, oh don't forget, He is the joking kind. And as for myself I'd just as leave forget That I ever existed And let it go at that. And now my dear classmates I must say good-bye, And hope you will forgive me If I have told a lie. Opal Edinger v Three Base Hit The fall of 1932 was a most important one in the minds of twenty-five pupils for this was the year they were to enter that new world known to them as "High School". Our class officers for this year were, President, Willis King, Vice-presi- dent, Lois Jordang Treasurer, Betty Jene Carr. We were called "green freshies" by the higher classes at that time but probably there was sufficient reason. Before the term ended we had lost three good students, Sylvia Hartman, James Derringer, and Raymond Spangler, but still our class had the others in the high school outnumbered. Seven of the girls took part in basketball to help build a team for future years. Five boys took part in football and ten in basketball. In the year of 1933 we again drifted in the doors but not the same group for each one had grown to be a better looking person. We had gained two new mem- bers, Robert McVey and Josephine Dukes. By the end of the year we had lost three classmates, Mildred Hall, Helen Sampson, and Lloyd Skeeters. We were again represented in athletics, both boys and girls. Our class off'icers for this year were: President, Aulton Wagnerg Vice-president, Betty Jene Carrg Secretary, Lloyd Skeetersg Treasurer, Maxine Light, Reporter, Maurine King. At the beginning of the Junior year we realized that more responsibilities were ours to assume. Also our studies were more difficult compared with those of pre- vious years. We gained one more student, Maxine Inbody, making a total of twenty- two Juniors. Our class officers for this year were: President, Robert McVey, Vice- president, Willis King, Secretary-treasurer, Mary Louise Whislerg Reporter, Mau- rine King. Our class was very well represented in basketball and football this year with nine boys and eight girls in basketball and nine boys in football. Several good parties were held during the year and were well attended. A good social time was enjoyed with our schoolwork, making school more interesting. We Juniors showed our ability to act in our play "The Hoodoo" presented on April 5th, 1935. Miss Thomas, who had been our class sponsor for three years, directed the play. We entertained the Seniors at a banquet which was very successful. So long till next year. Juniors of M. C. H. S. Maurine King and Maxine Light Top row-V. Crow, I. Strite, W. King, R. Coleman, A. Denny, L. Jordan. Middle row-M. King, M. Harper, G. Beagle, B. Carr, E. Cook, K. Bowersox, E. Shafer, I. Billings, Miss Thomas, Sponsor. Bottom row-R. McVey, I. Fisher, L. Dukes, A. Wagner, J. Dukes, M. Light, M. Inbody, M. Whisler. Two Base Hit Top row-R. Radabaugh, R. Hartman, R. Crawford, W. Westall, M. Stout, L. Flath, H. Wilkins. Middle row-D. McVey, A. Lee, L. King, B. Steininger, R. Bowersox, L. Reese, C. Collert. Bottom row-D. Powell, E. Inbody, J. Dukes, N. Geren, H. Welty, H. Frantz, Miss Swab, Sponsor. On Friday, September 8, 1933, twenty-three green and hopeful Freshmen re- ported in full regalia to be duly initiated as students of Mt. Cory Hi. In a more subdued manner the twenty-three newcomers began a busy year. At the first class meeting Nathan Geren was elected president 3 Angeline Lee, vice-presidentg Raymond Hartman, secretary-treasurer, Dorotha Powell, reporter, and Miss Swab was chosen class sponsor. The class was well represented in athletics and all other school activi- ties. Feeling the necessity of social life as well, a weiner roast was held early in the fall at Sheldon Hall's, a Christmas party at Wayne Miller's, a taffy pull at Raymond Crawford's, and at the close of the year a weiner roast at Botts Grove. During the year the class lost four members: Wayne Miller, Edith Nique, Clara Hartman, and Sheldon Hall. In September, 1934 the class was augmented by three new members to add to another group of unsuspecting Freshmen on the night of initiation. They are Mae- donna Stout, Wayne Westall, and Edwin Inbody. Again the members are becoming more outstanding in school activities and working hard selling popcorn to earn money for the class. The first social event was a weiner roast held at the home of the sponsor, Miss Swab, later Leah Mae Reese entertained the class in her home, and a New Year's party was given at Ruth Bowersox's. The following officers served this year: President, Leah Mae Reese, Vice-president, Nathan Gereng Secre- tary and treasurer, Angeline Lee, and Reporter, Ruth Bowersox. We feel if our next two years are as sappy and eventful as the past two have been our life in Mt. Cory High School shall always be a treasured memory. Polly Leah Mae Reese I have a bird, his name is Polly, Can he swear? Oh, yes, by golly. He jabbers and talks all the time, And the things he says is sure a crime. I took him to church one day, And placed him in the choir. Everything the preacher said, Polly would say you're a liar. When I took him home that night, I put him in the attic, out of sight. He cussed everybody blacker and blacker, But usually makes up when you give him a cracker. Nathan Geren - l.i, i-11- .. 1 . T Single On September 4, 1934 twenty eager Freshmen entered the halls of Mt. Cory High School, ready to combat with interesting yet rather baffling routine of high school life. The first day we were met with the not usual slams of "green" and "dumb", but we soon found our places among the various activities. Our class is well represented in athletics, and the glee club. We have had three class parties this year and all have proved a success. During the following year of our high school career, we shall undoubtedly meet many hardships and a few heartaches perhaps. But with the careful guidance of our instructors, we shall conquer these shortcomings, and in 1938 when we leave dear M. C. H. S. forever may we all be able to face the world alone and unafraid. Pauleyne M. Pitzene F-resh R-adical E-gotistical S-leepy H -elpless M-ean E-lastic N-ervy Top row--R. Krautter, J. Krautter, P. Pitzen, C. Alspach, L. Roether, Hamaide, S. Moyer, G. Steinman. Middle row-I. Woodward, T. Colman, R. Morrison, R. Shafer, P. Cook, L. Crow, N. Edinger. Bottom row-D. Wagner, E. Bergman, V. Waltz, Miss Romey, Sponsorg B. Smith, L. Dukes, M. Steinman. Seventh and Eighth Top row-K. Dukes, G. Dukes, E. Dukes, H. Powell, E. Risley, A. Amstutz B. Green, A. Wilkins, R. Dukes, C. Hamaide, R. Ferrel. Second row-M. Cupples, J. Wise, D. White, G. Reiter, M. Alspach, R. Steven- son, R. Moyer, E. Bowersox, M. Steiner, W. Moyer, O. Kuhns E. Klammer, W. Wagner. Third row-D. Harris, R. Green, F. Wilkins, L. Cupples, D. Simmons, L. Cup ples, R. Cook, E. Cupples, M. Carr, V. Wise, B. Clymer. Fourth row-Mr. R. Rothhar, Teacher, E. Light, N. Kirtland, R. Waltz, W Gossman, B. Garlinger, K. Pitzen, M. Risley, E. Balmer, G. Doty H. Schwab, Teacher. Seventh Grade Officers President ...,.............,....................,......................................,,...................................... Eugene Klammer Vice-president ,,....,... ,,...,...,,,, M arjorie Alspach Secretary ,............,.... ..,...,...... E arl Bowersox Reporter .............,. ....,...... M ary Lou Carr Eighth Grade Officers President .......,......,............................,......,............................,...,,.......................,.,.., Donavan Amstutz Vice-president ...,................. .,.... ,,,,..,........ E d na Cupples Secretary-treasurer ...,....... ...........,... B etty Garlinger Reporter ,......,........................ .,........... Donald Simmons Fourth - Fifth - Sixth Miss Jordan's Room Top row-L. Steiner, J. Warren, C. Fritz, R. Haas, D. Fisher, M. Ferrel M. Hennings, M. Mangus. Middle row-R. King, N. Light, G. Schwab, R. Steiner, B. Holmes, R. Berg- man, M. Kuhns, T. Jordan, Teacher. Bottom row-R. Werner, M. Dukes, E. Risley, B. McVey, C. Moyer, M. Stein- man, E. Bowersox, V. Hamaide. Miss Folk's Room Top row-E. Wagner, L. Steiner, W. Kuhns, G. Jordan, R. Powell, M. Mace L. Shafer, G. Methena. Middle row-C. Schaefer, J. Kuhns, L. Reese, K. Wilkins, D. Balmer, W Shafer, K. Walter, D. Amstutz, B. Green, Miss Folk, Teacher Bottom row-E. Moyer, M. Johnson, B. Edinger, K. Waltz, Z. Amstutz, V Smith, E. Risley, L. Woodward. First - Second - Third Miss Reichley's Room Top row-R. Pickens, L. Werner, E. Alspach, J. Stevenson, R. Bowersox, J. Shafer, H. Methena. . Second row-M. Reiter, A. Garton, B. Woodworth, J. Green, C. Wagner, B. Stevenson. Third row-A. Crow, W. Baker, M. Powell, E. Hartman, J. Kuhns, G. Green, K. Moyer, Miss Thelma Reichley, Teacher. Fourth row-G. Wagner, J. Carr, J. Dukes, D. Grismore, E. Steinman, M. Mace, D. Hamaide, B. Corw, B. Crawfis. Miss Woodward's Room Top row-D. Collert, V. King, N. Inbody, B. L. Crawfis, L. Simkins, V. Wag- ner, F. King, R. Manges, J. Fritz. Second row-L. Waltz, G. Billings, J. Wolfrom, C. Mace, T. Grismore, J. Dukes, C. Baker, K. Strite, D. Carr, A. Cupples. Third row-A. Steininger, M. Light, E. Steiner, D. Amstutz, P. King, Miss Beatrice Woodward, Teacher, M. Steiner, N. Steiner, M. Hamaide, , R. J. Dukes. SCHOOL DAYS School days, good old happy school days. Carefree are we in work and i play. Habits we form that through- out life Overcome for us many a strife. Old friends, old books, old melodies, Love to haunt our memories. Day after day new tasks we find. "Aim high and hold your aim" in mind, Years will prove that this is best, So let time put us to the test. sci-wool. LIFE PII AUTOGRAPHS 1l ,1l. ll...- . , Top row-D. Clymer, R. Bwersox, R. Crow, C. Guin, A. Kinstle, M. Reichley, B. Powell, C. Romey, Director. Bottom row-R. Moyer, B. Balister, C. Strite, M. Reese, M. Morrison, N. King. A Count Of No Account Archibald Waring-Tramp .,...,...........,,. James Long-Old Man .....,........ ,,......,..........i. . . . Marvin Short-Old Man .,....,.........,..,,. ,.,.. Johann Kramer-German ..,,.......,..,.....,...,,...... Count Henri Negoodio--Freshman.. .,....., ., General Iama Terror-Old Man .....,........ Si Perkins-Yankee ....,..,...,....,...........,...,,.... Hans-Porter ....................,..,...........,,,,..., , .... . Otto-Porter .,...,..,....,......,.......,...,........,...,................. Mrs. Maria Goodley-Old Maid .......,...,,..,.......... Bessie Long-Daughter of Mr. Long ..,,...,...,.. Jessie Short-Daughter of Mr. Short ,....,..,. ..,,...Burnette Powell ,..,.....,.......Arlo Kinstle ..,.......Richard Moyer .,.,..,..,...Norman King ...............Charles Guin .. ......... Charles Stril e Clymer Crow Richard Bowersox ........,.Marsella Reese ....,.MaXine Reichley ,,...........Betty Balister Louise-French Maid .............,.............,,.,,.,,,...............,.....,. .,..,,,,,............ . . .,,....,,. Mary Morrison Clover Time Peter West-Poor but honest ,,.........,.....,,...,.............................,.,,....,. ...............,,,,.,.,,.....,.,.,,...,.............., N orman King Sally West-"Isn't she the sweetest thing?" ....,.....,.,..,, .,...., . , ...,......,......... ,,,, , ....,.... Marsella Reese John Flint-Owner of the hardest heart and fattest pocketbook in town ...... Arlo Kinstle Fanny Flint-His Wife ..............,,.......,...,..,..,.,.......,..,...............,..,.,..,.........................,.,.....,....,..,.. ,, .,.......... Betty Balister Harry Flint-His Son ....,...... .....,..,,......,....,.,......,..,,.......,. .,,,.,,.... ..........l ,...,......,. ,.,....,.,..........,...,, . . . . B urnette Powell Katherine Flint-John's nifty niece from the big city ..,,, ., ,. .,..,, , , ..,, Maxine Reichley Stumpy Smith-Peter's pal and the toughest guy in the Susquehanna Valley ....,. Don Clymer Fatty McCullough-The town constabul' with lots of law but very little order ......,,...,...,,..,..,,,.....,,..,....,....................,,..,.,.,,,.,.,,.., ,...,....,........,..,,.,,,,..... , -Frank Balister Emmaline .,.......................,,,l...,...,.,,.. K Three Brown Sisters who U ,, ,. ,,,, ,,.. Mary Morrison Caroline ..........,l ..,,. ..,...,..,... 4 l ive in a red house on ,....,l. , ,,,......... Esther Welty Margoline ....,,........,.....................,...,.... 6 Green Street. E . ..............,..... .. . ...Opal Edinger S Y N O P S I S Peter West, poor but honest, lives with his attractive granddaughter, Sally, who runs the "Four Leaf Clover Tea Room". Her beau is young Harry Flint, son of the meanest man in town, John Flint. He's a real villain, and is planning to fore- close on the tea room just as the Wests have a chance to sell the land to a manu- facturing company at a big profit. Peter is accused of poisoning his old crony, Stump, but in a last-act climax, Stumpy returns, turns the tables on John Flint, and produces the happy ending. The three Brown Sisters, who always split a sentence three ways, provide much comedy, and so does Fatty, the easy-going constable. The Hoodoo Brighton Early--About to be married .......... ,......... ..... Billy Jackson-The heart breaker ........................,.................................. Professor Solomon Spiggot-An authority on Egypt ........... Hemachus Spiggot--His son, aged seventeen ........,.......,.,..,..........,......... Mr. Malachi Meek-A lively old gentleman of sixty-nine ........... Mr. Dun-The burglar ............,..,.........................................................................,......,.... Miss Amy Lee-About to be married ........,,......,..............,................,............... ..............,..Willis King ...............Robert McVey -..Aulton Wagner .,.........Ivan Billings ........Eldon Schafer Richard Coleman ..............Lois Jordan Mrs. Perrington-Shine-Her aunt and Mr. Meek's daughter .....,.......,.......,......,. Mary L. Whisler Gwendolyn Perrington-Shine-Who does just as mamma says .................,... .,.......Maurine King Dodo DeGraft-The dazzling Daisy ...........,.......,....,..........,...............,...,.................... ............. A rnetta Denny Mrs. Ima Clinger--A fascinating young widow .............. ..... Angelina-Her angel child, aged eight .......................,....... Miss Doris Ruffles-Amy's maid of honor ,....,.......,......,, Mrs. Semiramis Spiggot-the mother of seven ..........,.... Eupepsia Spiggot-Her daughter, aged sixteen .............. ..........Maxine Light ---Maxine Inbody .........,,.......Ilda Strite Genevieve Beagle ..........Viginia Crow Miss Longnecker-A public school teacher ......,............... .,,l.........,. J osephine Dukes Lulu-By name and nature ...........,...........,....,........,..... ,,...,..... ............. B e tty Jene Carr Aunt Paradise-The colored cook lady .,....,........ ......,.............,.. M ary K. Harper Five Little Spiggots ....,..,.,........,.............................,..............,.............,..............,..,......................,....... The Dukes Children Time-1912, in late September. Place-Mrs. Perrington-Shine's country home about thirty minutes from Philadelphia. Occasion-A house party at the Lee-Early wedding. SYNOPSIS Prof. Spiggot gives Brighton for a wedding gift, a marvelous Egyptian scarab. Under its evil influence, Brighton is blackmailed by a former flame, the susceptible Billy finds himself engaged to three ladiesg the professor is accused of bigamy and Dun, the burglar, is caught. Matters straighten out when the scarab is buried. Junior-Senior Banquet The Seniors will never forget May tenth when they were royally and highly entertained by the brilliant Junior class at the very solemn annual Junior-Senior banquet which was held in the high school auditorium. The auditorium was beautifully decorated by the keen-minded Juniors. A very unique idea-a sailor scene-was carried out. It was so gorgeously decorated that it made you feel you were Long John Silver himself. The placards were made es- pecially for the occasion, they were small sail boats. The programs were very ar- tistically decorated with skull and cross bones. The stage was decorated with a pirate scene. In keeping with the decorations the girls wore white sailor dressesg the boys, white trousers and dark coats. After the dinner was served, a delightfully entertaining program was presented by the members of the Junior class. Remarks by Mr. Simpkins and Mr. Hutton provided some of the entertainment. Besides the members of the Junior and Senior classes and high school faculty, Mrs. Robert Hutton and Laura Emily Simkins were present. It was another of those highly interesting unforgettable events of our thrilling high school days. The Girls' Glee Club w as organized in 1034 under the supervision of Miss Romey Twenty-eight members enrolled We elected the following officers President Mai sella Reese, Secretarv and Treasurrr Esther Welty Peporter Maxine Reichley and Librarian, Betty .Iene Carr The first entertainment was gixen at night school November 10 At Christmas both the boys' and girls glee clubs went Christmas carolmg We took part in the Farmers' Institute which was held Februarv 7 We also took part in the Llteraiv programs held at Liberty March I At present the girls are making preparations for the activities held at the end of the year Top row- ll. Powell, l.. Roether, M Stout, G. Beagle, M. Morri son, M. Harper, B. Carr, I' Pitzen, M. Reichley, O. Erl- inger, E. XVelty, L. Jordan V. Crow, B. Steininger, M Whisle. Bottom row- A. Lee, ll. McVey, M 7 Steinman, L. Ixeese, M. In- body, S. Moyer, C. Alspach D. Wagner, L. Flath. FC Bowersox, M. Light, M Reese, C. Amstutz, J. Dukes Miss Romey, Instructor. Top row- R. Bowersox, E. Schafer R. Crawford, ll. Nussbaum 1 A. Kinstle, B. Powell, I Billings, E. Inbody, F. Bal-i lister, W. King, A. Wagner Bottom row- cr, Il. Clymer, R. McVey J. Dukes, N. King, R. Moy: er, E. Steinman. Try outs for Boys Clec Club were held the first week of school and twenty two boys were admitted to the organization After practicing twice a week they madc their first public appearance earlv in November at night school In December some of the members assisted the Parents Teacher Association presenting a Christmas pageant On the Friday night before Christmas vacation the glee club in companv with the Girls' Glee Club sang carols at the homes of the aged and sick The boys are now preparing for activities held at the end of the year Miss Romey, Instructor, H. Welty, L. Dukes, I. Fish- MR. THOMAS, INSTRUCTOR I Orchestra Our school orchestra started four years ago under the direction of Prof. Ossman. In our first two years many were interested but few participated. The orchestra furnished entertainment for school plays and other school activities. Due to the resignation of Prof. Ossman, Mr. Thomas undertook the directing of our orchestra. We feel the next years were well spent because more interest was taken and more players wer added to our number. This year we and our faithful leader showed much interest and progress. We played for P. T. A. Meetings, School Plays, Chapel Programs, Farmers Institute, and other activities. The Arlington Band also directed by Prof. Thomas, favored us by helping en- tertain the people at the Farmers Institute. On March 15, we journeyed to Liberty where we played at the literary program. Not always did the entire orchestra furnish the entertainment, but various members entertained with solos, trios or in large groups. Thursday at 10:30 was our appointed time for orchestra practice. We practiced for 45 minutes in the auditorium and everyone entering the building could hear beau- tiful music such as Military Escort, Harbor of Dreams, Home on the Range, Now the Day Is Over, and other marches and waltzes. This year we shall lose a large number of our group: Marsella Reese, Burnette Powell, Norman King, Don Clymer, and Richard Moyer. We are sorry to see them go for we will miss their fine playing. We feel that a great deal of our progress and success was due to these players who so faithfully participated, but we hope to gain many more to take their places. There are sixteen in our group this year they are as follows: Norman King ....,......,.......,,.,,......... First trumpet Don Clymer--- .,......... C Melody saxophone Willis King ............, ,,...,, , First trumpet Burnette Powell., .,,........,....,...,.........,..., .Trombone Lynn Cupples ,...,,...,... .....,...,.., S econd trumpet Donald Harris ..,,......,...... .....,.,.,.. . Trombone Harold Welty ............ .......... S econd Trumpet Leah Mae Reese .............. ,,,.. , ...,..,...,.,...,..,,.., C ello Richard Moyer ..,..,,.......,.......,. Second trumpet Howard Frantz ........,,,.. ,......... F rench horn Marsella Reese .,......,,.... ,,..,.........,..,.....,........... V iolin Mary Lou Carr ,.,...,...,.. .......,.. F rench horn Lois Jordan ..., ,..,,,...,......... ...,..,......,,..,,....., Violin Robert Powell... .. ,.......,French horn Eugene Klammer ....,...,,.... ...... A lto saxophone Maurine King ........... ,,.........,......,.. P ianist Standing-Mr. Thomas, Instructor, M. King, Pianist. Back row-L. Cupples, H. Welty, R. Moyer, B. Powell, D. Harris, L. Reese, R. Powell, H. Frantz, M. Carr. Front row-N. King, W. King, D. Clymer, E. Klammer, L. Jordan, M. Reese. Q. , ' X 4 Trophies Pupils entering the lower hall will notice the new trophy case which was made by the Manual Training Class under the direction of Mr. Rothhar. This case is filled with Mt. Cory's collection of trophies which amounts to eleven. This collection was started in the years 1925-26 when Mt. Cory received two trophies, one was obtained for winning the Hancock oratorical contest, and the other was won by the girls in the county tournament. In the year 1926 the boys added another trophy to the collection by winning the Hancock county track meet, making a total collec- tion of three. In the years 1926-27 a group of pupils from the grades obtained our fourth trophy by winning the County Grade Contest. Participants in this contest were Grover Crites, Sara Moyer, Angeline Lee, Marguerite King, Livona Harris, Edmund Hummon, Evelyn Boobring, Kenneth Wise, Joe Swank, Vera Billings, and Mary Louise Whisler. Two other trophies were won in the same year, namely, the girls basketball conference and the county debate. In the next three years the girls showed their ability to play basketball by winning the girls county championship and also the foul shooting contest at Find- lay college. In the years 1931-32, the basketball boys won both the league championship and the tournament making us a total collection of ten trophies. The last trophy was won in the year 1934 by the football boys. This was the first trophy won in foot- fall but we all know it shall not be the last. Athletic Banquet The March meeting of the P. T. A. made and carried the motion to banquet the athletes of our high school. For the past several years this has been an annual affair. The following program was given: Grand March-Miss Carolyn Romey. Invocation-Mr. Raymond Rothhar. Toastmaster-Mr. D. C. Simkins. Toast-Mr. Robert Hutton, Coach. Toast-Miss Fern Thomas, Girls' Coach. Toast-Charles Strite, Capt. of 1934 Football team. Toast-Willis King, Capt. of 1934-35 Basketball team. Toast-Maxine Reichley, Capt. of 1934-35 Basketball team. Toast-Willis King, Co-Capt. 1935 Football team. Toast-Kenneth Bowersox, Co-Capt. 1935 Football team. Toast-Willis King, Capt. 1935-36 Basketball team. Vocal Solo-Miss Carolyn Romey. Address--Dr. A. E. Smull, Former Coach Ohio Northern U Presentation of Letters and Certificates of Merit. The Athletic department wishes to take this opportunity to thank the P. T. A. for the fine way in which they have cooperated with the school in putting on one of the most successful seasons in our athletic history. Top row-L. Dukes, I. Fishes, L. Crow, J. Dukes, T. Coleman, W. Westall, R. Moyer. Second row-Mgrs. H. Welty, E. Steinmang N. Geren, I. Billings, R. McVey, E. Shafer, R. Morrison, R. Coleman, R. Crawford, B. Powell, Coach Robert Hutton. Bottom row-W. King, C. Guin, R. Hartman, D. Clymer, R. Bowersox, A. Wagner, R. Crow, K. Bowersox, Capt. C. Strite. FOOTBALL SCHEDULE Sept. 14 Mt. Cory at Leipsic 12-0 Oct. 19 Mt. Cory Mt. Blanchard 13-6 Sept. 21 Mt. Cory at Arlington 0-0 Oct. 26 Mt. Cory at Arcadia 6-6 Sept. 28 Mt. Cory VanBuren 21-0 Nov. 2 Mt. Cory Vanlue 41-0 Oct. 5 Mt. Cory at Liberty 19-0 Nov. 9 Mt. Cory at Ada 24-0 Oct. 12 Mt. Cory at Rawson 12-0 Nov. 16 Mt. Cory McComb 19-6 Champions Mt. Cory High's 1934 football squad turned out for practice August 20, under the coaching of Mr. Hutton, former Findlay College athlete. The squad practiced every day, although, many of the players did not report daily until school started September 4. LEIPSIC A squad of 24 players traveled through a down-pour of rain to Leipsic, Mr. Hutton's home town. The field was very wet and slippery making passing and end runs nearly impossible. But Cory's backfield made large gains through holes made by the line. The touchdowns gave the victory to Mt. Cory 12-0. ARLINGTON Mt. Cory opened the conference with Arlington, one of the strongest teams in the conference, who was predicted to take the "Little Nine" title of 1934 and was given the edge to win over Cory's eleven. Mt. Cory's offensive thrust was weak against Arlington and they were held scoreless. This was the only game all season Mt. Cory lacked the power to score. Several times Arlington advanced the ball to Cory's 20 yard line, but were thrown back by a strong Cory line. The game ended 0-0. VANBUREN Mt. Cory played their first home game with VanBuren. This was VanBuren's first conference game and they were out to keep their standing untarnished. Cory's offensive power had improved from last week. VanBuren's eleven was unable to turn back the green and white eleven's goalward marches. Geren, Coleman and Powell each scored to roll up 21 points for us. Although VanBuren showed a lot of power, the game ended 21-0. LIBERTY At Liberty a large crowd gathered to witness another victory for the green and white. After a slow start Mt. Cory pushed over three touchdowns and gave the second team a chance to play. The green and white's eleven played a fine brand of ball, led by the plunging of Strite and Geren. RAWSON Mt. Cory was quite sure of themselves after a fast start scoring two touchdowns in less than five minutes. The first was made by Coleman on a line plunge, after two .lil-11 ..l- -1 - i..l.l-1 25-yard runs, the second, on a 30-yard pass from Geren to Strite. The Rawson eleven tightened down on Mt. Cory and held us until the end of the game, while they scored a touchdown, making the final score 12-6. MT. BLANCHARD The Cory eleven was still feeling high and mighty over the Rawson victory and did not play a very good brand of ball against Blanchard's small team. At the half the score was 6-6. The second half was nearly the same although the Cory eleven made a 50-yard march to score a 13-6 victory. ARCADIA The Arcadia-Mt. Cory game was the turning point in the league standing. Arcadia, Mt. Cory and Arlington were all tied for first place in the league with four victories and one deadlock. A large crowd saw the two evenly matched teams clash. Mt. Cory's eleven took the lead in the first quarter on a 25-yard run by King. It looked like Cory's game until the final period when Arcadia scored on a pass to banish our hopes for a victory. It made Arcadia and Mt. Cory tied for second place with Arlington leading the league. The score was 6-6. VANLUE Vanlue proved to be our easiest task being humbled 41 to 0. ADA We went to Ada where we defeated them 24-0. Here we enjoyed a big supper furnished by the A. A. When we got home we received the good news that Arcadia had defeated Arlington to put us in first place, tied with Arcadia. MCCOMB The McComb-Mt. Cory game was the last this season for both teams, and they both played a sparkling game of ball. In the first two minutes of play McComb carried the ball to Cory's ten yard line, where Mt. Cory took possession of the ball and in a series of plays returned it for a touchdown with Coleman going over. Two more six pointers were scored against McComb by Guin and King to put Cory in the lead 19-0. But in the last half of the game a muffled punt allowed McComb to score, making the score at the end of the game 19-6. We lose lettermen, Richard Moyer, Roy Crow, tackles, Richard Bowersox, center, Don Clymer, guard, Charles Guin, end, Burnette Powell, halfback, Charles Strite, fullback. Those we have back next year are: Co-Captains Willis King, quarterback, and Kenneth Bowersox, end, Aulton Wagner, guard, Raymond Crawford, halfback, Ray- mond Hartman, tackle, Nathan Geren, halfback, Dick Coleman, halfback, Bob McVey, end, Bob Morrison, guard, and Eldon Shafer, center. Many others who weren't lettermen will be available next year too. Charles Strite The starting lineup was: K. Bowersox - end Guin - end Hartman "- tackle Geren - halfback Wagner - guard Powell M- halfback R. Bowersox -- center K, Clymer - guard mg " quarter Crow -- tackle Strite - fullback Cheer Leaders Our cheerleaders showed a lot of school spirit. !We owe a lot of credit for our fine standing to the pep our cheerleaders aroused in the crowd. Maxine Light Mary Morrison Arnetta Denny Runners Up BOYS' BASKETBALL SCHEDULE 16 Mt 34 Mt. Cory Lima St. Gerard Cory .......,.,........... Vanlue 25 Mt. Cory Arlington 40 Cory 25 ..,,.......,......... St. Gerard 23 Mt. Cory Pandora 31 Cory 35 ........,,..,........ Pandora 34 Mt. gory IXj'aJnBuren 20 Cory 43 ,...,......,......... McComb 41 Mt. ory ierty 21 Mt. Cory Alger 31 TOURNAMENT Mt. Cory Rawson 33 Cory 17 .........,........... Rawson 20 Mt. Cory Arcadia 25 - -- Mt Cory Mt. Blanchard Cory 4 Opponents ' . 27 ...........,.......,. 18 Mt. 05 ..........,......, 378 The season started enthusiastically with twenty-five boys reporting. The end of the first week the squad was cut, and practice began in earnest. The season opened November 23. We won from St. Gerard after a slow start, 27 to 16. On November 28,we played two games. We won the first game 28 to 22 from Findlay U. P. Church, and the second from Findlay Vocational school 29 to 15. We opened our league play Dcember 7 with Arlington overwhelming us on our own floor 40 to 21. In this game Mr. Hutton found some real material, even at the hands of defeat. On December 8 we journeyed to Pandora where we met defeat at the hands of their strong team. The score was 31 to 22. After practicing his new found players together, Mr. Hutton had a fine team. We went to VanBuren December 14 and beat them 35 to 20. Liberty came over December 21 and met defeat at the hands of our much im- proved team 33 to 21. We played the Alumni January 4 and were beat after playing a close game all the way. The score was 35 to 31. On January 5 we went to Alger where we put on a thrilling exhibition for four quarters only to lose in the final period 31 to 28. Our old-time rivals were our next foe on January 11. Rawson was forced to exhibit fine basketball especially in the last quarter when Cory started making long shots, in order to win 33 to 28. We went to Mt. Blanchard on January 18 where we defeated them 27 to 18. Our next game, Arcadia on January 25, was an important game for if we lost we would go down another notch in the league. The team played an excellent game to tie the score when the final whistle blew. We won 25 to 30 in two overtime periods. What a thriller for the crowd. At Vanlue the entire squad had a chance to share our victory 34 to 25. We went to Lima on February 2, to return their game. It was close all the way but we came out on top winning 25 to 23. Pandora came over on February 9 with the intentions of beating us again. They were ahead all the way until King and Strite made long shots bringing us within one point and 40 seconds yet to play. In those last fatal moments Hartman made a basket making the score 35 to 34. We went to McComb February 15 to decide which would be in second place. McComb was far in the lead until King and Strite started making long shots and Bowersox began playing the sterling ball that he can. When the whistle blew, the score books registered a 43 to 41 victory for us. We drew Rawson in the tournament on February 23. After playing a close game all the way, Rawson forged to the front to win 20 to 17. We finished second in the league, won nine games and lost five games during the season. Although we will miss our senior players we have others to replace them. The boys who received letters are: Willis King fCapt.Jg Kenneth Bowersox, Wayne Westall, Nathan Geren, Raymond Hartman, Don Clymer, Burnette Powell, Roy Crow, and Charles Strite. Oh yes, I shouldn't forget our manager Richard Bowersox, who lent a helping hand whenever needed. Mary Morrison Top row-R. Hutton, Coach, J. Dukes, I. Fisher, R. Morrison, R. Coleman, I. Billings, E. Schafer, E. Inbody, R. McVey, P. Cook, N. King, R. Bowersox, Mgr. Bottom row-R. Crawford, C. Strite, W. Westall, R. Crow, N. Geren, R. Hartman, B. Powell, K. Bowersox, W. King, D. Clymer. . -il . - ..-.tli Top row-E. Welty, Mgr., L. Reese, A. Denny, M. Light, L. Jordan, J. Krautter, M. Harper, C. Alspach, V. Crow, M. Inbody, F. Thomas, Coach. Bottom row-R. Krautter, I. Strite, M. Whisler, M. King, M. Reichley, M. Morrison, M. Reese, B. Balister. Girls' Basketball GIRLS' BASKETBALL SCHEDULE Mt. Cory Lima Woolworth 37 . Cory 42 ...........,......,.. Arcadia Mt. Cory Arlington .................. 16 Cory 27 ..................... Vanlue Mt. Cory Pandora ............,..... 30 Cory 60 .........,......,.... Pandora Mt. Cory VanBuren ...,........... 25 Cory 45 ........ ..,... McComb Mt. Cory Liberty ......... .....,. 3 0 Mt. Cory Alumni .... ............ 3 5 TOURNAMENT Mt. Cory Alger ..............,............ 19 Cory 15 ...............,..... Rawson Mt. Cory Rawson ..................... 28 - Mt. Cory Mt. Blanchard ...... 41 567 409 We started practicing in the first part of November. Twenty-two girls reported making a good-sized squad considering the size of our school. We had six lettermen, meaning that the whole team was experienced and had played together for two years. We opened our season playing Lima Woolworth Girls on November 23. This was an easy game and we displayed some fine passwork winning 55 to 37. We had as our first league opponent, Arlington, on December 7. We had little trouble subdueing them 44 to 16. The next night, December 8, we went to Pandora where as usual we met very stiff competition. We payed hard however, and came out on the big end of the score. The score was 35 to 30. On December 14 we went to VanBuren, where because of illness, conceit and their small floor, we lost a hard fought game 24 to 25. This looked bad for our chances to take the league. Well the game we were looking forward to. It was Liberty. They came over December 21 with the same idea we had, that of a hard game. Crippled by illness and their strong guards, we lost 21 to 30. We always like to find out who can stand the most, "Youth or Age", so we played the Alumni on January 4. However, Youth conquered Age 43 to 35. We went over to the "onion country" on January 5 and conquered Alger by the amazing score of 62 to 19. All the players on the squad got to display their talents that night. With a record crowd coming as well as the strong Rawson girls team on Janu- ary 11, we were determined to fight hard even if we were the underdogs. But alas! We weren't so much the underdogs as you'd think. We had easy sailing after the first half and we won 42 to 28. Arcadia was our guests on January 18. We had an easy time winning 42 to 29. We went to Blanchard on January 25. We came through with a victory 52 to 41. Well, again we were destined to have a hard game, and it was. We played hard, however, and only won by a score of 27 to 25. That was on February 1 from Valnue. Pandora came over on February 9 determined to get revenge for the defeat we gave them on December 8. It looked like they were going to succeed in the first part of the game, but we finally regained our usual form and forged ahead to win 60 to 40. Our last league game was at McComb February 15. We played a good game and won 45 to 31. At the tournament our opponent was none other than our old rivals Rawson. Our luck was against us again. Once more sickness crippled the team and we lost to the strong Rawson team 23 to 15. Those who earned letters were Maxine Reichley fCapt.J 5 Mary Morrison, Maurine King, Mary L. Whisler, Ilda Strite, Marsella Reese, Mary Harper, Ruth Wrautter, Jeannette Krautter and Betty Balister. We all give a toast to our dependable man- ager Esther Welty, who also earned a letter. Marry Morrison Senior MARSELLA REESE Guard Sally was a good guard and was considered one of the best in the county which is a big distinction for one so little. Small but mighty, we should call her because she was always there when her forward had the ball MARY MORRISON Forward Mary, playing her final year for Cory, showed all the fine points of a good forward. Her one-handed shots thrilled the audience many times. Mary's best showing was in the Pandora game when she scored 39 points. RICHARD BOWERSOX Center Richie was a very good cen- ter and every team needs a good center. A lot of Cory's success centered on Richie because he never made a bad pass from center. ROY CROW Forward Roy played a relief role at forward, but when he was called on to play, he played hard. DON CLYMER Guard Donnie was a fighter and was a hard man to get around on defense. He was a good shot on offense. Players MAXINE REICHLEY Forward-Capt. Max was a good all around player, she could pass good and was a good shot. She could always be counted on to play good every game as she was a very steady player. BETTY BALISTER Forward Although Betty didn't make the first team, she was a good player. In the tourna- ment she surely showed us what kind of 3, player she is when she gets going. CHARLES GUIN End Chas. was a very good end and in his Junior year he made the All County team. He was a very good pass receiver and made many touchdowns. CHARLES STRITE Guard Charles was a very good guard and we will miss him next year. Many times he saved the game by his long shots that surely thrilled the crowds. BURNETTE POWELL Center Buzz was a relief center and filled the place well. Wher he went into the game he always fought hard. WHO'S WHO Who's Who BOY Most Popular ...............,..., ........ M axine Reichley .............. ........... B urnette Powell Best Looking ............... ...,..., M axine Reichley ............. ,,,,,A,,,,, W illig King Best Athlete ...,......,.. ....,.........,.................... M ary Morrison .............. ........... C harles Strite Best Mixer ................ ...- .......... .... .................. Marsella Reese ............. .,,,,,,,,,,, W illis King Biggest Flirt .............., ...................,............,. P auline Pitzen .............. ,,AA,,,,,A, E dwin Inbody Most Talkative .,...,....,.... ..,,.. L eah Mae Reese ................,,,,, A,,,A,,,,,A R aymond Hartman Biggest Gossip ...,.......... Mary Louise Whisler .........,,,,,, .,,,,.,,,,, R aymond Hartman Jolliest ....,......................... ......... M arsella Reese ............... .. .......,... Burnette Powell Most Giggly ...,......... ................. B etty Balister ........... ........... N orman Edinger Most Studious ....................... .,............ C elesta Amstutz .....,....,.. ........... N orman King Cutest ...,,.....,...................................... ........... C atherine Alspach ............ . ..,......,. Jasper Dukes Most Devoted Couple ............... .......,...... R uth Krautter ............. ....,...... H erald Welty Laziest ....,...,..................................... .,............. L ena Flath .............. ........... D onald Nussbaum Biggest Tease ..........,............... ............ M axine Light ........... ............ D on Clymer Tomboy and Sissy ....,......... ..........,......... I lda Strite .............. ............ E ugene Schwab Biggest Bluffer .............. .........,.... M ary Morrison ......,...... .,.......... J asper Dukes Wisecracker ............... .....,,...,,.. M ary Morrison ............. ......,..... B urnette Powell Gum Chewer ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,. .,..,......,,,. L ois Jordan ..,.......... ..........,. E dwin Inbody Popular Frosh ........., ...........,.. R uth Krautter .............. .....,..... R obert Morrison Digniiied Senior ............ .....,,..... E sther Welty ...,....... .........., A rlo Kinstle Strict Teacher ............ .,.......... F ern Thomas ...,...... .......,.., D . C. Simkins Popular Teacher .......,.... ............ F ern Thomas ........,.. ........... R obert Hutton Generous Teacher ,l,,o,,,,,,,,, .,,......,.... C arolyn Romey ...,,......... ........... R aymond Rothhar Imagine What Would Happen- IF Mr. Rothhar didn't blush when the girls talk to him. IF Mr. Hutton didn't argue with the referee at a basketball game. IF Miss Thomas quit teaching school and was married. IF Leah Mae R. would get lock-jaw so she couldn't talk to the boys. IF Edwin Inbody didn't dirt with the girls. IF Lucille Roether didn't invite a little red-headed boy from Liberty to the Fresh- man class party. IF Mary Morrison wasn't playful in "Glee Club", and especially if she wouldn't eat alum. IF Ruth Krautter wouldn't get into mischief then act very innocent. IF Jap Dukes wouldn't use his book in History class. IF Francis Wilkins would get all A's on his grade card including conduct. IF Donald Simmons would make all the baskets he shot. IF Norman Edinger would ask Max R. to take her to the Jr. Play. Of course he would have to ask her at least three weeks ahead of time so he would have a chance to get some stilts made. IF the Sophomore class wouldn't have a quarrel over Rawson and other town girls, when they are planning a party. IF Lyle Crow wouldn't blush when Marsella happened to sit beside him on the bus. IF the Seniors would act like Seniors should in their classes. IF Betty Garlinger and Katheryn Pitzen wouldn't get to sit beside certain high school boys in the assembly. IF Eldon Shafer couldn't talk to Mary Kate and Mary Louise. IF Angeline would lose her giggle. IF Mr. Simkins would run out of pictures for the bulletin board. IF "The Powell Chevie" wouldn't head for Liberty on those certain nights. IF Miss Swab would be taller so she wouldn't look like the deputy's little girl. IF Miss Romey would be a tight rope walker in the circus. Cathrine Allspach 1 The Three Mus- 1. Six M's of M. C. lceteers. H. S. 2 "Pals", 2. "Faithful", "Three Soph.s". :L "Ye Tea-chem" 4 "Buzz 19: Donnie". 4. "Fighting Spirits". School SEPTEMBER- 4-School opens with a bang. And what a bunch of green Freshies. Where's all the boys, Freshies? 5-Everyone is telling how much they're going to study this year. We shall see. 6-All ready for Freshman reception tomorrow night. Some of the Freshman boys are thinking of buying Austins. 7-Freshman reception. Oh what a time. 10-Just a blue Monday. 11-Juniors and Sophomores have decided to have a party. P. T. A. meeting. 13-Pictures taken. All had their pretty poses and ohl, what poses. Mr. Hutton broke the camera. Poor Mr. Smith just got that one new. 14-Sophomores had a female party at Miss Swab's, while the Juniors enjoyed a party at Botts Grove, especially one Junior, oh, me! Beat Leipsic 12-0. 18-Seniors and Freshmen decided to have a party. 21-Journeyed to Arlington. Swell game. Score ended 0-0. Freshies had a good time at Folk's woods while the Seniors had a Weiner roast and forgot the weiners. They enjoyed about fifteen minutes eating at Clymer's woods. 28-VanBuren payed a visit to Cory and what a welcome they received. Cory trounced them 21-0. OCTOBER- 10-Juniors had a busy day picking their rings, but finally they found the only one for them. 11-Seniors are given a great distinction on this memorable date. They are called the biggst mouthed class in high school. 12-My my, we got out of school today at 1:00 o'clock to go to the game at Rawson. We bat our oldest rivals for the first time in fiften years. CID Just think. The score was 12-6. Sunday school of the Evangelical Church served dinner. Got our grade cards for the first time this year. Many had to read between the lines to see their names on the honor roll. 17-Juniors served dinner today. 19-Mt. Blanchard journeyed over here to be turned back 13-6. The manual training class made us some bleachers. Nice of them, wasn't it? 22-Miss Romey picked Public Speaking Play, "A Count of No Account." 23-The Eighth Grade class is said to be the dumbest class in Mt. Cory in Arithmetic. Well, well, Seniors-you're not the only class with a distinction. 25-Seniors served lunch. The ice cream was salty but of course that didn't matter. Went to Arcadia and saw a swell game. Score 6-6, Bonfire in eve. Big turn out, although it was rather wet. NOVEMBER- 3-Poor Betty, or rather, poor Betty's cat. She put it in the oven to keep it warm during the night and the next morning went to Findlay and forgot all about it. When she returned, according to the reports of Betty's mother, she found that the cat didn't like a hot fire in the stove. 7-Out of school today at noon because of Night School in the evening. Very good attendance. Calendar 9-We played Ada at Ada and guess the score, 25-0. Arcadia beat Arlington which ties Arcadia and Mt. Cory for first place. 0-Seniors journeyed to Findlay to have their pictures taken. .2--Mr. Nonnamaker is our superintendent for this week. Mr. Simkins is unable to be here because of sickness. 3--Seniors had a grand holiday looking at each others "proofs". .6-We played McComb. Big crowd here to see the most wonderful game. 9-Boys basketball starts. 11-Public Speaking Play, "A Count of No Ac- count". The "Junior High" Bible Class was organized under the direction of Rev. A. E. McVey. .3-First basketball game of the season with Lima. Both teams were victorious. .8-Boys basketball games with Findlay. We won both games. Grade cards. The honor roll is more reasonable. 9-Thanksgiving-No school today or tomorrow. DECEMBER- 3-Back to school again and no one has any- thing to do. 7-Arlington came here to play the first county game of B. B. Girls were victorious. 8-We journeyed to Pandora for B. B. game. The boys lost but the girls won. 1-P. T. A. postponed. 4-We played VanBuren at VanBuren. The boys won but the girls lost by one point. 7-We were awarded the cup for football championship. It was awarded by Prof. A. J. Hooley of VanBuren and received by Charles Strite, Capt. of the football team. 1-We played Liberty, making a defeat for the girls and a victory for the boys. 2-First day of Christmas vacation. ANUARY- 2-Back again after a grand and glorious time. Of course everyone studied today. 3-Miss Freeman, one of our former teachers, was a visitor today. 4-Alumni game. The girls won but the boys bowed to defeat. 5-We journeyed to Alger to gain another vic- tory for the girls and a defeat for the boys. 6--Grand Review for exams. 0-11-Exams. I wonder why people stay in at noon to study. Unusual. 1-Rawson came here to play one of the most exciting games of the season. Our girls trounced Rawson but the boys lost by a few points. 4-County exams. The Senior class decided to sell subscriptions for magazines in order to raise money for the annual. The class is divided into two groups and the side sell- ing the least subscriptions has to feed the winning side. 1-The physics class was surprised upon Charles Guin's reply to "What is an optimist?" Charles thought it was some kind of a fish. 4-Pictures were taken for the annual. 5-The French class gave the chapel program. The play, "The Three Little Pigs" was giv- en. We played Arcadia. Our boys won by five points after playing two over-times. The girls defeated Arcadia by a large score. 'EBRUARY- 1-Out team went to Vanlue and did they win? Well, I guess. l l 1 l 1. "Just Ffreshiesn. 2. "Ah, well". 3. "Three City Boys". 4. "Star". H u Saleswomenn. Max. and Kate". "Freshies in School' AKHike77i-.CIOYpalV!' Alumni 1 9 0 1 Coza Light-Mrs. A. E. King .........,........ Mt. Cory, O. Merril King-Clerk .................. ,...,...,...... ............... F i ndlay, O. Otto Zeller-Farmer ......A....................... Pennant, Canada Ida Hubler-Mrs. M. S. King ......,.............. Findlay, 0. Preston Fellbaum-Road Contractor ...... Marion, O. Wm. Nonnamaker-Retired ...............,........ Mt. Cory, 0. 1 9 0 2 Melvin Williamson-Farmer .................,,.. Mt. Cory, 0. Atlee Green-Deceased J. F. Stultz-Bookkeeper ...............,.............. Columbus, 0. Milton Steininger-Merchant ....,............. Mt. Cory, 0. 1 9 0 3 Wilson Garlinger--Painter, Decorator ...............,........,...........Columbus, O. Mae Brenneman-Mrs. D. J. King ...... Findlay, O. Fred Williams-Farmer ..........,,......................,....,........ Arizona Clyde Asthimer-Furnace Operator ,...,.... Toledo, O. 1 9 0 4 Bessie Keel-Mrs. J. F. Stultz ..........., Columbus, O. Ada Bowersox-Mrs. Cloyd Roether ...... Rawson, 0. Mabel Garlinger-Mrs. Spear ........,,....................... Indiana Clyde Moyer--State Road Dept ......,.,. Columbus, O. Edgar Renninger-Ins. Agent ..,,,....................,. Lima, O. Arlo Bender-Stationary Engineer ..,...,.. Findlay, 0. Edgar Bodkins-Govt. Position...Washington, D. C. 1 9 0 5 Bessie King-Deceased Pauline Stultz-Mrs. Fisher .....,.....,.................. Delaware Mary Sanner-At home ....,..........,.. Fort Recovery, O. Ethel Williamson-Mrs. Earl Frantz Cory, O. Clarence Dorsey-Deceased Clyde Dorsey-Deceased Clarence Zeller-Farmer .,................ Pennant, Canada Fred Zeller-Real Estate Agent Angeles, Calif. 1 9 0 6 Dessie Cole-Mrs. H. C. Beagle ............ Mt. Cory, O. Gale George-Mrs. O. V. Guin ..........,..,. Mt. Cory, O. Hazel Harris-Mrs. W. Hummons I g 1 9 1 5 Mary Kramer-Mrs. Gail Clymer ..,......... Findlay, O. Madge Clymer-Mrs. Ura Dukes ...,.. Mt. Cory, O. Clarence Bibler-Laborer ................,.....,..,.,..,........ Lima, O. Harold Ewing-Rubber Worker .................. Akron, O. 1916 Florence Kramer-Mrs. Moore ............ Delaware, O. Fae Bodkins-Mrs. Beals .............,......................,.. Lima, 0. Marl Fellars-Farmer .............,.........,., ...i....... R awson, O. Cloyd Straugh-Oil Worker ..........,........,......,,.. Tiffin, O. Clarence Knepper-Laborer ........................... Rawson, O. Glenn Lanning-Foreman ........................... Sandusky, O. 1 9 1 7 Lula Poyell-Mrs. Cecil Henry .................. Findlay, 0. Gladys DeWease-Mrs. F. C. Evans Mass. Margaret Wonders-Mrs. Clair Bowersox O. Mae Ruhlman-Mrs. Alvin Barr ...... Stoutsville, O. Aura Wagner-Mrs. Welty ...........,.,.... Ft. Wayne, Ind. Grace Whisler-Clerk ...................,...................... Findlay, O. Mabel Harris-Mrs. W. Bennent ............ Findlay, O. Clarence Reiter-Farmer ,..,...............,........,. Mt. Cory, O. 1918 Grace Dietz-Mrs. Dale Clymer ,....,......... Rawson, O. Pauline Kane-Mrs. George Hickman .........................,.................,.Napoleon, O. Ruth Whisler-Mrs. Sink ...,.......................... Findlay, 0. Myrtie Wagner-Mrs. Forest Flora .....,..............................Durango, Calif. Howard Hetzler-Oil Worker ...,........ Hearne, Texas Herbert Lathan-Deceased Gail Shine-Operator ........................ ....,...... F indlay, O. Ralph Steiner-Farmer ..............,....,. .......... B luffton, O. 1 9 1 9 Hazel Hilty-Mrs. R. Krumlans Mildred Russell-Teacher ...,..........................,..... Toledo, 0. Elizabeth Davidson-Mrs. Tschiegg ...... Bluffton, O. Charles White-Crane Operator ........,,.. Mt. Cory, 0. Willis Ewing-Dentist ................,........,................... Akron, O. 1 9 2 0 Dorothy Folk-Mrs. E. L. Johnson ...... Deshler, O. ..............,.....................Santiago, Callf. Edwin Sanner-Auto Salesman .................. California 0. V. Guin--Farmer ................,......................... Mt. Cory, O. Harry Peer-Farmer ..,,................,........................,..... Colorado Wade King-Farmer .......................... ........... M t. Cory, O. 1909 Fair Osthmer-Mrs. Cobb ..................................,. Toledo, O. Waldo Folk-Insurance Agent .................. Findlay, O. Fred Moyer-Farmer ....,.........,...............,........ Mt. Cory, O. 1 9 1 2 Bertha Clymer-Mrs. W. Cupples ...... Mt. Cory, O. Ruth Folk--Teacher ................................,........, Mt. Cory, O. Charles Clymer--Clerk .......,.........,..................... Findlay, O. Homer Geiger--Teacher Lloyd Steiner-Doctor ........,,.....,........ Ann Arbor, Mich. 1 9 1 3 Levon Folk-Teacher ...........,......................,. VanBuren, O. Leura Runkle-Mrs. Kirk Folk ............... Findlay, 0. Joyce Crozier--Mrs. J. Romick ..........,,..,... Rawson, O. Russell Guin-Printer ,........... ,........,...,.......... W estville, Ill. Marco King-Laborer .................................... Mt. Cory, O. Floyd Moyer-Farmer ,.................................., Mt. Cory, O. Marguerite Falk-Mrs. W. L. Wittenmyer- Deceased 1 9 1 4 Mary Wagner-Mrs. Huston ..............,......... Findlay, O. Florence Garlinger--Mrs. E. Jackson O. Mamie Smith-Mrs. M. D. King ......... Mt. Cory, O. Sarah King--Mrs. E. Watkins .................. Leipsic, O. Florence Folk-At home ...................,........... Mt. Cory, O. Leura. Brundige-Mrs. Stratton ..........,.........,... Lima, O. Carroll Brundige-Deceased Harry Lanning--Farmer ........................... Bloomdale, O. Armilda Bibler-Mrs. H. Walters ..,,..... Findlay, O. Gaile Reichley-Mrs. R. O. Cupples...Mt. Cory, O. Lois Renninger-Mrs. Virgil Wooley...Findlay, O. Raymond Kinstle--Oil Worker ............ Sonora, Texas Myron Moyer-Farmer ...........,...,,.........,......... Mt. Cory, O. Lowell Lee-Salesman .............,............................ Findlay, O. Hope Carr-Mrs. C. D. Reiter ............,..... Mt .Cory, 0. Dale Clymer-Farmer ,..,....................,. ......,.... R awson, 0. 1 9 2 1 Olive Reichly-Decased Kathryn Davidson-Mrs. Harry Roades Theodore DeWese ........ , .....,,..............,......,................,,. New York Don Clymer-Teacher ...............,......,... ........... F indlay, O. 1 9 2 2 Mildred Guin-Mrs. Roach .....................,.. Cleveland, O. Francis Long-Mrs. Tracy .............. ..,........ R awson, O. Carey Cramer--Laborer .........,.......,.........,.,...,.. Fostoria, O. Mary King-Mrs. Don Clymer .....,......,..... Findlay, O. Milford Haas-Farmer ....................................... Pandra, O. 1 9 2 3 Winona Folk-Deceased Roy Clymer-Teacher .......................,,................,... Elyria, O. Henry Welty-Teacher ....................,..,.......,......,... Akron, O. Bliss Reiter-Laborer .......................................... Mt. Cory, O. Meredith Baldwin-Mrs. G. Hummon...Findlay, O. Alton Comer-Salesman ....,......,.........,........ Detroit, Mich. Florence Hess-Mrs. Noel Smith ..,.........,.. Shelby, O. Fern Hoch-At home ............................,............. Bluffton, O. Lottie Steinman-Mrs. Bob Foust ......... Findlay, O. 1 9 2 4 Lula Clymer-Mrs. O. Brooker .,.,.......,...... Findlay, 0. Treva Keel-Mrs. Floyd Hartman ...... Rawson, O. O Ruth Myers-Clerk .,......,................,......,............ Mt. Cory, . Alumni oogo -:gms ifiicgl '-' H5 mia? S5 S SEEN .. prog-:-x rnmgyl "SFI II55 F'-EIU' 3353 Honmrb wager Nwwk T559 5290 55 E :sg 5 an-u Q.. .-Q -- sw-l no 'FP' 14 OO O OOO 55555 5555535 tv' rib-I 25755 2525555 Q m Q - o v Eggwi ggmr uw Of- '4 97 mmm '-:nm ff :m5fD,-D., lgfig 5EgTgaf '1 rf U2 Q2s12 Eitslwg gzriz Lwm?gSE gg Env-1 NNWHQUQ NNE Sn EEQHQP-3 Penn H5 222m 229e9wm2222FQ 22S51Nf22f22P 222mwm222 E 222mm 22 229 2223.3 222Hg 2252223 b2252f2fEfif 22mfa 5552525 gs '-"P-3"" 5' P-SDH' -2.r45o5 Qmo 9555? ??SE?aS gasps sespiss Qoooo ooooooo Fanny Habegger-Mrs. H. Kirtland ...... Bluffton Mary Boerger--Mrs. H. Schmidt ............ Bluffton Oliver Welty-Clerk ...,...........,.....,..... Newcomerstown Harold Radabaugh-Farmer ...,.....,...,...,.., Mt. Cory, O Amasa Stevenson-Student ......... Bowling Green, O Benjamin Collert-Farmer ........................... Mt. Cory, O Thoburn Young--Laborer .,..........,..,.................... Toledo, O. Robert Hess-Laborer .................,. ............. F indlay, O 1 9 2 7 LaVern Althaus--Laborer .............,...,...,........... Toledo, O. Nina Habeggar-Mrs. H. Rupright ...... Bluffton, O Harold Boobring-Laborer .....,.........,................. Toledo, O. Burnell Wolfrom ..,,..................,.....,...,......,.,.,.......,.. Mt. Cory, O Adrian Eck-At home .......,...,................,...,...... Pandora, O Ethel Wineman-Mrs. Arthur Ralston M ich. Howard Hammond-Farmer ..,,............,. Mt. Cory, O Elizabeth Folk-Mrs. James Fields ...... Findlay, O Lester Lannlng-Laborer .,.....,......................... Findlay, O Glenna Amstutz--Mrs. G. Filhart .,..., Detroit, Mich. Helen Whisler-Mrs. Lytle ...........,,.........,.... Bluf'fton, O Faye Ludwick-Mrs. J. Hutchinson...Mt. Cory, O Frances Shafer-Mrs. Carrol Harris ...... Toledo, O Donald Stevenson-Student ...... Bowling Green, O L4 . E50 5? 557 :lm I: 5 '-45' 2 m as was F' ma: as sg? fi Bla L5 Ord! v-gl :ip-1 mtg le? is TF"-131 :Tn mm. HQ:- gf2efs : 555005 Fi? 5 525 5 P-JH 9-2-D O 333 3 P95 F OOOO O OO QE E? E955 GH 53 55.50-1 9 C.. 9Dmrh'4 NE gp, ..- S '4 :U wb cw E Ngjcng. E3 mQ Sago mx' '-vc gmgw at 55 v3.1 QQ 53 T553 Im ll Qla 3 . gm "11IP...,13 . 01+ Sift? m 'Ima 8gH5,g-2P- "rw Q2 42. pu: O fb ' erm 1 25N'I'55Q E"-:og-g gmwifgigimg we 325'-', FU", mfs' 25222 25 223i22m5 53 5525553 21 EE ErrwE25e 55 E00 E500 rv--1 r-OO f-500 O97 NNN U "!"1 -..UF FFF FFF? OOOO OOO OOOO ?59?SES55?5 gmgagsieaga .-lm NQCDU' it-1m "fr-1232-9' Q mmm Q- --"':no 55 ggmvx GTO gm-. :dig Q? 2:1 05 'Dam 3g.'35g5'm2'F'v3N5 ,algew5a2eI '-4' Bmw I Pl SUT! r Ia, ga' gm, m' 3 2 3,36 sw "5"fDl:'3-:m::.O H?QSpIgw'mS 25FDH"v-ij' '1 3 if 25255QW'ra 2l25eS5?QH 22322235225 E225Ei2E?ES 23222222328 EgPE!52L?2e Sogdinb, ?Ee??5E5aZ8 P???PP'l'f.514?? ooooooooooo Harry Zimmerman-Jeweler .....................l,. Bluffton, Joe Naylor-Clerk ..,,,.....,..,,............,.......,.........l.. Mt. Cory, Dorcas Wooley-Mrs. Lewis Strite..,Bloomdale Velma Wolfrom-Mrs. Orville Clymer Kathryn King-Mrs. B .Wolfrom ...... Mt. Cory Alnora Brower-Mrs. Troyer ............ Continental . 1 9 3 0 Esther Dukes-Mrs. G. Pearson ............ McComb, O. Edna Frantz-Mrs. D. Falk ...,......,............. Bluffton, O. Charles Starret-Laborer .........,........,...,..,....... Bluffton, O. Maxine Williams-Mrs. F. Clymer ...... Bluffton, O Esther Sites-Mrs. Allen High .l......... Mt. Cory, O. Clyde Kelchner-Student ...............,.........,..., Columbus, 0. Edith Hartman-Mrs. Devier ..................... Bluffton, 0. Alma Fisher-Mrs. K. Hummons ....,.......... Toledo, O. Lester Habeggar-Farmer ........................... Mt. Cory, O. George Pearson-Laborer ..,......,.,...........,...... McComb, O. Harold Weaver-Broadcasting ............... Columbus, O. 1 9 3 1 Kenneth Wise-Student .........,...............,....,........... Miami, O. Hildreth Alspach-Teacher ........................ Mt. Cory, O Margaret Doty--Student ............,.. Bowling Green, O. Evelyn Boobring-Teacher ...........,,......,.,........ Findlay, O. Marie Kempf-At home ..,.................,............... Bluffton, O. Lorene Myers-Mrs. Augustine ..................... Toledo, O John Crow-Student ...,.......,......,...,................,,.,.. Findlay, 0 Wilma Amstutz-Mrs. C. Filhart,.,Pontiac, Mich Earl Ludwig-Student ....,.................., ,..,.........,. C hicago, Ill Charles Bauer-At home .............................. Mt. Cory, O. Reva Harris-Meter Works ........................... Bluffton, O Kenneth Krautter-At home ..............,...... Mt. Cory, O Ruth Jordan-Meter llggrgcs ........................ Bluffton, O Oren Doty-At home ....................,,.............,....,. Mt. Cory, O Leota Wolfrom--Mrs. G. Gibson ............ Findlay, O Everett Doty-Student ................,.....,........,.... Cleveland, O Parley Sterrett-Farmer .............................. Rockford, 0 Esther Kinstle-Beauty Parlor .....,............ Findlay, O Richard Reiter-Laborer ...,.......................... Mt. Cory, O Lurabelle Bowersox-Meter Works .,..., Bluffton, O Arlene Slater-Mrs. W. Sampson ...... Mt. Cory, O. Don Kirtland-Meter Works .....,...,...........,.. Bluffton, O Marion Dukes-Mrs. D. Fisher ............ Mt. Cory, O. Howard Habeggar-At home ..................... Bluffton, O. Edmund Hummons-Student ............,...,. Columbus, O Vivian Billings-Mrs. Paul Cramer ...... Rawson, O. Leura Lee-Housework ................. ,.......... ......... ,....... L i m a, O Harry Edinger-Laborer ................,....,........... Bluffton, O. 1 9 3 3 Gale Augsburger-Farmer .......,.,,. ...,..,...... F indlay, 0. Doris Boobring-Waitress ...,........................,.... Findlay, O. Alice Welty-Nurse .......,................................,...,...... Akron, O. Margaret Clymer-At home ...... Tuminsburgh, N. Y. Byront Reese-Laborer ....................................... Findlay, O. Avery Keel-Laborer .................................,.....,..... Rawson, 0. Lenore Dukes-Mrs. H. Pearson ..,....,..,.... Findlay, O. Mildred Krautter-At home ..............,...... Mt. Cory, O. Albert Bauman-At home ..,........,........,,....... .Mt. Cory, O. Sarah Guin-Nurse ........................,.,.,....,,.......... Cleveland, O. Merritt Reichley-Farmer ....,.....,................... Rawson, O. Donald Wolfrom-Laborer ........................... Mt. Cory, O. Marcella King-Mrs. E. Smith .........,........ Jenera, O. James Morrison--Student ...........................,..... Findlay, O. Celia Dukes-Nurse ............................,...... ...,..,.... T oledo, 0. Therman Geren-Farmer ............,..... ............. F indlay, 0. Dorothy Edinger-At home ..,......................,. Bluffton, O. 1 9 3 4 Opal Sterrett-Mrs. R. Beach .....,.......,.... Mt. Cory, O. Luella Alspach-Housework ........................... Findlay, O. Ralph Strite-At home ............... North Baltimore, O. Clair Reiter-Laborer ,..............................,....,.. Mt. Cory, 0. Emogene Kempf-At home ............................,. Bluffton, 0. Livona Harris-At home ........... ..........., B luffton, O. Vera Billings-Waitress ........,... ..........,.... L ima, O. Norwood Powell-At home ............ ,........ ........ R a wson, O. Ruth Stevenson-Student ..........., - .,,.,...,.,.,...... Warren, O. Wendell Garlinger-At home .................. Mt. Cory, O. Blanche Fisher-At home ........,,...............,.... Mt. Cory, O. Earl McVey-Student ........................ Bowling Green, O. Clifford Woodward-At home ...........,...... Mt. Cory, 0. Gale Shafer-At home .................,.,.,.............. Mt. Cory, O. Ida McKee-Mrs. C. Reiter ...,.................... Mt. Cory, 0. H. J. HARRINGTON Chevrolet Cars Complete Wrecking Service Phone 117 Findlay, Ohio Mr. Simkins: "What would happen if we had no air?" Charles S.: "We'd all be bald." D. C. BIXEL, O.D. GORDON BIXEL, O. D. Eye Sight Specialists Citizens Nat'l. Bank Bldg. Bluffton, Ohio Beatrice Beauty Shop HF at It Nathan G.: "Is it possible for an man Permanents - Facials to love two women at the same time?" Jasper D.: "Not if the two women Arches - Finger Waves find it out." u Manicures IF lil if Gas Station Attendant: "How's your oil?" Phone 309-W ' . u 1 1 anliegro tourist. Ahs fine. Hows you Bluffton, Ohio COMPLIMENTS OF CITIZENS NATIONAL BANK Bluffton, Ohio PERRY HUGHES Cleaners and Dyers 112 West Front Street Phone 617-W Findlay, Ohio E. M. Warfel Sz Son GRADUATION GIFTS All the Latest in Jewelry Prices always reasonable 218 South Main Street Findlay, Ohio Womans Friend Washer ., i7'Qt ?lEf Built-in wi l l Electric Power " .and 'ZZ Gasoline Power E iff if Visit Our Q Factofry f Bluffton Mfg. Co. 433 W. Main Cross Street Findlay, Ohio Compliments of A. D. BAKER CO. Manufacturers of The Baker Thresher-Tractor- Steam Engine Home Office and Factory Swanton, Ohio Dr. King: "I'1l look you over for ten dollars." Mr. Rothhar: "All right, and if you find 'em, I'll give you half." if ik lk Norman Edinger: "I think she's as pretty as she can be." Tommy C.: "Most girls are." lk if if Mr. Hutton tto classjz "There's a young man in this class making a jack- ass of himself. When he's through, I'll start." A. HAUENSTEIN Sz SON Pharmaceutical Chemists Bluffton, Ohio McCullough Motor Sales Co. DODGE Motor Cars-Trucks-Buses PLYMOUTH Motor Cars 205-207 North Main Street Findlay, Ohio MUIR'S CUT RATE DRUG STORE Economy and Quality 324 South Main Street Findlay, Ohio Watch Repairing HARRY ZIMMERMAN Jewelry, Watch and Clock Repairing All Work Guaranteed Bluff ton, Ohio THIS ANNUAL COMES FROM THE PRESS OF The Bluffton News "The House of Fine Printing" High School and College Annuals a Specialty Bluffton, Ohio FINDLAY'S Newest Shoe Shop Fon WOMEN AND GIRLS NASONS Beautiful Shoes 327 South Main Street Findlay, Ohio IHLLER FUNERAL HOME Phone 222-T Bluffton, Ohio COMPLETE PRINTING SERVICE OFFICE SUPPLIES GREETING CARDS FINDLAY PRINTING AND SUPPLY CO. 113-119 W. Crawford Street Findlay, Ohio KESSEL'S Complete Line of COATS AND DRESSES Findlay, Ohio PANDORA LUMBER CO. Pandora, Ohio Mr. Steininger: "We have some very fine strin b an t -d " g e s o ay. Newly Wed: "How much are they a string?" F. L. MCKIRNAN Jeweler 116 West Crawford Street Findlay, Ohio Basinger's Furniture Store Noah Basinger, Complete House Furnishings, Radios. Funeral Service "We appreciate your business' Bluffton, Ohio Compliments of M. D. SOASH, M. D. Bluffton, Ohio Goodsell Bros., Inc. Wall Paper - Paint 106 South Main Street Findlay, Ohio PANDORA MILLING CO. Dealers of All Kinds of Grain, Seeds and Coal Pandora, Ohio MEDLOCK l la T0 Watchmaker and Jeweler W ATC H All Work Guaranteed RE PAIRS T' 1 1 h Main street Findlay, Ohio BIGLER BROS. MEAT MARKET Home Dressed Meats Cured and Lunch Meats Bluffton, Ohio W. H. GRATZ SHOE STORE Correct Fitting A Specialty Bluffton, Ohio GRAY Sz WHITE CO. WE BUY Cream, Eggs, Poultry, Ducks and Geese Gerald Chidester, Mgr. Bluffton, Ohio Compliments of Shell Service Gas Station Bluffton, Ohio Charles Hankish Foreign and Domestic Fruits Nuts, Candy, Ice Cream Sz Cigars Bluffton, Ohio For Her or For Him GRADUATION GIFTS G. R. Thompson Sz Son 107 Court Place Findlay, Ohio Rawson Elevator L. R. FORSYTH, Prop. Grain, Feeds, Coal, Seeds, Fencing, Grinding and Mixing Rawson, Ohio Miss Thomas: "If King Alfred were alive today what would be his views on ah Conscription, bb Universal suffrage, cj the press, dj polo?" Arlo K.: 'If King Alfred were alive today he would be too old to take an interest in such things." PF 41 Pk Mr. Simkins: "How do you account for the phenomenon of deW?' i Pauline Pitzen: "Well, you see the earth revolves on its axis every twenty- four hours and in consequence of the tremendous pace it perspires freely." Mt. Cor Elevator A. J. HOSLER, Prop. EAT AT PINE RESTAURANT Special Dinners CANDY, CIGARS, CIGARETTES BEER Bluffton - Findlay C. L. BILLINGS BARBER SHOP Hair Cut 250 - Shave 15c Mt. Cory, Ohio Milton Steininger GENERAL MERCHANDISE Clover Farm Quality Products Star Brand Shoes Phones-Mutual 2-135 Bell 63F21 Mt. Cory, Ohio Watch the Fords Go By Buy At The Dixie Motor Co. Bluffton, Ohio Your Ford Dealer Otto Funeral Home Phone 33F2 Quick Ambulance Service Night or Day Rawson, Ohio The Fred Gratz Store CLOTHING AND SHOES Your Patfronage Is Appfreciated Bluifton, Ohio W. S. Longbrake 8z Co. GENERAL HARDWARE Oil, Gas, Grease Woman's Friend Washer Mutual Phone 2-12 Mt. Cory, Ohio The orator, mounted upon the usual platform, was trying to convince a small and unenthusiastic audience. "What would you say," he demanded, "if I told you that all the rivers of the world are drying up." From the back of the crowd came a voice: "Go then and do likewise." bk Pk if Mary Morrison fat baseball gamejz "I don't see how that umpire can keep so cool." Maxine Reichley: "That's easy, look at all the fans around him." Riegle Beauty Salon EXPERT BEAUTY SERVICE "We Aim To Please" 81.50 Over Lion's Clothing Store Phone 719-J Maurine King: "That guy you were out with last night looked like a flat tire to me." Maxine L.: "That's just what he was. I'm gonna use him for a spare from now on." Il :F if Mr. Rothhar: "What is one-fifth of three-sevenths?" Norman Kirtland: "I don't know but it isn't enough to worry about." Compliments of SCOTT BRYAN T'S SHOE STORE Findlay, Ohio Opposite City Market W. G. GULIJREN FUNERAL HUME Ambulance Service Phone 600 Findlay, Ohio BUY FOR LESS We Sell Everything SHALLEY Sz SON 5 8: 10c 8z Variety Store Bluffton, Ohio The wife who drives from the back seat isn't any worse than the husband who cooks from the dining-room table. 41 ak DF Cop: "Madam, didn't you see me hold up my hand ?" Woman driver: "I did not." Cop: "Didn't you hear me blow my whistle?" Woman driver: "I did not." Cop: "Well, I guess I might a well go home. I don't seem to be doing much good here." Say It With Flowers Cut Flowers - Potted Plants Floral Designing GROVE STREET GREENHOUSES E. L. SHORT, Prop. Phone 404-W Bluffton, Ohio Dr. Francis Basinger Dr. Evan Basinger Dentists Bluffton, Ohio Doris Bryan Esther Kinstle Permanent Waving A Specialty Main Beauty Shoppe We Do All Lines of Beauty Work 302 North Main Street Findlay, Ohio I. G. A. STORE "The Best Place To Shop" Pandora Dry Goods and Clothing Co. Phone 45-A Pandora, Ohio A fat man bumped into a rather slim gentleman. 'From the looks of you," he said, belligerently, "there must have been a famine." "And from the looks of you," re- plied the lean gentleman, "you're the guy that caused itf' Pk fl' Bk Charles G.: "I feel sorry for Frank. Why he gives his girl the world with a fence around it." Willis King: "What did she give him?" Charles: "The gate." Value First Clothes EXCLUSIVE AT Compliments of SUTIES ZIEROLF sz BIERY DRY "F'inol7ay's Leading Mews and Boys' Store" Findlay, Ohio CLEANING AL. W. BAYE S, Manager Bluffton, Ohio JENERA CO-OPERATIVE ASSOCIATION Grain, Flour, Seed, Coal, Farm Supplies, Echo Feeds Co-operative Shippers of Live Stock Jenera, Ohio Billy: "A little bird told me what kind of a lawyer you dad is." Bonnie: "What did the little bird say?" Billy: "Cheap, cheepf' Bonnie: "Well, a little duck told me what kind of a doctor you dad is." Pls iff if Mr. Hutton: "Now as we have heard all about the duties of the senators and congressmen, Norman can you tell us the duties of the chaplain?" Norman K.: "The chaplain looks the senators all over and then prays for the country." When You Crave Good Coffee - Ask for - Hi-Test Coffee Roasted Fresh Every Day The Findlay Coffee, Tea and Spice Co. Findlay, Ohio Burkholder Garage GENERAL AUTO REPAIR and ELECTRIC WORK Mt. Cory, Ohio When in Need of Printing Think of- Reiter's Print Shop Prices and Work Right Mt. Cory, Ohio Frederick C. Reel, PHYSICIAN - SURGEON Eyes Examined -- Glasses Fitted Bluffton, Ohio Compliments of DR. KING Mt. Cory, Ohio Daifadille Beauty Shoppe "Your Satisfaction Is Ours" In McKinley Millinery Store Phone 306-W Vera Ridge, Mgr. Findlay, Ohio Mr. Simkins was seated in his office when the phone rang. "Hello", said a voice, "is this Mr. Simkins?". U'YeS.!! "Well this is Johnson, Johnson, John- son and J ohnson." "Oh, Good morning, good morning, Turner-Crosby Shoe Co. STYLE AND COMFORT 553.00 to 86.00 Findlay, Ohio Sidney's Drug Shop "A Store of Friendly good morning, good morning." SerUice,, lk if if MissuSwab: "What animal hunts in Bluffton, Ohio packs? Eugene L.: "The custom inspector." When you see me don't think of in- surance-but when you think of insur ance, see me. Clarence D. Diller, Agent All Kinds of Insurance "Diller's Policies Pay" Pandora, Ohio Allen's Fashion Shoppe 335 South Main Street Findlay, Ohio The Shoppe of Distinction Women's Wearing Apparel Phone 496-J KANEL'S Men's Furnishings Hats and Clothing Findlay, Ohio LINCO Gasoline Tires Motor Oil Batteries Produced Transported Refined Marketed by THE OHIO OIL COMPANY General Offices Findlay, Ohio Compliments of Kennedy Printing Co 219 South Main Street Findlay, Ohio Miss Thomas: "You grammar is Herce. With your I done this and I .done that. You make me think what Macbeth said to Banquo's ghost." Don N.: "What was that?" Miss Thomas: "Thou cans't not say I did it." bk FF if Officer: "The lady says you deliber- ately urged your dog to attack herg that you called out to him, 'Seize her, seize her'." Jasper D.: "Good heavens, officer, nothing of the kind. 'I was merely call- ing him off. Caesar is his name." WALTER'S SHOE CO. 331 South Main Street Findlay, Ohio SHOES FOR EVERYBODY It Costs Less to Dress Smartly When You Buy at the New Boston Store Findlay, Ohio "Where Spending Is Saving" its N114 fzlbxx fs? W FIIQIIS wx . ' Qwxfa' V . M "H ,N 'fp '. ' - gem- " V' f . .fx " 'Miva .,-1 W "rf ' V., 1 . .4 aw V 15.5 , X' If 'i af-'hz qi, v-1 1 51,8-v ..'1 N Q , U., . H -' V V f V-V 4 f , ei- , ' . gf!" ' X' V 22 '.'f- 10 , . 8' .' ' ."'P 1 1.4 iff' '? ,, V M' 'V 5' . 'A' ,"'L',V A ' -, 9. U 6.0321 .Y W4 A ,.. 4, . 1 .gpm ' x V-:ag 4 , .. gf , f , xx- 9-.Va , M 3- r s H ew: Q gm-'-VV -1 q V, . V 'A 4 1. x . A ff:-ffff., -3 V -V . -nf, V Ng a ,..r- , ' V . . X' . 'j-4 . 1..'sg. . z J 'tai' " j-V1 . V gf. f 1 ,, , QV . . -' Q V , -' .P 1 '-- : li? - fl.. Vy- I xg. ,J ' V V ".1 -,.' " 71. "V: . "f' -' 2. ' , . . 55? f Vw , ., , ,. n , f fe" t'2:9f-, "'.. -. mg D ,Ugygf-,V,r, ,,," AV. R 4 ' ,Hftj A 5 , Vw' V41 Q V JV H., V nk... v 1. V 1+-v V .2 'V . -sf ff -- avi .,,,. -. 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Suggestions in the Mount Cory High School - Shamrock Yearbook (Mount Cory, OH) collection:

Mount Cory High School - Shamrock Yearbook (Mount Cory, OH) online yearbook collection, 1936 Edition, Page 1

1936

Mount Cory High School - Shamrock Yearbook (Mount Cory, OH) online yearbook collection, 1945 Edition, Page 1

1945

Mount Cory High School - Shamrock Yearbook (Mount Cory, OH) online yearbook collection, 1948 Edition, Page 1

1948

Mount Cory High School - Shamrock Yearbook (Mount Cory, OH) online yearbook collection, 1935 Edition, Page 6

1935, pg 6

Mount Cory High School - Shamrock Yearbook (Mount Cory, OH) online yearbook collection, 1935 Edition, Page 43

1935, pg 43

Mount Cory High School - Shamrock Yearbook (Mount Cory, OH) online yearbook collection, 1935 Edition, Page 57

1935, pg 57

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