Milwaukee (AOR 2) - Naval Cruise Book

 - Class of 1990

Page 1 of 104

 

Milwaukee (AOR 2) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1990 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 104 of the 1990 volume:

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W'-f MQ, .9 nr '-'H 448 5, 54' 'N sd Htl If A . v ' .r ' .1 , 4 :a ' 11' . l 4' If 'L . 'tix I x '4 if -0. 07' f" "U x 'irq ' r Psi C' 2 1 USS MILWAUKEE AOR- NIED 1-9 V . I R af ,Min .V Q -. -..Z ' ,iff , ,f-P, 'N' .A 1 M, .,, -B w M , b . 1 Ar-,4 f ,,- A-.Z n Y.: rm-,,,,N-My L A .W Q, ' '. Ay ' h X. ' 'JV i" Q " V.: IA' if .n , , A, ' , 4 ' N 1 'f ll-L, ,WW , ' i' Kb, z. 'l K , ,,, -" ,-., K v 1 , ff J--.?l -,-?- ' N I. I -"""1.' Ky fi Mig" -if . ' .V f 5 4 r 5 1 4 . A, , , ,,,p H '- ,A , . , .,, ,!'fjff1ii ff -,, yi, f ,F,uslunnuunuahI1--'.'- A-. ' Q . J Alla" K. 25 .4 . ,,..' --. ,vu 5 A" x '1 1'.:l u . X-1 "K: " K if A APA. ,Q 5 Jig The AOR' is capable of transferring over 750,000 gallons of fuel and 250 measured tons of material 1 hour. The ability to provide a Wide range of material quickly frees the customer units of the Battle Grouppetg A SI-IIP'S MISS O The mission of replenishment ships in the US Navy is to provide the fleet with underway ,ep capabilities, minimizing the Navy's dependence upon overseas bases - bases which might h a time of war, international tensions, or changing political climates. The AOR is a multi-commodity vessel capable of providing customers with a wide range gf prod includes: 8.2 million gallons of Navy Distillate Fuel KF-761, used to power all non-nuclear Navy sm Q Aircraft Fuel UP-51, a full range of High Usage Load List and Deckload items, dry and frozen pf ' 'let ti C450 tonsi, and 600 tons of ammunition. In addition, with the ability to carry over 1000 meqgmedoxsrlg fleet freight on her cargo and main decks, the AOR has a vast capability to provide first-rate guppon fi? fleet. Perhaps the most unique and valuable feature of the AOR is the ability to provide no tothe, shopping."5 By load adjusting with other single commodity Fleet Support ships 11,60 AE AFS immediately prior to the UNREP evolution, the AOR can literally resupply an entire Battle Group 5-tl l 5 if return to their primary mission in a minimum amount of time - completely resupplied, 3 is . ul Q v V . Ir.. , ., xl f -Q , , ' N5-51 ' .-. ' 5 - "tw, 'ww -JM? gg, SI-IIP'S I-IISTCDRY :,' USS MILWAUKEE was commissioned on November 1, 1969 at the Boston Shipyard, f Massachusetts. She is the second of the Wichita-Class Replenishment Oilers QAORI E i and the fourth ship to bear the name MILWAUKEE. From 1970 to 1980 MILWAUKEE ,,, sailors conducted five Mediterranean cruises, three readiness exercises, evacuation of 5 Americans from Cyprus 09741 and Lebanon l1976l and transportation of the King Tutankhamun treasures. MILWAUKEE was cited as the top AOR in the Atlantic Fleet in 1979, receiving the Battle In 1981 MILWAUKEE completed a ma'or overhaul, 1 I fi refresher training at uantanamo Bay, Cuba and a North Atlantic cruise, where she it replenished 121 ship A glpngside in 68 days. V From 1982 througha- , 4, MILWAUKEE successfully completed two Mediterranean deployments. Durin , i period, MILWAUKEE had 226 satisfied customers alongside. f 1 She also complete gfirst ofa series of Planned Maintenance Availabilities QPMAI at Johnathan Shipyar s. ' MILWAUKEE underwent a second PMA at Johnathan Shipyards in May 1985. The majority of this work was related to outfltting MILWAUKEE with sophisticated weapons systems. A Phalanx Close-In Weapons System QCIWSJ and the foundation of a NATO ' Sea-S arrow Missile S stem NSSMS were installed as art of a hased installation. 1 . -P .V l I D P gf'l'I1e'hI ,light of was MILWAUKEE's participation in UNITAS JONI. During this 5 f' F-abr' V, I e ' MILWAUKEE was the sole logistics support ship for Task Force .IMILWAUKEE provided fuel, cargo and other supplies to par- . ', i.,l' South American ships. n I e' '21 if gt , to prove her excellence by receiving the Engineering L T +L .,p5gf " -,f H I ' I the Deck Seamanship Crossed Anchors, the Damage Control "DC", and the CNO Safety Award. Following the completion of MILWAUKEE's third PMA, in May 1987, she was called upon to participate in Fleetex 4-87. Later she deployed to the North Atlantic to participate in Exercise Ocean Safari. During that time MILWAUKEE supported over eighty NATO ships from eleven nations, transferring over 30 million gallons of fuel and 2000 tons of cargo in waters above the --. Arctic Circle. I In 1988, MILWAUKEE successfully completed a Mediterranean and Indian Ocean deployment where she spent 108 consecutive days at sea showing her ability to remain on station for I extended periods of time. In January 1989 MILWAUKEE entered her fourth PMA at Norfolk Shipyard and Drydock Company where she went through an extensive overhaul of all her UNREP stations and had the SLO-32 EW detection system installed. i coMMAND1 G OFFICER M. . F. ......,,T,. ' 1 L too pit tar sfor E .- 5 tB l3l Larry L. Ernst lA' l Captain, U.S. Navy lv Commanding Officer i i Xl l Captain Larry L. Ernst was born in Charleston, W. Va., on July 19, 1943. He graduated from Woodrow Wilson High 'Schooli Beckley, W.Va. and attended Ohio State University, graduating with a Bachelor's Degree in Aeronautical Engineering in1966 1. .tl Captain Ernst was designated a Naval Aviator in August 1967. k After completion of F-4 Phantom training, he joined VF-114 for his fleet squadron tour. During this tour he completed W . . . estern Pacific deployments aboard the USS KITTY HAWK QCV-63i, flying 136 combat missions in Southeast Asia 1 In August 1970, Captain Ernst began instruction at the U.S. Navy Test Pilot School, Patuxent River, Maryland. Following?- graduation in June 1971, he served in the Flying Qualities and Performance Branch of the Flight Test Division. ln September: 1972, Ca tain Ern t rt d ' ' p s repo e to Boscombe Down, England for exchange duty as a test pilot and tutor at the Royal Air Foroei Empire Test Pilot School Captain Ernst joined VF-111 in November 1975 and served as the Operations and Maintenance Officer during their? Mediterranean cruise aboard USS ROOSEVELT QCVA-417. He served as Operations and Executive Officer of the Nall? Fighter Weapons School tTopguni from September 1977 until July 1980. After training in the F-14 Tomcat, Captain Ernst commanded the fighting Checkmates of VF-211 until July 1983. Alteit attending the National War College, he assumed ' ' ' i command of the F-14 Training Squadron VF-101 in July 1984. f Captain Ernst served as Executive Off' u wer, USS coNsTELLATioN from March 1986 to August 1987. He then repvfledloif the Office of Navy Plans and Programs as Special Assistant to the Deputy Chief of Naval Operations lN6VY Pfogfamg Planningi, and held that position until March 1989. t Captain Ernst has been awarded the Meritorious Service Medal with 2 Gold Stars the Air Medal with 7 subsequent awardSi and the Navy Commendation Medal with C b " " - ' ' ' ' om at V and Gold Star for his b t t' .H awarded the prestl9'0U5, VADM James B. Stockdale Leadership Award for outstandin ' ' Com a ac Ion e was VF-101 9 Inspirational leadership for his tour as Commanding Offlcerolg Jetgraggain Ernst is married to the former Roberta Jo Ralston of Mansfield, Ohio. They have two daughters, Jacqueline andi i John B. Strott 2 i F Commander, U.S. Navy l 5 ii i l . I i E E Commander John B. Strott graduated from Duke University in 1975 and was icommissioned an Ensign in the United States Navy via a Navy ROTC Scholarship. QAfter commissioning he reported to Surface Warfare Officers' School in Newport, jRhode Island. Upon completion of SWOS he reported to the USS Byrd 1DDG-231 ffor his first Division Officer tour. 2 At sea, Commander Strott served as missile officer and ASw officer on USS B 5 Byrd 1DDG-231, served as both weapons officer and operations officer on first 3 :Department Head tour on USS Moinester1FF-10973, and was weapons officer on ii lUSS Belknap and part of the design team for the flagship conversion. F 5 His awards include: Meritorious Service Award, Battle Efficiency "E" 135, Golden QAnchor Award, and the ASW "Hook 'Em" Award. 5 Commander Strott and his wife, Debbie, have three children: Mandy 1101, Eddie 1171, and Eric 121. They reside in Virginia Beach. r S 1 Mitchell P. iviacwiiiiams ETCIVI1SWl, u.s. Navy Master Chief MacWilliams enlisted in the U.S. Naw in October 1970 and , graduated from recruit training Command, Orlando, FL in January 1971. After graduation from ET "A" school in Great Lakes, Master Chief MacWilliams reported to USS Saratoga 1CVA-607 for temporary duty, awaiting advanced train- ing in the ET field. He then reported to USS Holder 1DD-8193, homeported in Boston, Mass. He reenlisted in July 1976 and was transferred to Navy Recruiting t District, Buffalo, NY for duty as a CANVASSER Recruiter. He was then transferred 'to Service School Command, San Diego to attend ET "C7" school. Upon Grad- : uation he reported to USS Simon Lake 1AS-333 for duty as "R" Division LCPO. After his sea tour he reported to Mobile Technical Unit Two, Norfolk where he it served as Communications Branch Supervisor and Combat Systems technical ,A director. During this tour he was selected for the Command Master Chief Program . and was further assigned to USS Milwaukee as Command Master Chief. His Awards include: Enlisted Surface Warfare Specialist, Navy Achievement 1 Medal 125, Good Conduct Award 131, Battle National Defense Senlice Medal, i i .I Sea Service Deployment Ribbon, Navy Expeditionary Medal, Armed Forces Ex- peditionary Medal, and Meritorious Unit Commendation. Master Chief MacWilliams and his wife, Roseanne, have two children, Ryan and ,t Stacy. They make their home in Chesapeake, Virginia. 5 ii l Executive Officer CDFFICER CGIVIIVIAND MASTER CHIEF nf:-ng, CHA GE or CGMMAND aval ceremonies antedate the Ch I C mon dangers and shared victories tend om to the creation of brotherhood, and In F1009 is it closer than that of the naval profession Where men are bound by common traditions, shared . r, practices and ancient customs. The Navy, an 0 anization of explicit discipline, lends itself to the 9 . perpetuation of the venerated customs, heroic tra- ditions and dignified ceremonies such as the Change of Command. The Change of Command Ceremony witnessed today is prescribed specifically by U.S. Navy Reg- ulations and is a time-honored product of the rich heritage of Naval Tradition. It is a custom uniquely Naval without an equivalent counterpart in the Army or Air Force. Custom has established that this ceremony be formal and impressive - de- signed to strengthen that respect of authority vital to any military organization. Parading all hands at quarters and public reading of official orders stems from those days when movement of mail and persons was a very slow process. This pro- cedure was designed to ensure that only duly authorized officers held command and that all aboard were aware of its authenticity. The heart of the ceremony is the reading of official orders by both the relieving officer and the officer to be relieved. Command passes on the utterance by the relieving officer, "I relieve you sirl" The officer being relieved responds, "I stand relieved!" This simple procedure is duplicated hundreds of times daily in navies around the world as each watch officer passes responsibility to his relief in the conduct of the ship's routine. K RUS' .- -A EQFSTX N .. , X. , - N-,xmr . N55 xxzfgipb-, 53 pf. -3 I Ffxgg' f . f CLF Sftff Qyixxf xl-ki ,SK V x :Sf X Qi s . 1 H ' Zi- if 1 -5 . ,JJ- i -.J 4 1 l -X x ,--- i 11,4- L1 11 ,,, ,- ,,...,-F x--" 4" f un' ' .fa X in 7 - - J'- - U-v. . .S ,LH , 'Za-'Tv f 1 .L ll ,, " ,Z M! f f My ,Www-, ,J 4 1 f Z, I- 5 X u A YEAR UF C Soviet Visit Norfolk, Virginia 5 YL, K, Q " x ,, 1 HANGE 21,24 Mm -Jr' ff J m' ii 8 ,AJ lf huh Milwaukee supports 1989 Malta summit t had been 18 years since a United States Navy ship dropped its an- chor in a Maltese harbor. On Nov. 28, 1989, the event finally repeated it- self when USS Belknap , I I., - A i K ' entered Valetta Harbor and dropped its hook. Belknap was there along with the Soviet guided missile cruiser Slava for the American-Soviet summit which took place on Dec. 2 and 3. Due to the fact that both ships were at an- chor in the harbor they were completely isolated from the piers and thus needed small boats to ferry personnel back and forth. This is where the Belknap called upon her sister Navy ships for assistance. And, USS Milwaukee lAOFt-2l, a fleet auxiliary oiler, was standing by off the coast of Malta to sup- port the operation. Milwaukee, unable to ob- tain diplomatic clearance from the Maltese govern- ment, had to remain out- side their territorial waters. On Nov. 29 Milwaukee lowered her captain's gig and small crew into the water to begin their 12-mile transit to Valetta Harbor. Milwaukee's gig was joined by a boat from USS Trenton and five small Marine raider patrol boats which provided security during the summit. The summit was plagued by bad weather throughout the weekend. Both USS Belknap and the Soviet Slava dragged anchor and had tugs standing by to hold them in position in the high winds and seas. Through it all the Milwaukee's gig kept mak- ing its runs and proved to be a vital component in the operation as she ferried Secret Service, Foreign Service, White House staff, Department of State staff, and the press to and from the ships. UNDERWA Y 12 OCTOBER 89 Wg, ph, ' , " . 'T-'. E2 .15 fl? ,E ' 3- KAW' we F fe ,if l .. xy' 5 0 g 1 - hi' ' ' ,MJF 1 f - 4,-,p I xl u AIR OPS DESPERADOS A -.4 . -Q-f 12 HC-8 DET 1 55.3 513-96? 13 fw- 14 Settling In I 'n Q A X H:-'1 Q5 fd ' ,. H -qui. It 'Y v ...,. X H '-I ' -I l T" 7, DECK DEPARTMENT LT Peter Klaus 'TW' The largest Department onboard, our Deck Depa,-tm . considered the "main battery" of the ship's mission Te fit IS ferring of fuel, stores, and ammunition is made D0SSible slits. e efforts and accomplishments of the deck Seaman repa- I machinests and electricians, and the rated Boatswainmates This talented organization is comprised of three divisions wh ' in addition to being underway replenishment specialists stanczi ship control underway watches, handle all lines, boats and booms during seamanship evolutions, and are tasked with the cleaning and preservation of over sixty percent of the tm area of MILWAUKEE. a l Q 3 P . s '7 .vig !Wl ENS MCCFHW LTJG Leftwacn ...af qi ' 7 Q Jub Bos'n Wilson BMCS Etheridge 'pr- p 1-gf . . - fr 2.4- .I , "FG, ..- .l 7 "ig ,g , N ,,. , -s --M- " .,,. . -.. x ffiw. 5 - Q-,sk x kg' Nm", N M'-.N 4? S1455 . F M Y X mi?-':x.'1T1"5:-1g'1Nl+. V ' V. ,, , Abs '-,. s w Y Tmlgg- 4, . ' -. 4 X -Q -1- - - 1 ss. -, -' ix '-Q " in " W rf-nf.1x:f -X 1-AK 1 qi - K Ax hs' 0-r -:Sigh mal 'af lv n. ,Qt Sf' ii L ' - 'A f . -,L ,1."L. , 35.1-.Q . xi ...ml-.Q+. an 'C Q - - ' FIRST DIVISION lst For A Reason BM3 Aitch SN Darrel Avant SR Louis Baluyut SA Mark Boring SN Colquitt SN Briddick SN Kelvin Cook BM1 Fred Cosier BM3 B. J. Crooks SA Osworth Daniel BM2 Micheal Dare SR Eddie Delpino SR Patrick Dingle BM3 Patrick Doble SN Dogan I5 BMC Buchart . A , L 219' v , I . .. l lb -uf f 4.2 of-na, 1- E N ,Sf 1 gngl fi 3 1 K 1 . f- E Y' . 5, - ,te Q gi--271 ' 5 ' "-F'-' ' ,M -'lj A,-.4 Q1 ,.., a!2.Yiffrm'E:'f:.a...f!4-ess SN Mark Duke BM2 John Elmore SA Ronald Espiritu BM2 Eugene Feather BM3 Chris Fiegel SN Frey SN Gibson BM2 Harry Gonzales BM3 Richard Gregg SA Daryl Griffin BM3 Walter Griggs SA Hall BM3 Vincent Hamilton SA Brian Hann SN David Harris SN Henderson SR Hines BM2 Paul Huckaby SA Thomas lslar SA Michael Jacobs SA Chris Knoblesdorf SN Randall Johnson SN Lemond SN John Lewelling SN Joneth Leyba BM3 Jerry Loman SN Longino SN David May SN Pospicil SA Jerry Smirl SA Frank Smith SA Marcus Smith SN William Stikeleather SN Eric Tiffany SN Santti BM3 Leach SA Griffith SA Jones SECOND DIVISION Yi Second To None 3 I A BMC Thomas Scott Not Pictured SR Mike Amacher SA Donald Ardrey SA Becket SN Derrick Bennett SA Anthony Bishop SA Robert Bledsoe BM2 Steve Boggs SA Cedric Brant SA Lamar Brown SR William Brown BM3 Sean Caldwell SN Todd Caron SA William Caron SN Gordon Collins SA Jeff Cox SN Harold Deal SN Tony Edwards SA Rickey Griffith BM3 Kirk Grill SA Calvin Harrison BM1 Cox BM2 Dessa SN Kevin Haugen SA Glenn Henry SA Troy lgl SN Wesley Jones SN Patrick Jones SR Scott Kidwell SA Brian Kinne BM3 Douglas Leac Y h BM3 Thomas J. Livoti BM3 Larry Long SA Christopher McDanieIs SN Ricardo Meiendez SR Michael Meleon SR Harvey Meredith SA Jeff Miller SN John Miller SR Morgan SN Ernest Morris SR Phipps BM3 Sean Pond SA Charles Priest SN Shawn Pryor SN Chris Ramirez SA Frank Robinson SN Frank Fioman SN Christopher Smith BM2 Swackhammer BM2 Kieth Todd 11,74 Hsu, A ,A V f'-.5 - FN Derrick Battle FN Franklin Black FA Edward Clifton MM3 John Corbin MM1 Fred Crider MM1 Gerald Geideman FN Jesus Hernandez MM3 James House EM3 Charles Jones EM3 McCall MM3 Warren Noel MM3 Chester Olevnik MM1 Eugene Pride FA Jessie Thomas EM Charles Williams 0,2 ,T --f , - M ff' 1 Ji FOR THE CLD IVIIL NO JOB IS TOC On 23 January the salvage vessel USS Hoist was in need of fuel and called upon the MIL- WAUKEE for assistance. The men of Deck De- partment answered the call and rigged a special hose and fuel fitting to station seven to fit the Hoist's smaller requirements. She was along- side for an hour and a half and received over 1000 gallons of fuel. ,s IIQ-'T - , , mx. W g, e R 4'- ' .' Q , . sql.. X . IVIAN GVERBGARD . . . Nothing is more frightening to the ancient mariner than being tossed overboard. Unfortunately this happens to poor Oscar all the time. For some reason he just can't seem to keep himself on the bridge wing. Luckily for him the highly trained crew of the Old Milwaukee is there and ready to turn the ship around and go to all ends to recover their beloved shipmate. -'FY ! -f y 1 i - ' 'D .. 6 3 4 gg 5 Q 1.1 - .ns.... , -,n-- .. ' - 'T' - ' -5 L Q -5. 1.. 53-'I - ,gg .' f-91 7--, .- -up-L' lf --. ---1-1 ' li!-'11-X--2-:.ff..:."'2-1-,. J - -,lf-'fa' - "' .153 ' x A Y--aff' .4 - " 5 -f'f,-- .4-r,,Q . ' '--tr 4-'Ip' 'A 6.1" 'l---',,4. , ' -P-' -S11 -f 'ff 35 - f, f -4 --I -D I -'lf'-1-at M 5. x - Q nfs- ..-1, "14Z"'-l Q 3 if - l ii' 'ax "fir, 127' ' U - ' t '8 Qi v t 14-lv W, l ,. .1 gn.:-Y - ' ., , -4 fc -4"-1-3 Q'--f . - 'QQQ-aa' ' - " ' ' ' 1 f' . - fi'-3' ,,W, , .-o S-",""-P. fjgjif-.,'., -., Aff 'Pl . U . ae: - -. ,ag a - 'z ' ,'a ' n' - . P Y, v- I I Q ' ' 0, n 4-33'?3i f X- ,Ii U' Dc OLYMPICS gd X ,Xu li-311 19113911 iQ!.S..:iisl1x i llyit' -'llitn !1llt!!1il ng ' F Hive lil Y X ggusnt -'xiliiii liiif 1. + .1 X ....- ,: F -L ,gm .Z I' N-pi S 4 f'T'fi'fi , - X x I .'l . EW' Q- uwliyc 5 1 If 1 . THANKsGuvuNca UNDERWAY 23 M4-J I NGV. 1989 'Y F' fv- ff Q' i I Zf , ' . K .5 "' 1--N, iN lW'f' " tip-lvqlllf-lil? L I Q QW 5 iv- DC OLYMPICS . ., ' 4, iii " ' ke? .35 A -' " vw - Q, -5,-fi 4 . 1 .SV i A if ...pf hh.. .Vis QQM.. V -1 1' l ., ilv 7,0-if 1 x "M iii E A" " .. . ,,,, ' is W..-- M-.-.W .- . M , ,..,,... .Yu K 1 Q45 I N .VI . x 7 ,f-Q 1' i .e 522 H "YM X Q ns! ,I x mx v , ,L R .5 ' If H2 ,Fmt -+0 -.Q Q-H wr ' XP 'lu wx 'M N -sf Viv, fe . ,Q nu-1 AWESCJIVIE L 5 a ' V 'f' 4 if A N 'I Q Q 4 L V1 .: ' if ., fgnf w Q , I Q f j4,,f : fix' view V L ff, in ' :-'E -' xx k 1,1 ,,,, ' , l Q ' ,J '. ff ' " .,' f ik V g.-ww", VAN vu: , V ,rl 5 ,- "'11 -- f H K " I Q 'Nu-rl 5 ' "yZv11f,. ,, , , K K W . V . Y ? Y ,V -V 1 r,ff'f'- f' Q 1""w"k 42,.'Z'w X V ' if f- H H wikfme ,V M VE, ,. 4 6,9 5 A kv R x V ,W,qz,1.1., .I Vg? v V l X v, . S Q - , 'K-'sqm 'Haw-.-,w...-9 - ,I , Qin -A .Q - ,Vyv .-, -A-.vfq-:-. T ,.,, -- ., -Q I V has-I?-W4 J? ,pl ,, , .-. - f."1T's51'a-' ..,,,, an 3. --st "' -...,qp-eq 44 -osutp.. nm-'urn . ,A KL . '.?""! L.,q.., H.. COIVISIXFLT VADIVI Williarrfs Visit Y, - ' Augusta Ba Jan 90 -.vw-...uf '.as4"""U .1- N 1 M1 -N X1 ' xx' p I ,. I m . ' 'll A' . W f - ,xxx I Q b 3 ' .. T , ln L , .1 "BZ" FOR A JOB WELL DONE La Ivladalena I v , , Q P I N . I ,-S. A 4 ' i i 1, u I : - U.: J, , .Lt 5 D , If 3 gl ' ' , 1' t, i i .,.--1 ,Q f wa ,P ' A' "I ' A- ' 4 .1 1 , 1 ' 9 u,. gig , fn xx Ji V: 1' 7 , .Qrm J.f.,f-ww Q +3324 i 1 l V' In EH. ,. , I I ll! 3 i -' A Q .Jn . -.f lm 'H x Cartagena PIZZA COOKOFF l -'-'Y,-.,,.- X- ' ,miflm Q '41 'S .Q 'Z-N4 Wi 'l .-'44 Ninn J' " N , , X , MTV, V! VV ff fry if may 3 - , . .,,ff:- K.. 'fs.'N" 'Ulf 2,10 i 1- 'U' "Sw .. .--" 'WS- .- n ui. 4.1 Z' 1 F31 i .Q-"' 'Q i la at 1 fl '1 IIS-- 1 'qw nl' gy ',f7,g1Ul W I5 'E 'wif' , ,O 'Q 1 5 , 'r Q 0 'S .sk thru' , r T 1 . . ff- . DAY BY .4 ,,l5,g'.. Lyh, --' A, , P 'fin 7 Q 0 P . U' A 1. ch' N L ff' .24 ' I I. 1 """"'-'---x ,J ff ' , ...A ,...,y..,,, .,, gri- P V0 L 1 iw 15 4 F J 1 XH - XX MQ. wgx 1 ,Ur 314 PRESS ON ,Zi , - ,xg-, ANS K, i ,.r"" X on CHRISTMAS fi f Jem. ,igwff fl .f In X my ,, ,V x 'la ' W 1:8-J. ' V ' .a f, 35-xg-if L 9 3 1 4' L' , 1 Qian 31 N., ,mm IN PALIVIA v""lz fy as 'Y V1 Q 'wan' ig 5 6 47 , LCDR William Estrada Chief Engineer i l l l l ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT The Engineering Department onboard MILWAUKEE is for maintaining the ship's propulsion system, electrical systems ternal communication systems, and the auxiliary gear which ' numerous services to the ship such as providing hot water for and air conditioning for those hot deployment days. course of the deployment MlLWAUKEE'S engineers met and all challenges ensuring we were able to meet all commitments the same time they were gearing up for the April Operational Plant Examination QOPPEJ. Many man hours were expended the OPPE with areas of concentration in administration, training, siislic ualty control, firefighting, and material readiness. Their efforts and they successfully completed the examination during the home. N.. U 5- hee II 77 DIVISICN l - i lillggi ENS Robert Kemp MMC Brent Johnson SDM -:Q R I i i: K .? Ray Wood -""' ,v V f x. "sf-.-www iff? S ,..... fix V- fx! ii 1 f 4. - l, ei i Q f 3 , . . U s ', L FN Richard Broadhurst EN2 Sean Charles MM3 Todd Frederick MM2 Gerald Kinard MM3 Thomas Mllette FA Joseph Nicholson EN3 Michael Prins FN Douglas Pullen MM1 Francisco Santiago, Jr MM1 William Swank L l 5 BTC Krupinski DIVISICDN A l FA James Bennlngton BT3 Grlffln BT3 Danny Hall FN Daniel Harding BT2 Kevin Harlan FN Wllllam Hoch BT3 Allyn Machnlkowskl BT1 Salvatore Manno FA Chris Mmervlno FA Wayne Menendez fm ,paw IC' 1- , ,N :"f'r 5- ff .ll fl".--I' N! 1 I .ffs fi Y.,, V-V5 11 , . ' 5 are 'K K 14 pmf'5 as OS BT2 Ralph Stork FN Gilbert Tllam FA Leon Wilson Qu 1 -if 3?- MM2 Steven Mongeau FN Joel Rashko BT2 Ernest Rider BT3 Stevens BT3 Scipione 5s'! "E" DIVISION ENS Bruce JGFVIS EM2 Emmanuel Arcelona EMFN Charles Bustamante EM3 Charles Chambers IC1 Daniel Greiff EM1 Santiago IC2 James Hawkins, Jr. EM1 Jack Hill ICFN David Lawhead IC2 John McDaniel ICFA Daniel Nathman pig, I ri n 4 ff Q. ' A I, ,N ET. 'J' I EM Mike Thompson EM2 Steven Uva FN John Welch ICFN Brian Yanak Q l I gV.lb,lhf I , ,f""-xr wi 'R 1 v U'0 -1' L.-if U'6 -1' r VN 19 LTJG Edward Eckert MM3 Clifton Blosser MM1 Victor Carter MM2 Feliciano MM3 Charles Godfrey MMFA Mario Cesar Hildalgo MM3 Wayne Hoy MM2 Gerald Jackson MMS Timothy Jackson MM3 Brian Mairana MM3 James McCarthy for L, ,W N- x 7 rf""' MM3 Jeffery Mitchell MM3 David Perkins MMFN Abel Reyes MMFA Dan Ryan MM3 Floyd Stewart MM1 Steward MMFA Gordon Tuttle MMFN Fernando Velasco MMFA John Waden MMFN Wells ,- i .Q is .V- A A I V J ' XJR A E ,V -J , .,, 1 ii -Av- f"h-. V U ,,,,--P--u.....v' vmdf' gk' WQJQ 5 It ' qi 1 lil: ,, . Um LTJG Charles Caulkins FR Robert Barkan HT3 Mathew Buentello DCFA Glenn Corbett HT2 John Domino DCFN Kenneth Foss DCFR Robert Gillis HTFN John Holt HT1 Leon Mead DCFN Nestor Reyes DC2 Michael Sciacca 56 g U if W' . I 1 MPA CWO3 Paul Steinke - I , iv I .- Q 1 ,T ' rj , .h 5.4 JF - ,-,,,,, 9 1 -xr "" 141, ' - ' gig .sr ' ,R z1.Iv',.Tf"'Q . N' T ' , 90 1 gg ,N fqgoff 15 vt' I A T ' . I . , K , 1 Q 57 K l LCDR Randal Oliver Supply Officer SUPPLY DEPARTMENT MILWAUKEES Supply Department is a multi-faceted organizatio- Composed of Storekeepers, Mess Specialists, Ship's Servicemenay Gunner's Mates they provide an invaluable service to the Shiplleml laundry, hair cuts, and "Steel Beach" picnics to 24 hour weapql handling evolutions the Supply Department is there and readytosml the "Old Mil." Not only do they manage the ship's traditional supply needs but also the needs of the Fleet. ' F A I l, , 2' A wx-x if X X sg .. 4' l l DIVISICN ENS James Traa gxcs Clarence Schmalenberger SKC Eduardo Kalingking SK3 Maurice Allen SK3 Earl Armstrong SK3 Derrick English SK1 James Kruse SKSN Arnel Manalansan SK1 Pinkerton SK3 Quin Rawls SK3 Vincent Redd I , I 'Yi I 1 in ' M ' A J I fi-' E .r .A E-"" 77" 1' ,Nr X 1 5' J ii 4 1:1 'KL . t , I l E l'NX I I I I 1 I I Ii I I iI I I I I in I I I I Xiu A M aaa I I I S-2 DIVISION ENS James Traa MS3 Brian Basnight MS1 Randall Blong MSSA Roland Brown MS1 Donovan MS3 Sammy Harris MS1 Roy Micks MS2 Michael Ned MS2 James Richard MSSA Shawn Showalter MS3 Edward Simpson MSCS Dean Clam 'ns -' V, ,M , I Li- I ILS! ' ' " .. 'S , -if-H'?fgv,' 1 ,. '--X, , 'F 1 A N ! H dl i i i 221- ,L I2 Q , 5 U mga'H'5' 35 I ' -, --Q 9 " ' - I ' i R' 25' . -, ,R I x I sHo Gary Cuff SN Charles Avery SH3 Bernard Gauidin SKSA Maurice Hawthorne SHSN Jerry Jackson SH3 Richard Woodson DK3 Keith Wilkerson A 3 ,6 LTJG Edward Walker HV' GMG2 Ray Cary GMG3 Todd Cech GMG3 Ronald Cortes GMG3 Michael Maddox GMG2 William Skora GMG3 Thomas H fl' 7 f 1 fi Fl' i f .4 , fa' 'iw - "Pin -"' .vnu .and ' 9' 'vii - , f -vn- I Ng" YY' il' fa' 04 Q"' 94, mv Riggxv '. l E x i :Y f 'I 'fl A 1 fslhw 4 v 83 X 1 xx X X X TIMELINE MED 1-90 12 Oct. 12 Oct.-24 Oct. 24 Oct. 25 Oct.-31 Oct. 31 Oct.-1 Nov. 1 Nov.-3 Nov. 3 Nov.-8 Nov. 8 Nov.-16 Nov. 16 Nov.-18 Nov. 18 Nov.-20 Nov. 20 Nov.-22 Nov. 22 Nov.-28 Nov. 28 Nov. 28 Nov.-3 Dec. 3 Dec.-7 Dec. 7 Dec.-11 Dec. 11 Dec.-20 Dec. 20 Dec.-8, Jan. 8 Jan,-13 Jan 13 Jan.-S 17 Jan.- 17, Jan. 22 Jan. 22 Jan.-281Jan. 28 Jan.46 Feb. - UfW Med 1-90 Transit Rota, Spain Change of Command UlW Cent Med La Madalena, Italy UfW West Med Cartagena, Spain UIW Cent Med Naples, ltaly UlW Cent Med Augusta Bay, Sicily UIW East Med Augusta Bay, Sicily UIW, Malta Support Ops UlW West Med Valencia, Spain UlW West Med Palma, Spain UlW Cent Med Augusta Bay, Sicily X UAN CentMed X 8 Barcelona, Spain UlW Cent. Med S 1 f fmbflx QQUQXX 1 5, 1 X . 6 Feb.-9 Fen. eaera, nary 9 Feb.-13 Feb. UjW Cent Med 13 Feb.-16 Feb. San Rafael, France 16 Feb.-19. Feb UlW Cent Med 19. FQ,b.e-22 Feb. Monaco 22 FGQXXZG Feb. UlW Cent Med 26 Feta 15 Mar. Cartagena, Spain 15 M 19 M X g ar. UfW Cent Med L 19 20 M 0 ar. Cagliari, Italy X Y wrt' -31 M ar. U W Cent Med ,X TurnoverXwlUSS Savanna 5 .5 XX . QS XXX . . f M- N ef. X Xe- . ' X X - X X- ,.f-X :X SFXXXX-X-X - -X '11 I 2 K R t pai XXXXlQ?XXX...l A X2 .X XX .X 5 as X X n I X --QXK XXgX:X1QggX XXQ1' X381 1.55 X X so X S . -X SXXXXSX M .. XLX gas. 3il:.Xi,XXXgX XX X i 5 X .. . . SMX xX 5 X XSQxX.3iiS3 .XX.NfXsXF':X:f: X X X r WX 55 .Q '- Y X K - Ns xv'-- ' 1 fi-XX+ fffffs-Xfwbxv i XX X-NSS X X. X XQQXSXXQ Xi XRRXXQXSSE.QNXXQXQQSXXX5 Ng53X53.X,f . K K XX ...Q X11XXXXQXEQQQXEEQXQQQ . SX .XXQQQXQ K f x K X X X .K KX k ..X .... X XXX XXFXXXXQXQXXSQQESQSQQ X' K Xp. 'X - K .X X .... sg.sX9T?XgsX'1:r:s1sX XXXHX as X O Xi M i - - X.v5XXs35X,XsQXgXX,XX. 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Zig . .4-4 V 3'-1 M-xg, .11 '3' .ms fr- v U JM X ti X YQ-,M -my S.. 1 , Q - 11-. x, "- - QQ.f'7 v- . ' ' , t " - In ' ' N- 'fx N-Q 2 -, l f Hy- :au -'ix . 4, .1- V ,- qi X - '11 'ff-5u,':Jg1, 'nt A Cin pf mlln1gr'r"W N X 3 PA ,Q,,hL1.-Ap. ,... . .. ml an ii ifif. XLVL 4 m X Q4 P if ' 4. .A . '11 ' .LM . RCELONA --ci' ll!" ,- ,. - ,. gl Mk H1 4, - -.r f . ,, q., "5:. . 2.1, :,.-uw ,.,, V t I f-v :bmi t mf. Lk -A4.,,4-r..,. 4 i 3... 0 K fqx.. 4 - .-a-nv-mlb . " -T M ' 5" ' 'N' .Ali ML g li .:..... ' 1-P 'A W.. X' "J" - , ' . 4, ' --,Mui t Lip. Q Mullins.,-.-.. ' I--5-1 --.uu-nvA'-l ,,., V3 Alllltv- PWNQQIQ ll W-.-.,. -L,- Gi 'Q V Tk aa,-s J fv-lh.1"" -A --..., . .. ..... 'I' .f '-if-T -...... ,,,, W... ,, 4,-xg., E1-. N3 COOKIE BAKE OFF f' , . 21' rg.. 'bf- gall, "' A F., Q. W ,W X 3 - A R f' Sf' x K' A ,K 4 - Q Qs O.O.O g Q.fKf' 'N O, 4 2" A -' ' -',- X F 1Ww.M,' ir. , , X fx- J I -- -QM, x vw x,O, """"" ,T Q X "v'-I-A -f X f' Y , X X1'V-f"1rf li' aff 5- 0 C -- - H "ln I .Q . g .V 'L ' f I . ki.. 'L'1.s..g.-Lui-451 - .wx Q Y :bi ' ax , f . Q A f 'O I QO ' O " Jef- 555 N - '-'. . , - 3' , ,,' A ' : f Q - O 'K - LL. , -A .v O, AW, fr . .- - - '- H. Il 0 '1 X 4 s' 'C Y .. v E qs ix - 's .-uAlJ A 'sy x " - 3 -,fo R- M 1 , L, X STEEL BE CH ,fx s 1 K 3 K 1 i . , E i E 1 I MONACO 1 gh 1-my - C -4. pg.. S 1 5 1 3 AN...-U e a '1"6,'U 1 . 'H' A f ,A .g,..,,, YACIIT CLUB . E ,. N... N. W? '1 1' 1-.W f he 1- 3 - f NZ: 'lr Rf ,eww t 1, ,Sm 'H 'Y' as , P: g ... fs., A LA In ,lm 1 Um V I 3 ' n.1:.,.i" f '1 f sf" lifts? .I ,gf W if an-cr' 5. ml una 'Qu- ...-1 , .. asv - ' p--unfit' .iq ,du fgy p "m"""n Af . ish' A , ,. V1 ,gs-,.. - -' .,- ' 'YA 1 .:.1ii4.,,v V ,., -4- 2' 1 ..- ---f -Q 'gl A -. , ..- ,rr-5, r. -.m . ' Ja tal W...-vs. W 4 l A-I 4? ..,.4. no-14 Q. RT GE AN llll .I ,A 'ilk J -Q nfs r ,,---.51 f 3 3 1 1 E ? x F 3 E Y ! N E E 2 2 I Q A I i 5 2 I 3 4 i i . k L I I 5 Q s r is E xl . 5 E E . i L F: E I 2 5 7 g i 4 l Z 1 5 1 5 5 5 'A' , X X xiNixXXNx, WW . , 1 HQ if A f A if ,y x M! I vb" X 1, 1 ik 4, 3 x . . x . : : 735,11 J X X T174 pg 7 gif' 4... -an XM NQW ,it , x W ? I x Can s 5 5 3 L2 l 3 5 1 .1 Ik Q' -x ' fx, A rfifqu - 1 fav 4 . J ---hw' . ur ug., T10 s DEP RTMENT g me entire e safely and on time to carry out our mission. O O so a f f C 5 ,, fi I y , , . O Af f f A mg. 'f 1 - , ' , wwf nah Q .5 . igf! I . MAIL rrfr 4' fr rj HZ ffihw Q V I , 2 ig! 'aug Q - , ik K ,N f, f, gh, 4 ,, slit, 43-A W "" V , A ' ,V 'ff' 12 M 5' 41 - '1 sl if z is U 5 , , 775,132 , r".-gn'-if X A x J., " -. Q- V sv, , yi, ,, , W, fl jf ,I f 5 ' 5 -64 + , f . 4 'fly V T , I A V, A ,, V, t . lygwl 1 V qt J . . 3 V ' f- 6' ,, .v.' JK 'l elif-, , ,Q l" vu f. U ,K V ,V V l . -4 ,E - ..,,-161'-QM' " f' K 14 Q 1, c W dx 0 ensures the "OLE MlL" knows where she is going and that she gets there gg! me sensory Information and the processing of the information. The departmeflt consistsgof and Slgnalmen: OF Division, manned by Firecontrolmeng OE Division, manned ebyflectronicsge manned by Operations Specialists. These divisions work together to coordinateth gm ship gets to where she is need d ' ENS Brown FlMsn Kalvin Baker SMSR Prentice Berry RM2 Charles Churohwell SM2 Thomas Doshier RM2 Charles Eastridge RMS Charles Jones SM3 Greg Klousla SM1 Timothy Knowles SMS Flick Matrox SM1 Charles Williams OE DIVISION lf- is t' IL M j' k w LT Morgan ETCS LaQuay ET2 Wilson ET1 Miller OW DIVISION LTJG Bressant EW1 PON' f 83 I LTJG Curtis M OSl Taylor ' SN Marlow Debman OS2 William Hale OS2 Rodney Koehler SA Christopher Martin SR Kevin McGraw OS3 Patrick Miles SA ChadNodaS SN Edwin O'Connor OS3 Gregory Trahan OS2 Richard Wooldredge OF DIVISIO FK J ,. 2 I 2 , ff 1 ' 1 FC2 Albin FC3 Kingston FC3 Southeriand --fm W 110- N Q A 7V .an ,rx LT Rose MEDICAL DEPT HM2 Edmonds 3 Xa 1.5 1 ,. 5 V! .4 5, P1 I b' m 4- 2 S.. im Ls FK' W x., N: .l ff." 'vfay ... Hr ,yr HM3 Comegys HMS Simmons - V. '- 5 si 'f : M I up.- x gr' Q V . 6 fp IE 3, 1 .g 5 :yi-:'l!""Smf 'Z Az ,c .f V U g, -A 6 . UE- ' 39 pst' P? I P Iii. ix, . Q gm ' 1 1 a M ' ' 1, , " ,Q af- ! 3 , 'A ' 5. , : 3 ' ,335-Iii 1 1,51 1 df ' m "A '- V ,. - 4 m 5 ""' j . it ...Ig ' 5 ' 1 ,V ,535 ' t 1 5 s ' Q A , . if" 41 ' : HW' Y: if P 7, : .ii 1 2 . sp E , 1 ,fi ii 3 ' T fl 3 z 3 5 1 1 1 4 3 5 3 3. Eg A ii ' ga 5 if ii 1. .W sm is Wi :l! -iii 3' 3 i Sw Xu if if J ! ,J 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1. I1 1 11 11 12 '1 11 '1 1 1 11 11 i i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 31 11 11 11 1 1 1 1 1 I ll 1, 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 11 11 11 15 1 '1 11 11 1 11 I 1 11 11 11 -1 '1 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ,I 11 i 1 1 1 1 3 xx -8 Xi 5 , 4 5 ,I x .Q S ii I Q, il .2 is 31 gv fi lV 'Q :Wi Q, 1 '34 ! 1 -I 5 VX D ' I 13"- gl PF' QR' gn lr' I E 59 i s 1 . 1 JM i",-.I HC-3 DET 0 E DESPER DOS M 1 pd if , ,fx an fl ' , . .. J- .....,.. LCDR Claus LT Haley LTJG Latham Q3 ', gf. Q. M .gmihfws 3. -. QM., CWO2 Cordoza ATC Brown X X fin X " ' 1 'Q . '55 5 , , 15314159 1 " -1 fi- ' X . ,,,,v:. 5, 2-B X -1. I ,,, ,. NA, mi Ann E195 ,, , , Nxs Y . 'X . vi' "' A 'x 45 I, V 4. 52" . V , , "" . pu-I ar A' 4' sv ' v V' 36 959 fi V g X21 Y 131, ' ,rg , ' , lg if ' f 42 Ii f ,gg ,I ' I1 rf 'Ei , gx .. .za gi i X 'ii M: ,Y 4 E MQ EM ,Ii N mv 5 I we 'Z Sy! . 1 l X ,,,m.,,....x.X - six X, I X s l N I 'Q W1 g X N X .i. -a W5 V, ! 41,551 " A-4,1 -wwf 'f 34?-V '5'v?'w we QQXQ Rf S ,. , ., wwwuqu-W Ex xi if . I ,sy , L.. ,,-1 kv O I ' .1 wins . lf' XS Y E!!! abs-,.L0'l Q! I A PRAYER FOR THOSE I CUM A Heavenly Father, I am in need of your guidance so very, very much for the job I have been commissioned to do. Lead me, Lord, I so I can lead the men and women in my command I I I properly and wisely. E I long for their friendship - I guess everyone wants most of all to be liked - but I know that I need most of all their respect and their obedience. I know that sometimes they resent the ground I walk on I and the air I breathe and that at times they feel I am I most unfair and completely unreasonable. For there are times, almost every day at first, when they feel ready to drop of exhaustion, and I push them even harder, I and times when I seem to magnify and pick on l the slightest weakness or disorder and impose the severest penalty. I I Father, sometimes I want to get right out there and carry their load and take the brunt of the punishment I prescribed. But I know they have to learn to take it. Someday their lives may depend on it. But, Lord, make me a good leader - that I can push my officers, men, and women without pushing them too farg . that I can maintain discipline without being unfair, I that I can instill the strict obedience of respect rather than of hate-filled fear. Help me ever to respect each individual as a valued human being, remembering that Jesus cared enough for each of us to live and die for us. , And make it possible for each individual to see the spirit of Christ in me. I I ask one more thing, heavenly Father: Watch over my people! Protect them! Keep them unharmed in spirit as well as in body. And let me, Father, regard the life of each one of these individuals as highly as my own. I lg ll ll ll ill li' ll ll gl E I AIM il' .V .ll 2 1 . 5 . ,ll .1 ii 'Zz li I . I 1. li STE I I ,Q S: ,I -I ily. llli iii? I-" Iii Lili: li' , , M 94 i CREDITS CRUISEBOOK OFFICER ........ ENS PETER M. MCCRARY EDITOR ............... .... E NS PETER M. MCCRARY PHOTOGRAPHERS .... ................ H T1 MEAD BTFN MOMAN DCC BRACKETT SALES . . . .... DK3 WILKERSON 15: E w 33. , A Q2 ! TS 5 A5 ff 3 1 v i 1 3 3 i I I 1 5 Q x 1 1 v w 1 5 X 4 , 2 P 5 p 4 1 S 1 Q l i 1 4 , , a 2 1 Z f w i I 4 I 3 1 Q 4 1 W i. zx 3 3 I x L , 11 '.l 1 Q , 3 11 , in ix gi 5 3 1 5 u n 1 3 i 96 L -A . l Q 1 Y 6 i f I i S I P ,C '4'nv'1!. A -w-I '- M . , . 3 ! 1 l -.,' ff. T fu ,f .1 .. ft, .air 0, x V . ar 5 , , E f ,X:yh.,1k, E 1 ' ' I v vvl-1, . , f -.Q A ,Q-0?-:134 . e . L'l',LE:, Q A . 1. ' . his 4,:1i3.gQ3, f " ' ' jf- . A . ..g:,A,5 ,Q , . 'ft 1 ff.-"' ,W .V . 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Milwaukee (AOR 2) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1977 Edition, Page 1

1977

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1979

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1981

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1983

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