Moundsville High School - Orospolitan Yearbook (Moundsville, WV)

 - Class of 1922

Page 1 of 152

 

Moundsville High School - Orospolitan Yearbook (Moundsville, WV) online yearbook collection, 1922 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 152 of the 1922 volume:

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' n ' wr 5 , "4 s. --"Qin, x' . ' ii - u . 'AAI '79 7 v - ' 4 . 4. ,., .161 -'L-,s F ' .1'- . 'V .I an , N - n ' - pfwi' . , - , Q 3 F - 'Nl' I . 1 'V W , ' x N, Www, , f, 9-'-' a ." Q' 4v'L:-ws. v 'i . J' . . as ,,. 17 S: kwa 17. sw-j. - X H f T 9 ' -'L 'J '...? f 'P ll ' 4 ,, . - ? l Q .p U 'w ...s fx ,. 'L'-r 1 SIGNATURES OF' MY CLASSMATES lS?cCf,?v !w,.1.3,H.5, 'QV QV, SIGNATURES OF MY TEACHERS OFQOSPOLITAN YEAR BCDOK S3 2wQ Zcddfw, A7132 lfllifwg if, 445-J-L4 AAQKUQ- U LS U S SO U S G OO TV' lf- P v 9 . ' W a 4 ', . ' x I - I., ' 5 O 1 ' Q -r- . W 'N 9'- ,,. I o .' 9 . , o 4-, FACULTY ' r J 1 ' U ' Q - 311 Y J x 'J QS A , . Q f vt ' S 1 , Q I It 5 3' ' 5 -1 Q., ,dug-,E+-4, ' 5 v ' - I Q A lf, :rg I . f' 1' . . .Q , ' l. No Q 4: . M 4, . W9 ' 2 .L -I ' - ' ds' , 1 1 . i ' " ' ' A i ',, F gl. u ' , v 'W' - 5' 4 . .Jin ' '- , r. ff' ' - v D Q ' I , Q eh. 1, ' - .. xx 3' o J a 1 5' I. ' ' F . ' -'-, ,Wo C10 - F, Q . i ..!, , , Q tl - . ' In H' X, 15' .I ' t . v- ,ri Q . .' ' ' o ri' -A 'H . .A A' D' ' ' 1 Wi ' . .." -', 5 , Mn Q m 4, 't 5 0 . Y ' ' 5 r I ' O Y- r iff I V '.1-. 73, .yx ?J 'A' I .5 Q O Q - 4 0 4 1" .. '. - o J I JOHN C. SHREVES, A. M. Superi11tendeut of Schools A. M. HAUGHT, A. S. Principal of High Schonl HAROLD T. ROGERS J. A. AULD SCIENCE MANUAL TRAINING IDA E. WILLIAMS, A. B.. M. A. DEPARTMENT OF LANGUAGES NELL V. KITTLE, B. S. HOME ECONOMICS FRANKLIN P. JONES, A. B. A. B. YERGER, A. M. HISTORY MATHEMATICS MARGARET SIGAFOOSE, A. B. LILLIAN M. SMITH ENGLISH ENGLISH WALTER W. TILOCK, B. S. SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS LOREN D. WIANT COMMERCIAL VIRGINIA PATTERSON, A. B. NELL S. PARKS, A. B. ENGLISH HISTORY M. H. S. FACULTY Mr. Haught, being principal of the High School, comes first in the list. He is loved and revered by us all, and, al- though he has been with us but a short time, we have found his true worth, and how well he can manage a school full of unruly boys and girls. He is gthe teacher of Sociology, and those of us who are "exposed to it, but are not taking it' know that his equal is not to be found. A Our science teacher, Mr. Rogers, lovingly called "Scotchie" by some, de- lights in running the High School when our principal is away. He is not satis- fied with the work being done in his Chemistry Class. Plays and other sports have deterred the work and giv- en him cause to complain. Miss Parks is our History teacher, and, although some of Mr. Rogers' eX- planations about Washington and J eff- erson did not please her, yet she is well liked by the pupils. Mr. Yerger teaches Mathematics, whether the pupils like it or not. He enjoys open air exercises- greatly, and is often seen taking long hikes. Mr. Tilock is our foot ball and base- ball coach. He is very strong on these sports, but does not coach basket ball. He teaches General Science and History and hedcan -explain Civil Governent to even the dullest. Miss Kittle is our Domestic Science teacher and, although she makes us wash dishes after Rotary every Wed- nesday, still we could not live without her. Besides, we occasionally get some new clothes under her orders. Miss Smith is the head of the Eng- lish Dept., and she is wonderfully suit- ed for this work. She keeps an eye on the library and tells the students when they have books over due. On account of her travels, Miss Wil- liams is the one to whom we go for any information concerning foreign cus- toms or language. She teaches lang- uages and Commercial Geography, and is a friend of all Freshmen. Miss Sigafoose is another of our English teachers, and, although this is her first year with us, we have found out that she is a confidential advisor to everyone. Miss Patterson, another of our effi- cient English teachers, is our girls' bas- ket ball coach and a very good one, too. She also teaches Girls' Physical Train- ing Class on Mondays and Wednesdays after school. . Mr. Auld is the Senior class advisor and the coach of our Senior play. He is also Manual training teacher. Mr. Wiant is Commercial teacher and boys' basket ball coach and he cer- tainly puts pep into the boys in all the ga.mes. Mr. Jones is our youngest acting teacher. He certainly has a good time in Domestic Science Dept. He teach- es History and Commercial studies. Miss Martin is our office lady who answers all our calls for "A nickel's worth of theme paper, please." Mr. Bryson is our band leader and janitor. He could get music "out of a stone" and is liked by all the pupils. J. C. '22, THINGS THAT NEVER HAPPEN A HUMOROUS REMARK BY ONE OF OUR FACULTY. Mr. Haught 1-"Please excuse this personal experience, but I ah--" Mr. Wiaiit :-" You may have more brains than a dog, but the dog is the happiestf, Mr. Tiloek :-"Shall I sing it 'V' "You say that as if you were afraid you were right." Mr. Jones z-"Well, that isn't wrong." Mr. Auld :-"1 think she's the cleverest thing." Mr. Yerger :-Ulf at first you don 't suck seed, suck eggs." Miss Smith :-HI would suggestl-" Miss Williams:-t'The good students, take advantage of these last few 1l1OlI1611tS.7, Miss Kittle:-t'Now you girls get hack to the kitchen." Miss Patterson :-Toot! Toot! "Off the tloor, girls." " Heal ladies do not priinp in public." Mr. Rogers all ean't give any one credit, who doesn't study." Mrs. Tiiiihy:-"Now after this you children eoine to class prepa red. ' ' Miss Parks :-"Report to Mr. Yerger's detention, Wecliies- day." Miss Sigzitoose :-"l'm waiting for you girls to get quiet." Mr, Shreves:-"Not heiiig much of a speaker, I--H SENIORS -.' Y NE' n I - ' Sv. 'I' I A O pei: ,Q I o Y CLASS OF' 1922 OFFICERS President ..... ........... .... F r ed Parriott Secretary ...... ............. O lga Lewis Treasurer ........ ............ F rank Martin Social Chairman. .. .... Mary Elizabeth Johnson Historian ........ .............. O lga Lewis Faculty Advisor ........................ J. A. Auld Class Color-Purple Class Flower-Yellow Rose lllotto-t'We can because we think we can" Is there a little deed of love That should be done To make the world a brighter place More full of fun? Is there a friend who needs A helping hand 'Fo guide him past temptation And for the right to stand? ls there some service to be rendered Great or small That everlasting good Will be for all? - Thatls just what we are here for Everyone Just ask a senior Theylll no duty shun. FRED PARRIOTT ' ' Pop. ' ' Hobby, A family of seven, Commer- cial Course, Band, Senior Play, Class President '22, EDM UND ECHOLS ' ' Speed. ' ' Hobby, Cameron Girls, General Vourse, Basketball '20, '21, '22, Base Ball '20, '21, '22, Foot Ball '22, OLGA LEWIS t'Squire. " Hobby, Prize Fighting, General Course, Basketball '19, '20, '21, '22, Class President '21, Class Secretary '22, Chairman Social Committee '20. JEAN CARPENTER "GWEN." Hobby, Riding in the "Bomber," Home Economies Course, Glee Club, Senior Play. CHARLES MOSER 'iDllfCl1.,' Hobby, Talking to Girls, Orospoli- tan Staff '21, Class President '21, Busi- ness Manager '22, Foot Ball '22, Gen- eral Course. ALLAN DINSMORE i'Rudolpl1." Hobby, Making Dates, Manual 'Fraizling Vourse, Senior Play. WILLIAM WOODBURN ' ' Bill, " Hobby, Loafing, Football '20, '21, '22, Basketball '19, '20, '21, '22, Cap- tain '21, General Course. KATHLEEN WHITWORTH "Katt, ' ' Hobby, To be with Beulah, Commer- cial Course. FLORENCE SNEDEKER ' ' Flossie. ' ' Hobby, Falling in love, Commecial Course. VIOLA HAHN. Hobfby, Studying, General Course. EARL CHAMBERS "Swamp Grass." Hobby, A little joke, now and then, Manual Training Course, Senior Play, Football '21, Band. ESTHER SIGAFOOSE "Billy, " Ho-bby, Basket Ball, Orchestra and Glee Club, Basketball '21, '22, Commer- cial Course. CHARLES HUGHES " Chauncey. ' ' Hobby, His Doctrines, General Course, Assistant Editor Orospolitan '21, Editor Orospolitan '22, Valedictor- ian. HELEN LIPFERT '4Helen Liz." Hobby, Dodge Sedans, Glee Club, Senior Play, Commercial Course. LPRA SMITH "Smitty" Hobby, Driving the Buick, Commer- cial Course, Senior Play. MARY ELIZABETH JOHNSON "E-S Q." Hobby, Bluffing the teachers, Chair- nian Social Committee '22, Senior Play, General Course, Salutatorian. MARION CROVVE "Hilly." Hobby, Mischief, General Course, Foot Ball '21, '22, Captain '22, Senior Play. EIiEANORi BAUER. Hobby, Bobbed Hair, Glee Club, Home EL'0ll0llllCS Course. FRANK MARTIN "Jew, " Hobby, "Moore" dates, Commeeial Course, Orospolitan Staff '21, '22, Qhairman Social Committee '21, Busi- ness Manager of the Play. n MADELINE BRANTNER "Mike. ' ' Hobby, Acting natural, Commercial Course, Glee Club, Basket Ball '22, So- cial Committee '20, '21, '22, Senior Play. - FRIEDA GORBY "Toppy," "Fritz." Hobby, "Toppy," General Course, Senior Play, Glee Club. ESSIE CLARK "Lulu. " Hobby, Taking everyone by sur- prise, Glee Club, General Course, Sen- ior Play. RAYMOND BARNETTE ' ' Barney. ' ' Hobby, Girls, General Course, Bas- ket Ball '20, '21, '22, Foot Ball '20, '21, '22. SARAH MEREDITH "Flu1"fy." Hobby, Paul, Glee Club and Orches- tra, General Course. ROBERT JONES H Bob. ' ' Hobby, Woman hater, General Course, Base Ball '21, '22, Senior Play. MARIE SUTER ' 'Jack " Hobby, Giggles, Class Treasurer '21, Senior Play, General Course. ' MARY WELSOH. Q Hobby, Keeping quiet, Commercial Course. LEE MQELROY "Bull" Hobby, Teasing "Speed," Band and Orchestra, Senior Play, General Course. JOSEPH WILSON ' ' Joe. " Hobby, Originality, General Course, Basket Ball '21, '22, Band. KATHARINE WEBB ' ' Dodo. " Hobby, Six foot men, Senior Play. CWanted to graduate from a big school eo 031116 to Mouudsville,D General Uourse. HAROLD WAYT ' ' Weighty. " Hobby, Shooting' pool, Manual Training Course, Senior Play. ETHEL YINGLING "Ying," Hobby, Riding in taXis, Commercial Course. SOPHIA TUMOSKY ' ' Chubby. ' ' Hobby, Getting excused for Short- hand, Commercial Course. CHARLES VVILLIAMSON ' ' Doc. " Hobzby, Music, General Course, Band and Orchestra. HERBERT SMITH H FLEET. " Hobby, The girls, general course, Senior Play. ELIZABETH JARRETT "Tibby." Hobby, Dancing, Commercial Course, Senior Play. MABEL LEATHERBY ' ' Buddy. ' l Hobby, To attend every ball game, Basket Ball '22, Commercial Course. STELLA HENNE ' ' Nell. ' ' Hobby, A Wilsion, but not the ex- pres., Commercial Course. AGNES COX. . Hobby, The farm, General Course. EDITH FRANKLIN "Ja-Da. " Hobby, School teachers, General Course. EUGENIA CORCORAN "Jean," Hobby, lee Skating, Home Econom- ies, FLC TEAGARDEN "Wild Girl." Hobby, The boys, Senior Play, General Course. HERBERT O 'NEIL "Buck, " Hobby, Tall Girls. Commercial Course. Base Ball ,22. Senior Play. NAN HIGH "Nannie." Hobby, A Woods. Home Econom- ics Course. MARGARET PETERS "Marg, " Hobby, Express. truck. Glee Club. Commercial Club. I JOHN NATION "Johnny " Hobby, His Overland, Orchestra, General Course. WENONA EDWARDS "Wen.'7 Hobby, Being prepared for quiz. Just came to us this year and We can say she Was a nice addition to our class. General Course. ARTHUR MOUROT "Accum. H Hobby, Talking, General Course. Football '22, .1 -4.- ' The class of '22 entered the old cent- ral building in September, 1918. We were small in number, but great in wis- dom and school spirit. We held the first class meeting of the year and elect- ed the following officers: President, Edmund Echols, Vice President, Ken- neth Cullum, Sec. and Treas., Paul Harlan, Chairman of Social Comm., Sara Hostutler. Our party on Febru- ary 7th, and weinie roa-st later in the year, were the most popular social events of the season. NVe started our Sophomore year in the new building with a fine corp of officers: Mr. Auld, Class Advisor: President, Charles Moser, Vice Pres- dent, Joe Wilson, Treasurer, Mildred Burgess, Secretary, Helen Kinney, t'hairman of Social Comm., Olga Lew- is. On the evening of March 12th, we gave our annual party in the "gym," which was gaily decorated in purple and gold. A delightful program, in- cluding the rendering of some of Miss I'aulman's poetry, and an auction sale, were the events of the evening. Elev- en o'c-lock came all too soon, and the mystery concerning the "Jim Jams" and basket of sandwiches, has never been cleared up to this day. -luniors this year, my, how the time does tly! NVith the guidance of Mr. Auld, Olll' class makes itself more prom- inent than ever this year. Again, we lead in the soeial events ol' the season. Uur Valentine party held in the Manual Training room, was a novelty, as well CLASS OF '22 as a success. The Farmington Basket Ball Team was invited, and in the rev- elry soon forgot their defeat. For the first time in school history, the Junior class was not permitted to give a play. XVe were greatly disappointed, but to show that we never gave up, we rented the Park Theatre for April 29th and presented VVanda Hawley in "The Snobf' The proceeds from this pic- ture enabled us to give the Seniors a sumptuous banquet, which was the crowning feature of our Junior social year. Junior officers were: Pres. Ol- ga Lewis, Vice Pres., Arthur Mourot., Sec., Frieda Gorby, Treas., Marie Sut- er, Chairman of Social Comm., Frank Martin, Class Advisor, Mr. Auld. Seniors at last! But We say it with regret. It makes us begin to feel old and dignified. We feel youth slipping away from us, and responsibility rest- ing heavily on our shoulders. We think less of parties and good times and be- gin to ponder over the future. To help us through our last and hardest year we elected the following officers: Pres., Fred Parriott, Vice Pres., and See., Olga Lewis, Treats., Frank Mar- tin, Chairman of Social Comm., Mary E. Johnson. Our masquerade party featured a jazz orchestra, but the re- freshments, as usual, made a deeper im- pression on those present. Our Senior play, "The Hoodoo" to be given 011 April 7th, has 2111 all star cast- alld prom- ises to be one of the best ever given by school talent. O. M. L. '22, THE SENIOR CLASS M1922 T presents "THE HOODOO" A Vomedy in Three Aets Directed by J. A. Auld. Business Manager l-lrank Martin Property Manager Earl Chambers C'haraieters as They Appear. Lulu, by name and nature Essietllark Aunt Paradise, the eolorel cook lady Earllfhambers Angelina, that angel ehlld aged eight .............. . Madeline Brantner Malachi Meek, a young old llirt l3obJones Mrs. Perrington-Shine, Mr. Meeks daughter ......... Mary E. Johnson Gwendolyn PPl'I'lllgi0ll-Sllllltl, just as mama says ......... -lean Varpenter Mrs. Ima. i'linger, a fascinating young widow ................ Lura Smith liilly Jaekson, the heart breaker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Allan Dinsmore lil'lQ'ili0Il luarly, about to be m.:11'r1ed . . . .................. Harold Waliyt Peggy live, engaged to Early ..,.................llelen liipfert Doris iilli'l'll'S, l'eggy's maid ot' honor ,.................l4'rieda li. tiorby Miss liongneelcer, a publie sehool team-lier' ........... Elizabeth -larrett Professor Spiggott, an authority on Egypt ............... Fred Parriott Hemaehus Spiggott, his son, aged sev- enteen .............. Herbert Smith Dodo DeGraft, the Dazzling Daisy ..................KatherineWebb Dun, the burglar ...... Marion Crowe Mrs. Seniiramis Spiggott, the mother of seven ................. Marie Suter Eupepsia Spiggott, her daughter, aged . . . .Flo Teagarden sixteen .... Osiris ..... . . .Sophia Tumosky lsis ..... . . . Lee McElroy Ptolemy .... ...... l Trank Martin Rameses ............. Herbert O'Neil Musical Numbers "The Bridal Rose" .,....... Gverture "Ile Loves Me, He Loves Me Not" Duet. .Frieda Gorby, Allan Dinsmore "Carolina Rolling Stonel' .... Quartet Essie Vlark, Helen Lipfert, Bob Jones, Herbert Smith. Oh Girls, VVha.t a Boy" ....... Duet Essie Flark, Herbert Smith LC JLJNIGRS CLASS OF 1923 OFFICERS President .......... Clarence Lafferty Vice President ........ Chester Echols Secretary ..... .. Margaret Francis Treasurer .............. Frank Stultz Historian .......... Helen McCuskey Social Chairman ..... Glenn Hamilton Faculty Advisor ......... Miss Smith Class Colors-Purple and White Class Flower-Violet Motto-The Greatest Happiness for the Greatest Number. JUNIOR CLASS 1922 iiouNDsv1LLE HIGH SCHOOL Barnette, Raymond Billetter, Ivan Blake, Virginia Bonar, Alma Burley, Dessie Buzzard, Theodore Campbell, Bernard Conner, Leah Crow, Arley Crow, Gail Crow, Virginia Kerns, Aliee Kelley, Beulah Kanner, Beulah Hudson, Mildred Hooton, James Iolipsley, Ruth Hetzer, Helen Ilaniilton, Glenn llahn, Yolanda Gray, Hutchinson Gillespie, Leona l4'ra11cis, Margaret l+'leteher, Richard Fahey, Margaret l+l1'nst, llelen Evliols, Uhester Ryan, Eva Rulong, Mary Ruekman, Andrew Robinson, James Reed, Williani Polen, Lillian O'Neil, Herbert Moore, Virginia MeNineh, Harvey Mefluskey, Helen McConnell, Ruth Lancaster, Willis Lafferty, Clarence Lacey, Agnes N11-t'amic, Frances Mudge, Dorothy Mt-Ninch, Hazel NVoreh, Anna NVllS01l, Stuart NVhitworth, Kathleen 'xVayne, Bessie Walton, Mary Stultz, Miriam Ftultz, Frank Stilwell, Margaret Spoon, Leo Snedeker, Florence JUNIOR CLASS HISTORY ln the year 1919-September, you see, Our class entered High School so happy and free To our class mates and teachers we never appeared So green nor so giddy as we had all feared. For the year the new building was opened to us And each of the students was making a fuss, The Seniors, the Juniors, the Sophomores, and all Were in the same trouble-lost in the hall, Hunting for class rooms, and getting in wrong, And jumping in terror at every new gong, But soon we were all settled down to our task, And the Juniors and Freshmen, a friendship had cast. 7 Our Freshman Class meet was quite an event. An election of officers, our minds were all bent As advisor or sponsor, Miss Walthour we chose And she proved her ability, everyone knows. Dick Fletcher, for President. we then elected And though I'll not mention all, none was neglected. The second semester Bill Reed filled his place And he as well as Dick suited this space. Our Freshmen Frolic, the event of the year Was held in the "Gym" and decorated-Oh Dear! Everyone was present and dressed in his best That's why our party was such a success. The following year, back to school we all came But as Sophomores now, we must take a new name. We felt our importance too, you all know As we stood off and watched those poor "freshies" grow Again we held an important class meet The conduct of which, just couldntt be beat. The decision announced was, "Miss Walthour advisorf' It seemed to us all, that it would be far wiser To have her again than elect some one new, When she was so line, and, less trouble too. Bill Reed, too, had made such a wonderful hit That for President everyone voted him Hit." To open the season of social affairs We gave a ghost party and each one declares- That it must have been planned by the goblins themselves Or by some one, at least quite as clever as elves. We had a line class they will all admit And the way we ran high school, they all had a lit. Now we are Juniors, the best class in school We set great examples and follow each rule. Our tasks and our burdens, full well do we know, But the cares of the 'LFreshies,'-they puzzle us so. Miss Smith, as our sponsor, this year we all chose Whose ideas come with each wind that blows. She helps our class far more than I can tell And without her I'm sure, we could not do so well. Our president, 'tSkinny, " is firm as a wall, He's the very he-st president of them all. ln the month of January the 23rd day We gave our class party, some party, I'll say. Why everyone present exclaimed in a chorus 4'There wasnlt at thing all the evening to bore us I" The Minstrel, the songs, the eats and the jokes, Just seemed to astonish the waiting folks. We Juniors are there in Athletics, too Here 's something l'll het you--you never knew That three of the class made the boy's quintet, But. whats more, four girls to the tournament went. Our Banquet this year is going to be great, So Juniors and Seniors, look out for a mate To accompany you, and enjoy it fine, For Banquets you know are right in our line. Thus, with banquets and parties and school on our brain, How in the world could we ever be sane? I Next year wc'll lie Seniors of '23 And what a future in us you will see, NVe'll achieve something worthy and reach great fame lIere's hoping all classes may do the same. H. M. Mc. '23 JUNIOR CLASS POETRY Composed by Madeline Brantner VIRGINIA BLAKE- Virgfinia is a studious lass, But also full of life, Her lessons are learned before each class And she is as sharp-as the blade of a knife ALMA BONAR- I-Iere's one girl in our class Who a doctor, she expects to be, She no doubt will out surpass All others-in that degree. DESSIE BURLEY- She is so quiet, You'd hardly know she was around, She never causes a riot, And very seldom makes a sound. LEAH CONNER Leah is our cheer leader And yells like she was paid, We're sure no one can beat her, Because for this job, she was made. GALE CROVV- Her name suggests a thunder storm, But Gale is rather shy, She always has a pleasant smile, For those who pass her by. VIRGINIA CROW- Virginia does not loaf at school, After the day ls Work is done, She knows HE'S probably shooting pool, And hurries to meet this ONE. HELEN ERINST- "Helen" her mo-ther calls her, To her class mates HTutor," we refer. Bill calls her just "Hennic," And this of all she prefers. MARGARET FAHEY- Oh Marg, how can you look so sweet? You are perfect. from your head to your feet. We wonder why y0u've not valnped the boys More than you have, with that stately poise. MARGARET FRANCIS- Sis's thoughts at Marietta roam, When she is sitting alone at home. While going to Spencer, she sited the place, And nothing else interested her but this fine landscape LEONA GILLESPIE- We have with us a sweet brunette, Whom we are sure you all have niet. In mathematics she's a shark, And in other subjects sets the mark. YOLANDA HAHN- Yolanda came out for basket-ball And almost made the team, You don't see her loafing in the hall, But studying in class, her face a radiant gleam. HELEN HETZER- She's very bright in class work, For her father's President of the Board. He feels her work she cannot shirk, For her lessons she must hoard. RUTH HIPSLEY- She's very tall and stately, And very quiet., too. lf there 's a secret you Wish her to keep, Shes true, as true as blue. MILDRED HUDSON- lf Mid you'rc looking for today, Call at. liineh's Confeetionary, pray. She's like the wandering jew on the hill, You can never find her sitting still. ISEITLAII KANNER- Beulah is such an angelic name, The girl herself is just the same, Shes as fair as a lily, and sings like a. lark, And is never caught ont. at night in the dark. BEULAH KELLY-- Beulah is a student, Of this there is no doubt. And there 's another thing we 're sure of, And that is, she 's rather stout. ALICE KERNS- Her father sells rings and watches, And Alice too, we hear, But there 's a certain senior, That she thinks, quite a DEAR. AGNES LACEY- Here 's Agnes with her pretty curls, Who raises the enmity of all the girls. She is a student, too, we find, But when it comes to boys, she 's not that kind RUTH McCONNELL- Ruth, with her height and dark bro-wn hair Has won many a heart. She has been told she's not quite fair, But she thinks she's very smart. HELEN MCCUSKEY- Fairest Helen whose such a queen, Around with Barney is always seen, She 's one of the trio so happy and gay, Who wander together till the close of the day VIRGINIA MOORE- Virginia, a very demure lass, Is very popular in her class. At Basket Ball she's a regular roinper, And at leisure rides in the Martin Bomber. MIRIAM STULTZ- Miriam is her name, Being with Bus is her aim, Smiles a lot and chews chewing gum too, What more than that can any girl do? FRANCES lXfIcCAMIC- Frances, a very attractive lass Is very popular in her class, Her Dad 's machine is her main pastime, And quite a few fellows enter her mind. BERNARD CAMPBELL- Bernard, who's of a jolly mood, To the teachers was never known to be rude. To tease Miss Parks was his chief delight. Then tries to study with all his might. ARLEY CROW- There was a crow sat at his desk, But if this young bird was put to test, A wonderful knowledge he might unfold, For the key to success with-in he holds. CHESTER ECHOLS- Chester or t'Check', as you all know, Lives on Seventh and is not so slow, For in Basket Ball he 's making good, And if he doesn't make the team next year, he should IVAN BILLETER- This gentleman whom I introduce, Was never known to make an eXcuse. Makes tine grades with the greatest ease, And tries hard the faculty to please. WILLIS LANCASTER- Willis played foot-ball last year, And again expect to have him this year. He's tall and manly, and bright. as a tack, And in baseball this year will not fall back. HARVEY McNlNCH- Harvey with that wavy hair, Is sure to make a hit somewhere. For one of the Junior girls he fell, And his studying suffered we could tell. ANDREXV Rl'C'KNIAN- Andy is his name we find, And in study is never left behind. ln Viyies, Tiloek thinks hini bright, And in answering questions, he's always right. STl'Ali'l' WILSON- Stuart is very thrifty. And always looks quite nifty. At Watson's you lind liiin morning, noon and night, But stands in the door keeping all girls in sight. RICHARD FLETCHER- Richard for long, and Dick for short, A line fellow and great for sport. Third street seems to be his retreat, For with B-etty his life is complete. JAMES HOOTON- Jimmie is a lawyer 's sonnie, Calls a certain girl his I-Ioney. Rather popular, don 't you know, His long tailed coat is mainly his show. LEO SPOON- Heck, our cheer leaders hurrah! But with girls he doesn't stay, He 's a member of the Two To Go, And in future will make Some Show. CLARENCE LAFEERTY- Skinny Lafferty who is stately and tall, Is captain of the Basket Ball. Always on time, never tardy at class, And is really not crazy about any lass. JAMES ROBINSON- Jim a Two To Go, A good looking chap don't you know. Listen my children, and you shall hear, That he is foot-ball captain of the team this year. LILLIAN POLEN- Lillian with her friends is shy, And to make her happy We must try. Her name comes from the fairest of flowers, The "Lily" which grows in all the bowers. FRANK STULTZ- With that jet black hair and sparkling eyes, Where did you drop from, "Out of the skies?" In Wiant's room he 's always se-en, And the girls seem to think him quite a scream. WILLIAM REED- Bill, who stars in Basket Ball, Is not so short and not so tall, In classes he is never still, And when questions need answered they call on "Bill" GLENN HAMILTON- Oh, lllid! Why did you go away, And leave us '4Ha.m" not. nearly so gay? At, basket and foot-ball he's quite a star, And with the girl's is not behind so far. THEODORE BUZZARD- Theodore, the bird of our class, Flies through the room, but alas! He talks to the teachers with a smile on his face, But. when girls come around that srnile does erase. IIUTCHINSON GRAY- In Yerger's class in Geome-tree, Hutchinson 's presence there Would be. He was always brighter than any one, So some mother then, could be proud of her son. MARY RULONG- Little Miss Mary, so backward and shy, NVhere did you get that look in your eye? She regularly attends school every day, Rut waits anxiously until the last of May. HAZEL McNINCH- Hazel, we see is one of the Three, And on corners you hear their Tee He He. You see her with Harold niost every night, And in school keeps herself quite out of sight. DOROTHY MUDGE- NVe like to hear our Dorothy sing, As she did when she was a wee little thing. But now she's always with J. K. Chase, And the school never sees much of her face. EVA RYAN- Eva is so quiet i11 school, That she is never reprimanded by Ielaught. She gets her lessons and doesn't fool, Around the halls till she is caught. M A ROA R.E'l' STIINVELL- Margaret, a very attractive maid, Hy the fellows will never be way-laid. She loves her studies and her teachers, And at haslcet-ball is always seen on the bleachers MARY WAL'I'ON- Mary Melissa, a sweet child to behold, When it comes to fellows, she isn't bold. Her bobbed hair and her sunny smile. ls met by the pupils all the while. BESSIE 'WAYNE- Here's the picture of health, at sweet amiable lass, When it comes to lessons, she's sure to surpass She is liked by all and the faculty, too, We 're bound to say she'll get through. ANNA WORCH- Here 's one gifted with beauty, A charm to the opposite sex. ,She may enter a fashionable movie, And have Harvey as her special text. 3111 illlvmnrium VIRGINIA FERRIS Died Feb. 8, 1922. Virginia Ferris, whose death occurred on Wed- nesday, Feb. 8, 1922, was born Oct. 14, 1901. Both the student body and the faculty of the High School were visibly saddened by her death. She is missed not only by the class of '23 of which she was a mem- ber, but by all who knew her. She was an excellent student and she was also very active in athletics, playing' o11 the Girlls Basket Ball team and taking' a great interest in all other sports of the school. She was genial, kind and thoughtful of others, therefore although her death had been anticipated for lllany weeks, it could not help but carry with it a shock. It is indeed sad that one so young' must die, but the will of God must be done, and it is with this thought that the students of llc-undsville High School extend their heart felt sympathy to her bereaved family. Virg1inia's many friends expressed their sym- pathy with beautiful floral tributes, the like of which was hardly ever seen in Bloundsyille. The commit- tee who represented the -Iunior Vlass at the funeral was composed of: Ilelen Iflrnst, Miriam Stultz and Margaret lfrancis. The funeral was one of the larg- est ever seen in Bloundsyille, all who knew Virginia having' come to participate in the last sad earthly rites. SOPHGMCRES CLASS OF 1924 OFFICERS President ..... .... W alter Purdy Vice President. ....... J-eanette Brown Sec.-Treas. ..... ...... R alph Berry Historian ............ Nancy Johnson Faculty Advisor .......... Miss Kittle Alexander, Mary Ashworth, Harold Barnette, Frank Barnum, Susan Barr, Thomas Beall, Clarence Berry, Ralph Blake, Lenora Bonar, Mildred Boren, Robert Bosworth, Ada Bro-ck, Katherine Brown, Jeanette Brc-yles, Kingsley Cameron, Harry Chambers, R-oy Cox, Joseph T Cullinan, Margaret Dorsey, Mary Ellen Edwards, Charles Evans, Laurence Evans, Ray Friedly, Twill Forester, Ben Gandee, J. M. Clarke, Ethel German, Carl CLASS ROLL Gorby, Frieda L. Grandstaff, Mary Hamilton, Aleine Harlan, Paul Harris, Ronald Hartley, Dale Haught, Georgia Haught, Rosa Helms, Lester Hooton, Elizabeth Howard, Alene Howard, Zelda Hubbs, Nancy Irene Hudson, Keith Hughes, Virginia Hull, James Humes, Robert Johnson, Nancy Jones, Theodore Lafferty, Mary McCamic, Frances McConnell, Roberta McDaniel, Donald McElroy, lola Mcllvain, Earl McNinch, Hazel Manning, Helen Miller, Raymond Moore, lrene Mudge, Dorothy Myroski, Regina Peters, Walter Price, Burdette Purdy, Wailtei' Rankin, Helen Richmond, Flora Rife, Roy Riley, Virginia RC-senmerkel, Frank Rupp, Martha Sigafc-ose, Frank Smith, Bertram Smith, Mary Smith, Merle Sullivan, Paul Thomas, Frederick Thompson, Minnie Virgin, Tom Wziltoii, Robert, Wilsoii, Frank Wcilfe, Sterling WOOClXX'3,FCl, Robert Young, Lillian Class Colors-Old Rose and Silver Class Flower-Red Rose SOPHOMORE CLASS HISTORY t'The Class that ean't be beat! The busiest class in the school! The class that stands for knowledgeln In the latter part of August, 1920, We entered high school as Hgreen fresh- men"-and we were green, too-about a hundred of us-each, of course, a slightly different shade of the said col- or. So the grouping effect was indeed remarkable-it might be said, start- ling. As soon as we started to doing things we fairly beamed, and, now as Soph- oniores, we are nobly up-holding the re- putation of the past. It is said that a true estimate of character cannot be made until long after death. If this is true, we shall find it hard to estimate the Sophomores of Moundsville High School. That We boast of t'pep" and en- ergy, and of our intellectual ability, you are undoubtedly aware. As stud- ents, a glance at the grades is all that is necessary to show that many are Hmagna, cum laude." Versatile, cap- able, efficient, competent a11d skillful- sueh are the attributes of this excellent class. VVe are also at the forefront in our social life. The party, given in No- vember was a great success. due to the etforts of the social committee, and our much loved advisor, Miss Kittle. lu after years, we shall look back up- on this year as one of the busiest, but yet. the best, of "the Class of '24.', N. S. J. '2-1. 3111 illivmnrinm GEORGE ALAN BOTTOME. Died, March l, 1922. Divine Providence, by the whole course of Nature and the divine Word from the first to the last page, teaches us not to expend our greatest efforts and fix our fondest ex- pectations upon posessions that glide from our grasp and fade from our vision like vapors of the morning. We are taught of God, that we may not be taken by surprise and filled with despair when the killing frosts of disappoint- ment and death Withers the fresh blossoms, and blasts the unripe fruit of our earthly joys. We are all moving on in the same great procession, to the unseen home from which none return. Occasionally one of our beloved comrades falls out of the ranks, and we, who still live, move on With sadness and regret at the loss of the bright face and form and companionship of one of our number. And so, as the morning star melts into the superior glory of the rising sun-as the rosy dawn brightens into full day, our classmate and beloved companion George Bottoine on the first day of March, 1922, unmurmuringly bore all his suffering and surrendered all earthly attach- mentsg and, calmly and trustingly commended himself to the redeeming love, and fell asleep. Our hearts are sad at the loss, and he shall dwell for- ever in our memories as one Whom we loved and esteemed. But the measure of his days was with One who makes no mistakes in counting-his trust was in God, who gave to him the victoryg and his departure was but a triuinphal march at the close of which was his coronation. V. H. '24, CLASS OF 1924 We're boosters for the Moundsville Hi, all students here you know, And we 'll ever sing her praises, as on through life we go. We've a dandy bunch of teachers, they are brilliant and are wise, Lifting us from lower levels, pointing onward to the skies. And their memory we will cherish in the long, long years to come, When our task is almost finished and life 's raee is nearly run. But the one thing I must mention, sure you've heard it o'er and o'er, Is the One Class, the Brilliant Class, of 1924. Well we know there have been students that from Moundsville Hi have gone, With names renowned in history, in story and in song. And the classes that will follow will not be one whit below, For theylre handsome and they're 'wit- ty and they're brilliant, don't you know. And the world will hear from Mounds- . ville, now you mark my word, I say, And yon'll not be long in waiting for that great and happy day, When Monnclsville's name is on the map, as ne'er it's been before l'nt there by the Dandy Class of 1924. When you're growing old and feeble and your life is nearly done, And you 're thinking of the great things and the laurels that were won, Of names renowned in history, in sci- ence and in art Now Moundsville's girls and Mounds.- ville's boys have surely played their part. Then of llloundsville Hi you'll think again, as in the long ago, And see the classes at their tasks go moving to and fro. But the class that looms up best of all, as in the days of yore, Is the Ever, Ever, Famous Class, of 1924. Now Edison and Henry Ford have each , one made a name, And climbed the ladder, round by round, upon the way to fame, Still the road's not overcrowded and we've lots of timber near, And we're chuekin' in the knowledge, here in Nonndsville, year by year. Well, we know it won't be long till we must stand the test. VVill we stand it? Sure we will, and give the world our best. And we'll show the world we've got the 1 grit, though questions vex us sore. This Brilliant, Dandy, Famous Class of 1924. MQD. FRESI-IMEN Cottrell, Evelyn Adair, Columbia Allender, Ruth Awizius, Anna Baker, Virginia Bauer, Dorothy Blake, Cecil Buchner, Audrie Burdette, Nay Buzzard, Nona Campbell, Dorothy Campbell, Lulu Chase, J. K. Clyker, Eleanor Conneley, Max Corcoran, Thomas Criswell, Lillian Cross, William Derrow, Roy Dowler, Roy Ellis, Joe Ellis, Minnie Fahey, John Friedly, Chalmer Gandee, Mabel Garvin, Reed Gillespie, Alberta Gleason, George Gleason, Katherine Goldberg, Anna CLASS OF 1925 OFFICERS President ........... Naomi McMahon Vice President .... Elizabeth Isiminger Secretary .... ..... ll Iarion Knight Treasurer . . Historian ........ . . . .Ralph Pickett . . .Ralph Pickett Social Chairman ....... Mildred Smith Faculty Advisor ........ W. VV. Tilock CLASS Goldberg, David Grubber, Mike Haddock, Paul F Hale, Fannie Hicks, William Hill, Claire Howard, Frank Hull, John Hunter, Sam lsiminger, Elizabeth Jones, Andrew Joseph, Louis ,Kerns, Stephen Kimberley, Novella Kirby, Ralph Kittle, William Knight, Marion Lowe, Clarence McClintock, Gordon McGill, Donald McHenry, Edward McMahon, Naomi McMahon, Perry Maxwell, Ralph Miller, Frank Moore, Florence, Nuzum, Lucile Ovies, Joseph Parriott, Pat Penick, Clara ROLL Pickering, Rea Pickett, Ralph Raymer, Laura Riggs, Earl Riggs, Eva Riggs, Helen Virginia Rulong, 'Walter Rupp, William Sigafoose, Clara Smith, Mildred Stilwell, Frank Timblin, Chauncey VVarner, Ralph Warner, Virginia VVeaver, Mary Etta Welsch, Margaret NVheaton, Pauline Wilson, Clarence VVolfe, Frankie Workman, Alice Yeater, Paul Yeater, Wilma Moore, Hilda Moore, Margaret Myers, George Myers, Leta Angelo Joseph Jones, Leack, Martin, Grace McMasters, Lillian Class Colors-Green and White. Flower--White Rose. Adams, Marguerite Boston, Prentice Auten, Gladys Bosworth. Geraldine Boyarsky, Harold Broyles, Christine Corcoran, Margaret Coulter, Thelma Craig, Chester Dudzliug, Jerome Dungan, Martha Ferris, Josephine Francis, Kenneth Fox, Eldon Francis, Leona Gandee, Kenneth Hartzell, Opal Helms, John Hicks, Elmer Hicks, Robert Hill, Rebecca Hondinsky, Stanley Jefferson, Marjorie Weaver, Charles Polen, Londo Rist, Viva Stifel, Mary Sullivan, Pauline Suter, Eldron VVallat'e, Hilda I V 3 Ni fi FRESHMAN CLASS HISTORY One bright morning of last Sept., one could have seen the new members of the Emerald Class walking slowly up the steps of M. H. S. fearing the mys- terious realm beyond the door. Ev- erything was excitement and the new- ness caused us to be guided to our classes by the upper classmen for sev- eral weeks. EX-cept for that eventful night ond the ball park the Freshman Class sincerely thank the upper classes for their co-operation in guiding us about the building. Witliin a short time our class held its first meeting un- der the supervision of Miss Sigafoose and chose our officers, class advisor, and colors. We were known from this time on as the class of '25 Our class participated in the cheer- ing at any Athletic Event and is proud to claim several letter men. Our party which was held in De- cember, proved to be a great success and showed that the Freshman Cla-as knew a little of something about Social Affairs. After the Semester Exams a part ot our class joined the ranks of the Sopho- mores and the new members soon en- tered into our class -organization with spirit. W'e are proud to say that the Class of '25 has held to the loyalty of the school, Cthanks to our Class Advisor, Mr. Tilo-ekj and will continue to do so. The Freshmen are loyal to M. H. S. Although they are green, they Rank with the best. OUR SCHOCDI. ++++++++++++Q+++++++++++++++++++ 4++++++++6+i+++ 3 When you deal with "HINEY" E i you are uniting luxury with economy. E E 2 MENS FURNISHER cLo'rH1NG SWEATERS E E 2 SHOES 1-1 ATS TIES 5 +9 9 + cn I hll RJ -A Us ui l'l1 2 E '-I 2 E ra O r' L" IP R! va QW -z- -x- -z--x--x-x-x--x-4-x-x-x-x-H-x. 43,-:wx-4-aux--r -x-x-z-1-z-z-x-x-z--xg E Before you do your spring E a if 4. , 2 Shell Understand 2 house-cleaning 11,3 3 + 'R Q E buy a E E 1 2 2 3 3 Come in and see us and E E E we will arrange to send her E i and stop beating carpets 5,2 a beautiful box of her favorite Q E ' 3 f1owers,with your card tucked E Electric Irons inside. 3 Washing Machines A E 1 Heaters 4, E E Cooking Implements E 3 6 Electric Fixtures Z B. F. I.: la E R E 4 -1- urnmcx ruzcrmc SERVICE 5 Fl-0RlST 5 1 E ++++++++++ MGUNDSVILLE HIGH SCHOOL "I hold Education to be an organic necessity of a human being."-Horace Mann. The High School is a milestone in the course of Higher Civilization. As man 's intellect has progressed from that of the savage to that of the mod- ern scholar, there has necessarily been a standard of judgment. In the Stone Age, man required little knowledge. maintenance was easy, but today, with c crowding population, man has had to struggle to support himself. And this struggle has been good for man, for he has- had to use his faculties of thought. So today we have the standards -of civi- lization of a people, measured by their schools, of which the high school plays, perhaps, the most important part. M-oundsville High School was founded by some of the better minds of this city in 1873. Its beginning was very modest, having but a few students enrolled for several years. In 1887, graduated the first class of M. H. S., seven in number. Of this original class, one or two are yet living. So, to this day, has M. H. S., been "carry- ing on," graduating in those forty-five years, tive hundred and eighty stud- ents. - In this function, Moundsville High School has been doing a wonderful Work. Without great pomp and dis- play, performing in a peaceful manner it has furnished five hundred and eighty real, socialized citizens! The High School had its birth in the old building which preceded the one now used as the Central School in 1877. When the Central Ward .Building was tbuilt, it moved its home to the second floor of this building. Here, there was plenty of room for the crowded school. More classes were added, new teachers hired. In 1919, a third move was made to the present location on .Tomlinson Ave. In this new spacious building, there was adequate room for ,only one year. Now there are over four hundred students in the building, affording crowded conditions. Wlieii the move was made in 1919, two new popular courses were added-Domestic Science, and Manual Training. A word of commendation is here due to our teachers, past and present. Moundsville High School has always had the pleasure of having good teach- ers-teacher specialists in their lines. These patient, helpful souls gave and are giving themselves for the Cause of Education. Many of them have pour- ed out themselves in honest endeavor. Oftimes they accepted a teaching posi- tion at a very low wage, even lower than crude manual labor was receiving. It was clearly a case of self-sacrifice. Possibly their only reward in this world, will be in seeing great victories of their former students, in hearing of great accomplishments they have made. One is not only influenced by M. H. for the four years of school. The parental affection received there, goes hand in hand with the Alumnus, along life 's pathway. The relation between the Alumnus and the Alma Mater is ev- er keen, ever noble. People of Moundsville, realize your duty to the school and its duty to us. Recognize the school not as so much cement and stone, but recognize the soul of the school as it goes marvliiiig on, ever blazing bright, as a great search-light, lighting the way toward Truth. K Y x SX K CINWMERCUM. DEPARTMENT Hello, Mr. Business Man! Did you say you wanted a stenographer and bookkeeper? Do you know where you will find one? Right here, in the grad- uating class of Moundsville High School, you will have a good choice of efficient young people. Would you like to know why they are efficient? It is because they have completed the Commercial Course, which offers Com- mercial Law, Commercial Arithmetic and Commercial Geography, besides one and one-half years of Typewriting, .two years of Book-keeping and two years of Shorthand. This year's class should be a great deal more efficient than any other class because the advance Shorthand class have had a course in Office Training for Stenographers. It teaches how to ap- ply for a position, how to prepare mail for the post, how to use the modern bu- siness time saving machines, and vari- ous other important features that a skilled stenographer should know. Did you say you preferred a trained stenographer? All the students who took Office Training for Stenographers have nearly as good training as a ste- no-grapher who has had several years of real office work. Also, consider this! Students just out of High School have just completed shorthand which is still fresh in their minds, and they have not had time to get out of ,practice as some of the experienced ste- nographers have. A great deal of credit is due our teacher, Mr. Wiaiit, who has drilled the class in the principles of office training and stenography. Besides teaching fourteen class-es a day and night school twice a week, he has made the basket- ,ball boy's team a success by coaching them every evening. We hope he will ,be back next year to make an even bet- ter success than he has this year if that is possible. This is the fifth year of commercial training in Moundsville High School and each year it is improving just as the world is progressing in business. Each year has seen three or more good stenographers turned out of the Com- mercial Dept., into the business world where they have made a success. Give this year's class a chance and they will make an even greater success. 1' +- 1 ,,,.. -. ,,,,,.. ALUMNI iii++++++++++++++++++++++++++6++++++44649+499+++++++++++++++++ Take man a box of GAME ms, 5 NORRIS' ' E M0RSE,S E RESTAURANT E E L0wNEY,S E The place where more E E lTEYlllElT'S E Students eat than any E E or J0HNS0N9s A E other in Moundsville. E ,,, cnocomnss ,. ., 2 A And Win a Smile E Sl? 3 a E Z when they ,make "W" audi' E Goto GANDEES' lor all Kinds 2 we will have lt, at 3 5 gg of Good Eats 5 SPO0NS CONFECTl0NARY E E 5 M. A. SYBERT'S THEATRES E 2 E0llll'T WlTll TllE BEST Sll0WlNG TllE LATEST 2 Our service is selected to suit the 2 i public. E 3 We exhibit the most popular stars. E E Clean, Classy, Cosy-and free from E E noise at all times. E + + -1- Il! -1- THE BEST PICTURES MAKE THE BEST ENTERTAINMENT E STRAND MIDWAY PARK ENOUNDSVILLE, W. VA. lllcMECHEN, W. VA. MOUNDSVILLE, W. VA? 4+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++9++++++++++++++++++++++++++++3 ALUMNAE The school of Moundsville has ac- complished great results in its forty- tive years of duration-acting in the capacity of a great educator, furnishing men and women who have done things. In this association with the High School, the student learns of the qual- ities of a good citizenship, how to con- duct ones self that the family and state may prosper. He learns that nothing great can be accomplished Without personal sacrifice, that the true appre- ciation of riches lies in having been poor. He learns the dependence of everyone and that he must cooperate with his fellow being in order to com- bat With the forces of Nature. So instructed, have our Alumnae gone forth. In all, five hundred and eighty people have graduated from M. H. S. Everyone of these, without a single exception, have had the same purpose in view-to better the world. to make this Earth a better place for their having lived. And these five hundred and eighty souls are working in a massed forma- tion. Their lessons of cooperation have stood them in good stead. With organized efforts, they are struggling against the disciples of Evil and Un- ha.ppiness. Of course they are not all fighting on the same field, but their tactics are the same. Almost every profession has enjoyed the help of some of this class. Lawyers, doctors, teachers, good business, housewives,-all. This little band of Workers will for- ever perpetuate the memory of old M. H. S. Each year, still more recruits will be added to the band-each year, some one of this band will receive dis- tinction in God"s 4'Hall of Fame." Alumni! the school is proud of you. High School, the Alumni love you. MR. WM. B. MATTHEWS The Class ot '83 greets the young- sters of '22 not only with paternal but also with patriarchal love! Wliile our curriculum may appear somewhat meager compared with yours, and our number, seven, seems small though sac- red when reckoned with the large clas- ses of recent years, yet in quality and probity we admit that our class holds the record in the long and useful ca- reer of the Moundsville High School. However, we congratulate our 39th successor upon its enterprise and up-to- dateness in issuing an annual which no doubt will bc a thing of beauty and a joy forever. It will ever be a remind- er ot many pranks and pleasures which ctherwise would be forgotten. Many marvelous memories of '83 would be re- vived by such a publication had the fustoms ot the old century been similar to the new. Many things of phenom- enal progress have come into being since we received our high school di- plomas, hence why should not progress be manifested in your student body? Perhaps the absence of cinema shows within and auto joy rides with- out in some degree accounts for our in- tense stndions natures in that remote period. VVe admit none of us permit- td over-study to break down our health. indeed for 37 years death passed by our fortunate circle, when Mrs. Cora Park- inson McFadden was the first to be summoned. For a similar period my college class was equally blessed. May l suggest to '22 that you do what '83 failed to do, organize and ar- range frequent. meetings and class din- ners so that your present fellowship may be protected throughout the years. I occasionally see the lady members of '83, but I have not laid eyes on Dorsey Blake, my sole masculine colleague, since he entered the ministry long ago. All his classmates did not pick him for preacher in '83, but I understand he has made a good one. He could not ither than have made an intelligent ex- positor of the Gospel. My law class likewise scattered to the tour winds and even a chain letter cannot get half way around. Keep up the good work and perpetuate the good will which you enjoy in this good year of our Lord, 1922. WM. IBURDETTE BIATHEWS, Charleston, NV. Va. MEMORIES OF MOUNDSVILLE MAKE MECCA FCR US By William L. Stidger Moundsville is the Mecca of all of our memories. Like the worshipper of Allah looks Eastward to Mecca at evening time wherever he is, so the eyes and the heart of those of us who have wandered a world away look by to the old home town. We have tasted of 'LThe Old Wolf Spring" and we shall never be satis- fied to remain away very long at a time from that fair haven nestled in the crook of the arm of that old brawny Mother, the Ohio River. Some of the high spots that I visited when I was at home a few weeks ago and upon which I looked with hungry eyes were the Old Sheep Hole out at the forks of the two creeksg that swimmin' thole where we used to while away about ten out of the twenty-four hours of Summer days in boyhood. I saw it as my train came back from Grafton on my recent lecture trip. I looked up the creek to see if that old Elm tree was still leaning out over the creek as it used to lean long ago and, sure enough, there it was . I could s-ee it from the train away up the creek towards the Fair Grounds. I looked upon the Old Indian Mound with a thousand memories burn- ing in my heart and as the train from Pittsburg pulled into town I watched every foot of the river, from the old Offset Hole to the curve below town with memories of Summer swimming days and winter skating days throng- ing 1116. The old Methodist Church, now till- ed with commerce, used as a warehouse, and the old School Building, which to us, was the High School, with the old Town Clock-and a hundred spots- makes Moundsville the Mecca of our Memories. W. M. EVANS When I was graduated from the M. H. S., and a certain Moundsville man told me he was graduated Hfifteen years ago," I felt sorry for him, he was so old! It is thirty years since I was graduated and I am not old, and the man I felt very sorry for is very active today in the affairs of Moundsville, all of which shows that it all depends on one's viewpoint. Iliad one year's work in the classic- al course of a college, and completed a course in a business college after fin- ishing at the M. H. S., and yet when I applied for a position tive years ago where it was necessary for me to have the equivalent of a high school course, l could not dig up enough credits to make me eligible, which shows that there has been some advance in high school courses. The old school house, the only one in the town, at that time, gave way to a new and larger one, and other school houses have lx-een added and you enjoy a Iligh School Building, which shows how Mouudsville have grown and pro- gressezl. In the class ot' '92 there were seven girls and four boys. The other three boys have crossed the Great Divide, and the girls have scattered, only two of them now living in Moundsville, which shows that Time has been at work. In closing, I wish I might find Words to express the gratitude that I feel to- wards Miss Cora Myers, in whose room we studied, and Professor D. T. Wil- liams, our instructor. In that old school they did Godls work in a way that must have pleased Him. Miss Myers has gone to her reward, but Professor Williams is still very alert and does not lose an opportunity to send the encouraging word to one of his old students whenever the occasion arises. The class of '92 was the 'tbest class that ever was graduated from that school" up to that time, but every one since has been fthe best,', and I con- gratulate you and the members of the class of l22, Editor of Orospolitan on being a class that is thirty times better than mine. Sincerely, W. M. EVANS. HOWARD I. BOOHER It has been said that it is not enough for the knight of romance that you agree that his love is a very nice lady-if you will not say she is the best that God ev-er made, you must fight! So, indeed, it is with the graduates of 1914 as to their class. The writer has been asked to reminisce about that class. Reminisce of the class of 1914 in five hundred words! Unfortunate- ly, there is no one alive who could deal adequately with the subject in such short terms. Besides, at the best, the writer is not blessed with the gift of brevity. And yet in tive hundred words one may say something. He may record a few things, and perhaps those who read may find their memories so quickened that a whole train of re- collections will tumble down out of the dusty past. Let us, then reminisce by suggestion. At the start, there were forty-three of us. We were the largest Freshman Class the school had received up to that time. As we exceeded in num- bers, so we would boast that we exceed- ed in intelligence, any other entering class. From this distance, it seems that it couldn't have been otherwise, but for the disgraceful credulity of Jake Dorsey, on the opening day of school, when he inquired of an upper classman as to the securing of a history 'tponyf' We organized early in the year and selected the name X. I. V. Our first internal clash came over choosing of class colors and payment of dues. We agreed upon Purple and Gold for the colors, with dues at five cents a semes- ter. Towards the close of the year, we gave a banquet in the Parish House. No other Freshman Classs had ever at- tempted such a pretentious thing. Naturally, the other classes were much put out about it. The members of the then Sophomore Class were especially obnoxious and did their best to ruin the affair. Not being able to spoil the banquet by abstracting the food they attempted to capture the eaters. They were able to take only one pris- oner, and he escaped in time for the third course. By our Sophomore year, several Hames had burst out within the class. Morton Avenue became the regular re- sort of two of o-ur boys. F. C., H. W., F. K., B. S.-to use a form of expres- sion itself reminiscent of high eschool days. And there was something unus- ual in Miss Bates having Kathryn Bod- ley read the part of the carpenter in the drama we were then studying. To the boys who read perhaps will come recollections of color tights. These became of almost consuming im- portance in our third year. Class nu- merals had been painted on the face of the clock by every class, and so with ours. Every jo-int meeting of the lit- erary societies brought forth a display of class colors and resulting iight. All will remember the periodical Student Body meetings. They were always contentious. Training in argu- ment and debate derived from this source bore fruit in our own Senior .Class meetings. Every proposition ,presented to the class was contested, but differences were reconciled or abandoned under the pressure of ap- proaching graduation. The class had been reduced from forty-three to twenty-three members. These twenty-three stood for graduaf tion in May, retaining all the graces of the originally larger groups and pre- senting but few of its faults. HOWARD l. BOOHEH, 'H. 1 THE ALUMNI ROLL CALL 1877.-J. E. Cross, Alfred Harris, W. E. Neil, Albert Robinson, Chas. A. Showacre, Mort. Wyrick, Maggie Cra- go, Mary Hendershot, Birdie Higgins, Mary McCabe, Mary McClaskey, Addie Sloan, Jennie B. St. Clair. l878.-Amanda Roberts, Laura Floyd, Ada Wyrick, Moses P. Siga- foose, Allie Sawyers, Nanon Hender- shot, A. R. Warden. 1879.-Edna Hogan, Jennie Floyd, NVatson Warden, Ennna Elder, Elihu Taylor, Virginia Martin, Frank War- den, Sadie Rogerson, J. J. A. Montgom- ery, Maude Potts, R. S. Cook, J. Frank Burley. 1880.-Sarah Porter, Texie Jones, S. M. Steele, Blassa Martin, Robt. A. Riggs, Annie Sunderland, H. W. Steele, Richard R. Lutes, Hanson Criswell. l88l.-Mary E. J. Sharp. 1882.-Maude Jefferson, Nannie E. Warden, Orla H. Dorsey, Maggie B. Hicks, Chas. C. Newman, J. E. Roberts, Grace M. Blake. , l883.-Ella McFadden, Carrie Nol- ler, W. B. Mathews, Mary Belle Mar- tin, Fora L. Parkinson, Lizzie B. Mar- tin, Dorsey Blake. 1884.-Albert L. Hooton, Clara B. Baker, Emily V. Cockayne, Lista B. Evans. lda M. Porter, Ennna Parkin- son, Dora llieks, Lou Showaere, Irene Stidger, Maine Vifalker, George H. Jones, May Brook, Anna S. Vox, Mary A. Pickett, Laura M. Riggs, Nettie A. Rogers, lininia VV. Scott. Ada ll. St. Flair, Belle Sonnneryille. 1885.-Birdie E. Hart, Ennna L. ls-- rael, Lottie B. Jackson, Anna B. Jones. Annie D. Martin, Addie S. Thatcher. IHH6.-Lizzie Luster. lSH7.-Birdie llzlll, Mary Velton. 1888-Evan tl. Roberts, Daisy llnnt- er, Jessie Martin, Laura B. Martin. , l889.-William Turner, Effie Evans, Anna Hooton, Mollie Jefferson, Addie Koontz, Delia Porter, Mary Poyle, Car- rie Rulong. 1890.-Randolph Cox, Wm. O. EW- ing, Chas. Henretta, Frank Higgins, Ozera Hull, Vernie Johnson. 1891.-Charles T. Martin, Lola B. Donley, Ella Harris, Susan E. Copen- haver, Annie V. Ewing, Cora V. Martin, Alice B. Criswell. 1892.-Walter M. Evans, Chas. A. Manning, Maude Brock, Maggie M. Dunlap, Lola Helms, Alice W. Sanford, Alton Jones, Harry A. Patton, Myrtle Cox, Mary Halpin, Mollie Roberts. 1893.-Oscar B. Bonar, Mattie Crawford, Cora XL. Courtwright, Jessie B. Hooton, Lulu M. Jones, Alice Koontz, Madge R. Mathews, Dora L. Newman, Birdie M. Turner. 1894.-Iva L. Courtwright, Lily J. Criswell, Lillian A. Roberts. l895.-Franklin Kurtz, Bess G. Ew- ing, Jennie Halpin, Hallie Johnson, Hattie Johnson, Lottie Lewis, Mattie Roberts, Meta Roberts, Jennie Sanford. 1896.-Harold F. Rogers, Hadsal Manning, Pearl Criswell, Katharine Holt, Luella Dick Sigafoose, Lillian G. Martin, Smith, Alice Poyle, Mary I. Scott, Lulu E. M. Turner. 1897.-Win. P. Meliure, Daisy M. Gatts, Laura Rice, Alice B. Woodburn, Wni. L. Stillwell, Ella B. Grandstatf, Alina V. Taylor. 1898.--Austin Lowe, Mary Baldwin, Ella Fox, Bertha Doherty, Alice Ewing , 7 Florence Catts, Cecelia Halpin, Henri- etta Johnson, Mary McConibs, Nellie Roberts, Varrie Turner, Blanche Voitle. Clara XVeidebuseh. 1899.-Merton Carroll, Chas. S. Pot- 'COMMERCUM. DEPARTMENT Hello, Mr. Business Man! Did you say yo-u wanted a stenographer and bookkeeper? Do you know where you will find one? Right here, in the grad- uating class of Moundsville High School, you will have a- good choice of efficient young people. Woiild you like to know why they are efficient? It is because they have completed the Commercial Course, which offers. Com- mercial Law, Commercial Arithmetic and Commercial Geography, besides one and one-half years of Typewriting, ,two years of Book-keeping and two years of Shorthand. This year's class should be a great deal more efficient than any other class because the advance Shorthand class have had a course in Office Training for Stenographers. It teaches how to ap- ply for a po-sition, how to prepare mail for the post, how to use the modern bu- siness time saving niachines, and vari- ous other important features that a skilled stenograplier should know. Did you say you preferred a trained stenographer? All the students who took Office Training for Stenographers have nearly as good training as a ste- no-grapher who has had several years of real office work. Also, consider this! Students just out of High School have just completed shorthand which is still fresh in their minds, and they have not had time to get out of practice as some of the experienced ste- nographers have. A great deal of credit is due our teacher, Mr. Wiant, who has drilled the class in the principles of office training and stenography. Besides teaching fourteen classes a day and night school twice a week, he has made the basket- ,ball boyis team a success by coaching them every evening. We hope he will be back next year to make an even bet- ter success than he has this year if that is possible. This is the Hfth year of commercial training in Moundsville High School and each year it is improving just as the world is progressing in business. Each year has seen three or more good stenographers turned out of the Coin- mercial Dept., into the business world where they have made a success. Give this yearis class a chance and they will make an even greater success. ,.........+.. ALUMNI gi?+++++++9+4+++++9+++i+++++?iif+++++++++++++++9+++++4++++++++ 'I' -1- EE Take HER a box of E E NORRIS9 E GANDEE BROS.' M0RSE,s 5 RESTAURANT 4. LVWNEYS 2 The place where more E llEVlllEll'S E Students eat than any E or JOHNSONvS E other in llloumlsville. E coocoumzs E -2 And Win a Smile E "" -1- "'e"t"'1,"'eke"'ife'e""v, 5 Go to GANDEES' for all Kinds we will have lt, at E I A 1 ol Good Eats i Sl'00NS CONFECTl0NARY E E M. A. SYBERT'S THEATRES A + + A Ellllll'T WITH THE BEST Sll0WlNG TllE LATEST 2 6 6 l up 4. Our service is Selected to Suit the E E public. E E We exhibit the most popular Stars. I 2 E Clean, Classy, Cosy-and free from E 3 noise at all times. E Z -1- -1- '1' Iii 9 9 E THE BEST PICTURES MAKE THE BEST ENTERTAINMENT E STRAND MIDWAY PARK E EMOUNDSVILLE, W. VA. lllclllECllEN, W. VA. MOUNDSVILLE, W. VA? QQ6+9+++++++++++++++++++++++++++44++++++++++++++Q+++++++++++++ ALUMNAE The school of Moundsville has ac- complished great results in its forty- five years of duration-acting in the capacity of a great educator, furnishing men and women who have done things. In this ass-ociation with the High School, the student learns of the qual- ities of a good citizenship, how to con- duct ones self that the family and state may prosper. He learns that nothing great can be accomplished without personal sacrifice, that the true appre- ciation of riches lies in having been poor. He learns the dependence of everyone and that he must cooperate with his fellow being in order to com- bat with the forces of Nature. So instructed, have our Alumnae gone forth. In all, five hundred and eighty people have graduated from M. H. S. Everyone of these, without a single exception, have had the same purpose in view-to better the world. to make this Earth a better place for their having lived. And these five hundred and eighty souls are working in a massed forma- tion. Their lessons of cooperation have stood them in good stead. With organized efforts, they are struggling against the disciples of Evil and Un- happiness. Of course they are not all fighting on the same field, but their tactics are the same. Almost every profession has enjoyed the help of some of this class. Lawyers, doctors, teachers, good business, housewives,-all. This little band of workers will for- ever perpetuate the memory of old M. H. S. Each year, still more recruits will be added to the band-each year, some one of this band will receive dis- tinction in God"s "Hall of Fame." Alumni! the school is proud of you. High School, the Alumni love you. MR. WM. B. MATTHEWS The Class of '83 greets the young- sters of '22 not only with paternal but also with patriarchal love! While our curriculum may appear somewhat meager compared with yours, and our number, seven, seems small though sac- red when reckoned with the large clas- ses of recent years, yet in quality and probity we admit that our class holds the record in the long and useful ca- reer of the Moundsville High School. However, we congratulate our 39th successor upon its enterprise and up-to- dateness in issuing an annual which no doubt will be a thing of beauty and a joy forever. lt will ever be a remind- er ot many pranks and pleasures which otherwise would be forgotten, Many marvelous memories of '83 would be re- vived by such a publication had the f ustoms of the old century been similar to the new. lilany things of phenom- enal progress have come into being since we received our high school di- plomas, hence why should not progress be manifested in your student body? Perhaps the absence of cinema shows within and auto joy rides with- out in some degree accounts for our in- tense studious natures in that remote period. We admit none of us permit- td over-study to break down our health. indeed for 37 years death passed by our tortunate circle, when Mrs. Cora Park- inson McFadden was the first to be summoned. For a similar period my college class was equally blessed. May l suggest to '22 that you do what '83 failed to do, organize and ar- range frequent meetings and class din- ners so that your present fellowship may be protected throughout the years. l occasionally se-e the lady members of '83, but l have not laid eyes on Dorsey Blake, my sole masculine colleague, since he entered the ministry long ago. All his classmates did not pick him for preacher in '83, but I understand he has made a good one. He could 11ot ither than have made an intelligent ex- positor of the Gospel. My law class likewise scattered to the four winds and eve11 a chain letter cannot get half way around. Keep up tl1e good work and perpetuate the good will which you enjoy in this good year of our Lord, 1922. WM. BURDETTE MATHEWS, Charleston, W. Va. MEMORIES OF MOUNDSVILLE MAKE MECCA FOR US By William L. Stidger Moundsville is the Mecca of all of our memories. Like the worshipper of Allah looks Eastward to Mecca at evening time wherever he is, so the eyes and the heart of those of us who have wandered a world away look by to the old home town. We have tasted of '4The Old Wolf Spring" and we shall never be satis- fied to remain away very long at a time from that fair haven nestled in the crook of the arm of that old brawny Mother, the Ohio River. Some of the high spots that I visited when I was at home a few weeks ago and upon which I looked with hungry eyes were the Old Sheep Hole out at the forks of the two creeks, that swimmini .hole where we used to while away about ten out of the twenty-four hours of Summer days in boyhood. I saw it as my train came back from Grafton on my recent lecture trip. I looked up the creek to see if that old Elm tree was still leaning out over the creek as it used to lean long ago and, sure enough, there it was . I could see it from the train away up the creek towards the Fair Grounds. I looked upon the Old Indian Mound with a thousand memories burn- ing in my heart and as the train from Pittsburg pulled into town I watched every foot of the river, from the old Offset Hole to the curve below town with memories of Summer swimming days and winter skating days throng- ing nie. The old Methodist Church, now till- ed with commerce, used as a warehouse, and the old School Building, which to us, was the High School, with the old Town Clock-and a hundred spots- makes Moundsville the Mecca of our Memories. W. M. EVANS When I Was graduated from the M. H. S., and a certain Moundsville man told me he was graduated Uiifteen years ago," I felt sorry for him, he was so old! It is thirty years since I was graduated and I am not old, and the man I felt very sorry for is very active today in the affairs of Moundsville, all of which shows that it all depends on one's viewpoint. I had one year 's work in the classic- al course of a college, and completed a course in a business college after tin- ishing at the M. II. S., and yet when I applied for a position live years ago where it was necessary for me to have the equivalent of a high school course, I could not dig up enough credits to make me eligible, which shows that there has been some advance in high school courses. The old school house, the only one in the town, at that time, gave way to a new and larger one, and other school houses have l.een added and you enjoy a Iligh School Building, which shows how Moundsville have grown and pro- gressezl. In the class of '92 there were seven girls and four boys. The other three boys have crossed the Great Divide, and the girls have scattered, only two of them now living in Moundsville, which shovvs that Time has been at work. In closing, I Wish I might find Words to express the gratitude that I feel to- wards Miss Cora Myers, in whose room we studied, and Professor D. T. Wil- liams, our instructor. In that old school they did God's work in a Way that must have pleased Him. Miss Myers has gone to her reward, but Professor Williams is still very alert and does not lose an opportunity to send the encouraging word to one of his old students whenever the occasion arises. The class of '92 was the "best class that ever was graduated from that school" up to that time, but every one since has been 'fthe best," and I con- gratulate you and the members of the class of '22, Editor of Orospolitan on being a class that is thirty times better than mine. Sincerely, VV. M. EVANS. HOWARD I. BOCHER It has been said that it is not enough for the knight of romance that you agree that his love is a very nice lady-if you will not say she is the best that God ever made, you must fight! So, indeed, it is With the graduates of 1914 as to their class. The vvriter has been asked to reminisce about that class. Reminisce of the class of 1914 in tive hundred Words! Unfortunate- ly, there is no one alive who could deal adequately with the subject in such short terms. Besides, at the best, the Writer is not blessed with the gift of brevity. And yet in tive hun-dred words one may say something. He may record a fevv things, and perhaps those Who read may End their memories so quickened that a whole train of re- collections will tumble down out of the dusty past. Let us, then reminisce by suggestion. At the start, there were forty-three of us. VVe were the largest Freshman Class the school had received up to that time. As we exceeded in num- bers, so We would boast that We exceed- ed in intelligence, any other entering class. From this distance, it seems that it couldn't have been otherwise, but for the disgraceful credulity of Jake Dorsey, on the opening day of school, when he inquired of an upper classman as to the securing of a history t'pony." We organized early in the year and selected the name X. I. V. Our first internal clash came over choosing of class colors and payment of dues. We agreed upon Purple and Gold for the colors, with dues at five cents a semes- ter. Towards the close of the year, We gave a banquet in the Parish House. No other Freshman Classs had ever at- tempted such a pretentious thing. Naturally, the other classes were much put out about it. The members of the then Sophomore Class were especially obnoxious and did their best to ruin the affair. Not being able to spoil the banquet by abstracting the food they attempted to capture the eaters. They were able to take only one pris- c-ner, and he escaped in time for the third course. By our Sophomore year, several flames had burst out within the class. Morton Avenue became the regular re- sort of two of our boys. F. C., ll. W.: F. K., B. S.-to use a form of expres- sion itself reminiscent of high eschool days. And there was something unus- ual in Miss Bates having Kathryn Bod- ley read the part of the carpenter in the drama we were then studying. To the boys who read perhaps will eome recollections of color tights. These became of almost consuming im- portance in our third year. Class nu- merals had been painted on the face of the clock by every class, and so with ours. Every joint meeting of the lit- erary societies brought forth a display of class colors and resulting light. All will remember the periodical Student Body meetings. They were always contentious. Training in argu- ment and debate derived from this source bore fruit in our own Senior ,Class meetings. Every proposition gpresented to the class was contested. but differences were reeoneiled or abandoned under the pressure of ap- proaching graduation. The class had been redneed from forty-three to twenty-three nieinbers. These twenty-three stood for gradua- tion in May, retaining all the graves of the originally larger groups and pre- senting but few of its faults. IIONV,-XRD I. ISOOIIICH, '14, THE ALUMNI ROLL CALL l877.-J. E. Cross, Alfred Harris, W. E. Neil, Albert Robinson, Chas. A. Showacre, Mort. Wyrick, Maggie Cra- go, Mary Hendershot, Birdie Higgins, Mary McCabe, Mary MeClaskey, Addie Sloan, Jennie B. St. Clair. 1878.-Amanda Roberts, Laura Floyd, Ada Wyriek, Moses P. Siga- foose, Allie Sawyers, Nanon Hender- shot, A. R. Warden. 1879.-Edna Hogan, Jennie Floyd, NVatso-n Warden, Ennna Elder, Elihu Taylor, Virginia Martin, Frank War- den, Sadie Rogerson, J. J. A. Montgom- ery, Maude Potts, R. S. Cook, J. Frank Burley. l880.-Sarah Porter, Texie Jones, S. M. Steele, Blassa Martin, Robt. A. Riggs, Annie Sunderland, H. W. Steele, Richard R. Lutes, Hanson Criswell. 1881.-Mary E. J. Sharp. 1882.-Maude Jefferson, Nannie E. VVarden, Orla H. Dorsey, Maggie B. Hicks, Chas. C. Newman, J. E. Roberts, Grace M. Blake. , l883.-Ella McFadden, Carrie Nol- ler, VV. B. Mathews, Mary Belle Mar- tin, Cora L. Parkinson, Lizzie B. Mar- tin, Dorsey Blake. lt-48-l.-Albert L. Hooton, Clara B. Baker, Emily V. Cockayne, Lista B. Evans. lda M. Porter, Emma Parkin- son, Dora Hicks, Lou Showacre, lrene Stidger, Maine VValker, George H. Jones, May Brook, Anna S. Cox, Mary A. Pickett. Laura M. Riggs, Nettie A. Rogers, Emma VV. Scott. Ada ll. St. Clair. Belle Sonnneryille. ISSB.-Birdie E. llart, Ennna L. ls-- rael, Lottie B. Jackson, Anna B. Jones. Annie ll. Martin, Addie S. 'llhatcheit 18815.--Lizzie Luster. IHST.-Birdie llall, Mary Velton. ISSS-lflvau tl. Roberts, Daisy llunt- er, Jessie Martin, Laura B. Martin. l889.-William Turner, Effie Evans, Anna Hooton, Mollie Jefferson, Addie Koontz, Delia Porter, Mary Poyle, Car- rie Rulong. l890.-Randolph Cox, Wm. O. EW- ing, Chas. Henretta, Frank Higgins, Ozera Hull, Vernie Johnson. 1891.-Charles T. Martin, Lola B. Donley, Ella Harris, Susan E. Copen- haver, Annie V. Ewing, Cora V. Martin, Alice B. Criswell. 1892.-Walter M. Evans, Chas. A. Manning, Maude Brock, Maggie M. Dunlap, Lola Helms, Alice W. Sanford, Alton Jones, Harry A. Patton, Myrtle Cox, Mary Halpin, Mollie Roberts. 1893.-Oscar B. 'Bonar, Mattie Crawford, Cora L. Courtwright, Jessie B. Ho-oton, Lulu M. Jones, Alice Koontz, Madge R. Mathews, Dora L. Newman, Birdie M. Turner. l894f.-Iva L. Courtwright, Lily J. Criswell, Lillian A. Roberts. l895.-Franklin Kurtz, Bess G. Ew- ing, Jennie Halpin, Hallie Johnson, Hattie Johnson, Lottie Lewis, Mattie Roberts, Meta Roberts, Jennie Sanford. lS96.-Harold F. Rogers, Hadsal Manning, Pearl Criswell, Katharine Holt, Luella Dick Sigafoose, Lillian G. Martin, Smith, Alice Poyle, Mary I. Scott, Lulu E. M. Turner. lS97.-Wm. P. Mt-Lure, Daisy M. Gatts, Laura Rice, Aliee B. VVoodburn, XVIII. L. Stillwell, Ella B. Grandstaff, Alina V. Taylor. lS98.-Austin Lowe, Mary Baldwin, Ella Cox, Bertha Doherty, Alice Ewing, Florence Gatts, Cecelia Halpin, Henri- etta Johnson, Mary MeCombs, Nellie Roberts, Carrie Turner, Blanche Voitle. Clara NVeidehusch. 1899.-Merton Carroll, Chas. S. Pot- ter, Mary Bowly, Anna Griffith, Bertha Risinger, Anna C. Roberts, Mary Rob- erts. 1900.-Wylie M. Rogerson, Harry Seamon, Mertie Doherty, Ada Gatts, Ella Lee Hammond, Mary Pattee, Nelle Smith, Eva Walton. 1901.-Kenneth Burley, Rex Milli- ken, Mariva Baldwin, Anna Holt, Min- nie Keyser, Earl Evans, Chester Pat- ton, Bertha Evans, Carrie Jefferson. 1902.-Archie Allen, William Beam, Harlan Courtwright, Rex A. Houston, J. Wick Roberts, Frank Thatcher, Hugh Thompson, Lydia Clemens, Mary Fergu- son, Louise Hess, Etoile Houston, Mollie Price, Alma Woodburn, Lillian Wright. 1903.-Sara Humphreys, Elsie Jeff- erson, Edna States, Eva McLeod, Duella Stultz, Ella Chambers, Clarence Fox, Vilas Pickett, Everette Moore, William Stidger, Rena Jefferson, Laura McFad- den, Elsie Schwob, Ora Taylor, Sue Bauer, Leta Laing, Edward Morgan, Wilber Games, Ralph Rogerson, Stan- ley Cox. 1904.-Virginia Brock, Nellie Bald- win, Mabel Dressel, Harold Knight, Mamie Allen, Vivian Jefferson, Walter Morris. 1905.-Nellie Meek, Bessie Roberts, Kathryn Jacques, Dess Turner, Stanley Patton, Cecil Beam. 1906.-Austa Francis, Myra McCul- lough, Ivy Jeierson, Laura Chambers, Dollie Houston, Ethel Woodburn, Fred Cartwright, Kemble Manning, Harry Campbell, Nona Stidger, Robert Blake. 1907.-Clarence Gray, Clara Chase, Kenneth Beam, Ella Brown, Reid Stid- ger, Errett Roberts, Edward Hinerman. 1908.-William Dalzell, Harold Rogers, Willa Grisell, Alma Glasgow, Lela Moore, Leo Covert, Laura Baldwin. 1909.-Merle Trudeau, Geraldine Truman, Stanley Wilson, Ralph Wood' ruff, Homer Haddox, VVillie Fitzsim- mons, No-ra Cox, Curran Peck, Maude Conner, Clara Clark, Edna Greenan, Lottie Riggs, Mary Boher. 1910.-Ralph Williams, Cecil Riggs, Sebasteen Rafferty, Eula Yoho, Anna Garrison, Helen Henderson, Nellie Brantner, Mary Bardall. 1911.-lona Gorby, Sallie Love, Wilford Boo-her, Lloyd Arnold, Melville Stewart, Justin Cox, Annie Fitzsim- mons, Charles Lawrence. 1912.-Troy Conner, Robert Blank- ensop, Joyce Riker, Byron Henderson, Beamis Rogerson, Carrie Ransom, Car- rie Lutes, Verna Jefferson, Lucille Leach, Maude Riggs, Violet Smith, Katherine Sheets. 1913.-Nelson A. Parks, Roxie May Robinson, Ruth McMullen Noller, Ruby Lorena Mason, Clara S. McMillen, Mary Lee Bonar, Nelle Virginia Beam, Naomi Wilhehnia Lewis, Adah E. Fer- guson, William Roy Hess, John L. Higgs. 1914.-Howard I. Booher, Anna Arn, Ethel Dowler, Olive Crow, J. B. Dorsey, Lena E. Ebeling, Hazel Wood- ruff, Bernice Scott, Martha Timblin, George Ellis, Opal Cherry, Miriam Kes- ter, Beatrice O'Connell, Herbert Stil- well, Marie Howard, Lalah Stewart, Anna M. Hammond, Foss Curtis, Mabel Woodruff, Ethel Crow, Fred Karcher, Kathryn Bodley, Bessie Keyser, Gert- rude Smith. 1915.--Josephine Brantner, Hallie Bo-nar, James Byrnes, John Billetter, Pearl Chambers, Louis Conner, Erma Dowler, John Ernst, Abraham Ellis, Ralph Layfield, Hazel Love, Zelma Mer- cer, Lucile McCo-mbs, Virginia McCon- nell, Elmer Roberts, Helen Rogers, Ada Rogers, Emily Smith, Daisy Tyrell, Roy Woodward. 1916.-James Alvin Baker, Eulalia Elizabeth Barth, John Albert Bennett. Joseph Elmer Bloyd, Sterling Bodine Bottome, William James Burley, t'lara Mae Burkett, Edna May Vox, Joseph Earl Duffy, Harry Duncan, Meta Helen Ebeling, Mildred Marie Garvin, Grace Elizabeth Gillespie, David Marcellus Hammond, Frances I. Willard Ham- mond, Gladys Marguerite High, Mil- dred Elizabeth Jones, Raymond Ken- neth Johnson, Georgia Lucetta Karch- er, Ellen Capitola Keyser, Gertrude Ay- ers Laytield, James Malcolm Lewis, George Bryan McGary, John Wesley Meredith, Harry McKinley Miles, Jes- sie May Moore, Marguerite Anunciata Mourot, Alma Kathryn Riggs, Julia Bell Riggs, Mary McKinley Sheets, Walter Armand Hewart, Gertrude Le- ona White, Mary Elizabeth Williams. 1917.-Samuel Booher, Floyd Bon- ar, Doris Grandstatf, Dora Henderson, Lillian Hill, Mildred Hankins, Beulah Hobbs, Ethel Hubbs, Gladys Hunter, Victor Jones., Mary Johnson, Foster Leatherby, Sadie Marestallar, Margaret Nichols, Virginia Patterson, Frank Po- indexter, Pauline Powell, Wilma Riggs, lra Ransom, John Robinson, Minnie Supler, Perry Searls, Olive Spoon, Mar- garet Sigatoose, Helen St. Clair, Louis Timblin, Paul Wellman. 1918.-Leroy Baker, Ross Bonar, Joseph Burley, Dale Brock, Claire Oon- ner, Clarence Crow, Carl Ebeling, Hu- bert Faust, Eugene Garbesi, John Hop- kins, Ralph Hemphill, Russell Hamil- ton, Hubert Lutes, Harry Moore, Wayne Mason, ClydeMangold, Marion McDaniel, Ward McMasters, Everett Ray, L. Raymond Lough, Ralph Fitz- sinnnons, ll. Dean Garvin, Mary Bowen, Virginia Baker, Dorothy Cashen, Alice DeCa1np, Kidie Elliott, Esta Lee Jones, VVilnia Hubbs, Mary Garrison, Margar- et Lutes, Josephine Michel, Marie Rob- inson, Eva Riggs, Virginia Rafferty, Marjorie Steel, Louise Thompson, Clara Magoon, Pearl Rulong, Edna Burgess. l5llEl.-George Burley, Evelyn Bur- ley, Andrew Ellis, Virginia Seese, Gert- rude Ryan, Lulu Fisher, Margaret Kuhn, Ethel Magers, Sarah Manning, Cora McConnell, Manning Jones, Frank Martin, Lawrence Trimble, Frank Pet- ers, Walter Blair, Olive Lancaster, Lily Brantner, Esther Hahn, Brooks Roger- son, Geneva Lancaster, Margaret Bone, Mary Riggs, Archie Dorsey, Harold Young, Edna McBroo1n, Hugh Pickett, Gladys Gorby, Elizabeth Jane Show- acre, Pauline McMillen, Robert McMur- ray, Oharleen Evans, Julian Warner, Harry Thomas, Verna Berry, Rose Brantner, Luzerna DuBois, Hugh Well- man, Olive Lohr, Tencie McNinch, Evan- geline Henderson, Marjorie Ransom. 1920.-Phyllis, Ayers, John Brad- ley, Gazelle Crow, Kathryn Conner, Howard Duncan, Hilda Fish, May Fran- cis, Arch Gorby, Loretta Gregory, Mil- dred Helms, Leah Hubibs, Wilda Jonec, Joe Du11can, Elizabeth Leatherby, Wil- liam Leatherby, Helen Lewis, Paul Ma- son, John Mercer, Laura McConnell, Merritt, McCuskey, Helen Morningstar, Beatrice Nuss, Margaret Powell, Vir- ginia Price, Charles Wilson, Edith Ew- ing, Ralph Yeater. 1921.-Ellen Alexander, Vere Allen- der, Helen Bonar, Virginia Bonar, Dor- othy Bone, Paul Bottome, Virginia Bot- tome, Harry Carpenter, Howard Chad- dock, Hazel Clegg, Merlin DuBois, Mary Fahey, Martha Gregory, Jesse Harris, Willis Hartley, Melvin Hemp- hill, Jacob Hennen, Ruth Hennen, Le- one Holbrook, Bessie Huff, Helen Kin- ney, Katie Kouri, Moses Kouri, Walter Magers, Eugene OlConnell, Milton Me- Cuskey, Elizabeth McDaniel, Kathryn Myers, Charles Newman, Justus Pick- ett, Worley Powell, Louise Proells, J. W. Rickey, Evelyn Roberts, Margaret Roberts, Mary Riuekman, Kenneth Ry- an, Paul Ryan, Margaret Sehaub, Earl Sehlosser, Louise Sheets, Clyde Smith, Marietta Stewart, Marion Tennant, James Walton, Ethel Wayt, Lical Workman, Forest Woods, William NVoreh, Joe Young, Raymond Harlan. EDITORIALS all I i +4 ++++++++4+6++++++6++++++++++++++++ +++++++++++++++++++++++++ 4+ 4 6 + + a l jmmunn X NI lllll img-- or , AIIIIII E,-R921 Cl .fftxti .r C T -4 I f 3 Ggggkfg fKJTN+ - - Buick Model 1922 Six-45 , K A Child can Work the Clutch and Shift Gears on A BUICK CAR Why drive a car that takes all your strength and some- times makes you swear to shift the gears or work the clutch. It's Easy on a Buick A slight movement of the hand and foot shift Buick gears without noise. Buick cars drive right because they're built right, as more than half-million Buick owners will testify. Come in, see the 1922 Buick Models, and let us demon- strate to you the ease of Buick Clutch and Shift Control N0 oruens commas TRIMBLE 84 JOHNSON CO. NIOUNDSVILLE, W. VA. WHEN BETTER CARS ARE BUILT BUICK WILL BUILD THEM + +++++ Q64 iii +4 +++++++++++++++++++ ++?+++6++++++ 9++Q+++9++++ ++++++++++?+++++9+++++ + OROSPOLITAN STAFF Charles Hughes .... Jean Carpenter. . . Miriam Stultz .... Herbert Smith ........... . Ed. Echols ......................... Glenn Hamilton and Charles Moser .... Frank Martin .................... Frank Stultz .... . . . . Editor-in-Chief . . . .Literary Editor . . . . . . . Calendar ... Jokes Art Sports . . . . . . . . . . . Business Manager . . . .Assistant Business Manager Harold Rogers . .. ........... Faculty Advisor XYRRKNYKYXYXKXYKKYXXKYRXKKKXXXXYMNNXXXNXXWRRKKNXXXXXXXXW' V XX EDITORIALS N rif t T arc1fl lac1frl g It THE NEW GYMNASIUM At last the age-old desires of the youth of Moundsville High School are to be realized. At last the big draw- back of our schools development is to be overcome-there is to be a new gym- nasium built this summer, a gym- nasium such as will meet our require- ents of athletic work. Back in the days of Sports, great at- tention was paid toward the growth and training of the body. A strong physique counted for everything then, for the country was hard and cruel- there were wars continually, mighty conquests were made on surrounding countries. At this time, weak children were exposed, on the mountain tops, to die. This cruel practice, however, was necessary, for with their little weak bo- dies they would be but drags on the government, and later, when they had reached mature life, they would be un- fit for active combat. So today, we find Nature making a selection of our people, weeding out the physically unfit, and destroying them, keeping the strong, for they are able to carry on. Every few years some great sickness sweeps over our country, kill- ing people by hundreds of thousands, maiming others for life, destroying the peace of all communities, and upsetting our business and commercial world. Now at vigorous constitution can withstand these menaces, in fact, it fights them very actively, and puts them to route. A vigorous constitu- tion of this type can be secured in the gymnasium, for there the proper and sufficient exercise is provided, coupled with active mind work, in such games as basketball, and volley ball. ln our high school, this has always been a serious problem with us. We have always been at odds, for want of necessary room, at every basketball game, during the winter, the hall has been crowded. Oftimes two hundred people are in attendance, crowding ov- er the tio-or, and seriously interfering with the game. Such a condition as this certainly needs improvement. So this summer a gymnasium is to be built. It will be a large affair, provid- ing a spacious basketball floor, and seating one thousand people. There will probably be four or five class rooms on the second floor. NVhen this new building is complet- ed, the youth of llloundsville will find his pleasure there. ln school next fall regular training classes will be organ- ized-a splendid teacher provided. One-fourth of at credit a year, is given for this class. NIGHT SCHOOL IN M. H. S. All during the winter months of this year, there has been in existence night school, in the High School Building. This school was provided by the local po-st of The American Legion. To these classes, held three times a week, many foreigners have been coming. From the teachings of some special instructors, and the help of sev- eral men of the Legion, these foreigners have been learning our language, cus- toms, and principles of government. This provides a more desirable class of foreigners in our midst. Great credit should be due to the American Legion for making this thing possible. They have lent their every help toward this service. May they "carry on." ln our state, there has recently been a law passed, requiring cities of over 10,000 population, to provide night. schools, for those persons between the ages of fourteen and sixteen, who have been forced to leave school tolwork. This move is certainly a splendid one, and will help these young people. Hence, next winter, Moundsville will have a night school for young people. On behalf of the Orospolitan Staff, I wish to thank all those who have made this copy of the Urospolitan possible. NVe have tried to make this paper a real monument of service, the very best pa- per that the lligh School has ever put on. Whether we succeeded or not, is to be ,judged by our readers. Hur advertisers are certainly deserv- ing our special tl1a11ks-for they have made this book possible. Patronize them-they have the goods, and treat you right. lVe wish to thank all contributors, for they have made the real reading matter, the heart of this book. Orospolitan Staff EDITOR, MUSIC 4444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444 J. C. NIYERS CO. THE MEN'S STORE We have established the policy of selling only the best Wearables for men and boys. W. L. DOUGLAS Sll0ES ARROW SHIRTS KNOX HATS DRUGS--- Pure, of known strength, enter into the compounding of prescriptions by us. TOILET ARTICLES--- Choice articles of highest quality for women of high and reiined tastes. SODA FOUNTAIN--- Our service is bound to please. J. H. BEAM DRUG CO. REXALL s'roREs JEFFERSON AVE. FIRST STREET After the Show Visit Us Here you need not be particular, We serve the best in the most pleasing way. TRY OUR SUNDAES 81 DRINKS REYMEFVS 8: SHRAF'T'S WITH IMPERIAL ICE CREAM CHOCOLATES The Stand by The Strand M. E. SPERLING, Prop. 444444444444444444444444 444444444444444444444444444444444444444 44444 444444444 I "iii M H S. DEPARTMENT OF' MUSIC GIRLS' GLEE CLUB The Girl 's Glee Club, consisting of the student singers of M. H. S., is a pro- nounced feature of the musical life of the school. It has been seven years since a Girl 's Glee Club was first organized in our School, and this year's club has proven itself to be the best that has ever represented Moundsville High. The material, from which the club is select- ed, has been exceptionally good this year, and, as a result, we have grouped together many excellent singers. The success of the club is due to the untir- ing efforts of our director, Miss Nesbitt. Success of the club was demonstrat- ed in the year 1919, by a recital, and by t'An Old Fashioned Singing School," given at the Park Theatre. In the year 1920 the club provided entertain- ment for the teachers attending the In- stitute in Moundsville. In the spring of 1921, patriotic selections were ren- dered for the Naturalization of For- eigners. And, o-n March 3rd, 1922, the club presented "The Lady of Shalott," a Cantata. The program was very fa- vorably received in each case. SARAH E. MEREDITH Member of Glee Club 1-2-3-1. PERSONNEL Essie Clark, Accompanist. Miss Mary Nesbitt, Director. First Soprano Geraldine Bosworth Frieda L. Gorby Jean Carpenter Mary Ellen Dorsey Viva Rist Hilda Wallace Second Soprano Yolanda Hahn Leta Myers Helen Lipfert 4 Irene Hubbs Laura Raymer Roberta1McConnell Betty Isiminger Virginia Riley Hilda Moore Marjorie Jefferson Dorothy Bauer Clara Sigafoose Alice Kerns Elinor Bauer Mildred Smith He-len McCuskey Eleanor Clyker Miriam Stultz Alto Mildred Bonar Margaret Peters Margaret Fahey Esther Sigafoose Rebecca Hill Beulah Kanner Virginia W2lI'I19I' Anna Wrircli Sarah Meredith r' zu I fi'-' -1 . F- 1' SOCIAL LIF-'E SENIOR CLASS PARTY One of the most successful events of the season was the masquerade party given by the Senior Class on Oct.-, 1921 in the Manual Training Room. The room was very artistically decorat- ed in following out the color scheme of orange and black to suit the occasion. The corn shocks were arranged around the sides of the room and also thru the hall where the guests passed in order to gain admittance. Helen Ernst and Earl Chambers received prizes for be- ing the best dressed there. At a sea- sonable hour a very delightful luncheon was served after which the guests re- paired to their ho-mes all having had a splendid time. JUNIOR CLASS PARTY On Jan. 21, 1922, the Junior Class of M. H. S., had the first party of the new year, and what was considered the best party of the school year. The party was held in the Manual Training room which was tastefully decorated in both class and school colors. The main feature of the evening was the Minstrel Revue of '22. This minstrel, given by eleven boys was at scream from the en- semble to the finale. Many jokes were told of fellow students, and several songs were sung. After the minstrel came the tournament, and then follow- ed the great guessing contest which was won by Ed. Echols. The eats were scrumptiuos, as a certain Freshie said. Everyone was feeling fine so they broke loose on some wonderful harmony which lasted until "Good Night Ladies" ended the fun. FRESHMAN PARTY The Freshman Class under the sup- ervision of Mr. Tilock, held their first party of the season in the Girls' Assem- bly on Dec. 9, 1921. The room was deco- rated in the class colors which were green and white. A male quartette consisting of Bob Jones, Fred Parriott, Jim Robinson, and Heck Spoon enter- tained the folks for the greater part of the evening. Various other games oc- cupied quite a bit of the time. At a seasonable hour the guests all entered into a Grand March to the Domestic Science Hall and each, getting their re- freshments, made way into the assem- bly, to eat. after which the guests de- parted il homes. SOPHOMORE PARTY On the night of Nov. 19, the moon was high in the heavens shining down through the clouds upon Moundsville lligh School. The moon in fact was so bright one from outdoors would have mistaken it for a lovely June night. But as you walked along in the moon- light to the building the thought of the party was growing too large for your throbbing heart to realize the beautiful evening. The party was held in the gym, which was very artistically decorated in the good old Sophomore colors, old rose and gray, along side ot which were the colors of M. H. S. A large dome draped with the class colors formed the center piece. Games and orchestra music furnish- ed the enjoyment for the evening. Thru the cleverness of Miss Kittle, the play of 'tGathering Nuts" was a big success while Mr. Jones played the part of the villain. This was a complete surprise to every one there. He was ably assisted by Miss Sigafoose and Miss Patterson. Other games were al- so played. The girls in their dainty frock of organdies made one feel like it was summer time again. Delicious refreshments were then served by the Domestic Science Girlsof the class after which all departed for their homes. ROTARY CLUB BANQUET FOR THE BOYS OF THE SENIOR CLASS On NVQ-dnesday evening ot January 18. 1922, the Rotary Club of Mounds- ville luanqueted the boys ot the graduat- ing class ot 1922 in the Girls Assembly ot' the lligh School. The banquet was an enormous success to say the least and was perfectly prepared and served by the high school Domestic Science De- partment under Bliss Kittie. The cov- ers were so arranged that each guest of the t'lub was seated between two llo- tarians. At the end ol' the last course the :cpe-alter ot' the evening, Supt. Nelson, ot liellaire, Ohio schools, was introduced. His address was probably the most bril- liant and remarkable ever delivered to the Senior boys of the class of '22, He spoke at some length upon ideals nec- essary tor success in life today, and at no time throughout the evening's ad- dress, did he lose, in the slightest degree the absorbed interest of any person pre- sent. The recollection of that evening will live long in the memories of the boys ot '22, ad they will always recall with gratitude the all around good fel- lowship ot' the Rotary t'lub ot Mounds- ville. FOOTBALL BAN QU ET The mothers of the football boys prepared for them on December Sth a large and splendid banquet. The ban- quet was ready at 6 o'clock and the boys along with Miss Miriam Stultz and Mr. Leo Spoon, the two cheer leaders, assembled at the girl's study hall where a beautiful sight met their eyes. Be- fore them lay two long tables decorated in the school colors with cut iiowers ar- ranged very artistically on the tables. At each place a dainty, hand-painted place card was found with the nick- names of all present inscribed on them. Quite a bit of time was taken in finding their own places, but, after this was done, and grace was asked by Supt. Shreves all were seated The enjoyable part was now coming. The menu was as follows. I Fruit Cocktail II Mashed Potatoes Chicken Creamed Peas Cranberries Pickles Slaw Jelly Hot Rolls Ill Fake lee Cream Coffee Mints After the meal Fleet Smith was in- troduced as toastmasterg and talks giv- en by different football boys. The nomi- nations were then open for a foothball captain for the following year. Jimmo Robinson was elected, after which yells were given for the new captain and the old one. All departed for their homes expressing their appreciation to the va- rious mothers ROTARY CLUB BANQUET FOR THE GIRLS' TEAM On Friday evening, March 31, the Moundsville Rotary Club gave a de- the 1922 Basket entertainment of exhibition game between the Alumni and the Varsity. promptly at six lightful banquet for Ball Lassies. The the evening was an The game started o'clock, at the end of the first half the score stood 10-5 in favor of the Varsity, Both teams played fine basket-ball and many of the Rotarians, forgetting that they were dignified business men, shouted and cheered until they were hoarse. Altho the Alumni showed their old time form, the brilliant pass- ing and shooting of the 1922 team was too much for them. As soon as the game was over the Rotarians and their guests entered the banquet hall where an elaborate three course dinner was served by the domes- tic science department. After dinner interesting rec-itations were given by Paul Ruble, Mrs. lse a11d Helen Ernst. The duet by Mary Laff- erty and Mr. Jim Sanders was very unique and received great applause. The short speeches of Miss Patterson and Mr. Shreves were enjoyed. After singing America the Banquet was brought to an end. FIRST ANNUAL SCHOOL AND OFFICERS BANQUET On December 16, 1921 about seventy teachers and members of the Board gathered for their first annual banquet in the High School Building. The Domestic Science Class under thc supervision of Miss Kittle did the serving. Supt, Shreves was appointed chairman of the evening and Mr. Het- zer, Pres., of the Board, was toastmas- ter. The different members of the Board, namely: Mrs. Lutes, Mr. Hen- derson, Mr. Francis, Mr. Humes, and Dr. Duffy responded to toasts. Each building was represented in the program, which was as follows: In behalf of the Central Build- ing, Miss Founds gave an inter- esting talk, Miss Sigatoose and Mr. Yerger rendered solos in behalf of the High School. From the Third Street School, Miss Edith Ewing sang and Miss Geneva Lancaster gave a reading. The First Street School broke the formal nature ofthe occasion in both their numbers. First came the reading of limerics, ex- tolling the virtue and character- istics of several who were pre- sent. Their second number was a very cleverly arranged contest. Papers containing riddles, the answers to them being names of the local teachers, were distrib- uted and a time limit was made tor answering them. Much fun was afforded by each of these numbers. Quite a number responded to in- formal talks. An evening of good fel- lowship and pleasure was enjoyed by all present, and all are glad that such "An Annual Get Together Meeting" has been established. M. V, B. '22 HBACK TO THE FARM" ln a cold winter's storm, VValkcd a boy so forlorn, An expression of want on his face. crowds hurried on But the Sparing him not an alm . Though he ottered his talent in grace. Oh his hat it was torn, His coat wet by the storm, And his shoes they had only one lace. And at twelve in the morn, He wished he'd never been born, For to sleep he had narry a place. Then hc thought of the farm, lt hc'd only the barn: Oh why had he lctt such a place. lle would work in the morn, .Xnd go back, his hopes shorn. lfci- with citics he could not keep pace. -ll. BARNETTE. ATHLETICS x +++++++++++i++++++++++++++?+++?+++++Q++++++++4++Q+++++?Q++++++ -x- -1- -z- E Coats E The Meat Makes the Meal Ei 2 . 2 3 Q Suits Q 5 -x- -x- -1- Dresses ooo mm IS Home + 4 Q 2 Red cms Shoes DRESSED and SMOKED 5 llenderson's Corsets Q E E ffnumming-Bird Hosel, E More Meat for the Same Money 5 E E The Same Meat for Less Money E -x- -1- -z- Z The Best Quality 2 3 E For the Least Money E 8 E 3 . IE! Z + -1- MEAT MARKET 4- 'Q E. E. llENDERSON 81 SON E Second St, -z- E-Iwi'-!"!"!"I'-!"!"!'-X'-X01-'I--101'-I'4"!"!'4'40I'-I'4'4'-!'4'40!-'!E:I"!'4'4'4"!0P-!"I'4''Z"Z'-!'-1'-!0!0!"!0!"I'-!"I'e!"!'-!"!"!"!"!"I'-E Z Z Zi". FRANK CALLAHAN The Best Dressed Men 3 Z - 2 2 -1- , , -1- 'fhe ?'flvli"Z'Llfif21f1l'fE'il? E E MERCHANT TAILOR E 4 4 + E when you are til-gd of iii--x--x-4-4-4-4--x--e40x0x0x0z0z-xwx--x-4--m-+4--r4-4-4wznz-g E studying, or tired of E NOTHINE Expresses the E 4. h ho come here 3 affectlon you feel for 2 E t e S P' 3 those you love so much as 'I' sg to play and rest. g giving them beautiful Z E E jewelry. E if We have What You Want. E 200 JEFFERSON AVENUE 4. E JEFFERSON AVENUE E -le is +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++4++++++++++++++++++++++++6+++++++ THE MOUNDSVILLE HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC COUNCIL At the close of the 1921 football sea- son the proposition of an Athletic Coun- cil or Student Board to oversee and manage all things concerning athletics in High School was brought forth and received unanimous approval. Three players from the squad were appointed to interview Mrf Haugllt and Supt. Shreves upon the subject. A favorable report was received and ab-out two weeks later, at an assemblage of the en- tire student body, Mr. Haught outlined the matter and asked that each of the four classes of the school elect a dele- gate to a committee to draw up a consti- tution for such an organization. The delegates elected were: Charles Moser, Senior, William Reed, Junior, Perry McMahon, Sophomore, and John Fahey Freshman. Coach Tilock, of the foot- ball squad, presided over the meetings of the committee and also took an act- ive part in framing the Constitution. After a lapse of nine weeks, during which time the committees held four meetings and gathered data, a constitu- tion was drawn up and submitted to Mr Haught, the Principal,, on March 29. This document is the first of its kind ever drawn up at the Moundsville High School and is result of an insistent and growing demand on the part of the stu- dent bo-dy. It is remarkable in many ways and shows the results of long and careful deliberation upon the part of its framers. Under the terms of the Constitution there is to be a go-verning body known as the Moundsville High School Athlet- ic Council, which shall have control, management and oversight of all mat- ters pertaining to athletics in the High School. This co-uncil will consist of seven members, two from the faculty, one of whom shall be the Athletic Di- rector, and five from the student body four of whom shall be the managers of the teams in the major sports. This Council will meet a long felt want in the High School, namely parti- cipation by the students in the manage- ment of that part of the school in which all are interested. lf properly appre- ciated and supported by the present and future students of Moundsville High School, it will prove one of the greatest benefits that they could re- ceive. Coach Tilock's assistance in framing the Constitution for the Council has been one of the essentials of its success, and he has proven to be one of the mc-st helpful and farseeing members of the High School Faculty. Mr. Haught, Principal, and Mr. Shreves, Supt. of Schools have by their cooperation and approval also enabled what, at first, seemed an impossible fancy, to become an actual realization. The Mounds- ville High School Athletic Council sho-uld prove to be, in future years, one of the most progressive steps ever taken by its student body. CHARLES MOSER, '22 am., THE 1921 FOOTBALL SEASON This year 's football season has been a success in 'more ways than one, al- though the record of games won and lost may not seem so creditable. Ten games were played of which four were won and six lost. Most of thetteam this year were inexperienced and this, coupled with the fact that tive of the .games were played away from home, caused most of the defeats suffered. The team slumped after the first three games and lost five straight, but finally pulled up enough to win the last two games. Last year 's defeats by War- wood and Cameron were wiped out this year in decisive fashion, Cameron being defeated on their home grounds. Coach Tilock deserves great credit with the team this year. His cool judgment and sincere efforts in behalf of the squad have made him one of the most admired and respected coaches ever at Moundsville High School. It is almost a certainty that he will be with us again next year, and if so, the chances of a successful season next fall will be greatly increased, The squad next year should be one of the best ever turned out at M. H. S. Only five regulars will be lost by grad- uation, and with six players from this year's squad, and a host of green ma- terial to pick from, the 1922 team should repeat and add to this year's victories. Games away from home designated for the spirit and skill he has shown by 'FMoundsville 0 New Martinsville 10 Moundsville 13 Wellsburg 0 Moundsville 53 Sistersville 0 tMoundsville 0 Follansbee 27 Moundsville 3 Parkersburg 53 fMoundsville 0 Linsly 53 tMoundsville 0 Triadelphia 6 Moundsville 0 Spencer 6 Moundsville 24 Warwood 0 fMoundsyille 20 Cameron 0 GS THE OLD OHIO" It's a beautiful old Ohio at that, 4 Where the farmer plants his seed in the If you get away from where Spring The drift and the waste are scattered about Mid the pure and balmy air. ' This is d-own in old Kentucky Where the stories of old are told How that Night Riders and the Ku Klux Klan Fought so venturesonie and bold. And reaps from it in the fall Quite different from the arctic man For he reapeth not at all. You may talk of all your travels. though, No niatter where you may roani The best of your journey, you'll have to ad- init, ls the journey toward your honie. The Old Ohio it Hows the saine, The bridge, the road, and the little lane Have not changed one bit. then you'll want t 1 1 In your own dominion of Home Sweet Homf -ili. HARNICT l I4 WHEN WE MET DEAR CLD CAMERON! Revenge is sweet! On Thanksgiv- ing afternoon, the Orange and Black football team stepped upon the native gridiron of our ancient rivals, Cameron, determined to wipe out the 18-13 defeat administered on the M. H. S. field last year by the Purple gridders, On all sides were the Cameron root- ers. sure of another victory and cheer- ing their home team, that is, what there was of it. The field was a swamp ,with one arm of Fish Creek flowing thru the lowe-r side, but it took more than cold and mud and hostile rooters to stop the Orange that day. Scarcely after the opening whistle, and before the pigskin artists of the Purple knew what had happened, M. H. S., had rushed over a touchdown. From then on it was a massacre. Cameron strove desperately to hold the charging line and driving backs from old Mounds- ville, but they might as well have tried to stop a tank fleet. Two more touchdowns followed in rapid succession and a safety in the last quarter made the score 20-0. We did the unexpected. lt was the first time we had shut Cameron out from scoring in three years. That night there was a monstrous celebration over the few streets in the camp of the de- feated enemy. Led by the M. H. S. band, and followed by an army of home rooters, we celebrated the victory by much noise and marching until train time. Where is the Cameron rooster now? M. H. S. certainly did a good job of stripping him of his tail feathers. Last year the Cameron gridders crowed over an 18-13 victory over our squad for almost a year, In their year-book, "The Hilltop" they used several statements which they suppos- ed were Uoriginalt' and "sarcastic" to the effect that M. H. S. was "afraid to come down off our perch and play them in Cameron," and that they Hplayed too rough" for our teams. We have gone to Cameron and 'tcome down off our perch." What the Or- ange and Black didn 't do to the Purple and White wasn't worth doing. We hope Cameron is satisfied with the re- sult. We are. Enough said. We played them on their own home field A And piled up twenty points to none, But when we meet again next year, They'll know we've "Just Be- gun." May M. H. S. in future years, ever repeat the Turkey Day victory of the Orange and Black warriors of 1921. Good VVO-rk, Squad of 1921, Good VVork. IN THE STORM CENTER. . . First Kansas Farmer: Too bad the last cyclone took your dog house, Second Kansas Farnicrz Oh, l don't know. lt brought me a grand piano. Say it with tiowers, but don't throw boqucts at yourself. i THE POWER OF SUGGESTION. Vtfeary VVillie: VVill you please give me a drink of water? I'm so hungry I don't know where to spend the night. "Girls are better looking than boys. " "Naturally" "No. Artiticiallyf' N 2 F31- 1 ,Q x I f H X 5 01 i 2 as-151 -i N 4 . lk X if X28 KX7! , W RE f :ffl ' f u I fx! ' :ALL E ?1"xl?,:1 ' y x M W j4f!f H - " " f X mx w w , , , A, :fix . I f 77 ur' I X vb- . fi: il 4 ' W 1,4 ', ' X A ' U q X1 r'I I! xiii' 3 'Z ' ':l X N 1,vgx if M X M7 Fi xl ' W 'ii 'f'-5 L " . D , I jk If 71' ' W 'X Nz tw f X 4 if 1 H M M ' -- 5 12 . -..Qwbxsixdxx - RTS N' X X THE 1922 BASKETBALL SEASON Moundsville High School's 1922 Basketball season was a decided suc- cess, as was expected. Of a total of 19 games played, 12 have been won and 7 lost. Among the teams met were some of the strongest in the Ohio Val- ley, including Marietta High, whom Moundsville defeated this year for the hrst time. Two games each were played with teams such as, Parkersburg, Wellsibt1rg', Sistersville, Smithfield, and Martins Ferry. Moundsville was unfortunate in having one or more regulars sick for a lengthened period throughout the sea- son, and this doubtless accounts for the majority of our defeats. The entire regular early-season lineup was able to play in but 2 of the 7 games lost and this was the main cause for the few de- feats suffered. Among the notable victories of the season were those over Marietta, Farmington, double wins ov- er Littleton, Smithfield, and Middle- bourne, and a tournament, victory over Sistersville. For the first time in the past three Moundsyille 2-1 Mioundsville 49 Moundsville 2-1 Moundsville 36 Moundsville -19 tMoundsville 30 'fltloundsvillee 24 "'Moundsville 17 Moundsville 42 i'Mou11dsville tMoundsville 24 Moundsville 33 Moundsville 25 flvloundsville 27 Moundsville 27 "'Moundsville 27 'fMoundsville 41 Moundsville 27 551 Dk Games away from home. seas-ons, Moundsville was able to score more than two wins away from home, Smithfield, Hundred, liiiddlebourne, and Littleton being defeated in hard- fought games on their home iioors, On Wednesday, March 15th, the team left for Buckhannon to play in the 9th Animal State Basketball Tour- nament, going by way of New Martins- ville and the "Short Line. Thursday afternoon, in the opening game of the Tournament on Court B, they defeated Sistersville in a thrilling comeback, by a score of 19-15. The next mprning they lo-st to Clendennin, a team that went to the finals, by a score of 20-15. Coach Wiant of lllinois State, in his first year at Moundsville High School, is deserving of a great amount of cred- it for the success of the team. His untiring effort and skilled coaching has brought to M. H. S. new laurels and added victories. The team and coach deserve the credit for our third consecutive "suc- cessfuli' season. Following is the sea- son's record: CHARLES MOSER, Manager. Farmington 12 Follansbee 24 Littleton 18 Smithfield 28 Martins Ferry 12 Middlehourne 23 Sistersville 28 Parkersburg -18 St. Marys 16 1Vellsburg -12 Martins Ferry 28 Sistersville 37 Ma rietta 23 Littleton 26 1Vel1sburg 37 Smithfield 20 Hundred 39 Parkersburg 31 492 INDIVIDUAL WRITE-UPS, 1922 BASKETBALL TEAM VI IA RENCE LAFFERTY- 'tSkinney" was captain of the team this year and played his third year on the varsity, filling a forward position to perfection. Although sickness kept him out of several of the games, he more than made up for this in the oth- ers. t'Skinney" is a Junior. 'WILLIAM WOODB URN- "Billl' played his last basketball at M. H. S. this year and also his best. He has been the most consistent scorer for his team throughout the season and eompleted his fourth year on the varsity this spring. "Bill's" shoes will be hard to till and it will be a long time before another man will be found to take his plaee on the basketball court. GLENN HAMILTON- t'Ham" jumped center for the team this year, and most of his opponents thought he had springs in his shoes. An accurate shot and g'ood tloor man, he has proved to be one of the main- stays ot the team. "Ham" also is a Junior this year. It A YM OND BARNETTE- "Barney" played his last game of basketball this year for Moundsville Iligh, and has proved to he one of the best guards ever turned out by BI. Il. S. lIe is a three year man. EDMUND ECHOLS- . "Speed" also graduates this year and M. H. S. loses another guard of sterling worth. He has played a stel- lar and eonsistent game for the Orange and Black and altho this Was his first regular year on the varsity, he has eer- tainly made good, WALTER PURDY- t'Bud" alternated with Hamilton on eenter this year and proved his worth by getting into the majority of the varsity games. This has been his first year on the team and he should greatly strengthen next year's team. The "Sophs" claim "Bud" WILLIAM REED- "BiIl" was one of the surprises of the season. Playing his iirst varsity ball this year he performed like a vet- eran and is the most promising pros- peet on a guard that was turned up this season. 4'BiIl" is a Junior and will be here next year. JOE WILSON- "Joe" graduates this year but play- ed a fine game at forward in every game in which he played. He was 0116 of the pluckiest fighters on the squad and never said "Die" A forward to take his place next year will be hard to find. THE GIRLS' 1922 BASKETBALL SEASON The most spectacular girls basket ball season M. H. S. had in recent years ended with the Oran-ge and Black on the winning side of eight out of twelve games. The girls this year truly came into their own in the field of athletics, thus proving the presence of splendid material which will next year demand even greater consideration. The beginning of the season saw the girls start off under the greatest handi- caps. With a new coach, and mostly new men, the prospects did not look ,bright for the beginners. But the sea- son was one of many surprises and the dope bucket was spilled very inconven- iently for a large majority of our op- ponents. When Coach Patterson made her call for candidates at the first of the season between forty and fifty girls re- sponded. After several try-outs this number was with difficulty reduced to a squad of fifteen, which number was retained throughout the entire season. With a few exceptions the material was entirely new and it has taken many hours of hard work to develop the first class team which represented M. H. S. this year. A The season was ushered in by a 19-O victory over the Alumnae. Shadyside next bowed to our lassies to the tune of 31-11. Littleton, with a strong team of several years experience, prov- ed too much for us. However, the lo- cals held them to the smallest score of the season, 16-7. The Martins Ferry game on our floor was a walk away vic- tory for us of 22-8. Our return game with them on the Ohio floor was played under the handicap of a new referee and the six-girl team with Ohio's strict guarding rules. Never-the-less they were held to a game of no field goals the score being 18-15. The two games with the fast Sistersville team both proved victories for our girls, lt was at this point that our natty new uniforms appeared, Hundred and M. H. S. split even, each winning a game apiece. Seven players and the coach jour- neyed to Spencer to the girl's state tournament which was held March 9-11. We were unlucky, however, in being drawn to play in the second game of the opening session with the undefeat- ed Bluefield team, runners-up of both last year's and this year's tournaments. At the end of the first half the score stood 5-5, In the second half we lost can fouls which were called exceedingly close. Although the final score was 16-9 it was considered a freak game as our opponents were held to no field goals, making all their points on fouls. The only field goal of the entire game was made by Moore of M. H. S. Freshman: They 're calling C--D a glass blower now, Soph: How's that? Freshman: Always boasting of her diamonds. Baldy Harlan: Did you ever notice that red-headed women always marry meek men? Joe Shelton: Oh, no, the men get that way. THE MEMBERS OF THE GIRLS' TEAM OLGA LEVVIS- Olga Lewis' brilliant defense work as guard won for her much praise. The confidence of her team mates was won for her from the first when they select- ed her as their captain. Her coolhead- edness has enabled her to ill this posi- tion remarkably well. It was rumored at the tournament that she had been chosen for the first all-state team. However, the judges had a chance to see her in but one g.ame which resulted in their giving her a place on the third all-state. M, H. S. suffers a deep loss this year thro-ugh her graduation. HELEN ERJNST, Forward- As a basketball player at the for- ward position Helen Ernst has few peers. Although handicapped some- what by her height she is remarkably quick and sure of action which was shown by her spectacular dribbling, passing and basket shooting from dif- ferent positions. She has another year to add to her laurels. VIRGINIA MOORE, Center- To look at '4Ginny" you would nev- er think she is our center. This is Vir- ginia 's first ye-ar out and she surely has proved herself a star. It was only an exceptionally tall center that could out- jump her too. She distinguished her- self by shooting the only field goal in our game with Bluefield at the Tour- ney, We will hear great things of "Ginny" next year. ESTHER. SIGAFOOSE- Another valuable player this year was found in Esther. She is a hard, consistent fighter, who gives all she has. She played in all six-girl team varsity games, starring as side center. M. H. S. will miss her greatly next year as she is a member of this year's grad- uating class. MIRIAM STULTZ, Guard- It is very seldom that the playing of a guard ever attracts attention, but Miriam is an exceptional player. This is Stultzie's first year on the varsity, and she has helped to win many games for old M. H. S, She also held her op- ponent scoreless at the Tournament. Miriam will play again next year for old M. H. S. MADELINE BRANTNER, Guard- While Madeline did not get in all the games she always made up for lost time when she did, Mack can-fill the place of guard or center equally well and had this not been her iirst year out we are sure she would have been on the varsity. This is Mack's last year and the graduation of this faithful player will mean a big loss to the team. MARY LAFFERTY, Forward- Although Mary was playing her first year of basket ball she was able. in several varsity games, to exhibit work of the first class. Not a flashy player, but a consistent one, entering into the team play. She will have two more years to show her powers. MARGARET FRANCIS, Forward- This is Marg's third year in Basket Ball and the old saying t'Practiee makes perfect," certainly applies there. Marg is a shooting star. She has shot. her share of the goals and fouls this year and has been the main factor in winning many of our games. "Sis" will be back with us next year and we see a bright future for our team. M. H. S. boasts of A class material from the following subs who did eon- sistent and faithful work during the season:- Mary Grandstatf, Mabel Leatherby, Yolanda Hahn, Margaret Moore and Mary Ellen Dorsey. EQZEQEEGEEEESSSEEEGSEGEEEESSEEEGEEQ W R Hour: TEAMS" Sl 5? -- 3 3 Let ine introduce our B. B. Teams, 3 gf? And the players all in a stream, 3 3 Here is "Skinny," our jumping jack, E And "Bill" who puts them in the sack, 3 E? Also "Ham" who is tall and fair, Qi 3 With 'tSpeed" as swift as a hare, Q S And t'Barney" last but not least, 3 E With lots of "subs" slick as grease. 3 Well someone said with lots of noise, ga lg 'tThat's enough about the boys." 3 3 So of the girls l'1l talk awhile, 3 As they play with the greatest style, 'ga 3 Now here 's the "Squire" in new attire, Q 3 And i'Hennie" who can't reach the gg spire, 3 3 With HSis" who is short but fleet, 3 ig And "Stultzie" who is hard to beat, E 3 Now "Ginnie7, who also jumps, 3 gg To avoid her opponent's bumps, 3 There are also L'subs" on this team 3 All of whom we hold in high esteem. E As both the coaches are of fame Q 3 I think it useless to mention names. get H. V. R. 25. Q Q- W 93559395539QQQQQSQQQQQQSQQQQQQQEQQ LITERARY 9? +++++++++++++++++9+++ +4 + R -1- -1- -1- HIROPRAC'I'IC 2 3- -1- E PRONOUNCED "KI-R0-PRAK-TIK" E E Is a scientiiic method of eliminating the cause of disease by E E adjustments without the use of drugs, medicines, instruments 4- or massage, based on absolute facts of human anatomy. 3 Z 3 Z You do not receive a "treatment" in a straight chiroprac- Z E tor's office, you receive an "adjustment," E E Let US prove the distinction. E Z Il! 5 F. M. 81 MADGE l. NcCRACKEN "' 2 Docrons or cH1RoPRAc'r1c ,,, E o Palmer School Graduates E -g . E FHONES: Office, 149g Residence, 325 407 JEFFERSON AVENUE E ge--1--1-x--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1-1--1--1e--14--1-r-a401ne+-ee--e-r.x:1-m-4--aeu1-1-4-e014-4-x-+4w1--1-e-1-1-1-1-1-1-1-1-1-1-1-E 1 2 "' Ili 2 S 8 E -1- -1- g -1- 3 Telephone 68 2 l'00N 1 l ERN3 5 2 Z 2 + Q 3 TMS 5 The Clean Cleaners 2 -1- -1- -1- Z E Have Your Clothes Cleaned Z E C0' 2 and have Them Cleaned Well E Z E I -1- -1- -1- -1. -1- -1- E Feed and Produce 2 D Y 5 I N G 3 2 5 rnrssmo T "We Treat You Right." E Al-TERING V THIRD STREET G. CHAS. HUGHES -1- Phone 35lR a- 2 i a 2 THE TREASURE One stormy day during the Christ- mas vacation Jack Richmond and his chum, Bob Tilden, Who was visiting him, decided to satisfy their curiosity in regard to the contents of the remain- ing two, unexplored trunks in the attic. The family had left for the day and the boys had the house, one of the oldest in Washington, to themselves. Sever- al days before they had been in the at- tic and explored all but two of the large assortment of barrels, boxes and trunks it contained. The attic was very large and con- tained many other things but the boys had eyes for nothing but two dusty, cow-hide trunks in the farthest and darkest corner. These they pulled out into the light and as neither was locked they raised the lid of the smaller, al- most with bated breath, to iind-noth- ing! Greatly disappointed they turn- ed to the other and although it proved harder to open, as the catch was stuck, it contents were soon revealed. It con- tained a great variety of clothing of the early nineteenth century and the boys hurriedly ransacked it, for, to tell the truth, they were hunting for something to shed some light on the hiding place of the hoard of Jack 7s. great grandfath- er. This money, according to family ,tradition, was supposed to have been .hidden when old Randolph Richmond had gone to war in 1812 to keep it from the invading British soldiers. But no writing could they find and at last they started to replace the clothing, but as they were shaking an old coat before laying it away they heard a rustling of paper, and upon investigating found a folded paper sealed with red wax. On the outside was inscribed: TO ANY OF MY DESOENDANTS WHO FIND THIS, OR TO BE GIV- EN TO THEM BY ANY OTHER FINDER Signed: RANDOLPH RICHMOND Therefore Jack felt that he was privileged to open it and carefully breaking the seal, saw at a glance that it contained several lines of writing in an old-fashioned hand. They read it together. 'A fool and his money are soon part- ed, this is one of the proverbs in this country. Although the seller lived up in the north he was in height five or five and one-half feet. The one from the west was said to own two or maybe three yards of moose. This making four-thousand moose, per pound, in gold, at the sum of 342,000 Another owned a large silver mine which con- tained about 10,000 feet of ore. The jewels were the fourth man's Ran- dolph, although he was a rich-manf As this seemed senseless to the boys they immediately decided it was in code and throwing the rest of the clothes back in the trunk, slammed the lid, and rushed down stairs to puzzle it out. After the failure of many high hopes, Bob suggested, 'fWliy not try every fifth word?" f'It's the last hope be- cause we've tried everything else," Jack replied. In a few minutes he yelled, "I've got it." And read the following: 'Money is in cellar, north tive feet, west two yards, four thousand gold, -l42,000 silver, 10,000 jewels. Randolph Richmond. Bob seemed dazed but Jack cried, "Let's go" and started for the cellar, grabbing a yard stick 0-11 the way. He then measured five feet from the north wall and six feet from the west wall, but they came to the intersection of the lines they were greatly disappointed for the stone tioor seemed solid as ever and much tapping proved that it con- tained no secret hole. But Bob. who had been looking at the instructions, saw that they said north tive feet, and at once saw their mistake. They had measured from the north instead of to- ward the north. He remeasured cor- rectly and found that the lines inter- sected on a small block of stone not half as large as the others. This stone, the-y saw, was not cemented in place, and with the aid of a poker they lifted it out. A small iron chest greeted their gaze and although it was very heavy it was at last on the floor beside the hole. They did not dare take the risk of opening the chest by force, and ruining the jewels, as it was locked, so they dragged it up the stairs into the den belonging to Jack 's father, They hid their find beneath a couch and prepared to guard it, "with their lives" as Jack expressed it. Wliile waiting for the return of Mr. Richmond they thought they would find out some- thing about Jack's ancestor who had hidden the chest. Going to one of the bo-okcases in the library they soon found that for which they were hunting -a manuscript book, entitled, "The Richmond Family." This book, or the original of it, had been in the family even before they left England, soon af- ter the Revolutionary Waii'. Jack's father had had the manuscript type- written, so the boys did not have to struggle to read many unfamiliar hand- writings, as the book had been handed down from father to eldest son since the sixteenth century. They imme- diately turned to the part written by Randolph Richmond and his son, George Richmond. They found that Randolph Richmond had been killed in the War of 1812, while fighting for his adopted country, by a cousin, who was with the British forces. It told of find- ing, when the estate was settled, that a large amount of money and many of the family heirlooms had disappeared and the supposition that they had been hid- den by Randolph. From time to time, George Richmond told of vain searches for clues to its hiding place. Jack knew that his father would be very glad, because, although a rich man, his two daughters at Vassar and himself at a smaller college, were a steady drain on the family resources. Eventually, after waiting years, as it seemed, Mr. Richmond arrived and they both started at once to tell him of their discovery. Wlien he at last un- derstood them he became almost as ex- cited as they were and tried to open the box with the keys on his ring, but this was impossible as none of the new fashioned keys would fit the old fash- ioned lock. He then remembered an old key ring and keys that had belong- ed to his grandfather and sent Jack for them. They were in the case of old family relics and heirlooms and he soon returned with them. The last key on the ring opened the box and before the wondering eyes of the boys the contents were displayed. In the first of three compartments was a large bag of Span- ish gold money, in the second was a package which contained all the miss- ing heirlooms, and in the third a bag of silver. The money when taken to an expert to be valued proved to be worth much more than what old Randolph Richmond had thought and the heir- looms made quite an addition to the family collection. The money derived from the gold and silver enabled Mr. Richmond ti send Jack to Harvard, thus fulfilling the boy 'si greatest wish, and as Bob had helped so much in finding the treasure he insisted upon sending him also, so as to keep together the boys whose friend- ship had been formed in early child- hood, Thus everything ended happily for the boys who had found and solved the code to the lost treasure. FRANK STULTZ, '23. THE MYSTERIOUS PIT Several of my friends, and I, were seated around the fire, one wintry eve- ning, telling stories. One of my friends told a story that interested me very much. These are her words as nearly -as I can remember: "Perhaps you will listen to a story of an incident which occurred at my birthplace, when I was yet a little girl. Our house was a large, old fashioned one. In its day it had been somewhat of a mansion, but now it looked far from that-being Worn by storms of many, many years. "From the day I can remember, my brother and I were taught to fear a cer- tain opening in the large basement. There was a- trap door and We were cau- tioned never to go near it, for if once we stepped on the door, we would fall into a dark pit. They told us there were all sorts of ghosts in there, My mother and father were really afraid of the place, because of the superstitious tales that had been handed down from our ancestors "My brother and I had discussed these tales, and had finally decided to ,solve the mystery and find if there were really any truth in it. We plan- ned a day to investigate. Brother asked his chum to share in the adven- ture t'Taking a flashlight, we all entered the basement. John, my brother, told me to tie a rope around his waist, and also that of his friend. 'Then'-said John, 'if I call you must pull me out, but if I donlt you must let me go, Then we will wander around and investi- gate !' "So well I remember of his handing me a note and saying, 'Here Sis is a note-if anything happens to us, you give this to mama.' I must have turn- ed pale at the very thoughts, for he ex- claimed, 'Don't look so scared. I h'aint 'specting anything to happen' USO saying-they stepped on the door. At that instant they were lost to my sight. How frightened I was when I discovered that I had lost the ropes and that they Were in the pit with the rboys. But-O!-what could I do? I could no-t scream to them without moth- er hearing me. I didn 't know what to tell her and I knew she should know it. I lingered. about and finally mother call- ed me to dinner. 'VVhere is brother?' she asked. Witli a sigh I answered- 'I-I-er -'sp-ect he - is-er-playing. No-maybe he's over to -Iimmie's for dinner.' " 'Perhaps he isg' agreed mother. 'But come on to dinner Mary. What 's the matter dear you look so pale VZ' she went on to say. "Nothing," I assured her, 'only I feel sorta-sick. Don't want any din- ner todayf So saying, I went out., try- ing to think of some plan by which to rescue my brother. Mother being un- easy about me, came out and called, 'Now Mary, you must tell me what is wrong. You're crying. Come tell me,' she continued, fwhat is that piece of paper in your hand?' Then she came over to me taking the note that brother had given me. In amazement she read the following aloud: Dear Mama and All: Now I'm tired of this mystery, and Jimmie and me are going to try our best to find out what is in the dark pit. If anything happens to us-just remem- ber you've got a son that hain't afraid of ghosts like his paw is. Jimmie is just as brave as me, Now-don't cry if we don 't-for we are sure of getting to heaven-for I 've heard many times that if you're not afraid and trust- you'll get there. From your boy what hain't afraid of ghosts like his paw. By,By-John. ' H011 finishing the note, mother ex- claimed, 'Does this mean that my only son is in that terrible pit of darkness? Oh-my-brave son l' So saying, she fell to the ground and I ran for father. I explained to him the best I could, and then seeing that mother had recovered, he went for men to come and help get the boys out. They concluded it would never do to go down through the trap door for they would all likewise be swallowed up like the boys. "They decided the best plan was to dig into the earth, where they thought the pit might be. The men dug as fast as they could. Finally they found the pit-but to their amazement they found only utter darkness, with the exception of some light that shone in through the hole they had dug. They immediately got lights and searched every place, but in vain, for the boys were not there. The mothers of the boys were nearly frantic and were reading the note over and over, Each one was telling the other how brave their sons- were. , Then to the astonishment of everyone, the two boys appeared, each smiling, and carrying a little budget. H tNow,' cried teh men, who had been digging so faithfully, 'You boys were never in that pit and we have dug for you until we are about dead. Who started that false report anyway?' ' 'We were so,' exclaimed John, 'And if you'll listen I'll tell you all about it. We were scared nearly to death when we tumbled down-and -Oh-it was dark-but I soon put a tiash light to use. We knew we had to be brave and find some way out. We screamed, but no one came or answered. Finally we found a little door, and up- on opening it we discovered a passage and that is how we got out. Papa you rt-member those willows, down by the le-rc-ok? Well-that is where the pas- sage led to. Now look what we found in a little opening in the wall I' USO saying he opened the little bud- get and poured out on the ground coins of silver and gold. At this everyone opened their eyes, 'Now,' said John tYou men shall be paid for your dig- ging that you were sweating about.' " 'Well-Well,' said father, 'I've always heard that some of our ances- tors, centuries ago, kept their money down in this pit, but I never supposed any would still be there. You are brave boys, much braver than your fathers, I must admit. And you shall have the money as your own.' " F. T. '22, commenced to enjoy the freedom of the HANGING PICTURES It is a warm June day and spring has reached its height. Everything has taken on that fresh spring green- ness that appears about this time of year. Even the schoolboy, who has just begun to realize that vacation has really started, is gr-een, in a way, to the arts of housecleaning. He has just great outdoors and fully realizes that he is no longer bound to school work, which he has endured for nine long months. Then along comes house- cleaning with mother saying this about the time you grab your ball-bat: "Won't you please come and help me with these pictures? You know how hard it is for me to climb up and down that ladder, and I must have some help." You sadly lay the bat in one corner, put on an old pair of overalls, and sight. This is the last sure sign of spring. You grab the desired picture and climb the ladder with mother instruct- ing each step. She points out a spot for the picture, and you carefully mash your thumb with the hammer the first thing Then you almost forget your mother is near and stammer out some- thing that sounds like "dog-gone." At last the nail is in, and now comes the hardest part. You pick the picture up and carefully hang it in the center of the na.il. At this point mother calls up and sarcastically states that grand- pa's picture would be more becoming with him right side out. You meekly take it off and turn it around, and in doing so, nearly drop it. Mother screams and you make a beautiful catch of the precious portrait, mean- while upsetting the ladder. Down you come, picture and all! The picture suffers no damages but the tioor seems uncommonly hard to the back of your head. Mother then asks if you fell and you reply that you just came down for ano-ther nail. At last the picture is hung and you come back down the ladder on the rungs as you should. Mother then discovers that it is crook- ed, so after several trips up and down the job is finished. Such are the trials of picture hanging at house- cleaning time. L, H. '24 WHAT THE CLOCK SAW "Tick, tock, tick tock," droned the old schoolroom clock that held the most prominent position on the schoolroom wall, Htick, tock, tick, tock." And no one ever dreamed how many funny and pathetic sights that clock witnessed- in fact who ever heard of a clock hav- -ing eyes? I am sure it could tell many stories while tick-tocking away on the wall. So I am going to let it tell you of one instance that it saw and told me. "Of course," it would say, "l have seen many little girls copying arithme- tic problems, passing notes, or trading candy, and many little boys lighting ov- er pins, pencils and marbles. But, about the most comic was when a little lad from the "Emerald Isles" attempt- ed to get the better of a loyal son of Af- rica in a trade of a broken top and a pinching bug for a glass bottle and a part of a fish hook. As you know in the poorer districts of the South the negroes and the 'tPoor whites" attend the same schools and often sit together. Such was the case in this particular instance, although the two made a rather striking contrast. Moses Abraham Nebicinezzer Simms was a typical representative of his choc- olate colored race. A funny little fel- low was he with his mahogany skin, his kinky hair and thick crimson lips al- ways spread from ear to ear, displaying pearly teeth, But above all his large, dark eyes which resembled twin stars twinkling from out a midnight sky. And yet tick, tock, tick, tock, tick- the little Mose was no truer type of his unique race than was Mickey Patrick whose red curls and blue eyes tey-es as blue as the sky that canopied the green of the shamrock bordered shore from whence he camej reflected much of the wit, humor and superstition of old Ire- land, the land of fairies and wondrous wishing Wells. The argument began in a subdued whisper and ended in a clashing climax. t'Tick, tock, tick, tock," quote the clock, "it did not attract my attention for the first few minutes, but suddenly I heard Mickey say, "Oh, gee, Mose, sure and ye know I wouldn't pull it over on ye for the world, but this top of mine sure can spin even if 'tis brokeg and that there bottle of yours ain't very good anyway 'n who wants an old bent fish hook, the likes o' that, I'd like to know." At this the little negro rolled his eyes solemnly and replied, "Ah reckon as how mah Uncle Sam caught a fish most fo' feet long t'other day with this heah hook, and that there bottle, am suah enough the best bottle ah evah found." And here Mickey, in his eagerness, tried to guy Mose into the trade and consequently overstepped the bounds of propriety used in addressing any self respecting colored gentleman. 'tOh, come off there, Midnight Mose, sure and if that poor fish was as long as ye are black there sure am some storm brewin'.', Replied Mose, "Youall ain't nothin' but po' white trash, an, a red headed, freckled faced one at that and Ah'd rathah be a niggah any day." Pouncel Biff! Bang! The temper of the Irish met that of the African and clashed in deadly combat, and I fthe old clock on the wallj was left so dizzy that I could see nothing but an occas- io-nal red curl or streak of black kinky hair. And I kept repeating this all the rest of the day, Tick, tock, tick, tock. It ain't so much what's said that hurts As what you think lies hid, lt ain't so n1ucI1 the doin' As the way the thing is did, V. H. '24 Mr. Auld: The colored school near- ly burned down yesterday. Joe Cox: Well, I kinda expected it. I saw smoke, so I sex to myself, HVVIIPVP theres smoke there's always tire." Jones: "I want to do something big and clean before I die." Bones: "VVash an elephant." When Fashion enters the door, bills Hy in at the window. UI 1' 2 4 1 5 5 :ll 1? 'Z - N'I I 1 1 . : Q if 'V CALENDAR ,fix Z-a SEPTEMBER : Monday, 5-Labor Day. Everybody labors HD. Registration, Tuesday, 6-School starts proper. I Wonder why the pupils haven't. Wednesday, 7-Locker keys today.- Some jam. Thursday, 8-Some Freshies are hazed down at the ball park. O! Boys. Friday, 9-Mr. Jones arrives. O girls isn't he too cute? We hear he is interested about Bethany-at least he graduated there. Monday, 12-Schedule changed. Talk about contiicts-Oh My! Tuesday, 13-We're getting more ae- quainted with our teachers now- we love them all-as usual. Monday, 19-Orchestra organized. Meeting days on Monday and Wed- nesday at 8:15. Material is fine and we hope to get good results. Tuesday, 20-First meeting of Glee Club. We're to meet every Tues- day and Thursday at 8:15. HGet in line and have your voices tried." Miss Nesbitt will have quite a job with the Glee Club and orchestra both. , Saturday, 24-Boys journey to New Martinsville, This is the begin- ning of the Football season. At the end of the game the score stands -10-O in Magnolia 's favor. We feel they will brace up and win from now on. Friday, 24-Pep meeting in gym. i 'fl ' QW! m if 1? Spoon and Stultzie elected cheer- leaders. Great enthusiasm showed by the student body. Keep the good work up, fellow students. OCTOBER: Saturday, 1-M. H. S. 13, Wellsburg tl, We knew you could do it boys. We 're back of you now. Friday, 7-Big pep meeting in gym. Everybody full of GO. Learned some new songs and yells that will sure knock Sistersville stiff. Saturday, 8-Sistersville arrives but wants to get back soon after the game. M. H, S. 53, Sistersville O. Who said we didn't have a good team? Friday, 14-Left the school house at 7:30 and had a big parade. Red fire, drum corp and everything. Saturday, 15-Boys go to Follansbee. We ,lose-27-0. O well we can't win them all. Maybe we were a wee bit too sure of winning though. How about it boys? Friday, 21-Another big parade. This one even better than the first. High School band is out, Red tire helps light the way and tire crackers has- ten our steps. Mr. Auld takes charge of the parade and, thanks to him, it was a wonderful success. Saturday, 22-Parkersburg 53: M. H. S. 3. The Rig Red seems to be t'Nuf Fed." Monday, 24-Seniors have llallowecn party at the home ot' Mary Welsch in Glendale. It sure was "One Grand Party." Friday, 28-Pep meeting in gym. As many as possible are urged to go to VVheeling. Saturday, 29-Linsly 54, M. H. S. 0. There is a great turn out at Wheel- ing of our students. We at least got the compliment that we were the best yelling squad that had ever been on the Wheeling field. I'll bet Wheeling didn 't say it though. NOVEMBER: Friday, 4-Pep Meeting. Saturday, 5-We were so sure of bring- ing home the bacon today, but in- stead it was something like Triadel- phia 6, M. H. S. 0. I wonder where all the pep has leaked too. Monday, 7-Boys have Football meet- ing. Mr. Tilock gives them a very plain talk. lt is decided to re-or- ganize the team for the remaining games. Hillie is re-elected captain. Can't we get a little help from the student body in this slump of pep? Tuesday, 8-Jr., Sr., Soph., and Fresh., have class meetings to try and get a httle school spirit towards football. Flass cheer-leaders are elected to get up some rivalry between the classes. Posters are being made and displayed all over town. We have great hopes of more backing now. Thursday, 10-Big turnout i11 gym. Have big pep meeting there and then start up street. Never was there so much pep before. We see now that there is still some "Get Up" in old M. ll. S. Mr. Auld also has charge of this parade, He cer- tainly is a helping hand to the needy. Friday, ll-Armistice Day-Half Holi- day. We truly believe the old say- ing, "When it rains it always pours." Spencer arrives. They beat us by one touch down. Oh what luck. It sure was a fine game though. Mr. Bryson had the boys parade before the game in the pour- ing down rain. Three cheers for him and the fellows in the band. Spencer 6, M. H. S. 0. Friday, 18-Everyone on team gives a short talk in the gym after school. If what they say is true-we'll Win the rest or burst. Saturday, 19-Three cheers! M. H. S' 24, Warwood 0, Tilock has a hard time since he considers both teams his. He coached at Warvvood last year, you know. He didn't frown any 'cause we won though. Monday, 21-Nothing much going on any more except school. Vlfednesday, 23-Ano-ther night parade. Our school is altogether different now. They have "Some" pep. Of course they were always fine, but now they are finer. Thursday, 24-Thanksgiving-Holiday We did it this time. Cameron bows to Moundsville in a 20-0 mud bat- tle. A large crowd go from here, even if it was nothing but rain and mud. Who cares, when we win- how we look-or what we do 0? We paraded the streets of Moundsville when we came home. In other wo-rds we painted the town Red. Friday, 25-We all come to school but no one is anxious to go in. We de- cide to have a parade and show a little of our cheering ability. The whole school goes down to the ball park and yell as they never did be- fore. The board finally decide to give us a holiday if we will come to school for -L5 minutes after dinner. This we did and were rewarded for it. Saturday, 26-Bellaire O5 Wheeling O. Stake holders are kept busy giving back the bets they have been hold- ing, I wonder if some didn 't charge a storage fee? Monday, 28-Mr. Yerger is back after a short illness. VVe are mighty glad to see your smiling face again, Mr. Yerger, for we surely missed your jokes. Girls Basket Ball team starts practice. Only 50 go out for the team. Tuesday, 29-Boys have Basket Ball Meeting. DECEMBER : Thursday, 1-First night of Elk's Min- strel. We have quite a bit of tal- ent in High School, We can see a bright future for Miss Lafferty. Friday, 2--Holiday! Round Tabl-e. Glee Club and Orchestra furnish en- tertainment for those 'tAround the Tablew during the evening session. The Minstrel is over. I'll bet Mr. Haught is glad to have his students settle down to work once again. Sunday, 4--First Real snow. Every- one seen with their sled going to- ward Lindsey's. Monday, 5-Beginning of a new school week. Report cards given out. Horrors for some. Joy for others. That is just natural in a life time however. Basket Ball practice schedule is changed. Tuesday, 6-Girls have Basket Ball meeting. Olga Lewis is elected Cap- tain and we know she will make a good one. Orospolitan staff meets. Wednesday, 7-Another Rotary day with all the good smells coming from the kitchen. Mrs. Lutes is the guest, She is a new member of our board and we sincerely hope that she believes in holidays. Thursday, 8--Mothers of the boys who played Football prepare a wonder- ful banquet for them. Everything was iine. Even Beany's speech- although it was out of order. Fleet Smith acts as Toast-master. Friday, 9-School dismissed at 3:00. Educational meeting at Strand. Very successful. We wish they would come often. Thursday, 15-Basket Ball season starts with M, H. S. 24, Farmington 12. We like that kind of a start for the season, boys. Friday, 16-Teachers Banquet. Great success. Fine program. Mr. Het- zer is Toastmaster. Sunday, 18-Only one week until Santa comes. Ain't life grand? Monday, 19-Coach Patterson gives the girls some very stiff Basket Ball rules. No candy-very little cake and pie-to bed at ten bells, Gee, this sounds nearly impossible, but we 'll try it. Tuesday, 20-M. H. S. fellows lose to Alumni while the girls win. Thursday, 22-Mr. Wiant leaves for his Xmas. vacation. Mrs. Timby subs the remainder of the week, Friday, 23-School out at 3 :30 for the Xmas Vacation. Follansbee meets Moundsville and loses 53-15. Hur- rah! ' JANUARY: January 9-School starts again after two glorious weeks. "What all did you get for Xmas?" January 10-Orospolitan Staff meets. 4 "We'll have to get to work now' says Scotchie. "Allriglit" says we. January 11-Junior Class meeting. Sr. Classmeeting, Football meeting. Girls Basket Ball uniforms are or- dered. January 12-Senior committee picksin- vitations. Junior committee picks rings. January 13-No wonder the girls lost to Littleton. Look what day it is. lJon't worry though, we'll have bet- ter luck next week. Girls: M. H. S. 7, Littleton 16, Boys: M. H. S. 24, Littleton 18. Juniors sell can- dy. January 1-1-Saturday. Boys play Smithfield. We win 3-1-22. Best game this year. Juniors sell candy again. Monday, Jan. 16-Beginning of exam week, Everyone shaking in their boots-O, I beg your pardo11-Go- loshes-which are more in style. January 17-VVhy are they so cruel to us? Exams are going on at their worst. January 18-Nothing happens but ex- ams-we don't have time for any- thing else. Friday, January 20-Girls and boys win to Martins Ferry. Boys 49-12. Girls 22-8. Monday, 233-We all register for second semester. Most everyone passed Tuesday, 2-1-School proper again. Mrs. Timby is added to our faculty, NVQ-dnesday, 25-High School night at Methodist Revival. Large crowd go in a body. Thursday, 26-Nothing happens. Ev- eryone seems to have gotten religion. Friday, 27-Boys go to Middlebourne. Win 28-23. Ilad wonderful time. -Iunior-Freshman chapel. Saturday, 28-Girls go to Sistersville. Boys meet them at train. Both teams play in the evening. Girls win 18-ti. Boys lose 28-2-1. Sunday, 29-Bunch meets the teams at train on the return trip from Sisters- ville. Monday, 30-All those playing athlet- ics don tt have to take Physical Training. Three cheers! Tuesday, 31-t'Please open my lock- er.', Mr. Haught. locks all girls lockers and there is sure some mix- up. Report cards are again given out, FEBRUARY : Wediiesday, 1-Girls jerseys come. Maybe We won't sport now. Meet- ing in gym right after school. Leah Conner is elected cheer leader to take Stultzieis place. M. H. S. boys and girls have a benefit game. Both first teams play both second teams. First teams Win in both games, Thursday, 2-Boys get Basket Ball blankets from the returns of the be- nefit game. Friday, 3-Boys go to Parkersburg. Lose 48-17. Hard luck. The Big Red seemed to have them bluffed. Senior-Sophomore chapel. Saturday, 4-Girls and boys both win from St. Mary 's. Boys score 42-16. Girls 14-9, Monday, 6-Freshie and Sophomore class meetings are to elect represen- tatives to the Athletic Council. "Duck" and "Gus" are the lucky ones. Tuesday, 7-Senior and Junior Class meetings are to elect the Athletic re- presentatives. "Bill" and "Dutch" are chosen. Announcement of the Senior play to be given in the near future. "The Hoodoo." Vifednesday, 8-Girls and Boys Bas- ket Ball pictures taken. "Lend me your powder puff." This from a girl. No hard feelings boys. Some one shot a canon in the gym when the girls were practicing Basket Ball. Friday, 10-Sistersville girls and Mid- dlebourne boys arrive. We meet them at the train. M. H. S. girls win 19-15. M. H. S. boys Win 42-16. Saturday, 11-Boys go to Wellsburg and lose. What's your excuse boys? Wellsburg girls cancel since their team is broken up. Boys score- 42-25. Monday, 13-Mr. Haught is not here today. Mr. Rogers presides as principal. Today was supposed to be a holiday, but some how we love school. Tuesday, 14-A petition asking for a valentine box was presented to Miss Parks-but she refused. Announce- ment is made of the play "Double Crossed" to be given in the near fu- ture by the English Department. Thursday, 16-First night of i'Miss Bob White." Miss Hughes, one of our talented class mates takes an im- portant part in the play. Friday, 17-Senior-Sophomore chapel. Girls and boys both go to Martins Ferry. Boys lose 28-24. Girls lo-se 18-15. I Wonder where they found their referee. He called 42 fouls in 30 minutes in the girls game. Saturday, 18-Boys play Sistersville and lose 23-22, 1 wonder who sug- gested getting Ross to referee. I don't believe we had a neutral re- feree at Sistesrsville. ' Monday, 20-Juniors are all excited ov- er the arrival of the model ring. The're all anxious to order - but when vvill they pay? Friday, 24-Girls win from Hundred 27-11. Boys lose to Wellsburg 37-27. Monday, 274Senior play practice be- gins. We hope it turns out O. K. MARCH: Thursday, 2-School saddened by death of George Bottome last evening. Friday, 3-School closed to be fumigat- ed, Boys go to Smithfield. We Win 27-20. Saturday, 4-Boys and girls journey to Hundred. Boys win 41-40. Girls lose 25-12. Monday, 6-School opens as per usual, and we expected a week at least. Boys all excited over prospects for a track team. Tuesday, 7-Girls Basket Ball team all excited over leaving for the Tourna- ment at Spencer. t'The Lady of Shalottu by the Glee Club and 4'Double Crossed" given by the English Department are successful- ly put on at the Central School audi- torium. Wednesday, 8-Girls leave for Spencer at 11 :45, School out at 11:15- Juniors present them with M. H. S. pins. Huge crowd at station to see them off. Thursday, 9-M. H. S. draws Bluefield as their first victim and lose 16-9. We don't feel quite so bad though since they were runners-up. Boys start practice for track team. Friday, 10-Theadore gets very sarcas- tic in Civics. " Walrus! Ha ha ha !" VVe lose all hope of girls being re- drawn. More track. Boys lose to A Parkersburg 31-27. Juniors sell candy. Saturday, ll-"Who will win the Beth- any Tournament 1? Who will win the Spencer Tournament? And who will win the Wheeling vs. Parkers- burg ga1ne?" These are the main questions of the day, Several go to Wheeling to root for l'arkersburg. Sunday, 12-Girls arrive home. Ev- erything over for them now for a while. Capt. Lewis pulls third all- state. Monday, 13-Girls step out in their championship jerseys today. Ev- eryone rushes wildly at Squire to see her medal. Tuesday, 1-L-Boys are beginning to feel the need of clean collars and a few shirts to take to the Tourney. Wednesday, 15-Boys leave for Buck- hannon on the 7:19. Quite a few are at the train early to say goodbye and good luck, We think a lot of you boys, to get up so early in the morning. Tuesday, 15-M. H. S. draws Sisters- ville. We hear the report right af- ter sehool. Oh boy, aren't we glad. M. H. S, 16, Sistersville l5. Wednesday 16-Moundsville gets Clen- denning as their next opponents and are taken down . Hard luck boys but we're mighty proud of you any- way. Thursday, 17-We aren't very much engaged today since we have noth- ing to look forward to. He Haw. Friday, 18-Teachers leave for Round Table at Sistersville. Three cheers for the Holiday. Hennie, Alma, Mabel and Miss Patterson leave for the Tourney at Buckhannon. Saturday, 19-Boys play exhibition game with East Side at Buckhan- non, They get beat by one point. Score-18-17. Sunday, 20-Boys come home. Gee, but we're glad to see them. Hope they don't leave us soon again. Monday, 21-Big pep meeting in the gym after school. We have lots of speeches from both Tournaments and end up by letting the Juniors present the boys with something to help them make a clean sweep next year-Whisk brooms. Tuesday, 22-lt looks as though we 'll have to settle down now and get to work since Basket Ball is over. The Seniors are quite busy practicing for their play. Saturday, 26-Boys play Alumni. Al- umni win. Tuesday, 28-M. H. S. boys play W. Sa J. Freshies. W. 8a J. win. 1 Girls play Second team as prelimnary. First team wins. They sure make 'em tall at W. 85 J. Thursday, 30-We wish to take up a collection and buy an alarm clock for Miss Rupp and Mr. Stultz. The tardiness must be stopped. Friday, 31-Rotarians banquet M. H. S. girls Basket Ball Team and Alumni team after a very exciting game of which the former were the victors. The score 21-9. APRIL: Saturady, 1-April Fool. There wasn't any school. We were sorta sorry though for maybe if there had of been we wouldn't have came. Thurrday, 6-We can hardly wait tor the play. Seniors are getting mighty-pale. Hold your own Se- niors-we're back of you. , Friday, 7-Seniors stage "The Hoo- doo" at Strand, It is a wonderful success due to the Director and all star cast. Everyone says it is the best home talent play everi put on in Moundsville. How proud we feel. Quite a few played t'hookey" today. We hope they won't get punished too severely. Monday, 10-Six weeks exams come this week. Again we hold our head in shame. JOKES 'Z'402''Z"I''!"I"!"!"!"!"I"!"!"I''X"I"I"!"!"I"!"I"!"Z"Z"X"I"I''!"X"!"I"!"!"I"!"!"I"!"!"!' 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Teams s. sons E E Established 1883 2 E if 3 E For 39 years we have served E E the students of Mounds- E Z ville High School. 2 2 I E it Z 5 DRUGS--STATl0NERY--PRINTING 2 5 scuool. surruEs Q .313 Of All Kinds E 507 SEVENTH STREET 25' 32 1,4 ?++4+++++++++++++i+++++++++ +9++++'+i+++ - E JAM: osjylwh 'xi 'vs 'Z " or ,O , ah N, V In -J ,f A xsf ' w , . 1, J I W N, V . XM 1 JS f, N! ,Y 1 v v f M if f xf 44 H7 X JI 1 , xr. I Q rw f K M2 M Q in Uv' W ff llwyqfy w I 51,4 wif 'f "fl . f , f K W 1' lx 'JU V 'mf , .. A U5 ,I IIN' ww- h . fMQ j f-U3 , - NN NV' W' S ,ef ,ff 1' HP f 3- . ,gfr,P"'i3 Q Fl N ' 4 X I - -15.5. I - n ' L-I-A -,,' F17 Mm vy- 'rm . "Vx" QC' 1 X f"f fl I ' f 1 1 ' -Q ,' f 1- " ,4 ,H ' Sala' n fl' 'X - ' ' , 1 Q lfianfl -WH f' FI, ff aah iiarlw 0 M- U 4' 1 ' 1 - 1 0, smigw L N l'l,' f P x f fi xx. X I X , 0 1 iii ky . , ' 4- X --NE ix X. ,X , WMM Y 3 X . my 3 eiwlqm Q :Xa X Aww' J v T' Q' ,s:5-,4f - lx .nm IM 3,.,..q'g' rs " I, 'xx ' ' K 5 5?QfgT ' ' . .Mx X " X L 5 - 1 N1 1: iii '. ' QL I . ,,. . - J f- M 'S - X N ?f1 j' :if ff, " :Q ' I . "Q: 95q 1L 1 '4 A .25-f --1., L fy- :21'g " ' ' ' ' 'IYQINIQ uq E PUCK---SEES ALI.---KNOWS ALL Dream Street, Invisible Empire Joke Editor: Orospolitan, Bloundsville, W. Van- Knowing- you have ransaeked your brains, spent many sleepless nights, and spent many hours in quest of jokes, I l1ave decided to end your sufferings by sending you several I have picked up in my never-ending' travels. I hopped on a train to your eity. We went by a miserable burg, Cameron. A mortal was very angry, demanding' the eo-nduetor to stop the train. "VVe donlt stop here any more," said the conductor, Hthe engineer and fi'ameron's station master are sore at eaeh other." The man wilted and slumped down in his seat. I dropped off at Moundsville. I tlew up the street and entered Gandee's restaurant, I noticed they had got a new waiter sinee I had been there. The linger prints on the plate were differ- elit. I am 11ow going to give you a list of jokes I have picked up, together with my deputies in your town and school. NICKNAMES At MIDNIGHT I rode into town. It was IIIIJLY. In the street a kid was yelling for a LOIILYPOP. We went into a store where a- -IEW, who was very SKINNY, was throwing the l3IIIlI.i. A TVVO-GUN man entered, upsetting a STVBII' JI'BII'ER. The STVBII' -IVMPER picked up a HAM and thred it at him. He DUCK-ed, but too late, and the blood began to FLO. MER. Just then a KAT ran in, fol- lowed by a DOGGY, who chewed up the -IEW'S CAP. Then I was i11 DUTCH. The DOGGY was very FLEET. He I3I.'CK-ed me into a ISOIISHEVIK, who stole my tie. Some- one yelled "Ycu better get a TILOCKH With all SPEED I ran to the DOCNS, forgetting to pay my BILL. WIIID- EYE-d I asked him for a eure, Zllld soon I was a WELLMAN, It had been an He pieked up a TATER and hit a FAR- awful KNIGHT. H. S. i++++++Q++++++6+++++++++++++Q+++++9++++++++99+++++++99++++++QZ E A 'I' S 0 ' E + 4 + + E THE HOME OF E 2 KUPPENHEIMER CLOTHING Q 4- AND -1- + + 5 DUTCHESS TROUSERS 5 E VV'atson Clothing Co. E 2 Vorner 'l'hii'd :ind .IeI'l'erson aveiiue. Mouudsville. West Virginia. 3 + + +++++++++++++++++++++++4++++++44++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ Answer to IIB History exam: One of the important battles of the Civil War was that of Yorktown Island. George Washington commanded the Union forces, General -the Con- federates. The South advanced brave- ly, but their ranks were thinned by Un- ion inachine gun fire. The result of the battle was that the British surren- dered. First Telephone Central: Some of the things said o-ver these wires are not fit to be heard. Second Central: You can't expect to work around electricity and not be shocked. Mr. Rogers: What does sea-Water contain besides the sodium chloride just mentioned? Freshie: Fish, sir. Jim-O CAt foot-ball meetingj l nom- inate Gus McMahon for captain. Gus: I second the motion. I kicked a skunk as it went by- The skunk was incensed-So am I. Mr. Auld: What 's the longest word in the English language? Bill Reed: Rubber, it stretches so. Boge: Say, Pick, what is an ortho- grapic projection? Rea Pick: Oh, that's the next lesson in Ancient History, isn't it? Gordon McClintock: l see in the paper that it's raining oil in China. John Duck: Probably the bottom of one of those Texas wells l bought stock in dropping out. Prof. "Now I put the number sev- en on the board, What number in- stantly comes into your mind?" Student: "Eleven I " Old Farmer: Would you like to buy some cider? Toper: Well, is it ambitious and will- ing to work? Mr. Auld: What are you doing Wal: ter? Bud Purdy: Nothing. Mr, Auld: Please do it more quietly. Phool: "What's your idea of clean sport?" 'tSWim1ning I" Professor: "Hick, sit down in front." Hick: "I can't." +69++?+++++++++++++++++++++++h9699994+9++9++9+9+++?+++++++++++ THE PLACE OF AMUS1-:MENT VICTURY PO0L RO0M NICHOLAS GUSTA E 317 JEFFERSON AVE. H MOUNDSVILLE, W. VA. E Q++6++++++++9+4+++++9+++4i6+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ 4+99++++++++++++++++++++++++++++b++++++++++++++++9+i++++++++++ 'P -Z4 -1- -1- -1- -1- -1- -1- 2 ALBERT J. SLOKAN E -1- -1- -1- -1- E Cleaning, Pressing and Repairing E -1- E "Good as the best and better than the rest." E -1- -1- E 125 JEFFERSON AVE. MOUNDSVILLE, W. VA. E -1- -1- -1- -1- '3' 'Z' 944466+++++++++++++++++++++++4++Q46446+++++++++++++++++++++++h "This lets me out," said the jail- bircl, as he swiped the key from the jail- er's poekets. Helen Ernst 1 ls Agnes Vox a friend of yours? Maek Brantner: Yes-what's she been saying about ine now l? Bill VVooclburn: You say you're go- ing hunting? Wlizit for? Barney: Money: Iilll on the cent. Gladys Auteu: What do you think ot' the new fad of wearing socks with a roll in them? Fred Parriott: New? Woiiieii ear- riecl their rolls in their stockings before you and I were boru. Allan Dinsinore: There are some girls around this school so modest they wouldn't do improper fraction. "Johnny," said the proud mother, "You must stop shooting craps. Those poor little things have as much right to live as you." Leo Spoon: You're seared to fight, that 's all. Farmer Lancaster: No, I'1n not. My mother'd find out and liek me. Leo z How will she find out? Farmer: She'll see the doctor going to your house. A genuine excuse is often the most uneonyineing. +4+69+6++9+46+99Q++++++++++++++++++++++++Q++++++++++++QQ+Q9+++ BETTER SHOES 2 Fon E LESS MONEY BAUER'S sl-los sToRE E 210 JEFFERSON AVE. E Q+++4++++++++++++++++++++++++++++Q++94+++++++++++++++++++++++Q 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4' 4' 4' 4' 4' 4' 4' 4' 4 4 Z 'F 4. 4' 4' 4 4' 4' 4' 4' 4' 4 4' 4' 4' 4' 4' 4' 4' 4' 4' 4' 4' 4 44444444444444 444444444 E' if 2 H' 11' se 3 w"Ij g:"" 550 ,..CD 3'2" 5 rwigg '-JUDO 0 3'E.wr'?. 2-'T ,4 oo4EoW in ego C:D o o GEL S2 O -ergw :C-'ns :NVQ UJ"5O:.: EE-963 gd: CD :seef"'::Q- D-NJQ f-+ QSOCD Ce E22 2 1 CD Q mm E ,U 2 5 :g F5 444444444444444444444444 44444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444 A LOOK INTO THE FUTURE As we pass out of the door of youth and schooldays that are gone, but never can be forgotten, we try to gaze into the future of our fellow students. As we do, our first visit is to the confec- tionary that was occupied by Robert Linch, but we find that he is no longer proprietor, but it is run on a very ele- gant plan by Evelyn Cottrell and Aud- da Buckner, As we come down the street we arrive at the '4Old Pool Room." No more do the boys loaf here, but instead is a Library belonging to Chauncy Hughesg and every Tues- day, lectures are given by this inspiring young man on Etiquette. We go on up the line to Wheeling. Here we see Joe Shelton as Mr. Chas. ii ii 4' 4' 4' 31 4' IS 4' Iii 4' 4' 4' 4' 4' 4' 32 4' fl' 4' 4' 4' 4' 4' 4' 4' 4' '4 Zi! 4' 4' '4 4' 4' Iii Ei 4' 4' 4' 1 4' 4' 4' 4' 4' McCamic's assistant lawyer. We even go as far as New York and here we iind Virginia Hughes Cone of the greatest singers of the Metropolitanb singing in the largest opera house, and Mike Brantner who has become John D. R-ockefeller's private Secretary, has a box seat, listening to the voice of a friend whom she had heard in her own home town. It was rumored there that she would rise to great fame. The sight of the opera house fades and in its place is a great gym, A basketball game is be- ing played. The teams are playing for the World's Championship. Here we recognize two of our old guards, Stult- zie and Lewis. How we cheer when 4' 'P4WF44UP4W440F44UF44nF44''44nF44U i pm Sa 2'-2 :ww ...gig Q A Q2 W3 """-1 'tim 5 '44444444444 444444444444 4N44H44M44' 4'44H44'4044'44H44H44H44w44N44N44v44N4 +++++++++++4449+9+49++44+++++999+444694+++++++++++++4+++++4+++ West Virginia Clothing Company ME and BoYs o TFITTERS ++++6++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++44++++++++++h++++++++++++6 the game is over and we find they have lreen selected as the "World's Greatest Guards." We pick up a New York paper and here we see in large head- lines: "Joseph, of Moundsville, the World 's Greatest Prize Fighterfi There our thoughts carry us hack to the old days when Louie used to take the old hall over the line. As we lay the paper down we hear an familiar noise outside and as we gaze out, we see "The Martin Bomber" still driven hy Jew Martin, bringing back memories to many of us. Those who have enjoyed so many good rides in this car. But Alas l Our school days and all our pleasures are over, the happiest hours of one's life. We go over to Vlfashington, and as 4 we pass into the Hippodrorne here, we tind Mary Grandstaft' leading lady in the 4'Gold Diggers" play and as we see Roy Sullivan whose eyes never leave the face of the leading lady, Now we come hack to the homes of our childhood and as we pick up the old Moundsville Echo our eyes meet the marriage of the "Triplets,' Helen Mc- Fuskey, Helen Lipfert and Ginny Riley, which took place at the home of Dr. Mcfluskey. But still the two gangs are left, The Woiiian Haters and The Shifters. In my conclusion I must of- fer a word for our mosquito like Fletch- er, a popular little lad, who is the own- er of a great Duisenberg six, known mostly for its speed and not hy name. 4'Proag." +++++++++++++++++++++++4++64+Q+++++++++++++++++++++?++++++++++ '13 Ii! 'l'llE PARK Sll0E SHI E Pl-lRl.0ll E E 232 Jefferson Ave. E E The Best Shoe Shining Parlor E HE in the City for Ladies and Gentlemen E E Hats Cleaned and Blocked All Kinds ol Polishes 2 ++++4++4+++++++++++++++++++++++++6++++++++++++++++++6+++++++++ 9++++++++++++4+++++++++++++Q++++?+4++++4+++QQ++++++44++++++++4 -1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1- 5 . 93 Tl 99 O CD 3- RJ "1 ru S. i4 pq Q 2: 2 O : P1 um G P-4 5 E. CD N gr O : Ii N 5 A CD Q . If FD Ei 5. -1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1- A TO COLLEGE? MARIETTA COLLEGE 4 3 P W i U1 -Il -I P fi O L" F' U1 C5 E11 9 E offers to young men and women the opportunity to increase E :xx-0 their efficieneyg to have a larger worldg to discover one's cap- 2 i abilitiesg to have new and valuable associationsg to make last- 3 2 ing friendshipsg to choose wisely a calling and to develop a 2 noble character. +4 9+ 3 MARIETTA COLLEGE 2 Z has splendid traditionsg many men of distinction among her 2 Z alumnig high grade facultyg a beautiful and healthful locationg Z Z excellent equipment, wonderful spirit, high scholarship stan- 3 E dards, clean athletics policy, and noble ideals. E Z MARIETTA COLLEGE -3 4 '11 C C Z U G U F-I oo oo ow 9 +++9++ Z IP R7 1-QA E - eil? 9 Q PO CP U T F 5 fi E 'E 'C UD D! CU 'I DU E1 F- Z F1 U C1 if P' +6 P14 CP Z Ov E P-4 C1 ++++++ 3-1-1--1-4--1-4-4--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1-4--1--1--1--1-4--1--1- -1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1-!. 'I' -1- '1' -1- 'I' -1- 'I' -1- 'I' -1- 'I' -1- 'I' -1- '1' -1- '1' -1- '1' -1- '1' -1- -1- -1- -1- -1- -1- -1 -1- -1- -1- -1- -1- -1- -1- -1- -1: -1- -1- -1- -1- -1- -1- -1- -1- -1- -1- -1- -1- -1- -1- -1- -1- -1- -1- -1- -1- -1- . -1- -1- -1- -1- -1- -1- - -1- -1- -1- -1- -1- 1- -1- -1- -1- -1- -1- -1- -1- -1- -1- -1- -1- -1- -1- 2 2 -1- -1- 2 2 -1- -1- -1- -1- -1- -1- 2 2 -1- -1- 2 2 2 2 2 2 -!'-1-+4--1-4--1--1--1--1-1--1--1-1--1--1--1--14--1--1--1--1--1- -1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1- SCHOOL SUPPLIES SPORTING GOODS J. B. DORSEY DRUG CO. Whitman-CANDY-Huyler DRUGS-SODA STATIONERY -1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1- -1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1-1--1--1--1--1--1-1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1-1--1--1--14--1--1--1- O V E R L A N D WILLYS-KNIGHT Phone 252-J OVERLAND GARAGE COMPANY -..L -,gs-fd' 510 Tenth Street S E R V I C E VESTA BATTERIES 99999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999 9 6 9 9 9 9 E E. K. KANNAN E FRANK MAZIC 2 9 9 9 E ' Deere,-in. E TAILOR E E Fruits, Confectionery E CLEANING E E lce Cream, Soit Drinks, Tobacco E PRESSING 2 E Corner Ninth St. and Lafayette Ave. E REPAI Rl NG E 9 E MOUNDSVILLE, W. VA. Z 609 SEVENTH ST. E 9 9 E++++++99+99+99+99999999999999i399+99+++9++++9+99999999999999E 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 "' SWANEE RIVER "' 'I' E E TEA lllllllll AND 35 9 9 9 E SHOE SHINE 5 conrrcnonnnr 5 5 PARLOR .ff E 9 9 9 9 9 9 2 262 JEFFERSON AVE. 2 ROBERT M- UNCH 9 9 Q 9 9 E+++++++9+9999+99i++99++++++++gL+++++++++++9+++9+999999999994E 'T' -I' 'Z' 'I' 3 GEO. M. sci-IAU13 5 9 9 9 9 Q3 Plumblng and Gas and Steam Flttlng 9 9 E Natural Gas Supplies and Sanitary Goods 9 9 E Phone 80-J 604 Tomlinson Avenue Q 9 9 E99+999+99+99+++99+++9+9++99+++++99++9999999+99++++99++9+9999E 9 9 E I-IAVEI Y CU 2 9 9 E The Ideal Servant in Your House? E 9 9 Z Electricity, for lighting and household Z E appliances, helps to make the Home. E . . . 9 E Moundsvllle Electrlc Servlce E E PHONE 289 KREGLOW HOTEL BUILDING E 9 9 999999999999999999999999999999999999+999999999999+999999999999 ++++++++46+9++v+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ 9 4 4 E The Home of the E E 4 9 4 of 4 4 4 slanns a ALLEN E rnnwn a 5 E CHAS. M. CALLAHAN 32, E g++++++++++9??+96+?+++i?46++4+i?++++++++4?+4++++++++6++++4++QE 'I' 'I' 'I' A. H. FERRIS J. n. rnnns a son a , ra az Q Nntmns and 2 ICE Clllllllll Hllll CANDY Q 'I' 'T' 'X' General lllerchandlse Icjniffjivifjged '55 4 W ' Q E LAFAYETTE AVENUE E TELEPHoNE 37912 E Q E++?4+99++94++++4++Q+694694+++gL+i9+++Q4+?+++4++?9+++?++++4+6E 4 4 E Pure Drugs Sundries 532 4 4 E Soda VV'ater Q E "EVERYTHING THE BEST" Special Attention to Prescriptions E 4 9 R. 1-1. GANIBLE gi99+??++++++++QQQQQQQQQQQ++++f?+99+9+++?++++++++++9+++++9++6E 3 3 3 9 4 4 E SHEETS 81 BR0Yl-IES E JESSE .l. Cllllllllllll. E 4 + 9 E Up-t0-D3tg E E a 2: , s Q MILLINERY Q Spaclous 2 E 3 Ice Cream Parlor E -1- 'S -1- 4646+994+++++++++9++++++++++++++++++++9+++++++++++++++++++++++ 499++++++++++++++++++++++++++962++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ -1- -1- 1 WEST VIRGINIA IasIIaIIIIII DLLEGE 1 -1- -1- E BUCKHANNON, WEST VIRGINIA E 2 2 -1- Til......T.i..... -1- 2 2 2 The cultural courses of a modern Standard Z E College afford the surest preparation for busi- E E ness or professional success. Why not prepare E 2 for business leadership by majoring in The Z 3 New Department of Business Admrnrstratlon 3 E and Finance at West Virginia Wesleyan? E 2 I I I I -I1 11- I in-I Z -1- -1- 2 2 -1- -1- Q1 PRESIDENT WALLACE D. FLEMING, D. D., Ph. D. E Z BUCKHANNON, WEST VIRGINIA E -1- -1- -1- E-1--1--1-1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1-1-1--1--1-1--1--1--1-1-1--1--1-.!-1--1--1-1--1--1--1--1--1-1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1-1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1g -1- -1- -1- E E Ross' Famous Coffee Emma's Famous Pies E -1- -1- -1- 2 2 2 1 MARSHALL 1 R 8- E 1 2 2 2 1 1 LUNCH 1 -1- -1- -1- 1 CDU TY 1 1 -1- 4- 250 JEFFERSON AVENUE .g. 2 2 2 2 BA K 3-1--1-1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1--1- 2 2. E Come in, when it does not 2 E E interfere with your studies, E E E for a game of pool. E E E .We guarantee. that there E ole 4. w1ll be no gambling. 4. 2 2 -'- 2 1 W. VA. 1 1 1 22 I'IIsIII1II5 BILLIARD I'III1LOI1 1 -1- -1- -1- -1- -1- -1- +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++i4+++++++4+++++++++++++++++++++++ 44444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444 3 3 2 4 E E Have your eyes examined E 4 4 Z 3' and glasses properly fitted Z 4 . 4 4 3 Congratulations 3 by 3 4 E and 5,2 E -1- , 'I' -1- E Best W1ShCS E 0 ' A ' KE RNS E E to E Registered Optician E 4 1 4 4 E CLASS 22 Eqnwwwi ME 3 , M. H. S. 2 Z 4 2 n E H1-lNSON NEl.0DY Sll0P E 4 4 4 4 4 RALSTON'S SHOE STORE vlcron vlcrnoms 4 4 4 E 242 Jefferson Ave' 2 Pianos in Uprights and Grands E 4 4 4 E E SHEET Music 'Z 'I' Z E Zi-' E44444444444444444444444444444ga44444444444444444444444444444E "' Z 2 Wheeling and Pittsburg Papers E E All the Latest Magazines 2 2 CIGARS, CANDIES and BOOKS E 6 4 Q 4 E E. H. STILWELL, NEWSDEALER 42? E Corner Lafayette and Seventh E 4 4444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444Z 3 Z 3 4 4 + EF, , 2 U. S. BLAIR 81 SON fi 3 Compliments fg 'S Z 2 Staple and Fancy E 4 4 4- -x- , 'I' 2 of EGPOCCPICS 2 Q 4 E C. K. D E Fruits and Confections E E 2 248 JEFFERSON AVENUE gl -2- Z 'I' 44444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444 'I"I''I''I"I"I''I"I"!"I''I"I"I''I''I"I"I''I"I"I''I''I"I"I"I"I"I"I''I"I"I"I"I"I'4"b4'4'4'4"I"I"P'P4"P4"P4'4"P'I"P'I"I"I"P4"I"I'4"P I 3 Z 2 3 Z -x- Y RRY MILL R "' 4' E n. a M. wciscn E Staple and Fancy Groceries E K E E Dry Goods E Up-to-Date and Attractive E 2 M 1 LLI N E RY E Corner First Street and Ash Avenue E E -:Q '!"I"I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' j',,'-x--z- 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' exe 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' E 'I' 'I' 'I' :I:'I"I' Z Z ol- 'I' 3 2 ' 'I' 5 Compllments of 3 4- 'I' -2- 'I' -1- 9 'Z' a NANNA S GROCERY s -1- 'I' -1- 'I' -1- . 'I' 'I' E Phone 454-J Corner Third St. and Ash Ave. 5 'I' E s 'I' 'I' 'I' -1- 'I' 3 , fi- E E 2 1 'WA j 2 4. 'I' : 'I' 'I' 5 1 f nero-DAT: Z 5 4. ' BAKINCI 4- 'I' a f METHODS a CITY COU TY BANK s 'I' E eff X - E 2 If Q 34 ' 1 Z E E ll! Y QSM V 8 Y -il E Z 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' E It's zu fm-t that purity :md vlvzirrli- 2 lu-ss sire- the- YV2li'i'TlYVlll'4TS uf this up-Iu- op Z Z aintv lurking l'SY2lTlTiSTlll11'l1i'. l'i11'ity of E 2 2 Tll2'l'l'lTi1'llYSflil'l'SUll2lT l'Tl'illllTlll'SS uf 3 Z E 1-rrllzlrrhrm-sAfsc-i1-lrtifiv iilllililiitlll of-nur' Z 3 E .F wmwlisliulms :mel lll2ll'1llIll'l'j' :Irv guzlrzln- :Ig . . . 4. 2 tw-rl lu thc- public' wlrmneq- lDlll'l' fund np- 2 Z Z pi-tins lmu- pupulzirizwl nur 1-utlmt. Z tutiono :zzz -1- -1- 'I' vt- -1- 'X' 'I' 'I' 'X' 'I' 'I' 'I' ' MOUND CITY BAKERY 'P 'f 'I' 'I' 'I' -1' -1- 4' -1- -1- '1' 'I''I''I"I''I''I''I"I''I"I''I"I''I''I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I''I"I"I"I''I'4'4'4'4'4'4'4"I'4"I'4'4'4'4'4'4"P4"I"I"P4'4"P'I'4'4'4"I''I"I"I"I"I' ++++++6++++++++6++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ Q 4 9 2 3 'I' + ASK FOR 4- " IIIICIIIIIILII -1- -x- Z THE IINIIIIIII IIIIIJ 4 9 4 BEST RUST Z Z 3 3 5 llllll' ANY E -1- - -z- E Higgs-Moore 35 High School Boys Q Q 9 - 4 3 3 and Girls Come -x- E Bakery E and Bank with us. E E E E 3 3 3 E-x--z--1--x--I--z--z--z-a4--z--z--x--z-4--z-4--x--x--z-4-4--x-4--x-4--x--z--z--z-'zf:-z--z--x--x--x--z--x--:--z--x--z--z--x--z--z--z--x--z--z--x--z--x--x--z--z--z--x--x--z-E E - E -x- -1- E Fairmont State ormal School E -1- -x- 1 9 2 2 E SUMMER TERM---June 12-August 11 FIRST SEMESTER---september 12 -x- -x- E Superior advantages for the training and preparation of Z: E teachers. Strong faculty. Fine library. Well equipped lab- E 'I' 44+ 96+ oratories. Standard normal course. Normal training short Z course. Special courses for renewal of certificates and coupons 3 1 of credit. For information, Write the president, Z -x- -z- -x- -x- 2 JOSEPH ROSIER 5 E FAIRMONT WEST VIRGINIA EE -1- -I- -:- -1- 444+4iii++++++++++++++++++++++++4+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ +'P++++++++++++'P++++++'P+++++++'F4W++4'+'P++++'?++'9'9+++'P++++ 2 2 Liv TIRES AND TUBES OILS AND GAS 2 E S T 0 R A G E 2 'I' 'X' 'I' '-zz! 0 5:3 VlCt0PY Garage S if J. w. WELLMAN :2 e 3 , '55 E Studebaker AUt0m0bll8S Q is 2 Q DAY AND NIGHT SERVICE E ole 'I' 52 TELEPHONE 60 WESTERN SIXTH ST. 'I' -1- ' 4- 'X' 2 2 S: 2 2 2 2 Joe A-Boyarsky A. F. FRA CIS E 2 2 ez- -1- -l 'I' if D , - 2 2: E ea er In E F E -2- 'I' 4' Z Meats and 5 3 E Z GRUCERIES Z GFOCCFIGS Q -x- 'I' 'T' 2 Telephone 348 E Phone 303 2 'I' 2: 2: 'Q 2: 2 Corner Ninth and Lafayette 2 Lafayette Avenue E I 3' -1- +++++ I+ 'I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I' 'I"I"I"I' 'I"I"I' 'I"I"I'4"I"I"I'4"I"I"I"I'4"I"I'4"I'4"I"I"I"I"I' 'I"I' 'I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I''I"I''I''I''I''I''I''I''I''I''I''I'4'4"I"I"I'4"I"I"I"I"I'4"I'4'4"I"I"I"I'4"I"I"I'4' 'I"I4'I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I' READ TI-IE ADS. If tl1ere's anything you Wish, From a hobby horse to fish, Read the ads. Or a rocking chair or dish. Motor car or Lillie Gish, If there's anything you wish, Read the ads. If you want a railroad ride, Ur a raincoat or a bride, Read the ads. Ur a coat of cainel's hide. Or a fattened porker's side, 01' the ebbinfr of the tid-e, Read the ads. If you want some place to go. If you want to See a show. Read the ads. If you'd like to take a row. Buy a pitchfork or a hoe, If you'd cause the wind to blow, Read the ads, If fll9l'6'S anything you need, Lemonade, or garden seed, Read the ads. You don't have to beg: or plead, Till it makes your spirit bleed Just to get the things you need- Read the ads. If you want to buy a fence, Make some dollars and some cents. Read the ads, Whether you are wise or dense. It will make no difference. You will get your reeoinpnense- Read the ads. -Exchange. 'I"I"I"I''I"P'I'4"I"I"I"I'4'4'4"I"P'I"P4"I'4"P4'4"P'P4"P4"I''I''I''I"I''I"I"I"I''I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I' STATE GRUCERY COMl'ANY Distributors of GOLD COIN AN EXPANSIO FLOUR 'I"I"I' 'I' 'I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I' 'I"I' 'I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I' 'I"I' 'I"I"I"I' 'I"I' 'I"I"I"I"I"I' 'I"I' 'I"I' 'I"I' 'I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I''I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' E 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' ii 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I' 'I'f'I' 'I"I' o 4 . Q . Q' 0 5. D. 2' s 9 0? 4 ' P 7 -.I 4 'W Q , gr' . ' Lg 1' fig V, 5 A r' ' U' I r f'f.+' Q e', f f ' fy. Y 1 A. .P .4 ,Q 4 1 '9 il Q 4-1' ' Aff. r -K J 0 '1 , Al 5 . Sir wg ri' ' I ,Wil .Q ,. I I "1 ' '-,N ' - 75" 1 , 'A ' , 'fa E ' A , ,- Ev f . Q A , in ' '-L ! J ' F my I4-.J U, 44, - M Iivg' 441 A ' 'ann :gn A. -p " 7' "'-'K , n ., v. . , ,. " . 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Suggestions in the Moundsville High School - Orospolitan Yearbook (Moundsville, WV) collection:

Moundsville High School - Orospolitan Yearbook (Moundsville, WV) online yearbook collection, 1921 Edition, Page 1

1921

Moundsville High School - Orospolitan Yearbook (Moundsville, WV) online yearbook collection, 1925 Edition, Page 1

1925

Moundsville High School - Orospolitan Yearbook (Moundsville, WV) online yearbook collection, 1951 Edition, Page 1

1951

Moundsville High School - Orospolitan Yearbook (Moundsville, WV) online yearbook collection, 1953 Edition, Page 1

1953

Moundsville High School - Orospolitan Yearbook (Moundsville, WV) online yearbook collection, 1922 Edition, Page 54

1922, pg 54

Moundsville High School - Orospolitan Yearbook (Moundsville, WV) online yearbook collection, 1922 Edition, Page 82

1922, pg 82

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