Milwaukee (AOR 2) - Naval Cruise Book

 - Class of 1983

Page 1 of 128

 

Milwaukee (AOR 2) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1983 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 128 of the 1983 volume:

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" " ' 'F' V. --' ' D ..,.,flL,w,. I gr L", -Pu'--ww A 1 as - in ml - ' '-J'-. iw it. A df' -' maart 5 XJ .nl .. ,342 , , fit'-.D ,Y ' l, . l fi "' ilu-P' in, I9 - " v fl PK fa . 1,1 -ro- Q-.me 'O 3-v Ig Atl fa . , Q4 Lk. 1 1:3 ik, 1.- ,x fl, 4WL7r H1 H2 E r Q P if-ss, gi...-.ski Those who go down to the sea in ships, Who do business on great water, They see the works of the Lord, And his wonders in the deep. Psalm 107 Q N '? Q ss Q 1 K -- Y- 'Slums Q X . K- 4-rss.. MEDITERRANEAN CRUISE 1983 APRIL 27-NGVEMBER 21 f X .XXXXQX g XXARENNQ X :XXX F: X fp fx E4 I In ,, X. -W X X Xsviwximafyf XXX X - K X. X ' X - ' fXf'fXiS1Q X , X X'XfiX- ' k X f 1 ' Q SfNXNvxzsQiX1-v -vfX:--XSSXXX 'xXX ' f . XXXXQXXXX ' ' - X As N ' 0 QS 1 XX X .- -X XX- X f X ' LN XX .XTX XL gk X ixgffsun- Xx Mg :QXX -ij' LMXQXX5 XQX X -X - ff- V' ,, X' X XX XX sm XXXQX ' Ame' V ' fe - , X X. 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"ww, n .i . 1 L- ': in 4 ' 1 ' l par' ":f,""'-' f 1. W ,- "H 'W' ' I ' Muff'-...."""" ' ' l Ill: - . I ff M """' o.. f UI lllbfl x,T"'j ... ..5.., I 0 "'3"""' ik in up uf 5 ""irv.. 1' 1u.,.N... 'I 'W .. s- ' 'Wa'-Aa. Q. +" f ,, i 0 A Q 1 N379 -W M-Qu. ' tw- B . I .,i Vu '53 X x ge. 'V-5. 'Gr Q J . ,,n 'T' H-.LS ww. , Y w -S' rf?x In.. ,. Q. dui, i- 'vw v . .Q it li. Q. h W :BM 11 U . -f,"'f..A GH 5 up "'-ati .gf i 9 lb? Jr, Q, ain- -no , "fwfr CAPT I MAG ER 2:-Q if if 211- 23, 41 OFFICER Captain Magner was born in Dallas, Texas. He graduated from Jesuit High School in Dallas in 1951. He attended Loyola University in New Of- leans, Louisiana for two years prior to entering the U.S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland. Upon graduation from the Academy, he was initially as- signed tothe USS IRWIN CDD 4461 homported in Long Beach, California. As a result of IRWlN's decommissioning, he was reassigned in December 1957 as DCA onboard USS RADFORD QDDE 4465 in Pearl Harbor. Captain Magner entered the Submarine Force in January 1959 and attended the Naval Submarine School in New London, Connecticut. His first sub- marine assignment was to the USS RUNNER QSS 4765 in Norfolk, Virginia. He served as First Lieu- tenant, Weapons Officer, Supply Officer and Op- erations Officer on RUNNER. In March, 1962, he was transferred to USS JAMES MONROE CSSBN 6225 via the Guided Missile School, Dam Neck, Virginia. Captain Magner served on MON- ROE as Assistant Weapons Officer for a period of three years that included the precommissioning de- tail, shakedown operations and three successful de- terrent patrols. After a two year assignment at the Naval Postgraduate School in the Operations Re- search curriculum, Captain Magner's next sea tour was onboard USS TRUMPETFISH CSS 4251 as Executive Officer. After TRUMPETFISH, he was assigned to the Staff of Commander Submarine Development Group TWO where he served as the Tactical Analysis Officer. In July, 1974, he took over as Commanding Officer of USS JALLAO CSS 3683, making successful deployments to the Mediterranean Sea and Carribean Sea. After his command tour, Captain Magner at- tended Harvard Business School in the Program for Management Development. He was then as- signed as Administrative Assistant and Aide to the Chief of Naval Operations where he served for three years. After this assignment, he was trans- ferred to the Staff of Naval Operations for Subma- rine Warfare QOP-2J. While in OP-2 he served aS the Executive Assistant to the DCNO 215 well as the Attack Submarine Division Readiness and Tactics Branch Head. Captain Magner took com- mand of USS MILWAUKEE CAOR-25 25 Febru- ary 1982. l Captain Magner is married to the former LOUISC Adam of Richmond Hill, New York. They have three children, Carolyn Anne, Lawrence, Jr. and Laura. EXECUTI E OFFICER LCDR Lohrman was commissioned upon graduation from the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis, Maryland, in the class of l97O. His first billet was as ASW Officer aboard USS LEONARD F. Nl.-XSON lDD-8523. Upon eomoletion of this tour and graduation from Department Head School in Newport, Rhode Island, LCDR Lohrman served as Weapons Offi- cer aboard USS HAMNER QDD-7181 and as Operations Officer on USS HULL QDD-9453. He then returned to Newport to teach Seamanship and Tactics at Sur- face Warfare Officer Basie followed by enrollment at the Naval Post Graduate School at Monterey, California where he earned a Master of Science Degree in Oceanography. His next tour was as Engi- neering Officer onboard USS SHREVE- PORT QLPD-121. Finally, LCDR Lohr- man attended the Armed Forces Staff College prior to assuming the duties of Executive Officer on USS MILWAU- KEE CAOR-21. F 4 f , . ' X! f 'Y' R"-,Q C MMA MASTER CHIEF Master Chief Petty Officer Boatswains- mate Eugene L. Hussey served as the Master Chief of the Command throughout the Medi- terranean Cruise. Master Chief Hussey has had a challeng- ing career including duty at the following stations: USS ALSTED, USS NEWPORT NEWS, Boston Naval Shipyard, Logistics Support Component Diego Garcia, USS CA- LOUSAHATCHEE, Shipping Port ARD 4 at New London Connecticut, USS WIT- CHITA and finally aboard USS MILWAU- KEE. His commendations and awards include: Navy Achievement Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Vietnam Field Service Med- al, Republic of Vietnam Medal with device, Navy Unit Commendation Ribbon, Navy Battle "EM Ribbon, Humanitarian Service Ribbon, Navy Marine Corps Expeditionary Medal, Sea Service Ribbon and the Good Conduct Medal. Master Chief Hussey's NEC's inCl11dC Cargo Handler, Tug Master and Command Master Chief. "' DEPARTMENT HEADS fi LCDR D, Lindsay LCDR R. Theobald LCDR J. Kitts Dr. T. Bemiller Chaplain J. Vinson Dr. D. Turton LCDR J. Stafford . .vt 5 Af . .v f I v 5 . f , V is I , M qi, b .4 . FHITHI' Glass OFFICERS Q S54 tniattfginiai L rw' uf ,Q I 1, :Y ' ' tif" id 2 'P l xzhn 'A Y -- .gfj '55 N, L "'-143 'I Y 4 0 12? f, va D ., L 15. I! P - . .aiavf -. gag. '-ga, ' Q K 5 L 'J , ' ' is A' 'g'::' 5 :K Ng: T :gr iffy., ! LT E. Johnson LTjg M. Lynch LTjg E. Graves Is. elv- 0- 2 5 Y LT D. Jcrabck LT K. Darin ENS W. Smith 1 4 2 Z 5 Z s LT J. Silvester LT C. Erlandson CWO J. West CHIEF """"' PETTY . GFFICERS I ' .. . 1 1 ll I ' s ll i 1 in ' I 73- I .U lf" X , S I. . N af N I BMCM E. Hussy BMCM W. Hendricks RMCS V. Williams BMC C. Studds ETC M- Bean GMGC E- Ulmer HTC C. Underwood NF x,,, MMCS W. Crotemeyer HMC R. Livingston AMHC R. Writesel AZC R. Worrell ICC H- Warner SMC M. Bunch MSC L. Placido SKC W. Austria sq- Yin- wg 4 4 5 R 4 1 , . 1 5 g f I -Xi W lf' ., L MMC N. Smith BTC R. Thompson QMC L- Deaver . .gg W l ..v' JX J 5 i wiht T5 U I 5 Front MXS 3rd Class Ed Kelly, Ens Morgan, MXS lst Class Warren Coleman Back MXS lst Class Keith Foery, MXS 3rd Class Rich Ralls, MXS 3rd Class Kris Reed, MXS lst Class Jim Tranoris, MfS lst Class Ed Harrington During the Mediterranean Deployment, MILWAUKEE hosted three separate Mid- shipmen training periods, each approximate- ly four weeks in length. During these periods, one junior officer acted as running mate for each first class midshipman, while top-per- forming enlisted men had the responsibility of showing the ropes to the thirdclassmen. In ture MILWAUKEE fashion, the middies were kept busy, standing watches underway and inport and observing from the main deck as myriad Sixth Fleet units passed alongside to receive fuel, stores and ammo. During their stay, each midshipman also had the opportunity to observe and partici- pate in the daily routine of Deck, Engineering and Operations Departments onboard MIL- WAUKEE as well as cross-decking to the USS DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER, AUS' TIN and IWO JIMA to acquire a taste ofllfe aboard different communities of the surface force. Not to be left with the impression that the fleet is all work and no play, the ffammg periods were frugally interspersed with PQI! calls and steel deck picnics. When the lfaln' ing had been accomplished and the Midshlp' men were ready to return home, they all agreed that their month at sea had been 21 valuable and memorable experienCC- VI XJ 1 ,J Left: Milwaukee crew members and their loved ones take one last walk to the quarterdeck before the ship gets under- way. Below: BMI Jerry Stephens spends one last moment with his familyg daugh- ters Telma, Andrea fholding Dad's mon- keyj and wife Audrey. 'Y v X N e 1 f l '! al 1 ,Q ' ""' V, , ,ff I lit N., nadwh 'Y f gf' i Ft it tt. Underw For many years, men have been leaving their families behind to travel the seas. Milwaukee's turn to deploy came again this year, and on April 27th we left families and friends behind to be- gin a seven month deployment to the Mediterranean. For many of the men and their families, this separation was a fa- miliar thing. For others, it was the first time. But whether the first time or the fifth, the pain of separation was felt by everyone. Perhaps the only solace to be had was in the anticipation of the re- union. 'W' 'IS M ff ' W' Art , G , U DERW Y REPLENISHMENT W R xx .N X X x ,xt X xx X. xx X 5 I . ' X ,X 1 I -N I -X I ix? 03 05 0 Il I8 16 MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY Underway Replenishment at Sea- USS MILWAUKEEIS primary mission and the funtion which we perform best and most often. Imple- menting our mottos of "Service to the Fleet" and l'The Customer Comes First", MILWAUKEE es- tablished an unprecedented standard of excellence during the Mediterra- nean Deployment. The following was MILWAUKEE's Mediterranean Underway Replenishment Schedule: HMS HMS HMS HMS HMS HMS HMS HMS HMS HMS HMS HMS HMS HMS HMS HMS HMS USS ARTHUR W, RADFORD KHALID I8 MAY HMS BADAR BADAR HMS AS-SIDDIQ AS-SIDDIQ USS SAVANNAH FAISAI. 24 MAY HMS BADAR BADAR HNTS FAISAL KHALID HMS AS-SIDDIQ AS-SIDDIQ 27 MAY USS JOHN RODGERS FAISAI- BADAR 29 MAY USS JOSEPH HEXVES KHALID USS ANTRIM AS-SIDDIQ 30 MAY ITS INTREPIDO FAISAI. 3I NTAY KHALID USS THOMAS C. HART FAISAI- Ol JUN USS EL PASO BADAR USS PORTLAND KHALID USS AUSTIN FAISAL USS JOHN RODGERS Ol 02 O4 O5 06 07 08 I0 Il JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN JUN ITS LUPO USS JOSEPH HEWES USS BELKNAP USS ARTHUR W. RADFORD USS FLATLEY USS DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER USS ANTRIM USS HARLAN COUNTY USS BELKNAP USS ARTHUR W. RADFORD USS FLATLEY USS CONCORD USS MOUNT BAKER USNS PAWCATUCK USS EL PASO USS AUSTIN USS IWO JIMA IZJUN I4 JUN I5 JUN I7 JUN I8 JUN 23 JUN 26 JUN 08 JUL I0 JUL II JUL I4JUL I5JUI. I7JUL I8 JUL I9JUL 20 JUL 22 JUL 23 JUL 26 JUL 3I JUL I8 AUG 23 AUG 24 AUG 25 AUG 26 AUG 27 AUG 28 AUG 30 AUG JI AUG OI SEP 03 SEP 08 SEP I0 SEP USS CONCORD USS DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER USS MAHAN USS FLATLEY USS CONCORD USS SPRUANCE USS OLIVER HAZARD PERRY ITS LUPO USS FLATLEY USS EL PASO USS AUSTIN USS PORTLAND USS CONYNGHANI USS IWO JIMA USS PHARRIS USS HARLAN COUNTY USS TRIPPE USNS RIGEI. USS CONCORD USNS RIGEL USS JOHN RODGERS USS DONALD E. BEARY USS EELRNAP USS DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER USS CORAL SEA USS ARTHUR W. RADFORD USS PHARRIS USNS RIGEL USS CONCORD USS IWO JIMA USS MAHAN USS MOINESTER USS AUSTIN USNS MISSISSINEWA USS JOSEPH HEWES USS JOSEPH HEWES USS MOINESTER USS MAHAN ITS ORSA USS PHARRIS I USS BUTTE USNS RIGEL USS DONALD B. BEARY USS TRIPPE USNS RIGEL USS CONCORD USS PHARRIS USS MOINESTER USS DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER USS MAHAN USS BUTTE USS EL PASO USS JOHN RODGERS USS IWO JIMA ITS ARDITO USS EELKNAP USS HARLAN COUNTY USS AUSTIN USS MAHAN ITS SAGITARIO USS DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER USS MAHAN USS JOHN RODGERS USS BELKNAP ITS SAGITARIO USS MAHAN USS JOSEPH HEWES USS PUGET SOUND USS DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER USS MAHAN II SEP I3 SEP I4 SEP I5 SEP I6 SEP I I9 SEP OI OCT O2 OCT 0-I OCT 06 OCT 07 OCT O8 OCT 09 OCT I0 OCT I I OCT I2 OCT I3 OCT I6 OCT I8 OCT I9 OCT 20 OCT 2I OCT 22 OCT OI NOV 02 NOV I0 NOV USS VIRGINIA USS CONCORD USS TARAWA USS BELKNAP USS DULUTH USS FREDERICK USS EL PASO USS AUSTIN USS BOWEN USS CONCORD USS HARLAN COUNTY USS PORTLAND USS CONCORD USS JOHN RODGERS USS MAHAN USNS NIISSISSINEWA LJSS CONCORD US NS WACCA M A W LSS DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER ESS MA HA N USS BOWEN USS DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER USS MAHAN USS MOUNT BAKER USS DULUTH USS BOWEN USS MAHAN ITS .ARDITO ITS PERSEO USS JOHN RODGERS USS TARAWA USS FREDRICK USS NEW JERSEY I0 II I2 I3 I-I I5 I6 I7 NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV USS ARTHUR W, RADFORD I9 NOV USS MOUNT BAKER USS DULUTH USS TARA WA USS IWO JIMA ITS ARDITO ITS ORSA USS JOHN RODGERS USS AUSTIN USS PORTLAND USS PUGET SOUND USS BOWEN USS MOINESTER USS DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER USS MAHAN USS CONCORD USS NEW JERSEY USS EL PASO USS PHARRIS USS IWO JIMA USS AUSTIN USS JACK WILLIAMS USS JOSEPH HEWES USS PHARRIS USS CLAUDE V. RICKETTS USS PAUL USS W.S. SIMS USS JOHN F. KENNEDY SNS LANGARA USS JOHN RODGERS USS BELKNAP USS CLARK USS GALLERY USS DETROIT USS MOINESTER USS PHARRIS USS MAHAN USS USS USS USS USS USS USS USS USS USS USS USS USS USS USS USS USS USS USS USS USS USS USS USS USS USS USS USS USS USS USS USS USS USS JACK WILLIAMS JOSEPH HEWES INDEPENDENCE MOOSBRUGGER CARON MAHAN THOMAS C. HART MOINESTER PHARRIS BOWEN JOSEPH HEWES ANTRIM BELKNAP JACK WILLIAMS DEYO FLATLEY PHARRIS THOMAS C. HART MOINESTER MAHAN ARTHUR W. RADFORD JOHN RODGERS BOWEN JOSEPH HEWES MOUNT BAKER DEYO FLATLEY JACK WILLIAMS ANTRIM THOMAS C. HART PHARRIS MAHAN JOSEPH HEWES MOINESTER Q7 JUL 1 27-28 APR 29-30 APR 1-7 MAY 8 MAY 9-11 MAY 12 MAY 13-15 MAY 16-18 MAY 19-22 MAY SHIP S ,SCHEDULE l 20-22 JUN 23-25 JUN 26-30 JUN 1 JUL 2-6 JUL 7 JUL , 13 23 24J L 25 267' 2 AUG 3 17 AUG 18 19 A 20 AUG 21 AUG 22 AUG 23 AUG 2 SE 35SEP '19 501.115 Jus1 A FINGER PAPER' CUT. PEEFEQTO! 0 I Y Q FA r- Q -435 LV! 1 X 'Q 6223? I 1 I. 'X H ' 'Rini-i"x 'E N Y-5,-:..31 "1-7K ' 4.29:-e A L7 5 I O e Q45 ?iENRxrg4RI5Sx:xx-'scifi ig: . -L mixlfmmwff? Wm X k X Hi X lg ' ' JESS X E J ,411 f K 1 -1 I' . ' df if 'f ,iff Y Ik w Y ..-J X ,gif ,-ff . rf ' Y ij f 113 U ' "UD COPXEONE NEZAWE 2 oBREAKEVx.BKEPxKEPx GOOD BKDDY. NHATZS YouPc2o'9 , cm EQ- 1 N Q A an , MR. Annum 9,'b046 fd NN 4 7 by 19 W kj um-1' N ' 5 K7 ggg1yg,1g30z5HAff AQUQQ ff-UM mm . ff- 6 NM WTUM- ' ' BOAT! l '- Pk? Q 5 gmoucewms x 0. O Y M Q M- we f-N X ' KS AIR DEPT HC-6 DET 9 w--.-......,,,-,--gl. Y fl ,.. VERTREP I , ,. fi K i Z x I x 5 I Standing by for another lift Vertrep, or vertical replenishment, adds a third dimension to MIL- WAUKEE'S supply capabilities. Supported by Supply Department, these tandem rotored workhorses of the fleet expeditiously transfer a myriad variety of cargo, ranging from ammo and repair parts to fresh vegetables and soft drinks. Hovering above a rolling deck, hooking up pal- lets and depositing them gently upon the receiving ship's flight deck, ver- trep helicopters enable the support ship to simultaneously replenish four vessels or reduce the time alongside an aircraft carrier while engaged in a massive logistic operation. Vital to crew morale are the reliable mail services provided by the air detach- ment. In fact, sailors and marines can expect mail call almost as fre- quently while deployed as they would in home port. In addition, medical patients, emergency leave personnel and technical assistance representa- tives are never far from their desti- nations courtesy of the HC-6 teams. WT AN Michael Fleming PR2 Terry Corn AK2 Miguel Galindo 60' ' if X s Comrades in arms f e AD3 John Furr AE2 Steven Bo AD2 Harold Lenno? in yer AMSI Joseph SPOSIIO S, Q Two H-46D Helicopters and the pilots, maintenance officer, air crew and ground crew who operate and maintain these aircraft comprise MILWAUKEES Air Detachment. Det Nine is one of several operated by Helicopter Combat Support Squadron Six to deploy onboard the MLSF ships of ServRons Two and Four. Throughout the Mediterra- nean deployment the men at Det Nine reliably performed their spe- cially, providing a diversity of valu- able functions and greatly enhancing MILWAUKEES mission of "Ser- vice to the Fleet." Not pictured: AD3 Kurt Amiek AD3 Kevin Ross Q r B vw N .jf AMH2 Timothy Duffy L Q E AM H3 Edward Schwers if Lil? XE'n. AT2 Donald Churchwell Tanking up AMS3 Mark Corson 5. AMS2 Raymond Moss DECK DEP RT E I f 2 Z .42 1 xg Z ff ,V fl Z 1 X s if , N7-fl 2 H wwwf , ,W V f ,Wx 7 X, MW!-I X ,lu ara ZW f a I X ,K YN? H xfimfg, AL- Deck, the largest department onboafd, hfls a multitude of responsibilities. Beglrllllflg hls career on deck, the newly reported non-rated sailor learns the ropes, literally, and becomCS conversant with paint brush and binoculars. During unrep evolutions, Deck occupies the spotlight. The Boatswain's Mates and Sea' men of First and Second Divisions rig the fuel and cargo stations and fly them aloflgslqe' The Gunner's Mates of Third Divisioniflfe the shot lines and handle cargo ammunition as well as maintain the ship's weapfms ang small arms. The Machinist's and Electfl' cian's Mates of Stream Division maintain and repair the cargo winches and elevatofS which keep the rig teams in action. Dllfmg quieter moments, the deck force directs thelf energy toward combating corrosion. 3 vast and never-ending task. FIRST DI ISION X T'-IFE' R U . , .Q rf' fs Z A' if 5 ff 2 ,W V Q. ' , M. W ' f HV . Q... gg " 1 , , I I, , ff. If 5 QW ', ' sfvif-4'4'W'? ' , 1 jf I I -4 1 5 Q N 1 V ff 'ffff' , ' K ' f " I ' 'V X W 1 ,Www 2 l . sr Q P , X bi Q? .nw- -I .Q-wr mv ,Que Qty 0 ' L 'g Jil BMI E. Johnson BNII J. Tate BMI CI Lange , N "' ' " x , ,l BM2 J. Panning BM2 J. Mccool B513 G. Mancuso BM3 S. Burt BM3 K. Derry SN E. Elkins SN W. Killough SN J. Behanna SN J. Bailey SA M, Maxwell SA G. Goodman SA pi Skenenger SA R. Franco SA E. Spencer l :if ,. :rua , .av .. Eli' I-Q SN R- Wong SN T. Glassmire fit l.. Jackson '25 7 rw A W Q' V' i 1 wx It Q ,S S BM3 100 Leonard BN13 Jfffi Pwnc 5.x X1LlI'iK ,xiicn SN Ron Bell ' Q ' U 'f Qi ' ' - .Ju 1- -L -- K ,,. S 1' N SA Tim Brumbuugh SA .lgiek Clilhoun cr-1' rl SA Cephus Ray SR Dewey Lynn , f xfeilig 3 1 , Rf? A A fi 'K ,SQZQZ H Q 2 in SA Ronnie Fritz SA Vincent Gerber S.-X Ron Cash SA Paul Custelli hug gun SN Keith Durham SA Barry Edwards A ' ' i K I4 S N N A 3' 1 -- Q. .. it SA James Ginn SA Terry Hackett vag- SN Joe Hawkins I SR Eric Johnson Ziff! f ff!!! , ffffff ff P If W Q if fi ,, QM Z7 'I f. 79 f! SA Mike McPherson SN Roy Mowery In .1-L! l 4' 1 ,W . l SN Drew Ruroede SA R oberl Salazar 3 Jerry Payne WING! SN Joe Stanich Nik ' .. -5 4 'r WTA SN Wayne Johnson SN Tim King 7 ,V fjy kW S Y- i,- -rf SN Tim Puckett SN Ronald Rios vw V, if , 41,4 A K .-ap., SR Tony Sawyer SA Kevin Stanfield SN Kerry Strong SA Dwzwnc Tmugr SECOND DIVISIO M-W1 if ' 1 1 il' . L ls- ,whi S - 14 g -5 4 'f'1 ' I Y 'TL a I, 1 ' ful - 'Q Q W M '43 on-v""""' C24 'vw 4 'K KN, 'Wfx v-eq f . , . 1,,1!n'Sv 39' ,ner ,,4 'W K y I STK sv' :rf 'LML'+--I-MW' xr ,f "T..f- mv f- f,L.,.',l4nvQ '4M , -,,,v..-A W-Q--1---f 'A .. . N ,4-4 ' r ,yi 1. xl rv . fflgi' Q Q., 32 - '- ' X Ax f A J... ., p:L1.... 1 I ,. -sull- -l' f 113. .F' Q Y' .WA-.M v-V, in W. "" 'ww ,-fffw' e W I 1 s Emi. X -.4 VQQHEQ SN M. Smiddw SN R- R'-'If' HN Nl w....e. xx n. James W S SN R- Bault SN C. Burt SN l.. Pctlcngill SA M, Flores SN P' Schone SA T- Tolley SN M. vvoodard SA A. Graham SA D- Mvjica SA C. Williams vii, Q- 6- ' , BMI Curtis Hendrick5 BNII Stete Nhmre BMI Ken Pleasant BMI Robert VginH005icr fn. . I9 sr 1 ,- BMI Dale Winkler BNI2 Berry C'icIiImxki BN12 .lcrry Stephens BM3 Ignacio Nova 1 I JL uv BM3 Ken Patterson BNISN Grtiyling Allridgc SA .Iuy Barnett SA Richard Brady Y ' I Q ' 9 I if Y t.I.' f ,I J Y A I' I ' . . ,, ' . .., ", f 'Q "' U. - 5,--, ,, N Ay., - - --1' - , ' in -- .0-cu . - -- , . . , W- I :I ,A SA Mark Christie SR Ed Conner xXx' ,.v 1 I I I I I I I I w.' ' -5 b- -ag. 4, 14 .- 4 es- nti 1 -gf -I --Q. QQ- . ..,, . "Q m..',:",-I "i + SR Jim Craig SN Kevin Doolnn SN 'HH 9 W"A"r VX K'fl'K-'flLiCff1LifI'OW , I G V. N Cf' .Q ,, pf' .,,, - ' A SA Tony Gainey SN Chuck Goforth SN olny Cirmcll SN Jeff Hills r cl 'JT SN K H . . en olmes SN John Hough SN Wrllram Murklcy Jr. YNSN Gary MunS0I1 6 A SR Ron Packer SN T, N .rwney Peterson SN Larry Pcttcngil SN -,Cm Willis THIRD DIVISIO x ,1 Y . Q 1 .t gf Tir-' f :QW "X" ' 'Y uk! MI aff 'sly 1,7 ""iz..,M GMGI W. Spaeth GMG2 J. Coover GMC2 J. Carmona GMG3 J' Snyder GMC3 S. Weippert G MG3 l.. Ott GMG3 J- Peters GNIG3 J. Ole-sky CMGSN M. Felichko N fn, GMGSN R. Puckett SA D. LaP9 STREAM DIVISIGN ' C ol C 'E MMI R- Charter EM2 H. Stringer MM3 W. Knepp EM3 J. Munns MM3 G. Morrison MM3 E. Thomas Mmm L, Crawley xmrx C. Spence FA J. Smith ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT f in -.. ,-.. fi, th S1-,ix x -E X X df. ...ffl xx s - - .h ga The men ol A Division have greatly diverse responsibilities. The auxiliaries they maintain involve almost every apseet ol' operation and are located all over the ship. After steering, aviation pumproom. emergency diesel and ship's whistle all fall under the cognizance of "A Gang." They regulate the temperature with steam heaters and air conditioning units, keep the galley and laundry equipment on line and maintain boat engines and davits. During unrep evolutions the "A Gang" can be found manning the pump rooms and liquid cargo control and operating cargo fuel valves topside. MMC M Hays Mm J Bisisdeii FN2 J- Canlas EN3 G. H MM3 M vox EN3 R Reagan my MM3 M. Irish MM3 R. Wing EN3 E. Bigelow MM3 B. Palmer EN3 A. Gintile FN R, Mulligan Y FA T. Weller FN J. Holmack FN C. Sanders MMFN D. Carson MMFN D. Long B Division BT2 K. Fern BT3 R. Frey 135.8 .gy fiv- l .1 :r BT3 J. Epilow BTFN S. Lebedynec BT2 I. Puig BT3 G. Basnighl BT3 A. Duque BT3 G. Clark BT3 B. Brooks BT2 A. Brooks BT3 G. Lewis BT3 M. Winter fil-1 'ine ciivixion onboard MILWAUKEE ixiiieh xiippliex the power lo keep the Screws :iirning rind the lights burning is B Division. XTlil1UllxlllNiKS in Lin environment of incredi- ble iiezii is xuhgii these men must endure to pmdiiee the lite blood of the ship-steam. Their rating sziys it ull. They are "Boiler Technicians." ,xf AX N xx is Y si, 'xx .asv ff I , 5 ' ,A f 04' , ff 'K Q :pf If , fv Y, ,, .A-I , b fr I in-I if mxkm Y 1 Q 5, it 'V 4 NWT "QQ,-A lx. ,. -. ':-- ....,""'sai.'4 1101" " 5- .A-,B 1 J r 1 -- ig-v J. ,pd fd-'I ,ie -ZJ " it ELECTRICAL DIVISIO The men who directly ensure that the lights keep burn- ing onboard MILWAUKEE are the members of Electri- cal Division. The Electrician' Mates operate and main- tain all electrical auxiliaries found in the engineering spaces, and stand generator and gyro watches underway. In addition, they maintain a shipwide electrical safety program, control electrical tool issue and make repairs where needed. The lC Men of the division are responsi- ble for all interior communications and the ship's master gyro compass. They provide us with swift communica- tion from any location on the ship. , 'kxgy "T ,W- iw P ', IQXII x. llihhx IVNIZ 1. In-Cpu-x ENI2 J. Heard ICZ .l. Cogets ENIZ D. Pluff IC2 D. McKee EM2 K Coodwin I Nl K N. lirzmlnxhcrg ,-l. EM2 C. Ramos IC2 R. Plnuffn IC3 A. Carter EM3 T' Shanahan :PMA .l, from-II Tlie Nlacliinist's Mates ol' N1 Division operate and maintain tlic main propulsion turbines and ships service turbo generators. They respond to engine orders from the bridge to assist in maneu- vering the ship. keeping lier on station during a console or formation exercise. To remain on line. they closely monitor vital levels and temperatures and maintain the pumps and valves comprising the plant. ln addition to those duties. M Division ac- counts tor the ship's lube oil and conducts the calibration program. 49: S... 1 ,ans-ll!" .lla f 1 wif if ,g 1 a MNH P. Hauge NINIZ R. Rose NINIZ T. Dowd r NINIZ NI. Bcrnnrdi NINI2 D. Lienau MM3 W. Vanderjagt NINIFN W. Graham MMFA R- Vaughn MM3 jimmy Boswell MM3 Vernon Crump MM! Stoll Dzxvis MM3 LCS D021ne ,KVM I MM3 Dave Lawless MM3 Mike Russo MM3 Jim Walls MMFA Efnest BFYSOU MMFN Harvey Caywood FA Alonzo Chisolm FN Wayne Cook FR Rooofm Guajaca ,4q FA Rob tH o , ef ef' CYSOH MMFA Roger Thomas MMIVN .lolm 'lillou ll-QA Todd wcllcf 7 REPAIR DI I IO I Q N1 . s 's 'g 'g",s? 5 ,N..j:- ,, lp wtf-s 2 . ,Q JV' 4. ,M .A - brit H, ,,,,. A . -4' if! , gg ' - '18 'we .5 When machinery breaks down, Repair Division goes into action. As their name implies, these are the men who provide on-the-spot corrective maintenance to ma- chinery. The Hull Technicians, in addition to performing repairs, are responsible for running Dam- age Control. They maintain repair lockers. DC. equipment and pro- vide instruction and training. The Machinery Repairmen manufac- ture nevv parts such as pump shafts and valve stems to replace failed ones. Together. the two rates ensure the equipment readi- ness that enables MILWAUKEE to carry out her mission. K LA. - si, 1 rl.: ' Of W?" HTI J. Boyle HT2 D. Carman HT2 E. Cress MR2 P. Vanslooten HT2 G. Harshbarger ff- f W , 45x ,- if ' QQ., W 1 HT2 D. Ko K , 2 ,, , Y 'dish HT3 J. Fledderman fa QA IIT3 T. Dlugosh XIR3 P. Pierson HT3 'l'. Zampzlrdo E HTFN S. Shaffer HTFN J. Atwell HTFA H- HU50 'Q 'iw' Operations Department ' X'---.. 1 an-64,1614 11-ff ' :AO avg. , CAJ The Electronics Technicians of OE Division are highly trained to work on some ofthe Navy's most sophisticated electronic systems. Onboard MILWAUKEE, their respon- sibilities include the mainten- ance of all electronic commu- nications, satellite communica- tions, radar and electronic navigation equipment. ETI A. Bystrom ET2 R. White OE DIVISIO ET3 R. Denison ET3 E- Barnes K AQ. ., 1 ,Q 43421 , , ,V 1, ,W k NW, - K 'XX 3 Q " fb, Mfg' X, I I ,,', x,,,,,.,..,,, JFEKV, f F' ' -,M , ,Q-::,' fr 97 X' 2 bf' W5 l i l l I l t l 1 l i 1 l 5. i -..A J,-.-. B I 5 I Division xx is N t i l 4 l OC Division is composetl ol Ratliomen antl Sig- nalmen and is responsible lor all external commu- nications onboard LSS N1ll,WtXl lilill Radio- men process incoming and outgoing message trati- l'ic and set up the circuitry which allows the ship to communicate with shore stations and other ships via voice radio. Signalmen are responsible lor the visual means ot' signal flags, llashing light and semaphore which are the principal methods ol' communications with other ships during unrep evo- lutions. 7, :Ei 2 B ii 1' fi! in 63 SMI Steve Colbert RMI Roger Richncr RMI Dun Sweet SM2 Jim Ballard W 4 f wx SM3 Jerry Brown RM3 Terry Keen SM3 Tom Siler SMSN Tim Chappell SMSN Mike Haile RMSN Ricky Hull RMSN Prentis Jackson RMSN Paul Koenig RMSN Mitch Lowman RMSN Rick Palmer 6- Q-as-'T' RMSN .lim Radcliff RMSN Ron Wcissc RMI fi- SOON RNISN R. Nlasek SMSN T. Campbell I-Q Lv I? if -...I I . RMI T. Johnson RNU .l. Carrigan E I x K .X X X IH Y x'."5 av Q X -..fi j ? 'S Ak "Nix I OI Division wx The Operations Specialists of GI Division man the Combat Information Center around the clock. -FFOYU there they directly support the bridge by providing infor- mation pertinent to the operation of the ship. By ascer- taining the courses and speeds of surface contacts. COH1' bat can recommend avoiding courses to the Officer Of the Deck. Conversely, they can direct the ship towarda customer ship to affect a rendezvous. With several flldlp circuits blaring at once, the OS's assist with the coordi- nation of unrep scheduling and are sometimes the only link with our vertrep helicopters traveling to outlying ships. When the ship maneuvers in restricted waters. Combat provides the radar navigation expertise. ln addi- tion, they are on call to provide identification and fCPOfl' ing of Soviet Block vessels. I -P -an - ' L ' 56.-ui ,J Q 's 'f 4 ml!! 'N I F y' 1 I J-Fw' OSI M' Herron OS2 W. Cappelli OS2 T. Sago 052 M- Sauter OS2 T. Shannon Y n f 1 OSSN S- CUPQ' OSSN J. Brown i QNI2 W. Kuluus QNI3 C. Cc-phas SN B. Kinney Navigation vf N 1 , . EQ, ,Q Q f V X , SN S. Brandt SA R. Donnelly TSK JJEQA. wx A fi 1 ' R if SN R. Potter "Lir e A i ei?" rx , ' sz 1 v 9'1."- 1+ 3 "lin" Y :,- I . K 1 1 V MILWAUKEESS Quartermasters perform the functions which ensure the safe naviga- tion and piloting ofthe ship. This involves a diversity of responsibilities. Whether holding a true course as an aircraft carrier ap- proaches to port, shooting bearings in a har- bor entrance, or navigating by the stars in the evening twilight, the Quartermasters will be found. " ,, ,SF 1, . 1 F x rdf ll, O you 'xg-1. - .lib f SUPPL DEP RT ENT , Algiyly. WX Q 'ff f . Q GQ, ' :Y gf' 1 is vf 653, N i i 1, 2 x .af ll ,W ff-- , 3 Q . A A1 w Y ' R E e , 1 1 -4 L ' Y an I J I xx ' 4 X x 1' P x. X Yi Q V s I ., ,, I E I X . -qs-xy A Q X Q f X ,ff X s 5 Y ! :R X . X C wx Q -X, , Y K 5 F lk' ? Z .ff ,,--"M .474 1 DIVISIO X-sid' s X , ,4"' 1 A if I ?"'fj in Onboard a Service Force ship such as MILWAU- KEE. the function of S-l Division is vital to the acco- plishment of the ship's pri- mary mission. The Store- keepers of S-l order and control all parts and sup- plies for our own use as well as for customer ships. They are also responsible for or- dering and accounting for all cargo fuels. ln preparing for cargo transfer, the SKS go into action banding pal- lets and staging them be- neath the unrep stations or on the flight deck for trans- fer to customer ships. ,XX ' 'wfifksl x NJ! ZH x Q4 X Sq.,- N-W Y e A ,, X '7' 3 A SKI C. Bryant SKI R. Herrera SK2 M. Sprung SK2 L. Alba A SK2 NI. Canada rf- , '15-' W --.1-W., -1,-C-1-:mfr SK2 H. Chan SK3 C. Cross QK3 J Parker SK? f Bl5h0P if W 5 W SKSN R. Gibson - Division lx 9112: - ' fs, so s - 1, 54 , x lv' 6 ' at t Providing meals for close to four hundred men. from sunrise to midnight, day alter day is a signifi- cant responsibility. On MILWAUKEE, this task is expertly performed by the mess specialists of S-2 Division. Planning menus well in advance and hav- ing adequate stores on 'hand is just part ol' the activity that goes on behind the scene. S-2 is also called upon, on occasion, to prepare special meals for visiting dignitaries or birthday meals for MIL- WAUKEE's own crew. N x -.-l vs--pc... .- W '- 'iv-as 5 Q '-1 -...S x 0 " NU 3NUP.Vh0 1 f i L--...... .lb gba, 'L 5- ,.n M C 5. KH "il Z ...-I" cf-1-9 xX, X k fa XX'-K.. Q K'- .af- lv fl, lg. x - N xx m Ax 8 1 9 MS2 M. Melendez M53 M. Thompkins MSSN C. Leyden 79 X151 Rick Hqrrod N151 Cfrixpulo Pumyno M51 liimwru lmwpm M52 Bob Arnuo M52 .lim Larry MS-2 Munucl Mclcndcz M52 Roberto Victorino N153 Ron Bullingcr M53 C6150 Hows N153 lun Lindsay M53 George Sncud MSSA CHI Hubbllrd u IF, M52 Chris Noble M53 .lcf1Guntcr MSSA Paul WHEN DIVISIO USS MILWAUKEE, in support ol the fleet, may often remain at sea for long periods. Consequently, she must also remain entirely self-suffi- cient by providing such important services as laundry, barber, small stores, gedunk store and disbursing. The Shipls Servicemen and Disburs- ing Clerks of S-3 Division reliably perform these services and contri- bute to the smooth operation of the ship. 1-" ma iw-.ti?' i mf ' a l 2 6'.,xi 'l ' 2 r Y A2 S ll...5 1 DKI Y. Una , llkl I . Muirunn SH3 H. Walls SIU .l. Stewart NIII I-. fhildcu SH3 I.. Burris MII! NI llnrpvr SH3 K. Johnson SIISN R. Perry SHSN X. Peterson 4 SHSN R. Trauterman SH3 K. Jackson SIISN l.. Oehlke SHSN A. Williams I MILDIC Al DEPARTM ENT Q X 119 my 53 S HM3 B- Meadows 6 -5- Since its inception on 17 June 1898, the mission ot' the Hospital Corps has been "to give on land and at sea intelli- gent, capable and efficient as- sistance to Nledical. Dental. Nledical Service. Nurse and Hospital Corp Officers in the eternal vvar against disease, in- jury and death and to aid in maintaining the supply' and ad- ministration ol' the supportive branches ol' the Nledical De- partmentg in the absence ol' these ollieers, to display the judgement required to meet all emergencies and in every possi- - .1 g.. ble manner .-Xssist to the best ol' ' I , their abilityg i.e., to keep as many' men at as many guns as many days as possible." Q , was X, 1. ,R . 'ililitig . s . 9 ill ilf-4 Ol! . swam' . IV., ., i 2 f ly 1 fr q1llll"' MW"-n N, .Y.A4, JM ' 5 -fu Q Il i P f ,.."'..'!" Y.,- ----1" Q CORPSMEN al ii X ' .il i F 1 Vi-Q 86 1, 'W i, li. . Y I B-E. is-.4...--..,,....... ,.,,, 4 r Ship's correspondence. instruc- tions, the plan ofthe day, personnel records, orders, transfers, legal and so ong the flow of paperwork is al- most endless, and it is handled by one division: X Division. lf the pa- perwork of the Navy were viewed as a forest, the Yeomen and Personnel- men of X Division are the guides through the forest. How soon am I eligible for reenlistment'? What are X DIVISIO EL c CH' my rights under the U.C.M.J.'? How do I update my service record? lf X Division doesn't have the answer, they know who does. '- 'Q Y j X - s ' 1 dl l L . Y . . 1 -Q T nl o P 1 1 Q lake ,W KAI .aft K P.: - i. ' -.l.!.. - -4 ' -4? ,-,if '4 7' 14 I h d t rk YNSN Kulwicki rc-views new material YNSN Bligen ar 2 W0 f afffihz BMI Hendrick coordinates 35 MAA NCI Penny confers with YNI Waller r r PNSN T. Seiffert BMI C. Hendrick RPSN C. Hoffman PCI Clint Blackmon NCI Slew Penny i .IO3 Kurt Errickson YN3Ci1iry Ciillcr ...Q ,., ,- 1..- PN3 Mike Mujcski YNSN Curl Culp YNSN .lcff Kulviicki YNSN Don Rziinxuiicr NLXI .lim XviiiIlCI1bUf'g PCR Bili Couxiiis Q i 'QQ Th 2 PNK Rgiiiiiinc .lohnwn YN3 Al lloyd nur ' f SN lnxxrcncc Hicks PNSN Mikc .lumCS A , a 4 ' w f PNSN Ron Tzillcy Draguignan Remembers Every year, the people of Draguignan, France gath- er to remember the men who fell August 17, 1944 in the liberation of Draguignan. This year, the United States was represented at these ceremonies for the first time since 1945 - by the men of the USS Mil- waukee. The day began with a formation and ceremony at the Rhone American Military Cemetery and Memori- al Site by Milwaukee's Commanding Officer, Engi- neer Officer, Chaplain and Honor Guard. Following this ceremony was a joint service between Milwaukee and local citizens in the center of Draguignan. The local government then sponsored a ceremony honor- ing the French Resistance fighters who fell in battle. As one observer of the ceremonies commented, "those who forget the past are doomed to repeat itf, May the sacrifice of the men who died at Draguignan never be forgotten. A , Top: One ofthe fallen Americans buried at the Military Ceme- tery. Bottom: Milwaukee's Honor Guard marches toward the Memorial Site. R eq! ,, ,,,. ,N N..-BW? zz-s:2"1-'-22 afifli S by 5 , H' D If ' I as 5' gl 5.1 l' , T1 f-.Fein it Yrfg 'S , Q34 r 9 V l ,xx - i A- f 4- ri' ,. if i iff? . ,, 4.Vn,,,k , 'N Hin' - - .il ' I. A L fbi. . A 'V' i Above: French marines sound taps at a ceremony for fallen Resistance fighers held in the center of town. Upper right: Captain Magner signs autographs for french children after the memorial service held at the Rhone American Military Ceme- tery and Memorial Site. Right: Formation for the memorial service. Lower right: SN Ken Holms performs "The Battle Hymn ofthe Republic" while a french bugler watches. Bottom: A parade of french WWII veterans at the joint service held in Draguignan march before Milwaukees Honor Guard. -L ' 9 .,-.' ,, . -Y r I Q ' I L .4- 10,4 ' r . 1-zjnun - - A- ...Vx :H ,QL g , . ,.- ffl. L H 0 M Q' v""i'Q1',, t J!-V - l 'A 'f .qs W ,A 1Q.pi.nil!y by . V ,,...- , if " w.. ,? 7' ::p,4-'--'ig :.,.s:ee 5 ..f.,tf. .. ., ,ut-' . Q-. 7-. ,. .-.1 'wo --at 1 e V.: 1 P5--' , f'.4-535 I ' , nd' ' A 'Q 't' f ,w 4 54" wfffijj Illia N A l s Q fi? A 5 Q 91 K , , -5. , I. Awe: A- 1 K .,-. :c,5.iA' Q'.59:, .W- N .fl-In A I ' I A . in 1. -. ., ' .-. ,. 2 ,1 , ,gi ,. "3 , ,. It 4 , fa A, A 4 . A 0 fy. ,.. ur , rf-, ..-- f:..s'4r .. -.,4- "if-Fx".-:, ' rib? 'E' F41 if . 1- 1 c f' M ei- ' - - - --ii Ol mpics Although being at sea means hard work and long hours, it may also mean a chance to relax in an unusual way. One of these chances was Milwaukeeas annual "Steel Beach Picnic and Olympicsf' The days events consisted of boxing, wrestling, basketball, a 60 yard dash, an egg toss and a tug- of-war, fueld by an endless stream of hamburgers, hotdogs, chicken and sodas. It gave everyone a chance to breath easy for a day and have a good time. The HSteel Beach Picnic and Olympicsi' was an event we will all remember. Top: Mi1waukee's hoop getting uswishedf, Bottom: the men of Air Department heave-ho in the fierce tug-of-war competition that cli- maxed the days events. l Above: OS3 Tom Shannon PNSN Mike JHIHCS and MMFN Dave Carson l ' 14 1--.1i .....-avi-V-. Upper left: BTFN .lim Davis and BTBN Arshinn Brooks go at it during boxing matches held on the flight deck. Upper right: ITM3 .lim Stringer con- trols BTVN tireg Basnighl while l.t. Kevin Kasberg refer- ees, lfar left: HNA3 Ben Mead- ows pulls point for his buddies on the R-Division tug-of-war team. l,cft: Dr. Tim Bemiller stands ready at ringside. Bot- tom: Tension ripples in the air along with chicken embryos during the egg toss. Q REE LISTMEN TS Milwaukee Sailors know "IT PAYS TO STAY" The following crewmembers reenlisted during Med Cruise '83: MM2 Lash SK-2 C3mP5 Pggug Noble Ngva Lewis MS3 Lindsay BM3 Derry QM2 Smith DKI Ona BT3 Norman YNSN Culp RMI Johnson MSSN GaSS ETl Paszul SK2 Cruz HT3 Sparrgw OS3 Soltis BT2 Carter BMI MOOTC MS3 Rowlett MS3 Arnao SI-I1 Abiog SI-I2 Dillon ICC Warner -MM 3-ws-X I-I M3 Meadows MM2 Helmlinger ICl Bessette HN Williamson BM3 Leonard BT3 Peterson MS2 Victorino SKCS Lockett MSI Parayno HT3 Dlugosh BMI Pleasant RMI Richner r I Et E" t Adj Vice Admiral Briggs reenl Above: BT2 Carter happily accepts a reenlistment b v onus from Captain Magner. Right: LCDR Stafford reenlists OS3 Soltis as the Captain and OSI Herron look on. 94 i it ,ll at isgg ists tl to rl M83 Arnao, BM3 Derry and BM3 Leonard Each man in naval service learns to make decisions on a daily basis. While some are easy, others are difficult. Eventually, during Cf1Cll man's eareer comes one of the most imp0fl2Hl decisions of all -to stay or to leave. For manl' M l LWA U KEE sailors the decision was to stall- Why did they stay'? The reasons vary from lllan to man. For some it was the benefits saint? through reenlistment bonuses, while for othersll was the opportunity to select duty stationS0f attend one of the Navy Service Schools. lf0f others still it meant carrying OH H Pfofesslon which instills pride, offers challengCS, and Pro' vides the chance for adventure. d Throughout this nation's hist0fY, men ifnr women have answered the call to duty. gf many this call becomes a way oflifff- Becfwsew their commitment, Americans can continugur live as they always have - in freedom' congratulations and thanks to them all- Left: RMI Roger Richner swears in for another four in radio central. Lower left: MM2 Dave Lienau displays his 7,000 dollar reenlistment bonus cheek. Lower right: MSI Dios- coro Puspos is signed on in the supply office by LCDR Dave Lindsay. Bottom: YNSN Carl Culp cuts his reenlistment cake with Captain Magner and En- sign Jim Morgan in the Admin- V Q NX Af .Z , pow istration Office iwh, 5 NCI Penny qualifies ESWS Q ell Done! During the deployment, the flight deck was the scene of sever- al award ceremonies. MILWAU- KEE Officers and Crew received recognition for such accomplish- ments as the Navy Achievement Medal, Surface Warfare Qualifi- cation, letters of Appreciation and Advancement. Pictured be- low are just a few of those who chose to excel. 5-X in i w X If X ' f l S x , J' V .X s ,Q 3 1 v c - J' 4 ' i ? sv w5 N s ly Sl . ' LTJG Simons receives the Navy Achievement Medal BTC Thompson receives the Navy Achievement Medal ll 'Q A xi ' 1 fa '1 1, .s ' it yi t3 C ll ' K fi 'I' V' tx y J YS' 1 X E , , s 5 i ......1.1 .T1i EN2 Canlas receives a Letter of Commendation Petty Officer Siuter is frockcd to O57 e0rknev 'C fvJ'b63fl0lf'1., hum if p J ,,,fg,.Wan eb 1 --1 c 72 J Yxuk A.-.nlngf-a W 'XL QLFACAI wfxl A n JI'Ca L londonde rltxg IIIII III bl: -1 -2' A ,S-7-K Bel all "C 4 D NL. .aww 'I 9 sumo Dug-f48urr3wn,,.Qn H? -1. X,- . M 'ff' me erdam 7 if I fIh1IuUsl-'I om -11A W if, 0 A r- : Od 11 hn lv' 'HNKDBVQS Q-HNL4: Q., Bev Of H P 1-,jp Q 1: f 'F Fznlsterref,-YD' S 2,4 J X GI udlf 'fx Oporro 1 Nm X iron rr GNL Lnsoon , , .Nan E' lr ar :ere Q M-Ja! Casas aflfajusp VCX I More DC. , 4 'BHP ---sf' 2 lunge If .5 4 pic ofL " r- -J 'Lt NCP 1 Y fnboucloubffx X, lx N0 4 Nl: x BUOLQ. 5014 C. O If II , III WJT-agcH '- dbg W: I fu! 5 ,!N2C52U'lViis2 JJ e'IrD,I.IaX'1 .,. 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X.- ............--..-- .,-, - - Y- --Y- - ---- -- -- -Q ' - - - 5- -- -- -- V I II . - I, , L xv i- rhguff-gn ,. I , -., ,.I,'., . I,I:I s I N ' '- X' -' yas?-A 1 N, f' - ,- f' .f- . " -- N- 1 'A - . v . . ' " . 1 f-. -, - v v r -, -"' . 7 -js vf X kI 1 ' . 5 fl. A X Li' L !v.f'a.x:x.3 V I-I II -I' :5I:.I'I I I -I . ,rx ,-,I ,, v--HIHS I A ,I 7 I K '51 , 1 ' ' .-if ' ' ft n 1 L - "' 2. ' , '---- .W -f J-, I, 7, ' f.- - -' ' f- ' fy' f I A "' :L-,xxnfga - V' '--if ,-- -, " ' 'IYA 1. .- , . L , '1,f"' .. . , - I 4 x ," ' I 1 I . A .1 1 X 5 Q ' gr' - --'M 1 4 . A I, , ma, II-III-I II I . .I I I , , , -. I Fvfif L' Ap'-4: N I ' ' ' Y ,. ' I IWI ,III qx I V III is. I: I I I -.-41 rx '1AL.:G5-:' '. r :I J .. A I, If' li5I,f..IIfI'I I II IQIIQ I I IQ , Y 5 I I ' F-. ' '. - . . I.:vIIH I II IM. , I I I-II -Ir, vdM..,-, -,.-YV - -f-' Bermuda N . X K, : , gg an ' ,, . ,WW X .f - Ifll 5 i x 'X "rvQ'3E"7::ffg x, N Wi fs,3?iT?P5ffL 1, -A 1 ' F!! , MW PO TA DELG AZORES " "QQ..QT'A iQ ffziiff' 5 f""Qw... , Is' '- Fai. . ' s UN .,, TUNIS IA F nhl!" f:f'v'q:- ' ' 1 Aww.-L ,Fi P 'fix QBQO X .ucv .ou-00 ff 9' 7 unu1o0o0o001nooooo - 4' ' 1 u4oei00 .wo :QQQQA 'ao-U "1 ' 400 A 0049 fa' "9 no- own A ' Onntoooof mi ,L ' taboo" ' ' M 0 4 N000 no f o N X AQ , an .rf 'WL l if mx r ' ISRAEL This is a land of living history and the birthplace ol' three of the worldis major religions. Traveling through the desserts of Israel, one is surrounded by evidence of the struggles of past civilizations. Within the walls ofthe cities, there is a fascinating contrast between old and new and a diverse con- glomeration of religions and cultures. The first- time visitor is met by sights new to him, but the names of which are well known even to those who will never visit the Holy Land. This same visitor will leave with impressions which cannot soon be forgotten. A ,qs-L sf'f4f-1,--- gr if " .lu A .,, . r af Q T l 4 I i i fl 0 - nv L,, ,,4."- - L r.-,Q.I " , .. ' Q., i,. i ,.., iw. id i ,jail 'gui I" D l. ' .. V i ' f -5 'Q 'Y 0 ,., H 4' -12' 4 1 . .f I1 . l fl ii 101 1' X ? 'S X 54 al bfi. "1 .x,. y ALI. ,-f" J, I , ' . A gjizfftffi is ,b 57. I A' 1 9. "H K, g 'C' 5 I 1 1 Y A . Q' A 1 I W: 1 , 4- 7' M... - 'I ' - Nh if. i 391 5 . 1 Y I-1 ,inf VF.:-4 s 'QII 51 K ,Q , -Q 'E 'Wm ,- .Bl .lf I fs.. in i:7"-,fit ' --1 I fr:- .II -V . . I -In 104 RIPO SICILY Vs IIIIIA III Rnpmlu. IIIL' Ivllqiccrs and Crew of 'XIII NN Nl IXI I II.III Ihr -Ipporlunityto par lnunymlc III Ihr Iwlixzal 1II'S:iinI Peter. Pic mu-II .II II-I1 IS Ihr I IIIIIIII and below is the IIIICIIUI' IIIIIIIIIJ ciixmc murviccs attended by cum lIIl'IIIlK'Iw5. Al Inner left, Captai M N fR1 LIIUIIUI' I. xwlcurncci by thc Mayor 0 nslu I , 'sa ll' - A .2 I ff . T4 Sf A ik. f x 1.1 , -1 3 . ,144 yi! .1 2235. gx -15 . , , . Y AV. fb 9 '. .f ' ng ' v-Q 3 A 5 'Q S v" ' 'ar'-N f A 2 as . f , ' !0! r" 5 X ,Q 6 . A , 'N ae 4 5... , iw v l , .g 15 I 'N " . , V, .3 K He 'EWG .v' if ga' f I T an F Hw- ..-ni':"'.4 '-' . 1 5.551 S H N... A 1, . .W . Qu ,A 5,- .. ..f V vc I .Y 4 'fu 5? Q Y - - 1 1 1, - Q.- Q TW 'W .1 4 Pa A' , 5 fn.. f.,a'i "' 122.5 lb whiff ,iv l.4gL4nf-he if K .1 A-. ,ff In 4 U 'i 5 ,Q :1i4 ' 'S-2 1 15-gif f 4 'ff' L-4 A fi.i U " " .,-1 fm-'ua-M.. , 'A - .v i SH.. F" ' gr, A 1 6 4, I A. . 9. , 'I fl ,, ! 33' 'i bi i i f S 1 .Wig ,X 'A N 7 ffzifdfbnhuitfv -wad? 5 what Q ,Vg Y. VIZ" 'inns 5. l" p-iff., Putting into Soudu Buy for ll day to loud fuel, Mll-VVALlKEF made thc most ol' hcr time inport. A bcuch pic- nic wus orgL1ni7cd which wus uttcndcd by most ol' thc crew. With warm sun and cold bccr both in nm- plc supply. it wus thc gcn- crul conscnsus that Ll day ut thc bczich was just thc way to unwind from thc rigors of scat. , 4 ' .--- ,..- K- -- cf- .-,. l - ,.,, -,V 5 . . ...Q ...Sf - 'T' -" " -""- ll.,f L 'Nu -s "" 4 1 WA' -' -17111 F5-v 4 'I wi... 1,1-- -qjv-' 3 SA- K 41 . 3-g':--,.f,.- .- ,Q . -r--rv ff-j3a-a335if'5-f1'- ' pu.. P L SPAI x ' 'wwf TOULO , FRANCE . xx' I I 1" -1. 1.1. .-.- THENS GREECE .:.:-JMMHRMRHIIRI fX.X- .!"'1!""?'3"'!"!""' 'Baan- 5 tl u' fx nn' x n 1 ' x5- 1 1 1 ' lx na . A, N . -. ., fi? V 'u .. -f. -. ar .M-'34 f --- ,ll W- -,:-., . ,-, A ,l r-2+-f V -' ' :E-wr .-M E Va .fy bi, ......,3. .-Y, - mga?-. , .. Hn- ' 5 - ' fm'-, ' '59-if if V 1 , WT 'Y ' A .L ",.:7!' 'i' " 3 A ' 5 v' E+- ' guuf. Vx f- f AUD- 5. ,, l A , t " .,, K " . . 4 '.,..s -'- , g Q . , .x ., , .N .i -I, A. .P . x Inf.. L l , S ..,.:.. W A . -'- '-,' l IQ- ' 15:1 ,'M-gy-va:-f, i J up. ' -.gps W ! .lt ,hx ,...J,,,- ' ' Ni . 7 'L 5 -- m ri I p 'j HI 1. . 4 3 l itll., f . A .'f4.."-,J Cnee the site ol' one ol' the worldk most brilliant eivililations. Cireeee today presents a fascinating legacy ol, history and arehite- ehure. From the hollow ruins ol' Athens were born sueh eoneepts as Democracy and the philosophies ol' men like Plato and Aristotle. which have been the basis ol modern Western thought. Viewing Cireeee's past may provide some illumination into our world today. ' 'Q' , yy- ,,. I .Jn t il f-is'f1'il. , . ,-M-frr:-.--V si bi H -lp ,, ' a 'a - - . i ' ' o '- .Mm .-!'Z1,r'.' ,... , if' ' 27. ' A V2.5 - '-5+ L, iii. -1 , W "" lr" 'nf"' ' '-:'- ' in ' ' "I, - 3, Q ,dj 535. W .. ig jg -' AT 'v.u..n,:i:l!j gn u -I 1 . W- - ,L A .-' M ,Li "X V '. -i ' ' ET, -I H' i ' .11 . X .IH W I, I 'N 1 P ity, ' '.,X K Li' . --- " , A E Q, i, A . mf' 'K W- 2' J "' V. -A .V ' in L . '1, L .i. ,. ..g-,i 4 'Q QW' 'X ' x V.. 'Q 0.9 -- Q - -1:vf'l'- 2' '?"".'.a! - ' , , - -NYM--A' - ' -r ..--vw' 4: .3 7"f:'E -zr, I -,1 ". ,l 'I 'ful' ' 'J' ' '..4'..4f ' t ' Y .' 1 . L-an ' " 4. g,'j3'f1i'-, hr . hulk , I 5' LA' -iQ -1... .. X-u it ,JL is , , L ' v " ' 4 'A Q I ,...1 K--- Q 5 , W E V i Q A 5 . , fm ' , "1 . N' b ,Jai ., ' ,,, ""', 1 .fa 1 A f D fl':'a-Qgww-. - -V :a:g:-.-- Y ,qv L, . -4 , ,M vc, . Q s. 3 14 n '5' 'A dl '5 1 'jf' ' 1' v! I.. . fx Silva X ' . 1- 1 Q - 0 ..-'f-Ng5'f"'-14-P - x 5 'E uf' -J Kickin' 'Y-.,-' 5' . Back During the cruise, there were several long stretches of steaming when the only ports Milwaukee visited were Augusta Bay and Cagliari, Sicily to pick up fuel and stores. Although there was no liberty granted at either of these ports, the men did have a chance to get off the ship, drink a few beers and relax at a good old fashioned picnic. l l Q. Abovei MM3 Jim Schilling and BMSN Chuck Goforth kick back with a pair of brews in Cagliari, Sicily. Right: BM3 Kevin Derry, SN Tony Sawyer and various Mil- waukee sailors model the latest in summer fashion wear. it f'X W new-h f 3 , m ' ff 4. 1 oil' , Q' EVP? L I l , 4 , I A pnmm, .l- i'I7"' lil -- -N., 'w Top: Qforegroundj SN Kevin Doolan, SH3 Larry Burris, SN Joe Stanich and SN Bill Killough party down in Cagliari. Above: ICI Roger Bessette, Guardian ofthe Oly, Keeper ofthe Buds, carefully rations beer, making sure that no one gets less than two. ll' 1532.4 ' -X-. -1. fx MILWAUKEE ROCKS Musical Entertainment was provided at various ship,s functions by the 'Ole' MIL- WAUKEE Band. Steel deck picnics and our own talent competition generated enthusias- tic musical expression by numerous crew members. EMI Hibbs watches as members ofthe "MILWAUKEE BREWERS" jam on the cargo deck. Pictured are MM2 Roger Rose and MMI Jim Cristofolini on guitar, ET3 Morris Harris on drums and SN 'K.C.' Hendricks on bass. I?" , 'A I arse? USS u, ,,,a JERSEY USS NEW .lliRSliY. lirst ol' the IOW.-X elass Battleships to be reacti- vated. joined the Peaee-keeping Force oll' the eoast ol' lebanon to provide both strategie and taetieal support. This eame alter eonseeutive deployments to Central America and Southeast Asia and lengthened her total deployment to almost a year. All hands onboard Nlll,W,'XL'KI2l2 were glad to bring the NEW ,HER- SEY alongside and see lirst hand the ageless battleship and her sixteen ineh guns. in Q . ij- X -B' " il- H I ,1 Mir I fs, N -, . ' . Sf: -,- 1 730-1 . - -,, '. ..-' w ,K ,. ,, f '12 u. Q f , f. --at K- 1'-ev,-' V. 1, r ' i 1' - A M D ff- s Ii :ftr:"Lf'l?' ' - f '-f".f'5' Q 'x ii ' - ' 'ff s """ n Y- Ueaf.- ..,,"!". 'Q 4.11 - , , ' '. 9,9-1,5rf' 'ms' , I , , , , .H Q ,,,, r JI' . , 'V 3 , . - ,,,,,,,, ,ala ,V I , gif 135 g ' ' lava- w.,,2g,,f1,,f1.,.,.-I -.,,+:.Qwl-4 'A N 5. ,pai vi , -., 'gig-.jzg J,.5,,,,3-L, '1" 1" " 1' gl--Qfaf . ef'-' S 'fl' ' " , A " -LS!! 1 ,"' . ,'37'ff,QEf. ' E? . "3 r Q,,' .M . Wm- ."' '-'T 1 W' ,',.,,. 4 s -A 'S .5 -M, ,Q , .,,,,-1- ,VWQZV - -,Q t .-ff-1.1-f + Q .,r:5g- .f..f . - .tu Wtrir. - f u-fff r T-22'-?'.?f.f.l?-..auff"'74," ,- V,-" '91 I VJ ' " . V 'T' ,gf ' 5 ' 7"L'f?--37,33-lfhwi 954.4 'J-w'1 -- " ""' 'Zn , 1 V- 15- ' -uf? .V Q f- '- gi'-V V '33-2 " . ff fr" g r H+?-nz- P- "swf, i"e""l'l""ff" ' "if L 1:f'j1"... , + ' , 1 .- V ' 4 -- .-F - -F'.....,T:"i""-f"ffB..-.,'1' - .'95i-lg ' .357--f ' . -"1?- . 4, - A 0 ig .1514 - ..-,--gm, J api, 1 t. ,- . .I it .,. J- g, 4 yr,,t.:tf..,51:m.ff,-lghgga :gg 15 g'Al"r"".3g- " 'G'-'Lin ' -.'- ..'.. '--v....w-fm-s 4 h, ' ' V 1 'X -1 'Pt ,-Q , 7 ' . ai'-Q ,,,,. . ' -- '11-Q .- ,Yun g Q i Q 'n-,57""1. "'f1'45- 5'1"-far-: ' wg, X W' , e v a 4 JET BL D JP-5 A nuclear propelled aircraft carri- er like the USS DWIGHT D. El- SEN HOWER can steam for great distances without refueling. HOWCY- er, it requires tremendous l0g1SUC support to provide the jet fuel, Pafts and supplies needed to keep her ml?- sion ready. For MILWAUKEEQNS meant long and arduous evolutions where men and machines were Put to the test transferingjet engines tO.Sf3ft drinks. "IKE" became a famlllilf sight steaming alongside to port,21I1d a significant part of MlLWA.U' KEE's logistic contribution during Med '83, A..-J -1 ii 'l K Top: MHZ .lim Watts receives his red ball cap lroii X Captain Niatlner, Above: SN ilim Craig receives a letter olieommendation. Above right: CENKEI Cooyer is award ed a letter ol' eommendation. Right: Cio-getting llTlf Jerry Williams collects his red ba 'Q . ' 1 excellence. 'F -1 - - l e Sailor Cf The Quarter Cream Of The Crop Professional excellence. appearance. mili- tary bearing, leadership --- these are all quali- ties that make a good sailor. These are also the qualities used as a basis for selecting the two Milwaukee sailors who will receive one ol' her highest enlisted honors: the red ballcap of sail- or oli the quarter. MN12 -lim Watts and HTFN .lerry Wil- liams were nominated rated and non-rated "Sailor ol' the Quarter" respectively for the spring-summer quarter ol' 1983. Runners-up were GMG2 .limmy Coover and SN .lim Craig. All ol these men serve as models and symbols ol' the ideals represented by Milwau- kee's motto "Proud and Professional." They have proved themselves true professionals in every sense ol' the word. and they have a right to be proud. s-. g N, X 1 'T P 4 - u. u 5 CAPTAIN MAGNER SUMM RIZES THE DEPLOYM N T521 is 1' A .Q 'ir was s. X X 'Wg' ' . as ' K .S W3 mf NZ. f Bl Q sag, . st N14 S ' T Q 'Q NN A i. X X y ,A Ne is iam MILWAUKEE's deployment to the Mediterranean Sea can only be considered an outstanding success. The fact that MILWAUKEE managed to be successfully deployed for nine out of twelve months during I983 is significant. The ship left Norfolk on time and returned on time, but a lot of water flowed under its bridge while we were gone. The key to MILWAUKEE's success can be directly attributed to the superb team effort put forth by the officers and crew. The men that you see in the preceeding pages worked extemely hard in the early months of I983 to prepare for the deployment. On 27 April 1984, MILWAUKEE was "ready" in every re- spect. The near perfect execution of the operational de- ployment bythe MILWAUKEE crew was a result of the attitude that prevailed onboard, i.e., MILWAUKEE was completely dedicated to continuously providing the best possible services to the fleet. Whether it was refuel- ing Saudi PG's, Logrepping IKE, eonsoling with RIGEL or CONCORD, RASing the Amphibs 5 nautical miles off the Lebanese coast, or on liberty in the many fine liberty ports visited during the deployment, MILWAU- KEE was doing its thing -- carrying out its mission - and having fun doing it. I think Commodore O'Reilly summed it up nicely in a message commenting on a USS EL PASO message that commended MILWAUKEI55 willingness and professionalism in providing Short mme services while off Lebanon. He said, "Reference tag which sites a fine example of the quiet, service orienteu professionalism that is typical of MILWAUKEE lhls deployment is noted with pleasure. Well done, KCCP charging!" The real reward that the men of MII-WA.U' KEE have as a result of this deployment is the realization that each and every man on this crew on this dflploymem provided a very valuable service to the Nation, the Nffsl' and the SIXTH FLEET. We can all feel a sense ofpfl 6 in knowing we did ourjob well and that it was an lmpof' tant job. That may not get us a free drink at il bar In Norfolk, but nevertheless that sense of pride beIongS I0 us - we earned it -A and 226 satisfied alongside custom' ers can verify it. KEEP CHARGING! KEEP SMILING! WWW L.R. MAGNIQR CAPTAIN, U.S. NAVY nn YV .1-.,L..1....-.- With Chesapeake light in her ualse, Nlll - WfXl'lslQlf steamed into the Bay early on the morning of Zl November bound for home port. l.ater that morning at Craney Island, as the first heaving line landed to the sound of a local marching band, her seven month voyage had come to a close. Nlanning the rails and searching the crowded pier below for a familiar face. all hands shared in the excitement of homecoming. Al- though ships belong at sea and the beginning of a voyage generates great expectations. there is also a special satisfaction felt by mariners upon safely returning home. .4 -5-.Q L'-' . 24:4 Jar lnm 1 T ,...?.. , -'J V ,Q .. .x-If 3 ' be '....... 5-er its-fat" 711 '- ll 'Z ..,,q f '- 5. Q i I i i S 1 N 3 i i i 5 M Sea 4 fact 5 deplq signii on tiij we wil be diii by IH prcce. montli Aprilg spect.5 a allllll was ch best p ing S ' or of off th libert , KEE , and .E summ A.- xv-- -. 57 gr' i I i D N ' i F I 91 A A fi-Qi' 1895. iq. 'if R X , "I 4, s I I i , 1 i 1 i I 4 l i f ia , I i yi X ix , vi M 'Y XM, Advising iidillif l'i'.lG lnvio M ai iizigci' i'iA.lfi Siiiiima Pniizc lfdimi' SA Smith l'immgi'gipiicr HM? Harris Stziiii ,fNi'tist SA Smith K iiiiliihiiiiiii! Piiulogruphcrs I 'I .Hi ,lziimw I 'I Hi iiiwiixwil I li Nymuiii UNH Q cpiim USSR Hiwiiwi R MSN Rmiciiliii N .v '45 -E ' ' '-.N-sum, ""' 5' 8 1" A gil 1151, ...I qw ' QR ,. 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Suggestions in the Milwaukee (AOR 2) - Naval Cruise Book collection:

Milwaukee (AOR 2) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1977 Edition, Page 1

1977

Milwaukee (AOR 2) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1979 Edition, Page 1

1979

Milwaukee (AOR 2) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1981 Edition, Page 1

1981

Milwaukee (AOR 2) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1986 Edition, Page 1

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