Millersville University - Touchstone Yearbook (Millersville, PA)

 - Class of 1946

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Millersville University - Touchstone Yearbook (Millersville, PA) online yearbook collection, 1946 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 88 of the 1946 volume:

 b rHOURS for Wort MINUT 1Avyent at Millersville State Teachers College MILLERSVILLE. PENNSYLVANIA WITHIN THESE PAGES YOUR "TOUCHSTONE” STAFF DRAWS BACK THE CURTAIN UPON DAYS AT M. S. T. C„ A TALE SIMPLY TOLD IN PICTURES AND WORDS.RECORDED IN THE PAG PUBLISHED BY THE SENIOR CLASS OFES OF THE 1946 TOUCHSTONE MILLERSVILLE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGED E D I C AT I □ N It is with fond memories that we look back upon our beginning days in 1942, when we as a class of sixty-eight started a new life which was to present many problems and unexpected events. We were just becoming acquainted with our new home when Uncle Sam began claiming the boys of our class. One by one they left the classroom to join the ranks of our fighting forces. This year has seen some of them return to our campus again. However, there are two of our classmates who will never return to us. They made the supreme sacrifice so that we might continue to enjoy the freedom of democracy. It is with heartfelt gratitude that we. the class of 1946, dedicate our yearbook to George J. Brenner and H. Milton Eisemann. Sgt. George . Brenner, the first president of our class, entered the service on April 11. 1943. He received his basic training in the infantry at Camp Philip. Kansas. In August, 1944, he left for overseas where he was later attached with the 71st Infantry Division of the Seventh Army. On November 19, 1944, he was killed in action in France. Pic. H. Milton Eisemann entered the service on July 28. 1943. He received his basic training in the infantry at Camp Fairview, Texas. On January 28. 1944, he landed in England and was attached with the 29th Division of Company B. 116th Infantry Regiment. On D-Day, June 6, 1944, he was killed in action in France.THE LIBRARY TO HERE FOR LEARNING AND RESEARCH WE GO, TO DEVELOP OUR CULTURE AND ALLOW IT TO GROW.SCIENCE BUILDING IN THIS BUILDING OF SCIENCE AND ART, CREATIVE WORK AND USEFUL SKILLS START.FOR STUDY. FOR LEARNING. FOR MEM'RIES OF CLASSES WE LOOK TO WICKERSHAM. THOUGH TIME PASSES. WICKERSHAMBROOKS HALL'Vk .»4 ft t%. mm §£§£COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE MILLERSVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA January 24, 1946 Greetings to the class of 1946 : It is pleasant to anticipate the impending arrival of friends or the addition of congenial co-workers to the list of ones associates Since it is one of my cherished privileges to extend greetings good wishes to the elate of 1946 from the faculty and administration of the college, 1 wish to do so not as one who is saying good-hye to departing friends hut as one who welcomes new friends into new associations We are no , all of us, fellow teachera-sharers in the truly great enterprise of shaping mind and character in a new generation We respect the quality of your achievements here at Uilleratille; we believe that you will have much of good to bring to your chosen profession ttay our friendships grow stronger and more helpful with the years and may the hopes and aspirations bom of your efforts as students at Willersville come to rich fruition as you grow into the full stature of the good teacher. Sincerely yours, DLB: enh THE SANDERS P. McCOMSEY Dean oI Instruction H. C. SYMONS Bursar S. B. STAYER Director, Training School FACULTYililiiili SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS EDUCATION. PSYCHOLOGY. AND Mr. Beckmyer, Dr. Boyer SOCIAL SCIENCES Dr Dutcher, Dr. Stine. Dr. Myers. Mr. Bassler PHYSICAL EDUCATION Miss Griffith, Mr. Pucillo INDUSTRIAL ARTS Dr. Osburn, Mr. Kauffman, Mr. ShenkTECHNICIANS JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL SUPERVISORS Mrs. Stump, Miss McKee, Miss Davis Miss Powell. Mr. Hovis, Mrs. Brenneman, Mrs. Chalfant, Miss Gress, Miss Caton ELEMENTARY SCHOOL SUPERVISORS Miss Wilt, Miss Beyer, Miss Thompson, Miss Lovett, Mrs. Councilman. Miss Frey, Mr. Bailey, Miss Rothe, Miss Hoffmeir, Miss Hughes I BUSINESS STAFF Miss Copeland, Miss Leman, Miss Bauer, Miss Kendig, Miss Habecker, Mrs. Kilburn Absent from pictures— Dr. Gerhart. Mr. Porter, Dr. Steinhauer. Mr. SollenbergerOur 3 irit oCad, Mrs. Daniel L. Biemesderter, the wile of the president of Millersville State Teachers College, has become a symbol of the friendly spirit of the school with her ready smile and her cheerlul greeting to everyone she meets. Each year we are welcomed to the campus by our gracious first lady. Her warm sincerity makes the Freshmen leel that perhaps college will not be as bad as he thought, and to the upperclassmen it is like being welcomed home once more. Mrs. Biemesderier is truly a magnificent first lady.THE SEIVIOHS CLASS OFFICERS President..............................Verna Mae Frey Vice-President...................... Mary Rachel Hoover Secretary....................................Lois Hoover Treasurer..............................Helen Renninger Historian..............................Eula Mae BenderCLASS HISTORY 1942- 43 “All the world's a stage and all the men and women merely players." They have their exits and their entrances and one “frosh" in his M. S. T. C. life plays many parts, his acts being four ages. At first the Freshmen, pop-eyed and trembling, with dink on dome and identification badge on blouse, creeping unwillingly like snails to Line UpI Ah! yes, those were the days. After we gained a semblance of college sense, we put in our ballots and pulled out our officers: President. George Brenner; vice-president, William Rudewick; secretary. Mary Reisinger; treasurer, Paul Kammerer. As the call to service cut into our class ranks we replaced Paul Kammerer with John Crowthers and were later forced to replace him with Louise Ludwig. We reluctantly said “good-bye" to our class adviser, Miss Retan, but Miss Gress surveyed us, decided we needed help, and guided us from there on. Then we exerted our wits and willing hands and threw that never-to-be-forgotten “Dog Patch Hoedown." 1943- 44 Then the Sophomores, full of strange slang, looking down upon the “Frosh,” while seeking fun and frolic even under teacher's eye. To keep us on the straight and narrow path Richard Keller became the people's choice while Joanne Manifold stood by to assist him. Geraldine Yohe penned the activities in the book of M. S. T. C. life, and Betsy Stehman autographed the check stubs. Dr. Stine was added to our ranks and gave us masculine support as class adviser. More boys left for the service and we paused to consider the seriousness of days past and those to come. We planted the traditional tree, ours being a Norway Maple, located at the northern end of the Wickersham building. Letters and gifts were buried and we'll be back in seven years to claim our share of the booty. To prove we thought the “Freshies" were swell guys and gals we cooperated 'with them and threw a bang-up novelty dance-game night-general fun session party, and did we ever have f-u-n-?-? 1944- 45 Next the Junior, books in arms and training school in view, his Senior year too near, a time too soon of parting from his many friends, dreams and doodles in his classes. Verna Mae Frey took over as president and Alice Robb assisted her. Lois Hoover became our capable secretary and Marian Ledgard tallied our financial score. We accentuated the food sales and eliminated the hungry folks by holding two profitable food sales. To add a little adrenaline to the school spirit we recommended to everyone the Junior dance and party entitled “The Frosty Frolic." The fun of the evening dispelled all signs of anything called frost. We felt honored to have Lois Hoover chosen as queen of the Spring Frolic, and we tingled with pride as she descended the steps and led her court of lovely spring maidens beside the lake and across the amphitheater to her throne. We had the Junior Class very graciously represented in her court in the person of Verna Mae Frey. It was a perfect picture with which to close our Junior book of memories. 1945-46 Last scene of all that ended this short and happy four years was Senior year and graduation with diploma, friends, job, and hopes for everything and determination to face anything. Coming back to serve us just as capably as in our Junior year was Verna Mae Frey as president with Mary Rachel Hoover as vice-president. J-ois Hoover did a return engagement as secretary, and Helen Rennin-ger took the cash in hand (figuratively, not literally). To make the Touchstone a treasured remembrance, we gave to Lizzie Caslow the responsibility of editor-in-chief and to Mary Fulginiti the job of business manager. Our Senior play, “Mr. Pim Passes By," was a huge success with real men and romance. We added to our bank account by having our last and best food sale. Amid pleasing and unexpected incidents while student teaching we found enough time to select invitations, order our caps and gowns, and to pause long enough to “smile at the birdie." We hadn't saved all our money for nothing and our last and final party was a real one—never to be forgotten as our fellows returned and we thankfully lived in a world at peace. We knit into our final school pattern last-minute tests, addresses, farewells, and teas. Then it was here—what we had worked for and dreamed of attaining—commencement. We faced a world that needed rebuilding physically and intellectually, and we all said our last farewells and stepped beyond the gate to try our hand at running this world.EMMETT BARBER "Pappy.” One of the fathers in our class. Handed out cigars last December. Proud of that little boy. Majored in Industrial Arts and Science. Rod and Gun Club. Prefers hunting to eating or sleeping. A former member of Uncle Sam's A. E. F. CATHARINE L. BASSLER Small, dark-haired miss. Faithful member of choir for four years. Serious and a conscientious worker, but can have fun if she is in the mood. Always has everything done on time. Gave the Training School h6r best efforts. EULA MAE BENDER Ever feel blue? Call on Bender and she'll set your blues on the run. This "Who's Who Student" who hails from East Petersburg has sharp wits. Has an answer for every question, usually the right one. Fills in with some subtle remark at just the right time. The conscientious and intelligent leader of English Club who always kept her name on the Dean's List. RUTH A. BERTOLETTE Ruth's presidency of Normal Literary Society proved her leadership qualities. Student Council benefited by her efforts also. Summer camp and its pleasures! Lancaster held enchantment. Sewing machines offer no problems, old gym curtains testify. Greatest ambition, to run an orphanage complete with cat and canary; a Girl Scout troop is second choice. Refreshment committees her specialty; line forms to the right.RUTH A. BOMBERGER A boon companion of Cecelia, Ruth shared work and honors in fifth grade. A "fruit roll" at Christmas by her pupils showed their appreciation. A willing worker. Her talents were extremely useful in S. C. A., English club and refreshments. Proves the old adage that good things come in small packages. Determination conquers, even a Dutch accent. LIZZIE V. CASLOW Here is the actress who found herself almost a bigamist. A friendly girl who possesses a quick and ready wit pf pure York county style. The ardent editor of the Touchstone. Gave her time and talent to choir, Citamard, Snapper, Normal, and S. C. A. Taught the sixth graders first semester and really enjoyed it. Loves food almost as much as she enjoys talking. Positive that she is going to teach for the next seventy years. We wonder about that. It would be a "kat-a-strophe." NANCY A. CLIME "None” got a pleasant mixture of day and dorm life by spending her Senior year in the dorm. A more charming librarian you'll never see. Best of all is her story-telling charm for which she has won just acclaim. Gave a fine performance in the Senior play. President of Citamard. Loves to dance and is a fine supporter of all "rat races." RUTH L. COLIN Merry Ruth loves to tease and joke. Walking with a cane because of a knee that wouldn't stay in place never put a damper on her spirits. Spent many hours in the Training School with her sixth graders. Chief trouble was figuring out her monthly attendance record. Was seen at Gockley's often. Commuted from Columbia daily.EMMA MARIE ESHLEMAN Friendly, likable Emma Marie s favorite pastime is rereading letters that she has received from John. Spent her Senior year in the dorm and enjoyed it immensely. Always held open house for dorm and day students alike. Likes to visit after 10 P. M. Talks a great deal. Worries too much. Taught the fourth graders under Miss Rothes supervision. Spent every Saturday at Woolworth's. RUTH M. FALKLER Commonly known as "Blondie," this pert Senior comes, sees, and conquers. In addition to being seen in the book-room. she is a regular member of the hockey team, took part in the Senior play, is a member of Delta Phi Eta and is holder of the Wright Wentzel Memorial Award. Infectious giggle and rosy blush do not interfere in a good argument. ANTONIO . FEDERICO "Tony,'' handsome, interested in antiques and his better half. Left school in the middle of his Senior year to join Uncle Sam's armed forces. Hails from Easton but joined Mil-lersvilleites at Rice's. Hopes to start a business of his own after completing his Industrial Arts course. JESSIE L. FEHL Miss Fehl is our efficient student teacher. When she looks, they jump. To us she's just plain "Jess" with her pleasant smile, blue eyes, and frank retorts. If you misquote a term from geography to history, she's there to set you straight. Served the campus well on Student Council. English Club, and Delta Phi Eta.JOHN FILBEY A product for which Wrightsville can be held responsible. As a member of the House Committee he was he cause of the strict rule ?????? in the Men's dorm. A loyal Pageite and one of the few members of Phi Sigma Pi left on campus. The unforgettable but narrow-minded George in the Senior play. Spends week-ends in York visiting Marie. JEANETTE A. FORD Ford, our happy-go-lucky gal. whose only serious moments were spent in the Training School with Miss Powell and Miss Caton. Always seen with Squibb or at Gockley's. Carefree. Good-natured. Everybody's pal. Entertains many dorm students at her homo in the village. VERNA MAE FREY This attractive lass has been the leader of the class of '46 for two years. Deserving holder of the Wickersham Award. Loyal Pageite and member of English Club. Capable referee for intra-mural basketball games. Represented our class as a member of the queen's court in the 1945 Spring Frolic. Very studious but takes time out to entertain "Buzz'’ every Wednesday night and over the week-end. Delta Phi Eta member. Made "Who's Who Among Students." MARY L. FULGIN1TI Mary is the tiny, dark-haired bombshell from Lancas-terville who combines good looks with brains. Capable president of W. D. S. A., business manager of the Touchstone, member of the choir, vice-president of Page. Newman Club, chapel committee. Full of fun and always ready for a good time. Majored in math and science. Is looking forward to teaching. Made "Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities."ESTHER H. GANNES Remember the girl who sang so beautifully, "Silent Night,” in Greek at the 1945 Christmas program of English Club? That was Esther. Became a "legal” member of our class in January, 1946. Seen everywhere with Hazel or Mary. The free time not used in having fun with the "gang” she spends in swimming, ice-skating, dancing, or reading. ADA ZIEGLER GOOD Should we say Ada Good, good Ada, or Mrs. Bona? All the names correctly identify the blooming personality and all-around girl of our class. Conscientious, industrious, and reliable. An interesting conversationalist with a winning smile. Everybody's pal and friend as her successes in Freshman Orientation have shown. Made "Who's Who Among Students." Took to herself a husband last June. Worked hard TOM HARRIS Jap's "buddy." Returned during the first semester from the Army Air Forces. Married former classmate. First to take advantage of the "M. S. T. C. Housing Program.” Divided free time between the two S's—Skip and the Shop. Helped splash paint in the "ole gym." Industrial Arts major. Plans to go on for his Masters. Side line-building boats. Member of Iota Lamba Sigma. Normalite. MARY RACHEL HOOVER Whenever there was need of food for any organization or entertainment, the frantic cries for "Mary Rachel" could be heard throughout the day student room. This library science student had a way of making food committees her second life. We knew she could act, and her performance as "Thesby,” in the Spring Frolic, and as the reverend’s wife at the Page reception proved this fact. at keeping the dorm quiet.T. LOIS HOOVER Attractive, dark-haired Lois is always full of pep and ready for a good time. Active in many organizations on the campus. Her good grades place her near the top. Loves to dance, especially with a certain Ray. Goes all out for sports. Helped liven up the day student room. Was our lovely queen of the Spring Frolic. Made "Who's Who Among Students.” LOUISE A. HUGGENS Tall, good-natured "Huggie” is quiet on campus but in the dorm she has her share of fun. Caslow's roommate and side-kick for four years. A student in the elementary course, she was an inconspicuous worker in the S. C. A.. English Club and Citamard. For some reason "Huggie" went home practically every week-end her Senior year. NAT JASPER "Jap, the Philly Phlash." Dashed that direction every week-end. Returned to Millersville from the Army Air Corps to complete his last year. Has a sense of humor unsurpassed. Breakfasted daily at ten at the Tea Room with Tom. Much loved by "the guys across the street" as a drawing teacher. Normalite, Theatre Arts member, class representative to Student Council, representative to Veterans' Collegiate Association. VIRGINIA N. KILGORE This auburn-haired lass disproves the idea that red implies temper. She is very pleasant and calm. "Ginny" has been very busy with her duties as president of S. C. A. this past year. One of the Shakespeare students and could often be heard quoting drama at the breakfast table. Vice-president of Citamard. Normalite. Would like to teach near Lancaster. Why?????JOHN D. LANTZ Tall, dark, and slender. Easily recognized by a very large "cow-lick." Transferred from West Chester in '43. Tried to major in campusology but other and more important (???) projects forced him to major in Industrial Arts. President of Student Council. Chief cook, bottlewasher. and engineer of the old gym project. Other offices too numerous to mention. MARION A. LEDGARD Miss Ledgard to the fifth-graders: "Ledge" to the rest of us. Helped bring in ads for the Touchstone for two years. Made delicious potato salad for our food sales. Good forward of "The Yellowjackets." Presents a neat, attractive appearance at all times. Beautiful "golden red" hair. Likes to spend her free time driving her dad's car. DORIS E. LITTLE One can usually find this lass behind an armload of books hurrying to classes. Had an excellent time teaching math and science. Doris sang for Mr. Porter, typed for Snapper, helps Normal. Lutheran Students, and is assistant business manager of the Touchstone. Likes carrots and "carrot tops." Served as chairman of the "Frosty Frolic." JOANNE MANIFOLD Tall, blonde "Jo" is Miss Manifold to her small kindergarten cherubs. Favorite expression during the Christmas season. "Let’s all be Santa's little reindeer." Good forward of "The Yellowjackets." Has beautiful soprano voice; did especially well as a member of the girls' sextette. Spends most of her time "lobbying" with Tuck. Did a good job as chairman of the social committee. Member of Normal.CECELIA R. NORRIS Our Irish lass, "Seese," has an irresistible twinkle. Received that "ring” during her junior year. Career versus domesticity. A quiet person who willingly served on numerous committees; active in dormitory life as well as S. C. A. Fifth grade appreciated her efforts. Likes to write to a "certain someone." Nice contrast to her blonde roommate. Insists upon quiet but lenient with permissions during study hours. RUTH N. POWELL Pleasant, agreeable with a winning smile. Capable prexy of Primary Club. Normalite. Whether its Bach or boogie-woogie, Ruth can make it sound good. Uses pin-ups to make teaching more interesting. Likes 'em tall, dark and handsome. Enjoys dancing. Dislikes riding the Ephrata trolley. HELEN W. RENNINGER Blonde with dimples and a friendly smile. Travels from New Holland daily and always worries about the weather. Can be seen driving a gray car. Takes her teaching very seriously and keeps the third grade straight. Reads all the latest books, but still has time for a night out. Is seen mostly with Lois or Ledge. HAZEL RHOADS Ha2el is an accelerated student but during her stay at M. S. T. C. she has proved her capability in classes and extra-curricular activities. Whenever you're blue, talk to Hazel. She’s always able to give a "quip” that will boost your morale. Her original ideas and industriousness as chairman of the food committee for English Club always assured a perfect ending to every meeting.M. ALICE ROBB Presenting the tall, friendly, and sociable miss of our class. Enjoys talking and does her share of it. Likes to sing and contributed her talent to the choir for four years. Is athletically inclined and a whiz at basketball. Likes to dance and have fun with the gang. A constant companion of Doris and Mary Rachel. We hear that F. and M. holds some attraction. 1 BETTY JANE ROHRER Petite and quiet are two words which describe our Betty Jane. A day student who hails from the general direction of Mountville. Spent her Saturday's working at Garvin's. Geography major. Pageite. Efficient worker. ELIZABETH . SANDERS Popular with both sexes. Is called "Betsy" by everyone. Great jitterbug. Will be missed at the "rat races." A great deal of her time is spent with Hanebury. As a member of the Social Committee helped to make our Christmas dance of 1945 a success. Good story-teller. Spent second semester of her Senior year with the kindergarten cherubs. GEORGE L. SCHWAB Oh Ge-or-ge! My clock needs fixing. My radio won't play! M-ville's gifted radio-clock repairman from Hatboro. Student mailman and master mind of locks and keys. Keeps the dormitory "up too late" with his midnight piano concerts. You will always find George "with the gang." Besides his Industrial Arts and Science curricula, he participated in Theatre Arts. Entertainment Committee, and served as treasurer of M. C. A.EVELYN B. SENSENIG "Evie" left at the end of our Sophomore year to attend Goshen College but came back to graduate with her old classmates. An unusual sense of humor is one of her gifts. A brilliant conversationalist and in class is always "on her toes." Evie writes poetry and has dramatic talent. Poised and calm, she was quite fond of her first-graders. HELEN L. SHULTZ Dark-haired, petite Helen came to us in our Junior year after transferring from Bridgewater. Virginia. Hails from the mountains of our own State. Helen was a "library" student and could often be found on duty among the shelves of books ready to offer assistance to everyone. An active member of English and Library Science Clubs. Very fond of "Flowers” too. JEANETTE SQUIBB Friend to all but a special friend of the other Jeanette of the class. Spends many evenings at Ford's house. Received that "sparkler" a long time ago. One of her traits, neatness, was proven in 1944 when she and Dottie won the "room prize for the best suite." ELIZABETH STEHMAN Another "Betsy." Small, vivacious, and blond-haired. Pleasing personality. Library Science student. Served as class treasurer our Sophomore year. Day student from Lancaster. Enjoys the story about Sanford and Merton. Two coats necessary for a pleasure jaunt. Disagrees for the fun of disagreeing.JOHN R. WALKER Jack, one of the many "Johns” on campus, is always joking. Interested in managing Theatre Arts and acting in plays. Played "Brian” in "Mr. Pim Passes By.” Elected vice-president of M. C. A. Art editor of the Touchstone. Loyal Nor-malite. Has good intentions of furthering his education. Majored in Industrial Arts and Math. Took the accelerated course. MARY WALTER Jolly, efficient, even-tempered Mary with heaps of personality, completed her college course in three years. Mr. Porter's despair because she can’t sing. Majored in rural education. Liked teaching. Her special hobbies are hiking and reading. Gave her talents to Page. EDITH E. WALTON "Edie” seems to be a quiet girl until you get to know her. Did her student teaching in first grade. Could be seen headed in the direction of the Training School each day at 4 P. M. Served as captain and guard of "The Yellowjackets.” Ruled the dorm in her Senior year. All of her free time is spent with Johnny. Made "Who's Who Among Students.” WILLIAM WORKMAN One of the married men on campus. Majored in Industrial Arts. Army took him away from Millersville in '42. Bill, better known as Willie. Wife calls him "Fuzzy” for that fuzz he calls whiskers. Hails from Mt. Joy and returned to campus last June after three and one-half years in the Air Corps as bombardier, navigator, and instructor.NANCY T. WOOD Former member of the class of '47 but decided to accelerate her curriculum. Library Science student. Splendid member of the '45 hockey team. Did a great deal of work in helping to redecorate the old gym. Good conversationalist. Member of the Publicity Committee. Normalite. ROLL OF HONOR As we look back longingly to our beginning Freshman days, we remember a class containing a good representation of men. However, by the time our second semester was rolling around to final exams, we were beginning to realize what a ‘‘menless" class meant. The next September we returned to find that all our men had deserted us, though about 99 per cent had left for the service. The long fingers of war had reached into M. S. T. C. and we could do little then but work and wait and pray for their speedy return. Now that the war has ended we extend to these boys our humble gratitude, hoping that they may some day return to Millersville, as several already have done; and we bow our heads in silent prayer in remembrance of our two classmates, George Brenner and Milton Eisemann, who shall never return. Let us strive to make certain that the classes of the future shall never be touched by the grim horror of war. The boys from our class who left to serve their country are as follows: Cletus Albright Russell Berkheimer George Brenner John W. Crowthers Milton Eisemann James K. Fahs Richard Fisher William J. Gibbons Paul E. Gravell Reginald Greaser Robert Harclerode Kenneth Herbling Russell K. Hillegass John R. Holzinger Paul Kammerer Charles Landis Richard Martin Fred Mast Leo McGinnis Robert Newhart Frederick Robinson William K. Rudewick Herbert M. Shindler Herman W. Shiplett Robert Sponga John Vincent Ralph ZorgerMR. PIM PASSES BY On November 17, 1945, the Seniors presented their annual play before a capacity audience. This year's choice was "Mr. Pim Passes By," a sophisticated comedy by A. A. Milne. Much to our relief and pleasure the audience thoroughly enjoyed this unusual production, and the evening was pronounced "quite successful." CAST Carraway Pim..........................John Lantz Olivia Marden...............Lizzie Caslow George Marden.........................John Filbey Dinah................................Nancy Clime Brian Strange.................John Walker Lady Marden...............Virginia Kilgore Anne..........................Ruth Falkler Dramatic Director......Esther E. Lenhardt Music by the College Orchestra—Melzer R. Porter Staging and Lighting... .Theatre Arts ClubTHE UNDERCLASSMENTHE CLASS President...... Vice-President Secretary...... Treasurer...... The Class of 1947 entered their Junior year with a hopeful blending of enthusiasm and gayety which showed promise of their active participation in all of the coming campus activities. With Jean Ward. Olga Link, Mary Helen Mor-rin and Geraldine Izer elected as officers of the flock, plans were launched for a Food Sale to which the "eager beavers" of M. S. T. C. responded quite favorably. Then with the entrance of the basketball season, the class established themselves behind a candy stand replenishing the energy of exhausted cheerers. Members of the class also lent much of their time and talent to the redecorating of the Old Gym. while still showing evidence of achievement along the scholastic lines. After a much-enjoyed vacation from studying and quite pleased with the contributions of Santa Claus, plans were made and carried out in the form of a gala roller-skating party, open to the entire college at Maple Grove Roller Rink. CLASS OFFICERS ........................Jean Ward ........................Olga Link ................Mary Helen Morrin ....................Geraldine Izer  - i tzi !3 a n tm c_n K3 Hl2:M tTirM DF 1947THE CLASS • tin c=d n m Ln - 5=1 —3 S tm tn tr tm□F 1948 We Sophomores had a busy time this year as we shook off the last remnants of Freshman uncertainty and got into the swing of college life. Our class was represented in all campus activities. We sang lustily in the choir, gave our "all" to the Drama, did our bit in redecorating the Old Gym. and were prominent in all club and athletic affairs. We studied, too! Just look at the Dean's List if you don't believe it. Playground duty was an added attraction this year, where we received a taste of the trials of training-school life. It was an experience we'll never forget. The first task that faced us in September, as we gazed into our nearly empty treasury, was of a monetary nature. But that was easily solved. We sponsored a food sale, an act that met with hearty approval on the part of both producer and consumer. The profits went into our February party, "Cupid's Tailspin,' remember? Don't know when we’ve had more fun. As the year progressed, our class number was increased by the addition of returning service men and other new students. We welcome them gladly and hope that others will join us in the future. We’ll all make it a good future, these next two years at M. S. T. C. President ____ Vice-President Secretary..... Treasurer..... CLASS OFFICERS ..Anne Foster June Anderson .. Gloria Vassil .Betty GeislerCLASS OFFICERS THE President..........................................Kenneth Dambach (Serving in absentia) Vice-President............................Romaine Boyer Secretary.................................Miriam Walker Treasurer...........................................Louise Troutman September, 1945! Studious, ambitious freshmen entered the portals of M. S. T. C.—some coming directly from high schools and others from the ranks of Uncle Sam's Armed Forces. By the end of the first week we were wearing our regalia and were saying with a smile, "Good morning" and "Good afternoon” to everyone we met. It didn't take us freshmen long to get acquainted, because the local bus strike compelled most of us to stay on campus, where we were so kindly entertained by both the faculty and upperclassmen. Later our class advisers. Miss Hoch and Dr. Gerhart, called us together, telling us that now was the time to elect class officers. Action was taken immediately and the results were that Kenneth Dombach was elected president. However. Uncle Sam decided that he should give his presidency to our most capable vice-president. Romaine Boyer, and join his fellow-countrymen in the Navy. Miriam Walker, chosen secretary, was given a pen and book for recording the minutes of our future class meetings. Louise Troutman became the class treasurer and started collecting dues immediately. Blushing and sighing because of the Valentine cards we received, we went to a formal dance, which was called the "Winter Waltz." Time waits for no one. and thus the winter turned into spring, bringing with it all the wonders of nature exhibited on our campus. Still studying, but enjoying ourselves too, we thought of a year well spent at this, our Alma Mater. With exams in the past we left Millersville to enjoy a wonderful vacation, thinking only of greeting ourselves the following September as "Sophomores."CLASS DF 1949 A LORGANIZATIONSTOUCHSTONE M.AKY FuLGJNITi Business Manager Lizzie Caslow Editor Here is your 1946 Touchstone. In preparing this yearbook we have endeavored to make a concise record of those events of our college life which will induce fond recollections, provide recreative hours of pleasure in after years, preserve in our memories the activities of our school life, prevent class acquaintances from growing dim, and foster a higher regard for our Alma Mater. The editor and her staff hope you realize the difficulty they've had in preparing this volume due to the many uncertainties which faced them. We wish to extend thanks and appreciation to our class advisers, Miss Gress and Dr. Stine; also to Mr. McComsey, Dr. Boyer, and all other faculty members and students who helped in the preparation of this our Touchstone. THE STAFF Editor...................................................... Lizzie Caslow Assistant Editor.............................................Lois Hoover Business Manager......................................................Mary Fulginiti Assistant Business Manager...................................Doris Little Art Editor............................................................John Walker1946 EDITORIAL Eula Mae Bender Ruth Falkler Verna Mae Frey Helen Shultz Alice Robb Marion Ledgard Ella Mae Zink Barbara Angle Jessie Fehl Jean Ward Gerry Izer BUSINESS Mary Rachel Hoover Marion Ledgard Alice Robb Virginia Kilgore Louise Huggens Nancy Wood Nancy Clime Russell Schreiber Richard Kover TYPING Olga Link Helen Shultz Ruth Powell Verna Mae Frey John Lantz Roy Bitzer Jack Loose ART George Dietrich Tom Harris Nat Jasper SNAPPER The elements were green editors, an inexperienced reporting staff, feature writers without any ideas, and a bevy of ad salesmen minus customers. Only the typists were ready and waiting. As for quantities, there was a surplus of critics, a scarcity of leads, a debit as far as typewriters in the staff office, and never enough time. The formula was work, careful comparison of papers from bygone years, and a spirit of do or die. Thanks to Miss Spencer, Staff Adviser, and a tolerant campus public, SNAPPER has come through another year of headlines, deadlines, makeup sheets, and style. We’ve lessons behind us, experience to our credit, and high resolves for '46. Jean Ward......... Dorothy Waters. . Richard Kover..... Russell Schreiber. Pauline Rineer ... Catharine Bassler Norma Byerly.... SNAPPER STAFF .......................Editor-in-Chief .......................Managing Editor ....................Business Manager .........................Sports Editor ........................Feature Editor .................Circulation Manager ............................Art EditorSNAPPER Barbara Angle Betty Barber Lizzie Caslow Ed Donohue Ann Foster Virginia Gehman Virginia Kilgore Florence Markley Reporters Mary H. Morrin Roy Bitzer John Lantz Jack Loose Eula Mae Bender Betty Brenner Gladys Eshleman Patty Munn Geraldine Izer Romaine Boyer Norma Craig Florence Hagerty Nancy Miller Lois Kienzy Kathleen Martin Dorothy Lou Morrin Noreen Weaver T ypists Porsia Palumbo Doris Heffner Ann Lester Literary contributors have been the library students and other interested students of the campus.WOMEN’S COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION OFFICERS FOR 1945-1946 President......................................Edith Walton Vice-President.....................................Ada Good Secretary..........................................Olga Lin k Treasurer.....................................Evelyn Fletcher The W. C. A. is the governing body of the girls' dormitory. It is to this body of girls that we owe thanks for the efficient planning and managing of the various successful events carried on by the boarding girls. The W. C. A. is made up of three groups—Welfare, Equity and Directorate, all of whom see that the rules and regulations set up by the girls themselves are put into effect. The W. C. A. began the year's work when the Junior commissioners helped the freshmen to adapt themselves to their new environment and aided them to become acquainted with the various personalities and rules of the college. Next came "open house'' and the room contests. The biggest and most important activity of the W. C. A. came with the preparation for Mother's Week-End. Throughout the year many teas were sponsored by the W. C. A. The last and most exciting function of this body was move-up day, when members of each class were moved up to the next class and were given the honor of having the privileges of the higher class. To Miss Powell and Miss Lovette, we wish to extend our hearty thanks for their guidance and judgment in helping us solve our problems and for all other suggestions they willingly contributed.WDMEN’S DAY STUDENT ASSOCIATION OFFICERS President.......................Mary Fulginiti Vice-President..................Marion Ledgard Secretary.......................Margaret Herr Welfare Betsy Stehman Gladys Eshelman Mary Rachel Hoover Virginia Gehman Eula Mae Bender Betty Brenner Jessie Fehl Ruth Harnish Anne Bassler Equity Catharine Bassler Lois Hoover Dorothy Waters The Women's Day Student rooms are those boisterous rooms next to Room R filled with girls working and playing together under the friendly guidance of their new adviser. Miss Griffith. The W. D. S. A. is the proud possessor of the "Green Room,” otherwise known as the luncheon room, where "Do you have two nickels for a dime?” is the familiar greeting since the installation of the milk machine this year. Of course, we can't forget the "Milky Ways" and "Necco Bars" from the well-stocked candy stand where Betty Brenner and Gloria Vassil are in full control. In the lounge the prize painting of last year’s art contest graces the one wall. Our thanks are extended to Mr. Kauffman, who had it framed for us. This year's teas, a major activity, were planned and carried out under the guidance of Betty Brenner. But we mustn't forget the Christmas tree. You all saw it. It was so nice that it was used as one of the decorations for the Christmas Dance. The Day Student Girls are proud of their home and will extend a hearty welcome to all who come to visit them.MEN’S DAY STUDENT ASSOCIATION OFFICERS President................Earl E. Reifinger Secretary...................John Sweigart Treasurer...........................Joseph Hogentogler Once again, with the return of the former students, the Men's Day Student Association is becoming a powerful organization on the campus. The spirit of the organization was kept alive by a small nucleus of students during the war. But now the organization is planning bigger and better things to help the commuting men students. MEN'S COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION OFFICERS President................Russell Schreiber Vice-President........................John Walker Secretary.......................»Roy Bitzer Treasurer............................George Schwab The MCA during the year of ’45-'46 was again the ruling factor of the men's dormitory. In September a larger contingent of freshmen entered than had been on campus since the war. Peace having been restored. the Armstrong war workers returned our dormitory to us and we (the few men on campus) left music hall and the memories of it to see how a men's dormitory life could be. Approximately 85 per cent, of the men housed on campus are veterans. The problem of readjusting themselves to college life was not too difficult for these men with a few exceptions. Upon the election of our President. Russell Schreiber, to the presidency of the Student Council, our Vice President, John Walker, assumed responsibilities for our organization the second semester.STUDENT COUNCIL OFFICERS 1 st semester 2nd semester President...................John Lantz Russell Schreiber Vice-President................ Ada Good Olga Link Secretary ...............June Anderson Geraldine Izer Treasurer .............Edward Donohue Harry Henly MEMBERS First Semester—Virginia Gehman. Mildred Steigleman, Alice Ankrum, William Workman. Jean Ward. Jessie Fehl, Roy Bitzer. Porsia Palumbo. Second Semester—William Workman. Dorothy Waters, June Anderson, Pauline Rineer, Jean Ward, Nat Jasper, Porsia Palumbo, Alice Ankrum. The government at Millersville is established on the basis of cooperation between the faculty and the student body with the latter bearing the larger part of the responsibility. Its objective is to create an opportunity for students to experience democratic government and to constitute a medium for the expression of initiative and exercise of judgment in the management of student affairs. During November anyone caught strolling into the Old Gym was handed a screw driver or some such instrument to be used to take an accumulation of nails from the railings and window sills. This however was not the only center of activity. The walls were receiving their first coat of paint in years. The color scheme selected was peach and green. Flowered curtains, made by the Millersville Seamstresses, added their touch of gayness, while the stiff-backed benches took on a new appearance after being upholstered by the entire group of workers. This was the Council's major project While this project has been under way for the past several years, the Council, with excellent cooperation from the student body, succeeded in accomplishing the task. The job was well done and it has added greatly to social life at M. S. T. C.NORMAL LITER President...... Vice-President Secretary...... Treasurer...... Critic........ FIRST SEMESTER OFFICERS .........................Ruth Bertolette .........................Joseph Rodriquez .........................Evelyn Fletcher ................................Olga Link ...........................Lizzie Caslow SECOND SEMESTER OFFICERS President...................................Joseph Rodriquez Secretary...............................................Olga Link Treasurer...........................................Margaret WiseARY SOCIETY The Normal Literary Society is an active organization on the campus and otters many opportunities tor those of its members who are ambitious and interested in activities. "Be Normal—Join Normal" is the slogan all loyal Nor-malites sling at the freshmen the beginning of each new college term, for the annual feud between the Normal and Page societies is one of the greatest moments of the college year. Among the activities of our society this year was a play. "Gertie Goes Plain," by Peggy London. This Pennsylvania Dutch play was ably directed by Misses Hoch and Lovette and acted by personages such as only Normal can produce. October saw Normal celebrating its eighty-ninth anniversary. Our guest speaker was Mr. Calvin Bachman, noted authority on Pennsylvania Dutch life. In February the annual Sweetheart Dance was revived. This was the second formal dance of our college career for the majority of us and was a huge success.PAGE LITER President Vice-President Secretary...... Treasurer...... FIRST SEMESTER OFFICERS .........................Anna Mae Weaver .............................Mary Fulciniti ..............................Ann Foster .........................Mary Goldbach President..... Vice-President Secretary..... Treasurer...... SECOND SEMESTER OFFICERS .........................Edward Donohue ..........................Betty Giesler ...........................June Anderson ...........................Mary GoldbachARY SOCIETY What did we do in Page this year? To put it briefly, we did many things and were busy every minute. September 21 was our big reception for the shy, new freshmen, and you should have seen them laugh as they watched our "Little Theatre Group" at work in “The Flattering Word." They also had lots of fun at the party which followed. At a later date, as new members, the freshmen presented a talent program which made us very proud of them. Other monthly meetings consisted of musicales, movies, debates, etc., in which many Pageites participated and which were enjoyed immensely. You'll never guess who came to our Christmas meeting. Santa Claus! We hadn't realized that he was a Pageite. For our own information we conducted a poll of what sort of programs Pageites liked best, and the members came through in the best traditions of the society by placing literary activities above everything else. Also in keeping with tradition, we added a large number of books to the library. Lorenzo, the Magician, sponsored by Page, amused and amazed the chapel audience with his tricks in a first-semester entertainment. We'd still like to know how he changed a guinea pig into a rabbit right before our very eyes! At the time this was written no special plans had been made for Page's Ninety-first Anniversary meeting, but we know that the program will be carried out in the true spirit of the event. Last year Paul Harris, noted traveller, spoke on the subject, ’ Mexico," and it was interesting then to meet the alumnae of the society who attended and to hear them tell of their experiences as ex-Pageites. Though Page may be a dignified ninety-one years old. it is still a vital campus organization, and we know it will continue to be so for the next ninety-one years.s. c. A. OFFICERS President..... Vice-President Secretary..... Treasurer..... Virginia Kilgore .Cecelia Norris . .Margaret Wise .Alice Ankrum The Student Christian Association has completed its second year as a merger ol the Y. W. C. A. and the Y. M. C. A. It is a co-ed group of Christian students and faculty. “Our purpose as a Christian Association is the creation of a lasting fellowship among students and faculty who have a desire to come to an intimate knowledge of God and to spread this knowledge throughout our campus and community through Christian action.” The activities of the organization include informal Wednesday evening discussions and Sunday evening vesper services. After sending letters of welcome to new students, the S. C. A. sponsored a get-acquainted party in the form of a treasure hunt the first week of school. With October came the World Student Service Fund Drive. Students and faculty contributed their money to help prisoners of war and students less fortunate than ourselves. November brought the annual banquet. Our guest speaker was Angkar Narayan, a student at Susquehanna University, whose home is in British Guiana. Christmas cheer was spread on campus and in the village with the annual hanging of the greens, caroling and giving gifts to the children of the Mennonite Home. The second semester brought about a gala Valentine's party, S. C. A.'s participation in the Mothers' Week-End program, the Flower Tea, a three-act comedy, and Sunday breakfast for visiting mothers. The year's activities were brought to a close with the annual violet-picking for hospital patients in Lancaster. tLUTHERAN STUDENT ORGANIZATION The Lutheran Student Organization was reorganized this year. It is a co-ed group and is not solely for Lutheran students, as the name implies, but its membership is open to students of all denominations. Its object is to keep students interested in attending religious services and keeping up their individual spiritual life. Its activities have been rather limited since it is a new organization to the present student body. At our area conference, however, we were represented by two members. A group of members traveled to Elizabethtown on the afternoon of October 13 to lead the devotions in the first session of this conference. Our meetings are held bi-monthly on the second and fourth Tuesday at 8 P. M. under the able direction of our faculty adviser, Miss Lenhardt, and our spiritual adviser. Reverend Lebo. Once more the Newman Club, an organization designed to keep a close contact between the Catholic students and the church, has lifted its eyes and echoed its voice throughout the college. When the call to colors was issued at the outbreak of the war, the Newman Club was disbanded. This setback was in reality only a literal disbandment, for the club continued to thrive in the minds and hearts of the Catholic students on campus. Under the able guidance of the advisers. Reverend Anthony Kane and Miss Mary Lovette. and the president. Francis Trettel, the club held pleasant and profitable meetings. It is the ambition of the club to become an indispensable part of college life. NEWMAN ELUB OFFICERS President Francis Trettel Vice-President Helen Burke Secretary-Treasurer John FedericoLIBRARY SCIENCE CLUB This year, for the first time, the library science club opened its membership to all students interested in majoring in library science. The purpose of opening the club to all prospective library science students is to continue the interest created in high school library work and the courses of library science instruction which begin in the junior year. Miss Helen A. Ganser served as faculty adviser and Mary Rachel Hoover as president. Other officers were: Nancy Clime, vice-president, and Nancy Wood, secretary-treasurer. Highlight of the meetings was the Christmas Party and program of Christmas prose and poetry. Another outstanding feature of the library science club was the sponsoring of the annual Sunday evening book reviews.DELTA PHI ETA President...... Vice-President Secretary...... Treasurer...... OFFICERS ....Lois Hoover Verna Mae Frey Eula Mae Bender ____Jesse L. Fehl Delta Phi Eta is the girls' honor sorority at Millersville. Eligibility for membership rests upon four qualifications—character, leadership, service, and scholarship. The scholarship requirement is based upon a quality point of 2.5 or better for two consecutive semesters with sorority bids being confined entirely to Junior and Senior girls. This year Delta Phi Eta, in an effort to study prospective members more closely, inaugurated a month's pledge period. Lasses with red and white ribbons around their heads, wrists, and ankles informed interested campus students that they were “hopeful bids." Behind the fun of special line-ups and numerous tasks, the girls revealed their qualifications and willingness to uphold Delta Phi Eta standards. The sorority was proud to welcome four new members into its midst. After the investiture service, a gala banquet was held to celebrate the event. Delta Phi Eta participated in several money-making activities during the year to enable it to continue the alumnae "get-together" which was so successfully begun by the active sorority of 1945. In retrospect we see that this past year of success would not have been possible without the wholehearted enthusiasm and cooperation of each Delta Phi Eta member and the invaluable aid of Miss Powell.c I T A M A R D “To be or not to be (a success). That is the question." May the answer always be positive. The din of the applause from Citamard's many successes can still be heard vibrating through the chapel. As the curtain goes up and the lights are lowered, there is a faint rustle of programs and a slight catching of breath while each person in the audience lends his ear to catch the first words of the "enthusiastic disciples of Thespes." This year's gala performance was a three-act play. "The Lake," by Dorothy Massingham, presented in the College Chapel, on February 9. The dramatic role of Stella Surrege was very capably portrayed by Gloria Vassil, our own Katherine Hepburn. Among the supporting cast were: Florence Markley, John Lantz, Betty Geisler, Lois Hoover, Earl Reifinger, Harry Henly, Louise Hartman, and Alta Achison, in addition to a number of wedding guests and several servants. The play was directed by Esther E. Lenhardt. Each month these talented actors and actresses gather together to learn the art of acting and directing. Such one-act plays as "Escape," direced by Dorothy Waters, were the products of their efforts. However, Citamard is aware of the fact that without the help of the Theatre Arts Club it would be unable to produce such successful plays. These men behind the scenes are responsible for the quick changes of scenery, for the operation of the floodlights, and in general for all the backstage work. We are truly grateful to the members of the Theatre Arts Club, who, with their hammers and paintbrushes, made possible all the dramatic presentations on the campus. Words can not express our appreciation of Miss Lenhardt, our dramatic coach, who patiently, willingly, and untiringly, endeavored to bring the best out of us. So to her we say. "Thank you." OFFICERS President..... Vice-President Secretary...... Treasurer...... ____Nancy Clime .Virginia Kilgore Dorothy Waters . Charlotte ZinnINDUSTRIAL ARTS THEATRE CLUB OFFICERS First Semester Second Semester Manager.........................John Walker Forrest Guth Assistant Manager...............Earl Reifinger Kenneth Bachman Electrician.....................Charles Flowers Charles Flowers Assistant Electrician...........Samuel Lightwood Samuel Lightwood Secretary.......................Edward Donohue Edward Donohue Treasurer.......................Joseph Hogentogler Joseph Hogentogler Started the season off with a bang by cleaning out the clubroom. Storage closets were moved into the larger room, lights were repaired, and the space for new scenery was enlarged. Special flats were made for the plays, "Mr. Pim Passes By” and "Gertie Goes Plain." Also new methods of keeping scenery in place were devised. The Theatre Arts group had a great deal to do with the success of "Footlight Fantasies.” With the return of many old members, the club anticipates an even better season next year.ALL IN CHOIR The choir began the new school year by adding male voices to what was formerly a girl's choir. In addition to singing for the regular Tuesday chapel, the choir sang four numbers during the Normal Anniversary meeting, October 19. The Christmas Concert, given on December 16, was well attended. Other events of the year included selections for the Lancaster County School Directors during the month of March and a Spring Concert which was presented May 3. The last contribution of the year was the rendering of appropriate musical selections at the Baccalaureate and Commencement exercises. MEMBERS OF THE CHOIR Arlene Sann, Joanne Manifold, Catharine Bossier, Evelyn Fletcher, Arlene Henning. Mary Fulginiti, Alice Ankrum, Ruth Bury, Betty Geisler. Nancy Morris. Marilyn Reese. Ruth Bomberger, Marianne Weicksel, Nancy Miller, Dotty Lou Morrin, Kathleen Colestock, Anne Eshbach, Rosie Himmelreich, Doris Little. Alice Robb, Dorothy Waters. Mabel Short. Veda Tritch. Gloria Vassil, Ada Good. Lizzie Caslow, Wootie Breitigan, Dorothy Hillegas, Nancy Manifold, Verna Mae Frey. Lurene Frost, Margaret Thomas. Virginia Gehman, Betty Brenner. Mildred Steigleman, Harriet Trout.HARMONY Janet Martin, Mary Elizabeth Little. Doris Leary, Earl Herr, Kenneth Bachman, Richard Dieterle. Samuel Lightwood. William Englehart, Roy Bitzer, Doris Hoke. Florence Markley, Elinor Pennington. George Dietrich, Earl Reifinger, Glen Hackman, Joe Rodriquez, W. R. Bricker, Harry Henly, Samuel Geissen-hainer, Anne Bassler, Esther Gannes, Madeline Whedbee. Charles Flowers, Russell Schrieber, John Lantz, Samuel Miller. Edward Donohue. John Holzinger. ORCHESTRA Every Wednesday afternoon coming from Room R could be heard the somewhat discordant strains of music during the tuning-up exercises of the College Orchestra. Then when all instruments were in harmony and Mr. Porter had raised his baton all were prepared for an hour of hard practice. The musical selections' rendered at the various dramatic events and also at the Christmas concert were evidences of their many hours of preparation. MUSIC COMMITTEE Joanne Manifold................Chairman Catharine Bassler...Secretary-Treasurer Alice Robb, Evelyn Fletcher. Alice An-krum, Ruth Powell. Margaret Thomas. Melzer R. Porter.........................Adviser MEMBERS OF ORCHESTRA Florence Markley. Nancy Manifold, Evelyn Fletcher, Lurene Frost, Harry Henly, Anna Mae Weaver, Anne Bassler. Veda Tritch, Doris Hoke. Harriet Trout, Betty Brenner.ENGLISH OFFICERS President..................................Eula Mae Bender Vice-Presidents.............Anna Mae Weaver. Gloria Vassil Secretary...................................Barbara Ancle Treasurer...................................June Anderson Adviser...........................Mr. Sanders P. McComsey English Club, one of the busiest organizations on the campus, carries new meaning this year in plan and purpose. At the first meeting of the fall term. September 20. the year's club program was announced to the members, old and new. so that it could be carried out by an understanding group. Anna Mae Weaver, our Vice-President, introduced the club to a tentative three-year plan for activities, which was inaugurated this year. The outline program calls for one year's devotion of the cultivation of poise, good manners, charm, acceptable speech and pleasing personality. The second year will deal with creative work in any literary field by one person or a group of persons. The third year is set aside for constructive criticism and accuracy in grammar. CLUB In actual execution o! this ambitious program, Miss Swift presented and illustrated a talk on costume selection, colors suitable to personality and body lines, and current styles. The group entered wholeheartedly into the discussion. Another important factor which develops poise, enhances charm and is invaluable to the prospective teacher is posture and its relation to good looks—a topic well-handled by Coach Pucillo. He made the discussion practical by selecting students, analyzing their posture, and offering corrective suggestions. The Christmas program offered a new experience in Xmas celebrations. The theme was seeing how other people welcomed Santa's annual visits. The whole group climbed aboard the latest thing in imaginary cross-continental clippers to journey around the world on Christmas Eve. which stops at the British Isles. Scandanavia and Russia, Greece, Mexico and Peru. Guides, members of the group, presented a picture of Christmas customs, holiday festivities and celebrations. Back home, Christmas achieved reality in the form of welcome holiday refreshments. At the Christmas meeting we lost a capable, dependable vice-president but gained a willing worker in Gloria Vassil. The club will not lose Anna Mae as a loyal member. Meanwhile the study of charm and personality has made the term both interesting and profitable. The three-year plan is proving most beneficial.SPEECH CHOIR President .... Vice-President Secretary Treasurer Historian OFFICERS ...................Barbara Angle ...................Joan Spangler ...................Ella Mae Zink .................Maryalice Grubb .....................Helen Burke The Speech Choir which is under the able direction of Miss Esther E. Lenhardt presented a Christmas program in the Chapel preceding the holiday vacation. Included in the program were: an orchestrated Christmas carol, "We Three Kings of Orient Are," a dialogue between the ‘‘earth and the sky," the Biblical Christmas story as it is found in St. Luke, a Christmas ballad and a novelty number. ‘‘The Twelve Days of Christmas." A renewed interest in the Speech Choir, which has as its purpose the gaining of an appreciation of poetry through choral orchestration, was witnessed this year. The membership was greatly increased by the addition of sixteen Freshman members. In order to raise funds for the treasury, picture post cards of campus scenes are on sale by the members of this organization.PRIMARY CLUfi OFFICERS President Vice-President Secretary Treasurer .... ___Ruth Powell , .Charlotte Zinn . Thelma Keeney Jeanne Mehrlinc The year 1945-46 proved to be a very successful one for the Primary Club on all accounts. The season opened with the equivalent of a Fourth of July bang. Freshmen were received with open arms in a party form. October's program appropriately consisted of a study of Hallowe'en and seasonal games. Handicrafts under the able direction of Virginia Gehman were the order in November, and for the Yuletide season traditional poems and games were learned. The New Year was opened with Miss Ada Forry, our guest speaker, whose topic was Special Education. Again in February a guest speaker. Miss Mary Stauffer, discussed sight saving devices for us. In March we saw a film on child development which was later supplemented by a trip to Philadelphia during the month of April. This trip was for the purpose of child study. May ended the year with a banquet instead of the traditional doggie roast.PUBLICITY COMMITTEE OFFICERS Jack Loose..................... Margaret Thomas .............. Maryalice Grubb ............... Doris Heisey................... Edward W. Donohue.............. MEMBERS ...........Chairman Assistant Chairman ..........Secretary ..........Treasurer ....Representative Dorothy Hillegass, Elmira Eckert. Doris Creswell, Kathleen Martin, Emma Lou Nist. Nancy Rill. Norma Craig, Jane Keener. Richard Kover, Nancy Wood, Samuel Lightwood. The Publicity Committee of Student Council is the college "press agent.” It has five distinct functions to perform. Its primary role is to keep the name of MSTC in the newspapers wherever education is mentioned. By sending news about a student to his home town newspaper the committee honors both student and the college. Publicizing students and the Faculty is the second aim of the committee. With announcements of coming events and entertainments, the committee attracts outsiders to the college and thus manifests a third service. Photography is the fourth expression; it supplements the other three. Finally, the committee has a vital interest in increasing the enrollment. Much of its work is done for the real purpose of developing a more favorable attitude concerning the place of teacher training. To these functions the Publicity Committee have earnestly devoted themselves.SPOHTS lFOOTBALL Our football antics didn't exactly put Millersville on the map. but we did have fun practicing. Our schedule called for no games to be played and try hard as we could, we stuck strictly to that schedule. The boys are to be congratulated for their faithfulness in coming out to practice, under Coach Saymen's direction, five nights every week for about two months with no glory whatsoever. There was one theme in mind when we started practice in 1945, and that was to get ready for the 1946 season in style. In style we shall do it too. Practically every member of the "45 squad will be out in '46.BASKETBALL The 1945-46 basketball season opened in true Millersville style with a victory over our old rivals, West Chester. Two varsity men, "Dick" Reese and “Kenny" Herr, just returned to college and saw action in the opening game. There are several other veterans on the squad, including “lack” Lapin-sky. former Duquesne University player. "Johnny" Holzinger, and “Bill" Keays of Lancaster. The other members of the squad are: Carl Bernhardt, Robert Schmidt, and "Dick" Peters, all from Lancaster; and “Ed" Donohue and "Sam" Miller hailing from Spring City. After meeting the West Chester team, M. S. T. C. played three games against Ship-pensburg, Kutztown and Bloomsburg. The Marauders came out on the short end of these frays but kept improving with every game. THE MILLERSVILLE MARAUDERS OF 1946 Schreiber, Podlesney, Donohue, Keays, Biemesderfer. Smoker, Peters, Jones, Bernhardt. Breneman. Lapinsky, Peters, Herr, Coach Pucillo, Shultz, Holzinger. Aston. Derkac, Rathbun.BASKETBALL The second semester of the college year saw the return of a former varsity man, "Hubie” Peters, as well as several other new squad members. These men are: Donald Jones, Robert Shultz, "Bob” Biemesderfer, "Joe” Podlesney. "Chet" Brenaman, "Eddie” Aston, and Richard Smoker. However, Mill-ersville seemed to be having a streak of bad luck as she dropped 2 more to Lock Haven and Kutztown. After losing 5 consecutive games, the squad traveled to West Chester to gain their second victory of the season. Perhaps the most exciting game of the season was played with Lock Haven on February 28th. At the end of the game the score was tied but in the extra minutes which followed M-ville was defeated. Coach Pucillo was very proud of his men that night for they demonstrated great skill and a wonderful spirit of good sportsmanship. Coach Pucillo worked under great difficulties in organizing this year's team, but he has done a really commendable job. He's had the help of Russell Schreiber and "Dick” Peters, who served as managers for this season. We, the students, thank the coach, the team, and those behind the scene workers for an interesting and exciting season.SCHEDULE OF GAMES Opponent 39 60 37 35 39 44 41 42 41 57 57 Dec. U Ian. 5 Ian. 12 Ian. 18 Ian. 29 Feb. 2 Feb. 9 Feb. 16 Feb. 22 Feb. 28 Mar. 2 M.S.T.C. West Chester........................ 40 Shippensburg ....................... 49 Kutztown............................ 32 Bloomsburg ......................... 33 Lock Haven ......................... 33 Kutztown............................ 40 West Chester........................ 42 Bloomsburg ........................ 45 Shippensburg ...................... 60 Lock Haven ........................ 52 Albright........................... 37GIRLS’ HOCKEY GIRL S HOCKEY TEAM L.W.............................................B. Brenner L.I.............................................D. Hillegas C...............................................M. Dunlap R.I....................................N. Wood. M. Mellon R.W.................................R. Falkler, W. Breitigan L.H.............................................L. Servais C.H........................P. Herr, H. Flinchbaugh. A. Good R.H....................................E. Eckert, R. Markey L.F....................................N. Madlem, N Cline R.H................................................P. Rineer G.K.............................................L. Hartman Managers: H. Burke, R. Bertolette, F. Markley.Once again the sports spotlight shone on Millersville when girls' hockey was revived under the capable direction of the new physical education teacher. Coach Katherine Griffith. This varsity sport, after many years of hiding behind the goal cage, made a successful comeback as the team captured Lebanon Valley, the first game of the season. Pauline Rineer, captain, led the team through the season with flying colors, losing one game, tying another, and winning two. GAMES Millersville................... 4 Millersville................... 2 Millersville................... 5 Millersville................... 2 Lebanon Valley......... 2 Gettysburg ............ 2 Shippensburg .......... 0 Lebanon Valley......... 3GIRLS’ BASKETBALL GIRLS' BASKETBALL The team—Frymyer, Stigelman, Robb. Eschbach, Dunlap, Rineer. Whitcraft. Miller. Zinn, Coach Griffith, Squibb. Falkler, Ankrum, Heffner, Hoke, Pennington.This year has ushered in the first women's intercollegiate basketball team at Millersville in many seasons. These girls, under the supervision of Coach Griffith, spent many hours in learning new techniques and practicing various plays so as to better themselves and their team. The schedule which was carried out by the team was as follows: January 26 Shippensburg S. T. C............................Home February 1 Shippensburg S. T. C............................Away February 5 Lebanon Valley College............................Home February 14 Lebanon Valley College...........................Away February 22 Lock Haven S. T. C..............................Home March 2 Lock Haven S. T. C..............................Away The team consisted of the following girls: Alice Ankrum and Pauline Rineer (co-captains). Betty Barber. Marian Dunlap. Ann Eschbach. Ruth Falkler. Doris Heffner. Doris Hoke, Naomi Madlem. Amelia Miller. Eleanor Pennington. Alice Robb, Mabel Short, Jeanette Squibb, Mildred Stigelman, and Margaret Whitcraft. This year's managers were: June Anderson, Shirley Frymyer, Mary Ann Hostetter. and Charlotte Zinn.□UR ADVERTISERS Appel Weber, 40-42 N. Queen St., Lancaster, Pa. Colonial Theatre, 166 N. Queen St., Lancaster, Pa. Thomas A. Deen, 168 N. Queen St., Lancaster, Pa. Fields Clothing Store, 24 N. Queen St., Lancaster, Pa. W. E. Gockley, Millersville, Pa. Fred F. Groff, Inc., W. Orange St. at 234, Lancaster, Pa. Hermann's Shoes, 60 N. Queen St., Lancaster, Pa. L. B. Herr Son, 46 W. King St., Lancaster, Pa. Hill's Tea Room, Millersville, Pa. J. Lloyd Hollinger, 814 Sixth St., Lancaster, Pa. Paul W. Hoover, 416 N. Pine St., Lancaster, Pa. Hupper's Confectionery, 22 E. Orange St., Lancaster, Pa. Eugene Jacobs, Penn Square, Lancaster, Pa. Kirk Johnson, 16 W. King St., Lancaster, Pa. Ch. Kunzler Co., 652 Manor St., Lancaster, Pa. A. K. Mann Son, 417 N. Prince St., Lancaster, Pa. J. A. Miller Co., 36 N. Queen St., Lancaster, Pa". Penn Dairies Inc., 572 N. Queen St., Lancaster, Pa. Richards, 47 N. Prince, Lancaster, Pa. The Rosery, 137 N. Duke St., Lancaster, Pa. James H. Ross, 18 E. King St., Lancaster, Pa. Fred Ruof Sons, 601 S. Queen St., Lancaster, Pa. Saylor's Bakery. 615 S. Plum St., Lancaster, Pa. Sayres, Scheid, Sweeton, 28 E. King St., Lancaster, Pa. Russell G. Shelley, 18 W. Orange St., Lancaster, Pa. Shenk Brothers, 32 W. King St., Lancaster, Pa. Teachers Protective Union, 116 E. Prince St., Lancaster, Pa. Westenberger, Maley Myers, 125 E. King St., Lancaster, Pa. Yorgey's, 35 W. Chestnut St., Lancaster, Pa. Zook's, 50 N. Queen St., Lancaster, Pa.—


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