Milwaukee Downer College - Cumtux Yearbook (Milwaukee, WI)

 - Class of 1917

Page 1 of 184

 

Milwaukee Downer College - Cumtux Yearbook (Milwaukee, WI) online yearbook collection, 1917 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1917 Edition, Milwaukee Downer College - Cumtux Yearbook (Milwaukee, WI) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1917 Edition, Milwaukee Downer College - Cumtux Yearbook (Milwaukee, WI) online yearbook collection
Pages 6 - 7

Page 10, 1917 Edition, Milwaukee Downer College - Cumtux Yearbook (Milwaukee, WI) online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1917 Edition, Milwaukee Downer College - Cumtux Yearbook (Milwaukee, WI) online yearbook collection
Pages 10 - 11

Page 14, 1917 Edition, Milwaukee Downer College - Cumtux Yearbook (Milwaukee, WI) online yearbook collectionPage 15, 1917 Edition, Milwaukee Downer College - Cumtux Yearbook (Milwaukee, WI) online yearbook collection
Pages 14 - 15

Page 8, 1917 Edition, Milwaukee Downer College - Cumtux Yearbook (Milwaukee, WI) online yearbook collectionPage 9, 1917 Edition, Milwaukee Downer College - Cumtux Yearbook (Milwaukee, WI) online yearbook collection
Pages 8 - 9
Page 12, 1917 Edition, Milwaukee Downer College - Cumtux Yearbook (Milwaukee, WI) online yearbook collectionPage 13, 1917 Edition, Milwaukee Downer College - Cumtux Yearbook (Milwaukee, WI) online yearbook collection
Pages 12 - 13
Page 16, 1917 Edition, Milwaukee Downer College - Cumtux Yearbook (Milwaukee, WI) online yearbook collectionPage 17, 1917 Edition, Milwaukee Downer College - Cumtux Yearbook (Milwaukee, WI) online yearbook collection
Pages 16 - 17

Text from Pages 1 - 184 of the 1917 volume:

ll EX LIBRIS. j 'Clln Emu 1K2rr thin hunk i5 h2hitat2h by 1112 21mm nf nin2122n hunhr2h anh 521121112211 AMAW-MA v KT 5 HE 1917 CUMTUYAQA W'M'W' Table Of Contents The Preparedness Policy of Milwaukee-Downer College Outer Defenses ..................................................... 7 Officers ............................................................ 9 Connnander-in-Chief ............................................. 10 General Staff ................................................... 11 Standing Army ................................................... . 15 Trained Soldiers ................................................ 15 Regulars ....................................................... 23 Guards ........................................................ 33 Raw Recruifs .................................................. 45 Cmnmissary ........................................................ 55 Ambulance Corps ................................................... 61 Casualty List ...................................................... 71 Regimental Band .................................... . ............... 7 5 Imperial Government ............................................... 81 Allies .............................................................. 83 Red Cross Service .................................................. 85 Commissioners of Inspection ......................................... 87 Artillery in Action ................................................. 88 Scientific Experts .............................. v .................... 90 Womenk Relief Corps ............................................... 91 Foreign Legions .................................................... 92 International News Service .............. , ........................... 95 Opportunities for Development of Higher Life ......................... 96 -War Artists ....................................................... 97 Field Army ........................................................ 99 Mobilization of Securities ........................................ '. .. 111 Bulletin of Events .................................................. 113 Scraps of Paper ................................................... 135 Shot and Shell ..................................................... 151 Infantry ........................................................... 165 ?EEZQZZQEEE f; FHEWFQWUWDE A W'Wm' Trustees and Officers OFFICERS WILLIAM W. WIGHT ................................ , ........... President AUGUST H. VOGEL ......................................... Vice-President ngEORGE L. GRAVES ............................................. Secretary HAMLIN L. CHAPMAN ................................. Treasurer Emeritus CLASS OF 1915 CHARLES. H. EGGLESTON ........................................ Fox Lake 10TH W. JOHNSON ................................................ Racine THOMAS S. JOHNSON ......................................... Beaver Dani MRS. MARY A. MARINER ....................................... Milwaukee CHARLES H. PALMER .......................................... Milwaukee WILLIAM WOODS PLANKINTON .................................. Milwaukee MISS ROSE CARSON SWART ........................................ Oshkosh WHEELER A. TRACY .......................... 1, .................. Madison CLASS OF 1916 ,kGEORGE L. GRAVES ............................................ Milwaukee NELSON P. HULST ............................................ Milwaukee GEORGE W. LINDSAY .......................................... Milwaukee J OHN W. P. LOMBARD ......................................... Milwaukee H. AUGUST LUEDKE ........................................... Milwaukee MISS ELLEN C. SABIN ......................................... Milwaukee MRS. GERTRUDE H. G. VAN DYKE ............................... Milwaukee WILLIAM W. WIGHT .......................................... Milwaukee CLASS OF 1917 CHARLES H. ANSON ........................................... Milwaukee ROBERT CAMP ................................................ Milwaukee HAMLIN L. CHAPMAN ......................................... Milwaukee JOHN J. ESCH ................................................ La Crosse FREDERICK T. GORTON ........................................... Portage HENRY A. MINER ............................................... Madison HVALTER S. PADDOCK ........................................... Milwaukee CLEMENT E. WARNER ........................................... Windsor 1Decoascd, 1915. fResigned. $EZQXQEEZX MISS ALICE G. CHAPMAN ...................................... Milwaukee MISS FRANCIS E. DURAND ...................................... Milwaukee FREDERICK L. SIVYER ......................................... Milwaukee WILLIAM STARK SMITH ....................................... Milwaukee MRS. STELLA L. DESSERT THOMPSON ............................ Milwaukee JUDSON TITSWORTH ........................................... Milwaukee MRS. MARY G. UPIIAM ......................................... Milwaukee AUGUST H. VOGEI ............................................. Milwaukee OFFICERS H. L. CHAPMAN . . .; .................................. Treasurer Emeritus MARY L. LANGERS .............................................. Registrar MARGARET REYNOLDS, Wisconsin Library School .................... Librarian LUCY 1. LEE ..................................... Bookkeeper and Cashier HALLY J . FISHER ......................................... Graduate Nurse MRS. MARY STAHI ........................ Matron, Holton and J ohnston Halls MRS. E. M. SMITH .................................. Matron, McLarcn Hall MRS. J ENNIE CHALCRAFT .................. Matron, Louise Piister Yogel Hall J OHN W. YOUNG, Superintendent Buildings and Grounds and Assistant Treasurer FHEWTWVEUE? um A 'W'WW'A KTHE 1917 CUMTUK Am'mmv A AMAW-MA v? A ' Faculty for Scholastic Year 1915-1916 Faculty ELLEN C. SABIN, M.A., Litt.D., President Bible MINA KERR, RA, Smith College; PhD. Univ. of Penmylvania, Bean Education KATHERINE S. ARNOLD, B.A. Mt. Holyoke; M.A. Columbia University A ssisfanf Professor of Mathemaiics ALICE EMELINE BELCHER, BTA. Mt. Holyoke; M. A. Radcliffe Professor of Economics EMILY FRANCES BROWN, B.A., Wellcsley College; M.A. Columbia University Frofvxxcr of English MARGARET LOUISE CAMPBELL, B.S. University of Fhicago Curator Greene Memorial Museum; Geology AMELIA CLEWLEYV FORD, B.A. Radcliffe; M.A., P11.D. Univeristy of Wisconsin Professor of History MIRIAM FRTNK, RA. Smith College English RACHEL EMILlE HOFFSTADT, RS. Hanover College; M.A., Ph.D. University of Chicago Botany RUTH F. JOHNSTIN, BA. Pennsylvania College for Women; M.A. Ohio State University Professor of Chemistry ALICE AYR NOYES, B.A. Mt. Holyoke; M.A., Cornell University Biology ." K BEATIhCE J ANET PEARSON, Hygiene Department of Wellesley College Director of Physical Education FHEWIVQWUWDE A m'mmv ELIZABETH ROSSBERG-LEIPNITZ, B.A., M.A. University of Wisconsin Assistant Professor of German AMELIE SERAFON Professor of French SYBIL LAURA SMITH, B.A. Smith College; M.A. Columbia University Assistant Professor of Chemistry LENA B. TOMSON, B.A., M.A. Oberlin College Professor of Latin H ENRIETTA J. TROMANHAUSER, Ph.B. University of Chicago; Ph.D. Heidelberg University Professor of German MARY ELVIRE WILDER Professor of Vocal Expression Faculty of Music Department CLAUDIA MCPHEETERS Directw of Department and Professor of Pianoforte MRS. PERRY WILLIAMS, B.S. University of Wisconsin Professor of Theory of Music Harmony, Hisfory of Music, Analysis and Form, Pipe Organ EOLIA CARPENTER Professor of Vocal Music EFFA MAUDE RICHARDS 'Piano MARY LOUISE DODGE, B.A. University of Wisconsin Piano 'ALBERT FINK Violin 12 'T'Hawmwamajgji A mwmm' Faculty of Home Economics Department NELLIE CROOKS, B.S. Columbia University Director of Depa'rz'menf, Professor of Domextic .Ilrt JEANETTE ANTRAM, Graduate, of .Milwaukec Trade School Assistant Domestic Art WINIFRED M. FRYE, Graduate Department of Home Economics, Milwaukee-Downer College Domestic :1 rt POLLY M. GOLDSWORTHY, Graduate Department of Home Economics, Milwaukee-Downer College Domestic Art ALICE HANNAH McKINNEY, B.S. Columbia University Domestic Science VERA MAUNAIR, B.S. Simmons College Domestic Science SUSAN F. WEST, B.S. Columbia University Domestic Science Also College Teachers of Science, Psychology, Art, Vocal Expression, and Physical Training Faculty of Art Department ELIZABETH GREENE UPHAM, Thatcher School of Metal Director of Department, Arts and Crafts CHARLOTTE RUSSEL PARTRIDGE, Chicago School Applied and Normal Arts Drawing; Art :6: ?TazigEg-ym 14 'IKCEEZQZEQEEE KEEEQJVEQEyEAX LIDA FAKE Bonne Terre, M0. President of Class HAZEL DEAN LAING Gladstone, MiPh. Vice-President of Class President of Y. W. C. A. HELEN GENEVIEVE PETERSON Rockford, Ill. Secretary of Class GLADYS VIRGINIA GOTTLIEB Kenosha,' Wis. Treasurer of Class 16 KCTZEXQZEQEQDX DORIS ELIZABETH BELL Elgin, Ill. Chairman of McClaren Hall LAVISA ELIZABETH BIRD Mellette, S. D. Vice-President of Student Government Assn. ETHEL MARIE CAREY Racine, Wis. ELLA M. CUTLER Dodgeville, Wis. 'EHEV?SBA17VCXUWDZX w A m'mmv LORNA DIETZ Milwaukee, Wis. Editor-in-Chief of Kodak ETIIEL BRUCE ELMERGREEN Milwaukee, Wis. Chairman of City Studentf Organization IZERO VIRGINIA ENGLISH Baraboo, Wis. GRETNA MAE FETZER Sturgeon Bay, Wis. President of Liebling Club 18 .0: .:::::zyx LITA G. KELLER Batavia, Ill. LOIS ERWIN LATIMER Waukesha, Wis. Chairman of J ohnston Hall ELVA RUTH NEFF West Allis, Wis. LOUISA ELIZABETH NELSON Litchfield, Minn. CT HEWTQWWE 037$ M'WW' LUCIA CASWELL PERRY Fort Atkinson, Wis. President of Consumers, League JEANETTE ELIZABETH RODGER Fox Lake, Wis. RUTH ANNA RUGLAND Fergus Falls, Minn. CATHERINE LOUISE SPARKS Lodi, Wis. 20 Ci 6 mamagjam 'W'M'W EMILY MARGUERITE STOCKWELL Wilmer, Minn. President of Student Government Assn. MARY PARISH TRUESDELL, Waupaea, Wis. FLORENCE EMMA WATKINS Bisbee, Ariz. Chairman of Holton Hall IRENE HALEY WEBB 1 Plymouth, Wis. 21 KEEZQZZQEEZX FLORENCE MAY WRIGHT Ft. Dodge, 121. President of Dramatic Club .22 i N2vl'44'; 79; v A A E 1917 CQMTg v A v A v A A A ' KEG a ,5 'K'CEEZQXQEQZX ' GLENN EVELYN MILLER La Valle, Wis. President of Class GRACE WILSON Morris, Ill. Vice-President of Class Business Manager of Kodak GLADYS ELIZBETH MACDONALD Milwaukee, Wis. Secretary of Class President of Athletic Association MARGARET BRYCE MUNDIE Chicago, 111. Treasurer of Class 24 .Cr agjgxgaym ESTHER ROSELLA CADY Mellette, S. D. Secretary of Y. W. C. A. ALFREDA CLARK Hastings, Neb. CAROLYN JEANETTE CONLEE Bellingham, Wash. ELSIE LUCILE CORLISS Ripon, Wis. CT mama? qzm M'MW' LINDA COUNTRYMAN Bellingham, Wash. PEARL ADELAIDE DAVIS Milwaukee, Wis. EDNA NAOMI DU FOUR Marshfield, Wis. Secretary-Treasurer 0f McClaren Hall DOROTHY AMY FISH Milwaukee, Wis. 26 ?BWQWUWUE . A W'Wm' GRACE ALMEDA HAMMELTON Lisbon, N. D. Editor-in-Chief of Cumtux ALTA MAY HANSEN Bloomer, Wis. Secretary-Treasurer 0f Holton Hall ELEANOR MARY HATTON Neenah, Wis. EDNA FLORENCE HIBBERT Milwaukee, Wis. g: a Emma? DE: 'W'MW' HELEN KATHERINE KERMOTT Hudson, Wis. HELEN KUBECK Traverse City, Mich. JANET L. LEAVENS Neenah, Wis. DOROTHY GRACE LEDGEIm'OOD Chicago, Ill. fCr H EwQWUWU 592i m'M M'W' MILDRED GAIL WRIGHT Menomonee, Wis. President of Equal Suffrage League FREDRICA ANNE YOCKEY Escanaba, Mich. FRANCES STQW MCGOVERN Cedarburg, Wis. MARY PENDLETON MORSELL Milwaukee, Wis. '6: H EWIVSSWWUE? Um 'W'WW' KATHRYN SKINNER Watertown, Wis. FLORA DELLA STAPLES Iola, Wis. FRANCES TERRY Milwaukee, Wis. MILDRED ILEEN THOMPSON Milwaukee, Wis. 31 Kiiigzwigiym ADA LENORE PORTER Milwaukee, Wis. ESTHER WINIFRED REIMERS Milwaukee, Wis. Business Manager of Cumtux ELLEN SATTRE Rice Lake, Wis. JOSEPHINE ELIZABETH SCHROEDER Milwaukee, Wis. President of Marie Wollpert Verein .3 33193333333333 JESSIE MABBOTT Aberdeen, S. Dakota CONSTANCE MANCHESTER Lebanon, N. H. Seeretary-Treasurer of J ohnston Hall President of Science Club ETHEL CLARA MCDONALD Odell, 111. ESTHER PETER Milwaukee, Wis. 29 'r'CTZH HEZQZEEEEX LrI-IE GUARDS FL m; mm J--L lm. .CTZHE mmmm um M'WWVA 34 KEETLQJKQEBE Sophomore Class GLADYS RUGGLES ............................................... President ELVA SHIELDS ............................................. Vice-Presidout MARION WEST . ................................................ Secretary RUTH TUFTS .................. . ................................. Treasurer MISS ARNOLD ................................................ Class Officer 7C1 1311:1111 The Sophomore Class A demure, little maid is Geneva Aamodt; She never was involved in a scheme or a plot. She studies her lessons all the day, And sometimes far into the night, they say. Whatis happened to Lydia. Andrae? Sheis no longer bright and gay; She has been so very strange, Since that last Informal day. Mildred Beck so happy and gay, Had a bid to a iiPromi, one day; But exams came in the way And that was the end of the iiPromi, they say. I wonder what Elsie Buckstaff Will do, When she leaves her college dear? What Will ever become of her, When she hasnit her bunch near? Aileen Carney, tall and dark, Someone said she was a shark. Have you heard of the iimusieal maid ?ii Ora Christianson is her name; She is known so well, that lill Not trouble to speak of her fame. Miriam Chute was an H. E. fair, tho used to 000k and sew; But now that sl1e,s a Sophomore, She takes iiMathii and such, you know. Agnes 001111 to colleue leamo, Upon a dragon riding: The girls were all so shocked and scared, That now she keeps him hiding. Adelaide i 11111111i11s was a 11iu1 little girl, So plump and jolly and round; With hair always in a talwled curl, Lamrhter prevails When she is around. Margaret l 11111111i11s was a wise little maid, She changed her murse from an H. E. staid To keep her sister 0011111a1113li111 afraid Helene is fair and fair to see, A most happy little maid is she; But grief came to Helene one day When she in a car, hoard a woman say ThaVs peroxide hair! Beware! Beware; 36 rCiH Am-W.MA v? E 1917 CUMTUKA M'MW' A Helen Eggers is everyonek pet, ,Twas she who was chosen for Minuet ; She dances and sings the whole day long, And minds not at all a bell or a gong. Myrtle Eichelberg, the shark of the class, Is quite superior to the common mass ; She knows her English like a book, They say, too, she also can cook. Ruth Falkenau has a great aspiration, So she is given to fits of contemplation ; Whether or not a horse shelll ride, In Shakespearets pageant, her only pride. Dorothy Finney, so they say, Appears quite oft in manls array; A basket or baseball quite well can she hurl For mind you, shets our athletic girl! Marian Fox tries hard to please, And so she is never quite at her ease; But withal she is such a kindly maid, That 110 one is, of her, afraid. Hulda Friedrich is so very Clever, That to ape her, all do endeavor - To study so much each day, That the Faculty all will say, Send these students our way. Bernice Fulton, a tall maid, s0 straight, ls never to an appointment late; She works with a will And never is still And tries, her friends to educate. Vivian Hodgson, our captain, courageous, Studies so much, it would almost amaze us. There once was a student named Shirley, Who learned how to write very early; So good was her sight That now she can write The Lordls Prayer within a dime circle. Letha Hoskins continues to worry, Always is she in a flurry; She will burn midnight oil Oler her Shakespeare to toil, And one would think that her motto is itHurryP 37 Dorothy Hurlbutts a bright girl, they say, Her marks always soar around itAP She once wrote a song, For the Sophomore strong, She studies and works all the day. NormaKarnopp is young and sweet, She studies despite cold or heat ; In dramatics, she excells She is one of the class belles. J osephine Kapp is ambitious, they say, To tread the path of fame alway; So in solitude she paves the path Which is to illustrate her genius in tiMath? Marie Lewis does dance most divine, In dramatics also sheis fine ; We are glad she,s a Soph, And hope shetII not run off, And in the future with ttMovyh Stars dine. Bernice Lyonts very neat, She spends her spare time sweeping; She routs her roommate from her seat And sends her out, a-weeping. J ean McAlpine, to secure some knowledge Does study so each day ; We hope, that when she leaves our college, Sheql have a little play. Katherine Mcaurdy is short and dark- A lovely Hermia shetd make, I wot. Playing her part With grace and ease, By saying haughtily, ttI love you not W Marion Miller fair and petit, Among the Freshmen her friends did seek; She lives each day of work and play, And never a worry comes her way. Our little Marie Morrison, . A virtuous maid and s0 kind-hearted; We wonder what would iihapii to both If Edna O. and she were parted. A girl named Catherine Munson Does superbly dance and sing; She must be musically inclined When to school a tiVict, sheid bring. 38 fCTs H??QWUE? 029$ M'MW' Gladys Neff is the dearest young child, With heart so tender, and eyes so mild. A girl named Esther Neprud To college once did go ; Her name indeed, we,ll not forget She always hurried so. Edna Olander so tall and slow; Is calm and peaceful where she doth go; A great help to her roommate at night, For with much ease can she turn off the light. Hoch der Kaiser! We love to help rejoice. Provided Clara Ruder, Is the first to lend it voice. Where scholarship, Character and friendliness combine Gladys Ruggles, our president, is sure to shine. A co-patriot of true Teutonic blood, is Florence Schweke, Pro-Englishmen appear annoyed When round her flaxen locks, she wears ttNord-deutscher German Lloyd? Elva Shields in stature and face, Pretty enough a peacock pin to grace. Though Ruth Tufts is so little, That one can scarcely see her ; 1t,s she Who puts the basket through And makes the audience see her. Barbara Watkins, dusky maid of Arizona, Worthy daughter of Latona; As Dido governed Carthage, You rule College Basketball. To keep cool on a summer day, SO you can look your best ; Just follow in the wake and shadow, Of good old Marion West. 39 VCAM-W M y KA W'WW' A:l ' Conscientious Bessie Wolfner, Toiling, working, evermore ; First ifs French and then ifs Latin, Compositions by the score. Gay Annice Woodard, so they say, Went out for a frolic one fine day; To the movies she went N0 harm she meant Shall 1 say what happened ? 011 Nay! Irma Wumlerlichk grown serious and sedate, Since 81102.9 had to spend her time Quieting her roommate. When you speak of Vera Wunderlich, We think of the qMWner Hat? For this young woman, after seeking hard, Is the 0110, Who found that. Amanda Zeisler, so Wis said, With nature sweet and wisdom head ; Refuses all offices great and small, And turns her energies to basketball A perfect tribute to the white and red. 40 . ?EHEWIEWUWDE W'MW' QPHOMORE SEN EET WISCONSIN, MILWAUKEE-DOWNER COLLEGE, M JUDGE RENDERS DECISION Judge Hurlbut of Sophomore Court of Manners Hands Down Decision, Making it a Criminal Offent-e for Freshmen t0 Precede Upper Class- men Through Doorways. Great consternation was aroused among the Freshman audience in at- tendance at the trial of the Fresh- man students, arrainged for him- proper conductft When Judge Hurl- SOCI'ETY NOTES ENTERTA INS MARQUETTE FACULTY Miss Mildred Beck entertained the Faculty at Marquette College at a dinner dance in McLaren Hall, on Saturday of last week. This was the last of the seasonk social functions, as Miss Beck returns to her home the latter part Of this week. Miss Beck was attired in a Parisian 41 E 1917 KTH HZZZZQEQZQ? OBITUARY THE SOPHOMORE SENTI FOR SALE Buried at high noon on Wednes- day, June 21, 1916, at the Milwau- kee-Downer CollegeLodge, all enmity held during the past two years, fdr each other, by the members of the classes of 1917 and 1918. Buried on March 8, by the Fresh- men, all hopes of finding the ttHatW Requiems were sung in the Holton and McLaren Hall dining rooms by the members of the Sophomore class. HEAR MIRIAM CHUTE IN HER LATEST SONG HIT ttMarried Lifets Exciting, but it,s great to be an Old Maid,, GYMNASIUM SaturdayeS dclock Admission 500 FOR SALE My future wisdom teeth. Marion West. CHEAP ! Some United Records. worn from constant use. Bernice Lyon. Slightly LOST AND FOUND LOST: Sophomore Basketball players. FOUND: My enthusiasm for study. Helen Eggers. FOXI' S NEW VOCAL ACADEMY Thursdays and Saturdays M. Fox, Manager Watch in the TABLOID BOOK REVIEWS FOR LYDIA ANDRAEtS LATEST ttWhen Silence is GoldenfJ KEEWVQ?UWTE92$ M'WW' ORE SENTINEL, MAY 24, 1916 FAQ WANT ADS Agency for PATENT EAR PADS Serviceahle for WANTED:hhA Coat 0f ArmsP ALBERT HALL RESIDENTS Elsie Buckstatf. Lan3' warms ac- A. Conn. ceptediU 7 in, h Position as nurse maid, whantedh- by a young charge Letha Hoskins. DONT WANTEDlhBIUl'e information con- F AIL cerning my Informal Man Grladys A Ruggles. TO SEE VVANTmnz-A few intelligent re- hPUSSh sponsive students for the morning section of English III. Miss Brown. CUM' MINS Good position as companion open IN to any one who fully appreciates my MFHE ability. J05ephine Kapp. SAILOR LAD I wish to secure any position as 2111 accompanist. Work with opemttas, minuets and esthetic dancing classes most acceptable. Ora Christianson. WANTEDZ-By upper classmen, more respect from Freshmen. THIS SPACE IS FOR ADVERTISING Rates Cheap Apply Editor of Sophomore Sentinel AT THE GAIETY NEXT WEEK BASKETBALL ENTHITSIASTICS NOTICE THE LATEST RULE BOOK "The Pearson Methodh R. TUFTS 43 m ATE K1373? JCT: 'r' " Av 44 $EZQJZZQEQE - RAW R RUITT 0:: E:51::U:9:: m. ' 46 AMAWAMA v? A '63 HE 1917 CUMTUK M'WW' A Freshman Class OFFICERS First b'emesler ELMA WILSON ................................................. President KATHERINE BENNETT ....................................... Yice-Presidcnt ETHEL DAVIS ................................................... Secretary ROSETTA NEWMAN .............................................. Treasurer Second Semester ELLIDA MURPHY ........................................... ; . . . .President MARJORIE SEXTON .......................................... Vice-Presidcnt DOROTHY HALLINE .............................................. Secretary MARJORIE GRAY ................................................ Treasurer CLASS OFFI CER MIsS TOMSON 7' v Am-W-M THE 1917 CUMT .M.M.W9Zl??i 48 ?EEZQZZQEEE Addington Davenport Allen Dana Davis Barker Deakin ' V Dunlap Bennett Dohmen $1 Gronauer Bennett E0861 V I Gifford Beveridge Epstein Gary Bierbauer Fraser Gray Bundy F razee Graber , Ferris Garvin BOCk Good BOD Gutwillig Braunfeld Herman Cave Halline Coleman Hipke 52 f'CiH EXQZEQEEQEX fell, stiff and lifeless, in muddled heaps of disorderly debris, and triumphant elfin paddled his happy way back to the shores of content. Moral: Cease to abuse the innocent Freshman! Summon them to the fete called ttPromR lest perchanoe the Elf 0f Freshdom push you across the River Styx. FLORENCE DEAKIN, ,19. Class Song TUNE: WPHE VVEARIN, 0t THE GREEN? At Milwaukee-Downer College we,re the nineteen-nineteen class, The bearers and defenders of the true and noble green, With our high ideals and purpose we are bound in one high aim To be worthy of and eter preserve its well-deserved fame. We, came as shrinking Freshmen, wetll go out as Seniors brave, But throughout our lives wetll neter forget the love our college gave. were here to work, wetre here to play, with minds alert and keen, To give honor and distinction to the wearilf ot the green. RUTH BARKER. Hat Song We love our Freshman Class, ,Tis better than all the past, It far surpasses all, tTis bound to succeed not falle Our colors are the White and the green, May they last forever With ties that never sever. Weql get that noted hat, Sophomores! You may be sure of that, Freshmen! Class of one nine and nineteen, Our colors, white and green, Class of one nine and nineteen. Words and MusieeMARY PERKINS. M'WW' KT: EiWVEUBi-t 795 A Fairy Story FROM VOL. I 0F ttMIGHT COME TRUEs? In a far distant region called ttCollege Town? is the palaee-home of a kind old queen and her four lovely daughters ; the oldest daughter is very graveegarbed in black, flowing robes; and most important, the three others are care-free and rollickingeand ready to do or dare. One day, when the queen was very happy she summoned her ladies-in-waiting and spake in this wise: ttNow, my daughters, the princesses have been dutiful and good for many moonsemethinks the time is ripe to give them pleasure lest care turn their tresses ashy and the glow desert their damask cheeksft So, by the light of the royal candelabra, they planned a magnificent fete-Week, called ttpromttewith tinkling music lastingr far into the night, inspiring dainty feet until the signals of the dawn should dispel the paling stars; and the four lovely daughters rejoiced, Whilst gladsome tears gushed from their exquisite orbs. Then all was haste and preparation, and happiness reigned supreme. But the next morn was grey and dismal, for the queen and her attend- ants had pondered far into the night, and had cruelly decided that the youngest daughter should be barred from entering the enchanting garden of the midnight dance. Now, this was indeed very wicked, for the youngest daughter was bub- bling with youthful exurberance and felt crushed by her sad fate. And then came the party! The queen, with her three daughters, swept to the awaiting coach-and-four-and, alone in her dark and empty room, stood the youngest princess, her innocent blue eyes Wide with wonder at the rank injustice, and her red lips quivering with indignation. Sighing in despair, she picked up a book, but, alack, the story was of Cinderella, and moaning dismally the forlorn child uttered: ttOh! How like am I unto this unhappy maidenW and, throwing the volume from her, she wept copiously, and when exhausted by her sobbing, she raised her headelol her tears had formed a tiny lake about her, and swim- ming from out the salty depths was a ligureesmall, dainty, and very grotesque. tiOh! Who are you ?tt she gasped in Prunnellawy tones, and the hgure answered, ttI am the Elf of Freshdom. I guard all things fresh: the dewdrop, the water- cress, and that variety of the rose, called tgirl? ti Then, raising his wand, he transplanted her to a land of beauty, a land where happiness was enthroned, and misery was fast in a dungeon. Here, indeed, was forgetfulness; but the Elf 0f Freshdom forgets nothing, and leaving his protegee amid her happy surroundings, he swam down the ocean of Bliss, out into the world below. Hasteningr t0 the gay and festive scene, where the happy princesses were sipping nectar from goblets 0f shining plantinum, he stilled the orchestra and thundered: ttThe die is cast! For your unfeeling brutality, life shall depart from you P, and as he spoke they 50 m: H Euamama 795 m'mW' Extracts from the F reshman Magazine THE SUNSET Golden sunset fading away into the dusky twilight, Colors harmonious of every hue; Linger longer and let the water, Play with your irridescent blue. Gaze at your beautiful picture In the glassy mirror of gray, That the rolling white clouds May clothe the path of departing day. Sunlight fading so swiftly Over the distant curve of gray; Brighten anotherk darkness; And return to your western way To awaken dawning day! Goodnight, sun, god of the sleeping earth, T0 far lands take your way; Then race silently back again, T0 the world of another day. And When your light Lies bright upon the earth in golden rays, Bring to us all the thought of God, And the wish for a better day. MARJORIE GRAY. FRESHMAN FASHIONS What do Freshmen care for fashions, For new boots and shoes and things, Or for waists and dresses many, Or for chains and pretty rings. r They are not the vainest creatures That this college 0,9T has soon; They care not for pretty colors, Only for the white and green. But therck sonmthiug which they covet, And thoytll have it, I know that, For theytro very fond of millhfry, And thoytre bound to find that hat. GRACE YOLLMAR. KCEB Hemsing Heiss Hooper Jung Krauth Kyle Kuepper , Levy ' Kaigel Murphy Mellin Michel Moore W W' WAE E IQIZACUMTU m'mm' Hammersley Reed Renner Race Sexton Proudfit Perry Piper Wolff Nieh aus Sayre Look Wall Olander Morrison Turner Oppenheimer Umbreit Vollmar Steffen Warren Wilson 53 795 v A A' A A- AMAWAMA HE. 1917 ACUMTU ICE '1' 54 KEEZQEQEZJZX 'CTH HEZQZEQEBm BERTINE SQUIRE Cleveland, Ohio President of Class OLGA BIRKNER St. Louis, Missouri Vice-President of Class BERNIGE LOUNSBERRY Elkhart, Indiana Secretary of Class HELENA YERENA FREITAG Monticello, Wisconsin Treasurer of Class 56 FLORENCE BARRETT St. Paul, Texas FRANCIS ELMA DIXON Fort Wayne, Indiana RENATA MARGARET GERBER Milwaukee, Wisconsin NORMA MARIE JORDAN Waterloo, Wisconsin KEEISEZEQEQDX LYDA MAY LEUTSKER Antigo, Wisconsin MARY KAPLAN LICHTENSTEIN Lancaster, Pennsylvania MIRIAM LUSHER Elkhart, Indiana AGNES MAHURIN Fort Wayne, Indiana 6: 1.33m MABEL OTTISON Eau Claire, Wisconsin HAZEL MAY RENNOE South Bend, Indiana MARY PAULINE SAYLOR Fort Wayne, Indiana EDITH EMILY SCHOMBERG Milwaukee, Wisconsin 59 " 'mmfmi um M'MW' MURIEL FRANCIS SMITH Romeo, Michigan LOUISE SOBYE Stoughtou, Michigan V ERONA SOISSON Norwalk, Ohio HARRIET ELINCRE ZILLIER Milwaukee, Wisconsin AMA; W W M ?EHEASygvggmyZXi FIRST AID .x N .2 j y anmumu A mmum KiEWFQETOEf .W.M.Wy:7$1 A. M'Wm' yr v Am-W-MA v e KTHE 1917 CUMTUZQAX Junior Home Economics Class CLASS OFFICERS First Semester Second Semester President .............. Frances Hillier Sylvia Woods Vice-President ............. Nell Place Eugenia Foley Secretary ............... Elsie Prescott Ethel Klandrud Treasurer ........... Margaret Trudell Inez Rupel Class OfIicer ............................................... Miss McKinney CLASS OF SEVENTEEN TUNE: AULD LANG SYNE We work together, we sing together, Help each other, too; We sew together, cook together, H. E. girls, so true. We love the blue and the white so dear, The girls and teachers all, But the best indeed are the friends we make In Milwaukee-Downer halls! CHORUS : For M. D. 0., 0h, sing my dears, For class 0, seventeen, If we to her are ever true, Shetll help us live and die. NOW when we leave our college home, And roam the wide world through, Though even seas may roar between, Weql love each other more; Wetll love the blue and white so dear, The girls and teachers all, But the best indeed are friends we make In Milwaukee-Downer halls! KEEEEZQEQE ?CTH HEZQEQEEJZX " The Junior H. E. Flyer-LimitetP9 t"Why should anyone want to go to college for Domestic Science when they can learn to cook and sew at home ?t, is Mr. Skeptiets usual question. So to obliterate this idea from his mind forever we will bring,r him Vis-a-vis with the innumerable things we do in one day,s journey on the Jr. H. E. Flyer. Escorted by Engineer Crooks he entered Kimberly diner. Yes, just as he expected, there were girls with aprons 011 who would probably fuss an hour or so just to make something no one could eat. But what was that they were talking about, and why didn,t they cook? ttShft said the engineer, ttthey are having a conference with their Chef, Miss McNair; listenW Such phrases as ttsugar industryf, tteomposition of milk? ttprineiples of cooking? ttbalancetration of meals? floated to his ears. Well, he never thought this was what they did, and it would be interesting to know about these things, but why didn,t they apply them? That was the trouble with col- legesetoo theoretical, nothing practical. Suddenly his thoughts were interrupted by a general stir in the room. The girls were doing things now; one walked toward him with something. He looked at the plate she offered him. 011 it was a piece of tempting lemon pie-his favorite! When no one was looking he would try it. Htmethat did taste goodeeven better than his mother used to make. He would eat all of it. He turned to Chef MeNair. ttBy what artifice was this produced ?,, he demanded. 4"Phat? she sniilingly replied? is one of the secrets of the H. E. education? ttBut, how-y "Come, come? said Engineer Crooks, ttwe must go further? They entered Fashionville. ttAnywayf Mr. Skeptic consoled himself, ttthey wontt do anything but seW'here and anyone could pick that up if she tried? But what were they cutting out of that paper, and what was Mademoiselle Goldsworthy talking about? It sounded like geometry. He watched one of the girls. Oh! he had it! They were making patterns just like those one saw in the magazines. How very unusual all this was "How is it accomplished?,t he asked. ttThatf, said Mademoiselle Goldsworthy, :tis one of the secrets of the H. E. education. ttWe must hurry, interrupted Engineer Crooks, ttfor there are many more wonders to be seen? They entered the Chemistry Department. Why, he hadn,t known that this was included in Home Economics and anyway, What was the exigency of it? ttWatehf advised Engineer Crooks. Everybody was working energetically on some experiment, and as soon as one was hnished it was recorded in long com- plex formulas and equations. How did one learn to reason out such things? ttThatX, said Miss Johnstin, ttis a secret of the H. E. course? ttWell, it might develop onets reasoning power some? conceded Mr. Skeptic, as they passed on to the Home Management Department. Here to his amazement he found the girls discussing how houses were built, what to consider in the building of them. and other such things that he thought only men were concerned with. One girl went to the board and drew, without hesitation, the plan for a whole house. What a queer thing,r to be included in an H. E. education! ttWhyett he began. Another secret? answered Engineer Crooks. And without a murmur he fol- lowed his escort to the next stop. 65 ?.CTZH HEZQJXQEQE? They entered a physiological laboratory. Could he believe his own eyes? Girls were calmly and deliberately cutting up guinea pigs under the direction of Surgeon Noyes! And they were talking about respiratory, digestive, circula- tory systems as if they were studying to be doctors instead of cooks. If they kept on like this, soon doctors would be out of work. itNoft said Surgeon Noyes, we are just learning about the commonest things of life, and this is one of the secrets ofJ ttOf course, of course, was his only reply. ttNow we will spend a few minutes in Artville, b said Engineer Crooks. He found himself in a room full of sunlight, and happy girls were doing all kinds of designing. ttWhy, I thought it required an especially talented 0'irl to do these things, said Mr. Skeptic to the artist, Miss Partridge. ttOh, no? she replied, ttit is just a matter of education? ttOr, in other words? he retorted, ttanother secret? ttYes, you have the right idea now? said Miss Crooks, ttbut come, we still have another department to v1s1t i, They entered the Vocal Reaction room. Here girls seemed to be learning to talk all over agai11,under the direction of Miss Wilder, who used all sorts of astounding methods to illustrate her statements. It was better than a theater-4 he would like to stay awhile! Just then, it seemed necessary to dodge an ink- bottle, and both he and Engineer Crooks,feari11g for their safety, made a hur- ried exit. thhat was a most remarkable secret in its gymnastic features? laughed Mr. Skeptic. ttYes, and now we will see some real gymnastics, replied Engineer Crooks. They entered a large room Where girls were climbing ladders, vaulting horses, and jumping ropes "Can this also be included in this remarkable course 9v he asked. ttYes, indeed, it Engineer Crooks answered, ttand it is the last secret we have to see . But, tell me, do you still think that an H. E. course can be learned in the kitchen at home. W ,7 BREAD THAT WAS NOT BRED Tell me, where is fancy bread, Or in the hand, or in the head? How eomnosed, how kneaded? Reply, reply. It is prepared by H. E. maidens, With streaming fed, but does not rise In the pan where it lies; Let us all ring fancyls knell; Iill begin iteding-dongr bell. Ding-dong bell. E. F. ,17. FRIENDS Once I had an apron and a friend, I loaned my apron to my friend; And I lost my apron and my friend. E. F., t17 To those who borrow matches Neither a borrower nor a lender be; And borrowing dulls the edge of house wiflry. E. F., 17 66 ,, - .M.W.M. v Qggwggamym .. 5W" mew mar 67 'CiH HEZQZZQEEQ Formulas Bertha Blanchard: One ear, it heard; at the other, out it went. Louise Breuer: iiA friend of mine in the city? Marion Brigham: Her heart they say, is not in her work, but elsewhere. Doris Burgi: Some suns are more attractive to her than others. Amanda Combo: My own thoughts are my companions. Stella Connell: For she was jes the quiet kind, Whose natures never varies. J anet Ellsworth: J anet has deigned to contribute some new springs to the Infirmary. Ruby Engsburg: Shets tatting for a luncheon set, and so we think we know, Why an ttengagcdh sign She puts up when she begins to sew. Frances Felgner: There was a little girl named Fran, Who is fond of a football man, Each Saturday she went to a game, Where she saw him earn his fame. Eugenia Foley: You would never think from her thoughtful air, The soul of a poet lies hidden there. Margaret Fritchel: Little, but oh, my! Esther Greenlee: Some girls, dey has fat to keep iem warm, Other girls, deir muscles do the same; P0 Shrimp aint got no weight at all, But she git dar jest de same. Ruth Harris: As to my principles, I glory in having nothing 0, the sort. Alice Jacobs: Beware of her fair hair, for she excells all women in the magic of her locks. Gretchen Janowski: A blushing maiden for a reserved young man. Marie Karlen: Wk face demure, but, oh, those eyes? Ethel Klandrud : KEEZQEEQEyE Reidun Moe: A black cat crossed my path 011 my way to school. That is enough to raise 01165 ire, For in my quiz 1 shall expire! Clara Peters: I love the teachers! Nell Place: She twangs, 011,50 Gr:lilv, Her blamed eukaleli. Elsie Prescott: Better late than never. Inez Rupel: Inez has a little purse, Its hue is black as can be, And everywhere that Inez goes, This little purse 3011,11 see. Clara Scherf; i"My, Pat!! Wa ju get .W Harriet Simon: Simply by any other name would be as sweet. Marion Thomas: Gee, I wish I were home! Margaret Trudoll: iiWhatis the hurryfw Elizabeth Wait: A promising young business man said not long ago, iBetty . Wait? ii and she said, iTll wait? Merrill Walker: iiCheerful at morn, she wakes from sweet repose, Breathes the keen air, and carols as she goes? Lillian Wilding: There is an awful lot of knowledge, That you never learn at college, There are lots of things you never learn at school. Sylvia Woods: She leads a literary life, A woninn of letters is she. She writes a huge 0110 every night, And receives each day at least three. 'Ci 9 ?????UE? 9:93; m'va K'CEBZETLQKQEQE :Q mengmeMy 5 S A L C L A. .L C E P S KEEZSyZEaEyia 'ZHEMLQJEJQBQQE A Special Alphabet A special alphabet; B is Gert Breslon, the maiden s0 fair; Coss and Collat are the dancers so rare. D is for Davis, so modest and sweet, Edwards and Evans weire all glad to greet. Fischer and Faville unlike as can be; Gates and I. Groneman so busy youill see. Harper yowll neier 13nd is minus a crush; Irene W941 r:Etg1'21n15,, will have order to rush. J anet Lindsay with Melba competes; Knapp from the gay mllege life now retreats. Landgraf as Padrcwski some day will shine; Mildred Lucas is class treasurer so fine. Nelson sisters so loyal and so true; Olga Hefty, like her, there are but few. Prugger, the girl who in German excells; Quick as a flash xder, iidie, iidaf now she tells. Ruth Windom and Snitzer few can surpass; Spies, Schuette, Shapiro are three of our class. White, although last, is by no means the leasti Hail to the specials and the color cerise. 74 Am-w-MA ?EHgglzwgwgym EEEBXQEEE HELEN EGGERS Two Rivers, Wis. President of Music Class MILDRED LUCAS Lisbon, N. D. Secretary-Treasurer of Music Class Secretary-Treasurer of Special Class ROSA BROWN Eufaula, Okla. MARIAN CONNOR Marshiield, Wis. "CT :HEZQJVZQE: U21?! URSULA DUNHAM Elmer, Mo. Vice-President of Fourth Year Class of Seminary GRETNA MAE FETZER Sturgeon Bay, Wis. President of Liebling Club J OSEPHINE KAPP Battle Creek, Mich. CORINNE T. LANDGRAF Marinette, Wis. President of Special Class .6 1:33; ESTHER STARK Milwaukee, Wis. LILLIAN WARLOE Chicago, Ill. 78 'EHEZQEQEEZX ' 45 Q Q; Miscellaneous m9; waMMmeMQ STUDENT GOVERNMENT EXECUTIVE BOARD ICTH HEZQXQEEEX Imperial Government Student Government Association OFFJ C'ERS MARGUERITE STOCKWELL ........................................ President LAVISA BIRD Vice-President LINDA COUNTRYMAN ................................... Secretary-Treasurer FLORENCE WATKINS .............................. Chairman of Holton Hall ALTA HANSEN ............................ Secretary-Treasurer of Holton Hall DORIS BELL ................................... Chairman of McLaren Hall EDNA DU FOUR ........................ Secretary-Treasurer 0f McLaren Hall LOIS LATIMER .................................. Chairman of Johnston Hall CONSTANCE MANCHESTER ................ Secretary-Treasurer of J ohnston Hall ETIIEL ELMERGREEN ................ Chairman of City Studenw Organization ESTHER REIMERS ........... Secretary-Treasurer of City Students, Organization KEEIQZWEQEQEX The Council FACULTY MEMBERS DEAN KERR MISS ARNOLD MISS BELCIIER MISS ROSSBERG MARGUERITE STOCKWELL .......... President of Student Government Association LAVISA BIRD ................ Vice-President of Student Government Association FLORENCE WATKINS ............................... Chairman of Holton Hall DORIS BELL ..................................... Chairman of McLaren Hall LOIS LATIMER .................................. Chairman of J ohnston Hall ETIIEL ELMERGREEN ................. Chairman of City Studentst Organization LINDA COUNTRYMAN ..... Seeretary-Treasurer of Student Government Association LIDA FAKE ..................... T ............ President of the Senior Class GLENN MILLER ................................. President of the J unior Class GLAm's RUGGLES. . .e ........................ President of the Sophomore Class ELMA WILSON ................. President of the Freshman Class, First Semester ELLIDA MURPHY ............ President of the Freshman Class, Second Semester RENATA GERBER ............. President of the Senior H. E. Class, First Semester BER'FINE SQUIRE ........... President of the Senior H. E. Class, Second Semester FRANCIS HILLIER .......... President of the Junior H. E. Class, First Semester SYLVIA WOODS .......... President of the Junior H. E. Class, Seecond Semester CORINNE LANDGRAF ............................ President of the Special Class HAZEL LAING ..................................... President of Y. W. C. A. FLORENCE WRIGHT .............................. President of Dramatic Club LORNA DIETZ .................................. Editor-in-Chief of the Kodak GRACE HAMMELTON ........................... Editor-in-Chief of the Cumtux DOROTHY FISH ................ President of. Athletic Association, First Semester GLADYS MACDONALD ........ President of Athletfe Association, Second Semester 82 76355 1917 CUMTU: 'm'mmv Allies The City Students 011, we long for the life of the resident student, When early 0, nwrnings we hop out Of bed And dash for an M. D. C. ear,' and just miss it Or find that ifs niarked ttFolsom Onlyti instead! 0h envy the life of the resident student, But pity the city girl! In manner weire gay and in taste quite domestic, The Kimberly people have nothing on us ; A-heatiug mince pies 011 the pipes far aboye us, And sweeping and dusting without any fuss. Oh envy the life of the resident student, But praise ye the city girl. Our locker room boasts of but one little mirror, Before Which we use our community comb. Our Hoor is enlivened by young salamandars, Who charmed by our company, feel right at home. Oh gay is the life of the resident student, But wild is the City girPs! With candy sales, picnics and spreads for diversions W e, a la the Walrus, at random discuss Kitchens and ethics and dances and street cars ; Yes, ev erything g, anything interests us! Oh gay is the life of the resident student, But herds t0 the city girl! 83 VQH: :mngxxmozwm cg ? :2 A. CABINET V. C. Y. m; KTH 1917 CUMTU EM-W.MA A'EW'M'W' YQi Sisters of Mercy Young Womenas Christian Association OFFICERSTHH5-1916 HAZEL LAING .................................................. President MARGARET MUNDIE ......................................... Vice-President ESTHER CADY .................................................. Secretary MILDRED WRIGHT .............................................. Treasurer CHAI RMEN OF COMMITTEES MARY TRUESDELL ....................................... Religious Meetings FLORENCE WRIGHT .............................. - .............. B ible Study GLADYS RUGGLES ............................................... i. . . Social GRACE WILSON ................................ Missionary and Social Service VIVIAN HODGSON .............................................. Conference J ANET LEAVENS ................. , ............................... P ublicity ADVISORY COMMITTEE DEAN KERR MISS TOMSON MISS BELHIER 85 'Cr H EWIVSSKWUE? Um 'W'WW'A Scenes at Lake Geneva. 86 76 H EWFQWUE? om m'mW' Commissioners of Inspection Consumers, League OFFICERS LUCIA C. PElunj ................................................ President KATHRYN SKINNER ........................................ Vice-President BERNICE FULTON ...................................... Secretary-Treasurer MISS MARGARET CAMPBELL ................................... Faculty Adviser AIMS OF THE LEAGUE 1. T0 abolish the sweating system by legislation and the use of the label. 2. To obtain a short working day and short working week for women and children. 3. To establish a living wage. 4. T0 educate the public regarding pure food. 5. T0 discourage contract labor in prisons and reformatories. 87 iHEZQZZQEEE ,, r. Artillery in Action Dramatic Club OFFICERS FLORENCE WRIGHT ............................................. President JANET LEAVENS ............................................ Vice-President EDNA DU FOUR ....................................... Secretary-Treasurer CHAI RMEN OF COMMITTEES GRETNA FETZER ................................................ Program VIVIAN HODGSON ................................................. Play DOROTHY LEDGERWOOD ........................................... Property CORINNE LANDGRAF .............................................. Scenery LYDA LEUTSKER ................................................... Social '6: H EWIVQWUWD ?Qj 'W'WW' A mamwomam A M'WWV Scientific Experts 4: h; t 4 Science Club The meetings of the Club have included: Observation of the moon and planets through the telescope. Excursions to Jones, Island. Lecture on hHeredity and Evolution,y by Dr. Coulter, 0f the University of Chicago. Club discussions: Explosives, Ancient and Modern. Dyes and Chemicals at the Present Time. Potash Deposits in Utah. The Recent Water Contamination and Typhoid. OFFICERS: President ............. Constance IWanchester Secretary-Treasurer ............. Ethel Carey Y I T AMAW-MA fTH1917 CUMTmQj A'EW'MW'A Womenas Relief Corps Equal Suifrage League MILWAUKEE-DOWNER CHAPTER of the National College Equal Suffrage League Our purpose: To promote the Equal Suffrage sentiment, llIntelligent Votes for Women? among college women, both before and after graduation. a N VDTG5 FOP. womtw 40.4 S ELLDN uxwoM Irate M x0335 .5! llCo-suffrage ........ will react, not to the special advantage of either man or woman, but will result in a more enlightened, better balanced citizenship and truer democracy? OFFICERS MILDRED WRIGHT .............................................. President ETIIEL Mt'llONALD ......................................... Viee-President CATHERINE MUNSON ................................... Secretary-Trcasurer 91 l Kimxgwm Foreign Legions Le Cercle Francais OFFICERS VIVIAN HODGSON ............................................... President PEARL DAVIS ......................................... Secretary-Treasurer MEMBERS Fredrica Yockey Elizabeth Schroeder Bessie W olfner Irene Grant Margaret Mundie Glenn Miller 92 KEEZQZEQEQE?! Eh? matte mullpert Herein The Marie Wollpert Yerein was organized in November, 1915, for the pur- pose of socializing the students, knowledge of the German language, life, and culture. The club was named tcThe Marie Wollpert VereiIW in honor of Friulein Marie Wollpert, whose enthusiasm for German art and literature it is the 0111th desire to commemorate. Those who knew Fraulein Wollpert, sincerely hope that her dauntless spirit may be embodied in the club and stimulate its work. OFFICERS Elizabeth Schroeder, President; Myrtle Eichelberg, Secretary-Treasurer. MEMBERS Lydia Andrae Hulda Friedricks Helen Peterson Mildred Beck Gladys Gottlieb Esther Reimers Doris Bell Grace Hammelton Clara Ruder Kathryn Bennett Olga Hefty Gladys Ruggles Margaret Braunfeld Gretchen J anowski Elizabeth Schroeder Helene Dassler J osephine Kapp Elva Schields Pearl Davis Helen Kermott Catherine Sparks Lorna Dietz Gretchen Koss Marguerite Stockwell Edna Du Four Hazel Laing Irma Wunderlich Myrtle Eichelberg J anet Leavens h Vera Wunderlich Ruth Falkenau Lucia Perry Amanda Zeisler 93 . wzm4mwxmo$ CUM. 5 : 0 4 THE KODAK BOARD KT 75:97:09? :9: AM'MW' International News Service The Kodak MOTTO 9MEHR LIGHT? BOARD OF EDITORS LORNA DIETz, 1916 ............ ........................... Editor-in-Chiof DOROTHY ALLEN, 1919 ..................................... Literary Editor GLADYS GOTTLIEB, 1916 ................................ College News Editor LILLIAN KNELL, 1913 ...................................... Alumnae Editor DOROTHY HURLBUT, 1918 ................................... Exchange Editor GRACE WILSON, 1917 ..................................... Business Manager DOROTHY HURLBUT, 1918. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Assistant Business Manager COLLEGE BOARD FLORENCE WRIGHT, 1916 ................................. AGNES CONN, 1918 ESTHER REIMERS, 1917. . . . . . . . . . . . .1 ................. BERNICE FULTON, 1918 ELIZABETH SGIIKOEDER, 191'? ........................... GRACE SPERRY, 1919 DOROTHY FISH, 1917 ................................ LYDA LEUTSKER, 1916 JOSEPHINE KAPP, 1918 9A pen picture of college interests exposed in monthly snapshotsy KT: H Emmama 795 'W'WW' Opportunities for the Development of Higher Life Liebling Club OFFICERS GRETNA FE'PZER ................................................ President DELLA STAPLES ............................................ Vice-President RUTH RUGLAND ........................................ Secretary-Treasurer MEMBERS Mary Ball Marian Conner Om Christcnson Ursula Dunham H elen Eggers Bernice Fulton Dorothy Finney Dorothy Fish Grace Hammelton Elizabeth Hooper Evelyn Hammersley J osephine Kapp Emily Krieger Corinne Landgraf Mildred Lucas Esther Neprud Harriet Niehause Hazel Nelson Margaret Steffen Florence Schweke Sidney Sayre Marjorie Sexton Esther Stark Lillian Warloe Margaret Warren Elma Wilson Bessie Wolfner Florence Wright Fredrica Yockey n'CiH EXQZEQEym WAR AH? I an m N' "FHEWFQWUE? Q33 A M'WW' Department of Art The history of the art department dates from 1901, when the Fine Arts de- partment was started, which then consisted of sketching and drawing from figures and casts. Several years later, about 1910, the Applied Arts department was starteds Both departments have grown rapidly; the Fine Arts department has now increased its number of students to 140, and the Applied Arts to about 30. Be- sides the regular students in the College and the Seminary ,there are many city people who study art in the studios. The object of the art courses is not only to instruct the students how to draw and design, but also to increase and further their appreciation of art. The courses are so planned that they can be pursued along with the regular academic work, and also so that some students can take it as a special course. Many new courses have been offered in Fine Arts within the last few years: design, pictorial composition and illustration, costume design, and in- terior decoration. The distinguishing features of the Fine Arts department are the design which develops the creative faculties, the composition, and the class lec- tures, a method which is unique in art education. In the Applied Arts department jewelry tincluding casting and enamelingy, silver-smithing, and leather work are now done. Many interesting articles are made from copper, silver, gold, and leather, ranging from pins and rings to lamps, desk-sets and teapots. Within the last few years many articles have been exhibited in the Chicago Art Instittue, an .. honor which was granted to only one other school. This year also, the College has Offered an A. B. degree with either Fine or Applied Arts as a major. 98 KEEZQJEQEQE F ield Armies Athletic Association OFFICERS GLADYS MACDONALD, 17 ......................................... President VIVIAN HODGSON, 18 ....................................... Vice-President PAULINE SAYLOR, H. E., ,16 ...................................... Treasurer AMANDA ZEISLER, 18 ........................................... Treasurer HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS Miriam Chute Katherine McCurdy Pearl Davis Gladys MacDonald Betty Faville Ruth Rugland Dorothy Ledgerwood Barbara Watkins Mildred Wright MISS BEATRICE J. PEARSON ................................. Physical Director 99 'CTE HZZQKQEEZ$ 100 Wearers of Large M. D. ?race Wilson Gladys McDonald Henn Miller Lucia Perry Pearl Davis Norma J 0rdon Lois Latimer Eleanor Dana Km ME?Q7TUE$ um A'W'MW'A Wearers Of Small M. D. Miriam Chute Gladys MacDonald Eleanor Dana Constance Manchester Pearl Davis Margaret Mundie Edna Du Four Esther Neprud lzero English Lucia Perry Dorothy Fish Esther Reimers Alive Gronauer Pauline Saylor N orma Jordon Barbara Watkins Lois Latimer Grace Wilson Dorothy Lodgerwood Florence Wright Glenn Miller Mildred Wright ROWING MILDRED WRIGHT, UT .......................................... Manager Regatta, June 5, 1915. Senior Crew, 1915 RUTH WHEELER ............................................... Coxswain JEANETTE REID .................................................. Stroke Mary Anderson Marjorie Webber Marie Nelson Eleanor Wiser Helen Joerns J UNIOR CREW, 1916 DORIS BELL ................................................... Coxswain MARGUERITE STOCKWELL .......................................... Stroke Ethel Carey Hazel Laing Florence Watkins Helen Peterson Lavisa Bird SOPHOMORE CREW, 1917 MILDRED WRIGHT .............................................. Coxswain FRANK WEEKS ................................................... Stroke Constance Manchester Margaret Mundie Dorothy Ledgerwood Dorothy Fish Esther Reimers FRESHMAN CREW, 1918 BARBARA WATKINS ............................................ Coxswain BERNICE FUJiTON ................................................. Stroke Myrtle Eichelberg Lydia Andrae Vera Wunderlich Amanda Zeisler Alice Turner 102 'KZEZQEKQEEZX JUNIOR HOME ECONOMICS CREW, 1916 ELMA DIXON Coxswain RENATA GERBER .................................................. Stroke Gretchen J anowski Marjorie Markham Dorothy Stewart Uharlottc Parke Olga Birkner SENIOR HOME ECONOMICS CREW, 1915 NORMA JORDON Coxswain MARIE DAI'PRIUII ................................................. Stroke Irma Barnes Edith Gamble Violet Baker Esther Habighorst Esther Peter RESULTS OF REGATTA Preliminaries Semi-Finals Senior H. E. 8? Freshmen Seniorsl Seniors Freshmen 2 :24 25 JuniorsS 2 :22 2-5 S Ophomores 2:22 Juniors 1 Sophomores Freshmen l Sophomores Sophomoresj 2 :25 Sophomorcss 2 :22 1-5 Seniors 1 Seniors Jr. H. E.SS 2:26 THE WINNING CREW 103 "T'HWQWUE? um A M'WW' VIVIAN HODGSON, ,18 ................ Manager FIELD MEET JUNE 2 AND 3, 1915 EVENT RECORD WINNER 50 yard dash 6 3-5 Sec. l-Norma Woodhouse, College Z-Florence King, Seminary 3-M. Schwartzburg, Seminary 100 yard dash 12V2 Sec. l-Vivian Hodgson, College 2-N0rma Woodhouse, College 3-Lydia Andrae, College Running broad jump 13 ft. l-M. Schwartzburg, Seminary 2-M. Stuart, Seminary 3-Lydia Andrae, College Running Hop, Step, and 1-F. King, Seminary Jump 29 ft. 4V2 in. 22M. Schwartzburg, Seminary 3-Yivian Hodgson, College 5 lb. Shot Put 36 ft. 1-R0setta Neuman, Seminary 2-Betty Faville, College 3-Vivian Hodgson, College Basketball Throw for Dis- l-Betty Faville, College tance 75 ft. 10 in. 2-0. Norman, Seminary 3-M. Hickox, Seminary Baseball Throw for Dis- l-Betty Faville, College tance 195 ft. 6 in. 2-Rosetta Neuman, Seminary 3-D0rothy Finney, College 300 yd. Relay Race '42 Sec. 1--Seminary 2-College Newcomb Ball ................................ Seminary vs. College 50 32 Baseball ...................................... Seminary vs Collgge 37 Totals ..................................... Seminary vs. College 127 '72 RECORD BREAKERS 5 lb. Shot Put ........ . From 33 ft. 1 in. to- 36 ft ...... Rosetta Neuman Broad J ump ........... From 13 ft. to 13 ft. 7 in ....... M. Schwartzburg Baseball Throw ........ From 146 ft. 5 in. to 195 ft. 6' in.Betty Faville Relay Race ............ From 43 1-5 see. to 44 sec ...... Seminary 100 yd. Dash .......... From 12 2-5 sec. to 12V; sec. . . .Vivian Hodgson 104 KEEZQXQEEE Tennis KATHERINE MCCURDY, ,18. .' ...................................... Manager For the first time in three years, the tennis tournament was completed. Eleanor Dana, 21 member of the Class of 1919, was tennis champion. Hockey GLADYS MACDONALD ............................................ Manager GAMES-FALL, 1915 October 29 November 31 November 91 J unior H. E3s Seniors Sophomores 0 1 2 vs. Freshmen Sophomores vs. Junior H . Efs 2 2 0 Seniors November 1- Juniors 1 Seniors 1 vs. Junior H. Efs 0 vs. Junior H. Efs vs. J uniors 1 Novembef .21 0 November 4 0 Sophomore and Juniors tied for the championship. November 111 Juniors Freshmen vs. Sophomores 2 College 1 Tie-game played 10 vs. Freshmen vs. Seminary min. overtime. Q 0 COLLEGE HOCKEY TEAM Dorothy Fish ............................................. Center Forward Pearl Davis ......................................... Right Inside Forward Esther Reimers ....................................... Left Inside Forward Esther Neprud ............................................... Right Wing Alice Gronauer ................................................ Left Wing. Gladys MacDonald ....................................... Center Half-back Lucia Perry .............................................. Right Half-back Edna Du Four ............................................. Left Half-back Rosetta Neuman ........................................... Right Full-back Margaret Mundie ........................................... Left Full-back Katherine MCCurdy ................................................. Goal 105 'C'E Wy-WAM HE 1917 CUMT :W.M.,;9:7$ COLLEGE AND CHAMPION CLASS TEAMS 106 7C1" 65137715018? um M'WW' Basket Ball, 1915-16 Barbara Watkins, 118 ............................................. Manager TEAMS SENIORS, 191G Lita Keller, Lavisa Bird .......................................... Forwards lzero English, Louisa Nelson ....................................... Centers Gretna Fetzer, Helen Peterson ..................................... Guards JUNIORS, 1917 Gladys MacDonald, Pearl Davis ................................... Forwards Dorothy Ledgerwood, Dorothy Fish .................................. Centers Alta Hansen, Grace Wilson ........................................ Guards SOPHOMORES, 1918 Forwards ...................................... Ruth Tufts, Esther Neprud Centers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Amanda Zeisler, Vera Wunderlich Guards .................................... Adelaide Cummins, Agnes Conn FRESHMEN, 1919. Forwards ........................................ Ethel Davis, Elsie Graber Centers ....................................... Louise Wolff, Ellida Murphy Guards ..................................... Alice Gronauer, Helen Turner COLLEGE TEAM Forwards ......................................... Pearl Davis, Ruth Tufts Centers ................................ Dorothy Ledgerwood, Louisa Nelson Guards ......................................... Alta Hansen, Grace Wilson GAMES April 11 March 21 March 221 College Seniors Seniors 25 4 10 vs. Seminary vs. Sophomores VS. J uniors 10 32 28 Cup awarded to College. February 24- March 61 March 231 Seniors J uniors Sophomores 7 19 16 vs. Freshmen vs. Sophomores vs. Frcshnu-n 22 11 21 KiHEIZQUEQEym Baseball Manager .......................................... DOROTHY FINNEY, 1918 COLLEGE BASEBALL TEAM, 1915 Anna Grace Anderson Helen Lukens Margaret Bundy Esther Reimers Cora Christianson Pauline Saylor Pearl Davis Grace W ilson Norma Woodhousc Bowling General Manager ....................................... MIRIAM CHUTE, ,18 CLASS TEAMS FRESHMEN Mabeth Mellon ...................................... 89 Margaret Warren .................................... 86 Eleanor Dana ........................................ 82 J R. H. E. Marie Karlen ....................................... 101 Alyce Jacobs ........................................ 85 Louise Brennr ....................................... 84 SOPH OMORES Elva Shields ......................................... 90 H clone Dassler ....................................... 8.9 H elen Eggers ....................................... 86 RESULTS OF INTERCLASS CONTEST Sophomores ......................................... 98 Freshmen ........................................... 7 Jr. H. E. ........................................... 85 COLLEGE TEAM Lucia Perry Alyce Jacobs Mabeth Mellen 110 87 107 April 17- College 101 Seminary 90 Cup awarded to College. 108 re: .::X::m Indoor Meet A competitive gymnastic drill was a new contest held in the college gymnasium, and members of the Junior Home Economics, Freshman, and Sophomore classes took part. A student was eligible for a class team who had a good carriage, quickness of response, and mm of execution. These qualities were the basis for judging points in the drill. The points which were taken into consideration in judging for points in the drill were: Free Hand gymnastics .......... . ...................... 20 Marehing Running Dancing ............................................. 8 Apparatus ........................................... 5 The Sophomore Class had the highest number of points and was awarded the Cup, which was presented by Miss Beatrice J . Pearson. KEEZQZZQEEE 110 K FHEWFQWUWDm A M'WW' Mobilization of Securities THE ENDOWMENT FUND On Connneneenient Day of 1915, President Sabin announced that $76,000 had been pledged to the College Endowment Fund on condition that $300,000 be raised. Last June at their annual meeting the trustees had decided to add at least $300,000 to the endowment fund which then amounted to $215,000. During the summer and early fall months $20,000 more were pledged. Thus at the be- ginning of the present school year nearly one-third of the desired amount had been subscribed. These generous gifts were very encouraging, and the trustees, faculty, alumnae, and students determined to make every effort to raise the remain- ing two-thirds by June, 1916. Last October, Mr. Pritehett 0f the Carnegie Foundation visited the college and gave a brief address in assembly. He Visited several classes and seemed very favorably impressed with the kind of work which the College is doing. How favorably impressed he was we later learned by the announcement that the General Education Board, which he had represented, had voted to subscribe $100,000 to the EndowmentFund. Before this time the trustees, encouraged by many generous gifts, had raised the amount from $300,000 to $500,000. The conditions of the contribution of the General Education Board required that the entire Fund be pledged in from one and a half to two years and be paid in from four and a half to five years. This large donation filled the already enthusiastic workers with new confidence and enthusiasm. The trustees became more active; interested friends and alumnae made generous pledges; and the students presented several stunts and other forms of' amusement during the year. On January eighteenth the students voted to change the Building Fund which had been started in 1911-15 to the Endowment Fund. This fund amounted to $1,045.75 and the students determined to raise at least $500 more before June, 1916. Basketball games, a penny fair, a procession of the days and other stunts brought in varying amounts. With unprecedented loyalty the girls imperiled the workings of their digestive system and fearlessly faced the certainty of a blotched complexion by consuming penny and nickel bars of Endowment Fund candy. 2The Other Side of the Subject? a musical comedy which was given by the Building Fund Committee was perhaps the most original and most successful stunt which the college has ever presented; the returns from'it amounted to over $100. All pledges have not been paid, but by May 1 the following amounts had been raised by the students of the College: MeLaren-Holton Basketball game ................... $ 17.03 City students ..................................... 4.70 Junior Horne Economics Stunt ..................... 18.00 Chocolate and candy ........... . ..................... 40.39 Freshman Stunt .................................. 13.25 Johnston-McLaren Basketball game ........ V ........ 15.25 Faeulty-Holton Basketball game .................... 20.25 Endowment Play ................................. 102.20 Pledges .......................................... 94.16 ALTA HANSEN. 'CTH Hiigfgggym Missionary Fair of 1915-16 The Missionary Fair is held every year the first Saturday in December under the auspices of the Y. W. 1'. A. Since 1900 the receipts from the fair have amounted to $10 689. 70 For the year 1915-16 the receipts from the various classes are as follows: Seniors ................................................... $138. 85 Juniors ................................................... 85. 90 Sophomores ............................................... 73.42 Freshmen ................................................. 59.50 Senior Home Economics ................................... 40.47 Junior Home Economics ................................... 60.70 College Specials ........................................... 4.7.78 Fourth Years ............................................. 96.75 Third Years .............................................. 86.30 Second Years ............................................. 66.35 First Years ............................................... 63.80 Seminary Specials ...... . ................................... 3 6.95 General .................................................. 1.00 Total ................................................ $849.77 The money was apportioned as follows: Foreign extension work of Y. W. C. A ....................... $40.00 City Extension work of Y. W. C. A ......................... 60.00 University Settlement ....................................... 50.00 Jewish Settlement .......................................... 50.00 W0men1s Board of Missions of the Interior .................. 50.00 Women1s Board of Home Missions tPresbyteriam ............ 50.00 Congregational Association of Home Missions ................. 50.00 American Baptist Home Missionary Society ................... 50.00 Episcopal Board of Home Missions .......................... 50.00 American Missionary Association .......................... 50.00 The Southern Industrial Institute ........................... 50.00 The Pine Mountain School ................................. 25.03 Bombay Widows .......................................... 50.00 Total ................................................. $625.00 Leaving a reserve of $224.77, out of which $170 is used for the Lake Geneva Reserve Fund. 112 35 v A - 18m A' axis? .CT: 7 113 KEEXQZVEQEym MAY May 1-The Freshmen entertain the Juniors at a breakfast beach party. Miss Smith escorts Miss Brown and some Sophomores t0 2Twel1'th Night,, at the Ger111a11- -E11glish Academy. May 5 Cumtux elections. Mr. Yountr treats us to strawberry short cake. May ?eArbor Day celebration 011 the campus The U Ollewe Pro111e11'1111e IS held 111 the Athenaeum. Mock Prom successfully 1:1111111etes With the 2M1ra111ar? May SeUsual after-Prom festivities. M ay 9hLarger church attendance. What is the incentive? May 111Gertrude Puelieher marshalls her forces for the May Fete May 151011011 meeting 111111 reception of the Liebling Club. Rain! Rain! Juniors entertain the Seniors at Faxonk May 16ePeaee progrannne 111 the 1111111111. May 18-11e51dellt 80111101110108 entertain the city Sophomores at dinner in Holton Hall. M158 Arnold uses her 111111110111111111111 skill 111 carving the cake. May 191Sophomore Hut Day. Sophomores still in possession of the Hat 111111 11'11'e vent to their joy and enthusiamn at assemhlv b' 1111 exhibition 01" their 11013011 si11gi11g.A solo bv Dorothy Le11ge1'11'11011 111111 '11 111e111e1' were among the numbers Everyone is 1111151111 111 11'11ite11111 1211111111111 As they enter the Chapel singing 1'10- torious'lly, the hrexhnlen wat1h them 111111 11111111113 e1'es.As 3 1111211 climax of joyt, he class 11111r1'1111s about the 11111111111 51115111111 I1at $011115 and shouting H- A- T. May 2101191 rst 1111111111 given to the Freshmen, but they fail to grasp its import. May 2111111111! Rain! 1111111! Everything but M111 Day goes 1111' s11'1111111111g11'. May 221111111 Fete 111 Hawthorne 111111. 1111111 Leutsker is 0101111011 Queen of the May by R111 1111 11111111 111111 his 11111111 The Se111111ary wins from the, 1 111111110 111 N1111'1'1111111 and baseball 11ames. 1111112 2:11'11he Freshmen are 11111311 a 71111! 1111111111. 111211 21111 r11xl11111111 H111 D111. 114 CTH AMAW;M E 1917 CUMT H.W.M.WZJE2i 115 rCTHE HZXQEZZQEEm Faculty meeting and Sophomore song practice are interrupted by cries of H-A-T. After venting their enthusiasm in songs and marching 0n the campus, the Freshmen are entertained by the Sophomores at a beach party. On their return, festixities are continued around a camp- -fire built by the J umors May 25 The Juniors entertain the Freshmen at breakfast in MeLaren Hall. Celebration in Assembly. The Freshmen march in singing triumphantly, and while the Sophomores sing their dirge, Esther Cady gives the Hat Banner t0 Vera Wunderlich. May ZSeSecond Hat Banquet. Barbara Watkins responds to Margaret Mulldiek toast to the Third Girl. May SOeMemorial Day. Annual Dramatic Club picnic. . JUNE J une 2-Cumtux comes out. Completion of Track and Field meet. The cup goes to the Seminary. June 4ePresident Sabin entertains the members of the graduating classes at dinner in MeLaren Hall. June 5-A1111ua1 regatta. Crew of 1917 is Victorious. Time, 2:22. June 7-11eExaminati0ns! ! ! June 13eThe Baccalaureate address is given by the Rev. Mr. W F. Greenman in the Unitarian church. June 14eAlumnae Luncheon in Holton Hall. ttHenry VHF is presented in the ohapel by the Dramatic Club. Home Economics Alumnae Banquet is held in McLaren Hall. Graduating recital of the Music Class is given in the chapel at 8 P. M. Miss Elizabeth Wight is awarded the Liebling Medal for excellence in piano playing. June 15eClass reunions. Class Day exercises in the afternoon. The Senior class presents :The Call to Colorsh, written by Jeannette Reid. After dinner the alumnae and students gather on the campus to sing college songs. 116 YT e EWIEWUETDEX AM'WW'A The Commencement concert is given in the chapel by Marie Shaper and Ethel Puchner, alumnae 0f the music department. President Sahilfs reception follows the Convert. J1me 1Get'ommencement exercises are held in the chapel. The Rev. Mr. Fredric Edwards gives an address on stThe Art of Living? College collation is held in Holton Hall. Annual Senior dinner is given. SEPTEMBER September 22ettollege opens. Mr. Wight addresses the first assembly. Meeting of all new students in the afternoon. Long-faced Freshmen everywhere in evidence. Marian Brigham wonders that, after two years of college life, the girl with the fur-topped shoes is still untamed. September 23 Classes begin. Freshmen are busy hanging pictures for the hold girlst, yet are still able to evade the Sophomores and have their spread on the back campus at 4 P. M. Meeting of old students. Everyone is surprised to learn that ttSall, has not becohie thallyP Resident students meet the Faculty in their respective halls. According to her usual custom, Miss Tomson is able to call each girl by name within ten minutes. September 2FThe Y. W. C. A. reception to new students is held in the gym- nasium. The Juniors learn that Alice Gronauer does not consider cake and apples ttmuch of a spread? September 25-The Juniors entertain the Freshmen at a beach party in Lake Park. The Faculty members present graciously pose for their pictures. Norma Jordon presides at an initiation of Freshmen in the Sky Parlor. Presideiit Sabin holds a reception to the trustees and the Faculty. .CiHE AEM-W-MA 1917 CUMT M'M'W 118 mi 'CTH HEZQZVEEQZX September 261T11e hrst Vesper .1'e11i110 i.1' a Bible rally,con1luete11 by Dr. C. H. B11a1e.Bible 11121.1'se.1' are 0r;3 a11ize11. September 27+The Freshnmn 211111b Junior 11 E. 111-asses are organize11.E1111a Wil- ' 5011 1.1' elected president 01' the Freshman 1111.1'1' and Frances Hillier president 01 the Junior 11. E. 11a.1'.1'. Se11t11111l1er28hThe S1111i0r1' initiate the Juniors into the Junior- Senior room, and are 11111111 i11111r11.1.1'e11 11V 11111 1.111111111111111 01 1'111.1'1'i11a1 facts displaVed bV the Juniors. 1.1111te1111111r 291MIIe. Seraten entertains Mi1'.1' 11011111111 01' the Seminary 211111 Le 1611,1111 Francais at 11 111111111 partV in Lake Park. September 30 1. 010r1 Day. '11111 Freshmen are presented with green ribbons and the 1919 11111111118 bV E1111eth Kr11e11i11tn1915. The Junior H. E75 are presented with blue colors, and 1917 banner by Marguerite J e1111111gs, H. E. 191:3.ht1'11111111111 11110111 are made 111' 111111 1111.15 to secure a 111aj01'ity 0f the Faculty to wear their 11111.1 111111r.1'. The Seniors are victorious, owing to their 111011011011; 01' the telephone. First Y. W. C. A. service 111' the year is 11111 by President Sabin. OCTOBER October leThe Sephonwres entertain the Freshmen at 21 beach party in Lake Park. The annual Athletic Association Frolic i1 held in the gymnasium. '1Mr. Lueningh and "Miss Knelw award the cup to the winning crew. October 21AM M. 11.0. 0'0111' to .1'1111 '"l'he Birth 01' a Nation. 1' October 11111 11101111111111 i1111111'1111th11.1'11.1' i1 Miss Sabin 111111d111t1' .1 Bible 111111 for the Fm 111tV 1111 Monday '11'ter110011S. October ?eY. V1. 1 . A meetintr 11111 by De: 111 1x11.rr October 8-4111t Banquet . The .Fr11.1111111111 .1111'11w their courage to the sticking point 111111 meet their fate at the hands 01' the Sophomores. Chariie Chaplin, 119 AMAW;M; v KT 111:: 1917 cumerj M'WW' A ever willing to please, aniuses the Seniors. ttAthletie Rosie,, maintains her reputation in the pie-eating contest. The 11. E. banquet is held in MeLaren Hall. The banquet of the Special class is held in the City Students, 100111. October Sl-Annual Faculty Tea Party is held in Alumnae Hall. October lOeBible classes begin. October lleAt a wedding on the first floor of Helton Hall, Agnes Mahurin and Dorothy Finney pledge their treth. Dorothy Heiss plays the dejected lover. D. Ledgerwood inakes'her first call on Miss Pearson. October IZeMiss MePheeters hears tiOetoberis Bright Blue W eathert for the twen- tieth time. in announcing the proposed organization of a glee club, Miss Sabin regrets that she cannot join and says that, though her voice is base, it is not spelled b-a-s-s. October 13eMiss Teinson presents the subject of the Missionary Fair in assembly. Miss Brown makes sure that Vivian Hodgson has been to Martinis before giving her ttDawn O,Hara,t to read. October 141First meeting of the Council. Juniors are reminded in class meeting to send written acceptances and regrets for President Sabin,s reception. Esther Cady asks if they must send both. October 15-The Dramatic Club presents a program in the Chapel, which is fol- lowed by a reception in Johnston Hall. October 16 Miss Zena hale reads xExit Uharityt at President Sabin,s reception for the students. llene W ebb, being informed that everyone presents Miss Sabin with a gift on the annual occasion, goes to the reception carrying 11 handkerchief daintily wrapped in tissue paper. October He'llhe Lake Geneva Conference is presented by V ivian Hodgson at vespers. October 18eEllen Sattre,-s11ffering from poison ivy, is unable to hlaeken her face for the Junior stunt Margaret Mundie becomes greatly offended when Esther Reimers suggests that she blacken her face, itf01 nothing would hurt it anyway. October ISeThe Equal Suffrage League entertains at tea. Miss Corbett, Student Secretary for the North Central Field, speaks at a meeting of the Y. W. C. A. October 221Miss Corbett speaks in assembly on ttMenibership in the Y. W. C. A. The first Faculty Concert is given by Mr. Fink, assisted by Mrs. Nisen. 011t0ber 23-Cellege Outdoor Day. A new tradition is begun when we celebrate our first College Day. We all leave early in the morning for Donges Bay 011 a day s outing. We eat an early luncheon which we ha1e brought v1 ith 11s and prepare for a 101111 walk through the Chasm. Our diminuti1e 1111ide, 1111?, Milton, dire1ts 11s 111011111 the beautiful winding paths Just before we come out of the chasm Miss XX est falls eii' the path and is advised by Miss J ohnstin to blow her nose in a less precarious place. J essie Mabbott falls into the b10011. She and Marguerite Stockwell exehamre clothes; Marmurite in 21 short dress looks like anythinw but a di1rnit'1e1l S. 11. A. President The Science Club meets in the Science reading room, and discuss the 111111111. The Calendar for 1916 is presented in assembly by the Senior class. October ZT-President Vole of Wheaton College, Massachusetts, addresses the student body. . 120 TTHE 1917 CUMTU v AM-W-MA A 'W'M'W' ?Qi Under the auspices of the City H. E. Club, Miss Louise Johnson delivers a lecture 011 ttBudgetsP October 29eAn address is given in assembly by Mr. Pritchett, President of the Carnegie Foundation. He asks to which of the following classes we belong: ttCome to buy cargo ?v ttCome, look, see 19,, or xExpect to die soon ?t, Betty Faville is called to the telephone during dinner and informed that she is an aunt. There is great excitement in Holton Hall. We wonder what would have happened had it been twins. The Juniors present ttThe Grand Centralft October 30-The annual Halloween masquerade ball is held in the gymnasium. October 31eThe Glee Club makes its debut at Vespers. Miss Sabin reads, ttThe Passing of the Third Floor Back? NOVEMBER November 1eHoekey game: Seniors vs. Juniors; score, 0-1. November Z-Address in assembly by Miss Benton, Dean of Women, Carleton College. Sophomores defeat the Freshmen in hockey. Sprained ankles and smashed fingers are quite the rage at M. D. C. November 3 Address in assembly by Miss Orvis 0f Caesarea, Turkey. Hockey game: Seniors vs. Sophomores. 121 CT 11 EVQWUE? 1:531 M'MW' November 4hMiss Stone of Kohy College, Japan, speaks in assembly. 'leachers convention is held 111 Milwaukee J ohnston Hall makes its annual call on McLaren and Holton. The Freshmen are defeated in hockey by their sister class. November 5-H0eke1r game: Seniors 1s.Jul1ior H. E. s. A banquet for 111111111111L1el1ow11er 1rraduates is gi1L111 i11 McLaren Hall. November 64MLLare11 Hall 1111011111111. As 11sual,t11'o 111011 appear 111 business suits and tan shoes. Heard 111' the occupants of the Sky-parlor after the infor- 111a1, 11Sa1', 1101's, 11011111 you like 1111'? Wamft she a b01d.w November 94H0cke1' ga111e:Se11iors Vs.Fresh111en. Fire dri11111 assen1bly.VVe imagine the stage is on fire, and Miss Sabin calls words of encouragement as our 11i111i1111111L1 11111101111 trip down the stairs. November 10 The Marie W 011pert V erein meets at the home of Elizabeth Schroeder. November 1141 011L11r13-Se111i11111'1l 11111kL1' 01111110. The cup is awarded to the CO1- 1ege. The 00110110 appears in whiteb sweaters with blue balloons; the Semi- nary in red, with a fife and drum corps. Some neutral rooters cheer im- partially for both sides. Miss S1111i11,w1111e 110111111111 011 Gladys Gottlieb, refuses to disclose the author of the Foundery 1111111 11111111. November J24The 1011e1re 110L11ey team entertains the Seminary hockey team at dinner in Holton 112111. Miss Lorraine VV1'1111111 1ri1es 11 c1111rmi111r reeita1 consisting of French and 01d E11111ish songs. November 13 H01t011 Hall i111'or111al. As usual two men appear in dress- suits. NOV ember 154At a meetinn of the Y. W. C. A Miss Ursu1a Brown H.E.1915, tells of her work in the D1111L11s1t11 Settlement. November 16 Clam SLher1 keeps her 1ight 011 for 111111" an hour after fire drill, eX- p1ai11i11g that she thought this was allowed after social functions November 18 Founders, Dayprogram. Dr.B11t1er of Chicago speaks on SLib- eral Education 111111 the Time Sp1111t,1 NOVember 19411101118801 Luring mid Lone Bear are guests of M. D. C. Lone Bear is asked how he likes America; also 110w he likes Miss Sabin, to which he replies, SSlick 1,1 November 20411 ohnston Hall informal. As usual, one man fails to appear. . Cyril Maude plays in 11111111111111, at the Davidson. Dorothy Finney asks the price of tickets to ttGrouehP November 214Miss Kerr speaks in vespers 011 m11he Psychology of J esusf, November 224110011011 game: Juniors Vs. Sophomores. See next yeafs Cumtux for results. November 2:54Presentati011 01' Cumtux in assembly. November 244Tha11ksgivi11g revess hegilm. November 25411111111115111111111r D:1V.B;111quet in 1101t0n Ha11. N0vember2 274111ary' 1r11L1de111 fills out slip in Miss Barr s office as follows, SRid- i110 with cousins. Ladies 011111 Novembe 30 First Uenununity Meetilw in the chapLI at 6:45 P.M.P1ans are made to meet 011Le in 11111111 weeks for the diSLussion of matters of general interest. 122 'Ci .::X::z31 DECEMBER December 2- -Chen1ist111' 1 "1311115,, to Schlitz Bre1ver1'.The1' are grateful for the small taste of the malt. At the 11 LeLl1 1'. 11'. C. A.111eet11111.MiL15 Carey talks 011 the City Asso- e1at1011 Extension 111erk. December 3 Observame of Home Economics D211, 111 assembly. The ttbuW has 1n11pped us! Dr. Tromanhauser gi1es a lecture 011 Florentine Art, before the Milwaukee Art Society. December 4417 11'. t7. 11.111153101121111 Fair. December 54111119 Beleher calls 011 Mr. Gompers at the Wisconsin Hotel, to make arranuements for his speaking 111 assembly. She was cordially received. December 61Addmss 111' Mr. Samuel Gompers, President of the American Fed- eratjen of Labor. Deeen1l1erT4Bett1' Faville, 111111111r had her 1111111, appears before the Executive Board, and acts the court jester. December EJ-Y 11' C. A.111akes Christmas stockings for the Orphans Home. Thisi Is a breshman L1 idea 01 college life. December 10- The Science Club holds open meetinv. Professor Coulter 0f the U1111erL11t1' of U11eage lectules 011 111510111t1011 and Heredity. 11 December 114111111er rs 011 MThe Budge? are 111111011 by Mildred Wright and Esther Peter. December 12 Miss Sabin endeawrs to read 'tTl he Other 111LL 11111111 among eon- tiuued Loughs and s11eezes.b7he finally suggests that the demonstrations oeeur 1111 at once. December 13 Vivian Hodgson goes to the infunmry. She has her usual atten- tion. December 144The Benefit Performance of 11110111111111311 is given, under the auspices of the Mihvaukee- Downer t lub December 15 Grippe holds mighty sway. December 164See11 011 a Freshmmfs mirror. December 174111 assembly Miss Sabin asks all who own overshoes to rise. Three 111e111he1's of the student body stand. December JS-Christnms play given, under the leadership of Miss Brown and Miss Carpenter. Members from 1111 Llasses present a pageant-play, '1t7l1rist111as at Braeebridge Hall? December 20 Lantern Night Armed with Japanese lanterns and new overshoes, we make our annual 1isit to the hospital and orphan asyhuns Dece111ber 21411111119 1111111111111t011 1111 E111rliL1h 41: t'Miss Beleher and Katherine Fullerton Gereuld have known each other for '11 long time ever since they were both 11011112113, December 224C1hrist1nas carols awaken 11s at 6:30 A. M. Everyone approves of the new rising bell. College closes for the Christmas vacation. JA NUA R 1' J 11111121111 5-4College re-opens. . The wanderers return, at least, those who have not been 11gnpped11 whlle at home. 123 TZHEXQZEQEEm K J anuary GAY. W . C. A. parties 111 balls to make t'hmneytt spirit. The divorce evil has penetrated the precincts of our sequestered. realm! Mlle. serafon celebrates the divorce of her canaries, separated because of riinemnbatibility 0f temperanmnt? The president of S. G. A. returns, and pays $3 111 order that she may sit in Room 232 and have a social chat while English class is in session. January 7-Dramatic readings by members of the Sophomore class. No Sopho- mores present save the participants. There seems to be 0110 111e111ber less in the Petunia 0111b, and Miss Pearson sits out a dance. January 8eNi11eteen down for breakfast in McLaren Hall. Miss Tomson re- solves that it shall not happen again. The Junior H. Efs hold a Penny Fair in the gymnasium. Florence Wright refuses to be weighed. We wonder why. is it possible that the salt baths are not having the desired effect? January 9eSecond floor Holton is aroused 111 the middle of the night by unearthly shrieks issuing; from Miss Kerrts room. Merely nightmare. January IOAObservance of College Week of Prayer connnences with chapel exer- cises led by Dr. E. A. Cutler. J anuary ll-Chapel exercises led by the Rev. Mr. Williams. Verona Scisson signs up for practiee-teaching in the theater book. J anuary lzeChapel exert-ises led by Dr. Titsworth. Betty Favillo with her new pedometer measures her step through all the halls. January ISAChapel exercises led by Dr.Asl1worth. .W. . A. meeting led by Miss Kerr; subjecteY. W. C. A W ork at the Panama- Paeih'i Exposi- tion. Catherine Sparkk absent-niindedness quite remarkable. Thereiri :1 reason. January 14e0hapel exercises led by the Rev. Mr. Ostrnm. Basketball game between McLaren and Holton. McLaren is Victorious. Noel as mascot, leads the procession for Holton Hall. MeLaren distin- guishes itself with songs, accompanied by Mlle. 0. 0. Reine Lamlgmfk band. J anuary 11' he weather man at last graciously permits the Junior class to have a sleigh ride. Esther Reimers freezes her finger, but does not discover it until rather late 111 the ex e11111g, strange to say. J anuary 18 Good skatinfr weather January mehucia Perry prcsents the Athletic Association with 1111 Inner 011 s bowling cup Miss McKinneyis' five 0,010Ck cooking vlass is out at four oiolock. U11- .recedented. We wonder why. J anuary 20eThe Faculty practice basketball. J anuary 21eThe Faculty limp through the halls. Three Irish plays are given by the Dramatic Club. J anuary ZZAFreshman StuntAA Procession of Days, given for the benefit of the Endowment Fund. January 23 Vespers: Mr. Grcenman talked to 11s on the subject of gtPersonal Reserve? January 26eThe Marie Wollpert Verein met in Holton Hall. A study of the flags of Germany was made. January 27eAt a meeting of the Consumers League, Miss Jussen talked on iWVat1211t11111s for Working Girls t, 124 $EZQZZQEEE ?'CT :HEZQXQEyZlX J anuary 28-ttMarie Antoinettw was portrayed by Madame Guerin. J anuary 29eBible examination! Johnston- MeLaren basketball for the Endowment Fund. J anuarv SOeAt Vespers Mrs.Cai11e speaks on Booker T Washington. ?race V ollmar shows increasing interest in Dorothy Fish J anuary 31eThey say that President W 115011 spoke 111 the Auditorium today FEBRUARY February 3-wThe Y. W. C. A. meeting is led by Miss Harriet Haggard, Secretary of the Student. February 18 Lecture by Mr. A1t11ur Doe 011 ttThe European War. 1, February 19 Esther 1ady displays great ingenuity 111 fancy 11eedle1vork.With surplus zeal she sews all four sides of her pockets fast to her apron. A dance IS given by McLaren Hall for the benefit of the E 11110W111ent Fund. February ZleThe Seniors 1ote to 11ear caps and 1.1011115 to classes as well as to assembly. February 22eAnnual velebration of Washingtonk birthday, with the eotillion in the gymnasium. Alumnae and other Visitors swell the already large num- ber of participants. Banquets are held at six otclock in the 'residence halls. Holton Hall entertains Col. Watrous as guest of honor. February 23eA meeting of the Marie Wollpert Verein is held in the City Stu- de11ts1 1100111. The members bring gifts for the German Benefit Bazaar H; be given 111 the city. , February 24eBasketball game between Seniors and Freshman. The Seniors, as usual, are cheerful over their defeat. 126 ?'CT 1111119322933 1:231 v VOLUNTEER MOVEMENT February 4-I1ecture and readings by John Masefield. Is Edna D11 Four st1111y1111r music: She spends a great deal of time 111 Albert Hall. February 6 $ollege Day of PraVe1. The afternoon 211111 eVe111111r senims are 101111111te11 by Professor H111 0f Carleton College. FebruarV TVExaminations begin. February 10 1111.0. A. Patreant. ttThe Ministering 0f the Glft 11 111 the 131th February ,1th 101111 re1ital 11V Frit'l Kreisler 111 the 11ty. February 14VThe returns from the Bible examination are out. A gloomy day. February 15VBrighter VVeather for 301110. February 16-Fac111ty-1'101t011 basketball game. Score, 17-57. Jubilee banquet of the city Y. W. C. A. Several girls represent the 110110110 Y. W. C. A February 17-Gle1111 Miller, philanthropically 1111311111311, has her sweater cleaned. Address 111 chapel by Miss Louise Holmquiest of the National Board of the Y. W. C. A. 'C: emmfwm? 0:39;; 'W'mmv Lida Fake has acquired such an attachment to her cap and gown that she appears in them at the basketball game. Miss Eleanor Corey leads the Y. W. C. A. meeting and talks on ttlndustrial Work of the Milwaukee Y. W. C. A? Grace Hammelton decides to become an industrial worker. February 25-Miss Grosvenor speaks before the J uniors and Seniors 011 WVelfare Work in Department Stores? Grace reconsiders. The office is deluged with telephone messages, telegrams and special delivery letters requesting the vaccination of daughters of anxious parents. The exhibit of Domestic Art in Kimberly Hall is especially fine. ttPruneth is presented by the Dramatic Club. As usual, Biff Hodgson plays the ardent lover. February 26eLetha Hoskins pokes her finger into her pop-over and is amazed to find nothing inside. Milwaukee-Ihnvner girls are shot in the arm! A Charity Ball is given by the Y. W. C. A. for the Grace H. Dodge Memorial Fund. February 27eMiss Sabin reads ttEnoeh Ardent to us in Vespers. February ZSeIn trying to hnd a way for the girls to provide themselves with suffi- cient pure drinking water, Miss Sabin advises the purchase of germmroof Mason jars and says the office will procure, them since a large quantity will probably be required. Miss Sabin is not surprised at the usual small number of sensible people. MeLaren Hall, in a body, attends the Russian Ballet. MARCH March ldTwo industrious J uniors set a good example by washing up somebodyh soiled dishes in the J. S. Room. March 3eThe Y. W. C. A. Jubilee Banquet is held in McLaren Hall. In referring to the Y. W. C. A. as it was at Fox Lake twenty-tive years ago, Miss Sabin turns to Miss Tomson to corroborate her statements. The blank stare with which she is met causes her to recollect hastily and assure us that 128 KEEZQXQEQE iHEZQ-JZEQEEEEX Miss Tomson was at that time a very little girl. March PHolton Hall informal. Spectators, occupying comfbrtable seats in Al- bert Hall drawing room, enjoy the festivities with the aid of field-glasses. March 6eJ 1111i0r-Sopho111ore basketball game. March i'eAt Community Meeting Miss Kerr reads the rules and regulations in the Student Government books of other colleges. We are assured-that our lot is not so bad after all. March 8eThe second floors of the residence halls rejoice in new water coolers. A few fearless Freshmen, receiving some fearfully frightening Black Hand notes, follow their instructions to the letter. March 9e111 assembly, Rev. Samuel MCChord Crothers speaks on mPhe Art of Right Living? The Y. W. U. A. meeting is held in the Chapel. Several students talk on ttWhat it means to be a member of the Y. W . C. Aft March lOe-A recital is given by Mr. Arthur Danielle, assisted by members of 0111' Music Faculty. The J uniors discover at a measuring party that their combined age is 776 years, 1 month and 16 days; their combined weight is 4361V2 lbs, and if placed end to end, they would total 58 yards. March lleJohnston Hall informal The Albert Hall seats are again occupied March 12eRev. C A.Payneb1rives an illustrated legture 011 Mexico, dwelling espe- cially upon the Character of the country and its effect 1111011 the people. March 13 The Calendar Committee cannot refrain from ret 01d1ner an especially lengthy meeting. March 15e-The Ffeneh Club meets with Elizabeth Sehroeder. March 16eMrs. Cohurn 0f the tToburn Player? speaks on ttThe Origin and De- velopment of the Chinese Theatre? March NetStudents, Recital. March 18eM. D. C. is well represented in the balcony and gallery of the Davidson theatre, to see ttThe Brothers of the Pear-Tree Garden? MeLaren Hall informal. Spectators this time well hidden. J oseph Hoffman in the City. March 'l9eAt VesperS, Miss Ethel De Long talks of ttThe Mountain People of Kentucky? She also sings old English folk songs, accompanying herself 011 the h0111e-made musical instrument used by these people. March 20 Miss Belcher and Constance Manchester go 011 a night search for a million bugs? tMerely typhoid meeined March 22-Basketball game: Seniors vs. J 1111101's. The J uniors rejoice over the championship. The Seniors express their resignment t0 fate and commemorate the distinc- tion of never having won a basketball game, in the following odes: We,ve done the same thing over, Over again, over again; Weh'e lost the games of the season, Over and over again. The Freshmen and Sophomores and J 1111i0rs and all, They smile at us sweetly and then They role up the score as theytvc all done before, t Over and over again. 130 KCEEZQEQEE B And: Glorious! Glorious! No more games are in store for us ; Glory be, they are all done, And we haventt won a single one! 8:15 P. M. Lecture by Professor Du Bois 0n ttThe Theory of Exclu- siveness? Dorothy Heiss explains to Margaret Race that she intends to go, Since she thinks lectures are such an easy way of getting an education. Being asked 011 her return whether she feels much edified, Dorothy sighs and sleepily murmurs, ttToo deep for Freshmen W March 23eLiebling Club. Freshmen beat the Sophomores at an exciting game of basketball. Mischa Elman in the city. March 24-A delegation of earnest M. D. C. snffragists attend an address given by Mrs. Carrie Chapman Catt in the city. March 25eMiss Beleher entertains the J unior Class at a childrelfs party in the gym, the occasion being her sixth birthday. tierabella Ex'elilla,, proves a most excellent hostess. Freshman Rally. The J uniors are proud of their sister class. March 26-Vespers: Address by Rabbi Hirshberg. March QTeAddress by Pres. Henry Noble MacCracken of Vassar College in chapel. March 29eMeeting 0f the Marie Wollpert Verein in Johnston Hall. Subject, ttChaneellor V011 Bismarck; His Life and Letters? March 30-4215 P. M.eLawrence College Glee Club gives a concert. During a preliminary tryqout underneath the windows of the History lecture room, Miss Ford finds it difhcult to hold the attention of her Class. Madame Schumann-Heinck in the city. Many disappointed in not getting the usually unusual rates. March 31eLeeture by Prof. Hohlfeld 011 ttThe Dramatic Art of WagnerP Prof. Hohlfeld to Miss Rossberg, at the door of her Classroom, ttSo many pictures of prominent contemporary Germans? That would never be al- lowed at the University; but I see you have them hung? APRIL April 1e6230 A. M.-Unprecedented early rising in McLaren Hall to look for a bright red Cloud in the south! College vs. Seminary Basketball game. Cup returns home. 9245 P. M.-Betty Faville rings the fire bell in Holton Hall and informs the solemn assembly that it is only an April Fool joke. April ZeFirst robins herald the coming of spring. - A strong odor of onions 011 second fioor Holton. Miss Kerr stops Lucia Perry and asks her if she knows anything about it. April 3 Miss Carpenter starts a contest to outdo the robins by introducing in as- sembly, ttSummer is a-Conling in? 131 rCT HEZQXQEEEE 132 v AMAW-MA j K A M'MW' A April 4eMiss Carpenter coaxes summer a little further in. J ean Leavens meets Miss Beleher in the hall with a hat-box. Says J ean, ttHave you got a 110w hat, Miss Beleher ?t, ttYesf says Miss Beleher. ttGoodie! 1,111 so glad W What does Jean mean? April 5eRipo11 College Glee Club. Miss Belcher overhears a girl indignantly deny that she is dressed up. April GeDeaeoness Goodwin addresses Y. W. C. A. meeting. April 7eSummer comes a little further in. ttCuekoo! Well thou singest, CuekooW Equal Suffrage League banquet in MeLaren Hall. Musical comedy ttThe Other Side of the Subject? by Corinne Landgraf, pre- sented by the Endowment Fund Committee. April 8e111d00r Meet. Miss Sabin, in presenting the Pearson cup to the Sophomore Class, says that it is the best meet she has ever witnessed at M. D. C. April lOeFreshmen out at six otcloek to hunt the Hat! Just before breakfast they return, dusty and ttHatlessj, but nothing daunted, singing, tWVeql find that noted Hat, Sophomores? Miss Sabin asks Helen Kubeek what she can tell her about J onah. Helen: tWVhy, he swallowed the whale P, At assembly, summer comes in in four parts. Miss Carpenter offers to ex- cuse the lame, the halt, and the blind before beginningeVivian Hodgson leaves. Lucia Perry, inquiring the cause of the frequent interruption of her game of bowling, learns that the Freshmen are impatiently waiting to take up the alleys, in their search for the Hat. Josephine Kapp is asked Whether there are any sliding panels behind which the Hat might be hidden. April 12-G1en11 Miller 011aj01i11g in mathematiesy is asked 110W many feet there are in a mile, and answers: tiWhye365, areIYt there 19,, April MeVaeation beginsvunoHieially. April 15-Play presented by the French club, tiLe Triomphe de PAmourW April 19-Haster recess begins. April 26 Colleue reopens. April ZQeThe German club give the puppet play ttFaustt, in the Studentts Parlor. Aplil 29-A Faculty concert is given in the Chapel. April SOeProt. Neilson of Harvard talks on ttShakespeare and Religion? MAY May 2eProf. Gayley 0f the University of California addresses the college 011 ttThe Humanity of Shakespeare and what it means to us today? May 5eThe College Promenade is held in the Athenaeum. Mock Promenade is held in the gymnasium. 133 AM-W-MA v 16 HE 1917 CUMTUXD, M'MW' .A May Ge-The usual after-Prom festivities consisting of beach parties, dinner, and the Majestic are enjoyed. May 30-Memorial Day. The annual Dramatic Club picnic is held. JUNE J une 3-Field Day. June lOeRegatta. June 12eExaminations begin and tiThe Reign of Terror,, continues through the week. June 16-The Seminary Commencement. J une 18eBaccalaureate address. June 19eThe Shakespeare Pageant is given. June 20-01335 Day. June 21eCommeneement. Dr. Lewis of Chicago delivers the Commencement address. IF. tBy J. L. with apologies to R. KJ lf 1, could roll my eyes like Charlotte Walker, And walk like her, and such sweet manner feign; lf 1 could smile and pout like Mary Pickford; And wear light golden hair, like B. C. Bayne; lf Marguerite Clark would lend her fair attractions, That linger with us after she has gone; If I could play a ttCarmenf, like to Farrarls, And do it all without the aid of song; If Clara Kimball Young would only give me Her ear-rings and her eyes as dark as night, If I could be as bold as Theda Bara, And yet be always, always in the right; If Kathlyn Williams would consent to teach me, Her fearlessness of animals quite Wilde lid be the finest kind of movie actress, Andewhat is nioreeldd make some gold, my child. 134 fiCiEEZQEQEEZQFA jennrjormrm 'r k THE 1917 CUMTU: v Am-W-MA He Who Laughs Last The Stratford Players, as they faeetiously styled themselves, were rehearsing in groups on the back campus. On one side of a bush, plotted Boeaehio and Don Juan; from behind the hedge, came the garrulous tones of Dogberry instructing the watch; while under the big oak, the two chief actors played a little scene in real life. Beatrice, from her stump, was looking ominously across at Benedick with that same vixenish flash of the eye usually reserv ed for the fourth act, second scene. ttNo, ,t he went on, leisurely strewing his white tennis shoes with green grass- blades, quite blind to the flying sparks, I neVer saw a girl yet, that could put a bluff through successfully. ltts purely a masculine accomplishment. It takes steady nerve, andewell, it takes a man to do it, every time. Bea, by the way, have you made any arrangements yet for the mid-summer regatta? Pd like to take you if-tl Most opportunely just then, in the interests of peace, the coach came around the bole of the big tree. ttHeighehoP, in amazement, ttmy dear Lady Disdain? Why such a tFehru- ary face, so full of frost and storm and cloudiness ?,--and this a balmy J une day? Benedick looked up, for the first time in five minutes, and began to laugh tor- mentingly. ttOh, thatls her tKill Claudiot look: I know it of old. tShe will die rather than she will bate one breath of her accustomed erossnessft melodramatieally. tt tDisdain and scorn ride sparkling in her eyef ,t ttOh, t1 wonder you will still be talking, Signor Benedick. Nobody marks ou,J lt tartly. tt tAnd I would my horse had the speed of your tongue, and as good a con- tinuer. But keep your way; I have done? ,t And the impromptu, vituperative rehearsal ended in a sunnner-gale of laughter. Ever since the kindergarten circle days, when Benedick had sung tgGood- morning, dear playmate, good- -n101'11i110 to you, it and chosen Beatrice for his skip- ping partner, he had liked her better than any other girl. Most of all, he liked her teaseableness; utoo wise to woo peaceably? things could never become settled or stupid between them. In one of the interims of rehearsal, he held out half an almond to Beatrice. ttBea, will you eat a filipine with meeaml settle the dispute? If a girl suc- ceeds in bluffing 1110 before the Fourth of July, you win; and if 1 bluff you, I wi11- see ?ethe winner to choose his own forfeit? And Beatrice, being fond of almonds, took up the gage, and ate her half, darkly planning the while. Presently she helped herself to another one, ehummily asl'- lng- ttGoing out in the country with the gang tonight to see ttLads of the Lazy S W Benedick looked rather queer. ttWell nowo. V111 sorry. Cousin Mary, some elderly relative of Motherts from out West-Montana or New Mexico or sonlewllereeis coming, and Mother wants me home to help entertain herf, Bea stared suspiciously and unbelievingly. Any excuse from Benedick, s0 glib and oily as that one, had something wrong with it. She would need to hurry, or he would be crying ttflhecktt before she had even started. 136 KTH 1917 CUMTij AM'WW' A She wondered again that night after dinner, when she noticed Benedichs red pony, Snip, tied at his side gate, a long grey cloak dangling from the saddle horn. ml'hat doesntt look much like entertaining an elderly cousin? she mused. Moreover, she had just received a distressed telephone message from Benedick's mother, asking that their car should go to meet the expected guestts train; Bene-' dick, it seemed, had not returned yet. iiNot returned yetefrom Where ?t, she pondered. The red pony pawed restlessly until he dug a hole in the turf. The empty saddle had a most enticing look. She wished--what fun to block Benediekts plans -whatever they were. PerhapSebut it was time for the train now. tiThe Lads of the Lazy Sh proved about as bad as a play could be, drearily commonplace and full of horse-play; quite devoid of women, the cast consisting chiefly of cowboys who cavorted awkwardly over the stage, entangled in their own lariats. The sophisticated Stratford Playerseattending from professional courtesy in a bodyeyawned, and thought of the time to go home. Meanwhile, out in the black, rose-scented J une night, a mysterious lady in a long gray cloak might have been seen, riding a red pony. Her hands burrowed down under the saddle-blanket, tight against the ponyis shoulderseand at every cross-road she laughed and let him choose his own road. Sometimes she galloped long miles; and always, then, she sang the same song of gypsy wandering. An old farmer, milking late, lifted his head and listened. iiSome joy-rider, likely? A literary tramp, under a hay-cock half asleep, listened and quoted sleepily t0 himselfe And by the moon, the reaper weary, Listening, whispers lTis some fairy V ' Lady of Shalott-only as it happens, there iSIft any moon tonight? The solitary joy-rider came finally out of the dark ways to a noisy, lighted hall, and read the big white sign nailed up by the doorze Lads 0f the Lazy S Given by the Boy Scouts of J aekson County Benefit Performance. Proceeds to be used for The War Victims. The red pony turned in of his own accord; and smiling, the mysterious lady fished in her grey coat pocket for silver dross; but finding only coin of the fields, the daisies at her belt to offer the doorkeeper, she turned back to the rose-haunted roads again. Inside, the play was already half over; and the audienceechieiiy hilarious col- lege boysehad at last found a means of relief from its intense stupidity. Behav- ing after the manner of Elizabethan audiences, they were showerintr the players With a running fire of e,on1nient jeers and mt- ialls Indignant, scandalized little Bea was raging. iiOh, 1 could kill them! Suppose they act that way for us next Friday night. Do they take this for a field-meet, I wonder ?,i The ttOld Ti111eriL-leading man, stage manager, and coach, all in one- was evidently some old broken- down actor He had a certain pathos about him, and a look 1n his face of hopefulness long since worn thi11,of slow disappointment 137 WCAMiw;MAj ethe look of a weary clown with only a very tiny jest in his heart. He brought out his stale jokes, watching hungrily for a laugh. Once Bea started the applause herself. The rest of the Stratford Players joined in; and the Old Timer, with surprised responsiveness, brightened and sprang to his work like an old tireehorse at the Whistle. t"Phatts right, old duck? yelled an approving voiee. ttStay with the game! Hey, fellows, hets struck a new gait now. Look at the old bird! Ain,t he the daisy ?e-a regular sunflower patch W Whereupon, the comments of the fickle audience became highly approving, and the applause s0 continuous, that most of the time nobody could hear the ac- tors. The Old Timer was loudly commended as an ttAl eorkerft lauded for the ttsoug and dance he was giving them? and assured that he could make Otis Skin- ner of Charlie Chaplin take a back seat any time; and finally, at the end of the third act, given an uproarious eurtain-e-all. At last, the old man came out, and stood quietly waiting, with some new, in- definable dignity upon him, which won silence. It was a queer sort of curtain speecheinore of a human document than most. He told them about his past life; how he had lived with stage-folk alwayseborn in a green-rooni; how he had started out with the highest kinds of hope, playing minor parts, but confident always that better ones were coming, that he would make a Henry Irving some day; but some- how, the recognition hoped for had never eameeinstead, only slow grey disillusion- inent. ttSo you see, fellows? he finished with a sad little crooked smile. ttYou dorft need to rub it in. l know better than any of you, how many kinds of a failure I am. I can even see the joke of it, too; il' l were out there where you are, ltd be howlingr my head othhut this side of the footlightseitelooks different. Anyhow, as the preaehers say, tlet us have a good collection, for the war Vic- tims, and three cheers for the Boy Scouts, whose show this isP And the college men gave them with a sudden friendly thunder. That last act was curious to watch. Somehow, from beingr a dead thing, the story came to life under their eyes. The men watched the Old Timer with that same, keen, tense enthusiasm which they give to all game fighters. Bea sat out on the edge of her seat in a perfeet shiver of excitement. At the end, She jumped up, crying, ttCome, letts go behind the scenes, and Find him? Back in the gallery, the erstwhile seorners were chantingquhatts the mat- ter with the Old Timer? IIO,S all rightW A great mob of them went, Bea pulling off her flowers, as she ran. At the door of his dressiug-rooni, she was just in time to hear a jubilant, familiar voieee ttWell, fellows-da pretty good stunt, thatP, as the Old Timer whirled around, snatching off his wig,r and niake-up, and disclosing to her amazed unbelieving eyes, the mocking, triumphant face of Benediek. ttFlowersefor me, Beatrice? Well, some matinee idol l am! I cry you filipineP ttOh, you always end with a jade,s trick? she stormed, almost crying. H1' feel just like a slice of hot excitement, held under a cold faucet? ettAnd I think well make it the inid-sunilner regatta yes Bea ?,t She pinned the Howers hack on again with a Vicious stab 0f the pin, and made a sudden retreat into her Lady Disdain manner. tt t1 yield upon great persuasion; t she quoted, halt erossly, half laughing. 138 ,, K ttBy this light? he laughed back, tt 1 take thee for pity.,,t On the road home, Benediek told Beatrice all about his theatrical venture. ttThere was only one thing that spoiled it? he ended. ttYou know 1 had planned to bring Snip, and ride him right onto the stage in that last scene. It would have made an awful hit. I had him all ready, and sent a boy after him; but in the meantime, somebody got in a little funny work and swiped himeone of those fool engineers, I suppose? J ust then, from across the black field, there came a sound of singing, so clear that they could even hear the words, ttMorning waits at the end of the world Gypsy come away-J, ttWhois that, I wonder somebody on the 01d short-cut? Sounds pretty at night? At the door, as she said good-night, Beatrice asked impishly, ttOh, by the way, Cousin Benediek, what became of your elderly relative? I hadnlt noticed your tentertainingt her--,l ttHark, Bea W Benediek interrupted i11 swift excitement, ttListen W The night was very still, and from behind the tall hedge came the slow, crunch- ing sound of a horsetsfeet 011 the gravel. ttHe,s bringing Snip back! Just wait till I get hold of-et, and he ran stealthily across the lawn, Bea gleefully tagging behind. Through-the break in the hedge ,they could just see a black ligure dismounting, and then a pause long enough to tie. Benediek had crept up behind Snip, just ready to spring, when softly, almost hummingly, the thief began to sing the very same song which had come to them from the black fields- ' stEver the wild world over, lass Lights of my tent be fleetg' Over the world, and under the world And back at the lastetl His pocket flash revealed a girl uneoneernetlly tying his own grey cloak t0 the back of his saddle, on his pony. ttOh! Thank you? she said over her shoulders, evidently quite accustomed to having dark-lanterns flashed on her. ttTurn it up here, will you please? I cant seem to find these strings? And so Benetliek found himself in the absurd position of confederate to a robber-lady, covering up her tracks. Behind him, he could hear the soft crackle of the hedge, as Bea leaned over. ttNice pony? he remarked. iiIS he yours fw ItNo, he belongs to my cousin Benediek. Thanks for your help? And then, as she turned, for the first time Benetlick saw her face; and thunderstruck, like a flash, dropped the hulPs eye at a safe distance from his own. From the hole in the hedge came a mocking, jeering voiee- ttWell, Cousin Benedieketlf a girl succeeds in blufling me before the Fourth of Julyheyou remember? 1,11 take my filipine back again if you pleasee-thanks L0 Cousin Marys eonnivanee? - And the new elderly-young relative laughed. ammmmm A mem' ADA PORTER, 1917. 139 AMAWAMA TTHE 1917 CUMT .W.M.W9:7$ 140 'KZEZQKQEEEE t ....,s-. n a v-Ih W ...J9n mu. 4 it :- bNESs rpm- D'llj Proo'rl'rm r" x NW: T'NLP 0v" hunt with Commencamenf corvesPchr-iiwq r9 nur'hsfuv Fn-MIISI The Heavens 0f Milwaukee-Downer College BY PROF. MINOR ASTRONIMICUS, PH.D. The heavens of Milwulikee-Downer College are very brilliant, and at almost any time of the yiar senle Constellations are particularly beautiful. Cenimeneement tThe North Start marks the center around which 0111' in- terests swing, for it nmrks either the commencement of another school yeafs work if we are under-elassmen, or our work in the worhl if we are Seniors. The great constellation, Preparedness tGreat Dippew always swings around Commencement With its two pointers, Scholarship and Breadth 0f Visen ever pointing toward it. A few degrees from this constellation in the Eastern sky, the Pageant Onlge Dracoi winds. Still further to the left the Crown of the May Queen tNorth- ern Crowni van he seen in its mellow radiance, and in the same degree of lati- tude the head of examinations tSerpenti shines brightly. A little to the North of East, is a large constellation of particular interest to the Freshman, for it is Hunting the Hat tHunter 0r Bootesi, and in it 25 degrees from the handle of 141 .::::::.:wa Preparedness shines the seeond 0f the twenty brightest first-magnitude stars, the Hat tAreturnQ. - Turning to the Western sky, we pause directly overhead at the Zenith of our heavens, the Daily Program, and then, dazzled by the brilliance of two stars very close to the Zenith, we discover Work and Play, the Twins tCastor and Pollux in Gemini; 3 A little to the North of W est on a direet line with the largest constellation in the East, is found another equally lartre 011e, Sports tAurigat, the brightest of its stars being Regatta tCapellat. ttAu fond de P horizonf and 011 a line with the Serpent in the East, shines the lone bright star, Mid-Years tAldebaran or BulPs eye in Taurust fast dropping out of sight as we near commencement. Directly in the West is the most brilliant and most beautiful of Iiiid-winter eonstellations, Christmas tOriom. In it we recognize the Pageant and Lantern Night tBetelgense and Belletrixt, the most mysterious and beautiful of Nebulae, Christmas Day as the middle star in the belt of the giant, and the Fair tRigeU as that deep red star just 011 a line with the eye. Turning to the South we suddenly stop in awe at the splendor of the first of the twenty-first magnitude stars, which, with our eyes upon commencement, we are wont to forget. it is Opening Day of School tSiriust in the constellation of Opportunity tCanis Majori. With just a glance at the long ehain of events tHydrzU that follow the Opening Day, we turn for a last glance at the Northern sky. Sinee we last looked, two other beautiful stars have swung into View at the very edge of the Northern horizon. One is hiring Career tAlgoU, the most puzzling and inter- esting of stars, in the constellation of Futurus tPerseust; the other, Marriage tVegat, around which astronomers say the Heavenly bodies will swing eventually With it as their center of the Universe instead of Commencement tNorth Start. T HE PLANETS Two of the planets, Worth tMercuryt and Love tVenusL are nearer Light tSum than we are, and can be seen only in the path ot'.Lig11t. Worth toften called True Wortm, visible at certain seasons, hovers around Light, and is at present a morning star, easily visible at dawn. Love Ovenust is now in its most favorable position with respect to 11s, and can be seen in the early evening about 25 degrees from Light. it is exceedingly conspicuousethe most brilliant object in the heavens except Light. Persistence tMarst is in Personal Intiuenees tCancert at present, and is past opposition. It is visible each day until about 4 A. M., when it wanes for a few hours. When this planet is on the same plane with Light as we are, it is very radiant, but when directly in opposition, we receive very little light from it. Happiness tJupiterL brightest of the planets next to Love, is at times 142 KT ZHEZQiEQE via?! VA visible in the morning and at other times in the evening, but is nearly always to be found. Endeavor tSaturnl is in the Twins, Work and Play, and remains about sta- tionary. It is well placed for observation at present, and with the aid of its mysterious rings it Shines like an ordinary tirst-magnitlule star. Hope tUranusl seems like a star of the sixth iliagnituder-gis seldom seen With the naked eye. Although it is rotating 011 its axis at the tremendous rate of once every ten hours, because of its very great elipse, a long time elapses be- fore it ereveals itself to the individual as a realization. Ideal tNeptunel is the planet farthest from Lighteean he found new about twelve degrees East of Persistence, and is easily visible telescopically. Fellowship Qioom is the one satellite of our college. Like the planets, it shines from reflected light, the abundance of whieh seems to make it grow more beautiful as time goes on. OBSERVATORY 0F MILWAUKEE-DOWNER COLLEGE, 1916. JESSIE MABBOTT, 1917. MAY TWENTY-FOURTH. A space would make a horrid spot Upon this nice neat page, So Pm supposed to make a blot, And oh, it makes me rage. The night is hotel pray ,twill be The time this hit is readh For I am very weary and I want to go to bed. The breeze just sort of loiters up From 01d Lake Michigane Hurray! I will have writ twelves lines And only needed ten! J . L. ' v Am-W-MA ZHEMLQJZVQBDQEZDXI Milwaukee-Downer Anthology tWITH APOLOGIES 1'0 EDWARD LEE MASTERS MYRTLE EICHLEBERG 0h, Life was so wonderful to me, And everyone in it was so good! They told me that the strong hated as well as loved, So I stayed awake nights Trying to think of faults in my friends. 1 always spoke out just what I thought Only because I eouldnjt help it ; People would laugh at me often, But then that was all the more fume Life held so 11111011 fun always! KATHERINE MCCURDY They got me into the biology class 111 Milwaukee-Downer, and tried to make me believe In Evolution. I guess I knew. They tried to tell 1110, too, that I was wrong Vt he11 I said the 11 orld was getting worse exery day , But I vanquished all with my argumentse There was 110 one could argue with me. MISS JOHNSTIN 1 did not try to make chemists out of my students. Chemistry was not put in the Freshman course for that. But to make the girls thi11k,.a11d to train their minds. I often told them this, but they seemed to think That they were smarter than 1 was when I was in college And could get their lessons by reading them through? CURINNE LANDGRAF I was the musical genius of the college; It was a lot more interesting composing music Than studyi11gr.E11glish Literature. I wrote the music for the Founders Day Hymn, And wrote and directed a musical operae Worked till I was nearly deade But everyone said it was a great success; My mother came from home to see it. Oh! I had a good time out of life. My life was full of music and dance. I wish I were backeitts too quiet here. EDN 1 01 1NDER I never said much, but I saw a lot of things, Maybe life was worth living, and maybe not- It all depends upon your point of view. People said I was quieteWell, I preferred to be; Anyone can talk. 144 KT H EZSEZEEEZDX A SENIOR Oh Juniors! Ye debaters of the subjects 0f your Sociology, I, who lie here, was a Senior, Talkative, contentious, versed in the arguments Of the wisest men; But in discussions With you Upon divorce on grounds of ttincombatibility of temperamentt, Or the relative importance 0f marriage and a career I came to long for peace and quiet, And to know that, in your vicinity Only those who strive mightily, shall possess it. A FRESHMAN I wanted to go away to college To have some fun before I faced the cruel, hard world, So I consulted fifty catalogues or more, And finally chose Milwaukee-Downer as my goal. The tales of beach parties on Lake Miehigants broad shore, 0f boat races on the river, hat traditions, lantern night, And all the sport throughout the year, Appealed to me. I went, in September, A11 prepared to have the time of my young life, I joined all the clubs I could, Dramatic, Glee, etc. Went out for hockey, track, and rowing With a little basketball and tennis on the side. Then everything began to come at once, and no let-up; I knew I had bitten off more than I could chew. But still kept on, fool that I was. Then came Semesters, and I landed here beneath the turf; A joke on you, Milwaukee-Downer? ANOTHER FRESIIMAN The Sophomores played all sorts of jokes on me; They took my clothes off the hooks, And tied them into knots, while I was away Studying my Latin; and made me believe I had to take my umbrella to fire drills. And when the first Hat banquet came along They got a goat and made me ride it Up and down the hall, and other stunts as bad. That,s why my cornerstone is laid And my memorial tablets are erected. MISS BROWN I used to be a teacher of English at the collegee Though there wasn,t anything 145 QEZQZZQEEE That we didn,t discuss in my Classses; If the girls wanted to know about marriage, Or divorce, or religion, or politics, They took an English course with me. Sometimes I would feel so enthusiastic and joyful I could hardly keep it all within me,a Other times the unresponsiveness of my pupils Was very depressing. But life to me was always gloriously interesting, So vital, and rich, and full. MIss REYNOLDS I loved my work as a librarian, but for certain things, And they were almost too heavy for human to bear. But 1 took my lot with apparent complacency Until someone purloined ttMoral Ethicsh from the library And never returned it. . What was there to do but give up the ghost? BETTY FAVILLE Oh! Life was a lot of fun! I played tennis, roller-skated, hunted the hat and everything; : U was one of the Hat girls in 1916aI have on my Hat pin nowl There was always something to do. John 01137 brotherl used to come down for informals. I loved to go to informals. I had a baby niece named after me, too. MARGUERITE STOCKWELL I was president of the Student Government Association; It kept me busy, but I liked it Because I got to know all the girls. I loved Milwaukee-Downer, and did all I could for it Such as working for the Endowment Fund, and in the Y. W. C. A. I would like to be back there working now. RosALIE OPPENHEIMER Alice Gronauer, Hermoise Levy, and I came way from Tennessee To go to school at Milwaukec-Downer College. We liked it, too. It was hard work at first, but after you got on to it It wasntt so bad? , There were a lot lot things to do besides regular work, And we went in for everything. Alice made both Class and college teams in several sports, And then we took parts in plays and things. Oh; we had a good time, all right! 146 ?EHEZQXQEEE Mrss FORD thtudentsf 1 would say, ttAre your notebooks ready? But they never were. The Golden Age never came, Although my students were under my tutelage, Some of them, four years. They learned about Charlemagne, Caesar, Washington, Bruce, And learned how to write eascellent ten-minute papers. They handed in very good, yea! very line, reading slips: My ttNay, nay, Paulinelsl, grew fewer, And ttExcellanza, Mademoisellell more frequent, But the notebooks were never ready when the Last bell rang. AXEL I felt most comfortable when' I was sitting in my basement Smoking my pipe, with my feet up on the table, But just as I was settled Mrs. Stahl would call ttAxel! AxelW And there Pd have to fix a window, or a bell, Or an electric light, Or put up scenery for a show the girls were giving, Or more the pianos for one of those recitals; The water coolers always needed to be filled, too. Milwaukee-Downer was all right in its way, But Pm glad Pm no longer there. J OHN ALLEN I knew the Milwaukee-Downer girls well, I was in a position to-being motornlan on a Hartford car. They were nice girls. One thing always made me mad though- When we were in a hurry and a big crowd was waiting To take the car, thefd all stand back and waste time Letting certain girls get on first. I never could see any difference between The ones who got on first and the ones who waited. They always gave up their seats to women who were standing. It looked so nice and polite That I told my own daughter to do it, too. 147 "tamawaea 0:195 A M'MW' The Harp A long mirror 011 the opposite side of the wall reflected her form as she sat playing on the harp-reilected her slender unringed lingers, the pink sprigged muslin dress, with a tiny rosebud 011 the left shoulder and the eleally cut profile, eameo-like 1n outline, with a single curl nestling on the nape of her neck. ttYou re very like the picture, said a serious looking man who sat in a chair close by, watching her intently. ttMost girls of today try to diverge as far as possible from the lovely, old-fashioned ideal. That picture appealed to me as few pictures ever have, but the realitye-W. And his voice trailed off into silence as he only looked at her. ttOh, 1 love old-fashioned things? she said. ttThatts why father got me the harp when I was still quite a little girl. 1 dorft believe in suffrage at all, and I can,t stand girls who are always trying to imitate men? ttIt was strange? he mused, tthow long it took for me to find the original of those pictures. It was in New York, in a little out-of-the-way picture shop that I first saw a specimen of your father,s workeit was the ttSpinning Wheeltt, I believe -and although I admired the execution and delicacy of tone tremendously, it was even more the sweet little subject in the Puritan gown who appealed to me most of all. And then, afterwards, I saw others of his pictures, of even more perfect workmanship, and there was the same sweet girl looking out at me from the frame. I searched and searched until I met your father, and he said I might have a Chance to meet the original, and now that Pve met her, Itve decided that the original transcends all studies of herself? The girl lowered her eyelashes, glanced demurely down, and looked as if she would have liked to blush, but scarcely seemed able to. tTm not used to having things like that said to me? she replied. ttYou know, I ve hardly met any men at all. Father and I have been all in all to each other, and he has talked so much of my mother that I seem almost to know her, although she died when I was very small. h It1 wonder if your father would paint me a picture of you just as you are now erunning your fingers over the strings and looking wistfully off into the distance. Besides there are several other pictures of you Which I was unable to secure at the dealers. Do you think your father could get them for me 1W ttWellf, she replied hestitatingly, Itfather is very busy now and his only unsold pictures are those which he meant to keep for himself. But stillemaybeft ttWill you do your best for me then? You know how anxious I am to have them. I really must go now, but I will telephone you tomorrow to find out about the pictures? He arose slowly and as he stepped out of the shadowed corner where the harp stood, he was revealed as a tall man, with eyes like a boy and a mouth Which seemed peculiarly sensitive. The girl arose also and bade him goodnight. No sooner had he gone than a man of thirty- e-ight or forty, slightly inclined toward being fat, and wearing a smoking jacket, entered the room. tZIaquita, vous etes une artiste, une artiste, ma Cherie. That harpts a fine accessory. You must give me credit for that at least. He,s good for at least two hundred on those pictures, dontt you think so? A new gown for you, and a stock of champagne for mef, 148 ?CTH HEZQZZQEQ: 795 qull, at present ltd like a cigarettef said the girl. tSimmering away demurely all evening like thateitis wearing on the nerves, 1 tell you? ttI should rather think it would be for you, J aquitaf he replied with a kind of quiet sarcasm. The girl drew back offended. ttlel hate you when you talk like that, Fran? ttOh, simpering all evening has made you unduly nervous, Jaquita. Here, have one? He took a cigarette from out his battered silver case, and put it between her soarlet lips. tiHere, I will light it? He leaned over her and skillfully lit the cigarette. She sank easily down in the chair beside him and the two as they smoked together laughed long and merrily over the simplicity of the man with the bofs eyes and sensitive mouth. MARY MORSELL, 1917. Florinda the Freshman Or The Adventures of a Modern Maid Being an exact representation of a View of the higher education of our sex altogether obsolete today. Moral: There lSII,t any. It was the dawn of the great feminist movement; in fact it was nearly morning as you Will presently see. For the narrative about to be related con- cerns the adventures of a guileless maid who fared forth from the shelter of her parental home and her mothers tender care in to one of those sanctums in Vthll the lamp of learning bums most britrhtly. And why this rude severing of the bond? Why in her tender years was Florinda thus hung upon a cold and heartless college world? Gentle reader, I will tell you. Florinda wished to he emancipated! Her progenitors had, for countless generations, cooked and sewed and married, and then, need I add, cooked and sewed some more. Such was not for our heroine. The great time movement had grasped her, it had quite encompassed her and she decided to live! With this end in view she bought twelve large banners, a chafing dish, a Harrison Fisher picture, a bright red sweater and an application to Knowall College. What more could he needed? Florilula fared forth! Her parents and brothers could not leave the farm work to take her to the station, so the hired man drove her there. The spirit of freedom was beginning to touch the soul of Florinda. The dreams of her poetic nature would at last he realized. Ah! as soon as the train whistled itself into the station, she jumped onto it and sat down on a nearby seat. How her little heart fluttered? Two huge tears stood out in her big brown eyes as she thought of her mother and father and brothers who would 110w be left at home to do all of the w ork. A pitiful but willinu saCIitiee 011 the altar of the liberation of women! Liberation from the grinding degrada- tion that the tradition of the ages had imposed upon her sex! So inextricably hounded was she by her uplifting thoughts that she failed to observe the entrance 149 WCAMAW.MA3. of new passengers until she found herself the center of a group of laughing girls, all of them hugging each other. They at once started to embrace Florinda, so she felt thoroughly at home. Reader, can you guess the joyful surprise that was in store for our little friend? Yes, that is right. They were all going to Knowall College. e The journey was an eventful one. Several dashing youths from a nearby university made engagements with the girls to call the following night and to attend the next dance. Florinda felt that her first taste of college was all that could be desired. It was only three hours later that she found herself at the door of her future room. She had convinced the faculty of her proficiency in Latin and English by reciting the famous lines, ttld est tempns fugit evant erieft and, ttln the spring a young inants fancy lightly turns to thoughts of love? In mathematics she had obtained the Brilliant prize because of her solution of. the well-known prob: lem, ttlf no cat has eight tails and one cat has one more tail than no eat, 110w many tails has one cat 12:, Her heart was beating as she entered the room, for she felt that here indeed she was on the threshold of her college career. But her home-siek little soul took on new courage with the sight that met her eyes. There were at least a dozen girls in the delightfully ehaotie room and every one of them eating,r chocolate creams and fudge. They cast affectionate arms around her, greeted her cordially, and in short made her one of them. Florinda took her sweater out of her box, tied a wide red ribbon around her head, pinned 11p a banner and thus became completely adapted to her environment. Suddenly there was a rap on the door. Some one slid the candy under the bed, dumped an adjacent pack of cards into the waste basket, pushed the tennis shoes and racket under the desk and assumed an air of innocent respect. Then every one called, gCome in P, A gaunt bespec- tacled apparition of scholarly mien entered, embraced their linger tips and executed an affectionate adieu. Everyone breathed freely again. Each girl ate three pieces of fudge and five chocolate creams and became once more the ideal college girl. Florindefs wildest dreams were realized. This was real life! FRANCES TERRY, 1917. SERENADE TO CLASSES RETURNING FOR COMMENCEMENT REUNIONS. To you, dear girls returning, We sing a welcoming strain For M. D. Cfs been yearning To see you all again. Though we are younger daughters There,s just one place for alle On land and deep sea waters Alma Mater of us all. J . L. 150 KT :HEZQZWQQECZX $SHOTAND S?ELL w YIIHTI lllllllfllllll lllll ll l llllll ll :- 31 II mpmnriam QBf 1112 many gnnh thinga rut frnm thia mrtinn V by 1112 Natimml Enarh 11f Olmznrahip E a mam'm um 'W'mmv Endowment Fund Endow Students, Recitals with an audience. Lyihi Leutskcr with a pair of rubber heels. Dean Kerr with a season ticket to tho Majestic Miss McPhootors with a divtionary of nick names. Katherine Mohlrdy with conveit. Elsie Buckstatt with a hook on etiquette. Alice Gronauor with popularity. Margaret Mundic with Kowpies and other novelties. Elma Wilson and Grow Sperry with an easy system of keeping a room dean. McLai'en Hall with musical instruments. The Hits and Grinds committee with some jokes. When your grade slips are marked A and B, But the girl worth while Is the girl who can smile Tis easy enough to be pleasant When they come hack adorned with a D. 153 KT: Euawoma ?Qj M'MW' Anecdotes of Historic Notorious Characters Miss J ohustin tin Chemistry quizl : What is formed when coal gas is burned? Student: A flame. Miss Brown tin English ll : Miss Kuepper, please tell me where is found, iiA prophet is not without honor save in his own country? Gretchen Kuepper: Ahiahoahiiu J ohn, Act I, scene-I doult remember what scene. Miss Pearson tin gymnasium class when all students are lying on benches before the bar stallsl: N ow hold up your eyes and stick your tongues out. Mlle. St'arafon: We must say we ate and drank in the past indefinite. Miss Belcher to Constance Manchester 011 the discussion of the impulses of primitive peoplosl: What would you do if you got mad at me? Helen Kubeck tin a stage whisperl : Slap you! Vivian Hodgson 011 Economics Topiol : The La Follette Law requires every seanian to have a separate birth. Miss Belcher tin Sociology classl : Has anyone in the Class got tuberculosis? Taken from the Hygiene Blue Books: Kathleen Frazee: The proper way to stand is With the heels together and the feet apart. Lillian Wilding; The head should be perfectly erect and directly oyer the feet. AN EPIGKAMATIC ANECDOTE All Gretna Fetzer needs is a weather flag to be on almanac. SULPHIDIC Fritz Yockoy: 1 am not as thin as georgette cn'epe. 154 $ETLQJVEQEQ$A Characteristic Initials of Some Sophomores Ruth Falkenau, Rather Fresh. Gladys Rugglos, Good Repertoire. Elva Shields, Ever Silent. Esther Neprud, Endless Noise. Mildred Beck, Modest Brunette. Bernice Lyon, Beautiful Lungs. Ora Christianson, Orchestral Companion. Catherine Munson, Cosmetic Morsel. Marion Fox, Maybe Funny. Helen Eggers, Happy Echo. Ruth Tufts, Right There. Adelaide Cumlnins, Awful Glamor. Margaret Cummins, More Glamor. Amanda Zeisler, Agile Zephyr. J osephine Kapp, Juicy Kernel. KEEZQEEQEQm BEAUTIFUL SCENES ABOUT CAMPUS. 156 ?EHEWFQWUWDE W'Wm' For Sale or Rent My giggle: 100 an hour Dor0thy Heiss. My Latin tongue: Valuable to summer t0urists.-Grace Wilson. Two inches from my head or feet. Blanche Herman. My temper: To be had for the asking. Marj0rie Gray. Hot air for all occasions: I seem to have a monopoly. Harriet Niehaus. For Sale: Several outgrown dresses, scarcely worn. Li11ian Wilding. For sale: ShakespearHComedies. ShakespeareuTragedies. Schiller-Wilhelm Tell. ?oethe Hermann und Dorothea. 2 tickets for Pollyanna. Ethe1 McDonaldtJohnston Hall. For sale: Economics Book C0st of price, 500. Want Ads Wanted: A cure for Klondike Stare.-Gretna Fetzer. Wanted: Something more to lose.yEthel Carey. Wanted: Snap job as a janitor, by a good-natured Irishman.-BOX 54. Wanted: A little more graciousness. Ethe1 Garvin. Lost: Never to be found the point to my jokes.-G1adys Ruggles. 157 ?Cr AM-W-MA HEMLQlZVQBDIQBDEi Pfophecy What our Seniors Want to Be What they may be Lavisa Bird Louise Nelson Lucia Perry Gretna Fetzer Catherine Sparks Ethel Carey Mary Truesdell Irene Webb Marguerite Stockwell Ruth Rugland Visiting nurse Resident of Cafifornia Married Social butterfiy Private secretary to a wealthy old man Successful home maker Deaconess ' Head of a beauty parlor Settlement worker Grand opera smger Mother of ten Children Teacher of sewing at a mission school Newspaper reporter Mathematics 1 teacher in Sturgeon Bay MillineIJs model in a small department store Foreign missionary Annette Kellermafs understudy Nun President of seIf-govern- ment in an orphan asylum A physical director. mFHATb WHERE OUR SCRAPS OF LIVER GO, TO PAT MvPHEETERs? 158 A - i; Apmn or SIXES oAnuv' LONG LEGS POMMYAN N A MQ a . TH'E OTHER . suns, 20?; THE RUSSIAN BALLET SHEEGECF THEATRE ATTRACTIONS OF THE SEASON. 159 'rv Wit? This History of Ed is going to drive us all wild before we get through with it. YouIrc welcome. $1; W My name! What are you after my name for? Thank you. 1114 Take... I bet I know what you are go- ing to do. We were going to do the same thing last year. That looks terrible. Are you studying Character from hand writing? W! W WhatIs this? What,s this Cum- tux stuff? Does that suit you? I suppose itIs a good joke. W Oh-tell me what itIs for. Good writing. Ha, ha. Put Basketball under it. Q mamas? E?! A M'MW' gmtttim What ails you? Now look how terrible. While I have the op- portunity, Pm going to make a good one. Ian that beautiful? And just the way I write it, it will be put in the book. ?lmum. 7me What for? Oh, I know what itIs for, Cumtux. You dorft want it right now, do you? Oh Dear, thaths written terribly. Am I getting roped in some here? $Wg7itm, XM What for? Cumtux? Do you want the middle name? Oh, I heard that they all come and roar at you. ItIs for Cum- tux, or something. Just my full name? '7 v Am-W-M r. ZHEMLQIZVQBDSQZDX 5w? 74M 5M I suppose some fool thing in the Cumtux. QJMQGMUK I was told that Ild have to do this. I suppose we,ll see this later. W ?WEEZD- What are you doing anyway? Do you want my full nameeGen- evieve too? Do you want my ads dress, state, and county? VVhatIs this? Whatls this? Well, I will, but I wish I knew what for. Oh, for Cumtux! Well, let me write it over. There, does that look all right? mmmwg SurelyeDo you want my mid-V dle name? Youlre welcome. Oh! signatures! Well, Ild rather do it in ink. Do you think it will be all right in pencil? WW3? What for? Oh, for Cumtux. Real swell! Want it in pencil 0r ink? We almost did it last year. Just want my whole name. We did it to faculty last year. WW Say, what Cha want that, for? Some joke, Illl bet. But 1,11 tumble! Carft write very well! There, isn't that a pretty name? Now tell me what the joke is. WW What for? Some crazy stunt, huh? What characteristic do I display in my handwriting? 8M0. Dt9j; What,s the idea, huh? Oh, I think I understand. What the matter with this pen7 huh? IId like to know what all this is about. Ilve got a pretty ltig hunch. Ruth Rugland had writerls cramp and her good nature was off on a vacation when this col- lection was taken. 'THEWIWVEUE? um MVMW' QM Wm Mcme WWQ gagmw as A A msww formrmffeez Kiiiglzvfggiiym Light Occupations Waiting for a full attendance at Vespers Sunday evening. Waiting for Fritz Yockey to rEturn from Albert Hall in the evening. Trying to catch Miss Arnold with a problem in Mathematics For Vivian HodgsonhStudying. I For Louise Nelsoxi--staiidiilg on her feet when playing basketball. Having song-books ready on Singing day in chapel. For JuniorsiCleaning up the Junior-Senior room after Senior parties. For Sophomores Sending blaok-hand letters to Freshmen. b to be congenial with the Juniors. Attending Community Meetings. Boiling water to wash radishes and lettuce during the typhoid epidemic. tSuggcsted by Miss SabinJ For Mcl'iaren Hall Sophomoreghprepari11g for Prom tpreparations meaning cold cream and cocoa butter steadily applich. Ambition Our Faculty advises strongly That we take ttAmbition Pills? :3 For, our time we. use so wrongly, And theykl cure oh! many ills. For as Spring tomes, they are worried That our lessons Will just drag, And to blame them wotre not hurried For at study we do lag". Now in this quality, Ambition, Some of us pull but a D, And in June wdll fool contrition-v Calft believe it? Wait and see! it If interested, see Miss J ohnstin. 163 CF Am-WAMA HE 1917 CUMTU m'mW' 164 Kiiijgigifgli K $8 7915' 165 CT: H Ewawmio 2'95 M'WW' A CHAPMAN HALL !W m a VOGEL HALL 166 'K'CEEZQEZQEQE The Seminary The Seminary is an NInstitutionH of Learning. Now, llLearningli is a gerund, that is, a verb used as a noun. As a verb it asserts actioneit hustles to learn things. That is why it gazes so earnestly across Hartford Avenue. It is in the act of Learn- ing. As a noun it names something. It names what the Seminary is full of. It is full of Learning. Of course, during vacations it is only full of furniture, pictures, and canned fruit, all of which goes to show that Learning enters with the Faculty in September; and the asserted action of Learning, with us angel Children. Alfred Tennyson, James Lowell, and most of us, started our education with Latin. Thats the only way to start. If you want to study cookery or anything else, you will encounter such things as nutriment, fructose, and radishes. There is your Latin. And then, at the end of the course tin Latini Nliss Ferris lets you serve the upper Classmen With a Roman dinner. Now all studying in the Seminary is done in Eng- t lish,eexcept what is done in French and German. In ' this, we are strictly neutral. English runs through the entire course of four years. It slows up, however, on punctuation and capitalization. tSee Woolley,s Mo- chzmics of lVrz-tingj l Nlathematics is given in two courses,ellThe l Theory of Mathematics," and iiAppliCd NIathematicsf, l The first is given by l lSS Tainsh in Room 3 from i 1:45 A. M. until 5:30 P. M.sone-half hour off at noon. The second is a competitive course given by the wealth of our desires competing With the poverty of our exchequers. Exercises are given in class Hnance With banquet accounts, fourth year party accounts, and the class gift. The science work is done in labora- tories, and consists of experiment with things known, and research for things unknown. Practical use is made of this course in reading weather bulletins; freezing ice-cream, boiling water, classi- fying plants and animals by their symp- toms, explaining allusions in literature, and proving on all occasions that the l 167 TCT: HEIQZTQEEQ student and faculty re- citals; by the tri- weekly choral practice of two hundred voices in one chapel; or by symphony orchestra concerts down in the big city. Our histrionic abili- ty finds expression in a series of theatrical per- formances. The stars of the troupe are the Charming Anita Lasche; the noble hero, Agnes Pfeffer; and the Villain, Marion Bulla- course of everything is determined by its phy- siographic conditions. The Seminary pro- vides an excellent course in music appre- ciation in the form of exquisite strains of ensemble practice from some twenty or thirty pianOS in Albert Hall, with an occasional vio- lin or a sweet out- burst of eukalelis. When this ceases, there is an awful stillness, broken by intermittent more. The ideals of the stage are rising. We are gradually edu- cating the public; after seeing our company, they demand high Class work from the down- town theatres. The Art apprecia- tion course is given to such virtuosos as Hope Hawley, and metal- smiths like Erna Tros- tel, while the rest of us look at their master- pieces with profound 168 'r v Am;WAMAj awe and admiration; and we follow these Pied Pipers to their shrines in the art galleries of the big city. Here endeth the resume of work. Now let us bring forth our playe which, by elimination includes every- thing that is not work. We sleep at night, except when we have a previous engagement, or an examination the next day. We also sleep at such odd mo- ments as when certain people are recit- ing, after the rising-bell in the morn- ing, and over Certain books. Our meals are served in a diningAroom, or in our own rooms 05c extral. Sometimes they are served in banquets accompanied by toasted infant oratory. Some times meals are served on the shores of Lake NIichigan around the camp-fire. Our social life consists of formal receptions given by President Sabin and Dean Rodman; informal teas, and evenings llAt Homeh given by the Social Service Club; birthday and psuedo-birthday parties on Friday nights; dances and cotillions, formal and informal, in masque and fancy dress or in shirt-waist dresses. Our more rugged social life takes the form of long hikes over the hills and vales of the surrounding country, tennis, hockey, baseball, basketball, and bowl- ing jousts, Skating, and coasting; all of which give us beautiful and natural pink cheeks. And ah me! the seraphic serenity is broken for a space bye-a tooth-acht. mumps singly or in pairs, lost voice, or sham head-ache-each of which is cursed in the folds of the Infirmary, and work and play move on. The Seminary is not a finishing school, for no one of us is allowed to take a nap on the idea that she is Hfinished.H If she dare attempt such a thing, she is brusquely jogged on her way by the cry for "more, more, more work, more study, more exer- cise, more spirit, more courtesy, more generosity," and always by the cry, "Sit Lux." 169 'V "FHEWW: AcUEVfDEm mwmm' Fourth Year Class Marie. AdlerehShe turns and winds 3 flery Pegasus." Marie Anderson-Together we stand, divided we fall. Mary Ball-Cor unum, via una. 'Elaine EschweilereAnd then-ashe giggled! Dorothy Brown-Speaking of the smiles that never fade! Lucille EvanseSero sed serio. Frances BrowneBonne et belle assez. Constance Chase-The goddess of the chase. Marion Cormor-Veni, vidi, Vici. . V Mi1d1jed DeW'OlfeDelivered at the Seminary done up in a band box every day-at any tlme. - Ursula DunhameThe Music Master. Clara Edwards-Sewing sufficeth this silent siren. Hiznhrfh Credecepandide et constanter. Marie Froehlich--Our idea of a good, all-round athlete. Louise GoffeAudaciter et sincere. Ethel GoldbergeSweet and low. Josephine JewelleHer name betrays her. Margaret Jung-Orator and dramatic star. Ruth HayeseEager for information. Mildred Kahn-A fashion model from Eau Claire. Julia KelloggeA lot of fun she ise-amiable and docile. Pnnstancc Kennan-The silent wise man. Katharine Lindsay-Still waters run deep. Marie Kletzsch-Strictly neutral! Gertrude KuetemeyerePardon me! But I have the best joke to tell you. Leona KurtheA violet in a shady nook. Rose Lipman-The sun strikes her hair and it turns to gold. Margaret LogemaneA gurgling, sparkling brook. Catharine McHie-Our sainted sinner. Erna Mayeremfhrow physics to the dogs! 1,11 none of it." Florence MuellereA delicate sweet smile, and a soft sweet voice. Agnes Pfeffer-9970-and a good fellow everywhere. Mildred Porter-Everywhere we hear them calling, hPorterW Is this a Pullman? Helen Read-Ut apes geometriam. Anna ReedeFirst in war, first in peace, and Hrst one here in the morning. Margaret Scott-The most amiable. Dorothy Seaton-Some are weather-wise and some are otherwise. Ella ShureeGot your Math? Shure. And she,s so conscientious. Gretchen Strass-A comfortable sort of person. Ilse TrosteleAa bit of Dresden china. Caroline UphameLove me, love my dog-and my horse, too. Alberta Spaar-A mighty one of valour. 170 a AMAW1-LM 'r'. waggvggmym O GANI ZAT ONS Fourth Year 01533 President .............. ANNA REED Vice-Prosident ..... URSULA DUNHAM Secretary .............. NIARY BALL Treasurer ......... MARIE KLETZSCH Third Year Class President ............ ANITA LASHIE Vice-President ..... LILLIAN HARMON Secretary ........... ERMA SICHLING Treasurer ............ FRANCES HITZ Second Year Class President ...... VIVIAN ' REINEHTSON Vice-Prcsident ....... NORMA STRAAS Secretary .DOROTIIY S'x'lmla'rER Treasurer .......... qumam STUART First Year Class President .. . . .MAlmAuET EM MENLJNG Vice-Prosident ..... MILDRED Usmxn Secretary ........... HELENA. KEARN Treasurer ......... KATHARINE LONG A HI letz'c A ssocialion, President ........ MARIE FROEIILICH Sect.-Trcas ...... CONSTANCE KENNAN Special mass President ....... CATHARINE D. LONG Vice-President ........ MAE DICKSON Secretary ......... FRANCES LATIMER Treasurer ........... HOPE HAWLEY Social Service Club President ......... DOROTHY SEATON Vice-President ...... MARIAN CONNOR Sedretary .......... MILDRED PORTER Treasurer ......... MARGARET SCOTT Consumm? League President .............. MARY BALL VicmPresident ..... MARIE KLETZSUH Secretary ............ ERNA TROSTEL Treasurer ........ MARIE ANDERSON French Wub Director ............. NIISS ROBBINS German Club Directors ........... MISS SCHIRMER and MISS STARK 'CT 6 EWFQEAEUW? um Mvmmv Kiawawatm g9; M'Wm' Our Battlements The purpose of the high battlemented towers in the northeastern part of Mil- waukee is often a subject of speculation among strangers. One opinion is that they are merely for decoration; another that they are fortifications to defend the eity against pirate ships on Lake Miehigan. Their real purpose as we all know is for the protection of the young girls in our school. But why is our school fortified? Have you ever asked this question of yourself 0r of one of the faculty, and have you ever realized that the founders of our school were believers in the doctrine of ttpreparednes? long before Mr. Wilson? Our defense is .very important and 0111' enemies our often harder to cope with than those of the nation beeanse their methods of attack are so peculiar. Our special fee is lgnoranee. No deseription of any mythological monster. however horrible, eould compare with this terrible creature. He slips in slowly and 1111abtr11sively and though from our look-out towers we are ever on the watch, he sometimes penetrates into the innermost parts of our institution. Oeeasionallv he stays in hiding for quite a while, but like murder, Ignorance will out. How indeed could his presence be long a secret with shells such as tTolumbus diseovered Ameriea in 1650tt or ttAn adverb is something that comes after a veer and many others exploding daily before our very eyes. For a long time we seemed unable to keep out Idleness either by force or strategy. We finally diseovered it to be in the air like ttspring fevertt and eoneeived the brilliant idea of using; the very popular European gas bombs to defend ourselves. Thus it is proved that while our fortifications look medieval, our methods are modern. Disorder, another foe, eomes upon 11s suddenly, or probably we only fail to realize its presence until some very opportune moment sneh as an unexpected visit from a member of the faculty. Then 11111011 to our embarrassment we realize that our forces are seatteretl and no warring ot' swords can rally them. Our feet heinqr entangled in hidden snares, and in whichever direction we turn we find a debachment ot' Diserderts treons waiting to throw us into confusion. There has also been much trouble to overcome the enemy Disease, or Epi- demic. Kins: Contagion aml Conunander Carelessness have been quite successful m holding Fort Grippe. By a very clever strategic movement they have been able to poison the water which is sent to us through underground passages. Our soldiers, thinkingr themselves safe from things of this sort, behind their firm battlements have partaken freely ot the water much to their discomfort. How- ever, as the soldiers in Europe use, a kind of helmet to protect themselves against ens bombs, we have been resened from these poisoned waters by the use of spring water. In spite of this aeeount of the ernelties 0f the enemy, Sickness, we are obliged to admit that their hosts are very religious for they never fail to be drawn 11D in battle array every Sunday morning at ehnreh time. We have other toes assailing o11r fortress, some more formidable than any we have mentioned. Some are as old as life itself; some spring: so suddenly into existence that we are taken unawares and well-nigh vanquished. But on our towers pace the vartlers looking far and near for toes, while down below in the keep. the eo11rts, and the halls, goes 011 the preparation of weapons of defense: knowledge, e11lt11re. industry, and self control. Thus, you see that the battle- ments over which there have been so many speculations are of Vital importance in the lives of our five hundred cadets. A. P. 173 ,, Temptations - I, J ane Green, 011 J anuary the twenty-fifth of the year of our Lord, nineteen hundred and sixteen, verily do say that being a boarder at Milwaukee'-Dowuer Seminary is very fine, but the temptations you have to suffer are not few and far between. They are many and close together. . When awakened by the rising hell, you say to yourself, ttOh, couldift I stay in bed just a little longer 2w . Then perhaps you think, ttMayhe if 1 donit wash my neck and ears this morning, 1 could lie here just a few minutes more? But you remember some algebrathat has to be made up, and jump out of bed. ' On finishing your breakfast and going'out into the hall, you come upon a small group of your friends who call you over and then ask you to join their spread which is to take place at ten-thirty that eveninu. They alsovask you to bring:r potato salad, but you are trying to live up to some standard your forefathers made, and you answer, iiSince my allowauve has run out for this month I shall have to say no, as much as 1 would like to go? . Then, after studying hard all day, you drag your weary self out for a walk. Downer Avenue has the most wonderful tempting array of stores that you have ever seenanot that you are a widely traveled personeperhaps you have been only in Indiana, Illinois, and Michigan, but any hungry school girl would say that Downer Avenue is a street of temptation. 011 going by a drug store you imagine yourself inside seated at a small round table, consuming a double hot fudge marshmallow nut sundae. Some one comes along and dares you to go in with her, but you suddenly remember a very important engagement and rush down the street at a mad pace. On the southeast corner of Downer Avenue and Belleview Place stands the greatest temptation of alleThe Downerea timovie? You stop a minute to scan 'the bill-boards labeled tiTo-Daytt in Haring red letters, You lose all consciousness of your surroundings laud imagine yourself gazing at ten reels of fascinating iilm. Perhaps you think you see Charlie Chaplin cutting comic capers, or else some dark fearsome Villain stalking about. Or perhaps it is Mary Pickford in itFauehon the Cricketh whom you see. Then you come to life with a start, realizing that it is not quite the proper thing for girls to stand in front of itmoviesti You saunter back to school, half wishing:r some one had dared you to go in With her. 011 returning, you find your roomemato dancing 3 wild tango up and down the hall and calling for you to be her partner, but you answer with a KtNo, thank you? which would make William J eunings Bryan jealous. Then you saunter off to your room and study until ttSecond Winksf and then roll into bed only to dream of the fun you would be having if you were at home. J. S. tA First Yeary. 174 iHE:ngVQQEEBm- Cumtux Board Editor-in-Chief ........................................ GRACE HAMMELTON Business Manager ................ . ....................... ESTHER REIMERS Faculty Adviser ....................... s ............ . ....... MISS BELCHER- COMMITTEES LITERARY. Jean Leavens, Chairman . Esther Peter Dorothy Fish Frances Terry J essie Mabbott Ada Porter Eliiabefh Schroeder Mary Morsell CALENDAR Helen Kermott, Chairman Alta Hansen Esther Cady Margaret Mundie Glenn Miller ART Pearl Davis, Chairman Della Staples ORGANIZATI ONS Constance Manchester, Chairman Edna Hihbert Alfreda Clark Eleanor Hatton Kathryn Skinner Ellen Sattre CUTS AND GRINDS Dorothy Ledgerwood, Chairman Frances McGovern Frederica Yockey Mildred Wright Gladys MacDonald Grace Wilson Edna Du Four CAMERA Elsie Corliss, Chairman Mildred Thompson Linda Countryman . Helen Kubeck Ethel McDonald Carolyn Coulee KEELEZQZZQEEE


Suggestions in the Milwaukee Downer College - Cumtux Yearbook (Milwaukee, WI) collection:

Milwaukee Downer College - Cumtux Yearbook (Milwaukee, WI) online yearbook collection, 1910 Edition, Page 1

1910

Milwaukee Downer College - Cumtux Yearbook (Milwaukee, WI) online yearbook collection, 1911 Edition, Page 1

1911

Milwaukee Downer College - Cumtux Yearbook (Milwaukee, WI) online yearbook collection, 1926 Edition, Page 1

1926

Milwaukee Downer College - Cumtux Yearbook (Milwaukee, WI) online yearbook collection, 1930 Edition, Page 1

1930

Milwaukee Downer College - Cumtux Yearbook (Milwaukee, WI) online yearbook collection, 1932 Edition, Page 1

1932

Milwaukee Downer College - Cumtux Yearbook (Milwaukee, WI) online yearbook collection, 1935 Edition, Page 1

1935

1985 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1970 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1972 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1965 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals
FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
Are you trying to find old school friends, old classmates, fellow servicemen or shipmates? Do you want to see past girlfriends or boyfriends? Relive homecoming, prom, graduation, and other moments on campus captured in yearbook pictures. Revisit your fraternity or sorority and see familiar places. See members of old school clubs and relive old times. Start your search today! Looking for old family members and relatives? Do you want to find pictures of parents or grandparents when they were in school? Want to find out what hairstyle was popular in the 1920s? E-Yearbook.com has a wealth of genealogy information spanning over a century for many schools with full text search. Use our online Genealogy Resource to uncover history quickly! Are you planning a reunion and need assistance? E-Yearbook.com can help you with scanning and providing access to yearbook images for promotional materials and activities. We can provide you with an electronic version of your yearbook that can assist you with reunion planning. E-Yearbook.com will also publish the yearbook images online for people to share and enjoy.