Montana State University Bozeman - Montanan Yearbook (Bozeman, MT)

 - Class of 1921

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Montana State University Bozeman - Montanan Yearbook (Bozeman, MT) online yearbook collection, 1921 Edition, Cover
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Text from Pages 1 - 216 of the 1921 volume:

JUNIOR CLASS OF MONTANA STATE COLLEGE o years Pardon FelloxosjForetoorb Just as a reminder of another step in the progress of our institution, we will present this book as a memory of that step. To those who are now active in the institution, its memory will never be pleasant. But to those who took an active part in the making of the hook, we will add the memories of work, trials and the difficulties that were encountered. The hope is to those that follow us may take a notable step of advancement. For beyond us is a newer and faster step of advancement. We are with the old stride but our followers can bring about the enactment of their higher ideals. It is for their hope, success and the fulfillment of their ideals that we publish this book. Staff, 1921 Montanan.Ibbication In our gratitude for a better and broader institution with greater responsibilities, to the man who realizes the responsibilities and puts forth every effort to give our institution that sense, we, the class of 1921, affectionately dedicate this volume to President Alfred Atkinson.(Official iDimtorp EXECUTIVE BOARD Bozeman Bozeman Bozeman Bozeman Alfrkd Atkinson (ex-officio), Chairman... J. H. Bakek (Term expires April, 1923)... W. S. Davidson (Term expires April, 19211 Allen Cameron, Secretary-Treasurer........... ADMINISTRATE E OFFICERS Edward C. Elliott..............................Chancellor, University of Montana (B. S. 1895, A. M. 1897, Univ. of Nebraska; Ph. I). 1905, Columbia) Alfred Atkinson, M. S..................................................President Frederick B. Lin field, B. S. A......................Director, Experiment Station Fred S. Cooley, B. S.................................Director, Extension Service James M. Hamilton, M. S..............................................Dean of Men Una. B. Herrick...............................................Dean oj Women John H. Holst, M. A.. .Principal Secondary Schools and Director, Summer Session Roy Orvis Wilson, B. S.................................................Registrar Marsa Riddell, B. S.............................House Director at Hamilton Hall Anker Christianson.............................Acting Superintendent of Buildings Adele McCray......................................................College Nurse Ray B. Bowden.................................................Editorial Director PROFESSORS Abbey, Myron J..............................Professor of Agricultural Education (A. B., Brown University, 1902) Atkinson, Alfred............................President and Professor of Agronomy (B. S., Iowa State College 1901; M. S., Cornell University, 19121 Baldwin, Lana A........................................Professor of Applied Arts Bales, Alba.........................................Professor of Home Economics (B. S., Columbia University, 19171 Brewer, William F..............................................Professor of English (A. B., Grinncll College, 1891; A. M., 1897; A. M., Harvard University, 1899)Bi'BB, John P...............................Professor Military Science and Tactics (Captain. U. S. Army) Cardon, Philip Vincent.....................................Professor of Agronomy B. S., Utah Agricultural College, 1909) Cobleigh. William M..............Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering (A. M., Columbia University, 1899) Conklinc, Leon D.......................................Professor Civil Engineering (C. E., Cornell University, 1900) Cooley, Robert A............................Professor of Entomology and Zoology (B. S., Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1895) Currier, Aaron, H...........Director School of Music and Professor of Vocal Music (A. B., Obcrlin College, 1892; A. M., 1894) Forrest, Elizabeth ...........................................................Librarian i B. L. S., University of Illinois, 1906; A. M., University of Chicago, 1917) Ham, I" RANK......................................................Professor of Physics iB. S., Montana State College, 1903; M. S., 1905) HAMILTON, James M...........Dean of Men and Professor of Economics and Sociology (B. S., Union Christian College, 1887; M. S., 1890) Herrick, Una B................................................................ .........Dean of Women s Work and Director of Physical Education for Women Holst, John H..................................Principal of Secondary Schools, .............Director of the Summer Session and Assistant Professor of English (A. M., University of Montana, 1918) Linfield, Frederick B...........................................Dean of Agriculture (B. S. A., Ontario Agricultural College, 1891) Martin, George Lester.................................Professor of Dairy Husbandry (B. S., Iowa Slate College, 1908) Nash, W. Gifford............................................Professor of Piano Music NORRIS, Earle B. .. .Dean of Engineering and Professor of Mechanical Engineering (B. S., Penn. State College, 1904; M. E., 1908) O'Gorman, James M...........................Professor of Psychology and Education (B. S., Columbia University, 1909; M. A., 1910) Plew, William R.....................Professor of Architectural and Civil Engineering B. S., Rose Polytechnic Institute, 1907; M. S., 1910) Powell, Walter Daniel.................................Professor of Physical Education ( A. B., University of Wisconsin, 1914) •Deceasedsj m 6 5 a H C3 fj ,'■ ■ »© -- ga - '- T » ■ SCHOPPE, William F................................Professor of Poultry Husbandry (B. S., University of Maine, 1907; M. S., 1913) Swingle, Deane B............................Professor of Botany and Bacteriology IB. S., Kan. State Agri. College. 1900; M. S., Univ. of Wis., 1901 ) TaLLMAN, William I).......................................Professor of Mathematics (B. S., University of Wisconsin, 18961 Thaler, Joseph A...............................Professor of Electrical Engineering (F.. E., University of Minnesota, 1900) Welch, Howard......................................Professor of Veterinary Science (A. B., Univ. of Missouri, 1902; B. S. A., 1906; 1). V. M., Cornell U., 1909) WiLSON, Roy Okvis....................Professor of Secretarial Studies and Registrar tB. S., South Dakota State College, 1911) ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR Dlddy, Edward A.....................................Associate Professor of English (A. B., Bowdoin College, 1907; A. M., Harvard University, 1908) --N ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Brewer, Helen R........................................Assistant Professor of History ( A. B., Grinnell College, 1888) Ch ALLEND HR, Ralph T.....................Assistant Professor of Trades and Industry (B. S., Kan. State Agri. College, 1908; M. S., 1918; M. E., 1918) Currier, Edwin L..........................Assistant Professor of Farm Management (B. S., University of Nebraska, 1912) Foote, Herbert B.............................Bacteriologist, State Water Laboratory (B. S., Ottawa University, 1913; M. A., Kan. University, 1914) Ford, CarLOTTa Marks.........................Assistant Professor of Home Economics (A. B., University of Illinois, 1911) Franks, Edith..................................Assistant Professor of Home Economics Garrison, Emma Pauline.........................Assistant Professor of Home Economics i B. S., Columbia University, 1919) Gieseker, Leonard F................................Assistant Professor of Agronomy iB. S., Uni. of Nebraska, 1908; M. S., Cornell University, 1914) Hatfield, William D................................Assistant Professor of Chemistry I B. S., Illinois College, 1914; M. S., 1916; Ph. I)., Univ. of Illinois, 1918) Holmes, William Bartholomew...............Assistant Professor of Secretarial Studies (B. S., James Millikin University, 1913) M a i___J Jennison, Harry M...................Assistant Professor of Botany and Bacteriology B. S., Mass. Agri. College, 1908: M. A. Wabash College, 1911) JOSEPH, Walter Edward....................Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry (B. S., Purdue University, 1907; Ph. I)., Univ. of Illinois, 1912) Kiefer, James A.........................................Assistant Professor of Physics (B. S., Montana Stale College, 1914) Murdock, Harvey E.............................Assistant Professor of Farm Mechanics (B. S., Univ. of Colorado, 1906; M. E., 1908; C. E., Univ. of Illinois, 1911) McClIORD, Robert C.......................Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry (A. 13., Central Univ., 1908; B. S. A., Iowa State College, 1913) Quinn, Edmond John................................Assistant Professor of Chemistry (B. S., Notre Dame University, 1911) Sherwood, Reginald C.....................Analyst, State Food and Drug Laboratory IB. S., South Dakota State-College, 1914; M. S., 1916) Sloan, Royal I).......................Assistant Professor in Electrical Engineering (B. S., Montana State University, 1913) Spauldinc, Milo H...................................Assistant Professor of Zoology i A. B., Leland Stanford Junior University, 1903; A. M., 1906) Starrinc, Cecil C...............................Assistant Professor of Horticulture (B. S., South Dakota Slate College, 1911) Sumner, Harlan R..................................Assistant Professor of Agronomy (B. S. A., Kan. State Agri. College, 1916; M. A., Univ. of Mo., 1917) Therkelsen, Eric. . . .Assistant Professor of Electrical and Mechanical Engineering (B. S., Univ. of Washington, 1911; M. S., 1913) Wallin, Florence.........................Assistant Professor of French and Spanish (A. B., State University of Iowa, 1907) COUNTY AGRICULTURAL AGENTS Anderson, A. D........................................Choteau County, Fort Benton Anderson, E. W.......................................Sheridan County, Plenty wood (B. S. A., North Dakota Agricultural College, 1914) Banker, Paul P.................................................Hill County, Havre (B. S., University of Wisconsin, 1912) Broicii, Walter F.............................................Rosebud County, Forsyth (B. S. A., Oklahoma A. and M. College, 1913; M. S., Oregon Agri. College, 1915) Brossard, H. A..............................................Yellowstone County, Billings IB. S., Utah Agricultural College, 1916)  Chase, Floyd J.........................................Roosevelt County, Mondak B. S., University of Nebraska, 1912) Clarkson, Robert E.........................................Teton County, Chotcau (B. S., Montana State College. 1917) Gordon, W. R..........................................Broadwater County, Townsend (B. S. A.. West Virginia University, 1916) Hillman, Frank M.................................Sanders County, Thompson Falls (B. S., University of Minnesota, 1912) Jones, W. II..........................................Stillwater County, Columbus (B. S. A., West Virginia University, 1912) Lewis, Grover E................... .........................Prairie County, Terry (B. S., Utah Agricultural College, 1916) MANNING, J. W...................................Lewis and Clark County, Helena (B. S., Montana State College, 1917) MacSpadden, F. E......................................Cascade County, Great Falls (B. S., Montana State College, 1917) McKee, R. B.............................................Flathead County, Kalispell (B. S., North Dakota Agricultural College, 1916) Mendenhall, Deane W.......................................Dawson County, Glendive (B. S., North Dakota Agricultural College, 1914) Michels, Charles A.........................................Toole County, Shelby (B. S., N. D. Agri. College, 1909; M. S., Univ. of Wis., 1912) Peterson, Carl H....................................... .Fergus Falls, Lewistown POLLINCER, W. E.........................................Missoula County, Missoula Spain, Marvin........................................Musselshell County, Roundup ( B. S., Montana State College, 1911) SPRING, L. H.............................................Ravalli County, Hamilton (B. S. A., Oregon Agricultural College, 1910) Stapleton, W. P.............................................Phillips County, Malta (B. S. A., North Dakota Agri. College, 1913) Stebbins, Murray E........................................Valley County, Glasgow (B. S., North Dakota Agricultural College) Tiiorfinnson, M. A........................................Blaine County, Chinook (B. S. A., North Dakota Agricultural College, 1917) Yerrington, C. M..........................................Custer County, Miles City (B. S., North Dakota Agricultural College, 1914) ThirteenCOUNTY CLUB LEADERS KAUFFMAN, H. N..........................................Flathead County, Kalispell HOME DEMONSTRATION AGENTS Borthwick, Alberta.....................................Cascade County, Great Falls B. S., Montana State College, 1916) Erickson, Gertrude.........................Valley and Roosevelt Counties, Glasgow (Stout Institute, 1913) Foster, Inez..................................................Missoula County, Missoula (B. S., Minnesota, 1915) Hkidner, Barbara...........................Blaine and Phillips Counties, Chinook (B. S., North Dakota Agricultural College, 1916) Hott, Nora M...................................................Fergus County, Lewistown (B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1914) Kelly, Jeanette A....................................Stillwater County, Columbus (B. S., Montana State College, 1917) Kyte, Gladys.................................................Flathead County, Kalispell (B. S., University of Wisconsin, 1919) Swan, Inez B......................................Lewis and Clark County, Helena (Stout Institute, 1911) INSTRUCTORS Bull, Frieda M..........................................Instructor in Mathematics (B. S., Montana State College, 1907; M. S., 1909) Donaldson, Jesse........................................................Instructor in English (A. B., University of Minnesota, 1913) GRANT, Eugene L......................................Instructor in Civil Engineering (B. S., University of Wisconsin, 1907) Hartman, June...........................................Instructor in Piano Music (B. S., Montana State College, 1910) HomaNN, Frederick C..........................Instructor in Mechanical Engineering (B. S., Montana State College, 1916) Howard, Louis L.........................................Instructor in Band Music LUDWIG, Alfred...............................Instructor in Mechanical Engineering (C. E., Rcnssler Polytechnic Institute, 1889) Maxwell, Lora......................................Instructor in Physical Education (B. Ph., Montana State Normal College, 1911) Moore Muriel.....................................................Instructor in Art McCart, Doris...........................................................Instructor in English B. A., Depauw University, 1916) Randall, Laura.......................................Instructor in Home Economics (B. S., University of Minnesota, 1917) Seamans, Howard I............................Instructor in Entomology and Zoology (B. S., Montana State College, 1916) ft i P-.:i «sa ■Mr' m m Ss 1 % v-jV ■m t; ssy .r. .. j 3 ' =t-.=r — - • •r -5 I - - r m ; rr r- . J 1 IS vy j t zl’ - _ f c-' — m J • I S® £« ,TJ A; 'f U'-a if • j- • T-C ___N ,6 ;C » — - ■ i A' Fourteen v m « Sibley, Gertrude M........................................Instructor in English (A. B., Mount Holyoke College, 1913) YOUNG, Della A.......................Instructor in Stenography and Typewriting (Pd. M., Colorado Teachers’ College, 1917; A. B., 1918) ASSISTANTS Abbott, Mable L............................................Assistant Librarian (B. A., Univ. of Minn., 1902; Graduate N. Y. Public Library, 1914) Humphrey, Leo C..........................................Assistant in Chemistry (B. S., Montana State College, 1919) Norris, Earl B...........................................Assistant in Chemistry (B. S., Montana State College, 1919) Parker, Mae E............................................Assistant in English (B. A., Mount Holyoke University, 1909) Quaw, Marjorie.........................................Assistant in Applied Art (B. S., Montana State College, 1918) EXPERIMENT STATION STAFF Linfield, Frederick B.............................................. Director (B. S. A., Ontario Agricultural College, 1891) DEPARTMENT HEADS (To be Filled).............................................Animal Husbandry Cardon, Phillip V.....................................................Agronomy (B. S., Utah Agricultural College, 1909) Burke, Edmund....................................................Chemistry and Meteorology (B. S., Montana State College, 1907) Cooley, Robert A....................................................Entomology (B. S., Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1895) Currier, Edwin I...........................................Farm Management (B. S., Univeristy of Nebraska, 1912) Whitcomb, William 0.........................Superintendent of Grain Laboratory (B. S. A., N. D. Agri. College, 1909; M. S. A., Cornell U., 1913) Murdock, Harvey E.................................................Agricultural Engineering (B. S., Univ. of Colo., 1906; M. E., Univ. of Colo., 1908: C. E., Univ. of Colo.. 1911) Schoppe, William F.....................................................Poultry (B. S., University of Maine, 1907; M. S. University of Maine, 1913) Swincle, Dean B.....................................................Botany and Bacteriology )B. S., Kan. State Agri. College. 1900: M. S., Univ. of Wis., 1901) Welch, Howard ......................................................Veterinary (A. B.. U. of Mo., 1902; B. S. A., U. of Mo., 1906; 1). V. M.. Cornell Univ., 1909) Whipple, Orville B................................................Horticulture (B. S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1904) DEPARTMENT ASSISTANTS Bush, Morris J.......................................................Chemistry (B. S., Univ. of Neb., 1912: A. M., Univ. of Neb., 1913; Ph. D., Univ. of Minn., 1915) Day. W. Friend...........................................................Grain Laboratory r FifteenGieseker, Leonard F....................................................Agronomy (B. S., Univ. of Nebraska, 1908; M. S. A., Cornell University, 1914) Jones, Ray S..........................................................Chemistry (B. S., Montana State College, 1915) Joseph, W. E.............................................................Animal Husbandry B. S., Purdue Univ., 1907; Ph. D., Univ. of Illinois, 1912) McChord, Robert C........................................................Animal Husbandry (A. B., Central Univ., 1908; B. S. A., Iowa State College, 1913) Morris, Ernest.........................................................Agronomy Morris, H. E............................................Botany and Bacteriology (B. S., Montana State College, 1909; M. S., Univ. of Wisconsin, 1917) Nelson, Joseph B........................................................Agronomy Nutting, Grace B........................................Botany and Bacteriology (B. Ph., University of Vermont, 1915) Parker, John R.......................................................Entomology (B. S., Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1908) Pinckney, Reuben M....................................................Chemistry (B. S., Neb. Wesleyan Univ., 1906; A. M., Univ. of Neb., 19081 Starring, Cecil C..................................................Horticulture (B. S., South Dakota State College, 1911) Steward, Mildred V.....................................................Chemistry (B. S., University of Wisconsin, 19181 Sumner, Harlan R........................................................Agronomy (B. S. A., Kansas Slate Agri. College, 1916; M. A., Univ. of Wis., 1917) Tretsven, Oscar..............................................Animal Husbandry To be filled.................................................Farm Management Plumb, C. W........................................................Station Clerk SUBSTATION STAFF JUDITH BASIS SUBSTATION MOCCASIN Acting Superintendent Osenburg, Albert (B. S., Montana State College, 1916) Assistant May, Ralph W NORTH MONTANA SUBSTATION Superintendent Morcan, George (B. S., Montana State College, 1912) Assistant Woodward, Norval F HUNTLEY SUBSTATION HUNTLEY Superintendent .....Assistant Hansen, Dan ... Seamans, Arthur (B. S., Montana State College, 1913) .•Jfcftvw Sixteen HORTICULTURE SUBSTATION CORVALLIS Tiiornber, Harvey Superintendent AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION STAFF Cooley, Fred S..............................................................Director iB. $., Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1888) Beers, Wayland L.................................State Leader of Market Specialists iB. S., Brown University, 1895) Campbell, J. R......................State Leader, Extension Schools and Meetings i B. S. A., 1909; M. S., Iowa State College, 1911) COPELAND, A. J....................................Farm Management Demonstrator i B. S., Ohio State University, 19151 Graber, Mary Ann.............Assistant State Leader of Home Demonstration Agents (B. S., Ohio State University, 1915) Hampton, Samuel, J..........................................................Lecturer Jennison, Harry M...............................................Extension Specialist (B. S., Mass. Agri. College; M. A. Wabash College, 1911) Lott, Elmo Hamilton........................Assistant State Leader of County Agents tB. S., Cornell, Univ., 1912; B. S. A., Iowa State College, 1917) Ocaard, Arthur J............................................Extension Agronomist (B. S., North Dakota Agricultural College, 1913) OciLVlE, Mina...................Assistant State Leader of Hoys and Girls' Clubs (B. S., Kansas Agricultural College, 1912) Potter, C. E...............................State Leader of Hoys’ and Girls’ Clubs Quaw, Micnon M...............Assistant State Leader of Home Demonstration Agents IB. S., Montana State College, 1902; M. A., Columbia U., 1910i REYNOLDS, Lucile W..........Assistant State Leader of Home Demonstration Agents (Stout Institute, 1909) Riley, Edward H...............................State Leader of Live Stock Specialists i B. S. A., Univ. of Minn., 1903; D. V. M., George Washington Univ., 1911) Roosevelt, George A.................................Field Agent in Rodent Control Roosevelt, Georgia C........................................................Clothing Specialist (B. S., Montana State College. 191 li Smith, R. L..................................................................Poultry Specialist Rowe, Bess.............................State Leader of Home Demonstration Agents (B. S., University of Minnesota) Taylor, John C.............................Assistant State Leader of County Agents (B. S., Montana State College, 1912) ToMSON, W. E...........................................Stale Specialist in Dairying (B. S., Kansas Agricultural College. 1912) Wilson, Milburn Lincoln.............................State Leader of County Agents (B. S. A., Iowa State College, 1907) V; rntrni(Class Officers SENIOR President........... Vice-President...... Secretary-Treasurer ...Henry Michel Florence Switzer ..Genevieve Hall Hexrv R. Michel..........Bozeman. Montana Electrical Engineering Thesis: High Frequency Conductor and Insulation Tests with J. C. Flynn. Commissioner of Interests Musical (3 and 4); Band (1, 2, 3 and 4); Orchestra 1 and 2); Class President 13 and 4); Business Manager, 1920, Montanan: Electric Club: Student Branch A. I. E. E.; Stags: Les Bouflons; Sigma Chi. Florence Switzer.............Jeffries. Montana Entomology and Zoology Botany and Bacteriology Journal Club (3 and 4) ; Does: Treble Clef ll and 2 : Vocational Congress Committee. 1919: Vice President Class, (4); Phi Gamma. Genev.eve Hall...........Bozeman. Montana Home Economics Home Economics Club: Does: Phi L'psilon Omicron; Alpha Omicron Pi.Helen Elizabeth Lease. Great Falls, Montana Home Economics Thesis: l.'se. Composition and Preparation of Vegetables. Secretary. Alpha Epsilon Theta (4): Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (2. 3 and 4 ; Does; Home Economics Club; Treble Clef Club 1, 2 and 3); Theta Xi. Kenneth M. King..........Whitehall, Montana Entomology and Zoology Glee Club: Y. M. C. A.; Football C17 and ’19) ; Class Basketball ‘15. T6 and '171; Basketball (’20); Boosters: M. Club. . Bozeman, Montana Botany and Bacteriology r. C. A.; Women's League; Botany Bacteriology Journal Club; Does: Class Vice President (1); Dramatic Club; Treble Clef Club; Alpha Omicron Pi. Helen Herman Dickman..............Truly, Montana Agricultural Education Stags; Class Basketball (3 and 4); Class Baseball (3); Omega Beta.Stephen E. Smith...........Bozeman, Montana Agricultural Education Thesis: Outline of a Course of Study in Soils and Crops for Use in Vocational High Schools. Band (1, 2. 3 and 4): Glee Club 1 and 3) ; Agricultural Club; Y. M. C. A. (1 and 2) ; Montanan Staff (3). Earl Woolridce...........Chinook, Montana Agricultural Education Coffee Club; Press Club; Debate (4); Sports Writer Exponent (4). Evelena Hkkriott. .Thompson Falls, Montana Home Economics Thesis: Working Out a Schedule Card for Grading Home Economics Work. Y. W. C. A. (1, 2 and 3); Home Economics Club; Does; Historian Theta Xi; Theta Xi. Henry Oberle................Bozeman, Montana Electrical Engineering Thesis: Design and Specifications of Small Hydro-Electric Plant, with E. R. Glass. Electric Club; Dramatic Club; President Stags (4); Football (2 and 4); Track 3 and 4); M. Club; Omega Tuenty-threeOtto P. Roberts......Bozeman, Montana Animal Husbandry Agricultural Club; M. Club; Boosters; Class Track (1,2,3 and 4); Class Basketball )4» ; Class Football 2 and 3); Football (2 and 3); Omega Beta. Mary Louise Stone........Bozeman, Montana Home Economics Thesis: A Course of Study for High Schools. Chairman Vocational Congress (4); Treasurer, Y. W. C. A. (3); President. Home Economics Club (4) ; Woman’s League Council; Y. W. C. A. 11. 2. 3 and 4); Home Economics Club (1, 2. 3 and 4); Class Tennis 2); Cap and Gown Society; Phi Upsilon Omicron; Does; Chi Omega. L J. Hagan............Glendive, Montana Animal Husbandry U. of Notre Dame «1 and 2); Class Baseball (3); Stags; Omega Beta. Elmer M. Arneson.....Big Timber, Montana Agronomy Class Track t2t ; Cross Country (2); Orchestra t2 ; Stags; Omega Beta. rr . ... I,...Ne:l R. Jones.................Mazeppa, Minn. Agricultural Education University of Minn. (1. 2 and 4); Beta Epsilon. Leila M. Linfield...........Bozeman, Montana Home Economics Thesis: Batik. Home Economics Club 11) ; Treble Clef Club 12); Exponent 3); Art Editor, 1920 Montanan 3 ; Chairman Advisory Committee. Woman's League (4); Inter-fraternity Council (4 ; President Art Club (3 and 4) ; Vocational Congress Staff 1 and 4) ; Cabinet member. Y. W. C. A. «4); Does: Y. W. C. A.; Cap and Gown Society: Alpha Omicron Pi. Grant B. McConnell........Helena. Montana Civil Engineering Class Football; Class Baseball; Baseball (3 and 4 ; Omega Beta. John H. Kohnen.........Great Falls, Montana Civil Engineering Thesis: Survey and Design of Proposed Campus Road. Exponent (1, 2. 3 and 4); Managing Editor and Editor Exponent 2) ; Editor Exponent (3 and 4) ; Associate Editor. 1920 Montanan (3); Chairman Tournament Program Committee (4); Publicity and Business Manager Montana State College Regimental Band. 14th Annual Tour (4); Student Senate (3 and 4 ; Civil Engineering Society; T. 0. C.; Stags; President Press Club (4) ; I.es Bouf-fons: Sigma Chi. Twenty-fiveVictor F. Larse..............Plains, Montana Agronomy Class Basketball 11. 2 and 3): Class Baseball (1, 2 and 3); Baseball ($); Class Football (2); Football (4); Captain Sophomore Tug of War; Agricultural Club: Stags: Sigma Alpha Epsilon. H Green................Manhattan, Montana Botany and Bacteriology Thesis: The Effect of Arsenicals Upon Soil Bacteria. Treble Clef Club (2 and 4); Botany and Bacteriology Journal Club 3 and 4); Y. W. C. A.: Docs: Alpha Epsilon Theta. Arthur Incwald Hoem..........Butte, Montana Mechanical Engineering Thesis: Converting a Gas Engine Into a Semi-Diesel Engine. Class Baseball (1 and 2 ; Class Basketball 2 and 3); Class Football 3) ; Class Secretary (3): Commissioner of Interests Social 3 ; Montana Branch A. S. M. E.; Glee Club: Dramatic Club; Stags: Les Bouffons: Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Zaydah A. Holden_____Lebanon, Washington Home Economics Does; Home Economics Club. 'pn L. Tyler.................Nashville, Term. Industrial Chemistry Exponent (2); Spoils Writer (3); Associate Editor (41; Class Baseball (2 and 3); Chemistry Club; Stags; Secretary and Treasurer. Press Club; Hospital Corps (1); Hobo Club; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Evelyn Seeley...............Bozeman, Montana Secretarial Docs: Women’s League; Alpha Epsilon Theta 3 and 4); Vocational Congress Staff (4); Exponent (4); Hunt and Punch Club: Y. W. C. A.; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (2 ; Press Club Vice President (4); Dramatic Club (4); Choral Club (4); Theta Big Timber. Montana Earl Chattin Agronomy Agricultural Club. Hubert M. Rice.............Kalispell, Montana Animal Husbandry Class Football (’13 and '14 : Class Basketball (’13, ’14. ’15 and ’16 ; Class Track (’14, '15 and 16); Football (’15 and ’16); Basketball (T4. '15. ’16 and ’17); Track ('15 and 16) ; M. Club; Boosters; Lcs Bouffons; Assistant Coach ('19 and 20 ; Instructor of Vocational Animal Husbandry. '20; Sigma Chi. Twenty-sevenClifford Corkins.............Joliet, Montana Entomology and Zoology Thesis: An Annotated List of the Ortlioptcra of Montana. Agricultural Club «1 and 2); Y. M. C. A. Cabinet (2 and 3 ; Dramatic Club (2 and 3); Class Basketball 3 and 4); Boosters; Stags. ■c Sweat................Dutton, Montana Agronomy Band 11, 2, 3 and 4 ; Class Secretary 2» ; Class Football »3 ; Business Manager, 1918 Montanan (3) ; Exponent 3»; Stags; Omega Beta. Baker.............Columbia Falls, Montana Secretarial Does; Woman’s League; Alpha Epsilon Theta 3 and 4); Secretarial Club: President Secretarial Club (3); Y. W. C. A. President; Y. W. C. A. 2 : Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (1 and 3i ; Treble Clef Club 11. 2. 3 and 4i; Dramatic Club; Chi Omega. Albert J. Bortov..........Glasgow, Montana Agronomy Football 2. 3 and 41; Class Football (2, 3 and 4 ; Class President 4 ; Grain Judging Team 3); Class Baseball il and 2 ; Class Track (3); Cross Country 3 ; (-lass Basketball 2 and 4); Exponent 3); M. Club. Omega Beta.J. C. Flynn................Logan. Montana Electrical Engineering Thesis: High Frequency Conductor and Insulator Tests. uith.II. R. Michel. Captain Class Baseball 1 and 2i ; Baseball 2, 3 and 4): Manager Baseball (4); Stags; Chairman Student Branch A. I. E. E.; Secretary E. E. Club 2 ; Les Bouffons; Omega Beta. Ella I). Sullivan......Townsend, Montana Home Economics Home Economics Club: Woman's League; Does; V. W. C. A. Anker I.. Christenson......Lancaster, Hash. Mechanical Engineering M. E. Club (1. 2 and 3); President A. S. M. E. (4); Oratory (1); Football (1. 3 and 4); VI. Club; Omega Beta. A. Parker Stone...........Bozeman, Montana Animal Husbandry Agricultural Club; Band (1. 2. 3 and 4 ; Class Basketball (1 and 3 : Class Baseball (1 and 3); Sigma Chi. Twenty-nineHomer Taylor...........Sedro Woolley, Wash. Animal Industry Basketball (1. 2. 3 and 4); Football (1, 2, 3 and 4); Captain Football (4); Baseball 1. 2 and 3 ; President Associated Students (4 ; M. Club: Les Bouffons; Commissioner of Athletics C3» ; Stags; Omega Beta. Russell M. Pickens........Huntley, Montana Chemist ry Class Baseball (1. 2. 3 and 4): Associate Editor. 1920 Montanan 13»; Commissioner of Interests Social 4) ; Glee Club 2 and 3) : Chemistry Club; Stags; Rod Ramblers; Alpha Pi; Sigma Alpha F.psilon. Vera B. Harr'S.............Bozeman, Montana Home Economics Phi L'psilon 0micron; Alpha Epsilon Theta 4 : Cap and Gown Society 4 ; Home Economics Club; Treasurer. Home Economics Club 3 and 4); Does; Y. W. C. A.: Treble Clef Club 3 and 4 Council of Women’s League (4); Interfraternity Council 14) ; Chairman of Reception Committee of Vocational Congress. ’19; Chi Omega. Albert P. Stark. Jr........Livingston, Montana Chemistry Beloit College 1 and 2»: Les Bouffons; Sigma Chi; President Interfraternity Council 4).William B. Mabel..........Glasgow. Montana Entomology and Zoology Botany Bacteriology Journal Club. • I. Snydku.......Clarion, Pennsylvania Home Economics Pennsylvania t1 ) ; President F. S. C. Club; President Women's Council; Y. W. C. A.; Does; Press Club; Home Economics Club; Alpha Epsilon Theta. Fob best G. Henby........Townsend, Montana Electrical Engineering Thesis: High Tension Distribution for College, with C. E. Roney. Class Baseball (2 and 3 ; Band (1, 2, 3 and 4); Dramatic Club (3 ami 4); Boiler Class Club: Electric Club: Stags; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. High wood, Montana Animal Husbandry Class Football 1 and 2 ; Basketball 3 and 4); Football (4); Manager Basketball 4»: Stags; Sigma Chi. Thirty-oneErnest R. Glass.............Bozeman, Montana Electrical Engineering Thesis: Design and Specifications for a Small Hydro-Electric Plant—with Henry Oberle. Member M. S. C. Branch A. I. K. E.: Class Baseball and Football; Junior member Capacity Club; Stags: Boiler Club; Omega Beta. CLYDE E. Roney...............Missoula, Montana Electrical Engineering Thesis: High Tension Distribution System for the College with F. G. Henry. Class Basketball (1, 2, 3 and 4); Class Baseball 1. 2. 3 and 4) ; Baseball (3 and 4) ; Track Manager (4»; Hobo Club; Electric Club; A. 1. E. E. Club; Stags; Les BoufTons; Sigma Alpha Epsilon. TrENA HoLL'ER............Bozeman, Montana Home Economics Home Economics Club: Assistant Art Editor of Annual (3); Y. Y. C. A.; Red Cross; Glee Club (1 and 2 ; Theta Xi. H. Dickson.............Bozeman, Montana Animal Husbandry Class Treasurer 1); Assistant Business Manager Exponent tl); Business Manager Exponent (2 and 3 ; Baseball tit; Class Basketball tl. 2. 3 and 4): Class Track (1. 2 and 3' : Commissioner of Finance. A. S. M. S. C. 2 and 3t; Class Baseball (2 and 3 ; Stags; Manager Football 3 and 4); President Les BoufTons (3) ; Sigma Chi. Thirty-ttcoimtor JUNIOR ..Norman IIibbert Lillian Drummond . Henrietta Moebus ... Dean Hauseman President Vice-President Secretary. . .. Treasurer. . . . Norman Hiubert.....................President At class meetings he sits in the Chair And directly at Edith does stare. He always looks neat But has aromonous feet, Which clinches his chances right there. Secretary Henrietta C. Moebus.............. A certain romantic young Mr. Had a girl and he often Kr. But he asked her to wed And she solemnly said, “I can never be more thr.n a Lillian H. Drummond...........Vice President Our dear friend Lillian Drummond. Who started poor Scotty to bummin. But the pin belongs to Steve, And him she never will leave, For everything is ahummin.’ Dean M. Hauseman.......................Treasurer Dean spent money like a millionaire To place sweet Marlyn over there. The place she did win She owes all to him. For the rest of us. we didn't care.ALFRED E. McFARLIN No. Packy must needs tel! the truth When all evening he stood on the roof. With field glasses in hand He searched all the land And failed to find Dickie and Ruth. ELMER J. BUSH This famous Elmer J. Bush. Chose a big white hat in the rush. He's a rider of fame In the ditch rider's game. And longs for his "Noble" J. Bush. HELEN L. TRIPP Now Helen places her soul in her eyes And looks in MacMillan's face and cries. "Oh. Mac. dear heart. Please don't depart.” And MacMillan to the occasion docs rise. RUTH F. NOBLE There was a young girl who said. Here comes my Elmer J. Bush." When they said. "Is he small? She replied. "Nat at all. lie's tall, is my Elmer J. Bush. EDW ARD S. SCHURCH This slick young boy. Eddie Schurch, Was seen last Sunday in church. When the plate came b He wasn't so sly. At the door they gave him a search. LOW ELL E BOW EN A young economist named Bowen A to finances would have to be shown. School worth ten dollars a day. And not pitching hay. Was doubtful to economist Bowen. MINNIE ELLEN MARQUIS This Minnie Ell girl is a treat But she keeps poor John on the beat, She's little and small And good, that's all. Now we're sure on John being sweet. EVELYN P. W ATERMAN Here is a young girl from this town Who drives a big Velie aroun.' Her gait and her waddle Are used as a model By all the buxom young girls in the town.robert e. McConnell When Mac secs a bright spot hc niuit have it, If he wants it right bad he will grab it. Sonic people »ay. ''Oh!" "That's stealing"—But. no. It's only a strong grasping habit. STEPHEN C. PIERCE. JR Here is a young chemist named Pierce Who in Europe was terribly fierce. But when Lil he met He became quite a pet And changed to the docile from fierce. EDITH JOHNSON Edith lohnson from no matter where. Has often been heard to declare. "There's a good deal I ain’t. But so long as he's quaint. For the rest I don't bother or care." SIGVALD BERG Sig has been here and there But in France was aware. That life was so sweet When 'twas fully complete And of late for Helen does care. JOHN P. WALKER Our friend. Walker, is imbued With fear that his life is hoodooed: Though his meals are the best. Just now he's distressed That there’s nothing to eat but just food ALINE BURGESS Aline is a girl of some dream And she keeps every nail of her's clean: She's a student by far With her books she's a star: Now she needs a good man in her team. GLENN D. WILES Wiles, failing to enter the art .set. On social prestige had his heart set So. fast as he daster. He ate mustard plaster. And quickly got into the smart set. EMIL I. SALDINE Emil Saldine is specially clean And for a Civil's pay he does dream He is good and a' that. But with women he's flat Tho' things arc not what they seem.LORRES 0. BRADFORD Our editor, as you are aware. Last fall after Olive did tear. After New Year life lost it cheer Since he discovered her wearing a solitare. JOHN V. BOWEN "How shall J flee front this horrible cow: I will sit on this stile. And continue to smile. Which may soften the heart of that cow There once was a concert a-d in it Miss Kyle was asked to begin it. "About what shall I sing:" Asked Fannie, smiling. Said a voice. "About half a minute. WALTER I- MECHLF.NBF.RO There once was a man named Horaiious Who lived in an attic quite spacious. His home is in Chance And there he wears pants. But in the attic—Oh irraciou . CHARLES P. CARROLL This charming young man with red curls Is particularly fond of the girls. After loving eighteen, lie turned perfectly green. And promptly relinquished the girls. FRANCES FORBES This demure young lady. Mis Frances Forbes. With golden locks and fkv blue orbs. Chances are slim for you and me For her man has been over the sea And for him all her love she will hoard. FOR REST ROWE Forrest Rowe knows it's against the rules Of Hamilton Hall and this school. He will persist. And must be kiscsd Each week-end eve by Gussic Pool. ALFRED E. BAKER This young Aggie student named Baker When suddenly brought to his maker Will say with a tear. "Is Soil Physics taught lore. If so. I must go.” will say Baker.ALVIN J. PINCKNEY This i» a young man whole chin Resemble; the point of a pin: So he had it made sharp. And purchased a harp. And played several tunes with his chin. BENIAMIN GIBBS Bennie Gibbs plays a baritone in the band And they claim he's the best in the land: He studies E. E. An electrician to be. And when needed is always at hand. GREGOR M. MacMILLAN Now Gregor, a sweet boy is he. Who dearly loves sipping pink tea Open house afternoons He dirties six spoon .. His object we never could see. GLADYS WHITACRE Miss Whitacrc liails from Mintello. She seems rather mushy and mello; She will any time spoon By the light of the moon. And doesn't care much who's the fellow. A flighty young girl with a grin Whote figure was not the least th By feeding him fudge. She bumfurrled the Judge And extracted his Sigma Chi pin. EARL F. POTTER There was a young man with a nose Who said, "if you choose to suppose That my nose is too long You are certainly wrong: That remarkable boy with a nose. LEONARD S. NIEMI This Ncmi and Wise both give a surprise And their profs never seem to surmise But both had to crawl When the prof hit the ball And accused the poor boy of poor eyes. STEWART M. THOMPSON Mr. Thompson reluctantly grants Hi studies don't show much advance: When asked what he did He said. "Since a kid. Picking buds off century plants." ■nineFRED FINCH Here is our dear friend. Freddie Finch. Always ;ood in any pinch. Shining in basketball and track None better as bold halfback. The girls all say he's good in a clinch HARLEY W. HOLLINGSWORTH This boy by his friend i called Harley, He doesn’t know- clover from barley. In the enginer line He thinks it’s a crime To Isold up the class just to parley. GL'SSIE POOL A young entomologist named Pool Whose soup was exceedingly cool: So she put it to boil By the aid of some oil. This ingenious young lady. Miss Pool, MARY C. FLANAGAN Mary Flanagan's hair is quite red. And she goes out with him it is said. A a booster she's there 'Cause she's seen everywhere And never goes early to bed. FRANK WARE This man Ware hails from Podunk And hi woolen pajamas have shrunk They are getting so small He can't even crawl. He tumbles right into his bunk. GLENN B. MAJOR From his name you'd think he had rank But on the ship he danced on the plank This student is rare As a gob was a bear. So he makes a big run on the bank. LEON D. SAYERS Young Sayers once took the notion To take a cool dip in the ocean. A shark gazed in awe. Then swallowed him raw. And now ha a swell shimmy motion. LLOYD DE VORF. This athlete Lloyd DeV'ore Thinks milking the cow is no chore. For the girl he doe sec At old M. S C. Makes him love Dairy Husbandry more.HAROLD EATON This New York son. Harold Eaton. Whom the girls all think a sweet 'un At the Phi Gamma each day Can be seen shoveling away That S. O. S. from last meeiin.' ERNEST C. PARS CM When Chas. Farnum goes out on the track, Tne laurels he always brings back. He can run two miles And come in all smiles. And for wind he seems never to lack. FLORENCE C. WESCH This little girl in her sleep Dreams of none but Georgie YanFleet. She steps out with Van And don't give a damn Who sees them right on the main street. BERNICE HALL Here is sweet little Bernice Hall. Some day she has no class at all. But you just ought to try To wink your left eye. I'll say, "She has dope on the ball. GLEN J. HART Said Glen J.. "All pictures arc slow But that was some season's ago, Since then he has seen. When thrown on the screen. Moving pictures enliven a show. WILLIAM B. NEVILLE There was a young student named Will. The faculty thought him a pill. The whole teaching corps-Told him three times or four. That with grief his poor wife he would kill. HARVEY F.. LIMBERT One summer evening quite hot Emmet put a new cent in the slot When the phonograph spoke He expected a joke. But refused to repeal what he got. GRANT II. HODGSKISS Hodgskiss on his bench docs perk With preconceived notions of work All day in his brain He builds castles in Spain. All other construction he’ll shirk.LEWIS H. McROBERTS This sweet loving Lewis H.—Mickey Has a far reaching tongue that is tricky Whenever he is near Girls seem to appear: But his lips don't even get sticky. HELEN M. CAREY Our charming young friend. Helen Carey Flutters around boy like a fairy But one will be wishing That he had gone fishing. Instead of deciding to marry. HENRY J. ELLINGSON This Big Timber boy. Henry J. On the llat of his back loves to lay And think of the year When Mr , is near: And watch Henry J., Jr., at play. RAYMOND KUHNS Mr. Kuhns read advertized slips Of a new- breakfast food made of chips He suited his taste By chewing in haste. And slivers got stuck in his lips. EDI TH M. STANLEY There was a young perron whose history Was always considered a mystery She sat in a ditch Although no one knew which. And composed a small treatise on history CEORGIA B. HANNAH Our class mate and friend. Georgia Hannah, Has tried every course but piano; On the Exponent StafI She doe more than half And has never yet said. “How can-na." AUGUST M. SCHNEIDER This dejected young soul. August Schneider, Has longed for a -.eat right beside 'er But owing to Clyde He went out like the tide. And now weaves a web like a spider. ERNEST C ROBINSON Ernest, while abroad was a mucker But had all his clothe of sur—sucker: The Captain asked, “Will they press!” lie replied. “More or less. But I like them the best when they pucker.ROBERT EARL DAWES This electrical student called Earl On ihc dance floor the women docs twirl. By the light of hit eyes 11c draws many sighs. Especially from a certain young girl. GEORGE C. McFARLIN There was a young man from Melrose Who danced on the tips of his toes. He loves a short Miss Whom he must stoop to kiss. This stoopinc young man from Melrose. JOSEPHINE HOLDERBY There was a young lady whose folly Induced her to sit in a holly: Whereon, by a thorn Her dress being torn. She quickly became melancholy. MYRTLE HOLLIER Every Monday one's vision is jarred By exhibits in Myrtle's back yard: There thrown to the breeze The neighborhood sees Many things it would fain disregard. In Math. Wise is slow with his wits But of high power will take a few sips. His Math looked so queer That he set up a cheer. He found he'd derived an ellipse. LUC!EX L. BEXEPE This charming young l.ucicn Who hovers o'er Buzz like a In came a Seaman. With women a demon But no one e'er won o'er a L. Benepe. canopy. Benepe. VERGLE D. GILMAN Now Yergle is quite a debatot. His diet is raw baked poiaior. He fusses Miss Ompta. And moves on the jump la Take her to the theatre. LINDLEY R DURKF.E This football fiend. Lindley Durkce Chews snulf with a motion quite jerkev. Both English and Greek He can fluently speak But Hydraulics proves rather murky. Forty-threeC. FRANK HARRIS This certain young ttudent named Zckc Whom the faculty thought very weak. He insistently craves. And for Billings he raves. This basketball player unique. PEARL BEAUCHAMP This lady hails from the city of Zion. And had a lover named Ian "I don't want to be kissed. But if you insist. God knows you are stronger than I am RAYMOND PITTS Ray Pitts often sits to jumble his wits And plays ball in a style that sure fits. This Miss Cooley says. No. So he started to go. Now he plays in a town still famous for "Schlit ." JOHN WYLIE. JR. John met Helen at the stile. And asked he: to sit for awhile: "Out walking." she queried. He replied. "I am wearied. And a Miss is as good as a mile. YERNIE POOL Vernie Pool is :o lonesome and cool That a girl of this type as a rule: Will be good to a man As no other ones can. So just give her a chance out of school. MARJORIE BURGESS While mixing a nice cltocolaie cake In a class that was learning to bake. Marj found she had gotten An egg that was rotten. Then shouted. "I’ve made a bad break IAN BRIGGS There was a young fellow named Briggs. Who wished to learn how to raise pig . So he took Aggie one But just did it for fun. And now for his living he digs. POST SCRIPT The verses you print for a dollar Are enough to make real people holler. If such verbal tricks Are called limericks. Yet maybe thi junk you will swallow.tmnontores Presulent.... Vice-President Cornelius Harrington ........Nona Sackett CORNELIUS HARRINGTON, Preiident Forty-sevenROIIRF.R GARVIN KEOWN LIPPERT AMER BUZZARD HOLLIDAY JUDD KELLEY F.BERSOI.F. WATTS WILLIAMS MURPHY BENNETT CLELAND DEAN Fnrtv.piphtWILDMAX MILLER II SI FORREST STREET M ITTHEWS. GALLIHER ROBERTSON BORDER DAVIDSON BACHMAN NOBLE. D. RICHARDS COURTNEV OMPTA FOLDER Forty-nineJOHNSON COOLEY LUTHER F.RDMAN BOHART KENCK BOLE ERDMAN CRUZES LINDSLEY WILLIS E. COOLEY REED MINK MUNTZER CLIN KEN BEARD UlYDONOHOK HOLLAND BAKER KENNEDY I FA is DEGENHART BENTON ROTH WOCASEK jorgenson RYAN CHANNER Macdonald BL'ZZARD. M. NELSON HOLMESLAND Fifty-on JONES McKEE PIETSCH ST. CLAIR KRUGER GASTON COTTINGHAM BRINF.R EGAN CHESTNUT BECKER SUTHERLAND. S FENTON AITKEN CONKLIN STRANAHANBUZZELL SHOEBOTHAM MORPHEY WYLIE SABIN MATTHEWS HAGEN TRACKWELL HOLDERBY CAMERON. R SUCCETTI ALQUIST MORRI SON-BEACH SACKETT MATTHEWS. H. POI.I.ARD SPERLING RUSSELL YOUNG MUNSON RITSEL LOMAX  Freshman President Secretary T reasurcr ... Frank Knight Donald Anderson ...Lewis Ferrell FRANK KNIGHT. President Fifty sevenMEADE CAMPBELL. P. Dr.KAY BROWN GRIFFITH JOHNSON. A. WISE NORDSTROM COTTON AS BURY DRAINEY ANDERSON COX STACY BRANDENBURG RIDER MATTHEWS SWITZER FLOOR DONOVAN MOEBUS ELMER BROOK KEELER AI.DF.RSON CAMPBELL. R. BUCKINGHAM LINDEN. C. SMITH TEN NYSWEENEY JOHNSON DYER SCHMIDT BERRY DRAINEY POORMAN ASBURY. R YOUNG LINDEN KEI.I.EMS HALSTEAD JACKSON MANIS LEARY DEAN MAHONEY PAUGH GILBERT FORD RUNDELL RASK BELSHAW FORTIN E JORDAN FELT TAYLOR BOTHAM BRYAN RADCL1FFE Fifty-nineYARBROUGH COGSWELL STOCKER ERWIN SWANSON KLINE OBF.RLE ANDERSON ZOOK NORTON HINES DONOHUE THOMPSON ZACKER HERRON WILLSON MUMEDY RUTLER MONTIOY DRAINF.Y GOODWIN GEORGE WELLS BORTON ALBRECHT JOHNSON PETERSON WHITNEY VAN FLEET SWANSONWESTLAKE MOODY HUTCHINSON PHILLIPS McCARREN CAMPBELL CTACK ANDERSON. V. HUNT OWINGS BECKER. N. KIVENKSS FLOOK ENGLISH MATTHEWS TOWN MITCHELL Macmillan CORSI.AND SHINDAHL SMITH. R. CATES ALEX FORSWALD FINLEY HOFFMAN MASHIN STUMP WALTER SEARS Sixty-oneHOLLISTER PACKER BELI. AND LECHI.ITER SCHR1NER HARDY EW U.D IM'RBER STEPHENSON TALLMAN GRAHAM BURGESS WILLIAMS. H McCANN WAITE LANG DAHLSTROM WALKER CORSEAUX GALLAGHER THOMAS CASHMORE ROTH AGRICULTURAL CLUB MEMBERS SEX IORS ELMER M. ARNESON ALBERT J. BORTON EARL W. CHATTIX HAROLD L. DICKINSON PAUL HAGAN NEIL R. JONES VICTOR LARSE LADIMER MASHIN HUBERT RICE OTTO PAUL ROBERTS FORREST ROWE STEPHEN E. SMITH PARKER STONE JACK SWEAT HOMER C. TAYLOR WILLARD TOBEY J. PAUL WALKER EARL WOOLDRIDGE SOUPHOMORES RAY E. CAMERON CHAS. J. CROWLEY LLOYD G. DEVORE RICHARD H. FARRELL STANLEY I FENTON EDGAR JOHNSON RALPH E KENCK ALBERT B. KIRK ARNOLD R. KRUGER WILLIAM C. LIPPERT HOLLIS MATHEW THOS. F. RUSSELL OSCAR TRETSVEN RALPH WIN WOOD PAUL WYLIE FRESH.MRS JOSEPH A. SWEENEY I. R. WALKER MYRON M. WESTLAKE HAROLD P. WISE HOWARD ALEX FUHRMAN ASBURY JAMES B. ATTERBURY EATON BECKER CLARENCE BRYAN WILLIAM II. BUCKINGHAM ROY I. CATRON DON CHESTERMAN HOWARD M. COTTON ROBERT S. CO TTON GARRETT DE KAY DAVID DUNAVAN GEO. LEWIS ERWIN GEORGE V. FINLEY ETHAN FORD LLOYD GRAHAM J. HENRY GREEN CHAS. HEAGENEY GEORGE HUBBER SPENCER HIIS R. E. HUTCHINSON DWIGHT JOHNSON FRANK KNIGHT CHAS. LYNDON d. e. McDonald FRESHMEX ARTHUR E. MCDONALD LEVI MACHEMER JOHN MASHIN GERALD MEAD FERGUS MITCHELL CYRIL C. MOORE GEORGE M. MORDEN C. RAYMOND MOUNTJOY AARON OLSON JOHN R. PASHA WM. LEE POPIIAM CLAIRE K. OUIST HAROLD E RASK MICHAEL REYNOLDS I. THAYER STEPHENS JOHN W. STEPHENSON JCXIORS ALFRED BAKER BEN BEACH LUCIEN BENF.PE JOHN BOWEN IAN BRIGGS HAROLD EATON ERNEST C. FARNUM FRTJD FINCH VERGE!. GILMAN NORMAN HIBBF.RT GEORGE HILI.ES HARVEY E. I.IMBERT robert e. McConnell GEORGE C. McFARLIN WALTER L. MECKLENBURG ERNEST C. ROBINSON SIDNEY S. SUTHERLAND ARTHUR R WAKEFIELD Sixty-fiveARCHITECTURAL CUB OFFICERS ...........President .... Vice-President Secretary- Treasu rer Lorren 0. Bradford... Harley Hollingsworth Findley Dlrkee...... MEMBERS SENIOR Sigvald Berg. FRESHMEN Albert W. Beck Perry Gage Clarence S. Stacy William H. Shepherd JUNIORS Lowell Bowen Lorren 0. Bradford. Lindlev Durkee Harley Hollingsworth Sixty-sixCIVIL ENGINEERING SOCIETY OFFICERS Grant McConnell Emil Saldine.... John Kohnen ___ ..........President .....Vice-President Secretary-Treasurer MEMBERS SENIORS SOPHOMORES Jesse C. Black Henry J. Bolles Edward Hagan Charles F. Harris Minor T. Holliday Elmer Olson Thomas Shoebotham Elmer J. Bush Grant B. McConnell John H. Kohnen Edward L. Sutherland FRESHMEN Arno C. Albrecht Hugh Borton Arthur F.. Burley Donald I.. Donohue Walter I). Flook John P. Gallagher Clifford C. Gile Clarence Jackson Havard W. Mann J. B. Rouse J. C. Smith JUNIORS Charles P. Carroll Raymond Kuhns Glen B. Majors Emil J. Saldine John Wylie, Jr. August M. Schneider ■scicnHOME ECONOMICS CLUB OFFICERS Louise Stone ... Florence Wesch Ella Clark..... Vera Harris____ . .. .President Vice-President ... .Secretary .... Treasurer SENIORS Zada A. Holden Frances Kyle Helen E. Lease Minnie Ellen Manjuis JUNIORS Myrtle Hollier Henrietta Mochus Ruth Noble Vemie Pool Lois Smith SOPHOMORES Mildred Forrest Helen Haller Ruth Harrer Wilma Jones Helen Lewis Hutoka Miller Tbeo. Muntzer Zelma Nelson Dorothy Noble FRESHMEN Mary English Anita Ewalt Marie George Georgia Hampton Ruth Herrcn Marjorie Longcway Marie Moebus Alice Moody Genevieve Hall Vera Harris Trena Hollier Evelina Herriott Hess I. Snyder Louise Stone Ella I). Sullivan Pearl Beauchamp Marjorie Burgess Mary Flanagan Frances Forbes Helen Hill Jlelen Tripp Florence Wesch Gladys Whitacre Evelyn Border Marion Buzzard Ella Clark Vera Cleland Opal Clinkenbeard Lady Coffer Elizabeth Cooley Hazel Davidson Mary Ebersolc Anna Omta Dorothy Reed Eva Ritschel Nona Sackett Genevieve Sperling Rosemary Track well Ruby Walker Jessie Williams Ethel Young Miriam Packer Amelia Stubbs Ruby Swanson Virginia Walker Mildred Wilson Elizabeth Young Ruth Anderson Meda Becker Marie Brandenburg Oriel Campbell Chloe Cox Laura Dahlstrom Florence Daley Dorothy DeanELECTRIC CU R Jesse Flynn................................................................President H enry Oberle.........................................................Vice-President Oliver Polder..............................................................Secretary Walter Kennedy.............................................................Treasurer The Electric Club was organized in 1907 and membership is open to all regularly enrolled students in Electrical Engineering. The custom of giving an electric show some time during the spring, which was dropped during the war is to be again CHEMISTRY CUB Alvin Pinkney Russel Picken Albert Stark President........... Vice-President . . . Secretary-Treasurer SENIORS Russell Pickens John Tyler JUNIORS Alvin Pinkney Earl Potter I-con Sayers SOPHOMORES Jesse Jlolderby Katherine Keown Marguerite Lindsley Merle Luther Donald McDonald Emmet Mathews Eugene McLaughlin Albert Stark Frank Ware Glenn Wiles Josephine Holderby Lewis McRoberts Steve Pierce Arthur Morrison Judith Murphy Marjorie Nichols Rolla Pollard Eugene Robertson William Dennett Elizabeth Bole Melvin Conklin E. B. Cottingham Richard Dean Carroll Donohoe FRESHMEN Bruce Hollister Earnest Johns Lee Kading Ray Kuhns Knox Moore Nicholas Oberle Mildred Poorman Joseph RadclifTe George Rassley Lee Ritchey Anita Thompson Olive Shreiner Charles Taylor Katherine Towne Lucien Waldorf Homer Wise William Alderson George Belshaw Warren Bryan Paul Campbell Ellen Draney Roma Elmer Lewis Ferrel Clement Griffith 't-rentv Issrd •vSl ' . as Uu MONTANA STUDENT BRANCH OF AMERICAN SOCIETY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERS President...................................................................Anker Christenson Vice-Presulent ................................................................. Secretary...........................................................Frank Bentall Treasurer...........................................................Willis W ise Honorary Chairman...............................................Dean E. B. Norris FACULTY MEMBERS Dean E. B. Norris Eric Therkleso.n SENIORS A. liowm A. Christensen JUNIORS A. E. McFarlin L. Neemi H. W. W ise SOPHOMORES M. K. Alquist Ray Amer P. A. Willis L. Hackman F. M. Bentall F. L. Bonn B. H. Chestnut R. H. Cagle Wr. Watts FRESHMEN J. C. Brook T. C. Sears H. Jordan C. J. Crowley H. L. Tenney E. B. Poulsen H. 0. Fortin H. C. White H. W. Rundell B. Halstead A. Buhlen Leonard Swan W. I. Irvine C. Davies V. Zacker 11. McCann Leslie Gilbert W'. Whitney R. 1). Rouse J. W. Hines 35 =i i y •'.'—d ’-r; fetf '-'-d ■J3 :« - 2 - - Seventy oneALPHA VI CHEMISTRY FRATERNITY OFFICERS President.......... Vice-President .... Secretary-Treasurer .Eugene McLaughlin .. .Lewis McRobkkts Albert I . Stark, Jr. MEMBERS FACULTY Professor W. M. Corleich Mr. W. D. Hatfield Mr. E. J. Qu in-Mr. W. E. Joseph STATION Mr. Edmunde Burke Mr. M. J. Blish Mr. R. S. Jones Mr. Leo C. Humphrey Mr. Earl R. Norris Mr. R. E. Sherwood Mr. Herbert B. Foote Paul David son SENIORS Eugene McLaughlin Russell Pickens Albert P. Stark. Jr. JUNIORS Lewis McRoberts Stephen C. Pierce. Jr. Alvin Pinckney Leon D. Sayers Frank Ware Glenn Wiles PLEDGES Jesse Holder by Arthur Morrison Emmett Mathew Melvin Conklin Howell Dean Carroll Donohoe Rolla Pollard Eugene Robertson [Secretarial) President. Treasurer Secretary. Dean M. Hauseman .....Ethel Briner ..Bessie B. Philips MEMBERS Aline N. Burgess Ethel Briner Ada Baker B. Marie Cline Lillian B. Chauner Helen M. Carey Opal Clack Gertrude C. Corrigeaux Bernice 0. Flook Jorene Gaston Vera A. Gallihcr Dorothy Ann Holland Florence A. Johnson Marlvn E. Judd I.onise J. K cl la ms Marion A. Keller Anna M. Mumedy Bulah Mae Manis Anna M. McKee Harriet L. Nordstrum Bessie B. Phillips Loula V. Paugli Lillian Roth Maude Rider Mildred Rohrer Gregor MacMillan Marion J. Russell Henry Oberle Edith Stanely Ruth M. Switzer Evelyn G. Scelev Flora Schmid Dana E. Wells Herbert Wildman Evelyn Waterman Janice R. Waite Seventy-threeTHE WEEKLY EXPONENT ESTABLISHED JANUARY (Outgrowth of Monthly Exponent, Establish OFFICE—ROOM 1, REPUBLICAN-COURIER BUILDING The Weekly Exponent is strictly a student enterprise. Its chief purpose is to present to its readers, each week, an accurate and complete record of the developments in college affairs during that period and to exert its full influence for the upbuilding of Montana State College. The paper the result of voluntary effort put forth by the students who compose the staff.___________ is Published every Friday of the College year by a staff chosen from the students of the Montana State College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, of the University of Montana, Bozeman, Montana. Acceptance for Mailing at Special Rate of Postage provided for in Section 1103, Act of Oct 3, 1917, authorized Feb. 17, 1919. Two Dollars Per Year Students become SUBSCRIPTION RATE. subscribers upon payment of - Ten Cents Per Copy the regular Activity Fee. Kditor-m-Chief........John II. Kohnen, ‘20 Managing Editor... Alfred E. McFari.an, '21 Business Manager..August M. Schneider, '21 Advertising Manager... Lorren Bradford, ‘21 Associate Editor...............John Tylf.r, ’20 Society Editor.............Marlyn Judd, 22 Asst. Advertising Mngr.........Earl Dawes, ‘21 Asst. Advertising Mngr..G. Lewis Erwin, 23 GENERAL REPORTIAL STAFF REPORTERS BEING SELECTED BY COMPETITION Evelyn Seeley Cornelius Harrington Minnie Ellen Marquis Merrill J. Alquist Georgia Hannah Dean Hauseman Arnold Krueger Minor Holliday Leon Mink Merrill Luther N« rpn v.?Vi r Isis 9e .DRAMATIC CU B OFFICERS Gregor MacMillan...............................................President Helen Tripp...............................................Vice-President Dorothy Ann Holland............................................Secretary Lucien Benepe..................................................Trcasurer MEMBERS Forrest Henry Dorothy Ann Holland Helen Tripp Leon Sayers Henry Oberle Minnie Ellen Marquis Frances Kyle Helen Hill Jesse Flynn Lowell Bowen Helen Hose Gregor MacMillan Georgia Hannah Clifford Corkins Lucien BenepeBOTANY-BACTERIOLOGY JOURNAL CLUB MEMBERS W. B. Mabee Ruth Green Helen Rose Florence Switzer Edith Johnson Gussie Pool H. E. Morris, Chairman D. B. Swingle H. M. Jennison H. B. Foote Grace B. Nutting R. B. Streets Seventy-sixSeventy-sevenART CLUB Leila Linfield.................................................President Mary Stranahan............................................Vice-President Amy Louise Burlincame..........................................Secretary MEMBERS Mayme Egan Gladys Mathews CH ARLOTTE CoOLEY Marie Hol.msland Ada Jones Frances Wocasek Katherine Buzzell Eleanor Marston Alide Ten Half Manila Leckliter Norma Becker The Art Club was organized in 1918 and is composed of the four-year students registered in the Applied Art course. Meetings arc held during the year and various phases of art and its relation to other subjects arc discussed by the members and the faculty. I he Applied Art course, including work in design, oil and free hand drawing, such crafts as china painting, jcwelery, basketry and all other subjects necessary for a well balanced art education. ess sss -Srl Seventy-eightV. W. C. A. CABINET OFFICERS Alinf. Burgess..... Minnie Ellen Marquis Hutoka Miller...... Gladys Mathews..... .....President Vice-President . . . .Secretary ... . Treasurer CHAIRMEN OF COMMITTEES Louise Stone ...... Leila Linfield..... Helen Hill......... Marguerite Lindsley Elizabeth Cooley ... Norma Becker....... Helen Lease........ Helen Haller....... ..........Program ........Publicity ......Conference ..........Finance ............Rooms World Fellowship ..........Social ...Social Service SeventynincALPHA EPSILON THETA GIRLS’ LITERARY SOCIETY OFFICERS ..........President .....Vice-President Secretary-Treasurer Marjorie Burcess Edith Johnson .. Helen Lease..... MEMBERS Ycrnie Pool Frances Wocasek Florence Aitken Elizabeth Cooley Theo. Xluntzer Nonecta Noble Vera Cleland Gladys Mathews Vera Galliher Mary Flanagan Marlyn Judd Ethel Briner Nona Sackett Kathryn Keown Mildred Forrest Georgia Hannah Dorothy Ann Holland Dorothy Noble Wilma Jones Genevieve Sperling Gussic Pool Marjorie Bohart Helen Carey Opal Clinkenbeard Ruth Harrer Dorothy Heed Pearl Beauchamp Hutoka Miller Hazel Davidson Marie Holmsland Aline Burgess Marion Russel Ruth Green Bess Snyder Mayme Egan Henrietta Mocbus Evelyn Seeley Ada Baker Helen Tripp Lillian Drummond Helen Hill Ruth Noble Vera Harris Florence Wesch Katherine Buzzell Mary Stranahan EightyTHE DOES The Does were organized in 1909. the result of a plan to have some kind of a jollv up consolation celebration after the passing of the mid-year examinations. When the quarter plan was adopted the girls still continued to make the Doe initiation an annual mid-year event. Every year new torturous rites are performed and the Freshmen are put through the most gruesome agonies that Sophomore brains can originate. OFFICERS Helen Lease.......................................................President Dorothy Ann Holland...............................................TreasurerWOMAN’S LEAGUE Realizing the need of some sort of organization of all College Women, the Women’s League was organized the early part of this year. The various fields of work of this organization cover many activities hut the primary objects in view are to promote better standards of scholarship, look after the social welfare and promote high moral ideals among its members. In accomplishing this work a committee of advisors is selected from the upper class girls of the College and each of these is responsible for one or more Freshman girls. It is her duty to look after the grades and other interests of the girls in her charge and try if possible to be of help to them. A further Committee is working on Student employment. The work of this committee consists of lining up and cataloguing all available work for girls and making arrangements for the filling of these positions by capable girls. A bulletin to be issued by the league will be forwarded to girls contemplating attending the College containing a great deal of useful information, such as things to bring to College, and some of the first problems the Freshman girl meets. OFFICERS Opal Clinkenbeard............. Marguerite Lindsley......... Dorothy Ann Holland......... Frances Forbes ............. President .........................V ice-Prcsident ...............................Secretary ...............................TreasurerCOUNCIL Of WOMEN'S LEAGUE With the growth of Montana State the need for a central organization of women became more necessary every year. In the fall of 1919 Dean Herrick offered the Women's League plan to the women of M. S. C. As the order developed it affiliated with the national organization and in the fall of 1920 sent two representatives to the Western Conference at Pullman, Washington. A council of ten form the executive committee. Opal Clinkenbeard was elected first president of Women's League. Eighty-threeSTUDENT SENATE ...........President Councilman at large . . . .Senior President ... Junior President Sophomore President Homer Taylor....... Ruth Noble......... Henry Michel....... Norman Hibbert..... Cornklius Harrington STUDENT COUNCIL Homer Taylor....... Henry Michel....... Norman Hibbert..... Cornelius Harrington Ruth Noble......... R ay Pitts......... Lewis McRoberts..... Russell Pickens..... Charles Carroi..... Yercel Gilman...... John Kohnen........ Henry Michei....... .......................President ................Senior President ................Junior President .............Sophomore President ............Councilman at large .......Commissioner of Athletics .......Commissioner of Finance . .Commissioner of Interests Social . .Commissioner of Demonstrations .....Commissioner of Forensics ... .Commissioner of Publications Commissioner of Interests MusicalINTER TRATER IT) COUNCIL Top Row—John Wylie, Jack Sweat. Ben Beach. Albert Stark, Ambrose Rvan son Erdman, Alfred McFarlin. Second Row—Pearl Beachamp, Francis Kyle, Leila Linfield, Edith Johnson, era Harris, Edith Stanley. Mayme Egan The Inter-Fraternity Council was formed in October, 1919, by representatives of all of the fraternities and sororities on the campus. They make all rules pertaining to rushing and the governing of inter-fraternity life at the college. The Council is growing in strength and prestige each year.DEBATE ighty-seven“Sid" Sutherland and Ian Briggs, who met the Utah Aggies in debate in Bozeman. “Con" Harrington a n 1 Charles Lyndon, a couple of "Old Erin" blarneyers. who took on the Methodists from Helena. Virgil Gilman and Leon Sayers, two old-time Montana State orators, who exchanged words in the annual talk-fest with our rivals from the University."rU Ua W-. Wi VP'JSrSL'.'rrf'. £3 If iMlfl ' K i ; W] ! F? us ! It ' « bY i ; ' Ul I f-fL W M • . -d c:fle COFFEE CLUB OFFICERS Vercle Gilman...............................................................President Leon Sayers............................................................Vice-President Sidney Sutherland.................................................Secretary-Treasurer MEMBERS Robert McConnell Sidney Sutherland Ward St. Clair Ian Briggs Cornelius Harrington Charles Lyndon Minor Holliday Glenn D. Wiles Harley Hollingsworth Arthur Morrison Earl Buckingham Leon I). Savers HONORARY MEMBERS Professor W. F. Brewer Mr. Edward C. Duddy r V mi §3 n t--. 14 Se-'j {5; sr jft $ L‘ it £ • m {£3 —2 J.-v. 1 c y ii 1 a Ifl 3 a i . r t •Sg ; SS " fc2 m i: Vera Harris Leila Lixfield Louise Stone C fP AjQ GOWN SOCIETY Senior Women's Honorary Society The Cap and Gown Society, the senior women’s honorary society, was established by the faculty of the Montana State College upon the instigation of the Bozeman Panhellenic. The members of the Cap and Gown are chosen for scholarly attendance, participation in college activities and character. The members are chosen each year at commencement time from members of the junior class. 1920 MEMBERS V.-_ ________ORCHESTRA Prof. W. G. Nash, Director Violins A. Bulea G. DcKav V. Walter E. Norris E. Fa mum J. Brook G. Sabin W. F. Day Anita Thompson Flora Schmidt Muriel Moore Ruth Anderson Drums- Melvin Conklin Clarinet s- Cornets Minor Holliday Ralph Hilton John Wylie Ben Beach Piano Minnie Ellen Marquis-• 5 GLEE CU B Professor Aaron H. Currier, Director T enors Joseph Sweeney Howard Ales Robert McConnell Millard Peterson Harley Hollingsworth Basses Wellington Hardy Roy Cagle Henry Bolles Alvin Pinckney Glenn D. Wiles 1 i $4 Mindy-three L. L. HOWARD, Band Leader THE BAUD The Montana State College hand had a banner year during the 1919-20 season. As soon as school started, Director Howard commenced getting his old men and new together for his organization of musicians. As the year advanced a number of obstacles were encountered in the premature closing of school, the long Christmas vacation and the very cold weather, but these were all safely passed. The band gradually decreased from about forty in number to twenty-five, due to some of the men being obliged to quit school and for various other reasons. When the organization started on its annual trip which began April 15th, a long season of practice had been put in and the bunch were at their best. The band played to capacity-houses in Townsend, Great Falls, Lewistown, Billings and several other towns. The trip was a huge success, the concerts being very good everywhere and the college was advertised also during the trip. Altogether the trip was a great success and Director Howard was more than pleased by the way in which affairs turned out. The band finished its season with its appearance Visitors’ Day at the college. Lou expects a large number of his old men back next year as a nucleus for his 1920-1921 organization, which he hopes to develope into a larger and better band than this year’s, if this can be possible. Ninety-fivePHI UPS LON 0 MI CRON Epsilon Chapter HONORARY HOME ECONOMICS FRATERNITY i Founded at College of Agriculture, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, Feb. 10. 1909) ROLL OF CHAPTERS Alpha—University of Minnesota, St. Paul, Minn. Beta—North Dakota Agricultural College, Fargo, N. 1). Gamma—University of Ohio. Columbia, Ohio. Delta—University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyo. Epsilon—Montana State College, Bozeman, Mont. Zcta—University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho. EPSILON CHAPTER HONORARY MEMBERS Carlotta M. Ford Alba Bales SORORES IN UNIVERS1TATE 1920 1921 Genevieve Hall Minnie F.llcn Marquis Vera Harris Louise Stone Pearl Beauchamp Marjorie Burgess Helen Tripp Gladys Whitacre 1922 Hutoka Miller SORORES IN URBE Georgia Knott Mary H. Brown Mrs. Clara Campbell Bess M. Rowe Marv Ann Graber Epsilon Chapter was installed at Montana State College in May, 1917. The members are chosen from the upper two-fifths of the sophomore, junior and senior economics classes. a •- -Kr. ■ —■ » A. n . .Y inety-sfirnTREBLE H. Currier. Director Professor Aaros Second Soprano Ada Baker Vera Clelatul Charlotte Cooley Dorothy Dean Roma Elmer Dorothy Hagan Dorothy Ann Holland Marlyn Judd Rosemary Track well Ruth Norton First Soprano Florence Aitken Katherine Bczzell Marie Brandenburg Opal Clinkenbeard Gladys Mathews Marie Moebus Mona Sackett Mice Moodv Pearl Beauchamp Meda Becker Elizabeth Cooley Helen Haller Kathryn Keown .Minnie Ellen Marquis“M” CLUB The “M" Club was organized in the fall of 1912, and men who have won their letter in any cf the college sports are eligible to become members. The purpose of the Club is to boost Montana State College and the athletics which she fosters. The “M" Club has charge of the annual interscholastic basketball tournament, in which the different high school basketball teams participate. The club gives several dances during the year and is one of the most select upon the "hill." OFFICERS C. Frank Harris...................................................................President Joe Rush.....................................................................Vice-President Homer Taylor ...........................................................Secretary-Treasurer MEMBERS Lester Bachman Anker Christiansen Harold Dickson Frank Harris Arthur Jorgenson Kenneth King Ladimer Mashin Lloyd Morphy Henry Obcrle Raymond Pitts Hubert M. Rice Otto P. Roberts Eugene Robertson Homer Taylor Willard Tobey One hundred one COACH POWELL Coach Powell came to this college for the first time last fall with fine record from Wisconsin as a player, and West Missouri, Western Reserve, as a coach and as a physical director in the U. S. Naval station, Charleston. S. C., under Walter Champ. We may even go further and state that any of those of our number form the show-me state soon had their eyes opened when the coach got into action on the Gridiron.HAROLD DICKSON Football Manager “Dick” began handling the financial and moral destinies of the Bobcat football team in the fall of 1919. A couple of years’ experience in the A. E. F. taught him the necessary lesson of taking abuse with a smile, and lie went through the season with countenance unruffled. After graduation tackled the farming game and late in the summer took unto himself a manager all his own. One Hundred ThreeHOMER TAYLOR (Quarterback) Homer is one of the many old timers who answered the call of sport and alma mater this fall after their return from serving Uncle Sam. Homer's shifty play, speed and fast headwork on the field made him the logical man for the position of quarterback which position, as well as that of team captain, he held down in a very efficient manner in-cidently carrying the ball for the only score against the Bruins. LLOYD MORPHY ITackle) Pat is another of the vets returned to the institution last fall and as might have been expected held down a regular berth as tackle. Pat is to be captain of next year’s team and with his speed and knowledge of the game we are looking for some year under his leadership.VICTOR LARSE Vic this year played his last year of football for the college. Vic makes a good strong line man and can always he counted on to hold his own at all times and make it hot for the fellow who gets in his way. Pud started his football career some time in the past with the Gallatin County High school and from there came up to College and soon made the team after which he went into Uncle Sam’s service and made some more teams and finished by coming back and punching the line again last fall for some of the best gains made. HENRY OBERLEGEORGE McFARMN Some times known as Blubber, is one of this year’s first stringers and while Blubber did not play in all of the games he showed some great possibilities which will make him a valuable asset to next year’s squad. One hundred sitWILLARD TOBEY Better known as Bill, was another of Coach Powell’s boys on the line. Bill has played on the team some in the past giving him experience which coupled with weight and ability as an athlete made him a hard man for his opponents to handle. FRED FINCH This is Freddies third year out for football and like that prehistoric liquid the chemists tell us about, Fred improves with age so next year we may look for Fred out cavorting around the gridiron adding further laurels to his alrcadv heavy wreath. One Hundred SevenANKER CHRISTENSEN (Centre) Christy “Xty” was without argument the biggest man on the team and in fact about the biggest in the institution. Christy was next to invincible on the line and when opposing quarterbacks sent runners down his alley they were prone to stop rather suddenly. NORMAN HIBBERT Hib turned out for football this year for the first time and has developed into a fast line man serving this year in the capacity of sub centre. With Christy absent next year Hib will undoubtedly win his spurs as a regular.KENNETH KING ing was brought out from the •nd team a couple of years ago played quarterback but this year ■ found a new berth for him at back. King plays a strong game the defense and is right there er carrying the ball or in the rference. Kenneth will be keenly •cd next year. EUGENE ROBERTSON Better known as the Gob, reported back to M. S. C. from the U. S. Navy and was known to every one on the hill as the son of the Chief of Police. However with his experience in Gallatin High the Gob soon made a rep for himself. One Hundred NineWILDMAN Wildman put in a season’s work on the line, and although he did not land a regular berth, he made a name as the kind of a plugger who could go in and be relied upon. WAKEFIELD Arthur is one of Powell’s squad whose work is not marked so much by his record in the scores of games but nevertheless did his best on the practice field and may always be counted on as a hard worker and in the future a comer. One inmired tenOne Hundred Eleven DEVORE Devore is a fast and heady player who helped to give the Bobcats their place on the football map. Lloyd can always be counted on to deliver the goods when called upon. DURKEE Durkee was not quite able to make the regular line up this year but is a husky boy lif you don’t believe it look at his picture) and is looked on as one of the mainstays of next year’s team. LADIMER MASHIN {End) Mashin, while out for football for the second season of his career on the gridiron, proved to be one of the fastest and shiftiest ends on both offense and defense in the northwest. You have probably noticed, however, a picture of Mashin wearing a cap and gown somewhere near the front of this book, hence we can’t couijt on him for next year. RALPH WINWOOD Ralph did not get an opportunity to show up as much as might have been expected on account of injuries at the start of the season which kept him out of the game from then on. However, when Windy once gets started you can figure that he will go some. One Hundred TwelveSTREET Street turned out for the big sport tliis year for the first time and got some valuable experience which in another year will make a competitor show some class to keep him from earning a regular berth on the team. Garvcn has done duty both on the gridiron and the basketball floor with the Bobcats and is one of them who may always be found on the job. One Hundred ThirteenOctober 11—Bobcats ................... 0 October 18—Bobcats.................. 4-3 October 25—Bobcats.................... 0 November 1—Bobcats.................... 0 November 15—Bobcats................... 6 Wyoming ................... 6 Mines ..................... 0 Utah Aggies............... 19 Utah Univ................. 66 U. of Mont................. 6 “FOOTBALL DOPE” m Almost immediately after registration the call for football men was issued by Coach Powell and lovers of the sport from all of the classes reported for duty in good shape so that they were able to have the first scrimmage against Gallatin High School on the second day of October. At this time some 50 men had reported for duty and prospects for the season looked very bright, several old men were back and a large number of recruits with ambitions to become future stars of the gridiron manv of the latter hailing from High Schools of the state where they had won considerable fame in advancing the pigskin. Due to the conference ruling which provided that no Freshman is eligible for football a considerable amount of very promising material had to be left out of consideration and the Frosh had to remain content to play one game with the University of Frosh and getting some experience for coming seasons. The first big contest of the season was the Wyoming game played at Casper with the disastrous result of 6-0 in favor of Wyoming. There were streaks of good ball throughout the game, but it was evident that there were green men on both sides. Their touchdown was made by fair and square football tactics and was well deserved. After a week’s practice during which some of the weak spots discovered in the Wyoming game were polished off the team had worked itself into a very efficient fighting machine for the Mines game which was the first opportunity for the gridiron enthusiasts of the college to see the Bobcats in action on the campus. The result of this game was that the Bobcats outclassed the Miners to the tune of 47-0. Following the Mines game came a week’s hard grind in preparation for the Utah game. This game was characterized by a number of fumbles due to a muddy field and a number of serious injuries to first string players resulted in the Bobcats getting the short end of the score, 19-0. Before returning home a second game was played in Utah with the State I ni-versity. The team was badly crippled from the game of the previous week, Captain Taylor being so seriously injured that he was not able to enter the game at All and the Bobcats were losers of 66-0 game. Despite their injuries the Bobcats returned from L tali with spirits undampened and ready for the final practices for the climax of the season, the Bruins game. The Bruins were outclassed in every department of the game and while the official score was 6-6 there will always be considerable argument and doubt in the minds of the M. S. C. boosters as to the second touchdown we thought we had. Practically all of the game was plaved in Bruins’ territory while the Bobcat goal was threatened only once. The touchdown made by the U. was the result of a 70-yard run by Adams while Captain Taylor carried the ball for the Bobcats’ touchdown. While we did not get all of the bear meat we wanted, Brer Bear went home minus several pieces of his shiny coat. “A FEW’ FIGURES TO FIGURE ON.”BASKETBALL KAY PITTS Ray is not quite as heavy as he might be which handicapped him in the race for positions on the team, however, he made the squad and whenever sent into the game delivered '.he goods he was sent in to deliver. One Hundred Fifteen“ZEKE” HARRIS “Zeke" Harris, the long-boy from Billings, played the style of ball throughout the season that helped the Bobcats make a name in the Chicago tournament in 1917. He outjumped every man he played against and was a power of defense. HOMER TAVLER Homer Tayler, another survivor of the famous 1916-17 team, played a wonderful game of ball last year. His ability to drop in the ball from a position that would make a contortionist ashamed of himself, easily ranks him as an All-Northwestern forward.JOE BUSH Joe Bush, or Old Reliable, also made the trip to the Chicago tourney. Joe lost a few teeth in the Missoula game, but he never lost his head in any game. An opposing forward would shoot far and wide when he saw Joe coming, and would then regret having shot at all. Joe carries a long grudge against a certain Butte sport writer. One Hundred Seventeen“GOB ROBERTSON “Gob Robertson made good as general utility man. The games lie played in gave him a world of experience and the next few years should see him stepping with the best of them. KENNETH KING Kenneth King, although married, always played a steady, heady game. He was the kind of a man that a coach likes to have around, and although he never made a spectacular or grandstand play, he also never pulled a “boner.” (file Hundred E:REGULARS FRESHMEN One Hundred NineteenV RED” CARRELI Yell LeaderOne hundred twenty oneLes Bouffons, the honorary men’s social fraternity, has just completed the most successful period of its twenty-year existence. Les Bouffons Formal is considered the elite event of the year and this year the Ball maintained its reputation as a unique and wholly delightful affair. Several informal theatre parties were also given. Aside from social activities, the Fraternity has made a positive contribution toward the promotion of scholarship in the school, by presenting a beautiful loving cup for competition by the men’s Fraternities. The cup is to be held successively by that Fraternity maintaining the highest average of scholarship for the year. The return of members from the war has increased the membership to fourteen, but the constitution permits of only ten active members selected from the upper classmen. Abert P. Stark, Retiring President Hubert M. Rice Harold J. Dickson Gregor M. MacMillan Arthur I. Hoem Elmer J. Bush Horner C. Taylor Jesse B. Flynn Henry R. Michel John H. Kohnen Norman W. Hibbert Lewis H. McRoberts Fred Finch Clyde E. Roneym I ■ MB ff-'yb - TOBEY BERG BRADFORD SCHNEIDER MICHEL STONE HARRIS ERWIN BRYAN DICKSON ELLINGSON CHESTNUT SIGMA CIII STUMP RICE WILLIAMS STREET MORRISON WHITNEY CATES MITCHELL W ILI.SON RICHARDS BENEPE ANDERSON G. McFARLIN SWEENEY Macdonald BUSH HOLLISTER DtKAY Chip huntlrpt! lirfnlv-iour CARROLL HARRINGTON A. McFARLIN AI.QUIST STARK KOHNEN ' -C ._. i- PLEDGES Levi Machimer Arthur MacDonald Fred Stump One Hundred Twenty-five SIGMA CHI J. M. Hamilton E. F. Bunker Roy Malsor Whit Spain Glenn Willson FRATRES IN FACULTATE FRATRES IN URBE M. H. Spaulding Herman Willson John Taylor Harvey Griffin Don I.angohr FRATRES IN UN1V ERS1TATE 1920 Albert P. Stark. Jr. Harold Dickson Willard H. Tobey John H. Kohnen Alfred E. MeFarlin Frank Harris Charles P. Carroll Elmer J. Bush George MeFarlin Ben H. Chestnut Albert B. Richards Con. Harrington Joe II. Willson Bruce Hollister Joe Sweeney Donald W. Andefson Fergus G. Mitchell Hallam Williams 1921 1922 1923 Henry R. Michel Hubert M. Rice Parker Stone August M. Sehneider Lorren 0. Bradford Henry J. Ellingson Lucicn L. Benepe Sigvald L. Berg M. J. Alquist Donald I.. MacDonald Arthur L. Morrison Wallace F. Whitney Leonard R. Swan Clarence A. Bryan G. L. Erwin Havard Mann Edward Cates Garrett DeKav Warren BryanSIGMA ALMA EPSILON LIPPF.RT HOEM BEACH PICKENS ROBERTSON MINK H MATTHEWS BOTH AM M WESTLAKE HAGEN HOLLIDAY CRLZF.N CAMPBELL SALDIKE VAN FLEET BOWEN EATON HIBBERT KNIGHT lACQl'F.S FINCH McDonnell WYLIE COGSWELL I. ARSE CASHMORF. DONOHOE RONEY E MATTHEWS BAKER McROBERTS CAMERON HENRY HAUSEMAN DEAN SAYF.RS MacmillanW. F. Schoppc L. A. Copeland Zales N. Ecton Walter C. Gallon SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON Montana Alpha Chapter (Founded October 29, 1919) (Kappa N. U. Local, Organized March. 1912) FRATRES IN FACULTATE II. L. Seamans L. C. Humphrey FRATRES IN URBE H. L. Holm Ray S. Jones George A. Roosevelt Ralph L. Smith A. Leroy Strand Lovitt I. Westlake Forrest G. Henry Arthur I. Hocm Ben Beach Alfred L. Baker Lowell E. Bowen Harold F. Eaton Fred Finch Jesse C. Black Tom V. Bogy Kenneth Bright Ray E. Cameron Fred T. Cruzcn R. Howell Dean J. Paul Campbell Herbert D. Cashmore Edward B. Cogswell L. J. Ferrell FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE Ernest B. Stanley. '19 1920 Victor F. Larsc Russell M. Pickens 1921 Dean M. Hauscman Norman W. Hibbert Robert E. McConnell Gregor M. MacMillan Lewis II. McRoberis 1922 Carroll P. Donohue Edward Hagen Minor T. Holliday Edgar D. Johnson Arnold R. Kruger William C. Lippert 1923 Henry F. Jacques Dwight Johnson Frank H. Knight Cyril C. Moore PLEDGE William B. Nevill Clyde E. Roney John L. Tyler Emil J. Saldine Leon D. Sayers Fred K. Steel Emmet S. Matthews Hollis W. Matthew I.con D. Mink Paul R. Wylie Ralph Winwood W. Lee Pophatn Eugene Robertson George S. Van Fleet, Jr. Myron M. Westlake OMEGA BETA FLYNN OBERLE McCARRF.N HART GARVIN DICKMAN KUHNS H. BORTON DfVORF. AMF.R BOWEN I MASII1N SL'CETTI MAIOR DURKEE TAYLOR CHRISTF.RSEN HAGEN FINLEY HODGSKISS McDonnell JOHNSON MORPHF.Y WYLIE FENTON BORTON. A. McCANN ARNFSON PITTS IORGENSON HASTINGS I. MASH IN CLASS KF.LI.EY ROBERTS WATTS SUTHERLAND DEGEN 11 ART LUTHER c ' m M Igf f r mfv » trht n.. - k..„.i ,iOMEGA BETA i Organized May, 1915 ) Color: Green and Gold MEMBERS 1920 Elmer Arneson A. L. Christensen Herman Dickman J. C. Flynn E. R. Glass P. J. Hagan J. L. Hastings Ladimer Masliin G. B. McConnell Henry Oberle Raymond Pitts Jack Sweat Homer Taylor Albert J. Borton Otto Roberts John W. Bowen L. R. Durkee G. J. Hart Grant Hodgskiss 1921 Lloyd DeVore Raymond Kuhns John Wylie Glenn Major W. R. Amer W. F. Garvin Arthur R. Jorgenson E. J. Kelley M. K. Luther L. A. Morphey Edward C. Preston 1922 Glenn Succtti Willard Watts Sidney Sutherland A. E. Johnson F. H. Degenhart Stanley Fenton Hugh Borton John Masliin 1923 R. P. McCarren Harry McCann One hundred twenty-nineBETA EPSILON HOLDERBY STEPHENSON OBERI.E POLDER SHOEBOTHAM F.RDMAN ANDERSON WISE McLAUGH' IN GIBBS ASBL'RY RIVEN ES IORDAN WELLS WHITE WARE SMITH DYER STEVENS KENCK KENNEDY HARDY PETERSON LANG ALDF.RSON RYAN SCHl.'RCH BACHM N GILBERT RUNDELL SEARSBETA EPSILON 1922 Thomas B. Shoebolham Ralph E. Kenck Lester E. Bachman Oliver H. Pouder I. Thayer Stevens Ambrose A. Ryan Wilson A. Erdman Jesse I. Holderby Walter A. Kennedy 1923 Harold P. Wise Ernest T. Swanson Millard E. Peterson Howard C. Jordan Dana E. Wells Wayne T. Getchell Lloyd W. Dyer Leslie S. Gilbert William A. Alderson T. G. Arthur Scars Vernon L. Anderson Harry W. Rundell John W. Stephenson Harold C. White Alf. I. Rivenes Nicholas Oberlc Frateres in Facultate Prof. W. D. Tallman Major John P. Bubb Dr. W. D. Hatfield Prof. Edmund Burke 1920 Eugene M. McLaughlin Neal R. Jones 1921 Frank E. Ware Arthur R. Wakefield Albert B. Kirk Benjamin F. Gibbs Edward C. Schurch Herbert L. Lang Clifford A. Philo F. H. Smith Pledges W. Claude Hardy Frchrman A. Asburv John PashaSORORES IN UNIVERSITATE 1920 Genevieve Hall Leila Linfield Minine Ellen Marquis Helen Rose Lillian Drummond Henrietta Moebus 1921 Helen Tripp 1922 Florence Aitken Evelyn Border Charlotte Cooley Mildred Forrest Dorothy Ann Holland Marlyn Judd Dorothy Noble Nonceta Noble Gladys Mathews Mary Stranahan Ethel Young Oriel Campbell Marie Moebus 1923 Harriett Nordstrom Bess Phillips Pledge Chloe Cox Mary Curl SORORES IN URBE Mrs. W. F. Schoppe Patronesses Mrs. W. S. Davidson Mrs. W. F. Schoppe ALPHA OMICRON PI Alpha Phi Chapter (Founded February 23, 1917) (Aneves Club, Organized April, 1915) tors a One Hundred Thirlv-threeSACKETT STANLEY WATERMAN MARSTON NORTON HAGAN SWITZER KEOWN PHI GAMMA TEN HALF KYLE LINDSLEY NOBLE HILL TRACK WF.I.L HUTTON MOODY WESCH BL'ZZELL BURLINGAME GEORGERuth Noble Frances Kvle 1921 Florence Wesch Edith Stanley Evelyn Waterman 1922 Katherine Bu .zell Nona Sackelt Marguerite Lindslcy Eleanor Marston Amy Louise Burlingame Alide Ten Half Alice Moody 1923 Rosemary Trackwell Katherine Keown Jorene Gaston Dorothy Hagan Dorothy Hutton Marie George Ruth Norton THETA XI HARRIS BRANDENBURG PACKER BEAUCHAMP CLACK BAKER LEASE HALLER FORBES SEELEY LEWIS M HOLLIER WAITE HERRIOTT MILLER BUZZARD M. BURGESS T. HOLLIER E. CCX)LF.Y SWITZER MUNTZER BOI.F. ENGLISH A BURGESS STONE THETA XI (Organized February, 1917) Colors: Blue and Copper and Pink HONORARY MEMBERS Mrs. J. R. Parker Mrs. J. A. Thaler MEMBERS Seniors Sophomores Vera Harris Helen Lease Evelena Herriott Trena Hoi Her Ada Baker Louise Stone Evelyn Seeley Hutoka Miller Helen Lewis Elizabeth Bole Helen Haller Elizabeth Cooley Theo. Muntzer Marion Buzzard Juniors Freshmen Pearl Beauchamp Myrtle Hollicr Marjorie Burgess Aline Burgess Frances Forhes Janice Waite Marie Brandenburg Opal Clack Pledces Mary English Ruth Switzer Miriam Packer Were installed into Chi Omega. October, 1920. s 5 • s GOLLIHER HOLMSLAND V. FOOL DRAINED FLOOR WOCASEK W r 'S «.' A A' A IOTA DELTA E. JOHNSON KEELER WILLIAMS F. JOHNSON G. POOL DAVIDSON CLELAND BE- AIOTA DELTA (Organized Spring, 1919) Colors: Purple and Cream PATRONESSES Mrs. L. I). Conklin Mrs. G. L. Martin Mrs. G. Y. Patten Mrs. Rutlidge Mrs. J. H. Williams Mrs. Purdum MEMBERS Juniors Edith Johnson Gussic Pool Yernie Pool Sophomores era Cleland Vera Galliher Merie Holmesland Frances Wocasek Hazel Davidson Freshmen Pledges r lorence Johns Ellen Draney Bernice Elook Marion Keeler Jessie Williams Anita Thompson Mildred Tallman One hundred thirty-nineROTH HERRON CAREY SIT-: RUNG JONES M. BECKER F. S. C. GIRLS SNYDER N. BECKER FLANAGAN EBF.RSOLE REED M1NTFR l - Cine hundred I nr tvOne hundred forty-one F. S. C. GIRLS Norma Becker..........................Sophomore Meda Becker............................Freshman Helen Carey..............................Junior Opal Clinkenbeard.....................Sophomore Mary Ebersole.........................Sophomore Mary Flanagan...........................Jun ior Ruth Herron............................Freshman Wilma Jones ..........................Sophomore Anna Ompta............................Sophomore Dorothy Reed..........................Sophomore Lillian Roth ..........................Freshman Bess Snyder..............................Senior Genevieve Sperling ...................Sophomore ROBERTA MiNTER..................Honorary MemberCOLLEGE FAVORITE CONTEST THE BEST DANCER Evelyn Waterman Gladys Matthews Jorene Gaston THE HOST SENSIBLE GIRL ♦Ruth Noble Dorothy Noble Peg Lindsley THE MOST POPULAR GIRL ♦Dorothy Ann Holland Helen Hill Katherine Keown THE BEST LOOKING GIRL Genevieve Hall Marie George ♦Dorothy Hutton THE MOST ATTRACTIVE GIRL Mary Curl Rosemary Track well ♦Helen Tripp THE MOST STUNNING GIRL •Nona Sackett Marie Mocbus Vera Harris THE MOST CONGENIAL GIRL Frances Kyle Marlyn Judd Edith Stanley THE SWEETEST GIRL ♦Ethel Young Ruth Norton Henrietta Mocbus •Denotes Winners I,...,, -,,, ..............GLADYS MATHEWS Miss Gladys Matthews rose in two years from a bashful Freshman to a chorus girl was effected in the ranks of the oriental fantasy staged by the Junior class. Engaged at first as one of the “Ten and Thirty-six." she soon showed her talent and ability that she would not have to depend upon beauty alone. This season she has the title role in Edward Socke's comedy, “The Dancer One hundred forty-threeRUTH NOBLE Miss Noble who is finishing two straight seasons of playing in Bozeman, which is a record, by portraying Juliet in Borneo and Juilet in a series of double performances, with one of the schooTs leading athletes from li hiteliall, England. Next year this charming and beautiful young actress will again star in another famous Shakespearean play and is expected to bring a house down over her partner’s head. One hundred forty-four DOROTHY ASS HOLLASD Dorothy Ann Holland, who possesses unusual ability for getting emotional effects off the screen, has emerged after a three-year • period of schooling, as a star of the first magnitude. She has repeatedly turned down offers from the Famous Players Piasky Corporation in order to continue her dramatic studies. Her following has steadily increased unlit she has become one of the most popular actresses upon the local stage. One hundred forty-fiveDOROTHY HUTTON. Dorothy Hutton gave up u contemplated course of study preparatory to a debut at the Ellen Opera, Bozeman, in order to play the leading feminine part in “Four-Leaf Clovers," whose sweet, endearing words were written by "Swede" Alquist, the famous backstop. This is one of the leading affairs of the present Bozeman season. It has lately been said upon good authority that a strong affection between Miss Hutton and the author has developed since "Swede" conceived this brilliant brain child.HELEN TRIP ' Helen has attained stardom in the second step oj her career. I year ago she made her debut in the spring comedy, “Helen's Babies," in which she acted in Bozeman, Butte and other leading theatrical cities. Since the departure oj her former partner she has been playing in drama, but it is hoped by all of her followers that she will soon return to comedy. One hundred forty sevenNONA SACKETT Miss Nona Socket t. who co-starred a year ago in the spring drama, "Maying with a King” Since this great triumph she has been constantly in the student eye. Lately she has been playing minor parts, but shortly, upon the return oj her former partner in her first great success it is thought that she will again star in a new musical comedy, "Sailing on the HudsonMARY LI ! HDD Marylin, who is one oj the cleverest oj the younger actresses in the school, is a Montana girl, born in Canada. She shows a remarkable aptitude tor obtaining a college education outside oj school hours and during her meteroric career has obtained a following oj a much older actress. One hundred forty-nineETHEL YOUNG This winsome little star is just finishing her second season in Bozemans "Evening Frolic.” By her dainty ways and clever acting she has attained the pinnacle of success in a very short time. Her “first-nighters" are always in their regular seals and the press comment has been very favorable. It is hoped that in the next year or so she will return from the silent drama to the speaking stage as her first great success was made in this branch of dramatic art. One hundred fiftyOne hundred fifty-threeOne hundred fifty-fourOne hundred fifty-fiveOne hundred fifty sixOne hundred fitly sevenOne hundred fiftv-eiehtOne Hundred Fifty-nineOne Hundred Sixty-oneOne Hundred Sixty-twoOne Hundred Sixty-threeOne Hundred Six tv-six One Hundred Sixty-seren April Fool’s Day, 1919— Dr. McMurray of Columbia University delivered an excellent and instructive talk on the subject of “Growth" at a special assembly. Dan Noble has troubles of bis own—“Say when you fellows sew up my clothes, put on a few buttons.” April 2nd— Helena is given honor as State “Champs" Bush and Pitts bad charge of the games. “Jesse James” puts a hold-up sign on the Bulletin Board. April 3rd— Discussion clubs are organized On the Hill by Mr. ogel, an architectural engineer of the Orient. The “Phi Gams” use 219 regular “Mamma’s” Gravy did not call up for dinner. ft"' April 4th— The Juniors celebrate at a very successful dance in the Drill Hall. “Jedge” got away at “Jesse James” Junior Dance easy, he now has a new collar and tie. April 5th— “Honest John” Lillard gives good advice to “Blubber.” “Financially a man goes broke supporting two Queens.” April 8th— DF.AN RICHTER RESIGNS. “Boy, isn’t that a grand and glorious feeling.” April 12th— Maggie and Jorcne celebrate somebodv’s birthday and take a ride on the “Baby Tank.” =3 April 17th— Memories of the good old days of Peter Kotch are given us at assembly. Banquet and installation of officers of the Y. W. C. A. April 18th—- “Shorty” Bachman takes the Cross-Country for the Frosh in 15:12 seconds flat. “Paul Revere Rode again.” ' One hundred sixty-nine pril 19th— Received a case of fresh eggs—'I he "Sigs." Life for a few days is assured April 20th— Orchestra and hand practice go hard on dates for “Davutsen.” The Freshmen play a practical joke and give “R. O.’s” fish away April 21st— The Seniors heat the Sophs, 18-6, in the first inter-class baseball Gene” Street gives a party for the Sigs and ‘‘Bill” Toby drank most of the punch. April 25th— I irson s Jazz Band at the Electric. Very well attended by Faculty and Students. An exhibition of the Soph Moon-light Dance was given in the lower hall of the Main Building. The Frosh and Soph inter-class track meet was taken by the Freshmen. April 26th— The best dance ever held in the College Gymn, The Soph “Moonlight Dance, Every dance was a moon. Country life at Salesville has a strange elTect on “Scotty Graves and Mills see the aviators in Butte todav. April 28th— The Phi Gammas start ticket sale on their “Relief" Dance; they board up their windows. April 30th— Benepe as a returned soldier makes his appearance and talks like one of those Mule Skinner’s Bunkies.p m V-r ri May Day— The Sororities pass a number of baskets around to the Fraternity houses, however no one was caught. May 2nd— “Schneider has a walk like some duck I know” -Col. House. Inspecting Officer for the Rotcies—R. 0. T. C. May 3rd— Seniors buy out the millinery department at Woolworth’s. May 6th— Some unknown CO-EDS give the boys a serenade at a very early hour this morning. May 7th— At the Inter-class track meet today the Juniors came first. •: ft May 8th— Gloomy day “Chubby” didn't get her “painful” letter. Now, who’s Chubby? The Sigs want Red Carroll removed from the job as Yell Leader ’cause he sings Oh M. S. C. in his sleep. May 9th— The Phi Gamma Benefit Dance for the French Blind held at the Elk’s Home was very good, but of no benefit. “Proxy” Hamilton just insists that Benepe tell his experience of France, to the students at the assembly. May 10th— The Frosh Paint the “M.” “ledge” get in an argument with the Hashers at the Club and “Donny” protects him from the Vild Vimmen. May 12th— The Frosh get revenge on those of their number who failed to paint on the “M.” May 14th— The Architects take a Lamb into the Library, Bowen. “We're looking for ‘Liz’s Goat." One hundred seventy-oneMay 15th— Some of the boys from here take in the Missoula track meet. “The box cars were not so bad”—Benny. Mav 16th— “Red” gives baseball a rally. The first Frosh was thrown into the Frog Pond for not wearing his little old green cap—Jean Robinson. Coach Bennion’s lady friends increase in number from 6 to 16. May 17th— Missoula gets away with our track meet. The Sigs hold a picnic and dance at Spring-hill. May 18th— Missoula takes our team over to Missoula. “Speck” picks his own flowers for the formal. Hamilton Hall Formal was a crowded success. May 19th— Missoula takes the first baseball game from us. May 20th— Missoula takes the second (now let’s us take some). May 21st— Some one was caught “mush rooming” out by the grave yard. Let’s sec if they remember the date. May 23rd— Picture of the Relief Work of China and India were shown at Assembly____ “He Took Your Girlie to the Movies.” “Lolly-pops” goes for a ride up Spring-hill—ask Georgia i( men aren’t fickle. May 24th— The Phi Gams entertain for Theta Xis. May 25th— Prof, and Mrs. both play rag-time. '■'i i- I Si w isr E ? itj: rvs ; ; r m 8 m r Z% r.- - ' Y ». v-May 28111- Dan Noble makes a sensational play and catches one twelve feet off the ground. His old woman says this is the only one Dan ever caught. P. S.—We lost. Ml. St. Charles took this one in Baseball. Mrs. Kyle feeds the Phi Gams at dinner. Lucille McCracken gi'es a very good recital and it was the best attended of many. May 29th— Musical Assembly— Mr. Pratt sings and plays with “all us kids.” May 30th— This was to be a holiday but it's too muddy. Kappa Nu holds a dance at Salcsville. “Birds have associations for “Hod.” May 31st— The boys smoke at the sign of the Thumb. But what the girls do is not known to us. However, there was no sign of cars at the Junior Prom. It will be too late to believe in signs when they are shown again. “Reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of parties who stole the “Jitney Buss.” Shorty Bachman takes first in the two-mile run at the Rocky Mountain conference. June 4th— Soph have a picnic. Another Soph had a picnic of flats on the way back from Livingston. June 5th— Capt. Heath leaves for the Presidio. Lieut. Retired Weber refuses to drill any more. June 6th— Lou Howard features “Dutch” Schneider in a Drum Solo at the Band Dance on the Campus. Katty and Gussie of Missoula have a scene on the balcony at the Klk’s Home. Another one is taken from us by Missoula. June 7th— Frog Demers comes over to take Kate and another game; anyway he did not take Kate. The A. 0. P. gave a dancing party and their lawn in connection. One hundred seventy-threeft June 8th— “The Maid Was Wearing Proudly High' —You can ask Nona about the King. June 10th— The Phi Gamms give a Formal at the K. of C. Hall. No hard-boiled shirts were admitted. June 11th— Joe Bush says he will soon be able to think in interest. He’s working up on the Madison. June 12th— Kate Keown has one good laugh while up on the stage at assembly today It was all over a musical assembly, that may be the reason. June 13th— The Annual for “20” came out this morning at 11 o’clock. Benepe gives the Sigs a party on his lawn. June 15th— The Seniors all go to church for the last time, Baccalaureate Sunday, June 10th— We have the Class Day exercises again. The Seniors put on their last little picnic. “Prcxy” Hamilton has a reception in honor of the Seniors. I j 11 |g m g m m - c: | V m • « fT • 4 • »• June 17th— m % r iV Jr, _ They “commenced” today. The Sheep Skinners were handed their little roll of white paper. The “Pageant Trailed” late in the evening. Prcxv asks as to the whereabouts of the “Band.” June 18th— The examinations were started again today. June 19th— “A Circus played in our town this day. And only a few of us got away.”—Another Shakespcar. (Ending the year 18-19) in : be K». ’ re Qk 'Z One hundred seventy-four■p. ? BEGINNING A NEW COLLEGE YEAR—19-20 September 27th— Registration all over again. September 29th— Leo comes back from one of those “Long strips. September 30th— One or two more Frosh in the Frog Pond. October 1st— It was the Sophs that lost the hair today. October 2nd— The Frosh and Sophs staged a real battle out in front of the Electric Hall. Mr. “Bekea” breaks a rib. October 3rd— “Slicker" says everything is fine in Havre. Phi Gam open mouth (house). “Zcekc” and “Jedge” go over to take on a little “lovin.” October 4th— Hank and Fannie go to the Senior’s Ball in the Kyle “Show Case.' October 5th— Many of the boys attend “rest service” this Sabbath. President Atkinson speaks to the Presbyterian church. The Sigs take up most of the front row. October 9th— The Bobcats leave for Casper, Wyoming. October 10th— Bobcats lose to Wyoming, 0-0. v f 'm One hunared seventy ive |8 V , October 11 tli— The Phi Gammas entertain at a dancing party. Dean and Mrs. Hamilton furnish the feed. The whole affair ended in a slumber party at the Phi Gamma house. October 14th— The Theta Xis wait for the “Dear Dean” to come to dinner. October 17th— Alpha 0 open house for the Sigs and their pledges. Howard’s regimental band assist Chas. P. in a minor rally. Sigma Chi dancing party. October 18th— The Bobcats take the Mines over 43-0. October 23rd— Leila and “Chubby” make Y. W. curtains. October 25th— Theta Xi open house, 3-5. Tommy takes them at their word. October 27th— A new Sig pin makes its appearance on the hill, supported by Billie Hill. October 29th— Montana Alpha chapter of the Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity bestowed upon the Kappa Xus. October 30th— S. A. E.s give a formal dance in honor of their installation. October 31st— Sigma Cliis give the new S. A. E.s a smoker. The Hall girls go on a Halloween jamboree. November 1st— 'J he Omega Beta fraternity stage a house dance. November 2nd— The Phi Gamma new house rules go into effect. Remember fellows. “No phone calls at meal times.” “No Sunday night dates.” “Aro nothing” November 3rd— We arc all for the round-ups. “God bless ’em.” November 5th— “Lizz” and everybody are served with ginger bread in the library S ' . •' : : 8 I ' 38 V ri ! = d 4 a 42 : iJ ii? '-s ii- m m Si ft gg •rrc'S Jr fc-• -sz One hundred seventy-six I - s'} November lltli— Armistice day for the World War Veterans. Faculty didn’t belong so—-no vacation. Rally staged for Missoula game. November I-1th— Coach Powell tells the girls how to watch a football game. November loth— Aggi-Missoula game. Bobcats 6Missoula 6. They haven’t lost their horseshoe. Phi Gammas and Alpha Os hold open house for the Missoula guests. November 16th— The Sigs end their big state convention. November 21st— Girls’ vocational congress. Several meetings and many pink teas. All the sororities give a “StilTv joint tea at the Evergreen. November 24th— The Hall women are serenaded. November 27th— All home for turkey. Judge moves from both houses to his old home town. November 28th— Proxy says there is coal enough to last till the nineteenth. December 2nd— M. Club puts on a banquet and the Frosh get all the smokes. The coal shortage is getting still shorter. December 5th— The Honorable Mr. Hartman tells us how to better the college. December 8th— Arthur Mometcr says 38 below. December 10th— The Sigs call a day off to cut wood. Still no coal. The B. E. have a dinner party. s . ■ z--j One hundred seventy-sevenman December 12th— A Zero party indulged in by the Sigs and their lady friends. December 13th— School closes for a much needed rest. January 4th— Back to school with a ton of coal. January 9th— Red makes a short talk at the musical assembly. Fat takes in another pan. January 14th— New chemistry building dedicated. Chemistry club puts on a luncheon in honor of the visiting guests. President Atkinson is inaugurated. January 16th— Seniors stage a dance in the drill hall. Irrigation congress in session. “College Annual” favorite contest started. January 17th— Hunt and punch club hold a dance in the drill hall. January 19th— Nominating ballots counted for the favorite contest. January 21st— Contest ballots put on sale. No sales so far. January 23rd— Bobcats beat the Livingston Railway Club. 44-17. Doc. Blish determines the weight of the Gym. piano. January 24th— S. A. E.s hold a dance at Salesville. January 26th— Minor Holliday elected editor of 1922 Montanan. January 28th— Prexy thought that some of the boys were perfect 36s, but some of the class doubted it when he said that some of the telephone operators work only 'Sffrnt V.piohl v p ' ' . r — _ r ? - ii.- -■». 2i ? Janaury 29th— President Atkinson starts the ball rolling for a five-million bond issue. January 30th— Bobcats defeat Helena Wesseleyan, 56-12. February 2nd— Some say that the ground hog saw his shadow. We’ll see. February 4th— Prof. Brewer put in charge of bond issue publicity campaign. February 6th— The women had another assembly. Suppose they will be scared for another three months. Basketball team beats Missoula, 32-14. February 8th— Billie is back from a visit with the folks in Livingston. Junior hoopsters take the Seniors into camp, 10-7. February 11th— Dutch puts on a parade with the blinds up. February 12th— Abraham Lincoln had another birthday. No vacation as usual. February 13th— Walter Aitken gives a Lincoln address i:i the assembly. February 15th— Rosemary and Knox admit it. Rosemary buys the cigars. Thanks. February 16th— One hundred per cent by June 1st. February 18th— Stunt night. We played and we payed. All for Y. W. The Egyptians put on his famous funnel rattle in the famous sorority silks, under the direction of Griffith luce Benepe. The Bathing Beauties get the cup. February 19th— Ruth St. Dennis and her girls stage show for the B. E.s. No casualties reported to date. 92.5 m m 9£ P-r u One 11 undied Seventy nineFebruary 20th— From all appearances the Docs initiated hut How about it, Frosh. we KNOW that the Stags did C February 23rd— The scholarship committee is up to its old tricks again. You can’t heat a Corporation. February 26th— Rally planned hut classes interfered education. Another case of study interfering with February 28th— Some big dance at the electric. Also on the hill stamping grounds. Bobcats take another game from the U. new March 5th— Musical assembly. With Buzz singing “Ned” there was quite a drawing card, March 8th— The Calendar writer leaves to take up Chautauqua work March 9th— High School teams arrive for the Interstate basketball tournament March 10th— The tournament starts. Fat and Moriarity start the trade of peanut selling, March 13th— Dillon springs surprise and takes championship from Billing: March 17th— The proverbial Pat had another birthday. ‘Ray for Ireland March 26th— Phi Gamma formal at the home of T. B. Story. Benepe tells Buzz what he thinks of her. She took the pin March 27th— Sigma Chi house dance. April 3rd— Les Boufon formal at the Elk’s,fJJ- r- - i • •V, I SER '; |Ti April 8th— Sensational story printed by the Exponent. Florence and George never visit the library. No foolin.’ April 10th— Co-ed. barb formal at Elk’s home. April 12th— East number of the Lyceum course given by the Bozeman symphony orchestra. April 15th— The band leave for a tour of the state. April 19th— Spring football starts. April 20th— All College men appear in overalls and dungarees. Clothes should come down. April 23rd— The band and the broke Chicago tenor return home. J23 % April 27th— Prexy expounds on the winner of the human race. Special assembly to talk over the advisability of adopting Armenian babies. May 1st— Clyde and Merle swap pins. Another case of 100 per cent. Theta Xis deliver a few May baskets. None of them were caught Iota Deltas hold musical recital. Junior Pan show held at the Ellen. May 2nd— Alpha 0 open house. May 4th— We learn all about colloids. Ala Holmes. May 5th— Frosh prepare argument against running cross country. Finlay takes first place. Williams and Williams also finish. Some of the contestants ran out of cigarettes so had to stop. May 6th— Hickey gives an examination during a rally. - ... : • ■ •. Kv . One Hundred Eighty-one £53  1 L 1 ' 7 : 1 3» i D i y S .il- ?c, 1 ' ?r»4 S V V .A : •'• x .., V v e-v? May 8th— The Phi Gammas give a ragged dance. We lose a hall game to Missoula. May 9th— Mother’s day at the Sig house. May 10th— Theta Xis are inspected for Chi Omega. May 15th— Freshmen take inter-class track meet. Ted Cates lakes individual. May 17th— Juniors decide that no underclassmen will be allowed to attend the Prom except VanFleet and Sweeney. Drink Postum. “There’s a reason.” May 20th— Bobcats take a game from Ml. St. Charles, 4-1. May 21st— Visitors' day. Associated student assembly. Nomination for student officers. S. A. Es. and Alpha Os. get together. Eaton is excused for his first slip. Sigma Chi dance and picnic at Spring Hall. Skinney gets quite a kick out of holding Swan’s hand. “Darkness conceals many things, Skinney.” '''" 7 ( Hus ®l 3 teit Pi i-; § | I K m M 1 1 si »-3 ha y d 7, | IS a S i M r-£1 L ? SSli f i® b May 27th— Results from Associated Students’ election. Heard in the still of the night. Freddie F.: “Red, Oh Red!” 0 May 29th— Junior Prom. Some of the fair ladies amuse themselves by bouncing sugar cubes off the hard boiled shirts. June 3rd— Senior and Sophomore class elections. II.... ..............m bB m m § B ! gg r-g Bobcats lose two games to the U. The little pebble I. at Missoula is painted blue. June 6th— Alpha 0. open house. Much lemonade gargled by the visitors. June 9th— Bobcats lose to Livingston Independents. June 16th— Commencement starts. Seniors wearing a bored smile. June 17th— Chancy hands out the sheep-skins. Farewell, Seniors. June 18th— Finals start, the process of elimination. June 20th— All started home for the summer vacation. ' fc: : V It. - Sis SS SNS tgs 1 m ne Hundred Eighty-threeBITTEN BY THE LOVE BUG. By A. Dubb. Did you ever notice that these guys which goes to college and gets all learned on how to engineer and farm and do business, all fall for the same old stuff as these poor suckers which live in tenements and work eight to twelve hours per diem (day) and make seventy-five bucks almost every month? Did you ever stop to think that these same college guys make just as big fools of theirselves over these baby-faced, blue-eyed dolls which don’t know nothing about Columbus discovering America in 1942, or about the glorious and heroic deeds of the A. E. F. (Always Eating Fish), which never saw any of the bluish briny deep except when somebody poured bluing in their water, during the great world cat-as-trophy which convalesced the world during them momentous and back-breaking years from 1419 till four more years. These dolls, which I started in to talk about all pull the same old stall, but it gets away with these educated college boobs just as great as any other son of Adam, which happens to think he is in the same boat which Adam was before Eve walked into the garden and starts all the troubles which we poor mortals has been suffering from ever since. I had a wonderful chance to watch these college birds in action one year and there was a couple of them which sure needed nurses. One was named after a prizefighter which used to be famous, but hit the tobogan like all them grand old roughnecks which used to stand up and get slammed all over the ring for ten rounds for the price of a good meal nowdays. This guy Jim didn’t look like he ever saw a prizefighter but you can’t never tell what them fond parents of ours will do to a poor innocent baby which can’t do nothing to defend itself, and, I guess his parents had it doped out that he was the one to bring everlasting fame to his parents by being elected president of something, maybe his High School Freshman class. The other guy was a pretty good looking bird and was named after some king of England which the natives point to with pride in their voices and says “that’s what we sprung from.” I think they called this king lion-faced or lion-maned, or maybe it was Lion-hearted. Anyway this guy Alex, which was named after this king was sure a social lion with the women, because he would step up to the women and try and knock ’em cold with one look without having to use any of this caveman stuff you see advertised in the papers every once in a while. Alex was some knock-down and drag ’em out if he had his way about things but here is where little Jimmy slioed up with the armour on. Jimmy and Alex has both fell hard on the cement pavement for a little dame which has gold hair, a cute voice and a face that made me feel that these two fools was to be envied even if they did get the cold air for all their trouble. She was named after one of them Biblical characters which was always taking the waters at one of them wells which our teachers used to tell us was in a treeless, waterless waste where nobody could get a drink, but I’m beginning to think them teachers of ours were just giving us a little prophecy concerning this little old country which we are all glad we live in. Esther was sure some little queen and if the fellows who lived in them dawn of history days was writing about girls like her, I don’t blame them for raving on at length. Well, these two birds I was telling you about decided that this eternal triangle stuff didn’t appeal to them, so each one starts out to see whether he could make a straight line affair out of it, with himself and Esther at one end of the affair andthe other guy alone at the other end, no communication between the two opposing parties. Well you can sec just as well as I do that if the aflair got to this stage, there would he, telegraphically speaking, two dots (Esther and one of these hums) and then a dash (for the little church around the corner). Jimmy and Alex were snoring and eating in the same soup gallery and so every night when the boys started “Blowing Bubbles, there was a great raspberry session. Some bird would pipe up, “Well I saw Jimmy and Esther walking home from school together today,” and old Alex, who thought you couldn't raspberry him, would pipe up, “That’s fine, we (do you get the we, meaning he and Jimmy) didn’t want her to come down alone.” Then some other birds would remark in a subdued whisper that there wasn’t much hope of her coming down alone with two unlicked postage stamps like Jimmy and Alex always sticking around. Well this stuff goes on for some time, each one trying to show this Esther dame that he was the real man for her and not the other bird. One would take her to a show and then the other one would thank him from the bottom of his sole (footwear). Finally one of these dress balls comes up where the dames make an awful stab at getting their dresses on, but always have about a foot too little of dress, and where the boys all doll up in these outfits which has fronts on them that are the first cousin to inch planks and not quite as comfortable. Jim was the goat that night and being a short guy he was a riot in one of them “Damn, there goes another stud” layouts, but you couldn’t make him believe it. He stood in front of the mirror admiring himself until it was time to go and then finds his tic isn't straight, so he got there late, but everybody always does try to get out of the grand parade, so he was right in style. From there on out, Alex began losing out. He claims that Jimmy pulled dirty stuff on him and dates the dame up for weeks ahead of time, but still he put up a grand battle. When either of these two birds would come in after a session with this dame at some dance or movie, they would have the most soulful expression on their maps which you should ever hope to recognize. As time went by, little Jimmy keeps putting more over on Alex all the time, until one day Alex gets a letter from home telling him that the farm needs farming and the horses and cows need personal attention, so he packs up and beats it for little old home sweet home. From here on out little Jimmy is left in soul communication with his lady-love. Alex, he takes a run up to school before it let out, but he wasn’t any better off than when he left, so he finally gave up the sponge. Every time Jimmy comes in after a session with Esther he looked more like a prizefighter after a terrible knockout, you know it is that nobody-home expression, but there never was any marks of physical violence so we just let him struggle along. This Esther and yours truly happened to be from nearby burgs and one day Jimmy, he rushes up and wants to know what his chances are of working in our town and where he could sleep, etc. I told him as much as possible and then he wanders off with a vacant stare, which he always wore when he was trying to think. Well, one night before 1 left I was to a dance where Esther and Jimmy was and the way they danced you would think that they was the only ones on the floor and that the rest of the crowd forgot to come. Right there I says to myself, “He’ll never know what it is to come up for air again. A few days later I packs up and leaves for Homeburg and was told by Jimmy that he might be over to see me this summer. I didn’t tell him that Esther didn't live more than a day’s walk from my house, because I knew he already knew it. After arriving in the illustrious place of a number of the boys and girls who have in recent years gone away to school, and being told that I was looking fine and did I have a good time and was 1 going back, I started out in a search for the filthy lucre. Walking down the street one" day I One hundred eighty-fireOne Hundred— j . ■; • :, •i’.v i L i • . § £g •, £4 i 9 J Jtttex to AiUtertisements xT Baltimore Hotel..................... 221 Bozeman Hotel ...................... 214 Bozeman Wholesale Co................ 191 Braten’s............................ 210 Bungalow ........................... 221 Butte School of Mines............... 209 Burket, W. B. Co.................... 199 Central Studio...................... 201 Chambers-Fishers Co. ........... 195 Chronicle Publishing Co........... 198 Commercial National Bank.......... 218 Connell’s........................... 206 Copeland Lumber Co.................. 197 Davidson, Dr. M. P.................. 221 Ellen Parlors....................... 194 Exclusive Shoe Store................ 200 Gallatin Drug Co................... 203 Gallatin Grocery Co................. 219 Gallatin Laundry Co................. 218 Gallatin Trust Savings Bank...... 211 Garey Hay Grain Co............... 211 Gallatin Lumber Co................. 192 Hoenck, R. P........................ 194 Holm, Dr. E. 0..................... 221 Howard’s............................ 223 Ideal Furniture Co., Inc............ 194 Keister Bath...................... 221 Kenyon-Noble Lumber Co.............. 220 Lang ............................... 200 Langohr’s .......................... 191 Lindsay-Bozeman Co...................214 Long, C. W.......................... 198 Lund-Sanborn Motor Co............... 220 McCracken Jameson Co.............. 199 McKay, F. W......................... 198 Miners’ Savings Trust Co.......... 192 Model Grocery....................... 216 Montana Flour Milling Co........... 205 Montana Power Co................... 212 National Bank of Gallatin alley... 213 Orton Bros......................... 210 Owenhousc Hardware Co.............. 208 Palace............................. 221 Park Co............................ 217 Pease. H. A. Co.................. 205 Phillips Book Store................ 217 Rea, Thomas H. Co................ 190 Reed’s Bootery..................... 196 Roccher Drug Co.................... 200 Rohrer Grocery..................... 190 Rose Drug Co....................... 215 Sawyer Cash Grocery................ 197 Schlectcn Bros..................... 202 Schmidt Bros....................... 216 Security Bank and Trust Co......... 222 Simpson Truitt................... 203 Smith. D. D........................ 217 Snowden, J. C...................... 198 Specialty Boot Shop................ 216 Speith’s .......................... 212 Steffens, Gus. J................... 219 State Normal School................ 207 Story Motor Sales.................. T93 Story Motor Supply................. 193 Sugar Bowl ...................:. .. 219 Svmon’s ........................... 204 Topel Bros. 200 Vogue, The.......................... 212 Wagner Bros.....................190-19 Walker’s Specialty Store............ 199 Walsh’s.........'................... 203 Wilson, R. O........................-214 Williams, A. B...................... 213 Willson Co.......................... 1B« Willson, Geo. H..................... 215 Westphal’s :........................ 189 Lx es C m m m i ? 3iKham - - ■ One Hundred Eighty-sevenFounder of the Willson Company BOZEMAN, MONTANA General Lester S. W illson Born June 16, 1839. Died January 26, 1919 THE WILLSON COMPANY Established in 1866 This Store has been the standard for Quality and Service for more than Half a Century. IllllillllllllllllllllllllUllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllW One hundred eighty-eightWE'VE GOT THEM ALL BEATEN WHEN IT COMES TO STYLE You'll realize that we’ve done a real service to the young men of this community. If this college doesn’t get a reputation for well-dressed men it won’t be our fault. Nobody realizes better than we do that young men want lively styles; that’s one of the chief reasons why we handle Hart, Shaft tier Marx Society Brand, and Fashion Park Clothes Manhattan Shirts Florsheim Shoes IIole-proof Sox Dobb's Fifth Ave. Hats ’Failored Caps Ide Collars WESTPHAL’S THE HOME OF HART SHAFFXER MARX CLOTHES © A D G. C One hundred eighty-nineIlillilllllllll lllllllllllllli Pllllll llillillililill lll!ii!||||!;|| lllllllll THOS. H. REA CO. Wholesale Grocers and Retail AGENTS FOR THE FINEST GROWN CHASE SANBORN’S SEAL BRAND COFFEE AND TEA THOS. H. REA CO. TEL 24 127-9 W. MAIN OUR POLICY You must be pleased with every purchase ot‘ groceries you receive from us, otherwise we feel ourselves even more the loser to you. The welfare of our customers always comes first, any other policy is short-sighted. W e guarantee all our goods to be exactly as represented in quality, and worth the price asked. Goods not found so may be returned and the money will be refunded. Absolute fairness is the rule in dealing with our customers. We believe that by treating all fairly we will receive fairness in return. H. R. Rohrer—The Cash Grocer Phone 153 COR. MAIN AND TRACY WAGNER BROTHERS .7 Good Pair to Deal With Dealers In Men’s Furnishings and Notions Roots, Shoes, Gloves. Shirts, Hats, Sox, etc. (Illllllillllllllll!lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll.||llll!||llll!lillllli llllll!l!llllllllllll|||llllllllllllll!ll!lllll!lllllllll|illlllllllllll!l llllli:illllll|[|||lll!lllllll||||||||||l!llllllli||illllllil!l||i||||||]|||| || ||||||||l|||||||||||||||||||ll|||||illllllllllllllllllllHIIH One hundred ninetyYOU CAN HAVE FLOWERS DELIVERED ANY PLACE IN THE UNITED STATES OR CANADA WITHIN TWENTY-FOUR HOURS BY WIRE THROUGH L cmgal r's (SmnhnusB WE ALWAYS CARRY THE BEST CUT FLOWERS AND POTTED PLANTS IN SEASON AT OUR OWN GREENHOUSE PHONE 95 Visitors Always Welcome GREENHOUSES: 315 SOUTH TRACY AVENUE In figuring on a reduction in the H. C. L. let us assist you in economical buying of High quality food stuffs by recommending for your consideration the following quality lines: DEL MONTE CANNED FRUITS BURT OLNEY CANNED VEGETABLES CALIFORNIA HOME PICKLES AND CONDIMENTS WHITE HOUSE COFFEE AND TEAS For Sale By All Grocers Bozeman Wholesale Grocery Company Distributors PHONE 56 320 EAST MAIN STREET One Hundred Ninety oneGALLATIN LUMBER COMPANY YE REPRESENT THE NATIONAL BUILDERS CALL AND SEE OUR PLANS If you want a house, barn or building of any description, we have the plan for it. GALLATIN LUMBER COMPANY Miners Savings 36anfc anb (Trust Company BUTTE, MONTANA Capital $200,000.00 Surplus $50,000.00 OFFICERS David J. Charles David Malle T. J. Fenlon J. II. Roberts President Vice-President . Cashier Assistant Cashier iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiM One Hundred .Xinety-tuo STORY MOTOR SALES 400 West Main Street Cadillac G. M. C. Trucks THE WORLD’S BEST AUTOMOBILES They Speak for Themselves Office Phone 168 Repair Shop Phone 277 BOZEMAN, MONTANA IF IT CONCERNSDAN ACCESSORY FOR AN AUTOMOBILE. WE HAVE IT. FROM TIRE TO TOP. FROM RADIATOR TO GAS TANK. We carry the largest stock of tires and tubes of any retail accessory house in the Northwest. Our stock is complete in every detail. We don’t sell prunes or soda pop, but we do sell Automobile Accessories, and give service equalled by none. We are originators of low priced Gas. Both our Gas stations open every day in the week. ■? ■» i Our store and gas station, corner of Main Grand, open EVERY NIGHT until twelve o’clock. YOURS FOR SERVICE STORY MOTOR SUPPLY J. R. Cockran., Mgr. 29 WEST MAIN BOZEMAN, MONTANA !lll!lllllllllllllllllllllll!llllli:ill!ll!lllllllllllllllll!llll!IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIM IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIU One hundred ninty-threelioenck rurs EPAIRING EMODELING ELINING ENOVATING MONTANA'S LARGEST FUR STORE RICHARD V. HOENCK Butte's Furrier 206 No. Main Butte, Montana W hen You (jet Married Don’t Forget THE ELLEN PARLORS Davenport's Chocolates THE Ice Cream IDEAL FURNITURE Cold Drinks COMPANY, INC. Fountain Orders a Specialty Earl S. Marshall Dancing Afternoon and Night BOZ E MA X. M0 XTANA “Crab” naiiiiMiiiinininii One hundred ninety-fourThe Ghambers-risher Company The Most Progressive Store, The Most Aggressive Store,The Store that Is Bending Every Energy To Better Sen e Its Patrons tl SIX BIG COMPLETE STORES UNDER ONE ROOF AND UNDER ONE MANAGEMENT. DRY GOODS—Piece goods, notions, gloves, neckwear, knit underwear, hosiery, etc., in the largest and most carefully selected stocks in Bozeman. READY TO IVEAR—Women’s Ready-to-wear, a popular department because of high class qualities, charming styles and reasonable prices. SHOES- Women’s shoes, featuring John Kelly oxfords, pumps and boots in attractive leathers, graceful lines and smart styles. MILLINERY—The Bozeman home of Gage Brothers' distinctive hats, nationally famous style creators of college girls' millinery. MEN’S SHOES—Few clothing stores use the care in choosing for their patrons that we do here, the country’s foremost brands of men’s clothes and furnishings rightly priced makes this the busy store it is. BOZEMAN’S BUSIEST STORE AND A GOOD PLACE TO TRADE iiiiiiiiiiiiiMiii'iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiii’iiiiiuiiiMim One hundred ninety-fiveTHE COUSIN’S SHOE MADE IX NEW YORK FOR WOMEN NETTLETON’S FOR MEN The Famous Nettleton “Saxon’’ Here we have it in business dress-calfskin. A veritable pleasure to the man who likes shoes which not only feel well and give the longest possible wear, but look well all thru their service. REEDS BOOTERY BOZEMAN, MONTANA Agent—for Nettleton Men’s Shoes—the world's finest OUR STYLES LEAD, OTHERS FOLLOW Every Day Model and worth it Bal. — in black or tan calfskin. The “Saxon’’ is a finely proportioned model. THE "HOLD SHAPE” SHOE THOMPSON SHOE FOR MEN THE SHOE THAT IS TAILORED FOR WOMEN One hundred ninety-sixWE WANT TO FURNISH YOU BUILDING MATERIAL FOR ANY KIND OF A BUILDING THAT YOU CONTEMPLATE. We do our own designing. Let our draftsman make your plan freeof charge. COPELAND LUMBER COMPANY COR. CHURCH AND MAIN PHONE 82 We Originate; Olliers Imitate We carry a Full Line of STAPLE GROCERIES You Will Find Our Prices Right J. M. SAWYER CO. Cash Merchants BOZEMAN, MONTANA mnintiiiniiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii EVERYTHING FOR THE STUDENT AT WAGNER BROTHERS We Solicit Your Patronage One hundred ninety sevenF. W. McKAY 1103 SO. THIRD AVEXUE Resident Agent New York Insurance Company Office Phone 138 Res. Phone 732YY BOZEMAN. MONTANA 0220 “!) C. W. LONG TIRE REPAIRING U. S. 'Fire Agency 16 NORTH WALLACE Gallatin's Best Sews Gatherer THE BOZEMAN CHRONICLE Daily and Weekly Established 1882 Official Paper in Gallatin County More circulation in Gallatin county than all other dailies combined Member of Associated Press Commercial Printing Limited Means but Unlimited Determination Chronicle Publishing Co., Proprietors BOZEMAN, MONTANA One hundred ninety eightMcCRACKCN-JAA ESON COMPANY I he Right place to get everything to wear at the Right Price A ens Clothing and rurnishings Ladies’ Coats, Suits, Skirts, Waists, Hose and Full Line of Furnishings Our Shoe Department has always the good things for less Bozeman, Montana W. B. Burket Company V. D. Bell, President Ranches and City Property For Sale We rent houses, write insurance and make loans GALLATIN BUILDING BOZEMAN Authoritatxve Millinery AND Ready-to-Wear Garments for the Fashionable Woman are our Particular Specialty Exclusive Modes for the College Student Walker’s Specialty Store ;!II1IIIIIIIIU!I1IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII!IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII'III One hundred ninety-nineRoecher’s Dru§ Store Prescriptions A Specialty FIRST GRADE DRUGS AT ROCK BOTTOM PRICES Is the combination that brings a newer increasing business to our store. But whatever the price you pay, an important fact is quality. This is the point we insist on in every article sold by us Come to Lang The Exclusive Shoe Store TOPELS For Your Shoes Clothing and Gentlemen’s For All Furnishing Goods We Also Do Repairing Phone 379M 22 W. MAIN’ Collegian Suits See our samples for tailor-made suits llllilillllllllilllilllllillll!lllllllilll!l!l!llll;llllllll!llllllillllllllilllll! Illllllllllllll!lllllillllll!ll!llllllllililllllllll’linillllllllll!lllllllllllilllll]||lllillllll!lllllill!llllinil!lllj| IHIIIII'llllllillllllllllllllUIIIIM Two hundred 2323239148484848905353535389895323239191rIIE CENTRAL STUDIO PHOTOGRAPHIC WORK OF ALL KINDS Special Attention Paid to College Students EXPERT KODAK FINISHING Alfred Schlechten, Proprietor CORNER MAIN AND TRACY BOZEMAN, MONTANA iiliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiir.iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin i.iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii:ii:itiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiii Two hundred oneTHE SCHLECHTEN STUDIO ALBERT SCHLECHTEN The "Best Equipped Ground Floor Studio in JMontana PHONE 76-W 12 SOUTH BLACK BOZEMAN, MONTANA Two hundred twoSimpson Pruitt IReal €state ...anb... Ifnsurance LIVE STOCK AND GRAIN EXCHANGE WE SOLICIT YOUR PATRONAGE WALSH’S The Store for Men’s Wearing Apparel GALLATIN DRUG COMPANY “Walsh’s” Suits and Furnishings Quality and Service are known for consistent EASTMAN KODAKS AND good values SUPPLIES WALSH’S • Two hundred three 0102020023234823230190020221005353230116050704050307Why All JVlontanans Should Use Symons Residents of this great state have in Symons a store upon which they may depend entirely for everything in the way of wearing apparel from baby’s undergarments to father’s suits or overcoats' THROUGH THIS STORE’S SPLENDID MAIL ORDER SERVICE, SYMONS IS BROUGHT TO YOUR VERY DOOR, REGARDLESS OF WHERE YOU LIVE. Symons Stocks are Largest Symons Prices are Lowest Symons Service is Finest ON ALL MAIL ORDERS AMOUNTING TO $2.50 AND OVER SYMONS PAYS THE EXPRESS AND MAILING CHARGES—KEEP THIS FACT IN MIND Write to us for whatever you need—write to us for whatever you want—and we’ll promptly and satisfactorily till your order, besides saving you the most money on your order. And, above all, when you come to Butte, visit and shop at Symons. Symons Dry Goods PUTTE, MUHT. ! Company; PUTTE I OUT. Service by Mail iriiiuiNiiiiiiiniiiMiimMiimuHiuiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiittM Two hundred jourKnowledge The precept, “Know all things,” of the ancient philosopher is impossible for any one mind to accomplish, so an important part of education is learning to take advantage of the knowledge of others. Our know edge is of great advantage to you in the purchase of a diamond. Years of training and much experience in handling thousands of diamonds enable us to judge and grade diamonds most expertly, preventing poor stones getting into our stock. The large collection of fine gems, and th e rich values, are two other important facts in making Pease’s the best place to b uy diamonds. H. A. PEASE CO. JEWELERS AND OPTOMETRISTS 206 W. Main Street “The Hallmark Store” WHEN YOU GET MARRIED You want to start right. What you have to eat is an important thing to consider. More bread is used in the average home than any other one article of food, and for that reason your bread, in particular, should always be good. Heavy, soggy bread causes indigestion, and indigestion causes bad tempers. To any member of the class of 1921 of the Montana State College who is married within the next year, and who will advise us, we will send a sack of CERETANA FLOUR free of cost. To always have good bread, vou MUST have GOOD FLOUR and we want vou to start off with the RIGHT FLOUR— CeretanaL Flovir Montana Flour Mills Co. MILLS AT BOZEMAN. LEWISTOWX, GREAT FALLS AND HARLOW TON Daily Capacity, 4,000 Barrels iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiitiin liiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiir Two hundred fiveIf You Shop at Connell’s ou are assured oi courteous treatment at the hands of experienced salespersons. Besides, you are guaranteed entire satisfaction with your purchase or we will willingly refund your money. We cater to the mail-order trade, and all orders receive the most careful and prompt attention. We handle a complete line of Dry Goods Ladies and Gentlemen’s Wearing Apparel Furnishings and Shoes Brandegee-=Kincaid and Kirschbaum Clothes Victor Victrolas, Pianos, Sheet Music CONNELL’S BUTTE, MONTANA Two hundred sixA VOCATIONAL QUESTION ‘‘The teacher shortage” is an expression very frequently encountered in newspapers and magazines these days. What does it mean? For one thing it indicates that those who prepare adequately now will be sure of well paid employment and advancement in the profession. Does all this mean anything to you? In answering the question consider some of the following facts about 1. As one of the component institutions of the University its students enjoy the status accorded all members of the University. Courses completed at the Normal College receive full credit in the other schools of the greater University. Graduates of the two-year course receive junior standing if they decide to earn a degree at Missoula or at any important school of education in other states. 2. Graduates of the Normal College a re in immediate demand at excellent salaries. No trained teachers are looking for positions; several positions are looking for each possible applicant. 3. Standards, faculty, equipment, and facilities for acquiring professional spirit and training take rank with those of the best Normal Schools and Colleges in the United States. means higher salaries and better working conditions for those who teach. It the State normal College of the University of montana For catalog or information, address S. E. DAMS, President DILI.ON, MONTANA Two hundred sevenOwenhouse Hardware ------------------Company----------------- Stores at Bozeman, Belgrade and Manhattan Home of the International Harvester Co.’s line of Harvesting and Tillage 'Fools Implements and Hardware MCCORMICK AND DEERING BINDERS AND MOWERS P. AND 0. PLOWS DeLAVAL SEPARATORS MOWERS AND TWINE CARRIAGES AND HARNESS MONARCH RANGES PAINTS, OILS AND GLASS GARDEN TOOLS COLE’S AIR TIGHT HEATERS FAIRBANKS MORSE GAS ENGINES AND PUMPS AND ALL KINDS OF FARM MACHINERY MAKE YOUR SELECTIONS FROM THESE WELL-KNOWN LINES AND MONTANA’S CLIMATE WILL DO THE REST. .it .isstnibltf—TUey also serre who stand and wait. illill II llllllllllll!lll!!lllllllll||llllllllll!!lllllllllllilllll!H:illll!ll!lll lllll!llllll!ll'llllllll!lll!ll!lllllllllillllllllllllll!lllllllllllllllll!ll!l|i||!l!llllllllllllllllll!lll|!lllllll!IIIIIIIIIIHI!llllllll IIIIIMIIIIlirilllirilllMMIIIIIIIIIHII llllllll1IIIIH Two hundred eightthe Montana State School of Mines at Butte Is located in the greatest mining and engineering center between the Upper Mississippi Valley and Puget Sound. It offers four-year courses and degrees in mining, metallurgical and geological engineering. Eighty per cent of the students work part time, combining theory and practice, and earning while they learn.Dance THE GENUINE VICTROLA AND NEW7 DANCE RECORDS ARE ALWAYS READY. WE CARRY EVERYTHING IN MUSIC ALL THE TIME. ITS EASY TO PAY THE ORTON WAY. Orton Brothers 16 East Main Baltimore Block WE SPECIALIZE IN Smart High Grade Garments OF ALL KINDS FOR THE COLLEGE GIRL 'll IlllinillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllUIW lllllllllllllll IIIIIIIM IIIIIIIIIIIHIIHIN iwiiiiimii; |||||||||| |||||||||||||||l||||||||[llllll!llllllllllllllll|||||f||!lll Two hundred tenKRSISTENCY ISA JEWEL when applied to depositing your savings atour Savings Department! The now and then depositor seldom saves much, while the persistent one has a tine bank account earning 4' Interest. Be a persistent depositor at Gallatin Trust Savings Bank BOZEMAN, MONTANA Member Federal Reserve System GARY HAY GRAIN COMPANY, Inc. Wholesale and Retail Dealers In Wlieat, Oats, Barley, Potatoes, Timothy, Alfalfa Hay and Straw Elevators and Warehouses: Bozeman and Livingston, Montana Tel. Office 60 Tel. Elevator 316 iiiniiiRiiiiiininiiiiiMimiiiiiiimmiHiniimuiiHiRiiiiiiiuiiiimiiiiwiiiiitimiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiNiDiiiiiiiiiHiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiimiiiimiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiHiniiiiiiiii Tito hundred elevenTHE VOGUE “A student’s Store in Quality and Price” HIGH GRADE CLOTHING at a Popular Price l’p-to-Date Gents’ Furnishings Gordon Hats O’Donnell Shoes Chavey and Jacobs, Proprietors When in need of Electrical Goods come to SPIETH’S The Electric Shop We Do Repairing of all Kinds in the Electrical Line The Montana Power Company BOZEMAN, MONTANA Modern Power and Light Only Electric Current for up-to-date uses for power, light, heat and cooking. Examine our line of appliances. At Your Service 60 EAST MAIN STREET l!!!llllllll!lllll|llllllill'lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll!ll llllllllllll!ll llllllli;illlll!llllllll lllllllllllllllilltlMlillllllllillllll ll'llill llllllilllll'll llllllll!lllllllllllllllil!lllll,l!l!ll llllllillllllll'.llilll !!'il!llllllllll!llll!lll!]]!l!llllll!rilllillU llli Two hundred twelveACCOUNTS OF STUDENTS SOLICITED National Bank of Gallatin Valley Bozeman, Montana Checking Accounts Saving Accounts R. E. Martin, President Amos C. Hall, Vice-President H. R. Greene, Cashier O. A. Lynn, Assistant Cashier Chester A. Morton, Assistant Cashier Williams’ Barber Shop for the service that gives satisfaction 1921 Montanan 4—CHAIRS—4 Better Late Than A. B. Williams, Prop. Never. 28 WEST MAIN [imilllllllUllltllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllUllllllllllillillllllllllllll Two hundred thirteenLINDSAY BOZEMAN COMPANY (Wholesale) BOZEMAN . MONTANA Confectionery, Cigars and Tobacco Rainers High Grade Chocolates V. B. Havana Cigars Heilman’s New Style Beverage Quality First. Service Always The Montana State College ot Agriculture and Mechanic Arts Colleges of Agriculture, Engineering, Applied Science, Household and Industrial Arts. Courses in Vocational Education, Secondary Schools of Agriculture, Home Economics, Mechanic Arts. Registrar R. 0. WILSON Bozeman, Montana THE BOZEMAN EUROPEAN PLAN RATES $1.00 AND UP Hot and cold water in every room A first class cafe in connection Moderate Prices W hen going to Yellowstone Park Take the Gallatin Way And get full information at the Bozeman Hotel. iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiinii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii:iiiii Two hundred fourteenRose Drag Company W THE REX ALL STORE BOZEMAN, MONTANA “PINK” (GEORGE” “JOE” GEO. H. WILLSON CO. “Quality Stationers” YOUR BEST STORE FOR Books, Stationery, Office Supplies and Periodicals BOZEMAN, MONTANA Two hundred fifteenTHE PLACE TO BUY Cigars Cigarettes Pipes and Smoker’s Articles Expressing in Conservative Detail Our Quality Shoes and Slippers Completed in Various Leathers Styles for all Occasions Schmidt Brother the Specialty Boot Shop We handle the finest candies on the market Phone 71 132 WEST MAIN 240 WEST MAIN Proper Fitting Always Joe Conaty John Iiincs THE MODEL GROCERY GEO. BARTZ, Prop. Staple and Fancy Groceries FERN DELL TEAS AND COFFEES FOR FINE FLAVORS FERN DELL CANNED GOODS NONE BETTER A full one hundred cents’ worth (or more) for every dollar—this is the basis upon which all Fern Dell goods are prepared. It is this basis which brings back my customers week after week—not alone for these goods, but for every article which may be found in my store. BOZEMAN, MONTANA lilllllilllllllllllllll! Illlirilllllllllll!ll!llllllll!lllllllllll!lllllillllll llllll!llllll!lllll!li:illlll!lllll!llllllllllill.llllll llllll!l!llllllll!llllll!l.llllll'll!lllllll|l'l|'||[|ll llfllllllhi Two hundred sixteenPHILLIPS BOOK STORE AGE NTS Yawman Erbe Manufacturing Company Filing Devices Systems that simplify and make the office efficient. ALSO Fire Proof Safes For your valuable records of your Filing Systems, etc. LOOSE LEAF NOTE BOOKS FOR ANY PURPOSE If it’s for the office we have it PHILLIPS BOOK STORE 1). I). SMITH Everything in the Furniture Li?ie LJrJ Some of our exclusive specialties: PARK GLOBE-WERXICKE SECTIONAL BOOK CASES Billiards Art Goods of All Kinds Cigars, Cigarettes and Candy Hcosier Kitchen Cabinets Barber Shop Standard Sewing Machines Sterns and Foster Mattresses Royal Easy Chairs IrU |||||||||ll|||||l||||||||.|||||||||||||||||||||||||IW 11111 Two hundred wd seventeenGallanfinize Your Laundry Needs THE LAST W ORD IN QUALITY AND SERVICE IF YOU ARE PARTICULAR TRY US! Gallatin Laundry Company PHONE 79 M. J. O’CONNELL, MGR. Commercial national Bank OF BOZEMAN. MONTANA Capital Stock $150,000 Surplus and Profits $300,Oi 0 OFFICERS George Cox, President Charles Yandex hook, Vice-President J. II. Baker, Cashier II. M. Grant, Assistant Cashier UNITED STATES DEPOSITORY SillllllUIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIlirilllllll!llllll!lllllliri!llll!llllllll!llll||||||||||| Illl||]|||||liril!l||||||||!!ll|||||!l||||||||!|||||il|!||||||i||||||||!llllll!|||in T tco Ini ml led and eighteengJ_g 5 | 5 — G 5 5 Gallatin Grocery Company —5 5—PHON E—5 5 DROP IN AT Z5he Sugar ‘Botol After the Show Arthur Cutting G ‘Spud? Wilson "I 5! 5 5 M The Home oj Home Made Candies Qus J. Steffens Watchmaker and Jeweler GRUEN VER1THIN WATCH 'File most beautiful watch in America Fine Work a Specialty BOZEMAN, MONTANA lllllllllllllilllllllllllillllllllllllllllMllllilllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllM Two hundred and nineteen....................................mi llllllllillll!lllllll!llllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllilllllll|i|||||l!lllllllllllllll!llllllllllllllllllllllll!||||||||[|||||[||||||||lll!lllllj||||||||||||||il|||H LUND-SANBORN MOTOR COMPANY BATTERY RECORD CARD OBTAIN YOUR COPY TODAY Gives simple instructions on the care of your starting battery and enables you to conveniently record all your readings of your battery. Call for a Free Battery 'Pest today. We’ll hand you a copy of the record card and explain why a small but regular amount of attention to your battery will prolong thejife and increase the service of the battery you are using. Automobile Accessories Repairing—Storage ALL WORK G UARANTEED Telephone 760 SLASH GRAIN FIR FINISH VENEERED FIR PANELS BEAVER BOARD GOAL AND WOOD Kenyon-Noble Lumber Co. PHONE NO. 4 320 WEST MAIN ill iiiiiiii I'llllllll'IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIU Two hundred und twentyiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii ilium imimimiimmmiiiimmiiimmiiiiiiiiiiiimiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiimmm iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii PALACE STORE THE BUNGALOW A Store for Everybody Our candy and fountain service Better Goods at Smaller Prices still lead. O'Donnell Shoes $6.95 0 u at it y—Service Xiftv Hats $6.95 E. J. JOHNSON, PROP. KEISTER BATH I)R. M. P. DAVIDSON Attorneys-at-Law Dentist OFFICE OVER Phone 859-W NATIONAL BANK OF G. V. Bozeman, Montax a Commercial National Bank Bldg. BOZEMAN. MONTANA BALTIMORE HOTEL DR. E. 0. HOLM W Dentist Phones in all rooms Phone 332 Office Hours: 9 to 12 a. m. 1:30 to 5:00 p. m. Hot and cold water Commercial National Bank Bldg. BOZEMAN. MONTANA i!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimmiiiiiiiiniii!ii!ii!iiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimuiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiii!iiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiimm Two hundred and twenty oneAt Your Service Security Bank and Trust Company STUDENTS ACCOUNTS SOLICITED Capital $ 100,000.00 H. S. Buell, President Y. X. Purdy, Cashier OFFICERS A. G. Berthot, Vice President J. L. Ketterer, Assistant Cashier !!ll!lllllllllllllllllllllll!llllllllllll!lll!lllllllllllllllllllll!lll!illllllllllllllllllllllllH ||||!lll||iirillllllll!lllllllilllll!ll!llllll!IIIIIHI Two hundred and twenty twoHOWARDS’ Cbe Shop for tbe College flftan Whether for Every Day wear or for “Dress Up We can take care of your clothing requirements Prices will appeal to you □ □ THE HUB ED. HOWARD-LOU HOWARD WALK OVER SHOES NOBBY HATS Two hundred and twenty-three


Suggestions in the Montana State University Bozeman - Montanan Yearbook (Bozeman, MT) collection:

Montana State University Bozeman - Montanan Yearbook (Bozeman, MT) online yearbook collection, 1918 Edition, Page 1

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Montana State University Bozeman - Montanan Yearbook (Bozeman, MT) online yearbook collection, 1919 Edition, Page 1

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Montana State University Bozeman - Montanan Yearbook (Bozeman, MT) online yearbook collection, 1920 Edition, Page 1

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Montana State University Bozeman - Montanan Yearbook (Bozeman, MT) online yearbook collection, 1922 Edition, Page 1

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Montana State University Bozeman - Montanan Yearbook (Bozeman, MT) online yearbook collection, 1923 Edition, Page 1

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Montana State University Bozeman - Montanan Yearbook (Bozeman, MT) online yearbook collection, 1924 Edition, Page 1

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