Montana State University - Sentinel Yearbook (Missoula, MT)

 - Class of 1949

Page 1 of 328

 

Montana State University - Sentinel Yearbook (Missoula, MT) online yearbook collection, 1949 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 328 of the 1949 volume:

l949 Sentinel f- A H A 9 -U5 fx- V3 M, , 4" ' 2 .?', 'DK' w, 'W sf 5 , af' if W A ??n HE if 33539 1. 951- 2 . . We 1 I , JJ .215-iss ?,A iff . ,A .11 'f "dn, w , , G. 1 if fn fl MONTHNR STPZTE UNIVERSITY I949 MKRGERY HUNTER, editor JGHN LEMIRE, business mgr aL - wt .Wg QL UIQ 6- W ll fwf- 1 -1 U AM 4 I Q E ik 9 I 4 Vt ' '79-A 'A-. H 4' 1 4x3- dv. w n,"fI" VW Y 1 -. ffl' ,lf 1 vs I f,1 E i u 3 1 QUIET SUNDAY STEPS, restimq fran peoyle ' . . . two on cr wczlkg the sunny days with HQ qenerczl purpose . . . the Law building QQNS QI zuorcrmrium on study cmd Quioys the sun. L J J 2' 3 TWXW N W Nw 1 Wy QMQ ffm t ZW: , ,Ag afqfa- ? A i..w.asuuuaww0"bf""-ww 'iUlP'-Q-un.Mmq-w- un- -' 5- r wgaum I - f ,ff"' fvy: f X 2 Q if fin iff., 4 Q 1 j 1 :f ff 1 ' , f 'HC Q7' E12 f! I IW' I XR X X X V A j I? Q A ' v ' 2, -A Vs, 7' xi' L ' 9' IU' 'I ff f I v : "I - ' ,I , v' xii 1 'H -If vi' 4 A t JL? .",f v"' 3 7' ' X A Uv ' ' ' ' 1 " i tv ' 'v i x"""'f. 3 f-J-1.. ' Q ' " ' g .g....pf . N REWCDRD A YEARBOOK . . . presumptuous title . . . as if these 304 pages could portray the year for some 3,400 individuals. A theme . . . product of a moment's thought . . . a year's effort to make mentary fancy. the contents fall into the Grooves of that mo- And this is the result . . . one constructed around the other, a yearbook based on a cross-walks, minimized, edited, condensed . . . merely a cross-walks glimpse of a year's ex- istence upon a campus which in its entirety is termed Montana State University. A versatile existence . . . pictured through our eyes as three varieties of walks might be patterned. 19 96 A z. ,, gsm., f. W 1 3 1 ! 1.1 Q, T U - W To the straight and narrow ways, we designated the chan- nelized parts of university lite: the administration, both uni- versity and student, some 200 faculty members, the great 3,400 We cleared the by-paths for the extra-curricularites, the workers in words, the musicians, the followers of university drama, the gregarious belongers of clubs, those chosen few who fill the honoraries' quotas, and those athletes who tread upon the rougher by-paths. We routed the Greeks and dorm dwellers along remembered walks . . . and here also, those time-honored traditions and special days found their way. Hopefully constructed to present a record of the Year . . here is another Sentinel. lt has been compiled and published for those people who walk upon this campus . . . and to each of them . . . it is respectfully dedicated. CONTENTS SOME WALK THE STRAIGHT AND NARROW .Admrmstrotrorr . . . student Teoders . . . toculty . . . semors . , . rumors . . . sophomores . . . freshmen WHILE OTHERS STROLL DOWN BY-PATHS Publrcotions . . . dromotrcs . . . musrc . . . honororres . . . C1111 . . . tootboll . . . bosketbotll . . . mmor sports OR LINGER LONG UPON REMEMBERED WALKS Speciol days . . . dcmces . . . convocotions . . . outside eutertotrrmeut . . . dorms . . . frotermties . . . sororities J 'Im MF 1 x ,W , J ' 1 gvi T gk xg vlird- 7 'x 1 if ' 47 J l Q , 1 .-- 1,1,..f-rv 1-,,, ff," ff ,QI , 1 1 f, f 1 ,ine aia zzz! 1 , fi 1 :J M H 559 ll ' I f' J -fxzili xx -if' : ' hui ' l A LJ! i .ff " .? Z ,- I 2 7 f- ff ur' mx ,K -N1 I fm-X k ' vi: V Q x P ,. Q .5 T "' W., -, x J. .4,w.. Q 'W a Wie, . Q ww A ,.-M.. ,,,,,.,,,,,. ...,,...4f,,,w-4 far' Pr' :LWVZGW V WYQ, fi. '-fm. E, W 'wa -M ,A ' mf M was N 1 vm M ww my 'f ., A 1 wp: :www ma f f W Wsgasuw V-gk ml ,W sfgzvww my Im. W MY w 'diff , f uf fw , 4 ,,., I ,. , , ,..+, My ., zfwwf , any "LW ,MT , X wmv , w, M .. ' . my 1 A ..., 4 , A M v,,2 ' M-wif" M , . W ' ' ,gm ,, M , 2 12 In K 'Eff .vA. 'QP W? fy BQOK CNE x sy 56 'ew J? x M 5 35 6 ii' fx -7 Q xv :fn S X X 9 4535555 Q fwxswixswwwxw' M A ,W we 43 v if if p rv., 1 , if W W.. , f , gk ' QM Q J 5 SQ 'Q' " W ' -N-, , , 0 gf 1 V' '---.., gf 2 ww " . I 4 16+ R ' km Z I I V ! yi nf 159 fwnw, k M , QU Q in f f W www 12 ,, Q raw? y ,JVM 1 1 MM WW W ,. 1 f wfff Z QQ 1 3, W' ' .Q ' W an if , - , FQ Z", I , A J, , as 50 A I fam iff X , "Kg 3 I 989' f it :Z A , ,- 3 5, 'Sy f ' , vs W f if me My J E aim W' 5 Qfr but xg , ' ' ' N , Wm f ' ' ,fffr V 'f1,f,- fa - -Liu km? V ,, ,,,-,,Af.,,h i wh.. A 13' ' ., 'i?l,w,4f ,M ings VMQW s .X , 'M' A,4AA V , Q A Y 4, D 1 .-... Q A if , ' I ' mt 3 hd ZX A .. Q .. wt, QUQV ,N fAA1'. . Q ll 'K ADMINISTRATION ENERGETIC POLICY MOLDERS . . . qovernorsr Cho Cellor, ond Stote boord . . . university odrninistroto ond personnel people . . . ASMSU setup, siude voters' pride ond joy. I ENTHUSIASTIC, YOUNG. PROGRESSIVE . . . President McCain has spent a significant year marked with the success ot Refer- endums 51 and 52. Now, with the expansion hopes a reality and aided by a streamlined administration, the way is cleared for MSU's eighth president. Looked to confidently by tlne state and students alike, a sense of respect and pride is associated with any mention ot ..... PRESIDENT JAMES A. MCCAIN DE WALT PHOTO ' GEORGE A. SELKE, Chancellor of the University I STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION APPOINTED BY THE GOVERNOR, the state board ot education members serve without compensation. Tbey receive and revise budgets, appoint the executives ot CATLIN PHOTOS tbe different units ot the University, and approve staff At top: SAM C4 FORD' EX- appointrnents. Otticto President until lanuaryy l949. Below: IOHN W. BONNER, Exe Officio President since lanuarv 1949. Seated behind table: MISS ELIZABETH IRELAND, GEORGE LUND, VICTOR WEBER, G. M. BRAND- BORG. EMMET RILEY, SAM C. FORD. Secxted in iront of table: MRS. C. F. ULLMAN, CHARLES BALDWIN, G. A. BOSLEY, R. V. BOTTOMLY. Not pictured: CARL BRATTIN. UNIVERSITY DMINISTRATIO LIKE ANY BIG business, the University must have a capable staff to conduct its affairs, both financial and scholastic. Funds must be allo- cated and checked. Students must be guided during registration. Records must be kept. These I men help to manage the affairs of the University. DR. RICHARD H. IESSE, vice-president of the University and a member of the faculty for thirty- six years, is the presidents trouble shooter. I. B. SPEER. controller, helps with the budget, keeps an eye on expenditures, collects student fees. ANDY COGSWELL, director of public services, constantly reminds Montanans that they have a Uni- versity. LEO SMITH, registrar, keeps a complete record of every student . . . issues grades, checks registration, and faculty reports. ll?- -i A23 ie DR. GORDON B. CASTLE accepted a lanuary appointment by the state board ot education as the dean ot the Colleqe oi Arts and Sci- ences. At the same time, Castle was appointed senior academic Dean. Under this new adminis- trative system, he presides over the seventeen departments of the university and co-ordinates the university's entire instructional program. v 'TP' f'9'Q5 v-an DR. GORDON B. CASTLE, Dean ot the College ot Arts and Sciences and senior academic Dean. IAMES W. MAUCKER, Dean and Professor of Education, is director of MSU's summer session. KATH- LEEN CAMPBELL is university librarian. University auditor is E. KIRK BADGLEY. :I-zz 5 17 MAURINE CLOW HERBERT I. WUNDERLICH associate dean of students dean of students UNIVERSITY DEANS AND COUNSELORS HERB WUNDERLICH. congenial dean oi students, Carne to the University from Stanford in Ianuary. Maurine Clow has spent three years at MSU. As associate dean of students she is consultant to all university Women. With these two, dozens confer daily about everything trom grade points to week-end pers. The University has steadily increased its personnel serv- ices in recent years and now has a Well-trained group of counselors. A special group oi advisers, headed by A. L. Kadlec Works with the veteran group. GUY A. RENZAGLIA DAVID S. BRODY CHARLOTTE KILROY A. L. KADLEC A. S. MERRILL senior counselor counseling director counselor veterans' guidance veterans' education MQW 18 PERSONNEL SERVICES ROBERT BREEN vet housing manager EDITH AMES residence halls manager PEGGY LEIGH assistant director of placement bureau Ig GRACE IOHN SON acting director oi placement bureau Iuntil Ianuary, 19497 DR. C. R. LYONS health service director CYRILE VAN DUSER student union manager UNIVERSITY MAINTENANCE AND NEWS SERVICE EARL MABTEI-L T G SWEARINGEN UGWS S91'V1C9 maintenance engineer STUDENT IIM MUELLER asmsu president IIM LUCAS ' ess m busm cmclqer CATLIN PHOTOS ADMINISTRATION 'il CENTRAL BOARD functions as the official adminis- trative body of ASMSU. The strongest political group on campus, Central board offers desirable positions for spring campaigners. After political intrigues have been shelved for the year, Central board settles down Z to the work at hand and conducts its affairs through Z' 'WWA numerous sub-committees. Board members mingle weekly to chart the course of expenditures, activities, and campus policy. A LOUISE MORRISON vice president standing: SOLVIE, BADGLEY, BERGH. FREEMAN, Fnosr. SHALLENBERGER. Fox. BRIGGS. t T seared: KINNEY, MUELLER. MORRISON. Sem G Y PAT KINNEY 'Q ij, T 1 3 n 21 ASMSU M BOOK COMMITTEE . . . publishes the small but reasonably Valuable guide for students . . . contains a color- less account of a not-so-drab existence. ORVIS, chairman: HUNTER, PALMER. OUTSIDE ENTERTAINMENT . . . a moneyless group . . . nonetheless co- ordinates student participation in the community concert program . . . occa- sionally secures visiting orchestras and plays. CROWDER, BUE. PAULSON. DEAN. ANDERSON. ATHLETIC BOARD . . . faced more than the habitual budget worries in a year that saw a thorough shuffling of Mon- tana's athletic program . . . when the smoke cleared . . . MSU was re-coached and athletically directed. FESSENDEN, BADGLEY, KINNEY. MUELLER. LUCAS, chairman: PORTER. PUBLICATIONS BOARD . . . infrequent- ly consulted overseers of the ASMSU- financed written Words. When spring comes, doles out head positions on kaimin and sentinel to voluntary appli- cants. Back row: MILLER, HAWKINS, WUN- DERLICH. LAW. DUGAN. ORVIS. Front row: BERGH. SHALLENBERGER. chairman: VAN DUSER, HUNTER. COMMITTEES CONVOCATIONS BOARD . . . operdtes on d shoestring budget . . . schedules the welcome Fridoy morning bredks in closs routine . . . imports cis much out- side tolent os possible . . . recruits re- luctdnt student totlent. seared: FREEMAN, HARRINGTON. chdirmdnp LUEBBEN. standing: WQRKING. BALDWIN, BUE. HELLAND. SOCIAL COMMITTEE . . . members relieved themselves ot their only mdior tunction when they knocked closed ddtes trom the socidl cdlendotr in No- vember . . . survive becduse ct socidl committee seems cr logicdl inclusion in the osmsu set-up. SMITH, KURFISS. MORRISON. choir- mong BLESSING, SHORT. TRADITIONS BOARD . . . little under- stood committee . . . regdrded by some os the "originator ot trotditions" . . . survived its most ditticult period ot keeping trctditions dlive tor CI student populoice who simply didn't core . . . ornticipdtors ot the new order . . . the ddvent oi the I8-yedr-old regime. IOHNSON, NEILS, HUNTER. choirmdng IESSE, KALLGREN. BUDGET AND FINANCE COMMITTEE . . . horried distributors ot ASIVISU funds . . . hedded by Lucos dnd ddvised by Bctdgley they listened to constont de- mcrnds tor more money, more money, more money, but doled this out judi- ciously. BADGLEY. SARSFIELD, LUCAS, chdir- rnon: LUND, FROST. AW ASSOCIATED WOMEN STUDENTS . . . nearly eight hundred of them . . . send representatives to their council, the laison between university women and uni- versity administration. This group appoints upperclass women to start freshman orientation . . . they meet North hall girls at trains . . . to all new women students, they offer the counselor-counselee coke party. Sponsors ot the Miss Montana program for two years, they set up that administration with its thirty-odd committee members . . . thus they indirectly authorize the Miss Montana Pageant, the talent show and the Coronation ball. Routine duties involve gentle prods at recalcitrant coeds, who, regardless ot jerked social privileges, join others on the dark green oval tor the annual Lantern Parade. Back row: LANSING, RASMUSSEN, BREWSTER MILLER SHORTHILL BERGH, KINCAID. ROBERTSON. DANIELSON HART HUGHES ALBRIGHT BURR, ANTON. Front row: HARTIN. BELL WORKING LUEBBEN WADE s.! 1 MARGE HUNTER MARIAN BELL MARGOT LUEBBEN vice president secretary MISS MONTANA COMMITTEE Standing: LUND, SYNDER, LAWSON, GALEN, BALDWIN, BURNS. IELLI- SON, TAYLOR Seated: SHORTHILL. KIND, BURR, IESSE, CHAUVIN. FIELDS. AWS COUNSELORS Standing: HENNESSY, C H A U V I N BURR, ERICKSON, MCKOWN, HAR TIN, YOUNG, HUNTER, O'SHEA. Seated: MCCREA, IORDET, CRUM- BAKER, FRANZ, LUND, BERGET. treasurer Top picture, store board: standing: MacLEOD, IOHNSON. REUTERWALL. HELDING. sawed: SEVERY. LALLY, McCOLLUM. Bottom picture, Student Union executive board: standing: DRAGSTEDT. GAS- KILL, DAHL, REES, DUGAN, FORSYTHE. Seated: REUTERWALL, chairmang GLEASON, LLOYD, VAN DUSER, WUNDERLICH. STORE BOARD Elective positions insure student voice in the handling of the Associated Students' Store. Few understand either the function or the power of this group beyond store board's offering a few more contendable positions in spring elections. Student Union Executive committee this year found itself the arbiter in a properties dispute . . . settled the matter compromise-fashion . . . settled back to discussing union improvements and problems. STUDENT UNION EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE F7-K ULTY THE WHEELS THAT keep things running . . . guiding lights of the divisions ond professional schools . . . hurndn olier dll . . . iron hdnds in velvet gloves. ai. . ,QQ VK DEAN THEODORE H. SMITH business administration DEAN IAMES W. MAUCKER education DEAN KENNETH P. DAVIS forestry DEAN IAMES L. C. FORD journalism DEAN CHARLES W. LEAPHART law FACU LTY DEAN IOHN B. CROWDER music DEAN CURTIS H. WALDON pharmacy ,.f"'-w 1 wwf.. 7 . LW D A ,Q H-KIRFWSKS ,,i. -vwoxeaemue ADMINISTRATIQN DR. W. P. CLARK qracluate school COL. IAY B. LOVLESS military science DR. I. W. SEVERY biological science DR. HAROLD G. MERRIAM humanities DR. G. D. SHALLENBERGER physical sciences DR. I. EARLL MILLER social sciences REV. CARL L. SULLENBERGER reliqion BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Seated: DeMARIS, assistant professor: EMBLEN, professor: CROW, assistant professor: SMITH, dean: WILSON, as- sociate professor: HOFLICH, professor: HELBING, associate professor. Standing: KILBURG, RUDERMAN, as- sistant professor: RYDELL, instructor: GEORGE, assistant: FISH, instructor' WENDLAND, assistant: DWYER. ini structor: DAVIES. JOURNALISM Seated: DUGAN, associate professor: FORD, dean: BUE. associate professor: Standing: LUSK, instructor: ALCORN, assistant professor: BOWER, instructor: STRUCKMAN, assistant professor. PHARMACY SUCHY, professor: ANDERSON: WAL- DON, dean: M O L L E T T , professor: HAMMERNESS, instructor. EDUCATION Seated: AMES, professor: MAUCKER, dean: SMITH, assistant professor: Standing: FLEMING, assistant profes- sor: WILLSON, assistant: FROST, as- sistant professor: CARLETON, assistant professor. LAW Seated: MASON, professor: RUSSEL. librarian: LEAPHART, dean: POPE, professor: BRIGGS, professor. Standing: FRITZ, instructor: TOELLE, professor: BOONE, instructor: COLD- IRON, assistant professor: SMITH, as- sistant professor. MUSIC Seated: CROWDER, dean: MARVIN, instructor: COLE, instructor: GEDICK- IAN, instructor: WILLIAMS, instructor: CLOWES, secretary. Standing: PERKINS, instructor: TEEL, professor: ANDRIE, assistant profes- sor: LESTER, professor: STROETZ, instructor: STAFFANSON, assistant: ANTHONY, instructor: GRAY assist- ant professor: WENDT, associate professor. FORESTRY Seated: WATERS, professor: SPAULD- ING, professor: DAVIS, dean: CLARK, professor: MORRIS, associate profes- sor. Standing: HEISEL, experiment station: ETTINGER, librarian: WALBRIDGE, assistant professor: MOORE, instruc- tor: BRUNS, associate professor: PAT- TEN, instructor: CASTLES, assistant: HOPPER, secretary. MILITARY SCIENCE Seated: LT. DWYER. MAI. CULLISON, LT.-COL. GOLDEN, LEE, COL. LOV- LESS, MAI. CONLIN, MAI. HAMM, CAPT. RATLIFF. Standing: M :sein MULLER, 'M, SGT. DANKS, M,fSGT. SWANN, M fsar. ALLEN, M fsar. GARNER, M fSGT. B U D 1 N A.. M fser. SNODGRASS, M fsar. HANSEN. ,wt A f BDTANY AND BACTERIOLOGY Seated: HETLER, chairman bacteri- oioqy: SEVERY, chairman botany: DIETTERT, professor. Standing: IEFFERS, assisant professor: HOLTER, instructor: HARVEY, instruc- tor: KRAMER, associate professor. HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION COLE. instructor: MCFARLAND, assist- ant: DUFFALO, instructor: STOOD- LEY, associate professor: SARSFIELD, instructor: WILSON, assistant profes- SOI. PHILDSOPHY AND PSYCHDLOGY BUCK, associate professor: SAPPEN- FIELD, associate professor: ATKIN- SON, chairman, psychoioqy and phil- osophy: MARVIN, associate profes- sor: HAMILTON, assistant professor. ZDOLOGY Seated: WRIGHT, associate professor: CASTLE, chairman, zooioqy: BROW- MAN. professor. Standing: C H A P M A N , instructor: CLOTHIER, assistant: WEISEL, in- structor: CONAWAY, assistant. MODERN LANGUAGES Seated: HOFFMAN, professorp THOM- AS, department chairmang BISCH- OFF, professor. Standing: DURKEE, instructor: SOR- ENSON, assistant professor: SHOE- MAKER, assistant professor: BUR- GESS, assistant professor. ENGLISH, SPEECH, DRAMA SHERMAN, instructorg ARMSTRONG, instructor, MIRRIELEES, professor: HAYDEN, instructorg FREEMAN, pro- fessorg CARSON, instructor. Seated: FIEDLER, associate professorp MacLACHLIN, assistantg BOE, instruc- torg MERRIAM, chairman, department of English and Humanities divisiong MIKALSON, instructorg COLEMAN, professor. Standing: CARPENTER, assistant pro- fessor: BROWN, assistant professor: CLAPP, instructorg MCGINNIS, asso- ciate professorg MOORE, associate professorg SHEPHERD , instructorp HINZE, assistant professor. FINE ARTS DEW, instructor, ARNOLD, department chairman. CLASSICAL LANGUAGES CLARK, chairman, ciassicai Ianquaqesp EPHRON, instructor, EPHRON, M., as- sistant professor. MATHEMATICS CSTROM, assistant professor, GILLES- PIE, instructor, SMITH, instructor, Mc- BRIDE, assistant, MERRILL, assistant, MERRILL, A. S., chairman, mathe- matics department. GEOLOGY HONKALA, instructor, LOWELL, chair- man, geofoqy department. HOME ECONOMICS OLSON, PLATT, professor, GLEASON, chairman, home economics depart- ment, AMES, assistant professor. CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS Seated: HOWARD, professor, chem- istry, SHALLENBERGER, chairman, physics department and physicaf sciences division, IESSE, chairman, chemistry department, YATES, in- structor, chemistry, Standing: IEPPESEN, professor, phys- ics, PFLUEGER assistant, physics, IUDAY, assistant professor, STEW- ART, assistant professor, chemistry, LORY, associate professor, chemistry, HETLER, assistant professor, chem- istry. HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE WREN, assistant professor, ISCH, as- sistant, PHILLIPS, professor and di- rector, museum, BENNETT, professor. Standing: KARLIN, instructor, BATES, assistant professor, CHAMBERLAIN. instructor, TURNER. assistant profes- sor, HAMMEN, assistant professor. SOCIOLOGY AND ECONOMICS Seated: DICKERMAN, ELY. chairman, economics department, BROWDER, chairman department, sociology, TASCHER. associate professor. Standing: HUCK, instructor, ATHEARN. assistant, CARROLL, instructor, MA- LOUF, assistant professor. CLASSES IUST THE 3,400 inmates . . . qreenies to the old schaal students . . . their officers . . . all who make their way down the pathways . . . these, too, will pass . . . ,MF ,VT MacLEOD and SHALLENBERGER E I 0 central board delegates DWIRE LLOYD president vice president CHAFFIN MARTIN secretary treasurer V m ,,,r ' H .ff Inf- 6 Z as A . .' Q I9-49 ON THE RECEIVING end now . . . special benches and all they expect that diploma so spring quarter is lounqey Burly taps the select for Silent Sentinel . . . mortar boards have otticial walk 4 X 1 l F G their day too . . . with the impressive gowns for that last, slow lf'-' ,. K 14 1 ' xt-it 4 43 M, 'URPVY' fi' 2, WA sm QM 5 ' sv ?"1dU1wf sg, ww, ga-......4- -QMWN5 Barrett, Phyllis Socioloqy and Psycholoay Bartlett. Iohn Pharmacy Bauman, Richard Forestry Bays, Bette Mae Physical Education Bays, David Physical Education Beckman, Lois Mae Economics Bessire, lean Pre-Nursing Beveridge, Charles Education Abhary, Hossein Physical Education Adams, William Forestry Agte, Roy Sociology Albright, Ann Spanish Allen, Margaret Socioloay Amole, Warren Pharmacy Anderson, Keith Education Anderson, Vernard Law Angstman. Iames Wilfzl Lite Tech Armstrong, Keith Forestry Arneqard, Mavis Dietetics Arras, Arthur Law Athearn, Murray Geology ,ww Baillie, William Law Baldwin, Roger Law IIM MUELLER . . . forestry senior . . . honor student . . . asmsu prexy . . . silent sentinelite . . . phi sigma . . . ad infinitum . . . his drawling speech and easy manner belie his enthu- siasm and ambition . . . plans to enter private lumber in- dustry. ELEVEN SENIORS . . . representatives ot the seven schools and tour divisions . . . featured here because of outstand- ing achievements in their particular iields ci endeavor. Hard-working, prac- tical young men . . . they typiiy the various pursuits oi graduating seniors . . all of twhom . . . will walk along divergent paths. Brown, Bruce Law Brown, Ray Pharmacy Bryant, Anton Education Buntin, Arthur History Burk, Charles Forestry Burton, Ted Physics Carlson, Doris Spanish Carr, Helen Business Administration Carly, Iames Business Administration Casey, Larry Forestry Chailin, Carol Home Economics Chilton, Michael Law Christianson, Louise Home Economics Christy, Mariorie Sociology Clack, Herman Business Administration Bly. Roy Education Boesen, Marjorie English Bohliq, Richard Forestry Braycich, Ioseph lournalism Breidenield, Ierry Education Brewster, Eula English Briney, William Business Administration Brown, Bo lournalisrn Ktfmf. ' ,R-in us 0 q--fv seas, 951 ,8l0l,,.,., ii- ii, 2' is its -47" N-err-' 03545, 1 .3 S. "-40-Q... 'ASQ Www 9 is f A 35W93i"7T? JIM WK X " .,, wewwf.-.4 'Www' Cummins, Ann Business Administration Cunningham, Fred Law Dahl, Leonard Business Administration Davey, Ann Iournalism Davis, Euel Forestry De Boer, Mark Pre-Med De Bree, Robert Business Administration Degenhart, Ioyce Music De Laluz, Antonio Education Cleveland, Lila Mathematics Cockrell. Alan Pre-Med Cole. Shirley Music Collins. Betty Lou Iournalism Collison, Duane Business Administration Conner, Stuart Law Connick, Harry Law Cook. Abiiah Forestry Cook. Ross Pharmacy Copas, I. L. History Cordts, Howard Chemistry Corwin. Vin lournaiism Coster, Norman Pharmacy Cox, Glen Law Cresap. Paul Law Crissey, Robert Psychology Critelli, Nancy Music Croskrey. Ruth Home Economifs Cumming. Wayne Law Cummings, Luther Prefiinaineering I949 t t t 5 u i i I949 Dockins, William Forestry Donaldson, Walter Business Administration Dotz, Leona Business Administration Driscoll. Iohn Pharmacy Dunlap, Grover Business Administration Durland, Don Forestry Dwire, Mark Economics Edwards, Thomas Business Administration Egan, Maurice Business Administration Elfers. Alice Home Economics Ellison, Stuart Forestry Engelking, Shirley Home Economics Enzminqer, Delwin Iournalisrn Fahey, Marcia Psycholoqy Fanslow, Clayton Forestry Farrington, Harry Business Administration Farris, Martin Economics Faurot, Iames Forestry Fialka, Audrey Pharmacy Firehammer, Robert Business Administration Demmon. Don Education Denend, William Law wwf' 251 .Him QT' Denny, lim Pharmacy Deranleau, Iames Business Administration Devney, Iohn Business Administration Dick, Robert Business Administration Dickson, Clair Socioloqy and Social Administration Diederichs. Mary Margaret English Dipple, Iune Spanish fl' " gulf" 'haw W., rx. 'UW 365 Ks! Fish, Roger Forestry Fisk, Barbara Spanish Flattum, Russell Business Administration Fleming. Thomas Law Fluto, Iames Fine Arts Forister, Thomas Forestry Forsyth. George Business Administration Forsyth, Martha Psychology 5, F ,S 139' ,fwfr 'Q'.l.'5"' ,wr Mb Nfl Geil. William Business Administration Gerdes. Loren Pre-Med Gilbertson, Robert Botany Gisley, Eugene History Gonzalez, Frank Speech Gordon. Donna Business Administration Gould, William Pharmacy Green, lack Law it Forsythe, Barbara Education Fosland, Iordan Law Foss, Larry Law Fox, Richard Education Francis, Charles Business Administration Fultz, Calvin Law Gardner, Robert Law IOSEPH PAVELITCH . . . senior in English department . . . a Czech heritage influences his serious purpose in writing . . . his Mountaineer contributions indicate his ability . . . in- tends to continue writing after graduation. Fil'-""' 35" QQ .1 - f-nfs. - 'L-iii: sz Ltizf . 2' f , ' Mffvz: 't::V:'- ' vm Jw ,gre M , 'stimrjigizt X ' si .Q .. iw-if IFJ-fr'-it ' ' MICHAEL HUGHES . . . law honor graduate . . . success- fully combines a family life with a law student's schedule . . . member of Phi Delta Phi . . . may well anticipate a prosperous legal career. Halberq, Iohn Forestry Hales. Helen Music Hall, James Law Halverson, Esther Sociology Hammell, Myrtle Lu Chemistry Hansen, Aleta Law Hanson, Iames Business Administration Hanto, Norman Business Administration Harlan, Donna Music Hauqo, Orville Pharmacy Hawkins, Paul lournalism Hawkins, Robert Pre-Med I-Ieckathorn, Ira Law Hehn, Edward Business Administration Heisel, Elmer Forestry Greenwood, Barbara History Grieb, Richard Business Adrninistratiutn Grindy, Lois Nursina EdL1ffCIll" in Grove, Suzanne Business Adrninistratif in Grubaugh, leanne Home Economies Guiles. David Business Administration Haqie, Daryl Business Administration Haines, Harriet Business Administration 14: M575 in wb rings-I sei! -in -if fl 6. Jivlk 'lv Cl' 115, 4... 'lk 253152. Wm S RMM w Hunter, Howard Forestry lnnis, Cecil Law and Business Administration Isch, Harry Business Administration Iacobson, Edith Business Administration Iacobson, George Business Administration Ieannotte, Alfred Business Administration Iensen, Doris Business Administration Iezowski, Alton Bacteriology Helding, Iohn Psychology Education Henry, Bill Education Hermes, Harry Forestry Hickel, Kenneth Pre-Med Hillis, Edward Forestry Hines, Edward Hoffman, Iames Education Holderman, Ram Pharmacy Holmes, George Forestry Hoover, Florence Music Howard, Larry Pre-Med Hubley. Earl Education Hucke, Ioseph Business Admi DON LARSON . . . gave up a thriving accounting business to enter pharmacy school . . . honor student . . . heads Kap- pa Psi . . . channelized. energy . . . directed toward a phar- macist's career. Business Administration Henderson, Richard Hennessy, Wallace Business Administration ona nistration IIM CALLIHAN . . . plans a Kalaris, Gregory History Kalberg, Raymond Business Administration Keele, Richard Education Keig, Beverly lournalisrn Kiel, Pat lournalism Kelly, Robert Music Kelly, William Law Kiely, Thomas Law Kilroy, Leo Bacteriology Kincaid, Cecille l-lorne Economics Kincaid, Nancy Modern Lanquaqes Kincaid, William Forestry Kind, Donald Business Administration King, Charles Botany Kinney, Pat Sociology career in music education . . . remembered for his Desert Song role of Ali Ben Ali . . . well known to Montana audi- ences . . . Sinfonian quartet . . . a cappella choir . . . ex- ceptional college record. Iohansson, Karl Law Iohnson, Charles Forestry Iohnson, Iames Economics and Business Administration Iohnson, Roger Law Iones, C. Shelton Business Administration Ionutis, Joseph Business Administration Kaiser, Kenyon Music Kalaris, George Law tu-IQQHA A ac. '19 'Nm wird' 'QP' QW' Law, Mary Fran English Lea, David Chemistry Leaphart, Clark Chemistry Leeper, Sum Education Lemire. Iohn Pre-Med Lenz, Lois Pharmacy Le Sueur, Herbert Business Administration Lien, Bernard Business Administration Linebarqer, Albert Business Administration Kitchens, Iohn Forestry Kitt. Barbara Lou Sociology Kline, Frank Forestry Kobold. Lenore English Kocer, Frank Wild Life Tech Koenig. Fred Chemistry Kopriva, Guy Business Administration Koskinen, Victor Geology Kovacich, George Business Administration Kramis. Audrey Business Administration Kreis, Shirley Business Administration Kronen, Palmer Pharmacy Kurth, Sidney Law Lally, Kay Music Lamb, Carl Education Landry. Ann Psychology Lane, Dave Forestry Lansing, Katherine Sociology Larson, Donald Pharmacy Larson, Robert Pre-Med I949 I949 Lyden, I ames Pharmacy Lykins, Louise Business and Law Lyman, Iohn Forestry McAllister, Marian Home Economics McArdle, Iames Law McCann, Phyllis Home Economics McCarthy, Duncan Chemistry McDonald, Charles Forestry McDonald, David Forestry McGreal, Lalia Wanda lournalism McKinsey, Robert Forestry McLaughlin. lack Business Administration McNabb, Rich Business Administration McNair. Diana Psychology McShane, Shirley Psychology McVeda, Janet Music MacDonald, Helen Music Magee, Phil English Mahan, I ack Law Maitin, Ioseph Business Administration Linse, Eleanor Sociology Littell. Billie English Lloyd, Kathie Physical Education Lodders, Richard lournalism Longmire. Fred Business Administration Lovless, Ianet Business Administration Luetien, Calvin Law Lukens, Russ Mathematics Lund, Einar Business Administration A-N Manlove, Iohn Business Administration Marinkovich, Dan Physical Education Markle, Taq History Martin, Elda lean Chemistry Martinez. Ioe Business Administration Mastorovich, Zorka Modern Language Mathison. Bob Forestry Mathison, Sam Business Administration Matosich, Steve Economics and Sociology Melaney, Iohn Business Administration Mercer, Wally Business Administration Merkle, lack Forestry Merley, Richard Music and Education Miller. Elizabeth History Miller, Pat iii., Minifie, Darrel Law Mitchell. Skip Business Administration Moe. Orris Art Moen, Wilbur F ine Arts Mollander, Dennis English Moore, Iohn F. Music Moore, Iohn P. Law Moody, Fred Business Administration History DON WESTON . . . iournalism maior already ,well on his way towards a career in radio . . . combines a 40-hour work week at KGVO with an honor student's rank in the i-school . . . deserving re- cipient of the Western Mon- tana Press-Radio scholarship. FLETCHER NEWBY . . . gradu- ates in wild lite technology . . . with one of the highest grade indexes in his division. Married and a veteran. New- by received a Duniway award last spring . . . plans to work for his Doctor's de- gree. Nesbit, Annabelle Music Newell. lack Business Administration Newman. Herbert Zoology Nordstrom. Don Business Administration Nygard. Edward Forestry Oase. Betty Io Nursing Education O'Brien. Ed Business Administration O'Donnell. Neil Business Administration 5, Ogle. Clayton Forestry YV THU' Okerman. Gordon Business Administration Olson. Donald Education O'Neil. Richard Business Administration Onimura, Lillian Pharmacy H Osborne. Iohn Business Administration Owens, Frank Pharmacy . 4. Z , ,fr ws' 1 fr uw, ,y Moore. H. W. Iournalism Morrison. Louise Iournalism Mueller. Iames Forestry Murphy. Calvin Business Administration Myre. Hilda Economics and Sociology Naugle. Carl Education Nelson. Gary Forestry Nelson, Russell Wild Life Tech sive bw 'wa-mb., .pflhs K" J., !!"'?fv gk 'L-sv-f Rik wr-CJ -it U9 mn at '-up wmfx Y 'W'-v 'Navb- in 'Ghag- tain, 'Pk Us 'i' 591 .fvsfx wx .'. 7 'Lan 1O0QJ5" ' 'bud 'lv- 1 100: 'kv' 'QED- Nr' Peterson, Iohn Education Peterson, Ruth Pharmacy Pettinato, Frank Pharmacy Petty, Robert lournalism Pew, George Music Phillips, Aaron Education Phillips, Stanley Education Porter, Hammitt Law ..,,f"' Palmer, Loren Iournalisrn Pappas, Mitcho History Parke, Robert Botany Parker, Charles Pre-Med Parker. Maude Parmeter, Deanne Patterson. Edward English Patton. Robert Forestry Paulsen, Bud Pavelich, Ioseph English Peacock, Clyde Forestry Peacock, Iames Pre-Med Pederson, Don Law Peirce, H. W. Geology Perry, Robert Forestry IAMES IOHNSON . . . econ maior . . . after graduation he plans to begin all over again . . . next time in law . . . he leaves the university with a near-perfect record. Business Administration Physical Education Business Administration ,fr DAVID LEA . . . president of the Chemistry club . . . honor graduate . . . plans to do research as an industrial chemist . . . has accepted an offer from the Institute of Paper Chemistry. affiliated with Laurence college. Regis, Bernice Business Administration Reuterwall. Tore Business Administration Rine. Virginia Home Economics Ritenour, Katherine Socioloqy Risken. Blanche Business Administration Robinson. William Psychology Rogan. Edward Education Bounce. Barbara Music Rowton, Lucy History Rupp, IoAnn Home Economics Ryder. Spencer Business Administration Sales, Walter Business Administration Santoire, Armand Geology Savaresy. Carol Music Schara, Iohn Law Posey. Fred Education Prothero. Iohn Law Pugh. Clyde Forestry Ragsdale, Icrmes Business Administration Rapp. William lournalism Rebal, Donald Business Administration Redpath, Mary Eleanor Psychology Rees, Ralph Business Administration ill nvn.""' 4U"- 'lu K, 4!'Ff"" hr lv- 'xt 'D 'fm Schofield. Donald Music Schommer. Earl Business Administration Schwend. Harold Education Schwenneker. Paul Psychology Selstad. Tom Education Sethre. William Business Administration Shallenberger, Katherine Home Economics Shank. Henry Forestry Shcrrdlow. Thomas Iournalism Sheets. Lowell Business Administration Sheffield. Ioan Bacteriology Sherlock. Henry Education Short. Don Business Administration Shuder. Connie Sociology Silvernale. Ardis Physical Education Silvernale. Craig Forestry Simpson. Charles Forestry Skeie, Ellsworth Business Administration Skemp. Kenneth History Smallwood. Kenneth Geology Staley Martha I 9 I 9 Taylor, Iohn Business Administration Thompson, Charlotte Sociology Thompson, Maurice Education Thornfeldt, Paul Pre-Med Thorsrud, Ed Business Administration Throssell. Rowland Education Trerise, Betty-Io History Troyka, David Business Administration Turcott, George Botany Turley, Daisy Sociology Unired, Iohn English Vande Bogart, Florence Law Van. Delinder, George Pharmacy Van Sickle, Robert Psychology Verbeek, Iohn Forestry Verdon, Paul lournalism Vernetti, Rosemary Home Economics Vickers, Iohn Pharmacy Vinie, Peggy Sociology Walstet. William Pharmacy Stevens, Elmer Business Administration Stevens, Iohn English 'Q' 'ls MIS 'Qi R Stevens, Stanford Business Administration 9 4 9 Strand, Ommund Business Administration Stratton, Homer Forestry Svennungsen, Amos Education Sylling, Hans Business Administration Taiiala, Larry Pharmacy Taylor, Ieanne Fine Arts 'Maw 91890 il was Wu 'lm'- W2 fis- '99 gilt gnu, viii, DID in et 'Gr Q' Walker, William Forestry Wallander. Ierome "i??"i't"1'1"' film, 'Winder' Law Watt. Kernal Wild Life Tech Weber, Iohn Forestry Weir, Iames Education Wenstrom. Harold Education Weston, Don lournalisrn Wetzsteon, Astrid lournalism Whitmer, Parks Education Williams, Cecelia Social Administration Wooley, Robert Music Working, Dorothy lean Political Science Wuerthner, Iulius Iournalism and Philosophy Zelmer, Viola Music Zibell, Robert Political Science Zimmerman, Aaron Mathematics Smith. Elaine Art Voorhees, Paul Business Administration Wi'son. Dola Business Administration VVilson, Dorris Music Wiltzen. Harris Forestry Wirth, Iames Business Administration Wojciechowski, Blanka Pharmacy PARKS WHITMER . . . rated outstanding student teacher by both Dixon and Missoula high schools . . . transferred from Indiana State in 1946. With major work in both sci- ence and mathematics, he plans to stay in western Mon- tana to teach. 'nfl-'57 LEONARD DAHL wlnner of the Montana Bankers scholarshlp th1s year v1ce presrclent of the bus1ness admrnrstration honorary A1 pha Kappa Ps1 spec1a11zes 1n accountrng plans to enter a bankrng firm after graduatlon Hurly, Robert Graduate Garrison, Phyllis Graduate Lapine, Eva Graduate Lawson. Martha Graduate McFarland. Carol Graduate Standitord. Shirley Graduate Willson, Robert Graduate Zuercher. Imogene Graduate Burgett Earl Educatton Riley Marvin Busmess Admmlstratlon Haig Ski-waxing Haig. And Listening to Swimming A? K Frankenlield, Iohn Graduate Gallagher, Kevin Graduate 'G JLI IDRS LAURA BERGH and DAVE FREEMAN central board delegates LEX MUDD BOB ANDERSON KAY HENNESSY secretary vice-president treasurer I9O L . 'NN 2,4 'S--, ' IUNIORS DEVELOP THEIR orderliness . . . yet Continue their undergraduate flair for fun . . . even Waste tiny hours in the coke store. With their third year ambitions, they extend a more channeled exhuberance . . . represent the biggest fraction at the campus crowd . . . and finally settle down to work. F G' j QW f J! ,. 4 A E 57 Abbott. Frederick Ackerman, Ramsey Agostinelli. Vergil Aiken, Ernest Albert, Dean Anderson. Anderson, Anderson. Anderson, Bill Bob Bruce Harold Andrus, William Annala, Andrew Anton, Xenia Armstrong, Howard Armstrong, Laurence Arnich, Frank Arnold, Roy Aserlind, LeRoy Aspevig, Roger Auer, David Baldwin, Ierry Bangle, Edward Barsness, Dick Batzner, Richard Baun, Albert Beakey, Iames Beebe, Robert Behrens, Charles Bell, Iames Bell, Marian Bennett. Art Bennett, Mary Berg. Iohn Bergh. Laura Best, Barbara Beumee, lohn Biggerstaft, Reid Blanchard. Lois Blanchard, Ralph Blessing, Ianet Boschert, Sarah First row, left to Bourdeau. Fred Boyd. Morty Bowker, Robert Brandt, William Brenden, Orval Bridston, Iohn Briney, Frank Britton, Bette right: Second row: Brown, Martha Brown, Robert Brown, Rockwood Bulen, Trudy Buley, Ioseph Buller, Ierry Burch, Arthur Burchak, lay JU IORS-JU IORS-JU IDRS Third row: Burns, Robert Burke, Iohn Bush, Bill Bushong, Clayton Byrne, Paul Cacavas, Tom Caldwell, lack Campbell, Don mmm? 5-BUNNY or fax Mgwmvue ,stage yer -emu.. 665' Mm 233. ,awww Nagy "Om arreivrv. ,pav- I-dAl0lf"" ,wffvw M3491 mf K Fourth row: Canavan, Iune Carson, Helen Carstensen, Dick Cascaden, Milton Chapman, Fred Christensen, R. H. Christianson, Iill Click, Shirley Filth row: Bottom row: Clifton, Kelly Cope. Robert Cline, Ioanne Cotter, Rose Coggeshall, lack Crissey, Helen Cole, Charles Criswell, Don Collins, Io Crumbaker, Mary Io Conklin, Richard Dahl, Vic Conver, Don Dalrymple, Iune Coombs, Leonard Damon, Robert 4 ' N54 ,av--f vnu' , 'YY "'W"' 4-rf fm an-. wtf Mfr AWG- .-:rs fi-ax 'Q -9 ,::f:s vnu'-K is-+ B-ww? N.,....r' -qj-rn., 11595 Juni- wsu-.Q...,,, KUW QQ: LA 59 JUNIQRS - .IU IDRS - .IU IORS Danielson, Ioyce Davis, Iere Dawe, Ramona Delano, Iim Dempsey, Gloria Denny, March DeVore. Kent DiRe, Henry Dolan, Ray Domke, Howard Douglas, Fred Doyle, Dick Dresner, Edith Eastman, Ruth Eckmann, Wallace Edwards, Iim Third row: Elbert, Clyde Ellison, Alfred Engstrom, George Fauchald, Melvin Feinblum, Melvin Fields, Iohn Fink, Gregory Fischer, Garry Fourth row: F ischer, Vince Fitzgerald, Frank Flamm, Norman Floyd. Virginia Flynn, Pat Folkestad, Charles Fox, Charlotte Fraser, Carol Fifth row: Fredericks, Bradley Freeman, David Galen, Albert Garmoe, Robert Garmoe, Walter Garrison, Charles Garwood, Louis Gaskill, Albert Sixth row: Gaudin, Melvin Geis, Anthony Geitke, Mont Gillespie, Bob Gilmore, Gene Gin, Iohnny Goehry, Stanley Grail, Alex 60 Graff, Donald Graham, Iim Grant, Norman Gray, Charles Greene, Arthur Gregory, Horace Griffith, Dixie Grimes, Bruce Hagenston, Gunder Hahn, Harry Haight, Neil Hall, Lura Hanger, Harold Hanson. Dwain Hanson. Grace Hardie, Bea Harrington, Don Harris, Don Harrison, lames Harrison, Iohn Hartin, Barbara Hartsell. Paul Harwood. Bob Haynes, Iohn Hebert. Howard Hegland, Alman Heilman, Edward Heimes, Ioseph Heintz. Howard Helding, Bob Hendrickson, Carl Hennessy, Catherine Henretta, Pat Hensley, lack Hilgenstuhler, Ted Hilger, Henry Hoagland, Ioan Hoffman, Edward Holmstrom, Bob Holt, Harold Holter. Robert Holton, Robert Homes, Edward Horn, Norma Howser, Marilyn Hoyem, George Hoynes. Duane Hunter, Marge Hunthausen. Tony Hurlbert, Alfred Hyatt, Gene Ingersoll, Oliver Ingham. William Irwin. Iohn Iackson, Alan lackson. Marcella Iames. Bob Iansen, Arthur Ielks, Rukin Iellison, Dean Ieszenka, Donna Iohnson. Arthur Iohnson. Hubert Iohnson Don Iohnson. Keith Iohnson. Norma lohnson Phyllis Iohnson. Robert Iohnson. Royal Iohnson, Sid Iohnson. Virginia Iones. I anet loraanstad. Sigvart Iordan, Arthur Iordet. Iean Ioscelyn. Alden Iunek, Rhoda Kafentzis. Chris Kalaiatic, Andrew Kallqren, Gene Top row, left to right: Kautzmann. Emil Kelly, Danette Kelly, Thomas Kern, Charles g Kincaid. Iohn l King. lack 5 Knapp, Norman X Kobelin, Warren Second row: Kolppa, Marian Korn, Dan Kreitel, Veronica Kruzic, Frank Kuburich, Steve Kuchinski, Carolyn Kuffel, Connie Kumpuris, Mike JU ICRS-JU IDRS-JU ICDRS Third row: Kurfiss, Lorraine LaBonta, Bob Lampen, Margaret Langenbach, Bob Launsbach, Betty Lawson. lack Levine, Ierry Liggett, Marion Fourth row: Limeberger, Margaret Losleben. Roman Lovless, Velma Luchau, Richard Luebben. Margo Lund, Doris McCarten, Grace McCrea, lohn Fifth row: McDonald, Peggy McDonnell, Ianet McElwain, Iames McGinty, D. E. McGlynn, Lynn Mclnroe. Iames McLatchy, Larry McMahon, Iames Bottom row: McRandle, Iames McVey, Hal Mackey, Locea Magelssen, William Malone, Iack Martin, Francis Martinez, M. R. Mathews, Miller 4 'T H ll T Qy 1 i 63 JU IORS -JU IORS - JU IORS First row, left to right: Mattson, Eunice Maurer, Iames Meehan, Gloria Messelt, Virginia Miller, Dale Miller, Iohn Miller, Laura Miller, Warren Second row: Miller, Wilbert Mitchell, Wilmer Moe, Artha Lee Moore, Leonard Moran, Robert Morey, William Morgan, Bob Morris, Myrl Third row: Mudd, Lex Mundy, Grant Muriitt, Zane Murray, Betty Murphy, lim Murphy, Ioe Naumann, Virgil Navratil, Theodore Fourth row: Nedds, Eldon Neils, Marilyn Nelson, Dorothy Nelstead, Keith Newstrom, George Newton, Minnie Nicol, Robert Noland. William Fifth row: O'Brien, Iohn O'Donnell, Malie O'Donnell. Robert Oelker, Floyd Olney, Rosemary O'Loughlin, Iack Omlie, Iames O'Neil, Bob Sixth row: O'Nei1, Ivan Opitz, Iames Owens, Pat Page, Ralph Palm, Phil Parmeter, Betty Parsons, Clifford Pase, Charles 64 Payne, Pat Peterson, Dale Peterson, Don Peterson, Roger Phillips, Anita Plumley, Vern Pomroy, Peter Popham, lean Popovich, Ruby Preunninger, William Rainey, Patricia Ramsey, Walter Rapp, Margaret Rasche, Beverly Rasmussen, Gretchen Rasmussen, Lawrence Rathbone, Kenneth Regan, Dick Remington, George Replogle, Bert Rhoades, Sylvia Rhodes, William Ritchey, Donald Rizzonelli, Don Robb, Norman Robbin, Iames Roberts, Donald Roberts, Gene Roberts, Tom Robertson, Ianet Robertson, Iesse Rohan. Frank Rolfson, Bob Ross. Turner Rostad, Barbara Roney, Claud Ryder, Arthur Samuelson, Gordon Sassano, Michael Scheeler, Robert Nw .JSKQRQ iw? f- M99 Schenck. Mary Hunter Schmitz, Walter Schofield. Daniel Schulz, Robert Schwab, lohn Seier. lim Seliski, Bill Sell. Sally Selvig, Vern Sieminski, Ioe Servoss. Frank Shelton, Ed Shepard. George Shorthill, Pat Shultz, Don Sigg. lake Silvernale. Roger Silvey, Bruce Simons, Frances Siogren, Carl Smith. Elnore Smith. Ioan Spartz. George Smith. William Spraycar. Harry Standiiord, Alvan Stanton, Harold Stermitz, Bob Stevens. Al Stevenson, Iohn Strope, Phillip Sullivan, Mark Svingen, E. L. Svoboda, Bob Swanson. Donald Swanson, Robert Sykes. Robb First row, lelt to right: Sylling, Neil Talent, Donna Talent, Golda Thompson, Burt Thompson. Thomas Thorsrud. Gar Tingle, Iim Tirrell, Iack Second row: Torgerson, Audrey Tourikis. Mabel Tovey. Thomas Tschudin, M.W. Tucker. Carl Turman, George Ulrich, David Vachal. Stanley .IU IDRS-JLI IORS-.IU Third row: Van Horn, Alan Van Horn, Lee Van Sickle, Iames Vennetilli, Adam Voorhees. Ruth Wallace, Glenn Wallin, Elsie Walsh, Emmet Fourth row: Waters, Marian Ward, Bob Warlord, Roger Wark, Carl Way, Beverly Weedman. Frank Wesen. M. O. White, Edmond Fifth row: Willey, Dorothy Willey. Richard Winters, Iack Wise, Harry Wolpert, Ioe Wood. Iohn Woods, Robert Woodside. Don IDRS Bottom row: Wray, Richard Wright, Charles Wright, Phyllis Wuerl, Clayton Yelsa, Charles Young, D. R. Young, lack Young, Robert 67 if ' X ff x ': w My e. y 1: wi , yy :iff-swf., i pen x -X X - , ' fy ' -' 'kteeeweswgf Nw--W I' f e f 1 4 w, f-"Q 1:-Z.-'Ga' S-4'3:iH IWC-'4iT-:1?:hSk.xZ. ' '-,-:-Ut: b3'.-.dr:,'i'b' : , . Y - .X , f1i9'zN?'Q '- 2 3 .: ,sry -me ww 2533 EW ' X ' 5 ' WU" X Yiicizii , if 3 9 ,N ,L f- , ' A.-' ggmfx 5. H -- , 5 ,- ggf, .ww ' s 1 gfmi-x ,' ' ::, ,-fill , gms we X 'S f.-We -Q11 V , K if -In i . wwfmf' 1 :xii ' Q4 1 32444-'M i :' , , -Q, W U emaw 'A 5265--,g::.3.,.2:-5f.,I1l L .M ' f: ' . 4a 1 1542 1 - 2 2 ,Mo ,Jr " 1 4 'r Ag: -effif ' F S GL 'L X22 :Q El 1 X ' K ff ,, ? 1. 4 ' ' e f"Wf'w1G'? fy Mer w w" . 1 ' ' X YU Q' - . 3 f 1 434 A ,,p'r1fqx,1.3fx s , ' X f- 5 V Q . I 5 5 -.XQRQ 'rex W ' ,, Q x .vi n 57 . 1 ,A ' ' f-li? 4 H J 'f1"pp, f , 'Q M 6' , , ,.fy,V egg ,, W gfffgfrjfz am KQXJF X , , N central board deleqczte A IEANNE IONES BETTY BEA YOUNG vice-president secretary' Q G' 14 Q I ' if ' .e l9I SOPHOMORES TOEING THE mctrk . . . rectcln for new objec- tives . . . enjoy themselves . . . leisurely move into the campus walks . . . and tiqht the elements. Lots ot noise . . . activity . . . they pursue their courses. seam ,,.. .Q dkaib- ww :gym www ff-fm A5 .-aww .ww N., 5, Wim 49156 SOPHOMORES - SGPHOMGRES 70 Adams, Robert Alderson, Alice Alt, Bernard Andersen, George Anderson, lim Anderson, Marjorie Anderson, Maxine Anderson, Ralph Angstman, Anne Armstrong, lack Arntzen, Doris Ashworth, Iohn Ask, Tom Baillie, Wanda Bain, Lois Baldwin, Betty Barker, Gretta Barrett, David Barrett, Howard Baugh, Don Beatty, Benjamin Beckwith, Ioan Bennett, Hal Bennett, Robert Benz, Pat Berget, Billie Lou Berland, Betty Birkett, Lee Blenkner, Wlliam Blinn, Pat Bloom, Herbert Booth, Charles First row, left to right: Bosch, Margaret Bourdette, Warren Boyd, Herb Boyd, Pat Bradley, Aletha Bradley, Donald Bndenstine, Keith Brmton. Elaine Second row: Brown, Gay Brown, Ginger Brown, Mona Browne, Douglas Brownlee, lohn Bucher, Margaret Bulen, Virginia Bundy, David Thtrd row: Burgess, Beverly Burke, loseph Burkett, Bill Burkhart, Patty Burlingame, Larry Burr, Donna Bush, Clarice Butcher, Emmett Fourth row: Campbell, Robert Cannon, Ross Caraway, Charles Carleton, Trudi Carroll, Pat Carter, Harley Cash, Walter Chalfin, Everett Fifth row: Chapman, Betty Chauvin, Lois Chieslar, Eugene Child, Merline Choate, Lois Clearman, Francis Clinkingbeard, Iim Cochrane, Al Sixth row: Cole, Donald Coleman, Edwin Conner, Charleen Conover, Dale Cook, Earl Corning, Iames Crissey, Virginia Cunningham, Shirley SOPHOMORES SOPHOMORES Bottom row: Curry, Ianet Davidson, Gayle Dean, David Dean, Douglas Delaney, Betty Ann Dennison, N. L. Diettert, Gerald Donohoe, Irene Annan., , ,fi 'F L V 4- 12 17" mmm-4 'Vik ,qqg 10139141 SPCA, 'Wm wks. 3223322 sm bfia 'EW' ffm ' WW 'lik sm ,,w-953' 'Wm 'Mn dm HN, adw " WNW 'Nas WI we SOPHOMORES - SOPHOMORES Dontiqny, Delores Douchette, Bill Dowen, Nancy Drennen, Bill Dudley, Ieannine Dufresne, Florence Dunbar, Byron Duncan, Clyde Dunlap, Leslie Duval, Robert Dyer, Gwen Egqe, lack Ely, Harriett Emerson. Ralph Enebo. Doris Erickson, Barbara Estes. Ioseph Evans, Ann Fabert, Melvin Felt, Denise Fenell, Klas Ferguson, Gladys Ferguson, Janet Fields, Nancy Fillner, Russell Fisser, Herbert Flightner, Carol Forbes, Dale Fosland, Marian Fox, George Franklin. Terry Franz, Louise Second row , Fourth row: First row, left to right' Frette, Margaret Friede, Bob Fry, Marybelle Fulton, Colleen Furlong, Noel Gallagher, Francis Gartman, Theodore Gaskell, Bill Geary, Edna Geary, Ioe Gerhardt, Celia Clendenin, Melvin Goodbar, Stan Gopian, Isabel Grabow. Diana Grenaqer, Lyle Third row: Hall. Glenn Hanlin, Helen Hanson, Mary Anne Harper, Albert Harrington, Dorothy Harris, Mayre Lee Hays, Ioyce Hector, Caroline Heinen, Margaret Heinrich, Ruth Heitmeyer, Vera Helland, Frank Helming, Bruce Helton, Paul Hennessy, Pat Henry, Robert Fifth row: Herrington. Roscoe Heyer, Rosemary Heyn, Charles Hoffman, Wallace Holt, Larry Honey, Imogene Hoyland, Richard Huchala, Gene Sixth row: Humiston, Bill Hutchings, David Ingersoll, Bruce Ingman, Bob Iackson, Mrs. Bynum Iasperson, R. W. Iesse, Margaret Iohnson. Albert SOPHGMORES SOPHOMORES Bottom row: Iohnson, Mary lane Iohnson, R. A. Iohnson. Robert Iohnson, Stan Iohnston, Wylie Iones, Ieanne Iorqensen, Robert Ioyce, Norine ,y-4, 'Wm 4:-P? 64 .af'4s. 'UW' lwa. .,,.., 4-swf, 'W 2, 'blaze ,fan QVV Wa. 'ffl mf, in A.. we I F, X41-wp, V -ww., 'KY' WW ez., We-... Mem, 'fwxwv ew "- 'av 'Wa 'ui . Aux 'WP' 5vrvwl NRM' SJR ' gl... Ninn A 511.4 vii, ' SGPHOMORES - SGPHOMORES Iurovich, Gene Kampschror, Keith Kell, Dawn Keller, Mary Kelley. Bob Kelley, Mary Kessler. Donald Kiely. Iaclc Kind, Yvonne Kingsford. Tom Knoop, Iohn Korn, Norman Kosnick, lack Kratolil, Ioe Kraus, George Kruger, Lawrence Laas, Edna Lacklen, Ted Lambros, Helen Lang, George Leuschen, Irene Linse, Richard Little, Charles Lovell, Chuck Lucas, Richard Lueclc, Mary Luedtke, Walter Luhman. Fred Luke, Alvin Lust, Ada McArthur, Marvin McChesney, Bill Top row, left to right: McCrea, Mary Carol McGlothlin, William McKown, Shirley McLatchy. Pat Maclay, Bruce Manthey, Barbara Martinell, Bob Matheny, Ray Third row: Miller, Duane Miller, Walter Moe, Peder Motchenbach, Frank Moyer, Shirley Murray, Virginia Needham, Don Nelson, Beverly ,OUNV5 Second row: Matson, Diana Maxwell, lean Menzie. Shirley Merrill, Helen Middleton, Tomme Midtlyng, Ioanna Milburn, Roxie Milkwick, Norma Fourth row: Nelson, Helen Newton, Iames Nordwick, Bennie Nore. Barbara North Levonne Odden, Beverly Oeschli, George O'Neil, William Fifth row: Osborn, lane O'Shea, Michael Ott, Vernon Parker, Bill Patten, Donald Patterson, William Patton, Glenn Paulson, Forest Sixth row: Paulson, Lloyd Payne, Tom Payton, Don Payton, Kenneth Pederson, Clara Peirce, Lucile Penner, Herbert Perry, Marjorie SOPHOMORES SGPHOMORES Bottom row: Peterson, Elmer Philips, Donald Pierce, Bonnie Pilati. Paul Piper, Leonard Porter, Allan Porter, Scott Price, Ernest ,,,.,vav-f 'UPS' , .wh - f My Wm wil? lm, -It sr.. .4'Cl',T' f-15,3 'ii ,v-1,7 ewa- asa We frm' ,ww nk Q., -1:5 :gi ' 'fi' MRQ' +9 ,HRW all - sox wither Rn- Wm ,xg -vin.. .vs-.K 'f SOPHOMORES - SGPHCDMORES Purcell, I. G. Quesenberry, Iames Rademaker, Ton Reed, Dallas Remler, Robert Reynolds, Don Richardson, Ianet Richmond, Patricia Riggs, Louetta Ring, Donna Ripke, Ralph Robertson, Merton Robinson, Dale Robinson, Lee Ronning, Iim Rostad, Orville Roth, Ioel Roy, Mildred Rustuen, Rita Rutledge, Les Salter, Charlene Sanderson, Io Ann Sandvig, Earl Saylor, Kenneth Schelling, Blaine Schmidt, Anita Schultz, Pat Schuman, Theodore Scott, George Seibert, Grace Shipley, Roy Siebert, Fred First row, left to right: Simkins, Robert Simmons, William Sinnott, Mariorie Slingsby, lim Smith, Beverly Second row: Snow. Iames Speilman, Iohn Stamp, Doris Stewart, Charles Stewart, Gordon Strand, Louis Stroup, Helene Suchy, lohn Third row: Swanson, Dean Sweeney, Catherine Fourth row: Thompson, Edna Thompson, Lorna Thoreson, Glen Topel, Teresa Urquhart, Dorothy Van Delinder, Dallas Vecker, C. F. Wade, Marie Filth row: Wall, Elizabeth Walsh, Carol Waterman, Charles Webber, Garene Weir, Dennis Weldenhalt, Rich Westman, Fred Wilkerson, D. E. Sixth row: Wickizer, Charles Widenhoter, Allan Wilde, Wayne Wiley, Bernice Wilhelm, l. I. Wilson, Robert Whalen, Io Ann White, Iames Seventh row: Wolpert, Martin Woodahl, Pat Woods, Iesse Wylder, Iim Yardley, Dan Young, Betty Yuhas, Melvin Collins, Reid Sweeney, Marie Swingley, Boyd Taylor, Elsie Teel, Eleanor Thomas, Iosephine Thompson, Drusilla mul MM.,-f H099 Mlm we -me QWW- answ- ,gliwx ' DICK WOHLGENANT Central board delegate FRE HME STANAWAY HART president treasurer OLSON PERRY secretary vice president x-mrrwwvvez -1- ' ' ' V 5 P P Zffg 1 V0 W ,Mft . T 773 l .W-Mm,-.Q A - l . K I , I 14 , , 4 In JIM V , ,V 2. W ,.... , a ' W J , fm 'MI' 8 A . i , . 2' , 4 4 0 . 4, Q V. as V . Q .I I ' ' ' 6 Q i P lg - Q 5 6 1 ,Q . 4 ' ',,. C' ' ' f 4 ' i AV s vflwf: l 2 fi , Q, 'tra ., 'Yi lf ' ' 513 a':+'Wf t f ' . a L. ,l 5 M1u"w"', , M WV ,Zi ' ,344 N N 'W' ' ,....... l952 "W" ' A ' 4 u H . Pt . if 55 , Sir 3? 1 x it f 'V 'fi' , L' , - . , U A ' iw 5 , A Q! is N 'Exif ,P . , Q1 1 1 ami? - 1 r V s w., ,gt A V..V3g.1, MV? V MQW, 4,,,,3,1xijV , V, r jg . ,.,. Q -f ' . QA N, ,. , g 135 I , . V- .. 4- w e 9'-I ' V . sHffI.:'2f3Q"5"qf 'QV rf' ' it 'li -H374 V 3Z, '1'lf'f5 A i' 6' " w i f 'i V4 9 NG fwb, WW," 'V' ' ' 7 . .ow .... 1 .Y M ,,. .., . in Q 'MA V 4 V A f it is .V My 1 V ' V' 1 - 17 I x7" t if3t V I Q 3, ' w . 3 . if ,,... - 1 ' , ' ' 2 3 " " f' ' - " ' Y ..J V fit :S ' IQVV11' H 1 XV f 13 1-ffl! Wish . t V x Q ' ' .. Tr 1 1 4' -, V M 3 -, "5 I , , , , ,Q X 5,4 'Sp' , '- , . ti Q V may Q V - ,.v . Q. , -, i , V NV ' 3 - V, W .V . w ,, ' 5,-1 - Q- . ' - ,A V . : V ' 'Q , ' V. ' 1 Y V V V-.W '3' 1 " if f.1"1.,:1 . Q if ' f" ' A 'Vt ' ' V ,. ' Q WV. V 'Q' it f V . ,ff is t V H- .bc 1- ff V -V V ' .V Q, ,. , ,V fr g f, . ,gn ,A X- ' 593' - , . , -N , Y . 'IV ' ,, f , .4j:.,g lb 14,5 , - V- s Q -HL: r . 1 f, A' wb' ! h ,. , M V. lf: " ' A ' V Vf11"5Z ftfyyi ' 5 51 2 4 -I ' 'Yi ' , .. pg W3 55, 5- N-,Cf , z,-Wifi Wg- I. 5 we ,I , . ,, ,. f:,f,1.,.iHif ' V' We V ai, , -. , . - , ,, .. Q. . - , . g , , .ij-4 I- Wg, gt, ,P GZ ' , ff. 5 L. .4 , , , A '--'A SV! .1 . ,E .. 3. 2 any-M 'lfs 1 4 ' " - -yi if ff Gfj- In ,JJ ,yfh Q,:fS"2,,t,i3f3 n ',,.,. ' 1 , K Qifi ' ' , ' 3 , tj, 2 -ff.:-L 5 .. ' :. .1 'Q jj" ' f: 1 . , 'Q ,,, .I Vx' J " 5-..",,. . -I 2 . -,.,, .-, f - A-3 , .4 lfg,.,.t ,wg Y ,Q-A. t-' -1 ,. t GETTING OFF TO a runninq start . . . name Iackie Perry from North hall for Homecoming . . . strain under their M pledqe duties . . join upperclass loiterers . . . HCT Corp with exhuberance . . . learn to read karnpus kopy . . . help Bear Paws elect their class officers . . . struqqle to Sentinels peak . . team up to rewhiten the Biq M. P G' l li?- ,Nd H ' 79 Top row, left to right: Second row: Third row: ACTIS, FRANK ARNOLD, IOAN BALDWIN. IOAN ALFSON, FLOYD ASHENBRENNER, DOLORES BALDY, MARTHA AMBROSE, TOM AYERS, ELAINE BANGEMAN, BARBARA AMUNDSON. CONNIE AYERS, JAMES BARNETT, IOHN ANDERSON, ELEANOR AYRES, DANIEL BARTON, WANA ANDERSON, TOM BADGLEY, IOHN BAUER. MARIANNE ANGSTMAN, IOANNE BAKER. CHARLES BAYERS, BYRON ARNDT, DON BAKER, EUGENE BASYE, BETTY Fourth row: Fifth row: Botiom row: BEACOM, ELEANOR BEATTY, ANNE MARIE BEAUBIEN, PATRICIA BEAUCHAMP, GENE BERG. CONRAD BERG. RAYMOND BERNHARDT, BETTY BETHKE, ELTON BECK, IEWEL BILLSBOROUGH, RUSSELL BEDARD, ROBERT BIRDSILL, C. L. BELL, NORMA BISHOP, CHARLES BERG. BRUCE BLAKESLEE, BARBARA FRESHMEN - FRESHMEN BLOOM, ROBERTA BOLLHORST, FORREST BONNER, IOSEPHINE BONNES, ROBERT BOOTH. ELIZABETH BOTTS, WILLIAM BOYD, HAROLD BRASS. ALICE FRESHME - FRESHME Top row, left to right: Second row: BRAY, THOMAS BULS. DONNA BRAZIER, PETE CALVERT, NANCY BREITENSTEIN, BRYCE CAMBERN, KORTE BREST, BILL CARLSON, ARTHUR BRINIG. IACKIE CARSTENSON. IOYCE BROCKWAY, IO CERINO, RICHARD BROWN, L. D. CHEZICK, MARCELLA BUKER, NEWTON CHRISTENSEN, HARRY Fourth row: COOPER, DOUGLAS COSTER. DONNA COX. ROY CROGHAN. BETTY CROSSER. DON CULLEN, DON CUNNINGHAM, NANCY DAGGETT. GAIL Fifth row: DANIELSON, PAT DAVIES. IOHN DAVIS. EVELYN DEMMONS, IACK DIMMITT. LESTER Third row: CLAPP, PEGGY CLARK. ELAINE CLARK, IOYCE CLARK, VERNE COLEMAN, CHARLIE COLLVER, DICK COOK, FLORENCE COONEY, ROBERT Bottom row: DOGGETT. BILL DOGGETT. IEFF DONALLY, WILLIAM DONTIGNY. BARBARA DUTTON, IUNE DINWOODIE, D. H. EBERT, HELEN DOBB, AUDREY ECHOLS. KENNETH DOCKSTADER, RAYMOND EGGER, RAMONA FYOHI TCW left 10 fight! Second row: Third row: EIDE LORAINE EVANS. PATRICIA FULLERTON, ROBERT EISSINGER CLARE FARIAS. VIOLA FULMOR, PHYLLIS ELLIOT CHARICE FISHER, RITA GAGE. AUDREY ELLIOT IAN FLEMING, IOHN GALLAND. ROBERT ELLIS WILLMA FLESHMAN, DONNA GARDNER, MARY LEE EMBODY SHIRLEY FORD, ROBERT GARRETT. DON EMDRESS RAY FORNALL, DON GAVIN, SHIRLEY EVANS EMMA LOU FRY, DAVID GEIL, PHIL Fourth row: GETTER, TOMMY GIBSON. IOAN GILLETT, CAROLYN GILLETTE, MARILYN GLENN. LUTHER GOLFI, ELDA GOULD, CAROL GOULD. IANET Fifth row: GRADY, DONNA GRAHAM, PATRICK GRAY, FIELDING GRAY. RITA GRIFFITH, MARGARET GROSSCURTH, IIM GRUNDSTROM, ARLENE GRYCZAN, EDWARD FRESHME - FRESHME Bottom row: HAGLUND, EDWARD HAHN. IOSEPH HALL. LOIS HALSE, KENNETH HAMMER. GERALD HANNAH, IANE HANSEN, BETTY HANSEN, CARL First row, left to right: HANSON, ELOISE HARDEN. IOYCE HARDIN, IOAN HARES, FRANCES HARGREAVES, IANE HARKER, ROBERT HARPOLE, GEORGE Second row: HARRINGTON. IOAN HART, IACQUELINE HARVEY, HAROLD HAWLEY. VERNON HAYES, BONITA HAYES, HELEN HEDIN. M. I. FRE HME - FRESHME Third row: HENDERSON, MARY HENDRICKSON. CATHERINE HERRING. IDABOB HIEBER, SEVERIN HILL, LAWRENCE HILL, MARY IEAN HIORT, RICHARD HARRINGTON, HARRIETT Fourth row: HOFFMAN, RAYMOND HOLDEN, MARILYN HOLINKA, NICHOLAS HOLLAND, IAMES HOLLIDAY, DON HORNING, GILBERT HOWARD, HAROLD HOWE. IANET HELMER, CARYL Fifth row: HOWEY, ROBERT HUGHES, PAT HYDE, RUTH HUNTLY, CLAYTON HUSBAND, MARILYN INGERSOLL, ROBERT IRVINE, MARY ANN IACKSON, IANE HOFFMAN. EVELYN Bottom row: IACKSON, RICHARD IAMESON, WILLIAM IAQUETH, KENNETH IENSEN, RUDY IEWETT, T. A. IOHNSON, ALICE IOHNSON, HOWARD IOHNSON, LEE Nw 11948 Rx Wm W' I 63 ,Em oy., wo X Fxrst row left to nght: Second row: Third row: Bottom row: LUKENS. ANNE IOHNSON LOUISE KAUS, BETTY ANN KOON. GENE IOHNSON VERNON KEIL, BARBARA KORDOS, ALEXANDRIA IONES HUGH KENNEY. SAM KREBSBACH, MARIE IOSCELYN DEAN KESLER, ALICE KREKLAU, WILLIAM IUSTUS LANE KIRCHNER, SHIRLEY KRIEGER, ELINOR KADLEC LARRY KITT, BETSY KUGLER. IUANITA KAISER IEANNE KIELLGREN, BETTY KUHNE. HELEN KALBFLEISCH RAE KOEFOD, LAUREL KUNE, CATHERINE Fourth row: Fifth row: KURTZ, BETTIE LEICHT, RICHARD KUSTER, DOUG LENTZ, KARL LAHR, IOHN LAKE. ROBERT LARSEN, DIRK LAVOIE, IOE LeCLAIRE. LAWRENCE Le-FEVRE. IO ANNE FRESHME - FRESHM LeSUEUR, ELSIE LINDAHL, DEAN LINDBERG, BETTY LITTLE, WARREN LOISELLE. IACKIE LUDWIG, IANICE N LULL. TOM LYTHGOE, KAE MCCRACKEN, DICK MCCURDY. EDWARD MCDONALD, PATRICIA MCDONNELL, WILLIAM MCGREGOR. NATHALIE I-'irst row, left to right: McLEOD. I UNE MQCKENZIE. LEAH MQCPHERSON, DOUGLAS MAHLUM. RONALD MALINAR. MARY IO MALTHEN. FRED MANUEL. HARRY MARBLE. BETTY Fourth row: MOORE, COLLEEN MOORE, PATSY MORAN, DONNA MORGAN, HAROLD MORGAN, LEONARD MOSDAL, AGNES MUDD. ROSE ELLAN MUELLER. IOANNE Second row: MARKS. MARILYN MAKI, GEORGE MARRS, IEAN MARTIN, DOROTHY MARTIN, WILBUR MARTY, IOAN MATHESON, DONNA MATHISON, ELEANOR Fifth row: FRESHME - FRE HME MULCIHY, WINNIE MURFITT. MURRAY. NEIMAN. NELSON, NELSON, NELSON, NELSON, WALTER ROBERT CHARLES CORRINE FALLE FRED IOANE Third row: MATTSON. HELEN MAY, BILL MAYFIELD, BETTY MERLEY. IUNE MIGLIN, HAROLD MOLINE, LeROY MONDT. GRACE MOORE, ANNE Bottom row: NELSON, KEITH NETT, RUSSELL NETTLE, DON NIVA, WELDON NEWHOUSE, ROD NEWMAN, ROB NEWPORT, NANETTE NICHOLSON, ROBERT First row left to right: Second row: Third row: NOLL ROBERT OWENS, DELBERT PECARICH. IOHN NOREN ALBERT OXLEY, DAVID PECK, GALE NUNAN BARBARA OZANNE. BILL PERKINS, CLARA BELLE O BRIEN DALE PAGACHER, FRANK PERRY, IACKIE OLSON AUDREY PARK, ARTHUR PERSONS, DONNA OLSON CHARLES PATCH, GENE PETERSON, MARY IO ONEIL KATHRYN PATTISON, PATSY PETERSON, DORIS OVESEN IEAN PAUL, NONA PETESCH, SHIRLEY Fourth row: Fifth row: Botiom row: PICKARD, COLLEEN RAFN, RICHARD ROSS, BRUCE PONATH, MARILYN POPOVAC, STEVE POTTER, IEAN POWELL, MARY LEE POWERS, FRANCIS RADEMACHER, RAY RADIGAN. IAYNE RASSMUSSEN, LANVRENCE REED, DICK REID. IIM RENSHAW, IEAN REPLOGLE, IOYCE REYNOLDS, WILLIAM RICH, BEVERLY FRE HME - FRESHMEN ROTHWEILER, ROBERT SANDKNOP, CLAYTON SCHLAPPY. KEITH SCHUCH, MARILYN SCHUFF, ELLSWORTH SCOTT, FRANK SCHLIEMAN, HARVEY FRESHME - FRESHME First row. left to right: Second row: Third row: SCOTT, GEORGE G. SIMMONS. BARBARA SMITH. IOHN R. SCOTT, GEORGE W. SIMONSON. EARL SMITH, IUNE SCOTTEN, GEORGE SINGER, ROBERT SMITH, ROBERT SESSLER, KATHERINE SITTERLY. WAYNE SPENCER, RODERICK SEXTON, CLARA SKABRONSKI. LORRAINE SQUIRES, CALVIN SHAW, IOANNE SMART, BILLIE SQUIRES, GENE SHERBURNE, BETSEY SMITH, CLEONA STAHL, STANLEY SILVERNALE, LAWRENCE SMITH, IOHN STALEY, BEVERLY Fourth row: Fifth row: Bottom row: STANLEY, PATRICIA STOI-IR, DANIEL TANGEN, R. H. STANAWAY, DON STONE, ARTHUR THIELEN. PEARL STAUDACHER, MARY STRITCH, IRENE THOM, LORAINE STAUDACHER, ELAINE STUART, MARY THOMAS, IANE STEIER, WILLIS SUMMERS, BETTY LEE THOMAS, IEAN STERMITZ, MARY SUTLIFF, BERNARD THRONSON. IERRY STEWART, IAIMIE SWANSON, GLORIA TOLSON, ROBERT STITZ, BART SPENCER, IACK TOMCHECK, COLLEEN Top row left to right: Second row: Third row: TRACHOLT ARNE VAN VOROUS, PATRICIA WALLER, SALLY TREMPER FRANK VAN VOROUS. PHYLLIS WARWICK, CARLEEN TRIPPET IEANNE VILEN, CAROL WALSTON, ROINE TROWER PEGGY VINE, IO ANN WATSON, BRUCE TROXEL BETTY VISCON, STEPHEN WEBB, VERNON TUCKER WALLY VOLK, HELEN WEINGART, IOYCE ULRICH IOHN WALKER, IACK WILLIS, WAYNE UTTERBACH DOUG MALLETT, I EANNE Fourth row: WOHLGENANT, MONA WOHLGENANT, RICHARD WOLD, PAUL WOLF, LEILA WOLLSCHLAGER, WILLIAM WOOD, RICHARD WOODWARD, MARY ELLEN WUERTHNER, BEN FRESHME - FRESHME Bottom row: YOUNG, NANCY YOUNG, IANET YOST, HAROLD ZUNCHICH, DENISE SMITH, DUANE IEPPESEN, DONNA MARMONT, IOHN CRENNEN, ROBERT WILSON, OWEN BUCK TWO ,Q x my is A 'Sf Y. Q A: ., 1 X, my 'X 4 3 i wvmrwm ,. 1 X w xl, S f fl 1 Aww, ?' 9 ,Af.:',-f, X vga, ' i WWWQ, 5? ff 9 5' Q LS W . ,"'X1C ' fzf Mi? Ni, if f dl a ,, I if y Kiwi-3: X iz 9 W 1 if Q .f 4,1 1? 3, :4 ,ZZ , I Q li 53 I 4 KZ v Pi V, H if ' 3:3 fi 4 Q 2? 18 .mf by 4 iz 1 ' , ,I , ,, M93 A V Q 151, , .,,:- Q Q 2 Z ' H V ., 4. , 1 , f 5 f as 2 9, I I gf, ,. f ,, 2 1 1 gm 1 at ,W ., TK , fi 35 WM' ., wi Yi is . - , X vag- 03. 4. N v E: x yo- in- 4 N- Y 1 "- ' 3. 1. 4 f 5 ' 1' .. , 1 A if ' 3 V' ,N A .K V' 4-" A- fi, QQ H: -a , K. N iv vt a PUBLICATIQ S AN INSATIABLE DESIRE to Create, in their own small Way . . . an abtruse passion tor unrewarded work . . . a strange, lonely, unfathomable group, quietly or not so quietly enqrossed in themselves and the dubious importance of their work. CATLIN PHOTO MARGERY HUNTER, editor DORIS LUND BOB O'NEIL ossociote editor ctssociotte editor CATLIN PHOT O l949 A SENTINEL YEAR . . . unique existence . . . countless cups of student union coffee . . . ct pill-box office overflowing with people . . . some who liked to look ot pictures . . . some who liked to totlk . . . now ond then, some who worked . . . it didn't motter . . . they were dll essentictl . . . to complete the yectr . . . to mdke the book. It begdn in April . . . fctltering plctns ctt first, which mdteriolized in summer, ond begon to be effected in the fdll. Then ot hectic Winter session . . . ond finolly, the deodlines . . . the end of d Sentinel yeor . . . remembered for the lesser things . . . d post-Christmas return to ct lime-green office . . . thermostdts Whose tops fell off . . . five minutes off for ct coke . . . hots off to Montotnct ond here's the contrctct . . . d bdckwotid glctnce to see Whctt Milldr ond Luen- ing did in forty-one . . . how mdny greens cdn you get in l2 pctges . . . five minutes off for ct coke . . . trotin rides to Butte in cold, dctrk morn- ings . . . then discord the rubber cement . . . pictures ore in . . . Write some copy . . . ond it's dll over. CATLIN PHOTO SE TI EL THROUGH IT ALL, a few were constants . . . lohn Lernire Was an efficient business manager, conscientious and necessarily conservative. Dwain Hanson edited the entire sports section, and can call those forty pages his own. During all the year's minor catastrophes, Cyrile Van Duser was a patient, helpful adviser. Floyd Alison stepped into the photo editor's job late in the year, and promptly proved himself to be a photographic God-send . . . his time was Sentinels time. Their associate editor's title hardly does them justice, for Doris Lund and Bob O'Neil were more than that . . . they pasted, wrote copy, made layouts . . . designed sec- tions . . . and helped make Sentinel a very liveable existence. CYRILE VAN DUSER FLOYD ALFSON adviser photography N CATLIN PHOTO CATLIN PHOTO CATLIN PHOTO IOHN LEMIRE, business manager .139-lt' DWAIN HANSON sports editor .x sf' ss CATLIN PHOTO 91 PICTURED HERE are more than a handful of people who wrote . . . or filed . . . or pasted . . . or did any number of necessary Sentinel tasks. In the normal scheme of things some were more persistent than others. Hard working Margie lesse took time off from one or another of her various pursuits to perform thankless tasks. Tom Anderson was a valuable fall quarter worker. Marian Bell dropped in one day and then carried the ap- pointment load for weeks. Ierry Baldwin was a congenial contract man. Frank Zubick be- gan the year as photography editor . . . much of the pictorial work is his. The pathway sketch- es are Ioyce Clark's. Al Widenhofer spent long cold afternoons sketching house doorways. Margot Luebben wrote a little bit but smiled a lot. Both were appreciated. Working in the musty environment of a small cubicle above the auditorium was lohn Lemire's business staff . . . sparked by ad manager Boss Cannon and salesman Al Coch- rane plus a half dozen others: Barbara Blakes- lee, Marianne Bauer, Donna Moran, Marie Krebsbach and Dean loscelyn. Isabel Gopian, Eleanor Anderson, Bill O'Neil and Tom Ambrose were consistent re- appearers in the editorial office. There were others . . . not all pictured here . . . who worked . . . and thought about Senti- nel . . . who someday may rise to categoried yearbook position of dubious desirability. Top: LUEBBEN. ANDERSON. IESSE. Second picture: EDITORIAL STAFF. Back row: CALVERT. BEATTY, IRVINE. RUSTEUN, EM- BODY. Second row: VILEN, ANGSTMAN. CAMBERN. ANDERSON. MOSDAL, RADIGAN. Front row: GOPIAN, AMBROSE. O'NEIL. Third picture: ZUBICK. BELL. BALDWIN. Fourth picture: BUSINESS STAFF. Back row: MORAN, KREBSBACH. SHAW, BEAUBIEN. MARBLE, BLAKESLEE. ASHENBRENNER. Front row: HARRINGTON. IOSCELYN, PETERSON. Bottom: WIDENHOFER, CLARK, CANNON. U TAI EER STAFF THE MOUNTAINEER . . . an open door to the creative urge of MSU's workers in words . . . sorting, evaluating, critcizing . . . discovering wheat among the chaff . . . these are the jobs involving many hours of pouring over the hopeful entries for publication. Still in its formative stages, the Mountaineer advances toward the goal of an imminent college publication as each successive staff leaves its mark of improvement typified. by the re-organization effected winter quarter, a revamping including separation of duties, and the institu- tion of editors for poetry and prose. The Mountaineer pages are open to all who have something to say . . . makes no discrimination as to the class or major field of its contributors, but merely asks that their contributions be of the highest quality possible . . . the editors are not bound by restrictions attending and hampering commercial editors . . . literary worth is the sole criterion for selection. Back row PERKINS, O'NEIL. IOHN MOORE, adviser: GIONET. LINDELL. Front row: REGAN PHILLIPS BOESEN LAW DARLING, STRITCH. CATLIN PHOTOS MO TAA KAIMIN EDITOR PAUL HAWKINS . . . conservative and etti- 1 cient, toe treadinq done liqhtly but emphatically, always an ' air of restraint and competence. 4 BUSINESS MANAGER BO BROWN . . . handled a t unpublicized job to th ouqh but e credit oi the best oi businessmen. A ideal public relations man wh ' n o quietly qets things done. KAIMI DUGAN . . . subtle Kaimin overseer . . . capable . . . well- liked. REMINGTON . . . industrious . . . a constant Worker . . . major factor in Kaimin publication . . . SMITH . . . newcomer to the associate game . . . wise user of columnar attack . . CORWIN . . . conservative . . . careful worker . . . a steadvina influence in a hectic business . . . MORRISON . . . adds the necessary feminine touch . . . concocted social spotlight . . . HANSON . . . ambitious follower of athletics . . . provided exceptional sports coverage . . . Worked long hours. KAIMI PEOPLE INTERPOSED AMONG SHOTS of the physical workinqs of the Kaimin are pictured those who were most respon- sible for the work done in the news room and on the copy desk. Bill Smurr, columnist and feature writer: Carroll O'Connor, columnistp Ward Sims, fea- ture writery Don Graff, feature writerg Bob Crennen, circulation, and Bert Gas- kill, reporter and feature writer. All in all a pretty smooth year . . . a rather friendly quarrel with inter-fra- ternity council, no blows struck . . . a jibe or two at the Spurs . . . the qreat be-bop war . . . Uncle Paul's recipe column . . . a move toward friendlier relations with the Mountaineer and the English department . . . plenty cf news and very few fist fights. I DRAMATIC A NEW DRAMATICS set-up ond o highly successful yeor . . . or tremendous selection of productions ond concentrated seoson ticket sole to oiol the plcm to sepa- rote dromotics from ASMSU. 1 I s I Q K f V 1 I ? 1 Q r as EX ta' X., it - , in .ig ,Vp .,., 1-:-1 - 5. -XL 1 , ,gf swir S K t 2 SEWSVQ ,f A, 1 ef if fttlikfxyigi 952,32 QW Q' 'S t 1 S g is 3 33 2 R is E I 5 55 ri its M 1 'W new mb we MHHm-wt Y - ff BACK-STAGE LEROY HINZE AND ABE WOLLOCK can be rightly proud of their 1948-49 season. Four diffi- cult major productions were presented and each one of them was superbly done. Crowds flocked to see them all-"All My Sons," "Desert Song," "Life With Father," "Winterset." The switch to the Simpkins hall Little Theatre for "Winterset" had something to do with its success as well as serving to cut expenses. A great deal of credit for the sets should go to Ed Patterson, Bob Haight and I. C. Stevens. Bill Smurr handled publicity and season ticket sales. Tom Roberts and Nancy Fields seemed to put in twenty-five hours a day. If we were to mention anyone else it would certainly mean omitting some deserving person, and so other individual praise will have to be included in praise of the entire season. WWW f if , annum f1,f1+ , . 1 , -4 ' f-ny!,--. to 9 ALL MY SCNS ARTHUR MILLER'S PRIZE modern traaedy was chosen as the Masauers sprina quarter production. Under the direction of Lewis W. Stoerker, it enjoyed one of the most successful runs of any recent production. The cast was headed by Don Lichtwardt, Dick Haaq, Gayle Davidson and Wilma Olcsendahl. The impassioned story of the effect of a father's war profiteerinq upon his family was dramatically and satisfactorily presented to enthusiastic audiences. lt was a difficult task, well handled, and wrote a fittinq climax to a very successful Masquer year. Fit Egaltlkwllml lil? 1 lltql sl 2 Ht X it Y A 'd M 'W SIGMUND ROMBERG'S DELIGHTFUL OPERETTA was chosen for MSU's first all-school production in two years . . . the joint effort of the dramatics and music departments . . . weeks of preparation . . . lavish, colorful sets . . . a cast of more than one hundred . . . choruses and dancing girls . . . intrigue and comedy in the desert to the accompaniment of the music of the incomparable Romherg . . . a masterful and extremely entertaining rendition of an old and Well loved favorite . . . a triumph for the entire cast . . . three packed houses. , Mt gill f l I .S Q. fy f ,Mx 100 ERT S0 FLOYD CHAPMAN SCORED a personal triumph as the Bed Shadow: and it would be difficult to find anywhere a more charming and gracious Margot than Gayle Davidson. Delightful comedy support was provided by Patti Leur and Denny Galusha as Susan and Benny. lim Calahan played a very convincing and somber desert chieftan. George Lewis' fine tenor voice was put to great advantage as Sid El Kar, running mate of the Bed Shadow. Supporting rolls were carried by Doris Egger, Marie 'VV'ade, Bob Svoboda, Bruce Iohnson, Ierry Baldwin, Iohn Iones, George Armour, Mona Brown, Marta Drysdale and Iohn Moore. Directors for the production were LeBoy I-linze, dramaticsp lohn Lester, music, Norman Gulbrandson, chorus: Marian MacAllister and Betty Wylder, dances, and Lewis Stoerker, sets. Eugene Andrie directed the entire performance from the orchestra pit and kept an extremely difficult production running like clock work. 9 PATTI LUER AND PAUL TSCHACHE hilariously played Clarence Day's immortal father and mother in the Masquer's tall quarter production. The caricature ot a nineteenth century American family was directed by LeRoy Hinze, with the technical direction under Abe Wollock. The play rollicked through without a hitch, and a fine time was had by all. The excellent supporting cast was led by lohn Pecarich, Clem Ward, Marilyn Neils, Kurt Feidler, Ioel Fleminq, LIFE ITH FATHER Carroll O'Connor, Irene Stritch, Gayle Davidson, Ed Patterson and lim Callihan. 2 WINTER ET "MAXWELL ANDERSON'S MONUMENTAL TRAGEDY" hecorne MSU's most successful ond most entertcrininq production in rncrny years . . . Bo Brown ond Dick Hdoq, worlcinq together for the first time, qove LeRoy Hinze o ploy which would hove qiven enouqh sottisfoction itself to offset the entire yeotr's work . . . The supporting cost, led by Lcrrry Kodlec, Ccrrroll O'Connor, Edmund Wdrd, Tom Wickes cmd Morilyn Neils wcts nothing short of terrific . . . The move to the Sirnplcins holl Little theotre seemed to loe ctll to the qood . . . Abe Wollock's strikinq Set wos extremely dromcrtic ond suqqestive . . . All in dll, it wcrs o production which corn lonq he remembered with pride. ' iflxgv S- X 1 Y ARS is ' NX, -FWF 'iw ' LZ 5 S D, F Tl r"VlTW": qltvll' :Swell f' "Alf H' K' 'HQQQITQ-fax Aw FF-STA IN HIS SECOND YEAR AT MSU, LeRoy Hinze placed dramatics in a place of prominence that it had seldom before experienced . . . His productions have been well above the class usually expected in a school the size of MSU . . . Abe Wollock, durinq his first year at MSU, handled all technical direction for the productions and took over the direction of "Volpone" as the Sentinel went to press . . . Ginny Risch is officially desiqnated as secretary to Mr. Hinze, but her actual duties qo far beyond that . . . The number of hours she spends behind a desk and behind staqe during a normal production is rumored to run into the thousands . . . No meniion of the season would be complete without a few inadequate words about Bo Brown . . . lVISU's consistent star and talented actor, he topped off a hiqhly suc- cessful colleqe career by accepting a bid to enter the Cleveland playhouse next fall. MUSICIANS A VARIED PROGRAM given state-Wide publicity by a hard Working staff . . . always keeping in niind iliat the new building is a must . . . the University's spread- ers of good Will. 1,5 ,..:,gf'2 , I 5 fy f '47 N ff K V 'if fx'- 1 x , if YJ, - H -I? v-N -I QI I 3 ,I I , ' Ag ' I fig A SQ if . Im 5 N 2? I W' QQ .aw V -.ff ff 4 3 X 1 ,-.1 1. ' xx-' V ' + x " ', Q., Q' af' N f-- ' wi-W' V XI N I XI , .I 2, I Q -, 4 ' " f I y . .' . I, +:,L:.1i I, ' - Y, s .I ,, Q. ' ki' L' N: - I V4 - '3 I . . . . I' 'if , :LZ 4.2 ,W Qi, W, Y Y. ,J 3. x ,Q Isl! .I, III . .cw II I. .I XX II I-N II ,I ,I-.I Ira? ..A. H I I II, " I . ' " 3 ' J ' . I 5 f 9 1 1 5 fi ' 2 , , 1 F A 1 4' ,I I , I A' II I, I I Ig x . II 1 I , 45' "1 S' .. --wi 5' if A - 1 A ff "fm, 'QW , 2: I Ig Q , Ig .I I I . In . ' II , I III II.. -5' I - II :I ff - I QIWI -ww I I 'I , 1 be ' , M4 Vx XX ' IAN? f - - l ' 54 4 H' ".,..N .538 ig , V QQ t I, ., 1 Wfmx I W, Q - I X 1 5 II , wKsfImwg,. 'IW 5- I ' I If - , -."'X-.V X at .III v. N I :W I I .M I I III. I fx I I 1, ,M,mII.lII tv I, f f ,ff I , " 'rf " 5 N33 If 'uni 1. 'X , , I 1 ,, ' 1, , . ' I I df' I I ., II , . , Y Q., I I I, I XII I , bg? 1.. ' ,- - ' ,,n"v7' H ' fm M ' ,, ' X ' ' Ki A ' Wd, I, 2 . K V II Y II IIIV1M,AIIZIW? . 'I 4 . 1, ,I W fm W ws: , , . ,Q f f 25ZiQifI" "?f2'i'1 . -. W,-0. ' . -..,, . . ' " " M -ov 1- fn. ONE OF MSU'S FEW TOUCHES of culture, the symphony orchestra brings to the campus first class music which students would ordinarily have to travel a long way to hear. Working SYMPHO Y ORCHESTRA largely on their own time under Eugene Andrie, these students and faculty rnemloers produce good music deep in the wilds of Montana . . . ignored by the many but tremendously appreciated by the grateful few. OCAL GROUP GEORGE PERKINS MAINTAINED cz rnusic school reputotion tor tine vocol groups with CI series oi excellently presented ond Well re- ceived concerts spoced throughout the yeor. Working with or huge group of untrained voices, he presented the combined chororl groups in concert during winter quorter. This concert wos followed by the o coppello choir Cpictured belowl presentation of the lost two ports of "The Messiohf' Vocotl groups ore Consistent tourers of the stoite ond ombossodors-oi-whcrt ever-might-hoppen to he on the progrom for boosting. CLUBS THERE ARE DOZENS of them to satisfy C1115 one to meet your every interest when you chance to wander from the path of the strict curriculum. Help make by-paths one of the best parts of school lite. Seated: GIBSON, GONZALEZ, BOOTH, MR. MCGINNIS, VILEN, ARRAS. HEITMEYER, BURLINGAME. Standing: TURNQUIST, FRASER, CHAPPLE, SHEPARD, SVOBODA. KALB- FLEISH, PAYNE, COLLINS. LUCAS, CONNICK, IRWIN, DEAN, BALDWIN. SPEILMAN, IELLISON, COLE, IOHNSON, SYKES, MINIFIE, HEBERT, THOMP- SON, KENYON. DEBATE AN ORATORY DEBATERS AND ORATORS . . . titty students . . . built up record teams to send on tours to Montana hiqh schools . . . to participate in Montana inter- colleqiate meets . . . to compete in the Western Speech Association tourney and the trianqle debate with WSC and Idaho. MSU debators Won the "Inland Empire" meet . . . returned undefeated from the Rocky Mountain Speech tournament . . . and qualified tor the West Point nationals held in April. KI SLALOM THROUGH SEASON with faithful pilgrimages to Big Mountain and Diamond . . . the ski club made a big splurge to see West Yellowstone . . . to ride the only chair lift in Montana. Skiers threw open the doors of Chalet of the Gold Room for their annual sweater dance . . . rewarded students with equipment prizes . . . tried to help the ski team get to Whitefish, Banff, and into ldaho and Washington meets. Scotty MacLeod captained the group . . . more than two hundred with enthusiastic novices . . . enthusiastic experts . . . and representatives of each of the various other stages of enthusiastic ski-ability. CLUB The lodge, the lift, the loading-zone, and the run: then action, everywhere different, everywhere fun. L MV' i 11 WX 4 Nr 'K iw ' . fi . g x W 1, ,R it agen Q t QL! Officers: HOUTZ. HAMMEN, VERPLOEGEN. IESSE. MR. LUSK. PRESS CLUB OFFICIAL CLUB ot the journalists . . . president, Ted Houtz . . . entertain themselves in 1304 and refresh themselves with press- room coke and doughnuts . . . throw their big spring feed at the Press Club banquet when they get a chance to slash back at the journalism faculty. Master of ceremonies BILL RAPP. at the Press club banquet. WALT ORVIS and DONNA RING. Kaimin-knowns, at the Christmas party. 112 MA AGER'S CLUB GENERAL GRIZZLY AIDES . . . keep their noses to the qridstone, track, diamond and court, riqht along with the teams. Managers are the qear-packers who check the Grizzlies and their equipment in and out . . . travel with the teams . . . help the coaches. Henry "Bull-Doa" DiRe heads the Qroup . . . has reshuiflinq ideas to aive the club pre-war status when it awarded annual scholarships to its most active members . . . sponsored the Homecominq ball . . . had a constitution and even chose a queen. Back row: NEVE. BURKE, MOREY. LAMBURG, SILVEY, LITTLE. Front row: LERCH, ROSTAD, DiRE, LEVINE. 113 ROBBE. RAINEY, MURRAY, VERNETTI, L. CHRISTIANSON, SEIBERT. SWEENEY. HEINRICH. I. CHRISTIANSON, CROSKREY, LORENZEN, WILEY. ELY. HOME ECONOMICS MAIORS belong to this departmental organization . . . sponsor a style show each year . . . design, make and model their own creations as one of their projects. HOME ECONOMICS CLUB -- ORA Y PLATA GEOLOGY STUDENTS' CLUB passes along geo- logical information to its members . . . sponsors informal lectures, field trips and allied social functions. Geology majors with better than an average grade index in their major field can belong . . . group president is Victor Koskinen. Seated: DR. LOWELL, WAYMAN, ATHEARN. KOSKINEN, COSNER, ROOT. KNAPP, MR. HONKALA. Standing: FIELDMAN, NEWMAN, SMALLWOOD, PEIRCE, TRANKLE. BEN- NINGTON. DYE. FALLON. GARMOE. BALL. F RESTERS' CLUB HARD WORKING OUTFIT with log-rolling contests, hikes and Foresters' ball . . . nationally tamed and campus popular with its boisterous advertising and then its complete week-end of wooolsy intormality. Foresters bake the Aber bear for the all- school barbecue . . . keep close track ot Bertha, yet carry on their traditional spats with the lawyers across the way. DOC FULLER entertains at the tall hike . . . newlyweds take a ride . . . a neophyte pays tribute to BERTHA. Cooks, MCDOUGAL and BANGLE . . . MOTHER EVELYN DeIARNETTE receiving honorary membership . . . President DAVE LANE . . . "wood-wind" section of the club band. Serenade to the shysters . . . preparation to leave the bucking bronc . . . admin's- tration oi the oath. "5""'i 5, ,V Q, ur 6,11 Front row: PARKER, CARR, DAWE, SHEETS, MURPHY, CONITZ, CASCADENI I. SMITH. Second row: TIRRELL, RIZZONELLI, LANGENBACH. MATHEWS, IONES, SHERWIN. D. SMITH. DUNCAN, RITCHEY, RING. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATICN CLUB BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION MAIORS . . . may be members of the departmental student organization . . . professional group . . . Cal Murphy, president. Big undertaking is the Bank Night dance where students spend wads of bogus money. MATH CLUB INTEREST IN MATHEMATICS . . . requirement for membership in the math club . . . Paul Bygg presides. Activities . . . discussions of the field by faculty members . . . annual party at Dr. Merrill's home . . . picnic with the chemistry club. Seated: DR. MERRILL, CHILD, STROEDER, REMPLE, RYGG, TAYLOR, FRY, KREITEL, DR. OSTROM. Second row: WISCHAMANN, LUST, CEROVSKI, SCOTT, CLEARMAN, BENNETT, BERGER, KRATOFILL. ZIMMERMAN, THON, WRIGHT. Advertising staff, Iront row: HERMES, WEST- KAMP, MOON, business manager: COHEN. assistant: DUVAL. Second row: CASEY. BETHKE, FULLERTON. COONEY, WORF. MARTINEZ, NELSON, GASHWILER, CULLEN. Editorial staff, front row: CECH, senior adviser: KNAPP, editor: KERN photography editor. Second row: DAMON, photographer: ROBIN- SON: MCDOUGAL. f f i W7 5 W f x,...t r " , tg if WK J- .,:,A ::l Litas! M E 'I A lg 3 ""' I Q WF' FORESTRY SCHOOL YEAR BOOK . . . pictures life of the torester . . , on Campus . . . out in the Cold. Forestry club publishes its news . . . articles from the woods and from the sCnool's honorary, Druids . . . senior and alumni items. Editor of the only single de- partment annual is Norm Knapp. FORESTRY KAIMI Front row: GRECO. IOHNSON. PETERSON. LENZ. HOVVSER, SIGURNIK. COLLINS, NORTON. Back row: BRYANT, BOSONE, POGACHER, VERMILLION, LARSON, KRALL, AMOLE, HAUGO, BARTLETT, WAFSTET. PHARMACY C UB AMERICAN PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION branch on the campus is the pharmacy club . . . sponsor of the annual Pharmacy ball. All pharmacy majors are eligible to belong . . . each member automatically joins the national organization. President of the group is Warren Amole . . . purpose is to promote interest in pharmacy and professional ethics in the tield. MUSIC CLUB STUDENTS WITH MUSIC as their working interest . . . sponsor the annual Nite Club dance with their own floor show . . . a year's review of musical talent. Members entertain community concert artists at after-performance receptions . . . this year corn- piled a colleqe song book. Georqe Lewis is top officer . . membership qualification . . . interest in music. Front row: WILSON. LIGGETT, YOUNG. HARDIE, GOPIAN. RICHMOND. Second row: WONDER. IONES, STAGG. WARN. NESBIT, MURRAY. Third row: LENTZ. IUSTUS, MOLINE, HENRY, LEWIS. TURNER. ' 'f - 'ft zvgg'-is " .f 1 ' ' , 4 f fi -V' if 'X , -' f f 'Y' - ' 4 ff' if 3 1 Si it S R V .N , ,.,- K . . "54'+- 3 YPSR ,gp xi - b - V it .11 vifti B gg, U9 MEN'S "M" LUB MAIOR-LETTER MEN sponsor a lively boxing tournament and original public initiations . . . sell the usual programs and grandstand commodities . . . send a fine representation to cheer their various Grizzly brothers. Under president Iohn Helding, the muscle men gave a good growl with an improved Aber day schedule . . . did exceptionally well as the traditional bobbies. Top picture. back row: B. I. SMITH. REGAN, KING, BRANDT. EAHEART. B. HELDING, DOMKE, KINGS- FORD, NICOL. ARMSTRONG. Mddie row: WALSH. DeVORE, HILGENSTUHLER, SCOTT, CAMPBELL, LUCAS, MITCHELL. TABARACCI, STEWART, HUGHES. Front row: RADAKOVICH, BAUER, CARSTENSEN, KEIM, DELANEY. SELSTEAD, C. KAFENTZIS, HEINTZ. Bottom picture, back row: SIMPSON, MARINKOVICH. O'LOUGHLIN, CHAFFIN, A. KAFENTZIS, MAL- COLM, KUMPURIS, MALONE. Middle row: GRAHAM, MCLATCHEY, WARSINSKE, COPE, DOYLE, KORN, KUBRICH, THOMPSON, LEAPHEART. Front row: PREUNINGER, ROCHELEAU. NORMAND, I. HELDING, ANDERSON, GORTON, CORK, BRINEY. .. an lik 2 4- 1. 120 WOME 'S "M" LLIB TOP WOMEN ATHLETES . . . wear the qold M on maroon . . . are the rather inactive top--Crust ot the womens participation Credit hierarchy . . . yet each has added her individual sports, as workers in VVAA, and, most important, in the intramural team Competition Top row: MIDTLYING, BERGH, HALVERSON, D. PARMENTER, WORKING. CLEVELAND, FRASER HUNTER. Bottom row: FISKE, SMITH, B. PARMETER. LLOYD, BAYS. EWMAN CLUB CATHOLIC STUDENTS' ACTIVITY is centered in Newman club . . . meet once a month for breakfast at St. Anthony's church. Harry Hermes, president, and Father Plummer, adviser, guide the program . . . include a study club. Biggest Venture of the group is the Mardi Gras winter testivalp and the election of the king and queen . . . a concession from each living group. Nearly two hundred Catholic students belong to the club . . . eat breakfast together one Sunday morning out of tour . . . discuss Newman business with second cups of coffee. N. A L. 'vs ve st -Q 1 wi . . wr V It ff Q 5 , l , x an or fi X . - " if lx LUTHERAN STLIDE T GRCDUP 1949 FLATHEAD RETREAT between winter and spring quarters . . . with camping and hiking . . . a highlight for organized Lutheran students. Principal aims of the group are "to strengthen and sustain Christian .students in their faith and to afford the opportunity tor cultivating friendships and social lite on a Christian level' '... theme for this year is "lt We Obey Him." Front row: STRAND, ASPEVIG, HARES. HANSON. CROSKREY, CHRISTIANSON, CONOVER. Middle row: CARLYLE. DOCKINS. CHILD. KRONEN, VILEN, HAUGO. VAN VOROUS. OLSON. Back row: REV. G. V. THOLLEFSON, IOHNSON, OLSON. HEGLAND, FOS, KING. READ, KAS- BERG, De BOER. 123 4 MA l A I A Front row: REVEREND REAMER, REVEREND SPAULDING, ELY, BALDWIN, RUMSEY, R. AGTE. Second row: MRS. SPAULDING. GRUBAUGH, GREETAN. STROUP, FERGUSON. WOODWARD, MOR RIS, NELSON. IANSSON, BECK. Back row: BURNETT, BRANDT. ONSUM, WARN, ON. GRINDY, RICE, JAMES. M. AGTE. WE LEY FOLINDATIO METHODIST STUDENT ORGANIZATION helps students of that faith to continue contacts with the church While away from home . . . turthers Christian training. Reverend Francis Rearner and president Roy Aqte direct the qroup . . . rneetinqs come after Sunday eveninq suppers at the church . . . proqram also includes a Flathead Lake trip during spring vacation and the annual sprinq banquet in honor of the seniors. 124 ... ...-.- ',, ,, ,A fr '. .- .. ,J Y -- 4 v ,,,, ..., M -4 X , '4 1 D1rect1ng Councll STRITCH. COLLUM. HEPNER. B. MCICDONALD, REVEREND CAMERON H McrcDONALD. KALGREN, BERGET. PRESBYTERIAN STUDENTS CLUB . . . pursues a course of study and action through the year . . . mainly contributing in their assistance with services in many communities near Missoula. A new directory council is responsible tor the scheduling and planning of special programs, meetings and activities. WESTMINSTER FELLOWSHIP - - - CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP UNIVERSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP . . . allied with the Inter-varsity Christian Fellowship . . . slogan is "Reaching tomorrow's leaders tor Christ, today." This new group has weekly vesper services . . . open to all students . . . once a month meets to hear an outside speaker or to have a panel discussion. Front row TAYLOR PATTEN IAMES HUTCHINGS, RAINEY, NEWTON. Second row MARTIN ULRICH CURTIS COLLUM. BROWN, RHODES. I DEPE DE T TUDENTS ASSOCIATIO REORGANIZED INDEPENDENT ASSOCIATION drew up a new constitution . . . changed its name . . . affiliated with the national group . . . gave itself new punch. Social meetings with entertainers . . . informal dancing . . short business sessions . . . reports from the reactivated ten-member council headed by Les Rutledge. Big events . . . Halloween party, Christmas tireside, square dance, Cupid Hop, lost and tound auction, and the amateur show. Front row: AMBROSE, LaPINE, HENRY, RUTLEDGE, NESBIT. CONOVER, KAPCSAK. STONE. Second row: CHILDS, TOMTEN, HENDERSON. VERBEEK. SKABRONSKI. LOVINGFOSS, SCHLAPPY. DRABBS, THOMAS, RISCH, MIDTHUN. CARLYLE, RITENOUR. 126 ,, ., V .I ' J M HGNQRARIES RECOGNITION FOR ACHIEVEMENT Curricular and extra-Curricular . . . no time to rest on Iaurels tor an "honorary" becames a work detail . . . but always the satisfaction that comes with recognition. .... ,W,.,,,. -'Mi m. V im., I, mary 1 ' 1 152 4' Q- X 4 .T f K WZ Y W i ,mv MORT R BOARD TOP SENIOR WOMEN . . . a dozen ot them . . . with brains, activity records and universal good standing. This year, with Ann Albright, president, they presented a student calendar combined with their photographic contest . . . hung their rare Wake Island surrender papers in the Eloise Knowles room . . . honored Erika Mann, writer and actress. Chosen for the revealed and the poten- tial, the twelve reflect the somewhat conservative ideas ot the grade and good works aristocracy. Back row: KINNEY. LOMMASSON, SAVARESY, MILLER, KINCAID. BOUNCE. SHEPHARD. Front row: SMITH. HAMMELL, ALBRIGHT. CHAFFIN. MASTORO- VICH. V' M' l lt' " WC 5 5 vig, 'kmmf' - X if J t ag ILE T SENTINEL SILENT SENIOR GROUP . . . with Dave Lane, president . . . looks into things behind the scenes . . . deiiberates quietly , . . acts in the same unnoticed manner. Qutstandinq in their individual tieids, members are Chosen for service, leadership and ioyaity . . . are men who have been watched tor three years. Now as sentineis of Campus intanqibies, they have the hiqhest honor ot men at MSU. Standing: SARSFIELD. HELDING. HUNTER. ROCHELEAU, HAW- KINS. BROWN, McrcLEOD. Seated: DWIRE, LANE, LUCAS, MUELLER. fi O 4 fm, A I 5 2 'it I it is 5 7 A A fiiyf WE sf! "a Front row: MCELWAIN. HELDING. FREEMAN. BOURDEAU. IOHN- SON. HARRINGTON. BALDWIN. IOHNSON. IELLISON. Middle row: GALLAGER. WIDENHOFER. GOGAS, KRAUS. MOE. CHAFF IN. GALEN. BLOOM, OTT. KELLY, DeIARNETTE. FIELDS. ROSTAD. BEHRENS. Back row: GILBERTSON. DEAN. WALLACE. LITTLE. COCHRANE. SELVIG. RAFF. MURPHY. BLINN. REED. MACLAY, COLLINS. MCARTHUR. HELLAND. KALLGREN. BE R PAW CHAPTER IK' NOURISHES OF TRADITIONS . . . Bearpaws make tracks to help students find seats in the broad expanse of the bleachers in the men's gym . . . to find the Spur of the Moment . . . to get rid of hundreds of tickets . . . to boost school spirit. Somewhat less politically elected this year, the group was tapped in the fall of their sophomore year . . . active with Royal Iohnson chief grizzly for this year . . . find membership a stepping stone in spring election qualifications . . . are busy boys with their activity and all-around honorary. , 130 ANAN F SPLIR PATRIOT SOPHOMORE GIRLS with a superabunolance ot energy 5 . . . led by Margie lesse . . . sell candy and cookies . . . meet students Q at convos . . . usher sports fans into their places . . . help manage 5 l the community concert crowds . . . try to keep people ott the lawns , . . . argue With Kaimin . . . do ticket selling . . . acl intinitum. Their tapping impresses high school Visitors at track meet . . . names the next group of Versatile sophomores who as Spurs will make tra- ditions ancl low-down jobs their second-year career. 5 9 Standing: WALSH, BRADLEY, LAMBROS, DAVIDSON, BIRKETT, IONES. FIELDS, Mc- KOWN, BECKWITH, MATTSON, BURGESS, STAMP, CHAUVIN, HEINRICH. Seated: RING, WILEY, BOSCH, FRANZ. IESSE, YOUNG, GEARY, NORTH, BURR, DELANEY. m9959999 , 2' ' n' ff5,,i4, f, f if I X t A if H lfl Seated: ELLIS, CARLSON, THOMPSON, CRITELLI, BURTON. Standing: GREENWOOD, LINSE. MOTT, BURNS. ORVIS, MASTOROVICH. HAMMELL. 2 GRADE POINT ACCUMULATORS of the senior class skimmed over with the knife of a 2.3 index qualification . . . separated from the not-as-diligent majority below. Recognition tor these upperclassmen who achieve the admirable record comes within this local senior scholarship honorary which someday may be a chapter ot the nationally established Phi Beta Kappa. KAPPA T U LPH AMBDA DELTA COED SCHOLARSHIP ELECT . . . top Crap of freshrnan women who are outstanding for scholastic record . . . tapped for A. L. D. at a Convo in the fail of their sophomore year. To further frosh interest in scholarship, they entertain at a winter quarter tea for ali women with first quarter eiiqihiiity ratinqs. Standing: DOWEN, CHILD. GERHARDT. IOHN SON, LUER, NELSON, MUNETA. Seated: MATSON, president: TAYLOR, GREETAN, THOMPSON, senior ctd- viser: IENSEN. ELY, MILKWICK. Seated: JUTZI, MERRILL, MARSHALL, LEA, OSTROM, SHALLENBERGER, IOYCE. HAUGE. RYGG. Standing: HAYDEN, PFLUEGER, SCHILLING, BURTON. PHILLIPS, PETERSON, ZIMMERMAN, NAUMANN, BEATTY. Not Pictured: ZAHAREE, IAMES, LEONARD. WRIGHT. LUST. PI MU EPSILCN NATIONAL MATHEMATICS honorary . . . juniors and seniors who have distinguished thern- selves in math . . . awards prizes to new students on the basis ot examinations . . . David Lea, president. PHI CHI THETA WOMEN IN BUSINESS administration with average grades are eligible to belong to this national honorary . . . a year old on the campus . . . help the business ad club with its Bank Nite dance . . . Leona Dotz, presiding officer. Front row: PARKER, KREIS, PIERCE, DOTZ. REGIS.. KRAMIS. HAINES. Back row: RIEGER, YOUNGBERG. RISKEN, LOVELESS. WRIGHT, VOORHEES. MEEHAN. PAYNE, STALEY. ALPHA K PP PSI BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION HONORARY . . . fosters scientific research in commerce, accounting and finance . . . tries to educate the public to appreciate and demand higher ideals in these fields . . . promotes courses leading to degrees in business administration. Main activities of the fraternity . . . headed by Elmer Stevens . . . northwest district convention here . . . initiation of Conrad Bjornlie as an honorary member. , l L First picture, front row: DR. HOF- LICH, MR. DWYER, SCHOMMER, DAHL, MEAD, O'DONNELL, SEL- VIG, DEAN SMITH. Second row: CASCADEN. MCRAE, STEVENS, LUCAS, NEWELL, KAL- BERG. Third row: LUND, ISCH, ATHEARN, TAYLOR, MURPHY, KOVACICH, SHORT, NELSON. Second picture, front row: SARS- FIELD, HEHN, BURKE, ARRAS, DUNLAP, GALEN, WENDLAND, HOFFMAN. Second row: INNIS, HANTO, MIT- CHELL, RILEY, CONITZ, STENEH- IBM. SHEETS, GALLAGER. Third row: LANGENBACH, HAN- SEN, ASPERVICH, HEBERT. MATHEWS, AUBERT, EID, SMITH, IAMES. KPPAPI MEN'S PHARMACY HONORARY . . . national fraternity with the aim of fosterinq interest in the professional field of pharmacy . . . forty-odd actives and a small group of pledqes under Heqenf Mike Naqlich . . . require above average record in the pharmacy school. Officers: DR. SUCHY. VICKERS, PETTINATO, LARSON, AMOLE, STEVENS, FELDMAN. Pledges-Back row: GEORGE, WALTER, OTT, ANDERSON. Front row: COLLINS, HARGROVE, PETERSEN, COX, TESTER. Actives-Front row: NORTON, WALDON. KRALL, AMOLE, FELDMANN, VICKERS, STEVENS. Middle row: BERGMAN, SHOOK, KNOLL, GRECO, DOLAN, FELLOWS, KRONEN, HOTVEDT. Back row: LYDEN, VRALSTED, HAMMERNESS, KILBURG, NAGLICH, FULLER, PETELIN, HOLDERMAN, AMMEN. BARTLETT. KAPP EPSILO WOMEN IN PHARMACY who have shown themselves to be better than average in the qrade point-credit balance, and are outstanding in the school, belong to this national honorary . . . Ruth Peterson is president, and Mrs. G. C. Anderson is faculty adviser for the group. Seated: PETERSON, GRIFFITH, SIGURNIK. FIALKA. Standing: COLLINS. ANDERSON, HOWSER. IOHNSON, DENNEY, LENZ. 'OU Front row: SIMS, PFEFFER, BOWER, CORWIN. PEDERSEN. VERDON. Back row: REMINGTON. WUERTHNER. WESTON. WARSINSKE. HAWKINS, BROWN. ORVIS. PROFESSIONAL IOURNALISM FRATERNITY for men . . . odvonced promotions ond publicity for interscholostic . . . held smokers in the mornner of on orgdnized unit for good fellowship. President Poul Verdon ond members of the honordry olso try to odvonce the stondords of the press . . . foster or higher ethicol code. SIGMA DELTA CHI 138 THETA SIGMA PHI WOMEN'S IOURNALISM HONORARY offers CI scholarship eoch yeor to on outstornd- ing womon interested in journolism . . . sponsored g foll porty . . . brought Lulu Holmes to the compus for their ornnuoil Motrix honor toble. With president Astrid Wetzsteon os Chief scondol-monger, Thetd Sigs tossed slonderous remorlcs into their Aber Doy's Campus Rcxkinqs. KEIL, WETZSTEON, KEIG, SMITH. MORRISON, HUNTER. LUEBBEN. l I Front row: HOLT, WILLIAMS. TOOLE. CAVANAUGH. MOSES, KURTH, GOGGIN. RYAN. Second row: BEATTY, DIETRICH. LOCKEN, LUCAS. BURNETT. BUMEE, KALARIS. Third row: CONNER, DAVIS, KOBY. CONE. HAUGE, GAARNAS, MORRISON, SARSFIELD. PHI DELTA PHI NATIONAL LEGAL FRATERNITY . . . aims at higher standards ot professional ethics and culture in the law school . . . not an honorary . . . yet members must have maintained a certain grade index. Barristers in the bond meet at luncheons every two Weeks . . . hear local and imported speakers . . . also keep a bulletin board for law school employment opportunities . . . donated a plaque where the name of each year's outstand- ing law student will be inscribed. Front row: ROBERTS, NEILS, RISCH, ZIBELL. Second row: THOMPSON, MR. WOLLOCK, MR. HINZE. BULEN. Third row: BLINN. PATTERSON. IESSE, BRCWN. Back row: STEVENS. HAIGHT, KRAUS. S VEE, FIELDS. M0 TA A MASQLIER DRAMA WORKERS HONORARY . . . requires twenty points earned back stage or behind the spotliqhts. Marilyn Neils is president . . . Masauers assist in the regular University theatre productions . . . put aside the grease paint when they present the annual Spotliqht ball. Part of the honorary . . . Masquers Royale . . . reserved tor top-notchers with one hundred or more drama work points. 140 PHI LPH THET NATIONAL HISTORY FRATERNITY for honor students in that 1 iield . . . new on the Campus . . . installed last December. S Members must have high indexes in history . . . better than l averaqe in other work to be eliqible tor Phi Alpha Theta. 1 I fs it PQ Seated: CHAMBERLIN, HAMMEN, WREN, MORTSON, GREENWOOD, ISCH, MCRANDLE, PHIL- LIPS, BENNETT. Standing: ALBRIGHT, MILLER, SCHWINDEN, ACKERMAN, SOLLID, WALLACE, BURTIN. L iq- ,,l Front row: DR. BROWMAN. PROP. DIETTERT, GRIFFITH, PETERSON. RAINEY. MUEL- LER. OGLE. Second row: AMMEN, DOCKINS, PARKE, STERMITZ. DAMON. VANCAMP. SIEMIN- SKI. HAYNES, HEILMAN, WARD. Third row: SYLVESTER. WOODGERD, BRINKERHOFF, TURCOTT, PASE, NEWBY. HUNTER. POOLE, BRANDT. GILBERTSON. CURTIS. PHI SIGMA NATIONAL BIOLOGICAL HONORARY . . . members are students from the zoology, hotany and home economics departments, and the forestry school . . . must have twenty hours with high index in hiology courses . . . good over-all scholastic standing. Chuck Haynes is president . . . group encourages research . . . brings in speakers from out cf town . . . hears faculty in informal discussions. T U KAPPA NATIONAL FORENSIC HONORARY . . . top-notchers in debate and oratory . . . juniors and seniors . . . outstanding on this year's outstandinq debate tearns. Tau Kappa Alpha with Director McGinnis sponsors sprina intercollegiate tournament on campus. Seated: GONZALEZ, MR. MCGINNIS, ARRAS. Standing: LUCAS, BALDWIN. IELLISON. Front row: STROETZ, MR. GRAY, DEAN CROWDER, MR. PERKINS, MR. LESTER, MR. WENDT, ANTHONY MR. ANDRIE, STAFFANSON. Second row: SKLOWER, HERBIG, VICK, KAISER, SINGER, MAYNARD, IACKSON, ESTES, PATTON MOTT LEWIS, CALLIHAN, BURNETT. Back row: TURNER, SPENSER, TROYER, PRICE, WOOLEY. MUNDY, SCHOFIELD, MCCREA, GAUDIN SWINGLEY, BURCHAK, DAHLSTROM, RUPPEL. SINFONIA MEN'S MUSIC FRATERNITY and national honorary . . . devoted to the advance- ment of American music . . . installed here last year. One part of the group, the Sinfonian auartette, has been heard tre- auently on the campus . . . main activity ct the orqanization is their all-American music program presented each year. VICK, BURNETT, TROYER, RUPPEL. SING- ER, ESTES. LEWIS, BURNETT, DAHLSTROM, CALLI- HAN. SPCDRTS A TRAMPLED TURF on Domblazer . . . then tall days shorten . . . the gym qets set for its basketball invasion . . . afterwards . . . Cleats on a Cinder track, the crack of the bat . . . the sott tread across the courts. OOTB IACK O LOUGHLIN GIL PORTER football captain graduate manager A HEAVY SCHEDULE. which included five home games, coupled with poor performances, the causes of which no person seemed capable of explaining, resulted in Montana's poorest post-War season. The Grizzlies lost seven of ten games, and at the same time, their box office appeal. Immediate repercussions were: Cl? Coach DOUGLAS A. FESSENDEN requested and was granted transfer to non-coaching duties: C29 University of- ficials revamped the athletic organization by separating the job of director of athletics and head football coach, C35 The university hired CLYDE W. tCACl HUBBARD as director of athletics, and TED SHIPKEY as head coach: C47 Athletic accounts Went in the red: t5l The Grizzlies occupied the cellar of the PCC with a U-3 record: C65 Montana was named to play in the mythical Futility Bowl at Los Alamos, N. Mex.: C7l Montana continued its search for membership in a conference smaller than the PCC. Possessor of the best coaching record in the fifty-year history of university athletics, Fessenden expressed the hope that his successor would not be handi- capped by prejudices. CHINSKE frosh lcisketball and footballgDAHLBERG, assistant football and head basketball coachg FESSENDEN. head fcotball coach SZAKASH line coach: OSWALD. swimmina coach: GORTON, assistant frosh coach: ADAMS, track. 4. .mf FQ T !"'X t x ...-ima. i'w-CHN. tiri,i 3, iw' me , we i -V5 Q". ., 2 'tit V L fr 2' tf'2fMf' "t . . f f If 'tw , 1 ww k A , ' t. 1 Lf.-tl 1.5 ictpfggf 6 - , ' wif . 1 5, , 5 V ' ' 1 .v,'7 s' QQ-f ftfwiyi ' .. rwflk fi . , 'V PM zwn , A, A ? if ft 1 5 if wi 1 , Qian 2, 44, ALL-PCC HONORABLE MENTION honors were accorded HELDING by United Press, and MALCOLM and KUMPURIS received the sarne acclamation trorn Associated Press. MAL- COLM ranked second in the PCC in pass interceptions and kickoff returns, and sixth nationally in punt returns. HELDING rated fourth in pass ottense amonq PCC backs, and PREUN- nc- INGER was third in the conference in touchdown conversions. Six seniors, BADGLEY. HARRIS. LEAPHART, LEEPER. PREUNINGER and RADAKOVICH, completed their collegiate eligibility. BADGLEY. IACKSON, IOURDONNAIS and MONA- HAN sustained injuries that put them out ot action tor the season. The Grizzlies elected BAUER and SEMANSKY co-captains for the 1949 season. qu, 4 TWO GRIZZLY TACKLERS upset this Cheney back, but the Savages upset Montana in return. CHENEY I2 MCNTANA 7 THE GRIZZLIES' SLIPS started showing in the season opener when little Eastern Washington of Cheney outgained and outplayed them in Great Falls to earn an upset victory. Weak Grizzly tackling, a bugaboo all season, permitted the Savages to run off the Montana tackle positions for consistent gains. Co-champions of the Washington Intercollegiate conference in 1947, Cheney avenged five previous defeats by the Grizzlies. Campus quarterbacks reasoned that either the game was a fluke or Montana was getting off to a bad season. "Before the game no one would believe that Cheney is tough," Coach Doug Fessenden said after the game. "Maybe now they'll believe me." UTAH STATE I8 MONTANA 7 A BANG-UP PERFORMANCE was turned in by the Grizzlies against the Aggies in the first home game, but Montana was shortchanged in the final tally. lt was the Farmers' third triumph over Montana in as many years. Coach Fessenden worked ground defense in pre-game practice, and Mon- tana virtually mauled the Aggie line, but after the Grizzlies charged into the Utah backfield, they were only tantalized by the fancy capers cut by the Aggies' brilliant halfback, VAN NOY. The not-so-rustic Farmer scored one touchdown, passed for another, and set up a third as the Utags lead at halftime, l8 to U. Before the game, Coach Fessenden said, "VAN NOY is one of the best running backs in the nation." After the game, Coach Fessenden said, "l guess l'll eat some worms." PACIFIC O MONTANA 27 MONTANI-YS FIRST VICTORY came at the expense of Pacific university. Only in blocking and tackling did the Badgers prove superior to the Grizzlies. Mon- tana made capital of two recovered fumbles as it tallied in the first, second, and fourth periods. Enroute to the scores, the Grizzlies outrushed and outpassed the Badgers, and compiled more first downs. "Well, we finally got over one," Coach Fessenden commented as he smiled broadly in the training room after the game. "We'll give WSC a better game next week." WASHINGTON STATE 48 MONTANA O THE NIGHT BEFORE Montana's Homecoming game, Coach Fessenden spoke his piece before a gathering of students at a traditional bonfire rally. I-le was indignant over newspaper and radio reports that his team was facing inevitable defeat. Fessy saw a "whale of a ball game" in prospect, and asked for student support. Players on both sides vividly recalled the 13-12 upset the Grizzlies scored in 1947, and the Cougars were intent to erase the nasty incident from their memories. The sun shone brightly as the Grizzlies, keyed to fever pitch, pranced out of the locker room before the kickoff. A few minutes later an overflow crowd looked on in awe when the Cougars scored the first time they gained possession of the ball. Statistically, WSC trebled the Grizzlies, who reached Cougarland only twice and tackled feebly. The defensive star of the day was Montana's MALONE, who stopped everything thrown his direction. After the game, Coach Fessenden was speechless. WSC's mentor had poured it on unmercifully. Campus quarterbacks realized the Cheney incident was no fluke. THIS COUGAR BACK scored two of seven touchdowns that ruined Montcrnds Homecommq t i I . . g , if A , A Q N t t I 'WMM Www Mm s Qt r wf4,w.+' ' -- WW ...- , ,,:..y - r .- . tmo4.vg5,t ' ff.,-,,.gy,..esL , E i E H30 GRIM DETERMINATION WAS the keynote in this aged scrap. Return of the Copper Bowl to MSU was the reward. MONTANA STATE O MONTANA I4 THE ANNUAL COPPER Bowl contest ended with the Grizzlies on top and last year's loss avenged. Montana played steady, discerning ball before an over- flow crowd of 10,000 in Butte's Naranche Stadium. The Copper Bowl reappeared on the MSU campus after an unauthorized year's leave of absence. Critical talk of campus quarterbacks subsided temporarily after the Grizzlies won the most important game of the year. Two elements conspicuously absent all year-good tackling and blockingfappeared on the scene and were largely responsible for the victory. The Grizzlies methodically marched 67 yards in 18 plays for their first score as HELDING sneaked over. A pass accounted for the second touchdown, and PREUNINGER, who missed two tries for extra point in the l947 defeat, evened his score by kicking two conversions. Montana had the edge in statistics and staged a stubborn defensive stand on its l7-yard line in the final period when the 'Cats seriously threatened. ln what they hoped would be a surprise, the Grizzlies uncorked a single wing attack to open the second half. But the 'Cats had gotten wind of the innovation and Montana returned to its "T" after five plays. "We played our best ball of the year," Coach Fessenden said after the game. IDAHO 39 MONTANA O IDAHO'S REVITALIZED VANDALS all but annihilated Montana before a more- than-surprised crowd in Moscow's Neale stadium in what was to have been a close game. The Little Brown Stein and a pot of prestige were lost by the Grizzlies, who had blanked the Vandals two years in a row. The rude awakening was initiated even before the opening kickoff when the ldaho cheering section rudely and morbidly chanted, "Po . . . oor Griz . . . zlies." An Idaho back broke the bad news on the first play from scrimmage when he found a hole through center, raced into the secondary, evaded de- fenders, and galloped 38 yards before being hauled down. In the ensuing turmoil, the Grizzlies hardly knew, or believed, what was happening. The Vandals scored in short order and added four more touchdowns in a nightmarish second quarter. The Grizzlies spent the rest of the afternoon fighting a complex. Superior depth and weight, amazing speed, and a re- markable familiarity with the fundamentals of the game provided the Vandals their margin for victory. The Grizzlies lagged miserably in statistics. Forty-two per cent of their total offensive, 38 yards, came via the air, the only phase of the game they dominated. Capt. O'LOUGHLIN, injured on the opening kickoff, was lost for the day. The defeat thrust Montana into the PCC cellar. "lt's a great life," Coach Fessenden commented in a lifeless locker room after the game. A burly lineman, who had played his heart out, later remarked, "Sorry to let you down, coach." IDAHO'S BROGAN BROKE into the open many times that afternoon in Moscow. G .N f V 1, iris is if ir Q . . ,. 4... A f . .,. . . . .. , I I i I , ., I' - - A-abs! mlxxqv S' Z , . W, . MW ew it. ,t.,,, f X mx mil H I gtnnaquuunqnpman int' sow WW - 2AWX fX . vewwgxm . I 'Ma' - W" MxW4,,w.g.v,ggxfs,. WW v S, V 4. ,, ,ti -- 'h z 'W' . f :I f...f. .' ' ,: :' 7-. 'f ,. . , t. , , .., .,, yyy. 6' J? ' 4 , i , , 0 ,, v..-.'-, QQ ZJ I . : x V. h R' it .5 'Y , Sm .. if Q A x V L A 5 , , . THIS TIGER BACK. escorted by cr blocking end, was touchdown bound until cz Grizzly effected cr timely tackle. BRIGHAM YOUNG 26 MONTANA 20 A LATE RALLY by the Grizzlies fell short after they suddenly came to life to score once in the third quarter and twice in the final canto. But once the Grizzlies got going, it was too late. Montana turned in its best performance to date in the fourth quarter of this game at Provo, Utah. Brigham Young's sophomore sprinter, CHADWICK, ran for three scores the first four times he carried the ball, and buried Montana, 19 to U, by halftime. The elusive back broke away for runs of 77, 45, and 40 yards, and subsequently earned the reputation of being the fastest back Montana has faced in its post- war campaigns. "We got off to a bad start," Coach Fessenden said upon his team's return to the campus. "We should have won, and would have in another quarter." COLLEGE OF PACIFIC 32 MONTANA I4 LITTLE ALL-AMERICAN LEBARON, behind a 217-pound line, was too much for the Grizzlies, even at their best, as they went down to their sixth defeat before a small Dads day crowd. Montana played good football but was com- pletely outclassed by the West Coast independent powerhouse. The Tigers arrived from a mild California climate hoping for similar weather conditions on Dornblaser field. Instead, they were greeted by a second quarter snow storm. Cold weather was responsible for nine pass interceptions and five fumbles that marred the mix. Montana penetrated deep into Tiger territory on four occasions and twice lost the ball on downs after reaching the enemy 3-yard line. "Montana played the game it is capable of," Coach Fessenden commented after the clash. , 152 STANFORD 39 MONTANA 7 AT PALO ALTO the Grizzlies would have to be at their best if they were to avoid making a disgraceful showing, Coach Fessenden warned before the game. Otherwise, explained the mentor, Stanford could call the score. The Grizzlies were at their best the first quarter, the end of which the score was tied, 7 to 7. Like Idaho, Stanford came through with four tallies in the second quarter to bury the Grizzlies. The halftime score standing at 32-7, the Indians went on the defensive the rest of the game and the score stayed graceful. Montana's passers reached their season zenith against the indians, who were reputedly weak against aerials. Grizzly passers connected on 14 of 26 tries for 221 yards, virtually Montana's total offensive. "Stanford has a very fast line," Coach Fessenden recalled upon his tearn's return to the campus. NORTH DAKOTA 7 MONTANA 47 A STORYBOOK FINISH, the most fitting climax of all, was written to the Grizzlies' disappointing season with a crowd-pleasing triumph over the Sioux on Dornblaser field. The two teams were rated on a par before the tilt, but Montana played an entire game to its potential the only time during the season. The Grizzlies scored on the fifth play of the afternoon, and ran up a 26-U score five minutes into the second quarter. The game was marred by slugging, roughing, and near-riot among the players when a Montana safety man was molested on a punt return. Meanwhile, the tremendous success of the Grizzlies moved the home cheering section to give out with its first whole- hearted support of the season. Amidst a victory celebration in the Grizzly locker room, Coach Fessenden joshed, "Well, we looked a little better today." A GRACEFUL SCORE was recorded when Stanford went on the defensive the second half after piling up a comfortable halftime margin. FZ ,V .V 7333: I uwmmvmmww .v- mils' Q X Ag: ' ff 3. 1 5 ,4 ., , ,Q iii W .. aim 7,2 fi ,M , yr I 3 ag. . 'Q DQ f aiyg gb his its f X 1 .K I 5.9 3 Nw, X A X 'X 3 4 4 'fi ul Q Q,-, Q ing, 55. bn ww... ' fdN1x"'bff9Z"VVi5 X V QQHQQZBWWV 9993! Q, t INV Nag: V? Af, , R X 59 X' 41 Ie or 0 53521 Q23 SQ 2-N' Y . v..,.A',mK 'A 0 I ' , ' 3 f if .5'52f' h as F, ' ' b ' ' if .ers First row: MAYTE, REYNOLDS, KING. MALONE, KINGSFORD, O'LOUGHLIN, RADAKOVICH, HAMMER- NESS, KUMPURIS. HARRIS, GALLAGHER. Second row: CAMPBELL, DEVORE, MURPHY, HELDING, BRINEY, LENN, GILLESPIE, BADGLEY, SMITH, C. KAFENTZIS. Third row: MONAHAN. ANDERSON, SELSTAD, KEIM, DELANEY, BAUER, CHAFFIN, LEEPER, KUBERICH, REPLOGLE, McCOY. Fourth row: IOURDONNAIS, PREUNINGER, LEAPHART, A. KAFENTZIS, SEMANSKY, STEWART, FORD, LULL, KORN. CORK, IACKSON. LETTERMEN MEN AWARDED LETTERS, pictured on Pages 154 cmd 155, Were: First row: Mgr. MOREY, SELSTAD and BAUER, BRINEY, A. KAFENTZIS, DELANEY, KINGSFORD, HELDING, KING. Second row: KORN, REYNOLDS, C. KAFENTZIS, O'LOUGHLIN, MALONE, MALCOLM, RADAKOVICH, IOURDONNAIS, KUMPURIS. Third row: FORD, ANDERSON, KEIM, CAMPBELL, HAMMERNESS, SMITH, NAYE, SEMANSKY. Fourth row: STEWART, PREUNINGER, CORK, LEEPER, KUBERICH, BADG- LEY, HARRIS, LEAPHART, DEVORE. FRE HMA FOOTB LL SEVENTY-EIGHT ASPIRANTS answered Coach ED CHINSKE'S call for frosh gridders. Chinske looked them over, cut the squad, and moulded a unit good enough to send WSC's Coubabes reeling against the ropes in the season opener. Ahead, 13 to U, at the half the Cubs vanished in the second half when the coubabes rallied three times and won the game, 19 to 13. WOLD rarnhled 57 for a score, and WRIGHT broke loose for 58 and later scored. The Cubs edged the Montana State Bobkittens, 24 to 19, at home by running across two touchdowns in the fourth period. BYRNE, speedy halfback, skirted left end for 66 yards and a score, and tackle SHANDORF recovered a fumble to set up the second marker. RATHMAN suffered a fractured leg and was put out of action for the season. ln a return match at Bozeman the Cubs sloshed snow and rain to post a 20-U triumph over the MSC Kittens. WOLD scored twice, once on a 58-yard scamper. The Butte School of Mines-Cub game was cancelled at the Miners' request and the season ended abruptly. End ECHOLS and guard CASSICK were outstanding in the line. L. Le- CLAIRE, a promising fullback, became ineligible. First row: FRY, WPATCH, :FL LeCLAIRE. TCASSICK. WROTHWELL, XBYRNE. WINGRAM, WDISNEY, TWOLD. WHILL, RCERINO, WOOD, assi. mgr. Second row: WILSON, SQMENDRO, YG. MAKI, WSHANDORF. WBRADLEY. WVOLK, RROTHWEILER. I. SMITH. EANDERSON, ZEIENSEN ANDRUS, ELLIOTT. assi. mgr. Third row: FISHER. RROBB. THAGLUND, TECHOLS, TG. SCOTT, XQBAYER, MANUEL, XSMART, PATTIE, T. MAKI, NETTLE, cxsst. mgr Not Pictured: AUSTIN, BACON. XBODING. COOKSTON, TCOTE, :5iDiRE. mqr.: FORNALL. IOHNSON. LUCKMAN, "'RAFN, TRATHMAN F. SCOTT, C. SMITH, WESTON. TWRIGHT. :liDenotes lettermen. L H 5 Q73-1 5 45 '74 47 57 936405.-:Sl 1 39 1 Q .A s k i . -.lk-kia... , I- A3 , ,ve - .. , . -Y 'I f Ni . ff iz ' . . ,. 2 Y - 's:,.ff' if? t" "'::f' ..-C1111 - ,- ' - , W, , -1 .5 .sygrqgr --'nr .3-: fffv V - y Q5:,,KS-in -, I ,I N., PX: . . 3 'gg Q 5 wt- X 3 2 f . : X W.. .X - :..:f. ' .J K 1 , fit t ' .Sit . .Q :gd 1 "' ,ir tw - ,I .fix . A . ?"-. .. . V . . '. 5' 'N -... f . 1 , Xi - ' +w - . ':- V' fa 1-. . 1, ' ki'-Q.. -.T-'Z K ' ' ' 'EZ , ' ' ' " 'iff' 'fn -. . Q ' , .- he 5 . . ,W , "1 . -, fi 2 . it ' fl , .Q . l' 1 at f fi My A I ' ' v - - - Q ' ' f ' " " J " ' J 7 - .,.. ' ':' ,..,..'5w. 'f i' ' . ......,, '-'fi . ti, if A' ' V ' I' I' ' l 7 M 5 , 2 t "'S:....,Y-in tt' U I 'SALE vi 'f t -,,A , . t 1 Y V- I 0 f I ..gg.::g..-- '- 'K - ' I- V - - - I - . . 5,3 rv . . F.. -R,,:6.,,:h, I, .. . . ........-.................-.........-................... .. . . . ....-.. nw......................,.......N.....-....--.,.... I 1 - ,, . ' QQ.,-A -SSN A-un-n--as - ,i-wi, 3 ,.. .. H, WM ,iam .- . ' D I D I U I U l U I U I U I U I U I U I D I U I D X 'ft' I U l U I U I I H!3!l!iii7iIfmfiQ.L.2m ' ' f"Z57""'-"m7"'n"'2 ' '-'M' ""' A" .. "T""""' L'll"IQ.i.12w.Mf.Q.,.v..Hf3-,q..,,., ,g upH"A:i gmqmmqwmm- ' 'QQ KH, Wvspmqmwgam' A' , ...Mt , - . r WIMMI G TE M A BRIEF SEASON sow the Grizzlies win two of three meets ond finish fifth in the six- teom Northern Division rnotch. They then broke four university pool records in o post-seoson session in which they swom omonq themselves for records. The Grizzlies swamped Eastern Woshinqton ot Cheney, 63 to 12. On ct Week-end junket to the Polouse country, Montono ron over ldotho, 53 to 3l, ond lost to Wosh- inqton Stote, the second best teom in the division, l4 to 70. Vorsity letter winners were FORSYTH, HARASYMEZUK, B. INGERSOLL, T. OLSON, R. SAWHILL, SIMPSON, Capt. WARSINSKE, OLSON, cmd Manager OLSON. New university pool records: 150-yard bockstroke?B. INGERSOLL. l:52.3. Old record, l:59.2. 440-yord freestyleeHARASYMEZUK, 5:43. Old record, 5243.3 300-yord medley reloy-B. INGERSOLL, Capt. WARSINSKE. YOUNG, 3:l9.8 Old resord, 3:27.2. 400-yord freestyle reloy-FORSYTH, ALLEN, SIMPSON. YOUNG, 3:57.9. Old record, 4:01. ln oddition, HARASYMEZUK tied the 220-yord freestyle record in 2:32. FORSYTH set ct time of 2226.2 in the 130-yard individuol medley, on event never run off before in the U pool. Front row: YOUNG, B. INGERSOLL, O. INGERSOLL, BROWN, ALLEN, MURPHY, BALDWIN. Back row: HUGHES, C. SAWHILL, Manager OLSON, FORSYTH, SIMPSON, HARASYMEZUK, SAWHILL. Coach BOB OSWALD. Not pictured: Captain WARSINSKE. vi EAHART. SELSTAD, Capt. ROCHELEAU, COPE and CARSTENSEN collectxvlzed their confidence IN A 25-GAME SCHEDULE. the 1948-49 Grizzlies won 12, 1ost 13, and utilized a fast break to average a record- breakinq 64 points per qanie. Montana Won its first post-war state intercoiieaiate tit1e, took fourth in an eight-team field at the Los Anqeles fnvitation tourney, and broke six university scorina records. BA KETBALL X -2 RUGGED FLOOR PLAY featured the Washington State games. at home. Bad passes and personal fouls were a dime a dozen. COACH GEORGE UIGGSD DAHLBERG had ten lettermen on hand at the beginning of the season, but was faced with the problem of finding replacements for a pair of graduated guards. Center GRAHAM and Forward EAHEART were converted, SELSTAD arose from the bench, and the trio took turns at the guard posts. Capt. ROCHELEAU started his fourth year as a Grizzly regular and wound up the team's second highest scorer, its top defensive player, and its best all-around man. The springy legged forward could score when the pressure was on and was the most consistent rebound retriever. ln his four seasons he scored more points than any other cager in university history, a record he set during his third season. The most dangerous man on the squad, COPE was the team's high scorer the second straight year. After being named one of Americas thirty best cagers in 1948, the lithe offensive center was always shadowed by the opponents' top defensive man. But Cope played thumbs-up ball, was seldom stopped, and averaged a point more per game than during his sensational sophomore season. He set three university scoring records and was one of the standout offensive men in the Northwest. CARSTENSEN seldom made the headlines, but was valuable enough to start nearly every game. The tallest man on the squad, the defensive guard had several good nights under the boards. His push shot from the keyhole hit with amazing accuracy when he took a notion to shoot. GRAHAM faked Washington States guards all over the floor while scoring twenty-six points in the season opener. l-le broke his hand in scrimmage a few days later, however, missed twelve games, and was just recovering his form when the season ended. SELSTAD, the best floor man on the squad, provided the driving force a fast break must have. When no one else could pass into the hole or drive for a layup, he could. Coach DAHLBERG purposely kept him on the bench at the opening tipoff, and then used him as lubrication when the fast break became rusty. The crazy-legged guard could play all three positions. THE PL YER THE PLAYERS THE MOST IMPROVED man from the 1947-48 squad was EAHEART, who developed into a high-scoring guard in his first season as a regular. I-le was one of the fastest men on the team, used a one-handed push shot on the run, and ended up the third highest pointmaker. BAUER, an on-and-oft player, rounded out the "select seven" that saw most of the action. The lefthander played forward and guard, was cohesive on defense, and his unpredictable southpaw flips either hit in a spectacular manner or missed by a mile. DUDIK, HELDING. KINGSFORD, MARINKOVICH, RIPKE, SCOTT. and THOMPSON pro- vided reserve strength when called upon, but spent the majority of the time on the bench. Four seniors, DUDIK, HELDING. ROCHELEAU and SELSTAD, completed their eligibility. Letters were awarded to BAUER, CARSTENSEN, COPE. DUDIK, EAHEART. GRAHAM, HELD- ING. KINGSFORD, MARINKOVICH, ROCHELEAU, SELSTAD, THOMPSON and Mgr. LERCH. Asst. Mgr. NEVE received a jayvee sweater. ONLY ON REBOUNDS did Idaho State outdo the Grizzlies, who were generally weak in that department. flvmlxzs. S is an 'Q-143' "'.'iu:' Nav ' THE MOST SENSATIONAL play of the Bobcat series was made by SELSTAD. who dnbbled the length of the floor, retracted his landing gears when he approached the hole and stretched this shot into a layup. MONTANA RAN UP a four-game winning streak near the end of the campaign, and won seven of its last nine games. ln ten of their twelve victories the Grizzlies scored more than seventy points. Characteristic of fast-breaking auints, the Grizzlies subordi- nated defense to offense, but checked awfully close once the opponents offense was set. Every man was in excellent physi- cal condition, and not once was an enemy able to outrun or tire the Grizzlies, a team that used speed as its chief weapon. Opponents choosing to run with the Grizzlies, found them hard to beat. But if the Montanans were slowed down by a defensive-minded opponent, their attack was sapped, since they were not skilled in an alternative set offense. Weaknesses were evident in passing, rebound work and converting free throws. The Grizzlies lost six straight to top-flight competition before hitting the win column. They opened at home by losing two to Washington State, the second best team in the Northern Division. The Cougars' all-conference center, GAYDA, scored twenty-nine in the first game, but would have dropped in forty except for CARSTENSEN'S alert defensive job. With GRAHAM out of the lineup, the Grizzlies lost a double- header at Logan to Utah State, and Wyoming, ultimate king of the Skyline Six conference. Two more games with Washing- ton State meant two more defeats, but like the earlier series, the Grizzlies were within striking distance at one time or another. ROCHELEAU held GAYDA to two points the first thirty-six minutes of the first game, then limited the big Cougar to six the second tilt. Meanwhile COPE tossed in thirty-six points in the series after being stopped by GAYDA in the season openers. THE SEASON'S CYNOSURE was Montana's startling upset victory in the Los Angeles lnvitation tourney over Brigham Young, defending champs of the Skyline Six. The Grizzlies played way over their heads during a tremendous offensive battle in which the scoring differential was never greater than three points. The next night the Grizzlies, conspicuously weary, lost to Pepperdine. They then lost to Wyoming, whom they pressed a good share of the game. ROCHELEAU led Grizzly scorers in all three tournament games. COPE'S showmanship earned his a Helms foundation medal for outstanding play. COPE'S eleven field goals against San lose were not enough, but his prodigious thirty-three points against Idaho State were more than enough, as the Grizzlies won a two-game series. Gonzaga was expected to drop two to the Grizzlies in Spokane, but the Zags shot and checked better to walk off with both games. The Grizzlies turned in their best performances against the Montana State Bobcats in two games that broke the game scoring record for the series. Montana was red-hot the first game, and incredibly, remained that way the second night. Gonzaga's late arrival on a snowbound train, forced the cancellation of a third game with the Bulldogs. But the following night Montana won a thrilling game after trailing all the way. ln the last five minutes SELSTAD did the driving and feeding, and EAHEART the shooting. The Grizzlies' will to win paid off. ln a third game with Montana State, the Grizzlies made it three in a row and clinched the mythical state crown. By far the better team, the Grizzlies hit fifty-six per cent of their shots the second half, and spun a defensive cacoon about the Cats' scoring threats. ln the series and season finale, the Grizzlies, namely ROCHELEAU and a band of substitutes, lost to the Cats by one point after the first-string left the game on personals. The game total of 163 points, broke the series record once more, and the seventy-five fouls called on the two teams, also set a new mark. THE OFFICIALS CALL this one cz Jump ball ROCHELEAU COPE BAUER CARSTENSEN GRAHAM EAHEART SELSTAD DATE Dec. 20 21 29 Ian. 10 ll 28 29 Feb. 4 7 11 19 25 Dec. 3 4 10 11 17 18 30 31 Ian. 5 21 22 Feb. 8 26 Feb. 18 THE BOX-SCORE AT Missoula Missoula Los Angeles Missoula Missoula Missoula Missoula Dillon Walla Walla Missoula Missoula Bozeman Missoula Missoula Logan Logan Pullman Pullman Los Angeles Los Angeles San 'Frisco Spokane Spokane Walla Walla Bozeman Missoula OPPONENT SCORE WINS: 12 Whitworth 76-66 Whitworth 79-59 BYU 76-74 Idaho State 73-60 Idaho State 72-53 Mont. State 83-71 Mont. State 84-71 Mont. Normal 83-44 Whitman 76-59 Mont. Normal 74-45 Gonzaga 59-55 Mont. State 58-56 DEFEATS: 13 Wash. State 63-74 Wash. State 56-61 Utah State 67-75 Wyoming 51-77 Wash. State 45-61 Wash. State 53-65 Pepperdine 42-59 Wyoming 42-54 San lose 59-68 Gonzaga 38-55 Gonzaga 57-65 Whitman 59-61 Mont. State 81-82 GAME CANCELLED: Gonzaga HIGH MAN Cope Rocheleau Rocheleau Cope Eaheart Cope Eaheart Cope Cope Cope Cope. Cope Carstensen Graham Rocheleau Cope Cope. Cope Cope Eaheart Rocheleau Rocheleau Cope Cope Cope Cope, Graham. Rocheleau Rocheleau Late train PTS 22 21 20 33 16 29 19 19 26 18 14 19 26 19 25 17 17 19 10 14 22 17 18 14 26 RIPKE THOMPSON HELDING SCOTT THE SCORI G BAUER ,,,A,,,,,,,, CARSTENSEN COPE .....,,.vw... DUDIK ..,,., EAHEART ,.... GRAHAM ..,,. HELDING OO,,.AO, KINGSFORD ..,. MARINKOVICH RIPKE ,,.,,,.OO,.... POINTS 116 135 423 11 265 108 19 15 43 . 5 ROCHELEAU A,,.Y ..., 3 34 SCOTT ...w..,..w., SELSTAD ..,A, THOMPSON .... Totals .,A1.1 THE . 1 112 19 .,.,...1606 FG AVG. .277 .297 .383 .363 .340 .370 .240 .269 .356 .153 .331 .000 .250 .285 FT. AVG. .510 .652 .711 .300 .642 .608 .583 .333 .565 .200 .617 1.000 .600 .213 EW RECORDS Most points scored while representing University in varsity play ROCHELEAU. 1224, 1946-49. Highest individual point-per-game average for one season: COPE. 16.9 in twenty-tive games. Highest percentage of tree throw conversions during varsity play COPE. 67.8. Most points scored on tree throws during varsity play: COPE. 303. Highest team point-per-game average: 64.2 in twenty-five games MARINKOVICH KINGSF ORD DUDIK Front row: 'LUCAS, 'FORNALL. 'BEDAHD, 'CERINO, 'HASQUET, 'ANDERSON, 'STOCKHOFF 'Mgr. T. ANDERSON. Back row: 'SCOTT, SMITH. NEIMAN. 'LUCKMAN, 'HUNTLEY, ECHOLS, COLE WOLD "SQUIRES. 'Denotes Lettermen FROSH BA KETBALL 166 TEN STRAIGHT WINS were registered by COACH ED CHINSKE'S Cubs, who won fourteen of eighteen games, and averaged 67.4 points per tilt. Chinske was blessed with the turnout of a capable array of prospects, but was cursed by the impossibility of arranging a collegiate schedule for them. Killing time, the Frosh defeated Flathead county high's rangy prepsters twice at Kalispell. They also played and lost to the independent Missoula City Cleaners. Chinske then conceived the constructive idea of entering the Cubs in the Western Montana lndependent league. l-lis year- lings won two non-league games, and when the play opened, they went on to win seven of eight games as well as the league leadership. Punctuating the league schedule was a tilt with the varsity substitutes, and four games with the State college Bobkittens. When a Grizzly-Gonzaga game was delayed because of the late arrival of the Zags' snowbound train, the Cubs took the floor against the Grizzly subs and beat them, 66 to 62. The Bobkittens won both games of a series at Bozeman, 72 to 68, and 69 to 53. The Cubs likewise made capital of their home floor advantage to edge their rivals twice, 65 to 63, and 71 to 70, in Missoula. The Cubs' talented HASQUET scored fifty-four points in the latter two games, which closed the season. The starting quint was composed of HASQUET and LUCK- MAN, forwards: LUCAS, center, and STOCKHOFF and ANDER- SON, guards. HASQUET, a definite varsity prospect, led scorers with 292 points and a 16-point average. His running mate, LUCKMAN, followed with 188. BASEB LL THE CLASSIC REMARK that Montana should play baseball in the fall when the weather is milder than early spring, was made by COACH ED CHINSKE before the season opened. He then made an about-face and produced the finest Montana team since the early '2Os. With only three practices under its belt, a "sophomore" team left snow- blanketed Missoula in early April, for Lewiston, ldaho, and its season opener. There it lost two very close games to Washington State, ultimately the cham- pions of the PCC Northern Division. A team that is denied a Northern Division schedule, the Grizzlies went on to win thirteen of its remaining seventeen games. A A ' Defensive play reached as high a level as could be asked of a college club. For instance, the Grizzlies handled thirty-four fielding chances without error against Northern Idaho. Hitting was weak at times, especially against lefthanders, and upon occasion, it behooved the Grizzlies either to steal bases or squeeze in runs. Fourteen lettermen formed the nucleus of a squad that improved tremen- dously over the year before. Capt. I. HELDING, a converted third baseman, developed into a steady shortstop and was one of the power threats at the plate. Guarding the hot corner, NICOL'S swift, accurate pegs to first made him look more like a pitcher. Front row DEMING, WALSH, Capt. I. HELDING, ROBERTS, ARMSTRONG, NICOL. Second row THROSSELL, COPE, B. HELDING, MITCHELL, O'LOUGHLIN, TABARACCI, Mgr SHEPHERD Back row Coach CHINSKE, Capt.-Elect HILGENSTUHLER, LUCAS, DAHOOD, SCHNEBLY. Not Pictured EAHEART, MCCOURT. aBl'. nl 1 A-. sig? ii ,Nh A ,. .M .1 ng. g1u COPE ARMSTRONG TABARACCI DEMIN G First base Outfield Outfield Outfield Pitcher HILGENSTUHLER Second base L HELDING Shortstop NICOL Third base ROBERTS Catcher CAPT.-ELECT HILGENSTUHLER covered second base and was the classiest fielder on the squad. A Brooklyn boy who played Brooklyn-brand baseball, he had a mania for stealing home in a tie ball game. He didn't commit an error until mid-season. The outfield was composed of the team's strongest hitters. ARMSTRONG'S speed, arm and .365 hitting in the lead-off position, made him a fixture. WALSH blooped hits at a .379 clip and made a sensational catch to save the last game of the season. The cleanup hitter, TABARACCI. almost single- handedly won games against Northern Idaho and Bozeman with his major league cut. DEMING. a former infielder, was another slugger and rounded out an out- field that had hustle to burn. A promising player, EAHEART. broke his ankle in the opening game and was lost for the season. ROBERTS and MITCHELL divided the catching chores. Both made opposing base runners stick close to the bags, and knew how to handle pitchers. A club that employs "inside baseball" needs good pitching, and Montana had it in 1948. COPE was not only the team's most consistent long ball hitter, but his smoke ball and wrinkling curve raised the eye- brows of both batters and pro scouts. B. HELDING led the won and lost column with a 4-O record. A heady pitcher, he had control, always pitched to spots, and was the type of hurler that made a good defensive team relaxed and alert. LUCAS was a spot pitcher and drew all the touch assignments. He was smart on the mound and was a chucker who built up tremendous team confidence. O'LOUGHLIN was the dark horse of the staff and led it in shutouts that came with the help of a fine change of pace. At season's end, Coach CHINSKE wasn't the only man impressed by his winning ball club. Washington State's coach, BUCK BAILEY. called the Grizzlies one of the best teams his squad played in its pennant- winning season. Men receiving varsity letters were ARMSTRONG. COPE. DEMING. EAHEART, B. HELDING. L HELDING. HILGENSTUHLER. LUCAS. MITCHELL. NICOL, O'- LOUGHLIN, ROBERTS, TABARACCI and WALSH. EAHEART Date April 9 20 24 30 May 1 14 15 19 29 Iune 5 April 8 23 30 May 1 26 April 24 May 7 11 At Spokane Missoula Lewiston Spokane Cheney Missoula Missoula Missoula Missoula Kalispell Lewiston Farragut Spokane Cheney Missoula Lewiston Missoula Butte WALSH Outfield Winning Opponent Score Pitcher WINS: 13 Whitworth 7-2 HELDING 2-0 O'LOUGI'lLIN All-Stars 6-2 LUCAS Northern Idaho 10-0 HELDING Gonzaga 5-2 HELDING East. Wash. 9-7 SCI-INEBLY Northern Idaho 5-4 LUCAS 6-3 O'LOUGl-ILIN Bozeman Indep. 5-4 HELDING Mont. Mines 11-2 COPE Kalispell 14-1 COPE Somers 19-1 LUCAS Somers 3-0 O'LOUGI'ILlN DEFEATS: 6 Wash. State 1-2 LUCAS 3-8 COPE Farragut 3-4 COPE Gonzaga 0-4 O'LOUGHLIN East. Wash. 0-4 LUCAS All-Stars 4-6 LUCAS GAMES RAINED OUT: 4 Northern Idaho Gonzaga C21 Mont. Mines Department Leaders Hitting-WALSH, .379: ARMSTRONG, .365 Runs batted in-COPE. 16: TABARACCI, 12 Home runs-TABARACCI, 3: COPE, 2 Runs-ARMSTRONG. 17: I. HELDING. 16 Stolen bases-ARMSTRONG. 9: HILGENSTUHLER, 8 Fielding-TABARACCI, 1.000: ROBERTS, .985. Pitching-B. HELDING, 4-0: O'LOUGHLIN, 3-1 B. HELDING Pitcher THROSSELL First base McCOURT Second base DAHOOD Outfield MITCHELL Catcher Outfielcl itf . ' QV at Si 'I 0 + -wg B P . i . gnu 1 Av ' fx ,tx Lgigni xg., bl hh' alll Y' 4 f J F I Q, Nt., ., . . A .lm fl.-nu-ssgluv 1 W' -ian 5 if v . 1 5 X , , ' lf ' T t , . T L li T. Q i a i 4 4 I l i i 1 1 l l If I T 4 170 5:32 THEY GO WITH X , g V Standing: NEWTON. BLOOM, RADAMAKER. KALLGREN. Seated: HENNESSY, THOMPSON, PAYNE. MCCREA. TH E GAM E SOMETIMES THESE ARE FORGOTTEN in a maze ot statistics, but they are a part of the game . . . The cheerleaders: quite often forgotten, receive a great deal of ridicule as reward for a great deal ot work: are not exactly innovators or champion stimulatofs . . . The crowd is large or small, usually depending on the showing the team made in the last gamep they are quite often forgotten as a real part of the game by everyone except those who count the gate receipts . . . generally unenthusiastic, quite otten prone to criticize, but on the whole quite concerned with MSU athletics . . . The band is generally appreciated and very deservingly so. TRACK - - I948 MONTANA PLACED THIRD in the Northern Division PCC track and field meet for the first time in history, and scored more points in the event than ever before. ln regular season meets, the Grizzlies Won three of four. Paramount in the picture was YOVETICH'S inability to repeat his 1947 hurdles performances. ANDRUS, BRANDT, COPE, DOMKE. DOYLE, GRAHAM. GRAY, HEINTZ, MAYES, MCLATCHY, PFEFFER, REGAN, RO- CHELEAU. SCOTT. YOVETICH and Mgr FOX received varsity letters. SIX GRIZZLIES WON points in the Northern Division meet in Missoula. Pictured clockwise, the men were SCOTT. MAYES. DOYLE, YOVETICH, ROCHELEAU and DOMKE. ff, V. f 44 ii'-vi I948 TRACK EASON A SIX-MAN SQUAD placed third at WSC's indoor meet in March to open the season. DOYLE'S 138-foot discus throw broke the Cougar fieldhouse record. Montana's relay auartette, MCLATCHY, DOMKE, STELL and GRAY. broke up a tight dual meet at Cheney, which Montana won, 07 2-5 to 53 3-5. SCOTT'S sprint wins, YOVETICI-I'S hurdle triumphs, and ROCHELEAU' S versatility gave Montana a convincing victory at home over ldaho, 73 l-2 to 57 1-2. WSC's brilliant traclcmen Walked all over Montana and a sloppy track at Pullman, 102 to 29. WSC's POLSFOCT handed YOVETICH his first collegiate hurdle defeat, and loroke the Montanan's winning streak at twenty-five races, with a low hurdles triumph in 24.7s. SCOTT'S speedy 9.8s century highlighted an easy victory over the Mon- tana State college Bobcats, 100 1-2 to 28 1-2, on Dornblaser field under a hot sun. For the first time in twenty years, MSU played host to the Northern Division meet, which was won by WSC. YOVETICH'S high hurdles win in l4.8s was the Grizzlies' only first place, but they grabbed eleven places in nine events to pile up 251-2 points, 21-2 behind second-place Washington, the defending kings. Oregon, QSC, and ldaho followed. YOVETICH again lost to POLSFOOT in the lows. DOMKE cut loose with a sensational stretch sprint to win second in the 440 in 48.4s. SCOTT placed in the sprints, ROCHELEAU in the hurdles and MAYES in the pole vault and broad jump. DOYLE won second in the discus. Front row DOYLE. YOVETICH. ROCHELEAU. COPE. PFEFFER. Bcxck row FOX, manager: HEINTZ. DOMKE, MCLATCHY, REGAN, KOBELIN. GRAY, CAPT MAYES COACH ADAMS. NORTHERN DIVISION MEET A MEET RECORD was set by Washington State's mile relay quartet in 3:l7.2s. Montana's GRAY helped the Grizzlies fin- ish third. SCOTT PLACED SECOND in the 220-yard dash. behind WSC's KENISTON. who won both sprint events. POLSFOOT DEFEATED YOVE- TICH in the 220-yard low hur- dles. ROCHELEAU came in fourth for the Grizzlies. l 5 . I .r Y N . .., K, W M5 A ,t .W 'S ali" ,w A 1 X... 4- 5 l i .. uf- ft L E tt 3 t i i E l i I ll ll in ll fi I P .F .I ,V i f I i i i 5 1 l Q l74 I LACY'S, WHITEFISH Left to right: Graduate Mgr. GIL PORTER. THORSRUD, STEEL, BEATTY. MCCRACKEN, IOHNSON, RUDE, OST, FERNETT. KII G A WILD GOOSE CHASE into the wilds of Washington injected life into a season in which Montana won one of two meets, and finished last in the Northern Division meet. Montana placed seventh in an eleven-man lnternational lntercollege tourney at Banff, Alta. OST'S second in the slalom helped the Grizzlies, who finished one place behind Montana State in a meet won by the University of Washington. The Grizzlies won their own invitational meet at Whitefish, defeating Montana State, Carroll college, Eastern Washington and Gonzaga. MCCRACKEN took third in the downhill. IOHN- SON won fourth in both the slalom and combined slalom and downhill. The Northwest lntercollegiate Union meet at Martin, Wash- ington, was cancelled because of adverse highway conditions after the Grizzlies had departed from Missoula for the meet. Efforts to contact the uninformed skiers failed, and the weather- beaten highways proved a small obstacle. The Grizzlies arrived in Martin in time to 'znake a U-turn and start back for the campus. At the Northern Division meet at Pullman, LODDERS won l9th in the downhill and contributed one-third of Montana's points with tenth place jumps of lO7 and ll2 feet. OST finished l5th in the slalom. GOLF RIPLEY TOOK NOTES on Montana's 1948 golf season when the Grizzlies shot, not one, but two tie matches, oddities on any course. Player-Coach SARSFIELD led his team to a successful season which also included two wins and one loss. The Grizzlies opened with a 12-6 win over the State college Bobcats on the Missoula Country club course. SARSFIELD dropped a 40-foot putt on the eighth hole and carded a two- under-par 74. ln a second home match, Montana led Washington State most of the day, but the Cougars dominated the last three singles matches and tied the Grizzlies 1315 up. DAWES and B. LAHSON played exceptional golf in the singles. Montana's second tie match was with a good Gonzaga team on the home greens ward. SARSFIELD shot another 74 and Capt. LARSEN blanked the Zags' player-director in the singles. The Grizzlies met their first defeat at Salt Lake, where Utah bested them, 7 to 2, in the wind and rain on long downhill- slanting greens. A match with Utah State at Logan was can- celled because of May snow. Studies kept SARSFIELD and RADAKOVICH on the campus and an undermanned Grizzly team finished last in the Northern Division meet at Eugene, Oregon. The Grizzlies and the Bobcats entered a 54-hole medal play Missoula Invitational tourney, and Montana emerged victors by comparative scores. Montana placed fifth in a 28-team field, four places ahead of the Cats, in the season finale. Player-Coach SARSFIELD. LARSON, ANDERSON, DAWES. BOYD RADAKOVICH. Not plctured Capt. LARSEN. if , TENNIS-I948 CAPTAIN CUMMING'S PERFORMANCES as No. 1 man in singles were good enough to earn him eight wins in eleven matches, including victories over the No. l man of talented Wash- ington State and Gonzaga teams. His showing in the Northern Division PCC meet at Pullman was equally as impressive. Coach IULES KARLIN'S third winning team in as many years, gave him the title of the most successful coach on the campus. Top: Captain CUMMING Bottom: Coach IULES KARLIN THE MOST SUCCESSFUL season in Coach KARLIN'S three-year tenure saw Montana win nine of eleven matches and place third in the Northern Division PCC meet at Pullman. Grizzly netmen possessed the best overall record of any athletic team on the campus and extended their home court winning streak to fourteen matches. A six-man complement was filled by three returning lettermen, ANNAS, CUMMING and IARDINE, and newcomers BOTTOMLY. HOLMSTROM and ROBINSON. All played singles except BOTTOMLY, who worked with IARDINE in the No. 2 doubles team. CUMMING and ANNAS formed the No. l doubles squad. Mgr. LEVINE and the six men received letters. ANNAS and BOTTOMLY completed their eligibility. Captain-elect IARDINE won ten of eleven matches and showed great im- provement as the season progressed. Another dependable, ANNAS, won eight of eleven. Montana opened its season away from home with a 7-0 win over Cheney, but was edged, 3-4, by Gonzaga on the wfay home. In a three-day stand at home, the Grizzlies disposed of Whitworth, 4-3 and 5-2, and Idaho, 6-1. An early May snowstorm in Walla Walla forced playing the Whitman match at Pullman, where Montana had lost to Washington State the day before, 2-5. The Grizzlies defeated Whitman, 5-2, as CUMMING capably handled the Whit's frosh sensation, PENROSE. Montana played better against WSC than was expected. Three matches it lost went three sets, and CUMMING downed the Cougar No. 1 man, STRANKMAN. GAMES WITH GONZAGA scheduled for May 7 and 8 on the MSU courts were rained out, but when the Zags returned to Missoula a week later, they lost two closely contested matches. ln winning, 5-2 and 425-Zh, Montana made up for the early season loss at Spokane. CUMMING and Gonzaga's No. l man, BRASCH, split two tensely played matches. The Montana cap- tain had defeated his rival in the earlier match and boasted a two-out-of-three season edge. CUMMING reached the quarter-finals in the singles at the Northern Division meet, and collaborated with ANNAS to quality for the doubles semi-finals. IARDINE played excellent tennis in besting ldaho's RAINEY in the longest match of the tourney. But he tired and was eliminated by FINDLAY of Cregon State, who was ceded third. Rain delayed the tourney, eventually won by Washington, and the Grizzlies returned home to prepare for the season finale with the State College Bobcats. The Grizzlies outplayed the 'Cats, 6-1 and 5-2, in a severe windstorm, to close their fine season. Back row: KARLIN, HOLMSTROM. ROBINSON, Mgr. LEVINE. Asst. Coach BEATTY. Front row: BOTTOMLY. IARDINE, CUMMING, ANNAS. 'ti hmm, H In Upper left: O'HERN dropped SAYLOR in the first round. Upper right: Cook drove FRASER into the ropes and cut his eye. Lower left: MARLEAU and ASID exchanged only a few blows. Lower right: Pres. IAMES A. MCCAIN presented O'HERN with the outstanding boxer award 178 THE INDEPENDENTS WON the annual "M" club fight card. They collected twelve points to edge the defending champion SAE's, who earned eleven points. ABE O'HERN, SAE, won the outstanding boxer award. Winners: Achievements: ABE O'HERN, SAE-KO from KEN SAYLOR. Sigma Chi, in first. LYLE GRENAGER, lndependentseeKO from ED SHELTON. SAE, in second. AL ROSMAN. lndependentseKO from DICK CERINO. SAE, in third. LEE CORK. SAE-TKO from DICK REID, Corbin hall, in third. ELI ASID. SAE-TKO from IOHN MARLEAU, South hall, in first. LARRY RYAN, Independents-TKO from DON PAYTON. Theta Chi, in second. MARV MacARTHUR. Phi Deli'-Decisioned BILL REYNOLDS. Lambda Chi. DON MORGAN, Independentseefllecisioned BILL MAY, Phi Sigma Kappa. BILL INGHAM, Corbin halleDecisioned GEORGE SHEPHERD. Sigma Chi. EARL COOK-BOB FRASER fight declared "no contest" by referee. "M" CLUB TOURNEY I TRAMURALS SEVEN SPORTS ACTIVITIES were underwritten by the intramural department for the recreation and enjoyment of the student body. DAVE COLE, who succeeded PAUL SZAKASH as director in September, pledged to work to the best of his ability, and did just that. The department was limited in finances, and the referees took their share of guff from the stands, but all in all, interest in the program was keen. Measured in terms of enjoyment students derived from it, the program was a huge sucess. QPHOTO BY PEDERSENP SOFTBALL r , r es UNBEATEN IUMBO HALL de- feated Phi Delta Theta, 3 to l, for the championship. IUROVICH, lumbo pitcher, limited the Phi Delts to four hits and received good support afield. Triples by MORGAN and LOHSE provided the scor- Q , ' 4 Min 7,1 W- ., .MW ' di 3.. ZW 1 ' et. H! ll ll' l A li , il .ff gs ii, H- 1 V , ,ge - ., ,vi f Y 4' 5: 1 .I i- D ,- gif' :if F' - I " A " . I ww, tm 1, . ng?-jx, iiirif' P' i M I L I , . if t gr: v -f Q y.-lIuung....,3,,,-,, ,,,,,,,,f W-ww ,t , was - f , ,. i K X -' Q-v N V' , f" A wa S fe. K' -:Hvgw-A if f' few1,,li.L Lg -gf r wtf - 1 'Wm , I . fs 144. n .fr 5,1 Q , , kt M... K vigil c X . ing punch for the Eskimos. In the action picture at the right, South ha11's W Q V battery WOLPERT and WOLPERT, went to X at ,gf b to f' .A -Jx'si3'x,fi-t. Y K., A work on an enemy batter. lofi A ff f Q, f A fly' if T Q mg F if If I , Back row: LENN, MORGAN, IUROVICH. FANSLOW, WILSON. Front row: MGR. BOETTICHER, LEAF, TAY- LOR. DUKIAK, LOHSE. I I I I I i I I 1 I uf I 13:6 ' f I I .mfg ye, . M215 I ' fi 1.5" 3' ' Q? il Q, ,585 I if t 2555 If I 2 TGUCHBALL - TENNIS - SWIMMING A 16-8 VICTORY over Sigma Chi, Champs ot League A, gave Sigma Nu, League B titlists, the touchball crown. Sigma Alpha Epsilon took one singles match and both doubles from Theta Chi to win the campus tennis title. In a swimming meet dominated by Sigma Chi and the Phi Delts, the Sigs displayed needed depth, and won 34 to 29. Sigma Nu Touchball Team Standing: ARMSTRCNG, HALL, WALSH, LUCAS, MCLAUGHLIN, DiRe. Kneeling: LITTLE, ROSS, SKIE, IOHNSON, DOYLE. SAE Tennis Team HARRIS, ATWOOD, B. BRINEY. Sigma Chi Swim Team Standing: STEWART, LEMIRE, INGERSOLL, CHRIS- TIENSON. Kneeling: LONG, BLYNN, MURPHY. TRACK - BOWLING - BASKETBALL A RELAY VICTORY by the Phi Delts won them the track crown in a narrow escape from second-place Sigma Chi. The Phi Delts walked oft with the bowling title .. ,. A N. ,fm , , . J,-I by winning thirty-three oi thirty-nine matches. GIS ' L I ,3 y and the Sig Eps tied tor second. H The Ski club, League B runnerssup, defeated the 7' R Phi Delis, League B champs, 37 to 33, in the post- season championship game. Sigma Nu then edged the Phi Delis for second place. South hall, League A titlists, iolded in the tourney. Phi Delt Track Team Front row: IOHNSON, KUBURICH. CORNING. Back row: SMITH, CAMPBELL, SEL- STAD, WHITE. KOBELIN. Phi Delt Bowling Team to right: D. O'DONNELL, NES- BIT, T. O'DONNELL, IARDINE. DIKEOS. Left Ski Club Basketball Team Front row: MCCALL, LIND. HOL- LAND. Back row: DORAN, SULLIVAN, MARINOVICH. OBERWEISER. WAGNER. aff? Q Y K, F T s E s s E x 1 N, , X, V, 1 ,,., . Q -, . Y, .. Q ' V, ' vS"1"'2w:N .nie - . 4:1521 . SI-X , 1 wa .2- 4 . fi V. ' ""7i"4' ' mf' 4? 'EET'-F' 'I Xi.S:jS4?LffeI"E-Y A .Nb-T g'.:?j'2'l-'-' ':. b.5?Q5?I.A rw '- 'Q f-nw? H :-'-P:-c.:,::,f,,,:a Q., xveega rgsgx-fs MW, , f--X ee 2 Q 'G W we ,Q 'R 7 i r 3- A, ' S S iff R f 1 T S or 'L 2 1 Q E x 1 4:5 sf ' 32? '- ' - --'-A 5 www' fn - we X :W .,,f-.wx Q . rr " X' X Q x 4 f , f F S -.law we -V w ' 'N' V V 2-we L, of , , 3,25 -, W, , we we ,fy fx , is C , A: 9.x 1gg5,:'- he 2 , .1 0 P ' 5 I 5 I i B I B i 1 i w w 'i M T 182 I HERE AQUAMAIDS PETERSON. CLAPP, HART and ?OWELL hold a formation for the Sentinel Photographer overhead. Below, water-treaders line up. Back row: BURGESS, NESBIT. PETERSON. KITT. HART, MCDONALD, FLIGHTNER, POWELL. CLAPP. Froni row: O'NEII.. B. PARMETER, ZUNCHICH. GRIFFITH. KIND. D. PARMETER, FIELDS, STRITCH. WOMEN'S INTRAMURAL WOMEN OCCASIONALLY FORSAKE the coke-store, the Ii- brcxry, the afternoon confdb und mingle in cr decrepit wornen's gym to exercise un-used muscles cmd compete with other exercisers. WOMENS ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 'A KATHY LLOYD president WOMEN'S ATHLETIC GOVERNMENT is handled by the WAA council of sports managers and livinq group representatives . . . with Mrs. Sarsfield, adviser, regulate activities tor intramural competition . . . GINNY MESSELT volleyball, basketball, bowlinq, softball team tourna- vice president ments . . . individual play in badminton, table tennis, horseshoe matches. Group coordinators present cups . . . sponsor an annual qlrl-date-boy barn dance . . . have an all- women tun-niqht to explain the process ol participa- IOANNA MIDTLYING tion credits . . . make hiqh school play day their Secretary project. PEGGY McDONALD treasurer Seated: HUNTER, BAYS, MCDONALD, MESSELT, LLOYD, MIDTLYING, FISK, SILVERNALE, MRS. SARSFIELD. Standing: GILMORE, FRASER, CARSON, LcxPINE, HALVERSON, BECKWITH, BEATTY, KINCAID, EVANS, PARMETER, IOHNSON, RHOADES, GERHARDT, WEBBER, BERLAND, CRISSEY, O'SHEA. 183 Sn.. ,.II'...,. ' N 'L I I il , - f ' , ,1 ' we J-'I' I ' Q.:- ,J I f , 9 W. , 1 'E 'fs Sf' 'ffl I DELTA M 'Y i W F UELTA 'ffl gggjfw SEL: 'X f ,.- I , 'w T , JA' If '- ..-vf YL A N M 1 WOMEN'S INTRAMURAL WINNERS ALPHA PHI SKI TEAM MCKOWN, FERGUSON, CUNNINGHAM, KIND. TRI DELTA VOLLEYBALL Standing: BELL, BURR, SIMMONS, Mc- DONALD, YOUNG. BENZ. Seated: WORKING, BECKWITH, IOHN- SON, FRANZ, SMITH NEW HALL BOWLING TEAM NORTH, KUHNS, TAYLOR, GILMORE. TRI DELTA BASKETBALL Front row: WORKING, IONES, BURR, CHAUVIN, BELL. Back row: S I M M O N S , MCDONALD, BECKWITH, SMITH, IOHNSON. SIGMA KAPPA SOFTBALL Standing: FISK, WATERS, MILKWICK, POPOVICH, HALL, DREW, DOCKERY. Seated: BERLAND, ANDERSON, GAU- THIER, GRIFFITH, IOHNSON. BUCK THREE 5 AL mger L 011 8 017 X Q X 5 vQ ew ix iv W 3 5 x 'tl g ffA W ellh-inn. , . nn- M9 it Q F ?'lTf"""-F1 's 1 . 9 ' ' i 4- ' r D . d. U ff, -l . l " if- , , 'ilttr-TJ' O u i 5 ! 1 - i . WAYWARD W LKS A H ', 1 FOR SOME ONLY a diverqent step new and then: tar others rather extensive rarnbhnqsg but no matter what the direction, everyone side-steps the beaten path occasionally. Ofiicials "dug up" a famous personality for MSU'S big day. Contestants dug in for the traditional pie contest and cherry pits flew in all directions. For those who rose early enough the purpose oi "A" day was quickly explained. F if ' r 14 - 2' -N BERD Y C More energetic students took time out from picnicing to give campus lamp posts the new look. while faculty big- wigs used spare time to give students a lesson in softball. ' DADDY ABER WOULD shudder if he could see what had happened to his memorial day . . . "Lock the door, the spurs are in Siberia . . . Get up? . . . the picnic won't start for hours yet . . . Go to school? . . . they'll put you to work if you get near there . . . Not resting, just waiting for a rake . . . I know she's not wearing lipstick but l'Ve wanted to meet her all year . . . Why vote? l'm not running for an office . . . What d'ya mean, my duty, l'm an Independent . . . Raffle tickets? l've never won anything in my life . . . Who told the Theta Sigs about this? . . . it's a lie . . . of course . . . Paper cups? lust throw them on the lawn . . . Swearingen always cleans up afterwards anyhow . . . High court? Sure l'll go, they ain't got nothin' on me . . . l hope . . . Well that's over . . . where's the nearest picnic? . . . Shay mister did you see a bunch o' guys and a lot of beer go this way? . . . Girls should get late per on a day like this." After it all things do look a little fresher, the grass begins to grow in earnest and spring feels that it has been officially welcomed. . t t i f ,eh 1' If K i ,A g 1 , Kiki W1 I' ' X t 1 Q fs. W r"'fT'f" An unidentified co-ed typiiies "The Spirit of '48" or I'm losing but I'm having fun? Foresters, the official keepers of the steaks. What some people won't do for excitement, and it's water. too. The oval on Aber Day, playground of the gods, Greek, that is. Don Kern puts one over on the faculty. His mother never told him there would be moments like this. They don't serve beer on the campus, we gotta eat you know. 187 -id.. -nl' 'l 1d4. i Qs? rs, A giy A H: DORNBLAZER FIELD BECOMES the center of activity and high school athletes try out the turf that they may--tread as Grizzlies . . . the high iump is always a center ol activity . . . Loran Perry of Great Falls. despite an infected hand. managed to set a new interscholastic shot-put record and placed in the discus throw. THE BILLINGS TRACK TEAM under the tutelaqe ot MSU graduate lack Emiqh, broke Missoula's interscholastic victory string at three and Walked otf with the 1948 championship. The weather cold . . . bad cross Wind . . . crowd of about four thousand . . . noticeably lacking in MSU students . . . a qood show . . everyone well satisfied. BULLDOG DiRE and Ioe Heimes preside sedately at the registration desk . . . virtual towers of information . . . line-up oi winners of the discus throw. I OTERSCHOLASTIC WEEK INTERSCHOLASTIC runs pretty much true to form each yearg classes are over Thursday noon and everyone but the hard-working few hurry to get off the campus before the rush begins and there is any danger of being trampled by the stampede . . . bartenders begin check- ing ages . . . the student union overflows with future Grizzlies and the green and gold neon M blinks on the oval. When it's all over, new interscholastic track, DH. I. W. HOWARD lriterscholastic Chairman ' tennis, golf, debate, little theatre, and oratorical cham- pions have been Crowned and students hesitantly re- turn to the Campus to find everything in normal order by eight-ten Monday morning. X I I i ll r. l, THE PARADE OF HIGH SCHOOL athletes opens the forty-second interscholastic meet . . . Sigma Chis win the house decoration contest . . . what's on the other end of interscholastic pictures . . . Sigma Nu decoration . . . McGinnis hands out awards . . . Sigma Kappas . . . first place in the sorority competition . . . Ray Fenton guides the workings ot the high school' iournalists' edition of the Kaimin. 189 BURLY SUMMONS a new group of Silent Sentinels and one xs reminded that despite another graduation, things will go on as usual dlflerent faces but the same spmt still MSU Mortar Board gets the same change in personnel . . . it seems a whole week of rush and marching that in a small way dupllcate tour years the military gets out to ioin in the farewells . . . caps and gowns for a LAWRENCE A. KIMPTON ot Stanford addressed MSU's largest graduating class as the titty-first commence- ment speaker . . . Chancellor Selke spoke at Baccalau- reate . . . War March of the Priests . . . Montana My Montana . . . Hail the Copper, Silver, Gold for the last time . . . and now just pay your dues and you are a member ot the alumni club. GR DLIATIC A D SENI R WEEK THE END OF ANOTHER YEAR . . . sott Warm evenings . . busy days and nights tull oi reminiscing and hope tor the seniors . . . lantern parade on the oval . . . the last S. O. S .... senior dinner with all the big-Wigs . . parade across the campus in caps and gowns . . proud parents look on . . . baccalaureate and then the last hour comes . . . long speeches . . . biggest class in history . . . haze filled auditorium and finally that little piece ot paper which seems almost ridiculous in the presence of all that it stands tor . . . a last look at MSU . . . and that is all . . . but the memories. ill. 1, M4 THE OUTDOOR BAND concert iust before the lantern parade. a quiet serene ending for four years of hustle . . . reception in the Gold room . . . a mass of people and congratulations. REGISTRATION LINES . . . book lines . . . coke store lines . . . lines . . . lines . . . lines . . . line up for the Bobcat games in the gym . . . line up to eat in Corbin Hall . . . line up to check your coat in the student union . . . and then the last line and it all seems worth it . . . no money to pay . . . no soggy potatoes . . . iust congratulations and a kind of a warm feeling inside. 191 ORIENTATIO WEEK IT WOULDN'T BE A FRESHMAN WEEK without a new lace tor the "M" . .. . everybody gets to meet everyone else and as much whitewash gets on people as gets on the hill. "ORIENTATION IN ONE WEEK" becomes confusion in one easy lesson but somehow the frosh otlwotys momoqe to get registered and usually there are very few casualties . . . o lot of people that no one knows are elected temporory cldss officers and cr couple of hundred stag freshman men flood the mixers to dance with ct couple of girls . . . it dll seems d horrible mess and hardly worth while. . .rush week, a thousand handshdkes, cr thousand smiles, cz few beers, smoky sessions in cellars . . . forces, fdces, faces, fdces . . . l think l will make an awfully qood independent . . . finally it is dll over crnd school isn't half cts bad os they mdke out thot first week. "I KNOW, BUT I DON'T WANT TO TAKE PSYCHOLOGY. I'm a chemistry maior . . . prerequisites . . . what are they? . . . registered first day? . . . how did they do it?" . . . Even Mortar Board gets in the swim with a tea . . . more laces, more introductions, more people. more smiles. MW' 1 192 HOMECCDMI C5 ANOTHER HOMECOMING . . . just like last year . . . back for another look at the campus . . . the stories of how things used to be . . . now, if we had football teams like We used to have . . . and "foresters" in those days . . . yes, the old place is still here, but it will never 54. be the same again . . . the same stories that have been UM. told thousands of times . . . but somehow it is all new and worthwhile again at homecoming time . . . a tradition that can't grow old or be forgotten as long as the University lives. HOWIE HUNTER, the handsome looking fellow behind the hot dog. was student head for home- coming activities. ANN LANDRY, OIS-New hall candidate for homecoming queen, walked oft with honors and was crowned between halves of the game by Bill Burns. president of the alumni association. Here, Marie Wade and Miss Landry atop New Hall Float. swf' l93 ff 1 fy C 1 1 l t 4 i I l v E .ian ...prxi L. i I ,X tl , KZ 'ery v les, F "ggi 1 Es ' f f ymlg 1 x Wes ' fig? -- taffnfj - ig 'W'-i ,, zf"4' , -251, ,st . V, ivy.,-KQMQ Ji ,ab 4 A if '1 1 ' ig Y f. ,,V 41 Q A' -ie 52 'I 6 1 ',i' . " -.Qrt I r-1, .EL - N.., lngvs-. , J, 4 35: . .. . V -1,55 -,- l ., ' N sf - . ... Alpha Chis get in the swim and build the traditional :float for their candidate for queen . . . the president of the alumni association crowns ANN LANDRY, the IS A-New hall candidate, Queen of Homecoming, for 1948 . . . the band welcomes WSC between the halves, the football team had already done its part along this line . . . the Kappas ioin in entertaining visiting grads . . . everyone gets together for the annual bar-b-que. SAME GRADS, SAME STCDRIE SAME PLAC , EW TIME 194 ANOTHER HOMECOMING. they are as in- evitable as the autumn itself . . . The athletic department gets a boost in gate receipts . . . Mom and Dad have a good excuse to run over to Missoula to see how Iunior is coming with his studies . . . A sure sign of rain and Grizzly defeat . . . Reception at the house after the game . . . "When we trod the walks of old MSU . . . " . . . A great many headaches tor a great many people but after it is all over it does seem Worthwhile, that is it there are enough aspirins handy. 01' , Q' If-',. ff-N S5 ,Q The Iumbo boys ioin in the variety show to prove to doubting alumni that things did not completely go to pot when they left . . . for the only time during the year Q the campus has a bon-fire and there are even quite a few people out for the rally. The Sigma Chis masked their entrance and built the prize winning fraternity decoration around it . . . the Sigma Kappas took first place in the sorority division . . . Iackie Perry, on the North hall float, lines up for the parade down Higgins avenue. Q ,QW egg' ! V"l S515 . ' , FUTURE VOTE YES R ., , V f is Q if V Xl S . 7 195 e l ff f xlxwfmmmmkv ' ff Mm gif X x fy N THE COMBINED GRIZZLY AND BOBCAT bands plug fifty one and hlty two between halves . . . the MSU band and twirlers advance to the stadium the Bobcats swing down Park street Buck shows that xt can't happen twice in succession. REVENGE FOR LAST YEAR'S audacious con- duct of the Bobcats was methodically around out on the granite of Naranche stadium and after the game it was found that Meaderville hadn't changed a bit in a year . . . dinner at Teddy's . . . a house party or two . . . and so home until next year. BUTTE G ME OFF TO BUTTE tor the traditional trouncinq of the Bobcats, discontinued temporarily last year because ot circumstances beyond our control . . . parade . . . bands . . . snake dance . . . why do the Bobcats build better floats than we do . . . didn't see the game but sure had a tine time . . . Naranche stadium . . . Where is that? . . . You know, Bobcats are real people . . . they may have better floats but did you see that game . . . Bobcats undoubtedly the best losers in the state . . . they've had the most practice. SPURS AND BEAR PAWS lead the traditional parade down Park street e MSC band steps out Phi Delts commemorate the annual burial . . . and the Sigma Nus borrowed Barry's best tire engine again A yt tit -"' 'm i Cum: Cnfmzntcx YHIS l X RRR dgbz V353 PATTI LUER, MISS MONTANA OF 1948, rated at Atlantic City as one of the liiteen finalists . . . was siqniiicently recognized by people throughout the nation . . . began a series of eastern treks which more than established a foothold ln the music world. 198 MISS MONTANA PATTI IS CROWNED at the annual co-ed coronation ball by Miss Montana of 1947, Carol Chafiin. A LIEENS 400 O O Qc O0 QS GMO 9 99 XP, QS 'SOO NV vs QQ 9- 1 x- CX 650 'iw Q W1 ,X I ICD -Qgi.humWm, ANNE SHA W' M' fm, ' U1 Qrdl. QIQ X989 S QUQSD ','s"f.-11 ,N 32? ,Q 4. 'K 5 'wiv K iv A if A? W, uf? , 'Q A Y K . ,f Q4 fQ22fXE:w,1:2, -f ,. 'YS - A ww- , . - XA Lxg, s 'F E E ,E ,M H Q r 4 Ni M 1, 1 Ja g if ! 4 MB ng az M fff"" M ..- gf - N41 3' M S, -wr . " , ,X 1 ' Z ' 522' x Q - 2, W we , f K 21, 1 . ,,, 2 fu. 4' ' f ' f , 5 , ZF? xgmf df , .,,. , ,E 4 44 42 f 4 via R in 'N sv . H Y pu 'fm 21, 5 Xa f "f -4.06 hx, :zv 32' .. 3 . ,Ev -. - -y' :ff 11? JW, , f 441- 1 ,Vi f, 4 4 J . ' 0,5 1 1 b ,1 D 'ff l , , f ky ,r 0 I ' v f fs. ff I 1 I , lg ,ya g W A V1 I , W, 5 ,N , K -532955 i ,Ap fi' f I? f Q Y P ka 4 in if asa E 45 '16 Q, sr my '92 :HW X ... Q . if fm f, N m 9 , W4 0 ' .'A:ye,,, fr 0 my Q. fp? 352' DANCES: NOT MUCH CAN BE SAID: we will always have them . . . a pain in the neck for faculty chaperones . . . money raisers for campus organiza- tions . . . a lot of work decorating and then a kind of a good feeling when everybody has a good time and the "big dance" doesn't go in the hole . . . an hour and a halt to get dressed . . . everybody rushing around like crazy . . . we couldn't get along without them. - 4 sat Q gi ,xt g. .X ew-M rp : 4. .- .Hi-I N . . Q-JF' at Q XE Ygxfgffijis-. irq 1 , 1 Kim Titf.. 9 .x :V ,. "--A 1 s 2 elif M 5323 ,ax ., ' 'ff if ,Q s v , F Suk 'S' , A -vi' by 4. ,Ni . .Q- A cx- xt 2' rgfigtl v .1 :ski L ' Qfffw- lf' 1 , in i Q-YN L Hs, ' IN THE SPRING QUARTER time is taken out from picnics for dances but they are forced to take a back seat to the more outdoor of extra-curricular activities. Fraternity men get to- gether after spring elections and everybody remembers that "we are all Greeks together' '... at least for the one night of Interfraternity ball . . . House parties are in full swing . . Time out for Aber day . . . Masquers stage a Spotlight ball . . . The military drags out the brass for its yearly polishing and a new co-ed colonel is crowned . . . A stuffy Gold room and a crowded balcony, hundreds of stars and dozens of wistful sighs . . . lnterscholastic brings the jitney dances . . . A street dance here or there . . . Most of the time, however, it is too hot to dance and it is much easier to sit around a campfire or qo swimming by moonlight. l IN THE FALL QUARTER it is get acquainted time and dances run pretty much along the informal theme . . . barn dances, hay rides, tiresides . . . no one cares much about dressing up and things are mostly come as you are . . . The Spurs go all out for Sadie Hawkins day and the WAA has a barn dance . . . The M club sponsors mixers after the games and the ski club fills the Gold room with evergreens, ski poles and the boards themselves for their annual hop . . . Dances are all right in the fall but there are so many other things to do and everyone knows that there will be all Winter to dance . . . First football games get in the way and later on it is time to go skiing. Q IN THE WINTER QUARTER the social whirl attains lull speed . . . the skiers are not much interested in dancing but they are still in the minority . . . Foresters is, ot course, the high point, for everyone except the lawyers, that is . . . The Bear Paws crown a Spur of the Moment, and Miss Montana tor the year is crowned at the Co-ed ball . . . Fraternities and sororities concentrate on dinner dances, each trying to outshine the others . . . The Business Ad club finds time for another Bank Night and the pharmacists take their turn at decorating the Gold room . . . every group has its day to throw a dance and even the skiers come home tor Foresters. 2 5 Q i l i lil TU DE T CGNVGCATIGNS IN A YEAR noticeably devoid ot any student enter- tainment: a ttew bright spots did appear . . . the creative urge seemed at least temporarily stifled and convocations committee had to turn to other sources to till its rather meager program. STUDENT CCNVCDCATICNS l A FRIDAY INTERLUDE E V PAN HEL AND INTERFRATERNITY provided the only bright spots in a bare year for student participa- ' tion . . . The Radio Guild gave a mock radio broadcast and the Bear Paws and Spurs took a fling 4 lg at entertaining before the Butte game . . . The music school presented a quarterly program which would be justification in itself for the entire convocations program . . . For the most part the committee l secured good outside entertainment. 206 6 . CJUTSIDE E TERTAINME T THE COMMUNITY CONCERT series featured for the most part soloists, of varied talent. The concert series provides lVlSU's only constant source of out- side entertainment and is supported jointly by stu- dent funds and the Missoula Community concert association. Early in the spring quarter Albert Spaulding, violinist, climaxed the 1947-48 season. Frances Yeend appeared just before Christmas as the first artist of the 1948-49 season. She was followed late in the winter quarter by Rudolph Firkusney, Czech pianist and a leading interpretor of Czech music. The remainder of the l949 program carried over into the spring quarter and was highlighted by the Minneapolis symphony orchestra. CAMPAIGNING POLITICOS CONVERGE O MSU IN THE ELECTION YEAR of 1948 even Missoula was not exempt from campaign speeches. A presidential and a vice-presidential candidate each appeared before MSU students, more for the novelty rather than for information. Governor Dewey spoke early in the fall quarter on Dornblazer field. His speech consisted mostly of the glittering generalities that character- ized his campaign. Senator Barclay spoke before a convocation a little later on in the quarter. Although his speech was just as general as Mr. DeWey's, it was not so glittering. 208 DORMITORIES NEVER UNDERESTIMATE LIFE in d dorm . . . North, South, Corbin, New ond big Iumbo dre home to or third ot the cdmpus population . . . each governed by Cr club with student otticers. I A 5 xx E . Y. 1, ri s ,rs , Jr Back row: IUNEK. BERGH, LUEBBEN, RASMUSSEN, LIGGETT. BELL, sponsors. Front row: STERMITZ, treasurer: RADIGAN president: MISS HARTLEY. social director: MISS HAINES, assistant: PERSONS. vice-president: ELLIOT. secretary. QRTH HALL NOTORIOUS FOR AFTERHOUR PI parties . . . bull sessions Centered on campus casanovas . . . North hall weathers iis yearly feminine invasion . . . and watches, at year's encl . . . the mass exodus of soon-to- be-sophomore women . . . Who, all too quickly forget . . that one fine year . . . of simple colleqe living. If' I1 I -I 1 . Ii: I I1 rw ff, ef 1 ee I :z est is I ,Tsar E :i llZi13fs,l j ig I I II f are T f I 'A 1? ADAQ " " , I II S' 1: -. f , , Vi ., I H . 5: f Q A Y y W, fr? Yi ' ., I f f II S ' lv IA I X' :W 1' MI Irf an-III J 'II A I. Q - ,LII ,g I Ii 3 I I-If . I - L P: . f I 1 -'ll N 3 . Q J In ,IIN- m l Af xv I I5 I 'ff' 1-2 ': 41, ' :S A - "" -zip' " .-'I' ' i-- ' . 1, .'.a-445' . .. , is vm: t ,., Ii .1 p.-an Qu Jn. ' mae... VI I J IULII II ,Y H.-g '5a...f Z.. ' ' ' - ,IV ,,Qf7f.ffa' Q Y Y- H ' H I I I " ,, I A-IIIIIVII, 'f-if n l 4, 3-1 I ' - IM, - UXIIMK IUQIII -I -zilfi T -s'. " ' 'i'1':- ' " 5 ' -5 5 ' Iaifll' ' 'fy 7 - I A EIu411l?fini1'il3iTI1?fbEI Iggflf ky I 210 Back row: PAUL, CAMBERN, WAR WICK, HOWE. HARDEN, POTTER KEIL. EVANS. MALLETT. PICKARD ARNOLD, MOORE. OLSON. GARD NER. BARTON. Middle row: MARTIN, SHERBURNE WOHLGENANT. HOLDEN. HUGHES. CLARK. REEVES. GILLETTE, MAY- FIELD. TROWER. ALDERSON. Front row: KURTZ. ELLIOT. MARKS GRADY. BERNHARDT, WALLER. PERSONS. GOULD. 'Back row: NEWPORT, KORDOS. I. SMITH. BECK, C. SMITH. WALSTON. NELSON, BEATTY. DAVIS. BROCK- WAY. ANDERSON. CALVERT. HEL- MER, MOORE. GRIFFITH. Middle row: HANSEN. HART. GRAY. MATHESON, HANSON. PATTISON. SEXTON. FARIAS. HALL, KUGLER. STERMITZ. Front row: ANGSTMAN, SLOWEY. TANNER. STANLEY, LUDWIG. BALD- WIN. KESLER, YOUNG. Back row: HAYES. GRUNDSTROM BRINIG, HERRING. TROXEL. VINE RICH. RENSHAW. FOSTER. PONATH BLOOM. IACKSON. VANNOY. HAR RINGTON. RADIGAN, KAUS. Middle row: NUNAN, LEFEVRE. THOM IEPPESEN. REPLOGLE. M. STAUD ACHER, SUMMERS. COOK, PERKINS ELLIOTT. Front row: MONDT. GAGE. E. STAUD ACHER, HANNAH. HAIR. MCKENZIE KIELLGREN. HARES. Back row: OVESON. HANSEN. BANGE MAN, EMBODY. MORAN, HYDE STALEY, TRIPPET. YOUNG. MARTY. CROGHAN. KAISER. DANIELSON FULMOR. Middle row: KUNE, BONNER. TOM- CHECK, EGGER, SIMMONS. ELLIS. BELL, CHEZICK. WOODAHL, HILL. Front row: EISSINGER, BASYE. KOE- FOD, GILLETT. GOLFI. HEPNER, LUKENS. 1 Back row: RAINEY. secretary: VERPLOEGEN, oiiice girl: KREIS, treasurer: LENN, social chairman: GRUBAUGH, office girl. Front row: MASTOROVICH, president: MRS. RIMEL. social director: MRS. THOMP- SON, night hostess: GILMORE, vice-president. x I yuh, vl"."ll cy of 1 z l EWH LL Back row: SANDON. WARNKE, IOHN- SON, CRISSEY, ISCHMAEL, MUELLER VILEN, HEINEN, HANLIN, NELSON LEUSCHEN, RUSTUEN. Front row: LUST, SVOBODA, LIND- SAY, FISHER, KIRCHNER, FRIGAARD SWEENEY, MALINAK. STORY. Back row: HOPKINS, LENN, MURRAY REGIS, VOORHEES, MASTOROVICI-I HARLAN, FOSLAND, EIDE. ZWICKER SEEL, GOPIAN. Front row: DIPPLE, RAINEY, LAUNS BACH, ERICKSON, YOUNGBERG. VERNETTI, GREENWOOD, KEIL, MUR RAY, CHRISTIANSON. Back row: CHILD, CARLYLE, HAM MAN, DAWE, THOMPSON, URQU HART, NELSEN, ODDEN. Front row: C. HENNESSY. CHOATE MERRILL, PIERCE, P. HENNESSY. AN- TON, S W E E N E Y , VERPLOEGEN BUCHER. BIG, SHINY, UPPERCLASS DORM . . . thouqh built in the thirties, it retdins its new look . . . ond offers o handsome home to its inhobitonts . . . who ore d bit more settled than their North holl cousins . . . but find time tor cr donce, o fireside, cr good deol of fun olonq with it dll. Back row: PARKER, CARR, GRU- ,t by BAUGH, CRITELLI, ZUNCHICH, DUD- ,. 35: LEY, FLIGHTNER, BRINTON, PALL HENDY, WETZSTEON, IACKSON. Front row: VINIE. LINSE, CARLSON. ,gf- --mw .4 IF fr' ,V ll mm -F rw RU' k , - V I ' ' , V - f ' . L 'J-f':.? '.-Z' ' + , VJ-X :L KI LF ll J Qwl kj ww ZZ L-C' C " ,dx ,,Vi,,,,-, .. Ll ,.,.r, ,Q ' ' -1 I WF " ll t L t l ll lv ll t J-' L A ..-' ' -- .. 4 g..5, - . '12 ff if 3 g C Tir: ' o o E lt wife,-P-1-1,'--aft - I 1 , I - , E , fag' ' A: A -A jl - X. 1 N 52,3 , ' A , ' "-f ,A - - 4 : 4 C W i -4 - it'-t-,isle g 1 f it e- n f 'q .1. A N il u: f -. ij it on-AU-Bl - fin 1,3 1 J , X E rw my , , V, JL ,"- W A - t ' ' J ,. 15 b qi' i"?- - -, P. Y, W E If U All yt. - H '21 D W A ' 9 I..1....i f? Y r T' X fn? -it ,gl -X4, ff, A ng, , H31 ' , . '.?,5' 1 fi 3 ' i e- , I: . Q " 'tg U iiEEfIiWiL1lgm:1N .E,'1lM3flTQ, ll ,rr A f - " 1-. Y xi ' V Q i ' V e-'f'r.r1flJ114g3E' 'ft 3" ', 'l l :qffff .1 'lwffflu 1-f1f4f'f'?-'wfffffff'-ffff smzzznf' " if ' K :fn - o V K, I rw- ,fy W X 1 K ,I .sux I - , 43" gilt! -xffgiib' or -,mg ,, 'MQ 1. I 'vsf 1 rf KAPCSAK, NESBIT, STEINBRINK, XETCHAM, KOBOLD. Back row: WOLF, MOSDAL, TAYLOR, ALLEN, EBERT, SCHUCK, KIRKPAT- RICK. Front row: PETERSON, AMUNDSON, FLESHMAN, CARSTENSON, GOULD LIND. PETESCH, DAGGETT. Back row: GREETAN, SLOCUM. CLICK, SCHENCK. KREIS, STROEDER, ROY. Front row: ELFERS, BOESEN, SEIBERT, RICHMOND, GILMORE, WALLIN, BENNETTS, PHILLIPS. Back row: PURCELL, WATKINS, TY- VAND, HOLLAND, HELMING, MA- GEE, OXLEY, BYERS, LINSE, WAKE- FIELD, LARSON. Front row: BEAKEY, SMITH, I. HEINTZ, COX, SIEBERT, FLAMM, DYRUD, EL- LIOTT. DYRUD. Bcxck row: SIEBENFORCHER, PARK, MILLER, LAWSON, COLE. SMITH, K. ASHWORTH, HERMES, MATHEWS, REED, PILATI. PATTIE, SMITH, C. BRAZIER. Front row: YOUNG, FAHLAND, MUR- PHY, BETHKE, CULLEN, CASCADEN. MURFITT, KUWAHARA, POPOVAC. RIZZONELLI. Back row: LUHMAN, HEWITT, ZACEK, EMERSON, O'DONNELL, IACOBSEN, CANNON, FIELD. WICKIZER, OECH- SLI, GEARY, BLINN. Front row: BERG, PAYTON, PINNER. MORSEN, LUCKMAN, LARSON, CRENNEN, HAMAN, DALY, KRAUS. Back row: RING, HAUGO, HILGEN- STUHLER, SHERWIN, MARMONT, TROYKA, IONUTIS, HUNNES, FISHER, HANSEN, ROSS, HARVEY. Front row: KRALL. SIEMINSKI. LIAN- GENBACH, ..S C H U L Z , JACKSON. GRAY, BURCHAK, DAVIES. -33 C' F, -EJ .-. xg lx, km Q X7 H ' ... ,-... rf xQ 1 :asv .1 , 1 ' ' 11.' x 7 'T ?riwx..imQxifmm mm m mlllm I . 'fe ' -1' ' " 'S 'f fxv E 03g wxigwpe XX X f ED .,:::5g3,,.e,,1:. E .. 93:35. , NQIQQ.. gpm - fo ,age '- v Ns- i 360- +- 1 , X , r 1 -mee" 'zasgfsf-.-fe.1SA.+4Q Qriwyr' 5 X 1 pjipre -rg1 i 4,i1J3f-Xi! 5 A e2'aQ:a,-x Sf iiivwtw - W' 'Sf' 1 Wie W ' S5 ai 'P' " ' .r ' ?'55'l"!! 'll 'll 1 In 3 gm, lp ll 5: I i, -l .L , '11 7 - l A r ' -l-1 '--KN! '1L- 1 - S , I ,i . - ny Q7 E-fl ig 3- F - :bf llir ' me . . ' S, -A ,ll -- I il ' :I 9 . no E' 5 E Q i . .l I 1.3 H lass" .J f"T- ' x 'Yf 'I ', WQZ -"U ' w-- ..-----f-. ::??:S5.:' W A iv 'K' I' T1 X: l':::i2:?2 X' ' - N"" . F 1 1 N . - 5 ' x Siigigrr N :-I-Auf-.. 'gi-gil' -Q ...,,, r uv.. .J uv Y '- .,.Am.. a e -wig. ,fm,.m ' ' ' "" J L..v'Nv-, .1 -4,-.-'N-Yin. CGRBI H LL SMALL, MORE COMPACT than the other dorms, Corbin Hall commands the area separatinq New and North. A friendly group lives Within to eat, sleep, study, Converse . . . and occasionally entertain. Back row: MURPHY. MAGEE, KRALL. CASCADEN. proctors. Front row: RIZZONELLI. president: MRS. GORDON. housemother: IACK- SON. secretary: SCHULZ. treasurer. - I is I 5 , lx : S -x N5 3 . if N -is K ' 3 :ar f Q I If -7 .1-:-TTI:-:-1-L-pas:-J.:-,.:.-ea.-.-,,,... ., in eg " . .- 'IIIIIII -igigwsz :-, X- - --'--I -- , s IIIV X X , A VIFHQ-'M2'?'2c 'N is I X ' I .yrs-M -- A -- -- 'g.:srasyzq4Ai Iv I ' Q X ,X :fgwrf-34:34 X s 1 XXX T'--2 - . '-lsffaec-swf-:se WX 5 . I S i ', I - q.g.-.giigt .'Cf.'r. I z xv It , N- I W X- Q K X , 13.275 .3.Q:. ,I I, 1 1'-if :I .. '- . I I X ' I 1" ' I ' ' ' I 41352-1'L33155S X X ff -':!1F.'mk1-1.-.g.g IW I , X . - . .- ,-.9rh?'-?'fr'.'2',: X- -. X t 1 . I 1 I . I I , - . ' . - I iasifi'-'Sin' 1" -X f . - ' -"5-If4'ZQ,::af'I" X ' i ' t . . E, - -tl 'f.gfg.pz,5.gg5f X 1 ' ' xt ' Gm ' I ,stx . --mms' .f5f. . X , - x zsemwzyzva I I . rfgsg.-hZ'I'r"'fa 2 ' . 2 509114-"f:' X ,why ,GL- . 1 :A Q fmzgiapzfz 2 -, I ' mmuuniiuunuu Ilu13z3s5::sssa:sggaggs v I 1 53 --Q5 EIILQQQYIQQM. - W f " - I'SNsL::.-V:-.1-Lziii-e'' ' '-'11 f I I Wngagirfsg ,111i"gJQ,:,:,yz,,,I,i11t 1, X 1 :st : . -f flweifial , Y., ,, H , ,, , , ,MTX X by ' 274ZAO4f.74,,-, ,wx U W , .,f?4,,A',,,4 14.93 N x N, ' . U- 1-. 1 ts, , ,,VW,, V, .. v.,. V Y Hin. Y ' ,- A,, . I IIII W ,I.,., oe I IA., , , JUMBO H LL 216 BIG. BOISTEROUS IUMBO . . . houses more men than ony other livinq Center on coirnpus . . . now hos o "IumIoo Holi defy" to open its unique iowslunq home to the rest of the Campus . . who morvei ot IumIoo's enthusiosm for self-government . . its spirit . . . its distinct Woy ot life. Back row: CLACK. FIREHAMMER, DAMON, LQROWE. LEVINE, LINTON. SWINGLEY. Front row: PETTINATO, MATEYCHUCK. BOETTICHER. MARINKOVICH. FITZ- GERALD. WISE, EGAN. W its I fy I Back row: SEVERTSON. MAURER, La- ROWE, WHITE. EGAN. SWINGLEY WOHLGENANT. Middle row: WILLIAMS. ZEZULA, WIL- SON. WELCH. WARN. WISE, PETTI- NATO. Front row: FIREHAMMER. FITZGER- ALD, BURK. MATEYCHUX. LINTON. Back row: CUMMINGS, COTTER, DON- NELLY. FOSS. COVERDALE, DUDIAK. BOYD. Middle row: COM, GROVE. BYRNES. CONWELI.. BELTZER. DYE. CLACK. Front row: DOCKINS, FRAZIER. FILL- NER, ELBERT, ECK. DAMON. Back row: LENN. MOTCHENBACK. LePROWSE, RYGG. PASE. MAVITY MOEN. NAUMAN. Middle row: MCCUE. NEIMAN. MUR- PHY. MCGLYNN, OSTLAND. MOLLER- STUEN. PATCH. Front row: ROSA. OLSON. PATTEN. KING. PAYTON, PENNINGTON. Back row: KEMLER, KING. LUCAS. LULL. KNOO. KAUHANEN, HANSEN. Middle row: LENTZ. MOLINE. LESLIE MAILLET. MQCKAY. LIEDING. HAL VERSON. Front row: LOHSE, LEAF, MANUEL MARINKOVICH. LEVINE. McDERMED I 1 Back row: BYRNES. ABBOTT. ACTIS BRAACH. BEAUCHAMP, BENNETT BURKE. F. BROWN. Middle row: BUTCIIER, BIRKETT. BOET- TICHER, BENNETT, BAKER. BARRY BRACEWELL. Front row: BRAACH. BROWNE. AN DERSON. ASID. BILLSBOROUGH BRINK. Back row: HOLSINGER, GUSLANDER GALLAND. HARVEY. GEIL. IOHN SON. R. HOLINKA. GEIS. Middle row: HAYDAL. HUGHES. GRA- HAM. FULLERTON. HEDIN, HAGAN GRUSON. Front row: IUTTE. H. IONES. IORAANS- TAD, HORNUNG, IOHNKE, GOEHRY Back row: SYLLING. STAGG, SCHULZ PONKE. SACRISON, SINCLAIR. VIS- CON. Middle row: SCHROEDER, VERCAM- MEN, HUNTLEY, SIOGREN. SNYDER. SYLLING. SIGG. Front row: STRAND. HOLLIDAY, STITH. SIMPKINS. RUSKDASHEL. SULLIVAN. Back row: WOODS, ZANTO. TAYLOR. VILK. IUROVICH. WILSON. WEBB. Middle row: WILLIAMS. WOOMER, SALMONSON. SWITZER. SHIPLEY. SWANSON, WILLIS. Front row: TOVEY. TIRRELL. STOCK- TON. TERRY. THON, TUCKER. VET' HOUSING LIFE IN A PRE-FAB: not the pleasantest place to make a horney no louilt-insg plenty ot mud: no place for the kids to playg community show- ers: too many petsy dusty holes in the wallsp but the residents of "Splinterville" will defend their Community to the last aqainst those who dare to utter any harsh or derogatory words against it. Splinterville Administration: BOB FADER. ANDY ARVISH. TACK SWEE, DALE F ALLON. X M Sal X'- Sgsxiigi-5- XE m'!""' Air.-:,g..,tv 'lv- mf 5 V ,, if v 'rv Eg 1 i W i 'vf - ...une F f 'N' if .M -.V A ,af .ff ' ll- , ... K .E+ l, Q. Q. . yi Q . W . y ,Q M QA' " ,riff - v . -,.-3 .sv 49' ,xi bv, nm. 4- up 71, lllfzlllj L Q? T Q fwfr 'TQA x "'!" 1 H T1 fi V l ul i IQ I . 'Y N 4 ll l ll E xl ., E ""' tl T I' 5 fiisami f- X W I To X- eil 4, '2 ?m I 1 E ' ' e. - ---- . -I-TFL QQ L fl - '15 "., M- I. -Q ,VT 1 1. 5:3 as 5,1155 :ggi 1 --:gig Q a I - ffl "wt 5172 ,QQ H - it -N --nw rr: XL fi .5533 gg 11- -l ill. W tl: 5 .-E ', it E E If H ei '- -E E 'T-E if Q 'E t E ii' , rf ea t It 'W - 'ell +41 lf?-TTLEB igl T ,D ' . ,M .A4,, 4 -mul: :J t,+-flj 1 1 1 "" " 5 A ff' I 'S 'ts xx r E, -'aw W :wk Bt- M 'If' .A , ill, "' jLl,.+ A ,,. , , . ff'-M f-A ---L J NX STRICTLY INDEPENDENT and proud of it . . . always a threat in intrarnurals . . . somewhat clannish, a little older, more sedate and Conservative than in former years . . . a definite and Very important part ot MSU that is sometimes underrated in the Whole scheme ot things. Standing: IACOBSON SHARP. GRINDE, LUETJEN, WENSTROM. Seated: MONOHAN, MRS. BLAKE. DIMMITT. Back row: DUDHARKER, WATSON MELTON. DIMMITT. ANNALA. HAR- KER. MORGAN, JOHNSON, NYGARD BURCH, MUELLER, MARKS, PETER SON, MUNN. Seated: KREKLAU, TIELTVEIT, DICK WOLPERT, ROGAN, MURRAY. NEVE BRAYCICH. Back row: W A L T E R , SANDKNOP, IAMESON, LINDSAY, HUBLEY, PHIL- LIPS, BUTCHER, LARSEN. Seated: ADAMS, CLARK, IOHNSON, IEWETT, CONOVER, KRATOFIL, KA- LARIS, HOWEY. Back row: AMMEN, SQUIRES, FRY, HARRISON. WOOD, MYERS, BROWN, DAVIDSON, I. SMITH, ENDRESS. Seated: C. SQUIRES, WASHINGTON, STANAWAY, PECKENPAUGH, BRANDT, WALLACE, INGERSOLL, MCCOY. Standing: HEDDS, DINWOODIE, PRICE. LeSUEUR. PETERSON. Seated: MITCHELL, O'NEIL, NEW- HOUSE, HAGLUND, REMPEL. ,ff 5 it ,li H, ,fist S i , if -G, , . -ix Q i4 Jw ,f - 'mf' A XX - . AQ,-ff-' ,K X f-if V . ,., 5 ,--J-J- if if f- W. A I f' -F ,,, f' - - 5, vL,7:2i'ES"' 7" X5 -- --uE"ThxswtgvnQjFF'T',f' '--qgfg , ., ..... . N , Q - ---1----- Y 1 -v!'i 5--- --7 X, A -TSN' x X K S2-2'3P5QiZ":--l- It ' 1" Y ' VT -'W' 2643- 1 i-is 'a N 1 5- N X i ' xiii-iff-...WN E's A 21 Q-, . '- . . Kilim . t ' 'Q ,Q ii! " - W- Q- ,Q 'gr K I 'X :f."2.. "4 A ,'. ""-u:1..,,.q,Qw- N 11 L' 1 4: .1 ,Ei 1 . . gil 3 1 X! -5 2-Q if-. N Q3 r i 135 ai i v - ' ' I v ' 55. 1 S-v" 1 9:2 , R gi 'Tri X ff- if. -W2 1 4? ,'F-'SN Y 1 ti: Y . X t ' J ,. lx N T . XXX l 'X-1 , 'w.-Q ' - -' ' 1 n , y X I4-L-gag, . i I -1, N -" 3 ..:!. ' if - w '4' f'- 25, 1 X -M' 'W' -'95 2' X 2 .Q -'S ' .' ' , H t ffffi' " XJNQ 'N . ffl' J X in 'Q ' 5 vs '31, "fi x . x X . . - '- .1-1-1 -E I in E-,gwtj VB QL: Qi X , Y L" U ? A -:3 4, 2 :...':v-:.r.,-rr -::Q::g it Y X I .55-4-2 ' 3 -Xi- ii QM -M s:1e:,gzv-:QQ .. E K' ' .. .,.::z ,-1 u an .I ,- X its .,q:Hr,'- ,4 -' -f ., - . . Q., , ,. 'f men: . . ,447 ' 'S 3 M - 1 , Q Lf? .5 -N- f f .n.' .vN7,,,, .fw 'W , H! inf S NADELPHI WORKING TOGETHER . . . meoninq ot their new norne . . . Circle pine . . . symbol .ot their cooperotive order. Sponsored by the Women's Faculty club, the qroup Wos founded in 1940 . . president is Edith Dresner. -fsmfff' ' rw f ' , Q' ' ,, H v ., kv' . BLESSING CARSON DOTZ DRESNER GORDON HARGREAVES MCLEOD MORRIS NELSON PEDERSON WEINGART WOODS WOODWARD ZUERCHER GREEK NINE HUNDRED OF THESE . . . protected by the crest the pin, the rnonoqrammecl clishes . . . keep the easiest political pathway within their qrasp . . . contribute much to school spirit. Tariqible parts of national hierarchies . . . brothers and sisters in the bond. 300' qw me Q? Back row: MUDD, Delta Gamma: COLLINS, MILLER. Alpha Phi: GRIFFITH. Sigma Kappa: LUND, Kappa Alpha Theta: L. MILLER. Alpha Chi Omega: IORDET. Kappa Kappa Gamma: KREITEL, Alpha Chi Omega: HENNESSY. Delta Delta Delta. Front row: DOCKERY. Sigma Kappa: SHALLENBERGER, Kappa Alpha Theta: SHUDER, President, Delta Delta Delta: LANSING, Kappa Kappa Gamma: KITT. Delta Gamma: KEIG, Delta Delta Delta. GREEK WOMEN'S COUNCIL ol delegates from each sorority . . regulates rushing, membership, and the incidental one-half of the Greek slate for spring elections. Progress this year meas- ures most in the successful procedure for Panhellenic summer rushing . . . and the remote-control adoption of a French orphan. PA -HELLENIC COUNCIL 224 INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL FRATERNITY CONTROL BOARD . . . regulates conglomerate rushing . . . passes out trophies to top Greek teams in intro- murotl, inter-fraternity sports competition. Sometimes ensnctres itself . . . confusion during spring elections effected the loss of one of the good old nine. Back row: SETHRE. Theta Chi: SWAB, Sigma Chi: BREIDENFELD, Alpha Tau Omega: SPARTZ, Sigma Phi Epsilon. Front row: MILLER, Phi Sigma Kappa: STERMITZ, president, Phi Delta Theta: STROPE, Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 22 X fx f , rw 'ff' A j xx xx T11 K -rg t if are ' i 'W A z2g" 1 at , if fs- - ee - " e l ff '- 5241.2 'Lv' 'QI Xxi 2, :SE I .l i 'if "l" f , i ue 5 Ei? ng I ' 1 41-'l 'P gf, Mn' ,211 56.1 Q lt r 55 ga tm i iii i t Eel f . ff.2g1.-,AA it get . ig A fjgmw L' gl ' ---573 kef giq ig i 1' H fwkilsm . .q --.- 3-rf . V i f'-. '--Q-i I 3 t. -P if Q11 En' N Fifi, j Q J" wig I val li: 731 lt I 15 ,Jil it -'v f' L 1, e' V I . 7 2 7 tly'n"fi"Y F11 :iff X V 'N -I T: NNN' 4 ' ,gl J lw at l ' Nllmfffyl " Xqwyifql 'ng l it kim..- N I ltl fw ' ' f.- fl ,r,im:'i -N , , sl - X QNXN N5 - 'uvjxt H I5-Lf, y,jIf.k,j,V.,:mi,L iL' ' , - -r , 2 X ..,- S xi QR . XX kk, Q. n,- v."' 'Xxx XS ALPHA CHI . . . founded in l885 at DePauw University in Greencastle, lndiana . . . Alpha Xi chapter established . . . l923 . . . Helen Hales, president. wzmwwfa , " V 'W "" f 1 Maw-ww ' -JK .4 A X . , ' ANGSTMAN AYERS BAIN BECK BOYD BREWSTER BULEN CRISSEY DALRYMPLE GARRISON GAVIN HALES HALVERSON HAYES LPHA CHI 0 M E G A HOLDEN HORN HOWSER 40 'W' xonnos xmzmzr. LAAS LITTELL vm am QT, Mg' MARTIN MATHESON MILLER MURRAY POTTER RAPP ROSTAD SEXTON B. SMITH I. SMITH STALEY TORGERSON TRIPPET WALSTON E T ARNEGARD ARNTZEN BALDWIN BARKER BASYE BIRKETT BLAKESLEE BULEN CHAFFIN CHOATE CHRISTY COLLINS COSTER N CUNNINGHAM S CUNNINGHAM DANIELSON DAVIS DELANEY DENNY DOWEN DYER ELLIOT ENGELKING G. FERGUSON I FERGUSON GOULD GRAY HANSEN HARRINGTON HART HERRING KAUS KIND KREBSBACH LALLY LEFEVRE V ,m .' 111 -are ooro -- .vmww ...A .,.. .. . .. I 3. ff. Y. ,Q F: 37525 ,iv 1-Jw 1 IJ , Q X .. "FEEfE7:f:f Eg!-1-.iglzffljff-lj? I A Val, 1:--l - MV., qi v .-. ,JB g,Eu'c:a.i! J J' A I l-- 1 ' - ' Zu' .P , -J-1 1,45 4-.. - , Ja ' 'O 'F 1 '3 1 '9 Y , 1 , .1 , T 1 1 1 J 7 1 1, -4 T I W , L 4 1 ., I I 1 , , xf 1 , L T1 "i" ,v xxx .1--svn nf, '1 X "'.- """:.,-, .z"5"".- L' 414' " .,- " 444,551-"d.f-. fe f 1 5111. 'wx nv Rpm 4 K r , 1 I '- X , I R lu 1.151 Nqr, Bi 44.1571 J . 1 1 ,. ., ,X K., K -1 x . V :1--- X 3-1-115.215 f"""""' -N11 J 1 H ' lm 'A I .. K, X I K 1 1 xi 1' f mmm I 0 1 .-,J V 1-.. 1 -1. g 1.-Q19 ., 1 Q 111 .. X i 1 . as fx 1 Xipfd' X .4 ,L W i,-'p X ' LI mn -J " X f vt. 7...- E , 1 XX XX N1 X 111 iv JL L- 19. 1 1 1l1 f , 1 Lvl. X E no l 3? K fx 4 XM 1. IYJJ , Q 3 niffif' M Y -1 fi- .L K W iesJfHarM:1!fwfar M"!115ui" 'L ,A",'f"'1'bQw5 .--' it 5 fy L, A Z ALPHA PHI . . . Chi charter granted in 1918 . . . nationally founded ai Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York . . . 1872 . . . president, Ioan Sheffield. 1 ' 1 1 is Y jv W ' ' r 1 V" 1. f LIGGETT LUDWIG MCKOWN MERRILL MESSELT MILLER NUNAN OWENS PATTISON PAYNE PONATH RIGGS RING RUPP SELL SHEFFIELD STALEY THOMPSON VANDE BOGART WALL WALLER WAY WEBBER WHALEN DELT ' 1 A Bzcxwm-I M. BELL 7 N. BELL BENZ BEST BLOOM W N wa: R wg , L . BROWN BURR CARROLL CHAUVIN CHRISTIANSON CONNER CURRY DEMPSEY EGGER EVANS FISHER I-'RANZ GIBSON GRABOW HARDIE B. HARDIE HARES C. HENNESSY P. HENNESSY IACKSON IESZENKA L. IOHNSON M. IOHNSON N. IOHNSON 230 ,i f,f:T" X '- ,f Q3-r . xN x k,,T'i'-'ig------7 'W"'m"" ' ' .L-Q, L ...Assn -- - L, W x 1 Ms., W-. H .L i -- ff 2 W x 1 1 x. . ' " ' L 1 YV. t Y 1 ' . " .-vi - ' ' o L i if t X J A E ' - I 1 .1 F-i -Ty i ' Mrfm I fi" A ri LJ V . ffl. I f f, - . gr 13 1 4 -m, Nia. ' ' ' it it 5 V A ' :Pi ' -A 1 ' . -' ' -' .. 1. V 44 'HA'I!n 'if i .9-5! 'Q M' 'JJ it I ll if H ' '-' x J- .3 u , t L Q' - 5 .. '51, '-IL. A - -il 1- l' 'few J L 1 -S ll' ,iii-'12 fl E I I ,.,, Y ' 4? f. V i : .- ,, , bw . -1.5 ' Q in . 'ki LIMS ,o-.1i? ' -uli.i1E1i "5"-' , K 'X ' Bjfwyo .1-f-' Y V - -....n,z"' ,A J, ,,-.-.-,.....e, .. TRI-DELT . . . Founded ot Boston University in Boston, Motsso- chusetts . . . 1886 . . . Charter qrdnted Theto Rho Cinotpter in 1926 . . . Hildd Myre, president. IONES KEIG KINNEY KOLPPA KUCHINSKI MCDONALD MONDT MYRE NELSON OLNEY PETESCH PIERCE RISKEN SCHULTZ SHUDER SIMMONS SMITH STANLEY THOMPSON WALLIN WILLEY WOHLGENANT WORKING YOUNG ALLEN ANDERSON ASHENBRENNER BOOTH BRADLEY BROWN CANAVAN COTTER DEGENHART DUFRESNE ELY FLIGHTNER FULMOR GARDNER GERHARDT GRADY GRIFFITH GROVE ff s a Q was ,YL V 'W HARDEN HAYES HEINRIC -I HUGHES HYDE IRVINE IENSEN IOHNSON KAISER KEIL KELLEY KESLER KITT B. KITT KOEFOD KUGLER KURFISS KURTZ LOISELLE LUEBBEN MCGREAL MARRS MATSON MIDTLYING f' xxx: w X - "' 4g"', A WS E, .kj iff' 'T ff Q . S I if -if. ijnwwii-H K -ttf' YT' K W2 I ' if :WMM 4' at i 1 W i ft 5 'fe . rt I I Vik 4, . 1 i '1 f' f .5 Ins' X " MIM- ' firm I 1' ',-, ' j Q- 5. -I 14 5 DELT fi I 1 'T - If if .vi f GAMM I ww ' : -e""---alj..43- 1 ' , . Q, X. it -f'::J'?i1f-'I E, N Yi fy ig: ,L NU IM' 97 wi 2'- I SEQ-:ta iff ., JL 1 tt: 3 if - 1 - ' ' ' . gfzgf'-"1 5 1 21114 -'qu-fs-fkf fi- 1. 9M Ui 'IT L' ri ' A V' I 'K W 1, L W 7.+!...,.I--r , x IV., - ',A,p,.r f' ff v, ,f DELTA GAMMA . . . first Chdpter dt University of Mississippi, Oxford, Mississippi . . . 1874 . . . Pi chapter estdblished in 1911 . . Cdroi Sdvdresy, president. ,sr QQ! as --'se MOE MORRISON MOYER L. MUDD R. MUDD O'DONNELL OLSON PETERSON RASMUSSEN SAVARESY SCHUCI-I SHAW SHORTHILL SINNOTT SMART SMITH SWANSON TAYLOR THOM THOMPSON TROWER TROXEI. VOLK WILEY , -. S1tn,?' .Qa- -ir'-9 Gif' Ido. uf"-l..Kn.K1 KPP L ALPHA ANGSTMAN TH ET Bsssmr: Boscl-lrzm w v, ' V ig ? L 1 A v J BRINIG BURGESS CALVERT Y ,, . ,. JM V ' ' Y' ' , W M, V CARR CHEZICK FAHEY FELT FLOYD FRASER GEARY HAINES HAMMELL HARRINGTON HAYS HELMER HUNTER KELLY KUHNE LAW LLOYD LUKENS LUND MCCREA MCSHANE 234 I X F 1 X w , x 5 , f K. N l, X . u 4, ', f w 1 .- ' E f x ' I "' V- f' , -, J V 7.5.5 1. X , - , . . X Q71 , ! W 1 1- . . A X 5 J- N- '. A -. .. ' e Y fa w VL X Q . 1 Els ' ., - Sing .1 , ,.,,,,,. . . ....... , 1, I -...- 11 . , -, . v-V - xi" if 'E I.-.' 'I 1 .: . . -J a -. ,-- -gr. .N ' ' '. u " ', ' .,,, T. : 'A .Q , '-.'- : T IL!-If ' ge ' ', -T ff? '33 A ,L 1, 1 . A., , -H. gag! F - , .J . f',.' - :ti N . .- , . sl- - -GA I -V Q- :1 ,I ,. . , A V, - -VY du V l . W gi-1 x bw J..,,QX is 1 -5' 1 w-Ti: 1' -La: X591 ,g if 3 XX ' X ' Av: x in 1 Q , 'W x ' I ., f, I 1 5 - Q Q ' X, 13- was A" f Hin T eg ,mm :lnliimingms l ! 1l!4!fqll-55 .- ?3' . ' 'J' ' A in--1521 ' .3 'X .g7iI,IlRiE!!lIll Ill! Illllllll " I I llllll fs " Y 51.1.-i-E 5"-1'g'Pf'LN'-"'44'. . . , --. r .. e.. .x-W, A., .4 cgnnfaif' , '- N - ,' -Q. X, 'VIII ', ? . 51 ln" NV W fy f .ML 1' THETA . . . Firsi chapter at DePauw University, Greencastle, Indiana . . . 1870 . . . Alpha Nu Chartered in 1909 . Harriet Haines, president. MACKENZIE MOORE MORAN NEILS NEWPORT NORTH O'NEIL PERRY PERSONS POWELL RADIGAN ROBERTSON SANDERSON SHALLENBERGER STAMP STERMITZ STRITCH TAYLOR THOMAS VINE ZUNCHICH wJ""lnk.1.. . .Q , M , j .. .1----4-----"-'-"A M 5. 'EE Ig SZ oi f will ill' 1 Z E ,, '-fl 'A 1 ---- ,gg-F hi u lll nauun' 7 -B. Y'-xx 'N-X N' + X miillulll-ulllm':n'un1l1wEl 'SQ S 1 X -llllllllllllllIll 1 'ms , V1 4' . fl 'D e ,i 1-. f . .,f we af . . ni XX, 1 1? , -l .. INST.,--I-.v:9J A ,- I I I ,Li K -R XXX F Eli- l -.- V l .. , V n , ri I. i l iii Q ll- fa . XX? 22- If l I ' - 1 T :if .... i' '. ll l -. 1- A X X. 'sf H-, fe 1 'U - 1 f' gi' Q 4 'N i .I AQ -- ' -'M " l Y--, ig 5 .ATF i 'fi X 1 ' ' ' , l Q .Elgin 1 I " B - W 1 ' l'-E 4 'l'.. ? LW -1 4-- Cg.- l" . ' All ff ' 3' H 'VV' fi 1 l 5 us -1 .,., 3- S - -M -Q -A 4 I ' . . ' 1. - 1 1 - xl X ly ,X l'l l X .fx 1 .7. -1 Y V ff,-l. , fa 4 'li "fl 2' 'F' " gL,w 5 Xl. l -'HWY il ' gi .. E il 1 5 ' I-1 25: 1 " 1 JE -NW ' f Nr 1 -: 'iq 'W 'Q 'r 04 ' x x I X Z . 'qi li N: "A V ' X: N" ' , . N -5 ' I -,, :,- I' tl 4- lg N :. X7 J in . 51' 4' -' 'T' '-'f 'l if" li . - L +L -XX I 1 , I 52 l 5-Til X T I X f ' H l ii- ' lf' ' ..::Q a.1. ' - ' '- -:W Y- . -H-1' ""' , , 1- ,- , 1554 '11 fi! -nw "' 'a -' -S 'Q f' 4 N :-- QQ' 'o Q -we Q .1 1 11' A xw ir: , - S '1-L x - 4' B Y' lllllll '- I-l .......:...:.::.. -he Nm , . 1 N ' X xx 1,L.aaiu W -u-.--ii h -f' V' fi- '-V -1- "QLil,.l,1f. i l " A X- ll -'V' s. XA v.. v 'N 'S-, KAPPA . . . 1870 . . . Founded in Monmouth, Illinois, dt Monmouth College . . . Beid Phi Chapter formed in 1909 . . . president, Borrbdrd Rounce S E lv - T D V 2 ALBRIGHT ALDERSON ANDERSON BALDY BENNETT BERGET BONNER BRITTAN G. BROWN M. BROWN CAMBERN CARSTENSEN CLAPP COLLINS CRUMBAKEH CUMMINS DAGGETT DAVEY DAVIDSON ERICKSON EVANS FIELDS FRY GILLETT K PP PPA S GI L HARRINGTON HARRIS . -r ,W HARTIN HECTOR HOWE IESSE JOHNSON IORDET KINCAID KRAMIS LANSING I. LOVLESS V. LOVLESS MCDONNELL MCNAIR MARTIN MIDDLETON MILLER NOHE O'SI'IEA PETERSON REDPATH RHOADES RICH ROUNCE SIMONS STERLING STEWART TRERISE YOUNG ANDERSON ARNOLD BEAUBIEN BERGH BERLAND BLANCHARD 'Wm Kinky. BOSCH ww 'S' BROCKWAY ,gww'X " CLINE EASTMAN ENEBO I-'ISK FULTON GAGE GOLFI an an ,N 1 f ' 5 K 7' X ,,,, V qgxqxfaw Q GRIFFITH HALL HANNAH HANSON HILL IOHNSON IOYCE KUNE LAMBROS MCALLISTER MCGREGOR MALLETT MILKWICK MOORE all iv 1 n -' ii , , fxl e 'L -X5 Q ll l ""'- "", "inf ,.,, ac V 4'fli"l i H' t ya -' t in " QL A P 3 ' iff if ji i P l ill!! r rl A' ii-in 1-1572 -E Q K PPA l e at Ji . l QQ-ilxl - 1 -he , e ff F it ef i - at il., -Z 'ag H1 t J i ' -il K2 -, Vg, ' . ,- ir :K 'J-"' ' H '54 lil u-.Eglin ' Y B , iff? 'll s::.-::s:- P!Q5'.:vg.:,i X -z., 'e a, ,.,..f-A 5 4 'Ili . , 4 1 ,, . 'qu ,bf-, - f SIGMA KAPPA . . . First chapter at Colby College in Waterville, Maine . . . l87-4 . . . Alpha Nu Chapter Chartered in l924 . . Marian McAllister, president. 'Q will Q ' r Q ' N' mv' is V X .. v...J., -- 4- K 1' 'N PERRY POPHAM POPOVICH REPLOGLE ROY SCHELLING SCHMIDT SEIBERT SHERBURNE SMITH STAUDACHER TOPEL URQUHART WRIGHT 2 ' sr -ff il Y I V A .ffwls at .aa . ' 4 -A. gli- 'I ,, N , n. S - X ' -2:3 3 I 4 1 ul, y E . fy-- , 5' . X ' -5 tx , ' X Y -, is-M f- .L , xxu . Q - f Y J LZ., . f ., fQig! - . . '4 ! 'vi .81 ' i siflki--. 'I 'f. 'fs fe, aa .. A ' ' Q f llf Q S 1 rv Q 'Q-it Wg. M4 -V 1144+ , ,f i t . J :W i' - x -E Y 583:-1 'Q , 5: ' r.'."1-a!.'-- '1."'.s'-- 6. .L 1 1'-If 9"1.'l-r:5'W13 , Q3-7"fff'.lS-.T:4:f' - r.-t.- 'N'-gy vmy M- A 1 ..t...-.....-if. - B al gt - V. ' .... , .4 . . V 'fl-yf ' ' L . za., A "Q-sm N X U ' V X, " X , 'pfkw -vu A "N 'A "X W i . 1 ,y .- -, , ,,.,.,,,,,,,A0,,, ,0W,,,,,.,,,,,,, ,,, ,M .... ,. X Y I 4 U25 E ,ali , .. 1 H ,3'4i1'4f.-:H .P-Aq,,.'e ,,,, Mfg.-in . ., , N f A I' ' i 'J -,xg 1 ,ii L11 .?iQLj, All s . fc, 14 5.-1f2T'L' iigff' ' 1 1'- 4-'F , - iii: v N N5 ,eu v i 4-, .4 - 4 .vb t ,. V 'WAYS . - '.-. f 1 : - . '- . ' 5 .: 7'!'?'lI-Y' "' ' K4 --- 1 'fy 1. ' i I-...A - -Q-..--'X '- :fr -1.2635 -. L? - ' he 4 "PW A ' Sig ' ,A..,' o ., . 1 I , ,avi . ,I ' 4. ,A E M'--Q .Aus xww -x,- A. T. 0 .... Delta Xi chapter founded durinq 1923 first established at Virginia Military Institute, Richmond, Virginia 865 president Ierry Breidenield. AIKEN ANDERSON BARRETT BEEBE BREIDENFELD BRIDENSTINE BURCH BURCHAK CHAPMAN COLEMAN DUNLAP ESTES FLEMING GRIMES x ALPHA TAU OMEGA HAIGHT W' HEINTZ INGERSOLL A. IOHNSON NWN: sr YM w3'qW" wg' S-'Irma C. IOHNSON KENNEY KING MUELLER MUNDY F. NELSON R. NELSON POWERS REUTERWALL SIMPSON SMITH SPENCER VENNETILLI WRAY rw L KAPPA SIGMA FIRST CHAPTER AT University oi Virginia . . . 1867 . . . colony estdblished here ldst yedr . . . Bruce Silvey is president . . . members not pictured dre: Wdrren Carlson, Idck Dimrnock, lim Frisbie, Del Hollern, Hdrry Noel, Keith Owens, Bob Williams. Wizbang, 45591 QW X iam '? Wi' ARNICH ANDERSEN ENGSTROM 335-5 MQW' Myne W FAUCHALD FEINBLUM GEIL HAYNES MCGINTY O'BRIEN O'DONNELI. PAGE SCOTTEN SILVEY STEVENSON WEIR LAMBDA CHI FOUNDED AT BOSTON COLLEGE . . . 1999 . . . colonized here in 1947 . . . Elmer Stevens, president . . . Not pictured: Ted Allen, Rex Bdrkhuft, Douqlds Larson, Orville Lewis, lohn Murray dnd Frdnk Mdtsler. AMOLE BRADLEY "f""" DAHL DAMON Nha.. ls 'bum git MAURER MOE REYNOLDS RONNING STEVENS STEWART 2 PHI DELT THET B. ANDERSON H. ANDERSON B. ANDERSON BADGLEY BEATTY BOYD UWM. BRAZIER BRIDSTON BROWN BUNDY Www MW- WW-L susan ffgwv' my 4' 'Gb mm ,.5gw.f'm BURNS CAMPBELL CLINKINGBEARD COGGESHALL COOPER CORNING COX DELANO DEVORE DIETTERT DRENNEN EDWARDS FIELDS FISHER F ULTZ GILLESPIE GRAF F HAGLUN D I-IARRINGTON IAMESON I OHANSSON S. IOHNSON JORDAN KELLEY KOBELIN KUBURICH LANG LARSEN DAVIS FREDERICK R. JOHNSON LINEBARGER u . ,.l X, iff!-dl! r i ,Ji I ...NIU NSS Ll' 1 Jed, 4---5 U 1 ,A-,..,.f, 1 in . , I - 1 + .1 K 1 - . - I .iv . , I 4- E 1 Y A XS, .1 A QNX '1. 1' YW-- ,fifff 'Tu K .bn l X f 1 ' . . N f- - " ' ' ,u,.,...d Ll , ' I .xnxx . - was -x r..1s.ww... - - - - ' q " kb' X big-ij.. X: 4, f' ' " ' W I .':1SZfP6,"5'?SsQ "Q ' 'lg' 2 ' -:'T?"'?:+::-av"qg, - . I W "QW ' X ' g .1..,,- - vf?f:4:,'QfN'f9- V 5 , 41,1 1-XA 1 if Ev Vi P' 5 - Y 'X AMI' K ' 'fe '- f f- -'frm-.A -4.1.1 'F'-'-'N1,,-"N .2-va -' , - .Ink Y.: N R L L ., fj i!Nix,,xr:4.,,..-I V ,W I i . x .-5..- ' .. -1 1 ,V Li Q. ',,,f..A -'km+:sE:ss+- 94,5 jf., . , .I New -, -1 ' ' " .' 2 nw - - f - , -QIBIQIA I :L ,4 - . . m.f.5f',f t 'K .V yn,--in 9' '2 ' - . 5 - " I . " , " Q-..A - 1331.5 I 1 - . '- ' ' ' .hy 2 L " , :nr . Q A V 4-u-1-,'r' ' 1 ' :Q-vt.-:L-..-122: , .. ' f'1v.+1lif L f' -i .gf 1 '.:"19f'1?' 231' 1 1 ,. 'z-.ff-' . 'X ' 1. an " 'HH' 1 'T W-ie, ,A 1Qv.gy'.,X , -rw .. ' w 1 5:3 ,i:.f:11---ke - -, t YI, I fly. . . .' :E ,. A, fqt. Q 1 .V '-fa - ':sg,: ,.f Q T-+.. v U- ' '-.451 " A .- :r..:v:m- A' xv- +7 I IWQ L4-. 3 1 llqggfu- ,. .-.. ,, Xfi Am: n ....y.1.,3QX fl- 'ymg - "Ti, .. R Q36-4:-'z,.'Ax J N5 H? 92'!?kr:'.s2?1Q5v1 1 New 4-M ' . . if'MsS2S2z2Si:v- 61114 . f .1-"-iv!-.1 1 1 ' X . . ' L. ".f-9171-"'7--wew 'a 1,1 HL -- fx -TT -R - . .- -I K' N x --L 5 1, Q4 M N R 12 I QL A, .NY '-If V ' A 1 . N ig, O- 5-4-uv-.a,,, X rf!! n -.1 PHI DELT . . founded at Miami University, Qxford Ohio . . . 1848 . . . charter granted Montana A1pha Chapter in 1921 . . . Bob Sier- mitz president. LITTLE LUND MCARTHUR MCCRACKEN MALONE MARINKOVICH MARKLE MOORE NELSON NELSTEAD NICOL OKERMAN OZANNE PARKER PATCH PATTERSON PECARICH PEDERSON REGAN ROBBIN SCOTT SELISKI SELSTAD SHORT SILVERNALE SMITH SNOW STANAWAY STEIER STERMITZ WIRTH WHITE so AF: 17 U WWE r l X 1 - if 3 3 'S K f,X xx X W """r T'vY . .t A A -LM KFQixf'."'1-'-A if , i, ee- -X se ef-A , --, 1'-.T:::1' --Q, QQ LA -Q'Efii1T4'f"XwL:.f' ' ' ' Q55 .LH - -U A ":g,a-g 7s':Pf'f-fvfsfrfff, ff' , QM ff? t"""' K A - - o, ' 1-' ' KJ ., KE 4: - - - X , '1 f'-Q , M "'s I? 5 51. I . V? X X X 2 A fi spa 2 at , ' -F -im 5 . If "5 X- . 5 l S " X he O X fr I A tl so - ' - J, ' 1 ,5 vpvgbck' T xx Rx' C I f5x:-v-ride:-:KJ l .' rl X '- .1 ff, , l . .. -, t X 4 ,Q .jx ' - - 'fill ' I , lg I ' V I X le112' v O.. - -- .X ff 55 - ' A - ., ' ' ' bk Q : -1 -fl :Ill lg fl N, X ., it x Q .tr X .a - WP, X lf' " , fl, , x x X A-iw l 3, K " gf AMX v up-, . ' tx fe '. A -N I N s Xl ' A 1: in "4 ll: ' X 2' EF S an - +P 1, il N :Y X SQTTX X X -, A - 36, ' , , 7'f' - 14 x X . . S " , 1 . 7"1 V . ' - 11 , H X X , kt P. ,ZX r -9--a ' - x A Q, H 1 ..f.a'f l 14-1 .1 5 -1-----1 - A F vvznq- v f- - ,. -Q., i-' '- 5 -.. " " -. - - --:L1 1'1'3-r. - " 1 .JL--gg A . Eff.-:rl . ' X X yi QT:-.2551 , , , - 'Q t.,, l 7 ?"""'g"?4'f 'I f . '- - -""l' 'fl 4 h" - ' 'X X- ..L, ., ,L ox-. xx , ll J f Q. 1 I ,M l K X ru Qw xx wlxwgx M s .-3 , . -M J .,f--Q - , W Q - , - - - . , 'H' .,r..,.,. J, L . ' " . -'J' .H '-R ' Y 1-N -x., In ....- - ,, ,A ,. JMX .551 'N..,1.A' PHI SIG . . . Mu Deuteroh chapter founded in l923 . . . first chapter at Massachusetts State College, Amherst, Massachu- setts . . . 1873 . . . Leo Wolfe, president. ABHARY ALFSON BAUN BERG BOHLIG CARLSON CLACK DAHL DERANLEAU DINWOODIE ELLISON FISSER FLATTUM FORSYTH GALLAGHER HAMMER HANTO HARWOOD HEDIN HELLAND HELTON HENSLEY HOLLAND HOLMES PHI IGMA K PPA HOLTER HOVLAND KAMPSCHROR KAUTZMAN KITCHENS KNOOP KOON MCDONALD MAGELSSEN MAITIN MILLER D. MILLER W. MILLER ,Wm mm MITCHELL MURPHY NEWMAN M M nv-L6-. 1396... 4537 Nik: 'Hun wk, IRQ., 0- OELKER OGLE OMLIE 'flaw' lldlrl' mm 'IW fm kewl-' au. Q3 ages.. gm I YNKQ-v Wgfih-. wifi. M 'Wim 'DL G1 'fb as-fc. 'wr' Sm? K Q 1 OXLEY PALM PETERSON RAPP RATHBONE REID SCHMITZ SHIPLEY SITTERLY SMITH SPENCER STAHL SYLLING TUCKER D. VAN DELINDER G. VAN DELINDER WEIR WHITE ji' E RILEY ROTI-IWEILER STANTON SWVANSON WILSON WUERL 247 Will Q 1 1 I li yy, K-ff '..i'ftS"Q'??5-5-L 734- - i,Q11UEE:gfft,i,UBj -Tw -A ,Q ' ,.,, . .. 1 wr -ifww? J i iigw L ga' ,NF I , its it X ij fa-fi"-ls I aslg R A 1 M ADAMS il i : iff 1 1 3 tat i ii 1 9 -i i if AGOSTINELLI 1 A 1 Al YQ mls , t, W L Xxxw : -' ., 1 ek 9-p Wwkl Am 2' 5 j . u X xi Ji-I VM -A.L.f'q. Q it xx lf- 1:5 rx N K V K 'lt ' x. L' Q A Q 2 , 5 Stl' ww M we ws O 0 -,,.g-7 --sog,,o,K X Wt 5' A ' 2 ' V X ANDRUS AM.. ,lil ,oo S-QQSN' Wk ARNTLD '- I aafiwtat-I ' T ' 51' .- .- , f Xu t,,g,:,.M I X :X XXY -'MK Fx- VTV i BOTTS BOYD ww' SKK mf QW wi Arm, my WM was F. BRINEY W. BRINEY CACAVAS CARTER CERINO CONNICK CHAFFIN COPE DOMKE DOUGLAS DWIRE FISCHER FOX FURLONG GLENN GONZALEZ GOULD GRAFF GRAHAM GREGORY GUILES HARRIS HARTSELL HAWKINS HELMING HOLT HUNTHAUSEN HUNTLEY S. A. E .... Montana Beta chapter established in i927 . . . tirst cltapter at University of Alamaba, Tuscaloosa Alabama . . . l856 . . . President, Bud Paulson. CONVER GASKILL HANSON R. IOHNSON V. IOHNSON KADLEC KAFENTZIS KIELY KINCAID LACKLEN LAHR LANGENBACH SIGMA ALPHA EPSILO avxw Q A.. 1 Zia-fx LECLAIRE LUKENS L. MCLATCHY P. MCLATCHY MCNABB MERCER MOE MOLTHEN W. MURFITT Z. MURFITT , I. WU UN MW'- gm' 'fa M 6 X I iflkfm ww YK K.. Vx-IX M8259 3-Rgg, femur' wig? aw Mdvqg, ff nw: 'KM-mv MGE vita ,aux 'N' ugh if! 'V' "vamp,-A wx -uqpv NORDWICK PALMER PARKER SAMUELSON SASSANO SCHUMAN STEVENS STROPE SULLIVAN VERDON WALLACE WALLANDER PAULSON W. SCOTT SVOBODA WESTMAN PETTY REMINGTON ROSTAD ROTH F. SCOTT G. SCOTT SHELTON SMITH THOMPSON E. THORSRUD G. THORSRUD TI-IRONSON WICKIZER WILLIS WOLD WOODSIDE 249 B. ANDERSON W R. ANDERSON ANGSTMAN BARNETT BEHRENS BEVERIDGE BLINN BOURDEAU mfs mm 'im SIG A BREITENSTEIN BREST BULEY BURTON CANNON CARAWAY CARSTENSEN CHRISTENSEN CLIFTON COCHRANE COLLISON CONNER CHI ,, COOK CORWIN CRISWELL CUMMING CUNNINGHAM DEVNEY DRISCOLL EDWARDS FENELL FARRINGTON FLEMING FRY GALEN GILBERTSON GRIEB HAWKINS I. HELDING R. HELDING HARRINGTON HINES HOFFMAN HOLT HUNTER INGERSOLL IACKSON I ELKS JOHNSON KILROY KINGSFORD KUFF EL KURTH KUSTER 250 ' , 1 .F .1.... LARSON LEAPHART LEMIRE MCCHESNEY MG. mi ,ul 2 , -.-.,-, SIGMA CHI . . . First Chapter dt Miami University dt Oxford, Qhio . . . 1855 . . . Betd Deltd Chapter founded in 1905 . . . Ted Burton, president. GNN 29" MCCREA MCINROE MCVEY MITCHELL 'flav- AMW .546 'GN MOORE NEEDHAM NEWTON O'BRIEN PARKE A. PHILLIPS PUGH RADEMACHER RADEMAKER REPLOGLE REYNOLDS ROLI-'SON SAYLOR SCHWAB SEIER SERVOSS SHEELER SHEPARD STEWART SWANSON SWINGLEY THROSSELL VAN HORN WARD '. ... ,X 59" X D. PHILLIPS PLUMLEY RONEY SALES SMITH STEVENS B. WUERTHNER I. WUERTHNER 251 SIGMA N ANDERSON H. ARMSTRONG I. ARMSTRONG 'mv ARRAS ASERLIND ASHWORTH I. BALDWIN R. BALDWIN BIGGERSTAFF BLOOM BROWN BUKER N855 'WML BURKE BYRNE CLENDENIN COLE COLLINS CONKLIN ,mm may may WV' md' Wm www 'ISZYEV CRENNEN Di RE I. DOGGETT W .DOGGETT DOYLE DUNLAP ECHOLS FINK FORD FRANKENFIELD FREEMAN GARRETT GASKELL GETTER G. HALL I. HALL HARRISON I. HARRISON HEIMES HENRY HICKEL HOYNES HYATT IRWIN IACKSON IACOBSON IOHNSON JOHNSTON KALBFLIESCH KALLGREN KELLY KORN 252 'Wk 1 i--A 4 i i , 1 i ii 4.4, l i I yt- --,Zag at it Q PM 5f,ff f X R --.rgl tx A it E in 3. x L 'uw winifxnK-,,,,J,,,.,-,,3,T-T-.i..-lifts.,QAJSJIILSXL f??3jmkf+-if, ,ei S , tijil L J 3 ' in in ' 3 'ff' -- W- X A-'ill ,L it 1 , R- A A iv if it A sr X . if , S if T at ff ' j I -AQ 1: -59 . 2 l'l,x,'-- ' V ,J Q 'rq .N i i . 3 . i 1':'. if-if tr- " 'ft 2- i H f it i a .A R W t i? f 2 . E 'J 5 wwe. E SP5 il' 5 W X' I' W 2: V' I A y , '- V- . m fi W if ' ti ' 'It J... if ' NW? ,N .- 1 , - 'I. ' -- H,.m,, .Pip . -1 .11 A 'V I 'ff -H 7 N4 -15515-1 :xt 1 I I 1 ,,:- -:..4 l 1 , U7 xg,,.,.f.x R , IV ir , unkilnkwl. j A F, 1 1 5- ff it an ff LQWFJ-f1tii'3'J4tf V X 1 mi? ' - .sw . 1-qv lex- .., -Mbwib L ..L.L1..Lin FL . xl f :six . 4 . --: -"1 .,,,iSi?t'UTt1Luji,', ,,jf'j5 in W , ,. ' Q ' 51:3-., 11-.xiii ,,. .P J ,, ' A11-he-LQtLp- Q f' RI1JYDwffi, + "E K-my , ' '..,- "'- SIGMA NU . . . Gamma Phi chapter Chartered in 1905 . . . Founded at Virginia Military Institute, Lexington, Virqinia . . . Kenny Hickel, president. KOSNICK LA BONTA LAMB LAWSON LITTLE LOVELL MCLAUGHLIN MCMAHON mm mf'- ima mw Wham 'VS . fi. 'it 'Q' yen-uv ,HMA Whs- MACLAY R. MATHISON S. MATHISON MOODY MORGAN NELSON O'LOUGHLlN O'NEIL OTT PAYNE PETERSON POMROY PORTER PREUNNINGER REED REES ROBB ROBERTS ROSS SCHLIEMAN SELVIG SKEIE SPRAYCAR STANDIFORD STITZ TURMAN WALKER WALSH WOOD WOHLGENANT YOUNG ZIBELL 4' 'ffx 1 vAfl""'EY'i'f"'7" 'V 4 fl . CYQM Li,-. I6 X il X' XX ii xv Z,-f . E, 4 ..x 9 if I fail H ,251 - j K- ,. ,N '-,fQ 4? f Egan, Weir" if -I-if F 5335 -gt LL.g 1 AITA.-..:,.B '-V--...,.. SIG EP . . . Charter qranted Montana Alpha in 1918 . . . Founded at Richmond College, Richmond, Virginia . . . 1901 . . . President, Pai Spariz. ANDERSON AYERS AYRES BEDARD BOYD BROWNE BURLINGAME BUSH DEAN D. DEAN DEMMONS ENDRESS FARRIS FOLKESTAD GARRISON GRAY HEILMAN HENDRICKSON HOFFMAN HOLMSTROM HOLTON SIGMA PHI EPSILO HOWARD HOWEY HOYEM IAQUETH IONES 9' 'Fl IUROVICH IUsTUs LOSLEBEN LUCAS ,fm Am LUKE Y'f"""f" MCDONNELL www' I..-mmm. vu f""" "'-ar fv Lex 'W-Ilsmsf' MARL MARTIN MURPHY NEIMAN NETT OLSON PECK RIZZONELLI SCHUFF SMITH SPARTZ STEVENS C. SQUIRES G. SQUIRES THOMPSON TIRRELL TOLSON WALKER WILKERSON WINTERS WOOD THETA CHI ACKERMAN ANDERSON ARMSTRONG ARN DT BARSNESS BAUGH KNEW M BENNETT 1. BERG R. BERG BLANCHARD W QM, W WW as my QM WWW Nhwf Nafbfyiw 'QRM' BOOTH CALDWELL COLLVER COOMBS CULLEN DAVIES ELBERT ENZMINGER FRANKLIN FRIEDE FORNALL R. GARMOE W. GARMOE GARWOOD GREEN HAHN HALSE HARPOLE HARVEY HECKATHORN HILGER HOLLIDAY HUMISTON ISCH IASPERSON IELLISON IOHNSON IONES IORGENSEN KOENIG KORN KREKLAU . 5 s . f - ,fer . . -,NY , t l b .L . L fit lm Ht 3.5 , . .- - - -lliwxnil I H -swad f ,, u L43. 3 5 ..x , -Q93 - ,x , 1 ' X.--X 'y fir'- x X X ,X 2 ..1q,' QS- - :r . . , s ---.-' . x .7 -. . X. . .-.4 Xt, ' . A-F. .9 A. - Q ., 'rv .,, N Y ,A f Y--in XX X 1 , -.. ,N x mmm N- .wx N - -V- P ' X "' A 'AY' 'X -- 1 ,Ek 1. - K .NN-F . . W ,AW 11-,f ,h ',' . '- INV., .nity ' ,bfv rf"',.2Q 4 iff . A. -f x X" x 1 0ll!lZ .-. ,5,., 1 9 :4'J"'- N '. M. ,. , Ili, wry-- -.'::ff:0, 2-K" fm. ll! . .- j,-:A ,-:I -,x...- :'-53.1--L Q JSNVV' W' 1'Rt1z,:. In-.:.. -, L. . hz . if A f gg ull K 'F' 452 c .Q 3,-W-an ., g"':.? -.. .:'- ' . f AG - 4 I -' ,rw , A ' .iw " at "f'-'-riff? r :Xu ,, n ,ix 1 - -Q Qs - ,V :wg--1 ff .-.x ,,.- . x . '4 X nl Nik '-fgggw l,'lFuwmlw fweQ:Z' 'eq we ' wt K ff 'Si r 'ix N N l x Y ix g . NX H tr 4, X X lgyf Q N x A A -6 l S --N -ff . ,Q ik ,.,.... r1,, X -glttgf ' +14 I l , 9 X ix I X t x xg: - "Wt ' I ' f-.lv ' . ll"t"t 'r r t r f it -it , ' ' , X 'MC 4- N , ?, ' n ffl 'sql an EE R . :silxw ,, 4 P tl A, X Q I tue I ! V'-llkqln X' 1, K I , t. N 'N ' t P' tl ' My t Q. l , 3, 4 wx I QL nt ,Q 5' t I E: i - ' ,gil ef . I X l 'FS' S! . ' ' J U 5 X X l R x vs I lb' f b ' Q' gm: Ex ' , A' l v til! -M I X ,XZ J' 'K- 1-MPI ,Jnfaw-vy, P..- Y WH. --mga- ll .-.. ep ' . X, ,,,.i,k . C-Y . , THETA CHI . . . Founded Gt Norwich University, North- field, Vermont . . . 1856 . . . Betd Epsilon clidrtered in 1937 . . . Bill Setlire presides . . . requldr meetings on Mondoy. LINSE LUCHAU MCCARTHY MCELWAIN MCGLOTHLIN MQCPHERSON 4' 1--n-.. MQW'-K digg Hiram.. ww ww,-nm M533 'W alll' fx. affirm ,mm Ear mfg MP' ,ik 'V' EUMQ 'WU' 3'l"mu- yd? MAGEE MANUEL MELANEY MILLER MINIFIE MOLLANDER NETTLY NEWSTROM O'NEIL F. PAULSON L. PAULSON D. PAYTON K. PAYTON PRICE SHULTS SETHRE SIGG SILVERNALE SPENCER SPIELMAN STRAND SYKES UTTERBACK I. VAN SICKLE R. VAN SICKLE VISCON WIDENHOFER WILLEY vs"'K 'Wa wg-.4 NIVA RYDER SUTLIFF WRIGHT W' K 4 , , 'Wa Q 4 I g , f ,., XM ,Q . . iff- S -, wa,-g:.:z::e53g ' . k gr.-,,gM.1p-ez-f' 'W 1' ' ' Q Q , 1 Q 5 f ,, , N 94 if '5 ' J ,.. -V-2 ,H..,b, 9325-' ' x 9? x Q 6 4 , 1 D Mi if if Q 49 ii-400 WN lr 1 I 1 4 K A '. 1 ' ' in I AQ-"""'T""""' .- H . , Z. ww' .if ? 1 Z' 1 1,5 dv.. N Q IX 1. 4525: . . -f Q'25153L" gi ff D JL ,Q .iv 333 Y 1-m , 0 A cgi 'Wi it 1 I " f 35 wl blood racing to the tune of icy blasts and the hardier souls find diversion on snowy slopes, while the' social whirl gets into gear . . . tormals, dinners, and a watchful eye on the weather . 4 ,ll 746-Xl it ,Q , , - -ur' 4" 'vu 41,4 v . L 1 1 1 if 2 NWN gf"'-K "x x. 1 M 6 I J W K5 9 'Ni ' 1 5 Q . N' '1 ,J A ' NM . pf' 'V' Ng Ns f f r J x Y X 'gs 3 I - jk S ' 1 Q x f wi I ! I 4 i F 4 1 I . 1. Q l K 1 4 'Y' 1 1 1 ,Q X54 1 'T ' -V nd ' .X-wwivi'vfg:,1iQ?X,, - V x E"fN"SifQY'w' if SWE -Ei , 'P' , . 'S 5 ' -X f' 4 ' fy' aff' Ru! uigfiqgw X 'fgw s N My 4 W' F - ., 6' 1 M 6 X Y, ' fwze -: .. f-f , ,A ' .. M' , 'f":,::x':'x?4:,f'xb,-L ,. fi W , ' " ' MA7'f" . Q9 If ,X 0 5 A - Q- ,mf W f 2? -' Q . ,. -I 2, MM-'Q-::::f'f,, A A , ,, ,. ,fig-, V Q v . v . Q Q, 4-f I , ., fb , Y J 'IZ , 1 xzsw m 2, ,ff if 1,5 . in 7 0 sms , ' ww ,Q ff? QM img, O I .Q , . 1 " 3- 1 , Afiwrf ,iff X .QQ 1+ 1 A Qi' 19' 1, ' x - 1 ': ' ., , " My HL' U: A N v i ' f: ,'."g 1 bg. , , 'YZ-, vf, r QI 'x W ,.--Q' '4er., TWO-SIXTY FOUR . . . a simple page to write . . . no pictures to identify . . . few names to unwittingly misspell . . . little chance to error. lt's a useful page . . . for apologies, for obligations, for explanations. The apologies are as brief as they are useless . . . specifically for delayed delivery . . . more vaguely for the scattered errors which somehow escape correction . . . yearbookish errors in spelling or identification or categorizing. Cbligations are simpler to express . . . they're of a double nature . . . some contracted . . . some less formally arranged. The former include Art- craft Engravers of Seattle: Durand Cover makers in Chicago: McKee Printers in Butte, and Catlin's studio in Missoula. An then the uncontracted . . . the dwindling group of volunteers who produced this green-garbed book: Floyd Alfson, Frank Zubick and Art Foley . . . engrossed in their photographic world of flash-bulbs and speed graphics: lohn Lemire and his business staff . . . vendors of advertising space, with watchful budget attitudes: Dwain Hanson, soft-spoken sports editor: Cyrile Van Duser, congenial adviser: Bob O'Neil, capable associate . . . sometimes solemn, at others carefree . . . always helpful and concerned: and Doris Lund . . . constant yearbook colleague who generously applied her boundless energy to the long Sentinel year. Thanks, then, to these people . . . whose meager salaries were indicative of Sentinel's budget and did in no way compensate their contribution. There are others . . . unmentioned here . . . to whom Sentinel is obligated . . . but it was this handful of people who made the tiny office their home and knew what deadlines meant and pushed this book to completion. l scoffed when reading a last summer's letter from a friend who aired his yearbook views: "ln later years," he wrote, "looking back on these four years, a man may safely conclude that the whole thing-failure, successes, friendships, hatreds, passions, and fanciesmwas a dream, dead and buried. And that is what school annuals are for, isn't it, to capture the dream between two covers? lf college friendships meant anything, no annual would ever be printed. lt wouldn't be necessary. But annuals are necessary, if only to mark the transition from one type of dream to another: from the good-old-college-life to the good-life and the-little-thatched roof, and all of that." And l scoffed and disbelieved when l first read these words. Because then it seemed school annuals had some greater purpose than that. They recorded a year . . . preferably in some original manner. Surely friends would remember friends . . . so . . . search for ,a theme, look to layout . . . a dedication . . . a method of organizing the old categories of university life into different original groupings. That was in the beginning. And now . . . the product isn't artful, nor was it meant to be. lt's not original . . . nor particularly adult. Possibly its only mark is organization, and who can say if that is good or bad. But perhaps it will do one thing . . . perhaps some day it will rate a second glance from those who recall the good-oldcollege life . . . and in the same moment forget the good-old-collegians . . perhaps it marks the transition . . . complete with faces, faces, faces . . . so that some day, we may remember. -Marge Hunter ADVERTISING and INDEX fi 9 is S 5 4 9' 5 if Z, :Q 0 A5 V4 P P' E 5 W fwfwzf,,f,om,mw' wmfmfm. f, , ' 'A' . 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' lv - Lg :-,'V -,., ,.,. ,.'- X555 .-A2 ....,.1. .V A. . ,- ,. . K V.. . ,,, , , '- VGQQQVA wh f- X MMV Va va'- ,,-A2.,,- , VV., ,f...s,,, wx Q. V V, awsiigb 3 mfwqvw GMVQ3, S X ' s X Kgmxig A Q 3 Q A A -f' 2. -w PQI' fy." j:fX.i:.Qg,Z5tQ4S5vgMi. AV-V f Q ---"- ' ' -. - -v -,Q 4.,. x.. V v i3wS2fWv 3 K A ...QQ FIRST in MISSOULA 'Q.A,... A.-. a . . FIRST on the AVENUE? E .,."LQf3f.'f.-Magix, .x. .A ,, . ,. .. V. XMB-w ., N 22 Vf V .jg Q" gg .1 ri" T .. .-V. Sql gf- -1'- -4 4 N- V. , Q. .. V. . ,,1,:.::.5 .1.. V .' N: .'1g:V,.g:i.,i.2.5: w, l V - 1 Q V- - .Z 1f:..T:aR:." 3 . .. 1' "Nr -mrxi. ' ' W " N Weste rm Mon ta na S Sh opp f ng C 811 to f V- V- 5 1 rw k L. Q .. Q D " .f if f .. . ix ,. vi, .... X ,x..Q,.. , . - -. We. .ix QV.. -. . .W Q, YW-. gx. V V N.: qs. -S 'QQ SN- q.,g,K,5 .. Y, VA. , Ls., .fisxgir 3' QW ' Q X S. Mix VN' R? QM ' V..,m.??g xw.vms:Q2s'3f' 'ff 1 ' , ik 'RW X 'Y " ,. W, I s v I II ah i 1 5 1 e 0 4 I I Vu iV..,mx..a, 3. .. V 4 i. li 4 I king' ,Nr-wg. mn... ,, "F""""1u-na, v-Z. -.., . . of-V 1-.....-...,. .. , ...QV-.,,,N ...wa P .., W -. -, V. . - - - . . , V, Q, V - , ., "1 e-f - .f ..+-HV, '-.gwfg-,V V , ,- ,Q -V .V an - ' 2.5. V V N , nz? 1 V-- - - :QV vw. ' 5, ,, . -. f -' '0::b4:,-' fs 2'-:iw 4-NFIB EXQXQ1- Q-151-1-35'-.'ffV' r., 5. ' Qgxr'-. g. gg., 3- ', ., 3 , 5 . A ,.:F"fg-Qs H 1, 14 51 X ' 'ig Y Q -V 5- , . . . . . A Q ., . ,.1"v, . ' gv ' . -V V f X -if." P' Si . '.. 'W .s.S'TmV..s..'z1g mn.. M335-V' ',L-3-'i...w-., .T amd, . .-..A.a...mv., ..,, W , Scientific Lumbering Produces Many More Highly Useful Products for LESS MUNEY, for You. If the felling of trees were continued indiscriminately, as has hap- pened in the past, in too short a time the value of a piece of "wood" would be as gold. Scientific use of forest stands and scientific use of the yield is not only saving and perpetuating our natural supply, it is also saving money for the ultimate consumer of millions of lumber products and by-products. Neils Lumber Company is one of the larger companies which is practicing common-sense lumber in sustained yield and waste use for the beneht of all. SUSTAINED YIELD is a pro-gram providing for "Selective Cutting" rather than "stripping." It preserves forest, stimulates growth, protects natural water supply and wildlife, assures permanent economy for mill towns, and provides more public recreational facilities. EILS L MBER CO LIBBY, MONTANA ,xi D, .D .D .D NllDllQillfllllllllEllQN X- :D R S, , .5 Q W T lllilllillll N IIO evvvvvvvvvvvvvvvv----vvv ::::::::::::::::::::o NORTHERN BAR and COCKTAIL LOUNGE Where Students Find , , , We Furnish the Complete Home Quick Personalized O FURNITURE it 'if 1 is ' ' - .'-'T, Q DRAPERI ES 4 I HARDWARE D . D D gm a CARPETS ' 'tel Q -- - 0 CROCKERY , ' ax Collins Texaco Service J, M, LUCY 5, SQNS 265 The 1949 SENTINEL is bound in a DURAND CUVER .Qurcu2J .Manufacfurinq Gompcuzy 939 West 35th Street Chicago 9, IIIino's ete ...fo Q Iste gple e 1990 K Iocycles Yo fe diy Col be st to Mussoum, MGNTANA Rocky Mountain Beer Anaconda Brewing Company O ANACGNDA MONTANA glue Cpower 0, ci Cree qbeofale The Pharoahs had power galore at their command . . . man power . . . slave power. They squandered it on such useless projects as the pyramids. The glory of Egypt has waned. The electric power used in American industry gives an average manufacturing worker the equivalent energy of 160 men working with him on his job all year long. The resulting production of useful goods available to ALL of the people has made America great. When men are socialized or enslaved they lose the incentive to produce more and better goods at lower costs. Government ownership of the electric power in- dustry would be a major step towards complete sociali- zation of this country. Your generation will soon be handling the social, economic, and political affairs of the nation. Donit let America go the way of Egypt and Europe. Be active and vigilant to keep America free. THINK! he Montana Power Company 6 ni ' 'V .Snllivilzlzgf IIUZL' C'I'c'l',X' fI'UkX'. Graduates of M. S. U. are very special customers of CQLES in Billings. Naturally we want them to meet only the "right people" in Fashion-- That's why CQLES presents more nationally Famous lorands than any other Montana store. 'tbl at ' ' THPUUW irii ii 0LE55fMgNg35TonE - "5" 4 L :'liIl'li i ll ' R I iXxii:L ig tw- MIX E D REFRESI-IME NTS Tlfiliilllli Sli il? TZ llKWlll1-KN Superior Drug and Fountain Service I-lollyoalc Drug Co H F, Floherty "Where Friends Meetn South l-liggins at oth Srteet Missoula, Montana For Picnics and Snacks at Home 'visit our COMPLETE FOOD STORE 2.11 Sllflmlp QN9 SIlHlllD1lP BILLINGS MONTANA OPPOSITE POSTOFFICE .2 . 1 , , 5' PW 1 ,t'wljdf'e'?Nn'i,x 'le .5 'A' A .t I1 'fr 1.1-.N i i tx' L 111 ,VR 'Nh , .i1 .. Q Q15 'Af' q'N'5f""t.lx, f- -A" ,Q . if x'd, 4Li3Wft.'ffMQQ,,,, --- 1 .L i E 'Nw Y' :H ly Z ' ' W, 916' mlm, T t,tf'lXNgN I. i4 tt, tltlirl-:M ff, '1,,'Zlil SX, -F 4 , 1 "'llli04llpt. I H" t ,X - I ' u Mullin! ug, W' in Y If i-.1- 5 11: ' "H-,N xQVXTNx1'l-- Z-'ff . fl: Il- - f,,' ., " 'TS' '17 -,,, -.Q-ii-5 T, A'-7- - 'L,jfp,, ' . 11 va ' . ,?? i . E9 iqiil-..--:L-... V 1" mr' , f YY' , f +f-+- -L - ., '41 e 1' 'l 'f fr - 1 4 - rs ' 1 e r tfaygsy 1' Tf' --ii!! iT'l 1.--l 'ff ,IH - ll- -lf ' vyfvge -2 at --1,5 11' fs - 2-goat? -'L ' ' 7 - f ,, ,, f i'i 2 3 - - V 4:3 l I : f - ' 'ligjrrj I :ag-Ie Nga: ff V ELS. if 1-l-li Y A M 2 ' 4 ' , Q 'T X! ET" T - 4' -93' ':1-- -T ' -. r '-A Ei: 15 - 45 . 'T - - 5 ' Q - , " ti-i..T ' fl Q - - Q 'liar '-5 - l N , , 5.1 - E T 3 .1 ' I 12 --- YYY. , 11 'ff I W 1 'v'-45:1 1 ' 1 A . .gf:. ' ' '?ii - FFL" U ,V,-:gre 1 ' Choose top-flight engravings for our earhooli! Z' 23, X? X? XA? XI, e d UH the best quality engravings d and service . . . Yearbook Staffs turn to AIRTCHAPT year after year! We find real pleasure in satisfying year hook editors, advisors and the students. In rAMous ron DIAMONDS I I 106 NORTH BRGADWAY BILLINCS MCNTANA 60 Years of Friendly Service to Western Montana In the shopping center of the Midland The Western Montana qgmpire . . . National Bank Established Missoula Two FINE srones I889 Montana TO SERVE YOU Officers and Directors W. L. Murphy, Elmer Stowe, Chairman ot the Board Assistant Cashier N CQ, Paul S. Gillespie, O. H. Mann, President Ass't. Cashier Newell Gough, H. W. Lehsou, l"l'3"lf"Albln Store For Men Vice President Director lames A. Hart, H. O. Bell, Bll-l-INGS Cashier Director q!lfZ,QVL WM Give l-ler Flowers at qggnnggfg Lily rigid . . . I-I 0 o hi . ln Price elnrlq S ' ln Quality l32 N. Hlgglns ' In SHOP AT Give l-ler Jewelery MISSCULA, MONTANA You'll Like Q Community Pasteurized Milk and Cream Q Homogenized---with added Vitamin D Q Golden Nugget Buttermilk Q Cottage Cheese Q Ice Cream Q Cream CCDMMUNITY CREAMERY 420 NORA l'HUiXlE :il ,- , i A Abbott, Frederick Wallace, 58, 218 Abhary, Hossein, 38, 245 Ackerman, Ramsey, 58, 141, 256 Actis, Frank Charles, 80, 218 Adams, Bill, 38 Adams, Marshall, 221 Adams, Richard Kellogg Adams, Robert, 70, 248 Agostinelli, Vergil Michael, 53, 248 Agte, Roy, 38, 124 Aiken, Ernie, 58, 240 Albert, Dean 1-l., 58 --7vw!ex-- Albright, Ann, 24, 38, 128, 141, 236 Alderson, Alice, 70, 236 Alderson, Ann, 211 Alison, Eloyd Lawrence, 80, 91, 246 Allen, Elaine Tressy, 213 Allen, Margaret Ruth, 38, 232 Allen, Ted, 158 Alt, Bernard, 70 Ambrose, Thomas Cleary, 80, 92, 128 Ammen, George Albert, lr., 136, 142, 221 Amole, Warren R., lr., 38, 136, 118 Amundson, Constance Mae, 80, 213 be a i-1 L. X1 LGNG AFTER PRICE 15 MDRGOTTEN CONSULT US ABOUT YOUR PRINTING PROBLEMS Zaakfuwfma Wie? 99 912. .. t Q.. 3 r' QUALITY 18 REMEMBERED Andersen Anderson Anderson Anderson Anderson Anderson Anderson Anderson Anderson , George, 70 , Bruce, 58, 250 , Clayton, 218 , Eleanor, 80, 92, 211, 236 , George Richard, 157, 166 , 1-larold, 58 , lames, 70, 256 . S. Keith, 38, 240 , Lester, 136 Anderson, Marjorie, 70, 238 Anderson, Maxine, 70, 232 Anderson, Ralph, 70, 250 Anderson, Robert B., 56, 58, 120, 154, 156 Anderson, Thomas Eugene, 80, 92, 166, 252 Anderson, Vernard, Ir., 38, 254 Anderson, William, 58, 175 Andrus, Michael Allan, 157 Andrus, William, 58, 171, 248 Angstman, Anne, 70, 226 Angstman, lames B., 38, 250 Angstman, Ioanne F., 80, 92, 211, 234 Annala, Andrew, 58, 221 Annas, E. Eugene, 177 Anthony, lames, 144 Anton, Xenia, 24, 58, 212 Armour, George, 101 Armstrong, lack, 70, 252 Armstrong, I-loward, 58, 120, 167, 168, 180, 252 Armstrong, Keith, 38 Armstrong, Laurence, 58, 256 Arndt, Do nald Neil, 80, 256 Arnegard, Mavis, 38, 228 Arnich, Frank, 58 Arnold, loan Gillis, 80, 211, 238 Arnold, Roy Neil, lr., 58, 248 Arntzen, Doris, 70, 228 Arras, Arthur, 38, 110, 135, 252 Arvish, Andrew, 219 Ashenbrenner, Dolores Marie, 83 92, 232 Ashworth, lohn, 70, 214, 252 Asid, Eli, 178, 218 Ask, Thomas, 70 Aspervich, Roger, 135 Aspevig, Aspevig, Athearn, Paul, 123 Roger, 58 Iames, 135 Athearn, Murray Iames, 38, 114 Atwood, William Roy l., 183 Aubert, Dean, 135 Auer, David, 58 Austin, Charles Patrick, 157 Ayres, Daniel William, 80 Ayers, Elaine Mildred, 80, 226 Ayers, lames, 80, 254 Bacon, Ri Badgley, Badgley, B chard, 157 Iohn 1-I., 80 Kirk, lr., 147, 155, 156 Baillie, Wanda, 70 Baillie, William, 38 Bailey, Chandler Bain, Lois, 70, 226 Baker, Charles, 80, 218 Baker, Eugene, 80 Baldwin, Betty, 70, 124 Baldwin, lerry Douglas, 23, 25, 58, 92, 101, 110, 130, 158,252 Baldwin, Ioan Harriet, 80, 211, 228 Baldwin, Roger G., 38, 252 Baldy, Martha, 80, 236 Bangeman, Barbara lean, 80, 211 Bangle, Edward Charles, 58 Barker, Margaretta, 70, 228 Barnes, Leonard, 136 Barnett, lohn, 80, 250 Barrett, David, 70 Barrett, Howard, 70, 240 Barrett, Phyllis, 38 Barry, William, 218 Barsness, Dick, 58, 256 Bartlett, Iohn, 38, 118, 136 Barton, Wana Lois, 80, 211 Basye, Bette Ann, 80, 211, 228 Batzner, Richard, 58 Bauer, Marianne, 80 Bauer, Ray, 120, 154, 156, 164. Baugh, Don, 70, 256 Bauman, Richard, 38 Baun, Albert, 58, 246 Bayers, A. Byron, 80, 157 Bays, Bette Mae, 38, 121, 183 Bays, David, 38 Beacom, Eleanor, 80 Beakey, Iames, 58, 214 Beatty, Annemarie, 80, 92, 183, 211, 234 Beatty, Ben, 70, 174 Beatty, Bruce, 134, 139, 177 Beaubien, Patricia, 80, 92, 238 Beauchamp, Garland, 80, 218 Beck, Iewel Anne, 80, 124, 211, 226 Beckman, Lois Mae, 38 Beckwith, loan, 70, 131, 183, 184, 230 Bedard, Bob, 80, 166, 254 Beebe, Robert, 58, 240 Behrens, Charles, 58, 130, 250 Bell, I arnes, Ir., 58 Bell, Marian, 24, 25, 58, 92, 184, 210, 230 Bell, Norma, 80, 211, 230 Beltzer, Charles, Ir., 217 Benne Benne Benne Benne Benne Benz, Berg, Berg, Berg, tt, Art, 58, 218 tt, Harold, 70, 116, 256 tt, Mary, 58, 236 tt, Robert, 70, 218 tts, Bonnie, 213 Patricia, 70, 184, 230 Bruce, 80 Conrad, 80 loan, 58, 214, 256 Berg, Raymond, 80, 256 Berger, lohn, 116 Berget, Billie Lou, 25, 70, 125, 236 Bergh, Laura, 21, 22, 24, 56, 58, 121, 210, 238 Bergman, Walter, 136 Berland, Betty, 70, 183, 184, 238 Bernhardt, Betty, 80, 211 Bessire, lean, 38, 234 Best, Barbara, 58, 230 Bethke, Elton, 80, 214 Beurnee, lohn, 58, 139 Beveridge, Charles, 38, 250 Biggerstatf, Reid, 58, 252 Billsborough, Russell, 80, 218 Birdsill, Cloris, 80 Birkett, Ellalee, 70, 131, 228 Birkett, William, 218 Bishop, Charlie, 80 Blakeslee, Barbara, 92, 80, 228 Blanchard, Lois, 58, 238 Blanchard, Ralph, 58, 256 Blenkner, William, 70 Blessing, lanet, 23, 58, 222 Blinn, 250 Pat, 70, 130, 140, 180, 214, Bloom, Herbert Lawrence, 70, 130, 170, 252 Bloom, Roberta Lee, 80, 211, 227 Bly, Roy C., 39 Boding, Keith, 157 Boesen, Marjorie, 39, 93, 213 Boetticher, William D., 216, 218 Bohlig, Richard, 39, 246 Bollhorst, Forrest Darrell, 80 Bolog, Donald, 136 Bonner, Iosephine, 80, 211, 236 Bonnesm, Robert, 80 DCDIXVT BE LATE GET A DATE and meet the gang very finest of Southern Frled Chicken and other Excellent Foods rn the heart of downtown Missoula lLZlD4lD D Nlllllg ll U at . . . Enjoy the 1 KUPPENI-IEIMER CLOTHES McGregor Soortsweor Arrow Shirts Dobbs Hats 1 Von Heusen Shirts Pcndleton Woolens Florsheim Shoes Holciiroot Hose Jockey Underwear Clothlers - - Haberdashers - - Hatters Missoula, Montana "The Dttice Thot Poys You Dividends" BISHOP AGENCY REAL ESTATE INSURANCE-ALL KINDS RENTALS - BONDS INSURANCE - ALL KINDS Phone 5000 1-Ioniniond Arcode Building elvlissoulo Booth, Charles, 70, 256 Booth, Elizabeth, 80, 110, 232 Bosch, Margaret, 71, 131, 238 Boschert, Sarah, 58, 234 Bosone, loe R., 118, 136 Bottomly, Gene, 177 Botts, William A., 80, 248 Bourdeau, lohn, 59, 130, 250 Bourdette, Warren, 71 Bowker, Robert, 59 Boyd, Harold, 80, 254, 217 Boyd, 1-lerbert, 71, 248 Boyd, Mordecai lames, Ir., 59 Boyd, Patricia, 71, 226 Braach, Cliff, 218 Braach, Ray, 218 Bracewell, Robert, 218 Bradley, Aletha, 71, 131, 232 Bradley, Charles, 157 Bradley, Donald, 71 Brandt, William, 59, 120, 124, 142 171, 221 Brass, Alice, 80 Bray, Thomas, 81 Braycich, loe, 39, 221 Brazier, Peter, 81, 214 Breidenfeld, lerry H., 39, 240 Breitenstein, Bryce, 81, 250 Brenden, Orval, 59 Brest, Clarence A., 81, 250 Brewster, Eula, 24, 39, 226 Bridenstine, Keith G., 71, 240 Bridsten, lohn, 59 Briney, Frank, 59, 154, 156, 180, 120, 248 Briney, Frederick, 39, 248 Brinig, lacgueline, 81, 211, 234 Brink, Darrell, 218 Brinkerhoff, lohn, 142 Brinton, Elaine, 71, 213 Britton, Bette, 59, 236 Brockway, Io, 81, 211, 238 Brown, Arnold, 125 Brown, Bruce, 39 Brown, Firman, 39, 129, 138, 140, 252 Brown, Fred, 218 Brown, Gay, 71, 236 Brown Lyal, 81 Brown Martha, 59, 236 Brown Brown Brown Brown Mona, 71, 101, 230 Robert, 59 Rockwood, lr., 59, 158 Virginia, 71, 232 Browne, Douglas, 71, 218, 254 Brownlee, lohn, 71 Bryant, Anton, 39 Bryant, Lloyd, 118 Bucher, Margaret, 22, 71 Buker, G. Newton, 81, 252 Bulen, Trudy, 59, 228 Bulen, Virginia, 71, 140, 226 Buley, loseph, 59, 250 Buller, Gerald, 59 Buls, Donna, 81 Bundy, David, 71 Buntin, Arthur, 39 Burch, Arthur, 221, 240 Burchak, lay, 59, 144, 214, 2411 Burgess, Beverly, 71, 131, 182, 234 Burk, Charles, 39, 217 Burke, Burke, lohn, 53, 113, 130, 252 loseph, 71, 218 Burkett, Bill, 71 Burlingame, Lawrence, 71, 110, 254 Burnett, Coyne, 124, 144 Burnett, lack, 139 Burns, Burns. Don, 132 Robert, 25, 244 Burr, Donna, 24, 25, 71, 131, 184, 230 Burton, Ted, 39, 132, 134, 141, 250 Bush, Clarice, 71 Bush, 'William, 59, 254 Bushong, Clayton, 59 Butcher, Emmet, 71, 218, 221 i X 275 F6126 yls lID l!RiIlII W IE 11N Wolf Creek, Montana Your Missoula Dealer for DODGE and PLYMOUTH MURPHY MQTORS, INC. 208 East Mann Phone 3193 MISSOULA'S TREASURE HOUSE OF HIGH FA H10 Women's Wear TI-IE BEST TI-IE MARKET AFFORDS IN QUALITY LADIES' WEAR, AND FINE FOOTWEAR IS ALWAYS AVAILABLE AT BUTTREYS--HOME OF JUNIOR FASHION FAMOUS EXCEPTIONAL Wflffwi :frail Byers, Donald, 214 Byrne, Paul, 59, 252 Byrne, Robert, 157 Byrnes, Donald, 217 Byrnes, Erwin C., 218 C Cacavas, Thomas, 59, 248 Caldwell, John, 59, 256 Callihan, lames, 45, 101, 102, 144 Calvert, Nancy, 81, 92, 211, 234 Carnbern, Korte, 81, 92, 211, 236 Campbell, Don, 59, 120, 154, 156, 181, 244 Campbell, Robert, 71 Canavan, Tune, 59, 232 Cannon, Ross, 71, 92, 214, 250 Caraway, Charles, 71, 250 Carleton, Trudi, 71 Carlson, Arthur, 81, 246 Carlson, Doris, 39, 132, 213 Carlyle, Marilyn, 126, 123, 212 Carr, Helen, 39, 116, 213 Carr, Shirley, 234 Carroll, Pat, 71, 230 Carson, Helen, 59, 222 Carson, lo, 183 Carstensen, loyce, 81, 213, 236 Carstensen, Richard, 59, 120, 159, 164, 250 Carter, 1-larley, 71, 248 Cascaden, Milton, 59, 116, 135, 214, 215 Casey, Larry, 39, 117 Cash, Walter, 71 Casick, Matt, 157 Cavanauqh, Thomas Iohn, 139 Cech, Franklin C., 117 Cerino, Richard, 81, 157, 166, 248 Cerovski, Nickolas, 116 Chatiin, Carol, 36, 39, 128, 198, 228 Chattin, Everett, 71, 120, 130, 156, 248 Chamberlain, lames, 141 Chapman, Betty, 71 Chapman, Fred R., 59, 240 Chapple, Alex, 110 Chauvin, Lois lean, 25, 71, 131, 230, Chezick, Marcella, 81, 211, 234 Chieslar, Eugene, 71 Child, Merline, 71, 116, 123, 126, 133, 212 Chilton, Michael Cf., 39 Choate, Lois, 71, 212, 228 Christensen, Harry, 81 Christensen, R. H., 59, 180 Christensen. Robert, 250 Christianson, lill, 59, 114, 123, 230 Christianson, Louise, 39, 114, 212 Christy, Marjorie, 39, 228 Clack, 1-lerrnan, 39, 216, 217, 246 Clapp, Margaret, 81, 182, 236 Clark, Elaine, 81, 211 Clark, loyce, 81, 92 Clark, Verne, 81, 211 Clearman, Francis, 71, 116 Clendenin, Melvin, 71, 252 Cleveland, Lila, 40, 121 Click, Shirley, 59, 213 Clifton, Kelly, 59, 250 Cline, loann, 59, 238 Clinkingbeard, lim, 71, 244 Cochrane, Al, 71, 130, 250 Cockrell, Alan, 40 Coqqeshall, lack, 59, 244 Cohen, Leon, 117 Cole, Charles, 59 Cole, Donald, 71, 110, 214, 252 Cole, lim, 166 Cole, Shirley, 40 Coleman, Charles, 81, 240 Coleman, Edwin, 71 Collins, Betty, 40, 236 'a 4 4 fm I ' ' 24 A X K F, A W ? 1 ' I 3 '- 1 , 'wg'-1' jfiw' ' ' 1 ff" L41 ,p-A...-M J W 5 . 4 ',q.4.4, z , I ' M, ,., 5 ,- ,f fa.. I 1... Y .X , J, ..- i Q 1 ',,.y --X ' 4 K .5 I I 5 ' A .,3,.l.i 1 f x Z f Ifif , 4 A . . M A 'i -' ' .5 'Qi- i 1 :Hu w 'LAK 4 ', . Q--'-- ,,,......., 1 uw-'-ff MtwT,:,.. " w 14 l .l,k. 6 X K A :Z-'13-'ti' S' xql Ext gs. .1f"5-ill 'S Q ' XIII-ix! 1 'Q QQ S if We ' TF is Q -' 1 :Q Q "'.i'5 FY H S N., Q i I F Q Q " , S Q I' Q S SM -- . ii N., N, 'Q E 5- ,,, , :QV - 'f If ., , - , ... "-.gt 1 EL . 1 ww' F., .,. Z, Z . mv Qlgi i 7 ii Si Q- 'N I, E E m Y ' r 'A S I I lf S E,?iP+" P- E r. ,f ' F ig, 'ff-i 'S'gS Q I r Q E E 5 E i " ' T v,"'iiS5s.,- g .,, Y '- ,A Q U W Wh SE E E : -.. 5 5 ' 'N' Q i " 1 I E e: W' ',T,:j',A if i 5 5 5l. .l--4 f...M i U' - .. I-ICDTEI. IILCDQEIXICE MISSQLJLA, MGNTANA "AMiRlCA'5 FINEST SMALL HOTEL EVERYTHING IN FLOWERS Prepared by Experts 40 years of Experience Home-Grown Flowers Last Longer owden, wif 57 ,ouaf gompcufig "Serving you is a real pleasure" ummin MISSOULA, MONTANA Medi qfliafrea fo, the CLASS CDE 1949 X NX, X . owen 50 eyeowa fm 0 'fl M ff! XX i X 'X X XX Xi X X X X 4 N X X X X XXX X f" YQ X Xi X W NX XEWQXN QX Q DNN X X X X X X X QNX Q 1 N X XX Q X t Q X X X ' X XX X X SXX X XT X X X X X I N-X xwx XX XX XxxxX.X XXXXXXPN X XX Nrgagstu Osesor s nv Ln C Lmowfa, N exist XX Xl Collins, 1-lerbert, 136 Collins, Mary Io, 59, 118, 137, 224 228 Collins, Reid, 77, 110, 130, 252 Collison, Duane, 43, 253 Collum, Stanley E., 125 Collver, Dick, 81, 256 Com, Russell, 217 Cone, Charles, 139 Conitz, Robert, 115, 135 Conklin, Richard B. Conley, Chester F. Conner, Charleen, 71, 230 Conner, Stuart W., 40, 139, 253 Connick, 1-larry, 40, 110, 248 Conover, Dale, 71, 123, 126, 221 Canver, Donald, 59, 248 Conwell, Robert F., 217 Cook, Abisah L., 40 Cook, Earl, 71, 178, 253 Cook, Florence, 81, 211 Cook, Ross, 43, 136 Cookson, William, 157 Coombs, Leonard, 59, 256 Cooney, Robert, 81 Cooper, Douglas, 81, 244 Copas, 1. L., 40 Cope, Robert, 59, 120, 164, 167 168 171, 172, 248 Cordts, Howard P., 40 Cork, Lee, 120, 154, 156 Corning, lames, 71, 181, 244 Corwin, Vinton, 43, 95, 138, 251 Cosner, Oliver, 114 Caster, Donna, 81, 228 Coster, Norman, 40 Cote, Albert, 157 Cotter, lames, 217 Cotter, Rose Marie, 59, 232 Coverdale, Miles L., 217 Cox, Patrick, 136 Cox, Glen, 40 Cox, Roy, 81, 214, 244 Crennen, Robert, 96, 214, 252 Cresap, Paul 1-1., 40 Crissey, 1-lelen, 59, 183, 212, 226 Crissey, Robert, 40 Crissey, Virginia, 71 Criswell, Donald, 59, 251 Critelli, Nancy, 40, 132, 213 Croghan, Betty, 81, 211 Croskrey, Ruth, 43, 114, 123 Crosser, Don, 81 Crumbaker, Mary lo, 25, 59, 236 Cullen, Donald, 81, 117, 214, 256 Cumming, Wayne, 43, 176, 177, 251 Cummings, Dean, 217 Cummings, Luther, 40 Cummins, Ann Merriam, 40, 236 Cunningham, Fred, 43, 251 Cunningham, Nancy, 81, 228 Cunningham, Shirley, 71, 228 Curry, lanet, 71, 230 Curtis, Doyle, 125, 142 D Daggett, Gail, 81, 213, 236 Dahl, Philip, 246 Dahl, Leonard, 26, 40, 55, 135 Dahl, Vic, 59 Dahlstrom, Iohn, 144 Dahood, Wade loseph, 167, 169 Dalrymple, lune A., 59, 226 Daly, loseph, 214 Darnon, Robert, 59, 117, 142, 216, 217 Dammons, lack, 81 Danielson, Ioyce, 24, 60 Danielson, Patricia, 81, 211, 223 Darling, Richard, 93 Davey, Ann, 40, 236 Davidson, Ernest, 221 Davidson, Gayle, 71, 99, 101, 102 131, 236 Davies, lohn, 81, 214, 256 Davis Davis Davis Davis Dawe, Daws Dean, Dean, Carl, 139 Euel, 40 Evelyn, 81, 211, 228 Iere, 60, 244 Ramona, 60, 116, 212 Archibald Wallace, 175 'Davicl, 22, 71, 110, 130, 254 Douglas, 71, 254 DeBoer, Mark, 40, 123 DeBree, Robert, 40 Debruin, Lester Degenhart, loyce, 40, 232 Delarnette, Monroe, 130 Del..aluz, Antonio, 40 Delaney, Betty Ann, 71, 131, 228 Delaney, Donald, 120, 155, 156 Delano, lim, 60, 244 Deming, Cecil, 167, 168 Demmon, Don, 41, 254 Dempsey, Gloria, 60, 230 Denend, William, 41 Denney, March, 60, 137, 228 Dennison, N. L., 71 Denny, lim, 41 Deranleau, lames, 41, 246, 247 Devney, lohn B., 41, 251 DeVore, Lloyd Kent, 60, 120, 155, 244 Dick, Robert, 41, 221 Dickson, Clair, 41 Diederichs, Mary Margaret, 41 Dietrich, lohn Maurice, 139 Diettert, Eldon, 244 Diettert, Gerald, 71 Dikeos, Victor, 181 Dimmitt, Lester, 81, 221 Dinwoodie, David, 81, 211, 246 Di le, lune Loraine, 41, 212 DiRZ, Henry, 00, 113, 157, 180, 188, Next to the New Fox Theater on West Front Street 252 Disney, Dick, 157 DisRosiu, 136 Dobb, Dockery, Barbara, 224 Dockins, William, 41, 123, Dockstader, Raymond, 81 Doggett, leiferson, 81, 252 Audrey, 81 You'll like . . . Doggett, William, 81, 252 Dolan, Raymond, 60, 136 Domke, 1-loward, 60, 120, 171, 172, 248 Donaldson, Walter Robert, 41 Donally, William, 81 157 GET FROM LEONARD CLAUSEN'S The Newest from the Oldest Leonard Since IBBI Clauserfs Since l928 Refrigerators Ranges Water Heaters EQGTQYQQ nfrnlgfnia Tlgxefgg O lP24kllQ,llNNWAY llDllQll1 llEellllN A Dinner or a Snack Hamburgers and Milkshakes, a Specialty O DOHHQHY, Ieffy, Donohoe, Irene, 71 PILSENER Dontigny, Barbara, 81 BREW Dontigny, Delores, 72 Doran, lames, 181 Dotz, Leona, 41, 134, 222 . , . Doucette, Wilfred Lee, 72 Douglas, Roscoe Frederick, 60 . . . S d Douglas, Fred, 60, 248 Dowen, Nancy, 72, 133, 228 Downing, William, 136 Doylg, Norman, 17, 60, 171, The Home of Drabbs, Russell I., 126 Clothcratt Clothes Curlee Clothes gfeHHeHfEVgi11l1iGg1, 222244 Freeman Oxfords Pendleton Woolens Diiffehcmggriet 284 Day's Cords Faultless Pajamas Driscgul Iohnf 41, 251 Lee l-lats Van l-leusen Shirts Drysdale, Martha, 101 Dudharker, Kalegnwar Tukarum, 221 , Dudiak, lohn, 217 Dudik, Mike, 165 Dudley, leannine, 72, 213 gufrEsnei3Floren7c5, 72, 232 On Circle Square un ar, ron, , ,L Duncgnl Cylydel 72, 115 Carl lf, Dragstedt, 23 Roland Dragstedt, il Dunlap, Grover, 41, 135, 252 D 1 T '20 L 'Sl Dunlap' Leslie' 72' 240 rner 5, rags ed , , George ang, , Durland, Don, 41 Dutton, Iune, 81 Jack Wood, x'l5 BOOKS 6' SUPPLIES SPORTING GOODS GIFTS TOILETRIES CAN DY -TO BACCOS Keyed to the student needs, the Student Book Store provides a place to shop economically and easily. Sound management and efficient operation bring you the most favorable prices. Ill short . . . your best shopping bet is the STUDENT STORE. lt is student owned and operated. Donlt forget to use the Student Store mail-order system which allows you to take advantage of many fine buys even after you graduate. STUDENT BOOK STORE A HUDSON EFFICIENT X RELIABLE GRAEI-IL MOTOR SERVICE Duval, Bob, 71, 117 Dwire, Mark, 36, 41, 129, 248 Dye, Cleveland, 114, 217 Dyer, Gwen, 72, 228 Dyrud, Kenneth M., 214 E Eaheart, lohn, 120, 159, 164, 169 Eastman, Ruth, 60, 238 Ebert, Helen, 81, 213 Echols, Kenneth, 81, 157, 166, 252 Eck, Charles, 217 Eckmann, Wallace, 60 Edwards, lim, 60, 251 Edwards, Thomas, 41, 244 Egan, Maurice, 41, 216, 217 Egge, lack, 72 Egger, Doris, 101 Egger, Sylvia IRamonal, 81, 211, 230 Eid, Norris, 135 Eide, Loraine, 212 Eissinger, Clara, 211 Elbert, Clyde, 60, 217, 256 Elfers, Alice, 41, 213 Elliot, Archie, 157 Elliot, lanice, 210, 211 Elliott, Charice, 211, 228 Elliott, Ray, 214 Ellis, Tom, 132 Ellis, Wilma lean, 211 Ellison, Alfred, 60 Ellison, Stuart, 41, 246 Ely, Harriett, 72, 114, 124, 133, 232 Ernbody, Shirley, 92, 211 Emerson, Ralph A., 72, 214 Endress, Raymond, 221, 254 Enebo, Doris, 72, 238 Engelking, Shirley, 41, 228 Engstrom, George, 60 Enzminger, Delwin, 41, 256 Erickson, Barbara, 25, 72, 236 Erickson, Duane, 136 Estes, loe, 72, 144, 240 Evans, Ann, 72, 236 Evans, Patricia, 183, 211, 230 F Fabert, Melvin, 72 Fader, Robert, 219 Fahey, Marcia, 41, 234 Fahland, Felix E., 214 Fallon, Dale, 221 Fallon, Vance, 114 Fanslow, Clayton, 41 Farias, Viola, 82, 211 Farrington, 1-larry, 41, 250 Farris, Martin, 41, 254 Fauchald, Melvin, 60 Faurot, Iames, 41 Feinblum, Melvin, 60 Fellows, Walter, 136 Felt, Denise, 72, 234 Fenell, Klas K., 72, 251 Fergusen, lanet, 72, 228 Ferguson, Gladys, 72, 228 Ferguson, Merthyl, 124 Fialka, Audrey, 41, 137 Field, Clyde C., 214 Fieldman, Dolf, 114 Fields, lohn, 60, 130, 244 Fields, Nancy, 25, 72, 131, 140, 182, 236 Fillner, Russell K., 72, 217 Fink, Gregory, 60, 136, 252 Firehammer, Robert, 41, 216, 217 Fish, Roger, 42 Fisher, Clay, 157, 214 Fisher, Garry, 60, 248 Fischer, Vince, 60, 244 Fisher, Patricia Burkhart, 71, 230 Fisher, Rita, 82, 212 Fisk, Barbara, 42, 121, 124, 183, 238 Fisser, Herbert, 72, 246 Fitzgerald, Frank, 60, 216, 217 Flamm, Norman, 60, 214 Flattum, Russell, 42, 246 Fleming, lohn, 82, 240 Fleming, Thomas, 42, 251 Fleshman, Donna, 82, 213 Flightmer, Carol, 72, 182, 213, 232 Floyd, Virginia, 60, 234 Fluto, lames, 42 Flynn, Patricia, 60 Folkestad, Charles K., 60, 254 Forbes, Dale, 72 Ford, Henry, 154, 156 Ford, Robert, 82, 252 Forister, Thomas, 42 Fornall, Donald, 82, 157, 166, 256 Forsythe, Barbara, 42 Forsyth, George, 42, 246 Forsyth, lohn, 26 Forsyth, Harold, Ir., 158 Forsyth, Martha, 42 Fosland, lordan, 42 Fosland, Marian, 72, 212 Foss, Harold, 123, 217 Foss, Larry, 42 Foster, Francis, 211 Fox, George, 21, 68, 72, 248 Fox, Charlotte, 60 Fox, Richard, 42 Francis, Charles, 42 Francisco, Tony, 136 Frankenfield, lohn, 252 Franklin, Ierry, 72, 256 Franz, Louise, 25, 72, 131, 230 Fraser, Carol, 60, 121, 183, 234 Fraser, Robert, 110, 178 Frazier, William, 217 Fredericks, Bradley Freeman, David, 21, 23, 56, 60, 130 252 Frette, Margaret, 73 Friede, Robert, 73, 256 Frigaard, Ioyce, 212 Fry, David, 82, 157, 221, 251 Fry, Marybelle, 73, 116, 236 Fuller, Robert, 136 Fullerton, Robert, 82, 218 Fulmor, Phyllis, 82, 211, 232 Fulton, Colleen, 73 Fultz, Calvin, 42, 240 Furlong, Noel, 73, 248 G Gage, Audrey, 82, 211, 238 Gail, Philip, 82 Galen, Al, 25, 60, 130, 135, 251 Gallager, Francis, 73, 130, 135, 156 246 Galland, Robert, 82, 218 Galusha, Phillip, 101 Gardner, Mary Lee, 82, 211, 232 Gardner, Robert, 42 Garrison, Charles, 60, 254 Garrett, Donald, 82, 252 Garmoe, lim, 114, 256 Garmoe, Robert, 60, 256 Garnaas, 1-larold, 139 Garrison, Phyllis, 226 Gartman, Ted, 73 Garwood, Louis, 60, 256 Gaskell, William, 73, 252 Gaskill, Albert, 26, 60, 86, 248 Gaudin, Melvin, 60, 144 Gavin, Shirley, 82, 226 Geary, Edna, 73, 131, 234 Geary, Ioseph, 73, 214 Geil, William, 42, 218 Geis, Anthony, 60, 218 Geithke, Mont, 60 George, Charles, 136 Gerdes, Loren Albert, 42 Gerhardt, Celia, 73, 133, 183, 232 Getter, Tommy, 82, 252 , I 126 0 HZBVLCQ 5 izzesf 61275 Sforw . BILLINGS, MONTANA "" 5 ,J-' 2515? - -I-:fi sf- Qs' if - 5 7 X" 1111! AL., f,.r..1lv ' - H Tl-IE EINEST IN WATCHES Gibson, loan, 82, 110, 230 Gilbertson, George, 130 Gilbertson, Robert, 42, 142, 251 Gillett, Carolyn, 82, 211, 236 Gillette, Marilyn, 82, 211 Gillespie, Robert, 60, 244 Gilmore, Regina, 60, 183, 212, 213 Gin, Ioh nny, 60 Gionet, loseph, 93 Gisley, Eugene, 42 Glenn, Luther, 82, 248 Goehry, Stanley, 60, 218 Gogas, George, 130 Goggin, loseph, 139 Golfi, Elda, 82, 211, 238 Gonzalez, Frank, 42, 110, 248 Goodbar, Stanley, 73 Gopian, Isabel, 73, 92, 212 Gordon, Donna, 42, 222 Gorton, Robert, 120 Gould, Carol, 82, 211, 213 Gould, lanet, 82, 228 Gould, William, 42, 248 Grabow, Diana, 73, 230 Grady, Donna, 82, 211, 232 Graff, Alexander, 60, 244 Graff, Donald, 61, 96, 248 Graham, larnes, 61, 120, 164, 171 248 Graham, Pat, 82, 218 Graham, Richard, 136 Grant, Norman, 61 Gray, Charles, 61, 214, 254 Gray, Fielding, 82 Gray, Ray, 171, 172 Gray, Rita, 82, 211, 228 Greco, Frank, 118, 136 Greenw 212 ood, Barbara, 43, 132, 141 Grenanger, Lyle, 73 Green, lack, 42, 256 Greene, Arthur, 61 Greetan, Betty Lou, 124, 133, 213 Gregory, Horace, 61, 248 Grieb, Richard, 43, 251 Griffith, Dixie, 61, 232 Griffith, lean, 137, 142, 224 Griffith, Grimes, Margaret, 82, 182, 211, 238 W. Bruce, 240 Grindy, lohn, 124 Grindy, Lois, 42 Grosscu rth, Iames, 82 Grove, Suzanne, 42, 232 Grove, Paul, 217 Grubaugh, leanne, 42, 124, 212, 213 Grundstrom, Arlene, 82, 211 Gryczan, Edward, 82 Guiles, David, 43, 248 Guslander, lames, 218 H Haag, Richard, 99 Hagie, Daryl, 43 Haglund, Edward, 82, 157, 221, 244 Hahn, Harry, 61, 256 Hahn, loseph, 82 Haight, Neil, 61, 241 Haight, Robert, 140 Haines, Harriet, 43, 134, 234 Hair, Nancy, 211 Hales, Helen, 43, 226 Halberg, lohn, 43 Hall, George, 252 Hall, Glenn, 73, 180 Hall, larnes, 43, 252 Hall, Lois, 82, 184, 211 Hall, Lura, 238 gfanzilfon Eozzqbze - Qnffnaeur Cgfqin l'Ll6IZ 3620115 Qyykf B. 6' I-I. JEWELRY CCD. , 1 ,, Qspecializeal +1155 . ' CAMPUS PIQINTING g R I. ,,,., QPRINTING oLlTHoGRAPHlNG or 1- ftt' OSTATIONERY El!-ffl!! .OFFICE supplies QQKGWWA Bureau of Printing Poloce l-lotel Building MISSOULA Phone 4079 Halse, Kenneth, 82, 256 Halverson, Esther, 43, 121, 183, 226 Halvorson, Torval, 217 Haman, Raymond, 214 1-lamman, Bonnie, 212 Hammell, Myrtle Lu, 43, 132, 234 Hammer, Gerald, 82, 246 Hammerness, Rolland, 155, 156 Hanger, Harold, 61 Hanlin, Helen, 73, 212 Hannah, Hansen, Hansen, Hansen, Hansen, Hansen, Hanson, Hanson, Hanson, Hanson, Hanson, Hanson, Iane, 82, 211, 238 Aleta, 43 Audrey, 211 Betty, 82, 211 Carl, 82, 214 Richard, 217 Angie, 238 Dwain, 61, 91, 95 Eloise, 83, 211 Grace, 61 lames, 43, 135, 248 Mary, 73, 228 Hanto, Norman, 43, 246 Harasymezuk, lohn, 158 Harden, loyce, 83, 211, 232 Hardie, Barbara, 230 Hardie, Ruby, 61, 230 Hardin, loan, 83 Hares, Frances, 83, 211, 230 Hargreaves, Myra, 83, 222 Hargrove, lames, 136 Harker, Robert, 24, 83 Harlan, Donna, 43, 212 Harper, Albert, 73 Harpole, George, 83, 256 Harrington, Harrington, Dorothy, 73, 228 Harrington, loan, 83, 211, 237 Harrington, Harriet, 83, 92, 234 Harris, Donald, 61, 180, 248 Harris, Doyle, 155, 156 Harris, Mayre Lee, 73, 237 Harris, Warren, 147, 156 Harrison, lames, 61, 252 Harrison, lohn, 180, 252 Hart, lackie, 24, 78, 83, 182, 211, 228 Hartin, Barbara, 24, 25, 61, 237 Hartsell, Paul, 61, 248 Harvey, Harvey, Frank, 218 Harold, 83, 214, 255 Harwood, Robert, 246 Hasquet, Robert, 166 Hauge, Lester, 134, 139 Haugo, Orville, 43, 118, 214 Hawkins, Paul, 22, 43, 94, 129, 251 Hawkins, Robert, 43, 248 Hawley, Vernon, 83 Haydal, Henning, 218 Hayden, Philip, 134 Hayes, Bonita, 83, 211, 232 Hayes, Helen, 83, 226 Haynes, Charles, 142 Haynes, lohn, 61 Hays, loyce, 73, 234 Hebert, Howard, 61, 135 Heclcathorn, lra, 43, 256 Hector, Caroline, 73, 237 Hedin, Merlyn, 83, 218, 246 Hehn, Edward, 43, 135 Heilman, Edward, 61, 142, 254 Heirnes, loseph, 61, 188, 252 Heinen, Margaret, 73, 212 Heinrich, Ruth, 73, 114, 131, 232 Heintz, Howard, 61, 172, 241 Heintz, James, 214 Heisel, Elmer, 43 Heitmeyer, Vera, 73, 110 Helding, lohn, 44, 129, 147, 150, 156, 165, 167, 168, 251 Helding, Robert, 26, 61, 130, 167, 189, 251 Helland, Frank, 23, 73, 130, 246 Helmer, Caryl, 83, 211, 234 Helrning, Bruce, 73, 214, 248 Helton, Paul, 73, 246 Henderson, Mary, 83, 126 Henderson, Richard, 44 Hendrickson, Carl, 254 Hendrickson, Catherine, 83 Donald, 23, 61, 130, 244 IVIONTANAS LEADING ri Boar sromzs T HELENA orrlce SUPPLY co. X2 1 DL 50 North Mm st. I-IELENXR 5 orrncz SUPPLY COMPANY 115-119 VV. Broadway AAISSOULA OPEN 24 HOURS Stan Ganage Torn A,Wtc14es TOWING and WRECKER SERVICE STORAGE - CHEVRON GAS PHONE 4740 149 WEST FRONT Dr. L. R. Barnett Dr. D. R. Barnett O PTOMETR I STS GLASSES FITTED ALL OPTICAL REPAIRS 129 E, Broadway MISSOULAK MONTAIXIA "Your Friendly STUDEBAKER Dealer" NYBO 6- CO. NEW Cr USED Incorporated CARS Phone 2195 For CDi5'tz'n6Zz've fzinese and Q14 merican qoodf FD gofgen 1 easanf your gear? cvcwiefg SPROUSE-REITZ C0. 703 So. Higgins Ave. CANDY, NOTIONS, TOYS, GLASSWARE HARDWARE, STATIONARY, SCHOOL SUPPLIES Tuff Graff greefinq Grzras flu .garqesf Sefecfion in gown FLIGEL AN'S Helena, Montana One of Montana's Finest Stores Hennessy, Catherine, 25, 56, 61, 170, 212, 224, 230 Hennessy, Patricia, 73, 212, 230 Hennessy, Wallace, 44 Henry, lohn, 126 Henry, William, 44, 252 Hensley, lack, 246 Hepner, Ruth, 211 Herbert, Evelyn, 110 Herbig, Harold, 144 Hermes, Harry, 44, 214 Herring, ldabob, 83, 211, 228 Herrington, Roscoe, 73, 251 Hewitt, Iohn, 214 Heyn, Charles, 73 Hickel, Kenneth, 44, 252 Hieber, Severin, 83 Hilgenstuhler, Ted, 61, 167, 168, 214 Hilger, Henry, 61, 256 Hill, Lawrence, 83 Hill, Mary leanne, 83, 211, 238 Hill, William, 157 Hillis, Edward, 44 Hines, Edward, 44, 251 Hjort, Richard, 83 Hoagland, Iohn, 61 Hoffman Burt, 135 Hoffman Evelyn, 83 Hoffman, Iames, 44, 251 Hoffman Raymond, 83 Hoffman Wallace 73 254 Holden, Marilyn, 83, 211, 227 Holderman, Ramona, 44 Holderman, Robert, 83, 136 Holinka, Nicholas, 218 Holland, lames, 83, 181, 214, 246 Holliday, Donald, 83, 218, 256 Holmes, George, 44, 247 Holmstrom, Bob, 177, 254 Holsinger, Harve, 218 Holt, Harold, 61, 139 Holt, Laurence, 73, 251 Holter, Robert, 247 Holton, Robert, 254 Honey, Imogene, 73 Hoover, Florence, 44, 227 Hopkins, Mila, 212 Horn, Norma, 227 Hornung, Gilbert, 83, 218 Hotvedt, lames, 136 Houtz, Ted, 112 Hovland, Richard, 247 Howard, Harold, 83 Howard, Larry, 44, 255 Howe, lanet, 83, 211, 237 Howey, Robert, 83, 221, 255 Howser, Marilyn, 62, 118, 137, 227 Hoyem, George, 62, 255 Hoynes, Duane, 252 Hubley, Earl, 44, 221 Huchala, Gene, 73 Hucke, Ioseph, 44 Hughes, David, 158, 218 Hughes, Michael, 43 Hughes, Patricia, 24, 83, 211, 232 Humiston, William, 73, 256 Hunnes, Fred, 214 Hunter, Herbert, 142 Hunter, Howard, 23, 44, 129, 193, 251 Hunter, Margery, 22, 25, 62, 90, 121, 138, 183, 234 Hunthausen, Anthony, 62, 248 Huntley, Clayton, 166, 218, 248 Hurlbert, Alfred, 62 Hutchings, David, 73 Hyatt, Gilbert, 62, 252 Hyde, Ruth, 83, 211, 232 I Ingersoll, Bruce, 158 Ingersoll, Oliver, 158, 180, 251 Ingersoll, Robert, 83, 221, 241 Ingham, William, 62 Ingman, Bob, 73 Ingram, Malfred, 157 lnnis, Cecil, 44 Irvine, Mary, 83, 92, 232 Irwin, John, 62, l10, 252 lsch, Harry, 44, 135, 256 Ishmael, Marlys, 212 Jackson Jackson Jackson Jackson, Jackson I Alan, 147, 214, 251 Mrs. Bynum, 73 Jane, 83, 211, 230 Marcell, 62, 213 Richard, 83, 252 Jacobson, Arnold, 214 Jacobson, Edith, 44 Jacobson, George, 44, 252 James, Robert, 135 Jameson, William, 83, 221, 244 Jaqueth, Kenneth, 83, 255 Jardine, Charles, 177, 181 Jasperson, Robert, 73, 256 Jeannotte, Alfred, 44 Jelks, Rukin, 62, 251 Jellison, Dean, 25, 62, 110, 130, 256 Jensen, Dale, 83, 157 Jensen, Doris, 44, 232 Jensen, Leila, 133 Jeppesen, Donna, 83, 211 Jesse, Margaret, 23, 25, 73, 92, 112, 131, 140, 237 Jeszenka, Donna, 230 Jewett, Thomas, 83, 221 Jezowski, Alton, 44 Johansson, Karl, 45, 244 Johnke, Martin, 218 Johnson Albert, 73, 241 Johnson Alice Mary, 83, 212, 232 Johnson Arthur, 62 Johnson Bruce, 101 Johnson Charles, 45, 241 Johnson Don, 62, 110, 130, 256 Johnson Harold, 252 Johnson Howard, 83 Johnson Hubert, 251 Johnson James, 45, 50, 221 Johnson Keith, 62, 180 Johnson Laurise, 230 Johnson, Lee, 83 Johnson Louise, 84 Johnson, Mary Jane, 73, 133, 183 184, 230 Johnson, Norma, 62, 230 Johnson, Phyllis, 62, 118, 137, 184, 238 Johnson Robert, 73 Johnson, Robert, 62, 248 Johnson, Roger, 73, 218 Johnson, Roger, 45 Johnson, Royal, 23, 26, 62, 130, 174 181, 244 Johnson, Sid, 62 Joraanstad, Sigvart, 62, 218 Johnson, Stanley, 244 Johnson, Vernon, 84, 249 Johnson, Mary Virginia, 62, 237 Johnston, Wylie, 73, 252 Jones, Hugh, 84, 218, 255 Jones, Jeanne, 68, 73, 131, 184, 231 Jones, Shelton, 45, 256 Jonutis, Joseph, 45, 214 Jordan, Arthur, 244 Jordet, Jean, 25, 62, 224, 237 Jorgensen, Robert, 256 Joscelyn, Alden, 62 Joscelyn, Dean, 84, 92 Jourdonnais, Jon, 147, 155, 156 Joyce, Noreen, 73, 238 Joyce, Thomas, 134 Junek, Rhoda, 62, 210 Jurovich, Gene, 74, 255 Jurovich, George, 218 Justus, Lane, 84, 255 Jutte, James, 218 Jutzi, Eleanor, 134 effe 5 . . . The Home of 7 f LLSLC Sk0 ffm uric Gerzfer RCA Victor and Columbia Records King, Reynolds and Conn Band Instruments Kimball, Wurlitzer and Lester Pianos Magnavox and RCA Radios and Phonographs 310 N. Higgins Missoula, Montana Qrefude fo 6,1058 Oflolnzirifzq gfcuzces .l 9 Amr CAMPUS ggavm fyfe BEAUTY SHOP Phone 5588 Student Un n "EAT BON TON BREAD FOR HEALTHY DAYS AHEAD" ' WI-IOLESOME ' NOURISHING ' APPETIZING our Errors: i ma srgwr Liberty BOWLI G Center .gj:1"O'is Aff of il? ,f-1. ff' 1!4::'f fe! , il 1' A 1517 Sfffgs ""' ,ANM-,,xi ,rig 1 Fl it ,lf ln to A gqililiiliuny DEPARTMENT STORES OF MONTANA and WYOMING om 'mania o Tl-IE MISSCULA LAUNDRY AND DRY CLEANERS QQ' K Kadlec, Larry, 84, 249 Kafentzis, Andy, 154, 156 Kafentizis, Christian, 62, 154, 156, 249 Kaiser, Betty lean, 84, 211, 232 Kaiser, Kenyon, 45, 144 Kalalatic, Andrew, 62 Kalaris, George, 45, 139 Kalaris, Gregory, 45 Kalberg, Raymond, 45, 135 Kalbfleisch, Rae, 84, 110, 252 Kallgren, Eugene, 23, 62, 130, 170, 252 Kampschror, Keith, 74, 247 Kapcsak, Phoebe, 126, 213 Kauhanen, Taimoeli, 217 Kaus, Betty, 82, 211, 228 Kautzmann, Emil, 247 Keig, Beverly lean, 45, 138, 224, 231 Keil, Barbara, 84, 211, 232 Keil, Pat, 45, 138, 212 Keim, Ronald, 154, 156 Kell, Dawn, 74 Keller, Mary, 74 Kelley, Mary, 232 Kelley, Robert, 74, 130, 136, 244 Kelly, Danette, 63, 234 Kelly, Robert, 45 Kelly, Thomas, 63, 252 Kelly, William, 45 Kemler, Robert, 217 Kenney, Sam, 84, 241 Kenyon, Robert, 110 Kern, Charles, 63, 117 Kesler, Alice, 84, 211, 232 Kessler, Donald, 74 Ketcham, Caroline, 213 Kiely, lack, 74, 249 Kiely, Thomas, 45 Kilburg, LeRoy, 136 Kilroy, Leo, 45, 251 Kincaid, Cecile, 45 Kincaid, lohn, 63, 249 Kincaid, Nancy, 24, 45, 183, 237 Kincaid, William, 45 Kind Kind, Kind, King King King Donald, 45 Patricia, 74, 182, 228 Yvonne, 25, 184 Charles, 45 George, 217 lack, 155, 156, 217, 241 Kinqgfofd, Tom, 74, 155, 156, 165. 251 Kinney, Pat, 21, 22, 45, 231 Kirchner, Shirley, 84, 212 Kirkpatrick, Kyrol, 213 Kitchens, lohn, 46, 247 Kitt, Barbara Lou, 46, 224, 232 Kitt, Elizabeth, 84, 182, 232 Kjellgren, Betty, 8-4, 211 Kline, Frank, 46 Knapp, Norman, 63, 114, 117 Knoll, Donald, 136 Knoo, lack, 217 Knoop, lohn, 74, 247 Kobelin, Warren, 172, 181, 244 Kobold, Lenore, 46, 213 Koby, Raymond, 139 Kocer, Frank, 46 Koetod, Laurel, 84, 211, 232 Koenig, Fred, 46, 256 Kolppa, Marian, 63, 231 Koon, Eugene, 84, 247 Kopriva, Guy, 46 Kordos, Alexandria, 84, 211, 227 Korn, Dan, 63, 154, 156, 252 Korn, Norman, 74, 256 Koskinen, Victor, 46, 114 Kosnick, lohn, 74, 252 Kovacich, George, 46, 135 Krall, William, 118, 136, 214, 215 Kramis, Audrey, 46, 237 Kratoiil, loseph, 74, 116, 221 Kraus, George, 74, 130, 140, 214 Krebsbach, Marie, 84, 92, 228 Kreis, Shirley, 46, 134, 212, 213 Kreitel, Veronica, 63, 116, 224, 227 Kreklau, William, 84, 221, 256 Krieger, Elinor, 84 Kronen, Palmer, 46, 136 Kruger, Lawrence, 74 Kruzic, Frank, 63 Kuburich, Steve, 154, 156, 181, 244 Kuchinski, Carolyn, 63, 231 Koffel, Cornelius, 63, 251 Kugler, Iuanita, 84, 211, 232 Kuhne, 1-lelen, 84, 234 Kuhns, Pat, 184 Kumpuris, Mike, 63, 147, 155, 156 Kune, Catherine, 84, 211, 238 Kurtiss, Lorraine, 23, 63, 232 Kurth, Russell, 251 Kurth, Sidney, 46, 139 Kurtz, Bettie, 84, 211, 232 Kuster, Douglas, 84, 251 Kuwahara, Toe, 214 L Laas, Edna, 226 LaBonta, Bob, 252 Lacklen, Ted, 74, 249 Lahr, John, 84, 249 Lake, Robert, 84 Lally, Kay, 26, 46, 228 Lamb, Carl, 46, 252 Lamberg, Edward, 113 Lambros, Helen, 74, 131, 238 Landry, Ann, 46, 193, 199 Lane, David, 46, 129 Lang, George, 74, 244 Langenbach, Robert, 116, 135, 249 Lansing, Katherine, 24, 46, 224, 237 LaPine, Eva, 126, 183 LaRowe, Orville, 216, 217 Larsen, Dirk, 84, 21, 244 Larson, Byron, 136 Larson, Donald, 44, 46, 118 Larson, Floyd, 175 Larson, Robert, 46, 251 Larson, Stanley, 214 Launsbach, Betty, 63 Lavoie, loseph, 84 Law, Mary Fran, 22, 46, 93, 234 Lawson, lack, 25, 63, 214, 252 Lea, David, 46, 51, 134 Leaf, Kenneth, 217 Leaphart, Clark, 147, 155, 156, 251 LeClaire, lack, 157 LeClaire, Laurence, 84, 249 Leeper, Sam, 46, 147, 154, 156 LeFevre, IoAnne, 211, 228 Lemire, Iohn, 46, 91, 180, 251 Lenn, Kaye, 156, 217 Lenn, Marian, 212 Lentz, Karl, 84, 217 Lenz, Lois, 46, 118, 137 LeProwse, Robert, 217 Lerch, Fred, 113 Leslie, William, 217 LeSueur, Elsie, 84 LeSueur, 1-lerbert, 46, 221 Leuschen, Irene, 74, 212 Levine, Terry, 63, 113, 177, 216, 217 Lewis, George, 101, 144 Liangenbach, Bob, 214 Lieding, Calvin, 217 Lien, Bernard, 46 Liggett, Marion, 63, 210, 229 Limberger, Margaret, 63 Lind, Murray, 181, 213 Lindahl, Dean, 84 Lindell, David, 93 Lindberg, Betty, 84 Lindsay, Catherine, 212 Linebarger, Gale, 46, 244 Linse, Eleanor, 47, 132, 213 KRAMIS H RDWARE 1' SPORTING GGGDS , 1' HARDWARE SUPPLIES CHILDIQENS roYs i3Li2cTi2icAL APPLIANCES I-IENNESSY'S GROCERY I-IIELENA'S commsrs room sroee 'Q' AS IDA PEARSCDN SHOPS COATS DRESSES SUITS LINGERIE HOSIERY MILLINERY 133 So. Higgins Phone 2929 Everything Musical Since 1897 RECCRDS, BAND INSTRUMENTS, PIANCS CCMPLETE MUSIC G INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS rvis usic House 125 W. Main St. MISSGULA MONTANA Flne Furnlture For Your Home 9 l09 EAST FRONT ST PHONE 79l6 Quality Carpeting For Your Home The Northwests Smartest L O U N 6 E Missoula, Montana MEN'S SHOP FLORENCE I-ICDTEL BUILDING O EAGLE CLOTHES I ARROW SHIRTS and TIES 0 FREEMAN SHOES O KNOX HATS Linse, Richard, 74, 214, 247 Linton, Gerald, 216, 217 Littell, Billie, 47, 227 Little, Charles, 74, 130, 45 Little, Warren, 84, 113, 180, 252 Lloyd, Katherine, 26, 36, 47, 121, 183, 234 Locken, ldean, 139 Lodders, Richard, 47 Lohse, George, 217 Loiselle, Jacqueline, 84, 232 Long, Gilbert, 180 Longmire, Frederick, 47 Lorenzen, Phyllis, 114 Losleben, Roman, 63, 255 Lovell, Charles, 74, 252 Lovingfoss, Virgil, 126 Lovless, Velma, 237 Lovless, Ianet, 47, 134, 237 Lucas, Don, 166, 217 Lucas, Iames, 20, 22, 23, 110, 129, 139, 167, 169, 180 Lucas, Richard, 74, 255 Luchau, Richard, 257 Luckman, Ioe, 157, 166, 214 Ludwig, lanice, 84, 211, 229 Luebben, Margot, 23, 24, 25, 63, 92, 138, 210, 232 Lueck, Mary, 74 Luedtke, Walter, 74 Luer, Patti, 101, 102, 133, 198 Luetjen, Calvin, 47 Luhman, Fred, 74, 214 Luke, Alvin, 74, 255 Lukens, Anne, 84, 211, 234 Lukens, Russ, 47, 249 Lull, Lynn, 156 Lull, Thomas, 84, 217 Lund, Doris, 23, 25, 63, 90, 224, 234 Lund, Einar, 135, 245 Lust, Ada, 74, 212 Lust, Leonard, 116 Lyden, Iames, 47, 136 Lykins, Louise, 47 Lyman, Iohn, 47 Lythgoe, Kae, 84 Mc McAllister, Marian, 47, 238 McArd1e, Iames, 47 McArthur, Marvin, 74, 130, 245 McCall, William, 181 McCann, Phyllis, 47 McCarten, Grace, 63 McCarthy, Duncan, 47, 257 McChesney, William, 74, 251 McCourt, lack, 167, 169 McCoy, Albert, 156, 221 McCracken, Dick, 84, 174, 245 McCrea, Iohn, 63, 144, 251 McCrea, Mary, Carol, 25, 75, 170, 234 McCue, Robert, 217 McCurdy, Edward, 84 McDermed, Donald, 217 McDonald, Charles, 47 McDonald, David, 47, 247 McDonald, Patricia, 84 McDonald, Peggy, 63, 182, 183, 184, 231 McDonnell, Ianet, 63, 237 McDonnell, William, 84, 255 McDougal, lohn, 117 McE1Wain, Iarnes, 63, 130, 257 McG1oth1in, William, 75, 257 McG1ynn, Lynn, 63, 217 McGrea1, Lalia, 47, 232 McGregor, Nathalie, 84, 238 Mclnroe, Iames, 63, 251 McKinsey, Robert, 47 McKown, Shirley, 25, 75, 131, 184, 229 McLatchy, Larry, 171, 172, 249 McLatchy, Patrick, 75, 249 McLaughlin, lack, 47, 180, 252 ,ii my D gbze QDorfraz'fure . . . by TOAI'I'll Caffbz ff ,ff W! ff... flllff 6ffA-ff! . . 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V FAVINN AA f , 289 The New Grill Cafe FUCHS HIM North Broadway BILLINGS Mmcllonrl Empires Store ot Foshlon CITIZENS STATE BA K Hamilton, Montana Your Friendly l-lome Gwned Bank Member FDIC iffy' licttvr llrgt' 61011111.1111 I0 ID S Cl Florence Laundry Co. om: 2151- Mnssoum VISIT Tl-IE Coney lsland Cate BILLI NGS owning ewe ry 107 South Second HAMILTON McLeod, lune, 85, 222 McMahon, Iames, 252 McNabb, Richard, 47, 249 McNair, Diana, 47, 237 McRae, Kenneth, 135 McRand1e, lames, 63, 141 McShane, Shirley, 47, 234 McVeda, lanet, 47 McVey, 1-larold, 63, 251 M MacDonald, Helen, 47 MacKay, lohn, 217 MacKenzie, Leah, 84, 210, 235 Maclay, Bruce, 75, 130, 252 MacLeod, Maclseod, Scotty, 26, 36 lohn, 129 MacPherson, Douglas, 85, 257 Magee, Philip, 47, 214, 215, 257 Magelsson, William, 247 Mahlum, Ronald, 85 Maillet, Louis, 217 Maitin, loseph, 47, 247 Maki, George, 85, 157, 255 Maki, lohn, 157 Malcolm, Roy, 147, 155 Malinak, Mary lo, 212 Mallett, leanne, 88, 211, 238 Malone, lack, 149, 154, 156, 245 Manlove, Manthey, lohn, 48 Barbara, 75 Manuel, Albert, 217 Manuel, 1-larry, 85, 157, 257 Marble, Betty, 85, 92 Markle, Robert, 48 Marinkovich, Dan, 48, 165, 181, 216, 217, 245 Marks, Douglas, 221 Marks, Marilyn, 211 Markle, Tag, 245 Marleau, lohn, 178 Marrs, lean, 85, 232 Marshall, Don, 134 Martin, Dick, 255 Martin, Dorothy, 85, 211, 226 Martin, Elda lean, 36, 48, 237 Martinez, loe, 48, 117 Marty, loan, 85, 211 Mastorovich, Zorka, '48, 132, 212 Mateychuk, loseph, 217 Mathan, lohn, 47 Matheson, Matheny, Donna, 85, 211, 227 Raymond, 75 Mathews, Miller, 63, 135, 214 Mathison, Eleanor, 85 Mathison, Sam, 48, 252 Mathison, Robert, 48, 252 Matosich, Steve, 48 Mattson, Eunice, 64, 131 Mattson, 1-lelen, 85 Matson, Diana, 75, 133, 232 Maurer, lames, 217 Mavity, Gary, 217 Maxwell, Winnifred, 75 May, William, 85 Mayes, lames, 171, 172 Mayfield, Betty, 85, 211 Maynard, ludson, 144 Mead, Warren, 135 Meehan, Gloria, 64, 134 Melaney, lohn, 48, 257 Melton, William, 221 Mendro, loseph, 157 Menzie, Shirley, 75 Mercer, Vfally, 48, 249 Merkle, lack, 48 Merley, Tune, 85 Merley, Richard, 48 Merrill, Helen, 75, 134, 212, 229 Mersph, Frank, 214 Messelt, Virginia, 64, 183, 229 Middleton, Tornrne Lou, 75, 237 Midthun, Elmer, 126 Midtlying, loanna, 75, 121, 183, 232 flfiew flze Smarfesf Sfyfes mf I 39 W. Pork St, BUTTF 43,5 63166 GUARANTEED STEAKS Qrwe in at me fgmdfem o, gxc ence Roseth Brothers Distributors GREAT FALLS The Frontier Drive-In Restaurant glue Cnleafa Jautfrern gried ghicgen, The Place of Good Eats 113 W. Main St. l Miglin, Harold, 85 Milburn, Roxie, 75 - - Miikwick, Normamu, 75, 133, 184, 238 , Miller, Dale, 64, 247 .-':"1'-'.'- Miller, Duane, 247 A + Miller, Elizabeth, 24, 43, 224, 229 :3 L.g ,??1 Miller, lohn, 64 Q Miller, Laura Lee, 64, 224, 227 Miller, Pat, 48, 141 Miller, Walter, 75, 257 Miller, Warren, 64, 247 Miller Wilbert, 64, 214 Minifie, Darrel, 48, 110, 257 Mitchell, Bert, 136 Mitchell, lohn, 221 Mitchell, Leon, 48, 247 Mitchell, Wilmer, 167, 169, 251 Moe, Artha Lee, 233 Moe, Orris, 48 Moe, Peder, 75, 130, 249 Moen, Wilbur, 48, 217 Moline, LeRoy, 85, 217 Mollander, Dennis, 48, 257 Mollerstuen, Stan, 217 Molthen, Fred, 249 Monahan, Tom, 156 Mondt, Grace, 85, 211, 237 Moody, Fred, 48, 252 Moore Moore , Anne, 85, 235 Colleen 85 211, 238 Moore, lohn, 48, 101 Moore, lohn P., 48, 245 Moore, Palsy, 85, 211 Moore, William, 49, 251 Moran, Donna, 85, 92, 211, 235 Moran, Robert, 64 Morey Morga Morga , William, 64, 113, 154 n, Harold, 85, 221, 252 n, Leonard, 85 Morris, Myrl, 64, 222 Morris 233 on, Louise, 21, 23, 49, 95, 138, Morrison, Robert, 139 Mortson, William, 141 Mosdal, Agnes, 85, 92, 213 Motchenback, Frank, 75, 217 Mott, George, 132, 144 Moyer, Shirley, 233 Mudd, Mudd, Lex, 56, 64, 224, 233 Rose Ellen, 85, 233 Mueller, Alfred, 22 Mueller, lames, 20, 21, 22, 38, 43. 129, 142, 241 Mueller, loanne, 85, 212 Mulcihy, Winnie, 85 Mundy, Grant, 144, 241 Muneta, Amy, 133 Munn, Roger, 221 Murtitt, Walter, 85, 214, 249 Murfitt, Zane, 249 Murphy, Calvin, 49, 116, 135, 214, 215 Murph y, Charles, 156 Murphy, larnes, 130 Murphy, lames, 64, 158, 180, 255 Murphy, Ierry, 217 Murphy, loe, 64, 247 Murray, Betty lean, 114, 212 Murray, Kathy, 212 Murray, Virginia, 227 Murray, Robert, 85, 221 Myers, W., 221 Myre, Hilda, 49, 231 N Naglich, Mil-ce, 136 Naugle, Carlton, 49 Naumann, Virgil, 64, 134, 217 Navra Naye, til, Theodore, 64 William, 155 Nedds, Eldon, 64 Needham, Don, 75, 251 Neils, Marilyn, 23, 64, 102, 143, 235 at the PALLASD SHOP OUT 17657 'WZ5l765 to f 6 CLASS of 1949 IQ gg KKVBYXT RRR gl ll In GREAT FALLS Request For your pleasure Nesblts California Orange Cllcquot Club Products u wczser rlfz Wacky J40u1zfazn .7 css er fa Zgewera e o MISSOULA MONTANA TelePh0'1e 4356 0 O O O ,A ., -43 '..f.-fiiifffl , ' ' exif if-425'-Ggiift-ZifRfP2'f',-9' ' 1 Lfiv-Zz-221-'Ze'.ii-io'-f, . , 4f:1:f" 1 .,., .-2a.i-1a:1'g:23:3zi-Z-gi-211LL-Esii-i-f :iG'?33-Zi-if X 'Y "" 0 F " 4-ff ' 32. f.:, g:,:.-5 - - - --'-- -1- - rt - -'.4,1..4,-.::,I::,g,:- ' Qw jvyrf' y,. - . . . IB J ' 319 o L . I Complete Your Evening With a DELICIOUS SNACK f ro m t h e ,jc tssfir N s t M I SSOU LA 753555: 75 T 'qfllsig--1-ss'.,- -Legs MONTA NA YNS 'rx CURB SERVICE 'S X W X Q3 5 s N"fm1-'-sfessss -:cf--eL-,.,,ge -.gfsrtji FIRST NATIONAL BANK MISSOULA lfstiiilimlislucrl 1:1734 OFFICERS and DIRECTORS THEODORE JACOBS, President R. H. DICK, Cashier RANDOLPH JACOBS, Vice President R- E- NOEL, Assistant Cashier sr Trust Officer J. L. KELLOGG, Auditor S. J. COFFEE MABEL JACOBS RUSSELL E. SMITH MONTANA'S OLDEST BANK Member of Federal Deposit Insurance Corporoiton . meet me at 7 9 . food at its best HAMMOND ARCADE Neiman, Charles, 85, 166, 217, Nelson, Beverly, 75, 212 Nelson, Corrine, 85, 211 Nelson, Dorothy, 64, 231 Nelson, Falle, 85, 241 Nelson, Fred, 85 Nelson, Gary, 49, 252 Nelson, Helen, 75, 137, 212 Nelson, loAnn, 85 Nelson, Keith, 85, 245 Nelson, Melvin, 135 Nelson, Russell, 49, 241 Nelstead, Keith, 64, 245 Nesbit, Annabelle, 49, 126, 182 Nesbit, Charles, 181 Nett, Russell, 85, 255 Nettle, Don, 85, 157, 257 Neve, William, 113, 221, 257 Newby, Fletcher, 49, 142 Newell, lack, 49, 135 Newhouse, Rodney, 85, 221 Newman, Herbert, 49 Newman, Robert, 85, 247 Newman, William, 114 Newport, Nanette, 85, 211, 235 Newstrom, Georqe, 257 Newton, Minnie, 64 Newton, lames, 75, 170, 251 Nicholson, Robert, 85 Nicol, Robert, 64, 167, 188, 245 Niva, Weldon, 85 Noland, William, 64 Noll, Robert, 85 Nordstrom, Don, 49 Nordwiclc, Bennie, 249 Nore, Barbara, 75, 237 Noren, Albert, 86 North, Levonne, 75, 131, 235 Norton, lohn, 118, 136 Nunan, Barbara, 86, 211, 229 Nyaard, Edward, 49, 221 O Oase, Betty lo, 49 Oberweiser, Iohn, 181 O'Brien, Dale, 86 O'Brien, Edmund, 49, 251 O'Brien, lohn, 64 O'Connor, Carroll, 96, 102 Odden, Beverly, 75, 212 O'Donnell, Daniel, 181 O'Donnell, Edward, 214 O'Donnell, Maile, 64 O'Donnell, Neil, 49, 135 O'Donnell, Bob, 64 O'Donnell, Thomas, 181 Oechsli, George, 75, 214 Oelkers, Floyd, 247 Ogle, Clayton, 49, 142, 247 O'1-lern, Iohn, 178 Olcerman, Gordon, 49, 245 Oksendahl, Wilma, 99 Olney, Rosemary, 64, 231 O'Louqhlin, lack, 64, 147, 150, 154 156, 167, 252 Olson, Arthur, 217 Olson, Audrey, 78, 86, 211, 233 Olson, Olson, Onlie, O'Neil O'Neil, O'Neil, O'Neil, O'Neil, Charles, 86, 255 Donald, 49 lames, 247 Ivan, 64, 257 Kathryn, 86, 182, 235 Richard, 49 Robert, 64, 90, 93, 180, 252 William, 75, 92, 221 Onimura, Lillian, 49 Opitz, Iames, 64 Orvis, Walt, 112, 138 Osborn, lane, 75 Osborne, lohn, 49 O'Shea, Michael, 25, 75, 183, 237 Ostlund, Edward, 217 Ott, Vernon, 75, 130, 136, 252 Ovesen, lean, 86, 211 lnnmlnmwg if If hp' df 1 MGHO Tender , . '-f-1 THFRESQI Z, nv voun rurun: Montana Pay RQII Products hw: O JOHN R. DAILY, Inc. H- 0- BELL CO- MISSQULA YOUR FORD DEALER SINCE 1915 LUMBER DEPARTMENT ANACCNDA CGPPER MINING COMPANY I BON NER, MGNTANA The House of Famous Brands KUPPENHEIMER and EAGLE CLOTHES f-meow 0 oosrss SHIRTS MEN'S sr-lop HATS Sl Honra MAIN sr. Butte .M ,Lf-s --- Montana Owens, Delbert, 86 Owens, Frank, 49 Owens, Patricia, 64, 229 Oxley, David, 86, 214, 247 Ozanne, William, 86, 245 P Pagachar, Prank, 86 Page, Ralph, 64 Palm, Phil, 64, 247 Palmer, Loren, 22, 50, 248 Pappas, Mitcho, 50 Park, Arthur, 86, 214 Parke, Robert, 50, 142, 251 Parker, Charles, 50, 248 Parker, Bill, 75, 245 Parker, Maude, 50, 116, 134, 213 Parmeter, Deanne, 50, 121, 182 Parmeter, Betty, 64, 121, 182, 183 Parsons, Clifford, 64 Pase, Charles, 64, 217, 142 RAWLINGS SPORTING GOODS A. . I-IOLTER in juffe slap af Helena, Montana Patch, Gene, 86, 157, 217, 245 Patten, Donald, 75, 125, 217 Patterson, Edward, 50, 102, 140 Patterson, William, 75, 245 Pattie, Bill, 157, 214 Pattison, Patricia, 86, 211, 229 Patton, Glenn, 75, 144 Patton, Robert, 50 Paul, Nona, 86, 211 Paulsen, Bud, 50, 248 Paulsen, Clarence, 136 Paulson, Forest, 22, 75, 257 Paulson, Lloyd, 75, 257 Pavelich, loseph, 42, 50 Payne, Patricia, 134, 170, 229 Payne, Thomas, 75, 110, 252 Payton, Donald, 214, 257 Payton, Kenneth, 217, 257 Peacock, Clyde, 50 Peacock, lames, 50 Pecarich, lohn, 86, 102, 245 Peck, Gale, 86, 255 Peckenpaugh, Kiel, 221 Pederson, Alfred, 138 Pederson, Marie, 222 Petter, Elwyn, 138 Peirce, 1-l. W., 50, 124 Peirce, Lucile, 75, 134 Penner, 1-lerbert, 75 Pennington, Richard, 217 Perkins, Clara Belle, 86, 211 Perkins, David, 93 Perry, Iacgueline, 78, 86, 235 Perry, Marjorie, 75, 239 Perry, Robert, 50 Persons, Donna, 86, 210, 211, 235 Petelin, lack, 136 Petersen, Emil, 136 Peterson, Blanche, 213 Peterson Dale, 65 Peterson Darrel, 247 Peterson, Donald, 65, 253 Peterson, Doris, 86, 182, 237 Peterson, Elmer, 75, 221 Peterson, Iohn Alvin, 50, 134 Peterson, Mary lo, 86, 92, 233 Peterson, Roger, 65 Peterson, Robert Duane, 221 Peterson, Ruth, 53, 118, 137, 142 Petesch, Shirley, 86, 213, 231 111111111116 1Cl11,lUl1B or your avorife mixed refreslzmeizfs Pettinato, Filbert, 216, 217 Pettinato, Frank, 53, 136 Petty, Robert, 248 Pew, George, 50 Pietfer, Roman D., 171, 172 Ptlueger, Paul, 134 Phillips, Anita, 65, 93, 213 Phillips, Aaron, 50, 251 Philips, Donald, 75, 134, 251 Phillips, Stanley, 50, 221 Pickard, Colleen, 86, 211 Pierce, Bonnita, 75, 212, 231 Pilati, Paul, 75, 214 Pinner, Herbert V., 214 Pipinich, Harold, 136 Plumley, Vern, 65, 251 Pogacher, Frank, 118 Pomeroy, Peter, 253 Ponath, Marilyn, 86, 211, 229 Ponke, Raymond, 218 Poole, Rosemary, 142 Popham, lean, 65, 239 Popovich, Ruby, 65, 184, 214, 239 Popovac, Stephen, 86 Porter Porter Porter Posey, Potter, Allan, 75 , 1-lammitt, 50 , Scott, 75, 252 Frederick, 51 lean, 86, 211, 227 Powell, Mary Lee, 86, 182, 235 Powers, Francis, 86, 241 Preuninger, William, 65, 120, 147, 150, 154, 156, 252 Price, Ernest, 75, 257 Price, Guy, 144 Prothero, lohn, 51 Pugh, Clyde, 51, 251 Purcell, Iames, 76, 214 Q Quesenberry, Iames, 76 R Radakovich, Daniel, 120, 147, 155, 156, 175 Rademacher, Ray, 86, 251 Rademaker, Tom, 76, 251, 170 Radigan, layne, 86, 92, 210, 211, 235 Ratt, Iames, 130 Rain, Richard, 86, 157 Ragsdale, lames, 51 Rainey, Patricia, 65, 114, 125, 142, 212 Rapp, Margaret, 65 Rapp, William, 51, 112, 247 Rasche, Beverly, 65 Rasmussen, Gretchen, 24, 65, 210. 233 Rassmussen, Lawerence, 65, 86 Rathbone, Kenneth, 65, 247 Rathman, Frank, 157 Rebal, Donald, 51 Redpath, Mary Eleanor, 51, 237 Reed, Dallas, 76, 130, 214 Reed, R. Richard, 86, 252 Rees, Ralph, 26, 51, 253 Reeves, Patricia, 211 Regan, Agnes, 93 Regan, William Dickerson, 120, 245 Regis, Bernice, 51, 134, 212 Reid, lim, 86, 247 Remington, George, 65, 95, 138, 248 Remler, Robert, 76 Rempel, Evan, 116, 221 Renshaw, lean, 86, 211 Replogle, loyce, 86, 211, 239 Replogle, Bert, 65, 156, 251 Reuterwall, Tore, 51, 241 Reynolds, Donald, 76 Reynolds, William, 86, 154, 156, 251 Rhoades, Sylvia, 65, 183, 237 Rhodes, William, 65, 125 Rice, Charles, 124 Rich, Beverly, 86, 211, 237 Richardson, Ianet, 76 Richmond, Patricia, 76, 213 Rieger, Erna, 134 Riggs, Louetta, 76, 229 Riley, Marvin, 135, 247 Rine, Virginia, 51 Ring, Donna, 76, 112, 131, 229 Ring, Henry, 214 Ring, W. 1-1., 116 Ripke, Ralph, 76, 165 Risch, Virginia, 126, 140 Risken, Blanche, 51, 134, 231 Ritchey, Donald, 65, 116 Z .QRS A -ff I X init-lmeq lx DROP IIXI AT AI.-IED EASHIOIXIS ANID VIEW THE MAIXY HUNDREDS OE BEAUTIFUL DRESSES QQ Priced Low to Please the Middle Millions , I ,,it 4,4 i it 9 N5 'I' Et f i ? Q'f "Wf5'f RXE7 XT iF Rr XM lL7lllQ,AlNllB SllllllAVllEllE Sll1lDllEllE Burris, MONTANA Passes Bargains lnto the Student'soPocketbook LINCOLN and MERCURY AUTCMOBILES Iixclusive IJea1er ww PRICE MOTOR COMPA Y BUTTE,MONTANA Washing Greasing - Repairs - Gas WE BUY and SELL USED CARS Montana Teachers cunfemufed ofefaorfu nifflea throughout lim C1 eai, afaaka, and -Wawad ENROLL NOW . . FREE LIFE MEMBERSHIP I-IUFF TEACHER AGENCY 2120 GRAND AVENUE MISSOULA, MONTANA 34 YEARS SUPERIOR PLACEMENT SERVICE Member N.A-T-A- Ritenour, Katherine, 51, 126 Rizzonelli, Don, 65, Robb, Byron, 157 Robb, Evelyn, 114, 116, 214, 215, 255 213 Robb, Norman, 65, 253 Robbin, lames, 65, 245 Roberts, Don, 65, 253 Roberts, Gene, 65 Roberts, Pierre, 167, 168 Roberts, Torn, 65, 140 Robertson, lanet, 24, 65, 235 Robertson, lessie, 65 Robertson, Merton, 76 Robinson, Dale, 76, 117 Robinson, Lee, 76 Robinson, William, 51,177 Rocheleau, Louis, 120, 159, 164, 171, 172 Rogan, Edward, 51, 221 Rohan, Frank, 65 Rolfson, Robert, 65, 251 Roney, Claud, 251 Ronning, lames, 76 Root, lames, 114 Rosa, Frank, 217 Ross, Bruce, 86, 214 Ross, Turner, 65, 180, 253 Rostad, Barbara, 227 Rostad, Orville, 76, 113, 130, 248 Roth, loel, 76 Rothweiler, Robert, Rothwell, lohn, 157 86, 157, 247 Rounce, Barbara, 51, 128, 237 Rowton, Lucy, 51 Roy, Mildred, 76, 213, 239 Rude, lames, 174 Rumsey, Walter, 124 Rupp, lo Ann, 51, 229 Ruppel, Robert, 144 Ruslcdashel, Vergil, 218 Rustuen, Rita, 76, 92, 212 Rutledge, Lester, 76, 126 Ryan, Kenneth, 139 Ryder, Arthur, 65, 257 Ryder, Spencer, 51 Rygg, Paul, 116, 1 34,217 S Sales, Walter, 51, 251 Salter, Charlene, 76 Samuelson, Gordon, 65, 218, 248 Sanderson, lo Ann, 76, 235 Sandknap, Clayton, 86, 221 Sandon, Donna, 212 Sandvig, Earl, 76 Santoire, Armand, Sarstield, George, 175 Sassano, Michael, 51 23, 129, 135, 139, 65, 248 Savaresy, Carol, 51, 128, 233 Sawhill, Charles, 158 Sawhill, Robert, 158 Saylor, Ken, 76, 178, 251 Schara, lohn, 51 Scheeler, Robert, 251 Schelling, Alaine, 76, 239 Schenck, Mary Hunter, 66, 213 Schilling, Frederick, 134 Schlappy, Keith, 86, 126 Schliernan, Harvey, 86, 253 Schmidt, Anita, 76, 239 Schmitz, Walter, 66, 247 Schnebly, Louis, 167 Schofield, Dan, 66 Schoiield, Donald, 52, 144 Schomrner, Earl, 52, 135 Schroeder, Fred, 218 Schuch, Marilyn, 86, 233, 213 Schutt, Ellsworth, 86, 255 Schultz, Don, 257 Schultz, Patricia, 76, 231 Schulz, lames, 214 Schulz, Robert, 65, 218 Schuman, Theodore, 76, 248 "The Store of Personal Service" W WM THE IOGGERY 'IWIW ' ' MEN'S and BOYS' CLOTHING and FURNISHINGS i St. B SALES and SERVICE MISSCULA MCDTORS Inc. -...Z E.. WHILE IN BUTTE ENJOY YOURSELF at the Hotel Finlen If 69 gait?- gaffaw fire Haifa IQ PET E'S FUR AND FASHION SHOP Women's Apparel I25 E. Main Phone 28I Our Sfzffes gzrfcasf ffm QEISIZIIOIZH ccjhe sgiglf EUNICE IVI. BROWN No. 5 Hammond Arcade MISSOULA, MONT. THE TIIWN TALK CAFE MISSOULA, MONTANA coME in Amo GET AQQUAINTED Headquarters for Collegiate Clothing RELIABLE SERVICE 11711 lt S ID lttl IMAX IICIIDZAWL Si 41311 It SPUR GASOLINE Lou Bob Ellinghouse Laing lf'D'MA'f8M1Z, 48 WEST PARK ST. mart eminine apparel BUTTE Schutt ler, l-larlan, 136 Schwab, lohn, 251 Schwend, l-larold, 52 Schwenneker, Paul, 52 Schwinden, Theodore, 141 Scott, Arnie, 120, 171 Scott, Frank, 86, 157, 248 Scott, William, 249 Scott, George G., 87, 157, 166 Scott, George, 87, 245 Scott, George, 76, 165, 248 Scott, loseph, 116 Scotten, George, 87 Seel, Donna, 212 Seibert, Grace, 76, 114, 213, 239 Seier, lames, 66, 251 Sell, Sally, 66, 229 Selisk, William, 245 Selstad, Tom, 52, 120, 154, 156, 158, 164, 181, 245 Selvig, Vern, 66, 130, 135, 252 Semansky, Frank, 55, 156 Servoss, Frank, 66, 251 Sessler, Katherine, 87 Sethre, William, 52, 257 Severtson, Harry, 217 Sexton, Clara, 87, 211 Shallenberger, Katherine, 21, 22, 36, 52, 224, 235 Shandori, lerry, 157 Shank, Henry, 52 Shardlow, Thomas, 52 Shaw, loanne, 87, 92, 199, 233 Sheets, Lowell, 52, 116, 135 Shettield, loan, 52, 229 Shelton, Ed, 249 Shephard, Kathryn Reguiam, 128 Shepard, George, 66, 110, 167, 251 Sherburne, Betsey, 87, 211, 239 Sherlock, Henry, 52 Sherwin, Tom, 116, 214 Shipley, Roy, 218, 247 Shirley, Ray, 76 Shook, 1-larry, 136 Short, Don, 23, 52, 135, 245 Shorthill, Patricia, 24, 25, 66, 233 Shuder, Cornelia, 52, 224, 231 Siebentorcher, Richard, 214 Siebert, Frederick, 76, 214 Sieminski, loe, 66, 142, 214 Sigg, lake, 66, 218, 257 Sigurnik, Katherine, 118, 137 Silvernale, Ardis, 52 Silvernale, Craig, 52 Silvernale, Lawerence, 87, 245 Silvernale, Roger, 257 Silvey, Bruce, 66, 113 Simkins, Robert, 77, 218 Simmons, Viola, 125 Simmons, Barbara, 87, 184, 211, 231 Simmons, William, 77 Simons, Frances, 66, 237 Simonson, Earl, 87 Simpson, Charles, 52, 120, 158, 241 Sims, Ward, 96, 138 Sinclair, Clarence, 218 Singer, Robert, 87, 144 Sinnott, Marjorie, 77, 233 Sitterly, Wayne, 87, 247 Siogren, Carl, 66, 218 Skabronski, Lorraine, 87, 126 Skeie, Ellsworth, 52, 180, 253 Skemp, Kenneth, 52 Sklower, Max, 144 Slingsby, lames, 77 Slocum, Rosalie, 213 Slowey, Rita, 211 Smallwood, Kenneth, 52, 114 Smart Smart Smith , Billie lean, 87, 233 , lim, 157 B. 1., 120, 155, 156 Smith, Beverly, 77 Smith, Chadwick, 23, 52, 251 Smith f Cleona, 87, 211, 233 WALFORD ELECTRIC COMPANY 58 ears 0 Gonfinuous Cflfecfrical Service MISSOULA - MONT. CITY CLEANERS 610 S. Higgins Z4-HOUR SERVICE ON REQUEST Finest Foods at GREEN 'S CAFE Butte, Montana HE VLI TIN SHOP MISSOULA, MONT. qlorence giotel Q3l1ar1fn.acy Prescription Specialists Missoula, Montana Smith, Cletus, 157, 166, 214 Smith, Duane, 88, 116, 255 Smith, Edward Ralph, 52, 135 Smith, Elaine, 54, 128, 239 Smith, E1 Smith, Ioan, 66, 95, 121, 138, 184 nore, 66 Smith, Iohn, 87, 157, 221, 248 Smith, Iohn, 87, 257, 241 Smith, Iune, 87, 116, 211 Smith, Kelser, 214 Smith, Robert, 87, 247 Smith, William, 66, 181, 245 Smurr, William, 96 ,231 Snow, Iames, 77, 245 Snyder, Dan, 25 Snyder, Charles Edwin, 218 Sollid, Roberta, 141 Solvie, Pat, 21 Spangeld, Waldo, 52 Spartz, George, 66, 255 Spanser, lack, 87, 257 Spencer, Roderick, 87, 247 Spencer, Sherman, 52, 144, 241 Spielman, Iohn, 77, 110, 257 Spraycar, 1-larry, 66, 252 Squires, Calvin, 87, 221, 255 Squires, Gene, 87, 166, 255 Squires, Marshall, 221 Stafford, George Howard, 52 Stagg, Donald, 218 Stahl, Stanley, 87, 247 Staley, Beverly, 87, 211 Staley, Martha, 52, 134, 229 Stamp, Doris, 77, 131, 235 Stanaway, Don, 78, 87, 221, 245 Standiford, Alvan, 66, 253 Stanley, Pat, 87, 211, 231 Stanton, Harold, 66, 247 Staudacher, Elaine, 87, 211, 239 Staudacher, Mary, 87, 211 Steel, Frank, 174 Stenehjem, Arvin, 52, 135 Stejer, Wallis, 87, 245 Sterling, Stermitz, Stermitz, Sandy, 52, 237 Mary, 87, 210, 211, 235 Robert, 66, 142, 245 Sternhagen, Mare, 52 Stevens, Alfred, 66, 251 Stevens, Elmer, 53, 135 Stevens, Iohn, 53, 140, 255 Stevens, Stanford, 53, 249 Stevenson, Iohn, 66 Stewart, Charles, 77 Stewart, Gordon, 77, 120, 155, 156 180, 251 Stewart, Iamie, 87, 237 Stith, Bart, 87, 218, 253 Stockhoff, Walter, 166 Stockton, Arthur, 218 Story, Iane, 212 Strand, Louis, 77, 247 Strand, Ommund, 53, 218 Stratton, Homer, 53 Stritch, lrene, 87, 93, 102, 125, 182 235 Stroeder, Kaye, 116, 213 Stroup, Helene, 77, 124 Strope, Philip, 66, 249 Stuart, Mary, 87 Suchy, Iohn, 77 Sullivan, Brendan, 218 Sullivan, Edward, 181 Sullivan, Mark, 66, 249 Summers, Betty Lee, 87, 211 Sutliff, Bernard, 87, 257 Svennungsen, Amos, 53 Svingen, Svoboda, Svoboda, Swanson Ellsworth Leonard, 66 Ioan, 212 Robert, 66, 101, 110, 248 , Deon, 77, 251 Swanson, Donald, 247 Swanson, Glenn, 218 Swanson, Gloria, 87, 199, 233 Swanson . Robert, 66 ompfimenta a, wlend. .. A SMALL AMOUNT OPENS A SAFE AND PROFITABLE SAVINGS ACCOUNT LIBERAL DIVIDENDS REGULARLY I MISSOLILA BUILDING 31 LOAN ASSN 114 E. Main St. Phone 6944 COMPLIIVIENTS OF GOLDEN GLO CREAMERY FINEST DAIRY PRODUCTS Phone 4153 223 N Pattee rc sM,IsIx1XI I 5 KOIQQXIQ FIN1SH I NG CAMERA SU1i'1:'1.'IES B O OIR S GREETING CARDS PICTURES and FRAMES G1FT NGVEIIITTES 771: MISSOULA, MONT. Swee, Iohn, 140, 219 Sweeney, Catherine, 77, 114, 212 Sweeney, Mary, 77, 212 Swing1ey, Boyd, 77, 144, 216, 217 251 Switzer, Don, 218 Sykes, Robb, 110, 257 SyI1inq, Hans, 52, 218, 247 Sy11inq, Nei1, 67, 218 Syivester, Vernon, 142 T Tabaracci, Ted, 120, 167, 168 Ta1ent, Golda, 66 Tanqan, Raymond, 87 Tanner, Phy1Iis, 211 Tay1or, E1sie, 77, 116, 133, 233 Taylor, Betty, 184, 213 Taylor, Erma Lee, 125 Taylor, Ieanne, 25, 53, 235 Taylor, Iohn, 53, 135 BUTTE BEER'S BEST QZQ5' Taytor, Robert, 218 Teel, EIeanor, 77 Terry, David, 218 Tester, Wiliiam, 136 Thielen, Pearl, 87 Thom, Loraine, 87, 211, 233 Thomas, iane, 87, 235 Thomas, Iean, 87 Thomas, Iosephine, 77, 126 Thompson, Burton, 120, 165, 249 Thompson, Char1otte, 53, 132, 133 231 Thompson, Druci11a, 77, 212 Thompson, Edna Marie, 77, 170, 233 Thompson, Lorna, 77, 229 Thompson, Maurice, 53 Thompson, Thomas, 67, 110, 255 Thon, William, 116, 218 Thoreson, G1en, 77 Thornte1dt, Pau1, 53 Thorsrud, Edgar, 53, 174, 249 Thorsrud, Gar, 67, 249 Thronson, Iarron, 87, 249 Throssell, Row1and, 53, 167, 169, 251 Tirre11, Iack, 116, 218, 255 Vis I 'ul N Intensive training offered in various Business g -' N and College Preparatory courses. Q'?""' I A complete course in Higher Accounting and Business I Administration prepares the graduate for the C.P.A. Exam. APPROVED FOR G. I. TRAINING Write for Catalog -Enroll at any time J L Scott, President Owsley Block, Butte Tje1tveit, G1enn, 221 Tolson, Robert, 87, 255 Tomcheck, CO1199l'1, 87, 211 Tomten, Kenneth, 126 Too1e, Bruce, 139 Tope1, Mary, 77 Tope1, Theresa, 239 Torqerson, Audrey, 67, 227 Tourikis, Mabel, 67 Tovey, Thomas, 67, 218 Traeholt, Arne, 88 Trankle, Hans, 114 Tremper, Frank, 88 Trerise, Betty Io, 53, 237 Trippet, Ieane, 88, 211, 227 Trower, Peggy, 88, 211, 233 Troxe1, Betty, 88, 211, 233 Troyer, Ro1and Ierome, 144 Troyka, David, 53, 214 Tschache, Pau1, 102 Tschudin, Maron, 67 Tucker, Wa1Iace, 88, 218, 247 Turcott, Georqe, 53, 142 Tur1ey, Daisy, 53 Turman, George, 67, 253 Turner, Robert, 144 Turnquist, Nels, 110 Tyrand, Ray, 214 U U1rich, David, 67 U1rich, Iohn, 88, 125 Unfred, John, 53 Urquart, Dorothy, 77, 212, 239 Utterback, Douq1as, 88, 257 For All Types jan? be Q of I Qgf Sing Home Financing Qi See ll ' 517501126 WESTERN Momwu MEET THE GANG BtilkePLWEigif'1?B,iE3fN at SPlLLUM'S MlssouLA, MONTANA B UTT E Your Future . . . Use it wis ly I Valuable p Your Bank . . . Choose lf wisely - the Proper Connection will al Prove valuable in years ahead METALS BANK Q91 TQUST CGMPANY Butte, Montana Ugueffeguf Banking ,gince 4882H Member F.D.l.C. Relaxing Refreshment Between V Vachel, Stanley, 67 VanCamp, Milton, 142 Vande Bogart, Florence, 53, 229 Van Van Delincler, Dallas, 77, 247 Delinder, George, 53, 247 Van Horn, Alan, 67, 251 Van 1-lorn, Lee, 67 Vannoy, Gay, 211 Van Sickle, lames, 67, 257 Van Sickle, Robert, 53, 257 Van Vorous, Pat, 88 Van Vorous, Phyllis, 88, 123 Vecker, C. F., 77 ,sfgig Classes in Your tuclent Fountain , A I if ' and Cafeteria Student Union Building Insure Your Future . . . ACCIDENT FIRE AUTOMOBILE LIEE HOSPITALIZATION BONDS STREIT and COMPANY EAST BROADWAY PHONE 2776 , W lien in Butte itis GAIVlER'S Shoes for all tlie family IN BUTTE SINCE 1879 54 W. PARK ST. Vennettilli, Adam, 67, 241 Verbeek, lohn, 53, 126 Vercumrnen, Lee, 218 Verdcn, Paul, 52, 138, 249 Vermillion, George, 118 Vernetti, Rosemary, 53, 114, 212 Verploegen, Mary, 112, 212 Vick, Madison, 144 Vickers, lohn Robert, 53, 136 Vilen, Carol, 88, 92, 110, 123, 212 Vilk, Victor, 218 Vine, 1oAnn, 88, 211, 235 Vinje Margaret, 53, 213 Viscon, Stephen, 88, 218, 257 Volk, Fred, 157 Volk, 1-lelen, 88, 233 Voorhees, Paul, 54 Voorhees, Ruth, 67, 134, 212 Vralsted, Lyle, 136 W Wade, Marie, 24, 77, 101 Wafstet, William, 53, 118 Wagner, Marvin, 181 Wakefield, Sam, 214 Wallace, Glen, 24, 67, 130, 141, Walker, lack, 88, 253 Walker, William, 54, 255 Wall, Elizabeth, 77, 229 Wallander, Ierome, 54, 249 Waller, Sally, 88, 211, 229 Wallin, Ellen, 213 Wallin, Elsie, 231 Walsh, Carol, 77, 131 Walsh Emmet, 67, 120, 167, 169, Walston, Roine, 88, 211, 227 Walter, Ted, 136, 221 Vtlard, Charles, 142 Ward, Clemens, 102 Ward, Robert, 251 Warlord, Roger, 67 Warn, Lawrence, 124, 217 Warnke, Virginia, 212 Warsinske, Norm, 120, 138, 158 Warwick, Corleen, 88, 211 Washington, Charles, 221 Waterman, Charles, 77 Watkins, Wallace, 214 Watson, Bruce, 88, 221 Way, Beverly, 67, 229 Wayman Stanley, 114 Webb, Vernon, 88 Webber, Garene, 77, 183, 229 Weber, lohn, 54 Weingart, loyce, 88, 222 Weir, Dennis, 77, 247 Weir, lames, 54 Welch, George, 217 Weldenhalt, Rich, 77 Wendland, Wel, 135 Wenstrom, 1-larold E., 54 Wesen, Maurice, 67 Weskamp, Frank, 117 Westman, Fred, 77 Weston, Don, 48, 54, 138 Weston, Emery, 157 Wetzsteon, Astrid, 54, 138, 213 Whalen, lo Ann, 77, 229 'White, Douglas W., 217 White, Edmond, 67, 247 2 253 White, Iames, 77, 181, 245 Whitman, Donald, 136 Whitmer, Parks, 54 Wickerson, O. E., 77 Wickizer, Charles, 77, 214, 249 Widenhofer, Allan, 77, 92, 130, 257 Wilde, Wayne, 77 Wiley, Bernice, 7, 131, 233 Wilhelm, lerry, 77 Wilkerson, Douglas Elroy, 255 Willey, Dorothy Nielson, 231 Willey, Richard, 67, 257 Williams, Cecelia, 54 Williams, David, 139 Williams, Wallace, 217 Williamson, lames, 218 Willis, Wayne, 88, 218, 243 Wilson, Wilson Wilson, Wilson, Wilson, Dola, 54 Don, 217 Dorris, 54 Owen, 88 Robert, 77, 218, 247 Wiltzen, Harris, 54 Winters, lack, 67, 255 Wirth, lames, 54, 245 Wischamann, 1-lans, 116 Wise, Harry, 216, 217 Wohlgenant, Mona, 88, 211, 231 Wohlgenant, Richard, 78, 88, 217, 252 Wojciechowski, Blanka, 54 Wold, Paul, 88, 157, 166, 249 Wolf, Leila, 88, 213 Wolischlager, William, 88 Wolpert, loseph, 77, 221 Wood, Richard, 88, 225, 221 Woodahl, Pat, 211 Woods, lohn, 67, 252 Woods, Robert, 67, 218 Woodside, Donald, 67, 249 Woodward, Mary Ellen, 88, 124, 222 Woodgerd, Wesley, 142 Woolley, Robert, 54, 144 Woomer, larnes, 218 Worf, Bill, 117 Work, Carl, 67 Working, Dorothy lean, 23, 24, 121, 184, 231 Wray, Richard, 67, 241 Wright, Charles, 67, 257 Wright, lames, 116 Wright, Keith, 157 Wright, Phyllis, 67, 134, 239 Wuerl, Clayton, 67, 247 Wuerthner, Ben, 88, 251 Wuerthner, lohn, 138 Wuerthner, lulius, 54, 251 Wylder, lames, 77 Y Yardley, Dan, 77 Yelsa, Charles, 67 Yost, Harold, 88 Young, 231 Young, Young, Young, Young, Young, Betty. 25, 68, 77, 134, 184, Denzil, 67, 158 lack, 67, 180, 253 lanet, 88, 211 Nancy, 88, 211, 237 Robert, 67, 214 Youngberg, Fern, 134, 212 Yovetich, Dan, 171, 172 Yuhas, Melvin, 77 Z Zakos, 1-lenriette, 214 Zanto, Elmer, 218 Zelrner, Viola, 54 Zezula, Cecil, 217 Zibell, Robert, 54, 140, 252 Zimmerman, Aaron, 54, 116, 134 Zubick, Frank, 92 Zuercher, Imogene, 222 Zunchich, Denise, 88, 182, 213, 235 Zwicker, 1-lelen Elizabeth, 212 in --Q ' ' bi unmoeewi-EO . ' 'f f , A ,, 3 4 A. , sy- Q 1 ' - 5 ' ,,, , i 1 GARD 1111 1 4 ,FCITY Nt ' l nussli Qiwiiiimiiiiriaiwliiimissw i t 5. glBg5QW, W ,,,,,,f1u . Qi X, i Q: . W ' .75 PASTEURIZEU A . ,,,, , E f Priosr- we 4 if M14 iw., ,wnilig I , Imam my lil' , W ..- ' , .... ' 1 I ,Q-44 .,-,nu-1-" -v"""", 44,-n-"M v is X 3 1 V .uf-""' u. y A'-,,,..-'- ' Haw say if fasfes Leffern GARDEN CITY DAIRIES CREAM I BUTTER O COTTAGE CHEESE Regular and Homogenized Vitamin 'D' Milk Processed in lVlontana's Most Recently lvladernized Plant llflll lll8l llDlilllll .141 llHllilDlllllElll, Jungle Club Coffee Shop Crystal Bar Montmartre Lounge IIN N 'DMV Nl 'ID N fllfzek N A . . . OUR SYSTEM OF HIGHER EDUCATION by Dr. Francis A. Thompson, President Montana School of Mines Montana's pioneers caught the vision and held the faith that the future of their new commonwealth lay ill the youth of the generations yet tofbe. His- tory shows that immediately upon emergence from the swaddling clothes of territorial status, the pioneer legislators proceeded to make provision first for grade schools, then for high schools, and next for a state-supported system of 1lig1l6l' education. Their course in higher education was in large measure charted by the Enabling Act of 1889, which gave to the new state specific grants of land, C15 Mfor university purposes," C25 'Qfor a school of mines," C3Q "for state normal schools," and C45 ufor agricultural colleges." It was natural, therefore, that the legislative assembly, meeting in its third regular session in 1393, should act 011 the assumption that the designa- tio11 of four separate land grants, implied four separate institutions, and it pro- ceeded to create simultaneously, a university at Missoula, a school of mines at Butte, a normal school at Dillon, and an agricultural college at Bozeman. Thus 56 years ago, the pattern of higher education was set. In 1927 provision was made for the Eastern Montana State Normal School at Billings, and ill 1929 for the Northern Montana College at Havre. All four institutions were made uunitsi' of a consolidated system which was designated 66The University of Mon- tanafi A co-ordination officer, responsible to a State Board of Education, with enlarged powers, was provided for and given the title of '4Chancellor." Naturally the new units at Billings and Havre were 'Gborn into this system," and are in- tegral parts therof. ANACONDA COPPER MINING COMPANY "Work for a Greater and More Prosperous Montana." This is a project that should include all Montanans. .""!'lf"f'g . D Dfw- 3, wll ' , Vg 0 0 - lui . , ,-U I, ' qu o " I- O 'I . a I O 4 I . '14 4 I . .1 y 'S ' 1 I 0 w ' ' l M I ua' Y' x 1-- K 4 " I sl lj' o ,Y , ,'4la!AQ v , I 1 J.. 5.3


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Montana State University - Sentinel Yearbook (Missoula, MT) online yearbook collection, 1946 Edition, Page 1

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Montana State University - Sentinel Yearbook (Missoula, MT) online yearbook collection, 1947 Edition, Page 1

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Montana State University - Sentinel Yearbook (Missoula, MT) online yearbook collection, 1948 Edition, Page 1

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Montana State University - Sentinel Yearbook (Missoula, MT) online yearbook collection, 1950 Edition, Page 1

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Montana State University - Sentinel Yearbook (Missoula, MT) online yearbook collection, 1951 Edition, Page 1

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Montana State University - Sentinel Yearbook (Missoula, MT) online yearbook collection, 1952 Edition, Page 1

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