Millersville University - Touchstone Yearbook (Millersville, PA)

 - Class of 1950

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Millersville University - Touchstone Yearbook (Millersville, PA) online yearbook collection, 1950 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 136 of the 1950 volume:

OFFiejfTHE 111 ' W 1950 PUBLISHED BY THE SENIOR CLASS! HT I TOUCHSTONE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE MILLERSVILLE, PENNSYLVANIADEDICATED TO THE TEACHING PROFESSION Four years of teacher preparation: Do we know now why we want to teach? Before entering the profession we should be clear in our thinking. What do we expect from teaching? What arc we willing to give in return? Teaching means preparing youth for a place in his world, not ours, by observing constant changes and attempting to see the youth's world as he secs it. Is there another profession so tuned to progress, forward living and thinking? From teaching comes an enriched family life, free time to develop interests and leadership, constructive and creative work with young people, an easy access to self improvement and worthwhile associations both professional and social. No other type of work offers this combination of opportunities found in education. With these our sincere beliefs, we humbly dedicate this record book to our chosen profession, a direct path to a full and creative life. cltdl ten to comeADMINISTRATION ♦ s JItc yzinXstone can te urn the axe Jtazy, Lt the axe lIacI"j[ must do tlte cut tiny OUR PRESIDENT To the class of 1950: Among the most cherished of man's possessions are his memories. Time and circumstance work startling changes, separate the dearest of friends, and conspire to lead us into strange places. Despite the best in-tentioned plans the associations formed during college years slowly but surely grow dimmer with the passage of time until they come to live only in memory. This book will be your one best means of keeping alive in your garden of memories the voices and the faces of those who today are your constant companions, your closest friends, your trusted counselors. Its value will increase with the lengthening of the years. To the graduates of 19 0, your friends at Millcrsvillc offer warm congratulations and follow you with every good wish for happiness and success wherever you may go. D. L. BlF.Mn.SDF.RFER Pres i Jen IOUR DEANS SANDERS P. McCOMSEY Dean of Instruction RUBY BOGGS Dean of Women DR. CLYDE S. STINE Dean of Men OUR GEORGE R. ANDERSON, A M. Mathematics Director—Band HARRY M. BASSLER, M.A. Geography, Advisor— Basslcr Geographic Society DR. VIRGINIA BECK, PhD. History, Advisor— Social Studies Club G. FREDERICK BECKMYER, M S. Physical Science DR. WILMER C. BERG, Ed.D. Psychology RICHARD W. BISHOP, M.Ed. Health and Physical Education, Safety Education Basketball and Baseball Coach DR LEE E. BOYER, Ed.D. Mathematics—Mu Kappa Mu MAE G. H. BRENEMAN. A M. Geography, Advisor— Normal Literary Society DR. MARY A. BRIGHTBILL, Ph D. English WILLIAM H. CAULWELL, M.S. Biological Science Advisor—Roddy Scientific Society, Page Literary Society ANTHONY V. CHAMPA, M.A. History and Physical Science Advisor—Social Studies Club MARY ELIZABETH DIXON. M.Ed. Health and Physical Education Advisor—Cheerleaders, Girls' Varsity ClubFACULTY DR. DEAN DUTCHER, Ph.D. Social Science WILLIAM H. DUNCAN. M.Ed. Educational Supervisor—Junior High School Social Studies Advisor—Future Teachers of America. Normal Literary Society JOHN A. FISCHER, M S. Health and Physical Education, Mathematics. Football Couch PAUL ESHELMAN. A M. Industrial Arts, Advisor— Alpha Phi Omega Iota l.amhda Sigma DR. ARTHUR R. GERHART. Ph.D. Natural Science HELEN A. GANSER Director of Library Training Advisor—Library Science Club SAMUEL S. HARNISH Supervisor—Training School Music Director of College Orchestra KATHERINE E. GRIFFITH. M S. Health and Physical Education Advisor—Girls' Varsity Club. Women's Day Student Association HENRY J. KAUFFMAN. M S. Industrial Arts Department LOUIS C. JENNINGS. A M. English Advisor—SNAPPER GEORGE E. LEFFINGWELL, A M. Physics I JAMES E. KOKEN, A M. ChemistryOUR ESTHER E. LENHARDT, A M. Speech Advisor—Page Literary Society, Citamard, Lutheran Club DR. I.YNWOOD S. LINGENFELTER, Ed.D., Ph.D. English Advisor—English Club, Publicity Committee ALVIN F. McCANN, M.S. Biological and Applied Science CORAL MELSON, MS. Assistant Librarian MABEL L. MOBERG, M.A. Education Supervisor, Second Grade URBAN L. MONICAL, A M. Industrial Arts Supervisor, Junior High School Industrial Arts DR C. MAXWELL MYERS, Ph D. History Alpha Phi Omega DR. BURL N. OSBURN, Ph.D. Director, Industrial Arts Advisor—Industrial Arts Society NORMAN C. PENDERED, M.Ed. Industrial Arts MELZER R. PORTER, M.Mus. Music Director, College Choir ETHEL JANE POWELL, A M. History, Principal of Junior High School Advisor—Student Christian Association JOHN A. PUCILLO, A M. Health and Physical Education Athletic Director. Advisor—Varsity Cluh Chairman, Finance Committee Q t FACULTY DR. PAUL Z. RUMMEL, Ph D. Visual Education and Guidance Chairman, Guidance Committee 4 f I DR. EUGENE K. ROBB. Ed.D. Education and Psychology REBEKAH S. SHEAFFER, A M. Speech, English; Supervisor, Junior High School English Dramatic Coach. Citamard THEODORE H. RUPP, M.A. Romance Languages Wrestling Coach MRS. JANE GRAY SMITH, M.Ed. Assistant Librarian in charge of Laboratory School Library; Library Science courses MR. JOHN B. SHENK, M S. Industrial Arts, Advisor— Phi Sigma Pi, Radio Association MARION SPENCER, A M. English EMILY H. SNYDER. A M. English, Foreign Languages MARGARET SWIFT, M.A. Art DR. MARK E. STINE. Ph.D. Education and Psychology MR. CLIFFORD L. YARD. M.A. Industrial Arts JOSEPH TORCHIA, M.Ed. Education, Advisor— Future Teachers of America; Men’s Day Student AssociationOUR SUPERVISORS JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL Sealed left to right:—Mrs. Mac Brcnc-man, Geography; Echcl Jane Powell, Principal; E. R. Gress, Mathematics and Science. Standing:—Robert Duffey, English; Samuel Harnish, Music; Rcbekah Shacffer, English; Mr. Rothc. Science; Steve A. Namit, Physical Education and Mathematics. Sealed left to right:—Lillian V. Mast-rotto, First Grade; Betty R. Jennings, Kindergarten; Anna E. Beyer, Third Grade; Jane K. Rothc. Fourth Grade. Standing left to right:—Joseph Torch-ia. Sixth Grade; Elizabeth M. Jenkins, First Grade; Elbcrta Councilman, Fifth Grade; Miss Dresher, Third Grade.- 9 OUR STAFF HARRY C. SYMONS Business Manager and Agent, Department of Revenue SAMUEL B. STAYER Director, Student Tcaching, Laboratory School; Teacher Placement Service, h •! JAMES NORRIS Accountant MRS. CLARA M. STRASBURGER Women’s Dormitory Supervisor MRS. BARBARA DESMOND, R.N. School Nurse i EDNA N. KLINE DieticianSENIORSSENIOR CLASS The Senior Class Officers from left to right arc: Vice-President, Joseph Seitz; President, Dale Miller; Secretary, Mary Workman; Treasurer, Glenna Eshclman. gj-lu mile 1 ['tjaycx 0. Jlfs 2 tm I In.sonmled c ea The port of graduation—we drop anchor at last; and as wc do so, wc pause a moment to think what college has meant to us. Four years! They seemed a bewildering eternity to four hundred confused freshmen poised on the brink of our chosen journey on the sea of college experience. Even more bewildering was our first introduction to this college life—initiation! But those days of square meals, sun dial prostrations, and that insufferable regalia were not to last forever. Smoother sailing lay ahead. To steer our course mid the treacherous waters of freshman Jays, we chose Laird Robertson, Doc Savage, Penny Shepherd. and Chuck Benshetlcr. There was the excitement of our first big college football games, pep rallies, ana Homecoming Day. College dances beckoned us, and even we frosh executed our own dance, "The Harvest Hop," rustic in theme and decorations, and rollicking in atmosphere. May Day brought us the color and spirit of the Mardi Gras—indeed, the glamour that we had hoped and dreamed we should find at college. Inevitably, and less glamorously, the close of the year brought us also our first college finals, an experience we hesitate to describe. Sad we were to see that first year draw to a close. Three years! They seemed to prophesy much hap-pincss, for we were now orientated to college life and eager to make the most of the journey undertaken but a year before. Captained by Walt Ullrich, Chuck Bcnshetler, Mary Workman, and Arlene Snyder, we set sail for sophomore joys. How important we felt as we watched the lowly frosh suffer the agonies of initiation! How eagerly we joined in helping them to feel its most poignant elements! Our first orientation to our chosen profession awaited us in this year, the indescribable ecstacies of playground duty. Never shall wc fail to recall the five minute lunches and perpetual indigestion that accompanied it. Two years! Where did they go? With Jim Quack-enbush, Hank Freeman, Betsy Anncsley. and Ray Dunlap at the helm, we set forth upon the third lap of our travels. This year brought us joys that were not only academic in nature. Who could forget the night when Daisy Mac descended into our midst with Li'l Abner in tow, all because Sadie Hawkins Day had given the fair sex that glorious opportunity of annexing the man of her choice for a gala evening in Lower Slobbovia? Who could forget that great night when our wrestlers became state champions? Do you remember the Junior Prom ? One year—it seemed unbelievable that one year only lay before us. We caught ourselves nostalgically wishing, even as we looked forward to graduation, that we might begin our trip all over 3gain. We called upon Dale Miller, Joe Seitz, Mary Workman, and Glenna Eshlcman to pilot us to our journey's end and entrusted to Dave Davis the responsibility of compiling the events enshrined in our ship's log within the pages of the TOUCHSTONE. Wc knew the thrill that glows behind the footlights as we joined a bewildered Belinda in her adventures at "Ramshackle Inn.” To Miss Lenhardt we raise our hands in salute for guiding the cast to a successful performance. Wc experienced again the festive joys of May Day—the "Big Time." All too soon the arrival of announcements, caps and gowns, and those final finals told us that the end was near. Our Senior Prom brought us to the crest of social happiness. And now it has come—graduation day. We drop anchor at the end of our journey realizing that this is not an end, but a beginning. For a new- voyage begins tomorrow, a voyage upon the sea of life. It is our hope that as we embark upon it, we may lift anchor again with proper attitudes and sufficient knowledge to say with conviction, "We are ready—full speed ahead!"SENIOR CLASS ADVISORS Miss Katherine Griffith Mr. John B. Shenk Four years in college pass swiftly. An incoming class develops into the graduating group before we are fully aware of the great wealth of personalities involved. Friendships are formed that enrich daily living, and many created here will continue far into the future, despite time and distance. Many different kinds of young people are brought together on a college campus. The healthy exchange of ideas, wholesome personal contacts, participation in dramatic, musical, and athletic activities, and the enrichment of experiences on social, spiritual, scientific, and professional levels tend to develop balanced people who can occupy worthy positions in a democratic society. We, your class advisors, thank you for the pleasant classroom and campus activities you permitted us to enjoy with you. Serving as teachers of interested and interesting students is an enjoyable experience. Participating with them in appropriate out-of-class programs is a pleasure. We sincerely hope that you profited immeasurably by your college career. We wish you the maximum of success as active, interested, and thinking teachers in your respective fields, and as liberal minded, democratically inclined citizens of your country and of the world. May you take with you and spread to your students and others with whom you come in contact those lessons of freedom, responsibility, equality, and understanding you had the opportunity to learn from the personnel and program of this college.JAY A. ADAMS Secondary Lancaster . . . Married . . . day student from N. Queen St... . faithful Pageitc . . . has attractive wife named Janet waiting at home . . . veteran . . . will he glad to graduate and actually get out and teach, enough of this practice teaching ! ! ! NELSON D. ADAMS Secondary Crum Lynne . . . Nel . . . played football three years . . . Pageitc . . . active member of Bassler Geographic Society . . . Roddy Scientific Society . . . Phi Sigma Pi Fraternity . . . another Coffee Shopian . . . he makes the gals sigh ... active in campus organizations ... member of the Varsity Club . . . knows his geography . . . veteran . . . may be found hunting "bugs” or on lengthy field trips . . . personality plus . . . Mr. Bassler's pride and joy. .. . ELIZABETH ANNESLEY Elementary Philadelphia . . . Betsy . . . blond hair and brown eyes . . . her clothes from the pages of fashion . . . "guarded" action on basketball court . . . enthusiastic Girls' Varsity Club member . . . in addition contributes talents to FTA and Normal . . . shows mercy on helpless offenders as Welfare member.. . . "Oh! to be in England, France, Switzerland, Italy” . . . one of the "Smoker" bridge experts . . . spare moments at the Coffee Shop . . . graduate work at Penn.... MARGARET E. ARMS Elementary Lancaster . • • • • • baby faced Varsity Sweetheart . . . an ideal football rooter ... a Citamardite . . . responsible for the success of many college dances . .. member of Primary Club ... Junior Class Social Committee . .. lucky victim of campus romance . .. accelerated to graduate with Frank . . . big brown eyes . . . avid Pageitc . . . hopes to take "the big leap" soon . . . cute pug nose and sweet smile . . . always willing to lend a helping hand. . . . FRANK AUXER Secondary Etters . . . Refuses to reveal middle name ... always ready to laugh . . . loves the jokes his "kids" in training school tell him . . . graduated in January with major in geography . . . returned to get certified in elementary . . . considers lesson plans a curse to mankind . . . vice-president of Normal . . . VP of FT A . . . Bassler Geographic Society . . . smart man in politics . . . staunch Republican’. . . attended Luth-eran Students conference at Indiana State Teachers College. . . . » MRS. LELA D. BAGWELL ■ ■ Elementary Lancaster . . . Mrs. Bagwell . . . effervescent . . . from "the deep South" . . . cute drawl . . . commutes in familiar Chrysler daily . . . experienced teacher . . . loves children and enjoyed practice teaching under Miss Jenkins ... to be admired for her return to college . . . has son in high school . . . kids in training school worshipped her . . . Pageitc . . . active in Primary Club . . . member of P.T.A. . . . carries unforgettable briefcase . . . sincere . . . serious in her studies. . . . EARL WILLIAM BENEVIT Industrial Arts Reading . . . Hard working member of Industrial Arts Theatre C lub . . Lutheran Student Association proxy ... on Student Christian Assoc. Cabinet . . . Industrial Arts Society . . . married . . . Mu Kappa Mu . . . Pageite . . . President, Alpha Phi Omega . . . Iota Lambda Sigma . . . good student . . . veteran . . . friendly and well-liked by everyone . . . showed special interest in religious organizations . . . contributed much to their welfare. . . . ROBERT V. BENSON Industrial Arts Chester . . . Bob . . . one of the famous Chester boys . . . . . . married . . . lives in Recitation Hail . . . played football for M.S.T.C. in freshman year . . . vice-president of lota Lambda Sigma fraternity . . . manager of Men's Canteen (a huge task) ... Industrial Arts Society member . . . Navy veteran. . .. MRS. NANCY O. BERGMAN Elementary East Prospect . . . Nancy . . . sweet, quiet, and serious . . . left girls' dorm last year to enter her new home in the married couple's quarters . . . accelerated in order to graduate with husband . . . cool, calm, and collected on all occasions . . . Primary Club . . . her aquarium" a masterpiece . . . loves children . . . willowy and dark . . . will make a good elementary teacher. .. studious. .. . ROBERT C. BERGMAN Industrial Arts Manheim . . . Bob . .. married campus sweetheart and living in Recitation Hall now ... a faithful Normalite . . . math minor . . . member of Mu Kappa Mu . . . Industrial Arts Society . . quiet, unassuming, friendly . . . hard worker . . . nature-loving member of Rod and Gun Club . . . took "the big step” just last summer . . . Bob and Nancy . . . look-alikes . . . helped in making Normal Receptions successful. . . .RICHARD M. BRADLEY Industrial Arts Manhcim . . . Married . . . fellow M.S.T.C. student served as Cupid through introducing Hick to wife . . . May graduate . . . got Senior Life Saving while at M.S.T.C. . . . English minor . . . attended summer sessions... . LEVERE A. BREIGHNER Industrial Arts l.ittlestoun . . . One of the thirty-four seniors who received sheepskins in January . . . spent many an evening in the chapel working for the Theatre Arts Club, or the unsung heroes" . . . has lota Lambda Sigma Fraternity to his credit... . RUSSELL P. BROMMER Industrial Arts Pine Grove . . . Married . . . day student . . . veteran . . . transferred from Penn State to MSTC . . . Pageite . . . Industrial Arts Society . . . lived in Recitation Hall with wife . . . admirable . . . quiet, and another hardworking fellow . . . pleasing personality and famous ' Dutchy" accent . . . one of those who enjoyed his graphic arts course? . HARMON F. BROWN Industrial Arts Oxford . . . Brownie" . . . talented member of Theatre Arts Club . . . Industrial Arts Society . . . Square and C ompass Club . . . was male half of romance in the senior play. Ramshackle Inn” . . . member of F T.A . , Bassler Geographic Society . . Renee's shadow . . . just barely survived his teaching experiences at the Boys' Club . . . Normal ite. . . . PATRICIA A. BUCKIUS Elementary Lancaster . . . Pat . . tall, very attractive, and intelligent . . . engaged to F. M. student . . . has the longest eyelashes on campus . . . Janie's companion . . . sweet and pleasing personality . . . Normalite . . . Newman Club ... in day student government . . . on W.D.S.A. Welfare and Equity . . . collecting silverware and saving for that "big day" . . . won't marry for a few years . . . notebook doodler . . . a good catch for John Powers Modeling School.. .. » I GEORGE R. BURKHOLDER • v » . Secondary Lebanon . . . His car's always ready to go ... a whiz in history . . . claims he'll never forget summer school . . . Pageite ... in newly organized M.S.T.C. Radio Association . . . Basslcr Geographic Society ... always a smile . . . generous, friendly, popular . . . F.T.A. . . hero of summer softball games . . . nothing irks him . . . an all-round fellow . . . Joe and Frank's buddy . . . claims that brother owns the Lancaster stock yards. . . . CAROLYN R. BYROD Elementary Steeiton . . . The brains behind the Hallowe'en antics of the girls of the Senior Class, and the perfect Mr. Porter . . . card shark of the first order . . . dewy arc her eyes and Dewey were her walls . . . has now limited her political ambitions to cheering for the Harrisburg Senators . . . Steeiton bound every weekend, where she adds to her ever-increasing collection of record platters . . . sincerely hoping she will learn the gentle art of knitting before argyles go out of style.. . . MRS. RUTH E. CARMITCHELL Elementary Lancaster . . . January graduate . . . experienced teacher . . . commutes from Lancaster . . . can't afford time to participate in extracurricular activities . . . serious-minded . . . tries to get as much as possible out of every course. . . . KENNETH D. CHILD Industrial Arts Lincaster . . . Kenny . . . Normalite . . . member of Student Council for two years . . . light blonde hair . . . Industrial Arts Society member . . . math minor . . . Mu Kappa Mu . . . Future Teachers of America . . . active in M.D.S.A. . . . quiet, studious . . . always waiting for a bus . . . one of Mr. Shenk's boys—a second young Tom Edison. . . . J. FREELAND CHRYST Industrial Arts luincaster . . . Smoothie . . . what a line ... a terrific guard on the gridiron . . . three years in the Varsity Club ... a female talent scout once came to Dr. Osburn’s office looking for him . . . member of Page Literary Society . . . half of the Geiger-Chryst "make 'em swoon-’ club. . . .ESTHER D. CLAY Secondary Myerstou-n ... A heap of fun . . gets a big charge out of anything funny . . . made Delta Phi Eta Sorority . . . one of Mr. Anderson's protegees in the band . . . music chairman of Student Christian Association . . . lets herself go in Citamard . . . plays on the jayvec basketball team . . . one of the dutchmen from the Lebanon hills. . . took part in the senior play, "Ramshackle Inn.” . . . WILLIAM J. CONNER Secondary Crum Lynne . . . "Bucky" . . . Leap Year baby . . . sporting a Toni . . . distinctive dresser, with a passion for bow tics . . . charter member of the campus wrecking crew—a heartbreaker, that is . . . important cog in the football machine, where his teamwork w3s terrific . . . Varsity Club member with an avid interest in all sports, though football is his "first love" . . . the Varsity limp . . . great pals with "Ma" Brcncman . . . brought to M.S.T.C his high school motto, "If there's trouble, get into it; if there isn't, make some." . . . HAROLD CORNISH Secondary Crum Lynne . . . "Harry" . .. quiet, studious sort of a fellow .. . marks good enough to rate Phi Sigma Pi ... on Pa. Council of Geography teachers . . . science interest led to membership in Roddy Scientific Society . . . member of National Teachers Association . . . vice president of Bassler Geographic . . . known to have a weakness for nurses. . . . CAROLYN LOUISE COUNTY Secondary Anselma . . . Sleepy-time gal . . . long, blond tresses ... a history major . . . contributes her time to Varsity Club, F.T.A., Citamard, Roddy Scientific Society, Social Studies Club, and manager of girls' basketball . . . visits Coffee Shop quite frequently with Frank . . . domestic type . . . loves horses and modern dancing . . . finds time to raise scads of cats . . . sweetheart queen's court. . . . RUSSELL E. CUNNINGHAM Secondary Marietta . . . Member of the Page Literary Society . . . Men’s Day Student Association . . . quiet . . . August graduate . . . has too many off-campus responsibilities to participate as actively as he wishes . . . conscientious student . . . knows what he wants and is going after it . . . science major, math minor . . . attended G. I. College in Lancaster in 1946 . .. married ... has two-year old daughter.... WILLIAM D. CUSHMAN vj Secondary Lancaster . . . Active and energetic "Cush" is a campus favorite . . . fine dancer . . . frequents 'rat race' . . . well-dressed Romeo . . . baseball star and basketball trainer . . . president of Roddy Scientific Society . . . member of Phi Sigma Pi and Bassler Geographic Society . . . rated Who's Who . . . likes music of all kinds . . . member of the Page Literary Society .. . "stay loose.” ... DAVID R. DAVIS Industrial Arts Perhiomenville . . . Famous for his snappy comebacks and very corny jokes . . . works long and "hard” over his drawing board . . . editor-in-chief of 1950 Touchstone . . . vice-president of Student Council . . . historian of Rod and Gun Club . . . senior basketball manager . . . chess enthusiast . . . Citamard member . . . played Patton in senior play, "Ramshackle Inn" . . . Alpha Phi Omega brother . . . declares his maxim is "TRY, but not too hard" .. . A.D.A. member. ... ANTHONY DE ANGELIS Secondary laincaster . . . Tony . . . transferred from Lock Haven to M.S.T.C. in junior year . . . switched from physical ed major to secondary education . . . Pagcitc . . . day student . . . interested in athletics. . . . GRANT O. DEIBLER Industrial Arts Schuylkill Haren . . . Sincere, serious and apparently quiet. .. shares winning smile with Marilyn . . . well-groomed appearance . . . electricity lights the spark for his career . . . social studies minor . . . active member of the Industrial Arts Society . . . Normalite . . . Pennies from Heaven? ... no, a signal for his August bride . . . stakes his claim in a good meal . . . "guiding light" to Boys’ Club . . . carving his way to a successful future. . . . MARILYN CONKLIN DEIBLER Elementary Camp Hill . . . Ruminative eyes, touched with merriment . . . Colgate smile . . . final semester spent in wedded bliss . . . also found time for Primary Club and F.T.A. . . . Normalite . . took four in three . . . summer memories at M.S.T.C. . . . service with a smile at Grace and Johnny's . . . Pennsylvania accent conquered Syracuse . . . loved her moments in kindergarten . . . received her "sheep" in January. ...KENNETH C. DEPOE Lancaster Industrial Arts . . . "Buck” . . . English minor . . . basketball star for his four years at M.S.T.C. . . . captain of 1949-50 basketball team . . . married ... day student .. . member of the Industrial Arts Society . . . Nor-malite . . . very blue eyes ... his aim for that basket never misses . . . member of Varsity Club . . . shy, especially around women . . . tall . . . liked by all.. .. JAMES S. DESMOND Industrial Arts Chester ... Jim . . . Pageite . . . never has to worry about what to take for a cold . . . member of Bassler Geographic Society . . . he and pretty wife, Barb, live in married couple's dorm ... on Pennsylvania Council of Geographers . . . Industrial Arts Society . . . favorite hangout—you guessed it—the Coffee Shop . . . played football for two years ... a big boy ... a veteran . . another of the Chester crew . . . pleasant to talk to, ready for a good time, and a good student. . .. ROSE MAE DEVERTER Secondary Lancaster . . . Rosie . . . the dream girl . . . blonde hair and green eyes . . . graduate in the summer. . . English major . . . peppy cheerleader for three years . . . can she jitterbug! ... on publicity committee . . . Varsity Sweetheart . . . Normalite ... on Snapper and TOUCHSTONE staffs for two years . . . can be seen at noon rat-race . . . sweet, unassuming, likeable . . . spends half her time in the girl’s dorm, though she’s a day student . . . Bill . . . beautiful teeth.. .. HENRY DIEHL Secondary Allentown . . . A major in mathematics . . . belongs to Phi Sigma Pi . . . Mathematics Club . . . band and orchestra . . plays clarinet and saxophone in swing bands . . . enjoys a good game of tennis . . . puts plenty of mileage between here and Allentown, in fact, hasn’t missed a weekend in two years! . . . ANDREW JAMES DRABICK Secondary Phoenixtille . . . Andy . . . Pageite . . . basketball team . . . member of Phi Sigma Pi . . . participant in intramural sports . . . English club . . . enjoys sports, as you can see . . . Newman Club ... an English major . . . said he’s the best teacher the training school ever had . . . jokingly, of course . . . dry humor . . . usually at the shop. . . .ANNETTA J. DROSDAK Secondary St. Clair . . . Gert . . . nice things come in little packages . . St. Clair's pride and joy (and F. M.'s too) . . . charter member of good old summer school's "Stay Loose Club" . . . Belt's roomie . . . Science major, German minor . . . girl's dorm will be dead without her ... is going on to Penn to study medicine . . . wants to be a baby doctor ... a transfer to M.S.T.C. from Ursinus . . . another member of Smoker and Coffee Shop crowd . . . January grad . . . terrific personality. . . . RICHARD DEAN DUTCHER Industrial Arts Millersville . . . Although serious, he always enjoys a good joke . . . son of the well-known prof . . . lives in town with a lovely wife and two children . . . has manipulated the large purse strings of the Snapper now for two years . . . one of Normal's members . . . football manager for four years . . . close follower of all sports . . . photography as a hobby . . . interested in Professional scouting. . . . MAURICE EDWARDS Industrial Arts Prospect Park . . . Maury . . . "term” is up in August . . . Lloyd's roomie . . . Normalite . . . belongs to the Industrial Arts Society . . . member of the new Social Studies Club . . . took an active interest in the Lancaster Boys' Club . . . Coffee Shop, his hangout . . . decided to study in his last semester. . . . GLENNA M. ESHELMAN Library Science Lancaster . . . Doesn't talk much until you know her . . . brilliant librarian who is vice-president of Delta Phi Eta Sorority . . . chosen to be in "Who’s Who" . . . president of the Women's Day Student Association . . . treasurer of the Senior Class . . . attended Training School as a student in her younger days. . . . DENNIS E. FIANT Secondary Wernersville . . . Jovial . . . loves a good joke . . . upsets the library with the ones he tells . . . member of good standing in the English Club . . . Future Teachers of America . . . holds "Lingy" as his ideal . . . commutes from Columbia . . . minors in Science . . . loyal Pageite, but forgets the meetings . . . enjoys Shakespeare and his brand of humor. . . .GEORGE S. FREEMAN Industrial Arts Tremont • . . ’George” . . . Secretary-Treasurer of Iota Lambda Sigma . . . active in Industrial Arts Society . . .a G.I. for two years ... a member of Page Literary society . . Lindecamp's buddy . . . quiet fellow, but appreciates a good joke . . . home every weekend... . ROBERT P. FREY Industrial Arts Mount Joy . . . Bob . . . always has a smile and a witty greeting . . . member of Rod and Gun Club . . . likes swimming and tennis . . . spent time in U. S. Navy . . . Industrial Arts Society ... on TOUCHSTONE Art Staff . . . good organizer and worker .. . Normalite.. .. WILLIAM C. FROWNFELTER Industrial Arts Lancaster . . . Bill . . . veteran of the 8th Air Force . . . married . . . Alpha Phi Omegan . . . enjoys singing . . . Pageite . . . Industrial Arts Society . . . Future Teachers of America . . . favorite password, When do 1 graduate?’ . . . says being married keeps him busy . .. May graduate. . .. BONNIE FAY FUNKHOUSER Elementary Jonestown . . . Easy-going and pleasant personality . . . likes student teaching . . . serious about studies . . . interested in other people’s reactions . . . transferred here in her sophomore year . . . never gets angry . . . Dottie’s roommate . . . member of Primary Club, Future Teachers of America . . . Normal . . . spends about one-third of her college life at Mick's . . . should be in silent films. . . . ROBERT GADDIS Secondary Chambersburg . . . Tall and good looking, with an easy smile. . . . dresses well . . . member of Mu Kappa Mu Math Club . . . plays intramural basketball and softball . . . history minor . . . spends summers at Ocean City . . . tells some interesting experiences . . . likes sports, such as hunting and fishing . . . gets along well with the fairer sex . . . ex-manager of men's canteen . . . bad man of the second floor . . . fires his water pistol from the hip. . . .BETTY WARNER GAMLER Elementary Seven Valleys . . . "Bets” . . . tall, willowy blonde with long wavy locks . . . remembered for her six o'clock vigil at the window . . . changed her initials, all for the love of—Charlie . . . fascinating to and fascinated by her forty-odd fifth graders .. . F.T.A. and S.C.A. . . . possessor of that rare quality, an even disposition . . . IRENE L. GENBAUFFE Elementary Turtle Creek . . . "Renee" ... a musically inclined gal . . . member of the college choir, band and orchestra . . . high stepping head drum majorette of the band . . . gave her services to S.C.A., Future Teachers of America and Primary Club . . . scholarship earned her a bid to Delta Phi Eta . . . valuable member of TOUCHSTONE staff . . . performed well in senior play ... in the middle of all social activity . . . rated Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities . . . Citamard member . . . one of the Turtle Creek duet... . HANNAH E. GETTZ Elementary Havertown . . . Sandy . . . eyes of sincerity ... swings a wicked vocabulary . . . pounded the keys for the "sporting four" . . . busy as a bee; has a never-ending production line of posters . . . acting is her first love . . . unforgettable portrayal of Belinda in "Ramshackle Inn” . . . loved every minute of her endeavors for the athletic department . . . 4-year member of choir . . . Delta Phi Eta proxy ... in "Who's Who” . . . did her bit for the TOUCHSTONE (a great bit) ... BETTY JUNE GONDER Secondary York . . . Leading the triangular life, social studies being one angle of it, geography another, and "Jimmy" the acute angle, of course . . . geometrically cut diamond gives a mathematical slant to her engagement . . . likes to see things down in black and white, especially her pet panda, Jimmy's only rival for her affections . . . loyal S.C.A. and F.T.A. member . . . Bassler Geographic Society ... a flair for music and drama . . . RICHARD L. GOOD Secondary Lancaster ... A quiet, unassuming fellow . . . seems to have a real interest in geography . . . member of the Bassler Geographic Society . . . appreciates good music . . . usually hangs his hat in the library . . . loyal member of the Page Literary Society. . . .EUGENE W. GROFF Bausman Industrial Arts . . . Industrial Arts Society . . . veteran . . . spent a year and a half in U. S Navy . . . spends spare moments doing part-time work in Lancaster . . . accelerated . . . better known as "Gene” ... intends to go on to school very soon. . . . FRANK L. GROFF, JR. Secondary Lancaster . . . January graduate . .. invaluable football player . . . Varsity Clubber . . . energetic salesman of Booster Tags . . . engaged last year to Peggy . . . voted most valuable football player of the year . . . always at the bottom of the pile in a football game . . . tall, dark and handsome . . . enough school spirit for all of us . . . day student . . . can't help but like him . . . famous "beauty mark” . . . serious and hard-working . . . would make a good Arrow Shirt model.... HAROLD C. GROFF, JR. Secondary Lancaster . . . Member of National Science Teachers Association . . . Pageite . . . commutes daily . . . Alpha Phi Omega . . . Future Teachers of America . . . big smile . . . another of our vets . . . one of the founders and really active members of this Alpha Phi Omega organization ... has a cheerful word for everyone . . . easy to get along with. . . . DONALD K. GURTIZEN Secondary Holtwood . . . Gorti . . . married . . . member of Bassler Geographic Society . . . another one of Ma's boys . . . Page Literary Society . . . rather quiet fellow . . . always a friendly word . . . day student . . . pin ball machine fiend at the Sugar Bowl . . . doesn’t believe in the word "tilt." . . . THOMAS G. HAFFNER Industrial Arts Catasauqua . . . Tom ... a smile for everyone . . . metal shop major and social studies minor . . . tail gunner in the Air Force for three years . . . active in Industrial Arts Society, Theatre Arts Club, Student Christian Association and Future Teachers of America. . . a Normalitc . . . had a good time at the boys' club? .. . V 'MARY HAGERTY Elementary Horsham . . . Mary ... the gal with the ever-smiling face . . . visits Chester regularly . . future elementary teacher . . cute little giggle . . . member of Band and Page Literary Society . . . summer schoolitc . . . loves knitting argyles—for a certain man, that is . . . likes to dance and enjoys music of any kind . . . plays a mean flute . . . quiet, sweet—can't help but like her . . . Sally's bosom companion . . . engaged . . . bridge addict . . . Smoker crowd member. . . . GEORGE HARABIN, JR. Elementary Edwards ville . . . Harabin . . . one of the few boys enrolled in elementary . . . charter member of the Wacker A.C.’s . . . deep, "radio'' voice . . . Coffee Shopper . . . has trouble getting awake in the mornings . . . drops down to Florida now and then . . . big, friendly smile . . . summer schooler . . . vet . . . dorm student . . . always ready for a good time . . . quiet, yet loads of fun . . . member of Normal Literary Society . .. resident of that den of iniquity —Music Hall . . . had fun teaching a class in the geography of Millersville . . . charter member of American Dart Association. ... JAMES R. HARCLERODE Industrial Arts lumcaster . . . Tall, suave Jim . . . four letter man . . . powerful center for the Marauders . . . was cocaptain of football team . . . four years in the Varsity Club . . . liked student teaching . . . possesses a great determination to be successful . . . member of Page Literary Society . . . one of the "boys” . . . day student . . . dry humor. . . . JAMES P. HARRISON Industrial Arts Christiana . . . Jim . . . wild about sports . . . always immaculate . . . active member of Phi Sigma Pi . . . Mu Kappa Mu . . . Rod and Gun Club . . . Industrial Arts Society . . . quiet . . . has a definite opinion about women . . . Pageitc . . . softball enthusiast . . . the only man to figure out Mr. Shenk’s tests . . . dart fiend . . . Rothberg’s roomie . . . claims he did a song-and-dance routine at a certain night spot one evening ... a good student— WILLIAM P. HARTMAN Industrial Arts Altoona . . . Bill . . . quiet, but well-known and popular . . . always a hello” for everybody . . . prexy of Phi Sigma Pi honorary fraternity . . . former president of Normal Literary Society . . . talented musician . . . can play every instrument in the band, from the trumpet to the drums ... has a beautiful voice, too . . . member of Industrial Arts Society and the Square and Compass Club ... vet . . . dorm student . . . speaks French well ... has a pleasant life in Barb's hands....HOWARD J. HELVESTON Industrial Arts Philadelphia . . . Hap . . . married M.S.T.G sweetheart last spring . . . abode in married couple’s dorm . . . member of Industrial Arts Society . . . Normalitc . . . attends classes with wife, Bobbie . . . did some wrestling in sophomore and junior years . . . noted for his witticisms . . . Mr. Bassler's boy . . . following in his father's footsteps . . . always ready with his hunting equipment to head for the hills . . . smokes a pipe . . . nature lover. . . . ROBERT L. HENLY Industrial Arts Clay . . . Henly . . . Graphic Arts major . . . responsible for printing all entertainment programs . . . known as the "gentleman farmer" . . . football manager and active member of Varsity Club . . a favorite waiter in the dining room . . . tall . . . smooth dancer . . . member of lota Lambda Sigma . . . one of the youngest graduates ... of a long line of Henlys who attended M.S.T.C. . . . "dragged about" in the senior play... . EVELYN M. HERSHOCK Elementary Washington Boro . . . "Evie" . . . Washington Boro’s gift of friendliness to the M.S.T.C. campus . . . firm believer in the old adage. "Better late than never" . . . program chairman for Primary Club . . . says she’s Normal . . . seldom seen without a book under her arm. and not a textbook, either . . . takes a mean grip on a steering wheel . . . experienced in many kinds of work . . . day student. . . . LARRY HETTER Secondary South Williamsport . . . Larry . . . vet . . . transferred from Penn State to M.S.T.C. . . . Sam's buddy . . . Normalite . . . participated in intramural basketball and soft-ball . . . member of Mu Kappa Mu . . . devilish glint in his eyes . . . Coffee Shop boy . . . the girls say he's bashful? . . . never a harsh word, always a big smile . . . can't help liking the guy---- DANIEL W. HEYNE Secondary Bed Lion . . . Dan ... a lot of fun . . . loves to laugh . . . "old married man" . . . proud of his youngster . . . lives in attractive trailer near Elementary building . . . used to have a notoriously ancient blue car . . . gets a big kick out of teaching . . . Pageite . . . geography major.. . . I ROBERT N. HILL Industrial Arts Cbambersburg . . . Bob . . . quiet and unassuming, yet friendly . . . Recitation Hall roomer . . . Mrs. works for registrar . . . used to work in the college post-office . . . Pageite . . . member of the Industrial Arts fraternity, Iota Lambda Sigma . . . Future Teachers of America . . . regularly attends Bassler Geographic Society meetings . . . indispensible member of the Theatre Arts Club . . . knows his electricity. . . . A. JANE HOLLINGER Library Science Lititz . . . Jane . . . sincere, likeable girl . . . day student who travels from Lititz every morning . . . Glen-na's pal . . . may be seen working in day room or library . . . Normalite . . . W.D.S.A. representative of Welfare and Equity . . . treasurer. Library Science Club . . . former purse-holder of the English Club . . . bound to make good with her initiative and pleasant attitude . . . English minor. . . . HENRY L. HUBER Industrial Arts Pennsburg . . . Hank . . . friendly, well-known president of Student Council . . . Varsity Tennis player . . . Normalite . . . competent prexy of Phi Sigma Pi . . . vice president of Industrial Arts Society and was very active in its functions ... a willing worker and a dependable gent . . . received the James Pyle Wickersham Award for outstanding scholarship . . . member of Varsity Club . . . married . . . made Who’s Who in American Colleges . . . always laughing . . . intelligent . . . will be missed in many extra-curricular activities.... JEANETTE K. HUBER Elementary Sbaefferstoun . . . Neat as a pin . . . pert and pretty . . . runs good competition to the Duchess of Windsor for "best dressed" honors . . . Queen of 19 19 Sweetheart Dance . . . earring enthusiast, never without them . . . petite president of Primary Club . . . kept secretarial records straight for W.C.A. . . . loyal to ( itamard . . . another registrant in the Brooks Hall "wading" course . . . member of the "after 12” sorority . . . MELVIN HUNTER Industrial Arts Spring City . . . Snoby . . . popular, happy, and carefree . . . favorite study is woodworking . . . president of Industrial Arts Society . . . hopes to go on for Master's . . . likes music and plays the piano . . . college insurance salesman, or the friendly undertaker" . . . treasurer of the Varsity Club . . . capable worker . . graduated in January . . . always in the College Coffee Shop . . . irre-sistable personality . . . full of fun. . . .ADELE ELOISE HURSHMAN Elementary Lancaster . . . Loquacious manner . . . striking red hair . . . rainbow of colors reflects the "light in her eyes” . . . made her Citamard debut as the celebrated “Tweenic" in "The Admirable Crichton” . . . glad she’s Page . . . one of Miss Mastrotto's foursome . . . loves animals? . . . transferred from Penn State . . . Canasta expert . . . adds a tone of merriment to the Day Student s Room . . . touches of kindness to one and all . . . good in sports ... BENJAMIN J. JENKINS Secondary Lancaster . . . Ben . . . Normalitc . . . played football freshman and sophomore years at M.S.T.C. . . . member of Roddy Scientific Society . . . did student teaching at Manor High School . . . day student . . . vet . . . enjoyed arguing with Dr. Dutchcr ... a woman teaser . . . can be seen with Janie at the Shop between classes . . . quite a talker . . . big salesman for Normal during Frosh rush ... ALENE K. JONES Secondary Quarryt'ille . . . Flossie’s pal . . . day student . . . math whiz . . . talks about her Navy man continuously . . . Pageite . . . member of English Club . . . Mu Kappa Mu . . . F.T.A. secretary in senior year . . . Roddy Scientific Society secretary also . . . loves to carry on serious conversations over a cup of coffee . . . preferably with men, of course . . . JOHN E. JONES Secondary Wyoming, Pa. . . . Sparkplug of the cheering section at all football games ... a sense of humor that’s hard to equal . . . gave his time to the college band . . . known to be partial to the climate of sunny Florida . . . seems to be around when things are happening . . . another coal cracker . . . one of the old timers of the dorm . . . sponsor of the Millersville chapter of the A.D.A. . . . better known as "Jonsie” . . . loves to tell of his lurid experiences overseas ... AUDREY J. KAUFFMAN El ementary York . . . Sparkling sense of humor hidden behind a sweet, demure face . . . another senior who has enlisted in the ranks of the engaged . . . Primary Club note-taker . . . one of Mr. Porter's faithful four-year members in the choir . . . remembered by Miss Griffith as a persevering mermaid . . . also contributed her energies to F.T.A. and S.C.A. . . . known for her phenomenal sense of smell, especially near her birthday . . . not a sleep walker, but a sleep talker, declares her roommate . . . must be dreaming of that June wedding ... iJOHN H. KEAYS Industrial Arts Lancaster . . . "Most ' . . . he’s an eligible bachelor, girls . . . day student . . . Page Literary Society member . . . math minor . . . January graduate . . . M. LUTHER KEAYS, JR. Secondary Lancaster . . . Luke-. . . Normalite . . . manager of Varsity tennis team . . . excellent swimmer and diver . . . Varsity Clubber . . . interest in history and science . . . life guarding is summer occupation . . . has Senior Life Saving . . . field trips keep him in trim . . . summer tans are envy of all . . . accelerated . . . veteran . . . day student . . . one of the Coffee Shop crew . . . JOSEPH G. KOEHLER Industrial Arts Philadelphia . . . Joe . . . one of the two "Joes" constantly discussed in room 225 of the women’s dormitory . . . veteran . . . Pageite . . . amusing way of wording things . . . knows his Industrial Arts . . . engaged . . . tail and good-looking . . . intelligent . . . director of the Theatre Arts Club . . . Iota Lambda Sigma . . . Industrial Arts Society ... an all-round guy (just ask Babs) . . . keeps us in stitches . . . Coffee Shop addict . . . member of Alpha Phi Omega . .. CHARLES KORKUCH Industrial Arts Shamokin . . . Whitey . . . well-known basketball player . . . key man of this year's team . . . president of M.C.A. and Newman Club . . . member of Industrial Arts Society . . . Iota Lambda Sigma, Phi Sig and Alpha Phi . . . interested in photography . . . personality plus . . . member of Varsity Club . . . blonde hair source of his nickname . . . familiar face in college kitchen . . . popular member of the men's dorm .. . Photography for TOUCHSTONE HOWARD W. KOSER Secondary Camp Hill . . . Knows his literature . . . English major . . . may be seen in Sugar Bowl seriously conversing with Mr. Jennings . . . dry wit . . . material for a college prof, which he aspires to be . . . day student . . . Pageite . . . member of Newman Club and English Club . . . one of Dr. Lingen-felter’s protegees . . . F.T.A. . . . one of the many vets leaving us this year . . . good conversationalist . . . knows French backwards and forwards . . . ELWOOD KRAMER r Industrial Quakertou-n . . . Appears shy and quiet . . . easily makes and keeps friends . . . his hobby and main topic of conversation is trapping . . . likes music and dancing . . . favorite subject is drawing . . . secretary of the Industrial Arts Society . . . "Woody" . . . active in intramural sports . . . wants to travel . . . platinum blonde hair . . . MARY I. KROUT Elementary Y ork . . . Nifty with a needle, as evidenced by her attractive wardrobe . . . staunch advocate of club status and allocations for the "after 12" sorority, of which she is the most faithful member . . . one of the D.P.’s—Delta Phi Eta . . . human alarm clock for Jeanette . . . bathtub soloist and deep despair of Mr. Porter . . . future great Canasta player . . . doubled for Miss Dixon . . . dependable worker for many organizations— Primary Club, L.S.A., S.C.A., F.T.A. . . . Mary —one who will never let you down. . .. JOSEPH KURMAN Secondary Chester . . . Chester boy . . . doesn't know his own strength ... a Normal ite . . . member of Basslcr Geographic Society . . . huskey and full of fun . . . one of Dr. Dutcher's protegees . . . fond admirer of Mrs. Brencman . . . Harry's buddie . . . proud of his home town . . . snows others with his ability to speak "Uk'' . . . keeps a complete file of tests for ready reference . . . never downcast, always smiling . . . loves to needle the gals . . . will never forget his teaching experiences in Lancaster ... MARVIN S. LANTZ Secondary Lewistown . . . "Guns'' . . . married this year . . . Normalite . . . charter member of Wacker A. C.’s . . . wrestled four years . . . quiet around the women . . . formerly lived in Music Hall, until moving to married couple's dorm . . . good natured, easy to get along with . .. veteran .. . FLORENCE E. LEHMAN Secondary Columbia . . . Flossie . . . former prexy of English Club . . . math whiz . . . Alene’s buddy . . . Pageitc . . . may be seen buzzing about in her car . . . always willing to join in the fun . . . 48 head of frosh initiation . . . "wipe that smile off your face” Lehman . . . Coffee Shop addict . . . F.T.A. . . . emoted herself into the Citamard Club . . . also a Math Club member . . . active in W.D.S.A. . . . ready with a good idea . . . always room in her car for a few more ... MARILOU LEUSCH j ■ i • j . Library Science Hers hey ... A quiet, capable member of the class . . . dry sense of humor . . . well-dressed . . . always with Shirley . . . member of F.T.A. . . . Library Science Club . . . transfer from Hershey Junior College . . . Minored in German . . . member of the Page Literary Society . . . likes to knit and sew . . . hobby—interior decorating . . . DOROTHY LIGHT Elementary Lebanon . . . Dottie . . . fast line of gab . . . Primary Club and Industrial Arts interest . . . loyal member of Newman Club . . . Normalitc . . . lovely Lebanon lass . . . devilish smile . . . terrific bridge kibitzer . . . the "Light" in Frank's eyes . . . dimples . . . Bonnie’s roomie . . . wedding bells will be ringing very soon . . . has a beautiful solitaire on third finger, left hand . . . makes her own clothes ... a good student . . . loves cooking, sewing, knitting . . . Smokeritc . . . "Frankly" speaking, she’s O.K.! . .. FRANK R. LINDECAMP Industrial Arts West Chester . . . August graduate . . . rides Greyhounds constantly between W.C. and M.S.T.C. . . . Pageite . . . Industrial Arts Society . . . member of Square and Compass Club ... a devil-may-care sort of a fellow . . . enjoyed his course in guidance . . . always in the sugar bowl... appears quiet, but!... MRS. JEANNE R. LINGG Elementary Hanover ... Lived in married couple’s dorm 'til hubby graduated in January, and then made herself at home in girl's dorm . . . attended Shippensburg S.T.C. . . . member of W.A.A. . . . added beautiful alto voice to choir . . . Primary Club . . . Pageite . . . sweet as can be . . . gets along well with everyone, students and faculty alike . . . big dark brown eyes ... a hard-working student. . . WILLIAM G. LINGG Elementary Hanover . . . Ready with a friendly hello and a great big smile . . . wife is going to M.S.T.C. also . . . one of the students to be included in "Who's Who” in American Colleges . . . loves his "Kids” over in elementary building . . . belongs to Phi Sigma Pi fraternity . . . member of the Masons . . . took a role in the senior play, "Ramshackle Inn" . . . Senior manager- the man behind the Marauder grapplers. . . .JAMES T. LONG Lancaster r Industrial Arts . . . One of the first interested in Alpha Phi Omega —elected their treasurer . . . joined all three frats on campus in senior year . . . Originator of the Alpha Phi used-hooks idea . . . Industrial Arts Society member and hard working Boys Club instructor . . . married a former M.S.T.C. student . . . is a Red Cross swimming instructor. . . . RUTH W. LOPES Elementary Scbaefjerstown . . . Permanent wave, naturally so . . . related to Vincent? . . . four-year disbeliever in the merits of Millersville breakfasts . . . worked and worried with her second grade wonders . . . utilized artistic legacy as second generation executor of Lopes talents for M.S.T.C. . . . flirted with facts and figures as W.C.A. treasurer . . . Miss Lenhardt’s aide-de-camp through four years of service to Citamard . . . concerned with the "Welfare” of campus coeds . . . chief source of deviltry in "third floor front.” . . . ROBERT McCOACH Industrial Arts Cheltenham . . . "Mac" . . . former Army Air Force gunner who selected for his Millersville target blonde Ruthie Leister, an immediate volunteer for duty in the McCoach forces . . . sophomore-junior wedding in August '49 . . . Varsity Clubber who "tackled" his football responsibilities in true Irish form through a quartette of seasons . . . three years on the Brooks Hall mats . . . Page curator . . . present Wall Street financier in the Ixiokroom . . . ambitions for NYU. . . . gets our vote as the kind of husband the girls arc looking for. . . . CARL M. McPEAK Secondary Columbia . . . Jovial . . . loves a good joke . . . upsets the library with the ones he tells . . . member in good standing in the English Club . . . Future Teachers of America . . . holds ’ Lingy" as his ideal . . . commutes from Columbia . . . minor in science . . . loyal Pageite . . . enjoys Shakespeare and his brand of humor. . . . CHARLES PASQUALE MAIO Secondary Lancaster . . . The fellow with the big briefcase . . . Pageite . . . Geography brain . . . member of Bassler Geographic Society . . . day student . . . member of Alpha Phi Omega ... in Science Teacher's Associations . . . accelerated . . . vet . . . married . . . seems to be extremely serious in his studies . . . doesn’t waste much time. . . . iFRANK W. MALLOZZI «♦ ' Industrial Arts Ambler . . . Will marry M.S.T.C. gal this summer ... a ‘'Dot" to his record . . . charter member of the Wackcr A.C.'s . . . music hall man . . . member of the band . . . tall, dark . . . veteran . . . made some money substitute teaching this year . . . took care of the music for rat race every evening . . . loved his drawing courses? . . . GEORGE F. MALONEY Secondary Marietta . . . Another of our veterans . . . married . . . day student . . attended Lancaster College Center in freshman year . . . member of Page Literary Society . . . Rod 3nd Gun Club . . . Mu Kappa Mu . . . good enough student to get invitation from the Sigma Pi . . . not as active as he would like to be, since he is a day student. . . . JANE CLAIRE MANBECK Library Science Lancaster . . . Sweet, smiling Jane ... a beautiful set of molars . . . can't help but do a "double take” when you see her . . . English minor . . . Pageitc . . . Jane and Ben in the Coffee Shop . . . dose pal of Flossie . . . English Club member . . . also active in Library Science Club . . . big brown eyes . . . refreshing, full of vim . . . neat, dresses well . . . day student ... Oh! that smile! . . . efficient worker in college library . . . can't help but like her . . . cutest laugh. . . . B. SHIRLEY MARKERT Elementary Lancaster . . . Day student . . was in the Waves before- entering M.S.T.C. . . . member of Page Literary Society . . . Primary Club . . . popular . . . member of F.T.A. . . . only female veteran in the class . . . neat as a pin . . . studious . . . friendly greeting for almost everyone she meets... . JOHN LEROY MARTIN Secondary Lancaster . . . He's a vet . . . He's married . . . He's a day student . . . (but he doesn't use Pond's) . . . Pageite . . . Phi Sigma Pi fraternity . . . Mu Kappa Mu’. . . English Club . . . accelerated ... a sense of humor that is hard to equal . . . always time to hear a good joke . . . friendly greeting for everyone. . . . JOHN MARTYN, JR. Drexel Hill Industrial Arts . . . Member of Page Literary Society . . . he’s single, girls . . . member of Industrial Arts Society . . . another of our graduating vets . . . Iota Lambda Sigma Fraternity . . . spends summers at a camp in Canada . . . has a way with cars. . . . DALE K. MILLER Secondary Langbornt . . . "Dusty" . . . one of the "boys" . . . another member of the M.S.T.C. wrecking crew . . . successfully eluded all persistent coeds for four years . . . popular Senior Class and Varsity Club president . . . avid bug hunter for Gerhart and Caul-well, Incorporated . . . starting quarterback and big brother to faltering freshman footballers . . . singularly noted for the delicate( ?) aroma of his pipes and cigars ... K for Kirkpatrick . . . very "Filling" weekend escapades . . . remembered for his classic early morning greeting, "Hey, you lucky girls, Dusty's back." . .. IRWIN W. MILLER Industrial Arts Catasauqua . . . Quiety, shy guy . . . Industrial Arts Society . . . "silent" member of Theatre Arts Club, but in his quiet way, he did much for the organization . . . hails from way up in Northeastern part of the state . . . Vic and Tom's buddy . . . attended summer school . . . Pageite . . . "In" . . . spent years in-Pacific with Army Air Force . . . S.C.A. . . . "Babe Ruth" of intramural softball league . . . won Thomas R. Baker Memorial Scholarship in junior year. . .. JOHN W. MILLER Industrial Arts Lancaster . . . Lover of the out-of-doors . . . member of Rod and Gun Club . . . Industrial Arts Society . . . southern drawl . . . Pageite . . . veteran . . . married . . . commutes to M.S.T.C. every day . . . studious, usually quiet . . . loves to get into a discussion, especially on subjects concerning the South.. . . ROBERT L. MILLER Industrial Arts Lancaster . . . Bobbie ... on M.S.T.C.’s championship wrestling team for four years . . . member of Varsity Club . . . sports one of those treasured black and gold Varsity sweaters . . . Pageite . . . Industrial Arts Society . . . married a beautiful, little blonde recently . . . day student anti veteran . . . big dimples . . . an all-round and well-liked fellow . . . hated those evening classes . . . another of Mick s and Floss' fans . . . an old hand at square-dancing. . . . ROBERT F. MIMM Secondary Lancaster . . . Married . . . veteran . . . dry humor . .. English is his interest . . another hoy with a captivating smile . . kept Dr. Dutcher's classes laughing with his satirical answers . . . deep voice . . . has a fobia for writing witticisms on blackboards . . . went to West Chester S.T.C. in freshman year . . on track team three years . . . Pagcite . . . F.T.A. . . . English Club . . wrestling at West Chester .. . day student.... DAVID C. MORGAN Elementary Old forge . . . Dave ... a big man on the football field . . . won most valuable player award in 19-18 . . . Page Literary Society curator . . . Student Council representative-at-large . . . played intramural basketball with Wacker A.C.'s . . . may seem cpiiet to those who don't know him . . . eyes of blue . . summerschooler . . . serious in his work in the training school . . . will be greatly missed on the gridiron next fall.. . . SHIRLEY ANNE MORLOK Elementary Aberdeen . . . January graduate . . . cjuiet, passive . . . lived in the dream room of the girl's dorm—329 . . . hated to leave M.S.T.C. . . . transferred to Millersvillc in junior year . . a foreigner in Pennsylvania . . . Mary Lou's inseparable companion . . . loves children . . . noted for her habit of scrubbing her teeth while strolling up the dormitory halls . . . hard-working, generous, and fun-loving. . . . EDWARD H. MOYER Secondary Periasie . . . Usually seems cjuiet and easy going, but there are times when . . . card shark of the first order . . . always time for one more game of crib-bage . . . undefeated varsity tennis player in junior year . . good softball pitcher . . . remembered for his unusual reading position—chair on top of a table to Ik- close to the light . . . summer school fiend . . Coffee Shopper . . a stay looser. . . . JANE LOUISE NAGLE Elementary Lancaster . . . Silken tresses . . . tastefully attired . . . Ipana smile . . . one of the political bosses of the Women's Day Student Association . . . Welfare and Ecjuity . . . member of Future Teachers of America . . . did a bang-up job of preparing her sixth-graders for the big step into Junior High . . . proud she’s Page . . . runs competition with the C.T.C. . . . managed to endure the rigors of M.S.T.C. classes with sufficient energy to pursue week-end interests. . . .RUTH N. NENZEL Elementary York . . . Ruthie . . . naturally curly blonde locks . . . governing board of W.A.A, . . . proud she's Normal . . . delivered our laundry with a cordial greeting . . . accelerated . . . another gal who will marry a fellow Millersvillian soon .. . hockey manager in sophomore year . . . F.T.A. and Primary Club . . . L.S.A. . . . Lubbe, the major topic of her conversation . . . music lessons every evening in room 314.. .. RALPH H. NICHOLS Industrial Arts Bristol . . . Married Jenny, college librarian . . . lives in Millcrsville now . . . excellent sense of humor . . . lives up to the old adage. 'Nice things come in small packages” . . . one of Professor Shenk’s electric men . . . Coffee Shop customer . . . dark curly hair.. .. NICHOLAS NOEL, JR. Secondary Spring City . . . Nick . . . member of Varsity Club . . . played football for M.S.T.C. . . . first Stringer . . . on all-state football team . . . January graduate . . . man with the educated toe . . . quiet, but conscientious student . . . buddy of Snoby . one of the last of the Spring City gang . .. C. RICHARD NYE Secondary Shippensburg . . , Very neat dresser who frequents Mickey Lehr’s coffee shop . . active Mason . . . belongs to Square and Compass Club . . . member of Bassler Geographic Society. Social Studies Club . . . graduated in January . . . hopes to get Masters at Penn State . . . also desires to be master someday of one little Pinky . . . deserves recognition for finishing up affairs of 1949 TOUCHSTONE . . . dart shooter who believes that. "It only takes one good inning to catch up." . . . ELEANOR M. OELSCHLAGER Elementary Salfordtille . . . Blonde, blue-eyed, and a beautiful blusher . . . "extra curricularly so” . . . guiding spirit of W.C.A. . . co-captain and Fleet "wing" on the girls' hockey team . . . displayed her Palmer Method techniques as Girls' Varsity Club secretary . . . also gave her time and talents to Primary Club. F.T.A., S.C.A., and L.S.A. . . . received well-deserved recognition in Who’s Who . . . remembered by Audrey for her unintelligible conversations amid the throes of slumber . . . adored by her first graders . . . closet complex . . . Eleanor —a girl with a willing heart. . .. PATRICIA L. O’ROURKE Secondary Philadelphia . . . Intelligent conversationalist . . . swell dresser . . . goes home every weekend because of third finger, left hand adornment . . . member of English Club . . . one of the "Smoker” squad of girl's dorm . . . expert bridge player . . . tackled all her teaching in one semester . . . natural curly hair . . . knows her literature . . . Spanish minor . . . in Sweetheart Queen's court. ... THOMAS J. PARK Industrial Arts Wilkes-Barre . . . Big and jolly . . . would make a nice Santa . . . been known to stay up all night to get his drawings and designs in . . , member of Industrial Arts Society . . . handles the do-re-me for the Future Teachers of America . . . steady attendance of the Bassler Geographic Society meetings . . . one of them-there coal-crackers.. .. ALBERT C. PHY, JR. Industrial Arts Willow Grove . . . Played football for college in freshman year ... on baseball team two years . . . Normalitc... member of Rod and Gun Club . . . Industrial Arts Society . . . Iota Lambda Sigma Fraternity . . . capable and hard-working business manager of the TOUCHSTONE . . . always dependable, friendly, and efficient . . . helped everyone get a "bang" out of living in the dorm. ... EDWARD JOHN PLEVYAK Industrial Arts Carbondale . . . Ed . . . veteran . . . accelerated . . . Normalite . . . took part in intra-mural sports . . . member of Industrial Arts Society . . . Newman Club . . . Iota Lambda Sigma fraternity . . . dorm student . . . always a big grin on his face . . . cuts an impressive figure smoking a big cigar . . . looks like a politician . . . good Joe . . . Math minor.., HUGH J. PORTER Secondary Millersville . , . Four-year member of the college choir . . . soloist in Handel's "Messiah” and other programs . . . following Dad’s footsteps . . . member of college band . . . Mu Kappa Mu . . . walks to school from Kready Avenue every morning . . . math whiz . . . also has his interest centered in science . . . quiet, likeable, and hard-working . . . January graduate . . . attending Penn State for Master's Degree---- BRONDELL R. POTTER, JR. Industrial Arts Waynesboro . . . Ace . . . smooth, snappy dresser ... .1 transfer from the University of Pittsburgh . . . became a member of Normal Literary and Industrial Arts Societies . . . top-notch cartoonist for the Snapper . . . member of 1950 TOUCHSTONE art staff . . . proprietor and card shark of the most frequented room of the third floor, 377 .. . never too busy to smile and say, "Get out, you scrounge.”... WILLIAM S. PRAUL Secondary Langborne . . . Sam . . . Roddy Scientific Society . . . Mu Kappa Mu . . . keeps the tires of his car well worn ... of the summer school clique . . . F.T.A. . . . Pagcitc . . . Sam, that rough and tough cowboy from Langhorne . . . mathematics wizard . . . loads of fun . . . always laughing . . . noted for his corny jokes . . . has a way with women . . . hangs his hat in the Coffee Shop . . . the ladies enjoy Sam 'Prauling” round them ... a vet. . . . FRANK J. PRESCOTT Industrial Arts Overhrook . . . One of the '48 summer school crowd . . . Pageite . . . serious, hard-working, and a good conversationalist . . . math minor . . . active in Theatre Arts Club work . . . backstage hero . . . Alpha Phi Omegan . . . always talking about his nephew ... on wrestling team in freshman year . . . Coffee Shop boy ... a likeable guy, and always ready for fun . . . Industrial Arts Society member . . . good teacher material. ... LOUIS ANTHONY RAMPULLA Secondary Lancaster . . . Lou . . . Pageite Literary Society . . . played intramural baseball . . . sw-ell guy, terrific personality ... on Lancaster Presidents' Semi-Pro football team . . . has that "boyish" look . . . loves sports . . . another of the summer school gang . . . his major interest lives in Lancaster. . . . ROBERT C. RANKIN Secondary Lancaster . . . Bob ... a fellow who says what he thinks . . . active in intramural sports . . . Page Literary Society . . . probably the snappiest dresser on campus . . . Student Council representative . . . in charge of Old Gym . . . getting good practice refereeing J.V. basketball games . . . enjoys singing . . . likes a friendly argument . . . another of the summer school horde . . . owns nice convertible . . . excellent dancer . . . Mu Kappa Mu. . .  TAYLOR RANDOLPH I Secondary Columbia . . . Member of English Club . . . a likeable chap . . . dresses with excellent taste . . . travels to New York. Boston, and Philadelphia frequently . . . has a special delight in seeing good plays . . . commuting student from Columbia . . . history minor . . . has swell job at Stevens House . . . gets along well with everyone . . . witty sense of humor.. .. CHARLES J. REES Industrial Arts Millerstille . . . Pizzlc . . . never has to worry about cavities- — his pop being one of M.V.'s leading dentists . . . Pageite . . . member of Alpha Phi Omega . . . conscientious student . . . neat appearance . . . remembers his trip to Philadelphia for the I.C.G. convention . . . talented industrial arts man. . . . PAUL J. REVENE Secondary Lancaster . . . No! Not the fellow who rode the horse . . . witty transfer from the University of New Hampshire . . . Normal . . . Varsity tennis player for three years . . . once received a driver's license with "Paul Revere" enscribed upon it . . . excellent French student ... a short description of his extracurricular activities. "Anything, anytime!” DANIEL M. RHINIER Secondary l mcaster . . . Dan . . . gives out with good jokes . . . avid user of library's picture collection . . . got sheepskin in January . . . landed excellent job in New Jersey . . . Pageite . . . Roddy Scientific Society . . . Rod and Gun Club . . . Future Teachers of America . . . day student ... got along swell with everyone.. .. SAMUEL RINEER Secondary Philadelphia . . . Sam . . . another of our departing vets . . . historically minded . . . Page Literary Society . . . active member of Student Christian Association . . . played intramural basketball in junior year . . . accelerated to graduate with the class of '50 . . . Student Teachers of America . . . played a hot game of softball during the summer sessions . . . always ready with a witty remark . . . piercing eyes . . . good student . . . enjoys swimming. . .■. ,7 RONALD A. RICHARDS 11 huiitilri.il Arts Greers Ridge . . . Genial and big-hearted . . . always willing to lend a helping hand . . . "Toot" . . . loves a good argument . . . known as "Gumshoe, Jr.” . . . assistant Dean of Men . . . member. Mu Kappa Mu, Industrial Arts Society, Iota Lambda Sigma, and Phi Sigma Pi . . . likes music . . . popular with the men . . . counts chapel attendance . . . enjoys conversing at the dinner table. . . . DONALD L. ROBERTS Secondary Lancaster - . . Quiet and unassuming . . . married and is the proud papa of a baby girl . . . paints and sketches with genuine skill . . . famous for his doodling in classes . . . great friend of Roden’s . . . English major . . . art editor of Snapper . . . summer graduate . . . good bass singing voice . . . never-to-be-forgotten imitator of Al Jolson and Vaughn Monroe. . .. RAY M. RODEN Secondary luincasler . . . Ray . . . Twice-chosen president of his class . . . has a beautiful tenor voice . . . great big "politician’s" smile . . . makes an ideal master of ceremonies . . . Alpha Phi Omegan . . . married . . . commutes . . . always busy with some extracurricular activity ... he and Mrs. Brcnncman arc great pals . . . Roden—the people's choice .. . member of History Club.. .. HARRY ROHACEK Elemerstary Millersville . . . January graduate . . . lived in Millersville with his wife, while attending school . . . enjoyed his work with the youngsters in the training school . . . another Normalite . . . long-time member of Future Teachers of America . . . switched from LA to Elementary .. . hoping to get in on the administrative end of elementary ed.... IRVIN J. ROSE Industrial Arts Lancaster . . . Day student . . . married . . . whiz in Industrial Arts . . . Industrial Arts Society . . . received sheepskin in January graduation exercises . . . secretary-treasurer of Iota Lambda Sigma . . . has two children—boys ... is teaching in Philadelphia . . . veteran ... a keen sense of humor . . . noted for his accomplishments in ceramics and graphic arts . . . responsible for murals on the walls of Graphic Arts shop . . . has a major in every I.A. field, and did it in three years! . . . Can you top this!. .. »DONALD B. ROSS | 1 Setowlary Ridley Park • . . Bucky . . . friendly and congenial . . . Cush's roomie . . . interested in Penn State ... ex basketball star . . . Varsity Club member . . . Bas-ler Geographic Society . . . Coffee Shopper . . . one of Ma’s protegees . . . lackadaisical . . . vet . . . accelerated. . .. EUGENE ROTHBERG Secondary Philadelphia . . . Noise maker in our band . . . hot licks on the licorice stick . . . intelligent—enough so that he became a member of Phi Sigma Pi honorary fraternity . . . likeable . . . pleasant but can also be Mephostophelian when chaufferring innocent candidates for their initiation ride on cold rainy nights . . . impresses his charges in the training school with mental gymnastics in arithmetic class . . . member of TOUCHSTONE Staff. . . . HOBART W. SAPP Secondary Marmora, N. . . . . Hpbic . . . the Ocean City Injy . . . active in many campus functions . . . Page Literary Society; treasurer Rod and Gun Club; S.C.A.; treasurer Lutheran ( lub; Entertainment Committee; prexy of Euturc Teachers ol America; Roddy Scientific Society just to mention a few . . . wavy black hair . . . snappy dresser . . . always neat . . . served in the Pacific with the Army . . . dorm student.. . . WILLIAM R. SEAL win H rial Arif Zieglers tille . . . ' Bill" . . . conscientious worker . . . always a gentleman . . . never talks until he has something to say . . . served as president of Page this year . . . vice-president of Phi Sigma Pi . . . member of Citamard . . . was the Admirable Crichton” . . . Roddy Scientific Society . . . handy around a movie projector . . . interest lies in Lancaster . . . rated honor in Who's Who . . . veteran pilot. . . . RICHARD E. SCHNEIDER Secondary Lancaster . . . Dick . . . another of the day student crowd hailing from Lancaster . . . played football for M.S.T.C. . . . member of Varsity Club ... on Junior ( lass Social Committee . . . member of the newly organized Social Studies ( lub . . active member of Newman Club . . . pleasant smile, shy grin . . . always had the right answer in Mr. Bassler's daily recitations.. . . I tula it iuiI Arts JAMES E. SEITZ Columbia . . . Jim . . . attended Lancaster College Center in Freshman year . . Pageite . . . always ready to join in the fun . . . played football for the Marauders in Sophomore year . . . baseball . . . Industrial Arts Society . . . Rod and Gun Club . . . Iota Lambda Sigma ... vet. ... JOSEPH W. SEITZ Secondary Felton . . . Odd combination between seriousness and joviality . . . always ready to sit down to a good game of pinochle . . . yet active in Phi Sigma Pi honor frat . . . chosen to appear in Who’s Who . . . freshman orientation chairman who once "enjoyed" a swim in the lake . . . has sung and acted the leads in many college shows . . . musician in the band, choir, and orchestra . . . has large stamp and coin collections . . . vice-president of senior class . . . L.S.A. . . . plays a mean boggie on the piano . .. January graduate. . .. NANCY MARIE SEITZ Elementary Mount title . . . "Nan” . . tall, trim, and talented, especially on the keyboard . . . plays both piano and organ . . . spends her spare time teaching future keyboard artists their scales and exercises . . . avid reader, authority on all the latest in fiction . . . fell in love with her third graders at the training school . . . was in her "element" in elementary science course . . . Pageite . . . sports a sparkler . . . "Fry”ed foods her specialty . . . her favorite hair style, a "Bob" . . . "Nancy with the smiling face." ... DAISY M. SELLERS Elementary Pee uea . . . Pageite . . . day student . . . will specialize in rural elementary education . . . member of Primary Club . . . Future Teachers of America . . . taught fourth grade in training school . . . avid geologist in Mr. Beckmyer’s elementary science class . . . her efforts resulted in the latest of "rocks." . . . PAUL D. SHEAFFER Secondary Lancaster . . . Day student . . . drives daily from Lancaster in his black Mercury coupe ... an able man with the cards, hearts, pinochle or cribbage . . on that long list of Page members . . . unable to participate in as manv activities as he would like. ... i MARY ELIZABETH SHENK j v Elementary Lancaster . . . "Libby” . . . the gal with "that sultry look" . . . wears clothes beautifully . . . had her raven locks shorn, now looking good with the Princeton "Bob" . . . personification of the popular slogan, "She's engaged—she's lovely—she uses Parker Quink" . . . coffee shop her second home ... a ring on that important finger . . . sweet sophistication for that New England home she will be gracing after her summer wedding-to-be . . . "engineered" her way to graduation... . PAULINE SHEPHERD Elementary Oxford . . . Penny . . . tall, 'tractive, and t'riflic (even her fourth graders noticed it) ... sophisticated hairdo .. . "nose” her relationship to Bob Hope . . . clothes have a fitting flare . . . favorite waitress . . . Normalite ... an eye to the future as Primary Club and F.T.A. member . . . contributed Cita-mard talent to Senior play as the dark, cold beauty, Gail Russell . . . dramatic talents shown when she waved the merry handkerchief as Ruby B. . . . loves strawberry blonde baby sister . . . crystallized friendships at Sugar Bowl. .. . GLORIA JUNE SMITH Secondary Millersville . . . Glo . . . tall, blonde, vivacious . . . active in Citamard productions . . . unforgettable feminine lead in "The Admirable Crichton" . . . lives lust across the street . . . choir member . . . freshman class vice prexy . . . Pageite . . . F.T.A. . . . Science major, geography minor . . . member of Roddy Scientific Society . . . Bassler Geographic Society . .. showed journalistic skill on Snapper and TOUCHSTONE staffs . . . excellent swimmer. . .. MARION SMITH Secondary Aliquippa . . . Mitzie . . . lives near the "Smoky City" . . . attended California S.T.C. during summer . . . geography major and social studies minor . . . hockey manager . . . charter member of the Smoker gang . . . excellent bridge partner . . . member of Girls' Varsity Club . . . double row of eyelashes . . . dry wit and loads of fun . . . long way home . . . "Skip's" companion . . . can always tell which way "the wind's blowing" . . . ready and willing to have a good time... . HAROLD W. SOBEL Secondary Philadelphia . . . One of the married set ... a transfer from Indiana State Teachers College . . . speaks up when he has something to say . . . joined Page . . . took an interest in the Future Teachers of America . . . the man behind the mystery of the missing T-squares . . . Rudy's roomie . . . always willing to go along with a joke . . . graduated in January. . ..Industrial Arts JOHN SPITTLE Rcinerton . . . Jack . . . always ready to laugh . . . big hearted . . . likes to tease, especially the girls . . . active Alpha Phi Omega member . . . scoutmaster at home . . . likes to hunt and fish ... in I.A. Society . . . Rod and Gun Club . . . minored in science . . . likes student teaching . . . Normal . . . another one of those after-dinner speakers---- FRED W. STARR Industrial Arts Forty Fort . . . Big, brawny, and a whole lot of fun ... a good student who qualified for Phi Sigma Pi and Iota Lambda Sigma honor frats . . . victim of Mr. Shenk's experiments in hypnotism . . . treasurer of Industrial Arts Society . . . has some attraction in York County that he goes home to every weekend . . . plays canasta like he plays pinochle . . . taught only nine weeks . . . “broke out" in January. . . . FREDERICK W. STAUFFER Industrial Arts Millersville . . . Proud possessor of trailer planted next to Brooks Hall . . . married and a happy father . . . his black cocker spaniel a familiar canine on campus . . . hails from York . . . victim of Shenk's hypnotism experiments . . . member of Page Literary Society. . .. PAUL P. STEINMETZ Elementary Sew Holland . . . The science wizard . . . wants to go into elementary administration ... of music hall gang . . . famous owner of motor bike . . . Pageite . . . noted for his ability to baflle professors with his erudite questions . . . accelerated . . . studious ... knows his history. . .. R. BURNELL STRAUSBAUGH Secondary Codorus . . . "Jack" . . . never seems to get angry ... developed self-confidence while in college . . . takes classwork seriously enough to have earned entrance into Phi Sigma Pi honorary fraternity . . . vice-president of the English Club . . . knows his music . . . deep down bass in choir . . . plays the trumpet in College Band and Orchestra . . . personification of the small town constable as Small in ' Ramshackle Inn" . . . Joe's pal . . . nicknamed "Singin' Sam." . ..Secondary EVELYN J. STRAYER York ) i v t . . . Well-liked by her fellow classmates . . . works hard at all she undertakes . . . one of those leaping 'bug-hunters'' . . belongs to the Roddy Scientific Society and the Student Christian Association . . . pens glowing words for Snapper in style learned from Lingy's publicity committee . . . Evie . . . another bridge player . . . Future Teachers of America . . . girls' hockey team in senior year . . . English Club . . . Pagcite . . . accelerated . . . swam her way to Senior Life Saving. . . . JAMES R. TODD Secondary Lancaster . . . Jim . . . our star basketball and baseball player . . . proud of his son, Jimmy . . . noted for his coolness on the basketball floor... the boy who made the important points at the crucial moments during the basketball season ... a southpaw from away back . . . Varsity Club member . . . knows his history . . . shows the extent of his college education when he says, "Wa-a-a." ... VINCENT A. TRITCH, JR. Secondary MiUersviUe . . . Tritch . . . lives in married couples' dorm . . . Pagcite . . . who can forget Tritch on the softball field ? . . . cheered on by his pretty, blonde-haired wife . . . played intramural basketball . . . member of band and choir . . . prexy, Bassler Geographic Society . . . commissioner of football league . . . always smiling, always ready with a witticism, that’s Tritch. .. . WALTER D. ULLRICH Industrial Arts Upper Darby . . . Ullie . . . our John Barrymore . . . active Cita-mardian . . . excellent thumbnail sketchcr . . . Walt and Dottie . . . Industrial Arts Society . . . Junior Class prexy . . . does beautiful ceramic work . . . A1 Joison impersonator . . . "Lost Horizon," "Death Takes a Holiday,” and "The Admirable Crichton" star . . . wrestler of days gone by . . . vivid imagination . . . vigorous organizer and worker . . . makeup artist par excellence . . . curly brown hair . . . Coffee Shopper ... renowned jitterbugger . . . what a guy . . . versatility plus. . . . BENJAMIN T. UNKLE, JR. Secondary Lancaster . . . Unkle . . . Pageitc . . . Roden and Roberts' buddy . . . commutes every day . . . member of English Club . . . future Teachers of America . . . Social Studies Club . . . always ready for a laugh . . . big, devilish smile . . . likes to tease the girls . . . one of Dr. Lingenfelter's protegees . . . another veteran. . .. ALICE LOUISE WAGNER Library Science Philadelphia . . . The cpitomee of all-round activity . . . religiously, as active S.C.A. Cabinet member . . . educationally, as loyal F.T.A worker and State Secretary of the Pennsylvania F.T.A, . . . vocationally, as Library Science and English Club member . . . dramatically, as a Citamard Thespian ... politically, as W.C.A. Student Council representative . . . comprehensively, as Delta Phi Eta member . . . still had time for fun—and food ... a way with wheat thins . . . Alice—a "Page" in Millersville history. . . . CLARENCE G. WALTERS, JR. Industrial Arts Millersrille .. . Bucky . . . originally hails from Meehanicsburg, but he and wife, Marjorie, live in Millersville . . . another of Our vets . . . Pageite . . . transferred from Lebanon Valley College to M.S.T.C. in sophomore year . . . avid baseball player . . . Mu Kappa Mu . . . Industrial Arts Society . . beautiful blue eyes and dark, curly hair . . . Pepsodent smile . . . friendly with all . . . LYMAN WEAVER Elementary Sham ok in . . . Beans . . . January graduate . . . fulfilled all his desires when he made the dean's list his last semester here . . . untiring worker in the Coffee Shop . . . tried out every curriculum except Library Science before he left M.S.T.C ... on championship wrestling team . . . Varsity Club member . . . his sixth graders kept him jumping with their perplexing questions . . . Shamokin, his pride and joy . . . summcrschooler . . . bashful around the women . . . claims he'll be a bachelor . . . starved himself during wrestling season . . . a good Joe ... a "D.P.” ... HAROLD R. WEIRICH Secondary Lancaster ■ . . Hal . . . star baseball pitcher . . . pitched a two and a three-hitter against West Chester . . . member of Phi Sigma Pi . Page Literary Society . . . elected president of Roddy Scientific Society . . . good, serious minded student . . . married . . . veteran . . . active and willing worker in all organizations to which he belonged ... a great guy . . . one of the Varsity Club's most active members.... JOHN J. WELLER, JR. Industrial Arts Bare title . . . Jack . . . served with U. S. Army in Japan . . . sports, hunting, and "Winnie" his main interest . . . Normalite . . . Kramer's cx-roomic . . . enjoys good music . . . Rod and Gun Club . . . Industrial Arts Society . . . F.T A. . . . sense of humor ... a capable leader . . . Theatre Arts Club . . . teaching LA. at Lititz High . . . blonde-hair, blue eyes. .. . V J» IROBERT W. WHEELER V 1 Industrial Arts Lancaster - . . Bob . . . member of Scouter's fraternity, Alpha Phi Omega . . . commutes daily from 420 E. King Street ... In Industrial Arts Society . . . one of our married students . . . Hard working industrious student . . . very conscientious in his studies . . . quiet... unassuming ... friendly. .. . PAUL R. WINDMULLER Secondary Lancaster . . . Windy . . . Pageile . . . member of college choir for four years . . . tall, dark, and handsome . . . four-year intra-mural basketball player . . . English Club . . . Social Studies Club . . . dry wit . . . tried to obtain floor show contract at Mickey's ... a dart shooter and a half . . . basketball referee of unusual (?) prowess... . DANIEL G. WISOTZKEY Secondary Wrigbtsville . . . Gus . . . Normalite . . . baseball manager . . . Varsity Clubber . . . played the scheming doctor in "Ramshackle Inn" . . . lived in the dorm last semester . . . ay, ay, ay Dolores . . . laughable . . . Social Studies major, Geography minor . . . has been on the radio several times . . . pleasant voice, infectious laugh and smile . . . picked up nickname, "Gus,” at M.S.T.C. . . . GERALDINE WOLFE Library Science New Holland . . . "Gerry" ... a "Wolfe" from a long line of "Hunters” . . . victim of the "Monday Morning Mania" after those wonderful weekends at home . . . another merciful Welfare member. . . illustrating executive ability as Library Science Club president . . . very proud of her extensive family —of Shmoos . . . "lights up” at the sign of the "Green Lantern" . . . first lady in the life of John R. McCarty, President of the Wolfe Heart-Strings Bureau.... MARIAN I. WOLFE Elementary Harrisburg . . . "Mim" . . . energy personified . . . fascinating eyes . . . loved by 34 bright-eyed little third graders . . . Girls’ Varsity Club member who swings a mean hockey stick . . . dished out literary dope-sheets for this year's TOUCHSTONE . . . an eyeful of blonde iove interest in "Ramshackle Inn" . . . "Needle” little help with your sewing? See "Mira" . . . her beautiful clothes evidence of her ability . . . served "smiles” with each pile of laundry . . . weekends with John at Penn's Phi Dclt house ... all in all, diminutive proof that the nicest things come in small packages. . . .MARY E. WORKMAN Elementary East Petersburg . . . Distinctive walk and warm laughter. .. coiffure of the times . . . hockey co-captain . . . swung her way to presidency of Girls' Varsity Club . . . balanced the books for Normal . . . secretary for class of '50 . . . devoted extra moments to Primary Club, Welfare, and F.T.A. . . . starred as alto soloist in Mr. Porter's productions . . . dear "Little Buttercup" . . . sews a fine scam . . . Wriggler’s advocate since that fateful December night . . . What! a swimmer . . . Skip's roomie . . . Smoker gal . . . SARAH JANE WORTH Library Science Cbambersburg ... A friend "Worth" having . . . "Sleepy Time Gal” . . . helped chart the course of the S.C.A. Ship of State as Cabinet member ... fit as a fiddle, and with one, too . . . four-year loyalty to orchestra and choir ... a future P.I.A.A. girls' basketball referee, she hopes . . . left her contribution to future prosperity at M.S.T.C. behind the placid countenance of Abraham Lincoln . . . GRACE IRENE WRIGHT Elementary Dallastown . . . Five feet two. eyes of blue . . . just big enough to take care of her first graders . . . thanks her lucky stars she didn't have her heart set on secondary . . . Mr. Porter's "seeing-eye" and four-year soprano in the choir . . . charter member of the Royal Order of Mastrotto Animal Lovers . . . prefers horses to chickens and pigs, however . . . supported S.C.A., F.T.A., L.S.A., and Primary Club . . . likes to tickle the ivories . . . JEAN LORRAINE YOUNG Elementary-Secondary Lancaster . . . Combination of blonde beauty and artistic originality, the reason why her fifth graders were entranced with "Miss Young" . . . beautiful clothes and wears them well . . . one of the ambitious few who taught both semesters to secure elementary and secondary experience . . . twirls a mean baton, as proven by her service to the M.S.T.C. band ... a sparkling prophecy of happy days ahead foretold by third finger, left hand. . . . SHIRLEY JANE YOUNG Library Science Lnnoyne . . "Shirl" . . . tall, dark, and far from dignified, all the more reason for the fun loving atmosphere in Room 209 . . . "guard' ed the reputation of the girls' basketball team for four years as "the air-foam kid with the chewing gum complex" ... a passion for apples, apple pie, applesauce—and Albert . . . ardent room rearranger, surprised her home-for the-wcekend roommate with a new arrangement almost every Sunday night . . .MARIAN YOUNGBLOOD „ Secondary Spring City . . . Skip "the sniffer” . . . tall, trim co-ed ... the tailored look . . . strictly the "Normal" kid . . . landed a Geography Major . . . finds time for F.T.A. . . . was able to utilize her biting humor as the "satirical" detective in "Ramshackle Inn” . . . bridge expert of the "Smoker” . . . charter member of the "stay loose” club . . . brought Spring City's feminine touch to Millersville . . . member of frosh initiation committee who could keep a straight face . . . responsible for success of "Senior Weekend.” . . . VICTOR W. YUDISKAS Industrial Arts Scranton . . . Vic . . . Tom's roomie . . . loves to heckle the ladies . . . January graduate . . . lives in the Poco-nos . . . has nice new car . . . member of the Industrial Arts Society . . . joined Page Literary Society . . . loves to tell about his hitch hiking tour of the nation ... a veteran- CHRISTIAN N. YUNGINGER Industrial Arts law caster . . . Chris . . . day student . . . Student Council representative in junior year . . treasurer of student government . . . dignified mustache . . . acting ability shown in "John I.oves Mary" production . . . Citamard member . . . interest in dramatics led him to acting with a Lancaster group also. . . . HARRY M. ZERFING Industrial Arts Millersburg . . . Harry . . . served four years in the Navy . . . (much of the time overseas) . . . married M.S.T.C. girl . . . proud papa of baby girl . . . played a lively saxophone in the Band . . . member of both Iota Lambda Sigma and Phi Sigma Pi . . . Normal-itc . . . can't wait to get back to wife, Janet, and little daughter. . . . JOSEPH ZIGOVITS, JR. Industrial Arts Coplay . . . 4-year hitch in the U. S. Navy . . . head of administrative division organized surface battalion 4-19 m Lancaster for three years . . . also ass't district commissioner of Lane. Boy Scouts . . . married a beautiful redhead . . . sect’y of Alpha Phi Omega and Bassler Geographic Society . . . vice pres, of M.D.S.A. . . . trainer of football, wrestling, basketball for three years . . . member of Pa. Council for Geography Teachers. .. .GRACE E. ZIMMERMAN Elementary Lancaster ... A blue-eyed miss with a fondness for blue . . . a good Scout, in more ways than one, as her Brownies will testify . . . authority on the gentle art of forgetfulness ... a day student who is noted for her enthusiastic support of the C.T.C. . . . her principles of geography course a big incentive to geography interests, especially in regard to France . . . Primary Club and F.T.A. membership keys to the future . . . “Page"d her way through four years of "elcm" work . . . will not forget her kindergarden and third grade cherubs... . Secondary FRANK A. PETRAS Kingston "Pet’' ... a big man on campus . . . first string end of football team . . . class treasurer several times . . . genial . . . good sense of humor . . . chauffeur for the troops as driver of the "Pccjuea Express" . . . one of the original Whiz kids of the intramural league . . . staunch Newman club member. ... EDWARD M. FRYE Elementary Donora . . . Served in the U. S. Navy four long years . . . Industrial Arts Society . . . did student teaching in Reynolds High School, at the Boys’ Club, and in the training school . . Page Literary Society . . . day student . . . the other half of the two graduating Fryes.. .. MRS. N. JEAN FRYE Industrial Arts Donora . . . One of our few female veterans . . . served in the Waves for two years . . . Page Literary Society . . . day student . . . attends M.S.T.C. with husband . . . Primary Club member . . . went through the rigors of student teaching with her first graders. ...  WHO’S WHO IN AMERICAN COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES Joseph Seitz Harold Weirich Hannah Gettz Henry Huber William Ling Irene Gcnbauffe This year, ten M.S.T.C. seniors were awarded recognition in Who's Who in American Colleges and U niversilies. A nominating committee, consisting of the college president, the dean of instruction, dean of women, dean of men, senior class deans, and secretaries of various campus organizations, chose the 1949-50 recipients of this honor. To be included in Who’s Who, a student must possess a combination of qualities which testify to his contributions to the college. Among these, character, leadership, scholarship, and potentialities, are the four main criteria upon which final judgment is based. An edition is published yearly, disclosing the names of students from American colleges and universities, who have been chosen to represent their particular schools. ■ I Eleanor Oelschlager William Cushman Glenna EshelmanSENIOR PLAYRAMSHACKLE INN Patton ......... An bulb not Joyce Rogers. . Mame Phillips CAST ............. David Davis ........... Robert Henley ......Marion Youngblood ..........Irene Genbauffc Constable Small .... Burnell Strausbaugh Belinda Pryde................ Hannah Gcttz Commodore Lucius Tou-ser Joseph Seitz Gail Russel.............. Pauline Shepherd Alice Fisher........................Esther Clay Dr Russel............ ... Danial Wisotzkey Bill Phillips................Harmon Brown M r. Tempie................George 11 arabin Mary Temple................... Marion Wolfe Gilhooley.......... Christian Yunginger Fred Porter.................. William I.ingg This mystery farce in three acts by George Baston finds an elderly, rather eccentric spinster buying by chance a ramshackle inn, headquarters of a hijack liquor gang. Belinda Pryde’s life savings go to Mame Philips in exchange for "Ye Olde Colonial Inn" but Belinda buys more than she bargained for. The seemingly inconspicuous handyman Patton shows through his furtive actions that he is the head of a large liquor ring. Unknown to Belinda, F.B.I. agents and members of the gang both have registered as guests which sets the scene for action that comes so fast as to be confusing. Trunks, closets and safes are filled with bodies and the air is filled with laughter as Miss Pryde begins to realize the truth. A touch of romance adds to the confusion and precipitates another murder but dear old Belinda is gay through it all. Sowing the seeds of dissension among the gang and wielding a wicked bottle, our heroine clears the stage of hijackers and soon has the situation under control. The play's surprising yet humorous ending seemed a fitting conclusion to an enjoyable evening of drama.UNDERCLASSMEN 1L u no toija L atnuuj, us i ou sow ijoti slia toud to Ul 99 IJUNIOR CLASS Entering the third year at M.S.T.C., the junior class reelected Raymond Roden, president; John Michalwicz, vice president; Ruth Bragg, secretary; and Barbara McLeod, treasurer. Ever since this group entered Millersviilc, they have proven themselves a hard-working and interested class. Much admiration is extended to the junior class for its many contributions, both educational and purely recreational. ! This year, early in the Erst semester, The Annual Country Fair was held by the class. The old gym with its colorful array of balloons, fresh hay, and streamers really looked like the location of a good old-fashioned | barn dance. Pies, cakes, and jellies were give away to lucky students, and plenty of entertainment was on hand. Later in the year, another annual affair which was introduced into M.S.T.C. by this class was held, that being the Talent Night Show. As we look into the history of the junior class, we find that many worthwhile contributions have been made which were of benefit to the student body as a whole. INDUSTRIAL ARTS AND SECONDARYI I Left to right arc the Junior Class Officers: John Michalvvici, Vice-President; Barbara McLeod, Treasurer; William Petru, Secretary; Raymond Roden, President. LIBRARY SCIENCE AND ELEMENTARYSOPHOMORES Facing their second year in college, members of the sophomore class were determined to make this year even more successful than the last. Their first big social event of the year, was the Autum Cruise, a dance which was held in Brooks Hall. The gymnasium was decorated with nautical trappings which created a shiplike atmosphere. At this affair, Glenna Reese was crowned queen of the good ship. "U.S.S. Millersville." Another big event of the year, which this class sponsored was a 'Movie-Nite' held in the gym. One full length feature and a number of short subjects and comedies were shown. After this the chairs were removed and the audience danced for the remainder of the evening. These affairs were made possible only through the capable direction of the class officers who were: John Plymyer, president; Steve Palkovic, vice president; Virginia Hampton, secretary; and Joyce McCrancy, treasurer. The chairman of the social committee was Doris Brown, while Eules Philips headed the publicity group. Elizabeth A. Falkenstine was chairman of the decoration committee. Dr. Mary A. Brightbill and Mr. James Koken are the class advisors. The class is looking forward to the next two years at M.S.T.C. when they' will be able to plan more and better events. INDUSTRIAL ARTS AND SECONDARYThe Sophomore Class Officers from left to right arc: Joyce McCraney. Treasurer; Steve Palkovic, Vice-President; John Plymycr, President; Virginia Hampton, ec retar y. LIBRARY SCIENCE AND ELEMENTARYFRESHMAN CLASS Left to right arc the Freshmen Class Officers: Rebecca Frantz, Treasurer; Anne Cochrane, Secretary; Robert Morrison, Vice-President; Jerry Hodge, Student Council Representative. Wipe that smile off your face, Frosh, this is a serious matter. It took a while for us to realize that this would initiate us into the friendly atmosphere surrounding our new life. After four weeks of orientation, we were accepted as a vital part of the college life on campus, and, believe it or not, the upperclassmen became our friends! After much campaigning and picture advertisement, we held our class elections The offices were entrusted to Roddy O'Day, president; Robert Morrison, vice-presi- dent. Anne Cochrane, secretary, and Rebecca Frantz, treasurer. Spring fever acted as an incentive for our class, and we sponsored a dance in March. It was the highlight of our first year of college. This has been a happy year for all of us, in spite of orientation and studying for finals. To our Penn State freshmen, we extend a sincere wish for their success in the future. LIBRARY SCIENCE AND ELEMENTARYINDUSTRIAL ARTS AND SECONDARYORGANIZATIONS f if tlcLZ tlecd. aIio.11 ye L il,: HOW'VARSITY CLUB The Varsity Club was organized in 1890, and has been welcoming new, broad-chested male athletes to its ranks ever since. Those beautiful black sweaters with the yellow M s" on them weren’t received by sitting on a bench, either. The sweaters arc given to those men who have earned two letters in the same sport. When the huskies are admitted to the club, they receive the Varsity Key. Besides making up the teams of the many college sports, the athletes are active in other ways. During football season no one escapes from that question, "Have you got a Booster tag, Mac?' It is also from the Varsity Club that you buy all those programs of athletic events that you attend. One of the highlights of the group’s activities this year as always, was the Varsity Drag given on the eve-ning of Homecoming Day. The Varsity Sweetheart was also honored at the gala dance. But all these activities couldn't have been accomplished as they were if it hadn’t been for the capable direction of Dale Miller as president. He was assisted by Alan Brace, vice-president; William Cushman, secretary; and Melvin Hunter, treasurer. The faculty advisers arc Coaches Pucillo, Fisher, Rupp, and Bishop. President Dale Miller Set ret ary William Cushman T reaiurer Melvin Hunter Vice-President Alan BraceSTUDENT COUNCIL Each year one representative is elected to the Student Council from every class, the M.C.A., the W.C.A., the M.D.S.A., the W.D.S.A., and a general election is held for the president and two students-at-Iarge. These students are obliged to serve, to the best of their ability, the entire student body in the student government. In order to acquaint the student body with their Student Council, the first dance of the year, ' The Council Bounce," was sponsored by this organization. Student Council's big project is the Old Gym. Those who have been here several years may vouch for the many improvements made in the Old Gym. This year. new tables, chairs, cigarette stands, and entertainment facilities were added. Much has been done by the Student Council to improve the general appearance and serviceability of this building. Other services offered to the student body by the Student Council arc the yearly publication of the ''Handbook," sponsoring of the annual Christmas Dance, disbursement of allocations, and general discussion and action upon important matters arising in the administration of student government. Officers of Student Council this year were: Henry Huber, president; David Davis, vice-president; Ethel-anne Boden, secretary; Lena Bortncr, treasurer. Vice-President David Davis President Henry Huber Treasurer Lena Bortncr Secretary Hthclanne BodenMILLE, HE SNAPPER Sports Stuff iUoAlM Varsity Clubs Sponsor Hop ru (eo‘1 and rr.andlWJW! the pub-listing pUnl erf the H w Wilton Pub-li Mng Company, and various booh •bopa and muacurnt. . Tbialr, ’ ™ iL Vor Uiriij ejrer' "TV “ ?a4a Features Staff Itttflccsvtlk nam»ct v«l xxrv MATH C BAND S At Long Last! A Sugs! Spring — Annual Ban Nanlmr 9 Everyone Kaa Keaid about it everyone Kaa liked it' Kaa wanted to aec it—and at tael their dream are comm| the bond of MillenviUo State Teachers College will doctor "The Bravo Bandmaater." Cuiaeppe C evening. March 22. at 8:1 5 p. m T | la admission la IMa nawrt al.i |-| must tukaifi their acUvNy tiehet far a concert ticket bef.ee aooei. March IT. The ticket may be secured at the office of the dean. March 13. 1 . and ST Dorothy Morgan, ticket chairman. and her committee will be Mtu ated outride the chapel on Wed day. March IT. until noon After thl lime ticket, will be told for the pr erf on. Jvilar, laa included ThU admiuion fee II made po.ilble becau of the aaalalance of Page and Normal Idler.ry Soclctle who are iponsor the arttiti. Oueat Conductor Maestro Cuiaeppe Creator Napiea, come from a long Urn BiuiicUna Aa a boy he itudled a famoua Conaervatory of Muilc In plea and excelled at a concert tr bontrt At IT he became conductor Uic Nopie Municipal Band and held that coveted portion for right yrar. In 1 W. he gave hi. hr it American concert at Hammenteln i Roof Car-den He oeganued hla own opera company in ITS which flourithed for five year He will celebrate the both annlver-aary of hla arrival In America by conducting the M8TC band In a perform-aace of hla original compoa.tlona -Turkish March- and Traumerei.' and arrangement, of 'Nabocco Overture,' Turkish March.-God To Thce.- o ' Co -" XT SAT. SICIANS Oliver Guest Speakers School Math Meeting Dr. Boyer. General Chairman I be boat to lh« annual High School Mathematics onTetencewhich it scheduled for Saturday. March I 2. The general meeting of teacher , professor . and other interested in maihematKa erection of Dr. Lee Emerson Boyer, head of the d - rensured Speaker The feature addreat of the day long conference will be at 10:30 a. m when Pr Harold P. Fawcett, pcofeaaoe of education at Ohio State University, will apeak on the topic 'Secondary Mat hematic a and lb Core Currlcu- ert Leh Nealt Willin' fan .llend-neet.ng nee on arch I •ration to the State'T Ponference. to be held in Hairiiburg, April IJ-1 . at which time a model conatitutioo for the State of Pennaytvaiua will be framed D gln.a Beck and Mr VikcM P »fdvip Business Staff Dr. Fawcett baa been a member of lb University faculty alnce IM3. and chairman of the department of education since ! He ha received hla matter'a and doctorate degree from Columbia University in New York City lautchran Adders After the luncheon meeting begin-mg at IT JO pm Dr A I Oliver -wall present hla view on Building the ew Mathematic Curriculum.- Dr. Of-er it the aamtant profciaor of education at the University of Penniyi-vama, and chairman of the State Committee for Revising the Malb Curriculum, He ha had much experience in high school and In other college In Pennsylvania aa well aa other l te . He h a written numerous magailn article and ha helped in the writing of a book concerning mathematic Other Mew Ung The day a program alao Include math ditplay arranged and »upermed by George K Anderson, professor A panel discussion will be held al JO a m on the topic 'Proposed Im-'or the New Curriculum" of 1100 «F. Connected the World Student 'la used among people of ail the money 1 aent oversea •tudenta attending unlveraitle Th. WSSF la alao working to IspUced person settled here and These people will re pc school at the later conference In Harrisburg hundred dollar to the aortal atud.es t'onUaued aa Page FleaSNAPPY 5L Published Bi-weekly by and for the Students of Mn.lJJLWIl.l,F. STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE EXECUTIVE BOARD WillUm Kettcrm»n. William Petni (’51) Co-Editorvin-Chief Richard Dutchcr (’50) Bu ine s Manager FACULTY ADVISOR Louis Jennings STAFF Eugene Moran (‘51) Sport Editor Marilyn Young CSl) News Editor Barbara Witmyer ('$?) Feature Editor Kenneth Ernst. Thomas Water . Elizabeth Falkenstine ('52) Make-up Editor John Plymyer ( 52) Exchange Editor REPORTERS Feature Staff—Margaret E. Beilis, Alice T. Doles. Florence Shepherd. Emili Clay. Norma King, Winifred Bull. Barbara Helveston. Allen Adair, Bob Hanci James R. Hollinger. Mary Pclger, Jane Dale. New Staff—Gloria Smith. Evelyn Strayer. Helen Witmer. Connie Matlavage son. Mildred Martin, Patricia Jane Smith, Nan Cole, Estelle S Sport Staff—Barbara Aston. Kitty Charles. Dorothy Pinkerton. Gerald Kolb, Kenneth Ernst. Make-Up—Carol Read, Esther Everitt Exchange Reporter—Evelyn Schoflstall TYPISTS Erika Holr, Jean Graybill MEMBER INTERCOLLEGIATE PRESS Of all the organizations on the campus, the Snapper, school newspaper, probably distinguished itself the most during the past year. Coming out with very little of the style evident in previous years, the new Snapper made innovations for which both students and faculty had high praise. The first great metamorphosis occurred last year when Bill Kettcrman and Bill Pctru were appointed coeditors-in-chief. In this capacity, they have worked out the newspaper policies now in practice. The most obvious and eye-catching of the recent changes is that of the newspaper makeup. The shiny paper used in past years was relinquished, and, at present, the Snapper is run off on regular newsprint. The is- sues are also larger, and a new and more attractive head has replaced the old one, adding much to its general appearance. Other policies have changed also. Headlines are varied and unusual, catching the attention easily. Better journalistic styles have been employed in stories. The Snapper is sponsoring a drive to bring a foreign student to M.S.T.C., offering him a year’s free tuition, which is to be paid by the student body at large. Thus far, some funds have been raised. In February, the Snapper staff sponsored a show entitled. The Filthy February Follies,” the proceeds of which went to this cause.THE 1950 "Ye gads!” At last, we have finished four years of college, four years of happy, not to be forgotten times. The earnest wish of the staff is that the 1950 Touchstone will help to hold and bring back to you unchanged those priceless memories of life on campus. Plans can not be executed, deadlines met, and a successful yearbook published without willing cooperation, so the editor takes this opportunity to thank the staff for their interest and initiative. Special thanks to the Art Staff who did a good job on paste ups, a rather routine but costly job which most staffs leave to the publisher. David R. Davis, Editor EDITORIAL STAFF Ethclannc Boden, Associate Editor Rudolph Miller Pauline Shepherd Esther Clay Shirley Snyder Elizabeth Falkcnstine Gloria Smith Hannah Gcttz Guenther StcfTan I.aruc Gluntz Marion Wolfe William Peiru Leo Sabatine Gene RothbergTOUCHSTONE BUSINESS STAFF Albert Phy, Businas Ahn.t rr Richard Freeman, As sislans Kenneth Childs Robert Gaddis Irene GcnbaufTc Florence Lehman Jane Ritchcy William Seal Joanne WeilerNORMAL LITERARY SOCIETY Beginning its ninety-fourth year on the Millersville campus, Normal greeted the freshmen in September. The entertainment for the Normal "Get Acquainted Party" was the Gegirgs-Trachtcn Verein "Edelweiss." a singing and dancing group from Reading. Dancing and refreshments also shared the spot light of the evening. This program was to secure the approval of the new students on campus and lure them from Normal's rival, the Page Literary Society. The Normal Anniversary also provided entertainment for the college in October. The Negro chorus from Chcyney State Teachers College, under the direction of Dr. C Leslie Pinckney Hill, gave a concert in the college chapel. Normal held their annual Sweetheart Dance. T his is the bright star in Normal's social calendar and was held in the month of hearts—February. For this lovely dance the girls gathered all their courage and invited the boys. The finale on the Normal calendar was the college band concert under the direction of the guest conductor, Guiseppc Creatore. Mr. Creatorc is a man of international fame and he provided a fine program for the college.The climax of the Sweetheart Dance was the crowning of the queen—Barbara McLeod! Gegirgs Trachten Verein "Edelweiss"—German dancers at the Normal Reception. 'Tuas a lovely way to spend an evening.OFFICERS President.............. .................William Seal Vice-President ..........................John Flatley Secretary . Esther Clay Treasurer . . . . Catherine Shenk This is the first year since 18 5, when Page was founded, that membership in one of the literary societies wasn't required—yet Page kept up its membership to what it's done in the past. It still remains an active-organization regardless of its age. Under the adviser-ship of Miss Esther Lenhardt, Page has contributed much to the welfare of MSTC. Many varied and interesting programs were offered to the college this year. Two of them will probably not be forgotten for years to come. The first was a gentle satire on the opposing society's freshman welcome. Who doesn't remember the "Etruscan Hoop-Lo Dancers" who invaded the Old Gym that night? The second was the"RICH IN TRUTH” Above:—"Page girls" distribute free artificial chrysanthemums at the Homecoming Day football game. big variety show "The Naughty November Gaieties." Held in the chapel, this new type of show on the campus was thoroughly enjoyed by all. Other entertainments throughout the year included the movie "Great Expectations," a Christmas program at one of the Wednesday chapel services, featuring all-Freshman talent, and a musical talent night. William Seal, president of the literary society, did a good job of supervising and guiding the many activities of the year. He was helped by equally capable officers such as John Flat ley, vice-president; Esther Clay, secretary; Catherine Shenk, treasurer; and William Ketter man, historian. Below:—AH Page's activities aren't literary !CITAMARD CAST Ernest Woolley. WILLIAM KETTERMAN Crichton .. . WILLIAM SEAL Aftatha Lasenby............ ESTHER CLAY Catherine Lasenby .HANNAH GETTZ Mary I.ascnby......................GLORIA SMITH Mr. Treherne ............JOHN PLYMYER Lord Loam .............. WALTER ULLRICH Lord Brocklehurst........... ALLEN CLAY Tweeny.............................A DELE HURSHMAN Lady Brocklehurst ETHELANNE BODEN MISS LENHARDT AdvisorOFFICERS President.........................William Ketterman Vice-President .....................Ethclannc Bodcn Secretary........................... Marilyn Young Treasurer.............................Eules Phillips "Curtain Time!" How those two words bring a thrill to the hearts and a lump to the throats of would-be actors and actresses pursuing their love of drama in M.S.T.C.'s Citamard Club. This year’s club has seen the fulfillment of things long hoped for, especially in its new practice of inviting the entire student body to witness its monthly one-act productions and inviting them to share their thoughts and opinions on the plays presented through the use of rating cards. This new feature of Citamard enables the club to broaden its influence, attract potential talent, and receive helpful suggestion for improvement of its program. President Bill Ketterman planned a busy, happy year for his co-lovers in dramatics, and it has been just that. From the time approximately one dozen slightly terrified new members endured the rigors of the most unique initiation antics in Citamard history until the curtain went down on the last one-act production of the 1949-50 season, life in Citamard was gay, glad, and dramatically delightful. In addition to monthly business meetings and accompanying dramatic productions, Citamard sponsored the annual High School Drama Night in November, with four high schools presenting one act plays or excerpts from full length productions with several other high schools being in attendance. After a critic discussed the plays with the individual casts, Citamard members entertained the groups informally in the dormitory reception rooms. As an additional contribution, Citamard brought to the college campus, once each semester, an outstanding dramatic artist who presented his program for the entire student body. A field trip was taken in the spring to Hedgerow Theatre for both appreciation and inspirational purposes. By far the greatest event of the year, however, was the never-to-be-forgotten spring production of "The Admirable Crichton" with its all Fnglish cast. Who among us can forget the glorious moments of this Barrie masterpiece. And who among us can forget the untiring and self-sacrificing efforts of a most marvelous coach, Miss Rebckah Sheaffer. Bill Ketterman was ably assisted in his direction of the club this year by Ethclannc Bodcn, vice-president; Marilyn Young, secretary; and Eules Phillips, treasurer. These four, guiding the Citamard ship of state, for their fellow shipmates, wish to launch a vote of thanks and appreciation to Miss Esther Lcnhardt, whose loyalty and service to the club will be remembered always by all those who participated in its activities.WOMEN’S COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION Reading clockwise are WCA’s officers: Treasurer, Rulh Lopes; Vice-President, Shirley Younj;; President, Eleanor Oclschlager; Secretary, Jeanette Huber. Hurry girls! Let's don't be late after such a big date! It's that midnight snack to top off a long, hard day! Dormitory life—that never-to-be-forgotten experience of college days that we shall remember always! Even the mass meetings, fire drills, study hour regulations, and limited permissions will seem wonderful to us when we look back upon them in future years. And the little gab sessions in one another's room, which formed a vital part of our college education, will lx- the more dear because they will be memories tinged with true meaning. The administration of the intricacies of dormi-tory living at Millersville is entrusted to the W.C.A., which in addition to taking care of rules and regulation, sponsors a busy program of activities throughout the year. September brought the traditional Big-Little Sister Party, a special occasion in the junior girls' program of acclimating the new freshman girls to life at Millersville. In October W.C.A. sponsored a tea on Parent's Day, in order that the visitors might join in the atmosphere of friendliness and cordiality that is typical of M.S.T.C. Homecoming Day brought a unique display to greet the alumni, set up on the balcony above the main entrance to the dormitory. Pumpkins and corn stalks were arranged on the balcony, to form a background for a huge black cloth sign, upon which golden autumn leaves formed the welcome, W.C.A. GREETS YOU, in the school colors. MEN’S COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION Men living in the college dormitory are members of the Men's Community Association, an organization through which they reap many benefits. The pride of the M.C.A. is the "canteen" located in the cver-famous "dungeon,'' a popular gathering place in the evening. A television set, bought by the organization, is the main attraction. However, other forms of entertainment are offered, such as dart boards, table tennis, cards, and eating facilities where ice cream, candy, pretzels, soft drinks, and other food is accessible. Through the sale of refreshments and through a yearly auctioning of unclaimed laundry, the M.C.A. manages to make most of its profit. Auction night is'a gala affair—a part of dorm life never-to-be-forgotten. Officers of the M.C.A. are: president, Charles Korkuch; vice-president, Ronald Richards; secretary, Joseph Fink; treasurer, John Flatley. Dr. Clyde S. Stine, dean of men, is the advisor of M.C.A. Front left to right are MCA officers: Secretary Joseph Fink; Vice-President. Ronald Richards; President, Charles Korkuch; Treasurer, John Flatley; and Robert Benson, head of the Canteen. Good-bye five o'clock shadotv! Social life in the men's dorm. .THEATRE ARTS CLUB The Industrial Arts Theatre Club, an indispensible auxiliary to the Citamard Club, again showed its ingenuity this year in the staging of several plays. Specializing in lighting and backstage technique, building new scenery and stage properties, the I. A. Theatre Club was responsible for the sets for high school drama night, the Senior Play, the Christmas Play, and the yearly Citamard production. The organization, sponsored by Miss Esther Lenhardt, is made up of men in the Industrial Arts Curriculum, who arc especially interested in staging productions. Not only are these men responsible for scenery, lighting, and stage properties, but they also control sound effects and other off-stage business, relieving the director of many responsibilities. Receiving no remuneration for their many hours of work, these men are deserving of praise and recognition. This year’s officers were Joseph Koehler, director; Frank Prescott, Assistant Director; Earl Benevit, secretary-treasurer.OFFICERS WOMEN’S DAY STUDENTS The Women's Day Student Association, that group which provides a home away from home for our commuting women, has its headquarters under the veranda. The room which was painted last year has been kept in good condition by the girls. Freshly cut flowers arc placed about the room whenever possible with the colored watering can close by. At the Christmas party the girls enjoyed decorating the tree, singing carols, listening to the talent program, exchanging gifts, and eating tasty refreshments. The Halloween cider pour was a marked success as proven by the gallons of cider that disappeared down the throats of visiting males. The girls worked hard and displayed keen interest in all activities sponsored by the association. All members agree that the girls' day student room must be kept a cheerful place in which to play cards and meet with friends. There is even a minority who contend that the room was originally designed for study. President ................... Glcnna Eshleman Vice-President .....................Florence Lehman Secretary ................ ....Patricia Kelly rreasurer................................... Betty Bard President......... Vice-President . . Secretary........ T reasurer........ OFFICERS . Henry Kcncagy Joscph Zigovits Robert Mayer .George Wilson MEN’S DAY STUDENTS The Men's Day Student Association, that group of men who commute to and from school, have established their lair in the basement of the old gym. In the way of entertainment the men have changed their activities with the changing world. Darts have replaced pinochle. Candy and coke machines have been installed for the convenience of the men; a walk to Pat's or the Coffee Shop would be out of the question! The room is conducive to study with the strains of ’Music, Music, Music" and Rag Mop” gently floating from the radio. The men sponsored a chess tournament under the capable management of Milton Paul, a member and Lancaster County chess champ. All the students of the college were invited to participate. Under the direction of Henry Kcncagy the men have made plans for improving the room.FUTURE TEACHERS OF AMERICA The January meeting of F.T.A., the topic of uhieb uas, "Hate You I Ltd Your Vitamins'" The Future Teachers of America was organized on the Millcrsville campus in 1945. Since that time, its membership has swelled, until, at present, there arc 168 participants in the chapter. Its main purpose is to inform prospective teachers about professional activities in the field and to arouse their interest for teaching. A $2.00 membership fee is required. This entitles the student to regular subscriptions of the National Education Association Journal and the Pennsylvania State Education Association Journal. He is also entitled to junior membership in the two associations. This year, the F.T.A. sponsored a course in camping with Mr. Roth instructing. Each year, F.T.A. also sponsors High School Senior's Day. In December observance was given to National Education Week, through the presentation of a special program. That regal display at the front gate on Homecoming Day may also be attributed to this organization. The 1949-50 officers of F.T.A. were Hobart Sapp, president; Franklin Auxcr. vice-president; Alcnc Jones, secretary; T om Park, treasurer. Mr. William Duncan and Mr. Joseph Torchia arc the organization's advisors. President Vice-President Secretary. Treasurer...... OFFICERS Hobart Sapp Frank Auxcr Alcne Jones Thomas ParkSOCIAL STUDIES CLUB A new organization, appropriately called the Social Studies Club sprang up on our campus this year. Majors and minors in the social studies field felt it worthwhile to have a club on campus in which they could share their interests in that particular field, and in which they could discuss the difficulties encountered m teaching social studies. The aims of the Social Studies Club are to make the students more conscious of historical facts, to promote a better understanding of the present political situation, and to receive advice concerning the teaching of history. Miss Carolyn County served as chairman of the organization this year. Advisors of the club are Mr. V. A. Champa, Dr. Virginia Beck, and Dr. Dean Dutcher. ALPHA PHI OMEGA Alpha Phi Omega, a comparatively new fraternity on campus, has shown, in the past two years, its intent to accomplish its aim- service. To be eligible for membership in this fraternity, one must be a Scout or a former Boy Scout. The purpose of the fraternity, as set forth in the national constitution is "To assemble college men in the fellowship of the Scout oath and law', to develop friendship and promote service to humanity." This year, Alpha Phi Omega sponsored Homecoming; John Boyd was chairman of the event. The fraternity also sponsored a secondhand book service, a new innovation helpful to college students, and they also held a Scout Master's Training Course for local townspeople. Still another service offered by Alpha Phi Omega was extended to a Scout group in Royerstown, which was having difficulty in administration. The successfulness of Alpha Phi Omega may be seen in its already impressive record and the swelling of its membership. Officers this year were: president, Frank Prescott; vice-president, Rudolph Miller; secretary, Herbert Waltz; treasurer, James Long; historian, Harold Groff. Some folks may treasure memories of the little brown jug,” but M.S.T.C. guys and gals will long remember “the big brown jug” which welcomed students and alumni to Homecoming Day's "Cider Pour” in the Old Gym, sponsored by English Club and Delta Phi Eta. January brought the initiation of eight new members; and as pledges walked about the campus adorned with big red and white hair bows and large identifying signs, many freshmen probably thought nostalgically, or otherwise, of the days of orientation when they were in much the same situation. Initiation lasted only a week, however, and a just reward came to the pledges in a gala initiation banquet at Howard Johnsons, after which the new candlelight induction ceremony based on the four planks of the sorority—scholarship, leadership, character, and service. Again this year the best "nuts” in the dormitory were the "doughnuts” of the Delta Phi Eta girls. Their sale enabled the girls to secure funds for the carrying out of various worthy projects. This year's officers, Hannah Gcttz, president; Glenna Eshlcman, vice-president; Ruth Bassler, secretary; Janet Kurtz, treasurer; and Joanne Wcilcr, historian wish to thank faculty advisors, Miss Ruby Boggs and Miss Ethel Jane Powell for their sincere cooperation and guidance on behalf of all the club members. members were accepted in the traditionally beautiful  I With the feeling of fellowship governing its action, Phi Sigma Pi Honorary Fraternity this year lowered its point requirement for entry to 2.75. The brotherhood says this was done to enable more men to enter into the close friendship a fraternity has to offer. Only through invitation may one become a member, and those men selected were considered on the basis of scholarship, leadership, and character. At the beginning of the school year, Phi Sig secured a tower room in which all the campus fraternities are invited to hold their meetings. Both the informal inquisition and formal induction of new men into Phi Sigma Pi was held in the room this year. Of course the famous paddlings and "midnight walks" were again a part of the initiation. Besides its monthly meetings, the fraternity presented the annual Christmas show which was held free of charge. The chapel program last December was a movie entitled "Scrooge." There was also a visit from old St. Nick, who was guided by Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer. The officers for the 1949-50 Phi Sigma Pi were president, William Seal; secretary, Fred Stinner; and treasurer, Robert Mayer.Iota chapter of the lota Lambda Sigma fraternity was installed on our campus in 1935. It is a national professional industrial education organization and exists to give recognition to students for scholarship in the Industrial Arts field of education. In order to be eligible for membership in Iota Lambda Sigma, one must have a B average and at least 2d credits in Industrial Arts subjects. Each year, it is this fraternity's practice to complete a project to be presented to the college, which is a most worthwhile service. This year, these men gave to the college a portrait of Dr. Burl Osburn, head of the Industrial Arts Department, in recognition of his contributions to the field of Industrial Arts education. At present, there are twenty-four members in Iota Lambda Sigma. Officers arc C. W. Lubbe, president; Robert Benson, vice-president; Irvin Rose, secretary-treasurer (first semester); George Freeman, secretary-treasurer (second semester); Charles Korkuch, historian. Mr. Henry Kauffman and Mr. Paul W. Esheiman arc advisors. IMKM KAPPA Mu Kappa Mu boasts a membership of sixty-five, the largest in its history. With its increase in size has come a new spirit of cooperation and unitary action that has contributed much to this up-and-coming organization. The club’s homecoming display was an example of a product of well-coordinated effort. One of the projects to which the group looked forward was the trip to the Bureau of Standards in Washington, this spring. Last year, Mu Kappa Mu originated a mathematics competitive test for high school seniors. The test was given again this year with awards offered at fifteen dollars for the first prize, ten dollars for second prize, five dollars for third prize, and honorable mentions. In this way the club extends its influence beyond the campus, and furthers the interests of mathematics in the surrounding area. Under the capable leadership of Fred Stinner as president, Robert Casper as vice-president, Lee Meredith as secretary, and Richard Cocklcy as treasurer Mu Kappa Mu has completed another year's growth toward the acquisition of a greater understanding of mathematics and its place in our world today. Dr. Lee Boyer is faculty advisor for Mu Kappa Mu.STUDENT CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION Many students look forward to the Wednesday evening meetings held by the Student Christian Association, for they are friendly gatherings offering fellowship, fun, and spiritual guidance. Whether the group is singing, receiving a speaker, or having a social affair, there is always a general feeling that a real need is being satisfied. Besides regularly scheduled meetings, the S.C.A. holds Sunday evening Vesper Services, consisting of a half-hour of hymns, prayer, inner solitude and thought. Each year, the S.C.A. goes to the Mennonite Children's Home in Millcrsville and distributes Christmas gifts. As the Yuletidc approaches, caroling expeditions are made throughout the town by members of S.C.A. S.C.A.'s activities and benefits are not confined to our campus alone. Each year, the group sponsors the World Student Service bund, the proceeds of which go to needy students and schools throughout the world. Spiritual Enrichment Week is but one highlight of the association’s calendar, which was so astutely fulfilled this year by the organization. Officers were Sarah Sen ft, president , Jane Worth, vice-president; Burnell Strausbaugh, secretary; treasurer, Sylvia Plouse.LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION Under the direction of its president, Earl Benevit, the Lutheran Student Association accomplished many worthwhile activities which contributed to the member's religious life. This organization cooperates with Lutheran churches in the village and contributes each year to the college Spiritual Enrichment Week. Miss Esther Lenhardt, advisor, has been affiliated with the Lutheran Student Association for four years. The organization meets every two weeks —on Wednesday evenings immediately after the dinner hour. During this time a brief worship program is offered. This year, the L.S.A. had films on mission work of the church; two displaced persons also attended meetings and offered speeches of special interest to the group, and general discussions were held concerning church rituals. There arc approximately 30 members in the organization. A new feature of the L.S.A. was a project undertaken this spring. They sold postcards of college campus scenes to the student body and other individuals. A dinner was also held in St. Paul's Church as another spring function. NEWMAN CLUB Since its affiliation in 1941 with the National Federation of Newman Clubs, the Millcrsville State Teachers College Chapter has been serving as a medium of contact between the Catholic Church and her members matriculating at M.S.T.C. The primary purpose of the Newman Club is to maintain a close contact and relationship between its members and their church. This is accomplished principally through the bi-monthly meetings which are held in the Women's Day Student Room on the campus. At these meetings talks arc given relating to religious subjects followed by discussion periods in which the students participate. The meetings arc under the direction of Rev. Louis A. Creeden, chaplain. At various times throughout the year, the club has been honored with the presence of guest speakers, including priests and prominent laymen of the area. The officers of the Newman Club who have served this year are: president, Charles Korkuch; vice-president, Steve Palkovic; and secretary-treasurer, Elizabeth Falkenstine. The year was highlighted by several social events which were under the direction of the social committee of which Gerald Barger was chairman. Eugene Moran was chairman of the program committee for the past year.ENGLISH CLUB The primary aim of the English Club is to solve English problems of student teachers, to improve functional diction among its members, to develop appreciation of contemporary prose and poetry, and to establish a common bond of English interest that will persist in the member s professional life-after they leave M.S.T.C.. Since the club's founding in 1933, monthly programs have been presented. This year, meetings were held every Thursday afternoon at -1:00 p.m. Under the capable leadership of its president, William Petru, the club held a Christmas party, and in November. Dr. Lingen-feller, head of the English Department, and advisor of the organization, spoke on his summer activities at Breadloaf, where many contemporary authors met and discussed various problems. Dr. Lingenfcltcr has been advisor of the English Club since the close of the last war. Other officers are: Jack Strausbaugh, vice president; Florence Lehman, secretary; Shirley Young, treasurer. LIBRARY SCIENCE CLUB The dub opened this year's activities by holding a picnic to welcome back old members and to greet those freshmen interested in the library curriculum. Due to rain, the picnic was held in the Library Science Room. The Library Science Club meets monthly to develop ideals in library science as they apply to the public school and community through their discussions on library work, problems and news. The club acted as host to the Third Annual High School Library Club Conference this year. Increasing interest is shown in this conference yearly. A scries of Sunday evening book reviews were sponsored by this organization. A picnic and food sale are held by the club each year, the proceeds of which arc added to the library flower fund. The officers of the club are Gerry Wolfe, president; Lena Bortner, vice-president; Dorothy Morgan, secretary; and Jane Hol-linger, treasurer.PRIMARY CLUB r The Primary Club is the student branch of the National Association of Childhood Education. Interesting and informative programs were planned for the entire year under the leadership of the advisor, Miss Charlotte Good, and Jeanette Huber, president. The programs this year offered interesting and helpful information, not only for those who are student teaching, but also for the future student teachers. Demonstrations in Music, Art, and classroom activities form the core about which the programs are planned. At Christmas, Miss Jenkins gave a piano recital, and Miss Lenhardt told a story, "The Song from Heaven." A more varied type of program carried out the second semester featured a movie on "Infant Behavior” by Dr. GascII, a talk by Dr. Robert Kemble, psychiatrist, on behavior of children and their implications in school life, a talk by Mrs. Jane Grey Smith on the techniques and source materials for story telling, and a reading forum by the Primary club members. The culminating activity of the year was a banquet held in Lancaster for the one hundred and ten members. Pr'udcn, S'rrtlar Treasure nt °FfICERs : Audr? Jane Hitch, ey RODDY SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY It was just last year—in 1949—that the Roddy Scientific Society again took its place among the extra-curricular activities on campus. The club was disbanded shortly after the start of the war because of the lack of men in the college, but it is now coming to the fore. The reorganization was done mainly through the efforts of Hal Wcirich and George Wilson. Programs consist of faculty speakers, members of the club addressing the group, and movies. Chemistry lab demonstrations arc sometimes given. The Society is backed by three advisers: Mr. Caulwcll, Mr. Koken, and Mr. McCann. The purpose of the Roddy Scientific Society is to aid in the advancement of knowledge and of interest in the broad field of science. The officers who arc guiding the society to its former place on the campus arc William Cushman, president; Nelson Adams, vice-president; Alcne Jones, secretary; Henry Kcncagy, treasurer; and Robert Hostctter, historian. COLLEGE RADIO ASSOCIATION The Millersvillc State Teachers College Radio Association is a group of men who have banded together to pursue a common interest—that of radio and electronics. The main objectives of the Association arc the following: to foster interest in these fields on the campus, and to aid others in obtaining their amateur radio operators' licenses. The Radio Association maintains and operates an amateur radio station in the tower of the main building, the call letters of which are W3QDC. The operators of this station are in frequent contact with other "hams” in all parts of the country. Other activities of the Radio Association include service projects for the school, such as providing facilities for the broadcasting of announcements and music over the entire campus on special occasions. These occasions arc highlighted by Homecoming Day and the pre-Christmas season.INDUSTRIAL ARTS SOCIETY The Industrial Arts Society since its inception in 1932 has grown into an active organization with 150 members. The purpose of this society is to encourage professional study and service to the college under the direction of the Industrial Arts Department. It brings to our campus distinguished lecturers and craftsmen. This year speakers attended meetings giving demonstrations in plastics, whittling, and other topics of interest to those primarily concerned with this field of study. In February, an Ansco color film demonstration was given. Among the lecturers this year, was Dr. Picket, of the Industrial Arts Department at New York University. Those students interested in Industrial Arts work, but who arc not enrolled in the curriculum, may become associate members of the I. A. Society. Alumni arc also encouraged to join. Dr. Burl Osburn. head of the Industrial Arts Department, is advisor. Officers were: Melvin Hunter, president; C. W. Lubbc vice-president; Elwood Kramer, secretary; Fred Starr, treasurer (first semester); Frank Prescott, treasurer (second semester). Time for „ ir, r ■' From left to right are the LA. officers: Frank Prescott, Program Chairman; Elwood Kramer, Secretary Fred Starr, Treasurer; Melvin Hunter, President; and Clarence Lubbc. Vice-President. Who mil have the lucky door prize number?ROD AND GUN CLUB After having been disbanded during the war, the Rod and Gun Club reorganized in the fall of 1946. Although primarily made up of hunters, the club does many services for the college which belies its name. Everyone likes to see the squirrels running across the campus and climbing the trees. Most of these little animals were put here by this group of students. Feeders are also provided, and the club secs that they remain well-stocked in the winter with acorns and other food. The birds also receive their share of the fare. This semester, after the lake had been deepened and cleaned, the Rod and Gun Club assumed the responsibility of restocking it with fish. Fertilizer was placed on the bottom of the lake until natural algae grows to supply food. The group's other activities included practice and competition on an inside rifle range, and planned hunting and fishing trips. The men who guided the organization through its many functions were Robert Frantz, president; Marvin Lantz, vice-president; Clarence Kling, secretary; Hobart Sapp, treasurer; and David Davis, historian. BASSLER GEOGRAPHIC SOCIETY Named in honor of Professor H. M. Bassler for his service in the field of geography, the Bassler Geographic Society is a comparatively new organization on campus, having been organized in September, 1947. The membership is made up of students majoring or minoring in Geography. The purpose of the society is to supplement the student's knowledge of geography and to develop his appreciation of the subject. Regular meetings are held at which discussions, lectures, and visual aids promote geography interests. The officers were president, Vincent A. Tritch; vice-president, Harold Cornish; secretary, Joseph Zigovits; treasurer. Marvin Lantz. Professor Harry M. Bassler is advisor of the society.VARSITY SWEETHEART Each year the Men's Varsity Club bestows upon some lucky junior or senior coed the honor of being chosen Varsity Sweetheart, and the fortunate young lady is feted at the annual Varsity Drag, the fitting climax to Homecoming Day festivities. This year's sweetheart was blue-eyed, auburn-haired Lois Price of York County, a junior in the Secondary Curriculum. Lois represents the typical college miss, full of life and fond of fun and good times, yet at the same time eager to get a real education from her college days. Appropriately, she has an avid love for sports and also manifests an active interest in good music, good books, and her favorite, French. She treasures the silver initialed bracelet bestowed upon her by the Varsity Club, and is justly proud and fittingly humble of the high honor accorded her. President......... Vice-President----- Secretary......... Treasurer.......... OFFICERS .............Mary Workman ............Barbara McLeod ....... Eleanor Oelschlagcr ..................Jane Ulsh GIRLS VARSITY CLUB The Girls' Varsity Club offers social contacts, group loyalty and good sportsmanship to its members. To become a member of this organization, a girl must earn a varsity letter in either hockey or basketball. A black blazer piped in gold, and bearing the insignia of the club, is presented to each girl who has earned three varsity letters in one sport. This year the girls maintained a check room in Brooks Hall during the wrestling matches, basketball games and dances. In conjunction with the Men's Varsity Club, the girls' club shared the responsibility of operating the concession stands at football games, selling programs, and ushering. As previously, the members entertained opposing teams. On Homecoming Day, the Girls' Varsity Club proudly hung their large Welcome Alumni" display between the Girls’ Dormitory and the Old Gym.The members of the band had their spirits lifted and were filled with enthusiasm when they found snappy-looking new uniforms waiting for them upon their arrival at school in September. Attractiveness and spirit were added to the football games by this smart-stepping, streamlined marching band. The band took part in the Christmas Program by playing several favorite Christmas carols. However, the band's brightest moment of this year was the annual Spring Concert presented on March 22. Guisscppe Creatore was guest conductor and Elvira Helal was guest soloist. Behind the scenes of each successful performance were many hours of hard practice by members of the band. Through continual stress on practice, Mr. George R. Anderson, director, has improved this musical organization's contributions a great deal. Student leaders of this year's band were William Hartman, student director; Dorothy Morgan, secretary; Lee Meredith, librarian; and Irene Gcn-bauffe, head drum majorette.ORCHESTRA t Student Prince ’ "Word by OTH'Y DONNELLT Serenade So o Version Mutie by SIGMUND ROMBERG jr aot |; of a bud,- T pm y"'-. I Cou d my bf arV bul a new This year the college orchestra acquired - ,«w leader. Mr. Porter, who was for many years director of the musicians, turned the job over to Mr. Harnish. the new Junior High Music supervisor. Room R is the base of operations for this talented little group, 3nd Tuesday afternoons is the time when they can be found rehearsing diligently. The overtures and incidental music between acts arc always welcome at the Senior and Cicamard plays. Because the Messiah was not given this past Christmas, the orchestra did not perform, as has been the custom in previous years. However, the group did offer its talents at the May Queen celebrations which were held. The Orchestra may be small, but it is a friendly group of students who enjoy following their musical interests together.COLLEGE Above: Soprano Section Below: Tenor Section On almost any Thursday evening that you arc around the college, listen carefully and you can hear the beautifully blended tones of the choir floating out to you. Giving up an evening a week, and quite often two. doesn't bother these singers. They know that producing pleasurable music requires long hours of patient practice together, and it is enough reward for them to know they have mastered a difficult choral fugue by Bach, or a mighty chorus from the Messiah by Handel. This year, as always, the Choir gave its annual Christmas concert. Instead of the entire Messiah being presented, a varied program of well-known Christmas music was offered. Everyonef T [ CHOIR Above: Alto Section Below: Bass Section who attended—and there was a very large audience—enjoyed it immensely. But the Handel oratorio was not forgotten. The "Hallelujah” and "His Yoke Is Easy” choruses were rendered in the Choir’s usual stirring way. Soloists for the concert were Francis Reh-meyer, soprano, Mary Workman, alto, Hugh Porter, tenor, and Pickering Reynolds, bass. Everyone is acquainted with the group’s process as shown in the weekly chapel programs. There is hardly a Wednesday goes by that the students are not entertained with an anthem. Then in January the lovely Girls’ Glee Club, made up of the soprano and alto sections of the Choir traveled into Lancaster to sing for the Iris Club.ATHLETICS A cJlel ti. learn, levc tlu i ame leifotui the j rije )FOOTBALL First row: Dougherty, Smith, Heckard, Harclerode, Morgan, Chryst, Noel, Petras, Miller, Groff, Connor. Second row: Coach Fischer, Assistant Coaches Santanicllo, Namit, Manuel, Bissinger, Pinkowicz, King, Randall, Garrett, Weik. Third row: Trainers Cushman, Zigovitz, Artz, O’Day, Leinaweaver, Huber. D'Amico, Mohr, Croce, Vcrmeztliuck, Craft. Fourth row: Managers Henley, Eberly, Gvasdauskas, Wenrich, McCoach, Alexander, Garland, Richards, Hoover, Neail. Fifth row: Manager Pcrtchack, Kauffman, Moran, Workinger, Geiger, Ovcrdorf, Lctrinko. The football log of the Millersville Marauders for the 1949 season reads: one victory, eight defeats. Behind this poor record, however, are certain facts that should be known. Hampered by injuries, lack of replacements, and the lightest squad in the Teachers Conference, Millersville was a target for the other teams in the circuit, but the Black and Gold put up a terrific battle in every contest, while only two games were rather lopsided affairs. It was without doubt, the pluckiest squad this college has seen in years. In the opener, East Stroudsburg won 13-0, yet the boys from the Poconos were unable to make a first down until the third quarter. The following weekend, a light Marauder squad upset a powerful Shippcnsburg eleven, 14-7, after spotting the Red Raiders a touchdown in the first few minutes of the game. Playing before a large crowd in their initial home game, Millersville almost made it two victories in a row, but the Bald Eagles from Lock Haven triumphed in the last thirty seconds on a 25-yard field goal. After traveling to Bloomsburg and coming out on the short end of a long score (32-7), the Black and Gold returned home to meet a hot-and-cold St. I'rancis outfit. Although the score (19-7) would seem to indicate that the Frankies had an easy time, actually the game was fairly close. Ten costly fumbles ruined all the Marauders chances for a possible victory. The interest over the West Chester game was as high as usual, but a heavy rain dampened everyone's spirit, and the Rams, capitalizing on the weather, their weight, and an abundance of material, won going away, 26-0. The coldest day of the football season saw the Black and Gold drop another hard-fought battle to a stronger Kutztown eleven, 21-13 The score showed the usual story- the visitors had too much weight and reserves. Playing before the Homecoming Day crowd, an inspired Marauder team nearly upset a vaunted California eleven. With the score 7-7 at the half, both teams fought on even terms until the Californians pushed over the winning touchdown. With a spirit unparalleled in years, had the team more weight and deeper reserves, the total picture may have been differently drawn; in fact, it might even have been reversed. Notable individual performers were many: Geiger, Miller, O'Day, Chryst, Morgan, Connors, and the ►cam’s outstanding player, Frankie Groff. A potentially fine passing combination was exhibited in Patsy D Amico and Cake” Alexander. Credit must be awarded to the team and to the coach-ing staff for their courage and determination. We hope that next year's team will have the same fighting spirit this team exhibited along with more weight and reserve strength.From the standpoint of the record, it was a dismal season, hut the second guessers had a fine year. There were enough breaks, both good and bad, to provide plenty of material for three hypothetical victories. With a few "if we had gotten a block here . . "if we had tried a pass there . . and Millcrsville imaginably comes out on the long end of the score. The toughest break and the best example of the type of luck characterizing the season was in the Lock Haven game. With the Marauders leading 14-13 in the closing minutes of the game, good coaching called for Millers-ville to try for a touchdown rather than a field goal. since a field goal would have been worthless had the Bald Eagles crossed the goal line again. In line with this reasoning the Marauders tried for the touchdown but missed; Lock Haven kicked a field goal, however, and the final score became just one of those things." Second guessing any game we lost by two touchdowns or more approaches fantasy and leaves the field of speculation. But the fact that many of the games were not won in a manner so convincing as to preclude any theorizing indicates that if the team's depth and weight equaled their spirit, the paper record might have been more-respectable. First row: Groff, Morgan, Noel, McCoach, Harclerodc. Second row: Trainer Zigovit . Chryst, Connor, Peiras, Dutcher.(First row) Coach Rupp, Willing, Barger, Herbert, Miller, Shervanick. (Second row) Waters, Meys, Senft. Thier, Yascnchck, Bissinger. (Third row) Manager Shoemaker, Pfrommcr, Doerr, Doherty, Kemp, Manager I.ingg. (Fourth row) Schmidt, Maurer, Price, Grander, Watkinson, Dyson, Manager Moran. WRESTLING i You might say that Coach Rupp's squad of huskies had a fairly successful season. You might, that is, if you are somewhat pessimistic. Since this reporter is not, he will say that a record of 7 wins to 1 defeat and a runnerup slot in the Pennsylvania State Teacher’s Tournament is a very good record. It is probably the best record of any of our competitive teams, for it compares favorably with the basketball team's record. The one defeat was no discredit to the squad because Waynesburg was as tough an aggregation as we have seen 3nd though our boys did their best, the Waynesburg grapplcrs just did a little better. In the tournament, Barger, Doherty and King came through with firsts; Miller and Waters took seconds; Kemp, Meys and Doerr gave us thirds. The boys garnered 33 points to finish only 7 points behind first place Lock Haven. The outlook for next season is particularly bright. We will probably lose only Miller, anti in the 121 pound class we have an excellent replacement in Jerry Shervanick. It old man injury doesn't hit us, we should have a season equalling, if not surpassing, this past season.Pole Yasenchek, 145 lb. Middle Atlantic A.AM. Champ. Jerry Barger, 155 lb. Stale Teachers Champ. George Doherty, lb5 lb. Stale Teachers Champ. Robert King, 175 lb. State Teachers Champ. Ted Rupp, coach of ureslling. VARSITY LINEUP Jerry Shervanitk ..................121 lb. Robert Miller .....................121 lb. Skeetcr Kemp.......................128 lb. John Meys..........................136 lb. Pete Yascnchck.....................Id5 lb. Jerry Docrr........................145 lb. Jerry Barger ......................155 lb. George Doherty ....................165 lb. Bob King ..........................175 lb. Tucker Waters...................Unlimited Fred Christ, assistant coach.First rou ', Korkuch, Dcpoc, Weaver. Bernhardt. Second row: Todd, Alexander. Day wait, Hershey, Kline. Third row: Manager Davis, D'Amico, Coach Bishop, Kramer, Manager Stinner. BASKETBALL With a final record of 15 4, Max Bishop's Marauders finished their most successful season in a decade. As tall and as ably coached as most of their opponents, the Marauders swept through a tough schedule highlighted by a smashing victory over an N.I.A.B. tournament-bound Westminster aggregation. (As this is being written, Westminster is seeded number one in the tournament.) In eleven games of Teachers College competition, the Marauders met defeat twice at the hands of their nemesis West Chester, and were rudely upset by the off-and-on Bloomsburg Huskies. In outside competition the Marauders lost only to high-rating national invitation tournament contender LaSalle, while conquering Geneva, the aforementioned Westminster, and this county opponent Elizabethtown, the latter bowing in both games. Since only the veterans Korkuch, Todd, and Depoc who served as this year's nucleus will be lost by graduation, Millersville's prospects for next year areas bright as usual. Hershey, Weaver, and Kramer will lx- juniors; Kline and Alexander, sophomores. With these seasoned players as a core to which a few men from the J.V.'s and the freshmen prospects can be added, the Black and Gold should show real power The high-scoring J.V.'s, displaying speed and accuracy completed a season of 14 wins and 2 losses in running rough-shod over an assorted competition. Captain Ken Depoc.First row: Moran, Irwin, Michalccwiz, Charles, Eckert. Second row Coach Bishop, Wcnglasz, Cushman, Brenner, Todd. Dunlap, Lafferty. Third row: Managers Hunter, Orstcin, Werner, W. Krcider, Wcirich. Miller, Weik, Manager Federico. BASEBALL Baseball, that evcr-popular spring sport, reared its head on Millersvilic’s campus as the local nine propped to meet some tough competition. Returning to the diamond for the Marauders were seven varsity holdovers from the 1948 season. Comprising this group arc the following: William Cushman, Kenneth Dombach, Raymond Dunlap, James Todd, George Vengrin, Harold Wcirich, and John Wenglasz. Coach Max Bishop contends that the outlook is fair for the 1950 season. "What we lack in long ball hitting, ' says the diamond mentor, "we will have to make up in consistent hitting." Again this year he hopes to rely on the pitching arm of "Hal" Wcirich, and the consistent hitting of Jim Todd to put the needed punch in the local's attack.GIRLS’ HOCKEY First row: Coach Griffith. Thompson. Wolfe, Workman, Oelschlagcr, Pusey, Ulsh, Coach Dixon. Second row: Slaver, Manager Bushey, Hampton, Schork. Higgins. Styer, Wiley, Dort, Bclscr, Huber, Myers. Third row: Evans, Sporkin, McLeod, Groff, Ruth, Ulmer, Levan. Although the shouts and cries of the girls' hockey team have long since died down, the girls have earned themselves a record well-worth remembering. Showing an improvement over last year, the gals with the sticks'' kept a neat slate by gaining victories over Shippensburg and Albright, tying Lebanon Valley and Gettysburg, and dropping two hard-fought contests to Lock Haven. Such "first ladies" as' Virginia Hampton, Arlene Hubert, Barbara McLeod, Shirley Myers, Eleanor Oelschlagcr. Dorothy Pusey, Janet Thompson, Jane Ulsh. Marion Wolfe, Jane Wiley, and Mary Workman, led the M.S.T.C. team throughout the hockey season. Far too little credit is given to these "unsung heroines" who gave of their time, energy, and spirit to build an impressive name and record of which the students of our college could be proud. Not to be outdone by their older sisters, the Junior Varsity took another step up the latter of success by winning two and losing three of their games. Having been only the second year that our school was represented by a Junior Varsity Team, these gals too deserve a round of applause 3nd a word of encouragement. To the coaches, Miss Griffith and Miss Dixon, the Varsity and Junior Varsity teams, and the hard-working managers, Marion Smith, Alden Gieek, Julia Metz, and Nancy Bushey,—go congratulations for a job well-done.GIRLS’ BASKETBALL t » First row: Shenk, Warner, Ulsh, Young, Thompson, Hampton. Second row: Manager County. Shcrer, Glcim, Mengcl, Harrison, Billet, Clay. Third row: Levan, Ulmer. Kilmer, Holz, Pickle, Sauerbaum, Sebastian. Fourth row: Managers Worth and Borncr, Evcrhardt, Dubson, Blaney, Golden, Coach Griffith, Manager Ruth. Facing such strong opponents as Elizabethtown, Lock Haven, Albright, Gettysburg, Shippensburg, and Moravian Colleges, the Lady Marauders had a tough schedule from beginning to end. Even though they traveled the road of victory but a few times, the girls, hampered by some injuries, really went all out for the school and put their hearts into the game. Possibly if the student body had offered more support the team would have come home with the crown of victory more often than it did. Because of the many tough breaks, the girls deserve additional credit and honors for keeping up their spirits and going into each game with the desire to win. Members of the junior varsity team, which will one day take the Varsity’s place, equalled their older teammates in initiative and persistence. We wish to express thanks to our two fine coaches—Miss Mary Dixon and Miss Katherine Griffith, who gave much encouragement and time to the guidance of the team, to the managers, Carolyn County, Lee Bortner, Sara Jane Worth, and Mary Ruth, who so often do not receive a word of appreciation for their watchfulness over the team; and of course, to the team themselves for giving their all through a difficult season.TENNIS 1950 Left to right: Cams, Moyer. Revene. Huber, Emery, Manager Kcays. The outlook for Millersville's colorful tennis squad is very bright for this season. The team is bolstered by four returning lettermen. Coach Pucillo has the services of “Hank” Huber, Paul Revene, “Chuck” Emery, and Ed Moyer to form the nucleus of his 1950 squad. Also much help will come from the fol lowing men: Robert Gerhart, Carl Bernhardt, and four or five promising freshmen. Interest in tennis has risen to new heights in the past four years at M.S.T.C by the colorful display of tennis from such players as: Easy Ed" Moyer, a senior, who will try to stretch his string of six consecutive victories on through to the end of the 1950 season; Paul Revene, a senior, better known as Trenchy" will hope that his feet hold up this season so as to enable him to notch a few more-victories; "Hank" Huber, a senior, who plays a steady and consistent game; and finally "Chuck” Emery, a sophomore, who gives tough competition to those opponents who face him in the No. 1 spot.-ARROW SHOE STORE Known for Qualify 14 E. KING STREET HILL’S Lancaster, Pa. MILLERSVILLE COLLEGE COOPERATIVE STORE Drugs Magazines School Jewelry, Pennants Text Books SPALDING REACH KODAK FILM RECORDS SHENK BROTHERS DARMSTAETTER S Sporting Goods and Toys 37 N. QUEEN STREET 30-32 WEST KING STREET Lancaster, Pa. Lancaster, Pa. Porker Pens and Pencils Kodaks Your Campus Snapshots Expertly Developed, Printed, Enlarged School Supplies StationeryDinners Banquets COLLEGE COFFEE SHOP Mick and Floss 3 Normal Avenue, Millersville, Pa. MEET YOU AT THE COFFEE SHOP Sandwiches Good Coffee Dial 3541 Visit WADE'S GIFT SHOP A Fine selection of greeting cords, gifts, cords, gomes, pens, pencils Costume Jewelry, handkerchiefs, house wares novelties Millersville, Pa. When you think ol onything in Music—think of KIRK-JOHNSON COMPANY MUSIC HOUSE Pionos—Orgonv—Radios—Record —Music LANCASTER. PA. Serving the Musicol Public for over 65 Yeors Compliments of Compliments of THOMAS A. DEEN The Sugar Bowl Jeweler Millersville, Pa. Next Door to the Colonial Theatre 168 N. Queen Street Lancaster, Pa. Dial 3-3808 COMMERCIAL PRINTING HOUSE Printers Market and Grant Streets Lancaster, Pa.which have grown near and dear to your heart during your years at MSTC Your training at MSTC has created a valuable asset, . . your ability to teach. While physically able to be on the job,—in the classroom,- this asset will pay dividends in the form of regular monthly salary checks. BUT, when disability rudely interrupts, thru SUDDEN accident or UNEXPECTED sickness, income will cease while regular expenses PLUS the extra bills of disability accumulate rapidly.---That is when a TPU membership steps in to lend a helping hand. So, when it comes to remembering.....md long before you tenderly tuck this copy away in mothballs for posterity, . . . we hope you won't forget to remember to INSURE YOUR EARNINGS and you will PROTECT EVERYTHING. Investigate TPU's plan as soon as you are assured of a teaching position. For a personal interview or detailed information write to; . . . WM. O. GARDEN. District Manager 2 Pearl Street, Lancaster, Pa. Representing THE TEACHERS PROTECTIVE UNION The LARGEST Organization of Its Kind in the World TPU Building 116-118 N. Prince Street Lancaster, Pa. RUDISILL AND COMPANY, INC. Printers "Printers of the 1950 Touchstone" 109 West Chestnut Street LANCASTER, PA.APPEL A WEBER JEWELERS 40-42 North Queen Street Lancaster, Pa. DIAMONDS GIFTS SILVERWARE L B. HERR SON 46-48 West King Street THE OAKS ★ LANCASTER'S The Inn LEADING with the Friendly STATIONERY and Atmosphere BOOK STORE SAFE HARBOR Printing School Supplies Phone Millersville 3082 FRED F. GROFF, Inc. RUOF'S FUNERAL SERVICE For Fresh Flowers WEST ORANGE STREET AT 334 601 S. QUEEN STREET Lancaster, Pa. Lancaster, Pa. Phone: 7253COE CAMERA SHOP 148 N. Queen Everything in Photography 24 Hour Photo Finishing Success to the 1951 TOUCHSTONE Patronize THE OLD GYM REFRESHMENT CONCESSION Under the Auspices of the STUDENT COUNCIL MICK and FLOSS—Caterers GOOD LUCK SENIORS Compliments of the TOUCHSTONE STAFFSCHMID'S ICE CREAM MILL OUR OWN MAKE ICE CREAM Just Beyond the Lancaster Co. Riding Club on the Lincoln Highway, West CURB SERVICE FOUNTAIN SERVICE BAR-B-Q'S OUR SPECIALITY Senior Pictures by SARONY STUDIO 1316 WALNUT STREET Philadelphia 7, Pa. THE BEST IN COLLEGE JEWELRY See Your Representative BARR'S FLOWERS Millersville Agent For All Occasions for 116 N. QUEEN STREET J. F. APPLE CO., Inc. Phone 3-3300 Lancaster, Pa. 


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